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THE . . . 

NEWFOUNDLAND 



,-. V* , , ^Lf* - _ * Vaf T,J 















\l\ 



QUARTERLY. 






VOL. IV. \u. i. 



JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 
JUJNE, J904. - KIARCH 



40 CTS. PER VEAR. 




CONTENTS. 




Sport in Newfoundland. 

Photos, by James I'tv. 









" His Excellency Sir Cavendish Boyle, K.C.M G., 

Governor of Newfoundland,'' with portrait ... i 
' To His Grace the Most Rev. M. F. Howley, 
First Archbishop of Newfoundland" Poem, 

by D. Carroll i 

Vale," by Sir Cavendish Boyle, K.C.M.G 2 

" The Governor's Poem" To Hon. E. P. Morris, 
K.C., LL.D., Chairman of Welcome Commit- 
tee for Old Home Week. . 2 


" Newfoundland Name-Lore," by Most Rev. M F. 

Howley, D.I) '. 3 

" Re-KindleM" Poem, by D. Carroll 4 

" James J. McAuliffe," with portrait 4 

Supplement: A full-page Illustration of Interior 
of Roman Catholic Cathedral, showing new 

Ceiling and Altar 

" Renovation of the Cathedral" 5 

" Pro Fide et Avalonia" Newfoundland a New 
Archbishopric St. John's a Metropolitan See, 

by Rev. }. A. O'Reilly, D.D 6 

' This is My Own My Native Land" Poem, E. C. 7 
' A Tribute to Sir Robert Bond" a Poem, with 
Illustration Twillingate, by D. Carroll 8 

Supplement : A full-page Illustration from Photo- 
graph " Turning First Sod O'Donel Memo- 
rial Hall" 

" The O'Donel Memorial Hall," by James M. . 
Kent. B.A., K.C 9 

" Placentia Strike" with Illustration from Pho,to. . 10 

Supplement: A full-page Illustration from Photo- 
graph " Committee of Cabot Club, Boston". 

" The Cabot Out Committee, Boston" Biogra- 
phical Notes ii 

" By the Sea" Poem, with Illustration. Cape 
Race, by Eros Wayback 12 

" A Welcome to Our Visiting Fellow Country 
men," from Hon. E. P. Morris, K.C., LL.D., 
Attorney General, Chairman Old Home Week 
Committee, with portrait of the writer, and 
Illustrations Fort Amherst and Petty Harbor 13 

" Bishop Feild College," with Illustrations 15 

" Engineer Sub-Lieut. R. A. Howley, R.N 17 

" Books on Newfoundland," by D. W. Prowse, 
LL.D 18 

'Fisher-Folk" an Etching, by F. B. Wood.... 20 
' Avalon's Farewell to Miss Lane" Poem, by E.C. 20 

" God Guard Thee '." Ode to Sir Cavendish 

Boyle, K.C.M.G., by Arthur S. English 20 

" Trust" Poem, by George F. Power. . 20 

" A Faiewell" Poem, by F. B. Wood 20 






24- 



-*P*'i,iiuT*( _f ifiTi iHifIS ami r-ra^-.-% --ri inJftg-v 1 

Estimates Given for all kinds of 




Work 



Speciality 



Removing Pianos, 



THK NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



W. & 0. REND[LL, 

V General Commission * / 
^ Property and Insurance 
Agents. < * < < 



ST. JOHN'S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 



AGENTS FOR THE 

PHCENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED, 

OF LONDON. 





Queen 
fire Insurance Companj 



FUNDS 



$AO,OOO,OOO 



INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 



JOHN CORMACK, 



AGENT FOR NEWFOUNDLAND 



PHCENIX 



Assurance 




Co., Ltd., 



Nf Id. Steam Screw Tug Co., Ltd. 

D. P. higraham* ' & Launch Dtiisy, 
J/t Joint Green. Jit 

Rates of Towage of Vessels in and out of St. John's Harbor, from a mid 
outside the (leads to the Consignee's wharf, or from the Consignee's whar 
to a mile outside the Heads. 



OF LONDON, - - ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Annual Premiums ................. $7,500,000 

Fund held to meet losses ........... 9,000,000 

Jncalled Capital . ...... ........... 12,000,000 

7440 G * RENDELL > 

T. JOHN'S. Agent for Nfld. 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO | 



GROSS TONNAGE. 

60 Tons and under 84.00 

From 60 to 100 Tons (10 cts. 
pel ton additional.) 

101 to 125 Tons 

126 to 150 
151 to 175 
176 to 200 

2OI to 225 



226 to 250 
251 to 300 



IO.OO 
12. OO 

14.00 
16.00 

iS.oo 
20.00 

22.00 



GROSS TONNAGE. 

From 301 to 350 Tons 524.01 



351 to 400 

401 to 450 

451 to 500 

501 to 550 

551 to 600 

60 i to 700 

701 to Soo 

80 1 to 900 

901 to 1000 



26.01 

28.0. 

30.0 

32.0. 
34.0 
38.0 

42.0 
46.0 
50.0 



Vessels requiring the Steamer to go beyond the above limits as far z 
Cape Spear to pay one-third additional. 

N. B. Special Rates, will be charged during the ice season. 

The owners are not responsible for any damage done by the Vess 
towed, to themselves or others. 

JOHN GREEN, Manager. 



I Exaggeraion 
to say that^s 




Ropal 

Standard 

flour 



Alan Goodridge $ Sons 

325 WATER STREET, ST. JOHN'S, N. F., 

General Importers and Wholesale and Retail Merchants. 



'I I I I I I I I I I I ! 



I HI |.| I I I I I 



CXPOMRS Of ALL KINDS Of PRODLCf 



IS EQUAL TO ANY OTHER 
f BRATSfD IN THE MARKET.^ 

Give it a fair trial when you want another barrel. 



HARVEY & Co'y. 



BRANCH ESTABLISHMENTS: 

Witless Bay, Tor's Cove, Ffcrryland, Renews, 
Nipper's Harbor, New Perlican, Round Harbor, 
Hant's Harbor, Caplin Bay, j jt J* j 

Where Fishery Outfits can at all time 
be Supplied, 




THE NE WFO UNDLAND QUAR TERL Y. 



Imperial Tobacco Co., Ltd. 

Manufacturers of Choice Tobaccos. 



Smoking and Chewing, 

Plug, Cut Plug, and Granulated. 

ome of our brands: 

" GOODWIN'S BEST CUT PLUG," 
"EARLY BIRD," "EMPIRE," 

" MARINER," " DAISY," 

" MONT ROYAL," " OUR FAVORITE," 

"J. D." "VIRGINIA LEAF," 

" HAPPY THOUGHT," " CROWN," 

" RICHMOND GEM," " SUCCESS," 

" IMPERIAL." 
For a cool, refreshing smoke, try " KILLIKINKNICK." 

OFFICES AND FACTORY: 

Flavin and Bond Streets, J* St. John's, Newfoundland. 



THE "SAMPSON" LINE 



AND: 



THE "GOLD MEDAL" BRAND 

Of Hemp and Cotton ^ 
Twines are the Strongest 
and Best ever produced! 

Sold Everywhere 




Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Belo'tv. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 





FOR NEWFOUNDLAND 
AND LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 

CANADA. 


I pou 

2 poll 

3 
4 
5 
6 

8 

9 
10 
ii 


nd 


See 
16 
24 
32 
40 
48 
56 
64 
72 
So 
88 

Under i Ib 
per 2 oz. 




24 ce 

24 
24 
48 
48 
48 
48 
72 
72 
72 
72 

No parcel s 
less than 


nts 


12 ce 

24 
36 
48 
60 
72 
84 
96 
$i 08 


nts 


i 5 cents. 
3 
45 
60 

75 
90 
Si .05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 


nds 










































































, 




I . 12 . . 




weight, i cent 


ent to UK. for 
24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from New York ; 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Orifice every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 



RATES OF COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 



General Post Office. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding $10 5 cts. Over $ 50, but not exceeding $60 30 cts. 

Over $10, but not exceeding $20 10 cts. Over $60, but not exceeding $70 35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 15 cts. Over $70, but not exceeding $80 40 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 20 cts. Over $80, but not exceeding $90 45 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 25 cts. Over $90, but not exceeding $100 50 cts. 

Maximum* amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John's, Newfoundland, June, 1904. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



OFFICE AND STORE Adelaide Street. STONEYARD Just East Custom 
House, Water Street. Telephone, 364. 



W. J. ELLIS, 

- Contractor and Builder. 

Dealer in Cement, Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Mortar, Brick, Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps; Chimney Tops, all sizes, and Plate Glass. 

Estimates Given for all kinds of Work at Shortest Notice. 



Parlor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 



Church Seats. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 



T. MARTIN,^ 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Cower Street. 

Repairing Furniture Horses and Vans for 

a Speciality. Removing Pianos, &c. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Angel Engineering & Supply Co., Ltd 

Headquarters for all kinds of Machinery 
of Imported and Local Manufacture* < 



er 



Saw Mills, Plainers, Rock Drills, Pneumatic Machinery, Pumps, Machinists' Tools, 
Gasoline, Kerosene & Gas Engines, Ship's Windlasses, Ship's Pumps, Rouse Chocks 

and Hawser Pipes.^ 



Leather and Rubber Belting, Circular Saws, Pulleys, Shafting, Bar Iron, 
Mild Bar Steel, Cast Steel, Tool Steel and Drill Steel, and all kinds of 
Machinists, Mining, Mill and Ship's Supplies. 

;^ Correspondence solicited on any Engineering question. 



2P 



St. John's Municipal Council. 

PUBLJG NOTICE. 



WHEREAS under and by virtue of certain powers and 
authority vested in the Saint John's Municipal Council 
by the Municipal Act of 1902, empowering the said 
Council to impose, fix, and collect certain taxes, rates, assess- 
ments, rents, etc., and whereas by Section 1 19 of the Municipal 
Act of 1902, it is provided as follows, viz. : " In addition to the 
' water rates and assessments provided by the foregoing sec- 
' tions, it shall be competent for the Council to fix and impose 
' a tax, rate, or assessment, which may be called and described 
' as a sewerage rate or tax, to be levied and imposed upon and 
' paid by the same parties and in respect of the same properties 
: and interests therein as are and shall be respectively liable to 



' the said water rates and assessments. The said sewerage rate 
' or tax may be either at a specific annual rate or assessment of 
so much per cent, upon the annual rents, interests, and rent- 
' values of the properties assessed, or by way of a proportionate 
' addition to the water rates and assessments." 
And Whereas by resolution of the Saint John's Municipal 

Council, dated January i2th, 1904, it was ordered that the said 

Sewerage Rate or Tax shall be one-fourth of the annual Water 

Rates payable under existing appraisement. 

Be it therefore Resolved that the said Rate or Tax shall be 

one-fourth of the Water Rates as aforesaid to take effect from 

and after the ist day of July, 1904. 

By order, 



JOHN L. SLATTERY, Secretary. 



NOTICE. 

UNION BANlTofNEVVfOlNDLAND 

I IN LIQUIDATION. 

J^ NINTH DIVIDEND of 2 y 2 cents in the dollar will 
be payable to the creditors of this Institution at Martin's 
Building, Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland, on and after 
Wednesday, May 25th, J904. And 

fsJOTICE s hereby given .that all persons holding Notes 
of this Bank are required to immediately produce and 
furnish the same for payment of Dividends at the above office. 

JAMES GORDON, 
JAMES R. KNIGHT, 
JAMES D. RYAN, 
JAMES RYAN, 
Receivers and Liquidators. 



GUARDIAN^ 



ASSURANCE Co., Ltd., 

OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 



Established 1831. 



The Guardian has the largest paid-up capital of any 
Company in the world transacting a Fire business. 



Subscribed Capital 
Paid-up Capital ... 
Invested Funds exceed - 



$lo,ooo,ooo 

5,ooo,ooo 

23,5oo, ooo 



T. & M. WINTER, Agents ": Newfoundland 



^^> "~oo^ >r<xiw ^OsiJ K2^30 i-v3sS>o 4-^SX) 6-^sx) C~JS5*0 R5^X) KS^ vS^ S^ K5^ KS^ K5^ KSS ! 

ITHE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY! 



VOL. IV. No. i. 



JUNE, J904. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 



Ris excellency Sir Caixndisb Boplc, K.Cfl>.6 



Governor of PcwfoiiiKll.inU. 




**** 



SN the occasion of the appointment of His Excellency 
to the Gubernatorial position of this the Most Ancient 
Colony, M. A. P., than whom there is no better au- 
thority in Great Britain, when speaking of the pro- 
minent men of the Empire, naively discourses thus 
of the subject of our sketch : 

" Sir Charles Cavendish Boyle is (writes my Colo- 
nial correspondent) one of those level-headed colonial 
officials who may be trusted never to hit the right nail 

on the thumb. When a man goes out into the world with the 

Carthusian hall-mark upon him 

it is easy to speculate on the suc- 
cessful side of his career. Put a 

Carthusian into one of the deepest 

holes and he will clamber his way 

out somehow, as we have often 

seen, before the genial Baden- 
Powell gratified his old school- 
mates by his heroic defence of 

Mafeking. When on that black 

St. Patrick's night in 1891, in the 

roadstead at classic " Gib" the 

emigrant - laden Italian vessel 

Utopia went down, Cavendish 

Boyle showed the mettle of his 

pasture in more ways than one. 

For his courage and resource on 

that occasion he was cordially 

thanked and honoured by the 

then King of Italy, was especially 

applauded by the Board of Trade, 

and awarded the vellum certificate 

of the Royal Humane Society." 

SIR CAVENDISH BOYLE'S CAREER. 

" A cadet of the fine old Irish 
family whose titular head is the 
Earl of Cork and Orrery, Caven- 
dish Boyle in 1869, and in his 
twentieth year, " Took a Stool" 
in the Court of Probate, but for a 
young man of his temperament 
and energies this was no place, 
and he soon shook the dust of it 
from his shoes. The glamour of 
romance still hung about the West 
Indies, and while yet a young 
man Boyle found himself acting 

the Cadi under the palm-tree in the 'picturesque Leeward 
Islands. As a Stipendiary Magistrate he was wise and fatherly ; 
as a Coroner he sat on many black bodies; as an aimable gen- 
tleman of old-fashioned courtliness he was loved by all old and 
young, white and black. Then he became Registrar Genaral in 
Dominica, with a seat in the Legislative Council, and being 
greedy for work, was made Inspector of Prisons, Master of the 
Vice-Admiralty Court, and other things. In 1882 he was 
translated from pleasant Dominica northward to the " vex'd 
Bermoothes," where he worked as Colonial Secretary and a 





SIR CAVENDISH BOYLE, K.C.M.G. 



Member of the Legislative and Executive Councils for half 
a dozen years. From Bermuda he was promoted to the Colonial 
Secretaryship of Gibraltar, where he put in another six year$, 
till he was appointed Government Secretary of British Guiana 
in 1894. As training for the Governorship that has now very 
properly come to him, Sir Cavendish Boyle on several occasions 
was called upon to act as Governor of the prosperous " Sugar- 
and-Mud'' Colony, and has well established his fitness for such 
an office." 

" A man of generous disposition, quick habit of decision, and 
marked administrative talent, the new Governor of Newfound- 
land is certain of popularity and 
success. An all-round sportsman, 
he will enjoy himself in the old 
Atlantic Colony, and his character 
is so well known that the New- 
foundlanders are full of satisfac- 
tion over his appointment. Sir 
Cavendish Boyle is a young man 
for his years, and before he is 
done with the Colonial Depart- 
ment must reach a high place 
among our vice-regal represen- 
tatives.'' 

AS GOVERNOR OF NEWFOUNDLAND 

When the glorious tidings of 
the settlement of the French 
Treaties, were flashed far and 
wide around our Island Home, 
' the announcement was received 
with greater pleasure, in all the 
Outports as well as in the city, 
~- j than any other announcement for 
many a day. At a public meeting 
in Channel convened immediately 
on receipt of the good news, the 
intelligent folk of that centre, in 
public meeting assembled passed 
a series of resolutions expressive 
, of their approval, which voiced in 
fitting terms the sentiments of the 
people of the whole Island. One 
of the resolutions read : 

" That in this hour of our triumph 
' we recognize with gratitude the suc- 
' cess achieved by our much loved 
' Governor, His Excellency Sir Caven- 
' dish Boyle, on his untiring efforts to 
' benefit the condition of the inhabit- 
" ants of this Newfoundland oi Ours, and we congratulate His Excellency 
" on being so worthily His Majesty's representative at this historic period." 

These are not only the sentiments of the hardy fishermen of 
Channel, but those of the people, gentle and simple, of the whole 
Island. Sir Cavendish has endeared himself to all with whom 
he came in contact, and that would include nearly the whole 
population. He has visited the principal outports, and met and 
mixed with the people there. He has visited the sealing fleet 
and received ovations from representative fishermen from the 
North and the South, the East and the West ; the members of 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



the Royal Naval Reserve esteem him as personal friend ; and 
the school children all over the Island imbibe lessons of Patriot- 
ism daily in singing what has now been adopted as our National 
Hymn, his pretty little poem " Newfoundland." 

As an official, he has been a worthy representative of Our 
Sovereign Lord King Edward the Peacemaker. In an island 
like this where politics are generally, in comparison with those 
of the empire, merely parochial, and where party feeling at times 
runs so very high, a Governor needs an unlimited stock of 
patience and tact, so that he may not be identified with any 
party or any section. We could not always boast of possessing 
representatives, who would not get entangled in our local squab- 
bles thus embittering all parties, but Sir Cavendish while doing 
his duty fearlessly and efficiently, kept himself aloof from all 
parties, and compelled their respect and esteem. As a sports- 
man whether stalking the " head of heads" on Patrick's Marsh, 
struggling with a fresh run salmon on the banks of the lordly 
Huinber, angling for the festive sea trout in the noble Codroys ; 
or in his charming pen pictures of either or all these pursuits 
dear to the hearts of many a Newfoundlander, he has endeared 
himself to all kindred spirits in the Island. Socially he and his 
talented niece, Miss Adelaide Lane, have done much towards the 
encouragement of the higher musical and dramatic culture of 
our citizens, by their patronage and participation in such artistic 
exhibitions and re-unions. 

On all public occasions whenever he met the representative 
Societies, the members of the Royal Naval Reserve, gatherings 
of sealers, or the children of the schools, the lessons he incul- 
cated were those of Patriotism, loyalty to the Empire and love for 
our own Island Home. All his writings and speeches were 
charged with these messages. In his poem, "Newfoundland," 
he has given the people a patriotic song, that is sung not only 
by Newfoundlanders from Cape Spear to Cape Ray, but also 
by many of our fellow countrymen in United States and Canada. 
And long after his official acts are forgotten, he will be 

" Still to sight and memory dear," 
through the medium of this patriotic little poem. 

Sir Cavendish has been more fortunate than many of his pre- 
decessors, inasmuch as during his regime, Newfoundland has 
enjoyed a continuance of a term of unprecedented prosperity, 
which has reached the climax in the settlement for all time, of 
that vexed and ever-recurring cause of uneasiness the French 
Treaty Shore Question. It is true that 

" Peace hath her victories, not less renowned than war," 
and when the history of this great victory of Peace is written, it 
will be seen that Sir Cavendish Boyle played no laggard part. 

While we rejoice in his promotion for his sake, we regret 
it for our own. Personally he has been a consistent friend of 
the QUARTERLY, and has aided by voice and pen our humble 
effort to produce a magazine worthy of our Island Home. This 
would be sufficient reason, if we had not the broader and higher 
ones for wishing him God Speed ; and in expressing our own 
sentiments we feel we are only voicing those of the whole 
people, when we add the wish that he may be spared long and 
rise yet higher on the list of those famous British men who have 
done such brilliant work for the Empire and civilization. And 
" Even so though his memory should now die away, 
'Twill be caught up again, in some happier day 
And the hearts and the voices of Av'lon prolong 
Through the answering Future, his name and his song." 



Co fiis Grace 



the most Reo. m. ?. Bowles;, first flrcbbishop of neurtoundland. 

1*0-0 AY our hearts beat high with rising pride 
* In thee bright son of Terra Nova's Isle ; 
We hail thy exaltation with full tide 
And flood of joy. Thy neffer-ceasing toil 
Has wrought for beauty ever, till the smile 
Of works well done proclaims on every side 
Thy strong right hand, well chosen now to guide, 
And deck thy Island Church with nobler wreath the while. 
Long may Your Grace adorn thy native throne, 

Be every year instarred with honors new, 
While we thy people hail thee as our own 

Soggarth Aroon ; with hearts e'er beating true ; 
The poet, scholar, statesman, father, friend, 
The Pallium fits thee well. God, years of glory send 
St. John's, April 4 th, ,904. ' D _ CARROLL _ 




i Vale. A 

to furnish a contribution to the June 
issue of this magazine, the above word 
forces itself upon the writer in front of all 
others as the subject ; and the contribution, 
like the word, must be short. Farewell is 
never an easy word to express and often it 
****** is a sad one. It means, in its general ac- 
ceptance, the prelude of a severance of ties which 
have connected the individual with his environment 
and the cutting of such strands, under whatever con- 
ditions and in whatever circumstances, is an occasion, 
whilst, whenever there has been a community of in- 
terests, that occasion cannot be free from sadness. 

In the present instance the word is written with 
unfeigned regret, for it signifies to the writer the 
termination of three very happy years in a land he 
has learned to love right well, it means that he is 
leaving a home, and it tells him that the hands 
which have been held out to him since he entered 
that home can no longer touch his own. 

But in most events, if search be made, compen- 
sations may be found, and, in this, there is one great 
satisfaction, which is due to the knowledge that the 
land is prospering, and that bright conditions exist, 
and brighter prospects may be safely said to be in 
store for those who will remain in that home. 

To those, to the friends whom he is leaving be- 
hind, and who will read this word after he has gone, 
the writer, from .his heart, says fare-well, 'and he ven- 
tures to repeat the prayer to which he heretofore 
gave expression, and which he will always fully 
mean, the prayer, and the hope, that God will ever 
guard Newfoundland. 

May, 1904. CAVENDISH BOYLE. 

Che fioucrnor's poem. 

To Hon. E. P. Morris, K.C., LL.D., President of Welcome Committee for 

Old Home Week. 

y^ VALON is calling you, calling o'er the main, 
^ * Sons of Terra Nova, shall she call in vain ? 
Dwellers in the new land gather to her shore, 
Gather in the old land, the homeland loved of yore. 

All her strand shines golden 'neath the summer sheen, 
All her hills show purple, all her fields are green, 
All her woodland song-birds chant in joyous strain 
To Avalon, to Avalon, welcome home again 1 

Fleecy clouds are sweeping round the azure bowl, 
Bays respond sonorous to Atlantic's tidal roll: 
Newfoundland is calling, calling 'cross the main, 
Children in the far lands, must she call in vain? 

Belle Isle's northern foreland, Fortune's southern Bay, 
{lumber's winding river, where the leaping salmon play; 
Western shore-built hamlet, forest lake and plain 
Join in kindred chorus, come to us again. 

Avalon's heart lies open, will you say her nay ? 
When she bids you welcome, will you stay away ? 
Newfoundland is calling, calling o'er the main, 
Sons of Terra Nova, can her call be vain ? 

Children though you leave her, far away to roam, 
All your tenderest yearnings point you back to home ; 
All her voices echo, echo one refrain, 
Newfoundland is calling, welcome home again. 

CAVENDISH BOYLE. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



neutfoundland Dame-Core. 



M. F. Howley, D.D. 

XI. 




r** 



*l 



HE "run" between Fogo Island and the main land is 
called on modern maps 

"SIR CHARLES HAMILTON'S SOUND." 

This name of course speaks for itself, being given 
in honor of the well known Governor who ruled here 
from 1818 to 1825. The name is altogether too 
cumbersome. Hence it has never " taken hold." 
If it had been called " Hamilton Sound" it would 
doubtless have become popular, as " Hamilton Inlet" in Lab- 
rador. I am not aware whether this latter is called from the 
same Governor's name or not. I find no traces of it on any of 
my ancient maps, or down to 1796. But the name Bay of the 
Esquimaux seems to occupy the place. It is decidedly a mis- 
take to give long and unwieldy names to places, as people will 
never use them. We have another example in Sir John Hawley 
Glover's Island, a name given to the island in Grand Lake. If 
If it were called Glover Island it would soon become popular. 
The very fine estuary of the 

GANDER RIVER 

flowing out of the lake of the same name makes it embouchure 
into Hamilton Sound. This name is no doubt given in refer- 
ence to the large number of wild geese which frequent the arm. 
These magnificent birds migrate regularly every year, arriving 
in our bays and fiords early in April just as the ice begins to 
break up. They wait in large flocks in the open-water spaces, 
until an unfailing instinct tells them that the ponds in the interior 
are free from ice. They then take flight for the lakes where 
they build and breed, returning again for the winter to the 
Central and Southern States of America. This name might, 
with propriety, be given to any of our bays or river mouths, but 
it has been monopolized by this one for more than a hundred 
years past. I find it on Cook's maps of 1784, and on the French 
reproduction of them, translated as Baye des Jars. 

Coming eastward from the outlet of Gander River we meet 

RAGGED HARBOR. 

This is one of those names which are to be found multiplied 
many times all around our coast, and which call for the services 
of the Nomenclature Committee. At the last meeting of that 
body Mr. Woods, P.M.G., related " the adventures of a letter," 
which had been addressed to one of these harbours. After 
several months, and most praiseworty efforts on the part of the 
Postal officials, the correct destination of the letter was found. 
The search was one that would have done credit to the Detective 
Department of the London Post Office. Our officials, however, 
were rewarded for their diligence by a furious onslaught for 
their neglect and incapacity, and several broad-sides, in the 
local press of St. John's. The origin of the name is quite 
obvious. It is well described by Taverner. (English Pilot, 
I 755) * * * " R a gg e d Harbour is so called by reason of the 
abundance of ragged and scraggy rocks which lie before and 
within the harbour." There are many islands off the coast, one 
of which is called 

PENGUIN ISLAND. 

This island is called from the well known sea-bird, now I believe 
almost extinct but at one time very numerous on our coasts. 



They are thus described by Taverner : " There is also another 
thing to be taken notice of, by which -you may know when you 
are on the Bank. I have read an author that says, in treating of 
this coast, ' that you may know this by the great quantities of 
fowls upon the Bank, viz. : Sheer-waters, Willocks, Noddles, 
Gulls, and Penguins, &c.,' without making any exceptions, which 
is a mistake, for I have seen all those fowls 100 leagues off this 
Bank, the Penguins excepted. It's true that all these fowls are 
seen there in great quantities, but none are to be minded so much 
as the Penguins, for these never go without the Bank as the 
others do, for they are always on it or within it, several of them 
together, sometimes more, other times less, but never less than 
two together. They are large fowls, about the bigness of a 
goose, a coal-black head and back with a white belly, and 
a milk-white spot under one of their eyes, which Nature has 
ordered to be under the right eye, and extraordinary remarkable. 
For my part I never saw any with such a spot under their left 
eye, the figure of which I have here set down to facilitate the 
knowledge of them." * 

In connection with Penguin Island must be mentioned an- 
other island about thirty miles to the north-east of it. It is 
called at the present day 

FUNK ISLAND, 

or The Funks, a very ineuphonious name, but very expressive 
as alluding to the offensive smell produced by the immense 
masses of guano, deposited by the myriads of sea-birds which 
constantly cover this island. It is a pity, however, that the 
island lost its original, also quite expressive name of 

BIRD ISLAND. 

Under this name it appears on all the most ancient maps, trans- 
lated into various languages according to the nationality of the 
map. Thus on the Latin map it is marked Ares ; on the Span- 
ish (as Majollo, 1527), Y tie Oceles ; on the Italian, Isola degli 
Ucelli; on the French Isles aux Oiseaux. There is another 
island in shore to the south-east of Cape Freels which must be 
mentioned in connection with those two. On our modern maps 
it is marked 

CABOT ISLAND, 

but on those of a little more remote date, as for instance, Page's 
map, 1860, it called Stinking Island. The name is translated 
on the French maps lies Puantes. It requires no explanation. 
The origin being the same as that of the Funks. I find that on 
the ancient maps these names are all given to the one group of 
islands, the same as the Bird Islands. They were a well known 
land-mark to the early navigators, being the objective point on 
the outward voyage, and the point of departure for the home- 
ward voyage. This was the point of land made for by Jacques 
Cartier on his celebrated voyage of 1534, but owing to the ice 
he was obliged to steer a little to the southward and enter 
Catalina Harbor. He remained there ten days, and on the 



* As the work of Taverner, from which I quote, is rather rare, and not at 
the convenience of the general reader, I may say that a re-production of the 
above-mentioned figures may be seen in Prowse's History, p. 283. The 
learned Historian, however, calls them " The Great Auk." This is not 
correct, as there is a great difference between the Auk and the Penguin. 
The latter is of the family Aptenodytcs. The former of the Alcida. But 
both of these families are non-flying birds, impennes, or ptilopteri. They 
have wings short like flippers, without any quills, and covered with short 
feathers almost resembling the fur of the seal or sea-lion, whereas the bird 
shown by Taverner is a truejiycr, like the loon or wild goose. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



2ist of May he left Catalina and steered northwardly "* 
as far as the Isle of Birds (Title des ouaiseaulx) which was com- 
pletely surrounded by broken ice." Notwithstanding this he 
sent boats ashore for birds, " of which there is a great number, 
which is a thing incredible to one who has not seen it. Although 
the island is about a league in circumference, yet it seemed as 
if it were covered with snow or hoar-frost. Besides the birds 
perched on the island, there are hundreds of others in the water 
around it and in the air above. Some are as large as geese, 
black and white (no doubt the Penguins |M.F.H.), and they 
have the beak like a crow and they are always in the sea, not 
being able to fly in the air, for they have only small wings; but 
with these they can go very quickly in the sea, and they are 
wonderfully fat. We call them Apponatz. We took a boat load 
of them in less than half an hour, just as we would take beach- 
stones, and each of our ships salted four or five pipes of them." 
In his voyage of the following year (1535) Cartier made directly 
for this Bird Island, and arrived there on the yth July. He 
again speaks of the enormous quantity of birds, and says that 
" all the ships of France might easily load there, and one would 
not perceive that any had been taken away. We took two boat- 
loads as part of our victuals." 

The only survival, I believe, of this beautiful, expressive and 
historic name of ' Bird Island" is the settlement of " Bird Island 
Cove" off Cape Bonavista, and some one afflicted with this new 
name changing mania, has attempted to have it abolished and 
supplanted by the trite and meaningless name of Brighton. The 
Nomenclature Committee, however, have put their veto upon 
this change, and the old name is to be retained. 

I will close this number by alluding to the very prominent 
and important point 

CAPE FREELS, 

which forms the northern headland of Bonavista Bay. This 
name, under various forms and spellings, is found on all the 
earliest maps, at least as far back as the first quarter of the 
XVI. Century. Thus it appears on the map of Majollo, 1527. 
It is metamorphosed into Feraulois; on Verazzano, 1528, it ap- 
pears as P. de Selius ; on Kiberos, 1529, Ya tie Freelius ; on 
Rot's map, 1542, /. de Freilis. On the Harleyan map of 1542 
and Descelier's of 1553 we have Ya. de Freilis; on De Laet's, 
1630, Ihlas de Fra Leois ; on Friend's map, 1713, I. de P'rillis; 
on T. Cour Lotter's. 1720, Point S. Gillis seems intended for it. 
On Cook's maps, 1774. it appears as we spell it now C. Freels, 
and on the French copy of Cook, C. Freel. It seems to have 
puzzled the early cartographers. It is in reality a Breton name, 
and shows the early occupation of this shore by those fishermen 
long previous to Carder's time. The proper spelling is Cape 
Frehel, or Frehale. It is the name of a cape near St. Malo in 
Brittany, at the entrance to the Bay of S. Brieuc. Another 
point of the Newfoundland coast, the most southerly point of the 
Island, between Cape Pine and St. Shots, also bears this same 
name, showing that it was a popular name among the Bretons. 



& Re-Kindled. * 

By D. Carroll.. 

^"\NLY a blackened chink the rocks among, 

^^ Yet 'tis a picture eloquent to me, 

Each dry and blackened ember hath a tongue 
Attuned to stir the depths of memory ; 

Its magic maketh live again my young 

And gladsome friends, their faces now I see, 
The joyous hills re-echo with their glee, 

I hear their laughter gay, the merry songs they'd sung. 

Now scattered long, to many a clime and far, 

Is the glad group that filled that summer's day 
With music, love and laughter, till the star 
Of evening sank across the moonlit bay, 
,put they are coming home, the thousands say, 
The exiled sons and daughters of our land, 
And in each loved " Old Home" in Newfoundland 

This cry is rising clearer day by day ; 
" Come to thy home, to Terra Nova come, 
The land with open arms is shouting WELCOME HOME.' 



3ames 3* DKflulifft 

THE accompanying reproduction is from a recent photograph of Jas. j. 
McAuliffe (Artist), Everett, Mass., who is a prominent member of 
the Cabot Club of Boston and the Old Home Week Committee. Born in 
6t. John's, Newfoundland, in the year 1848, he learned the trade of sail- 
making in his native town. He emigrated to Boston in the year 1866, and 
studied art at the Lowell Institute and at the South Boston School of Art, 
also with Prof. Bartlett, the Principal of the Massachusetts Normal Art 
School, and with Marcheal Johnson, the celebrated marine artist. He 
exhibited his work at all the principal exhibitions in Boston and in other 
cities. Some of the finest collections in the Slate of Massachusetts con- 
tain marine pictures from the studio of McAuliffe. His celebrated marine 
picture U. S. Ship Constitution, otheiwise known as "Old Iron Sides" 
chased by a British squadion in 1812, was purchased by the City of Everett, 
and now hangs in the Public Library of that city. Mr. McAuliffe has been 
a teacher of art in Boston and Everett for several years. He visited Saint 
John's in the summer of 1874 with an excursion party from Boston and 
New York on the s.s. Verge; and again visited the Old Home in 1899 and 
exhibited the picture "Ecce Homo" at the T. A. Hall, which now 
hangs in the west aisle of the R. C. Cathedral. In political matters, in his 




JAMES j. MCAULIFFE 

adopted country, he has always been affiliated with the Democratic party, and 
for several years has been Secretary of the Democratic Committee. He served 
the City of Everett, as Trustee of the Public Library for five years. He 
is also a member of several fraternal organizations, among which are the 
Knights of Columbus and the Order of Foresters. Mr. McAuliffe lectured 
on " The Ancient Colony" at People's Temple, Boston, in 1902, and again 
in 1903, and received unstinted praise from the press and people. Under 
the auspices of the Cabot Club he lectured at the above place May 4, 1904, 
on the same subject, giving an account of the principal events in the history 
of the country. Most of the material for this lecture was collected by Mr. 
McAuliffe while on a visit to Newfoundland in 1899, and the pictures were 
selected under his supervision. We herewith give the Program, showing 
some interesting features introduced in his last lecture : CONCERT, 8 p.m. 
Tenor Solo, "The New Born King," Mr. Joseph Dempsey ; Bass Solo, 
" My own Leonora "; Soprano Solo, " Waiting," Millard ; Tenor Solo, 
"Greeting," Dr. Easterbrook : Duet, from Marilana ' Sainted Mother," 
Mme. Wyse-Fournier, Mrs. Chester Wallace; Grand Solo and Chorus, 
the Inflammatus Pupils of Wyse-Fournier School of Opera, Solo by Mme. 
Wyse-Fournier. LECTURE, 9 p.m., by James J. McAuliffe; ist view: 
"Home Sweet Home," by the Choir. The interiors of the principal 
churches were shown, accompanied by the following music : Cower Street 
Methodist Church, ' Old Hundred"; Church of England Cathedral, " Lead 
Kindly Light "; Roman Catholic Cathedral, "Adeste Fideles ; " Presby- 
terian Church, " Nearer. My God, to Thee." 




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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Rcnouation of tbe CatlKdrah 



g*W*gHt first move in the interior renovation of the Cathe- 

MV ft 

dral was the 




of the hiah flltar, 

This was a very difficult and delicate undertaking. 
The work was commenced on April yth, 1902, and 
the completion of the work and the consecration and 
placing of the magnificent marble table-slab took 
place on February 7th, 1903, that is to say ten 
months after the commencement of the work. The whole of 
this time, however, was not occupied in work. As soon as the 
immense basement of solid mason-work was completed, it was 
allowed to " settle" for some months. The actual work of taking 
down the Altar and re-building it commenced on Sept. gth, 
1902, so that it occupied exactly five months. The work was 
one that required extreme caution and unusual engineering 
skill. The grand Baldachino rises above the Altar in the form 
6f a triumphal arch of purest Grecian architecture delicately 
poised on light monolithic granite columns. Upon the pediment 
is a group of angels supporting a cross, at a height of over fifty 
feet above the floor. Some of the stones composing this group 
weighed over two tons. They were removed and replaced with- 
out the slightest hitch or accident, under the skilful management 
of Jonas C. Barter, Cathedral Architect. The Altar now stands 
about seven feet further back than; formerly. This gives a mag- 
nificent spacious Sanctuary in which the grand ceremonial of 
the Catholic Church can be carried out with all its dignity and 
decorum. 

The Altar is now actually in the site originally intended, as 
shown on the plans of the Cathedral. A marble slab with an 
inscription commemorative of the event has been inserted by 
His Grace the Archbishop in the basement of the Altar. We 
give here a copy of the Inscription with Translation. 

D. O. M. 

ALTARE HOC MAIVS 

D. IOAN BAPT. NOMINE DICATUM. 

PROPRIO SITVI ADMOfUM. 

IN MELIOREM FORMAM REDACTUM 

MARMOREA MENSA ADAVCTUM 

SOLEMNI RITU CONSECRAVIT 

M. F. HOWLEY, EPUS SCTI IOAN, T.N. 

ANNO EPISCOPATUS XI. SAL MDCDIII. 

; VII. ID. FEB. 
" Ego confirmavi columnas ejus." PS. LXXXiv-8. 

( Translation.) 

TO GOD GREATEST AND BEST. 

This High Altar 

Dedicated in the name of St. John the Baptist. 
Having been removed to its proper position. 

Being rebuilt in better form 

and adorned with a marble table. 

M. F. Howley, Bishop of St. John's, Nfld. 

Consecrated with solemn rite 

in the i ith year of his Episcopate 

of our Salvation, 1903, 

on the yth of February. 

" I have strengthened thy columns." Ps. 84, v. 8. 



Che Renovation of the Ceiling. 

Tiia C ithedral, being built in the style of the Roman renais- 
sance, has a flit ceiling supported by an elaborate cornice. 
This latter, though not altogether in perfect classical style, has 
nevertheless a very imposing appearance. It consists of a freize, 
with sunken coffers, intersected by florid, acanthus-leaved mo- 
dilh'ons. These support a heavy moulding, over which is a cove, 
the opening of which nearly three feet wide is filled in with 
a vine-like tendril highly ornamented. Above this again ; s 
another deep moulding, and lying on the suffit of the ceiling are 
ornamental foliages of acanthus and lotus alternately. The' 
whole width of this cornice is thirteen feet, and the effect is 
striking and beautiful.. 

Up to the present time the whole surface of the ceiling was 
one great plain, unbroken except fof the six massive center- 
pieces. His Grace the Archbishop determined to enrich the 
surface by paneling and coffering it, after the style of the 
Greater Roman Basilicas. It was not as easy a matter as might 
at first appear. The main principals or stringers supporting the 
roof, and on which the ceiling joists were laid, could not of 
course be touched or interfered with, and these had to be taken 
into account and wrought into the plan of the paneling. This 
was done by making mock beams running longitudinally, and 
by raising the joists eighteen inches, The stiles were so ar- 
ranged as to correspond with the beams, and thus a neat and 
symmetrical design was secured with a sinkage of eighteen 
inches for the panels, which average about eight feet square, and 
have double sets of mouldings representing fleui-de-lys and 
egg-and-dart divided by fillets. In the center of each panel is 
a rosette design of acanthus and lotus alternately. The panels 
are rounded at the corners, thus giving a circular space at the 
intersections of the stiles, in Which are smaller moulded centers, 
each containing a globe with * ; thirty-two candle-power incan- 
descent electric bulb. The large center-pieces, as well as the 
cornice all round the building, are also set with electric lights, 
the number in all being about 350 bulbs. 

On account of the Cruciform style of the church a special 
design had to be adopted for the great square at the intersec- 
tions of the aisle and transepts. This was arranged in the form 
of twelve large panels radiating from the great center-piece, 
giving coffres about twelve f^et long, in which it is intended by- 
and-bye to have frescoes of the Apostles. The whole effect of 
this new embellishment, spreading as it does over a vast area, 
is truly magnificent, and when lit up by the glow of sparkling 
jets of the electric bulbs is almost fairylike ; yet its gigantic pro- 
portions and massive solidity and its great perspective dis- 
tances, prevent anything like lightness or frivolity, and produce 
a sense of awe and solemnity elevating the mind to a high pitch 
of devotion and religious exaltation. 

The work at the new floor, which is to be of maple-wood 
worked in parquet design in the alley between the pews. The 
pews are in golden finished oak, with open ends, and are de- 
signed according to the prominent features of the building. It 
is not exaggerating to say that there is nothing on this side of 
the Atlantic that can at all compare with this grand edifice ; and 
even in the first capitals of Europe it is not easy to find a build- 
ing superior to it in its general features. It is to be hoped that 
His Grace may be enabled to carry out his designs for the em- 
bellishment of the interior with costly marbles, guilding and 
fresco painting. 



fHE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



pro Fide ct floalonia/' 



Itewfoundland a new flrcbbisbopric. 



St. John's a metropolitan See. 



By Rev. J. A. O'Reilly, D.D. 




ITJRING the Paschal Season of this year, 1904, intel- 

Dligence came from Rome that sent a thrill of gladness 
jj throughout all Newfoundland. It announced a "gift 
? from the Royal Pope coming over the purple sea," 
a " Pledge from Rome of Rome's undying love," and 
was in effect this : that His Lordship Right Rev. 
Michael Francis Howley, Bishop of St. John's, had 
been appointed by the Holy See Archbishop of the 
newly created ecclesiastical Province of Newfound- 
land, which now includes the Archdiocese of Saint 
John's and the Suffragan Dioceses of Harbor Grace and Saint 
George's. The latter has been changed from a Vicariate to a 
Diocese the first Bishop of the new See being the Right Rev. 
Neil McNeil. The antiquity 
of the Diocese of St. John's 
relatively to the Dioceses of 
the New World, and the posi- 
tion of St. John's as the Seat 
of Government and Commer- 
cial Capital of the Island, 
were no doubt considered by 
the Sacred Congregation of 
Propaganda in moving for 
the erection of the new Arch- 
diocese. It is now over one 
hundred years since the ar- 
rival of our pioneer Bishop 
the Rev. Doctor O'Donel a 
missioner of Apostolic mould 
and a Prelate whose name 
still sounds stirring to the 
Catholics of Newfoundland. 
Since that time the city of 
St. John's has had a marvel- 
ous development. Rome' was 
not finished in a day ; neither 
was our own Metropolis. But 
for the past half hundred 
years the " City by the Nar- 
rows" has so grown in all its 
Institutions social, political, 
educational and religious 
that Newfoundlanders who 
have been abroad and return 
always express surprise at the 
evidence of expansion. But 
not alone the prominence of 
Saint John's as the Island 
Capital was considered, for 
there was also in view the 
eminent service to the Church 
of His Lordship Bishop 
Howley. 

The Archbishop is now 
some years beyond the silver 

jubilee of his priesthood, and in all these the years of his Sacred 
Ministry (over thirty) he has done yeoman work for the ecclesi- 
astical advancement of Newfoundland. As a missionary in the 
southern and western outports; as a Bishop in St. John's; as a 
writer of our ecclesiastical annals ; as a preacher, a lecturer and 
a poet; a social leader, an architect and an antiquary; his 
motto has ever been " Pro Fide et Avalonia"' Faith and 
Fatherland." 

The Restoration of the Cathedral and the completion of the 
young ladies' Academy at Littleclale are foremost amongst the 
manifold tangible results of the Bishop's zeal for religion and 
education. These were literally colossal undertakings, but the 
Bishop pushed them through so rapidly that many did not realize 




HIS GRACE THE MOST REV. M. F. HOWLEY, D.D. 



that the work was even begun when it was finished. The Arch- 
bishop is not only a church builder and an educationalist ; he is 
also, and has ever been, a missionary. As such it has been his 
part to traverse the coasts of Newfoundland afoot or in sailboat, 
and to learn by personal proof the various vicissitudes of times 
and tides to which the church worker in this ocean-fronted 
Island is ever subject. The snow-crusted barrens and the ice- 
strewn bays have been by turn the scenes of his labors, there- 
fore has he a most practical knowledge of the various localities 
all around our shores over which Rome has named him Chief 
Pastor. As a Missionary he has labored incessantly in the con-, 
fessional, the sanctuary and the pulpit, but the work so done 
has been essentially of the spiritual order, and its results cannot 

be catalogued or appraised 
by ordinary standards. 
The Archbishop was born in 
1843, and the following table 
of biographical events will 
give an idea of His Grace's 
progress as a churchman. It 
will be observed that he 
brings to the discharge of 
his new office a vast and 
varied ecclesiastical experi- 
ence. 

mosr.iphic.il figures. 

1857 Entered St. Bonaven- 
ture's College then first 
opened. Previously a 
student of Nugent's 
Academy; aged 14. 
1863 Went to Rome, enter- 
ing Propaganda as an 
Ecclesiastical student ; 
aged 20. 

1868 Ordained a Priest, 
and went to Scotland as 
Secretary to Most Rev. 
Dr. Ayre. Stationed in 
the Western Highland 
District for 15 months. 
1870 Returned to Rome 
with Archbishop Ayre. 
Was present on the oc- 
casion of the Declaration 
of the Dogma of Papal 
Infallibility by Pope 
Pius IX. Also assisted 
in 'Rome in the same 
year at the Consecrea- 
tion of His Lordship 
Rt. Rev. Thomas Joseph 
Power, with whom he 
returned to Newfound- 
land, arriving in September, 1870. He was then stationed 
for some years at St. John's Cathedral. He next proceeded 
to the Harbor Breton Mission, remaining there about three 
years ; and then returned to St. John's, where he remained 
until appointed to West Newfoundland. 
1886 Made Prefect Apo.-,tolic of St. George's, with jurisdiction 

over the "Treaty Shore." 

1892 Consecrated Bishop in St. John's and made Vicar Apos- 
tolic of St. George's. Consecrating Prelate, Right Rev. 
Dr. Power; Preacher, Archbishop O'Brien. Assistant 
Prelates Right Rev. Dr. McDonald, of Harbor- Grace, 
and Right Rev. Dr. McDonald, of Charlottetown. 
1894 Appointed Bishop of St. John's in succession to Right 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 






Rev. Dr. Power. Installed on the Feast of St. Peter's 
Chair at Antioch. 

1904 Named by Holy See Archbishop of the Ecclesiastical 
Province of Newfoundland. Letters of Appointment pub- 
lished at the Cathedral on Easter Sunday. 

The foregoing figures are the leading dates in the career of a 
Prelate who is known, with distinction, wherever the name of 
Newfoundland has reached. That he is a great and patriotic 
Newfoundlander is the united testimony of his countrymen at 
home and accross the seas ; that he is a great church worker is 
proven by results achieved ; and that he is a great ecclesiastical 
Ruler and Statesman is shown by the fact that the traditional 
wisdom of Rome has placed the Catholic Church of Newfound- 
land under his jurisdiction. 

Amongst the many local congratulatory tributes paid the new 
Archbishop let us quote with pride and pleasure that given him 
by our late Govenor Sir Cavendish Boyle, one of the most uni- 
versally respected and popular Representatives of Royalty that 
this or indeed any other country in the Empire has ever had. 
His Excellency in the course of a speech delivered at a farewell 
banquet given in his honour in the Archipiscopal Palace spoke 
as follows : 

" Gentlemen, we have been privileged to witness and to rejoice in a very 
important event, a very high and historically important occurrence, namely: 
the elevation of this See into an Archbishopric ; and upon no shoulders could 
that mantle of distinction more worthily have fallen than upon those of 
our kind and gracious host, in whose palace we have met, whose lavish 
hospitality we have so thoroughly enjoyed to-night. In this beautiful hall, 
the work, if not of his own hands at least of his gifted mind and utiring and 
artistic energy, we have, as his grateful guests, but one united feeling of 
satisfaction for the distinction which has come to him, for the honour 
which has been won by his merit for the whole of that large portion of the 
community who are numbered as his flock, an honour which will be recog- 
nized and shared by thousands who are not so numbered. For I know, 
gentlemen, know from the experience of the past three years, that consist- 
ently and persistently has His Grace Archbishop Howley worked for the 
prosperity of the whole people, and has, without ceasing, advocated the 
soundest of all policies, namely: that of a joining of all hands in the work 
for the common weal. And that is the truest and the soundest and the 
highest labour to which any man can turn his hand. On all occasions has 
His Grace been the ardent advocate of unity of purpose and peaceful action; 
and, therefore, I say, and say with conviction, that my addition of this 
fouith event is a proper one for me to make, and I assert that to have wit- 
nessed it during my stay among you makes me very glad and very proud." 

The appointment of the new Archbishop had been for some 
time expected. The arrival of the following letter, sent by His 
Eminence Cardinal Gotti, showed that " Rome had spoken, and 
that the question was decided." 

MOST ILLUSTRIOUS AND REVEREND LORD, 

It is pleasing to me to send to Your Grace, herewith, the Apostolic 
Letters by which an Ecclesiastical Hierarchy is erected in the island of 
Newfoundland, St. John's bjing constituted the Metropolitan See, and the 
Vicarite Apostolic of St. George's being erected into a diocese. 

Herewith, I aslo send the Apostolic Letters by which Your Grace is 
named the first Archbishop of the new Metropolitan See of St. John's, 
and the Right Reverend Neil McNeil is appointed to the new See of St. 
George's. I will also send, herewith, the sheets of the faculties which are 
granted both to yourself and to the two suffragan Bishops. 

Your Grace, will please transmit to the respective Prelates the documents 
intended for them. 

As regards yourself, by these presents is conceded the faculty of performing 
what are called the "greater functions," even before the reception of the 
Archiepiscopal Pallium. The Sacred Congregation of Propaganda will 
take care to postulate tl.e Pallium in the next Consistory. I hope then 
that the establishment of an Ecclesiastical Hierarchy in your Island, as it 
adds new glory to the Catholic Religion, will also promote a new increase 
of the same, and provide a plentiful harvest of spiritual fruits. 

I the meantime, I avail of this occasion to wish you every joy and happi- 
ness, and to pray that God may long preserve you safe and sound in the 
possession of your new dignity. 

Your Grace's most faithful servant, 
[Sgd.] FRA. H. M. CARDINAL GOTTI, Prefect. 

The publication of the above letter appealed at once to the 
religious spirit of Newfoundland. The people in the three 
Dioceses of the new Province felt equally honoured in the eccle- 
siastical distinction conferred on the whole Island by the action 
of the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda. The raising of St. 
John's to an Archdiocese reminded the country of the church- 
work which has been in progress here for upwards of two cent- 
uries. It reminded it of the great Apostolic efforts of Bishop 
O'Donel; it recalled the zeal of Bishops Lambert and Scallan ; 
the church building enterprize of Rt. Rev. Dr Fleming; the 
Statesmanship and intellectual gifts of Bishop Mullock, and the 



ceremonial splendor and far reaching educational efforts of 
Bishop Power. It seemed an augury of future success that 
Archbishop Howley inheriting all the traditions of a long and 
illustrious line of Prelates and gifted besides with those qualifi- 
cations which go to the making of the great churchman should 
have been called by Rome to this great office. As regards 
Newfoundland, its erection into an ecclesiastical Province seems 
to herald the advent of the new day and to signify that : 
" The Star of the West shall yet rise in its glory, 
And that land which was darkest be brightest in story." 
The new Archbishop has already received hundreds of congra- 
tulations and his appointment has called forth universal enthu- 
siasm. On this occasion, and in the name of the many readers 
of THE NFLD. QUARTERLY, may we not venture to felicitate 
St. John's, Harbor Grace and St. George's on the fact that they 
are now combined in one unified ecclesiastical Province ? May 
we not also extend our special congratulations to His Grace 
the Archbishop of St. John's; to the zealous and beloved Bishop 
of Harbor Grace Rt. Rev. Dr. McDonald : and to the new 
Bishop of St. George's the esteemed Dr. McNeil on the new 
honor conferred on Newfoundland by the venerated successor 
of St. Peter ? 

Rome, the scource of ecclesiastical honours and the fountain 
of ecclesiastical jurisdiction, has placed on the brows of our 
Island Church its crowning glory. The Holy See has thus 
given our country a new proof of the solicitude with which she 
watches over the nations of the world. 



" Breathes there a man with soul so dead. 
Who never to himself hath said 

CMs is lp Own 0)p Patioc Cand" 

K'VE heard thy call dear " Avalon," 

Sweet HOME across the sea! 
Fram'd in such touching accents 

By him,* from shores of Lee ! 
An exile's dream is painted 

An exile's passions sung 
And love of home and country 

From every period flung! 
We've heard thee call, dear " Avalon"- 

It haunts us in our dreams ! 
Thy fir-crown'd hills, thy rugged shores, 

Thy fern-fring'd lakes and streams ! 
And mid this Babel's turmoil 

We long for each dear scene, 
And with an exile's yearning 

Would bridge the sea between ! 
We've heard thy call dear " Avalon !" 

Old homeland, pure and sweet, 
Back to thy hills defiant 

Blue ocean at their feet ! 
We'll answer then, MAVOURNEEN ; 

We'll come across the sea! 
To mem'ries fond and tender, 

And dreams that vanished be I 
* * * * . * 

We'll miss some hearts to greet us 

In the old land, we trow 
From sacred graves of mem'ry 

Lov'd voices, soft and low : 
But round the um immortal 

Some radiance still shall shine, 
'Twill greet us in a " WELCOME," 

And thrill with " AULD LANG SYNE." 

Now freedom's breath inspires thee, 

No alien claims thy shore 
From fetter'd fangs we greet thee, 

Our own forever more 1 
An exile's dream is granted 

An exile's passion sung 
And love of home and country 

From every heart is flung. E. C. 

*Our recent well-loved Governor Sir Cavendish Boyle, K.C.M.G., who wrote the beautiful 
poem to the home-comers, " Avalon is Calling." 



8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




[P/wto by Prof. JMlmviiy.} 



TWILLINGATE. 



fl Cribute to Sir Robert Bond* 



By D. Carroll. 



*TpHE wave of enthusiasm that swept over Newfoundland, when 
it was announced that the French Shore question had been 
* settled, that a canker of two centuries standing had been 
removed and removed forever stands without parallel. 
The wildest excitement reigned, and the gratitude of Newfound- 
land to her patriotic Premier Sir Robert Bond found gener- 
ous expression. Press and people vied to do him honour. 
Through the length and breadth of the land the wires sang 
with messages of praise ; a new vigour thrilled the people ; a 
sense of shackles thrown aside prevailed ; and Terra Nova stood 
erect in stately strength and pride, a victor over the darkest 
phase of her " historic misfortunes." The following poem 
was composed on the occasion above refered to and speaks for 
itself. Twillingate, the district of Sir Robert's special care, is 
foremost in her congratulations to her distinguished representa- 
tive. The accompanying picture represents Twillingate proper, 
the principal town of the District, and " Metropolis of the North." 

CHEER, for the reign of the Frenchman is ended 
'Long the great coast from St. John to' Cape Ray ; 

Cheer for the man who has rendered each bay to us 
Free and untrammeled, forever and aye. 

BOND! not a name in our colony's story, 
Statesman or patriot, thine can eclipse : 
Every flag raise to him, 
Shout from the bays to him 
Thunder our praise to him guns, hearts and lips. 



Fling out the free sail, ye skiffs heavy laden, 
Aliens no more in your safe havens stand 

Leeward or windward, to shelter or trade in, 
Harbor and inlet are yours to command. 

Cheer Newfoundland with thy girdle of ships, 

Every crew of ye, every man, 
Lusty-lunged thunder let burst from your lips 

Wake the whole coast, to its norther-most span. 

Cheer ev'ry river that's rushing to westward, 

Leaps with a greater delight on its way ; 
Cheer ev'ry full tide that comes to the Freed Shore 

Sweeps with a joy to the arms of each bay. 

Long hath our toilers been harassed and driven, . 

Sorely and long was our loyalty tried, 
Now comes the crown by our Empire given, 

Spread the glad news of it, swift, far and wide. 

Cheer for this saving boon so long denied to her, 
Cheer that we've seen it accomplished with pride to her, 
Cheer so each heart which has e'er been allied to her 

Catch the wild strain of it borne on the breeze ; 
Cheer for the statesman who've been a true guide to her: 

Cheer for our Island Home Queen of her Seas. 

Grand day of history, down thro' the years 
Glad generations shall hail it with pride ( 
With this brave name placed in honour beside, 

Full in the flame of it, 

Bright with the fame of it, 
ROBERT BOND, boast of his land and compeers. 




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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



** Clx O'Donel Memorial Rail. 



By James M. Kent, B.A., K.C. 



E* 

K**i 




the month of February, 1906, the Benevolent Irish 
Society will celebrate the One Hundreth Anniversary 
of its foundation. It is proposed by the Society and 
its friends and admirers, to honour the event in a 
manner suited to the occasion and in keeping with its 
glorious records and traditions. When the centenary 
year comes round a time will be devoted to jubiliation 
and rejoicing, and the great deeds and illustrious names that 
brighten the pages of its history will be brought prominently 
before men's minds. This is as it should be. No institution in 
this Colony deserves more honour and gratitude from our people 
than does this venerable Society. It has been the pioneer of 
our social, charitable and intellectual advance ever since, and 
long previous to, the time when the Colony developed a definite 
political existence. In the beginning of the last century the 
people of the Colony made their first efforts to build up, for 
their protection and comfort, those various institutions which 
form the great help-mates to civilization. Previously religi- 
; ous intolerance, self interest and prejudice had combined their 
harmful influences to create discord amongst the residents and 
to destroy all attempts to establish a settled government in the 
: Island. With the opening years of the New Century a better 
. feeling prevailed, brought about partly by a more intimate know- 
ledge of the country and its resources, and still more by a relaxa- 
tion of those cruel penal laws which disgraced the annals of the 
previous century, and an effort was made to ameliorate the sad 
condition of affairs which existed, and to draw the inhabitants into 
a closer bond of citizenship. Foremost amongst the champions in 
this struggle to elevate the life of the people were the Irish immi- 
grants who forced by persecution and injustice to fly from home 
had sought in Newfoundland an Asylum in which they might 
enjoy security and rest. These immigrants found in their new 
home men of their own race, such as Bishop O'Donel, Lieut.- 
Col. John Murray and Jas. McBraire, with warm and generous 
Celtic enthusiasm, striving to improve the temporal, moral and 
social condition of the inhabitants. It is to this generous spirit 
of benevolence that the Benevolent Irish Society owes its origin. 
It has been said that all History is development. This is true 
to a pre-eminent degrees of the history of the Benevolent Irish 
Society, it was erected by its noble founders upon " firm prin- 
ciples of loyalty, true benevolence and philantrophy " and its 
history has been a steady development of these eternal princi- 
ples. At the time of its foundation the most pressing claims on 
its resources were those which arose from material distress. A 
system of charitable relief was devised for the purpose of caring 
for orphan or neglected children, for helping the aged, the 
infirm and distressed and for encouraging the industrious. 
Some twenty years later when other institutions, of more recent 
origin, had lessened the burdens of the Society in this direction, 
it was resolved to devote its energies mainly to educating the 
poor children of the city. A grant was obtained from the 
Imperial Government of the land on which St. Patrick's Hall 
now stands. The old "Orphan Asjlum" was erected in the 
year 1827, and schools were opened there in the same year. 
This building will be remembered by most of the citizens of 
St. John's. It was one of the finest buildings in the city at the 
time and was built entirely of wood. It is thus described by 
His Grace Archbishop Howley in his " Ecclesiastical History 
'of Newfoundland." 

" It had some pretensions to architecture, having a- fanciful 
" central tower and portico called 'The Observatory.' It was 
" at the time of its erection considered one of the neatest 
" buildings in the city and was much admired by the typical 
" ' Out-Harbour Man ' on his annual visit to the Capital. The 
" upper portion of the building the grand banqueting Hall, 



" where for half a century sons of St. Patpick held their yearly 
" dinners, balls and reunions. The lower portion of the build- 
" ing was devoted to teaching of poor children." In this build- 
ing the schools of the Society were carried on for over fifty years. 
Originally non-denominational, the teaching in the schools early, 
by the exertions of Bishop Fleming, became denominational and 
Catholic. The Society itself although remaining non-sectarian 
in theory had long previously become in reality a Catholic Body. 
The teaching was conducted by lay teachers with the exception 
of a short interval from 1847 to 1853 when it was under the 
direction of a Branch of the Brothers of the Order of St. Francis 
from Galway, until the introduction of the Christian Brothers 
fom Ireland in 1876. 

The arrival of the Christian Brothers gave fresh life to the 
schools, and in a very few years the effect of their work was 
felt throughout the whole educational system in the Colony. 
The Christian Brothers were and are recognised throughout 
the world as being among the first educators of the day. 
What they have done for the lifting up and improvement of 
their youthful charges is well known to the people of Newfound- 
land and to others who have followed their progress in Ireland 
and in foreign lands where the Brothers have established them- 
selves. For themselves or their work they seek no earthly praise 
or pay. Their only recompense is the success of their charit- 
able mission and to see their boys turn out good, sober and 
industrious citizens. 

This union of the Society and the Brothers is a singularly 
happy one. Brought into existence about the same time and 
for the same object, namely, the elevation of the children of the 
poor from the utter neglect and degradation in which the cruel 
penal laws of the eighteenth century had forced them, they 
united their purpose in this city to its everlasting profit and 
advantage. 

When the Brothers settled to their work the old " Orphen 
Asylum," through age and lack of proper accomadation, was 
found unsuited to the new conditions. It was accordingly deter- 
mined to erect a more spacious and modern building. This 
resolve soon took definite form. Subscriptions came in gener- 
ously, and in the year 1880 St. Patrick's Hall was completed and 
school opened there by the Brothers. Everyone in the city is 
familiar with St. Patrick's Hall. It is one of our most striking 
buildings. Standing immediately under the Cathedral, it can be 
seen from every part of the city and harbour. It was designed 
almost exclusively with a view to school accommodation. The 
class rooms were planned under the directions of the Christian 
Brothers on highly scientific principles to obtain the very best 
method of securing the health and comfort of the numerous 
scholars who attend there. To effect this the building had to 
bp narrowed and the large hall upstairs made less spacious than 
it otherwise would have been, but this drawback is more than 
compensated for in the lightsome, airy and healthy class rooms 
in which the schools are conducted. 

After twenty-five years of prosperous life these class rooms 
are found to be too small to satisfy the ever increasing demand 
for admission to the schools. The centenary of the Society is 
approaching and the members have determined to mark the 
occassion by adding to the number of their schools. They will 
erect a new building on the grounds of the Society which, while 
it will provide sufficient space to meet all applicants for admis- 
sion to the schools of the Brothers, will also stand as a loving 
tribute to the memory or the earliest benefactor and friend of 
the Society. The new building will be erected to the memory 
of the late Bishop O'Donel, the pioneer, the first Bishop and 
organizer of the Catholic Church in Newfoundland and the 
great apostle of education, religion and charity in the Island. 
It will be located to the Eastward of and adjoining St. Patrick's 
Hall and will contain at least two class rooms of the same style 
and proportions as those in the Hall itself. A room will also be 



IO 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



aside for technical education, where the boys will be taught the 
use of mechanical tools, and learn to respect manual labour and 
to engage therein with skill and success, if such be their lot in 
life. The building will be neat and handsome, will be tastefully 
designed by one of the best architects in the city, and be known 
as " The O'Donel Memorial Hall " in honour of the good 
Bishop. 

The movement is meeting with a most generous support from 
the members and friends, and promises to equal, if not exceed, 
the many noble works accomplished in the past by this Society. 
The enthusiasm with which the project was taken was shown at 
the meeting of the Society at which the undertaking was deter- 
mined upon when no less than $5,380.00 were subscribed in less 
than one hour. The work is now well commenced. A most 
energetic Committee has charge of it, and the first earth was 
broken and the undertaking blessed by His Grace Archbishop 
Howley on Wednesday, 2oth day of April last. The laying of 
the foundation stone will take place during the Spring with be- 
coming ceremony and the formal opening will be an event in 
the Centenary Celebration of the Society in the year 1906. 

In deciding to erect this new hall to the memory of the good and 
saintly Bishop O'Donel the members of the Society have shown 
a wise and just appreciation of the foundation and history of 
the Institution. Any one who reads the story of the formation 
of the body and is at all familiar with local circumstances at that 
time must know that were it not for the good will and co-oper- 
ation of the Bishop the Society could not have been established 
on the safe and permanent basis upon which it was erected. 
His aid and assistance was solicited from the very first. At the 
first meeting of the promoters, before any plan or modus oper- 
andi was decided on it was resolved " to consult with Right 
" Revd. Dr. O'Donel and others whose local knowledge of this 
country could best inform them" of the line they ought to 
pursue. In writing to Chief Justice Tremlett on February i2th, 
1806 to inform him, as Chief Magistrate, of the institution and 
objects of the Society, the founders cite Bishop O'Donel as 
being practically sponsor for the Society. He recommended it 
to the members of his congregation and exhorted them to 
support it by every means in their power. When the constitu- 



tion was adopted and the first officers elected on iyth February, 
1806. Bishop O'Donel occpuied the chair, and having thus 
watched over and completed the organization of the Society, he 
sent it forth on its career under the sanction of his episcopal 
approval and good will. He was made a permanent honourary 
Member of the Committee of Charity, at that time the most 
active Committee connected with the Society. When he left 
this country in July, 1807, he had the satisfaction to see his fav 
orite institution already firmly implanted in the hearts of citizens 
of every denomination and nationality. The members were not 
forgetful of the great services he had rendered to the Society 
and on the eve of his departure the President by the unanimous 
instruction of the members wrote to His Lordship as follows : 

ST. JOHN'S, July 20, 1807. 

SIR, " As President of the Benevolent Irish Society, the pleasing task 
devolves to me to express to you the unanimous sentiments of respect 
and esteem that the Society so justly feel for you. Embarked in the 
cause of humany we could not fail meeting with your hearty support ; the 
respectability of your name, the force of your example, the steady and 
firm support you have given to this infant institution is the best proof 
that can be offered of the propriety of the principles upon which it is 
founded, we shall ever look to your name on our records with pride and 
pleasure. When memory will retrace to us your many virtues our prayers 
will be offered for your health and happiness in this world; and we rest 
assured that the blessed reward of a pious and well spent life awaits you 
in that which is to come. 

" W. TONGK, President B. I. Society. 
" To the Right Revd. Dr. James O'Donel." 

It is gratifying to see that the esteem and respect thus ex- 
pressed by the first President of the Society still lives in hearts 
of the members and that they, after one hundred years, are about 
to erect the "O'Donel Memorial Hall" in loving and permanent 
remembrance of its great and earliest benefactor and founder. 

This action of the Benevolent Irish Society will commend 
itself to all our citizens. The memory of Bishop O'Donel is 
held in great reverence by them all as the pioneer of religious, 
civil and political freedom in the Colony. The influence of his 
gentleness, tact and his saintly life dispelled the ignorance and 
prejudice that marked the Fighteenth Century and brought 
about that more charitable sentiment of enlightenment and unity 
which is embodied in the above letter of President Tonge. 




Placentia R. R. Station Strikers Awaiting Arrival of Train. 



I. ING the past winter the men at work on the loading of the Reid 
steamers, considering that the amount of wages they were 
I was not adequate to the work, the latter being very hard and 
Deluding night work, struck for higher pay. For a time things 
>nous, for the men-thongh not at all riotous or >iolent-were very 
They threatened to prevent the railway train from leaving the 
on, and thus " hung up" all traffic for a week. A squad of Police were 



sent on from St. John's, but their services were not required, as matters 
had been satisfactorily arranged in the meantime. Our engraving is 
from a "snap" taken by the Very Rev. Father St. John, P.P. of Argentia, 
The " strikers" are evidently not of a " rowdy" or " hoodlum" class, and the 
Police seem to fraternize quite cosily with them. Nevertheless, we should 
not wish to see a return of such strikes, for the men are not persons to be 
trifled with. 






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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



ClK Cabot Club Committee. 




- - have much pleasure in presenting in our current 
9 number, a large photo.-engraving of the Excursion 
Committee of the Cabot Club of Boston, together 
with some short biographical notes of the various 
members. As our readers know the Club is com- 
posed exclusively of Newfoundlanders residing in 
Boston, and gets its name from the discoverer of 
our Island. Its object is the mutual benefit of its members 
financially and socially. It will be observed from the notes 
supplied that they are all doing well, either holding responsible 
positions, in well known business firms, or doing business on 
their own account. The Club has taken the initiative in Boston 
in organizing the Old Home Week movement, and all the signs 
point to the fact that their efforts will be crowned with abundant 
success. They have entered into the movement with great en- 
thusiasm, and our local Committee has met them more than 
half way. Elsewhere we publish the Programme of our Local 
Committee and some notes of the proposed Celebration. To 
the Cabot Club is due all the praise for the initiation and suc- 
cess of the movement. Judging by the correspondence of the 
QUARTERLY with the Committee, they have devoted much time 
and thought to make the movement a success, and this is especi- 
ally, true of Mr. Moulton, the President. He has been untiring 
in his exertions, and for one who is kept so close to business he 
has found time to do a lot of work in connection with the Old 
Home Week. These are a few of the Newfoundlanders who 
have succeeded in the United States. Of course there are 
thousands of others who have achieved success, many of whom 
we will have the pleasure of greeting during the coining season. 

A. MOULTON (President) was born at Pouch Cove, St. John's 
East, Dec. 13, 1861, and received his early training there. For 
many years he was engaged as a dry goods clerk in St. John's, 
but went to Boston, August, 1893. He was first employed in 
the dry goods business from Sept., 1893, to March, 1894. He 
then engaged in real estate until February, 1895. Mr. Moulton 
was very prominent in raising the Boston fund at the time of 
our bank crash, and was appointed by Mayor Curtis, of Boston, 
as deputy treasurer of the fund. He attended to all correspond- 
ence, and gave much valuable time and assistance without re- 
muneration. In March, 1895, he re-entered the dry goods busi- 
ness, and in 1897 was engaged as buyer of dress goods, silks, 
velvets, etc., by Messrs. W. & A. Bacon, the oldest dry goods 
store in Boston, which position he still holds. He organized a 
mutual benefit association in connection with his fellow em- 
ployes, and so successful has it become that its members, during 
s'ckness or disability do not suffer the loss of an hour's pay. 
He is at present Secretary and Financial Secretary of the W. & 
A. Bacon Employees Benefit Association ; Vice-President of the 
Boston Dry Goods Clerks' Benefit Association ; a member of 
tie Boston Terra Nova Association, and an Ex-President of the 
Newfoundlanders' Mutual Benefit Association. Mr. Moulton 
takes a great interest in everything in connection with New- 
foundland, and we have to thank him for his kind interest in the 
QUARTERLY and the list of subscribers forwarded by him. 

DENNIS J. CANTWELL (Secretary) was born at St. John's, 
Newfoundland, in 1866, and was educated at St. Bonaventure's 
College. In the early years of his manhood he was engaged as 
a school-teacher, and was stationed at Kelligrews for three years, 
and at Riverhead, St. John's, for another three years. After 
giving up school-teaching in Newfoundland he went to Boston, 
and for sixteen years was a salesman in the upholstering depart- 
ment of Jordan, Marsh Co, He is now with Shepard, Norwell 
Co., and is a well-known Newfoundlander in the " Hub." Mr. 



Cantwell was nine years Financial Secretary of the Newfound- 
landers' Mutual Benefit Association, and for the last three years a 
Trustee of the same Association, which office he holds at present. 

DENNIS WALSH (Treasurer) was born at Carbonear, Oct. i, 
1858, where he received his education. While in Newfoundland 
he was engaged in the fisheries. He left Newfoundland in 1884 
and worked as a core maker since arriving in Boston. For the 
past fourteen years he has been employed by Messrs. Gurney 
& Sons, East Boston. He is a member of the Catholic Order 
of Foresters, and Boston Terra Nova Association. Mr. Walsh 
is a very efficient workman and a genial companion. He is 
highly esteemed by his brother Newfoundlanders, as also by his 
employers. He was married in 1891 to an American lady. 

M. J. SMART was born at St. John's, February, 1850, and 
received his education at St. John's and Harbor Grace. He 
started as a seaman, and left Newfoundland for the first time in 
1870. Returning in 1874, he sailed out of John Munn & Co.'s 
employ, Harbor Grace, as mate for seven years, and as master 
of the brigt. Rarenwood, brigt. Rescue, schr. Edward Albro, and 
for five years in the brigt. Arctic. He left Newfoundland, July 
4th, 1888, for Boston, and is at present an employe of the City 
Government. Captain Smart was well known in Harbor Grace. 

J. P. MCCORMACK was born at St. John's, March 8, 1845, 
and was educated in his native town. He was first engaged as 
a fisherman, but left Newfoundland, May 20, 1866, for Boston. 
Thirty-three years ago he was selected foreman and head ship- 
per at John P. Squire & Co.'s packing house, and still holds 
that position. Mr. McCormack was elected to the Common 
Council, City of Cambridge, 1883 and 1884. He was appointed 
to the Board of Registrars of Voters by the Mayor and Alder- 
men, City of Cambridge, for the term beginning May, 1900, and 
ending May, 1904. He was re-appointed to the same Board 
for the term ending May 1908. 

R. J. OLLERHEAD was born at Heart's Content, October 3rd, 
1864, and was educated at the above town. He took a hand 
in the fisheries in his own country, but on arriving at Lynn, 
Mass., April 28th, 1891, he went to work in the Thompson- 
Houston Electric Light Works, He worked there for about 
four months. He then went to work in the Union Wheelwright 
Shop, Boston, and has been working there ever since, which 
would make his term of serving them thirteen years. He 
started in as a learner and is now head blacksmith, having been 
so for the past five years. 

F. A. SULLIVAN was born at Pouch Cove, May 15, 1866, 
and received his education there. In early manhood he was 
engaged at various works at home, but on arriving in Boston he 
went to work as shipping clerk in the wholesale grocery business 
of L. Pickert & Co. He left that employ March 6, 1891, and 
started for himself in the retail grocery business. His store is 
at 65 Lamartin Street, Jamaica Plain, Boston, and he is very 
successful in business. 

WM. WINSOR was born at Carbonear, February 6, 1863. 
He received his early training at Carbonear, and went to night 
school in Chelsea, Mass. While his home was in Newfoundland 
he was a fisherman and mariner. He left St. John's, Nov. 6, 
1886, for United States. Arriving at Chelsea he learned the 
stone-cutting trade and worked at it for seven years. Ten years 
ago he bought the store he occupies at present and is doing an 
ever increasing business. He keeps in his store, besides fine 
groceries and provisions, Newfoundland codfish, caplin and sal- 
mon, which he gets from Carbonear. He also handles our hard 
bread and excursion bread, and gets it from the Rennie Baking 
Co. Four years ago he ran for Alderman, but was defeated 
by a small majority. 

JAMES J. MCAULIFFE'S portrait and notes appears on page 4 
of this issue. We had the above in our possession long before 
we received the plate of group. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



K. E. YOUNG was born at Heart's Content, March n, 1871, 
and was educated at that town. He was engaged in general, 
business while iri Newfoundland. Arriving in Boston the 22nd 
of Nov., 1900, he went to work for the Prudential Life Ins. Co. 
the following February. After twelve months he went to work 
for S. B. Yerxa, wholesale and retail grocer. He worked for 
him six months, and then went with Houghton & Dutton, one 
of the largest department stores in the city. After six months 
with H. & D. he got a position with L. J. VVyzanski, E. Boston, 
and is now in charge of the domestic department. 

HENRY A. RENDELL was born at Heart's Content in 1865, 
and received his education there. He learned the trade of 
blacksmith and left Newfoundland in 1891. Since leaving 
Newfoundland he has been most successful. He worked first 
as foreman blacksmith with the firm of VV. II. Swett, Lynn, 
Mass. In 1897 he returned to St. John's and opened business 
on King's Road. Business being dull in his line (electro-plating) 
at that particular time he left Newfoundland a year later. Since 
1898 he has been employed as foreman in the works of the 
New England Bolt & Nut Co.. Boston. Mr. Renclell is identified 
with the following societies: Masonic Order (i 5 degrees), Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, and Order of Sons of St. George. 

J. F. DKMI'SKV was born at Si. John's, June 24, 1848. and 
lived at Chapel Lane for some time. He received a part of his 
education at the Orphan Asylum, and finished -at Ed. Roche's 
school. He left Newfoundland in August, 1864, and arrived in 
Bsston after fourteen days' sailing. His trade is that of a wood 
carver and modeler, and some of his work can be seen at Saint 
Mary's Catholic Church in Charlestown, Mass. The figures 
that he carved for the above church are classical size ^150 feet 
of lumber in one figure; the wings on the figure, 5 feet from tip 
to tip ; on the breast of the figure are the Emblems of the 
Crucifixion. His work can also be seen at the State House in 
Boston, in the Reading Room of the Senate, and in some of the 
best houses in Boston and all over the State. 

B. T. SHORT was born June 25111, 1867, at Hani's Harbor, 
and was educated at the Wesleyan Academy, St. John's. He 
left Newfoundland in 1888. and on arriving in Boston he secured 
a position as dry goods clerk with Jordan, Marsh Co., which he 
held for ten years. About two years ago he started business for 
himself, and deals in society goods, emblems, flags, banners, etc. 
Previous to leaving Newfoundland, with the exception of one 
year with the old firm of Finlay, Eraser & Co., he helped his 
father (John Short) with Irs business at Hant's Harbor. He 
married Miss Naomi A. Parsons, of Harbor Grace, six years 
ago, and has two girls and one boy. He is very successful in 
business, and visited his old home about six years ago. 

MARTIN M. BREEN was born in St. John's, and left New- 
foundland with the family for Boston in 1870 when but six and 
a half years old. He is a graduate of the Lawrence Grammar 
School in South Boston. His present position is superin- 
tendent of H. A. Johnson's, wholesale preservers' and brokers' 
suppliers. He has been President of the Boston Terra Nova 
Association for the past three years; and is Vice-President 
of the Prospect Club, one of the leading social organizations 
of Somerville, Massachusetts; also a member of Division 51, 
A. O. H., and past President of same; member of Mr\\ No. 45, 
Fraternal Order of Eagles; Chairman of.Somerville Democratic 
Committee; member of Knights of Columbus, and several other 
social organizations. Mr. Breen is a son of the late Capt. Robt. 
Breen, who commanded some of the largest sealing vessels 
before the advent of steamers, notably the brig Contest. He 
married Anne M. Deady, of St. John's, daughter of Thomas 
Deady of Springdale Street, and has six children living. He 
polled the largest Democratic vote that was evei given to a 
candidate for Alderman in Somerville, at the last election for 
his Ward. 

PETER J. SHORTALL was born at St. John's West, and was 
educated at the Old Orphan Asylum. He served his apprentice- 
ship at J. & W. Stewart's cooperage, where his father was fore- 
man for several years. He left Newfoundland in 1887, but 
nsited St. John's a short while ago. He was President of the 
Boston Terra Nova Association one of the oldest Newfound- 
land Societies in the United States from 1892 to 1897 Mr 



Shortall is well known in Boston and St. John's, being a brothef 
-of x \V. PX Shortall, Water Street. . 

T. M. DALTON, although not born in Newfoundland, spent 
so many of his earliest years here, that we may claim him as 
one of us. He was educated in St. John's and served his time 
as cooper with Mr. John Byrne, who did an extensive business 
on Cochrane Street before the fire of '92. He left for Boston 
about eighteen years ago, and has since held a responsible posi- 
tion as master cooper in his adopted city. He is now about 
forty-eight years old. He is brother of our esteemed fellow- 
townsmen Messrs. P. J. Dalton (Marshall Bros.), and J, Dalton 
(T. & M. Winter). " Tom" is well and kindly remembered by 
numbers of old " Mall Boys," who made the " Mall" their head- 
quarters about twenty years ago. 

T. H. SHAW formerly belong to St. John's West, but we are 
unable to get any particulars up td the time of going to press. 

M. E. SMART (not in the picture through sickness) was born 
at Harbor Grace, in 1873, and was educated at St. John's. He 
was a painter by trade, and left Newfoundland in 1890. Mr, 
Smart worked at the painting since arriving in Boston, and has 
been very successful at his business. 

T. F. KEVIN was away when photo, was taken. 




CAPE RACE. 



Bp the Sea, ** 



By Eros Wayback. 
A DOWN by the refluent sea, 
^*- O'er whose breast the white gulls soar ; 
Now, I watch them circling free, 
A stroll by the pebbly shore. 

I glance where the blue waves throng, 

In a seething, white-capped foam ; 
Thundering a psalm-like song, 

By night, 'neath the glittering dome. 
How they chaunt in runic rhyme, 

Thro' the hours, in rhythmic speech; 
Marking the march of time, 

As they roll to the shining beach. 

What time the young stars gleam, 
Gemming the blue with their light; 

I roam by the strand and dream 
I hear her voice thro' the night. 

For, with me, she gathered of yore, 
Here, the tinted shells upthrown ; 

She hath passed to the further shore, 
And I stand watching alone. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Supreme Court of Newfoundland. 

List of Deputy Sheriffs. 



RESIDENCE. 



DISTRICTS. 



SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 



NAMKS. 



Ferryland 



Ferryland 

Mobile 

Kermeuse 

St. Jlary's 

Salmonier 

1'lacentia 

F'resque | 

Oderin 

Mat Island Burin 

Hurin 

St. 1 awrence 

.1 ,a\vn i 

l.-amaline 

Grand Bank 



IGeorye Geary. 

lohn T. I- it/ger;) 

I William Trainer. 

Placenlia and St. Mary's. M. Malmney. 

Francis K. Cmli 
A. Collins. 
1 homas Sullivar 
Peter Mannins;. 
1 Io\\ ai (1 Parsons 
Stephen \Vhitu. 
C vru*. He< k. >r. 
Joseph Muijihy. 
William G. I'iltr 
Kli Hani-. 



St. Jacques Fortune Hay 

Helleoram 

Pnshthrongh 

Harbor Hrelon 



Kunn-a 

Kose Hlani In- 

' 'h aim el 

( 'oclloy Si. ( 

( i I .Mill River 

Robinson'^ I lead 

Si. ( ieorye Sandy I't. . 

Wood's Island. . .' 

I'.ay of Islands 

Holine ! lav . . . 



William Grandy. 

lo^epii ( 'amp. 

Benjamin < hapman. 

Albeit Kelland. 
.... Matthew Na.-h. 
. . . . Prosper A. Garden. 
... . | James II. Wilcox. 

e I li'iny ( ;allo]>. 

Thomas H. Doyle. 

\brah.un Tilley. 

M. Iv Messervey. 

Simeon I ennex. 

Daniel I. Gilker. 

. . I leo. 1 lalfvard. 



NORTHERN DISTRICT. 



RESIDENCE. 



DISTRICTS. 



St. Anthony St. Harbe 

Conche " 

La Scie ! " 

Tilt Cove Twillingat e 

Little Bay " 

J.ittle Bay Islands 

1'illey's Island 

I .eading Tickles 

' New Bay 

Botwoodville 

Kxploits 

Lewis port 

T.willingate 

Moreton's Harbor. . . . 

Kogo 

Barr'd Island 

Seldom-Come- By .... 

Change Islands 

Gander Bay 

Musgrave Harbor. . . . 
I'inchard's Island .... 

Wesleyville 

Pool's Island 

Greenspond 

Glovertown 

Gambo 

B ooklyn 

Salvage 

Alexander Bay 

King's Cove 



\N ni. A . Toms. 
Constable T. Walsh. 
Thos. K. Wells 
! Vf er < 'ampbell. 
Thomas Kobe! Is. 
William I, aiming. 
1'e'ter Moores. 
I. T. liendle. 
George S. Lilly. 
Alfred G. Young. 
William Baird. 
Edward Bartlett. 
Ambrose Fii/gerald. 
' leorge I' osier. 
Philip I'evry. 
John 1'orler. 
Robert Pike. 
Adam "Bradley. 
Jacob Helferton. 
Win. Sainsbnry. 
Peter Roberts. 
Klijali Spurrel. 
Thomas W'ornelk 
Chailes Kean. 



Bonavista 

( 'a! alina -. . . 

Trinity 

Hoiun ent lire 

Northern Hight 

Hritannia Cox e 

Shoal Harbor 

< 'laren villc 

Foster's I'oinl 

Pay Bull's A rm 

\\ hitbou rne- 



l!ona\isla Noah Verge. 

Trinity Isa.n Manuel 

Kii hard Speni e. 

Xoah Miller. 

l-ldmond l!en-on 

k. Cnnie. 

Caleb Tuck. 

( icol^^e lanes. 

: Gt.uige Leawood. 

Thomas P. French. 

. . F.liel Noseworthv- 



Albert L. Howe. 
John Burden. 

Thomas Curtis. 



New Harbor - < jeorge Bussey. 

Heart's Content : " 'Charles Rendell. 

i Hani's Harbor ; " \. 'largelt. 

Old IV-rliean I'.ay de- \'erde Moses Bursey. 

Bay -de \ erde i Keiiben Curtis. 

Lower Island Cove I Kli Garland. 

Western Hay | I'-^en Kennedy. 

Carbonear .' Ic'arbunear l-lrnest Forward. 

Harbor Grace Harbor Grac- .John Trapnell. 

Spaniard's Hay | Jesie ( io.-se. 

Hay Roberts. '. . -\- Hieilihy. 

Krigus Port de-Grave P.enjamin Butler. 

Conception Harbor . . . Harbor Main William Cole. 

Harbor Main James Murphy. 

Holyrood ! William Malier. 

Middle Bight ' William Butler. 

Hell Isl'd Lance Cove. St. form's East John II. Ley. 

Bell Island Beach .... John H. Bennett. 

Portugal Cove Edward Harding. 



JAMES CARTER, Sheriff, Newfoundland. 
W. J. CARROLL, Sub-Sheriff, 



Thomas Smyth, 

Wholesale Dealer in 

Provisions, Groceries, fruit, Etc. 

Head McBride's Hill, Duckworth Street. St. John's, Nfld. 



To Wholesale Buyers only : 

For American Cotton Goods, 
Cotton and Wool Fonts, Remnants and Seconds, 
Top Shirts, Underwear, Sweaters, 

Place your order with 

W. A. SLATTERY, 

Wareroom: Seaman's Home Building. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



R. PHIPPARD, 

Contractor and Builder. 



All work in the Masonry line promptly and 
personally attended to. Estimates furnished 
on application. 

Address: 182 GOWER STREET. 



THING of BESUTY 

is a joy Forever, and there will now be joy in the hearts Of those who 
admire the beauties of the Art Photographic For we have now on 
sale something entirely new in that line ; 'tis the New Monochrome 
Photographic Views of Local Scenery, re-produced on silk, the most 
beautiful thing in Photography. We have in this series : 
Sunrise at Placentia, 80 cents ; Shell-Bird Island (Humber), 80 Cents ; 
At Pilley's Island, 80 cents ; Four Choice Bits of Scenery, 50 cents ; 
Off Cape Harrison, So cents ; Labrador Fishing Boats, 60 cents. 

We have Photos of choicest bits of Local Scenery finished by the new 
Monochrome process, mounted, 5oc. and 6oc. Photos of all that is most 
beautiful and interesting in Newfoundland and Labrador Scenery, mounted 
and unmounted, from 2oc. to $3. Newfoundland (Illustrated), an album 
of over 60 exceedingly handsome and representative views of Newfound- 
land and Labrador. Pictorial Post Cards of the City, The Narrows, Public 
Buildings, Icebergs, &c , 2oc. doz., 2C. each. 

DICKS & COMPANY, Popular Bookstore. 




j 



SPORT IN NEWFOUNDLAND. 



The Public are reminded that the 

Game Laws of Newfoundland, 

Provide that: 

No person shall pursue with intent to kill any Caribou from 

the ist day of February to the 315! day of July, or from the 1st day of 

October to the 2Oth October in any year. And no person shall 

kill or take more than two Stag and one Doe Caribou in any one year. 

No person is allowed to hunt or kill Caribou within five miles of either 
side of the railway track from Grand Lake to Goose Brook, these limits 
being defined by gazetted Proclamation. 

No non-resident may hunt or kill Deer without previously having pur- 
chased and procured a License therefor. All guides must be licensed. 
Issued free to residents ; to non-residents costing fifty dollars. 

No person may kill, or pursue with intent to kill any Caribou with dogs, 

or with hatchet or any weapon other than fire-arms, or while 

crossing any pond, stream or water-course. 

Tinning or canning of Caribou meat is absolutely prohibited. 

No person may purchase, or receive any flesh of Caribou between 
January ist and July 3ist, in any year. 

Penalties for violation of these laws, a fine not exceeding two hundred 
dollars, or in default imprisonment not exceeding two months. 

No person shall hunt, or kill Partridges during the present year, or 
before ist October, 1905. After that period not before ist October or 
later than I2th January. Penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars 
or imprisonment. 

Any person who shall hunt Beaver, or export Beaver skins till October ist, 
1907, shall be liable to cofiscation of skins, and fine or imprisonment. 

And no person shall hunt Foxes from March icth to October 1 5th in 
any year, under the same penalties. 

T. J. MURPHY, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
May and, 



DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURE AMD MINES. 



NOTICE. 



TONSIDERABLE ALTERATION having 
V been made in the mode of securing Titles to 
Mining Locations by the Act passed during the 
last Session of the Legislature, parties interested 
can obtain copies of the said Act on application 
to the Department of Agriculture and Mines 
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. 

HON. ELI DAIVE, 

Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 

Department of Agriculture and Mines, 
September 22nd, 1903. 

P. J. HAINLEY,J 

Painter, Glazier, Paper Hanger 
and House Decorator . 

First Class Work in our line; prompt and particular attention given to 
Outport Contracts. 

Always on hand HANLEY'S celebrated brands of Snuffs. 

Outport orders thankfully received. 
N.B.--We employ a staff of expert mechanics, who execute work with neatness and despatch 

Address t No. 5 King's Road. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



INT ERNATIONAL 



The Worlds Verdict -The Walk-over Shoe Stands Every Test" 




JACKMAN the TAILOR, Sole Agent for Nfld, 



BAZAAR .# 

(Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor.) 

IN AID OF THE RESTORATION OF THE ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL, 



THE: 



BRITISH HALL, Sept. 27, 28, 29, 30. 

President Mrs. Bowring 

I Mrs. Gosling, Mrs. M. Winter 
Vice-Presidents ...} Miss Browning 

Secretary Miss Hutchinson 

Assistant Secretary Mrs. W. C. Job 

Treasurer Mrs. J. A. Clift 

Assistant Treasurer. . . .Mrs. P. F. LeMessurier 



STALLS: 



GENERAL NOVELTY Mrs. Bowring 

FANCY Mrs. Gosling and Miss Browning 

PLAIN WORK Mrs. Martin 

HANDKERCHIEFS Mrs. Albert Martin 

TOY Mrs. M. Winter 

JUMBLE Mrs. John LeMessurier 

REFRESHMENT Mrs. McCoubrey 

FRUIT, FLOWER AND VEGETABLES. .Mrs. G. Bolt 

CANDY Mrs. Anderson 

TEA TABLES Mrs. E. H. Davey, Mrs. George Davey, 
Mrs. McCowen, Mrs. Hoare, Mrs. Carnell and Mrs. Sleater. 



MURPHY,^ 

West End Hair Dresser* 



Hair Cutting, Shaving and refreshing Sea Foam. 

Water Street, West, 

Opposite Angel Engineering & Supply Go's. Store. 

The "Duckworth" 
Hair-Dressing Parlor! : 

For an up-to-date Hair Cut or Shave, call 
at the " Duckworth" Hair-Dressing Parlor. 

I F. McGUIRE, Proprietor, 

200 Duckworth Street, - East of " Waverly Hotel." 



Job Printing neately executed at 34 Prescott Street. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND .QUARTERLY. 



Telephone: Office 131, Store 345. 



P. 0. B. 275. 



L H. i 0. DAVEY, 



III BOND STREET. 



Contractors, Builders, and 
Dealers in Building Materials. 



WhARr & STORES : JOB'S COVE. 



/. I/. A 7- V/; A.(' 



FURLOXG &> KENT, 

+ * * 
BARRISTERS and SOLICITORS. 

DUCKWORTH STREET, A'/'. JOHN'S. 



GESR & CO., 

Headquarters for.. 

Marbleized Mantelpieces, English and 
American Tiled Grates, Tiled Hearths, 

Fancy lirass and Iron Kerbs, 
Fire Brasses, Dogs, Stops, 
and cither Artistic Grate 
and 1 1 earth Furnishings. 

349 Wafer Street. 349 



LEGAL CARD. 



I'. J. MORRIS, K.C., 

i Kiinbcrlcv Rms, St. Jo/nis, Newfoundland. 

TEi.j'.riioxi-:. NO. 266.. 



Phenix Insurance Co. 

Of Brooklyn, New York. 

frrjnnsurances effected at lowest Current Kates of Premium on 
all kinds of properly in Newfoundland. 

A. 0. HAYWARD, A'.C., 

./!,'(/// for Newfoundland. 

$4_A_ MONTH 

Is not very much for a voting man of 20 to put 
aside out of his salary, but if invested with the 
CONFEDERATION LIFE it will give 

To his family, if he dies before age 40, - - $1000.00 
To himself, if he Hues to age 40, from - - $1 159.00 

to $1372.00 
according to plan selected. 

Insure early, while your health is good. 
You will get your money back earlier in life, 
when you can use it better. 

C O'N. CONROY, 



PROGRAMME 

for Old Home Week festivities 

^ At St. John's. ^t 



MONDAY, AUGUST 1st. 

AFTERNOON Reception of visitors by Committee. 
EVENING General illuminations and bonfires, with band 
concerts in both Parks. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 2nd. 

FORENOON Labor Parade. AFTERNOON Athletic 
sports. NIGHT Theatrical performances in the different 
halls. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3rd. 

ALL DAY Regatta, with its accompanying amusement, 
at Quidi Vidi Lake. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST Ath. 

FORENOON Naval Review. AFTERNf )( )N -Garden 
Party in Bannerman Park. NIGHT Grand Ball in Prince's 
Rink. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 5th. 

Outing by rail to Topsail and other popular places of resort 
around Conception Bay. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6th. 

No special attraction arranged for to-day, but Smoking 
Concerts in Club rooms and halls at night. 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



1 1 1 1 



Law Chambers, St. John's. 



GENERAL AGENT. 



E. P. MORRIS, Chairman Committee. 
ALEX. A. PARSOXS, .SVr ' " 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Welcome to Our Visiting fellow Coumrpmen 

From Hon. E. P. Morris, K.C., LL.D., Attorney General, 
Chairman Old Home Week Committee. 






11 BREATHES there the man, with soul so dead, 
\Vho never to himself hath said; 

' This is my own my native land ;' 
Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned 
As home his footsteps he hath turned 

From wandering on a foreign strand." 

were so kind, Mr. Editor, in asking me to write 
something for the "Old Home Week" part of the 
June issue of the NEWFOUNDLAND QUAKTKKT.Y that 
I really find it impossible to refuse you. The diffi- 
culty, however, is great to select some subject which 
may prove of interest to at least some of your readers, 
and, at the same time, one which has not already 
been written threadbare. Natur- 
ally the subject uppermost in 
our minds is the " Old Home 
Week." 

In the early days of the coming 
month of August we hope to have 
some hundreds of the sons and 
daughters of Newfoundland revisit 
their old home. Such an auspici- 
ous occasion, bringing as it does 
together brother and sister, father 
and son, mother and child, awakens 
feelings and sentiments difficult to 
describe. In this re-union thou- 
sands will meet who have not met 
for years ; the past and present 
will be bridged over; the friend- 
ships of by-gone days will be re- 
newed, and new pledges will be 
made to kindle and keep alive at 
home and abroad the love for the 
dear old land ; for 

i 

" She is a rich and rare land, 
Oh she is a fresh and fair land, 
She is a dear and rare land, 
This native land of mine." 




But whilst our re-union will have 
its joys it will also have its sorrows. 
For many of those who will return 
there will be a vacant chair more 
than a vacant chair for some the old homestead will have been 
dismantled, and a more pretentious mansion will have taken its 
place ; it may be that the loved ones who in the years gone by 
sat round the Christmas fire and listened to the Christmas tale 
will have passed away, and other faces and other forms will now 
call it home : 

" The mossy marbles rest 

On the lips that he has pressed 

In their bloom ; 

And the names he loved to hear 
Have been carved for many a year 

On the tomb." 

Rejoicing, however, in the main will triumph. Gladness will 
vanquish sorrow. Amidst all the causes for joy for our guests 
will be the permanent improvement in the country the marked 



HON. E. P. MORRIS, K.C., LL.D., 

His Majesty's Attorney General for Newfoundland, 

Chairman of Old Home Week Committee. 



prosperity of its trade, and the comfort and happiness of its 
people. What will strike our visitor most is the contrast be- 
tween the country he left and the country he is now visiting. 
Not even Canada, phenomenal as has been the development of 
late years, can boast of greater strides than Newfoundland 
since 1890. Notwithstanding that our people have had to re- 
cover, during the past fourteen years, the disastrous effects of 
the trade and bank crash of 1894, our trade has in the same 
period nearly trebled; and our total trade, which in 1890 was 
not more than $8, 000,000, to-day is nearly $20,000,000. 

Each year for the past five years has witnessed a reduction of 
fixation i,i favor uf the working classes lines and twines, salt, 

molasses, flour, kerosene oil, and 
farming and mining implements, 
representing a reduction of $250,- 
ooo, have all been placed upon the 
free list, and still the revenue in- 
creases, and keeps on i: creasing. 

At the last session of the Legis- 
lature the Government was enabled 
to reduce taxation $180,000 on the 
necessaries of life; and the Gov- 
ernment who next meet Parliament 
will have a surplus which \\ill en- 
able them to still further reduce 
taxation by another quarter of a 
million dollars. In other words 
the Government will be able to say 
to every workingman in the Colony 
" you have now a free breakfast 
table, the coat on your back pays 
no duty, and you have higher wages, 
shorter hours, and cheaper and 
better food than you ever had be- 
fore." And the friends who visit 
us will want to know the cause of 
this wonderful prosperity. Our 
answer must be; If you seek the 
causes look around. Previous to 
1890, we carried all our eggs in 
the one basket, we had nothing 
but the fisheries to depend on, and 
when they failed, it was starvation or emigration. Now, through 
the agency of the railway by the " policy of progress," carried 
out for the past fourteen years the country has been opened 
up. Our vast wealth in minerals, timber and fisheries, has 
become known, and is being developed by home and foreign 
capital. Our people are employed, and are just beginning to 
feel the benefits which flow from a living wage. The earning 
powers of our people have been increased two-fold. No man 
need now be idle. The winter season, formerly one of enforced 
idleness, is now one of our busiest periods ; and the hum of in- 
dustry in the milling and lumbering camps, and in the brick- 
yard and slate quarries is now as familiar as the busy scenes of 
fish-making in the spring and autumn months. 

When many of our visitors left us in the sixties, it was the 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



custom in St. John's for a man to work from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. for 
70 cts., and for 60 cts. if he went to work after breakfast. Now 
this is all changed. No employer would now offer any labourer 
less than $1.00 per day: and thousands of mechanics and 
labourers are receiving from $1.50 to $-2.50 per day. And we 




FORT AMHKRST ENTRANCE TO ST. JOHN S. 

Photo, by James I'ey. 

are only on the threshold of improvement. Employers of labour 
are beginning to recognize that labor has its rights as well as 
capital that capital and labour is a partnership necessary for 
the production of the wealth and development of a country ; 
and that when the profits of this union, this marriage, this part- 
nership, are large and certain, they should not all ;,o to the credit 



of one of the partners, but that the labourer, who is as necesSafy 1 
as the capitalist, should have his share. Does he receive this 
when he is paid one dollar per day, or say $300 per year? Can 
he feed his wife and little children, and keep them decently clad, 
and give them warmth, and schooling, and pay rent out of this ? 
I hardly think he can, and I fancy that those who seriously re-- 
fleet, must see that in the past a great injustice has been done to 
the labouring classes by the miserably low rate of wages they 
have been paid. In 1887 the Government of the day did not 
consider they were doing anything very extraordinary when 
they fixed the rate to be paid labourers on public works a 
thirty cents per day. The public records show this ; but what . 
would be thought of a Government to-day who would pay even 
the ordinary labourer anything less than one dollar for his day's 
work ; and the time has nearly arrived when no ordinary labour 3 
ing man will be offered less than $1.50 per day, and this wages 
will only give him, say at 300 working days, about $450 per 
year. When that day arrives we shall have less strikes and less 
dissatisfaction. Men will take a greater interest in their work, 
and confidence will be restored between employer and employed. 
The labouring man will be looked on as something more than a 
mere machine a bond of sympathy will be created between 
labor and capital, and the employer, when he looks at his own 
healthy, well-fed, well-clad children, will not be ashamed to look 
on the children, of those who work in his employ. 

And thus the good work will go on, and when another Old 
Home Week comes around, and our friends again visit us, 
they will see new contrasts and new improvements, but they 
will be contrasts and improvements which will have no painful 
side to them. They will all represent advancement and progress, 
a policy whose every tendency will be upwards a new and 
abiding hope will have been implanted into the breasts of our 
people, and they will go forth to their labor with real genuine 
satisfaction. It will be a labor of love, because there will be 
no grievance because they will feel that they are fully paid for 



their labor 



Men my- brothers, men the workers 
Ever reaping something new ; 

That which they have done, but earnest 
Of the things that they shall do. 




Photo, by James 



PETTY HARBOR IN THE DISTRICT OF ST. JOHN'S WEST, 



Ti-fE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



BisDop 




College. 




College, as the institution of higher education tot 
the Church of England in Newfoundland, originated 
i" 1851, partly out of a private school maintained by 
Bishop Feild and partly out of a General Academy 
which was started in 1846 and maintained by the 
Government. Its existence as a special institution for the Church 
of England was due to the efforts of the Bishop. A grant was 
voted it by the Legislature and it was placed under the control 
of five Directors. For some time the work was conducted in 
part of a house called Avalon, on Forest Road. In 1858 the 




AT KINDERGARTEN WORK, 

present spacious and central site was secured and the substantial 
brick building forming the centre and west wing of the present 
suite of buildings was erected. By 1876 the Directors found the 
accommodation insufficient and built the plain wooden structure 
which serves now as the Gymnasium, to afford extra room for 
the time being. This seems to have answered the needs of the 
school for the next sixteen years. 

In 1891 the present Headmaster, W. W. Blackall, B.A. of the 
University of London, was appointed to take charge of the 
school. He came well recommended from England, and in a 
short time the number attending the school increased to such an 
extent that the accommodation became insufficient. Conse- 
quently in 1893, the Directors made arrangements for the erec- 
tion of Ihe large addition made to the original buildings on the 
West and the North, affording accommodation for two hundred 
students, together with hostel accommodation for thirty. The 
building was completed by August, 1894, and in September of 
the same year work commenced in the new premises. Under 
the present Headmaster's supervision there have been a steady 
growth in numbers and constant development. In 1877 the 
Synod Girls' School was made a part of the institution and was 
conceded a part of the Government grant, but the work of the 
Girls' School has always been conducted in a separate building; 
there has never been any concerted action between the two 
schools, and, except that they share the same grant, the two insti- 
tutions are quite distinct, the Directorship of the Girls' School 
being delegated to a committee of the Executive Committee of 
the Synod by the Board of Directors of the College. In 1890, 
by an Act of the Legislature, the number of the Directors was 
increased to twenty-one and the nomination entrusted to the 
Synod. From 1850 to 1892 it was known as the Church of 
England Academy. By the Education Act of 1892 the Institu- 
tion was styled the Church of England College, and in 1894, 



after the extension on the West and North had been completed, 
the Boys' Side, embracing the site and buildings on Colonial 
and Bond Streets, was named Bishop Feild College, after the 
prelate who, forty-four years previously, had striven so hard for 
its foundation. From its start the institution has enjoyed the 
patronage and protection of the several Governors of the Colony, 
and the care and oversight of the several Bishops of Newfound- 
land, 

Previous to the year 1898 no provision was made in the 
college for the instruction of boys under standard three in attain- 
ment. In this year, under the 
advice of the Headmaster, and 
by the financial guarantee of cer- 
tain gentlemen of the city, there 
was established a preparatory 
department, which has steadily 
grown in numbers and useful- 
ness, and is to-day a very useful 
feeder of the institution. Not 
only does it secure a constant 
supply of young boys into the 
lower forms, but it ensures that 
they are trained in a manner 
best fitted for their future life 
in the college. One of our illus- 
trations is the picture of a class 
of little boys in this department 
in the year 1898 doing some 
kindergarten work. 

In 1890 the College celebrated 
its jubilee, which took the form 
of a Commemoration Service in 
the Cathedral in the morning and 
a programme of Sports in the 
afternoon. On the occasion of 
the Commemoration Service the 
choir consisted exclusively of 
those associated with the Col- 
lege, and the entire service was 

rendered by those who had been or who were at the time asso- 
ciated with the College. We have not space to give a full 




TABLEAUX ATHLETIC SPORTS. 



r6 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



account of this interesting ceremony, but refer our readers to 
the July No. of the Feildian, 1900 (Vol. 7 No. 10). 

Last year, in order that the institution might be kept well 
up to date in its organization, the Directors determined, under 
the advice of the Superintendent of Education, Dr. Pilot, and 
of the Headmaster, to inaugurate Manual Training as a branch 
of the college work, and consequently one ot the staff, Mr. I. J. 
Samson, was selected and despatched to the McDonald Training 
School of Truro, Nova Scotia, for the purpose of receiving train- 
ing as an instructor in this branch of educational work. 

The wooden building erected in 1876 and used since 1894 as 
a gymnasium is to be added to by 35 feet, and a spacious well 
lit manual training room with the necessary offices will be the 
result. This room and the offices will be well equipped and 
in September Mr. Samson will commence his work at Bishop 
Feild College in manual training. 

The best testimony to the education and training given at 
the College is to be found in the lives of those who have 
been educated within its walls. Again space prevents us from 
going into details, but a very long list could be prepared of 
those who have excelled in life's walk, not only in Newfound^ 



land, but in other parts of the world, out of those who were ec'ii 
cated in the College. One is a bishop, another is an admiral, 
a large number hold leading positions in the professions, and 
many of the most brilliant business men of the community are 
proud to call themselves " Old Feildians," and the College is 
proud that it is so. Of recent years the College has annually 
sent in a large numbej" of candidates for the several pubic ex- 
aminations which can be availed of in the colony, and rna'nj' 
of its boys are now Associates of Arts of the Council of Higher 
Education, under-graduates or graduates of Oxford, Cambrige, 
London, Edinburgh, Glasgow, McGill or other Universities. 

In the field of athletics, too, the institution is well to the fore ; 
not only has it a well organized cadet corp, but has proved that 
its lads are well trained in such manly games as football, cricket 
and hockey, holding as it does at this present time two of the three 
Intercollegiate trophies. 

Of the other illustrations given, one is a picture of the boys 
and masters in the jubilee year 1890, and another shows one of 
the tableaux given in the atheletic sports of the same year, in 
which year classes were trained in gymastics under Sergeant 
Ross from the Aldershot Gymnasium School. 




MASTERS AND BOYS OF BISHOP FEILD COLLEGE, 1900. 
(Jubilee Year.) 










THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

engineer Sub=Cieut. Riclwd H. fiowlep, R.IX 



TJ.VGINEER SuB-LlEUT. RlCHARD A. HoWLEY, R. N., the 

subject of this sketch and son of James P. Howley 
F.G.S., enjoys the distinction of being the only native of this 
country in the Engineering Branch of the Royal Navy. He is 
at present serving on board the first-class armoured battle ship 
Victorious, in the Channel .squadron, flag ship of Rear Admiral 
Hon. Hedworth Lampton, C.V.O., C.B. 

Dick, as his school-fellows familiarly called him, seems to have 
been fitted by nature for the calling he has chosen ; bright, in- 
telligent, with a decided mechanical turn, thick-set and robust 
of constitution, afraid of nothing; he was just one of those 
boys who would " up fist and down house" with anyone who 
would say " boo" to him. A thorough athlete fond of all sorts 
of manly sports, Dick was, so to speak, "to the manor born," 
exactly the kind of material the Naval Authorities require. 




R. A. HOWLEY, R.N., AS A CADET IX 1897. 

Richard A. Howley's appointment came about in this way. 
Each year the Colonial Office has the right to three places for 
applicants from the Colonies to study at one of the Royal En- 
gineering Colleges in England, where they undergo a five years 
course of technical training to fit them for the onerous duties 
now devolving upon that branch of the navy. 

Our late Governor, Sir Terence O'Brien, believing that we 
should possess suitable material here, referred the matter to the 
heads of our several colleges asking them to select from their 
students such boys as, in their judgment, would fill the bill. He 
promised to use all his personal influence to obtain a nomination 
for one of those whom they would select. The Christian Bro- 
thers of St. Bonaventure's College, in response to His Excel- 
lency's wish selected Richard A. Howley, and his application 
was at. once forwarded by the Governor to the Colonial Office. 
His nomination was accepted, and in due course he underwent 
the preliminary examination required by the regulations, on 
board the Commodore's ship on this station. Having success- 
fully passed this test, he was immediately ordered ' Home" to 
enter the Royal Engineering Training College of Keyham, 
Devonport. 



Here he commenced his career by having a piece of metal, 
a hammer and chisel placed in his hands on which to begin 
with. From that his studies led up by degrees to the various 
operations of making and fitting machinery of all kinds con- 
nected with the construction of modern ships of war. The 
course is complete and thorough and is accompanied throughout 
by much study and attendance at lectures, delivered by the most 
skilled technicologists, in all that pertains to mechanical and 
engineering science. Strict discipline and manual drill is main- 
tained all through, nor is physical culture neglected ; on the 
contrary, it is encouraged as much as possible. Boating, row- 
ing, swimming, cricket, football, &c., are all indulged in to the 
fullest extent. The college teams hold high records, especially 
in the latter sport, and Dick soon made his mark as a footer. 
Every year's class has a team of its own. and many contests 




R. A. HOWLEY, R.N., AS SUB-LIEUT. ENGINEER IN 1903. 

between them and those of other colleges, as well as with out- 
side clubs, take place, in which Keyham usually comes out on 
top. Prizes are given by the college authorities and by friends 
of the students, all of whom, with officials of the Admiralty, as- 
semble to witness the games and give encouragement to the lads. 

In this way the five years course is spent, and towards the end 
of the term the students are given practical training on board 
ship, where they go through the whole operation of getting up 
steam, starting and working the engines, &c. They are also 
required to attend to the cleaning, repairing, and refitting the 
machinery of any ship laid off for overhauling. A course of gun- 
nery, hydraulics and electricity usually terminates their studies. 

Mr. Howley passed out in his fifth year, and was appointed 
to H. M.S. Jupiter, a first class armoured battleship of the Chan- 
nel squadron, on which he served his two years probation. 

Last year, his term having expired, he spent some time on 
various ships, and during the manreuvres, was aboard the King 
Alfred, one of those huge four-funnelled monsters, the leviathans 
of the fleet. Finally he was gazetted on February and, last, 
as senior Sub-Lieut. Engineer on H.M.S. Victorious, on which 
he will probably spend the next two years. 



i8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Books on Deutfoutidland. ** 




subject I have been asked to write about for this 
number of the QUARTERLY, is Newfoundland Biblio- 
graphy, or all about books concerning the Island. 
It is a large subject, and one that, owing to the small 
space at my disposal, must be treated as poor old 
J.ohn Clarke used to say in a " summinary way." 
Who will be interested in such a topic ? Certainly 
not the crowd, but there are a chosen select few who 
are real book-lovers and who may possibly appreciate one's 
efforts to make them better acquainted with old books about 
their own country. Always prefer to play for the critics 
in the pit and not for the noisy gods in the gallery. How dif- 
ferently men view such subjects as science, art, literature or 
natural history is very well exemplified in a story told by Sir 
Wemyss Reid to the Vagabond Club in London. As everyone 
knows he was a great newspaper man, editor of the Leeds Mer- 
cury, Speaker, &c. Meeting a great scientist one day in the 
Strand the Professor said to him " Reid, why don't you give us 
some news ?" " News, my dear friend, we have been spending 
thousands on telegrams and special correspondents in South 
Africa; what more news do you want ?" "You call that stuff 
news," said the man of science with a snort ; " what 1 want is 
real important news, news about the spots in the sun." 

The bibliographer must not be confounded with the biblio- 
maniac ; the latter has a rage for rare editions and tall copies, 
his passion is only for the externals, whilst the bibliographer's 
love is for the soul within the covers the heart of the book. 

How fraught with dear memories are some old books ? The 
dog-eared, shabby old Virgil, scrawled over with notes in a round 
school-boy's hand. What pleasant recollections does it bring 
back to us of the great classical scholar who first instilled into our 
juvenile unformed mind some faint idea of the perfect form and 
polished verse of the great Roman poet. That baitered old Don 
Quixote, as we open its pages we seem still to inhale the pungent 
odour of old Don Ramon's strong black cigar as he tried to infuse 
into our own ignorant and insular soul some of his own deep 
knowledge and still deeper enthusiasm for that splendid classic 
with its stately Castilian eloquence and its wholly untranslatable 
humour and wit. 

Books, to the ordinary mind, are only so much prepared wood- 
pulp in the form of paper, but to the enthusiast they are living 
realities associated with one's life and thoughts and aspirations. 
The Prince of Bibliographers of to-day is Doctor Richard 
Garnett, C.B., formerly of the British Museum. The most 
delightful old man, I think, I have ever known. I can fancy I 
see him now, with his wonderfully shabby old clothes. As 
polite and as anxious to assist some poor distraught young 
woman student, and as much at home with her as with the 
Prince of Wales. 

We have generally been of opinion that old Whitbourne's 
was the first book about Newfoundland. This is an error ; 
there were several earlier works about the Island. Without 
referring to such old works as Fabian's Chronicle, Howe, 
Edens, Gomara, Oviedo, Ramusio, &c., or to the great Spanish 
classic Navarrete, all of which refer to the Colony. We must 
also pass over the great English Encyclopaedia of early voyages 
and descriptions of the New Island given by Hakluyt and 
continued by Purchas. The first work especially and entirely 



By D. W. Prowse, LL.D. 

devoted to Newfoundland is the quaint old treatise of Sir George 
Peckham of 1583. I will give my readers its title page with all 
its quaint lettering and erratic spelling: 



A. TRVE REPORTS 

Of the late discoveries. 

And possession taken in the right of 

The Crowne of England of the New- 

founde lands by that valiant and worthye 

gentleman Sir Humfrey Gilbert, 

Knight. 

Wherein is also breefly setle downe her 

Highnesses lawful tytle thereto and the great and 

manifolde commodities that is likely to growe 

thereby to the whole Realme in generall 

and to the adventurers in particular. 

Together with the easiness and 

shortness of the voyage. 



Scene and allowed, 
at London. 

Printed by J. C. for John Hinde 

Dwelling in Paules Church-Yarde at 

The sign of the Golden Hinde 

Anno 1583. 

There were no newspapers in " the spacious days of Queen 
Elizabeth" when this curious old book first saw the light. It is 
antiquated and a queer old production, but as an advertisement 
of the new association for colonising our Island it is worthy of 
the genius of the cleverest company promoter of ihe twentieth 
century. 

It sets out the internal resources of the Colony in glowing 
terms 

" By establishing a safe harbour and head-quarters, and it is 
well known to all men of sound judgment that this Newfound- 
lande voyage is of greater importance, and will be found more 
beneficiall to our country than all other voyages at this day in 
use, and trade amongst us." 

This early view of the importance of Newfoundland is corro- 
borated by Sir Walter Raleigh who declared in Parliament that 
our fishery " was the main-stay and suport of the Western 
Counties," then the chief maritime centre of England. That a 
mishap to the Newfoundland fleet was the greatest calamity that 
could befall England. 

This old work is a most sensible, clear-headed business 
document. I enjoyed its perusal. The author shows himself 
a keen trader with a very extensive knowledge of human nature. 
He offers attractions to everyone : Sport for the genteels. 
Fishing for all. A North-West passage to India from New- 
foundland for the adventurous. The 100 subscriber was to 
have 16,000 acres of land, with authority to keep Court Leet 
and Court Baron. To be chosen one pf the Council to make 
laws. All were to be benefitted and honoured down to the poor 
subscriber of ten shillings. 

It was a very ingenious dodge to keep Gilbert's charter alive. 
These shadowy pretensions were maintained by his family for 
many years, but it all came to naught. It offords another in- 
stance of the way in which Rulers in these old days flung away 
Islands and Continents to their courtiers and favourites. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



isydney and Carlile, sons-in-law of the great Walsingham, 
wrote a paper on the colonising of Newfoundland and North 
America. The greatest book, however, on the Colony was Lord 
Beacon's treatise written for the promotion of Guy's Company, 
in which the great Chancellor was a shareholder. Only portions 
and extracts from this splendid work, written with all the great 
man's eloquence, force and power are preserved in Purchas ; 
every trace of the actual" publication has been lost. It must not 
be confounded with Bacon's well known pamphlet on Coloniz- 
ation. It is in this book on Newfoundland that occurs the oft 
quoted passage about " the gold mines of the Newfoundland 
fishery, of which there are none so rich greater than the fam- 
ous diamonds of Golconda or the treasures of Peru." When we 
consider for a moment all the wealth this harvest of the ocean 
has produced, we realize the truth of the great Verulam's elo- 
quent words. What couuntless millions have been drawn from 
these fisheries for four centuries a mine that never petered out 
as productive to-day as when John Cabot and his Bristol 
crew first caught sight of Cape Bonavista, the headland bright 
and green with the springing grass of early June. 

"Bonavista," oh good, "oh happy sight!" the most natural 
exclamation in the world for the old Italian sailor after his long 
dangerous voyage across unknown seas. 

There is a good deal of literature about Newfoundland during 
the reign of the high and mighty King James (1603-1625). The 
most amusing and best written work about North America, at 
this period is the production of the jovial French Lawyer Mark 
Lescarbot " La Nouvelle France." It contains a most graphic 
history of the new countries, the fishing, hunting, Indians, &c. 
Incidentally it gives a picture of Newfoundland and the rest of 
the European possessions in the New World. The most im- 
portant publications during this reign, relating specially to our 
Island, are undoubtedly Mason's " Brief Discourse of New- 
found land," and Whitbourne's well known book. Old Whit- 
bourne, as I have discovered, was of very humble origin. His 
literary ability, like his learning, was very scanty; but the old 
fellow was shrewd and humorous. A right trusty and brave old 
sailor. The most sincere and faithful friend of the Colony. It 
was a very happy thought of Sir Robert Bond to commemorate 
the gallant Sir Richard's memory by naming our first inland 
town and important railway junction after this brave old Eliza- 
bethan mariner. It seems to me a pity that another great bene- 
factor to Newfoundland at a little later period, the man who 
saved the settlers from extermination by the West Countrymen 
John Downing is not also similarly honoured. 

To follow chronological order in giving a list of books on 
Newfoundland, Mason precedes Whitbourne. His book was 
written between 1618-1619 a d published early in 1620. Whit- 
bourne's first edition appeared in the latter part of 1620, with 
new issues in 1621-22-23. The important map by Mason was 
made in 1617, but it did not appear in print until 1625, when it 
was inserted in the very erratic work of Vaughan about New- 
foundland "The Golden Fleece"; followed by a still more 
curious publication " The Nevvlanders Cure." 

Mason's book is the work of a scholar; its full title after the 
fashion of the day ij very quaint : 



BRIEVE DISCOURSE 

of the 

Newfoundland. 

With the situation Temperature 
and commodities thereof 
Inciting our nation to goe 

forward in that hop- 
full plantation begunne 
" Scire tuum nihil est nisile scire noc sciat alter." 

A. H. 

Edingburgh 
Printed by Andro Hart 1620. 

An American friend and lover of history James Phinney 
Baxter aided me in the full investigation of Mason's life. I 



need not say that in other histories of Newfoundland there is 
not the least notice taken of this important personage' in our 
Colonial annals. To John Mason we owe a deep debt of grati- 
tude, not only for his favourable and truthful account of the re- 
courses of the Island and its adaptability as a Plantation, but also 
for the important record of the tradition that Bonavista was the 
landfall of John Cabot. In his map he marks opposite Cape 
Bonavista : " A Caboto primum reperta" first land found by 
Cabot. In law there is a well known maxiom, that evidence 
given before the commencement of litigation and the opening 
.out of controversy, is always to be received with far more con- 
fidence than testimony brought forward after the issue of pro- 
ceedings. The latter may be manufactured to suit the case. 
The former is entirely free from such suspicion. We must bear 
in mind that Mason's .statement was made in 1617, about 120 
years after Cabot's voyage. There were then men alive whose 
fathers had sailed with the Italian discoverer. I illustrated 
this fact by my own experience. I knew well a great-aunt of 
mine whose husband was a commander at the battle of Tra- 
falgar, 1805. She was born about 1780, and as I am 70 our 
united experiences cover 124 years. Mason was a geographer, 
a university scholar, Captain in the Royal Navy ; a most truth- 
ful, exact and reliable man. His record of Cabot's landfall was 
undoubtedly received from the trustworthy statements of living 
witnesses. It is further corroborated by a similar note on 
Dupont's a French geographer's map about the same time. 
On this question I was like the famous defender of the Catholic 
Doctrine of the Trinity " Athanasius contra munduin." All 
the leading authorities at home and abroad ridiculed my view. 
I must say this much for my fellow Newfoundlanders they all 
believed in me, and they will be pleased to know that recent 
investigations of old maps make the landfall of Cabot at Cape 
Bonavista on St. John the Baptist's Day, 241(1 June, absolutely 
as certain as any fact happening four hundred years ago can be 
ascertained. 

Mason's narrative contains one of the most strange and 
romantic incidents in our early Colonial history. It is a remark- 
able story a fine illustration of the old saying, that truth is 
stranger than fiction. If we found this tale ot the Indian 
Squantum in a dime novel or shilling schocker we should look 
upon the incidents as far fetched and wholly improbable. We 
should declare that the long arm of coincidence was stretched 
too far by the author's vivid imagination. The remarkable ad- 
ventures of this poor Indian will give my readers a more exact 
impression of the close connection between the Continental 
Colonies and our Island, even in these early days. It will also 
illustrate the antiquity and the continuity of the trade in dry 
codfish. It went on with Spain hundreds of years before the 
discovery of America. Squantum was kidnapped by one Thomas 
Hunt in New England in 1614, taken to Malaga, in Spain, with 
nineteen more Indians, and there sold in the usual way as slaves. 
Being very docile and intelligent he was allowed his liberty. 
Wandering about the quay he met a captain belonging to Guy's 
Newfoundland Colony. He stowed away and catne out to 
Cupids. In Newfoundland he met John Mason and a Captain 
Dermer, agent for Sir Fernando Gorge, the Patentee of New 
England. Dermer brought him to Plymouth to interview 
the Knight, and from thence, about 1616, he was returned to 
his native land. When the Pilgrim Fathers landed in 1620 
they were delighted to meet a friendly native who spoke good 
English. Squantum became their firm friend and ally. He 
taught them how to plant Indian corn, and to top dress with 
fish manure. This remarkable savage spoke three languages ; 
had embraced four religions Heathen, Roman Catholic, High 
Church Anglican, and lastly a Puritan and Independent. He 
was very arrogant to his fellow natives, always wore English 
clothes, and made his countrymen believe that like a white man 
he had control over both disease and death. At his latter end he 
asked Governor Bradford to pray that " He might goe to ye 
Englishman's God in Heaven." 

I am afraid these Bibliographical sketches are rather desul- 
tory and rambling. Put the blame on that old Prince of 
Essayists Sieur de Montaigne. He has taught us small 
scribblers to be various and discursive in our attempts to enter- 
tain our readers. 



20 



THE NE WFO UNDL A ND QUAR TERL Y. 



* 



Crust 



AN ETCHING. 
By F. B. Wood. 

I. 

A SHORT night's rest, a simple meal, 
^*- "A kiss good wife I'm ready," 
He steps on board and hoists the sail, 
The wind is fair and steady. 

II. 

The wind increased unto a gale, 
Though not for long it lasted, 
They found his body on the beach, 

Nearby his boat dismasted. 
St. John's, Newfoundland, May I3th, 1904. 



flualotTs Farewell * 

Co IRiss Cane. 

A s the tender strains, 'neath thy gifted hands 
* * Swept thro' the church last night, 
We felt some Angel touch'd the chords 

Methinks we felt aright I 
For angels walk this old earth still, 
Thank God, in forms like thine ! 
And heaven is nearer where they tread 

And life almost divine I 
****** 

We'd not forget thee if we could 

The echoes, pure and rare 
Of that farewell shall fill our hearts 

And ling'ring, end in prayer. 
That never " rift be in thy lute" 

That all life's chords atune 
And love forever wreathe thy heart 

With sweetest flow'rs of June ! 
St. John's, Nfld., May 9, 1904. E. C. 



By George F. Power. 

As the " great machine" goes whirling round. 
And the sweat of the worker steams on the wheel, 
'Tis the heart of the toiler attunes the sound, 

And its notes accord with the thoughts they feel ; 
To our friends far away it merrily sings 

A harmony grand in sweet refrain, 
For every round of it nearer brings 

The dream of their life to them " Home again." 

That vision of " Home" to them never dies, 

The years are bridged by the firmest span, 
The rivets of hope bind love's strong ties, 

And the pillars of faith in their countryman ; 
Remembrance to them has never brought 

(For Kate is Kate and Joe is Joe) 
A change by wealth, or " grandeur" wrought, 

We are as we were in the long ago. 

Let us, by our greeting, this dream fulfill, 

Let honesty once more take its place, 
And the laugh in the mother's eyes don't chill 

By the formal smile on the daughter's face. 
Let fathers and sons be as men were of old, 

Giving them welcome with heart and hand, 
And the tale will be telling, as often was told, 

" There's no place in the world like Newfoundland." 
St. John's, Newfoundland, May 5th, 1904. 



# "God Guard CDeer ^ 

Ode to Sir Caoendisl) Bovlc, K.C.TO.6. 

[These lines were written and presented to His Excellency Sir Cavendish 
Boyle, and elicited a pleasing note of appreciation and acceptance a few days 
before his departure from our shores.] 

YVTHERE mild Mauritius waves her stately palms, 

O'er shores, whose waves in Capricomic calms 
With coy advances, reaching from the main, 
Kiss the warm strand, then hasten back again, 
To run with gentle murmurings thro' the shade 
By sea-fans, and the roseate coral made 
Thou goest ! and our blessing goes with thee. 
Hear in the gentle sighs of southern sea, 
The cordial wish, eternal as the waves 
That roar unceasing in our Islands caves 
God guard thee I this our prayer, our voice's weak 
The heart's warm wish to plead, let the waves speak. 

And let the sweet voices of echoes that hover, 
The " Three Breasts"* around, that tell of the lover 
Paul, and his lost, his Virginia fair 
Whisper unceasing, and mingle with their 
Regret for the lovers, our loss of a friend. 
But in the vain regret, what gladdening strains blend 
A voice from the north, where Atlantic waves meet, 
No coral, but stem cliffs adamant feet. 
Let the southern stars and fan-palm trees 
Repeat the song from these northern seas 
" God guard thee I" our friend on that favoured strand 
Who taught us to sing, " God Guard thee Newfoundland." 
Three hills in the Island of Mauritius, spoken of in the story of Paul and Virginia. 

ARTHUR S. ENGLISH. 



<* fl Farewell 

By F. B. Wood. 
'T T HE worthy representative 
^ Of him who fills our Empire's throne, 
With honour you discharged his trust, 
And made our hopes and fears your own. 

For all your wisdom and your zeal 
Deep gratitude is but your due ; 

Your gracious deeds and kindly words 
Have won our heart's affections too. 

Now that our king has called you hence, 
And from our shores you must depart, 

Altho' our lips shall frame the words, 
Our fare-thee-well comes from the heart. 

Nor would we, if we could, forget 
The lady standing by your side, 

Though we may see you nevermore 
Kind thoughts of both shall still abide. 

Where e'er you go may you soon win 

The love of those 'mongst whom you dwell, 
Yet oft recall in future years 

Old Terra Nova's fond farewell. 
St. John's, Newfoundland, 



May I3th, 1904. 



'THE NEWfOUNDLAND QUARTERLY' 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 
Issued every third month about the 1 5th of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, -:- -:- - : . PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

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y. 




THE ... 

NEWFOUNDLAND 




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%^ 1 ^ WLF B_~ /""m I ^ K^r 

QUARTERLY. 



i 



JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 



VOL. IV. No. 2. 



OCTOBER, J904. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 








^M 9 



CAI'ii RACK. 




^e CONTENTS, ^e 

OCTOBER, J904. 

PAGE. 

"The Old Coat of Arms at Pla- 
centia" (Illustrated), by Most 
Rev. M. F. Howley, D.D i 

"The Exile's Daughter" Poem, 

by D. Carroll 4 

Supplement : Two Illustrations from 
Photographs " Saint Bonaven- 
ture's College Sports, 1904," 
" C.E.I, and C.L.B. Sports, St. 
George's Field, 1904 

" Progress in Newfoundland,' by 
Newfoundlander 5 

" The Pilgrim" Poem, by D. C. . . 5 

" The Colonial Policy of the Radical 
Party -New Colonial Policy," 
by Rev. M. J. Ryan, Ph. D.... 6 

" In Evangeline's Garden" Poem, 
by Eros Wayback 8 

Hoisting of the Banners" Poem* 
by Sir R. Thorburn, K.C.M.G 8 

Supplement: Two Illustrations from 
Photographs ''The First Train 
with Old Home Week Visitors," 
' Some Guests at Mount Cashel 
Garden Party" 

" How Jack Burton Returned to 
Newfoundland," by Rev. J. A. 
O'Reilly, D.D 9 

" A Foretaste of Autumn" Poem, 

by R. G. Mao Donald ro 

" A Six Months' Tour," by James 
Carter 1 1 

" Rev. Canon Pilot, D.D., D.C.L., 
I.S.O.," with Portrait 12 

" Capt. John Green," with Portrait 13 

" A Plea for the Stag Caribou" 

Poem, by L. F. Brown 13 

Portraits of Some of the Candidates 
in the Coming Election 14 

Portraits of Candidates for the 

Rhodt-s Scholarship 17 

' Our Portrait Gallery," with Notes 18 

' Sliding" -Poem, by Robt. Power. 20 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



W. & 0. RENDELL, 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



General Commission < 
Property and Insurance 
Agents* < *g < <g 



I 



Partnership 

: Business Interests 

should be protected, not only for the satisfaction it gives, but for 
the sake of your business interests in case one of the partners 
should die. Will be glad to tell you about the good features of 

AN EQUITABLE PARTNERSHIP POLICY. 

J. A. CLIFT, Agent, 

LAW CHAMBERS, ST. JOHN'S. 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I t I I I I I ' I I l_ 



ji 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



ST. JOHN'S, NEWf OUNDLAND. j * Comfortable Living for Your Family 



AGENTS FOR THE 

PHCENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED, 

OF LONDON. 



Can be provided at the cost of only a few dollars a year 
I when that few dollars are invested 

i In an Adequate Endowment Policy in the Equitable 

! 

j 

r.i 



It means freedom from worry while you live, and inde- 
pendence for your loved ones if you die. Ask for 
information about it. 

J. A. CLIFT, Agent, 



LAW CHAMBERS, ST. JOHN'S. 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



PHCENIX 



Assurance 




Co., Ltd., 



OE LONDON, 



ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Annual Premiums $7,500,000 

Fund held to meet losses 9,000,000 

Uncalled Capital 12,000,000 

. & G. RENDELL, 

ST. JOHN'S. Agent for Nfld. 



Nfld. Steam Screw Tug Co., Ltd. 

D. P. Ingraham, Jt Launch Daisy, 
Jt John Green. ' jt 

Rates of Towage of Vessels In and out of St. John's Harbor, from a mile 
outside the Heads to the Consignee's wharf, or from the Consignee's wharf 
to a mile outside the Heads. 



GROSS TO 

60 Tons and und 
From 60 to 100 To 
pel ton a 
" 101 to 125 T 
" 126 to 150 
" 151 to 175 

" 176 tO 2OO 
" 2OI tO 225 

" 226 to 250 
" 251 to 300 


NNAGE. 

er $4.00 


Fr 

4 
t 


GROSS TO 

:>m 301 to 350 T 

' 351 10400 

401 to 450 
451 to 500 
501 to 550 
551 to 600 
601 to 700 
701 to 800 
' 801 to 900 
' 901 to looo 


>4NAGE. 


ns (10 cts. 

dditional.) 


. . 26 oo 


28.00 




* I2.OO 




* 14.00 




16.00 


38 oo 


' 18.00 




* 20.00 




* 22.00 








Vessels requiring the Steamer to go beyond the above limits as far as 



N. B. Special Rates, will be charged during the ite season. 
The owners are not responsible for any damage done by the VesseP 
towed, to themselves or others. 

W H. STRONG, Manager. 



1 Use 



Royal 



Household 
Flour* 



Alan Goodridge $ Sons, 

325 WATER STREET, ST. JOHN'S, N. F., 

General Importers and Wholesale and Retail Merchants. 



I I I I I Mill I I I i p i i j i , i 



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BRANCH ESTABLISHMENTS : 

Witless Bay, Tor's Cove, Ferryland, Renews, 
Nipper's Harbor, New Perlican, .Round Harbor, 
Hant's Harbor, Caplin Bay, jt Jt jt 

Where Fishery Outfits can at all times 
be Supplied. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value mist be Stated 






FOR NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LABRADOR FROM JULY, 1904. 

^ 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION 
CANADA. 


OF 


i pound 


8 cents 


24 cents 


12 cents 


1 5 cents. 
30 

45 
60 

75 
90 
Si .05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 


2 pounds 


ii " 


24 ... 


24 " 


7 " 


14 " 


24 


-56 " 


4 " 


17 ' 


48 


48 " 




20 " 


48 


60 " 


6 


27 " 


48 




_ > 


26 " 


48 


84 " 


8 


20 " 


72 


06 " 


9" ... 


72 " 


72 " 


$1 08 




.1C " 






II *' 


1$ '' 


72 " 






Under i Ib. weight, I cent 
per 2 oz. 


No parcel sent to U K. for 
less than 24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 






N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from New York ; 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 



General Post Office. 



RSTES OF COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding $10 ........................... 5 cts. Over 550, but not exceeding 56o ........................ 30 cts. 

Over Jio, but not exceeding $20 ........................ 10 cts. Over Soo, but not exceeding $70 ........................ 35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 ........................ 15 cts. Over S/o, but not exceeding SSo ........................ 40 cts. 

Over 1.30, but not exceeding $40 ........................ 20 cts. Over SSo, but not exceeding 590 ........................ 45 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding 50 ........................ 25 cts. Over $90, but not exceeding Sioo ....................... 50 cts. 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John's, Newfoundland, September, fgoj. H, J. R. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



GENERAL POST j* OFFICE. 

Postage on Local Newspapers. 

TT.is observed that BUNDLES OF LOCAL NEWSPAPERS, addressed to Canada and the United States, are frequently 
* mailed without the necessary postage affixed; and, therefore, cannot be forwarded. 

The postage required on LOCAL NEWSPAPERS addressed to Foreign Countries is i cent to each two ounces. Two 
of our local newspaper?, with the necessary wrappers, exceeds the two ounces, and should be prepaid TWO CENTS. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURE AND MINES. 



NOTICE. 



CONSIDERABLE ALTERATION having 
been made in the mode of securing Titles to 
Mining Locations by the Act passed during the 
last Session of the Legislature, parties interested 
can obtain copies of the said Act on application 
to the Department of Agriculture and Mines 
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. 



HON. ELI DA WE, 

Minister of Agriculture and Mines 



Department of Agriculture and Mines, 
September 22nd, 1903. 





Queen 
Fire Insurance Company 



FUNDS. 



, OOO,OOO 



ii 1 1 1 tin 1 1 1 1 1 



INSLR4NCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 



JOHN CORMACK, 



AGENT FOR NEWFOUNDLAND. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



$4 A MONTH 

Is not very much for a young man of 20 to put 
aside out of his salary, but if invested with the 
CONFEDERATION LIFE it will give 

To his family, if he dies before age 40, - - $1000.00 
To himself, if he Hues to age 40, from - - $1 159.00 

to $1372.00 
according to plan selected. 

Insue eal y, while your health is good. 
You will get your money back earlier in life, 
when you can use it better. 

C O'N. CONROY, 

GENERAL AGENT. 

Law Chambers, St. John's. 



HEARN & Co. 

WHOLESALE ONLY.. 
AT LOWEST PRICES. 



PORK. Mess, Bean, Ham Butt, Family Mess, 
Loins, Jowls, Hocks, Spare Ribs, Hams. 
BEEF. Packet, Plate, Mess and Boneless. 

SUGAR. Fine Granulated, in barrels and bags. 
Yellow, in brls. and bags. White Moist, 
in brls. Cube, in i cwt. boxes, 

MOLASSES. Choice New Barbados, in Pun- 
cheons, Hogsheads and Tierces. 

. .ALSO. . 

Split and Round Peas, Rolled Oats, Oatmeal, and Sole Leather. 

Sole Agents for 

LIBBY, McNEiu, & LIBBV'S Canned Meats & Soups. 

PRICE LISTS FURNISHED ON APPLICATION. 



BAINE, JOHNSTON 4 Co. 

Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland, 

General Merchants and Ship Owners^ 

* * 

..EXPORTERS OF.. 

Codfish, Cod Oil, Seal Oil, Seal Skins t 
Codliver Oil (Norwegian process), 

Salmon, Split Herring, Scotch Cured 
Herring, Trout and Lobsters* 

Sealing Steamers for Arctic hire. Steamers on 
Labrador requiring COALS can be supplied at 
Battle Harbor, at entrance to Straits of Belle Isle, 
where there is telegraphic communication. 



.* NEWMAN'S .* 

Celebrated Port Wine, 



In Cases of 1 doz. each, 
at $8.25 in Bond; also, 

in Hogsheads, Quarter Casks a d Octaves. 



Baine, Johnston & Co*, 

AGENTS. 



Imperial Tobacco co. 9 Ltd. 

Manufacturers of Choice Tobaccos. 

Smoking and Chewing, 

Plug, Cut Plug, and Granulated. 

fi@-Some of our brands: 

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JUST THE THING 

for housekeepers ; our small boxes of 

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5 



A very neat package of wood, lead lined. 

10 



LB. BOXES $1.50 

2.00 

2.50 



LB. BOXES $3.00 

4.00 

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For a cool, refreshing smoke, try " KILLIKINKNICK." 

OFFICES AND FACTORY: 
Flavin and Bond Streets, j- St. John's, Newfoundland. 



DAISY," 

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IOO Boxes Ceylon Tea, from 25o. Ib. 
IOO Half Chests " " 2Oo. Ib. 



Also, 100 chests ^^ 
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j^lb. packets, green label. 

30 boxes China Tea. jt 10 half chests Green Tea, 

PRICES RIGHT. 

il orders receive prompt delivery. 

J. D. RYAN, Water Street. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY; 



VOL. IV. No. z. 



OCTOBER, J904. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 



CDe Old Coat of firms at placentia. 



By Most Rev. M. F. Howley, D.D. 




AMONG the Historical Relics, for which old Placentia is 
notable, may be mentioned the painting of the Royal 
Arms, which till lately hung in the Old Anglican Church 
there, and is now, pending the erection of a new church, 
in the custody of Mr. John Bradshaw. This emblem is 
I suppose typical of the ' Church," while emblematic of 
the ' State" is a bailiff's staff, preserved at the Court House, 
which bears the same achievement of arms. 

1 have not sufficient data to give the History of 
these old relics, or to say how they came to be 
lodged at Placentia; but I have thought that a de- 
scription of them, and an explanation of the Arms, 
might prove a subject sufficiently interesting for an 
article in THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

Many people think that the Art of Heraldry is 
only an antiquated fancy, not far removed from 
pureile folly, and that in these prosaic centuries a 
study of these absurd mediaeval figures would be 
a .-.hear waste of time. Such, however, is not really 
the case. Although it must be admitted that in the 
XV. and XVI. centuries this art, like many others, 
becime very much degenerated, yet it cannot be 
deniei th\t Heraldry has played an important part, 
and exercised a powerful influence in moulding the 
History of the World. It has also been of incal- 
cuiable benefit in creating and fostering a taste for 
tie fine arts; the fantastic forms of armorial bear- 
ings and devices lending themselves admirably to 
artistic decoration. No one can pretend to any 
degree of perfection in Art, Sculpture, Architecture, 
Archeology or Literature, without at least an ele- 
mentary knowledge of the curious conceits and 
technicil terminology, of this quaint branch of 
science. Indeed it is almost impossible to read 
with a true understanding and appreciation, not 
only the higher .class of romance and literature, 
such for instance as the works of Scott, but even 
History itself can be but half understood without 
the aid of Heraldry. In fact Heraldry may be called 
" History in pictures." The explanation which I 
am about to give of these old arms at Placentia 
will show that not only the whole History of Eng- 
land, but also a very considerable portion of that of Europe is 
written upon that small piece of painting. 

Again Heraldry has its utilitarian side. It serves to distin- 
guish family alliances and descents, often of great legal import- 
ance in settling questions of heredity and property, etc. 

It is useful in the formation and organization of guilds and 
corporations: in the invention of trade-marks of business rlrms : 
in the designs of National Banners, and Royal Standards, which 
become the recognized symbols of racial loyalty and national 
fealty, which call forth in their defence the highest sentiments 
and noblest feats of patriotism and heroic bravery. 

Although it has become the custom in modern times and in 
new countries, like our neighbors in the United States of Am- 
erica, to despise as unworthy of serious thought the childish 
heraldry of mediaeval Europe, yet it would seem that a symbol- 
ism of some sort is a necessity of human intercommunication, 
and those very people who reject with scorn the ingenious and 
well-devised designs of ancient heraldry, have found it necessary 



BAILIFFS 

S I'AFF. 



to adopt for themselves a spurious and mongrel imitation of the 
truly poetic and romantic imagery of the middle ages. This 
craving which seems inherent in the human heart, shows itself 

o 

cropping out in such tinsel and tawdry hybrids as ' The Knights 
of Columbus," " The Knights of Pythias," " The Foresters," c. 

It may probably surprise some of the sons of the great modern 
Republic to learn that their very national flag their " Old 
Glory," uf which they are so justly proud, is not, as they may 
have thought, a spick span new American invention or concep- 
tion, but a survival and adaptation of old English heraldry. The 
stars and stripes were originally the arms or heraldic bearings 
of the family of Washington ! 

The first quarter of the coat of arms at Placentia is blazoned, 
that is to say heraldically described, in the following manner: 

Gules, three lions passant guardant Or: in pale, for England. 
For the benefit of the uninitiated, this may be explained as fol- 
lows : On a red ground there are three lions in gold or yellow 
colour passing or walking towards the left hand, and looking 
full face at the beholder. These lions are placed one above the 
other in the centre line of the shield. 

This is the Arms of England 
at the present day, and is to be 
seen in the first and fourth (or 
last) quarter of the Royal Stan- 
dard, or upon British money. 
The other two quarters, called 
the second and third, being oc- 
cupied respectively with the 
arms of Scotland and Ireland: 
(Fig. No. ..) 

We will consider each of these 
coats of arms separately. Firstly 



THE ARMS 



ENGLAND. 




(NO. I.) 

reign of Henry III., between 



Among the symbols or emblems 

used in heraldry the lion was a 

very popular and much used 

one, being the representative of 

strength and courage. There is 

a roll of arms drawn up in the 

1243 and 1246, containing the blazons of 218 coats of arms, 

and no less than forty of them exjiibit the Lion in one form or 

another. 

The lions on the English arms were those of Normandy, and 
are supposed to have been brought over by the Conqueror; but 
they were originally only two and they were not lions but 
leopards, or as the French called them lionceaux. The first 
reliable mention we find of them in connection with English 
History is in a description given by the Monk of Marmoutier of 
the enrollment of Geoffry, Count of Anjou, the father of Henry 
II. Plantagenet into the order of Chivalry. His shield is de- 
scribed as having " leunculos aureos imaginarios" " imaginary- 
little lions (or leopards) of gold." These animals like the griffins 
are partly fabulous. They are called leones kopardes. They are 
a cross between the lion and pard. The pard is a name given 
indiscriminately to the tiger, panther, leopard, jaguar, cat-a- 
mountain, and such like. It is alluded to by Shakespear, in the 
well-known passage from " As you like it." Act II.: Scene 7, 
describing the Ages of Man. The fourth age is : 

" A Soldier 
" Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



The third lion was added by Richard Cour de Lion, after 
his return from captivity, 1194, King John before coming to the 
throne signed or sealed with two lions, but after he became 
king he used three, and so the seal has remained ever since. 

On the Royal Arms of England, as we see them to-day, the 
first quarter is entirely occupied by the arms of England, the 
three lions as mentioned, but on this shield at Placentia it will 
be noticed that this quarter is subdivided, as it is called "per 
pak" or into two parts, side by side, called the dexter, (that 
on the left hand of the observer) ; and the sinister, (that on 
the right hand of the observer). The reason of this division 
is to make a place for the arms of Scotland the " Lion Ramp- 
ant," which on the Royal Standard of to-day occupies alone 
the second quarter. It will be observed that in this Placentia 
coat of arms the second quarter is occupied by the Arms of 
France, namely, three lilies, or fleurs de lis. We will now 
consider 

THE ARMS OK SCOTLAND. 

The heraldic blazon of these arms is as follows : " Or, a lion 
rampant, gules, surronnded by a double tressure flory counter 
flory of the second." In plain English, On a yellow or golden 
ground, a red lion standing on his hind legs with his fore paws 
stretched out as if clawing or clutching, surrounded by a double 
red border flowered on both sides. The origin of this arms is not 
known. It is thus beautifully epitomized by Scott in Marmion 

" The ruddy lion ramps in gold 

On Scotland's royal battle shield." 

The arms of Scotland and of 
Ireland were introduced into the 
British escutcheon by James I. 
of England and VI. of Scotland 
in 1603. He gave the second 
quarter of the shield to Scotland, 
the third to Ireland, and the 
first and fourth to the combined 
arms of France and England, 
quartered as in the time of the 
Tudors. (Fig. No. 2.) 

This marshalling was followed 
by Charles I. But when Crom- 
well established the Common- 
wealth, being imbued with a 
more republican spirit, he dis- 
carded the Lions both of Eng- 
land and Scotland and the 
Lilies of France, and in their 
stead placed the Cross of St. George for England and that of 
St. Andrew tor Scotland, retaining the Harp of Ireland and 
placing his own arms, a lion 
rampant, very inconsistently 
over all in an escutcheon of 
" Pretence." (Fig. No. 3.) 

With the restoration of 
Charles II. the arms were 
again brought back to their 
former style as in the reign 
of Charles I. 

On the abdication of James 
II. (1688) the Crown of Eng- 
land was offered to William 
III., Stadtholder of the United 
Netherlands and Count of 
Nassau. He was the son of 
the eldest daughter of Chas. I. 
Besides these titles William 
held another, that of Prince of ( No - 3-) 

Orange. This title was derived from a beautiful Province of 
that name in the South of France in the Department of Vaucluse. 
It came into possession of the House of Nassau through Rene, 
nephew of Prince Philibert of Orange in 1530. The sister of 
Philibert had married the Count of Nassau. Rene dying child- 
less his cousin William I., Stadtholder of the Netherlands, be- 
came Prince of Orange, since which lime the family has assumed 
the title of Orange-Nassau. In England this short Dynasty is 




(No. 2.) 




known as the Orange Stuarts. By a strange irony of fate this 
title of Orange, his only Catholic title (as it may be called) is 
the one by which he has become notorious and left his indelible 
mark on the pages of English History. That title, accruing 
from the smiling Province of Southern France : a country which 
brings to our minds memories of peace and harmony only; of the 
chivalrous days of the troubadours and ministrels of Provence I 
Sad that it should have become the shibboleth of strife and 
bloodshed, of hatred and racial antipathy, of internecine war, 
of fratricidal feuds, of political and fanatic animosity and sec- 
tarian intolerance, which for so many centuries have afflicted the 
once peaceful shores of Ireland ! Let us hope that the curtain 
may soon be drawn over this sad scene of the drama of Irish 
History. 

William III., Prince of Orange, 
on ascending the throne of Eng- 
land introduced another change 
in the Royal Escutcheon. He 
marshalled the Arms of Nassau : 
Azure, seme of billets, a lion 
rampant or. This coat was 
placed en surtout, or on an 
inescutcheon of Pretence in 
the centre of the Royal Arms. 
(Fig. No. 4.) 

In the reign of Anne another 
change was made. During her 
reign occurred, in 1707, the 
Union of the Parliaments of 
England and Scotland, under 
the name of The Parliament of 
Great Britain. At this time also 
the celebrated Duke of Marlborough 
war in the Netherlands, and making 
progress. The victories of Blenheim, 
Malplaquet, &c., followed hard upon 




(No. 4.) 

was carrying on the 
a sort of triumphant 
Ramillies, Ondenarde, 
each other. In honor of 

these victories Queen Anne made a change in the Royal Escut- 
cheon. She withdrew the Arms of Scotland from the second 
quarter, placing them, as we have seen 'Mn pale" with the 
British Arms, on the first quarter, and gave the whole of the 
second quarter up to the Arms of France, as we see them on 
this shield at Placenta. She left Ireland in its original place 
on the third quarter; repeated on the fourth quarter the com- 
bined Arms of England and Scotland, and discarded the Arms 
of Nassau. The changes in the fourth quarter (on the Placentia 
shield) were introduced with the House of Brunswick and will 
be explained later on. 

Mary Queen of Scotts, having married the Dauphin of France 
quartered his arms (quarterly, ist and 4th, the Arms of France 
three fleurs de lis ; 2nd and 3rd or, a dolphin embowed azure) 
with those of Scotland. When her husband became King of 
France, as Francis II., she quartered the Arms of France (three 
Lilies) with her own. But before this she was induced by her 
father-in-law, Henry II., to quarter the arms of England on her 
shield. This was an occasion of jealousy and fear to Queen 
Elizabeth and will be alluded to further on. 

During the reigns of the Stuarts the custom prevailed of 
marshalling the Arms (at least for Scotland) in the following 
manner, viz.: quarterly, ist and 4th, Scotland ; 2nd, France and 
England ; 3rd, Ireland. Thus giving Scotland the place of 
honour. This custom was also continued (for Scottish coins) 
by William III. He, however, added the Arms of Nassau 
en surtout as he had done on the English coins. Even the 
unfortunate first Pretender, assumed these arms and had a coin 
struck in 1716, giving himself the title of James III. and 
James VIII. Although this pretension of the Stuarts was vain 
and merely theoretic, still England permitted the use of these 
arms long after the Union of the Parliaments of England and 
Scotland. 

When in Edinburgh, in 1902, I copied a very interesting 
coat of arms from a fountain in front of Holy Rood Palace. 
The marshalling was novel and striking. The shield was divided 
" per pale," the whole of the dexter side the place of honor- 
being charged with the Lion of Scotland, while on the sinister 



Supplement to " The Old Coat of Arms at Placentia" 




oi.n C:HURCH AT PLACENTIA EXTERIOR. 







OLD C1URCH AT PLACENTIA INTERIOR. 



Supplement to " The Old Coat of Arms at Placentia? 





ROYAL ARMS AT PLACEN TIA. 

iz Photograph by Kt. Rev. Afgr. Reunion. 



COIN OK THE REIGN OF GEORGE II. 




COMMUNION SERVICE AND BIBLES PRESENTED BY THE DUKE OF CLARENCE (WILLIAM IV.), 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



3 




TaT"&r) s ' e were tne usual quarterings 
iff MrolT'l f the Arms of England and 

i . . W*TI France . (Fig. No. 5) 

The fountain was erected by 
the late Prince Consort during 
his sojourn in Edinburgh, and 
is a reproduction of a more an- 
cient one at Linlithgow Palace, 
erected by King James V. 

THE FRENCH ARMS. 

Although the Fleur de Lys 
was from time immemorial used 
in ornamentation of crowns and 
scepters, it .seems to have been 
first formally adopted as the 
Arms of Royalty in Erance by 
Louis VII. called Lejeutic, in 
1147. He adopted this cogniz- 
ance when about to proceed to the crusade. His shield was 
"Seme" or "Sown" with these lilies, that is to say, there were 
several of them scattered over the field as seeds are sown broad- 
cast. They were of gold on an azure or blue ground. In an 
ordinance concerning the coronation of his son Philip Augustus, 
it is declared that the mantle, the chaussures, and the oriflamme 
are to be sown with fleurs de lis. as described by the poet Rigord : 
" Vexillum floribus liliorum distinctum." 

The number of Lilies was reduced to three by Chas. V. (1376) 
in honor of the Most Holy Trinity " Pour Symbolise) la Sainte 
Trinite" and continued so till the destruction of the monarchy. 
This modification of the number of the lilies was not accepted 
in England until the reign of Henry IV., 1399. The three lilies 
are placed in the form of a triangle, the base being upwards the 
apex below, thus v They are said to be placed "two and one." 
This is always understood in Heraldry to be the disposition of 
the charges when they are simply mentioned as three without 
any qualification. If placed otherwise it is always mentioned 
as "per fesse," "per p.ile," "per bend," &c. If three charges 
are placed with the apex upwards thus .'. it is bad heraldry and 
they are said to be " mal ordonnes." I find that while on the 
old coat of arms in the church at Placentia the lilies are placed 
properly, yet on the bailiff's staff they are wrongly placed or 
"mal ordonnes This is owing to the form of the shield, oval, 
which would not allow of their being placed properly. 

The claim of England to the Crown of France originated with 
Edward III., who claimed it in right of his mother Isabella, 
sister of the French King, who could not succeed to the throne 
owing to the Salic law. After the Battle ot Sluys in which he 
completely annihilated the French fleet ( 1340) he placed the 
French Arms on the English escutcheon, and assumed the title 
of King of France, which was retained by the English Sovereign 
ever after with a slight respite during the Commonwealth, until 
1801, when, on the Parliamentary Union of Great Britain and 
Ireland, it was finally abandoned, and the lilies were stricken 
out from the British escutcheon. This empty claim to a title, 
which was purely fictitious, and had no real or actual dominion 
attached to it, at least ever sincfe the loss of Calais, 1556, the 
last French town held by England, seems almost puerile in these 
modern prosaic days, but in the ages of chivalry a good deal of 
store was laid by it, and it played no small part in the moulding 
of British History. Thus when Elizabeth was negotiating a 
peace with France, the French King being annoyed because she 
retained the style and title of Queen of France, in retaliation 
caused his daughter-in-law Mary Queen of Scotts to assume 
the title and style of " Queen of England and Ireland". This 
assumption not only irritated Elizabeth extremely and wounded 
her pride, but it seriously alarmed her ; for it cast a doubt upon 
her legitimacy and her right to the Crown. Consequently it 
embittered the feelings between those two cousin queens, so as 
to lead to the captivity and final execution of Mary Stuart. In 
fact all through her reign Elizabeth was haunted by this bug-bear 
of Mary Stuart assuming the title, style and arms of England 
Although Mary declared that she never intended to put this 
claim into actual effect, still it was always a subject of jealousy, 
the abandonment of which entered into every negotiation of 
peace with France ; and tinged the whole attitude of Elizabeth 



towards Scotland and her beautiful but unfortunate Queen. 
We next come, to consider 

THE ARMS OF IRELAND, 

which occupy the third quarter of the shield. The heraldic 
blazon of this coat is "Azure, a harp or: stringed argent." 
That is to say, on a blue ground, a golden harp with silver 
strings. The first thing that attracts our attention concerning 
this achievement is the colour of the field or ground, which is 
blue. At the present day it is well known that the green has 
been adopted by the people of Ireland as the 

NATIONAL COLOUR ; 

but antiquaries and experts in this heraldic art tell us that this selection is 
of comparatively modern date. By some it is said to have its origin from 
the blending of the colours of the two opposing factions the orange and 
blue by the United Irishmen at the close of the XVIII. Century (1791), 
under the celebrated Theobald Wolfe Tone. But on the other hand good 
authorities say that the green was used as the colour of the National Stan- 
dard of Ireland as far back at least as the XVI. Century. Sir Bernard J. 
Burke, " Ulster King of Arms," says that " Previous to the Anglo-Norman 
invasion there was no colour or standard for 1 reland at large. Brian Boru's 
banner at Clontarf was red. The favourite colours in those days were 
crimson, saffron, and blue. Green was not in favour. . . . Since the 
introduction of English Rule the national colour, established by, and derived 
from, the Royal Arms has been invariably blue. But this colour has not 
taken in modern Ireland, and Sir Bernard himself when called upon to com- 
pose the Arms for the Royal University of Ireland ( 1881), blazons the 
Arms of Leinster as vert (i.e. green), an Irish harp or. The adoption of 
green by Sir B. Burke instead of blue, as heretofore, was either in deference 
to modern national sentiment, or perhaps for sake of distinction, as he gave 
azure (blue) for Minister, and the field of the Connaught Arms is also 
argent and azure. As all the four Provinces are quartered on the shield, 
there would have been three azures, which would not have a good effect. 
May we not hope that when Ireland gains " Home Rule," which now seems 
to be not far distant, the concession to her national aspirations may be made 
of changing her quarter of the National Standard from blue to green ! 
With regard to the 

"GOLDEN HARI>" 

of Erin, a few words may be of interest. At what time the harp was selected 
as the Emblem of Ireland is unknown. It is probably in remembrance of 
the liar]) of Brian Born, and distinguishes Ireland as a music-loving 
country. Moore's beautiful lines on the Origion of the Harp are of the 
highest order of poetry, but of course all pure romance. It is certain that 
the Harp was acknowledged as the Emblem of Irelad in the XVI. Century. 
We have already stated that King lames I., who ascended the throne in 
1603, placed the harp on the Royal Escutcheon as the achievement of 
Ireland. In an Edition of Keating's History of Ireland, published in 1/25, 
there is given a representation of Bjian Bom. We have already mentioned 
that the colour of his banner was red, and strange to say, on his escutcheon 
in this engiavyig the arms are given exactly as those of England, namely, 
three lions rampant, guardant "in pale." This is the arms of the O'Brien 
family at present. The harp, however, is represented on this picture as 
embroidered on a cloth which rests on a table beside him. 

Henry VIII. in 1526 issued coins for Ireland : a groat bearing the harp. 
This is, I believe, the oldest representation we have of the harp as Ireland's 
Emblem. It was continued in subsequent reigns. King James II. issued 
copper coins for Ireland (farthings) in 1613 bearing the harp. It was 
thought that they might not be received by the people of England, as being 
only in base metal. Hence the harp was placed on them as they were 
thought good enough for Ireland. 

Cromwell also, in 1649, issued 
special coins for Ireland. They 
had two shields, one bearing the 
harp, the other the cross of Saint 
George. These shields were united 
at the top, symbolizing the union 
of the two kingdoms. The shields 
thus joined bore a fancied resem- 
blance to a pair of breeches. 
Hence this coinage was called i " 
"Breeches Money." (Eig. No. 6.) \ 

We now come to consider the 
charges on the 

FOURTH QUARTER 
of the arms at Placentia. It will 
be seen at a glance that they are 
quite different from those which 
occupy the fourth place on the 




Arms of the present day, 
are simply a repetition of 



(No. 6.) 



Royal 
which 
the first quarter^ viz. : the three lions of England. 

The heraldic blazon of this quarter is as follows : Tierced per pairte 
reversed; 1st gules, two lions passant guardant or; for Brunswick, 2nd or, 
seme of hearts gules, a lion rampant azure, for Lunenberg; 3rd (in point) 
gules, a horse courant argent for Westphalia or Saxony. It is still to be 
seen carved on the chalk hills of Dover. On an inescutcheon, upon this 
fourth quarter, is the so-called " Crown of Charlemagne." These combined 
arms constitute the achievement of the Electorate of Hanover. As they 
do not appear very clear on our engraving, which is taken from a photo- 
graph by the Right Rev. Monsignor Reardon, the original being now much 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




blurred and injured by time, I give also, on accompanying supplement, 
an engraving of a coin of nearly the same period, and bearing precisely the 
same arms. This will enable the reader to understand more clearly the 
exact style of the escutcheon. 

These arms were thus borne on the English Escutcheon until ist January, 
1801, when, on the Parliamentary Union of Great Britain and Ireland the 
arms of France were discarded; the lions of England repeated in the fourth 
quarter; and the arms of Hanover were placed on an inescutcheon of pre- 
tence over all (en sitrtout) in the centre of the shield. This inescutcneon 
was at first ensigned or surmounted by the Electoral Bonnet, until the year 
1815, when, after the treaty of Vienna, Hanover was made a Kingdom. 
The Electoral Bonnet was then supplanted by a Crown. They were thus 
borne until they were finally abandoned on the occasion of Queen Victoria, 
1837, as we shall see later on. 

Finally we come to consider the 

SHIELD OF PRETENCE 

in the centre of this quarter, and 
which bears, as we have stated, 

" THE CROWN OF CHARLE- 
MAGNE." (NO. 7.) 

George Lewis Guelf, Elector of 
Hanover, son of Ernest Augustus, 
Elector of Hanover, &c., &c., and 
Sophia, daughter of Elizabeth 
Stuart', Queen of Bohemia, sister 
of Charles I. of England, succeed- 
ed, or rather acceded, to the Crown 
_, on the death of Queen Anne, 

August ist, 1714. He brought 
with him a confusing number of German and foreign titles, among which 
was that of " Archtreasurer of the Holy Roman Empire !'' It was in view 
of this fictitious title that he quartered on his arms the (also fictitious) 
" Crown of Charlemagne." This title was doubly or triply fictitious. In 
the first place the Empiie itself was fictitious; his claim to the Treasurer- 
ship was fictitious; the treasurership itself was fictitious, and the emblem, 
the so-called Crown of Charlemagne, is fictitious. 
A few words here concerning the 

HOLY ROMAN EMl'lRK 

may not be considered out of place. The old Roman Empire, founded by 
Julius and Augustus Cccsar, was divided at the close of the IV. Century 
(395) between Arcadius and Honorius, sons of Theodasius the Great, into 
the Eastern and Western Empires. The capital of the Eastern was Con- 
stantinople, of the Western Rome. In the year 476 the Western Empire 
was overthrown by Odoacer. In the following (VI.) Century Justinian 
became Emperor of the whole Empire, and though retaining Rome, he still 
kept his Court at Constantinople. This state of things lasted until the year 
800, when Charlemagne. King of the Franks, was crowned at Rome by 
Pope Leo III. as Emperor of the New Roman Empire, called the Holy 
Roman Empire. The imperial title had fallen very low under succeeding 
Emperors till the time of Otto the Great (962) who revived some of its 
glory. From his time down the' German Emperors kept the title, until the 
year 1806, when Francis II., Archduke of Austria, King of Bohemia and 
Hungary, &c., resigned the imperial title and assumed the title of Emperor 
of Austria, with him the " Holy Roman Empire" ended. * 

George's claim to the office of Archtreasurer, &c., was based upon an 
intricate chain of consanguinial descent, from the House of Guelf, son of 
Isembert, Count of Aldtdorf, and Irmintrude, sister of Charlemagne The 
Crown which he marshalled on his arms, and which is erroneously called 
"the Crown of Charlemagne," is in reality a Southern Italian piece of 
workmanship of the XI. Century. Until the year 1796 it was preserved in 
the Church of the Holy Ghost at Nnrenberg; at the present time it is in 
the Treasure Chamber at Vienna. The letters S.R.I.A.TH. on the Coin, 
shown on supplement, apply to this rather nebulous claim of the Electors 
of Hanover. The full reading is SA.NCTI ROMANI IMPERII ARCHI-THES- 
AURARIUS. In English it reads Archtreasurer of the Holy Roman Empiie. 
The other caballistic letters refer to the various other German and foreign 
offices which were held by the Elector of Hanover, and which were insinu- 
ated into the "style and title" of the first Monarch of the House of Bruns- 
wick. Though not immediately relevant to our present subject, a few words 
in explanation of them may not be without interest. This Coin, as will be 
seen by the date (1729), belongs to the reign of George II. It is conse- 
quently of older date than the painting at Placentia. But as the achieve- 
ment is the same, it serves as an example. We can see of course only one 
side in this engraving. It is called the reverse side. The obverse side (which 
we do not here see) bears a bust of the King, with the inscription Georgius 
II., Dei Gratia (George II. by the Grace of God). Then on the reverse 
we have the following letters: M. B. F. ET. H. REX. F. D. B. ET. L. D.S. 
R.I.A.T. ET. E. 1729. The reading in full of which is as follows: Magna 
Britannia;, Francis, Et Hibernian, Rex, Fidei Defensor, Brunsvicensis Et 
Lunmbergensis, Dux, Sacri Roman! Imperil Archi-THesaurarius ET 
In English" King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, De- 
fender of the Faith, Duke of Brunswick and Lunenberg, Arch-Treasurer of 
the Holy Roman Empire, and Elector." 

Besides these this Monarch bore a few other titles, which he probably 
ldnot thmk worth recording, or, perhaps, there was no room for them on 

r- *u l ,' S ^\. this account that the P ra y e r formerly said in the Liturgy of the 
Catholic Church on Good Friday, "Pro Christianissimo Imparatore Nostro" 
has been suppressed. Not, as has been ignorantly thought by some because 
the Church of Rome refuses to pay due honor to temporal sovereigns 



the coin. Among them was that of Lay Bishop (!) of Osnabruck, Duke of 
Calenberg, Zell, &c., &c. 

The first part of this Inscription relating to the claim of the King of 
England to the Crown of France and Ireland has already been fully ex- 
plained ; also that relating to the Holy Roman Empire. 



F. D. 

The title of Fidei defensor, Defender of the Faith, adopted by the Sov- 
ereigns of Great Britain, was originally conferred on Henry VIII. by Pope 
Leo X. in the year 1521. It was granted to Henry for his celebrated work, 
a treatise on "The Seven Sacraments," written by the King (or at least ac- 
credited to him) in reply to Luther's " Babylonish Captivity of the Church." 
A copy of this work bound in cloth of gold, and bearing the King's auto- 
graph, was presented to the Pope, who read it with delight and eagerness, 
and published a Bull conferring the above mentioned title on the Royal 
Author. In this work Henry defended the doctrine of Transubstantiation, 
the Mass, Seven Sacraments, &c. Doctrines which were afterwards repudi- 
ated, and which up to the present day the Sovereign of England is obliged, 
on his accession to the throne, to declare that he believes to be idolatrous 
and blasphemous, yet by a strange inconsistency he retains the title con- 
ferred by the Pope. Whether it was owing to a sense of this incongruity 
or not, 1 cannot say, but in the year 1849 (I2th Victoria) a Florin was 
struck, on which these letters (F. D.) as well as the others [D. G.] did not 
appear. The inscription being simply I'ictoria Kegina. The omission of 
these letters offended the sense of the nation. The coins were designated 
" Godless" or " Graceless" money. The issue was immediately withdrawn 
and a new issue struck containing the letters F. D. The throne of 
Hanover, which had been an appanage of the English Sovereign since the 
time of George I., became vacant on the accession of Queen Victoria, as, 
according to the Salic law, women were excluded from the succession. 
The crown of this little kingdom was therefore conferred upon her uncle, 
the Duke of Cumberland. 

There is no date upon this coat of arms at Placentia, but it bears the 
initials G. III. R. The old Staff, however, at the Court House, bears the 
date of 1772, and it is probable that they are both of the same age. This 
date is prior to the erection either of the old Court House 01 the old 
Anglican Church. Accoiding to Judge Prowse [Chronological Table, 
p. 653] the former was built in 1774, two years later than the date of the 
Statt. Hence it could not have been presented to the Court House. But 
Prowse tells us [p. 314] that Court was held in Placentia as far back at least 
as 1749 "in a dingy room in Thomas Kennedy's house." On July 2Oth, 
1786, ll.R.H. William, Duke of Clarence, [afterwards William IV.] pre- 
sided, at the Court House in Placentia in his capacity of Surrogate or 
Magistrate. Prowse also tells us [p. 366] that the building of the Church 
was ordered by the Prince in 1787. "He contributed handsomely to its 
erection," continues Judge Piowse, " and furnished the massive Communion 
Service long in the custody of Dr. Bradshaw's family at Platentia." 

I have no knowledge of the date of this presentation, but it must have 
been much later than the date of the Arms. Piobably more light may be 
forthcoming on this point. 

I have now told all I know of interest about these old Arms, and only 
trust I may not have occupied too much space or wearied the readers of 
THK NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTKRI.Y. 

tM. F. HOWLEV. 

* Che exile's Daughter, # 

By J). Carroll. 

THRICE welcome stranger fair are you 
To this your fathei's native home, 
Who left the grasses waving blue 

Beneath Kentucky's azure dome; 
And sought our Island Home to view, 

The hills thy father loved to roam, 
The friends that he in boyhood knew 

To make perchance. those friends thine own. 
******* 
We may not meet again, yet still, 

That we hate met this once shall be, 
A link within our lives that will 

Grow strong with years of Memory : 
For you'll remember happy days 

And friendships formed beside the sea, 
And we'll remember one who strays 

Where blue grass waves in Kentucky. 



'THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY" 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 

Issued svery third month about the I 5 th of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

IOHN J. EVANS, -:- - : . . : . PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rales: 

Single Copies, each , o cents 

One V ear, in advance, Newfoundland and Canada 40 " 

Foreign Subscriptions (except Canada) 50 " 

Advertising Rates 

830.00 per page ; one-third of a page, Jio.oo; one-sixth of a page, Scoo; 
one-twelfth of a page, 2.50. Special rates for illustrative advertising; and 
trade cuts or half-tone plates obtained on order for same. 







Photo, by James Viy. 



ST. BONAVCIMTURE'S COLLEGE! SPORTS, I9O4. 





Photo, by Jamis Vey. 



C. E. I. AND C. L. B. SPORTS, St. George's Field, ISO*. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



CONSTABULARY fIRE DEPARTMENT.-fIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



EASTERN DISTRICT. 

NO. LOCATION OF BOXES. 

12 Temperance Street, foot Signal-hill Road. 

13 Factory Lane. 

14 Water Street, foot Cochrane Street. 

15 Duckworth Street, corner King's Road. 

16 Cochrane Street, corner Gower Street. 

17 Colonial Street, corner Bond Street. 

18 Inside Colonial Building, special box. 
112 Inside Hospital, Forest Road, special box. 
113 Penitentiary, corner Quidi Vidi Road. 
114 Military Road, comer King's Bridge Road 
115 Circular Road, comer Bannerman Road. 
1 16 King's Bridge Rd., near Railway Crossing 
117 Opposite Government House Gate. 
1 18 Rennie's Mill Road. 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

21 Horwood's Lumber Works, special box. 

22 Water Street, foot Prescott Street. 

23 Water Street, foot McBride's Hill. 

24 Gower Street, corner Prescott Street. 

25 Market House Hill. 

26 Duckworth Street, corner New Gower Street . 

27 Cathedral Square, foot Garrison Hill. 

28 Long's Hill, and corner Livingstone Street. 
221 Military Road, Rawlins' Cross. 
223 Hayward Avenue, corner William Street. 
224 Monkstown Road, foot of Fleming Street. 
225 Gate Roman Catholic Orphanage, Belvedere. 
226 Carter's Hill and Cookstown Road. 
227 Lime Street and Wickford Court. 
228 Freshwater Road and Cookstown Road. 
231 Scott Street, corner Cook Street. 
232 Inside Savings' Bank, special box. 
234 Queen's Road, corner Allen's Square. 
235 Centre Cartel's Hill. 



WESTERN DISTRICT. 

31 Water Street, foot Adelaide Street. 

32 New Gower Street, corner Queen Street. 

34 Waldegrave and George Street. 

35 Water Street, foot Springdale Street. 

36 Water Street, foot Patrick Street. 

37 Head Pleasant Street. 

38 Brazil's Square, corner Casey Street. 

30 Inside Boot & Shoe Factory, special box. 
331 LeMarchant Rd., head Barter's Hill. 
332 Pleasant Street. 

334 Patrick Street, corner Hamilton Street. 
335 Inside Poor Asylum, special box. 
336 Torpey's, Cross Roads, Riverhead. 
337 Hamilton Avenue, corner Sudbury Street. 
338 Flower Hill, corner Duggan Street. 

42 Southside, near Long Bridge. 

43 Central, Southside. 

46 Road near Lower Dnndee Premises. 



On the discovery of a fire, go to the nearest box. break the glass, take the key, open the door of the large box, and give the alarm by pulling the Hook all the way down OBCe, then let 
go and listen for the working ot the machinery in the box. If you do not hear it, pull again. After giving the alarm, remain at the box, so as to direct the Fire Brigade where to go. 

CAUTION. Persons wilfully giving false alarms, or damaging the Fire Alarm apparatus, will be rigorously prosecuted. 
"FIRE OUT SIGNAL." Two strokes on the large Hell, repeated three times, thus: II II II. 

JOHN R. McCOWEN, Inspector-General. 



Customs Circular 

No. 15. 



WHEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles, Angler's Outfits, Trouting Gear, Fire-arms 
and Ammunition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be 
admitted under the following conditions : 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles, Trouting Poles, Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equipage. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the AssistantJCpllector, 
St. John's, if taken in St. John's the Receipt No. 2 shall be sent 
to the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre- 
senting the articles at the Port of Exit and having them com- 
pared with the receipt. The Examining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the result of his examination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

No groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund may 
be taken upon such articles. 

R W. LeMESSURIER, 

Assistant. Collector* 

CUSTOM HOUSE, 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 22nd June, 1903. 



C. NURSE. 



C. AUSTIN. 



NURSE & CO., 




Ship and Sanitary 

Plumbers, 
Gasfitters, &c. 



Estimates cheerfully given on all work in the above line. 

All orders personally attended 
to and satisfaction guaranteed. 

129 Gower Street, St. John's, Newfoundland 



JOHN KEAN, 



\U ADELAIDE STREET, 



Boot and Shoe Maker. 



Hand Sewing a Specialty. 
Strictest attention paid to 
all work. < < < 

Outport Orders Solicited. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



,< progress in Deivfoundland. .* 






" Better fifty years of Europe than a cycle of Cathay." 
sang Alfred Lord Tennyson in Locksley Hall; but to-day 

even Cathay is moving. The East is no longer asleep. 

What means the sudden emergence of Japan as a world 

power, defeating on land and sea one of the mightiest 

nations of Europe? What means the military training 
under Japanese officers of numbers of Chinese in the different 
Provinces of China ? These mean that henceforth the Japanese 
will claim the right to dominate the Far East, and that the anti- 
cipated division of Chinese territory between Western Powers 
will not materialize. Yes, the East is moving. And the pro- 
gress of the West still goes forward by leaps and bounds. At 
present the United States of America is making a water-way 
between North and South America for the commerce of the 
world, and Canada is gathering in citizens by the thousand to 
develop the resources of her great North West, and will soon 
become the granary of the Empire. 

History is being rapidly made in the morn of the 2oth Century; 
and in the general advance, Newfoundland is claiming a share. 
Not long since the supplying merchant held in his keeping the 
conditions almost of life and death, certainly of sufficiency and 
want. Fishermen were afraid to speak, for to offend him meant 
no outfit for the fishery and, consequently, no means of obtain- 
ing a livelihood and no food. This is largely a thing of the past. 
The supplying merchant is still here, and still needed, but the 
fisherman sees another open door he is no longer a slave. 

The contrast between the Newfoundland of to-day and that 
even of 1900 is marvellous. What patriotic Newfoundlander 
can recall the condition of things existing in 1900 without 
trembling as if awaking from a horrible nightmare ? A crush- 
ing debt had been created by the construction of the railway; 
but at that time only the debt remained as the country's heritage, 
the railway having become the property of a Company. Tele- 
graph lines, Municipal Basin, and over 3,000,000 additional 
acres of land including mineral and timber lands, squatters' 
claims, and hundreds of miles of water-side had all been 
handed over, and Newfoundlanders were practically without a 
country. Was ever a people brought to a more humiliating 
condition apart from a disastrous war ? And as if that were 
not sufficient, a definite, persistent and carefully organized 
attempt was being made to obtain control of the Legislature of 
the Colony. In that hour of awful gloom a great cry went up 
to heaven : 

" Give us men ! A time like this demands 

Strong minds, great hearts, true faith, and ready hands; 

Men whom the lust of office does not kill; 
Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy ; 

Men who possess opinions and a will ; 

Men who have honour, men who will not lie ; 

Men who can stand before a demagogue, 

And damn his treacherous flatteries without winking ! 

Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog 
In public duty and in private thinking : 

For while the rabble with their thumb-worn creeds, 

Their large professions and their little deeds, 

Mingle in selfish strife, lo ! Freedom weeps, 

Wrong rules the land, and waiting Justice sleeps 1" 

Heaven heard that cry, men were given, the Legislature was 
rescued, and the recovery of our forfeited honour and inde- 
pendence became a possibility. It was no light task which 
confronted the newly elected Parliament of 1900 ; the task of 



By Newfoundlander. 

undoing a great evil is always difficult. Nor has it even yet 
been fully accomplished. At the present moment, the knife is 
being sharpened to carve the pound of flesh blood included 
from poor Antonio's body. Wounds so deep heal not in a few 
short years. But if the restoration is not complete, enough has 
been accomplished to inspire confidence in the future. The 
reversion of the railway, the telegraph lines and over 3,000,000 
acres of land have been recovered. And it is to the eternal 
credit of the Government that no harsh measures were used in 
obtaining these things; though, possibly, circumstances may 
have justified the employment of such measures. Nothing was 
done to weaken the confidence of capitalists in the honour of 
the Colony. A quid pro quo was paid in hard cash or its 
equivalent. Our heritage was redeemed. Successful efforts have 
been made in other directions also in the line of improvement. 
The burdens of the travelling public have been relieved by the 
new Coastal Contract; the pressure of taxation has been light- 
ened by the removal of duty from a number of the necessaries of 
life; and, last but not least, a Contract relieving Newfoundland 
of French territorial and exclusive fishery claims has been 
signed, and passed by the Imperial Legislature, and now only 
awaits ratification by the French Government. 

It is impossible, therefore, to compare Newfoundland as it 
was in 1900 with what it is in 1904 without seeing that vast 
strides upwards have been taken. Have we reason to hope 
that this upward tendency will be continued? Perhaps; but it 
is necessary to remember that " Eternal vigilence is the price of 
freedom," and that national progress cannot be had at less cost 
than National Freedom. 



Cbe Pilgrim, 

By D. Can-oil. 

OLD HOME, I feel that thrill again 
That stirred my heart when life was new, 
As 'cross the Gulf our good ship strains 
To reach thy land-locked waters blue. 
Old friends, old scenes, old mem'ries too 
Shall crowd to meet me on the shore, 
And cheat old time one day to woe 

Old dreams, in haunts we loved of yore. 

The path that winds across the hill 

Is calling with a mystic voice, 
The trees are beck'ning from the heights, 

The brooklet sings, " rejoice ! rejoice !!" 
The valley's glad with sun and song, 

The land is gay with one refrain, 
Nature's and friendship's best, that vie 

To greet the wand'rer home again. 

" Do you remember ?" sings the breeze, 

O'er many a spot where we've delayed, 
The well beside the road, the bridge, 

The cove where one bright eve we stayed 
And watched the twilight on the sea 

Change dreamily to night and stars, 
Then you were all the world to me ; 

That mem'ry, time, nor distance mars. 

O, many a distant clime I've trod 

Since that glad summer eventide, 
Mid gorgeous scenes, but this is still 

More lovely than all else beside. 
For here I won my angel bride, 

But ah, my restless feet would roam, 
'Neath starlit southern skies she died 

Still dreaming of her Island Home. 
****** 
Farewell 1 I breath it once again, 

Land of my heart's best love, Farewell I 
Fain would I in thy arms remain 

And calmly rest whate'er befell. 
But I must haste away and dwell 

Where cities plaud the strenuous hand, 
Yet, o'er the roar of marts shall swell 

This song, " I love the Newfoundland." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Cbc Colonial policp of tbc Raaical partp. 



By Rev. M. J. 

TMTHEN I was a young man," said Earl Russel (more 
\nj remembered as Lord John) to Mr. Lecky in 1870, 
" it was thought the part of a statesman to turn a 
small Kingdom into a great Empire; now it seems 
to be thought to be the part of a statesman to turn 
a great Empire into a small Kingdom." Those were the days 
in which a school was in the ascendant that regarded the 
Colonies not only as a present burden, but as never likely to be 
niiything else, and as certain to separate from the Mother- 
Country as soon as they grew capable of making any return for 
the protection which had sheltered their infancy. Men remem- 
bered how the Mother-Country had fought a great war for the 
advantage of the original Thirteen Colonies, and how those 
Colonies, when asked to defray part of the expense of the army 
which defended them against the Indian Tribes, had risen in 
revolt, and had called in the aid of the very nations with which 
the Mother-Country had for their sake quarrelled. Men forgot 
that we are not like the American Colonists. Thus the view 
was taken that the only possible policy with regard to Colonies 
was to drift along, to do little for them, and to expect nothing 
in return. And now a school arose caring nothing for prestige, 
and eager to be rid of the Colonies at the earliest moment 
possible. 

Sir Henry Taylor, one of the most accomplished men who 
have ever been employed in the Colonial Office, tells us in his 
Autobiography how in the year 1864 he wrote the following 
letter to his chief, the Duke of Newcastle, in company with a 
memorandum on the defence of North America which had been 
sent over from the War Office : 

" As to our American Colonies, I have long held and often 
expressed the opinion that they are a damnosa hcrtditas ; and 
when your Grace and the Prince of Wales were employing your- 
selves so successfully in conciliating the Colonies, I thought 
you were drawing closer ties which might better be slackened, 
if there were any chance of their slipping away altogether. I 
think that a policy, which has regard to a not very far-off future, 
should prepare facilities and propensities for separation. . . . 
In my estimation, the worst consequence of the late dispute 
with the United States has been that of involving this country 
and the North American Provinces in closer relations and a 



common cause. 



. Sir Erederick Rogers (Lord Blachford), the permanent Under- 
secretary for the Colonies, wrote thus to Taylor in 1865 : 

" I go very far with you in the desire to shake off all respon- 
sibly-governed Colonies ; and as to North America, I think if 
we abandon one, we had bettei abandon all. I should wholly 
abhor being left with a pitiful remnant on my hands say, 
Prince Edward Island or Newfoundland. I also go with you in 
hating the the talk about prestige." 

Greater and more powerful men than Taylor or Rogers ex- 
pressed these views publicly. During the great American con- 
flict in which the principle of Union "stamped out in blood" 
(to use Senator Lodge's words) " the principles of the Declara- 
tion of Independence," Bright in his place in parliament more 
than once proclaimed his hope and his assurance that British 
North America would declare its independence and unite with 
the American Republic ; and during the debates on the British 
North America Act in 1867 he repeated the wish, though not 
the prediction. 

During the American Civil War, Mr. Goldwin Smith, while 
travelling in the United States? received a letter from Gladstone, 



Ryan, Ph.D. 

intended for publication, but suppressed by Mr. Smith from 
regard for his friend's position in public life; in this letter the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer offered to the North the amazing 
suggestion that, if it would not harden its heart but would let the 
South go, it might have have all British America as compensa- 
tion. When Gladstone afterwards formed his first Government, 
he entrusted the Colonial Office to Lord Granville now almost 
forgotten, and remembered only as the feeblest of foreign 
Secretaries. At the Colonial Office, he wrote a letter to the 
Prime Minister of Canada informing him that " Her Majesty's 
Government" would prefer that Canada should separate from 
the Mother-Country, and then annex itself to the United States. 
The Canadian Nation was founded by Frenchmen against whom 
the Americans had stirred up a war of conquest, and by men 
of English blood who were hunted from their homes like wild 
beasts simply because of their loyalty to a United Empire; to 
the sons of such men, the suggestion of Gladstone's Government 
that they should turn themselves into Americans resembles what 
Gladstone himself once said of an invitation from the Turks to 
the Cretans to become (and to call themselves) Turks "nearly 
the most daring insult ever offered to civilized men." 

Gladstone's letter to Goldwin Smith was written about the 
time when he called upon the North to recognise thaWhe South 
had made itself a nation. His later explanation of this speech 
is curious reading : He " weakly supposed that the time had 
come when respectful suggestions of this kind were required by 
a spirit of that friendship which, in so many contingencies of 
life, has to offer sound recommendations, with the knowledge 
that they will be unpopular." How is it that a man of his genius 
could be such an officious simpleton ? Or what is the source of 
this maudlin sentimentality in Liberals where the United States 
is concerned ? " I did not desire a division of the United States 
on the ground of British interests. My view was distinctly 
opposite. I thought that while the Union continued, it could 
never exercise any dangerous pressure upon Canada to estrange 
it from the Empire our honour rather than our interests forbid- 
ding its surrender. But were the Union split, the North would 
seek a partial compensation for its loss by trying to annex 
British America." 

Now we are beginning to understand. Mr. Gladstone thought 
that the success of the South would be bad for his own country, 
since it would lead to an attempt of the North to subjugate 
British America, which Great Britain, contrary to its own in- 
terests, would be bound in honour to defend. Yet his love for 
the Americans was so great that he -wished them not to exhaust 
themselves in the effort to reconquer the South, but to spare 
their blood and treasure, though they might employ these in a 
war upon the British Empire, unless Gladstone could previously 
persuade the French-Canadians and the Sons of the Loyalists 
to change the " Flag of the Clustered Crosses " for the Stars 
and Stripes. Both British America and Great Britain ought 
certainly to be very grateful to Mr. Gladstone for his interest in 
the welfare of the Americans. 

Lord Elgin, the greatest statesman who has ever governed 
Canada the only man who ever carried through a Reciprocity 
Treaty and carried it by securing a " solid South" by the adroit 
threat, if the treaty were rejected by Senate, to annex all the Brit- 
ish Provinces and thereby add six new States to the North, as 
against the South Lord Elgin once wrote Home to ask indignant- 
ly regarding a Little-England speech, why should people assume 
that a connection between the Mother-Country and her Daughter 
States is incompatible with the full development of the latter ? 
" Is this really so incontestable a truth that it is a duty not only 
to hold but to proclaim it ?" 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Che Dew Colonial Policy 




<tN 1873 a new era in Colonial Policy began. The great 
American war for union, the union of British America, the 
unification of the Italian States, the confederation of the 
J> German States, the Russian conquests in Asia, woke the 
United Kingdom from the sleep into which the Little-Eng- 
land School had hypnotized the people. Disraeli who twenty 
years before had spoken of " those wretched Colonies" as " a 
mill-stone around our necks" and as sure to separate in the 
course of a few years made a famous speech at the Crystal 
Palace. Soon after, the Imperial Federation League was found- 
ed by men of both parties with a Liberal at their head. But 
Disraeli, by his conscienceless policy, made Imperialism stink in 
the nostrils of the Empire ; and Providence punished the British 
people for tolerating him by five years (1880-85) f the weakest 
and meanest and silliest Government that the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury saw. Gladstone in his old age became from sheer fatalistic 
pessimism a Little-Englander ; he got it into his head that the 
Biitish Empire was doomed, like that of Venice, of Spain, and 
of Holland ; and he held that the only policy was to submit to 
the inevitable with as much show of good grace as possible, and 
to give away what would otherwise fall away or be torn away. 

In the North American Review, of September, 1878, to atone 
for his meddling in American affairs, he was kind enough to 
inform his " kin beyond the sea" that the commercial primacy 
would be wrested from Great Britain by the United States of 
America. " We have no more title against the United States 
than Venice, or Genoa, or Holland has had against us. We 
have no title to murmur, and I," he piously exclaimed, " have 
no inclination." He went on to complain that his countrymen 
were blind to the imminence of a time when they would be 
unable to support the burden of Empire, and to the need of 
ridding themselves of the burden before that time arrived. 

Now, what is to be thought of the intellectual resources of a 
statesman who could originate no thought of any means of 
meeting American competition ? And what is to be thought 
of the spirit and the patriotism of a man who could so easily 
imagine such a doom for his country, and so readily resign 
himself to it ? And what is to be thought of the gumption 
of a statesman who could think to win friendship and re- 
spect for his country by such servile flattery of a foreign 
nation and such disparagement of his own ? By all the laws of 
human nature, those who crawl will get kicks; Americans, in 
particular, respect patriotism, being patriotic themselves, and 
despise cosmopolitans even when these are most useful to them ; 
and it is small wonder that, when Gladstone's article was scat- 
tered broadcast throughout the United States, that country 
soon after became the cradle of a conspiracy to assist Great 
Britain to get rid of the burden of Empire. 

It is clear, however, that Gladstone's view was held by the 
majority of the Liberals elected in 1880. As late as 1890, a 
friend of Sir W. Harcourt's was asked by a journalist, " Is 
Harcourt sincere in any of his politics ?" 

" Well, I am sure," was the reply, "that he is perfectly sincere 
in his detestation of the Colonies." 

This view is the explanation of the policy of surrender to 
everybody which characterized Gladstone and Gladstonians in 
later years. It is extraordinary that men experienced in politics, 
and presumed to have some knowledge of human nature in its 
political aspect, could fancy that concessions, such as those 
made to the Boers in 1881, could produce any feeling save con- 
tempt and dislike. They might have seen in the United States, 
that there is, indeed, in the South much hatred of the North, 
but not one half of what there would by this time be, if the 
North had conceded to the South independence or even a 
separate Congress. The Boers to-day, after the conquest and 
devastation of their country, bear us far more goodwill than 



they did after the concessions of 1881 and the further conces- 
sions of 1884. That is human nature. Fortunately, there were 
growing up in the Radical as well as in the Conservative Party 
younger men, saner, more courageous, and more resourceful, 
who were prepared to make a stand against the policy of the 
Gadarene swine. Fortunately, also, the British Democracy 
showed that Gladstone had misunderstood the character of his 
countrymen. He says, indeed, that he learned their nature 
when he was young ; that once, when he was canvassing against 
the Reform Bill, (which he mistook for Antichrist), and was 
trying to frighten a fanner by pointing out that in foreign coun- 
tries popular franchises had led to revolution, "the man looked 
me straight in the face, and said precisely the following words, 
'D n all foreign countries; what has Old England in common 
with them /" " 

Gladstone claims that he showed how much he profited from 
this lesson by his share in two later extensions of the franchise ; 
but if he had learned the lesson of his countrymen's character 
as thoroughly as he thought he did, he would have understood 
that the British masses were as little disposed to abdicate empire 
as to subvert the monarchy, and that the lot of Venice, of Spain, 
and of Holland will not be ours, for the short and simple reason 
that we are not Venetians, nor Spaniards, nor Dutchmen, but, 
by the good providence of God, resolute, resourceful Britons, 
subject to occasional deception, but speedily recovering our 
sense and spirit. Little-Englandism is dead, and so is its 
prophet. 

" Dead the warrior, dead his glory, dead the cause in which he died." 
Lord Rosebery, once under the spell of Gladstone, now differs 
(and his friends as well) from the Unionists only as Outs differ 
from Ins. \Ve may feel perfectly sure that when the British 
Opposition conies into office (it will not come into power) the 
Colonial Department, and indeed all the other great depart- 
ments, will he filled by Imperialist Radicals; and should 
any dispute arise within that Ministry between the Imperialists 
and the Radicals, we can count on the patriotism of the 
Unionists, even when in opposition, to throw their weight in 
the scale of Imperialism. 

The policy of organizing and consolidating the unity of the 
Empire goes steadily on. Even Mr. Redmond looks to Imperial 
Federation as the only chance of Home Rule. The great author 
of the new policy, a short time ago, stood "crowned with sun- 
light over darkness from the still unrisen sun." He now 
has won over great interests to the cause. Too intelligent a 
man to be himself either an unconditional Free-trader or an 
unconditional Protectionist, he will manage to make both the 
instruments of a great political design the Protectionists to 
keep out foreign products, the Free-trader to let in Colonial 
products. The effect of prosperity is against change ; but when 
bad times come, as come they will they are beginning in the 
United States, then his policy will come in like a flood. The 
first step must be to impose the responsibilities of government 
on the Opposition, and. to endow his own party with the freedom 
of opposition. Fiscal Reform, like most other reforms in 
Britain, may be carried by those who at first opposed it. 

The Radicals, when saddled with the responsibilities of office, 
will undergo a change as great as that of the Canadian Liberals, 
who, when out of power, became such a party of traitors that 
Mr. Blake refused to lead them, and who sold themselves to 
American Capitalists; while they have, in office, developed into 
a party of Imperialists, preferentialr traders, and finally avowed 
protectionists. 

In this country, we have seen that statesmen who stood, 
when out of office, for freedom of the trade in bait fishes, have 
had the patriotism, when in office, to face the charge of incon- 
sistency, and to impose restrictions on a minor industry for the 
protection of the great staple industry of the country. Our 
enemies abroad, and those within the gates who sympathise 
with our enemies, long for the success of the British Radicals ; 
but they may be disappointed with the result of that success. 
The world of politics is one in which the Progress of the living 
forces of the present against the policies of the past is embar- 
assed and retarded by faction fights and personal interests ; 
but nevertheless, to use a phrase which was well invented, 
" nevertheless it moves." 



8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



In euangclinc's Garden. 



By Eros Wayback, 



A BOLD tall peony flatiied to view 
In a garden bed where a daisy grew 
Beneath the imperious, scarlet thing, 
That far and wide did its arms outfling. 
Now, low, at hie feet, he just caught sight 
Of the sweet, shy flower drest in raiment white ( 
Save the delicate bloom on her petal tips, 
As she kissed the dew from the morning's lips, 

He derisively flouted the simple flower 

That timidly crept by my lady's bower, 

Where castjes in Spain thro' the summer hour, 

Kvangeline's airy fancy drew 

In the circumambient shimmering blue. 

Unconventional mixed with minarets tall, 

The woodbined cottage and stately Hall; 

In the nebulous scheme no science had part. 

There, shewed Gothic and Moorish and modem art ; 

Quick as the moves in a fairy dance, 

Now, Elizabethan and Renaissance. 

As for the people her fancy wrought, 
From varying climes and limes were brought ; 
Evolved from Evangeline's summertide moods, 
Waverley knights, and her own day dudes; 
Alonzo and Jack in that wondrous throng, 
George, Hernando and Tom stepped airily along; 
The Regency's dandys in satins and ruffs, 
With our own placid youths in collars and cuffs. 

Now, the peony noted with jealous eye 

That the singing bee and butterfly 

Alighted oft on the gem-like flower, 

Caressing and kissing through sunlit hour, 

Whispering tales in her pearl rimmed ear 

Of her kith and kin in the gardens near 

On each pictured wing were the fly's notes wrought, 

Whilst the bardic bee garrulous hummed each thought, 

When the daisy's bed in the noon-tide sought. 

And the peony bent his scarlet head 

Low down o'er the fair flower's bordered bed, 

Anxiously seeking to intercept 

Tne bee and the fly as they downward swept 

To where the daisy grew apace, 

Fearfully watching the angry face 

Of the peony glowering at its homely grace; 

But the gold-banded bee and the emperor fly 

Never once heeded that amorous sigh. 



Nor deigned a glance at the garish thing, 
Whilst around they poised on quivering wing, 
As never such plant as the peony stood 
In Evangeline's garden in arrogant mood. 

" Now, get thee hence, low sickly thing. 

That hath cumbered my feet since earliest spring 

Sent hither her bees with their merry chaunt, 

And the pictured fly to a favoured haunt, 

Where waves thro' the day my scarlet plume ; 

'Neath the trampling feet of men resume 

Your place by the wayside's deepest gloom." 

Then the sweet, timed flower lowly bent her head 

In sore afright of the peony red; 

And the bright eye dimmed, and the petals turned 

Paler it seemed, as the bold flower spurned. 

Then Evangeline hearing the click of the latch 

Of the garden gate, and a scraping match ; 

And dreamily noted her lover's tread 

As he cigaretteiferous odours shed ; 

Cried, " Jack ! you're as bold as that brazen flower 

That keeps nodding its red face here, thro' the hour) 

And just like the plant, a tiresome pest, 

Hither coming, an unbidden guest." 

'Twas Evangeline's charmingly pettish mood, 

Philosophical Jack quite understood; 

And meekly smiled as he raised the hand 

That wore a rich gemmed, golden band : 

" 'Tis somewhat solemn, here, 'neath the yews j 

Now, what is the budget of latest news ?" 

The peony had heard this perseflage, 

And down to the roots was filled with rage; 

Grew ruddier still, with injured sense 

Of my lady's most slighting reference; 

Malevolent, now, with wrath and pride, 

Stood the purple flower by the daisy's side. 

But that night the wind, with whirl and shout. 

Scattered his gleaming plumes about ; 

And the morning sun saw a skeleton stalk 

Where he arrogant stood by the garden walk. 

When the daisy awoke from the night's light dreams, 

She smilingly greeted the daygod's beams; 

Pleasing each eye where she lowly grows 

When summer has fled with the perfumed rose; 

'Till the snow flakes cover with feathery plumes 

Evangeline's garden's latest blooms. 






hoisting or the Banners. 

By Sir Robert Thorburn, K.C.M.G. 



REAR high the Crimson Banner of St. George, 
Beneath whose ample folds Britannia guards, 
'Neath Southern Cross, or by the Arctic gorge, 

Her gallant sailors on the quiv'ring yards ; 
Or on the bloody field of Africa's velt, 

Where sailors, soldiers, share a common grave ; 
That flag, a shroud for those whose honor felt 
No stain should ever mark the fallen brave. 

Rear high the Golden Harp, enshrin'd in green, 

Old Erin's banner of the Sister Isle, 
Inwoven with the Shamrock leaves between 

By maiden fingers deft, in ornate style. 
No braver race 'ere trod the tented field 

To strain of music, or in silence stern, 
Disdaining death, ne'er yet as cowards yield, 

Has Celt been found the backward step to learn ! 



Rear high St. Andrew's flag of azure hue 

The banner of the gallant Scots unfold ; 
Her Patron Saint wore Cross of White and Blue, 

And " Scots wha hae wi Wallace bled" were told 
Grow thistles still, and hold their heads full high 

Still " welcome to their gory bed" of yore 
Are Highland clans, when in the van they ply 

The foe with bayonet thrust, or fell claymore. 

Rear high once more old Terra Nova's flag, 

As well becomes her Norsemen's sons of old ; 
Her colors on those Cabot Towers, no brag, 

They fill the Post of Honor, and uphold 
Our Country's claim to mark the sacred spot 

Where Cabot's welcome to our Newfoundland 
Burst forth in lusty cheers from British throat 

That echo still around her ancient strand 1 



Uphold the Briton's flag, then, brothers all, 

Where're it waves by land or surging sea 
At home, abroad, respond to Duty's call 

No tyrant's yoke we wear, or bend the knee, 
Except to Him who rules by sovereign grace, 

And " holds within the hollow of His hand 
The mighty deep," that cradle of our race ! 

"God save the King," and bless our Mother Land. 







rhoto. by James Vey. 



The First Train with the Old Home Week Visitors. 




Pkota by James Vey. 



Some Guests at Mount Cashel Garden Party. 



Top Row Hon. E. M. Jackman, H. H. Carter, Rev. Arch. O'Neill, Rev. W. Jackman, Rev. M. Clarke, Rev. Dean Ryan. 

Second Row Rev. Fr. O'Rourke, Hon. J. D. Ryan, Administrator Horwood, Archbishop Howley, Rev. W. Borne, Rev. Fr. Finn, Rev. J. MacNamara. 
Third Row Rev. Bro. J. E. Ryan, Rev. Fr. Fleming, Rev. P. O'Brien, Rev. P. W. Browne, M. P. Cashin, Sir E. P. Morris, Rev. Bro. Slattery, Sup., 

Hon. L. O'B. Furlong, Rev. Wm. Browne. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



ESTABLISHED J809. 

AND 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Company. 



Total funds exceed $72,560,330. 
GEORGE SHEA, Agent for Newfoundland. 



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....Headquarters for.... 

Marbleized Mantelpieces, English and 
American Tiled Grates, Tiled Hearths, 

Fancy Brass and Iron Kerbs, 
Fire Brasses, Dogs, Stops, 
and other Artistic Grate 
and Hearth Furnishings. 

349 Water Street. 349 



Telephone: Office 131, Store 345. 



P. 0. B. 275. 



E. H. & 0. DAVEY, 

111 BOND STREET. 

?r 

Contractors, Builders, and 
Dealers in Building Materials. 



VVIIAUI & STORES: 



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LEGAL CARD. 



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BARRISTERS and SOLICITORS. 
DUCKWORTH STREET, ST. JOHN'S. 



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i Kimberley Row, - St. Johns, Newfoundland. 
TELEPHONE, No. 266. 



JOB BROTHERS & Co., 

Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

of British and American Goods of every 
description Wholesale and Retail. 



JAMES VEY, 



Gazette Building, 





f Codfish > <^>doil, Codlweron, Seal Oil 
J Lobsters, Furs, and general produce. 
All orders for same promptly filled at very lowest rates. 



Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 



Photos Enlarged and Finished in Ink, Framed Oil Por- 
traits 88.00; English, German, American and Canadian 
Mouldings always in Stock ; Frames and Cornices made 
to order; a large assortment of Views of Newfoundland 
Scenery. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

Bow Jack Burton Returned to Deutfounaiand 



T^i^T 
\A/ 

1 






By Rev. J. A. 

," said Skipper Mickle Brophy, as he took a seat 
on the "settle" in James Burton's cottage and 
spread his hands over the blazing logs that lay 
inside the " dog-irons," " I'm goin' to say fifty years 
now av its a day, and I never seen such a night as this in all 
me livin' days." Well might Skipper Mickle say so for it was 
such a storm as is remembered in the Island to this day though 
nearly forty years have passed since it took place. 

" Ves," said Mr. and Mrs. Burton, "its a dreadful night on 
the land even ; may God protect those that are out on the ocean." 
Here the speakers said a prayer, Skipper Mickle Brophy doing 
the same. 

" Isn't it wanderful," said Mickle, " that people are niver so 
pious as when there's a big breeze of wind from the North-Aist 
or Sou'-West ?" This cynical piece of philosophy was honored 
with a laugh. As they thus spoke the tempest seemed to have 
reached its height. In violent gusts it swept over the forests 
and down the hills; rushing at the house it caused it to rock 
and reel; whilst the window panes were all but driven in. 

All this while the sea was thundering against the cliffs, and 
the ocean was rising with ever increasing rage as though to over- 
leap all landward barriers. A wild storm of rain changing 
hill-side rivulets into foaming yellow torrents added its share 
to the elemental warfare. The loud voice of the storm at inter- 
vals dropped to a melancholy sobbing, as though in grief over 
the lives then perishing from its wrath. The whole scene was 
a bearing out of Longfellow's phrase the " Mournful Atlantic." 
Dense darkness prevailed, illumined at times by the fierce search- 
ing flashes of lightning, which were flung for moments athwart 
the awesome scene and when these ceased all was again buried 
in darkness "chaos and old night.'' Again and again did 
those in Burton's cottage tell their beads and invoke in that 
hour the aid of her, so well called " Star of the Sea," that she 
might add the weight of her influence in Heaven to their efforts 
on earth. 

And now indeed it would seem to be the hour of " utter need" 
with many a seaman off the coast of Newfoundland. It was 
certainly the hour of " utter need " with one brave ship, which 
at that moment was fighting the storm near the south coast of 
the Island, and aboard of that vessel was Jack Burton son of 
the people whose household we have described as praying for 
those out on the ocean in such a tempest. 

Burton had been in the United States for about ten years 
previous to the time when we find him returning to Newfound- 
land. His pursuits had been mainly seafaring. Some years 
were spent on the George's Banks, whither he sailed from 
Gloucester; other seasons were spent on river-boats; he made 
several trading trips in the Atlantic and Pacific; from the Gulf 
of Mexico to Hudson Bay nib experience brought him. He was 
a through built seaman of the Newfoundland type ; brave to 
recklessness but courage well balanced by the coolest calcula- 
tion. In appearance, a man of six feet though breadth of 
shoulders and depth of chest took from his height ; his face 
frank and good humoured was made stern and keen by that 
look which comes to men who have to look angry skies and 
dangerous seas in the face. His face was bronzed by foreign 
suns, used all his life to danger, and his present situation had 
not in it the embarassing ingredient of novelty. Not so the 
American captain, who, although a proven seaman, now found 
himself in a difficulty ; first inasmuch as the storm was sudden 
and violent, making it a life and death matter to reach a harbor ; 
and because he was almost a total stranger to the difficulties and 
dangers of the Newfoundland coast, especially in such weather. 
He appealed to Burton, as a man well accustomed to the coast, 
for advice and encouragement. 

" Well," said the latter, " in the open sea, in weather of any 
kind, a good ship is a good harbor ; but to be running for the 
coast of Newfoundland in weather like this is no child's play, 
captain." 

The other said, '-You know the coast along here better than 



D.D. 

I do being a stranger. What say if you take the wheel and 
see if you can fetch her through it." 

' All right captain, I'll do my endeavours," said Burton. " It 
looks saucy enough out here, but if she'll keep together I'll 
drive her through. I was often out in worse." The captain 
stepped from the wheel and the Newfoundlander took charge 
of the ship. He first secured himself by being "lashed" to the 
wheel a precaution made necessary by' the lurching motion of 
the vessel which was such that as she rolled in the seas 
everything movable would have been swept over the rails un- 
less already fixed securley on the deck by ropes and chains. 
This done Burton gave his orders to the well nigh panic-stricken 
crew to batttn down the hatches and shorten sail in a word 
to make all ready for a rough storm. The cool courage of the 
Newfoundlander speedily restored confidence of the hitherto 
discouraged men. They obeyed his orders quickly and reefed 
the sails as he told them, and not a minute too soon for the 
storm had by this time all but redoubled its fury. The vessel 
was now under double reefed canvas anil the men stood by ready 
to lake off all sails and let her drive before the gale under bare 
poles. Night was rapidly getting darker and more confusing- 
and the vessel was now rushing at fearful speed through the 
surging waters and it took all of Burton's seamanship to keep 
the vessel on such a course as to avoid being upset or else 
buried beneath the billows which were every few minutes break- 
ing either ahead or astern of the fast-Hying ship. 

The vessel's decks were swept every few minutes and Burton 
held his footing only by being lashed to the wheel. The 
drenching spray immersed him and all but carried him over 
despite the ropes : death yawned for him all around, but no 
perils drew off his mind from the main task: that of getting 
the ship in reach of land. Never is brave soldiership so well 
proven as in leveling a forlorne hope; and never is New- 
foundland seamanship well shown as in bringing a vessel through 
the seas when the waves are like mountains all around, and 
when an iron bound coast is wailing to drive in her bow's if she 
strike. One false turn of the wheel might send the ship to 
bottom ; one moment of confusion might dash her on the rocks. 
But Burton like a brave leader who brings his men past the 
enemy's lines steered the ship past the ocean lines which 
every moment massed their forces and sprang at her sides to 
drag her down to the depths. She was the sport of the ele- 
ments. The floods crash over the rails, decks and topmast : be- 
fore and behind the sea opened in yawning gulfs : now she sinks 
in the trough of rhe sea : and now she climbs a hill-side of water. 
No sooner is she on the crest of the wave than she plunges 
again as though to strike the very earth and through all this 
dreadful crisis the hand of the Newfoundlander is as steady on 
the wheel ; his heart as staunch and his eye as true as though 
every minute did not bring the possibility of a " sailors grave." 
And in good truth not mere courage but the rarer quality of 
cool deliberation could have secured safety in such a crisis. 

The American captain cries: "Do you think she'll come 
through all right ?" 

" All right, captain. Never say die." 

A distant harbor ; a storm risen to a hurricane ; and a thick 
musky night all conspired to make the steering difficult. The 
chances were a hundred to one that she would be swamped or 
upset before port could be gained. Burton knew all this ; none 
better. Seafaring was his trade and life-work, but he knew 
what the call was on his own nerve and then the Higher 
Power Sole Ruler of the storm. In prayers brief, though 
fervent, he called God to his aid, whilst he often made a sign, of 
the cross on the seas, and then with new manhood face the 
battles of wind and sea. His steering was so true that within 
another hour the vessels would have got into New Port. Already 
she was getting into smoother water, owing to the shelter of the 
steep headlands, at least, the force of the gale was greatly 
lessened when crash ! ! goes the foremast broken near the 
decks by the sudden swoop of wind from the heights, and falling 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



it hangs a mass of wood and cordage over the ship's side. The 
ship thus hampered no longer answers the wheel ; but driven 
by wind and tide she is rushing towards the iron fronted cliff of 
Sunken Rock Point, where many a gallant ship and brave crew 

met destruction. 

# # # # * # # 

Father, there's a wreck on the Sunken Rock Point and the 
people are gone out to save the crew, and they want you to go 
with them." 

It was Katty Simmonds, the venerable house keeper of 
Father Furlow, who thus spoke. The clergman was just finish- 
ing his breviary, as the house mistress, haste in her step, fire in 
her eyes, and a pair of top boots and waistcoat in her hands 
enters his study with the afore said message. It was no new 
call that to Father Furlow for often in his thirty years of mis- 
sionary life in that and other ports of Newfoundland, had a 
similar call been given him. When foremost amongst his 
people he went to the cliffs and the strand, or the sinking vessel 
itself to help to save the drowning; or to administer the last sac- 
raments when possible to the dying, or, at least, to recover the 
dead bodies for burial in consecrated ground. Not once or 
twice but a score of times in his long missionary career had 
he been on the very brink of deadily peril in thus carrying out 
his sacred duties. 

When the message was thus given his reply was " A wreck 
is there ? Tell Paddy Sloan to get a lantern and come out with 
me to Sunken Rock Point." Sloan is sleeping the sleep of a 
tired man by the kitchen fire when the house mistress rings the 
trumpet call in his ear. " Get up out of that and get the stable 
lantern and go out with the priest to Sunken Rock Point there's 
a wrack there." 

"A wrack," said Sloan, as he assumed the perpendicular. "A 
wrack, is it tibaccy or what or what?" Never mind what it is: 
it is not rum or tibaccy, but drownin' men to be saved. I'd 
advise you not to keep the priest waitin' any longer." " Sloan, 
come along fast," says the priest from within. Sloan was 
promptly arrayed in sea-gear and lighting a lantern lie opens 
the door when an inrush of storm drives him back. "Arrah, 
yer reverence, wat's the use of goin' out such an night as this. 
Shure these poor souls are gone be this, any way." "Go on," 
was tte stern reply of the clergyman. "Amin," said Sloan, and 
then as he plunged into the darkness he added under his breath: 
"I'm not a horse at any rate." The clergyman and his faith- 
ful, though sometimes obstreperous man plod sturdily on by the 
narrow path-way which ran a quarter of a mile from the settle- 
ment towards the scene of the wreck. Their road lies within a 
few yards of the sea-broken cliff, and their footing needs to be 
firm, for the gale at times is so swift and stormy that it is only 
at the risk of being swept over the edge that they can make 
good their ground and go along. 

Near Sunken Rock Point the rocks descended in slopes and 
steeps at heights varying from fifty to one hundred feet from 
the waters level to the top. The people amongst them Skipper 
Mickle Brophy were gathered at the place, and all provided 
with ropes and chains : for ships great and small had time and 
again been wrecked on that rock-ribbed tide ravaged shore 
and the residents were well skilled in the art of life-saving: and 
well ready, too, to venture their own lives and limbs in taking 
the dead or drowning from the very jaws of the sea. And so it 
has ever been for never has the call to save the shipwrecked 
been made to the people of the Island, but strong hearts and 
willing minds have been ready for the work. Whether on the 
storm swept sea or amid the crushing waves and rocks or over 
the front of the beetling headland the Newfoundlander has 
never failed to bring deliverance to those in need ; And so it 
was now that a large number of men and boys was gathered on 
the outer ledges of Sunken Rock Point, to see by what means they 
might put in safety the remnant of the wrecked crew. When the 
ship had been dismasted, Burton managed to launch the little 
deck boat and so brought the crew to the only safe landing 
place in their reach a platform of rock at the foot of one of 
the highest peaks of Sunken Rock Point. Landed here they 
were safe at least for a while and before leaving the drifting 
ship Burton made signal lights for help, in answer to which the 
people had come to their aid. Soon the ropes, with chains, are 



lowered over the heights and Jack Burton causes each man to 
be raised by this the people above drawing the ropes up. As 
soon as all are up 'he puts the rope around his own waist and 
begins the upward climb. His experience told him that the rope 
would be over worn from contact with cliffs and so he had told 
the people by the mouth of those who had gone up before him, 
to leave the rope somewhat slack whilst he was going up, as he 
would be able to help himself along by making a sort of step- 
ladder of the rougher projections of the sea-wall. This was 
very near costing him a l : fe, and in this way. 

About half way up he rested his whole weight for a moment 
on a stone, which gave way under him, and as the rope was 
released he was on the point of falling to the bottom, when his 
old sailor training saved him. Often on the Banks had he gone 
to the masthead when the vessel was pitching and tossing and 
now. no way unnerved, he clings hand and foot to the cliff, and 
so preserves a balance and saves his life, whilst those above 
pull tighter the rope. Coming near the upper edge of the cliff, 
another danger confronts him. Where the people were standing 
the ground was beginning to give away. As Burton gets near 
the top, a couple of men reach hands down to him, and by 
sailor's grip assist him to jump in on solid ground clear of the 
outer edge. No sooner has he done so than several tons of 
earth, gravel and stone the whole upper edge of the precipice 
goes clattering down a hundred feet and falls with a dead 
thud on the rocks below. 

Safe, however, he is greeted by scores of friendly voices. 
All go with him to his old homestead, and there a real Irish 
welcome greets the wanderer after years of absence. And so it 
was, that fom the deck of a shipwrecked vessel ; and from out 
the depths of a raging sea, and over the face of an iron-bound 
cliff that Jack Burton returned about 40 years ago to the 
Old Homeland. 




fl Foretaste of flutumn. 



fly Robert Gear MacDonald. 



WILD north-west wind, oh, what do you say to me, 
Me, who with shivering steps wander on ? 
Bending spruce boughs, what's the tune that you play to me, 

Now that the glow of the daylight is gone? 
Waves of yon dark pond, I hear but the plash of you, 

Though the moon rises, as yet she is low 
Yet well I know, by the fierce striving lash of you. 
Summer is passing, and soon must she go. 



Chill is the night air, but fragrant with scent of boughs ; 

Weird is the forest, and dark are its dells ; 
Standing before me one tall fir tree, scant of boughs, 

Moans like a wizard rehearsing his spells ; 
Low breathes the streamlet, and black is the path of it, 

Slipping o'er stones that show white in the eve 
Save where a narrow place foams with the wrath of it 

Sputtering to alders that over it grieve. 



Far in the marshland one stray bittern, hoarse of tone, 

Hides in the shadow of rush and of fem ; 
Sounding like one who with fitful remorse of tone 

Tells a foul secret we wish not to learn. 
And through the dusk air, like mad thoughts that fleet by one 

Whirrs the last snipe, speeding over one's head: 
List ! 'tis a rabbit disturbed by strange feet, by one 

Sauntering at eve ere the last lights are dead. 



Summer is going the gay dancing feet of her 

Speed from the barrens, and flee to the south ; 
Pale partridge berries turned red by the heat of her 

Soon will grow lucious and soft to the mouth. 
Shrills the north-west wind a menacing knell to her, 

Mournfully answered by birch, spruce, and fir ; 
Then, my hushed soul, say a nirie-month's farewell to her- 

Hail then to Autumn, its clearness and stir 1 

Three Pond Barrens, August 271(1, 1904. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



ii 



fl Six lontb$' Cour. 



Extract f torn Letters of a Tour to Egypt, The Nile, Palestine, Turkey, Greece, and Europe, 1904. 

By James Carter, 

i p.m. and then went for a walk and visited the shops, arcades 
and bazaars, but we had not much time, leaving for Cairo by the 
railway at 4 p.m. The line is run by an English Company, the 
carriages being similar to those in England with one carriage 
seating six, they are very comfortable and run very smoothly 
and quickly, about forty miles per hour. The scene at the 
station was most animated and the noise deafening, for so many 
carriages, horses, mules, donkeys, all mixed up together. The 
scenery was very picturesque along the line. There was a road 
on either side, where one could see the Arabs passing on the 
backs of camels, donkeys and horses, and women in carts. We 
passed several Arab villages enclosed by a wall and built with 
mud, some low and others conical like a honey-comb. The 
villages were crowded with men, women and children. The 
vegetation is extraordinary, as far as the eye can reach on 
each side fields of barley and clover with long drains here 
and there about eight or ten feet wide for water, with horses 
working wooden wheels for irrigation. The rain that falls in 
June would take the balance of the year before it would reach 
that distance from the head of the river. We crossed some very 
fine iron bridges from eight hundred to a thousand feet long 
that crosses the Nile and Canal at several places. We saw the 
Egyptian oxen yoked to the plough in pairs turning over the soil, 
worked by Arabs. They get in some places, several crops of 
clover in one year. Several large flocks of sheep and a good 
deal of cattle grazing ; camels, horses, donkeys, etc. Passed two 
or three large towns, one of fifty thousand inhabitants, where 
the train stopped at the station to land and take passengers. 
The place was crowded with Egyptians, Arabs and Greeks and 
in their Oriental costumes looked very picturesque. Several 
Arabs were at prayer in the fields and on the road, previous to 
which they wash their feet and rinse their mouths. 

Alexandria is about 130 miles from Cairo. We arrived about 
7 p.m. at " Sheppard's Hotel," a very fine and extensive build- 
ing, with a beautiful terrace in front and very handsome break- 
fast and dining rooms. We found there an immense assembly 
of ladies and gentlemen in evening costume. The ladies were 
elegantly dressed: they were holding a reception in the garden 
at the rear which is very large, with beautiful palms, and the 
trees were hung with a thousand colored lamps, flags and elec- 
tric lights in arches. The place was literally packed with ladies 
and gentlemen of all nationalities. English officers in gold lace 
uniforms, Egyptians, Greeks, Syrians and Europeans, I am sure 
there could not be less than five thousand ; you could not get 
standing room, and carriages and pairs constantly going with 
the elite of Cairo and still adding to the number; it was a kind 
of carnival which takes place at certain seasons, I expect much 
the same as at Rome and other places in Italy. They were 
amusing themselves by throwing in the face of each other small 
colored paper like wafers, which would stick about the ladies' 
hair and dresses. The illuminations of the hotel, coupled with 
the garden, was a scene of Oriental grandeur that could not be 
excelled in beauty elsewhere. 

The next day the garden was completely covered up to your 
ankles with the paper, which had to be taken up and the paths 
all covered again with red sand and gravel. There is a num- 
ber of guests here at present, the tables are crowded, the cooking 
good, and there is a large attendance of waiters; Arabs, Greeks 
and also English. I think they have at least, fifty serving and 
waiting at table and there does not seem to be too many en- 
gaged. They have two alternate tables every time each day 
and they sit a big crowd. It is to me wonderful, where all the 
people are coming and going. At Alexandria, we visited 
Pompey's pillar which is about one hundred feet in height, 
built of granite and marble. There are the ruins of several 
others to be seen and a good deal of excavation has latterly 
taken place, where a lot of Catacombs have been discovered 
with several tombs, galleries, etc. The population of Alexan- 



GLORIES of other lands, some may tell 

Of mountain slope, river, field and dell; 

Yet fairest St. John's we love thee best, 

Thy sea laved beach and hilly crest, 

To us more classic than the hills of Rome ! 

Heaven ever prosper thee " Home dear Home." 

MARCH 4th, 1904. 

I left you at sea, bound to Egypt via Alexandria, and now as 
you will see by the above address, I am writing you at the 
" Sheppard's Hotel," Cairo, and I will try to give you a brief 
outline of my movements since. 

We arrived at Alexandria at 6 a.m. on Wednesday; there was 
a sand-storm the night before, so that we were delayed, which 
prevented us from making the land it being like a fog. The 
land is very low and flat, but we lay close into the quay and had 
no trouble in landing. Up to the present time I have seen no 
trouble with regard to surf, that I have heard remarked. We 
drove to the hotel the new " Khedival" quite large and exten- 
sive, with marble pillars, galleries, etc., handsomely frescoed in 
Egyptian style. Called at Cook's office, and was very much 
pleased to find that four of our late passengers on the Republic 
were booked for the same trip as myself; Americans and mil- 
lionaires at that; two couples, one young and the other elderly, 
which fitted in alright. Both of them had been all over the 
world, and were just making this trip to round off as it were. 
Well, we formed the party right away (five), and with the drago- 
man drove throirgh the town in American style. We were 
tormented by a crowd of Arabs at starting, who had all kinds of 
fancy articles for sale, in fact the streets were crowded with all 
nationalities Arabs, Turks, Syrians and I don't know bow- 
many others. We went through the principal streets, which are 
quite up-to-date, and some of them very wide with fine buildings 
on either side, and very many handsome structures, such as 
theatres, opera houses, museums, etc. We then went to the 
suburbs, where there are some beautiful villas, some of them in 
extensive grounds ; one, especially, belonging to a rich merchant 
of the place, where the King, when Prince of Wales, remained 
with his uncle, the Utfke of Cambridge, some time after his 
illness some years ago. The grounds are immense with statuary 
of all descriptions; large figures in marble, such as Nelson and 
other notable generals, modern and ancient, Neptune and a lot 
of fancy figures. The fountain in front of the house is very 
handsome. The dwelling house is built principally of white 
marble, with several cupolas. Lilies and flowering vines, etc., 
surround it. The palms were a sight, very high and formed an 
avenue up the side-walks with cactus scattered all about the 
grounds. I wish that " Balsam Place" was situated in a corner, 
so that we may experience what it is to live in the way and 
manner in which it was first ordained, amidst the grandest 
scenery of art and nature, fanned by the perfumed breath of the 
soft balmy air. 

We then passed the canal that connects the Nile and over 
several bridges. The road on either side of the canal was crowd- 
ed with arabs, mules, donkeys, camels and the canal itself with 
boats of the peculiar rig of which you see in Oriental pictures. 
The women are all veiled and dressed in black. They wear on 
the forehead a peculiar tube for breathing through, all you can 
is their eyes. The men in a variety of colors, I suppose according 
to their state and rank. The view in the country is a sight that 
can be seen only in Oriental countries, the palms scattered as 
far as the eye can reach, with the cactus, indianrubber trees and 
a host of others in full bloom. The pineapples, bananas and 
others fruits, also fields of wheat, etc. We returned to lunch at 



12 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



dria lias been computed at four thousand, half of which are 
Arabs, etc. It is veiy seldom that there is any rain and in 
driving through the country we were covered with fine sand. 
The Arabs have large brushes which they always bring with 
them for brushing off the sand. 

Thursday, March 4th, was a very fine day and in the morn- 
ing we walked the principal streets of the city of Cairo, which 
are fine and wide with large shops, some of them English, sup- 
plied with all description of goods. After lunch, took a car- 
riage, accompanied by a Dragoman and visited the Arab and 
Moorish quarters, where we had to leave the carriage and walk 
through the narrow streets. On either side were shops with all 
kinds of fancy and antique goods, ornaments, etc. Some of the 
entrances on the outside were very narrow, only a few feet in 
width, but extended up a court inside with the articles for sale 
on the floor of the shop; an immense stock of Persian carpets, 
silks, rugs and cotton and woollen goods. Over the shop which 
was situated in a square, were the latticed windows looking into 
the interior. Some of the goods were very expensive; 40.00 
for a small silk rug. Others, again contained all kinds of an- 
tique gold and silver ornaments, also swords and knives, and a 
fine lot of precious stones, diamonds, rubies, etc. On the out- 
side were the Arabs, working, carving, tailoring, etc. The 
streets were crowded by mixed groups of Arabs and Syrians, 
walking and on camels, donkeys, horses and carts. There 
are several hundred of those shops and the streets twisting and 
turning in every way. The houses appear very old, and on the 
roof, from one house to another, are placed planks and boards, 
which are coveted with any old material in order to keep the 
sun from descending. \Ve went through another street where 
there was only gold and fancy jewelry; the owners in front of 
their stalls working at their trade. While there 1 saw the fun- 
eral of an Arab. In front walked the hired wallers, making 
their laments, after which the coffin a plain wooden box with 
some fancy covering or pall ; then followed the mourners or 
friends, after which a cart containing the wives (6) of .the de- 
ceased with their faces covered. There also passed the funeral 
of a rich Arab lady, with an elaborate panoply over the coffin, 
followed by a large crowd and about one hundred carriages, all 
with two horses and full of men. There were also men walking 
and camels with panniers carrying presents for distribution to 
the poor. 

The " Continental" is a very fine hotel and only recently 
finished. It is much handsomer on the exterior than " Shep- 
pard's, the vestibules are exceedingly large, and the rooms are 
splendidly frescoed and ornamented. The " Savoy" is also a 
very large hotel, but " Sheppard's" is the oldest and most con- 
servative and much frequented by the " upper ten." You can- 
not get along there under under nine or ten dollars per day. 
The " Continental" is cheaper, $5.50, but there are others of 
less size and expense, but in any case, Egypt is a dear place in 
which to reside, as a sovereign is only worth about nineteen 
shillings of their money. 

Went in the morning to the oldest Mosque in Cairo. Before 
entering we had to put on big sandals over our shoes. The 
buildiug is very old, and said to be built of some of the stones 
of the Pyramids. The Arabs were praying in the building; it 
is very extensive, but much out of repair and some men were 
working on parts of it. Its foundation is said to be laid in 
A.D. 643 and to have been nearly destroyed by fire in the 
gth century. 

We then went to the Mosque tombs of the present family of 
the Khedive of Egypt, and also the tomb of the grandmother of 
" Ismael." The tombs are beautifully carved, gilded and orna- 
mented and are of different colored marbles. There were a lot 
of other tombs of sons and daughters of the same family, all 
very handsome in bronze and marble, etc. Thence to the 
Citadel which is occupied by the British (about ten thousand) 
inside of which is the Mosque of Mohammed Ali, who was 
elected Pasha of Egypt by the people. It is a most magnificent 
Mosque, built of marble and alabaster with marble pillars. His 
tomb is also in the Mosque, an elaborate work of art, consisting 
of all kinds of stones richly carved and gilded. The Mosque is 
of an immense size, and is gorgeous in its symnetry of archi- 
tectural beauty. 



Rcix Canon pilot, D,D. t D.C.C., ISA 

HPHE veteran Superintendent of Church of England Schools, 
whose portrait we publish herewith, was the recipient of 
a Royal Birthday honor in June last. The King has made him 
a Companion of the Imperial Service Order, and everyone ac- 
quainted with the long and distinguished services of this rever- 
end gentleman will agree that the honor has been well earned 
and justly bestowed. The Canon is son of the late Thomas 
and Ann Pilot. He was born at Bristol on December 3oth, 
1841, and was educated at St. Boniface, Warminster, and at St. 
Augustine's, Canterbury. He was ordained Deacon in the 
spring of 1867 by Bishop Wilberforce, of Oxford, and came to 
Newfoundland and became Vice-Principal of Queen's College. 
Here he continued till 1875, when he became Superintendent 
of Church of England Schools. In 1870, he married the only 
daughter of R. R. Wakeham, Esq. In 1878, he received from 
the Archbishop of Canterbury, under a patent from the Crown, 
the Degree of B.D., and that of D.D. in 1891. In the latter 




REV. CANON PILOT, D.D., D.C.L., I.S.O. 

year he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society 
and an honoray Fellow of St. Augustine's College, Canterbury. 
In 1896 he was installed by Bishop Jones a Canon of the Cathe. 
dral. For many years he has been examining Chaplin to the 
Bishop of Newfoundland. In 1897 he received the Degree of 
D.C.L., from Winsor, N.S. In scholastic concerns in 1898 he 
received the thanks of " My Lords" of the Privy Council for a 
valuable and complete report of the system of education in the 
Colony, and in 1901, the thanks of the Imperial Government for 
the part he took in this Colony in the Royal Patriotic Fund. 
Canon Pilot has been President of the Council of Higher Edu- 
cation since its birth in 1893. He is Grand Master of the 
Order of United Fishermen. He has at various times received 
the thanks of the Synod. He is author of a Geography of New- 
foundland, of School Reports, and articles on Newfoundland 
Folk Lore. We wish the learned Doctor a long continuance 
of his successful career, and that he may receive additional 
honors. 






THE NEWFOUNDL 

Captain 3obn Green, 

CAPTAIN GREEN was born in King's Lynn, Norfolk, England, 
on January 29th, A. D. 1831, and is consequently nearing his 
74th mile post. At an early age he was indentured to a firm of 
Solicitors in his native town, but the work not being congenial, 
after a short time, he left and entered the office of a large mer- 
cantile firm. Here he came in contact with many sea captains 
whose tales of the sea captivated the fancy of the young clerk, 
who became so discontented with his work, that at last he threw 
it up and went to sea. His first voyage so discouraged him 
that he vowed he had enough of it. But the salt was in his 
veins and the sea called him. He again set forth and served a 
long time in the Baltic trade, making a number of voyages to 
Cronstadt, near St. Petersburg, During the time of the Crimean 
War, a large number of Russian vessels, which were in various 
ports in England, were sold. In one of these a barque called 













CAPTAIN JOHN GREEN. 

he made his first voyage to St. John's, with a cargo 
of salt, serving in the capacity of mate. After discharging the 
ship went to the Gulf of St. Lawrence for a load of timber. 
Here he left her and returned to St. John's, entering the firm of j 
P. Rogerson & Sons, who at that time did a large business, 
having many foreign going vessels, beside a large sealing fleet. 
In 1857 he was in charge of the old Ann Isabella and made 
many foreign voyages in her. In 1864 he invested in a brig 
c.illed the Saxon, and ran her till 1871. Finding freights going 
down on account of so many steamers running, he sold her in 
Leith, after discharging a cargo of sugar at forty-five shillings 
freight from Pernambuco a freight in those days considered 
very unremunerative. Returning to St. John's he went into the 
steamboat business with C. . Bennett & Co., Messrs. Prowse, 
P. & L. Tessier, Goodridge & S.ons, the late Capt. Graham and 
others. This he worked so successfully that for the greater 
part of the thirty-two years of his connection with the Steam 
Tug Company, he was the trusted and efficient Managing 



A.\ T D QUARTERLY. . /? 

Director. On his retirement a short time ago he was the recip- 
ient of a warm and flattering address from his friends and 
co-workers, beside a valuable and massive silver service. Capt. 
Green, though having passed man's allotted "span, is still a smart 
active man for his years. After a long and active career, he is 
now enjoying a well-earned rest from the cares and distractions 
of business. He is now on his way to British Columbia on a 
holiday trip. The many friends and admirers of Captain Green 
wish him many years yet of rest and happiness, a wish which is 
cordially echoed by THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



fl Plea for the Stag Caribou, 

By L. F. Bnmw. 

A IXJMAIN so grand and remote and free, 
This island's own fastnesses wild, 
Should mean safety for me, 
Where I always could be 
Secure on the pinnacles piled 

Above green, sparkling streams that are crooning and clear. 
Yet across this whole island, and passing me here, 
Is an iron-railed road through the haunts of the deer. 
We were happy. Why are we beguiled? 

A half million caribou range at sweet will. 
From Cape Norman to Fortune's fair bay. 
The tundras we cross, 
And we feed on the moss 
That waves from the " vars," while we play 
( )ver leagues upon leagues of the barrens afar. 
We're so \\ild that we're tame; but the seas are a bar! 
And beings with firesticks our happiness mar. 

There is danger through night and through day. 

We paw through the snow to the hidden, sweet moss: 
We browse as the Northern Star gleams. 
From the headlands we gaze 
In the long Arctic days, 
Or the low. midnight sun's waning beams, 
A f the glittering cr.ij.js which the lone iceberg lifts 
Toward the stern, ragged clouds with their somber wild rifts; 
While the Snow King's white fingers his wide mantle sifts 
Where the pale, ghostly moonlight streams. 

^ 

Think, think, ye strange hunters, be beings that fill 
Our faint hearts with forebodfngs, woes! 
What if we could will 
A full license to kill. 
In your own loved Arcadia ? Suppose 
That your own does and fawns were hunted and shot, 
While the seas made a prison of every dear spot 
In your own happy lands? Would you joy at your lot, 
Or revile and condemn your dread foes? 

You should leave this one land in the beautiful world, 
To be sacred to safety and bliss, 
For the caribou wild, 
For the. barrens' own child ; 
And not doom us to wonder, to miss 
Our own wives and children at sad eves and morns. 
Don't shoot us to get a stag caribou's horns, 
For our heads that you think your grim 'sport-den "adorns!" 
Would your mercy to us be amiss? 

But come with your cameras ; come as our guests. 
Come as friends to our green K remote hills. 
Your camp-fires have scarred, 
Your dread flames have marred 
The forests that guard our wild rills. 
Oh, the ranges and valleys where Nature, distressed, 
Finds her wilderness fair that was happy and blest, 
Left all desolate, lorn ! Follow mercy's behest. 
Be our guardians. . Spare us these ills. 

Gaff Topsail Mountain, Newfoundland, July 5, 1904. 



THE NE IV FO UNDL . t .\'D (J U. I R TEKL V. 





^P*% 




R'l'. HON. SIR ROBERT BOND, P.C., K.C.M.G., I.L.D., 

Premier and Colonial Secretary. 
Candidate for Twillingate District. 



SIR EDWARD MORRIS, K.C., KT.B., LL.D., 

Minister of Justice. 
Candidate for St. John'* West District. 





JAMES AUGUSTUS CLIFT, K.C., 
Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 
Candidate for Twillingate District. 



JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Deputy Mayor. 
Candidate for St. John's West District. 



THE XKll'J-OUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 





HON. K. M. JACKMAN, 
Minister of Finance and Customs. 
''anJidate for I lacemia and St. Mary's District. 



HON. F.LI DA\VE, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
Candidate for Harbor Grace District. 





CAPT. THOMAS BONIA. 
Candidate for Placentia and St. Mary's District. 



MICHAEL S. SULLIVAN, 
Candidate for Placentia and St. Mary's District. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 






KKOKCK \V. C.rslU'K. 

Minister of 1'ublic Work-;. 
Candidate for '1'iiniiv District. 



GEORGE SHEA, 

Mayor for St. John's. 
Candidate for St. John's East District. 





WILLIAM A. OKK, 
Candidate for Harbor (iracS District. 



JAMES M. KENT, B.A., K.C. 
Candidate for St. John's East District. 



Till-: tiEWFOU\'DLA .W> Q i '.-! A' TERL Y. 





HOX. HENRV GEAR, 
Candidate ff r Burin District. 



F.mVARI) II. DAVEY, 
Candidate for liurin District. 





FRANK J. MORRIS, K.C., 
Candidate for Harbor Main Distiict. 



WILLIAM J. ELLIS, 
Candidate for Ferryland Distrkt. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Our portrait Galkrp. 



0UR many readers in Canada, United States, and all over 
Newfoundland, will scan with interest the many plates in 
the Portrait Gallery of our current issue. In fact the 
suggestion that we reproduce the portraits of our public men, 
especially those who will be candidates at the coming general 
election, comes from a friend and patron of the QUARTERLY 
an intensely patriotic Newfoundlander who has been some years 
residing in Boston. Many of our public men are known to our 
exiled fellow-countrymen by repute, but they all agree that it 
increases the interest in our biographical sketches, when illus- 
trated with first class portraits, such as the QUARTERLY has 
been endeavouring to supply to its readers and patrons. We 
have endeavoured to secure the portraits of all the Candidates, 
but only partially succeeded. We reproduce for our readers a 
goodly number of the friends and patrons of the QUARTERLY. 

SIR ROBERT BOND. 

Newfoundlanders at home and abroad, irrespective of class or 
creed, are proud of their fellow-countryman our first native 
Premier the Right Hon. Sir Robert Bond, P.C., K.C.M.G., 
LL.D. His probity and patriotism are unquestioned. As 
Premier of the Colony, his administration has been one of the 
most successful and beneficial to the Colony's best interests, 
that we have enjoyed, since we first obtained the boon of 
Responsible Government. New industries have been fostered, 
to such an extent, that labour of all kinds is abundant. The 
fisherman, the mechanic and the labouring man are better off 
to-day than at any other period in our history. As a consequence, 
that mill-stone that hung about our necks and sapped the man- 
hood of our hardy toilers, as well as impoverished the country 
able-bodied pauper relief has been shaken off, and let us hope 
forever abolished. Our revenues have doubled up ; our educa- 
tional grants have been increased nearly a hundred percent; 
our special and road grants have been augmented, and improve- 
ment is noticeable in every department of the Public Serv'ce. 
And notwithstanding that the duties have been taken off of 
Flour, Molasses, Salt, Kerosene Oil, Lines and Twines to the 
extent of nearly two hundred thousand dollars, yet so prudent 
and statesmanlike has been his policy that during his adminis- 
tration, notwithstanding the increased expenditure for roads, 
bridges, light houses, public wharves, education, etc., etc., we 
have had the unprecedented state of affairs, that we have had a 
handsome Surplus Revenue each year. Small wonder that his 
countrymen are proud of him and those brainy and patriotic 
Newfoundlanders with whom he is associated, and that Sir 
Robert Bond holds a very high place in the estimation of all 
patriotic Newfoundlanders both at home and abroad. 

SIR EDWARD MORRIS, K.C., K.T.H., LL.D. 

Sir Edward Morris is an old St. John's boy. He was elected 
for his own district, St. John's West, when he was scarcely out 
of his teens ; he has been continuously elected ever since. If 
it were conceivable that the people of his district would allow 
him to leave, he would have no difficulty whatever in being 
elected in any constituency in his native land. He has been, by 
long odds, the best member ever elected for the West End. 
His indomitable energy and his pride in his district has changed 
the whole face of St. John's West. This was abundantly testified 
by the exiled Newfoundlanders who were here duiing old home 
week. Many of them who were born and bred in the District 
scarcely recognised it, with its numerous industries, its magnifi- 
cent roadways, and its general improvement in the last ten years. 
Certainly, if any district in the Island shows that it possesses a 
live, energetic member that one is St. John's West. Sir Edward 
has been associated with Sir Robert Bond, and has held the 
port folio of Attorney General, a post for which he has proved 
to his countrymen that he is well fitted. As a criminal lawyer 
he has no superior. He has the largest and most extensive 
private practice of any practitioner at the Bar. Morris's Re- 
ported Cases is a standard work, in which he has displayed 
wonderful industry as well as legal acumen. He has ever been 
foremost in all movements for the betterment of his district and 
his native land ; and when His Gracious Majestv Kin<r Edward 



conferred the honour of knighthood on him, the rejoicing was 
universal, not a single fellow-countryman of his grudged him the 
honour. Sir Edward is now in his prime, and has many years 
before him of honours to himself and usefulness to his native 
land. 

HON. E. M. JACKMAN. 

A typical Newfoundlander, coming from a good old stock, 
with a name that will be ever famous in the fishery annals of 
Newfoundland. Captain Bill Jackman of happy memory was a 
man who was idolized by Newfoundlanders. He was the highest 
development of the type of those who "go down to sea in ships"; 
an intrepid commander, a king fisherman, and brave to the verge 
of rashness. His rescue of a ship's crew at Labrador would be 
sufficient to immortalize his name, if his hundreds of other good 
qualities had not enshrined him in the hearts of all Newfound- 
landers. Capt. Arthur we still have with us, and if it were pos- 
sible to put the question in Newfoundland as to who was a 
typical Newfoundlander a brave, determined, hardy, generous 
Newfoundlander of our day the universal answer would be 
Arthur Jackman. What the other Jarkmans achieved wrestling 
with the stormy ocean at our doors, E. M. Jackman achieved 
in the quieter paths of commerce. He is one of the most suc- 
cessful of our younger business men. Mr. Jackman's reputation 
as a business man for square dealing, for honour and probity is 
one that any man may well feel proud of. By his unaided 
energy and ability he worked up one of the most successful 
business concerns in the country, and when he entered politics, he 
brought with him every requisite that was necessary for a public 
man. His unique record as Minister of Finance speaks more 
than volumes. When he took hold of the Receiver-Generalship 
the Colony was, according to the solemn declaration of his pre- 
decessor in office on the floors of the Assembly, " on the verge 
of bankruptcy." He and his associates worked the Colony out of 
difficulties, and now boasts what no other Receiver General could 
ever boast, that lie has had a handsome Surplus Revenue nearly 
every year since he assumed office. And this in the face of 
reduced taxation on the one hand, and increased expenditure 
for education, roads, bridges, light houses, public wharves and 
every department of the Public Service on the other. And to 
this must still be added the striking off of all duty on flour, 
kerosene oil, molasses, salt, lines and twines a sum amounting; 
yearly to nearly two hundred thousand dollars. 

HON. ELI DAWE. 

Hon. Eli Dawe was born in Port-de-Grave in 1843, and re- 
sided for many years in Bay Roberts. Capt. Dawe is a New- 
foundlander, a successful fisherman, with a thorough knowledge 
of the seal, cod, lobster and herring fisheries. FYom the very 
first he proved a valuable acquisition to our Assembly, whose 
main business it is to legislate for the staple industries of the 
Colony. Capt. Dawe unfolded the Liberal Banner in 1889, and 
was elected for Harbor Grace. He has been elected continu- 
ously for the same district ever since. He is one of the most 
popular as well as the most respected members of the Govern- 
ment. A plain, unassuming, commonsense man, with more than 
the average ability, he has held the port folio of Agriculture and 
Mines in the Executive Government with credit to himself and 
benefit to his native land. In his official capacity he has made 
a host of admirers by his courtesy and kindness, and his fellow- 
countrymen of all creeds and classes hold him in the highest 
esteem. 

WILLIAM A. OKE. 

W. A. OKE, whose portrait appears in this issue, was born in 
Harbor Grace on the i4th December, 1859, and has resided 
there since. He started work as an apprentice at the Standard 
office when a lad i3years old, and has followed the fortunes of 
that paper to the present time. He attended the local schools 
first that of the late Mr. Gardiner, next that kept by Mr. J. L. 
Bell, and later at the Grammar School, under late J. I. Roddick. 
In 1897 he was called out by the workingmen of his native town, 
to contest Harbor Grace District in the interest of the Liberal 
Party. In this contest he was successful, coming within a score 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



'9 



of the total number of votes polled by the veteran representative 
of the district Capt. Eli Dawe. In 1900 he again contested the 
district, and was returned. The result of the forthcoming poli- 
tical contest is unknown, but it may not be over-sanguine to say 
that he has lost no friends and made but few, if any, enemies 
since 1897. Being popular among the younger voters, he is 
looked upon as their choice. Although nearing that time when 
active sport is too hard for the average man, Mr. Oke has shown 
this season that he has not lost interest in cricket and other sports 
and has taken a hand in football. He has always shown a lively 
interest in sport generally, especially aquatic contests, and any 
movement set on foot by the young men is sure to have h'is 
ready help and support. In his profession he has been rewarded 
with the same measure of success that has been his politically. 
Always taking a deep interest in his work he has built up quite 
a new industry in printing. He has shown no mean mechanical 
skill. Mr. Oke is prominent in Society work. He is a member 
of the Conception Bay British and Masonic Societies, and is the 
President of the Sons of England Society of Harbor Grace. His 
many friends in Harbor Grace and elsewhere will join with the 
writer in wishing him every success at the coming contest, and 
many years of usefulness to his native town. 

ARTHUR BARNES, A. A., the third man on the Liberal Ticket for 
Harbor Grace, is a native of Topsail, but has resided for the 
past 22 years in Bay Roberts. The Academy there has, under 
his charge, been instrumental in developing the mental faculties 
of not a few of Bay Roberts' sons, and educational matters have 
been given new life through his work. He is an Associate of 
Arts, and is acknowledged to be a brainy and industrious man. 
His entering the political field will open a new sphere of work, 
wherein his ability will enable him to make his mark in the 
political history of his native land. His popularity is widespread, 
and his ability as a speaker and a debater is acknowledged. 

HON. H. GEAR. 

Hon. H. Gear is another young Newfoundlander of whom his 
countrymen feel proud. The trusted member for Burin, on the 
retirement of Hon. H. J. B. Woods, was tendered a seat in the 
Executive Council. A clever young business man, the senior 
and controlling partner in the reliable old firm of Gear & Co., 
he brought to his new duties all the qualities requisite in an 
ideal representative. While Newfoundland is represented by 
such sterling and patriotic men as Henry Gear, there need be 
no fear for her future. 

GEORGE SHEA, MAYOR. 

George Shea, the controlling partner in Shea & Co. was born 
in St. John's. Under the new Municipal Act he was elected its 
first Mayor, an office he has filled with dignity and ability both 
creditable to himself and beneficial to the city. Apart from the 
high place he holds in commercial and civic circles, he is per- 
haps one of the most popular men in the city. Being of a genial 
kindly nature, and possessing a voice of rare beauty and power, 
his name has always figured piominently on the lists of those 
singers and performers who have always been ready to donate 
their talent for charitable and philantrophic purposes. He is 
kindly and unostentatiously charitable, and only very few of his 
intimates know the extent of his practical sympathy to the needy 
and distressed. He comes of a fine old family. His esteemed 
father Sir Edward Shea, President of Legislative Council, and 
his uncle Sir Ambrose, late Governor of the Bahamas, are the 
pride and boast of Newfoundlanders the world over. They 
have proved that for brains and ability, Newfoundlanders when 
they get the chance, are able to hold their own with the foremost 
men of the Empire. Mr. George Shea was for some years the 
Executive representative of the District of Ferryland. In com- 
mercial circles he holds . a high place; for years he has been 
local agent for the Allan and Dobell lines of steamships, and 
the North British and Mercantile Insurance Company. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, DEPUTY MAYOR. 

John R. Bennett is well known and one of the most popular 
men of the city. His popularity was well attested in the Muni- 
cipal election : he received the largest number of votes of any 
the candidates, thus making him Senior Councillor and Deputy 
Mayor. Mr. Bennett, well as he is known in the East end of 
the city, where he does a successful business as proprietor of the 



largest Aerated Water concerns in the Colony, is better known 
in his birth place in the West end, where nearly every man of 
his generation is a personal friend. He is also proprietor of the 
large brewery business of Bennett & Co. in the West end. In the 
old home movement Mr. Bennett was the moving spirit ; as 
Deputy Mayor he was the convener of the meeting, and the large 
and representative gathering in the T. A. Hall on that occasion 
were loud in their praises of his tact and ability in the conduct 
of the meeting. The subsequent success of the movement was 
largely due to his untiring efforts and the visiting Newfound- 
landers on several occasions heartly acknowledged it. In 
Masonic circles, and other philantrophical and social organiza- 
tions Mr. Bennett holds a deservedly high place. 

JAMES M. KENT, K.A., K.C. 

James M. Kent was born in St. Johns in 1872, and comes 
of a family that have been prominent in the public life of the 
Colony for over a half a century. His father, the late Hon 
Robert Kent, represented St. John's East for a large number of 
years. He is considered as one of the most promising of rising 
Newfoundlanders. He has been a prominent member of the 
Benevolent Irish Society for years, and is no\\ Yice-President ; 
it is only a question of time when he will hold the highest posi- 
tion that the Society can confer on him. Though comparitively 
a young man, he has earned the reputation of being a sound and 
and reliable lawyer, and his firm. Furlong and Kent, has one of 
the largest practices in the Colony. Mr Kent has had an 
almost unanimous call from the Liberals of St. John's East, to 
to put himself in nomination as a candidate at the coming elec- 
tion. His name is almost sufficient to elect him there, even it 
were not backed by sterling honesty and ability such as he pos- 
sesses. He is most fortunate in being called to his home district 
where he is so well known and where he has thousands-of friends 
and not one enemy. 

GEORGE W. GrMlt'E. 

George \V, Gushue, Minister of Public Works, is a generous 
and genial son of Terra Nova, and for years has represented, 
with credit to himself and benefit to the Colony at large, the 
important District of Trinity. As Minister of Public Works, 
he has had no superior in the office. He is very thorough in 
his conduct of the Department, and is recognized on all hands 
as an efficient and painstaking official. His charitable and 
genial disposition has gathered round him a large number of 
friends and well wishers. 

EDWARD H. DAVEY. 

Edward Davey, the senior partner of Davey Bros., architects 
and builders, has a very high reputation in his native city as a 
business man and citizen. He is prominent in Church circles, 
being a member of the Diocesan Synod, and Vestry man in the 
C. E. Cathedral. He is also a member of the Cathedral Resto- 
ration Committee, and his knowledge as an architect and 
builder has been of infinite value in the direction of vast num- 
bers of details in connection with such a grand undertaking. As 
an architect and builder he has a first class reputation. He in- 
herits the traditions of those old country builders of whom we 
have so few now-a-days, men who used to build for not only the 
present proprietors but for generations yet unborn, such as the 
Cornick Bros., the late Wm. Kelly, Alex. Smith, the Southcotts 
and others who are responsible for all our older public buildings. 
As a citizen Mr. Davey enjoys the confidence and respect of 
his fellow-townsmen, irrespective of class or creed. He is the 
type of man that any city or country may well feel proud of. 
His firm have initiated an industry that promises to revolutionize 
the process of stone and brick building in Newfoundland. We~ 
refer to the pressed brick industry. Davey Brothers are now 
building a large house. and store on Duckworth Street, and if 
this be a fair specimen of the style and material, it is very likely 
that in the near future no other style of buildings will be at- 
tempted in the city. It looks artistic, clear cut and solid, and is 
a kind of material that will commend itself to future builders. 
Mr. Davey deserves great credit for his pluck and enterprise in 
bringing the process to such a state of success, and the reward 
of his labours which he will reap, as soon as the advantages of 
the new building material and more widely known, will be well 
earned and none will rejoice in his success more than his fellow 
townsmen who are all proud of Ned Davey. 



2O 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



CAPT. THOMAS BONIA. 

Capt. Bonia was born in Placentia in 1856. At an early age 
he served his apprenticeship in the finest training school in the 
world for hardy seamen Cape St. Mary's. That he was an apt 
pupil was proved while still in his teens, he was master of a 
schooner on his own account and for three or four years piose- 
cuted the fishery successfully in the Straits of Belle Isle and neigh- 
bourhood. In 1880 he took charge of a large banker and struck 
out for the Grand Banks, and was a successful skipper among 
the big fish killers, when that industry was in its prime. In 
1894 he commanded the s.s. Alert on the Placentia Bay Mail 
Service, and acquitted himself with credit to his sea-going 
qualities, and with such satisfaction to the people of the Bay 
that to day he is probably the most popular man in the district. 
In 1894 the fishermen of Placentia sent Capt. Tom to represent 
them in the Legislature. Here his early training stood him in 
great stead. He not only represented his district with credit to 
his fellow-fisherman, but his vast and varied experience in all 
branches of the fishery, fitted him to speak with authority 
on all matters connected with our staple industries the 
fisheries of the country. He possesses a vast fund of what the 
fisherman call "common horse sense," lie is a forceful and fluent 
speaker, and like several other fishermen representatives, in 
the House surprised those who heard him, with the breadth and 
solidity of his views on matters pertaining to the welfare of his 
native land. He is noted for his geniality and humour and often 
brightens a monotonous debate with gleams of witty utter- 
ances. He prides himself on the fact that he is a fisherman, 
and a representative of fisherman, and if lie is a fair specimen 
of the Placentia Bay men they ought well feel proud of him. As 
a representative he has proved himself painstaking and efficient. 
In fact the district was never so well represented as it has been 
by the genial Captain Tom and his colleagues. Light houses 
and other works of public utility have multiplied in all parts of 
the district and the question that had been a standing joke for 
years, the bringing of the water supply to Placentia, has at last 
been solved mainly to his exertions, and the Ancient Capital 
now enjoys a water supply, nearly as good as that of St. John's. 
In case of sickness or accident or any trouble to his constituents 
the big hearted Captain is always at hand with his sympathy 
and practical help, and has thus endeared himself to the people 
in all parts of his large district, even his political opponents testify 
to the kindness and generosity of the big-hearted Captain Tom. 

JAMKS AUGUSTUS CLIKI', K..C. 

J. A. Clift was born in St. John's in 1857. He was admitted 
to the Inner Bar in 1883 and "took silk" last year. He entered 
the political arena in the great Liberal year 1889 and was elected 
for Port-de-Grave, and in the session of 1891 was appointed 
Acting Speaker of the Legislature, a position which he held with 
such dignity as to merit the encomiums of members from both 
sides of the House. He is a prominent churchman and a member 
of the Diocesan Synod. He was one of the organizers of the 
Sons of United Fisherman and still holds a leading position in 
the Mother Society at St. John's. He is also a leading member 
of the Masonic Fraternity. Mr. Clift has for some years repre- 
sented in the House the Premier District of Twillingate as the 
trusted colleague of Sir Robert Bond. 

MICHAEL P. CASHIN. 

MICHAEL P. CASHIN is a splendid type of our successful 
young business men. Born in Cape Broyle 38 years ago and 
educated at St. Bonaventure's College, he acquired a commer- 
cial training in the office of the late Ml. Thoiburn, Esq., and 
then began business on his own account in his native place. 
He has been wonderfully successful, every ei.terpii.se he has 
undertaken having proved immensely profitable, and he is lo-day 
among the foremost of our outport merchants. Besides large 
interests in the fishery business he is also a prominent operator 
in whaling and salvage undertakings, and has acquired a well- 
merited reputation for business acumen and a masterly grasp of 
everything that pertains to the industrial interests of the Colony. 
Mr. Cashin first entered public life in 1893 when he contested 
his native district, and headed the poll, a distinction he has 
achieved in every contest since by a steadily increasing vote. 
He is universally popular and highly regarded for his probity. 



WILLIAM J. ELLIS, M.C. 

William J. Ellis is a popular and respected business man of 
St. John's. In commercial circles he occupies a deservedly 
high place. As a citizen his popularity is best attested by the 
large vote which he obtained in the recent Municipal election. 
He polled the largest vote except the Deputy Mayor and was 
only five or six votes behind him. He has been prominently 
identified with the Temperance movement in St. John's, having 
been for years elected Vice-President of the St. John's Total 
Abstinence Society by acclamation. As a contractor and build- 
er Mr. Ellis enjoys the reputation of being in the very first class. 
His sterling honesty and integrity is the best guarantee that 
those who do business with him will get first class work and 
material, As a result he does one of the very largest contract- 
ing businesses in the city. Mr. Ellis superintended the laying 
of the water pipes at Placentia, which was a most difficult piece 
of work. He has done work on some of our principal buildings, 
notably the rebuilding of the towers of the R. C. Cathedral. 
This proved to be such a solid and massive job that it will be a 
monument to his ability for the next century. 

FRANK J. MORRIS, K.C. 

Frank J. Morris is one of the best known and one of the most 
popular men in Newfoundland. In 1889 he fought his first 
political battle in Harbor Main. He met the Tory Colonial 
Secretary of that date, and notwithstanding that his opponent 
had all the Government patronage, and spent money lavishly in 
the district, Mr. Morris beat him by the largest majority ever 
rolled up in Newfoundland. He has been a most painstaking 
representative, and his district shows the result of his efforts. 
There is a great difference in Harbor Main now and when he 
was first elected. His district is now one of the most prosper- 
ous in the whole Island, due largely to the progressive measure 
initiated by the Liberal Government, of which Mr. Morris has 
always been a prominent member. 

MICHAEL S. SULLIVAN. 

Michael Sullivan was born in Presque, Placentia Bay He 
is the second son of the late Patrick Sullivan, Magistrate of 
Presque, so well and widely known for his kindly disposition 
and hospitality to strangers visiting Presque. Mr. M. Sullivan 
is a worthy son of a worthy sire. At an earl) age he left Presque 
and took a course of training as land surveyor. He is now one 
of the most reliable of our young surveyors and is constantly 
employed in surveying mineral and lumber lands, and in kindred 
work. Mike is popular in St. John's where he now resides, and 
he and his family are as well known in all parts of Placentia Bay 
as they are in Presque and are as highly respected. He is very 
popular among the younger people of the Bay and is widely 
kown among them as a good fellow. 

ALBERT H. MARTIN. 

ALBERT H. MARTIN, of the well-known lumber firm of Martin 
Brothers, was born in St. John's in 1859, and was educated at 
the Church of England Academy. He is senior partner in the 
firm and it is largely due to his energy and ability that they now 
hold a leading place in the produce and lumber trade. Mr. 
Martin is President of that fine old body of men the Newfound- 
land British Society. After the great fire when their Hall was 
destroyed by fire, and when in common with nearly all their 
fellow citizens, they had lost all their property, Mr. Martin's 
ability as an organizer stood them in good stead. By his exer- 
tions, backed of course by the Society, one of the finest halls 
in the city was erected, and the Society to day is in a more 
flourishing condition than at any other period of its history. 
The Society has testified to his work, by re-electing hin for a 
number of years by acclamation to the proud position of Presi- 
dent. He is an ardent Temperance man, and a patriotic New- 
foundlander. Those who know him intimately, and that includes 
more than half the inhabitants of St. John's, have the highest 
regard for Albert, and irrespective of creed or class are proud 
of their young fellow-townsman. 

In closing the pages of this issue, we have 'to say that we 
will commence work at once on our Christmas Number. We 
will make a special effort to largely illustrate it, and w : e have 
arranged to print a larger edition than heretofore. 



TtiE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Sliding. 



By Robert Power. 

winter, we were sliding adOwn the Poor House Lane ( 
My slide she was A. dandy, and " Rover" was her name i 
A bravo smart, and painted blue, with roses on the seat, 
And every slide upon the hill I reckoned she could beat. 

My comrades there, a score or more of happy boys were they, 
Alaughing, and ajoking as we joined in merry play, 
feut a race is on, we all make start the hill-top now to climb, 
And take up our positions or we'll be left behind. 

Now all are ready for the test, with every slide in line, 
Some are boasting of their speed, and I shout in praise of mine ; 
But hold ! Here comes Jack Murphy with his old-fashioned slide, 
Ah, she's too slow I we will not wait, so o'er the hill we glide, 

The race is o'er, my slide has won, but Jack comes up to me, 
And asks me why I didn't wait for him ? to let me see 
How he could go, and knock me out, or any on the hill, 
We all burst laughing at poor Jack, till tears our eyes did fill. 

But we couldn't trifle with him. or his clumsy looking slide, 

He didn't care for any, and the " bravos" he defied; 

When some one said "your da made her," Jack's eyes then quickly flashed 

It seemed to make him proud j that word and up the hill he dashed; 

"Come on," he yelled, "and take your place, I'll leave you all behind, 

Altho' my da he chopped her out, she's good as you can find." 

We raced him, but away he shot, and left us in the rear, 

On the slides our das bought down the town, which seemed a kind o' queer ! 

And such is life I We sometimes make a very grave mistake 
In judging men as being slow, who might a record make; 
Perhaps he looks a kind o' rough, as tho' he was chopped out, 
His coat a kind o' shabby, as if 'twas knocked about. 
But don't rush at conclusions, just wait and judge him fair. 
You may get left, and just find Out with him you can't compare 
In noble acts which prove the man, in keeping up in pace, 
With others who load smarter, in this life that's b.ut a race, 




AUGUSTUS WHITE. 



SYDNEY HKRKERT. 



ANTHONY POWER. 



THK granting of a Rhodes Scholarship to this Colony means 
much for Education here. As every French soldier was said to 
cany a marshal's baton in his knapsack, so every Newfound- 
land boy is a possible Rhodes scholar. The first winner of this 
substantial prize is Sydney Herbert, the central figure of the 
trio given above. He was a student at St. Bonaventure's Col- 
lege, as were his competitors, Anthony Power and Augustus 
White, this college being the only institution in the Colony 
whose pupils succeeded in securing " exemption from Respon- 
sions," the scholastic test essential for entry as a candidate for 
the nomination. In the future we may expect all the colleges 
to make a greater feature of this competition and to see our 
locally-educated boys hold their own with boys educated abroad 
as they have done so far. 







FOR BOYS' AND MEN'S AMERICAN 

Hats, Caps, Shirts, Boots, Ties and Suspenders, 

Call at Jackman the Tailor s. 

Our Gothing Department for Winter Wear 

is now complete* 

We have the best selected stock in the city. Everything for Men and Boys' wear can be had at our store 

JAGKMAIN the Tailor, Arcade 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



for the 
fall's Trade 



We are Ready 

Our Yards and Stores are well 
stocked with all grades of < 

LUMBER .* 
.* PRODUCE 

and Roofing Materials. 
MARTIN BROS. 



MAKM'S for Clothing 

If you are about to buy a Suit, Overcoat, or Reefer, call and 
see our Stock of Readymade Clothing ; all new, and mostly 
our own make. Cannot be beaten in the city. We will be 
sure to please you. We make alterations free of charge. 

E. J. MALONt, * Tailor and Clothier, 



268 Water Street. 



P. 



Painter, Glazier, Paper Hanger 
and House Decorator. 



First Class Work in our line; prompt and particular attention given to 
Outport Contracts. 

Always on hand HANLEY'S celebrated brands of Snuffs. 

Outport orders thankfully received. 
N.B.-We employ a staff of expert mechanics, who execute work with neatness and despatch 

Address: No. 5 King's Road. 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



EXAMINERS MASTERS AND MATES. 

# OFFICE: LIGHT HOUSE BUILDING. J 
Examiner-in-Chief CAPT. E. ENGLISH. : Assistant Examiner CAPT. J. R. MOSS. 



Examination of Masters and Mates. 

Examinations will begin on Wednesday of each week, providing that the 
candidate produces the requisite certificates of character and time, and 
passes the color test. 

Application-'.'must be made to the Examiner on Form Exn. 2, and all 
previous certificates and testimonials deposited at least two days previous 
to the examination. Testimonials of character and sobriety must be pro- 
duced for twelve months immediately preceding the application. 

All services must be verified by a certificate of discharge. 

An Only Mate must be not less than nineteen years of age, and must have 
served five years at sea. 

A First Mate must be not less than nineteen years of age, and must have 
served five years at sea, of which one year must have been as Second or 
Only Mate. [From ist Januaiy 1896, the Officer's Service must have been 
performed with the requisite certificate.] 

A Master must be not less than twenty-one years of age, and he must 
have served six years at sea, of which one year must have been in the 
capacity not lower than Only Mate of a foreign-going vessel whilst holding 
a certificate not lower than an Only Mate's certificate for foreign-going 
vessels, and, unless this service as officer was performed whilst holding a 
First Mate's certificate for foreign-going vessels, he will also be required to 
prove the officer's service prescribed for that grade. 

Certificates applying only to steamships are issued to candidates who are 
either unable to comply with the regulation which requires them to have 
passed one year in square-rigged sailing vessels, or who prove in course of 
examination that they are ignorant of the management of square-rigged 
sailing vessels. All the qualifying officer's service prescribed for these 
Certificates must have been performed in steamships. 

These Certificates will entitle the holders to go to sea as Masters or 
Mates of foreign-going steamships, but will not entitle them to go to sea as 
Masters or Mates of foreign-going sailing ships. 

Fees. 

For a Certificate as Mate $5 .00 

For a Certificate as Master 10.00 

For a Certificate for Colors .20 



These fees admit of two examinations. After the second examination 
another fee will be required. 

Candidates for Only and First Mates' Certificates must complete the 
whole of their examination in Navigation in twelve hours, including the 
time allowed for the papers on the cyclone or revolving storms, and for 
the correction of all errors and over-sights ; but the nautical problems up 
to and including (K) of the Syllabus prescribed for Only and First Mate 
must be completed within six hours and without the candidate leaving the 
premises during that period. 

Candidates for Masters' Certificates must complete the whole of their 
examination in Navigation in fifteen hours, including the time allowed for 
the papers on the Chart, the Compass deviation, Cyclones, or revolving 
storms, and for the correction of all errors and over-sights : but the prob- 
lems up to and including (K) of the Syllabus prescribed for Only and First 
Mate must be completed within six hours and without the candidate leaving 
the premises during that period. 

The examination commences punctually at 10 a.m., and closes at 4 p.m., 
when all papers will be called up, and if not completed the candidate will 
be declaied to have failed. 

In all cases of failure the candidate will be examined dt novo. 
If failed in Seamanship, he will not be examined for six months. 

If failed three times in Navigation, he will not be re-examined for three 
months. 

For further information as to time, place, and objects of examination, 
applicants should apply to the Examiner-in-Chief. 

Rules. 

No books, papers or memoranda are allowed in the Examination room. 

In the event of any candidate being discovered copying from another, 
or referring to any book or memoranda, he will not be examined for six 
months. 

Navigation is taught at Carbonear, Harbor Grace, Bay Roberts and 
Saint John's. 






The Public are reminded that the 

Game Laws of Newfoundland, 

Provide that: 

No person shall pursue with intent to kill any Caribou from 

the ist day of February to the 3ist day of July, or from the ist day of 

October to the 2oth October in any year. And no person shall 

kill or take more than two Stag and one Doe Caribou in any one year. 

No person is allowed to hunt or kill Caribou within five miles of either 
side of the railway track from Grand Lake to Goose Brook, these limits 
being defined by gazetted Proclamation. 

No non-resident may hunt or kill Deer without previously having pur- 
chased and procured a License therefor. All guides must be licensed. 
Issued free to residents ; to non-residents costing fifty dollars. 

No person may kill, or pursue with intent to kill any Caribou with dogs, 

or with hatchet or any weapon other than fire-arms, or while 

crossing any pond, stream or water-course. 

Tinning or canning of Caribou meat is absolutely prohibited. 

No person may purchase, or receive any flesh of Caribou between 
January ist and July 3131, in any year. 

Penalties for violation of these laws, a fine not exceeding two hundred 
dollars, or in default imprisonment not exceeding two months. 

No person shall hunt, or kill Partridges during the present year, or 

before ist October, 1905. After that period not before ist October or 

later than I2th January. Penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars 
or imprisonment. 

Any person who shall hunt Beaver, or export Beaver skins till October ist, 
1907, shall be liable to cofiscation of skins, and fine or imprisonment. 

And no person shall hunt Foxes from March I5th to October I5th in 
any year, under the same penalties. 

T. J. MURPHY, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
September iqlh, 11)04. 



NEWFOUNDLAND PENITENTIARY. 

BROOM DEPARTMENT. 



Brooms, * Hearth Brushes, * Whisks. 

A Large Stock of BROOMS, HEARTH BRUSHES and 
WHISKS always on hand ; and having reliable Agents- 
in Chicago and other principal centres for the purchase of 
Corn and other material, we are in a position to supply the 
Trade with exactly the article required, and we feel as- 
sured our Styles and Quality surpass any that can be 
imported. Give us a trial order, and if careful attention 
and right goods at right prices will suit, we are confident 
of being favoured with a share of your patronage. 

J5p i= All orders addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt 
attention. 



ALEX. A. PARSONS, Superintendent. 

Newfoundland Penitentiary, September, 11)04. 

A CARD. 

J9NAS (L BARTER, 

flrcWtect * and # Builder. 

aea GOWER STREET. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Supreme Court of Newfoundland 

List of Deputy Sheriffs. 



SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 



RESIDENCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMES. 






George Geary. 
John T. Fitzgerald. 
William Trainer. 
M. Mahoney. 
Francis R. Curtis. 
A. Collins. 
Thomas Sullivan. 
Peter Manning. 
Howard Parsons. 
Stephen White. 
Cyrus Beck, sr. 
Joseph Murphy. 
William G. Pittman. 
Eli Harris. 


St. Jacques 


Fortune Bay 








Belleoram 


u 


William Grandy. 
Joseph Camp. 
Benjamin Chapman. 
Albert Kelland. 
Matthew Nash. 
Prosper A. Garcien. 
James H. Wilcox. 
Henry Gallop. 
Thomas B. Doyle. 
Abraham Tilley. 
M. E. Messervey. 
Simeon Jennex. 
Daniel J. Gilker. 
Geo. Halfyard. 






Pushthrough 


" 




Placentia and St. Mary's. 
Burin 


Harbor Breton 







Burgeo 


Burgeo and La Poile .... 

(t U 
U U 




Ramea 




Rose Blanche 


OH ^ 


Channel 


Flat Island 




G rand River 






Robinson's Head 






St. George Sandy Pt. . 






Wood's Island 






Bay of Islands 






Bonne Bay 


St. Barbe 



NORTHERN DISTRICT. 



RESIDENCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMES. 


St. Anthony 


St. Barbe 


James Johnson. 






Moah Verge. 
Isaac Manuel 
Richard Spence. 
Noah Miller. 
Edmond Benson. 
R. Currie. 
Caleb Tuck. 
George Janes. 
George Leawood. 


Catalina 


Trinity 


I a Scie 


M 


Wm. A. Toms. 
Constable T. Walsh. 
Thos E Wells 


Trinity 




Tilt Cove 


Twillingate 






Northern Bight 






(i 


Peter Campbell. 
Thomas Roberts. 
William Lanning. 
Peter Moores. 
J. T. Bendle. 
George S. Lilly. 
Alfred G. Young. 
W T illiam Baird. 






Pilley's Island 


u 


Shoal Harbor 







11 








, 








j 






F 1 'f 


, 






Eliel Noseworthy. 
George Bussey. 
Charles Rendell. 
A. Targett. 
Moses Bursey. 
Reuben Curtis. 
Eli Garland. 
Ewen Kennedy. 
Ernest Forward. 
John Trapnell. 
Jesie Gosse. 
A. Hieilihy. 
Benjamin Butler. 
William Cole. 
James Murphy. 
William Maher. 
William Butler. 
John H. Ley. 
John H. Bennett. 
Edward Harding. 




i 


New Harbor 


it 




t 




' .* 


M H h 


, 




(( 






Ambrose Fitzgerald. 
George Foster. 
Philip Perry. 
John Porter. 
Robert Pike. 
Adam Bradley. 
Jacob Hefferton. 
Wm. Sainsbury. 
Peter Roberts. 


Old Perlican 


Bay-de-Verde 











Lower Island Cove. . . . 
Western Bay 


M 




M 


it 




u 




Carbonear 




u 






Pinchard's Island 
Wesleyville 


Bonavista 

\ 






Bay Roberts 







i 


Brigus 
Conception Harbor . . . 


Port-de-Grave 




i, 


Thomas Wornell. 
Charles Kean. 











H 




u 


Middle Bight 


U 







Albert L. Howe. 
John Burden. 


Bell Isl'd Lance Cove 
Bell Island Beach 


St John's East 


Salvage 


11 






H 


H 


King's Cove. . 


H 


Thomas Curtis. 







September, 11)04. 



JAMES CARTER, Sheriff, Newfoundland. 
W. J. CARROLL, Sub-Sheriff, 



OFFICE AND STORE Adelaide Street. STONEYARD Just East Custom 
House, Water Street. Telephone, 364. 



W. J. ELLIS, 

Contractor and Builder. 

Dealer in Cement, Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Mortar, Brick, Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps ; Chimney Tops, all sizes, and Plate Glass. 

Estimates Given for alt kinds of Work at Shortest Notice. 






Parlor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 



Church Seats. 



T. MARTIN,^ 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Cower Street. 

Repairing Furniture Horses and Vans for 

a Speciality. Removing Pianos, &c. 



-ivv 



ax-s 
fr 

# 

^v 

A 

*, f .< 

* 

/r* 



THE . . . 

NEWFOUNDLA 



-N" 



talk 



QUARTERLY. 



HP 



JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 



VOL. IV. No. 3. 



DECEMBER, 1904. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 



*sL 

fwb? 




CHRISTMAS MORN. 




ISC 



Christmas number. 

CONTENTS. 

" Christmas, 1904," Editorial i 

" How Meagher Became a Millionaire" A True 
Story of Old St. John's by Most Rev. M. F. 

Howley, D.D 2 

Illustration from Photograph " His Grace Arch- 
bishop Howley and Rt. Rev. Mgr. Reardon 

starting for a sleigh-drive." 3 

" To My Mother" Sonnet, by Edgar A. Bowring 3 
" Topsail Stages" Poem, by late R. Raftus, B.L., 

with illustration "Topsail Beach." 4 

" Newf'undland Men and Cape Shore Men," by 

W. J. Carroll 5 

"A Christmas Carol," by S. T. Coleridge 5 

" After Caribou in Newfoundland." by Lieut. 
E. C. Kennedy, R. N., with illustration 

" Newfoundland Caribou." 6 

"An Ocean Voyage," by Rev. Charles Lench.. 8 
'Above the Bridge" Poem, by Daniel Carroll. 8 
" The Catholic Church and the British Empire," 

by Rev. M. J. Ryan, Ph. D 9 

" On Christmas Day" Poem, by Dinah Maria 

Muloch Craik ' 10 

" Risen from the Dead," by H. W. LeMessurier 1 1 
Supplement: A full-page Illustration from Photo- 
graph " Diocesan Synod Lord Bishop, 

Clergy, and Lay Delegates." 

" Memories Grave and Gay," by Rev. Canon 

Pilot, D.D., D.C.L., I.S.0 13 

" A Six Months' Tour" Extracts from Letters, 

by Sheriff Carter 15 

" The S.S. Portia" A Description of the new 

Northern Coastal Steamer 16 

Supplement : Two Illustrations from Photographs 
" S. S. Poitia," and ' Town of Fogo". . . . 
" Books About Newfoundland," by Daniel W. 

Prowse, LL.I) 17 

" Wireless Telegraphy in Newfoundland and 

Labrador," by Win. Campbell 18 

" Samuel Mucklebacket, Esq." Poem, by Sir 

Robert Thorburn 19 

" The North Sea Outrage" Poem, by E. C . . . . 19 

Illustration " The Dead Monarch" 20 

" Christmas in the Twentieth Century" Poem. 

by Robert Gear MacDonald 20 

- -jjp 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



W. & 0. R[NDELL, Bowring Brothers, 



General Commission g 
Property and Insurance 
Agents* * * < << 

ST. JOHN'S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 



AGENTS FOR THE 

PHCENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED, 

OF LONDON. 



Li mi ted. - 

Ship Owners, Brokers, and General Merchants. 

Exporters of Codfish, Salmon, Herring, Seal Oil, Seal Skins, 
Cod Oil, Lobsters, Whale Oil, Whale Bone, Etc. 

AGENTS FOR 
LLOYD'S. 

London Salvage Association. 
New Swiss Lloyd's. 

National Board of Marine Underwriters of New York. 
Liverpool and Glasgow Underwriters. 
Liverpool and London and Globe Fire Insurance Co. 
New York, Newfoundland, and Halifax Steam Ship Co. 
English and American Steam Shipping Co. 

Represented by C. T. BOWRING & Co., Ltd., of Liverpool, London, Cardiff. 
Represented by BOWRING & Co., New York and San Francisco. 

CODES Scott's, Watkins, A. B. C., Western Union, Premier, &c. 
Cables: " BOWRING," St. John's. 



PHCENIX 



Assurance 




Co., Ltd., 



Nf Id. Steam Screw Tug Co., Ltd. 

D. P. fngrakam, jt Launch Daisy, 
Jt John Green. jt 

Rates of Towage of Vessels in and out of St. John's Harbor, from a mile 
outside the Heads to the Consignee's wharf, or from the Consignee's wharf 
to a mile outside the Heads. 



STABLISHED I 

Of LONDOM, ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Annual Premiums ................. $7,500,000 

Fund held to meet losses ........... 9,000,000 

Uncalled Capital .................. 12,000,000 



< 

Fr 




GROSS TO 
Jo Tons and unc 
Dm 60 to 100 To 
pej ton 3 
101 to 125 T 
126 to 150 
151 to 175 
176 to 200 

2OI to 225 

226 to 250 
251 to 300 


NNAGE. 
er. . . . $4.00 


Fr 


GROSS TO 

3m 301 to 350 T 
351 to 400 
401 to 450 
451 to 500 
501 to 550 
551 to 600 
601 to 700 
701 to 800 
801 to 900 
901 to looo 


VNAGE. 


ns (10 cts. 
dditiohal.) 
ons ../... 10.00 




. . 28 oo 












16.00 


. -38.00 


' 18.00 








' 22.00 


. so.oo 






Vessels requiring the Steamer to go beyond the abqve limits as far as 



& G. RENDELL, 

ST. JOHN'S. Agent for Nfld. 



Cape Spear to pay one-third additional. 

N. B. Special Rates, will be charged during the ice season. 

The owners are not responsible for any damage done by the Vessel 
towed, to themselves or others. 

W. H. STRONG, Manager. 



ANGEL 

Engineering & Supply 

Company, Limited. 



We are not quite sure, but we think we 
have the most Efficient Organization and 
Plant in the country for all kinds of 

Machine and Iron IVork. 

irsiHYrite for Information. 



Alan Goodridge $ Sons, 

325 WATER STREET, ST. JOHN'S, N. F., 

General Importers and Wholesale and Retail Merchants. 



EXPORTERS OE ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE. 



BRANCH ESTABLISHMENTS: 

Witless Bay, Tor's Cove, "Ferryland, Renews, 
Nipper's Harbor, New Perlican, Round Harbor, 

Hant's Harbor, Caplin Bay, jl ^ <& 



Where Fishery Outfits can at all times 
be Supplied. 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 





FOR NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LAHRADOR FROM JULY, 1904. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 
CANADA. 


I pou 
2 pou 

3 

4 

6 

8 
9 

10 

1 1 


nd 


See 
it 
M 
I? 

20 
23 
26 
29 
32 

35 
35 
Under i Ib 
per 2 oz. 


nts 


24 ce 
24 
24 
48 
48 
48 
48 
72 
72 
72 
72 

No parcel 
less than 


nts i 12 cents 


15 cents. 
3 



75 
90 
$i .05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 






' 24 " 


| 




* -?6 






' *9. 








60 








72 








84 








96 








Si.oS. . . 








I . 20 ... 








I 12 . 




weight, I cent 


sent to U K. for 

24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from Ne~v Yoik ; 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 



RSTES OF COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 



General Post Office. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding $10 5 cts. Over 50, but not exceeding $60 30 cts. 

Over $10, but not exceeding $20 10 cts. Over $60, but not exceeding $70 35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 15 cts. Over $70, but not exceeding $80 40 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 20 cts. Over $80, but not exceeding 890 45 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 25 cts. Over #90, but not exceeding $100 50 cts. 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John's, Newfoundland, December, igo4. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

GENERAL A POST ^ OFFICE 

Postage on Local Newspapers. 

TT is observed that BUNDLES OF LOCAL NEWSPAPERS, addressed to Canada and the United States, are frequently 
* mailed without the necessary postage affixed; and, therefore, cannot be forwarded. 

The postage required on LOCAL NEWSPAPERS addressed to Foreign Countries is i cent to each two ounces. Two 
of our local newspapers, with the necessary wrappers, exceeds the two ounces, and should be prepaid TWO CENTS. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

~^G E N E R AL POST OFF IGE^ 

./ Postal Telegraphs. . 

/COMMENCING to-morrow, Wednesday morning, 2 ist instant. Telegraph messages will be accepted at the Telegraph window 
in the lobby of the General Post Office building, for transmission within the Colony to and from the undermentioned offices 
for the sum of TWENTY CENTS FOR TEN WORDS and TWO CENTS FOR EACH ADDITIONAL WORD, exclusive 
of address and signature which will be transmitted free, viz : Bay L' Argent, Baine Harbor, Burin, Belleoram, Bonavista, 
Beaverton, Baie Verte, Birchy Cove, Bonne Bay, Brigus, Botwoodville, Come By Chance, Clarenville, Catalina, Change Islands, 
Fogo, Fortune, Grand Lake, Grand River, Grand Bank, Greenspond, Gambo, Gander Bay, Glenwood, Humbermouth (River- 
head), Howards, Harbor Breton, Herring Neck, King's Cove, Lewisporte, Lamaline, Long Harbor, Little River, Little Bay, 
Musgrave Harbor, Millertown Junction, Nipper's Harbor, Norris Arm, Newton, N. W. Arm (Green Bay), Pilley's Island, 
Port au Port (Gravels), Port aux Basques, Port Blandford, Seldom Come By, Sound Island, St. Lawrence, St. Jacques, 
St. George's, Sandy Point, Stephenville Crossing, South West Arm (Green Bay), St. John's, Tilt Cove, Terrenceville (Head 
Fortune Bay, Trinity, Twillingate, Wesleyville, Carbonear, (via Bay de Verde) Lower Island Cove, Old Perlican, Western Bay, 
Harbor Main, Manuels and Britannia Cove. 

H* J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General 

General Post Office, St. John's, Newfoundland, September 20th, 1904.. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



For 



Christmas, 1904 



IN STOCK: 



HUNTLEY & PALMER'S 

Cake, Biscuits, Shortbread, 

finest Malaga Table Raisins, 

Almond, Hazel and Walnuts, 

nun A pull LINE OF = 

Tine Groceries. 

Irish Hams and Bacon. 

J. D. RYAN. 



Mrs. A. Mitchell, 



.. 

Mantles, Millinery, Dress Goods, 
Hosiery, Gloves, Laces and 
Trimmings of all kinds. 



...... IN STOCK ...... 



English and American Silk Blouses, 
Underwear and Novelties, 



BAINE, JOHNSTON & Co. 

Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland, 

General Merchants and Ship Owners. 



..EXPORTERS OF.. ^ 

Codfish, Cod Oil, Seal Oil, Seal Skins, 
Codliver Oil (Norwegian process), 

Salmon, Split Herring, Scotch Cured 
Herring, Trout and Lobsters, 

Sealing Steamers for Arctic hire. Steamers on 
Labrador requiring COALS can be supplied at 
Battle Harbor, at entrance to Straits of Belle Isle, 
where there is telegraphic communication. 



< NEWMAN'S 

Celebrated Port Wine, 

In Cases of 1 doz. each, 
at $8.25 in Bond; also, 

in Hogsheads, Quarter Casks a JL d Octaves. 

Baine, Johnston & Co., 

AGENTS, 



$4 A MONTH 

Is not very much for a young man of 20 to put 
aside out of his salary, but if invested with the 
CONFEDERATION LIFE it will give 

To his family, if he dies before age 40, - - $1000.00 
To himself, if he Hues to age 40, from - - $1 159.00 

to $1372.00 
according to plan selected. 

Insure early, while your health is good. 
You will get your money back earlier in life, 
when you can use it better. 

c, era, CONROY, 

GENERAL AGENT. 

Law Chambers, St. John's. 



Queen 
fire Insurance Companp 

FUNDS $40,000,000 



i tii i t i t i i i i i i iiiij' 



INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 



|lll"l I 'I II Illll Illlllllillill!!!!:! l|iirii.-|lir!Hi'| lr|. |n| |! 



JOHN CORMACK, 



AGENT FOR NEWFOUNDLAND. 








QUARTERLY 



Number 



VOL. IV. No. 



DECEMBER, 1904. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 



Christmas, 1904. * 



THE Xmas chimes sound sweet and clear 
And fill with joy, the listening air, 
And whispering Hope the bosom swells, 
While Angel fingers tune the bells. 
This gladdest time of all glad times, 
Ring out ye Merry Xmas Chimes 1 

Christmas is again with us. How 
short a time it seems, since the issue 
of our last Xmas Number; yet what 
changes have taken place since then. 
What changes will have taken place 
ere the coming of the next Christmas- 
tide. All is change here. 
" Change and decay in all around I see." 

The moral of these reflections is, to 
make the best of our present oppor- 
tunities. After all if poor weak hu- 
mans do, to the best of their abilities, 
the task allotted, no matter how hum- 
ble it may be, all will be well. 

This is the message of the Christ- 
mas Chimes. And this is the one 
season that the message is heeded by 
the universal Christian world. This 
is the season of Peace and Joy and 
Charity. 

" Thou hast brougnt with Thee plentiful 
pardon 

And our souls over-flow with delight ; 
Our hearts are half broken, dear Jesus ! 

With the Joy of this wonderful night." 

It is the feast of the children, and 
therefore of the world, because the 
world is ruled by the children. It is 
a time of joy and gladness for them, 
and for us, too, who have retained, 
despite the struggle and turmoil of our daily strife, the attributes 
that make us " like unto children." Like the children, we can 
all have the Spirit of Christmas in our hearts. 
" And they who do their souls no wrong, 

But keep at eve the faith of morn, 
Shall daily hear the angel-song, 

To-day the Prince of Peace is born I" 

Faith and Hope ! Hope and Faith ! These are the gifts we 
lay at the feet of the Christ Child. These are the poor offerings 
for which we are repaid thousandfold. Faith in the Infinite 
Goodness and Mercy that caused the joyful tidings to the faith- 
ful shepherds ; and Hope in the same Goodness and Mercy 
that redeemed the Race. Hope, the Consoler, that teaches us 
that even if we grasp not that which constitutes happiness here, 
yet if we " but keep at eve the faith of morn," the Crib at Beth- 
lehem and the Cross of Calvary will be our sureties in the here- 
after for the joys that never end. 

" Tell me, how I may join in this holy feast 
With all the kneeling world, and I of all the least ? 
Fear not, O faithful heart, but bring what most is meet : 
Bring Love alone, true Love alone, and lay it at His feet." 

********* 




Christmas Chimes. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 
wishes all its Patrons and Readers 
H Verp fiappp Xmas and 
Prosperous Hew year. 
This is our fourth annual greeting 
to our readers. We promised to pro- 
duce a magazine that would not re- 
cognize any class or party, but would 
be devoted to the best interests of our 
Island Home. We conserve these by 
getting timely articles, both entertain- 
ing and instructing from some of the 
best writers in our midst. We also 
endeavour to rescue from oblivion, 
and record for future generations, the 
history of the country as told at many 
a Christmas fireside. It may be that 
we are garnering the data for some 
future historian, who, with a master 
touch, will open our eyes to the great- 
ness of the deeds of daring every clay 
performed in our midst by some one 
or other of the thousands who yearly 
go down to the sea in ships. 

During the coming season, we in- 
tend soliciting the assistance of our 
patrons and readers in the Outports, 
and will be glad to reproduce for our 
readers some stiiring incidents that 
happened in various parts of the Is- 
land in ihe brave days of old. There 
is not a Bay in the Island but has had 
its deeds of daring, its romance, its 
songs and poetry. If we could get 
some of the experiences of outport 
clergymen, doctors, teachers, planters and fishermen, we would 
have a valuable addition to our local history. 

We will be glad always to consider the manuscripts of our 
outport readers, especially those who can give us bits of local 
history that will be of general interest to all Newfoundlanders. 

Our portrait gallery was so acceptable to our readers at home 
and abroad, that we intend to enlarge it the coming year. 

Our present Number will be one of the best of its kind ever 
published here. It is replete with articles from some of our 
best known writers, and illustrated with pictures of local scenes 
of more than passing interest. 

Our readers and patrons will be glad to hear that our circula- 
tion has more than doubled during the year. Last year we pub- 
lished a very large edition. We could not half supply the de- 
mand o' patrons who wanted to send some memento of the old 
land to friends away. This }ear we have prepared a still larger 
edition, and hope to have enough to supply all our friends and 
patrofis. 

In conclusion we repeat our greeting, and wish you all, dear 
readers, A VERY HAPPY XMAS AND PROSPEROUS 
NEW YEAR. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Row leagber Became a millionaire. 

fl cru Slorp of Old St. John's. 

By Most Rev. M. F. Hoivley, D.D. 



THE splendid harbour facilities of St. John's: its easy 
access from the Atlantic : the aptitude of the surround- 
ing land for the site of a town, and the suitableness of 
its surrounding valleys for an agricultural settlement; 
rendered it from the beginning a most likely place for 
the founding of the Capital City of the Colony. Hence 
although Ferryland and Placentia had the advantage of it in 
priority of selection, and in the expenditure of vast sums of 
money in the erection of military works, &c., yet these places, 
not having the natural advantages of St. John's, yielded to it in 
the course of time, and about the beginning of the XVIII. Cen- 
tury we find St. John's the acknowledged Capital and the 
residence of the Governor. 

It was not, however, until the early decades of the XIX. Century 
that she began to " change her character from a fishery to a large 
commercial town." (Extract fjom Governor Keat's letter to 
Lord Bathurst. Prowse, p. 399.) The population of the city 
at that time was 10,000, and immigrants were constantly pour- 
ing in, principally from Ireland. Between the years 1814 and 
1815 as many as eleven thousand immigrants came from Ireland. 
Kent & Morris had a regular passenger service by sailing ves- 
sels from Waterford. Newfoundland was blessed in those days 
with two enlightened and broad-minded governors, viz. : Admiral 
Sir John T. Duckworth, who came in 1810, and Admiral Sir 
Richard Goodwin Keats, who succeeded him in 1812. 

Under these progressive men, great improvements were made 
in St. John's and its environs. The "Ships' Fishing Rooms," 
which had monopolized the best sites in the town, were abol- 
ished. The laws forbidding the erection of permanent houses 
were repealed ; grants of land were made in small lots in the 
suburbs (the grant of "Mount Cashel" lands date back to this 
period, 1815); more than a thousand acres of land were then 
under cultivation. The streets of the city were laid out on an 
improved and enlarged plan; a police force was established, 
also a fire brigade, and an attempt was made at lighting and 
sewerage. 

In the year 1812 the second American war broke out, and it 
was a harvest time for the merchants of St. John's. Many a 
" fortune" was made in those years, and of one of these I am 
going to tell the story. Judge Prowse in his admirable History 
gives a graphic sketch of St. John's in these days, (p. 387 et 
seqq.) "During the whole conflict (the American war) New- 
" foundland was in a state of great prosperity, wages were high, 
"... fish and oil and all our produce was also abnormally 
" high." St. John's was the base of operations of the British 
fleet during the war. " There were in the Harbour at the 
breaking out of the war three sail of the line, twenty-one frigates, 
and thirty-seven sloops, brigs and schooners of war." Prizes 
were constantly being brought in laden with various cargoes, 
many of them of very great value. At one time there were 
thirty American prizes in the harbour. " I have heard a gentle- 
man describe his walking across from Bennett's (now Duder's) 
to Alsop's on the Southside on American prizes chained to- 
gether. ... On board the captured vessels were all sorts of 
valuable freights, Lyons silks, and whole cargoes of cham- 
pagne, &c. (Prowse, p. 387.) 

Among the mercantile houses of St. John's about the year 
1815, was that of Meagher & Sons. Their premises were 
situated about where Tessier's are now. On an old code of 
signals in my possession (for which I am indebted to our local 
artist, Jno. Hayward, Esq.), I find Meagher's house-flag. It is 
all green with a large yellow capital M in the centre. He was 
a very wealthy merchant, owning several foreign-going vessels. 
He, like many others, having amassed a large fortune returned 
to live in his native country. Before proceeding to tell how he 



started on his career of success, I must say a few words con- 
cerning the family history of the head of this firm. 

Among the Irish immigrants who came to Newfoundland 
about this time was a young man, a native of Clonmel, named 
Thomas Meagher. He was a tailor by trade and worked at 
first in the establishment of Mr. Crotty, a man who carred on a 
large tailoring and clothing business. Young Meagher was a 
shrewd business man and a great favourite in the household. 
Mr. Crotty died, and in due course of time Meagher married 
the widow and became owner of the whole business. There 
was a romance connected with this Crotty, which it would be 
out of place to relate here, but which may form the subject of a 
future Christmas story. 

During this stirring period scarcely a day passed on which 
there was not a sale of goods from the cargoes of the prizes 
brought into the harbour by the British men-o'-war. 

One day a prize was brought laden with delf crockeryware 
and glassware packed in crates. A sale was called by the town 
crier. Mr. Meagher, who, besides his clothing business, always 
had an eye to "the main chance," was punctually on the ground 
at all these sales. Seeing that the goods in this case were not 
of much value, he agreed with William Thomas, another pro- 
minent merchant of those times, to "go halves" for one crate, 
"just to keep their hands in." The crate was knocked down 
to Mr. Meagher " for a mere song," and the auctioneer, seeing 
that there was going to be no bidding that day, was about to 
close down the sale, when a commotion was heard on the out- 
skirts of the crowd. The Commissary or Quarter-Master of the 
Military, at the time, was a certain Captain Barnes. He was a 
jovial and convivial chafacter and was well known through the 
town as the perpetrator of innuinerab'e practical jokes and the 
performance of many bold and dare-devil feats. He was seen 
riding along the street until he reached the scene of the auction 
when he reined in his horse. It was evident from his rollicking 
manner and the somewhat unsteady way in which he sat his 
horse that he was returning from some carousal and was not 
quite himself. 

Flourishing his whip he forced his way through the crowd, 
cracking jokes right and left. On learning that the sale was 
about to be called off ' Come, Mr. ," he cried, " I'll take 
the whole d lot of them ! I want the crates to make coops 
for my spring chickens. You may pitch the cups and saucers 
over the wharf, but send up the crates to the Ordinance Yard 
at once." He went off whistling a lively air, and thinking no 
more about the matter. The auctioneer knocked down the 
whole lot, some couple of dozen, to the Captain, and prepared 
to have them carted to his residence. 

In the mealtime, it having been agreed between Meagher and 
Thomas, that he (Meagher) should take the crate home and 
unpack it, and send half the contents back to him (Thomas). 
Meagher had the crate carted to his house and placed in the 
back work-room. He waited till night-time, when his journey- 
men had all gone home, before commencing to unpack. 

No sooner had he removed the first tier of delf ware, than he 
stood amazed and astonished, for there before his eyes he saw 
the rarest selection of valuable silks with which the whole in- 
terior of the crate was closely packed ! He could scarcely draw 
his breath, so excited was he, as he took out one after another 
rolls and p: c'cages of the most brilliant and costly fabrics : 
silk stuffs woofed with wool, and with gold and silver threads, 
forming the most exquisite patterns; shawls, hankerchiefs, 
scarves, watered silks, poplins, velvets, satinets, moires. &c., it 
was pimply .bewildering. It had been the intention, of course, 
to introduce these articles as contraband to America. 

Mr. Meagher quietly packed all the goods into trunks, safely 
loci ed them, and carefully concealed them. The delf-ware of 
which thtre vas cnly an outer layer all roi nd the crate buried in 
straw, he leligiously dhided, and in the iroining sent one half 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Over to Mr. Thomas, but said not a word about the silks. 
Thomas made some slight remark about the smallness of the 
quantity, but was easily led to believe that the greater part of 
the ware had been broken. 

When Commissary Barnes awoke next morning, having slept 
off his debauch, he was surprised to hear a great noise and 
commotion going on outside. Looking out of his window he 
saw the square of the Ordinance Yard encumbered with the im- 
mense crates, and horses and carts still bringing more. He 
could not understand what it was all about. He had quite for- 
gotton his freak of the day before. In the course of the day, 
however, his memory began to clear up, and it was helped by a 
sharp reprimand from from the commanding officer of the gar- 
rison who had come to learn of the absurd purchase. He was 
reminded that his position debarred him from entering into 
commercial enterprises, and he was ordered lo send back at 
once the ridict.lous articles, or to pay from his own pocket the 
amount of the Bill. The auctioneer, of course, would not hear 
of taking back the articles, and the consternation of poor Barnes, 
whose salary was not over large, was quite pitiable, besides his 
confusion at being made the laughing stock of the whole gar- 
risun. While in this miserable plight Mr. Meagher came like a 
good angel to his relief. Happening along as it were by mere 
chance and with a'l air of complete innocense. He got into 
conversation with Barnes, sympathized deeply with him in his 
distress, and finally in a burst of most magnanimous generosity 
he said : " I'll t. 11 you what, Barnes. Without any inconveni- 
ence to myself, I can help you out of this dirrkully. In my shop 
I do a little of all kinds of business, so I'll take the crates off 
your hands. Of course I know I may have to wait a long time 
to realize them, as there is an over-stock of crockery-ware in 
town just now. But I have compassion for you ; you're not a 
bad fellow, and I like to help a poor devil out of a mess." 

" My dear f How," shouted Barnes, squeezing him by the 
hand, ''I'll r.ever forget this noble act I To tell the truth, it 
s ves me from court marshall and degradation, for I assure you 
I m deucedly hard up, and I never could find the money to pay 
for those ink nal crates! I thank you most sin.eiely.'' 



Meagher lost no time in gretting the crates home and settling 
the auctioneer's account. For weeks after be spent his nights 
locked up in his work-room assorting and packing into trunks 
and portmanteaux the contents of the crates. All were filled 
with valueable goods like the first one. 

That fall Meagher went home. The number of trunks and 
portmanteaux he brought with him excited some comment, but 
he said it was ready-mades that he was supplying to the Irish 
trade. When he returned in the spring he brought out a whole 
cargo of goods for the general trade of the Island, and seemed 
also to have an unlimited supply of money. He bought a water- 
^ide premises, as mentioned above. He soon became one of 
our wealthiest merchants. After a few years, having amassed a 
large fortune, he retired to Ireland and spent his last days in 
Waterford. He was taken prisoner by a French ship, but man- 
aged to escape. He had two sons Patrick and Thomas. 
Patrick became a Priest and a Jesuit, and was the first New- 
foundlander promoted to Holy Orders. Thomas, who was also 
born in Newfoundland was the father of Thomas F. Meagher, 
the famous " Young Irelander," " the Vergniaud of the rising 
of '48." 



CO 



SONNF.T: FROM THE GKRMAN OK HEINK. 
/>> Edgar Alfred Bowring. 

I HAVK been wont to bear my head right high, 

My temper too is somewhat stern and rough ; 

Even before a monarch's cold rebuff 

I would not timidly avert mine eye. 

Vet. mother dear, I'll tell it openly : 

Much as my haughty pride may swell and puff, 

I feel submissive and subdued enough 

When thy much cherished, darling form is nigh. 

Is it thy spirit that subdues me then, 

Thy spirit, grasping all things in its ken, 

And soaring to the light of Heaven again ? 

liy the sad recollections I'm oppress'd 

T l-at I have done so much that grieves thy breast, 

Which loved me, more than all things else, the best. 




Photo by Janus- Vey. 

His Grace Archbishop Howley and Rt. Rev. Mgr. Reardon starting for a sleigh-drive. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




TOPSAIL BEACH, FROM A LATE PHOTO. 



T 



'HE following verses were written early 
in the seventies by the late Mr. 
Richard Raftus, B.L., and published 
in the Morning Chronicle. The local allu- 
sions caused a good deal of amusement at 
that date, but most of them are pointless 
to readers of the present day. We repro- 
duce it by request of a Boston subscriber. 

(To the Editor Morning Chronicle.) 
DEAR SIR, Havin' been informed that 
you were offerin' a shillin' a line for poulthry, 
and been in the want of a little tin, I suc- 
ceeded in puttin' the folio win' together. 
Perhaps you'd object to payin' so much, as 
the lines are shorter than usual ; if so I'd 
be willin' to make it sixpence, or make it a 
lump sum for the lot, if you could let me 
have it before Patrick's Day, 
You'd oblige, 

Your humble servant, 

JERRY JEHU. 

P.S. The charge is as raysonable as any 
man on the stand. 



OH ! Topsail's stages and flakes umbrageous 

Are situated in Conception Bay; 
There folks go browsin' and some carousin' 
- From St. John's town on a summer day. 

Tho' in winter sayson, for the same rayson, 
In a double sleigh, with two or three, 

Take my assertion, you'll have divarsion, 
Before returning, as you will see. 



Copsaii Stages. 

By late Richard Raftus, B.L. 

But first on startin' you'll make a dart in 

To a dacent house at Kiverhead; 
Your asofaygus, some Ould Tom negus 

Slip down quick and jump in the sled. 

Then with furs wrapped round you, I'll be bound you, 
'LI snap your fingers at snow drift and squall; 

As you lave the city, strike up some ditty, 
Till you're snugly sated at Boggy Hall. 

If from sucking dudeen or sigaroodeen * 
You're slightly husky in the passageway, 

Good Misses Farrell will draw from a barrel 
Some usquebaugh that's kum o'er the say. 

When done with drinkin', you will be thinkin' 

'Tis time you started upon the run ; 
And hear the rhymin' and merry chimin' 

Of the sleigh-bells as away you're spun. 

Some pleasant chaffin" uproarious laughin' 
Lightens the way till you get to Dunn's; 

Or if you prefer it, then away we skerrit 
On t'other side to soft spoken Ann's : 

There another taste of O. T., the laiste of, 

A drop of whisky or brandy mind, 
Keep head-piece coolin' to share the foolin' 

A game of Loo or a dollar " Blind." 

If you get three aces, make no smilin' faces 
Nor slip another from off your knee ; 

For such chatin' gainin', there's no manin' 
Except with Grimshaws or cute Chinee. 

But faith 1 'tis noonday and must soon way 
On the journey to the land of splits ; 

After more libations and inspirations, 

We drop the picthers, and hall on our mits. 

*Ce'tic for cigarette. 



Then softly glidin' the double slide in, 
No longer tarry, but to Daley's haste; 

Where we will pop in, and take a diop in 
That well-known hostel for man and baste. 

But there's no stayin' or long delayin' 
Till we get to Squires' for a quiet lunch, 

Then we will squat down and let a lot down 
Of whatever feedin' we get to munch. 

For our peryfayries, somewhat varies, 
And Nature vacuums we know detests, 

So sit round the table, and whate'er your able 
Stow away like " invited guests." 

Now the Lord that head is, of the Kennedies, 
With the big boys of his Governmint, 

To our native town is a comin' down, 
And is for sartin on a good time bint. 

Now if you pull in the caplin scull in 
A fry of fresh ones, he will surely get 

Cake-toutens, dough-boys, fresh codfish oh boys ! 
Sure a finer male he never eat. 

Then some calibogus mind a sly rogue is. 
But for a wash down is much finer, say 

Than the best French wine, or that from the Rhine. 
Johannesberg or yet Tokay. 

But sure I'm wanderin' and phlanderin' 

And must get back where we started from ) 

So lets fill our glasses to the Topsail lasses 
And drink their healths ere we start for town. 

But when we get there, we will all rep; ir 

To Atlantic Hotel or else Depot 
And finish up with a nate hot sup, 

For they're famous places as you all know. 

Now good-bye gintils, get beyond the lintils 
Of your various doors ; don't stop out, fear 

Of a white stone head in your geen bed in 
The General Protestant or Belvedere. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY; 



neutf'undlatid lcn ana Cape Shore i))cn. 



By W. J. 

THE Seiners, by James B. Connolly, a tale of the Glouces- 
ter fishermen, is a tale that will be read with avidity by 
every Newfoundlander. While it ostensibly deals with 
the fishermen of Gloucester, it includes, of course, the 
many recruits from our Island that go each season to 
man the American banking fleet. Dealing as it does with the for- 
tunes of the fishermen of Gloucester, a change of name to Cape 
St. Mary's, the Straits, or Labrador, and the description would fit 
to a nicety the lives of thousands of our hardy toilers of the sea. 
It is a tale of live, strong, vigorous men battling with tempestu- 
ous seas lashed by angry winds. Its a strenuous tale of virile 
men, with the tonic of sea salt quickening the hot red blood that 
courses through their veins, and gives us glimpses of human 
nature that is of the nature of those who go down to the sea in 
ships that excites alternately our laughter and our tears. 

The description of the "drive" for the first load of mackerel, with 
a little alteration, would describe the struggle for the " log load'" 
enacted every spring in our waters by our local vikings. The pic- 
ture of the seining, splitting and salting of a large haul of mackerel, 
with its days and nights of hustling, with a few moments only to 
get a " mug up" and no time at all to change wet clothes, or get 
a wink of sleep, till a man falls where he is standing and sleeps 
for hours as sound as the sleep of death, is a graphic description 
of the life of our local fishermen in the " caplin school." And 
then Wesley Marrs, Patsie Ocldie, Tommie Ohlsen, Torn 
O'Donnell and Tommie Clancy are all big, brave, hoyclenish, 
simple, lovable men, men brave to rashness, resourceful in 
danger, recking nothing of their lives to save a fellow-fisherman 
in distress, driving like fiends to kill a voyage, and generous to 
a fault with their hard earned money. Their prototypes in 
Newfoundland are legion. 

The Race and the rescue, and the run for home in the storm, 
all are vivid pictures of the sea, and displays in a remarkable 
manner Mr. Connolly's intimate knowledge of men and things 
and their ways, and describes the life with such vigour and sym- 
pathy, that one almost positively concludes that here is a tale 
told by one who has just relinquished his dory paddles, and 
while his mind is still keyed to the struggle, seizes his pen and 
in a burst of genius describes it. Here's a pen picture of a 
vessel sailing, by Captain Tomy Clancy, who lashed to the 
helm on an inky night, sends a message to the cook. 

" Then go below and tell him. Joe - , tell him to mouse 
his pots and kettles, for with sail alow and sail aloft, with her 
helmsman lashed, and her house awash, in a living gale and the 
devil's own sea, the Johnnie Duncan is going to the Westward." 

And when they had all foregathered on the night preceding 
the great race and were discussing the prospects of the morrow, 
and the song and jest went merrily round, and O'Donnell started 
in to sing " On, Seiners all, and Trawlers all," but Alexander 
McNeill and Patsie Oddie interrupted : "Oh give us the other 
one, Tom ' The Newf'undland and Cape Shore Men.' ' 

" Ha !" laughed O'Donnell, " it's the mention of your own 
you want you and Patsie there. Well, its all one to me. Any 
man from any place, so long as he's a fair man and a brave 
man, and the Lord knows ye're both ttoit. Well, here's to you 
both a wee drop just, Tommy easy easy, and he began 

Oh, Newf'undland and Cape Shore men and men of Gloucester town, 
With ye I've trawled o'er many banks and sailed the compass roun' ; 
I've ate with ye, and bunked with ye, and watched with ye all three, 
And better shipmates than ye were I never hope to see. 



Carroll. 

I've seen ye in the wild typhoon beneath a Southern sky, 
I've seen ye when the Northern gales drove seas to masthead high ; 
But summer breeze or winter blow, from Hatt'ras to Cape Race, 
I've yet to see ye with the sign of fear upon your face. 

Oh, swingin' cross the Bay 
Go eighty sail of seiners, 
And every blessed one of them adriving to her rail ! 

There's a gale upon the waters and there's foam upon the sea, 

And looking out the window is a dark-eyed girl for me, 

And driving her to Gloucester, may be we don't know 

What the little ones are thinking when the mother looks out so. 

Oh, the children in the cradle and the wife's eyes out to see, 

The husband at the helm and looking Westerly 

When you get to thinking that way, don't it make your heart's blood foam ? 

Besuie it does so here's a health to those we love at home. 

Oh, the roar of shoaling water, and the awful, awful sea, 

Busting shrouds, and parting cables, and the white death on our lee; 

Oh, the black, black night on George's when eight score men were lost 

Were ye there, ye men of Gloucester ? Aye, ye were and tossed 

Like chips upon the water were your little craft that night, 

Driving, swearing, calling out, but ne'er a call of fright. 

So knowing ye for what ye are, ye masters of the sea, 

Here's to ye, Gloucester fishermen, a health to ye from me. 

And here's to it that once again 

We'll trawl and seine and race again ; 
Here's to us that's living and to them that's gone before ; 

And when to us the Lord says, " Come!" 

We'll bow our heads, " His will be done," 
And all together let us go beneath the ocean's roar. 

" I never again expect to hear a sea song sung as Tom O'Don- 
nell sang it then, his beard still wet with the spray and his eyes 
glowing like coal fire. And the voice of him ! He must have 
been heard in half of Gloucester that night. He made the table 
quiver ; and when they all rose with glasses raised and sang the 
last lines again, any stranger hearing and seeing might have 
understood why it was that their crews were ready to follow 
these men to death." 




H Christmas Carol 

By Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 

npHF. Shepherds went their hasty way, 
* And found the lowly stable shed 
Where the Virgin Mother lay : 

And now they check their eager tread, 
For to the Babe, that at her bosom clung, 
A Mother's song the Virgin Mother sung. 



They told her how a glorious light, 

Streaming from a heavenly throng, 
Around them shone, suspending night 1 
While sweeter than a Mother's song, 
Blessed angels heralded the Saviour's birth, 
Glory to God on High I and Peace on Earth. 

in. 

She listened to the tale divine, 

And closer still the Babe she pressed ; 
And while she cried the Babe is mine ! 
The milk rushed faster to her breast 
Joy rose within her, like a summer's morn 
Peace, Peace on Earth 1 the Prince of Peace is born. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY; 



Utter Caribou in PeiDfounaiand, 



By Lieut. E. C. Kennedy, R.N. 



THE writer of the following graphic sporting yam is Lieutenant E. C. 
Kennedy, R.N., of H.M.S. Ariadne, Flagship of the Ndrth American 
squadron. All Newfoundlanders will remember his uncle, the genial 
-Admiral Sir W. R. Kennedy, R.N., K.C.B., the best all-round sportsman 
in the Royal Navy and one of the most humorous after dinner speakers in 
England; Author of several well-known works on Travel and Sport; one 
of old Newfoundland's best friends. The guides who were with the young 
Lieutenant speak in glowing terms of his wonderful walking powers and 
good shooting. He is a born sportmen, his father, Mr. E. B. Kennedy is 
a well-known authority on fishing in Norway and Sweden ; author of two 
works "The Black Police of Queensland," and "Thirty Seasons in Scan- 
dinavia." A younger uncle is G. B. Kennedy, well known to lawyers as 
the Editor of Koscoe's Criminal Evidence. D. W. PROWSE. 



^NEWFOUNDLAND has been described by one of its lead- 
I / ing authorities as one large deer park; a grand range for 
its splendid caribou larger than all Ireland. And so it 
is judging by the many accounts heard and by what the 
writer himself witnessed ; there is probably no better big 
game country existing. 

Some twenty years ago, before the railwaj joining the East 
and West Coast was finished, the caribou could wander unmo- 
lested over the whole of the interior, except for such sportsmen 
and trappers who could afford time to make expeditions any 
distance from the coast ; now, however, thanks to the enterprise 
of R. G. Reid, the sportsman can be put down in the heart of 
the deer country, with all the luxury of modern travelling. 

The line though, makes little difference to the caribou, who 
can often be seen scampering away at the approach of the train 
to some other part of the many miles of unsurveyed country 
that still exist, and probably will do so for many years to come. 

It was the middle of September that I went on an expedition 
to these parts; I had been informed that to get one's heads was 
a very simple matter a little patience and straight powder were 
all that was necessary, once in the track of the deer and one 
made his choice this I believe to be the case in many parts, 
especially during the month of September when the deer migrate 
South to warmer latitudes. Such, however, was not my experi- 
ence as perhaps the following account may show, consequently 
it was all the more enjoyable as one had to work to get such 
satisfactory results. 

It was near midnight that the train put me down at a certain 
place near the centre of the Island, where no station, or even 
footboard exists ; my two guides were awaiting me here. 
Luckily it was fine ; no tent had yet arrived, but in spite of the 
cold, a fairly comfortable night was passed, thanks to the two 
excellent back woodsmen men who had spent most of their 
lives with axe and rifle, and as long as wood and water were 
obtainable could make themselves comfortable. 

B. was detailed as guide, and C. as cook. We spent two days 
here, away from daylight to dark, scouring the country for sev- 
eral miles round, and I must confess that my introduction 19 
the sport was somewhat disappointing. Where were those 
countless herds that I had heard so much about ? We saw 
tracks, but very few of them were fresh. B., who had hunted 
this same country last year in the same month and had never 
had a blank day, was quite non-plussed ; the only explanation 
he could offer was that owing to the mildness of the weather the 
deer had not yet started tracking South. 



Another place, some twenty miles to the West had also been 
recommended to me, but rny proposal of going there on' the 
third day hardly met with B's. views, he being unacquainted 
with that country. Anyhow it seemed slow work remaining 
here, so I overruled all objections on the part of the guides, and 
accordingly we stopped the Express (it runs every two days), 
and an hour later arrived there. 

A couple of sportsmen were awaiting the train, and they had 
just time to inform me that they had been there two days, seen 
several does and bagged one, but no stags. This sounded more 
hopeful, and following their advice, and the tent having arrived, 
we pitched it some four miles north of the line. 

The country here proved much more open than at the previ- 
ous place, rocky hills and open stretches of marsh with small 
woods here and there. 

We remained here five days and worked hard. It was, how- 
ever, not till the fourth day that I saw and got my first caribou. 
We had been walking for about two hours when B. spotted a 
couple feeding about 500 yards nearly to leeward. After some 
rapid tactics of B's., which consisted of keeping out of sight and 
running for about 500 yards so that they would not be able to 
wind us, we got to within 300 yards, and though somewhat 
breathless, was lucky enough to wound one, which made off. we 
following as fast as the nature of the ground would allow and 
finely came nearly up with him, after having run about a mile, 
as he was entering a lake. He remained about 100 yards out 
in his depth and presented a broadside view when a bullet 
through his heart finished him ; to our surprise it was a doe 
with a small head. B. was mistaken by the horns which were 
out of velvet, an unusual thing for that time of the year. We 
kept the antlers and the meat made a useful addition to our 
larder, which was beginning to get somewhat low. It blew a gale 
nearly every day, from the north or west, and our camp was not 
too well sheltered, so I decided to shift to some other part of 
the country; three hours portage brought us to a snug looking 
clump of trees where we selected a protected place. It was a 
move in the right direction, for, as will be seen, our game was 
very much more plentiful here. 

The men were pitching camp, so taking a look round I soon 
spotted a herd on a neighbouring hillock. A closer inspection 
revealed the fact that there were seven, one being a stag with a 
small head of thirteen points. My license only allowed me to 
kill three, and though an enticing shot I was afterwards glad I 
did not take it. 

Arriving back the men told me an old stag of thirty to forty 
points had passed quite close to them. My disappointment at 
losing this chance was great, still I was consoled in having seen 
more already than at our previous place. 

The next day I proposed visiting a large lake to leeward of 
us; it took nearly four hours walking and we saw two or three 
small herds, but winding us they made off before we got close 
enough to inspect them. Our return journey, which was by a 
different route and to windward, brought us better results. 

We were at the foot of a hill when some three-quarters of a 
mile up it. a black bear was out feeding in the open on the blue- 
berries near a wood. My only chance was to cut him off, as he 
was already apparently finishing his meal and approaching the 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



worJd ; I accordingly made off as fast as possible, the ground 
being very rocky and broken, in hopes of a shot, but alas! I 
was disappointed, for when 150 yards from him he saw me. 
" Shoot," said B., but I was too unsteady, so I refrained in 
hopes of getting closer. As luck had it the ground got denser, 
with broken trees and stumps, and though Bruin must have 
passed within thirty yards of me, so thick was it, I never saw 
him again. He was a big fellow and as black as coal, and it 
was in very low spirits we wended our way home. 

We had walked on for half an hour, when suddenly " Stag," 
from B., caused us both to take cover, and there, 150 yards 
down a hill was a fine looking beast with two or three does, the 
first good one I had seen. It was an easy shot, as he presented 
a broadside view and had not seen us; a bullet behind his 
shoulder caused him to stagger on for a short way when he 
rolled over dead a good head of thirty points. This consoled 
me somewhat for the loss of the bear. We grallocked him and 
hung up a rag as a land-mark, as we were some way from camp 
and it was getting dark. 

Another two hours walking and B. spotted a herd about half 
a mile ahead on the crest of a hill in an admirable position for 
stalking, dead to windward with good cover. We crawled to 
within eighty or ninety yards and got a good view of them ten 
does and a magnificient looking stag with a grand he;\d, the re- 
mainder of him being behind a rock. I waited until the old 
gentleman came into a sm.ill opening, and fired, result a regular 
stampede the whole lot coining down the hill nearly straight for 
us for they had not yet seen us, the stag bringing up the rear 
apparently uninjured. What a grand sight he looked as he 
charged past me about twenty yards off; surely I could not 
have missed. Anyhow I was determined not to lose this chance 
and I gave him one point blank behind the shoulder. His pace 
never altered till he had gone a good 100 yards when he stopped, 
faced us and rolled over dead thirty two points but a far finer 
head than the previous one the brow antlers being particularly 
well developed. PL ven B . old hunter as he was, admired him ; 



an inspection showed that the first bullet was too far forward, 
having pierced the loose part of his neck which had little or no 
effect, the last one made a frightful hole in his side. I was 
using a .303 Lee Metford, with a soft-nose bullet. 

We arrived at camp soon after dark. The next day the men 
were employed bringing in meat, etc. I kept the antlers of the 
former, and complete head of the later, to remind me of a very 
enjoyable trip. We remained there another day getting in some 
of the meat and salting the skins, then returned to the Station, 
I carrying my belongings, the men carrying the remainder, 
which with the skins and heads formed a pretty heavy load. 

B. and C. proved a couple of very useful men, some of their 
many experiments were very amusing and instructive to listen 
to; they were unequalled at skinning and grallocking a deer ; 
they were obedient, hard workers, and never seemed to tire, 
provided they had their tea and grub, which former they con- 
sumed in large quantities. 

To anybody who contemplates such an expedition the follow- 
ing items may be of interest : 

Close season, ist February to 3ist July, also from ist October 
to aoth October. License costs $50, which allows holder to kill 
two stag and one doe. Guides usually paid about $2.00 a day 
and found in provisions. Tent and cooking gear necessary. 
All one wants is a frying pan, kettle, poiling pot. with cups, 
forks, spoons, knives, etc, ; and of provisions the following are 
necessary : Tea, sugar, flour, bacon, pork, milk, lard, butter 
and salt (not omiting coarse salt for skins, etc.), also fresh bread 
for a start, when excellent flap-jacks can be made a kind of 
pancake made of flour and water. A very useful thing lent me 
by a friend was a piece of light cotton duck about 6ft. x 2}^ ft. 
It weighed practically nothing and could be fixed up to repre- 
sent a stretcher by reeving four sticks or poles through places 
made in the head and sides and securing them to four uprights, 
its great advantage was that it kept one off the damp ground. 
A complete shift of underclothing and good strong boots com- 
pleted one's kit, with a large canvas bag to sling over both 
shoulders to carry it in, and for night I found three blankets 
necessary, as it usually froze. 




Photo li]' S H. Parsons, 



NEWFOUNDLAND CARIBOU. 



;; THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



fln Ocean Vopage, 

By Rev. Charles Lench. 



ALL things here have an end. So had our eight weeks of 
delightful pleasure time in the Home-Land. June, July 
and August passed all too quickly. The friends we met 
fe$8 with gladness after a long interval of years, we had to 
leave again with heavy hearts. August the i8th found us on 
board the Atlantic liner Ionian, a good ship, well commanded, 
8,265 tons register, length 485 ft., and a 58 ft. beam. Her crew 
numbered over 100, and her passengers 720; total 820 souls. 

The majority of our passengers were crossing the ocean for 
the fiist time, while a considerable percentage, having visited 
the old land, after years of absence, were returning to the land 
of their adoption. This was to be our fifth crossing of the At- 
lantic, and as old Neptune had never brought us to his feet in 
obeisance, we had no cause to entertain anything but feelings of 
gratitude for past mercies. 

It is amazing how soon, in this big world so shrunk by mod- 
ern circumstances, you meet with some one who knew some 
place or person that you know or were acquainted with, some- 
where at sometime. We had scarcely settled before we were 
face to face with Rev. W. J. and Mrs. Luscombe, and two 
children, enroute to Wesley, Iowa, U.S. via Montreal. We had 
met at the Free Trade Hall, Manchester, on the first Sabbath in 
England, but never expected to see him again. It was the self- 
same Bro. Luscombe. We couldn't observe the slightest change. 
We would not have known that he was a full-fledged Yankee, a 
real naturalized citizen of the United States if we had not learnt 
the tremendous fact that his allegiance was transferred from the 
Union Jack to the Stars and Stripes. 

It is marvellous how quickly such a family will become ac- 
quainted, and although it was six o'clock when we left the wharf 
at Liverpool, on arriving at Moville, Ireland, at ten o'clock next 
morning we seemed to be no longer strangers. Boats were soon 
alongside and we were informed that for two shillings we could 
go ashore and return. On landing we found a large number of 
jaunting carts and their drivers, very anxious to take passengers 
to the "Green Castle." 

Some drivers got impatient for customers and went in for a 
horse-whip 'skirmish. The Kilkenny cats never had a better 
time, but while they were engaged settling their business, the 
story of the dog and the shadow was re-enacted and the sensible 
drivers got the prey. I suppose their differences are settled by 
this time ! My friend Luscombe invested in an Irish pig of 
bog-oak. He paid a good price for a small article, but he could 
see nothing that would please one of his parishioners better, 
a son of Erin, than an image of " the gintleman that pays the 
rint." 

My souvenirs were a small kettle of bog oak, some sprigs of 
Irish heather, a specimen of peat, the "dear little shamrock," 
and some most interesting picture post cards. Our true born 
Americans having taken a very circumspect view of the quiet 
little town of Moville, pronounced it " alright," and when one 
of Uncle Sam's representatives brings that word into requisition, 
you may depend that it is alright ! 

We were in due course under-weigh and after a few hours had 
rought but one vast expanse of sky and ocean. 

As the days passed and the storms failed to interrupt our 
pleasure, the voyage became increasingly enjoyable. It was 
good to have so many who could sing and play. A Church 
organist, a professor of music; and amateurs on the violin, 
guitar, flute, and mandolin. 

A concert rendered by our amateur artists would have done 
credit anywhere. Our concert was given in aid of Liverpool 
Seaman's Orphange. The Rev. Thomas Harris presided, and 
advocated in a splendid speech the claims of that Institution. 
He was enthusiastically congratulated on obtaining his Minis- 
terial Jubilee. 



The writer addressed the audience, rubbing in a few hard 
facts and practical lessons. Songs, instrumental selections, 
recitations and readings filled in a good programme, and the 
collection amounted to 522.00. Three other collections were 
taken for this object during the voyage. 

Profitable and instructive conversations and debates were 
always in order. Great International questions were raised and 
settled according to our own peculiar views: moral and political 
economy, Chamberlain's fiscal policy, &c., etc. 

Some passengers, we thought, went too often, for their own 
good, to a little shop in a side street, and imbibed too freely of 
Scotch whisky and other beverages. Yet none were locked up 
for being drunk and disorderly. Some of the younger voyagers 
became to all appearances intensely affectionate. Perhaps the 
old lines have since been fulfillled in more instances than one : 

" To meet, to know, to love, and then to part, 
Is the sad tale of many a human heart." 

Can you imagine the delight with which the first voyagers 
greeted the welcome sound of " land ahead," or the tremend- 
ous rush and excitement at early noon, of hundreds of pass- 
engers to get their first glimpse of an ice berg ? Nor was the 
passage through the Straits of Belle Isle without interest to us, 
as we left old Terra Nova behind us for a few days longer. 

How shall we describe that 800 miles run up the River St. 
Lawrence. Beautiful towns and villages and at length the Mont- 
morency Falls, and soon after the charming view of old historic 
Quebec, with its heights and Plains of Abraham, the frowning 
fortress and the quaint old city. 

Here the steerage passengers left us, and after a delay of 
some eight hours we proceeded by moonlight upon the last stage 
of our voyage to Montreal, accomplishing the 2,900 miles in 
four hours less than any previous voyage of the Ionian, making 
it her record trip. Soon we were through the customs. Then 
came the good-byes and the genuine hand-shaking, but not for 
ever. We hope to meet again, and the Great Pilot face to face, 
when we have " crossed the bar." 




flbouc the Bridge. 

By D. Carroll. . 

A BOVE the Bridge the night is fair, 
^ Up-floating on the frosty air, 
The clink of steel and shouts that go 
From skaters flitting to and fro, 
Re-echo from the hills of snow 

Above the Bridge. 

To lands where summer breezes blow 
Have gone the friends I loved to know, 
Who many a night, as this as fair, 
Had revelled in the moonlight here, 
With mazy glidings, long ago 

Above the Bridge. 

O ! many a night shall come and go, 
With moon-lit sheen the scene shall glow, 
And Youth and Love shall gather there 
And new delights their souls shall share ,' 
While dreaming hearts shall whisper low, 
The snow-clad hills again shall grow 
Transfigured ; well 'twas ever so 
Above the Bridge. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



CDc Catholic Cburcl) and tlx British empire. 



By Rev M. J. Ryan, Ph. D. 



" Let not your good be evil spoken of." 

1 HAPPENED last summer while travelling to meet a very 
intelligent and fair-minded man, not a Catholic, who was 
desirous of information concerning the mysterious institu- 
& tion to which I belonged. The notions which he entertained 
were so remote from the reality that it occurred to me that 
we are perhaps somewhat negligent in explaining our O\MI prin- 
ciples to the world in which we have to live, and for whose 
welfare we are bound both to pray and to work. And this feel- 
ing has grown upon me as I have seen, in English reviews and 
newspapers, the disposition of a large section of the party which 
once was entitled to the name of Liberal, to work up a " No- 
Popery" cry as a means of securing them a majority that would 
make them independent of what they describe as " the intolerable 
Irish yoke" upon their party. 

It is with the object of meeting misrepresentations, that 1 put 
my ideas on paper. The Catholic religion is a religion of order- 
ed freedom, and holding as it does ajitste milieu between extremes, 
it is continually liable to be attacked by extremists on both sides ; 
it is charged by extreme Conservatives with disloyalty; and it is 
charged by extreme Radicals with being the party of tyranny. 
The Catholic Church, in Ireland, in particular is the object of 
hatred to both Orangemen and Fenian. The Catholic religion is 
essentially a religion of order and union, of law as the bond of 
order, and of authority as the source of law. Under this aspect, 
she may be viewed as a great Conservative institution, the in- 
flexible opponent of anarchy, lawlessness, and rebellion. At the 
same time, by the necessity of her essence, the Church must 
stand for freedom of conscience against the absolutism of the 
State. She must insist on the independence of the spiritual 
order; and she must defend the right of association. And as 
religious freedom has no real security, without civil freedom, 
and as, on the other hand, civil freedom leads as a rule to reli- 
gious freedom, therefore the Church incidentally favours civil 
freedom as a means to that religious freedom which is of course 
her main concern. She undoubtedly finds herself most at home 
under constitutional government, and particularly under consti- 
tutional monarchy. 

Now, I do not want anyone to be bringing me objections from 
the i6th century. To accuse the Church to-day of disloyalty 
because she was hostile to the government of Queen Elizabeth 
would be as absurd as to accuse the Conservative party of dis- 
loyalty because it was hostile to the Revolution settlement for 
sixty years. It is sometimes said that there are Americans who 
do not know yet that George III. is dead. In the same way, 
there are Protestants who do not know that Pius V. is dead. 
And yet he is dead, more dead than Pius I., and there is no 
one to whom the Catholics of to-day would more readily apply 
the theological principle that " the canonization of a saint is not 
the canonization of his actions." 

I often wonder that British Protestants do not see what a 
striking analogy there is between the British Empire and the 
Catholic Church. The Anglican Reformation was really an 
ecclesiastical " Declaration of Independence," and it had in the 
Grand Rebellion and the declaration of American independence 
its logical consequence and (let me sa) without offence) its pro- 
vidential punishment. 



Long before the American Revolution, the New England 
had effaced the cross from the flag of Old England as savouring 
of Popish superstition. The Catholic Church, like the British 
Empire, is envied for its greatness and dreaded for its power ; 
and it is hated and misrepresented for the same reasons. And 
the misrepresentations against the Catholic Church take the 
same contrary forms as those against the British Empire. Each 
is described at one time as tottering to its fall, and at another 
time as being so mighty and so aggressive that only a coalition 
of all other powers can withstand it. The British Empire is 
described in Europe as the home of revolution and in America 
as the great embodiment of tyranny; so is the Catholic Church 
assailed with opposite charges of tyranny and rebelliousness. 
There are people so blindly anti-British that Great Britain can 
always dictate to them what side they shall take up; bv sup- 
porting the right, she can make them support the wrong by 
choosing the winning side, she can make them range themselves 
on the losing side. She can make them support a Boer republic 
or a Russian autocracy, Calvinists or orthodox Greeks, those 
who profess to be defending their own soil against a robber 
or those who openly acknowledge that they are going to seize, if 
they can, other people's land. So it be anti-British, these 
people will sympathise with it. And so too there are people so 
blindly anti-Catholic, that any cause, however bad, has their sym- 
pathy if it be in opposition to the Church. It may be tyranny or 
it may be anarch)-, it may be the tyranny of a monarchy or that 
of a mob, it may be indifferentism or it may be aggressive and 
fanatical infidelity, the denial of the right of association. the 
confiscation of property, all have their redeeming points as 
soon as they are against the Catholic Church. When the 
Divorce Bill was being carried through in England, by the party 
of all the virtues, Mr. Gladstone, opposing it with the conviction 
of a Christian and the spirit of a man, wrote (Quarterly Review, 
July, 1857 ) " An attempt is made to prepossess our minds ad- 
versely to this ancient and venerable [marriage] law, by insisting 
on the fact that we owe it to the times of Popery. . . . 'Why 
should it be thought a thing incredible ' with us that the Church 
of Rome might here and there, by accident at least, do right ?" 
Disraeli wrote once to a friend that the Catholic Church and the 
Conservative party were natural allies, and that it was the ambi- 
tion of his life to bring them into alliance. Disraeli usually knew 
what he was talking about ; but how then can the Church be 
accused of disloyalty ? Of course I am not claiming that Catho- 
lics invariably act in perfect accordance with their principles ; no 
one is perfectly consistent; no one always understands his own 
real interests ; no one always rises above the temptation of pre- 
ferring the interest of the hour to principle. I speak of the 
spirit and the principles of the Church, and of the tempei and 
character which she tends to produce, but does not always suc- 
ceed in producing, in her children. 

The person whom I refer to, inquired about the " deposing 
power." I thought that this was rather a matter of archaeology 
at present ; but I thought, historically, that it proved more con- 
servative than the modern principle that subjects have a right 
to decide for themselves when they should rebel. I said that 
the Church of England on one occasion and the Scotch Kirk on 
several occasions had exercised what was practically the same 



IO 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



as a "deposing power", and I asked him how much trouble Gov- 
ernment would have in the British Empire if it never had any 
except what the Pope would now stir up. In truth it is very 
remarkable that the statesman who accused the Vatican decrees 
of making Catholics disloyal should, before ten years were over, 
be appealing to the Pope to make the Catholics loyal, in one 
part of the Empire. 

Now if we turn to foreign countries, Italy, one of the most 
Catholic countries in Europe, is the one where the people wors- 
hip England ; and that sentiment is scarcely less strong in the 
Vatican than in the Quirinal. In France, until the Dreyfus 
affair the Catholics were the pro-British party ; that was as it 
should be, for English sympathy then went with the Catholic 
Church; but Catholic sympathy was carried so far that distin- 
guished French Catholics wrote in defence of British policy in 
Ireland ; and it was to the Radicals and Socialists of France 
that Parnell appealed. I do not defend the French Catholics 
for their attitude on the Dreyfus case ; but I think the London 
Times might have remembered that it, too, was once deceived by 
a forger ; and it is very natural that the French Catholics should 
have resented the attacks on their army. Now, if we turn to 
the storm of abuse during the Boer war, in what country was 
there such an outburst of diabolical and hypocritical malignity 
as in the land of the Reformation ? Every Protestant pulpit in 
Germany resounded with accents of wrath and hatred. I do 
not know that the Catholics were any better, but at least the 
Catholic pulpits were not degraded in this fashion ; and I know 
that the Germailia, one of the two chief Catholic organs in Ger- 
many, argued that friendship with England would be better than 
friendship with Russia, because the example of England would 
work in favour of fair treatment for the Catholic Church, and 
the example and influence of Russia against it. 

If we turn within the Empire, the French Canadians, though 
newly conquered, were loyal in i 776, when the Protestants of 
the Thirteen Colonies rebelled ; and the French Canadians are 
loyal still; Bourassa is a gas-bag, of no influence; and anyhow 
he is not a " Clerical" but an anti-clerical. If it be said that 
there is some racial dislike to the English, I answer that the 
French Canadians like the English much better than any other 
race; they like a Protestant Englishman better than a Catholic 
Irishman; they have usually voted on the opposite side to the 
Irish ; and when they went solid to elect a Prime Minister of 
their own race, it was indeed a Liberal, but a Confederate, and 
Imperialist, and one who has since carried his imperialism so 
far as to say, in his place in the House of Commons, that though 
he believed in the principle of Home Rule, yet he must add that 
some of the Nationalist Leaders had by their conduct excited a 
just and reasonable distrust. 

In Ireland, I maintain that the Catholic Church for the last 
one hundred and fifty years has been loyal to Great Britain, 
while the Protestants of Ireland have been loyal to nothing but 
their own interests, have played off the two peoples against one 
another, have been Irish or English according as it suited their 
own purpose, and have always been ready to ally themselves 
with the rebel faction whenever they were not allowed to have 
their own way in oppressing the Catholics. In speaking of the 
Protestants of Ireland, I do not know whether I ought to call 
them Irish Protestants or Protestant Irish, or whether I ought 
to call them Irish at all, and not rather an Anglo-Scotch Colony 
in Ireland. The word Irish is as ambiguous as the word Am- 
erican, which may mean a Red Indian, a white man, or a negro 
citizen of the U. S. I notice that both the English and the Irish 
are ready to claim them when they do anything honourable, and 



to disown them when they do anything shameful; but if they are 
English when they win battles, they are English when they com- 
mit crimes, and if they are Irish when they win battles, they are 
Irish when they commit crimes. All I ask for is consistency. 
They themselves were Irish in 1782 and English in 1798 ; they 
were Irish the other day, when it was a question of getting 
a grant from the treasury in addition to the price of their estates ; 
they are English again when it is a question of Home Rule ; in 
general, they are Irish when they want the help of the Catholics 
to get anything from Great Britain, and they are English when 
they want to refuse the Catholics any share of the freedom or the 
power which they monopolise. Perhaps we ought to say that 
they are neither English nor Irish, but a tertium quid. Mr. Bryce, 
who belongs to them, thinks them superior in character to either 
Irish or English. Matthew Arnold thinks that they have retained 
"the narrowness and doggedness of the Saxon" and acquired 
"the passionate unreason of the Celt." 
(Continued.) 




TILT COVE. 

On Christmas Dap. 

By Dinah Aftirin Midoclt Craik. 

GOD rest ye, merry gentlemen ; let nothing you dismay, 
Kor Jesus Christ, our Savior, was born on Christmas Day. 
The Dawn rose red o'er Bethlehem, the stars shone through the gray, 
When Jesus Christ, our Savior, was born on Christmas Day. 

God rest ye, little children ; let nothing you affright, 

Kor Jesus Christ, your Savior, was born this happy night ; 

Along the hills of Galilse the white flocks sleeping lay, 

When Christ, the child of Nazareth, was born on Christmas Day. 

God rest ye, all good Christians ; upon this blessed morn 
Tne Lord of all good Christians was of a woman born : 
Now all your sorrows He doth heal, your sins he takes away; 
For Jesus Christ, our Savior, was born on Christmas Day. 



it 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY" 



AN ILLUSTRATED MAOAZI.NE 

Issued every third month about the 151!) of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, -:- -:- -:- PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

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One Year, in advance, Newfoundland and Canada 40 " 

Foreign Subscriptions (except Canada) 50 " 

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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



ii 



Risen from the Dead. 

By H. W. LeMessurier. 



IN a fisher's cot, situated in a remote fishing hamlet of one of 
our southern bays, a woman sat, at the close of an afternoon 
of September, gazing out over the restless sea which con- 
stantly beat on the beach which fringed the wild and open 
jfi cove that served as a resting place for the fishermen's boats 
when not at work. As the woman gazed she saw not the 
steady roll of the ocean's billows as they sped landward and 
broke upon the shore, nor the fishing boats in the distance 
hieing homewards, nor yet the beauties of the seascape lighted 
by the rays of the setting sun, and alternating in colors as the 
clouds moved slowly overhead. Her thoughts were far away 
in past scenes, when happy days were hers, and when a loved 
one had been eagerly looked for each day as time came for his 
fisher's skiff to come to land. And as. she thought and gazed 
she remembered the time when happy days were turned to grief, 
and patient watching and fervent hopes alone kept her alive and 
helped her to bear her heavy burden. 

But now after nearly seven years of loneliness she was faced 
by a question of, to her, stupendous moment, and this was the 
cause of Ruth Hope's idleness on this summer afternoon. 
Would she wait and hope any longer and eke out the miserable 
pittance which just kept herself and child from starvation, or 
would she accept the offer of marriage made her by Edward 
Poole who for the last seven years had been a persistent ad- 
mirer of hers. This was the question which she tried to settle 
in her own mind, for whilst her love was with the absent and 
perhaps dead one, her needs of sustenance were great and 
the future of her boy was a greater consideration with her. 

Nearly eight years prior to the opening of this story John 
Hope had brought Ruth, a blushing bride, from her home in a 
settlement thirty miles distant, and was the envy of all the 
bachelors of Lobster Cove, as Ruth was a comely maiden of 
winning manners. The girls of the cove also were envious, for 
Ruth had taken from them one of the most eligible and best 
looking young fishermen to be found for miles. Amongst those 
who envied John the most, was his chum and fishing mate 
Edward Poole whose work brought him in constant contact 
with Ruth. It was not long before he learnt to regard her with 
the deepest of affection and became secretly jealous of John's 
good fortune in the posse sio.i of such a wife. His jealous 
temperament worked on his better feelings and often he found 
himself planning how John might be disposed of or got out of 
the way, so that he might have Ruth as his own. 

The Cove they lived in w.is open to the east and southerly 
winds, and. it b.-ing a rough spot when these winds blow, no 
craft could be kept there which could not be hauled up on the 
beach out of reach of the raging seas. During summer jime the 
boats were mostly put on collars that is moored out from the 
shore, and sometimes when an unusually heavy sea rose they 
were swamped at their moorings and often sank. Hence it was 
that all their trading was done with the schooner traders which 
periodically visited the Cove taking the catch of the fisherman 
and leaving such supplies as they needed. Occasionally the 
fishermen visited St. Pierre in the spring and fall to settle up 
their accounts and then they clubbed together and went in one 
of the largest skiffs belonging to the settlement. 

Christinas was approaching, the first that Ruth was to spend 
in her new home, when it became necessary for John and several 
others to visit St. Pierre and purchase a few necessaries in pre- 
paration for the celebration of the coming festival, and Ruth 
was anxious that John should go as she wanted, for a particular 
event, one 01 two articles which could not be obtained in Lob- 
ster Cove. Edward Poole was amongst the number who were 
going," and laughingly said when wishing Ruth good-bye, "we 
may not get back until after Christmas." St. Pierre was reached 
in due course and the first evening wa> spent in the Cafe Lion 
D'ur, where a motley crowd had assembled. Amongst those 
present was the mate of a ship which had a few days before put 
in to the roadstead from stress of we.ither, having had her decks 
swept coming out of the Gulf and losing three of her crew. She 



was a barque bound to England with a load of deal, and having 
a scanty crew when she left Miramichie was now too short- 
handed to proceed on her voyage. It was very hard to get 
sailors in St. Pierre, as the French sailors of the port did not 
care to ship on an English ship, and the few English speaking 
sailors would not ship for the run unless they were guaranteed 
their return passage to Newfoundland. The mate of the ship 
was endeavoring to get men by every means in his power, and 
spying the Lobster Cove men he very soon invited them to 
drink, and broached the subject of his needs in the usual man- 
ner. His eloquent description of the outside world, and the 
advantages to be gained by sailing to foreign parts almost won 
some of them over, and two promised to meet him again on the 
morrow, and afterwards left the Cafe. 

Edward Poole who had sat quietly listening to the offers, and 
had decidedly refused them, made as though he were going with 
the others, but slipped back and sitting clown alongside the mate 
began bargaining with him for three men. He pointed out that 
by a little management they might be secured and that strategy 
would have to be used to secure them, Before he left he ar- 
ranged to delay the sailing of their small craft for two days and 
to bring on board three men on the next night, the mate to have 
everything ready for sea and to be prepared to drug the men. 

Edward Poole had thought out a diabolical scheme for getting 
John Hope out of the way, for a time at least, and hoping that 
thereby he might win Ruth for himself. With this object in 
view Poole on the morrow persuaded two of the men to go with 
him in the evening on board the barque to visit the mate, and 
tried to induce John Hope to also go. He had some difficulty 
in doing so, but at length prevailed, alleging as an inducement 
that he might want John's help to row back the boat, as he 
thought it likely that the others would stay until morning. 

Everything went as he desired for the carrying out of his 
nefarious scheme, and when the dory got alongside the barque 
they were most effusively welcomed on board by the mate, who 
invited them to the cabin where they were introduced to the 
captain. After talking a while the mate produced a decanter of 
nun, and filling out drinks for all, but the captain, jocularly 
offered a toast " To sweethearts and wives, 1 ' which he evaded 
drinking himself by just putting the tumbler to his closed lips 
and holding it as though he were drinking. Edward Poole, who 
was in an awkward position, first held his glass and looked 
steadily at the mate, and keenly nothing what he did followed 
suit, whilst the others, in the conventional style, tossed the 
liquor off draining the glasses without a stop. 

The effects of the drugged liquor soon began to tell on the 
men who were pressed to take a parting glass, and in their half 
stupid state did so without heeding the large quantity poured 
out for them. It was not long before Edward Poole was speed- 
ing on his way shoreward with the reward of his treachery in 
his pocket. As he had so timed his departure for the ves- 
sel, and his arrival back, he reached his lodging house before 
supper-time and before Mat Rogers, the eldest of the Lobster 
Cove men, had returned. Upon the entry of Rogers, Poole 
inquired of him where Hope and the other men were, and as 
Rogers casually remarked that they might be at the Cafe Lion 
D'or, nothing more was said, and no notice was taken of their 
absence until late on the following morning. Poole slept but 
little that night, and at day-light went to view the roadstead, and 
to his intense relief saw the barque being towed to sea by a 
small tug, he watched her until she was well out of sight, and 
then returned to his bed to meditate on his future actions. 

At breakfast the landlady of the house remarked, that the 
others must be lazy this morning and supposed that they would 
soon appear. As Mat Rogers was engrossed with his business 
and anxious to get away that evening, or as soon as a favorable 
time offered, he went out without making any enquiry about 
Hope and his comrades, but about -i i o'clock he returned in 
search of Hope's aid in a transaction of mutual benefit to them, 
and on enquiry learnt that he had not been at home during the 



12 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



night and that neither of the three had been seen since last 
evening. Mat Rogers immediately made enquiries at all the 
haunts of the Newfoundlanders, and securing Poole's aid in his 
search went to the Commissaire de Police and told him the story 
of the missing ones, and Monsieur B , who was interested in 
and knew John Hope, secured a ready promise from the Com- 
missaire to at once institute a search for the missing men. 

It was not long before the news, that three of the Newfound- 
land fishermen had disappeared, spread over St. Pierre, and 
many were the conjectures as to what had become of them. 
During the evening a gale of wind sprang up from the North 
and blew with great violence for two days, veering on the second 
to North-East, thus preventing Rogers and Poole from leaving 
St. Pierre even had they desired to do so. The gendarmes had 
searched St. Pierre and Isle-aux-Cliiens and no tidings had been 
obtained, although the Commissaire de Police had discovered 
that the captain of an English barque had been looking for men 
and he concluded that the missing men had gone in her. Mat 
Rogers, however, could not believe that John Hope would'wil- 
lingly go away without consulting him, and whatever the others 
might do he would not leave his wife and home to whom, Rogers 
knew, he was deeply attached. Having done all in his power, 
and apparently in the power of Poole, to find John Hope and 
the other two men, he reluctantly set out for Lobster Cove with 
a fine southerly wind and made a quick run home. 

You may be sure that Mat Rogers was not silent on his way 
home. He reviewed again and again the occurrences of the 
past week and the conjectures which had been mooted as to the 
disappearance of the men always winding up with the pro- 
nouncement that " whatever had happened them, John Hope 
never went away of his own good will." 

Rogers discussed with Poole the best way to break the news 
to Ruth, and Ruth's future if John did not come back, and it 
was arranged that Rogers being the eldest should perform the 
unpleasant task, whilst Poole visited the friends of the other 
men on a similar errand. 

It was dark when the skiff touched the beach of Lobster 
Cove, and after she had been moored and the goods which they 
brought taken out of her, Rogers, who had told his wife, upon 
their arrival, of the sad news he had, induced her to go with 
him to Ruth's house. Ruth was anxiously on the lookout for 
her husband, and supposing he was detained by securing the 
boat, welcomed Mat and his wife into the house. It was with 
great difficulty that Rogers told her of her husband's absence, 
and of how it occurred that he came back without him. 

The blow was a great one to Ruth, who at first could not 
realize that John was not somewhere in St. Pierre, and the only 
comfort she had was in Mat Rogers' suggestion that he might 
have been forced on board the vessel that was there wanting a 
crew and being carried away against his will. Ruth after a time 
clung strongly to this supposition, and in all the years that had 
passed never lost faith in the hope of his return. 

A satisfactory arrangement was made by Mat Rogers, on 
behalf of Ruth, with Edward Poole to continue to run the fishing 
skiff as of yore with the help of Mat's youngest son, so that with 
her husband's savings and her share of the skiff's earnings she 
had managed for five years to live in a semblance of comfort. 

One month after Mat Rogers came from St. Pierre and told 
of the disappearance of her husband, a son was born to her, and 
for some time she hovered between life and death, but owing to 
a strong constitution and the kindly offices of the mothers of the 
settlement, she was able to resume her household duties before 
the spring. It was a pathetic sight to see the way she cared for 
her baby boy, and how carefully she brought him up, and when 
he grew to talk, how she constantly talked to him about "dadda" 
and what they would do when he came home. 

During this period Edward Poole had pressed her again and 
again to marry him, and by his constant attention and pecuniary 
aid had forced her to regard him in the light of a brother, but 
to all his oft repeated importunities of marriage she gave him 
the one answer, that she could not think of marrying whilst 
John was alive. 

After five years of long waiting Poole was forced, by a failure 
in the fishery and the destruction of their boat in a great gale, 
to seek employment in a nearby settlement as a bank fisherman, 



and Ruth was driven to support herself by knitting, making 
fish, and working generally for the neighbours. The year pre- 
vious to the commencement of our story had been a trying one 
for Ruth, who was often with barely enough to keep her self 
and son from starving. Poole had done well as a bank fisher- 
man and urged Ruth to escape her drudgery and starvation by 
marrying. As an inducement for her to do so, he spoke so 
feelingly of her little son and the advantages of education that 
he might have, that she had given him a promise that if John 
did not turn up at the end of the next year she would favour- 
ably consider his proposal. 

And now the time was fast approaching and Ruth was in 
great perplexity, as in her inmost heart she believed that John 
was living and might come back. Yet she dreaded the future, 
more for her son than for herself, and thus we find her at the 
opening of our story debating with herself what her answer 
would be when Edward Poole came for it at the end of a week. 

Whilst Ruth was thus engaged the sailing packet, which 
periodically visited the Cove, hove up and sent her boat ashore 
with the mails and a passenger who appeared to be a weather 
beaten' seaman. The usual crowd of unemployed greeted the 
mailman when he came ashore, but no one recognized the sea- 
man until he met Mat Rogers whom he stopped and spoke to, 
At first Mat did not recognize him, and when he did was almost 

frantic with joy and took him to his house telling him on the way about 
Ruth and his boy. John wanted to go on to his own house, but Rogers 
insisted on it that he should go on and prepare Ruth. John agreed to this, 
but would not stay behind. Mat Rogers found Ruth as has been previously 
described, who told her that the mail had just arrived and that there was 
good news for her. Before he could say much more John was in the house, 
and Ruth, with true wifely instinct, flew to his arms the moment she saw him. 

John's story was soon told, how he had been induced to go on board the 
barque and of the scene in the cabin, and how he remembered nothing more 
until the evening of the next day when he was rudely ordered on deck to 
help the sailors. During that day and the four following days a heavy gale 
of wind from the North drove the ship out of her course. As the ship on 
the first day lost her mizzen-mast and maintopgallant-mast and was forced 
to run before it under reefed fore-topsails, when the gale abated it was 
found that she was leaking badly, and that if she had not been lumber 
laden she would have certainly sunk. All of this John knew little about, 
as in the loss of the topgallant mast he had been struck in the head by the 
end of one of the yards and had been insensible for some time. At the 
same time three of the sailors, including the other Cove men, had been 
washed overboard, and had it not been for the boatswain, who had taken 
a liking to John he would never have returned to Ruth. For some days 
the ship lay wallowing in the sea until sighted by a vessel bound for the 
Brazils which rescued them from a watery grave. John meantime had re- 
covered his bodily strength, but constantly complained of his head and 
could remember nothing of past events. He was eventually landed in Per- 
nambuco and taken charge of by the British Consul, who finding that he 
was not in his proper mind and could not tell where his home was, had him 
removed to a hospital. Subsequently he was discharged, and in one of his 
few sane moods shipped on a vessel bound to the West Indies. In one of 
the Islands he became ill and was removed to hospital, and from thence 
taken to a lunatic asylum where he had to perform manual labour with his 
fellow inmates, who were blacks. About nine months previous to his home 
coming, one of the black lunatics, who had an aversion for John, in a state 
of frenzy struck him over the head and he was picked up in a state of in- 
sensibility. The doctor of the asylum, finding the skull slightly crushed 
and that it appeared as an old wound, summoned a well-known surgeon 
who was at the hospital and successfully performed the operation of 
trepanning or lifting the crushed bone from pressure on the brain. When 
John was restored to consciousness and his brain commenced to work pro- 
perly, he was puzzled to know where he was and how he came there, but 
the good nurse who tended him understood what he wanted, and told him 
to rest and keep quite and all would be well. Next day John woke, with- 
out any fever, and in a short time grew quite strong and tried to piece 
together his story since leaving St. Pierre. This he could no^ have done 
but for the kindly assistance of the asylum doctor, who took a great interest 
in John, and traced his coming from Brazil to the West Indies. When 
John was well enough to be discharged the good doctor got him a position 
with one of the planters, who placed him in charge of a boat which traded 
between the plantation and the town. During the time of convalesence 
John was eager to get home, and often wondered how his absence had been 
accounted for, the great obstacle to his leaving for Newfoundland was his 
want of means. John worked steadily for seven months, and every cent he 
earned he carefully husbanded, at last he heard of a chance to get to Halifax 
and speedily availed of it, working his way thither in a Canadian schooner, 
and from thence to Burgeo, where he arrived in time to catch the fortnightly 
packet which sailed down the coast. 

The home coming of John was the cause of much rejoicing, and yet it 
was tinged with sadness when the treachery of Edward Poole was disclosed, 
and the friends of those men who were lost, were bitter in their denuncia- 
tions of him, so much so that he left the country as soon as he heard of 
John's return. John and Ruth lived to enjoy a happy life ; he often declared 
that Ruth was Hope by name and hope by nature, otherwise she would not 
have waited for him, and she affirmed that there was no man so much worth 
waiting for as her John. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Supreme Court of Newfoundland 

List of Deputy Sheriffs. 



SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 



RESIDENCE. 



DISTRICTS. 



NAMES, 



RESIDENCE. 



DISTRICTS. 



NAMES. 



Ferry land 

Mobile 

Fermeuse 
St. Mary's . . . 
Salmonier. . . . 

Placentia 

Presque 

Oderin 

Flat Island. . . 

Burin 

St. Lawrence. 

Lawn 

l.amaline 
Grand Bank. . 



Ferry land 



Placentia and St. Mary's, 



Burin. 



George Geary. 
John T. Fitzgerald. 
William Trainer. 
M. Mahoney. 
Francis R. Curt'is. 
A. Collins. 
Thomas Sullivan. 
Peter Manning. 
Howard Parsons. 
Stephen White. 
Cyrus Beck, sr. 
Joseph Murphy. 
William G. Pittman. 
Eli Harris. 



Burgeo and I.a Poile . 



St. Jacques Fortune Bay 

Belleoram | " 

Pushthrough 

Harbor Breton .... 

Burgeo 

Ramea 

Rose Blanche .... 

Channel 

Codroy St 

Grand River 

Robinson's Head 

St. George Sandy Pt. . 

Wood's Island 

Bay of Islands 

Bonne Bay 



St. Baibe 



William Grandy. 

Joseph Camp. 

Benjamin Chapman. 

Albeit Kelland. 

Matthew Nash. 

Prosper A. Garcien. 

James H. Wilcox. 
eorge Henry Gallop. 

Thomas B. Doyle. 

Abraham Tilley. 
|M. E. Messervey. 
iSimeon lennex. 

Daniel J. Gilker. 

Geo. Halfyard. 



NORTHERN DISTRICT. 



RESIDENCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. DISTRICTS. 


NAMES. 




St. B 
Twil 




James Johnson. 




Noah Verge. 
Isaac Manuel 
Richard Spence. 
Noah Miller. 
Kdmond Benson, 
k. Currie. 
Caleb Tuck. 
George Janes. 
George Leawood. 


















Tilt Cove 




Constable T. Walsh. 
Thos E Wells 














Little Hay Islands 




Peter Campbell. 
Thomas Roberts. 
William Lanning. 
Peter Moores. 
J. T. liendle. 
George S. Lilly. 
Alfred G. Young. 
William Baird. 
























.. . . 








Foster's Point ! 


Botwoodville 

















Eliel Noseworthy. 
George Bussey. 
Charles Rendell. 
A. Targett. 
Moses Bursey. 
Reuben Curtis. 
Eli Garland. 
Kwen Kennedy. 
Ernest Forward. 
John Trapnell. 
Jesie Gosse. 
A. Hieilihy. 
Benjamin Butler. 
William Cole. 
James Murphy. 
William Maher. 
William Butler. 
John H. Ley. 
John H. Bennett. 
Edward Harding. 


































Fogo 




Ambrose Fitzgerald. 
George Foster. 
Philip Perry. 
John Porter. 
Robert Pike. 
Adam Bradley. 
Jacob Hefferton. 
Wm. Sainsbury. 
Peter Roberts. 


Old Perlican Ba 


y-de-Verde 


liarr'd Island 








Lower Island Cove. . . . i 








i. 






Carbonear Carbonear 
Harbor Grace Harbor Grace 




i 




I'inchard's Island 
Wesleyville 


Bonavista ,....! 

- J 










( 


Conception Harbor . . . Harbo Main 
Harbor Main j 






Thomas Wornell. 
Charles Kean. 














Middle Bight ' 






Albert L. Howe. 
John Burden. 


Bell Isl'd Lance Cove t St 
Bell Iskmd^Beach , 


Jol n's East 














. 








Thomias Curtis. 









November, 1904. 



JAMES CARTER, 
W. J. CARROLL. 



Sheriff, Newfoundland. 
Sub-Sheriff, " 



OFFICE AND STORE Adelaide Street. STONEYA-RD Just East Custom 
House; Water Street. Telephone, 364. 



W. J, ELLIS, 

= Contractor and Build e. 

Dealer in Cement, Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Mortar, Brick, Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps; Chimney Tops, all sizes, and Plate Glass. 

Estimates Given for all kinds of Work at Shortest Notice. 



Parlor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 



Church Seats. 



T. MARTIN,^ 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Cower Street. 

Repairing Furniture Horses and Vans for 

a Speciality. Removing Pianos, &c. 




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K 
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O 

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(D o 

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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



lilt 



ROYAL STORES 



LTD., 

p^ 



137, J39, 141, 143, & 145 WATER STREET, 




CARRY A LARGE STOCK OF 

DRY GOODS, 
HARDWARE, * 

GROCERIES, 

CROCKERYWARE, 
.* FURNITURE, 

Sewing Machines. 





Manufacturers of Readymade Clothing for Men and Boys. 

DRESS MAKING AND MILLINERY. 
Repair Shop for Sewing Machines, Guns, &c. 

Special attention paid to the packing and prompt shipment of Outpori Orders. 

Job Brothers & Co., 

f ^ St. John's, IN. F* -* 



Importers Of Provisions, including Flour, Molasses, Pork, Beef, Ships' Materials, and all things 
necessary for prosecution of the Fisheries. We are in a position to supply all Goods at Lowest 

f Cash Prices. 

Highest Prices Given for all products of the Fisheries, including Codfish, Cod Oil, Refined 
Cod-liver Oil, Pickled Salmon, and Herring, and Lobsters. Exporters ef all Newfoundland Products. 

-MTire & Marine Insurance.^ 

Lowest Rates quoted for all forms of Insurance. 

AGENTS FOR- R oyal In sura nce Co, (Fire). 

Union Marine Insurance Co., Ltd., and 
Maritime Insurance Co., Ltd. (Marine). 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY . 



EXAMINERS MASTERS AND MATES. 

j OFFICE : LIGHT HOUSE BUILDING. j 
Examiner-in-ehief CAPT. E. ENGLISH. : Assistant Examiner CAPT. J. R. MOSS. 



Examination of Masters and Mates. 

Examinations will begin on Wednesday of each week, providing that the 
candidate produces the requisite certificates of character and time, and 
passes the color test. 

Application must be made to the Examiner on Form Exn. 2, and all 
previous certificates and testimonials deposited at least two days previous 
to the examination. Testimonials of character and sobriety must be pro- 
duced for twelve months immi diately preceding the application. 

All services must be verified by a certificate of discharge. 

An Only Mate must be not less than nineteen years of age, and must have 
served five years at sea. 

A First Mate must be not less than nineteen years of age, and must have 
served five years at sea, of which one year must have been as Second or 
Only Mate. [From ist Januaiy 1896. the Officer's Service must have been 
performed with the requisite certificate.] 

A Master must be not less ti.an twenty-one years of age, and he must 
have served six years at sta, of which one year must have been in the 
capacity not lower than Only Mate of a foreign-going vessel whilst holding 
a certificate not Mower than an Only Mate's certificate for foreign-going 
vessels, and, unless this service as officer was performed whilst holding a 
First Mate's certificate for foreign-going vessels, he will also be required to 
prove the officer's service prescribed for that grade. 

Certificates applying only to steamships are issued to candidates who are 
either unable to comply with the regulation which requires them to have 
passed one year in square-rigged sailing vessels, or who prove in course of 
examination that they aie ignoiant of the management of square-rigged 
sailing vessels. All the qualifying officer's service prescribed for these 
Certificates must have been performed in steamships. 

These Certificates will entitle the holders to go to sea as Masters or 
Mates of foreign-going steamships, but will not entitle them to go to sea as 
Masters or Mates of foreign-going sailing ships. 

Fees. 

For a Certificate as Mate $5 .00 

For a Certificate as Master 10.00 

For a Certificate for Colors .20 



These fees admit of two examinations. After the second examination 
another fee will be required. 

Candidates for Only and First Mates' Certificates must complete the 
whole of their examination in Navigation in twelve hours, including the 
time allowed for the papers on the cyclone or revolving storms, and for 
the correction of all errors and over-sights ; but the nautical problems up 
to and including (K) of the Syllabus prescribed for Only and First Mate 
must be completed within six hours and without the candidate leaving the 
premises during that period. 

Candidates for Masters' Certificates must complete the whole of their 
examination in Navigation in fifteen hours, including the time allowed for 
the papers on the Chart, the Compass deviation, Cyclones, or revolving 
storms, and for the correction of all errors and over-sights : but the prob- 
lems up to and including (K) of the Syllabus prescribed for Only and First 
Mate must be completed within six hours and without the candidate leaving 
the premises during that period. 

The examination commences punctually at 10 a.m , and closes at 4 p.m., 
when all papers will be called up, and if not completed the candidate will 
be declared to have failed. 

In all cases of failure the candidate will be examined de ncvo. 

If failed in Seamanship, he will not be examined for six months. 

If failed three times in Navigation, he will not be re-examined for three 
months. 

For further information as to time, place, and objects of examination, 
applicants should apply to the Examiner-in-Chief. 

Rules. 

No books, papers or memoranda are allowed in the Examination room. 

In the event of any candidate being discovered copying from another, 
or referring to any book or memoranda, he will not be examined for six 
months. 

Navigation is taught at Carbonear, Harbor Grace, Bay Roberts and 
Saint John's. 



The Public are reminded that the 

Game Laws of Newfoundland, 

Provide that: 

No person shall pursue with intent to kill any Caribou from 

the ist day of February to the 3151 day of July, or from the ist day of 

October to the 2Oth October in any year. And no person shall 

kill or take more than two Stag and one Doe Caribou in any one year. 

No person is allowed to hunt or kill Caribou within five miles of either 
side of the railway track from Grand Lake to Goose Brook, these limits 
being defined by gazetted Proclamation. 

No non-resident may hunt or kill Deer without previously having pur- 
chased and procured a License therefor. All guides must be licensed- 
Issued free to residents ; to non-residents costing fifty dollars. 

No person may kill, or pursue with intent to kill any Caribou with dogs, 

or with hatchet or any weapon other than fire-arms, or while 

crossing any pond, stream or water-course. 

Tinning or canning of Caribou meat is absolutely prohibited. 

No person may purchase, or receive any flesh of Caribou between 
January ist and July 3131, in any year. 

Penalties for violation of these laws, a fine not exceeding two hundred 
dollars, or in default imprisonment not exceeding two months. 

No person shall hunt, or kill Partridges during the present year, or 
before ist October, 1905. After that period not before ist October or 
later than I2th January. Penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars 
or imprisonment. 

Any person who shall hunt Beaver, or export Beaver skins till October ist, 
1907, shall be liable to cofiscation of skins, and fine or imprisonment. M 

And no person shall hunt Foxes from March I5th to October icth in 
any year, under the same penalties. 

HON. ELI DAWE, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fishtiies, 
November, 11)04. 



NEWFOUNDLAND PENITENTIARY. 

BROOM DEPARTMENT. 



Brooms, * Hearth Brushes, * Whisks. 

A Large Stock of BROOMS, HEARTH BRUSHES and 
WHISKS always on hand ; and having reliable Agents 
in Chicago and other principal centres for tlje purchase of 
Corn and other material, \ye are in a position to supply the 
Trade with exactly the article required, and we le<jl as- 
sured our Styles and Quality surpass any that can be 
imported. Give us a trial order, and if careful attention 
and right goods at right prices will suit, we are confident 
of being favoured with a share of your patronage. 

orders addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt 
attention. 



ALEX. A. PARSONS, Superintendent. 
Newfoundland Penitentiary, November, 1904.. 



A CARD. 

J6MAS (L BARTER, 

Architect ** and * Builder. 

263 GOWEZR STREET. 




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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

lemorks6raoe and Gap. 



By Rev. Canon Pilot, 

/^UGG*:STIONS have been frequently made to me by a 
(S number of my friends that I should put into shape remi- 
niscences of my official life and work, extending now over 
A^a period of thirty years. To these suggestions I have 
^" hitherto turned a deaf ear, until now the editor of this 
QUARTERLY has asked me for a contribution for its Christmas 
Number, and I have yielded, but with grave doubts as to whe- 
ther 1 have acted wisely in doing so. In these memoirs 1 have 
no pet fad to exploit, no special topic to discuss, nor any parti- 
cular scholastic ideas to enunciate. These find their proper 
place in those most charming of all literature the ' : Reports of 
Inspectors of Schools." My aim is to give a plain homely story 
of some of the things I have observed, approved, blamed or 
laughed at, in one or two departments of my official life, and 
this department shall be " My Schools and my Teachers." 
In doing this 1 may have occasion to refer to many old friends 
(alas! few only now living), but I shall endeavour to avoid 
such references as may give offence. Without further preface 
or apology I plunge in ti/etlias res. 

In the early seventies travelling round the Coast of New- 
foundland was no easy undertaking compared with the multi- 
plied facilities of doing so to-day. Then there was no railroad, 
and steam communication was infrequent and less certain. 
Nearly a!4 my inspection and visitation had to be done in bully- 
boats, jacks and whale-boats, and in the doing of it, I was, to 
use an incongruous metaphor, always in the saddle. 1 was a 
regular vagabond, months on end away from home. In their 
charity some of my then friends declared I was " like a roaring 
lion ;" but I must ask my present friends to believe that the 
analogy, between a nameless other personage who did the like 
and myself, ends there. One of the longest trips 1 ever made 
continuously extended from Cape Kay to Cape St. Francis, 
taking in the sinuosities of the Bays of Hermitage, Fortune and 
Placentia, crossing from LaManche to Rantem, and travelling 
on foot round the south side of the Bay of Trinity to Bay-de- 
Verde, where I took the s. s. Leopard for St. John's. I reached 
home feeling literally like a returned empty. Of that one solitary 
trip I saw enough, and heard enough, to fill a three-volume 
novel which has yet to be written. Even now it is replete with 
the most pleasant recollections. I was, and am an ardent fish- 
erman. My rod was my constant companion, and between the 
limits above given there is scarcely a tarn or a brook over which 
I have_not cast my line. Of the hospitality 1 received from the 
fishermen I have the most grateful memories, albeit in some 
cases it was of a most " lively" character. But itwas given with- 
out stint, or expectation of a return. The best their larders 
provided was always placed before me, and my visit ended, I 
was afterwards forwarded on my way with the same amiable 
disposition. 

Some one has called hospitality a savage virtue. Be it so: 
then some savage things are very lovely, estimable and of good 
report, furnish memories that will stand the wear and tear of 
many a long year, and amid a desert of, it may be polished but 
meaningless conventionalities, retain a freshness, unfading and 
unchangeable like all things good and genuine. One instance 
occurs to me. I was anxiously awaiting at Burgeo the arrival 
of the Royal Mail Packet that ran between that port and HarbrJr 
Breton. She arrived on a Saturday. Now the worthy Parson 



D.D., D.C.L., I.S.O. 

of the town had counted on my help for his Sunday Services. 
I was not unwilling to stay, but could not see how this was to 
be done. The Parson held consultation with the Skipper of the 
Packet, and that estimable person with a wary eye cast heaven- 
ward ordered the crew to take down sail, as, to use his own 
language, " we's in for a blow." It was a glorious day, and so 
was the Sunday, but on the Monday when we started it was 
foggy and logy, and we were just one week going about seventy 
miles. In those days there were no schedules or schedule time 
to keep. It was like silver in the reign of an Israelitish King, 
it was nothing accounted of in those days. On parting with the 
Skipper, I offered payment for my week's entertainment and 
passage, but he refused it with a " Begar sir, we never charges 
the Parson nothing." Pressing his hand gratefully, J said, if 
ever he came to St. John's, I hoped he would call on me. In 
the following January he did call, and bemoaning the loss of his 
Royal Mail Packet in the late November gale sought my help 
to ;*et for him from the Government, a Roval Mail Steamer. I 

- 

remember also a Captain of a Coastal Steamer delaying a whole 
day in port for me while I did my work, and who felt amply 
repaid for the retention by a present of fresh lobsters that I had 
speared after that work was done. 1 'low this can't be done 
now-a-days, 

1 cannot omit to mention one more instance of seemingly the 
opposite to the above courtesies. I had gone on shore \\ith 
hitherto a most obliging mailman, with urgent request that he 
would not leave without me. There were at least a hundred 
and fifty passengers on board, and the worthy Captain svas eager 
to push along. 1 was not in time for the mail man, and begged 
a bystander to put me off in his punt. The Captain eyed my 
frantic gestures, and awaiting my arrival at the gangway, ad- 
dressed me after the following fashion : ' NYho are you, sir. to 
keep my boat waiting like this ? I don't care for parson, priest 
or preacher the poorest passenger aboard my boat pays his 
passage as well as ye." Meantime 1 had mounted the steps, 
and through the crowd of exultant passengers, made my way to 
the stern where I consoled my offended dignity with a draw of 
the fragrant weed. I had not long been there before the genial 
Captain came aft ; and in half audible whisper, said " Parson 
Pilot, sir, you mustn't mind me. It's a farm I goes thro'. I 
does it to everybody." This atoned for all I had suffered, but 
ever after when I went ashore with the mail man, I took care to 
carry the bay; myself, and did not mind the " Farm." But I am 
wandering; where was I? This paper was to be about my 
Teachers. So I must begin. 

But a word about schools first the fabrics, that is. In the 
early days, while some of these schools were fairly satisfactory 
in respect of building and equipments, a large majority of them 
was of the most primitive description, and in a most sorry con- 
dition. They were architecturally of the early Newfoundland 
style an oblong structure, with low roof, without ventilation, ap- 
paratus, desks, maps, or blackboards ; furnished(?) with broken 
or fragmentary forms, and at certain times of the year crowded to 
suffocation with pupils of all ages from the babe to the hobble- 
dehoy. Not infrequently a sail loft, or the upper story of a fish 
store was dubbed with the exalted name of a school. I recall 
to mind a feeble old man, with one foot in the grave, who re- 
duced the much too limited number of cubic feet of air in his 
school-room still further with all the paraphernalia of a fisher- 
man's craft, hooks and lines, sails and twines, bultows.and bar- 
rows, and nets, which emitted an effluvium such as I never felt 
before or since, the effect of which was moderated to some ex- 
tent by the scent of a small quantity of new mown hay, stowed 
away on boards above the rafters. He kept his goats in the 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



school by night. His emoluments were small, small his children, 
and educational results nil. What was I to do but recommend 
his retirement. The Board pleaded theirs and their Teacher's 
poverty : there was no pension fund to come to the relief. But 
the old gentleman was retired, in a way not unheard of before, 
by an allocation (our outport people love the word) from the 
Road Grant, which the feeling member for the District, in play- 
ful irony, recommended should be " spent by Mr. on the way 
to the churchyard." It was not long before he made his final 
journey to this quiet resting place. He had in his day been a suc- 
cessful fish-hawk and sealing skipper. Sic transit gloria .' An- 
other school and this a pattern of many was lumbered up 
with articles and tools of a carpenter's trade, in anticipation of 
the modern Manual Training School no doubt, though then the 
only pupil to ply the plane was the industrious dominie. I 
could multiply instances of similar conditions. Happily all such 
schools have been improved out of existence, and have been 
superceded by others having some pretensions to architecture, 
hygiene, and modern educational requirements. During my 
thirty years in office, I have seen rebuilt ever)- Church of ling- 
land School in the Colony with the exception of the one at St. 
Philip's, eloquent in its hoary loneliness of the good old umes, 
but now giving place to one of modern type and proportions. 

Now to My Teachers. In the early days my Teachers as a 
class were greatly lacking in their knowledge of the ordinary 
branches of a fair English education, and still more particularly 
for want of training, in that knowledge which would tit them for 
the right conduct and management of our common schools. I 
recall to mind instances of where a whole generation had been 
indicted with a permanent injury by the retention of an incom- 
petent Teacher. The idea prevailed that the scholars were few, 
and so young that it made little difference who was engaged in 
teaching. Some teachers had been employed from so-called Char- 
ity, when either advancing years had rendered them incapacitated 
for any other employment; or when every other business failed 
with them. The schoolmaster was indeed abroad : and often- 
times he was the butt of those, who knowing his drawbacks and 
his dollars should have been apoligists for his deficiencies. I 
remember being entertained by an eminent M. 1). in a northern 
outport, with a dozen others, the elite of the Town, when the 
medico began jocosely to chaff me for the incompetency 
of my Teachers, and cited instances. Now in the earlier 
part of the day this genial friend had introduced me to a brother 
Medico, Dr. F , who, he confidentially informed me a few 
minutes afterwards, could neither read nor write. It was my turn 
to be playful. While admitting much that he had said about my 
Teachers. I retorted that as yet I had not come across a single 
one so competent as his friend Dr. F. and insinuated that 
I was credibly informed that all my Teachers who failed to 
pass examination for the lowest grade, were going to turn 
Doctors: and instanced one, who, the year before was retired 
because he could not make up averages, and was now a Doctor 
making ,300 a year. He was dear as a Teacher with the pro- 
verbial 40. 

In a nearer outport a pompous Stipendiary Magistrate, fond 
of airing his scholarship had preserved a whole file of letters 
received from Teachers in and around his district. Producing 
these he feebly suggested the incompetence of the writeis, from 
some grotesque spellings contained in their communications. I 
had to remind him that the schoolmaster was abroad even in his 
own office, and pointed to the label on the file which read 
" Curiosities of Litrature." He defended the spelling of the final 
word, until a reference to his Webster Unabridged dispelled his 
illusion. I asked who taught him to spell. 

In a nearer outport still an estimable man was dismissed from 
his school because his wife opened a store, destined it was 
said to become a rival with that of a member .of the Board the 
magnus mercator of the Town. The chairman could not bring 
himself to send the Dominie his conge in his own handwriting, 
so sent the MS. of the resolution as it passed the Board. That 
resolution was the source of worry and correspondence to 
me for over two years. It had been copied Verbatim, and sent 
to the Governor, Premier, and Colonial Secretary. Each of these 
functionaries forwarded it to me with a request for a reply. In 
the resolution there were two grammatical blunders, and more 



than two errors in spelling, and the worthy schoolmaster, who 
possessed a certificate of Grade Three, asked His Excellency if 
the writer of such a resolution was competent to judge of his 
qualifications as a Teacher, requested protection against ignor- 
ance, and suggested His Excellency should insist upon a quali- 
fying Examination of all members of Boards of Education be- 
fore gazetting them to so exalted a position. 

Indeed some of my Teachers were queer fish. One of these 
old worthies always wore during school hours an old-fashioned 
beaver hat, "to inspire fear, and to command respect" he inform- 
ed me. School over, the beaver was exchanged for a billy-cock. 
I never heard that the children trifled with the beaver, even 
when they were left in school alone. 

On one occasion I made a surprise visit to a school taught by 
a septuagenarian. Gently lifting the latch I looked in, and there 
1 saw this worthy measuring the upper end of his room with 
equal paces, capped, pipe in his mouth, and flourishing a supple 
wand over the head of some imaginary urchin : the children all 
the while playing with marbles on the floor. At sight of me 
their play ceased, and there was complete silence. The domi' 
nie's reverie and smoke were ended. He came rushing towards 
the children with up-lifted wand and caught my eye. Closing 
the door quickly I hurried away to be shortly interviewed by a 
friend commissioned to take the sting out ot it." This Teacher 
was pensioned. Another Patriarch dragging out a feeble exist- 
ence, whose school was not up to the mark in even the beggarly 
elements, was alarmed at my plain talk with him about his school. 
He had never seen an examination before, and I question if he 
had ever heard of the bogie. 1 do not wish to charge him with 
attempted bribery and corruption, but on parting he began 
stealthily to thrust some money into my hand, with " You'll 
want this before you get home." 

An elderly female Teacher once wrote to me " to get her 
sallary rose a few Ibs." Needless to say this is no part of my 
duty, that pleasure or prerogative attaches to the august gentle- 
men who compose the Boards of Education. I examined the 
school of this worthy lady and described it as "ungraded," 
which so grievously offended the poor soul, that she incontin- 
ently resigned. She had gone upon the principle that " it's little 
they pays me, and its little I teaches 'em." 

One veteran who entered the wedded life for a third time was 
absent from his school on the day of its examination. To ac- 
count for this dereliction of duty he entered in the School Log 
Book : " Teacher absent, undergoing i matrimonial operation." 
One of my colleagues, now deceased, told me that on entering 
a school for examination, on a sweltering hot day, he found the 
Teacher with his coat and collar off, shiit-sleeves tucked up, a 
red handkerchief tied round his head, and the children each 
gabbling away his own lesson. The Inspector asked him for 
his first class. The Dominie replied he had no classes, that he 
taught the children one by one. '-But," continued the Inspec- 
tor, " you should have them in classes, it would lesson your 
labour." " 1) it," exclaimed the irate pedagogue, " how can 
I class 'em when they have no books." This Teacher was sub- 
sequently pensioned. 

I could go on multiplying instances of the idiosyncrasies of 
my Teachers, but space forbids. Of the one hundred and forty- 
four I had to do with thirty years ago, one hundred and forty 
have passed on to the unreturnable bourne. Pax vobiscnm ! 

It was in 18767 I recommended a compulsory examination 
of all Teachers, the Legislature accepted the recommendation, 
and thus came to an end all family organizations which in a 
great measure had ruled schools and school-masters in the good 
old times. 

The Examinations began, and I could fill another such paper 
as this with ''howlers", and amusing incidents which took p'ace 
in tl.eir progress. Many of these old teachers were aged, and 
hopelessly improvable, yet there was not a few on whom kindly 
encouragement had a quickening effect, and who with the pos- 
sibility of a certificate, and thereby continuance in office, set to 
work pluckily and gained the Coveted Parchment and the scanty 
emolument ranging from six to twenty dollars, which it bro ight 
with it. I need scarcely add that they were most grateful. I 
never more fully recognized that kind words cost little and are 
worth much to all my teachers. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



fl Six lomi)$' Cour. 



Extract from Letters of a Jour to Egypt, The Nile, Palestine, Turkey, Greece, and Europe, 1904. (Continued.) By James Carter. 



THE Mosque of Mahommed AH in Egypt is covered by a 
vast dome, richly frescoed in colors. The courtyard is 
surrounded by > colonnades and gigantic arches. We 
visited also several mosque tombs of the Khedives who reigned 
from 1382 to 1517. Some of these tombs must have cost 
considerable sums of money. We had a magnificient view from 
the Citadel of the city, old and new, the desert and the pyramids 
twelve miles away. I saw them and for the first time ; at the 
sight of them you begin to realize the old and historic lore of 
this very ancient land, the cradle of all civilization and culture, 
in war, art and science and all that makes- up the grand and 
beautiful, not only in the science of living, but also of dying ; 
they bring before us the mighty deeds of the past. We were* 
shown the Citadel from where the Mamelukes were assassinated 
by Mohammed AH. They were treacherously invited to an enter- 
tainment and as soon as they were inside, the gates were closed 
and the soldiers opened fire upon them ; 470 of their followers 
were murdered, and it is said that only one escaped. Afterwards 
we visited their tombs. On returning from the Citadel we met 
the funeral of a Pasha; in front came a lot of horses and 
camels with baskets, from which the attendants were distributing 
gifts to the poor, after which a large body of police (I suppose 
he must have been a judge or a magistrate), then a body of Der- 
vishes and a lot of Oriental servants, and others the friends of 
the deceased, some of them in flowing robes and Oriental cos- 
tumes, then all the wives in carriages. When it passed our 
carriage, one of the wives, I expect as she was young the 
latest, tore the veil from her face and commenced fo wail. 
Poor girl, I expect she was wailing for joy and (lie opportunity 
perhaps of getting another husband to her taste. The body was 
in a common deal coffin, perfectly plain, with some writing on 
the side, which is taken from the box and placed in the grave 
with the body wrapped in a sheet. The body was also followed by 
water carriers. I did not hear what rank the deceased represented. 
After lunch, we went to one of the Mosques to hear the howl- 
ing Dervishes. Friday is their Sunday. They celebrate with 
drums and instruments of music. They commence by chanting 
the psalms of the Koran and then making a peculiar noise with 
their breath, drawing in a'nd out. making a queer and weird sound, 
bowing their heads to the music, after which they get excited, but 
we did not remain as their prayers would not appeal to anything 
less than an Egyptian God. At times they get beyond control of 
themselves and the police have to put a stop to it. We then 
drove to old Cairo through the "Arab quarters" and visited the 
Mosque of Ami Said. It contains 366 lar<ie marble pillars and 
occupies a large extent of ground.. It also contains a tomb of 
the Sire of Ami. The Mosque Hassan is very large and exten- 
sive, it is said that when the structure was finished, the archi- 
tect's hands were cut off, to prevent him from executing a similar 
work. In the court yard are two fountains of water, one used 
by the Egyptians and the other by the Turks. On the Eastern 
side can be seen a few of the halls which were fired at the Mosque 
by the army of Napoleon. We then crossed the river Nile in 
a ferry to see the building where the waters are measured, so that 
it can be seen how much it rises and falls. We then visited the 
place pointed out where Moses was found by the Egyptian maid- 
en, one of Pharaoh's daughters, but as I could not see any rushes, 
I was sceptical, but the guide said that the river had changed its 
course. I replied that if so, how can they vouch for any author- 
ity as to its truth ? He said that faith was the principle ingred- 
ient in all religions (perhaps he is right). We then went to the 
old Coptic church which was founded in the fourth century and 
said to have been restored in the eighth. It contains some inter- 
esting pictures and a very ancient bronze candalr.brum in the 
shape of two winged dragons, with seventeen sockets for lights. 
On the roof is a small bell in a cupola. The entrance to the 
grounds is through a very ancient gate in the wall, opened and 
locked by a peculiar wooden key. This style of lock is very 
ancient and is still used at Damascus. It leads into a small 
narrow street that formerly was full of small shops the ruins of 



which are still plainly to be seen. 

In the evening we visited the Arabian quarters; the streets 
were full of Arabs, etc. There are miles of those narrow streets 
and the turns are very tortuous so that it would be easy for one to 
lose his way. There are numbers of coffee houses in which the 
entertainment consists of Arab girls dancing writhing figures, 
etc., in costumes, throwing their bodies into wonderful contor- 
tions. All these are crowded with Arabs and Egyptians ; they 
appear to be very peaceable and orderly and do not insult 
strangers in any way, although in the midst of thousands. You 
can pass along without any protection even late at night. We 
crossed the Nile, going over a very long bridge ; there were 
hundreds of boats on the side of the river. The bridge was built 
by the French ; it has two immense marble lions on either end, a 
beautiful road on each side of the rive lined by immense trees 
which form a shady avenue. The road was crowded with private 
carriages, very handsome turn-outs, full of ladies going to the 
race course. We drove round the island from one side of the 
river to the other. There were a number of beautiful residential 
buildings, some situated in magnificent grounds and a great 
many new ones in course of completion. We passed a very 
large hotel which is also new, called " Ghizeh Castle," and I 
believe owned by the proprietors of Sheppard's" Hotel. We 
also passed a large barracks belonging to the British and capable 
of accommodating six thousand men. The Post Office. Govern- 
ment House and Court House are very tine and beautiful build- 
ings, and there is a score of others for different purposes. It is a 
remarkable fact, here in Cairo that you can leave the town of 
handsome buildings and go to the old portion which has been in 
existence for four thousand years. 

Saturday, March ^th, 1904. A beautiful day. not too warm. 
This clay we have appointed to visit the Pyramids, and accord- 
ingly, with a guide and carriage, we left at 9 a.m. The distance 
is about twelve miles, a level road, no sign of a hill, the trees on 
both sides arching over making a lovely shade from the sun. 
The size of the big Pyramid " Cheops" seemed to grow as you 
approached nearer, and the view of the country was exquisite. 
Electric cars run all the distance. At the foot of the Pyramid 
were a big crowd of Arabs, guides and sheikh, all waiting to be 
employed and overwhelming you with their attentions. We ac- 
cordingly made arrangements with the sheikh and took two 
guides each. We went inside first before climbing to the top. 
The opening from the outside is about forty-five feet from the 
ground, the descent is terribly steep and slippery. There are 
small steps in the rock in which you have to place your feet, 
if you missed you would go headlong to the bottom, but two 
Arabs hold your hand before and behind. The passage is very 
dark and you have only the light of a candle to see where to 
place your feet. In some places you have to crawl through 
tunnels which are about three feet in height then you have to 
take a turn in the dark and ascend for some distance. The place 
is as dark as pitch and not a breath of air, with the perspiration 
running like a river from every part of your body ; you will then 
find yourself in a passage which leads to the Queen's chamber ; 
a light is then procured from a kind of torch. The rocfing 
is a beautiful piece of workmanship. Then you take a passage 
that leads to another chamber, which is the King's. The roofing 
is of flat stone, and the floor is 140 feet square. Inside 
lies the empty, broken, coverless red granite sarcophagus of 
" Cheops " who was most oppressive and cruel and plunged into 
every kind of wickedness. The stones were brought from the 
quarries in the Arabian Mountains, down to the Nile, transferred 
in vessels across the river, thence dragged to the Lybian Moun- 
tains. They worked to the number of 100,000 men for three 
months every year. The people were harrassed by toil 
for ten years, and it took that time to construct the road 
on which they drew the stones, and in forming the sub-ter- 
raneous apartments on the hill, on which the Pyramid stands 
and which " Cheops" made as a burial vault for himself on 
an island formed by a canal from the Nile. Twenty years 



i6 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



were spent in erecting the Pyramid. It is composed of polished 
stones and jointed with the greatest exactness ; none of the 
stones are less than thirty feet. The Pyramid is built in the form 
of steps. When they had first built it in this manner, they raised 
the remaining stones by machines made of short pieces of wood. 
Having lifted them from the ground to the first range of steps 
and then removed by another machine that stood ready on the 
first range, thence to the second, with the machines were 
portable, and to each range in succession, when they wished 
to raised the stones higher. The highest parts, therefore, were 
part finished and afterwards completed. On again getting out- 
side it was like a new existence to be able to breath the fresh 
air. You are literally dragged to death by the dragoman, one 
holding your hand and another at your back to prevent slipping. 
The strain on the muscles is something fearful and you feel as if 
you had been on the rack or taken out of some infernal machine 
of torture. It had to be done; it was for this purpose one came 
to enjoy this lively experience. You had now to face the top; 
what in heaven will you do ? Will you risk another bad quarter 
of an hour? Yes, you must. Your courage, your honoris at 
stake. You say yes again. They come and seize you, your 
cries avail nothing; they are bound to get backsheesh and get 
it they will. So on you go, raising your legs four feet every s'ep, 
for the pyramid is four hundred and eighty feet in height. One 
holds your hand on either side and another behind to push \ou 
up. Vou are afraid to look up and you dare not look b.ick ; 
they say that out of hell there is no redemption ; of that 
1 cannot say, but I do say that once the Arabs have got hold of 
you there is no redemption, for if they do not bring your body 
they will carry your limbs to the top, come what will. So in such 
case you have to go on, and at last you take courage and look 
above and see the sun and what is a great deal better, for you, 
the top of the pyramid. You then take fresh courage and mount 
again, until your haven, or at least I should say heaven is reached; 
you sit down on the top and collapse with the perspiration coming 
from every pore of your body and thank God that you are an 
entity and have not lost your legs and arms in toto. After a little 
while you begin to live again and what would you not give for 
a "whisky cock-tail" stimulant? why, yes, thousands; yes, 
millions of Pyramids, but alas ! alack, you have to get down 
again before you can get one. 

The top is about thirty feet square, the view of Cairo and the 
the surrounding country is grand and an ocean of sand beyond 
so far as the eye can reach. Coining down, is like the second 
squeeze of the rack, which is done by jumps, that is if you are 
able to jump ; 1 did it by sliding, to the damage of my 
anatomy. However one can always go down the hill better than 
going up, providing that you do not go too quickly which in this 
case there was no fear as I was not able to "haul the proverbial 
herring off the fire," so was dragged down. " nolens volens" 
and landed once again on terra firma. You have every reason 
to be grateful to Divine Providence, but feel that it would be 
trusting it too far ever again to climb it inside or outside. 

From the Pyramid we mounted a camel, and after having our 
likeness taken went to the Sphinx, of which I will try and give 
you a brief description. Just as you see it in many pictures, so 
it appears to i(s lying on the sand in full majesty of its great 
proportions. The head is perfect, minus the nose. The Sphinx 
is hewn out of the living rock, but pieces of stone have been 
added where necessary. The body is about 150 feet long, the 
paws are 50 feet and from the top of the head to the base of 
the figure is 70 feet. The condition in which the monument now 
appears is due to the savage destruction by the Mohammedan 
rulers of Egypt. We then went to the Temple of the Sphinx 
which is a little to the south-east. In one chamber and at the 
end of the passage leading from it, are niches which were pro- 
bably intended for to hold mummies. At a short distance from 
the Pyramid, has been erected recently a very extensive 
hotel (Moorish architecture) where we had our lunch. The place 
was crowded with guests. Some go to stay, in consequence of 
the lovely dry atmosphere. At the outside of the hotel the 
temperature was 70 degrees. Such lovely weather you can hardly 
realize. On returnig to Cairo, we went to the Museum. We 
saw all the monuments from Upper Egypt, too numerous to 
mention. And saw a legion of mummies, some inside ; others out 



of the coffins. Cheops was there, taken out of the Pyramid. 
You could see the face very plainly ; also Rameses the second, 
who persecuted the children of Israel in the time of Moses, and a 
lot of Queens and a number of Kings, who lived 3,000 and 4,000 
years before the Birth of Christ. You could see many of the 
features quite plainly, as they were uncovered and out of the 
coffin. I am leaving on Tuesday in the steamer Rameses 
for the Nile and will be on that cruise three weeks, so that will 
be for you .a rest, from trying to make out my long letters. 
I shall have much to tell bye and bye which I cannot put in 
writing giving an account of my experiences in each place 
visited. I have so far as possible seen everything that is to be 
seen and must of necessity have a lot to say. I often -wish that 
you were with me to enjoy many a good laugh. That I am 
having a good time, goes without saying. I have met with many 
nice people and am especially fortunate with my present com- 
panions in travel. I have been told that the trip up the Nile is 
very attractive and with good company, must be most enjoyable. 

( Continued.) 





S. S. " Portia." 



'PLSEWHERE we reproduce an excellent photo of the new Coastal 
*"* Steamer Portia. Her lines are beautiful and graceful, and she has 
proved herself an excellent sea boat. The late accident has turned out, as 
fur as the ship, her captain and owners are concerned, a kind of blessing in 
disguise. While everyone regrets the untoward accident that brought her 
in contact with the uncharted shoa), it has had the effect of intensifying, as 
il were, the confidence placed by the public in her owners, captain and 
crew. The accident proved, beyond doubt, that the ship was well furnished 
with life saving boats and gear, and that even though a hole was stove in 
hc-i bottom, she is so well constructed that she could steam in safety to any 
of the numerous harbours on her route. And though for a short time after 
the accident panic reigned supreme, yet her gallant captain and crew were 
true to the traditions of- Newfoundland seamen, and without undue haste 
or fear, safely launched the life-boats and disposed of the large number of 
panic-stricken passengers. It is regrettable that the accident happened 
Captain Kean, but at the same time it proved beyond cavil that he and his 
first officer Joseph Kean, second officer John Field, chief engineer Wylie, 
and the other officers and members of the crew, weie men to rely on in 
such crisis, and notwithstanding the exaggerated fears of inexperienced 
passengers, they stood to their posts like brave British seamen and ensured 
the safety of the ship and passengers. 

It is also creditable to Messrs. Ivowring Bros., that when the sudden call 
came, there were not only life-boats and life-buoys sufficient, but also extra 
blankets and coverings to keep the passengers warm in the boats during 
the chilly autumn night. 

The ship accommodates 60 first class and 90 second class passengers. 
Her staterooms are most comfortably, even luxuriously furnished through- 
out, and she is fitted with all the modern improvements of a first class 
British passenger ship. She steams on an average about 10 knots, but 
she made I2> knots on her trial trip. She has triple expansion engines, 
and her dimensions are : length, 200 feet; breadth, 30 feet; depth. 15 feet 
3 inches ; gross tonnage, 978 ; net, 599 ; speed. 1 2}/ 2 knots. Besides being 
luxurious in all her appointments, her saloon, music rooms, smoking rooms, 
etc., being furnished with mahogany, upholstered with plush, she is also 
comfortably heated throughout by steam. She is lit by electricity and has 
a powful search-light as well as electric masthead and port and starboard 
lights, and when all her lights are going as she enters a harbor after night- 
fall, she presents a most b.illiant spectacle. All the berths in the ship are 
fitted with life belts of the very best kind, and everything that science can 
suggest or money can purchase is supplied for passengers' safety and com- 
fort. Added to this the table is bountifully supplied with good wholesome 
food, carefully prepared and daintily served. Is it any wonder then that 
the Portia and her sister ship the Prospero have bounded into public 
favour, and are likely, for years lo come, to be largely patronized by the 
travelling public ? 




Photo by Wm. Robertson dv Co.,] 



S. S. " PORTIA." 

The Northern Coastal Steamer. 



\Gourock, N. B., Scotland. 







From t/ie Reid-Newfoundland Co's.] 



FOGO. 



[Collection of Photos. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



FOR THE FESTIVE SEASON ^ XMAS PRESENTS ** IN 

Hats, Caps, Shirts, Boots, Ties and Suspenders, 

Call at Jackman the Tailor s. 

Our Qothing Department for Winter Wear 

is now complete. 

We have the best selected stock in the city. Everything for Men and Boys' wear can be had at our store 

JAGKMAN the Tailor, Arcade 



M. W. FURLONG, A'.C. J. M. KENT, A'.C. 

FURLONG & KENT, 

BARRISTERS and SOLICITORS. 
DUCKWORTH STREET, ST. JOHN'S. 



LEGAL CARD. 



F. J. MORRIS, A'.C,, 

/ Kimberley Row, St. Johns, Newfoundland. 
TELEPHONE, No. 266. 



P. J. 



Painter, Glazier, Paper Hanger 
and House Decorator. 

First Class Work in our line; prompt and particulai attention given to 
Outport Contracts. 

Always on hand HANLEY'S celebrated brands of Snuffs. 

Outport orders thankfully received. 
N.Ii.--We employ a staff of expert mechanics, who execute work with neatness and despatch 

Address: No. 5 King's Road. 



Thomas Smyth, 

Wholesale Dealer in 

Provisions, Groceries, Fruit, Etc. 

Head M< Bride's Hill, Duckworth Street, St. John's, Nfld. 



C. NURSE. 



C. AUSTIN. 



NURSE & CO., 



JOHN KEAN, 



ADELAIDE: STREET, 




Ship and Sanitary 

Plumbers, 
Gasfitters, &c. 



Estimates cheerfully given on all work in the above line. 

All orders personally attended 
to and satisfaction guaranteed. 

129 Gower Street, St. John's, Newfoundland 



Boot and Shoe Maker. 



Hand Sewing a Specialty, 
Strictest attention paid to 
all work, $ < * 

Oittport Orders Solicited. 



If you want neat Job Printing, call at JOHN J. EVANS, 34 Prescott Street, St. John's, 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Books about nciofoundland. 



By D. W. Prowse, LL.D. 



IT was the fashion for a long time to decry this " Newfoundland 
of Ours," to deride the idea of her importance and to despise 
her attractions. As the French say we have changed all 
that. The local historian who claimed that the story of New- 
foundland was not only interesting, but of national importance, 
might be sneered at and looked upon as an enthusiastic dream- 
er. When, however, all the leading journals of the world sup- 
ported the Newfoundland writers opinions; when to-day we find 
the most celebrated sportsmen, writers, and artists like Selous, 
Millais, Prichard, and Admiral Kennedy, &c., proclaiming the 
attractions of Newfoundland, the scoffers have to be silent. The 
opinion of these world renowned authorities cannot be gainsaid. 
The old proverb about giving a dog a bad name, is most applic- 
able to this Colony. Some harm has been done to us by exag- 
geration, and by detraction, but we are now getting known, not 
half so well known as we ought to be, and we have quite passed 
the stage in which any malign old scribbler like General Dash- 
wood can do us the leasl harm. 

I have undertaken to say something about Books on New- 
foundland, but it is a subject one can only glance at in the pages 
of a magazine. For the Bibliography contained in my History 
the titles of the works alone occupy nearly 20 pages of large 
octavo ; yet it is still admitted to be incomplete, and to bring it 
up to date would take as much more space. One of most inter- 
esting features of these ancient books on Newfoundland some 
of them nearly three hundred years old is their description of 
the various seasons and of the operations of the fishery. We 
can see how unchanging are the ways of nature, how undeviating 
and eternal are her ways and works. Like the ocean 

" Unchangeable save to the wild waves play ; 
Time writes no wrinkle on thy azure brow 
Such as creation's dawn behold, thou rollest now." 

It should be a comfort to the croakers, and prophets of ill omen, 
who are always predicting the decline and ruin of our fisheries, 
to read these old writers, and learn how unchanged, and un- 
changeable, are the migrations of the fish and the harvest of the 
sea. These old chroniclers' description of the spring herring, 
the opening of the codfishery, the advent of the caplin, the ar- 
rival of the squid, and lastly the large herring of the Fall, all 
read like a Fishery Report of to-day. 

The discovery of New Worlds East and West ; the Voyage of 
Columbus, and the Doubling of the Cape of Good Hope by the 
Portuguese had excited the wonder and admiration of the Tudor 
age. The excitement over these marvellous events had not 
abated in the earlier reign of the Stuarts. 'Whilst much was 
known about the new countries in Asia, Africa, and America, 
there was still an unsatisfied longing and curiosity, and over- 
whelming desire to know more about these marvellous New 
Lands and Islands of the ocean. 

Shakespeare, the great genius of that age, the most splendid 
genius the world has ever produced, voiced the sentiments of 
his age. All marvels and prodigies were possible for a genera- 
tion that had discovered new worlds. He makes his great crea- 
tion Othello speak 

" Of the Anthrophagi, and the men whose heads do grow beneath their 
shoulders." 

The world of that day was always on the look-out for new 
miraculous creations, new monsters. Orders were given to every 
ship leaving England to search out rare birds, animals, plants, 
and curiosities to please King James' favourite the dissipated, 
gifted and erratic Buckingham. 

Two remarkable Books on Newfoundland, typical products of 
this age of marvells and wonders, are "The Newlandei's 
Cure," by Sir William Vaughan, a kinsman of Richard Vaughan, 
Earl of Carbery, in whose beautiful mansion " Golden Grove," 
in South Wales the renowned poet and Royalist, Jeremy Taylor, 
found a refuge from the storms of the Civil War. 

Vaughan, like Baltimore's plantation in Newfoundland, formed 
part of the original given by King James I. to that shrewd 
speculator John Guv, afterwards Mayor of Bristol and Member 



of Parliament. Vaughan's tract of land lay south of Guy's, from 
Petty Harbor to Placentia, and extending south to Cape Race. 
He founded his Welsh Colony in Trepassey Bay, naming it Cam- 
briol Colchos, and his own residence Golden Grove after his 
brother's ancient seat in Caermarthenshire. In John Mason's 
map of the Colony all these names are set out. 

The Colonists a wretched crew of wild men from Wales, 
caught by the press gang, and coralled like so many bullocks 
came out to Newfoundland in 1617. Old Whitbourne was sent 
to bring them food and other requisites the next year, 1618, but 
his ship was plundered by what he calls " An erring Captaine 
who went forth with Sir Walter Rawleigh." The truth is that 
on his return from his last voyage to Guiana the " El Dorado" 
of that day the poor Knight and his companions were in such 
sore distress, that they came north to rob and plunder the New- 
foundland fishing fleet, English and foreign alike. It was then 
the only part of North America where white men and victuals 
could be procured. 

The seas swarmed with these pirates of all nationalties; some 
of them called, by the old writers, Turks. Lots of places in 
Newfoundland are called after these daring free-booters 
" Turk's Gut," " Turk's Cove," &c. They were really from 
Barbary in North Africa and are generally known in European 
history as the Salee Rovers. Numbers of them renegade Chris- 
tians, Greeks and Italians mostly, but amongst them an odd 
English man and the ubiquitous Irelander. 

All the patentees of the new plantations were sorely troubled 
by these ocean robbers. Whitbourne gives us a doleful account 
of their misdeeds. 

To return to our Author, he was a mystic, a dreamer, one of 
his leading ideas was to cure the awful drunkenness of that age 
by the use of spruce beer a fantastic notion just as practical 
as Mrs. Sartington dipping up the Atlantic with a bucket. The 
one use for spruce beer by the jovial West Country men was to 
compound it with rum into that delectable drink known as ' Cala- 
bogus." Spirits were not so commonly used as they are now. 
More wine and beer were drunk, specially beer. The high quali- 
ties of English ale has always been proverbial ; the sentiments 
of the old topers are set forth in the ancient song. 
" Back, and sides, go bare, go bare, 

Both feet and hands go cold ; 
But belly. God send thee good ale euough, 
Whether it be new or old." 

With all his fantastic notions Vaughan was enlightened enough to see 
the importance of Newfoundland, its stratagetic position in the New World, 
and its vast potential wealth. He begged the King to give the country a 
firm Government and the blessings of law and justice ; but the High and 
Mighty Prince James cared for none of these things. Like the Whigs and 
Radicals of to-day, he was a veritable Little Englander, and he turned a 
deaf royal ear to all poor Vaughan's petitions. Friends in England told the 
poor exile that if he wanted to excite curiosity in his readers and sell his 
works he must give them strange titles. So in his books " The Newlander's 
Cure" and ' The Golden Fleece" are the strangest medleys about colon- 
ization, law, medicine, and religion, all mixed up in the most fantastic way 

Not a single name given to the country by Vaughan has survived. The 
King was well called " the most learned fool in Chrisendom." He took an 
interest in this queer scholar, sent him relief in his distress and two Men-of- 
war to bring him and his poor Colonists home. The one sensible thing 
that Vaughan did was to sell part of his grant to Lord Baltimore. 

When Baltimore was a Protestant and an Oxford student he had been a 
close associate of Lord Carbery and his younger brother. They were senti- 
mentalists and kindred spirits. Just as one pawns off an unsound horse on 
a dear friend, so Vaughan sold a large portion of his most worthless pro- 
perty to his beloved old associate Baltimore at a very high figure. The 
one and only practical thing this poor enthusiast effected in his long 
painful and most unfortunate Colonial experience. 

I must leave to a later issue Robert Hayman, settled at Harbor Grace, 
who begged the King to re-name the country " Brittaniola " He was a 
rymer and a fantastic dreamer, an early edition of Power, the Pokeham 
Path Poet, who penned the tragic story of the lost Dauntless. 
" She struck on Cahill's Rock, my boys, 

And tore away her keel, 
And down went the bould Dauntless 
Belonging to Davie Steele." 



i8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



UUrckss 




By Wm. 

WE live in extraordinary times. We were but just becom- 
ing accustomed to the triumph of mechanical genius in 
overcoming the obstacles of nature, and communicating 
between continents by means of the telegraph cable, 
when science triumphs by using rather than overcoming 
the elements. That Marconi had received a telegraphic 
message at Signal Hill from Wales through the air without any 
visible connection was doubted by many ; we heard but com- 
prehended not. 

The recently published message received from the Govern- 
ment Marconi Station at Venison Island, Labrador, was a great 
surprise to the public generally, who were not aware that such 
stations had been established along that isolated coast. Though 
the system is only in the experimental stage many messages have 
been transmitted therefrom the past summer, and the result has 
been so satisfactory as to ensure such development of the system 
in the Colony as is now regarded by many as only a dream. 

The first of the Newfoundland stations is located at Battle 
Harbor, forty-two miles distance in a direct line the second office 
is placed upon Venison Island, thence sixteen miles further we 
come to the third office at the Seal Islands ; the next station is 
at Domino, fifteen miles distant, then the current travels with- 
out a break for seventy-eight miles to the most northern of the 
five islands known as " Smoky. " 

Young men from Conception Bay, employees of the Postal 
Telegraph System, have been in charge of these stations, they 
having been instructed in the use of the instruments by the 
engineers who were engaged the past summer erecting the appa- 
ratus at the above mentioned places. 

The Canadian Government have stations at Bell Isle and 
Chatteau, where connection is had with Quebec, and the mes- 
sages from the Newfoundland stations are now sent in that 
way. It is, we believe, the intention to connect the Labrador 
stations directly with the Postal Telegraph System of the island, 
probably at Flower's Cove or Bonne Bay, thus ensuring direct 
communication. The Labrador and Coastal steamers will like- 
ly also be equipped with the necessary instruments for trans- 
mitting and receiving messages, so that Marconigrams brought 
on board the mail steamers at any of the numerous ports of 
call could be sent off as soon as the ship came within two hun- 
dred miles of a land station. 

Every steamer almost which passed " Belle Isle in the Straits" 
the past summer was equipped with the Marconi wireless appa- 
ratus. Their approach being heralded to the lonely watchers 
on that Craggy Isle long before they came within sight, messages 
fly back and forth from Isle to ship and from ship to Isle her 
name, cargo and incidents of the voyage, origin and destination, 
in fact all about her is before she is plainly in sight an old 
edition of the Operator's budget. Finally she passes by as an 
old familiar friend, and the operator's " good-by" exchanged 
long afterwards when Island and mast-head are but specks upon 
the horizen. It is impossible to measure the benefits shipping 
will derive from its use. 

Our sealing fleet will undoubtedly be equipped with this very 
useful invention, communication with the other vessels of the 
fleet or to their watches over the ice floes would be a boon 
that all will appreciate, and on shore we would know daily, 
even hourly, the progress of the fleet. 

To fully describe technically would be endless labor but the 
discription of the method followed and the kind of instruments 
used will perhaps be interesting. 

The sending key is the usual Morse telegraph key with its 
contacts immersed in oil. When the operator works the key the 
spark gap throws out sparks in such a way as to represent dots 
and dashes, under the Morse code of telegraphy. An accepted 
theory states that, " The surging of electrical charges between 
" the spark gap causes the current to flow up the sending mast 
" in rings, and that these expand in all directions, reaching the 
" distant station, travelling at the same rate as light, without 
" wires and in a greatly attenuated condition." 

At the receiving station the wave strikes the wire screen, er- 



In Reurtoundland 
and Cabrador. 

Campbell. 

ected for receiving purposes, the exact sound made by the 
sending instrument is reproduced, and the operator, who has 
a telephone connection with the wire screen, receives the dots 
and dashes made by the sending instruments. 

The receiving instrument consists of self-induction coils, a 
condenser, a telephone receiver, a responder and local battery. 
It is said to be possible to so tune the receiver's electrically, 
that each will only respond to waves intended for same, and 
therefore the waves intended for one station will not interfere 
with those intended for another. 

The long intervals for communication by mail to distant 
Labrador, has greatly handicapped the lumber and mineral de- 
velopment of that coast, and the benefit this speedy, means of 
communication will be to such that cannot be estimated. 

The toiling fishermen and sailors are very liberally attended to 
just now. Many will remember when a monthly visit of a mail 
steamer was the only break in the monotony of the Labrador fish- 
ing voyage, then this was changed to a fortnightly service, and 




Copyright by James Vey. 

GUIGLIELMO MARCONI. 

shortly afterwards a physician was placed on board, later a 
mission hospital ship, fitted out and equipped by Philanthro- 
pists, was sent to minister to the sick and needy, then perma- 
nent hospitals were established where the sick and injured 
were nursed and tended by skilled physicians and now the 
most modern facility for speed communication has been estab- 
lished. 

The possibilities for its usefulness are many, in a number of 
instances the ability to communicate by a merchant with his 
vessel on the Labrador coast at critical times would have saved 
thousands of dollars. Vessels have had to return to St. John's 
in ballast, having left to load for European markets, but not 
knowing until they reached the Labrador that no fish had been 
caught. With the system established, the merchant at his head 
office may keep in touch with the vessels and branches of his 
business at all points, and the fishermen " Floaters " may obtain 
from the stations prompt and accurate information pertaining to 
their calling. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



The fishermen are often driven hither and thither on that 
coast, sailing many miles uselessly in quest of fish. An idle 
rumor of good fishing to the North or South is sufficient to 
cause him to hoist up anchor and proceed on a fruitless journey. 
We have heard of men, driven to desperation by the conflicting 
rumors of sickness and death of their families, coming home to 
ascertain the truth, as " bad news travels fast." He need not 
now be over anxious concerning his friends at home, for if any- 
thing serious does occur it could speedily be made known {o him. 

These are but a few of the many, benefits the telegraphic com- 
munication will be to the fishing interests of that coast. A cable 
service there would be an impossibility ; for, apart from the rocky 
nature of the sea shore, the ice would soon chafe and destroy a 
cable necessitating expensive repairs every season, as instance 
the heretofore frequent interruptions of the cable between Belle 
Isle and the main land, for at the present time this cable is not 
working, and they depend altogether upon the wireless service. 

Recently a wireless message was sent from Chicago to the 
St. Louis Exhibition, and though scientists have expressed 
doubt concerning the possibility of sending messages overland, 
when the .current that transmits them has to pass through many 
obstacles, the message referred to had to pass through skyscrap- 
ers, power houses and elevated structures in the heart of the city. 

That its sphere of utility is unlimited has been fully demon- 
strated, messages have been exchanged between ships at sea, 
from sea to land and from point to point; it is an accepted 
twentieth century facility, as firm as is the telephone, telegraph 
or cable, with a greater future than the three combined. 

May we not then expect a larger extension of the system within our Island, 
and is it too much to hope that the electrical wave between 1'ort-aux-Basque 
and Sydney will be used to convey our foreign messages to the offices of 
the Great Western Union system at Sydney, thus bringing us into touch 
with the great cable and land services of that Company with its fifty thou- 
sand offices in Canada and United States. 



DEDICATED TO 

Samuel rmicklcbackct, $q,, 

FROM 

" Somewhere far abroad, 

Where sailors gang to fish for cod." 

By Sir Robert Thorburn, 

On receipt of the Author's Book of Poems, in which he complains that 
Dame Fortune had been hitherto somewhat unkind to him. 
I hae yer bulk, ma canty frien', 

An's read it wi' great pleasure, 
So may yer muse be ever bricht, 

Nor scrimpit in her measure ! 
And may Dame Fortune change her mind 

Sine fill her Bardie's pocket ! 
An' keep his caunle burnin' bricht 

Doun to the very socket ! 
" A fellow feelin', wondrous kind," 

Makes us o' ane anither, 
In ilka loyal Scot we find 

A sympathetic blither. 
But if the muse cements the links, 

That tells each brither's trouble, 
Ah, then! a dual cord entwines 

An' makes the mandate double. 
I too hae woo'd the " Fickle Jade," 

While wan'drin' o'er the heather, 
Weel clad in tartan trews, I wot, 

But guileless o' shoe leather ! 
But that's lang syne, in youthful days, 

When storms o' life were hidden, 
An weel it is my honour'd friend', 

For come they will unbidden- 
Then gird yer loins, my sturdy Bard, 

An' face the stormy weather, 
" The darkest hour precedes the dawn," 

The silver linings gather. 
Our Father never smites in vain, 

Nor lifts the rod in anger, 
He pilots ilka ane through life, 

An' maist while shadows gather ! 
For some maun dree the loss o' life, 

An' some maun lose their treasure, 
But spar'd ane's health, an' friendship's ties, 

There's still a blessed measure. 
Wi' food eneuch, an' claes to boot, 

Then let us be contented ; 
O' life we are but tenants here, 

So be our time weel tented ! (Amen !) 
St. John's, Newfoundland, December, 1904. 



Cbe Dortl) Sea Outrage. 

" The Russian Bailie P leet while steaming up the North Sea, 200 miles off 
Spurn Head at midnight on Friday, came across a fleet of British steam 
trawlers comprising the Hull fishing fleet busily plying their nets. Without 
warning the Russians opened fire, sinking two trawlers and badly damaging 
several. Two fishermen were killed and many wounded. Five trawlers are 
still missing, others have reached Hull with dead and wounded. The snr- 
vivors report that the Russians without any provocation maintained fire for 
half an hour, all vessels of the squadron participating, although the war- 
ships' searchlights fully revealed the identity of the helpless fishermen. 
The Russians then apparently realizing their mistake hastily steamed away 
without stopping to assist the sinking vessels." 

E floats the flag o'er Britain's realms 
Where beat the " Hearts of Oak," 
There British prestige reels to-night 

As from a mighty stroke ; 
There " Soldiers of the King's" quick throb 

Is heard in every hall, 
And hearts beat fierce in prowd desire 
To hear the bugle call ! 

We're one where Greater Britain rules 

Where hearts, indignant burn 
We're of the pulse that throbs to-night 

The Tartar's act to spurn ! 
We're with the outraged fisher fleet 

Upon God's jielding sea ! 
Where Russian wrath and coward force 

Wrought Death and Mystery! 

Proud scion of a thousand thrones ! 

Victorioa's soar ! Our King ! 
What insult's this to thy proud flag 

The Russian's dared to fling! 
At flag and fleet, at Hearth and Crown, 

o ' 

In Britain held divine ! 
Let Russ. and Cossack know at once 
The Bear must face the Lion ? 

***** 

Are the voices still'd who the ramparts thrill'd 

Who the pride of the Russian quell'd? 
Is the " ROCK" dissolv'd in the ocean's depths 

Are the arms of the gunners fell'd ? 
Are the warriors dead, has the courage fled 

That won our fislds of old ? 
Is the sword to rust in the scabbard thrust 

In the brave old Lion's Fold ? 

Shall " The Gates of the Sea," a highway be 

For the Cubs of the treacherous Bear ? 
Shall the Foe defile and smirch our Isle 

With the blood of our kindred dear ! 
Is " THE FLEET" but a name to conjure with ? 

Are the guns of the ramparts mute? 
Must the crescent sink in the dull wave's brink 

Of the North Sea's rude dispute ? 

Must " The lion spirits who tread the deck" 

Be still, while the Empire throbs ! 
And the coward Bear, in his northern lair 

Growls back as the widow sobs ! 
Ah me I for the rays of the Chatam days 

To flash on the Realms again 1 
And the men and the guns, who the Empire won 

To smite for their brothers, slain ! 
* * * * * 

There's a Drake and a Nelson on some brave ship 

And they breathe amid " HEARTS or OAK"- 
And a Wellington stands with impatient hands 

Somewhere, to avenge this stroke ! 
For the wound will smart in the Empire's heart 

Which her daring and and might must heal; 
And the North Sea's waves, will, above these graves 

Rebound to the deeds of the Leal ! 

E. C. 



20 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




From the Reid-Newfoundland Go's.] 



THE DEAD MONARCH. 



[Collection of Photos. 



-.* Christmas in the Quentieth Ccnturp. * 



LORD, still we worship Thee ; 
To-day at countless altars, millions kneel, 
Adoring the Incarnate Word, and feel 

With thrilling hearts that joyful Mystery ; 
Yea, still within Thy Church upon the earth, 
The great proclaimer of Thy Virgin Birth, 
Is preached Thy Manhood and Divinity. 
Yet, as we look around us, what is there 

To tell that Christ has come ? 
Error, and crime, and misery, and despair 
Are all around us ; war and pestilence 
Have shocked the gazing East, 
And sent their echoes to the listening West ; 
The harlot's oath, the outcast children's cry 

Ascend the heaven's dome; 
And cold Indifference saunters listless by. 
Where is the wondrous change 

That Simeon saw far off, and hailed, and died, 
While o'er the earth's wide range 

Such horrors stalk, unchecked and undefied ? 

O Thou, who born for man, art always Man, 

These men who flout Thee, those who nothing care, 

Are all Thy brothers ; In the mighty plan 
Of Thy Redemption, Save I 

Thou Virgin pure beyond all thought, 

With lily chaplets crowned, 

These wretched ones whose shame profound 
Is deeper than the grave, 

Are all thy sisters, pity them ; thy Son by what He wrought 

Will surely save them, for he can 1 



By Robert Gear MacDouald. 

Upon a holy day, 

The lonely Dreamer on far Patmos isle 
The height of heaven clomb ; 
And underneath the rainbow arched dome. 
A throne was set : bright lamps of fire did play 
Before the Lamb that stood amidst the throne, 

Slain, yet alive the while ; 
While Beasts and Elders praised His wondrous worth. 

No hands could ope the Volume but His own. 
And still beneath all plagues could hurt the earih 
And its inhabiters; but still He sate 
That none of His should perish, small or great. 

Is not this a parable 

It were meet to study well ? 
The throne is set to-day, 

And still Thou sittest in the very midst, 
Directing, guiding all this great display 

Of mighty forces ; only as Thou didst 
'Tis ours to suffer ; infinitely worse 
The pangs Thou hast borne for us : 
Over the world like Babel clamorous 
Thou siaest, working out Thy purpose vast, 
Till Time's sad years are past. 



So " Peace on Earth" has not been sung in vain 
Year after year, since first the sacred strain, 
The ever broadening verse, 
Had angels for its primal choristers : 
We can but see in part ; the wondrous whole 
Will reconcile the sections to our soul. 
So shall we echo " Glory in the Height 

To God, and Peace on Earth : " 

Glory to God for His most joyful Birth 
Scattering forever sin's most awful night. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



GEAR & CO., 

Headquarters for 

J J 

Marbleized Mantelpieces, English and 
American Tiled Grates, Tiled Hearths, 

Fancy Brass and Iron Kerbs, 
Fire Brasses, Dogs, Stops, 
and other Artistic Grate 
and Hearth Furnishings. 

j* j* 

349 Water Street. 349 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 imjwmi 



1904 Greeting 1904 

JAS. J. 






friends for their kind patronage 
=Z during the past year, and wishes 
MERRY XMAS. 



them, one and all, a VERY 

We respectfully draw your attention to our Stock of 
PERFUMERY ! 

It is the very choicest obtainable, and being put up in fancy 
boxes, baskets, &c., would make ideal Xmas Presents. 
We also carry a full line of 
Perfume Sprays, Shaving Brushes, 

Sacnet Powders, Fancy Toilet Soaps, 

Toilet Boxes, Smelling Bottles, 

Hair Brushes, Washing Gloves, 

in fact a complete assortment of everything necessary for Toilet and 
Medicinal purposes. 

A visit to our Store will convince you, that right here is the best 
place to buy anything in the above line. 
We defy competition in goods or prices. 

MANNING'S DRIG STORE, 

New Gower Street. Open till 1 1 o'clock every night. ; 



f 



iiiiiii in J I in. l:r liiliitrlilrMiiriiiiliiliiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii 



Imperial Tobacco Co., Ltd. 

Manufacturers of Choice Tobaccos. 



Smoking and Chewing, 

Plug, Cut Plug, and Granulated. 

ome of our brands : 

" GOODWIN'S BEST CUT PLUG," 



HEARN & Co 

WHOLESALE ONLY.. 
AT LOWEST PRICES. 



'EARLY BIRD," 

'MARINER," 

'MONT ROYAL," 

'J. D." 

' HAPPY THOUGHT," 

' RICHMOND GEM," 

" IMPERIAL." 
For a cool, refreshing smoke, try " KILLIKINKNICK." 

OFFICES AND FACTORY: 

Flavin and Bond Streets, St. John's, Newfoundland. 



EMPIRE," 

DAISY," 

OUR FAVORITE," 

VIRGINIA LEAF," 

CROWN," 

SUCCESS," 



PORK. Mess, Bean, Ham Butt, Family Mess, 
Loins, Jowls, Hocks, Spare Ribs, Hams. 
BEEF. Packet, Plate, Mess and Boneless. 

SUGAR. Fine Granulated, in barrels and bags. 
Yellow, in brls. and bags. White Moist, 
in brls. Cube, in i cwt. boxes, 

MOLftSSES. Choice New Barbados, in Pun- 
cheons, Hogsheads and Tierces. 

. .ALSO. . 

Split and Round Peas, Rolled Oats, Oatmeal, and Sole Leather. 

Sole Agents for 

LIBBY, McNEiLi. & LIBBV'S Canned Meats & Soups. 

PRICE LISTS FURNISHED ON APPLICATION. 



J.V.O'DEA&Co. 



WHOLESALE. 



flour, Provisions and Feed. 

ST. JOHN'S. 



SMOKE CHACON'S 



Genuine Jamaica Cigars 

Governors j* Cspeciales 

and enjoy the Xmas Season. 
ROTHWELL & BOWRING, Wholesale Agents. 



C.f. Bennett& Co., 

* WHOLESALE DEALERS IN j* 

Provisions ^ Groceries. 



The American Tailor 

Has just received a large shipment of 
Fall and Winter Goods, of the most 
up-to-date patterns, in Suitings, Trou- 
serings fancy Vestings, etc. ; all of the 
latest styles and quality. 
He guarantees first class work, cut and finish in the latest American style. 

W. P. SHORTALL, 

334 Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

Jl^=Patterns and self-measuring cards sent on application. 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



CONSTABULARY TIRE DEPARTMENT. fIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH, 



EASTERN DISTRICT. 

NO. LOCATION OF BOXES. 

12 Temperance Street, foot Signal-hill Road. 

13 Factory Lane. 

14 Water Street, foot Cochrane Street. 

15 Duckworth Street, corner King's Road. 

16 Cochrane Street, corner Gower Street. 

17 Colonial Street, corner Bond Street. 

1 8 Water Street, East. 

112 Inside Hospital, Forest Road, special box. 
113 Penitentiary, corner Quidi Vidi Road. 
114 Military Road, corner King's Bridge Road 
115 Circular Road, corner Bannerman Road. 
I id King's Bridge Rd., near Railway Crossing 
117 Opposite Government House Gate. 
118 Rennie's Mill Road. 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

21 Head Garrison Hill. 

22 Water Street, foot Prescott Street. 

23 Water Street, foot McBride's Hill. 

24 Gower Street, corner Prescott Street. 

25 Court Mouse Hill. 

26 Duckworth Street, corner New Gower Street. 

27 Cathedral Square, foot Garrison Hill. 

28 -Long's Hill, and corner Livingstone Street. 
221 Military Road, Rawlins' Cross. 
223 Hayward Avenue, corner William Street. 
224 Maxse Street. 

225 Gate Roman Catholic Orphanage, Belvedere. 
226 Carter's Hill and Cookstown Road. 
227 Lime Street and Wickford Court. 
228 Freshwater Road and Cookstown Road. 
231 Scott Street, comer Cook Street. 
232 Inside Savings' Bank, special box. 
233 Flemming Street. 
2 34 Queen's Road, corner Allen's Square. 
235 Centre Cartel's Hill. 



WESTERN DISTRICT. 

31 Water Street, foot Adelaide Street. 

32 New Gower Street, corner Queen Street. 

34 Waldegrave and George Street. 

35 Water Street, foot Springdale Street. 

36 Water Street, foot Patrick Street. 

37 Head Pleasant Street. 

38 Brazil's Square, corner Casey Street. 

39 Inside Boot & Shoe Factory, special box. 
312 Horwood Factory. 
313 LeMarchant Rd., head Springdale St. 
331 LeMarchant Rd., head Barter's Hill. 
332 Pleasant Street. 

334 Patrick Street, corner Hamilton Street. 
335 Inside Poor Asylum, special box. 
336 Torpey's, Cross Roads, Riverhead. 
337 Hamilton Avenue, corner Sudbury Street. 
338 Flower Hill, corner Duggan Street. 

42 Southside, near Long Bridge. 

43 Central, Southside. 

44 Dry Dock. 

45 Southside, West. 

46 Road near Lower Dnndee Premises. 



On the discovery of a fire, go to the nearest box, break the glass, take the key, open the door of the large box, and give the alarm by pulling tile Hook all t 
CAIIT ON P^r^'ni? H "' !1C "TT" " e b0 , X ' " - y U ? I-"' h T il ' pu " again ' A "" g^in g the alarm, remain at the box as todi?ect the Fire 

^iwni1712Xf;5r^fe 



"FIRE OUT SIGNAL." Two strokes on the large Bell, repeated three'tinies, th'usT "li 'if-'-Il' 



the way down once then lei 
Bri^de wheVe""go 



JOHN R. McCOWEN, Inspector-General. 



SHEEP PRESERVATION ! 

TPHE following Sections of the Acts 47th Victoria, Cap. 7, and 50th 
Victoria, Cap. 9, for the Preservation of Sheep, are published in 
consolidated form for the information of the public: 

t. It shall be lawful for the duly qualified Electors resident within an 
area or District within this Colony to present to the Governor in Council 
a Petition or Requisition in the form prescribed in the S- hedule to this Act, 
or as near thereto as may be, setting forth the limits or boundaries within 
which such area or District is comprised, and the names of the towns, 
harbors or settlements included therein, and praying for a Proclamation 
hrohibiting the keeping of Dogs within such area or District. 

2. Such Petition or Requisition shall be sent to the nearest resident 
Stipendiary Magistrate, and shall be by him (after examination and certifi- 
cate as hereinafter provided) furnished to the Governor in ''ouncil. 

3. Upon receipt of any su;h Petition or Requisition containing the 
signatures of not less than one-third of the Electors resident within any 
such area or District, certified as aforesaid, the Governor in Council shall 
issue a Proclamation or Public Notice prohibiting the keeping of Dogs 
within such area or District. 

^ 4. From and after the day prescribed in and by such Proclamation or 
Notice, it shall not be lawful for any person resident within such area or 
District to keep, or to have in his possession, or under his control, any Dog 
within the area or District to which such Proclamation or Notice shall 
relate, under a penalty not exceeding Fifty Dollars, or imprisonment for a 
term not exceeding Three Months. This prohibition shall not apply to any 
person or persons travelling or passing through such area or Districts and 
having a licensed Dog or Dogs in his or their possession, charge or control 
and not at large. 

5. It shall be the duty of all Police Constables to kill all Dogs found by 
them in any area or District in which the keeping of Dogs is prohibited 
under this Act, except Shepherd Dogs or Collies, and those excepted under 
the next preceding section, and all such dogs not so excepted may be killed 
by any person whomsoever. And it shall be lawful for any person to destroy 
any Dog kept in contravention of the provisions of this Act. 

VA11 penalties under this Act may be sued for and recovered in a sum- 
mary manner before a Stipendiary Magistrate or Justice of the Peace, and 
all fines shall be paid to the person who shall give information of the offence 
and prosecute the offender to conviction. 

SCHEDULE. Form of Petition or Requisition. 

To His EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR IN COUNCIL: 
The Petition of the undersigned humbly sheweth, 

That your Petitioners are duly qualified Electors residing in an area or 
section of the Electoral District of , comprised and bounded 

as follows : 

That the said area or section contains the following towns (or harbors or 
settlements, as the case may be). 

That your Petitioners are desirous, and humbly pray Your Excellency in 
Council, that a Proclamation or Notice be issued under the provisions of 
an Act passed in the Forty-seventh year of the reign of Her Majesty Queen 
Victoria, Cap. 7, entitled " An Act to provide for the better Preservation of 

leep, and for other purposes," prohibiting the keeping of Dogs within the 

a ' d DUtrict ' and y r Petitioners 



wil? e^eTTa 
Dated at 



f 



, the 



day of , 190 . 

J. G. CONROY, 

P r /> c, / L Stipendiary Magistrate for Newfoundland. 

Police Office , St. John's, Decimber, 



Customs Circular 



No, 15. 



WHEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles, Angler's Outfits, Trouting Gear, Fire-arms 
and Ammunition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be 
admitted under the following conditions : 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles, Trouting Poles, Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equipage. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the Assistant Collector, 
St. John's, if taken in St. John's the Receipt No. 2 shall be sent 
to the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre- 
senting the articles at the Port of Exit and having them com- 
pared with the receipt. The Examining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the result of his examination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

No groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund may 
be taken upon such articles. 

H. W. LeMCSSURICR, 

Assistant Collector. 

CUSTOM HOUSE, 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 22nd June, 1903. 




THC ... 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

QUARTERLY. 

JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 



JVOL. IV. No. 4. 




LITTLE RIVER, CODROY. 



Notes and Portraits of His Excellency Sir William and 

Lady MacGregor i 

' St. Andrew's Church" (illustrated), by R. C. Smith. . 2 

" Right Hon. Sir Robert Bond, K.C.M.G., P.C., LL.D." 4 

' The Catholic Church and the British Empire," (Con- 
cluded), by Rev. M. J. Ryan, Ph. D $ 

' Forever and Forever" Poem, by Daniel Carroll. ... 6 

' Poultry Fanning, and How to Make it Pay," by E. A. 

Elgee, P.S., A.D.C 7 

Supplement : Steamers and Captains of Red Cross Line, 
Messrs. Bowring Brothers, Ltd., and Messrs. Harvey 
iV Co.. Agents for Newfoundland. 

"Supplement: Two Illustrations from Photographs 
Burin" ;.nd ' Holyrood." 

" Newfoundland Name-Lore," (Article XII.) by Most 

Rev. M. V. Howley, D.I) 9 

" The Educational Outlook in Newfoundland," by Rev. 

L. Curtis. M.A.. D.D. . 10 



" In Memoriam Mrs. Rogerson," Poem by I). Carroll n 

" The Dead Singers," by Newfoundlander n 

"Life at an Outport [ repressions," 4 with portrait of 

author, by Rev. A. \V. Lewis, B.A., B.D 12 

" Nightmare" Poem, by R. G. MacDonald 12 

A full-page illustration from Photograph " T. A. & B. 

Society Officers," with Notes 14 

Illustration from Photograph '-Little River, Codroy". 15 

" The Dead Christ," by F. M. White 17 

' Harry Bessemer's Investment," a novelette of New- 
foundland Life, by R. G. MacDonald 19 

' The Breton Fisher's Prayer" Poem, by Dr. Richard 

Burke How ley 20 

' Recipe for a Composition Cake." by a Member of the 

Littledale Literary Club 20 

' The Fisherman" Poem, by Chas. E. Hunt 20 

" Song : Keep Her to the Wind." by Danniel Carroll. . 20 



": THE" NFAYFOUNDLAND QUARTF.RLY. 





Queen 
Fire Insurance Company 

FUNDS. $AO,OOO,OOO 




INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or I );imaj^e by Fire 

arc issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 






JOHN CORMACK, 



SGEINT FOR NEWFOUNDLAND. 



*^ m m "! 



Royal 

Household 

Flour. 



L 



,J 



NEWfOUNDLAND 

LIME-SAND BRICKS. 

(Size 9 x 4 }4 x 3). 

\YK GUARANTEE THESE BRICKS 

1 As Good and Cheaper 

Than any Imported Brick. 

GOOD PRESSED EACE-BRICKS 

Selling at Lowest 
Market Rates by The 
NEWFOUNDLAND BRICK & MANUFACTURING Co., Ltd., 

E. H. & G. DAVEY, Managers. 

Telephone, 345. litick -Plant Works, Jon's Cove. 

Water Street, St. John's. 



The Newfoundland Consolidated 
foundry Company, Limited.. 

Manufacturers of Cooking, 
Parlor, Mall and Church 
Stoves, Gothic GRATES, 
Mantelpieces, ' Windlasses, 
Rouse Chocks. HAWSER 
PIPES, and every variety of 
Ship and "General Castings. 
Churchyard or Cemetery 
Railings, Crestings, and all 
Architectural Castings 

W. P. WALSH, S. WILL. CORNICK, 

President. Manager. 



P. 






Painter, Glazier, Paper Hanger 
and House Decorator. 



JOHN KEAN, 



ADELAIDE STREET, 



hirst Class Work in our line; prompt and particular .attention given to 
Outport Contracts. 

Always on hand HANLEY'S celebrated brands of Snuffs. 

Outport orders thankfully received. 
X.l*.--\\ c employ a stuff of expert mechanics, who execute work with neatness and despatch 

Address: No. 5 King's Road. 

The American Tailor 

Hns just received our fust shipment of 
Spring and Summer Goods, of the most 
up-to-date patterns, in Suitings. Trou- 
serings fancy Yestings, etc.'; all of the 
latest styles and quality. 
He guarantees first class work, cut and finish in the latest American style. 

W. P. SHORTALL, 

334 Water Street, - St. John's, Newfoundland. 

Pattern? and self-measuring cards sent on application. 




Boot and Shoe Maker. 

Hand Sewing a Specialty. 
Strictest attention paid to 
all work* < *g & 

Outport Orders- Solicited. 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, t*e senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 





FOR NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 
CANADA. 


I pou 

2 pou 

3 
4 

8 

9 
10 
ii 


nd 


8 cents 


24 ce 

24 
24 
48 
4 8 
48 
48 

72 
72 
72 
72 
No parcel 
less than 


nts 


12 Ct 
24 

3 6 

4 8 
60 
72 
84 
96 
Si 08 




1 5 cents. 
3 
45 
60 

75 
90 
$i .05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 

weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 1 5 cents. 


nds 


ii " 








14 " 
17 " 


, 


t 




i 


, 




2O " 


, 


j 




2** " 


, . 


i 




2 6 


i 


4 




2Q " 


i 


t 




T.2 " 


i 






-I r " 








3C ' 








Under I Ib. weight, I cent 
per 2 oz. 


sent to U K. for 
24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Ked Cross Line to and from Ne~v York ; 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 



RSTES OF COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 



General Post Office. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as .follows : 

For sums not exceeding Sio 5 cts. Over $50, but not exceeding $60 30 cts. 

Over $10, but not exceeding $20 10 cts. Over 56o, but not exceeding Sjo 35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 15 cts. Over $70, but not exceeding SSo 40 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 20 cts. Over SSo, but not exceeding $90 45 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 25 cts. Over $90, but not exceeding Sioo 50 cts. 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, an I to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, Sioo.oo, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John's, Newfoundland, March, 1905. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



GENERAL # POST A OFFICE. 

Postage on Local Newspapers. 

TT is obHWed that BUNDLES OF LOCAL NEWSPAPERS, addressed to Canada and the United States, are frequently 
mailed without the necessary postage affixed; and, therefore, cannot be forwarded. 

The postage required on LOCAL NEWSPAPERS addressed to Foreign Countries is i cent to each two ounces. Two 
of our local newspapers, with the necessary wrapper, exceeds the two ounces, and should be prepaid TWO CENTS. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 




General Post Office. 

TELEGRAMS for the undermentioned places in Newfoundland are now 
Offices in the Colony and in St. John's at the Telegraph window in the LoL 
Court House, Water Street, at the rate of Twenty Cents for Ten words or less, 
address and signature, however, is transmitted free: 



Postal Telegraphs* 

accepted for transmission at all Postal Telegraph 
by of the General Post Office and at Office in new 
and Two Cents for each additional v\ord. The 



Avondale 

Baie Verte (Little Bay N.) 

Baine Harbor 

Bay-de-Verde 

Bay L'Argent 

Bay Roberts 

Beaverton 

Belleoram 

Birchy Cove (Bay of Islds.) 

Bonavista 

Bonne Bay 

Botwoodville 

Britannia Cove 

Brigus Junction 

Burin . 

Carbonear 



Catalina 
Change Islands 
Clarenville 
Come-By-Chance 
Conception Harbor 
Fogo 
Fortune 
Gam bo 
Gander Bay 
Glenwood 
Grand Bank 
Grand Lake 
Grand River 
Greenspond 
Hant's Harbor 
Harbor Breton 



Harbor Grace 

Harbor Main 

Hening Neck 

Holyrood 

Howards 

Humber Mouth (River- 
head, Bay of Islands) 

King's Cove 

King's Point (S. W. Arm, 
Green Bay) 

Lamaline 

Lewisport 

Little Bay 

Little River 

Long Harbor 

Lower Island Cove 



Postal Telegraph Message Forms may be obtained at any Post Office in the Colony, and 
desires, the message may be left with the Postmaster, to be forwarded by mail Free 

General Post Office, St. John's, Newfoundland, March, 



Manuels 

Millertown Junction 

Musgrave Harbor 

New Perlican 

Newiown 

Nipper's Harbor 

Norris' Arm 

N. \V. Arm (Green Bay) 

Old Perlican 

Pilley's Island 

Port au-Port (Gravels) 

Port -aux-Bas-ques (Channel) 

Port Blandford 

Steplienville Crossing 

St. George's 

St. Jacques 

from Mail Clerks on Trains and Steamers. If the sender 
of Postage to nearest Postal Telegraph Office. 

H. J. B. WOOL'S, Postmaster General. 



St. John's 

St. Lawrence 

Sandy Point 

Scilly Cove 

Seldom-Come-By 

Sound Island 

S. W. Arm (Green Bay) 

Terenceville (head of 

Fortune Bay) 
Tilt Cove 
Trinity 
Twillingate 
Wesleyville 
Western Bay 
YVhitbourne 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



ESTABLISHED I8O9. 



FIRE and LIFE. 

North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Company. 

\ 

Total Fiinds exceed $72,560,330. 

GEORGE SHEA, Agent for Newfoundland. 

BAIN[, JOHNSTON & Co. <* NEWMAN'S 

Celebrated Port Wine, 



Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland, 

General Merchants and Ship Owners. 



..EXPORTERS OF.. \ 

Codfish, Cod Oil, Seal Oil, Seal Skins, 
Codliver Oil (Norwegian process), 

Salmon, Split Herring, Scotch Cured 
Herring, Trout and Lobsters. 

Sealing Steamers for Arctic hire. Steamers on 
Labrador requiring COALS can be supplied at 
Battle Harbor, at entrance to Straits of Belle Isle, 
where there is telegraphic communication. 



In Cases of 1 doz. each, 
at $8.25 in Bond; also, 

in Hogsheads, Quarter Casks a d Octaves. 

f 

Baine, Johnston & Co,, 

AGENTS. 



Guarantees Talk. 

Estimates Don't 

A BUSINESS PROPOSITION. 

That is what the ACCUMULATION POLICY of the 

Confederation Life 

is. Business men should compare its Guarantees 
with those of other companies before placing their 
risks. Call on or write to 

C O'N* CONROY, 

GENERAL AGENT. 

Law Chambers, St. John's. 



HEARN & Co 

WHOLESALE ONLY.. 
AT LOWEST PRICES. 



PORK. Mess, Bean, Ham Butt, Family Mess, 
Loins, Jowls, Hocks, Spare Ribs, Hams. 

BEEF. Packet, Plate, Mess and Boneless. 

SUGAR. Fine Granulated, in barrels and bags. 
Yellow, in brls. and bags. White Moist, 
in brls. Cube, in i cwt. boxes, 

MOLASSES. Choice New Barbados, in Pun- 
cheons, Hogsheads and Tierces. 

. .ALSO. . 

Split and Round Peas. Rolled Oats, Oatmeal, and Sole Leather. 

Sole Agents for 

LIBBY, McNEiLL & LIBBY'S Canned Meats & Soups. 

PRICE LISTS FURNISHED ON APPLICATION. 



TH[ NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY; 



VOL. IV. No. 4. 



MARCH, 1905. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 





HIS EXCELLENCY, SIR VVM, MACGRKCOR. 

TT7HE following extract from Whittakcr's Animal, for 1904, 
J I V will give our readers an idea of the Governor's work as 
an Empire Builder before he was transferred to New- 
foundland : 

"SiR WILLIAM MACGREGOR, K.C.M.G., 1889; C.B., 1897; M.D. 
Abdn., 1874; D.Sc, Camb. ; LL.t). Edin. and Abdn.; Fellow of the 
Royal Geographical Societies of England, and Scotland, and Berlin ; and 
of the Royal Ethnological Society of Italy; Watson gold medalist., 1872; 
formerly IBS. surgeon, ies physician. Glasgow Royal Infirmary; res. physi- 
cian, Royal Lunatic Asylum, Aberdeen; asst. govt. medical officer, Sey- 
chelles, 1873; superintendent lunatic asylum and resident surgeon Civil 
Hospital, Port Louis, Mauritius, 1874; chief medical officer, Fiji, March, 
1875; also receiver-general, and member of the executive and legislative 
councils, January, 1877 ; has acted as registrar general, agent general of 
immigration, and commissioner of lands; engaged, 1876, in the suppression . 
Of the disturbances in the mountains of Viti Levu, for which he was voted 
a gratuity of 200 ; joint commissioner, 1877, for the settlement of debts 
due from natives and Europeans, and for the settlement of all pecuniaiy 
claims against the late government of Fiji; member of the Native Regula- 
tion Boatd, 187?; proceeded to Tonga, 1879, to report on the financial 
condition of that country; acting colonial secretary, Novemljer, 1883,10 
June, 1884, and October, 1874, to January, 1875; administrator of the gov- 
ernment and acting high commissioner and consul general for the West 
Pacific. January to August, 1875; representative of Fiji at the first session 
of the Federal Council of Australasia, at Hobart, January, 1885; Albert 
medal of the 2nd class (1884), with the Clarke gold medal of the Royal 
Humane Society of Australasia in 1885. for saving life at sea; dep. admin- 
istrator of Fiji, September, 1885. and August, 1886; administrator and 
declared sovereignty over British New Guinea, 1888; lieut. -governor, 1895; 
Founder's medal, R.G.S.E., 1896; governor Lagos, 1899-1904." 

His Excellency was the first to cross the Island of West 
Guinea via the Stanley Range, where he discovered several new 
kinds of the famous Bird of Paradise, together with many other 
Unknown specimens of animal and vegetable life. As an in- 
stance of the difficulties encountered by the expedition, one 
mile a day was often a high rate of progression, and it was due 
to His Excellency's immense strength and resource that he suc- 
ceeded where so many had failed. Being a Botanist, Miner- 



I.AI1V MACC.RECOR. 

alogist and an Astronomer, it was not surprising that the scien- 
tific :\vo rid reaped large stores of information from his experi- 
ences, and were pleased to honour him accordingly. From 
New Guinea, which he had succeeded in pacifying and reducing 
10 order, he was translated to Lagos, West Africa, a Colony 
even more unhealthy. During Sir William MacGregor's terms 
of office the annual mortality amongst white officials was reduced 
enormously, and the prosperous and present happy state of the 
inhabitants is a striking testimony to the wisdom of his rule. 
That our new Governor takes as much interest in Newfound- 
land as in former Colonies is evidenced by the fact that he has 
already tabulated an immense amount of information relative to 
our fisheries for the la*t hundred years. Newfoundland has, on 
more than one occasion, suffered through want of information in 
the Colonial office. Sir William appears to have set himself the 
task to remove this obstacle, and to supply the Imperial Authori- 
ties with reliable data, so that they may in future negotiations, 
regarding the welfare of the Colony, have the most trustworthy 
information to hand. He has also expressed an intention of visit- 
ing all the centres of industry and factories in the Island. We 
understand that in the summer of this year, His Excellency is 
contemplating an extended visit to our dependency Labrador. 

Lady MacGregor and her talented daughters, have already 
earned enviable reputations. As a hostess at Government 
House, Lady MacGregor has charmed all those who have had 
the privilege of meeting her. The Misses MacGregor, who are 
musicians of no mean order, have since their very arrival, placed 
their talents at the disposal of all those who have been labour- 
ing for any philanthropic purpose, and are in high favour with 
all lovers of good music. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY, 



St. flndiWs CDurcl% 



By R. C. Smith. 




ST. ANUREW'S CHURCH, ST. JOHN'S. 

" HER Saints take pleasure in her stones, 
Her very dust to them is dear." 

TTTHE words "Nee Tamen Consumebatur," surrounding a 
J I li burning bush, form the motto and crest of the Church of 
Scotland. The reference is, to that scene on Horeb, 
where God talked with man and disclosed His plan for the de- 
liverance of His People Israel from Egypt. " The bush was 
not consumed." 

It is not necessary for the purposes of this paper that we 
should seek to discover all the meanings of this motto, further 
than to say that they take us back to almost the beginning of 
our religious history, to that gray dawn which preceded the 
rising of the Sun of Righteousness ; also to point out that 
they are not inappropriate to the story of the " Kirk" in 
St. John's. 

In a similar manner, if we inquire what this building stands 
for, and what it means to those who worship within its walls, we 
shall find that its foundations were laid in lands far distant and 
times long past. The Briton proud .of his citizenship and free- 
dom, calls to mind that they have been purchased by "the 
breasts of civic heroes bared in freedom's holy cause." So we 
of the Kirk love to dwell upon "our martyrs in heroic story 
worth a thousand Agincourts.." Nor do we stop here. Our 



claims are large- A recent pulprit utterance in St. 
Andrew's, in connection with this matter, was to 
this effect: "We find the roots of the present 
deeply embedded in the soil of the past. I respect 
the man who claim antiquity for his Church, I claim 
it for mine own." Before Knox and other mediaeval 
reformers were, back to the time when the Son of 
Man walked this earth, and said " Upon this Rock 
I build my Church," back to the eternal purposes 
of the Divine will, do we look for the Church's 
foundations. 

The Kirk is not alone indebted to the names 
emblazoned on her own honour roll for her mak- 
ing. Down through the ages, have the great and 
good of both sexes helped to mould, and form her. 
Chrysostym, St. Columba, St. Augustine, St. Patrick, 
VVyckliffe, Thomas a Kempis, Latimer, Ridley, 
Wesley, Whitfield, and Newman, as well as Knox, 
Rutherford, McCheyne, Guthrie, Chalmers, and 
Henry Drummond have all been laid under tribute 
to make her what she is. 

If ability permitted, it would not be possible 
within the compass of an article of this kind to tell 
the story of the Kirk even in part, or to name the 
factors which under Divine Guidance have been 
used to form her. But the influence of environment 
cannot be passed over. 

The Scotch are a virile race. The conditions of 
their country have made them so. The scramble 
for life has made the Scotchman agressive, has de- 
veloped that sense of individual and national inde- 
pendence, which the predominant partner of the 
political union cannot overawe or eradicate. Again, 
a community of interest has been established in 
some measure by the same circumstances. This 
kinship termed clannishness has been fostered by the struggle 
with reluctant nature from within, and hostile man from without 
chiefly from over the border. 

In addition to those factors, indeed growing out of them, we 
have the superior system of Scottish education, which makes it 
possible for a " lad of pairts" to obtain the highest collegiate 
honours indeed as many of her distinguished sons have done. 
It has developed in the humblest, the metaphysical and dialec- 
tical faculties accounting for that spirit of criticism and contra- 
diction so repugnant to those who do not understand the 
genius of the race. 

These features are marked characteristics in the ecclesiastical 
life of the Scottish people. In vindicating independence in 
Government, freedom of interpretation and liberty of conscience, 
the Kirk has been baptised with fire. Those days now happily- 
past which saw her sons and daughters seal the covenant with 
their blood, have left a testimony whereby future generations 
have fortified their faith. Later came the great question of 
patronage, culminating in 1843 in the spectacle of nearly five hun- 
dred of her ministers giving up their parishes and manses for 
conscience sake, and instituting the Free Church of Scotland. 
To-day we have another great ecclesiastical question agitating 
Scotland as she has seldom been stirred before, involving mil- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



lions of money, and subtle distinctions of doctrine which the 
learned English minds of the Lords of Appeal have failed to 
discern. 

The effects of the disruption and indeed of all the trouble which 
have agitated the Scottish Church have been shown in renewed 
spiritual activity. Through all her testing times the Kirk has 
ever held aloft her high standards. In the effort to raise the 
blue banner still higher her children have differed and are differ- 
ing, but the rallying cry now and ever will be, " For Christ and 
His Covenant." 

It was of this genesis the men and women were, wlio had 
come from Scotland to this 

" Place far abroad, 
Where sailors gang to fish for cod." 

They had already learnt that man's chief end is to glorify God 
and enjoy Him forever. They desired to do so as their 
custom and want had been, and so introduced Presbyterianism 
into St. John's. 

On December 3rd, 1843, St. Andrew's Church of the Estab- 
lished Church of Scotland was opened. It occupied the site 
of the present' edifice. Its first minister was the Rev. Donald 
Allan Eraser, M.A. (To his son, John McL. Eraser, we arc in- 
debted for the picture of the Church published in this issue.) 
Mr. Eraser is described -as a man of commanding presence, 
cultured mind and deep spirituality. His preaching was often 
really eloquent, racy of his Highland birth and mysticism. He 
died in 1845, after a pastorate of two years, deeply regretted. 
Amongst those who succeeded Mr. Eraser, we call to mind 
Revs. Donald MacRae and J. D. Patterson, who have'left loving 
memories lingering in many hearts. The latter died-some years 
ago in Australia. The former is now a Professor at Kingston, 
Ontario. He revisited St. John's two years ago. 

The disruption agitation which swept over Scotland in 1843 
at length reached Newfoundland. The little Presbyterian com- 
munity here divided. The Free Church of Scotland was opened 
on Duckworth Street, where Dr. Eraser's residence now stands. 
Rev. Adam Muir was its first minister, and was followed by 
Rev. Dr. Harvey in 1852. Dr. Harvey ministered to this 
Congregation until its re union with the mother Church in 1876. 

During 1876 events took place which brought about the re- 
union of the separated congregations. On January 3oth St. 
Andrew's Church on the hill was destroyed by fire, and on 
October I5th, of the same year, Free St. Andrew's met a similar 
fate. Bjth congregations homeless, the guidance could not be 
ignored, union was consummated in 1877. 

Previous to the union St. Andrew's worshipped in the Old 
Temperance Hall, and Eree St. Andrew's in the Court House. 
The amalgamated bodies worshipped in the Athenaeum until 
the new Church was completed. The United Church was now 
affiliated with the Presbyterian Church in Canada, but she still 
preserves the features and complexion of her Scottish origin. 

The corner stone of the first United Church was laid on 
June i8th, 1878, by the Rev. Dr. Muir. The site being at the 
junction of Duckworth Street and Cathedral Hill. It was 
opened for worship on Nov. zoth, 1879, by Rev. L. G. Mac- 
Neil, who had been called as minister to the new congregation. 
Rev. Job Shenton conducted the evening diet of worship. 

Under Mr. MacNeil's ministry, which lasted until 1887, the 
congregation prospered. The union was complete. No sign 
of cleavage on the old lines has ever appeared. The minister 
was .an earnest, powerful and logical preacher a man of much 
force of character. Accepting a call from St. Andrew's, St. 
John, N. B., he was. after a most successful pastorate, succeeded 



by Rev. W. Graham in January, 1887. 

In 1892, during the years of Mr. Graham's ministry, the great 
fire took place. Again the Presbyterians beheld their Temple 
in ashes. Again preparations were made to rebuild their Zion. 
The congregation meanwhile found accommodation in the West 
End Presbyterian Hall, Hamilton Street, and later in the Church 
Hall. Queen's Road. 

A majority vote of the congregation decided that the new 
structure should occupy its present commanding site. At the 
time a considerable and influential minority were of opinion 
that the position was not sufficiently easy of access. It is now 
conceded that time has proven their opinion to have been cor- 
rect. Exchange of site with that of the Presbyterian College 
would have been advantageous to both institutions. 

The Church is built from plans by Messrs. Wills & Sons, by 
S. M. Brookfield, of Halifax. The corner stone of the new 
building was laid August 24th, 1894, by Sir Terence O'Brien, 
K.C.M.G., and was dedicated to the worship of God on August 
2nd, 1896, by Rev. L. G. MacNeil, its former pastor. 

At the morning dedicatory services the Rev. L. G. MacNeil 
preached from Exodus, 3rd chap, and 3rd verse, " And Moses 
said I will now turn aside and see this great sight why the bush 
is not burnt." 

The dominant tone of the services and attention of the people 
was one of praise and gratitude to the Almighty that once more 
within His house their teet were found. The Old Hundred had a 
new depth of meaning as it poured over the hearts of the people 
calling on them lo praise, laud and bless His name always, for 
it is seemly so to do. The evening service by the same preacher 
was from Luke's Gospel, " Lord increase our Faith." 

This same year Mr. Graham resigned the charge, accepting 
a call to Kingston, Jamaica. He was a warm-hearted Scotch- 
m.in, a good preacher, and had a firm place in the affections of 
many. He was succeeded by Mr. Robeitson, the present In- 
cumbent. 

Trie Church, occupying a commanding site, is of the Gothic 
style of architecture. It is built of Accrington brick trimmed 
\\ ith Scotch freestone. The tower and spire completed last year 
are in keeping with the general design, and are very handsome. 

The main porch is composed of the same stones as were 
used in the porch of the Duckworth Street Church and is sur- 
mounted with the identical burning bush which was not consumed 
in the fire that destroyed that building in 1892. 

Tne cost of this property, including Manse and Hall, is in 
the neighbourhood of $85,000. Like many buildings erected 
since the rite of [892 repairs have been required out of all 
proportion to the demands of ordinary wear and tear ot time 
and use. To the energy and zeal of the Hon. James Baird the 
congregation and community are indebted for the completion 
last year of the handsome tower and spire. This work has been 
to him a labour of love. It is proposed to hold a special meet- 
ing of the congregation in the coming April when the cost of 
the completed building w : ll be submitted and adjusted. 

Although not a large congregation, the influence of Saint 
Andrew's in the community is great. Her ministers from the 
first have been broad-minded, cultured and earnest men. They 
have entered into the life of the people, and from pulpit, plat- 
form and press have contributed to the uplift of and the pros- 
perity of the commonwealth. They have commanded and 
received the respect of all classes at all times. One of them 
Rev. Dr. Harvey by his wealth of literary endowment and 
untiring zeal in the Colony's service, has done much for her 
development and material prosperity. 

So the Auld Kirk stands, thrice burnt but never consumed. 
More and more may she fulfil the purpose of her Divine origin 
and Supreme Head. May the great outstanding facts of human 
need and sin and God's remedy continue to be the burden of 
her inessage. May she help to usher in the time when jangling 
creeds shall no more perplex when the mists of misunderstand- 
ing shall have rolled awa^ leaving nothing but the clear "lift 
abune" through which comes the Father's smile on those who 
would serve Him. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY, 




RT. HON. SIR RGHKRT HONI), K.C.M.C., P.C., LL.I>. 

" WF must be free or die. who speak the tongue 
That Shakspeare spake: the faith and morals hold 

\Vhich Milton held. In everything \ve are sprung 
Of earth's first blood, have titles manifold." 



" SOME say that the age of chivalry is past. The age of chivalry is never 
past as long as there is \viong left unredressed on eaith. and a man or 
woman left to say, ' I will redress that wrong or spend my life in the 
attempt.' " Kingitey. 

1 do love 

My country's good with a respect trore tender, 
More holy and profound, than mine own life." 

Shakspeare. 

^CTHESE quotations seem to afford a good setting for a brief account 
J I L of the career of the Rt. Hon. Sir K Bond, whose name is to-day a 
1 household woid in every village and hamlet of Newfoundland, and 
whose services to his country have been many and great. ' It has been said 
that " every man is the result of three factois his ancestors, life surround- 
ings, and his individuality" ; in attempting to give an account of the sub- 
ject of our sketch, therefore, we must begin with his ancestors. He comes 
of excellent British stock, of sturdy West Country type, "of earth's first 
blood," and is a good illustration of the saying, " Blood tells." Born in 
the Capital of Terra Nova, in 1857, two years after (he Introduction of 
Responsible Government by Governor Darling, he may be said to have 
been. given to Newfoundland contemporaneously with the great boxm of 
complete Self-Government. In 1846, St. John's petitioned the Impeiial 
Government for this, and having waited nine long years, the new Chatter 
came; and thus the spirit of freedom was in the air during the Premier's 
early years, a spirit which he imbibed to the fullest extent and has stood 
for all through his public life. His early yeais in the home of his father, 
a prominent St. John's merchant, could not fail to bring 1 im into sympa- 
thetic touch with the business life of the country, and cna'e and foster an 
interest in its success which has characterized his who'e career. In addi- 
tion to such educational advantages as were afforded in the land of his 
birth, he enjoyed the privilege of training at Queen's College, Taunton, 
England; where, besides a valuable scholastic conrse. re obtained a know- 
ledge of English life, became imbued with Englisji principles, and obtained 
a culture and thorough gentlemanliness of manner and I-eaiing which can- 
not fail to impress all with whom he comes in contact. Having completed 



his college term, he entered upon the study of law which, howeveri Owihg 
to indications of failing health, he was advised to discon'inue. 

His first venture upon the troubled waters of political life was in i88i 
when, at the age of twenty-five, he was elected as one of the Representa- 
tives for Trinity, and, upon the opening of the Legislature, was appointed 
Speaker of the House of Assembly. In the General Elections of 1885, his 
Party was defeated, but Fortune Bay stood by Mr. Bond, and he represented 
that constituency until the General Elections of 1889, when his Tarty was 
victorious at the Polls, and he was again elected Member for Trinity and 
entered the Cabinet with the Portfolio of Colonial Secretary. This orifice 
he held barring a short interval in 1894 until the General Elections of 
1897 when his Government was defeated. The District of Twillingats 
placed Mr. Bond at the head of the Poll, howeve.r, and his Party appointed 
him Leader of the Opposition. It was in that position that he so heroically 
opposed the now notorious Railway Contract of 1898, and subsequently 
carried the war into the constituencies. At the opening of the Legislature 
in 1900, upon a Want of Confidence vote, the Government was defeated, 
and His Excellency the Governor called upon Mr. Bond to form a Ministry, 
This he did, and having passed the Supply Bill, etc., the Legislature was 
prorogued and, in an appeal to the country, the Government was sustained 
by 32 out of a total of 36 Members. In 1904 the country again gave its 
endorsation to his Policy by returning 30 out of the 36 as his supporters/ 
Thus in twenty three years of political sunshine and shadow, Sir Robert 
has never known defeat at the Tolls, has spent almost two-thirds of his 
political life as ( oionial Secretary, and in his two appeals to the Electorate! 
as Premier, he has been returned by unprecedented majorities. 

His services away fiom home, as the Colony's Representative, can only 
be touched upon in passing. In 1890 he was one of a Delegation sent to 
London in defence of the rights of the Colony against the encroachments 
of the French. Fiom thence he went to Washington, with the concur- 
re;.ce of Lord Knutsfoid, to negotiate what is known as the Bond-Blaine 
Tre..ty, which owing to unwarrantable interference on the part of Canada 
was blocked. 

In 1894, after the closing of our Banks, he was one member of a Depu- 
tation to visit Ottawa in the interest of the Colony ; and when Canada 
failed to meet that Deputation in a generous spirit, in the darkest moment 
of oui" country's hisloiy, Mr. Bond was the man who volunteered to go on 
what appeared to many, if not to all, a hopeless mission : and though fol- 
lowed from place to place by damaging messages to the press from his 
country's deadly enemies, who tried to make success impossible, he suc j 
ceeded in obtaining the requisite funds and saved the credit of the Colony. 
By pledging his personal property as security, he secured a further loan to 
relieve the pressure on the Government Savings Bank, and returned horns 
the saviour of his country. From his grateful fellow-countrymen he 
received such a welcome as his great services merited. 

Nor has his Sovereign been slow in recognizing his worth to the Empire* 
Upon the visit of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Conv 
wall and York to Newfoundland, he was honoured with the badge at 
K. C. M.G. ; and in 1902, when representing the Colony at the Coronation 
of His Majesty King Edward VII., His Majesty piesented him with the 
Coronation Medal and mads him a Member of the Privy Council. Edhv 
burgh also honoured him with the Freedom of the City, and its University 
conferred upon him the Honorary Degree of LL.D. 

Such manifestation of confidence at home and recognition of merit abroad 
few indeed have enjoyed. If we may venture to offer an explanation, it is 
this : Sir Robert possesses ability of a high order, and all is placed unre j 
servedly at the disposal of his country. He toils for her welfare with a zeal 
and an enthusiasm that will brook neither weariness nor discouragement/ 
Like a knight of old, he stands to defend her against all her foes. He sees 
wrongs inflicted upon her by her enemies and says, "I will redress those! 
wrongs or spend my life in the attempt." He thinks and toil* most ardu- 
ously for Newfoundland because he loves her most intensely. With 
Shakspeare he can say, " I do love My country's good with a respect moro 
tender, More holy and profound, vhar. mine Own life." 



Rot the first Ratine premier. 

A GEKTLEMAK in Toronto has called our attention to an error which 
inadvertenly crept into tl.e October number of the QUARTERLY. There 
the writer referred to Sir R. Bond as the first native Premier. This, of 
course, was inconect, as duiing the fifty years of Responsible Government 
Newfoundlander have, at diffeient times, occupied that honourable posi- 
tion. Indeed, if we mistake not, Sir H. W. Hoyles who became Premier 
in 1861 was a native of the Colony. 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

Clx Catbolic Cburcl) ana tbc Britisb empire. 



(Concluded?) By Rev, 

NOW, the Protestants of Ireland insisted on the breaking 
of the Treaty of Limerick ; the penal laws which they 
passed would have been even baser and viler than they 
were but for the veto of the Imperial Government; and it 
was only by the Imperial Government exerting its utmost 
influence that the repeal of the penal laws was at last carried 
through the Irish Parliament. Everywhere else but in Ireland, 
the British word is regarded as an oath. Go where you will, to 
Egypt, to India, literally "from China to Peru," the native has 
unfaltering faith in the British word. In South America, the 
most solemn asseveration is " Parola Ing/ese" on the word of 
an Englishman. As I have heard a Frenchman say, " The 
English word carries to the end of the world." Nowhere have 
such tributes beerr paid to the English faith as in the United 
States. No man, I suppose, living under the English flag, 
could read without pride the poem in which an American poet 
celebrated the journey of a British trapper through Minnesota 
in 1862 when the Sioux were "up and on the shoot," and when 
" there warn't a livin' Yankee" would have "crossed them plains 
alone for a waggon load of gold." A British fur-trader on his 
way to Fort Garry came to St. Paul, and everybody warned him. 
" He only laffed and said he knowed the Injuns all his life, and 
he was goin' to mozey through and take along his wife. And 
she, you bet, was plucky, and said she'd go along." 
And, right a-top that creekin' cart 

Upon the highest rack, 
That trader nailed a bloomin' rag, 

An English Union Jack. 
So there he'd gone and done it, 

Ez stubbern ez a mule 
And knowin' fellers said we'd seen 

The last of that d fool. 
They wuzn't long upon the trail 

Before a band of Reds 
Got on their tracks, an' foller'd up, 

A-goin* to shave their heads. 
But when they seen that little flag 

A-stickin" on that catt, 
They jes' said, " Hudson Bay ! Go on, 

Good trader with good heart." 
And when they struck the river 

And took to their canoe, 
'Twas that thar bit of culler 

That seen them safely through. 
Fer there that cussed little rag 

Went floatin' through the State, 
A flappin' in the face of death 

And smilin' right at fate. 
That wuz the way them tarnal fools 
Crossed them thar' blazin' plains, 
An* floated down the windin' Red 

Through waves with bloody stains. 
What give that flag it's virtoo ? 
What's thar in red and blue, 
To make a man and woman dar' 

What others daren't do ? 
Jes' this an' Injuns know'd it 

That whar them cullers flew, 
The men that lived beneath them, 

Wuz mostly straight an' true; 

That when they made a bargain, 

'Twuz jes' as strong and tight 

As if 'twere drawn on sheep-skin 

An' signed in black and white. 



M. J. Ryan, Ph. D. 

That's how them Hudson tiaders done 

Fer mor'n two hundred year; 
That's why that trader feller crossed 

Them plains without a fear. 

***** 
But when the men beneath that flag 

Tries any monkey ways, 
Then, good-bye, old-time friendship, 

For Injuns gain' ter raise. 

"Monkey ways'" were tried in Ireland with results that every 
one can see, and that we all deplore. Plighted faith was broken, 
however the blame be distributed, and the Catholics were the 
sufferers. But I will only say that in my humble opinion, when 
any Irish Protestant having turned Nationalist, denounces the 
penal laws as the work of "England" that is, coming from such 
a one, the height of human impudence. England has to bear 
her share of the blame for consenting to that breach of faith ; 
the men who insisted on that breach were more guilty still, and 
their descendants, instead of throwing the sin off their fathers 
upon less culpable people, ought to be doing penance in sack- 
cloth and ashes. 

In 1776 the Presbyterians and Whig Episcopalians of Ireland 
were on the side of the American Revolution, while the Catholics 
where on the side of the Crown. Nothing is more noticeable in 
the correspondence of the Americans of that day than their ap- 
peals to the Protestants on the ground that the Papists were 
against them. That is a fact which it is all the more your duty 
to remember within the 'British Empire because it is so often 
brought up against the Irish in the United States. The rebellion 
of '98 was got up by the Ulster Presbyterians, and opposed by 
the Catholic Priests. In 1793, when it was found necessary to 
broaden the basis of government, Lord Clare proposed raising 
the Presbyterians to an equality with the Episcopalians and 
forming a solid Protestant party, and defying the Catholics. 
Pitt declared that the Catholics were more entitled than anyone 
else to concessions, and began to grant to them, together with 
the Presbyterians, some liberties. The Presbyterians were not 
grateful for partial concessions which left them on a level with 
the Catholics. There was a disappointed place-hunter, who had 
proposed to Pitt an expedition to plunder Spanish America. 
The gold Chalices and Crucifixes, alone, he said, would pay the 
expense. Finding himself treated with silent contempt this man, 
of whom O'Connell said that he ought to have been hanged by 
the Irish people if the government had neglected its duty, and 
whose career exemplifies the saying that " patriotism is the last 
refuge of a scoundrel, " founded the Society of United Irishmen 
in order to make the Catholics the tools of the Presbyterians and 
and both, the tools of his own revenge. Into what a frightful 
abyss of misery the unhappy people were drawn in spite of the 
Catholic Church and the Catholic gentry, this is no place to tell. 
It is better that it should be remembered by those who inflicted 
the atrocities than by those who endured them. It is sufficient 
to say that the Protestant government of Ireland were only re- 
strained by the Imperial government, from the last extremities 
and that when a member of the Imperial government defended 
them in the House of Commons against an attack, Pitt was so 
indignant that he got up and marched out of the House. 

In 1-800, the Catholic Bishops were all on the side of the 
Union, and brought man}' of their people over to the same side, 
for as one of them wrote, the government under which they 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



lived was worse than that of the Mamelukes. The Bishops saw 
clearly that the Union was the indispensable preliminary to re- 
form. It is the Union that has made possible Catholic emanci- 
pation, the disestablishment of the Protestant Church, the en- 
franchisement of the masses, the concession of local government, 
the transfer of the land from the smallest class to the largest. 
Catholic emancipation would never have 'been conceded by the 
Irish Protestants; they would have defied the people to rebel, 
knowing that the Imperial Government would have to suppress 
the rebellion for them. It is to the free entry to the British 
market that Ireland owes to the fact of an annual excess of ex- 
ports over imports. All this is no argument in favour of a cen- 
tralized union, because centralization is contrary to freedom 
though union is not. O'Connell, even during the Repeal agita- 
tion, wrote that he would prefer a federal arrangement, and he 
privately urged the Whig leaders to proffer some policy that he 
could accept instead of the one he had taken up. 

In 1830 many opponents of Catholic emancipation actually 
voted for O'ConnelPs party out of revenge against their own. 
In 1848, a Protestant landlord, who had opposed the repeal 
(even during the famine) of that old Corn Law which (in Ire- 
land at least) enriched his own class at the expense of the com- 
muqity, placed himself at the head of a rising. In 1869, the 
Orangemen threatened to kick the Crown into the Boyne if their 
Church were disestablished ; and Episcopalians, out of revenge 
reorganized the Home Rule movement (dead for twenty years) 
and gave it a leader. This was to take away the Catholic vote 
from the Liberal Party, and to teach the English people that 
justice in Ireland would make more enemies than friends. At 
the general election of 1874, in spite of the utmost exertions of 
the Catholic Priesthood, the Liberals "were defeated in most 
districts. When this work was done, most of the Protestants 
deserted Home Rule and went back to Toryism. It was a Pro- 
testant leader who brought the Home Rule Party into alliance 
with the American Clan-na-Gael. I cannot profess any admira- 
tion for those Catholics whose " passionate unreason" has 
always made them, in spite of the Church, the dupes and tools 
of their enemies. 

The Catholic Church has assuredly no sympathy with the 
principle of nationality. It is in her eyes immoral and in it she 
recognises her worst enemy. She is essentially an international 
Church. She believes that all the disciples of Christ through- 
out the world should be bound up in one communion with a 
central government sufficiently strong to control the disintegrat- 
ing force of national antipathies, and to sustain the independence 
of her local branches against alike the civil magistrate and the 
mob. She knows that Donatism, Nestorianism, Monophytism, 
the Schism of the East, and Protestantism all made way by ap- 
pealing to nationality and to a so-called patriotism. She fears 
that Nationality in Ireland might be directed against Rome. 
She has not forgotten that Henry VIII. was able, after his 
breach with Rome, to obtain the title of King of Ireland, that 
the Irish Chieftains acknowledged him as Head of the Church, 
and that he was able to boast that if the Pope succeeded in com- 
bining France and Spain against him, the Irish would stand by 
him. And yet the Irish are said to be naturally disloyal ! Even 
in civil affairs the Church regards the principle of nationality as 
wrong. The inhabitants of Switzerland are Germans, French, 
and Italians. But they owe allegiance to the Swiss State and 
'to no other state, actual or capable of being created. The in 
habitants of Austria are Germans, Slavs, and Italians ; but they 
are bound in conscience to the Austrian Crown, and Italia 
irridenta is an immoral cry. But though the Church does not 



embrace the principle of nationality, the Irish bishops feel that 
Justice entitles their people to a large measure of local self-gov- 
ernment, and that their training in county government has made 
them fitter than they were in 1886. Nor is the principle of na- 
tionality any part of Liberalism ; for it has shown -itself com- 
patible with injustice and tyranny in Hungary and in the Trans- 
vaal, and with slavery in the Transvaal and in the nation which 
Jeff Davis made. Assuredly I am not implying, what I do not , 
think, that the Irish Nationalists are disposed to oppress any 
one, but only that the principle of nationality is not a security 
against tyranny. 

Now, it would be very absurd to blame the 'Catholic Church 
for the doings of extreme men, like Mr. Davitt, who has, been 
stirring up the Nonconformists against the Education Act on 
the ground that it puts education in the hands of priests,- while 
he has been writing to American papers that he opposes it 
because it takes education out of the hands of priests, and, who 
has been pointing out to the Nonconformists that they could 
deprive the Catholic religion of all representation in the House 
of Commons by repealing the Union. Is it riot very ridiculous 
that the Catholic Church should be blamed for the actions or 
intentions of a man who has denounced the Episcopate and the 
Vatican so fiercely for their opposition to Socialism that on one 
occasion the priests of the United States warned him to leave 
this country or they would denounce him from every altar. 
Nothing is commoner among the Clan-na-Gael than the saying : 
" But for the Clericals we could get up a rebellion." 

On the other hand, it were well if Catholics, would always re- 
member that there is a certain amount of prejudice ; that they 
are gravely responsible before God if they create prejudice 
against the Catholic religion and avert men's hearts from it by 
identifying it with anything that wears the appearance of dis- 
loyalty to an Empire in which almost every grievance has been 
removed, in which there is a fair chance of removing those that 
remain, and in which the worst-governed province is as well 
governed as the best-governed province of any other power. 
And having given this advice to my fellow-Catholics, I will now 
venture to ask those of my Protestant fellow-countrymen who 
may be good enough to read this, whether they do not think 
that the Catholics are quite as loyal to the British Empire as 
Protestants would be to a Catholic Empire? Personally, I 
think they are more so, tor Catholicism has a principle of 
obedience and pure Protestantism has not. 



Foreoer and Foroer. 

By Daniel Carroll. 

A SUN-KISSED wave stole up the beach one day, 
The while his Mother Ocean gently slept ; 
Along the pebbled strand in laughter swept 

And kissed a rose-lipped shell, and stole away. 



Long years have passed and many a storm has flung 
The wrecks of gallant ships that beach upon ; 
But ever in the shell's deep heart rings on 

The music which that laughing wave had sung. 



And thus it is, sometimes from life's dull sea, 
A joy-lit wave shall swell our souls to claim, 
And teach our hearts the music of a name 

That fills our lives thro' all the years to be. 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Poultrp farming, ana fiou> to l))akc it Pap. 



By E. A. Elgee, P.S., A.D.C. 



VERY many people keep poultry, but few understand them. 
They probably imagine it pays them, but they will have 
no figures of expenditure and receipts to prove it. They 
may be keeping a dozen good laying hens and a dozen 
bad ones and quite forget that the latter cost just as much 
to keep as the former, and that, if they had been killed at 
first for table purposes, their profits would have been much 
larger. " Trap-nests" to find out the regular layers are all im- 
portant to chicken farmers. Egg production has now become a 
science, and England, who is the largest importer of eggs of any 
country, has begun to realize that there are profits to be made 
in this connection, provided that .proper attention is given to 
such details of management as are contained in this article. 
Now, if a profit can be made in the Mother Country by poultry 
farmers, how much more ought one to be obtained by those in 
' Newfoundland, where the price of eggs is far higher and food- 
stuff cheaper, if anything? In St. John's, in the non-laying 
months, fresh laid eggs vary from 50 to 60 cents per dozen, and 
in the summer months from 20 to 30 cents. In England, in 
country districts, r they seldom fetch more than 40 cents in the 
winter and 15 cents in summer. It has been estimated that in 
1903 the value of eggs and poultry produced in Great Britain 
has increased during the last fifteen years in value by .2,000,- 
ooo, sterling. This means that poultry are now receiving that 
scientific treatment which has always been accorded to other 
farm stock, and it is from the experiences of business men 
engaged in the trade that the following notes are gathered. 

There are endless causes of disease amongst poultry, chief 
among them being Damp, Draughty Houses, Filth and Care- 
less Breeding. The two last mentioned are the most danger- 
ous of all and the most easily , remedied. Isolate at once 
those who show signs of sickness, or if they are not valuable 
birds kill them, It will be cheaper in the end. Appoplexy can 
rarely be cured. The best remedy observed is as follows : 
Open the large vein under the wing and hold the bird's head 
under a cold water tap for a minute or two; then, if it shows 
signs of recovery, feed it sparingly for a few days on soft, light 
food no hard grain and a dose of five grains of Bromide of 
Potassium each day. Bronchitis is the result of exposure to 
cold, wet weather and draughts. Isolate all such subjects in a 
warm, dry, draughtless house and dose them with one drop of 
tincture of Aconite three times a day. Gapes is very similar to 
Bronchitis and hard to distinguish. Try first Bronchitis treat- 
ment and if not successful, then feed them by hand with a warm 
mash, not sloppy, but a crumbly mixture composed of three parts 
scalded bran, one part cooked lean meat, and one part each of" 
boiled linseed meal with plenty of r green food and grit of some 
kind. In obstinate cases fumigate the patients with a little 
Eucalyptus oil on a hot shovel; this will make them cough, but 
will do them a great deal of good. In the case of Colds or, in- 
deed, illness of any kind isolate the bird at once. A good 
preventitive of -colds is to put- a small piece of camphor in each 
drinking trough, only on no account must the water be allowed 
to dry up or the ca.mpher will evaporate and your labour be 
wasted ; and to add a little ground ginger to the soft food. Con- 
stipation can be cured by a dose of from ten to thirty grains of 
Epsom salts in warm water on an empty stomach and a green 
food diet. Cramp, like apoplexy, comes from over-feeding or 
from too much fatty matter. To cure, soak the legs in hot mus- 
tard water and, when quite warm, rub dry, and then anoint them 
first with turpentine and afterwards with vaseline. When the 
bird seems to be always trying to^ swallow something, one must 
treat for Crop Disease a teaspoonful of Magnesia in hot water 
in first instance and, afterwards, a diet of boiled bran and 
boiled linseed meal fed by hand, with plenty of green food. 

Diarrhoea can usually be stopped by giving one meal of well- 
boiled rice, strained very dry, over which a little powdered chalk 
has been sprinkled. Dropsy, which arises from damp, frost 
bite, etc., rarely occurs when the birds have plenty of exercise 



and have to hunt for their food. A dose of castor oil and food 
composed of green stuff and lean meat will cure. 

Feather Eating is the result of confinement and insufficient 
green food, frost Bite makes the combs black. Light airy, warm 
and dry quarters with plenty of green food is the remedy. Their 
combs may be dressed with the following ointment : Vaseline 
3, Glycerine 2, and Turpentine l /z table-spoonful. 

Scaly Leg is very infectious and easily cured by rubbing the 
legs with kerosene, and when the oil has soaked in, with strong 
sulphur ointment. Isolate the birds. 

To prevent all the above mentioned diseases, observe the fol- 
lowing rules. Give your poultry light, airy quarters and scratch- 
ing sheds. Vary their food. Use plenty of green food, oyster 
shell and grit. Regularly sweep out and lime-wash occasionally 
their houses and see that their nests are kept clean. 

HOUSING OK POULTRY. 

Over-crowding is the greatest drawback to the production of 
eggs. It has been proved that a farmer may keep about thirty 
hens about the homestead profitably ; but if he increases the 
number, without change of method, to one hundred his returns 
will be proportionately lessened and the birds will suffer from 
disease. From experiments it has been found that flocks of 
twenty-five hens, when kept separated, give a higher average of 
eggs than when they are massed together in larger numbers. 
The explanation is, that in the latter case they do not get suffi- 
cient fresh air at roost. It may be mentioned that in F.ngland 
moist poultry manure is worth about Sio per ton, and that 
twenty-four hens, under ordinary conditions, will yield a ton of 
this during the year. To secure this amount it is essential that 
the manure shall be well distributed over the land. The plan 
oi portable houses, which are easily made, has been found most 
conducive to this end, and in addition they can be built to 
accommodate flocks of twenty-five. The best models are 
on wheels, and can be disconnected so as to rest firmly in the 
ground when in position. Perches should all be on the same 
level, not more than two feet from the ground and facing the win- 
dows. Nest boxes should be on the dark side of the house. 
One nest box is necessary for every three hens, and a scratching 
shed sheltered from bad weather, as in North America, by 
oiled muslin curtains which can be hung up against the roof 
when not in use and suspended in front during snow storms. 
Peat moss litter is an excellent covering for the ground as it in- 
creases their warmth. 

THE BEST LAYING BREEDS. 

All breeds of hens lay well in spring and summer, but the 
object of the poultry farmer is to get a good winter supply of 
eggs when the prices are double those obtainable in the summer. 
Large householders in St. John's would be probably willing to pay 
twenty cents per dozen in the summer months and forty-five 
cents during five non-laying months for a regular supply. Com- 
pareuthese prices with the fifteen cents and forty cents obtainable 
in England and you can judge for yourselves the prospects of a 
successful keeper. Now as to the Breed ! Non-sitting hens, 
such as the Leghorns, are the most prolific in the course of the 
year, but the general purpose or sitting breeds are the best 
Winter Layers. Amongst the most popular of these breeds may 
be mentioned the Plymouth Rock, Wyandots, Orpington, 
Faverolle and Langshan, and, when' -kept under favourable con- 
ditions, fowls of an) one of these breeds can be depended upon 
for a regular supply of winter eggs. 

The " Strain" of a fowl is of as much importance as the breed. 
The great American Egg Farmers have actually built up strains 
of hens to lay 200 and even 250 eggs per annum in a very few 
years. The methods employed are as follows : A record of the 
egg-laying capacity of each fowl of the flock is kept by means 
of a " trap-nest." The best layers are then selected to mate 
with cockerels which have been raised in the previous year from 



8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY, 



pedigree layers. This is common sense the breeding of pro- 
ducers together to secure producers. The laws of inheritance 
and transmission are the same with birds as with cattle, sheep, 
and horses. Pullets to replace part of the old stock should be 
raised so as to be ready to lay at the opening of the winter. 
The different breeds vary in this respect. Leghorns and 
Minorcas start laying at about five months, whilst pullets of the 
larger breeds do not begin until they are seven or eight months. 
Pullets that commence laying in June or July and moult in 
October (i.e. those hatched in January or February) are spoiled 
for winter laying, whilst if they are hatched too late and if they 
do not belong to an early maturing breed they cannot be in- 
duced to lay in winter and will only start with the approach of 
Spring. The most productive period of a hen's life is between 
the age of six and eighteen months and it is a general axiom 
amongst modern poultry keepers to get rid of laying hens at one 
and a half years and to replace them by six months old pullets. 
This may be modified to the extent of clearing them off at two 
and a half years. The net earnings of laying hens in England 
and at English Prices are calculated as follows : ist year, $1.50 ; 
2nd year 90 cents, and in the third year the profits would be 
very small as the bulk of the eggs would be laid in the spring 
and summer. 

The Housing of the Hens duiing the Winter Months is of the 
utmost importance. The roosting house should be well built, with 
a solid foundation, dry floor, roofs and walks proof against damp 
and current of cold air. It should be well lighted and ventilated 
and to each bird the space of about ten cubic feet ought to be 
allowed. In the day time they should have a scratching shed 
as described above, so that they can get daily exercise, and the 
floor should be well littered with chaff or mill-dust, etc., in which 
should be buried or raked a large proportion of the unground 
corn which is fed to the hens every day. A busy hen is healthy 
and a good layer. 

WINTER FEEDING OF LAYING HENS. 

No matter how long the inherent instinct to lay may be, and 
it is not very strong in the depth of winter, the hen cannot pro- 
duce eggs if she is not supplied with suitable food, and the ques- 
tion is what foods or combination of foods can be advantageously 
and economically fed to promote winter laying ? It is certain 
that the profits will be light if the feeding for winter eggs consists 
of corn or meals made from corn alone for they are not suffi- 
ciently nitrogenous, and do not supply the proper materials for 
forming an egg unless they are used in combination with foods 
such as milk, ground bone, clover and other vegetables. It is 
believed that the reason why hens lay so well in spring and 
summer is not because the weather is mild, but because they 
generally have a free run and access to foods such as grains, 
clover, weeds, worms and insects. However the results of 
experiments seem to prove that the following is the best Kegime 
to promote winter laying. In the morning about nine o'clock, 
when the fowls have come from the roosting house to the ad- 
joining scratching shed, they are fed with a few handfuls of 
cracked Indian Corn scattered in the litter and they busy them- 
selves seeking for this until about eleven o'clock, when they are 
fed a full feed of mash as much as they will eat up from troughs 
in half an hour. Make the mash in this way : 30 Ibs. of finely- 
cut clover hay is steamed and mixed with 20 Ibs. of barley 
meal, 20 Ibs. of Indian meal, 20 Ibs. of bran, 10 Ibs. of cut green 
bone, and enough skim milk to form the whole into a stiff mash. 
This is mixed a few hours before it is required for use and is 
fed warm at the time mentioned. At mid-day a small quantity 
of wheat is fed in the litter of the scratching shed not enough 
to make a meal, but sufficient to keep the birds busily employed 
until evening, when they are fed with whole grain about an hour 
before roosting time. It isadviseable to feed a variety of grains, 
not mixed together but one on each evening; wheat, indian corn, 
oats, barley and sunflower seeds have been found to be good 
foods for promoting winter laying. The object of varying their 
diet is to keep the body in good health and in good condition for 
the formation of the eggs that the hens are expected to lay. 

The following notes may be interesting to those who would 
wish to preserve or " pickle " their eggs for use in the season 
when they would fetch the greatest price. Waterglass, which is a 
solution of silicate of soda, is perhaps the best and it can be 



obtained in a concentrated form. Eggs for preservation should 
be treated as soon as possible after they are laid but not until 
they have been cooled. An egg has a greater food value when 
twenty-four hours old than when it is a week old. Eggs from hens 
with full liberty and fed chiefly upon grain have been found to 
keep better than others. Again infertile eggs keep better than 
those containing a living germ. Preserved eggs sho'uld be kept 
in a cellar, preferably, where the temperature is not more than 
forty-five degrees (Fahrenheit) or less than thirty-three degrees. 
The best months for preserving are March, April, May and June. 
" Summer Eggs" do not keep so well. A bad egg can easily be 
told by holding it between a strong light and the eye. All dark 
eggs, or those showing spots or black shadows, are bad. 

ARTIFICIAL HATCHING OF CHICKENS. 

In America and England huge plants are to be found, where 
30,000 to 40,000 birds are hatched out. And on account of the 
greater variations in temperature of the former country, it will 
be best to follow the methods employed there. Incubator houses 
are partly under ground, and so a cellar would be the best place 
in Newfoundland : but it must be well ventilated and sweet. 
Now as to the incubators. Much controversy has arisen as to 
the relative merits of tank and hot air machines, and ,it is inter- 
esting to know that, from most exhaustive trials of both, there 
has been found little difference in their respective merits. In 
this Colony the tank incubator would probably be the best, as it 
has the advantage of being able to meet great variations in tem- 
perature. Two lessons learnt from the above trials are, (i) 
Better results are obtained when the incubator is not packed 
with eggs to its full capacity ; (2) The better the ventilation the 
better the results. The tank machines used were Hearson's 
Champion and Tamlin's Non-Pareil, and there is very little to 
chose between them. 

POULTRY FATTENING. 

Before closing this article, mention should be made of a very 
paying industry in connection with poultry keeping, viz. : poultry 
cramming. The three systems most known are roughly (i) to 
keep birds without exercise and to allow them to feed on fatten- 
ing food; (2) to cram them by hand with pellets of mash moist- 
ened in skim milk, and (3) to cram them by means of a cram- 
ming machine which, with the aid of an india rubber tube, injects 
into the crop of the bird a mash similar to that employed in 
No. 2, but in a semi-liquid form. The subjoined table will show 
the effect of the different methods. It should be mentioned that 
the " cramming" was only employed the last ten days, and with 
Lot No. 3. 



Lot 
No. 


No. of 
Turkey 
Cockerels 


Weight 
on 
Nov. 20. 


Weight 
on 
Dec. 5. 


Weight 
on 
Dec. 15. 


Total 
Increase 
in 21 days. 


Average 
Increase 
in 2 1 days. 






Ibs. 


Ibs. oz. 


Ibs. oz. 


Ibs. oz. 


Ibs. oz. 


I 


10 


170 


189 8 


198 o 


28 


2 12 


2 


10 


171 


191 o 


205 o 


34 


3 6 


3 


IO 


170 


190 o 


212 8 


42 8 


4 4 



From the above it will be seen what an advantage the machine 
has over other methods. It can be employed with hens (how- 
ever old) even to more advantage than with turkeys, and, in 
addition, is not expensive. Any body interested to see the 
machine at work and to obtain any information, with regard to 
price, etc., should apply to the writer of this paper. 



BLOW, blow, March winds, blow ! 

Blow us April, if you please, 
Blow away the .cold white snow, 

Blow the leaves out on the trees. 
Blow the ice from off the brooks, 

Set their merry waters free ; 
Blow dead leaves from woodsy nooks 

Show the violets to me. 
Do all this, 'twill be but play : 
Then please blow yourself away. 








I'AIT. CLARKE. 



S. S. ROSALIM! RKI) (ROSS LINE. 



ClK Red Cross One 

Sailing Between 

Dew Jtork, Halifax, IX s. t and st 30^% D. 

IRessrs. Baroep $ Co., flgents for Returoundland. 




CAPT. FARRKI.L. 




S. S. SILVIA RED CROSS LINE. 



ll 




From t/ic Reid'NfK'fnnndland L'o'sl\ 



BURIN. 



[Co Ik 'ft 'ion of Photos. 




Front the Reid- Newfoundland Co's.~\ 



HOLYROOD. 



{Collection of Pan i>s. 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Deutfoundland Dante-Core. 

By Most Rev. M. F. How ley, D.D. 



XII. 



Southward from C. Freels we encounter two im- 
portant names which, no doubt have a history, but I have 
no information concerning them. These are Greet? s Pond 
^t and Pool Island and Harbor. The former name is of 
great antiquity. We find it first appearing (as far as my 
knowledge goes) on the map of Hermann Moll ( 1735). It was 
a place of importance, having a court of justice as far back as 
1784. Pool's Island and Harbor may very probably have re- 
ceived its name from some of the West Country planters or 
merchants from Poolc, the well-known seaport of Dorsetshire, 
from which pl.ice came many of our old-time merchants, such 
as the Spuniers, Slades, and others. 

Coming Southward from Green's Pond we find, in Bonavista 
Bay, a harbour and island named Trinity, but as this is but a 
little known place, I \\ill pass it by at present so as not to cause 
confusion with the well-known capital of the Grand B.iy of 
Trinity. The Island of Cottel's, now called St. Brendan's, has 
already been alluded to and fully discussed in Article No. II. of 
this series. At the bottom of Bonavista Bay, there are two long 
indrafts or " Sounds." The more southerly one i.s named 

" CI.ODK SOUND," 

the meaning of which name I do not know up to the present 
time. The more northerly is called " Freshwater Bay," a trite 
name. But there flows into this sound, the 

CAMHO RIVKR, 

out of Gambo Pond. In Article VIII., while tracing the origin 
of the name " Njtre D.ime B.iy," I stated my belief that it is a 
torruption of the old name " Baia de las G im.is" the Bay of 
the Does, or female deer, a name which appears on our oldest 
maps. 1 think it quite probable that tl.is name of Gambo is but 
a corrupt foim of this name. 

Coning to.virJj tiia so'jtlisr.i s!urj of Bja.ivista Bay, we 
mjjt with srns names of histori; significance. I am indebted 
tj Mr. 'M. A. Devine, Editor of the Trade Review, for much 
valuable information concerning King's Core and its neigh- 
borhood. 

PLATE COVE 

is most probably named from the formation of the land around 
the harbour. It slopes up gradually all round, something after 
the shape of a dish or soup-plate. It is this same idea which 
suggested to the French the name of Tasse dt L 1 Argent, (cup, 
or bowl, or dish, of silver) in Placentia Bay. ' The same idea 
suggested the name of the Punch-bowl or the " Devil's Punch- 
bowl," a name common in Ireland and elsewhere. It may be 
also remarked that the French name for flat or level \sp/atte. 
Thus the "flat islands" in Placentia B.iy are marked on French 
maps as " Les lies Plattes." 

To the North East of Plate Cove lies 

OPEN HALL. 

This place was formerly called Open Hole, but it has been 
changed to its present name, partly (or euphony, and partly to 
commemorate the lavish hospitality of the Shears's and the 
Long's of sixty years ago, who were the fishermen-princes of 
the place. The descendants of these worthy old planters who 



occupy the place to-day have lost nothing of the geniality and 
hospitality of their ancestors. 

Rounding " Western Head" we come to the well known 
harbour of 

KEELS. 

We find this name on very old maps. On some (e.g. Michael 
Lok, 1 582) it is given in Latin as Carenas, afterwards corrupted 
into C. (Cape) Arenas. On Cook's map, 1775, '* seems to oc- 
cupy the place of King's Cove, which latter name is not given. 
Keels is supposed to be called from the pieces of timber found 
there in the early days, which are supposed to have been parts 
of the keels of Norwegian barks lost in the neighborhood long 
before the days of Columbus or (Jabot. Bishop Mullock in his 
' Lectures on Newfoundland" (p. 6.) says: " * * * It is very 
improbable that so many accounts of voyages would be pre- 
served, the names of the discoverers and navigators : the birth 
of some of the children recorded : the wreck of one of their 
ships on Keelerness, Kell, Cape, or Ship Cove, and the locality 
marked, out, now Keels in Bonavista Bay . . . if it all were 
the work of imagination." Since this was written (1860) the 
authenticity of the Norse voyages has been placed beyond doubt 
by the discovery of ihe Sagas, and briefs from the Vatican 
Library. The identification, however, of Keels in Bonavista 
Bay has not been so clearly proved. The origin of the name 
Kialarness (keel nose, or promontory) is thus given in the Saga 
of Eric Ruacl (the red). " The next summer, (being A.D. 1004) 
'.' Thorvalcl with a portion of his company, in the great ship, 
." coasted along the eastern shore, and passed round the land 
' to the northward. They were then driven by a storm against 
' a neck of land, and the ship was stranded ; the keel was 
" damaged. Remaining here for some time, they repaired their 
" ship. Then Thorvald said to his companions : Now let us 
" fix up the keel on this neck of land, and let us call the place 
" Kialarness." 

About four and a half miles south of Keels, and half mile 
north of King's Cove there is a small cove or gulch named 

' OAK-STICK. GULCH." 

It is so named from a large oak balk, firmly fixed in a fissure of 
the cliff just above high-water-mark. This stick has certainly 
been there for over 150 years. It is said by the old folk to be 
part of the cargo of a vessel lost there in what is known as 
" Pymer's Gale," the date of which is not certain. The stick is 
quite sound to-day. Mr. Devine has a paper cutter made from 
the wood of it. The" balk is so firmly imbedded in the cliff that 
it is impossible to remove it. We now come to King's Cove. 

KING'S COVE. 

The inhabitants of this" town are strong advocates of its great 
antiquity and historic importance. They firmly believe that it 
was the first landing place of Cabot, who called it " King's 
Cove or Royal Port" in honor of his generous (?) patron, the 
Tudor Monarch, Henry VII., who rewarded him by the dona- 
tion of " io/. to hym that found the new isle." It is the only 
safe harbour between Bonavista Cape and Plate Cove, and " if 
Cabot steered into Bonavista Bay at all, and kept the shore in 
view to port," he must have fetched up at King's Cove. At all 
events King's Cove is known to be one of the earliest settled 
parts of the Island. James McBraier, Esq., founder of the 
Benevolent Irish Society, did business there in 1800. 

t M. F. HOWLEY. 



10 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



CDc educational Outlook in Dcutfoundland. 



By Rev. L. Curtis, M.A., D.D. 



0R. WILLIAM JAMES, Professor of Philosophy at Har- 
vard University, has said that he looks forward with no 
little confidence to the day when the United States of 
America will lead the education of the world. He bases 
is expectation largely upon their exceptionally fine com- 
mon school system, the independence of their colleges 
and universities, and the happy relationship which each class of 
schools sustains to the others. Dr. James is no mere dreamer ; 
he is a philosopher and a logician, and his words should not be 
regarded as ordinary American spread-eagleism. He argues 
that as their present educational conditions are probably the 
best in the world, the fruits of those conditions should be cor 
respondingly satisfactory. If his premise be correct, we cannot 
object to his conclusion. Indeed, in all such reasoning, the cue 
to our expectations of the future should be the conditions of the 
present, unless some modifying circumstance is anticipated. 

In considering therefore the educational outlook in New- 
foundland we must start with things as they are. The question 
then is, what of our present educational condition ? Is it in all 
respects satisfactory ? And may we reasonably claitn,that ad- 
vancing along the same lines a great future awaits us? Terence 
used to say, " So many men, so many minds. Every man in 
his own way." One can only reason from his own point of 
outlook and reach his own conclusions. And to begin with, it 
is worthy of notice that not a single condition upon which Dr. 
James based his expectations of a great future for American 
education, obtains in this Colony. We have not what is known 
as common schools ; we have not what may be regarded as 
independent higher educational institutions. We have the 
denominational system of education and, presumably, to stay. 
For weal or woe we have reached a time in the history of the 
world when King Demos rules. Even the Czar of all the Rus- 
sias is obliged to bow to the will of the people, or take the con- 
sequences; and the remembrance of the fate of his father will 
probably have its due effect. And so. far as outward and visible 
signs may be taken as evidence, King Demos has willed that 
the demoninational system of education shall obtain in this 
Colony. No Government could survive that would attempt to 
make a change without a mandate from the people ; and there 
is at present absolutely no indication that any such mandate 
will be given. Our outlook for the future of education in this 
Colony, therefore, must be from the denominational standpoint. 
In view of this fact, it is cause for genuine satisfaction that a 
word of commendation can be spoken concerning the work that 
is being done by not a few of the schools of the Colony. Indeed, 
one of the most remarkable features of the history of the Colony 
during the past ten years is the progress of education. The 
English examiners for the Council of Higher Education, in 
1901, bore voluntary testimony to this fact in the following 
words: " We have again conducted examinations for the New- 
" foundland Council of Higher Education, and whether it is the 
" influence of these examinations or not, we certainly do find 
" the standard of Education in that Colony has enormously im- 
" proved since we first conducted them there seven years ago." 
There is no reason whatever to doubt that this statement is cor- 
rect and that much of the progress made is due to the operations 
of the C. H. E. Nor have we any reason to suppose that the 
improvement will not continue. Indeed the records of the 



C. H. E. indicate a very decided advance in numbers almost 
every year. In 1900 there was a total of 686 passes; in 1901, 
708; in 1902, 829; in 1903, 804; and in 1904, 866; and the 
improvement in the quality of the work has doubtless kept pace 
with the increase in the number of passes. From facts and 
figures available from the records of the C. H. E, alone, 
therefore, it can be seen that the outlook educationally is bright 
with promise. 

And then it must be remembered that a new and important 
feature has recently been introduced into our school work ; I 
refer to Manual Training. There are, it seems to me, splendid 
possibilities for the boys of the future in this new departure. 
To the casual observer, the value of Manual Training is usually 
estimated by the safety, ease and efficiency with which boys are 
trained to handle tools. And were there nothing more than 
this in that training, it certainly would be of great value as a 
supplement to tl.e store of knowledge obtained from books. 
But this is, in reality, not the most important advantage. To 
the psychologist, the principal value of Manual Training is 
found in the increase of intellectual power obtained by a devel- 
opment of a part of the brain, which but for this would remain 
uncultivated. So that when the system of Manual Training be- 
comes general which let us hope is not far distant the boys 
of Newfoundland will enjoy the advantages of an intellectual 
equipment hitherto unknown in the Colony. 

But when everything possible has been said in favor of the 
work that is being and will be accomplished, it is impossible 
not to entertain the opinion that the educational outlook would 
be more hopeful had we a different system. The fact is we 
have in Newfoundland denominationalism run to weeds. Take 
as an illustration the grant for Manual Training. The total 
vote of $3,000 is sub-divided on the per cap ut basis, as follows: 
Roman Catholic, $1,038.07; Church of England, $997.35; 
Methodist, $838.61; Salvation Army, $90.08; Presbyterian, 
$20.45; Congregational, $13.03; others, $2.41; and so with 
regard to every grant, large or small, made for any department 
of educational work. And the tendency is to increase the 
number. Until 1901, the Salvation Army grant was used by 
Protestant schools in operation in their localities ; but since that 
time, they operate separate schools. And if other religious 
teachers should drift to our shores, such as Dunkards, Mennon- 
ites or Shakers, and prevail upon enough of our weak-minded 
people to join them, we should forthwith have still further 
divisions of these grants. 

Now from the stand-point of educational efficiency can any- 
thing be more absurd ? And yet, this is the foundation upon 
which Newfoundland is trying to erect an educational structure 
in the twentieth century ! The weakness resulting from these 
manifold divisions is felt to some extent throughout the entire 
system ; though in places where Superior Schools are possible 
it is not so manifest as elsewhere. It is in places where schools 
of the lowest grade exist that it is most keenly felt to-day, though 
we are nearing a time when its effects will be manifest also at 
the highest end of the ladder. In small places where two or 
three schools operate at a poor dying" rate for two or three 
months each, instead of one efficient school for the whole year, 
the evil ot the system speaks for itself; and yet, although there 
are scores of such places in the Colony, the provision of the 
Act for Amalgamated Schools is almost entirely ignored. Need- 
less to say, hundreds of the children of those settlements are 
doomed to comparative ignorance. 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



1 1 



At the upper end of the ladder, the weakness will t be increas- 
ingly felt in the lack of an institution for advanced work. We 
have to-day three Colleges doing effective class work to the 
standard of university matriculation. This seems to be the ex- 
tent for which available funds enable them to provide suitable 
staff and equipment; and, indeed, for this work, additional 
income would be very welcome. 

Now it cannot be denied that were provision made for a year 
or two of university work, not a few who seek that training in 
other lands would obtain it at home, and others who at present 
see nothing beyond the A.A. of the C. H. E. or University 
Matriculation, and leave school, would gladly continue their 
studies. But what are the prospects for this in existing circum- 
stances? Is it conceivable that the Legislature will make large 
grants for university training on denominational lines while every 
class of existing institutions, from the colleges to the lowest 
schools, is in need of additional funds, and clamoring for them? 
To my mind it is absolutely inconceivable. It is extremely 
doubtful indeed whether, even with all denominations uniting 
upon the subject and agreeing to support one such institution, 
it would be wise for the Legislature to assume any considerable 
part of the financial obligations, while the need of improved 
general education is so pressing. The percentage of university 
students in the most favoured countries is very small ; and it is 
a safe and wise, as well as generally accepted, principle that 
large public expenditure should benefit the many rather than 
the few. As a rule institutions of higher learning are provided 
and largely sustained by men of wealth. But whatever hope 
there may be for such an institution if all unite, there would 
seem to be none, at present certainly, apart from united effort. 
Whether therefore our educational outlook be considered from 
the standpoint of advanced education or elementary schools, 
some modification of our present system seems necessary if the 
pressing needs of Newfoundland boys and girls are to be met. 



In Ifletnoriam. 



[OUR many countrymen abroad will have heard with regret of the death 
of MRS. ROGERSON, lovingly and familiarly known under the nom de plume 
of " Isabella." The deceased lady was of the good old Whiteford family, 
sister of the late James and William Whiteford, and shared with them the 
esteem and regard of Newfoundlanders of all classes and creeds. The 
deceased lady was gifted with more than ordinary ability as a " singer of 
sweet strains," and her pen and voice were ever at the service of New- 
foundland, and everything calculated to raise or advance her interests. In 
seasons of joy, as at the glad Christmas times, or in times of sorrow or 
death, the pent-up feelings of the people found vent in the songs of Isabella. 
Many a sorrowing home was brightened by her musical messages of cheer 
and hope, and faith in the Great Creator. Her kindness and sympathy 
could always be relied on by the local journals, and the QUARTERLY, on 
several occasions, had the pleasure of delivering her messages to its 
readers. It is meet now that we, joining in sympathy with the many who 
mourn her, give voice to her Requiem in the accompanying verses, a 
pleasing tribute to the dead poetess from the pen of one of the most gifted 
of our younger writers.] 

By Daniel Carroll. 
IT moves along the city street, 
A cortege sad, and in its train 
The leaders of the land ; 
There, men of toil with toilers meet, 

And in hushed accents, once again, 
With many a tribute fair, they tell 
How long they knew her, and how well, 
This gifted child of Newfoundland, 

The poetess, Isabel. 
****** 

" What form is this which cleaves the clear, , 

Blue Heaven, and comes on joyous wings ? 

What other form unto him clings ?" 
An angel asks his angel peer. 

And clear as peal from silver bell, 
Across the ether space it rings, 
An answer to those questionings : 

" From Earthly woes escaped I come ; 

I bear a sweet, strong singer Home 

The poetess Isabel." 
St. John's, Feb. 6, 1905. 



Cbe Dead Singers, 



By Newfoundlander (in U. S. A.) 

' Christ save us all from a death like this." 

The Wreck of the Hesperus,. 

FOUR young men cousins had gone shooting sea-birds, 
in Conception Bay, many years ago. 'Twas a lovely calm 
morning when they started, but suddenly a blizzard sprang 
up. Skipper George Barbury, the father of two of the boys and 
uncle of the others, tells how his eldest son, after battling in 
vain with the tempest, " gave hisself up to his God an' laid 
<; down and put his tired arms round his brother, an' so ... 
" there was four dead men in their boat waitin' on the Beach o' 
" Broad Cove, tull some one 'ould come an' take their poor 
" bodies an' strip away the ice from 'em an' put 'em in the 
" ground, .that comes more natural, in a mariner, sir, . . . 
" People that lived on Bell Isle h'ard si;.-!.;' goin' by in the 
" dark, like chantin' we have in the Church. They said 'twas 
" beautiful, comiir up an' dyun aw'y, an' so goin' \\i' the wind. 
: It's very like, sir, as Paul an' Silas sang in prison, so they 
" sang in storm." 

Skipper George's Story. 

Bell Isle iii rugged beauty, 

Sat mirror'd on the breast 
Of the waters of Conception ; 

And old ocean lay at rest. 
Its sun-lit surface pictured 

Snowy shores that fringed the Bay, 
'Twas a perfect winter picture 

On that perfect winter's day. 



But it darkened to the Nor'r'd, 

And the feathery snow-flakes spread; 
The storm-king rode the waters, 

Moaned the icy air in dread. 
Of a sudden, burst the blizzard 

And the day grew black as nighr, 
The cliffs flung back the surges, 

And defied their angry might. 



Between the boist'rous storm blasts, 

Rise voices clear but dim; 
Comes floating on the tempest, 
The sweet old evening hymn, 
" Abide with me 

Fast falls the even tine, 
The darkness deepens 

LordJ with me abide." 
The plaintive chaunt is drown'd 

By the roaring, seething .sea, 

But anon the strains float faintly 

" Oh, Lord, abide with me." 



The morrow's sunrise pictured 

Yet another perfect day, 
Mute in death on the icy beach 

The frozen singers lay. 
Heaven's glory for them had dawn'd. 

The Lord had heard their cry, 
Beyond the deep'ning darkness 

They abide with Him on High. 
***** 

When again the angry tempests 
Lash to wrath the cruel sea, 

Be merciful, O Christ, to all, 
Who on the wint'ry water's be; 

Through gloom encircling lead them, 
And, Lord, abide with me. 



12 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Cifc at an Outport-lmprcssions. 



By Rev. A. W<_ 

IMPRESSIONS" is the word for a new-comer. Only 
last summer the writer came from the land of the 
" Maple Leaf"; and he knows his inability to learn so 
soon all the undercurrents of " life at an outport" ; and 
he does not wish to mark out those already traced. 
Besides, he has been so thoroughly satisfied with life at Harbor 
Grace that he has not visited any other outport beyond the 
limit of a " spin" on air. He his not even been tempted to 
visit the Metropolis of our Island Home. So he has taken the 
liberty of slightly altering the subject suggested by the NFLD. 
QUARTERLY. It must be merely Impressions, and a few of them. 
One afternoon affords sufficient impressions for a biograph 
and a volume. From the first view of Harbor Grace, seen from 
above Riverhead, to the " Gordon Lodge," scene follows scene 




REV. A. W. LEWIS, H.A., K.D. 

too rapidly to inspire speech. One sits entranced, wishing first to 
" develop" the views before he " prints" them for another eye. 
A beautiful harbor! At its entrance, six miles out, Harbor 
Grace Island and Salvage Rock stand centinels. To Concep- 
tion Bay their attitude is firm, Thus far let thy jurisdiction 
come. Fringing this lovely she^t of water are the homes of 
6,000 human beings, besides others. The train glides up the 
grade, near Christ's Church, close behind the " Kirk," and halts 

above St. Paul's, 

" Beloved of pious worshippers, 

The pride of all the town." 

To the left, a few points east, stands the new Methodist Church, 
beautiful in its bridal dress. And next to that rise the tall 
spires of the Cathedral, whose bell calls to " Vespers." Back of 
the Railway Station, and still higher, are the Athletic Grounds, 
commanding an excellent view of the Town and Southside, the 
Harbor and the Bay, and the purple hills of farthest Avalon. 
From this standpoint life at this outport in summer is ideal. 

As the stranger drives along the streets, he is charmed by the 
quaintness of certain portions. The fences, woven of rods ; the 
goats, with their yokes ; the dogs, with their checks ; and the far- 
famed ponies, with their carts, all are characteristic of an out- 
port. In winter, " slides" and sliders illustrate locomotion by 
dog-power. The " wheelman," who in summer had skimmed 



Lewis, B.A., B.D. 

the smooth and level streets, now plods his weary way, like a 
clogged eagle. 

The summer visitor from the oppressive air of an American 
city revels here in the sweet, invigorating breath of undiluted 
Neptune. Pallid cheeks take on the flush of health. Languid 
muscles become tense with the joy of life. And over-taxed 
nerves rest, like an accusing conscience that has found peace. 
As the electric light illumines our homes, so health and happi- 
ness illumine life. 

Tourists need not expect here the marvels of the Humber ; 
but the less ambitious may revel in the open spaces with the rod 
and reel. If they do not basket many speckled beauties, they 
may rejoice in the exercise and sport, the air and the scenery. 
One afternoon last summer the writer landed with his "fly" 
three handsome trout, the largest about three pounds. Ah, 
there are hills too, long and steep! They are grand to view, 
wearisome to mount, and perilous to descend on a " wheel." 
List summer a Medical Doctor was taken in charge by his 
"cycle" and hurriedly dismissed, headlong, with costs. The 
chain of a Government -official took the right crank and the 
official the wrong dismount. But the hills must be taken with 
the trout. The writer on one occasion spoke unadvisedly of 
the fish he had caught. He was promptly corrected by a rising 
youth that peered into the brsket, "Dem's not fish; dem's 
trout." In winter boys and girls slide about the streets on 
skates; the older folk without them. 

It is the people that makes the place. The hospitality of the 
Harbor Gracuns is known abroad, and doubtless that of other 
outports. The writer has proved it to ba unbounded. The 
friends ' take one in" with a cordiality that knows no limits; 
and the beggars try to take one in" with equal zeal. The 
latter fiiendship is rapidly Hearing the vanishing point; the 
f >nner grows with growing comforts. Town life is greatly 
benefited by educative and refining Societies. In these one 
meets hundreds, to their mutual benefit. Harbor Grace has a 
comfortable, well-lighted, and well stocked Reading Room. 
Every morning the electric wires bring their messages to us 
from the ends of th earth. And we feel like asking, Is Harbor 
Grace an Outport ? 

St. Andrew's Manse, Harbor Grace, February, 1905. 



nightmare. 



By Robert Gear MacDonald. 
ONE wretched night the poppied anodynes, 
I used to deaden memory, failed to keep 
My soul within that barren land where sleep 
Brings forth no dreams; and, far beyond its lines, 
Through groves where many a poisoned vision twines, 
I was set wandering; towards me saw I sweep 
Her I had loved : she did not smile or weep, 
But passed as one who no man's face divines. 
Then I was 'ware that it must still be thus 
In day's white land, or on the night's sad shore ; 
In market-place, or dream-paths tortuous ; 
She'll greet me still with the same scorn she bore. 
And I awoke with limbs all tremulous, 
And lips that cried, God, let me dream no more ! 



-THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



'3 



RED CROSS LIND 

SAILING BETWEEN 

New York, Halifax, N. S., and St. John's, N. F. 




For a short vacation, the 
round trip by one of these 
steamers is hard to beat, and 
is cheap enough to suit the 
most modest purse. 




\ 

O^^N-i-N 



AGENTS : 

HARVEY & Co., 

and BOWRINO BROS. LTD., 

St. John's, N. F. 
G. S. CAMPBELL & Co., 

Halifax, N. S. 
Bcnvkixc & Co., 

17 State Street, 

New York. 



UP-TO-DATE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION. 



Rates To New York, Single. . . .$34.00; Return. . . .$60.00; Steerage . . . .$13.00; Return. . . .$25.00 
" Halifax, .... 18.00; .... 34.00; .... 6.00; .... 12.00 

Freight Carried at Through Rates to all Points* 






ST. JOHN'S,. 
NEWFOUNDLAND 



T. A. THEATRE, 

' '- :; x 
. . . . Is fully equipped for. . . . 

Theatricals, Operas, Concerts, and Lectures. 

STACK with a complete set of Scenery to suit all Dramatic Performances is, height, 26 feet ; 
depth, 25 x 56 feet. Tie-floor Gallery, Five Dressing Rooms, One Piano; Two Private Boxes. Opera 
Chairs, 400; Gallery, 350; Pit, 600; Total, 1,350 seating capacity. Heated by Steam, Lighted by Gas 
and Electric Light. Entrances to all parts of Theatre by Henry Street. 

For further particulars as to open dates, rent, etc., apply to 

JAMES J. BATES, President. 
or GEO. J. COUGHLAN, Secretary. 



Thomas Smyth, 

Wholesale Dealer in 

Provisions, Groceries, fruit, Etc. 

Head McBride's Hill, Duckworth Street, St. John's, Nfld. 



M. IV. FURLONG, K.C. 



J. M. KENT, K.C. 



FURL ONG & KENT, 

= ^ * 

BARRISTERS and SOLICITORS. 
DUCKWORTH STREET, ST. JOHN'S. 



-14 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 





: 








St. John's T. A. & B. Society, 




Photo fir /.,. ;>,.. 
K. J. Undy. ist A.V.P. 



W. J. Ellis, M.C, M.H.A., W. F. Kelly, znd A.V.P. 

Vice-President. 



M. J. Summers, ist Treasurer, .las. J. Bates, President. P. J. Hanley, 2nd Treasurer. 

G. .1. Coughlau. Secretary. Rev. W. J. H. Kitchen, Ph.D., N. J. Murphy, Grand Marshal. 

Spiritual UiiectOi. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Officers of tbe St. John's Cotal abstinence and Benefit Society. 



ON the opposite page we give the picture of the Officers of 
the St. John's Total Abstinence and Benefit Society for 1905, 
which is a copy of a photograph taken to accompany congratu- 
latory addresses to Sister Societies in Canada. The following 
are the notes on the different Officers i 

JAMES J. BATES, President, was elected to office in 1895, 
and have been elected to office for ten years in succession. 
He occupies the responsible position of storekeeper with 
the firm of Messrs. Baird, Gordon & Co., and he is highly 
esteemed by the members of the Society and the general 
public of St. John's. 

WILLIAM J. ELLIS, M. C., M. H.A., Vice-President, was 
elected to office for seven years in succession. He was elected 
a City Councillor at the Municipal Election, and at the last 
General Election was returned to the House of Assembly by a 
large majority for the District of Ferryland. Mr. Ellis has 
.proved himself one of the most energetic of our City Councillors, 
and the people of Ferryland District will find him to be an 
energetic and painstaking representative. He is very popular 
in the Society, and is a total abstainer since early boyhood. 

EDWARD J. LANDY, ist Assistant Vice-President, has been 
elected to office for several years, and is most popular with the 
younger members of the Society. He occupies a position as 
salesman in the employ of the Royal Stores, Limited. 

WILLIAM F. KELLY, and Assistant Vice-President, has 
held the office for two years, and occupies the high position of 
Chairman of T. A. Club. He is a very energetic worker and 
most popular with the members that visit the Club rooms. 



MICHAEL J. SUMMERS, Treasurer, has been elected to 
office for a number of years and is looked upon as an ideal 
Treasurer. He is well and widely known as a business man 
of good standing, and has been closely identified with local 
charities as Treasurer of St. Vincent de Paul Society. 

PHILIP J. HANLEY, 2nd Treasurer, has occupied that posi- 
tion for a number of years, and is one of the most popular 
members in the Society. He is always foremost in every social 
event. Mr. Hanley is a hustler at the painting business, and 
commands a fair share of patronage both in St. John's and in 
many of the outports. 

GEORGE J. COUGHLAN, Secretary, has been elected ten 
years in succession to that office. He is a favourite with all 
the members, as is evidenced by the large vote put up for him 
on the last election. He also occupied the position of Secretary 
of the Cadet Corps Committee since its inception. He is 
Secretary and Accountant in the Constabulary and Fire Depart- 
ment Office. 

NICHOLAS J. MURPHY, the respected Grand Marshal, has 
held the office for a number of years. He is a most energetic 
officer and takes a great interest in all matters appertaining to 
the welfare of the Society. 



REV. W. J. H. KITCHEN, PH. D.. was appointed Spiritual 
Director about two years ago. He is very highly respected and 
take a deep interest in the welfare of its members. He has 
given a series of Lectures and is a great advocate of Total 
Abstinence. 




From the Reid-Newfoundland G'<0'j.] 



\Colleclion of Photos. 



LITTLE RIVER. CODROY. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



The Walk-Over 
Shoe. 



JACKMAN Ttie Tailor, 



Sole Agent. 




This is a 
Vic Calf 

"Knob" Last 

WALK-OVER. 



Price, $4.5O. 



Dressy Shoe for 

Spring and Summer, 



Ml DEfAKTMLNI.-"flR[ ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



EASTERN D!STS!CT. 



NO. LOCATION or BOXES. 

12 Temperance Strsvt, fi.ct Si;.;ii:il-lnll Road. 
ij -' actory Lane. 

14 Water Stieet, foot Cod'.rane Street. 
. 15 Duckworth Street, cornel King's Road. 

16 Cocbrane Stieet. cotncr (urner Street. 

17 Colonial Stieet. coinei Bond Stu-et. 

18 Water Street, East. 

iia Inside Hospital. I-'oixst Road, s]>ei,ial box. 

113 Penitentiary, corner Ouidi Vidi Road. 

114 Military Road, coiner King's Bridge Road 

115 Circular Road, corner Bannerman Road. 

116 King's Bridge Rd . neai Railway dossing 

117 -Opposite Government House (late. 

118 Rennie's Mill Road. 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

-Head Garrison Hill. 

-Water Street, foot I'rescott Street. 

-Water Street, foot Mi-Bride's Hill. 

Govver Mieet. comer I'rescott Street. 
-< 'ourt ' oust: Hill. 

-Duckworth Stieet, corner NewGower Street. 
-Cathedral Square, foot (iarrison Hill. 

Long's Hill, and coiner Livingstone Street. 
-Militaiy Ri ad. Ra\vlins' ( ross. 
-Haywaid Avenue, corner \\illiam Street. 
-Maxse Street. 

-(iate Roman Catholic Orphanage, Belvedere. 
-Cartel's Hill and Cookstown Road. 
-Lime Stieet and Wickfoid Court. 
-Flesh water Road and Cookstown Road. 
-' cott Stieet. coiner Cock ^ treet. 
-Inside Savings' Hank, special box. 
-! lemming Stieet. 

-Queen's Road, corner Allen's Square. 
-Centre Cartel's Hill. 



3'- 
3- 
34- 
35- 
36- 
37 
3- 
39- 

3' 2 ' 

3'3- 
331- 

33?- 

334- 

335- 

336- 

337 

338 

42 

43" 

"44- 

45- 

46 



WESTERN DISTRICT. 

-Water Street, foot Adelaide Street. '.', ) 

-New Gower Stieet, coiner Queen Street. 

-\\aldegiave and Cieorge Street. 

-Water Street, foot Springdale Street. 

-Water Street, foot Patrick Stieet. 

-Head Pleasant Stieet. 

-Brazil's Square, corner Casey Street. 

-Inside Boot & Shoe factory, special box. 

-Horwoqd Factory. 

-LeMarchant Rd., head Springdale St. : 

-LeMarchant Rd., head Barter's Hill. 

-Pleasant Street. 

-Patrick Street, corner Hamilton Street. 

-Inside Poor Asylum, special box. 

-Torpey's. Cross Roads, Riveihead. 

-Hamilton Avenue, corner Sudbury Street. 

-Hower Hill, corner Duggar? Street. 

- Southside. near Long Bridge. 

-Central Southside. 

-Dry Dock. 

-Southside. West*. 

-Road near Lovv"ftynndee Premises. 



On the discovery of a tire. ^> i.> c u u-a -j^t . f i)^. D/J.I c tiie 'la; 

go and listen for the working ol the machinery in the bi>x. If you d 

CAUTION. Persons wilfully giving false alarms, or damaging tl- 

" FIRE OUT SIGNAL." Two strokes on the Urge Hell, repeated 



<. nice tiij Kjy. n ie.i the door ol the large box, and give the alarm !j/ puiung t \t J jot ju i. -:iJ ' tj n i:e. iien let 
not hear it, pull aga n. After giving the alarm, remain at the box, so as to direct the Fire i|||gade where to go. 
e Kire Alarm apparatus, will be rigorously prosecuted, 
three times, thus: [1 II II. 

JOHN R. McCOWeiV, Inspector-General. 



C. NURSE. 



C. AUSTIN. 



NURSE & CO., 




^ Ship and Sanitary 
Plumbers, ^ , 
Gasfitters, &c. 

Estimates cheerfully given on al! work in the above line. 

All orders personally attended 
to and satisfaction guaranteed. 

129 Gower Street, St. John's, Newfoundland 



Pailor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 



Church Seats. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 



T. MARTIN,^ 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Cower Street. 

Repairing Furniture Horses and Vans for 

a Speciality. Removing Pianos, &c. 



JOB 



PRINTING D F 

EVERY KIND 

NEATLY EXECUTED. 

Besides other additions to our Job Department, we have imported 
one of the Latest and Most Up to-Date Job Presses in this, or 
any other country, for Small Forms of Printing. We are now prepared 
to receive orders for any Job" of Printing, from a Visiting Card to any 
Job covering a surface of 12 x 18 inches. This magazine is a fair 



sample of our woik. 



12 x 18 
JOHN J. EVANS, 



-,4 I'rescott Stieet. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



OK "Dead Christ." 



E. M. White. 



READING an article in the Irish Penny Journal, of date 
igth December, 1840, dealing with the life and work of 
the artist Hogan, my thoughts-very naturally ran in the 
< direction of the statue of the Dead Christ, beneath the 
Altar of our Roman Catholic Cathedral. And not a few of our 
people may be interested in this remarkable Irishman, whose 
chisel and genius gave us this almost incomparable piece of statu- 
ary and whose character as a sculptor caused him to be honored 
by the highest tribunal in the City of Arts, with a tribute of ap- 
probation never before bestowed on a native of the British Isles, 
in unanimously electing him without solication or anticipation 
on his part a member of the oldest Academy of the Fine Arts 
in Europe, that which enrolled among its members the divine 
Raphael, and all the illustrious artists of the age of Leo, and 
which holds its meetings upon their graves the Academy of 
the Virtuosi del Pantheon. 

Hogan was born at Talloa, in the County of Waterford, in the 
year 1800. He received but an ordinary school education, 
though a scion of a noble and blue-blooded race, and in the 
year 1812 was placed by his father under an attorney in Cork, 
named Michael Foote. After two years of this, which has been 
called the ' unhappy period of his existence," the soul that 
revolted against Law was given to the Arts, and an Artist he 
became. 

Entering as an apprentice in the office of Sir Thomas Deane, 
of Cork, where he was employed in the capacity of draughtsman 
and carver of models with a view of becoming an architect, his 
first production was a carving in wood of a female skeleton the size 
of life, on which a Dr. Woodroffe was able to lecture his pupils, 
as if it were, what it actually seemed, a real skeleton in form and 
color. Under Woodroffe's tuition our subject studied the ana- 
tomic art for several years. 

In 1816 a society for promoting the Fine Arts was formed in 
Cork, and to which through the solicitation of influential Irish- 
men in 1818, the Prince Regent was induced to present a selec- 
tion of the finest casts from the antique statues which had been 
presented him as a gift by the Roman Pontiff ; the value of 
which this " inartistic" Prince but little appreciated. 

The presence of these newly acquired treasures of ancient 
art, which consisted of one hundred and fifteen subjects, selected 
by Canova, and cast under his direction, kindled a flame in 
Hogan's mind never to be extinguished; and to this study he 
devoted the fervor of heart and soul till 1823, when that critical 
writer of the period on works of art William Paulett Carey 
(afterwards Sir William) on a visit to the gallery of the Cork 
Society, " accidentally saw a small figure or torso carved in pine 
timber, which had fallen down under one of the benches." " On 
taking it up," continues Mr. Carey's interesting narrative, "he 
was struck with the good taste of the design and correctness of 
the execution." 

On inquiry he learned of it being the work of Hogan, done 
in the leisure hours of his apprenticeship by a strict application 
to carving and modeling from the Papal casts. Hogan was im- 
mediately paid a visit by the stranger, in a small apartment in 
the Academy, who was surprised to find the self-taught artist in 
the midst of the Triumph of Silenus consisting of fifteen figures 
about fourteen inches high, cut in bas-relief from pine timber ; 
also various studies of hands and feet ; a head of an apostle ; 



Michael Angelo's mask, and several other designs which, though 
cut with delicacy and beauty, still were not inseparable from the 
defects of an early age of untaught study. 

Becoming thus acquainted with Hogan's abilities, Mr., now 
Sir Win. Carey, wrote a series of letters to the Cork Advertiser, 
addressed to the gentry and capitalists of the city, entreating them 
to raise a fund by subscription to defray the expenses of sending 
our young artist to Italy, and supporting him for three or four 
years in studying at Rome. Through Sir William's enthusias- 
tic representations a sum sufficient for the nonce was subscribed 
and Mr. Hogan set out for the ' Eternal City," where he found 
himself an entire stranger, with little knowledge of the world, 
without acquaintance or patron (which in those days was almost 
indispensable) and incapable of speaking the language at the 
commencement of his studies at Rome. 

In the first year of his studies, and at a meeting of eminent 
artists, the celebrated British sculptor Gibson, essayed the 
opinion, "that it was impossible to imagine an attitude or expres- 
sion in the human figure which had not been already appropri- 
ated by the great sculptors of antiquity." Hogan listened 
intently, thought differently and ventured to express his dissent, 
when Gibson astonished at our young neophyte's presumption, 
somewhat pettishly replied, " Let us see you produce such an 
original work !" This public taunt stung the young'sculptor, 
who lost no time to rescue his name from the imputation of 
vanity and rashness. He toiled night and day at his work, his 
Irish was up, the result of his labors being a Drunken Faun 
a work which the great Thorwalclsen pronounced "a miracle of 
art," and which, if Hogan never produced another, would have 
been alone sufficient to immortalize his name. 

A number of other notable and famous works were produced 
by him, but in this sketch, what we are particularly interested 
in, is the ' Dead Christ": * * * the exquisite statue of the 
Dead Christ now placed beneath the altar of the Roman Catholic 
Church in Clarendon Street, Dublin. 

This work was originally ordered for a chapel in Cork by the 
Rev. Fr. O'Keefe, but that gentleman, on its arrival in Dublin, 
not being able to raise the funds required for its payment, per- 
mitted Mr. Hogan to dispose of it to the priest of Clarendon 
Street, who paid for it the sum originally stipulated, namely, 
four hundred and fifty pounds, and we may scarcely add, that 
this statue is one of the most interesting objects of art adorning 
the City of Dublin. 

" Mr. Hogan," the narrative continues, " subsequently executed 
" a duplicate of this statue with some changes in the design, for 
" the City of Cork, but we regret to have to add that he has 
" been, as yet, but very inadequately rewarded for his labors on 
"this work; a sum of two hundred and thirty-seven pounds 
" G 2 37) being still due him, and the amount which he has 
" actually received, two hundred pounds (200), being barely 
li the cost of the marble and rough workmanship." 

From the foregoing my readers would infer that this has re- 
ference to the exquisite piece of statuary under the Altar of our 
grand Cathedral, but I understand such is not so. This statue 
rests in the old South Church, Cork, and I may add, in paren- 
thesis, that there has been three such works executed by him, 
our replica being the best, most prized and perfect specimen. 

I have no doubt but more interesting information connected 
with ours than I can furnish, is extant, and probably if this meets 
the eye of the happy possessor of such particulars, an appreci- 
ative number of readers will be enlightened in a subsequent 
issue of the NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



i8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



fiarrp Bessemer's inoesttntiit. 

fl nouclctte of nciofoundland Cifc. 



By Robert Gear MacDonald. 
PART I. 



it T AM SORRY, Mr. Bessemer, I cannot spare you a 

waltz," she was saying, perhaps with a slight chill in her 

voice, or perhaps Bessemer only imagined it to be so. 

< " But I can give you this square-dance further on," and 

she traced his initials on the diminutive programme, which was 

the fashion that season, with some deliberation ; and the next 

moment bowed cordially to a rather German looking young 

man, who was approaching. 

Bessemer turned away, trying to feel, as he looked, uncon- 
cerned ; but Elvire Exonton's indifferent manner was begin- 
ing to tell upon him. It was not that he was vain or self-con- 
scious, or that he wished to pay her any particular attention. 
He, in common with most men, he might have supposed, would 
be attracted and inspired by her beauty ; but the very case with 
which he had stepped into his present position made it ^ little 
puzzling. He had paid little definite court to any of the ladies 
in his set; though some of them, it may be, had paid court to 
him. His mind had been occupied with other matters, matters 
which threatened to become all-absorbing, unless some other 
interests came up to balance them. 

Harry Bessemer was something over five and twenty, and at 
first sight appeared to have achieved little enough. After a 
youth spent in Newfoundland, and the usual three years at 
Camoridge, he had returned to accept the apparently trivial and 
unimportant post of confidential clerk to the Minister of Forestry. 
But it must be remembered that the Minister of Forestry was 
the one strong man in the Benton Cabinet, now entering upon 
the second year of its second term ; and it must also be remem- 
bered that Bessemer was the power behind the Minister of For- 
estry. From his youth Bessemer had felt the hum of mighty 
workings within his soul. He believed that Newfoundland with 
her unique geographical position ; with her immense resources 
and vast coastline, deeply indented with mighty bays, was des- 
tined to play a great part in the history of the Empire and of 
the World. And he believed that he was fitted to bring the 
Island to this position in the forefront. 

He was a wealthy young man for such a comparatively poor 
country. An uncle in England had left him a very considerable 
fortune, and this was handsomely augmented by what his father 
had been able to bequeath to his only son. With his powers 
and his splendid imagination, he would realize little difficulty in 
stepping as high as he wished to. These aspirations of his he 
never talked about, but they were generally credited to him. by 
those in town, by that species of telepathy which is general 
enough in a small and compact community. But before he could 
lead he must learn, hence his present position. 

He danced out his quadrille with Elvire ; and he, and perhaps 
she, enjoyed it moderately well, seeing it was not a waltz. It 
was hers to be enthusiastic over everything she took up. Her 
Norman mother had given her that consummate grace, which our 
girls rarely possess to the full. She was of blonde, perfectly 
Anglo-Saxon beauty, with all the glow of color which is the 
glory of our countrywomen ; all that energy and independence, 
which in spite of obstacles, in spite of drawbacks, of the indif- 
ference of short-sighted imperial politicians, of the cramping 
effect of foreign treaties, have held us together and are fast 
welding us into a nation. 

Half an hour afterwards Bessemer had bidden adieu to Mrs. 
Lindholm, his hostess, and was on his way home. Very natur- 
ally he walked, smoking a mild cigar. His home was in a sub- 
urb distant from that in which Mrs. Lindholm's house was by 
some two miles. It was in January, and the air was cool, hardly 
cold ; and it was very calm. It was hardly midnight, and the 
northern lights spread out over his head like a great fan, hav- 
ing its apex at the North Star. They shifted and coruscated 
sometimes with a peculiar shuffling noise, along the sky. The 



moon looked calmly out between the spaces as it descended 
into the depths, and a few golden stars twinkled through the 
silver bars of the mighty screen of light. 

As he walked along the deserted country road, he smiled 
whimsically to himself as he thought of Elvire, and wondered if 
she disliked him. Though she gave little encouragement to any 
of her admirers, of whom, however, he could hardly be counted 
one ; still there was an added coldness, though very slight, in her 
manner towards him, which struck him the more because of the 
complacency with which most girls regarded the slight attentions 
he sometimes paid them. There seemed in a word to be some 
intangible mutual repulsion. And Hallowell, when she returned 
from school, had said that Elvire and he would be a perfect 
match ! The idea ! 

But if it must be owned, his thoughts went less on matters of 
sentiment than on Colonial affairs. He felt that now was a 
crisis in Newfoundland affairs. For a considerable time past 
German capital, backed it was whispered in very high Berlin 
circles, had been seeking to insinuate itself into the industries 
of a country which had unmeasured resources but scanty capital ; 
and how to keep it out without retarding the development of the 
Colony, was a problem. British capital, except in the hands of 
one or two prominent speculators, was slow in availing itself of 
the new opening in this rugged Island of the New World, per- 
haps because it was fully occupied elsewhere; American capi- 
talists owned quite as big a stake in the land as Bessemer 
thought compatible with its best interests ; and there were few 
other sources in sight. Hallowell, the deputy Colonial Secre- 
tary, whose position made him cognizant of every Stir in the 
world's money markets, had told him that there was a move- 
ment among German money-lenders which as far as he could 
judge appeared to have Newfoundland as its objective point. 
Enquiry in the Departments of Railways and Mines had yielded 
him no information. The transfer of a short branch line to Bay- 
de-Verde, to a company whose directors were all Canadians ; the 
shipment of more than usually large amount of iron ore to Phila- 
delphia had certainly no apparent tendency that way ; and if 
any more was being made within the purview of his own depart- 
ment, he would certainly have heard of it. He was puzzled. 
Germany in her great struggle for commercial supremacy would 
leave no effort untried to gain her ends. 

Though he was not late at the office the next morning, he 
found his chief had arrived before him. The Hon. Alexander 
McLean, Colonial Minister of Forestry, was a big Newfound- 
lander of Scottish descent. Tall and broad shouldered, sprightly 
and active despite his sixty years, a merchant prince, he was 
easily the most influential man on the Executive Council. He 
was a man of not many words, but always spoke to the point. 

" Look here, man," said he, as soon as Bessemer had removed 
his overcoat and had sat down, " it seems to me that Germany 
is going to have her way with us after all; you know Exonton." 
Bessemer nodded, " well, he has been speculating in South Am- 
erican Railways, of which he knows as much as I do about 
Sanscrit, and has come to grief badly. Not only must his mer- 
cantile premises go, which is bad enough, but his great lumber 
interests must be abandoned. And who is to take them up? 
You are aware of his peculiar social ideas, about the division of 
profits and so on, have alienated the entire mercantile commu- 
nit) , not one of them would stir a finger to help the lame duck. 
I myself " this with a deprecating gesture " might feel like do- 
ing so only that it would be misconstrued by our friends the poli- 
tical enemy, and might even lead to the downfall of the cabinet. 
And this, in my honest opinion would be an enormous loss to 
the country. A change of Government would be little short of 
disastrous at the present moment, and I must needs stifle my 
private inclinations for the good of the community." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



The length of his speech was the best proof to Bessemer of 
the importance of the interests at stake, and he felt correspond- 
ingly impressed. 

" What then is to be done ?" he asked. " I suppose we ought in 
the first place to find out the extent of the trouble. It appears.to 
me that the most straightforward way would be the best in the 
present case. Mr. Exonton has, I believe, confidence enough in 
me to tell me frankly the extent of the damage that is, if he 
knows. With so many irons in the fire, it must be a little difficult 
for him to know which are hot. But if you wish, Mr. McLean, 
I will. walk down to see him; when we know how things stand, 
we may devise means to prevent this causing harm to the country. 
By the way, I suppose the Department can do nothing ?" 

" Hardly, I fear," answered the Minister. " The cheese-parers 
are too much in evidence. They would not tolerate the acquire- 
ments of a national Forest Reserve ! Send Devanna in," he 
added, as Bessemer was leaving the room. Bessemer spoke to 
the assistant clerk who immediately went into the Minister's 
private office ; and preceded on his way to Water Street. 

It was still early when he entered the offices of Alfred Exonton 
& Son ; and Mr. Robert Exonton the " Son" in the firm name, 
Alfred Exonton the founder being dead some years, had not 
yet come down. The rooms were spacious and well lighted. 
A number of well dressed clerks were already at work at their 
desks. The great windows at the back of the office looked out 
upon the wharves, where at this season there was little doing ; the 
broad harbor, rapidly narrowing as it extended west, thinlv 
sprinkled with vessels and schooners; the moored sealing 
steamers; and above them the grand white-covered mass of 
Southside Hill. It is a sight the Terra Novian loves. 

Mr. O'Rielly, the head book-keeper, upon hearing that his 
business lay with the principal, asked Bessemer to be seated. 
But he had not long to wait. Mr. Exonton appeared almost 
immediately and was about to pass at once into his private 
office. He wished Bessemer good morning as he passed, how- 
ever, and at a word from Mr. O'Rielly, asked him to follow; 
and, telling Mr. O'Rielly that he would be engaged for some 
little time, closed the door. 

Perhaps he had some inkling of the reason of Bessemer's 
visit, for he asked him if he had come from the Departmental 
office. Mr. Exonton was A well preserved and active man, 
though he must have been nearly sixty, and he had had his 
share of troubles. His .wife and two sons of great promise had 
died some years ago, and Elvire was all he had left of his im- 
mediate family. He was tall and inclined to be stout, though 
the latter tendency had been kept down by his strenuous and 
active life. To-day his usually florid face looked a little pale 
and worn. It was not difficult to guess that sleep had been far 
away during the previous night. 

To the merchant's query, Bessemer answered simply that he 
had come down from the office, where he had been in consulta- 
tion with the Minister. 

" Then," pursued Mr. Exonton almost eagerly, as if he 
would have been half afraid to have himself to tell Bessemer the 
truth " you know what has happened." 

' Yes," answered Bessemer, gravely. " Is it then as grave as 
we have heard ? Is it overwhelming ? I know," he pursued, 
" that this may seem an impertinent question, but you at least 
will understand that it is a matter of public policy." 

Exonton bowed slightly, " Quite so ; but I do not think what- 
ever you have heard can over-estimate the gravity of the loss. 
And I, who should have been the last to be led away, have be- 
trayed all my people into the hands of the Philistines. And yet 
it seemed to be in such a good cause. You may not know that 
the fishery at our place on Labrador, Lattice Harbor, 'has been 
an utter failure the last three years. Now you see I am speak- 
ing frankly, as the matter is one which concerns, or may con- 
cern the whole community very much of the firm's available 
capital has been employed in opening up Exonton, in the in- 
terior; and from this, there has as yet been little net profit. I 
went on, hoping that things would brighten ; but this fall was 
worse than ever ; and then, in a desperate attempt to save the 
situat : on, I 'plunged' in South American railway stocks. The 
unusual epidemic of Revolutions there just now, have ruined my 
hopes, and I am left practically penniless. The firm will have to 



put up its shutters. My girl has a few hundred a year left her 
by her mother," Mr. Exonton showed a slight sign of emotion 
here, and a tear glistened in his eye" which happily is settled 
upon her and is chiefly in Government Debentures, but that is all." 
"And can you think of anything to be done? Mr. McLean 
sends assurance of his sympathy, but you can quite understand 
that his hands are tied." 

" I fear it is a case where little can be done," answered Exonton 
sadly. " If we assign, the Exonton property will be sold up by 
the trustees, and the opposition will see through any scheme of 
the Government's to buy it, and you know what that would mean 
in the present nicely balanced state of parties. Idle capital is 
an unknown thing in the Newfoundland market just now, and 
outside helpers in the United States, Canada, or England are 
very few; all feeling that they have enough money invested in 
the Colony at present." " I have thought it all out," he con- 
tinued, wearily. " To borrow money would put us at once 
under the thumb of the party or Bank that would advance the 
money. I am not such a fool even yet as to suppose that they 
would allow us to carry on in the present manner. I know my 
socialistic theories and practices are the laughing stock of Water 
Street. No, there is only one thing to do. Rancke & Hummel 
of Hamburg and Berlin, have signified within the past week that 
the offer made last summer for the timber areas at Exonton is 
still open. I must sell out to them. By that means I can save 
the remnant of what my foolishness has destroyed,'' and the un- 
fortunate merchant hid his face in his hands. 

Bessemer was thinking deeply. " How much would be nec- 
essary to put things straight ?" he enquired suddenly. 

Mr. Exonton looked up. "Seventy tnousand dollars," he re- 
plied, but it might just as well be seventy millions." 

" Mr. Exonton," said Bessemer steadily, " I think I could raise 
that sum. You know I am not without resources." 

Mr. Exonton looked aghast. "My dear young sir, you are 
mad. I cannot allow the thought of such a thing. It would be 
too much for anybody to do. What interest have you in my 
affairs that could lead you to think of such a thing?" 

"I am also a native," he answered, quietly, " and do not wish 
to see strangers of foreign speech inheriting our birthright. It 
i.> for 'he country's sake I make this offer ; not, if you will per- 
mit me to say so, that I can condone what you have admitted to 
be folly ; but because, as things are, you are the one who most 
of all men in this country, stand for the benefit of the masses 
and of the whole people. It is for this reason alone that I step 
in here. I am fully aware, but for this one slip, that all your 
firm's troubles have arisen from the failure of the Labrador 
fishery on your room year after year. I have nojieed, I am sure, 
to stipulate that all the sum advanced by me shall go into the 
lumber and general trade. That is a postulate. The result can 
never be in doubt, I take it. In two years the mills will be pay- 
ing handsomely. So you see there is no risk. I shall bring 
my solicitor and the notary at once and we can arrange matters." 
Exonton wrung his hand in silent, but thankful emotion. Besse- 
mer stepped to the telephone. In a little while the two gen- 
tleman named appeared, and the transfer was made which saved 
the venerable house of Alfred Exonton & Son from bank- 
niptcy and the island from the invasion of foreign commercial 
interests. The men of business were too cautious to express 
any surprise at this turn of affairs, no matter what they may 
have thought ; and indeed their experience was that Bessemer, 
young as he was, was well able to take care of himself, in pecun 
iary as well as other matters. (Concluded in our next.) 

"THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY" 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 
Issued every third month about the 1 5th of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, -:- -:- -:- PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rates : 

Single Copies, each 10 cents . 

One Year, in advance, Newfoundland and Canada 40 " 

Foreign Subscriptions (except Canada) 50 " 

Advertising Rates 

$30.00 per page ; one-third of a page, $10.00; one-sixth of a page, $5.00; 
one-twelfth of a page, $2.50. Special rates for illustrative advertising. 



2O 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Che Breton Fisher's prapen 

By Dr. Richard Burke Howley. 

"ON leaving harbour, the instant his boat is afloat, the pious Breton 
fisherman is used to exclaim with head bared : Gardez moi Bon Dieu 
tareque la mer est grande et ma barque est petite." Henri Perreyve. 

Yo HO ! Heave away ! and the fisher's bark 

Moves out e'er the dawn o'er the waters' dark. 

Oh the bonnie boat, through the gladsome day, 

Like the grey gull flits 'mid the sparkling spray, 

But she folds her wings at the eve's decline, 

To nestle all night on the seething brine. 

O Lord who rulest the sea and air, 
Turn not away from the fisher's prayer, 
" I)e I'rofundis Clamavi !" Hear my call ! 
For thy sea is grand and my bark is small. 

And now we are far on the heaving deep, 

Where the Lord keeps watch tho' He seem to sleep, 

And His dreaming's told in the solemn sight 

Of the dark sea depths that are steeped in light. 

Ah, the fisher feels 'mid his perils there, 

All the Maker's might and the Saviour's care, 

And, thrown on his Clod he must trust Him all, 

For the sea is great and the bark is small ! 

On, on, she flies, for 'tis vain to strive. 
Whither so ever the storm may drive 
Till the Master speak, when a calm shall fall 
On the sea so grand and the bark so small. 

On the broad billows of life we're cast, 
Sport of the furious flood and blast, 
Helpless and heedless we come and go, 
Floating o'er many a wreck laid low, 
We hurry along to the dismal caves, 
Where the sad sea sleeps by a shore of graves. 
Yet Safe with Him on the stormy way 
Whom the waves uphold and the winds obey, 
Nor depths shall daunt us, nor heights appal, 
Tho' the seas run wild and our bark be small ! 



Che Fisherman. 



Recipe for a Composition Cake. 

Ky " Member of the Llttlednle Literary Chtk. 

Mix one pound of appropriate words into choice language. 
Stir thoroughly until you form (a) a subject, (b) a predicate, to 
every three ounces of words. Avoid too much stirring, as you 
are likely to separate the clauses, etc., from the principal quali- 
fied word. Lightly sift in some Capital letters, and about three 
dozen of the best punctuation marks, at suitable intervals : first 
put in the commas, next the colons and semi-colons, and lastly 
the full-stops. 

Beat in slowly some choice quotations, to aid in making the 
cake high flown ; these will also help to make it rise. 

Mix this substance with Arnold's best black ink stir 
throughout with a falcon pen and bake on a sheet of smooth 
ivory paper. 

Bake for one hour and a half, in a nice oak desk. Lay a 
sheet of white blotting paper on the top, to test if it is well 
baked. 

When cool place it for inspection on Sister's desk. After 
weighing it, and seeing the quality of material composing it, she 
will mark it in portions with her pencil, and call her pupils, so 
that they may have the benefit of it. When the cake has been 
thoroughly criticized by the girls, they scatter the contents of it, 
all over the school, and the cake is voted a great success. 

This recipe if faithfully carried out will prove splendid, as 
those who tried it, have never known it to fail. 

February, 1905. 

N. B. The above is an itncorrected Exercise of one of the Pupils of 
St. Bride's Academy, Littledale. 



By Chas. E. Hunt. 

HE clasps his wife in a fond embrace as he wishes her good-bye ; 
And a kiss to each of his children gives, but a tear is in his eye, 
For he's leaving a home that is dear to him and is going far away, 

To fish for cod near the rocky shore 

Of weather-beaten Labrador, 
For many a long, long day. 

His ship is ready to leave the port and is manned by a hardy crew, 
Who will fight the roaring winds and tides as they've long been used to do ; 
A sailor's life is a life of toil, but little does he dread ; 

The winter will soon be here again, 

And it's out afar on the angry main, 
That he earns his daily bread. 

The good ship sails from the harbor snug and the dear ones left behind; 

Far out of sight they soon will be, but never out of mind; 

The sweetheart longs for her sailor boy ; the mother for her son ; 

The children for their father yearn 

And pray to God for a safe return, 
When the summer's work is done. 

Through many a storm the good ship goes and many an anxious night 
Is spent on deck by the gallant crew when the storm is at its height; 
Then many a noble deed is done and when it's done, that's all; 

He does not look for a medal bright 

Nor seek some gifted pen to write 
What he did at duty's call. 

The summer is drawing t'wards its close and short the days become ; 

The skipper knows that the fish below will fetch a goodly sum; 

And on bended knee he thanks the God who has heaid his anxious prayer; 

For the wolf oft knocks at the fisher's door, 

When the catch is bad and the price is poor; 
But now he need not fear. 

Now as the good ship enters port he stands on deck once more; 

And the children glad, with dancing eyes, wave to him from the shore ; 

How gay his laugh and how bright his face as they slowly walk the lane ! 

Safe with those that he loves at last; 

Trouble and care to the winds are cast, 
When father's home again ! 



Song: Keep her to the Ulind 

By Daniel Carroll. 

UP the shore the fishing fleet 

Bravely stems the fresh'ning gale, 
And I watch one craft that beats 

In advance of every sail. 
From her proud and stately prow 

Gallantly the foam she flings ; 
Towards the land she's speeding now ; 

Cheerily her helmsman sings: 

" Though we're on the losing tack 
Let no thread of canvas slack, 
Lest squalls catch our sails aback, 
Keep her to the wind." 

Let us then on life's broad sea, 

When the winds adverse shall blow ; 
If we're " drifting by the lee ;" 

Leeward ever seem to go. 
Waver not thou timid soul, 

Trim her for another tack; 

Tho' the storm grows deeper black, 
Next time we may reach the goal. 

Tho' we're on the losing tack, 
Let no thread of canvas slack ; 
Lest squalls catch our sails aback, 
Keep her to the wind. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



BANK OF MONTREAL! 

Capital, $14,000,000; Rest, $10,000,000; Undivided Profits, $583,196.01. 

Bankers for the Government of Newfoundland, 
Financial Agents for the Government of the Dominion of Canada. 

Right Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, G.C.M.G., President. 

Hon. George A. Drummond, Vice-President. 
E. S. Clouston, General Manager. 

LONDON, ENGLAND, BRANCH 22 Abchurch Lane, B.C. 

BRANCHES IN NEW YORK, CHICAGO, and every Province of the DOMINION OF CANADA. 

Commercial Letters of Credit and Travellers' Letters 
of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

J. A. PADDON, Manager, St. John's, Nfld. 



Imperial Tobacco Co., Ltd. 

Manufacturers of Choice Tobaccos. 



Smoking and Chewing, 

Plug, Cut Plug, and Granulated. 

of our brands : 

GOODWIN'S BEST CUT PLUG," 



"EARLY BIRD," 

"MARINER," 

"MONT ROYAL," 

"J. D." 

" HAPPY THOUGHT," 

" RICHMOND GEM," 

' IMPERI 
For a cool, refreshing smoke, try 



EMPIRE," 

DAISY," 

OUR FAVORITE," 

VIRGINIA LEAF," 

CROWN," 

SUCCESS," 

L." 

" KILLIKINKNICK." 



OFFICES AND FACTORY: 
Flavin and Bond Streets, J* St. John's, Newfoundland. 



GEAR & CO., .* 

....Headquarters for.... 

jfi J* 

Marbleized Mantelpieces, English and 
American Tiled Grates, Tiled Hearths, 

Fancy Brass and Iron Kerbs, 
Fire Brasses, Dogs, Stops, 
and other Artistic Grate 
and Hearth Furnishings. 

j/t j> 

349 Water Street. 349 



Notice to the Public! 

We have recently introduced a system of 

^ FREE GAS FITTING, ^ 

which is meeting with much favor from those who want a good light in 
their homes and places of business, but who do not wish to make a large 
immediate outlay for the installation of same. For full particulars apply 
at the offices of the 

ST. JOHN'S GAS LIGHT CO. 



Manning's Drug Store, 

150 New Power Street. 

OPEN <* EVERY ^ NIGHT 
TILL U O'CLOCK. 



MISS MAY MLONG'S 

Easter Show* * 

The very latest in Spring and Summer Goods 
from London and Paris. 

282 Water Street, - - opp. Bowring Bros. 



M. J. Summers 

330 Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 



IMPORTER OF AND DEALER IN 



L \RTHI \WARL CHWA. GLASSWARE and DRY GOODS. 

Also, Men's Underwear. 

AMERICAN OIL CLOTHES : Double, Patched and Single. 
LOCAL OIL CLOTHES : Single. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Bowring Brothers, 

Limited 

Ship Owners, Brokers, and General Merchants. 

Exporters of Codfish, Salmon, Herring, Seal Oil, Seal Skins, 
Cod Oil, Lobsters, Whale Oil, Whale Bone, Etc. 

AGENTS FOR- 
LLOYD'S. 

London Salvage Association. 

New Swiss Lloyd's. 

National Board of Marine Underwriters of New York. 

Liverpool and Glasgow Underwriters. 

Liverpool and London and Globe Fire Insurance Co. 

New York, Newfoundland, and Halifax Steam Ship Co. 

English and American Steam Shipping Co. 

Represented by C. T. BOWRING & Co., Ltd., of Liverpool, London, Cardiff. 
Represented by BOWRING & Co., New York and San Francisco. 

CODES Scott's, Watkins, A. B. C., Western Union, Premier, &c. 
Cables: " BOWRING," St. John's. 



NEWFOUNDLAND PENITENTIARY. 

BROOM DEPARTMENT. 



Brooms, ,* Hearth Brushes, * Whisks. 

A Large Stock of BROOMS, HEARTH BRUSHES and 
WHISKS always on hand ; and having reliable Agents 
in Chicago and other principal centres for the purchase of 
Corn and other material, we are in a position to supply the 
Trade with exactly the article required, and we feel as- 
sured our Styles and Quality surpass any that can be 
imported. Give us a trial order, and if careful attention 
and right goods at right prices will suit, we are confident 
of being favoured with a share of your patronage. 

orders addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt 
attention. 



ALEX. A. PARSONS, Superintendent. 

Newfoundland Penitentiary, March, 



Customs Circular 



No. 15. 



WHEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles, Angler's Outfits, Trouting Gear, Fire-arms 
and Ammunition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be 
admitted under the following conditions : 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles, Trouting Poles, Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equipage. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the Assistant Collector, 
St. John's, if taken in St. John's the Receipt No. 2 shall be sent 
to the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre- 
senting the articles at the Port of Exit and having them com- 
pared with the receipt. The Examining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the result of his examination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

No groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund may 
be taken upon such articles. 

' H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Assistant Collector. 

CUSTOM HOUSE, 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 22nd June., 1903. 



The Public are reminded that the 

Game Laws of Newfoundland, 

Provide that: 

No person shall pursue with intent to kill any Caribou from 

the ist day of February to the jist day of July, or from the ist day of 

October to the 2oth October in any year. And no person shall 

kill or take more than two Stag and one Doe Caribou in any one year. 

No person is allowed to hunt or kill Caribou within five miles of either 
side of the railway track from Grand Lake to Goose Brook, these limits 
being defined by gazetted Proclamation. 

No non-resident may hunt or kill Deer without previously having pur- 
chased and procured a License therefor. All guides must be licensed. 
Issued free to residents ; to non-residents costing fifty dollars. 

No person may kill, or pursue with intent to kill any Caribou with dogs, 

or with hatchet or any weapon other than fire-arms loaded with 

ball or bullet, or while crossing any pond, stream or water-course. 

Tinning or canning of Caribou meat is absolutely prohibited. 

No person may purchase, or receive in barter or exchange any flesh 
of Caribou between January ist and July 3ist, in any year. 

Penalties for violation of these laws, a fine not exceeding two hundred 
dollars, or in default imprisonment not exceeding two months. 

No person shall hunt, or kill Partridges during the present year, or 
before ist October, 1905. After that period not before 1st October or 
later than izth January. Penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars 
or imprisonment. 

Any person who shall hunt Beaver, or export Beaver skins till October ist, 
1907, shall be liable to cofiscation of skins, and fine or imprisonment. 

And no person shall hunt Foxes from March I5th to October I5th in 
any year, under the same penalties. 

ELI DAWE, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
March, 



JOB BROTHERS & Co., 

Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

of B " r ' sh and American Goods of every 
description Wholesale and Retail. 

f Codfish ' Codoil, CodliverOil, Seal Oil, 
Lobsters, Furs, and general produce. 

All orders for same promptly filled at very lowest rates. 





_ 

1 ^^^^^^mi^m-mm 

<Vf^< 

THE . . . 

NEWFOUNDLS 

UARTERLY. 

JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 
gSX^- ___ 

ft Vdl,. V. No. i. 



i^ 
^ 



^^ 

Q 




' ' 



^i 

5;^ 



JULY, 1905. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 




<$ NEWFOUNDLAND ^ 
"THE SPORTSMAN^ PARADISE/^ 





THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Now landing, and to arrive during the 
next three months, a large assortment of 



LUMBER 



We have also a full stock of 

SEASONED BOARD in store. 

All selling at the Lowest Market Prices. 
Purchasers will get good value for their 
money. 

W. & G. RENDELL 



Alan Goodridge $ Sons, 

325 WATER STREET, ST. JOHN'S, N. F., 

General Importers and Wholesale and Retail Merchants. 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 < 



EXPORTERS OE ALL KINDS OE PRODUCE. 



BRANCH ESTABLISHMENTS: 

Witless Bay, Tor's Cove, Ferryland, Renews, 
Nipper's Harbor, New Perlican, Round Harbor, 
Hant's Harbor, Caplin Bay, 2* & Jk 

Where Fishery Outfits can at all times 
be Supplied, 



PHCENIX 



* 



Use 



Assurance 




Co., Ltd., 



Royal 



Or LONDON, 



ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Annual Premiums $7,500,000 

Fund held to meet losses 9,000,000 

Uncalled Capital 12,000,000 

. & G. RENDELL, 

ST. JOHN'S. Agent for Nfld. 



Household 

\ 

Flour* 



J 



Queen 
Fire Insurance Company 

FUNDS $4O,OOO,OOO 

ii i i i i i i i i i ii ui 111 ii in. mi i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ,., , ni 1,1 i.,iiin i i i i i i i.i 1,1, 1,1 1,1 11 ..,.,, i 

INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



JOHN CORMACK, 

ASCENT FOR NEWFOUNDLAND. 



JOHN KEAN, 



ADELAIDE: STREET, 



Boot and Shoe Maker. 



Hand Sewing a Specials 
Strictest attention paid 
all work* <g < 

Oiitport Orders Sot 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 






FOR NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 

CANADA. 


i pou 

2 pou 

3 
4 

1 

7 
8 

9 
10 
u 


nd 


8 cents 


24 ce 

24 
24 
48 
48 

4 i 
4 5 

72 
72 
72 
72 

No parcel s 
less than 


nts 


i 2 cents 


15 cents. 
3 
45 
60 

75 
90 
$1.05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 


nds 


ii " 




24 " 




14 




76 " 




17 




48 




2O 




60 




23 












84 




2O 




96 




-S2 " 




$1 .08 . 




, r <i 




I . 2O ... 




,C 1. 








Under i Ib. weight, i cent 
per 2 oz. 


ent to U K. for 

24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from New York ; 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 



RATES OF COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 



General Post Office* 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by "any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion #f Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding f!io ........................... 5 cts. Over $50, but not exceeding $60 ........................ 30 cts. 

Over $10, but not exceeding $20 ........................ 10 cts. Over $60, but not exceeding $70 ........................ 35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 ........................ 15 cts. Over 870, but not exceeding $80 .... .................... 40 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 ........................ 20 cts. Over $80, but not exceeding $90 ........................ 45 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 ........................ 25 cts. Over 590, but not exceeding $100 ....................... 50 cts. 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John's, Newfoundland, June, 1905. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

GENERAL & POST * OFFICE. 



Postage on Local Newspapers. 

TT is observed that BUNDLES OF LOCAL NEWSPAPERS, addressed to Canada and the United States, are frequently 
* mailed without the necessary postage affixed; and, therefore, cannot be forwarded. 

The postage required on LOCAL NEWSPAPERS addressed to Foreign Countries is i cent to each two ounces. Two 
of our local newspapers, with the necessary wrapper, exceeds the two ounces, and should be prepaid TWO CENTS. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



General Post Office. 



Postal Telegraphs* 



TELEGRAMS for the undermentioned places in Newfoundland are now accepted for transmission at all Postal Telegraph 
Offices in the Colony and in St. John's at the Telegraph window in the Lobby of the General Post Office and at Office in new 
Court House, Water Street, at the rate of Twenty Cents for Ten words or less, and Two Cents for each additional word. The 
address and signature, however, is transmitted free : 



Avondale 

Baie Verte (Little Bay N.) 

Baine Harbor 

Bay-de-Verde 

Bay L'Argent 

Bay Roberts 

Beaverton 

Belleoram 

Birchy Cove (Bay of Islds.) 

Bonavista 

Bonne Bay 

Botwoodville 

Britannia Cove 

Brigus Junction 

Burin 

Carbonear 



Catalina 

Change Islands 

Clarenville 

Come-By-Chance 

Conception Harbor 

Fogo 

Fortune 

Gambo 

Gander Bay 

Glenwood 

Grand Bank 

Grand Lake 

Grand River 

Greenspond 

Hant's Harbor 

Harbor Breton 



Harbor Grace 

Harbor Main 

Herring Neck 

Holyrood 

Howards 

Humber Mouth (River- 
head, Bay of Islands) 

King's Cove 

King's Point (S. W. Arm, 
Green Bay) 

Lamaline 

Lewis port 

Little Bay 

Little River 

Long Harbor 

Lower Island Cove 



Manuels 

Millertown Junction 

Musgrave Harbor 

New Perlican 

Newtown 

Nipper's Harbor 

Norris' Arm 

N. W. Arm (Green Bay) 

Old Perlican 

Pilley's Island 

Port-au-Port (Gravels) 

Port-aux-Basques(Channel) 

Port Blandford 

Stephenville Crossing 

St. George's 

St. Jacques 



St. John's 

St. Lawrence 

Sandy Point 

Scilly Cove 

Seldom-Come-By 

Sound Island 

S. W. Arm (Green Bay) 

Terenceville (head of 

Fortune Bay) 
Tilt Cove 
Trinity 
Twillingate 
Wesleyville 
Western Bay 
Whitbourne 



Postal Telegraph Message Forms may be obtained at any Post Office in the Colony, and from Mail Clerks on Trains and Steamers. If the sender 
desires, the message may be left with the Postmaster, to be forwarded by mall Free of Postage to nearest Postal Telegraph Office. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

General Post Offiee, St. John's, Newfoundland, June, 1905. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




HON. JAMES BAIRD, President. established 1875 C. R. THOMSON, Manager. 

THE NEWFOUNDLAND BOOT & SHOE MANUFACTURING Co., Ltd. 

Manufacturers of Boots, Shoes, and Slippers. Dealers in Canadian and American Rubbers. 
WHOLESALE ONLY. @~A11 Reliable Dealers keep our Goods in ,Stock. 



BAINE, JOHNSTON & Co 

Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland, 

General Merchants and Ship Owners. 



..EXPORTERS OF.. N 

Codfish, Cod Oil, Seal Oil, Seal Skins t 
Codliver Oil (Norwegian process), 

Salmon, Split Herring, Scotch Cured 
Herring, Trout and Lobsters. 

Sealing Steamers for Arctic hire. Steamers on 
Labrador requiring COALS can be supplied at 
Battle Harbor, at entrance to Straits of Belle Isle, 
where there is telegraphic communication. 



.* NEWMAN'S 



Celebrated Port Wine, 



In Cases of 1 doz. each, 
at $8.25 in Bond ; also, 

in Hogsheads, Quarter Casks a _i d Octaves. 

f fcM 

Baine, Johnston & Co., 

AGENTS. 



Keeping Rich 

is frequently harder than getting rich. 
Many a man loses in three months the accumulations 
of thirty years. That is why you should take out an 
Insurance Policy which will give immediate protec- 
tion and ease your mind at once of all worry about 
those who are dependent upon you. Send at once 
for particulars of the Unconditional Accumulative 
Policy .issued by the Confederation Lite As- 
sociation, Toronto. It is the best policy contract 
issued in Newfoundland to-day, jt jt jt jt jt 



* FOR jt 



CHAS. O'NEILL CONROY, 

GENERAL AGENT FOR NFLD, 

Law Chambers, St. John's, N. F. 



HEADQUARTERS 

Books, Photographs, Post Cards, Albums, 
and all Literature relating to Newfoundland. 

Photographs of all the most beautiful and interesting scenes in and about 
Newfoundland and Labrador. The largest and most varied stock of 
Photographs, relating to Newfoundland. The work of a Master Artist. 
Price, 25 cents to #5.00. 

Newfoundland "The Norway of the New World," an exceedingly Hand- 
some Album, containing over 100 views of our choicest scenes in 
Newfoundland and Labrador, 40 cts. 

Newfoundland Illustrated. An Album of 63 views of Newfoundland and 
Labrador scenes, beautifully finished in tints, 40 cts. 

Piltorial Post Cards of every object of interest in City and Outports, 
complete set of 30 for 50 cts., or 20 cts. dozen Cards. 

Newfoundland at the beginning of the 20th Century. A treaties of History 
and Development, beautifully written, bound and illustrated, $3.00. 

Newfoundland Men, or Who's Who in Newfoundland, with portraits, by the 
Editor of The Daily News, 60 cts. 

History of Newfoundland. Geography of Newfoundland. 
Guide Book of Newfoundland, etc. 

POPULAR 

BOOKSTORE. 
ST. JOHN'S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 



DICKS & CO. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY; 



VOL. V. No. i. 



JULY, J905. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 



ncioroundland : ft Sportsman's Paradise. 



By W. /. Carroll. 




" HE must go. go, go away from here, 

On the other side the world he's over-due; 

'Send your road is clear before you, 

When the old spring fret comes o'er you, 
And the Red Gods call for you." 

LATE official estimate, approximates the amount of 
money spent annually for Uavelling expenses by the 
ever-increasing stream of American tourists at one 
hundred million dollars. They spend another hun- 
dred million dollars in purchases of every sort, and the freight 
and duty on these purchases amount to a fabulous sum. A 
large percentage of this sum goes to Europe and Eastern coun- 
tries, and is spent by ladies and invalids. Hunters and anglers 
in Norway, England, Scotland and Russia account for another 
portion, while thousands, who "must go away from here" 
" when the old spring, fret comes o'er them," hie themselves off 
to the backwoods of Canada, the hills of New Hampshire, the 
Adirondack, the Rocky Mountains, and the woods of Maine. 
Of late years the vanguard of this globe-trotting army have 
over marched the Continent and turned their steps towards 
Newfoundland. We, with our insular limitations, are apt to ex- 
aggerate our own advantages, when we are not belittling them. 
We do both alternately, except when we take some snarling old 
misanthrope as a prophet, and hrs diatribes against the country 
as gospel, and divide into rival camps, when the converts with 
newly acquired zeal, reassert for fact, the jocose dictum ofia pro- 
minent local politician, that " the interior of this country is not 
a howling wilderness. because there's nothing in it to howl." 

Our American visitors, as a class, have been, such genuine 
sportsmen, that they not only enjoyed the sport themselves, but 
during t.he last few years, have given their experiences in the 
leading American magazines and journals, with such enthusiasm, 
backed with such detailed fishing and shooting data, that now 
nearly every Shooting and Fishing Club in the States sends a 
representative member or two yearly. We will have more visi- 
tors this year than ever, and it will be the fault of our own 
neglect and shortsightedness if this stream cf visitors does n,ot 
increase hundredfold within the next decade. It was.estimated 
that there were between eight and twelve million dollars spent 
in Maine last year by tourists. There have been lately dozens 
of articles witten by visitors of repute in the British and Ameri- 
can sporting journals that prove that our shooting and fishing 
facilities are peerless in the world to-day, and as far as Maine is 
concerned for deer, salmon, grilse, sea and^brook trout, it is not 
in the same class at all~as' Newfoundland. 

When Mr. Moulton, member for Burgeo, asserted there were 
over a quarter of a million caribou in the Island, and that they 
were increasing annually at the rate of ten thousand, no one 
gainsaid him. He talked like a man who knew what he was 
talking about. These herds of deer properly preserved, will 
make the Island, the recreation ground of thousands of visitors 
for the next century. In confirmation of everything said about 
our caribou nlay be cited the written words of such men as 
F. C. Selous, J. Guille Millais, Admiral Kennedy, Sir Terence 
O'Brien, Sir Cavendish Boyle, and hosts of American sports- 
men. As for our salmon, grilse and sea trout, the evidence of 
outsiders is such, that it would be incredible if the witnesses 
were not men whose veracity is beyond all question. One 
American gentleman who has fished all Canada and from Maine 
to California, in an American magazine for this month, says, 
talking about brook trout and brown trout : " They are more 
common than perch and sun fish in the States. Catching them 
will srJqn; surfeit the angler. . . . Such catches are counted 
fij> the "dozen, one lot of seventy-two doz,en" being brought aboard 
tbejrain. . . . There are 687 lakes~6n the island and 50,000 
known, ones without names. The Island has 4,000 miles of sea^ 



coast, including the bays. . . . From one to six streams of 
clear green water run into each of these bays. . . . Every 
stream that reaches salt water is a salmon (or trout) stream. . 
Others have not even a tradition of a fish net, or rod or hook, 
and there are lakes never mapped where one maj camp and add 
to the fare, wild geese, ducks, willow grouse, ptarmigan, plover 
and curlew." . . . and so on. The salmon and sea trout returns 
for the last two or three years are enough to bring anglers from 
the ends of the earth. 

A little intelligent care now in preserving our rivers, will keep 
the Island, the greatest game fish country in the world, bar none, 
till some cataclysm changes its formation, and the countless 
lakes, ponds, gullies, rivers and streams cease to be. Clouds of 
witnesses attest that our game fish facilities are not equalled in 
the world. I have been informed by a credible authority that 
a certain British General, who is a witness lor the "other side" 
and one of the sportsmen who came for years, though he only 
had indifferent sport, caught, two years ago for his own rod, on 
the Upper Humber, the insignificant bag of joo salmon. Just 
imagine the furor in Great Britain if such a catch were taken in 
a British river. 

For camping, canoeing and yachting, our woods, lakes, rivers 
and bays, offer every inducement to the sportsman, whether he 
be seeking sport, photos, specimens, health, rest or recreation. 

The time has now come when we should make an intelligent 
effort, to turn these grand assets to good account. If Maine 
earns ten million dollars yearly, in the next decade we should 
earn as much. We have everything that Maine has to offer 
visitors, and more. We only lack good hotels and boarding 
houses. But these will follow. If our own people don't cater 
in this respect, there are others who will see the possibilities, 
and erect summer hotels in favoured regions along the railway. 
Our business men should advertise their wares in such a 
manner that tourists would be prevailed on to purchase all their 
supplies in the Island, thus avoiding the vexations of mislaying 
packages, paying freight, duty, and other expenses incidental to 
such transport. If travellers were convinced that they could 
get their outfit here as cheap as in New York, less the trouble 
and expense of carrying them along, many more would be 
induced to visit us. 

Our fish and deer will have to be protected and preserved. 
We will need a Game Commissioner, whose heart is in the work, 
who will organize a corps of intelligent sworn guides, into a 
body of game wardens, who will effectually police the whole 
country. He will see that the guides do not extort, as some are 
reported to have done last season, and thus disgust visitors who 
are ready and willing to pay liberally. The rivers must be pro- 
tected from poachers, and saved from pollution. It is said that 
some of our best rivers are now being polluted by sawdust. A 
careful inspection should be instituted and this prevented. I 
heard indirectly, but cannot vouch for its accuracy, that one 
river on Avalon was netted last season by an ex-warden and 
another, and that he got nine barrels of salmon for his share. 
Every^ guide should be sworn and licensed and shAild be amen- 
able to the law and should lose his license for any breach to 
which he was party, of the game regulations in his section. It 
should be made worth his while to enforce the law, and he should be edu- 
cated up to the point that it would be his interest, as well as that of the 
public, to enforce the law strictly. All the wardens' shooting and fishing 
reports should be tabulated by the Commissioner atnd distributed among 
the shooting and fishing clubs and sporting journals in Britain and Am- 
erica, and thus advertise our wares to the thousands who are on the move 
each eason seeking sport, change and rest. We should start in right now 
and make every effort to preserve our game. If the authorities only realize 
the magnitude of the fish and game resources, and their future possibilities; 
much time would not be lost before an effort would be made to keep 
Newfoundland in the futuie, what all visitors testify it now is, 
r _j, ._. . A SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



ClK Investiture of Our first flrcDbisbop. 




INGULARLY memorable in the history of this country 
was Friday, June 23rd, in this year, the Vigil of Saint 
John the Baptist, patronal feast of our city and of all 
Newfoundland, for on that day, to quote from the 
Pastoral Letter of the occasion, the Church in Newfoundland 
reached the climax of her hierarchical maturity, and has taken 
her place among the churches of Christendom in all the fullness 
and dignity of ecclesiastical development,- in the investiture of 
our first Archbishop with the Archiepiscopal Pallium in his 
Metropolitan Cathedral Church of St. John's. 

The import of this event, as well as the history of the develop 
ment of the Catholic Church in Newfoundland, has been dwelt 
on in the Pastoral, from which we have been quoting. It is 
our intention merely to describe the ceremony. 

At half-past eight o'clock on Friday morning the joy-bells 
rang out from the Cathedral towers. We may say of them that 
they, like Canterbury bells, 

" The City's voices be 
Ringing from the steeple, singing on the lea." 

Their melodious peals are as the familiar voices of friends in 
our city of St. John's; and joyously did the gentle morning 
breeze, a very /em's crepitans ausfer, bear their glad message 
over the city and the neighbouring country and out upon the 
deep. 

At a quarter to nine the procession issued from the Palace, 
passing down the lawn and across the great Cathedral close 
to the central door. 

First the Processional Cross between acolytes, then the choir 
boys, the clergy and the ecclesiastical dignitaries, and finally 
the Archbishop, accompanied by two Deacons of Honour and 
preceded by a Subdeacon bearing the Pallium on silver salver 
covered with a white veil. 

At the entrance to the Cathedral the procession was met by 
the Admipistrator, attended by two chaplains, by acolytes and 
a thurifer. , 

The Archbishop having been incensed by the Administrator, 
the Procession passed up the central aisle of the Cathedral, the 
choir chanting 

Ecce Sacerdos Magnus 

as the Archbishop entered. 

Arrived at the Sanctuary, the Archbishop ascended the throne, 
and " low" Mass was celebrated by the Lord Bishop of Saint 
George's, Junior Suffregan of the Province. The Pallium which 
had been laid on the throne credence was taken to the altar at 
the post-communion by the Master of Ceremonies. 

Immediately after Mass the Pastoral Letter was read by a 
Lector from the pulpit, then the Senior Suffregan, the Lord 
Bishop of Harbour Grace, the Officient proceeded, in cope and 
mitre, to a faldstool prepared on the predella of the altar. 
Simultaneously the Archbishop descended from the throne, and 
accompanied by his Deacons assistant knelt, dctecto capite, before 
the altar. 

The Mastei of Ceremonies taking the Pallium from the altar 
presented it to the Bishop Officient, who, sitting on the faldstool, 



placed it on the shoulders of the Archbishop, saying (in Latin) 

" To the honour of Almighty God, and of the Blessed Mary ever Virgin, 
" and of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, of our Lord Pius X. 
" Pope, and of the Holy Roman Church, and also of the Church of 
" St. John's committed to thee, we hand thee the Pallium, taken from 
' the body of Blessed Peter, in which is the plentitude of Office I'onti- 
" fical, with the appellation of Archbishop, to use it within thy Church 
"on certain days which are nailed in the grant of privileges by the 
" Apostolic See. In the name of the + Father, and of the + Son/ 
" and of the Holy + Ghost. Amen." 




HIS GRACE THE MOST REV. M. K. HOWLEY, D.D. 

Then the Archbishop wearing his pallium arose from his 
knees, the Archieposcopal Cross was brought forward and held 
by a clerk kneeling, with its figure turned towards the Arch- 
bishop, and the first Blessing in A-chiepiscopal rite was given 
by tl.e first Archbishop in Newfoundland. 

Thereupon the Te Deum was intoned, and as the dear old 
walls of our Cathedral re-echoed the solemn words of Ambrose 
and Augustine, they seemed to acquire yet a nearer meaning 

for us. 

Te per Orbcm Terrarum, 
Saiicta Conflict ur EC c It si a. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Photo, by James Vty] {Jonas C. Barter, Architect. 

INTERIOR OF CATHEDRAL OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST, ST. JOHN'S. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Deutfoundland as a Summer Resort/ 

WE have been privileged to peruse a letter received by Judge 
Prowse from J. Guille Millais, naturalist, artist and hunter, 
whose reputation among English speaking people is little inferior 
to that of his famous father Sir John Millais, Bart, President 
of the Royal Academy. In referring to the "Guide Book," 
among other complimentary things, occurs this paragraph, 
which epitomizes volumes of praise: 

"I think it is a splendid little book, just the very thing that was wanted, 
and bearing the great advantage of accuracy about the country without 
undue puffing ; the whole tone is excellent. * * * Your little chapter 
re History of Newfoundland is' a model of what such an introduction 
should be. * * * It is quite a little encyclopaedia * * * ." 

The Judge has always been an enthusiastic champion of the 
Island. Through his History the reading public has " re-dis- 
covered" Newfoundland. His articles in the Encyclopaedia 
Brittanica, and . thejMeading English literary and sporting mag- 
azines have do* w^ftSers in dispelling the mists, of misrepre- 



sentatiogsj-that seeiu, through some fatality, to enshroud our 
A keen sportsman, as well as a piquant writer, in the 
present volume, he has excelled himself. Personally, and with 



nds 
ent 




gfjbd right hand v he has done yeoman service in killing 
e class who looked upon , tbefeland as a private preserve, 
came annually and killSdaBBEttfgh deer and salmon to pay 
or their outfit, and then went a'agvamd decrieithe country, its 
ees, climate, and sporting^facilities. ^But in this little 
he has not only held up his end, but ne* has marshalled 
chsia strong force, all as ^enthusiastic as himself, that he be- 
comes simply invincible.^ Here is an array of contributors 
each a, leader in his linJ5setting forth facts about the Island 
Jhat are irresistible an* Incontrovertible : iSis Excellency Sir 
vW. McGregor (Governor), Admiral Sir W. R. Kennedy, K.C.B., 
J. Guille Millais, H. Hesketch Pritchard, F. C. Selous, Sir Bryan 
Leighton, Dr. Grenfell, Auditor General Berteau, J. P. Howley, 
F.G.S., Hotx"H. J. B. Woods (Postmaster General), and so on. 
These write on sport caribou, salmon, sea trout, &c. The 
rest of the book is devoted to everything appertaining to the 
Island. In.3act it" includes anything about which either a resident 
or non-resident is likely to be inquisitive, or want information. 
We should have a Tourist's Association here, whose duty it 
should be to place a copy of. this book in the reference library 
of every sporting journal in England and America, as well as in 
the reading rooms of every angling, shooting, yachting, canoeing 
and social club in all ^large cities in these countries. Failing 
such an association, clearly the duty devolves on the Minister 
of Marine and Fisheries, to use this splendid statement of New- 
foundland's possibilities and place it in the ken of the thousands 
in the outside world, who are seeking information of the very 
things we possessan abundance, and of which this little book is 
such an illuminating 



ewfoundlan 

"tertido'n: B 

all local booksellers. 




Prowse-KG,. LL .D., 
O.ie sTffiTirignet. At 




FRED KIRBY A VOUNG HERO. 



ON the zist April, 1905, His Excellency- the - Governor and 
suite .went to Burin and presented the Royal: Humane Society's 
Medal to Fred Kirby, aged 6, for saving', from drowning, thg 
life of a boy mueh.older than himself. Anhe time of the rescue 
he was about 5, and is the youngest,. to receive this honor. 






SUNSET BAY Ok ISLANDS. 



'N-LIGHT BAY OF ISLANDS. 

A WORD TO PROSPECTU^ VISITORS The quickest, cf, 

comfortable route, from NBil^Yoik or Halifax, is by the 

>.s. Kosalind and s.s. Silvi^^^e^ -HUJl^lJjWHSJY fittj 

boats, and the trip on them is immensely enjoyable. The fare is very 

modest, and the table appointments and attendants are efficient and up-to- 
date. Tickets and all information can be had in New 
York from Bowring & Co., 17 State Street; in Halifax, 
G. S. Campbell & Co. 

An ideal trip from St. John's, is either North in the s s 
Portia or South and West in the s.s. Prospero. The sail 
ing is calm and enjoyable ; the scenery beautiful ; the trip 
chock full of variety, touching into numerous quaint little 
towns on either route. The return fare West is $22.50, 
and North $17.50 It occupies about ten days, and gives 
the visitor a chance to see either way, more than half the 
bays, towns and villages in the Island. The tickets 
include meals and all attendance.. Fuller information, as 
to either of these trips may be had on application to 
Hon. Edgar Bowring, or Hon. John Harvey, who are 
rated as among the leaders of our younger and more pro- 
gressive business men in Newfoundland. They, or their 
firms, Bowring Bros., Ltd., or Harvey & Co., will furnish 
reliable information as to passage, etc., to any intending 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

tbe foreign Policp of the Radicals. 



By Rev. M. J. Ryan, Ph. D. 



SRSkHE spirited and vigorous policy of gallant little New- 
foundland, which has obtained so much admiration 
even in the country against which it is directed, stands 
in brilliant and striking contrast with the state of 
inertia to which the financially and commercially most powerful 
land in the world has been reduced by the factiousness of its 
Opposition. The United States has established preferential 
trade with Cuba, an island which it could not have annexed 
without British support; and when the question of preferential 
trade hung in the balance between the two parties, the scale was 
turned in favour of preferential trade by the cry that, without 
this, British trade was driving out American trade. The British 
commercial classes could do nothing but make the Foreign 
Office register a protest, a protest which the Foreign Office 
knew beforehand would be disregarded. Mr. Carnegie tried to 
prevent preferential trade in the United States lest it should 
provoke the British people to establish also preferential trade. 
But the American statesmen calculated more accurately than 
Carnegie the effects of faction in the United Kingdom. Mr. 
Morley declares that he is afraid of trouble with the United 
States. The Americans would be angry if the British dared to 
imitate them. Lord Rosebery, who professes to stand for the 
Empire, and who has been both Foreign Minister and Prime 
Minister, says also that he is afraid of the Americans. Still 
more recently, Germany has succeeded in establishing a system 
of preferential trade throughout Central Europe, that is aimed 
directly at British trade; but the capacity for resentment, and 
even the instinct of self preservation is paralyzed by the Opposi- 
tion. It is needless to say that the Americans are not such 
fools as to try to dictate a British tariff. 

The reading of Mr. Morley's speech caused me to turn to 
some of his writings to see whether his deliberate opinions 
agreed with his talk on the hustings; and here is what I find he 
says of the disputes about the boundary between British Am- 
erica and the United States in the forties, and of Palmerslon's 
stand against foreign aggression : ' Disputes about an Ameri- 
can (sic) frontier were bringing us within an ace of war with 
the United States. When Peel and Aberdeen got the quarrel 
into more promising shape, Palmerston characteristically taunt- 
ed them with capitulation." Now, what are the facts? The 
fact is that it was Palmerston's attitude in opposition that en- 
abled the Foreign Minister to bring the Americans to terms. 
On this point there can be no question, because both the Am- 
erican Minister (such was the title then) in London, and the 
British Ambassador in Washington, and many Americans with 
good opportunities of knowing, inform us that the settlement 
proposed was accepted by the Senate simply because they saw 
that a change of government was about to take place in the 
United Kingdom, that Palmerston was coming back to power, 
and that Palmerston would not concede more, and probably 
would not concede as much if the offered concession was once 
rejected. Palmerston's attitude, therefore, was exactly what 
secured the settlement of the question. It ought to be added 
that this happy result was also due in a large measure to 
O'Connell, who publicly declared that if Great Britain would 
give Ireland Home-Rule, Ireland would be only too happy to 
back up Great Britain in " taming the pride of the American 
Eagle." 

It may be said that Morley and Rosebery are not really afraid 
of the United States, but only affect to be so. But then there 



must be some class to whom they are appealing that are already 
afraid, or whom they wish to educate into a state of cowardice. 
Many queer things are said on the hustings in Ireland, but one 
thing can never be talked there, and that is the langujge of 
fear. The fact is that there is a class in Great Britain who at 
heart are more American and Republican than British and 
Monarchical. These men encouraged the American Revolution 
and by their assistance enabled it to succeed ; and they will 
side, every time, with the United States against their own 
country, especially when their own country is represented by 
their political opponents. They now want to Americanize the 
schools. This class comprises probably the majority of the 
Unitarians, of the Baptists, and of some other Seventeenth- 
Century Nonconformists. (The Methodists, on the other hand, 
have never allowed any dispute with the Anglican Church to 
lead them into disloyalty to the State which is allied with that 
Church). 

1 turn to another part of Mr. Morley's writings. What is to 
be thought of a statesman who, in the prime of life, exhibits for 
our admiration an old man in his dotage, " babbling of green 
fields" in the following fashion, against the maintenance of the 
Navy at the two-power standard?" " I am not only an English 
but a European statesman. My name stands in Europe for 
peace. What would be said (in Europe) of my active participa- 
tion in a policy that will be taken as plunging England into a 
whirlpool of militarism ?" Such is the language, such are the 
sentiments which Mr. Morley considers proper and admirable 
under the circumstances. For the poor old man, at his age, no 
one will feel anything but a respectful pity, together with a sense 
of mourning over what was once so great. But what is to be 
thought of the biographer who in the prime of his intellect 
agrees in holding that a statesman, in fixing the defences of the 
country, should be thinking of his own reputation among 
foreigners ? 

It is eminently to be desired that the British Opposition 
should be speedily saddled with the responsibilities of Govern- 
ment, and satiated with the power and emoluments of office. 
The longer they remain out, the more unscrupulous they will 
become. Never was the " grand old name" of Liberal so " soiled 
with all ignoble use," and so " defiled by every charlatan." The 
true Liberals are Balfour, Wyndham, and their supporters. The 
Opposition, when they get into office, will have to choose 
between the Labour Party and the German and Jew financiers 
and ' sweaters" of London. They will have to choose between 
the Catholics of Ireland and the Rev. Mr. Clifford's party. 
What they will do, no one can tell, because they cannot tell, 
themselves. But one thing we can tell, and it is this : " ^"they 
can get the support of the Duke of Devonshire and his follow- 
ing, they will betray both Labour Party, Nationalists, and 
'"Political Dissenters." That which shall be will be, and we 
shall see that which there will be to be seen. Meantime, it is a 
satisfaction to feel that the King, supported by the Nation, will 
be able to guide the foreign policy. Otherwise there would be 
much cause for anxiety over the effect of a change. For how 
does it happen that the Pro-Boer party, who had no sympathy 
for the oppressed British Colonists in the Transvaal, should be so 
consumed with sympathy for the blacks of the Congo that they 
are anxious to drive the Government into intervention, even 
though they are thereby driving the Belgians into the arms of 
the Pan-German party ? And how does it happen that the very 
party who raise this clamour about the doubtful " atrocities of 
the Congo" should be the foremost in denying or excusing the 
undoubted atrocities of the Russian autocracy. Belgium is a 
free country; Russia is the home of arbitrary government. Is 
it then because Belgium is weak, and Russia is strong ? Perhaps 
a!l that need be said of the arguments of this faction and of the 
audiences that swallow their arguments may be summed up in 
the remark of the old Roman that the lips and the lettuce 
agree when an ass is eating thistles. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Cocbranc Street Wctbodist CDurcl). 



fi. P. Couwrtlwaitc, IHJI., D.D., Pastor. 

By M. A. P. 




TANDING at the head of Cochrane Street in this city, 
with slender spire rising in graceful lines above the 
surrounding buildings, is the handsome edifice known 
as the Cochrane Street Methodist Church. We take 

pleasure in presenting in THE QUARTERLY an engraving of 

this sanctuary, and of the esteemed Pastor thereof, Rev. Dr. 

Cowperthwaite. The mother church of Methodism in this city 

has found it necessary, because of growth, to send off-shoots in 

times past east and west, so as to provide for the large numbers 

attending her communion. In 1873, George Street Church 

came into being, followed in 1882 by Cochrane Street Church, 

and at a later date by Alexander 

Street Church and still it is found 

impossible, even in the larger, 

newer Gower Street Church, to 

accommodate all who desire to 

attend there. 

The Cochrane Street Church, 

about which we shall speak more 

particularly in this article, was 

built from the plans of Mr. Gibb, 

Architect, at one time resident in 

this city. The contract was given 

to the late Mr. John Score, and the 

cost was $25,000. On the yth Sep- 
tember, 1880, Mrs. Job Shenton, 

with appropriate ceremonies, laid 

the corner stone, and on the i4th 

May, 1882, the building was dedi- 
cated to the service of Almighty 

God by Rev. Charles Ladner, 

President of the Conference. The 

event was of more than ordinary 

importance, and was attended by 

evidences of the Christian charity 

that existed at that time, and which 

still exists between the pastors and 

members of the Non-Conformist 

Churches. The Rev. D. Beaton 

(Congregationalist) preached at the 

afternoon service, while the Rev. 

L. G. MacNeil (Presbyterian) gave 

a fervid discourse in the evening. 

We are glad to say that Cochrane 

Street Church has, since that day, on many occasions welcomed 

the above preachers and their successors in the pastorate of 

these churches, and has listened with pleasure and profit to the 

scholarly, earnest and practical discourses which have fallen 

from their lips. 

Cochrane Street Church has been privileged in having in the 

Pastorate, divines, eloquent and practical in discourse and wise 

in administration. The Rev. George J. Bond, B.A., was the 

first pastor, and was followed by Revs. George Vater, Joseph 

Parkins, F. R. Duffill. John Pratt, George Paine, James Pincock, 

F. W. W. Des Barres, B.A., and H. P. Cowperthwaite, D.D., the 

present occupant of the position. 

Distinctive in talent, different in method and varied in age as 




COCHRANE STREET METHODIST CHURCH. 



the above ministers were, they each recognized the fact that 
Cochrane Street was essentially a "young people's church." 
What a privilege to minister to .those who are upon the thres- 
hold of life ! The sapling may be straightened and trained at 
will, but the full-grown tree defies your efforts, and your trouble 
is for naught. What an influence has been exerted upon the 
young men and women who for nigh a quarter of a century 
have passed in and out of Cochrane Street Church portals I 
Some are to-day labouring as Ministers of the Gospel in this 
and other lands, while we claim as ours the first lady missionary 
to the foreign field, in the person of Mrs. A. Pinsent who leaves 

for Japan in August next. And 
has not the young manhood and 
womanhood of Cochrane Street 
had its influence upon the pastors? 
We dare venture the opinion that it 
has. Who is there c that can come 
into touch with the vigour and 
spontaneity of youth and not feel 
the induction of vitality and viril- 
ity ? Certainly, not a pastor in 
sympathy with his flock. Why, 
even the present staid and reverend 
doctor of divinity, whom we rejoice 
to acknowledge as pastor, feels the 
exhilaration and is renewing his 
youth ! 

Because Cochrane Street is the 
Church of the young people, the 
Sunday School is one of the most 
important of the organizations in 
connection theiewith. Forty officers 
and teachers and over four hundred 
scholars are under the direct super- 
intendence of the Hon. H. J. B. 
Woods, who, although a Sunday 
School Superintendent fora quarter 
of a century, is also a good example 
of the effect of association with the 
young, in that he does not seem to 
get older, but rather younger, as 
the years roll by. 

The Epworth League, with Mr. 
W. J. Milley as President, is also 
a young people's organization in connection with Cochrane St. 
Church. It provides the machinery and the opportunity for 
the carrying out of practical work by the young people of the 
church along the lines of Christian Endeavour, relief of distress, 
visitation of the sick, and literary culture. Other departments 
there are in connection with this church, dealing with matters 
spiritual and matters physical, for we believe in looking after 
the body as well as the soul. 

We cannot pass, however, without reference to the musical 
services for which this church is noted. This work centres in 
Mr. Arthur Mews, who. in August of this year, will have com- 
pleted twenty-five years of service as an Organist, having first 
played in the old Gower Street Church in August 1880. The 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



choir at present consists of twenty-five picked voices ladies 
and gentlemen and is noted not only for its fine singing, but 
also for the esprit de corps which exists amongst the members, 
from the basso profundo Mr. S. H. Parsons, who is another 
"young man" down to the rosy-cheeked youngest soprano. 
The Anniversary Services of the Sunday School are marked by 
special singing by the scholars, which we think cannot be 
excelled anywhere. . 

The church interior is adapted to meet the demands which 
the congregation make upon it. The auditorium, capable of 
seating from 900 to 1,000 people, is most comfortable and 
home-like. The finish is in pitch-pine, which has become of a 
dark rich colour with the lapse of time. The pulpit and com- 
munion are of walnut, while the walls, painted a light green, 
form a pleasant and restful contrast. The school rooms are 
under the church proper, and are divided into main room, prim- 
ary rooms, class rooms and library. 

The presiding genius of this church is the Rev. Doctor 
Cowperthwaite, a man widely .known 
and highly esteemed, not only in 
Newfoundland, but also in the neigh- 
bouring Continent. 



a man ; at the eloquence born of close kinship and sympathy 
with mankind ; at the pointed and practical thought coming out 
of an experience of over half a century ? What a privilege for 
the young people of Cochrane Street Church to have such a one 
to inspire them with faith and hope I Aye, and for the old 
people, too, who appreciate the good Doctor to the full, and 
wish him many years of happy service in proclaiming the glad 
tidings of the old Gospel. 



H Faithful friend. 

fty W. P. Wornell, Brigus. 
WHEN times of grief and sorrow come, 

And life seems wrapped in fruitless aims ; 
Who has not found a joy untold, 

To have a friend to share his pains ? 



After spending three 



DR. COWPERTHWAITE was born at 
Sheffield, N. B., on November 3oth, 
1838, was ordained at Halifax in 
1867, and graduated at Mount Allison 
College, taking the degree of A.B. in 
1867, A.M. in 1870, and D.D. in 
1903. The Doctor was stationed on 
the following Circuits before coining 
to Newfoundland : In New Bruns- 
wick, at Sussex Vale, Fairville, and at 
Queen Square. St. John ; in Nova 
Scotia, at Pugwash, Windsor, and 
Horton ; in Prince Edward Island, at 
Tryon, Cornwall, and Charlottetown, 
arriving in Newfoundland July i5th, 
1890. His fivst charge was Gower 
Street the mother church where he 
was a successful pastor for three years; 
then George Street, and Carbonear. 
years on this last named Circuit, Gower Street unanimously 
invited him for a second term. He .remained there for four 
years, then coming to Cochrane Street where he is just com- 
pleting his second year. 

The Church has highly honoured the reverend gentleman, he 
having been elected President of the New Brunswick and Prince 
Edward Island Conference in 1889, and President of the New- 
foundland Conference in 1896. 

Dr. Cowperthwaite was married in July, 1867 to Miss Annie 
S. Buchanan, daughter of W. M. Buchanan, Esq., of Glasgow, 
Scotland, sometime Lecturer in -Chemistry and Geology in con- 
nection with the University of Glasgow. 

Dr. and Mrs. Cowperthwaite have three children Dr. Walter, 
of Sydney, C. B., Dr. Hunter, of this city, and Mrs. March, 
wife of W. S. March, Esq., Ph. D., also of St. John's. 

Rev. Dr. Cowperthwaite is a man of large experience, broad 
views and deep sympathies ; a man who keeps abreast of the 
thought and the movement of the age ; liberal enough to give a 
chance to the new idea, but sufficiently conservative to keep it 
from ousting the old idea till it had proved its right to do so. 
Can you wonder at the attractiveness of the preaching of such 




REV. H. P COWPERTHWAITE, M.A., D.D. 



When 'midst the highways of our life 
The great mad world looms in our view, 

And cheering words and looks we need 
Do not we need a friend that's true ? 

As on this earth we often meet 
With disappointment and despair; 

And troubles thickly round us rise; 

How good to have a friend who's dear ? 

As one lone being on an isle 
finds no one to caress or cheer, 

So does a friendless youth in life 
Miss that which others hold so dear. 

Oh ! who can value half the worth 
Of one, to whom our deepest thought 

We can relate, and feel secure, 

Because his heart with love is wrought ? 

Be it our aim to find a friend, 
That in a time of trouble stands 

Ready with fond word to heal 

The aching heart, with prompt amends. 



When home surroundings are no more 

But city's din is in our ears. 
And home's fond hearts are far away, 

And strangers chance to heighten cares. 

Then some one's love we crave, to fill 
The vacant spot our hearts attain 

Some loving faces us to greet. 

To cheer and raise our hopes again. 

Oh ! can this earth a picture show 
That's sadder than a friendless life ? 

Or can an artist paint the joy 

Of one who's found a loving wife ? 

Oh 1 how we feel our pulses thrill ; 

When some one whom we love has given 
A token of their love teturned. 

Of hopes fulfilled, of barriers riven. 

May friends be true in word and deed, 
And seek to act as good, as true, 

As doth become a constant friend, 
For then no fault there'ill be to rue. 



8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



D)p First Salmon. 

By Dan. Carroll. 

FAR up the river the cascades leap, 
The shallow rapids in tumult sweep, 
The deep brown tints where the waters sleep 

Are lit by the glint and gleeming 
Of sun-flecked foam that weaves in glee; 
But this shadow holdeth a charm for me, 
So I'll stay to find of \vhat mystery 

The still deep pool is dreaming. 

The flies with an artful hand I've hung; 
The line is long and the cast is flung. 

And drawn close up where the rattle plays, 

With expectant hand and steady : 
Graceful it sweeps o'er the waters clear, 
When presto! a thrill akin to fear 
A roll a plunge a strike! a cheer; 

Then the captor's instincts my spirit sways, 
And my staunch canoe stands ready. 

The rod is raised and the reel awakes; 
Oh ye who've fished over teeming lakes, 
Who know how the " Silver Doctor" takes. 

Know, too, of the joy that thrilled me 
As melts the line from the reel away : 
Will he never pause, will he never stay ? 

Is the pent-up thought that fills me. 

Oh the screaming reel and the wild career 
Of that racing fish, and the straining 
For victory ; 
The repeatedly 

Recovered line, and the gaining 
Of advantage grand. 
As we near the strand, 
Where the glitt'ring sand is drifted; 
Till it seemed to me, 
In my ecstacy 

E'en the green-brown rocks they lifted 
Their sparkling heads o'er the waters clear, 

And the deeper currents swelling, 
The song of the crystal spray to hear, 
For I ween that the river far and near 

The tale of the chase was telling, 
**** 

That full fulfilment of promised joy. 
I travelled a thousand miles to know; 
Now oft comes a whisper, " Rise and go 

There are greater gods than Mammon." 
And I dream of that river far away. 
Lit by a halo of silv'ry spray, 
Where I caught a wonderous fish one day, 

My first, my brave first salmon. 

Over the city's ceaseless roar, 

The scream of traffic's relentless war ; 
The noise of the million restless feet 

On the hot parched pavement falling; 
There comes a song to me evermore, 

From the wooded banks of a stream afar. 
" Come from the dust of the city street, 
Here is the sportsman's true retreat. 
Come where the lakes are beauteous, come f 
This land of mine is the hunter's home 
Where antlered monarchs in freedom roam 

Thro' vistas of scenes enthralling." 
Ever o'er Gotham's ceaseless beat 
Of monster works, and the furnace heat; 
" Finances frenzy"; the " set's" deceit ; 
To the heart of my longings in accents sweet, 
The voice of the Humber is calling. 




HUMBER RIVER. 

rtn Interesting Seller from an Old neutfoundlander. 

WE have much pleasure in reproducing the following letter 
from a subscriber in Australia. Although he is 91 years old, 
his handwriting, his own assertion to the contrary notwithstand- 
ing, is as firm as that of many a man not half his years. The 
Mr. Grieve he speaks of was uncle of Mr. Walter Baine Grieve, 
of this city. Some of our older readers may remember the 
writer, so we give his letter in full, and incidently illustrate the 
saying, that the QUARTERLY, like its namesake the Newfound- 
lander, is found in all parts of the world. 

" MOOLARA," South Yarra, Melbourne, Feb. 1st, 1905. 
Mr. John J. Evans, 34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Nfld. : 

Dear Sir, Thanks for THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY, which duly 
came to hand. The contents send me back to my early days in dear old 
Terra Nova, the land of my birth, 6th March, 1814, when my grandfather, 
Sheriff Bland, was then High Sheriff of the Island. And among other 
interesting names and places, I see the photo, of my good old friend Mr. 
Walter Grieve, who must now be somewhere near my own age, and glad 
am I to see he looks so hale and hearty. Many other names I see must be 
sons of those I knew so well. Should you see Mr. Grieve tell him I am 
still in the land of the living; but'my dear wife, whom he will likewise 
remember, passed away about eight years ago. He will remember our 
marriage, as he was my best man at it. The Rev. Francis Vey was Curate 
of the church here, of which I am senior warden, but is now over in Auk- 
land, New Zealand. He writes me he is very happy and comfortably 
placed there. Old age is making my hand shake, but general health good. 
Excuse this yarn, I only intended it to enclose subscription for two years 
of "The Newfoundland Quarterly." Yours very truly. 

J. B. HUTTON. 

MEMO. I find the Post Office here cannot give an order direct, but that 
the London office will send the order on, and that you will find it at the 
Post Office in your own city. Our money is still s. d., so the order is 
for 55. stg. They tell me this is the first P. O. Order ever issued here for 
your part of the world, and could give me no document to enclose. 

J. B. H. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Award our Material 
the "Palm," for Cor- 
rectness of Style 
and Durability. 




Jackman 



Tne 
Tailor's 



Ladies' Furnishing Department 

Corner Adelaide & New Gower Streets. 

CONSTABULARY fIRE DEPARTMENTS-EIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



EASTERN DISTRICT. 

NO. LOCATION OF BOXES. 

12 Temperance Street, foot Signal hill Road. 

13 Factory Lane. 

J4 Water Street, foot Cochrane Street. 

15 Duckworth Street, corner King's Road. 

16 Cochrane Street, corner Gower Street. 

17 Colonial Street, corner liond Street. 

18 Water Street, East. 

112 Inside Hospital, Forest Road, special box. 
113 Penitentiary, corner Quidi Vidi Road. 
114 -Military Road, corner King's Bridge Road 
115 Circular Road, corner Bannerman Road. 
116 King's Bridge Rd., near Railway Crossing 
117 Opposite Government House Gate. 
1 1 8 Rennie's Mill Road. 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

21 Head Garrison Hill. 

22 Water Street, foot Prescott Street. 

23 Water Street, foot McBride's Hill. 

24 Gower Street, corner I'rescott Street. 

25 Court House Hill. 

26 Duckworth Street, corner New Gower Street . 

27 Cathedral Square, foot Garrison Hill. 

28 Long's Hill, and corner Livingstone Street. 
221 Military Road, Rawlins' t ross. 
223 Hayward Avenue, corner William Street. 
224 Maxse Street. 

225 Gate Roman Catholic Orphanage, Uelvedere. 
226 Carter's Hill and Cookstown Road. 
227 Lime Street and Wickford Couit. 
228 Freshwater Road and Cookstown Road. 
231 Scott Street, corner Cook Street. 
232 Inside Savings' Hank, special box. 
233 Flamming Street. 
234 Queen's Road, corner Allen's Square. 
235 Centre Carter's Hill. 



WESTERN DISTRICT. 

31 Water Street, foot Adelaide Street. 

32 New Gower Street, corner Queen Street. 

34 Waldugrave and George Street. 

35 Water Street, foot Springdale Street. 

36 Water Street, foot Patrick Street. 

37 Head Pleasant Street. 

38 Brazil's Square, corner Casey Street. 

39 Inside Boot & Shoe Factory, special box. 
312 Horwood Factory. 
313 LeMarchant Rd., head Springdale St. 
331 LeMarchant Rd., head Barter's Hill. 
332 Pleasant Street. 

334 Patrick Street, corner Hamilton Street. 
335 Inside Poor Asylum, special box. 
336 Torpey's, Cross Roads, Riverhead. 
337 Hamilton Avenue, corner Sudbury Street. 
338 Flower Hill, corner Duggan Street. 

42 Southside, near Long Bridge. 

43 Central, Southside. 

44 Dry Dock. 

45 Southside, West. 

46 Road near Lower Dundee Premises. 



On the discovery of a fire, go to the nearest box, break the glass, take the key, open the door of the large box. and give the alarm by pulling the Hook all the way down once, Ihen let 
go and listen for the working ot the machinery in the box. If you do not hear it, pull again. After giving the alarm, remain at the box, so as to direct the Fire Brigade where to go. 
CAUTION. Persons wilfully giving false alarms, or damaging the Kire Alarm apparatus, will be rigorously prosecuted. 
"FIRE OUT SIGNAL." Two strokes on the large Hell, repeated three times, thus: II II II. 

JOHN R. McCOWEN, Inspector-General. 




PUBLIC NOTItf. 



\lk/HEREAS considerable difficulty has been experienced 
in Departments of His Majesty's Government in Eng- 
land in connection with the attestation of signatures to docu- 
ments executed in this Colony and required for use by Foreign 
Governments, by reason of a lack of knowledge of the genuine- 
ness of the signatures to the same ; 

Those of the Public, therefore, who may have occasion to 
send certificates, or powers of attorney, or judicial acts to any 
of the Departments of His Majesty's Government in England 
for legal use in England or in any Foreign Country, are hereby 
notified that in future they will require to have such documents 
authenticated in this Colony by His Excellency the Governor or 
the Officer for the time being administering the Government.. 

R. BOND, 

Colonial Secretary. 
Colonial Secretary's Office, 
May nth, 1905. 



NEWEOINDLAND PENITENTIARY. 

BROOM DEPARTMENT. 



Brooms, & Hearth Brushes, * Whisks. 

A Large Stock of BROOMS, HEARTH BRUSHES and 
WHISKS always on hand ; and having reliable Agents 
in Chicago and other principal centres for the purchase of 
Corn and other material, we are in a position to supply the 
Trade with exactly the article required, and we feel as- 
sured our Styles and Quality surpass any that can be 
imported. Give us a trial order, and if careful attention 
and right goods at right prices will suit, we are confident 
of being favoured with a share of your patronage. 

(@ = A11 orders addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt 
attention. 

ALEX. A. PARSONS, Superintendent. 

Newfoundland Penitentiary, June, i<?oj. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 





CAPT. CLARK, 



S. S. ROSALIND RED CROSS LINE. 



"T" i F C d 

i ' n c. r" 




GROSS LI 



SAILING BETWEEN 




,* SAILING BETWEEN ..* 

New York, Halifax, N. S., and St. John's, N. F. 



For a short vacation, the round trip 
by one of these steamers is hard to 
beat, and is cheap enough to suit the 
most modest purse. 



AGENTS: 

HARVEV & Co., and BOWRING. BROS., LTD., St. John's, N. F. 
G. S. CAMPBELL & Co., Halifax, N. S. 
BOWRING & Co., 17 State Street, New York. 



UP-TO-DATE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION. 

Rates To New York, Single. .. .$34.00 ; Return ... .$60.00 ; Steerage ....$ 1 3.00 ; Return. ,. .$25.00 



" Halifax, 



.... 18.00 ; 



34.00 ; 



6.00 ; 



12.00 



FREIGHT CARRIED AT THROUGH RATES TO ALL POINTS. 




CAPT. FARRELL. 




S. S. SILVIA RE1) CROSS LINE. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



NEWFOUNDLAND 

LIME-SAND BRICKS. 

(Size 9 x 4^ x 3). 

WE GUARANTEE THESE BRICKS 

As Good and Cheaper 

Than any Imported Brick. 

GOOD PRESSED FACE-BRICKS 

Selling at Lowest 
Market Rates by The 

MWIOIMM \M> BRICK & MAMI ACIlRIMi Co., Ltd., 
E. H. & G. DAVEY, Managers. 

Telephone, 345. Brick Plant Works, JOB'S Cove. 

Water Street, St. John's. 



Everything you need for __ 
Camping and Picnic Season. 



200 cases Tinned Meats (T^C 
Fruit in Tins, dt Fruit in Glass. 
Pickles, Sauces, Syrups, Cordials. 
Irish Hams & Bacon, Irish Pig's 
Heads, Fidelity Hams & Bacon. 



J. D. RYAN, 

281 Water Street. 



Notice to Mariners, 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 

No. 2 of 19O5. 



Notice to Mariners. 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 

No. 3 of 19O5. 



IRON ISLAND, 

Off entrance to Burin, Placentia Bay. 



SQUAREY ISLAND, 

on the Port hand entrance to Bonavista Harbor. 



Latitude. . . 47 02' 40" North 
Longitude.. 55 06' 50" West. 



Latitude. . . 48 39' oo" North 
Longitude.. 53 07' 40" West . 



(Vide Notice to Mariners No. 8, '04.) 

I^OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a square pyramidal 
wood Tower, with flat roofed keeper's dwelling attached 
to Northein side all painted White, has been erected on Iron 
Island, from which, on and after the 22nd May, inst., a BELL, 
struck by machinery, will be sounded during thick or foggy 
weather, giving ONE STKOKE EVERY TEN SECONDS. 

ELI DA WE, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, St. John's, Newfoundland, 
May ist, 1905. 



IVIOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a square pyramidal 
' ^ wood Tower, with octagonal drum and lantern, all painted white, 
has been erected on Squarey Island from which a Fixed Red 6th order 
Dioptric I-ight will be exhibited on and after the first day of July (instant). 

The light is elevated S7 feet above sea level and should be seen in all 
directions seaward from a distance of nine miles. 

Height from sea level to base of tower 39 feet 6 inches. 

Height from base of tower to ventilator on to]) of lantern 2 1 feet 9 inches. 

The Keeper does not reside at the station. 

Owing to the uncertainty of landing on the Island, the light will be con- 
tinuous and not constantly watched. 

EUI DAWE, 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
Department of Marine and Fisheries St. John's, Newfoundland, July, 1905. 



T. J. 




151 Duckworth Street, J 112 Military Road. 
IMPORTER OF 

Fine Groceries, Fruit, Confectionery, 
Provisions, Feeds, etc, 

Special attention given to 

Tourist's and Sportsman's Outfits, 

Price List sent on application. 

ORDERS SOLICITED. 

We Guarantee the Quality of our Goods. 

T. J. 



The Best is *g * * 
The Best and Cheapest, 

G. Browning & Son's 

Biscuits and Crackers 

Are acknowledged 
to be the Best 

Sold by all Shop Keepers, 
j fifty Varieties. 



\**ns*ts\ 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Supreme Court ot Newfoundland 

List of Deputy Sheriffs. 



SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 



RESIDKNCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMKS. 


RESIDENCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMES. 


Ferryland 


Ferryland 


George Geary. 
John T. Fitzgerald. 
William Trainer. 








Belleoram 




William Grandy. 
Joseph Camp. 
Benjamin Chapman. 
Albert Kelland. 
Matthew Nash. 
Prosper A. Garden. 
James H. Wilcox. 
Henry Gallop. 
Thomas B. Doyle. 
Abraham Tilley. 
M. E. Messervey. 
Simeon Jennex. 
Daniel J. Gilker. 
Geo. Halfyard. 




( 


, Pushthrough 


>< 




Placentia and St. Mary's. 




., 




Francis R. Curtis. 
A. Collins. 


Burgeo 


Burgeo and La Poile .... 
St. George 




Ramea 


P 




, 1 


Peter Manning. 
Howard Parsons. 
Stephen While. 
Cyrus Heck, sr. 

William G. 1'ittman. 
Eli 11 an is. 


Channel 


Flit Island 


Codroy 












Robinson's Head 






St. George Sandy I't. . 
Wood's Island 








(' - 1 P- k 










St Barbe 







NORTHERN DISTRICT. 



RESIDENCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMKS. 


RESIDENCE. 


DISTRICTS. 


NAMES. 




St Barbe 


James Johnson. 






Noah Verge. 
Isaac Manuel. 
John C. James. 
Noah Miller. 
Edmond Benson. 
R. Currie. 
Caleb Tuck. 
George Janes. 
George Leawood. 










La Scie 
Tilt Cove . 


t 










Constable T. Walsh. 
Thus. E. Wells. 
Peter Campbell. 
Thomas Roberts. 
William Lanning. 
Peter Moores. 
J. T. Hendle. 
George S. Lilly. 
Alfred G. Young. 
William Baird. 


Bonaventure 




I -ittle Bay 








Little Bay Islands. . 


t 








t 






Leading Tickles 


, 








, 








t 


Bay Bull's Arm 




.Exploits 


t 






Eliel Noseworthy. 
George Bussey. 
Charles Rendell. 
A. Targett. 
Moses Bursey. 
Reuben Curtis. 
Eli Garland. 
Ewen Kennedy. 
Ernest Forward.- 
John Trapnell. 
Jesie Gosse. 
A. Hieilihy. 
Benjamin Butler. 
William Cole. 
James Murphy. 
William Maher. 
William Butler. 
John H. Ley. 
John H. Bennett. 
Edward Harding. 




lt 






T\villingate 


H 






Moreton's Harbor 
Fogo 


u 








Ambrose Fitzgerald. 
George Foster. 
Philip Perry. 
John Porter. 
Robert Pike. 
Adam Bradley. 
Jacob Hefferton. 
Wm. Sainsbury. 
Peter Roberts. 






Barr'd Island 










, 


Lower Island Cove. . . . 


lt 


Change Islands 


i 





Gander Bay 


( 






Musgrave Harbor,. .. 


t 


Harbor Grace 


Harbor Grace 


Pinchard's Island . 






J 


Bay Roberts 









Brigus 
Conception Harbor . . . 


Port -de-Grave 
Harbor Main ,. . . 


Greenspond 





Thomas Wornell. 
Charles Kean. 


Glovertown 







u 


Gambo 


, 


Middle Bight 


,( 


Brooklyn 


, 




Bell Isl'd Lance Cove. 
Bell Island Beach 




Salvage 


t 


John Burden. 




Alexander Bay 


i 


M 


King's Cove. . 


u 









June, 1905. 



JAMES CARTER, Sheriff, Newfoundland. 
W. J. CARROLL, Sub-Sheriff, 



!" Place to Get a Suit of Clothes 

Made to Order, or Readymade, is 





We keep in stock English, Scotch and Canadian goods. 
Also, Shirts, Ties, Caps, Braces, etc. ,,*,, 

C. J. MALONE, , Tailor and Furnisher, 



268 Water Street. 



Parlor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 



Church Seats. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 



T. MARTIN,^ 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Cower Street. 

Repairing Furniture Horses and Vans for 

a Speciality. Removing Pianos, &c. 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

CD* Uloodland Caribou. 



By IV. A. B. Sclater. 




SHOT NEAR THE RAILWAY TRACK. 



?HE "Woodland C-iribou" is -the only representative of 
the Great Reindeer family " Cervus Tarandus" found 
in Newfoundland. Others of the family are Mountain 
Caribou, Queen Charlotte's Islands ; Greenland Cari- 
bou, and a smaller one called the Barren Lands Caribou, found 
on the shores of Hudson's Bay and Northern Labrador. 

Our Woodland Caribou is by far the finest of the family, as 
well as the largest, and is really confined to the Island. None 
of the others approach him in beauty of form, nor do any of 
them carry such beautiful antlers (many having been taken with 
from forty to fifty points). There are two migrations each year, 
one from the south towards the north-west parts of the Island, 
where in May and June they bring forth their young. The old 
bucks of the herd then take to the higher ground, and the does 
to the river banks and small marshes in the woods, where they 
bring up their young and hide from the bucks, who, it is well 
known, would kill or maim the fawns through jealousy. Many 
are destroyed at this time by wolf and lynx. The second migra- 
tion begins as soon as the weather becomes stormy, and the 
frosts set in, about the end of October, towards the south-east. 
Not all, however, come south, as many are found on the barren 
hills of the north and west all winter. About the end of August 
and early in September, the does begin to leave the river banks 
and gather in herds on the higher grounds, and big marshes, 
where they meet the stags coming up fiom the north. On the 
first of October the rutting season begins, and lasts about 
twenty-five days. After that, if the weather is fine and soft, 



they move back to their old feeding grounds, and remain till 
the frosts and snow drive them south. They swim lakes, rivers, 
and even arms of the sea in their migration. 

The males shed their antlers every year, but the females do not, 
and as a proof that it is so, many does are found in early spring 
with antlers not coverd with velvet, while others are found in 
summer with the velvet still on. The horn covering, or velvet 
as it is called, is formed of minute points of the veins or blood 
vessels which nourished the antler when growing. The antler 
at this time is very soft and easily broken, and for this reason 
the stags keep to the barrens and high lands. After the first of 
September the bucks begin to clean their horns and get the velvet 
off them. The horn-covering or velvet having been got rid of, 
a quantity of blood remains on the horn, which gives it the red 
color so much coveted by sportsmen. 

On one occasion I saw a stag cleaning his horns on an old 
stump in a marsh, near a shallow pond, into which he waded 
several times, going back each time to the stump for another 
rub. A long strip of velvet appeared to give him some trouble 
to get rid of, as he had to make several trips to the old stump 
before he did so. Was he using the pond as a dressing glass ? 
After the velvet has been all removed the antlers are hard and 
strong (and they need be), for now the fighting goes on in 
very earnest, and many a broken antler, and torn hide have I 
seen by the last of October. 

They generally fight with the front feet, rising on their hind 
legs and striking out with the fore. The outcome of the fight 



10 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



is pretty hard on the beaten one, as every doe in his herd will 
join those following his rival. At this time the stags are easily 
called within range by making a noise rather like the grunting 
of a pig. 

On the Gaff Topsail grounds a few years ago one of the 
guides with a party of sportsmen put the skin and antlers of a 
stag over his head, walking out into the marsh gave the usual 
call. Well ! the old gent responded ; and had no help been at 
hand, the old guide would have had a bad half hour; as it was 
he did not get over the fright for the day. They are easily 
approached from the leeward side, but with the slightest whiff 
from windward, they are off back over the track they came by, 
a practice often taken advantage of by old hunters. 

The number of Caribou on the Island has, I think, been 
greatly over-estimated. I have heard (interested) people say that 
one million would be near the mark, others again one quarter 
of that number; but if you leave out the inhabited district, and 
also that much frequented by people, as well as the great lakes 
and rivers, and allow three to the square mile, I think that fifty 
thousand would be nearer the mark. Some one will say that 
there are more than three to the mile ; true, as to some miles, 
but there are many miles which contain not one: even in the 
best deer country. I have hunted the famous Gaff-Topsail 
grounds for clays to get meat for camp,' without having seen one. 
and I have found it just the same in other parts of the country 
during the summer when the deer are scattered all over the 
feeding grounds. 

They suffer greatly from the attacks of the black fly, and al. o 
of the deer fly, 'which deposits its eggs in the hide along each 
side of the back bone and in the nostrils. Later on those eggs 
grow; to such a size as to completely fill the nostrils, while those 
deposited near the back bone look like huge black-heads, and if 
the lijicle be removed (in June) they will be found to have pene- 
trate^l the skin, which when dressed will be found full of holes 
and useless for any purpose. The hair of" the Caribou is biit'lc : 
and like that of most of the deer family, hollow anil very light 



'a small bag filled with it will keep the weight of a man afloat 
The form of the Caribou's foot is rather curious. Between 
the toes is a cell-like cavity, which is not seen till the hoof is 
split open. It is lined with hair, and old hunters call it the 
scent-bottle, and say that when the deer suspects the approach 
of an enemy, he lifts the hind foot, smells it, and is off at oncei 
I think, however, that it has something to do with the expanding 
of the hoof when going over snow or soft marshes. They are 
easily approached from the lee side, but if they get the slightest 
whif of you from the windward they are off. They don't appear 
to trust much to their eyes, for unless moving they take no 
notice of man. 

And now a word as to how the slaughter on the West and 
North Coasts is carried out. The arrangement is a kind of 
grub-stake affair. The hunters are fitted out by a local man 
with powder, shot and provisions, he paying himself out of the 
proceeds of the trip. The method is this: the hunters go upas 
far as possible into the country by boat, and camp. They then 
scatter all over the hills tin 1 a herd is found, when the whole 
party starts together, and one man takes charge. His busi j 
ness is to place the men, with guns, in the different leads, 
one man in each; and when all is ready he goes round to the 
windward of the herd and starts driving them towards the leads. 
The waiting hunter shoots the leading deer, the others turn 
back to another lead to be met in the same manner, and so 
on till the deer become so frightened that they flock together, 
and are often nearly all killed by the hunters who have closed 
in round them. The number taken would not nearly represent 
the number destroyed, as about sixty per cent, are does, which 
would in a few weeks drop their fawns, and many wounded 
would escape to die in agony in the bush. When the hunters 
are satisfied that is when they can get no more the carcasses 
are taken to the edge of the ice, to be left there till the steamer 
calls for them. If mild weather prevails, many are thrown 
away; but, if frosty, the meat comes to St. John's fresh. Con- 
sidering the slaugnter by market hunters and tourists, the wonder 
is that they are not decreasing. 




Photo by S. II. Parsons. 



WHEN MIGRATING THEY SWIM I.AKKS, RIVERS, ANT) EVEN ARMS OF THF. SEA. 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



11 



H Yankee's Impressions or Pciuroundlana 

Us a Sportsmen's Resort. 

By L. F, Brown, New York, 
& FTER two visits to Newfoundland and much experi- tism of Newfoundland lies rather in her superb loneliness, her 



^.j ence, study "and recollection, what most impresses 
^ me is the novelty, unexpectedness and absorbing 
interest of the sylvan scenery. Tundras, headlands, 
pinnacles, scantily forested barrens, gray moss, bake-apple 




GOING UP GRAND LAKE. 

berries, and a wildness and remoteness that in regions like 
upper Red Indian and Grand Lakes and the upper Humber 
Valley, grip the heart with a half sense of fear, so appalling and 
removed from human presence are the streams, forests, lakes 
and mountains. It is not that the caribou shooting is fine, that 
the trout-fishing is practically omnipresent in the lakes almost 
always in sight of the traveller or the canoeist, that the grilse 
and salmon and sea-trout are in every stream, up which they 
can go from salt water. That sport may be had in Quebec, 
Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick in rich measure. The hypno- 




majestic repose, and the unusual landscapes. 

No man who has a heart can pass through the Humber canon 
unmoved. Steady Brook Falls, Marble Mountain, the clear, 
dark river, the cliffs and colors, heights crowned with cedar and 
spruce, fairly burn their own personalites into the heart of the 
beholder. No more silent, remote, charming spots than Glover 
Island of Grand Lake, or Buchan Island where the last of the 
Red Indians left this world. The weird, strange forms of the 
Topsails looking down on those leagues of splintered rock; the 
fantastic forms into which the water has carved the ravines and 
recesses of Kilty's Brook, the absolute and grateful knowledge 
of breathing air no one ever breathed before. It is so refreshing 
and delightful to the man on vacation from the States, to look 
O'.:t on a dozen " ponds," some of them over thirty rnile^ l<->n<j. 
o'hers to be seen from both sides of his tent, u.n . 01 uuntin<,- 
trail, and know that practically no one has ever fi>hed there; 
that no boats are on the smaller lakes, which are vet full of 




TENTING ABOVE UPPER END OF GRANT) LAKE. 



SHOT AT UPPER HUMBER, B1RCHY LAKE. 

I 

trrut. The wealth of angling and hunting possibilities is bewil- 
dering. And how the countrj mesmerizes is shown by the fact 
that after a fortnight in Newfoundland, the views on the return 
hoipe, as seen from the windows of the train as it passes through 
Cape Breton, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Maine seem 
" stale, flat and- unprofitable." 

The hard, stern life of tbfe natives, their honesty, simplicity, 
and he.ilthful fortitude; and happiness amid such stern experi- 
ences, their unfailing courtesy and welcome to the sportsman, 
and tireless care and attention when camp attendants, the com- 
parative absence of money and the substitution of barter, the 
meils of canned rabbits, bike-apple sauce, marmalade and 
inevitable tea, the children swarming in many a tiny home, 
t'leir gooJ health, and often ragged and bearfooted exposure to 
wet and cold; the forest fires, hundreds of miles of fire swept 



12 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




LOOKING FOR CARIBOU TRACKS. 

country lying in sad ruin and desolation ; the softer scenes such 
as at Bay of Islands and St. George's Ponrl; the chuckling, 
racing waters over and between rocks often so thick that the 
bottom of the stream seems half above it; the Gut and Protest- 
ant Chapel at Placentia, the numerous islands at Notre Dame 
Bay ; the salmon swarming up the Falls above Willow Steady 
on the Humber; the sombre, blue-black Blomidon with snow on 
its league-long sides, even in August; and superb Serpentine; 
the unknown regions swarming with caribou west of Fortune 
Bay ; the waters at Holyrood changed in hue by the myriads of 
caplin that have come to lay their eggs in that sandy beach, the 
shore piled with the dead fish in a row a foot deep, three feet 
wide and two miles long; the dull red of the sails everywhere 
as the cod-fishing smacks go in and out ; the flakes, queer smells, 
moss on the vars and cedars, density of the jungles, thronging 
robins. 



It is an Arcadia full of wild 
wood-violets all through the short 
summer. Up Bottom Brook we 
saw acres of lilies of the valley, 
blossoming all unseen. Queerly 
colored orchids bloomed right be-- 
side the railroad track at Harry's 
Brook sidiug. And those unique, 
grateful features of Newfoundland 
made our hearts clasp and hold it 
with a love that can never cease. 

Sport ? We took salmon, grilse, 
sea-trout and brook-trout all right 
from one pool on Bottom Brook. 
From Pinch Gut stream, that flows 
into upper St. George's Pond, ! 
took a twenty-three pound salmon, 
From the pools of what they call 
Force de la Plain on Harry's 
Brook, not over a mile from the 
Railroad track, I took nine salmon 
inan hour and half. Oliver Benoit, 
of Main River, acting as my guide. 
Sea-trout were taken at pleasure 
near the pier at Placentia ; brook 
trout that were large enough to 
make my photographers eyes bulge 
and to say, " He's got another 
whale" were taken from Villa 
Marie Pond. 

As I write this, the longing to- return to the island is so great 
as to be almost painful. Every wave and stream seemed to sing 
a song of welcome to us; each forest around us was like a 
shelter and benediction. Twice in that far land the writer has 
drank deep of the fountains of returning health. Mny it be and 
remain majestic, grand, and shelter the ardent sportsmen for 
many and many a long year. 

Still the memories of those two vacations throng and haunt 
us. Deer Lake at evening, Micquelon, the flowers among the 
sand at City Point. I cannot write soberly of that island. 




ON A LONG PORTAGE, UPPER GRAMD LAKE. 



Che Inucsiiiurc of tbe pallium 

Bp Bis 6race flrcbbisbop Boiclep, 23rd June, 1905. 

GATHER within the Temple 

Come from afar and near ! 
Prelates, and priests and people 

As of old, " It's good to be here I" 

Come in your joy and gladness 

Come in your faith and love ; 
For the trembling soul awaiting 

Stands stamp'd from the HAND above 1 

This is his cherish'd birthland! 

Climb'd to the " Heights" has he! 
Stainless his life and garments 

Simple, yet noble ! and we ? 

We are his spiritual children 

We are his loving flock 
Proud of the " Keys of Peter" 

Proud of the ancient " Rock !" 

Proud of the man invested 

In the Church he so adorns ! 
Proud of the added garlands 

Won in a path of thorns ! 

Bells in yon lofty steeple 

Let the peals of your gladness glide 

O'er the depths of the throbbing ocean, 
To the heart of the forest wide ! 

For this is his cherished Birthland, 
Climb'd to the " Heights" has he ; 

So gather we in our thousands 
This beautiful sight to see ! 

E. C. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 



13 



Cbc flrrtoal of tbc Wail in tbe Olden times. 



A true story of Old St. Johns. ' 

i. N a morning, early in the spring of 182-, a quiver of 
excitement ran through the old town of St. John's, 
from the " Rising Sun" to the " Traveller's Joy.' 1 
The report had spread abroad that a vessel had 
1 arrived at Bay Bulls with a large Mail on board. Hence the 
unwonted stir and bustle. 

The tiine of which I am speaking was long before the estab- 
lishment of a Regular Mail, or Post Office. Judge Prowse 
indeed tells us in his History that a " Primitive Post Office" was 
established as far back as 1805, by Simon Solomon, the father 
of William Solomon, who was afterwards our first Postmaster- 
General. The rates for letters from Canada ranged from seven- 
pence to two shillings and nine-pence half-penny ! But this In- 
stitution was very " primitive" indeed, and very little availed of. 

It was thought much safer and more expeditious to send 
letters in charge of any private traveller who would be found 
obliging enough to take them. 

The mails from Europe generally came out in care of the 
captains of the merchant vessels, and were consigned to the 
Mercantile House to which the ship itself was consigned. The 
Head of the House or chief agent, became, on the arrival of a 
vessel, Postmaster for the time being, and distributed the letters 
and papers to their addresses. During the winter months when 
the arrivals were few and far between, the receipt of mail was, 
as may be imagined, a matter of great interest and importance. 

On the occasion to which I allude the excitement was more 
intense than usual. It had been a long hard winter with a con- 
tinuance of storms, and there had been no arrival in port for the 
past three months and a half. We had now reached the begin- 
ning of April and the snow still lay in deep banks along the 
country paths and the harbor was blocked with drift ice, and it 
would have been quite impossible for any vessel to make port. 
Several were expected with salt and Bridport goods for the 
coming summer's fishery, but with this interminable ice-blockade 
no one expected the arrival of a vessel. 

Nevertheless, as I stated above, the rumor had started ; no 
one knew how or where, that a vessel had arrived at Bay Bulls. 
It was one of those strange unaccountable rumors which seem 
to arise by spontaneous generation. The rumor was vague and 
undefined at first, but as the morning hours advanced towards 
noon it began to take more definite shape and form. 

It soon began to be bruited abroad that it was the brig 
Magnolia, thirty days out from Bridport, and consigned to 
Bully & Job ; that she had five bags of mails, and that they 
were now being brought on over-land by some of the crew or 
some of the men of Bay Bulls. Finally it was definitely stated 
that the mail would arrive at 3 p.m. 

In those days the only way of approach from Bay Bulls to 
St. John's was by the foot-path over the Long Ridge, through 
Shoal Bay and Petty Harbour, and thence by the path over the 
Southside Hill, reaching the Riverhead of St. John's a little 
above where the Long Bridge now stands. 

As the time advanced towards three o'clock a great concourse 
of people was seen wending their way up the " Lower Path" 
towards Riverhead : some in anxiety to hear the latest news, 
others merely attracted by curiosity and the fineness of the 



H false rtlarm. 

By Most Rev. M. F. Howley, D.D. 
weather. There had been a slight snap of frost during the night 



which had dried up the street, and the walking and sliding were 
pleasant. The crowd converged towards a well-known tavern 
called " THE TRAVELLER'S JOY." 

This tavern was kept by one John Cahill, and was situated at 
the extremity of the town, just where the houses began to thin 
out and the road to take on the appearance of a country path. 
It stood about opposite the gate of the present West-End (Vic- 
toria) Park. It had a very conspicuous swinging sign-board, on 
which, besides the names of the tavern and its keeper in bril- 
liant lettering, there were also two poetical distichs. That facing 
the town ran as follows, addressed to outward bound travellers : 

" Before the Traveller's Joy you pass 

Step in and take a parting glass !" 

while the one on the country side, intended to greet the eye of the 
returning wayfarer, contained the following enticing invitation : 

" Now that your journey's almost over 

Step in your spirits to recover!" 

The genial Caliil was in his element on this sunny April after- 
noon. The crowd, though perhaps they could not with any show 
of decency put forward the plea of " bona fide traveller," still 
they found it hard to resist the invitation couched in such entic- 
ing poetical diction, so many of them while waiting patronized 
the bar. As a consequence they were in very good humour, 
and quite an amount of impromptu amusement and fun was 
indulged in. 

Promptly at three o'clock, live strapping young fellows were 
seen just emerging from the low copse of underwood that cap- 
ped the brow of the Southside Hill, each carrying on his back 
a large bag containing the long expected mail : the letters and 
newspapers of the last three or four months. As the boys ap- 
peared in full view, striding along down the hill-side, a great 
shout of welcome rang out from the excited crowd, while the 
elder and more sedate ones already revelled by anticipation in 
the feast of literature and general news of the world which they 
should enjoy for the next couple of weeks in perusing the latest 
newspapers. There were very few magazines in those days, 
only the Gentleman's Magazine, The Rambler, The Mechanics ', 
The Penny Magazine, and a few others. 

It was not long before the mail carriers had reached the foot 
of the hill and crossed the river on the ice, for it was not yet 
broken up, and they were received with unrepressed demonstra- 
tions of joy. The bags were taken from them and placed on a 
couple of dogslides that were in waiting and were soon on the 
way at full speed to Bully & Job's office which was down near 
the lower end of the town. The excited crowd followed after, 
while some took care of the couriers, bringing them into Cahil's 
and getting a good meal for them and probably a small libation 
of the beverage so highly lauded on the poetical sign-board. 
Some endeavoured to get by viva voce the news of the day from 
the boys, but either they were very stupid, or they were too 
fatigued by their journey for they seemed to have but very 
vague ideas concerning the arrival of the Magnolia, and indeed 
their reports seemed almost contradictory one of another, so 
after a short time it was found that nothing of any interest could 
be got from them, and they were let alone. They quietly de- 



14 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



parted and wended their course towards some of the straggling 
lanes at the back of the town up near the " Cribbies," or Lazy 
Bank and Pokham Path, and were soon lost to sight, and could 
not afterwards be found. 

In the mean time the crowd who followed the mail had now 
gathered about the front entrance to Bully & Job's premises, 
anxiously awaiting the distribution of the contents of the mail- 
bags, only some twenty or more privileged ones, heads of Mer- 
cantile Houses, agents, magistrates, and other officials being 
allowed in to witness the solemn and momentous performance 
of the opening of these precious deposits. The bags were found 
duly sealed, so that there had been no tampering with them. 
But when the strings of the first bag were cut, the seal opened, 
and the contents dumped out on to the counter, to the amaze- 
ment and stupefaction of all present instead of letters and news- 
papers a pile of shavings! appeared before them 1 Each one 
looked at the other, but no one spoke. There were no written 
or vocal words which could express the feelings then existing in 
the minds of the spectators. 

The head clerk rushed frantically for the second bag, cut it 
open quickly out came another select assortment of number one 
cooper's chips ! 

By this time amazement began to give way, in the lighter 
hearted ones to amusement, and an audible titter was beginning 
to make itself heard. The head-clerk on whom had devolved 
the duty of opening the bags, began to feel somehow as if he 
were being made the butt of the laughter, and began indignant 1 }- 
to bundle the bags out of the room. 

Some of those present however remonstrated, 

" No, no," they said, "open them all. Let us see it out." 

" You'll have kindling enough for a month to come, at all 
events." 

" Open out, open out ! There may be one bag of letters yet," 
and so on. 

The clerk, though feeling somewhat chagrined, began again 
and turned out the rest of the bags on to the floor. Some con- 
tained hay, some dry leaves, some moss, and so forth. At last 
on opening up the fifth bag, right at the very bottom of it, 
appeared a large official envelope, closed with a massive seal in 
red wax, bearing the Royal Arms. It was addressed 
" To the worthy and intelligent 

Citizens of St. John's, 

Newfoundland." 

By this time the spectators had all recovered their good 
humour, and loud laughter and jokes passed round. The dis- 
covery of the envelope, however, caused a hush of expectation : 
and cries of " Open, open 1" were heard on all sides. With a 
hand slightly trembling,' the clerk broke the seal. Inside the 
envelope was contained a large sheet of official foolscap, neatly 
and professionally folded. 

On opening it, they saw two words only, clearly engrossed in 
a fine round legal hand, in the centre of the first page, namely : 
"APRIL FIRST." 

MORAL. St. John's possessed practical jokers then, as well 
as now. 




Solicitude. 



By Dan. Carroll. 

THE bay looks out upon the main, 
Where snow-white sail and stately mast, 
Fanned by the summer breeze go past, 
And sighs, " Will they come back again 
Those ships of mine ?" 

The storm is raging on the deep, 
The thunder peals ; the fierce winds shout : 
Across the foam the bay looks out ; 

And murmurs plaintively, "God keep 
Those ships of mine." 

Bright stars look down upon the sea, 
On home-bound fishing boats, and down 
Upon a little fishing town ; 
The bay is shouting joyously, 

" Right bravely ye return to me, 
Oh, ships of mine!" 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



15 



ana 




By Rev. Canon Pilot, D.D., D.C.L., I.S.O. 

n. 



tN the Act for the Subdivision of the Education Grant for 
Protestant Education, no provision was made for the 
Examination of Teachers. In my first report (1876) to 
His Excellency the Governor, I " respectfully recommend" 
ed the Legislature to make it imperative upon all Teachers to 
present themselves for Examination within a reasonable period." 
The Act of that year made such Examination permissive only, 
and operations under it began in the December following. One 
very important change, however, was made in that Act, viz. : 
the indenturing of Pupil Teachers to the Superintendent. Before 
this it was customary for a Pupil Teacher to be bound to serve 
his Nominating Board. But the conditions of the service were 
as much observed in the breach as in the performance of them. 
They were never enforced, and at least twenty-five per cent, of 




REV. CANON PILOT, D.D., D.C.L., I.S.O., (AUTHOR). 

Pupil Teacher (then so-called) gave no return for the money 
spent upon their education. At the loss of their patronage 
Boards raised a storm of opposition, which speedily subsided 
when the abuses which had obtained under the old plan were 
made public. I have said the Act of 1876 made Examination 
of Teachers permissive only. Boards continued to engage 
graded or ungraded Teachers. The latter were much disin- 
clined to face the ordeal. In 1878 with a view of stimulating 
them to do so, I recommended the Government to attach a direct 
money value to each Certificate according to its grade the 
money to be paid direct to Teachers from the Treasury ; and in 
the following year. 1879, mv recommendation was adopted, and 
the Education Act amended. This Act required all Teachers 
to.be examined within a period of two years, and obliged Boards 
to employ as Teachers such persons only as had obtained a 
grade. Two thousand dollars were provided for payment of 
Bonus. Out of these circumstances arose considerable heart- 
burnings and trouble. I was looked upon as a being bursting 
with importance, positively inflated with official gas, and every 
scheme was devised to get quits with me. The cry was for the 



old palmy days, but the Government most willingly backed up 
the Superintendents, and the inquisition began. 

I have said already that my teachers were of all classes and 
kinds. I call to mind four run-away man-of-wars-men not by 
any means bad fellows, who stuck to their guns assiduously until 
it was rumored that one of H.M.S. was in the neighbourhood, 
and then for a time they were nan sunt inventi. Two of them 
had assumed borrowed names. There were three runaway 
sailors from ships in port, another was a Cambridge man (who 
had kept all but his last term) son of a dignitary of the Church 
in England,and whom I was instrumental in restoring to his family 
circle. Another was the son of a noted clergyman who entered 
the field of controversy with Wilberforce, the Bishop of Oxford, 
and yet another son of a clergyman, fellow of his College in 
Cambridge. I could go on with such examples of my early 
Teachers. Suffice to say all these with one hundred and more 
besides had to qualify for grade, or leave their lucrative 
positions. 

I notified all Teachers of the change in the law, and appointed 
centres for the examination within a given radius. In St. John's 
these examinations had become familiar with Pupil Teachers 
for three or four years, and so far as the Capital is concerned there 
is nothing out of the ordinary to relate concerning them. Though 
it may not be out of place to say that the present Chief Clerk 
in the Prothonotary's office in St. John's Newfoundland was the 
first to receive a Certificate of qualification from any Board of 
Examiners. 

In the outports such examinations were indeed novelties. In 
one of the centres in Conception Bay I secured for the purpose 
a suitable room, and arranged the day before the place where 
each of the Candidates was to sit ; and with necessary stationery 
provided was ready for the fatal day. My every movement had 
been watched, canvassed and criticized. What was the meaning 
of all this fuss ? There were a dozen to be examined, all old men, 
and family men as well. I had been advised to prepare for per- 
missio i to " leave the room" and had arranged all that was neces- 
s \ry behind some easels and blackboards in one corner of it. At 
9 a.m. sharp on the day appointed I was at my post. Nervously 
suspicious one by one the Candidates ambled in, each secreting 
as lie did so the dudeen that had been his post prandial comfort. 
I salute:! each with a "good morning," and indicated his seat. 
1 was eyed as if I were some cruel ogre. One was late in arriv- 
ing. He told me the Chairman of his Board, had been the cause 
of it, and so he had been, for after the day was over that gentle- 
mnn assured me ' I had the work of the world to induce - 
to go into the Examination. ' Sir,' said he to the Chairman, 
1 if 'twasn't for the disgrace of the thing, I'd just as soon be 
going to be hanged. What is he going to do with us?' " 

It was not long before every one set to work. On the whole 
my questions were simple enough. The two papers that floored 
them completely were the grammar and school management 
papers. The examination lasted but one day, but that one day's 
work was a great strain upon their mental and physical powers, 
and besides, with more than the Candidates, it was a long time 
between smokes. 

Two of this batch obtained the coveted parchment from the 
Board of Examiners. With the others we dealt leniently, ac- 
cepting what was satisfactory and giving them supplementary 
exams, as they became prepared. I brought them in couples to 
St. John's, where in the Central Training School they got suffi- 
ciently coached to pass. All returned to their posts ; much more 
important in their own, and their neighbour's eyes than when 
they left them, and all destined to return and to keep to the 
well beaten rut of years gone by. One refused to come to St. 
John's, and he thereby became disqualified to act as Teacher. 
I only remember him as one who threatened my life, and who 
to show his disgust of me turned Methodist. He went the way 
of all flesh soon afterwards. 



16 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 



One or two memories of this centre are fresh in my mind my 
diary of all these early times were burnt in the fire of 1892, merci- 
ful relief! One whom I had brought to St. John's to " qualify" 
brought into the room on the day of examination some written 
helps, contrary to the law in such case made and provided. 
He was caught flagrante delicti, and was dismissed from the 
room. At 10 o'clock that night his wife called to me at my 
house and begged me to forgive her wicked spouse. She was a 
strenuous body, and had come to town to look after her man. 
She assured me of her husband's repentance, and gave me a 
solemn promise such should never happen again. What was I 
to withstand such pleading? I relented and forgave, and six 
month's later gave the recalcitrant another examination which 
he passed. He was for many years after a useful Teacher, but 
I am sure he always disliked to see me, and bore a secret 
grudge against me. 

The case of another of these worthy old fellows was a sad 
one. He had spent six months in St. John's, won the magic 
scroll that was to be the open sesame to any school in the 
Island; but alas! even the one he had left he never entered 
again, nor for the matter of that, any other school as a Teacher. 
Before he became a Domine he had prosecuted the Labrador 
fishery, and what is not unusual in such cases (1 appeal to a 
knowing public) he fell behind with his merchant. Now, that 
mercator was an influential member of his School Board, and 
thought this a suitable opportunity to sue his quondam dealer 
for arrears due. The case came before the Court, the defend- 
ant pleaded the statute of limitation and gained a verdict. 

This was magnified into a ''dishonest transaction" unworthy 
of a dignified schoolmaster. He received his conge on this ac- 
count, and had to seek a living outside of the educational fold. 
He declined all my offers of other schools. He had house, 
land and family in his own place, and preferred these with 
hardships, to pastures new and comfoit. 

At another centre in Trinity Bay I had a like class to examine, 
attended with pretty much the same kind of results. All, with 
one exception came to St. John's an uncongenial atmosphere 
for many of them. Here they qualified, and with gladdened 
hearts returned to follow in iheir accustomed ways. It is hard 
to teach an old dog new tricks. But the one exception. He 
had seen better days, and before he took to teaching had been 
captain of foreign-going ships. He was of a noble, aristocratic 
bearing, of a genial countenance, and of gentle and gracious 
manners. In his younger days he had received a suitable edu- 
cation, not mixed up with the new-fangled notions of subject and 
predicate, of complements and adjuncts. He had followed the 
sea for nigh on fifty years. All his language was nautical. His 
pupils were "chaps," his classes "gangs," his dismissal 
" coil up." 

He seemed to scorn the simplicity of the arithmetic questions. 
Had these been on some subtle trigonometrical problem he 
would have been quite at home, and felt honoured. But a simple 
Bill of Parcels. Pish I But he did make out the simple trans- 
actions proposed, and it was 

Timothy Snipcheese bought of 
Jonathan Mousetrap. 

His answer to the question on the Reformation of religion in 
England was: " 'Twas the casting of Master Pope out of the 
ship of the Church of England." 

One of the questions called for " a composition on the place in 
which you live." His answer was touchingly pathetic. " I live 
in . I was born in London. There is a great difference 
between the two places. My home was amid the busy throng. 
My present abode is amid high and lonely hills, which recall 
to my mind the words of the Poet 

' When e'er I take my walks abroad, 
How many 'ills I see.' " 

" In fact," he wound up, "this is not the place to make a man 
say with the Apostle, ' Lord, it is good for us to be here.' " He 
received his parchment. 

I have said my notes and diaries of these early school-days 
were lost (providentially no doubt) in the fire of 1892, and 
hence all I have said is from memory. I had some racy 
howlers. One worthy thought that John Bright brought in the 



incurable disease, another that the "barrens'" were too much {or 
King John ; another that Governor Glover had been a slave 
driver at the W. Coast of Africa ; while another described the 
Premier of the Colony as the man that had the givings out of 
all the Jobs, and another with perhaps a little more truth, that 
the people elected the members to the House of Assembly aud 
they acted accordingly. But then, these are the days that are 
past. It is all different now Eh ? 




* fl rjunc Idpl. * 

By Eros Wayback. 

THE odorous breath of June pervades the ambient air, 
Here, thro' the fervid noon, I lie in her arms fair. 
By the banks of a purling brook, where the mavis comes to sing 
I stretch in a bosky nook, and list to the carroll of spring; 

And dream of the glamorous time when all the world seemed fail ; 
And I in youthful prime oft sought this umbrageous lair. 
For a moment free from care, afar from the haunts of men; 
Alone I now repair, to muse in this verdured glen. 

The brook in its sinuous course doth babbling still rehearse 
Its tale of mead and gorse in rippling runic verse. 
Its plaintive speech the same, meandering to the shore, 
As when in the past- 1 came, in the jubilant days of yore. 

And my ear is still attune to its sibilant, murmuring bent, 
E'en as in that golden June, we strayed by its banks, Annete! 
.Nor, yet, hath scienced lore quite banished all its fays, 
For, like songs of the troubadour, still they haunt my later days. 

It springs from a crystal bed, afar in the gleaming west ; 
And, now, by a plain doth spread its placid and glassy breast. 
Again, with a rippling song it drops from a rocky height, 
And around its spray is flung in a gossamer veil of light. 

Anon, by the alder row, and now by yon drooping birch, 
For a moment stops its flow where the mavis holds its perch. 
But wends it slow or fast, by wood or dell or lea, 
It sinks with a moan at last, in the grip of the ruthless sea. 

To me it's a sentient thing, with its garrulous, bubbling prate. 
And now seems a dirge to sing, on the verge of impending fate. 
Oh, stream ! how like unto thee, man's varying lifetide flows. 
From birth to eternity's sea, when the waves of oblivion close ! 

May those of the Borderland hitherward, still draw near, 

And the interspace be spanned, once passed from this terrene sphere ? 

For, me thought, I heard the tread, the rustling robe of a maid, 

As of old she oft-times sped in laughter across yon glade ! 

And my breast held a pleased alarm, e'en if my thoughts mislead, 
To think that a vanished form stood out from the shrouded dead 1 
To dream that the turf -crowned fair should stand in an erstwhiles guise, 
With the sheen on her braided hair, and love in her placid eyes I 

To dream that the shoonless feet again by this stream should roam, 
As in that June, Annete, you tripped by its feathery foam ! 
To dream, as in days of yore you stood in your beauty rare, 
When I sought for the flower you wore, the rose in your banded hair ! 

But you tread the ' golden street,' afar from the birchy bower, 
Only memory now, Annete, remains, and a faded flower ! 
Afar from this haunted Brook, I'll seek surcease of thought, 
Its breast is a graven book with dead-past scenes re-wrought ! 

Once more to the cities of men, where hurries the jostling throng, 
I'll flee from this memoried glen and the Brook's old troublous song! 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



17 



poultrp Farming ana Bow to lakc it Pap. 



By E. A. Elgee, P.S., A.D.C. 



u 



ii 

k NDER the conditions named in a previous article i.e. 
a good chicken house, scratching shed, which should, 
if possible, admit the sun, and a good egg-laying 
strain -of fowls, it may be interesting to note the 
principles observed by American and Canadian farmers to obtain 
a good supply of eggs in the winter. It is almost altogether a ques- 
tion of common sense. No hard and fast laws of diet can be laid 
down like human beings hens hive their idiosyncracies. How- 
ever, there are two things indispensable to every breed 
exercise and sufficient food. A scratching shed with a bed of 
straw or peat moss litter some twelve inches deep supplies the 
first named, if the grain fed is scattered about twice a day in 
small quantities. A cabbage or some other green food hung up 
just out of reach is also to be recommended. With regard to the 
food indispensable, let us first consider the constituent parts of 
an egg itself not contained in sufficient quantities in the grain 
food. They are roughly phosphates, albumen, salt. In the 
summer when hens are in the fields they obtain these readily. 
In winter confinement, therefore, one should make use of ground 
bone, ground meat and salt. The animal life consumed in sum- 
mer by a hen escapes ones notice, but it is a very important item 
and accounts for their egg-laying capacity to a great extent. 
Fresh water and charcoal (as a corrective) are also necessaries, 
and without grit a hen cannot digest its food. 

When fowls have yard range, one pound of green cut bone 
and one quart of grain fed at night should be sufficient for 
sixteen hens per day in winter. Vary this by feeding household 
scraps and a hot evening mash of meal mixed with steamed hay 
and clover. The green cut bone is a highly concentrated food 
and one ounce per diem is sufficient for each hen. The green 
bone should, of course, be ground up in a bone-cutting machine 
before use. Patent egg producers are not to be recommended. 
Now turn to the hen itself. After it is two and a half years you 
can expect very lew winter eggs. The warmer you can keep 
your hens without artificial heat the more eggs will be laid and the 
sooner will they become broody. The difficulty of getting fer- 
tilized eggs in the early spring is overcome by giving plenty of 
exercise and keeping the eggs, which are intended for the incu- 
bators, warm. The living germ in a winter egg is often killed 
by the cold. With regard to the incubator, the only thing to 
be noticed is that best results are obtainable when it is not 
filled to its utmost capacity. Success, otherwise, seems to de- 
pend on common sense and attention. The right way of feed- 
ing young chickens is a very open question, but there is one 
thing conclusively proved from numerous trials the best way 
to bring them on quickly and to increase their bone and size is 
to give plenty of animal food. Green or fresh bones from the 
butcher, and ground up, MUST be fed with their other food 
especially in the case of ducklings. The generality of poultry 
in Newfoundland at the present moment is of the most wretched 
and degenerate type undersized and small boned. And here 
let everybody note that a bird weighing four pounds does not 
eat twice as much as one which weighs two pounds, but only a 
very little more, which is more than made up by the size of egg 
and the bird's value when ready for the table. A hen of the large 
breeds, when laying, requires about 4 oz. of food per diem ; 
Leghorns, while laying, require about 3^ oz. per diem. The 
same applies to the turkeys and ducks. 



It will be interesting here, to mention what other countries 
expect of their poultry in this respect. Just compare the follow- 
ing authenticated weights of poultry plucked for the table: 
Orpington Pullets, 21 Ibs. ; Farmyard Cockerels, 24 Ibs. ; Farm- 
yard Pullets, 17 Ibs. ; Pekin Ducks, 15 Ibs.; Turkey Cocks, 
59 Ibs. ; Turkey Hens, 49 Ibs. These of course have been 
crammed, but fancy our wretched little small-boned i-lb. hens 
ever aspiring to reach to 17 Ibs., and our 8-lb. turkeys to 49 Ibs.! 

To remedy this one must have plenty of new blood, and the 
right stock to distribute throughout the Island. The only way to 
effect it, as far as one can see, is to start a Poultry Association 
with a small member's subscription, with its centre in St. John's, 
and possibly Branches in other districts later. The object of the 
Association would be (i ) to breed the right kind of poultry and 
to sell them to members at cost price probably about half 
what it would cost to import ; (2) to supply technical information. 

Both Ireland and Denmark have benefited largely of late 
years from Associations. In 1895, the hitter country exported 
$2.000,000 worth of eggs, whilst in 1903, the value had quadru- 
pled itself to $8,000,000. In Ireland large district have become 
suddenly prosperous from the far reaching effects of treating 
the egg industry scientifically, hackee! up by Associations of the 
kind mentioned. Surely, therefore, the home market could be 
supplied in Newfoundland, and profitably to both producer 
and consumer ! 




SI'ORT IN NEWFOUNDLAND. 



18 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



* Iwrp Bcsscmcr's Investment 



rt novelette of ncivfoundKind life. 

By Robert Gear MacDonald, 




SYNOPSIS OF PART I. 

HARRY BESSEMER, a Departmental Clerk, but a man of wealth, meets 
Elvire Exonton, who he fancies dislikes him, at a party. Next day he 
discoveis that her father, a merchant, is on the verge of financial ruin. 
Solely from patriotic motives, to save the timber lands from German con- 
trol, he offers to lend Exonton sufficient money to save him. At length the 
latter consents, and the transfer is made. 

M NEWFOUNDLANDERS, with all their faults, are patri- 
otic, and it need not excite any wonderment tliat 

Bessemer was ready to risk a large part of his means 

in such a venture. It would therefore be idle to ques- 
tion if during the transaction the vision of eyes with 
Glances where such depth of purple lies 
As rests upon the deep when sunset dies 
O'er some great northern buy, 

haunted him. It was certainly with no conscious thought of 
them that this was done. It was all for his country's interests, 
as he understood them. He, with Mr. O'Hara the lawyer, ami 
Mr. Eyre, the Notary Public, was to take dinner with the mer- 
chant the next day. Meanwhile he returned to the office, and 
made Mr. McLean acquainted with enough of what had passed to 
give him a fairly clear idea of how things had gone. The Minis- 
ter said little, but perhaps he thought the more on that account. 



PART II. 

" Well, did he propose last night ?" 

" Hardly," answered Elvire, smilingly. " 1 am not sure that 
his supposed passion for me is not all a delusion.'' 

" Oh, well, what everybody says must be true : my dear Elvire, 
I am convinced of it. It may be that he is a little backward, on 
account of his present anomalous position, but with his means 
that need not matter." 

" Hut, even if it should be so," answered Elvire with a slight 
show of asperity, " he need not appear so sure of me. Hut 1 do 
not believe he has any thoughts beyond the ambition of being 
the social and political leader of the country. I cannot imagine 
him loving passionately; his would be merely a marriage which 
would serve to strengthen his social position ; and it is hardly 
likely that he has marked me out for the honor of being his 
consort." 

" Be that as it may," her friend replied, " he can offer more to 
his wife than any other young man in the island." 

" I do not think that would attract me," said Elviie, with a 
slight drawing up of her slender frame: and the talk drifted to 
other matters, and the subject of the dinner last night did not 
recur. 

Elvire supposed there must be something in all this that Mrs. 
Teddy Nicholson hinted at so persisently. Her friend could 
hardly appear so sure of what was quite non-existent. But per- 
haps the matter was not so unexplicable after all. Bella Nichol- 
son had married somewhat beneath her. All her smartness had 
only enabled her to capture a young man who held a quite sub- 
altern position in the office of the Minister of Finance and 
Customs. Nicholson was not really stupid, but he had not much 
political or social influence. His wife was not slow to see, there- 
fore, that when Bessemer came to the front, it would be greatly 
to her husband's and her advantage, to have Bessemer allied 
to her dearest friend. Bella Nicholson knew something of the 
wheels within wheels. And she was not slow to suggest what 
she had now, perhaps, come to believe ; namely, that Bessemer 
intended to ask Elvire's hand. Nor did she lose any opportu- 
nity for a disinterested urging of Bessemer's suit, at which Bes- 
semer, had he known it, would have been greatly surprized, 
and not a little offended. But Elvire suspected nothing of all 
this intrigue on Mrs. Nicholson's part, and was inclined to believe 
either that Bella was mistaken, or that Bessemer was inclined 
towards her for mere reasons of convenience. She had lately, 
with a not unnatural curiosity, looked for some symptoms of par- 



tiality on Bessemer's part, but had not found any, which had 
piqued her a very little. 

A few nights after the conversation above recorded was the 
long talked of Concert in aid of the Home for Indigent Gentle- 
women, which was held in the College Hall. The magnificient 
Auditorium was packed ; all the beauty and fashion were present, 
all the best talent of St. John's was on the platform. 

Bessemer, who rarely attended Concerts, went as it were by 
accident to this, and arriving just before the Concert began, 
was a little surprised to find that Elvire was to sing. He, of 
course, knew that her voice was of more than ordinary excel- 
lence, though she was hardly a " popular singer;" but he had 
never heard her sing in public. He had thought a very little 
about her since the night he had been to Exonton's to dinner; 
and seeing her name again, in print, had revived that slight in- 
terest : and he confessed to himself a feeling of impatience 
which made him smile, until her number was reached. 

She came gracefully forward, in a dress of crepe tie chine, 
made with exquisite taste, enhancing her beauty to the utmost. 
Bessemer found himself regarding the bank-clerk, who, with two 
rather loud young ladies sat in front of him, with indignation, 
because he oggled her throbgh a pair of opera-glasses which be- 
longed to one of his companions. And then, remembering, he 
smiled to himself. She was nothing to him, nor he to her. 

The song she sang was a simple enough thing ; a little poem 
written by a big, tender-hearted Bohemian fellow, who had been 
cast ashore on the Island as the Atlantic brings sea-weeds; and 
who had been swept away again in much the same fashion, 
leaving a disconsolate maiden, and a still more disconsolate 
tailor. Such a piece, to such a melody as had been wedded 
to the woids, was exactly what suited Elvire's powers. Her 
voice was not of extraordinary compass, nor of very great 
volume, but it was infinitely sweet and tender; and she had 
learned how to use it to the best advantage; so that when she 
was encored, as she was heartily, it was a pleasure to hear her 
repeat a verse or two of the song. And there were others 
besides Bessemer with whom the refrain of it 

" But the heart of Trixie Elgar 
Will never sleep again" 

lingered far longer than that night. 

Bessemer awoke with a start. What was there in that voice ; 
in that fair, flushed, face ; in that slender figure swaying with 
the emotion of the song, which stirred his nerves, and made the 
blood dance in his veins? What longing was that which awoke 
in his heart ? Could it be what he had heard of. had read of, 
but had never known Love ? If so, it was inexpressibly 
painful, and ineffably delicious. 

He hardly knew anything of what followed ; his drive home 
was a procession of shadows. When he arrived there he was 
too excited to sleep, too dazed to read. The passion, which had 
been so long in coming, had come, and with stunning force. 
And could she care for him ? We tried to think of her attitude 
towards him, especially the last time they had met, a few even- 
ings before at dinner at her father's house. But she had always 
been the same towards him, friendly -but indifferent. He 
wondered had her father told her of his embarrassment, and 
how he had been helped out by him. He thought not. Mr. 
Exonton's pride would cause him to hide his misfortunes and 
the rather strange manner in which he had been assisted, from 
his daughter as well as from the rest of the world. And her 
manner that evening, he thought, had borne out this belief. 
She was certainly innocent of any sense of obligation towards 
him ; there was no such embarrassed self-consciousness as he 
felt certain would have been present had she known the state of 
affairs : and that thought, somehow, gave him hope. It was 
strange that he -had never thought of her in that way before ; 
and a line of Browning's " How can man love but what he 
yearns to help" flickered through his mind as he fell into a light 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



19 



doze, in which Elvire's face appeared more than once, we may 

not doubt. 

*_* * * * * * * 

" Did you notice young Bessemer at the Concert last night?" 
her father asked of Elvire at the breakfast-table next morning. 

" I have a confused recollection of seeing him, while I was 
singing," replied Elvire, " he appeared, if I may say so, interest- 
ed in my song. But there were so many there, I cannot say I 
noticed him specially." 

" I spoke to him, casually," answered her father as he went out, 
'but he did not reply to my 'good night,' indeed, he appeared 
like a man in a dream. I mention it because he is 'usually so 
courteous and friendly to everybody, that I fear he must have 
been unwell." 

" I have never known him to be indisposed," said Elvire, 
carelessly. " No doubt he was planning some great political 
coup; they say the Government takes over all its ideas in a 
ready-made form from him." 

" He is a good fellow," remarked her father. " I happen to 
know a certain merchant in this city who might be in the Bank- 
ruptcy Court to-day but for the practical and timely assistance 
that Bessemer gave at the critical moment in a financial way 
that would have been beyond the power, as well as beyond the 
will, of most men in this country. He will not lose by it, even 
financially, I am almost certain, but how few would have done 
such a thing. How few indeed !" he repeated, half to himself. 

Elvire had not the remotest idea that her father was referring 
to himself; such a thought would have been very unlikely. 
She had as strong a belief in her father's business stability as 
she had in his personal probity. It was unbounded. But the 
story made a great impression upon her mind. She could she 
told herself love a man like that. Accordingly she was not 
altogether surprised when he was announced shortly after 
dinner. Her father and her aunt, who lived with them, taking 
their usual post prandial naps, she had gone to the drawing- 
room and was listlessly turning over some music. Her playing 
or singing did not disturb her father ; but she did not feel any 
inclination to play or sing that evening, and was glad of an 
interruption which promisee) her the company of one whom she 
had such kindly thoughts of during the day. 

As Bessemer entered she was conscious that there was something 
in his bearing, something in his manner, which she had never 
seen before, and which puzzled her a little. But he had himself 
well in hand, and after they had greeted each other he said, " I 
called this evening to congratulate you upon your very fine sing- 
ing last night, i never had the pleasure of hearing you before, 
you know." 

" I must thank you for your appreciation, but really," she re- 
plied, " I should hardly have thought that. 1 have sung in pub- 
lic more than once before. I did not sing here last Tuesday 
night simply because you all got so immersed in politics that I 
only had to sit and listen ; father usually asks me to sing after 
dinner for any guests who may be here. It is strange when 
one comes to think of it that you have never heard me, but I am 
glad if it pleased you," she smiled. 

"Yes," he rejoined, and he felt that the supreme moment had 
come, " and I heard something else also I heard your voice 
calling to my soul, as nothing has ever spoken before. I did 
not know till last night, Elvire, that my whole heart and soul are 
yours, but it must have been so from the first." 

She had been surprised for a moment at this outburst, but 
had quickly controlled herself. Now he caught both her hands 
and she did not attempt to prevent him. " Elvire, Elvire, I love 
you, I love you, can you give me ever so little hope ?" he cried. 

" I think so," she whispered, smiling through tears that, some- 
how, would come : she had known what her answer would be as 
soon as he had spoken. As she raised her face he kissed her. 
And then he told her that his wealth was not as great as was 
generally supposed, though his income was still large. And 
she told him that she knew why it was, that her father had told 
her. 

" But did your father tell you any names ?" he asked, breath- 
lessly. 

" None but yours," she answered simply, " and it does not 
matter. Do you know, dear, the moment you told me of your 



love I knew that my heart was and always had been, yours, but 
what my father told me to day, seemed to bring my love near 
to the surface, so that I had no need to hesitate as I might 
otherwise have done." 

After a much longer time than either would have believed 
had not their watches told a like story, Bessemer waited on Mr. 
Exonton, who was then in his Library. That gentleman was 
perhaps slightly surprised at Bessemer's declaration, who ex- 
plained shamefacedly that he had had no thought of such a step 
until the night before, and telling Mr. Exonton what had hap- 
pened. 

" So," replied the latter, " that is the explanation of you hav- 
ing passed me last night without knowing me." And Bessemer 
said " No doubt, the result of a not unnatural pre-occupation." 

Of course Mr. Exonton gave his consent, observing however 
that in his opinion it would be better that their bethrothal should 
not be publicly announced for three months, and Bessemer in 
exchange exacting his promise that Mr. Exonton should never 
tell Elvire of the business transactions between them, declaring 
that this had nothing to do with the matter in hand, as indeed it 
had not. Mr. Exonton readily enough engaged to be silent ; he 
was little inclined to tell Elvire disagreeable things about his 
affairs at an) 1 time, and still less in the present case. And so 
Elvire never knew, which was, on the whole, better for her peace 
of mind. 

Among their earliest confidences the lovers canvassed thor- 
oughly the state of each other's feelings before the day when 
their eyes were opened; and Elvire was as much struck with 
the fact of her supposed dislike, as Bessemer was to hear that 
Mrs. Teddy Nicholson believed him to be in love with Elvire all 
along ; and they had more than one laugh over both. Both 
agreed, on considering it, how strange it was that it had taken 
them so long to fall in love with each other. 

They were wedded a few months afterwards, the Cathedral 
being thronged to see what was considered quite the most impor- 
tant matrimonial event of the season. 

In the Autumn, Bessemer, who had given up his departmen- 
tal Clerkship before his marriage, contested a bye election, and 
came out victor with Hying colors; and was at once a man to 
be reckoned with by both parties in the House. 

As sometimes happens on the Labrador coast, the cod fish, 
which had studiously avoided Lattice Harbor, where Mr. Exon- 
ton had his fishing-room for several years, came back that very 
season in countless numbers, and a rich harvest was brought in 
for several successive years. The timber lands, too, steadily 
increased in value, and the old firm was in time more prosperous 
than ever; and Mr. Exonton was at length enabled to launch 
his pet scheme of a Laborers' Institute, and carry out his ideas 
regarding the division of profits to the workmen on his room 
and his timber estates. 

Elvire never knew how near her father had been to ruin, and 
by what means his commercial honor had been saved, and per- 
haps it was just as well that it was so. She might have looked 
at it from a different, and so unjust, point of view, had she 
known. A woman's faith is everything, but even the possibility 
of a doubt may ruin it. 

Her husband and her father, in the confidence of their 
libraries, often go over the matter, and neither has ever had 
cause to regret the results, financial or otherwise, of Harry 
Bessemer's Investment. THE END. 



"THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY' 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 
Issued every third month about the I5th of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, -:- -:- PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rates: 

Single Copies, each 10 cents . 

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one-twelfth of a page, 2.50 for each insertion. 



20 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



tUben tbe Goose Comes Dortlnuard 




' 



By Arthur S. English, * 

r HO that ever has heard the merry, joyous, and musical 
honk, honk, of the wild goose, on some bright, sunny 
morning or mellow evening in Spring, has ever forgot- 
ten it ? When it falls for the first time on your ears, after the 
long silent winter, you instinctively look up, and beholding the 
vanguard, the first messengers of the most delightful season of 
the year, you long to say to them cead mille failthe, in the langu- 
age that they could understand. 

They have come from the South trom Mexico and Texas, 
and are flying North, to bid Winter begone. Their voices 
speak in accents of those sunny lands, and their plumage is still 
perfumed with the odours of the hyacinth and lily. 

On Friday, March thirty-first, I beheld them for the first time 
for the season, going East, towards the head-"waters of Little 
River, with necks out-stretched and " honk-honking" their merry 
greeting. 

Their song can awaken different responses in different breasts. 
To some ears the tune is but partially rendered, requiring the 
crash and reverbration of the fowling-piece to complete the sym- 
phony. Among this class is my esteemed friend Geo. Knowling, 
of Little River. He is the most successful of all who take 
delight in wild fowl hunting, along the rocky coast between the 
Barachois and Nor'-West Cove. 

The 3ist of March being a fine day, my friend induced me 
to go with him to the " Point." The distance to be traversed is 
about two and one-half miles. Our road, being for the greater 
part of the distance, over the frozen river, the walk was a most 
enjoyable one, George regaling me with stories of past exploits 
in pursuit of the feathered quarry. 

Soon as we bring the ice strewn waters of the Guff plainly 
into view, we behold a fine flock of geese about half a mile from 
land, quietly sitting on the drifting ice. 

How contentedly they ride on their crystal ferries, calmly in- 
different whither they are carried, proudly conscious of the 
power of their tireless wings, to bring them back to land at night- 
fall. At dusk they will venture in to rest, and feed during the 
night in the shallow and sedgy waters of the Barachois. 

Knowing this characteristic, George intends to spend the day 
duck shooting, and at evening repair to the haunts of the goose. 
He is now enveloped in a white soutan-like garment, with a 
hood to cover the head. This dress serves the double purpose 
of rendering him less conspicuous on the ice, and of shielding 
him from the cold wind. I am content to remain in a sunny 
position on shore and dream, whilst Nimrod goes off to the 
farthest pinacle of ice and ensconces himself, to await the coming 
of the unsuspecting duck. 

The warm south wind is blowing 

" From some green Eden of the deep, 

Where Pleasure's sigh alone is heaved, 
Where tears of rapture lovers weep, 

Endeared, undoubting, undeceived; 
From some sweet paradise afar 

Thy music wanders, distant, lost 
Where N-ature lights her leading star, 
Where love is never, never cross'd." 

It comes across the brine, bringing with it visions of the 
flowery summer. It bears on its breast the spirit of spring, in 
its voice the music of the morn of that delightful season. 
Memory here interposes her voice ; in it is a strain of sadness. 
Though there is a plaint, there is also a sweet gladness in her 
whispering voice. I see a quiet corner in the woodland, on 
whose mossy carpet the first and bluest wild violets grew. Here 
also the dainty yellow-hammer built her nest in the budding 
alder, and sang her song of love. How eagerly I watched the 
snow melt from that sheltered spot. How gladly I gathered a 



Little River, April, 1905. 

fragrant bunch of those sweet floral emblems of modesty, to lay ( 
alas ! on an earthly altar. Like all things earthly that shrine, 
has fallen fell even as I knelt in devotion. 

" Ye field flowers ! the gardens eclipse you 'tis true, 
Yet wildings of Nature, I dote upon you, 

For ye waft me to summers of old, 
When earth teemed around me with fairy delight, 
And when daisies and buttercups gladden'd my sight 

Like treasures of silver and gold." 

The time, the scene will not permit any trick of memory to 
cheat of the delights they offer. What a bright picture is pre* 
sented to my sight. The broad expanse of gleaming waves, in 
tireless commotion, pregnant with suggestions of mystery. The 
glistening margin of ice along the coast, filling the little bays 
from jutting headland to headland. On the outer edge of this 
blockade, miniature bergs are dancing a fantastic minuet to the 
music of the waves. Ducks flit in busy succession up and down 
the shore. Whilst far in the distance you may see black clouds 
of sea-ducks. The wild, shy things that rarely come near the 
land. 

Towards evening we repair to the nearby residence of a 
friend William Carter at whose hospitable board we enjoy 
a cup of warm, fragrant tea. Inevitably when gunners meet 
and pipes are lit, stories of hunting prowess and of singularly 
good shots are related. The fine qualities of each gun are 
pointed out, and tales bearing testimony to her worth are told. 
" Bill," in his younger days, had the reputation of being a very 
clever marksman. He told us that once he killed a goose, with 
a ball, at a distance as great as from his house to 'Gustan's 
Island, (considerably over a quarter of a mile.) This was at 
Cape Ray. The shot was fired from a small bridge near his 
" Cape" residence, the goose falling in the water, fully four 
hundred yards beyond the " Whistle House." The light-house 
keeper, Mr. Rennie, can verify this story. I've heard of a very 
modest fellow, who, on being asked why he always used salted 
bullets, replied, " that his gun could kill so far, that in order to 
preserve the flesh of his victim til! he could reach it, he found it 
necessary to send the brine with the messenger of death." 

Just as the sun, in the act of setting, was gilding the moun- 
tain tops, and painting the slopes in softest rose-pink, we left 
" Bill" Carter's, to take up our positions near the open water of 
the Barachois. 

Here George built a " gaze." A gaze is a miniature fort, 
behind which one conceals himself whilst waiting for the birds. 
On the sea shore such shelter is made of stones, rudely heaped 
together, sometimes it is made of drift 'wood. In this instance 
it is made of ice blocks. 

Leaving George in his gaze, I move on to the " Sand Bar," 
to muse in the gathering twilight, on the extreme human misery, 
this lonely bit of coast had witnessed. What cries of distress 
had gone up from the shivering remnant of some storm-tossed 
crew, when no sympathetic ear, was near to receive it. Those 
lonely, unmarked, grass grown graves, tell a harrowing tale, of 
shipwreck of cold and hunger and despair. What anguish was 
in the prayer of him, who, strongest of the band, fell down at 
last amidst his dead comrades, to rise no more. 

In the deepening gloom of night I sit and listen to the sounds 
of nature. The soft splash of the waves on the shoie, singing 
a sad requiem, o'er ocean's countless dead, the quack, quack, of 
some lonely duck, that has lost its mate, or the wierd hoo, hoo, 
of some distant owl. Presently there is a rustling overhead, as 
a flight of geese goes by, looking like grey spectres, 'that have 
come to visit the scene where their relics repose. How dim 
and mystical they look against the darkness of the night. 

Turning my eyes in the direction of their flight, my sight is 
startled by a vicious lurid flash, in the gloom of the Barachois, 
followed by a sharp report. 

Poor bird you flew too near the gaze. Then there is a con- 
fused, honka, honka, honk, honk, as the frightened things leave 
the fearful place, and again seek the quiet of the ocean. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




'T'lIE SUBSCRIBED, having in view the increased popularity 
* in the wearing of Tailored Costumes, &c., has had the 
upper premises of the "Telegram" Building refitted in an up- 
to-date style for the purpose of carrying on a' Costumiery. We 
recognize the fact that to be successful we must be piepared to 
be in a position to make superior Tailored Costumes. It is not 
proposed to here make mention of the Fitter and Tailor who 
have been engaged for this departure, being satisfied to await the 
judgment of our patrons upon the merit of the work turned out ; 
and it is proposed to always have on hand every Fashion Plate 
of recognized authority. A full set is now ready. 

The Premises consisting of four large, well-lighted and venti- 
lated rooms, with every convenience, are, as will be seen, situated 
in a central portion of the city, and easy of access. The comfort 
of our patrons will be our study. 

An extensive line of Ladies' Costume Cloths in every shade, 
pattern, etc., as worn for the season, will be kept in stock, which 
patrons can make selections from. Our range of trimmings include 
all classes of novelties in Silks and Braids in fact everything ne- 
cessary for this class of trade will be found in the establishment. 

Estimates will be cheerfully given. We confidently invite a 
trial order. 



"Telegram" Building. Entrance from Water Street. 
Thanking you. in anticipation, 1 am sincerely yours, 

MAYERS, 





We request the favour 
of your next , *e , *e , < 

MAIL ORDER 

We are always pleased 
to forward *g < < * 



SAMPLES 



AND 



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same day as the order is received. 

BISHOP & MONROE. 



M. IV. FURLONG, A'.C. 



/. M. KENT, K.C. 



FURLONG & KENT, 

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DUCKWORTH STREET, ST. JOHN'S. 



MISS MAY FURLONG'S 

282 Water Street, opp. Bowring Brothers. 



Dress Goods, Mantles, Millinery, 

Feathers, Flowers, Gloves. 



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Channing's Drug Store, 

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OPEN # EVERY ^ NIGHT 
TILL H O'CLOCK. 



Imperial Tobacco co. 9 ud. 

Manufacturers of Choice Tobaccos. 



Smoking and Chewing, 

Plug, Cut Plug, and Granulated. 

Jdgp-Some of our brands: 

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Has on hand a full line of general Fishery 
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FISH AND OIL. 



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" IMPERIAL." 
For a cool, refreshing smoke, try " KILLIKINKNICK." 

OFFICES AND FACTORY: 
Flavin and Bond Streets, ^ St. John's, Newfoundland. 



Office and Stores . Goodfellow's Buildings, Water Street. 



JOB BROTHERS & Co., 

Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

f British and American Goods of every 
description Wholesale and Retail. 
of Codfish, Codoil, Codliver Oil, Seal Oil, 
Lobsters, Furs, and general produce. 

All orders for same promptly filled at very lowest rates. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



SOME SPECIALLY INTERESTING. 

Newfoundland Literature 



Caribou Shooting in Newfoundland, with over sixty illustrations, 

by Dr. S. T. Davis Paper 60. cts. Cloth, Si .25 

From Newfoundland to Cochin, China, by Lady Howard Vincent, 

illustrated New and cheaper edition, Cloth, $1 . 25 

Mineral Resources of Newfoundland, in two parts 60 cts. 

Newfoundland Standard History of, by D. W. Prowse, Esq., J.P., 
LL.D., with numerous Maps and Illustrations. Demy, 8vo; 
Cloth, Gilt ; and edition $i .75 

Newfoundland Ecclesiastical History of, by His Grace the Arch- 
bishop of Newfoundland $2 . 50 

Poems, by His Grace the Archbishop of Newfoundland 75 cts. 

Captain of the Dolphin, and other Poems of Newfoundland and the 

Sea, by Rev. F. j. J. Smith. Cloth, 75 cts., Gilt top 90 cts. 

Dr. Luke of the Labrador, by Norman Duncan 50 and 75 cts. 

Lure of the I.abrador. Wild, by D. Wallace $i .50 

Interested persons should drop us a Post Card for complete list of Books, 



The Way of the Sea, by Norman Duncan 50 and 75 cts. 

The New Priest in Conception Bay, by Rev. Robert Lowell ; only a 

very few copies now in print Cloth, $1.75 

Newfoundland Illustrated, with 109 beautiful half-tone views of the 

chief attractions of the Island 50 cts. 

Rambles in Our Ancient Colony by the Banks and Bergs of Terra 

Nova, with numerous illustrations * 40 cts. 

St. John's and Newfoundland Illustrated, with 59 Half-tones of the 

Capital of Newfoundland, with adjoining Outports 25 cts. 

NEWFOUNDLAND VIEW POST CARDS. 

The Garland Half-tone Series 45 varieties, 2 cts. each, 80 cts. set. 

The Garland Photogravure Series 25 varieties, 3 cts. each, 70 cts. set . 

The Garland Photolet (Photograph) ... 15 varieties, 3 cts. each, 45 cts. set. 

The Garland Chromo-Litho 8 varieties, 4 cts. each, 30 cts. set. 

The Garland Photo Iris 8 varieties, 4 cts. each, 30 cts. set , 

Pamphlets, Sheet Music, Maps, Charts, etc., relating to Newfoundland. 



S. E. GARLAND, Books, Stationery, Fancy Goods, etc., Garland Bldg., J77-9 Water Street, East ) S T. JOHN'S, 
GARLAND & CO., Booksellers and Stationers, opposite Post Office, 353 Water Street, West } Newfoundland. 



Customs Circular 



No. 15. 



WHEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles, Angler's Outfits, Trouting Gear, Fire-arms 
and Ammunition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be 
admitted under the following conditions : 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles, Trouting Poles, Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equipage. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the Assistant Collector, 
St. John's, if taken in St. John's the Receipt No. 2 shall be sent 
to the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre- 
senting the articles at the Port of Exit and having them com- 
pared with the receipt. The Fjcamining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the result of his examination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

No groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund may 
be taken upon such articles. 

H. W. LeMESSURICR, 

Assistant Collector. 

CUSTOM HOUSE, 

St. Johns, Newfoundland, 22nd June., fpoj. 



The Public are reminded that the 

GAME^ LAWS 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Provide that : 

No person shall pursue with intent to kill any Caribou from 

the ist day of February to the 3151 day of JuU/, or- from the 1st day of 

October to the 2Oth October in any year. And no person shall 

kill or take more than two Stag and one Doe Caribou in any one year. 

No person is allowed to hunt or kill Caribou within specified limits of 
either side of the railway track from Grand Lake to Goose Brook, these 
limits being defined by gazetted Proclamation. 

No non-resident may hunt or kill Deer without previously having pur- 
chased ($50.00) and procured a License therefor. Licenses to non-resi- 
dent guides are issued, costing #50.00. 

No person may kill, or pursue with intent to kill any Caribou with dogs, 

or with hatchet or any weapon other than fire-arms loaded with 

ball or bullet, or while crossing any pond, stream or water-course. 

Tinning or canning of Caribou is absolutely prohibited. 

No person may purchase, or receive in barter or exchange any flesh 
of Caribou between January ist and July 3ist, in any year. 

Penalties for violation of these laws, a fine not exceeding two hundred 
dollars, or in default imprisonment not exceeding two months. 

No person shall hunt, or kill Partridges before the first day of October 
in any year. Penalty not exceeding $100.00 or imprisonment. 

Any person who shall hunt Beaver, or export Beaver skins before October 
ist, 1907, shall be liable to cofiscation of skins, and fine or imprisonment. 

No person shall use any appliances other than rod, hook and line to 
catch any Salmon, Trout, or inland water fishes, within fifty fathoms from 
either bank on the strand, sea, stream, pond, lake, or estuary debouching 
into the sea. 

Close season for salmon and trout fishing: I5th day of September to 
1 5th day of January following. 

ELI DAWE, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheriet, 
ist June, 



II 



iv.^ 
jjp- 




THE . . . 

NV^MJM 
EWFOUNDLSND 

QUARTERLY. 

JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 



VOL. V. No. 2. 



OCTOBER, 1905. 



40 GTS. PER YEAR. 





TROUT CULTURE IN NEWFOUNDLAND. 
"THE ANGLER'S PARADISE," 








THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



LUMBER 



SCANTLING, 5x5 to 10x10. 
STUDDING, all sizes* 

JOISTING, 2x3 in. assorted. 

We have also a full stock of 
SEASONED BOARD in Store. 

All selling. at the Lowest Market Prices. 
Purchasers will get good value for their 
money. 

W. & G. RENDELL 





5 Queen s 
Fire Insurance Company 

FUNDS $40,000,000 



INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 



i > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



JOHN CORMACK, 



SGEMT fOR NEWFOUNDLAND. 



PHCENIX 



Assurance 




Co., Ltd, 



Of LONDON, ESTABLISHED \U2. 



Annual Premiums ' . $7,500,000 

Fund held to meet losses 9,000,000 

Uncalled Capital 12,000,000 

W. & G, RENDELL, 

ST. JOHN'S. Agent for Nfld. 

JOHN KEAN, 

14 ADELAIDE STREET, 



Boot and Shoe Maker. 



Hand Sewing a Specialty. 
Strictest attention paid to 
all work. < *g <g 

Outport Orders Solicited. 



SHEEP PRESERVATION! 

'T T HE following Sections of the Acts 47th Victoria, Cap. 7, and 50th 
* Victoria, Cap. 9, for the Preservation of Sheep, are published in 
consolidated form for the information of the public: 

l. It shall be lawful for the duly qualified Electors resident within an 
area or District within this Colony to present to the Governor in Council 
a Petition or Requisition in the form prescribed in the Schedule to this A. t, 
or as near thereto as may be, setting forth the limits or boundaries within 
which such area or District is comprised, and the names of the towns, 
harbors or settlements included therein, and praying for a Proclamation 
hrohibiting the keeping of Dogs vuthin such area or .District. 

- Such Petition or Requisition shall be sent to the nearest resident 
Stipendiary Magistrate, and shall l>e by him (after examination and certifi- 
cate as hereinafter provided) furnished to the Governor in ''ouncil. 

3- Upon receipt of any such Petition or Requisition containing the 
signatures of not less than one-third of the Electors resident within any 
such area or District, certified as aforesaid, the Governor in Cmincil .shall 
issue a Proclamation or Public Notice prohibiting the keeping of Dogs 
within such area or District.. 

4. From and after the day prescribed in and by such Proclamation or 
Notice, it shall not be lawful for any person resident within such area or 
District to keep, or to have in his possession, or under his control, any Dog 
within the area or District to which such Proclamation or Notice shall 
relate, under a penalty not exceeding Fifty Dollars, or imprisonment for a 
term not exceeding Three Months. This prohibition shall not apply to any 
person or persons travelling or passing through such area or Districts and 
having a licensed Dog oT Dogs in his or their possession, charge or control, 
and not at large. 

5. It shall be the duty of all Police Constables to kill all Dogs found by 
them in any area or District in which the keeping of Dogs is prohibited 
under this Act, except Shepherd Dogs or Collies, and those excepted under 
the next preceding section, and all such dogs not so excepted may be killed 
by any person whomsoever. And it shall be lawful for any person to destroy 
any Dog kept in contravention of the provisions of this Act. 

***A11 penalties under this Act may be sued for and recovered in a sum- 
mary manner before a Stipendiary Magistrate or Justice of the Peace, and 
all fines shall be paid to the person who shall give information of the offence 
and prosecute the offender to conviction. 

SCHEDULE. form of Petition or Requisition. 

To His EXCELLENCY THK (HIVKKNUK i\ Cm NCII,: 
The Petition of the undersigned humbly sheweth, 

That your Petitioners are duly qualified Electors residing in an area or 
section of the Electoral District of , comprised and bounded 

as follows : 

That the said area or section contains the following towns (or harbors or 
settlements, as the case may be). 

That your Petitioners are desirous, and humbly pray Your Kxcellency in 
Council, that a Proclamation or Notice be issued under the provisions of 
an Act passed in the Forty-seventh year of the reign of Her Majesty Queen 
Victoria, Cap. 7, entitled " An Act to provide for the better Preservation of 
Sheep, and for other purposes," prohibiting the keeping of Dogs within the 
above described area or section of the said District, and youir Petitioners 
will ever pray. 

Dated at , the day of , 190 . 

J. G. CON ROY, 

Stipendiary Magistrate for Newfoundland. 
Paiiee Oj/iet, St. John's, September, 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels, may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 






FOR NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 
CANADA. 


I pou 

2 pOU 

3 

4 

1 

8 
9 

10 

1 1 


nd 


See 
ii 

14 
'7 

20 

2 3 
26 
29 
3 2 

35 
35 
Under i Ib 
per 2 oz. 


nts 


24 ce 
24 
24 
48 
48 
48 
48 
72 
72 
72 
72 

No parcel s 
less than 




12 ce 

24 
3 
48 
60 
72 
84 
96 
$i 08 




15 cents. 
30 

45 
60 

75 
90 

51.05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 


nds 


















































































weight, i cent 


ent to U. K. for 
24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from New York ; 
Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 

Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 



RATES OF COMMISSION 

ON MONEY ORDERS. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding $10 5 cts. Over $50, but not exceeding $60 30 cts. 

Over $10, but not exceeding $20 10 cts. Over J6o, but not exceeding $70 35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 15 cts. Over $70, but not exceeding >8o 40 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 20 cts. Over 80, but not exceeding $90 45 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 25 cts. Over $90, but not exceeding $100 50 cts. 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John's, Newfoundland, September, 1905. H. J. B. "WOODS, Postmaster General. 

General Post Office, f Postal Telegraphs. 



JEREAFTER Cable Messages for all parts of the world will be accepted for transmission 
** over Postal Telegraph lines and cable to Canso, N. S., at all Postal Telegraph Offices in 
this Colony. 

INLAND. 

TELEGRAMS for the undermentioned places in Newfoundland are now accepted for transmission at all Postal Telegraph 
Offices in the Colony and in St. John's at the Telegraph window in the Lobby of the General Post Office and at Office in new 
Court House, Water Street, at the rate of Twenty Cents for Ten words or less, and Two Cents for each additional word. The 
address and signature, however, is transmitted free: 



Avondale 

Baie Verte (Little Bay N.) 

Baine Harbor 

Bay-de-Verde 

Bay L'Argent 

Bay Roberts 

Beaverton 

Belleoram 

Birchy Cove (Bay of Islds.) 

Bonavista 

Bonne Bay 

Botwoodville 

Britannia Cove 

Brigus 

Brigus Junction 

Burin 



Carbonear 

Catalina 

Change Islands 

Clarenville 

Come-By-Chance 

Conception Harbor 

Fogo 

Fortune 

Gambo 

Gander Bay 

Glenwood 

Grand Bank 

Grand Falls 

Grand Lake 

Grand River 

Greenspond 

Hant's Harbor 



Harbor Breton 

Harbor Grace 

Harbor Main 

Heart's Content 

Herring Neck 

Holyrood 

Howards 

Humber Mouth (River- 
head, Bay of Islands) 

King's Cove 

King's Point (S. W. Arm, 
Green Bay) 

Lamaline 

Lewisport 

Little Bay 

Little River 



Lower Island Cove 

Manuels 

Millertown Junction 

Musgrave Harbor 

New Perlican 

New town 

Nipper's Harbor 

Norris' Arm 

N. W. Arm (Green Bay) 

Old Perlican 

Pilley's Island 

Port-au-Port (Gravels) 

Port -aux-Basques (Channel) 

Port Blandford 

Stephenville Crossing 

St. George's 

St. Jacques 



St. John's 

St. Lawrence 

Sandy Point 

Scilly Cove 

Seldom-Come-By 

Sound Island 

S. W. Arm (Green Bay) 

Terenceville (head of 

Fortune Bay) 
Terra Nova 
Tilt Cove 
Trinity 
Twillingate 
Wesleyville 
Western Bay 
Whit bourne 



Long Harbor 

Postal Telegraph Message Forms may be obtained at any Post Office in the Colony, and from Mail Clerks on Trains and Steamers. If the sender 
desires, the message may be left with the Postmaster, to be forwarded by mail Free of Postage to nearest Postal Telegraph Office. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

General Post Office, St. John's, Newfoundland, September, 1905. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



BAINE, JOHNSTON 4 Co, 

Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland, 

General Merchants and Ship Owners. 



..EXPORTERS OF.. 



\ 



Codfish, Cod Oil, Seal Oil t Seal Skins, 
Codliver Oil (Norwegian process), 

Salmon, Split Herring, Scotch Cured 
Herring, Trout and Lobsters* 

Sealing Steamers for Arctic hire. Steamers on 
Labrador requiring COALS can be supplied at 
Battle Harbor, at entrance to Straits of Belle Isle, 
where there is telegraphic communication. 



NEWMAN'S 



Celebrated Port Wine, 



In Cases of 1 doz. each, 
at $8.25 in Bond ; also, 

in Hogsheads, Quarter Casks a JL d Octaves. 

* 

Baine, Johnston & Co., 

AGENTS. 



NEWFOUNDLAND 

LIME-SAND BRICKS. 

(Size <; x 4 l /2 x 3 ). 

WE GUARANTEE THESE BRICKS 

As Good and Cheaper 

Than any Imported Brick. 

GOOD PRESSED EACE-BRICKS 

Selling at Lowest 
Market Rates by The 

NEWPOINDLAND BRICK & MANirACTLIRING Co., Ltd., 
E. H. & G. DAVEY, Managers. 

Telephone, 345. Brick Plant Works, Jon's Cove. 

Water Street, St. John's. 



W[ CORDIALLY EXTEND 

To our Patrons and the Public 

generally an invitation to visit our 

NEW STORE 



Which has just been opened. 

We carry full Lines of 



American, Canadian, a i" English 



Suitings, Overcoatings, and Trouser- 
ings, in the very latest materials and 
patterns, and we guarantee, as always, 
the utmost satisfaction to those who 
favor us with their orders. 




W. P. SHORTALL, 



The American Tailor, 

30O Water Street. 



Keeping Rich 

is frequently harder than getting rich. 
Many a man loses in three months the accumulations 
of thirty years. That is why you should take out an 
Insurance Policy which will give immediate protec- 
tion and ease your mind at once of all worry about 
those who are dependent upon you. Send at once 
for particulars of the Unconditional Accumulative 
Policy issued by the Confederation Life As- 
sociation, Toronto. It is the best policy contract 






j. jt 



issued in Newfoundland to-day. 

CHAS. O'NEILL CONROY, 

GENERAL AGENT FOR NFLD, 

Law Chambers, St. John's, N.F. 



A. HARVEY I (k, 

Manufacturers of 

SODA, PILOT and 
jr FANCY BISCUITS, 

We recommend all who want a really 
FIRST CLASS SODA BISCUIT to 
ask their grocer for a 

Tak-Hom-a Soda Biscuit, 
or Three X Soda Biscuit. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY; 



VOL. V. No. 2. 



OCTOBER, J905. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 



ftF 



Che Cathedral Bells. 

By Most Rev. M. F. Howley, D.D. 



_|HERE are at present in the Cathedral of St. John's 
four Bells, one in the Eastern Tower and three in the 




Western Tower. 

The Great Bell in the Eastern Tower is two tons 
weighl. It is five feet two inches in diameter, and sixteen feet 
in perimeter. There are very few larger bells in America 
if any. 

These Bells were cast by Murphy, of Thomas Street, Dublin. 
This firm became famous in Europe and America, and it was 
this great bell of our Cathedral which first made them famous. 

The Bell was. cast in 1850, and was placed on exhibition in 
Dublin at the " Exhibition of Irish Manufactures" of the Royal 
Dublin Society, together with some other of lesser weights. 
" Your monster Bell," Murphy writes to Bishop Mullock, " takes 
all their attention." " It is universally admired by all visitors." 
" It is admitted by all who heard it to be the best Bell of its 
weight in the British Dominions." Murphy received the award 
of a Gold Medal for this Bell. " The frame and fittings are of 
the best Irish oak." It cost, together with fittings, ,272 195. 
9 d., stg. 

Bishop Mullock, who was almost a professional in the matter 
of bell foundry, being a great musician and high authority on 
the subject, was enraptured with the Bell. He wrote a letter of 
congratulation to Murphy in which he says: "* * * I never 
" saw in Europe a more beautiful casting, nor a more beautifully 
" shaped Bell. Tolling as it does, at a height of 400 feet over 
" high water, it is heard for many miles round the country, and 
" the power and richness of its tone cannot be surpassed. . . . 
" The sounds come out clear, deep and mellow, and at a dis- 
" tance of miles the continuous deep and sonorous vibration is 
" heard like the diapason of an organ. I can say in all sincerity 
" I never heard a finer bell of its weight (40 cwt.)." This Bell 
is christened by the name of St. John, the patron of the church 
and city. 

Encouraged by the success of this attempt, Murphy, in the 
following year (1851), sent two Bells of smaller size to the 
Exhibition at the Crystal Palace, London. The larger of the 
two was 29 cwt. He fears that he will not get justice from 
the English judges. It will be remembered that this was about 
the time of the " Papal Aggression," the Establishment of the 
Hierarchy in England, and anti-Papal feeling ran very high. 
Among the devices on Murphy's Bell was St. Patrick in Vest- 
ments and Mitre, trampling the serpent, and surrounded by a 
wreath of shamrocks. Some of the English papers said it was 
Cardinal Wiseman! He did, however, get a medal for them. 
His name soon became known in England and he sent several 
bells over, " even to Birmingham, the seat of metallurgic 
industry." In 1852 he had on exhibition in Cork a peal 
intended for Melbourne, Australia. 

In 1852 Bishop Mullock, on account of bad time's, could not 



order the peal of bells for the Cathedral. The large Bell does 
not belong to the peal. The peal will consist of eight bells. 
The tenor, or largest being 29 cwt., and the whole peal weighing 
92 cwt. Of these, three are now in the western tower, and five 
are wanting. In January, 1853, Bishop Mullock ordered the 
first two Bells of the Peal D. and K. The Bishop sent the 
designs for Inscriptions and devices. The clergy have promise 
to assist him in purchasing them. 

Rev. Fr. Bonaventure McCarthy, t).S.F.,of Adam and Eve's, 
was commissioned by Bishop Mullock to look after the Bells for 
him. Father McCarthy writes as follows (March 30, 1854) : 
I went to Murphy and had the satisfaction of finding 
that he was not only busily engaged in the necessary prepara- 
tions for casting, but manifests an honest earnestness and a 
tradesman like pride that pleased me. The mould for the larger 
bell was complete. Its goodly proportions tempt one to walk 
round it. Nor are the anticipations of a great bell and full 
melodious sound diminished by contemplating the burly maker 
as he stands with his legs wide apart and his hands stuffed into 
his pockets, viewing his work with the most pursey com- 
placency." 

In April, 1854, the two Bells were completed and shipped to 
Liverpool. They were valued at ^400, stg. Murphy writes of 
them in the following strain : " * * * I have great pleasure 
" in informing Your Lordship that they are a pair of as beautiful 
" toned bells as ever I cast. I have cast them to their precise 
" notes, D and E natural, without a chip being cut from them 
"for tuning; they are, then, what is technically termed in 
" Bell-Music 

" MAIDEN BELLS. 

' It often occurs, even with the best founders in England, that 
" they will not have a single maiden bell in a whole peal." 

The Bells were shipped from Liverpool on June ist, aboard 
the ship Corrotnilla. I find no mention of the date of the 
arrival of the Bells, but they were rung for the first time on 
Sunday, November 26th, 1854. They are of the respective 
weights of 27 cwt. and 21 cwt. The former (which is rung for 
the Angelus) is christened St. Mary, and the latter St. Patrick. 
These two Bells, D and E, were the first two of the peal, and 
Dr. Mullock intended to order the other six immediately, but 
the " times were so bad" he could not do so. In 1863 (?) the 
third bell F (sharp) was ordered. 

In 1863 Murphy writes, saying that he has on hand, all ready 
for shipping, the five bells that are wanting to complete the 
peal, viz. : G A B C (sharp) and D (octave). The whole weight 
of the five Bells now required is 41 cwt. 

It is the intention, if possible, to have the five additional bells 
ordered immediatly, so as to give us the hope of being able to 
peal out the " Adeste Fideles" on next Christmas Night. 

+ M. F. HOWLEY. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Grouse Shooting in Detofoundland. 




By D. 

" Of all the joys that sporting yields, 
Give me to hunt the stubble fields 
Quite early in September." 

k HEN old Somerville sang so enthusiastically of the 
delights of Partridge shooting in Southern Eng- 
land ; the joys of the heather and the far superior 
sport of the Northern gunners on the Grouse 
moors was hardly known to the old author of " The Chace." 

In the Old Country, grouse shooting is the pastime of princes 
and the delight of nobles and millionaires. In Newfoundland 
it is the fisherman's amusement, open to everyone who can beg, 
buy, or borrow a gun, and steal a dog. Though only a small 
brown bird, " Tetrao Scoticus" is a power in the Mother Land. 
Parliament is prorogued in his honour, the House always rises 
on the 1 2th August, and the coveys rise on the wing for sporting 
M. P's. Anyone who has happened to be in Scotland about the 
nth will not readily forget the scenes at the Scotch stations, 
especially such a one as Perth. The endless gun cases, the 
splendid setters and pointers, straining at the leash. The eager- 
gaitered and well got up sportsmen, the gillies and the garb of 
old Gael, all bound for the land of the bonnie heather. 

Punch describes a worried Scotch Railway Porter wrestling 
with a lot of pointers and setters: " What am I going to do 
with these tam dugs? they have all aiten their tackets." 

Our sporting demonstration on the opening day does not quite 
come up to this fine show. If you look into the luggage van at 
the Railway Depot you will find, about the i4th September, 
eight or ten fine dogs variously occupied with their chains, and 
a small but illustrious band of keen sportsmen (the noble Von 
Stein, with his ample person bestowed on a box, the voluptuous 
form of John Strang reclining on a sack, nearly as popular as 
the ample flask he carries in his bulging pocket). Three or 
four minor individuals, with pipes, seriously occupied with the 
care of their impedimenta and eager to display their more or 
well-formed calves and brand new knicker-bockers. 

The journey down to the barrens, whether by road or rail, is 
always pleasant. You are out for a holiday, there is a freedom 
from all restraint ; care and anxiety and all earthly troubles and 
worries are foi the time banished far away. The fresh spark- 
ling water, the sweet breath of the pine wood, the fresh breezy 
air are all delightful, and above all there is the joyous anticipa- 
tion of good sport on the morrow. Every now and then there 
are kindly greetings on the road; you meet your old friends of 
former trips " What about the birds, Mick ?" " Well, you see," 
says he, " I'm tuk up with the vyage, and so I don't be follying 
the country, but the bys that's be after the cows seed a few 
scattered covies about the Burnt Hills and the Look Out. I 
don't be thinking there powerful plenty at all." Your informant 
is probably a shooter himself, and this pessimistic report is a 
dodge to keep a few birds for his own gun. Bye and bye you 
meet another more genial and inventive livier, and with an air of 
simple candor and veracity he says: "How be the birds?" 
" Well, I never heard tell on the like. Jim Malone cum across 
the country from beyant tudder day, may be a week agone last 
Sunday, he had nara dog, he never stepped off the pat and 
begob he put ten fine covies to wing." I knew one gifted artist 
in mendacity who promised an exalted personage royal sport. 
" Come out to me, Sir William, and I'll show you thirteen fine 



W. Prowse, LL.D. 

covies." The reality, after a hard day's tramp, materialized into 
one solitary old cock. However, all things come to an end, 
and by night-fall you have reached your destination either a 
camp in the woods, or your head-quarter at a fisherman's house. 

It is worth while to make the journey for such a kindly wel- 
come. All the village has foregathered in your honour the 
old man and the boys are soon puffing away with your tobacco, 
the guns are always a special object of attraction, and all the 
queer odds and ends of tinned provisions are turned over and 
examined. In the meantime the mistress and the girls are busy 
about your supper. 

A wise man you go early to bed, and don't take too much of 
the " craytur." There is no need to rouse you in the early 




WILLOW GROUSE. 

\ 

morn, you are off before dawn ; the dread of some keener 
sportsman cutting you off lends wings to your movements, and 
before sunrise you are climbing the Hills. We breast the long 
ascent ; it takes it out of us a bit. We stay a moment to draw 
breath, the sun is just touching the eastern hills with a soft 
roseate light, below us lies the bay with its brown-sailed fishing 
boats and its purple islands. Through the pure air for miles 
away we can see the gleam of white houses, behind the dark 
pine woods, the fir-clad hills, the broad open moors, interspersed 
with verdant marshes in the long distance, seem as bright 
and green as the new mown meadows. The wild far-stretching 
moorland that lies before us has a beauty of its own. Every- 
where there are wild flowers and low berry-bearing shrubs with 
clear bright purling streams and endless lakes ; much of the 
open country is stern, wild and bare, but it has a weird beauty 
of its own, and the clear exhilerating atmosphere braces you 
like a subtle tonic. 

Before we commence our day's sport, let me say one word 
about your Newfoundland guide. In his old canvas jacket and 
patched moleskin trousers, 3 our Terra Novian fisherman is not 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



so picturesque a figure as the Scotch gillie in the garb of old 
Gael ; but for keenness of sight, for knowledge of birds and their 
habits, for accuracy in marking where the covies pitch, for endur- 
ance and walking powers, and above all, for courtesy and kindly 
manners, I will back him against the best of the bra Highlanders 
that ever drank the mountain dew, or scratched himself in the 
early dawn. If you make, a bad miss he will always find an excuse 
for you "Sure there as wild as hawks; the devil wouldn't kill 
the like of em." 

I remember one day five birds rose, two crossed as I fired, 
and both came down. My companion killed right and left, and 
I finished off the fifth bird with my second barrel. The whole 
thing was a pure fluke, but our guide turned to two old fisher- 
men who were cruising the hills " Dat's the way, Paddy," said 
he, " their doing it all day." 

All the English and American sportsmen who have visited 
Newfoundland Selous, Guille Millais, Pritchard the Novelist, 
and Vanderbilt the Millionaire, speak in the highest terms of 
the never-failing cheerfulness, their patient endurance of fatigue, 
the remarkable knowledge of all woodcraft and habits of the 
caribou shown by their Newfoundland guides. All unanimously 
declare that no better companions, for the woods and wild sport, 
can be found anywhere. And now 

" Together let us beat this ample field, 
Try what the open what the covert yields." 

Out range the dogs, away they go, with a rushing gallop right 
and left across the wind, bye and bye you notice Grouse is on 
a hot scent, Don and Ranger take it up, and you get excited and 
nervously finger your gun, you work the ground carefully all 
over, but it ends in a fiasco. The birds have lain there all night, 
and at early dawn they have flown to the feeding ground. On 
go the dogs again. Presently you notice Grouse begins to draw. 
He has the birds this time all right. As you mount the next 
low hill you see him just below, his lashing tail has become stiff, 
and with head outstretched and rigid body he slowly moves 
along, until at last he stands as motionless as if carved in stone. 
Ranger and Don, as they mount the ridge, suddenly catch sight 
of Grouse, and at once you see them also transformed into 
statuesque canines backing their companion. 

Slowly you saunter up to Grouse. Mick your man with the 
Celtic temperament may be excited, but if you are a genuine 
sportsman you will keep cool. You have broken in your dogs ; 
you know them well, and you know, too, that if you get flurried 
they will soon copy your example. 

As you approach Grouse, slowly and cautiously he moves 
ahead. Whilst you have been walking up to him the birds have 
also moved on, not far, but still further off than the old dog 
considers the correct thing. You look about you, wondering 
where on earth are the birds ? When, whirr 1 there is a startling 
sound, and a dozen brown birds are in the air scudding away; 
with your right barrel you pick off the old cock, and with your 
left down goes another, shot through the back he lies with wings 
outstretched. Mick declares " Begob, it was a great shot," but 
you know in your heart that it was plain and easy, and that you 
would be the veriest duffer if you had missed them. All the 
same your sportsman's vanity admits the soft impeachment, 
" Not bad, Mick." The remaining birds have taken refuge in 
a big tuck a lot of stunted spruces on the hill-side leading 
down to the brook. They are scattered and lie close. This is 
the prettiest shooting of all, and one and by one you work them 
all out, getting every variety of shot ; and if you are in good 
form you will bag nearly the whole covey. 

On you go over the barrens, meeting birds more or less 



singly and in covies and by the brooks an odd snipe. Pre- 
sently, about eleven o'clock, you look about for a place to boil 
the kettle. 

This is the most delightful time of all for Mick. The amount 
of " lay" a good hearty Newfoundlander will swallow is some- 
thing incredible. He wont eat so much meat, unless you force 
it on him ; but after you have done, he loves to refill the pot 
and go at it again. 

The knowing shooter takes a good long time over his lunch. 
In the middle of the day is the worst time for the birds, whilst 
the late afternoon and evening are the best. On the return 
tramp all the scattered covies will be found in their old haunts. 
By this time you will be a bit stiff and tired, and probably good 
shot as you undoubtedly may be, you will miss an occasional 
chance ; but you have had a good day's sport, a good tramp, 
and you will enjoy your supper as if you had earned it. 

A good day's grouse shooting in Newfoundland affords as fine 
a sport as there is in the world. This, at least, is the opinion 
of Admiral Sir W. R. Kennedy the best all round sportsman 
in the British Navy. 

And now in conclusion let me say just a word about the 
natural history of our fine indigenous bird. The Devonshire 
men, who first settled in this country, had never seen the moor 
fowl, so they named our bird after their own " Partridge." The 
correct description is the " Willow Grouse" " Tetrao Saliceti." 
He is a distinguished member of the great family of the Tet- 
raonidoj, all northern birds, they range from the Capercaillie, or 
Cock of the Woods, weighing seventeen pounds an inhabitant 
of Northern Sweeden and Lapland, to the little Rocky Mountain 
Grouse of less than one pound. In Newfoundland we have two 
distinct forms of the Grouse shown in the engraving. 

The Willow Grouse, too well known to need description, 
varies in weight from twenty-three to twenty-seven ounces, 
whilst the Rock Grouse or American Ptarmigan " Texrao Lago 
Pus Rupestris" is smaller than its congener and rarely exceeds 
twenty ounces. Its general plumage is grey, or gray brown, and 
the tail and wing feathers a blackish brown, much darker in the 
Willow Grouse than in the Rock Grouse, which is slightly red- 
dish grey about the head, which is also smaller. Altogether, in 
its more sober colours, it differs from the rich reds and brown 
of the larger species. 

The habitat of the Rock Grouse is high mountains. In New- 
foundland it is only found on the South and West of the Island. 
Both species are spread over Hudson Bay, Labrador, and the 
Arctic Regions of North America. The Scotch Grouse has 
been naturalized in Sweden. It seems to me desirable that an 
attempt should be made to introduce both the Black Cock and 
the Grouse into this country ; more efforts should also be made 
to re-introduce the moose. The funds obtained from deer and 
licenses fgr sporting dogs might very well be set apart for the 
laudable purpose of preserving our rivers, and stocking valuable 
game birds on our wild lands. 

The Native Grouse is being rapidly thinned out ; I know 
many places from whence it has entirely disappeared. An effort 
has been made to prevent the extinction of one of the most 
valuable game birds in the world, by stopping all shooting for 
one year and putting back the opening season until October. 
We shall see this year how it has worked. Grouse being mainly 
a ground bird can be easily decimated. 

In the August Cornhill, 1905, I discussed the question of 
Grouse disease, and proposed, as a remedy, to mate the home 
birds with our hardier and stronger breed. Mr. Reginald I. 
Smith, K.C., the Editor, intends to try the experiment. To be 
successful it will have to be carried out on a large scale. 



4 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



International Order or Good templars. 

By Rev. A. W. Lewis, B.D., Grand Chief Templar of Newfoundland. 




I 



surprise 



<;RANI> I.OIX;K SKAI.. 



E new inter- 
pretation of 
I. O. G. T. 

will probably 
even many 
Good Templars. This 
name has been under 
consideration for years 
by the International 
Supreme Lodge ; and 
at its last Session in 
Belfast, Ireland, Aug., 
1905, it was adopted in 
the place of " Inde- 
pendent Order of Good 
Templars." Instead of 
calling the Officers of 
this Triennial Lodge 
Right Worthy Grand 

Templars, they are now to be known merely as " International." 
The change of name is fully justified by the unexampled growth 
of this Temperance Movement. It is " the largest Total Abstin- 
ence Brotherhood in the world." Councillor Joseph Malins, of 
Birmingham, England, has been Right Worthy Grand Templar 
for years; and has most efficiently filled this important office. 
Upon his retirement in August, 1905, Lieutenant Wavrinsky, 
P.G.C.T. of Sweden, was elected as his successor, ' International 
Chief Templar." The International Counsellor is Dr. L. O. 
Jensen, G.C. T. of Norway. Councillor Malins. G.C.T. of Eng- 
land, is Past International Chief Templar. The International 
Vice-Templar is Mrs. James L. Yule, P.G.T. of Ireland. The 
International Secretary is Colonel B. I 1 '. Parker, P.G.S. of Wis- 
consin, U.S.A. The International Assistant Secretary is Rev. 
Rees Evans, G.C.T. of Wales. The International Treasurer is 
Dr. Bluine, Berlin, G.C.T. of Germany. The International 
Chaplain is Rev. M. Bruce-Meikleham, G.C.T. of Scotland. 
The International Superintendent of Juvenile Temples is Miss 
Jessie Forsyth, Boston, U. S. A. The International Marshal is 
J. W. Howells of Natal. The International Deputy Marshal 
is Miss Margaret E. Wright of New South Wales, Australia. 
The International Messenger is James A. Simpson of Nova 
Scotia. The International Guard is R. Sandilands of Natal. 
The International Sentinel is William Arnot of Bombay, India. 
The International Electoral Superintendent is Guy Hayter, 
P.G.Co. of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England. Surely the Order 
is entitled to the name of International. 

In writing a short article upon the International Order of 
Good Templars, I do not wish to compare it in any way with 
other excellent Total Abstinence Societies. We wish all ' God 
speed." But every member of every such Society must be in- 
terested in Good Templary. for all are sister societies, not rivals, 
but partners. Under the shade of the subject of this article all 
branches of the Church Universal may stand as brothers and 
sisters, hand joined in hand. This article should be of interest 
to every part of Newfoundland, also because the Grand Lodge 
has prepared a Circular Letter to be sent to EVERY clergy- 
man in this " our Island Home," where there is not already a 
Good Templar Lodge. Although I feel incapable of doing 
justice to this noble Order, I trust the universal interest will 
over-look any defects. 

Every man and woman deplores drunkenness. No intelligent 
person denies that it is the great curse of modern civilization. 
It weakens the nation, corrupts society, robs home of its light, 
blights character, and gives innocent children an awful heritage. 
The only difference of opinion is how best to combat the evil. 
If some believe in Temperance and not Total Abstinence, yet 
they should not be inimical in any way to those that just as hon- 
estly believe in a complete boycott of Alcoholic Beverages. If 
their position is as strong, then they can afford to be magnan- 



imous. Right never needs acrimonious arguments. Let US 
calmly look at the case of Good Templary. 

Total Abstinence is thorough and well defined. Temperance 
in Drinking says, " You may take a glass or two, but do not 
take enough to make you drunk." There is NO LIMIT; and 
there is where all the drunkenness arises. Some have strength 
of will to do this and never be more than moderate drinkers. 
Others do not do this, for every drunkard began by being mod- 
erate. Some have a dormant thirst for drinks containing 
alcohol; and a glass now and again awakens this sleeping tiger 
of appetite. You may as well talk to a robbed tigress as to a 
man that has that craving. Experience abundantly proves this. 
Now, Total Abstinence says, " Let us be sure of results and know 
just what is allowed. If you never taste alcohol, you will never 
be a drunkard." Is there anything wrong in that ? 

When Good Templary asks a man to give up his occasional 
glass, it does not ask him to deny himself what is good for him. 
A healthy body does not need alcohol ; and in case of illness 
the Doctor may prescribe. What is more, Science has proved 
that the use of alcohol even in moderation is harmful to the 
normal body. This is taught, at least in the schools of America 
in Science Primers. The vital organs are weakened. They 
do their work less perfectly and are the more exposed to dis- 
ease, ever lurking near man. Insurance Companies are not 
Temperance Fanatics ; and they give special terms to those in 
the " Total Abstinence Class." The pleasure arising from the 
exhileration of a " drink," is more than counterbalanced by the 
reaction. 

Good Templary asks us to deny ourselves what we may think will not 
harm us, for the good of others. If those in danger of becoming drunkards 
are to be reached, it must be by the stronger ones making common cause 
with them. We say, " I will not touch alcoholic beverages, in order to get 
some one in danger to do the same." A moderate drinker cannot get a 
weak brother to abstain by saying to him, " You are weaker. You cannot 
do as I do." This is felt to be an insult ; and the weak one is more deter- 
mined to show that he is not weak, only to fail as before. It is example 
that helps. And surely the principle is deserving of respect, " Let us deny 
ourselves for the good of others." 

Good Templary believes, in prevention. It cures those that need a bro- 
ther's helping hand ; but it lays great emphasis upon training the young 
and pledging the young, before they begin to tamper with what may be 
their ruin. The Juvenile Temples, from the age of five years, are taught 
the principles of Good Templary, as they are able to understand them. As 
they grow up they naturally become Good Templars, and they are pledged 
to life-long total abstinence. Thus, though they may cease to be members 
of a Lodge, their honor keeps them true to the aims of the Order. Ten 
millions have thus been pledged by this one Society. 

Good Templary enlists the social instincts. The sacred cause of human- 
ity has allied with it the charm of earth's best fellowship. Society, is freed 
from the blight of an indulgence which robs it of its purest joys. Temp- 
lars gather week after week for helpful companionship, under educative 
influences. Many of the best public speakers in the land had their first 
training in the entertainments of the Templar Lodge; and bashful youths 
learn to forget themselves in an honest attempt to make others happier 
and better. 

The change in Public Sentiment on Temperance the last few years is a 
marvel, imperfectly understood by the many. We can remember when it 
was considered the proper thing to have wines upon the side-boards ; and 
the clergy might take their glass without offence. Now the custom is retir- 
ing to the back-ground. It is fashionable not to offer intoxicants to those 
that do not " drink." And gentlemen in choosing a life-partner prefer one 
that does not " like her glass." Good Templary has done much to effect 
this change of sentiment; and Public Sentiment is stronger than the arm 
of Law. Good Templary is doing much to train young ladies to prefer the 
young men that are pledged against the great enemy of home and happiness. 

Prohibition is a step in advance of Total Abstinence. Concerning this 
there is more difference of opinion. Many say we have no right to rob 
others of their liberty to eat or drink what they choose. Yet all civilized 
countries maintain that the state has a right to forbid what is detrimental 
to the public welfare, physically and morally. W^e have stringent laws 
about lighting fires in the dry season. Lotteries are outlawed, at least in 
the United States and Canada, probably in Newfoundland. The only 
questions are, " Does the licensed sale of intoxicants weaken and maim true 
citizenship, and infringe upon the rights of good citizens? Are the saloons 
a menace to young manhood, the hope of the home, and the hope of the 
State ? How does the danger compare with an occasional bush fire ?" 
However, a Good Tempiar is not pledged to Prohibition, although the In- 
ternational Supreme Lodge at its session at Indianapolis in 1869 adopted 
(Continued an page 13.) 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

Crout Culture in DcutfoundlaiKL 

By L. E. Keegan, B.A., M.D. Illustrated from Photographs by the Author. 




EWFOUNDL AND known to the outside world as 
the land of fogs and codfish is becoming universally 
spoken of as the " Angler's Paradise," a much more 
euphonious and deserving name. During the the past 
few years we have been visited by many sportsmen, and it is to 
the Disciples of Isaac Walton, who have come here from the 
East and from the West, that we owe our new title, for those 
who have been lucky enough to cast the fly on our rivers to 
have done battle with our noble salmon or fill their creel with the 
sporting char have left us, favourably impressed, much improved 
in health and full of determination to visit the Angler's Paradise 
once more. 

Trout culture in such a country may seem unnecessary, never- 
theless the Game Fish Association is leaving nothing undone in 
this line. An up-to-date hatchery is in full working order near 
St. John's; thousands of fry, principally of the Rainbow Trout 
variety, are turned out annually and distributed throughout the 
country, and the result is splendid sport in nearly all the neigh- 
bouring lakes. In the near future most of the lakes throughout 
Newfoundland will contain the Rainbow Trout a very valuable 
addition to our present sporting fishes, and if the propagation is 
carried on in a proper manner Newfoundland's present reputa- 
tion will certainly live. 

Before describing the " Trout Culture" as carried out at the 
Game Fish Association Lakes, it might be well to say a few 
words about the Association. The object of the Association is 
the propagation of Game Fish throughout the Island, and 
the advancement of angling as a sport. It receives no Govern- 
ment Grant for the work done; on the contrary the Association 
piys the Government an annual rental for the control of the 
two lakes where the " Trout Culture" is carried on.". 

The Association has a ;nembership of about fifty, and its run- 
ning expenses are financed by the members who are all good 
sportsmen, keen on angling themselves, and anxious to do every- 
thing in their power to advance sport for the benefit of others. 

The Club Lakes are situated near Portugal Cove in a most 
picturesque spot, about seven miles diftance from St. John's, and 
quite adjacent to the lakes and fed by water running therefrom 
stands the hatchery. The members have the sole right of fish- 
ing the waters from June ist to December ist. 




Overlooking the lakes is a well-built club house, fitted with 
every accommodation, and much frequented during the fishing 
season. 

To watch and study the various stages of " Trout Culture" 
from the capture of the parent fish to the ova stage, and from 
this to the fully developed fry, one must visit the lakes and 
hatchery during the months of April, May and June, and 
although only members are admitted special pemission can 
always be obtained by anyone anxious to see the various inter- 
esting sights during the spawning season. 

The first stage in the process is the capture of the parent fish, 
and this is accomplished by netting the river which connects the 
two lakes. The river is a small one. It has been widened and 
well gravelled, and pools and falls have been artificially con- 
structed to entice the fish from the deep water of the lakes. 

On or about the latter part of April the spawning season 
commences, and then the river is carefully watched. At first the 
fish are shy. Trout varying from y, to 4 pounds may be seen 
for some time about the mouth of the river, but becoming rest- 
less and anxious to carry out the process of reproduction in the 
natural way. they soon enter the spawning beds where the fish 
waiden is ready to receive them. He is armed with a net strung 
on a large triangular frame, nd quickly impounding the fish by 
blocking the mouth of the liver he drags the pool for spawners. 




THE CLUB HOUSE. 



DRAGGING THE POOL FOR SPAWNERS. 



Large cans containing water are in readiness. The captured 
fish are placed therein and conveyed to the other end of the 
lake where " sorting" takes place, the male fish or milters being 
placed in one can, the females in another. As quick and gentle 
manipulation is important, differentiating between the sex . is 
somewhat difficult, but after a little time one becomes quite pro- 
ficient, distinguishing at a glance the short head and rounded 
body of the female fish from the longer head -and thinner body 
of the male. 

The second stage, or " stripping" the fish, as the artificial 
method is called, is now proceeded with, and this stage is ex- 
tremely interesting, when you consider that a little egg may 
eventvally mean a two or three pound fish, and that with ordin- 
ary care 85 per cent, of the eggs spawned and fertilized by this 
artificial method hatch out. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



" Stripping" is the most difficult process, gentle manipulation in 
handling the fish being absolutely necessary, and no fish should 
be killed or injured during the operation. 

The requirements for the operation are few : a steady table 
on which is placed a clean dry basin, an ordinary tea-spoon, and 
a pair of light spring forceps. Beside the table is placed a large 
tub containing ordinary salt and water for the salt bath, and a 
few cans of fresh water. Every preparation must be complete 
before touching the fish. The operator then draws on a pair of 
thick woollen gloves, and commercing with the females, he lifts 
the fish out of the can with a light short-handled landing net. 
With his left hand he quickly grasps the slippery trout just 
above the tail, while with his right he carefully seizes the head 



The fish is then dropped into the salt bath and left there for 
a minute. This process cleanses and stimulates the skin and 
prevents the formation of fungus growth. An assistant now 
lift it out and returns it to the lake, when after a short rest it 
completely recovers and swims away, apparently none the worse 
for the operation. 

Having spawned all the female fish into the basin, a couple 
of good male fish are selected, and being handled in somewhat 
the same manner, the milt is expressed and deposited on the 
eggs. It is not necessary to apply pressure so high up in the 
case of the male fish, because the milt glands are situated much 
lower than the ovaries. 





HOLDING A FOUR FOUNDER. 



and shoulders. Then holding the fish vent downwards over the 
basin, he applies gentle pressure with his right hand upon the 
belly, when if the fish is ripe the eggs rush out in a steady 
stream. With a little further gentle manipulation the complete 
contents of the ovaries will be expelled. 




THE EGGS RUSH OUT IN A STEADY STREAM. 



DEPOSITING THE MILT ON THE EGGS. 



The eggs and milt must then be thoroughly mixed by a rotary 
movement of the basement. To the naked" eye they appear as 
a yellow sticky mass, adhering to the dish and to each other. 
A small amount of fresh water is now poured on, the mixing 
continued for a few minutes longer, when the dish is covered 
and left standing to allow fertilization to be completed. 

The time necessary for fertilazation varies according to the 
temperature, but one hour will generally be sufficient. The 
eggs are then examined again, and it is found that they present 
a different appearance ; fertilization has already caused a change 
and they appear larger and separated from each other. 

The third stage consists of thoroughly washing the fertilized 
eggs, and is a very important step. In large hatcheries where 
millions of eggs are handled they are placed in a washer, through 
which a constant flow of water passes. With us fresh water is 
poured on the eggs and off again several times, until they are 
washed and become brilliant looking. The eggs are now carried 
to the hatchery and carefully spread out on the grills. The 
grills we use are made of perforated slate, and are suspended in 
the hatching boxes so that the water may pass under and over 
them. Each grill is capable of carrying about a thousand eggs, 
the measure used being an ordinary teaspoon which holds about 
one hundred ova. 

When all the fertilized ova have been placed in the hatching 
boxes and the water supply seen to, there is little else to do 
except watch them from day to day and pick out dead eggs as 
they appear. There is no difficulty in detecting them as they 
become quite opaque. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




LIVE EGGS. 



DEAD EGG.S. 



If the dead eggs are not removed they become covered with 
a fungus growth which quickly spreads and causes great damage. 
The hatchery should be kept dark dining the whole of the in- 
cubation period, as light is not only favourable to the growth of 
fungus, but it may injure the embryos. 

The different stages of " Trout Culture" have now been de- 
scribed, the capture of the parent fish, the stripping, the fertili- 
zation of the ova, the washing and deposit on the grills, and at 
this stage it might be well to give a short description of the in- 
teresting changes that are taking place in the ova from the mo- 
ment of fertilization, right up to the end of the incubation time, 
when the small fry bursts from its egg. 

A trout egg or ovum is made up of protoplasm, and if it is 
carefully examined under the microscope a sirull cell called the 
germinal vesicle will be seen situated to one side. A closer 
examination of this " Germinal Vesicle" will reveal a much 
smaller cell in its centre which cell is called the " Germinal jpot." 
When the milt is deposited on the eggs as described and the 
small spermatozoa contained in it successfully enters the ger- 
minal spot, impregnation takes place and great changes soon 
follow. The Germinal vesicle first divides into two cells and 
these two cells subdivide into others, and so on, every new cell 
forming other new cells, this cell formation being known as the 
" segmentation process". When this process has ceased the 
ovum consists of a mass of small corpuscles without any cell 
wall, and somewhat resembles a mulberry, consequently this 
is called the morula stage. As development advances the 
" morula" cells change in shape and become armed with little 
threads called cilia, which gives it the power of movement. This 
stage in the development being known as the ' planula" stage. 
The ovum now consists of three parts, and each part has the 
special function of developing certain portions of the little fry's 
anatomy. These interesting changes are not visible to the naked 
eye; nevertheless, they are taking place while the eggs lie in the 
hatching boxes during the first few weeks, and can be studied 
with the microscope. Towards the end of the third week, ac- 
cording to the temperature of the water, the result of the de- 
velopment that has been going on becomes apparent, and the 
observer who has probably given up all hope of seeing any 
change becomes intensely interested as he notices black spots 
appearing in each egg. The OVA are now said to be " eyed up," 
and at this stage of development the incubation is about half 
over, and the eggs which required perfect rest up to this time, 
can now be taken up, washed, packed in boxes and sent to dif- 
ferent parts of the world where the hatching can be again con- 
tinued. If the " eyed" ova be examined with the microscope 
one can distinctly see the circulation of blood, also the veins, 
arteries and tissues of the future fry. After the eggs have been 
"eyed" no further change will be noticed [or several days, but if 



the temperature of the water in the hatchery keeps at about 50 
degrees ten days will be sufficient to complete the development. 
Then a great metamorphosis takes place and the thousands of 
eggs, which had remained motionless on the grills for so many 
weeks, suddenly change into thousands of little wriggling and 
peculiar looking creatures called " alevins." 

Alevins are delicate and helpless, their peculiar appearance 
is due to the small yellow sac which is attached to the belly, 
this sac contains fat globules, the absorption of which sustains 
life during a period of about fourteen days. When the fat glob- 
ules are all used up, the sac shrinks and the alevin assumes a 
proper shape and is then called a fry. 

If proper attention has been paid to the hatching boxes dur- 
ing the incubation stage, about 85 per cent of the eggs put dov. ,. 
will hatch out, and after a wait of some weeks one will have the 
satisfaction of seeing thousands of fry in a healthy state. At 
first they pack closely together at the head of the boxes, but 
after a little time they swim about vigorously in their miniature 
stream, rising at any small particle floating down. It is a very 
interesting sight to watch them, and even the most casual ob- 
server becomes much impressed and wonders at the marvellous 
way in which Nature can be beaten by Art in this culture and 
propagation of fishes. 

In about five weeks from the date of hatching the fry will be 
hardy and ready to embark in life. During that period they are 
fed on grated liver or cod roe, which is an excellent food and 
than thousands of them are conveyed to the different lakes 
about the country, where in a few years they will have grown to 
good size fish, affording splendid sport to the lucky angler. 

Other lots of fry are placed in a specially prepared pond 
close to the hatchery, known as the Fry Pond, where they are 




THE FRY POND. 

watched and carefully fed for a period of twelve months, when 
as " yearlings" they are turned loose in the club lakes. On a 
miscellaneous diet the yearlings thrive well and very soon 
become good sporting fish, and although many fall victims to the 
" well delivered fly, many others escape and in due time enter 
the spawning beds to deliver up their eggs as their parents did 
before them. 

Thus is the propagation of species maintained, and thus is 
trout culture carried on at the Game Fish Association Hatchery. 
What we do is but part of what should be done, and in conclu- 
sion I would point out that in our Inland Fisheries there is a 
mine of wealth for the Colony, that the care and the propagation 
of the Salmonida; is of the utmost importance, and I would urge 
that the Inland Fishery Question be given the attention it de- 
serves and be treated in a scientific manner. If this be done 
there is every reason to hope that sport will improve, and that 
Terra Nova will be an "Angler's Paradise" for many years to 
come. 



8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



In Cuangelinc's Garden. 

' noi. 

"TITYRE TU RECUBANS." 
By Eros Wayback. 

ONE evening the summer day ending, 

When the lights with the shadows lay blending. 

And the delicate, scent-laden, mauve-laden bushes 

Of lilacs that spread where the flushes 

Of light from the west were last falling, 

And 'the throstle to mate softly calling; 

When one catches the fragrance of grasses 
That's pilfered by soft breeze that passes, 
To Kvangeline's Garden I wandered. 
And there 'neath the old yew tiee pondered 
On days that art- passed, that are hoary, 
On long ago days and their story. 

Like a latter-day Tityrus lying 

Outstretched on the sward, I am plying 

Fond memory, and scenes that are olden 

Come time-softened heie thro' the golden 

Diaphanous light of the garden, - 

Thro' the branches of the old yew, fie warden. 



The smoke from my briile-gueule floats curling. 

Like wreathing of incense unfurling ; 

I soar with it dreamily whirled 

From the strenuous life of the world. 

With surcease from toil and the_ babble 

Of streets and the noise of the rabble. 



There she stands, over yon, with the shimmer 
Of white on her garments, and glimmer 
Of tresses, like sheaves on the praiik- 
That e'er and anon seem to vary 
When bound by the reapeis, all mellow 
With the ripeness of autumn, and yellow 

With red gleaming autumn's bright flashes 

Of gold in Iheir waving and splashes ; 

Was there ever a latter-day maiden 

With such tresses, loose flowing or braiden, 

With such eyes of the depths of the azure, 

Oft beheld 'twixt the cloudlet's embrazure; - 



With the swesp of those fringing curved lashes 
That are shading and softening their flashes; 
And e'er with that smile supplemented 
I!y deep dimples so cunning indented 
On cheeks with the glow of lipe peaches, 
And Cupid's sweet curve that beseeches ? 

And there by the woodbine entangled, 

With those strange, yellow flowers bespangled. 

Again I behold her reclining. 

In that arbour the roses entwining, 

Where evening's last light has just caught her, 

And I seek for the jewel I biought her ; 



Why, old fellow \ been dosing ? 

Sure, the maiden reposing 

There, is Mollie, Evangeline's daughter I 



"Its so long,' said the sun to the brook that was froze, 
Since you bubbled and babbled of joys and of woes. 
That when you get started again, I suppose, 

Some chestnut we'll hear aboul " Flowers and breezes so balmy." 
Then the brook lisped reply, " When your gr.dding around, 
Thay I'm gurgling and flowing quite free and unbound, 
As of yore, I am rushing by mead and by wold, for you thaw me." 

F.ros ll'aybatk. 



Song of a Dcopl)ptc. 

Bv Robert Gear Mac Donald. 

IT has come, it has come, O my heart 

Like the scintillant glow of the dawn \ 
And the leaps in my pulses start, 

And Life's curtain is backward drawn. 
In a sky that no cloudlets blur 

It wheels in gyrations free, 
And its joy's in the wind astir, 

And its flash on the amber sea. 

And ever through sun-burnt days, 

When September is turning aside, 
It is setting my brain ablaze 

And thrilling my heart with pride ; 
And ever through darkling nights, 

When the stars shine full in their place, 
I know that more glorious lights 

Are shimmering over my face. 

Ye odors that come from the sea, 

Come now as ye breathed in the past ; 
Ye waves that are tumbling with glee 

Bring me earnest of happiness vast. 
For the past and the future meet 

In these days that inspire my soul, 
And the past's dim vista is sweet, 

And the future looks sound and whole. 

The years that the locust ate, 

God will to my life restore, 
His bounty is passing great, 

He blesses me more and more. 
And the canker-worm is dead, 

Whose tooth would have withered my heart 
The blood in my veins bounds red 

With intoxicating dart ! 

Oh, life to be lived by me ! 

Oh, joy of the unborn years ! 
Oh, jubilant hours to be ! 

Oh, light that the future wears ! 
The glow of that new fire spreads 

In the clear dawning heavens above ; 
I live in the light it sheds, 

And its wonderful name is Love 1 



in ilic Offing. 

By Dan Carroll. 

FAR out whsre white sails dip and lift 
Their swelling bosoms on the verge 
Of waters, there's a ship that waves 

A sun-lit sail all day. 
Her helm has taught her many a shift ; 
Still far to sea that ship delays, 
Rapt in a dreamy summer haze, 
And gains no length of way. 

She cannot catch a breeze to urge 
Her landward ere the day is done; 
But with the setting of the sun 
She's glorified, and like a star 
Her mast-head flashes from afar 

This thought to me: 

" Thus souls upon the swelling sea 
Of song and passion miss the gift 
Of words, that pass them winging swift, 
So on the verge of silence cbift 
With dip and lift." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



M. & [. Kennedy, 

CONTRACTORS and 
PI in niFpg 

******************************************** 

Dealers in Pressed and Stock Brick, 
Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Drain Pipes, 
Cement, Chimney Tops, &c, 



orders in the Carpentry, Masonry, and all classes 
of work in the Building Business, promptly attended to. 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE: 

38 henry Street, # St. John's, Nfld. 

K. NOAH, 

322 Water Street, opposite fllan Goodridge & Sons. 

We have been in the Dry Goods for-a number of years and 
understand our business. Our ideas are old and new. Noah 
of old saved the people, and Noah of St. John's can supply, 
wholesale, all kinds of Goods. Lowest quotations. Give us 
a trial order and be convinced. 



K. NOAH, 



322 WATER STREET. 



fishermen & Town Customers ! 

READ THIS CAREFULLY. 

PROVISIONS and GROCERIES 

JOHN J. HEALEY, 

(Near the Long Bridge), is offering some wonderful Bargains in Flour, 
Biead, Pork, Butter, Molasses, Cornmeal, Oats, Corn, Cattle Keed, B-an; 
and cheap Tea remarkable for strength. We trade in Fish, Oil, Turnips, 
Potatoes, Partridge, and Rabbits. Call before you buy anywhere else, and 
you won't be sorry. JOHN J. HEALEY, 68 & 70 Water Street West. 



A. W. 



CUSTOM SHOEMAKER. 
Boots & Shoes Repaired, 

230 Theatre Hill, St. John's. 

Fine Repairing a Specially. Outport Orders Solicited 

e^Carlton Restaurant*^ 

W. COLLYMORE, late, R. IM., Proprietor. 

Boarding, Lodging and Refreshments, 
Teas, Lunches, Dinners and Breakfasts 
at all hours shortest notice 

Cold Lunches and Suppers 106 Water Street, 

always on hand. St. John's, ma. 



Ho One tikes 

BEN-HUR FLOUR 

unless they have used it* 






But once used, Always used* 

YOUR GROCER SELLS IT 

0. I. ANDERSON & Co., Agents. 



WILL NOT GET 
LUMPY. 

VERMIN PROOH 




IN 

TWO 
PIECES 

*1.5O 
FXTDA 

MANUFACTUBED BY , 

HUE MATTRESS MFij C? 

5TJOMN'5 NEWFOUNDLAND. 



5ize.. 



Ft 



Ins 



.GUARANTEED 

TO 

CONTAIN 

NOTHING 

BUT 

PURE 
ELASTIC 

mr 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly.' 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Manning's Drug Store, 

148 ft 150 New Power Street. 

Only Drug Store in the City 

OPEN # EVERY # NIGHT 
TILL H O'CLOCK. 



J.V.O'DEA&Co 

WHOLESALE. 



flour, Provisions and feed. 

ST. JOHN'S. 



JOB BROTHERS & Co., 

Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

I 111 |l Apt OpC f British and American Goods of every 
I NI|JUI \\J\ O description Wholesale and Retail. 

F VflApt OpC f Codfish, Codoil, Codliver Oil, Seal Oil, 
LApUl Id O Lobsters, Furs, and general produce. 

All orders for same promptly filled at very lowest rates. 



Parlor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 



Church Seats. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 



T. MARTIN,^ 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Cower Street. 

Repairing Furniture Horses and Vans for 

a Specialty. Removing Pianos, &c. 



Mansour Joseph Sharlette, 

398 Water Street West. 

.... Dealer in . . . . 

Jewelry and Dry Goods. Sei ""g off chefl p- 

All orders promptly attended to. 



M. W. FURLOKG, K.C. 



/. M. KENT, K.C. 



FURLONG & KENT, 

= * ~ ^ 

BARRISTERS and SOLICITORS. 

DUCKWORTH STREET, ST. JOHN'S. 

OFFICE AND STORE Adelaide Street. STONEYARD Just East Custom 
House, Water Street. Telephone, 364. 

W/jTELLIS, 

Contractor, Builder, and Appraiser. 

Dealer in Cement, Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Mortar, Brick, Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps; Chimney Tops, all sizes, and Plate Glass. 

Estimates Given for all kinds of Work at Shortest Notice. 



Short Order Restaurant ! 

Corner Water and Adelaide Streets. 

Try us once and you will call again. Full line of first class 
Candies, Cigars, Fruit, F/c. 

J. A. CORBET, 




S. B. CHESTAR: 

Readymade, $4.50 upward. 

Made to order, $10.00 upward. 

Jackman The Tailor. 



When wriiing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly.' 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Avalon Steam Cooperage, Limited. 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL CLASSES OF 



Tight and Slack Packages and Boxes, Pickle Barrels, Salmon Tierces, 

Berry Barrels, Oak Oil Casks, Drums, Fish Casks* 
Special attention paid to Scotch Pack Herring Barrels. 

This is a mdst up-to-date Works, and those in the market for Cooperage or Boxes would 
do well to ask our quotations and samples before arranging for their supply. 

ORDERS PROMPTLY DELIVERED. 

Office and Works, Brewery Lane, ,* * St. John's, Newfoundland. 

NOTICE TO MARINERS. 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 

NO. 8 OF 1905 

ST. JOHN'S NARROW'S, CAHIIL'S ROCK, and PANCAKE SHOAL 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Spar Buoy painted White, has been 
moored in 3 fathoms, to show the position of Cahill's Rock; and a Spar Buoy painted 
black and white horizontal bands, surmounted by a white painted cone, in 3 fathoms, to indicate 
the position of Pancake Shoal, both on the South West side of the Narrows, or Entrance to 
the Harbour of St. John's. 

Buoys will be removed when ice is on the coast without further notice. 

ELI DA WE, Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, St. Johns, Newfoundland, 
September I2th, 1905. 



GUARDIAN 

> , . . Mi^l^PSHi ^ 



Of London, England 



ESTABLISHED 1831. 



The Guardian has the largest paid-up capital of any 
Company in the world transacting a Fire business. 



Subscribed Capital 
Paid-up Capital ... 
Invested Funds exceed - 



$lo,ooo,ooo 
5,ooo,ooo 

23,5oo,ooo 



T. & M. WINTER, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



At Our Book Store 

We keep all School Requisits 
and Office Utensils* < < 

A large stock of Books by leading authors. 
Wallets, Pocket Books, Purses, Picture Placques, 

Photo Frames, Baskets, Accordions, Concertinas, 

and Mouth Organs. 
Also, a full line of Fancy Goods and Toys of all 

description ; Playing Cards, Games, etc. 

SHEA'S 

BOOK & STATIONERY STORE, 

Telephone 429. 3OA WATER STREET. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly."- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



I5O,OOO Lbs. of 

Cotton and Wool Tents, 

....COMPRISING.... 

Misprints, Patches, White Shirtings, 
Grey Calicoes, Lawns, Flanneletts, 

Cotton and Wool Tweeds, Velveteens, 
Art Sateens, Percales, &c., &c. 

ALSO, A SPECIAL LINE OK 

Men's Fleece-lined UNDERWEAR, Overalls, 
Top Shirts, Sweaters, &c., &c. 

ft^WHOLESAUE ONLY. 

Call and see us or write for Price List. 

W. A. SLATTERY, 

Wareroom: Seaman's Home Building, Duckworth Street. 



The Bank of Montreal 

Isn't any more reliable than Our make of 
BOOTS. They stand hard rough wear, 
and can be relied on in the severest rain and 
snow storms. 

Boots for Men, Women and Children our own 
make. 

Also, everything in Rubber and Felt Footwear. 
Men's, Women's and Children's long Rubbers, 
Gaiters and Rubber Shoes. 

GIVE US A CALL. 

PARKER & MONROE, 

The Shoe Men. 

Wholesale and Retail. 195 & 363 Water St. 



Thomas Smyth, Co., Ltd. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Provisions, Groceries, Fruit, Etc. 

Head McBride's Hill, Duckworth Street, St. John's, Nfld. 



Dr. A. B. LEHR, 



** DENTIST,^ 



Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

Office and Residence: opposite T. McMurdo & Co. 
Teeth Extracted by Hale Method or Gas. 



C. NURSE. 



C. AUSTIN. 



NURSE & CO., 



The New Store 

for Boy's and Men's Clothing 
and Outfitting. ,* * 




Ship and Sanitary 

Plumbers, 
Gasfitters, &c. 



Estimates cheerfully given on all work in the above line. 

All orders personally attended 
to and satisfaction guaranteed. 

129 Cower Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 



T. J. BARRON, 



358 Water Street, 
One door West of Post Office. 



JAMES VEY, 



Gazette Building, 



Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 



Photos Enlarged and Finished in Ink, Framed Oil Por- 
traits 88.00; English, German, American and Canadian 
Mouldings always in Stock ; Frames and Cornices made 
to order; a large assortment of Views of Newfoundland 
Scenery. 



Established 1860. 



A. B.C. and Scott's Codes used. 



WILLIAM COOK 

Butcher and Victualler. 

Vegetables, Meats, and Ship Stores 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 

278 Water Street, St. John's, N. F. 

Ships' Letters addressed to my care 

delivered immediately on arrival. & 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

jlgents for mcKau & Dix, new J>ork. 



INew Gandy Store 

A. A. DELGADO, 

Candy Manufacturer, & Jt & 176 Water Street. 

Choice Candies of all Descriptions* 

(WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.) 

Also, Ice Creams and Ice Cream Soda different flavours. 
Fruit and Cut Flowers in Season. jt Remember the address. 

A. A. DELGADO, 176 Water Street. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



9 



Cbc CatDolics in 1798. 



By Rev. M. J. 

kJN 1798," says that vigorous and able champion 
of the Union, Dr. T. Dunbar Ingram, " while the 
Eastern Counties were disturbed, the whole West, 
where in the mountainous parts of Cork and Kerry 
the remnants of the Celts still lingered and preserved their 
language, was free from any taint of rebellion. In truth, the 
long hostility which England and Great Britain have experienced 
in Ireland, has come not from the kindly and social Celts, whose 
missionary labours in the past have made their name famous, 
but from the men of the mixed race, in whose veins there ran 
English or Scotch blood." In whom, I suppose, " the passionate 
unreason" has been intensified and stiffened by an infusion of 
" doggedness and narrowness." In truth, the insular hostility 
to union and to the. country with which Providence has decreed 
that they must be united, the separatist spirit as distinguished 
from the nationalist, has shown itself most strongly in the de- 
scendants of English and Scotch settlements, whose blood has 
often curdled (like that of Americans) into a hatred the more 
malignant because unnatural. " Hiberniores Hibernis ipsis" 
might in many cases be translated " more anti-English than the 
Irish." So far as liking goes, the Celtic Irish like the English 
far more than the Scotch do, and are far more ready to speak 
generously of them. Yet in the face of these facts, a great 
English Liberal can talk such nonsense as that the Celt looked 
in 1798, as he did in 1689, to Brest for the sails that never 
came. In 1798, the sails did come (bearing Wolfe Tone) pretty 
close to the coast of Kerry ; and when the Erench sent a boat 
on shore, the Celts gathered and drove it off. The leaders in 
disloyalty, from Wolfe Tone to Parnell, have been non-Catholics, 
usually of pure English, or Scotch, or Welsh blood, "I wish," 
writes Edmund Burke to Rev. Dr. Hussey, afterwards bishop, 
" that the leading people among the Catholics would give the 
most systematic attention to prevent frequent communication 
with their adversaries. There are a part of these, proud, insult- 
ing, capricious and tyrannical ; these, of course, will keep at a 
distance. But there are others of a seditious temper, who would 
make the Catholics at first the instruments, and in the end the 
victims, of their factious temper and designs." So, in fact, it 
happened ; and so we now have Mr. Sloan, who not long ago 
was a champion of Orangeism, setting Ulster on fire against the 
design of the British Government to endow a Catholic Univer- 
sity, now appealing to the Catholics to forget all they have 
suffered and join with their persecutors against those who 
emancipated them. And the Clan-na-Gael at once responds to 
the cry. 

Rev. Dr. Hussey to Burke (Nov. jo, 1796 ) : " I am terri- 
fied at what I foresee regarding my unfortunate native country. 
To break the connection with Great Britain is the plan of the 
United Irishmen. The wretches never consider that their 
grievances are not from England but from a junto of their own 
countrymen ; and that Camden and Pelham (Lord Lieut, and 
Chief Secretary), whom notwithstanding my differences with 
them, I consider the most honest men in office here, are as com- 
pletely junto-ridden as my former patron the King of Spain is 
convention-ridden." 

Burke to Dr. Hussey, December, 1796 : " You feel the thing 
very rightly. All the evils of Ireland originate within itself. 
That unwise body, the United Irishmen, have had the folly to 



Ryan, Ph. D. 

represent those evils as owing to this country. . . . The 
English Government do not in any way interfere, that I know 
of : and no oppressive disposition exists. . . . Ireland has 
derived some advantage from its independence (1782) on the 
Parliament of this Kingdom ; or rather it did derive advantage 
from the arrangements that were made at the time of the estab- 
lishment of that independence ; but human blessings are mixed ; 
and 1 cannot but think that even these great blessings were 
bought dearly enough when, along with the weight of the authority, 
they have totally lost all benefit from the Superintendence of the 
British Parliament. Our pride of England is now succeeded 
by fear" (of a declaration of independence by the Irish governing 
class). " If the people of Ireland were to be flayed alive by the 
predominant faction, it would be the most critical of all attempts 
so much as to discuss the subject in any public assembly on this 
side of the water." 

Burke, (Sept., 7792 ), to Richard Burke (then agent of the 
Catholics) : " I now press again that those to whose cause we 
wish well .in Ireland would leave off that topic, of which some of 
them are so fond, that of attributing the continuance of their 
grievances to English interests or dispositions, to which they 
suppose the welfare of Ireland is sacrificed. I know not whe- 
ther they believe me or not; or whether they may not think that 
I too speak from that sort of policy. But, believe what they will, 
there is not one story that the Protestant ascendancy tells of 
them (the Catholics) that is more groundless than that notion. 
What interest has any individual here, or what interest has the 
whole Kingdom collectively, that the Catholics of Ireland should 
have no share in the election of Members of Parliament ? Since 
1782, and even before, the jobs of the Irish Government are 
almost wholly in their hands, . . . and if they (the Catholics) 
think that the Court Party, or the Ministerial Party, or any party 
whatsoever, on this side of the water, wish to keep down the 
Catholics in order to keep the whole mass of Ireland feeble, 
they do an injury to the quietness of their character; and at the 
same time, infinitely too great an honour to the profundity of 
their politics . . . Our friends are greatly, radically, and 
to themselves most dangerously, mistaken, if they do not know 
that the whole of what they suffer is from cabals purely 
Irish. ... I wish that [they would avoid] everything 
which might discover a disposition to throw the blame of 
what they suffer on this country, in whose moderation and im- 
partiality alone their hopes of redress exist. . . . Anything 
like tiie menace of a force which does not exist, and which, too, 
is known not to exist, gives offence where it can inspire no fear, 
in those who know the true state of things ; and to those who 
do not know it, raises an alarm, the effect of which is, the desire 
of opposing to it a contrary force, to support a grievance which 
is felt only by others, rather than to run the risk of any change 
which might derange an order in the preservation of which they 
have (or think they have) a greater interest than they can derive 
from a reform attended with equal uneasiness and confusion. 
. . . The Ministers have not given any person authority to 
declare that they would use the forces of this country to coerce 
the Catholics." 

II. 

To Rev. Dr. Hussey (May 18, 1795) : " If some proper 
mode of education is not adopted, I tremble for the spread of 



10 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



atheism among the Catholics. I do not like the style of the 
meeting in Francis Street. The tone was wholly Jacobinical. 
. . . Under every provocation, the Catholics ought not to be 
irritated out of their principles and out of their senses. The 
language of the day went plainly to a separation of the two 
kingdoms. God forbid that anything like it should ever happen ! 
They would both be ruined by it; but Ireland would suffer most 
and first. The thing, however, is impossible. . . . It is a 
foolish language, adopted from the United Irishmen, that their 
grievances originate from England. T/ie direct contrary. It is 
an ascendancy which some of their own factions have obtained 
here, that has hurt the Catholics with this Government. It is 
not as an English Government that Ministers act in that manner, 
but as assisting a party in Ireland." (So the Unionists of Ire- 
land now call for a reduction of Irish Members.) "When the 
Catholics talk of dissolving themselves as a Catholic body and 
' mixing their grievances with those of their country,' all I have 
to say is that they lose their own importance as a body by this 
amalgamation, and they sink real matter of complaint in those 
which are factious and imaginary. For, in the name of God, 
what grievance has Ireland, as Ireland, to complain of. with 
regard to Great Britain ; unless the protection of the most pow- 
erful country on earth* ... be a matter of complaint ? The 
subject, as a subject, is as free in Ireland as he is in England. 
As a member of the Empire, an Irishman has every privilegr of 
a natural-born Englishman in every part of it, in every occupa- 
tion, and in eve'ry branch of commerce. No monopoly is estab- 
lished against him anywhere; and the great staple manufacture 
of Ireland is not only not prohibited, not only not discouraged, 
but it is privileged in a manner that has no example. The 
provision trade is the same; 'nor does Ireland, on her part, take 
a single article from England, but what she has with more ad- 
vantage than she could have it from any nation upon earth. I 
say nothing of the immense advantage she derives from the use 
of English capital. In what country upon earth is it, that a 
quantity of linens, the moment they are lodged in the ware- 
house, and before the sale, would entitle the Irish merchant or 
manufacturer to draw bills on the terms, and at the time, in 
which this is done by the warehouse men on London ? Ireland, 
therefore, as Inland, suffers no grievance. The Catholics, as 
Catholics, do ; and what can be got by joining their real complaint 
to a complaint which is fictitious, but to make the .whole pass for 
fiction and groundless pretence ? . . . The tenor of the 
speeches in Francis Street, attacking the idea of an incorporat- 
ing union, expressed principles that went the full length of a 
separation, and of a dissolution of that union which arises from 
their being under the same crown. That Ireland would, in that 
case, come to make a figure amongst the nations, is an idea 
which has more of the ambition of individuals in it, than of a 
sober regard to the happiness of a whole people. But if a people 
were to sacrifice solid quiet to empty glory, as on some occa- 
sions they have done ; under the circumstances of Ireland she, 
most assuredly, never would obtain that independent glory, but 
would certainly lose all her tranquillity, all her prosperity, and 
even that degree of lustre which she has by the very honourable 
connection .she enjoys with a nation the most splendid and the 
most powerful on earth. ... It is a struggle against nature. 
Ireland must be protected, and there is no protection to be 
found for her but either frotn France or England. France, even 
if she were disposed to give the same protection* to Ireland, has 

* Burke here expatiates on the fact that Ireland up to this time was 
protected against invasion or attack at the expense of England alone 
"a liberal and honourable protection" he calls it. 



not the means, either of serving her or hurting her, that are irt 
the hands of Great Britain." [For P'rance, now substitute the 
United States, since the American Clan-na-Gael now say : " Why 
should not we do in Ireland what we (Americans) have done in 
Panama and Cuba?"] "She might make Ireland (supposing 
that independence could be maintained, which 1 am certain it 
could not, for one year) a dreadful thorn in the side of this 
kingdom ; but Ireland would dearly buy that malignant and 
infernal satisfaction." 

III. 

The German Kaiser, by making friends with the Catholic 
Church, has obtained a bulwark for his throne against the Social' 
Democrats, has strengthened the union of South Germany with 
North, has made Alsace glad to be German rather than French 
territory, has gratified the Catholics of Austria, has secured the 
support of the Catholic Party in Italy for the Triple Alliance, 
has won the confidence of Catholic Belgium and detached it 
from France (and the British Radicals and Non -Conformists 
may enable him to detach it from ourselves), has bridged the 
gulf which separated the Irish-Americans from the German- 
Americans, and has set some of the Catholics of Hungary talk- 
ing of getting one of his sons for King of Hungary if there 
should be a secession of Hungary from Austria. The Repub- 
lican Party in the United States, which once leaned on the 
Puritans, now sees in the Catholic Church a breakwater against 
Socialism, and an aid against anarchy in the Philippine Islands. 
If King Edward had as free a hand as the German Kaiser, he 
would do from goodness and kindness of heart and fairness of 
mind what the other does from calculating policy, would abolish 
the oath which obliges our King to insult his Catholic subjects, 
(and all the Catholics of the World and the whole Eastern 
Church) would endow a Catholic University in Ireland, and 
would abolish those remnants of the penal laws which interfere 
with charitable bequests and which enable busy-bodies to annoy 
the religious orders. But the unchristian, unpatriotic, irrational, 
and immoral bigotry of the Puritan element in Great Britain and 
Ireland prevents the King from being what he craves to be, 
the King and the Father of all his people. In 1888, Mr. 
Gladstone said to the leader of the Nationalist Party : "The 
Prince of Wales (as he was then) is no enemy to Ireland nor 
to any policy that has the sanction of the masses of the Irish 
people." All the evidence we have shows that his heart is still 
in the same place. 

It should be clear from Burke that, instead of being a link be- 
tween the Irish and English people, or a channel for the removal 
of misunderstandings, the Irish Protestants are a source of dis- 
union, some of them misrepresenting England to their Catholic 
countrymen, and others misleading England by misrepresentations 
against the Catholic Irish. I must add, from my own observa- 
tion, that they misrepresent to the American people both Eng- 
land and the Catholic Irish, in order to make out that they are 
themselves a set of injured innocents, cruelly ill-treated by both 
England and the Catholics of Ireland. (The most anti-British 
of the great newspapers in New York, the only one that has the 
support of the Clan-na-Gael, has for its manager and editor two 
Belfast Protestants.) This misrepresentation of both English 
and Irish is practised particularly by the Scotch-Irish ; who, by 
the waj, assert in the United States that they are not Irish at all 
but Scotch, and that the Irish in America have no claim to such 
Revolutionists as Patrick Henry. (" They say they are not 
Irish ; and God knows they're not Scotch"). 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



11 



What Canada ana United States are Doing 

for agriculture. 



-By J, T. Law ton 

F you have read the Budget Speech of the Hon. Minister 
of Finance for the past year, you will notice that he can 
tell you how many slates were quarried in Trinity Bay and 
how many feet of board were sawn during the year ; but 
he cannot tell you whether the agriculture of the year has been 
a failure or not. He cannot say if there were a million barrels 
of potatoes grown or a thousand barrels. The slate industry is 
an industry of a few thousand dollars ; the agriculture of the 
country is one of millions, and is equal in value to half the 
fisheries. Why so little effort has been made lo develop our 
agriculture is a problem beyond the power of the present writer 
to solve. If the agricultural industry were insignificant ; or if 
this country were a barren wilderness, this apathy would be 
excusable ; but when it is known that the people of this country 
owe a great part of their support to the products of the land ; 
when we have practical proof that the soil is productive ; and 
when we know that we pay to other countries tens of thousands 
of dollars for agricultural produce that could be raised in this 
country, it does seem strange that a more progressive supervi- 
sion in agricultural matters is not considered necessary. Thou- 
sands of dollars are spent annually in fisheries' supervision 
because of the illusion that " the fisheries are the mainstay of 
the country." There are hundreds of fishermen who if they 
depended on their earnings from the fishery would have died 
from starvation long ago. 

While we allow our agriculture to take care of itself, in sharp 
contrast to this is. the course pursued by the United States and 
Canada. The following is a brief synopsis of the agricultural 
organisation of the United States : 

The United States department of agriculture is composed of 
nine principal bureaus. 

The Bureau of Animal Industry makes investigations as to 
the existence of dangerous diseases, the nature and prevention 
of such diseases, and studies and reports on the means of im- 
proving the animal industry of the country. 

The Bureau of Soils is intrusted with the survey and mapping 
of the arable soils. It determines the kinds of soils in each 
locality and gives information as to the best crops to grow in 
certain localities. During the year 1903, the officials of this 
Department surveyed and mapped 14,907,520 acres. In some 
districts, as many as twenty-two different types of soils were 
found. It is well known that different soils are suited to differ- 
ent crops, and in a large country like the United States, the 
gain by sowing crops suited to the soil may be reckoned in 
millions of dollars. 

The Bureau of Entomology obtains and disseminates informa- 
tion regarding injurious insects affecting field crops, animals and 
forests ; conducts experiments and tests with insecticides and 
insecticide machinery. The importance and necessity of this 
Department may be inferred from the fact that in 1903, the loss 
to the cotton crop in Texas alone from the Mexican Cotton Boll- 
Weevil was estimated at $15.000,000, and Congress appropriated 
$250,000 for immediate steps towards abating the further spread 
of this insect pest. A further proof of the necessity of this 
Department is the fact that the annual loss from forest insect 
depredations amount to not less than $100,000,000. 

The Bureau of Plant Industry conducts experiments with 
field crops to discover the earliest and most prolific varieties and 
studies of plant life in all its branches. It originates new varie- 
ties capable of withstanding the wide ranges of climate in the 
United States. 

The Bureau of Chemistry has charge of analysis of soils, 
fertilizers and farm products. It determines the feeding yalue 
of farm crops, and investigates the purity of foods admitted to 
or manufactured in the United States. 

The Bureau of Forestry investigates methods of planting 



, Harbor Grace. 

trees ; gives practical assistance to tree planters and assists in 
protecting the national forests. 

The Weather Bureau forecasts storms, and reports on the 
probable temperature and rain conditions, and assists the farmer 
in guarding against unexpected losses by bad weather. 

The Bureau of Public Roads has charge of the proper build- 
ing of roads. 

Besides these Bureaus, which are under the direct control of 
the Government, there are sixty-six agricultural colleges which 
send out annually thousands of men trained in agricultural 
work, who spread a knowledge of scientific fanning in the 
districts where they settle. 

Farmers' Institutes play an important part in diffusing agri- 
cultural knowledge. At their meetings, papers on agricultural 
subjects are read and discussed, and new ideas are exchanged 
amongst the members. Farmers' Institutes exist in every State 
and are aided by a Government grant. Add to these factors, 
the Experiment Stations, Dairy and Live Stock Associations, 
Forestry and Horticultural Societies, all of which are assisted 
in some way by the Government, and it can easily be seen how 
great are the forces at work in the United States for the develop- 
ment of agriculture. The practical and logical result of this wise 
organization has been a rapid and marvellous agricultural out- 
put. The exports of farm products has risen from $147,000,000 
in 1851 to $87 8, 000,000 last year. 

These same remarkable results are evident also in Canada, 
under its enlightened system of agricultural development. 
Nineteen years ago, a committee appointed by the Canadian 
Government found that "the depressed condition of farming was 
" not due to any fault in the climate or soil of this country, nor 
" to a lack of industry among the farmers; but to defective 
" farming, and to the want of skill and knowledge in all 
" departments." 

The Dominion Government immediately adopted measures to 
remedy this depressed condition. Experimental Farms were 
established, and a system of organization was begun which 
has made Canada one of the foremost agricultural countries. 

The Experimental Farms have proved a great blessing to 
Canadian farmers. One instance will suffice to show their 
utility. It was found that the varieties of wheat and apples, 
which ripen well in the Eastern Provinces, fail to ripen in the 
Northwest, on account of the shortness of the season. What 
was wanted was new varieties that would ripen earlier. The 
Central Experimental Farm, after some years of experimenting, 
has produced a variety of wheat called Preston, and a variety 
of apples from the Siberian Crab both of which are capable 
of ripening in the short season of the Northwest Territories. 
Numerous experiments are performed at the Experimental 
Farms with ordinary crops to determine the best varieties, the 
effects of fertilizers, the feeding value of farm crops, and the 
solution of problems connected with agricultural science. The 
information thus obtained is circulated amongst the farmers. 
Advice on all points of farm management is given free by the 
Farm staff. 

Last year the Canadian Government distributed 30,000 pack- 
ages of seeds to farmers who were willing to sow them and test 
their value. By this plan the Canadian farmers become experi- 
mentalists, and an impetus is thereby given to scientific and 
practical research that must be of incalculable benefit. By this 
arrangement every locality finds out for itself the best varieties 
of seed for that particular locality. 

Not satisfied with the results of her own experiments in agri- 
culture, Canada sends experts to other countries to' find out how 
these countries do things, and the information thus obtained is 
brought back for the benefit of the Canadian farmers. Canadian 
produce is shown at every Exposition. Canada has an exhibi- 
tion manager whose sole business is to see that Canadian products 



12 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



are shown to the best advantage at the world's exhibitions. 
What are the results of this organisation ? Canada is becoming 
one of the chief agricultural countries of the world. Thousands 
of immigrants are -annually finding homes in the Canadian 
Northwest. Towns are springing up like magic. There are 
in Canada to-day, towns of four thousand and five thousand 
inhabitants, with all modern convenience, that were not in exist- 
ence ten years ago. All this progress is due to Canada's wise 
recognition of agriculture as the basis of every nation's pros- 
perity. Under this progressive policy the exports of farm pro- 
ducts have increased from from #9,584,000 in 1871 to $44,600,- 
ooo in 1903. 

Twenty-five years ago a Joint Committee of both branches of 
our Legislature also deplored the backward condition of our 
agriculture, and declared that " Our agricultural industry is 
" susceptible of a very enlarged development. Vast stretches 
" of agricultural land need only the employment of well-directed 
" labour to convert them into means of independent support for 
" thousands of our population." 

After twenty-five years of waiting, what has become of the 
"Enlarged development?" Not only do we not export farm 
produce ; but we are forced to import to supply our needs. 

Does agriculture need Government supervision ? I claim that 
the agriculture of a country needs as much supervision as the 
fisheries. We are pleased to hear of an increase in the catch of 
fish; but why not feel pleased at an annual increase in our hay 
or potato crop ? An increase in one means money as well as 
the other. From certain experiments at the Central Experi- 
mental Farm, Ottawa, it has been calculated that the loss on 
our annual agricultural output is fully Si, 200,000. We send 
out of the country about $800,000 for agricultural produce. 
The hay crop is short every year. The price of meat is increas- 
ing owing to the scarcity of cattle. There's scarcely a child in 
the street can tell carrot seed from turnip seed. In some locali- 
ties this spring there was a shortage of potatoes for seed. And 
yet there are some who seem to think that our agriculture needs 
no further develoyment 





Fishing in the Crick/ 

By L. F. Brown, New York. 

IN his father's rubber boots, 
Where the winding streamlet shoots 
O'er the gray and tumbled shingle, 

W T ith a stick, 
He fishes for brook trout. 
He knows what he's about, 
As he feels them jerk and nibble 
In the " crick !" 

His " ma" told him to churn : 

But he's out along the bum 

That goes singing through the forest 

Toward the sea, 
With its message for the ocean, 
Born in green and white commotion ; 
And he don't know just how happy 
Boys can be. 

He feels tha mountain breeze, 
Hears the bluebirds in the trees, 
Sees the happy violets nodding. 

And all that. 

Hell be punished, pays the cost, 
Wants the big one that he lost. 
An unconscious poet under 
His old hat. 



lie admires the curve and foa.nl 
Of the water. He's at home. 
And my ! but that's a whopper 

Jumping there ! 
He'll come back to this pool 
When he ought to be at school ; 
But when trout are biting well 
He doesn't care. 

And if mercifully spared 

Until he is gray-haired, 

Then he'll know what happy times,-^ 

What perfect joy, 
Was all around about 
As he angled for brook trout, 
In the mountain creek he worshipped 
When a boy. 





Che Forgotten Song, 

, By Dan. Carroll. 

GATHERING wild fragrant flowers, beside a stream 
A fair-haired child a rambling went one day, 

And when returning in the evening's beam, 
Amidst the mazy woodland lost his way. 

He cried aloud one name his only love, 

His mother's echo mocked him and he wept, 

'Till faint and weary in the deep'ning grove 
He laid him down dejectedly and slept. 

The sylvan Nymphs around him gathered then, 
The sweetest Zephyrs whispered in bis ear, 

And every beauteous spirit of the glen 

With gladness in their voices, hovered near. 

There guardian angels of the cities trod, 

Who watch the toiling masses sweat and bleed, 

And die ! with pale wan faces turned to God 
The helpless victims of remorseless greed. 

They hovered near and sang a song that eve, 
That haunts the sleeper's soul adown the years, 

Of deeds triumphant which the great achieve, 
The blood of toilers and the rain of tears. 

They sang his soul in magic breathing lines, 
The song of Brotherhood, which is to be 

The watchword and the shibboleth that binds 
The races, in thy reign Humanity. 

They laid their hands amid his sunny hair, 
And in the light by sunset glories thrown ; 

They touched his brow and sleeping lids with prayer, 
And reverently claimed him as their own. 

When lo ! a frowning demon fiercely swept 
Upon the group, and struck with hand of hate 

The forehead of the smiling child, then leaped 
Into the gloom, and jeered like mocking fate. 

The big trees shuddered, terror chilled the breeze, 
That moaned despairingly as if it knew 

The child ordained the whispered song to seize, 
Would know full oft that jeering demon too. 

The seekers found him where the flowers bloomed 
The fairest ; soon were stilled his hearts alarms : 

They placed him with his angel face illumed, 
Within his anxious mother's waiting arms. 

And while the twilight o'er the landscape fell, 
And while his heart beat wild twixt joy and fear, 

He tried with child-like awe his dream to tell 
In lisping accents in his mother's ear. 

And still he tries, and still with lisping word, 

Tho' care has dimmed his eyes and locks are gray 

To teach the world the wondrous song he heard 
Within the woodland solitude that day. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



13 



International Order of Good Cemplars. 

( Continued from page 4.) 

Prohibition as one plank in its platform. Good Templars are left free to 
choose what they believe to be the best way to promote the principles of 
total abstinence. Good Templary stands also for wholesome religious in- 
fluence. It is not sectaiian. Only atheists are excluded from its member- 
ship. No distinctive doctrines are inculcated, but the Bible is commended, 
and the truth of the presence of God is kept before the Lodge as an enno- 
bling thought. It stands not only for the Fatherhood of God, but also for 
the true Brotherhood of man. This is beautifully expressed in the accom- 
panying Grand Lodge Seal of Newfoundland. 

Considering its broad and solid foundation and its humanitarian plan, no 
one should wonder at the grand and beautiful structure that has arisen in 
a few years. The first brick was laid in New York State, U.S.A.. in 1851. 
The work. went on rapidly. Joseph Malins, of Birmingham was in America 
for a time ; and, while there, he was led to join a Lodge. On his return to 
his native land he organized the first Good Templar Lodge in England, 
September 8th, 1868; and he called it Columbia No. i. The Order 
spread over the British Isles ; and by military, naval, and civil deputies 
it was carried to almost every habitable part of the earth. Russia excludes 
the Order, as she does so much that is good in Modern Life. 

THe Northern Whig, of Belfast, in its issue of August 3rd, 1905, gives 



the following paragraph relating to Newfoundland : " An interesting fea- 
ture occurred during the morning, when the Right Worthy Grand Templar 
called forward Brother A. J. Preece, who has just recently established the 
new Grand Lodge of Newfoundland, . . . and, after complimenting Bro. 
Preece on the success of his work, handed to him for transmission to the 
new Grand Lodge the charter granted by the International Supreme Lodge." 

In the Report of the R.W.G.T. submitted to the August Triennial Lodge 
we find the following : " A few months ago our R.W.G. Secretary de- 
spatched Bro. Rev. A. J. Preece (now G.Ch. of New Jersey) to mission the 
Island of Newfoundland, and build a Grand Lodge. No fitter Missioner 
could be chosen. He is an able speaker and preacher, of high character 
and long experience. He enlisted some of the highest and best elements 
of the Province and formed a group of good Lodges ; and, with the co-op- 
eration of several past G.L. Executive Officers, instituted the Grand Lodge 
of Newfoundland on June I4th, 1905. 

The Grand Lodge started with 15 Lodges, with 689 members and 
4 Temples with 128, and 2 District Lodges are also working. Bro. Preece 
has since added other Ix>dges, and now there are over 1,000 adult and 
junior members several clergymen being Lodge Deputies. The G.C.T. 
is Bro. Rev. A. W. Lewis; the G.Sec., Bro. F. H. Scott, and the G.Supt. 
Juvenile Temples, Bro. Rev. J. J. Thackeray. The Island has possessed 
Local Veto powers, and has well used them." " Come thou with us, and 
we will do thee good." 

St. Andrew's Manse, Harbor Grace, August 25th, 1905. 



6oioer street D)etbodi$t Cburcb. 



" No silver saints, by dying misers giv'n, 
Here brib'd the rage of ill-requited heav'n : 
But such plain roofs as Piety could raise, 
And only vocal with the Maker's praise." Pope. 

Mk AY this be claimed for Gower Street Church to-day ? 
Possibly respecting that there may be room for 
M^B^fl diversity of opinion, although the writer is disposed 
to answer in the affirmative. And yet the sacred 
edifice known by that name is no mean structure. While not 
unduly pretentious or elaborate, and making not the smallest 



By Rev. L. Curtis, Af.A., D.D. 

has the proud distinction of being the Mother Church of 
Methodism in St. John's. Whatever changes may come as 
years pass by, this glory abideth, and not abideth merely, but 
increaseth as years add to the number and importance of her 
offspring in the city. 

In the matter of seniority, however, St. John's must yield the 
palm to some of the outports, especially to places around Con- 
ception Bay. The Gospel of the New Testament as interpreted 
by Methodism was first preached in those places as early as 




mm 
,5 a 




Minn* 





GOWER STREET METHODIST CHURCH. 

claim to magnificence, either in dimensions or style, it is at least 
respectable in appearance, and in its adaptibility to meet the 
needs of a worshipping congregation, it leaves scarcely anything 
to be desired. But the peculiar distinction of the Gower Street 
Church is not in its style of architecture or brick and mortar, 
or even in its splendid situation, but rather in its historic asso- 
ciations and relationships. It has been said that a man may 
have many wives but only one mother ; and Gower St. Church 



REV. L. CURTIS, M.A., D.D. 

1765; and, in a few years, churches were erected in Harbor 
Grace, Carbonear, Blackhead, Lower Island Cove, and Old 
Perlican. Such individuals or families in St. John's, in the 
latter part of the eighteenth and early morn of the nineteenth 
century, as preferred Methodist doctrines and polity, found in 
the services of the Congregational Church then established 
there such spiritual help and comfort as their souls required. 
Indeed, the ministrations of Rev. John Jones, a man of excel- 



14 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



lent character and superior Christian spirit, who was a resident 
of St. John's from 1775 until his death in 1800, and who forsook 
military life for the pulpit, were greatly appreciated by visitors 
to the city as well as by members of his congregation. As 
Methodists continued to increase, however, the desire to have a 
church and clergyman of their own denomination became in- 
creasingly strong ; and at a meeting held in the fall of 1814. 
it was resolved to arise and build in the following spring. This 
resolution was put into effect in 1815, and work pushed vigor- 
ously forward, securing its completion in a few months. That, 
however, proved one year too soon ; as on February i2th, 1816, 
a fire, which left 1000 persons homeless, laid low the church so 
recently erected and set apart for holy service. Even while the 
joy of having a suitable church home was new to the small con- 
gregation, they were suddenly robbed of their clearly bought 
privilege, and obliged to seek shelter in the Charity School- 
room, the use of which was secured for them through the good 
offices of the Rector of the Church of England. 

Not for long, however, were they content to remain without a 
church; for, despite the unfavourable financial condition of the 
town a condition brought about by the fire and other misfor- 
tunes and resulting in widespread destitution on Sept. 171!! of 
the same year, 1816, was laid the foundation .stone of the new 
church; and on Christmas Day the building was occupied by a 
worshipping congregation. 

The Governor of the Colony, Vice Admiral Pickmore. and a 
large company of people of different denominations, manifested 
their sympathy with the movement by tluir presence at the lay- 
ing of the corner stone. Thus after the purging by fire, as if to 
test the quality and devotion of the aspiring congregation, and 
after the toil and expense of building two churches in as many 
years, Gower Street Church was fairly started upon its career of 
service for God and humanity. 

The church at that time erected seems to have met the require- 
ments of city Methodism until the middle of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, when it became too small and otherwise unsuited to the 
altered conditions; and a movement was set on foot for a new 
and improved building. In 1856 the new church was ready for 
use; and from that time until the great fire of July. 1892, when 
it was laid in ruins, it was the centre of the manifold activities 



inseparable from the church life of modern Methodism. During 
those thirty-six years, two large streams broke away from the 
main current the stream in the West of the City upon the 
erection of George Street Church, and that in the East, upon 
the erection of Cochrane Street but nevertheless* the mother 
church abounded with life and activity, and was so liberally 
patronised that for some time prior to that fire, the question of 
additional accommodation was engaging the attention of the 
official Boards. After that fateful day, however, only one deci- 
sion was possible the erection of a new church. 

A temporary building, known as the " Tabernacle," was set 
up to meet the immediate requirements of the congregation ; 
and thus, with greater deliberation, the more arduous task of 
erecting a suitable and up-to-date church was faced. The 
foundation stone was formally laid by Rev. A. Carman, D.D., 
General Superintendent of the Methodist Church, and on 
October 4th, 1896, the present spacious edifice was dedicated 
to the worship of Almighty God ; Rev. John Potts, D.D., one 
of Canada's most brilliant orators, having come from Toronto 
to participate in the functions of the important occasion. As 
the new church was so much more commodious than the old 
one, fears were entertained by many that a considerable time, 
possibly several years, may pass before all available pews would 
be taken. All such fears were entirely groundless, however, as in 
a very few weeks, families were seeking in vain for accommo- 
dation. Rev. A. D. Morton, M.A., D.D., was Superintendent 
of the Circuit during the years of its erection, and the writer 
entered upon the duties of that office just as it was ready for 
use. Rev. H. P. Cowperthwaite, M.A., D.D., followed in order; 
and he was succeeded by the present highly esteemed Superin- 
tendent, Rev. J. L. Dawson, B.A., who, three years previously, 
had been invited from Nova Scotia to the Superintendency of 
the St. John's West Circuit. 

The Mother Church of Methodism in St. John's continues to 
prosper. The young people's Societies, such as Sunday School 
and Epworth League, are in a flourishing condition, and the 
regular Church Services are attended by a loyal and enthusiastic 
congregation. Contributions for Missions alone last year reached 
the fine sum of $1,480. 



Che Dap or CIK Races at home. 

By a Newfoundlander hi Boston. 




at home, 
have now 



N esteemed correspondent sends us the following racy 
references to persons and happenings of years ago : 

" There were several of us gathered together at the 
Seaside on August 2 last, ' The Day of the Races" 
It is over fifteen years since I left the Island, and I 
in a measure, lost touch with current events. I some 
times see your local papers, but they do not interest me very 
much, as they often deal with matters beyond the comprehension 
of one who is not a close student of local events. 

" But I get the QUARTERLY regularly, and am very pleased 
with it. Most of the contributors are old favourites, and some 
of the writers have a reputation more than insular, and still 
some of the newer ones display more than ordinary literary 
merit, and their essays and poems interest me very much. My 
views were shared by nearly the whole party, and I thought 



when sending my subscription I would let you know that your 
efforts are appreciated, in this quarter at any rate. 

" Of course in a short time we became reminiscent, and the 
subject that seemed to interest and amuse us more than any- 
thing else was a discussion on the " Races." O.ie of the num- 
ber, who, bye the by is, perhaps, one of the most successful 
Newfoundlanders in Massachusetts, held forth on the old times. 
He talked of the days of the Native, the Hawk, the Buttercup, 
Fire-Fly, Heather Bell, Lurline, Lady of the Lake, and so on, and 
had something interesting to say of each. He recalled some of 
the old coachers, such as old Mr. Winter, father of Sir James 
Winter, who was no mean oarsman in his day ; Mr. Ryal), 
lovingly known to the older generations as " Tommy" and re- 
garded as a fine sterling old sportsman ; Sam Ryan, another 
famous coxswain, and among the younger fellows, Charlie Clift 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



15 



Was a great favourite. The old Native, with her amateur crew 
consisting of the Winter boys, and the Cliffs and others, and 
coached by old Mr. Winter, who was a regular disciplinarian, 
gave a good account of herself for many years. In recounting 
the deeds of the brave days of old, it was pleasing to note that 
many of those who participated in them, succeeded in their 
various professions. Sir James Winter has attained a high place 
in his profession; "Duke" Winter is rated among business men 



Cove, etc., and there must be thousands of others around the 
Island as good, if not superior to the crews from these parts. 
And this lake on Regatta Day is really a pretty and uncommon 
picture. I say this as not only my own experience, and that of 
most Newfoundlanders I ever heard discussing it. but also of 
many strangers, who happened along the " Day of the Races." 

" It was also recalled that many " Champions" came along 
from various parts, and wilh their jaws held the championship, 




AT QUIDI VIDI LAKE 
OR REGATTA DAY. 



here who know him, as one of the leading business men in the 
Island. Ted Clift (now the Rev. Theodore) is known to many 
Newfoundlanders as a successful clergyman, and " J ; mmy" Clift 
now occupies a prominent position in Newfoundland. Then the 
old Buttercup crowd, "Johnny" Roach, Greenway, Rowe, and 
lots of other who have passed away or are scattered to all parts 
of the earth. 

" I tell you the memory of the beautiful hike, g,iy with its 



till some Coaker or Squires, or some unpretentious fisherman, 
in fear and trembling in a " punt," faced the champion, who, in 
thirty seconds alter the start, lost the " belt" beyond all redemp- 
tion. We don't hear much of the single scull race on Quidi 
Vidi these times. Newfoundland ought hold permanently the 
single scull championship of the world. This branch of aquatics 
should be cultivated among the younger oarsmen. There is 
more fame and kudos in it than in any other branch. 



A SIX-OARED RACE BOAT 
ON QUIDI VIDI LAKE. 




well dressed orderly crowds, the white canvas tents and parti- 
coloured bunting, with the music and bustle and good natured 
fun and excitement, makes a picture for the wanderer, that can 
be recalled more vividly almost than any other feature of our 
Island Home. 

" Looking back on these days now, with larger experience, I 
think that Newfoundlanders, are easily the very best oarsmen 
in the world. I do not believe it possible to get any six men in 
the world to beat six picked men like those who rowed on the 
Lake, hailing from Outer Cove, Black Head, Quidi Vidi, Broad 



* * * * * 

" Another feature of the QUARTERLY that appeals to readers 
in the United States is the portrait gallery the men in the 
" Public Eye." It is interesting to see portraits of well-known 
old Newfoundlanders, and not less so to see those of the ccming 
men. You should certainly develop that department of the 
journal. Even the very advertisements are read and discussed 
with interest, and I was glad to see some old firms are still 
to the fore, and appear to be as vigorous as they were fifty 
years ago." 



16 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

Sir flmbrosc SDca, K.CI.6. 



QN August 23rd, in the year of Grace 1905, was laid 
to rest in Belvedere Cemetery, all that was mortal of 
one of our Island's most gifted sons Sir Ambrose 
Shea, K.C.M.G. The deceased was born about the 
year 1815, and was therefore in his ninetieth year when the 
summors came. His great talent developed early, as he was 
scarcely nineteen years old when he first took a prominent place 
in local parliamentary affairs. His energy and ability placed 
him easily first amongst the ablest of our local men, and the 
right to that position was unquestionably conceded him by all 
his contemporaries, till the Imperial Authorities recognized his 
worth, and offered him the Governorship of the Bahamas. 

Judge Prowse writing of him says: "Nature endowed Sir 
Ambrose with every gilt and grace; lie had not only a fine and 
very distinguished appearance, courtly manner, fit to grace any 




\ 



SIR AMBROSE SHEA, K.C M.G. 

position, but his intellect and logical powers were of the highest 
order. As a debater he was unrivalled. He always appealed 
to the reasoning and common sense of his hearers. A master 
of argument and clear, nervous, forcible English, he was a 
speaker who would command a high position in any assembly 
in the world. As a writer, he was just as powerful as a speaker. 
Probably his most unique gift was his personal influence over 
both individuals and bodies of men. He was equally at home 
talking with the humblest or the highest. Every one felt the 
magnetic power of his personality. As an enlightened, far-seeing 
man, he was generally in advance of his compeers. It is to him 
we owe our splendid water supply. He had advanced ideas 
about the fishery, and started the first steam bait-skiff. As every 
one knows, he was the leader in the great Confederation move- 
ment for union with Canada." 

Sir Ambrose had the misfortune to have been born with 
abilities and perceptions ahead of his age, and in several crises 
in his life and in our history he was cramped and thwarted by 
petty local jealousies. A naturally strong, energetic personality, 
his very force, created a resistance of prejudice and misconcep- 



tion, that robbed his services to his native land, of a great deal 
of benefit that would otherwise have accrued from the labour of 
her gifted son. We will never know the loss which was ours, 
when the Imperial Government entrusted him with the Gover- 
norship of the Island, and pitifully mean local intrigue, deprived 
us of his ripe statesmanlike experience. Probably most of the 
evil of which we now complain would have been obviated by 
his ability and patriotism. The services that would have been 
freely given his birth place, were utilized in developing the 
industries of the Bahamas, of which place he was appointed 
Governor. 

However, after a brilliant career in the Imperial Service, the 
wish of his heart was gratified, and his remains now rest among 
his old-time friends and companions in Belvedere Cemetery. 

The country did itself credit by tendering her gifted son a 
public funeral. The funeral was large and representative, and 
His Grace Archbishop Howley delivered the panegyric in the 
Cathedral. The floral tributes were many and beautiful, and 
were sent by the following : 

Their Excellencies Sir William and Lady MacGregor. 

Sir W. H. Horwood, Chief Justice and Deputy Governor. 

Right Hon. Sir Robert Bond, Premier. 

Hon. Sir E. P. and Lady Morris (Minister of Justice). 

Sir J. S. and Lady Winter (Ex-Premier). 

The Executive Council. 

The Legislative Council. 

The House of Assembly. 

The St. John's Municipal Council. 

The Constabulary and Fire Departments. 

The Benevolent Irish Society. 

The St. Andrew's Society. 

The Newfoundland Biitish Society. 

The Mechanics' Society. 

The Total Abstinence Society. 

The Star of the Sea Association. 

The Ix>yal Orange Association. 

The Onward Lodge, I.O.G.T. 

The Grand Lodge Sons of Temperance. 

Mr. C. S. Pinsent, Misses Browning, Mr. J. Ryan. 

ORDER OF PROCESSION. 

Constabulary (under Supt. Sullivan). 

Reserve Firemen. 
Methodist Guards Brigade. 

Band. 
Catholic Cadet Corps. 

Band. 
Church Lads' Brigade. 

Band. 
Detachments from H. M. Ships. 

HEARSE AND CASKET. 

Carriage containing Sir E. D. Shea, Rev. J. Bennett, Dr. H. Shea. 

Hon. George Shea, Dr. H. Shea, jr. 

His Lordship the Deputy Governor, and A.D.C. McCowen. 

Rt. Hon. Gentlemen of Privy Council. 

Sir R. Thorburn, Sir J. S. Winter. 

Naval Officers. 

Hon. Gentlemen of Legislative Council. 
Ex-Members of Legislative Council. 

Members of House of Assembly. 

Ex-Members of the House of Assembly. 

Heads of Government Departments. 

The Municipal Council. 

Clergymen. 
Capt. Hamilton, officers and crew of R.M.S. Carthaginian. 

Citizens, on foot. 
Citizens, in carriages. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



17 



Cbc Citp Councillors 

Visit tbe scene or operations at the new Water Works, Winsor 3ake. 




Photo by James Vey. 



On Top John Ryan, City Engineer. 



Second Row Councillor J. R. Bennett, M.H.A.; Councillor W. J. Ellis, M.H.A. ; T. Carew, Herald Reporter. 

Third Row Councillor M. J. Kennedy, Councillor Hon. John Harris, Hon. George Shea, Mayor ; Councillor Hon. John Anderson. 
Fourth Row John L. Slattery, Secretary-Cashier City Council; John Gait, C.E., Toronto ; . Pippy, Telegram Reporter. 



18 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 



OK fluxiliarp Water 



By Jo/in L 

NkOT since St. John's received the power of 
managing its own civic affairs, has there 
been undertaken an enterprise of so much 
importance to the citizens, as the Auxiliary Water 
Service inaugurated by the gentlemen who now 
control the destinies of the City. 

For a long period, the want of an enlarged water 
supply has been felt, because of the expansion that 
has taken place in the community during the past 
decade ; an expansion that was steady and substan- 
tial. The development and growth of building pro- 
perties, in that section of the City, towards the sum- 
mit North of Military and LeMarchant Roads has 
been considerable ; and to such an extent that pro- 
vision for an efficient supply of water, for domestic 
and fire purposes, was deemed necessary to meet 
the requirements of the increasing number of dwel- 
lers in that sectjon. 

As is well Ifcnown, artificial means have been 
availed of to give this part of the town some relief, 
but always at the expense of other sections, the sup- 
ply for which was at times considerably curtailed. 
The present system, which served the city so well 
in the past, and .has met the ever increasing demands 
on its powers had to be changed. 

With the end therefore of making ample provision 
for domestic and fire purposes, particularly for the 
New St. John's^ the present board of Councillors, 
viz.: Mayor Shea, and Councilmen J. R. Bennett, 
W. J. Ellis, Hon. John Harris, Hon. John Ander- 
son, and M. J. Kennedy, with the late Councillor 
C. F. Muir, entered into an arrangement with John 
Gait, C.F., of Toronto, for a report as to the best 
means of accomplishing this, and on September 3rd, 
1903, after a careful examination, Mr. Gait presented 
his recommendations. The proposals for installing ; 
the New System were approved, and after prelimin- 
aries were arranged, the work under the superin- 
tendence of City Engineer Ryan, was ordered to be 
begun in 1904. 

Briefly the scheme for the new water supply is as 
follows : 

(a) The 3,000 feet of 24-inch main pipe from 

Winsor Lake, to be replaced by a concrete 
conduit 4x5 feet. 

(b) At the end of this conduit is situated a new 

screen house, completed. 

(c) From the new screen house, there is a concrete 

conduit averaging 10 feet sections, 8,000 



. Slaftery. 

feet long, which takes the place of the twirl 
1 6-inch and i2-inch mains that connected 
with the single 1 6-inch main leading to the 
city. 

(d) At the end of this conduit, there is completed 
a concrete compensating basin, oblong shape, 
capable of holding in reserve 750,000 gallons 
of water. 

(c) Connected with the basin are to be 2 24-inch 
mains, each 1,500 feet long, one to supply the 
present 1 6-inch pipe leading to the city, the 
other to supply the 1 6-inch main for the 
upper level service. 

(_/) All the pipes now in use, out to the basin, are 
to be taken up, re-laid from the point stated 
in the previous paragraph, making a new and 
improved service to the city a distance from 
the compensating basin to the summit of 
1 3,000 feet. 

(g) The upper level service, which will come 
along by Long Pond Bridge to Newtown 
Road, to head of Parade Street and continue 
to Freshwater lioad, will be at an elevation 
of 130 feet above the old line. 
The system, which is designed on a most mod- 
ernized scale, according to the reports received, will 
be a highly efficient one", that will produce the very 
best results, with a capacity for fire and domestic 
purposes 1$^. serve a city with a population much 
greater tiw^the present one. 

The -Work is in full swing at present; and, from 
all that is known, the citizens of St. John's may look 
forward early next year to the completion of an 
undertaking that will be of lasting benefit to our 
prosperous town. 

"THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY" 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 

Issued every third month about the 1510 of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, -:- -:- -:- PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rates : 

Single Copies, each 10 cents . 

One Year, in advance, Newfoundland and Canada 40 " 

Foreign Subscriptions (except Canada) 50 " 

Advertising Rates 

$30.00 per page ; one-third of a page, $10.00; one-sixth of a page, $5.00 ; 
one-twelfth of a page, $2.50 for each insertion. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



19 



Skp at Dlgm. 



By a Member of The Littledale Literary Club. 




,O work more fully manifests the sublimity of nature 
than the sky, at any time, and particularly at night. 
It is one of the nfost important works of the great 
Creator, and is almost universally believed to be the 
boundary line, as it were, between the beautiful and everlasting 
city of the New Jerusalem and this " Vale of Tears." 

It is almost impossible for one who gazes intently at the sky 
in all its grandeur on a clear starlight night, to prevent his 
mind from dwelling on the beauties that must be beyond. 

In one day, that is in the space of twenty-four hours, the sky 
undergoes numerous changes. First in the early morning we 
have sunrise. The sun rises gradually in the Kat. 
" See from his deep cloud-curtained couch arise 
The drowsy Sun, and with a feeble ray, 
Peep o'er the hill-tops on the morning giay 
Now sailing upwards through the Eastern skies." 
And when he has reached his zenith it is noonday. 

The next great change is Sunset; then in rapid succession 
follow twilight, starlight aud moonlight. 

Sunset is often very lovely in our Island Home, and its 
beauty (which is, to a certain extent, enhanced by surrounding 
wild and picturesque scenery) is highly appreciated by us. 
and is honestly praised and admired by tourists in the holiday 
season of the year. 

The sun which has been rapidly journeying from the Kast all 
day, though to us it appears to move but slowly, reaches the 
West in the evening and prepares to sink to rest in all his glory. 
The sky (towards the West) tinged with bright crimson, rich 
purple and azure is a beautiful and fitting background for the 
great, red ball of light, as he sinks and becomes invisible to us. 

Twilight now falls softly, and almost immediately over the 
Earth. Nature seems to be resting for a space ! Silence reigns 
supreme ! 

Involuntarily one holds one's breath, fearing to disturb the 
delightful tranquility of the scene. Gradually the stars come 
out. One by one they peep shyly forth until in mute admira- 
tion we behold the brilliantly studded firmament above. 
" Silently one by 'one in the infinite meadows of heaven, 
Blossomed the lovely stars, the forget-me nots of the angels." 

The stars which are more widely known are Jupiter, Saturn, 
Mars, Venus, and Mercury, the principal planets. 

Soon we notice a subdued light, on the summit of Signal 
Hill, which is a reflection from the Moon's beams, and we 
real'ze with pleasure that we shall very soon have Moonlight. 

As the orb rises slowly and majestically, she appears to barely 
skim the summit of the surrounding hills, when in reality the 
moon is hundreds of thousands of miles distant from the loftiest 
mountain on the earth's surface. 

In watching the moon rise, we have, perhaps, failed to notice 
that the stars are gradually becoming dimmer, and now, that the 
greater orb has risen high in the heavens, continuing her course 
round the earth, we find that the smaller ones are almost invisible 
completely eclipsed by the " Queen of Night." 

The grandeur and sublimity of the sky is now truly inspiring. 

" The heavens" are like unto unto a vast fathomless lake, and 
the moon is so clear at times, that the hills and valleys on its 
surface are visible to the naked eye without any artificial aids. 

The beautiful, subdued light which is shed over the earth by 
the moon's beams on such a night, and whose mellowed softness 



unconsciously sinks into one's very soul, filling it with a serene 
peace, and making one forget for the time being, that there are 
such things as hurry and strife: may well be said to inspire the 
great writer who has said : 

" In the night an athiest, 
Half believes there is a God." 

" Beautiful Moonlight, peaceful and calm, 
O'er the tired spirit, pouring sweet balm ; 
Karth glows with beauty, lovely and pale, 
Wrapt like a bride in thy silv'ry veil. 
See the blue waters sparkle with light; 
O. thou art lovely, beautiful Night !" 



having written the following 
in reply to the lines of the 



His GRACK THE ARCHBISHOI 
beautiful and graceful Sonnet 
gifted K. (J. upon the Investiture of the Pallium, we gladly 
publish it together with the original lines. 

CDc Inuesliture of tbe pallium 

Bp his Grace flrchbishop rknolep, 23rd June, 1905. 

(lATHKR within the Temple 

Come from afar and near ! 
Prelates, and priests and people 

As of old, " It's good to be here !" 

Come in your joy and gladness 
' Come in your faith and love ; 
For the trembling soul awaiting 

Stands stamp'd from the HANH above ! 

This is his cherish'd birthland ! 

Climb'd to the " Heights" lias he ' 
Stainless his life and garments 

Simple, yet noble ! and \ve ? 

\Ve are his chosen children 

\Ve are his favored flock 
Trend of the " Keys of I'eter" 

Proud of the ancient " Rock !" 

Proud of the man invested 

In the Church he so adorns ! 
Proud of the added garlands 

Won in a path of thorns ! 

Bells in yon lofty steeple 

Let the peals of your gladness glide 

O'er the depths of the throbbing ocean. 
To the heart of the forest wide ! 



For this is his cherished Birthland, 
Climb'd to the " Heights" has he ; 

All hail to our first archbishop, 
All hail on bended knee ! 



. C. 



Sonnet 



In thanks to . C. for the Beautiful lines on the inoestiture of 
the Pallium. 

Thanks ! " Poetess of Pity" whose sweet strain 
Erstwhile Melpomene's sad muse has woo'd, 
In choicest verse, though tuned to minor mood. 

Thou oft hast soothed the broken heart's dull pain: 

The widowed hearth, the orphaned home, again 
Hast helped to brighten: ever "doing good," 
Like to the MASTER Who from Sacred Rood, 

Drew all things to Him, in His loving train. 

But now thou showest how thy Muse's lyre, 
Can soar to loftier key : strike brighter chord 
Of triumph : thrilling all the strings along. - 
Touched by Calliope's heroic fire; 

It fills the heart with soul-inspiring word, 
Again I thank thee for thy noble song ! 

-|-M. F. H. 

St. John's, Nfld., loth July, 1905. 



20 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




The C. C. C. Officers at Camp, 1905. 

Top Row C. Vaughan, Lt. ; F. Hiscock, Lt. ; J. Meehan, Lt. ; J. Murphy, Lt. ; J. Shortall, Lt. ; P. Jordan, Lt. 
Second Row M. Donnelly, Lt. ; P. J. Kent, Capt. ; Hon. D. J. Green, Lt. -Col. ; Rev. A. Howley, D.D., Chaplain ; G. T. Carty, M.H.A., Capt. 




A special effort will be made in the Make-up 
of the Christmas Number of "The New- 
foundland Quarterly" for 1905. . 

New Advertisers would please send in copy of Advertisements as soon as 

possible to 

JOHN J. EVANS, 34 Prescott Street. 



Stebaarrrian s 0iritrr]er|t 

Will cure Rheumatism, Abscesses, Festers, 
Scabbing, Catarrh, and all kinds of Sores. 
Price, 2O Cents per Box. 

L. STEBAURMAN, 

18 Prospect Street, j St. John's, Newfoundland. 



M. MURPHY,! 

West End Hair Dresser. 

Hair Cutting, Shaving, and Refreshing Sea Foam. 
Water Street West. 

Opposite Angel Engineering & Supply Co's Store. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



500 Packages, 

Direct from Ceylon. 



TEA! 

in 5 lb., 10 lb. and 20 lb. Boxes, and 50 lb. Chests. 

25 cases Seal Brand Tea, - * lb - p ackets - 
50 boxes China Tea, 20 Ibs. each. 



And a full line of Family Groceries and 
Provisions : English and American 

Send for Samples and Price List. 

jg^pMail Orders shipped promptly. 

J. D. RYAN, 



281 Water Street, 

St. John's. 



u^ 

* 



"Seme" 



********}I 



w 

$ 
51 



* 
* 






Baking Bowder. 

The purest and best 
on the market 

Packed in 2 02,, < < 
J-41K and 1-2 lb. Tins. 

Thos. McMurdo & Co. 



j 









i- 



s 
s 



I 



The Newfoundland Consolidated 
foundry Company, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Cooking, 
Parlor, Hall and Church 
Stoves, Gothic GRATES, 
Mantelpieces, Windlasses, 
Rouse Chocks, HAWSER 
PIPES, and every variety of 
Ship and General Castings, 
Churchyard or Cemetery 
Railings; Crestings, and all 
Architectural Castings 

W. P. WALSH, S. WILL. CORNICK, 

President. Manager. 



IT IS A WELL KNOWN FACT 

Libby, McNeill & Libby's 

NATURAL FLAVOUR PRODUCTS 

occupy 
FIRST PLACE 

amongst 

CANNED MEATS and SOIPS. 
HEARN & CO., Agents. 

FOR PRICE LIST. 



R. J. Coleman, 

Wholesale Provision Merchant. 



Wholesale Dealer in 



J. B. URQUHART, 

Wholesale Flour Dealer, 

T. A. HALL, ST. JOHN'S, N EW FOU NDLAN D. 



Flour, Vegetables, Cheese, 

Fruit, Confectionery, etc. 

Our prices are always the very lowest. 

Office & Store, : Adelaide Street. 



.... Brands : . . . . 



PERFECT, # BEAVER, # SEAL, 
MIAMI, # SKIPPER. 



!!!? Place to Get a Suit of Clothes 

Made to Order, or Keadymade, is 





MISS MAY WONG'S 

282 Water Street, opp. Bowring Brothers. 



We keep in stock English, Scotch and Canadian goods. 
Also, Shirts, Ties, Caps, Braces, etc. Jt jt Jt 

E. J. MALONE, * Tailor and Furnisher. 



Dress Goods, Mantles, Millinery, 

Feathers, Flowers, Gloves. 
St. John's, jt Newfoundland. 



268 Water Street. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



SOME SPECIALLY INTERESTING. 

Newfoundland Literature 



Caribou Shooting in Newfoundland, with over sixty illustrations, 

by Dr. S. T. Davis Paper 60. cts. Cloth, $i .25 

From Newfoundland to Cochin, China, by Lady Howard Vincent, 

illustrated New and cheaper edition, Cloth, $i .25 

Mineral Resources of Newfoundland, in two parts 60 cts. 

Newfoundland Standard History of, by D. W. Prowse, Esq., J.P., 
LL.D., with numerous Maps and Illustrations. Demy, 8vo; 
Cloth, Gilt ; 2nd edition fi .75 

Newfoundland Ecclesiastical History of, by His Grace the Arch- 
bishop of Newfoundland $2 . 50 

Poems, by His Grace the Archbishop of Newfoundland 75 cts. 

Captain of the Dolphin, and other Poems of Newfoundland and the 

Sea, by Rev. F. J. J. Smith. Cloth, 75 cts., (Jilt top 90 cts. 

Dr. Luke of the Labrador, by Norman Duncan 50 and 75 cts. 

Lure of the Labrador Wild, by D. Wallace $i . 50 

Interested persons should drop us a Post Card for complete list of Books 

S. E. GARLAND, Books, Stationery, Fancy Goods, etc., Garland 
GARLAND & CO., Booksellers and Stationers, opposite Post 



The Way of the Sea, by Norman Duncan 50 and 75 cts. 

The New Priest in Conception Bay, by Rev. Robert Lowell ; only a 

very few copies now in print Cloth, $1 .75 

Newfoundland Illustrated, with 109 beautiful half-tone views of the 

chief attractions of the Island 50 cts. 

Rambles in Our Ancient Colony by the Banks and Bergs of Terra 

Nova, with numerous illustrations 40 cts. 

St. John's and Newfoundland Illustrated, with 59 Half-tones of the 

Capital of Newfoundland, with adjoining Outports 25 cts. 

NEWFOUNDLAND VIEW POST CARDS. 

The Garland Half-tone Series 45 varieties, 2 cts. each, 80 cts. set. 

The Garland Photogravure Series 25 varieties, 3 cts. each, 70 cts. set. 

The Garland Photolet (Photograph) ... 15 varieties, 3 cts. each, 45 cts. set. 

The Garland Chromo-Litho 8 varieties, 4 cts. each, 30 cts. set. 

The Garland Photo Iris 8 varieties, 4 cts. each, 30 cts. set. 

Pamphlets, Sheet Music, Maps, Charts, etc., relating to Newfoundland. 

Bldg., J77-9 Water Street, East 1ST. JOHN'S, 
Office, 353 Water Street, West j Newfoundland. 



Customs Circular 



N(X 15. 



WHEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles, Angler's Outfits, Trouting Gear, Fire-arms 
and Ammunition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be 
admitted under the following conditions : 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles, Trouting Poles, Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equipage. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the Assistant Collector, 
St. John's, if taken in St. John's the Receipt No. 2 shall be sent 
to the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre- 
senting the articles at the Port of Exit and having them com- 
pared with the receipt. The Examining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the result of his examination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

No groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund may 
be taken upon such articles. 

h. W. LeMCSStJRIER, 

Assistant Collector. 

CUSTOM HOUSE, 

. St. John's, Newfoundland, 22nd June, 1903. 



The Public are reminded that the 

GAME^ LAWS 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Provide that: 

No person shall pursue with intent to kill any Caribou from 

the ist day of Februaiy to the 3ist day of July, or from the ist day of 

October to the 2Oth October in any year. And no person shall 

kill or take more than two Stag and one Doe Caribou in any one year. 

No person is allowed to hunt or kill Caribou within specified limits of 
either side of the railway track from Grand Lake to Goose Brook, these 
limits being defined by gazetted Proclamation. 

No non-resident may hunt or kill Deer (three Stag) without previously 
having purchased ($50.00) and procured a License therefor. Licenses to 
non-resident guides are issued, costing $50.00. 

No person may kill, or pursue with intent to kill any Caribou with dogs, 

or with hatchet or any weapon other than fire-arms loaded with 

ball or bullet, or while crossing any pond, stream or water-course. 

Tinning or canning of Caribou is absolutely prohibited. 

No person may purchase, or receive in barter or exchange any flesh 
of Caribou between January ist and July 3131, in any year. 

Penalties for violation of these laws, a fine not exceeding two hundred 

dollars, or in default imprisonment not exceeding two months. 



No person shall hunt, or kill Partridges before the first day of October 
in any year. Penalty not exceeding $100.00 or imprisonment. 

Any person who shall hunt Beaver, or export Beaver skins before October 
ist, 1007, shall be liable to confiscation of skins, and fine or imprisonment. 

No person shall use any appliances other than rod, hook and line to 
catch any Salmon, Trout, or inland water fishes, within fifty fathoms from 
either bank on the strand, sea, stream, pond, lake, or estuary debouching 
into the sea. 

Close season for salmon and trout fishing: 1 5th day of September to 
15th day of January following. 

ELI DAWE, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheriei, 
12th August, 1905. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly. 




THE . . . 

NEWFOUNDLAND 



Ji VOL. V. No. 3. 



QUARTERLY. 



JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER -AND PROPRIETOR. 



DECEMBER, 1905. 





Christinas Dumber. 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



L U M B E 




SCANTLING, 5x5 to 10x10. 
STUDDING, all sizes. 

JOISTING, 2x3 in. assorted. 

We have also a full stock of 
SEASONED BOARD in Store. 

All selling at the Lowest Market Prices. 
Purchasers will get good value for their 
money. 

W. & G. RENDELL 




Queen 
fire Insurance Company 

FUNDS $*O, OOO.OOO 



INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 



- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 



JOHN CORMACK, 



SGENT FOR NEWFOl)NDLND. 



PHCENIX 



Assurance 




Co., Ltd, 



GUARDIAN 

ASSURANCE CD., LTD., 

Of London, England 



HESTABIISHF.D 17 



ESTABLISHED 1831. 



Of LONDON, ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Annual Premiums $7,500,000 

Fund held to meet losses 9,000,000 

Uncalled Capital 12,000,000 

& G. RENDELL, 

ST. JOHN'S. Agent for Nfld. 



The Guardian has the largest paid-up capital of any 
Company in the world transacting a Fire business. 



Subscribed Capital 
Paid-up Capital ... 
Invested Funds exceed - 



$lo,ooo,ooo 

5,000,000 

23, 5oo,ooo 



T. & M. WINTER, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



The Newfoundland Consolidated 
foundry Company, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Cooking, 
Parlor, Hall and Church 
Stoves, Gothic GRATES, 
Mantelpieces, Windlasses, 
Rouse Chocks, HAWSER 
PIPES, and every variety of 
Ship and General Castings, 
Churchyard or Cemetery 
Railings, Crestings, and all 
Architectural Castings 

W. P. WALSIt, S. WILL. CORNICK, 

President. Manager. 




A. HARVEY I 

Manufacturers of 

SODA, PILOT and 
FANCY BISCUITS. 

We recommend all who want a really 
FIRST CLASS SODA BISCUIT to 
ask their grocer for a 

Tak-Hoin-a Soda Biscuit, 
or Three X Soda Biscuit. 






When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 






FOR NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 
CANADA. 


I pou 

2 pou 

3 
4 

I 

7 
8 

9 
10 


nd 


8 cents 


24 ce 
24 
24 
48 
48 
48 
48 
72 
72 
72 
72 

No parcel s 
less than 


nts 


12 ce 
24 
36 

48 
60 
72 
84 
96 
i 08 




1 5 cents. 
30 

45 
60 

75 
90 
$1.05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 


nds 


n " 








14 " 






t 


17 " 








20 ' 








2-1 ' 








26 ' 








2Q ' 








32 * 








I? " 








-3C t. 








Under i Ib. weight, I cent 
per 2 oz. 


ent to U. K. for 
24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. ^Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from Ne~v York ; 
Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 

Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 

General Post Office. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding $10 ........................... 5 cts. Over $50, but not exceeding $60 ........................ 30 cts. 

Over $10, but not exceeding $20 ........................ 10 cts. Over $60, but not exceeding $70 ........................ 35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 ........................ 15 cts. Over 870, but not exceeding $80 ........................ 40 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 ........................ 20 cts. Over $80, but not exceeding $90 ........................ 45 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 ........................ 25 cts. Over $90, but not exceeding $100 ....................... 50 cts. 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John's, Newfoundland, December, fgoj. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



General Post Office, f Postal Telegraphs. 



HEREAFTER Cable Messages for all parts of the world will be accepted for transmission 
over Postal Telegraph lines and cable to Canso, N. S., at all Postal Telegraph Offices in 
this Colony. ' 

INLAND. 

TELEGRAMS for the undermentioned places in Newfoundland are now accepted for transmission at all Postal Telegraph 
Offices in the Colony and in St. John's at the Telegraph window in the Lobby of the General Post Office and at Office in new 
Court House, Water Street, at the rate of Twenty Cents for Ten words or less, and Two Cents for each additional word. The 
address and signature, however, is transmitted free : 

Avondale Carbonear Harbor Breton 

Harbor Grace 

Harbor Main 

Heart's Content 

Herring Neck 

Holyrood 

Howards 

Humber Mouth (River- 
head, Bay of Islands) 

King's Cove 

King's Point (S. W. Arm, 
Green Bay) 

Lamaline 

Lewisport 

Little Bay 

Little River 

Long Harbor 

Postal Telegraph Message Forms may be obtained at any Post Office in the Colony, and from Mail Clerks on Trains and Steamers. If the sender 
desires, the message may be left with the Postmaster, to be forwarded by mail Free of Postage to nearest Postal Telegraph Office. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

General Post Office, St. John's, Newfoundland, December, 1905. 

When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



Baie Verte (Little Bay N.) 

Baine Harbor 

Bay-de-Verde 

Bay L'Argent 

Bay Roberts 

Beaverton 

Belleoram 

Birchy Cove (Bay of Islds.) 

Bonavista 

Bonne Bay 

Botwoodville 

Britannia Cove 

Brigus 

Brigus Junction 

Burin 



Catalina 
Change Islands 
Clarenville 
Come-By-C nance 
Conception Harbor 
Fogo 
Fortune 
Gambo 
Gander Bay 
Glenwood 
Grand Bank 
Grand Falls 
Grand Lake 
Grand River 
Greens pond 
Hant's Harbor 



Lower Island Cove 

Manuels 

Millertown Junction 

Musgrave Harbor 

New Perlican 

Newtown 

Nipper's Harbor 

Norris' Arm 

N. W. Arm (Green Bay) 

Old Perlican 

Pilley's Island 

Port-au-Port (Gravels) 

Port-aux-Basques(Channel) 

Port Blandford 

Stephenville Crossing 

St. George's 

St. Jacques 



St. John's 

St. Lawrence 

Sandy Point 

Scilly Cove 

Seldom-Come-By 

Sound Island 

S. W. Arm (Green Bay) 

Terenceville (head of 

Fortune Bay) 
Terra Nova 
Tilt Cove 
Trinity 
Twillingate 
Wesleyville 
Western Bay 
Whitbourne 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Xmas Greeting to All ! 

If you want to make all happy 
at home, CALL AT 




Where you can be supplied with 
everything for Boy's and Men's wear, 
and at prices that cannot be beat. 

T. J. BARRON, 

Boy's and Men's Outfitter. 

358 Water Street, 

One door West of Post Office. 



INew Gandy Store 

A. A. DELGADO, 

Candy Manufacturer, < * 176 Water Street. 

Choice Candies of all Descriptions* 

(WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.) 

Also, Ice Creams and Ice Cream Soda different flavours. Fruit and 
Cut Flowers in Season. Outport orders solicited. Remember the address. 

A. A. DELGADO, 176 Water Street. 



M. W. FURLONG, K.C. 



J. M. KENT, K.C. 



FURLONG & KENT, 

~~ * 9 *~~ 

BARRISTERS and SOLICITORS. 
DUCKWORTH STREET, ST. JOHN'S. 



The 








Tilled with 
Bargains. 



W[ CORDIALLY EXTEND 

To our Patrons and the Public 

generally an invitation to visit our 

(NEW STORE 



Which has just been opened. 



Any amount of. Suit- 
able Goods for Christ- 
mas Presents. 



We carry Full Lines of 

American, Canadian, a r English 



Suitings, Overcoatings, and Trouser- 
ings, in the very latest materials and 
. patterns, and we guarantee, as always, 
the utmost satisfaction to those who 
favor us with their orders. 



CALLAhAN, GLASS & CO., 




Duckworth and 

Cower Streets. 



W. P. SHORTALL, 



The American Tailor, 

30O Water Street. 



$4 A MONTH 

Is not very much for a young man of 20 to put 
aside out of his salary, but if invested with the 

Confederation Life it will give 

To his family, if he dies before age 40,. . .$1000.00 
To himself, if he lives to age 40, from. . . .$/ 150.00 

to $f3?2.oo 
according to plan selected. 

Insure early, while your health is 
good. You will get your money back earlier 
in life, when you can use it better. 

CHAS. O'NEILL CONROY, 

GENERAL AGENT FOR NbLD, 

Law Chambers, St. John's, N. F. 



TO EACH OF 

Our Absent Friends! 

A Souvenir of the Old Home Land. Now that the Xmas Season 
has come, we have something appiopriate for each of them. 

Headquarters for Books, Photographs. Post Cai s. Albums, and all 

Literature relating to Newfoundland. 
Photographs of all the most beautiful and inte:esting scenes in and about 

Newfoundland and Labrador. The largest and most varied stock of 

Photographs, relating to Newfoundland. The work of a Master Artist. 

Price, 25 cents to $5.00. 

Newfoundland "The Norway of the New World," an exceedingly Hand- 

some Album, containing over 100 views of our choicest scenes in 

Newfoundland and Labrador, 40 cts. 
Newfoundland Illustrated. An Album of 63 views of Newfoundland and 

Labrador scenes, beautifully finished in tints, 40 cts. 
Pictorial Post Cards of every object of interest in City and Outports, 

complete set of 30 for 50 cts., or 20 cts. dozen Cards. 

Through Newfoundland with a Camera, by the late Mr. Holloway, $2. o, 
the best Book of Newfoundland Views ever published a book you 
would be delighted to send and your friends to receive. 
our Photo Christmas Cards. 



DICKS & CO. BOOK 



BOOKSTORE. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 





Christmas Number 

NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY; 



VOL. V. No. 3. 



DECEMBER, 1905. 



40 CTS. PER YEAR. 



CDristmas Carol 







Our Christmas Greeting. 

READERS ! we greet you cheerily ; 
Dear friends ! at home or far away, 
In what so-ever clime you stray, 

Whatever lands ye roam ; 
Wherever tossed by life's rude sea. 
May gladness fill your hearts to-day 
And lead your spirits home. 

As rose the wondrous star of old, 

Immortal Light, mysterious yet, 
As on that night when sages sought 

The King of Kings thro' Nazareth : 
So rises Mem'ry's radiant star 

At Yule-tide wheresoe'r we roam, 
I'oints to our first lov'd land afar 

And leads the exile's heart to home. 

Atlantic breaking on the shore, 
That sang your cradle lullaby, 

Ye'll hear in dreams of home once more ; 

Sweet dreams of happy days, before 

Ye passed high-hoped, the far seas o'er, 
The far strange world to try. 

And we remember, o'er our hearts 

Steal dreams of many a boyhood year, 
How merrily the Christmas went 

When you, ye absent friends were here: 
And we extend to you our best, 

May Peace for aye with you abide, 
And Love forever be your guest, 

And Joy be yours this Christmas-tide. 



" ' GOOD MORNING, SIR ! A MERRY CHRISTMAS 
TO You !' " 

" And Scrooge said often afterwards, that of all 
the blithe sounds he had ever heard, those were the 

blithest in his ears." 

* ****** * 

" Oh ! but he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, 
Scrooge ! A squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutch- 
ing, covetous old sinner 1 Hard and sharp as flint, from which no 
steel had ever struck out generous fire ; secret, and self-contained, 
and solitary as an oyster. The cold within him froze his old 
features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened 
his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out 




shrewdly in his grating voice. A frosty rime was on his head, 
and on his eye-brows, and his wiry chin. He carried his own 
low temperature always about with him ; he iced his office 
in the dog-days ; and didn't thaw it one degree at Christmas. 

" External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No 
warmth could warm, no wintry weather chill him. No wind that 
blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon 
its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty. Foul weather 
didn't know where to have him. The heaviest rain, and snow, 
and hail, and sleet, could boast of the advantage over him in 
only one respect. They often 'came down' handsomely, and 
Scrooge never did. 

" Nobody ever stopped h'tn in the street to say, with gladsome 
looks, " My dear Scrooge, how are you ? When will you come 
to see me ?'' No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no 
children asked him what it was o'clock, no man or woman ever 
once, in all his life, inquired the way to such and such a place, 
of Scrooge. Kven the blind men's dogs appeared to know him ; 
and when they saw him coming on, would tug their owners into 
doorways and up courts ; and then would wag their tails as 
though they said, "No eye at all is better than an evil eye, dark 
master!" But what did Scrooge care ! It was the very thing 
he liked. To edge his way along the crowded paths of life, warn- 
ing all human sympathy to keep its distance, was what the 
knowing ones call "nuts to Scrooge." 

Thus in the chastest prose poem in the language does the 
master portray Selfishness and Avarice. 

But the spirit of Christmas worked miracles in the hard 
hearted old miser. After showing him the joys and pleasure in 
the poorest ar.d humblest homes where Love presided, and then 
foreshadowing his own loveless deathbed, with the hired ghouls, 
before his life had yet departed, fighting over his few squalid 
possessions ; and then the vision in the dank cold graveyard, 
of a neglected grave, marked " Ebenezer Scrooge," he was 
redeemed by the spi inklings of the torch borne aloft by the 
Spirit of Chiistmas. 

His heart was softened, his eyes opened to his folly, his selfish- 
ness thawed in the presence of the Spirit of Love, and for the 
first time in many years he responded to the Spirit of the Season. 
He realized his duty to those who were dependent on him ; to 
the widow and the fatherless ; to the poor and outcast. 
******** 

"Good Spirit," he cried, "if I am spared and given the 
chance, I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it 
all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present and the Future. 
The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut 
out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away 
the writing on the stone 1" 

" Scrooge was better than his word. He did it all and 
infinitely more," and the first genuine pleasure he tasted for 
many a year, was when he did a kindness to his ill-paid old 
servitor poor Bob Cratchit. 
******** 

" But he was early at the office next morning. Oh ! he was 
early there. If he could only be there first, and catch Bob Cratchit 
coming late ! That was the thing he had set his heart upon. 

And he did it; yes, he did ! The clock struck nine; no Bob. 
Quarter past. No Bob. He was full eighteen minutes and a half 
behind his time. Scrooge sat with his door wide open, that he 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



might see him come into the Tank. His hat was off, before he 
opened the door ; his comforter too. He was on his stool in a jiffy ; 
driving away with his pen, as if he were trying to overtake nine 
o'clock. " Hallo I" growled Scrooge, in his accustomed voice, as 
near as he could feign it. " What do you mean by coming here 
at this time of day ?" 

" I am very sorry, sir," said Bob. " I am behind my time." 

" You are ?" repeated Scrooge. " Yes. 1 think you are. Step 
this way, sir, if you please." 

" It's only once a year, sir," pleaded Bob, appearing from the 
Tank. " It shall not be repeated. I was making rather merry 
yesterday, sir." 

" Now, I'll tell you what, my friend," said Scrooge, ;< I am 
not going to stand this sort of thing any longer, and therefore," 
he continued, leaping from his stool, and giving Bob such a dig 
in the waistcoat, that he staggered back into the Tank again ; 
" and, therefore, I am about to raise your salary !" 

Bob trembled, and got a little nearer to the ruler. He had a 
momentary idea of knocking Scrooge down with it, holding him, 
and calling to the people in the court for help and a strait 
waistcoat. 

"A Merry Christmas, Bob 1" said Scrooge, with nn earnest- 
ness that could not be mistaken, as he clapped him on the back. 
" A merrier Christmas, Bob, my good fellow, than I have given 
you for many a year! I'll raise your salary, and endeavour to 
assist your struggling family, and we will discuss your affairs 
this very afternoon, over a Christmas bowl of smoking bishop, 
Bob ! Make up the fires, and buy another coal-scuttle, before 
you dot another i, Bob Cratchit !" 
******** 

" Scrooge was better than his wo'rd. He did it all, and 
infinitely more; and to Tiny Tim, who did NOT die, he was a 
second father. He became as good a friend, as good a master, 
and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other 
good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world. Some 



people laughed to see the alteration in him. but he let therrt 
laugh, and little heeded them ; for he was wise enough to know 
that nothing ever happened on this globe, for good, at which 
some people did not have their fill of laughter in the outset ; and 
knowing such as these would be blind anyway, he thought it 
quite as well that they should wrinkle up their eyes in grins as 
have the malady in less attractive forms. His own heart 
laughed ; and that was quite enough for him. 

He had no further intercourse with Spirits, but lived upon 
the Total Abstinence principle ever afterwards ; and it was 
always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, 
if any man alive possessed the knowledge. 

May that be truly said of us, and all of us ! And so, as 
Tiny Tim observed, 

"GOD BLESS US, EVERYONE!" 




Clx Infinite. 

THE Infinite always is silent 

It is only the Finite speaks. . 
Our words are the idle wave-caps, 

On the deep that never breaks. 
We may question with wand of science, 

Explain, decide, and discuss ; 
But only in meditation 

The Mystery speaks to us. 

-y. fl. O'Kielly. 




THE STAR OF BETHLEHEM. 

From the Wattr (olmir by Sir E Rurne Jonrs. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Snowbound at Cbrisimas. 




By the Rev. Cyrus 

NE Christmas I was snow bound on one of the obscure 
branches of the Santa F6 Railroad. If the train had 
been on time I would have made a connection and 
have reached home by Christmas Eve, but it was 
very evident as the day wore on that it was not going to be on 
time ; indeed, it was problematical whether it would ever get 
anywhere at all. It was snowing hard ; our progress had be 
come slower and slower ; finally, in a deep cut, we stopped. 
There were three other men, one woman and two little children 
in the car ; no other passengers in the train. The train was of 
that variety known out West as a " plug," consisting of a com- 
bination baggage and smoker and one coach. 

One of the train hands started on a lonely and somewhat 
dangerous tramp several miles up the road to the next station 
to call for the snow-plow, and the rest of us settled down to 
spend the night. Certainly we could not hope to be extricated 
before the next evening, especially as the storm then gave no 
signs of abating. We all went up to the front of the car and 
sat around the stove, in which we kept up a bright fire; fortun- 
ately, we had plently of fuel, and in such circumstances we 
speedily got acquainted with one another. One of the men was 
a drummer a traveling man for a notion house another was 
a cowboy, another was a big cattleman, and I was the last. We 
soon found that the woman was a widow who had maintained 
herself and the children precariously, since the death of her 
husband, by sewing and other feminine odd jobs, but had at last 
given up the struggle and was going back East to live with her 
mother, also a widow, who had some property. 

999 

The poor little threadbare children had cherished anticipations 
of a joyous Christmas with their grandmother. From their talk 
we could hear that a Christmas tree and all sorts of things had 
been promised them. They were intensely disappointed at the 
blockade. They cried and sobbed and would not be comforted. 
Fortunately the woman had a great b.isket filled with substantial 
provisions, which, by-t lie-way, she generously shared with the 
rest of us, so we were none of us hungry. As the night fell we 
tipped up two of the seats, placed the bottoms sideways, and 
with our overcoats made two good beds for the little folks. Just 
before they went to sleep the drummer said to mei 

" Sa), parson, we've got to give those kids some Christmas!" 

" That's what !" said the cowboy. 

" I'm agreed I'' added the cattleman. 

" Madam," said the drummer, after a brief consultation be- 
tween us, addressing the woman with the easy assurance of his 
class, " we are going to give your kids some Christmas." 

The woman beamed at him gratefully. 

" Ves, children," said the now enthused drummer as he turned 
to the open-mouthed children, " Santa Claus is coming around 
to-night, sure. We want you to hang up your stockings." 

" We ain't got none," said the little girl, " 'ceptin' those we've 
got on, an' ma says it's too cold to take 'em off." 

" I've got two new pair of woolen socks," said the cattleman 
eagerly, " which I ain't never wore, an' you are welcome to 'em." 

There was a clapping of little hands in childish glee, and then 
the two faces fell as the elder remarked : 

" But Santa Claus will know they are not our stockings, an' 
he will fill them with things for you instead." 

"Lord love you !" said the burly cattleman, roaring with in- 
fectious laughter, " he won't bring me nothin'. One of us will 
sit up, anyway, an' tell him it's for you. You've got to hustle 
to bed right away because he may be here any time now." 

Then came one of those spectacles which we sometimes wit- 
ness once or twice in a lifetime. The children knelt down on 
the rough floor of the car. beside their improvised beds. In- 
stinctively the hands of the men went to their heads, and at the 
first words of " Now I lay me down to sleep" four hats came off. 
The cowboy stood twirling his hat and looking at the little 
kneeling figures, the cattleman's vision seemed dimmed, while 
in the eyes of the traveling man there shone a distant look a 
look across snow-filled prairies to a warmly lighted home. 



Toumsend Brady. 

The children were soon asleep. Then the rest of us went 
into earnest consulation. "What should we give them ?" was 
the question. 

" It don't seem to me that I've got anythin' to give "em," said 
the cowboy mournfully, " unless the little kid might like my 
spurs; an' I would give rny gun to the little gal, though on gen- 
eral principles I don't like to give up a gun : you never know 
when yer goin' to need it, 'specially with strangers, " he added, 
with a rather suspicious glance at mel I would not have harmed 
him for the world. 

" I'm in much the same fix," said the cattleman. " I've got 
a flask of prime old whisky here, but it don't seem like it's very 
appropriate for the occasion, though it's at the service of any of 
you gents." 

" Never seen no occasion in which whisky wasn't appropri- 
ate," said the cowboy, mellowing at the sight of the flask. 

" I mean, 'tain't fit for kids," explained the cattleman, hand- 
ing it over. 

" I begun on't rather early," remarked the " puncher," as he 
lifted the flask, for a drink, " an' I always until this time drank 
it when my feelin's is onsettled, like now." 

Then he looked at the two little forms asleep with a sigh, and 
handed th<; flask back its contents untouched. 

" Never mind, boys!" said the drummer, "you all come along 
with me to the baggage car." 

So off we trooped. He opened his trunks and spread before 
us such a glittering array of trash and trinkets as almost took 
away our breath. 

"There!" he said, " look at that ! We'll just pick out the 
best things from the lot and I'll donate them all." 

"No, you don't," said the cowboy; " my ante's in on this 
game, an' I'm goin' to buy what chips I want an' pay for 'em, 
too. else there ain't goin' to be no Christmas around here !" 

" That's me, too," said the cattleman. 

" I think that will be fair," I heartily assented ; "the travel- 
ing man can donate what he pleases, and we can each of us buy 
what we please, as well." 

9 99 

I think we spent hours looking over the stock which the obliging man 
spread out all over the car for us. He was going home, he said, and every- 
thing was at our service. The trainmen caught the infection, too, and all 
hands finally went back to the coach with such a load of stuff as you never 
saw before. We filled the socks and two seats besides with it. The grate- 
ful mother was simply dazed. 

As we all stood about, gleefully surveying our handiwork, including the 
bulging socks, the engineer remarked : 

" We've got to get some kind of a Christmas tree." 

So two of us plowed off in the prairie it had stopped snowing and was 
bright moonlight and wandered around until we found a good-sized piece 
of sage-brush, which we brought back and solemnly installed. The woman 
decorated it with bunches of tissue paper from the notion stock, and clean 
cotton waste from the engine. We hung the train lanterns around it. 

We were so excited that we actually could not sleep ! The contagion of 
the season was stiong upon us, and I know not which were the more de- 
lighted the next morning, the children or the amateur Santa Clauses, when 
they saw what the cowboy called " the lay-out." 

Great goodness I Those children never did have, and probably never 
again will have, such a Chiistmas ; and to see the thin face of that woman 
flush with unusual color when we handed her one of those monstrous red 
plush albums which we had purchased jointly, and in which we had all 
written our names in lieu of our photographs, and between the leaves of 
which the cattleman had generously slipped a hundred-dollar bill, was 
worth being blockaded for a dozen Christmases. Her eyes filled with tears 
and she fairly sobbed before us. 

During the morning we had a little service in the car, in accordance with 
the custom of our church, and 1 am sure no more heartfelt body of wor- 
shippers ever poured forth their thanks for the Incarnation than those men, 
that woman and the little children. The woman sang " Jesus, Lover of 
My Soul." from memory, in her poor little voice, and that small but rever- 
ent congregation cowboy, drummer, cattleman, trainmen and parson all 
solemnly joined in. 

"It feels just like church," said the cowboy gravely to the cattleman. 
" Say. I'm all broke up. Let's go in the other car." 

The train hand who had gone on to division headquarters returned with 
the snow-plow early in the afternoon, but, what was more to the purpose, 
he brought a -hole cooked turkey, so the children had a Christmas tree, a 
Christmas dinner and Santa Claus to their hearts' content. 

I did not get home until the day after Christmas. 

But, after all, what a Christmas I had enjojed ! 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



In tbc " Greyhound's" Crack. 

Where the "iKarp Rose" Went Down. 

By Eros Wayback. 

RtRANCE takes the initiative amongst the nations to have defined an 
IF "Ocean Liner's Lane" betwixt the continents thus tending to 
eliminate one prolific source of danger to the toilers of the deep. 

The United States must surely aid in a movement that so nearly 
concerns her hardiest sons, many of whose lives are thus yearly 
needlessly sacrificed. 

I. 
Of the ships that sail to Newfoundland Banks, 

Where the fishermen go, and and the fog looms dark, 
Where the Briton trolls with the venturous Franks, 

And the shrouding mists envelope each bark, 
There be many shall remake not the home-port again : 

For the deep claims its own, must have its tale. 
In the comber's sweep, in the fierce gale's strain 
The craft goes down and women will wail 1 

II. 
Or thro' these dank mists, without stop or heed, 

Bursts the " Ocean Liner," then a clash, 
Twice ten thousand tons, like from guidance freed, 

Divide the deep, on the frail craft crash ! 
And Nellie and Kate at the window pane, 

And little Jack from the Tor's bald height 
May watch thro' the spindrift all in vain 

For the Banker that ne'er shows her red port light ! 

in. 
Tho' the kindly neighbors in their Doric speech. 

As they wistfully gaze at the children dree, 
And e'er and anon look athwart the beach, 

Say, "There's hope, O, friends, there's hope from the seal" 
But the days roll on, and full many a sail 

Is outlined white 'gainst ihe azure dome, 

Ay. right well they have weathered each fierce-wrought gale, 
But no Afary Kusf from the Banks comes home ! 

IV. 

The rugged, stooped sire who for forty years, 

Or a decade more hath the waters trolled, 
May not, tho' he try, repress the tears 

That well to his eyes, for the stricken fold ; 
For the lusty lads with life's wine filled 

Who ever held their own 'midst storm or wrack, 
And toiled for their meed tho' it rimed and chilled. 

But helpless sank in the " Greyhound's Track ?" 

v. 
Oh ! the grey gnll sweeps with quivering wings 

From the Newfoundland Banks where the fishermen hie, 
And the tossing bark to her cable swings ; 

For he knows full well where the dead men lie 
'Midst the shrouding weed, 'neath storm waves whirl ; 

And his cry resounds from the seaward scaur 
That bars and breaks the mad waters' swirl, 

As they spend their force 'gainst the grim, grey Tor 1 

VI. 

Oh ! the grey gull knows where the lost lads rest, 
As he bends his flight o'er th' uncoffined graves. 



All strewn around where no mound is blessed, 
In the still, deep solemn and restful caves ; 

And he oft times dips o'er each low laid tomb, 
From the basalt scaurs to the ocean's rim, 

And his great, keen eyes pierce profoundest gloom. 
For the sea's dark secrets are not hid from him I 

VII. 

To his wild cry, hark ! like a bugle blast, 
As it swells or sinks o'er the waves' repose ; 

Say, what ship's crew's graves did he pass o'er last. 
Was it those of the lads of the Mary Rose t 



Che SoutlvVallep Road. 

By Dan Carroll. 

ABOVE the wooded hill a star; 

Twilight along the stream ; 
St. Bride's fair valley spread afar, 

And in my heart a dream. 
I stroll, and hear, the while I stroll 

The winding road along, 
As deep, more deep descends the dusk, 

A vanished summer's song. 

The iris and the buttercup 

With ox-eyed daisies grew, 
The gentle Springtide zephyrs here, 

With sweetest fragrance blew ; 
From clover fields and distant lanes 

The drowsy cattle lowed, 
And many a meadow smiled beside 

The sweet South Valley Koad. 

'Twas here our fav'rite swimming pool 

In August days we sought, 
" Sam White's" and " St. John's" waters cool 

Where many a fray we fought. 
The boyish fiay the deeper seed 

Of manly friendship sowed, 
Friendships that in our hearts enshrine 

The bright South Valley Road. 

Far up the grove of stately trees 

That clothe the sloping hill 
Above the sighing of the breeze 

Luke's Brook is singing still ; 
The stars are leaning thro' the night 

A nearer glimpse to know 
Of the bright valley's chaims that won 

Our hearts, long years ago. 

The moonlight 'wraps the scene again 

And summer breezes blow, 
'Tis just as beautilul as when 

\\ e lingered long ago 
Upon the bridge that spans the stream 

Wl.en every piospect glowed 
Etheieal in the light of youth 

Along S >uth \ alley Road. 





" In genial spring beneath 

the quivering shade, 
Where cooling vapours 

breathe along the 

mead, 
The patient fisher takes 

his silent stand. 
Intent, his angle trembling 

in his hand." 

Pope. 





3S. 



FISHING PARTY AT NINE MII.E POST. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Boys Always Look Swell 

In Our Clothing* *g < 

JAEKMAN me Mar. 




Our display of Christmas 
Footwear is a grand one. 
This is the verdict of every one. 

We've Everything for Everybody 

Boots for the Street Boots for Dress, the swellest 
of the swell or conservative styles. 

Slippers of every description. All sorts of Cold 
and Wet Weather Shoes. 

Romeos, Juliets, Felt Footwarmers, Leggins of 
every kind, Rubbers in all styles oh, well, we can't 
tell you the half of what we have in store for you. 

There's No More Sensible Christmas Gift 
Than Footwear, 

Especially a pair of " Queen Quality" Boots for 
your wife. 

If you come here for it you'll not only get the best, 
but you'll have more money left for other things. 

Merry Christmas to All! 
PARKER & MONROE, 

THE SHOE MEN, 

195 & 363 WATER STREET. 



Bowring Brothers, 

Limited _ 

Ship Owners, Brokers, and General Merchants. 

Exporters of Codfish, Salmon, Herring, Seal Oil, Seal Skins, 
Cod Oil, Lobsters, Whale Oil, Whale Bone, Etc. 

AGENTS FOR 
LLOYD'S. 

London Salvage Association. 

New Swiss Lloyd's. 

National Board of Marine Underwriters of New York, 

Liverpool and Glasgow Underwriters. 

Liverpool and London and Globe Fire Insurance Co. 

New York, Newfoundland, and Halifax Steam Ship Co. 

English and American Steam Shipping Co. 

Represented by C. T. BOWRING & Co., Ltd., of Liverpool, London, Cardiff. 
Represented by BOWRING & Co., New York and San Francisco. 

CODES Scott's, Watkins, A. B. C., Western Union, Premier, &c. 
Cables: " BOWRING," St. John's. 



JOB BROTHERS & Co., 

St. John's, N. F. 

Importers of Provisions, including Flour, 
Molasses, Pork, Beef, Ships' Materials, and all things 
necessary foi prosecution of the Fisheries. We are in a 
position to supply all Goods at Lowest Cash Prices. 

Highest Prices Given for all products of the 

Fisheries, including Codfish, Cod Oil, Refined Cod-liver 
Oil, Pickled Salmon, and Herring, and Lobsters. Export- 
ers of all Newfoundland Products. 

Fire& Marine Insurance 

Lowest Rates quoted for all forms of Insurance. 
....AGENTS FOR.... 

Royal Insurance Co. (Fire). 

Union Marine Insurance Co., Ltd., and 

Maritime Insur'nce Co., Ltd., (Marine) 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



BOVRIL WINE/ 

Bovril Lozenges, 
Bovril Beef Jelly. 

LIEBIG'S EXTRACT MEAT. 

Virol, Celery Salt, 

Wild Cherry Sauce, 

Goorka Relish. 

put up by BOVRIL, Limited, 

Food Specialists. 

T. J. EDENS, Agent for Nfld. 




JOHN R. BENNETT, 

PROPRIETOR OF 

Garten's Aerated Water Works, 

Desires to wish his numerous 
Friends and Patrons ........ 



A Happy Xmas gii a Bright' M Prosperous 
New Year, 

And to remind them that our /Erated Waters are 
still unequalled for Brilliancy, Purity and Flavor. 

Address: 166 & 168 Duckworth Street, St. John's. 
P. 0. Box, 183. j Telephone, 207. 



GEORGE NEAL, 

Wholesale Dealer in Provisions, 
Groceries, Fruit, Vegetables. 

Large Stock Oats, Hay, Cattlefeed, Bran, Corn, 

&c., always on hand. Big Shipment Poultry 

to arrive for Xmas. 

M. J. Summers 

330 Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 



Notice to Mariners. 



N 



IMPORTER 



AM> DKAI.KR IN 



Earthenware, China, Glassware and Dry Goods. 
Also, Men's Top Shirts, Underwear, Braces, Ties, 
Boots, Shoes, &c. American Oil Clothes (Double, 
Patched and Single), Local Oil Clothes (Single). 



NEWFOUNDLAND. 

No. II of 19O5. 

OTIC'E is hereby given that the undermentioned Aids to Navigation 
will not be in operation fiom 1st day of January until the 
1st day of April, I9O6, and without further notice these Aids will be 
discontinued during the same period in each year. 

Iron Island Fog Bell, off entrance to Burin, Placentia Bay. 

Latitude 47" 02' 40" North. 
Longitude 55" 06' 50" West. 

Burnt Point Fog Alarm & Light, entrance to Seldom-Come-By. 

Latitude 4</' 36' oo" North. 
Longitude 54^' 09' oo" West. 

Squarey Island (Red Ligln), on the Port hand entrance to 
Bonavista Harbor. 

Latitude 48 49' oo" North. 
Longitude . 53 07' 40" West. 



Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
St. John's, Nfld., Nov. 26, 1905. 



ELI DAWE, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 




Resting In inc Inish of mntide. 



Che ncivfoutidiatid Quarterly, 

0UR one and only Magazine, contains, every issue, Essays, 
Sketches, and Poems by the very best local writers. The 
Christinas Number is a fair specimen. Our circulation 
has doubled du i ing the last year We are desirous of having 
the Quarterly in every home in Newfoundland. And we also 
desire to enroll amongst our subscribers all Newfoundlanders 
abroad. The Quarterly will keep them in touch with the 
thoughts and opinions of leading men in their native land. 

SPECIAL OFFER. To any teacher or subscriber in Newfound- 
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same amount of reading 20 pages. 

Subscription, Newfoundland and Canada, 40 cents per year. 
Foreign, 50 cents per year. 

JOHN J. EVANS, Printer, 

34 Prescott Street, St. John's. Nfld. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




I 



Bob's 6bost 

By H. W. LeMessurier. 




T was the second night of the wake at John 
Coady's ; the neighbours were gathered from 
all parts in-side and outside of the Arm. 
Several came from Paradise, and not a few from 
the Bight, so that the rooms were filled almost 
to overflowing. 

In the kitchen sat Bob Martin, the centre of a knot of those 
who delighted in egging him on to propose the most wonderful 
conundrums, which not even Bob, at times, could answer, and 
tell the most outrageous tales that only Bob could manufacture. 
A stranger was present, whom Bob designated as " wan of dem 
dandy down-along fellers," who rather irritated Bob by his per- 
sistently asking riddles, which were seemingly more appreciated 
by the girls than those that were set forth by him. 

" Come now, Mr. What-you-calls-yourself," asked Bob, " kin 
you tell me what's the dufference between a bultow-by and a gal 
that has a rag on every bush ? Now, answer me that an you'r 
a better man nor me." 

The young man smiled and said he felt awkward in trying to 
answer such a question, as it inferred that the girls about here 
were flirts. Bob remarked that he knew all about the " gals" 
and " wasn't afeared of hurtin' their failin's." One of the young 
maidens said she believed that Bob did not know the answer to 
the' riddle himself. This created a little diversion in favor of 
Bob, whose part was taken by most of the women, whilst some 
of the men eagerly supported the strai'ger. The fun that this 
rivalry called forth began to get too uproarious, so Mick Walsh 
said he'd settle the whole matter, and asked the stranger was 
he willing to stand by his decision ? The stranger acquiesced, 
and Uncle Mick said: " Well, if the stranger can't answer Bob's 
riddle, and Bob can answer it himself, the stranger will have to 
stand Bob a bottle of gin. Is that agreed to?" " Yes," said 
Bob, and after a little consultation with one of the company, the 
stranger also agreed; saying he gave it up, and trusted that 
Mr. Martin was able to explain his own conundrum. " Be de 
sowkins," said Bob, " I don't know what youse call a humdrum, 
as I'm not lamed in those jaw breakers, but I can answer cle 
riddle if all's fair play." " Fair play," says Uncle Mick. " Now 
then Bob, heave.it out of you." "Well, bys, it's like this: 
a bultow-by ties on to a lot of hooks, and a girl that's always 
after the boys hooks on to a lot of ties." 

There was a general tiner amongst the girls and a dispute 
arose as to whether that was a fair answer. Bob explained that 
it was Sundays he was thinking of, when all the boys wore neck- 
ties, and Uncle Mick decided that the bottle of gin was fairly 
won, and adjudged that the stranger should forthwith pay the 
penalty. 

As the evening advanced, and various tales had been told by 
different persons in the assemblage, the subject of ghosts crop- 
ped up, and Uncle Mick was asked if he believed in them. 
" Sure and I do then ; don't I remember me father telling about 
the ghost that used to hant the Island, and how one night he 
woke old Mr. Cooke up, that carried on business there, and 
towld him there was a big vessel ashore on the back of Marti- 
cot, and ould Cook, almost scared out of his life, got up and 
went down to the cook-room and called the men and they took 
the big skiff and rowed out, and sure enough on the back of the 
island there was a brig ashore and not a soul on board. And I 
knows that ghost has been walking there ever since, for James 
saw it when he tuck the business over, and old Crewe met it 
wan night when he was staying up there and wished it the time 
of day, but it never said a word only pinted to the ould church- 
yard. Next day Bill Hickey's big ram was found dead near the 
church-yard pint." 

Various other stories were told about ghosts about the Ghost 
in the Gulch near Toslow, the Ghost of the Back Cove, the Ghost 
of the Oven, and the Ghost that tormented the ' Gooldworthys" 
down in the Bight. 

It was getting late and some of the company began to dis- 



perse. The Ann's Cove people had promised Bob a passage as 
far as their place, and as they had some distance to row, they 
were amongst the first to leave. Bob had imbibed rather freely 
during the evening and was in a very talkative mood on his way 
down the Arm, the chief topic of his conversation being ghosts. 
As they got near the Cove he became very valiant, declared he 
was able to fight any amount of ghosts, and there " warn't a 
ghostess barn" that he couldn't tackle. One of the girls re- 
minded Bob of this when he landed at the stage and started to 
walk to St. Kyran's, calling after him, " Look out for the ghost 
near the pond, Bob; she's always there after twelve." 

Bob started off round the Cove and climbed the hill leading 
out of Green's Cove. When he got near the top of the hill, he 
took the bottle of gin out of his jumper the prize which he had 
won at the riddle contest, and which he had selfishly k'ept for 
himself and imbibed some of its contents. " Be de hokey 
smut," says Bob to himself, " I'm fit now to fight all de ghostess 
in de wide wurrulecl," and on he went filled with new courage 
and a trifle of gin. Now it so happened, that a little way on the 
road, there was a diversion in it caused b} an attempt to carry 
the road round a knoll instead of over it, and as it was never 
finished it ended in a sort of cnl-ik-sac. Before Bob came to 
this place he had helped himself several times from the bottle, 
and to further keep up his courage sang some of the Bay ditties 
with which he was familiar. Of course Bob should take the 
wrong road, and as he floundered along singing 

' De captin was an Amerycan. 

De mate he war de same, 
And deie were four bould sailor boys 

From Newfoundland dey came." 

Bob's attention was suddenly attracted by a noise ahead of 
him, and peering through the darkness he saw something white. 
" Howly Mudder. I wander which of dem ghostess dis wan is ! 
Say, mister, are you a ghostess, or are you some one else. I 
wander if he'll t;ike a drink; here's te ye, me boy," said he ad- 
vancing a little and taking a sup from the bottle. " Kf you'r out 
fur the night perhaps you'd take something to warm ye." There 
being no iesp/onse, Bob went forward a little, and as he advancd 
the ghost retreated. Bob plucked up courage when he saw that 
the ghost, as he thought, was running away. Tare-an ounds, 
but I've skeered him, and he's running away : hurroosh me foine 
ghost, but ef you'd only hould on I'd tickle yer ribs fur ye. Be 
dad, he's not threadin very lightly," said Bob, for the ghost was 
evidently heavy and made a noise as it walked along. 

For a little while Bob followed on, half afraid of the white thing 
ahead of him. and every now and then getting courage from the 
gin bottle. Bob began to get very fuddled and staggered a good 
deal. Suddenly, when he was quite unprepared, the ghost 
turned and came towards him. As it came close it made a rush 
and p.issed hi'n. Bob saw it coming, made an attempt at dodg- 
ing it, and falling over was struck on the head by something and 
became unconscious. Early next morning Bob was found sound 
asleep in the cul-de-sac by one of the Leonard girls who was out 
looking for their white cow which had been astray for some 
time from St. Kyran's. 

When Bob came to himself, the sun was about two hours high, 
and as he sat up, stretched himself and looked around, he mut- 
tered, ' Be de hokey smut it wasn't a draine after all, and I got 
the duvil's own fright. Let me see, where has I got to at all, at 
all ?" After this soliloquy he set out to find the road, and was 
soon on the correct one and trudged along for the Cove with 
a bursting head and an empty feeling, which he consoled himself 
he would cure if he could get the soft side of Mary McCue the 
first house he intended to make for. 

Arriving there he told, dolefully, about the wake at John 
Coady's, and of who were there and what they did, omitting all 
that he had said and done, and when he had got a " bowel of 
tay" disposed of, he told about the ghosts he met and how they 
shook hands with one another, that was the ghosts, and that 



6 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



t'.iey went on talking about the other world just as though they 
were Christians, and he learnt a lot by barkening to them, which 
he couldn't talk about. Mary was listening intently to Bob as 
he related his wonderful yarn, merely ejaculating every now and 
and then : " D' you say so," " Oh I but you were the brave boy." 
" Sure and now I do believe you, &c., &c." When Bob had 
satisfied the inner-man, and looked round the Cove for a boat, 
he got a lift across the reach for Isle-a-Vallyah where he was 
bound. Stopping at Swaddler's Cove he retailed his experiences 
of the night before, with a few additions to the tale he had 
already related in St. Leonard's. 

This was Bob's usual routine when he had anything worth his 
while to tell. Every time he related an experience it was mag- 
nified and added to, so that by the time he related his experience 
in the " Isle-a-Vallyah" cook-room it read something like this: 

" Well, bys, I had the curriestest ting happen to me last night 
as ever yez heerd tell ov. I landed wid the bys an gurrils in 
Ann's Cove last night and set out for St. Kyran's. I tuck me 
toime an' war cumin' 'long de road up near the pond, when out 
jumped a lot ov ghostesses and cot me atune em and made a 



reglar ball ov me, haaving me from wan to de udder 'till I 
taught I war swimmin' in de air. Wan ov de ghostesses i'd 
sing out ' ketch,' jist as if I wuz a yaffle ov fish, and den he'd 
jerk me over to de udder. Be me sowkins, I tried to say me 
prayers, but dey knocked de wind out of me, so dat I culdn't 
get a blessed wurrd out of me carcass. Den dey laid me down 
and danced all roun me, and de smell ov de brumstone wuz so 
strong dat I wuz nearly choked, and ef yez only heered wat 
dey said about de udder wurrild yer hairs 'd stand on en' like 
mine did. I wuz linking it wuz all over wid me whin dey strip- 
ped off all me clothes and each ghostes jumped on me. All at 
wancet dere was a big blaze of blue litenin' an dey vanished. 
An den de daylight wuz cummin' on and dere wuz me close 
hung all along on de bushes, an I had to get em shivering and 
shakin' from head to fut. Dhrinking wuz I ? No, I wuzzent. 
I wuz as sober as I am now, and dat's moighty dry boys." 

The truth, of Bob having been seen by one of the Leonard girls 
sound asleep on the Ann's Cove road, soon got about, and when 
he afterwards told the story of his encounter with the ghosts, he 
scouted the idea that it was Leonard's white cow he had met. 




' What Sport can earth, or sea, or sky, 
Co match the princely chase, atford." 

Sir Walter Scott. 



" peace * * and good health and 
much good fish." 

Coioper. 



fldoiun the Cane, 



" STRANGE night for tender mem'ries 
Strange night for musings sad!" 

While all around is revelry- 
The city gay and glad : 

The lovely harbour studded 
With brave and gallant ships. 

And floods of searchlight trembling 
Like smiles from loving lipg. 



" Strange night, strange night" I murmur, 

" Strange night for dreams as now t 
Dreams look'd upon as vmish'd 

Like youth, from cheek and brow- 
" On such a night" I murmur 

" On such a night as this 
Ileav'n clos'd to me its portals 

And Hell flung out its kiss !' r 

I see the " Hiils" before me 

They're mirror'd in the sheen 
Of madly dancing waters 

And light and shade between 
Ah me ! my view embraces 

The whole, with suppress'd pain 
For heart and soul are centred 

la forms adown the Lane 1 



By E. C. 



They're mirror'd in the shadows 

They pass before the light 
The little scarlet bonnet 

The coat of doubtful white ! 
The shimm'ring ringlets straying 

The curls that told of rain 
Ah me ! How could the angels 

So steep my life in pain 
And rob me of the treasures 

That haunt me down the Lane I 

To hold for one brief moment 

Those little human hands ! 
To clasp those trembling bodies 

Now with the angel bands ! 
The wish is like a torrent 

And shrouds my soul in pain. 
So vivid is the picture 

I see adown the Lane ! 
* * * * * 

Is mine the only echo 

Mid human hearts to-night ? 
Am I the one scarr'd soldier 

In earth's brief, bitter fight ? 
Are mine the only lute-strings 

A rift in yearning pain 
My ghost, the only phantom 

Adown Life's shadowy Lane I 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Bp Sbannon SDore. 




By Rev. /. 

FEW years ago, while visiting Ireland, I 
found myself traversing the noble plains of 
Ormond, which lie in Tipperary, between 
the Keeper Mountains and the River Shannon. 
At the southern' end of Lock Derg rise the Hills 
of Arra, or Du-Arra as the peasants call them 
from their dark and gloomy aspect. From their highest points 
the whole of Ormonde is visible, and one evening while enjoying 
all the beauties of the far stretching plain at our feet, I learned 
many interesting particulars from my companion, an old school- 
fellow. There before us lay the well tilled fields, the fruitful 
orchards, the extensive woods of Ormonde. Far spreading lake 
and towering mountain, green pastures and fertile slopes, all 
were there, forming a scene not easily forgotten. Never did 
foot of hound or wing of bird flyover a fairer landscape. 
Many a green slope and sheltered valley are dotted by a dis- 
mantled castle or an ivied abby. The lordly Keeper towers 
over them all, the broad Shannon spreads out below them, both, 
silent witnesses of their past glories and their present ruin. 

From where we stand, a large wood may be seen in the far 
distance towards Portumna, and on a fine day a white washed 
coltage even may be noticed in the midst. Long ago in that cot- 
tage livtd Richard Grace and his wife Mary. He was born there, 
but his wife belonged to the Hills around us. He was a landed 
proprietor on a small scale, owning and tilling his own comfort- 
able farm. 

They had been married many years before God blessed them 
with any offspring. Then appeared little Garrett. and two years 
Liter the storks brought baby Richard. 

As the boys grew up the difference of years seemed gradually 
to lesson, and when the elder was fifteen you could scarcely say 
which had come first into the world. 

Garrett was gentle, thoughtful and domestic, while Richard 
was wayward, wild and impulsive. The elder seemed to partake 
of his mother's refined and gentle nature, while Richard was 
simply the peasant son of his father. Snaring rabbits in the 
wood, coursing hares on the hills, fishing in the streams, or 
boating on the Shannon were the simple enjoyments of their 
childhood. 

As they grew older Garrett seemed more and more thought- 
ful, fo id of books and quietness, while Richard became more en- 
amored of daring feats on the lake and of prolonged fowling over 
the hills. He was often late in returning, but as he showed the 
spoils of his wanderings he was always welcome. 

When Garrett was sixteen the parents decided that their boys 
should enjoy a few years of College life, both to finish their educa- 
tion and to give them an opportunity of selecting their future 
calling. They left home wilh man) sobs and tears, accompanied 
on their way by their father and by the fond embraces and tears 
of their kind and amiable mother. As the parents, were simple 
and affectionate and the boys reproduced these qualities in dif- 
ferent ways, it would be hard to determine whether the parents 
or the boys felt the separation the more. But the parting had 
to be made and both sides tried to endure the trial as best they 
could. 

Nearly four years were spent at school. Then both returned 
home, and for a year or so nothing of importance occurred 
except that in their conduct the two boys continued to diverge 
more and more. Their earlier characteristics were maturing. 
Garrett was even more studious and reserved, and often spent 
his days wandering through the woods. 

Richard, much more brilliant in his studies, resumed many of 
his earlier amusements, and added others not so harmless. 
Frequently fowling and hunting on the hills, he also patronized 
fairs and races, games and sports. Often returning at late hours 
his mother remonstrated and quietly tried to withdraw him from 
his idle ways. Repentance of a brief nature and the company 
of his bother prevailed for a time, but slowly the more evil 
influences seemed to succeed. Gradually the periods of his 
absence increased, and no excuse or explanation was forthcom- 
ing. Home became a cage, and a fast and wild life the rule. 



L. Slattery. 

It was the aist of June when Garrett Grace was twenty-two, 
that he asked his mother to walk with him to an old circular 
Danish Fort that lay at the farthest end of their farm. They 
returned towards evening, silent and with moistened eyes. That 
evening Mrs. Grace told her husband that Garrett had opened 
his whole heart to her and had told her of his determination to 
join some religious order. " And what Order does he purpose 
joining ! The Jesuits ?" asked the father, as a choking sensa- 
tion hindered his words. " No, the Trappists I" answered the 
mother, sobbing like a child. Hand in hand, they sat on in the 
little parlour, while the fountains of their sorrow flowed freely. 
Not a word passed between them, except when Richard Grace 
from time to time exclaimed in agony : " The Trappists I" 
They were roused from their stupefaction by the boisterous 
laughter of Richard, who,with some companions, just then entered 
the cottage. The father went to his room, but the mother wiping 
her eyes went out to meet her wayward son and his idle associates. 

The hospitalities of a true Irish home were generously prof- 
fered and freely accepted, but the surroundings seemed depress- 
ing and the visitors soon left. Richard was too much in touch 
with his home not to see that something was astray. Garrett 
had gone back to the wood, his father remained in his room 
nursing his sorrow and he was now alone with his mother. 
"What is wrong, mother, why are you fretting? For a moment 
she made a brave effort to baffle him and to conceal her great 
sorrow, but lier tears would flow, and her sobs would belie her. 
At last, in a few bioken words, she told him all. 

Perhaps I have dwelt too much on the weaker features of 
Richard's character, for it is only just to say that he was of a 
very affectionate disposition and in his own way was deeply 
attached to his family. He felt the blow intensely and his better 
nature at once asserted itself. ' Mother," he said, " it is all 
my fault. Had I remained more at home Garrett would never 
think of this." 

Soon after, Garrett returned and the evening meal came on. 
It was s.id and short, no one mentioning that of which all were 
thinking. Servants wondered and whispered, but knew nothing. 

Next day Richard called Garrett and they both went slowly 
and silently towards the wood. There, with a burst of grief he 
expostulated with Garrett, condemned himself a thousand times, 
appealed to his affection for his parents, and pictured in the 
gloomiest colours the life that Garrett was about to adopt. His 
grief was too wild, his words too incoherent for reason, and Gar- 
rett said little. Only at times would he say quietly, " It is for the 
best." " God calls me ;" ' I have long since made up my mind." 

The day wore on, and towards evening they returned home. 
As they approached the house, they stood at a wicket and 
Garrett solemnly placed his hand on his brother's shoulder. 
" Richard" he said, " don'; blame yourself for this, though I 
disapproved of your conduct it had no influence on me. For 
years, even since boyhood, I yearned for a quiet life where I 
could save my soul. At best there is little happiness in this life, 
but those who deny and mortify themselves find the most. 
Even thoughtful men among the pagans acknowledge this. 
Next Monday I sail for France and I shall reach La Trappe 
before the end of the month. I leave our dear parents to your 
care. You have been a little foolish, but you are now their sole 
reliance. They cannot live long, make the evening of their 
lives as pleasant as you can. We shall not meet again nay I 
can not write, as the Trappist Rule supposes one to be dead to 
the world ! Now cheer up and comfort our dear v parents when 
I am gone.' 1 Poor Richard was unable to speak but he sobbed 
out the ever present conviction, " It is all my fault." 

I shall attempt no description of Garrett's departure. The 
heart broken parents, the repentant Richard, the desolate old 
cottage, all were parted with calmly and firmly. Garrett Grace 
looked his last on the Plains of Ormonde, the beetling brow of 
Keeper and the gloomy Hills of Du-Arra. Richard, sobbing or 
sillent, remained alone to face the changed conditions of the old 
homestead. 

Silently onward still flowed the Shannon, while Garrett made 



8 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



his way to France, and in due time reached La Trappe. He 
joined the Community and devoted himself with all his heart to 
the duties he had assumed. Perpetual silence, broken only by 
the voice of prayer, or lecture, seemed hard at first, but in his 
devotion to his duties he soon found himself entirely absorbed. 
The great gates of the Monastery shut out from him all the 
World, and the deep cowl of the Trappists shut him off even 
from his companions around. Many a Trappist monk has never 
once seen the face of one of his companions, and in this is ex- 
emplified their idea of living alone with "God. This thought 
peopled the deserts with holy hermits and filled many a vast 
monastery with saintly recluses. Despising the world and its 
ways they asked not for its approval, they cared not for its 
censure. 

For two years the novice was under training, and during that 
time Garrett was entirely free and could leave without let or 
hindrance. But the two years quickly passed and he loved his 
solitude the more. He asked for permission and was allowed 
to make his vows in perpetuity. There, prostrate, in the Choir 
of the Monastery, in presence of all his brethren, he pledged 
himself solemnly to persevere till death, as a Trappist monk. The 
great Monastery bells tolled out their joyous peals, and the 
monks sang their glad Te Dcnm as " Brother Ambrose" took 
his place among their ranks. 

Needless to follow his daily routine of life, the midnight office, 
the long prayers, the scanty meals, the paltry couch these are 
so well known and so much alike in all severe monasteries that 
they need only be mentioned. 

Years pass by slowly, or swift, as our dispositions make them, 
and well nigh twenty had the young Tipperary man lived as 
Bro. Ambrose. Then the austere life began to tell on a frame 
never very robust, and one after another his more severe duties 
had to be renounced, and for many weeks he had been confined 
to the infirmary. 

The venerable Abbott came to see the sick Brother, and aston- 
ished to find him so weak, he recommended him to receive the 
last Sacraments. " There is no immediate danger Bro. Ambrose" 
he said, "but I shall send you Father Dominic in the afternoon. 
He is on the sick duty this week, and will anoint you. Farewel, 
my beloved son, resign yourself to God's holy will, and we shall 
meet in Heaven." 

That afternoon found Father Dominic sitting by the dying 
monk hearing his Confession. Soon the last Rites were finished 
and the priest prepared to leave. "Good bye, Bro. Ambrose," 
he said, "I commend you into the hands of God, and I shall 
not forget to offer Holy Mass for you. Can f be of any further 
use to you ? Is there anything on your mind ?" " V'es, as I 
am dying I fear I am troubled about my brother." 

" Yes, yes, Bro. Ambrose ; what can I do ?" 

" Perhaps, it may be in your power to advise him to tell 
him that when I was dying I wished him to think of his 
soul. He was wild and thoughtless and I fear he leads a 
careless life. Ask him in memory of our childhood by the 
Shannon to remember his duty to God." 

" Oh, yes. I shall certainly do as you say. I shall ask the 
Abbot to write to him. But, what is his address ; what is his 
name ?" 

"His name is Richard Grace he lives in Ireland, in 
Ormond by the Shannon." 

" What ! Was Richard Grace your brother ?" 

" Yes he was my brother God bless him." 

The priest threw back his cowl, exposed his face, and cried 
aloud" Garrett, Garrett !" 

"Oh, oh, Father Dominic my brother my brother 

Richard I" 

The two brothers embraced each other fondly, and each hold- 
ing the others hands they looked long and lovingly into each 
others eyes. 

" My dear Bro. Ambrose, my dear Garrett. I left home 
less than two years after yourself, and have been in this holy 
house ever since. Our parents had both died, and blaming my- 
self for your departure and their sorrows, I followed you to 
La Trappe." 

Noticing some change in the features of the dying monk, the 
priest looked more closely, and found that he was addressing 



only the body of his brother. 

In the quiet but crowded cemetery of La Trappe rises A 
modest cross, on which are engraved the name of " Brother 
Ambrose," with his age and the date of his death. Not far 
away is another, giving similar particulars of "Father Dominic." 
Not a word is there to tell of their pathetic story, but in the 
Annals of the Monastery are authentically given the particulars 
here related. 

And away in Ormonde, by the Shannon, the peasant mother, 
gathering her little ones round her knee, teaching them to lisp 
their evening prayer, encourages them to a life of virtue by re- 
counting the story of the two holy brothers, who though sleeping 
in far -La Trappe were born by the Shannon Shore. 




Clx midnigM D)ass, 

By Dun Carroll. 

FROM lonely home and hall of luxury, 

By ev'ry street, from alley lane and square ; 

A multitude is moving peacefully, 

In rev'rence, towards the temple on the hill. 

Glad Youth, rejoicing in its strength is there, 
And Age, with hoary hair, yet sturdy hearted still. 

Serene the night. Illumed with light of stars 
The snow-clad hills look smilingly to heaven : 

The joyous bells, with tongues of gladness flood 
The midnight with a music sweetly given. 

Far up the vale and farthei out to sea 

Sweet chime on chime, it floats in swelling melody. 

We cross the threshold. Panel, column and arch, 

With light of thousand tapers gleam and glint I 
A radiant splendour floods the stately church 

From many a glowing lamp of varied tint. 

The grand High Altar's form magnificent, 
Our vision thrills with light and majesty. 
The wonder of the Mighty Mystery 

The hour commemorates, our spirits feel ; 
In awe and love we low in adoration kneel. 

And youth and beauty, sinner, saint and seer, 
The city's throbbing life is gathered nc>w ; 
The joy-lit heart, the sad and troubled brow. 
All, all are kneeling hushed and silent here : 
And prayer the gold, the frankincense, the myrrh, 

Of contrite hearts - ascends unto the Throne, 
As soareth now the fragrant incense flung' 
From censers sweet before the altar swung; 

" O God 1 Our Father, teach, oh teach Thy own 
Unworthy children e'er to love but Thee alone " 

And hark ! It swells again, the song that rolled 
Above Judea's loftiest mountain height 
And thrilled the lowly watchers on that night 

When angel hosts proclaimed that He of old, 

By prophet-bard and kingly seer foretold. 

The King of Kings was born ; that sin-lost Earth 
That day had known its long expected Saviour's birth/ 

And " Glory, glory, glory unto God 

And Peace on earth to men," is ringing clear. 

Our souls are lifted by the midnight song 

To heights that lead us nearer and more near 

To Him, our Infant Saviour fondly press'd, 

In Bethlehem's lone hut, to Mary's virgin breast, 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




nciufoundland nainc=Corc. 

By Most Rev. M. F. Howley, D.D. 

XIII. 




HAVE received some very interesting notes 
from the Venerable Canon Smith, of Portugal 
Cove, in relation to the names of places in 
the neighbourhood of King's Cove. " About two 
miles south of King's Cove, there is a small cove 
named 

ROLLING COVE. 

This is a most interesting name. It is quite poetic and descrip- 
tive. In stormy weather the huge waves roll in on the beach 
from the wide Atlantic, breaking in immense " rollers," as the 
fishermen call them, with a deep rumbling sound. The name 
is onomatopoeic or sound-suggesting, like Homer's Poluphloisboio 
Thalasses (I presume you have no Greek type). This phrase 
has been so beautifully rendered by Longfellow as " The 
deep-mouthed neighboring ocean," that we forgive him the 
plagiarism. 

' Fifty years ago," writes Canon Smith, " the women of King's 
Cove were accustomed to get sand from this cove to strew 
upon their kitchen floors. In winter they used saw-dust, which 
was gathered from a place nearby named 

STOCK COVE. 

This is also an interesting name. It is so called from the saw 
ing of logs, called among the people by the old English name 
of " stocks." These stocks were sawn in the old " saw-pits," an 
institution and an industry now fast going out of use, owing first 
to the fact that all good saw stocks are now cut out for many 
miles from the shore, and secondly from the establishment of so 
many large saw mills all over the country. As late as forty years 
ago fishermen spoke of their winter work as having cut so many 
" stocks." The Revd. Canon suggests, and I agree with him, that 
this word may be the origin of the name of 



PIPER STOCK HILL, 

near Torbay. " The place where the piper lodged the result of 
his winter's work, ... or may be a convivial piper when 
returning from Town, mounted on a pile of stocks, played for 
the delectation of his companions." It may be remembered 
that when I published, some few years ago, some extracts from 
the Registers of the Church of England, of this city, one of the 
entries was as follows : 

" 1785. Buried, Quack, the piper, June 26," so that the idea 
is not so far fetched as might at first appear. 

Not far from King's Cove is a small Cove called 

SAINT CROIX, 

or Sand Cross. Canon Smith says of it: " * * * Perhaps the 
sign of our Redemption stood there long ago to mark the, spot 
where either a traveller had died, or more probably some 
drowned mariners had been buried." It may be remarked that 
the name of St. Croix, as a family name, exists to the present 
day at St. Mary's. 

"On the south side of Keels (I am still quoting from Canon 
Smith) is Keel's Harbor, where alone craft can take in or dis- 
charge cargo. . . . This place has a narrow entrance, 
and is surrounded by high cliffs, that have something of a 
castellated appearance, hence its name, 

CASTLE COVE. 

There is no other name of any historical or antiquarian im- 
portance until we come to Cape Bonavista, and as I consider 
that name too important to be treated of at the end of an article, 
I reserve it for next number. 

+ M. F. H. 




HOLYROOD, CONCEPTION BAY. 

ClK Christmas Spirit. Nearer and closer to our hearts be the Christmas 
Spirit, which is the spirit of active usefulness, perseverances, cheerful dis- 
charge of duty, kindness and forbearance ! It is in the last virtues especi- 
ally, that we are, or should be, strengthened by the unaccomplished visions 
of our youth ; for, who shall say that they are not our teachers to deal 
gently even with the impalpable nothings of the earth ! 

Therefore, as we glow older, let us be more thankful that the circle of 
our Christmas associations and of the lessons that they bring, expand I Let 
us welcome every one of them, and summon them to take their places by 
the Christmas hearth. Dickens. 



Chrisimas Cimc in Ireland. 

AT Christmas-time in Ireland how the holly branches twine 

In stately hall and cabin old and gray ! 
And red among the leaves the holly-berries brightly shine, 

At Christmas-time in Ireland far away. 
And blighter than the berries are the kindly Irish eyes, 

And cheery are the greetings of the day, 
The greetings and the blessings from the Irish hearts that rise 

At Christmas-time in Ireland far away ! 

At Christmas-time in Ireland you can hear the chapel bell 

A-calling ere the dawning of the day, 
You can see the people thronging over field and over fell, 

To the " early Mass" in Ireland far away ; 
And saintly are the soggarlhs that before the altars stand, 

And faithful are the flocks that kneel and pray 
Ah, surely God must show'r His choicest blessings on the land 

At Christmas-time in Ireland far away I 

At Christmas-time in Ireland there is feasting, there is song, 

And merrily the fife and fiddle play. 
And lightly dance the colleens and the boys the evening long, 

At Christmas-time in Ireland far away. 

There is light and there is laughter, there is music, there is mirth, 
And lovers speak as only lovers may, 
Ah, there is nothing half so sweet in any land on earth 
As Christmas-time in Ireland far away ! 

At Christmas-time in Ireland there is sorrow, too, for those 

Who scattered far in exile sadly stray, 
And many a tear in silence for a friend beloved flows 

At Christmas-time in Ireland far away; 
But still amid the grieving is a hope to banish fears, 

That God will send them safely back some day, 
To kno'w again the happiness that long ago was theirs 

At Christmas-time in Ireland far away I 

Denis A. McCarthy. 



10 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




J\ Single tear 

from tlx Past Bistorp of Portugal Cowc. 

By Rev. Canon Smith, R. D. of Avalon. 





ITT HE telling of stories round the Yule-log, has 
J I \ been for ages a favourite Christinas past- 
1 time. Ghost stories, and stories of thrilling 
adventure have held honoured place on such oc- 
casions. Love stories, too, have ever been held 
in high estimation, and much sought after at 
Christinas. The story that I have to tell is one of Love, but it 
has a most pathetic ending. The story is brief, but true in every 
particular. When I came to the charge of the Portugal Cove 
Mission, twenty years ago, there were then living quite a number 
of old people in the Parish who remembered well the lovers 
who figure in the story I am about to tell, and it is from their 
lips that I have heard it. The lady being a native of Portugal 
Cove was especially well known to those old people, who, as 
young people, were her contemporaries. Here is the story. 

In the early part of the year of our Lord. icS23, there lived at 
Portugal Cove a young lady famed throughout St. John's and the 
whole of Conception Hay for her exceedingly great beauty. New- 
foundland ladies are, and ever have been, justly famed for their 
beauty, but this young lady appears in this respect to have 
eclipsed all of the gentle sex of her day. From the testimony 1 
have heard borne to her character by those who knew her well, 
she appears to have been what is far better than possessing 
mere beauty of countenance and person quite as good ,is she 
was beautiful. The wise man saith ' Favour is deceitful, and 
beauty is vain ; but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall 
be praised." 

In her end this young lady showed that in her life she feared 
God and tried to serve him. Women, as well as men. seem to 
have been fascinated by her beauty. Indeed she appears to 
have had as man)- devoted admirers among her own as among 
the sterner sex. Seventy-five years after her death I. myself, 
have known old women here become enthusiastic in speaking of 
her beauty. One dear old soul, who died here only about three 
years ago and was nearly one hundred years old at the time of 
her death, tbld me that the best description she had ever heard 
of this young lady's beauty fell short of the reality. You had 
to see her yourself to comprehend in any way how entrancing!)' 
beautiful she really was. Hers was no doll's face. She had a 
most expressive countenance that fascinated all beholders. 
When you saw her (so said this old lady) your gaze became 
fixed upon her countenance, so attractive was she in appearance. 
Her voice, too, was sweet in keeping with her beauty of person, 
it was musical and ravishingly sweet. 

This young lady's Christian name was Tryphena, and she 
was known far and wide, and is spoken of to this day. by the 

descendants of those who knew her, as " Pretty Pheeny ." 

She had hundreds of admirers among the male sex, and many 
suitors for her hand. Had she chosen she could have married 
into a high station of life and been endowed with much earthly 
goods. But only one suitor found favor in her sight; he. Mr. 
, was in her own station of life and conducted a flout ishiiig 
business at Brigus, Conception Bay. He is said to have b-en a 
handsome man, honest and upright in conduct, and amiable in 
manner. They were devoted lovers. In March, 1823. their 
earthly happiness was to have been consummated by their mar- 
riage at Portugal Cove. But the Dread Being in Whose Hands 
alone lieth the power of life and death, and Wh-ise ways are 
unsearchable by human understanding, had in His wisdom 
ordered otherwise. 

On the Friday of the week previous to that on uhir-h she wis 
to have been married, Miss - - was stricken by rxphoid fever 
Medical aid was summoned from St. John's, but all' human help 
was unavailing. The Master had come and called for His 
servant, and she must perforce rise up, and leaving all of earth 
follow Him. She grew rapidly worse, and on Sunday evening 
her eyelids closed in death. Up to a few hours before her Heath 
she was perfectly conscious that her end was near, and able to 



converse with those around her dying bed. She expressed her'-' 
self as having full trust in God's mercy through Christ for her 
soul, and her perfect resignation to His will. 

No pen can adequately describe the grief of her parents at 
her decease, and indeed of everyone who knew her, for she was 
greatly beloved by all, high and low, rich and poor. 

At that time there was no consecrated burial ground at Pur- 

tugal Cove, therefore Miss was interred in a quiet spot, 

then shaded by trees, in her father's garden. 

The garden and trees have long since disappeared, but the 
place of sepulture is railed off by a picket fence. A head stone 
cut in England stands at the head of her grave, on which, 
barely legible now, are inscribed her name, age, date of death, 
and some poetry to her memory. She was buried on the same 
day and at the same hour at which she was to have been mar^ 
ried, had God spared her. Crowds attended her funeral, and 
not a dry eye was seen among any then present ; they " carried 
her to her burial and made great lamentation over her." 

And now, for a while let us return to notice of her intended 
husband. There was then no telegraph in Newfoundland, and 
hardly even a weekly communication between Portugal Cove 
and the towns at the head of the Bays. On the Monday morn- 
ing, altogether ignorant of his betrothed's illness, much less of 
her death, the intended bridegroom left his house at Brigus full 
of the happiest anticipations of his. as he thought, approaching 
bliss. He travelled towards Portugal Cove on horseback by a 
" bridle path" which led around Conception Hay. His saddle 
bags were stuffed to bursting point with presents for his intend- 
ed bride and her bridesmaids. He whiled away the tedium 
of the journey with happy song. On the very morning of Miss 
's funeral he reached S. Philip's (Broad Cove), all ignorant 
of the terrible news that awaited him there. Friends there 
broke it to him as gently as they could, but it simply over- 
whelmed him. The terrible news struck the poor fellow like a 
bolt from heaven. He was stricken to the heart. He would 
not go on to Portugal Cove, but remounting his horse he return- 
ed at once to his, tor him henceforth, desolate home at Brigus. 

On arriving at Brigus he at once took to his bed, and never again 
rose therefrom, for shortly afterwards he died of a broken heart. 

The light that comes to us from the manger Throne at 
Bethlehem, revealing to us as it does Incarnate God, Who can 
sympathise with our sorrows, and feels for our infirmities, and 
Who is the Resurrection and the Life can alone brighten this 
otherwise sad romance of real life. 




AT GRAND POND. " The sta-tled 
on the further shore." Anon. 



d, hard pressed, seeking sanctuary 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY, 



11 



fl feu) Seasonable Reflections. 



By A. A. Parsons. 




I STOOD on a tower in the wet, 

And New Year and Old Year met, 

And winds were roaring and blowing: 

And I said: " O years that meet in tears, 

Have ye aught that is worth the knowing ? 

Science enough and exploring, 

Wanderers coming and going, 

Matters enough for deploring, 

But aught that is worth the knowing ?" 

Seas at my feet were flowing, 

Waves on the shingle pouring, 

Old Year roaring and blowing, 

And New Year blowing and roaring. Tennyson. 

HE late Judge Pinsent, whenever asked to 
contribute to a Christmas Number or other 
local publication, would almost invariably 
reply : " Shall I write about the French Shore 
question ?" He was nearly as fond of that subject 
as the present genial Judv;e Prowse, who still 
seems to have a hankering after it, notwithstanding the fact that 
the whole question has been officially and forever settled. But, 
speaking of Sir Robert Pinsent: I remember the last time I 
called on him for a Christmas contribution. He was seated in 
a comfortable chair near the fire, absorbed in the pages of 
Dumas' " Three Guardsmen." As I entered he looked up and 
greeted me in that peculiar official manner of his which seemed 
to fit him so perfectly for the Supreme Bench. While he held 
out his hand, I looked at the book he had just laid aside and 
smiled, perhaps a little suggestively. Any way, he caught my 
meaning in a moment and remarked, good naturedly : " You 
smile at finding me reading a book like that !" "Yes," I said. 
" because I expected to see you differently employed ; for in- 
stance, either critically examining the latest- edition of our 
' Consolidated Statutes,' or ' writing a Judgment ' on one of the 
more important cases recently decided by you." "Do you 
know," he rejoined, " I find it a great relief, after a busy and 
prolonged sitting in Court, to spend a few hours with a clever 
author like that F'renchman. There are times at night when 
light mental food is necessary to enable us to properly digest 
the heavy accumulations of the day. It clears the intellectual 
atmosphere, so to speak." 

Then we be^an to cast about for a peg on which to hang the 
new Christmas article ; and this we did for some time with indif- 
ferent success. I suggested two or three subjects; but not one 
of them seemed to merit his approval. At last he observed, 
tapping the table, at the same time, with the index finger of his 
left hand : " I'll tell you what I'll do : I'll write you an article- 
on the ' Past, Present and Future of Newfoundland.' " I thanked 
the Judge, went home and patiently awaited the promised 
contribution. Did I get it ? Yes, I did ; but not in time for 
publication. It reached me the day before Christmas, and when 
lie saw that it did not appear, he requested me to return the 
manusciipt, which I did,' together with a note expressive of the 
regret I telt on being obliged to go to press without it. How- 
ever, I afterwards discovered that the learned Judge had turned 
the article to good account by extending it to the proportions of 
a lecture and delivering it before a large and appreciative audi- 
ence in the Athenaeum Hall. But all this en passant. It is not 
my intention now to write a biography of Sir Robert Pinsent ; 
nor is it necessary that I should. Judge Prowse and other warm 
friends of the deceased jurist have long ago laid their literary 
tributes upon his bier and duly honored the memory of one of 
the most distinguished occupants of our Supreme Bench. 

Metaphorically speaking, what I want to do here is to get the 
re.iders of the QUARTERLY in near the Yule-log, right under the 
holly and mistletoe, and make them really feel that " this 'is 
Christmas." But one feels so timid in writing for the first time 
to a paper whose talented contributors stand so high in the 
world of literature as do those of the NEWFOUNDLAND QUAR- 
TERLY. Why, its roll of honor embraces archbishops, bishops, 
archdeacons, canons, curates, doctors of divinity, and all the 
other degrees and varieties of our universally-respected clerical 



persuasion ; not to speak of our legal and medical professions. 
What a brilliant galaxy of literary stars you have twinkling upon 
your pages, to be sure ! But my space is too limited to dwell 
upon the portraits and productions of the QUARTERLY'S able 
staff of writers. They are already so well known and appreciated 
that they need no mention here. 

By the way, in the Old Country, I notice, publishers are now 
complaining of the paucity of really good writers in the realm of 
fact as well as fiction. This, I think, can easily be accounted 
for. To-day literature is checked by the peculiar state of 
society puritanism, hypocrisy and timidity pervading nine out 
of every ten books. This is because authors in our utilitarian 
age prefer gold to glory, the wind-bag of present popularity to 
future fame. One glorious triumph for literature in the future 
will be the adoption of a universal language. A French author 
has calculated that in a hundred years 860,000,000 persons 
will speak the Fnglish language, 120,000,000 German, and 69,- 
000,000 French. When things come to this pass, the necessity 
for a universal language will lie more and more apparent, and 
English, on account of its richness, power and expression, and 
growing use, may, with confidence, be pointed out as the ulti- 
mately chosen one. The arts, which to-day do not flourish 
because other interests than religion and patriotism predominate 
in the world, will, as soon as the political and social freedom of 
nations have been secured, be gloriously accelerated, and men 
will return with boundless enthusiasm to the pursuit of them, as 
they are doing in Japan and Egypt today. 

But social miserv must first be alleviated, and the actual wants 
of mankind be satisfied before they can be expected to prove 
that beauty, truth and goodness are not obsolete, but "spring 
eternal in the human breast." Thus the material and ideal in 
nature will be opened once more to them, and the arts, which 
depend strictly on these, will correspondingly flourish. One 
might carry on indefinitely in this strain, but I forbear. I shall 
probably (with the QUARTERLY'S permission) have another 
chance of falling back on it before the year that is coming melts 
away into the year that is bidding us farewell. May it carry 
thee gently forward, good reader, whoever thou art, on Time's 
flowing stream towards that shoreless ocean where all the years 
are gone. But 

" Not in vain the distance beacons. Forward, forward let us range, 
I, t-t the great world spin forever down the ringing grooves of change." 




" A deer was wont to feed." 

* * * * 

' White were her feet, her forehead showed 

A spot of silvery white 
That teemed to glimmer like a star 

In Autumn's hazy night." IV. Cullen Bryant. 



12 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Christmas Reflections. * 



By Rev. A. W. Lewis, B.A., B.D. 



fSl 
2 

^""^ 



Ik. HRISTMAS REFLECTIONS !" Let us the 
rather say, CHRISTMAS RAYS. In these 
days we hear much of the Finsen Rays, 
Cathode Rays, Roentgen Rays, Becquerel 
Rays, and what-not. But the Christmas Rays excel, as light 
outrivals darkness, as love excels force, as spirit transcends 
matter. These Rays can be seen by all. These Rays shine for 
all. These Rays heal all, to a degree, in body, mind, and spirit. 
It was the sheen of that light, coming into the world, that shone 
about the Shepherds of Bethlehem. The Christmas Rays are 
the scintillations of the very life of the great-hearted God, Who 
is light. Let us now allow some of these Rays, flashing forth 
in Revelation, to pass through the prism of our mind. P'aint 
gleams of the spectrum will fall upon this printed page. Yes. 
These will be "CHRISTMAS REFLECTIONS." 

Christmas! Behold its BRILLIANCY! It sparkles with 
the Radiancy Divine. It is the most joyous day of the Christian 
Year. In the orange seed lies, wonderfully enfolded, the hidden 
beginnings of that life which develops into the tree, with its 
glory of bridal blossoms and golden fruit. So in the fact of 
which Christmas is ever reminding us there lay the unseen 
potentialities of the Tree of Life, now beginning to bloom in our 
little earth, whose " golden age" will shortly dawn. 

A fact ! Thank God, it is a FACT. Our birth-days are an- 
niversaries of a fact, a vital fact to us. Christinas is the anni- 
versary of the fact of Jesus, the God-man, a vital fact to us and 
to every child of woman born. It is fact we want. The pre- 
sent age takes little interest in the speculations of man. How- 
ever beautiful they may be, they are like the mirage in the hot, 
dry desert, that is bleaching the bones of myriads so deceived. 
The sin-sick soul of man cries out for truth, for fact. Let the 
atheist scoff, and the infidel laugh us to scorn, and the wise critic 
smile a knowing smile, we care not. They cannot touch the 
fact of Christ. Upon this fact of God our souls rest in peace. 
May each reader so receive this fact that we can say with a sure 
confidence, " Requiescat in pace" 

A MYSTERIOUS fact. Who can understand the Incarna- 
tion ? Some may think they do. The wise know they but 

glean a few small handfuls an infinitely wise God has let fall for 
them. 

" The first-born sons of light 
Desire in vain its depths to see ; 
They cannot reach the mystery, 
The length and breadth and height." 

Yet mystery does not weaken fact. All beginnings are mysterious. 
Of all kinds of life we must say, with bowed head, " IN THE 
BEGINNING GOD." No one can explain how the plant life is 
united with the starch of the seed. How much greater is our 
ignorance when we stand face to face with the truth of ' God 
manifest in the flesh !" Yet this does not alter the fact. You 
cannot tell how the life is united with the body, but you believe 
in the body's life, which develops the body and preserves the 
body. All that are permitted to be " at large" believe in the 
fact of their birth, though our life is a mystery. How is the 
soul united with the body ? You cannot say ; yet all, except 
the " missing links" unrecognized, believe that man has a soul 
apart from the life of the body. So Christmas reminds us of 
the unexplained fact of THE UNION OF THE HUMAN AND THE 
DIVINE in Jesus of Nazareth, the Christ of God. 

THE SON OF GOD BECAME THE SON OF MAN ; but how can 
that enable the sons of men to become the sons of God ? How ? 
This does not concern us. We do not need to know how the 



seed transforms the mineral earth into the growing bush, with 
its thorns and bright leaves and fragrant blooms of surpassing 
loveliness. If we knew the philosophy of its development the 
rose could not be the sweeter. The Incarnation has proved its 
power to transform human life, as the water gushing up through 
the dry, glowing sands, makes the desert blossom as the rose. 
See the fruits of Christmas ! Picture Central Africa, with its 
degradation, made by the Slave Trade " confusion worse con- 
founded" ; and then try to get a bird's eye view of Christian 
Lands. Why the contrast ? Christmas explains. It is the 
INCARNATION WRITTEN IN LARGE, IRIDESCENT LETTERS. 

The Christmas Rays spell out the same truth in millions of 
microcosms. THE INCARNATION GLOWS IN THE HUMAN LIFE. 
Consider yonder man. Yesterday his life was dark, black. His 
deeds were of the dark. His desires and passions marked him 
of the darkness dense. The future had no rays of light, but fell 
about him like a pall of a " horror of great darkness." For him 
there was no God above, no heart within. To-day ah, who is 
this ? It is the same and yet not the same. With beaming face 
and sparkling eye he answers our questioning gaze, " Whereas 
I was blind, now I see." The night-mare of the past rolls away 
like a dark cloud, driven far to sea by wind invisible. Light 
enshrouds him, and better still shines into his heart, illumining 
his whole life. He hates the ways of darkness ; and a strange, 
new love is springing up for the pure things and the noble things 
that yesterday he scorned. He shrinks from looking backward, 
but ever gazes upon the light that is streaming over the heights, 
and slowly growing brighter and more glorious. Millions like 
this one can say, " Our citizenship is in heaven ; whence also 
we wait for a Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ : Who shall fashion 
anew the body of our humiliation, that it may be conformed to 
the body of His glory." 

Christmas calls up memories of " good things" to every one in 
Christian Homes. To the child and to the animal-like man or 
woman the Holy Season means little else than the gratification 
of the flesh. Many know Christmas-tide as "the ass his master's 
crib." The best and wisest rejoice in the gifts that flutter from 
hand to hand, " from the river unto the ends of the earth" on 
that clay of days. We all should receive with gratitude and 
delight the pleasant things which God moves others to give us. 
They come from God's heart to us, His wayward children. 

Gifts are valuable mainly for the thought that gave them, for 
the love they bring. All the gifts of earthly friends speak to us 
of God's greatest gift, on the first Chiistmas Morning. It will 
take all eternity for us to learn the greatness of the Gift. How 
much it meant to God ! How much it means to us ! It is the 
only possible remedy for human misery and degradation. It 
will be the great glory of God that he will have far more than 
effaced the evil wrought by Satan. Man shall be far higher and 
greater than if sin had not entered the world. Where sin abounds 
there will grace much more abound. Yet Christmas means more 
than this unspeakable gift. Its greatest value is in the motive 
that prompted the gift. The Divine Love stooped to share "the 
ills that flesh is heir to," that man might share the Divine Life. 
The gift of a Mother, however small, touches the heart, because 
it voices the Mother-love. The boundless love of God, that 
sparkles in the rippled life of our Christmas-tide, is the only- 
power that can soften hearts of stone and make dead souls throb 
with joyous life. This is the love, more tender than a Mother's, 
that awakes an answering echo in our hearts. The faintest 
Rays of Christmas give us some hint of the world's great 
dynamic. As we rejoice in this true joy of Christmas-tide, the 
love of which it speaks will prove a perpetual joy, and we shall 
share the power of God in prevailing with our fellow men. Love 
is the light of Christmas ; God's love the light of the world. 

" O Love, that will not let me go, 

I rest my weary soul in Thee ; 
I give Thee back the life I owe, 
That in Thine ocean depths its flow 

May richer, fuller be." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



13 



Christmas Reminiscences. 



By Rev. Charles Leuch. 




WHEN requested to write something for the 
NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY on the sub- 
ject of " Xmas Reminiscences," I tried to 

recall some item of interest from my somewhat 

monotonous outport experiences of the world's 

great festive and popular holiday. 

I was about to give it up when the thought occurred to me, 
if you cannot write in a humorous strain, write for those who 
may be passing through sorrow at this Christmas time. With 
this, my mind carried me back, twenty years; to the early days 
of my Newfoundland pilgrimage. 

In those days I would wander in imagination to the old land, 
and fancy would picture for me the members of the family 
gathering around the Christmas fire. How the old folks would 
refer to the " missing link" in that family gathering I Time 
passed on and the "old folks" were gone to a better home and 
laid to rest in God's acre. Christmas has its sad as well as 
gladsome memories, and while most subscribers to Christmas 
numbers prefer the sunny side, yet to pastors of Christ's flock, 
the festive season of the Wonderful Child who came to bring 
peace on earth and good will to men ; there are various causes 
which tend to turn the thoughts into other channels than those of 
innocent mirth and happiness, to sympathize with the bereaved 
and sorrowing, for the loss of the head of a family or the cherub 
who filled the household with its innocent prattles. At this 
happy season how many will be passing through the vale of 
tears and 

" Sigh for the touch of a vanished hand, 

And the sound of a voice that is still." 

It was Christmas week of 1885, but the travelling preacher 
had spent his two Sundays at head-quarters and must move on 
to his numerous appointments, entailing a journey of sixty miles 
to and from the extern fishing village of the Mission. We had 
called at Garia, where the kind-hearted people were always glad 
to welcome " The Monthly Visitor." Uy Christmas Day we 
were fifteen miles farther east, and had arranged to make the 
best of the world's holiday at Grand Bruit, named by the French, 
probably from its beautiful waterfall. We preached in the morn- 
ing and planned to have an enjoyable time in the afternoon, by 
-singing and talking lo the fisher-folk of other lands, and doings 
of other people at Christmas time. As the neighbours were 
gathering to Skipper Sam's Cottage, a fishing boat rounded the 
point of the harbor. What could be the business of those 
strangers at that holiday season ? 

On landing they soon explained that an accident had occurred 
by which a young man had lost his life, and the friends had 



sent for the minister to come to them in their hour of trouble. 
We started for Garia with little delay, and by the time we 
reached the house of mourning, after fifteen miles in a small 
fishing boat on a cold winter's day. the evening had closed in 
upon us. But how shall we describe the scene we witnessed in 
that sorrow-stricken fisherman's dwelling ? 

At early morn of December 24th, a father and two sons left 
home in a fishing punt for a distant settlement at the head of 
the bay. They decided to leave the. eldest son on an island, 
where lie must spend the day watching for seals to make their 
appearance. For his comfort and convenience a gaze had been 
built of stones, to answer for warmth and shelter. Some two or 
three hours later another boat left Garia, containing two fisher- 
men, with the object of visiting the aforementioned island, on 
the same business of securing seals. They never stopped to 
think that others could be before them, and as no boat was 
hauled up in the land-wash, they concluded they were first in 
order that day. On landing they hauled up their boat, shouldered 
their guns and started around the island in opposite directions. 
Soon after came the report of a gun, followed shortly by a scream 
of tenor. The young man asserted that he heard a noise in 
the direction of the gaze, and seeing a fur cap at once concluded 
that it was the head of a water-bear, and taking deliberate aim 
he put the load into the object. Instantaneous death was the 
result, and when the father and son returned to the island, they 
found the poor lad cold in death. It was Christmas eve when they 
landed at their stage head with the body of poor Wm. Smith, and 
the world's great festival was no happy day for that sorrow- 
stricken family. I shall never forget the grief of that house- 
hold, especially the broken-hearted parents, and the neighbours 
of that sorrow-stricken hamlet. We found it hard to get away 
from the place of \veeping where we tarried for several days. 

Magistrate S , of C , came on a mission of investigation, 

and finding it to be a case of pure carelessness, forbade the 
young man using a gun for five years. This is by no means a 
solitaiy case of death emanating from the careless use of fire- 
arms in this Colony. Too often has death resulted from indis- 
cretion, and gloom and sadness been self-inflicted that could 
easily have been avoided. 

How many homes in St. John's and immediate neighbour- 
hoods will be still ei ing this Christmas time through the victims 
of the traffic in strong drink during the past year ? If a " Merry 
Christmas" cannot be secured without the social glass, that 
brings ruin and rrrsery and domestic infelicity and sorrow, then 
we will change the expression, and wish the readers of THE 
NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY A Very Happy Christmas. 





" I care not, I, to fish in seas 

Fresh rivers best my mind do please, 

Whose sweet calm course I contemplate, 
And seek in life to imitate." 

The Angler's Song. 



THE MIDDLE POOL, UPPER SALMONIER RIVER. 



14 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 

neiofoundland postal Spstcm. 



By Wm. Campbell. 




tHE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY has recorded in its 
pages many interesting truths concerning matters of 
public interest, therefore a few facts respecting the 
much abused Postal System will, I am sure, interest 
its readers. My connection with the Post Office hardly 
numbers a score of years, but from its records I have 
been able to compare its activities previous to my 
connection with it. 

History records that in 1805, just a century ago, the first 
Post Office was established in Newfoundland. Its operations 
at first were of course insignificant, and until the system of 
handling mail matter was modernized by Inspector Hawkins 
from Ottawa much unnecessary work was performed by the 
officials. There were no Travelling Post Office ill those days; 
letters from harbor to harbor passed through the place where 
addressed on their way to St. John's, where the sealed bags 
from the different Post. Offices were opened and the contents 
assorted, and later returned to their destination. To have a 
letter recorded or registered was a very great undertaking and 
necessitated much entering of address on forms of different 
coloured papers, fastening with wax and sealing. Money Orders 
were unknown, and all Parcels came as freight. There being 
no house to house delivery of mail matter the work of the staff 
at the old Post Office must have been manifold, and the many 
anxious and persistent enquiries for letters that never came did 
not tend to the answer being " the soft word which turneth away 
wrath." 

The opening of the Railway line to Harbor Grace and the 
placing of mail clerks on that line, and on the Coastal Steamers 
North, West and Labrador, who transacted the business of a 
Post Office, in specially fitted compartments, enabled letters to 
be sent and answered from place to place without having to come 
into St. John's. The registering of letters was made a much 
less difficult undertaking, and the inauguration of the Money 
Order and Parcel Post branches were great helps to the suc- 
cessful transaction of business by post. 

There being, until recently, no Banks outside St. John's the 
transmission of money from place to place was only possible by 
means of the Registration and Money Order System, and up to 
the present, with a few exceptions, the Outport Post Offices con- 
duct the whole financial business of the community. 

Of the two million letters handled by the Post Office Depart- 
ment last year, a very small percentage of them were reported 
as delayed or lost, and the fact that those missing may have 
been lost or delayed before receipt at or delivery from the Post 
Office seems not to occur to the critics of post office methods. 

There is now more mail matter landed by the steamer Bruce 
at Port-aux-Basques, per trip, three times each week that is 
two days mail than arrived once a fortnight twelve years ago 
when brought from Halifax to St. John's by the Red Cross line 
steamers. Only the mail matter for St. John's and its suburbs, 
about one-tenth of the whole, reaches the General Post Office ; 
the remainder being despatched from Bruce and Train by the 
Mail Clerks en route. A constant stream of mail bags are thrust 
out from the mail cars to the intermediate offices, and to Bay 
and Coastal Steamers from each of the Express Trains from 
Port-aux-Basques. The St. John's city letters and papers are 
also assorted into sections, so' that reasserting of them by the 
staff at the General Post Office is not necessary. Carriers for 
the extreme East or West sections of the city, fo'r instance, may 
obtain the bundle of letters and papers for the ward served by 
them at once as it comes into the office from the train with the 
number of his district marked upon the wrapper. The clerk in 
the General Post Office tabled off to attend to the placing of 
mail matter into the section of rented mail boxes, situated on 
the East, West or Central side of the office, may at once obtain 
the mail matter for his section, which also comes into the office 
divided and labelled with the number of the box section served 



by him. In this way there is no delay, and less than half an hour 
after arrival of trains the box holders may obtain all of their 
letters, and in half an hour their newspapers. This is a record 
that any post office may well feel proud of. The mail from trains 
and steamers coming into the cities in Canada and the United 
States go into the offices unassorted, there to be sub-divided, 
and thereby delayed for hours before being ready for delivery. 
Time was in St. John's when letters placed into boxes remained 
there uncalled for for days, but competition in trade is now so 
great that messengers from the same firm cross one other on the 
way to the General Post Office for their letters. 

The Registered Letters also are recorded by the Railway 
Mail Clerks; three copies, by carbon, of the addresses of those 
for St. John's being made out, one copy being retained by the 
clerk, the second being for the St. John's office, and the third is 
the form of receipt presented for signature with the letter It is 
not unusual for the clerks to have five and six hundred such 
letters each trip, many of them being packages of money. If 
you think it is easy to make the necessary entries for these, try 
writing when next you take a trip by lail and be convinced. 

The unpaid or short prepaid matter which come frequently 
from the United States causes much delay in carriers delivery, 
as the amount of money to be collected on each has to be com- 
puted and charged to the carrier responsible for its delivery. 
This also is a matter which the Canadian and American offices 
have not to the same extent to contend with. The Universal 
Penny Postage scheme will be the cure for this. 

It has so often been stated that many registered letters are 
lost during transit that it would seem to be for some reason that 
an effert to discredit the Registration, of letters was purposely 
made, the loss of an unregistered letter, alleged to have been 
mailed, being mad.e to appear to have been a registered letter. 
The fact that out of over one hundred thousand registered letters 
handled by the Newfoundland Post Office officials last year two 
only were lost the amount of contents being made good by the 
Department should go far to alleviate the minds of any who 
may have doubts of its safety. More than half of the above 
large number of registered articles were really packages of coin. 

The advantages of the Money Order System are very largely 
availed of by the great number of our people who leave New- 
foundland for Canada and the United States for parts of each 
year. 

By the courtesy of the Canadian Post Office Department and 
the Bank of Montreal, the services of the Postmaster at Sydney, 
and of the branch of the Bank at the same place has been put 
at the disposal of the Post Office of Newfoundland, and the 
advices of all Money Orders issued in American and Canadian 
cities for places in Newfoundland are sent to the Post Master 
at Sydtvey who obtains from the Bank there the necessary funds 
and sends it by Registered mail direct to the offices on which 
the orders are drawn. Thousands of dollars from our roving 
population, who spend many days of each year away from home, 
is transmitted in this way, and the work performed by the Post 
Master at Sydney, for the benefit of our people is well worth 
the $50 allowed him by the Government. To appreciate the 
present system, however, we have to' contrast it with the former 
method, when the money to pay an order issued at Sydney or 
New York would have to be sent from St. John's, necessitating 
a delay of weeks after the orders themselves had reached the 
owners, but which the Post Mister was unable to cash until he 
later received the money from St. John's. 

With a few exceptions people in the outports are compelled 
to use the Post Office to transmit money to the Banks or else- 
where, therefore the establishing of a Postal Savings Bank 
Branch will be one of the earliest improvements in the service 
that may be expected. In no part of the world is there greater 
need of Savings Banks than in Newfoundland. Our people are 
blessed at certain seasons with abundance, but the many alluring 
devices to obtain their money increases day by day. The news- 
papers which reach them are full of "get rich quick" ads., and 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



15 



the records of the Dead Letter Branch show that many dollars 
sent to Foreign firms must be lost for ever to the senders, as 
only a small proportion of those sent can be discovered in time. 
Many are returned to the senders when it is ascertained that 
the addressees are conducting a fraudulent business. 

The Parcel Post mails are weighty with patent medicines, 
ordered by healthy people convinced of illness, and for which 
they have expended their, hard earned dollars, hence the need 
of establishing Postal Savings Banks in every settlement to care 
for the surplus earnings of our people. Many of the Outport 
Post Offices have been made Telegraph Offices, and with the 
Savings Bank Branch added, and later the long distance Tele- 
phone connection, we may consider ourselves up-to-date. 

There is no branch of the Civil Service that so comes into 
contact with all classes of the community as the Post Office. 
Any improvement in its methods, or increase of its facilities, is 
for the benefit of all. and judging from the past it has a great 
future for usefulness ahead of it. 

There are many who think that the European mails for North 
America will soon cross Newfoundland by rail and through the 
Gulf by tunnel. Possibly, later, mails will be forwarded by 
air ships. The reindeer will take the place of the dog for haul- 
ing mails in winter, and the motor car will take the place of the 
old mail waggon. Free house to house delivery of mail matter