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Full text of "ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA, 1925, v.6"

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T V DOMINION OF CANADA 



ANNUAL 

DEPARTMENTAL 

REPORTS 

1924-25 



VOL. VI 





OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1937 



NOTE 



This edition of the annual reports of the various departments of the Govern- 
ment of the Dominion of Canada is intended to meet the needs of institutions, 
chiefly in the nature of Legislative and University Libraries, which in past 
years had received copies of these reports under the title of "Sessional Papers," 
represented by several cloth-bound volumes of approximately equal bulk, the 
number of reports to a volume being determined by the size of the respective 
reports. The House of Commons in 1925 ceased to order annual departmental 
reports to be printed as Sessional Papers and the annual reports of 1923-24 are 
therefore the latest appearing under that title. In the present issue of these 
reports the same general form and appearance have been preserved as when they 
appeared as "Sessional Papers." The number printed is limited and particulars 
as to the selling price of the set of several volumes may be obtained from the 
King's Printer, Ottawa. 



ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 



VOLUME I 

Auditor General, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925 — Vol. I, Parts "a" to "d" 
and Vol. IT, Parts A to N. 

VOLUME II 

Auditor General, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925— VoL III, Parts to ZZ 

VOLUME III 

Public Accounts, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Customs and Excise; Department of, containing accounts of Revenue with statements 
relative to the Imports, Exports, and Excise of the Dominion of Canada, for the fiscal 
year ended March 31, 1925. 

Shipping Report (Customs and Excise), containing the Statements of Navigation aad 
Shipping for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Trade and Commerce; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Weights and Measures, Electricity and Gas Inspection Services (Trade and Com- 
merce), for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Commissioner of Patents and Copyrights, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Dominion Statistician (Trade and Commerce), for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
1925. 

Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada (Trade and Commerce), for the crop 
year ended August 31, 1925. 

Interior; Department of the, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 



Immigration and Colonization; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 
Indian Affairs; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

VOLUME IV 

Trade of Canada (Imports for Consuraption and Exports), for the fiscal year ended March 
31, 1925. 

VOLUME V 

Mines; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1926. 

Agriculture; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1926. 

National Defence; Department of, (Militia and Air Service), for the fiscal year ended 
March 31, 1925. 

National Defence; Department of, (Naval Service), for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1926. 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1926. 

Health; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Superintendent of Penitentiaries, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, for the year ended September 30, 1926. 

Secretary of State; Department of the, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

VOLUME VI 

Civil Service Commission, for the calendar year ended December 31, 1925. 

External Affairs ; Department of the Secretary of State for, for the fiscal year ended March 
31, 1925. 

Labour; Department of the, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1926. 

Public Printing and Stationery; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1926* 

Marine and Fisheries (Marine); Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Marine and Fisheries (Fisheries); Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Post Office; Department of the, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Public Works; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

VOLUME VII 

Railways and Canals; Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada, for the calendar year ended December 31, 1925. 

Chief Electoral Officer (Fifteenth General Election), 1925. 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 
OF CANADA 



FOR THE YEAR 1925 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1926 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Vimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the Domin- 
ion of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency: 

The undersigned has the honour to lay before Your Excellency the accom- 
panying report of the Civil Service Commission of Canada for the year ending 
December 31, 1925. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST LAPOINTE, 

Secretary of State. 

Ottawa, May 11, 1926. 



May 11, 1926. 



The Hon. Ernest Lapointe, LL.B., K.C. 

Secretary of State of Canada. 



Sir, — In conformity with the provisions of section 36 of the Civil Service 
Act, 1918 (as amended by chapter 10 of the Statutes of 1919, Second Session), 
I have the honour to submit herewith a report of the proceedings of the Civil 
Service Commission of Canada for the year ending December 31, 1925. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM FORAN, 

Secretary, 



15215— A} 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Report of the Commissioners v 

An Acknowledgment (being a roster of the names of those who served on 

boards of examiners for special examinations) xii 

APPENDICES 

A. Memorandum re reorganization of Government Departments or 

Branches xv 

B. Tables— 

1. Permanent Appointments 3 

2. Postmasters 48 

3. Number of Appointments to Permanent, Seasonal and Tem- 

porary Positions 53 

4. Promotions 54 

5. Transfers 88 



IV 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 

In compliance with the requirements of section 36 of the Civil Service Act, 
the Civil Service Commissioners submit their Seventeenth Annual Report, 
covering the transactions and affairs of the Commission for the calendar year 
1925. 

Examinations 

During the year the Commission examined the qualifications of upwards of 
18,000 persons, an increase of about 4,000 candidates over the previous calendar 
year. Nineteen hundred individual examinations were held. 

Appointments, Promotions, and Transfers 

Action is required to be taken by the Civil Service Commission on requis- 
itions from the departments for appointments, promotions, and transfers, and 
all appointments, promotions, and transfers are the direct result of requisitions 
for the same received from the departments. 

The tables in appendix "B" show that during the year 2,379 appointments 
of a permanent character were made, including 307 rural postmasters; 174 
seasonal employees, and 36 permanencies under P.C. 2958; while 2,928 assign- 
ments of temporary employees were also made. Tables 1 and 2 indicate the 
departments to which appointments were made, classes and salary ranges, 
appointees with overseas active service, disabled war veterans, and widows of 
overseas men entitled to preference under section 39 (3) of the Civil Service Act. 
Other tables give particulars as to the promotions and transfers effected within 
the same period; 1,437 certificates having been issued for promotion and 243 
certificates for transfers. 

It should be observed here that notwithstanding frequent statements to the 
contrary no appointments are made and no person is assigned to any position 
in a department except upon the specific request of the deputy minister. Further- 
more, promotions are based largely upon comparative ratings of the candidates, 
furnished by the departments. 

Order in Cojncil P.C. 2958, as Amended 

Since December 16, 1920, when Order in Council P.C. 2958, recommended 
by the deputy ministers and the Civil Service Commissioners, was passed, 
approving of the permanency of certain employees in the public service, whose 
appointment had no statutory authoritv, two amending Orders in Council, 
P.C. 3560 of October 3, 1921, and P.C. ^3895 of October 22, 1921, have been 
passed. 

The original Order in Council was passed under Section 11 of the Civil 
Service Act primarily for the purpose of giving permanent status to a number of 
temporary employees who had been employed continuously for a considerable 
period in positions of a permanent character and had acquired valuable experi- 
ence in the service. Besides persons taken on without examination throughout 
the departments at Ottawa during the war who had become well trained and 
efficient employees, there were also employees in what had hitherto been called 
the Outside Service, who had been appointed by ministerial authority and had 
held their positions for a number of years — some for twenty years and upwards — 
but for whose appointment there was no statutory authority. 

In order to regularize these appointments and to fix the permanent estab- 
lishment of the several departments with as little disturbance to the personnel 
as possi])le, it was deemed advisable by the deputy ministers and the Civil 



vi CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Service Commissioners to provide by regulations under section 11 of the Civil 
Service Act, for the permanent appointment without formal examination, of 
such temporary employees occupying positions of a permanent nature, as were 
certified by the departments to be giving satisfactory service and who had been 
assigned to their positions prior to November 10, 1919, subject to the pro- 
visions outlined in the Order in Council of December 16, 1920. Permanent 
status could be effected in this way, but only upon the recommendation of the 
deputy minister and the minister of the department concerned and approval by 
His Excellency the Governor General in Council. 

The two amendments passed later modified the regulations so that it became 
possible to effect the permanency of those employees who, while not occupying 
the same position since prior to November 10, 1919, had been occupying positions 
of a permanent nature. Also with certain provisos, the original Order in Council 
was made to apply to all services with the exception of the Income Tax Office 
which is exempted from the Civil Service Act. As a result of the operations 
carried on under these Orders in Council (commonly called blanketing orders) 
4,179 employees have been made permanent, divided as follows: — overseas 
active service men, 1,216; male civilians, 1,669; and women, 1,294. 

As this Order in Council has now been in effect more than six years, and 
during 1925 only thirty-six cases were dealt with thereunder, there is no doubt 
in the minds of the Commissioners that the purpose for which it was passed has 
been fully attained. As employees to benefit under the authority referred to 
must have been occupying positions, of a permanent nature, since prior to Nov- 
ember 10, 1919, it will be observed that ample time has been afforded depart- 
ments to recommend them for permanency, had they so desired. The Com- 
missioners entertaining the above views deemed it advisable that the Order in 
Council should be rescinded. A recommendation to this effect was transmitted 
to Council in August, 1924, but up to date no action has been taken thereon. 

Separations 

During the year 1,481 separations from the pubhc service were effected. 
Of these, 1,088 were from permanent positions, 86 from seasonal, and 307 from 
postmasterships. In 1924 separations proper totalled 1,444, but in addition to 
these there were 995 employees retired under the PubUc Service Retirement 
Act, a special measure by means of which the service was cleared of its old and 
worn out employees who were not under any superannuation law. The above 
figures indicate that the usual flow of separations has continued, being almost 
identical for the last two years. 

Superannuation 

Under the Civil Service Superannuation Act, 1924, section 9 (1), the Civil 
Service Commission is required to report as to whether or not the granting of a 
superannuation or retiring allowance will be in the public interest. Between 
July 19, 1924, the date the Act came into effect, and December 31, 1925, the 
Civil Service Commission approved of retirements with annuities in 157 cases. 

Rural Post Office Employees 

Chapter 36, 15-16 George V, an Act to amend the Civil Service Act, 1918, 
respecting certain Post Office employees, passed by Parliament last session, 
remedied an anomalous situation so far as postal employees in a rural post office 
being brought under the Civil Service Act are concerned, but a difficulty con- 
tinues to exist in the matter of promoting assistant postmasters in revenue offices. 
If it be the pleasure of Parliament the Civil Service Act might be amended to 
authorize the promotion of well qualified and efficient assistant postmasters in 
revenue offices to the position of postmaster, as being in the public interest. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS vii 

Classification 

The Commission has endeavoured to reduce the number of investigations 
into the duties of individual positions and to devote more time to surveys of 
branches and divisions as a whole, in order to ensure a more uniform classification 
and to obtain accurate information regarding each position in the unit as a 
guide to future reappraisals. In this endeavour, the Commission is pleased to 
be able to report a considerable measure of co-operation from departments, but 
the number of cases submitted by some departments for individual consideration 
is still far too high. Without particularizing the Commissioners are constrained 
to say that some departments submit to them almost any request of an employee 
no matter how unreasonable. Fully thirty per cent of these cases should be 
negatived in the department. As each case, regardless of its merits, demands 
the same routine in the Civil Service Commission, the waste of time involved is 
an increasingly serious matter. The Commission's investigational staff, al- 
though somewhat reduced in the interests of economy, can handle expeditiously 
the normal flow of legitimate classification work and in addition can undertake 
a certain amount of reorganization, but the flood of groundless demands for 
consideration of individual cases causes unnecessary delay, and in the interest 
of legitimate business must be suppressed. 

As an example the following may be cited. Of thirty cases submitted by a 
department for reappraisal, it was found on investigation that only five merited 
a higher classification, while the deputy minister opposed the rejection of one 
case only. This example also indicates the economy which results from the 
close scrutiny by the Civil Service Commission of all requests, either for re- 
classifications of old positions or for classifications of new posts. 

The Commissioners beheve that the remedy for this attempted misuse of 
classification is the creation of a fixed establishment for every department in the 
service. With the duties of all positions clearly defined there would be less 
likelihood of unreasonable demands being made. 

The Commission has continued to reduce and combine classes. During the 
revision of clerical salaries some sixty classes were replaced by four general 
grades. The total number of classes has been reduced from 2,536 to 1,935, and 
further reduction will be made as opportunities occur. 

A Book of Classification was published during the year, setting forth classes 
of positions and rates of compensation for each class, revised to July 1, 1925. 

Salary Revision 

By Order in Council dated March 29, 1924 (P.C. 530), the Commission was 
directed to undertake a revision of salaries of the civil service. In December 
following the schedules of the field services of the Post Office Department and 
the Department of Customs and Excise were approved and applied. During the 
early part of 1925 the revision was completed, and the Commission's recom- 
mendations approved and made operative by Order in Council of May 6. The 
provisions of this Order have been applied to all positions affected except in a 
few isolated instances. The essential feature of the revision has been the absorp- 
tion of the cost of living bonus previously granted to the lower paid classes in a 
series of salary ranges, which the Civil Service Commission believes to be equit- 
able. 

Opportunity was taken to effect certain adjustments, shown by the experi- 
ence of the past five years to be necessary, in the general and stenographic 
classes. 

Order in Council P.C. 1644 was passed on September 14, 1925, reading as 
follows : — 

"The Committee of the Privy Council have had before them a report, dated September 11, 
1925, from the Honourable Charles Murphy, Postmaster General, submitting, on behalf of the 
Sub-Committee of Council which met the representatives of the postal employees on June 4, 1925, 



viii CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

and heard their objections to the salary schedules as finally revised by the Ci\il Service Com- 
mission, a verbatim report of the proceedings at the interview mentioned. 

"The minister recommends that the said report be forwarded to the Civil Service Com- 
mission, with the view of having that body make an upward revision of the salaries in question, 
in the light of the representations made by the representatives of the postal employees at the 
said interview, and in accordance with the attached summary, which reflects the opinion and 
confirms the judgment of the Post Office Department as embodied in the salary schedules sub- 
mitted to the Civil Service Commission in 1924. 

"The minister represents, that having regard to the fact that the salary schedules for the 
entire Civil Service are co-ordinated, it will naturally follow that the representations made on 
behalf of the clerical service by the Civil Service Association of Ottawa which have been received 
since the date of the interview above mentioned, will be considered by the Civil Service Com- 
mission in conjunction with such action as the Commission may take in regard to the salaries of 
the postal employees. 

"The minister further recommends that these additional representations be also forwarded 
to the Civil Service Commission so that a comprehensive decision that will apply to the entire 
Civil Service may be reached at the earliest possible date. 

"The Committee concur in the foregoing and submit the same for Your Excellency's ap- 
proval." 

The Commission at present is preparing a report on further salary revision. 

Organization 

Surveys of a number of branches of departments have been made either 
in the course of reorganization or for the purpose of providing a set estabhsh- 
ment. As pointed out above, one of the chief values of an establishment is as a 
basis for all future revisions in classification and organization. With a set 
establishment in which the duties of each position are clearly defined any change 
in the same may be readily detected, and it has been found where such establish- 
ments exist that the work in connection with personnel has been appreciably 
reduced and simplified both for the department and the Commission. 

In addition to several smaller organizations, establishments have been set 
up for: — 

Post Office Department: 

(a) Revenue Division, Financial Branch. 
(h) Postal Note Division, Financial Branch. 
(c) Savings Bank Division, Financial Branch. 

Customs and Excise: 

(a) Inspection Branch. 

(b) Headquarters. 

Interior: 

(a) Topographical Survey. 
(h) Dominion Parks Branch. 

Immigration and Colonization: 

(a) Offices in the United Kingdom and Europe. 

(b) Western Division. 

(c) Juvenile Immigration Branch. 

(d) Stenographic Pool. 

(e) Eastern Division, Headquarters Staff. 

(f) Women's Division. 

Indian Affairs: 

(a) Indian Commissioner's Office at Regina. 

National Defence: 

(a) Caretakers, Stationary Engineers (revision). 

(b) Chief of Staff Branch, Historical Section, 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



IX 



The following table shows some of the reductions in staff and pay-roll costs 
by reorganization. In most cases these reorganizations were carried on in co- 
operation with the responsible departmental officers: — 

(o) Number of positions prior to reorganization. 

(b) Number of positions on new establishment. 

(c) Number of positions eliminated. 

(d) Approximate annual saving. 



Department 


Branch or Division 


(a) 


(b) 


(c) 


id) 


Post Office 


Postal Note 


64 

43 

439 

284 

97 

184 


48 

34 

431 

202 

82 
150 


16 
9 
8 
82 
15 
34 


$ 

13,050 




Savings Sank 


9,330 


Customs and Excise 


Headquarters 


10,000 


Interior ... 


Topographical Survey 

Dominion Parks 


198,000 




18,000 


Immigration and Colonization 


United Kingdom and Europe. 


37,690 



Future Organization 

The Civil Service Commission has consistently urged a strong program of 
general reorganizations for the Civil Service of Canada. The efforts of some 
departments and their branches to estabhsh themselves as self contained units, 
have resulted in a multiplication of highly paid supervisory positions with a full 
complement of specialists and duplication of expensive equipment. 

In 1924 the Commission in its report to the Special Committee of the 
Senate to inquire into the Civil Service, submitted a number of suggestions for 
consideration which were commented upon favourably. This memorandum is 
reprinted as appendix "A," being indicative of some possible measures of re- 
organization worthy of serious consideration. 

It is submitted that if the Commission were to receive the necessary measure 
of support, not only could large economies be effected but the general condition 
of the service would be improved. 



Observance of the Civil Service Act and Regulations 

Section 4 (h) of the Civil Service Act places upon the Commission the duty 
of reporting "upon the violation of any of the provisions of this Act, or of any 
of the regulations made thereunder." The Commissioners have pleasure in 
reporting that there has been a steady improvement in the observance of the 
law and the regulations arid a marked development in the co-operation existing 
between the Commission and the several departments. The Commission, 
however, regards it as a duty to call attention to the following instances in 
which, in the opinion of the Commissioners, the spirit and principle of the Civil 
Service Act have not been as fully upheld as might be possible. 

Delays in installation of appointees. 

In certain cases the persons who have been selected and certified by the 
Commission in accordance with the provisions of the Act for appointment to 
vacant positions, have not been installed in these positions by the departments, 
without what appears to the Commissioners to be undue delay. In some cases, 
no steps have yet been taken to install in office the candidates who have for 
months past been certified therefor, but persons placed in office by a department 
have been retained, for whose employment no legal authority exists. While 
departmental conditions in exceptional circumstances may render immediate 
action in such cases inadvisable, the Commissioners are of opinion that when 
reasonable latitude in this regard has been allowed, the persons who have been 
selected and certified as required by Section 43 of the Civil Service Act, should be 
installed in ofiice by the departments concerned without further delay. 



X CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Acting Appointments. 

The Commissioners have found upon receiving requisitions for the 
fining of many positions, both by promotion from within the service, and by 
open competition from without, that the positions in question have sometimes 
for months been occupied by incumbents who have been placed therein by the 
department in an acting capacity. Subsequently this temporary appointee has 
an unfair advantage over other competitors for the promotion or permanent 
appointment. To overcome this favouritism, requisitions for filling vacancies 
should be forwarded to the Commission as soon as it becomes apparent in a 
department that a position will soon require to be filled so that when the incum- 
bent retires the new appointee would be ready to take over the duties of office. 

Delays in Promotions. 

The Commissioners have been in receipt of many complaints from members 
of the service and others regarding the delay which takes place in connection 
with promotional competitions in certain departments. In the great majority 
of such cases it has been found that the delay occasioned has been due to the 
failure of the department interested to supply the Commission, with reasonable 
expedition, with the necessary reports upon the qualifications, efficiency, and 
fitness of the candidates concerned. Promotions are based largely upon the 
departmental reports on the qualifications of applicants, and the Commissioners 
believe that if these reports were furnished by the departments with the least 
possible delay, the result would be a better morale amongst employees and 
improvement generally in the public service. 

It is not the purpose of the Commission to refer specifically to any depart- 
ment in this report, though should the practices alluded to above be continued, 
it may be necessary to deal with them specifically upon a future occasion. 

Rejections. 

Section 13 of the Act provides a probationary period in connection with 
appointments, during which the appointee if found unsatisfactory, may be 
rejected by the department concerned. This provision of the law, has been 
observed mainly in a spirit of fairness and justice, but in some cases, in the 
opinion of the Commissioners, a reasonable opportunity has not been afforded 
those assigned to demonstrate their qualifications for the positions in question. 
It may be noted that out of 2,379 appointments to permanent positions made 
during the year, less than 1.5 per cent were rejected under this section of the 
law — an indication of the suitability for their posts of those selected and assigned 
by the Civil Service Commission. 

Ministerial and Departmental Authority. 

From observations made in the public press and otherwise it is apparent 
that an impression prevails that the Civil Service Act has removed the min- 
isterial and departmental authority which is necessary for the proper control 
and discipline of the staff. For this reason it seems desirable to quote the 
following sections of the Civil Service Act: — 

"Section 28 (1). Subject to the provisions of Section 3 of this Act, nothing herein contained 
shall impair the power of the Governor in Council to remove or dismiss any deputy head, officer, 
clerk or employee, but no such deputy head, officer, clerk or employee, whose appointment is of a 
permanent nature, shall be removed from office except by authority of the Governor in Coimcil." 



"Section 29 (1). The head of a department, and in his absence the deputy head, may — 

(a) suspend from the performance of his duty any officer, clerk or employee guilty of mis- 
conduct or negligence in the performance of his duties; 

(b) remove such suspension." 



"Section 42 (1). The classes of positions, including the several rates of compensation in the 
classification of the Civil Service of Canada signed by the Commission and dated the first day 
of October, one thousand nine hundred and nineteen, and submitted to Parliament, are hereby 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS xi 

ratified and confirmed, and the Civil Service shall, as far as practicable, be classified in accord- 
ance therewith. Provided, however, that the statement of duties given in defining the class in 
the said classification shall not affect the powers or duties of any employee under any statute, 
or the power of a head of a department or a deputy head to control and direct the work of any 
employee under such head or deputy head." 

Full ministerial and departmental authority is therefore provided by the 
Civil Service Act for the control of the personnel of the service. It is desirable 
also to stress that no addition to the personnel of the Civil Service and no 
change in status of any employee is made except upon the requisition of the 
department concerned. 

Reduction of Commission's Staff 

During the year there has been a reduction of ten in the staff of the Com- 
mission, which at present comprises one hundred and fifteen permanent em- 
ployees. 

As in former years the Commission has been assisted in its examinations by 
the services of scientific, professional and business men outside the government 
departments, as well as by departmental officers. To these gentlemen whose 
names are given on page xii, the Commission expresses its appreciation. In the 
majority of cases they served as members of advisory examining boards without 
remuneration of any kind, and through their active interest the application of 
the merit system has been facilitated. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

W. J. ROCHE, 

Chairman. 

M. G. LaROCHELLE, 
CLARENCE JAMESON, 

Commissioners. 

March 3, 1926. 



Xii CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The Civil Service Commission desires to express its grateful appreciation 
to the gentlemen mentioned below who have willingly, and often at personal 
inconvenience, rendered valuable service by acting as advisory examiners in a 
number of the special competitions held under the direction of the Commission. 

A. J. Ames, Managing Director, Instruments Limited, Ottawa. 

R. M. Anderson, Division of Biology, Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

Honourable Mr. Justice Audette, Judge of the Exchequer Court of Canada, Ottawa. 

J. A. Baillie, Agent, Mergenthaler Linotype Machines, Ottawa. 

G. D. Barrowman, Custodian and Adjustor of Surveys Equipment, Geological Surveys Branch, 

Department of Mines, Ottawa. 
A. F. Barss, Associate Professor of Horticulture, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. 

B.C. 
Dr. J. S. Bates, Chemical Engineer, Bathurst Company, Limited, Bathurst, N.B. 
J. C. Berard, former Linotype Machinist, Department of PubUc Printing and Stationery, 

Ottawa. 
Colonel O. M. Biggar, K.C, Chief Electoral Officer, Ottawa. 
G. L. Blatch, Chartered Accountant, Ottawa. 
Elie Bourbeatj, Inspector General of Cheese and Butter Factories, Department of Agriculture, 

of the Province of Quebec, St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 
J. W. Brant, Accountant, National Live Stock Records, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. 
O. F. Bryant, Laurentide Company, Grand Mere, P.Q. 
K. M. Cameron, Chief Engineer, Department of Public Works, Ottawa. 
P. G. C. Campbell, Professor of Romance Languages, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont. 
S. G. Carlyle, Live Stock Commissioner, Alberta Department of Agriculture, Edmonton, Alta. 
John M. Casey, Statistician, Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

H. R. Christie, Forestry Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. 
Dr. D. A. Clark, Assistant Deputy Minister of Health, Ottawa. 
H. H. Claxjdet, Consulting Mining Engineer, Ottawa. 
W. Davey, Assistant Manager, Mortimer Company, Limited, Ottawa. 
N. B. Davis, Geologist, M. J. O'Brien, Limited, Ottawa. 
G. J. Desbarats, Deputy Minister of National Defence, Ottawa. 
A. Dickison, Supervisor of Drafting, Department of Mines, Ottawa. 
S. P. DuMARESQ, Architect, Halifax, N.S. 

Commander C. P. Edwards, Director of Radio, Department of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa. 
George Edwards, Chartered Accountant, Toronto, Ont. 
R. B. Faith, Editor, Ottawa Valley Journal, Ottawa. 

E. M. Finn, Photographer, Publicity Branch, Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa. 
G. A. Gaudry, Chief Map Draughtsman, Department of the Interior, Ottawa. 

R. E. Gilmore, Superintendent Fuel Testing Laboratory, Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

R. Harcourt, Professor of Chemistry, Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Ont. 

Angus Hay, District Representative of the British Columbia Department of Agriculture at 

Cranbrook, B.C. 
Dr. J. J. Heagerty, Chief, Division of Venereal Diseases, Department of Health, Ottawa. 
R. K. Hicks, Associate Professor of French, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont. 
Clifton D. Howe, Dean of the Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. 
Dr. D. Jenness, Ethnologist, Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

F. M. G. Johnson, Professor of Chemistry, McGill University, Montreal, P.Q. 

A. B. Lambe, Engineer, Dominion Power Board, Department of the Interior, Ottawa. 
H. M. Lancaster, Chief Analyst, Department of Health, Ottawa. 

C. Leavitt, Chief, Fire Inspection, Board of Railway Commissioners, Ottawa. 
Reverend Father Leopold, Director, Institut Agricole d'Oka, Oka, P.Q. 

F. C. C. Lynch, Superintendent, Natural Resouces Intelligence Branch, Department of the 
Interior, Ottawa. 

D. A. MacKay, Ottawa Collegiate Institute, Ottawa. 

A. C. Mackenzie, Engineer of Maintenance, Canadian Pacific Railways, Montreal, P.Q. 
George Maheux, Entomologist, Department of Agriculture of the Province of Quebec, Quebec, 

Dr. M. O. Malte, Chief Botanist, National Herbarium, Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

P. March AND, Financial Controller, Accounts Branch, Department of the Interior, Ottawa. 

N. Marr, Dominion Water Power Branch, Department of the Interior, Ottawa. 

H. Martin, The Lowe-Martin Company, Ottawa. 

M. T. Mason, Assistant Chief Engineer, Canadian National Railways, Montreal, P.Q. 

J. MoRELAND, Windermere, B.C. 

B. E. Parry, Architect, Department of Health, Ottawa. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS xiii 

E. J. Pearce, formerly Pressman and Assistant Foreman, Department of Public Printing and 

Stationery, Ottawa. 
John Powis, Photographer, Ottawa. 

Dr. J. W. Robertson, formerly Commissioner of Agriculture and Dairying for Canada, Ottawa. 
J. P. Sackville, Professor of Animal Husbandry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man. 
Dr. D. C. Scott, Deputy Superintendent General of Indian Affairs, Ottawa. 
Fred C. Smith, Bridge and Structural Engineer, Department of Public Works, Ottawa. 
I. R. Strome, Senior Assistant Engineer, Dominion Water Power Branch, Department of the 

Interior, Ottawa. 
Dr. J. M. SwAiNE, Chief, Division of Forest Insects, Entomological Branch, Department of 

Agricultvu"e, Ottawa. 
P. A. Taverner, Ornithologist, Department of Mines, Ottawa. 
Wade Toole, Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Ont. 
John M. Trueman, Professor of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, Agricultural College, 

Truro, N.S. 
J. A. Webster, President Canadian Silver Fox Breeders' Association, Summerside, P.E.I. 
G. W. Wood, Professor of Animal Husbandry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man 
L. A. Zufelt, Superintendent, Eastern Dairy School, Kingston, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS XV 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



APPENDIX "A" 



Memorandum regarding the Reorganization of 
Government Departments 



XVI CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



INDEX 

Page 

1. Housing xvii 

2. Engineering and Scientific Service • xx 

3. Accounting Service xxii 

4. Piu"chasing Service xxii 

5. Multigraphing and Duplicating Service xxiii 

6. Translating Service xxiii 

7. Photostat, Blue-Printing, Photo-Lithographic and Photographic Service xxiv 

8. Income Tax Service .- xxv 

9. Telegraph, Signal and Radio Service xxv 

10. Surveys Branches xxv 

11. Government Publications xxvi 

12. Parliamentary Post Offices xxvi 

13. Departments of Secretary of State and External Affairs xxvii 

14. Book Bindery xxvii 

15. Lands Branches (Interior) xxvii 

16. Filing Systems and Office Services (Interior) xxvii 

17. Accounting Services (National Defence) xxviii 

18. Legal Officers xxviii 

19. Engineering Services (Marine and Fisheries) xxix 

20. Customs and Excise Statistics xxix 

21. Standardization of Paper xxx 

22. Departmental Libraries xxx 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER xvii 



MEMORANDUM 

REORGANIZATION OF GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS 
OR BRANCHES 

In the following notes, an attempt has been made to indicate in brief some of 
the more obvious possibilities of reducing the cost of civil administration at 
Ottawa. Several schemes, the practicability of which is still doubtful, have 
been omitted. 

The figures quoted, while as accurate as circumstances permit, are primarily 
intended as guides only. The maintenance of sufficiently detailed statistical 
records to enable such statements to be produced, would entail the employment 
of a considerable staff, an expense which the Commission is not, at present, 
prepared to incur. They may, however, be taken as sufficiently correct for the 
purpose. 

1. 

Housing. 

While the accommodation of departmental staffs is not a matter for which 
the Civil Service Commission is responsible, the question is so closely related to 
organization that it is given the first place in this report. The necessity for the 
serious consideration of the housing problem is, it is submitted, of the utmost 
urgency. 

There are, in Ottawa, twelve main office blocks, owned by the Federal 
Government, and occupied by its employees: — 

Federal Buildings — Occupied by — 

East Block Justice Department 

External Affairs 

Privy Council 

Finance Department 

Auditor General 

Governor General's Secretary 
West Block Trade and Commerce 

Railways and Canals 

Secretary of State 

Public Works — Laboratory 

Agriculture — Several Branches 
Langevin Block Post Office Department 

Interior 

Agriculture 

Patents and Copyrights 
Hunter Building Public Works Department 

Civil Service Commission 

Marine and Fisheries 

Connaught Building Customs Department 

Archives Building Archives 

Printing Bureau Building Public Printing and Stationery 

Geodetic Building Interior — Geodetic Survey 

Observatory Interior — Astronomical Branch 

Royal Victoria Museum Mines Department 

National Gallery 

Mines Building (Sussex St.) Mines Department 

Post Office Building Ottawa f ost Office 

In addition to these there were, in March, 1924, some fifty-three buildings, 
leased, either in whole or in part, for the accommodation of departments, at a 
gross rental which exceeded $680,000. Details are given below. 

15215— B 



XVlll 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



BUILDINGS LEASED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, OTTAWA, 

(MARCH, 1924) 



Building 



Rental 

per 
annum 



Occupied by- 



Branch 



Marine Signal. 

Castle 

Peerless 

Vimy 

Earlscourt .... 



Jarman 
Lamb. . 



Kent and Sparks St. 
204 Wellington St.... 

Old Free Press 

Motor 

Journal 

Stephen 

Jackson 

Lowe-Martin 

Bryson 

Trafalgar 



Carling 

Slater and Sherwood. 

Martin 

172 Wellington 



Norlite 

Booth 

Regal 

MacKenzie 

Queen and Metcalf St. 
Royal Bank 



Birks 

Nagle 

Union Bank. . . 

Robinson 

64-68 Queen St 
Elgin 



Elgin Annex 

Elgin Cottage. . 
Reclamation. . . 
47 Slater St. . . . 

O.A.A.C 

Woods 

Canadian 

Bate 

Central Station 
Transportation. 



12,580 00 
3,400 00 

13,000 00 
3,500 00 

1,560 00 
2,660 00 

6,116 76 

600 00 

7, 600 00 

15,393 00 
9,328 54 
7,500 00 

32,145 75 
6,000 00 
9,240 00 

16,880 60 

15,000 00 
11,000 00 

5,500 00 
1,140 00 

30,000 00 
17,319 75 
16,500 00 
16,000 00 
1,000 00 
15,050 25 



8,097 39 

2,560 00 
67,110 70 



15,200 00 

6,801 96 
23,000 00 



6,993 92 

1,835 70 

5,858 40 

2,750 00 

8,227 33 

37,412 11 

53,313 39 

16,000 00 

21,356 00 

35,600 00 



National Defence. 

National Defence 

National Defence 

Interior 

Interior, Trade and Com- 
me^rce. 

Trade and Commerce 

Trade and Commerce. . 

Health 

National Defence 

Trade and Commerce 

Mines 

Interior 

Interior 

Interior 

Immigration 

National Defence 

Interior 

Interior 

Purchasing Commission 

Interior — vacant 

Justice 



Immigration. 
Justice 



Interior 

Indian Affairs 

Labour 

Post Office 

Agriculture 

External Affairs 

Interior 

Justice 

Railways and Canals 

Trade and Commerce 

Vacant. 

Agriculture 

Railways and Canals 

Justice 

Immigration 

Interior 

Post Office 

Mines 

Vacant. 

Agriculture 

Canadian Patriotic Fund 

Customs 

Health 

National Defence 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establish 
ment. 

Customs 

Immigration 

National Defence 

Interior 

Agriculture 

National Defence 

National Defence 

National Defence 

Finance 

Railway Commission 

Auditor General 

Agriculture 

Interior 



Justice. 
Vacant. 



Ordnance. 
Medical Stores. 
Registration. 
.Stationery and Supplies. 

Patents. 
Patents 

Weights and Measures. 
Foods and Drugs Laboratory. 
Garage. 

Gas and Electricity. 
Mincralogical Museum. 
Natural Resources. 
Forestry. 

Stationery and Supplies. 
Administrative. 
Operations and Intelligence. 
Dominion Parks. 
Revenue and I3\penditure. 
Administrative. 
School and Ordnance. 
Royal Canadian Mounted 

Police. 
Exhibition. 
Royal Canadian Mounted 

Police Stores. 
Lands. 

Administrative. 
Administrative. 
Equipment and Supplies. 
Publications. 
Passport. 

Advisory Technical Board. 
Purchasing. 
Highways. 
Patents. 

Entomological. 

Rideau Canal. 

Penitentiaries. 

Soldiers' Settlement. 

Legal. 

Money Order, etc. 

Translators. 

National Live Stock Records. 

Administrative. 

Collector. 

Administrative. 

Signal Service. 

Federal Appeal Board. 

Express. 

S. S. B. Supplies. 

Air Service. 

Reclamation. 

Dairy and Cold Storage. 

Local Units. 

Headquarters. 

Administrative. 

Commissioner of Taxation. 

Administrative. 

Publications. 

North West Territories and 

Interior Boundary. 
Technical Adviser. 
To be given up under new 

lease. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



XHC 



BUILDINGS LEASED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, OTTAWA, 

(MARCH, \%2A)— Concluded 



Building 


Rental 

per 
annum 


Occupied by 


Branch 


Plaza 


$ 

18,023 53 

7,225 00 

12,832 00 

24,200 00 
11,500 00 

2,448 00 
2,390 00 
1,680 00 


Finance 


Insurance. 




Interior 


British Columbia Lands. 


113 Rideau St. ... 


Soldiers' Civil Re-establish- 
ment. 
Vacant 


Units. 

Vacated by Royal Canadian 


Larocque . . . . 


Justice 


Mounted Police. 
Royal Canadian Mounted 


New Labelle 


Interior 


Police. 
Surveyor General. 


Old Labelle. ... 


Interior 


Surveys. 




Marine and Fisheries 


Stationery and Supplies. 




National Defence 


Records. 


Labelle Garage 


Labour 


Public Printing and Stationery 


105 Murray St 


Labour 


paper stores. 
Public Printing and Stationery 


Goulden 


Archives 


Storage. 
Historical Publications. 


140 Argyle Ave 


Justice Department. 
Justice Department. 




Exhibition Grounds. . 












Total 


678,430 00 









From the foregoing table, the extent of decentraUzation is apparent. For 
example, elements of the Department of the Interior occupy sixteen rented 
and two Government-owned buildings at a rental of over $150,000; while the 
Department of National Defence occupies ten (some of which, however, are for 
storage only), at a cost of more than $130,000. 

In some cases, the situation of a branch is determined by the nature of its 
work; the Dominion Observatory or the Experimental Farm, for instance, could 
not very well be located in the city ; in others, the locality is of minor importance, 
dependent perhaps only on accessibility to the general public, or on proximity 
to the Parliament Buildings. 

There is no doubt that the scattering of branches of departments over a 
comparatively large area multiplies the cost of adniinistration. This condition 
is due partly to the rapid expansion which has taken place during the last ten 
years, and partly, no doubt, to the reluctance of some departments to move in 
order that others might be better accommodated; it is with the effect, however, 
rather than the cause, that the Commission is concerned. The decentralization 
has led to the creation of separate divisions for the usual office services — steno- 
graphy, typing, filing, etc.— as well as for such work as drafting and photo- 
graphy; and in at least one department has necessitated the provision of an 
expensive motor delivery service for files and mail. 

Without entering into a detailed criticism of the accommodation which has 
been secured, it should be said that many of the buildings are scarcely suited 
for their present purpose. An office building, to be efficient, should contain 
enough large rooms to hold junior employees, whose work cannot be properly 
supervised if they are segregated into small groups; a few individual offices for 
personnel, the nature of whose occupation demands quiet or privacy ; some pro- 
vision for a rest-room for female employees (which, apart from any other con- 
sideration, reduces absence on sick-leave very materially) ; and a general layout 
which will enable work to be routed with a minimum loss of time or motion. 
Very few of the buildings occupied by departmental staffs fulfil these require- 
ments. 

Several of the proposals outlined in the succeeding paragraphs are dependent, 
to a greater or less extent on some improvement in the housing situation; and 

15215— Bji 



XX CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

this quite apart from the question of the desirabiUty of spending annually a 
sum which represents the interest at 5 per cent on more than thirteen and a 
half million dollars on rented accommodation, a great deal of which is of only 
indifferent quality. 

2. 

Establishment of an Engineering snd Scientific Service. 

At the present time the Engineering and Scientific Services are divided 
among some several departments, notably the following: — 

Public Works; 

Railways and Canals; 

Interior; 

Marine and Fisheries; 

Mines. 

The work of some of the branches of these departments is such that they 
are inter-related with the work of some of the branches of other departments. 
In many cases a single function is divided between branches of two departments, 
an outstanding instance being topographical surveying, a considerable amount 
of which is done by the Topographical Survey, Department of the Interior, and 
by the Geological Survey, Department of Mines. The Geological Survey has 
carried on primary triangulation, a function assigned to the Geodetic Survey. 
This has, no doubt, arisen through the Geological Survey finding it necessary 
to establish reference points when it was not possible for the Geodetic Survey 
to do the work without seriously interfering with its own carefully prepared 
program of work. Even though a reorganization of each department were made, 
and the functions of each branch carefully delineated for the time being, it is 
considered that any inter-departmental co-ordinating agency, such as the 
present Surveys Board, would probably work to the best advantage under 
the direction of a single head. This would have the twofold result of controlling 
functions as between branches and provide the machinery for the large amount 
of co-operation between technical branches necessary to the most efficient 
promotion of such work, which co-operation is now dependent upon the accident 
of mutual good-feeling and absence of professional jealousy between the heads 
of branches. 

For these reasons, and for the further reason that it is believed that econ- 
omies in staff and material can be effected by amalgamation, plans for an 
organization to include all scientific and engineering services, except those 
relating to agriculture and the promotion of the public health, have been pre- 
pared. 

A proposed organization plan has been drawn up for an Engineering Service 
comprising the following major units or branches: — 

Secretary ; 

Surveys ; 

Design, Construction and Maintenance; 

Resources Development; 

Physical Science Investigations; 

Natural Science Investigations; 

Mining and Chemical Investigations. 

(1) The Secretary's Branch is to consist of the clerical, accounting, store- 
keeping and purchasing staffs. 

(2) The Surveys Branch would consist of four branches consolidated out of 
the various survey units in the different departments. A move towards the 
consolidation of survey branches has recently been made by placing the survey 
branches of the Department of the Interior under one head, the present Sur- 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS XXI 

veyor General. To make this survey organization complete, the following 
units should be combined with it if all surveying is to be properly planned and 
carried out under one head: — 

Topographical Survey Section of the Geological Survey; 

Topographical Branch, Department of National Defence; 

Surveys Branch, Department of Indian Affairs; 

A small number of employees. Department of Public Works; 

Hydrographic Survey, Department of Marine; 

Tidal and Current Survey, Department of Marine; 

A number of employees of the Dominion Water Power Branch, Department 
of the Interior, on stream measurement and watershed investigations. 
See also sections (10) and (19). 

(3) The Design, Construction and Maintenance Branch would consist of 
three major branches, as follows: — 

Chief Engineer; 
Chief Architect; 
Superintendent of Operation. 

The branch would assume the work of thje following departments or units : — 

Public Works; 

Railways and Canals, excepting Railways and Board of Railway Com- 
missioners ; 

Engineering and Construction work. Marine and Fisheries; 

Part of the work of the Dominion Water Power Branch in maintaining 
irrigation and reclamation works. 

(4) Resources Development Branch. This branch would consist of the 
present services where the work is of a scientific or technical character for the 
purpose of conserving or developing natural resources and supplying information 
to the public or interested parties in connection therewith. 

This branch would consist of the following units: — 
Water Power and Hydro-Electric Development; 
Natural Resources Intelligence; 
Forestry ; 
Dominion Parks. 

The Water Power and Hydro-Electric Branch would consist of the 
present Water Power Branch, excepting the staff engaged on Reclamation 
and Irrigation transferred to the Design, Construction and Maintenance Branch. 
The Natural Resources Intelligence, and the Forestry Branch would consist of 
the present branches. In the case of the Forestry Branch, which has a consider- 
able number of employees outside Ottawa, it might be practicable to effect 
economies by administering field staffs through the district offices of the Design, 
Construction and Maintenance Branch. 

(5) Physical Science Investigation. This branch would consist of the 
Dominion Astrononiical Observatory, the Dominion Astrophysical Obervatory 
of the Department of the Interior, and the Meteorological Service of the Depart- 
ment of Marine and Fisheries. 

(6) Natural Science Investigation. This branch would consist of the present 
Geological Survey minus the Topographical Survey work now carried on which 
is to be placed under the Surveyor General. 

(7) Mining and Chemical Investigation. This branch would consist of the 
Mines Branch of the Department of Mines. 

The incorporation in the proposed organization of the Water Power Branch, 
the Natural Resources Intelligence, the Forestry Branch, the Observatories, 



xxii CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Meteorological Service, the Geological Survey and the Mines Branch does not 
present any difficulties requiring elaborate explanation, as the branches would 
be transferred practically intact. The nucleus of the proposed Surveys Branch 
already exists and at the present monient is capable of taking over all surveying 
in the Government service (except coastal and inland water surveys) by assign- 
ing the required additional employees to the staff. 

The creation of the new branch, Design, Construction and Maintenance, 
requires, however, the bringing together of three or four existing Dominion-wide 
organizations with both technical and administrative duties. 

Note. — The above covers very briefly the scope of a proposed Engineering 
Service. An ultimate saving in personnel and overhead can only be conjectured: 
one estimate places it as high as $1,000,000 per annum, but while the Com- 
mission is not prepared, in the absence of more detailed information, to guarantee 
this figure, it is certain that the reduction in cost would be very considerable 
indeed, involving as it does, amalgamations which will reduce overhead costs 
of administration and supervision to an absolute minimum. 

3. 

The Provision of a Central Accounting Service for all Government Departments. 

The accounting problems which confront the various departments, especially 
those which are not revenue-producing, are basically similar; an appropriation 
is provided against which expenditures are charged, and in most cases, a great 
deal of that expenditure is made on account of salaries and wages. 

Whether a central service could take charge of all government accounting is 
a problem which has not yet been thoroughly worked out, but there is no doubt 
that the payment of salaries, except perhaps for casual labour, could be central- 
ized with advantage and economy. If such a large organization as the Depart- 
ment of Customs and Excise can, without difficulty, pay its employees by 
cheque from the head office, there does not appear to be any reason why the 
principle should not be capable of a broader application. 

It is estimated that in the larger departments there are upwards of 70 
employees, at an aggregate salary of $85,000, fully engaged in the payment of 
salaries. To this must be added the services of part-time employees, both in 
and outside Ottawa. 

The advantages of such an amalgamation, besides the saving in salaries, 
which might amount to as much as 15 per cent, would be: — 

1. A pre-audit of pay-lists. 

2. The introduction of mechanical methods for the preparation of pay- 

lists and the writing of cheques. 

3. Uniformity in the interpretation of the regulations affecting pay. 

If this scheme were put into effect, it is considered probable that it would 
pave the way to further centralization. 



The Provision of a Central Purchasing Service for all Government Departments. 

There has been considerable difference of opinion on the question of central- 
ized purchasing, but the principle has the support of several of the largest 
business concerns in the Dominion, as well as of a number of states in the United 
States, in which it has been adopted with marked saving in public money. 

The purchasing of stationery and office furniture are already centralized 
in the Printing Bureau and Department of Public Works respectively, but 
thirteen other departments maintain a separate purchasing branch for general 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS xxiii 

and special supplies. These staffs comprise some hundred and twelve employees, 
at an annual cost of over $80,000. The Government Contracts Supervision Com- 
mittee employs, in addition, 11 at $19,840. The largest purchasing branches 
are found in the Department of National Defence, the Printing Bureau, the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, the Public Works Department, 
and the Department of Marine and Fisheries, which vary from 25 to 12 em- 
ployees. Smaller departments, such as Mines, employ two or more. The 
larger departments mentioned purchase supplies to the extent of well over 
$1,000,000 annually. 

In general, the routine of these branches and the problems encountered are 
very similar, and the Commission is of the opinion that the following benefits 
would result from the establishment of a central purchasing service, containing 
a more highly specialized staff of buyers: — 

1. A considerable reduction in staff and salaries. 

2. A substantial reduction in the cost of supplies and equipment (rendered 

possible by bulk purchasing) . 

3. Better deliveries. 

4. Better control. 

No details of saving can be furnished at present, but it would be quite safe 
to put the reduction in staff at not less than 15 per cent to 20 per cent. 



The Provision of a Central Multigraphing and Duplicating Service. 

Hitherto, owing to the absence of any control, departments have purchased 
duplicating machines, e.g., multigraphs and mimeographs, independently, with 
the result that a comparatively large quantity of this equipment is now lying 
idle and is deteriorating. 

At present there are about thirty multigraphs and seventy mimeographs 
scattered through the various departments, and of these, eleven multigraphs 
are reported as being in disuse. The staff employed to run these machines is 
over 50, and their cost in salaries more than $60,000. This does not include the 
part-time services of typists who cut stencils. 

The objection to each department having a printing press of its own holds 
good, to a modified extent, in this case. It is very convenient to have a multi- 
graph within easy reach, but unless it and its operator are engaged full-time, there 
is a waste of time and money in proportion to the period of slackness. 

There is no reason why a central multigraph and mimeograph unit should 
not be formed at some central point. It is easier, in a large organization, to 
eliminate slack periods, for there is usually work which can be done at leisure. 
Rush work could be performed much more quickly as it would be possible to 
utilize several machines instead of one or two. 

The success of this arrangement would depend, very largely, on the prompt 
filUng of requisitions, but this matter of administration could be successfully 
handled by a competent chief. 

The saving in staff and equipment should be material, perhaps 20 per cent 
in the former case; but this cannot be determined until a detailed survey of 
requirements has been made. 

6. 

The Provision of a Central Translating Service. 

Most departments have a small but expensive translating staff, not only 
to handle French correspondence but also departmental publications and general 
translation. 



XXIV 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



The total number of translators (exclusive of the Senate and House of 
Commons staffs) is 50, and the annual cost $111,000. The following table gives 
details : — 



Department 



Number 

of 

employees 



Total 
salary 



Agriculture 

Archives 

Customs and Excise 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Health 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Interior ' 

Labour 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

National Defence 

Patents and Copyrights 

Post Office.. 

Privy Council 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Trade and Commerce 



13,711 
3,300 
2,940 
2,190 
2,880 
3,300 
1,560 
2,880 

16,771 
6,000 
8,460 
5,820 
6,180 
2,280 

11,680 
3,660 
7,980 
2,280 
6,630 



50 



110,502 



Stenographic help is additional to this figure, but is not less than S25,000. 

As an argument in favour of a central translation branch, the case of the 
Department of the Interior may be cited. Prior to April, 1923, the translators 
were allocated to various branches, but on the reorganization of the Secretary's 
Branch they were combined into a division and this centralization has proved 
satisfactory. There remain, with the other branches, of course, bilingual steno- 
graphers, who handle ordinary correspondence. 

The work performed by the Department of the Interior is varied in nature 
and if a central translation division works satisfactorily in this case the applica- 
tion of the principle to the whole service at Ottawa seems only logical. This 
central unit would handle translation other than departmental correspondence, 
which would be performed by bilingual stenographers. 

Under proper organization, there would be a saving, not only by the elimin- 
ation of positions which would naturally become surplus on amalgamation, but 
also by reduction in the classification of others; for example, eleven head trans- 
lators would scarcely be required in the new branch. 

There is no reason why departments should not receive better service than 
at present, as rush work could be performed more quickly. 



7. 

The Provision of a Central Photostat, Blue-printing, Photo-lithographic and Photo- 
graphic Service. 

The total staff engaged in this work, exclusive of photo-hthography and 
motion picture photography, is 44, and costs annually about $57,000. Twelve 
separate divisions are maintained in eight different departments, the largest being 
in the Natural Resources Intelhgence Branch, Department of the Interior, the 
Pubhc Works Department, and the Department of Trade and Commerce. 
The distribution by duties is: — 

Photostat 6 $ 7, 500 

Blue-printing 8 8,500 

Still and other photography 30 41,000 

44 $57,000 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS xxv 

There is no doubt that the large number of units employed in this work, 
the cost of supervision, materials, etc., heighten its cost, and while it would not 
perhaps be advisable to include such plants as those of the Department of 
Public Archives and the Astronomical Branch, Department of the Interior, 
most of the divisions could be combined in order to reduce cost of administration 
and maintenance. 

The consideration of housing enters largely into this question, but failing 
the possibility of accommodating the entire photographic service in one building, 
at least sonie units, for example those in the Department of the Interior, could 
be combined. 

Photo-lithographic staffs are employed at the Printing Bureau, the Topo- 
graphical Surveys Branches of the Departments of the Interior, National 
Defence and Mines. Housing, again is a consideration, but the amalgamation 
of these units would be in the public interest, especially if the various surveys 
branches were combined, as discussed in paragraphs (2) and (10). 

A careful survey would have to be made, before any figures as to probable 
saving could be given, but amalgamations of large units seldom result in a 
reduction of less than 10 per cent to 15 per cent. 

8. 

The Amalgamation of the Income Tax Service with the Department of Customs 

and Excise. 

There are 1,284 employees in the Income Tax Service and 3,950 in the 
Customs Excise Service, a total of 5,234, with an annual pay-roll of approxi- 
mately $8,000,000. 

There are good reasons why the Income Tax Service should be combined 
with the Department of Customs and Excise, as was done with the Department 
of Inland Revenue in 1921. 

The organization maintained by the Department of Customs and Excise 
for the collection of taxes is widespread and capable, with the addition of the 
necessary personnel, of absorbing the work performed by the Income Tax Service. 

There would, of course, be a considerable saving in expenditure on salaries, 
as well as in office accommodation, if this amalgamation were put into effect; 
it is not possible to estimate the exact reduction, but it would be very material. 

Note. — This suggestion has now been acted upon. 

Public Works Telegraphs Service, Department of Marine Signal Service, and 

Radio-Telegraph Branch. 

The Department of Marine has a signal service for reporting boats on the 
St. Lawrence. The service extends from Father Point to Montreal, and is also 
used for general departmental work. 

This department also has charge of radio-telegraph work, and maintains 
numerous radio stations in different parts of Canada. 

Consideration might be given to the possibility of transferring these units 
to the Canadian National Railways, where there is a complete telegraphs organ- 
ization. 

10. 
Amalgamation of Surveys Branches. 

The Commission is now in communication with the Minister of the Interior 
and Mines with a view to the amalgamation of the Topographical and Drafting 
Branches of these departments. Should this prove practicable (and the Com- 
mission is strongly of the opinion that such a step would be in the public interest) , 
the Minister of National Defence will be approached on the subject, as his 
department also carries out topographical surveys. 



XXVI CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

The respective strengths and approximate costs of the three branches are : — 

Interior 240 $525, 000 

Mines 31 80,000 

National Defence (civil staff only) 23 40,000 

Total 294 $645, 000 

(These figures include the drafting staff, but not temporary field employees 
such as rodmen, chainmen, etc.) 

The saving due to amalgamation, which should be very large, would be 
accomplished by. — 

1. Reduction in the number of highly paid supervisory positions. 

2. Pooling of office services, not only of stenographers, typists and filing 

personnel, but also of the office engineering and drafting staffs. 

The Director General of Surveys (Dr. E. Deville) has expressed himself 
in favour of this amalgamation. 

The Question of amalgamating Militia surveys with those of Interior and 
Mines would require some working out, as the branch is used extensively for the 
training of military personnel. Details, however, could probably be arranged 
to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

If the proposals made in paragraph (2) are put into effect, the amalgamated 
topographical branches would naturally form a part of the major organization. 
See para. (2), section (2). 

11. 

Distribution of Government Publications. 

Under the present organization, the Department of Public Printing and 
Stationery distributes certain government publications, the House of Commons 
staff distributes a large volume of sessional papers while Parliament is sitting, 
and most departments maintain a staff for the distribution of books and pamph- 
lets w^hich concern their own work. 

It should be possible to centralize this activity, preferably at the Printing 
Bureau, in the following manner: — 

1. Sessional Papers. These could be distributed to senators and members 

by a staff detailed for duty by the Bureau, and to others from the main 
Distribution Office. During recess all distribution could be made from 
the main office. 

2. Departmental Publications. These, with the exception of a few copies 

retained by the unit concerned for emergencies, could be distributed 
from the main office. Departments would be responsible for the pro- 
vision and maintenance of their mailing lists. Single orders could 
be filled by requisition. 

It is estimated that the Printing Bureau could handle the sessional dis- 
tribution at a saving of more than $6,000 on the present arrangement. The 
House staff of four could be eliminated, and it is more than likely that the 
distribution staff at the Bureau (at present 29, with a cost of nearly $35,000), 
could, by careful reorganization, be reduced as well, as it appears to be in excess 
of requirements for its present duties. 

The saving effected by the centralization of departmental distribution 
should be considerable, but no estimate is possible until a thorough survey has 
been made. The introduction of up-to-date mechanical appliances would 
probably play a large part in the reduction of cost. 

12. 

Parliamentary Post Offices. 

The provision of employees to handle the Senate and House of Commons 
Post Offices appears to be somewhat in excess of requirements. The permanent 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS xxvii 

staffs are two and four respectively, and the annual cost about $10,000, to 
which must be added the services of some fifteen sessional personnel. 

While it is essential that the service should be excellent, the volume of work 
during recess scarcely seems to warrant the size of the staff retained. 

As an alternative it is suggested that the Post Office Department be re- 
quired to furnish sessional help as required, and that one clerk only be retained 
in each office when Parliament is not sitting. These, with the help of the 
messenger service, should be sufficient to handle the reduced amount of corres- 
pondence, and the services of the remaining personnel utilized if necessary by 
transfer to the Postal Service. 

13. 

Possible Amalgamation of the Departments of the Secretary of State and External 

Affairs. 

This, of course, is a matter for Parliament, and it may be that there 
are adequate reasons for the maintenance of two separate organizations. 

Some saving, however, could be effected by amalgamation, chiefly by the 
elimination of supervisory positions and the pooling of office services. 

14. 

Transfer of Book-bindery work to the Department of Public Printing and Stationery. 

The small bindery units employed in the Natural Resources Intelligence 
Branch, the Astronomical Branch, and the Lands Patents Branch, of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior, might be transferred to the Printing Bureau. There does 
not seem to be any reason why these branches should have a separate division 
of this kind more than any other which sends its books and documents to the 
Bureau to be bound. 

On the other hand, the binderies in the Library of Parliament and Depart- 
ment of Public Archives are better as they are at present, as the work is more 
highly specialized, and the risk of damaging a valuable work is not worth the 
trifling saving to be gained by centralization. 

15. 

Amalgamation of Lands Branches, Department of the Interior. 

As the organization exists at present the following seven branches deal 
with Dominion lands: — Dominion Lands, School Lands, Lands Patents, Ord- 
nance, Admiralty and Railway Lands, Timber and Grazing Lands, British 
Columbia Lands, and Mining Lands. The strength of these branches averages 
48, varying from 11 (British Columbia Lands), to 82 (Dominion Lands); the 
total staff is 337, and the approximate annual cost $490,000. 

An attempt is now being made by the department to amalgamate these 
branches under one administrative head, and the deputy minister has asked 
for the Commission's co-operation in this work. 

It is too early to estimate with any accuracy the probable saving which will 
result, but a considerable reduction can be made by the following: — 

1. The eUmination of several highly-paid supervisory positions. 

2. The pooling of all office services, e.g., stenography, typing and filing. 

3. The retirement of as many employees as are eligible, and the abolition 

of the positions thus vacated. 

16. 

The Centralization of Filing Systems and Office Services, Department of the Interior. 

Owing to very unsatisfactory housing conditions the Department of the 

Interior is scattered through eighteen different buildings. This necessitates 



XXVlll 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



the retention of a much larger staff of file clerks, stenographers and messengers 
than would be necessary were the department concentrated into one large building. 

There is a main registry for land files, but other branches are compelled 
to maintain a sub-registry; the total filing personnel is over 75, and costs in 
salaries more than $100,000, a figure which might be reduced considerably if all 
filing could be centralized. The advantage of a central registry is too obvious 
to require further comment. 

The department at Ottawa employs 250 stenographers of various grades 
whose annual salaries are approximately $300,000. This total, again, could be 
materially lessened as this type of labour lends itself readily to pooling, which is 
one of the best methods of keeping down the number of junior employees, and is 
already in use in some of the larger departments, e.g., Post Office. 

The saving in messenger service would be small, as the salaries are low, but 
the motor delivery service, which employs six chauffeurs (exclusive of the 
minister's) at about $7,500 per annum, might be done away with. 

17. 

The Consolidation of Accounting Services, Department of National Defence. 

In 1923-24 the pay and allowances of the Royal Canadian Army Pay Corps 
were $177,150 and the salaries of the Accounts Branch (exclusive of employees 
at the Naval Dockyards), $143,700; a total cost for accounting service of $320,- 
850, or of $2.50 for every $100 of appropriation. There were about 90 employees 
in each branch and 13 more at the Dockyards. 

With the reduction in the estimates for 1924-25 the percentage cost would 
approach $2.75 even though the salaries remained stationary, but the depart- 
ment proposses to increase the cost of its Accounts Branch by numerous upward 
revisions in classification and by the addition of new positions. 

The amalgamation of the Royal Canadian Army Pay Corps and the Accounts 
Branch would in no way lessen the efficiency of these units and would effect a 
considerable saving in administrative overhead and throughout the organization 
generally. The chiefs of both units have expressed themselves strongly in 
favour of the idea, the Director of Pay Services with the proviso that the Fax 
Corps should have the controlling interest, and the chief accountant on the 
assumption that the new organization would be essentially civil in character. 

As a corollary to amalgamation the present Audit Division might with 
advantage be taken over by the Auditor General to obviate the duplication of 
work which now takes place. 

18. 
The Transfer of all Legal Officers to the Department of Justice. 

There are at present in the service, exclusive of the Department of Justice, 
fifteen legal officers employed as departmental solicitors. The annual salaries 
for these officers total more than $56,000, exclusive of stenographic and clerical 
assistance which amount to about $25,000. The following table gives details : — 



Department 



Number 

of 

employees 



Total 
salaries 



Customs and Excise. . 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Indian Affairs 

Interior 

Marine and Fisheries . 

Post Office 

Public Works 

Railway Commission 
Railways and Canals. 
Secretary of State 



1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 

15 



3,480 
5,000 
4,020 
4,020 
10, 020 
3,240 
3,700 
7,260 
4,020 
5,000 
6,480 

56.240 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS xxix 

The Deputy Minister of Justice has verbally agreed with the suggestion 
that these legal officers should logically be placed under that department; and 
that this action would very probably result in economy. 

It seems more appropriate that the legal officers in the service should be 
controlled by the Department of Justice, and no doubt several positions would 
then be rendered surplus. 

The Department of Justice could allocate them to departments as necessary. 

One fault of the present system is that departmental solicitors may be 
required to do work of a clerical nature which might be performed by lower paid 
employees. 

19. 

The Consolidation of Engineering Services, Department of Marine and Fisheries. 

Prior to 1903, the Chief Engineer of the Department of Marine had responsi- 
ble charge of both the maintenance and the construction of aids to navigation, 
and also directed such work as the removal of wrecks and obstructions from 
navigable waters, tidal and current surveys, hydrographic surveys, and the 
construction and repairing of fish hatcheries. 

In that year, however, an Order in Council was passed, which removed the 
maintenance of aids to navigation from the control of the chief engineer, and 
appointed a commissioner of lights for this purpose. 

Since this Order was passed, the following have also been removed from 
the control of the chief engineer: Hydrographic Survey, Tidal and Current 
Survey, Dominion Steamers, Life-saving Service, and Fisheries Engineering, 
and today there are in the department the following branches, with expenditure 
as indicated, the officer in charge of which reports directly to the deputy 
minister : — 

(a) A Chief Engineer's Branch ($825,000 for engineering work). 

(b) A River St. Lawrence Ship Channel Branch ($600,000, plus $100,000 
to cover the cost of operation of a Marine Signal Service). 

(c) A Hydrographic Survey Branch ($300,000). 

(d) A Tidal and Current Survey Branch ($30,000). 

(e) A ship-building and repair plant with an operating cost of about 
$125,000. 

(f) A Fisheries Engineer's Office ($30,000). This officer reports to the 
Director of Fisheries. 

(g) A Dominion Steamers Branch ($1,500,000 for maintenance of and 
repairs to service steamers and ice-breakers). 

(h) A branch is also maintained for the purpose of administering the 
Steamboat Inspection Act ($120,000). A detailed study of this work 
might show the advisability of amalgamation. 

As the activities of the units mentioned above are fundamentally similar 
in their problems an^ in the type of labour engaged, they might, with advantage, 
be combined under one head. Such a change in organization should render 
possible a considerable reduction in the cost of administration, personnel, 
material, and gear. 

If, however, the proposals made in paragraph (2) are put into effect, the 
recommendations contained in this section must be modified accordingly. 

20. 
Customs and Excise Statistics. 

A staff of about 124, with salaries amounting to $187,000, is at present 
employed in the Customs Statistical Branch. 

The method of preparing statistics is by hand, which involves a very large 
amount of simple but laborious addition of items entered, also by hand, in 
ledgers. 



XXX CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

In other departments, e.g., the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the 
Department of Labour, these methods have been replaced by mechanical 
tabulation. The advantage is obvious. 

A detailed survey of this branch has already been made with a view to the 
introduction of mechanical methods. Besides a substantial reduction in the 
number of staff required, a lower salary scale could be paid if mechanical tabula- 
tion were introduced, as in this case the bulk of the work falls on card-punchers 
whose duties are purely mechanical, instead of on expensive Customs statistical 
clerks. 

Besides the financial saving, the mechanical system possesses the great 
advantage of flexibility, and is capable of presenting a given set of statistics in 
as many different forms as required at an infinitely higher rate of speed than 
could be accomplished by any known hand method. In this way, statistics 
bearing on new problems could at any time be quickly secured; a task which, 
under existing conditions, would necessitate a large expenditure of time and 
money. 

The financial saving may be estimated at $70,000 per annum. 

21. 

Standardization of Paper. 

The question of standardizing paper for government correspondence and 
forms, e.g. ledger-sheets, requisition forms, etc., does not directly concern the 
Civil Service Commission, except in so far as it forms part of the general pro- 
gram of economy. 

It is impossible not to notice the variations in the size and quality of sta- 
tionery used for similar purposes by different departments, and it is considered 
that a study of the requirements of the service would result in a reduction of 
expenditure. 

The United States Government has recently taken up this matter with 
considerable success. It is understood that, before the investigation, there were 
fifty different sizes of paper in stock, but that this number was reduced to seven, 
and that a bureau is no longer allowed to order-forms on "odd-size" paper, 
which results in waste during cutting. 

The following are some points which would have to be considered in any 
investigation : — 

1. The use of expensive paper, frequently embossed, for inter-departmental 

and inter-branch correspondence. 

2. The use of expensive linen-lined envelopes for other than foreign dis- 

patch. 

3. The use of odd-size forms which cause waste in cutting from standard- 

size sheets. 

4. The use of full-size sheets for letters or memoranda of a few lines only. 

5. The separate printing, for each department of stock forms such as 

requisitions, contract demands, memorandum pads, etc. 

6. The provision of unnecessary expensive stationery, e.g., a ledger, where a 

cheap index would have been sufficient. 

22. 

Consolidation of Departmental Libraries. 

Almost every department has a library which may vary from a few hundred 
books of reference to a large collection. 

This total number of employees now classified in one or other of the librarian 
classes is 40 and the annual cost in salaries $65,000. To this must be added a 
small amount, difficult to ascertain exactly, but probably not exceeding $5,000, 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS xxxi 

for the part-time services of typists and junior clerks. These figures do not 
include the Library of Parliament which does not appear susceptible to amal- 
gamation. Details follow: — 

Department — Number of Employees 

Agriculture 4 

Archives 1 

Civil Service Commission 2 

Health ' 1 

Interior 8 

Labour 3 

Marine and Fisheries 1 

Mines 6 

National Defence 3 

Post Office. 1 

Privy Council 1 

Railway Commission 1 

Research Council 1 

Secretary of State 1 

Supreme Court 4 

Trade and Commerce 2 

40 

The officers of the Commission have frequently remarked on the large 
number of reference books purchased, e.g., Year Books, Gazetteers, City Direct- 
ories, Revised Statutes ; and there seems to be no reason why a central reference 
library could not be established to contain such works as are not consulted 
frequently. For example, there are many sets of the Revised Statutes in the 
various departments, but it is quite safe to state that in comparatively few 
cases are they used so frequently that it would be a loss in efficiency if they 
were not within easy reach. 

The saving in staff, were a central reference library established, would be 
considerable, certainly not less than 15 per cent, and the saving by the restric- 
tion of indiscriminate purchasing of books would also be material. 

It would be necessary, of course, to make certain exceptions from this 
centralization, e.g., the Supreme Court Library and such technical libraries as 
that of the Department of National Defence. 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



APPENDIX "B" 



TABLES 



1. Permanent Appointments. 

2. Postmasters. 

3. Number of Appointments to Permanent, Seasonal, and 

Temporary positions. 

4. Promotions. 

5. Transfers. 



15215—1 



t;( 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act 

O.A.S. — "Overseas Active Service," — active service overseas in the military or naval forces of His 
Majesty or of the Allies of His Majesty during the recent war. 

§ Disability preference. 

**O.A.S. preference granted to widows under the provisions of Section 39 (3) of the Civil Service Act, 
1918, as amended by Chap. 22 of the Statutes of 1921. 

tPosition exempt, insofar as the principle of competition in appointment is concerned, from the operatioa 
of the Civil Service Act (8-9 Geo. V, Chap. 12, Section 38b, as amended). ' 

'Seasonal position. 

AGRICULTURE 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Trudeau, Mary M. 



Ardouin, M. I. Germaine A 

Moffit, Russel James §O.A.S. 



Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 



Millar, Ruth. 



Taylor, Garnet Stickney O.A.S 

Stewart, Amy Mildred 



Ellah, Joseph N O.A.S, 

Forward, Lorna McRae 

Craig, Clarence Marquis 



Bogart, Edna M 

Hutton, Hazel Mary F. 
Goudie, Elton Blake 



Clark, Mary Isabella. 



Ferns, Stanley J 

Cheeseman, Frederick William, 

IO.A.S 

Nagle, Mrs. Margaret M 

Young, Mary Jane 



Lamb, Mary Agnes , 

Scott, Gordon Alexander O^.S. 

Smith, George Ennis 



Lay inspector (pack 

ing plant) 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Fruit inspector 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Veterinary inspector 
Clerk-st«nographer 
Fruit and vegetable 

inspector 

Clerk-stenographer. . 

Fruit and vegetable 
inspector 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Poultry inspector. 

.Stock car inspector 

Junior clerk 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 



Assistant plant 
pathologist 

Animal nutritionist 
and geneticist.. 



Stewart, Sheila I. . . . 
Brissette, Emerilda. 

Newman, Arthur 



Library assistant. 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Assistant to super- 
intendent. Experi- 
mental Farm . . . 



Hyde, John Alexander O.A.S, 

Barrack, Anna , 

Goulden, Cyril H 

Lockhart, Charles J 



Stock car inspector. 
Clerk-stenographer. 

Cereal specialist 

Farm foreman 



Kloot, Mrs. Isabella P. L. 
Chabot, Honorius 



Typist, grade 2. . , 
Assistant to superi- 
intendent. Experi- 
mental Farm . . , 



Yelle, Simon 

Clark, Victor Glen. 



Brown, Archibald M.. 
Charron, Alphonse T. 

16215— IJ 



..O.A.S, 



Dairy recorder and 

tester 

Insect pest or plant 
disease investiga- 
tor 



and 



and 



and 



and 



600 
600 

1,140 

600 
1,500 

600 

1,800 

960 

1,500 
960 
960 

1,500 

600 
1,440 

1,080 
600 

600 
600 

1,920 

2,220 
allowance 
960 

600 



1,500 
allowance 
1,080 

960 
2,400 
1,200 
allowance 

960 



1,500 
allowance 

1,080 



Assistant deputy 
minister 



1,080 
1,080 

4,500 



1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 

•5- 1-25 

17-11-24 
♦10-11-24 

16-11-24 
4-12-24 
8- 2-25 

*14- 1-25 

13-12-24 

1-12-24 

* 5- 1-25 

1- 1-25 
1- 3-25 

6-12-24 
13- 1-25 

1- 1-25 
1- 3-25 

1- 2-25 



1- 4-25 
11- 4- 25 



8 4-25 



IC- 3-25 
5- 3-25 
1- 4-25 
8-5-25 

7-4-25 
1- 1-25 



4- 5-25 
1-11-24 



*19- 5-25 
*18- 5-25 



11- 5-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Toronto, Ont. 

Sherbrooke, Que. 
Wellington, Ont. 

Charlottetown, P.E.I; 
Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Calgary, Alta. 

Kitchener, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Calgary, Alta. 

Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Saskatoon, Sask. 



Prince Edward Island. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Lennoxville, P,Q. 



Lethbridge, Alta. 

Toronto, Ont. 
Prairie Provinces. 

Kentville, N.S. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Cap Rouge, P,Q. 
Quebec, P.Q. 



Edmonton, Alta. 
Manitoba. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



4 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

AGRICULTURE— Continued 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Peine, Carlisle R 

Williamson, Alice 

Blackmer, Lilly Grace. 

Droeske, Ena 

Walker, John 



O.A.S, 



Clerk, grade 1 

Stenographer, Gr, 2 

Clerk, grade 2 

Stenographer, Gr. 1 
Assistant to superin- 
tendent. Experi- 
mental Farm . . . 



Rainey, Winnifred E. 
Rankin, John Alex. . . 



Stenographer, Gr. 1 
Poultryman 



Dionne, Raoul 

Roach, Lewis H §O.A.S 

MacKenzie, Charles F 



Bourbonnais, Joseph. 



O'Keefe, Rose Mary Violet. 
Elliott, Revillow 



Bonrgeau, Yvonne J 

Spicer, Annetta 

Webber, Alfred Edward... .§O.A.S 



Russell, Ralph Clifford. 
Castner, John Brooks.. . 



Sheep promoter — 
Stock car inspector 
District live stock 

promoter 

Dairy recorder and 

tester 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Dairy produce grad- 
er 

Stenographer, Gr .1 . 

Lay inspector (pack- 
ing plant) 

Assistant plant 
pathologist 

Fruit and vegetable 
inspector 



and 
and 



Alexander, William . . . . 
Welsh, John Nicholas. 
MacDougall, W. G 



...O.A.S 



Poultryman 

Cerealist 

Assistant to superin- 
tendent Experi- 
mental Farm 



McManus, James A. 



P6pin, Joseph Auguste. 
Hartley, Oscar B 

Buffam, Alfred 



.O.A.S, 



Paterson, James Sharp. 
White, Oliver Henry J. 

Rouse, Gilbert 

Bacon, Marie L. Flore., 

Turner, Lilian G 

Roper, Frank H , 

Haslam, Robert J 

Crossgrove, Robert F., 



.O.A.S 



Chester, Herbert O.A.S 



Fleming, William Melvin 

Henderson, Arthur E O.A,S 



Taillefer, J. L. Omer 
Bailey, Winnifred M. 
Newton, Margaret. . . 
Jutras, Lucien 



Dairy produce grad 



Supervising analyst 
Dairy produce grad- 



dairy 



Inspector of 
products 

Head herdsman 

Assistant dairy pro- 
duce grader 

Farm foreman 

Stenographer, Gr. 1 . 
2. 

Herdsman 

Tobacco inspector... 

Insect pest or plant 
disease investi- 
gator. . 



Assistant to superin- 
tendent. Experi- 
mental Farm 



Fruit and vegetable 
inspector 



Stenographer, Gr. 3 

2, 

Plant pathologist... 

Herdsman 



720 
960 
960 
720 



1.500 
allowance 

720 
1,080 
allowance 
1,560 
1,140 

1,920 

1,140 
960 

2,400 
720 
720 

1,200 

1,920 

1,500 

960 
1,920 



1,500 
allowance 

2,400 
2,520 

2,400 

1,500 
1,200 

1,680 
1,200 

720 

960 

960 
1,680 



1,200 



1,500 
and allowance 

1,500 
and allowance 

1,500 



1,260 
960 

2,400 
960 



and 



6- 5-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 6-25 
6- 5-25 



8- 6-25 
28- 5-25 

1- 4-25 

1- 8-24 

15- 6-25 

6- 7-25 

8- 7-25 
18- 5-25 

23- 6-25 
4- 6-25 
8- 6-25 

8- 7-25 

27- 7-25 

* Season 
1925 
1- 8-25 
6- 8-25 



1- 8-25 

15- 6-25 
21- 1-25 

9- 7-25 

20- 6-25 
29- 6-25 

26- 6-25 

1- 6-25 

2- 7-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 8-25 

11- 8-25 



* Season 
1925 



15- 8-25 
1- 8-25 



*20- 7-25 



1- 8-25 
28- 7-25 
24- 8-25 

1- 5-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Brandon, Man. 
Fredericton, N.B. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Indian Head, Sask. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Fredericton, N.B. 

Quebec. 

Moose Jaw, Sask. 

Ontario. 



Winnipeg, Man. 



Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Toronto, Ont. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 



Vernon, B.C. 
Invermere, B.C. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Lennoxville, P.Q. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Quebec, Que. 

Montreal, P.Q. 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Kapuskasing, Ont. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Brandon, Man. 
Cap Rouge, P.Q. 
Kentville, N.S. 
Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Ontario. 



Invermere, B.C. 
Summerland, B.C. 



Okanagan Centre 
Winfield, Oyama 
District, B.C. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Edmonton, Alta. 

Saskatoon, Sask. 

LaFerme, P.Q. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 5 

Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

AGRICULTURE— ConcZi«ied 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Pringle. Frank S §O.A.S 

Richardson, Lila V 

Bamett, Harry §O.A.S 

Sweeney, Joseph Roj' 

O'Neill, John A §O.A.S 

Culham, Muriel 

Fleet, William T O.A.S 

James, Elizabeth A 

Watson, Edith Jean 

Haw, Bessie 

Overholt, Percy M 

Graham, Walter L 

Johnson, Thorvaldur 

Hurlbert, Gladys B 

Craigie, John Hubert O.A.S 

Sanford, Guthrie B 

Allaway, C. Marjorie 

Lawrence, Mary Louisa 

Richards, Albert Edward. ..O.A.S 

Buckingham, Ernest H §O.A.S 



Lay inspector (pack- 
ing plant) 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Inspector of dairy 
products 

Dairy produce grad- 



Messenger 

Seed analyst 

Fruit and vegetable 
inspector 

Stenographer, Gr. 1. 

Seed analyst 

Clerk, grade 1 

Seed and feed in- 
spector 

Supervisor of cow 
testing 

Assistant plant path- 
ologist 

Clerk, grade 1 

Plant pathologist... . 

Seed analyst 



1,200 
960 

1,440 

2,400 

720 

1,080 

1,500 
720 

1,080 
720 



5 da 



Supervisor of illus- 
tration stations 

Seed and feed 
inspector 



Palmer, John Lemuel. . . 

Bond, Eric Warren 

Edge, Garth Alexander. 
Schurman, David C 



.O.A.S. 
.O.A.S. 



Fruit and vegetable 

inspector 

Veterinary inspector 

u 

Assistant to superin- 
tendent. Experi- 
mental Farm 



Heisler, Eva May . . 
Gordon, William L. 



Andrews, Robert Percy . 



.O.A.S 
.O.A.S, 



Walker, Alma Martha. 
Homer.- ham, Arthur S 
Kesten. Samuel Harris 
Donaldson, Marion E.. 

Brault, J. T. Lucien 

Turner, William Henry. . .§O.A.S 

Mallet, Edward W 

Malloy, Norah Catherine 

Stevenson, Clarence T 



Cossitt, Jean Marion. 
Woods, John Jex Jr. . . 



.O.A.S. 



.O.A.S. 



Stenographer, Gr. 1 

Assistant plant path- 
ologist 

Fruit and vegetable 
inspector 

Seed analyst 

Bee-keeper 

Veterinary inspector 

Stenographer, Gr. 1. 
2. 

Caretaker 

Senior egg inspector. 

Stenographer, Gr. 1. 

Fruit and vegetable 
inspector 

Stenographer, Gr. 1. 

Assistant to superin 
tendent, Experi 
mental Farm \ 



and 



Lefebvre, .John Gordon 

Tobin, Mary 

Thomas. Phyllis E 

Leaver, Katherine L 

Childs, Thomas O.A.S 

Thomson, William George 

Renaud, Regina 

Carter, Marj' Christina 



.Junior swine grader. 
Stenographer, Gr. 1 . 

Seed analyst 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 
Veterinary inspector 
Veterinary inspector 

Clerk, grade 2 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 



and 



1,920 

1,920 
720 
2,400 
2,400 
1,080 
1,080 

1,680 

1,800 



1.500 
1,800 
1,800 



1,500 
allowance 
720 

1,920 

1.500 
1,080 

960 
1,800 

720 

960 
1,080 
1,800 

720 

1,500 
720 



1,500 
allowance 
1,680 

720 
1,080 

960 
1,800 
1,800 

960 

960 



8- 7-25 
15- 9-25 

20- 1-25 

1- .5-25 

14- 5-25 

*21- 9-25 

* 1- 8-25 

10- 8-25 
♦21- 9-25 

1-10-25 

* 2- 7-25 

11- 9-25 

8- 9-25 

1-11-25 

18- 9-25 

23- 9-25 
*21- 9-25 
*21- 9-25 

1-10-25 

* Season 

1925 

* 5-10-25 

24- 9-25 
29- 9-25 



22-10-25 
24- 9-25 

8-10-25 

♦ 1-10-25 

• 1-10-25 
2-11-25 

23- 9-25 

28- 9-25 

1-10-25 

1-11-25 

1- 9-25 

19-10-25 

•16- 9-25 
21-10-25 



12-10-25 

10-10-25 

1-10-25 

♦12-10-25 

16-11-25 

28- 9-25 

1-10-25 

2-12-25 

17-11-25 



Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

London, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Grand Forks, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Harriston, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Toronto, Ont. 



British Columbia. 



Calgary, Alta. 

Prince Edward Island. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Regina, Sask. 
Calgary, Alta. 
Rosthern, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto. Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Wellington, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Agassiz, B.C. 
Ontario. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



6 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Glasses made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act— Continued 

ARCHIVES, PUBLIC 



Name 


Class 


Salary 


Date 


Locality 

of 

Appointment 


Hamilton, George O.A.S. 

deCathelineau, Emmanuel. .O.A.S. 


Associate archivist . 
t A ssistant archivist 


S 

1,800 
1,080 


25- 3-25 
1- 4-25 


Ottawa. Ont. 
Paris, France. 



AUDITOR GENERAL 



Thicke, Mabel V 

Boiid, Wilfred Stanley. . . .. .O.A.S 

Simpson, William O.A.S 

Howard, William Victor 

Curry, Phyllis N 

Lefebvre, M. C. Jeanne 

Pookey, William J. B O.A.S 

Powers, Arthur D.J O.A.S 

Mcintosh, A. J. A 

Adamson, Albert O O.A.S 

Morrison, Maye 

Paquin, Marie Laurenza 

LeCain, Dorothy L , , 

Roberts, Sydney V O.A.S 

Middleton, Norah E 



Junior clerk-typist . . 
Audit clerk 

Clerk, grade 2 

Junior audit clerk. . . 
Stenographer,' Gr. 2. 
Audit clerk 

Clerk, grade 4 

Principal audit clerk 
Clerk, grade 1 

Audit accountant, 

grade 4 

Clerk, grade 1 




2-11-25 
1-10-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Johnston, Ella Gertrude 

McElroy, Martha Charlotte. 
Rochon, Mrs. Valentine G. C 

Sharp, James Gordon C 

Hanratty, M. Gertrude 

Rainboth, Marie 



Junior clerk-typist. . 

Clerk-stenographer . 

Office boy 

Typist, grade 1 

Clerk, grade 1 




Ottawa, Ont. 



CUSTOMS AND EXCISE 



Harrington, Cecil Edward. .O.A.S, 

Bastien, Louis Philippe O.A.S, 

Hale, Edward R O.A.S, 

Waddell, Edith 

Jamieson, Gertrude Violet 

Link, Robert L O.A.S, 

Laird, George §O.A.S, 

Kelso, Robert O.A.S 

Tingle, Alfred 

B^langer, Joseph J O.A.S 

Malins, William O.A.S 

St. Jean, J. Albert O.A.S 

T6trault, Wilirid §O.A.S 

St. Thomas, James Peter. .§O.A.S 
McDaniel, Matthew George. O.A.S 
Gauthier, Armand O.A.S 

Sinclair, Alexander G O.A.S 

London, Lemuel Allen O.A.S 



McKee, Horace George. 
Donovan, John E 



.O.A.S 



Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 

Supplies clerk 

Clerk-stenographer . 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Messenger-clerk 

Junior clerk 

Sr. customs analyst. 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



teenior messenger. . , 
Customs excise clerk 

Junior clerk 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
limited service 
outport 

Customs excise clerk 



1,200 

1,200 

960 

960 

960 

1,200 
600 
600 

2,580 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 

960 
1,200 

600 

1,200 
1,200 



600 
1,200 
1,200 



1-11-24 
1-12-24 
16-12-24 
1-12-24 
1-12 24 

25-11-24 
18-12-24 
18-11-24 
12- 1-25 

1- 1-25 
1-10-24 



1- 

13- 

1- 

1- 



2-25 
1-25 
1-25 

4-24 



1- 2-25 
1-12-24 



10 12-24 

1- 1-25 

12-12-24 



St. John, N.B. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Cornwall, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Centreville, N.B. 
St. John, N.B. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act— Continued 

CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Conhnwea 



Name 




Hanson, Samuel Albert. . . . .O.A.S 



Ferguson, Allan C O.A.S 

Wright, Arthur Edmund. . .§O.A.S 
Stewart, George P O.A.S 



Pilon, Joseph Emilio. 
Sullivan, James B 



Fillion-Payoux, Emile 

Paul, Charles M 

Garceau, Raphael 

McLean, Andrew John. . . 



Lynch, Lionel Turner. 
Mitchell, A. Judson. . . 



.O.A.S 

..O.A.S 
.O.A.S 

.O.A.S 
O.A.S 



.O.A.S 



Blake, "Violet E 

Sanders, William B 

Varcoe, Marion Francis. . . . 
Abrahart, William Arthur. 

McGill, Robert Vincent 

Wright, James Ernest 



Duffield, John Ernest. . . 

Delude, Simone 

Kitts, Gerald J 

Young, Charles V 

Boland, Aileen Mary S.. 
Henderson, Hubert M . . . 



§O.A.S, 

!6.'a'.s. 

.O.A.S. 
.O.A.S. 

.O.A.S. 



.O.A.S. 
O.A.S, 



Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
grade 1 outport . . 

Customs excise ei 
aminer 



Special customs offi 
cer, grade 1 

Junior clerk 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise ex- 



aminer, grade 1 
outport 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise en- 
forcement officer. . 

Clerk-stenographer . 

Mes.senger-clerk 

Clerk-stenographer . 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Messenger-clerk. . 

Customs excise i 
aminer 



Mclntyre, Duncan §O.A.S 



Gauthier, Georges E O.A.S 

Gillis, Daniel O.A.S 

Hopper, Allen George §O.A.S 



Harraway, Ernest V O.A.S 

Racette, Joseph L. P O.A.S 

Curran, John §O.A.S 

Deacon, Thomas O.A.S 

Cheverie, William Joseph. . .O.A.S, 



Gibson, Helen Cameron . . 
Simmons, James Aubrey. 



Brown, George V. . . . 
Cash, Marion Luella. 
Hunter, Arthur R 



..O.A..^ 

.§O.A.S. 
.'.O.A.S. 



Clerk-stenographer . 

Customs truckman . 

Clerk-stenographer . 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Collector of customs 
and excise, grade 1 
port 



Customs excise ex 
aminer 

Customs truckman 

Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
limited service 
outport 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Supplies clerk 

Junior clerk 

Customs truckman 

Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
limited service 
outport 

Clerk-stenographer . 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



Customs excise clerk 
Clerk-stenographer . 
Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



1,260 

1,200 
1,200 

1,320 
600 

1,200 
1,200 

1,200 
1,200 



1,200 

1,200 

550 
960 
600 
960 

l,20a 
600 

1,200 

1,200 

960 

960 

1,080 

960 

1,200 



1,560 

and $120 

registrar 

shipping. 

1,200 
1,080 



900 

1,200 
960 
600 

1,080 



7.50 
960 

1,200 
and allowance 
1,200 
960 

1,200 



of 



3- 2-25 



19- 1-25 
5- 2-25 



2- 2-25 
2- 9-24 



29-12-24 
1-11-24 



1- 1-25 
15- 1-25 



1- 4-25 

23- 3-25 

1- 3-25 

1- 2-25 

27- 1-25 

1- 1-25 

1- 3-25 
1- 2-25 

9- 2-25 
6- 2-25 
6- 2-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 2-25 
1- 2-25 

1- 2-25 



9- 2-25 



7- 2-25 
1- 9-24 



17- 2-25 

1- 3-25 

1- 4-25 

19- 1-25 

2.3- 2-25 



11- .3-25 
16- 2-25 



2- 3-25 
16- 1-25 
16- 2-25 

1- 2-25 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Meaford, Ont. 

Bridgeburg, Ont. 
Hamilton, Ont. 

Chatham, N.B. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Newcastle, N.B, 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Samia, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Kam loops, B.C. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Wilson's Beach, N.B. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Hamilton, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Picton, Ont. 
Owen Sound, Ont. 
Sherbrooke, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
London, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Bridgeburg, Ont. 



CoUingwood, Ont. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Cartwright, Man. 

Huntingdon, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Edmonton, Alta. 



Souris, P.E.I. 
Regina, Sask. 



Skagway, Alaska. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Prince Albert, B.C. 



8 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Conimued 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Poirier, Joseph D 

Urquhart, Mary C 

Wright, Joseph R O.A.S. 

Hales, Wilfred §O.A.S. 

Lalonde, Joseph F. L 

Hooser, George Arthur.. . .§O.A.S, 

Mingay, Frederick M O.A.S 

Tanguay, Romeo M O.A.S, 

Watson, Thomas O.A.S 

Goyns, Bertram Francis ? 

Jameson, George Henry §O.A.S 

Adams, James O.A.S, 

Keatinge, Claude Francis. . .O.A.S 
Stitt, Harry Birks §O.A.S 

Allaire, Joseph L. J O.A.S 

MacNeil, Edward R 

O'Neil, John Valentine 

Nadon, J. Edgar 

Beckman, William Conrad.. O.A.S 
Quick, Arthur S O.A.S 

Brosseau, Joseph G. P. Lionel 

Bertin, A. Leon S 

Boutilier, John Jacob O.A.S 

Girardin, Emma Rosalie 

McKibbon, James Edwin. . §O.A.S 

Martineau, Georges 

Pitt, Lindsay J §O.A.S 



Wallace, Andrew George O.A.S 

Leduc, Sylvio O.A.S 



^G^ 



Customs excise en- 
forcement officer. . 

Clerk-stenographer . 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise en- 
forcement officer. . 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Messenger-clerk 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Caretaker 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
grade 1 outport. 

Customs excise clerk 

Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
limited service 
outport 

Messenger-clerk . . 



Customs excise clerk 
Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



Brisbois, J. D. Emmanuel 

Gendreau, Adalbert O.A.S 

Murphy, Nicholas §O.A.S 

Sherren, George Edward... §O.A.S 
Angus, Jack Ironside §O.A.S 

Laidman, George H. R 0.\.S 

Ryerson, William £ O.A.S 

Dunbar, Gordon A O.A.S 



Mailhot, Edmond 

Stewart, Graham 



Customs exbise clerk 

Customs excise ex 
aminer 

Clerk-stenographer , 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Junior clerk 

Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
limited service 
outport , 

Special customs offi' 
cer, grade 1 

Customs excise ex 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 



Customs.excise clerk 
Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



..O.A.S 



Customs truckman. 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 
outport .... 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs guard.. . 



Cave, Edward Norman O.A.S. 

DesRosiers, Idelphonse Us- 
mar O.A.S 



Customs excise ex- 
aminer -k 



1,200 

960 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 
1,200 

1,200 
600 

1,200 
960 

1,200 
1,200 



1,260 
1,200 



350 

600 

600 

1,200 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 

1,200 
960 

1,200 
600 



1,200 

1,320 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 

1,200 
1,200 
1,080 

1,200 

1,200 
1,080 

1,200 
1.200 



16- 3-25 
1- 1-25 

1- 1-25 

2- 3-25 

1-4-25 

1- 2-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 
1-4-25 

1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 
1-4-25 



4- 5-25 
1- 4-25 



1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 
1-4-25 

23- 2-25 
3- 3-25 



4- 3-25 

13- 4-25 

1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
9- 3-25 
9-4-25 

14- 4-25 

14- 5-25 

5- 5-25 
6-4-25 



6- 5-25 



1- 4-25 
30- 3-25 



29- 4-25 
1- 4-25 



Montreal, P.Q. 
Toionto, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Kenora, Ont. 

Montreal, P.Q. 

Pacific highway, B.C. 
Hamilton, Ont. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Victoria, B.C. 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Pacific highway, B.C. 

Walkerville, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 



Chippewa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Grand Narrows, N.S. 
Halifax, N.S. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Regina, Sask. 

Belleville, Ont. 
Lacolle, P.Q. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Halifax, N.S. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Trenton, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Iroquois, Ont. 
Dalhousie, N.B. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 



Victoria, B.C. 
Queenston bridge, Ont. 
Hamilton, Ont. 



Edmundston, N.B. 

Three Rivers, P.Q. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Niagara Falls, Ont. 
Quebec, P.Q. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



9 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

CUSTOMS AND EXCISEr-Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Aubin, Alfred John 

Donogh, Kathleen Enid 

Rush. Fred Charles O.A.S 

Clin, John §O.A.S 

Samson, J. Adelard 

Ingersoll, Bessie 

Mercil, Lucien 

Ste. Marie, Lucien O.A.S 

Tuer, Milton Roy O.A.S 

Moxley, Keith §O.A.S 

S6guin, Conrad 

Low, Fred Matthew O.A.S. 

Coulter, Kenneth Charles R.O.A.S. 

Langlois, Lionel O.A.S. 

Mayer, Joseph Arthur O.A.S. 

Boutet, Antonio 

Beaudet, Hector O.A.S. 

Menzie, Marjorie M 

Daunais, Joseph Omer 

Menzies, William 

Parent, Joseph A 

Bonetto, Jean D 

Dingwall, George C §O.A.S. 

Campeau, A. Norbert 

Coady, Peter W 



Special customs offi- 
cer, grade 1 



Special customs ex 
aminer 

Customs guard 

Customs excise ex 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 

Clerk, grade 2 

Special customs offi 
cer, grade 1 

Customs excise en 
forcement officer. 

Customs excise ex 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 

Clerk, grade 1. . . . 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise en- 
forcement officer. . 

Customs excise clerk 

Clerk, grade 2. . . . 

Messenger 

Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
grade 1 outport . . . 

Stenographer, Or. 2. 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 1 
outport 

Customs excise en- 
forcement officer. 



Ellis, John Edward. 



McAngus, George 

Attfield, Frederick C... 

Lecourt, John Joseph 

Brulotte, Joseph Albert. 



O.A.S. 



...O.A.S. 
...O.A.S. 



Customs guard 

Junior clerk 

Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
limited service 
outport 

Cub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise 
(Yukon) 



Clerk, grade 3. 
Clerk, grade 2. 



and 



Brais, Oswald 

Bureau, Joseph Emile. 



Tucker, John Henry D O.A.S. 

Harvey, Russell M O.A.S. 

Fournier, J. E. Aur61ien 



Pegg, Ruby E. E.. 
Wright, Harry S... 



Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



-O.A.S. 



Foreman, Albert O.A.S. 

Smith, William James §O.A.S. 

Hoare, Douglas fO.A.S. 



Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 1 
outport 

Customs excise clerk 

Messenger 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



1,320 



1,140 
1,080 

1,200 
960 
960 

1,320 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

720 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

960 

720 



1,260 
960 

1,200 



1,200 

960 
1,200 
1,080 

600 



600 



1,440 
allowance 
1,260 

960 

960 

1,200 
960 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 

960 



1,200 

1,200 

720 

1,200 



5- 5-25 



1-4-25 
9- 4-25 

1- 4-25 
1- 9-22 

1- 6-25 

14- 4-25 

16- 3-25 

6- 4-25 

17- 4-25 
22- 4-25 

20- 5-25 

2- 6-25 
1- 6-25 
1-4-25 

15- 5-25 



1- 7-25 
15- 6-25 

27- 5-25 



16- 5-25 

25- 6-25 
10- 3-25 
4- 5-25 
16- 3-25 



27- 6-25 



8- 4-25 

1- 8-25 
16- 7-25 
14- 7-25 

2- 7-25 
27- 7-25 

1- 6-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 4-25 

13- 7-25 



1- 7-25 

1- 7-25 

24- 7-25 

27-12-24 



Gasp^, P.Q., and dis- 
trict. 

Victoria, B.C. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Quebec, P.Q. 
Levis, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Montreal, P.Q. 



Port Arthur, Ont. 
Brockville, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Coutts, Alta. 

Emerson, Man. 
Quebec, P.Q. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Quebec, P.Q. 



Victoriaville, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Montreal, P.Q. 



Weyburn, Sask. 

Covey Hill, P.Q. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Victoria, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



New Waterford, N.S. 



Forty Mile, Y.T. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Lac Megantic, P.Q. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Quebec, P.Q. 
Pacific highway, B.C. 
Bridgeburg, Ont. 
Rouse's Point, N.Y., 

U.S.A. 
Sherbrooke, P.Q. 



Aldergrove, B.C. 
Calgary, Alta. 



Vancouver, B.C. 



10 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Glasses made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 













Locality 


Name 




Class 


Salary 


Date 


of 
Appointment 


Edwards, John Raymond. 


..O.A.S. 


Customs truckman.. 


$ 
1,080 


1- 7-25 


Montreal, P.Q. 


Wilson, John 


.§O.A.S. 


Customs excise clerk 


1,200 


1- 7-25 


Calgary, Alta. 


Scott, Harry G 


..O.A.S. 


Customs excise ex- 










..O.A.S. 
.§O.A.S. 


aminer 


1,200 
720 


18- 7-25 
1- 7-25 


Gretna, Man. 


Hill, John Thomas 


Messenger 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Hanson, Reginald E 


Sub-collector of cus- 








toms and excise. 












grade 1 outport . . . 


1,260 


29- 7-25 


Drumheller, Alta. 


Watkins, Charles George.. 


..O.A.S. 


Clerk, grades 


1,260 


13- 7-25 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Howes, Walter E 


..O.A.S. 


Customs guard 


1,080 


22- i-25 


Vancouver, B.C. 


Pearsall, Allan D 




Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise. 


















grade 1 outport . . . 


1,260 


15- 7-25 


Kingsville, Ont. 


Paquet, Francois A 


.§O.A.S. 


Customs truckman.. 


1,080 


20- 7-25 


Quebec, P.Q. 


Heighton, Alvin D 


..O.A.S. 


Clerk, grade 3 


1,260 


7- 8-25 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Ramey, Mrs. Lillie S 




Stenographer, Gr. 2. 


960 


6- 7-25 


Bridgeburg, Ont. 


Clarke, Roland 


.Vo.'a'.s. 


" " . . 


960 


15- 6-25 


London, Ont. 


Gaul, Howard Walter 


..O.A.S. 


Clerk, grade 2 


960 


1- 8-25 


Ottawa, Ont. 


McLeod, Robert S 


..O.A.S. 


" 


960 


10- 8-25 


" 


Macdonald, Douglas K 


..O.A.S. 


Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 1 












outport 


1,200 
1,200 


1- 5-25 
1-4-25 


Point Edward, Ont* 


Hubert, Paul Albert 


Customs excise clerk 
Customs excise ex- 


St. Johns, P.Q. 


Marett, Frederick D 


.'.O.A.S. 






iidiose.. . 


aminer 


1,200 
960 


18- 5-25 
1- 3-25 


Montreal, P.Q. 


Giroux, Joseph Ludger Ga 


Clerk-stenographer. . 




Hodgins, George Fuller. . . 


lO.A.S. 


Customs excise ex- 










..O.A.S. 


aminer 


1,200 
720 

1,200 
720 
960 


27- 7-25 
1- 9-25 

18- 7-25 

17- 8-25 

1- 7-25 


London, Ont. 


Lacoste, Joseph P 


Messenger 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Ho watt, Edgar Ross 


Customs excise ex- 
aminer 








Regina, Sask. 


Lober, Joseph 


Clerk, grade 1 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 


Montreal, P.Q. 


Macaulay, Mary M 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Guernon, M. J. E. Rom^o. 


Messenger 


720 
1,260 


1- 9-25 
1- 9-25 


Montreal, P.Q. 


Gallant, Daniel Edmund.. 


..O.A.S. 


Customs excise clerk 


Charlottetown, P.E.I. 


Graham, James Hunter. . . 


..O.A.S. 


" " . . 


1,200 


1- 2-25 


Bridgeburg, Ont. 


Brown, Richard 


.§O.A.S. 


Customs excise ex- 










..O.A.S. 


aminer 


1,200 
1,200 


4- 2-25 
26- 1-25 


Guelph, Ont. 


Dixon, Alfred Gabriel 




Cobalt, Ont. 


Dorey, Frederick Thomas 


..O.A.S. 


Customs excise clerk 


1,200 


1- 2-25 


St. Stephen, N.B. 


Giroux, Laurent Joseph 


..O.A.S. 


Customs excise ex- 










.§O.A.S. 


aminer 


1,200 


1-2-25 


Montreal, P.Q. 


McDonald, Joseph A 


Customs excise en- 








forcement officer. . 


960 


6- 3-25 


Lingan, N.S. 


Leclair, Horace 




Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 1 


















outport 


1,200 


12- 2-25 


Lachute, P.Q. 


Chia.sson, Arthur 


..O.A.S. 


Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
limited service 












outport 


600 
960 

1,200 
1,200 


16- 3-25 
13- 5-25 

19- 5-25 
9- 2-25 


New Waterford, N.S. 


Richardson, Robena H. . . 


Clerk-stenographer. . 
Customs excise ex- 
aminer 


Sarnia, Ont. 


White, Leigh S 






.§O.A.S. 


Coutts, Alta. 


Hill, William John 


Customs excise clerk 


Orillia, Ont. 


James, Charles A 


..O.A.S. 


Customs excise en- 












forcement officer. . 


1,200 


27- 7-25 


Morden, Man. 


Edwards, John Ray 




Customs excise ex- 
aminer 


1,200 


1- 8-25 








Bridgeburg, Ont. 


MacDonald,ClaytonHarold.O.A.S. 




1,200 


1- 7-25 


Niagara Falls, Ont. 


Kingsjey, Edward R 


..O.A.S. 


" " . . 


1,200 


1- 7-25 


Bridgeburg, Ont. 


Grant, Kenneth Allen 




Junior clerk 


1,200 
600 


1- 7-25 
5-12-24 


<' 


Desrochers, Adolphe 


Montreal, P.Q. 


McKay, Frederick N 


..O.A.S. 


Clerk, grade 2 


960 


1- 8-25 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Halford, William Frederic 


k 

..O.A.S. 


Messenger 


720 


18- 8-25 


Toronto, Ont. 


Niles, Cecil Victor 


Customs excise en- 








forcement officer. . 


1,200 


1- 9-25 


Cobourg, Ont. 


Macgillivray, Ronald A. . . 


.§O.A.S. 


Customs truckman.. 


1,080 


24- 8-25 


Halifax, N.S. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



11 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Glasses made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



Name 


Class 


Salary 


Date 


Locality 

of 

Appointment 


Johnston, Arthur 




..O.A.S. 
lewellyn. 


Customs excise ex- 
aminer 


$ 
1,200 

1,200 

1,200 
720 
960 

1,100 
1,200 

1,260 

1,200 
1,200 

1,200 
1,200 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,260 

1,200 
720 

1,260 
2,100 

1,200 
1,200 

1,200 

960 

1,200 

1,200 
1,080 

1,260 

and 120 as 

registrar of 

shipping 

1,200 

1,260 

720 

1,200 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 

900 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 

960 


1-10-25 

1-10-25 

16- 7-25 
14- 9-25 

20- 7-25 

10- 9-25 
1- 8-25 

23- 9-25 

1-10-25 
1-10-25 

5- 9-25 

14- 9-25 

1- 7-25 
8- 9-25 

21- 9-25 

21- 9-25 

15- 9-25 

1-10-25 

22- 9-25 

1-10-25 
1- ^25 

1-10-25 
1-10-25 

11- 5-25 
9-10-25 

18- 6-25 

1-10-25 
1-10-25 

12-10-25 

14- 9-25 
20- 8-25 

6- 7-25 
1-10-25 

17- 7-25 
1-10-25 
1-10-25 

24- 9-25 
15-10-25 

1- 8-25 
2-11-25 
1-11-25 


Prescott, Ont. 


Goddard, Victor Edwin L 


Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 1 
outport 


Sidney, B.C. 


Moran, Arthur Joseph. 




Customs excise ex- 
aminer 




..O.A.S. 


Timmins, Ont. 


Williamson, James 


Messenger 


Halifax, N.S. 


Coles, Vera L. V 


Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
limited service 
outport 


Winnipeg, Man. 


Coulter, Frederick C 


..O.A.S. 

..O.A.S. 
..O.A.S. 


Haskett, Man. 


Freeman, Frank G 


Customs excise ex- 
aminer 


Calgary, Alta. 


Home wood, Percy W. F. . 
Mundle, Wilfrid A 


Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
grade 1 outport.... 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 1 
outport 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 

Clerk, grade 3 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 


Prince George, B.C. 


Lewis, Claude Harrison... 
Dupont, Emile 


..O.A.S. 


Prescott, Ont. 
Sarnia, Ont. 


Ross, Colin Spry 

Carre, Francis James. . 

Shoobert, Henry Arthi 
Ward, Gordon Hyland 

Bailey, John P 

Doyle, Michael Hulbei 


O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 

jr.... O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 

....§O.A.S. 
-t 


Farnham, P.Q. 
Leamington, Ont. 

Belleville, Ont. 
Lethbridge, Alta. 
London, Ont. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 


Fleming, Hugh 




.§O.A.S. 

.§O.A.S. 
..O.A.S. 


Sarnia, Ont. 


Whitehead, Descombe R- 


Messenger 


Winnipeg, Man. 


Turner, Harold Shiplej 

Hale, Maxwell Matthe 
MacCoubrey, John Les 

Butler, James Joseph. . 
Gagnon, Louis Lorenzo 


f-. ■ 
w 


Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
grade 1 outport . . . 

Assistant chemist.. . 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 


Clinton, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 


lie. 


.lO.A.S. 
..O.A.S. 


St. John, N.B. 


Customs excise clerk 
Customs excise ex- 
aminer 








Montreal, P.Q. 


Ritzel, Edith 


Stenographer, Gr. 2. 
Customs excise clerk 
Customs excise ex- 
aminer 


Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 


Deschfines, Joseph T 


Shawinigan Falls, P.Q» 


Hadden, James H. 


..O.A.S. 
..O.A.S. 
.§O.A.S. 

.§O.A.S. 
..O.A.S. 


Windsor, Ont. 


Mills, Frederick Charles. . 
Holden, Norman 

McPhee, Wilfrid Laurier. . 

Bain, John William 

Grenier, Th^ophile 


Customs guard 

Sub-collector of cus- 
toms and excise, 
grade 1 outport . . . 

Customs excise clerk 

Clerk, grade 3 

Clerk, grade 1 

Customs excise clerk 
Customs excise ex- 
aminer 


Vancouver, B.C. 

Port Dover, Ont. 

St. John, N.B. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 


Anderson, Robert Elliott. 
Leighton, Donald A 


..O.A.S. 


St. John, N.B. 




..O.A.S. 


Regina, Sask. 


Clutterbuck, Samuel A 
Burns, Charles Russell 

Grignon, Raoul 

Orrell, Samuel 

Manseau, Charles F. . . 




Watchman.. 

Customs excise clerk 

t( << 
Stenographer, Gr. 2. 


Windsor, Ont. 




.§O.A.S. 
.§O.A.S. 
.§O.A.S. 
..O.A.S. 


Montreal, P.Q. 


Brown, Neil D 

Bennett, Lillie Hattie. 




Walkerville, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



12 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Conduied 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Ci-^ 



stokes, Gordon Hubert O.A.S. 

Butler, Robert Wilson O.A.S. 

Fletcher, Wilfrid Ernest O.A.S. 

Cole, Walter Leon O.A.S. 

McLeod, Matthew M 

Warren, Henry N. W O.A.S. 

Wilson, John 

Wheeler, Sydney E §O.A.S. 

Williams, John K 

Allison, Walter O.A.S 

Montgomery, Hugh Gordon. O.A.S, 
Baxter, John Sanborn O.A.S, 

S6n6cal, Lucien Ren6 

Logan, George M O.A.S. 

Gagn6, Alyre O.A.S. 

Oattes, Hazel M 

Wilcox, George Fraser O.A.S, 

Cripps, Ernest Albert O.A.S, 

Gauthier, Solange V. H 

March, Cecil Sinclair §O.A.S 

Teal, Groves Milton 

Sheedy, John Joseph 

Croshaw, Anna Beatrice 

Conlon, A. Ethel 

Holland, William 

Lyall, Alexander Reid 

Blanchet, Joseph A. E 

McArthur, James J O.A.S 

Browne, Leslie Owen O.A.S 

Carnie, Christina T. R 

Fiddick, Cecil Clarence 



Borton, Lionel S O.A.S 

Yates, Reginald Spencer. . O.A.S 

Dickson, Ivan L 

Cyr, James Edward 

Stinson, Lewis George O.A.S 

Lamarche, J. A. Leopold 

Hornby, John Harrison §O.A.S 



Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



Customs truckman 

Customs excise en- 
forcement officer 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 1 
outport 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs guard.. . . 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise clerk 
Sub-collector of cust- 
oms and excise 
limited service 

outport 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 
Customs excise clerk 
Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Stenographer,grade2 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Freight examiner 
(United States).. . 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Sub-collector o f 
customs and 
cise, limited ser- 
vice outport 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 

Customs excise 
enforcement offi 
cer 

Freight examiner 
(United States). 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer, grade 
outport 

Customs excise ex- 
aminer 



Messenger. 



1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,080 

300 



1,200 

1,200 
1,200 

1,200 
1,080 
1,080 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 



1,080 

960 

1,200 

1,200 
1,260 
(inc. flat 
increase) 

1,200 

1,380 

1,380 

960 

960 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 



1,260 
1,200 

1,200 
1,380 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

720 



1-10-25 

1-10-25 

1-10-25 

15-11-25 

20-10-25 



3- 8-25 

1-10-25 
15-10-25 

1-11-25 
13- 8-25 
18- 5-25 

1-10-25 
1-10-25 
2-11-25 



19-11-25 

12-10-25 

1-11-25 

1-10-25 



1-10-25 

1-10-25 

1-12-25 
1-12-25 
1-11-25 
1-10-25 

1-10-25 
1-10-25 
1-10-25 
1-10-25 
1- 9-25 
3-12-25 



10-12-25 
1-12-25 

24-11-25 
1-12-25 

1-10-25 

7-12-25 
1-11-25 
4-12-25 



Windsor, Ont. 

Saskatoon, Sask. 
Murray River, P.E.I. 

Powell River, B.C. 

Windsor, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Belleville, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Windsor, Ont. 
Walkerville, Ont. 



St. Anselme, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Windsor, Ont. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 
Niagara Falls, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Windsor, Ont. 
North Portal, Sask. 
Levis, P.Q. 
Ingersoll, Ont. 
Fort William, Ont. 
Niagara Falls, Ont. 



Brighton, Ont. 
St. Thomas, Ont. 

Wild Horse, Alta. 
Niagara Falls, Ont. 

St. Leonard, N.B. 

London, Ont. 
Berthierville, P.Q. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



13 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 





EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 






Name 


Class 


Salary 


Date 


Locality 

of 

Appointment 


D^sy, Jean 


Counsellor 


$ 

4,200 


16- 7-26 


Ottawa, Ont. 








FINANCE 



Livingston, Stanley Lyman. O.A.S. 

Effemy, George D O.A.S. 

Perkins, Sidney John O.A.S. 

Webber, John Henry O.A.S. 

Hickson, Martin J 

Rowe, Freeman 

Casey, Mary Evel3m 

McMillan, Francis C 

McGinnis, L. J O.A.S. 

Schryer, Alvin Robert O.A.S. 

Harper, Peter S O.A.S. 

Ficking, May Eliza W 

Bates, Nora Darlington 

Turner, Jessica 

Walmsley, Harry O.A.S. 

Wilson, Elizabeth J 

Shane, Mary Alma 

McElary, Victor D O.A.S. 

Ray. Roy Byron 



Account clerk. 



Senior clerk 

Clerk 

Printer, Finance 

Department 

Paper pulp maker. . . 
Stenographer, Gr. 1. 
Clerk, grade 2 



Paper pulp maker's 

helper 

Stenographer, Gr. 1 



Clerk, grade 2. 



Stenographer, Gr. 1. 
2. 
Clerk, grade 2 



Clerk, grade 2. 



960 

960 

1,320 

960 

1,680 
1,440 
720 
960 
960 
960 

960 
720 
720 
960 
1,260 
(inc. flat 
increase) 
720 
960 
1,260 
(inc. flat 
increase) 
1,260 
(inc. flat 
increase) 



1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
8-10-24 
1- 1-25 

1- 3-25 
1- 3-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 8-25 

1- 3-25 

1- 7-25 

11-10-25 

1- 8-25 



1-10-25 

27-10-25 

9-12-25 



1-12-25 
1-12-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Halifax, N.S. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Regina, Sask. 
Victoria, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Calgary, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Ottawa, Ont. 



HEALTH 



Pamey, Fred. S O.A.S. 

Kirby, Frederick Arthur... .O.A.S. 



Holland, John Charles §O.A.S 

Beaulieu, Stella 

Sauv6, Joseph Ad61ard 

Horswill, Alfred S §O.A.S. . 

Holman, John O.A.S 

Hardy, Charles O.A.S 

Pears, Guy Crow O.A.S 



Clancy, Catherine Mary 

Brouse, Marjorie 

Beaulieu, Lucien §O.A.S 



Medical officer, 
grade 2 

Inspector of foods, 
drugs and fertil- 
izers 

Hospital guard 

Graduate nurse 

Office boy 

Inspector of foods 

and drugs 

Laboratory helper. . 

Caretaker 

fAttendant (leper 
station) 



Stenographer, Gr. 1, 
Hospital guard 



2,880 



1,200 

660 

and allowance 

900 

420 

1,320 

720 

1,080 

1,080 
and allowance 



720 
720 
900 
and allowance 



1-10-24 



12- 2-25 

18- 3-25 

*21- 5-25 

1-10-25 

15- 5-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 7-25 



1- 9-25 



1-12-25 
1-12-25 

♦ 1-10-25 



England and the 
European continent. 

Regina, Sask. 

Halifax, N.S. 
Quebec, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Nelson, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
HaUfax, N.S. 



William Head Quaran- 
tine Station, Vict- 
oria, B.C. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Quebec, P.Q. 







HOUSE OF COMMONS 






Dewar, Howard Douglas.. 
Little, Thomas 


..O.A.S. 


Committee clerk... . 
Assistant parlia- 
mentary reporter.. 
Joint law clerk 


1,800 

2,040 
3,480 


12-2-25 

5- 2-25 
19- 5-25 


Ottawa, Ont. 


OUivier, Paul Maurice 


..O.A.S. 


« 



14 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

IMMIGRATION AND COLONIZATION 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Clark, George J. D 

Pautz, John August O.A.S 

Desarmeau, Clifford William, 

O.A.S 

Clavin, John Brown O.A.S 

Hodge, Thomas Henry. . . .§O.A.S 
Delorme, Louis Alfred 

Middleton, Agnes M 

Bartle, Thomas O.A.S 

Buchanan, Gerald A. B O.A.S 

Pennoek, Orange Carman 

Trdpanier, Jean-Baptiste Edgar. . . . 

Glenn, William G. F §O.A.S 

Drew, William Groves 

Peele, John 

Ferguson, James S 

Westman, Astrid Elizabeth 

Gosselin, Adjutor 

Petersen, Asgar Oyvin O.A.S 

H6bert, N6r6e Calixte 

Lavigne, Dora O 

Gray, Francis John §O.A.S 

Gillingham, Henry Job. . . . §O.A.S 

Robitaille, Joseph C O.A.S 

MacDonald, Anne 

Wilson, May 

MacCharles, Malcolm D O.S.A 



Coward, George Stanley O.A.S. 

Fraser, William John O.S.A. 

Brooks, George Frdncis O.A.S. 

Cotsworth, Frank B O.A.S. 

Johnston, Loral Geraldine 

Leigh, Kathleen Ethel 

Perdue, John G §O.A.S. 

Tuffin, James John 

deBlois, Wilhelmina R 

Stuart, James W. A O.A.S. 

Breckon, William D O.A.S. 

Scobie, Melville J §O.A.S. 

McDonell, Donald N §O.A.S. 



Messenger-clerk.. , 

Clerk 

* 

Clerk-stenographer. . 

File clerk 

Caretaker 

Emigration agent, 
grade 2 

Inspector (British 
immigrant child- 
ren 

Immigration guard.. 

tEmigration agent, 
grade 2 

Clerk 

Office boy 

Deportation officer.. 

Office boy 

Deportation officer. . 

Clerk-stenographer. . 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Immigration guard . 

tEmigration agent, 
grade 2 

Immigration inspec- 
tor 

Typist, grade 1 

Immigration inspeo 
tor 

Immigration guard 

tEmigration agent, 
grade 2 

Stenographer, Gr. 1, 

Emigration agent, 

grade 1 



and 



and 



and 

and 
and 
and 



600 
960 

960 
960 
960 

1,920 
allowance 



1,320 
660 

1,920 
960 
300 
900 
300 
900 
960 

600 



1,920 
allowance 

1,200 
720 

1,200 
900 
660 

1,920 
allowance 
720 

1,560 
allowance 
1,560 
allowance 
1,560 
allowance 



Stenographer, Gr. 1 . 

2. 

Emigration agent, 

grade 1 

Immigration guard. 
Clerk, grade 2 

Emigration agent, 
grade 1 

Inspector (British 
immigrant child- 
dren) 

Emigration agent, 
grade 1 



1,560 
and allowance 

1,560 
and allowance 
720 
960 

1,560 
and allowance 
900 
960 
960 

1,560 
and allowance 



1,320 

1,560 
and allowance 



1-11-24 
1- 1-25 

1- 1-25 
22- 1-25 
19- 2-25 



17- 2-25 



26- 2-25 
11- 2-25 

1- 1-25 
1- 2-25 
1-12-24 
24- 3-25 
1- 2-25 
1-11-24 
1-10-24 

1- 3-25 
22-12-24 



1- 1-25 

1- 3-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 3-25 

1- 5-25 

16- 1-25 



1- 3-25 
1- 6-25 



28- 3-25 

16- 3-25 

6- 4-25 

14- 4-25 



1-4-25 
1- 6-25 
1- 7-25 



16- 3-25 
1- 6-25 
1- 8-25 
1- 7-25 



fr- 4-25 

1- 8-25 

14- 4-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Victoria, B.C. 



Woonsocket, R.I. 
U.S.A. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Halifax, N. S. 

The Hague, Holland. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Quebec, P.Q. 



Antwerp, Belgium. 

Lacolle, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Niagara Falls, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Quebec, P.Q . 



Inverness, Scotland. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Glasgow, Scotland. 

London, England. 

Great Falls, Mont., 
U.S.A. 

Des Moines, Iowa, 
U.S.A. 

Birmingham, England 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Cambridge, England. 

Halifax, N.S. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



St. Paul, Minn, U.S.A. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Fargo, N.D., U.S.A. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



15 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

IMMIGRATION AND COLONIZATION— Concluded 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Norris, Walter 

Ryan, Henry 

Riordon, J. Barry. 



.O.S.A. 
.O.A.S. 



Typist, grade 2 

Immigration guard. 

Emigration agent, 

grade 2 



Smith, Charles Edward S. . O.A.S 



Charette, Guillaume J §U.S.A 



Faux, Edward Roy §O.A.S 



Grain, Dorothy E 

Beatty, Walter Murray O.A.S. 

O'Connell, Maurice J §O.A.S. 

Ostiguy, Vincent 

Rivest, Irene 

McNairn, Maude 

Gervais, Joseph Ovide Eudore 

Lothian, Marjory M. L 

Black, Arthur Morley O.A.S 

Murphy, Laurie Margaret 

Boyd, Mabel 

McLauchlin, Louise A 

Roger, Frances Beatrice 

Scott, James Gondie O.A.S 

Hannum, Marion N 

Leonard, Grenville B 

McCarthy, J. Frederick 



Emigration agent, 
grade 1 



Emigration agent, 
grade 2 



Emigration agent, 
grade 1 



Stenographer, Gr. 1 

Emigration agent, 

grade 1 



Messenger 

Deportation officer 
Stenographer, Gr. 2 

Conductress 

Office boy 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 

Emigration agent, 

grade 1 



Typist, grade 1 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Typist, grade 1 . . . . 
Stenographer, Gr. 2 



Clerk, grade 2 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Clerk, grade 2 



Powell, George Fidelis... 
Bowman, Samuel 



.O.A.S. 
.O.A.S. 



Elliott, William O.A.S. 

Bernhardt, William EdwardO.A.S, 

Vannan, Donald O.A.S. 

Johnston, Vera K 

Malcolm, James Lyall 



Immigration inspec- 
tor 



960 
900 

1,920 
and allowance 



1,560 
and allowance 



1,920 
and allowance 



1,560 
and allowance 
720 

1,560 
and allowance 

720 
1,080 

960 
1,200 

420 

960 

1,560 

and allowance 

720 

960 

720 

1,260 

(inc. flat 

crease) . . . 

960 

960 

960 

1,260 

(inc. flat 

crease)... 

960 



Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Emigration agent, 

grade 1 



1,440 

(inc. flat 

crease)... 

1,380 

1,380 

1,380 

960 



1,560 
and allowance 



8-25 
6-25 



24- 2-25 



15- 4-25 



24- 2-25 



6- 4r-25 
18- 9-25 



4- 8-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 5-25 
8- 5-25 
1- 9-25 
1-10-25 



21- 7-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 9-25 



1-10-25 
1-11-25 
1-10-25 
1-11-25 



1-11-25 
1-11-25 



1-11-25 
1-11-25 
1-12-25 
1-12-25 
1-10-25 



23-11-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Halifax, N.S. 



New England States 
(Portland, Maine), 



Kansas City, Mo., 
U.S.A. 



New England States 
(Fall River, Mass.) 



Bristol, England. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Belfast, Ireland. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Atlantic ports. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Birmingham, England. 
Ottawa, Ont 



Emerson, Man. 
Pigeon river, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Glasgow, Scotland. 







INDIAN AFFAIRS 






Smith, Arthur G 


O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 


tindian farming in- 
structor 


720 
and allowance 

720 
and allowance 

1,020 
and allowance 


&-10-24 

4-12-24 
10-12-24 




Grfegoire, Laurent 

Murdock, David 


Indian agent, grade 3 
Clerk-bookkeeper. . . 


Waywayseecappos Re- 
serve, Birtle Agency 
Man. 

Christian Island Ag- 
ency, Ont. 

Kenora, Ont. 



t6 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



INDIAN AFFAIRS— Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary- 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Goodson, James, 



.O.A.S 



tindian farming in- 
structor 



Bleecker, George H 

Johnstone, Walter Richardson 

Bavis, Walter Emerson 

Mareng^re, Joseph Felix 

Hamman, Harold A 

Street, John A 

Brock, Lois M 

Coster, Ruth Smith 

Turner, Miss Louie 

Shabb, Alex 



McAulay, Daniel Angus O.A.S 

Campbell, Gordon L O.A.S 



Gibson, Richard O.A.S. 

Kelly, Patrick Joseph 

Bell, Gordon L O.A.S. 

Coleman, James O.A.S. 

Hamilton, Foster C 

Minielly, Edmund G 

Cameron, Henry George. . . . O.A.S. 

Home, Winifred A 

Stevenson, Lillian V 

Nettleton, John M O.A.S. 

Moore, Richard H O.A.S. 

Caza, Zotique 

Jardine, Hugh M O.A.S. 

D6ch6nes, Louis 

McArthur, William C 

Kirkpatrick, Charles G 

L'Heureux, Napol6on O.A.S. 



Physician, part time 
flndian farming in- 
structor , 



720 
and allowance 



750 



720 
and allowance 



Physician, part time 

Office boy 

tPhy8ician,parttime 



Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Clerk-stenographer 
Junior clerk 



Constable (Indian 
Reserve), part 
time 



Physician, part time 



Physician, part time 

Office boy 

Physician (Treaty 

payment) 

Clerk-stenographer , 
Physician 

flndian farming in- 
structor 

Physician (Treaty 

payment) 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 , 
Stenographer, Gr. 1 . 
Physician, part time 

Indian agent, Gr. 5. . 



Physician, part time 

tConstable (Indian 

Reserve), part 

time 

Indian agent, Gr. 3 . . 



400 
300 
700 
350 



600 
960 
600 



240 
325 
500 

550 
420 



10 da. 
960 
2,100 



720 
and allowance 



10 da 
960 
720 
500 

1,980 
allowance 

720 
allowance 

300 



Physician, part time 

flndian farming in- 
structor 



and 
and 



and 
and 

and 



600 

720 
allowance 

800 
allowance 

840 
allowance 



1- 1-25 



1- 1-25 



12-12-24 



11-10-24 
1- 2-25 

28- 8-24 
&- 1-25 



1- 1-25 

20-12-24 

1- 2-25 



5-12-24 

25- 4-25 
1- 2-25 

1- 5-25 

1- 4-25 

*21- 6-25 
1- 2-25 

26- 3-25 

4- 5-25 



*14- 6-25 
15- 6-25 
30- 6-25 
10- 7-25 



5- 7-25 

17- 8-25 
25- 7-25 

3-12-24 
25- 8-25 
15- 9-25 

1-10-25 



Beardy's Reserve, 
Duck Lake Agency, 
Sask. 

Queen Charlotte Ag- 
ency, B.C. 

Muscowequan Re- 
serve, Touchwood 
Hills Agency, Sask. 

Port Renfrew, B.C. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Fort Vermilion, Alta. 

Kwawkewlth Agency, 
B.C. 

Brantford, Ont. 

Regina, Sask. 

Onion Lake Agency, 

Sask. 



Fort William Agency, 
Ont. 

Middle River Reserve 
N.S. 

Duck Lake Mission 
and Westbank Re- 
serves, Okanagan 
Agency, B.C. 

Kamloops Agency, 
B.C. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Treaty 9 District. 
Vernon, B.C. 
Six Nations Reserve, 
Ohsweken, Ont. 



Swan Lake Reserve, 
Portage la Prairie 
Agency, Man. 

Treaty 10 District. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

it 

Christian Island Ag- 
ency, Ont. 

Stuart Lake Agency, 
B.C. 

North Temiskaming, 

P.Q. 
Rexton, N.B. 



Bersimis Agency, P.Q. 
St. Regis, P.Q. 
Rama Agency, Ont. 



Battleford Agency, 
Sask. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



17 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



INDIAN AFFAIRS— Concluded 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Thomas, Peter 

McNab, Fredrick A 

Charter, George Arthur 

Mancor, Claude A O.A.S. 

Diggle, Ella 

Digout, Joseph Henri 

Stephenson, Ernest William 

Isabelle, Jean J 

Baldwin, Sidney George O.A.S 



Constable (Indian 
Reserve), part 
time 

Indian farming in- 
structor and con- 
stable 

Physician, part time 
Indian farming in- 
structor and con- 
stable 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 . 
Physician, part time 

Clerk, grade 2. . . . 

Office boy 

Physician, part time 



and 



and 



and 



360 



840 

allowance 

700 



840 
allowance 



960 
300 



960 
allowance 



420 
600 



1- 9-25 



22- 6-25 
1-10-25 



1- 9-25 



1-11-25 
23-10-25 



17-11-25 

18-11-25 
23-11-25 



Tobique Indian Re- 
serve, N.B. 



Babine Agency, B.C. 
Williams Lake, B.C. 



New Westminster Ag- 
ency, B.C. 

Regina, Sask. 

Richmond county and 
Chapel Island, N.S. 

Edmonton Agency, 

Alberta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Okanagan Agency, 

B.C. 







INSURANCE 








Weaver, Gerald Travers. . . 


.O.A.S. 


Clerk 


960 

600 
720 


27-12-24 

6-2-25 
1-10-25 


Ottawa. Ont. 


Ay 1 win, Douglas C 


Junior statistical 
clerk 








" 


Bradley, Mary E. Rubina. 


Clerk, grade 1 


« 










INTERIC 


)R 









Hines, Lucy E 

Burrows, Charles Edward 

Pearce, Jospeh A O.A.S. 



Giles, John Herbert O.A.S. 



Case, Frank Walter §O.A.S 

Johnston, Reta Evelyn 

Morrison, Lester 

Farr, Mrs. Margaret Maxwell 

Fensom, Kenneth G 

Gates, Harold L 

Wells, Frank Leslie O.A.S 

Latimer, William Rogers O.A.S 

Mitchell, Jesse Hunter 

May, Arthur William O.A.S 

Fritz, Clara W^inifred 

Wright, Edith Altass 

Reader, Lawrence Hedley 

Adams, Thomas Henry , 

Gentles, Margaret C. W 

Fultz, WinnifredF 

15215—2 



Clerk-stenographer. . 

Assistant astron- 
omer 



Ass istant forest 
ranger 



Clerk 

Clerk-stenographer. . 
Laboratory assist- 
ant 

Telephone operator . 

Timber tester 

Office boy 

Park warden 

Senior clerk 

Assistant engineer. . . 
Fire ranger 



Timber pathologist. 
Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Forest ranger 



Assistant forest 
ranger 

Junior clerk - steno- 
grapher 

Clerk-stenographer. . 



960 
960 

1,800 
and allowance 

1,020 
and allowance 

960 
960 

900 

780 
1,440 

300 
1,200 
1,320 
2,100 
Prevailing 
rates 
2,040 

600 
1,200 
and allowance 

1,020 

600 
960 



1-11-24 
20- 9-24 

28-11-24 
5-12-24 



1- 1-25 
1-10-24 

19- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
13- 1-25 
29-12-24 
26-10-24 
1- 3-25 

* 1- 4-25 

*10- 4-25 
1-4-25 

27- 4-25 

* 1- 5-25 



*13- 4-25 



1-25 
2-25 



Indian Head, Sask. 
Jasper Park, Alta. 

Victoria, B.C. 



Nisbet Pines Reserve, 
Prince Albert Dis- 
trict, Sask. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Calgary, Alberta. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Banff, Alta. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Jasper, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Banff, Alta. 

Prince Albert, Sask. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Prince Albert, Sask. 
Entrance, Alta. 



Prince Albert, Sask. 

Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



1? 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Glasses made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

INTERIOR— Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 
of 
Appointment 



Jones, Grattan Sheen O.A.S. 

Pickering, William John 

Querney, Arthur Henry , . 

Connell, Charles O.A.S. 

Tupper, James Joseph O.A.S. 

MacFarlane, John D. B O.A.S. 

Bessette, J. T. Lucien 

Gingras, Joseph Elias O.A.S. 

Boivin, J. A. Lucien 

Avery, Henry George L O.A.S. 

McCardell, William H O.A.S, 

Falconer, Joanna 

Martin, W.J O.A.S, 

Davidson, William W §O.A.S. 

MacNamara, John W 

Sutherland, Mary I 

Earl, Harold Eugene O.A.S. 

Hardy, Enid Hood 

Frost, Charles O.A.S, 

Bedell, George 

Snowdy, Clifford L O.A.S 

Adamson, William O . A. S 

Sigurdson, Gunnar O.A.S 

Best, Hugh O.A.S 

Liersch, John Edward 

Falconer, Joseph G 

Colbran, Basil S 

St. Amand, Joseph 

Bird, John Charles O.A.S 

Damer, John Warnett O.A.S 

Johns, Sol Dee O.A.S 

Shaw, Philip O.A.S 

Alexander, Brian R 

Sweeney, Michael L 

Douglas, John S §O.A.S 

Bell, Douglas E 

Phillips, Wilfred John O.A.S 

Black, Machell H §O.A.S 

Jenkins, John Henry O.A.S 

Lees, Laurence, jr O.A.S 

Gawley, William Charles. . .O.A.S 



Clerk 

Clerk, grade 1 

Instrument maker, 
grade 2 

Photographer 

Assistant forest 
ranger. 

Forestry assistant... 

Office boy 

Laboratory assistant 

Office boy 

Lithographic press 
feeder 

Stenographer-book- 
keeper 



Clerk 

Assistant timber 

tester 

Assistant in forest 

surveying 



Clerk-stenographer. 
Stenographer-book- 
keeper 



Stenographer, Gr. 1, 
Fire ranger 



Assistant in forest 
surveying 

Assistant forest 
ranger 



Fire ranger. 



Assistant in forest 
surveying , 



Assistant migratory 
bird warden 

Office boy 

Assistant forest 
ranger 

Fire ranger 



Junior engineer. . . 
Assistant in forest 
surveying 



Office boy 

Assistant fire ranger 

Assistant in forest 
surveying 



Timber scaler. . . . 
Timber test engineer 
Fire ranger 



960 
720 

1,620 
1,200 

1,020 

1,320 

420 

900 

420 

1,200 

1,020 

1,020 
960 

900 

Prevailing 
rates 
960 

1,020 

720 
Prevailing 
rates 



1,020 

1,020 

and allowance 

Prevailing 

rates 



1,080 
420 

1,020 

Prevailing 

rates 

1.680 

Prevailing 

rates 
420 
Prevailing 

rates 



1,800 

2,100 

Prevailing 
rates 



1- 1-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

*21- 4-25 

11- 5-25 
1- 5-25 

27- 4-25 

12- 5-25 

1-4-25 

8- 4-25 

* 1- 4-25 
8-12-24 

13- 5-25 



*20- 5-25 
22- 1-25 

1- 2-25 

1- 6-25 

*15- 6-25 

* 2- 6-25 

* 1- 5-25 

* 2- 5-25 



*20- 5-25 

* 1- 5-25 

*26- 5-25 
*26- 5-25 

1-4-25 
1- 4-25 

* 2- 4^25 

*18- 5-25 

* 5- 5-25 
*16- 4-25 



*13- 6-25 
27- 5-25 

*11- 5-25 

*26- 5-25 

*26- 5-25 

1- 5-25 

19- 5-25 



* 5- 5-25 

* 1- 5-25 



Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Prince Albert, Sask. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Kamloops, B.C. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Brazeau Reserve, 
Coalspur, Alta. 
Kamloops, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Vancouver, B.C. 



Manitoba. 
Lethbridge, Alta. 

Rocky Mountain 

House, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Ontario. 

Greenbush, Sask. 
Coalspur, Alta. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
New Westminster, 
B.C. 

Alberta. 



Maritime Provinces. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Calgary, Alta. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Banff, Alta. 



New Brunswick. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

New Westminster, 

B.C. 
Alberta. 

New Westminster, 

B.C. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Manitoba (South 
District). 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



t9 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

INTERIOR— ConhnMed 



Name 

Bell, John Edward O.A.S 

Flowers, William E 

Groves, Tom Douglas 

Turner, Joseph Edward O.A.S 

Vernon, Arthur John O.A.S 

Sweet, Reginald L O.A.S 

Burwash, Lachlin T O.A.S, 

Montgomery, Charles 

Howie, Eugene Lee 

Wroe, Percy O.A.S. 

Bell, William M O.A.S. 

Abrahamson, J. Albert 

Johnson, James Albert O.A.S. 

Birchard, Walter H O.A.S. 

VanWyk, Symen 

MoHugh, Edgar 

Patterson, David O.A.S. 

Harrison, Thomas Dudley 

Kemp, Alexander B O.A.S. 

Bennett, Frederick C O.A.S. 

Bryant, Franklyn A O.A.S. 

Spence, William Gray O.A.S. 

Hole, George 

Ranger, Cecile 

Fowler, Eric George 

Newlove, Harry O.A.S. 

Haight, Harold Joseph O.A.S, 

Heaney , Harold D 

Dunfield, Colin M O.A.S. 

Blain, Wilfred M O.A.S. 

Elgood, John Roger O.A.S. 

Foster, Charles Edwin §O.A.S. 

Innes-Taylor, Ian 

15215-2J 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Assistant forest 
ranger 



Assistant in forest 
surveying 

Assistant forest 

ranger 

Fire ranger 



Assistant forest 

ranger 

Exploratory engineer 

Fire ranger 



Assistant in forest 
surveying , 



Forest ranger. 



Assistant forest 
ranger 



Fire ranger. 



Assistant forest 
ranger 

Assistant chemist. . . 

Assistant forest 
ranger 



Park warden. 
Fire ranger... 



Park warden 

Assistant fire ranger 

Senior game warden 

Park warden 

Fire ranger 



1,020 
and allowance 

1,020 
and allowance 



Prevailing 

rates 

1,020 

Prevailing 

rates 



Stenographer, Gr. 1. 

Assistant in forest 

surveying 



Assistant fire ranger 
Forest ranger 



Assistant in forest 
surveying 



Fire ranger 

Assistant forest 

ranger 

Assistant fire ranger 

Assistant forest 

ranger 

Fire ranger 



1,020 
2,760 

Prevailing 
rates 

Prevailing 

rates 

1,200 

and allowance 

1,020 
and allowance 

Prevailing 
rates 

1,020 
2,100 

1,020 
and allowance 

1,200 
Prevailing 

rates 

1,200 
Prevailing 

rates 
960 

1,200 
Prevailing 

rates 

720 

Prevailing 
rates 



1,200 
and allowance 

Prevailing 
rates 



1,020 

Prevailing 

rates 

1,020 

Prevailing 

rates 



*14- 4-25 
*16- 4-25 

*29- 6-25 
*10- 4-25 
*12- 5-25 

* 1- &-25 
10- 7-25 

* 6- 5-25 

*21- 5-25 

* 1- 5-25 

* 1- 5-25 

* 1- 5-25 

* 1- 5-25 
17- 7-25 

* 4r- 5-25 

1- 7-25 

♦15- 4-25 
15- 7-25 

* 4- 5-25 
1- 4-25 
3-11-24 

*20- 5-25 

* 1- 6-25 
6-8-25 



* 1- 6-25 
♦15- 5-25 



*29- 4-25 

♦16- 6-25 
♦13- 4-25 

♦ 1- 5-25 

♦18- 5-25 

♦15- 5-25 

♦25-4-25 



Calgary, Alta. 

Clearwater Reserve, 
Rocky Mountain 
House, Alta. 



Alberta. 

Prince Albert, Sask.. 

Kamloops, B.C. 

North West Terri- 
tories and Yukon. 

New Westminster, 
B.C. 

New Brunswick, 

Entrance, Alta. 



Rocky Mountain 
House, Alta. 

Revelstoke, B.C. 

Kamloops, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Rocky Mountain 

House, Alta. 
Nemiskam, Alta. 

Prince Albert, Sask. 
Kootenay, B.C. 

Salmon Arm, B.C. 
Fort Smith, N.W.T^ 
Jasper, Alta. 

The Pas, Man. 
Norway House, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Ontario. 

New Westminster, 
B.C. 

Slave Lake, Alta. 



Manitoba. 

Spruce Lake, Sask. 

Kamloops, B.C. 

Salmon Arm, B.C. 

Kamloops, B.C. 

Winnipeg, Man. 



20 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act— Continued 

INTERIOR— ConcZwded 



Name 



Jones, William O.A.S 

Hirtle, Bordon O.A.S 

Bergeron, Aurora 

McKenzie, G. Susan 

Duckworth, Frank O.A.S 

Somerville, Robert O.A.S 

McElligott, Arnold E O.A.S 

Beverley, John L O.A.S 

Mallory, George D O.A.S, 

Hall, Margaret Jean 

Martell, James 

Freeborn, Frederick J O.A.S. 

Locke, Mrs. May Sarah 

Ardouin, Germaine 

Williams, Alice L 

Manuel, David Marshall. .§O.A.S. 

Brennan, Helena M 

Bird, Arthur O.A.S. 

Kerrigan, Celestine 

3lhodes, Arthur 

Atkin, Gilbert McI O.A.S. 

Best, Thomas Dodd O.A.S. 

Allen, Herbert Alfred O.A.S. 

Simpson, Daintry E 

Dransfield, Edward G O.A.S. 

Francis, Lionel George O.A.S. 

Robertson, Elizabeth Morris 

Mugridge, George H O.A.S. 

Creed, Deana Riecker 

Brennan, Marjorie K 

Blandy, Geoffrey W §O.A.S. 

Morison, Murray B 



Class 



Assistant forest 
ranger 



Stenographer, Gr. 1 

" 2. 

Assistant forest 

ranger 



Fire ranger. 



Salary 



Assistant forest 
ranger 



Clerk, grade 2. . . 
Assistant research 



engineer 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Forest ranger , 



Assistant forest 
ranger 



Telephone operator.. 
Stenographer, Gr. 1. 
Telephone operator.. 

Clerk, grade 2 

Stenographer, Gr. 1. 
Instrument maker, 

grade 2 

Stenographer, Gr. 1. 

Photographer 

Physician, part 

time 

A ssistant forest 

ranger 



Stenographer, Gr. 1 . 

Assistant forest 
ranger 

Junior-map drafts- 
man 

Stenographer, Gr. 1 . 

Assistant fire ranger 

Stenographer, Gr. 1. 
Timber scaler 



Forestry assistan t. . . 



1,020 
and allowance 

1,020 
and allowance 
720 
960 

1,020 

and allowance 

Prevailing 

rates 

1,020 
and allowance 
960 

1,920 
960 
1,200 
and allowance 

1,020 
and allowance 
720 
720 
780 
960 
720 

1,680 

720 

1,320 

600 

1.020 
and allowance 
1,020 
720 

1,020 

1,020 

720 
Prevailing 
rates 

720 

720 
1,800 

1,320 
and allowance 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



* 1- 9-25 

* 1- 5-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 8-25 



* 9- 4-25 

* 1- 5-25 
1- 9-25 

14-9-25 

1-9-25 
1- 7-25 

* 1- 5-25 



^20- 5-25 
1- 9-25 

23- 9-25 
1- 1-25 
7-10-25 
1-10-25 

1-10-25 

1-10-25 

14- 9-25 

17- 8-25 



11- 5-25 

15- 4-25 
1-10-25 

*1- 5-25 

10-11-25 
1-10-25 

16- 5-25 
1-10-25 
1-10-25 
1- 9-25 

5-11-25 



Annette, Sask. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 



Calgary, Alta. 

Kamloops, B.C. 

Dauphin, Man. 

Montreal, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Kamloops, B.C. 

Entrance, Alta. 



Slave Lake, Alta. 
Banff, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Banff. Alta. 
Prince Albert, Sask. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 
Banff, Alta. 



Pincher Creek, Alta. 
Calgary, Alta. 
Ottawa. Ont. 

Greenbush, Sask. 

Ottawa. Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Salmon Arm, B.C. 
Prince Albert, Sask. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
New Westminster, 

B.C. 
Swan River, Man. 



JUSTICE 



LeBlanc, Ferrain P O.A.S. 

Bertin, William O.A.S. 

Cochrane, David O.A.S. 



Walsh, Teresa 

Joinette, Joseph 

Lachatne, J. Ald^ge R. 



,..O.A.S, 



Prison guard, grade 

B 

Prison guard 

Steam power plant 

engineer 

Clerk-stenographer. 
Prison guard 

Messenger-clerk 



960 
960 



1,740 
960 
960 

600 



1- 1-25 
1-10-21 



1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 

1- 1-25 



Dorchester, N.B. 
St. Vincent de Paul, 
P.Q. 

Dorchester, N.B. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



21 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



JUSTICE— Cortttntted 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Hall6, Joseph F. X §O.A,S, 

Potvin, Edmond O.A.S. 

O'Neill, Edward James 

Tanner, John William 



Senior account clerk 
Prison guard 



Lecompte, Joseph Donat. 
Wardrop, John Patrick 



.O.A.S 



Birchenough, John Albert.. .O.A.S 

Heaps, John William O.A.S 

Belanger, Joseph C. A 



McElroy. David Cardin.. 
Marchand, Philias H 



.O.A.S 



Low, George §O.A.S. 



Lamb, John Geore;e 

Hubbell, Ada Isabella. . . 
Ribbens, Arthur William. 
Savignac, Romeo 



.O.A.S. 



Starratt, William B 

Smith, George M 

Arnold, Sidney William.. 

Hanaghan, Francis P 

Kerfoot, William Donald. 



Price, Griffith 

Archibald, Rankin 

Pelletier, G. Henri 

Rapin, Almeo 

Woods, Henry George... 

Moles, George Fred 



Wood, Clifford R... 
Laing, Henry MacL.. 
Farrell, Russeil E 



.O.A.S 
lO.A.S 
.O.A.S 
O.A.S 
.O.A.S 



.O.A.S 
.O.A.S 

.O.A.S 

.O.A.S 
.O.A.S 

.O.A.S 



.O.A.S 
.O.A.S 
50.A.S, 



B 

Prison guard. 



grade 



Industrial guard- 
mason 



Prison clerk-book- 
keeper 

Prison guard... .... 

Assistant steam 
power plant engin 
eer 



Industrial guard- 
blacksmith 

Industrial guard- 
tailor 



Prison guard. 



Clerk-stenographer.. 
Prison guard 



Sigouin, Alfred. 



Newman, John G.. . . 
Lamoureux, Joachim. 



.O.A.S 



Sylvestre, Lucien 

Field, Herbert 

Markland, Frederick J. . 
Wood, Sidney Charles... 

Shewell, George Harold. 
Smith, Charles Edward. 
Hancock, John William. . 
Hanson, Oscar Eugene. . . 
Babcock, Russell H 



.O.A.S. 

.O.A.S, 
.O.A.S. 



.O.A.S. 
.O.A.S. 



Senior stores clerk 
Prison guard 



Industrial guard- 
farmer 



Prison guard. 



Industrial guard- 
mason 

Prison guard fire- 
man 



Prison guard. 



Prison guard. 



Assistant prison 

steward 

Prison guard 



1,320 

960 
960 

960 
960 



1,080 



1,260 
960 



1,260 

1,080 

1,080 

960 

960 
960 
960 
960 

960 

1,320 

960 

960 

1.080 

1,080 
1,080 

960 

960 

1,200 

960 

1,080 
1,080 
1,080 

1,080 

1,080 
1,080 

1,080 
1,080 

1,080 

1,200 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 



1- 8-24 

6-10-24 
28- 1-25 

12- 2-25 
18- 8-24 



2- 2-25 



1-12-24 
1-10-24 



14- 1-25 

2- 4-25 

29- 1-25 

10- 2-25 

1- 3-25 

1- 4-25 

1- 3-25 

10- 2-25 

1-12-24 

15- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

20-12-24 

1-4-25 

12- 2-25 

10- 2-25 

1-10-24 

1- 6-25 

8- 6-25 

1- 6-25 
1- 6-25 
1- 2-25 

1- 7-25 

1- 6-25 
1- 7-25 

13- fr-25 
1- 6-25 

1- 7-25 

23- 6-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 6-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 7-25 



St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 

(t 

Kingston, Ont. 

Prince Albert, Sask. 
St. Vincent de Paul, 
P.Q. 

New Westminster, 
B.C. 

Stony Mountain, Man. 



St. Vincent de Paul, 
P.Q. 

Kingston, Ont. 

St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 
St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 
Kingston, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Kingston, Ont. 
St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 
Dorchester, N.B. 

Kingston, Ont. 



New Westminster, 

B.C. 
Prince Albert, Sask. 
New Westminster, 

B.C. 
St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 



Stony Mountain, Man. 

New Westminster, 

B.C. 
Prince Albert, Sask. 

New Westminster, 

B.C. 
St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 
Kingston, Ont. 
St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 

tt 

New Westminster, 

B.C. 
Kingston, Ont. 

New Westminster, B.C 
Kingston, Ont. 

a 

Stony Mountain, Man. 
Kingston, Ont. 
Dorchester, N.B. 



22 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

JUSTICE— ConcZwded 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Potvin, David 

Torrents, Henry Neil O.A.S 

Jackson, Edward R 

Vinet, Henry O.A.S 

Ctoulet, Joseph Robert O.A.S 

Burns, Victor §O.A.S 

Coyles, Henry O.A.S 

Cobb, Thomas Adam O.A.S 

Rose, Herbert Cecil O.A.S 

Foster, Arthur §O.A.S, 

Canfield, George Wm 

McClure, Archie Cameron.. .O.A.S 

Eraser. Peter Stewart O.A.S 

Leclaire, Albert 



Locat, Henri O.A.S. 

Topping, Frederick Wills.. . .O.A.S. 

Davis, Patrick O.A.S. 

Hill, Edwin John O.A.S. 

Duchaine, Albert O.A.S. 

Shearman, Fred J. W O.A.S. 

Harraway, Victor James O.A.S. 



Prison guard 

Industrial guard- 
blacksmith 

Inspector of peni- 
tentiaries 

Prison guard 

Senior draftsman 

Clerk, grade 2 

Industrial guard- 
farmer 

Messenger 

Prison guard 

Clerk, grade 3 
(prison clerk) 

Prison guard-fire- 
man 

Prison guard 

Messenger 

Prison guard 

Senior draughtsman 

Clerk, grade 3 

(prison clerk) 



$ 
1,080 

1,200 

2,820 
1,080 
1,080 

1,080 

1,680 

960 

1,200 
720 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 

1,260 



1,080 
1,080 
720 
1,080 
1,080 

1,680 

1,260 



1- 7-25 



24- 8-25 

4- 5-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 7-25 

1- 7-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

1-9-25 

1- 9-25 

19- 8-25 

19- 8-25 

1- 9-25 

13- 7-25 



17- 9-25 

1- 9-25 
1-11-25 
1-10-25 

2- 6-25 

1- 4-25 
16- 9-25 



St. Vincent de Paul, 
P.Q. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Stony Mountain, Man. 

St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 
Stony Mountain, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Stony Mountain, Man. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Prince Albert, Sask. 

Kingston, Ont. 

St. Vincent de Paul, 
P.Q. 



Prince Albert, Sask. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Stony Mountain, Man. 
St. Vincent de Paul, 

P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

New Westminster, 
B.C. 



LABOUR 



Mitchell, Ethel B 

McQuarrie, Clifton H. 
Greig, Robert 

Kelly, Donald C/ 

McGuire, Kathleen... 



.O.A.S. 
.O.A.S. 



.O.A.S. 



Clerk-stenographer. . 

Junior industrial 
research clerk 

Clerk, grade 2 

Office appliance oper- 
ator, grade 2 



960 
960 

1,380 
960 

900 



1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 



1-25 
7-25 



24- 8-25 



Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Davey , Edward 

Jardine, Frank Russel O.A.S 

McFarlane. Ernest 

Robertson, Alfred 

UTebb, Joseph Keay O.A.S 

Pierce, Frank §O.A.S 



"Raven, Charles. 
Chartier, Oscar. 



.O.A.S, 



Gough, Hugh Ernest. . . 
Murray, A. Bemadette. 



.O.A.S, 



Junior radiotele- 
graph operator . 

Caretaker 

Office boy 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 4, CI. 15 
" Gr. 4, CI. 11 

Boatman (Life Sav- 
ing Service) 



Hatchery assistant. 

Lightkeeper, Gr. 4 
CI. 15 

Hatchery assistant. 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 



660 
960 
300 

150 
420 



540 
and allowance 

1,080 
and allowance 

150 
1,080 



600 



1-11-24 

23- 9-24 

1- 1-25 

1-10-24 
10-10-24 



1-11-24 
1- 1-25 



23- 1-25 
27-11-24 



1-12-24 



Wherever assigned . 
Toronto, Ont. 
Charlotte town, P.E.I. 

Annandale, P.E.I. 
Havre Boucher, N.S. 



Long Point, Ont. 

Skeena river, B.C. 

Champlain, P.Q. 
Anderson Lake, B.C. 

Parry Sound, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



23 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



MARINE AND FISHERIES— Con/inuei 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Spinney, Frank K O.A.S 



Racine, Joseph 

Rains, Harold V 

Richardson. Aylmer O.A.S 

Bisson , Louis 



Atkins, James Leonard O.A.S 

Symns, Bernard Herbert O.A.S 

Cox, Henry Maurice 

Perry, Horace Greeley 

Riddell, John Melville 

McLean, Donald Stewart 

Shaw, Charles Arthur O.A.S 

Moisan, Joseph C, Roger 

Clark, Clarence 

Hardy, Ernest Arthur 

Thorn, William Albert O.A.S 

Bond, Victor John 

Oliver, Sigurdur O.A.S 

Caton, William Archibald 

Seguin, Oscar Jules 

Ross, Alfred Inkerman O.A.S 

Spicer, Leslie T O.A.S 



Young, Archibald Aitkin 

Sutherland, William M 

Bisaillon, Arthur 

Robillard, Simion 

Perron, Achilla 

Cooper, George Percival O.A.S 



Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 3, CI. 8 



" Gr. 4, CI. 15 



C lerk-st«nographer 

Lightkeeper, Gr. 4, 

CI. 14 



Junior radiotele- 
graph operator. 

Hatchery assistant.. 
Junior raldiotele- 
graph operator.. 

Weather observer, 
Gr. 3 

Junior stores clerk 

Lightkeeper. Gr. 2, 
C1.3 

Wharf patrolman . . . 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 4, CI. 15 

i< « 

Assistant weather 
forecaster 

Junior radiotele- 
graph operator 

Fishery overseer 

Junior radiotele- 
graph operator 

Lightkeeper, Gr. 4, 
CI. 14 

Steamship inspector 
(general) 

Lightkeeper, Gr. 4, 
CI. 15 

Steamship inspector 
(hulls and equip- 
ment) 

Junior radiotele- 
graph operator 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 4, CI. 14 
" Gr. 4, CI. 15 
" Gr. 3, CI. 10 
Junior radiotele- 
graph operator 



750 
and 36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 

150 

150 

960 

180 
and 36 foi 
operating 
fog-horn 

660 
and allowance 
1,080 

660 
and allowance 

400 
600 

1,560 
720 

600 

150 



150 

1,800 

660 
and allowance 

1,020 
and allowance 



660 
and allowance 

180 

2,700 

150 
and 36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 



2,400 

660 
and allowance 

180 
150 
570 

660 
and allowance 



13-12-24 
15- 5-23 



1- 2-25 
1- 1-25 



20- 1-25 



8-12-24 
14-12-24 



1-11-24 

1- 1-25 
29- 1-25 

28-11-24 
3- 2-25 

1- 1-25 

1- 8-24 

1- 2-25 
19- 1-25 

7-11-24 
1- 2-25 

1-11-24 
1- 5-22 
6-4-25 

7- 2-25 
16- 3-25 

1- 2-25 

1- 7-23 
27- 3-25 
26- 3-25 

1- 2-25 



Bliss Island, N.B. 
St. Francois river, 

P.Q. 
Sailors' Encampment, 

Ont. 
Parry Sound, Ont. 



Grand River, P.Q, 



Wherever assigned. 
Kennedy lake, B.C. 



East coast. 

Wolfville, N.S. 
Parry Sound, Ont. 

Guion Island, N.S. 
Dartmouth, N.S. 

Quebec, P.Q. 

Grand Entry harbour, 
Magdalen Islands, 
P.Q. 

Little channel, P.E.I. 

Toronto, Ont. 



Wherever assigned. 

Lake Winnipegosis, 
Man. 



Wherever assigned . 
Rigaud river, P.Q. 
Halifax, N.S. 

Spencer's Island, N.S. 
Toronto, Ont. 

East coast. 

Lacolle, P.Q. 
St. Sulpice. P.Q. 
Cap aux Oies, P.Q. 

East coast. 



24 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

MARINE AND FISHERIES— Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



0^ 

Var Maynard, Emest H O.A.S. 



Spinks, Robert O.A.S, 

Mitchell, Alexander 



Lightkeeper, Gr. 3, 
CI. 9 



Cripps, Alfred W O.A.S 

Robertson, George W 



Graham, Reginald O.A.S, 



Lawton, Alphonsus T O.A.S. 

Hargrove. Frederick E 

Chilcott, Ernest Baldwin 

Waugh, James Nicol §O.A.S. 

Hamilton, Ellsworth A 

Johnson, Lyle Hiram 

Rajotte, Lionel 

Spence, Roderick E O.A.S. 

Camrite, Ross 

Savoir, Joseph Elz6ar 

Mclsaac, Benjamin §O.A.S. 

Martin, Joseph §O.A.S. 

Thordarson, Ingolfur O.A.S, 

Filion, M. Bemadette J 

Scott, Robert John C O.A.S 

Moffat, John J 

Williams, Harry Percy O.A.S 

Axcell, Arthur E 

O'Hanley, Charles John 

Mosher, Donald Willard 

Legere, Frederic L 



Wharf patrolman . . . 
Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 2, Ci. 3 
" Gr. 3, CI. 6 
Junior radiotele- 
graph operator 

Lightkeeper, Gr. 3, 
CI. 7 



Junior radiotele- 
graph operator. . . 



Junior clerk 

Assistant weather 

forecaster 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 3, CI. 7 



" Gr. 2, CI. 3 
Junior radiotele- 
graph operator. . . 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 3, CI. 9 

" Gr. 2, CI. 4 
" Gr. 4. CI. 13 
" Gr. 3, CI. 10 



« Gr. 3. CI. 9 



Stenographer, Gr. 
Junior radiotele- 
graph operator. . 

Steamship inspector 
(general) 

Hydrometric recor 
der 

Junior radiotele- 
graph operator 



Inspector of fish cur- 
ing and packing.. . 



660 
and 36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 

720 

1,560 
960 

660 
and allowance 

840 
and 36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 

660 
and allowance 
600 

1,800 

840 
and 36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 

1,560 

660 
and allowance 

600 

660 

918.36 

210 

570 

570 
36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 

660 
and 36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 

720 

1,320 
and allowance 

2,700 

1,440 

1,320 
and allowance 

1,380 

1,380 

1,380 



and 



1-10-24 
29-12-24 



1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 



1- 2-25 



18- 2-25 



1- 3-25 
♦10- 3-25 



25- 2-25 



1- 4-25 
1- 3-25 

1- 2-25 

1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 

15- 4-25 

3- 4-25 



1- 5-25 
1- 6-25 



1- 5-25 

16- 6-25 

1-6-25 

1- 4-25 

* Season 

1925 
*15- 7-25 

* 1- 6-25 



Lucy Island, B.C. 
Prince Rupert, B.C. 

He Parisienne, Ont. 
Burlington bay, Ont. 



Wherever assigned. 



Fiddle reef. B.C. 



Wherever assigned . 
St. John, N.B. 

Toronto, Ont. 



Portlock Point, Pre- 

vost Island, B.C. 
Seal Island, N.S. 



East coast. 

Montreal, P.Q. 

Red river, lake Winni- 
peg, Man. 
Presqu'ile, Ont. 
South Tracadie, N.B. 
West Point, P.E.I. 



Giant's Tomb, Ont. 



George Island, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



East coast. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Wherever assigned . 

Yarmouth county, 
N.S. 

Lunenburg county, 
N.S. 

Counties of Resti- 
gouche, Gloucester, 
Northumberland 
and Kent, N.B. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



29 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Glasses made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

MARINE AND FISHERIES— ConHnucrf 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Walsh, Harold Edgar O.A.S 

Marks, Robert Byron O.A.S 



Thomas, Caroline L 

Delaney , Joseph A 

McLeod, Robert W O.A.S. 

Pettingell, Joseph E. Edgar. O.A.S. 

Laing, James R 

Paquet, Etienne T 

Binet, Morton S O.A.S. 

Theriault, Vilbon 

Davis. William J §O.A.S. 

Beaudoin, Joseph Charles 

Vezina, D6sir6 

Carter, Jean Elizabeth 

Ringer, Robert A O.A.S. 

T6trault, Joseph Honor6 

Fricker, Reginald H O.A.S. 

Boudreau, Harry T O.A.S. 

Tapp, Jean Baptiste 

Holmes, C. Hazen 

Covey, Wilfred 

Vaughan, Wilbert H 

Robert, Amede O.A.S. 

Gerard, Philip E 

Dancause, Edouard 

McKenzie, Maurice §O.A.S. 

Wame. Frank O.A.S. 

Nichols, George Murray 

Curry, Freeman 



Junior radio electri- 
cal engineer 

Lightkeeper, Gr. 3 
CI. 7 



Clerk-stenographer . 
Inspector of fish cur- 
ing and packing. . . 

Fishery overseer 

Lightkeeper, Gr. 3 
CI. 6 



Inspector of fash cur- 
ing and packing. . . 



Signal agent . 



Inspector of fish cur- 
ing and packing. . . 



Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 4. CI. 13 
Steamship inspector 
(hulls and equip- 
ment) 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 3, CI. 10 
Stenographer, Gr. 
Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 2, CI. 3 
" Gr. 4, CI. 14 



Junior radiotele- 
graph operator.. 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 2, CI. 3 
" Gr. 4, CI. 15 

" Gr. 3, CI. 7 



" Gr. 2, CI. 2 
Inspector of fish cur- 
ing and packing.. . 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 4, CI. 11 
Tidal and current 

observer, part time 
Signal agent, part 

time 

Clerk, grade 2 

Fishery overseer 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr. 4, CI. 13 
" Gr. 2, CI. 2 



1,680 

840 
and 36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 

960 

1,380 

1,020 

960 

1,380 

720 
and 180 for 
operating 
semaphore 

1,380 

1,380 

210 

2,400 

720 
720 

1,740 
180 



660 
and allowance 

1,560 
150 

840 
and 36 for 
operating 
fog-horn 

2,100 

1,380 



420 

240 

300 

960 

1,020 



210 
2,340 



29- 5-25 



10- 7-24 
20-11-24 

*15- 5-25 

16- 6-25 

11-12-24 



Season 
1925 



5- 1-25 

♦ 5- 4-25 

* 5- 4-25 
16- 7-25 

10- 3-25 

19- 6-25 
1- 7-25 

27- 7-25 
12- 8-22 

13-12-24 

1- 1-25 
13-12-24 



29- 1-25 
19- 5-25 

*15- 4-25 

10- 7-25 

1- 8-25 

1- 9-25 
14- 9-25 

30- 6-25 



2 9-25 
26- 8-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Nootka, B.C. 
Victoria, B.C. 

Magdalen Islands, 

P.Q. 
Cariboo district, B.C. 

Sisters' lightstation, 
B.C. 



Guysboro county, N.S. 



St. Nicholas, P.Q. 

Richmond, Cape Bre- 
ton and Victoria 
counties, N.S. 

Cape Breton and Vic- 
toria counties, N.S. 

Aylmer Island, P.Q. 



Quebec, P.Q. 

Crane Island, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Lockeport, N.S. 
Contrecoeur Vercheres 
P.Q. 



British Columbia. 

Green Island, N.S. 
St. Maurice de 
I'Echourie, P.Q. 



Southwest Wolf Island 
N.B. 

Louisburg, N.S. 

Lunenburg county, 

N.S. 

Caraquet Island, N.B. 

Point St. Peter, P.Q. 

Crane Island, P.Q. 
Halifax. N.S. 
Naas river district, 
B.C. 

Gushing, P.Q. 
Flint Island, N.S. 



26 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



MARINE AND FISHERIE&-ConcZwdei 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Aucoin, Joseph David O.A.S 

Bell, Lucy Edna R 

Irish, Victor William 

Coumoyer, Pierre 

Denis, L6o 

Moore, John Stuart O.A.S 

Bald, Andrew Jardine §O.A.S 

Boyle, Howard O.A.S 



Inspector of fish cur- 
ing and packing. . . 
Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Junior radiotele- 
graph operator 

Lightkeeper, 

Gr.4, CI. 11 
" Gr. 4, CI. 13 

Typist, grade 1 

Lightkeeper. 

Gr. 3, CI. 10 
" Gr. 2, CI. 3 



1,380 
960 

1,320 
and allowance 
150 

210 
720 

720 
1,740 



*15- 5-25 
1- 9-25 



1-10-25 
1- 9-22 



25- 9-25 
1- 8-25 



1-12-25 
13-11-25 



Inverness county, N.S. 
Newcastle, N.B. 



East coast. 

Ste. Anne de Sorel, 

P.Q. 
He au Milien. P.Q. 
Charlottetown, P.E.I . 

Whiskey Island, Ont. 
Cabot Head, Ont. 



MINES 



Slack, M . Marion K 


Clerk-stenographer. . 


960 


1- 1-25 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Dyer, William Spafford. . . 


O.A.S. 


Assistant geologist. . 


2,100 


1- 3-25 


ii 


Saint-Laurent, Germaine.. 




Junior clerk-steno- 












grapher 


600 


1- 4-25 




Roberts, William George.. 


..O.A.S. 


Messenger-clerk 


600 


1- 4-25 




McClelland, W. Raymond 




Engineer, Mines 












liranch, grade 1.. . 


1,680 


1- 6-25 




Way, Ernest George O . . . . 




Office boy 


420 


17- 6-25 




Steeves, Samuel Merritt 


Junior topographical 












engineer 


1,680 


21- 5-25 




Johnston. John D 


§O.A.S. 


Junior chemist 


1,680 


1- 9-25 




Malcolm, Margaret Ross. . 




Ijibrary assistant . . . 


960 


1- 9-25 




Butler, Joseph Clivis 




Office boy 


420 


5- 9-25 




Delanev, Ann Margaret. . . 




Stenographer, Gr. 2 


960 


17-12-25 




Weeks, Ludlow Jackson. . . 


.O.A.S. 


Assistant geologist. . 


2,100 


1-12-25 





NATIONAL DEFENCE 



Simard, Joseph M 

Roberts, Robert. ..... 

Bates, Patrick Augusti „ 

Sims, Sidney Colin O.A.S 

Young, Florence 



.O.A.S 
.O.A.S 

ine...§O.A.S 



Mathieu, C6cile Diane 

Steenson, Myrtle Matilde. 

Low, William 

LeBlanc, Herv6 T 



.O.A.S. 



.A.S. 
.A.S, 



.O.A.S, 



Campbell, Edith S. . . 

Glaude, Alexandre 

Emond, Henri Paul. . . 
Withers, George F. S., 
Jennings, Thomas J. . . 

Goodwin, Alfred 

Putt, Walter John 

Betts, Horace Hector 

Comerford, James J 

Gent, Harold Edward O.A.S 

Geddes, Alexander O.A.S 

McGiUicuddy, Arthur J O.A.S 

Turner, Kingsley 

Groulx, Julien 

Fortier. Francois 

Maingot, Albert J O.A.S 

Stevens, Ema Merle 

Groulx, Julien 



backer and helper... 
Clerk-stenographer.. 

Watchman 

Caretaker 

Junior clerk - steno- 
grapher 

Clerk-stenographer. . 

Junior stores clerk... 

Schoolmaster, 

Naval Training 
School 

Clerk-stenographer.. 

Office boy 

Instructor in French 

Clerk-stenographer. . 

Caretaker 



Office boy 

Clerk-stenographer.. 
Junior stores clerk . . 



Account clerk. 
Office boy. . . . 



Junior stores clerk . . 

Clerk, grade 4 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Office boy 



780 
960 
720 
960 

600 
960 
960 
600 



1,680 
960 
300 

2,340 
960 
960 
960 
960 
420 
960 
600 
600 
960 
300 
300 
600 

1,500 
960 
420 



1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
5-11-24 
1- 1-25 

26- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
4- 2-25 



26-11-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 2-25 

16- 2-25 
1- 3-25 
1- 2-25 

17- 3-25 
17- 3-25 

1- 4-25 

26- 2-25 

26- 1-25 

7- 3-25 

1- 4-25 

26- 1-25 

4- 2-25 
15- 4-25 

5- 6-25 
1-5-25 
1- 6-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Esquimalt, B.C. 
Halifax, N.S. 
Esquimalt, B.C. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Quebec, P.Q. 
Esquimalt, B.C. 



Halifax, N.S. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Regina, Sask. 

Halifax, N.S. 

Esquimalt, B.C. 
« 

Halifax, N.S. 
Esquimalt, B.C. 
Esquimalt, B.C. 

Quebec, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Quebec, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Halifax, N.S. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



zr 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

NATIONAL DEFENCE— ConciWed 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Mclvor, Mary I 

Pollack, Pearl 

Scott, Lucy 

Todd, Gwytha 

' Cassidy, Thomas Wilbert. 
Thomas, Alexander Joseph 
Chabot, Charles A 

Woollett. Archibald P 

Hill, Dorothy Ermyn 

Wheeler, George Alex 



Clerk-stenographer. . 
Stenographer, Gr. 2 
1 
Junior clerk - steno- 
grapher 

Office boy 

u 

Associate professor 

of French 

Office'boy 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Office boy 



960 
960 
720 

600 
300 
420 

2,940 
420 
960 
420 



1- 5-25 
1- 7-25 
4- 6-25 

26- 2-25 
1- 1-25 
1-10-25 

1-10-25 
13-10-25 
12-12-25 

1-12-25 



Calgary, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Kingston, Ont. 
Esquimalt, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



POST OFFICE 
(For Postmasters appointed — see Table No. 2.) 



Brown, Frank Joseph O A.S 

Shaw, Charles Ernest §O.A.S 

Tyler, Sydney C 

Craig, Crawford W. J O.A.S 

Wheelock, Jesse Hayes O.A.S 

Bering, Charles Hubert § 

Rayner, George O.A.S 

Lemmon, Herbert H 

Gamble, William Henry. . . §O.A.S 

Dungg, Arlington M 

Lane, George Frederick O.A.S 

Andrews, Thomas §O.A.S 

Love, Edward Albert fO.A.S 

Egan, James Michael O.A.S 

Turner, Muriel 

Daugherty, George Edwin 

Pick, Austin Lawrence O.A.S 

Droppo, Murray O.A.S 

Morrison, James O.A.S 

Harvie, George Hume O.A.S 

McCann, Mary L 

Ryan, Patrick O.A.S 

Findlay , Hugh G 

Brecknell, Percy Thomas.. .O.A.S 
Davis, German Campbell... O.A.S 
Lawson, William Edward. . O.A.S 
Prouix, Marie Cecile 

Brownie, William 

Basing, Henry Frederick O.A.S 

Legault, Leo O.A.S 

Foster, Andrew S §0. A.S 

Bums, William Urret Glad- 
stone O.A.S 

McFadden, Harold E O.A.S 

Long, Albert O.A.S 

Cruse, Harold Bertram O.A.S 

Manning, Percy Cecil O.A.S 

MacFaul, Edith A 

Lawford, Eari L §O.A.S 

Barker, Albert Spencer O.A.S 

Prance, Edward Herbert 

Smith, George §O.A.S 

McDonald, Norman 

Spiers, Richard 

Tease, Samuel H 

Laird, John O.A.S 



Postal helper 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

Letter carrier 

t( 

Postal helper 

it 

it 

Office appliance 
operator, grade 2 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 

a 
it 

tt 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2 
Postal helper 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

Packer and helper.. 
Postal helper 

it 

Clerk-stenographer. 
Postal helper 

it 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 



1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

840 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

840 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

840 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 

780 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

960 
1,020 
1.020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 



1- 4-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 

29-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1-11-24 
1-10-24 

22-11-24 
1- 1-25 

1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 7-24 
1-11-24 
1-10-24 
7-11-24 

1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1-10-24 

1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-11-24 
13-10-24 
1-10-24 

1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
5- 5-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-12-24 
1-12-24 
12-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1- 1-25 



St. John, N.B. 
Windsor, Ont. 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Regina, Sask. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Windsor, Ont. 



Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Windsor, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Port Arthur, Ont. 
Edmonton, Alta. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Port Arthur, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Hull, Que. 
Niagara Falls, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Niagara Fails, Ont. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Port Arthur, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Calgary. Alta. 
Regina, Sask. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



i» 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



POST OFFICE— Con<tn«e(i 



Name 






Locality 

of 

Appointment 




Robinson, James O.A.S 

Gardner, George §O.A.S 

Laurin, Melita Helen 

Heath, Lewis Henry §O.A.S 

Hancock, Noel Henry O.A.S 

Smith, Peter M. O.A.S. 

Marston, William §O.A.S, 

Cook, William O.A.S. 

Peterson, Joel O.A.S. 

Ferguson, Dominic J. L 

B6dard, Louise 

Smith, Eggar Edwin §O.A.S. 

Hillyard, Frank Joseph O.A.S. 

Clayson, Charles W O.A.S, 

Foster, George §O.A.S. 

Hewlett, George O.A.S. 

Welsh, James O.A.S. 

Quinn, Joseph Feilix O.A.S. 

Home, Charles Henry O.A.S. 

Atto, Artha J 

Edmondson, Margaret 

Breton, J. Napol6on, jr 

Edwards, George §O.A.S. 

Deshaies, Louis O.A.S. 

McNair, James O.A.S. 

Kiloh, Andrew D O.A.S. 

Unthank, William Arthur.. .O.A.S. 

Craig, Robert Frederick O.A.S. 

Watson, Abram O.A.S. 

Cook, David Waters O.A.S. 

Corin, Daniel H O.A.S. 

Smerdon, Albert V 

Jones, Robert Ernest O.A.S. 

Lowdell, Sydney §O.A.S. 

Duck, Sydney W O.A.S. 

Crossley, Henry Reginald. .§O.A.S. 

Fulton, Robert §O.A.S. 

Hughes, Gordon W §O.A.S. 

Cronin, Thomas Patrick O.A.S. 

McLeod, Annie 

Freeman, Mareus Roland O.A.S. 

Achielzer, Elias Leo O.A.S. 

Turner, Fred James §O.A.S. 

Hume, William James O.A.S. 

Walker, Robert L. Macdonald, 

§O.A.S. 

Burley, Edward K O.A.S. . 

Palmer, Edward George C 

Donohoe, John Willard §O.A.S. 

Lawrenson, Robert §O.A.S. 

Mcintosh, John James 

Galliene, Walter Henry O.A.S. 

MacKintosh, John Henry 

Styres, Alfred O.A.S. 

David, Percy Roy 

Markham, Harold Wm O.A.S. 

Bryan, Denis Dewar O.A.S. 

Blair, James McLaren O.A.S. 

Elliott, William Henry 

Holmes, George Percy O.A.S. 

Stuart, John Charles O.A.S. 

Huntley, William A O.A.S. 

Harding, Cecil O.A.S. 

Gale, Edward Maurice 

Timleck, Lee Sanford O.A.S. 



Postal helper 

C lerk-stenographer , 
Office appliance 

operator, grade 2 
Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Office appliance 
operator, grade 2 

Postal helper 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

a 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 

iC 

it 
a 

it 

Messenger-clerk 

Postal helper 



$ 

1,020 

1,020 

960 

840 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1.020 

840 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 

840 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
600 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 



1- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1- 1-25 

20- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1- 1-25 

17- 9-24 
7-12-24 
1-10-24 
1-7-24 

1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 4-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 

1-10-24 
7- 2-25 
1- 8-24 
1- 9-24 
1- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-12-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-11-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 

1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-12-24 
1-12-24 
1-12-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 

1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 

2- 3-25 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 



Regina, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Quebec, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Regina, Sask. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Niagara Falls, Ont. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Brantford, Ont. 
Prince Rupert, B.C. 
Port Arthur, Ont. 
Sherbrooke, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Sherbrooke, P.Q. 
Brantford, Ont. 
Sherbrooke.P. Q. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Brantford, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Sarnia, Ont. 
Prince Rupert, B.C. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



North Bay, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



29 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Glasses made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

o{ 

Appointment 



Phillips, Harold Hackett....O.A.S. 

James, Walter John O.A.S. 

Richardson, George Emerson 

Cooper, Frederick Robert. ..O.A.S. 

Munden, Joseph John O.A.S. 

McFayden, Gilbert G 

Wood. William O.A.S. 

Wright, George Edward 

Chinn, Charles O.A.S. 

Hewitt, Ernest Charles O.A.S. 

Paterson, John Granville.. .§O.A.S. 

Weir, John James §O.A.S. 

Bell, Alured S §O.A.S. 

Penfound, Victor Fred O.A.S. 

Stevens, Edgar G. Wm O.A.S. 

Munro, Arthur §O.A.S 

Bishop, Albert fO.A.S 

Moran, Charles James 

MacLennan, Kenneth O.A.S 

McBride, Henry A O.A.S. 

Johnston, Thomas Theodore 

Carson, LawTence B O.A.S. 

Davis, William Mactaggart. O.A.S. 
Whithouse, Frederick Wm. .O.A.S 

Coleman, Frank Cyril 

Boland, James Patrick O.A.S 

Levick, Charles Leo 

Welch, Rolfe B O.A.S 

Stoddart, Baldwin H. W 

Sangster, Albert Stanley 

Dance, James William O.A.S 

Pallister, John Eric 

Sutherland, Angus George. ..O.A.S, 

Fairbairn, Thomas G O.A.S. 

Dungey, Arthur William 

Willatt, Arthur O.A.S 

McBride, Lawrence Oscar 

Hughes, Herbert Ross O.A.S 

Edwards, William O.A.S. 

Bruce, George Nicol O.A.S. 

Martin, Maurice 

Kirk, Samuel Russell 

Evans, George Frederick 

Fleeton, Charles 

Southorn, Alan Sydney 

McFadyen, Donald Malcolm 

Ward, Bertram 

Seager, Thomas James O.A.S. 

Hayes, David Bernard O.A.S. 

Nimmb, Thomas Victor 

Mathieu, Joseph Arthur 

Dumontier, J. Andre A 

DeVeault, Oswald Lester 

Alarie, Joseph Louis A O.A.S. 

Lajoie, Alcide G6rin O.A.S. 

Prud'homme, Louis 

Labrosse, Oscar O.A.S. 

Arland, Chester Blair §O.A.S. 

Craig, .John Nelson 

Irons, James O.A.S. 

Cockburn, David Leslie... .§O.A.S. 
Daniels, William Henry... .fO.A.S. 

Strathdee, Donald 

Sullivan, Ernest Arthur O.A.S. 

Cutting, George §O.A.S. 

Stevens, Walter Alfred §O.A.S. 

Simpson, Helen Stewart 

Smith, Frances Winnifred 



Postal helper. 



Postal clerk... 
Postal helper. 



Postal clerk... 
Postal helper. 



Mail porter. . 
Postal clerk. 



Postal helper.. 
Letter carrier. 

Postal helper.. 



Clerk-stenographer. 



1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
960 
960 



-10-24 

- 1-25 
-10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 

- 7-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 

- 1-25 
-10-24 
-10-24 
■10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 

- 1-25 

- 1-25 

- 5-24 

- 1-25 
-10-24 
•10-24 

- 1-25 
-10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 
-10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 
10-24 

7-24 

7-24 

7-24 

7-24 

7-24 

7-24 

7-24 

1-25 

10-24 

10-24 

10-24 

10-24 

10-24 

10-24 

10-24 

10-24 

2-25 

3-25 



Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
North Bay, Ont. 
Moncton, N.B. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 



Toronto, Ont. 



Toronto, Ont. 



Saskatoon, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



30 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act— Continued 

POST OFFICE— Cow<tnwed 



Name 



Long, Georgina Dean O.A.S, 

Hill, Gerald §O.A.S. 

Lloyd, Oliver Gordon O.A.S. 

Stainton, Mary Helen J 

Redmond, John 0,A.S. 

Quinn, Charles O.A.S. 

Dale, Leslie Lee 

Chapman, Wilfred L O.A.S. 

Bowsher, Howard K 

Moody, Clifford 

Melville, Charles B. M 

Gossling. Guy O.A.S. 

White, Arthur Douglas O.A.S. 

Lowes, Albert James 

Curran, Alexander J 

Elliott, David L 

Donoghue, William Patrick. O.A.S. 

Dennis, Albert B. C 

Westall, John Thomas 

Townsley, Leonard O.A.S. 

Sutcliffe, Bruce Albert 

Bees, Lewis Charles O.A.S. 

Armstrong, George William.O.A.S. 

Darg, Leonard O.A.S. 

McMaster, Wilfred Andrew..O.A.S. 

Porter, Benjamin O.A.S. 

Hunter. Charles A §O.A.S. 

Brazeau, Joseph Harold 

Laporte, Wilfrid S 

Hawes, Frederick A O.A.S. 

Hillen, George Victor O.A.S. 

Gibson, Norman Arthur 

Corlett, John Maurice 

Sussams, George A 

Dawson, Walter 

Hambly, Ernest O.A.S. 

Cope, Richard O.A.S. 

Upshall, Horace George O.A.S. 

Wade, George William O.A.S. 

Latham, Ernest Edward O.A.S. 

Howell, George O.A.S. 

Belcher, William F. J O.A.S. 

Miller, Donald O.A.S. 

Blais, George 

Smith, Harry 

Johnston, David B O.A.S. 

Archambault, P. Gerard A 

Provost, J. Hermas 

Betts, Mabel W 

Grant, John Mackenzie §O.A.S. 

Cook, Ernest §O.A.S. 

Archambault, J. Georges A 

Marentette, J. Ernest 

Morgan, John Palmer O.A.S. 

Baisley. John R O.A.S. 

Baldwin, Thomas O.A.S. 

Bourrie, Joseph N 

Ouellette, J. L. Rosaire 

Normoyle, Margaret M 

Lee, Reuben §O.A.S. 

Johnston, Andrew G. A O.A.S. 

Murphy, Albert Edward.. .§O.A.S. 

Deneau, J. Ernest P O.A.S. 

Bourret, J. 0.0 

Ethier, J. Henri 



Class 



Postal helper. 



Clerk-stenographer. 
Postal helper 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Letter carrier. 



Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 



Postal clerk. 



Office appliance 
operator, grade 2. 

Junior clerk 

Railway mail clerk, 
Postal clerk 



Salary 



$ 

1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

840 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1.020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 

600 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 

840 
600 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 



Date 



1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 2-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 

1-12-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-11-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 

9- 3-25 
1-10-24 
1-12-24 
1- 7-24 
5- 1-24 

14-10-24 
1-12-24 
1-12-24 

14- 5-24 
1- 7-24 

3-12-14 
12- 3-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Toronto, Ont. 
North Bay, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Sydney, N.S. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Peterborough, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Collingwood, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

it 

Saskatoon, Sask. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



3T 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



.A.S 

:o.A.s. 



Bastien, Joseph Arthur 

Brine, Frederick George O.A.S. 

Knight, John Henry O.A.S. 

Kingwell. Albert O.A.S. 

Joyce, Thomas Patrick O.A.S. 

Saville. Edwin §O.A.S 

Se berry, Dal ton Richard 

Wright, Albert Dudley 

Rickard, Percy Enoch O.A.S 

Boyce, Alfred George Keam, 

§O.A.S 

Oliphant, Roi Bruce E. G 

Crapper, Harold William 

Krawchuck, Phillip O.A.S 

Wellard, Albert O.A.S 

Armstrong, William S §O.A.S 

Baylis, Edward George 

Jones, John G. H. L 

Hozack, Robert James 

Hickman, Arthur Edwin O.A.S 

Gray, Oliver O.A.S 

Ross, Ernest Brown 

Wilson, Archibald Sharp 

Culver, George A 

Wratten, Edward Price O.A.S. 

Mackie, William O.A.S. 

Hutchinson, Frederick O.A.S. 

Hodges, Rowvres F §O.A.S. 

Tobe, Andrew Teddie 

Parton, Alfred Earl 

Quarrier, John Amott 

Parkinson, William J O.A.S. 

Keeping, Weston Kimball 

Morris, Johnston Eric 

Gossman, Vincent 

Robinson, Benjamin A O.A.S. 

Crough, Joseph Francis 

Kerry, Arthur Ernest O.A.S. 

Shuker, Thomas Daniel... .§0 .A.S. 

Campbell, John O.A.S. 

Byme, John Fraser 

Burke, William Travers O.A.S. 

Bridge, William O.A.S. 

Symon, Gerald Alexander... O.A.S. 

Bendle, Ernest Clifford O.A.S. 

Johnston, George Ford 

Saunders, Fred 

Dresser, William Henry 

Mackay, John Robert 

Latchford, Frank Robert, jr 

Bennie, David O.A.S. 

Murray, Patrick O.A.S. 

Day, Cecil John Louis 

Hallett, George Ashfield. . .O.A.S. 

Hunting, Guy O.A.S. 

Tress, George P O.A.S. 

Brownridge, William Earl..§O.A.S. 

Bell, John O.A.S. 

Pearson, Everett R 

Heckler, Bernard Alfred 

Pugh, Harold Annis 

Bailey, Ray O 

Hillis, James Richard OA.S. 

Grass, Clark Howard 

Paine, George Fred O.A.S. 

Davey, Edward Emmanuel§O.A.S. 
Dent, Robert Everett O.A.S. 



Postal helper 

u 
it 

Railway mail clerk 

Postal helper 

« 

K 
« 

« 
H 
<< 
<< 
<< 
li 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

It 
« 

« 
tt 
tt 
« 

« 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 

Mail porter 

Postal helper 



$ 

1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 



1- 7-24 
1-12-24 
21- 2-25 
9- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 

1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 

1- 2-25 

2- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-21 
1- 1-25 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 



Montreal, P.Q. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Guelph, Ont. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Hamilton, Ont. 

tt 

Belleville, Ont. 
London, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



32 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Glasses made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Conhnwed 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Hunter, Robert Trueman. . .O.A.S, 

Whiteside, William §O.A.S. 

Bescoby, John Edward §O.A.S. 

Twaddle, William Muir O.A.S. 

Amyst, J. Eugene A 

Marier, J. A. Alexandre 

Hatch, James Wesley O.A.S. 

Bradwell, Joseph O.A.S. 

deLadurantaye, J. E. Aivaft 

Bedford, Isaac O.A.S. 

Dunning, Fern I 

Emery, Henry John O.A.S. 

McDonald, Norman T §O.A.S. 

DuBroy, Jennings G 

Arnold, Albert E. C 

Greenfield, William John... §O.A.S. 

Clark, Leon A 

Small, Jack Hurrell O.A.S. 

Wellman, William G O.A.S. 

Cosentino, Michael V 

Gagnon, Ir6n6e 

Shardlow, Cecil Francis O.A.S. 

Levin, Walter Borne O.A.S. 

Manning, Charles W O.A.S. 

Chicoine, Joseph 

Bastien, Joseph Armand 

Belanger, Joseph Godefroi 

Viens, J. L. Hermann 

Roy, Philippe Luc 

Rivard, Joseph Jules O 

Pleitch, James O.A.S. 

Mitchell, Clarence Bert 

Rousseau, Lucien A 

McDonald, Archibald H. . . .O.A.S. 

Papineau, J. E. A. Romeo 

Cox, Vernon 

Boulay, Marie Fleurange 

Robbins, Roy Russell O.A.S. 

Martin, Cecil James O.A.S. 

Creighton, Stewart Austin 

Browne, Robert O.A.S. 

Huggins, Harry O.A.S. 

Bouneville, Louis Montezuma 

O.A.S. 
VanHorne, Burton Charles.. O.A.S. 
McGregor, Kenneth John. ...O.A.S. 

Clark, Walter O.A.S. 

Laprise, Henry Wilfred O.A.S. 

Johnson, James F §O.A.S. 

Hunt, Henrietta 

Gagnon, Albert D 

Holtom, Herbert O.A.S. 

Sones, William Ernest 

Birrell, Paul Cecil 

Clarke, Albert E §O.A.S. 

Gittins, John Richard O.A.S. 

Burns, George Walton O.A.S. 

O'Connor, Cornelius §O.A.S. 

St. Antoine, J. Hector A 

Gratton, Henri Victor 

Rignall, Percy E O.A.S. 

Laberge, J. Venceslas 

Laferriere, Paul C 

Lavallee, Louis AdMard 

Walton, Garnett Britten O.A.S. 



Postal helper. 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2 
Postal helper 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2 
Postal helper 



Railway mail clerk. 



Postal helper 

Office appliance 
operator, grade 2. 

Postal clerk 

Railway mail clerk, 
Postal helper 



Postal clerk. 



Postal helper. 
Postal clerk.. 



Postal helper. 



$ 

1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

840 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

840 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 

840 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 



1- 1-25 
1-12-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1-12-24 
18-11-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 

30- 3-25 
18-12-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-12-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-11-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 

3-12-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
9- 2-25 
1- 1-25 

1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1-11-24 
27- 2-25 

22-11-24 
1- 7-24 

30- 4-25 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 

24- 2-25 

12- 2-25 
1-7- 24 
1- 7-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 



Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Toronto, Ont. 
Quebec, P.Q. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Nanaimo, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Toronto, Ont. 

Quebec, P.Q. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Vancouver, B.C. 



Calgary, Alta. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Hamilton, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Regina, Sask. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Montreal, P.Q. 

Toronto, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Toronto, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



33 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission, under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Continued 



Name 



Class 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Harrod, Percy O.A.S 

Montcalm, Georges H 

MacAulay, Alexander J 0.A.8 

Elder, William James O.A.S 

Hughes, George Edward O.A.S 

Blais, J. E. RoUand 

O'Brien, Lincoln 

Lowe, Alfred O.A.S 

Lyle, Thomas 

iCoux, F. Maurice I. H 

Dechene, Emile O.A.S 

Dunnigan, Julia Irene 

Sym, James O.A.S 

Fagan, Marguerite M 

Edge, Robert O.A.S 

Fetherston, John §O.A.S, 

Duffy, Bernard Driscoll 

Jackson, Robert O.A.S. 

MacKenzie, Alexander E. . .fO.A.S 

Wilson, Thomas Alfred §O.A.S 

Hamilton, John F O.A.S 

Morris, William Arthur O.A.S 

Binet, Lionel Aubin O.A.S, 

Gash, William R §O.A.S, 

Surtees, William E O.A.S. 

Roe, Frank J. H O.A.S. 

Shaw, Earl Brock 

Joly, Armand 

Poulin, Arthur 

Desmarais, Edgar 

Boyer, Alfred Holland 

Higgins, Frederick William. O.A.S 
Davies, Thomas Edward. .§O.A.S, 

Bruce, Ernest Alonzo O.A.S, 

Paterson, Ronald O.A.S 

Burns, Robert O.A.S 

Davies, George Gilbert H 

Tomlinson, George Ivor O.A.S 

Brown, Gilman Gerald O.A.S 

Church, Kenneth V O.A.S 

Gear, Leslie Thomas O.A.S 

Burley, Edgar C 

Green, Martin R §O.A.S 

Fletcher, John F O.A.S 

Doran, Harry Wesley 

Williams, Thomas A- E O.A.S 

Millhench, Frank O.A.S 

Galbraith William TorranceO.A.S 

Claude, Philippe Eugene 

S6guin, Donat 

Bouthillette, Emile 

Clerk, Douglas Leo 

Delisle, Eugene 

Jolin, Adelard 

Therien, Victor 

Stacey, Walter Dennis 

Spong, John Henry O.A.S, 

Page, Albert Charles O.A.S 

Harrison, William §O.A.S 

Lewis, Joseph Forster O.A.S 

Webster, Percy George O.A.S 

Anderson, Hattie Anne 

Moir, James O.A.S 

Gilbert, Donald Waite O.A.S 

Kenney , John J f 

Brifere, J. Oscar 

15215—3 



Railway Mail clerk. 
Postal helper 

Railway mail clerk. 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Office appliance 
operator, grade 2. 

Postal helper 

Clerk-stenographer. . 
Postal helper 

ii 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

i( 
it 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

a 

n 
a 

a 

Office appliance oper 

ator, grade 2 

Postal helper 



1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 



840 
1,020 
960 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 



020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
080 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 
020 



900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 



30- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 1-25 

1-10-24 

1- 3-25 
7- 4-24 

2- 3-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 2-25 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1,10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 3-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 

18- 3-25 
4- 1-25 

3-12-24 
1- 1-25 
9- 2-25 

1- 1-25 

2- 6-24 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Sydney, N.S. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Port Arthur, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Regina, Sask. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 



Toronto, Ont. 



Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Brandon, Man. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
London, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Port Arthur, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Calgary, Alta. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



34 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Continued! 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Frederick, Norman N 

Collison, Herbert T O.A.S. 

L^veille, Joseph Arthur 

Rawlins, Ernest William. . . O.A.S. 

Maughan, Wilfrid P. S O.A.S. 

Davis, Sidney Walter O.A.S. 

D6sorcy, Henri 

Lachapelle, DoUard 

Giroux, L^onidas 

Bissonnette, Paul 

Boismenu, Wilfrid 

Cinq-Mars, Maurice 

Constantin, Armand 

Daoust, Ald6ric 

Daz6, Charlemagne 

Desp>arois, J. L6onidas O.A.S. 

Giguere, Adelard 

Henault, J. Albert 

L6veill6, Leonidas 

Maisonneuve, Donat 

Marchand, Auguste 

Rousseau, Ernest 

Mariotti, Robert 

Smithers, Victory 

Stuart, Alexander O.A.S. 

Ennis, John Thompson O.A.S 

Barry, Edward Joseph O.A.S. 

James, Joseph H 

Rice, Ambrose William O.A.S 

Davidson, Robert O.A.S. 

Brandwood, George §O.A.S 

Simmonds, Vincent H O.A.S 

Canning, Edward L §O.A.S. 

Mar key, Arthur William. . . .O.A.S. 
Pawley, Ernest Edward .... O.A.S 

Calverley, E. A O.A.S. 

MacMillan, Walter A 

Therrien, Elz6ar A 

Turgeon, J. E. Leonidas O.A.S 

Shanks, Alphee O.A.S 

Lauz6, G6d6os Antonio 

West, Philip Harfield O.A.S 

Young, Archibald O.A.S 

Watts, James Alfred O.A.S. 

Humphries, Archibald §O.A.S 

Vaillancourt, Louise E , 

Drury, James 

Lavallee, Robert 

Gauvin, J. A. Ren6 

Dansereau, Gustave O.A.S. 

Crothers, George Edward... O.A.S. 

Morin, Paul Henri 

Olivier, Joseph L 

Pion, J. J. Rodrigue 

Robitaille, Paul Hector 

Olivier, Paul Emile 

Pelletier, Lionel 

Geoffroy, J. E. Honorius.... O.A.S. 

Garceau, J. Albert 

S6guin, Roland 

Bernier, Robert 

Cofsky, Paul Emile 

Magnan, Duguesclin 

Champagne, J. A. Lionel 

L'Esperance, Joseph Camille 

M6nard, Femand 

Lattinville, Eugene H 

Lefebvre, Hilaire 



Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

a 
a 
ti 
i( 

it 

ic 
u 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

« 

it 

a 
it 

a 
a 

Postal clerk 

a 

Postal helper 

it 

Postal clerk 

C lerk-stenographer 
Postal helper 



,020 
,080 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,080 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,080 
,080 
,080 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,080 
960 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 
,020 



1-10-24 
1-10-24 

29- 1-25 
1- 3-25 

25- 2-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
&-11-24 
1- 1-25 
5- 5-25 
1- 9-24 
3- 3-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 



Toronto, Ont. 
Prince Rupert, B.C. 
Regina, Sask. 
Edmonton, Alta. 

Kitchener, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



North Bay, Ont. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 
North Bay, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 



Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Chatham, Ont. 
Regina, Sask. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



35 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Con<tnued 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Ethier, Henri 

Guimond, J. Napoleon O.A.S 

Taylor, Bernard 

Robitaille, Lucien R 

Bemier, Antoine 

Chevrier, Antonio 

Foumelle, Lucien 

Lapar6, Arthur 

Lamoureux, J. Lucien 

Kiely , Daniel 

Denis, Joseph Arsfene 

LaRochelle, Ren6 G 

Desjardins, L6o 

Duckett, Philip Henry 

Depatie, Etienne 

Demers, Armand 

Aubin, Azarie 

Caty. Rosjiire 

Muten. William Fred O.A.S 

Haley, Percy O.A.S 

Stokes, Percy Harold O.A.S 

Crierie, Athol Fraser 

Ryder, Louis O.A.S 

MacLean, Muriel 

Woodhead, Wilson 

Skene, Albert 

Bourque, Alexandre O.A.S 

Parrott. Francis S §O.A.S 

Shearman, Percival J §O.A.S 

Marshall, John Bruce 

Goddard, Geoffrey T O.A.S 

Barbeau, Lucien 

Laurin, J. Arthur 

S6guin, Omer 

Menard, Lionel 

Nantel, Paul 

Maillet, Lucien 

Cloutier, Adrien 

Gravel, Albert Louis 

Choquet, Paul Emile 

Groves, Vaughan O.A.S 

Horn, Harry James 

Martel, Charles Auguste 

Robinson, Harry M O.A.S 

Kelsall, William Albert O.A.S 

Huxley, Mrs. Effie D 

Archibald, Ambrose A 

Bowles, Sidney Harold O.A.S 

Allcock, Sydney Charles.. .§O.A.S 

Wylie, Stanley D. D 

Davidson, Norman G 

Buchan, Robert Ritchie O.A.S 

Gravel, Eustache 

B^rard, Pierre Antoine 

Moreau, Paul 

Ross, Arthur 

Hanson, John Alex 

Desjarlais, Robert Yvon 

Constantin, Paul 

Gratton, Ovide 

Comtois, J. P. Elz^ar 

Fyfe, Louis Ramon O.A.S 

Marquis, John 

Charron, Adrien 

Hunter, George Daniel O.A.S 

Grenier, Georges 

Villemaire, J. C. Antoine 

15215— 3i 



Postal helper 

Railway mail clerk 
Postal helper 

Railway mail clerk 
Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Mail porter 

Postal helper 

u 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

Clerk-stenographer. 
Postal helper 

Clerk '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Postal helper 

t( 
i( 

u 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 



1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 

600 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1.020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1.020 
1.020 
1.020 
1,020 
1.020 
1,020 
1.020 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1.020 
1.020 
1.020 
1.020 
1.020 
1.020 
1.020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1.020 
1.020 
1.020 
1.020 



1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
30- 4-25 
1- 4-24 
1- 1-25 
11- 4-25 
30- 4-25 

23—4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 4-25 

26- 3-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 5-25 
1-11-24 

15-10-24 
1- 1-25 
3-11-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 

27- 4-25 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 8-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 



Montreal, P.Q. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Fort William, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Saskatoon, Sask. ' 

n 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto. Ont. 

North Bay. Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Winnipeg. Man. 
Windsor. Ont. 
Quebec, P.Q. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Calgary, Alta. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg. Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Regina, Sask. 
Toronto. Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Fort William. Ont. 
Montreal. P.Q. 

Hamilton, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



36 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



POST OFFICE— Continued 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Rouleau, Raoul A , 

Robert, Emmanuel 

Eldl^d, Douglas John O.A.S 

Johnson, William Harry O.A.S 

Luettge, Frank T O.A.S 

Silversides, Guy O.A.;S 

Widdowson, Gilbert Jphn. . .O.A.S 

Staley, Reginald ; ^ . . 

Campbell, Thomas. ....... .O.A.S 

Hunter, John 

Davidson, Myrtle M 

L'Ecuyer, J. C. Arthur 

Taillefer, Rodolphe 

Pontbriand, Franchere 

Cameron, Herbert James 

Taylor, Herbert Hamnett..§O.A.S 

Lavalee, Lucien 

Gray, Ernest Edward O.A.S 

Savage, Marcel 

Archambault, Albert 

Mitchell, Walter Brice O.A.S 

Gibeault, J. Oscar O.A.S 

Leader, John Robert O.A.S 

Dubreuil, Hubert 

Boivin, Oscar §O.A.S 

Horsman, Frank Vincent.. . . O.A.S 
Binks, George Musgrave. . .O.A.S 

Moors, John William O.A.S 

Messier, Rosario 

BSlanger, J. Edouard 

Falardeau, Alex. L O.A.S 

Richard, Isidore 

Pr6novost, Benoit 

Landry, Andre Charles 

Jackson, Charles O.A.S 

Anderson, James George 

Bernard, Herv6 O.A.S 

Ryder, Martin O.A.S 

Beckwith, Charles Alan O.A.S 

Quesnel, Eugene O.A.S 

Andrew, Robert Alfred O.A.S 

Bennin, Cyril A. J O.A.S 

Monckton, Henry C O.A.S 

Dey, Edward William George, 

O.A.S 

Labelle, Joseph E. Armand 

Mason, Adam O.A.S 

Sparrow, Barrington O.A.S 

Logan, Edwin James Walter, 

&O.A.S 

Descoteaux, Gilles 

Steepe, Earl 

Westrop, George O.A.S 

Larose, Aubert 

Scott, Milton Joseph O.A.S, 

Tatnall, Henry James O.A.S 

Evans, Evan Idris 

Denton, William O.A.S 

Emmerton, Ernest O.A.S 

Bernard, Roland 

Crawley, Bertie Frederick. .O.A.S. 

Lecompte, Paul Emile 

Kilpatrick, William Roy.. . .O.A.S 

Foord, George Alfred 

McLean, Stephen O.A.S 



Postal helper. 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Clerk 

Postal helper. 



Office appliance 
operator, grade 2. 

Postal clerk 

Messenger 

Mail porter 

Clerk 

Postal helper 



Mail porter. . . 
Postal clerk... 
Postal helper. 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Clerk 

Postal helper. 



Clerk 

Postal helper. 



$ 

1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

900 
1,080 

720 
1,080 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 



1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 3-25 
1- 4-25 

27- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 5-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 

1- 5-25 
1- 7-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 7-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 2-25 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 5-25 
1- 4-25 

28- 6-25 
27-6-25 

1- 4-25 

1-10-24 

16- 3-25 

1- 5-25 

1- 4-25 
9- 2-25 
1- 2-25 
1- 5-25 
1-10-24 
1- 6-25 
8- 7-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 1-25 
1- 2-25 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 5-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 4-25 



Montreal, P.Q. 

Peterborough, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Regina, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Moncton, N.B. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



London, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Edmonton, Alta. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Brantford, Ont. 
Edmonton, Alta. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Brandon, Man. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Three Rivers, P.Q. 
London, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Brandon, Man. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto, Ont. 
London, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
London, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Bratadon, Man. 
New Westminster, 
B.C. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



37 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Con«n«ei 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Rouiller, Lionel 

Courchesne, Alfred 

Dowson, Vernon Robert O.A.S 

Roy, Suzanne 

Caron, Louis Thomas 

Mazurette, J. R. G. F 

Paulhus, Joseph A. H 

Wells, Leslie Ernest 

Benoit, Georges 

Benson, Frederick... : §O.A.S 

WTielan, Alfred James O.A.S 

Chapleau, Joseph A { 

MacDonald, Harry 

Noble, Egbert Richard O.A.S 

Boyd, Byron C O.A.S 

Martin, Hector James O.A.S 

Montpetit, Elie 

Page, Paul M 

Bigras, Joseph Georges 

Baxter, Law O.A.S 

Laumiere, Alfred Wilfred. .O.A.S 

Lowe, Malcolm D §O.A.S 

Dubuc, Hector 

Jauvin, Albert 

Elsworth, James §0.A .S 

Richardson, Walter Alfred. O.A.S 

Cruse, Edward George O.A.S 

Herst, John Stanley O.A.S 

Benoit, Joseph Willie 

Gosselin, Paul Emile 

Anderson, William J §O.A.S 

Dasey, Alfred Allen O.A.S 

Stoat, Walter Harold O.A.S 

Munro, John O.A.S 

Santier, Armand O.A.S 

Gristwood, Robert W O.A.S 

Ledger, Percy Albert 

Opie, Harold J O.A.S, 

Chittick, William P O.A.S 

Todd, Samuel G O.A.S. 

Johnston, Thomas Law O.A.S 

Hope, Edward Walter O.A.S, 

Parkin, James O.A.S, 

Laurence, Arthur 

Chevalier, Alfred 

MacDonald, James B O.A.S. 

Rowse, Percival Fred O.A.S. 

Graziadei, Carmelia 

Carter, Elwin Earl O.A.S. 

Lapointe, Zacharie 

Mulhall, Mona F 

Moir, George William §O.A.S. 

McRac, William Francis M.§O.A.S. 

Wilson, Robert Hardie O.A.S. 

Addy, Edward R. N O.A.S. 

Ranee, Ernest O.A.S. 

Heron, William O.A.S. 

Westwater, William O.A.S, 

Becotte, Paul Auguste 

Lussier, Aim6 . .• 

Desmarais, Isaie 

O'Brien, Anna 

George, Charles John O.A.S. 



Postal helper. 



Postal chauffeur. 
Junior translator. 
Postal helper 



Railway mail clerk 

Mail porter 

Postal helper 



Postal clerk 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Messenger 

Postal helper. 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



1,020 
1,020 
1,140 
960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 

900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 

900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

720 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

900 
1,020 
1,020 

900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

900 
1,020 



1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 6-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 5-25 
1-10-24 
1- 5-25 
1- 6-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 5-25 
16- 8-25 

1- 6-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 5-25 

1- 6-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
6- 5-25 
1- 5-25 
16- 8-25 
1- 1-25 
9- 2-25 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 6-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1-4-25 

1- 6-25 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 

1- 7-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 5-25 
1-4-25 
1-4-25 
1-4-25 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 

1- 7-25 
1- 4-25 



Montreal, P.Q. 

Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Windsor, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Moose Jaw, Sask. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Regina, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Chatham, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Three Rivers, P.Q. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 

Moncton, N.B. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Truro, N.S. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, P.Q. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



38 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Verville, Napol6on 

Papillon, Philippe. 

Pickup, Randolph O.A.S 

Dufresne, Sinai O.A.S 

Watson, James O.A.S 

Harris, Albert George O.A.S 

Murphy, Fred O.A.S 

Harrington, Francis O.A.S 

Tnielove, Ambrose S O.A.S 

Byron, Russell E . . . . 

Dodd, John Joseph O.A.S 

Borland, Albert Edmond... .O.A.S 

Smith, John O.A.S 

Lithgow, Walter O.A.S 

Doris, Patrick Joseph O.A.S 

Camahan, Kenneth E O.A.S 

Carpenter, Anthony G §O.A.S 

Tudor, George O.A.S 

White, Wilford Edwin 

Roy, Patrick 

Wight, Stella 

Sutton, Charles S §O.A,S, 

Morin, Lucienne 

Cambridge, Thomas S §O.A.S, 

Gingras, Rom6o 

H6tu, Arthur 

Bouthillier, G6rard 

Bou'rque, Camille O.A.S 

Amesse, Joseph P 

Nielsen, Charles A 

Hogue, Jean Marie 

Tedford, Donald Clive O.A.S, 

Sutton, Stephen Edward O.A.S. 

Hodgkinson, Stanley V O.A.S 

Dodds, LeoJ O.A.S 

Chapman, James O.A.S 

Mangin, Ernest J 

Marshall, Harold James O.A.S 

McCracken, Fred. William. §O.A.S 

Keams, Edward .O.A.S, 

Carrick, Hugh §O.A.S. 

Gorman, Matthew E O.A.S. 

Skilleter, Arthur Edward. . . O.A.S, 

Draper, William Henry O.A.S. 

Forrest, Thomas O.A.S. 

Eadie, James O.A.S 

Clarke, Albert O.A.S. 

Murphy, Patrick §O.A.S. 

Murphy, Mary Edna 

Th6riault, Gerard 

Lanciault, Hormisdas 

Brown, John Henry O.A.S. 

Constantin, Arthur 

Webster, Florence Morris 

Cadieux, Ulderic Emile O.A.S. 

Lamb, Jesse A O.A.S. 

Adams, Percy William 

Russell, Albert O.A.S. 

Brown, Luke William O.A.S 

Mullen, William John O.A.S 

Johnson, William LeRoy O.A.S 

Lowe, Charles George 

Kendall, Alfred Charles O.A.S. 

Graham, Allan Elmer 

Whatmore, Leonard O.A.S 



Postal helper. 



Postal clerk.... 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 

Postal helper 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Postal clerk.. 
Postal helper. 



Mail porter. . . 
Postal helper. 



Postal clerk.. 
Postal helper. 



Letter carrier. 
Postal helper. . 



Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 
Postal helper 



Messenger 

Postal helper 

C lerk-stenographer . 
Postal helper 



Mail porter. . . 
Postal helper. 



1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 

900 
1,020 

900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

900 
1,020 
1,020 

720 
1,020 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 



1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- &-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 6-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 4-25 

11- 5-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

16- 8-25 

1- 7-25 
1- 1-25 

1- 7-25 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 7-24 
1- 4-25 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
16- 8-25 
16- 8-25 
16- 8-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
16- 8-25 
26- 5-25 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 
1-4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

1- 7-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 

24- 8-25 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
3- 1-25 

19-11-24 
1-12-24 
1-10-24 

12-12-24 
1-10-24 
1- 1-25 



Montreal, P.Q. 

Toronto, Ont. 

St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 

Toronto, Ont. 



St. Catharines, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Peterborough, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Windsor, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Truro, N.S. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Sarnia, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 

London, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 

Windsor, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
North Bay, Ont. 
St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Calgary, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Truro, N.S. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



3ft 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

POST OFFICE— Continued 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Fitzpatrick, William .O.A.S. 

Leonard, Lucien 

Crossley, William O.A.S. 

McNamara, Thomas M §O.A.S. 

St. Denis, Rom6o §O.A.S. 

Horan, Harold §O.A.S. 

Sumner, Charles A O.A.S. 

Latimer, John M O.A.S. 

Glancy, John O.A.S. 

Kirton, Bert §O.A.S. 

Roberts, Oliver Thomas. . . . O.A.S. 

Furois, Yvette 

Bourgeau, Francois A 

Wood, Harry C O.A.S. 

Hebert, Emile 

Deschamps, Raoul 

Pilkington, John O.A.S, 

Herring, John Fred O.A.S. 

Guindon, Ovila 

Cyr, Lucien 

Ormston, Robert W 

Morin, Jean-Baptiste 

Minshall, Harry O.A.S. 

Perrin, Winona Ada 

Moyer, Thomas Stanley 

Conkey, Georgina Mildred 

Sattler, Flavina 

Sugarman, Muriel 

Manton, Joseph Herbert O.A.S. 

Totten, Eleanor May 

Thompson, Beatrice A 

Merrithew, Harry Leonard. .O.A.S. 

Ball, Walter §O.A.S, 

Barker, John O.A.S. 

Carr, Thomas William O.A.S. 

Morris, Edwin O.A.S. 

Blake, Edward §O.A.S. 

Adams, John T O.A.S. 

Armitage, Bruce O.A.S. 

Bacon, Laurie Bedford §O.A.S. 

Amsbary, Vivian 

Thompson, John Andrew 

Graham, Frederick Ewart 

Beard, Dorothy 

Brayford, Robert Henry O.A.S 

Saindon, Arthur 

Mills, Dorothy Lucy 

Ferguson, Charles §O.A.S 

Humble, William Gamett 

Galloway, John O.A.S 

McKinnon, Joseph R §O.A.S 

Godbout, Antonio 

Atkinson, John 

Golland, C6cile 

Gordon, Wilma 

Marcotte, Amedee 

Thorn, Herbert William O.A.S 

Cowling, Harold Albert O.A.S. 



Postal helper 

u 

Office appliance 
operator, grade 2 

Postal helper 

u 
u 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Postal helper 

u 

tt 

it 

u 
u 

Stenographer, Gr. 1 

Postal helper 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 

Mail porter 

Stenographer, Gr, 2 
(( 

Postal helper 

it 

« 
i( 

i< 

Postal clerk 

u 
u 

it 
it 

Clerk, grade 2 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2 
Postal helper 

Mail porter 

Postal helper 

Typist, grade 2. . . . 

Postal helper 

Typist, grade 1 . . . . 



Assistant post- 
mistress (grade 5 
office) 



Letter carrier. 
Postal helper. . 



1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

900 

900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

960 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

720 
1,020 

960 

960 

960 
1,080 

960 

960 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,080 
1,520 
43(5) C.S. Act 

1,310 

43(5) C.S. Act 

1,080 

1,310 

43(5) C.S. Act 

960 

900 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 

960 
1,020 

900 
(inc. flat 
increase) 



2,100 
43(5) C.S. Act 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 



1- 1-25 
1-10-24 
1- 4-25 

1- 6-25 
1- 6-25 
6- 5-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

17- 6-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 8-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 5-25 
1- 8-25 
1-10-24 
1-10-24 
1- 9-25 
1-10-24 
1- 5-25 

18- 9-25 
1-10-24 
1- 7-25 

22- 9-25 
4-11-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 7-25 
1-11-25 
1-10-25 
1- 8-25 
1- 9-25 
1-4-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 8-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 8-25 
1- 7-25 

1- 7-25 

1- 7-25 
1- 7-25 

1- 7-25 
1-10^25 

19- 8-25 
1-10-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 7-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 9-25 
1- 7-25 



20-10-25 



1- 7-25 
16- 8-25 
16- 8-25 

1-10-24 



Toronto, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Regina, Sask. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Quebec, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
London, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Winnipeg, Man. 
London, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

St. Catharines, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
London, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Toronto, Ont. 

Fredericton, N.B. 
Regina, Sask. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Brandon, Man. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
London, Ont. 
Amherst, N.S. 
Oshawa, Ont. 



Ottawa, Ont. 



St. Catharines, Ont. 
Fort William, Ont. 
London, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Oshawa, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Sarnia, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



40 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes' made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



POST OFFICB— Concluded 



Name 



Class 



Salary- 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Brennan, Marguerite H 

Lussier, Georges Ernest 

Sargent, Doris 

Boume, Lutwidge Edward..O.A.S 

Bureau, J. Hercule O.A.S 

Anderson, Henry Bielby. . . .O.A.S 
Hill, Edna C 

Phillips, Ernest E 

Rose, John E O.A.S 

Seymour, Calvin Henry O.A.S. 

Campbell, Clarence C 

Jeffery, Amos O.A.S. 

Beggs, Edgar 

Martin, Iva Marie 

Kelley, John Clarence 

Norris, James O.A.S. 

LeBourdais, Alphonse 

Malone, Frank P 

Dorward, John §O.A.S. 

Walker, James B O.A.S. 

Elliott, Renwick F O.A.S. 

Latham, Kenneth A O.A.S. 

Daglish, Hamilton O.A.S. 

Davidson, Mary Isabel 

Fotheringham, Margaret T 

Brown, Frederick Wm O.A.S. 

MacMillan, Edgar W 

Read, Reginald F. J O.A.S. 

Williams, Fred George O.A.S. 

McAuley, Alex 

Loft, Henry Charles 

Knott, Charles Joseph O.A.S. 

Ward, Richard J O.A.S. 

Greenslade, Angus M 

Langford, Rose E 

Norman, Albert O.A.S. 

Skinner, Fred Charles O.A.S. 



Stenographer, 

grade 2 

Postal helper. 
Postal clerk.. 



Clerk, grade 2. 
Postal helper. . 



Postal clerk. 



Postal helper. 



Postal clerk. 



Postal helper. 
Postal clerk. . 



Principal postal 
clerk 



Postal helper. 



Postal clerk 

(Dawson) 

Office appliance 

operator, grade 2. 



Letter carrier 

Senior postal clerk. 



Postal helper. 



Postal clerk.. 
Postal helper. 



Postal clerk. . 
Postal helper. 



960 

1,020 

1,080 
43(5) C.S. Act 
960 

1,020 

1,020 

1,080 
43(5) C.S. Act 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,380 
43(5) C.S. Act 

1,020 

1,440 
43(5) C.S. Act 

1,352 
43(5) C.S. Act 

2,100 
43(5) C.S. Act 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 

2,520 

900 

900 
1,080 
1,920 
43(5) C.S. Act 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 



1-12-25 
1-10-25 

1- 7-25 

22-12-25 

1-10-25 

1-10-25 

1- 7-25 
1-10-25 
1-10-25 
1-10-25 

1- 7-25 
1-4-25 

1- 7-25 

1- 7-25 



l-7-%5 
24- 8-25 
1-10-25 
21- 9-Z5 
1-10-^5 
1-10-25 
1-11-25 
1-10-25 

3- 9-25 

28-11-25 

17-11-25 

1- 9-25 

1- 6-25 
1- 9-25 
1-11-25 
1-10-25 
1-10-25 
1-10-25 
1-12-25 
1-10-25 
1- 7-25 
1-10-25 
1- 7-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 

St. Hyacmthe,P. Q. 

Oshawa, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Windsor, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Windsor, Ont. 



Port Arthur, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 
Regina, Sask. 
Windsor, Ont. 

a 

Moncton, N.B. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Dawson, Y.T. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

tt 

Oshawa, Ont. 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Brantford, Ont. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Windsor, Ont. 

Regina, Sask. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Windsor, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 



PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Dumouchel, Cyprien §O.A.S. 

Talbot, Anna M 

Emery, Mary 

Sadler, Edgar John S §O.A.S. 

Seed, Richard Joseph §O.A.S. 

Phelan, Thomas A 

Wadman, Augustus O.A.S. 

Catellier, Paul Aim6 

Whitmarsh, Warner 



Messenger-clerk 

Clerk-stenographer 

Account clerk 

Messenger-clerk 

Clerk-typist 

Truckman 

Clerk-typist 



600 
960 
960 
960 
600 
960 
780 
960 
960 



1- 


1-25 


30- 


12-24 


14- 


1-25 


19- 


12-24 


9- 2-25 1 


1- 


2-25 


1- 


1-25 


1- 


3-25 


29- 


4-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



41 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Glasses made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

PUBLIC WORKS 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Powney, William B §O.A.S 

Saunders, John O.A.S 

Devlin, Bernard §O.A.S. 

Ainsworth, Arthur §O.A.S, 

Ashton, William P O.A.S 

Pag6, H. E. Armand 

Pennock, Edmund E 

Tenbeth, William C O.A.S 

Taylor, Frederick O.A.S 

Randell, William Thomas. §0. A. S 

Matheson, Colin S O.A.S 

Kirk, Margaret P 



Halsall, Joseph E O.A.S. 

Beeching, Charles Percy O.A.S 

Candler, Russell P O.A.S 

Barbour, Doris A 

Merritt, Alfred M O.A.S 

Wissell, Albert §O.A.S. 

McSweeney, Delia 

Smith, William. . . .' O.A.S 

Lemire, G. Edouard §O.A.S 

Trahan, Anna Mary 

Matthewson, Mrs. Frances Mary. . . 



Patterson, Robert §O.A.S. 

Ayer, John Edmund §O.A.S. 

Cooper, William O.A.S 

Steele, Archibald i 

Hurst. William O.A.S 

Porter, James O.A.S. 

Cosgrove, James McA O.A.S 

Daye, Luke 

Finnic, Ellen Calder 

Schumann, Mabel A 



O'Donnell, M. J. Hubert. 
Harris, Walter 



O.A. 
.0.A, 



Gagnon, Omer §O.A, 

S^guin, George 



Elevator operator. 

Caretaker 

Cleaner and helper 

Caretaker 

Oflfice boy 

u 

Cleaner and helper, 
part time 

Watchman 

Caretaker 

Draftsman 

Telephone operator 
(Telegraph Ser- 
vice) 



Public building en- 
gineer-caretaker 
Caretaker 



Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Cleaner and helper 
part time 

Watchman 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Caretaker 

Elevator operator. . . 

Junior clerk-steno- 
grapher 

Telephone operator 
(Telegraph Ser- 
vice) 



Watchman . 
Caretaker. . 



Elevator operator. 

Cleaner and helper 

Caretaker 

Public building en- 
gineer-caretaker. . . 

Clerk of works, 
grade 2 

Telephone agent- 
operator 



Telephone operator 
(Telegraph Ser- 
vice) 



Cleaner and helper. . 
Cleaner and helper, 

part time 

Caretaker 

Caretaker, limited 

service 



Cleaner and helper. 
Watchman 



Cowan, Henry J §0 . A 

Brannon, Thomas P §O.A 

Duguay, Simon §O.A 

Golledge. Joseph Bert |O.A.-. 

Brazier, Herbert |0. A. S.I Caretaker 



Cleaner and helper. 



780 
960 
720 
720 
960 
300 
300 

500 

720 

960 

1,260 



780 
(prevailing 
rates) 

1,200 
960 
960 

600 

500 
720 

600 
960 

780 

600 



780 

(prevailing 

rates) 

720 

960 

960 

780 

720 

2,160 

1,200 

1,560 

720 
(prevailing 
rates) 



780 
(prevailing 
rates) 
720 

500 
960 

325 
and allowance 
720 
720 
720 
720 
960 



10-12-24 
19-12-24 
15-12-24 
21-10-24 
1- 1-25 
15-12-24 
20-11-24 

17-12-24 

15-12-24 

19- 1-25 

1- 1-25 



1- 1-25 

17-11-24 
8-12-24 
1- 1-25 

16- 1-25 

31-12-24 
5-12-24 

1- 2-25 
8- 1-25 
3-11-24 

1- 1-25 



6-12-24 
27-11-24 

8- 1-25 
5- 1-25 
1-11-24 

11- 3-25 

9- 2-25 

12- 2-25 
1- 3-25 



12—2-25 



6- 2-25 
1—1-25 

6- 2-25 
1- 2-25 

13- 2-25 

23- 2-25 

26- 3-25 

1- 4-25 

12- 2-25 

14- 4-25 



Port Arthur, Ont. 
Charlottetown, P.E.L 
London, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Whitby, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Montreal, P.C 
Milton, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Merritt, B.C. 

Calgary, Alta. 
Regina, Sask. 
Bowmanville, Ont. 

St. John, N.B. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Halifax, N.S. 
Samia, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Princeton, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Sackville, N.B. 
Oshawa, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
White Horse, Y.T. 

Calgary, Alta. 

Halifax, N.S. 



Vanderhoof, B.C. 



Keremeos, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Rivifere du Loup, P.Q. 

Rigaud, P.Q. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Calgary, Alta. 
Victoria, B.C. 



42 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

PUBLIC WORKS— Conhnued 



Name 




Locality 

of 

Appointment 



McEwan, Matthew F. 



.O.A.S 



Telegraph operator 
(Telegraph Ser- 
vice) 



McNeill, George Robertson. 



Dubois, Alphonse O.A.S 

Fraser, William §O.A.S 

Madore, Maximilian O.A.S 

Lafrance, Joseph §O.A.S 

Vine, Arthur R §O.A.S. 

Casey, Wilfred Pascal O.A.S 

Kay, Archie O.A.S, 

MacQuarrie, Daniel H 

Sheppard, Elsie G 

Heselwood, Robert T §O.A.S, 

Dawson, Olive May 



Vauns, Ernest G §O.A.S 

Cameron, John Martin O.A.S 

Mailly , Marie Anne 

Potter, Sybil A 



Roberts, David Alford.... §O.A.S 

DeVan, John Francis O.A.S 

Anderson, Alan 

Wallis, Newton James O.A.S 

MacRury , Angus John §O.A.S 

Oakley, Hazel Margaret 

Penny, Michael S O.A.S 

Lawton, William Parker. . . .O.A.S 

Barber, Richard B O.A.S 

Gamache, Amedee §O.A.S, 

Dorkin, John David O.A.S 

Dawson, Charles S §O.A.S, 

Read, David O.A.S 

Rivett, William O.A.S, 

Hextall, Thomas §O.A.S. 

Cunningham, Annie B 



Genest, Conrad O.A.S, 



Telegraph messenger 



Caretaker 

Caretaker, limited 

service 

Caretaker 

Cleaner and helper, 

part time 

Caretaker 



Faulkner, Charles F. P.. 
Weatherly, John S 



...O.A.S. 



Dickinson, James §O.A.S 

Boisvert. M. E. Juliette 

Hurley, Edwin George W 

Couture, M. A. B. L6onie 

Donahue, John Joseph §O.A.S 



Senior inspector of 

dredges 

C lerk-stenographer 
Telegraph messenger 



Telegraph operator 
(Telegraph Ser- 
vice) 



Cleaner and helper. 
Operator lineman. . 



Stenographer, Gr, 
Telegraph messenger 



Caretaker. 



Draftsman 

Junior engineer 

Caretaker 

C lerk-stenographer 
Cleaner and helper. 

Caretaker 

Cleaner and helper. 

Watchman 

Cleaner and helper. 
Assistant architect 
Cleaner and helper. 



Telephone operator. 



Draftsman. 



Junior engineer 
Telegraph operator 

(Telegraph Ser 

service). . 



Junior engineer. 
Stenographer, Gr, 

Office boy 

Typist, grade 2. . . 
Caretaker 



1,560 

(prevailing 

rates) 

480 

(prevailing 

rates) 

960 

600 
960 

500 
960 
960 
960 

2,100 

960 

480 

(prevailing 

rates) 



780 

(prevailing 

rates) 

720 

1,584 

(prevailing 

rates) 

720 

480 

(prevailing 

rates) 

1,080 

960 

1,380 

1,680 

960 

960 

720 

960 

900 

900 

900 

2,100 

720 

900 

720 

780 

(prevailing 

rates) 

1,380 

1,680 



900 

(prevailing 

rates) 

1,680 

960 

420 

960 

1,080 



23- 3-25 



1-10-24 
6- 4-25 

14- 4-25 
28- 2-25 

24- 4-25 
1- 5-25 
1- 5-25 
5- 5-25 

1- 4-25 
6-4-25 



1-4-25 



23- 2-25 
7- 5-25 



12—3-25 

2—4-25 



1- 5-25 

6- 5-25 

1- 6-25 

23- 4-25 

26- 5-25 

21- 5-25 

1- 6-25 

1- 3-25 

15- 3-25 

6- 5-25 

1- 4-25 

11- 5-25 

12- 5-25 
19- 5-25 
11- 6-25 
23- 2-25 



1- 6-25 
26- 6-25 



13- 8-25 



21- 6-25 

6- 8-25 
1- 6-25 
1- 7-25 

7- 7-25 
1- 8-25 



Vancouver, B.C. 



Vernon, B.C. 
Nicolet, P.Q. 

Hartland, N.B. 
Souris, P.E.I. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Battleford, Sask. 
Shediac, N.B. 
Hampton, N.B. 

St. John, N.B. 
Halifax, N.S. 



Penticton, B.C. 



Montreal, P.Q. 



Estevan, B.C. 
Quebec, P.Q. 



Kamloops, B.C. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Dartmouth, N.S. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Kamloops, B.C. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Halifax, N.S. 
St. John, N.B. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Victoria, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Princeton, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Nelson, B.C. 



Kelowna, B.C. 
Fort William, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Rimouski, P.Q. 
St. John. N.B. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



43 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

PUBLIC VfORKS— Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Loftus, Kathleen V. 



Telephone agent- 
operator 



Hayes, Alex. R.. . . , 



O.A.S 



Telegraph operator 
(Telegraph Serv 
ice) 



WorraU, William H §O.A.S 

Leduc, Olive 

Lazenby, Arthur Wilson O.A.S 

Pilkington, Grace May 



Meikle, George Dale §O.A.S 

Wynne, John §O.A.S 

Coughlin. Harry P O.A.S, 

Stone, Charles H 



Caretaker 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 

Caretaker 

Telephone operator 



Elevator operator. . 



Clerk, grade 2 

Telegraph messen- 
ger 



McCurdy, Jessie I . 



Telegraph messen- 
ger 



Stewart, David C... 
Cooper, Edith 



.O.A.S 



Lovett, Violet L. 



Taylor, John Pringle 

Flowers, Thomas William 

Robotham, Ambrose A O.A.S. 

Soper, Donald 

Robitaille, Louis Emile 



Caretaker 

Clerk, grade 2 (witjh 
stenographic 
ability) 

Stenographer, 
grade 2 

Office boy 

Gardener 

Cleaner and helper. 

Junior engineer 

Telegraph agent- 
operator 



Pothier, Raoul 

Mcintosh, Angus, jr.... 



.O.A.S. 



Cleaner and helper. 
Lineman 



McCartin, John Joseph 

Crane, Bert O.A.S. 

Fawcett, Walter O.A.S. 

Jenks, John James O.A.S. 

Burton, Roland Charles §O.A.S. 

Clark, George §O.A.S. 



Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Elevator operator. . . 

Messenger-clerk 

Elevator operator. . . 

Cleaner and helper, 
part time 



780 
(prevailing 

rates) 



1,440 
(prevailing 
rates) 
1,080 
960 
960 
780 
(prevailing 
rates) 
960 
960 
and allowance 
960 

1,116 

(prevailing 

rates) 

660 
(prevailing 
rates) 
1,080 



960 

960 
420 
960 
900 
1,680 

960 
(prevailing 
rates) 
900 
1,320 
(prevailing 
rates) 
and allowance 
960 
960 
720 
960 
780 

500 



28- 3-25 



1-6-25 
16- 7-25 
14-4-25 

1- 6-25 



14- 7-25 
2- 9-25 



19- 6-25 
18- 8-25 



1-9-24 



1- 7-25 
22- 6-25 



21- 9-25 

17-10-25 
2- 9-25 
19-10-25 
23- 9-25 
15-10-25 



1-10-25 
6-10-25 



25- 7-22 
15- 1-26 
1-11-25 
16-10-25 
16-11-25 
13-12-24 

15-10-25 



Notch Hill, B.C. 



Big Salmon, Y.T. 
Neepawa, Man. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Regina, Sask. 



Vernon, B.C. 
Brantford, Ont. 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Dawson, Y.T. 



Powell River, B.C. 
Burford, Ont. 



Toronto, Ont. 

Halifax, N.S. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Toronto, Ont. 
London, Ont. 



Chicoutimi, P.Q. 
Three Rivers, P.Q. 



Eighth Cabin, B.C. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 
Regina, Sask. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



RAILWAYS AND CANALS 



Labelle, John 

Johnston, Elmer Joseph O.A.S. 



Innes, John 

Perry, Richard Henry. 
Saint-Laurent, Jean 



O.A.S. 



Lockman 

Lockmaster and 
canal clerk, part 
time 

Lockmaster 

Account clerk 

Junior engineer 



720 


* Season 




1925 


840 




and 150 




respectively 


19-12-24 


840 


4- 2-25 


960 


2- 2-25 


1,680 


19- 1-25 



Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 



Young's Point, Ont. 
Greece's Point, P.Q. 
Peterborough, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



44. 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

RAILWAYS AND CANALS— Continued 



Name 




Salary 


Date 


$ 




2,160 


15-12-24 


1,380 


3- 2-25 


840 




and 400 




respectively 


1- 3-25 


600 


* Season 




1925 


900 


25- 3-25 


720 


* 1- 4-25 


720 


* Season 




1925 


1,440 


10- 4-25 


780 


* 1- 4-25 


780 


*14- 4-25 


780 


1- 4-25 


720 


* 1- 5-25 


720 


* 1- 5-25 


960 


1- 4-25 


720 


* 9- 3-25 


780 


1- 4-25 


720 


* 1- 5-25 


720 


* 6- 4-25 


720 


*22- 5-25 


960 


20- 4-25 


960 


1- 1-25 


870 


* Season 




1925 


720 


*22- 4-25 


840 


* Season 




1925 


720 


14- 5-25 


960 


*16- 6-25 


780 


* Season 




1925 


870 


* Season 




1925 


960 


* 9- 6-25 


870 


* 7- 6-25 


780 


* Season 




1925 


780 


* (< 


840 


* 1- 7-25 


960 


* Season 




1925 


780 


« 11 


780 


* " 


840 


*20- 5-25 


720 


* 1- 5-25 


780 


* Season 




1925 


780 


* i< 


1,320 


1- 5-25 


960 


19- 8-25 


840 


* 1-10-25 


840 


* 1- 5-25 


960 


1-10-25 


960 


* 1-10-25 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Martin, Louis Alex 

Gayder, Fred J §O.A.S. 

Grant, Donald Horwood O.A.S. 

Pollard, David Henry O.A.S. 



Pewtress, John O.A.S 

Moroughan, Edward Roy. . .O.A.S 
Todd, John 

Dalgleish, Chester §O.A.S 

Barney, George Allan O.A.S 

St. Louis, John §O.A.S 

Payment, Mose Joseph O.A.S 

Andrews, Wesley John §O.A.S 

Lowe, Walter O.A.S 

Clarke, Cynthia L 

Brownson, John Robert 

Willoughby, Walter 

Wannamaker, Harry O.A.S 

Mcintosh, Charles O.A.S 

Eason, George Gordon §O.A.S 

Kingston, Sidney John O.A.S 

Heymann, Louis O.A.S 

Lynch, Joseph §O.A.& 



McGrath, John Henry O.A.S. 

Williams, Henry William... .O.A.S. 

Weatherhead, Helen M 

M6nard, Joseph X 

Thompson, Albert W §O.A.S. 

Greer, William §O.A.S. 

Bramah, Edward Albert... §O.A.S. 
Henry, William I §O.A.S. 

Livesey, Thomas §O.A.S. 

Smith, William.. §O.A.S. 

Hatch, James Henry 

Gillespie, William §O.A.S. 

Olmsted, Percy M §O.A.S. 

Haywood, Archie J §O.A.S. 

Keating, Fred I O.A.S. 

Matthews, George William.. O.A.S. 
Blair, Edward O.A.S. 

Moody, Charles William. . . §O.A.S. 
Longtin, Leo-Paul 

Falardeau, Rosaire 

Watt, Clarence O.A.S. 

Haggart, WilUam Donald.. .O.A.S. 

Cavanagh, Mary Monica Veronica. 
Chaput, Eugene 



Canal overseer, 
grade 4 

Electric lamp trim- 
mer 

Lockmaster and 
canal clerk, part 
time 

Damkeeper, part 
time 

Rodman 

Lockman 

Canal overseer, 

grade 2 

Lock motorman... . 

ic 

Lockman 

Clerk-stenographer 

Lockman 

Lock motorman 

Lockman 

Bridge keeper 

Clerk, grade 2 

File clerk 

Lock and bridge 
motorman 

Clerk, grade 1. . . . 
Lockman 

Typist, grade 1 . . , 

Lock motorman.. 

it 

Lock and bridge 
motorman 

Lock motorman.. 
Lock and bridge 

motorman 

Bridge motorman.. . 

Lock m^otorman 

Bridge keeper 

Lock motorman 

Bridge motorman. . . 
Lockman 

Bridge motorman.. . 

Lock motorman 

Senior clerk 

Clerk, grade 2 

Lockman 

iC 

Stenographer, Gr. 2 
Lock motorman 



Lachine canal, P.Q. 
St. Catharines, Ont. 

Smith's Falls, Ont. 



Gooderham, Ont. 
Cornwall, Ont. 
Rideau canal, Ont. 

Brewers Mills, Ont. 

Trent canal, Ont. 
Cornwall, Ont. 



Campbellford, Ont. 

St. Catharines, Ont. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 
Cornwall, Ont. 
Trent canal, Ont. 
St. Peter's, N.S. 
Peterborough, Ont. 
Port Dalhousie, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Welland canal, Ont. 
Port Dalhousie, Ont. 

Trenton, Ont. 
Peterborough, Ont. 
Soulanges canal, P.Q. 

Welland canal, Ont. 



Washago, Ont. 

Cornwall canal, Ont. 
Welland canal, Ont. 

Frankford, Ont. 
Long Island, Ont. 

Cardinal, Ont. 
Welland canal, Ont. 
Cascades Point, P.Q. 

Montreal, Que. 
Rideau canal, Ont. 
Carillon and Grenville 

canal, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Soulanges canal, P.Q. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



45 



Table No. 1— Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 

RAILWAYS AND CANALS— Conciuefed 



Name 




Salary 


Date 


$ 




1,260 




(inc. flat 




increase) 


1-11-25 


840 


*25-10-25 


840 


*24-10-25 


960 


*26-10-25 


960 


•24-10-25 


840 


* 1-10-25 


960 


*26-10-25 


960 


*29 10-25 


840 


♦24-10-25 


1,020 




(Sec. 18, II 




(1) P.C. 2/712) 


17- 2-25 


2,400 


1-11-25 


960 


1-11-25 


960 


♦23-10-25 


840 


♦ 1-12-25 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Thornton, William A. 



.O.A.S. 



Rondeau, Andr6 O.A.S 

Ginchereau, Cyrille §O.A.S 

Deblois, Alvares O.A.S 

Chartrand, Emile O.A.S 

Densmore, James Gordon... O.A.S 

Brisebois, Gustave O.A.S 

Bastien, Adrien O.A.S 

Guy, Leo O.A.S 

Corbeil, J. A. Georges 

Carty, Edward Godfrey 

Walker, Ruth M 

Archibald, William O.A.S 

McMahon, Hugh M 



Clerk, grade 2. . 

Bridgeman 

Lock motorman 

u 

Lockman 

Lock motorman 

Bridgeman 

Stenographer, 



Travelling auditor. . 
Stenographer, Gr. 2 

Lock motorman 

Bridge keeper 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Lachine canal, P.Q. 

St. Our's lock, P.Q. 
Lachine canal, P.Q. 
Carillon and Grenville 

canal, P.Q. 
Lachine canal, P.Q. 



Carillon, P.Q. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
St. Catharines, Ont. 
Lachine canal, P.Q. 
Murray canal, Ont. 



RAILWAYS AND CANALS — Railway Commissioners, Boabd of 



XeSage, Alex O.A.S 

Parks, John Hegan O.A.S 

Hodgins, Thomas F 

Deschamps, M. Juliette 

Wright, Clarence Remshart 



Inspector of railroad 

operation 

Division engineer. . . 
Clerk-stenographer. . 
Stenographer Gr. 2 
Office boy 



2,280 


26- 1-25 


3,300 


14- 4-25 


960 


1- 1-25 


960 


27-10-25 


420 


1- 4-25 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Calgary, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE 



CuUen, Esther Mary. 
Meek, Marjorie 




Toronto, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



TRADE AND COMMERCE 



Fowler, Howard F O.A.S. 

Leslie, Gwendolyn J 

Capon, Sydney M 

Edwards, Gwilym §O.A.S. 

Richmond, Kathleen 

Evans, Albert E 

Penfold, Stephen D 

Jobin, Ernest 

Pike, John 

McBeath, William A 

Cryer, Mabel Vera 

Eddowes, C. G. B O.A.S. 

Erskine, Thomas §O.A.S. 

Smith, Edward P. J §O.A.S. 

Clark, Elizabeth Agnes 

Condy, Mrs. M 



Deputy grain in- 
spector 

Junior statistical 
clerk 

Grain weighmaster. 

Grain weighman 

Clerk-stenographer. . 

Grain sampler fore- 
man 

Deputy grain in- 
spector 

Inspector of electri- 
city and gas 

Deputy grain in- 
spector 

Clerk- typist 

Grain trackman 

Grain clerk 

Office appliance 
operator, grade 3. 

Junior clerk- 
stenographer 

Junior statistical 
clerk 



1,800 

600 
2,400 
1,680 

960 

1.560 

1,800 

1,440 

1,800 
1,800 

960 
1,200 

960 

1,080 
600 
600 



1-12-24 

1- 1-25 
♦15-12-24 

♦ 1-11-24 

♦ 1- 1-25 

♦19- 1-25 

1-12-24 

1- 1-25 

1- 1-25 
1-12-24 

♦ 1- 1-25 
♦15-11-24 

♦ 1- 4-26 

1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 

2- 4-25 



Vancouver, B.C. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Calgary, Alta. 
Fort William, Ont. 

Edmonton, Alta. 

Vancouver, B.C. 

Montreal, Que. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Fort William, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



46 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Continued 



TRADE AND COMMERCEr— Continued 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Corbett, Ruby Victoria 

LaRochelle, May Agnes 

Campeau, Charles O.A.S. 

Gourlay, George R O.A.S. 

Wood, George O.A.S. 

Glaister, Rowland L 

Lev4ill6, Aurele 

Grosvenor, Rita 

Skinner, Edward A 

Skelly, MaidaB 

Forbes, Olive Mary 

McLeod, Harold O.A.S. 

Owen, Floyd A 

Game, William George O.A.S. 

Eraser, Frank W O.A.S. 

Macgillivray, John C O.A.S. 

Lees, Oliver O.A.S. 

Wilson, James O.A.S. 

Morgan, Ethel L 

Millington, P. W. E O.A.S. 

Hasell, James 

Beavis, Bruce §O.A.S. 

Johnston, Ella T 

Limbrick, Charles B O.A.S. 

Matheson, C. Elder O.A.S. 

Preston, Annie 

Westwood, Hugh O.A.S. 

Bissett, Clifford S O.A.S. 

Dion, Joseph L O.A.S. 

Thompson, Minnie I 

Horwitz, Muriel 

Fancy, Elizabeth F 

Robertson, Alex F O.A.S. 

Porteous, Robert E 

Harvey, Gordon William... .O.A.S. 

Grew, Richard 

Lewis, Irene 

Forsyth, James 

Kirker, Annie Georgina 

Weatherill, Ellen 

Mcintosh, John L 

Doucet, Joseph B 

Murdock, Ada Florence 

Porter, Arthur D 

Watkins, Hallen M 



Junior clerk- 
stenographer 

Junior statistical 
clerk 

Messenger-clerk 

File clerk 

Grain weighman 

Oflfice boy . . 

Clerk, grade 1 

Messenger-clerk 

Stenographer, Gr. 1. 

Clerk, grade 1 

Principal statistical 

clerk 

Clerk, gracje 3 



Junior trade com- 
missioner 



Assistant grain 
weighman 

Grain weighman 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Assistant grain 
weighman 

Grain weighman 

Inspector of weights 
and measures 

Clerk, grade 1 

Clerk, grade 3 

Grain weighman 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Inspector of electri- 
city and gas 

Junior trade com- 
missioner 

Inspector of Weights 
and measures. . . . 

Clerk, grade 1 

Typist, grade 1 . . . . 

Clerk, grade 1 

Inspector of electri 
city and gas 

Inspector of weights 
and measures. . . 

Clerk, grade 3 . . . . 



Junior trade com- 
missioner 

Clerk, grade 1 

Deputy grain in- 
spector 

Typist, grade 2 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Assistant grain 
weighman 

Inspector of weights 
and measures 

Stenographer, Gr. 2. 

Assistant grain 
sampler foreman . . 



600 

600 
600 
960 
1,680 
1,680 
420 
720 
600 
720 
720 

1,800 
1,260 
1,260 

1,800 
1,800 

1,500 

1,680 

960 

1,500 
1,680 

1,380 

720 

1,260 

1,680 

960 

1,560 

1,800 

1,380 
720 
720 
720 

1,560 

1,380 
1,260 



1,800 
720 

1,800 
960 
960 

1,500 

1,380 
960 

1,620 
(inc. flat 
increase) 

1,620 
(inc. flat 
increase) 



1- 4-25 

1- 4-25 
6- 4-25 
1- 4-25 

* 1- 6-25 

* 1- 6-25 
1- 4-25 
1- 5-25 

* 1- 4-25 
14- 5-25 

14- 7-25 

1- 6-25 

* 1- 7-25 

* 1- 7-25 

10- 8-25 
10- 8-25 

* 1- 7-25 

* 1- 7-25 
*13- 7-25 

* 1- 7-25 

* 1- 7-25 

16- 7-25 

19- 7-25 

*17- 8-25 

* 1- 2-25 

* 3- 9-25 

1-10-25 

15- 9-25 

13- 7-25 

25-10-25 

1-11-25 

5-11-25 

1-10-25 

21- 9-25 
8-10-25 



5-10-25 
1-12-25 

1-10-25 

* 6- 8-25 

* 2-11-25 

*15-ll-25 

13-11-25 
5-11-25 



14-11-25 
•14-11-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 

u 

Calgary, Alta. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

n 

Fort William, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Fort William, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Port Arthur, Ont. 
Fort William, Ont. 
Port Arthur, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Fort William, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Fort William, Ont. 

Regina, Sask. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 
Fort William, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Prince Rupert, B.C. 

St. John, N.B. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



47 



Table No. 1 — Permanent Appointments of all Classes made by the 
Commission under the Provisions of the Civil Service Act — Concluded 

TRADE AND COMMERCE— ConcZuded 



Name 



Class 



Salary 



Date 



Locality 

of 

Appointment 



Timbers, George Henry. 



Taylor, Reginald Robert. 



Temple, Henry. 



Morden, Hazel Viola. . 
Santhouse, Herbert B. 



Assistant grain 
sampler foreman. 



Deputy grain 

inspector 

Typist, grade 2. . . . 
Assistant grain 

sampler foreman. 



Smith, Arthur J. 
Barton, Cecil E.. 



.O.A.S. 



Grain sampler fore- 
man 

Assistant grain 



Bailey, George. . . 
Fenwick, Arthur. 
Sidders, R. H... 



.O.A.S, 



Nelson, A. E 

Fleming, Robert Brown . 

Chaput, Omer 

Rosie, Charles 



.O.A.S, 



1,620 
(inc. flat 
increase) 

1,620 
(inc. flat 
increase) 

1,800 
960 

1,620 
(inc. flat 
increase) 

1,560 



sampler foreman. . 


1,620 
(inc. flat 


" .. 


increase) 

1,620 

(inc. flat 


<< i< 


increase) 

1,620 

(inc. flat 


(( « 


increase) 

1,620 

(inc. flat 


Clerk, grades 

Senior translator 

Deputy grain 
inspector 


increase) 
1,560 
1,260 
1,800 

1,800 



* 14-1 1-25 



♦14-11-25 



1-10-25 
*17- 8-25 



♦14-11-25 

♦ 1-10-25 
♦14-11-25 

♦ 1-10-25 

♦ 1-11-25 



♦14-11-25 

♦ 1- 9-25 

♦ 1-12-25 
6-10-25 

1-11-25 



Winnigeg, Man. 



Fort William, Ont. 



Winnipeg, Man. 



Fort William, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 



TRADE AND COMMERCE— Patent and Copyright 



Bryson, Elizabeth Ann 

Hussey. George T §O.A.S. 

Rattey, Marie Beatrice 



Joss, Mrs. Margaret L ♦♦ 

Clarke, Charles F O.A.S. 



Clerk, grade 1. . 
Typist, grade 1 . 

Clerk, grade 1 . . 

2.. 



720 
720 
900 
(inc. flat 
increase) 
900 
(inc. flat 
increase) 

1,260 
(inc. flat 
increase) 



1-11-25 
14-10-25 



1-10-25 
14-11-25 
14-11-25 



Ottawa, Ont. 



48 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Table No. 2 — Appointments to the Position of Postmaster 

ALBERTA 



Post Office 



Appointee 



Bruederheim 

• it 

Brul6 Mines 

Calgary (Sub office No. 5) 

Cassils 

Chancellor 

Chipman , 

Coalspur 

Cold Lake 

Crossfield 

Dapp 

Duffield.... 

Empress 

Forestburg 

Forest Lawn 

Halkirk 

High Prairie 

Jarrow 

Kirriemuir 

Magrath 

Newcastle Mine 

Pickardville 

Radway Centre 

Rosedale Station 

Sangudo 

Standard 

Sylvan Lake 

Three Hills 

Travers 

Veteran 



Bolton, Arthur William 

Bolton, Samuel E 

Bowyer, George Herbert 

Hall, Joseph 

Ruckman, Mrs. Winnifred May 

Foote, Arthur Blair 

Davies, Mrs. Eunice J 

Nielson, Hans Fred 

McLeod, Fred. Hunter". 

Mossop, Frank 

Flint, Mrs. Agnes Jane 

CoUingridge, James 

Hamilton, J. Sydney 

Smith, Wm., jr 

Dalton, George Henry 

Hiles, George 

Binnie, James 

Ramsey, Percy R 

Brocklesby , John Wm 

Taylor, Hyde S 

Preston, John 

Measures, Mrs. Elsie 

Kunnas, Nestor 

Mitchell, Mrs. Joseph F 

Thibert, Eugene J 

Messenger, Francis 

Toye, Walter T 

Quigley, Samuel 

Clarke, Stanley 

Ballentine, James H 



O.A.S. 



50.A.S. 

SO.A.S. 
O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 

§O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 



SO.A.S. 

O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 



O.A.S. = 13; Male civilians = 12; Women=5. Total=30. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Baynes Lake 


Boyington, Mrs. Isabel Evelyn A 




Bella Bella 


McMurray, John D 


O.A.S. 


Blakeburn . 


Mackay, Mary 




Blubber Bay 


Kearns, Richard 


O.A.S. 


Bridesville 


Johnston, Mrs. Olive G 




Brighouse 


Dear, Albert Edward 




Brilliant 


Katasonoff , Peter Alex 




Chilliwack 


Kipp, Wilfred H 


O.A.S. 


Dome Creek 


Stewart, Andrew Aitcheson 


O.A.S. 


Fife 


Mazzocchi, Olivo 




Genoa Bay 


Wallace, Norman Bernard 




Kildonan 


Chambers, Robert Earl 


O.A.S. 


Koksilah 


Henri, Arthur Leonard 




Maillardville 


Duplin, Wilfred 




Namu 


Hill, Leonard N 


O.A.S. 


North Bend . . 


Richardson, Mrs. Annie J 




Princeton. . ... 


Lavack, Robert W 


O.A.S. 


Ruskin 


Hopkins, Mrs. Martha Anne 




Spences Bridge 


EUingsen, Carl 




Squamish 


Dixon, Herbert C 


§O.A.S. 


Swanson Bay 


Langis, Joseph E. D 




Tofino 


Hamilton, Mrs. Mabel H 






Pimlott, James William 




Vancouver (Sub office No. 15) 


Armson, Hubert Victor 




" (Sub office No. 25) 






" (Sub office Adela) 


Hutchinson, Wm. Hunt 




Ymir. . . . 


Burgess, Edna Bernice 











O.A.S.=8; Male civilians =12; Women=7. Total = 27. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 49 

Table No. 2 — Appointments to the Position of Postmaster — Continued 

MANITOBA 



Post Office 



Appointee 



Birch River 

Camper 

Chatfield 

Cromer 

Cypress River 

Decker 

Ethelbert 

Fairfax 

Fisher Branch 

Glenella 

Grande Clairiere 

Haskett 

La Riviere 

Leteilier 

Mulvihill 

Rossendale 

Thornhill 

Transcona 

Whitemouth 

Winnipeg (Sub office No. 21) 

( " No. 22) 

" ( " Kildonan West) 

( " King Edward). 



Bowen, Peter 

Henderson, Mrs. Harriet 

Fargey, Frank 

Scott, Robert Earl 

Owens, Mrs. Frances S. . , 

Stewart, Harry 

Skaife, Bertrand 

Dobson, Mrs. Jane 

Bouchard, Ernest 

Addis, Walter 

Pollard, Franogis T 

BrowTi, Mrs. Marie I 

Keating, Mrs. Alice J. . . . 

Bouchard, Alma 

Robinson, Wm. Henry. . , 
Crocker, Wm. Harold... 
Campbell, Arthur James 
Whittaker, Nathaniel F. 

Latta, Robert B 

Baird, Charles A 

Campbell, Isabella 

Dack, Adolph 

Rourke, Robert Henry.. 



O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 
§O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 



lO.A.S. 
§O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 



O.A.S.=8; Male civilians = 8; Women = 7. Total = 23. 

NEW BRUNSWICK 



Andover 

Canterbury Station 

Chatham 

Cody's 

Green River Station 

Hawkshaw 

Lord's Cove 

Lower Hainesville 

Memramcook West 

Millville 

Penobsquis 

St. John (Sub office Union Street). 

Tracy 

Welchpool 



Kelly, Jessie Alicia 

McMullin, Thos. J 

Stothart, James 

Keyes, Mrs. Lillian C 

Thiriault, Martha 

Carson, Wardlow Albert. . 

Smith, Charles V 

Reynolds, Allison LeR 

Leblanc, Mrs. Marie 

Estey, Walter C 

Secord, Harold Cleveland 

Fitzgerald, Francis B 

Tracy, Harry Esmond 

Mitchell, Gertrude L 



§O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 



O.A.S.=3; Male civilian8=6; Women=5. Total = 14. 

NQVA SCOTIA 



Annapolis Royal 

Block House 

Boylston 

Caledonia Mines 

East La Have 

Glace Bay 

Halifax (Sub office No. 5) 

Kingston 

Liscomb 

Mill Vijlage 

Milton 

New Ross 

North Lochaber 

Port Greville ' 

Sydney (Sub office Whitney Pier) 

Tracadie 

Tusket 

West Gore 

West Pubnico 



Merriam, K. H 

Ernst, Fannie M 

Brown, Mrs. Anna Belle 

Gallant, Charles F 

Conrad, Caleb Burnett 

Burchell, Jos. Robert 

Gordon, John W 

Walker, Maude Clarke 

McDiarmid, Mrs. Annie 

Mack, Robie Lester 

Braine, George Albert 

Boylan, Frank Edwin 

Manson, Kenneth C 

Seavey, Mrs. Elizabeth Howard 

Jack, Harvey Kingsley 

MacDonell, Mary 

Babin, Alfred Nicholas 

Hilchey, Mrs. Edna E 

d'Entremont, Wm. Arthur 



O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 
§O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 



O.A.S. =6; Male civilians =6; Women=7. 
15215—4 



Total = 19. 



so CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Table No. 2 — Appointments to the Position of Postmaster — Continued 

ONTARIO 



Post Office 



Appointee 



Acton 

Amer 

Arthur 

Atwood 

Ayton 

Bellamy's 

Cannington 

Chelmsford 

Chepstow 

Collin's Bay 

Conn 

Craighurst 

Cutler 

Delaware 

Detlor 

Easton's Comers 

Elsas 

Embro 

Ennismore 

Glanworth 

Glencairn 

Goudreau 

Grand Bend 

Hamilton (Sub office Mount Hamilton) 

Humber Bay 

Humberstone 

Hymers 

Indian River 

Inkerman 

Innerkip 

Iron Bridge 

Kingston (Sub office No. 1) 

( " " ) 

London (Sub office No. 4) 

" ( " St. James Park).... 

Loring 

Lynden 

Madawaska 

Matheson Station 

Middleville 

Milton Heights 

Monckland Station 

Mount Pleasant 

Nakina 

Newboro 

Nicholson Siding 

North Gower 

North wood 

Norwich 

Novar 

Oro Station 

Ottawa (Sub office Glebe) 

Pakenham 

Port Dalhousie t 

Ridgeville 

River Valley 

Ruel 

St. George 

St. Joachim River Ruscom 

Scotia 

Sellwood 

Sleeman 

South Woodslee 

Sunderland 

Thamesville 

Thombury 

Thomloe 

Toronto (Sub office No. 9) 

( " No. 14) 

( " No. 30) 

( " No. 36) 



Matthews, James Chester 

Abbott, Sydney 

Buschlen, Walter S 

Vallance, Lloyd Duncan 

Fisher, Wm. H 

Hawkins, John H 

Brandon, Scott Fred 

Gratton, Hugh J 

Boegel, Albert Michael 

Langley, Fred. Chas 

Worthington, Thomas 

Fisher, Francis E 

Eitel, Mrs. Amelia 

Laurie, James Tait 

Turriff, Mrs. Alice May 

Turkington, Mrs. Caroline O. . 

Brooks, Ross J 

Mooney, John Ross 

Crough, Michael J 

McLachlan, James Archibald. 

Stephens, Paul C 

Sarver, Douglas Brian 

Oliver, William 

Farrell, Fred. N 

Runnalls, Joseph 

Glass, Alexander Ronald 

Withenshaw, Mark 

Dewart, Albert E 

Keyes, Wm. Ralph 

Hotson, Zella M 

Amill, William Alexander 

Knight, Alex. Garland 

Warmington, Robert 

Heughan, Wm. H 

Hanlon, Gerald P 

Kelcey, Edward Holland 

Robertson, John B 

Chaddock, Frederick T. H... 

Begley, Mrs. Laura Ellen 

Barr, Lionel John Clifford 

Farlow, James Gordon 

Coulthart, Lawrence H 

Devlin, Edwin John 

Collins, Howard 

Tracy, George 

Brady, Allen Frederick 

Scott, Emma 

Chatterson, Edna Amelia. ... 

Poldon, George Harold 

Olan, James B 

Walker, Everard F 

Dawson, John Leonard 

Smith, Nora C 

Hart, Wilfrid Laurier , 

McClellan, James M. B 

Ladouceur, Mrs. Joseph 

PloufTe, Cyprien 

Forsyth, Julia Etta 

Beuglet, Leo J 

Marshall, Ralph O 

Taylor, Mrs. Irene 

Ratigan, Charles , 

Keating, John J 

Welsh, George Arthur 

Kenney, Mrs. C. Mac Vicar 

Ferguson, Reginald C 

Wakeford, Cecil H 

Pearen, Edgerton Ward 

Smith, Mrs. G. M 

Edwards, George 

Hall, Frederick Wilfred 



A.S. 
A.S. 
A.S. 



§O.A.S. 



A.S. 
A.S. 



IO.A.S. 



A.S. 
A.S. 



O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 



,A.S. 
,A.S. 



O.A.S. 



A.S. 

A.S. 



O.A.S. 



.A.S. 
.A.S. 



O.A.S. 



A.S. 
A.S. 



O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 



A.S. 
A.S. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 81 

Table No. 2 — Appointments to the Position of Postmaster — Continued 

ONTARIO— Concluded 



Post Office 



Appointee 



Toronto (Sub office No. 38), 

No. 40). 

No. 45). 

No. 49). 

No. 51). 

No. 51). 

No. 52). 

No. 53). 

No. 59). 

No. 66). 



No. 110). 
No. 118). 
No. 140). 
No. 141). 
No. 148). 
No. 157). 
). 



Walker's 

West Lome 

Westmeath 

Whitevale 

Windsor (Sub office No. 2). 

Wolvorton 

Worthington 

Young's Point 



Carlton Street) . . 
).. 

Lee Avenue) 

Spadina Avenue). 



Mackendry, Robert Edgnart. 

Mirochnick, Mooney S 

Boughner, Wm. S 

Annis, Charles Milton 

Glass, Ed. M ,. 

Kirby, William Henry 

Kitching, Mrs. F. E 

Brannigan, Wm. Thos 

Collins, Cornelius 

Toyne, Wm. Henry 

Darlington, Fred. Geo 

Dawson, Geo. Harold 

Whetstone, Thos 

Gibney, Elizabeth 

Beedie, Annie 

Hall, Ernest Lewis 

Stewart, John 

Bailey, Frederick Richard... 

Leslie, Leonard A 

Elliott, James Walton 

Franks, Arthur 

Munro, Neil Alex 

Scott, James Paul 

Grylls, Mrs. Eva L 

Parks, Miller Russell 

Reycraft, Joseph 

Dawson, Joel, jr 

Haigh, John William 

Kearney, Jennie 



O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 

§O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 

§ 
O.A.S. 

§O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 



O.A.S. =38; Male civilians = 45; Women=17. Total = 100. 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



Kinross McLeod, Samuel A 

Peake Station Currie, John Walter 




O.A.S. =0; Male civilians = 2; Women = 0. Total = 2. 

QUEBEC 



Actonvale 

Beloeil Station 

Charlemagne 

Chemin Tach6 

Douglastown 

Guay 

Guigues 

Labelle 

Lac k la Tortue 

Lac Bouchette Station. . . 

Lac Megantic 

La Malbaie 

Langevin 

La Reine 

La Tuque 

Luceville 

Marieville 

Matapedia 

Montreal (Sub office No. 



39). 
46). 

72). 

73). 

85). 

125). 



Neubois. 

North Coaticook 

Notre- Dame de L^vis. 

Pont Rouge 

15215— 4J 



No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

St-Jean de la Croix) 

Vilieneuve) 



Lampron, Laurent 

Brien, Omer 

Martel, Maria 

Hudon, Mrs. Ernest 

Trachy, Edward 

Pelltetier, Chas E 

Cot6, Nestor 

St. Jacques, Paul 

Marchand , Eddy 

Claveau, Mrs. Laizai G. . . . 

Thibodeau, Irene 

Dufour, Charles 

Rancourt, Arthur. . , 

Chabot, Mrs. Oza 

Bigue, Marie 

D'Anjou, Jos. A. E 

Gdlineau, Samuel Joseph. . . 

Doiron, Regina 

Ledoux, Albertina 

Valiantes, Andrew 

Major, Joseph W 

Lanonette, Henri 

Chenier, Joseph Arthur 

Ladouceur, Arthur 

Gadbois, Emile Armand. . . 

Gauthier, Jean Jacques 

Genest, Joseph 

Cameron, Joseph 

Morin, Joseph Romeo 

Dallaire, Mrs. Davila Jean. 



O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 



52 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Table No. 2— Appointments to the Position of Postmaster— Concluded 

QVEBEC— Concluded 



Post Office 



Ste. Adele 

Ste. Angele de Rimouski 

St. Damien de Buckland 

St. Francois de Montmagny. 

St. Georges Est 

Sl>-Jean de Matha 

St-Joseph d'Alma 

St. Lambert de Levis 

St. Lin 

St. Louis de Courville 

St. Moise Station 

St. Pac6me 

St. Pie 

St. Polycarpe 

St. S6bastien 

St. Valerien de Rimouski. . . 

Sault au Mouton 

Trois Pistoles 

Val Barrette 

Van Bruyssei 

Warwick 

West Brome 

West Broughton 



Appointee 



Paret, Denise 

Thibault, Jean 

Roy, Joseph Arthur 

Boulet, Loretta 

Moisan, Henri Jules 

Dugas, Am6d6e 

Gagn6, Yves 

Turgeon, Marie T 

Locas, Henri 

Latulippe, Mrs. Nora Dub6. . 

Vaillancourt, Mrs. Ludger 

Le Brun, H. Miville 

Martin, Mrs. J. A 

Gareau, Philippe H 

Corriveau, Eusebe 

Coates, Mrs. Yvonne Lavoie. 

Renaud, Joseph Ernest 

Lindsay, Wm. R 

Emard, Sergius 

Lefebvre, Georges H 

Kirouac, Alvina 

Derby, Minnie Emma 

Lapointe, Joseph A 



O.A.S. 



§O.A.S. 



O.A.S.=6; Male civilians =30; Women=17. Total=53. 



SASKATCHEWAN 



Antelope. . . 

Arran 

Avonhurst. 
Battrum . . . 
Carruthers. 
Creelman.. 
Crichton... 
Darmody. . 

Denzil 

Dubuc 

Dumas 



Dunkirk 

Elrose 

Englefeld... 

Eston 

Fenwood 

Goodeve 

Herschel. . . 

Instow 

Keppel 

Kindersley. 

Kisbey 

Maymont.. . 
Naicam .... 

Nipawin 

Norquay. . . 
Onion Lake. 

Parry 

Red vers 

Robsart 



St. Gregor 

Sedley -. 

Senate 

Stoughton 

Vantage 

Willow Bunch. 
Wordsworth... 



Aird, Howard 

Terry, Thomas G 

McFadden, Thos. C 

Battrum, Archie Thomas. 

Kendall, Arthur 

Carrothers, Mrs. Clara M. 

Gibbs, Abraham 

McGhee, James 

Tout, George 

Merrin, Mrs. Margaret J. . . 

Filteau, Arthur 

Gagnon, Mrs. Bessie 

Ayling, Francis Albert 

Cairns, Mrs. Jessie M 

Morrow, Charles 

McPhee, Mrs. Margaret 

McKenzie, Robert John 

Arbon, Lionel Edward 

Mann, George Albert 

Foord, Albert Wm 

Westwood, Wm. Edward.. 

Thomson, Wm. B 

Hughes, Arthur G. W 

Coleman, Clement Arthur. 

Bradley, Mrs. Isabel 

Lawrence, Henry Jos 

Mathison, Alfred P 

Hall, Wm. John 

Donaldson, Mrs. Lilian T. . 

Ray worth, Arthur G 

Caswell, Stephen H 

Caswell, Mrs. Kathleen M. 

Fawcett, Walter Irving 

Kildea, John James 

Finkle, Hayden Howard... 

Wright, Ellis Sheppard 

Crawford, Mrs. Zella G 

Bellefleur, John Frank 

Stockton, Walter R 



O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 

§O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 



.A.S. 



O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 

§O.A.S. 

§O.A.S. 
O.A.S. 

O.A.S. 

*« 

O.A.S. 



O.A.S. 
§O.A.S. 

§O.A.S. 



O.A.S. = 17; Male civilians =14; Women = 8. Total = 39. 

GRAND TOTAL 
O.A.S.=99; Male civilians =135; Women = 73. Total=307. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



5^ 



Table No. 3 — Number of Appointments to Permanent, Seasonal and 

Temporary Positions 





Permanent 


Seasonal 


Temporary 


Department 


02 
< 

6 


O 


c 
a; 

a 

o 


1 


CO 

< 
6 




» 
a 

s 

o 


3 

o 


CO 

< 

6 


a 
.5 

« > 


a 

a 

o 


1 


Agriculture 


24 
2 
6 


37 


38 


99 
2 

15 

6 

264 

1 

19 


6 


8 


6 


20 


58 
1 
3 


199 
2 
7 
13 
67 
5 
2 


111 

5 
34 
19 
15 
10 

3 

2 
3 


368 


Archives, Public 


8 


Auditor General 


2 
1 
68 
1 
4 


7 

5 

25 

"6 










44 


Civil Service Commission 










3'> 


Customs and Excise 


171 










86 
1 
1 


168 


External Affairs 










16 


Finance 


9 










6 


Government Contracts Supervision Com- 
mittee 










•> 


Health 


7 

2 
35 
14 

1 
28 
49 

3 
41 

4 

12 

474 

99 


1 

1 

16 

20 

1 

15 
18 

"46 

4 

15 

334 

135 


2 

"i8 

6 

1 

22 

2 

2 

5 

4 

10 

51 

73 


10 
3 

69 

40 

3 

65 

69 

5 

92 

12 

37 

859 

307 








2 


3 


14 


20 


House of Commons 




Immigration and Colonization 










43 

8 


41 

29 

3 

100 
38 
1 
93 
98 
39 

492 


45 

10 

3 

54 
13 
5 
17 
14 
19 
114 


129 


Indian Affairs 


2 






2 


47 


Insurance 






6 


Interior 


40 


20 




61 


72 
39 
3 
27 
26 
47 
323 


226 


Justice 


90 


Labour 










9 


Marine and Fisheries 


2 


8 




10 


137 


Mines 


138 


National Defence 










105 


Post Office 










029 


Postmasters (see Table No. 2) 












Privy Council 












1 

14 
99 
48 

3 


'"3 

33 

6 

1 
3 

1 


1 


Public Printing and Stationery 


4 

72 

10 

2 


3 

17 
8 
2 


2 

21 

4 

1 

2 


9 

110 

22 

5 

2 












17 


Public Works 










89 
24 


221 




36 


7 




43 


78 


Railway Commissioners, Board of 


4 


Royal Canadian Mounted Police 












S 


Secretary of State 


















1 


Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 
























Pension Commissioners, Board of 






















2 
54 

3 
12 


? 


Trade and Commerce 


13 


12 


14 


39 


13 


16 


7 


36 


20 
3 


28 

i 


102 


Honorary Advisory Council 


6 


Patent and Copyright 


3 




2 


5 










13 
















Total 


§1085 


§§761 


323 


**2169 


§100 


59 


15 


174 


§877 


§§1437 


614 


292S 







Summary: Permanent (including seasonal) 2,343 

Temporary 2,928 



Total 5,271 



*In all cases where male civilians or women were appointed, there were no qualified Overseas Active 
Service men available for the positions. 

tincluding 3 (permanent) and 1 (temporary) widows (8-9 Geo. 5, Chap. 12, Section 39 (3)), amended. 

§Including 240 (permanent), 21 (seasonal) and 137 (temporary) O.A.S. granted disability preference. 

§§Including 7 (permanent) and 2 (temporary) disabilities (Canada). 

**In addition to this total of 2, 169, there were 36 temporary employees made permanent under the 
provisions of the Order in Council of the 16th December, 1920, P.C. 2958, as amended by the Order in 
Council of the 22nd October, 1921, P.C. 3895. 



54 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Comimission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended 



Department and Name 




To 



Agriculture — 

Heath, Joseph 

Caswell, Willard Elmer. . 
Montreuil, Joseph Elzear. 



Gardener 

Clerk-typist 

Superintendent, Tobacco Station 



Chantler, Howard McDougall. 

Evans, Mary Louise 

Walker, George Parker 



Junior chemist, Mines. 

Clerk, grade 2 

Junior entomologist. . . 



Walters, Anabel 

White, Arthur Henry. 
Fulton, Andrew 



Junior account clerk 

Senior dairy promoter 

Assistant to fruit commissioner. 



Babour, Gavin 

Denny, Douglas Graham. 



Junior swine grader. 
Poultryman 



Flewellyn, Edna Mabel 

McLoughry, Robert Archibald... 
Gornall, William Bramwell 



Stenographer, grade 1 

Distributor of live stock . 



Fruit and vegetable inspector 
(seasonal) 



Jackson, Addie B. 



Junior clerk-stenographer. 



Myre, Yvonne 

Kendrick, Thomas Joseph. 
Twinn, Cecil Raymond 



Senior clerk 

Junior entomologist. 



Dustan, Alan Gordon. 
Reynolds, Dorothy... 



Assistant entomologist. 
Clerk-stenographer 



Elliott, George Arthur. 



Seed and feed inspector, Toronto, 
Ont 



Keenan, William Nicholas. 
Eraser, William Pollock 



Assistant entomologist. 
Plant pathologist 



Goold, William Dickson.. 
Pearsall, Luke Windham. 
Buckell, Edward Ronald. 



Castonguay, Ernest Napoleon.. 
Crawford, Henry Gordon Mac- 
Gregor 



Office appliance operator, grade 2 

Swine grader 

Assistant entomologist, Ottawa, 

Ont 

Senior clerk-stenographer 



Entomologist. 



Greaney, Francis James. 



Insect pest or plant disease inves- 
tigator. Saskatoon , Sask . . . 



Winthrop, Winnifred Jean. 
Cameron, Alne Edward. . . 



Seed analyst 

Animal pathologist, Lethbridge, 
Alberta 



Watson, Mrs. Beulah Bethel Maria 

Paquette, Maria Rose Albertine. . 

Jenkins, Murray Hazelton 

Younghusband, Harriet Lillian 



C ler k-stenographer . 



Junior clerk 

Poultryman 

Stenographer, grade 2 . 



Ensor, Horace Clarence. 



Clerk, grade 4, Auditor General's 
Office 



Archives, Public — 
Audet, Francis J. 
Marion, Serephin. 



Auditor General — 

Casselman, Robert Lee 

Price, Frederick Llewellyn . 
Allan, Charles J 



Associate archivist 

Instructor in French, National 
Defence. Kingston, Ont 



Clerk, grade 4 

Audit accountant, gradfe 2. 



Head gardener, Invermere, B.C. 

Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Superintendent, Experimental 
Farm, grade 1, Farnham, Que. 

Assistant chemist, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant entomologist, Frederic- 
ton, N.B. 

Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Dairy specialist, Ottawa, Ont. 

Chief, Extension of Markets Divi- 
sion, Ottawa, Ont. 

Swine grader, Ontario. 

Head poultryman, Summerland, 
B.C. 

Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

District live stock promoter, Mani- 
toba. 

Fruit and vegetable inspector (per- 
manent), Calgary, Alberta. 

Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

it u 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant entomologist, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Entomologist. Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Supervising analyst. Seed Branch, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Entomologist, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior plant pathologist. Saska- 
toon, Sask. 

Supplies clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

District swine grader, Ontario. 

Entomologist, Vernon, B.C. 
Senior translator, Ottawa, Ont. 

Chief, Division of Field Crop In- 
sects, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant plant pathologist, Winni- 
peg, Man. 
Senior seed analyst, Ottawa, Ont. 

Chief veterinary inspector, Ottawa 

Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Head poultryman, Nappan, N.S. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



Archivist, Ottawa, Ont. 

Head translator, Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal audit clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Audit accountant, grade 3, Ottawa, 
Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



5ft 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Auditor General — Con. 

King, Brock Rankin 

King, Walter Charles 

Rettie, Samuel 

Douglas, Charles H 

Glass, Robert Secord 

Hamlyn, Rupert Gladstone 

Buckle, John Gray 

Seddon, Francis Leslie 

Brown, Albert H 

Reid, John Warren 

Casselman, William H 

Bowles, Thomas 

Prowse, Walter Hamilton 

Morrison, David Eldon 

Stockton, Edmund E 

MacMillan, Herbert S 

Tribble, John Norman 

Bond, Wilfred Stanley 

Powers, Arthur Daniel Joseph. . . 

Civil Service Commission — 

Barthe, Marguerite 

Battle, Dorothy Winnifred 

Sharp, James Gordon Campbell. 
Tuttle, William James 

Customs and Excise — 
Baker, Arthur 

Bennett, Mabel Margaret 

Brown, Percy Harold 

Buckingham, Charles Osborne.. 
Colter, Frederick Percival 

Gallop, Reginald Harry 

Glenday, George Walter 

Holmes, Leslie W 

Mann, Ormond Melville 

Meara, Thomas V 

Michon, Joseph Arthur 

O'Heany, Martin 

Price, Francis Noel 

Ruel, Alexander 

Smith, Percy 

Sparks, John William 

Thompson, John 

Tobin, Joseph John 

Vaughan, James William 

Currie, Allan 



Principal account clerk 

Audit accountant, grade 1 — 
"2.... 

"3.... 
(( (< 
Principal audit clerk 

Account clerk, Agriculture — 

Clerk, grade 2 

Audit accountant, grade 4 . . . . 

« it 

« « 1 

Audit clerk 

Audit accountant, grade 4 . . . 
2... 
" 3... 
Clerk, grade 2 

Clerk, grade 2 

1 

Office boy 

Customs truckman 

Clerk, grade 3 

Customs truckman 

Clerk, grade 3 

Cashier and computing clerk 

Clerk, grade 3 

Messenger 

Clerk, grade 3 

Senior messenger 

Clerk, grade 3 

Clerk-stenographer 

Junior clerk 

Clerk, grade 3 

Customs truckman 

« 

Computing clerk 

Messenger 

Customs truckman 



Audit accountant, grade 2, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Audit accountant, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Audit accountant, grade 4, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

it u 

Audit accountant, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Chief executive assistant, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Chief supervisor of Audit, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Audit accountant, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Senior audit clerk, Ottawa, Ont 



Chief auditor of revenue and stores, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Audit accountant, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Audit accountant, grade 4, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 



Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 1, Ottawa, Ont. 



Customs excise clerk, Winnipeg, 
Man. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Customs excise examiner, Winni- 
peg, Man. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant customs appraiser, Fred- 
ericton, N.B. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Customs excise examiner, Winni- 
peg, Man. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

(( t< 

Customs excise clerk, Winnipeg, 

Man. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 
Freight examiner (United States), 

Niagara Falls, Ont. 
Customs excise clerk, Winnipeg, 

Man. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 
Customs excise clerk, Winnipeg, 

Man. 

Customs excise examiner, Winni- 
peg, Man. 

Senior customs excise clerk, Tor- 
onto, Ont. 

Customs excise clerk, Winnipeg, 
Man. 

Customs excise clerk, Vancouver, 
B.C. 



56 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Customs and Excise — Con. 

Hogan, James Joseph 

Milne, William 

Yeomans, Harold Lloyd 

Campeau, Auguste Norbert 

Dagan, Joseph B 

Haley, Michael Francis 

Orr, David 

Riddell, Reta Isabelle 

AUingham, Frank 

Donaldson, James Munroe 

Garceau, Ralph 

Gelly , Aurele 

Gill, Maurice William 

Gilson, Percival Willard ..... 

Girard, Lucien 

Fillon-Payoux, Emile 

Hall, George 

Sinclair, William 

Trythall, Roy Willoughby 

Wynne, John 

Hurteau, Joseph Albert 

Gariepy, O 

Graham, Herbert Robert 

Tory, Frederick Thomas 

Barr, Henry 

Duke, John 

Tiemey, Edward Duncan 

Hays, Howard 

Johnstone, Alexander Grierson. . . 

Mackell, Mary Edith Elizabeth.. 

Taylor, Francis Richard 

Pilon, Joseph Valens 

York, John Edward 

Younger, Lloyd Robert 

DayboU, Edgar 

McGuirl, Allan Carleton 

McLachlan, Robert Alexander. . . 

Rochette, Joseph Marie 



Customs excise examiner. 

Clerk-stenographer 

Customs excise examiner. 

Junior clerk 

Customs excise examiner. 

Customs excise clerk 



Customs truckman. . . 
Customs excise clerk. 



Customs excise examiner. 
Customs excise clerk 



Customs excise examiner. 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs truckman 



Clerk-stenographer 

Senior computing clerk. 



Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, limited service, Stic- 
keen, B.C 



Senior customs excise clerk. . 
Sub-collector of inland revenue, 
grade 2, (supernumerary).. 



Customs excise examiner, grade 
1 outport 



Senior clerk 

Customs excise clerk. 



Junior clerk 

Cashier and computing clerk. . 
Customs excise clerk 



Clerk-stenographer. . . 
Customs excise clerk. 
Clerk, grades 



Stenographer, grade 3 (super- 
numerary) 

Senior clerk 

Special exciseman, grade 1 



Customs excise examiner. 



Cashier and computing clerk, 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Customs excise clerk, Vancouver, 
B.C. 

Express and postal computing clerk 
St. John, N.B. 

Customs excise examiner, Mont- 
real. P.Q. 

Senior customs excise examiner, 
Samia, Ont. 

Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 1 port, Chatham, N.B. 

Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 1 port, Revelstoke, B.C. 

Clerk, grade 4, Toronto, Ont. 

Customs excise examiner, Toronto, 
Ont. 

Express and postal computing clerk 
Calgary, Alta. 

Computing clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 

Sub-collector of customs and ex- 
cise, grade 2 outport, Levis, P.Q. 

Express and postal computing 
clerk, Calgary, Alta. 

Express and postal computing clerk, 
Victoria, B.C. 

Computing clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 

Customs excise clerk, Toronto, 
Ont. 

Customs appraiser (divisional), 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Sub-collector of customs and ex- 
cise, grade 1 outport, Anyox, B.C 
Principal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 

Customs excise examiner, L'Epi- 
phanie, P.Q. 

Sub-collector of customs and ex- 
cise, grade 1 outport, Kingsgate, 
B.C. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Express and postal computing 
clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 

Customs truckman, Winnipeg, 
Man. 

Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 2 port, Fort Frances, Ont. 

Senior customs excise examiner, 
Walkerville, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 

Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Cashier and computing clerk, 

Hamilton, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 



Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

« « 

Superintendent of customs excise 
examiners, Vancouver, B.C. 

Senior customs excise dark. Three 
Rivers, P.Q. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



57 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Customs and Excise — Con. 
Garmichael, Andrew 



Chisholm, Alexander John. 



Thomson, Kathleen 

Allen, James Crothers. . 

Aust, George Elliott 

Bishop, Robert Arthur. 



Chiasson, M. Zelia 

Code, Gordon Hamilton. 



Hossack, James 

Ingall, Cyrus Milo. 



Jones, George William.. 
Morris, Thomas Henry. 



Nauman, Vernon Clifford 

Richardson, Walter Frederick. 

Smith, John Robert 

Thornton, Robert William 

Tomlinson, George Wright 



Burt, Florence 

Cherry, Kate Marie. 
Dalgetty, James 



Parent, Marie Alvine. . . . 
Rocque, Albert Ovide. . 
Watt, Harold Chipman. 



Capbert, Ernest Joseph. . . . 

Jacob, Martin Octave 

Kingsbury, Hector Albert. 
Stevens, Edward Vernon. . . 
Ware, J. A 



Doyle, Samuel Francis. 

Goyer, Joseph 

Steckley, Percy L 

Campbell, Patrick 



Dugal, Joseph Louis Arthur. 

Hicks, John Henry 

Neven, Peter James 



Computing clerk . 



Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, grade 1 outport. Kings- 
gate, B.C 



Junior clerk-stenographer 

Assistant customs appraiser. 
Stenographer-bookkeeper... . 



Assistant inspector of customs 
and excise 



Clerk-stenographer. 



Assistant inspector of customs 
and excise , 



Junior chemist 

Assistant inspector of customs 
and excise 



Head clerk 

Customs excise examiner. 

Head clerk 

Customs excise clerk 



Customs 
cashier. 



express and postal 



Sugar tester 

Customs excise examiner. 

Clerk-stenographer 

Principal translator 

Clerk, grade 4 

Clerk 



Senior customs excise clerk, Ed- 
monton, Alta. 



Collector of customs and excise, 

grade 2, port, Cranbrook, B.C. 
Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Customs appraiser (divisional), 

Toronto, Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Special inspector of customs and 

excise, Ottawa, Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Special inspector of customs and 

excise, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant chemist, Ottawa, Ont. 

Special inspector of customs and 
excise, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior customs excise examiner, 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Special inspector of customs and 

excise, Ottawa, Ont. 
Express and postal computing 

clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Cashier and computing clerk, 

Toronto, Ont. 
Assistant inspector of customs and 

excise, St. John, N.B. 

Customs excise cashier, grade 7 

port, Toronto, Ont. 
Junior chemist, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior customs excise examiner, 

Calgary, Alta. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Head translator, Ottawa, Ont. 

Investigator of drawback claims, 

Toronto, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 



Customs excise examiner, Hali- 
fax, N.S 



Customs excise examiner. 
Computing clerk 



Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, grade 1 outport. Prince 
George, B.C 



Customs truckman 

Customs excise examiner. 
Customs excise clerk 



Customs examiner (UnitedStates), 
Chicago, 111., U.S.A. 

Senior customs excise clerk, Char- 
lottetown, P.E.I. 

Assistant customs appraiser, Mont- 
real, P.Q. 

Assistant customs appraiser, To- 
ronto, Ont. 



Customs excise examiner. Silver 

Heights, B.C. 
Customs excise examiner, Quebec, 

Que. 
Senior customs excise examiner, 

Toronto, Ont. 
.Computing clerk, Walkerville, Ont. 



58 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 


From 


To 


Customs and Excise — Con. 
O'Neill, John Valentine 


Messenger-clerk 




Reid, Walter Fisher 


Customs appraiser (divisional). . 

Customs excise enforcement offi- 
cer. Pigeon river, Ont. 


N.S. 
Investigator of values, Vancouver, 
B.C. 


Richards, George S 






Charest, Joseph Albert Rom6o — 
Dunsmore, Thomas Edward 


Customs excise examiner 

Stenographer, grade 3 


Ont. 
Computing clerk, Sherbrooke, P.Q. 


Murray, John William 


Customs excise examiner, Van- 
couver, B.C 


Ont. 




Customs examiiner (United States), 


Oakes, William 


Customs excise examiner, Winni- 
peg, Man 


Superior, Wis., U.S.A. 




Customs examiner (United States), 


Allen, Malcolm Lennox 


Customs excise examiner, Walk- 
erville, Ont 


Chicago, 111., U.S.A. 




Cashier and computing clerk, 


Conney, Patrick John 


Customs excise examiner 

Senior customs excise clerk 

Customs excise examiner 

Customs excise clerk 


Windsor, Ont. 
Senior customs excise examiner, 


LeBeau, Joseph Alfred 


Montreal, P.Q. 


Dennison, Philip Emile 


Assistant inspector of customs and 


Johnston, Sutherland 


excise, Calgary, Alta. 
Senior customs excise examiner, 


Boutillier, Murdoch Chisholm 


Samia, Ont. 
Assistant registrar of shipping, 


Clarke, Howard Wallace 


Customs excise enforcement 
officer 


Halifax, N.S. 




Customs excise examiner, North 


McCallum, Alexander 


Express and postal computing 
clerk 


Sydney, N.S. 




Customs express and postal cashier, 
Victoria, B.C. 


White, Henry 


Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 2 port, Cranbrook, B.C. 

Head clerk 


Bleakney, Arthur Crawley 


Special inspector of customs and 

and excise, Vancouver, B.C. 
Chief clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Carleton, William Henry 


Clerk, grade 4 


Principal customs statistical clerk. 


Chiasson, Arthur 


Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, limited service outport. 
New Waterford, N.S 


Ottawa, Ont. 




Customs excise enforcement officer. 


Creelman, John Currie 


Customs reviewing appraiser 

Head clerk 


Lingan, N.S. 
Chief clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Evans, Richard Henry 


Registrar of correspondence, Ottar 


Finner, Francis Joseph 


Senior clerk 


wa, Ont. 
Examiner of refund claims, Ottawa, 


Gunby, Charles Enoch 


Junior law clerk 


Ont. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Haw, William Clifford 


Senior clerk 


« « 


Hooper, Sidney Charles 


Clerk-stenographer 


Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 


Johnston, James Herbert 


Principal clerk 


Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Lessard, Joseph Fortunat 


Senior file clerk 


Principal file clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Lewis, Hugh Bower 


Senior clerk-bookkeeper 


Excise statistical checker, Ottawa, 


Peaker, John Merely 


Head customs excise checking 
clerk 


Ont. 




Chief customs excise checking 


Perrin, Wesley Ellis 


Principal clerk 


clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Slater, Firmus James 


Principal file clerk 




Smith, Rodney Charles 


Senior file clerk 


Principal file clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Smyth, Peter Leo 


Senior customs excise clerk 

Excise statistical checker 

Assistant chemist 


Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Taylor, Walter Edgar 


Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Watson, Clayton Edward 


Chemist, Ottawa, Ont. 




Principal clerk 


Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


DeCourcy, Margaret 


Clerk-stenographer 


Customs excise clerk, London, Ont. 


Marsh, Edward Alfred 


Customs excise clerk 


Customs excise cashier, Ottawa, 




Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



59 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Customs and Excise — Con, 
Mason, James 

Pellerin, Raoul 

MacDonald, Thomas Edward.. . 

O'Doherty, H. A 

Roberts, William 

Leahy, Norman P 

Weir, Fred 

Giroux, Joseph Ludger , 

Cleary, Hilary Andrew , 

Somerton, George Christopher. . 
Buisson, Charles O'Keefe 

Cole, W.I 

Cypihot, Alexandre 

Wilson, Walter Leslie 

Haggins, Ernest Melville 

Falkner, William Francis 

Ellement, Ambrose Augustine.. . 
Deachman, John Stewart 

Neighom, John 

Hunt, Herbert Garvin 

Lumbard, Reginald William 

Booth, George 

Gaudet, Albert 

Goodwin, Leonard Wilfred 

Grant, George 

Hill, Malcolm Gordon 

O'Brien, William Francis 

Paterson, Robert Gerrie 

Rousseau, Camille Achille 

Samson, Joseph L. T 

Taylor, Stewart Edward Martin 

Tobin, Michael 

Wood, Henry Livingston 

Gariepy, Joseph Philias 

Eraser, John A 



Customs excise examiner 

Senior customs excise clerk 

Customs statistical clerk 

Senior file clerk 

Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, limited service outport, 
Twin Lakes, Alta 

Computing clerk 

« 

Clerk-stenographer 

Senior clerk 

Customs excise examiner 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise examiner 

Assistant customs appraiser 

Customs statistical clerk 

« « 

te (t 

<< <( 

<« « 

Senior clerk-stenographer 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise examiner, grade 1 

outport, Powell River, B.C.... 

Messenger-clerk 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise clerk 

Express and postal computing 
clerk 

Customs excise clerk 

Express and postal computing 

clerk 

Senior customs excise clerk 

Customs excise examiner 

Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, grade 2 outport, L6vis, 

P.Q 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise checking clerk. . . 

Customs appraiser, grade 3 

Customs excise clerk 



Cashier and computing clerk, St. 

Thomas, Ont. 
Customs appraiser, grade 3 port, 

Three Rivers, P.Q. 
Customs excise checking clerk, 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Customs excise examiner, Leth- 
bridge, Alta. 

Senior customs excise clerk, Hali- 
fax, N.S. 

Senior customs excise clerk, Walk- 
erville, Ont. 

Customs excise examiner, Mont- 
real, P.Q. 

Customs excise checking clerk, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Cashier and computing clerk, 
Windsor, Ont. 

Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 2 port, Shawinigan Falls, 
P.Q. 

Senior customs excise examiner, 
Belleville, Ont. 

Assistant inspector of customs and 
excise, Montreal, P.Q. 

Senior customs statistical clerk, 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Customis excise checking clerk, 

Ottawa, Ont. 

(( « 

Express and postal computing 
clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 



Customs excise clerk, Calgary, 
Alta. 

Senior customs excise clerk, Mont- 
real, P.Q. 

Senior customs excise clerk, Char- 
lottetown, P.E.I. 

Cashier and computing clerk, 

London, Ont. 
Cashier and computing clerk, 

Welland, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Assistant inspector of customs and 

excise, Winnipeg, Man. 
Cashier and computing clerk, St. 

Hyacinthe, P.Q. 



Customs appraiser (divisional), 

Quebec, P.Q, 
Collector of customs and excise, 

grade 1 port, Amherstburg, Ont. 
Senior customs excise checking 

clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 3 port, Three Rivers, P.Q. 

Customs excise cashier, Char- 
lottetown, P.E.I. 



66 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Customs and Excise — Con. 
Hayden, R. R 



Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, limited service outport, 
Port Wade, N.S 



Th6riault, Joseph Prosper 

Greenwood, Donald Drummond. 

Mulligan, James Edward Scanlon 
Duval, Josaphat Rodolphe 



Customs excise examiner. 



Customs excise examiner, grade 
1 outport 



Customs excise cashier.. . 
Customs excise examiner. 



Belton, Frank Sydney. 
Hardy, William A. G., 



Senior clerk-stenographer. 
Customs excise examiner. , 



Veitch, Robert Adam . 



Hassett, Henry Jerome. 
Lachance, Remi Felix... 



Customs excise clerk. 
Computing clerk 



Customs excise examiner, limited 
service port, Annapolis Royal, 
N.S. 

Special customs ofl&cer, grade 2, 
Montreal, Que. 

Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, grade 1 outport. Point 
Edward, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Customs excise cashier. Three 

Rivers, P.Q. 
Computing clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Special exciseman, grade 1, Belle- 
ville, Ont. 
Cashier and computing clerk, 

Toronto, Ont. 



Kavanagh, John P 

Everett, Lawrence R 

Relyea, Thomas G 

Elsey, Raymond Henry 

McCallum, William John 

McLenaghan, Frederick Holmes. . 



Assistant customs 
Montreal, P.Q. 



appraiser, 



Ward, James 

Noble, William Arthur. 



Messenger-clerk 

Assistant customs appraiser. . 
Cashier and computing clerk. . . . 

Senior customs excise examiner. 

Customs guard 



Customs excise examiner. Silver 
Heights, B.C 



Ozard, George Couzens 

Martin, Joseph Telesphore . 

Pag6, Joseph Emilien 



Customs express 
cashier 



and postal 



Gareau, Romeo 

Parizeau, Louis D. 



Hughes, Michael 

Grenier, Paul Emile 

Labont6, Francois Xavier. 
Darby, Edgar L 



McMahon, Maude Mary 

Brisebois, Joseph Lionel Conrad... 

Tennant, Ernest Joseph 

Vermette, Henry 



Stewart, Frank Bradford 

Bordeleau, Joseph Charles 
Alphonse 



Hall, Frank. 



Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 2 port, Shawinigan 
Falls, P.Q 



Customs excise clerk. 



Customs excise examiner. 



Customs excise cashier, grade 7. 
Customs excise clerk 



Express and postal computing 

clerk 

Customs guard 



Express and postal computing 
clerk 



Cleaner and helper. Public Works 

Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, grade 1 outport, Vict- 
oriaville. Que 



Customs guard. 



Customs guard, Victoria, B.C. 

Customs appraiser, Toronto, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Windsor, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Special exciseman, grade 1, Belle- 
ville, Ont. 

Special customs officer, grade 1, 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, grade 2 outport, Ocean 
Falls, B.C. 

Customs excise cashier, Victoria, 
B.C. 



Inspector of customs and excise. 

Three Rivers, P.Q. 

Express and postal computing 

clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 

t( « 

Senior customs excise examiner, 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Assistant customs appraiser, 

Toronto, Ont. 
Express and postal computing 

clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Senior customs guard, Vancouver, 
B.C. 

Customs express and postal cashier, 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Customs truckman, Halifax, N.S. 



Assistant inspector of customs and 
excise, Sherbrooke, P.Q. 

Customs excise clerk, Victoria, 
B.C. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



&1 



Table No. 4— Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended— Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Customs and Excise — Con. 
Richards, David Herbert 

Summers, John Alfred 

Cole, Samuel Arthur 

Groves, Frank Ernest Benedict 
Veronica 

Hooker, Edward Delos 

Peake, Ernest deBlois 

Legg, Herbert 

Weston, Bruce Vernon 

Tossell, Carl Archibald 

Abbott, Robert Wilfred 

Skaife, Maurice Edward 

Schram, Richard Lewis Henry. 

Stark, Robert Scott 

Betts, H. W 

Lamothe, Joseph Dominique 
Arthur 

LaZerte, Curtis James 

McKibbon, Robert 

Harrop, Frank Thomas 

Armstrong, Bernard Carmile.... 

Abbott, Robert Wilfred 

Pariseau, Joseph Adolphe 

Harris, Charles H 

Schuler, Frederick Charles 

Farrell, John J 

Lydeard, William Edgar 

Conway, Wilkie Thomas 

Gray, Robert Scott 

Robinson, Wallace 

Wall, William F 

Williams, William Clifford 

Brown, Charles Bassett 



Customs excise examiner 

Express and postal computing 
clerk 

Senior customs excise examiner. 

Customs excise examiner 

Cashier and computing deck. . . . 

Customs excise cashier 

Assistant inspector of customs 
and excise 

Special customs oflBcer, grade 1 . 

Computing clerk 

Postal clerk, Post Office 

Exciseman, grade 2 

Customs excise clerk 

Cashier and computing clerk. . . . 

Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, limited service, outport, 
Iroquois, Ont 

Customs excise examiner 

Express and postal computing 
clerk 

Customs excise examiner 

Express and postal computing 
clerk 

Sub-collector of inland revenue, 
grade 1 branch 

Customs excise examiner, grade 
1 outport 

Customs excise examiner 

Cashier and computing clerk. . . . 

Customs excise examiner 

Senior customs excise clerk 

Exciseman, grade 2 

Express and postal computing 
clerk 

Assistant customs appraiser 

Customs excise clerk 

Customs excise clerk 



Cashier and computing clerk, 
Calgary, Alta. 

Customs express and postal cashier, 

Calgary, Alta. 
Collector of customs and excise, 

grade 4 port, Sarnia, Ont. 

Assistant inspector of customs and 

excise, St. John, N.B. 
Collector of customs and excise, 

grade 3 port, Welland, Ont. 
Assistant customs appraiser, 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Inspector of customs and excise, 
Calgary, Alta. 

Customs excise examiner, St. 
John, N.B. 

Assistant customs appraiser, Van- 
couver, B.C. 

Customs excise examiner, Van- 
couver, B.C. 

Special exciseman, grade 1, St. 
Catharines, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 

Collector of customs and excise 
(Dawson), Dawson, Y.T. 

Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 2 port, St. Hyacinthe, 
P.Q. 



Collector of customs and excise, 
grade 1 port, Morrisburg, Ont. 

Senior customs excise examiner, 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Customs express and postal cashier, 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Collector of customs and excise, 

grade 1 port, Trenton, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 

Customs excise enforcement offi- 
cer, St. Jacques, P.Q. 

Sub-collector of customs and 

excise, grade 1 outport, Norwich, 

Ont. 
Computing clerk, Brantford, Ont. 
Collector of customs and excise, 

grade 2 port, St. Thomas, Ont. 
Computing clerk, Lethbridge, 

Alta. 
Assistant inspector of customs and 

excise, Montreal, P.Q. 
Senior customs excise examiner, 

New Westminster, B.C. 

Assistant customs appraiser, Tor- 
onto, Ont. 

Customs appraiser, Montreal, P.Q. 

Cashier and computing clerk. 
Fort Frances, Ont. 

Customs express and postal cashier, 
Toronto, Ont. 



62 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4— Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Customs and Excise — Con. 
Curren, John Joseph 

More, Elisha Dolliver 

Mossop, George Visser 

MacMahon, Carmel 

McKinnon, William Graham.. 
Smith, Mary L. I 

Kendall, C. R 

McKenna, Joseph 

Rutherford, James McGregor. 

Sabourin, Fabian 

Hazlewood, George Frederick 

Wetmore, Harvey Maurice 

Clarke, William George 

Cook, John Edward 

Darwin, Norbert John 

Devlin, Harry Franklin 

Guibord, Joseph Rodolphe 

Kane, Thomas Leo Aloysius. . 

Martin, Thomas Robson 

Munroe, Harry Reeves 

Sharkey, Norman 

Smith, Alexander Hamilton... 

Yeo, Stanley Dibb 

MacNeill, Colin Campbell 

Warner, Frederick Alexander.. 
Woods, Stanley Gordon 

Kelso, Robert 

Anderson, Alexander 

Brouillette, Albert Ernest 

Gagnon, Joseph Aime 

McAllister, Robert 

Buck, Arthur James 

Young, Angus 

Brecknell, Percy Thomas 

O'Donnell, Michael James. . . . 
McCallum, J. S 



Customs excise examiner. 



Customs excise examiner, limited 
service port 



Clerk, grade 3 . 



Office boy 

Stenographer, grade 2. 



Customs excise examiner, grade 
1 outport 



Customs truckman. 



Collector of customs and excise, 
limited service port, Canso, 
N.S 



Clerk, grade 2 

Caretaker, Public Works. 



Clerk, grade 4 

Express and postal computing 

clerk 

Customs excise clerk 



Clerk, grade 3. . . 
Computing clerk. 



Clerk, grade 3. 
Clerk, grade 4. 



Customs express and postal 

cashier 

Customs excise examiner 



Senior customs excise checking 
clerk 



Senior messenger. 



Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, grade 1 outport. Port 
Burwell, Ont 



Clerk, grade 1 

Ship watchman 

Postmaster, Post Office. 



Computing clerk. 



Express and postal computing 
clerk 



Clerk, grade 1 

Special customs officer, grade 2 

Postal helper, Post Office 

Clerk 



Senior customs excise examiner, 
Halifax, N.S. 

Collector of customs and excise, 
limited service port, Liverpool, 
N.S. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 1, Toronto, Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Sub-collector of customs and 
excise, grade 1 outport, Barrie, 
Ont. 

Customs excise clerk, Toronto, 
Ont. 



Customs excise clerk (relieving), 

Halifax, N.S. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Customs excise examiner, St. John, 

N.B. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Computing clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Special exciseman, grade 1, Van- 
couver, B.C. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior computing clerk, Vancouver, 
B.C. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal customs statistical clerk, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 



Computing clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Special exciseman, grade 1, Walk- 
erville, Ont. 

Principal customs excise checking 

clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Customs excise clerk, Halifax, 

N.S. 



Collector of customs and excise, 

grade 1 port, Tillsonbarg, Ont. 
Customs excise clerk, Vancouver, 

B.C. 
Customs excise examiner, St. John, 

N.B. 
Sub-collector of customs and 

excise, limited service outport, 

Mansonville, P.Q. 
Assistant inspector of customs and 

excise. Three Rivers, P.Q. 

Customs express and postal cashier, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Customs excise clerk, Toronto, 
Ont. 

Assistant inspector of customs and 
excise. North Sydney, N.S. 

Customs excise clerk. Saskatoon, 
Sask. 

Customs excise examiner, Mont- 
real, P.Q. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



63 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



External Affairs — 

Drysdale, Sara E 

Finance — 

Staden, Sydney A 

Congdon, Richard Weldon 

Ronson, Walter Clifton 

Viets, Robert B 

McCavour, Samuel Perry 

Johnston, A. C 

Parry, James 

Morton, William 

Bury, George Milton 

Blyth, Egbert Percy 

Frederickson, Earl 

Government Contracts Supervision 
Committee — 
Day, Arthur William 

Health- 
Smith, Edward 

Cowan, Francis William 

Miller, George S 

Teevens, Lambert Parker 

Mercier, Lten 

Gaumond , Joachim 

Jacques, Jean-Baptiste 

Lynch, John 

Ross, Arthur Henry Fraser 

House of Commons — 
Dun, John T 

Cloutier, Victor 



File clerk. 



Accountant, Assistant Receiver 
General's Office, grade 2, Vic 
toria, B.C 



Clerk. 



Departmental accountant, grade 
5 



Departmental solicitor. 



Assistant receiver general, grade 
4, Toronto, Ont 



Accountant, Assistant Receiver 
General's Office, grade 2. . . , 



Senior currency teller. 



Accountant, Assistant Receiver 
General's Office, grade 2, Cal 
gary. Alberta 



Clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 



Senior account clerk, Winnipeg, 
Man 



Accountant, Assistant Receiver 
General's Office, grade 4. . . 



Senior clerk. 



Steward, Quarantine Hospital or 

Station, Grosse Isle, Que... 
Head clerk 



Hospital attendant, part time . . . 

Head clerk 

Fireman 



Stationary engineer, heating 
grade 1 



Stationary engineer, grade 
grade 2 



Senior file clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



Accountant, Assistant Receiver 
General's Ofl&ce, grade 4, Tor- 
onto, Ont. 

Accountant, Assistant Receiver 
General's Office, grade 2, Hali- 
fax, N.S. 

Assistant to Secretary of Treasury 

Board, Ottawa, Ont. 
Solicitor to the Treasury, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Comptroller of currency, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Assistant receiver general, grade 2, 
Halifax, N.S. 

Accountant, Assistant Receiver 
General's Office, grade 2, Hali- 
fax, N.S. 



Assistant receiver general, grade 2, 

Regina, Sask. 
Senior currency teller, Regina, 

Sask. 

Accountant, Assistant Receiver 
General's Office, grade 2, Regina, 
Sask. 

Assistant receiver general, grade 4, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



Fumigating officer, Montreal, Que, 

Chief, Narcotic Division, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Hospital attendant, Lunenburg, 
N.S. 

Chief, Proprietary or Patent Medi- 
cine Division, Ottawa, Ont. 

Stationary engineer, heating, grade 

1, Grosse Isle Quarantine Sta- 
tion, P.Q. 

Stationary engineer, heating, grade 

2, Grosse Isle Quarantine Sta- 
tion, P.Q. 



Clerk, grade 1 . 
Office boy 



Electrician-engineer, Grosse 

Quarantine Station, P.Q. 
Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 1, Ottawa, Ont. 



Isle 



Committee clerk 

Senior committee clerk. 



Senior committee clerk, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Assistant Chief of Committees and 

Private Bills Branch, Ottawa, 

Ont. 



64 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



House of Commons — Con. 
Hugg, Claire 

Beaubien, Ald6ric H 

Baril, Joseph Wilfrid 

Immigration and Colonization — 
Gelley, Thomas 

Walker, John Bruce 

Stewart, Edna Mae 

Byers, Jessie Madeline 

Johnston, Bertha Ruth 

Morgan, William Howard 

O'Connor, Leona Margaret M. . . 
Westman, Astrid Elizabeth 

Rivest, Mary Irene 

Hopkirk, Jessie F 

Ahern, Ruby Amelia 

Grant, Hubert Maitland 

Dorsey, Willard Hargrave 

Lecompte, Donat Joseph 

Ellis, Amos 

Martin, Cyril Alban 

Desarmeau, Clifford William. . . 

Chapdelaine, Jean Aim6 

Charlesworth, Mrs. Clare Maud 
O'Kelley, Andrew N 

Belanger, Emile 

Cormier, Odilon 

Emard, Raoul Herv6 

Thomas, Robert Garnet 

Smith, Foster Albert 

Henderson, Anna M 

O'Connor, Edith Anne 

Rombough, Thomas Harold 

Laing, John 

Holmes, Frederick William 

Fulton, H 

Johnston, Thomas 

Wood, S 

Dalby, Fred 



Assistant curator of reading room 
Principal translator 

Division commissioner of immi- 
gration, grade 1 

Superintendent of United States 
Emigration, Ottawa, Ont 

Junior clerk-typist 

File clerk 

Clerk-stenographer 

Principal clerk 

Senior clerk-stenographer 

Junior clerk-stenographer 

Stenographer, grade 2 

Senior clerk-typist 

Clerk-stenographer 

Immigration inspector, Ellis 
Island, N.Y., U.S.A 

Immigration inspector 

Prison guard. Justice, St. Vincent 
de Paul Penitentiary, Que. 

Immigration inspector, Fort 
Frances, Ont 

Clerk-stenographer, Halifax, N.S 

Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 
Ont 

Clerk-typist, Ottawa, Ont 

Conductress, Atlantic ports 

Superintendent of Emigration 
(Continental Europe) Antwerp, 
Belgium 

Emigration agent, grade 2 

Emigration agent, grade 1, Dan- 
zig, Poland 

Junior clerk 

Confidential messenger 

Immigration inspector, Niagara 

Falls, Ont 

Senior clerk-stenographer 

Senior account clerk 

File clerk 

Senior statistical clerk 

Immigration hall attendant 

iC 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. . . 



Curator of reading room, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Parliamentary translator, Ottawa, 

Ont. 



Division commissioner of immi- 
gration, grade 2, Western Divi- 
sion. 

Director of European Emigration, 

London, England. 
Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 2, Winnipeg, 

Man. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Montreal, P.Q. 

Supervising immigration inspector, 

grade 1, Ottawa, Ont. 
Supervising immigration inspector, 

grade 2, North Portal, Sask. 

Immigration investigating officer, 
grade 1, Montreal, P.Q. 

Supervising immigration inspector, 
grade 1, Kingsgate, B.C. 

Immigration inspector, Ellis 
Island, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Senior clerk-stenographer, Mont- 
real, P.Q. 

Emigration agent, grade 1, Ant- 
werp, Belgium. 

Immigration investigating officer, 
grade 1, Toronto, Ont. 



Assistant Director of European 
Emigration, London, England. 

Emigration agent, grade 3, Paris, 
France. 

Emigration agent, grade 2, Ham- 
burg, Germany. 
Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
File clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



Senior clerk-bookkeeper, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk-bookkeeper, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk-bookkeeper, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Immigration guard, Winnipeg, 

Man. 



Chief clerk, London, England. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



65 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Immigration and Colonization- 
Concluded. 
Hales, Miss K 



Principal account clerk. 



Cardinal, Charles F. 



Johnston, Loral Geraldine. . . 
LaFreniere, Joseph Frederic. 

Morgan, Elsie Annie 

Munroe, R. N 



Immigration investigating offi- 
cer, grade 2, Edmonton, Alta. 

Stenographer, grade 1 



Supervising immigration inspec- 
tor, grade 1, Coutts, Alberta. . 

Stenographer, grade 1 



Immigration investigating officer 
grade 3 



Powers, Nicholas David... 
Tallon, Margaret Veronica. 

Wilson, May 



Typist, grade 1 

Stenographer, grade 2. 



Bambrick, William John. . 
McFarlane, John Darvill.. 

Norris, Walter 

Larose, William Stanfield. 



Clerk, grade 3. 



Typist, grade 2 

Immigration investigating offi- 
cer, grade 1 



Skinner, A. E. 



Division immigration inspector, 
grade 1 



Reeder, George Charles 

Robertson, Walter Whiston. 



Immigration inspector, Emer- 
son, Man 



Immigration inspector, Winni- 
peg, Man 



Indian Affairs — 
Clarke, Frederick James. 



Indian farming instructor. 



Ostrander, James Pember Brook- 
bank , . . 



Clerk, grade 2, Edmonton, Al- 
berta Agency 



Pugh, John Edwards. 



Indian agent, grade 4, Saddle 
Lake Agency 



Awrey, Herbert Nathaniel. 



Principal account clerk . 



MacKenzie, Alexander Ferguson.. 
Arnold, Colonel Harry Watson 

Pescod, Eva Grace 

Parker Charles Carleton 



Head clerk 

Postmaster, Kindersley, Sask. 



Junior clerk-typist 

Inspector of Indian agencies, 
grade 2 



Insurance — 

Aylwin, Douglas Courtenay. 
McDonald, William Robert. 



Booke, Samuel 

Harkness, Andrew Edmund . 



Junior statistical clerk 

Junior examiner of companies. 

Actuarial clerk 



Interior — 
Gillespie, Alma Gertrude. . 
Renault, Joseph Ferdinand. 
Rigby, Joseph Arthur 



Junior clerk 

Senior translator. 
Clerk, grade 3. . . 



Departmental accountant, grade 2, 
London, England. 

Immigration investigating officer, 

grade 3, Calgary, Alta. 
Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Supervising immigration inspector, 
grade 2, Fort Frances, Ont. 

Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Assistant division commissioner of 

Immigration, grade 2, Winnipeg, 

Man. 
Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 



Immigration investigating officer, 
grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Division commissioner of immi- 
gration, grade 1, Vancouver, B.C. 

Supervising immigration inspector, 
grade 1, Coutts, Alta. 

Immigration investigating officer, 
grade 2, Edmonton, Alta. 



Indian agent, grade 4, Griswold 
Indian Agency. 



Indian agent, grade 4, Saddle Lake 
.4gency. 

Indian agent, grade 5, Crooked 

Lakes Indian Agency. 
Departmental accountant, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Chief clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Indian agent, grade 4, Moose 

Mountain, Sask. 
File clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Inspector of indian agencies, grade 
3, Ottawa, Ont. 



Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant examiner of companies, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Actuarial assistant, Ottawa, Ont. 



Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal translator, Ottawa, Ont. 
Motion picture projectionist, 
Ottawa, Ont. 



15215—5 



66 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4— Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Interior — Con. 

Brady, Martin 

Gauthier, Henri E. D 

McCarthy, Joseph Victor 

Welsh, Catherine 

Appleby, Georgia B 

Johnston, Marjorie 

Somers, James Godfrey 

Lecourt, Charles Eugene 

O'Leary, Susan 

Webb, Christopher Everest 

Bazinet, Odilon Gedeon 

Falconer, Joanna 

Fleming, William Gregory 

McKenzie, Jessie Gladys 

Underwood, Thomas Arthur 

Wadman, Theodore James 

Dwyer, Michael 

MacNeill, William 

McRae, Dorothy Catherine 

Prince, Rose Hamilton Gordon. . . 

Sills, Orville 

Sinclair, Donald Stewart 

Agnew, Hilary Le Mesurier 

Clough, Irvin 

Parker, Henry John 

Paterson, Lome Crookenden 

Hutchingame, Thomas Henry. . . . 
Webster, James Robertson 

Lafranchise, Marie Louise Yvonne 

Mahon, Edith Maude 

McGahey, Honora Pearl 

Rigby , Joseph 

Bums, Maude May Theresa 

Akins, James Robert 

Blanchet, Guy Houghton 

Bridgeland, Morrison Parsons.. 

Christie, William 

Colquhoun, George Allan 

Cory, Wilfrid Mayfield 

Cowper, George Constable 

Gumming, Austin Louis 

Daly, Kenneth Robinson 

Davidson, Robert Douglas 



Principal clerk 

Map draftsman , 

Junior draftsman , . , 

Junior clerk-stenographer. 



Forest ranger 

Senior map draftsman. . . 

Clerk 

Senior assistant engineer. 



Map draftsman 

Stenographer bookkeeper (sea- 
sonal) 



Clerk, grade 2 

Stenographer, grade 1. 



Clerk, Swift Current, Sask. 



District fire ranger. 

Messenger 

Forestry assistant. . 



Junior clerk -stenographer. 
Library helper 



Senior clerk 

Assistant forest ranger. Riding 
Mountain Forest Reserve, 
Dauphin, Man 



Senior clerk. 



Assistant fire ranger (seasonal). 



Senior clerk 

Principal clerk. 



Office boy 

Assistant fire ranger (seasonal). 



Clerk-stenographer 

Junior clerk-stenographer 

Clerk-stenographer 

File clerk 

Clerk-stenographer 

Chief of party, general survey. 



Topographical engineer. 



Chief of party, general survey. 
Assistant office engineer 



Junior departmental solicitor 

Chief of party, general survey.. 



Departmental solicitor 

Assistant to dominion land sur- 
veyor 



Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Surveys physicist, grade 1, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Draftsman, Ottawa, Ont. 

Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior forest ranger, Greenbush, 
Sask. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

District hydraulic engineer, Van- 
couver, B.C. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Stenographer grade 2 (permanent), 

Kamloops, B.C. 
Clerk, grade 4, Revelstoke, B.C. 
Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Homestead appraiser. Moose Jaw, 

Sask. 
Land agent, Revelstoke, B.C. 
Watchman, Ottawa, Ont. 
Forester, Duck Porcupine Reserve, 

Swan River, Man. 
Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Departmental librarian, grade 1, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



Forest ranger, Duck-Porcupine 
Forest Reserve, Swan River, 
Man. 

Principal clerk. Prince Albert, 
Sask. 

Fire ranger (seasonal), Revelstoke, 
B.C. 

Land agent, Kamloops, B.C. 

Chief land agent. Prince Albert, 
Sask. 

Clerk, grade 1, Ottawa, Ont. 

Fire ranger (seasonal), New West- 
minster, B.C. 

Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Surveys engineer, grade 6, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Surveys engineer, grade 5, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Surveys engineer, grade 4, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Surveys engineer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Assistant solicitor, Ottawa, Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 4, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Solicitor, Ottawa, Ont. 

Surveys engineer, grade 3, Ottawa, 
Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



67 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Interior — Con. 

Davis, Elmore Alexander 

Dodge, George Blanchard 

Dunlop, Henry Joseph 

Eider, Albert James 

Fawcett, Sydney Dawson 

Fletcher, William Arthur 

Fontaine, Louis Elie 

Fry, Eric Stanley 

Gagnon, Josephat 

Hawkins, Albert Howard 

HoUingsworth, Gilbert Stephen 

Hubbell, Ernest Wilson 

Jones, Cyril Eardley 

Knight, Richard H. 

LeBlanc, Pierre Maxime Henri. 
Linford, Walter James 

Lonergan, Gerald Joseph 

Macllquham, Walter Lloyd 

MacMillan, John P 

McClennan, Walter Danesbrook 
McKay, Robert Bennie 

Narraway, Athos Maxwell 

Nash, Thomas Sanford 

Palmer, Philip Ebenezer 

Palsen, Gudlangur 

Parry, Harry B 

Pierce, John Wesley 

Rinfret, Claude 

Ross, Robert Chatfield 

Taggart, Charles Henry 

Waugh, Bruce Wallace 

Wight, Edward James 

Alberga, Albert Miller 

Balmer, Eva 

Bateman, Albert Edwin 

Bennett, Mary Lorraine 

Birchall, William Albert 

Burkholder, Edgar Leroy 

Calderhead, William Graham.. 

Currie, Peter William 

de Puyjalon, Louis Henry 

Deslauriers, Joseph Emile 

Dorval, Ida 

Dove, Charles Henry 

15215— 5§ 



Engineering clerk 

Special surveys engineer 

Assistant magnetician 

Assistant office engineer 

Chief of party, general survey. . . 

Inspector of surveys 

Articled pupil, Kamloops, B.C.. 

Lithographic press feeder 

Assistant office engineer 

Map draftsman 

Inspector of surveys 

Junior map draftsman 

Chief of party, general survey. . . 

« « 
Surveys physicist 

Inspector of surveys , 

Assistant ofl&ce engineer 

i< « 

Chief of party, general survey. . 

Supervisor of surveys 

Office engineer 

Chief of party, general survey. . 

Assistant leveller, Edmonton 
Alberta 

Assistant office engineer 

Chief of party, general survey. . . 

« « 

Surveys physicist 

Chief of party, general survey. . 

i< ' it 
Assistant office engineer 

Engineering clerk 

Junior clerk 

Senior account clerk , 

Junior clerk-stenographer 

Principal map draftsman 

Senior engineering clerk 

Junior draftsman 

Assistant office engineer , 

Editorial assistant 

Assistant map draftsman 

Junior clerk-stenographer 

Clerk 



Senior engineering clerk, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 6, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Office engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 

it it 

Surveys engineer, grade 4, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

ft tt 

Surveys engineer, grade 5, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 1, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Lithographic printer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Soil analyst, topographical survey. 

Saskatoon, Sask. 
Surveys engineer, grade 1, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 5, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 4, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

(( (( 

Surveys physicist, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 5, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Office engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

if it 

Surveys engineer, grade 5, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Assistant Director Topographical 

Survey, Ottawa, Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 6, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 4, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Surveys engineer, grade 1, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Office engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 

Surveys engineer, grade 4, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

« « 

Surveys physicist, grade 2, Otta- 
wa, Ont. 
Surveys engineer, grade 4, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

it it 

Surveys engineer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Senior engineering clerk, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal account clerk, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Chief map draftsman, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Principal file clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Draftsman, Ottawa, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant office engineer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



68 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4— Promotions made by the ComLmission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 




To 



Interior — Con. 
Engler, Carl William Bernhardt... 

Field, Reginald Hugh 

Gillmore, Edward Theodore Bar- 
clay 

Hand, Selwyn Ewart 

Harris, Kenneth Davies 

Helmer, John Dickie 

Higginson, James Darwin 

Jones, George Samuel 

Low, William Wilson 

Lytle, William John Alexander 

Matheson, Donald 

May, John Ernest 

Metivier, Antonio 

Milliken. John Bolton 

Mills, Thomas Stanley 

Miskell, Willoughby Leonard 

Murphy, Stephen John 

McDonald, Marion Anna 

McKinley, Emily Margaret 

Nagle, Charles Edmond 

Ouimet, Rene Eugene 

Pinard, Arthur Achille 

Rice, Frederick William 

Roberts, Stanley Oxley 

Rochon, Ernest Calixte 

Sparks, Nicholas Arthur 

Spero, John Ethelbert 

Tague, Hector Oswald 

Troy, Constance Mary 

Villeneuve, Eugene J 

Washington, Annie May 

West, Gordon Ogilvie 

Williams, Mabel B 

Wilson, Clyde Tucker 

Craig, Henry Clifford 

Finlayson, Ernest Herbert 

Hogan, Laurence Douglas 

Holland, Victor George 

LaBrosse, Joseph 

Leetham, Mildred 

MacLean, George Ian 

Old, Frank John A 

Phillips, Edmund Morrison 

Richards, James Percival 

Scovil, Stuart Southmayd 



Chief map draftsman 

Surveys physicist 

Senior engineering clerk 

Senior file clerk 

Senior engineering clerk 

Map draftsman 

Clerk 

Senior engineering clerk 

Instrument maker, grade 2 

Senior engineering clerk 

Editorial clerk 

Principal map draftsman 

Apprentice metal printer 

Assistant office engineer 

Senior assistant engineer 

Assistant photographer 

Surveys physicist 

Clerk-typist 

Clerk-stenographer 

Principal clerk ; 

Map draftsman 

Head clerk 

Assistant office engineer 

Junior geodetic engineer 

Assistant office engineer 

Draftsman 

Law clerk 

Stenographer-bookkeeper 

Junior clerk 

Senior map draftsman 

Clerk-typist 

Senior engineering clerk 

Publicity agent 

Clerk 

Principal clerk 

Forest protection specialist. . . 

Clerk-bookkeeper 

Account clerk 

Senior clerk 

Clerk-stenographer 

Departmental accountant, grade 
4 

Map draftsman 

Account clerk 

Senior clerk 

District hydraulic engineer — 



Chief, Mechanical Division, Otta- 
wa, Ont. 

Supervisor of surveys laboratory, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant office engineer, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant architect, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior map draftsman, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Engineering clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant office engineer, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Instrument maker, grade 3, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant office engineer, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Chief map draftsman, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Photographer, Ottawa, Ont. 

Office engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant Chief Engineer, Dom- 
inion Parks, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Surveys physicist, grade 3, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Assistant, Wild Life Division, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Relief map maker, Ottawa, Ont. 
Chief, Historic Sites Division, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Office engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior draftsman, Ottawa, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal map draftsman, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Surveys physcist, grade 1, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Engineering clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental accountant, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Director of Forestry, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk-bookkeeper, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Senior engineering clerk, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Departmental accountant, grade 5, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior map draftsman, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant Director, Dominion 

Water Power and Reclamation 

Service, Ottawa, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



69 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Interior — Con. 
Tobin, Arthur Joseph 

Woodill, Cecilia Ruby 

Plaskett, Harry Hemley 

Hemphill, Mildred Merribell... 
McElhanney, Thomas Andrew 

Lafleur, Raoul 

Macdonald, Redmond Donald, 

Christy, Norman 

Johnston, John Thomas 



Miskell, Clifford Saunders 

Deslauriers, Joseph Leo 

Cleary, Katherine Gertrude.... 

Ewers, Arthur Reginald 

Gibson, James Edward 

Taylor, Lome Bryson 

Buck, Donald 

Daoust, Paul Jo.seph Philippe. . 

Frappier, Irene Ethel 

Ridgway, Alfred 

Ix)chman, William Patrick 

Spry, Isobel Rosetta 

Tod, John 

Anderson, Mabel Gladys 

Leslie, George Ernest 

MacFarlane, John Douglas Barron 

McCoy, Arthur Michael 

McEwan, David 

NichoUs, William Leonard 

Botzow, Gottlieb Smidt 

Brault, Marie Germaine 

Jolliffe, Edythe Miriam 

Meister, Alfred Ernest 

O'Regan, James Morton 

Quigley, Anna Pearl 

Justice — 

Miall, Edward 

MacDougall, Sinclair 

Payne, Percy Frank 

Archibald, Walter Norman 

Godwin, Harold Albert 

Burns, Myrtle 



Senior clerk. 



Junior clerk-stenographer. 
Astronomer 



Junior clerk-stenographer 

Assistant to dominion land sur- 
veyor, Ottawa, Ont 



Messenger-clerk 

Senior engineering clerk . 



Fire ranger (seasonal), Salmon 
Arm District 

Assistant Director, Dominion 
Water Power and Reclamation 
Service 



Junior map draftsman. 



Junior draftsman 

Clerk-stenographer. 



Office boy 

Clerk 

Senior engineering clerk. 

Forest ranger (seasonal). 



Clerk, grade 3 

Stenographer, grade 1. 
Forest ranger 



Clerk, grade 4 

Stenographer, grade 1. 
Clerk, grade 4 



Stenographer, grade 2. 
Map draftsman 



Forestry assistant, Winnipeg 

Man 

Clerk, grade 1 

Map draftsman 

Assistant forest ranger 

Clerk, grade 2 



Stenographer, grade 2. 

Clerk, grade 2 

Map draftsman 

Clerk, grade 2 

Stenographer, grade 2. 



Senior engineering clerk, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Research astronomer, Victoria, 

B.C. 
Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 

Superintendent of Forest Products 
Laboratory, Vancouver, B.C. 

Confidential messenger, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Assistant office engineer, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Forest ranger, Kamloops, B.C. 



Director of Dominion Water Power 

and Reclamation Service, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior map draftsman, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Map draftsman, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer,Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Junior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior file clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant office engineer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Forest ranger (permanent). Lesser 

Slave Reserve, Slave Lake, 

Alta. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 
Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior forest ranger, Bow River 

Reserve. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Crown timber agent, Winnipeg, 

Man. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Senior map draftsman, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Forester, Dauphin, Man. 
Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior map draftsman, Ottawa, 
Forest ranger, Greenbush, Sask. 
Clerk, grade 3, Prince Albert, 

Sask. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
.\rti.st (publicity), Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 



Advisory counsel. 
Prison keeper 



Prison guard. 



Clerk-stenographer. 



Senior advisory counsel, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Chief prison keeper, Dorchester 

Penitentiary, N.B. 
Prison keeper, St. Vincent de Paul 

Penitentiary, Que. 
Prison keeper, Kingston, Ont. 
Prison clerk, Kingston, Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 



70 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Justice — Con. 

Hora, Hansord 

Gray, Charles Herbert 

LSontiefif, Ernest 

Darby, Charles Sylvester 

Goad, George Thomas 

Bumside, Netta Irmal 

Jack, Richard 

Cummings, Edgar Henry 

Bachand, Louis Andre 

Gumming, Alexander Burns 

Dillon, G. A 

Black, Kathleen 

Waldron, Thomas Stephen 

Labour — 

Cross, Lorena J 

Gouin, Eva 

O'Meara, Mrs. Lillian G 

Reynolds, Bernice H 

Cram, Robert McCheyne 

Rooney, Kathleen F 

Library of Parliament — 
Monette, Thomas Ernest 

MacCormac, Michael Connolly 

Tarte, Joseph 

Marine and Fisheries — 
Clawson, Ernest Edward 

Hurst, William 

Nelson, Wilfred Laurie 

Hall, George Benson 

Brown, Lucy Rhys 

Leclerc, Arthur 

Anderson, Frederick 

Deacon, Alan Inglis 

Turner. Eric 

Daniel, James , . 

Robidoux, Leonide 

Harker, James Ernest 

Tee, Harold David 

Morrison, Ruby 



Prison clerk 

Prison guard 

Industrial guard-mason 

Senior stores clerk 

Clerk-stenographer 

Prison guard 

Chief prison keeper 

Messenger-clerk 

Prison guard 

Purchasing agent 

Stenographer, grade 2 (law) . . . 

Stenographer, grade 3 (law) . . . 

Statistical clerk 

Office appliance operator, grade 2 
Junior statistical clerk 

Statistical clerk 

Principal statistical clerk 

Stenographer, grade 2 

Library assistant. Agriculture. . 

Chief reference clerk 

Reference clerk 

District engineer 

Cleaner and helper. Public 
Works 

Junior radiotelegraph operator 
Canso, N.S 

Junior purchasing agent 

Junior clerk-stenographer. Inter- 
ior 

Lightkeeper, grade 3, class 8. . . . 

Hydrographer 

Junior radiotelegraph operator. . 

Senior radiotelegraph operator, 
grade 2, Vancouver, B.C 

Clerk, grade 2 

Senior radiotelegraph operator, 
grade 2 

« « 
Junior clerk-stenographer 



Principal account clerk, Kingston, 
Ont. 

Prison keeper, New Westminster, 
B.C. 

Industrial guard-mason, St. Vin- 
cent de Paul Penitentiary, P.Q. 

Chief industrial officer, Saskatch- 
ewan Penitentiary, Prince Albert 
Sask. 

Warden, Dorchester Penitentiary, 
N.B. 

Clerk-bookkeeper, Ottawa, Ont. 

Prison steward. New Westminster, 
B.C. 

Deputy warden, Dorchester Peni- 
tentiary, N.B. 

Court usher, Ottawa, Ont. 

Prison keeper, Dorchester Peni- 
tentiary, N.B. 

Departmental purchasing agent. 

Stenographer, grade 3 (law), 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Statistical clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Price statistician, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 



Registry and shelving clerk, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant librarian (English), 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Chief reference clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



Marine agent, C harlottetown, 
P.E.I. 

Caretaker, Toronto, Ont. 

Senior radiotelegraph operator. 

Eastern Division. 
Principal clerk, Quebec, Que. 

Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Lightkeeper, grade 3, class 7, 

Grande He Kamouraska, P.Q. 
Chief hydrographer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior radiotelegraph operator, 

grade 1, Western Division. 



Chief radiotelegraph operator, 

Estevan, B.C. 
Clerk, grade 3, Sorel, P.Q. 

Chief radiotelegraph operator, Van- 
couver, B.C. 

Chief radiotelegraph operator, 
Gonzales Hill, B.C. 

Stenographer, grade 2, St. John, 
N.B. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



71 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Marine and Fisheries — Con. 

Garland, Walter Andrew 

Gray, Gifford 

Lawton, Alphonsus Thomas 

Bonneville, Nazaire Louis 

De Young, Ralph 

Lafleche, Joseph F. A 

Bowerman, William John 

Hosterman, Charles Henry 

Matthewman, Arthur Stanford.. 

McKinnon, Frank A 

Theakston, John Clarence 

Gray, Andrew Laurence 

Hamelin, Francois X 

Arden, E. T 

Hassard, Nina May 

Bergeron, Irma 

Bermingham, James 

Maguire, Frank James 

Cardin, Edward B 

Faulkner, Gilberte 

Goodwin, James E 

Adamson, James Kilgour Black 

Jones, Sydney Phillip 

Ferris, Thomas 

Hartnell, George Edward 

Moses, Charles Allan 

Roberts, Mary Taylor 

Jones, Frederick Simeon 

Malouin, Lorenzo 

Ogilvie, Freeman Scott 

Dub6, Joseph Ulric 

Myers, Milton Lee 

Forsythe, William Patrick 

Tingley, Frank Albert 



Senior radiotelegraph operator, 
grade 2, Halifax, N.S 

Senior radiotelegraph operator, 
grade 2, Dead Tree Point, B.C. 

Junior radiotelegraph operator. . 

Office appliance operator, grade 2 

File clerk 

Assistant hydrographer 

Chief radiotelegraph operator . . . 

Senior clerk-bookkeeper 

Instrument man 

Office boy 

Clerk-bookkeeper 

Chief radiotelegraph operator, 
Gonzales Hill, B.C 

Steamship inspector (boilers and 
machinery) 

Lightkeeper, grade 2, class 4. . . . 

Junior clerk-stenographer 

Account clerk 

Senior account clerk 

Principal clerk-bookkeeper 

Senior clerk 

Junior clerk-stenographer 

Lightkeeper, grade 4, class 12 . . . 

Junior radiotelegraph operator. . 



Lightkeeper, grade 4, class 11 . . . 

Junior purchasing agent 

Junior radiotelegraph operator.. . 

Account clerk 

Junior engineer 

Lightkeeper, grade 2, class 4 

Junior radiotelegraph operator. . 

Foreman mechanic (marine sig- 
nals), grade 1 

Junior radiotelegraph operator. 

Hatchery assistant 



Radiotelegraph inspector, Hamil- 
ton, Ont. 

Radiotelegraph inspector, Winni- 
peg, Man. 

Senior radiotelegraph operator, 
Eastern Division. 

Office appliance operator, grade 3, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior stores clerk, Halifax, N.S. 

Senior assistant engineer, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Radiotelegraph inspector, Vancou- 
ver, B.C. 

Departmental accountant, grade 2, 
Halifax, N.S. 

Hydrometric recorder, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Junior clerk, St. John, N.B. 

Senior clerk-bookkeeper, Halifax, 
N.S. 

Radiotelegraph inspector, Vic- 
toria, B.C. 

Steamship inspector (general), 
Sorel, P.Q. 

Lightkeeper, grade 2, class 3, 
Sheringham Point, B.C. 

Clerk-stenographer, New West- 
minster, B.C. 

Clerk-bookkeeper, Montreal, P.Q. 

Senior clerk-bookkeeper, Montreal, 
P.Q. 

Departmental accountant, grade 2, 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Employment agent, Sorel, P.Q. 

Clerk-typist, Ottawa, Ont. 

Lightkeeper, grade 3, class 10, 

Woods harbour, N.S. 
Senior radiotelegraph operator, 

grade 1, Eastern Division. 
Senior radiotelegraph operator, 

grade 1, west coast. 
Lightkeeper, grade 3, class 9, Burnt 

Island, Ont. 
Departmental accountant, grade 2, 

Victoria, B.C. 
Senior radiotelegraph operator, 

grade 1, Western Division. 
Senior account clerk, Victoria, B.C. 

Assistant hydrographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Lightkeeper, grade 2, class 3, West 

Point, Anticosti Island. 
Senior radiotelegraph operator, 

Eastern Division. 

Foreman mechanic (marine sig- 
nals), grade 2, Quebec, P.Q. 

Senior radiotelegraph operator, 
Eastern Division. 

Superintendent of hatchery, grade 

3, Kennedy Lake Hatchery, B.C 
Superintendent of hatchery, grade 

4, Babine Lake Hatchery, B.C. 



72 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 




To 



Mines — 
Bolton, Launcelot L 

Hotchkiss, Cyrus Percival 

Jenness, Diamond 

Levesque, Placide Emile 

Sternberg, Charles M 

Young, Charles Henry 

Wintemberg, William John 

James, William Fleming 

Maddox, David Crisp 

Picher, Rodolphe Hector 

Godard, John Stoddart 

Macdonald, John Angus 

Spence, James Welton 

Laliberte, Joseph Alphonse 

Edwards, Edith Mae * 

Trudel, Marie Yvonne 

Vincent, Walter Murray 

Dolmage, Victor 

Mawdsley , James Buckland 

Cockfield, William Egbert 

National Defence — 
Pittman, Douglas Graham Lam 
bert 

Smith, John Roberts 

Martei, Joseph Emmanuel 

Beatty, F. A 

Belanger, Charles E 

Conquer, Stanley F 

Robson, Harold Spencer 

Mossop, James Alstair , 

Letourneau, Vincent 

Bruce, Bower Raney 

Ashton, Herman 

Whelpley, Myrtle A 

McColl, Alexander Edwin 

Phillips, Ernest Cumbers 

Bowditch, Frederick George 

Beecher, Oliver 

LaRochelle, Joseph 

Dubois, Femand Ludovic 

Moss, Wilfred 

McMorrow, Irene 

Sheppard, William T 

Foley, Sarah 

Parisien, Aline 

Bums, Charles 

Minter, Harry Thomas 

Todd, William Robert 

Harrington, Laura L 



Secretary 

Engineer, Mines Branch, grade 4 

Associate ethnologist 

Assistant editor 

Senior collector-preparator. . . 



Assistant geologist 

Junior engineer 

Engineer, Mines Branch, grade 2 

Engineer, Mines Branch, grade 1 

Junior topographical engineer. . 



Messenger-clerk 

C ler k-stenographer . 



Junior clerk-stenographer. 
Junior purchasing agent. . . 



Associate geologist, Vancouver 
B.C 



Assistant geologist. 
Associate geologist. 



Clerk, grade 4 

Messenger 

Photographer 

Clerk, grade 2 

Senior account clerk . 



Office boy 

Junior clerk 

Clerk 

Cleaner and helper 

Junior clerk-stenographer. 

Clerk 

Clerk-bookkeeper 

Junior stores clerk 



Senior account clerk . 



Office boy.. . 
Stores clerk. 



Junior clerk-stenographer. 

Stores clerk 

Junior clerk-stenographer. 

Typist, grade 1 

Purchasing agent 



Junior purchasing agent. 

Head clerk 

Clerk, grade 2 



Assistant deputy minister, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Secretary, Dominion Fuel Board, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Ethnologist, Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal clerk; Ottawa, Ont. 

Collector-preparator specialist, Ot- 
tawa, Ont. 

Assistant archaeologist, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Associate geologist, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant geologist, Ottawa, Ont. 
Engineer, Mines Branch, grade 3, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Engineer, Mines Branch, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Topographical engineer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Supplies clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental purchasing agent, 

grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Geologist, Ottawa, Ont. 
Associate geologist, Ottawa, Ont. 
Geologist, Ottawa, Ont. 



Storekeeper, Halifax Dockyard, 
N.S. 

Senior messenger, Halifax Dock- 
yard, N.S. 

Assistant process worker, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal account clerk, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Clerk, grade 1, Esquimalt, B.C. 
Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior messenger, Kingston, Ont. 
Clerk-stenographer, Halifax, N.S. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior account clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Stores clerk, Esquimalt, B.C. 

Departmental accountant, grade 2, 

Quebec, P.Q. 
Junior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior stores clerk, Esquimalt, 

B.C. 
Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior stores clerk, Quebec, P.Q. 
Clerk-typist, Ottawa, Ont. 
Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental purchasing agent, 

grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental purchasing agent, 

grade 1, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental purchasing agent, 

grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Halifax Dockyard, 

N.S. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



73 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 




To 



Post Office- 
Brownie, William 

Gibson, Tom 

Crossley, William 

Dickinson, Charles Willett 

George, Charles John 

Johnstone, Duncan MacLeod 

Laird, John 

Luettge, Frank Theodore 

Moore, John William 

Richardson, Walter Alfred 

Sugden, Walter 

Taylor, Herbert Hamnett 

Titley, John 

Whiteside, William 

Droppo, Murray 

Dufresne, Sinai 

McFadden, Harold Ernest 

Williams, J. H 

Gear, Leslie Thomas 

Haworth, Reginald Thomas 

Huggins, Harry 

Marshall, John Bruce 

Morin, Jean Baptiste 

Alexander, Angus Matheson 

Allen, William Rennie 

Grant, Kenneth 

Hadden, Robert Alexander 

Hampton, Thomas 

Lutton, Thomas Charles 

Richer, Emeriza 

Skene, Albert 

Tobin, Elizabeth Jerome 

Benjamin, Harry 

Conlon, Bertha Mary 

Spong, John Henry 

Tracey, Wilfred James '. . . . 

Yandon, John Peter 

LeBrun, George 

Bayly, Norman 

Farquhar, Agnes Caroline 

Foumier, Joseph Clement 

Goodwin, Melville Arthur Sher 
man 

Harding, Herbert Henry 

Macdonald, Wilfrid 

Peters, Mary K 

Robinson, James 

Anderson, James George 

Aubin, Azarie 

Benoit, Georges 

Bissonnettc, Paul 

Bouthillette, Emile 

Campbell, Thomas 

Caty, Rosaire 

Cauldwell, Thomas 

Constantin, Joseph Alfred Arthur. 

Courchesne, Alfred 

Crothers, George Edward 



Postal helper 

a 

(< 
(( 

u 
ti 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

it 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Postal clerk, Brantford, Ont 

Postal clerk 

Postal clerk, Guelph, Ont 

Postal clerk, Windsor, Ont 

Postal clerk 

Junior clerk-stenographer, Agri- 
culture 

Mail porter 

Postal clerk 

Stenographer, grade 1, Civil Ser- 
vice Commission 

Postal helper 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

Senior postal clerk 

Clerk-stenographer 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Clerk-stenographer 

Postal helper 

ii 
it 

i< 

Principal postal clerk 

Postal helper 



Mail porter, Winnipeg, Man. 
Letter carrier, Vancouver, B.C. 
Mail porter, Winnipeg, Man 



Letter carrier, Vancouver, B.C. 
Mail porter, VVinnipeg, Man. 
Letter carrier, Vancouver, B.C. 
Mail porter, Winnipeg, Man. 
Railway mail clerk, Moose Jaw, 

Sask. 
Postal clerk, St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 
Letter carrier, Windsor, Ont. 
Letter carrier, Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 
Senior postal clerk, Vancouver, 

B.C. 
Postal clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 
Postal clerk. North Bay, Ont. 
Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 
Railway mail clerk, London, Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, Saskatoon, 

Sask. 
Railway mail clerk, London, Ont. 



Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Railway mail clerk, Saskatoon, 

Sask. 
Senior postal clerk, Samia, Ont. 
Senior postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 

Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Letter carrier. Port Arthur, Ont. 
Postal clerk, St. Catharines, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 
Principal postal clerk, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Winnipeg, 

Man. 
Letter carrier, St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 

Assistant postmaster, grade 4 

office, Amherst, N.S. 
Railway mail clerk, Winnipeg, 

Man. 

<< iC 

Postal clerk, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Postal clerk, Regina, Sask. 
Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 
Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 



Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 
Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 
Head postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 



74 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Comm.ission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 


From 


To 


post Omce^Con. 
Desparois, Joseph L6onidas 


Posta: 

Typis 
Posta 

Lettei 

Posta 
Posta 


helper 


Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 


Duckett, Philip Henry 




it a 


Falconer, William Campbell 


' 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Fournelle, Lucien 


' 


Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 


Geoffrey, Joseph Eugene Honorius 


t 




Gingras, Rom6o 


t 


« (1 


Gravel, Albert Louis 


' 


i< « 


Gray, Ernest Edward 


< 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Groves, Vaughan 


< 




Hatch, James Wesley 


' 


« (( 


Henault, J. Albert 


t 


Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 


Hogue, Jean Marie 


< 




Hunter, John 


t 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Johnson, William Harry 


t 




Kilpatrick, William Roy 


' 


Letter carrier, Saskatoon, Sask. 


Lacourciere, Nancy 


t, grade 1 


Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 


Laurence, Joseph 0. A. L 


helper 


Ont. 
Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 


Lauze, Gedeas Antonio 






Marchand, Auguste 


« 


« « 


Mariotti, Robert 


< 


« « 


Mitchell, Walter Brice 


I 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Nantel, Paul 


( 


Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 


Nielson, Charles Asgrimur 


( 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Pion, Jean Jacques Rodrique 

Richard, Isidore 


c 


Letter carrier, Montreal, P.Q. 


< 




Smith, Peter McGuffie 


' 


Postal clerk, Regina, Sask. 


Stokes, Percy Harold 


< 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Sutton, Charles Samuel 


< 


Letter carrier, Saskatoon, Sask. 


Widdowson, Gilbert John 


t 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Browne, Robert 


< 


Postal clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 


Clarke, Albert Edmund 


< 




Gittins, John Richard 


< 


« « 


Humphrey, Ernest Frederick 
George 


" carrier 


Senior letter carrier, Oshawa, 


Bryson, James Harris.. 


clerk 


Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, Truro, N.S. 


Egan, James Michael 


1 helper 


Letter carrier, Windsor, Ont. 


Emery, Henry John 








Horn, Henry James.. . . . . 


< 


« « 


Lawrenson, Robert 


' 


a it 


Lloyd, Oliver Gordon 


( 


It It 


Westrop, George 


' 


tt It 




' 


Mail porter, Montreal, P.Q. 


Laporte, Wilfrid 


t 




Marquis, John 


' 


" " 


Mclntyre, Basil James 


Posta 

Posta 
Posta 

Posta 
Junior 

Posta 

Senio] 

Lette 
Posta 
Railw 

Posta 
Posta 

Lette 

Posta 

Railw 

Alb 


I clerk 


Senior postal clerk, Lindsay, Ont. 


Robert, Rodolphe 




Senior postal clerk, St. Hyacinthe, 


Steepe, Earl 


1 helper 


P.Q. 
Mail porter, London, Ont. 


Cline, Arthur Roy 


I clerk 


Assistant postmaster, grade 5, 


Foord, George Alfred. 


helper 


office, St. Catharines, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Brandon, Man. 


Rodger, Jean W 


clerk-stenographer 

1 clerk 


Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 




Ont. 
Senior postal clerk, Peterborough, 


Black, Frederick Howard.. 


r postal clerk 


Ont. 
Postmaster, grade 5 office, St. 


Dungy, Arlington McKinley 

Harvie, George Hume. 


r carrier 


Catharines, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Windsor, Ont. 


1 helper 


Mail porter, Edmonton, Alta. 


Peck, Henry Brougham.. 


ay mail clerk 


Principal postal clerk, St. John, 




1 helper 


N.B. 

Letter carrier, Regina, Sask. 






Senior postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


St. Pierre, Joseph Louis. 


r carrier overseer 


Senior postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 






Senior postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Gilbert, Frank 


ay mail clerk, Calgary, 
erta 






Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



75 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Comimission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 




Post Office — Con. 
Lafleur, Florence 

Worrall, Winnett Irwin 

Durocher, Pauline 

Faribault, Anne 

Gignac, Margaret 

Harwood, Marie Florence Albert- 

ine 

Johnston, John Henry 

Lawford, Earl Lancelot 

Milton, Alice Maud 

Minehan, Bridget 

Morgan, Owen Lawrence 

O'Neill, Charles 

Price, Frances Edith 

Secor, Richard Joseph 

Scanlon, Margaret Mary Aileen.. 

Spence, George Drummond 

Vallieres, Anna 

Warner, Frederick Alexander 

Provost, Henri 

Murphy, John Francis 

Black, George 

Cadieux, Joseph A. E 

Coffey, Jeremiah 

Monro, Michael 

McCann, Thomas John 

Twaddle, William Muir 

Brown, Frank Joseph 

Hubbard, George Alexander Wil- 
liam 

Joly, Joseph Armand 

Rawson, Charles Alfred 

Willett, William Arthur 

Stuckey, Adne Harkness 

Willis, Walter 

Fyfe, Louis Ramon 

Harrison, Leonard 

Kelly, James J 

Marentette, Joseph Ernest... . 
Naylor, John Smith 

Saunders, Albert Victor 

Chainey, George Edmund. . . 
Botel, Henry 

Falvey, William Patrick 

Stuart, John Charles 

Kilgore, Dorothy Florabel... 

Lee, Charles James 



Junior clerk-typist. Soldiers' 
Civil Re-establishment 



Mail porter. 
Junior clerk. 



Postal helper. 
Junior clerk. . . 



Junior clerk (supernumerary) . 

Messenger-clerk 

Postal clerk 

Junior clerk 



Postal clerk. 
Junior clerk. . 



Messenger-clerk 

Junior clerk 

Senior postal clerk. 



Railway mail clerk. 



Postal clerk. 



Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Senior postal clerk. 

Postal helper 



Postal clerk. 



Postal helper. 
Postal clerk... 



Postal helper. 
Postal clerk... 



Head postal clerk. 



Postal helper 

Assistant supervisor of city mail 
transport 



Postal clerk. 
Postal clerk. 



Postal information clerk. 

Postal helper 

Stenographer, grade 1 



Postal clerk. 



To 



Office appliance operator, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerk, London, Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Assistant postmaster, grade 5, 
office, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 

Mail porter, Ottawa, Ont. 

Office appliance operator, grade 2, 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Senior postal clerk, Moncton, N.B. 
Office appliance operator, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Railway mail clerk. North Bay, 

Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Assistant postmaster, grade 8 

office, Halifax, N.S. 
Assistant postmaster, grade 4 

office, St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 
Assistant postmaster, grade 4 

office, Lindsay, Ont. 
Railway mail clerk, Winnipeg, 

Man. 
Postal clerk, St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 
Senior postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Letter carrier, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant postmaster, grade 5 

office, Sarnia, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Mail porter, St. John, N.B. 

Postal clerk, St. Catharines, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Railway mail clerk, Saskatoon, 

Sask. 
Letter carrier overseer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Letter carrier, Brandon, Man. 
District examiner of postal service, 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Letter carrier, Fort William, Ont. 
Railway mail clerk, Winnipeg, 

Man. 
Superintendent of mail despatch, 

Toronto, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Windsor, Ont. 

Principal postal clerk, Toronto, 
Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, Charlotte- 
town, P.E.I. 

Senior postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Railway mail clerk, Winnipeg, 
Man. 

Senior postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, London, Ont. 



76 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended— Continued 



Department and Name 




To 



Post Office — Con. 

Mogk, Wilfrid Harold 

Ritter, Alfred John 

Archambault, Joseph Georges Al- 
bert , 

Bryan, Denis Dewar 

Charbonneau, William Wallace. . . 

Conroy, Philip Stephen 

Curran, Alexander J 

Desmarais, Deus Edgar 

Fortune, Hubert John 

Gorrell, Claude Archibald 

Gray, Oliver 

Grenier, Georges 

Hall, Ralph Edward 

Hobart, Matthew Thornton 

Hunter, Charles Alexander 

Irving, Kenneth Henderson 

Ives, Charles Ritchie 

Leonard, Lucien 

Mooney, Albert Ambrose 

O'Hagan, Arthur William Sidney. 
O'Halloran, William Henry 

Owen, James Arthur 

Parker, Thomas Arthur 

Robert, Emamnuel 

Robinson, Harry Marshall 

Rouleau, Raoul A 

Ryan, James Harvey 

Shuker, Thomas Daniel 

Stewart, John William 

Unthank, William Arthur 

Villemarie, Joseph Calixte Antoine 
Webb, Vincent 

Allcock, Sydney Charles 

Arland, Chester Blair 

Armstrong, George William 

Belcher, William Frederick James 

Bennio, David 

Blair, Charles 

Blair, Isabelle 

Boland, James Patrick 

Bolt, William Henry 

Bowles, Sidney Harold: 

Brown, Oilman Gerald 

Bruce, George Nicol 

Bums, Robert 

Church, Kenneth Vernon 

Crochtiere, Joseph Rosaire 

Culver, George Alfred 

Daniels, William Henry 

Darg, Leonard 

Davey, Edward Emmanuel 

Davies, George Gilbert Hooper.. . 

Dent, Robert Everett 

Duck, Sydney William 

Fitzpatrick, William 

Gibson, Norman Arthur 



Postal clerk. 



Postal helper 

Senior audit clerk. 



Departmental accountant, 

grade 1 

Postal helper 



Senior clerk. 



Departmental accountant, 

grade 1 

Postal helper 



Senior clerk. 



Departmental accountant, 
grade 2 

Postal helper 

Departmental accountant, 
grade 1 

Postal helper 



Senior clerk. 



Departmental accountant, 

grade 2 

Principal clerk 



Postal clerk, Guelph, Ont. 
Postal helper 



Departmental accountant, 

grade 1 

Postal helper 

Railway mail clerk 



Postal helper 

Principal account clerk. 
Postal helper 



Junior clerk-typist. 
Postal helper 



Principal postal clerk. 
Postal helper 



Senior postal clerk, Guelph, Ont. 
Railway mail clerk, London, Ont. 

Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 
Departmental accountant, grade 1, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Departmental accountant, grade 1, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Departmental accountant, grade 1, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerld, Toronto, Ont. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Letter carrier, Vancouver, B.C. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Departmental accountant, grade 1, 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental accountant, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Railway mail clerk, London, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Mail porter, Vancouver, B.C. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
District examiner, postal service, 

London, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Departmental accountant, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 

Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 
Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 

Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 
Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Brantford, Ont. 
Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 
Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 
Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 
Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 

Head postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 

Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 
Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 



Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



77 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 


From 


To 


Post Office— Con. 
Graham, Henry 




Letter carrier overseer, Winnipeg, 
Man. 


Gray, F.J 




Green, Martin Roscoe 






Hallett, George Ashfieid 


" 


Mail porter Toronto, Ont. 


Harding, Cecil 


« 




Harrington, Michael Joseph 


Clerk 


Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Hillen, George Victor 


Postal helper . . , . 




Hollebon, Albert Ernest 






Holmes, George Percy 


" 


« « 


Hozack, Robert James 


" 




Hunter, Robert Trueman 


« 




Jeffrey, William Henry 


Senior stores clerk 


Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Jones, John G. H. L 


Postal helper 


Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 


Joyce, Thomas Patrick 




Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 


Kehoe, Peter 


Senior supplies clerk 




Krawchuck, Phillip 


Postal helper.. 


Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 


Langlois, Alfred 


Supplies clerk.. . . . 


Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Levick, Charles Lee 


Postal helper 




Ling, Samuel Myring 


Letter carrier. 


Postal clerk, Brandon, Man. 


Logan, William John 


Postal helper 




Lowes, Albert James 




Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 


Lowrv, E. F 


« 




May, P'rederick Wiles 


Senior stores clerk 






Postal helper.. 


Letter carrier Toronto, Ont. 


Moran, Charles James 






Mundan, Joseph John 


<< 


Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 


Mackintosh, John Henry 


" 




McFayden, Donald Malcolm 


" 


it it 


McMaster, Wilfrid Andrew 


" 


Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 


Organ, J. P 


" 




Ormerod, A. G 


" 


it tt 


Paine, George Frederick 


" 


it it 


Parkinson, William James 


" 


Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 


Parton, Alfred Earl 


" 




Pearson, Everett Rowe 


« 


« « 


Pednault, J. Romeo 


Clerk-typist 


Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Phillips, Harold Hackett 


Postal helper.. 


Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 


Quarrier, John Arnott 




Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 


Quinn, Charles 


" 


Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 


Ross, Roderick Finlayson 

Saville, Edwin 


Senior letter carrier 


Letter carrier overseer, Winnipeg, 
Man. 


Shearman, James Percivak 




Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 


Smith, Percy Robson 


Postal clerk.. 


Senior postal clerk, Windsor, Ont. 


Stoddart, Baldwin Henry Wilson. 


Postal helper 


Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 


Styres, Alfred 






Tomlinson, George Ivor 


" 


Letter carrier, Toronto, Ont. 


Townsley, Leonard 


<< 




Upshall, Horace George 


« 


« a 


Veale, Alfred 


Letter carrier 




Verreault, Annie 


Junior clerk-stenographer 


Clerk-stenographer, Quebec, P.Q. 
Mail porter, Toronto, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Brandon, Man. 


Whatmore, Leonard 


Williams, Thomas Albert Edward 




Butterworth, Ernest Albert Rey- 
nolds 


Principal account clerk. . . 




Daoust, Lucien 


Senior clerk.. 


Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Droppo, Murray 


Postal helper... 


Dumphey, Martin Henry 


Postal clerk 


Senior postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Departmental accountant, grade 1, 


Hill, George Albert Lloyd 


Audit clerk 


Miller, Dorothy Helen 


Clerk-stenographer. . 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 
Ont. 


McElrov, John Thomas 


Principal clerk. 


Ross, David Murray 


Mail porter 


Senior mail porter, Saskatoon, 
Sask. 

Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont, 


Roux, Frangoise Maurice Isidore 
Horace 


Postal helper.. 


Snowdon, Vivian 


Audit clerk 


Wimperis, Robert Harold 


Clerk-typist 



78 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 


From 


To 


Post Office— Con. 
Baisley, John Rupert L 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Baldwin, Thomas 




Bering, Charles Hubert 


" 


Postal clerk, Regina, Sask. 
Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Beseoby, John Edward 


" 


Binet, Lionel Aubin 


« 


Blair, James McLaren 


" 




Brine, Frederick George 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg Man. 


Burley, Edward Kimberley 




Postal chauffeur, Toronto, Ont. 


Donoghue, William Patrick 


<< 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Findlay, Hugh Galbraith 


" 




Gardner, George 


" 


il u 


Gedge, Charles Robert 


Mail porter 


« <( 


Gray, Frederick William 


Postal helper 


(( « 


Hancock, Noel Henry 




i< << 


Levin, Walter Borne 


" 


It It 


Morgan, John Palmer 


ii 


ti 11 


McDonald, Archibald Harris 


" 


11 tt 


McDonald, Norman 


" 


« i< 


McLaren, John George 


Postal clerk 


Senior postal clerk, Vancouver, 


Palmer, Edward George Copping. 


Postal helper 


B.C. 
Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Palmer, John Charles Nelson 


Mail porter 




Petersen, Joel 


Postal helper 


It It 


Paterson, Ronald 




Postal chauffeur, Toronto, Cnt. 


Smerdon, Albert Victor 


it 




Tease, Samuel Hamilton 


« 


Postal clerk, Winnipeg, Man. 


Wade, George William 


« 


Postal chauffeur, Toronto, Ont. 


Cruse, Harold Bertram 


<< 


Mail porter, Saskatoon, Sask. 


McNair, James 


" 




Cogan, Mary Agnes 


Account clerk 


Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Whitehouse, Frederick William . . . 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Gash, William Rawson 






Roe, Frank John Hay 


" 


« tt 


McCourt, John Thomas 


Postal clerk 


Senior postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Hume, William James 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Small, Jack Hurrell 






Irons, James 


" 


tt tt 


Smith , Frank 


" 


Letter carrier, Peterborough, Ont. 


Campbell, Alexander Duncan 


Postal clerk 


Senior postal clerk, Edmonton, 


DuBroy, Jennings Gerald 


Postal helper 


Alta. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


James, Walter John 






Wellman, William George 


" 


(( tt 


Berridge, Sydney Collington 


Postal clerk 


Senior postal clerk, Brandon, Man. 


Fetherston, John 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Walker, Morley Edwin Beverly. . . 


Senior postal cierk 


Assistant postmaster, grade 5 


Allan, Lillian Edith 


Clerk 


Office, Guelph, Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 3, 


Chicoine, Joseph P. A 


Postal helper 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 


Bastien, Joseph Armand 






Belanger, Joseph G. A 


« 


« « 


Brownell, William Herbert 


Railway mail clerk 


Principal postal clerk. North Bay, 


Hunting, Guy 


Postal helper 


Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


King, l3onald Albert 


Assistant postmaster, grade 8 






Postmaster, grade 8 office, Hali- 


Marier, Joseph Arthur Alexandre. 


Postal helper 


fax, N.S. 
Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 


Montcalm, Joseph G. H. A 






Papineau, Joseph E. A. R 


" 


(( tt 


Rivard, Joseph Jules Ovila 


« 


It tt 


Roy, Joseph M. P. L 


" 


If tt 


Stuart, Edgar Allan 


Senior postal clerk '. . 


Principal postal clerk, Toronto, 


Telford, Jessie Margaret 


Clerk 


Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 3, 


Thompson, Alexander 


Inspector of postal service 


Ottawa. Ont. 
Postmaster, grade 7 office, St. 




John, N.B. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



W 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 


From 


To 


Post Office — Con. 
Gagnon, Marie Joseph V. I 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 


Viens, Joseph Louis Hermann 






Basing, Henry Frederick 


" 


Mail porter. Moose Jaw, Sask. 


Freeman, Marcus Roland 


" 




Lane, George Frederick 


" 


u « 


MacDonald, Norman Thomas. . . . 


<< 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


MacKenzie, Alexander Ernest 


" 




White, Harold Edgar 


Senior postal clerk 


Assistant postmaster, grade 6 


Andrew, Elmer Allan Grant 


Clerk 


office, Peterborough, Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Barrette, Joseph Thomas Jean . . 


Account clerk 




Bell, Albert S 


Po.stal helper 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Bell, William James 


Senior audit clerk 


Departmental accountant, grade 1, 


Boyce, Alfred George Keam 


Postal helper 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Brandwood, George 






Broom, Tessie Harriet 


Clerk-stenographer 


Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 


Bruce, Ernest Alonzo 


Postal helper 


Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Canning, Edward Lawrence 






Ashley, George Chaplin 


" 


Postal clerk, Regina, Sask. 


Clayton, John Lawther 


Postal clerk 


Railway mail clerk. Moose Jaw, 


Dan is, Ren^ Romeo 


Account clerk. . . 


Sask. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Davidson, Robert 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Davis, William Edward 

Dawson, George Bernard 


Auditor of postal stations 

Assistant postmaster, grade 5 
office 


Principal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Postmaster, grade 5 office, Samia, 


Demers, Dora 


Junior clerk 


Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 2, 


Dewar, Henry Charles 


Senior audit clerk 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental accountant, grade 1, 


Fagan, Patrick 


Messenger-clerk 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Confidential messenger, Ottawa, 


Fulton, Robert 


Postal helper 


Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Hutchinson, Frederick 






Ingham, Francis Frederick 


" 


Letter carrier, Vancouver, B.C. 


Johnson, William LeRoy 


" 


Postal clerk, Truro, N.S. 


Kelsall, William Albert . . 


« 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Lindsay, Thomas Graham 


Account clerk 


Clerk-bookkeeper, Ottawa, Ont. 


Long, Georgina Dean 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Mackie, William 






Markey, Arthur William 


" 


U it 


Maurault, Hector 


Postal clerk 


Senior postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q. 


McKee, Thomas 


Postal helper 


Letter carrier, Vancouver, B.C. 


Paterson, .John Granville 




Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Pelletier, Joseph Phillippe Lionel. 


Account clerk 


Clerk-bookkeeper, Ottawa, Ont. 


Penfound, Victor Fred. . 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Pope, James Alexander 


Senior postal clerk 


Principal postal clerk, Toronto, 


Pothier, Alphee Simon 


Departmental accountant, grade 
1 


Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Pretty, Joseph Melville 


Postal helper 


Principal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Prockter, Colin Arthur 


Postal clerk, Regina, Sask. 


Ross, Ernest Brown 




Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Russell, Albert 


" 




Sangster, Beverley T 


Departmental accountant, 
grade 1 






Head clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Sheldon, Corydon C 


Senior audit clerk 


Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Simmonds, Vincent Henry 


Postal helper 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Stevens, Edgar George William.. 






Stevens, Walter Alfred Charles 


u 


« n 


Vermette, Adrien 


Senior clerk 


Departmental accountant, grade 1, 


Welsh, James 


Postal helper 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Letter carrier, Brantford, Ont. 


Wilson, John Alexander 


Mail porter 


Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 


Wratten, Edward Price 


Postal helper 




Gorman, Gerald Thomas 


Clerk 


Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Pheasant, Frederick Walker 


Principal clerk 


Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



80 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 




To 



Post Office — Continued — 
Bolte, Camille 



Boucher, Jules Louis. 



Keetley, Bertie. 



Fish, George Robert 

Rees, Louis Tregarthen 

Thornborough, Oswald Cecil 

Mercer, David Crofton 

Hurle, Herbert Norman Seager.. 

McBay, Arthur Frederick 

Sefton, Horace Frank 

Foster, Archibald Walker 



Arel, Louis Philippe 

Home, Charles Henry 

Lawson, William Edward 

Manning, Percy Cecil 

Predergast, Matthew Emery. 

Sullican, James Augustine 



Sullivan, Ernest Arthur 

Rycroft, W. H 

Cockbum, David Leslie. . . . 

Moss, J. B 

Poole, George F 

Weir, John James 

Wilson, James Albert 

Cowling, Harold Albert 

Hughes, Gordon William. . . 
Kernaghan, Hugh David. . . 
Armstrong, William Stuart. 

Munro, Arthur 

Cutting, George 

Hewitt, Ernest Charles O. . 

Bishop, Albert 

Davis, Frank John 

Williams, Roy 

Brown, William Alexander. . 

Spector, Abraham 

Lane, Edwin 

Flood, John Dobson 

Fugard, Robert Douglas 

Seholes, Francis Edmund. . , 
Doran, Wallace William 



Schoenherr, Henry Albert. 

Sykes, Wilfred Edward 

GibsOn, Alexander M 



Riddell, William Robert.. 

Farrell, Joseph 

Burton, Arthur Frederick . 
Aymong, Roch Amyot... . 



Walsh, George William. 
Taylor, James 



McKeogh, Patrick Ralph. 
Nadon, Napol6on 



Senior postal clerk 

Assistant postmaster, grade 4 
office 



Postal clerk . 



Postal clerk, Regina, Sask. . 
Postal clerk, Brandon, Man. 



Postal helper. 



Postal clerk. 



Postal helper. . 
Mail porter. . . 
Postal helper. . 
Letter carrier. 



Postal helper. . 
Letter carrier. 
Postal helper.. 



Mail porter. 



Postal clerk. 



Senior postal clerk 

Inspector of postal service . 
Postal clerk 



Postal helper 

Head postal clerk. 



Departmental accountant, grade 1, 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Postmaster, grade 4 office, St. 

Hyacinthe, P.Q. 
Railway mail clerk, Moose Jaw, 

Sask. 



Postal helper, Brandon, Man. . 

Postal clerk 

Postal clerk, Brandon, Man. . . 
Assistant Postmaster, grade 4 
office 



Assistant postmaster, grade 5 
office 



Postmaster, grade 4 office, Am- 
herst, N.S. 
Letter carrier. Three Rivers, P.Q. 
Letter carrier, Port Arthur, Ont. 



Railway mail clerk, Vancouver, 
B.C. 

Postmaster, grade 5 office, Guelph, 

Ont. 
Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 



Assistant postmaster, grade 
office 



Letter carrier 

Chief clerk. Chief Post Office 
Superintendent's Office 



Postal cletk. 



Postmaster, grade 5 office, Sault 

Ste. Marie, Ont. 
Senior postal clerk, Otta,wa, Ont. 

Principal postal clerk, Toronto, 

Ont. 
District superintendent of postal 

service, Toronto, Ont. 
Railway mail clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Letter carrier, Brandon, Man. 
Superintendent, Secretarial Branch 

Toronto, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Amherst, N.S. 

District superintendent of postal 
service, Montreal, P.Q. 

Postal information clerk, Mont- 
real, P.Q. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



81 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Comm.ission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 




To 



Post Office— Con. 
Forbes, Robert Kincaid , 

Hay, George 

Stokes, Percy , 

Valiquette, Wilfrid L 

Goodman, Alfred 

Alway, Frederick John 

Cantwell, William Joseph Patrick 

Carl, L. C 

Carson, Thomas Hamilton 

Fregeau, Raoul 

Gauthier, Alfred 

Haynes, Frederick Charles 

Hurtubise. Joseph E 

Morris, William Ernest 

Murphy, Augustine 

Stuart, Archibald 

Bouvier, Wilfrid 

Brown, Henry Maurice 

Mucklei-, Frederick Hamilton 

Munn, William James 

Carr, Joseph 

Colven, John Alexander 

Pequegnat, Trochow Paul 

Vallee, Paul E. M 

Taylor, William Stuart 

Bidner, Thomas M 

Randall, Frederick Arthur 

Nightingale, Gordon Ernest 

Cottrell, William Henry 

Bruneau, Lucienne 

Grant, Murdoch Charles 

Choquette, Bernard Richard 

Proulx, L6on J 

LaRose, Albert 

Henderson, Joseph Steadman 

Harris, John H 

Buck, Alfred 

Munn, George Douglas 

Borland, Albert Edmond 

Lynott, Anna Theresa 

McCluskey, David Harris 

O'Leary, Norman Dunne 

Shuttleworth, Mrs. Ellen 

Beard, Arthur Robert 

Dickson, Thomas 

Handren, Ralph Waldo 

Sargent, John William 

Barry, Edward Joseph 

Breton, Joseph Napoleon 

Buxton, Frank 

Cook, David Waters 

Cooke, Margaret Adelaide 

Cronin, Thomas Patrick 

Emeny, George 

Hazell, Alexander 

Herring, John P'rederick 

Shane, Daniel Maurice 

Criise, Harold Bertram 

15215—6 



Senior postal clerk 

Postal helper , 

Letter carrier overseer 

Clerk 

Postal helper 

Principal postal clerk , 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Letter carrier overseer 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Mail porter 

Postal helper 

Mail porter 

Senior postal clerk 

Mail porter 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Mail porter 

Postal clerk 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

u 

Clerk-stenographer 

Junior clerk 

Postal helper 

Office appliance operator, grade 2 

Assistant postmaster, grade 6 

office 

Postmaster, grade 6 office 

Letter carrier 

Postal helper 

Clerk, grade 1 

Postal clerk 

Senior postal clerk 

Clerk, grade 1 

Postal clerk 

Letter carrier 

Railway mail clerk 

Mail porter 

Postal helper 

i( 

it 

Junior clerk 

Postal helper 

Mail porter 

Postal helper 

Postal clerk 

Mail porter 



Assistant postmaster, grade 6 

office, Brandon, Man. 
Letter carrier, Belleville, Ont. 
Letter carrier. North Bay, Ont. 
Letter carrier supervisor, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Postal clerk, Calgary, Alta. 
Letter carrier, London, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Mail porter, Vancouver, B.C. 
Senior postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 
Senior postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q 

Letter carrier, London, Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, Montreal, P.Q 

Letter carrier, London, Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, Toronto, Ont 

Letter carrier, London, Ont. 

Senior mail porter, Montreal, P.Q 

Mail porter, London, Ont. 

Senior mail porter, Kingston, Ont 

Postmaster, grade 6 office, Bran- 
don, Man. 

Postal clerk, Hamilton, Ont. 

Letter carrier. Saskatoon, Sask. 

Postal clerk. Kitchener, Ont. 

Departmental accountant, grade 1, 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Postal clerk, Vancouver, B.C. 

Senior postal clerk, London, Ont. 

Mail porter, Winnipeg, Man. 

Senior postal clerk, Brantford, 
Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior clerk-stenographer, Quebec, 
P.Q. 

Account clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Letter carrier, Ottawa, Ont. 
File clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant postmaster, grade 7 
office, Moncton, N.B. 

Postmaster, grade 7 office, Monc- 
ton, N.B. 

Postal clerk, Naiiaimo, B.C. 

Postal clerk, Regina, Sask. 

Postal clerk, Peterborough, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Railway mail clerk. North Bay, 
Ont. 

Principal postal clerk, Toronto, 
Ont. 

Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, St. Catharinet3, 
Ont. 

Postal clerk, London, Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Postal clerk, Lodnon, Ont. 

Letter carrier. North Bay, Ont. 

Letter carrier, Sherbrooke, P.Q. 

Mail porter, Moncton, N.B. 

Postal clerk, Brantford, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Postal clerk, Sarnia, Ont. 

Postal clerk, Guelph, Ont. 

Postal clerk, Brantford, Ont. 

Mail porter, London, Ont. 

Senior postal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Postal clerk. Saskatoon, Sask. 



82 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Post Office— Con. 

Cyr, Lucien 

Dechfene, Emile 

MacDonald, Harry 

Dingle, Albert Walker 

Knight, John Henry 

Parke, Charles George Alexander 

Spence, George Drummond 

Stewart, Kenneth Campbell 

McQuarrie, Archie 

Bei.oit, Joseph Willie 

Galbraith, William Torrance 

Hartney, Kathleen Mary 

May, Thomas Joseph 

McDougall, Allan Laverne 

McLaren, Joseph 

Latchford, Francis Robert, jr 

Bonner, James Joseph 

Carroll, Thomas Herbert 

Fortin, Philias 

Fraser, Mary 

Griffith, William Frederick 

Leveille, Joseph Arthur 

Lynch, M. E 

Robertson, Charles Robert, jr. . . 

Robertson, Charles Robert, sr... 



Robertson, James Joseph. 

Cathcart, Cecil Everett... 
Dempsey, John William.. 
Gervin, Kames Charles... 
Ramsdale, Harry 



Public Printing and Stationery- 
Beaudry, Irene 



Boyer, Joseph Louis Albert. 
Brennan, John Joseph 



Bradley, Frances Gwynneth. 
Desjardins, Lucien Elzebert.. 

Hains, Louis 

Wilson, Mary Ethel 



Fallis, Richard W.. 
Wilson, Mary Ethel. 



Lajambe, Phileas Napoleon. 
Harvey, Charles Proper. . . . 

Cousineau, J. Oscar 

*Higgerty, Henry Iris 

*Hewton, Frederick Alva.. . 



Postal helper. 



Principal postal clerk. 
Postal helper 



Office appliance operator, grade 2 

Poatal clerk 

P(>stal helper 



Clerk, grade 2. 
Postal clerk 



Postal helper 

Principal account clerk. 

Senior postal clerk 

Clerk, grade 2 

Principal postal clerk... 



Postal helper... 

Clerk 

Clerk, grade 4. 



Departmental accountant, grade 
2 



Postal clerk. 



Clerk, grade 3. 
Postal helper... 
Letter carrier. . 
Postal helper... 



Office appliance operator, grade 1 

Clerk-typist 

Linotype machinist " 



Junior clerk-stenographer 

Senior stenographer-bookkeeper. 

Assistant editor 

Clerk-stenographer 



Fireman 

Senior clerk-stenographer. 



Messenger-clerk 

Assistant copy editor 

Clerk, grade 2 

Linotype machinist helper. 



Mail porter, Montreal, P.Q. 
Postal clerk. Saskatoon, Sask. 

Inspector of postal service, Cal- 
gary, Alta. 

Postal clerk, Guelph, Ont. 

Postal clerk, Lethbridge, Alta. 

Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Railway mail clerk, London, Ont. 

Letter carrier, Sydney, N.S. 

Letter carrier. Three Rivers, P.Q. 

Mail porter, London, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Railway Mail clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Senior postal clerk. Medicine Hat, 
Alta. 

Mail porter, Brantford, Ont. 

Postal clerk, Toronto, Ont. 

Departmental accountant, grade 2, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant postmaster, grade 5 
office, Fort William, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Inspector of postal service, St. 
John, N.B. 

Letter carrier, Regina, Sask. 

Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 

Principal account clerk, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Departmental accountant, grade 3, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior postal clerk, Hamilton, 

Ont. 
Clerk, grade 4, Ottawa, Ont. 
Postal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Mail porter, Hamilton, Ont. 



Office appliance operator, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior stenographer-bookkeeper, 

Ottawa, Ont. . 

Foreman linotype machinist, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant editor, Ottawa, Ont. 
Editor, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Electrician-engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 
Secretary to executive, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Copy editor, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Linotype machinist, Ottawa, Ont. 



Public Works — 
Mcintosh, Angus, jr. 



Lineman, Eighth Cabin, B.C. 



Pinard, Joseph P. Charles. 
Pilkington, Grace May 



Telegraph agentK)perator, Sixth 

Cabin, B.C. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Telegraph agent-operator, Kere- 
meos, B.C. 

♦Assignment within Mechanical Staff under the provisions of the Order in Council P.C. 9/2333 of the 
19th November, 1923. 



Clerk 

Telephone operator. Telegraph 
Service, Vernon, B.C 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



83 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Public Works — Con. 

Dowling, Francis William.. 

Krock, EIlaA. B 

Charlebois, Jeanette Marie. 

Yarrow, Doris Keeler 

Thorburn, Duncan Lachlan 

Pennock, Edmund Earl 

HoUingsworth, G 

Macdonald, Alexander 

Brophy, George Patrick. . . 

Cantin, Joseph Arthur 

Dudley, George Harvey.. . 
Howson, Gertrude C 

Burgess, John Hartley 

Lawrence, John Dorland.. . 

Allum, Fred 

Dewhurst, Mrs. Florence. . . 

McLean, William Lachlan.. 
Cunningham, Robert 

Noel, Joseph D 

Pope, Edwin 



Richardson, William Augustus 

Valade, Alice 

Brown, John Graham 

Anderson, Alexander Alderson. 

Stewart, Mary Nairn 

Brousseau, Emile J 

Kelly, Norma M. H 

Smith, Gustave E 

Barlow, Richard 

Hart, Berton Felix 

Rogers, George Gordon 

Hillier, William L 

Narraway, Charles Augustus.. 
Kirkpatrick, Robert Alonzo.. . 

Bouvette, Wilfred Sifton 

O'Brien, William Emmett 

Howson, Gertrude C 



District superintendent of tele- 
graphs, grade 2 



Junior clerk- typist. 



Junior clerk-stenographer 

Senior file clerk 

Office boy 

Stationary engineer (heating), 
grade 2 



Senior clerk-bookkeeper. 



Junior engineer, Port Arthur, 
Ont 



Senior draftsman 

Clerk, grade 1 

Telegraph operator. Telegraph 
Service 



Lineman. 



Telegraph agent-operator. Any ox 
B.C 



Cleaner and helper 

Telephone operator. Telegraph 
Service 



Senior clerk 

Junior engineer, Winnipeg, Man. . 

District superintendent of tele- 
graphs, grade 2, Battleford, 
Sask. 

District superintendent of tele- 
graphs, grade 2 



Division superintendent, Tele- 
graph Service, Kamloops, B.C. 
Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Typist, grade 1, Ottawa, Ont. 

Stationary engineer (heating), 

grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Inspector, Telegraph Service, 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant engineer. Fort William, 

Ont. 
Estimate draftsman, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Telegraph agent-operator, Kel- 

owna, B.C. 
Telegraph agent-operator. Alert 

Bay, B.C. 

Telegraph office manager, Prince 

Rupert, B.C. 
Elevator operator, Toronto, Ont. 

Telephone agent-operator, 
Princeton, B.C. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant engineer. New West- 
minster, B.C. 

Division superintendent. Tele- 
graph Service, Edmonton, Alta. 



Junior engineer 

Clerk 

Assistant architect. 



Assistant engineer, London, Ont 



Estimate clerk 

Draftsman 

Telegraph messenger. 



Draftsman, Toronto, Ont. 
Cleaner and helper 



Senior clerk-bookkeeper 

Principal clerk 

Lineman, Port Renfrew, B.C. 



Principal clerk 

Assistant engineer. Nelson, B.C. 



Telegraph operator. Telegraph 
Service 



Head clerk 

Telephone operator. Telegraph 
Service, Keremeos, B.C 



16215— 6i 



Division superintendent. Tele- 
graph Service, Quebec, Que., 
from April 1, 1924 to October 
31, 1924. 

Assistant engineer. Nelson, B.C, 

Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

District resident architect, 
Victoria, B.C. 

Senior assistant engineer. Fort 
Arthur, Ont. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior draftsman, Ottawa, Ont. 

Telephone operator, Telegraph 
Service, Kamloops, B.C. 

Junior engineer, Fort William, 
Ont. 

Elevator operator, Hamilton, 
Ont. 

Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Telegraph agent-operator. Coal 
Harbour, B.C. 

Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior assistant engineer, Winni- 
peg, Man. 

Telegraph agent-operator, 

Kelowna, B.C. 
Clerk of estimates, Ottawa, Ont. 

Telegraph operator. Telegraph 
Service, Kelowna, B.C. 



84 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the CommLission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended— Continued 



Department and Name 




To 



Public Works — Con. 

Powell, James Isaac 

Smith, William Leo 

Burwell, Ernest Victor 

Burns, Ernest Arthur 

Cayouette, Joseph Fenelon. . . 

Morton, Kenneth William 

Cox, Horace Gordon 

Potter, Sybil Agnes 

Mills, Frederick Oldham 

Railways and Canals — 
Girard, Victor 

Lemay , Ulric 

Black, BurtE 

Lecomte, Rodolphe 

Beckstead, Irvin Herbert 

Wallace, George Henry 

Lang, William 

Duplantie, Joseph Armand. . . 
Rouleau, Euclide 

Fournier, Arthur 

Marleau, Alexis 

Montpetit, Adelard ,. . . 

Chartrand, E 

Gemme, Joseph Napol6on 

Martin, Zepher 

O'Neill, William Leslie 

Garry, Cecil Alfred 

Lemay, Ulric 

Lamoureux, D 

Haynes, E. C 

Hunting, Arthur Seymour 

Sanders, Ernest 

Horner, Thomas Samuel 

Howe, Walter Horace 

MacLean, William Archibald 

Reynolds, Thomas Charles. . 

Andrews, Albert H 

Howard, Benjamin 

Cardinal, Victor 

Gillian, William 

Powell, George 

Angell, George 



Cleaner and helper 

Junior architect 

Junior mechanical engineer. 
Principal account clerk 



Stenographer, grade 2. 

Assistant engineer 

Clerk, grade 3 



Telegraph messenger, Kamloops, 
B.C 



Senior draftsman. 



Lockman. 



Lock motorman 

Messenger 

Lockman (seasonal). 



Lockman, Williamsburg canal. 



Cleaner and helper 

Lockman (seasonal) 

Lock motorman (seasonal). 
Lock motorman 



Lock motorman (seasonal). 

Lock motorman 

Bridge keeper 

Lock motorman (seasonal) . 

Lock motorman 

Bridge keeper (seasonal) . . . 



Lockman. 



Lock and bridge motorman. 
Account clerk 



Lock motorman (seasonal). 

Stores clerk 

Lock motorman (seasonal). 
Lock motorman 



Lockman 

Lockman (seasonal). 



Junior canal clerk. . . 
Lockman (seasonal). 



Elevator operator, Toronto, Ont. 

Assistant architect, Ottawa, Ont. 

Assistant engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 

Departmental accountant, grade 
2, New Westminster, B.C. 

Clerk of works, grade 1, Quebec, 
P.Q. 

Senior assistant engineer. New 
Westminster, B.C. 

Junior engineer. New West- 
minster, B.C. 

Telephone operator, Telegraph 
Service, Vernon, B.C. 

Assistant engineer, New West- 
minster, B.C. 

Bridge motorman, Chambly 
canal, P.Q. 

Lockmaster, St. Ours lock, P.Q. 

Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Lockmaster, Chambly canal, 
P.Q. 

Lockmaster, Farran's Point, 
Ont. 

Caretaker, Cornwall, Ont. 

Lockmaster, Merrickville, Ont. 

Lockmaster, Lachine canal, P.Q. 

Lockmaster, Soulanges canal, 
P.Q. 

Lockmaster (seasonal), Sou- 
langes canal, P.Q. 



Lockmaster, Soulanges canal, 

P.Q. 
Bridge motorman, Chambly 

canal, P.Q. 
Lock motorman (permanent), 

Cornwall canal, Ont. 
Lockmaster, St. Catharines, 

Ont. 
Marine railway operator; Trent 

Canal Construction Division, 

Swift Rapids, Ont. 
Lock motorman, St. Our's lock, 

Quebec Canals. 

Lockmaster, Welland canal, Ont. 
Senior account clerk, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

CC it 

Lockmaster (seasonal), Welland 
canal, Ont. 

Senior stores clerk, Welland canal, 

St. Catharines, Ont. 
Lockmaster (seasonal), Welland 

canal, Ont. 
Lockmaster, Cornwall canal, 

Ont. 
Lockmaster, Trent canal, Ont. 
Lockmaster, Ste. Anne's lock, 

Quebec Canals. 
Messenger-clerk, Sault Ste. 

Marie, Ont. 
Canal clerk, Port Dalhousie, 

Ont. 
Lock motorman, Ste. Anne's 

lock, Quebec Canals. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS m 

Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 




To 



Railways and Canals — Con. 
Crevier, Regis 

Hunter, John 

Louisseize, Joseph 

Carleton, James 

Marcotte, Adelard 

Daoust, Antoine 

Martineau, Joseph 

Welsh, James Lucas 

King, Joseph 

Laurendeau, Hector 

Gayman, Samuel C 

Steele. M.E 

Cosgrove, Walter M 

Edgett, Charles H 

Sanders, Ernest 

Commarford, John 

Milne, Mary Marjorie Urquhart. 

Yuill, Russell 

Clarke, Harold 

Filion, Adelard 

Tardif, Henri 

Railway Commissioners, Board of- 
Langelier, Joseph David Israel. . 

Martin, J. E 

Lajoie, Joseph Valmore 

Britton, T. G 

Chambers, David Howard 

Drury, H. A. K 

Simmons, Thomas Lockwood 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — 
Dean, Emma Dorothy 

Lachance, Henry Vernon Joseph. 
Doyle, John Clarence 

Secretary of State — 

Emond, Gustave 

Birdwhistle, Matthew John 

Currans, Henry David 

O'Connor, Daniel J 

O'Meara, William Patrick John. , 

Shibley, Gervase Rea 

Comfoot, Nathan Alexander 

DeGagne, Germaine 

Godbout, Cecile 

Clift, John A 

Anderson, Cassie Ann 



Lockman (seasonal). 



Rodman 

Lockman (seasonal). 



Lock motorman (seasonal) . 



Bridgeman (seasonal) 

Bridge motorman (seasonal). 

Bridgeman (seasonal) , 

Account clerk 



Bridgeman. 



Senior account clerk 

Lockmaster (seasonal) 

Junior purchasing agent 

Assistant purchasing agent. 

Senior account clerk 

Canal overseer, grade 2 

Stenographer, grade 2 

Senior assistant engineer 



Switch and signal operator. 



Regulating weir attendant (sea- 
sonal) 

Departmental accountant, grade 1. 



File clerk 

Senior file clerk . 
Clerk-typist .... 



Statistical clerk . 
File clerk. . : ... 



Division engineer 

Assistant chief engineer. 

Clerk-stenographer 



Principal file clerk . 
Clerk 



Head clerk 

Departmental accountant, grade 2 

Senior clerk-bookkeeper 

Senior clerk 

Junior departmental solicitor 



Head clerk 

Clerk, grade 4 

Stenographer, grade 1. 

Typist, grade 1 

Principal clerk 

Junior clerk-typist 



Lock motorman, Ste. Anne's 

lock, Quebec Canals. 
Stores clerk, Cornwall, Ont. 
Lock motorman, Ste. Anne's 

lock, Quebec Canals. 
Bridge master, Lachine canal, 

P.Q. 



Senior stores clerk, Trent canal, 

Ont. 
Bridge motorman, Lachine canal 

P.Q.^^ 

Timber inspector, Welland Ship 

canal, Ont. 
Lockmaster (permanent). Port 

Colborne, Ont. 
Departmental purchasing agent, 

grade 1, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental purchasing agent, 

grade 3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental accountant, grade 

1, Cornwall, Ont. 
Canal overseer, grade 3, Welland 

canal, Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
District hydraulic engineer, St. 

Lawrence Deep Waterways, 

Cornwall, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 3, Welland Ship 

canal, Ont. 

Watchman, Lachine canal. Que. 
Head clerk, Quebec Canals, 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Senior file clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal file clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior statistical clerk, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk-stenographer, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant chief engineer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Chief engineer, Ottawa, Ont. 



Senior clerk-stenographer, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 



Remission registrar, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental accountant, grade 

3, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Departmental solicitor, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Chief clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Stenographer, grade 2, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 



86 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Comimission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Department and Name 


From 


To 


Senate — 

Oilman, H. D 


Senior account clerk 


Departmental accountant, grade 


Roy, J. O. A 


Senior law clerk-stenographer. . . 
Clerk-stenographer 


2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Committee clerk and clerk of 


Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment — 
Valiquette, Olive 


Minutes and Journals, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 


Plunkett, Ernest C 


Office appliance operator, grade 2 
Junior clerk-typist 


Ont. 
Clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Mcintosh, Violet 


Clerk-typist, Ottawa, Ont. 


Wood, William Jeffrey. . . . . 


Clerk 


Senior account clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Murphy, Anne Irene 


Clerk-stenographer 


Senior clerk-stenographer. 


White, Joseph 


Departmental accountant, grade 
2 


Ottawa, Ont. 




Head clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Compton, Bessie L 


Clerk-stenographer 


Senior clerk-stenographer. 


Bishop, Inez Florence 


Junior clerk-typist 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 


Brooks, Murray James 


Clerk, grade 4 


2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Principal clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


Mitchell, Mildred Clara 


Clerk, grade 1 


Office appliance operator, grade 


Wilson, Clara Beatrice 


« 


2, Ottawa, Ont. 

« « 


Trade and Commerce 
Clarke, W. McL 


Trade commissioner, grade 2, 
Milan, Italy.. . . ... 






Director of the Commercial Intel- 


McNulty, Ann Ethel 


Junior file clerk 


ligence Service, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 


Stiver, John Leslie 


Division superintendent of elec- 
tricity and gas 






Director of Electrical and Gas In- 


Moreton, Ella J 


Clerk, grade 1 


spection, Ottawa, Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 2, 


Cuddy, James 


Chief deputy grain inspector 

Assistant chief grain inspector. . 
Deputy grain inspector 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Assistant chief grain inspector. 


Fraser, James Dale 


Winnipeg, Man. 
Chief grain inspector, Winnipeg, 


Ludlam, Frederick Sherratt 


Man. 
Chief deputy grain inspector, 


White, Henry George. 




Winnipeg, Man. 


Young, Thomas William 


Chief deputy grain inspector, 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Clerk, grade 3 




Piatt, Henry John 


Grain inspector, grade 2, Calgary, 

Alta. 
Clerk, grade 4, Vancouver, B.C. 


Croft, Carman Milward 


Assistant trade commissioner 

Stenographer, grade 2 


Trade commissioner, grade 1, 


MacRae, Hattie Margaret.. 


Auckland, New Zealand. 
Stenographer, grade 3, Ottawa, 


Dolighan, Julia Anna Stella 


Junior statistical clerk 


Ont. 
Office appliance operator, grade 2, 


Valine, Alice 


Junior clerk-stenographer 

Junior statistical clerk 


Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 


Donovan, Mary Magdalene.. 


Statistical clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 


O'Reilly, Cecile 






Chenier, N6ella 


" 


« « 


Bryan, A. E 


Trade commissioner, grade 2, 
Kobe, Japan 






Inspector of trade commissioners' 


Jarrett, Harry Victor 


File clerk 


offices, Ottawa, Ont. 
Senior file clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 






Clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, Ont. 


Armstrong, Sybil Grace 

Losee, William Herchmer 

Weber, Louis 


Junior clerk-stenographer 

Principal statistical clerk 

Inspector of electricity and gas. . 

« « 
Deputy grain inspector 


Statistician, Ottawa, Ont. 
District inspector of electricity 


Withers, S. W 


and gas, Regina, Sask. 
District inspector of electricity 


McDougal, Guy . . 


and gas, Halifax, N.S. 
Chief deputy grain inspector. Port 


Falconer, Dorothy Isabel. 


Clerk-stenographer 


Arthur, Ont. 
Secretary to executive, Ottawa, 






Ont. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



87 



Table No. 4 — Promotions made by the Commission under Section 45 
of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Concluded 



Department and Name 



From 



To 



Trade and Commerce — Con. 
Gillen, Eulalia Lillian 

Campsall, Nettie May 

Hart, Frederick Thomas 

Lamontagne, Yves 

Langley, James Augustine 

O'Meara, Robert Stewart 

Miller, Arthur 

Thompson, Stanley 

Watson, John 

Cudmore, Sedley Anthony 

MacLean, Murdoch Campbell.. . 

Johnson, Gordon B 

Honorary Advisory Council — 
Agius, William 

Willoughby, Dorothy Yorke 

Patent and Copyright — 

Brennan, Mary Mildred 

Richard, Joseph Heremenegilde 
Emile 



Clerk-stenographer 

Office appliance operator, grade 2 
Inspector of weights and meas- 
ures 

Assistant trade commissioner 

« << 

Assistant trade commissioner, 
Calcutta, India 

Deputy grain inspector 

Deputy grain inspector, Winni- 
peg, Man 

Senior statistician 

Assistant Chief, Educational 
Statistics, Dominion Bureau 
of Statistics 

Trade commissioner, grade 2. . . . 

Messenger 

Clerk, grade 1 

Junior clerk- typist 

Junior file clerk 



Senior clerk-stenographer, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Statistical clerk, Ottawa, Ont. 

Senior inspector of weights and 
measures, Peterborough, Ont. 

Trade commissioner, grade 1, 
Brussels, Belgium. 

Trade commissioner, grade 1, 
Kobe, Japan. 

Trade commissioner, grade 1, 
Singapore, Straits Settlement. 

Chief deputy grain inspector, 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Chief deputy grain inspector, 
Edmonton, Alta. 

Chief deputy grain inspector. 

Prince Rupert, B.C. 
Chief, General Statistics and 

Editor Canada Year Book, 

Ottawa, Ont. 



Statistician, Ottawa, Ont. 
Trade commissioner, grade 
Glasgow, Scotland. 



Office appliance operator, grade 2, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Library assistant, Ottawa, Ont. 



Typist, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 
Clerk, grade 2, Ottawa, Ont. 



88 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 5 — Transfers approved by the Commission under Section 45 
(a) of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended 



Name 



From 



To 



Adam, Simoi 

Adams, H. M. V. 



Agnew, Alexander. 



Alexander, A. M. 
Alexander, J. B. . 



Alexander, Miss K. E. 

Allan, R. M 

Anderson, Ernest 

Archibald, Ocenia. . . . 

Arsenault, D. E 

Axford, F 

Babin.Mrs. G. K 

Bealy, J. M 

Beaulieu, Alice 



Bennett, H. E.. 
Benoit, George. 



Bingham, Dorothy 

Bird, Leonard 

Bisson, Flory 

Bisson, J. L 

Bleakney, A. S 

Bliss, Stanley 

Boisvert, J. I 

Bond, William 

Boughner, J. W 

*Brennan, John Joseph. 

Brown, E. G 

Brown, G. D 

Brown, R. M 

Breyenton, S. O 



Burrows, J. T... 
Cameron, D. R. 

Carsell, Q. L... 



Senior mail porter. Post Office, Mont- 
real, P.Q 

Investigator, Organization Branch, 
Civil Service Commission, Ottawa, 
Ont 

Mail porter. Post Office, Hamilton, 
Ont 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Toronto, Ont.. 

Assistant to Dominion land surveyor, 
Interior, Calgary, Alta 

Junior clerk-stenographer. Marine and 
Fisheries, Ottawa, Ont 

Chief industrial officer. Justice, Prince 
Albert, Sask 

Grain weighman, Trade and Com- 
merce, Vancouver, B.C 

Senior postal clerk. Post Office, Truro, 
N.S 

Inspector of dairy products. Agricul- 
ture, Edmonton, Alta 

Lay inspector (packing plant), Agricul- 
ture, Toronto, Ont 

Supernumerary clerk. Post Office, Ot- 
tawa, Ont 

Railway mail clerk, Post Office, Lon- 
don, Ont 

Supernumerary translator, Interior, 
Ottawa, Ont 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Regina, Sask. 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Montreal, 
P.Q 

Telephone operator. Public Works, 
Kamloops, B.C 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Vancouver, 
B.C 

Junior clerk-typist. Civil Service Com- 
mission, Ottawa, Ont 

Senior assistant engineer. Public 
Works, Port Arthur, Ont 

Trade commissioner, grade 1, Trade 
and Commerce, Brussels, Belgium.. . 

Deputy grain inspector. Trade and 
Commerce, Fort William, Ont 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, Que- 
bec District 

Customs excise examiner. Customs and 
Excise, Lethbridge, Alta 

Assistant engineer. Public Works, Fort 
William, Ont 

Linotype machinist. Public Printing 
and Stationery, Ottawa, Ont 

Telegraph agent-operator. Public 
Works, Alert Bay, B.C 

Clerk-bookeeper, Public Works, Kam- 
loops, B.C 

Superintendent of forest reserves. In 
terior, Pincher Creek, Alta 

Assistant inspector of customs and ex 
cise. Customs a:nd Excise, St. John 
N.B 



Senior postal clerk. Post Office, Saska- 
toon, Sask 

District forest inspector. Interior, 
Kamloops, B.C 



Customs excise examiner, grade 1 out- 
port, Customs and Excise, Wetaski- 
win, Alta 



Mail porter. 

Head clerk, Agriculture. 

Letter carrier. 
London, Ont. 

Timber tester, Vancouver, B.C. 

Toronto, Ont. 

New Westminster, B.C. 

Prince Rupert, B.C. 

Postal clerk. 

Quebec, P.Q. 

Peterborough, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 2. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Translator. 
Mail porter. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Penticton, B.C. 

Letter carrier. 

Agriculture. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Rio de Janeiro, South America. 

Vancouver, B.C. 

Montreal District, P.Q. 

Customs excise clerk. 

London, Ont. 

Foreman linotype machinist. 

Anyox, B.C. 

Junior clerk-stenographdr. 

Kamloops, B.C. 



Customs excise clerk, Amherst, 

N.S. 

Postal clerk. 

Assistant Director of Forestry, 
Ottawa, Ont. 



*Transfer and permanent status under the provisions of the Order 
November, 1923. 



Camrose, Alta. 

in Council P.C. 9/2333 of the 19th 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



Table No. 5 — Transfers approved by the Commission under Section 45 
(a) of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Name 



From 



To 



Carter, V. W. 



*Carter, Wm. George. 



Chabot, A. 



Chabot, Mrs. M. E. 
Chapman, W. A 



Clarke, Harold H. 
Cloutier, E 



Cook, G. L. 
Cook, P. W. 



Cormack, James. 



Couvrette, Romeo. 
Covey, A 



Crump, F. J. 



Cummerford, R. T. 

DeBlois, Joseph 

Desforges, A 

Dickinson, Alfred. . . 



Doree, Henry. . 
Downing, J. D. 



Doyle, James 

Dunlop, Mrs. A. M. 
Easton, VV. D 



Ennis, W. T 

Ferguson, F. A 

Ferguson, Jessie 

Forbes, T, C 

Forbes-Mitchell, W. J. 

Foumier, Oriana 

Gagne, J. C 



Galipeau, J. J. 



Sub-collector of customs and excise, 
grade 1 outport, Customs and Excise, 
Bamfield,B.C 



Assistant foreman of composition, Pub- 
lic Printing and Stationery, Ottawa, 
Ont 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Montreal, 

P.Q ...., 

Supernumerary junior clerk. Post Of- 
fice, Ottawa, Ont 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, Tor- 
onto, Ont 

Senior clerk, Soldiers' Civil Re-estab- 
lishment, Ottawa, Ont 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Montreal, 
P-Q 

Mail porter. Post Office, Toronto, Ont 

Trade commissioner, grade 1, Trade 
and Commerce, Rio de Janeiro, 
South America 

Trade commissioner, grade 1, Trade 
and Commerce, Jamaica, B.W.I. . 

Letter carrier. Post Office, Montreal, 
P.Q 

.Lightkeeper, grade 2, class 2, Marine 
and Fisheries, Flint Island, Port 
Morien 



Postal clerk. Post Office, Toronto, Ont. 

Lockmaster (seasonal), Railways and 
Canals, Thorold, Ont 

Clerk, grade 4, Soldiers' Civil Re- 
establishment, Ottawa, Ont 

Customs excise clerk. Customs and 
Excise, St. Johns, P.Q 

Lightkeeper, grade 2, class 3, Marine 
and Fisheries, Quatsino, B.C , 



Postal clerk. Post Office, Prince Al- 
bert, Sask 

Supernumerary principal postal clerk, 
Post Office, Montreal District, P.Q.. 

Letter carrier, Post Office, Vancouver, 
B.C 

Supernumerary postal clerk. Post 
Office, Toronto, Ont 

Lockman, Railways and Canals, Nic 
holson's lock station 



Lay inspector (packing plant). Agricul- 
ture, Peterborough, Ont 

Customs excise examiner. Customs and 
Excise, White Rock, B.C 

Senior clerk-stenographer. Royal Cana- 
dian Mounted Police, Ottawa, Ont. . 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, Win- 
nipeg, Man 

Senior assistant engineer. Public Works, 
London, Ont 

Stenographer, grade 2, Post Office, 
Ottawa, Ont 

Inspector of weights and measures. 
Trade and Commerce, Montreal, 
P.Q 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, 
Montreal, P.Q 



Customs excise clerk, Victoria, 
B.C. 



Foreman of composition. 

Mail porter. 

Junior clerk. 

Ottawa District, Ont. 

Interior. 

Mail porter. 
Letter carrier. 

Jamaica, B.W.I. 
Trinidad, B.W.I. 
Mail porter. 



Lightkeeper, grade 2, class 5, 

Western Head, N.S. 
Letter carrier. 



♦Transfer and permanent status under the provisions of the Order 
November, 1923. 



Regulating weir attendant. 

Auditor General's Office. 

Customs excise examiner. 

Lightkeeper, grade 2, class 4, First 
Narrows, B.C. 

Saskatoon, Sask. 

Principal postal clerk. North Bay, 
District, Ont. 

Mail porter. 

Postal clerk. Dead Letter Section. 

Merrickville lock station, Rideau 
Canal, Ont. 

Toronto, Ont. 

New Westminster, B.C. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Postal clerk» 

St. John, N.B. 

Railways and Canals. 

Sherbrooke, P.Q. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

in Council P.C. 9/2333 of the 19th 



90 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 5 — Transfers approved by the Commission under Section 45 
(a) of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Name 



From 



To 



*Garrison, James W. 
Gauthier, Josephat. . 
Giguere, Mrs. M 



Gill, C.B.... 
Glover, T. H. 



Goodman, F. C... 
Goold.Wm. D... 

Gregory, A. W 

Guy, Frank 

Hanslay, Robert.. 
Heath, Dr. L. M. 
Henderson, D. D. 
Henderson, D. D. 

Hill, Hazel O 

Hillhouse, R. F. . . 

Howard, W 

Hull, Miss E.M.. 



Humble, W. G 

Hurst, R. R 

Jackson, L. H 

James, Ernest R. S. 
Jardine, G. V 



Jasienski, A. M. 
Jepps, J. A 



Justason, H. E. 
Kerkham, A. . . 



Kerr, A. T 

Kerslake, A. W... 

King, B. R 

Klock, W. B 

Krempeaux, C. S. 



Hand compositor. Public Printing and 

Stationery, Ottawa, Ont 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Montreal, 

P.Q 

Supernumerary junior clerk, Post 

Office, Ottawa, Ont 

Forester, Interior, Swan River, Man.. . 
Assistant inspector of customs and 

excise, Customs and Excise, Peter- 
borough, Ont 

Letter carrier, Post Office, Calgary, 

Alta 

Supplies clerk. Agriculture, Ottawa, 

Ont • 

Assistant engineer, Public Works, 

Ottawa, Ont 

Clerk-bookkeeper, Interior, New West^ 

minster, B.G 

Fire ranger, Interior, Manitoba South 

District 

Animal pathologist. Agriculture, Hull, 

P.-Q 

Senior postal clerk. Post Office, Ed 

monton, Alta 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Edmonton, 

Alta 

Clerk, grade 2, Agriculture, Ottawa, 

Ont 

Indian farming instructor, Indian 

Affairs, Portage la Prairie Agency.. 
Radiotelegraph inspector, Marine and 

Fisheries, Victoria, B.C 

Telegraph agent-operator. Public 

Works, Keremos, B.C 



Customs excise examiner, Customs and 
Excise, Prince Rupert, B.C 

Assistant plant pathologist. Agricul- 
ture, Saskatoon, Sask 

Letter carrier. Post Office, Calgary, 
Alta 

File clerk. Agriculture, Ottawa, Ont. . . 

Letter carrier. Post Office, Kitchener, 
Ont 

Letter carrier. Post Office, Medicine 
Hat, Alta 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Montreal, 
P.Q 



Senior statistical clerk. 

Letter carrier. 

Junior clerk. 
Forest supervisor. 

Assistant customs appraiser. 

Kitchener, Ont. 

File clerk. 

Halifax, N.S. 

Kamloops, B.C. 

Prince Albert District, Sask. 

Lethbridge, Alta. 

Postal clerk. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Carlton Agency. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Telephone agent-operator. Nelson, 
B.C. 

Vancouver, B.C. 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Postal helper. 
Supplies clerk. 

Calgary, Alberta. 
Kitchener, Ont. 



Emigration agent, grade 3, Immigra- 
tion and Colonization, Antwerp, 
Belgium 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, 
Toronto, Ont 

Sub-collector of customs and excise, 
grade 1, Customs and Excise, Bur- 
dett, Alta 

Division engineer. Board of Railway 
Commissioners, Calgary, Alta 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Vancouver, 
B.C 

Principal account clerk. National De- 
fence, Ottawa, Ont 

Supernumerary junior clerk. Post 
Office, Ottawa, Ont 

Customs excise clerk. Customs and 
Excise, Portage la Prairie, Man. . . 



Immigration inspector, Immigra- 
tion and Colonization. 



Danzig, Poland. 
London, Ont. 

Taber, Alta. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Saskatoon, Sask. 

Auditor General's Office. 

Junior clerk. 

Sub-collector of customs and excise, 
grade 1 outport, The Pas, Man. 



♦Transfer and permanent status under the provisions of the Order in Council P.C. 9/2333 of the 19th 
November, 1923. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



91 



Table No. 5 — Transfers approved by the Commission under Section 45 
(a) of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Name 


From 


To 


LaFontaine, W 


Telegraph operator. Marine and Fish- 
eries, Forty Mile, Y.T 






Dawson, Y.T. 


Lallier, Joseph 


Inspector of postal service. Post Office, 
Montreal, P.Q 






Quebec, P.Q. 


Lamontagne, J. A. E 


Senior postal clerk, Post Office, Mont- 
real, P.Q 


Postal clerk. 


Landriau, R 


Supernumerary clerk, Post Office, 
Ottawa, Ont 






Clerk. 


Langton, Thos 


Postal clerk. Post Office, Toronto, Ont. 
Postal clerk. Post Office, City Deliv- 
ery Branch, Montreal, P.Q 


Mail porter. 


Larue, C. H 






Money Order Branch. 


Ling, S. M 


Postal clerk. Post Office, Brandon, 
Man 






Letter carrier. 


Little, W. R 


Director of European Emigration, 
Immigration and Colonization, Lon- 
don, England 






Commissioner of Colonization in 


Love, Agnes 


Telephone operator, Public Works, 
Penticton, B.C 


Canada. 




Vernon, B.C. 


Macdonald, D. A 


Forestry assistant. Interior, Alberta 
Inspection Office 


Bow River Reserve, Calgary, 


Mackenzie, G. P 


Gold commissioner. Interior, North 
West Territories and Yukon Branch . 

Stenographer, grade 3, Post Office, 


Alta. 


MacNaughton, Miss H. V 


Exploration and development 
officer, Canadian Arctic. 

Edmonton, Alta. 


MacNeill, J. A 


Senior customs excise clerk, Customs 
and Excise, Charlotte town, P.E.I. . . 

Clerk, Quebec Canals, Railways and 
Canals 




Madore, Joseph 


Customs excise examiner. 




Watchman, Lachine canal. 


Maguire, C. S 


Letter carrier. Post Office, Kitchener, 
Ont 






Medicine Hat, Alta. 


March, A. H 


Postal clerk, Post Office, Toronto, Ont. 

Senior assistant engineer. Public Works, 

St. John, N.B 


Mail porter. 


Martin, G. E 






London, Ont. 


Mason, J. A 


Clerk-bookkeeper, Public Works, Ba1> 
tleford, Sask 

Emigration agent, grade 1, Immigra- 
tion and Colonization, Antwerp, 
Belgium . 




McBrearty, R 


Edmonton, Alta. 




Danzig, Poland. 


McConkey, Chas. A 


Customs excise examiner. Customs and 
Excise, Pacific highway, B.C 

Lockman, Railways and Canals, St. 
Peter's canal 




McCuish, David 


White Rock, B.C. 




Bridgeman. 


McDermid, W. D 


Inspector of bounty claims. Trade and 
Commerce, Petrolia, Ont 






Customs excse examiner. Customs? 


McGill, H. W 


District examiner postal service, P6st 
Office, London, Ont 


and Excise, Samia, Ont. 




Supervisor of mails, grade 8 office. 


McGovem, Miss C 


Office appliance operator, grade 2, Post 
Office, Ottawa, Ont 






Clerk, grade 1. 


McKay, Angus 


Telegraph agent-operator. Public 
Works, Echo Lake, B.C 






Iskoot, B.C. 


McKay, G. W 


Telegraph office manager. Public 
Works, Prince Rupert, B.C 






Ashcroft, B.C. 


McKenzie, R. E 


District fire ranger. Interior, Riding 
Mountain Reserve 






Forest ranger. 


McKeown, William 


Prison guard, Justice, Dorchester Peni- 
tentiary, N.B 






Postal helper. Post Office, St. 


McLean, Charles 


Caretaker, Public Works, Saskatoon, 
Sask 


John, N.B. 




Cleaner and helper. 


McMaster, A 


Mail porter. Post Office, Toronto, Ont. 
Special exciseman, grade 3, Customs 

and Excise, St. Hyacinthe, P.Q 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, 

Ottawa, Ont 




McNally, Edward 




McNulty, J 


Montreal, P.Q. 




Toronto District, Ont. 


McPherson, Murdo 


Mail porter. Post Office, Calgary, 
Alta 






Postal helper, Vancouver, B.C. 


Middlemiss, Fred. H 


District examiner of postal service. 
Post Office, Vancouver, B.C 






Principal postal clerk. 



92 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 5 — Transfers approved by the Commission under Section 45 
(a) of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Name 



From 



To 



Miller, A. H 

Miller, G. G 

Mitchell, A. R 

Mitchell, J. A 

Moodie, D 

Moore, W. P 

Moquin, E. C 

Morris, R. M 

Mousseau, E. S 

Moxon, A. W. R 

Muddiman, A. B 

Napolitano, Frank. . . 

Noel, Lionel 

Nicholls, R. L 

Nicholson, R. H 

Nolet, Joseph Harris 
O'Meara, Mrs. L. G. 

Palmer, F. H 

Parker, T. G 

Patterson, F. W 

Patterson, Violet. . . . 

Pearson, A. F 

Perkins, Winnifred. . . 

Peterson, A. O 

Phelan, Thos. A 

Phillips, S. S 

Pouget, Mrs. M 

Poussette, H. R 

Power, Joseph 

Powers, G. E 

Proulx, C 

Quartus, L. S 

Rainboth, B 

Rayne, George 



Collector of customs and excise, grade 
1, Customs and Excise, Highwater, 
P.Q 

Postal clerk, Post Office, Toronto, Ont. 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Montreal, 
P.Q 

Emigration agent, grade 2, Immigra- 
tion and Colonization, Danzig, 
Poland 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Saskatoon, 
Sask 

Clerk-bookkeeper, Post Office, Otta- 
wa, Ont 

Emigration agent, grade 3, Immigra- 
tion and Colonization, Riga, Latvia. 

Postal clerk. Post Office, St. John, 

N.B 

Clerk, grade 2, Interior, Ottawa 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, 

Ottawa, Ont 

Trade commissioner, grade 1, Trade 

and Commerce, Singapore, S.S 

Letter carrier. Post Office, Toronto, 

Ont 

Junior clerk. National Defence, Ottawa, 

Ont 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, To- 
ronto, Ont 

Inspector of marine signals. Marine and 
Fisheries, Prince Rupert, B.C 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Ottawa, Ont. 

Junior clerk (supernumerary). National 
Defence, Ottawa, Ont 

Trade commissioner, grade 1, Trade 
and Commerce, Rotterdam, Holland 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Saskatoon, 
Sask 

Head clerk. Agriculture, Ottawa, Ont. 

Stenographer, grade 2, Interior, Winni- 
peg, Man 

Railway mail clerk. Post Office, St 
John, N.B 

Stenographer, grade 2, Office of Dist- 
rict Superintendent of Dredges, Pub- 
lic Works, Vancouver, B.C 

Emigration agent, grade 2, Immigra- 
tion and Colonization, Antwerp, 
Belgium 

Clerk-typist, Printing and Stationery, 
Ottawa, Ont 

Fruit and vegetable inspector (season- 
al), Agriculture, Vancouver, B.C. . . . 

Supernumerary junior clexk, Post 
Office, Ottawa, Ont 

Trade commissioner, grade 3, Trade 
and Commerce, Trinidad, B.W.I. . . . 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Niagara 
Falls, Ont 

Railway mail clerk, Post Office, To- 
ronto District, Ont 

Railway mail clerk, Post Office, 
Montreal District, P.Q 

Customs excise examiner. Customs and 
and Excise, Niagara Falls, Ont 

Messenger-clerk, National Defence, 
Ottawa, Ont 

Postal helper. Post Office, Vancouver, 
B.C 



Sutton, P.Q. 
Edmonton, Alta. 

Mail porter. 



Antwerp, Belgium. 

Vancouver, B.C. 

Auditor General's Office. 

Immigration agent, grade 4, Mont- 
real, P.Q. 

Nigara Falls, Ont. 
Agriculture. 

Montreal, P.Q. 

Rotterdam, Holland. 

Mail porter. 

Junior account clerk. Royal Cana- 
dian Mounted Police. 

London, Ont. 

Victoria, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q. 

Junior statistical clerk. Labour. 

Milan, Italy. 

Prince Albert, Sask. 
Senior clerk. 

Edmonton, Alta. 

Postal clerk. 



Office of the District Engineer, 
New Westminster, B.C. 



Riga, Russia. 

Account clerk. 

Grand Forks, B.C. 

Junior clerk. 

Calcutta, India. 

St. John, N.B. 

Postal clerk. North Bay, Ont. 

Quebec District, P.Q. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Clerk, grade 1. 

Calgary, Alta. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



93 



Table No. 5 — Transfers approved by the Commission under Section 45 
(a) of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Continued 



Name 


From 


To 


Reid, Percy B 


Chief Controller of Chinese Immigra- 
tion and Division Commissioner of 
Immigration (Pacific), Immigration 
and Colonization, Vancouver, B.C. . . 

Principal postal clerk. Post Office, 
Saskatoon, Sask 




Reilly, T. J 


Gold Commissioner, Interior, 
Dawson, Y.T. 




Edmonton, Alta. 


Richardson, A. S 


Senior clerk, Soldiers' Civil Re-estab- 
lishment, Ottawa, Ont 






Auditor General's Office. 


Richardson, G. W 


Deputy grain inspector, Trade and 
Conimercc, Fort William, Ont 

Clerk-stenographer, Civil Service 
Commission, Ottawa, Ont 




Rivest, Alice 


Vancouver, B.C. 




Dominion Lands Branch, Interior. 


Robbins, J. W 


Railway mail clerk. Post Office, To- 
ronto, Ont 






London, Ont. 


Robertson, Jean 


Stenographer, grade 2, Trade and Com- 
merce, Ottawa, Ont 






Immigration and Colonization, 


Robillard, T. J. M 


Messenger, Post Office, Ottawa, Ont. . 
Letter carrier. Post Office, Hamilton, 
Ont 


Toronto, Ont. 


Rock, E.J 






Mail porter. 


Rushmere, S. R 


Stenographer, grade 3, Immigration 
and Colonization, Toronto, Ont 

Clerk, grade 4, Auditor General's 
Office, Ottawa, Ont 




Russell, Maud C 


London, England. 




Justice. 


St. George, Miss P 


Office appliance operator, grade 2, Post 
Office, Ottawa, Ont 






Clerk, grade 1. 


Scobie, Kate 


Clerk-typist, Soldiers' Civil Re-estab- 
lishment, Ottawa, Ont 






Clerk-stenographer, Public 


Shaefer, E. H 


Telegraph operator, Telegraph Service, 
Public Works, Big Salmon 


Archives. 




Hootalinqua, Y.T. 


Sheane, T. W 


Postal clerk. Post Office, London, Ont. 


Toronto Ont 


Shillington K G 




Simard, J. W. A 


eries, Kelly's Pond Hatchery, P.E.I. 
Customs excise enforcement officer. 
Customs and Excise, Armstrong, 
P.Q 


St. John Hatchery, N.B. 




Sub-collector of customs and ex- 


Sinclair, E. G 


Postal clerk. Post Office, Lethbridge, 

Alta 


cise, limited service. 




Letter carrier. 


Sinclair, Walter E 


Letter carrier. Post Office, Medicine 
Hat, Alta 






Mail porter. 


Slinn, Miss D. E 


Typist, grade 2, Mines, Ottawa, Ont. . 
Post office inspector, Post Office, Cal- 
gary, Alta 


Clerk, grade 1. 

Postmaster, grade 8 office, Edmon- 


Smith, Fred. Howard 


Smith, H. J 


Postal clerk, Post Office, Saskatoon, 
Sask 


ton, Alta. 






Smith, Percy R 


Railway mail clerk, Post Office, Lon- 
don, Ont 






Postal clerk, Windsor, Ont. 


Spiller, F. A 


Railway mail clerk. Post Office, Moose 
Jaw, Sask 






Postal clerk. 


Spittle, Samuel 


Fireman, Public Works, Edmonton, 
Alta 






Cleaner and helper. 


Stafford, John 


Customs excise examiner. Customs and 
Excise, Coutts, Alta 




Sub-collector of customs and ex- 


Stokes, Percy H 


Postal clerk. Post Office, Winnipeg, 
Man 


cise, grade 1 outport, Pinhom, 
Alta. 




Customs excise examiner, Cus- 


Strong, Harold W 


Stenographer, grade 2, Marine and 
Fisheries, New Westminster, B.C. . . 

Assistant Superintendent of Emigra- 
tion for Canada, Immigration and 
Colonization, London, England 

Hatchery assistant. Marine and Fish- 
eries, St. John Hatchery, N.B. 


toms and Excise. 


Sullivan W. H 


Vancouver, B.C. 


Tait, Allison 


Immigration agent, grade 3, Ellis 
Island, N.Y. 




Kelly's Pond Hatchery, P.E.I. 



04 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



Table No. 5 — Transfers approved by the Commission under Section 45 
(a) of the Civil Service Act 1918 as amended — Concluded 



Name 



From 



To 



Teevens, E. M 

Tessier, J. N 

Thorpe, Cecil M 

Vechsler, Harry 

Walterhouse, A. E 

Ward, John 

Warner, Aria B 

Watson, H. N 

Watson, Wm. George. 

West, Maud 

Whalley, William 

Wilkinson, Thomas G 
Withrow, James 

Woodill, Miss P 

Woollard, W. J 



Stenographer, grade 2, Interior, Cal- 
gary, Alta 

Senior postal clerk. Post Office, Cal- 
gary, Alta 

Postal clerk, Post Office, Saskatoon, 
Sask 

Senior postal clerk, Post Office, Mont- 
real, P.Q 

Railway mail clerk, Post Office, Lon 
don, Ont 

Telegraph operator. Public Works, 
Hootalinqua, Y.T 

Junior clerk-stenographer. Civil Ser 
vice Commission, Ottawa, Ont 

Railway mail clerk, Post Office, Lon- 
don, Ont 

Postal clerk. Post Office, Vancouver, 
B.C 



Clerk-typist, Civil Service Commis- 
sion, Ottawa, Ont 

Customs excise clerk. Customs and 
Excise, Victoria, B.C 



Messenger, Public Works, Ottawa, Ont. 
Telegraph agent-operator, Public 
Works, Second Cabin, B.C 



Office appliance operator, Post Office, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Customs excise examiner. Customs and 

Excise, Toronto, Ont 



Labour, Vancouver, B.C. 

Edmonton, Alta. 

Letter carrier. 

Postal clerk. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Stewart River, Y.T. 

Marine and Fisheries. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Customs excise examiner. Customs 
and Excise. 

Clerk-stenographer, Public Works. 

Sub-collector of customs and ex- 
cise, grade 1 outport, Bamfield, 
B.C. 

Clerk, grade 1. 

Operator-lineman, Bobtail lake, 
B.C. 

Clerk, grade 1. 

Customs excise clerk. 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



FOR 



EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31 
1925 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1926 



A<^ 



AT.T 



lAHC 



axAxa 'iic 



aSTTA-^'I/. 



'^sppv'vrt-v^ 



AV:.V-^v^i 



I. .ay 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Vimy, O.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governoi' General and Commander in Chief of the 
Dominion of Canada. 



My Lord: 

I have the honour to lay before Your Excellency the annual report of the 
Department of External Affairs for the year 1924-25. 

I have the honour to be, my Lord, 

Your Excellency's obedient servaijt, 

W. L. MACKENZIE KING, 

Secretary of State for External Affairs. 

Ottawa, December 18, 1925. 



10915—2 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Consuls in Canada, Alphabetical List of Foreign 10 

Countries haying Consular Representation in Canada, Alphabetical List of 15 
Under-Secretary of State for External Affairs, Report of 5 



THE REPORT OF THE UNDER-SECRETARY OF STATE 
FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

The Right Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King, C.M.G., M.P., 

Secretary of State for External Affairs, 
Ottawa. 

SiR^ — I have the honour to submit the customary annual review of tha 
more important matters which have engaged the attention of the department 
during the past year. 

In the first place reference might be made to the following agreements, the 
negotiations for which were carried on directly by the Canadian Government: — 

Commercial Treaty with the Netherlands. — This Convention was signed 
at Ottaw^a on July 11, 1924, by the Hon. J. A. Robb and the Hon. T. A. Low, 
as Canadian plenipotentiaries, and by Mr. Th. de Meester, Consul-General of 
the Netherlands at Montreal, as the plenipotentiary of the Netherlands. Hav- 
ing been approved by the Canadian Parliament and the States General of the 
Netherlands, it was duly ratified and the ratifications exchanged at Ottawa on 
October 28, 1925. 

Universal Postal Convention. — The Universal Postal Convention, as revised 
and adopted at the International Postal Conference held at Stockholm in July 
and August, 1924, Canada being represented by Messrs. P. T. Coolican, W. J. 
Glover, Arthur Webster and Henri Fortier, was signed by the various plenipo- 
tentiaries on August 28, 1924, and ratified by Canada in November, 1924, com- 
ing into operation on October 1, 1925. 

Trade Agreement with Australia. — A Trade Agreement with Australia was 
approved by an Act of the Canadian Parliament 15-16 George V, chapter 30, 
and in accordance with the provisions of that Act, a Proclamation was issued 
October 1, 1925, extending the sanctioned tariff concessions to Australian pro- 
ducts. 

IREATIES WITH THE UNITED STATES 

Suppression oj Smuggling and Prevention of Narcotic Ojjences. — ^A Con- 
vention for the purpose of suppressing smuggling operations along the inter- 
national boundary, and preventing the violation of the laws regarding narcotics 
was signed at Wasliington on June 6, 1924, and ratifications exchanged at the 
same place on July 17, 1925. 

Extradition Treaty Narcotic Offences. — A Supplementary Convention to 
provide for extradition on account of crimes against the laws for the suppression 
of traffic in narcotics was signed at Washington on January 8, 1925, and rati- 
fications were exchanged on July 17, 1925. 

Lake of the Woods Levels. — On February 24, 1925, a Convention between 
Canada and the United States was signed at Washington providing for the 
regulation of the levels of the Lake of the Woods, ratifications being duly 
exchanged at Washington on July 17, 1925. 

International Boundary Demarcation. — ^At Washington on the same day 
a Treaty was signed to define more accurately the international boundary 
between the two countries, and ratifications were exchanged at Washington on 
July 17, 1925. 

5 

10995—24 



6 DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

Of treaties in which Canada shared in the negotiations with other parts 
of the Empire might be mentioned: 

The Protocol embodying an Amendment to Article 16 of the Covenant of 
the League of Nations, adopted by the Fifth General Assembly, which was 
signed on behalf of Canada at Geneva by Senator Dandurand in September. 

Tlie Protocol for the Pacific Settlement of International Disputes, framed 
at the Fifth Assembly of the League of Nations and recommended by the 
League to the acceptance of its members, to which Canada, finding it unac- 
ceptable, declined to adhere. Having failed to meet general approval, it remains 
inoperative. 

Washington Conference Treaties. — Ratifications of the Treaty between the 
British Empire, United States, Belgium, China, France, Italy, etc., signed 
February 6, 1922, regarding principles and policies to be followed in matters 
concerning China, as well as of the Treaty, signed by the same Powers on the 
same date, relating to the Chinese Customs Tariff, were duly deposited at 
Washington on August 5, 1925. 

Aerial Navigation Convention, 1919. — The King's ratification of the Proto- 
col of June 30, 1923, effecting amendments in Article XXXIV of this Conven- 
tion, was deposited at Paris on November 20, 1924. 

Agreement respecting the treatment of Venereal Diseases. — Canada's 
adhesion to the International Agreement respecting the treatment of Venereal 
Diseases ainongst Seamen, framed by the International Office of Public Health, 
was notified to the Government of Belgium on August 21, 1925. 

GENEKAL ARBITRATION CONVENTIONS WITH THE NETHERLANDS, NORWAY, 

PORTUGAL AND SWEDEN 

With Canada's concurrence, the general Arbitration Convention with the 
Netherlands of February 15, 1905, was by an Exchange of Notes at London 
on July 12, 1925, extended for a further period of five years from that date. 
The similar Convention with Portugal was similarly extended for two years 
from November 16, 1924, by an exchange of notes at London on August 29, 
1925; the Arbitration Convention with Norway of August 11, 1904, was renewed 
for five years from November 9, 1924, and that with Sweden for a like period 
from the same date. 

Of other treaties in the negotiation of which Canada did not take part, 
by which she is not bound, but in which she has an interest are: 

The Anglo-Finnish Commercial Treaty. — ^This Treatj^, concluded at Helsing- 
fors on December 14, 1923, is not generally applicable to Canada, but its 23rd 
Article provides for the extension to the products of the Dominions not parties 
to it of the same treatment as that accorded to products of the United Kingdom, 
so long as such Dominions accord to Finnish products treatment as favourable 
as that accorded to the products of any other foreign country. The Act passed 
in the session of 1925 to ensure to the products of Finland most-favoured-nation- 
treatment in Canada, was brought into operation by Order in Council in 
accordance with mutual arrangement on August 1, 1925, so that the Treaty 
benefits should accrue to Canadian goods from that date. 

The Convention signed at Paris, May 8, 1924, between the Principal Allied 
and Associated Powers and Lithuania, providing for the transfer to the last 
named Power of the Memel Territories surrendered by Germany, final ratifica- 
tions of which were deposited at Paris, August 25, 1925. 

Treaty of Commerce and Navigation with Austria. — This Treaty was signed 
at London on May 22, 1924, and ratifications were exchanged at London on 
February 11, 1925. Its stipulations generally are not applicable to Canada, but 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 7 

Canadian products and manufactures are to enjoy in Austria complete and 
unconditional most-favoured-nation-treatment so long as Austrian products and 
manufactures are accorded similar treatment in Canada, 

Tlie Protocol signed at Paris on November 22, 1924, by the six Powers 
(including Great Britain) represented on the Reparations Commission, to 
amend paragraph 13 of Annex II to Part VIII, of the Treaty of Versailles, June 
28, 1919, providing for arbitration of differences arising between the delegates 
on the commission in regard to the interpretation of that part of the Treaty. 

Agreement regarding East Greenland. — An exchange of notes was effected 
with Denmark, April 23-June 4, 1925, by which that Power undertook to 
accord to British subjects, companies and vessels in East Greenland most- 
favoured-nation-treatment in every respect, mention being made particularly 
of access to the coast and adjoining territorial waters; hunting and fishing, right 
to occupy sites in virtue of usage and the right of establishing stations and 
installations for scientific and humanitarian purposes. 

CONFERENCES 

League of Nations. — The Fifth General Assembly of the League of Nations 
met at Geneva on September 1, 1924; the Canadian delegates were the Hon. 
Raoul Dandurand and the Hon. E. M. Macdonald. 

Tlie Draft Treaty of Mutual Assistance, framed by the Fourth Assembly 
with the object of promoting International Security in Europe, not having 
proved generally acceptable to the Members, fresh proposals resulted in the 
adoption of a Protocol for the Pacific Settlement of International Disputes. 
This Protocol, which was to be ratified by the different Powers, provided for 
the assembling of an International Conference for the Reduction of Arma- 
ments at Geneva on June 15, 1925, subject however to the possibility of cancel- 
lation if a certain number of ratifications had not been deposited by May 1. 

An Amendment to paragraph one of Article 16 of the Covenant, relating 
to the enforcement of the sanction of economic blockade, was adopted, so that 
the prohibition to trade should be applicable to " residents " in the territories 
of the Powers concerned, application to their " nationals " being left optional. 
Consideration of a proposed amendment to paragraph two of the same Article 
was postponed to the next Assemlbly. 

Resolutions were also adopted regarding, among other matters, inter- 
national arrangements for legal assistance to the poor, the appointment of a 
Committee of Experts to consider regulation by international agreement of 
certain matters of international law, the offer of the French Government to 
establish at Paris an International Institute for the furtherance of Intellectual 
Co-operation; the offer of the Italian Government to est-ablish at Rome an Insti- 
tution for the unification or the simplification and co-ordination of private law; 
the circulation of a draft convention for the control of traffic in arms and muni- 
tions. The Republic of Santo Domingo having applied for admission was duly 
accepted as a member of the League. 

It might be pertinent here to refer to the decision of the Government, with 
the object of removing disadvantages arising from Canada's distance from the 
headquarters of the League of Nations, to create the position of Advisorj^ Officer 
for League of Nations purposes, and the appointment to this office on January 1, 
1925, of Mr. W. A. Ridddl, Ph.D., who was duly accredited to the League 
authorities. 

International Labour Conference. — The Sixth Session of the International 
Labour Conference was held at Geneva from June 16 to July 5, 1924. The 
Canadian Government was represented by Mr. F. A. Acland, King's Printer, 



% DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

and Mrs. Charles H. Tliorburn, Vice-President of the National Council of 
Women. Mr. Melville P. White, of the Canadian General Electric Company, 
Limited, of Toronto, represented the employers of Canada, and Mr. Tom Moore, 
President of the Trades and Labour Conference of Canada, the workers of the 
Dominion. 

The conference adopted, to be submitted to the members of the International 
Labour Organization for consideration with a view to their being made effective, 
recommendations in regard to the preservation of spare time: the promotion of 
health measures; the matter of housing conditions; institutes for the utilization 
of spare time; the free use of such institutes and the co-ordination of local action 
in regard thereto. 

The Second Opium Conference. — This conference M^as convened at Geneva 
by the Council of the League of Nations on November 17, 1924, with the 
object of arranging an agreement for limiting the traffic in opium and other 
dangerous drugs. The delegates appointed to represent Canada were in the first 
place the Hon. H. S. Beland, Minister of Health, and Dr. J. A. Amyot, Deputy 
Minister of Health, but it having become necessary to adjourn the conference, 
Dr. W. A. Riddell, the Canadian Advisory Officer, League of Nations, was 
appointed to replace them at the subsequent meetings. 

The conference adopted a Convention relating to dangerous drugs, also a 
Protoeol, both of which were signed on Canada's behalf in September, 1925. 

Arms Traffic Conference. — On the invitation of the League of Nations, an 
International Conference was assembled at Geneva on May 24, 1925, to consider 
the draft convention relating to the control of international trade in arms, 
munitions and implements of war, drawn up by the Temporary Mixed Com- 
mission. Canada took part in this conference at which she was represented by 
Dr. W. A. Riddell. The conference adopted the Convention, together with a 
declaration regarding the territory of Ifni, a Protocol prohibiting the use of 
gases and bacteriological methods of warfare, a Protocol of Signature and a 
Final Act. Of these documents, the Protocol regarding the use of gases and 
bacteriological methods of warfare was the only one signed by the Canadian 
delegate at the conference, though arrangements were afterwards made for the 
signature of the other documents on Canada's behalf by Senator Dandurand 
when at Geneva as delegate to the Sixth General Assembly of the League of 
Nations. 

International Congress of Agriculture. — The Twelfth International Congress 
of Agriculture was held at Warsaw in June, 1925, and on the invitation of the 
Polish Government, Dr. Riddell was delgated to represent Canada at the 
Congress. 

Canada-West Indies Conference. — In December, 1924, a delegation headed 
by Mr. Hance J. Logan, M.P., was despatched to visit the various British-West 
Indian colonies, Bermuda and British Guiana, with the object of inquiring into 
the means of improving trade relations with the Dominion, and of conveying an 
invitation to attend a conference at Ottawa. The conference was duly assembled 
on June 19, 1925, delegates in addition to the Canadian representatives and 
representatives of the British Government being present from Bahamas, Barba- 
dos, Bermuda, British Guiana, British Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward Islands, 
Trinidad and Windward Islands. An agreement was concluded and signed on 
July 6, 1925, containing articles providing for special tariff treatment of West 
Indian products imported into Canada, and of Canadian products imported into 
the West Indian colonies concerned, and also for the establishment of two subsi- 
dized steamship services between Canada and the eastern and western groups 
respectively of those colonies. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS d 

The business of the Passport Office for the year shows no falling off, some 
26,000 new passports having been issued, and over 6,000 renewals granted, the 
accruing revenue being over $142,000. Modifications have been made in the 
procedure in making applications for passports which it is believed will facilitate 
their issue, and conduce to the convenience of those applying for them. 

It would not seem fitting to omit reference to the resignation at the end of 
the fiscal year of Sir Joseph Pope, who has efficiently filled the office of Under- 
Secretary of State for External Affairs since the establishment of the department 
in 1909, and who thus brought to a conclusion a long and distinguished career 
in the public service of almost half a century. 

I am glad to express my appreciation of the diligent and efficient manner in 
which the members of the staff have discharged their various duties. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

0. D. SKELTON, 

Under-Secretary of State for External Affairs. 



Ottawa, December 18, 1925. 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



APPENDIX A 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents in the Dominion, according to the latest information 
supplied to the Department of External Affairs. 



Name 


Designation 


Country 


Residence 


When 
pointed 


Alexander, K 


Vice-Consul 


United States 


Riviere du Loup 

St. John, N.B 


1923 


Allison, M. A 


Consul 


Portugal 


1903 


Allman, H. F 




United States 


Ottawa, Ont 


1925 


Anderson, P. M 


Vice-Consul 


Belgium 


Regina, Sask 


1924 


Andrews, G. B 


Vice-Consul 


United States 


Montreal, P.Q 

Sydney, N.S 


1924 


Angwin, J. G 


Vice-Consul 


Sweden 


1906 


Antonisen, J 


Vice-Consul 


Norway 


Port Arthur, Ont 

Fernie, B.C 


1922 


Appleyard, G. S 




United States 


1924 


Armstrong, W. W 


Consul 


Siam 


Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, P.Q 


1924 


Aubert, L.C.M 


Consul General 


Norway 


1917 


Barattieri, di San Pie- 
tro, Count G 


Consular Agent 


Italy 


Winnipeg, Man 

Bridgewater, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 


1910 


Barnaby, A. C 


Consular Agent 


United States..... 


1920 


Barranco , C . A 


Consul 


Venezue la 


1923 


Barranco y Fernandez 
C.A 


Consul 


Cuba 


Toronto, Ont 


1918 


Barron, L. M. . 


Consul General . . 


Mexico 


Toronto, Ont 


1925 


Barry, J. R 


Vice-Consul 


United States 


Montreal, P.iQ 

Toronto, Ont 


1919 


Beaton, W.J 


Acting Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 


Sweden 


1924 


Beebe, H. S 


United States 


Beebe Jet., P.Q 

Winnipeg, Man 

Vancouver, B.C 

Windsor, Ont 


1909 


Bell, C. N 


Consul 


Guatemala 


1896 


Belovsky, S. A 


Vice-Consul 


United States 


1924 


Benedict, J. S 


Consul 


United States 


1923 


Bernard, F. W 


Vice-Consul 


Argentine Republic 

Norway 


Vancouver, B.C 

Regina, Sask 


1925 


Beyer, B. E 


Vice-Consul 


1923 


Bjorke, C.J 


Vice-Consul 


Norway 


Vancouver, B.C 

Halifax, N. S 


1920 


Black, W. A 


Consul 


Panama 


1910 


Blair, F. N 


Acting Vice-Consul 

Consul 


Portugal 


Rimouski, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 


1913 


Blohm, L. R 


United States 


1925 


Boggild, J. E 


Consul General 


Denmark 


1924 


Bohne, F. A 


Vice-Consul 


United States 


1922 


Bonardelli, E 


Consul General for 
Ontario . 


Italy 


Ottawa, Ont 






1924 


Bonet y Leon, P. A.. . . 


Consul General 


Cuba 


Halifax, N.S 


1924 


Bouillon, E. A. A . ... 


Vice-Consul . 


Brazil 


Paspebiac, Que 

Winnipeg, Man 

Port Hawkesbury, 
N.S 


1918 


Bourgouin, J. H 


Consular Agent 


France 


1916 


Bourinot, J. J 


Consular Agent 


United States 






Consul 


United States 


1923 


Boyce, R. F 


Hamilton, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Niagara Falls, Ont — 
Fernie, B.C 


1924 


Braga, A. R 


Consul 


Brazil 


1924 


Braida, P 


Acting Consular Agent 

Consul 


Italy 


1923 


Brand, N. F 


United States 


1918 


Branson, C. L. H 


Vice-Consul 


Argentine Republic... 
Bolivia 


Victoria, B.C 


1923 


Branson, C. L. H 


Hon. Consul 


Victoria, B.C 


1923 


Branson, C. L. H.. . 


Hon. Consul 


Mexico 


Victoria, B.C 


1923 


Brist, G. L 


Vice-Consul 


United States 

United States 


St. Stephen, N.B 

Halifax, N.S 


1925 


Brown, W. H 


Vice-Consul 


1923 


Brunswick, W. W 


Consul .*. . . 


United States 


Niagara Falls, Ont.. . . 
Victoria, B.C 


1924 


Bucklin, G. A 


Consul 


United States 


1924 


Burdon, H. E 


Consular Agent 


United States 


Ocean Falls, B.C 

Quebec and St. John, 
N.B 


1920 


Cable, D.J 


Hon. Vice-Consul 


Finland 






Consul 


Cuba 


1924 


Campbell, G. D 


Weymouth, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 
St. John, N.B 


1913 


Campbell, M. M 


Consul 


Monaco 


1925 


Carlson, H. W 


Vice-Consul 


United States 


1924 


Carter, E. H 


Vice-Consul 


United States 


1919 


Carter, K.J 




United States 


Gaspe, P.Q 


1922 


Carosella, L 


Acting Consular Agent 


Italy 


Fernie, B.C 


1917 


Cattin, Paul 


Switzerland 


Winnipeg, Man 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 
St. Stephen, N.B 


1923 


Chapman, W. E 


Consul 


United States 


1925 


Chilton, T.W 


Consul 


United States 


1924 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



11 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued 



Name 



Designation 



Country 



Residence 



When 
Ap- 
pointed 



Chow Kuo-Hsien 

Ciceri, G.B 

Cicvarek, V 

Clarholm.M 

Clark, J. W 

Clinton, G.W 

CoUart, T 

CoUis, E.J 

Corriveau, J. E 

Cox, H 

Cram, P. H 

Creaghan, D. S 

Creaghan, D. S 

Creaghan, J. A 

Cress6, L. G. A.. K.C 

Critch, D. W. H 

Crosby, G.E.J 

Culver, H. S 

Cummings, E. A 

Daoust, J 

Davis, C 

Davis, R. N 

Davison, J. M 

deAngelis, G 

deBurlet, H 

Defries, R. L 

De Jardin, A 

DeLamater, H. I 

de Lima, F. J 

deMeester, Th. H 

Deming, J. F 

Dennison, E. H 

de Roussy de Sales, F 

D^ry, A 

deSt. Victor, R 

de Vitrolles, Baron R. 

Dick, H. H 

Dickie, F. W 

Donaldson, D 

Duggan, F. M 

Dupont, R 

Dybhavn, John 

Eakin, W. R 

Eakins, A. W 

Edgett, O. B 

Edwards, M. B 

Emanuels, S. J 

Erhardt, J. G 

Espaillat de la Mota, 

F 

Fetherstonhaugh , F . 

B 

Finley, J. G 

Firth, T. A 

Fisher, N. R 

Fitts, H. L 

Fletcher, C.P 

Forsyth, L. A 

Foster, J. G 

Francis, A. E 

Franke, F 

Futcher, F. A 

Gaboury, E 

Garrety, W. P 

Gerbore, P 

Gintzburger, S 

Godin, E 

Goosse, M 

Gordon, J. A 

Gotlieb, B 



Consul General. . . 
Consular Agent. . . 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. . . 
Consular Agent . . . 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . . . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . . . 
Honorary Consul.. 
Hon. Vice-Consul. 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . . . 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 



Consul 

Consul General. 

Vice Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent . 

Consul 

Consular Agent. 
Consul General. 

Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 



Consul General. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Hon. Consul. . . . 
Consul General. 

Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . 

(^'onsul 

Vice-Consul . . . . 

Consul 

Hon. Consul . . . . 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 



China 

Italy 

Czecho-Slovakia.. . . 

Sweden 

United States 

United States 

Belgium 

United States 

Argentine Republic. 

United States 

United States 

Sweden 

Sweden 

United States 

Guatemala 

Spain 

United States 

United States 

United States 

Hayti 

Peru 

United States 

Sweden 

Italy 

Belgium 

Honduras 

Belgium 

United States 



Chile 

Netherlands.. . 
United States. 
United States. 

France 

Nicaragua 

France , 

France 

United States. 

Hayti 

United States. 

Sweden 

Belgium 

Norway 

Uruguay 

Cuba 

United States. 

Sweden 

Brazil 

United States. 



Dominican Republic. 

Argentine Republic... 

United States 

Sweden 

Peru 



United States 

United States 

Mexico 

United States 

Latvia 

Austria 

Norway 

France 

United States 

Italy 

Switzerland 

Mexico 

Belgium 

Argentine Republic. 
United States 



Ottawa, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Cumberland, B.C 

Prince Rupert, B.C.. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont 

Quebec, P.Q 

Edmonton, Alta 

Regina, Sask 

Chatham, N.B 

Newcastle, N.B 

Newcastle, N.B 

Montreal, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Charlottetown, P.E.I 

St. John, N.B 

Moncton, N.B 

Montreal, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Halifax, N.S 

Edmonton, Alta 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 

Fort William and Port 

Arthur, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Calgary, Alta 

Quebec, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Sydney, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Hamilton, Ont 

Quebec, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . 

Montreal, P.Q 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Lethbridge, Alta 

St. John, N.B 

Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 



Montreal, P.Q. 



Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q.. 
Dawson, Y.T... 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Calgary, Alta — 

Toronto, Ont 

Halifax. N.S 

Ottawa, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q. . 
Montreal, P.Q.. 
Victoria, B.C.... 

Halifax, N.S 

Prescott, Ont. . . , 
Montreal, P.Q . . 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q . . 

Ottawa, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q. . , 
Halifax, N.S 



192.5 
1923 
1922 
1921 
1924 
1918 
1919 
1918 
1924 
1915 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1913 
1923 
1922 
1910 
1916 
1925 
1924 
1922 
1906 
1920 
1922 
1913 
1922 

1920 
1924 
1923 
1925 
1919 
1923 
1923 
1913 
1924 
1924 
1925 
1921 
1910 
1920 
1918 
1924 
1907 
1919 
1913 
1915 
1924 

1925 

1923 
1925 
1920 
1925 
1922 
1924 
1923 
1903 
1925 
1924 
1907 
1916 
1925 
1925 
1913 
1923 
1923 
1908 
1924 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued 



Name 



Designation 



Country 



Residence 



When 
Ap- 
pointed 



Grassi, G 

Guerin, T.J 

Guerrero, A. G 

Gunn, J. A 

Gunsaulus, E. N., Jr.. . 

Hackett, W 

Hackett, W 

Halstead, A 

Hanrahan, E. C 

Hanson, O 

Harris, E. L 

Harrison, W. H 

Hawley, H. F 

Haydin, A 

Hechler, Henry 

Heintzleman, P. S 

Hendricks, P. M 

Herbert, E. E 

Hickerson, J. D 

Hill, J. M 

Hosmer, C. B 

HoTsan 

Hoyt, E. M 

Hugill, John W 

Hugill, JohnW 

Huot, A 

Hurtado, E 

Hutchinson, G. A 

Inches, Cyrus F 

Izaquirre, L 

Jackson, W. I 

Jean, S. M 

Jenvrin, P. G 

Johnson, A. C 

Johnson, F. C 

Johnson, J. O 

Johnson, J. P 

Johnson, L. H 

Johnston, F. S. S 

Jones, A. N 

Jones, A. N 

Jones, W. G 

Kelly, M. A 

Kempff, L 

Kerman, W. S 

King, John 

Klein, D. V 

Knight, J. T 

Korte, E. J 

Kveton, P 

Labbie, A. P 

Lacroix, Ed 

Ladner, L 

Lane, C. W 

Lapierre, L 

La Richeli^re, E. W... 

LeBoutillier, C. S 

LeBoutillier, C. S 

Ledingham, W. D 

Le Feuvre, E 

LeGros, P. E 

Le Quesne, J. C 

Levasseur, T 

Leveson, E. J 

Lewis, G. D. D 

Lothrop, A. P 

Mack, J. M 

Maher, D. W 

Margotti, G. M. P 



Consular Agent 

Hon. Consul 

Honorary Consul , 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul , 

Consul General , 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consul General 

Consul 

Consul General 

Actg. Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Acting Consular Agent 

Hon. Consul 

Consular Agent 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Vice-Con.sul 

Hon. Consul 

Honorary Vice-Consul. 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 



Italy 

Greece 

Chile 

Hayti 

United States 

Norway 

Portugal 

United States 

Belgium 

Sweden 

United States 

France 

United States 

Hungary 

Liberia 

United States 

Norway 

United States 

United States 

United States 

United States 

China 

United States 

Netherlands 

Sweden 

Italy 

Venezuela 

Sweden 

Uruguay 

Mexico 

United States 

France 

France 

Denmark 

United States 

Sweden 

Sweden 

United States 

United States 

Argentine Republic 

Belgium 

Spain 

Norway 

Germany 

Brazil 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Denmark 

Finland 

Czecho-SIovakia. . . 

United States 

France 

Belgium 

United States 

Brazil 

United States 

Brazil 

Portugal 

Italy 

Panama 

Brazil 

Portugal 

Brazil 

Salvador 

Norway 

United States 

United States 

United States 

Italy 



Sault Ste. Marie, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Charlottetown, P.E.I 

North Sydney, N.S.. 
North Sydney, N.S... 

Montreal, P.Q 

Sydney, N.S 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . . 

Vancouver, B.C 

St. John, N.B 

Windsor, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Halifax, N.S 

Winnipeg, Man 

Outlook, Sask 

Regina, Sask 

Ottawa, Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . . 

Sherbrooke, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Ottawa, Ont 

Calgary, Alta 

Calgary, Alta 

Quebec, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Richibucto, N.B 

St. John, N.B 

Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, P.Q 

Regina, Sask 

Edmonton, Alta 

Winnipeg, Man 

Fredericton, N.B 

Port Arthur and Fort 

William, Ont 

Wetaskiwin, Alta 

Winnipeg, Man 

Kingston, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Campbellton, N.B... 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Fort William, Ont.... 

Toronto, Ont 

St. John, N.B 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

St. Leonards, N.B. . . 
North Sydney, N.S.. 

Vancouver, B.C 

Lunenburg, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Gaspe, P.Q 

Gaspe Basin, P.Q 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Gaspe, P.Q... 

Paspebiac, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Louisburg, N.S 

Kingston, Ont 

Liverpool, N.S 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . 
Montreal, P.Q 



1914 
1923 
1921 
1925 
1924 

1910 
1910 
1920 
1921 
1920 
1925 
1924 
1924 
1925 
190.3 
1925 
1917 
1922 
1925 
1920 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1923 
1925 
1921 
1924 
1911 
1920 
1925 
1923 
1922 
1920 
1924 
1921 

1921 
1920 
1925 
1910 
1923 
1921 
1894 
1916 
1921 
1916 
1922 
1925 
1925 
1920 
1925 
1915 
1909 
1920 
1924 
1920 
1924 
1876 
1895 
1919 
1925 
1918 
1898 
1902 
1925 
1921 
1922 
1895 
1925 
1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



13 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued 



Name 



Designation 



Country 



Residence 



When 
Ap- 
pointed 



Margueirat, J. C 

Marino, E 

Martel, A. A 

Martin, A. C 

Martin, H 

Masi, N 

Masi, N 

Mason, T.J 

Mathers, H. I 

Mathers, H. I 

Matsunaga, N 

Mersereau, CM 

Midence, A. C 

Miles, Henry 

Miller, H. C 

Mills, F. W 

Milner, J. B 

Mitchell, F. N 

Mitchell. W. A 

Mitchell, W.M. P.. . 

Monroe, E. L 

Morang, G. N 

Morissette, J. B 

Moore, R. H 

Morris, H. J 

Morris, M. P 

Morris, M. P 

Mosher, R. B 

Muirhead, D. A 

Mullin, D 

MacDonald, M. W... 

Maclean, J. B 

MacMillan, F 

McAndrews, P. J 

McCunn, J. N 

McLean, H. H 

McLean, H. H. Jr. . . 

McLennan, A. N 

McOsker, J. A 

Nagel, T 

Neale, F. E 

Neale, F. E 

Neville, J 

Newfomb, R. M. . . . 

Nordbye, Dr. F. A.. 

Nordheimer, A 

Owen, J. M 

Oxlev, H 

Pallesen, P 

Payne, C. E. B 

Petrv, W. H 

Pistone, T. D 

Planta, Z. E 

Ponce, Jorge A. Gon- 
zalez 

Ponce, V Martinez, J. R . 

Prescott, J. W 

Printz, C. J. P 

Rader, I 

Rasmusen, Bertil M. 

Rauanheimo, A 

Reat, Samuel G 

Remes, A 

Restaldi, V. V 

Rickstal, J. Van 

Roberts, A 

Robertson, W. H.... 

Rochereau de la Sa- 
bliere, C. E 

Rochereau de la Sa- 
bliere, C. E 



Consul General 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consul General 

Honorary Vice-Consul.. 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-C'onsul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agunt 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

C'onsul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Con.sul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul Ganeral for Ontario 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Consular Agent. . . 
Vice-Consul 



Consul General 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Acting C'onsular Agent. 

Consul 

Consul 

( 'on.sul 

Consul General 

Hon. Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 



Argentine Republic. 

Italy 

United States 

United States 

Belgium 

Italy 

Italy 

Brazil 

Denmark 

Norway 

Japan 

United States 

Honduras 

Paraguay 

Greece 

Brazil 

United States 

United States 

Mexico 

United States 

United States 

Guatemala 

Brazil 

United States 

Colombia 

Panama 

Chile 

United States 

United States 

Belgium 

L^ruguay 

Portugal 

Sweden 

United States 

United States 

Argentine Republic. 

Norway 

Netherlands 

United States 

Netherlands 

Denmark 

Norway 

Uruguay 

United States 

Norway 

Netherlands 

United States 

Portugal 

Denmark 

United States 

Denmark 

Italy 

Norway 



Consul 

Consular Agent . 



Colombia 

Cuba ., 

Brazil »»», 

Norway > ., 

Italy 

United States. 

Finland 

United States. 

Belgium 

Italy 

Belgium , 

Cuba 

United States. 



Ottawa, Ont 

Fort William, Ont.... 

Louisburg, N.S 

Vancouver, B.C 

Edmonton, Alta 

Hamilton, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Ottawa, Ont 

Bathurst, N.B 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont , 

Montreal, P.Q , 

Niagara Falls, Ont.. . 

St. Stephen, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Riviere du Loup, P.Q 

Sherbrooke, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont , 

Quebec, P.Q 

Kenora, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

White Horse, Y.T.... 

St. John, N.B 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Sheet Harbour, N.S.. 

Prescott, Ont 

Yarmouth, N.S 

St. John, N.B 

St. John, N.B 

Sydney, N.S 

Hamilton, Ont 

St. John, N.B 

Chatham, N.B 

Chatham, N.B 

Halifax, N.S 

Victoria, B.C 

Camrose, Alta 

Toronto, Ont 

Annapolis, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Calgary, Alta 

London, Ont 

Quebec, P.Q 

Sydney, N.S 

Nanaimo, B.C 



Montreal, P.Q... 

St. John, N.B 

Vancouver, B.C. . . 

Toronto, Ont 

Calgary, Alta. . . . 
Moncton, N.B. . . . 
Montreal, P.Q... 

Calgary, Alta 

Ottawa, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q.... 

Montreal, P.Q 

Bridgewater, N.S 
Halifax, N.S 



Belgium . 
France. . . 



Toronto, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 



1924 
1912 
1922 
1925 
1917 
1922 
1915 
1918 
1906 
1906 
1923 
1915 
1925 
1924 
1920 
1917 
1916 
1925 
1901 
1924 
1925 
1896 
1918 
1918 
1925 
1906 
1892 
1915 
1921 
1908 
1923 
1922 
1882 
1920 
1920 
1908 
1922 
1921 
1922 
1922 
1918 
1909 
1913 
1914 
1916 
1922 
1872 
1916 
1923 
1921 
1911 
1923 
1907 

1924 
1923 
1918 
1908 
1925 
1918 
1923 
1918 
1925 
1925 
1921 
1925 
1923 

1904 

1908 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, etc. — Concluded 



Name 



Designation 



Country 



Residence 



When 
pointed 



Roderick, F. L 

Ross, T. P 

Rouillard, L 

Routh, F. C 

Royer, J. S 

Saarimaki A 

Sack, Francis M 

Sainz de la Pena, A. F 

Sanford, H. M 

Sanguesa, F. H 

Sanguesa, F. H 

Sauer, E 

Schack, Count E. H... 

Schioler, K 

Scott, A. C 

Seferovitch, A. V 

Seltzer, G. E 

Shantz, H , 

Silver, R. H 

Simard, Geo. A 

Sinclair, N , 

Skarin, E. R. T 

Slater, F. C 

Smith, H.J 

Steckmest, S , 

Spencer, W. B 

Stahlschmidt, C.B... 

Stewart, F. S 

Stewart, W.C 

Straszewski, Dr. M.. . 



Suzor, P. M 

Suque y Sucona, A 

Taggart, G. R 

Tanguay, E. G 

Tatsuo, Kawai 

Taylor, T. M 

Teall. G 

Terry, W.S 

T6trault, N 

Tewell, H. S 

Thompson, J. Enoch.. . 

Thompson, W. P 

Thrall, R. A 

•Thurnheer, W 

Tomroos, G. W 

Vance, M. M 

Van Riemsdijk, L.J.F 

Van Houten, A. C 

Van Roggen, M. A 

Viau, Paul 

Villardson, J 

Wakefield, E. A 

Ward, W. A 

Warren, F. K 

Wells, A. D 

Whitman, F. C 

Willson, G. R 

Winch, R. V 

Woodward, G. C 

Wormuth, R 

Yeigh, F 

Young, J. A 

Zuerrer, E. R 



Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Honorary Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul , 

Consul for the Dominion of 
Canada 



Brazil 

Netherlands. . . 

Hayti 

Portugal 

Guatemala 

Finland 

United States. 

Cuba 

United States. 

Peru 

Costa Rica 

United States. 

Denmark 

Denmark 

Norway 



Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Honorary Consul General 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul. 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Consular Agent. . . 

Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General with juris- 
diction over the whole 
of the Dominion of Can- 
ada 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul , 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 



Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Honorary Vice-Consul. 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 



Poland 

France 

Spain 

United States. 

Paraguay 

Japan 

Guatemala 

United States. 

Belgium 

Panama 

United States. 

Spain 

Mexico 

United States. 
Switzerland.... 

Finland , 

United States. 

Netherlands.. . 
United States. 
Netherlands. . . 

Nicaragua 

Norway 

United States. 

Denmark 

Netherlands. . . 
United States. 

Cuba 

United States . 

Sweden 

United States. 
United States. 

Paraguay 

Norway 

Switzerland 



St. John 

Quebec, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q. 

Toronto, Ont 

Niagara Falls, Ont... 

Montreal, P.Q 

Ottawa, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Winnipeg, Man 

Quebec, P.Q 



Serbs, Croats, and 

Slovenes 

United States 

United States 

Venezuela 

Roumania 

United States 

Sweden 

United States 

Sweden 

Norway 

Italy 

Norway 

Mexico 

United States 



Montreal, P.Q 

North Bay, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Summerside, P.E.I. . . 

Edmonton, Alta 

Sarnia, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 

Montreal, P.Q 

Halifax, N.S 

Vancouver, B .C 

St. John, N.B 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 



Montreal, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, P.Q 

London, Ont 

Quebec, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 

Victoria, B.C 

Montreal, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 

Lethbridge, Alta... 
Montreal, P.Q..... 

Vancouver, B.C 

Fort William and Port 

Arthur, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 

Nanaimo, B.C 

Vancouver. B.C 

Montreal, P.Q 

Winnipeg, Man 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . . 

Vancouver, B.C" 

Halifax, N.S 

Windsor, Ont 

Annapolis, N.S 

Yaiinouth, N.S. 

Vancouver, B. C 

Campbellton, N.B — 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 



1923 
1910 
1920 
1911 
1925 
1924 
1921 
1925 
1898 
1921 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1924 
1922 



1918 
1924 
1924 
1924 
1919 
1907 
1920 
1925 
1904 
1920 
1919 
1907 
192.3 
1925 



1922 
1915 
1925 
1920 
1914 
1925 
1916 
1924 
1912 
1920 
1925 
1900 
1924 
1921 
1925 
1924 

1925 
1924 
1918 
1921 
1923 
1920 
1918 
1923 
1923 
1925 
1904 
1924 
1906 
1918 
1924 
1903 
1911 
1920 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



15 



APPENDIX B 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented in Canada by Consuls, 
Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, according to the 
latest information supplied to the Department of External Affairs. 



Country 



Argentine Republic. . 



Austria.. 
Belgium. 



Bolivia. 
Brazil. . 



Chile. 



China 

Colombia. 



Corea* 
Costa Rica. 
Cuba 



Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

•Represented by 



Halifax, N.S.. 
Ottawa, Ont... 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Quebec, P.Q... 
St. John, N.B. 
Toronto, Ont... 




Vancouver, B .C 

Victoria, B.C 

Montreal, P.Q 

Edmonton, Alta. . . . 
Fort William, Ont... 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C. 

Quebec, P.Q 

Regina, Sask 

St. John, N.B 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 



Vancouver, B.C. 

Victoria, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man.. 

Victoria, B.C 

Gasp6, P.Q 

Gasp4, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q. ., 
Montreal, P.Q... 
Montreal, P.Q.. 
Montreal, P.Q.., 
Paspebiac, P.Q.. 

Quebec, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

St. John, N.B... 
Toronto, Ont.... 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q.. 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C. 

Ottawa, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal, P.Q. . 



Vancouver, B. C . 



Montreal, P.Q 

Annapolis, N.S.... 
Bridgewater, N.S. 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q.... 
St. John, N.B 



Toronto, Ont. 



Weymouth, N.S. 
Yarmouth, N.S., 
Montreal, P.Q. . . 
Montreal, P.Q. . . 

Calgary, Alta 

Chatham, N. B. 
Japanese Consuls. 



Jones, A. N 

Margueirat, J. C 

Gordon, J. A 

Corriveau, J. E 

McLean, H. H 

Fetherstonhaugh, 
F.B 

Bernard, F. W 

Branson, C. L. H. . . 

Franke, F 

Martin, H 

King, John 

Jones, A. N 

deBurlet, H 

Rickstal, J. Van. . . . 

Remes, A 

Goosse, M 

Collart, T 

Dupont, R 

Anderson, P. M 

Mullin, D 

Hanrahan, E. C... 

Rochereau de la Sa- 
bliere, C 

Ladner, L 

Terry, W.S 

de Jardin, A 

Branson, C. L. H 

LeGros, P. E 

LeBoutillier, C. S 

Braga, A. R 

Moretzhon, D 

Mills, F.W 

Lapierre, Lorenzo 

Bouillon, E. A. A 

Levasseur, T 

Morissette, J. B 

Roderick, F. L 

Kerman, W. S 

Mason, T. J 

Emanuels, S. J 

Prescott, J. W 

de Lima, F. J 

Guerrero, A. G 

Morris, M. P 

Chow Kuo-Hsien 

HoTsan 

Ponce, Jorge A. Gon- 
zalez 

Morris, H. J , 



Vice-Consul 

Consul General. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 



Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Hon. Consul... . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul General. 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 



Designation 



Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Consular Agent. . . 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . . . 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. . . 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. . . 

Vice-Consul. 

Consular Agent. . . 

Consul 

Honorary Consul. 
Consul General..., 
Consul General..., 
Consul 



Consul General. 
Consul 



Sanguesa, F. H 

Whitman, F. C 

Roberts, A 

Bonet y Leon, P. A.. . 
Sainz de la Pena, A. F 
Ponce y Martinez, 

J. R 

Barranco y Fernandez, 

C. A 

Campbell, G. D... 

Eakins, A. W 

Kveton, F 

Cicvarck, V 

Pallesen, P 

Neale, F. E 



Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent. 
Consul General. 
Consul 



Consul. 



Consul 

Consul , 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul. 
Vice-Consul. 
Vice-Consul. 



I* 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued 



Country 




Designation 



When 
Ap- 
pointed 



Denmark — Con . 



Dominican Republic. 
Finland 



France. 



Germany. 
Greece 



Guatemala. 



Hayti 



Honduras 

Hungary 
Italy 



Japan. 



Latvia 

Liberia 

'Luxembourg. 
Mexico 



Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Winnipeg, Man 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec and St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Calgary, Alta 

Edmonton, Alta 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q... 

Regina, Sask 

North Sydney, N.S 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 



Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

W'innipeg, Man 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Calgary, Alta 

Edmonton, Alta. . . 

Fernie, B.C 

Fort William, Ont. 

Halifax, N.S 

Hamilton, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 



Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Niagara Falls, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont 



Quebec, P.Q 

St. John, N.B 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

W^innipeg, Man 



Ottawa, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C, 
Montreal, P.Q. . 
Halifax, N.S.... 



Mathers, H. I 

iggild, J. E 

Schack, Count E. H, . 

Petry, W\ H 

Knight, J. T 

Klein, D. V 

Ward, W, A 

Johnson, A. C 

Schioler, K 

Espaillat de la Mota,F. 

Rauanheimio, A 

Cable, D.J 

Saarimaki, A 

Tornroos, G. W 

Korte, E.J 

de Roussy de Sales, F, 

Jenvrin, P. G 

Gaboury, E 

de Vitrolles, Baron R 
de Saint Victor, R. . . . 

Jean, S. M 

Lacroix, Ed 

Harrison, W. H 

Rochereau de la Sa- 

bli^re, C.E 

Suzor, P. M 

Bourgouin, J. H 

Kempff , L 

Guerin, T.J 

Miller, H. C 

Cress6, L.G.A., K.C.. 

Royer, J. S 

Morang, G. N 

Taylor, T. M 

Bell, C.N 

Dickie, F. W 

Daoust, J 

Rouillard, L 

Gunn, J. A 

Midence, A. C 

Defries, R. L 

Haydin, A 

Rader, I 

de Angelis, G 

Carosella, L 

Marino, E... 

Spencer, W. B 

Masi, N 

Margotti, G. M. P... 



Gerbore, P. . . . 
Restaldi, V. V. 

Braida, P 

Bonardelli, E.. 



Huot, A 

Ledingham, W. D. 

Grassi, G 

T. D. Pistone 

Ciceri, G. B 

Masi, N 

Barattieri di San 
Pietro, Count G. 

Matsunaga, N 

Tatsuo Kawal 

Francis, A. E 

Hechler, Henry 



Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul. 

Hon. Consul 

Consul... , 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul. . . 
Hon. Vice-Consul. . . 
Hon. Vice-Consul. . . 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 



Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Hon. Consul 

Honorary Vice-Consul 

Honorary Consul 

Honorary Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent. . . . 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent. . . . 

Consul General for the 
Dominion of Canada 
excluding Ontario 

Vice-Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul. . 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consul General for 
Ontario 

Consular Agent .... 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent. ... 

Consular Agent 



Consular Agent . 
Consul General. 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 



Halifax, N.vS... 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Forsyth, L. A. 
Godin, E 



Hon. Consul. 
Hon. Consul. 



1906 
1924 
1925 
1911 
192.5 
1925 
1923 
1924 
1924 
1925 
1923 
1924 
1924 
1924 
1920 
19^3 
1920 
1916 
1924 
1913 
1922 
1909 
1924 

1908 
1925 
1916 
1921 
1923 
1920 
1913 
1925 
1895 
1916 
1896 
1925 
1925 
1920 
1925 
1925 
1913 
1925 
1925 
1920 
1917 
1912 
1919 
1922 



1924 
1925 
1925 
1923 

1924 
1921 
1919 
1914 
1923 
1923 
1915 

1910 
1923 
1925 
1925 
1903 

1923 
1923 



•Represented by Consuls of Belgium. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



17 



Alphabktical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued 



Country 




Designation 



When 
Ap- 
pointed 



Mexico — Con. 



Monaco , 

Netherlands. 



Nicaragua. 
Norway... 



St. John, N.B . . . 
Toronto, Ont.... 
Toronto, Ont.... 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Victoria, B.C.... 
Winnipeg, Man. . 
Montreal, P.Q.. 

Calgary, Alta 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q. . 
Montreal, P.Q.. 

Quebec, P.Q 

St. John, N.B... 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 



Vancouver, B.C. 
Winnipeg, Man.. 



Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Campbellton, N.B. 

Camrose, Alta 

Chatham, N.B.... 

Halifax, N.S 

Louisburg, N.S. . . . 
Montreal, P.Q 



Panama. . 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Poland... 

Portugal. 



Roumania. 
Salvador. . 



Montreal, P.Q 

Nanaimo, B.C 

North Sydney, N.S. 

Outlook, Sask , 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C. , 

Quebec, P.Q 

Regina, Sask 

St. John, N.B 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B .C 

Montreal, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont , 

Montreal, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, P.Q 



Stewart, F. S 

Barron, L. M 

Mitchell, W, A 

Izaquirre, L , 

Branson, C. H 

Thompson, W. P.. 
Campbell, M.M... 

Hugill, J. W 

Warren, F. K 

deMeester, Th. H. 

Heward, S. B 

Ross, T. B 

Nagel, T 

McLennan, A. N.. 
Nordheimer, A 



Van Roggen, M. A. . . . 
Van Riemsdijk, L. J, 

F 

Viau, Paul 

6ry, A 

Kelly, M. A 

Nordbye, Dr. F. A.... 

Neale, F. E 

Mathers, H. I 

Lewis, G. D. D 

Aubert, L. C. M 



Gasp6 Basin, P.Q. . . 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

North Sydney, N.S 

Pasp6biac, P.Q 

Rimouski, P.Q 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 



Hon. Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul. . . 

Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul. . . 
Hon. Vice-Consul. . . 
Consul General..... . 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General for 

Ontario 

Consul 



Steckmest, S 

Planta, A. E 

Hackett, W 

Hendricks, P. M 

Antonisen, J 

Dybhavn, John 

Scott, A. C 

Beyer, B 

McLean, H. H. Jr... 

Young, J. A 

Printz, C. J. P 

Stahlschmidt, C. B. 

Bjorke, C. J 

Futcher, F. A 

Villardson, J 

Black, W^ A 

T6trault, N 

Le Feuvre, E 

Morris, M. P 

Miles, Henry 

Tanguay, E. G 

Yeigh, F 

Sanguesa, F, H 

Davis, C 

Fisher, N. R 

Straszewski, Dr. M. 



Leboutillier, C. S 

Oxley, H 

Routh, F. C 

Hackett, W 

Le Quesne, J. C. 

Blair, F. N 

Allison, M. A 

Maclean, J. B 

Simard, Geo. A.. 
Leveson, E. J 



Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul , 

Vice-Consul , 

Consul , 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General with 
jurisdiction over the 
whole of the Domin- 
ion of Canada 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul. . . . 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Con.sul 

Hon. Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Honorary Consul , 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General with 
jurisdiction over the 
whole of the Domin- 
ion of Canada 

Acting Vice-Consul. . . 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul. . , 

Acting Vice-Consul. . . 

Consul 

Honorary Consul 

Hon. Consul General 

Hon. Consul 



1923 
1925 
1901 
1925 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1879 
1910 
1922 
1921 

1922 
1921 

1924 
1923 
1923 
1916 
1916 
1909 
1906 
1921 



1917 
1920 
1907 
1910 
1917 
1922 
1918 
1922 
1923 
1922 
1911 
1908 
1907 
1920 
1907 
1920 
1910 
1920 
1925 
1906 
1924 
1914 
1903 
1921 
1924 
1925 



1924 
1895 
1916 
1911 
1910 
1898 
1913 
1903 
1922 
1919 
1925 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued 



Country 




Designation 



When 

Ap- 

jrainted 



Serbs, Croats and Slo- 
venes, Kingdom of 
the 

Siam 

Spain 

Sweden 



Switzerland. 



United States. 



Montreal, P.Q 

Vancouver, B.C 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Calgary, Alta 

Chatham, N.B 

Dawson, Y.T 

Edmonton, Alta 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Newcastle, N.B 

Port Arthur and Fort 

William, Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C.. . 

Quebec, P.Q 

Richibucto, N.B 

Sheet Harbour, N.S.. 

Sydney, N.S 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Wetaskiwin, Alta 

Winnipeg, Man 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 

Vancouver, B.C 

Annapolis, N.S 

Bathurst, N.B 

Beebe Junction, P.Q... 

Bridgewater, N.S 

Calgary, Alta 

Calgary, Alta 

Campbellton, N.B 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Cumberland, B.C 

Edmonton, Alta 

Femie, B.C 

Fernie, B.C 

Fort William, Ont 

Fort William, Ont 

Fredericton, N.B 

Gaspfe, P.Q 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Hamilton, Ont 

Hamilton, Ont 

Kenora, Ont 

Kingston, Ont 

Kingston, Ont 

Lethbridge, Alta 

Liverpool, N. S 

London, Ont 

London, Ont 

Louisburg, N.S 

Lunenburg, N.S 

Moncton, N.B 

Moncton, N.B 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 



Seferovitch, Captain 
A.V 

Armstrong, W. W 

Jones, W. G 

Suque y Sucona 

Thompson, J. Enoch. . 

Critch, D. W. H 

Hugill, J. W 

Creaghan, D. S 

Firth, T. A 

Skarin, E. R. T 

Davison, J. M 

Clarholm, M 

Creaghan, D. S 

Johnson, J. O 

Hanson, O 

Duggan, F. M 

Hutchinson, G. A 

MacMillan, F 

Angwin, J. G 

Edwards, M. B 

Beaton, W.J 

Winch, R. V 

Johnson, J. P 

Smith, H.J 

Thurnheer, W 

Zuerrer, E. R 

Cattin, Paul 

Gintzburger, S 

Owen, J. M 

Mersereau, CM 

Beebe, H. S 

Bamaby, A. C 

Fitts, H. L 

Reat, Samuel G 

Woodward, G. C 

Gunsaulus, E. N 

Stewart, W.C 

Clinton, G. W 

Cox, H 

Appleyard, G. S 

Brand, N. F 

De Lamater, H. I 

Vance, M. M 

Johnson, F. C 

Carter, K. J 

Robertson, W. H 

Gotlieb, B 

Brown, W. H 

Boyce, R, F 

Donaldson, D 

Moore, R. H 

Johnston, F. S. S 

Lothrop, A. P 

Thrall, R. A 

Mack, J. M 

Taggart, G. Russell... 

Payne, C, E. B 

Martel, A. A 

Lane, C. W 

Rasmusen, B. M 

Cummings, E. A 

Halstead, A 

Barry, J. R 

Jackson, W. I 

Andrews, G. B 

Clark, J. W 



Consul for the Domin 

ion of Canada 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General , 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Consul 

Acting Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent , 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 



1918 
1924 
1894 
1925 
1900 
1923 
1925 
1925 
1920 
1920 
1906 
1921 
1925 

1921 
1924 
1910 
1911 
1882 
1906 
1913 
1924 
1906 
1920 
1904 
1925 
1920 
1923 
1913 
1872 
1915 
1909 
1920 
1922 
1918 
1918 
1924 
1925 
1918 
1915 
1924 
1918 
1920 
1924 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1923 
1924 
1921 
1918 
1910 
1922 
1921 
1895 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1924 
1918 
1916 
1920 
1919 
1923 
1924 
1924 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



19 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, etc. — Concluded 



Country 



Place 



Name 



Designation 



When 
Ap- 
pointed 



United States — Con. 



Uruguay.. 
Venezuela. 



Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Nanainio, B.C 

Newcastle, N.B 

Niagara Falls, Ont 

Niagara Falls, Ont 

North Bay, Ont 

Ocean Falls, B.C 

Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Port Hawkesbury, N.S. 

Prescott, Ont 

Prescott, Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C 

Prince Rupert, B.C 

Quebec, P.Q 

Quebec, P.Q 

Riviere du Loup, P.Q. . . 
Riviere du Loup, P.Q. . . 

Regina, Sask 

Regina, Sask 

Sarnia, Ont 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. . . 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont... 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. . . 

Sherbrooke, P.Q 

Sherbrooke, P.Q 

Summerside, P.E.I 

Sydney, N.S 

St. John, N.B 

St. John, N.B 

St. Leonards, N.B 

St. Stephen, N.B 

St. Stephen, N.B 

St. Stephen, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

White Horse, Yukon 

Windsor, Ont 

Windsor, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 

Winnipeg, Man 

Winnipeg, Man 

Winnipeg, Man 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

St. John, N.B 

Sydney, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 



Finley, J. G 

Deming, J. F 

Van Houten, A. C 

Creaghan, J. A 

Brunswick, W. W 

Sack, Francis M 

Seltzer, G. E 

Burdon, H. E 

Foster, J. G 

Hickerson, J. D 

Sandford, H. M 

Hoyt, E. M 

Allman, H. F 

De Lamater, H. I 

Vance, M. M 

Bourinot, J. J 

Garrety, W. P 

McAndrews, Patrick J 

Wakefield, E. A 

Maher, D. W 

Dennison, E. H 

La Richeliere, E. W... 

Mitchell, W. M. P 

Alexander, K 

Cram, P. H 

Herbert, E. E 

Slater, F.C.. 

Chapman, W. E 

Collis, E.J 

Carlson, H. W 

Hosmer, C. B 

Monroe, E, L 

Sinclair, N 

Dick, H. H 

Wormuth, R 

Carter, E. H 

Labbie, A. P 

Brist, G. L 

Chilton, T.W ■ 

Mitchell, F.N 

Shantz, H. M 

Sauer, E 

Bohne, F, A 

Teall,G 

Fletcher, C. P 

Harris, E. L 

Tewell, H. S 

Blohm, L. R 

Belovsky, S. A 

Martin, A. C 

Bucklin, G. A 

Newcomb, R. M 

Muirhead, D. A 

Hawley, H. F 

Wells, A. D 

Heintzleman, P. S 

Erhardt, J. G 

Davis, R. N 

Johnson, L. H 

Willson, G. R 

Neville, J 

Eakin.W.R 

Inches, C. F 

MacDonald, M. W. . . . 

Silver, R. H 

Hurtado, E 

Barranco, C. A 



Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. . 
Consular Agent. . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . . , 
Consul General... 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul , 

Vice-Consul , 

Vice-Consul , 

Consul , 

Consular Agent. . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. . 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . . 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General... 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General... 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Hon. Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 



1925 
192.5 
1918 
1925 
1924 
1921 
1924 
1920 
190.3 
1925 
1918 
1925 
1925 
1920 
1924 
1923 
1925 
1920 
1918 
1925 
1919 
1924 
1924 
1923 
1924 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1918 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1907 
1924 
1924 
1919 
1915 
1925 
1924 
1925 
1924 
1925 
1922 
1924 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1924 
1925 
1924 
1914 
1921 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1924 
1922 
1925 
1924 
1913 
1924 
1920 
1923 
1924 
1924 
1923 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year ending March 31, 1925 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1926 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Vimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the 
Dominion of Canada. 

May It Please Your Excellency: 

The undersigned has the honour to forward to Your Excellency the accom- 
panying report of the Deputy Minister on the work of the Department ol 
Labour of the Dominion of Canada for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1925, 
all of which is respectfully submitted. 

JAMES MURDOCK, 

Minister of Labour. 



7343-1 i 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 5 

I. Industrial Disputes Investigation Act 12 

II. Conciliation Work 33 

III. Fair Wages 36 

IV. Statistics 45 

V. Labour Gazette 54 

VI. Combines Investigation Act 56 

VII. Employment OflBces Co-ordination Act 61 

VIII. Technical Education Act 70 

IX. Government Annuities Act 119 

X. International Labour Organization 121 



REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 

FOR THE 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1925 



To the Hon. James Murdock, 

Minister of Labour. 

Sm, — I have the honour to submit a report on the work of the Department 
of Labour for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1925. 

In many respects the fiscal year was not as favoiu-able as the period 
1923-24. More unemployment was reported each month than in the correspond- 
ing months of the previous year, and the index number of employment averaged 
a declension of nearly two points, denoting a slackness in Canadian manufac- 
turing industries. During the last quarter, however, a slight improvement in 
employment was evidenced, which, though not pronounced, contrasted with a 
downward tendency noticeable at the same period in the past four years. 
Revenue suffered from a dealine in imports, but exports remained at a high 
level throughout the year, and a large favourable balance of trade was shown 
for the fiscal year of $284,429,106. According to statistics of building permits 
in 60 Canadian cities, building construction was slightly less active than in 1923 
or 1922, although the situation was better than in 1921 or 1920. . Lower agri- 
cultural yields during 1924 than in 1923 were offset by the recovery of prices, 
the total value of all field crops exceeding the 1923 figure by $96,009,700. The 
cost of living as reflected in the departmental statistics showed the lowest figure 
since 1917, the reduction from last year being in food and fuel. Wages rose 
slightly in practically all trades, save steam railways, which remained unchanged, 
and coal mining, which declined. 

Industrial disputes did not show as good a record as in 1923. Although 
there were fewer disputes and not quite so many employees involved as in 
either of the two preceding years, the time loss in man working days was much 
greater than in 1923 and nearly as great as in 1922. Strikes of coal miners were 
largely responsible for this situation, 87.8 of the total time loss being charged 
to the coal mining industry, and one strike alone, that of 7,000 coal miners in 
Alberta and southeastern British Columbia, which lasted from April to October, 
causing a time loss of over one million working days. 

Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907 

From the inception of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act on March 
31, 1907, do\\Ti to the close of the fiscal year 1924-25, there were referred under 
its provisions 638 disputes, in each of which the applicants for a Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation had stated under oath that a strike or lockout was 
believed to be imminent and that further negotiations of a direct character 
were useless. Boards were established in 450 cases. In all but 37 of the 
cases dealt with, either a direct working agreement was effected or tlie situation 
as between the employer and the workers was so modified as to obviate the 
danger of the threatened strike and no cessation of work occurred. 



6 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

During 1924-25 nine boards only were established out of 22 cases dealt 
with under the Act. The number of boards established was the lowest during 
the life of the statute, the next smallest figure being in 1915-16, a war period. 

It will be remembered that during the fiscal year 1923-24 the Industrial 
Disputes Xnvestigation Act faced an attack in the courts of Ontario. A Board 
of Conciliation and Investigation under its provisions had been established in 
August, 1923, by the Minister of Labour to deal with a dispute between the 
Toronto Hydro-Electric System and its electrical workers, members of the Cana- 
dian Electrical Trades Union, Toronto Branch. The management of the system, 
the Toronto Electric Commissioners, had contended that, as the system was 
controlled by a municipality the provisions of the Industrial Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act did not apply, and that the statute invaded provincial rights and was 
unconstitutional. An interim injunction had been obtained from Mr, Justice 
Orde, of the High Court Division of the Supreme Court of Ontario, but the trial 
judge, Mr. Justice Mowat, had intimated his dissent from the view taken by 
Mr. Justice Orde and had directed the action to be heard by a Divisional Court. 
The view of the majority of the First Appellate Division of the Ontario Supreme 
Court had upheld Mr. Justice Mowat's decision. 

Early in the present fiscal year the Toronto Electric Commissioners obtained 
permission to carry the case direct to the Judicial Committee of the Privy 
Council, by whom it was heard in the month of November. The personnel of 
the Judicial Committee was as follows: Viscount Haldane, Lord Dunedin, Lord 
Atkinson, Lord Wrenbury, and Lord Salvesen, and their judgment, which was 
delivered by Viscount Haldane on January 20, 1925, sustained the appeal of the 
Toronto Electric Commissioners and pronounced the measure to be beyond the 
competence of the Federal Government. The principle underlying the Act was 
not impugned, but only the right of the Dominion Government to legislate in 
fields which the Judicial Committee declared to belong, under the provisions of 
the British North America Act, to the provincial legislatures. 

The decisions of the Ontario courts, including the judgment of the Appel- 
late Division, which was delivered on April 22, 1924, were printed in full in the 
last annual report. The text of the judgment of the Judicial Committee of the 
Privy Council referred to above will be found in chapter I of the present report. 

A volume was issued by the department in March, 1925, containing a full 
account of the legal proceedings in this case and including the texts of the judg- 
ments of the various Ontario courts and of the Judicial Committee of the Privy 
Council, the cases for the several parties as presented before the Judicial Com- 
mittee, the argument before the Judicial Committee, and other correlated data. 

Amendments to Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907 

The disallowance of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act was received 
with a general feeling of regret, and in many quarters the necessity was stressed 
of continuing the service which the statute had rendered to the advantage of the 
whole country during eighteen years. At the ensuing parliamentary session, 
amendments to the Act were introduced by the Minister of Labour which asserted 
the federal authority in cases where the jurisdiction of the Dominion Parliament 
applies and excluded works that lie exclusively within the legislative competence 
of the provinces. The enterprises coming under federal jurisdiction were 
enumerated in the amending measure as including works carried on in connec- 
tion with navigation and shipping; lines of steam or other ships, railways, tele- 
graphs, canals, ferries, and other works extending beyond any one province; 
works operated by aliens; works declared to be for the general advantage of 
Canada or for the advantage of two or more of the provinces; and works of 
any company incorporated under the authority of the Parliament of Canada. 
The application of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act was also defined 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 7 

in the Bill as extending to any dispute which the Governor in Council may in 
apprehended national emergency declare to be subject to the provisions of the 
Act, and to any dispute within the exclusive legislative jurisdiction of the pro- 
vinces which a province, by legislation, makes subject to the provisions of the 
Act. 

While the amending Bill was before the House of Commons certain clauses 
were added with the object of making clearer the original intent of the Indus- 
trial Disputes Investigation Act in certain respects. These additional clauses 
Avere identical with the changes embodied in a Bill to amend the Act which was 
before Parliament at the two preceding sessions and which was dropped on each 
occasion because of alterations made by the Senate which proved unacceptable 
to the House of Commons. 

The amending Bill, with the clauses mentioned in the preceding paragraph 
incorporated therein, passed both Houses of Parliament and became law on June 
12, 1925. The parliamentary proceedings took place chiefly after the close of 
the fiscal year, but, in view of the importance of the new legislation, a statement 
on the subject is included in the chapter relating to the Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act. 

Combines Investigation Act, 1923 

The annual statement of proceedings under the Combines Investigation 
Act, which is required to be laid before Parliament, comprises a chapter of the 
present report. This legislation, which furnishes effective machinery for investi- 
gating combines, mergers, trusts and monopolies operating to the detriment of 
the public interest, became law during the parliamentary session of 1923 and 
was placed under the Minister of Labour for general administration. A state- 
ment was included in last year's report setting forth the representations and 
inquiries relative to the Act which had reached the department during the first 
seven months of its existence. Mention was also made of an investigation of 
a preliminary nature which had been initiated in connection with a combine 
alleged to exist among jobbers, brokers and other dealers in fruit and vegetables 
in British Columbia and elsewhere, resulting in the control of prices to the 
detriment of producers and consumers. Early in the present fiscal year Mr. 
Lewis Duncan, of Toronto, was appointed a commissioner under the provisions 
of the Act to inquire into this alleged combine. The conmiissioner conducted 
a most searching inquiry, and his interim report, dated February 18, 1925, dis- 
closed a combine of jobbing and brokerage houses operating against the interests 
of the Canadian public. " including in that term producer, consumer and trade 
opposition." The conclusions and recommendations of the commissioner will 
be found at page 56. Shortly after the close of the fiscal year the attorneys- 
general of the provinces affected, namely, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatche- 
wan, and Manitoba, offered to co-operate with the federal authorities in prose- 
cuting those responsible for the unlawful combine. 

In October, 1924, Mr. David Campbell, K.C., of Winnipeg, was appointed 
a commissioner to investigate an alleged combine of retail and wholesale coal 
dealers and coal mine owners. This combine, it was claimed, had acquired 
control of the purchase and sale of coal in the pro\'inces of Manitoba and else- 
where, to the injury of the consumer. The commissioner in his report stated 
that, while the methods of the Retail Coal Dealers' Association of Winnipeg 
might lead to abuse, the prices fixed by them did not appear to have reached a 
point where they could be considered unreasonable or unfair, and, as to the 
Western Canada Fuel Association, his conclusion was that the association, in 
its activities in endeavouring to limit or prevent unfair competition, had not 
operated to the detriment of or against the best interests of the public. 

An investigation was also instituted by the Registrar towards the close of 
the year into an alleged combine in connection with the marketing of the pwtato 
crop of New Brunswick. 



8 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

) Employment Offices Co-ordination Act 

At the close of the fiscal year 1924-25 sixty-five employment ofiices were 
operating under the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act. Applications for 
employment registered at these ofiices during the year totailled 501,574, and the 
aggregate number of persons placed in employment was 340,819. 

A new section covering specifically employment work on behalf of partially 
disabled veterans of the Great War was inserted in uniform agreements which 
were concluded under the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act with all the 
provinces excepting Prince Edward Island. The specialized work of endeavour- 
ing to find suitable employment for employable handicapped ex-service men 
whose disabilities were due to war service had been taken over from the Depart- 
ment of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment during the previous year, the work in 
question being covered by supplementary agreements; these were, however, 
signed by five only of the provinces. The federal-provincial agreements for 
1924-25 embodied the principle of recognizing the provincial employment offices 
as the media through which disabled veterans might secure employment, and 
all of the eight co-operating provinces signed the agreement and undertook to 
make special efforts to find, through the instrumentality of the existing offices 
of the Employment Service, employment for ex-soldiers who were partially dis- 
abled as a result of their war service. 

I International Labour Organization 

Canada has the honour of being one of the eight states of chief industrial 
importance in the membership of the International Labour Conference entitled 
to seats on the Governing Body, i.e., the executive of the conference. The 
Canadian Government representative, the Hon. James Murdock, Minister of 
Labour, finding it impracticable during the past two years to attond personally 
the sessions of the Governing Body, which are held at intervals of approxi- 
mately three months, it has been necessary at each meeting to designate a 
person to act as substitute. During the fiscal year 1924-25 the following sub- 
stitutes were appointed: at the meeting of April 8-10, 1924, M. Philippe Roy; 
at the meeting of June 12-13, 1924, Mr. F. A. Acland; at the meeting of 
October 9-11, 1924, Prof. 0. D. Skelton, and at the meeting of January 8-10, 
1925, Hon. H. S. Beland. 

In view of the disadvantage tinder which Canada labours in fulfilling the 
duties devolving on her as a member of the League of Nations, which include 
official representation by three delegates at each meeting of the Assembly of 
the League, by two delegates at each annual or special meeting of the Inter- 
national Labour Office, and by a representative at the quarterly meetings of 
the Governing Body mentioned above, the appointment was authorized by the 
Government of Canada in the month of December, 1924, of an Advisory Officer 
resident in Geneva, Switzerland, the headquarters and customary place of meet- 
ing of these organizations. It was considered that the appointment would 
ensure greater permanency and continuity of representation at the meetings 
in question and would increase the efficiency of Canada's representation. The 
position was filled by the appointment on January 1, 1925, of Dr. W. A. Riddell, 
former Deputy Minister of Labolir for the Province of Ontario and who had 
held an important post on the staff of the International Labour Office from 1920. 

The 1925 session of the International Labour Conference was held in 
Geneva, the Government delegates being Mr. H. H. Ward, of Ottawa, Deputy 
Minister of Labour for Canada, and Dr. W. A. Riddell, Geneva, Switzerland, 
Dominion of Canada Advisory Officer (League of Nations). Four conventions 
and four recommendations were adopted by the conference as follows: — 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 9 

Conventions and Recommendations adopted provisionally in 1924 cmd sub- 
mitted for final vote: 

(1) Equality of Treatment for National and Foreign Workers as regards Workmen's 
Compensation for Accidents. — Convention adopted by 125 to 0. Recommendation adopted 
by 128 to 0. 

(2) (Night Work in Bakeries. — Convention adopted by 81 to 26. 

Other Conventions and Recommendations r 

(3) Workmen's Compensation for Accidents. — Convention adopted, final vote, by 83 
to 8. Two Recommendations adopted, final votes, 79 to 24; 85 to 18. 

(4) Compensation for Occupational Diseases.— C!onvention adopted, final vote, 89 to 6. 
Recommendation adopted, final vote, 98 to 3. 

A proposed draft convention providing for weekly suspension of work in 
glass manufacturing processes where tank furnaces are used was passed pro- 
visionally in 1924, but did not receive the required two-thirds majority vote 
requisite to its final adoption in this year's conference and therefore failed of 
adoption. 

In addition resolutions were adopted on compensation for occupational 
diseases and on general problems of social insurance, as well as on several 
other questions which did not appear on the formal agenda. 

When the construction of a new building to house the International Labour 
Office was decided upon at the Third Assembly of the League of Nations, the 
hope was expressed that every member of the League would contribute to the 
stiiicture by gift of building materials, by ornaments, or by works of art, repre- 
senting the most characteristic forms of national production. In view of the 
fact that the vast forests of Canada are among its most valuable resources and 
cause it to rank as one of the great lumber producing countries of the world, 
and the kindred industries of woodworking being amongst its principal manu- 
factures, the Dominion Government, on June 23, 1924, authorized the donation 
of the doors on the main floor of the building. The doors are to be made in 
Canada by Canadian workmen and of Canadian wood, in accordance with 
plans furnished by the architect, and a suitable tablet, commemorative of the 
gift and referring to the Canadian materials employed in their manufacture, 
will be placed in the vestibule. 

It is beheved that this material e\'idence of Canadian participation in the 
great work of the International Labour Organization will bring encouragement 
to those who are engaged in the work, and that, when the edifice is completed, 
the materials and workmanship of the doors will attract favourable attention 
to the Canadian resources and industries represented in their manufacture. 

National Conference Regarding Winteir Employment 

A cx)nference was held in Ottawa on September 3 and 4, 1924, on the 
initiative of the Government of Canada, for the purpose of devising means for 
the regularization of industrial employment, having regard particularly |to 
building and other out-of-door work during the winter season. Attending the 
conference were representatives of the Federal and Provincial Governments, 
the principal municipalities, the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, the 
Association of Canadian Building and Construction Industries, the two transr 
continental railways, the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada, and import- 
ant union organizations in the building trades. 

A comprehensive sur\'ey of the situation was made by those in attendance 
and several resolutions emibodying their views were adopted unanimously, 
which it was hoped would lead to the systematic co-operation of all public 
authorities and others interested in creating and maintaining a reasonable 
volume of employment during the winter months. 

The conference placed itself on record as opposed to assistance in the form 



10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

of money or doles, and favoured the encouragement of work of some descrip- 
tion in every localitj^ with special consideration to work of a permanent nature, 
such as building, construction, etc. 

It was also the view of the conference that certain classes of work, which 
in the past had been discouraged during the winter season, could with perfect 
safety and economy be undertaken throughout Canada. 

" Laboue Gazette " and Special Departmental Publications 

The Labour Gazette was published regularly in English and French during 
the year, the average monthly circulation of the two editions being 7,649. 

Reports dealing with (1) Labour Organiaation, (2) Organization in Indus- 
try, Commerce and the Professions, and (3) Labour Legislation, were also 
published as usual covering the calendar year 1924. 

The fourteenth annual report on Labour Organization in Canada, being 
for the calendar year 1924, contains comprehensive information concerning the 
nature of the organizations with which Canadian workers are allied, and includes 
complete statistics of organized labour in Canada. At the close of 1924 there 
were 2,429 branches of labour organizations operating in Canada, with a reported 
and estimated membership of 260,643. 

The fourth report on Organization in Industry, Commerce and the Pro- 
fessions in Canada gives full information in regard to employers' organizations 
and ser^^es as a companion volume to the department's annual report on Labour 
Organization. Associations numbering 1,325 are recorded in this volume, being 
an increase of 97 over the preceding year. There are 733 main organizations, 
with 592 branches, and the aggregate reported membership is 1,033,131 as com- 
pared with 861,933 in the last report. 

The report on Labour Legislation in Canada for the calendar year 1924 
gives the text of the laws affecting labour enacted during the past year by the 
Dominion Parliament and by the legislatures of the several provinces. This 
publication constitutes the fourth annual supplement to the volume entitled 
" Labour Legislation in Canada as existing on December 31, 1920," which con- 
tained a compilation of all labour laws enacted up to that date. 

The department also issued the seventh and eighth reports in its Wages 
and Hours of Labour Series, these two reports giving figures as to wages and 
hours of labour of various classes of trades and occupations in Canada from 
1920 to 1924. 

Three special bulletins dealing with the organization and use of vocaibionaJ 
school libraries were prepared by the Technical Education Branch and sent to 
Canadian schools. Also a list of books for use in circulating libraries on voca- 
tional education was compiled in co-operation with the provincial officials and 
distributed to every province. 

At the request of the National Council of Women, which embraces numer- 
ous women's organizations in the cities and towns of Canada, the Dominion 
Government published, also under the authority of the Minister of Labour, a 
pamphlet respecting the " Legal Statlus of Women in Canada," as shown by 
extracts from Dominion and provincial laws relating to naturalization, fran- 
chise, crime, marriage, divorce, property, devolution of estates, mothers and 
children, employment, and other subjects. 

Other Branches of Work 

Gratifying progress was made throughout Canada during the year in 
promoting technical education. There was a noticeable improvement in the 
quality of the work in every province, and the enrolment and attendance showed 
a oontinued increase in the number of pupils in day schools. The amount 
paid from federal grants under the Technical Education Act during the school 
year was $830,476.77. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 11 

The advertising campaign with respect to Dominion Government annuities 
which had been maintained with marked success during the second half of the 
fiscal year 1923-24 was renewed in the fall of 1924. Purchase money for annui- 
ties received during the fiscal vear ended March 31, 1925, reached the high 
figure of $1,606,665.03. On March 31, 1925, there were 5,862 annuity con- 
tracts in force, and purchase money received from the date of the inception of 
the Annuities Branch, September 1, 1908, up to and including March 31, 1925, 
amounted to $9,754,299.42. 

An amendment to the Annuities Act of 1908 was enacted at the 1925 
session of Parliament reducing the minimum annuity purchasable under the 
Act from $50 to $10. The main ptirpose of the amendment was to enable 
employers to purchase outright annuities of $10 or more as gifts or bonuses 
for employees who had been with them for many years. 

The regular functions of the department in collecting and publishing statis- 
tics as to prices, cost of living, wages, industrial disputes, and industrial acci- 
dents, were continued throughout the year. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
H. H. WARD, 

Deputy Minister of Labour and Registrar 
of Boards of Conciliation and Investigation 

Department of Labour, Ottawa. 



12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



1. INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES INVESTIGATION ACT, 1907 

EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS, BEING FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1925 

Introductory Note 

The uncertainty prevailing during the year as to the outcome of the legal 
proceedings which had been instituted in August, 1923, by the Toronto Electric 
Commissioners concerning the constitutionality of the Industrial Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, 1907, undoubtedly affected proceedings under the Act generally and 
the department was handicapped to a certain extent in applying its provisions. 
The Toronto Electric Commissioners had questioned the right of the Dominion 
Parliament to enact the statute and the case had been heard by various Ontario 
courts whose decisions were printed in the report for the fiscal year 1923-24. 
The result of the litigation was not known until January 20, 1925, when judg- 
ment in the matter was delivered by the Judicial Committee of the Privy 
Council. This judgment, which declared the Act as it stood to be beyond the 
competence of the Dominion Parliament, was received with much concern by 
those in Canada interested in the maintenance of industrial peace and the 
improvement of relations between employers and employees. The difficulties 
created by the judgment were, however, overcome by the passage during the 
1925 session of Parliament of amendments limiting the application of the Indus- 
trial Disputes Investigation Act to matters not within the legislative jurisdic- 
tion of any province. The statute is therefore still applicable to industrial 
disputes in such enterprises as come clearly within the purview of the Dominion 
Government. Although the parliamentary proceedings occurred mainly after 
the close of the fiscal year, it is thought desirable, in view of the importance of 
the new legislation, to include a brief statement on the subject in the present 
chapter. 

The most difficult situation during the year in connection with proceedings 
under the Act arose in the case of the dispute in the coal mining fields of Nova 
Scotia, in which a board was in course of establishment when judgment adverse 
to the validity of the statute was rendered by the Judicial Committee of the 
Privy Council. Although the board proceeded to Cape Breton, it was powerless 
to function save with the joint consent of both parties, and accordingly attempted 
only a friendly offer of assistance. The miners, however, repudiated the board, 
refusing to give evidence or enter into negotiations, and the board was com- 
pelled to report its inability to take effective action. 

In the following pages will be found the tables usually presented with this 
report. The number of applications for the establishment of Boards of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation under the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act 
reaching the department during the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925, was 19. 
Three cases were carried over from the preceding year, making 22 cases in all 
dealt with during the fiscal period under review. Nine boards only were 
established. 

One strike occurred after reference of the dispute to a Board of Concilia- 
tion and Investigation, that, namely, involving the coal miners of Nova Scotia, 
and, as mentioned above, the board in this case commenced its proceedings 
following the Privy Council decision. It is a matter of regret that the avenue 
of escape from this industrial warfare, with all its attendant suffering and loss, 
which would have offered had the board been vested with sufficient authority 
to conduct an investigation on the usual former lines, was closed. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



13 



Four of the applications received during the year were caused by disputes 
affecting workers in commercial and press telegraph services. In one case an 
adjustment of the dispute was effected with the aid of a departmental officer 
and board procedure was unnecessary. Three boards were established, two 
dealing with disputes between the Canadian National Telegraphs and Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company's Telegraphs and their respective employees being 
commercial telegraphers and in each of which settlements were reached between 
the parties concerned. The third case, involving telegraphers employed by the 
Canadian Press, was more troublesome. The minister authorized the estab- 
lishment of a board immediately upon receipt of an application from the 
employer, but the labour organization to which the employees belonged had 
ordered a strike for the following day and refused to withdraw the instruction. 
The strike lasted ten days, the men returning to work at the instance of the 
Minister of Labour, who prevailed upon them to refer the dispute to the Board 
of Conciliation and Investigation which had been already authorized and to 
name a person to represent them as board member. The findings of the board 
were put into effect by the Canadian Press and no further difficulty was 
encountered. 

Summary Tables Respecting Proceedings Under the Industrial Disputes 

Investigation Act, 1907 

The tables here presented are arranged in several divisions, viz.: (i) show- 
ing proceedings by industries concerned from April 1, 1924, to March 31, 1925; 
(ii) showing proceedings by industries concerned from March 22, 1907, to March 
31, 1925; (iii) showing by fiscal years, 1907-1925, number of disputes dealt 
with; (iv) showing by calendar years, 1907-1925, number of disputes dealt with, 
and (v) containing statistical summary of operations under the statute for the 
fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

I. TABLE SHOWING PROCEEDINGS BY INDUSTRIES FROM APRIL 1, 1924. 

TO MARCH 31, 1925 



Industries affected 


Number of 
applications 
for Boards 
received* 


Number of 

Boards 
established 


Number 

of strikes 

not 

averted 
or ended 


I. Disputes affecting mines, transportation and communication 
and other public utilities — 
(1) Mines — 

Coal 


3 

4 
4 
1 
4 

3 
3 


2 

2 

1 
3 

1 



1 


(2) Transportation and communication — 

(a) Steam railways 





(b) Street and electric railways 





(c) Shipping 





(d) Telegraphs 





(3) Miscellaneous — 

Light and power 





II. Disputes not falling clearly within the direct scope of the Act . 





Total 


22* 


9 


1 







•Including three cases left over from preceding year, as stated below. 

The proceedings under the Act during the year include three cases in which 
certain proceedings had taken place during the preceding year, namely, disputes 
between (1) Toronto Electric Commissioners and certain of their employees 
being linemen, groundmen and others concerned in the work of power trans- 
mission and distribution and being members of the Canadian Electrical Trades 
Union, Toronto Branch; (2) Cities of Port Arthur and Fort William and their 
employees in street railway service, members of Division No. 966, Amalga- 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



mated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of America, and 
(3) various shipping companies trading to the port of Montreal, P.Q., and cer- 
tain of their employees being members of the Syndicated Longshoremen of the 
port of Montreal. 

II. TABLE SHOWING PROCEEDINGS BY INDUSTRIES FROM MARCH 22, 1907, TO 

MARCH 31, 1925 



Industries affected 



Num?jer of 

applications 

for 

Boards 

received 



Number 

of strikes 

not 

averted 
or ended 



II 



Disputes affecting mines, transportation and communication, other public 
utilities and war work — 

(1) Mines — 

(a) Coal 

(b) Metal 

(c) Asbestos 

(2) Transportation and communication — 

(a) Steam railways 

(b) Street and electric railways 

(c) Express 

(d) Shipping 

(e) Telegraphs 

(f) Telephones 

(3) Miscellaneous — 

(a) Light and power 

(b) Elevators 

(4) War work 

Disputes not falling clearly within the direct scope of the Act 

Total 



71 


10 


20 


5 


1 





192 


7 


105 


7 


11 


1 


32 





21 


1 


7 





24 


3 


1 





30 


1 


123 


2 



638 



37 



The figures contained in the above table may be thought to show discrep- 
ancies as compared with those appearing in the yearly summary. A closer 
examination will, however, show the respective statements to be in agreement. 
A complete statement of proceedings for a year must show all disputes dealt 
with during the fiscal year. The figures of the yearly statement include, there- 
fore, disputes carried over from the previous year and which are counted in 
the summary of that year's proceedings. Thus the same dispute may properly 
figure in the annual statement for each of two years. In the statistical recapitu- 
lation covering several years, as above, it is necessary that no dispute shall be 
counted more than once, and account is taken of the number of applications 
received during the year arid thus brought within the purview of the statute. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



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24 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Validity ob' Industrial Disputes Investigation Act 

As mentioned in the report for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1924, liti- 
gation arose during that period as the result of the refusal of the Toronto 
Electric Commissioners to recognize the authority of a Board of Conciliation 
and Investigation established under the provisions of the Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act to deal with a dispute between the commissioners in question 
and certain of their employees being linemen, groundmen ,and others concerned 
in the work of power transmission and distribution and being members of the 
Canadian Electrical Trades Union, Toronto Branch. The texts of the judg- 
ments of the various Ontario courts in this case appeared in the Annual Report 
of the Department for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1924. These included 
(1) the judgment of Mr. Justice Orde of the High Court Division of the 
Supreme Court of Ontario, granting an interim injunction on August 29, 1923, 
restraining the Board of Conciliation and Investigation from interfering with 
the business of the commission and from exercising any of the powers conferred 
on such a board by sections 30 to 38 of the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, thus limiting it to an investigation of ^ voluntary nature; (2) the judgment 
dated December 15, 1923, of Mr. Justice Mowat of the same court, who refused 
a permanent injunction, and (3) the judgment of the First Appellate Division 
of the Supreme Court of Ontario, delivered on April 22, 1924, by Mr. Justice 
Ferguson .and concurred in by Mr. Chief Justice Mulock, Mr. Justice Smith, 
and Mr. Justice Magee, together with the ddssenting judgment of Mr. Justice 
Hodgins. The majority decision of the Appellate Division sustained Mr. Justice 
Mowat's finding and upheld the constitutionality of the Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act. 

The counsel for the Toronto Electric Commissioners appealed the decision 
of the First Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of Ontario to the Judicial 
Committee of the Privy Council in England, by whom the case was heard in 
the month of November, 1924. The Judicial Committee was composed of Vis- 
count Haldane, Lord Dunedin, Lord Atkinson, Lord Wrenbury and Lord Sal- 
vesen. The judgment of the Lords of the Judicial Committee, delivered by 
Visicount Haldane on January 20, 1925, reversed the decision of the majority of 
the Ontario Appellate Divisiion and declared the Industrial Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act in its then existing form to be ultra vires of the Dominion Parliament 
on the ground that it encroachedi upon the rights given the provinces under the 
provisions of the British North America Act. 

text of judgment of the judicial committee of the privy council 

Following is the text of the judgment of the Judicial Committee of the 
Privy Council: — 

The Toronto Electric Coiamissioners, Appellants, v. Colin G. Snider and others, Respon- 
dents, and The Attomey-iGeneral of Canada and the Attorney-General of Ontario, 
Interveners, from The Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of Ontario. 

Judgment of the Lords of the Judicial Committee of the Pr'ivy Council, delivered the 
20th January, 1926. 

Present at the Hearing: Viscount Haldane, Lord Dunedin, Lord Atkinson, Lord 
Wrenbury, Lord Salvesen. 

(Delivered by Visccnint Haldane.) 

It is always with reluctance that their Lordships come to a conclusion adverse to the 
constitutional validity of any Canadian statute that has been before the public for years 
as having been validly enacted, but the duty incumbent on the Judicial Committee, now 
as always, is simply to interpret the British North America Act and to decide whether the 
statute in question has been within the competence of the Dominion Parliament under the 
terms of section 91 of that Act. In this case the Judicial Committee have come to the 
conclusion that it was not. To that conclusion they find themselves compelled, alike by 
the structure of section 91 and by the interpretation of its terms that has now been estab- 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 25 

lished t>y a series of authorities. They have had the advantage not only of hearing full 
argumients on the question, but of having before them judgments in the Courts of Ontario 
from which this appeal to the Sovereign in Counci'l came direatly. Some of these judg- 
ments are against the view which they themselves take, others are in favour of it, but 
all of them are of a high degree of thoroughness and ability. 

The particular exercise of legislative power with wMdi their Lordships are concerned 
is contained in a well-known Act, passed by the Dominion Parliament in 1907 and known 
as The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act. As it now stands it has been amended by 
siibsequent Acts, but nothing ttims, for the purposes of the question now raised, on any 
of the amendments that have been introduced. 

The primary object of the Act was to enable industrial disputes between any employer 
in Canacfa, and any one or m^ore of his employees, as to " matters or things affecting or 
relating to work done or to ibe done by him or them, or as to the privileges, rights and 
duties of employers or employees (not involving any such violation thereof as constitutes 
an indictable offence), relating to wages or remuneration, or hours of employment, sex, 
age or qualifications of employees, and the mode, terms and conditions of employment ; the 
employment of children or any person, or classes of persons ; claims as to whether preference 
of employment should be given to members of labour or other organizations; materials 
supplied or damage done to woi*k; customs or usages, either general or in partioular districts; 
and the interpretation of agreements. Either of the parties to any such dispute was empow- 
ered by the Act to apply to the Minister of Labour for the Dominion for the appointment 
of a Board of Conciliation and Investigation, to which Board the dispute might be referred. 
The Act enabled the Governor in Council to appoint a Registrar of such Boards, with the 
duty of dealing with a'U applications for reference, bringing them to the notice of the 
Minister, and conducting the correspondence necessary for the constitution of the Boards. 
The Minister was empowered to establish a Board wh^ he thought fit, and no question 
was to be raised in any Court interfering with his decision. Each Board was to consist 
of three membere to be appointed by the Minister, one on the recommendation of the 
employer, one on that of the employees, and the third, who was to be Chairman, on the 
recommendation of the members so chosen. If any of them failed in this duty the Minister 
was to make the appointment. The department of the Minister of Labour was to provide 
the staffs required. The application for a Board was to be accompanied by a statutory 
declaration showing that, failing adjustment, a lockout or strike would probably occur. 

The Board so constituted was to make inquiry and to endeavour to effect a settlement. 
If the parties came to a settlement the Board was to embody it in a memorandtim of 
recommendation, which, if the parties had agreed to it in writing, was to have the effect 
of an award on a reference to ai^bitration or one made under the order of a court of record. 
In such a case the recommendation could be constituted a rule of Court and enforced 
accordingly. If no such settlement was arrived at, then the Board was to make a full report 
and a recommendation for settlement to the Minister, who was to make it public. 

The Boards set up were given powers to summon and to enforce the attendance of 
witnesses, to administer oaths and to call for business books and other documents, and also 
to order into custody or subject to fine, in case of disobedience or contempt. The Board 
was also empowered to enter any premises where anything was taking place which w^s 
the subject of the reference and to inspect. This power was also enforceable by penaltj\ 
The parties were to be represented before the Board, but no counsel or solicitors were to 
appear excepting by consent and subject to the sanction of the Board itself. The proceedings 
were noi-mally to take place in public. 

By section 56 of the Act, in the event of a reference to a Board, it was made unlaw- 
ful for the employer to lock out or for the employees to strike on account of any dispute 
prior to or pending the reference, and any breach of this provision was made punishable 
by fine. By section 57, employers and employed were both bound to give at least thirty 
days' notice of an intended' change affecting conditions of empLo3rment with respect to wages 
or hours. In the event of a dispute arising over the intended change, until the dispute 
had been finally dealt with by a Board and a report had been made, neither employers nor 
employed were to alter the conditions, or lock out or strike, or suspend employment or 
work, and the relationship of employer and employee was to continue unlinterrupted. If 
^n the opinion of the Board, either party were to use this or any other provision of the 
Act for the purpose of unjustly maintaining a given condition of affairs through delay, and 
the Board were so to report to the iMinister, such party was to be guilty of an offence and 
liable to penalties. 

By section 63 (a), where a strike or lockout had occurred or was threatened, the Min- 
ister was empowered, although neither of the parties to the dispute had applied for one. to 
set up a Board. He might also, under the next section, without any application, institute 
an inouiry. 

Whatever else may be the effect of this enactment, it is clear that it is one which could 
have been passed, so far as any Province was concerned, by the provincial legislature under 
the powers conferred by section 92 of the British North America Act. For its provisions 



26 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

were concerned dlirectly witlx the civil rights of both employers and employed in the 
Province. It set up a Board of Inquiry which could summon them before it, administer 
to them oaths, call for their papers and enter their premises. It did no more than what 
a provincial legislature could have done under head 15 of section 92, when it imposed 
punishment by way of penalty in order to enforce the new restrictions on civil rights. It 
interfered further with civil rights when, by section 56. it suspended liberty to lock out or 
gtrike during a reference to a Board. It does not appear that there is anything in the 
Dominion Act which could not have been enacted by the Legislature of (^itario, excepting 
one provision. The field for the operation of the Act was made the whole of Canada. 

In 1914 the Legislature of the Province of Ontario passed a Trade Disputes Act which 
substantially covered' the whole of these matters, so far as Ontario wag concerned, excepting 
in certain m;nor particulars. One of these was the intei'ference in the Dominion Act with 
the right to lock out or strike during an inquiry. This was not reproduced in the Ontario 
Act. Another difference was the necessary one that the operation of the Ontario Act was 
confined to that Province, instead of extending to other parts of Canada. It was, of course, 
open to the legislatures of the other provinces to enact similar provisions, and some of them 
appear to have done so. 

Subject to variations such as these, there is, in the Ontario Act, little alteration in sub- 
stance of the provisions of the Dominion statute. The Lieutenant-Governor of the Provin- 
ciaf Council, instead of the Minister of Labour, appoints the Registrar. There are to be set 
up two different kinds of statutory Council, one of Conciliation, the four members of which 
are to be nominated by the parties, the other a Council of Arbitration, consisting of three 
memlbers, two of whom are to be appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor of the Province on 
the recommendation of the parties, and the third, the Chairman, to be nominated by the 
Lieutenant-Governor on failure of the parties to agree and name. The Mayor of any city 
or town in the province, on being notified that a strike or lockout is impending, may inform 
the Registrar of the fact, and a Council of Arbitration may then be empowered to inquire 
and to mediate. Unless there is an agreement by one or both of the parties, in which case 
the award of the Council may be enforced as on an arbitration, there is no power given to 
suspend the right to strike or lock out. 

It is clear that this enactment was one which was competent to the Legislature of a 
Province under section 92. In the present case the substance of it was possibly competent, 
not merely under the head of property and civil rights in the Province, but also under that 
of municipal institutions in the Province. For the appellants are incorporated, by tihe 
Province, a public utility commission within the definition in chapter 204 of the Revised 
Statutes of Ontario, 1914, relating to the constitution and operation of works for supplying 
public utilities by municipal corporations and companies, and are employers within the 
meaning of the Ontario Trade Disputes Act already referred to. Their function is to manage 
the municipal electric light, heat and power works of the City of Toronto. 

The primary respondents in this appeal are the Members of a Board of Conciliation 
appointed by the Dominion Minister of Labour under the Act first referred to. There was 
a dispute in 1923 between the appellants and a number of the men whom they employed, 
which dispute was referred to the first respondents, who proceeded to exercise the powers 
given by the Dominion Act. The appellants then commenced an action in the Supreme 
Court of Ontario for an injunction to restrain these proceedings, on the allegation that the 
Dominion Act was ultra vires. The Attorneys General of Canada and of Ontario were 
notified and made parties as intervenants. 

There was a motion for an intei-im injunction which was heard by Orde, J., who, after 
argument, granted an injimction till the trial. The action was tried by Mowat, J., who 
intimated his dissent from the view of the British North America Act taken by Orde, J., 
who was co-ordinate in authority with him, according to which view the Dominion Act was 
ultra vires. He, therefore, as he had power by the Provincial Judicature Act to do, directed 
the action to be heard by a Divisional Court, and it was ultimately heard by the Appellate 
Division of the Supreme Court of Ontario (Mulock, C. J., Magee, Hodgins, Ferguson and 
Smith, JJA.). The result was that by the majority (Hodgins, J. A., dissenting) the action 
of the appellants was dismissed. 

The broad grounds of the judgment of the majority, which will be referred to later on, 
was that the Dominion Act was not a law relating to matters as to which section 92 conferred 
exclusive jurisdiction, but was a law within the competence of the Dominion Parliament, 
inasmuch as it was directed to the regulation of trade and commerce throughout Canada, 
and to the protection of the national peace, order and good government, by reason of (a) 
confining within limits, a dispute which might spread over all the Provinces; (b) informing 
the general public in Canada of the nature of the dispute, and (c) bringing public opinion to 
bear on it. The power of the Dominion Parliament to legislate in relation to criminal law, 
under head 27 of section 91, was also considered to apply. 

Before referring to these grounds of judgment, their Lordships, without repeating at 
length what has been laid down by them in earlier cases, desiVe to refer briefly to the con- 
struction which, in their opinion, has been authoritatively put on sections 91 and 92 by the 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 27 

more recent decisions of the Judicial Committee. The Dominion Parliament has, under the 
initial Avords of section 91, a general power to make laws for Canada. But these laws are 
not to relate to the classes of subjects assigned to the Provinces by section 92, unless their 
enactment falls under heads specifically assigned to the Dominion Parliament by the enumera- 
tion in section 91. When there is a question as to which legislative authority has the power 
to pass an Act the first question must therefore be whether the subject falls within section 92. 
Even if it does, the further question must be answered, whether it falls also under an 
enumerated head in section 91. If so, the Dominion has the paramount power of legislating 
in relation to it. If the subject falls within neither of the sets of enumerated heads, then 
the Dominion may have power to legislate under the general words at the beginning of 
section 91. 

Applying this principle, does the subject of the legislation in controversy fall fully within 
section 92? For the reasons already given their Lordships think, that it clearly does. Itf so, 
is the exclusive power prima facie conferred on the Province trenched on by any of the 
overriding powers set out specifically in section 91? It was, among other things, contended 
in the argument that the Dominion Act now challenged was authorized under head 27, " the 
Criminal Law except the Constitution of Courts of Criminal Jurisdiction, but including the 
Procedure in Criminal Matters." It was further suggested in the argument that the power 
to conferred is aided by the power conferred on the Parliament of Canada to establish addi- 
tional Courts for the better administration of the laws of Canada. 

But their Lordships are unable to accede to these contentions. They think that they 
cannot now be maintained successfully, in view of a series of decisions in which this Board 
has laid down the( interpretation of section 91(27) in the British North America Act on the 
point. In the most recent of these cases, that of the Reciprocal Insurers ([1924], A.C. 328, 
at p. 342), Mr. Justice Duff stated! definitely the true interpretation, in delivering the judg- 
ment of the Judicial Committee. Summing up the effect of the series of previous deci- 
sions relating to the point, he said: — 

" In accordance with the principle inherent in these decisions their Lordships think it is no longer open 
to dispute that the Parliament of Canada cannot, by purporting to create penal sanctions under section 91, 
head 27, appropriate to itself exclusively a field of jurisdiction in w^hich, apart from such a procedure, it 
could exert no legal authority, and that if, when examined as a whole, legislation in form criminal ds found, 
in aspects and for purposes exclusively within the provincial sphere, to deal with matters committ-ed to the 
Provinces, it cannot be upheld as valid." 

In the earlier Board of Commerce case ([1922], AC. 191), the principle to be applied was 
laid down in the same way. It was pointed out that the Dominion had exclusive legislative 
power to create new crimes "where the subject-matter is one which, by its very nature, 
belongs to the domain of criminal jurisprudence." But "it is quite another thing, first to 
attempt to interfere with a class of subject committed exclusively to the- provincial legis- 
lature, and then to justify this by enacting ancillary provisions designated as new phases 
of Dominion criminal law, which require a title to so interfere as the basis of their applica- 
tion." 

Their Lordships are of opinion that, on authority as well as on principle, they are 
to-day precluded from accepting the arguments that the Dominion Act in controversy can 
be justified as being an exercise of the Dominion power under section 91 in relation to 
criminal law. What the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, which the Dominion Parlia- 
ment passed in 1907, aimed at accomplishing was to enable the Doniinion Government to 
appoint anywhere in Canada a Board of Conciliation and Investigation to which the dis- 
pute between an employer and his employees might be referred. The Board was to have 
power to enforce the attendance of witnesses and to compel the production of documents. 
It could imder the Act enter premises, interrogate the persons there, and inspect the work. 
It rendered it unlawful for an employer to lock out or for a workman to strike, on account 
of the dispute, prior to or during the reference, and imposed an obligation on employees 
and employers to give thirty days' notice of any intended change affecting wages or hours. 
TTntil the reference was concluded neither were to alter the conditions with respect to 
these. It is obvious that these provisions dealt with civil rights, and it was not within the 
power of the Dominion Parliament to make this otherwise by imposing merely ancillary 
penalties. The penalties for breach of the restrictions did not render the statute the less 
an interference with civil rights in its pith and substance. The Act is not one which aims 
at making striking generally a new crime. Moreover, the employer retains under the 
general common law a right to lock out, only slightly interfered with by the penalty. In 
this connection their Lordships are therefore of opinion that the validity of the Act cannot 
be sustained. 

The point was also put in a somewhat different form. It was said that the criminal 
law of Canada was in its foundation the criminal law of England as at 17th September, 
1792; that, according to the criminal law of England as at that date, a strike was indictable 
as a conspiracy; that, consequently, strikes were within the ambit of the criminal law; and 
that, as a law either declaring strikes illegal as at common law, or making them illegal, 
would be a proper enactment of the criminal law, so, though this is rather a non-sequitur, 



28 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

it was only a branch of that law to enact provisions which should have the effect of pre- 
venting strikes coming into existence. 

It is not necessary to investigate or determine whether a strike is per se a crime 
according to the law of England in 1792. A great deal has been said on the subject and 
contrary opinions expressed. Let it be assumed that it was. It certainly was so only on 
the ground of conspiracy. But there is no conspiracy involved in a lockout; and the 
statute under discussion deals with lockouts pari ratione as with strikes. It would be 
ijiipossible, even if it were desirable, to separate the provisions as to strikes from those as 
to lockouts so as to make the one fall under the criminal law wihile the other remained 
outside it; and, therefore, in their Lordships' opinion this argum.ent also fails. 

Nor does the invocation of the specific power in section 91 to regulate trade anid com- 
merce assist the Dominion contention. In Citizens Insurance Company v. Parsons (7 
A.C. at p. 112) it was laid down that the collocation of this head (No. 2 of section 91), 
with classes of sulbjects enumerated of mational and general concern, indicates that what 
was in the mind of the limperial Legisilature when this power was conferred in 1867 was 
regulation relating to general trade and commerce. Any other construction would, it was 
pointed out, have rendered unnecessary the specific mention of certain other heads dealing 
with banking, bills of exchange and promissory notes, as to which it had been significantly 
deemed necessary to insert a specific mention. The contracts of a particular trade or busi- 
ness cou'ld not, therefore, be dealt with by Dominion legislation so as to conflict with the 
powers assigned to the Provinces over property and civil rights relating to the regulation of 
trade and commerce. The Dominion power h^s a really definite effect when applied in aid 
of what the Dominion Governlment are specifically enabled to do independently of the 
general regulation of trade and commerce, for instance, in the creation of Dominion com- 
panies with power to trade throughout the whole of Canada. This was shown in the deci- 
sion in John Deere Plow Company v. Wharton ([1915] A.C, at p. 340). The same thing 
is true of the exercise of an emergency power required, as on the occasion of war, in the 
interest of Canada as a whole, a power which may operate outside the specific enumerations 
in both section 91 and 92. And it was observed in the Alberta case, in reference to attempted 
Dominion legislation about insurance, that it must now be taken that the authority to 
leigislate for the regulation of trade and commerce does not extend to the regulation, for 
instance, by a licensing system, of a particular trade in which Canadians would otherwise 
be free to engage in the Provinces (see [19161 1 A.C. at p. 593). It is, in their Lordships' 
opinion, now clear that, excepting so far as the power can be invoked in aid of capacity 
conferred independently under other words in section 91, the power to regulate trade and 
commerce cannot be relied on as enabling the Dominion Parliament to regulate civil rights 
in the Provinces. 

A more difficult question arises with reference to the initial words of section 91, which 
enable 'the Parliament of Canada to make laws for the peace, order and good government 
of Canada in matters falling outside the provincial powers specifically conferred by section 
92. For Russell v. The Queen (7 A.C, 829) was a decision in which the Judicial Committee 
said that it was within Hie comipetency of the Dominion Parliament to establish a uniform 
system for prohibiting the liquor traffic throughout Canada excepting under restrictive con- 
ditions. It has been observed subsequently by this Committee that it is now clear that it 
was on the ground that subject-matter lay outside provincial powers, and not on the ground 
that it was authorized as legislation for the regulation of trade and commerce, that the 
Canada Temperance Act was sustained (see the Alberta case [1916] 1 A.C, at p. 595). But 
even on this footing it is not easy to reconcile the decision in Russell v. The Queen with 
the subsequent decision in Hodge v. The Queen (9 A.C. 117) that the Ontario Liquor License 
Act, with the powers of regulation which it entrusted to local authorities in the Province, 
was intra vires of the Ontario Legislature. Still more difficult is it to reconcile Russell v. 
The Queen with the decision given later by the Judicial Committee that the Dominion 
licensing statute, known as the MiQCarthy Act, which sought to establish a local licensing 
system for the liquor traffic throughout the Dominion, was ultra vires of the Dominion 
Parliament. As to this last decision it is not without significance that the strong Board which 
delivered it abstained from giving any reasons for their conclusion. They did not in terms 
dissent from the reasons given in Russell v. The Queen. They may have thought that the 
case was binding on them as deciding that the particular Canada Temperance Act of 1886 
had been conclusively held valid, on the ground of fact that at the period of the passing of 
the Act the circumstances of the time required it in an emergency affecting Canada as a 
whole. The McCarthy Act, already referred to, which was decided to have been ultra vires 
of the Dominion Parliament, was dealt with in the end of 1885. Ten years subsequently 
another powerful Board decided the case of Attorney-General for Ontario v. Attorney- 
General for the Dominion and' the Distillers' and Brewers' Association ([1896] A.C. 348). 
liord Herschcll and Lord Davey, who had been the leading counsel in the McCarthy case, 
sat on that Board, along with Lord Halsbury, who had presided at it. In delivering the 
judfe.ment. Lord Watson used in the latter case significant language: — 

"The judgment of this Board in Russell v. Regina, has relieved their Lordships from the difficult duty of 
considering whetlher the Canada Temperance Act of 1886 relates to the peace, order and good government of 
Canada in such a sense as to bring its provisions within the comipetency of the Canadian Parliament." 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 29 

That decision, he said, must be accepted as an authority to the extent to which it goes, 
namely, that 

" the restrictive provisions of the Act of 1886, when they have been duly brought into operation in any 
provincial area within the Dominion, must receive effect as valid enactments relating to the peace, order and 
good goveri^ment of Canada." 

The Board held that, on that occasion, they could, not inconsistently with Russell v. 
The Queen, declare a statute of the Ontario Legislature establishing provincial liquor prohi- 
liitions to be within the competence of a provincial legislature, provided that the locality 
had not already adopted the provisions of the Dominion Act of 1886. 

It appears to their Lordships that it is not now open to them to treat Russell v. The 
Queen as having established the general principle that the mere fact that Dominion legisla- 
tion is for the general advantage of Canada or is such thait it will meet a mere want which is 
felt throughout the Dominion, renders it competent if it cannot be brought within the heads 
enumerated specifically in section 91. Unless this is so, if the subject-matter falls within any 
of the enumerated heads in section 92, such legislation belongs exclusively to provincial 
competency. No doubt there may be cases arising out of some extraordinary peril to the 
national life of Canada, as a whole, such as the cases arising out of a war, where legislation 
is required of an order that passes beyond the heads of exclusive provincial competency. 
Such ca.ses may be dealt with under the words at the commencement of section 91, conferring 
general powers in relation to peace, order and good government, simply because such cases 
are not otherwise provided for. But instances of this, as was pointed out in the judgment 
in the Fort Frances Pulp case ([1923] AC. 695), are highly exceptional. Their Lordships 
think that the decision in Russell v. The Queen can only be supported to-day, not on the 
footing of having laid down an interpretation, such as has sometimes been invoked of the 
general words at the beginning of section 91, but on the assumption of the Board, apparently 
made at the time of deciding the case of Rxissell v. The Queen, that the evil of intemperance 
at that time amounted in Canada to one so great and so general that at least for the period 
it was a menace to the national life oS Canada so serious and pressing that the National 
Parliament was called on to intervene to protect the nation from disaster. An epidemic of 
pestilence might conceivably have been regarded as analogous. It is plain from the decision 
in the Board of Commerce case that the evil of profiteering could not have been so invoked, 
for provincial powers, if exercised, were adequate to it. Their Lordships find it difficult to 
explain the decision in Russell v. The Q^ieen as more than a decision of this order upon 
facts, considered to have been established at its date, rather than upon general law. 

The judgments in the Court below express differing views. Orde, J., granted an in,terim 
injunction, restraining the first respondents from interfering with the business of the appel- 
lants and from entering on their premises, or examining their works or employees, and from 
exercising their compulsory powers as a I3oard of Conciliation and Investigation under the 
Dominion Act, and fxom interfering with the property and civil or municipal rights of the 
appellants. He held that the Dominion legislation interfered with provincial rights under 
section 92 in a fashion which could not be supported under any of the enumerated heads in 
section 91, and therefore could not be sustained by invoking the general words with which 
that section commences. The decision in the Fort Frances Pulp case {ubl supra) afforded no 
analogy on which such a contention as this last could be based. 

Mowat, J., dissenting from this reasoning, referred the trial of the action to a Divisional 
Court. He thought that the legislation in question was a matter of national importance, 
dealing with a subject which affect-ed the body politic of the Dominion, as in Russell v. The 
Queen {ubi supra). 

In the Appellate Division, Mulock, C. J., Smith, J. A., and Magee, J. A., concurred in 
the judgment delivered by Ferguson, J. A. That learned judge held that the Act in question 
was not, " in its pith and substance," an Act relating to merely provincial matters falling 
within section 92, but related to industrial disputes which might develop into disputes 
affecting, not only the immediate parties, but the national welfare, peace, order and safety. 
He cited the analogy of the Australian Constitution Act, which, by section 51, placed such 
disputes within the competence of the Australian Parliament when they extended beyond 
the limits of any single state. He was of opinion that, even if the Dominion legislation 
actually interfered with provincial powers, it might be supported if necessary as dealing with 
the interest of the peace, order and good government of Canada, but he thought that it was 
not necessary to go further in point of principle than to treat Russell v. The Queen (ubi 
supra) as showing that, where an abnormal condition in a great emergency demanded it, the 
Parliament of Canada might legislate for such a case without even trenching on the powers 
allocated to the Provinces under section 92. He also thought that the Act wag not one to 
control or regulate contractual or civil rights, but that its object was to authorize inquiry 
into conditions or disputes, and that the prevention of crimes, the protection of public safety, 
peace and order, and the protection of trade and commerce, were of its pith and substance 
and paramount purpose. The Act could also be supported as Dominion JegiMation under 
the overriding enumerated heads of section 91, as being legislation in relation to the regula- 
tion of trade and commerce, and also to the criminal law. 



30 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Hodgins, J. A., dissented. In his view industrial strife was nothing more than the 
result of an undersirable use of the civil right to cease work in the operation of various 
businesses. The argument in support of the Act was practically an endeavour to invent a 
new field, which was only a department or development of one of those exclusively possessed 
by provincial legislatures. Nor was the matter made better by the contention that the 
Act, when examined in the light of evidence adduced, dealt with a subject which trans- 
cended provincial hmits and was of Dominion importance. It was, no doubt, true that, 
owing to the hiechly oraandzed methods of modem labour, strikes might spread and extencL 
to other businesses.. This might happen, and the state of things might conceivably reach 
a height in which it became comparable to war, famme, or rebellion, and justify Dominion 
action. But on the only facts proved, in the learned Judge's view, this Act could not be 
supported as dea;ling with a case of (1) emergency, or (2) general Canadian interest and 
importance, or (3) with a power conferred under any of the enumerated heads in section 
91. No great national emergency was shown to have existed when the statute was enacted 
in 1907. or to have occurred since, and the statute was not framed so as to come into opera- 
tion only when such emergency arose. The statute was further not framed so as to confer 
the drastic powers that would be necessary in such a case, but was based on the normal 
working of industrial relations, which often required time and patience and some restraint 
if dislocation was to be avoided. It was essentially a relative measure. The special and 
exceptional conditions of emergency required by the judgments in the Board of Commerce 
and Fort Frances Pulp cases {uhi supra) did not appear to him to have existed in point of 
fact. So far as anticipations of changes in the future were concerned, Hodgins, J. A., thought 
that the question was whether regulation of civil rights or invasion of property rights in 
the fashion provided by the Act, in order to bring about a uniform and desirable method ot 
dealing with industrial disputes, admirable as its purpose might be, could be valid in view 
of the exercise of the powers given to the Provinces. That the Provinces had such powers. 
as complete as those in this Act given to the Dominion, he entertained no doubt. Several 
Provinces had on their statute books legislation of much the same kind. Even granting 
the national importance of the question, the whole success of this method of dealing with 
it depended on the capacity to seize on local disputes and their conditions, and to manage 
the exercise of civil rights in relation to them. The circumstance that the dispute might 
spread to other Provinces was not enough in itself to justify Dominion interference, if such 
interference affected property and civil rights. The Province in the present case was simply 
the scene of municipal action. As the result of his consideration of the principles laid down 
for the interpretation of the British North America Act, the learned Judge was of opinion 
that the Act could not stand. 

Their Lordships have examined the evidence produced at the trial. They concur in 
the view taken of it by Hodgins, J. A. They are of opinion that it does not prove any 
emergency putting the national life of Canada m unanticipated peril such as the Board 
which decided Russell v. The Queen may be considered to have had before their minds. 

As the result of consideration, their Lordships have come to the conclusion that they 
ought humbly to advise the Sovereign that the appeal should be allowed, and that judg- 
ment should be entered for the aj>pelilants for the declaration and injunction claimed. 
There should be no costs, either of .this appeal or in the Courts below, and any costs paid 
under the judgment of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court ought to be repaid. 

Amendments to the Industrial Dispiites Investigation Act 

The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, having been in January, 
1925, disallowed in its then existing form by the Judicial Committee of the 
Privy Council on the ground that it invaded the fields of jurisdiction allocated 
to the provinces under the terms of the British North America Act, amend- 
ments looking to its rehabilitation were introduced in the House of Commons 
by the Minister of Labour on March 12, 1925. The amending measure restricted 
the application of the Act to matters on which the Dominion has unquestioned 
jurisdiction, and contained an enumeration of the works and undertakings to 
which the provisions of the Act should apply. 

The minister's explanation concerning the aim of the Bill was as follows: — 
"The purpose of this amendment is to limit the application of the Act in terms to 
matters not within the legislative jurisdiction of any province. It is recognized, of course, 
that the enumerative provisions of the amendment are not technically necessary for_ this 
purpose, but it is thought advisable, nevertheless, to insert them for purposes of convenience 
and to make the Act more intelligible to the body of employees and employers whose 
interests the legislation is designed to serve. These remarks ap,t)ly_ as well to any overlapping 
which may be found to exist in the amendment as drawn. It is hoped the enactment of 
the section in this form will tend to prevent misunderstandings and differences regarding 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 31 

the application of the Aot to particular disputes and creat-e greater certainty in |th«Q 
administration of tlie Act than would be possible if the provisions were couched in more 
general terms. The purpose of the proposed paragraph (iv) is to enable any province to 
take advantage of the Dominion Act should it so desire." » 

During consideration of the Bill by the House of Commons three clauses 
were added with a view to making more effective the provisions of the original 
statute, the changes incorporated in these last-mentioned clauses being identical 
with those which were before Parliament at the two preceding sessions and which 
on each previous occasion were severely opposed in the Senate and so amended 
as to prove unacceptable to the House of Commons. The sections of the Act 
affected were 15, 57 and 58. 

The object of the amendment to section 15 was to facilitate applications 
for Boards of Conciliation and Investigation. There had been instances in the 
past where communications addressed by one of the disputing parties to the 
other had remained unanswered and it could not be therefore definitely stated 
that negotiations had taken place and that all efforts to effect a settlement by 
negotiations had failed. The amendment permits the establishment of a board 
where a declaration is submitted to the effect that it has been found impossible 
to secure a conference between the parties concerned or to enter into nego- 
tiations. 

With respect to section 57, which governs the relations of the parties pend- 
ing board proceedings, the amendment places clearly upon the party desiring 
a change in wages or hours the full responsibility, in the event of a dispute 
occurring, for making an application for a board. 

Section 58, one of the penalty sections, was amended so as to conform with 
the change in section 57, the amendment providing that any employer making 
effective a change in wages or hours contrary to the provisions of the Act shall 
be liable to a fine for each day or part of a day such change exists. This 
section had previously made an employer liable for a fine only in the event of 
his declaring or causing a lockout in violation of the statute. 

The Bill, including these additional clauses, passed the House of Com- 
mons and Senate without division, receiving royal assent on June 12. The 
amending Act is printed below. Section I embodies additional clauses. In 
sections 2, 3 and 4 the changes effected are indicated by italics. 

AN ACT TO AMEND THE INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES INVESTIGATION ACT, 1907 

[Assented to 12th June, 1925.1 

HIS MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of 
Commons of Canada, enacts as follows: — 

1. The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, is amended by inserting after section 
two thereof the following: — I 

"application of act. 
"2a. This Act shall apply to the following disputes only: — 

(i) Any dispute in relation to employment upon or in connection with any work, 
undertaking or business which is within the legislative authority of the Parliament 
o' Canada, including but not so as to restrict the generality of the foregoing: 

(a) works, undertakings or business operated or carried on for or in connection with 
navigation and shipping, whether inland or maritime; 

(b) lines of steam or other ships, railways, canals, telegraphs and other works 
and undertakings connecting any province with any other or others of the 
provinces, or extending beyond the limits of the province; 

(c) lines of steamships between a province and any British or foreign country; 

(d) ferries between any province and any British or foreign country, or between 
two provinces; 

(e) works, undertakings or business belonging to, carried on or operated by aliens, 
including foreign corporations immigrating into Canada to carry on business; 



32 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

(j) such works as, although wholly situate within the province, have been or may 
be declared by the Parliament of Canada to be for the general advantage of 
Canada, or for the advantage of two or more of the provinces; 
(g) works, undertakings or business of any company or corporation incorporated 

by or under the authority of the Parliament of Canada, 
(ii) Any dispute which is not within the exclusive legislative authority of any 
provincial legislature to regulate in the manner provided by this Act. 

(iii) Any dispute which the Governor in Council may by reason of any real or 
apprehended national emergency declare to be subject to the provisions of this Act. 

(iv) Any dispute which is within the exclusive legislative jurisdiction of any 
province and which by the legislation of the province is made subject to the provisions 
of this Act. 

"2b. The provisions of this Act shall be construed as relating only to the application of 
The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, and not so as to extend the meaning 
of the word 'employer' as defined by section two, paragraph (c), of the said Act." 

2. Subparagraph (6) of paragraph two of section fifteen of The Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act, 1907, as enacted by section two of chapter twenty-nine of the statutes of 
1910, is repealed, and the following is substituted therefor: — 

"(b) A statutory declaration setting forth that, failing an adjustment of the dispute or 
a reference thereof by the minister to a board, to the best of the knowledge and belief 
of the declarant a lockout or strike will be declared, and (except where ,the application 
is made by an employer in consequence of an intended change in wages or hours proposed 
by the said employer) that the necessary authority to declare such lockout or strike 
has been obtained; or, where a dispute directly affects employees in miore than one 
province and such employees are members of a trade union having a general committee 
authorized to carry on negotiations in disputes between emiployers and employees' and so 
recognized by the employer, a statutory declaration by the chairman or .president and by 
the secretary of such committee setting forth that, failing an adjustment of the dispute 
or a reference thereof by the minister to a board, to the best of the knowledge and belief 
of the declarants a strike will be declared, that the dispute has been the subject iof 
negotiations between the committee of the employees and the employer, or that it has 
been impossible to secure conference or to enter into negotiations, that all efforts to obtain 
a satisfactory settlement have failed, and that there is no reasonable hope of securing a settle- 
ment by further effort or negotiations." 

3. Section fiftynseven of the said Act, as amended by section five of chapter twenty- 
nine of the statutes of 1910, and as further amended by section five of chapter twenty- 
nine of the statutes of 1920, is repealed, and the following is substituted therefor: — 

"57. Employers and employees shall give at least thirty days' notice of an intended 
or desired change affecting conditions of employment with respect to wages or hours; 
and in the event of such intended or desired change resulting in a dispute, it shall be 
unlawful for the employer to make effective a proposed change in wages or hours or for 
the employees to go on strike, until the dispute has been finally dealt with by a board, and 
a copy of its report has been delivered through the registrar to both the parties affected; 
the application for the appointment of a board shall be made by the emiployers or employees 
proposing the change in wages or in hours; neither of those parties shall alter the con- 
ditions of employment with respect to wages or hours, or on account otf the dispute do or be 
concerned in doing directly or indirectly, anything in the nature of a lockout or strike, 
or a suspension or discontinuance of employment or work, but the relationship of employer 
and employee shall continue uninterrupted by the dispute, or anything arising out of the 
dispute; but if, in the opinion of the board, either party uses this or any other provision of 
this Act for the purpose of unjustly maintaining a given condition of afflairs through 
delay, and the board so reports to the minister, such party shall be guilty of an offence, 
and liable to the same penalties as are imposed for a violation of the next preceding 
section." 

4. Section fifty-eight of the said Act is repealed, and th)e following is substituted 
therefor: — 

"58. Any employer decliaring or causing a lockout or making effective a change in wages 
or hours contrary to the provisions of this Act shall be liable to a fine of not less than 
one hundred dollars, nor more than one thousand dollars for each day or part of a day 
that sucli lockout or change exists." 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 33 



II. CONCILIATION WORK 



Apart from the administration of the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, the services of the Department of Labour were utilized during the year in 
connection with the adjustment of a number of labour disputes. In connec- 
tion with some of these disputes application had been made for the establish- 
ment of a Board of Conciliation and Investigation, but it was not found neces- 
sary to proceed with the establishment of a board since the difficulties were 
adjusted through the assistance of a conciliator. In other cases in which appli- 
cation was made for the establishment of a board it was found that the dispute 
did not come within the provisions of the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act and the Department of Labour assisted by the appointment of a conciliator 
in bringing about an amicable adjustment. In many of the disputes where a 
settlement was secured by conciliation and no strike took place it was deemed 
desirable to give the matter as little publicity as possible. As a result the best 
work of the department achieved in this direction often becomes known only 
to the chief representatives of the disputants. 

The Minister of Labour assisted personally in some instances and in other 
cases the good offices of the department were exerted through the fair wages 
officers who are stationed at different industrial centres. The officers in question 
are: Mr. Theo. Bertrand, stationed at Montreal; Mr. E. N. Compton, stationed 
at Toronto ; Mr. F. E. Harrison, stationed at Vancouver. Mr. E. McG. Quirk, 
of Montreal, though not actually an officer of the department, acted on various 
occasions as a special representative in connection with conciliation work in 
Quebec and the Maritime Provinces. Mr. F. E. Harrison, who had been for 
a number of years stationed at Calgary, was moved to Vancouver, and, in 
addition to his charge of departmental matters in British Columbia, has con-' 
tinned to keep in touch with labour questions in Alberta and Saskatchewan, 
particularly in connection with disputes occurring from time to time in the 
coal fields of Alberta and eastern British Columbia. 

Close attention was given, as in previous years, to disputes affecting t!he 
coal fields of British Columbia, Alberta, and Eastern Canada. Reference has 
been made in previous reports to the cost of living commission which was 
established in 1918 on request of the coal miners and operators of Vancouver 
island to deal with the cost of living and wages matters there. An agreement 
had been made whereby the cost of living bonus granted to the miners would 
be adjusted quarterly in accordance with changes occurring from time to time 
in the cost of living. This agreement continued in effect from the fall of 1918 
till the month of November, 1924, when the commission was discontinued on 
account of an agreement which had been reached with the miners providing 
for a stabilized rate of bonus. 

Reference was made in the last annual report to the strike which had 
occurred on March 31, 1924, in the collieries controlled by the members of the 
Western Canada Coal Operators' Association. The workmen involved in this 
dispute comprised the membership of District 18 of the United Mine Workers of 
America. The strike continued throughout the spring and summer months and 
into the ensuing fall. Towards the end of September a conference was held on 
request of the Minister of Labour and under the chairmanship of Mr. F. E. 
Harrison, Fair Wages Officer. After several meetings had been held the miners 
proposed a renewal of the wage agreement with a reduction in ivages of one dollar 
per day for contract men, and ^ or 12^ per cent for day wage men. The miners' 
committee later accepted the suggestion of the departmental officer that wages 
of contract employees be reduced by $1.17 per day, and those of datal men be 

7343-3 



34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

reduced i or 12^ per cent, the agreement to run for three years. This proposal 
was declined by the operators, principally on the ground of the length of the 
contract. The joint conference then adjourned until the second wteek of 
October, when it was expected the Minister of Labour would be present. 
Between October 6 and 10, negotiations were carried on, the Minister of Labour 
and the Premier of Alberta being present. On October 10 a settlement was 
reached, renewing the agreement which expired March 31, 1924, until March 31, 
1927, sulbject to six months' notice from either party after March 31, 1925, the 
wage scale to be reduced as mentioned above. This settlement was subject to 
ratification by ballot of the members of the miners' union, who, on October 16, 
voted for ratification. 

Following the foregoing settlement the mines in the district were reopened, 
but in some instances the steam coal mine operators reported that they could 
not get contracts for coal in competition with coal from the United States at 
low prices and that it was impossible to operate the mines at a loss. Some of 
the mines were, therefore, closed down indefinitely. As a result of ensuing 
negotiations, some of the operating companies withdrew from the Western Canada 
Coal Operators' Association and entered into separate agreements with their 
employees, providing for lower wage scales than that in the district union 
agreement. 

Mr. Harrison was successful in the month of February in the securing of 
an adjustment of wages rates affecting the workmen employed on the construc- 
tion of a subway in Edmonton which was being built under agreement between 
the municipality and the Canadian National Railways. The dispute had 
previously led to a strike of several weeks' duration in mid-winter and had been 
the subject of protracted discussion between (he public authorities concerned 
and the workmen's representatives. 

Mr. Harrison made several trips throughout his territory during the year in 
fvhich he assisted in the settlement of industrial disputes at various points. 

The time of Mr. E. N. Compton, resident Fair Wages Officer in Toronto, 
was largely taken up during the year in connection with labour questions 
arising on the contracts for the Welland ship canal which are dealt with in 
another chapter of the present report. 

Happily during the period covered by this report there were relatively few 
industrial disputes in the territory covered by Mr. Compton. He had, however, 
many conferences with representative employers and labour men on matters 
j>ertaining to labour conditions and his services were used at various points 
in the settlement of labour difficulties. 

Mr. Theo. Bertrand, resident Fair Wages Officer in Montreal, investigated 
eleven industrial disputes during the year involving 258 employers and 3,640 
employees. Assistance was rendered wherever possible in securing working 
agreements between the parties affected. In several instances mediation 
through the departmental officer was instrumental in preventing threatened 
interruption of work. 

Extended reference was made in the last annual report to the strike of 
steel workers and coal miners in Cape Breton which occurred in the summer 
of 1924 and to the efforts which were exerted through the Department of Labour 
to secm^ a settlenoent of this trouble. Mention also was made of the report 
of a Royal Commission which was appointed by the Government in September, 
1924, to inquire into the recurring industrial unrest among the steel workers at 
Sydney, N.S., "creating conditions which have occasioned the calling out of 
the active militia in aid of the civil pvower and their retention for a consider- 
able period of time in the areas affected." The recommendations made by this 
commission were printed in the last annual rejwrt of the Department of Labour. 

Mr. E. McG. Quirk, of Montreal, was in touch with the labour situation 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 8S 

in Nova tecoua during the past year, as a special representative of the Minister 
of Laboiir. 

Mention is made elsewhere in the present report of the dispute involving 
11,000 coal miners in Nova Scotia which resulted in a cessation of work in the 
coal mines of that province on March 6. 

Mr. Quirk assisted in the settlement of a dispute affecting 3,000 employees 
of the Montreal street railway company and also in the settlement of a dispute 
affecting the foremen, checkers, coopers, truckers, etc., employed by the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway on the wharves in Montreal. In both of these last-men- 
tioned cases applications had been made for the establishment of Boards of 
Conciliation and Investigation, but the difficulties were adjusted by direct 
negotiations, Mr. Quirk acting as a conciliator. 

An investigation was made by Mr. Quirk of alleged discrimination shown 
by one of the taxi-cab companies in Montreal against certain of its employees 
on account of union activities. As a result of conferences on this subject, the 
company gave assurance that it would meet a committee of its employees 
with regard to grievances and would show no discrimination. Application had 
been made by the employees involved in this dispute for the appointment of a 
board under the Inidustrial Disputes Investigation Act, but the subject matters 
were not deemed to be within the scope of the Act, for which reason no board 
was estaiblisihed. 

Mr. Quirk was further called on to deal with the wages ckims of various 
classes of workmen employed in construction operations in the harbour of 
Montreal. He was instrumental as well in securing a settlement of a strike of 
the employees of one of the principal paper companies in the eastern town^ips. 



7343-3J 



36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



III. FAIR WAGES 

The fair wages policy of the Government of Canada is based on a resolution 
of the House of Commons which was adopted at the session of 1900 as follows: — ■ 

"That it is resolved, that all Government contracts should contain such conditions 
as will prevent abuses, which may arise from the subletting of such contracts, and that 
every effort should be made to secure the payment of such wages as are generally accepted 
as current in each trade for competent workmen in the district where the work is carried 
out, and that this House cordially concurs in such policy, and deems it the duty of the 
Government to take immediate steps to give effect thereto. 

" It is hereby declared that the work to which the foregoing policy shall apply includes 
not only work undertaken by the Government itself; but also all works aided by grant of 
Dominion public funds." 

Additional force was given to the fair wages resolution in the revision of the 
Railway Act in 1903 by the inclusion in that statute of a section requiring the 
payment of current rates of wages to all workmen engaged in the construction 
of lines of railway towards which the Parliament of Canada voted financial aid. 
An Order in Council was also adopted in 1907 requiring contractors to post fair 
wages schedules in a conspicuous place on the public works under construction 
and to keep a record of payments made to workmen in their employ, such records 
to be open for inspection by the fair wages officers of the Government. In con- 
formity with the foregoing, conditions have been inserted since 1900 in Govern- 
ment contracts to which the fair wages policy applies requiring the observance of 
current wages rates. In connection with proposed works of construction schedules 
have been generally prepared setting forth the minimum wages rates and hours of 
labour to be observed in the performance of the contract. In other cases a clause 
was inserted calling for the observance of current wages and hours of the district 
and providing that in the event of any dispute arising as to what are the current 
wages or hours the same shall be determined by the Minister of Labour, whose 
decision shall be final. 

In order that the fair wages policy should be made as nearly uniform in terms 
and administration as possible, it was confirmed in 1922 by Order in Council 
(see Annual Report, 1922, pages 42-46). 

This Order in Council contains two sets of labour conditions marked '*A'' 
and " B ", respectively. The fqrmer is applicable to " all contracts made on 
behalf of the Government of Canada for the construction or remodelling of public 
buildings of all kinds, railways, canals, roads, bridges, locks, dry docks, eleva- 
tors, harbours, piers, wharves, lighthouses, and other works for the improve- 
ment and safety of transportation and navigation, rifle ranges, fortifications and 
other works of defence, dams, hydraulic works, slides, piers, booms, and other 
works for facilitating the transmisisaon of timber, and all other works and 
properties constructed or remodelled for the Government of Canada;" the like 
conditions are as far as practicable observable also by the departments of 
government in connection with all agreements involving the grant of Dominion 
public funds in the form of subsidy, advance, loan, or guarantee for any of the 
purposes mentioned. The conditions marked " B " are observable by the depart- 
ments concerned in connection with *' all contracts for the manufacture and 
supply to the Government of Canada of fittings for public buildings, harness, 
saddlery, clothing and other outfit for the military and naval forces. Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police, letter carriers, and other Government officers and 
employees, mail bags, letter boxes, and other postal stores, and any other articles 
and things hereafter designated by the Governor in Council." 

As a result of experience gained in the administration of the fair wages 
policy, as set forth in the Order in Council of June 7, 1922, certain amendments 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 37 

were made to the "A" conditions by Order in Council of April 9, 1924, on recom- 
'mendation of the Minister of Labour, which, without altering the scope and 
intent of the policy, are intended to make its purpose clearer and more definite. 
In the case of all contracts to which the "A" conditions apply, the depart- 
ment of the Government concerned is required to communicate to the Depart- 
ment of Labour the nature of the proposed contract and the classes of labour 
likely to be required in its execution. The Labour Department is charged with 
the preparation of schedules setting forth the rates of wages and hours of labour 
generally accepted as current, for competent workmen of the various classes 
required, in the district in which the work is to be performed. This fair wage 
schedule is thereupon embodied in the contract. In any cases where the Depart- 
ment of Labour is unable to furnish fair wage schedulles for the purpose afore- 
said, authority is given for the insertion in the contract of a fair wage clause in 
the terms following: — 

All mechanics, labourers, or other persons who perform labour in the construction of the 
work hereby contracted for, shall be paid such wages as are generally accepted as current 
from time to time during the continuance of the contract for competent workmen in the 
district in which the work is being performed for the character or class of work in which 
they are respectively engaged, and if there be no current rates in such district, then fair and 
reasonable rates, and shall work such hours as are customary in the trade in the district 
where the work is carried on, or if there be no custom of the trade as respects hours in the 
district, then fair and reasonable hours, unless for the protection of life and property, or for 
other cause shown to the satisfaction of the Minister of Labour, longer hours of service are 
lequired. The Minister of Labour may at any time and from time to time determine for 
the purposes of this contract, what are the current or fair and reasonable rates of wages, and 
the current or fair and reasonable hours, and may from time to time rescind, revoke, amend, 
or vary any such decision, provided that his determination and any amendment or variation 
shall not be operative prior to the period of three months immediately preceding the date 
thereof. Where there are special circumstances which in the judgment of the Minister of 
Labour make it expedient that he should do so, he may, in the manner and subject to the 
provisions herein above set forth, decide what are the current or fair and reasonable rates of 
wages for overtime, and what is the proper classification of any work for the purposes of 
wages and hours. Immediately upon receipt of notice of any decision of the Minister of 
Labour hereunder the contractor shall adjust the wages and hours and classification of work 
so as to give effect to such decision. In case the contractor shall fail so to do, or to pay 
to any employee or employees for any services performed or for any hours of labour, wageg 
according to the rates fixed therefor by the Minister of Labour, the Minister of Labour 
may authorize and direct the minister* to pay such wages at the rates so fixed and to deduct 
the amount thereof from any moneys owing by the Government to the contractor and any 
such payment shall for all purposes as between the contractor and the Government be 
deemed and be taken to be payment to the contractor, and the contractor shall be bound in 
every particular by any such authority, direction and payment as aforesaid. The powers 
of the Minister of Labour hereunder shall not be exercised as to any employee or employees 
where it is established to his satisfaction that an agreement in writing exists and is in effect 
between the contractor and the class of employees to which such employee or employees 
belong or the authorized representatives of such class of employees fixing rates of wages, 
overtime conditions and hours of labour. 

During the year 1924-25 the Department of Labour prepared fair wage? 
conditions in connection with the execution of eighty-five contracts. These were 
divided among the different departments of the Government as follows: Rail- 
ways and Canals, 9; Marine and Fisheries, 4; Interior, 1; National Defence, 
2; Indian Affairs, 4; Public Works, 65. 

Works for which Fair Wages Conditions Prepared 

The following tables give particulars regarding fair wages conditions pre- 
pared in the Department of Labour during the fiscal year 1924-25: — 



*The term " miuistei " in this case refers to the minister of the department with which the contract is made. 



38 



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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 41 

Table showing, by provinces, the Fair Wages Conditions prepared, 1924-25. 



Department of Government 


Prince 
Edward 
Island 


Nova 
Scotia 


New 
Bruns- 
wick 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Mani- 
toba 


Alberta 


British 
Columbia 


Sas- 
katche- 
wan 


Total 












9 

16 

1 










8 


Public Works 




7 


2 


21 


2 




17 




66 






1 






1 












1 


2 








3 


1 








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2 










2 




4 
















Total 




10 


2 


24 


27 2 




19 


1 


Si 








1 











Post Office Contracts — List of supplies furnished the Post Ofl&ce Depart- 
ment by contract, or otherwise, under conditions for the protection of 
the labour employed, which were approved by the Department of 
Labour, 1924-25. 



Nature of Order 



Amount 
of Order 



Supplying waterproof capes 

Supplying cloth caps and waterproof covers 

Supplying porcelain enamelled post office signs 

Supplying straw hats 

Supplying gasolene 

Making of railway mail clerks' travelling boxes 

Supplying of liquid soap 

Supplying of tins for cancelling ink 

Supplying of grey frieze and blue and brown melton. 

Supplying street letter boxes 

Supplying of letter boxes 

Supplying of leather straps 

Supplying parcel receptacles 

Making up of coats and trousers 

Supplying of ferrules 

Supplying of cloth caps and covers 

Supplying of rubber boots 

Supplying of gasolene 

Supplying of cotton duck 

Supplying of chamois vests 

Supplying of waterproof capes 

Supplying of waterproof capes 

Making up of waterproof coats 

Making up of leather straps 

Supplying of malleable cast iron bars 

Supplying of cast iron bars 

Supplying of brass grommets 

Supplying of brass grommets 

Supplying of grey satchels 

Supplying of fur caps 

Supplying of cancelling ink 

Supplying of blue and brown serge 

Supplying of post office delivery truck bodies 

Supplying of ink tins 

Supplying of ink tins 

Supplying of rubber stamping cushions 

Supplying of gasolene 

Supplying of lead seals 

Supplying of grey frieze 

Supplying of blue and brown melton 

Making up of bronze buttons 

Supplying of capes , 

Supplying of waterproof coats , 

Supplying of cloth caps and waterproof covers 

Making up of flannel shirtwaists 

Making up of sackcoats and trousers 

Supplying of hand towels 

Supplying of parcel receptacles 

Supplying of letter boxes 

Supplying of gasolene 

Making up of sackcoats and trousers 

Supplying of cancelling ink 



Total. 



S cts. 

380 00 

1,113 00 

2,207 50 

3,920 00 

2,450 00 

510 00 

960 00 

400 00 

18,510 00 

895 00 

265 00 

912 00 

2,585 00 

34,636 50 

740 00 

775 00 

1,044 95 

2,300 00 

12,156 25 

1,386 00 

983 13 

64 50 

2,089 15 

1,100 00 

153 00 

153 00 

116 00 

116 00 

420 00 

525 00 

1.260 00 
18,910 00 

1,873 00 

110 00 

110 00 

120 00 

1,900 00 

2,750 00 

6,400 00 

17,750 00 

522 75 

2,073 70 

4,155 20 

2.261 00 
11,940 00 
70,244 70 

270 00 

2,360 00 

1,297 50 

2.300 00 

412 00 

370 00 

243,255 83 



42 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Fair Wages Complaints on Government Works 

Complaint was made to the Department of Labour in various instances 
during the past year that contractors for Government works were not complying 
with the fair wage requirements of their contracts. Most of these complaints 
related to alleged non-payment of the wages rates contemplated in the contract, 
the requirement in each case being that the contractor should pay the work- 
people the rates of wages current in the district for the various classes of labour 
employed. In some cases inquiry showed that the claims were not justified; in 
all instances, however, in which the complaints were well founded action was 
taken by the Department of Labour to uphold the rights of the workmen con- 
cerned. 

As in the preceding year, a number of the complaints related to the con- 
tracts for the construction of the Welland Ship Canal, which is the largest public 
work under way in Canada at the present time. The construction of this canal 
was begun in 1913. The work was discontinued towards the close of the Great 
War, but was resumed later by the Department of Railways and Canals. Con- 
tracts were subsequently let for the completion of sections 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, also 
for the construction of sections 7 and 8, leaving only one section in the neigh- 
bourhood of Welland on which construction work has not yet bieen begun. Pro- 
vision has been made by the Dominion Government in all cases for the observ- 
ance of the rates of wages and hours of labour generally accepted as current in 
the district for the different classes of workmen employed. 

On account of disputes which had arisen on the Welland Ship Canal work, 
the Minister of Labour issued a ruling in the month of June, 1923, regarding the 
wages rates and hours of labour of the different classes of workmen employed. 
The rates and hours sanctioned by the minister were based in the main on 
agreement which had been reached between the contractors and their employees. 

Application was made to the Minister of Labour during the past winter by 
the different contracting firms concerned for a revision of the 1923 wages rates, 
and some of the firms submitted a schedule of rates which in their opinion should 
be adopted. These proposed rates ranged from a minimum of 25 cents per hour 
for common labour upward. On receipt of this request the Minister of Labour 
directed that a special inquiry should be made for the purpose of ascertaining 
the rates of wages and working hours that are current at present in the district. 
This inquiry was made by one of the fair wages officers of the Department of 
Labour, accompanied by a representative of the Department of Railways and 
Canals, which latter department is charged with the supervision of the work. 

During the course of the inquiry, an opportunity was granted by the 
Government officers to the contracting firms affected and to the labour repre- 
sentatives to submit all information in their possession as to the standards which 
were being observed on other work and which were applicable to the canal con- 
struction. Before acting on the report the minister convened and attended a 
conference of the contractors and labour representatives in St. Catharines and 
an opportunity was provided in this way for the fullest discussion of the situa- 
tion in all respects. An opportunity was also afforded to the contracting firms 
and to the labour representatives to reach an agreement, if possible, by mutual 
understanding. Efforts made in this latter direction were, however, unsuccessful, 
and the minister's ruling was issued within a few days thereafter. On the report 
submitted by the Government officers as to existing wages stand'ards in the dis- 
trict, certain changes were sanctioned by the Minister of Labour in the schedule 
from those that had been previously in effect. Changes were also made in the 
case of some trades in the working hours. 

The rates, as sanctioned in the schedule are subject to further revision from 
time to time under the terms of contract as may be necessary in accordance with 
any changes which may occur in current wages rates and hours in the district. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



43 




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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 40 



IV. STATISTICS 

During the year statistics of strikes and lockouts, wages and hours of 
labour, prices and cost of living, employment and industrial accidents have been 
collected and published regularly in the Labour Gazette, annual reviews also 
appearing soon after the close of the calendar year. In accordance with the 
'' Statistics Act, 1918," and under arrangements with the Dominion Statistician, 
approved by Order in Council dated October 16, 1922, certain classes of these 
statistics are collected and published in co-operation with the Dominion Statis- 
tician, in close association with statistics of general social and economic condi- 
tions as 'organized in the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The classification of 
industries and occupations drawn up in the bureau is followed in the compilation 
of the statistics of labour. 

Statistics respecting employment appear in chapter VII of the present 
report. 

Strikes and Lookouts during 1924 

The year 1924 was marked by a smaller number of strikes and lockouts 
than 1923 or 1922, which years in turn had shown lowest numbers of disputes 
since 1915. Of the 73 disputes in existence during the year, 10 were carried 
over from 1923, there being 63 which began during 1924. At the end of the year 
two disputes were still in existence, one of clothing workers in Montreal, which 
began in December, and one of coal miners at Drumheller, Alberta, which began 
on December 29. The numbers of employees involved and the time loss in man 
working days were much greater than in 1923, and nearly as great as in 1922, 
owing to a strike of over 7,000 coal miners in Alberta and British Columbia, 
which lasted from April to October, and caused a time loss of over one million 
working days. A strike of similar magnitude and duration had occurred in 
1922 also. 

The other principal disputes during the year included a strike of about 
10,000 coal miners in Nova Scotia in January and February, and the strike of 
job printing compositors for the 44-hour week which began in 1921 and con- 
tinued in Canada in six cities, being not called off until August 30, 1924. A 
strike of loggers in British Columbia in January and February involved over 
1,500 employees, causing a time loss of nearly 45,000 working days. 

The departmental record of strikes and lockouts in Canada was begun on 
the establishment of the department toward the end of 1900 and particulars 
of industrial disputes have been given each month in the Labour Gazette; also 
as early in each year as possible a summary statement of the previous calendar 
year is printed in the Labour Gazette, with a statistical analysis. The figures 
are given for the calendar rather than the fiscal year, because in this form they 
become more easily comparable with statistics on the same subject gathered in 
other countries, which also as a rule use the calendar year. The figures printed 
are inclusive of all strikes which come to the knowledge of the department, 
and the methods taken to secure information practically preclude probability 
of omissions of a serious nature. So far as concerns figures given with respect 
to duration of strikes, numbers of employees concerned, etc., it is impossible 
always to secure exact information, but the estimate made in such cases is the 
result of painstaking methods in the collection of data, and, with increasing 
experience in dealing with the subject, it is believed that the statistics indicate 
the conditions with reasonable precision. 

The record of the department includes lockouts as well as strikes, but a 
lockout or an industrial condition which is undoubtedly a lockout is rarely 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



encountered. In the statistical tables, therefore, strikes and lockouts are 
recorded together under the term " industrial disputes." 

A strike or lockout, included as such in the records of the department, is 
a cessation of work involving six or more employees, and lasting more than 
one working day. Disputes of only one day's duration or less and disputes 
involving less than six employees have not been in the past included in the 
published record, but a separate record of such disputes has been maintained 
in the department. For 1924, however, any such disputes involving a time loss 
of ten working days or more are included in the published record, there being 
five of these, involving twenty-six employees and resulting in a time loss of 760 
working days. 

The accompanying chart of the time loss in working days, by groups of 
industries for each year back to 1901, shows that in mining considerable time 
loss occurred in 1903, 1909, 1910, 1911 and 1913, and again in 1917, 1919, 1922, 
1923 and 1924. In the metal trades no great time loss appeared except in 1919, 
when the strikes in the metal trades in various cities and the general strike in 
Winnipeg in sympathy with the metal trades' strike there, caused a time loss 
of about two million days. In 1918, 1920 and 1923, however, the time losses (in 
these trades) were larger than in other years. In building and construction 
considerable time loss appeared in 1903, 1907, 1911 and 1919. In transportation 
there was considerable time loss only in 1901, due to a strike of trackmen; in 
1908, due to a strike of railway shop machinists; and in 1918 and 1919, due to 
numbers of strikes in street railway operation, as well as among freight handlers, 
in local transportation, cartage, etc. 

RECORD OF INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES BY YEARS, 1901 TO 1924 





Number of Disputes 


Disputes in existence in the year 


Year 


In existence 
in the year 


Beginning in 
the year 


Employers 
involved 


Employees 
involved 


Time loss in 
working days 


1901 


104 

121 

146 

99 

89 

141 

149 

68 

69 

84 

99 

150 

113 

44 

43 

75 

148 

196 

298 

285 

145 

85 

91 

73 


104 

121 

146 

99 

88 

141 

144 

65 

69 

82 

96 

148 

106 

40 

38 

74 

141 

191 

290 

272 

138 

70 

77 

63 


273 
420 
927 
575 
437 

1,015 
825 
175 
397 

1,335 
475 
989 

1,015 
205 
96 
271 
714 
766 

1,913 

1,273 
907 
569 
419 
415 


28,086 
12,264 
50,041 
16,482 
16,223 
26,050 
36,224 
25,293 
17,332 
21,280 
30,094 
40,511 
39,536 
8,678 
9,140 
21,157 
48,329 
68,489 
138,988 
52,150 
22,930 
41,050 
32,868 
32,494 


632,302 

120,940 

1,226,500 

265,004 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


217,244 


1906 


359.797 
621,962 


1907 


1908 


708,285 


1909 


871,845 


1910 


718,635 


1911 


2,046,650 


1912 


1,099,208 


1913 


1,287,678 


1914 


430,054 


1915 


106,149 


1916 


208,277 


1917 


1,134,970 


1918 


763,341 


1919 


3,942,189 


1920 


886,754 


1921 


956,461 


1922 


1,975,296 


1923 


768,474 


1924 


1,770,825 






Total 


2,915* 


2,803 


16,406* 


835,689* 


23,118,849 







*In these totals figures for disputes extending over the end of a year are counted more than once. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



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48 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



TIME LOSS IN WORKING DAYS THROUGH STRIKES AND LOCK- 
OUTS BY GROUPS OF INDUSTRIES EACH YEAR 1901-24 



WORKING MYS 




A 000 000 




3 eoo 000 




3 600 000 


— 


3 400 000 




3 200 OO'O 


— 


3 000 000 


— 


2 800 000 


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— 


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— 


2 200 000 





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— 


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1400 000 





1200000 



i ceo OQO 



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600 000 



400 000 



200 000 



OTHER INDUSTRIES 

METALS MACHIMERY ETC 

MINES SMELTERS ETC 

CLOTHING 

TRANSPORTATION 

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION 




OoOOOOOOor~*"~ — — — — — — «^<^«M0^«N1 



£ — ^'^'^SD— £^ ci^' (^ ^ ^ 



REPORT OF- THE DEPUTY MINISTER 40 

RESULTS OF STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS ACCORDING TO NUMBERS 
OF EMPLOYEES INVOLVED IN 1901-1924 



MEM 
HOOOO- 



I9O00Q- 



120000- 



iii5ooo- 



JOOOO0- 



nUMBER or MEN WHO LOST HBl 

NUMBER or MEff WHO WOd I I 

NUMBER Of MEN WHO COMPROMISED ^^M 
inOEPINITE iSIZZ3 



i 



90000 



BOOOO- 



70000 



60000 




1901 1902 190? I90<l 1903 1906 IM7 1908 1909 



m 1913 m 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 I9?l mz 19231924 



7343-1 



50 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Prices and Cost of Living 

The publication in the Labour Gazette each month of statistics of retail 
prices of staple foods, and of coal and wood and coal oil, and as to the rentals 
of six-roomed workingmen's houses in some sixty of the industrial centres of 
Canada, begun in 1910, has been continued. Since 1921 the figures as to food 
prices have been secured through the Dominion Bureau of Statistics from repre- 
sentative butchers and grocers in these centres, as well as through the resident 
correspondents of the Labour Gazette. The calculation of a weekly family 
budget of foods, fuel and rent, in order to show the changes in the costs of these 
items from month to month, which has been continued and supplemented by 
information as to the changes in the costs of clothing, boots, etc., secured half- 
yearly, has made possible the publication from time to time in the Labour 
Gazette of a table showing, by percentages, the changes in the cost of the prin- 
cipal items of family consumption, as in the accompanying table. 

In connection with the statistics of wholesale prices published by the 
department in special reports from 1910 to 1917 and monthly in the Labour 
Gazette since 1911, it is to be noted that, as a result of an arrangement made 
in 1918, the Dominion Statistician has constructed a new index number of 
wholesale prices in Canada designed to replace that published by the depart- 
ment as the official index number for Canada. The index number calculated 
by the department covering the period 1890 to date (based upon prices 1890- 
1899 as 100) has therefore been discontinued. The new index is weighted and 
based upon the prices of 238 commodities in 1913, and has three systems of 
grouping, enabling analyses to be made from three different points of view. 
For the years prior to 1913 the new index number was constructed from the 
prices published by the Department of Labour from 1890 to 1913 using 1913 
as 100, the index number being unweighted for this period. This number was 
issued by the bureau in 1923, a summary being given in the Labour Gazette for 
June of that year. The figures for the main grouping, namely, that according 
to " Chief Component Material," have now been carried back by months to 
the year 1913. The figures for the other two groupings have been calculated 
by months from 1919 to date. Pending the publication of the new index number 
by months back to 1913 the department continued the publication in the Labour 
Gazette of its index number of 272 commodities up to the end of 1924, but pub- 
lished the summary tables of the new index each month with notes on the prices 
movement and this is being continued. 

Other index numbers of wholesale prices in Canada calculated by Pro- 
fessor H. Michell, the Canadian Bank of Commerce, and the United States 
Federal Reserve Board, are given in summary form each quarter in the Labour 
Gazette. 

Statistics as to the movements of prices in other countries have been pub- 
lished in the Labour Gazette as in previous years, the considerable development 
of statistical work of this nature in nearly all countries having increased the 
amount of information available. 

The statistics of prices and cost of living have been used to a considerable 
extent in the adjustment of wages, while in some cases employers and employees 
have agreed to adjust wage rates from time to time according to the cost of 
living statistics in the Labour Gazette. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 

CHANGES IN THE COST OF LIVING IN CANADA FROM 1913 TO 1924 
(Average prices in 1913 = 100) 



51 



Date 


Food 


Fuel 


Rent 


Cloth- 
ing 


Sun- 
dries 


All 


Dec. 1914 


108 
111 
138 
167 
186 
201 
229 
202 
180 
152 
161 
150 
140 
140 
140 
141 
145 
139 
142 
146 
139 
135 
140 
144 


98 
97 
110 
134 
163 
166 
191 
218 
208 
197 
189 
187 
181 
179 
189 
186 
189 
182 
183 
185 
180 
176 
176 
175 


92 
84 
86 
94 
102 
117 
134 
139 
139 
143 
145 
145 
145 
146 
146 
146 
146 
147 
147 
146 
147 
147 
147 
146 


110 
125 
143 
167 
198 
234 
260 
235 
195 
173 
167 
158 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 


100 
105 
110 
145 
160 
180 
190 
190 
188 
181 
170 
166 
164 
164 
164 
164 
164 
164 
164 
164 
164 
164 
164 
164 


102 


Dec. 1915 


104 


Dec. 1916 


119 


Dec. 1917 


143 


Dec. 1918 '. . 


162 


Dec. 1919 


179 


July 1920 


201 


Dec. 1920 


192 


Mar. 1921 


177 


June 1921 


163 


Sept. 1921 


163 


Dec. 1921 


156 


April 1922 


152 


July 1922 


152 


Sept. 1922 


152 


Dec. 1922 


153 


April 1923 


154 


July 1923 


152 




153 


Dec. 1923 


154 




151 


July 1924 


150 




151 


Dec. 1924 


163 







Wages and Houbs of Labour 

Statistics as to wages and hours of labour are secured to a considerable 
extent in connection with the work of the department on strikes and lockouts, 
industrial agreements, conciliation and mediation in industrial disputes, pro- 
ceedings under the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, fair wage 
schedules, and reports of changes in wages and hours. Reports are also secured 
each year from representative employers in the various industries and from 
labour organizations as to the rates of wages in effect. 

The series of bulletins on wages and hours of labour in Canada begun in 
1921 has been continued. Report No. 7, issued as a supplement to the Labour 
Gazette for January, 1925, gives information as to rates of wages, in certain 
trades and industries for 1920 to 1924. The accompanying table from Report 
No. 7 indicates the movement in wage rates during 1924, as compared with 
previous years for the classes included, and these index numbers are intended 
to show the trend in wage rates pending the calculation and publication of an 
index number covering the industries more completely. It will be noted that 
during 1924 wages rose slightly in several of the groups, but fell in coal mining. 
There were advances in the building trades, metal trades and printing trades, as 
well as in common labour in factories and lumbering. Report No. 8, issued as 
a supplement to the Labour Gazette for April, 1925, was supplementary to Report 
No. 7, and dealt w4th wages from 1920 to 1924 in certain manufacturing indus- 
tries, in local transportation, in grain elevators, in laundries, and for telephone 
and civic employees. 



7843-42 



X)2 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



INDEX NUMBERS OF RATES OF WAGES FOR VARIOUS CLASSES OF LABOUR IN CANADA, 

1901-1924. (Rates in 1913= 100) 



Year 


Build- 
ing 
Trades 


Metal 
Trades 


Print- 
ing 
Trades 


Electric 
Rail- 
ways 


Steam 
Rail- 
ways 


Coal 
Mining 


A?erage 


Com- 
mon 
Factory 
Labour 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Factory 
Trades 


Lum- 
bering 


1901 


60-3 
64-2 
67-4 
69-7 
73-0 

76-9 
80-2 
81-5 
83-1 
86-9 

90-2 

96-0 

100 

100-8 

101-5 

102-4 
109-9 
125-9 
148-2 
180-9 

170-5 
162-5 
166-4 
169-7 


68-6 
70-2 
73-3 
75-9 
78-6 

79-8 
82-4 
84-7 
86-2 
88-8 

91-0 
95-3 

ioe-0 

100-5 
101-5 

106-9 
128-0 
155-2 
180-1 
209-4 

186-8 
173-7 
174-0 
175-5 


60 
61-6 
62-6 
66-1 
68-5 

72-2 
78-4 
80-5 
83-4 
87-8 

91-6 

96-0 

100-0 

102-4 
103-6 

105-8 
111-3 
123-7 
145-9 
184-0 

193-3 
192-3 
188-9 
191-9 


64-0 
68-0 
71-1 
73-1 
73-5 

75-7 
81-4 
81-8 
81-1 
85-7 

88-1 
92-3 
100-0 
101-0 
97-8 

102-2 
114-6 
142-9 
163-3 
194-2 

192-1 
184-4 
186-2 
186-4 


70-8 
73-6 
76-7 
78-6 
78-9 

80-2 
85-5 
86-7 
86-7 
91-2 

96-4 
98-3 
100-0 
101-7 
101-7 

104-9 
110-1 
133-2 
154-2 
186-6 

165-3 
155-1 
157-4 

157-4 


82-8 
83-8 
85-3 
85- 1 
86-3 

87-4 
93-6 
94-8 
95-1 
94-2 

97-5 
98-3 
100 
101-9 
102-3 

111-7 
130-8 
157-8 
170-5 
197-7 

208-3 
197-8 
197-8 
192-4 


67-8 
70-2 
72 7 

74-8 
76 5 

78-7 
83-6 
85-0 
85 » 
89 1 

92 5 
96 

100 

101 4 
101 4 

105-7 
117 5 
139 8 
160 4 
1921 

1861 
176 8 
178-4 
179 3 








1902 








1903 








1904 








1906 








1906 








1907 








1908 








1909 








1910 








1911 


94-9 
98-1 

too 

101-0 
101-0 

110-4 
129-2 
152-3 
180-2 
215-3 

190-6 
183-0 
181-7 
183-2 


95-4 
97-1 
100-0 
103-2 
106-2 

115-1 

128-0 
146-8 
180-2 
216-8 

202-0 
189-1 
196-1 
197-6 


93-3 


1912 


98-8 


uu 


100-0 


1914 


94-7 


1916 


89-1 


1916 

1917.. 

1918 


109-5 
130-2 
150-5 


1919 


169-8 


1920 


202-7 


1921 


152-6 


1922 


158-7 


1923 


170-4 


1924 


183-1 







*Simple average of six preceding columns. 

Fatal Industrial Accidents in Canada in 1924 
Fatalities due to industrial accidents in Canada, as shown by reports to 
the Department of Labour, numbered 1,281 in 1924, as compared with 1,412 in 
1923. The number of persons employed during the year was, however, some- 
what smaller than during 1923. In both years logging had a higher fatality 
record in proportion to the number of workers employed than any other indus- 
try; falling trees, branches, etc., were responsible for 90 deaths in 1924, drown- 
ings for 39, and the handling of materials in rolling, piling and loading opera- 
tions for 25 deaths. The non-metallic mineral mining and quarrying industry 
was second in its rate of fatalities, a principal cause being the fall of loose rocks 
from the sides of open pits. In the mining, smelting and quarrying group the 
three main causes of fatalities were falls of rock, which accounted for 65 deaths, 
explosives which accounted for 25 deaths, and mine and quarry cars which 
accounted for 24 deaths. In steam railway service 139 deaths were reported; 
in water transportation, 76; in storage and local transportation, 39; and in pub- 
lic utilities, including the telegraph and telephone services, 45. In the manu- 
facturing industries 164 fatalities were reported, the greatest number being in 
the saw and planing mills and in the iron, steel and products groups. Ninety- 
three deaths occurred in the agricultural group, 21 being caused by horses and 
12 by farm machinery. 

The greatest loss of life in all groups was caused by falling objects, which 
included the 90 deaths already mentioned as due to falling trees, branches, etc., 
in the logging industry, 65 deaths due to falling rocks, etc., in the mines and 
quarries, 25 caused by material falling from elevations, loads, piles, etc., and 
21 due to the collapse of structures. Moving trains, vehicles, etc., caused the 
death of 236 employees, derailments and collisions causing 22 of these fatal- 
ities, being struck by, run over or crushed by or between cars and engines 
causing 106, mine and quarry cars, 24, automobile and other power vehicles, 34, 
and animal drawn vehicles, 12. There were 135 deaths due to drowning; 83 
due to falling from elevations such as scaffolds, bridges, etc., 44 of these being 
in the construction industries; 10 deaths were due to falls from ladders; 52 
were caused by explosive substances and 13 by steam escapes, boiler explos- 
ion®, compressed air, etc.; 52 deaths were caused by electricity; 5 by hot sub- 
stances and 5 by gas fumes. Working machinery was responsible for 46 deaths. 
Aibout 30 persons died from infection following injuries. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



53 



The accompanying table shows the fatal industrial accidents in 1924, classi- 
fied by months, and the ratio of accidents to the number of employees in certain 
of the industries based on figures showing the estimated number of persons 
employed in these industries in 1923, the figures for 1924 being not available 
at the time of publication: — 

FATAL INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS DURING 1924. BY MONTHS 



Industry or Trade 



Total 

in 

1924 



OS 1> 

■Is 



>>S5 

s.s 



\ a a> 



5 s 






5 

Or-, 

a) 5 
O1M.2 



Agriculture. 
Logging 



Fishing and Trapping 

Mining, Non-Ferrous 
Smelting and Quarry- 
ing 

Metalliferous mining 

Coal mining 

Non-metallic mineral 
mining and quarrying, 
n.e.s 

Clay products and struc- 
tural materials, n.e.s. . 



Manufacturing 

Vegetable foods, drink 
and tobacco 

Animal edible products. . 

Textiles 

Leather, fur and paper 
goods 

Rubber goods 

Pulp, paper and paper 
goods 

Printing and publishing . . 

Saw and planing mills. . . . 

Wood products 

Iron, steel and products . . 

Non-metallic mineral pro- 
ducts 

Non-ferrous metal pro- 
ducts 

Chemical and allied pro- 
ducts 

Miscellaneous products. . . 



93 
215 
33 



170 

50 

77 



32 

11 

164 

13 
11 

7 



7-3 
16 9 
2 6 



13 2 

3 
60 



2-5 



12-7 

1-0 
0-9 
0-5 



*988,000 
33,795 
53,517 



66,952 

16,472 
32,046 



7,014 
11,420 



53,569 
34,431 
92,669 

25,568 
11,809 



Construction 

Buildings 

Railway construction.. 

Shipbuilding 

Miscellaneous construction 

Transportation and 
PubUc Utilities 

Steam railways 

street and electric rail- 
ways 

Water transportation. . 

Air transportation 

Storage and local trans- 
portation 

Telegraph and telephones 

Public utilities, n.e.s 



Trade 

Wholesale. 
Retail 



27 



29 



7 
3 

198 



312 

139 



24 3 

1 



tll8,462 
(in 1922) 

88,071 

16,677 

21,409 

15,939 
22,407 



4,051 



178,052 
11,346 



Service 

Public and municipal. . . 

Recreational 

Laundering and dyeing. 

Domestic and personal. 
Miscellaneous 



Totals. 



28,567 
11,094 



01 
6-2 
0-6 



2-6 

3-2 
2-4 



4-6 
11 



0-2 
0-3 
0-1 



0-7 



0-5 

01 

0-4 

0-4 
0-1 



0-8 
11 



0-3 
3-2 



129 
195 
29 



187 
40 
113 



25 



198 



4 
177 



372 

168 

13 

100 

5 

40 

8 

38 

24 

7 
17 

61 

27 

5 

1 

28 

40 



91 

13-8 

21 



13 3 

'•9 
8-0 



0-6 

140 

1-0 
0-9 
0-6 

0-3 
0-3 

1-7 
01 
2-7 
0-6 
4-7 



0-2 

0-6 
0-3 

12-5 

4-9 
2-2 
0-3 
51 



26 4 

119 

0-9 
7-1 
0-4 

2-8 
0-6 
2-7 

1-7 

0-5 
1-2 

4 3 

1-9 
0-4 
01 
1-9 
2-8 



110 



109 



124 



134 



87 



121 



106 



190 



1,281 



MWJ 



1,412 



100 



•Estimate figures based on comparison of number of farmsin 1921 with numbers of farms in 191 1 and on number of agricul- 
tural workers given in census of 1911. The figures includes farm operators, farm labourers and farmers' sons over 14 years 
tFigure for wcmd and paper products for 1923 not yet available. 



54 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



V. LABOUR GAZETTE 

The Labour Gazette was published monthly in English and French during 
the fiscal year ending March 31, 1925, which was the twenty-fourth year of 
its existence. The average monthly paid circulation of the two editions was 
7,649, or 6,581 of the English edition and 1,068 of the French. A nominal sub- 
scription of 20 cents a year, or 3 cents per copy, is charged, the purpose of the 
suibs'cription being to keep the distribution within the limits of the actual 
demand, rather than to pay the cost of production. The subscription list includes 
the names of chartered banks, employing firms, and labour unions which paid 
subscriptions in behalf of their individual officers or members. In addition to 
the paid circulation, the publication is issued gratuitously to certain public 
bodies and in9titutions_, including government departments, both federal and 
provincial, municipalities, university and public libraries, boards of trade, labour 
organizations, newspapers and trade journals, as well as to certain persons who 
supply from time to time information requested by the department. Free 
single copies are frequently sent to persons seeking information on subjects 
dealt with in a particular issue. The average monthly distribution of compli- 
mentary copies was 3,723 of the English and 667 of the French edition. 

The Labour Gazette contains the official record of all proceedings under 
the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, including the full texts of the 
reports of Boards of Conciliation and Investigation established under the pro- 
visions of the Act. Information is also given in the Labour Gazette with respect 
to proceedings under the other statutes administered by the Department of 
Labour, including the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act, the Technical 
Education Act, the Government Annuities Act, and the Combines Investiga- 
tion Act, and to proceedings under the federal Order in Council providing for 
the payment of fair wages on Dominion Government contracts. 

The Labour Gazette is the usual medium for the publication of the "' statis- 
tical and other information relating to the conditions of labour " which, under 
the provisions of the Conciliation Act of 1900, the department is required to 
collect, digest and publish. These records include a monthly analysis of prices, 
wholesale and retail, in Canada, with estimates of the average cost of living, 
the prices of staple articles, and index numbers of price movements over a 
series of years. Similar statistics compiled from records in other countries are 
also given for the purpose of comparison. Periodical statements and tables 
appear indicating the movements of employment and the extent of unemploy- 
ment in Canada and in the various provinces and municipalities. This informa- 
tion is derived from three sources: (1) reports received from the 63 offices of 
the Employment Service of Canada showing the number of applications for 
work, the existing vacancies, and the number of workpeople placed in positions; 
(2) reports from trade unions showing the extent of unemployment among their 
members; and (3) reports from employers throughout Canada showing the 
number of employees on their pay-rolls. Statistical information on changes 
in wages and hours of labour is presented from time to time in special articles. 
Monthly and annual tables of industrial disputes are also given, showing the 
causes, extent and results of strikes and lockouts in Canada. The agreements 
entered into between employers and workmen are described each month in detail. 
Quarterly and annual statistics are given of the fatal accidents that have 
occurred in the various branches of industry, stress being laid on the causes 
of these accidents with a view to the possible elimination of some of the risks 
of industry; a series of notes on industrial safety and health is also published 
monthly with the some object. 

The labour legislation enacted by. the Dominion Parliament and by the 
legislatures of the various provinces is outlined in the Labour Gazette on the 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 55 

conclusion of each session, and note is made, as far as possible, of the outstand- 
ing activities throughout Canada under existing Acts or regulations. These 
records are of interest as showing a tendency towards uniformity among various 
provincial Acts concerning the regulation of factories and mines, workmen's 
compensation, minimum wages, mothers' allowances, and in many other fields 
of legislative action. Each issue contains further an account of important 
recent legal decisions affecting labour. 

The conventions and other activities of labour unions are noted from month 
to month, with particular reference to legislative proposals put forward by 
labour men. The subject of technical education and apprentice training is also 
covered in a series of notes in each issue. 

Prominence is given in the Labour Gazette to the important work of the 
League of Nations International Labour Organization, the draft conventions and 
recommendations put forward from time to time being printed in full, and a 
record kept of the progress of ratification, both in Canada and in other countries. 

In addition to the' regular periodical articles, each issue of the Labour 
Gazette contains special articles on subjects arising out of the general work of 
the department, as well as notes on current topics of interest to labour. 



56 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



VI. COMBINES im^ESnGATION ACT, 1923 

The Combines Investigation Act, 1923, chapter 9, 13-14 George V, which 
became law on June 13, 1923, was, by Order in Cooincil of August 14, 1923, 
placed under the Minister of Labour for general administration. By Order in 
Council of August 25, 1923, Mr. Harry Hereford, Industrial Engineer of the 
Department of Labour, was appointed Registrar of the Combines Investigation 
Act. 

Section 2 of the Act defines a combine as follows: — 

(a) The expression " Combine " in this Act shall be deemed to have reference to such 
combines immediately hereinafter defined as have operated or are likely to operate to the 
detriment of or against the interest of the public, whether consumers, producers or others; 
and limited as aforesaid, the expression as used in this Act shall be deemed to include (1) 
mergers, trusts and monopolies so called, and (2) the relation resulting from the purchase, 
lease, or other acquisition by any person of any control over or interest in the whole or 
part of the business of any other person, and (3) any actual or tacit contract, agreement, 
arrangement, or combination which has or is designed to have the effect of (i) limiting 
facilities for transporting, producing, manufacturing, supplying, storing or dealing; or (ii) 
preventing, limiting or lessening manufacture or production; or (iii) fixing a common price 
or a resale price, or a common rental, or a common cost of storage or transportation; or 
(iv) enhancing the price, rental or cost of article, rental storage or transportation; or (v) 
preventing or lessening competition in, or substantially controlling within any particular 
area or district or generally, production, manufacture, purchase, barter, sale, storage, trans- 
portation, insurance or supply; or (vi) otherwise restraining or injuring trade or commerce. 

and section 26 provides that: — 

(a) Every one is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to a penalty not exceeding 
ten thousand dollars or to two years' imprisonment, or if a corporation to a penalty not 
exceeding twenty-five thousand dollars, who is a party or privy to or knowingly assists in 
the formation or operation of a combine as defined in this Act. 

(b) No prosecution for any offence under this section shall be commenced otherwise 
than at the instance of the Solicitor General of Canada or of the Attorney General of a 
province. 

Investigation into Alleged Combine in the Distribution of Fruit and 

Vegetables 

Included in the representations received in the department during the first 
seven months of the operation of the Act, as set forth in the Annual Report of 
the Department of Labour for the year ending March 31, 1924, was a complaint 
regarding conditions said to exist in connection with the marketing of British 
Columbia fruit and vegetables. This matter was being investigated by the 
registrar at the close of the fiscal year 1923-24, and in July, 1924, an application 
for an investigation, signed by six residents of British Columbia, led to the 
appointment of Mr. Lewis Duncan, barrister of Toronto, as commissioner by an 
Order in Council, which named various parties to the alleged combine, these 
parties being for the most- part members of the Nash organization in Canada, or 
ehareholders in the Growers' Sales Agency, Limited. 

The commissioner made an interim, report to the minister on February 18, 
1925, referring to conditions as found in the provinces of British Columbia, 
Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. 

The conclusions and recommendations of the commissioner were as fol- 
lows: — 

The conclusions of your commissioner are that the Nash combination of jobbing and broker- 
age houses is a combine which is operating and has operated detrimentally to the interests of 
tjie Canadian public, including in that term producer, consumer and trade opposition. Your 
comonissioner is also of the conclusion that, while other combines within the meaning of the 
statute exist, such as the self-defensive combine of the members of the Growers' Sales 
Agency Limited, and the local associations of jobbers who meet to discuss prices and supply, 
still the Growers'' Sales combine would dissolve into its constituent competitive elements if 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 57 

the jobber-broker ccnnection were made unlawful ; and that the price-fixing arrangements of 
the local associations of jobbers are made more permanent than would ordinarily be the 
case by the threats of the Nash brokers and supervisors to discipline any price cutter by 
depriving him of his supply. 

The Nash combine is a double combine. It consists first of a combination of a large 
number of jabbing houses, which has already been referred' to as the jobber-jobber com- 
bine; and secondly of an association in the one organization of brokerage and jobbing 
houses, referred to as the jobber-broker combine. 

A jobber-broker combine»is not a "natural" combine; for it is an attempt to join in 
the one organization two opposing factors: the broker, whose interest should be solely that 
of the grower; and the jobber, whose interest is opposed to that of the grower. Such a 
combination is wrong in principle and dangerous, and your commissioner recommends that 
it be declared unlawful. There is a mass of testimony in favour of such action, including 
testimony already quoted from jobbers. 

The following resolution passed at a meeting of the directors of the Berry Growers' 
Co-operative Union of British Columbia, held on January 30, 1925, may be here quoted as 
showing the feeling of the growers: — 

That whereas the fruit and vegetable selling at prairie points is now performed 
by brokers who are paid for their services by the shippers of British Columbia, and 
at the same lime these brokers are appointed and controlled by jobbers at prairie 
points who buy British Columbia produce from the brokers, be it resolved that this 
union goes on record as opposing this principle, and that the Dominion Government 
be petitioned to pass legislation making jobber-owned brokerages in Canada illegal ; and 
that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Premier, the Ministers of Agriculture and 
Labour, the Canadian Horticultural Council, and to Mr. Munro, M.P. for the Fraser 
Valley. 

If legislative action is taken to sever the jobber-broker connection of the Nash and 
Growers' Sales organization, the latter organization will dissolve into its constituent and 
independent jobber elements. But in the case of the Nash organization there will remain 
the jobber-jobber combine. 

Such an organization has the power by collective action to operate prejudicially to the 
interests of the public. If there were no collective action, but if each jobber member traded 
in competition with fellow members and the opposition, no exception could be taken; and 
the Nash group though much larger would be in the same position as other groups of jobbing 
houses, conducted under one management, such as the Scott Fruit Co. Limited, P. Burns & 
Co. Limited, and Macdonald's Consolidated, Limited. 

The insistence, however, of the Nash and in a more limited way of the Gro\yers' Sales 
houses on sales to them being made through their brokerage offices (which for this purpose 
are only brokerage agencies levying a toll on each transaction), in effect denies a great part 
of the market in Western Canada to products handled by other brokers. Western Canada 
has been divided by these organizations into brokerage areas, and the policy has been laid 
down that brokers selling produce direct to jobbing houses must pay brokerage to the broker- 
age office within whose area the sale has been made. This toll amounts in some cases to $90 
a car; and it is exacted for the privilege of being allowed to sell to the jobbing house. The 
charge is made even when the brokerage company has had nothing to do with effecting the 
sale. This practice restricts distribution, assists the creation of monopoly and injures the 
producer, consumer and broker. Your commissioner recommends that it be declared 
unlawful. 

The phenomenal advance of the Nash interests at the expense of the independent broker 
and jobber is bringing Western Canada face to face with the possibility of a monopoly in 
the distribution of fruits and vegetables. Once monopoly or effective monopolistic con,trol 
is reached the regulating factor of competition disappears. The only alternative to mono- 
poly is to make possible the continua,tion of effective competition both of brokers and 
jobbers. 

In the United States of America the courts have been given power to order the dissolu- 
tion of certain combines on the application of the Federal Trade Commission. Your com- 
missioner suggests the advisability of considering the enactment of similar legislation appli- 
cable to persons engaged in the distribu'tion of the products of the soil. 

While your commissioner feels that legislative action along the lines indicated is neces- 
sary, he is also of the opinion that many of the existing evils could be renHoved by the 
establishment of a nation-wide grower-owned selling agency. It would lie with such an 
agency, while obtaining the best prices for the growers, to give a maximum distribution 
without wasteful overlapping, and to develop a rational and unified export policy. Pro- 
vided four tests are met, no merchandizing, no favouritism, the strictest accounting, and 
the employment of men of probity, that way lies success. 

The interim report of the commissioner was, in accordance with section 25 
of the Act, remitted to the Attorneys General of the Provinces of British Col- 



58 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

umbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba for such action as they might 
respectively deem necessary, and it may be stated that, after the close of the 
fiscal year, and therefore outside of the period properly covered by this report, 
the provincial attorneys general above named offered to co-operate with the fed- 
eral authorities and requested the latter to institute the necessary proceedings. 
The Dominion Government therefore appointed Mr. J. C. McRuer, Assistant 
Crown Attorney, of Toronto, as general prosecutor. 

Investigation into Allegp:d Combine amongst Coal Dealers at Winnipeg 

A formal application for an investigation, signed by six residents of Win- 
nipeg, Man., led to the appointment in October, 1924, of Mr. David Campbell, 
K.C., of Winnipeg, as a commissioner to investigate an alleged combine of retail 
and wholesale coal dealers and coal mine owners, resulting in their acquiring 
control of the purchase and sale of coal in the province of Manitoba and else- 
where, to the injury of the consumers. 

The application presented to the registrar under the Act for an investiga- 
tion, was accompanied by a formal complaint, signed and sworn to by six resi- 
dents of Winnipeg, all more or less in touch with the retail coal business. One 
of the chief allegations was stated by one of the complainants as follows: — 

I believe there is a oombination in existence among the members of the Winnipeg 
Retail Coal Dealers' Association to maintain the retail prices of coal at the standards which 
now maintain among them, and in particular, to maintain the price of Drumheller lump at 
approximately $13 per ton. I also believe that one of the methods used by said members 
of making this combination effective is to cut off the supplies from and to put out of busi- 
ness any coal dealer who will not maintain this said standard of prices. In particular, I 
believe that the coal dealers who are in the combination are at present engaged in a move- 
ment to cut off my coal supplies and to put me out of business, and that the sole reason for 
this is my unwillingness to oo-operarte with them in maintaining their scale of charges and my 
persistence in selling my coal at prices substantially lower than theirs. 

The commissioner reported to the minister on February 28, 1925, and, after 
enumerating the various parties alleged to be included in a combine, allowed 
that a strong prima facie case had been made out by Mr. Hudson and others 
of the complainants. " Briefly," he said, " they allege that a combine exists 
among some or all of the above named corporations, firms, associations or 
individuals whereby the prices of domestic coals to the customers at Winnipeg 
are enhanced to the amount of from $300,000 to $500,000 per year in excess of 
what was a fair cost, and to this extent was an injury or detriment to the public. 
. . . . The evidence of Mr. Hudson sets up many facts which pointed 
strongly to the existence of a combine and documentary evidence produced early 
in the proceedings apparently corroborated some of his statements and empha- 
sized many of his contentions." 

In summarizing the evidence taken at the inquiry, the commissioner referred 
to the refusal of Mr. Hudson, one of the complainants, to join the Winnipeg 
Retail Coal Dealers' Association, or to be governed by its fixed prices: — 

Mr. Hudson testified that in November or December, 1923, he was approached by Mr. 
Bums, the secretary of the Retail Coal Dealers' Association of Winnipeg, to become a 
member of the association and to be governed by its prices. This he stated occurred shortly 
after he began business for himself that season, and had been advertising coal at reduced 
prices. He states that he refused to be governed by others in the matter of prices and that 
Burns then told him the association would see that his supply of coal was shut off. Mr. 
Bums denies having had such a conversation with anyone, and says that in all probability 
he did communicate with Hudson about that time with a view to securing his membership, 
as he was then busily engaged in building up the association. 

In all probability Mr. Bums said sufficient to raise in Mr. Hudson's predisposed mind 
the suggestion that, if he failed to join the association and reduced his prices to the extent 
that he was then doing, an attempt would be made to put a stop to his securing a supply 
of ooal. 

I am quite convinced that at no time could this association shut off Hudson's supply of 
coal, because any i>erson who proposes to deal in coal and has money to buy it can do so. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 59 

The commissioner discussed the methods of the Retail Coal Dealers' Asso- 
ciation of Winnipeg, and concluded that, while their methods might lead to 
abuse, they did not appear to have reached a stage at which they would come 
within the purview of the Combines Investigation Act. He said: — 

I am therefore of the opinion that the discussion and fixing of prices is one of the main 
purposes of this association, but as already indicated, until that is carried to the point that 
prices are unreasonable or unfair, no fault can be found in that direction. I have already 
expressed my view that the prices charged by the retail dealers, or fixed by the association, 
cannot be said to be unreasonable or unfair, having regard to all the circumstances. And 
realizing the efficacy of the Combines Investigation Act, and its protection being so easily 
accessible to rich and poor alike, one can rest quite content as to what may happen in the 
future. 

Finally, the commissioner referred to activities of the Western Canada Fuel 
Association in confining the retail coal busin-e&s to so-called *' legitimate " dealers, 
that is, those equipped with sheds for housing coal and engaged permanently in 
the business: — 

Having regard to these abuses which have been a real menace to the coal trade and a 
loss to producers for many years, one can scarcely find fault with the efforts of the associa- 
tion or others to suppress such activities. The small gain to those who happen to buy at 
the reduced price is more than offset by the probable failure to obtain well prepared coal, 
and the absence of these dealers carrying their fair share of the burden of necessary reserve 
supplies together with the injury they inflict upon bona fide dealers with large investments. 

But let us suppose that the Western Canada Fuel Association achieves its aims in 
finally eliminating the so-called illegitimate dealer. We immediately find ourselves facing 
a new problem — What could be more conducive to the dealers, particularly in many towns 
and villages in these provinces, getting together and raising the price of coal to suit their 
desires for profit, or deciding not to carry the burden of reserve stocks of coal? However, 
•we need only consider the foregoing supposition for the purpose of testing the present activi- 
ties of this association, viewed in the light of present conditions. Upon these grounds I 
have come to the conclusion that, in its activities in endeavouring to limit or prevent this 
unfair competition, it has not operatt^d to the detriment of or against the best interests of 
the public, and I feel the future can and will be amply safeguarded by this Act. 

Investigation into Alleged Combine Limiting Competition in the 
Marketing of the Potato Crop of New Brunswick 

In December, 1924, a formal application, signed by six residents of New 
Brunswick, for an investigation of an alleged combine limiting competition in 
the marketing of potatoes, led to the registrar being instructed to investigate 
the same. At the end of the fiscal year the investigation was still proceeding, 
but it may be stated that on June 9, 1925, the registrar reported to the minister 
that, in his opinion, a com'bine existed. The registrar's report was remitted 
to the Attorney General of New Brunswick in accordance with the provisions 
of the Act for such action as he might think necessary. 

Various Complaints, Inquiries, etc., Receiving Attention 

Investigations initiated by the registrar as a result of representations 
received, not accompanied by formal applications signed by six persons, are 
as follows: — 

Complaint that certain dealers in oflEice appliances refused to sell certain 
repair parts unless all supplies were bought from them. Result: Firm 
complained against agreed to supply parts required and applicant 
stated that, as the departmental action had been successful in ensur- 
ing them proper treatment, they had no desire that the department 
take any further action. 

Complaint that a stove company refused to supply complainant with any 
more stoves on the ground that he was failing to maintain the resale 
price set by them. Result: Complaint found to be unjustified. 

Complaint that certain fruit dealers were refusing to supply citrous fruits 
or oranges to produce merchants unless they would also take large quan- 
tities of apples, etc. Result: Complaint found to be unjustified. 



60 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Complaint as to alleged combine in connection with a civic by-law 
which necessitated certain supplies being purchased through a plumber. 
Result: Complainant advised that proof submitted of the existence of 
a combine within the meaning of the Act was not suflBcient. No formal 
application received. 

Complaint that a combine exists regarding the distribution of spark plugs 
in Canada. Result: Being investigated by the registrar; inquiry still 
proceeding. 

In addition to the above listed investigations, representations and inquiries 
were received and given necessary attention by way of preliminary inquiry 
concerning the following industries or commodities; wholesale groceries, engrav- 
ing, oil, coal, gasoline, grapes, underwear, textiles, tobacco, cement, hardware 
supplies, repair parts of farm implements, range boilers, distribution of fruit, 
etc., in Ontario, monopoly in flour and bread, as well as many inquiries from 
merchants and lawyers and others for information on matters coming within, 
or thought to come within, the scope of the Act. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 9t 



VII. EMPLOYMENT OFFICES CO-ORDINATION ACT 

The present statement is the seventh annual report of the Employment 
Service Branch, being for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1925. 

Function of the Branch 

The primary function of the Employment Service Branch is to administer 
the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act (8-9 George V, chapter 21), which 
empowers the Minister of Labour, — 

(a) to aid and encourage the organization and co-ordination of employ- 
ment offices and to promote uniformity of methods among them; 

(b) to establish one or more clearing houses for the interchange of informa- 
tion between employment offices concerning the transfer of labour and 
other matters; 

(c) to compile and distribute information received from employment offices 
and from other sources, regarding prevailing conditions of employment. 

The employment offices whose co-ordination and uniformity of methods are 
sought are the employment offices of the various provincial governments. The 
desired co-operation of the provinces, one with the other and all with the Depart- 
ment of Labour, is obtained by the device of federal subventions for employ- 
ment service work, provided for in the Act. In view of the close co-ordination 
of effort which is attained, the employment offices of the several provinces and 
the federal clearing houses, though each unit retains its individual identity, are 
considered as a single organization known as the " Employment Service of 
Canada." 

Agreements with the Provinces 

The Employment Offices Co-ordination Act, 1918, provides in section 6 (in 
part) that, — 

"The payments hereinbefore authorized shall, as to each province, be conditional upon 
agreement between the Minister and the government of the province as to the terms, con- 
ditions and purposes within the meaning of this Act upon and (for which the payments 
are to be made and applied." 

Accordingly, during the fiscal year 1924-25, uniform agreements were concluded 
with all the provincial governments except that of Prince Edward Island. The 
sum of money which was mentioned in the agreement as being available for 
payment by the Department of Labour to the provinces was $150,000. An 
additional appropriation of $50,000, which had been provided by Parliament 
the previous year, was not provided for the year under consideration, and fed- 
eral payments were restricted to the sum provided by statute. The amoimt of 
$150,000, when distributed among the provinces in proportion to their expendi- 
tures on employment office administration and operation, enabled a repayment 
to them of 34 1 per centum of their gross expenditures. Table No. 1 on page 
66 shows in detail the amounts paid to the various provinces, dividing the 



62 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

totals under the different items which are considered legitimate expenditures 
under the Act. Moreover, on its part the Department of Labour undertook 
to, and did, furnish the provinces with the different forms utilized in the employ- 
ment offices. The terms and conditions under which the moneys were to be 
paid to the provincial governments, as set forth in the agreements, showed but 
one deviation from those of the* preceding year; a new section, No. 14, was 
added in each case to cover specifically employment work on behalf of veterans 
of the Great War who were partially disabled as a result of their war services, 
thus superseding the supplementary agreements of the previous year. 



Location of Employment Offices 

Every office of the Employment Service offers facilities for both men and 
women who are seeking work in any occupation, and for employers seeking any 
sort of help. Obviously, it is neither practicable nor advisable to segregate the 
various functions of the offices at all centres, but when the volume of work 
warrants it, and where the population to be served is of sufficient magnitude, 
such division of functions is made, and men's and women's skilled and unskilled, 
farm, factory, and domestic, etc., divisions are separately operated. On the 
prairies, where farm labour is regularly hired in large numbers, it is common 
custom, particularly in Saskatchewan, to operate temporary offices. These are 
not included, however, in the list below. 

At the beginning of the year offices were conducted at 67 centres, but at 
the close of the year this number had been reduced to 65. During the year 
offices at Portage La Prairie, Man., and Fernie, B.C., were closed, while no 
new offices were opened. 

The list of centres where offices were located at March 31, 1925, follows: — 

Nova Scotia (three centres). — Halifax, New Glasgow, Sydney. 

New Brunsmck (three centres). — Chatham, Moncton, St. John. 

Quebec (five centres). — Hull, Montreal, Quebec, Sherbrooke, Three Rivers. 

Ontario (twenty-five centres). — Belleville, Brantford, Chatham, Cobalt, 
Fort William, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Niagara 
Falls, North Bay, Oshawa, Ottawa, Pembroke, Peterborough, Port 
Arthur, Sarnia, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Catharines, St. Thomas, Sudbury, 
Timmins, Toronto, Windsor. 

Manitoba (three centres). — Brandon, Dauphin, Winnipeg. 

Saskatchewan (nine centres). — Estevan, Moose Jaw, North Battleford, 
Prince Albert, Regina, Saskatoon, Swift Current, Weyburn, Yorkton. 

Alberta (five centres). — Calgary, Drumheller, Edmonton, Lethbridge, Medi- 
cine Hat. 

British Columbia (twelve centres). — Cranbrook, Kamloops, Nanaimo, Nel- 
son, New Westminster, Penticton, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Revel- 
stoke, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria. 

For the purpose of co-ordinating the efforts of the various local offices, 
and to enable the transfer of any kind of laibour from districts over supplied 
to those where a dearth exists, clearing houses have been established at eight 
centres throughout Canada. Those for provincial clearance, operated by the 
provincial governments as part of the Employment Service of Canada, are 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 63 

situated at Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Regina, Edmonton and Vancouver. 
Those for interprovincial clearance operated by the Department of Labour in 
the interests of the Employment Service of Canada are: Eastern Clearing House, 
Ottawa; Western Clearing House, Winnipeg. 



Staff 

At the close of the previous fiscal year, the personnel of the Employment 
Service totalled 274. This number was distributed among the various com- 
ponent authorities as follows: Nova Scotia, 11; New Brunswick, 7; Quebec, 29; 
Ontario, 96; Manitoba, 30; Saskatchewan, 26; Alberta, 22; British Columbia, 
33; Federal Government, at Ottawa, 17, and at Winnipeg, 3. 

On March 31, 1925, the total of employees stood at 278, 32 of whom were 
employed by the Federal Government and 246 of whom were attached to the 
staffs of the various provinces. The detailed distribution of the provincial staffs 
was as follows: Nova Scotia, 6; New Brunswick, 7; Quebec, 29; Ontario, 106; 
Manitoba, 22; Saskatchewan, 27; Alberta, 20; and British Columbia, 29. The 
federal employees were located as follows: Department of Labour, Ottawa, 17; 
Western Clearing House, Winnipeg, 3; local employment offices at Halifax, 2; 
at Ottawa, 1; at Toronto, 3; at Winnipeg, 2; at Vancouver, 3; and at Victoria, 
1. The federal employees in the local offices were there for the purpose of 
affording specialized facilities for securing employment for handicapped ex-ser- 
vice men. 

During the year the federal staff of the Employment Service showed a net 
increase o(£^12, wholly accounted for by the additional attention directed to the 
placement of handicapped ex-service men, while the provincial staffs showed 
a net reduction of 8. 



Conferences 

The Employment Service Council of Canada, a body advisory to the Min- 
ister of Labour and composed of representatives of the various parties to the 
agreements, as well as representatives of the railways and organized labour and 
employers, held its sixth annual meeting at Ottawa on September 2-5, 1924. 
The executive of the council met on January 9, 1925, in order to discuss certain 
matters affecting the Employment Service and also to approach the Minister 
of Labour and advise with him concerning the recommendations of the sixth 
annual meeting of the council. 

Specialized Employment Work on Behalf of Handicapped Ex-Service Men 

Previous to the fiscal year 1923-24, any specialized employment work 
affecting men having phj'-sical handicaps, due to service in the late war, was 
carried on by the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. The Employ- 
ment Service of Canada did, in a general way, seek to serve the needs of this 
deserving class, but quite obviously in only two or three centres was the special- 
ization of the functions of the employment office sufficiently developed to permit 
of that detailed attention being given to the handicapi>ed ex-soldier, which his 
needs undoubtedly demanded. The desirability of centralizing employment 
activities led the Ralston Commission on Pensions and Re-establishment and 
the Employment Service Council of Canada to recommend, in 1923, that this 
work toe taken over by the Employment Service of Canada, and that the field 



64 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

for placing these men be exploited by the latter organization. In keeping with 
these recommendations, the Minister of Labour endeavoured, toward the middle 
of 1923, to have the provinces make supplementary agreements covering this 
particular work. While some success accrued to these efforts, by April 1, 1924, 
only five provinces had adhered to the principle of having the provincial employ- 
ment ofiices the recognized media through which disabled veterans might secure 
employment. 

In drafting the federal-provincial agreements for 1924-25, a new section, No. 
14, was inserted, which embodied the principle contained in the supplementary 
agreement of the year before. The purpose of section 14 was declared to be 
" for the purpose of providing necessary and adequate facilities for registering 
and placing in employment employable handicapped ex-service men whose dis- 
ability is due to war service." As before stated, all of the eight co-operating 
provinces signed the agreement, and, consequently, undertook to make especial 
efforts to secure employment for these disability cases. In the previous year's 
supplementary agreement the Department of Labour undertook to reimburse 
the provinces in full for all additional expenditures due to the taking over of 
this work, but in section 14 this basis was altered to read that the department 
would appoint, and pay in full, any additional staff necessary, the remaining 
additional expenses to be treated as all other expenditures, that is, but a por- 
tion of them to be refunded by the Department of Labour. In actual practice 
this alteration is not of material importance, for a few months of experience 
had shown that staff salaries virtually constituted the total additional expendi- 
ture necessary. 

Surveys of the employment situation as affecting handicapped ex-service 
men were conducted, and it was learned that the greatest need existed in the 
larger cities, for, due to various reasons, the men affected were living in those 
centres. The greatest problems were encountered in Toronto and Vancouver, 
that in the latter being due to the attractiveness of a more genial climate to a 
person physically disabled. On being studied, it was decided that the addi- 
tional staff necessitated by the increased volume of work to be handled should 
consist of two at Halifax, one at Ottawa, three at Toronto, two at Winnipeg, 
three at Vancouver, and one at Victoria. Accordingly, the Department of 
Labour "engaged the necessary employees and placed them in the employment 
offices at the respective centres. The specialized handling of this work became 
effective at Toronto on November 1, 1924; Vancouver and Victoria on Decem- 
ber 1, 1924; and Ottawa on February 1, 1925. In Halifax and Winnipeg, 
though slightly different arrangements were in effect, the work had been taken 
over during the previous year. Beside those ofiices where additional staff was 
found to be necessary, the remaining offices of the Employment Service began, 
during the year, to devote more attention to the problem. The results of the 
endeavours of the months subsequent to the taking over of the work have been 
very gratifying in so far as the placement of ex-service men is concerned. 

Employment Statistics 

Statistical information covering the field of employment is published 
monthly in the Labour Gazette and includes daily reports from employment 
offices, monthly trade union reports, monthly reports from employers and reports 
of building permits, the two latter being compiled by the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics in accordance with the " Statistics Act, 1918." 

Daily reports from all the offices of the Emplojrment Service throughout 
Canada show the number of orders for workers received in each industry, the 
number of applications from workers for employment, and the number of place- 
ments made in each industry. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 65 

Reports from trade unions throughout the country show the number of 
members in each union, and the number of members Out of work or working 
on short time, reflecting in a measure the state of employment in organized 
trades. These reports are received monthly from approximately 1,500 labour 
organizations with an aggregate membership of about 150,000 persons. 

Statistical Report of Employment Offices 

The tables on pages 66 and 67 show (Table No. 2) applications, 
(Table No. 3) vacancies, and- (Table No. 4) placements in regular and casual 
employment as reported by tne offices of the Employment Service of Canada 
in thp Various provinces ^'during the fiscal year; an analysis of the vacancies 
and placements by industrial groups for the same period is also given (Table 
No. 6). 

As may be seen in the tables, during the year 1924-25 there were registered 
at the public employment offices a total of 501,574 applications for employment, 
385,271 being from men and 116,303 from women. The total for the previous 
fiscal year was 597,783. 

Opportunities for employment of which the offices were notified numbered 
382,934, of which 286,564 were for men and 96,370 for women. The correspond- 
ing total for the fiscal year 1923-24 was 545,517. Placements effected by the 
Service show a total of 340,819, 261,086 having been men and 79,733 women. 
Considered on the basis of the duration of the prospective work, the figures 
are further sub-divided into " casual," i.e., where the duration of employment 
does not exceed seven days, and " regular," i.e., where the duration of employ- 
ment is in excess of seven days. From this angle the placements of men show 
54,031 to have been casual and 207,055 to have been regular; of the placements 
of women, 43,094 were casual and 36,639 were regular. It might be added that 
the statistics for the preceding fiscal year recorded placements of 383,395 men 
and 85,420 women, or a total of 468,815. 

Laboub Mobility 

While the offices of the Service are located at the points of chief industrial 
activity, the facilities afforded are not only utilized locally, but each office sup- 
plies a considerable number of workers to the contiguous districts. Out of the 
total of 340,819 placements effected, 168,681 were made outside of the centres 
in which offices are situated. 

Since 1919, the railways have accorded to bona fide applicants at the 
Employment Service, who may desire to travel to distant employment for which 
no workers are available locally, a concession involving a reduced fare. This 
privilege is effective on the following railroads: Canadian National, Canadian 
Pacific, Dominion Atlantic, Kettle Valley, Michigan Central, Pacific Great 
Eastern, Quebec Central, Temiskaming and Northern Ontario, and the Wabash. 
The reduced rate is for a second-class fare at a rate of 2-70 cents per mile, 
obtainable on the surrender of a certificate secured from the Employment 
Office. A minimum fare of four dollars is stipulated so that a person travelling 
to emplojrment at a distance where the reduced rate does not amount to the 
minimum is not able to derive the benefit therefrom. From Table No. 5 on 
page 67, which gives details regarding the use of this certificate, it will be 
learned that 29,985 persons were by this means aided in securing employment. 



7343-6 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



Table No. 1 — Federal Subventions to each province showing distribution of 
payments among the different items of expense accepted as proper main- 
tenance expenditures under the agreement. 





Nova 
Scotia 


New 
Brunswick 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Manitoba 


Saskat- 
chewan 


Alberta 


British 
Columbia 


Canada 


Salaries 


i cts. 

2.651 64 

82 62 

841 20 

30 03 

21 46 


$ cts. 

3.083 83 

34 55 

679 01 

16 21 

20 38 
2 05 

57 15 
135 36 
22 18 

21 24 
10 46 


$ cts. 

10,841 76 

195 34 

1,107 75 

152 55 

110 44 

6 14 

436 52 
218 75 
29 91 

97 22 
53 34 


$ cts. 

45,801 44 

1.297 20 

9,432 59 

372 87 

252 08 

20 90 

1,333 01 
1,841 46 

347 28 

505 17 
5 70 

170 07 


$ cts. 

10,162 73 

62 21 

2,531 04 

30 74 
132 09 

4 22 

451 91 
562 42 
48 96 

155 93 
105 47 

31 87 


$ cts. 

12,535 26 

480 52 

3,639 60 

77 43 

48 55 
7 81 

422 00 
658 13 
103 23 

317 41 

464 52 

40 82 

49 31 


$ cts. 

9,162 91 
449 43 

2,088 78 
56 55 
40 67 
18 53 

350 68 

923 00 

96 22 

131 83 
47 44 

265 00 


$ cts. 

14,779 31 

83 97 

3, 156 25 

50 25 

77 91 


1 cts. 

109,018 88 

2,685 84 

23,476 22 

786 63 


Travelling expenses . . . 
Rental and janitors. . . 
Heat 


Light 


703 .58 


Water 


59 65 


OfSce supplies and 


281 41 
176 81 
26 12 

37 06 
81 36 


1,037 35 
670 70 
202 32 

168 16 
76 94 


4,370 03 




5 186 63 




876 22 


Freight, bxpress, cart- 
age and postage 

Advertising 

Repairs and altera- 


1,434 02 
845 23 

507 76 


Unrefunded advances 










49 31 




















Totals 


4,229 71 


4,082 42 


13,249 72 


61,379 77 


14,279 59 


18,844 59 


13,631 04 


20,303 16 


150,000 00 



Table No. 2. — Applications for employment as reported by the offices of the 
Employment Service of Canada in the various provinces during the year 
April, 1924-March, 1925 (inclusive). 



Province 


Men 


Women 


Totals 


Nova Scotia 


6,352 
6,831 
32,462 
148,218 
38,531 
44,859 
45,989 
62,029 


2,726 

3,476 

7,342 

53,325 

21,852 

7,229 

9,541 

10,812 


9,078 


New Brunswick 


10,307 


Quebec 


39,804 


Ontario 


201,543 


Manitoba 


60,383 


Saskatchewan 


52,088 


Alberta 


55,530 


British Columbia 


72,841 






Canada 


385,271 


116,303 


501,574 







Table No. 3. — ^Vacancies in regular and casual employment as reported. by the 
offices of the Employment Service of Canada in the various provinces 
during the year April, 1924-March, 1925 (inclusive). 



Province 


Men 


Women 


Totals 


Nova Scotia 


5,184 

6,010 

9,476 

112,640 

27,365 

58,543 

38,689 

28,657 


2,710 
3,440 
5,889 
39,408 
18,889 
8,005 
8,865 
9,164 


7,894 


New Brunswick 


9,450 


Quebec 


15,365 


Ontario 


152,048 


Manitoba 


46,254 


Saskatchewan 


66,548 


Alberta 


47,554 


British Columbia 


37,821 






Canada 


286,564 


96,370 


382,934 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



67 



Table No. 4. — Placements in regular and casual employment as reported 'by 
the offices' of the Employment Service of Canada in the various provinces 
during the year April, 1924-March, 1925 (inclusive). 



Province 


Regular Placements 


Casual Placements 


Total Placements 


Men 


Women 


Totals 


Men 


Women 


Totals 


Men 


Women 


Totals 


Nova Scotia 


2,732 
3,074 
10,150 
70,959 
23,323 
39,722 
32,784 
24,311 


802 
964 
4,835 
12,797 
4,860 
4,083 
4,783 
3,515 


3,534 
4,038 
14,985 
83,756 
28,183 
43,805 
37.567 
27,826 


2,068 
2,153 
306 
29,085 
5,105 
3,157 
3,286 
8,871 


1,489 

2,278 

240 

16,849 

12,775 

1,996 

2,978 

4,489 


3,5.57 

4,431 

546 

45,934 

17,880 

5,153 

6,264 

13,360 


4,800 
5,227 
10,456 
100,044 
28.428 
42,879 
36,070 
33,182 


2,291 
3,242 
5,075 
29,646 
17,635 
6,079 
7,761 
8,004 


7,091 


New Brunswick 


8,469 


Quebec 


15,531 


Ontario 


129,690 


Manitoba 


46,063 


Saskatchewan 


48,958 


Alberta 


43,831 


British Columbia 


41,186 






Canada 


207,055 


36,639 


243,694 


54,031 


43,094 


97,125 


261,086 


79,733 


340,819 



Table No. 5. — Reduced Transportation Rate Certificates issued in each province 
by the Employment Service of Canada from April 1, 1924, to March 31, 
1925. 



Issuing Province 


N.S. 


N.B. 


Que. 


Ont. 


Man. 


Sask. 


Alta. 


B.C. 


Totals 


Nova Scotia 




















New Brunswick 




















Quebec 






290 

48 


1,974 

5,962 

2,631 

360 










2,264 
6,090 


Ontario 


2 


2 


67 

3,992 

217 

1 

52 


9 
1,407 
2,907 

■•^os 

3,513 






Manitoba 


94 

23 

2,292 

2,520 


2 

20 

34 

1,057 


8,126 


Saskatchewan 








3.527 


Alberta 








2,835 


British Columbia 








1 


7,143 












Totals 


2 


2 


338 


10,928 


4,329 


8,344 


4,929 


1,113 


29,985 







7343-5J 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



Table No. 6 — Positions Offered and Placements Effected, through offices of the 

31, 





Nova Scotia 


New Brunswick 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Industry 


Vacan- 
cies 


Placements 


Vacan- 
cies 


Placements 




Placements 


Vacan- 
cies 


Placements 


Regu- 
lar 


Cas- 
ual 


Regu- 
lar 


Cas- 
ual 


cies 


Regu 
lar 


Cas- 
ual 


Regu- 
lar 


Cas- 
ual 




855 
4 


485 
1 


270 
3 


696 
43 


489 
42 


168 

1 


1,045 

8 


843 
6 


64 


13,882 

682 

1 

311 

2,022 

24 

1,350 

600 

965 

1,966 

33 

415 

348 

243 

474 

3,117 

273 

520 

638 

26,835 

23 

12,692 

1,242 


8,587 

282 

1 

150 

1,298 
17 
776 
492 
473 
957 
6 
240 
247 
163 
278 

2,250 
195 
337 
425 

17,537 

20 

11,039 

1,146 

5 

919 

222 

86 

2,200 
616 
119 

1,465 

26,487 
12,229 
7,215 
7,043 

15,138 

1,708 

1,826 

999 

323 

1,539 

8,558 

185 

1,335 

1,003 

332 

181 


3,896 


Animal products, edible 


272 


Leather and its products 

Lumber and its products 


6 

287 


3 
216 


3 
50 


2 
288 


2 
189 


■ "69 


11 

160 

6 

222 
42 

274 
49 


8 
139 
4 
209 
40 
197 
27 


4 

2 
35 

""i7 


121 

419 

5 


Pulp and paper products 


115 


50 


22 


31 


28 


2 


518 
53 


Textile products 


18 

65 

10 

9 

6 

2 

1 

297 

3 

21 

11 

1,295 

71 

327 

34 
10 

6 
18 

19 

342 
136 
94 
112 

802 

36 

311 

455 

3,401 

62 

191 

190 

80 

461 

2,416 

1 

689 
455 
234 

59 


1 
33 
6 
9 
3 
2 

■■i44 
3 
4 
10 

1,039 

21 

291 

68 
44 

6 

18 

8 

110 

8 
23 
79 

579 

20 

257 

302 

833 
37 
89 
46 
14 
31 

615 
1 

91 
66 
25 

9 


5 
23 


30 
75 


9 
60 


21 
12 


198 




722 






Chemical and allied products . 


3 

i 

142 

1 

17 
36 

3 


12 

2 
4 
6 
123 
13 
39 
28 

2,072 

13 

119 

13 

12 


2 

2 

3 

6 

76 

11 

39 

20 

1,426 

7 

103 

8 
7 


9 

i 

""37 
2 

""ii 

36 


10 
21 


10 

12 




103 
68 




72 




5 
72 

9 
80 
76 

2,883 


5 
50 

6 
76 
54 

4,457 


6 

10 


169 


Iron and steel products 

Non-ferrous metal products... . 


729 
62 
180 


Miscellaneous 


205 


Logging 


93 




1 


Farming 


11 


443 
14 


386 
11 


9 


1,211 


Mining 


39 


Coal 














984 
258 

143 

4,008 

1,578 

178 

2,252 

39,633 
13,574 
16,837 
9,222 

49,110 

2,902 

2,779 

2,445 

797 

7,642 

32,158 

387 

3,792 

3,056 

736 

688 


27 


Non-metallic ores 


12 

221 
124 
69 
28 

171 
16 
38 

117 

2,188 
24 
72 
113 
66 
432 
1,481 

590 
379 
211 

49 


1 

2 

430 
61 
180 
189 

896 
194 
100 
602 

4,780 

54 

158 

272 

97 

1,125 

3,068 

6 

396 

337 

59 

33 


1 

2 

193 
19 
83 
91 

513 

120 

51 

342 

1,110 

27 

118 

86 

9 

79 

787 

4 

173 
135 
38 

14 




14 


11 




12 




56 


Transportation 


152 
41 
95 
16 

345 
73 
42 

230 

3,478 

28 

40 

181 

87 

1,039 

2,101 

2 

222 
200 
22 

19 


485 
40 
22 

423 

3,275 
530 
210 

2,535 

6,630 

13 

820 

336 

17 

487 

4,955 

2 

516 

288 
228 

74 


463 
34 
20 

409 

2,986 
479 
176 

2,331 

5,405 

10 

683 

246 

11 

354 

4.100 

1 

374 
179 
195 

60 


61 

30 

3 

28 

350 
3 
5 

20 

2 

80 

240 

46 

40 

6 

6 


1,710 


Street railway and cartage 

Railway 


934 
54 


Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Mainten- 
ance 


722 
11,626 




372 


Highway 


9,548 


Building and other 


1,706 


Services 


24,519 


Governmental 


1,121 


Hotel and restaurant 


280 


Professional 


1,238 


Recreational 


431 


Personal 


6,682 


Household 


14,766 


Farm-household 


1 


Trade 


2,295 


Retail 


1,898 


Wholesale 


397 




488 






All Indijstr'.es 


7,894 


3,534 


3,557 


9,450 


4,038 


4,431 


15,365 


14,985 


546 


152,048 


83,756 


45,934 






Men 


5,184 
2,710 


2,732 
802 


2,068 
1,489 


6,010 
3,440 


3,074 
964 


2,153 

2,278 


9,476 
5,889 


iO,150 
4,835 


306 
240 


112,640 
39,408 


70,959 
12,797 


29,085 


Women 


16 849 







REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 69 

Employment Service, in each industry during the year April 1, 1924, to March 
1925 



Manitoba 


Saskatche^^ 


an 


Alberta 


British Columbia 


Canada 


Vacan- 
cies 


Placements 


Vacan- 
cies 


Placements 


Vacan- 


Placements 


Vacan- 
cies 


Placements 


Vacan- 
cies 


Placements 


Regu- 


Cas- 


Regu- 


Cas- 


cies 


Regu- 


Cas- 


Regu- 


Cas- 


Regu- 


Cas- 




lar 


ual 




lar 


ual 




lar 


ual 




lar 


ual 




lar 


uaV 


1,295 


458 


825 


822 


327 


451 


1,901 


1,143 


722 


4.514 


2,604 


1,737 


25,010 


14,936 


8.133 


55 


14 


40 


98 


43 


53 


93 


42 


64 


289 


119 


172 


1,172 


549 


595 


23 


4 


17 


25 




25 


86 


8 


78 


91 


7 


70 


225 


20 


. 190 


56 


15 


38 


20 


4 


17 


53 


17 


36 


36 


7 


23 


495 


206 


238 


158 


122 


78 


206 


125 


57 


668 


579 


74 


2,169 


1,644 


427 


5,958 


4,312 


1.178 


2 


1 
52 


1 
71 














2 
97 


30 


2 
68 


34 

1,998 


22 
1,162 


10 


128 


33 


4 


■■"'28 


■■■'22 


"is 


9 


753 


12 


3 


9 


7 


1 


6 


8 


2 


6 


42 


9 


34 


711 


547 


108 


162 


32 


121 


7 


2 


6 


24 


11 


12 


86 


13 


71 


1,566 


738 


450 


201 


68 


129 


141 


23 


114 


152 


94 


59 


174 


68 


82 


2.823 


1,330 


1.141 


5 


2 
17 


1 
71 








3 

71 


1 
25 










51 
680 


15 

318 


1 


S9 


ii 


2 


9 


""ii 


63 


is 


49 


286 


26 


19 


5 


73 


64 


9 


100 


76 


21 


62 


25 


31 


638 


438 


137 


14 


11 


3 


11 


4 


7 


53 


34 


18 


153 


146 


6 


480 


363 


107 


41 


8 


34 


10 


1 


9 


13 


6 


6 


7 


4 


4 


557 


308 


222 


191 


54 


127 


142 


59 


80 


423 


157 


251 


844 


234 


601 


5,209 


3,024 


1.973 


10 


1 


9 


1 




1 


12 




12 


266 


242 


9 


587 


458 


95 


19 


5 


10 


19 


2 


17 


78 


■ "65 


21 


54 


12 


41 


830 


530 


286 


103 


30 


61 


18 


3 


14 


43 


23 


21 


79 


31 


47 


996 


596 


363 


913 


3,855 


1 


1,591 


1.701 


1 


2.458 


2.427 




5.888 


5,400 


90 


43,935 


37,842 


248 


8 


9 




1 


1 




6 


4 




16 


14 




137 


76 


37 


18,954 


16,720 


453 


48,685 


33,164 


156 


24,678 


22,077 


122 


3.762 


8,268 


186 


109.660 


92,048 


2,151 


23 


9 




262 


253 


2 


1,125 


1,083 


17 


878 


830 


27 


3.581 


3,408 


85 








249 


244 




1,062 


1,017 


17 


166 


165 




1.499 


1,482 


17 


2i 


8 

1 






8 
1 


2 


6 
57 


9 
57 




664 

48 


643 

22 


2 

25 


1.681 
401 


1,593 
333 


2» 


2 




3 


39 


22 


19 


4 


119 


108 


13 


65 


43 


13 


38 


18 


20 


408 


284 


118 


592 


239 


335 


500 


141 


348 


601 


292 


323 


1.736 


363 


1.331 


8.694 


4,001 


4.420 


344 


98 


228 


435 


111 


315 


457 


170 


306 


783 


117 


646 


3,834 


1,173 


2,594 


238 


135 


100 


65 


30 


33 


144 


121 


17 


73 


58 


15 


994 


589 


383 


10 


6 
1,475 


7 
937 










1 
4.778 


518 


880 
8,583 


188 
5,879 


670 
2.349 


3,866 
65,012 


2,239 
46,102 


1,443 


2,348 


4,120 


3,405 


397 


5.355 


16.404 


954 


995 


6 


2,443 


2,142 


90 


2,971 


2.909 


63 


1,779 


1.537 


111 


22,481 


20,431 


751 


132 


133 


6 


418 


355 


64 


718 


582 


131 


2,939 


2.262 


553 


21,665 


11,031 


10,385 


1,262 


347 


925 


1,259 


908 


243 


1,666 


1.287 


324 


3.865 


2.080 


1.685 


20,866 


14,640 


5,258 


20,336 


5,087 


13,928 


9.898 


4,591 


3,356 


10,501 


5,369 


4.046 


11,045 


4.160 


6.641 


115,701 


41,693 


68,506 


80 


38 


31 


88 


35 


50 


135 


74 


59 


889 


642 


215 


4,223 


2,571 


1,531 


1,641 


872 


752 


771 


570 


47 


1,098 


929 


65 


1,065 


765 


217 


8.523 


6,852 


1,478 


390 


126 


251 


1,043 


926 


62 


211 


126 


67 


360 


238 


101 


5.247 


2,793 


2,033 


237 


41 


183 


214 


25 


187 


190 


85 


98 


141 


44 


94 


1,773 


552 


1,14& 


1,784 


91 


1,652 


1,106 


77 


1,020 


1.070 


197 


869 


1.928 


246 


1.668 


15,603 


2,614 


13,442 


14.935 


3,239 


10,826 


4,043 


1,618 


1,973 


5.945 


2,633 


2.886 


6,625 


1,870 


4,268 


74,145 


23.420 


38,641 


1,269 


680 


233 


2.633 


1,340 


17 


1.852 


1.325 


2 


37 


355 


78 


6,187 


3,89i 


333 


1,689 


291 


1.348 


526 


106 


406 


831 


341 


480 


1,316 


273 


953 


9,755 


2,984 


6,340 


878 


199 


635 


384 


79 


292 


563 


253 


299 


990 


202 


714 


6,951 


2,116 


4,467 


811 


92 


713 


142 


27 


114 


268 


88 


181 


326 


71 


239 


2.804 


868 


1,883 


74 


21 


49 


34 


8 


23 


34 


10 


23 


45 


17 


26 


1.041 


320 


683 


46,254 


28,183 


17,880 


66,548 


43.805 


5,153 


47,554 


37,567 


6,264 


37.821 


27.826 


13,360 


382.934 


243,694 


97.125 


27,365 


23,323 


5,105 


58,543 


39.722 


3,157 


38,689 


32,784 


3,286 


28.657 


24,311 


8.871 


286,564 


207,065 


54.031 


18,889 


4,860 


12,775 


8,005 


4.083 


1,996 


8,865 


4,783 


2.978 


9,164 


3.515 


4.489 


96,370 


36,639 


43.094 



70 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



VIII. TECHNICAL EDUCATION ACT 

The Technical Education Act has now been in operation for six years, and, 
as a result of the liberal assistance rendered by the Dominion Government, every 
province has taken steps to establish technical or vocational education as a per- 
manent part of the provincial educational system. No two provinces have 
organized the work along the same lines and there h^s been a lack of co-opera- 
tive effort throughout the Dominion, but very satisfactory and encouraging 
progress has been made despite the great handicap? of scattered population, 
geographical divisions, and an extended period of industrial depression follow- 
ing the war. It cannot be said that vocational education in Canada is now 
understood and appreciated by the public or even by the majority of educational 
authorities, but, at least, there is a growing demand for this type of education 
and the results already obtained where the work has been given a fair trial are 
such that a successful future is assured. 

Relation between Federal and Provincial Governments 

Vocational education as at present conducted costs more than the older 
types of school work and many local school boards cannot see their way clear 
to imdertake this added expense when all available funds are needed for existing 
activities. It was precisely such situations, coupled with the urgent need for 
new types of school programs, that led to the provision of federal assistance 
which has enabled the provincial governments to provide liberal grants to muni- 
cipalities covering from 20 per cent to 75 per cent of the cost of salaries and 
equipment for vocational classes. 

Some of the provinces hesitate to increase expenditures on vocational educa- 
tion, knowing that the Technical Education Act expires in 1929. They fear that 
they may build up a system of education which will involve greatly increased 
expenditures for the future and that they will be called on to bear the full cost 
after 1929. Undoubtedly the work would make more rapid progress if per- 
manent federal assistance were assured. On the other hand, the fear that this 
assistance may be withdrawn in 1929, and the fact that the provincial govern- 
ments must contribute an equal amount with the Dominion Government, have 
had the effect of preventing mushroom growth and of confining developments 
along lines indicated by the more pressing needs of provincial conditions. 

Educational development is a provincial responsibility, and, although the 
national importance of the work justifies and even necessitates federal assist- 
ance, great care has been taken to avoid anything which might give the impres- 
sion of federal interference or control. Experience has shown, however, that it is 
unwise to pay grants without exercising a certain amount of control over the 
manner in which the money is expended and limiting the scope and nature of 
the work for which it may be used. The grants provided under the Technical 
Education Act were set aside for the purpose of promoting and developing 
specific types of new educational work, and, unless careful supervision is main- 
tained over the expenditure of this money, it has become evident that, in many 
cases, it will be used to support work which does not come within the provisions 
of the Act. 

The practice in certain provinces of including all manual training, domestic 
science, or practical arts work, as a part of the vocational education programme, 
has had the effect of misleading the public regarding the nature and purpose 
of vocational education and of making it financially impossible to adequately 
develop the work which the federal grants are intended to promote. It is recog- 
nized that each province has its own peculiar problems and that no fixed regula- 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 71 

tions ran be devised which will be agreeable to all provinces, but the federal 
director is convinced that the only possible way in which to develop vocational 
education in Canada is to insist upon certain minimum requirements before 
paying grants. 

PuEPOSE OF Vocational Education 

There must be a clear cut distinction between vocational education and 
the practical work which is added to the established high school courses because 
of its educational or cultural values. Federal grants are not paid on certain 
school subjects; eligibility for grants is determined by the purpose or aims of 
the courses of study. The inclusion of domestic science, sewing, millinery, 
woodworking, metalworking, mechanical drawing, etc., in the courses organized 
to prepare students for university matriculation or normal school entrance, does 
not convert them into vocational courses, nor does it entitle the school to federal 
grants on the teachers' salaries and equipment required for this extra work. 
In order to qualify for federal assistance, the courses of study in day vocational 
schools must be specially organized to meet the educational and vocational 
needs of young people who leave school between the ages of 14 and 18 and who 
desire to continue their schooling after entering employment. 

Such courses should not be expected to produce skilled workers in any trade 
or occupation, but they should enable boys and girls to intelligently select a 
suitable, available occupation and to enter employment or apprenticeship with 
a practical knowledge of the fundamental operations or processes of the work 
and a clear conception of the requirements and possibilities of advancement and 
personal development. The schools must share the responsibility of placing 
these young people in suitable positions and should provide suitable opportuni- 
ties for continuing the education and training of all young workers in both day 
and evening classes. 

The work provided in these day and evening continuation classes should 
not duplicate the instruction and training received on the job, but should sup- 
plement it in such a way that the classroom instruction is directly related to 
the work and natural interests of the students. This necessitates special instruc- 
tion for workers in different types of occupations, and, except in very large 
communities, it will be found necessary to abandon the old system of clas.9 
instruction and adopt a form of individual or group instruction. It would 
appear that the Dalton Plan, or some similar form of organization, is specially 
suited to this work, and, in the few places where such organization has been 
tried, it seems to be giving satisfactory results. 

Necessity for Co-operation 

A brief study of the reports from the nine provinces, which are a part of 
this report, will show that in almost every case some branch of the work is 
being neglected or is suffering from a temjyorary setback, due to financial string- 
ency or the failure of previous efforts. Such a condition is to be expected under 
present economic and industrial conditions, especially in an effort to promote 
new work. It should not be interpreted as indicating any inherent weakness 
in vocational education. The noimerous examples of successful vocational 
schools of various tj'pes in Great Britain, Europe, the United States, and parts 
of Canada, and the rapid progress which the work continues to make throughout 
the world, show clearly that a new era in educational ideals and methods has 
arrived and vocational education has become recognized as an essential part 
of every modern educational system. 

The provincial governments and local school boards cannot be expected to 
change their systems and methods in a year or two, nor should they be held 
solely responsible for the success or failure of the work undertaken. Parents, 



72 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

employers, organized labour, and the taxpayers generally have it in their power 
to develop or destroy the efforts of the educational ofl&cials. Unless the people 
of the community have a fairly clear conception of the purpose and scope of 
the work to be undertaken, and are willing to oo-operate with the local board 
in every way possible, it is almost impossible to organize vocational classes 
which will serve the commtunity in an adequate manner. The people must be 
informed regarding the aims and methods of vocational schools and they should 
be encouraged at every opportunity to visit the schools and become familiar 
with the work. 

Valtib of Newspaper Advertising 

The Canadian press has shown a very commendable interest in vocational 
edtication and has given very necessary and valuable publicity to practically 
every school in Canada. Some of the schools have been slow to realize the 
value and importance of newspaper advertising and free publicity through well 
written news items and editorials, but the more progressive school's are making 
increasing use of these excellent methods of reaching the public. Vocational 
schools throughout the Dominion owe a debt of gratitude to the newspapers for 
their willing and sympathetic co-operation in helping the people to understand 
the aims and methods of technical and vocational schools. 

Co-operation Between Schools and Industry 

An outstanding weakness of these schools in Canada is their failure to co- 
operate with industry. This criticism does not apply to several schools in the 
larger industrial centres, because it is in these schools, which have established 
a relationship with industry, where the urgent need for closer co-operation in 
every department of the work is recognized and sought. 

The ultimate organization and methods of vocational education in Canada 
depend more upon the nature and extent of this co-operation than upon any 
other phase of the work. As pointed out in last year's report, costs may be 
lessened by co-operative action, and efficient vocational training cannot be given 
in all branches of industrial life until the schools and industry work together. 
Employers and employees must unite in supporting the schools and they must 
be given a leading part in the organization and control of the school programmes. 

Undoubtedly much good work is being done by technical schools which 
have not established any direct relationship with local industries, but during 
the past two or three years there has been an increasing tendency on the part 
of these schools to emphasize the value of their academic training and to reduce 
the time devoted to practical studies in order to meet the requirements of 
university matriculation. 

Perhaps the chief cause of this change in policy is the misconception in the 
minds of many people regarding the purpose and value of vocational education. 
Too many parents and teachers believe that manual work and industrial employ- 
ment do not require education or special training and are therefore undesirable. 
They look upon vocational classes as a suitable place for mental defectives 
and retarded pupils only. This attitude is reflected in the minds of the children 
when choosing courses of study and they seek training which will eliminate the 
necessity of working with their hands or soiling their clothes. In endeavouring 
to meet the demands of these pupils and retain the social status of high schools, 
the technical schools are impelled to provide courses leading to university. 

Need for Definite Objectives 

Where such courses are regarded as of more importance than the industrial 
and commercial courses, those in charge are losing sight of the immediate 
objective of vocational education, which is to fit pupils for suitable employ- 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 73 

ment. Pupils who desire to enter university are provided for in the established 
high schools. The reason for vocational courses is the fact that a large majoritY 
of high school pupils do not go to university and require special vocational 
training, which is not provided by industry or in existing high school courses 
and which cannot be given by modifying these cotirses so as to serve both types 
of pupils. 

The federal director regrets that some of the principals and teachers in 
schools receiving federal grants lack a sympathetic understanding of the pur- 
pose and aims of vocational education. Such persons are hampering the 
development of the work by trying to retain as much of the old high school 
system as possible and by lacking any clear cut objective or aims which they 
can explain to pupils, parents or associates. It would seem that provincial 
officials, local directors, and members of school boards or vocational committees 
would do well to frequently examine the objectives which they have set, to 
revise them in the light of experience and to insist upon a sympathetic under- 
standing of these objectives on the part of every teacher in the vocational 
schools. Only in this way can they hope to develop a system or systems of 
vocational education which will solve the problem of preparing young Cana- 
dians for modem industrial life. A splendid beginning has been made and in 
some cities the work is well advanced, but, on the whole, vocational education 
in Canada is only in the initial stages of its development and its future depends 
upon the quality and devotion of the teachers in every branch of the work. 

Summary of Developments 

It is practically impossible to collect and tabulate statistics which will 
accurately indicate the development of vocational education throughout the 
Dominion. Despite the continued efforts of the federal director to simplify 
and standardize the statistical returns from each province, he has not been able 
to present returns which represent the same thing in each province. The differ- 
ences in nomenclature, organization and administration in the various provinces 
are such that a comparison of figures is of no value unless the reader is familiar 
with local conditions in each province. 

The financial tables are, of course, accurate in so far as they represent the 
total amount of money available for and spent by each province, but these 
tables cannot be arranged so as to clearly indicate the nature of the work on 
which the money was expended. The returns for the past year show a slight 
decrease in the total expenditures by federal and provincial governments. 
Ontario was the only province which used up all the available funds, but 
Alberta, Quebec, and New Brunswick had the full amount of the unexpended 
balance carried forward for use during the remaining years of the Act's duration. 
Twenty-five per cent of the annual appropriation was carried forward for each 
of the remaining five provinces, but the remainder of the unearned portion 
reverted to the federal treasury, or consolidated revenue fund. 

The enrolment and attendance tables, while indicating the extent of the 
work being carried on and the number of persons affected, do not reflect the 
real value of the work. They show a continued increase in the number of 
pupils in day classes, which is very encouraging. During the past six years, the 
enrolment in these classes has increased from 8,512 to 24,137, a growth of 293 
per cent. The number of municipalities conducting day classes has increased 
during the same period from 32 to 65, or 200 per ceiit. The increase in munici- 
palities conducting evening classes has been approximately 500 per cent, the 
total now being 156. There has been a growth in correspondence class enrol- 
ment of 790 per cent during these six years, and last year 1,638 pupils received 
instruction through these departments. Teacher-training, although still the most 
urgent need of vocational education in Canada, has made rapid strides in 
Ontario, British Columbia and New Brunswick. 



74 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Last year 245 teachers and prospective teachers received special profes- 
sional training in teaching methods and procedure for vocational classes. There 
has been a very noticeable improvement in the quality of the work in every 
province and the outlook for the future is very promising. 

Two outstanding events of the past year were the conferences held in Cal- 
gary and Montreal. These gatherings, which were the first of their kind to be 
held in Canada, revealed a strong desire for co-operative action on the part of 
those persons engaged in promoting and conducting vocational education 
tliroughout the Dominion. No immediate changes resulted from the discussions 
and recommendations, but those attending the meetings have come to realize the 
similarity of their problems and the advisability of co-operative action. 

The Calgary Conference, which met on April 17-18, was attended by repre- 
sentatives from the four western provinces, who discussed ways and means for 
co-operative action in Western Canada. Particular attention was given to even- 
ing school courses and correspondence instruction. The federal director acted as 
secretary and prepared a report which was issued as a bulletin of the Technical 
Education Branch of the Department of Labour. 

The Montreal Conference, which met from June 11 to 13, was called by 
Dr. A. Frigon, the provincial director, and was attended by provincial officials, 
principals and teachers of the various technical schools, representatives of 
employers and organized labour, and other persons interested in the develop- 
' ment of vocational education in the province of Quebec. The federal director 
attended the meetings and is confident that the keen interest and spirit of 
co-operation displayed by the delegates insure a very successful future for the 
work in Quebec. 

The three main topics discussed were: — 

(1) The Relationship between the Primary School and the Technical School; 

(2) The Relationship between Apprenticeship and Technical Education; 

(3) Problems Relating to Teaching and Technical School Organization. 

A special session for school principals and teachers was held on Saturday 
morning for discussion of the third topic, and several important matters affect- 
ing the work in Quebec were dealt with. It is expected that this conference will 
result in an annual gathering of a similar nature. 

A limited supply of copies of the proceedings is being issued by the pro- 
vincial director and it is likely that extracts from the papers and discussions 
will be issued as a bulletin of the Technical Education Branch. 

This office has continued to distribute bulletins and information of benefit 
to teachers and others engaged in vocational work throughout the Dominion. 
Three special bulletins dealing with the organization and use of vocational 
school libraries were prepared and sent to Canadian schools. Judging by the 
comments of various people, these bulletins appear to have filled a real want in 
vocational schools. A list of books for use in circulating libraries on vocational 
education was compiled in co-operation with the provincial ofiicials and dis- 
tributed to every province. Special service was rendered to two provinces in 
connection with summer schools for teacher-training. Numerous requests for 
information and assistance were received from organizations, teachers and 
students in all parts of Canada, and, whenever possible, such service was gladly 
given. 

The attached reports from each province indicate the scope and develop- 
ment of the work in every school. 

Beief Summaeies of Provincial Reports 

The following brief summaries point out the principal developments of the 
past year. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 76 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 

The closing of the Agricultural and Technical School in Charlottetown and 
the transfer of some of the work to the Prince of Wales College was the chief 
development in Prince Edward Island. Commercial work was undertaken for 
the first time and evening classes were opened in Georgetown. Despite the very- 
serious setback caused by the closing of the Charlottetown school, the work has 
been revived within the year and is spreading to other centres. 

NOVA SCOTIA 

In Nova Scotia substantial gains were made in every department of the 
work, except evening coal mining schools. The decreased attendance in these 
classes was due to unsettled industrial conditions affecting the whole mining 
industry. Home nursing was added to the courses provided in evening technical 
schools. 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Development in New Brunswick took the form of greatly increased building 
activity, which was brought about by the provision in the provincial legislation 
whereby grants on buildings cease in 1925. Five new buildings were in course 
of erection during the year, making a total of eight buildings in the province 
having special provisions for vocational work. The outstanding development 
was the commencement of the St. John Vocational School, which will be the 
second purely vocational school in the province. 

QUEBEC 

The most important development in the province of Quebec was the First 
General Convention of Technical Education to which reference has been made. 

The opening of the Hull Technical School and the organization of cor- 
respondence instruction in connection with the School of Higher Commercial 
Studies in Montreal were the other important developments during the year. 
The Hull school has had a very successful year, and, although statistics are not 
available for the correspondence work in Montreal, it is understood that this 
work is also proving successful. 

ONTARIO 

The establishment of the Teacher-Training College for Technical Teachers 
was the outstanding development in Ontario, if not in the Dominion. This 
school, which supplants the summer school training provided during the past four 
years, provides for a greatty enlarged programme of teacher-training and fills 
a long- felt want. The building programme in Ontario was continued on a large 
scale and there were very satisfactory increases in day school enrolments. 
Vocational education has now become an established part of the educational 
system in almost every Ontario municipality of over 5,000 population. 

MANITOBA 

The payment of provincial and federal grants to the Winnipeg School of 
Art was perhaps the most noteworthy development in Manitoba. This school, 
which is operated by a board comprising representatives of the Provincial 
Government, the Department of Education, the University, and other bodies 
interested in the development of art instruction in Manitoba, has been operated 
for a number of years without financial assistance from the province, but it is 
now recognized as a part of the provincial system of vocational education. It is 



76 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



similar to the College of Art in Toronto, the Schools of Fine Art in Montreal 
and Quebec, and the Victoria School of Art in Halifax, all of which receive 
grants under the Technical Education Act. Evening courses in English for 
adults conducted in three Winnipeg schools are included in the report for the 
first time. 



SASKATCHEWAN 



There has been a continued gain in the commercial courses in the four 
Saskatchewan cities, but other branches of the work have lost ground. The 
Saskatchewan Department of Education has not yet undertaken the extension 
of vocational education into the smaller communities through evening classes or 
correspondence instruction. 



ALBERTA 

There has been a steady growth and an increased interest in vocational 
education throughout Alberta during the year. The work has been revived in 
Medicine Hat and the prospects for future development in Alberta are encourag- 
ing. . , I 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

British Columbia reports substantial gains in both day and evening classes 
and continued development in every phase of the work. Efforts are being made 
to establish a school of design in Vancouver. It is expected that the report of 
the commission now investigating educational conditions in British Columbia 
will do much to stimulate the growth of vocational education throughout the 
province. 



TABLE I. MONEY AVAILABLE AND MONEY PAID TO THE PROVINCES UNDER THE 
TECHNICAL EDUCATION ACT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1925 



Province 


Annual 
appro- 
priation 


Balance 

from past 

years 


Total 
amount 
available 


Amount 
paid to 
province 


Total 
amount 
carried 
forward 


Amount 
lapsed 


British Columbia 


$ cts. 

70,374 35 
77,725 40 
97,165 78 
80,218 72 
347,636 30 
281,751 31 
54, 640 80 
70,288 60 
20,198 74 


$ cts. 

75,454 73 

19,431 35 
128,184 62 
113,547 26 

Nil 
259,694 22 

86,340 63 
116,540 37 

37,771 04 


$ cts. 

145,829 08 
97,156 75 
225,350 40 
193,765 98 
347,636 30 
•541,445 53 
140,981 43 
186,828 97 
57,969 78 


$ cts. 

40,860 48 

62,215 61 

17,249 37 

19,500 37 

347,636 30 

263,399 70 

43,040 51 

34,623 67 

1,950 76 


$ cts. 

93,048 32 

34,941 14 
152,476 06 
133,601 94 

Nil 
278,045 83 

97,940 92 
134,112 52 

42,820 72 


$ cts. 

11,920 28- 
Nil 


Alberta 


Saskatchewan 


55,624 97 
40,663 67 

Nil 


Manitoba 


Ontario 


Quebec 


Nil 


New Brunswick 


Nil 


Nova Scotia 


18,092 78^ 
13, 198 30 


Prince Edward Island 


Totals 


1,100,000 00 


836,964 22 


1,936,964 22 


830,476 77 


966,987 45 


139,500 oa 





REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 79 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 

W. Boulter, Secretary of Agriculture 

During the year ending June 30, 1925, the following courses were offered 
in connection with the Technical Education Act. 

1. Short term courses in home economics including millinery, dressmaking, 
laundry, home nursing, household administration, accounts and English reading. 

2. Short term courses in motor mechanics, woodworking, blacksmithing, 
civics, commercial arithmetic, English reading and drawing. 

3. Special short course for cheese and butter makers, followed by visits of 
instructor to factories for instruction, observation and demonstration. 

4. Commercial course of two years open to students having completed two 
years of high school work, 

5. Night school courses for day workers to fit them for advancement. 

ENROLMENT 

The total enrolment for the school year was 171, and the numbers registered 
by courses were as follows: — 

Course 1, 56; Course 2, 43; Course 3, 34; of which 13 attended the Central 
School, the remaining 21 receiving instruction at their factories; Course 4, 8; 
and Course 5, 30. 

The chief feature of development during the year was the establishing of 
the commercial course with the view of fitting young men and women to take 
responsible positions in this line of work. 

This course is conducted in Prince of Wales College, Charlottetown, and 
is open to students who have completed two years of high school work. It is 
planned to extend it over two years of thirty-four weeks each with thirty-five 
class hours per week. As the course had not been opened until late in January, 
or the middle of the school year, and the qualifications for admission are fairly 
restrictive, the number enrolled was small, seven men and one women, but 
highly encouraging. The work of the first year includes shorthand, typewriting, 
book-keeping and business' forms, English, history, French, arithmetic, elementary 
science, i>enmanship, drawing and physical exercises. Several of these subjects 
were taken in conjunction with the classes in the regular course for teachers 
given by the college and economy thereby effected in the teaching staff. It is 
expected, however, that in the coming year this course will be largely attended 
and a class unit will be formed in each subject. 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND 
TEACHERS IN DAY VOCATIONAL CLASSES FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30. 1925 





Department 


Enrolment and attendance 




T„i„l 












Municipality and 


Full-time 
Classes 


Short Term 

and Special 

Classes 


Enrolment 
All Classes 


Teachers 


School 


a 

11 


H 


+3 

-a 
e2§ 


4J 






3 
e2 


1 


S 
'•5 

p3 




"3 
S 

01 


3 

o 


Charlottetown .... 


Home economics. 
Industrial 






56 

77 






56 






















77 
7 
















Commercial 

Totals 


8 


7 


1 


141 


4 


12 


9 


7 


16 












8 


7 


133 




84 


57 


141 


4 


12 


9 


7 


16 



80 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



The night school conducted at Georgetown was very successful. The class 
consisted largely of fishermen and labourers, some of whom had comparatively 
no education. They eagerly availed themselves of this opportunity of improve- 
ment. The course consisted of reading, writing, business arithmetic, civics, 
geography and elements of navigation, also drawing. Students were encouraged 
to present difficulties met in their work, and these formed topics of discussion 
and research which proved to be both interesting and instructive. 

Such good reports have spread of the work done in this night school that 
it is expected other villages will endeavour to follow their example in the 
coming winter and several school inspectors have been solicited to aid in pro- 
curing suitable teachers for this work. 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND 
TEACHERS IN EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 

1924, TO JUNE 30, 1925 



Municipality or School 


Total 
Number 

of 
Subjects 


Total 

Enrolment 

All 

Classes 


Total 

Student 

Hours (by 

clock) 


Teachers 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Georgetown 


7 


30 


1920 


1 




1 






Totals 




30 


1920 


1 





1 









NOVA SCOTIA 

Report of the Director of Technical Education 

F, H. Sexton 

Gains were made in registration in all branches of secondary vocational 
education, except in the evening coal mining and engineering schools. The 
total enrolment in all the evening schools rose from 3,118 in 1923-24 to 3,378 
in the present year, even though the number in the coal mining schools decreased 
from 701 to 608. The correspondence study gained 356 course-enrolments, 
bringing the total to 1,232 isince it was established four years ago. It is diffi- 
cult to reconcile statistics of correspondence students with those taking other 
courses, because the former enrol continuously throughout the year and may 
take more than one year to complete the courses for which they enrol. Fre- 
quently they register immediately on the completion of one course and remain 
on the roll for ,& number of years. It is also difficult to know just when to 
strike off the names of dilatory students, because they sometimes fail, for 
adequate or inadequate reasons, to send in lessons for a considerable period, 
then resume actively, and carry the work through satisfactorily to its con- 
clusion. 

The reason for the falling-off in enrolment in the evening coal mining 
schools was due in all probability to the condition of depression in the industry. 
The production of coal decreased, the men were discx)ntented with working con- 
ditions, and the opportunity for employment of certificated officials in the col- 
lieries was very much restricted. In the face of these conditions the incentives 
to self-improvement by study were distinctly dampened and the classes showed 
a distinct shrinkage. 

new DEVEI.0PMENTS 

There have been no changes of policy regarding secondary vocational 
education nor new legislation passed affecting this branch of educational service. 
Courses already established have been revised and strengthened ^nd made 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 81 

more effective to meet the needs of the men and women who throng to the 
evening technical schools. The proved value of these continuation classes 
demonstrates more clearly every year the need of regular full-time day training 
for adolescents in various branches so that they may be fitted for a better 
entrance to their practical life in the manifold occupations of modem business 
and industry. It is confidently hoped that schools for this purpose will be 
established in the near future in Nova Scotia as they have_ already been in 
many other provinces of the Dominion. The progressive policy of Ontario in 
starting a comprehensive and effective centre for the training of teachers in 
secondary vocational training must bring finiitful results and it is hoped that 
a method may be developed whereby certain teachers from Nova Scotia may 
avail themselves of such opportunities. It is too expensive a matter and too 
ambitious a scheme for this small province to undertake to provide such an 
institution for special teacher-training as has Ontario. 

In evening technical schools the subject of home nursing was added to the 
regular curriculum. During the Great War courses in this subject were carried 
on by the St. John Ambulance Association and other organizations in a wide- 
&pread and effective manner. With the advent of peace there was a lapse of 
interest and most of these classes discontinued. With the revival of concern in 
the great programme of public health in this country as well as others there has 
grown a demand for instruction in home nursing. After a careful investigation 
it was decided to adopt the home nursing course as developed by the Canadian 
Red Cross Society as the best for the local conditions. This consists of a 
series of twelve periods of two hours each in which a portion of each session 
is devoted to a lecture and the remainder to a demonstration. The topics 
treated are as follows: — 

1. Health in the Home. 

2. Bedroom in Sickness and in Health. 

3. Signs of Sickness. 

4. Care and Comfort of a Patient. 

5. Feeding the Sick. 

6. Treatments. 

7. Communicable Diseases. 

8. Emergencies. 

9. Maternity Nursing. 

10. Care and Feeding of the Baby. 

11. Feeding of Children. 

12. Review. 

Each instructress was a registered nurse and the lectures on topics 8, 9 
and 10 were given by physicians specially qualified to treat on these subjects. 

In Halifax splendid co-operation was secured from the Victorian Order 
of Nurses, the Massachusetts-Halifax Relief Commission^ the Public School 
Nursing Service, and the Victoria General Hospital. All the facilities of th« 
new Public Health Clinic of Dalhousie University were made available for the 
classes and the instruction was carried on in this institution. The results were 
so encouraging that this subject has been definitely added to those offered in 
the evening technical schools. 

CORRESPONDENCE STUDY DIVISION 

Correspondence study, which is the most recently developed project of the 
Technical Education Branch of the Department of Education, has grown 
steadily in favour with the people of the province and has won a permanent 
position for itself. After four years of existence its facilities have become 
widely known and its usefulness for special study and for those students in 
remote sections is now generally recognized. 

7343-6 



82 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

The organizat; >n has become standardized to a great extent, and tliere is 
now that certaintj in the results of the methods employed which comes only 
from experiment and experience. If all the courses offered had necessarily to 
be developed anew by the Technical College the cost would have been prohibit- 
ive. Other similar bodies in the United States had, however, borne the expense 
of this pioneer work, and generous assistance has been rendered, especially by 
the Extension Division of the Massachuset'ts Department of Education and the 
Extension Division of the University of Wisconsin. 

The past year has been one of steady growth, with 356 course-enrolments, 
as compared with 314 for the preceding year, and of this number 254 were from 
new students. The percentage enrolment in groups remains very regular, 
though this year it shows a slight rise in the industrial and college preparatory 
groups, the figures being: — 

Per cent 

Industrial 49 

Commercial 27 

College Preparatory 20 

Home-making 4 

Particulars regarding each subject taught are given in the appended table. 

A very encouraging feature of the work is the number of students who 
complete their courses satisfactorily. The total course-enrolments to date from 
September, 1921, is 1,232, and the number of completed courses 431, or 35 
per cent, which compares very favourably with the figures available from insti- 
tutions teaching by the correspondence method, and the comparison is even more 
favourable when it is remembered that most of the 901 uncompleted courses 
are " active " ones and will be completed within a reasonable period. 

Another cause of satisfaction is the growing willingness of mechanics to 
study mathematics before attempting to specialize, and of almost all students 
to value the possession of such a knowledge of English as will enable them to 
express themselves with clarity, directness, force, correct form and in the 
accepted usage of the day. 

The courses are constantly being improved by revision and substitution, 
and, owing to the many requests from teachers and those wishing to prepare 
themselves by private study for provincial and matriculation examinations, it 
has been found necessary this j'-ear to revise the Latin courses and rewrite those 
in mathematics. Both these courses, as do also those in English and French, 
conform strictly to the requirements of the Nova Scotia Board of Education, 
the texts used being those specified by that department. New courses have been 
prepared to meet the provincial requirements and the particular needs of study 
by correspondence. 

The teaching staff continues to give the most meticulous care to the students, 
and neither time nor trouble is spared to provide the very best instruction and 
service, while the letters of thanks and expressions of good-will received by 
the staff from the students show that the efforts made on their behalf are 
appreciated. 

CONCLUSIONS 

The year that has passed has been very encouraging in that there has 
been a distinct increase in enrolment and a more sustained evidence of interest 
throughout all the classes. With the advent of better times in industry, more 
regular employment and increased earning and spending power, there will be 
another advance in vocational education. Until then there is the task of 
maintaining and improving the activities and services already established. In 
the discharge of this duty the subsidy for technical education to the province 
from the Dominion is a necessary factor and, notwithstanding the fact that all 
of the subsidy available was not absorbed, it is doubtful if the work would 
not have suffered a recession more or less severe if the assistance had not been 
given from the federal treasury. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



83 



NOVA SCOTIA.— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS IN 

DAY VOCATIONAL CLASSES 

For Period July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1925 





Department 


Enrolment 

and 
Attendance 


Total 

Enrolment 

Clas.ses 


All 




T^„ «!.„-„ 




Municipality and School 


Short term 
and Special 
Classes 






Total 
Enrol- 
ment 


1- 


13 


-2 
S 

o 


o 






-2 
"3 






Nova Scotia Technical Col- 


Short Course Divi- 
sion 


33 


17,849 


33 




33 


4 


8 


12 








1^ 




Totals. . . . 






33 


17,849 


33 




33 


4 


8 


12 




12 



Correspondence Department: — New Course — Enrolment, 356; teachers, 21; New Student-Enrolment, 
254. 

NOVA SCOTIA— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS IN 
EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1925 



Municipality 


Total 

Number 

of 

Subjects 


Total 
Number 

of 
f' las.se .s 


Total 
Enrol- 
ment 
All 
Classes 


Total 

Student 

Hours 

(by 
clock) 


Number of 

Individuals 

Enrolled 


Teachers 


or 
School 




£ 


$ 

o 


"3 


'a 
£ 


3 

c 


Technical — 

Halifax 

New Glasgow 

Westville 


16 

10 

2 

1 

8 
1 
1 

7 
1 

1 

3 
2 

13 
5 
3 

7 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

3 
5 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 


58 

13 
3 
1 

12 
1 
1 
8 
1 
1 
4 
4 

19 

7 
2 
3 
4 
3 
2 

2 
2 

2 
2 
3 
5 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 


1,246 

217 

59 

21 

227 

18 

16 

158 

30 

19 

61 

110 

349 

158 

81 

107 
22 
25 
44 
33 
42 
10 
44 
36 
37 
31 
59 
60 
26 
21 
3 
3 
5 


61,111 

13,515 

4,672 

1,128 

13,221 

1,618 

890 

8,973 

1,828 

1,276 

2,870 

6,421 

23,024 

10,402 

5,370 

6.738 
1,040 
1,818 
2,660 
1,372 

564 
2,072 
2,907 
2,112 
3,080 
2,606 
3,232 
2,866 
2,658 
2,490 
30 
20 

122 


597 
94 

106 

" ■ '47 

" "20 

138 

22 

4 

107 
22 
25 
44 
33 
30 
10 
44 
36 
26 
31 
59 
58 
26 
18 

I 

5 


649 

123 

59 

21 

121 

18 

16 

111 

30 

19 

41 

110 

211 

136 

77 

'l2 

10 

4 

3 


1,246 

217 

59 

21 

227 

18 

16 

158 

30 

19 

61 

110 

349 

158 

81 

107 
22 
25 
44 
33 
42 
10 
44 
36 
37 
31 
59 
60 
26 
21 
3 
3 
5 


26 
5 

6 

5 

2 

"lO 

2 

6 
2 
3 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
3 
5 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


18 
5 
3 
1 
5 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 

4 
8 
6 
4 

1 

i 

3 

1 


44 

10 

3 


Truro 

Amherst 


11 


Springhill 

Kentville 




Yarmouth 

North Sydney 

Dominion 




Windsor 




Sydney Mines 

Sydney 

Glace Bay 


18 
8 


Stellarton 


4 


Coal Mining— 

Sydney Mines 

Reserve Mines 

New VVaterford 

Glace Bay 


6 
2 
3 
3 


Florence 


2 


Dominion 


2 


Dominion No. 6 

Port Morion 

Birch Grove 

Inverness 


2 
2 
2 

2 


Westville 


3 


Stellarton 


5 


Soringhill 


6 


Joggins Mines 

River Hebert 

Maccan 


2 
3 
1 


Thorburn 


1 


Little Bras d 'Or... 


1 


Totals 




186 


3,378 


194,706 


1,606 


1,771 


3,369 


98 


69 


167 









7843-^i 



84 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

NOVA SCOTIA— SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN CORRESPONDENCE CLASSES 



Subject 



Total 


Completed 


Enrolment 


Courses 


22 


8 


144 


31 


41 


10 


32 


6 


19 


3 


25 


3 


3 


1 


7 


1 


7 


2 


44 


18 


14 


7 


34 


18 


2 





35 


12 


8 


3 


7 


1 


34 


11 


13 


5 


14 


3 


7 


4 


23 


8 


12 


5 


43 


12 


80 


40 


6 


6 


10 


5 


6 


5 


55 


15 


21 


2 


16 


7 


9 





35 


12 


54 


31 


20 


4 


44 


33 


32 


3 


45 


13 


17 


6 


12 


2 


34 


7 



Un- 
completed 
Courses 



Advertising 

Book-keeping 

Accounting. 

Business English 

Commercial Correspondence 

Business Arithmetic 

Para, and Punctuation 

Commercial Law 

Cookery 

Dressmaking 

Millinery 

Blueprint Reading 

Machine Design 

Mechanical Drawing 

Architectural Drawing 

Estimating 

Elementary English 

English Composition 

English Matriculation 

Electric Wiring 

Practical Electricity 

Advanced Electricity 

French 

Gasoline Automobiles 

Gas and Oil Engines. 

Heating and Ventilating 

Home Decoration 

Latin 

Algebra 

Geometry 

Trigonometry 

E. A. Arithmetic 

P. A. Mathematics 

Shop Mathematics 

Plumbing 

Radio 

Salesmanship 

Steam Engineering 

Shorthand 

Show Card Writing 

Surveying 

Telephony 



138 



66 



1,232 



431 



14 

113 

31 

26 

16 

22 

2 

6 

5 

26 

7 

16 

2 

23 

5 

6 

23 

8 

11 

3 

15 

7 

31 

40 



5 

1 

40 

19 

9 

9 

23 

23 

16 

11 

29 

32 

11 

10 

27 

6 

72 



801 



Individual Student Enrolment — 

Sept. 1, 1921, to June 30, 1924 727 

July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1925 254 

Total 981 

Individual Students who have completed one or more courses — 

Sept. 1, 1921, to June 30, 1924 218 

July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1925 135 

Total 353 



NEW BRUNSWICK 

Repokt of the Director of Vocational Education 

F. Peacock 

While the number recei\'ing vocational training in New Brunswick is not 
yet great, compared with that of some other provinces, substantial progress, is 
being made. The year ending June 30, 1925, shows growth in every depart- 
ment. Two hundred and fifteen full-time day students were enrolled, being 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



85 



an increase of 15 per cent over last year. The short tenn day courses served 
97, being an increase of 59 per cent. This year 1,637 attended evening classes, 
or 38 per cent more than last year. Six hundred and seventy-seven received 
instruction by itinerant teachers, making a growth of 166 per cent. While only 
30 received teacher training instruction in the New Brunswick Summer School, 
as compared with 31 last year, a big increase is to be recorded in the number 
of vocational teachers going outside of the province for professional training. 
The total number in attendance at all vocational classes was 2,656, which is an 
increase of 54 per cent as compared with the previous year. The accompany- 
ing tables show the distribution of enrolments. 

DEVELOPMENTS 

"WTiile the above figures show changes in the direction of progress, a better 
measure of the status and outlook of vocaitional education in New Brunswick 
will be obtained by a glance at the building program of the province. Although 
not a single vocational school was in operation prior to O(!tober, 1919, the 
following are now either open or in course of construction. The approximate 
costs are shown. 



School 



When 
Built 



Total 
Cost of 

Con- 
struction 



Cost of 
Vocational 
Depart- 
ment 



Govern- 
ment grant 

(Half 
Federal and 
Provincial) 



Carleton County Vocational School . 



Milltown Composite High School .... 
Edmundston Composite High School 
Fredericton Composite High School. 
McAdam Composite High School — 
Newcastle Composite High School . . . 

St. John Vocational School 

Campbellton Composite High School 



1913 



1922 

1923 

1924-5 

1924-5 

1924-5 

1925 

1925 



$ 
50,000 



106,000 
160,000 
170,000 
70,000 
70,000 
400,000 
100,000 



50,000 



20,000 
52,000 
96,000 
30,000 
40,000 
400,000 
75,000 



Nil 

(Built en- 
tirely by 
funds be- 
queathed 
by late L. 
P.Fisher). 
10.000 
26,000 
32,000 
15,000 
20,000 
100,000 
25,000 



763,000 



228,000. 



Three of the above eight schools (those at Fredericton, McAdam and New- 
castle) were completed during the year covered by this report and will receive 
students for the first time in September, 1925. The Campbellton and St. John 
schools are still under construction and will be completed about the end of 
1925. 

Thus New Brunswick, with less than 400,000 people, has invested more 
than three-quarters of a million dollars in accommodation for vocational train- 
ing, not including the cost of the equipment that will be required. The bulk of 
this development has taken place during the past two years. It means that 
already provision is made for fully 1,500 full-time day vocational students and 
twice that number of evening pupils. 

These schools are well distributed and show a growing interest in the cause 
of education. Only one community of any considerable size in the province 
is now without vocational facilities. This large and widely placed monetary 
interest in vocational training is one of the best assurances of the ultimate 
success of such training. "Where their treasure is there will their heart be 
also." 



86 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

THE COMPOSITE TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Six of the eight New Brunswick schools are of the composite type, i.e., they 
supply both academic and vocational courses. The school at Edmundston, for 
example, offers foxir avenues through which pupils of high school age may pass. 
These four departments (each headed by a specialist) are: — ■ 

(1) Academic, which leads to matriculation to college, 

(2) Commercial, which provides a thorough general education and pre- 
pares for entry upon stenographic, book-keeping and other business 
positions, 

(3) General industrial, which in addition to a good general education, 
gives the boys an insight into the woodworking, metal-working and 
electrical trades, 

(4) Home economics which provides the girls with a broad training and 
some speciali-zation in clothing, foods, sanitation, preparatory to tak- 
ing up nursing, dietetics and home-making. 

A junior industrial or prevocational department is also a feature. This 
type of school seems well adapted to serve small towns. 

THE PURELY VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

The Woodstock (Carleton county) and St. John schools are devoted 
exclusively to vocational training. The former was the pionedr school of the 
province and has done excellent service as a leader in this field of education. 
It continues to command in increasing measure the support, patronage and 
esteem of its constituency. 

The St. John Vocational School, which will open early in 1926, will be 
modem in every particular. In addition to prevocational and commeiTcial 
training, it will offer day and evening instruction in home economics subjects, 
woodworking, machine shop, motor mechanics, plumbing, electricity, printing, 
draughting and applied art. 

THE AXTTOMOTIVE BRANCH 

Instruction in the automotive field has been continued and developed. This 
year special six weeks' courses were carried out at Woodstock, St. John and 
Edmundston under Mr. W. B. Main, of the provincial department, and his 
assistants. In these courses ninety-seven garage workers were enrolled. During 
the summer the itinerant instructor has been active in the fishing districts and 
small communities of the province. This service to the automotive trade and 
users of internal combustion engines is becoming more firmly established as 
time passes. 

TEACHER TRAINING 

In 1924 summer courses were provided in the province for teachers in the 
home economics field only. Other day vocational teachers were assisted to 
take professional improvement courses outside of New Brunswick as formerly. 
No adequate policy to meet the ever growing need for trained vocational teachers 
has yet been adopted. 

NEW LEGISLATION 

The 1925 Legislature amended the Vocational Act so as to make building 
grants apply to buildings erected prior to the end of 1925, Provision was also 
made for the payment of these grants forthwith. Formerly the policy was to 
spread the payments in annual instalments over a period of twenty years. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 87 

PERSONNEL 

Miss Sarah M, Barnett, B.S., Home Economics Supervisor, returned to her 
post in Febmary after one and one-half year's leave of absence for study. The 
present membership of the New Brunswick Vocational Education Board and 
Staff is a.s follows: — 

Appointed by the Board of Education: 

Hon. Fred Magee, Port Elgin, Chairman; 

Rev. Father Tessier, St. Joseph's College; 

]\'Ir. George H. Maxwell, St. John; 

Mr. W. H. Miller, Campbellton; 

Mr. R. K. Tracey, M.L.A., Contreville. 

]\Iembers Ex-Officio: 

Dr. W. S. Carter, Chief Superintendent of Education, Vice-Chairman; 

Dr. .H. V. B. Bridges, Principal of Normal School; 

Mr, Han'-ey Mitchell, Deputy Minister of Agriculture. 

Administrative Staff: 

Mr. Fletcher Peacock, Secretary and Director; 

Miss Marguerite L. Taylor, Clerk- Accountant; 

Mr. W. B. Main, Supervisor, Automotive Work; 

Miss Sarah M. Barnett, B.S., Supervisor, Home-making Department. 



88 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



89 



NEW BRUNSWICK— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS 
IN EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1925 



Municipality 


Total 
Number 

of 
Subjects 


Total 

Number 

of 

Classes 


Total 
Enrol- 
ment 

All 
Classes 


Total 
Student 
Hours 

(by 
clock) 


Number of 

Individuals 

Enrolled 


Teachers 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 




2 

8 

5 

12 

7 
9 
I 
2 


7 
32 

5 
27 
14 
18 

1 

2 


176 

546 

66 

348 

219 

246 

19 

17 


10,364 

18,448 

1,622 

11,580 

6,708 

7,274 

760 

646 


117 
251 
20 
74 
65 
46 


59 
295 

46 
274 
154 
200 

19 

17 


176 

546 

66 

348 

219 

246 

19 

17 


3 
5 

1 
5 
2 
1 




4 
11 
4 
10 
6 
9 
1 
2 


7 




16 




5 


Frederic ton 


15 




8 


Campbellton 


10 


Bathurst 


1 


Milltown 


2 






Total 




106 


1,637 


57,302 


573 


1,064 


1,637 


17 


47 


64 



QUEBEC 

Report of the Director op Technical Education 
Dr. A. Frig on 

The most important development during the year has been the opening 
of the Hull Technical School in November, 1924. The equipment of the school 
will be completed during the coming year, and ,it will then include a machine 
shop, a w^oodworking shop, a foundry, a smithy and an automobile repair shop, 
besides the ordinary laboratory facilities for physics and chemistry. The school 
is veiy well situated in an elevated part of the town, and in the centre of the 
section inhabited by the working class. Mr. A. Buteau, C. E., B.A.Sc, formerly 
a professor of the Quebec Technical School, has been appointed principal of the 
new school, and during the past year has had under his direction a staff of two 
professors and two shop instructors. 

As is the case with the other schools controlled by the Government of the 
province, the aim of the Hull Technical School is not to cater to a great number 
of pupils, but rather to give a good technical training both in practice and theory. 
It will endeavour to prepare young men to become thoroughly qualified foremen 
and expert craftsmen, after they have had sufficient experience. In addition to 
these manual and practical qualifications, graduates will possess a knowledge 
of fundamentals in apphed science and technology. 

This new school was well received by the community, and the director and 
the teacliing staff deseive to be congratulated for the very steady attendance 
which has been maintained throughout the year, more particularly in the case 
of the evening classes. 

The industrial courses of the Sacred-Heart Academy of Grandmere 
received this year a special grant from the province. This school is conducted 
by the Sacred-Heart Brothers. It includes a grammar school and two advanced 
courses, one commercial and the other technical. During the last three years 
of their primary course, the pupils spend one, two and three hours respectively 
per week in manual training. After they have been through the grammar 
school, they may decide to take three years of advanced commercial studies, 
or the three corresponding years of the technical course. Two instructors who 
have had practical experience in their trade are in charge of the metal-working 
shop and the woodworking shop. Throughout all their entire course the pupils 
may avail themselves of the dormitory facilities of the school. This is a very 
great advantage for an institution which is located in a rather small town, and 



90 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

which might be requested to give instruction to boys who come from the sur- 
rounding country. 

All the other schools in the province have progressed normally. The Ecole 
des Hautes Etudes has organized a correspondence course which promises to 
have a great success. Statistics are not yet available, but up to this time the 
results have been very satisfactory. 

The most important event of the year has undoubtedly been the holding 
of a general convention of all those interested in technical education. The 
meeting took place at the Montreal Technical School on June 11, 12 and 13, 
1925. Three questions had been put up fof discussion: — 

(a) Relationship between the primary school and the technical school. 

Preparatory courses to technical schools. 
Vocational guidance. 

(b) Relationship between apprenticeship and technical education. 

What should be the character of apprenticeship school?. 
Which trades in the province of Quebec most require apprentice- 
ship courses? 

(c) All questions of general interest pertaining to teaching. 

Programs, time-tables, pedagogical methods, co-operation between 
schools, etc, 

The meeting was attended by almost the complete staff of all the technical 
courses of the province, and also by representatives of big industrial concerns 
and of trade unions. Thirty-two papers were presented, and were thoroughly 
discussed during the five half-day sessions of the convention. There is no 
doubt that this meeting has done a great deal to promote mterest in technical 
education in this province. A great manyquestions of fundamental importance 
have been discussed. For instance, after thorough discussion, it was recognised 
that the grammar school was not to be expected to sj>ecially prepare pupils for 
technical schools, but rather that these should look after the preparation of 
their own candidates, if required. It was also admitted that trade schools and 
apprenticeship courses were needed more than ever in this province, but repre- 
sentatives of the trades were advised that no attempt in that direction would 
be made, unless those directly interested, the trade unions and the employers, 
would show a desire to co-operate and would first agree between themselves on 
the necessity and the character of the course. 

As far as the personnel of the schools is concerned, it was resolved that 
some kind of a pension fund would be organized, and that a technical publica- 
tion would be published in order to promote interest in technical education in 
this province. 

The convention, with an attendance of over one hundred, was so highly 
appreciated that there is no doubt that it will be an annual affair hereafter. 

It is safe to say that technical education in this province is entering an era 
of intensive progress. We feel sure that we have succeeded in interesting the 
trade unions and a good many big industrial concerns in our work, and with 
their aid we look forward to important development. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



91 



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92 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 
ONTARIO 



Report of the Director of Technical Education 
F. P. Gavin 

SUMMARY OF PROGRESS 

New full-time day schools, giving instruction in one or more of the voca- 
tional departments, were opened in Owen Sound, Port Arthur, and Welland. 

The total number' of full-time day schools open throughout the whole 
school year is now twenty-five (including the Ontario College of Art). In 
addition, there are day schools open for the months of January, February, and 
March in Kingston, Collingwood, and Midland, giving instruction in naviga- 
tion and marine engineering. 

Evening schools were carried on in fifty-three places. 

The total enrolment of full-time day pupils was 11,653, an increase over 
the previous year of 27 per cent. 

The total enrolment of part-time pupils was 1,851, an increase of 40 per 
cent. 

The total enrolment of evening class pupils was 35,789, a decrease of 1.8 
per cent. 

The following tables show the progress of the vocational schools: — 

DAY VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 



1920-21 



1921-22 



1922-23 



1923-24 



1924-25 



Number of full-time teachers 

Number of part-time teachers 

Number of full-time pupils on roll 

Average attendance of full-time pupils 

Number of part-time pupils on roll 

Aggregate student-hours of part-time pupils. 

Number of special pupils on roll 

Aggregate student-hours of special pupils — 



191 



2,600 

2,123 

907 

40,997 

1,019 

223,570 



212 

60 

5,344 

4,260 

574 

37,776 

1,604 

351,214 



288-0 

49-0 

6,958-0 

5,454-3 

988-0 

60,972-5 

1,456-0 

247,439-5 



379' 

82 ■ 

9,153' 

7,148' 

r,319- 

176, 673' 

2,347- 

314,427' 



418 

126 

11,653 

9,287 

1,851 

246,998 

1,918 

256,241 



EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 





1920-21 


1921-22 


1922-23 


1923-24 


1924-25 


Number of teachers 


900 

27,297 
1,119,287 


1,075 

32,545 

1,176,039 


1,097 

33,581 

1,298,746 


1,194 

36,452 

1,423,816 


1,203 


Total number of pupils 


35,789 




1,676,081 







SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES BY MUNICIPALITIES 



1919 



1920 



1921 



1922 



1923 



Total expenditures. 
Legislative grants. . 



$ cts. 

659,072 82 
140,294 14 



$ cts. 

1,347,905 04 
511,021 04 



$ cts. 

1,585,086 36 
670,758 56 



$ cts. 

1,871,614 21 
638,217 28 



$ cts. 

3,957,136 88 
624,558 06 



AMENDMENTS TO THE REGULATIONS 



In order to ensure that a suitable proportion of the time of students in 
industrial and technical departments of the vocational schools be assigned to 
practical subjects, certain amendments have been made to the Regulations for 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER d3 

Vocational Schools, Under the new requirements at least forty per cent of the 
time in the first and second years shall be given to practical work and draughting, 
in the third year this proportion shall not be less than thirty per cent, and in the 
fourth year not less than fifteen per cent. 

Under another amendment to the regulations vocational schools are entitled 
to annual grants only when, among other conditions, satisfactory provisions are 
made for the instruction of employed adolescents who are required under the 
Adolescent School Atendance Act to attend school part time. 

It has been found that an occasional centre attempts to carry on an evening 
class programme without cost to the local school authorities by charging the 
students such fees that the evening school may be maintained out of the fees 
and the Government grant. In future the Government grant on salaries of 
evening class teachers will be paid on the total of the salaries less the amount 
of fees collected. In this way the cost of the evening classes will be shared by 
the local school authorities and the Department of Education. 

Provision has been made in the regulations whereby boai'ds may give 
teachers leave of absence with pay to attend the Ontario Training College for 
Technical Teachers. A grant equal to fifty per cent of the salary allowances to 
such teachers will be paid by the Department of Education to the local school 
authorities. 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS AND BUILDING OPER.\TIONS 

The year 1923 was remarkable for the number of buildings that were ereicted 
for the purpose of providing accommodation for vocational school classes. Two 
factors tended to make in this year a record in building that will not soon be 
surpassed. On the one hand, the programme for providing school accom- 
modation of all kinds which was delayed during the war took some time to get 
under way again and did not reach its greatest effort until 1923, and, on the 
other hand, it took local school authorities two or three years to determine to 
what extent and in what fields they could provide industrial and technical 
training. The important and substantial programmes for vocational education 
finally adopted were undoubtedly due in a large measure to the grants on capital 
expenditure available from provincial and Dominion sources which became 
available in 1919. 

While 1923 will stand out as a record year, the building programme for 
1924-25 shows that local school authorities are continuing their efforts to provide 
facilities for vocational training. 

The new building in Gait, the corner-stone of which was laid in August, 
1923, by Dr. Cody, was sufficiently completed in September, 1924, to be occupied 
by classes. The shop wing extends to the rear of the building and is notable 
for the excellent natural lighting available from three sides. The building is 
quite different from the usual style of modern schools, and from the front 
presents a fine architectural appearance with a distinctly scholastic effect. 

The new building in Owen Sound, which was begun in 1923, was completed 
in 1924 and occupied at the beginning of the autumn term. It was ofiicially 
opened by the Lieutenant-Governor of the province and Dr. Cody on December 
3, 1924. In addition to the usual class-rooms, it is provided with generous shop 
areas for machine shop work, for woodworking, and for motor mechanics. 
Visitors at the opening commented favourably on the commodious shops and 
the well-planned layout of the machinery and equipment. The distinguishing 
charactertistic of this school is the large amount of accommodation that was 
obtained for the amount of money spent. 

In London the increase in attendance in 1923 was such that a six-room 
addition was made to the school during the year. The further increase in 
attendance in the autumn of 1924 was such that, even with the additional 
accommodation, the school was still congested, and another six-room addition 
has been made, to be ready for occupancy on September 1, 1925. 



94 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

in Niagara Falls a four-room addition to the technical school was made 
during the year to provide much needed additional accommodation. 

In St. Thomas a new building has been in process of erection at a cost of 
approximately $200,000 to provide accommodation for vocational education. It 
was hoped that the building would be ready for occupancy early in the autumn 
of 1925, but, as this has been found impossible, it has been decided to defer the 
establishment of the industrial and technical departments until next year. In 
the meantime the commercial department is carrying on in the collegiate 
institute. 

The local school authorities in Chatham have dealt with the problem of 
providing accommodation for vocational classes in an unusual and yet interesting 
way. The question of accommodation for the industrial classes had become a 
pressing one, not only because the arrangement whereby they were housed in the 
Central Public School was an unsatisfactory one, but because the rooms occupied 
by these classes were needed by the public school classes. As the school authori- 
ties felt they were not in a position at present to enter on an adequate building 
programme, they purchased the Sanita Hotel property, facing on Tecumseh 
Park, which they were offered at a veiy reasonable price. The site is an 
excellent one, especially for evening class work. The remodelling of the building 
has been done at a very moderate cost, and has provided accommodation, 
adequate for some years, which is a great improvement over that formerly 
available. The hotel garage, a separate building, was converted with little 
expense into a first-rate machine shop, and the mineral bath-house once used in 
connection with the hotel has been made into a good woodworking shop. 

In Weston, one of the smaller places undertaking to carry on technical 
education, the attendance has increased beyond all expectations, and the local 
school authorities were faced in 1924 with the question of more accommodation. 
An addition of six rooms has been made to the vocational school, to be ready 
for use in September, 1925. 

The city of Peterborough has submitted plans for a substantial building 
to the rear of the collegiate institute to provide accommodation for vocational 
classes. The plans have been approved by the Advisory Vocational Committee, 
the Board of Education, and by the Minister of Education. It is estimated that 
the building will cost $370,000 and will provide adequately for instruction in 
industrial and technical, in home-making, and in commercial departments. 

En'ENING CLASSES 

The increased attendance in evening classes is due largely to the steady 
growth of the evening classes in the larger centres, and especially in the centres 
which have entered on a day school programme and have provided special 
accommodation. In places like Windsor, St. Catharines, Kitchener, and Guelph 
the increases have been quite remarkable. 

In smaller communities the growth in evening class attendance has been 
more irregular and uncertain. In some places the growth has been well main- 
tained; in others there has been little growth, and in an occasional community 
a falling-off in attendance. The lack of growth in certain places cannot be 
due to the fact that all the educational needs of the employed part of the 
community have been met. In some comparatively small places where a vigorous 
promotion effort has been made by those in charge, where teachers who are 
enthusiastic and keen, and who are acquainted with the needs of the students, 
have been in charge of the work, and where well-planned progressive courses of 
study outlined in definite units have been offered, evening classes have been 
quite as successful as in large places. The interest of the class in their studies 
and the amount of work they have covered are due in part to the enthusiasm of 
the teacher. In every community of three or four thousand up there are 
doubtless a number of young men who would respond in the same way to the 
same opportunity if properly presented to them. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 95 

In Vellore, a very small community, a class in farm mechanics was carried 
on in the community hall with an enrolment of forty n^ien and boys from the 
neighbouring farms. As no equipment of any kind was available, each student 
brought his own tools and material to work with. The class were most enthusi- 
astic about their work, and maintained an average attendance of twenty-three 
for the course. While much of the success of the work was due to the ability 
and interest of the teacher, yet the determining factor was the strong local 
public interest inspired in the first instance by Mrs. H. M. Atkin, a worker in 
the Women's Institute, who overcame ail difficulties and proved that even in 
the smallest community there is a place for an evening class. 

TEACHER-TRAINING ACllVITIES 

The provisional scheme for training teachers of shop subjects in summer 
courses adopted in 1921 for a period of four years terminated in 1924. Experi- 
ence with this plan showed (1) that the length of the com^e, viz., two summer 
sessions of five weeks each, was not great enough to cover satisfactorily the 
work required, and (2) that, as the regular day schools were closed for the 
summer holidays, it was not^ pvossible to give practice teaching under actual 
class-room conditions. 

To provide on a permanent basis an adequate and comprehensive scheme 
for the training of shop teachers, the Ontario Training College for Technical 
Teachers has been established in Hamilton. The classes of the Hamilton 
Technical Institute are used for observation work and practice teaching. The 
first session of the college opened on April 20, 1925. 

A suitable building for the use of the college will be erected in the near 
future on a site adjacent to the Hamilton Technical Institute. 

The course consists of two parts. Part 1, which consists largely of lecture 
and theoretical work, may be taken in two smnmer terms of five weeks each. 
Part II, which consists largely of obscr'/ation and practice teaching, may be 
taken in the autumn or the spring term only. 

The course is so arranged that teachers in service who are required to take 
the training will be able to take one-half the course during summer holidays 
and will need to obtain leave of absence from their duties for ten weeks only 
during either the autumn term or the spring term. 

The subjects of study to be given in the new teacher-training course are 
as follows:— 

English, 

Principles of Teaching, 

History, Principles and Problems of Vocational Education, 

School and Class Management and School Law, 

Trade Analysis and Courses of Study, 

Study of Industries, 

Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects, 

Practice Teaching, 

Vocational Guidance, 

Shop Plans and Equipment, 

Mechanical Drawing, 

Costume Design. 

T'le terms are so arranged that there will be no teachers-in-training at 
the college during the winter months. During these months the staff of the 
college will be used for field service, i.e., for conducting in outside centres short 
intensive courses for untrained evening class teachers, many of whom neither 
can nor will attend the regular sessions of the college, for giving assistance on 
the job to day school teachers in selecting and organizing teaching material, in 
planning and equipping shops, in adopting the most efficient methods of teach- 
ing, or in any way that makes for the improvement of teachers in service. 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



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98 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

The requirements for admission to the Training College are as follows :- 



1. General Education: 

(a) The applicant for admission shall be required to pass an examination 
in general education. The examination will consist of a paper in arithmetic, 
a paper in composition, spelling, penmanship, and a paper in general knowledge 
of the subject which the candidate proposes to teach. The work in arithmetic 
will include the four fundamental operations, simple, vulgar and decimal frac- 
tions, and percentage. 

{b) If the applicant submits satisfactory evidence of having taken two 
years' high school work or its equivalent, he may be exempted from the examina- 
tion in arithmetic and in composition, spelling and penmanship. 

2. Trade training and experience: 

(a) The training or apprenticeship required shall be that usually demanded 
for a journeyman's qualifications in the trade concerned. Special training 
obtained in a day vocational school' will be taken into account in considering 
the period of training. 

(b) The experience required depends upon the trade. Experience in 
approved shops shall be required and shall be such as to show that the applicant 
is proficient in his trade and is acquainted with its recent developments. 

3. Health and character: 

Applicants shall be in good health, and shall be of good moral character, 
and shall possess the personal qualifications necessary to success in teaching. 

In the case of teachers m service who may find it necessary to obtain leave 
of absence to attend durin^ an autumn or a spring term, provision has been 
made that, if the local school authorities give them leave of absence with pay, 
a grant will be paid to the board equal to one-half the salary allowed the 
teachers while in training. 

The attendance at the Training College for the two terms already com- 
pleted was as follows: — 





Men 


Women 


Total 




28 
53 


14 
48 


42 




101 







An interesting feature of the work of the summer session was the require- 
ment whereby each of the senior students made a special study of some one 
of the many problems <3f vocational education and wrote up the results of his 
study in a thesis or essay. These essays become part of the reference material 
of the library of the college. 

CHANGE IN STAFF 

Mr. F. P. Gavin, Director cl Technical Education, will leave his present 
position to become Principal of the Ontario Training College for Technical 
Teachers on September 1, 1925. 

Mr. D. A. Campbell, Principal of the Samia Technical School, will succeed 
him as Director of Technical Education. Mr. Campbell before coming to Samia 
was Director of Technical Education for Alberta. 

Mr. F. S. Rutherford, Organizer of Technical Education, will become 
Assistant Director on September 1. 

Mr. M. A. Sorsoleil, and Miss E. I. McKim, Organizerv=j of Technical educa- 
tion, will join the staff of the Training College. 

Miss Alice Hamill, of the Kitchener-Waterloo Vocational School, will 
become Organizer in the Technical Branch of the Department of Education. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



99 



ONTARIO— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS IN 

EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1925 



Municipality or 
School 


Total 
Number 

of 
Subjects 


Total 
Number 

of 
Classes 


Total 
Enrol- 
ment all 
Classes 


Total 

Student 

Hours 

(by 

clock) 


Number of Indi- 
viduals Enrolled 


Teachers 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


Amherstburg 

Barrie 


6 

8 

15 

20 

25 

11 

23 

9 

17 

12 

4 

8 

19 

13 

4 

24 

43 

9 

8 

13 

30 

37 

5 

19 

15 


3 

6 

18 

21 

17 

9 

17 

6 

10 

7 

4 

8 

19 

23 

9 

29 

58 

8 

7 

8 

60 

55 

6 

18 
11 


61 

136 

337 

689 

575 

181 

611 

103 

315 

140 

82 

504 

412 

554 

132 

1,120 

1,821 

146 

134 

120 

1,294 

1,901 

134 

722 

261 

192 
331 

4,681 
201 
499 
409 
211 
355 
218 
250 
385 
345 
127 

1,051 
632 
694 
25 
353 
399 

8,216 

2,643 

7,245 

92 

177 

367 

2,914 

635 

52 


1,246 

8,820 

12,814 

21,264 

11,027 

7,180 

10,280 

4,250 

9,888 

5,944 

2,385 

8,688 

13,630 

16,728 

3,800 

44,093 

73,920 

4,230 

4,521 

2,890 

45,786 

51,784 

3,165 

7,820 

12,476 

25,000 

16,376 

152,957 

7,864 
11,009 
13,926 

6,214 
58, 137 
13,448 

6,116 
18,003 
10,242 

7,410 
33,320 
22,712 
69,550 

1,258 
12, 624 

8,474 

288,974 

73, 160 

129,445 

4,744 

8,840 

11,850 

110,340 
2,164 
1,260 


9 

35 

136 

180 

117 

54 

110 

16 

67 

24 

24 

69 

210 

230 

2 

417 

1,066 

19 

70 

39 

623 

684 

24 

330 

145 

116 

166 

1,186 

72 
132 
191 

70 
114 

59 

26 
235 
146 

64 
406 
184 
191 

22 

136 

262 

2,730 

1,031 

1,455 
36 
78 
98 

1,780 
128 
27 


34 

69 

201 

345 

226 

92 

227 

119 

116 

70 

32 

92 

196 

281 

106 

703 

591 

114 

64 

48 

671 

521 

110 

220 

109 

76 

114 

3,495 

129 

316 

218 

141 

241 

159 

206 

150 

136 

63 

514 

282 

344 

3 

202 

43 

3,400 

1,010 

1,619 

56 

99 

220 

1,134 

221 


43 

104 

337 

525 

343 

146 

337 

135 

183 

94 

56 

161 

406 

511 

108 

1,120 

1,657 

133 

134 

87 

1,294 

1,205 

134 

550 

254 

192 
280 
4,681 
201 
448 
409 
211 
355 
218 
232 
385 
282 
127 
920 
466 
535 
25 
338 
305 
6,130 
2,041 

3,074 

92 

177 

318 

2,914 

349 

27 


1 
5 
9 
12 
11 
5 
8 
2 
7 
4 
1 
3 
14 
8 
1 

14 

65 

2 

6 

3 

31 

33 

3 

9 

7 

12 
6 

32 
6 
5 

11 
7 
9 
3 
3 

13 

11 
4 

20 

10 
8 

9 

124 

44 

57 
3 
5 
8 

45 
9 
2 


2 
2 
8 

10 
6 
4 
9 
5 
5 
3 
3 
4 
7 
9 
3 

22 

80 
5 
2 
5 

15 
9 
3 
7 
6 

8 
5 

48 
4 

12 
6 

10 
5 
7 
6 
6 
7 
4 

14 
6 
9 
1 
9 
5 

48 

18 

10 
2 
4 
8 

26 
6 


3 

7 


Belleville 


17 


Brantf ord 


22 


Brockville 


17 


Burlington 


9 


Chatham. 


17 


Collingwood 


7 


Dundas 


12 


Elmira 


7 


Espanola 


4 


Fairbank 


7 


FortWiUiam 

Gait 


21 

17 


Goderich 


4 


Guelph 


36 


Hamilton 


85 


Hespeler 


7 


Ingersoll 


7 


Iroquois Falls 

Kitchener-Waterloo. . 
London 


8 
46 
42 


Midland 


6 


Niagara Falls 

North Bay 


16 
12 


Ontario College of 

Art 


20 


Oshawa 


10 
36 
10 
10 
14 
17 
16 
14 
10 
17 
16 
11 
24 
14 
23 
1 
18 
18 
68 
41 

17 

6 

8 

11 

31 

22 

2 


11 

184 

9 

21 

26 

19 

18 

9 

14 

26 

14 

6 

41 

14 

17 

1 

16 

13 

318 

102 

160 

5 

10 

17 

116 

23 

2 


11 


Ottawa 


80 


Pembroke 


10 


Owen Sound 


17 


Peterborough 

Perth 


17 
17 


Port Arthur 


14 


Preston 


10 


Renfrew^ 


9 


Sarnia 


19 


Sault Ste. Marie 

Smith's Falls 

St. Catharines 

Stratford 


18 

8 

34 

16 


St. Thomas 


17 


South Porcupine 

Sudbury 


1 

16 


Timmins 


14 

172 
62 

67 

5 

« 

16 

71 

15 

2 


Toronto (Central) 

Toronto (R'dale) 

Toronto (H.S. Com- 
merce) 


Wallaceburg 


Welland 


Weston 

Windsor 


Woodstock 


Vellore 




Totals 




1,649 


46,184 


1,676.081 


15,841 


19,948 


35,789 


726 


477 


1,203 







7343-7i 



100 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



MANITOBA 

Report of the Director of Technical Education 
R. B. Vaughan 

Vocational education in Manitoba coming under the scope of the Tech- 
nical Education Act has been confined to Winnipeg, Norwood, Teulon and 
St. Laurent. Courses in home economics only have been given in Teulon and 
St. Laurent, while commercial work has been offered in Norwood. In Winni- 
peg, courses in junior matriculation and engineering, practical arts for girls 
and commercial work have been conducted as usual. 

Commercial education continues to increase. Practical arts for girls main- 
tains its former status and evening classes ha^'e made a slight advance. 

Comparison of work done in the year ending June, 1924, with that for the 
previous year, follows: — 



1924 



1925 



Number of day schools 

Number of evening schools 

Number of teachers in day schools. 

Number of evening school teachers 

Total attendance day schools 

Total enrolment evening schools 

Attendance Winnipeg School of Art 
Attendance teacher-training course. 



11 

3 

3 

98 

43 

1,183 

1,539 

25 



(full-time) 
(part-time) 



11 

5 

5 

91 

46 

1,359 

2,937 

264 

25 



In the evening classes the following courses have been offered: — 

Kelvin Technical High School: Practical electricity, first, second and third 
years; mathematics for electrical courses, auto mechanics; woodworking; 
machine shop work; pa item-making; machine drawing; dressmaking; miUinery; 
cookery; show-card writing; drawing; design; book-keeping; typewriting and 
shorthand. 

St. John's Technical High School: Millinery; dressmaking; architectural 
drawing; show-card writing; woodworking; machine shop courses; gymnasium; 
business English; stenography; typewriting, book-keeping; auto mechanics; 
electricity; fadio; and English for illiterates. 

Courses in English for adult Canadians of foreign birth were held at the 
Maple Leaf, Norquay a,nd Strathcona schools. 

Twenty-five teachers and others were again enrolled in the teacher-train- 
ing course. Classes were held on Wednesday evening throughout the winter. 

Fifteen girls attended the home economics course for girls held at the 
Manitoba Agricultural College and a number completed the course outlined 
for high school girls. 

As a result of the Calgary conference, Manitoba has made arrangements 
to begin correspondence courses in steam engineering. The courses prepared 
by the Calgary Technical Institute have been carefully examined by the board 
of examiners and by the engineering department of the University of Manitoba 
and accepted for use in Manitoba; in fact the Calgary Technical Institute has 
reason to feel gratified by the many complimentary things said about this 
course. Members of the staff of the university will read th§ papers and direct 
the students in their study. There is every indication that this course will 
prove very popular in Manitoba, and also that correspondence courses in other 
subjects will find a large group of students ready to enrol. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER tlH 

A class in commercial work has been conducted in Norwood dm"ing the 
year, and the Norberry School, St. Vital, is making ^arrangements to offer a 
course in commercial work next year. It is apparent that the tendency of 
development in Manitoba is toward courses in commercial education to a 
greater extent than work leading to trades and industries. 

No legislation respecting vocational education has been passed during 
the year. 

The Winnipeg School of Art 
W. Percy Over, Honorary Secretary 

The general session of the school opened October 6, 1924, and closed May 
15, 1925. A total of 264 students were registered during the session, the day 
school numbering 72, evening 98, and Saturday 94. The summer outdoor 
sketch class totalled 18. The enrolment of this year compares very favour- 
ably with that of previous years. 

The annual exhibition op>ened on April 6, continuing for five weeks. It 
was well attended and very favourably commient€d upon by the public in gen- 
3ral, and tlie press. Great care was taken to present a comprehensive display 
of the entire work of each class, carrying each subject through its whole course 
of development. The work on display went through a rigid process of elimina- 
tion at the end of each month, which stimulated the students to greater efforts 
and enabled us to present the results of our entire course of instruction. 

The scholarships awarded for 1925 and 1926 are 5 one-term scholarships 
and 3 one-month scholarships in the day classes, 3 one-term scholarships and 
3 one-month scholarships for the evening classes, and 3 one-term scholarships 
for the Saturday classes. 

Constant use has been made of the school library this year and the students 
are learning more and more the value of art reading. On numerous occasions 
books by G. Clausen, and other men of note, have been read to the students. 

It has been interesting to note in the progress of the school that the prac- 
tical side has been emphasized sufficiently to enable a number of students to 
secure a beginning in the world of commercial art. The British and Colonial 
Press has taken one of our day students on their permanent staff, and Brigdens 
of Winnipeg, Limited, have absorbed a number of others. All these students 
are now studying in the school at whatever time is practicable, most of them 
continuing their studies in the night class. Also, a number of the night students 
attending the various classes are employed in occupations where the study of 
art is not only helpful but necessary to advancement in their chosen line of 
work. Numbers of the students not employed in positions demanding any art 
instruction have shown a definite desire to develop their talent, with the final 
objective in mind of taking a position in commercial art whenever such pre- 
sents itself. 

In reporting the activities of the school, it will perhaps be best to discuss 
the classes individually. 

The Life Class, which has been the largest in its history, has made very 
satisfactory progress. The importance of drawing from life cannot be stressed 
too strongly, for a keen understanding of the figure is most essential in what- 
ever field the student wishes to branch. 

The Anatomical Aspect of Life Draioing has been given very careful con- 
sideration, each student receiving individual diagrams explaining his or her 
particular phase of the pose. 

A variety of mediums has been used throughout the course: charcoal, 
pencil, pen and ink, oil, watercolour, pastel, wash and tempera, and modelling 
in plasticine. 



102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

We have endeavoured to keep the students " on their toes " by the unique 
variety of poses employed, embodying a great range of perspective in the 
figure, and a constant changing of mediums to allow the student to feel out for 
himself what is best adapted to drapery studies. The figure in action from 
memory in figure compositions has also held an important place in this class. 

The Antique Class forms the foundation for practically all branches of 
drawing, developing the greatest power of draughtsmanship and a compre- 
hensive understanding of the figure. Here the entering student acquires the 
first principles of form and light and shade, training the hand, the eye and the 
power of observation. There has been no great variety in this work for the past 
session. Next year it is our intention to use the model one day a week for the 
antique students, not only to break the monotony of drawing from the cast, 
but to give them a better insight into what the work is leading up to. The 
charact^er of this class will be, quick action poses, the introduction of the 
variety of mediums in life drawing, and a more intensive study of anatomy. 

Composition has played an important part in this year's curriculimi. Ii-s 
bearing on commercial layout requires no further mention. The class started 
with a series of '* Thumbnail " sketches, filling a variety of shapes with simple 
compositions, thus acquiring a basie on which they were able to build colour 
cc^mbinations. Many subjects were handled in many different ways, with the 
result, as evidenced by the school exhibition, that the student is now quite 
capable of turning out a drawing which is very satisfactory from a composition 
standpoint. The usual variety of mediums was carried out in this class, includ- 
ing a very interesting method of imitation wood block cut. Posters, landscapes, 
figure compositions of various natures were amongst the many class problems. 

Outstanding amongst the work of the students is a series of mural dooora- 
tions donated to the Children's Hospital. There are eight panels in number, 
each representing some fairy tale. The sizes range from 2 by 4 feet to 10 by 4 
feet and present an entirely different problem to the ordinary class assig-nmeut 
Material and paint were furnished by various firms in the city. 

Perspective, a most essential study, has been given very careful considera- 
tion and has been taught through tlie execution of actual perspective drawings. 

Grouping of simple objects, squares, cylinders, cones, etc., were amongst 
the first assignments. These were done in outline only. Gradually working the 
student into light and shade v.^^ increased the difficulty of the subject and 
assigned drawings to be made of various sections of the school. 

With the coming of suitable weather the class had advanced sufficiently to 
make sketches of the Parliament Buildings, and the subject matter close at hand, 
the railroad yards, and their relative points of interest. It has been our aim to 
keep the student keyed up to a subject that might otherwise seem irksome, by 
introducing as much outdoor perspective drawing as one-half day a week allows. 

The students in design have been carried through a carefully planned course, 
commencing with simple geometric border and all-over patterns in black and 
white, gradually leading to colour compositions in a variety of designs. 

A very thorough study of leaves, flowers, roots, inflorescence and their kin- 
dred subject was carried out. Blackboard demonstrations were used to give the 
student a firmer grounding in plant construction, after which they were assigned 
a number of problems in invented plant life. 

Birds were next dealt with in their relation to design and problems in inven- 
tion of bird form were carefully planned and carried out. 

All our classes have been planned to give the student the best grounding 
TK'j^ssible, a set of tools with which it will be possible to fashion his advanced 
course, a knowledge of the first principle of drawing without which it is of little 
avail to carry on m commercial work. 

We have tried in the school lobby to keep a constantly changing exhibition 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



t03 



of outside infterest, such as the exhibition of student work from Chicago, various 
selections of posters, and a variety of clippings pleasingly mounted dealing with 
design, contemporary American paintings, etc. These have served to give the 
student an insight into what is happening in the aa*t world at large and have 
created much interest in our classes. 

In reporting Mr. Fursman's activities during his stay as visiting instructor, 
h*s association with the school has been very beneficial. He drove home what 
we Have been constantly hammering at. We have found it of great value to be 
able to refer to what he said in his talks to each class. He addressed each group, 
dwelling on the relation and the importance of each group to the ultimate aim 
of each student, viz., that of making his or her way in the commercial field one 
of success. 

MANITOBA— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS 
IN EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FOR PERIOD JULY 1. 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1925 



Municipality or 
School 



Total 
Number 

of 
Subjects 



Total 
Number 

of 
Classes 



Total 
Enrol- 
ment all 
Classes 



Total 

Student 

Hours 

(by 
clock) 



Number of Indi- 
viduals Enrolled 



Male 



Fe- 
male Total 



Teachers 



Male 



Fe- 
male 



Total 



Winnipeg — 

Kelvin 

St. John's 

School of Art 

Including Courses in 
English for Adults- 
Maple Leaf 

Norquay 

Strath cona 

Totals 



14 



86 



1,550 

1,387 

139 



503 



3,579 



32,562 
26,895 



942 

849 

59 



538 
80 



552 



60,009 



1,850 



1,226 



1,550 

1,387 

139 



503 



3,579 



42 



21 



24 

22 

3 



14 



63 



104 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 





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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER fOS 

SASKATCHEWAN 
Report on Vocational Education 
J. H. McKechnie, Chief Inspector 

The progress in this phase of educational work during the statistical year 
just closed continued to be substantial. There was no abatement of interest in 
the three cities of Moose Jaw, Regina, and Saskatoon, although financial condi- 
tions were of such a character that trustees were unable in some cases to proceed 
with new undertakings and in one city there was of necessity a slight curtail- 
ment of the day industrial classes. On the other hand, the enrolment in com- 
mercial classes was considerably increased. In one school, where one hundred 
and seventy-five pupils were enrolled in the first year, seventy-nine of these were 
enrolled in the commercial course. In the three cities encouragement was given 
students to enrol for the three-year commercial couTse, and the number so doing 
is increasing very encouragingly. 

The niunber of girls requ^ing the so-called vocational course in home 
economics is not increasing appreciably. The reason for this is largely economic. 
Practically every girl in this province finds it necessary to earn her own living 
for a time at least. While undoubtedly she has home-making in mind, yet her 
echool course must be siiaped cither towards commercial work or teaching. Much 
as she may like to s{>end considerable time in home economics, she is forced by 
economic circumstances to enter the commercial or teacher's coiu*se, with a view, 
nr^t only of earning a living, but also, in a great munber of cases, of repaying 
her parents for funds advanced for her schooling. In a new country such as 
Saskatchewan it will be years before this condition of affairs is changed. 

A very encouraging feature of the collegiate work in the three cities, how- 
ever, is the number of girls of the first and second years who take the classes in 
home economics, altliough the time devoted to the work is perhaps not all that 
one would desire. In one school, for instance, every girl of the first and second 
years took the household science class as one of the optional classes, and in this 
school over thirty per cent of the third year girls selected this option. In this 
particular school all the boys of the first and second years were enrolled in the 
classes for manual training and shop work. Practically similar conditions existed 
throughout other schools. 

Tlie day industrial classes for boys and yoimg men continued successfully 
in Regina. Moose Jaw has not felt any real demand for this type of day work. 
In Saskatoon, day industrial classes were provided in both collegiates and 
continued until June, 1924. Beginning with the fall term of 1924, this work 
was discontinued, except in Bedford Road Collegiate, where the first year class 
of the previous year was continued as a second-year class. The class contained 
thirteen boys, ten of whom intended entering mechanical pursuits and three the 
engineerirg course at the university. A feature of the work of this class was the 
visiting of places of industry throughout the city and the instruction and dis- 
cussion incidental thereto. The instructor kept in close touch with the parents 
who appreciated the work and instruction their boys received. 

Before discontinuing strictly vocational day courses, the board gave the 
matter serious consideration. The grade VIII pupils in the public schools were 
canvassed for possible students. The response was fair. On one side of the 
river only five or six boys signified a desire for instruction in wood or metal. 
After due consideration the board felt that for the present it would concentrate 
in the day classes on commercial work, teachers' diplomas and matriculation 
work, retaining, however, the home economics and manual training departments 
for those students who wished these options. As soon as any real demand in the 
city arises for industrial classes, the board will be found ready to meet the 
demand. 



106 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



The great industry of Saskatchewan is agriculture and the work of vocational 
training is shared by the College of Agriculture and the Department of Agri- 
culture. Both the college and the department are active in all phases of 
instruction which will make the work of the people on the land not only profitable 
but happy. The College of Agriculture in particular is interested in every phase 
of farm life and short courses are provided in a great variety of subjects appealing 
to both the male and female members of the community and these courses are 
largely attended. In addition, the various machine companies have short 
vvinter courses of instruction for farm boys and men on the gas tractor. These 
courses are given in the cities and larger towns. They are efficiently planned 
and are annually taken advantage of by hundreds of men and boys over fifteen 
years of age. A feature of these courses is the series of talks given by business 
and professional men, in addition to the technical instruction by the machine 
experts. One company provides a complete course for operators of internal 
combustion engines which includes a series of lectures lasting five days and 
covers every phase of internal combustion engine operation and design, with 
particular application to tractor work. 

As an example of the activities of various departments of the government 
in providing educational facilities, I may mention the course provided by the 
Department of Agriculture to steam engineers, and the courses given the 
employees by the Department of Telephones. 

As in previous years, the evening classes were well attended in the three 
cities, there being an increasing number each year taking advantage of the great 
variety of instruction provided. It was felt that the preparation of courses 
especially in millinery and dressmaking and in English to the non-English, 
would further stimulate the interest in these classes and help to organize the 
work so that students would enrol for two or more terms. Recommendations 
to this effect have been made to the superintendent. 

During the year the day and evening classes were visited by a high school 
inspector, or the chief inspector, in some cases accompanied by the superin- 
tendent. Problems were discussed with the instructors and members of the 
committees. 

At Easter a very instructive conference was held at Calgary where repre- 
sentatives of the western provinces met with the Dominion director, Mr. Craw- 
ford, and discussed ways and means of co-operating in the work of vocational 
education in the western provinces. 

SASKATCHEWAN— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS 
IN EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 

FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1925 



Municipality or 
School 


Total 
Number 

of 
Subjects 


Total 
Number 

of 
Classes 


Total 
Enrol- 
ment all 
Classes 


Total 

Student 

Hours 

(by 

clock) 


Number of Indi- 
viduals Enrolled 


Teachers 




Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


Regina Collegiate Ins- 
titute 


12 
S 
8 

6 


14 

3 

12 

15 


448 

51 

354 

205 


16,354 

702 

6.702 

5,554 


98 

21 

123 

80 


350 

30 

164 

125 


448 

51 

287 

205 


15 
2 
6 

4 


5 
1 
4 

5 


20 


Saskatoon Nutana 
Collegiate Institute 

Bedford Road Colle- 
giate Institute 

Moose Jaw Vocational 
Building and Cen- 
tral Collegiate In- 
stitute 


3 
10 

9 






Totals 




44 


1,058 


29,312 


322 


669 


991 


27 


15 


42 







REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



T07 



SASKATCHEWAN— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS IN 
DAY VOCATIONAL CLASSES FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1925 





Department 


Enrolment and 
Attendance 


Total 

Enrolment 

All 

Classes 




T€ 








Municipality and 
School 


Full- 
time 
Classes 


Short 

Term and 

Special 

Classes 


achers 




o h » 

45 
31 

289 

13 

161 

90 
260 


Average 
attend- 
ance 


Total 
enrol- 
ment 


+3 

3 O 


'a 


S 

a 


1 
o 
H 


0) 


V 


-2 


S 


1 


Regina Central 

Collegiate Institute. . . 
Scott Collegiate Ins- 


Home-making — 
Industrial 

Commercial 

Pre- vocational. . . . 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Domestic Science. 


320 
22-0 

222-6 

12-78 

158-41 

73-0 
2200 








45 


45 
80 

289 

13 

161 

90 
260 


1 
2 

5 

2 
.... 


7 
7 

2 
5 

11 


4 
6 

3 
5 
9 

7 


4 
3 

4 

4 

4 
1 


« 


49 


38 


80 
99 

13 

67 

49 


190 

94 

41 
260 


9 

7 


Bedford Road Colle- 
giate Institute, Sas- 






5 


Bedford Road Colle- 
giate Institute, Sas- 






13 


Vocational Building 
and Central C. I., 






11 








1 
















Totals 


889 


740-79 


49 


38 


308 


630 


938 


11 


43 


34 


20 


54 









ALBERTA 

Report of the Director of Technical Education 
W. G. Carpenter 

The past j'ear has been a quiet one in the development of technical education 
in this province. While there has been no great display, there has been a steady 
growth and an interest in technical education which is wholesome. Parents are 
looking more seriously at industrial careers for their sons. Boys are realizing 
that the rewards in the industrial field are, on the whole, larger than those 
in the professional. Young women are likewise training themselves for com- 
mercial activities, the tendency in this respect being to get a sound scholastic 
background before taking more specific business training. The commercial 
schools report a larger number with higher academic standing than in previous 
years. In fact, in Calgary, where the accommodation is limited, those with 
merely a grade VIII standing are finding it difficult to gain admittance to the 
Commercial High School. There are a number who are obtaining university 
degrees before qualifying for stenographic and secretarial duties. 

In the city of Edmonton the Technical High School has had a normal year 
without any great change in the enrolment. The large enrolment still exists in 
the prevocational and matriculation classes. The print shop has been closed 
by the board. The sewing classes have been popular, there having been a 
specially fine vocational class in dressmaking. The school passed a crisis during 
the year when it weathered opposition which threatened its existence. This 
criticism has strengthened the school and there is a determined effort being 
made to make it function to its maximum value in the community. There has 
been a marked increase in the attendance in the commercial classes where 
effective work is being done. 



108 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

In Calgary there has been a shght falling off in the attendance at the Pre- 
vocational School. This is attributed to the lack of attention that is being 
paid to manual training in the elementary grades, which is not giving the same 
opportunity as formerly to young people to discover their natural bent. The 
commercial classes, while not much larger than in the previous year, owing 
to lack of accommodation facilities, are more select. The average academic 
attainment of the commercial students is higher than that of the previous years. 

The Provincial Institute of Technology and Art has had a good year. 
While there has not been much of an increase in the numbers enrolled, there has 
been a decided improvement in the quality of young men and women who are 
being attracted to the institute. The average age of the students is 20.04 years. 
The average academic schooling in grades is 8.8. Approximately 66 per cent 
of the students enrolled gave as their home address some address other than 
Calgary. Students were in attendance from Saskatchewan and British Columbia. 
The student hours instruction in all departments for the year is 185,658, which is 
30,282 student hours in excess of those given in the previous year and 74,888 in 
excess of those in the year 1922-23. Two new courses were offered, namely. Rail- 
way Station Agents' course and a course in Farm Construction for young 
farmers. There has been a slight falling off in the numbers taking correspon- 
dence courses in Mining and Steam Engineering, because of the unsettled con- 
ditions in the mining industry. During the year the staff of the institute has 
made a careful analysis of the jobs which the students are required to perform 
during their instructional courses. This work has been helpful in systematically 
organizing the teaching service. The prospects for the coming year are ver>'' 
good. 

Lethbridge has continued to maintain a strong commercial department and 
has also conducted successful and much appreciated night classes. These classes 
have been of great service. 

Medicine Hat organized a vigorous night class in commercial subjects and 
in millinery for women. This is a revival of a service that has been in suspension 
for several years. 

Calgary and Edmonton conducted their usual programme of night instruc- 
tion. In the former place the city school board programme was largely academic, 
the practical industrial subjects being given in the Technical Institute. In Edmon- 
ton the evening class had much more of an industrial bent. Successful evening 
classes were conducted in Blairmore, Nordegg, Canmore, Drumheller, and Edson, 
which is an increase in the number of centres. 

At Blairmore there was an interesting development. The coal mines in th^ 
Crow's Nest pass have been largely electrified by means of water-power, which 
has resulted in a minimum use of steam. Steam operators were anxious to 
learn enough electricity to qualify themselves to operate the new equipment. An 
evening class was organized to meet this need, with splendid results. 

Drumheller was unfortunate enough to lose their school building through 
fire. A strong urge was placed upon the school board to make provision for 
technical education in the reconstructed building. This the board would have 
done gladly if they could have had financial assistance available for their 
building programme. This is interesting in showing the growing appreciation 
of technical education. 

A significant event of the year was the conference of representatives from 
each of the four western provinces, held in Calgary during Easter week. The 
object of the meeting was to discuss ways and means of co-operating in economi- 
cally organizing and conducting correspondence courses and evening class 
instruction. While certain definite plans of study were agreed upon, further 
than this there has been no action to date. 

No changes have been made during the year in the legislation governing 
technical education in Alberta. No great new development is immediately in 
sight, but an optimistic spirit is developing again and with it a genuine and 
wholesome appreciation of technical education is growing. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



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110 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



ALBERTA— SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS IN 
EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1924. TO 
JUNE 30, 1925 



Municipality or 
School 


Total 
Number 

of 
Subjects 


Total 
Number 

of 
Classes 


Total 
Enrol- 
ment all 
Classes 


Total 

Student 

Hours 

(by 

clock ) 


Number of Indi- 
viduals Enrolled 


Teachers 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 




7 
3 

7 
29 

5 

2 

4 

2 

1 
1 

1 


6 
6 

8 
84 

6 

4 

4 

2 

1 
h 

1 


175 
266 

259 

1,827 

192 

101 

63 

29 

30 
24 

21 
198 






93 

163 

199 
701 

94 

88 

11 

13 


175 
266 

259 
1,120 

144 

101 

63 

29 

30 
24 

21 
198 


7 
5 

4 
17 

2 

1 

3 

1 

1 
1 

1 

7 



11 




Calgary S.D. No. 19: 

Central H.S 

Commercial H. S.. 

McDougall Public 

School 


9,109 
11,084 

8,838 
30,418 

50,638 

7,932 

2,496 


82 
103 

60 
419 

50 

13 

52 


7 
« 

8 


Edmonton S.D. No. 7 

Lethbridge S.D. No. 

51 


28 
6 


Medicine Hat S.D. 
No. 76 


3 


Drumheller S.D. No. 
2472 


4 


Canmore S.D. No. 
168 


1,124 

1,040 
904 

954 
6,692 


16 

30 
12 

21 

198 


2 


Nordegg S.D. No. 
3211 


1 


Edson S.D. No. 2298 
Blairmore S.D. No. 

628 

Provincial Institute 


2 
1 


of Technology and 
Art, Calgary 


7 


7 


7 


Totals 




130 


3,185 


131,229 


1,056 


1,374 


2,430 


50 


25 


75 





























BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Repoet of the Provincial Organizer of Technical Education 

John Kyle 

Technical courses in high schools are organized in the cities of !New West- 
minster, Vancouver, Victoria, and Trail. In the T. J. Trapp Technical School, 
New Westminster, may be found the four divisions, academic, home economics, 
technical and commercial, which go to form what is known in Ontario as a 
composite high school. The three-year technical courses of study in these schools 
embrace the following subjects: — 

Technical Course for Boys. — English, citizenship and economics, history, 
French or Latin, mathematics, applied mechanics, physics, chemistry, drawing 
and design, electricity, physical culture, shop work in wood and metal. 

Household Science Course for Girls. — English, citizenship and economics, 
history, French or Latin, mathematics, chemistry, physics, physiology, dietetics 
and cookery, needlework (dressmaking and millinery), drawing and design, 
household art, vocal music, physical culture. 

Commercial Course. — (a) Secretarial, (6) accounting — English, business 
correspondence and filing, arithmetic, book-keeping and accounting, commercial 
geography, shorthand, typewriting, commercial law. 

At the conclusion of these courses examinations are held for the technical 
leaving certificate, junior matriculation certificate and commercial certificate, 
all of which are issued by the Department of Education. 

The following table gives the number of students attending the technical, 
household science, and commercial courses: — 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



%%% 



Technical 



Household 
Science 



Commer- 
cial 



New Westminster. 

Trail 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Burnaby 

Kamloops 

North Vancouver. 

Point Grey 

Prince George 

Prince Rupert 

Revelstoke 

South Vancouver. . 

Surrey 

West Vancouver. . . 



104 
35 

554 
97 



42 



790 



141 



55 



482 
208 
52 
27 
82 
75 
17 
18 
22 
102 
20 
19 



1,179 



Total 2, 110 students 



Representations have been made to make the technical leaving certificate 
stand in lieu of the junior matriculation. This seems to be a reasonable request 
in order to admit students to the applied science course at the university. The 
subjects of English, mathematics, and chemistry of the technical leaving 
examination are already accepted for junior matriculation. Trigonometry, 
drawing and design, practical woodwork, metal work, and machine shop bench 
work of the technical course are not required for matriculation, but the boy who 
aspires to university must add history and a foreign language. 

If a special examination in industrial history and economics could be pro- 
vided, instead of the history taught in the academic course, this would meet the 
needs of the technical boys. To equalize the expense of this step, let the present 
three technical papers, electricity, mechanics, and physics, be supplanted by the 
ordinary rnatriculation physics paper, which now includes mechanics. In regard 
to the foreign language, it could be commenced in the first year university and 
treated as a supplemental. 

While there is no doubt in my mind that this link with the university should 
be forged, yet the main objective of a technical course should be direct entrance 
to industrial work. The great field for technical education is among the 80 per 
cent who do not enter high school and the additional number who leave the high 
school during the first year, and we should direct the thoughts of those to indus- 
trial training. 



Present Matriculation 



Present Technical 
Leaving Certificate 



Proposed Technical 
Matriculation 



1, English 

2. History and historical geography. 

3, Mathematics (algebra and geom- 

mctry). 

4. French or German or Latin 



6, Two languages in 4 not already 
taken or one of the languages in 4 
not already taken and one of the 
following: — Chemistry, physics, 
botany, Eigriculture; 
or 

Two of the fLllowing sciences: — Chem- 
istry, physics, botany, agriculture. 



1, English 

2, Citizenship and economics. 

3, Mathematics (algebra, geo- 
metry, trigonometry). 

4, Applied mechanics 

5, Physics 

6, Electricity 

7, Chemistry 

8, Drawing and design 



Additional subjects: — 
Woodwork, sheet-metal work, 
machine shop work. 



1. English, 

2. Industrial history and geog- 
raphy, 

3. Mathematics (algebra, geo- 
metry, trigonometry;. 

4. French, to be taken as sup- 
plemental in university. 

5. Physics (electricity, applied 
mechanics) . 

6. Chemistry. 

7. Drawing and design. 



Additional subjects: — 
Woodwork, sheet-metal work, 
machine shop work. 



112 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

TECHNICAL COURSES 

The high school technical courses are still gaining steady favour in the cities 
where such are in operation. 

When the school boards of Bumaby, Point Grey, and Noith Vancouver 
make up their minds to enrich their courses of study by embracing technical 
work, a regular and fully equipped technical school can be successfully estab- 
lished in Vancouver. Such a school is highly desirable, for, as Dr. A. N. Mac- 
Callum, Chairman of the Research Committee of Canada, states, "What we need 
is a highly skilled population having every scientific means of adding value to 
the raw material." It is at technical schools where skill in creative work is fost- 
ered. It is there that the people are trained to establish high standards of taste 
and skill in production. The technical school is the basis of industrial prosperity 
and the time is ripe for its erection. Already the question of apprenticeship is 
taking form with various trade organizations, already schemes have been formu- 
lated whereby boys will be trained systematically in the building trades, and 
included in the indenture drawn up by business men and employers of labour is 
a proposal that " the apprentice be paid full time throughout apprenticeship 
and allowed off duty at least one day per week during the winter months to 
attend a technical or vocational school." Thus we see the arrival of the method 
already adopted in Ontario, in the United States of America, in Great Britain, 
and in Germany. Here educational authorities may obtain a glimpse of how 
they can best serve the people who are entering industrial life and who are going 
to be the producers of wealth. No better paying investment could be made 
to-day in Vancouver than equipping a school where all the necessary knowledge 
could be obtained and skill developed in order that productive trades might be 
successfully conducted. When the large technical school was built in Toronto a 
few years ago, opponents said it would be a " white elephant." Since its erec- 
tion, however, it has become necessary to build two more technical schools, so 
great has been the call from the inhabitants of the city. 

Aid in planning a technical school should be sought from an advisory com- 
mittee. A well-selected body of business men would be in a position to lend 
valuable assistance and guidance to the school trustees in making expenditures 
on mechanical equipment. The advisory board of New Westminster have been 
assiduous in their endeavours to assist the school trustees in their manifold 
duties. In Vancouver the selection of men has not been so happy, and, with 
two or three notable exceptions, their attendance at meetings has been disap- 
pointing. 

Extension of facilities in the Vancouver Technical School for studying 
motor mechanics is urgently needed. The gasoline engine plays such an impor- 
tant part in modem life that an opportunity for a thorough understanding of 
its mechanism forms a tremendously valuable part of a man's stock of know- 
ledge. 

The introduction of a three-year technical course in South Vancouver high 
school failed to materialize owing in a great measure to the fact that South 
Vancouver and Vancouver were likely to join forces. It is hard to understand 
what difference such an amalgamation would make in the situation, for, even 
if the populations combined, the best thing that could be done for South Van- 
couver would be to organize a high school with four departments: academic, 
technical, commercial, and home economics. This kind of school is certainly 
the most suitable type for a democratic community and one which would lend 
itself admirably to the introduction of the junior high school system. 

The city of Victoria might also with great advantage seriously consider 
such a change in her high school. In Vancouver city a school of applied arts 
and design has been formed with a view to raising the standard of taste among 
producers and of training designers for industries. Industrial countries are fully 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



113 



alive to the importance of such training, for a school of design always accom- 
panies a technical school. The combination of satisfactory design with good 
technique produces a work of art, i.e., "the well-doing of what needs doing"; 
in other words, art is thoughtful workmanship, and the success of the Vancouver 
school is assured. 

A students' follow-up system should be started without delay. Something 
must be done, not only to guide the boy into his proper vocation, but to keep 
track of him and mark the practical value of his training on his progress. By 
means of a follow-up system we could check up the school work and keep adjust- 
ing it to meet the real needs of the people. Record cards have already been 
printed for a systematic check-up and we shall soon be endeavouring to glean 
information which must prove exceedingly interesting and helpful and will do 
much to prevent undue attention being paid to secondary issues. 

HIGH SCHOOL COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

As will be seen from the table, only two high schools in the province pro- 
vide a three-years' course in the above subjects. These two schools are the T. J. 
Trapp technical school, New Westminster, with forty-two students attending, 
and the King Edward high school, Vancouver, with ninety -nine students on the 
roll. Members of these classes may graduate to the Normal School, but their 
standing is not yet recognized by the University of British Columbia, as the 
subjects of their final examinations are not accepted as equivalent to the junior 
matriculation examination. It would seem, however, that, by a very slight 
adjustment, a reasonable educational basis could be arrived at by which the 
students of the home economics course would not be handicapped for matricula- 
tion to university, and yet preserve the present standard of their practical work. 
The following subjects are placed side by side for comparison, and it will be 
noted that the changes necessary are in the examinations in mathematics and 
chemistry. 



Present Matriculation subjects 



Proposed Home Economics Matriculation 



1. English 

2. History and historical geography 

3. Mathematics (algebra and geometry) 

4. French or Gennan or Latin 

5. Two languages in 4 not already taken 

or 
One of tne languages in 4 not already taken and 
one of the following si-iences: — Chemistry, phy- 
sics, botany, agriculture; 

or 
Two of the following sciences: — Chemistry, phy- 
sics, botany, agriculture. 



1. English. 

2. History and historical geography. 

3. Mathematics (arithmetic and algebra) special 
paper leaving out geometry. 

4. French or Latin. 

5. Chemistry (insertion of questions relating to 
home economics on the usual matriculation 
paper) . 

6. Physics. 

Additional compulsory subjects: — 
Cooking, dressmaking and millinery, physiology, 
hygiene and home nursing, drawing, design, 
music (choral), physical culture. 



Dressmaking and millinery in the home economics course should be taught 
with a view to vocational efficiency. In the usual high school domestic science 
course, the sewing, dressmaking, and millinery should be taught from quite 
another angle. The teachers in the home economics course should boldly attack 
their work with workshop methods and practice always in mind. Draughting 
patterns for clothing, designing costumes, studying colour schemes and har- 
monies, etc., are all included in the three-years' course. Tliese practical prob- 
lems, together with a scientific study of chemistry, physiology and physics, make 
this high school course of great importance. 



7343-8 



114 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

COMMERCIAL COUESBS 

The above courses are attended by 1,179 students, and this number will 
continue to grow because the merchandising and trading firms are still on the 
upward grade. The rearrangement of the three-years' course is proving a great 
success and there is no more thorough office training to be obtained anywhere. 
It has been suggested that school trustees should put on a short intensive course, 
such as people demand and receive at commercial schools conducted by private 
enterprise. Intensive work is commendable, not only in commercial subjects 
but in all subjects. The most evident thing in school life is the fact of pupils 
being permitted thirty minutes to do a fifteen minutes job. In all technical 
training, be it commercial, home economics or industrial lines, the time element 
should be seriously reckoned with. 

The commercial courses are straight vocational. Unlike those who attend 
the technical and home economics classes, the students do not clamour for an 
examination to admit them to university. The commercial students find a direct 
avenue to office work and in their real working environment they seem to acquit 
themselves credibly. At open tests in typewriting and stenography held in the 
province the students from the high schools can hold their own with other com- 
petitors and each year they carry a good share of trophies to their schools. 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Vancouver 

While the name of this school is a misnomer, yet it is one in which excellent 
work is being accomplished. The greater proportion of the students pass out 
into industrial life, while a few pass into various high schools. Pupils undoubt- 
edly find themselves and discover their capabilities in this school. They obtain 
an insight into active life outside the school by visits to factories and workshops, 
and by listening to regular talks from successful business men and women. By 
being occupied during 50 per cent of their time with handwork of the most 
up-to-date character, they are prepared for industrial life. 

There is no more commendable educational work being done in the province 
to-day than that in the junior high school, and the staff is well chosen. The 
work done by the girls in home economics has a true ring to it, and in child 
welfare studies the children in the orphanage are visited and all necessary work 
of the day undertaken. Such practical exercises as are found in the junior high 
school reach a high water mark in education for girls. " We need to invigorate 
and reinvigorate education," says H. G. Wells, " We need to create a sus- 
tained counter effort to the perpetual tendency of all educational organizations 
towards clasaicalism, secondary issues, and the evasion of life." 

TEACHER TRAINING 

Teacher training for technical school work is proceeding satisfactorily, and 
the members of the class, twenty-five in number, are composed entirely of prac- 
tical craftsmen, who either are engaged at present as manual instructors or have 
passed through the manual training instructor's class and thus have caught the 
educational viewpoint. 

The success of technical education will depend upon the attitude, training, 
sikill, and educational backgroimd which the instructorSi possess. So far the 
teachers in the province are far above the average, and the opportunity to attend 
such classes as have been organized will tend to keep up the standard. The 
teachers find a way of advancement through these classes ; they return year after 
year to continue their studies. They have a vision of ever-increasing technical 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER ff8 

work being imdertaken by provincial educational bodies and they are determined 
to be prepared for the work of instruction. In having men of this attitude, we 
are singularly fortunate, for it gives one confidence in dealing with school boards 
who wish to participate in the advance which is being made along the lines of 
tephnical education. 

Technical teachers' certificates are of two kinds, interim and permanent. 
After two years' successful teaching experience, the interim certificate may be 
made permanent. The course of study is not so general, but more specific than 
that for the manual training teachers' high school certificate. Part I consists of 
a study of trade analysis and a study of teaching methods (and principles, during 
which they chart out a course of work. Part II consists of practice teaching. 

Notice has come from the Hamilton Technical School that the Ontario 
Training College for Technical Teachers has been opened and the syllabus shows 
that an excellent systemi of training is now being undertaken. It is improbable, 
however, that successful craftsmen teachers will be attracted to the east, as the 
salaries are not sufficiently high to warrant a man in stopping his wage-earning 
occupation to run into great expense in order to attend college. 

The training of first class certificated teachers as commercial teachers is 
also undertaken by class work and by correspondence. Twenty-two students 
are enrolled in shorthand, typewriting, book-keeping and teaching methods. 
The work is conducted at summer school classes and by correspondence lessons 
as a means of continuing the studies and linking up the summer school. The 
growth of commercial work in high schools and the difiiculty of obtaining efficient 
practical teachers, led to the idea of training instructors. The step has been pro- 
nounced an unqualified success and the men in charge deserve great praise for 
the faithful way they have held to their purpose. This opportunity for training 
should be continued as the success of high school commercial combes depends 
entirely upon it. 

Commercial certificates are of two kinds: Interim and permanent. After 
two years' successful teaching experience the interim certificate may be made 
permanent. 

The sum spent on teacher training, both technical and commercial, for the 
year October 1, 1924, to September 30, 1925, amounted to $8,906.62. 

NIGHT SCHOOLS OR EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 

Night schools were conducted in thirty-five cities and municipalities in the 
province, with an attendance of 7,386 pupils. These, however, were not individual 
students and next year it would be advisable to compile a master register in city 
centres in order to know the registration of individuals and the proportion of 
males and females, as this information is required by the Dominion Government. 

The following subjects are included in the night school courses: English, 
English for foreigners, subjects for Civil Service examinations, subjects for 
pharmaceutical examinations, subjects for junior matriculation, citizenship and 
economics, mathematics, mechanics, physics, machine construction and drawing, 
pattemmaking, forging, machinists' work, steam engineering, automotive ignition 
system, magnetism and electricity, electrical engineering, chemistry, metallurgj^ 
coal-mining, building consti-uction, carpentry and joinery, architectural design, 
estimating, navigation, forestry, papermaking, printing, commercial English, 
typ>ewriting, stenogi-aphy, accounting (elementary and advanced) ; commercial 
languages, i.e., Spanish, Russian, Japanese, Chinese, French; salesmanship, 
drawing and design, modelling, metal repousse, wood-carving, embroidery, pot- 
tery, china painting, show-card writing, dressmaking, millinery, costume-design- 
ing, laundering, bread-baking, canning, cookery, music (instrumental and 
choral), elocution and public speaking. 

The first essential in a night school is an instructor who is master of his 
work and consequently has public confidence. The next important feature is 

7343-8J 



116 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

for such a man to chart out his lessons for the whole course. This rule is invari- 
ably adopted in classes characterized by a higli average attendance. After the 
season's course is planned, each individual lesson should be carefully prepared 
and such a procedure is soon reflected on the class. 

School boards might well study the business methods of private firms who 
run night schools. They must remember that the public need is to be informed 
and therefore advertising is imperative to a successful enrolment. Each boy 
and girl in the day schools is a medium for such publicity, each goes to a home 
and might well carry at least a handbill or programme of studies. Each school 
teacher is a point of contact with the general public. The newspapers and 
churches rarely object to a public appeal. No activity in the community 
deserves more support, for habitual attendance at night schools has a tremendous 
effect on character. Gathering knowledge is a habit and the night school habit 
is contracted much like the poolroom habit or the habit of playing poker. 

Women's Institutes are more than usually interested in night schools, but 
they cannot receive grants direct. Ten institutes under the auspices of the 
school boards held classes and 3S0 students were enrolled. In rural districts it 
is often necessary to hold the classes during the afternoon, and in such cases 
the meeting is counted as a night class. Unsolicited testimonials to the beneficial 
effect on efficiency and the spread of knowledge have come from many quarters. 
The people who have gone to live in outlying rural districts deserve eveiy 
encouragement to gather together for mutual help and improvement, and it is 
to the credit of the Department of Education that they stepped into the breach 
when the Department of Agriculture abandoned their educational work amongst 
women. 

CORRESPONDENCE CLASSES 

Not only is educational work carried on among adults, but in the most 
inaccessible parts of the province, where as yet no school exists, the helping 
hand goes out to the children. The home of the pioneer is invaded with school 
work and the children conduct their lessons by mail. We have examples of 
pupils w*ho, though they have never been to school, have passed the entrance 
to high school examinations successfully. 

From the same office are sent out the lessons to those engaged in coal-mining 
operations. The way is prepared clear and straight for an ambitious boy work- 
ing in a coal district to step gradually upward to the highest rung of the ladder. 
Such a youth can start by correspondence at fifteen years of age and work to 
the age of twenty -three on the fundamental mining subjects. Six separate sec- 
tions of study, at $5 per section, will give him ample preparation by the time he 
is of age to try the shot-lighters' examination. With a continuance of his study, 
his papers as overman will not be difficult to obtain, and, following these two, 
the aspiring coal-miner may go to any height he desires. 

Under the democratic arrangement whereby persons employed in some 
occupation during the daytime may try the university matriculation examina- 
tion in four parts, it may easily be seen that an ambitious and intelligent young 
man may even emancipate himself entirely from his environment in order that 
he may specialize in the directions which call into activity the gifts with which 
nature has endowed him. 

It is surprising that there ere not more night school tutorial classes at which 
correspondence students could study and receive individual help. The combina- 
tion of the two would give students a remarkable opportunity for advancement. 

EXPENDITURE 

The total amount of expenditure from October 1, 1924, to September 30, 
1925, on the subjects previously referred to, but exclusive of manual training, 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



117 



domestic science, and correspondence work with elementary school children, 
amounted to $108,249.25, and of that sum the Dominion Government paid 
$54,124.62. 

Excerpts from the latest report from the Dominion Director of Technical 
Education show that the province of British Columbia takes fourth place for 
the total amount of expenditure on technical education; third place for the 
number of students attending night school; fourth for the number taking cor- 
respondence classes, and second for the number of students imdertaking training 
as technical teachers. Considering that the cost of administration is also shown 
to be one of the lowest in the Dominion, it would seem to prove that the situa- 
tion is one which might be considered satisfactory. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA-SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND TEACHERS 
IN EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1925 



Municipality 


Total 

number 

of subjects 


Total 
number 
of classes 


Total 
enrolment 
all classes 


Total 

student 

hours 

(by 

clock) 


Number of 
individuals enrolled 


Teachers 


School 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


Bumaby 


12 
1 
3 
9 

1 
1 
2 
1 
6 
5 
2 
2 
3 
1 
6 
1 

1 
1 
6 

18 
2 
3 

10 
1 
2 
2 
5 
6 
2 
2 
4 

12 
2 

20 

37 


23 
1 
3 
9 
1 
1 
3 
2 
9 
6 
2 

I 

1 
6 
1 

1 
1 
6 

20 
2 
3 

13 
1 
2 
2 
5 
6 
2 
2 
4 

40 
2 

25 

71 


264 
14 
46 

101 

9 

24 

36 

39 

130 

121 
30 
24 
94 
21 
90 
15 

11 
15 

101 

339 
37 
34 

178 
23 
34 
51 

109 
67 
19 
23 
85 

716 
29 

859 
3,598 








264 
14 
46 

101 

9 

24 

36 

39 

130 

121 
30 
24 
94 
21 
90 
15 

11 
15 

101 

339 
37 
34 

d78 
23 
34 
51 

109 
67 
19 
23 
85 

716 
29 

859 
3,598 


8 
1 
3 
5 

5 

3 

1 

3 

5 

1 

5 

12 
1 
3 
5 
1 
1 
1 

4 

2 

4 

8 
1 

14 
35 


7 

2 

1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 

i 

1 

1 

i 

1 

6 
5 

5 

1 

2 

""i9 

1 

8 
14 


15 


Britannia Mine 


504 

3,020 

2,917 

335 

480 

308 

2,340 

8,028 

3,168 

1,500 

2,960 

3,917 

840 

7,200 

600 

880 

944 

4,404 

27,120 
3,3o0 
2,710 

14,140 
1,740 
2,620 
2,220 
4,360 
3,360 
1,520 
1,740 
5,315 

44,854 
1,160 

57,260 
206,744 






1 


Cassidy 






3 


Chilli wack City 






7 


Chilliwack Mun 






1 


Colwood 






1 


Esquimalt 






3 


Femie 






1 


Granby Bay 






1 


Kamloops 






6 


Keremeos 






2 


Kelowna 






2 


Kimherlpy.^. 






3 


Langley ... • 






1 


Maple Ridge 






6 


Metchosin 






1 


Michel and New 
Michel 






1 


Malakwa 






1 











New Westminster. . . . 






18 








1 


Ocean Falls 


». . . 




3 


Penticton 






10 


Pitt Meadows 






1 


Port Coquitlam 






1 


Powell River 






1 


Saanich 






5 


Summerland 






5 


Surrey 






2 


Sidney 






2 


Trail 






4 


Vancouver South 






27 


Vanderhoof 






2 


Victoria 






22 


Vancouver 






49 










Totals 




282 


7,386 


425,468 






7,386 


132 


89 


221 













118 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (M9 



IX. GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES ACT 

During the early years of the 20th century, there took place throughout 
the civilized world a distinct movement in favour of ameliorating the living 
conditions of the less well-off members of society. One form which this move- 
ment took in the United Kingdom was that of old age pensions granted by the 
State as a free gift to its poorer citizens, whose earnings were very generally 
insufficient to permit of a margin of saving. In Canada, where wages were 
higher and a margin of saving consequently existed, the movement took the 
form of providing, through the establishment of Government annuities, an 
absolutely safe investment for such savings, which had only too often been lost 
through the inexperience of their owners, leaving the latter a burden upon the 
charity of relatives or of the public. 

Under the Government Annuities Act, 1908 (7-8 Edw. VII, c. 5), as 
amended by the Acts of 1920 and 1925, His Majesty the King, represented by 
the minister (at present the Minister of Labour), may sell to persons over the 
age of five years, domiciled or resident in Canada, immediate or deferred annui- 
ties of not less than $10 nor more than S5,000 (1) for the life of the annuitant; 
(2) for a term of years certain, not exceeding twenty years, or for the life of 
the annuitant, whichever period shall be the longer; and (3) an inmiediate or 
deferred annuity to any two persons domiciled in Canada during their joint 
lives, and with or without continuation to the survivor. The property and 
interest of any annuitant in any contract for an annuity is neither transferable 
nor attachable. The purchaser may contract that, in the event of the death 
of the annuitant before the date fixed for the annuity to begin, all money paid 
shall be refunded to the purchaser or his legal representatives with interest at 
the rate of 4 per cent compounded yearly. 

During the session of 1924-25 an amendment was made to the Act reducing 
the minimum annuity purchasable from $50 to SIO. It was believed that such 
a reduction would be an additional encouragement to employers to assist their 
employees in making provision for old age by the purchase of Cumulative Single 
Premium Annuities, each transaction being complete in itself, and that it would 
induce individuals to purchase who did not favour the plan of annual payments. 
As an illustration of the working of this plan it may be said that a man of 20 
in order to secure an annuity of $10 to begin at 65 would pay $7.89 on Plan E, 
or $15.10 on Plan A. Under the latter plan if the annuitant should die before G5 
the payments made plus 4 per cent compound interest up to the date of his death 
would be returned to his heirs. At age 21 the rate would be on Plan B, $8.25, 
and on Plan A, $15.70. At age 22, $8.63 on Plan B, and $16.33 on Plan A^ the 
premium increasing with each attained birthday. He could purchase as many 
of these annuities at each age as he might wish, and as he saw his annuity grow 
a strong incentive would be created to continue the purchase and add to his 
holdings. The annuity may start at any age — if earlier than 65 the cost will be 
more; if later, it will be less. The plan presents the advantage of enabling a 
person with the ready cash to purchase at any time, in amounts of $10 or more, 
the accumulation of such purchases providing a specific income for life to begin 
at the age fixed upon. 

Financial Statement 

From September 1, 1908, the date of the inception of the Annuities Branch, 
up to and inclusive of March 31, 1925, the total number of annuity contracts 
issued was 6,542. Of the purchasers of these contracts 680 have been canceLed, 
leaving in force on March 31, 1925, 5,862 contracts. The total amount of pur- 
chase money received during the same period was $9,754,299.42. The following 
statement gives the details: — 



120 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



Sept. 1, 
Mar. 31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31. 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 



1908, to Mar. 
1909, 

1910, " 

1911, " 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 
1917, 
1918, 
1919, 

1920, " 
1921, 
1922, 
1923, 
1924, 



1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 
1917, 
1918, 
1919, 
1920, 
1921, 
1922, 
1923, 
1924, 
1925, 



566 
1.069 
1,032 
373 
318 
264 
325 
285 
187 
147 
204 
195 
277 
339 
409 
486 



contracts. 



Total 6,542 



S 50,391 31 
434,490 89 
393,441 40 
441,600 bO 
417,135 50 
390,886 72 
314,765 29 
441,696 09 
432,272 40 
332,792 01 
322,154 23 
408,718 78 
531,800 45 
748,159 73 
. 1,028,353 07 
. 1,458,975 92 
. 1,606,665 03 

.$ 9,754,299 42 



During the fiscal year ending March 31, 1925, 225 immediate annuities and 
261 deferred annuities, a total of 486, were purchased, amounting in the aggre- 
gate to $191,673.45, an average of about $394 per annuitant. 

The amoimt of purchase money received during the same period was 
$1,606,665.03. 

The number of annuities in force on March 31, 1925, were as follows: 
Immediate, 1,858; deferred, 4,004, or a total of 5,862, and the amount of such 
annuities was $1,725,142.30. The amount received on account of the purchase 
of annuities from September 1, 1908, to March 31, 1925, exclusive of amounts 
returned to purchasers, was $9,754,299.42. 

Government Annuities Fund Statement, March 31, 1925 

ASSETS 

Fund on March 31, 1924 $7, 162,971 64 

Receipts 1924-25, less payments 1,305,526 67 



Fund on March 31, 1925 S 8,468,498 31 

LIABILITIES 

Net present value of all outstanding contracts $ 8,445,883 51 

Assets over liabilities 22, 614 80 



-$ 8,468,498 31 



RECEIPTS 

For immediate annuities $ 1,263,194 96 

For deferred annuities 343, 627 07 

Interest on fund at 4 per cent 300, 501 58 

Amount transferred by Government to maintain reserve 



-$ 1,907,323 61 



PAYMENTS 

Annuities paid under immediate contracts $ 591 , 826 67 

Return of premiums with interest 8, 802 72 

Return of premiums without interest 1, 167 55 

Balance, March 31, 1925 1,305,526 67 



-$ 1,907,323 61 

VALUATION ON MARCH 31, 1925, OF ANNUITY CONTRACTS ISSUED PURSUANT 
TO THE GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES ACT 



Number 



Amount 

of 
Annuities 



Total value 

on 

Mar. 31, 1925 

of annuities 

purchased 



1. Immediate annuities 

2. Immediate, guaranteed 

3. Immediate, last survivor. . . 

4. Deferred "A" 

5. Deferred "A", guaranteed.. 

6. Deferred "A", last survivor 

7. Deferred "B", last survivor 

8. Deferred "B" 

Totals 



1,198 

470 

190 

1,181 

2,158 

82 

45 

538 



472,278 44 

107,351 85 

89,428 46 

275,623 97 

538,667 38 

37,046 53 

21,858 08 

182,887 59 



3,828,313 00 
995,928 00 
897,781 00 
759,123 49 

1,134,934 47 

167,168 25 

64,013 92 

598,621 38 



6,862 1,725,142 30 8,445,883 61 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 121 



X. ij:ague of nations, internationai. labour organization 

In previous amiiial reports of the Department of Labour a chapter has 
been devoted to the International Labour Organization of the League of Nations 
wjhich was established in 1919 under the authority of the Treaties of Peace. 
The objects for which the Internationial Labour Organization was formed are 
set out in Part XIII of the Treaties of Peace and are, briefly, to promote the 
improvement of industrial conditions by legislative action and international 
agreement. 

The Organization comprises the International Labour Office in Geneva, 
Switzerland, and the International Lalbour Conference, which meets annually 
and wfcich is composed of four representatives of each member state, two of 
w^hom are Government delegates and two representing employers and employed 
respectively. Fifty-seven countries are members of the International Labour 
Organization, including all of the important industrial countries of the world, 
excepting the United States. 

The International Labour Office is under the control of a Governing Body 
consisting of twenty-four persons appointed by the International Laibour Con- 
ference, twelve representing Governments, six representing employers and six 
representing workers. In addition to its control of the Labour Office, the 
Governing Body is charged with the preparation of the agenda of the annual 
conference. 

The conclusions of the International Labour Conference from year to year 
may be oast in the form of draft conventions or O'f recommendations to the 
national Governments, a two-thirds majority being required in the conference 
for the adoption of either a draft convention or a recommendation. Und^ the 
Treaties of Peace the member states of the International Labour Conference 
are bound to bring the draft conventions or recommendations of the Inter- 
national Labour Conference before the authority or authorities within whose 
competence the matter lies for the enactment of legislation or other action. 

The majority of proposals wihidh have been dealt with at the successive 
sessions of the International Labour Conference since its inception in 1919, 
hiave beien adjudged by the law officers of the Crown to fall within provincial 
jurisdiction in Oanadia and have accordingly been brou^t to the attention 
of the respective provincial governments. The draft conventions and recom- 
mendations have also been brought to the attention of the Federal Parliament. 

The Department of Labour is entrusted' witlh the duties arising out of the 
relations of Canadia with the International Labour Organization. These have 
entailed much correspondence, not only with the International Labour Office, 
but also with other departments of the Dominion Government, with the pro- 
vinces and with employers' and workers' organizations. Replies have also been 
prepared in the Department of Labour to various questionnaires wjhich were 
circulated on behalf of the International Labour Office. The performance of 
these duties has necessarily entailed a close study on the part of officers of the 
department of the various tedhnical questions whidh have figured on the various 
conference agenda and meetings of the Governing Body and of questionnaires 
received from the International Labour Office. 

A bulletin entitled " Canada and the International Laibour Conference " 
was issued by the Department of Labour in February, 1922, for the purpose of 
furnishing information in reference to the International Labour Organization 
and the subjects wjhich have received attention at the hands of this body. 

In the month of December, 1924, in order to secure closer touch with the 
wtork of the Leiague olf Nations and of the International Labour Organization, 



122 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

the appoinitment was made by tlhe Governmen't of Canada of an Advisory 
Officer resident in Geneva. It was feilt that tlhis appointment would ensure 
greater permanency and continuity of representation at the meetings of the 
Governing Body of the International Lalbour Office and that such an oflBoer, 
acting as a substitute for lamd under the direction of the Minister of Labour, 
would improve the present plan of Canada's representation. Dr. W, A. 
Riddell, former Deputy Minister of Labour of Ontario, who had 'held an 
important position on the staff of the International Labour Office since 1920, 
was entrusted with the duties of Dominion of Canada Advisory Officer, League 
of Nations, in Geneva. 

Amendments to the Canada Shipping Act 

An Act to amend the Canada Shipping Act in order to give effect in 
Canada to the proposails contained in four draft conventions of the Interna- 
tional Labour Conference relative to the employment conditions of seamen 
wate passed at the 1924 session of the Dominion Parliament. This legisla^tion 
was introduced by the Minister of Labour and will take effect on a date to be 
fixed by proclamation of the Governor in Council. Following are the provisions 
of this measure: — 

(1) Minimum Age for the Admission of Children to Employment at Sea. — ^The 
employment of children under the age of fourteen years on vessels engaged in maritime 
navigation is prohibited. 

(2) Unemployment Indemnity in case of Loss or Foundering of the Ship. — It is pro- 
vided that in the case of loss or foundering of vessels engaged in maritime navigation, 
seamen employed thereon shall continue to receive payment from their employers of their 
regular rate of wages during any period of unemployment which may result therefrom 
not exceeding two months. 

(3) Minimum Age for Admission of Young Persons to Employment as Trimmers or, 
Stokers. — ^The employment of young persons under the age of eighteen as trimmers or 
stokers on vessels engaged in maritime navigation is prohibited. 

(4) Compulsory Medical Examination of Children and Young Persons Employed at 
Sea. — It is required that the employment of any child or young person under eighteen 
years of age on vessels engaged in maritime navigation, other than vessels upon which 
only members of the same family are employed, shall be conditional upon the production 
of a medical certificate attesting fitness for such work signed by a doctor who should 
be approved by the competent authority; it is further provided that the continued employ- 
ment at sea of such persons shall be subject to repetition of medical examination at inter- 
vals of not more than one year. 

Canada and the Eight-Houb Day 

/ On motion of the IMinister of Labour, the draft convention which was 

J adopted at the first session of the International Labour Conference in 1919 
limiting the hours of work in industrial undertakings to eight in the day and 
forty-eight in the week was referred in May, 1924, to the Select Standing 
Committee of the House of Commons on Industrial and International Rela- 
tions for examination and report with reference to the jurisdiction of the Dom- 
inion Parliament and provincial legislatures on the subject matters in question. 
The report of this committee recommended a reference of the subject to the 
Supreme Court nf Canada for an advisory judgment. This recommendation 
was adopted by the House of Commons and the reference was made to the 
Supreme Court accordingly. The judgment of the Supreme Court of Canada 
was announced on June 11, 1925, and was in effect a confirmation of the view 
which 'had previously been expressied by the law officers of the Crown and 
embodied in an Order in Coimcil of tlhe Dominion Government in November, 
1920. The court found that the subject matter of the draft convention is gen- 
erally within the competence of the provincial legislatures, but that the authority 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



123 



vested in the latter does not enable them to give the force of law to provi- 
sions which would apply to servants of the Dominion Goveanment or to legis- 
late for those parts of Canada which are not within the boundaries of a province. 

Provincial Legislative Action 

The Provincial Legislature of British Columbia enacted during the session 
of 1923 a measure, effective January 1, 1925, providing for the application of 
the edght-ihour diay in industrial undertakings and authoa-izing the establish- 
ment of a board of adjustment to administer the Act and to grant exceptions 
therefrom. 

The Legislature of Nova Scotia on April 30, 1924, adopted a resolution 
approving the principle of the Washington draft conventions concerning the 
minimum age of admission of children to industrial employment and the night 
work of wx)men, and the Geneva (1921) draft oonvenitions concerning the 
minimum age of admission of children to agricultural employment and the 
right of association and combination for agricultural workers. 

The Legislature of Saskatchewan, on March 19, 1924, adopted a resolution 
approving the principle of the same draft conventions as those approved by 
the Nova Scotia Legislature above mentioned. 

Intern.\tional Labour Conference, 1925 

The seventh session of the International Labour Conference was held in 
Geneva, Switzerland, from May 19 to June 10, 1925. Forty-six countries were 
represented by delegations comprising over three hundred delegates and technical 
advisers. This was the fullest representation of any of the annual conferences 
yet held. A list of the countries represented follows: — 



South Africa, 

Germany, 

Argentine Republic, 

Australia, 

Austria, 

Belgium, 

Bolivia, 

Brazil, 

British Empire, 

Bulgaria, 

Canada, 

Chile, 

China, 

Ciolomlbia, 

Cuba, 

Denmark, 



Spain, 

Esthonia, 

Finland, 

France, 

Greece, 

Haiti, 

Honduras, 

Hungary, 

India, 

Irish Free State, 

Italy, 

Japan, 

Lat\na, 

Lithuania, 

Luxemburg, 

Nicaragua, 



Norway, 

Paraguay, 

Netherlands, 

Peru, 

Poland, 

Portugal, 

Roumania, 

Kingdom of the Serbe, 

Croats and Slovenes, 
Siam, 
Sweden, 
Switzerland, 
Czechos'lovakia, 
Uruguay, 
Venezuela. 



The Canadian delegation in attendance at tlhe Conference was as follows: — 

Delegates representing the Government of Canada. — Mr. H. H. Ward, of 
Ottawa, Deputy Minister of Labour for Canada ; Dr. W. A. Riddell, of Geneva, 
Switzerland, Dominion of Canada Advisory Officer, League of Nations. 

Technical advisers to the Government delegates. — Honourable Dr. Forbes 
Godfrey, of Toronto, Ont., Minister of Health and Labour of the Province 
of Ontario; Honourable Laureat Lapierre, of Quebec, Member of the Executive 
Council of Quebec; M. Pierre Beaule, of Quebec, P.Q., President of the Con- 
federation of Catholic Workers of Canada. 

Delegate representing the employers of Canada. — Mr. John Lowe, Jr., of 
Valleyfield. P.Q., General Manager, Mointreal Cotton Company, Ltd. 



124 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Technical adviser to the employers' delegate. — Mr. Hugh Macdoaiald, of 
ToiToiito, Ont., Legal Secnetary, Canadian Manufactmrers' Association. 

Delegate representing the workpeople of Canada. — Mr. P. M. Draper, of 
Ottawa, Ont., Secretary-Treasurer, Trades and Labour Congress of Canada. 

Technical adviser to the workpeople's delegate. — Mr. Gustave Francq, of 
MoiDtreal, P.Q., Chaiirman, Quebec Provincial Executive Committee, Trades and 
Labour Ciongress of Canada. 

The lagemda of the conference included the followinjg subjects: — 

I. Workmen's compensation. 

II. Equality of treatment for national and foreign workers as regards workmen's com- 
pensation for accidents (draft convention and recomlmendation adopted by a preliminary 
vote of the conference at its sixth session). 

III. Weekly suspension of work for twenty-four hours in glass-manufacturing proceaaes 
where tank furnaces are used (draft convention adopted by a preliminary vote of the con- 
ference at its Sixth se^ion). 

IV. Night work in bakeries (draft convention adopted by a preliminary vote of the 
conference at its sixth session). 

In addition to the foregoing it was intimated that a general discussion 
would be held in the conference of problems of social insurance and that the 
conference would also re-elect a Governing Body of the International Labour 
Organization to holld office for a period of three years. 

List of Conventions and Recommendations Adopted 

Of the five diraft conventions whiah were submitted to the conferenoe, four 
were adopted on final vote by substantial majorities. This is the first time since 
1921 that the list of conventions has been augmented. Four recommendations 
were also passed. Following is a list of conventions and recommendations 
wthich were adopted by the conference: — 

Conventions and Recommendation adopted provisionally in 1924 and submitted 
for final vote: 

(1) Equality of Treatment for National and Foreign Workers as regards Workmen's 
Compensation for Accidents. — Convention adopted by 125 to 0. Recommendation adopted 
by 128 to 0. 

(2) Night work in Bakeries. — ^Convention adopted by 81 to 26. 

Other Conventions and Recommendations: 

(3) Workmen's Compensation for Accidents.-— Convention adopted, final vote, by 83 
to 8. Two Recommendations adopted, final votes, 79 to 24; 85 to 18. 

(4) Compensation for Occupational Diseases.— Convention adopted, final vote, 89 to 
6. Recommendation adopted, final vote, 98 to 3. 

A proposed draft convention providing for weekly suspension of work in 
glass manufacturing processes where tank fumaces' are used was passed piro- 
visionially in 1924, but did not receive the required two-thirds majority vote 
requisite to its final adoption in this year's conference and, therefore, failed of 
adoption. 

In addition resolutions were adopted on compensation for occupational 
diseases' and on general problems of social insurance, as well as on several other 
quiestioms which did not appear on the formal agenda. 

Draft Conventions and Recommendations Adopted at Previous Sessions of 
THE International Labour Conference 

Following is a list of draft conventions and recommendations which have been 
adopted at the successive annual sessions of the International Labour Confer- 
ence, 1919-1924. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 125 

The draft conventions and recommendations adopted at the first session 
(1919) are as follows: — 

Draft conventions (1) limiting the hours of work in industrial undertakings to eight 
in the day and forty-eight in the week; (2) concerning unemployment; (3) concerning 
the employment of women before and after childbirth; (4) concerning employment of 
women during the night; (5) fixing the minimum age for admission of children to indus- 
trial employment; (6) concerning the night work of young persons employed in industry. 

Recommendations concerning (1) unemployment; (2) reciprocity of treatment of 
foreign workers; (3) the prevention of anthrax; (4) the protection of women and children 
against lead poisoning; (5) the establishment of government health services; (6) the 
application of the Berne Convention of 1906, on the prohibition of the use of white phos- 
phorus in the manufacture of matches. 

The agenda of tihe second session (1920) related exclusively to matters 
affecting seamen and the draft conventions and recommendations adopted are 
as follows: — 

Draft conventions (n) fixing the minimum age for admission of children to employ- 
ment at sea; (b) concerning unemployment indemnity in case of loss or foundering of the 
ship; (c) for establishing facilities for finding employment for seamen. 

Recommendations concerning (a) the limitation of hours of work in the fishing 
industry; (6) the limit-ation of hours of work in inland navigation; (c) the esta;blishment of 
national seamen's codes; (d) unemployment insurance for seamen. 

The third session (1921) resulted in tihe adoption of the -following draft 
conventions and recommendations: — 

Draft conventions concerning (1) the age for admission of children to employment in 
agriculture; (2) the rights of association and combination of agricultural workers; (3) work- 
men's compensation in agriculture; (4) the use of white lead in painting; (5) the applica- 
tion of the weekly rest in industrial undertakings; (6) fixing the minimum age for the 
admission of young persons to employment as trimmers and stokers; (7) concerning the 
compulsory medical examination of children and young persons emplo3''ed at sea. 

Recommendations concerning (a) the prevention of unemployment in agriculture; 

(b) the protection, before and after childbirth, of women wage-earners in agriculture; 

(c) night work of women in agriculture; (d) night work of children and young persons in 
agriculture; (e) the development of technical agricultural education; (/) living-in condi- 
tions of agricultural workers; (g) social insurance in agriculture; (h) the application of the 
weekly rest in commercial establishments. 

The fourth session (1922) resulted in the adoption of the following recom- 
mend'ation: — 

Recommendation regarding the communication to the International Labour OflSce 
of statistical or other information regarding emigration, immigration and the repatriation 
and transit of emigrants. 

The fifth session (1923) resulted in the adoption of the following recom- 
mendation: — 

Recommendation concerning the general principles for the organization of systems 
of inspection to secure the enforcement of the laws and regulations for the protection of 
the workers. 

The sixth session (1924) resulted in the adoption of the following recom- 
mendation: — 

Recommendation concerning the development of facilities for the utilization of workers' 
gpare time. 

Governing Body of the International Labour Office 

During the past fiscal year four meetings of the Governing Body of the 
International Labour Office were held as follows: April 8-10, 1924; June 12-13, 
1924; October 9-11, 1924; and January 8-10, 1925. These meetings were held 
in Geneva, Switzeriand. The Governing Body is charged with the general 
oversight of the International Labour Conference and also prepares the agenda 
of the annual conference. Hon. James Murdock, Minister of Labour, who is 



126 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

the Canadian Government representative on the Governing Body, was unable 
to attend any of the meetings wlhich were held during the past year, but M. 
Philippe Roy acted as substitute at the meeting in April, Mr. F. A. Acland at 
the meeting in June, Prof. 0. D. Skelton at the meeting in October, and Hon. 
H. S. Beland at the meeting in January. 

The Internationail Labour Conference at its seventh session re-elected the 
Governing Body of the International Labour Office for a period of three years. 
The only change made in its composition was the substitution of Argentina and 
Norway for Chile and Finland as two of the four states, other than the eight 
states of chief industrial iimjportanoe, whidh have seats on the Governing 
Body. Six representatives each of the employers and ol the workers were re- 
elected, including Mr. Tom Moore, President of the Trades and Labour Con- 
gress of Canada. Under the provisions of the Peace Treaty, the eight coun- 
tries of chief industrial importance in the membership of the International 
Labour Conference are entitled to seats on the Governing Body, and four other 
government representatives are chosen from the other member states. Canada 
was declared by the Council of the League of Nations in 1923 to be oine of the 
states of chief industrial importance, and therefore retains its seat on the Gov- 
erning Body. The choice of workers' representatives is made from all the 
countries which are represented in .the International Labour Organization. 

The Governing Body as composed at present is as follows: — 

Government representatives. — Argentina, Belgium, Canada, France, Ger- 
many, Great Britain, India, Italy, Japan, Nonvay, Poland and Spain. 

Employers' representatives. — Sir James Lithgow (Great Britain), Mr. 
Pinot (France), Mr. Olivetti (Italy), Mr. Carlier (Belgium), Mr. Hodacz 
(Czechoslovakia), and Mr. Gemmill (iSouth Africa). 

Workers' representatives. — Mr. Jouhaux (France), Mr. Poulton (Great 
Britain), Mr. Tom Moore (Canada), Mr. Muller (Germany), Mr. Oudegeest 
(Netherlands) and Mr. Thorberg (Sweden). 

Action taken in various Countries 

The following figures summarize the results attained in the execution of 
the draft conventions adopted by the International Labour Conference up to 
the end ol July, 1925: — 

First Conference (Washington, 1919): 

Ratifications registered, 66 (Hours Convention, 7, including two condi- 
tional; Unemployment, 18; Childbirth, 4; Night work of women, 14; Minimirai 
age in industry, 10; Night work of young persons, 13). 

Second Conference (Genoa, 1920) : 

Ratifications registered, 27 (Minimum: age at sea, 11; Unemployment 
indemnity, 6; Employment for seamen, 10). 

Third Conference (Geneva, 1921): 

Ratifications registered, 68 (Minimum age in agriouiture, 9; Rights of asso- 
ciation for agricultural workers, 13; Workmen's compensation in agriculture, 
8; White lead, 8; Weekly rest in industry, 10; Minimum age for trimmere and 
stokers, 10; Medical examination of young seamen, 10). 

In addition, about 40 ratifications have been authorized- but not yet regis- 
tered, and over 100 more have been recommended. 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



DEPARTMENT 



OF 

PUBUC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



ANNUAL REPORT 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 

1925 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KINGS MOST EXCELLENT MAJE8TX 

193ft 



.Mmm mk ; 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Vimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the 
Dominion of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to Your Excellency the Annual 
Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery for the year ended 
March 31, 1925. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

JAMES MURDOCK, 

Minister of Labour. 



7473— li 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT 

Ottawa, August 31, 1925. 

The Hon. James Murdock, 

Minister of Labour. 

Sir, — I have to report with regard to the work of this department for the 
past fiscal year that it has proceeded along satisfactory lines and without 
encountering any serious difficulty. 

In presenting the report for the preceding fiscal year, 1923-24, 1 took occasion 
to refer at some length to the important changes which had been made in the 
Government Printing Bureau during the period almost immediately prior to 
the beginning of your administration, December 21, 1921, and as a result of 
which the institution had been at the close of the year 1920 placed on what was 
regarded as a sound business basis. The burden of the war had no doubt 
contributed largely to the overstaffing of the department at many points; 
whilst, on the other hand, the equipment had been allowed to fall behind, a not 
unnatural accompaniment or outcome of the war. Several hundred employees 
were retired during the reorganization, special authority being taken to secure 
for them gratuities or other retiring allowances, proportionate to age and length 
of service. In most branches, also, the equipment was considerably improved; 
in other cases it still remained necessary in the years following reorganization 
gradually to bring the branches up to the level of proper efficiency in the matter 
of modern machinery. Continuing on these lines the facilities of the Printing 
Bureau have been increased during the past year by some important additions 
in the printing and binding divisions at an expenditure in round figures of $37,500, 
as provided for in the estimates of 1924-25; the principal items in this expenditure 
were as follows: (1) For Pressroom: One Dexter automatic pressfeeder, two 
Jobber printing presses. (2) For Bindery: One Chambers-King folder, one 
Jobbing folder, one Frohn feeder, one Smithe No. 8 envelope machine. 
(3) For Paper Stores: One Seybold cutting machine. (4) For Mechanical 
Division: One Paper-knife grinding machine and one engine blade and equip- 
ment. 

As you are aware the rates of pay for the mechanical division are determined 
by section 18, chapter 80, R.S.C. (the Public Printing and Stationery Act), 
which provides in effect that the wage rate in question shall not be above that 
which is "paid for similar work in the cities of Montreal and Toronto". In 
the remarks preliminary to the annual report of last year, 1923-24, I submitted 
a statement giving the wage rates in different branches from the date of the 
estabhshment of the Printing Bureau in 1887 to the then current year; this 
statement showed that the wage rate then current was that established in 1920, 
and the situation in this respect remains unchanged; the number of working 
hours per week similarly remains at 44, as determined by Order in Council 
P.C. 1524, July 22, 1922. 

The personnel of the establishment was, you will recall, set at 705 by the re- 
organizing body when its work was completed, at the close of 1920. The figure 
in question represents normal requirements only, and was not, as I understand, 
intended to apply to emergency conditions such as may naturally be encountered 
from time to time, particularly during a session of Parliament. The close of 
the fiscal year, March 31, falls usually when Parliament is sitting, and the 
Printing Bureau is at its heaviest pressure of work. A night staff is supplied 
from the general force to meet the necessities of Hansard and other parliamentary 

5 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



papers and the general staff is accordingly weakened, though the day staff is by 
no means exempt from the pressure caused by parliamentary work. At the 
close of the fiscal year the establishment stood at 685, as compared with 719 at 
the same date a year earlier. The year shows a turnover of 108 employees — 
37 appointments and 71 separations — most of these occurring in the mechanical 
staff. The separations comprised retirements under the Public Service Retire- 
ment Act (or Calder), 43; retirements under special ordinance, 4; resignations, 7; 
temporary releases, 12; abandoned positions, 1; deaths, 2; transfers to other 
departments, 2. The turnover is about 15 per cent, a larger proportion than 
usual on account of the number of employees who came under the provisions of 
the Retirement Act; so large a percentage will hardly be found again. 

It is useful perhaps to recall the fluctuations during a period of years 
of the numbers to be found on the roll of employees. The number of employees 
of all classes stood as follows on December 31, for each of the years named: — 



1891 
1901 
1911 



,,ij.. 



341 
511 

861 



1915 ii.OkC.L.. 1,160 

1916 /; . 4Ml-r. . i . . 1,240 

1917 1,306 

1924 



1918 


I.lfifl 


1919 1.131 


1920 


703 


1921 


730 


1922 


665 


1923 


688 



670 



It should be noted with regard to these figures that for some years 
prior to 1920 the numbers given included some fifty women employed in the 
char service. Employees of this class, who of course are but part-time 
workers, are now on the pay-roll of the Public Works Department, which 
recharges the wages to the Printing Bureau. 

The figures quoted show that not only is the establishment being retained 
within the limits set at the time of reorganization but a substantial reduction 
has been effected, and this in spite of the fact that when, as pointed out last 
year, the duties of the Editorial Committee were taken over two officers of that 
body were incorporated into the personnel of this department; also, the addition 
of two clerks to the administrative branch became necessary. 

This reduction below the limitation suggested by the Civil Service Commis- 
sion and its agents has been undoubtedly facilitated by the operation of the 
Public Service Retirement Act, which ceased to be effective on November 1, 
1924. This Act, you will recall, permitted the retirement under a system of 
gratuities or pensions of employees who by age or impaired health could no 
longer render effective service. In the absence of a superannuation system 
affecting all classes of employees humanitarian feelings would perhaps have 
prompted the continued employment for a while of some of these persons, 
but the retirement legislation, commonly known as the Calder Act, permitted 
procedure which seemed to go far towards meeting the demands alike of humanity 
and economy; the number retired, including four dealt with by special Order- 
in Council, was forty-seven. It was of course impracticable as a rule to abolish 
the positions which had been occupied by the persons retired, but a greater 
degree of efficiency was secured in the new officers appointed by the Civil Service 
Commission, and in a number of cases the circumstances permitted abolition 
of the vacated positions. In a small unit of four clerks, for instance, having 
charge of the audit of Government advertising, the two senior officers were 
retired, the work placed under the supervision of another branch head and the 
two vacant positions abolished; a reorganization of the Stationery Branch also 
permitted the abolition of six vacancies caused by retirements. 

You have not of course failed to observe that the superannuation legislation 
enacted at the session of 1924 made no provison for employees whose wages are 
based on the system of prevailing rates, a condition extending to about two- 
thirds of the personnel of the Printing Bureau. With the lapse, therefore, on 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 7 

November 31, 1924, of the Calder Act, the employees of the mechanical branches 
will again as before the institution of this legislation in 1920, be compelled, 
with respect to the matter of provision for failing health or old age, to rely on 
their own resources, no matter how long their services or how severe their 
necessities. Since the department was so lately reorganized and the retirements 
included already within the conditions of age or ill-health or within sight of 
such conditions, the lack of a system of superannuation for the mechanical 
branches is not perhaps a problem of first importance at the moment, but a few 
years will assuredly develop cases where it will be necessary to choose between 
continuing the employment of men and women who have lost their efficiency 
or releasing such employees destitute aUke of health or means. 

During the past year or two the Delivery Branch has been in process of 
reorganization. At the time you assumed charge of the department the system 
consisted of one light auto-truck and ten carters. The system was anti- 
quated, expensive and ineffective. Enquiry seemed to show that the work 
would be more efficiently and much more cheaply performed by three or four 
auto trucks. You decided that the change should be made and it is now in 
progress. At the end of the fiscal year the cartage contractors had been 
reduced to three and two trucks were in use. At the close of the session the 
remainder of the carters had disappeared and the delivery is confined to a 
truck service. The change means a saving of twelve or fourteen thousand 
dollars yearly. 

I would refer briefly to the subject of outside printing. The class of work 
properly so classed has been reduced during recent years almost to the vanishing 
point, and, save under some wholly exceptional conditions, no work which can 
be economically executed in the Printing Bureau is now given to commercial 
firms. This statement does not of course include lithographic work, all of 
which must be given out to private firms. You are aware that the Printing 
Bureau, though admirably equipped for all work in connection with printing 
and bookbinding, has not been furnished with the machinery, employees and 
facilities necessary for carrying on the work of lithography, and it has hitherto 
been considered wiser in an economic sense to employ outside firms for this 
purpose. For larger jobs quotations are secured and the work goes to the lowest 
tenderer; for small jobs current rates are allowed. The department deals only 
with firms known to be in a position actually to perform the work and does not 
allow a contract to be jobbed out. With the growth of governmental map 
work and other undertakings not feasible for a purely letterpress establishment 
it has been questioned if the time had not arrived when this department should 
be equipped with a lithographic plant, and the point has been of increased 
importance in view of the fact that several branches of the Government service 
have secured during the war or otherwise small lithographic plants and are 
themselves undertaking minor work of this nature. 

It is, however, to be noted that the processes of lithography, particularly 
with respect to points where these processes merge with those of letterpress 
work, are believed by some to be at the present time on the eve of extensive 
changes, especially by the development of the offset press and improvements 
in the phototype system, and it is thought the better course is still to refrain 
from introducing new and expensive equipment, the probabilities being that 
within a year or two the whole situation as to these matters will be considerably 
clearer. In the meantime the improved types of machinery for letterpress 
work which have been added to the Printing Bureau, chiefly by way of replace- 
ment, have tended to increase production in differeat branches, and have made 
less frequent occasion for invoking the service of outside establishments. The 
Labour Gazelle, for instance, which had been for many years printed by private 
firms, always at contract rates, has been, since the beginning of the calendar year 
1924, printed in the Printing Bureau itself. This change has the double advantage 
of not only being a direct economy, since the Printing Bureau is able to do such 



9 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

work more cheaply than an outside firm, but also of providing work during 
the slack seasons and lessening the evil of turnover of staff. 

There remain occasional necessities for the employment of private firms, as, 
for instance, when (1) a Government branch at a point distant from Ottawa 
needs emergency printing, usually of a minor character, or (2) requires a number 
of books to be bound, and the freight costs t6 and fro would be a serious and 
unreasonable addition to the actual costs of binding; or, (3) when a small piece 
of printing is required in a language of strange type characters, such as Ukrainian; 
occasionally, also, (4) when work is required where printing is incidental only 
to other work, as in the case of tags or stamped envelopes of special sizes, for 
the manufacture of which different commercial firms have equipped themselves 
with special machinery, which, if purchased by the Printing Bureau, would remain 
idle during the greater part of the year — such articles as postage stamps, post 
cards, postal notes, etc., have also been hitherto regarded as of this class. 

As the demand for printing along these various lines becomes regular and 
constant the question of the advisability of the Printing Bureau becoming 
equipped with the machinery necessary for the execution of the same will 
assuredly be a matter for careful thought. With any such departure, however, 
would be involved the matter of physical accommodation. The accommodation 
of the present building is strained to the utmost and necessary stores have for 
many years overflowed into other buildings, two of them rented. You have 
yourself considered the problem whether or not the conditions would warrant 
the erection of a new building, the present premises being perhaps utilized for 
other Government services and thus lessening the number of buildings in Ottawa 
rented for departmental purposes. After careful consideration you have decided 
that the question of a new building may be held over for the present. By a 
rearrangement of branches and an improved utilization of existing space a 
reasonable accommodation has been found for present necessities, apart from 
the storage premises above mentioned. 

I have thought it desirable to refer in some detail to these points since all 
are linked up more or less with the question of what has been generally termed 
"outside printing," and because of evidences which come to hand from time to 
time of the wide misunderstanding which prevails on this whole subject. At the 
last session of Parliament, for example, a return was ordered of particulars as to 
the amount spent for outside printing, the return being applicable to all depart- 
ments, and the information given showed a considerable amount of printing, 
chiefly lithography, ordered direct by other departments from private establish- 
ments, these being located sometimes in the tJnited States. The departments 
in question no doubt deemed themselves fully justified in placing their orders 
direct and without reference to the King's Printer; at any rate this has been 
the pratice for many years and long prior to the period covering your administra- 
tion. In the case of orders given by other departments to United States firms, 
moreover, the printing was chiefly for distribution in the United States, and 
included maps of a character which until lately could not be produced in Canada. 
This department is not of course responsible for transactions in which it has 
had no part, but you have intimated your agreement with the view that there 
would be less confusion on the whole subject, and in all probability some reduc- 
tion in expenditure, were it understood that the King's Printer is the only 
medium whereby any printing of whatever class can be executed, whether or not 
the work can be done in the Printing Bureau. I am aware that you are inquiring 
into these matters with a view to securing ultimately the actual centralization 
in this department of printing orders of all kinds. 

During the recent discussion in Parliament on these matters you had 
cited the case of Ukrainian printing as an instance in which the assistance of a 
commercial printing office could be economically utilized, and a member 
remarked that such cases were no doubt rare. The case of Ukrainian printing 
was cited only, however, as an illustration of a class of printing of exceptional 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 9 

character, and it is a fact that there have been during the past year or two 
demands for printing in Danish, Norwegian, Eskimo, Indian, German and 
Ukrainian, all which have been met to the satisfaction of the parties concerned, 
and only in occasional instances have the facilities of the Printing Bureau itself 
been inadequate to the requirements. 

One further necessity yet, but one which is becoming less and less frequent, 
for invoking the assistance of private firms in ordinary letterpress printing 
would arise from some peremptory demand to meet a sudden exigency on the 
part of a branch of the Government when the Bureau is at the peak of its work, 
usually during a session of Parliament. The facilities of the Printing Bureau 
are large and are equal to an immense amount of printing relatively speaking, 
but emergencies must in the nature of things arise from time to time and can be 
met only as conditions require. 

The statements attached show that with minor exceptions production 
in the different branches has exceeded that of last year. As you are aware, 
the department works, so far as concerns printing orders, at cost, though in 
the balancing at the close of the year there may be a slight loss or gain owing 
to the multiplicity of small calculations of hours and of material values. For 
the year there was in the Printing Branch an excess of revenue over expenditure 
of $88,485, which, following the Auditor General's practice of closing the books 
for the year, was transferred to the credit of the Dominion Government's casual 
revenue account. When, however, under the method followed in the Bureau, 
inventories are taken into consideration, the balance or profit for the year, 
on a total turnover of about four and a half million dollars, is found to be 
$47,046. 

In the case of the Stationery Branch, under a long-standing practice, a 
small percentage is added to purchasing cost to meet overhead expenses, and the 
turnover of about two million dollars resulted in a profit of $12,233, which, 
however, is also applied to a reduction of debits of previous years. In the case 
of the Canada Gazette the record shows a profit of $49,459, as compared with 
$37,440 for the year 1923-24; the subscription and advertising prices of the 
Canada Gazette were advanced during the year, and the figures reflect the 
increase. With regard to sales of public documents the public demand has been 
well maintained despite the fact that, following out the instructions of the 
Government Sub-Committee on Printing and Stationery, the prices to the public 
have been placed generally on a level somewhat above cost. The revenue for 
the year has been $48,117, as compared with $44,171 for 1923-24. 

You have, as chairman since its inception of the Government Committee 
on Printing and Stationery, necessarily maintained a close familiarity with 
the larger printing and stationery orders received from the different departments, 
and have thus become aware of the steps taken here, under the instructions 
of the committee, and following out the principles laid down in P.C. 1631, 
August 17, 1923, for the effective supervision of departmental requisitions 
of all kinds, efficiency and economy being the object sought. The task of 
supervision falls in the first place to the Supervisor of Government Publications, 
Mr. Fred Cook, former Chairman of the Editorial Board, and the supervisor 
and the undersigned are able, by discussion or correspondence with officials 
of the various departments which may be concerned, to reach satisfactory 
arrangements, as a rule, on questions which have been raised. In a number 
of cases our suggestions have not proved acceptable and it has been necessary 
to secure the decision of your committee. Where the matters involved 
were of unusual importance the heads of the departments concerned have 
attended meetings for consultative purposes. The members of the committee 
are yourself as chairman, the Hon. Ernest Lapointe, Minister of Justice, and the 
Honourable A. B. Copp, Secretary of State, the secretary being the supervisor, 



10 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Mr. Fred Cook; the King's Printer also as a rule attended the meetings. 
The various points referred to the committee were satisfactorily adjusted, 
though in some cases only after an extremely active discussion. The principal 
matters dealt with were briefly as follows: — 

Trade of Canada, — The question was that of obviating the duplication 
of tabular matter in the Annual Report of the Department of Customs and 
Excise, and the Annual Report on the Trade of Canada issued by the B'lreau 
of Statistics. The first named report cost $6,929 in 1922-23, and the Trade 
of Canada report cost $7,568. It had been suggested that the duplicated 
tables should be dropped from the Customs Report, and by the ruling of the 
committee this valuable economy was effected and the printing cost of the report 
reduced by a sum estimated at $5,761; this will be the approximate annual 
saving. 

Financial Report of Customs and Excise. — This publication, which has been 
issued annually for some years, is a complete record of the staff of the depart- 
ment. Much of the information appears in the Report of the Auditor General. 
The number of copies ordered is small, that in 1923-24 being 106, but the matter 
being mainly tabular the printing costs are high; the cost per copy for 1923-24 
was $23, a total charge of $2,483. The volume is intended for the use only of 
officials of the department, and its annual publication has been regarded by 
the supervisor and myself as hardly warranted. By the ruling of your committee 
the report will be issued biennially instead of annually, thus effecting a yearly 
saving of $1,200. 

Militia List. — An important question dealt with by the committee was that 
relating to the printing of the Militia List, which in place of the bulky and costly 
volume of previous years was during the year 1924 printed in two parts. Part I 
consists of the records of the Headquarters Staff in the different military dis- 
tricts, and the personnel of units of active militia; while Part II embodies a 
list of officers on the retired list, etc., and is not required to be consulted as 
frequently as Part I. The supervisor's recommendation was that Part I should 
not be issued more frequently than twice a year, and that Part II should be 
published only in alternate years. The Adjutant General favoured at least a 
quarterly publication of Part I, but the committee ruled in favour of semi-annual 
publication only. It should be added that the Adjutant General readily 
accepted suggestions made by the undersigned and the supervisor as to typo- 
graphical economies, which had the further effect of improving the form of 
the publication. The changes effected represent a saving annually of 
several hundred dollars. 

Electoral Atlas. — The question of printing an Electoral Atlas of the Domin- 
ion, based on the Representation Act of 1924, is of course a matter solely of 
Government policy; it is, however, one which required consideration by this 
department, since, were the printing ordered, timely planning would permit 
important economies. At the committee meeting called by you for the 
discussion of the subject, there were present by invitation the Hon. Charles 
Stewart, Minister of the Interior; Col. O. M. Biggar, Chief Electoral 
Officer, and Mr. F. C. C. Lynch, Director of Natural Resources Intelligence 
Service. The question for consideration was whether or not conditions neces- 
sitated or justified the issue of a new edition of the Electoral Atlas. It was 
reported that the demand for copies of the Atlas was small and that requests 
for electoral maps had hitherto been satisfactorily met by the map section 
of the Natural Resources Intelligence Service. It was pointed out that the 
Electoral Atlas issued in 1915 cost $18,897 for an edition of 2,111 copies, and 
that an estimate for printing 1,500 copies for the present year placed the cost 
at the much lower figure of $7,000, the reduction being largely the result of 
keener competition on the part of lithographic firms. Since, however, the 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 11 

plan adopted by the Natural Resoujces Intelligence Service appeared to be 
giving entire satisfaction, and the cost of the process used would not probably 
exceed $1,000, the committee decided to recommend the continuance of this 
method and not to incur the cost of a new edition of the Atlas ; this recommenda- 
tion was duly approved by Council. The effect of this procedure may be 
deemed to have effected a direct saving of $6,000. 

"History of the Canadian Forces — Medical Services". — The specifications 
for the printing of this work by Sir Andrew Macphail were taken up in consulta- 
tion with Col. A. F. Duguid, Director of the Historical Section of the Canadian 
General Staff, Department of National Defence. The publication was under- 
stood to be the first one of a series numbering probably ten volumes. The 
distinguished author had urged that the volume should be smaller than royal 
octavo, the size agreed on for the set as a whole. The supervisor and myself 
opposed this view, contending for uniformity in size for all volumes of the set. 
Royal octavo size was eventually adopted for the set. The influence of your 
committee assisted in effecting this arrangement informally. The work itself 
was not issued until some time after the close of the fiscal year, but I take advan- 
tage of the tact that the present report had not at the time been sent to press to 
refer to the general typographical excellence of the volume, which was admitted 
on all sides to be one of the handsomest productions of the Printing Bureau in 
many years. The free distribution of the volume, on lists furnished by Colonel 
Duguid, was made from the Distribution Office of the Printing Bureau, which 
also is in charge of the sales. 

I am, sir, etc., 

F. A. ACLAND, 

King's Printer. 



F. A. AcLAND, Esq., 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit a report of the work executed for Par- 
liament and the various departments in the Government Printing Bureau and in 
commercial lithographing, engraving and printing establishments during the 
fiscal year ending March 31, 1925, contained in the following tabulated 
statements: — 

1. Annual reports. 

2. Supplementary reports. 

3. Routine Parliamentary work. 

4. House of Commons and Senate Debates. 

5. Statutes. 

6. Canada Gazette. 

7. Voters' lists. 

8. Pamphlet and miscellaneous book-work. 

9. Statement of other letterpress departmental work. 

10. Statement of books bound. 

11. Pads made. 

12. Making and stamping of prepaid Post Office envelopes. 

13. Die stamping of letter and note headings and envelopes. 

14. Loose-leaf work. 

15. Lithographed maps, plans, cheques and forms. 

16. Half-tones, line cuts, electros and dies made. 

17. Comparative statement of presswork. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. M. DRAPER, 

Director and Superintendent of Printing. 
Ottawa, August 4, 1925. 



13 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 1 — Annual Reports to Parliament completed during the Fiscal Year 

1924-25 



Title of Document 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 
of 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Cost 



English 

Agriculture, 1923-24 

Civil Service Commission, 1923 

Commissioner of Patents, 1923-24 

Customs and Excise, 1924 

Dominion Statistician, 1923-24 

Health, 1923-24 

Immigration and Colonization, 1923-24 

Indian Affairs, 1923-24 

Interior, 1923-24 

Labour, 1923-24 

Marine and Fisheries (Fisheries Branch), 1923-24 

Marine and Fislieries (Marine Branch), 1923-24 

Mines, 1923-24 

National Defence (Militia Service), 1923-24 

National Defence (Naval Service), 1923-24 

Penitentiaries, 1923-24 

Postmaster General, 1923-24 

Public Accounts, 1923-24 

Public Archives, 1923 

Public Printing and Stationery, 1923-24 

Public Works, 1923-24 

Railway Commission, 1923 

Railways and Canals, 1923-24 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 1923-24 

Secretary of State, 1923-24 

Secretary of State for External Affairs, 1923-24 

Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment, 1924 

Trade and Commerce, 1923-24 

Weights and Measures, Electricity and Gas Inspection 
Services, 1923-24 

Bilingual 
Auditor General— Auditeur g6n6ral, 1923-24 (Vol. I). 
Auditor General — Auditeur general, 1923-24 (Vols. II 

and III) 

Shipping — Navigation, 1923-24 

Trade of Canada — Commerce du Canada, 1922-23 

Trade of Canada — Commerce du Canada, 1923-24 

French 

Affaires Indiennes, 1922-23 

Affaires Indiennes, 1923-24 

Agriculture, 1922-23 

Agriculture, 1923-24 

Chemins de fer et Canaux, 1922-23 

Commerce, 1922-23 

Commerce, 1923-24 

Commissaire des brevets, 1923-24 

Commission des chemins de fer du Canada, 1922 

Comptes publics, 1923-24 

Defense Nationale (Service de la Milice), 1923-24 

Defense Nationale (Service Naval), 1923-24 

Douanes et de I'Accise, 1922-23 

Immigration et Colonisation, 1923-24 

Impressions et Papeterie publiques, 1923-24 

Interieur, 1922-23 

Marine et P6cheries (Marine), 1923-24 

Marine et P6cheries (direction des Pfecheries), 1923-24 

Mines, 1922-23 

P6nitenciers, 1922-23 

Poids et mesures, de I'electricit^ et du gaz, 1923-24. 

Postes, 1924 

R6tablissement des soldats dans la vie civile, 1923. 
Royale gendarmerie k cheval du Canada, 1922-23. . 

Sante, 192.3-24 

Secretaire d'Etat, 1923-24 

Secretaire d'Etat pour les Affaires ext^rieures, 1923-24 
Travaux publics, 1923-24 

Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1924) 



5,556 

1,056 

1,151 

1,385 

995 

1,675 

1,575 

1,401 

1,150 

1,480 

1,006 

875 

4,485 

700 

650 

1,925 

1,325 

1,550 

1,616 

480 

925 

1,000 

1,356 

1,275 

668 

590 

1,525 

1,081 

1,071 



2,160 

1,910 

981 

1,921 

1,800 



312 
216 
2,000 
1,910 
341 
281 
235 
230 
351 
245 
175 
200 
316 
695 
145 
320 
285 
275 
1,236 
371 
285 
340 
261 
291 
550 
185 
205 
235 



114 

88 

34 

120 

20 

56 

60 

104 

146 

136 

104 

164 

80 

106 

24 

48 

120 

202 

506 

92 

180 

164 

112 

84 

426 

20 

60 

42 

68 



234 

2,166 

120 

1,664 

1,496 



72 

104 

120 

120 

200 

66 

44 

34 

240 

202 

106 

24 

708 

64 

96 

170 

178 

114 

68 

44 

68 

120 

92 

64 

64 

434 

20 

188 



633,384 

92,928 

39,134 

166,200 

19,900 

93,800 

94, 500 

145,704 

167,900 

201,280 

104,624 

143,500 

358,800 

74,200 

15,600 

92,400 

1.59,000 

313,100 

817,696 

44,160 

166,500 

164,000 

151,872 

107,100 

284, 568 

11,800 

91,500 

45,402 

72,828 



505,440 

4,137,060 

117,720 

3,196,544 

2,692,800 



22,464 

22,464 

240,000 

229,200 

68,200 

18,546 

10,340 

7,820 

84,240 

49,490 

18,550 

4,800 

223,728 

44,480 

13,920 

54,400 

50, 730 

31,350 

84,048 

16,324 

19,380 

40,800 

24,012 

18,624 

35,200 

80,290 

4,100 

44, 180 



$ cts. 
641 84 
.508 57 
120 96 
856 42 
80 42 
283 62 
355 01 
712 27 
612 31 
723 84 
432 98 
709 41 
587 21 
474 25 
92 62 
258 42 
850 99 

1,480 17 

3,068 52 
530 50 

1,052 16 
704 57 
508 89 
438 87 

2,313 63 
100 53 
353 55 
217 16 

398 14 



15,596 20 

732 17 
10,247 47 
10,931 11 



240 22 
366 89 
5.34 17 
552 31 
969 86 
252 84 
204 42 
102 89 
960 83 
905 05 
417 83 
82 92 

2,593 22 
259 35 
296 72 
590 60 
739 30 
449 26 
308 48 
177 03 
320 67 
350 80 
454 48 
294 47 
314 74 

2,092 40 
96 89 

1,037 55 



62,790 
65,521 



12,984 
15,420 



17,084,624 
20,294,640 



72,940 97 
81,257 66 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



15 



Table No. 2 — Supplementary Reports to Parliament completed during the 

Fiscal Year 1924-25 



Title of Document 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Cost 












Engush 
Report on Agricultural Credit 


1,150 
665 


90 
20 


103,500 


$ cts. 
155 95 


Bilingual 




Report of the Chief Electoral Officer, 1924— Rapport 


13,300 


116 16 






Totals 


1,815 
2,601 


110 
666 


116,800 
412,534 


272 11 


Totals (March 31, 1924) 


2,847 36 





Table No. 3 — Statement showing the Routine Parliamentary Work, 

Year 1924-25 

* In this table and in other tables which contain a column giving the total number of printed pages, 
the figures in the total column coincide, as a rule, with those obtained by multiplying the number of copies 
by the number of pages. In some cases, however, a printing job includes different sections or series which 
vary as to number of copies and number of pages; the two first columns do not therefore multiply into the 
figures shown in the column representing the total number of pages printed. Cases of this class are denoted 
by an asterisk (*). 



Title of Document 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Votes and Proceedings 

Procfes-verbaux 

Orders of the Day 

Feuilleton 

Senate Minutes 

Proc^a-verbaux des Stances du S6nat 

Public Bills 

Bills d'interfet public 

Private Bills 

Bills d'inter^t priv6 

Third Reading Bills (Commons) 

Bills en troisifeme lecture (Communes) 

Third Reading Bills (Senate) 

Bills en troisifeme lecture (S6nat) 

Returns (for distribution or Sessional Papers, either or both) 

Reponses (pour distribution ou pour insertion aux documents par 

lementaires ou pour I'une ou I'autre) 

Divorce Cases 

Printing of various Committee sittings 

House of Commons Journals, 1924 

Appendix No. 1, 1924 

Appendix No. 4, 1924 

Appendix No. 5, 1924 

Journaux de la Chambre des Communes, 1924 , 

Appendice n° 6, 1923 

Appendice n° 5, 1924 

Senate Journals, 1924 

Journaux du S6nat, 1924 

Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1924) 



tl.475 

t415 
tl,220 

t286 

1,215 

300 

tl,625 

t392 
tl,340 

t348 
tl.OOO 

t265 
tl,126 

t290 
30,422 

5,523 
71,400 
51,006 
300 
300 
300 
406 
100 
256 
106 
312 
100 



1,288 

1,286 

2,818 

3,038 

1,092 

992 

1,232 

1,142 

718 

658 

1,123 

1,131 

662 

534 

1,904 

608 

2,872 

5,634 

752 

604 

100 

332 

732 

1,186 

350 

616 

632 



1,899,800 
533,690 

3,437,960 
868,868 

1,326,780 
297,600 

2,002,000 
447,604 
962,120 
228,984 

1,123,000 

299,715 

745,412 

154,860 

*2, 338, 808 

*204,416 

*1, 220, 600 

*2, 720, 618 

225,600 

181,200 

30,000 

134,792 

73,200 

303,616 

37,100 

192,192 

63,200 



171,828 
186.810 



34,036 
26,341 



22,053,735 
18,235,336 



t Average number of copies printed. 



t6 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 4 — Statement of the Work on the House of Commons and Senate 

Debates, Year 1924-25 

• In this table and in other tables which contain a column giving the total number of printed pages, 
the figures in the total column coincide, as a rule, with those obtained by multiplying the number of copies 
by the number of pages. In some cases, however, a printing job includes different sections or series which 
vary as to number of copies and number of pages; the two first columns do not therefore multiply into the 
figures shown in the column representing the total number of pages printed. Cases of this class are denoted 
by an asterisk (*). 



Title of Document 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Cost 


House of Commons Debates — 

Unrevised Edition (English) 


t5,956 

t812 

600 

800 

147 

1,475 

115 

350 

86 


6.614 
6,074 
4,898 
248 
5,224 

1,094 
314 
944 
952 


*37,746,772 

♦4,525,100 

2,938,800 

198.400 

767,928 

1,613,650 

36,110 

330,400 

81,872 


$ cts. 
33,098 29 


Unrevised Edition (French) 


20.947 20 


Revised Edition, 1924, 5 Vols. (English) 


} 10,352 03 
5,550 77 


Revised Edition, 1924. Index 


Revised Edition, 1924. 5 Vols. (French) 


Senate Debates — 

Unrevised Edition (English) 


3,536 56 


Unrevised Edition (French) 


1,054 47 


Revised Edition, 1924 (English) 


1,401 37 


Revised Edition, 1924 (French) 


3,264 89 






Totals 


10,341 
8.625 


26,362 

24,578 


48,239,032 
33,596.996 


79,205 58 


Totals (March 31, 1924) 


61,514 60 






Speeches: Extra copies ordered by Members and 
Senators 


189.744 
148.165 


1,576 
1,536 


♦2,312,164 
♦2,101.990 


2,150 02 


Speeches- (March 31, 1924) 


1,862 42 







t Average number of copies printed. 

Table No. 5 — Statement of the work on the Statutes, Year 1924-25 





Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Cost 


The Statutes 
Volumes I-II. 1924 (English) 


4,550 
569 


702 
712 


3,194,100 
405, 128 


$ cts, 
5,867 69 


Volumes I-II, 1924 (French) 


2,235 06 






Totals 


5,119 
5,165 


1,414 
1,640 


3.599,228 
4,227,430 


8,102 75 


Totals (March 31, 1924) 


8,507 74 







Table No. 6 — Statement of the work on the Canada Gazette for the Fiscal 

Year 1924-25 



Aggregate 

Annual 

Issue 



Number of 
Pages in 
Volume 



Canada Gazette 

Supplements 

Extras 

Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1924) 



101,450 
13,700 
21,320 



136,470 
193,560 



4,376 
54 

48 



4,478 
5.324 



Table No. 7— Voters' Lists. (None prmted in 1924-25.) 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



17 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

Year 1924-25 

* In this table and in other tables which contain a column giving the total number of printed pages, the 
figures in the total column coincide, as a rule, with those obtained by multiplying the number of copies 
by the number of pages. In some cases^ however, a printing job includes different sections or series which 
vary as to number of copies and number of pages; the two first columns do not therefore multiply into 
the figures shown in the column representing the total number of pages printed. Cases of this class are 
denoted by an asterisk (*). 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Agriculture — 



English 



The Strawberry Root Weevil — With Notes on other Insects affect- 
ing Strawberries (Pamphlet No. 5 — New Series) 

Report of the Veterinary Director General, 1923-24 , 

Injurious Shade Tree Insects of the Canadian Prairies (Pamphlet 
No. 47 — New Series) 

Bull Loaning Policy (Booklet No. 6) 

Grasshoppers of British Columbia (Bulletin No. 39 — New Series) 

Potato Crop Report — With Notes on Markets, November, 1924... 

Imperial Fruit Show, 1924 (Apple Supplement No. 38, Commercial 
Intelligence Journal) 

The Root Vegetables Act, 1922 — Acts, Orders and Regulations 
(No. 3) 

The Seeds Act, 1923— Acts, Orders and Regulations (No. 11), 
October, 1924 

Fertilizer Analyses, 1923-24 (Pamphlet No. 57— New Series) 

The Canadian Record of Performance for Pure-Bred Dairy Cattle — 
Regulations, Standards and Records of Cows Qualified for 
Registration (Report No. 16) 

The Agricultural Gazette of Canada — Index to Nos. 1 and 2, 
Volume XI, 1924 

The Control of the European Apple Sucker, Psyllia mali Schmidb. 
in Nova Scotia (Pamphlet No. 45 — New Series) 

The Dairy Produce Act and Regulations 

Fourth Annual Live Stock Market and Meat Trade Review, 1923.. 

How to Reduce the Meat Bill 

The Finch Dairy Station — A Further Report of Progress (Pamph- 
let No. 44 — New Series) 

The Seeds Act, 1923, with the Regulations made by the Minister 
of Agriculture 

The Canadian Record of Performance for Pure-Bred Poultry, 
1922-23 (Section "A") — Regulations, Standards and Records 
of Fowls Qualified for Certificates (Report No. 4) 

Fruits and Vegetables — Canning, Drying and Storing 

Get of Bull Competition 

Canadian Grown Apples — Delight in every bite 

Fruit Statistics of Canada, 1920-23 

Swine Husbandry in Canada (Bulletin No. 10 — New Series) 

The Fruit Act and Regulations — Acts, Orders and Regulations 
(No. 7) 

The Testing of Milk, Cream and Dairy By-Products by Means of 
the Babcock Test (Bulletin No. 14 — New Series) 

Fodder and Pasture Plants 

Canadian Live Stock and Meat Industries 

Canadian Fruit, Vegetables and Honey 

Home-niade Frozen Desserts (Pamphlet No. 49— New Series) 

Regulations made under the provisions of the Live Stock Products 
Act, 13-14 George V, Chap. 18, respecting the Grading and 
Marking of Eggs 

The Origin and Quality of Commercial Live Stock Marketed in 
Canada in 1893 (Report No. 4) 

Why and How to Use Milk— Revised Edition (Pamphlet No. 36— 
New Series) 

The Satin Moth in British Columbia (Pamphlet No. 50— New 
Series) 

The Meat and Canned Foods Act and the Regulations made there- 
under Governing the Inspection of Meats — Acts, Orders and 
Regulations (No. 15) 

Carried forward 

7473—2 



2,506 
6,006 

3,006 

10,000 

1,500 

5,000 

1,400 

5,000 

15,050 
2,000 

14, 106 

7,500 

1,006 

3,000 

4,000 

20,006 

8,006 

5,006 



7,872 
60,006 

2,000 
40,406 

3,000 
10,000 

30,250 

5,006 

5.000 

50,006 

55,456 

30,006 



50,000 
2,506 

20,100 
1,506 

2,006 



112 



32 



96 
32 
22 
24 
20 
68 

24 

48 

144 

40 

32 

8 



50,120 
312,312 

72,144 

280,000 

72,000 

80,000 

28,000 

80,000 

481,600 
96,000 

1,579,872 

60,000 

16,096 

36,000 

256,000 

240, 072 

64.048 

160, 192 



755,712 
1,920,192 

44,000 
969,744 

60,000 
680,000 

726,000 

240,288 

720,000 

2,000,240 

1,774,592 

240,048 



400,000 

140,336 

643,200 

24,096 

104,312 



489,224 



1,290 



15,407,216 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25— Continued 



Description 



Agriculture 



Brought forward . 
-Continued 



English — Concluded 



An Act to amend and consolidate the Acts respecting Live Stock. . 
Neutralization of Cream for Buttermaking (Pamphlet No. 52 — 

New Series) 

Studies on the Spruce Budworm (Bulletin No. 37 — New Series)... . 
The Feeding Stuffs Act with Amendments and Regulations — Acts, 

Orders and Regulations (No. 10) 

Fruit and Vegetables — Canning, Drying, Storing 

Why and How to Use Cheese (Pamphlet No. 7 — New Series) 

Control of the Destructive Spruce Bark Beetle in Eastern Canada 

(Pamphlet No. 48 — New Series) 

Fox Ranching in Canada (Bulletin No. 12 — New Series) 

Canadian Grown Apples — Delight in every bite 

Hay and Straw Inspection, as amended to January 1, 1925 — Acts, 

Orders and Regulations (No. 16) 

List of Publications, 1925 (Pamphlet No. 53— New Series) 

The Habits and Economic Importance of Wolves in Canada 

(Bulletin No. 13— New Series) 

Fruit and Vegetable Crop Report 

Bulletin of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association 

Seed, Feed and Fertilizer Markets — Eastern Canada Edition. . . 

French 

Petits refrigerateurs et laiteries (bulletin n° 16 — nouvelle s^rie). 
Rapport sur la recolte des pommes de terre (et notes sur les 

marches), novembre 1924 

Consommons du lait 

Consommons du fromage (feuillet n° 7 — nouvelle s6rie) 

La station laitiere de Finch) — Progres de la station — Nouveau 

rapport (feuillet n° 44^ — nouvelle sirie) 

Concours pour la progeniture de taureaux 

Liste des publications, 1924 (feuillet n° 42— nouvelle serie) 

Guide des exp6diteurs de b6tail (feuillet n° 38 — nouvelle s6rie) . . 

Mauvaises herbes 

Rapport du Directeur g6n6ral v6t6rinaire, 1921-22 

Le contr61e de la ponte au Canada pour les volailles de race pure, 

1922-23 (Section "A")— Rapport n° 4 

La revue des marches des semences, des produits alimentaires pour 

les animaux et des engrais chimiques (Edition des provinces de 

Test) 

Le pore a bacon et le classement des pores — Manuel de I'feleveur 

(feuillet n° 40 — nouvelle serie) 

Les vers fils de fer et les moyens de les detruire (feuillet n° 33— 

nouvelle serie) 

Le classement et le marquage des oeufs 

Desserts geles faits a la maison (feuillet n° 49— nouvelle serie) . . . 

Rapport de I'entomologiste du Dominion, 1919 et 1920 

La revue des marches des semences, des produits alimentaires pour 

les animaux et des engrais chimiques (edition des provinces 

de Test) 

Taureaux de race pure — Conditions auxquelles ils sont pretes par la 

_ division de I'industrie animale (livret n° 6) 

Loi inodifiant et codifiant les lois concernant les animaux de ferme 
La loi des semences, 1923, et reglements 6tablis par le ministre de 

I'Agri culture 

La loi des produits alimentaires pour les animaux avec amende- 

ments et reglements (n° 10) 

Liste des publications, 1925 (feuillet n° 53 — nouvelle serie) 

La loi des semences, 1923, et reglements 6tablis par le ministre de 

I'Agriculture— Lois, arrgt^s et reglements (n° 11) 

Carried forward 



Number 

of 
Copies 



489,224 



400 

4,500 
1,500 

7,000 
50,000 
20,100 

3,000 

5,000 

50,400 

7,000 
15,000 

7,500 

25,330 

120,018 

125,806 



206 



15,100 
10,000 

5,006 
1,000 
15,006 
15,006 
1,009 
2,000 

500 



1,000 

20,006 

1,000 

20,000 

10,006 

500 



59,006 

5,000 
100 

5,000 

3,000 
5,000 

3,006 



1,130,221 



Number 

of 

Pages 



1,290 



144 

24 
32 
16 

32 
44 
24 

16 
12 

24 
124 

32 
208 



22 

8 

8 

196 

48 

96 

8 

24 

8 

8 

8 

44 

184 

28 
8 

36 

28 
8 

32 



2,948 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



15,407,216 



3,200 

36,000 
216,000 

168,000 

1,600,000 

321,600 

64,000 

220,000 

1,209,600 

112,000 
180,000 

180,000 

*627,344 

*960, 192 

*1, 006, 448 



4,120 

15,776 
604,000 
240,000 

40,048 
22,000 
120,048 
120,048 
197,764 
96,000 

48,000 



8,000 

480, 144 

8,000 

160,000 

80,048 

22,000 



*472, 048 

140,000 
800 

180,000 

84,000 
40,000 

96,192 



25,590,636 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



IS 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 



Brought forward 

Agriculture — Concluded 

French — Concluded 

Rapport sur la recolte des fruits et des legumes 

Bulletin de 1' Association Canadienne Antituberculeuse 

La Gazette agricole du Canada 

La loi des produits laitiers et reglements — Lois, arrfet^s et regie 
ments (n° 6) 

Les larves des racines et les moyens de les d6truire (feuillet ii° 32 — 
nouvelle s6rie) 

Lies pucerons des plantes (feuillet n° 31 — nouvelle s6rie) 

Conserve de fruits et legumes — En bocaux, s^chfes, en cave (bulle- 
tin n° 32 — nouvelle s^rie) — 

Archives — 

English 

The Voyages of Jacques Cartier 

The Canadian Archives and its Activities 

Auditor General — 

Bilingual 

Auditor General's Report — Rapport de I'Auditeur general, 1923-24 
(Published in separate parts) 

Canada Gazette — 

English 

Index to the Canada Gazette, 1923-24 

Chief Electoral Officer — 

English 

Dominion Elections Act — Election Instructions for all Election 
Officers (Book A), August 1, 1924 

Dominion Elections Act — Election Instructions for Urban Regis- 
trars (Book F), August 1, 1924 

French 

Loi des Elections fed6rales — Instructions felectorales pour tous les 
ofBciers d'^lection (cahier A), ler aoftt 1924 

Civil Service Commission — 

English 

Civil Service Examinations — Answer Book 

Civil Service Regulations 

Customs and Excise — 

English 

Customs and Excise — List of Forms, April 1, 1924 

List of Ports with Outports, Preventive and Collecting Stations 
and Licensed Air Harbours (Corrected to April 1, 1924) 

Official List of Licensed Manufacturers and Bonded Warehouses, 
1924-25 

The Customs Tariff, 1907, and Amendments, with Index to August 
5. 1924 

The Special War Revenue Act, 1915, and Amendments and Regu- 
lations to date (Office Consolidation) 

Departmental Regulations and Instructions for the Survey of 
Malthouses, &c 

Carried forward 

7473— 2J 



1.130,221 



2,898 

12,024 

1,606 

2,006 

3,000 
2,000 

15,006 



1,499 
993 



50 
2, 175 

32,600 
3,000 

8,556 



10,000 
500 



1,206 
2,006 
1,106 
3,000 
50,100 
1,500 



1,286,052 



2,948 



84 

32 

112 

16 



32 



354 
114 



2,400 



80 



248 
40 



260 



32 
48 
80 
284 
48 
16 



25,590,636 



*49,336 
*96, 192 
179,872 

32,096 

24,000 
16,000 

480,192 



530,646 
113,202 



120,000 
174,000 

8,084,800 
120,000 

2,224,560 



120,000 
13,000 



38,592 

** m 

96,288 

88,480 

♦800,000 

2,404,800 

24,000 



7,282 



41,420,692 



20 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Customs and Excise — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

Petroleum Inspection Act, 1906, and Amendments thereto 

Regulations in respect of Tobacco and Cigars and Tobacco and 

Cigar Manufactories 

Annual Report of the Topographical Survey of Canada, 1923-24.. . 

The Excise Act, 1906 (Office Consolidation) 

Factum " 

Circular No. 320C 

Circular No. 236C 

Circular No. 327C 

Memorandum No. 45 — Supplement B 

Memorandum No. 45 

Memorandum No. 50 



French 

Loi speciale des revenus de guerre, 1915 (codification officielle) 

Reglements et instructions administratifs pour la surveillance des 

malteries, etc., 11 novembre 1924 

Tarif des douanes, 1907, et modifications, avec index jusqu'au 5 

aoilt 1924 

Memoire n° 45 — Supplement B 

Memoire n° 45 — Revise 

Memoire n° 50 



Experimental Farms- 



English 



Experimental Station, Swift Current, Sask.— Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1923 . 

Experimental Station, Rosthern, Sask.— Report of the Superin- 
tendent, 1923 ..... 

Experimental Station, Lennoxville, Que.— Report of the Superin- 
tendent, 1923 

Experimental Station, Nappan, N.S.— Report of the Superintendent, 

Experimental Station, Chariottetown, ' P.E!i.— Report of the 
Superintendent, 1923 

Experimental Station, Scott, Sask.— Report of the Superintendent 
1923 

Experimental Station, Lethbridge, Alta.— Report of tlie Super- 
intendent, 1923 : . . . 

Experimental Station, Invermere, B.C.— Report of the Superin- 
tendent, 1923 

E.xperimental Station, Kapuskasing, Ont.— Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1923 

Experimental Station, Cap Rouge, Que.— Report of the Superiii 
tendent, 1923 

Experimental Station, Morden, Man.— Report of iblie Superin- 
tendent, 1923 .... 

Experimental Station, Ste. Anne de la Pocatiere, Que.— Report of 
the Superintendent, 1923 

Experimental Station, Sydney, B.C.— Report of tlie Superin- 
tendent, 1923 

Experimental Station, Indian Head, Saslc.— Report" of the Super- 
intendent, 1921 and 1922 

Experimental Station, Fredericton, N.B.— Report of the Superin- 
tendent, 1923 

Experimental Station, La Ferme, Que.— Report of the Superin- 
tendent, 1922 and 1923 

Experimental Farm, Brandon, Man.— Report of the Superintendent, 



Carried forward . 



1,286,052 



3,000 

5,000 

600 

500 

40 

11,000 

1,200 

5,000 

17,000 

11,200 

8,000 



7,000 

500 

4,000 
5,000 
5,000 
1,500 



7,500 

7,006 

15,006 

7,006 

8,006 

12,066 

15,091 

5,206 

9,000 

15,100 

10,000 

3,000 

5,006 

7,000 

8,000 

4,000 

9,006 



1,519,591 



7,282 



20 

32 
32 
116 
24 
16 
12 



16 

8 

48 

16 

240 
8 
16 



32 
52 
56 
56 
40 
64 
48 
24 
64 
56 
52 
32 
48 
48 
80 
68 
104 



41,420,692 



60,000 

160, 000 

19,200 

58, 000 

960 

*88,000 
14,400 
40, 000 

136,000 

*89,600 
64', 000 



336,000 

8,000 

960,000 
40,000 
80,000 
12,000 



240,000 
364,312 
840,336 
392,336 
320, 240 
772,224 
724,368 
124,944 
576,000 
845,600 
520,000 
96, 000 
240,288 
336,000 
640,000 
272,000 
936, 624 



8,834 51,828,124 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



21 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Experimental Farms — Continued 

E NGLI8H — Concluded 

Experimental Farm, Agassiz, B.C. — Report of the Superintendent, 
1923 

Experimental Farm, Indian Head, Sask. — Report of the Superin- 
tendent, 1923 

Dominion Experimental Farms — Report of the Director, 1923-24 

Dominion Experimental Farms — Tobacco Division — Report of the 
Officer in Charge, 1923 

Report of the Dominion Apiarist, 1923 

Report of the Dominion Poultry Husbandman, 1923 

Report of the Dominion Chemist, 1922-23 

Report of the Dominion Botanist, 1923-24 

Report of the Dominion Cerealist, 1923 

Report of the Dominion Field Husbandman, 1923 

Report of the Dominion Horticulturist, 1923 . . 

Report of the Chief Supervisor on the Illustration Stations in 
(3ntario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince 
Edward Island, 1923 

The Dominion Experimental Farms 

Hay and Pasture Crops in Northwestern Saskatchewan (Bulletin 
No. 40 — New Series) 

The Organization, Achievements and Present Work of the Experi- 
mental Farms 

Canadian National Egg Laying Contests 

The Illustration Stations in British Columbia, Alberta and Sas- 
katchewan — Report of the Chief Supervisor, 1923 

Division of Economic Fibre Production — Report of the Chief 
Officer, 1923 

Experiments with Wheat at the Dominion Experimental Farm, 
Brandon, Man.— A Summary, 1889-1923 (Bulletin No. 42 
New Series) 

The Prairie Farmer's Vegetable Garden (Bulletin No. 43 — New 
Series) 

Influence of Grain Growing on the Nitrogen and Organic Matter 
Content of the Western Prairie Soils of Canada (Bulletin No 
44 — New Series) ; 

Plum Culture and District Lists of Plums Suitable for Canada with 
Descriptions of Varieties (Bulletin No. 45 — New Series) 

Seasonable Hints 



French 

Station exp6rimentale, Morden, Man. — Rapport du r^gisseur, 1922. 

Station exp6rimentale, Rosthem, Sask. — Rapport du r6gisseur, 1922 

Station exp6rimentale de Swift Current, Sask. — Rapport du r6gis- 
seur, 1922 

Station exp^rimentale de Swift Current, Sask. — Rapport du r6gis- 
seur, 1923 

Station exp6rimentale, Nappan, N.-E. — Rapport du r6gisscur, 1923 

Station exp^rimentale, Lennoxville, Qu6. — Rapport du r^gisseur, 
1923 

Station exp^rimcntale, Kapuskasing, Ont. — Rapport du regisseur, 
1923 

Station expdrimentale, Ste-Anne de la Pocatiere, Qu6. — Rapport du 
r6gisseur, 1923 

Sous-stations expfrimentales: Beaverlodge, Alta, Fort Vermilion, 
Alta, Salmon Arm, C.-B., Betsiamites, Qu6., Fort Smith, 
T.N.-O., Fort Resolution, T.N.-O., Fort Providence, T.N.-O., 
Swede Creek, Yukon — Rapports des experimentateurs pro- 
poses, 1922 

Ferme expdrimentale, Brandon, Man. — Rapport du r6gisseur, 1923. 

Fermes exp^rimen tales f^derales — Rapport du directeur, 1923-24. . . 



Carried forward 2,757,559 



1,519,591 



12,006 

7,000 
15,090 

10,000 
7,006 
15,006 
10,006 
8,106 
12,006 
20,000 
15,120 



12,056 
25, 100 

20,232 

5,074 
10,056 

12,006 

7,506 

20,000 
12,000 

10,000 

15,000 
930,568 



1,5C6 
1,000 

1,500 

1,006 
1,006 

6,000 

3,000 

4,000 



2,006 
1,000 
5,000 



8,834 



60 
80 

16 

304 
52 

40 

24 

56 
36 

16 

80 
144 



64 

24 

32 
64 

60 

68 

32 



144 
108 
100 



11,050 



51,828,124 



576,288 

336,000 
1,448,640 

480,000 
168,144 
720, 288 
560,336 
453,936 
240, 120 
480,000 
846,720 



723,360 
♦1,004,000 

323,712 

1,542,496 
522,912 

480,240 

180, 144 

1,120,000 
432,000 

160,000 

1,200,000 
n4, 889, 088 



132,528 
64,000 

36,000 

32, 192 
64,384 

360,000 

204,000 

128,000 



288,864 
108,000 
500,000 



82,634,516 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Experimental Farms — Concluded 

French — Concluded 



Rapport de I'aviculteur du Dominion, 1922 

Rapport du botaniste du Dominion, 1922 

Rapport de ra\iculteur du Dominion, 1923 

Rapport de I'apiculteur du Dominion, 1923 

Rapport du chimiste du Dominion, 1922-23 

Rapport de I'agriculteur du Dominion, 1923 — Service de la grande 

culture 

Services de I'exploitation animale, 1922 

Les plantes medicinales et leur culture au Canada (bulletin n° 3&— 

nouvelle serie) 

L'exportation des bceufs canadiens — Comment elle doit fetre faite 

(feuillet n° 39 — nouvelle sferie) 

Service des tabacs — Rapport du chef du service, 1922 

Service de la production des fibres 6conomiques — Rapport du chef 

de service, 1921 et 1922 

Plantes k foin et si pacage pour le Nord-Ouest de la Saskatchewan 

(bulletin n° 40 — nouvelle s6rie) 

Concours de ponte national canadien (bulletin n° 38 — nouvelle serie) 
Les abeilles et la conduite du rucher (bulletin n° 33 — nouvelle s6rie) 
Engrais pour plantes maratcheres et notes sur I'emploi des engrais 

chimiques (bulletin n° 32 — deuxieme s6rie) 

Conseils pour la saison 



External Affairs — 



Confidential documents. 
Finance — 



English 



English 



Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between the United Kingdom 

of Great Britain and Ireland and Finland 

Budget Speech, April 10, 1924 

List of Lost, Stolen and Destroyed War Loan, Victory Loan Bonds 

and Canadian Bonds issued at New York, October 1, 1924.. 

Superannuations, Judges' Salaries and Pensions 

List of Lost, Stolen and Destroyed War Loan, Victory Loan Bonds 

and Canadian Bonds issued at New York, June 1, 1924 , 

Regulations respecting Bonds of the Dominion of Canada 

Estimates of Canada, Supplementary, 1924-25 

List of Lost, Stolen and Destroyed War Loan, Victory Bonds and 

Canadian Bonds Issued at New York, February 10, 1925 

Estimates of Canada, 1925-26 

Royal Commission to enquire into and report upon affairs of the 

Home Bank of Canada 



BnJNGUAI. 

Convention of Commerce between Canada and Economic Union of 
Belgium and Luxembourg — Convention de commerce entre le 
Canada et I'union §conomique Belgo-Luxembourgeoise, 1924. . . 

Convention of Commerce between Canada and the Netherlands — 
Convention de commerce entre le Canada et les Pays-Bas, 1924 



French 

Expos6 du budget, 10 avril 1924 

Carried forward 



2,757,559 



6,006 
2,500 
6,006 
2,006 
3,000 

3,000 
5,006 

1,006 

506 
6,006 

1,000 

506 

3,006 

10,000 

4,000 
82,006 



575 



500 
10,006 

9,112 
100 

9,006 

15,000 

300 

5,800 
700 

8,997 



500 
1,006 

4,506 



11,050 



466 



24 

32 

44 

32 
16 
16 

48 
104 

902 



48 



82,634,516 



32 
76 
52 
28 
64 


192, 192 
190,000 
312,312 
56,168 
192,000 


28 
56 


84,000 
280,336 


32 


32,192 


24 
64 


12, 144 
384,384 


12 


12,000 


16 
56 
64 


8,096 
168,336 
640,000 


36 
64 


144,000 
*1, 312, 096 



♦11,650 



4,000 
240, 144 

291,584 
4,400 

288,192 

240,000 

4,800 

278,400 
72,800 

*477,498 



8,000 
12,072 

*108,144 



2,959,227 



13,522 



88,696,456 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



23 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward . 



Health— 



English 



Regulations made by Order in Council (March 31, 1924) under the 
Opium and Narcotic Drug Act 

Morphinism 

Regulations under the Food and Drugs Act made by Order in 
Council, April 8, 1924 

Fourth Annual Canadian Conference on Child Welfare, Winnipeg, 
1923 — Proceedings and Papers 

How to Build Sound Teeth (Publication No. 30) 

Small-Pox and Vaccination (Publication No. 32) 

Narcotism in Canada (Publication No. 32) 

Immigration Medical Service — Instructions to Medical Officers 

Small-Pox and Vaccination — A Popular Treatise (Publication No. 



32). 



Planning of Small Community Hospitals (Publication No. 34). . 
Regulations concerning Water for Drinking and Culinary Purposes 

on Vessels Navigating on the Great Lakes and Inland Waters. 
Canadian Agencies for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuber 

culosis 

Abstracts of Current Venereal Disease and Social Hygiene Litera- 
ture — 

Abstract No. 23 

Abstract No. 25 

Abstract No. 26 

Abstract No. 27 

Abstract No. 28 

The Little Blue Books (Mother's Series) — The Canadian Mother's 

Book (Publication No. 2) 



French 

Reglements ^tablis par arrets minist6riel le 31 mars 1924 sous 
I'empire des dispositions de la loi de I'opium et des drogues 

narcotiques 

Le probleme universel du jour (publication n° 19) 

Rfeglements concemant I'eau destin^e h. des fins potables et culi- 
naires k bord des vaisseaux naviguant sur les grands lacs et 

dans les eaux int^rieures 

Reglements 6tablis sous I'empire de la loi des aliments et drogues 

par arrets minist^riel du 8 avril 1924 

Les petits livres bleus (collection domestique) — 

Canadiens, buvez du lait! — Publication n 12 

Canadiens, buvez du lait! — Publication n° 12 

La cuisine canadienne — Publication n° 13 

La cuisine canadienne — Publication n° 13 

Comment tenir maison au Canada — Publication n° 14 

Les dechets familiers— Publication n° 15 

Les ordures m^nageres — Publication n° 15 

Comptabilit§ domestique au Canada — Publication n° 16 

Les petits livres bleus (collection du foyer) — 

La premiere 6tape au Canada — Publication n" 7 

La premiere etape au Canada — Publication n" 7 

Comment construire une maison canadienne — Publication n° 8 . 

Comment construire une maison canadienne — Publication n° 8 . 

Comment fonder un foyer canadien — Publication n° 9 

Les foyers-vedettes au Canada — Publication n° 10 

Accidents et premiers secours — Publication n° 11 

Les petits livres bleus (collection matemelle) — 

Comment prendre soin de b6b6^Publication n° 3 

Comment prendre soin de b6b6 — Publication n° 3 

Comment prendre soin de maman — Publication n" 4 

Comment prendre soin de maman — Publication n° 4 



2,959,227 



5,006 
10,006 

10,000 

1,008 

50,000 

20,006 

5,006 

3,000 

20,100 
10,000 

1,000 

3,000 



8,506 
1,506 
1,500 
1,500 
4,300 

20,050 



3,000 
5,006 



500 
2,506 

3,006 
10,000 

3,006 
10,000 

3,006 

3,006 
10,006 

3,006 

3,006 
10,000 
3,000 
10,000 
3,000 
3,006 
3,000 

3,006 
10,006 

3,006 
10,100 



13,522 



36 

56 

240 
16 
32 
32 
52 

32 
100 



12 



36 

20 
16 
20 
32 

136 



120 



64 

12 
16 
52 
72 
44 
8 
12 
12 

16 
24 
12 
20 
32 
12 
24 

20 
32 
20 
32 



88,696,456 



40,048 
360,216 

660,000 

241,920 
800,000 
640,192 
160, 192 
156,000 

643,200 
1,000,000 

8,000 

36,000 



306,216 
30,120 
24,000 
30,000 

137,600 

2,726,800 



24,000 
600,720 



4,000 
160,384 

36,072 
160,000 
156,312 
720,000 
132,264 

24,048 
120,072 

36,072 

48,096 
240,000 
36,000 
200,000 
96,000 
36,072 
72,000 

60, 120 
320, 192 

60,120 
323,200 



Carried forward 3,251,899 



15,078 



100,262,704 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 



Brought forward . 
Health — Concluded 



Fkench — Concluded 



Comment 61ever les enfants — Publication n° 5 

Comment elever les enfants — Publication n° 5 

Comment prendre soin de papa et de la famille — Publication n° 6 
Comment prendre soin de papa et de la famille — Publication n° 6 



House of Commons — 



English 



Commercial Forest Trees of Canada (Circular No. 14) 

Commons Debates, April 10, 1924 

Press Gallery Chansons and Parliamentary Parodies 

Candida — House of Commons Debate 

Report of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada, August 
31, 1923 

Select Standing Committees, 1924 

An Act to provide for the Superannuation of Civil Servants 

Correspondence between the British and Canadian Governments on 
Lausanne Conference and Treaty 

Canada Gazette extra 

Canada and the West Indies — Speech of Mr. H. J. Logan, M.P., 
advocating Closer Trade Relations and replies by Hon. George 
P. Graham, M.P., and Hon. T. A. Low, M.P., June 12, 1924.. , 

An Act to amend the Indian Act (reprint) , 

Estimates of Canada, Supplementary, 1923-24 , 

Proceedings of the Select Special Committee of the House of Com' 
mons to inquire into Agricultural Conditions (Part I-II) , 

Select Standing Committee on Agriculture and Colonization- 
Address by Mr. H. T. GUssow, Dominion Botanist, on Wheat 
Rust (Parliamentary Session 1924) 

Select Standing Committee on Agriculture and Colonization- 
Address by Mr. H. T. GUssow, Dominion Botanist, on Seed 
Potato Certification (Parliamentary Session 1924) 

Alphabetical Index to the Sessional Papers of the Parliament of 
Canada, 1924 

Special Committee appointed to consider questions relating to the 
Pensions, Insurance and Re-Establishment of Returned Sol- 
diers—Interim and Final Reports (No. 30), July 19, 1924 

Index to the Sixty-First Volume of the Journals of the House of 
Commons, 1924 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1923 (Vol. I) 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1923 (Vol. II) 

Hansard , 

List of Reports and Returns to be made to the House of Commons 
by Public Officers and Private Corporations — Session of 1925 

Capitalization for Hansard, January, 1925 , 

Report of the Board of Pension Commissioners for Canada, 1923-24 

Report of the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission 

Standard Forms — For use by Members of the Staff, 1925 

Estimates of Canada, 1925-26 



Bilingual 

Annual Report of Criminal Statistics, year ending September 30, 
1923 — Rapport annuel sur la statistique de la criminalite, annee 
expiree le 30 septembre 1923 

List of Members of the House of Commons — Liste des membres de 
la Chambre des Communes, 1924 

Canal Statistics, 1923 — Statistique des canaux, 1923 

List of Shipping, 1923 — Liste des navires, 1923 

list of Members and Constituencies of the House of Commons 
(arranged according to Provinces) — Liste des membres et 
districts ^lectoraux de la Chambre des Communes (d'apres 
chaque province) 



3,251,899 



3,006 
10,000 

3,006 
10,000 



1,500 
500 
600 
600 

106 
600 
650 

1,500 
500 



1,000 

100 

1,100 

706 



8,006 

8,006 
3,225 

50 

41 

206 

100 

2,500 

400 
200 
225 
425 
100 
1,375 



175 

200 
100 
100 



606 



15,078 



16 

8 

16 

2,410 

32 

24 
42 

24 

84 

1,146 

960 

32 



24 

20 

218 

88 
104 



392 

20 

56 

240 



32 



100,262,704 



120,240 

560,000 

48,096 

400,000 



12,000 

32,000 

12,000 

9,600 

6,784 
14,400 
13,000 

24,000 
4,000 



16,000 

800 

17,600 

1,701,460 

256, 192 

192, 144 
135,450 

1,200 

3,444 

236,076 

96,000 

*32,000 

3,200 
4,800 
4,500 
92,650 
8,800 
143,000 



68,600 

4,000 

5,600 

24,000 



16,192 



Carried foi-ward ^. 3,313,313 



21,460 



104,582,532 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



25 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

House of Commons — Concluded 

Bilingual — Concluded 

Convention of Commerce between Canada and Economic Union of 
Belgium and Luxembourg — Convention de commerce entre le 
Canada et I'union 6conomique Belgo-Luxeinbourgeoise, 1924. . 

List of Members of the House of Commons — Liste des membres de 
la Chambre des Communes, 1925 



3,313,313 



French 

D6bats de la Chambre 

Rapport de la commission royale sur le bois k pate, Canada 

Index alphab^tique des documents parlementaires du parlement du 
Canada, 1924 

Budget du Canada, 1925-26 

Rapport ofEciel des t6moignages entendus par le comitS de la 
marine et des pecheries concernant les changements projet^s 
dans les reglements gouvernant la mise en conserve du homard, 
29 avril 1924 

Reglement de la Chambre des Communes du Canada, avec annexe, 
1925 :••••:••. 

Loi procurant une pension aux fonctionnaires civils 

Budget du Canada, supplementaire, 1923-24 

D61iberations du comite special de la Chambre des Communes 
charge de s'enquerir des conditions de I'agriculture (Partie 

irii)..... 

Comite special permanent de I'agriculture et de la colonisation, 
session de 1924 — Tfemoignage rendu par M. H. T. Giissow, 
botaniste federal, sur I'attestation des plants de pommes de 
terre 

Comit6 special permanent de I'agriculture et de la colonisation, 
session de 1924 — Temoignage de M. H. T. Giissow, botaniste 
fed6ral, concernant la rouille du ble 



Immigration and Colonization- 



Engush 



Western Canada — Cheap Railroad Rates for Settlers 

Canada West 

Eastern Canada 

Canada — A Call to Women 

The Immigration Act and Regulations 

Farm Opportunities in Canada 

Woman's Work in Canada — Duties, Wages, Conditions and Oppor- 
tunities for Household Workers in the Dominion 

Assisted Settlement of Approved British Families on Canadian 
Government Farms 

Juvenile Immigration, 1923-24 



French 

Canada — Atlas descriptif •. 

Manuel du citoyen — Le vade-mecum du nouveau canadien. 

L'ouest canadien (Canada^ — Le nouveau chez soi) 

L'est canadien (Canada — Le nouveau chez soi) 



Dutch 

Handboek voor den Nieuwen Canadees — Gids tot verkrijging van 
het burgerrecht 



1,500 
600 



500 
750 

1,375 
300 



250 

100 
350 
206 



260 

2,006 
2,000 



10,000 

363,490 

82,080 

10,006 

5,006 

114,760 

101,900 

15,000 
3,000 



25,000 
10,000 
25,000 
25,000 



10,000 



21,466 



16 

298 



42 
104 



36 

104 
20 
16 



2,390 

24 

28 



24 



104,582,532 



24,000 
38,400 



8,000 
223,500 

57,750 
31,200 



9,000 

10,400 
7,000 
3,296 



621,400 

48,144 
56,000 



80,000 

*11,631,280 

2,626,560 

480,288 

320,384 

3,672,320 

2,038,000 

480,000 
48,000 



1,600,000 
240,000 
600,000 
600,000 



240,000 



Carried forward. 



4,123,752 



25,100 



130,377,454 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward . 



Indian Affairs — 



English 



Report by Col. Andrew T. Thompson, B.A., LL.B., Commis- 
sioner to Investigate and Enquire into the Affairs of the Six 
Nations Indians, 1923 



Insurance — 



English 



Abstract of Statements of Loan and Trust Companies in Canada, 
1923 

List of Insurance Companies Licensed to do Business in Canada 
under The Insurance Act, 1917, and Amendments 

List of Insurance Companies Licensed to do Business in Canada 
under The Insurance Act, 1917, and Amendments 

Civil Service Insurance Act— Regulations and Table of Premium 
Rates 

List of Insurance Companies Licensed to do Business in Canada 
under The Insurance Act, 1917, and Amendments 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1923 (Vol. I) 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1923 (Vol. II) 

Annual Statements required from British and Foreign Companies 
Licensed to Transact Business other than Life Insurance, in the 
Dominion of Canada, in Compliance with the Insurance Act, 
1917 

Annual Statements required from Canadian Companies Licensed 
to Transact Business of Insurance other than Life Insurance, in 
the Dominion of Canada, in Compliance with the Insurance 
Act, 1917 

Schedule of the Classification of Fire Insurance Risks, December 
31, 1923. 

Census of Indians and Eskimos in Canada, 1924 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of 
Canada, 1923 — Loan and Trust Companies 

List of Insurance Companies Licensed to do Business in Canada 
under The Insurance Act, 1917, and Amendments 

List of Securities held by Insurance, Loan and Trust Companies in 
Canada, December 31, 1924 



Bilingual 

Abstract of Statements of Insurance Companies in Canada, 1923 — 
Relev6 des etats des compagnies d'assurance au Canada, 1923 



Interior — 



English 



Caijada — Natural Resources and Commerce 

Compact Facts, Canada, 1924 (Third Edition) 

Photographic Surveying (Bulletin No. 56) 

Western Hemlock (Tree Pamphlet No. 5) 

Red Pine (Tree Pamphlet No. 6) 

Save the Forest Week — Programme for Schools 

Bench Marks established along certain Meridians, Base Lines and 
TowTiship Outlines in Alberta (Bulletin No. 53) 

Regulations governing Placer Mining in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, 
Alberta and the North- West Territories of Canada 

Natural Resources of Quebec 

Report of the Director of Forestry, 1922-23 

Eighteenth Report of the Geographic Board of Canada (Supple- 
ment to the Annual Report) — Containing all decisions to March 
31, 1924 

Annual Report of the Director of the Geodetic Survey of Canada, 
1922-23 



4,123,752 



206 



506 

725 

750 

5,006 

750 
3,800 
4,600 

1,100 

450 

500 
300 

456 

756 

756 



8,780 



27,675 
50, 256 
1,157 
10,000 
10,000 
10,006 

481 

2,000 

10,056 

2,006 



1,006 
1,706 



25,100 



28 



24 

16 

16 

12 

14 

1,146 

960 



28 

48 

16 
36 

170 

16 

258 

360 



528 
32 
56 



72 

24 
144 
36 



390 
64 



Carried forward 4,279,542 



29,618 



130,377,454 



5,768 



12,144 

11,600 

12,000 

60,072 

10,500 
4,354,800 
4,416,000 

30,800 

21,600 

8,000 
10,800 

77,520 

12,096 

195,048 



3,160,800 



*4, 930, 200 
1,608,192 
64,792 
80,000 
80,000 
80,048 

34,632 

48,000 

1,448,064 

72,216 



392,340 
109,184 



151,724,670 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



27 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Interior — Continued 

English — Continued 

Save the Forest Week Competition, 1924 (Prize-Winning Essays) 

The Province of New Brunswick, Canada — Its Development and 
Opportunities 

Wood-Using Industries of Ontario. II (Forestry Branch, Bulletin 
No. 75) 

The Migratory Birds Convention Act and Federal Regulations for 
the Protection of Migratory Birds, September 1, 1924 

Annual Report of the Reclamation Service, 1922-23 

Regulations for the Issue of Oil and Gas Permits and Leases in the 
Northwest Territories of Canada, &c 

Pocket Guide to Banff and District 

The Banff-Windermere Highway 

Success in Prairie Tree Planting (Forestry Branch — Bulletin No. 72) 

Report of the Commissioner of Canadian National Parks, 1922-23. 

Through the Heart of the Rockies and Selkirks (Second Edition). 

Arctic and Western Hudson Bay Drainage, 1921-22 (Water Re- 
sources Paper No. 40) 

Pulping Qualities of Fire-Killed Wood (Bulletin No. 76) 

Geographic Board Decisions (18th Report^ — Supplement 6) 

Regulations for the Protection of Game in the North- West Terri- 
tories 

Publications of the Natural Resources — Intelligence Service... . 

Regulations for the Disposal of the Petroleum and Natural Gas 
Rights, &c 

Annual Report of the Director of the Geodetic Survey of Canada, 
1923-24 

The Call of Untrodden Ways 

Tree-Planting on the Prairies of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta (Forestry Branch — Bulletin No. 1) 

Regulations governing Grazing Lands in the Provinces of Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan, Alberta, and in the Peace River Tract in the 
Province of British Columbia , 

Forest Fire Protection in Canada (Forestry Topic No. 2) 

Regulations for the Disposal of Quartz Mining Claims on Dominion 
Lands in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the North- 
West Territories 

Silviculture in Canada (Forestry Topic No. 3) 

Dominion Lands Hand-Book — For the Information of the Public 
(Edition of October 1, 1924) 

Canada in relation to the World's Timber Supply (Forestry Topic 
No. 1) 

The Canadian Historical Association — Annual Report, 1924 

St. Lawrence and Southern Hudson Bay Drainage, Ontario, 1922-23 
(Water Resources Paper No. 42) 

Report of the Commission appointed to Delimit the Boundary 
between the Provinces of Alberta and British Columbia (Part 
II), 1917 to 1921 

Pacific Drainage — British Columbia and Yukon Territory, 1922-23 
(Water Resources Paper No. 43) 

An Act respecting Irrigation 

Forest Research Manual 

Coal Mining Regulations for the Disposal of Coal Mining Rights, 
the Property of the Crown, in the Pro'\nnces of Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the North- 
West Territories, the Railway Belt in the Province of British 
Columbia, &c 

City Mapping Research — Mathematical Statistics of the Geodetic 
Survey of the City of London, Ont. (Publication No. 12) 

Regulations governing the Granting and Administration of Grazing 
Leases on Dominion Lands in the Railway Belt in the Province 
of British Columbia 



Carried forward 4, 534, 172 



4,279,542 



25,726 

15,006 

5,006 

16,106 
2,006 

1,006 

25,006 

25,206 

6,006 

2,006 

10,650 

1,806 

1,006 

376 

2,500 
10,606 

2,006 

1,716 
10,006 

10,006 



5,000 
10, 100 



2,000 
10,000 

30,350 

10,000 
1,000 

1,800 



1,012 

1,800 

500 

1,000 



2,000 
310 

5,000 



29,618 

32 

80 

112 

24 
96 

16 
16 
36 
36 
36 
144 

280 
16 



16 



64 



20 



36 
16 

48 

16 
122 



178 

170 
24 
96 



31,710 



151,724,670 

823,232 

1,200,480 

560,672 

386,544 
192,576 

16,096 
400,096 
907,416 
180,216 

72,216 
1,533,600 

505,680 
16,096 
3,008 

80, 000 
339,392 

32,096 

82,368 
240, 144 

640,384 



40,000 
202,000 



72,000 
160,000 

1,456,800 

160,000 
122,000 

172,800 



180, 136 

306,000 
12,000 
96,000 



32,000 
27,900 

40,000 



163,016,618 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward '. 

Interior — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

Natural Resources of the Prairie Provinces, 1925 

Index to Precise Level Lines of the Geodetic Survey of Canada in 
the Provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, 
&c 



Save the Forest Week, April 19 to April 25, 1925 — Programme for 
Schools 

Jack Pine (Tree Pamphlet No. 7) 

Lodgepole Pine (Tree Pamphlet No. 8) 

Regulations governing the Granting of Yearly Licenses and Permits 
to Cut Timber on Dominion Lands in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, 
Alberta, &c 

Precise Levelling — Bulletin N 

Geographic Board Decisions 

Publications of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 

Natural Resources, Canada 



Fhench 

Le sapin de Douglas (fascicule n° 3) 

La pruche (fascicule n" 4) 

Loi de la convention concemant les oiseaux migrateurs et reglements 
fed6raux pour la protection des oiseaux migrateurs — Edition du 
ler septembre 1924 (pour I'usage des services administratifs 
seulement) , 

Canada — Ressources naturelles et comimerce 

Le pin rouge (fascicule n° 6) 

Concours — La semaine de protection des forfets, 1924— Essais 
primes 

Les ressouces naturelles du Quebec 

Le Tsuga de I'Ouest (fascicule n° 5) 

Service administratif des terres fedferales — Renseignements pour le 
public, ler octobre 1924 

Semaine de protection des forfets, 19 au 25 avril 1925— Programme 
pour les 6coles 

Ressources naturelles, Canada 



Justice — 



English 



Geography and Geology of Lake Melville District, Labrador 
Peninsula (Memoir 114) 

Factum 

In the Supreme Court of Canada — On Appeal from the Exchequer 
Court of Canada 



Labour- 



English 



Wages and Hours of Labour in Canada, 1920 to 1924 — Supplement to 
the Labour Gazette, January, 1925 

Investigation into Alleged Combine in the Distribution of Fruit 
and Vegetables — Interim Report of Commissioner, February 
18, 1925 (Combines Investigation Act, 1923) 

Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907 — Test of Judgment of 
Judicial Committee of Privy Council in reference to Validity 
of this Statute 

Investigation into Alleged Combine amongst Coal Dealers at Win- 
nipeg and Other Places in Western Canada, 1924-25 — Report of 
Commissioner, February 28, 1925 

Government Intervention in Labour Disputes in Canada — Supple- 
ment to the Labour Gazette, March, 1925 



Carried forward 4 , 816 , 259 



4,534,172 



1,000 



350 

25,000 
10,000 
10,000 



5,100 
356 
376 

3,412 
113,725 



2,006 
2,006 



2,006 
3,043 
2,006 

15,150 

12,756 

2,000 

3,000 

10,500 
13,980 



500 
550 

100 

17,765 

12,050 

1,300 

750 
11,300 



31,710 



32 

32 

4 

258 

48 



24 
256 



36 
144 



60 



16 
"48 



112 
436 

248 

64 

368 

16 

48 
48 



163,016,618 



48,000 



5,600 

200, 000 
80,000 
80,000 



163,200 

11,392 

1,504 

*154,940 

*454,900 



16,048 
16,048 



48,144 

779,008 

16,048 

545,400 

1,836,864 

16,000 

180,000 

168,000 
*55,920 



56,000 
*21,920 

*12,400 



♦568,480 

*2, 217, 200 

*10,400 

36,000 
♦271,200 



34,128 171,087,234 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



29 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Labour — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

Judicial Proceedings respecting Constitutional Validity of the 
Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, and Amendments 
of 1910, 1918 and 1920 

Fair Wages Policy of the Government of Canada 

Labour Organization in Canada — Thirteenth Annual Report, 1923. 

Third Report on Organization in Industry, Commerce and the 
Professions in Canada 

National Conference regarding Winter Employment in Canada, 
September 3^, 1924 — Official Report of Proceedings and Dis- 
cussions (Bulletin No. 8 — Industrial Relations Series) 

National Conference regarding Winter Employment in Canada 

Legal Status of Women in Canada 

Sixth Report of the Employment Service Branch of the Departs 
ment of Labour, Canada, on the Operations under the Employ- 
ment Offices' Co-ordination Act, 1918, 1923-24 

Fifth Report of the Technical Education Branch of the Department 
of Labour, Canada, on the Operations of the Technical Educa- 
tion Act, assented to July 7, 1919, 1923-24 

Index to Labour Gazette, Vol. XXIV, 1924 

Seventeenth Report of the Registrar of Boards of Conciliation and 
Investigation of Proceedings under the Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act, 1907, 1923-24 

Prices in Canada and other Countries, 1924 — Supplement to the 
Labour Gazette, January, 1925 

The Labour Gazette, Nos. 4 to 12, Vol. XXIV, and Nos. 1 to 3, Vol. 
XXV 

Vocational Education 

French 

Salaires et heures de travail au Canada, de 1920 k 1924r— Supplement 
k la Gazette, du Travail, Janvier 1925 

Politique des justes salaires du gouvemement du Canada 

Hygiene (approvisionnement d'eau) — Alimentation en eau potable 
des maisons Isoldes et des petits etablissements depourvus 
d'aqueduc municipal (publication n° 17) 

Legislation ouvriere au Canada, 1923 

Prix au Canada et dans d'autres pays, 1924 — Supplement k la 
Gazette du Travail, Janvier 1925 

L'Enseignement Professionnel 

La Gazette du Travail, Nos. 4 to 12, Vol. XXIV, and Nos. 1 and 2, 
Vol. XXV 



Library of Parliament- 



English 



Speech of the Hon. C. P. Beaubien, Senator, on the Canadian 
Exhibition Train in France and Belgium, delivered in the 
Senate, July 8, 1924 



French 

Train-exposition canadien — Extrait des D6bats du S6nat canadien, 
seance du 8 juillet 1924 



Marine and Fisheries — 



Engush 



Regulations respecting the Shipping of Live Stock from Canada, 
1909 

Regulations for the use and management of Government Wharves 
in Canada, &c 

Carried forward 



4,816,259 



2,000 
1,000 
5,006 

1,756 



2,506 

250 

10,006 



200 



4,500 
9,400 



300 

17,750 

132,226 
9,112 



2,275 
300 



2,506 
256 

2,275 
618 

20,017 



25 



25 



306 
500 



34, 128 



304 

8 
288 

106 



138 
8 



12 



40 

64 

1,194 
44 



64 
76 

64 
112 

1,198 



16 



24 



24 



171,087,234 



608,000 

8,000 

1,441,728 

186, 136 



345,828 

2,000 

880,528 



2,400 



216,000 
225,600 



12,000 

*568,000 

•■13,159,100 
•201,064 



*62,800 
2,400 



160,384 
19,456 

•72,800 
•23,082 

•2,175,816 



400 



600 



2,448 
12,000 



5,041,374 



38,152 



191,475,804 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Marine and Fisheries — Continued 

English — Continued 

Tide Tables for the Pacific Coast of Canada, 1925 

Radio Stations of Canada, January 1, 1924 — Supplement No. 2 to 
Official List 

Abridged Edition to Tide Tables for Quebec and Father Point 
with Tidal Differences for the St. Lawrence, 1925 

Abridged Edition of Tide Tables for St. John, N.B., with Tidal 
Differences for the Bay of Fundy, and Time of High Water at 
Windsor, N.S., 1925 

List of Lights and Fog-Signals on the Atlantic Coast, including the 
Gulf of St. Lawrence to Head of Ocean Navigation of Canada 
(Corrected to April 1, 1924) 

List of Lights and ibg-Signal-- of the Dominion of Canada on the 
Pacific Coast and the Rivers and Lakes of British Columbia 
(Corrected to April 1, 1924) 

Abridged Edition of Tide Tables for Vancouver and Sand Heads, 
B.C., p.nd Slack Water for First Narrows and Active Pass with 
Tidal Differences for the Strait of Georgia, 1925 

Tide Tables and Information connected with the Ship Channel 
from Father Point to Montreal, 1924 

Tide Tables for the Eastern Coasts of Canada, 1925 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VIII 
Mollusks, Echinoderms, Coelenterates, &c., Part J) 

List of Broadcasting Stations of Canada and the United States 
(Corrected to January 31, 1924) — Special Supplement to "Offi- 
cial List of Radio Stations in Canada" 

The Meat and Canned Foods Act and Regulations made thereunder 

Regulations relating to the Issue of Motor Engineer Certificates 

Report of the Canadian Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. XIII: Eskimos 
Folk-Lore, Part B) 

Canadian Rules and Regulations relating to the Examination of 
Masters and Mates of Coasting and Inland Vessels, 1924. . . . 

Radio Stations of Canada — Supplement No. 3 to Official List. . 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. IX: 
Annelids Parasitic Worms, Protozoans, &c.. Part J) 

Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of Nova Scotia 

Annual Report on Fish Culture, 1923 

Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of New Brunswick 
(Office Consolidation) 

Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of Prince Edward 
Island 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. XIII: 
Eskimo Folk-Lore, Part A) 

Index to Notice to Mariners, 1923 (Nos. 1 to 88 inclusive) 

Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of Ontario (Office 
Consolidation) 

Liabilities of Carriers by Water 

Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of Quebec (Office 
Consolidation) 

Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of Manitoba (Office 
Consolidation) 

Special Fishei-y Regulations for the Provinces of Saskatchewan and 
Alberta and the Territories North thereof (Office Consolidar 
tion) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. Vlil: 
Mollusks, Echinoderms, Coelenterates, &c., Part A)— Supple- 
mentary Report 

Tide Tables for the Pacific Coast of Canada, 1925 

Notice to Mariners— No. 85 of 1924 (Pacific No. 16) 

Monthly Record of Meteorological Observations— Supplement, 1920 



5,041,374 



22,206 
2,006 
5,000 

16,000 

1,800 

1,100 

10,006 

1,210 
11,106 



Carried forward 5, 157, 874 



5,006 



1,0C6 

2,006 

500 

5,006 

206 
1,006 

5,000 
2,000 



2,006 

1,006 

5,000 
300 

1,500 
1,006 

1,000 

1,506 

1,500 



5,000 
1,500 
1,200 
1,200 



38,152 

72 
66 
32 

32 

330 

76 

48 

96 
80 



16 
16 
16 

192 

24 
68 



39,996 



191,475,804 



1,598,832 
132,396 
160, 000 

512,000 

594,000 

83,600 

480,288 

116,160 

888,480 

40,048 



16,096 

32,096 

8,000 

961,152 

4,944 
68,408 

40,000 

104,000 

26,664 

96,288 

32,192 

480,000 
4,800 

48,000 
28,168 

36,000 

48,192 



36,000 



40,000 
108,000 

57,600 
115,200 



198,473,408 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



31 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Marine and Fisheries — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

Memoranda, Correspondence, &c., bearing on the Validity of 
Existing Canadian Legislation and the Power of the Canadian 
Parliament to enact Valid Legislation relating to Merchant 
Shipping 

List of Lights and Fog-Signals of the Dominion of Canada on the 
Pacific Coast and the Rivers and Lakes of British Columbia, 
April 1 1925 

Abridged Edition of Tide Tables for St. John! N.B., with Tidal 
Differences for the Bay of Fundy, and Time of High Water at 
Windsor, N.S 

List of Lights and Fog-Signals on the Atlantic Coast, including the 
Gulf of St. Lawrence to Head of Ocean Navigation of the 
Dominion of Canada, April 1, 1925 

List of Lights and Fog-Signals on the Inland Waters (West of 
Montreal and East of British Columbia) of the Dominion of 
Canada, April 1, 1925 

Tide Tables for the Eastern Coasts of Canada, 1926 

Amendments to the Radio Regulations since June 1, 1923 

Monthly Record of Meteorological Observations 

Quart«rly Bulletin of Sea Fishery Statistics 

Bilingual 

List of Shipping, 1923 — Liste des navires, 1923 

Supplement to List of Vessels, 1923 — Supplement a la liste des 
navires, 1923 

French 

Reglements concemant I'usage et la question des quais de I'Etat au 
Canada, etc 

Reglements canadiens concemant I'examen des capitaines et des 
seconds des bdtiments de cabotage et de navigation int^rieure, 
1924 (exemplaire oflHciel) 

Loi relative aux viandes et conserves alimentaires et reglement 
6tabli sous son empire (codification administrative) 

Reglements intemationaux pour prevenir les abordages 

Mines — 

English 

Investigations in 1922 — Mineral Resources and Technology 

Investigations in 1922 — Ore Dressing and Metallurgy 

Investigations in 1922 — Fuels and Fuel Testing 

Investigations in 1922— Ceramics and Road Materials 

Amprior-Quyon and Maniwaki Areas, Ontario and Quebec (Memoir 

136). 

Metal Mines in Canada, 1924 

Annual Report of the Explosives Division of the Department of 

Mines, 1923 

Catalogue of Mines Branch Publications, with Alphabetical Guide. 

Price List of Publications 

The Mineral Industries of Canada (British Empire Exhibition 

Edition, No. 611) 

Report on Tertiary and Quaterary Fossils from the Canadian 

Arctic Coast 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. IV: 

Botany, Part D) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. XI: 

Geology and Geography, Part A) 



5,157,874 



500 



156 



500 
500 



1,000 
500 
506 
506 

2,504 
3,506 

2,006 

2,006 

506 

20, 156 

300 

4,506 

3,806 



39,996 



198,473,408 



1,000 


36 


36,000 


1.000 


76 


76,000 


16,000 


32 


572,000 


1,800 


330 


594,000 


1,000 
11,000 

1,750 
15,678 

1,956 


154 

80 

8 

1,086 

48 


154,000 

880,000 

14,000 

♦1,290,420 

♦31,296 


600 


240 


144,000 


3,312 


104 


♦26,736 



24 



36 



128 
40 
40 

156 
20 

20 
40 



138 
12 
12 

172 



Carried forward 5,256,434 



43.144 



12,000 



5,616 

10,000 
10,000 



68,000 
64,000 
20,240 
20,240 

390,624 
70,120 

40, 120 

80,240 

4,048 

2,781,528 

3,600 

54,072 

654,632 

206,580,940 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Mines — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

The Mining Laws of Canada — A Digest of Dominion and Provincial 
Laws 

Natural Gas in Alberta 

Non-Metal Mines in Canada, 1924 (List No. 3) 

Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 

Palaeontology of the Silurian Rocks of Arisaig, Nova Scotia 
(Memoir 137) 

Annotated List of Economic Mineral Deposits in Canada 

Coquihalla Area, British Columbia (Memoir 139) . 

An Act to regulate the Manufacture, Testing, Storage and Importa- 
tion of Explosives 

Bituminous Sands of Northern Alberta 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. V: Botany, 
Parte) 

Bentonite 

Development of Chemical, Metallurgical, and Allied Industries in 
Canada in Relation to the Mineral Industry 

Development of Chemical, Metallurgical, and Allied Industries in 
Canada in Relation to the Mineral Industry — Vol. I. Chemical 
Industries 

Development of Chemical, Metallurgical, and Allied Industries in 
Canada in Relation to the Mineral Industry — Vol. II. Metal- 
lurgical and Allied Industries. . . : 

Central and District Heating — The Possibilities of Application in 
Canada 

Publications of the Geological Survey 

Investigations in Ore Dressing and Metallurgy, 1923 

Investigations of Mineral Resources and the Mining Industry, 1923. 

Investigations of Fuels and Fuel Testing, 1923 , 

Physiography of Nova Scotia (Memoir 140) 

Investigations in Ceramics and Road Materials, 1923 

Geography and Geology of Lake Melville District, Labrador 
Peninsula (Memoir 141 ) 

The Smoky River Coal District — Examination and Comparison 
with the Kananaski Area (Dominion Fuel Board, No. 7) 

Colour Printing of Geological Maps (Bulletin No. 39) 

Upper Ordovician Faunas of Ontario and Quebec (Memoir 138) 

Preliminary Report on the Clay and Shale Deposits of Ontario 
(Memoir 142) 

Summary Report, 1923 (Part A) 

Summary Report, 1923 (Part B) 

Summary Report, 1923 (Part CI) 

Summary Report, 1923 (Part CII) 



French 

Les lies canadiennes de I'ocfean Arctiquc — Journal de Texp^dition 

canadienne de 1922 

I-e maniement des explosif s 

Rapport sur les mat^riaux de construction le long du fieuve St- 

Laurent, entre Prescott (Ont.) et Lachine (Qu6bec) 

Rapport annuel de la division des explosifs du minist^re des Mines, 

1923 

Renseignements sur la tourbe 

Loi concernant la fabrication, I'fepreuve, I'emmagasinage et I'im- 

portation des explosifs 

Les industries minerales du Canada 

Chauffage central et regional — Possibilit6 de sa mise en pratique 

au Canada 



5,256,434 



13,006 
1,506 
3,006 
1,000 

2,506 
7,000 
3,006 

2,000 
5,006 

4,500 
4,000 

3,000 



5,000 



5,000 

5,270 
1,006 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
2,500 
4,000 

2,000 

10,032 
1,800 
2,012 

3,500 

3,506 
3,506 
4,000 
2,500 



506 
5,006 

1,006 

1,006 
5,006 

1,000 
1,500 

1,500 



43,144 



52 

72 

12 

172 

244 

64 

196 

10 
38 

86 
46 

384 



236 



156 

90 

12 

156 

76 

88 
188 
82 

112 

32 

16 

358 

184 
114 
128 
172 
48 



152 



10 
152 



92 



206,580,940 



676,312 

*54,216 

36,072 

172,000 

611,464 
448,000 
589, 176 

20,000 
190,228 

387,000 
184,000 

1,152,000 



1,180,000 



780,000 

474, 300 
12,072 
624,000 
304,000 
352,000 
470.000 
328,000 

224,000 

321,024 

28,800 

720,296 

644,000 
399,684 

448,768 
688,000 
120,000 



16,192 

80, 096 

152,912 

20,120 
240,288 

10, 000 
228,000 

138,000 



Carried forward 5,390, 132 47,290 220, 105,960 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



33 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1934-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

National Defence — 

English 

The Militia List of Canada— Part I (Corrected to January 23, 1924) 
The Militia List of Canada — Part II (Corrected to January 23, 1924) 
Memorandum for Camps of Instruction, 1924 — Part I. Instructions 

for Training 

Pay and Allowance Regulations for the Permanent and Non-Per- 
manent Active Militia, 1924 

Royal Canadian Naval Reserve Officer's Training Certificate Book 

Equipment Lodger 

Standing Orders for the Fortress of Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1923. . . . 
The Canadian Navy List for June, 1924 (Corrected to May 20, 

1924) 

Royal Canadian Naval Reserve Men's Certificate 

Index — Appointments, Promotions and Retirements — Canadian 

Militia (Januarj^ 4 to December 31, 1923) 

Regulations for Rifle Associations, 1924 

Priced List of Clothing, Necessaries and Badges, 1924 

Report on Civil Aviation, 1923 

Pay and Allowance Regulations for the Royal Canadian Air Force, 

Permanent and Non-Permanent, 1924 

Regulations for Rifle Associations, 1924 

Standing Orders for the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, 1924 

The C.A.M.C. with the Canadian Corps during the Last Hundred 

Days of the Great War 

The Royal Militia College of Canada — Standing Orders (Amended 

to January, 1924) , 

Instructions for the Canadian Officers' Training Corps, 1924 

The King's Regulations and Orders for the Royal Canadian Air 

Force, 1924 

Naval Prize Fund 

Index — Pay and Allowance Regulations 

The Militia List of Canada— Part I (January, 1925) 

Royal Canadian Air Force — Sequence of Flying Instruction, 1925 

Index to General Orders, 1924 

Index to Militia Orders, 1924 

Militia Orders, 1924-25 

Militia General Orders, 1924-25 

Appointments, Promotions and Retirements, 1924-25 



French 

Nouvelle grammaire franciaise, 1924 

Rfeglements pour les societes de tir, 1924 

Ordres de la milice, 1924-25 

Ordres g6neraux de la milice, 1924-25 

Nominations, promotions et retraites, 1924-25 

National Gallery — 

Enqush 

The National Gallery of Canada — Catalogue, 1924 i. . . 

Annual Report of the Board of Trustees, 1923-24 

Northwest Territories — 

English 

Northwest Territories, 1922 — Local Conditions, MacKenzie Dis- 
trict, Canada's Arctic Islands, Canada's Wild Buffalo, Mining 
Development, MacKenzie District 



5,390,132 



1,000 
1,000 

5,006 

4,016 
200 

2,550 
206 

131 
1,500 

2,400 

30 

1,500 

1,706 

1,006 
2,006 
1,000 

1,006 

321 
6,006 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1.000 

500 

2,400 

2,400 

249, 600 

45,600 

45,600 



200 

506 

10,600 

2,100 

2,100 



1,000 
1,500 



306 



47.290 



720 
362 



360 
24 
20 
64 

32 
40 

64 
40 
40 
56 

128 

36 

104 

304 

120 



394 

16 

16 

252 

12 

24 

16 

536 

256 

232 



80 

40 

524 

300 

256 



218 
20 



80 



220,105,960 



720,000 
362,000 

480, 576 

1,445,760 

4,800 

51.000 

13, 184 

4,192 
60,000 

153,600 

1,200 

60,000 

95,536 

128,768 

72,216 

104,000 

309,824 

38,520 
408,408 

197,000 

16,000 

16,000 

252,000 

6,000 

57,600 

38,400 

•1,286,400 

*614,400 

*556,800 



16,000 

20,240 

•52,400 

*30,000 

♦25,600 



218,000 
30,000 



24,480 



Carried forward . 



5,790,634 



53,240 



228,072,864 



7473-:; 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 19^4:-25— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Patent and Copyright Office — 

English 

Circular of the Patent and Copyright Office containing "The Trade 
Mark and Design Act" and "The Timber Marking Act" 

The Copyright Act, 1921 — Rules and Forms 

The Patent Act 

Patent Office of Canada — Rules and Regulations and Forms, 
September 1, 1923 

The Copyright Act, 1921 — Rules and Forms 

An Act to amend and consolidate the Law relating to Copyright. . 

The Canadian Patent Office Record 

French 

Loi de 1921 concernant le droit d'auteur— Reglements et formules. 

Post Office— 

English 

List of Money Order Offices in Canada, 1924 

Ontario Distribution List, 1924 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services — West of Port Arthur, 

May, 1924 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services— East of Port Arthur, 

' July 1, 1924 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services — West of Port Arthur, 

October, 1924. 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services — East of Port Arthur 

October, 1924 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1924 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1924 (Part I) 

Instructions to Letter Carriers 

Postal Information, 1924 

Sale of Unclaimed Parcels 

Report of Proceedings between Representatives of the Canadian 

Federation of Postal Employees, Officials of the P. O. Depart- 
ment and the C. S. Commission, &c., September 11, 1924... 
Province of Ontario — Names and Occupations of Householders in 

Places other than Cities (Vols. 1 and 2) 

Province of Manitoba — Narnes and Occupations of Householders 

in Places other than Cities 

Quebec Distribution List, 1924 

Alberta Distribution List, 1924 

Rural Post Offices in the Maritime Provinces (First Revision) 

Rural Post Offices in the Province of Ontario (First Revision) 

Rural Post Offices in the Western Provinces (First Revision) 

Rural Mail Delivery in Canada 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1925 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1925— Part I 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1925— Part II 

Names of Rural Mail Delivery Boxholders — 

North Bay Postal District (First Revision) 

Moose Jaw Postal District 

Quebec Postal District 

Calgary Postal District 

Saskatoon Postal District 

Toronto Postal District 

Ottawa Postal District (First Revision) 

Winnipeg Post^al District^(First Revision) 

Charlottetown Postal District 

Halifax Postal District 

St. John Postal District 

London Postal District 

Vancouver Postal District 



Carried forward. 



5,790,634 



2,006 
1,000 
5,000 

5,000 

500 

500 

53, 186 



700 



7,606 
3,027 

1,206 

1,706 

1,200 

1,700 
13,683 
3,715 
1,000 
300^ 100 
2,006 

2,000 

500 

506 

1,922 

1,717 

1,006 

2,500 

2,000 

10,000 

13,811 

3,462 

25 

500 
506 
506 
506 
506 
506 
506 
506 
506 
506 
506 
506 
506 



6,241,496 



53,240 



36 
16 
24 

32 

16 

32 

3,942 



32 



112 

152 

136 

272 

144 

274 

636 

252 

20 

16 

64 

108 

1,194 

410 

136 

132 

40 

32 

52 

32 

636 

248 

388 



80 

24 

12 

196 

144 

24 

48 

40 

52 

304 

32 



228,072,864 



72,216 

16,000 

120,000 

160,000 

8,000 

16,000 

*3, 955, 132 



*11,200 



851,872 
460, 104 

164,016 

464,032 

172,800 

465,800 
8,702,388 

936, 180 

20, 000 

4,801,600 

128, 384 



*74, 000 

597,000 

207,460 

261,392 

226, 644 

40, 240 

80,000 

104, 000 

320,000 

8,783,796 

858,576 

9,700 

4,000 

4,048 

40,480 

12, 144 

6,072 

99,176 

72,864 

12, 144 

24,288 

20,240 

26,312 

153,824 

16,192 



63,828 261,653,180 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



35 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 



Brought forward 

Post Office — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

Rural Mail Delivery Routes with Number of Boxes on Each Route — 

London Postal District 

Halifax Postal District 

Toronto Postal District 

Vancouver Postal District 

St. John Postal District 

Winnipeg Postal District 

Calgarj' Postal District 

Charlottetown Postal District 

Ottawa Postal District 

Saskatoon Postal District 

Report of the Board of Pension Commissioners for Canada, 1923-24 
Monthly Supplement to Canadian Official Postal Guide, 1924-25.. . 
Monthly Supplement to Canadian Official Postal Guide and Money 

Order Information, 1924-25 

Monthly Distribution List, 1924-25 

BlUNGU.\L 

Table to Enable Postmasters to Calculate the Value of Postal 
Notes — Table permettant aux maitres de poste de calculer la 
valeur des bons de poste 

Province of Queliec. Names and Occupations of Householders in 
Places other than Cities — Province de Quebec. Noms et occu- 
pations des chefs de maison dans les endroits autres que les 
villes (3 Vols.) 

Rural Post Offices in Quebec Province (First Revision) — Bureaui 
do poste ruraux dans la province de Quebec (premiere edition 
revue et corrigee) 

Montreal City Preliminary List, December, 1924 — Liste de distri- 
bution preliminaire de la ville de Montreal, P.Q., decembre 1924 

Names of Rural Mail Deliverj' Boxholders (First Revision) — 
Noms des abonnes sur les routes du servace rural (premiere 
edition revue et corrigee) — Montreal Postal Districts— District 
postal de Montreal 

Rural Mail Delivery Routes with Number of Boxes on Each 
Route — Routes de livraison rurale avec le nombre de boites sur 
chaque route — 

Quebec Postal District — District postal de Quebec 

Montreal Postal District — District postal de Montreal 

French 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1924 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1924 (premiere partie). . . 

Renseignements postaux, 1924 

Reglements relatifs aux bons de poste pour les maitres de poste des 

bureaux non-comptables 

Achat et installation des boites rurales 

Distribution rurale des correspondances au Canada 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1925 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1925 (Premiere partie). . . 
Supplement mensuel au guide officiel du service postal canadien, 

1924-25 

Supplement mensuel au guide officiel du service postal canadien et 

renseignements sur les mandats de poste, 1924-25 

^Public Printing and Stationery — 

English 

Report of the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission 

Estimates of Canada, 1925-26 



6,241,496 



3,000 

500 

2,000 
500 

506 



2,006 
2,000 



2,908 

726 

75,800 

256 
3,000 
3,000 
3,024 

718 

27.615 
15. 100 



9,185 
325 



63,828 



261,653,180 



2,006 


12 


24,072 


2,006 


4 


8,024 


2,000 


8 


16,000 


2,000 


8 


16,000 


2,000 


8 


16,000 


2,000 


8 


16,000 


2,000 


8 


16,000 


2,000 


4 


8,000 


2,000 


8 


16,000 


2,000 


2 


4,000 


10 


20 


200 


37,250 


96 


*1, 100,300 


65,300 


224 


*1, 219, 000 


51,868 


122 


*526,968 



1,800 

32 
372 

152 



648 

264 

16 

20 
8 

32 
650 
264 

84 

190 



654 
104 



24,000 

90.000 

64.000 
186,000 

76.912 



16,048 
16, 000 



1,884,384 

191,664 

1,212.800 

6.120 

24,000 

96,000 

1,965,600 

189,552 

*21 1,000 

♦260,850 



1,502,330 
33,800 



7473 -3 J 



Carried forward 6.668. 105 



69,690 



272,689.804 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25— Continued 



Description 



Number 
of 

Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

^Public Printing and Stationery — Continued 

English — Continued 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1925 

An Act respecting Ordnance and Admiralty Lands 

An Act respecting the Public Revenue, the raising of Loans author- 
ized by Parliament, and the auditing of the Public Accounts 

An Act respecting the incorporation of Boards of Trade 

An Act to incorporate the Montreal, Ottawa and Georgian Bay 
Canal Company 

The Canada Grain Act, 1912, with Amendments to date, January 1, 
1925 

An Act respecting the Civil Service of Canada 

The Excise Act, 1906 (Office Consolidation) 

The Companies Acts and Amending Acts, 1924 (OfiSce Consolida- 
tion) 

Report re North Atlantic Steamship Combine, December 31, 1924 

The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907 

An Act respecting the disposal of the Canteen Funds 

Judicial Proceedings respecting Constitutional Validity of the 
Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, and Amendments 
of 1910, 1918 and 1920 

Northwest Territories, 1922 — Local Conditions, MacKenzie 
District, Canada's Arctic Islands, Canada's Wild Buffalo, 
Mining Development, MacKenzie District 

An Act to provide for the Establishment of a Medical Council in 
Canada 

An Act incorporating The United Church of Canada 

List of Senators and Members of the House of Commons, 1924 

Votes and Proceedings of the House of Commons, April 30, 1924. . . 

An Act to assist Returned Soldiers in Settling upon the Land 

Report of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada, August 
31, 1923 

Eighteenth Report of the Geographic Board of Canada — Containing 
all Decisions to March 31 , 1924 

Select Standing Committees, 1924 

An Act respecting Pensions to the Permanent Staff and Officers 
and Men of the Permanent Militia and for other purposes 

An Act respecting the Extradition of Fugitive Criminals 

Report by R. H. M. Temple, on Captain Boyd Complaint, Winni- 
peg, May 28, 1924 

Report by R. H. M. Temple, on Purchasing Department at Van- 
couver, Winnipeg, May 26, 1924 

An Act respecting the Surveys of the Public Lands of the Dominion 
and the Surveyors entitled to make such surveys 

An Act to amend The Insurance Act, 1917 

An Act respecting the Superannuation and Retirement of persons 
employed in the Civil Service of Canada 

Estimates of Canada, Supplementary, 1923-24 

Preparation of Copy for the Printer (Fourth Edition) 

Royal Commission to enquire into and report upon Affairs of the 
Home Bank of Canada 

An Act for granting to His Majesty certain sums of money for the 
public service of the Financial Year ending March 31, 1925 

Alphabetical List of Employees, July 1, 1924 (Revised to Sep- 
tember 1, 1924) 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1923 (Vol. I) 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1923 (Vol. II) 

The Customs Tariff, 1907, and Amendments, &c 

The Immigration Act and Regulations 

Iron and Steel and their Products in Canada, 1921 and 1922 

Stationery Office Stock List 

An Act respecting the inspection of Meats and Canned Foods 



6,668,105 



1,800 
200 

500 
300 

300 

1,000 
500 
500 

1,500 

1,000 

200 

200 



500 



200 

200 
500 
300 
200 
300 

225 

200 
100 

400 
200 

200 

200 

200 
1,000 

200 
500 
500 

5,000 

500 

50 

25 

35 

1,500 

500 

200 

1,000 

200 



69,690 



636 
20 

52 

18 

42 

80 

36 

116 



304 



80 

16 
96 
56 
16 
48 

64 

390 

24 

20 
16 

104 

36 

32 
16 

12 
16 
40 

462 

96 

40 

1,146 

960 

232 

64 

98 

16 

26 



272,689,804 



1,144,800 
4,000 

26,000 
5,400 

12,600 

80,000 
18,000 
58,000 

132,000 

32, 000 

4,000 

1,600 



152,000 



16,000 

3,200 
48,000 
16,800 

3,200 
14,400 

14,400 

78,000 
2,400 

8,000 
3,200 

20,800 

7,200 

6,400 
16,000 

2,400 

8,000 

20,000 

*231,000 

♦110,400 

2,000 
28,650 
33,600 
348,000 
32,000 
19,600 
16,000 
5,200 



Carried forward 8, 691, 240 



75,348 



275,475,054 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



37 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward . 



6.691,240 



^Public Printing and Stationery — Continued 

Engush — Concluded 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of 
Canada, 1923 — Loan and Trust Companies 

An Act to amend the Penitentiaries Act, &c 

Report of the Special Committee on the Civil Service 

Alphabetical Index to the Sessional Papers of the Parliament of 
Canada, 1924 

Price List of Government Publications, July, 1924 

National Conference regarding Winter Employment in Canada — 
Held at Ottawa, Sept. 3^, 1924 (Bulletin No. 8— Industrial 
Relations Series) 

Coal Statistics for Canada, 1923 ' 

Special War Revenue Act, 1915, and Amendments and Regulations 
to date (Office Consolidation) 

An Act respecting Quartz Mining in the Yukon Territory 

An Act to authorize the levying of a War Tax upon certain incomes 

An Act to provide to or in respect of Members of the Canadian 
Naval Military and Air Forces 

Proceedings of the Select Special Committee of the House of Com- 
mons to inquire into Agricultural Conditions (Part I-II) 

Various Acts reprinted for stock 

Printing of various Committee sittings 

Commons Debates of various dates 

Monthly Supplement to Canadian Official Postal Guide, 1924-25. . 



Bilingual 

Convention of Commerce between Canada and the Netherlands- 
Convention de commerce entre le Canada et les Pays-Bas. . . 

Canal Statistics, 1923— Statistique des canaux, 1923 

List of Shipping, 1923— Liste des navires, 1923 

Statistics of Electric Railways of Canada, 1923 — Statistique des 

tramways electriques du Canada, 1923 

Sixth Census of Canada (Vol. I. Population) — Sixi^me recensement 

du Canada, 1921 (Vol. I. Population) 

Annual Report of Criminal Statistics, September 30, 1923— Rapport 

annuel sur la statistique de la criminalite, 30 septembre 1923.. . 
Statistics of Steam Railways of Canada, 1923 — Statistique des 

chemins de fer du Canada, 1923 

Auditor General's Report— Rapport de I'Auditeurgfen^ral, 1923-24 — 

Part A — Agriculture Department 

Part D — (Customs and Excise Department 

Part E — External Affairs Department 

Part H— Immigration and Colonization Department 

Part I — Indian Affairs Department 

Part K — Interior Department 

Part M — Labour Department 

Part O — Marine and Fisheries Department 

Part P— Mines Department 

Part Q — National Defence Department 

Part S— Post Office Department 

Part T — Public Printing and Stationery Department 

Part V— Public Works Department 

Part W — Railways and Canals Department 

Part X — Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Part GG— Health Department 

Part YY— Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment Department 

Part ZZ — Trade and Commerce Department 



100 
106 
106 

100 

250 

50 

100 

35 
75 
20 
25 
310 
40 
10 
60 
20 
50 
75 
25 
50 
35 
10 
60 
25 
20 



75.348 



275,475,054 



150 


170 


25,500 


15,000 


8 


120,000 


250 


44 


11,000 


25 


42 


1,050 


1,006 


52 


52,312 


5,500 


138 


759,000 


100 


104 


10.400 


1,000 


48 


48.000 


1.000 


40 


40,000 


1,000 


52 


52,000 


1,000 


52 


52,000 


300 


2.410 


723,000 


117,480 


*2,128 


*1, 910, 216 


3,425 


2,714 


♦264,250 


1,250 


392 


*104,000 


21,300 


108 


*154,800 



56 
240 

56 

958 

392 

176 

88 

1,56 

8 

102 

2.58 

156 

10 

140 

18 

144 

182 

28 

240 

114 

28 

32 

94 

56 



800 

5,936 

25,440 

5,600 

239,500 

19,600 

17,600 

3,080 

11,700 

160 

2,550 

79,980 

6,240 

100 

8,400 

360 

7,200 

13.650 

700 

12,000 

3,990 

280 

1.920 

2,350 

1,120 



Carried forward 6,862, 783 



87,590 



280,272,838 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 



Brought forward 

^Public Printing and Stationery — Concluded 

French 

Budget du Canada, 19^-26 

Guide ofiiciel du service postal canadien, 1924 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1925 

Loi concemant la forme de 1' interpretation des lois 

Budget du Canada, suppl6mentaire, 1923-24 

Deliberations du comit6 special de la Chambre des Communes 

charge de s'enquferir des conditions de I'agriculture (Partie I-II) 

Supplement mensuel au guide officiel du service postal, 1924-25. . . . 

Public Works — • • 

English 

Dominion Government Telegraph and Telephone Service, Merritt, 
B.C. (Exchange), April 1, 1924 



6,862,783 



Bilingual 

Conditions of Competition for National Commemoration War 
Monument, Ottawa, Canada — Conditions de concours pour un 
monument national de la guerre, Ottawa, Canada 



Railways and Canals — 



English 



Rules and Regulations for the Guidance and Observance of those 

Using and Operating the Canals of the Dominion of Canada. 
Motor Vehicle — Registrations, Licenses, Revenues, Fees, &c., 1923 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Highways, 1923-24 

First Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on the St. 

Lawrence Waterway 

Second Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on the St. 

Lawrence Waterway 

Third Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on the St. 

Lawrence Waterway 

Fourth Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on the St. 

Lawrence Waterwaj' 

Fifth Report of the Interdepartmiental Committee on the St. 

Lawrence Waterway 

Sixth Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on the St. 

Lawrence Waterway 

French 

Progres r6alis6s dans les travaux routiers sous la loi des grandes 
routes du Canada, 1923 (bulletin n° 4) 

Vehicule k moteur — Enregistrements, licences, revenus, tarifs, etc., 
et le comptage des touristes venues au Canada pendant I'annee 
1923 (circulaire n° 5) 

Railway Commission — 

English 

Index to Vol. XIII— Judgments, Orders, &c 

Judgments, Orders, &c 



Research Council — 



English 



Nitrogen Fixation (Bulletin No. 11). 
Carried forward 



350 



1,000 



506 
306 

606 
19,670 

1,0C6 
,895,871 



87,590 



280,272,838 



10 


104 


150 


648 


150 


650 


100 


48 


110 


16 


100 


2,390 


.400 


96 



16 



3,0G6 
2,006 
2,006 


36 
20 

44 


106 


28 


100 


48 


100 


8 


100 


52 


100 


64 


100 


12 



16 

428 



32 



92,422 



281,374,878 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



3d 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Secretary of State — 

English 

OflSce Consolidation of the Treaty of Peace (Germany), Order 1920, 

and Amendments 

The Companies Act and Amending Acts, 1924 (Office Consolidation) 

Senate of Canada — 



English 



Royal Commission to Enquire into and Report upon Affairs of the 
Home Bank of Canada 

An Act to provide for the Superannuation of Civil Servants 

Report by R. H. M. Temple, on Captain Boyd Complaint, Winni 
peg, May 28, 1924 

Senators of Canada, according to Seniority, February, 1925 

Report by R. H. M. Temple, on Purchasing Department at Van- 
couver, Winnipeg, May 26, 1924 

Report of the Special Committee on the Civil Service 

Parliamentary Memoir of Lieut. -Colonel George Harold Baker, 
M.P. (Fifth Canadian Mounted Rifles) 

Railway Transportation to Senators of Canada, 1925 

Senators of Canada, according to Seniority, February, 1925 



Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment — 

English 

Report of the Board of Pension Commissioners for Canada, 1923-24 
Soldier Settlement Board — 

English 

Third Report of the Soldier Settlement Board of Canada, Decem- 
ber 31, 1924— Land Settlement 



French 

Troisieme rapport de la commission de I'^tablissement des soldats 
sur les terres au Canada, 31 dfecembre 1924 

Supreme Court — 

English 

Canada Law Report — The Supreme and Exchequer Courts of 
Canada — 

Part IV— April 30, 1924 

Part V— May 31, 1924 

Part VI— June 30, 1924 

Part VII— September 30, 1924 

Part VIII— October 31, 1924 

Part IX— November 29. 1924 

Part X— December 31, 1924 

Part I— January 1, 1925 

Part II— February 28, 1925 

Trcule and Commerce — 

English 

The Climate and Meteorology of Canada 

Forestry in Canada 

The Fisheries of Canada 

The Manufacturing Industries of Canada 

Carried forward 



6,895,871 



506 
1,750 



3,400 
1,000 

600 
300 

600 
1,500 

1,006 
125 
600 



800 



500 



200 



6,256 
6, 256 
6,256 
6, 300 
6,256 
6,256 
6,282 
6,256 
6,266 



100 
800 
800 
800 



6,967,642 



92, 422 



24 



894 
20 

104 
16 

36 
44 

24 
12 
20 



20 



20 



20 



48 
108 

96 
140 
122 

88 
188 
114 

66 



94,858 



281,374,878 



12,144 
154,000 



•■178,800 
20,000 

62,400 
4,800 

21,600 
66,000 

24,144 
1,500 
1,200 



16,000 



10,000 



4.000 



300, 288 
675,648 
600, 576 
882, 000 
763,232 
550,528 
1,181,016 
713,184 
413,556 



2,400 
25,600 
16,000 
38,400 



288,113,894 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 



Brought forward 

Trade and Commerce — Continued 

English — Concluded 

Report of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada, August 

31 1923 
Fruit Statistics of Canada, 1920-23. .....'. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . 

Buy in Canada 

Gasoline Measuring Devices 

List of Licensed Elevators and Warehouses in the Western Grain 

Inspection Division, 1923-24 

Chemical and Allied Products in Canada, 1922 

Report on the Grain Trade of Canada, 1923 

Condensed Preliminary Report on the Trade of Canada, 1924 

Preliminary Report of the Mineral Production of Canada, 1923 

(Reprint) 

Catalogue of Motion Pictures (Revised to July 1, 1924) 

Prices and Price Indexes, 1913-1923. 

Interim Report of the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission, Van- 
couver, B.C., June 19, 1924 

Canada Year Book, 1922-23 

Annual Report of the Mineral Production of Canada, 1922 

Coal Statistics for Canada, 1923 

Report on the Fur Farms of Canada, 1923 

Index to the Commercial Intelligence Journal — Six months ending 

June 28, 1924 (Commercial Intelligence Journal, Nos. 1040 to 

1065) 

Preliminary Report of the Mineral Production of Canada — Six 

months ending June 30, 1924 

Handbook for the Use of Crop Correspondents with Selection of 

Annual Agricultural Statistics, 1908-1923 

Registration of Patents and Trade Marks in Brazil 

Cost of Grain Production in Canada, 1923 

Report on the Consumption of Mine and Mill Materials by the 

Canadian Mining Industry, 1923 

Report on the Sixth Census of Canada, 1921 (Reprint, Introduction 

to Vol. I) 

Iron and Steel and their Products in Canada, 1921 and 1922 

Manufactures of the Non-Ferrous Metals in Canada, 1923 

Index to the Commercial Intelligence Journal — Six months ending 

December 27, 1924 (Commercial Intelligence Journal Nos. 1066 

to 1091) 

The Canada Grain Act, 1912 with Amendments to date, January 1, 

1925 (Office Consolidation) 

Report of the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission 

Preliminary Report of the Mineral Production of Canada, 1924 

Forestry in Canada (Reprinted from the Canada Year Book, 1924) 
List of Publications, including Reports, Bulletins, Press Releases, 

&c 



List of Licensed Elevators and Warehouses in the Western Grain 

Inspection Division, 1924-25 

Annual Survey of Education in Canada, 1923 

Monthly Report of Coal Statistics for Canada 

Commercial Intelligence Journal 

Supplement to the Commercial Intelligence Journal 

Monthly Bulletin of Agricultural Statistics, 1924-25 

Monthly Trade Report, 1924-25 



Bilingual 

Canal Statistics, 1923 — Statistique des canaux, 1923 

Census of Industry, 1922, Central Electric Stations in Canada — 
Recensement industriel, 1922, usines electriques du Canada.. . . 

Census of Industry, 1921 and 1922, The Lumber Industry — Recense- 
ment industriel, 1921 et 1922, I'industrie du bois 



6,967,642 



500 

1,006 

100,000 

500 

1,006 
1,006 
1,656 
1,006 

5,000 
1,506 
1,0C6 

200 
7,492 
2,706 
1,356 
2,006 



2,656 

2,506 

5,000 
306 
500 

500 

1,206 
1,706 
1,000 

2,500 

250 

50 

3,012 

606 

1,000 

1,000 
1,700 
12,066 
140,390 
11,718 
75,530 
14,116 



600 
1,806 
1,506 



94,858 



160 
48 
192 

48 

40 
32 

128 

32 

1,078 

228 

104 

56 



16 
32 

24 

8 
22 

12 

44 
98 
36 

16 

80 

218 

48 

36 



160 
174 
192 

1,300 

72 

360 

4,976 



56 
32 
104 



288,113,894 



32,000 

20, 120 

*800, 000 

4,000 

160,960 
48,288 

317,952 
77,088 

200,000 
48,192 
128,768 

6,400 

.333,576 

616,968 

141,024 

112,336 



42,496 

80, 192 

120,000 

2,448 

11,000 

6,000 

53,064 

167,188 

36,000 

40,000 

20, 000 

10,900 

144,576 

21,816 

8,000 

160, 000 

295,800 

*193,056 

*3, 404, 752 

*104,592 

*2, 268, 328 

*6, 398, 656 



33,600 

57,792 

156,624 



Carried forward 7, 379, 424 



105,236 



312,998,446 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19^-^5 



41 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Trade and Commerce — Concluded 

Bilingual — Concluded 

Live Stock and Animal Products Statistics. 1923 — Statistique du 

b6tail et des produits animaux, 1923 

Statistics of Electric Railways of Canada, 1923 — Statistique des 

tramways ^lectriques du Canada, 1923 

Statistics of Steam Railways of Canada, 1923 — Statistique des 

chemins de fer du Canada, 1923 

Fisheries Statistics of Canada, 1923 — Statistique des pecheries, 1923 
Statistics of Dairy Factories, 1923 — Statistique de I'industrie 

laitiere, 1923 

Sixth Census of Canada, 1921 (Volume I) — Sixieme recensement du 

du Canada, 1921 (Volume I) 

Financial Statistics of Provincial Governments in Canada, 1922 — 

Statistique financiere des gouvemements provinciaux du 

Canada, 1922 

Census of Industry, 1923, Pulp and Paper — Recensement industriel, 

1923, pulpe et papier 

Vital Statistics, 1922, Second Annual Report — Statistiques vitales, 

1922, second rapport annuel 

Annual Report of Criminal Statistics, September 30, 1923 — Rapport 

annuel sur la statistique de la criminality, 30 septembre 1923. 
Statement of Civil Service Personnel and Salaries in the month of 

January, 1912-1924 — Etat des fonctionnaires et employes de 

radministration federale et de leurs appointements au mois de 

Janvier 1912-1924 

Census of Industry, 1923, Central Electric Stations in Canada — 

Recensement industriel, 1923, usines felectriques centrales du 

Canada 

Sixth Census of Canada — Sixieme recensement du Canada — 

Bulletin No. 16 

Bulletin No. 17 

Bulletin No. 18 

Bulletin No. 19 

French 

Mesurage de la gazoline 

Table des matieres du Bulletin des renseignements commerciaux — 
Couvrant les six mois terminus avec juin 1924 (Numeros 1040 k 
1065) 

Annuaire du Canada, 1922-23 

Bulletin de renseignements commerciaux , 

La Gazette agricole du Canada 

Bulletin mensuel de la statistique agricole, 1924 j. , 

Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1924) 



7,379,424 



1,906 

406 

856 
2,031 

2,500 

10,000 

1,500 

1,000 

1,500 

800 

1,500 

2,000 

3,500 
3,506 
3,506 
3,506 

100 



706 

1,800 

38,378 

550 
12,060 



105,236 



104 

56 

176 
200 

84 

958 

84 

82 

490 

392 

36 

32 

112 
64 
96 

112 



12 

1,088 

816 

112 

396 



312,998,446 



198,224 

22,736 

150, 656 
406,200 

210,000 

9,580,000 

126,000 

82,000 

735,000 

313,600 

54,000 

64,000 

392,000 
224,384 
336,576 
392,672 

800 



8,472 

1,958,400 

*614,048 

61,600 

♦407,992 



7,473,035 
8,570,498 



110,746 
100,917 



329,337,806 
314,224,259 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25 — Continued 

NOT EXECUTED IN PRINTING BUREAU 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Agriculture — 



English 



Studies on a New Species of Empusa Parasites on the Green Apple 
Bug in Nova Scotia (Reprint) 

The Entomological Record for 1923 (Reprint) 

Farm Weeds 

Dusts and Dusting in Crop Pest Control (Reprint) 

Selection of Lamb Cuts — Directions for Cooking (Pamphlet No. 9 — 
New Series) 



French 

L'Slevage du renard au Canada (bulletin n° 12^nouvelle s^rie). . 

Pommes cultiv6es au Canada — Chaque bouchfe est un regal 

Elevage des pores 

Insectes nuisibles au betail (bulletin n° 29 — nouvelle s^rie) 

La vente cooperative des produits de la basse-cour (bulletin n° 25 — 

nouvelle serie) 

Les fermes experimentales — Ce qu'elles sont, ce qu'elles ont fait, 

ce qu'elles font 



•Customs and Excise- 



English 



Customs and Excise— Financial Report, 1922-23 — Showing a List 
of the Officers on the Inside and Outside Services throughout 
the Dominion, &«; 



Experimental Farms- 



French 



Station exp^rimentale, Kentville, N.-E. — Rapport du r6gisseur, 1923 

Rapport preliminaire de I'horticulteur du Dominion, 1922 

Station experimentale de Ste-Anne de la Pocatiere, Qu6. — Rapport 

du rSgisseur, 1922 

Fermes experimentales f^derales— Rapport du directeur, 1922-23. . . 
Les fermes experimentales — Ce qu'elles sont, ce qu'elles ont fait, 

ce qu'elles font 



French 



Health— 

Pour lire en attendant b6b6 

House of Commons — 

French 

Proes-verbal des deliberations du comite permanent des banques 
et du commerce de la Chambre des Communes, etc. (revise). 

Conference imperiale, 1923 

Conference economique imperiale, 1923 — Proces-verbaux et docu- 
ments 

Rapport sur le credit agricole, Ottawa, 4 avril 1924 



Immigration and Colonization — 

English 

Canada — The New Home Land 

Interior — 

English 

Attracting Birds with Food and Water 

Regulations governing the Granting of Yearly Licenses and Permits 
to Cut Timber on Dominion Lands, &c 



500 


28 


250 


16 


9,037 


344 


400 


16 



10,000 



5,006 

10,006 

5,006 

2,000 

1,506 

5,000 



106 



1,506 
7,006 

4,006 
5,006 

2,500 



10,000 



250 
250 



250 
250 



239, 500 

20,000 
10,006 



Carried forward. 



349,. 347 



44 
32 
68 
34 

20 

338 



306 



48 



338 



72 



1,098 
132 

500 



32 



3,838 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25^ 



43 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 
Year 1924-25— Conc/wrfed 



Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 




349,347 


3 838 


17,329,848 


Interior — Concluded 

French 






Conseils aux chasseurs 


2,006 


20 


40, 120 


Labour — 

English 




Vocational Education 


1,200 


24 


28,800 


French 




L 'organisation ouvriere au Canada — Treizieme rapport annuel, 1923 


856 


310 


265,360 


Marine and Fisheries — 

French 








Rapport ayant trait k la raise en conserve du homard, 1923.. 

Reglements concemant la radiot616graphie dans la Puissance du 

Canada 


306 
2,006 


16 
20 


4,896 
40, 120 


^Public Printing and Stationery — 




French 








Proces-verbal des deliberations du comity permanent des banques 
et du commerce de la Chambre des Communes, etc. (revis6). . 

Conference feconomique impdriale, 1923 — Proces-verbaux et docu- 
ments 


250 

156 
150 


1,098 

500 
96 


274,600 
78,000 


Rapport sur le cr6dit agricole, Ottawa, 4 avril 1924 


14,400 






Totals 


356,277 
837,029 


5,922 
3,449 


18,076,044 


Totals (March 31, 1924) 


65,811,790 







tFor sale purposes 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 9 — Statement of other Letterpress Departmental Work 
for the Fiscal Year 19^-25 



Department 


Executed 

in 

Printing Bureau 


Not executed 

in 

Printing Bureau 


Envelopes 


Copies 
other 
work 


Envelopes 


Copies 
other 
work 


Agriculture 


2,859,200 

16,000 

66,875 

88,500 

404,450 

2,229,014 


6, 638, 027 

31,575 

282,296 

275,250 

927,823 

26,826,455 

30 

1,058,149 

396,381 

53,910,226 

15,000 

14,226 

459,600 

319,340 

4,686,825 

627,807 

735, 155 

4,258,890 

154,870 

1,714,345 

32,008 

2,573,988 

377,979 

4,375,241 

50,375 

537,962 

16,060 

73.458,579 

657 

3,643,080 

5,573,221 

976,805 

120,215 

18,300 

544,360 

65 

417,840 

71,341 

854,700 

1,221,772 

35,166 

3,776,642 




7,793,215 


Archives 






Auditor General 






Chief Electoral Officer 






Civil Service Commission 






Customs and Excise 




3,000 


Exchequer Court 






Experimental Farms '. 


290,400 

36,075 

1,464,266 

10,000 

15,000 

66,700 

419,075 

536,875 

115,000 

20,000 

872,945 

73,500 

199,500 

5,000 

484,430 

136,786 

1,152,021 

1,500 

201,050 


39,400 


360, 000 


External Affairs 




Finance 






Government Contracts Supervision Com- 
mittee 






Governor General's Secretary 






Health 






House of Commons 






Immigration and Colonization 


10,000 


115 


Indian Affairs 




Insurance 






Interior 




69,823 


Justice 


10,000 




Labour 


554,225 


Library of Parliament 






Marine and Fisheries 


25,000 


2,250 


Mines 


12,512 


National Defence 




64,052 








Patent and Copyright Office 












Post Office 


5,647,233 

1,400 

1,090,650 

887,435 

95,700 

52,413 

11,000 

120,000 


148,035 


40,761,410 


Privy Council 




Public Printing and Stationery 






Public Works 




240 


RailM'ays and Canals 




15,600 


Railway Commission 






Research Council 






Royal Canadian Mounted Police 






Royal Mint 






Secretary of State 


108,575 

19,300 

501,000 






Senate 




7,520 


Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment 




17,100 


Soldier Settlement Board 




30,000 


Supreme Court 


5,000 
616,975 






Trade and Commerce 




906,500 








Totals 


20,920,843 
21,722,563 


202,008,626 
167,810,971 


232,435 
137,850 


50,597,562 


Totals (March 31, 1924) 


27,423,117 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 45 

Table No. 10 — Statement of Books Bound during the Fiscal Year 1924-25 



Department 


Executed in 
Printing Bureau 


Not Executed 
in Printing Bureau 


Full 
Leather 


Half 
Leather 


Quarter 
Leather 


Cloth 


Half 
Leather 


Quarter 
Leather 


Cloth 


Agriculture 


4 


72 
1 

8 

4 

6 

1,524 

17 

142 

29 

48 

1 

1 

100 

74 

82 

105 

147 

103 

113 

628 

164 

70 

28 


250 

1 

40 


9,762 

3 

93 






14 037 


Archives 








Auditor General 










Chief Electoral Officer 










Civil Service Commission 




1 
3,321 


4 

14,898 

1 

346 

878 

249 

7 

3,178 

5,538 

2,128 

2,470 

8,077 

10,089 

122 

277 

35 

18,411 

1,949 

9,121 

996 

240 

394 








Customs and Excise 


27 
12 
62 








Exchequer Court 








Experimental Farms 


26 
13 

77 








External Affairs 








Finance 










Governor General's Secretary 


1 








Health 


50 
30 
42 

151 
10 

170 

9 

10 

177 
73 
15 
27 






129 


House of Commons 


1 
6 
1 

12 

201 

2 

24 

8 

104 

52 
3 








I m m igration and Colonization 








Indian Affairs 








Insurance 








Interior 




2 




Justice 






Labour 








Library of Parliament 








Marine and Fisheries 










14 






National Defence 






Naval Service 








Northwest Territories 


1 
48 












Patent and Copyright Office. 


123 

37 

1,011 

2 

124 

141 

26 

7 


1 

13 
830 








Penitentiaries 








Post Office 


2 
6 

5 

1 

10 


50,160 
3 

33,935 

4,517 

1,968 

26 

109 

1,352 
12 


2 






Privy Council 






Public Printing and Sta- 
tionery 


225 

101 

58 

2 








Public Works 








Railways and Canals 








Railway Commission 








Research Council 










Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police 




92 

2 

81 

11 

9 










Roval Mint 












Secretary of State 


11 
5 


15 
21 

4 








Senate 


876 

3,189 
1,690 








Soldiers' Civil Re-Establish- 








Soldier Settlement Board. . . . 










Supreme Court 




4 
41 










Trade and Commerce 


10 


30 


16,441 
















Totals 


619 
697 


5,178 
5,463 


5,793 
4,840 


203, 544 
184,763 


16 

16 


2 


14,166 


Totals (March 31, 1924).. 


11,230 









46 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. U — Number of Pads made during the Fiscal Year 1924-25 



Department 



Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 


Not Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 


Quantity 


Quantity 


13,229 

1,120 

1,321 

17,590 

1,604 

815 

3,202 

4,030 

5,590 

10,924 

633 

8,800 

97 

1,217 

200 

3,983 

626 

22,356 

105 

350 

61,760 

120 

82,343 

36,625 

6,951 

1,217 

1,100 

150 

1,362 

1,950 

516 

210 

17,218 


4,343 




26,571 




5,677 






500 








5,560 

500 

19,572 




4,301,460 


51,186 
3,262 




















309,314 
377,011 


4,418,631 
1,408,282 



Agriculture 

Auditor General 

Civil Service Commission 

Customs and Excise 

Experimental Farms 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian AfJairs 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

National Defence 

National Gallery 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Senate 

Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 

Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1924) 



Table No. 12 — Statement of Prepaid Post Office Envelopes made and stamped 

during the Fiscal Year 1924-25 



Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 



Quantity 
made and 
stamped 



Not Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 



Quantity 
made and 
stamped 



One-cent envelopes 

Two-cent envelopes 

Three-cent envelopes 

Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1924) 



2,528,646 
1,507,000 
3,115,596 



7,151,242 
5,931,300 



1,993,233 

524,000 

1,084,721 



3,601,954 
983,750 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-26 



4W 



Table No. 13 — Statement of the Die Stamping of Letter and Note Headings 
and Envelopes during the Fiscal Year 192^-25 



Department 



Executed in Printing Bureau 



Foolscap, 

Half Cap, 

Letter 

and 

Half Letter 



Note 

and 

Half Note 



Envelopes 



Number 

of 

Impressions 



Not Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 



Note 

and 

Half Note 



Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Civil Service Commission 

Customs and Excise 

Exchequer Court 

Experimental Farms 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

National Defence 

National Gallery 

Patent and Cop>Tight Office 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police. . 

Royal Mint 

Secretary of State 

Senate 

Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment. 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 



Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1924). 



25,000 
3,000 
4,000 
3,500 

20,000 
1,000 



24,000 
15,000 
21,500 

5,000 
35,000 
29,000 

7,000 
40,000 
21,000 

5,000 

9,000 
10,000 
20.000 

5,000 

5,000 
49,000 
2o,500 

4,250 
31,250 
14,000 

1,000 



5,000 
27,000 
45,550 
18,900 
1,500 
7,500 
17,000 



556,450 
669,574 



1,500 



750 



350 

500 

1,000 

26,127 

1,000 

31,649 



3,000 
406 
125 



2,000 



10, 000 
1,650 



300 

256 

1,060 

6,000 



1,392 

30, 123 

2,000 



400 



1,000 
5,000 
2,350 
4,000 
507, 190 
1,000 
350 
5,500 



27,500 



392,724 
26,000 



10,500 
10,000 
9,000 



750 



5,000 

1,329,000 

12,500 

5,000 

216,6.50 

5,000 

6,000 

6,000 



300 

43,550 

3,500 



1,000 
1,000 



26 
9 
6 
7 
527 
2 

30 
16 
75 

6 

459 

55 

7 
40 
34 
15 
18 
10 
22 

5 
10 
1,388 
40 
.9, 
248. 
19, 

8, 
12, 

5. 

28, 

119, 

24, 

1, 

8, 
18, 



,000 
500 
350 
500 
940 
000 
700 
000 
000 
127 
000 
373 
000 
000 
000 
500 
406 
125 
000 
750 
000 
000 
000 
650 
250 
200 
256 
060 
000 
000 
692 
223 
400 
500 
500 
400 



121,588 
287,985 



2,6.37,364 
1,363,967 



3,315,402 
2,321,526 



5,350 



5,350 
340 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 14 — Statement of the Loose-Leaf Work performed during the Fiscal 

Year 1924-25 





Executed in Printing Bureau 


Not Executed in Printing Bureau 


Department 


Binders 


Loose 
Leaves 


Index 
Leaves 


Index 
Cards 


Binders 


Loose 
Leaves 


Index 
Leaves 


Index 
Cards 


Agriculture 


82 
2 

20 

59 

16 
365 

20 
4 
1,157 
2 
5 
8 

13 
6 

13 
214 

11 

5 

106 

18 

133 

2 

5 

11 

52 


229,837 

2,000 

18,450 


1,178 


700 




500 














842 
26 


























6,100 

504,457 

38,800 

58,680 

113,550 

'■'io^sso' 

1,300 
169,235 

31,900 

131 

418,151 

27,500 
239,400 

94,850 

17,750 
802,630 














3,596 
79 
95 
338 
64 
70 


3,000 


1 


2,110 












External Affairs. ... 
























Governor General's Secretary. . . 












Health 












House of Commons 














145 

145 

348 

2,468 

639 

109 

1,537 

56 

12, 547 


200 








50,000 


Indian Affairs 
























78 

400 

6,000 










Justice . . 










Labour ... 




















Mines . . 












National Defence 
























Patent and Copyright Office 


3,000 

7,525 

284,875 


1,124 
145 

845 
























Post Office 


1,250 

15,000 

536,000 

500 

25 


300 


25,300 






Privy Council 






Public Printing and Stationery . . 
Public Works 


86 
852 
101 

25 


929,361 

173,325 

196,630 

500 


2,541 
648 
293 
48 
162 
113 
156 


2 
























Railway Commission^ 










Research Council 












Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 


444 
12 
72 
27 

396 


309,700 
10,000 

172,350 
63,000 

678,864 






















SoLdiers' Civil Re-Establishment 












Soldier Settlement Board 


348 
1,530 




































Totals 


4,344 
5,324 


5,614,761 
5.271,735 


32,235 
34,771 


563,153 
291,827 


303 
4 


27,910 
4,150 


ie' 


50,000 


Totals (March 31, 1924) . 





ANNUAL REPORT, 19P.4-26 



49 



Table No. 15 — Statement giving the Number of Maps, Plans, Cheques and 
Forms Lithographed during the Fiscal Year 1924-25 



Department 



Not Executed 

in 
Printing Bureau 



Maps 
and 

Plans 



Cheques 

and 
Forms 



Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Customs and Excise 

Experimental Farms 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Intepor 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

National Defence 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Penitentiaries 

Post Office 

Public Printing and Stationery.... 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police. . 

Secretary of State 

Senate 

Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment. 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Trade and Commerce 



10,000 
10,000 



5,000 



332,876 
37,500 



333,561 
6,917 



378,283 

112,941 

7,042 



1,115 



10,000 
7,266 



Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1924). 



1,252,435 
960,577 



1,811,222 

11,750 

103,000 

198,376 

1,018 

26,816 

885,764 

6,000 

578,575 

906,021 

37,575 

150 

582,376 

20,500 

10,000 

700 

94,008 

102,366 

376,479 

38,596 

400.000 

4,740,800 

139, 189 

163,300 

53,500 

107,271 

3,500 

6,000 

1,159,925 

187,624 

971,847 



13,723,248 
6,752,640 



7473-4 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 16 — Statement of the Number of Half-tones, Line Cuts, Electros 
and Dies made during the Fiscal Year 1924-25 



Department 


Not Executed in 


Printing Bureau 


Half-tones 


Line Cuts 


Electros 


Dies 


Agriculture 


129 
34 


52 
2 
4 


442 


4 


Archives 




Auditor General 


4 
8 

70 

44 

22 

2 




Civil Service Commission 




4 


Customs and Excise 


1 

192 






Experimental Farms 


4i8 




External Affairs 


3 


Finance 




1 


Governor General's Secretary 






1 


Health 


68 

1 
115 


38 

22 

6 

1 


16 


1 


House of Commons 


9 


Immigration and Colonization 


204 




Indian Affairs 




Insurance 




2 
47 
6 
8 
2 
6 




Interior 


368 
30 


214 
10 
69 


5 


Justice 




Labour 




Library of Parliament 






Marine and Fisheries 


6 

278 

4 

1 


236 

263 

14 




Mines 


1 


National Defence 


2 








Patent and Copyright. 


7,428 
15 






Post Office 


1 

26 

5 

5 


179 
853 




Public Printing and Stationery 




Public Works 


1 
5 


1 


Railways and Canals 




2 


Railway Commission 




1 


Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 


3 


1 






Secretary of State 




1 




2 








Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment 


3 
360 


1 
13 




Trade and Commerce 




' 








Totals 


1,269 
1,181 


9,163 
10, 608 


1,931 
1,238 


34 


Totals (March 31 , 1924) 


76 







Table No. 17 — Comparative Statement of the Number of Letterpress 
Impressions for the last Eight Fiscal Years 



Years 


Impressions 

executed in 

Printing 

Bureau 


1917-18 


112,502,835 


1918-19 


100,522,456 


1919-20 


111,937,537 


1920-21 


94,563,860 


1921-22 


94,482,190 


1922-23 


98,789,239 


1923-24 


109,417,386 


1924-25 


96,879,527 







ACCOUNTANT'S BRANCH 

Ottawa, August 1, 1925. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report of the transactions 
of this branch of the department for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1926. 
Complete details of the financial operations of the department will be found 
under the following heads : — 

1. General Financial Statement. 

2. Letter of Credit Account. 

3. King's Printer's Advance Account. 

4. Printing Branch Account and comparative statements. 

5. Stationery Branch Account and comparative statements. 

6. Appropriations, detail of expenditure. 

7. Canada Gazette, comparative statement of Revenue and Expenditure. 

8. Casual Revenue Account. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. G. BRONSKILL, 

Chief Accountant. 



7473—41 



51 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



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ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-26 



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56 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

2. LETTER OF CREDIT ACCOUNT 

Amount received by letters of credit for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1925 $ 2,938,257 50 

Amount received by bills of exchange 15, 496 88 

Amount received by cheques on New York 41 , 654 92 

Amount received by cheques on Shanghai, China 5 40 

Amount received by cheques on Paris, France 38 60 

Amount received by cheques on Barcelona, Spain 3 03 

Amount received by cheques on Holland 1 72 

Amount received by cheques on Bruxelles, Belgium 2 29 

Amount received by cheques on Berlin, Germany 94 80 

Amount received by cheques on India 29 47 

Total S 2,995,584 61 

Detail, by accounts of net expenditure drawn on above credit account — 

Printing Branch Account $ 1,938,979 42 

Stationery Branch Account 840,299 36 

Printing, binding and distributing the annual statutes 8, 102 75 

Plant— New 37,467 80 

Plant— Renewals 29 , 599 20 

Canada Gazette 27,964 48 

Miscellaneous printing 19, 997 35 

Distribution of parliamentary documents 39, 997 73 

Gratuities 522 00 

Provisional bonus allowance 29, 565 09 

Public Service Retirement Act, 11-12 Geo. V, Chap. 49 20. 333 98 

$ 2,992,829 16 

Refunds deposited to respective accounts — 

Printing Branch Account $ 2, 539 91 

Stationery Branch Account 187 90 

Plant Renewals 19 76 

Provisional Bonus Allowance 7 88 



2,755 45 



Total $ 2,995,584 61 



3. KING'S PRINTER'S ADVANCE ACCOUNT 

Debit balance brought forward from fiscal year 1923-24 — Stationery Branch account $ 83,499 12 

Advances to King's Printer during fiscal year 1924-25 — 

For Printing Branch '. $ 1,941,519 33 

For Stationery Branch 840,487 26 

2,782,006 59 

Am^ount received for printing, etc., in excess of expenditure on same 88, 485 63 

$ 2,953,991 34 



Deposits to credit of Receiver General made by the King's Printer to cover advances 
during the fiscal year 1924-25 — 

Amount received form departments and Parliament for printing, etc $ 2,027,234 61 

Amount from sale of empty spools 61 50 

Amount from sale of electros 14 35 

Amount from sale of cloth 78 

Amount from sale of gold and silver savings 153 81 

$ 2,027,465 05 

Amount of refunds — Printing Branch 2, 539 91 

$ 2,030,004 96 

Amount received from departments and Parliament for stationery, etc $ 845, 749 04 

Amount from discarded typewriters. . . . ; 1,092 50 

$ 846,841 54 
Amount of refunds — Stationery Branch 187 90 

$ 847,029 44 
Debit balance as on March 31, 1925, carried forward to fiscal year 1925-26 — 

Stationery Branch Account 71 , 265 87 

918,295 31 



$ 2,948,300 27 
.\mount by which the stock of Stationery Branch was increased during the fiscal year 

1924-25 5,691 07 



$ 2,953,991 34 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 57 

4. PRINTING BRANCH ACCOUNT 

Inventory on April 1, 1924 $ 355,553 43 

Expenditure for the fiscal year 1924-25— 

Wages I 935,862 18 

Printing material $ 65,084 63 

Customs duties (rechargeable) 342 72 

65,427 35 

Paper stock 542, 193 94 

Outside work 364, 175 72 

Office printing 13,496 29 

Office stationery 2, 752 91 

Freight 1,059 56 

Brokerage 18 50 

Medical and hospital 779 25 

18,106 51 

Char service and cleaning material 13, 213 72 

1,938,979 42 

Excess of revenue over expenditure during the fiscal year 1924-25 transferred to credit of 

Casual Revenue Account 88, 485 63 



$ 2,383,018 48 



Revenue for the fiscal year 1924-25 — 

Sale of inside work, printing, etc., to departments and Parliament $ 1,638,817 15 

Sale of outside work to departments and Parliament 388, 417 46 

$ 2,027,234 61 

Sale of empty spools I 61 50 

Sale of electros 14 35 

Sale of cloth 78 

Sale of gold and silver savings 153 81 

230 44 

$ 2,027,465 05 

Debit balance for the fiscal year 1924-25 40,839 56 

Inventory on March 31, 1925 314, 713 87 



i 2,383,018 48 



Detail of Inventory of Printino Branch as on March 31, 1925 

Work in process — Labour and burden — 

Hand composition , $ 32,400 56 

Monotype composition 21, 357 80 

Linotype composition 12, 977 33 

$ 66,735 69 

Stereotyping : 1,419 48 

Press work 12,318 56 

Binding 15,277 06 

Die-stamping 113 63 

Engraving 530 00 



$ 96,394 42 



Work in process — Material — 

Press division— Ink $ 392 38 

Bindery division 281 92 

Engraving division 1 44 

Stereotyping division 75 

Paper 49,090 37 

$ 49,766 86 

Materials, etc., on hand in different divisions — 

Paper stores division $ 92, 757 57 

Printing stores division 56, 252 23 

Mechanical division 1, 618 55 

Hand composing division 30 24 

Monotype composing division 2 22 

Linotype composing division 1 42 

Stereotyping division 50 99 

Press division 1, 136 60 

Binder>' division. 3,470 41 

Engraving division 663 24 

$ 155,983 47 

Amount for lithographing, printing, binding, etc., paid to outside firms and not charged to 

departments and Parliament on March 31 , 1925 12, 569 12 

$ 314,713 87 



58 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Statement, by Departments, of accounts paid for Printing, Binding, Litho- 
graphing, etc., done outside the Department, during the fiscal year ending 
March 31, 1925 



Department 



Express and 

Freight 

paid to 

transportation 

companies 



Printing, 

Binding and 

Litlio- 

graphing 



Total 



Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Civil Service Commission 

Customs and Excise 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Governor General's Secretary. . . . 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization. . . . 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

National Defence 

National Gallery of Canada 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery.... 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Trade and Commerce 



cts, 



577 19 



3,905 48 



1,957 47 



2 80 

44 30 

1,346 95 



206 94 

6 35 

20 04 



64 95 

200 76 

4 83 



2r 60 
486 21 



132 60 
"'6'45' 



Total. 



74 18 
9,053 10 



S cts, 

32,545 38 

791 89 

90 20 

42 61 

3,571 02 

18 90 

108 17 

6,016 46 

78 41 

2,125 13 

7,752 79 

62,343 46 

218 81 

49 14 

52,317 80 

6,484 74 

4,097 17 

21 98 

19,736 35 

14,058 61 

2,463 45 

6 03 

9,626 16 

101,592 96 

17,477 56 

3,873 52 

559 24 

608 17 

14 38 

348 06 

540 76 

54 82 

1,299 14 

839 63 

3,349 72 

355,122 62 



$ cts. 

33, 122 57 

. 791 89 

90 20 

42 61 

7,476 50 

18 90 

108 17 

7,973 93 

78 41 

2,127 93 

7,797 09 

63,690 41 

218 81 

49 14 

52,524 74 

6,491 09 

4,117 21 

21 98 

19,801 30 

14,259 37 

2,468 28 

6 03 

9,647 76 

102,079 17 

17,477 56 

4,006 12 

559 24 

608 62 

14 38 

348 06 

540 76 

54 82 

1,299 14 

839 63 

3,423 90 

364,175 72 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



59 



Statement of Printing, Lithographing, etc., and Paper SuppHed to Departments 
and Parliament for the Fiscal Year ending March 31, 1925 



Department 



Outside 
Work 



Inside 

Printing, 

Binding, 

etc. 



Paper 



Total 



Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Canadian National Railways 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Customs and Excise 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Government Contracts Supervision Committee. 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

Miscellaneous Printing 

National Defence 

National Gallery of Canada 

Northwest Territories 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Penit«ntiaries 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Research Council of Canada 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Royal Mint 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 



52 



% cts 

785 60 

424 63 

90 20 



42 61 

,437 73 

18 90 

71 78 

,400 04 



78 41 
,121 84 
,962 27 
,628 85 
218 81 

49 14 
132 25 
463 .38 
117 21 

21 98 
030 45 
048 91 
391 01 
573 89 
6 03 



9 
115 
"'4 



722 81 
120 97 
565 69 



187 75 

599 12 

600 74 
22 26 



348 06 
'546'76' 



1 

3,360 04 



370 87 
862 47 



% cts. 

72,155 28 

3,340 64 

13,187 94 

221 71 

3,484 02 

2,979 11 

56,428 03 

171 73 

8,706 23 

15,844 09 

43 94 

1,099 26 

10,589 50 

150,669 05 

29,141 28 

5,714 32 
24,926 13 
65,500 04 

5,482 03 
27,175 16 

7,852 63 

55.390 95 
43,591 07 
16,288 36 
40,038 29 

1,016 89 
544 47 

23.391 71 
1,696 12 

133,851 26 

375 58 

66,691 58 

11,818 70 

9,520 48 

3,010 01 

861 85 

4,776 31 

26 04 

6,297 01 

8,789 71 

4,950 15 

2,418 95 

4,997 24 

105,073 23 



$ cts 

55,964 19 

658 37 

2,532 59 

1 98 

4,228 75 

3,195 62 

76,309 03 

26 95 

2,582 74 

15,780 54 

52 11 

622 71 

6,993 79 

18,942 78 

51,005 38 

2,919 55 

5,. 323 54 

37,204 01 

998 92 

9,711 78 

181 79 

16,892 00 

17,107 61 

8,289 72 

20,574 17 

239 22 

162 25 

5, 182 47 

926 87 

114,681 19 

270 70 

44,764 52 

10,571 52 

4,603 10 

706 56 

133 89 

3,980 50 

50 97 

2,613 07 

353 38 

7,062 28 

2,300 57 

3,218 17 

28,767 22 



$ cts. 

180,905 07 

4,423 64 

15,810 73 

223 69 

7,712 77 

6,217 34 

137,174 79 

217 58 

11,360 75 

38,024 67 

96 05 

1,800 38 

19,705 13 

177,574 10 

143,775 51 

8.852 68 

30,298 81 

155,836 30 

25,944 33 

41,004 15 

8,056 40 

91,313 40 

74,747 59 

24,969 09 

63,186 35 

1,262 14 

706 72 

38,296 99 

2,743 96 

364,098 14 

646 28 

115,643 85 

22,989 34 

14,724 32 

3,738 83 

995 74 

9, 104 87 

77 01 

9,450 84 

9, 143 09 

13,383 30 

5,581 99 

8,215 41 

137,200 49 



Total. 



388,417 46 



1,050,128 08 



588,689 07 2,027,234 61 



60 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Comparative Statement of Printing, Binding, Lithographing, etc., and Paper 
supplied to Departments and Parhament for the last five fiscal years, 
1920-21, 1921-22, 1922-23, 1923-24 and 19^-25. 



Department 



1920-21 



1921-22 



1922-23 



1923-24 



1924-25 



Agriculture 

Air Board # 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Board of Commerce 

Canadian National Railways 

Canadian Patriotic Fund 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Commission of Conservation 

Council on Economy and Efficiency 

Customs and Excise 

Departments Generally 

Editorial Committee 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Government Contracts Supervision Committee 

Governor General's Secretary 

health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Inland Revenue 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

I/ibrary of Parliament 

Marine 

Mines 

Ministry of Overseas Military Forces 

Miscellaneous Printing 

National Defence 

National Gallery of Canada 

Naval Service 

Northwest Territories. 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Penitentiaries 

Pension Commissioners 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Information 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Purchasing Commission 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Research Council of Canada 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Royal Mint 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce , 

War Purchasing Commission 



$ cts, 

104,991 09 

23,742 92 

3,211 41 

4,416 74 

3,783 13 

6,10.i 70 

217 49 

65,651 76 

17,558 10 

10,610 16 

374 74 

98,484 34 

457 23 

715 92 

1,179 07 

16,754 94 

188,356 61 



3,712 16 

8,717 22 

198.295 64 

62,076 95 

6,828 48 

45.731 23 

23,968 84 

125,8.50 82 

2,947 34 

75,991 69 

9.839 27 

53,418 10 

53,891 80 

171 60 

72,723 13 

82,061 89 

M5 28 

69,574 25 

1.166 10 

40,865 43 

2,505 02 

19,239 26 

285,699 45 

505 49 

78 60 

151,451 19 

25,497 24 



38.644 15 

4,277 10 

1.422 63 

14,188 71 

94 47 

16,820 47 

14.222 23 

36,632 55 

20,609 15 

8. 488 19 

164,805 24 

1,957 33 



$ cts 

160,945 90 
11,6.58 92 
12,502 06 
4,940 46 



3,466 05 



70,330 09 

15,357 04 

1,577 65 

.343 10 

155,147 43 



142 94 

3.225 60 

15,023 55 

138,205 37 



2,859 50 
36,356 21 
192,450 14 
46,827 66 

7,718 45 

1,213 32 
31,356 74 
166,204 17 

6,000 17 
86,598 32 
11,293 90 
71,400 62 
71,731 33 



67,133 28 

81,998 75 

261 70 

100,884 21 

1,455 34 

34,280 66 

4,328 18 

4,423 26 

271,523 64 

1,035 41 



172.3.57 38 

29,708 94 

2,431 03 

17,385 86 

4,669 18 

2,813 20 

14,789 89 

48 45 

20,846 92 

12,499 21 

32,863 25 

10,641 46 

14,866 53 

199,641 56 



$ cts 

144,813 89 
2,459 90 
2,325 30 
18,004 39 



$ cts 

174,620 70 

21 20 

12,604 82 

19,316 92 



3,307 73 



2,460 



19,212 85 

8,998 61 

5 50 



3,861 10 
8,981 23 



100,015 93 



107,956 54 



153 69 

1,988 70 

10,557 49 

115,228 81 



2,602 81 
18,051 75 
156,780 74 
79,383 05 

5,892 06 



3 15 

299 88 

12,912 67 

117,840 68 

190 32 

2,576 59 

39,216 05 

138,354 05 

146,373 32 

8,498 09 



37,361 57 
133,319 45 
6,624 04 
52,849 63 
7,024 40 
85,929 75 
78,547 24 



34,822 68 
125,611 76 
6,252 10 
49,138 77 
8,397 66 
109,843 55 
70,294 99 



8,422 64 

47,711 28 

346 02 

15,378 49 

2,328 20 
41,226 57 

3,365 47 



21,010 31 

59,407 66 

209 28 



1,880 12 

41,305 84 

3,093 79 



253,725 57 
515 05 



310,095 45 
1,006 12 



116,217 72 

15,984 76 

1,713 95 

12,896 05 

5,167 07 

2,903 54 

7,240 97 

74 22 

11,347 13 

7,843 91 

20,887 66 

10,990 36 

11,416 28 

159,445 50 



115,720 49 

21,143 78 

211 28 

15,616 80 

5,324 37 

1,088 73 

7.379 47 

267 28 

13,576 12 

11,765 46 

18,182 .54 

7,199 21 

11,071 79 

174,215 42 



$ ct«. 
180,905 07 



4,423 64 
15,810 73 



223 69 



7,712 77 
6,217 34 



137,174 79 



217 58 

11,360 75 

38,024 67 

96 05 

1,800 38 

19.705 13 

177,5;4 10 

143,775 51 

8,852 68 



.30,298 81 
155,836 30 
25,944 33 
41,004 15 
8,056 40 
91,313 40 
74,747 59 



2^,969 09 

63,186 35 

1,262 14 



706 72 

.38,296 99 

2,743 96 



364,098 14 
646 28 



115,643 85 
22,989 34 



14,724 32 

3,738 83 

995 74 

9,104 87 

77 01 

9,450 84 

9,143 09 

13,383 30 

5,581 99 

8,215 41 

137,200 49 



Total. 



2,297,697 04 



2,427,763 



1,848,596 69 



2,041,221 09 



2,027,234 61 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924^5 



61 



5. STATIONERY BRANCH ACCOUNT 

Debit balance brought forward from fiscal year 1923-24 $ 83, 499 12 

Inventory, April 1, 1924 155,090 60 

Amount of goods purchased during fiscal year 1924-25 — 

Canadian $ 691,288 62 

United Kingdom 14,963 17 

United States 19, 597 23 

Other countries 175 31 

726,024 33 

Amount of other expenditure during fiscal year 1924-25 — 

Wages (direct) $ 86,208 21 

Wages (indirect) — ^Mechanical repair and upkeep 475 69 

86,683 90 

Customs duties and Import Sales tax (rechargeable) 3, 891 30 

Brokerage 133 10 

Office printing 2,087 97 

Office stationery 2,501 56 

4,589 53 

Freight, etc. (rechargeable) 10, 014 31 

Freight, etc 3,492 44 

13,506 75 

Postage (rechargeable) 3,400 00 

Char service and cleaning material 2, 054 95 

Sundries 15 50 



114,275 03 

$ 1,078,889 08 

Amount of goods issued to departments and Parliament during fiscal year 

1924-25 $ 845,749 04 

Amount of sale of discarded typewriters 1,092 50 

$ 846,841 54 

Debit balance as on March 31 , 1925 carried forward to fiscal year 1925-26 71 , 265 87 

Inventory, March 31, 1925 160,781 67 



% 1,078,889 08 



The stock of goods has been increased $5,691.07 during the fiscal year. 

Statement of Goods purchased and Goods issued to Departments and Par- 
liament in each month for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1925 



Month 


Canadian 


United 
Kingdom 


United 
States 


Other 
Countries 


Total 


Goods 
Issued 


1924 
April 


% cts. 

43,441 39 
61,111 43 
56,565 99 
44,568 52 
43,665 63 
77,892 87 
60,015 72 
54,325 86 
62,413 26 

46,305 38 
57,057 45 
83,960 04 


% cts. 


$ cts. 

225 00 
1,689 90 
2,534 33 
2,020 07 

179 10 
1,575 29 

161 09 
1.854 77 
1,427 54 

2,218 69 
3,683 55 
2,029 70 


$ cts. 
1 29 


$ cts. 

43,667 68 
64,350 39 
59, 100 32 
49,910 8& 
43,844 73 
80,955 41 
61,154 18 
59, 146 39 
63,846 13 

49,842 55 
62,851 23 
87,391 16 


$ cts. 
76, 150 84 


May 


1,549 06 


69,445 96 


June 




77,370 50 


July 


3,320 02 


2 27 


54,062 74 


August 


54,880 79 


September 


1,487 25 

969 74 

2,962 98 




70,251 14 


October 


7 63 
2 78 
5 33 

64 40 
40 44 
51 17 


81,710 99 


November 


67,279 35 


December 


67,595 86 


1925 
January 


1,254 08 
2,069 79 
1,350 25 


75,476 61 


February 


71,326 14 


March 


80,198 12 






Refunds on goods purchased 


691,323 54 
34 92 


14,963 17 


19,599 03 
1 80 


175 31 


726,061 05 
36 72 












Total of goods purchased 
and goods issued 


691,288 62 


14,963 17 


19,597 23 


175 31 


726,024 33 


845,749 04 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Comparative Statement of amount of Goods issued to Departments and 
Parliament for the last five fiscal years, 1920-21, 1921-22, 1922-23, 1923-24 
and 1924-25 



Department 



1922-23 



1923-24 



Agriculture 

Air Board 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Biological Board 

Board of Comnierce 

Canadian National Railways 

Canadian Trade Commission 

Chief Electorai Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Commission of Conservation 

Council on Economy and Efficiency 

Customs and Excise 

Dominion Police 

Editorial Committee 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Government Contracts Supervision Committee 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Housing Committee of the Cabinet 

Immigration and Colonization. . . 

Indian Affairs 

Inland Revenue 

Insurance 

Interior 

International Joint Commission 

Internment Operations Office 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine 

Mines 

Ministry of Overseas Military Forces 

National Defence 

National Gallery of Canada 

Naval Service 

Northwest Territories 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Penitentiaries 

Pension Commissioners 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Purchasing Commission 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Research Council of Canada 

Royal Mint 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Russian Famine Fund 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Rp-establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 

War Purchasing Commission 



$ cts 

e!,170 51 

28,040 32 

1,282 92 

9,169 35 

2 12 
4,822 30 

27,406 71 
9 00 

12,733 52 

22.624 48 
2,900 38 
1,896 01 

62,998 12 

3 00 
473 39 
276 10 

4,892 37 
94,8,52 60 



1,838 30 

16,872 92 

22,167 06 

7 46 

23,110 10 

19,850 33 

21,178 14 

2,536 77 

105,471 88 

119 66 

32 62 

5,742 79 

14,864 03 

597 73 

22,043 80 

18,005 06 

1,247 45 

67,775 88 

596 28 

60,054 98 

1,818 33 

4,592 12 

5,638 51 

43,754 84 

205,301 61 

1,360 02 

66,200 ,54 

39,691 45 



23,. 336 17 

5,474 .58 

1,059 65 

390 65 

29,579 38 



11,504 00 
8,465 15 

57,320 68 

59,837 68 
1,001 54 

55,078 81 
945 86 



$ cts 

59,541 38 

22,246 30 

3,181 47 

7,238 54 



5 24 
10,370 38 



11,469 34 

12,514 24 

347 92 

512 26 

80,171 40 



363 47 

525 01 

5,390 20 

78,893 99 



2,123 16 
10,196 18 
11,226 00 



31,698 76 

25,776 16 

1,514 30 

3,097 47 

101,847 92 

106 66 



7,640 27 

9,413 31 

470 43 

33,264 40 

15,998 59 

47 22 

65,385 96 

215 73 

34,009 40 

1,615 77 

5,444 96 

6,423 88 

12,760 83 

160,607 94 

904 95 

51,694 31 

39,160 16 

1,646 38 

18,146 27 

4,994 29 

2,/36 .34 

385 82 

25,079 11 

1,335 98 

11,541 65 

9, 790 25 

80,297 97 

21,284 09 

761 46 

50,132 16 



$ cts 

.55,845 86 
3,789 61 
3,9.53 10 
7,306 63 



$ cts 
63,253 38 



2,670 88 
4,939 64 



10,910 45 



11,356 17 



3,184 56 

6,209 77 

11 25 



207 31 
8,937 33 



62,010 75 



73,520 75 



421 38 

390 84 

4,539 22 

53,213 05 



2,157 25 
9,284 11 
10,380 34 



69 29 

582 69 

5,2.56 41 

42,220 24 

395 15 

3,290 62 

9,434 98 

8,707 52 



22,841 99 
32,180 77 



27,447 35 
33,735 53 



2,688 98 

85,786 59 

21 45 



2,961 15 

79,340 25 

14 



7,557 54 

4,995 59 

534 50 

43,211 28 

18,015 55 



7,. 506 19 

3,8,35 93 

837 00 

46,192 68 

20,320 68 



47,933 35 

172 61 

7,024 48 

4,414 55 

4,421 82 

8,259 05 

17 40 

136,095 93 

924 11 

78,243 78 

28,771 09 

1,292 12 

22,727 66 

5,351 53 

1,847 32 

234 82 

22,243 41 

308 59 

7,752 75 

5,700 97 

55,076 75 

24,443 30 

992 06 

37,221 66 



64,440 43 
37 58 



3,417 62 
3,770 33 
7,682 06 



179,869 20 

1,707 69 

70,034 99 

34,652 49 

136 93 

21,605 51 

6,507 51 

1,484 07 

204 07 

17,373 92 



9.216 57 

6,. 339 30 

50,211 19 

20,891 60 

1,104 13 

33,553 34 



Total. 



1,362,018 01 



1,153,547 63 



952,913 52 



991,259 79 



$ cts. 
61,530 09 



2,870 80 
3,253 64 



2,621 49 



1,022 95 
5,747 14 



77,638 16 



319 34 

4,661 95 

19,488 46 

261 68 

1,925 90 

7,924 24 

12,388 41 



28,623 70 
33,251 04 



2,375 44 

77,971 07 

20 97 



6,038 70 
3,385 17 
894 73 
34,280 95 
19,423 09 



72,718 15 
70 81 



1,797 68 
8,062 .54 
7,731 48 



115,996 55 

1,129 60 

56,790 20 

32,648 13 



24,796 70 

5,201 39 

1,330 90 

181 94 

12,315 16 



8,796 02 

6,306 99 

.35,948 09 

14,959 82 

714 84 

30,332 34 



845,749 04 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-85 63 

6. DETAIL OF EXPENDITURE OF APPROPRIATIONS 

Gratuities paid under C. S. Act, 1918 $ 522 00 

Detail of expenditure, death gratuities paid to widows or legal representatives of — 

Camille Lussier, account clerk, died June 10, 1924 $ 210 00 

Edgerton G. Roy, pressman, died December 7, 1924 312 00 

522 00 

Appropriation — Civil Government Salaries $ 72, 625 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Salaries paid during the year $ 71 , 156 38 

Unexpended balance 1 , 468 62 

$ 72,625 00 

Appropriation— Civil Government Contingencies 10, 500 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

\\ indow cleaning $ 684 00 

Washing office towels and welfare linen 225 30 

Office printing 3, 522 31 

Office stationery 3,406 66 

Travelling expenses 1,398 81 

Telephone and telegraph 608 30 

Cab hire and street car fare 127 85 

Postage 154 00 

Advertising 83 62 

Newspapers and periodicals 241 46 

Sundries 41 65 

S 10,493 96 

Unexpended balance 6 04 

$ 10,500 00 

Appropriation— Plant , New S 37,500 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Bindery division $ 12,939 00 

Envelope division 2, 584 40 

Press division 9,800 00 

Mechanical division 5, 326 00 

Paper stores division. 3, 575 00 

Customs duties 3,017 04 

Brokerage 8 00 

Freight, etc 218 36 

$ 37,467 80 

Unexpended balance 32 20 

$ 37,500 00 

Appropriation— Plant, Renewals $ 30, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Bindery division $ 2, 257 86 

Die-stamping division 35 57 

Divisions generally 1 , 471 28 

Envelope division 588 27 

Hand composing division 1,217 96 

Linotype division 11,895 02 

Mechanical division 3, 168 08 

Monotype division 2, 210 02 

Offices 112 62 

Paper stores division ' 123 75 

Press division 5,045 55 

Printing stores division 194 08 

Ruling division 125 77 

Shipping division 21 84 

Stereotyping division 138 20 

Engraving division 5 26 

Customs duties 742 28 

Brokerage 67 02 

Freight, etc 178 77 

$ 29,599 20 

Unexpended balance 400 80 

$ 30,000 00 



64 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Appropriation — Miscellaneous Printing $ ' 20, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure: — 

Public Printing and Stationery — 

Acts, Public and Private $ 5, 423 73 

Postal Guide and Supplements, 1924 323 14 

Annual Reports 4, 181 37 

Copies of Hansards •. 7, 755 33 

Members' speeches 2, 250 97 

Senators' speeches 62 81 

$ 19,997 35 

Unexpended balance 2 65 

$ 20,000 00 

Appropriation — Canada Gazette $ 45, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Printing of Canada Gazette $ 21 , 137 13 

Paper used for above 3, 537 35 

Editing and translating 3, 290 00 

% 27, 964 48 

Unexpended balance 17, 035 52 

% 45,000 00 

Appropriation — Distribution of Parliamentary Documents $ 40, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Office printing $ 1,377 22 

Office stationery 2, 635 13 

Office stationery — "addressograph" equipment 9,366 40 

Postage 2, 606 00 

Express and freight 242 27 

Char service and cleaning material 790 33 

Motor supplies, repairs, renewals, gasoline, oil 1 , 072 49 

Sundries 200 30 

Salaries (direct) 20, 792 51 

Salaiies (indirect) — Mechanical repairs and upkeep 915 08 

39,997 73 

Unexpended balance 2 27 

$ 40,000 00 

Appropriation — Printing, binding and distributing the Annual Statutes $ 16, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Printing and binding $ 8, 102 75 

Unexpended balance 7,897 25 

$ 16,000 00 

Appropriation — Provisional Bonus Allowance ? 29, 565 09 

Detail of expenditure — 

Clerical staff $ 29, 565 09 

$ 29,565 09 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1924-25 



65 



ApproT riation — Public Sertice Retirement Act, lOiO, an amended 

DETAIL OF EXPENDITURE 



$20,333 9S 



Name 



Duties 



Date of 
Retirement 



Two 
Months' 
Gratuity 

under 

Section 3; 

1 



Gratuity 

under 
Section 3