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Full text of "Valley: Lebanon Valley College Magazine"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 






http://www.archive.org/details/valleylebanon131984leba 



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Lebanon Valley College Magazine 

Interview With Dr. Peterson 

General Education Program 

The Best of Both Worlds 

A Flair For Food 

Admissions Profde 

Art Ford, First LVC Faculty Fulbright 

Postscript 
Two Electron Microscopes 



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Lebanon Valley College Magazine 

VOLUME I, NUMBER 3 
FALL, 1984 



Table of Contents 



3 INTERVIEW WITH DR. PETERSON 

5 THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS 

by Ed Okonowicz 



6 A FLAIR FOR FOOD 

by Jan Margut 



7 ADMISSIONS PROFILE 



9 ART FORD, FIRST LVC FACULTY 
FULBRIGHT 



10 POSTSCRIPT 



10 COLLEGE PURCHASES TWO ELECTRON 
MICROSCOPES 

12 GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

by Arthur Ford 



Publisher Howard L. Applegate 

Editor Dawn C. Humphrey 

Alumni Editor Robert L. linger 

Parents Editor loseph P. Wengyn 

Sports Editor Charles Frostick 

Production Editor Mary B. Williams 

Creative Director Michael R. Casey 



LETTERS 



Dear Editor: 

Congratulations on the new alumni magazine — The Valley! 

Having edited an alumni magazine for over fifteen years, and 
having seen the magazines of hundreds of colleges. 1 think 1 
know a good magazine when I see one. 1 am proud to display 
the magazine of my Alma Mater. 

Incidentally, tell your contributor, Mr. Drago, that there are 
at least two errors in his baseball quiz. John J. McGraw was 
not known as "Little Poison" and Lloyd Waner was not called 
"The Little Napoleon". McGraw was "Little Napoleon" and 
Waner "Little Poison". I am sure he knows better but I just 
want him to know that at least one alumnus read his article 
and also knows better. Perhaps it was an intentional error to 
see if anyone was reading. 

Sincerely. 

Wade S. Miller '27 

Editor's Note: 

Mr. Miller's letter is one of several we received from eagle- 
eyed readers who spotted the error in the baseball quiz in our 
last issue. In defense of Mr. Drago's reputation as a 
sportswriter and a baseball fanatic, we must admit the mistake 
was made in our office. And, no, fans, it was not intentional. 
We wouldn't do that to our growing legion of loyal readers. 

Dear Editor: 

I want to thank you for the excellent article about Jean Love 
in the most recent issue of The Valley. Jean played an 
important role in my choosing to enter psychology and 
academics and has remained a dear friend over the years. It is 
wonderful to see her finally receiving the recognition she so 
richly deserves. 

Sincerely. 

Hiram E. Fitzgerald '62 

Dear Editor: 

We think The Valley has really improved! It looks good, 
sounds good, and your hard work is worth it. 

Thank you very much! 

Tina DeAngelo 



The Valley is published quarterly by Lebanon Valley 
College. Second-class postage paid at Annville, PA. 

Please send address changes to Lebanon Valley College. 
Annville, PA. Inquiries should be addressed to Dawn C. 
Humphrey, Editor, The Valley, Lebanon Vallev College, 
Annville. PA 17003-0501. Telephone: 717-867-4411. ext. 226. 

© copyright 1984 Lebanon Valley College 



The Valley 2 




Interview 

With 

Dr. Peterson 

Following is an interview Editor Dawn 
Humphrey recently conducted with Dr. 
Arthur L. Peterson. Peterson, the Col- 
lege's fourteenth president, assumed his 
office in March of this year and will be 
inaugurated on October 14. 

Q. "Dr. Peterson, what are your 
impressions of the College after several 
months?" 

A. "My impressions are very positive. 
My wife Connie and 1 have been 
warmly received by faculty, staff and 
students. Everyone has been patient 
with me. And every day I become more 
and more a part of the community that 
is LVC." 

Q. "We have all heard stories about the 
financial difficulties of America's col- 
leges and universities. How does LVC's 
financial picture look?" 

A. "Having recently returned from a 
conference with other presidents of 
small colleges, where we discussed col- 
leges that were in financial difficulty, I 
can confidently report that Lebanon 
Valley is in pretty sound financial 
shape. 

All colleges, large and small, face 
challenges in the decade ahead, but 
based on Lebanon Valley's past per- 
formance. I am very optimistic about 
our financial picture. We are in a good 
solid position even though there are 
some short-range problems which must 
be addressed. It will take hard work, 
creativity and added commitment on 
the part of all members of the LVC 
family, including the alumni, but all of 
that is in the forecast for Lebanon Val- 
ley College." 

Q. "What steps will the College take in 
the next ten years to counteract the pro- 
jections of a shrinking pool of 18-year- 
olds? Do we need a redirection, or a 
redefinition of our role in the educa- 
tional marketplace?" 

A. "As you know, demographic projec- 
tions show a general diminution of the 
number of 18- to 22-year-old students 
for the next decade, with a decline of 
35 percent in the Northeast, which is 

The Valley 3 



our marketing area. So for us to 
maintain a high-quality student body 
of 800, we must remain strong where 
we have been nationally respected and 
strengthen programs where we have 
had instability in the past. 

In addition to strengthening the regu- 
lar academic program, we must also 
engage in some transformational think- 
ing with respect to new markets for our 
educational programs. I have every rea- 
son to agree with Peter Drucker's 
statement that the largest growth indus- 
try in America today is adult education. 
Therefore, we must provide attractive 
and relevant programs for the 25- to 
55-year-old individuals who wish to 
enhance their professional competence 
and standing through coursework and 
for those who wish to improve their 
quality of life through a return to 
school for the arts and sciences they 
may have been unable to study in their 
earlier education. We have taken a first 
step in that direction by expanding 
evening and weekend college offerings 
on campus and at the University Center 
in Harrisburg. And this fall we have 
introduced early evening courses. 

To summarize: our strategy for the 
decade to come is to strengthen all 
undergraduate programs so that we can 
be highly competitive with any institu- 
tion for that shrinking pool of youthful 
scholars and to attack vigorously that 
market for older students who need our 
kind of humanizing, liberal arts educa- 
tion if they are to function effectively in 
the world of tomorrow." 

Q. "1 have heard you speak of a man- 
agement institute at Lebanon Valley 
similar to one you directed at Eckerd 
College. What will this entail and is this 
type of program a moneymaker, or are 
the benefits for the College more 
intangible in terms of reputation and 
contacts for graduates?" 

A. "Through the institute we will pres- 
ent four-day seminars on management 
development for middle and top man- 
agers and programs for people in all 
phases of organizational life, business 
and non-profit, to help them better 
understand themselves and others and 
to help them master critical aspects of 
management. 



"Our strategy is to 
strengthen all under- 
graduate programs so 
we can be highly 
competitive with any 
institution." 

The seminars will be staffed by our 
own undergraduate faculty, supple- 
mented by individuals from business 
and the non-profit sector who are 
already engaged in such teaching. We 
will be following some of the models 
I've used at other schools, models 
which have been highly successful. The 
management development programs 
will generate additional income for the 
College and provide a service to the 
community. A similar program at Eck- 
erd broke even in the first year, made 
money in the second year and in the 
third year produced a net income of 
$200,000." 

Q. "In addition to the programs and 
goals you have mentioned, what else is 
in the works at Lebanon Valley 
College?" 

A. "For several months we have been 
in negotiation with graduate schools of 
business in an effort to offer a Master 
of Business Administration program on 
campus. 

This is another example of the kind 
of programs that respond to the needs 
of adult learners in our area and which 
supplement rather than supplant our 
traditional undergraduate program. In 
accord with the tradition of this college 
we want to be responsive to the 
demands of society. My hope is that 
LVC can offer programs in both the 
humanities and the sciences which will 
answer the needs of our rapidly chang- 
ing technological society. One example 
is our program in recording technology, 
which marries the liberal arts to the 
high technology of the recording 
industry." 

Q. "You have spoken of the 'leadership 
imperative.' What do you mean by that 
and how does it fit into your plans for 
Lebanon Valley College?" 

A. "The country faces a leadership 
shortage today, especially among young 
people. During our lives we are con- 



stantly challenged by an imminent and 
important problem. There must be 
those in the community who respond to 
that challenge and see it through to a 
successful solution. 1 envision LVC as a 
leadership school, helping young people 
become leaders. We have discussed 
introducing a leadership requirement 
that would expose students to the 
nature of leadership as early as the 
freshman year. During the sophomore 
and junior years students would partic- 
ipate in leadership experiences such as 
tutoring other students or younger stu- 
dents, visiting nursing home residents, 
and engaging in leadership-centered 
internships in business or the profes- 
sions, or in government. Then in the 
senior year, they would take a capstone 
course in leadership. 

We can also function as a leadership 
academy to help students in public and 
private schools. I have met with a very 
positive response to our plans in my vis- 
its with each of the superintendents of 
area schools." 

Q. "Will this leadership training of 
high school and college students dove- 
tail with the management institute we 
discussed earlier?" 

A. "Yes. To the best of my knowledge, 
we will be the first school in the country 
to address the leadership imperative on 
so many levels, from high school stu- 
dent right up through top management. 

Q.. "What would you like to see LVC 
become by the year 2000?" 

A. "By the year 2000 I would like to see 
Lebanon Valley College as the out- 
standing small liberal arts college in this 
area, known for its commitment to 
academic excellence and the leadership 
experience, a college known for stu- 
dents who are concerned, community- 
oriented, well-prepared professionals. I 
would hope that we will have main- 
tained our rich tradition and outstand- 
ing reputation in music and science and 
that programs in each of our majors 
will give us special recognition as a 
school that cares not only about itself 
but also about the world around it. a 
school where values continue to have a 
place in the curriculum, a place where 
we can have fun and great personal 
satisfaction while we seek for the 
truth." 



The Valley 4 



The Best of Both Worlds 

Is There a Doctor in the Gallery? 




by Ed Okonowicz 

You might say Bill Renzulli '61 has 
the best of both worlds. 

Renzulli, who after graduation 
from LVC received a medical degree 
from Jefferson Medical College and 
for nine years conducted a successful 
internal medicine practice, now works 
as a doctor for only six months of the 
year. 

For the remaining six months he 
turns in his stethoscope for a palette 
and brushes as he picks up his other 
career — that of an artist. 

Before his metamorphosis began, 
he was a full-time physician making 
all the right moves and with the mark 
of success. He had a growing private 
practice and had accepted a presti- 



gious position as a section chief in the 
department of medicine at the 
Wilmington Medical Center. 

But he was not happy. 

First, there was his growing 
difficulty with the emotional toll the 
practice of medicine can take on a 
physician. "Rather than having 
doctor-to-patient relationships, 1 had 
person-to-person relationships; I 
believe that if you give of yourself, 
people will respond. But, as time went 
by, I felt the losses much more 
acutely, much more personally. I 
don't know if I overdid it. Certainly 
leaving my practice and not having 
that on-going relationship with people 
has been a big loss, but there is also a 
sense of having a burden lifted from 
my shoulders." 



Then there was his renewed interest 
in art, in which he had dabbled 
during his years at college and medi- 
cal school. At his first public showing 
in 1978 he sold ten paintings. Later 
that year, during his first formal 
exhibit, he sold thirty-five more. 
Perhaps it was a combination of 
talent and the unique focus of his 
work that brought him sales and 
attention soon after he began his 
second career. 

A 1979 Philadelphia Inquirer 
feature on Renzulli asked: "How 
many others . . . have ever painted a 
picture of the old Wilmington Dry 
Goods discount store?" The Inquirer 
article characterized him as an urban 
landscapist, one who prefers gritty 
storefronts to more sylvan scenes. 



The Valley 5 



Initially, he coped with his dilemma 
of wanting to pursue two very 
different careers simultaneously by 
rescheduling his medical office hours 
so that he could spend three and a 
half days a week with his patients and 
the other day and a half on 
Wilmington's streets, sketching and 
painting buildings. 

It soon became apparent, however, 
that each of his careers demanded his 
undivided attention. So, in 1980. with 
the support of his family, he made 
"one of the biggest decisions" of his 
life. He gave up his private practice 
and arranged to work as an 
emergency room physician for half of 
each year, in alternating three-month 
periods. 

He says moving from one of his 
careers to the other requires an 
adjustment not only of workplace, 
but also of attitude. 

"As an artist, I feel I have to be 
open and receptive to everything. I 
have to respond to things I see and 
allow things to settle into me. I wear 
my heart and soul on my sleeve. But 
if I did that practicing emergency 
room medicine, I would be rolled 
over within a couple of days. In 
emergency medicine there's death, 
trauma, hurt and pain. I find I have 
to close up a bit. I don't see any real 
connection between the two careers, 
but I do feel the polarity of the two 
extremes can only enrich both of 
them." 

If his art were to become a 
lucrative career, would he leave the 
medical profession completely? He is 
not sure: "I don't know whether I will 
ever return to medicine fulltime or 
make art a full-time career. I am 
hoping those questions will answer 
themselves." 

Meanwhile, he lives in a com- 
fortable city home, works the 
graveyard shift for vacationing 
emergency room doctors and 
struggles to establish himself as a 
respected and successful artist. 

Ed Okonowicz, a Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, freelance writer, is associate 
director of alumni relations at the 
University of Delaware. 



A Flair for Food 



by Jan Margut 79 




When Scott Aungst graduated from 
Lebanon Valley College in 1972, he 
had good reason to look back on his 
college years with pride. For he, like 
many other LVC students, had 
worked hard to help defray college 
expenses: cooking, waiting and 
clearing tables, washing dishes in 
popular area restaurants. 

Unlike many other students, 
however, Aungst 's part-time restaurant 
jobs have mushroomed into a career in 
food, a career he loves. Today, the 
Lebanon Valley economics and business 
administration graduate owns and 
operates three diverse and successful 
food-related businesses in the Lebanon 
Valley area. He puts in long hours, as 
many as fifteen a day, at Scott's 
Restaurant and Motel on Route 22 



near Grantville, a business he has 
owned and operated for several years. 
Previously, he had owned and 
operated several other area restau- 
rants including the Dutch Diner and 
the Canterbury House, both in 
Palmyra, and The Manor House in 
Jonestown. 

Scott's Restaurant serves such 
authentic Pennsylvania Dutch 
favorites as pot pie, pig stomach and 
many of the regionally traditional 
"sweets and sours" in addition to 
more standard restaurant fare. While 
Aungst believes the quality of food in 
the United States "has slipped 
somewhat in recent years," he 
continues to believe that "quality 
sells" and therefore uses only the best 
ingredients. Furthermore, he says, the 



The Valley 6 



;ooking is all done "from scratch." 

When Aungst isn't hard at work on 
Route 22, he is usually hard at work 
it the Lebanon Valley Mall on Route 
122, east of Annville. His newest 
/enture, Scott's Connoisseur Connec- 
ion & Epicurean Market, opened 
here last October. On weekends he can 
}e found at the front counter, 
demonstrating the fine arts of carving 
and garnishing, ". . . the little touches 
:hat make meals special." On any 
/isit, however, one can be sure to find 
shoppers browsing through the 
Dakery, nibbling on generous samples 
af candies, snacks and imported 
:heeses, or taking a respite from 
shopping to relax over made-to-order 
deli-style sandwiches and freshly- 
ground-and-brewed coffee. 

The Connoisseur Connection - 
and Aungst 's business cards — boast 
a "gourmet pantry" of "exquisite, 
grande and unusual" foods, many of 
them imported. The shoppers' 
temptations range from French pate, 
Italian pasta, and Swiss chocolates, to 
smoked conger eel, frozen frog legs, 
and ready-to-stuff snail shells. 

But Aungst still has time for a third 
enterprise — catering. He prides 
himself, he says, on preparing 
outstanding meals, from a private 
dinner for two to a large banquet for 
state governmental personnel. And he 
delights in pampering his affluent 
clientele with limousine service to 
dinner and, afterward, to the theater. 

Crystal, Scott's wife and a part- 
time Lebanon Valley College student, 
also helps out in the businesses. And, 
believe it or not, they do have time 
for a hobby, of sorts: cookbook 
collecting. The couple has explored 
restaurants across the country and, at 
last count, they collected more than 
2,500 menus. 

The son of Clarence Aungst, class 
of '38, and Sara Light Aungst, class 
of '37, Scott Aungst says there is 
nothing he'd rather be doing "than 
working with the public and working 
with food." 



Ian Margut is managing editor of the 
Community Magazine in Lebanon. 



Admissions Profile 

One of the best ways to understand 
the caliber of students LVC attracts is 
to look at a brief profile of this year's 
entering class. 

The natural sciences continue to 
gain strength with 44 percent of the 
freshman class enrolled in natural 
science curricula. Business-related 
majors captured 23 percent of the 
class, with 19 percent in the 
humanities, 5 percent in the social 
sciences, 2 percent in individualized 
majors and 7 percent still undecided. 

As always, most of this year's 
freshmen hail from Pennsylvania, but 
California, Connecticut, Delaware, 
Florida, Maryland, New Jersey, New 
York, and Rhode Island are also 
represented. In addition, the Admis- 
sions Office has enrolled four Vene- 
zuelan students, one student from 
Ecuador, and one from Brazil. 

Our entering class scored an 
average of seven points higher on 
both the math and verbal portions of 
the SAT tests, a clear indication that 
LVC is counteracting the national 
trend of declining board scores for 
freshmen. 

Traditionally, the vast majority of 
our freshmen have graduated in the 



top half of their high school classes. 
And each year the percentage grows. 
In 1984, 44.7 percent of our entering 
freshmen graduated in the top one- 
fifth of their graduating classes, an 
increase of 2.5 percent over 1983 and 
10.4 percent increase over 1982. 

With your help . . . 

Our Alumni Ambassadors have 
repeatedly demonstrated that our 
graduates do the best job of con- 
vincing high school students that 
LVC is the place to go. The Admis- 
sions Office again requests the expert 
help of all our alumni. 

Elsewhere on this page is a list of 
college recruitment sessions our 
admissions counselors will attend this 
fall. 

You can help our counselors by 
joining them to talk with students and 
their parents at these sessions or by 
housing a counselor overnight, saving 
the college a considerable amount of 
money. 

If you are interested in helping 
your Alma Mater in this way, call the 
Admissions Office collect at (717) 
867-441 1, extention 230 or write Dean 
of Admissions Gregory Stanson 
today. 




The Valley 7 



COLLEGE NIGHT SCHEDULE - 1984 



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Bloomsburg University. Bloomsburg. PA 715- 9:00 p.m. 

Juniata High School. Mifflintown. PA 7:30 p.m. 

Bishop Eustace Preparatory. Pennsauken. NJ 7:00- 9:00 p m 
Frederick Community College. Frederick. MD 7:00- 9:00 p.m 
Somerset County College 1:00- 4:00 p.m. 

Dallastown Area H.S.. Dallastown. PA 7:00 p.m. 

Monsignor Bonner H S . Drexel Hill. PA 7 30 p.m 

E Stroudshurg University. F Stroudsburg. PA 730- 9:30 p.m 
Harford Counts Vo-Tech H.S . Bel Air. MD 6:30- 9:00 p.m. 
William Penn Sr H.S.. York, PA 7:30 p.m. 

Patchogue-Medford H.S . Medford. NY 6:00 p.m. 

Upper Darby High School. Upper Darby. PA 12:30 p.m. 

Father Judge H.S.. Philadelphia. PA 7.30 p.m 

Mansfield University 9 00 a m -12:00 

Atlantic Community College. Atlantic City. NJ 1:00 p.m 

Centennial H S . Ellicott City. MD I 00- 8 00 p.m 

Tysons Corner. Fairfax County. VA 7:00- 9:30 p.m 

Robinson High School. Fairfax County. VA 7:30- 9:30 p.m 
Williamsport Comm College. Williamsport. PA 7:00- 9:00 p.m 
Oakton High School. Fairfax County. VA 7:30- 9:30 p.m 
Cumberland County College. Vineland. NJ 7:00- 9:00 p.m 
Cumberland Valley H.S . Mechanicsburg. PA 7:00- 9:00 p.m 
Carteret High School. Carteret. NJ 7:00 p.m 

xl.in.is^ikin 11 igh School. M.m.tsqu.tn \l 6:30 p.m 

Elkton High School. Elkton. MD 7:00- 9:00 p.m 

Lee High School. Fairfax County. VA 7:30- 9:30 p.m 

Colonie Hill. Hauppauge. NY 

Cranford High School. Cranford. NJ 7:30- 9:00 p.m. 

Gloucester County College. Sewell, NJ 7:00- 9:00 p.m 

Chambersburg Sr. High School. 7:00- 9:00 p.m. 

Chambersburg. PA 
SUNY. Old Westbury. NY 

Tenafly High School. Tenally. NJ 7 30- 9:30 p.m. 

Morns Hills High School. Morns Hills. NJ 
Wayne Hills High School. Wayne. NJ 

Middlesex County College. Edison. NJ 1:00- 4:00 p.m 

Reading High School. Reading. PA 6:00- 9:00 p.m. 

Pennsauken High School. Pennsauken. NJ 7:00 p.m. 

Northampton Co Area Comm College. 7:00- 9:00 p m 

Bethlehem. PA 
Hereford High School. Parkton. MD 7:30- 9:30 p.m. 

Mt. St Joseph High School. Baltimore. MD 7:30- 9 30 p.m. 
Bridgewater-Raritan High School. Rantan. NJ 6:30 p.m 

Freehold Regional High School. Freehold. NJ 7:30- 9:30 p.m. 
Woodlawn High School. Baltimore. MD 6:00- 9:00 p.m. 

Nornstown Area High School. Nornstown. PA 7:30- 9:00 p.m. 
Lehigh County Comm. College. 6:00- 9:00 p.m. 

Schnecksville. PA 
Burlington County College. NJ 6:00- 9:00 p.m 

Indian Hills High School. Oakland. NJ 7:30- 9:30 p.m. 

West End Armory. Binghamton. NY I LOO- 3:00 p.m 

6:00- 9:00 p.m. 
Luzerne Co. Community College. 7:00- 8:30 p.m. 

Nanticoke. PA 
Montclair High School. Montclair. NJ 7:30- 9:30 p.m. 

Scotch Plains-Fanwood H.S . Scotch Plains. NJ 7:30 p.m. 

Watchung Hills Reg H.S . Warren, NJ 7:30- 9:30 p.m. 



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Wildwood Catholic H.S.. Wildwood. NJ 
Lower Merton H.S., Ardmore. PA 
Harmon High School. NJ 
Arnot Mall. Horsehcads. NY 



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Broadneck Sr High School. Annapolis. MD 
Madison High School. Madison. NJ 
William Penn High School. New Castle. DE 
Hatboro-Horsham H S . Horsham. PA 
Broadneck Sr H S . Annapolis, MD 
Philadelphia National College Fair. Phila.. PA 
Schuylkill Campus, Schuylkill County. 'PA 
Marywood College. Scranton. PA 
Vernon Township High School. Vernon. NJ 
Owen J. Roberts High School. Pottstown. PA10:30 
Saint Mane Goretti H.S.. Hagcrstown. MD 730 
Archbishop Wood High School. 

Warminster. PA 
Lake Forest High School. Felton. DE 
Gwynedd-Mercy Academy. Gwynedd 
Valley. PA 
Baltimore National College Fair. 

Baltimore. MD 
Sun Valley Sr High School. Aston. PA 
Conestoga Sr. H.S.. Berwyn. PA 
Conestoga Valley H.S.. Lancaster. PA 
Westwood High School. Westvvood. NJ 
Union High School. Union. NJ 
Chesapeake College. Wye Mills. MD 
Harnsburg Area Comm, College. 
Harnsburg. PA 



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3:30- 



7:01). 

8:00 
I I 00 
10:30- 



Millord Mill High School. Baltimore. MD 
Central Bucks West H.S.. Doylestovvn. PA 
Delran High School. Dclran. NJ 
Chester County College Fair. Chester Co . PA 2 00- 

6:30- 

High Point H S . Beltsville. MD 7:00- 

Linden High School, linden. NJ 7:30- 

Council Rock H S . Newtown Co .PA II 45 
Wcstfield Sr High School. Westlield. VI 

Radnor High School. Radnor. PA 8:00- 

Bowie High School. Bowie. MD 7:00- 

William Tennent H.S.. Warminster. PA 10:45 

Ocean County College. NJ 7 30- 



9:20 p.m. 
10:00 p.m. 

9 15pm 
9 (III p m 
5:00 p m. 

9:00 p.m. 

Ill 00 p m 
a m -12:45 

I 00 p m 

5:00 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. 

9 00 p.m. 
a m- I 15 

8:00 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. 

9 00 p.m 
,i m -12 15 

9 30 p.m. 



The Valley 8 



Art Ford, 
First LVC Faculty 
Fulbright 



Dr. Arthur L. Ford, '59 professor and 
chairman of English, has been 
appointed a Fulbright professor to 
Damascus University, Syria, for the 
1984-85 academic year. 

Ford will lecture on American 
literature and conduct graduate 
seminars on literary studies at the 
Middle Eastern University. 

The first Fulbright professor in 
LVC's history. Ford was nominated 
by the Council for International 
Exchange, a private agency affiliated 
with the American Council on 
Education. The Fulbright program is 
administered by the United States 
Information Agency (USIA). 

In addition to teaching at 
Damascus, Ford will lecture on 
journalism throughout the Middle 
East as part of a USIA program. He 
has been teaching journalism at LVC 
for the past six years. "1 originally 
intended to go into journalism," Ford 
said, "but then 1 found teaching." 

The Fords will leave in mid- 
September for their ten-month stint in 
Syria. Before returning they expect to 
spend a month in England visiting 
friends they made during a 1972-73 
sabbatical year in Cambridge. 

Damascus University, with a 
student population of approximately 
40,000, is the largest university in 
Syria. Ford said the University has 
approximately 2,000 English majors. 
He will lecture in English to these 
students. 



Despite the unsettled conditions in 
the Middle East, Ford expects a 
relatively uneventful year. "Syria is 
actually one of the more stable 
governments in the Middle East," he 
said. He added that the current 
government goes back to 1970, 
something of a record for longevity in 
that part of the world. 

"I'm also told that the Syrians are 
very hospitable, especially towards 
Americans," he said, despite the 
differences between the two govern- 
ments. He added that conversations 
with recent Fulbright professors in 
Damascus have confirmed this 
hospitality. 

"Syrians are able to distinguish 
between the government and the 
people." Ford said, adding that 
Americans often have trouble making 
that distinction because we are so 
involved with the government. "We 
actually elect our government," he 
said, "so naturally we think of our 
government as us. Unfortunately, this 
isn't the case in much of the rest of 
the world." 

Ford hopes to increase understand- 
ing between these two cultures with 
his teaching. "I'm not naive enough," 
he said, "to think I can have much 
impact on the incredible problems 
over there. But I do believe deeply 
that the study of a culture's literature 
can increase understanding of that 
culture so perhaps I can add one 
small bit to the bridge of interna- 
tional understanding." 

Damascus itself. Ford said, is an 
international, even cosmopolitan city 
of two million. "As a capital, of 
course, it's full of embassies and 
people from many nations," he said. 
He added that Damascus is also a 
very safe city with a low crime rate. 
"At a recent briefing in Washington 
we were told we could walk the 
streets after dark, something 1 don't 



do comfortably in most cities," he 
said. 

Ford, a graduate of Lebanon 
Valley College and Bowling Green 
University, has been at LVC since 
1965. During that time he has 
published several books, including 
critical studies of Joel Barlow and 
Robert Creeley, two American poets, 
and a study of the poetry of Henry 
David Thoreau. He has also 
published critical articles on other 
writers and his own poetry, and he 
has written libretti for operas and 
song cycles in collaboration with 
fellow faculty member Thomas 
Lanese. He has also written and 
edited for area industries and 
contributes regularly to a local 
newspaper. 




The Valley 9 



Postscript 

Some schools are legendary for their 
tradition of alumni helping graduates 
find jobs. The Aggies of Texas A&M 
come to mind immediately. A 
December, 1983 Wall Street Journal 
article quoted one graduate saying: 
"When all things are equal, you go 
with the Aggie." 

At Lebanon Valley such helping 
happens occasionally and often 
accidentally. 

The story of Bob Schaeffer '84 and 
Harold Morgan '79 is a recent case in 
point. Bob was featured in the Spring 
1984 issue of The Valley as one of 
three graduating Alumni Scholars. 
The article detailed his plans to look 
for a job teaching history in Lebanon 
or Lancaster counties. The article also 
spoke of Bob's off-campus job and 
his dedication to his church. 

Thousands of miles away, Harold 
Morgan, head of the social studies 
department at the Salzburg (Austria) 



International Preparatory School, 
happened to be looking for a history 
teacher. While paging through his 
copy of The Valley he noticed the 
article on Bob, was impressed by 
what he read and called to offer him 
a two-year teaching appointment. 

That one phone call has literally 
changed the course of Bob Schaeffer's 
life, at least the course he will take in 
the next few years. As a member of 
the Salzberg faculty, he will have an 
opportunity to accompany students 
on field trips to France. Germany and 
other European destinations. He also 
plans to buy a Eurail pass and travel 
when school is not in session. 

Dave Evans, director of career 
planning and placement, is overjoyed 
at Bob's good fortune. "This is a 
great example of how our graduates 
can help our students. I only wish 
more alumni would seek out LVC 
graduates for job openings," he said. 

Evans' office functions as a contact 
point between employers and LVC 
students and alumni. He has on file 



resumes of current students and 
alumni and urges alumni and friends 
of the college to call him when they 
have a job opening. 




Bob Schaeffer 



College Purchases Two Electron Microscopes 




A scanning electron micrograph of an ant magnified 51 times 



Lebanon Valley College recently 
purchased a scanning electron 
microscope and a transmission electron 
microscope through a $136,000 grant 
from the Whitaker Foundation. The 
grant also financed the purchase of a 
transmission electron microscope and 
equipment needed to prepare slides 
for viewing through both instruments. 

Dr. Allan Wolfe, professor of 
biology, explains that the transmis- 
sion microscope works by bouncing 
electrons off the surface of the speci- 
men, "much like bouncing a ball off a 
wall with an uneven surface." he says. 
Like a ball thrown repeatedly at an 
uneven surface, the electrons bounce 
off the specimen at varying degrees, 
depending upon which area of the 
specimen they strike. A sensor 
monitors the angle of these electrons 
(called primary electrons) and the 
angles of deflection of electrons 
dislodged from the specimen by the 
electron beam. The computed angles 
are analyzed to produce the 



The Valley 10 




Dr Allan Wolfe at the controls of the College's new scanning electron microscope 



computer-generated display the 
operator sees, and the image 
photographed. 

Organic specimens, because they 
are composed of elements with rela- 
tively stable electrons, must be thinly 
coated with a substance whose 
electrons are more easily disturbed. 
Most often, the coating used is gold. 

The scanning electron microscope 
has a magnification range of lOx to 
200,000x and allows researchers to 
study in minute detail objects barely 
visible or even invisible to the naked 
eye. 

Wolfe has been using similar equip- 
ment for several years in his research 
of the reproductive organs of male 



brine shrimp. With the scanning 
electron microscope he can study 
parts of the fingernail-sized shrimp 
that are invisible to the naked eye. 
His research centers on the males' 
frontal knobs with which they clasp 
the female during mating. Wolfe 
explains that the shrimp clasp for a 
relatively long time compared to the 
length of time they actually mate. He 
hypothesizes that once the male clasps 
the female, he may be able to sense 
the movement of the eggs within the 
female and commence mating at the 
appropriate time. Wolfe is now 
studying what he believes to be nerve 
endings in the knobs. 

The microscopes will be used by all 
the natural sciences, for interdisci- 
plinary and independent study as well 
as for research. And the benefits to 
students are substantial. "While some 
other small colleges in the area have 
similar equipment," says Wolfe, 



"students at those schools may only 
get to focus the microscopes before 
they graduate." At LVC, use of the 
electron microscopes will be worked 
into the curriculum, as another lab 
skill that must be mastered before 
graduation. Students also must 
master darkroom technique as part of 
their laboratory training. Wolfe 
explains: "Our students who go out 
with bachelor degrees often function 
as technicians in research labora- 
tories, where they might operate 
electron microscopes." But LVC- 
educated technicians have an advan- 
tage says Wolfe, because "a Ph.D. 
would rather have a technician who 
can think than one who is merely 
trained in the use of specific 
equipment." 



The Valley 11 



General Education Program 

by Arthur Ford '59 



We began our quest for a revised 
general education program at Leb- 
anon Valley in September of 1981. At 
that time many other schools were 
doing or were about to do the same 
thing. 

Furthermore, a barrage of reports, 
including "A Nation at Risk" (". . . a 
rising tide of mediocrity") critical of 
the educational establishment was 
about to be unleashed on the public. 

Little did we know then that we 
would soon be in the middle of 
significant educational controversy. 

We did know, however, that the 
American Association of Colleges had 
recently set up a program for general 
education development called General 
Education Models (GEM), which 
provided advice we were to use 
frequently during our deliberations. 

At the same time we realized that 
any changes here would have to 
reflect the particular conditions of the 
College and the desires of the faculty 
and students. 

We knew it would not be easy. 

Just a few years earlier William 
Brown, president of Princeton 
University, had said, "The surest way 
to guarantee a long, disputatious, 
unsettled and unsettling faculty 
meeting is to bring to the floor any 
proposal for a change in the nature of 
content of the requirements governing 
the undergraduate program." 

Woodrow Wilson, an earlier. 
Princeton president, had said it more 
succinctly: "Changing a college curri- 
culum is like moving a cemetery." 

This fall Lebanon Valley will 
formally institute its new general 
education program, and I can report 
that not only have we moved the 
cemetery (with a surprising amount of 
good will and even a bit of grace) but 
that the general education program 
here at the Valley is breathing new 
life. 

Once we had finished developing 
the program, we were eager to see 
how it fit in with the general trends in 
general education reform. 
Fortunately, at about that time we 
received a second report from the 
American Association of Colleges 



called "Reforming General Educa- 
tion: A Survey." This document 
summarized questionnaire results 
from 139 schools across the country 
that had either recently developed or 
were in the process of developing a 
new program of general education. 

The report noted a trend in higher 
education toward increasing the 
amount of general education in a 
student's program. The mean amount 
of general education required by 
surveyed schools was 44 semester 
hours, representing approximately 35 
percent of the total required for 
graduation. Our new program 
matched this almost exactly. 

A second trend involved moving 
away from the large number of 
courses which could be used to meet 
general education requirements, the 
so-called smorgasbord approach. The 
report noted a limited range of 
courses in 88 percent of the 
institutions. Sixty-eight percent had 
actually reduced the number of 
courses compared to their old 
programs. 

Here, too, Lebanon Valley was 



consistent, with a significant 
reduction in the number of courses 
offered for general education credit. 
We intentionally limited students' 
choices in order to increase their 
common learning experience. We felt 
we should take advantage of our 
smallness and provide our students 
with a greater opportunity to share 
their learning with each other. 

We also believe this shared learning 
experience could be heightened by 
incorporating interdisciplinary courses 
into the program required of all 
students. To this end we developed 
core courses in aesthetics, contexts of 
history, and contexts of culture, in 
addition to the English composition 
course required of all students. 

The AAC study reported that the 
use of a core curriculum increased at 
68 percent of the schools surveyed 
and that interdisciplinary core courses 
are found in 55 percent of the 
schools. 

Our new general education pro- 
gram reflected dominant trends across 
the country in other ways. For 
example, our reinstatement of foreign 



jjgfiSii HMiJi'J!! tlffiHHM 




TT5 



The Valley 12 



languages coincides with a return to 
this discipline in general education 
programs. The study reported that 57 
percent of those schools surveyed now 
have a requirement in foreign 
language. 

With its computer literacy com- 
ponent, our new program is also in 
line with general education tenden- 
cies. The percentage of schools now 
requiring computer work of all 
students is up to 45 percent. 

Finally, most of the schools 
surveyed reported that the academic 
disciplines remain at the heart of 
general education programs. That is 
the case at Lebanon Valley. We have 
always had strong departments, and 
the general education committee 
insisted that any new program should 
capitalize on that fact. 

Most of the courses offered in the 
Valley's new program also serve as 
introductory courses to major pro- 
grams. That is true of 69 percent of 
the schools surveyed by the AAC. 
While the committee was aware of 
what many other schools were doing 
with general education reform - 
primarily through the GEM program, 
through the publication Liberal 
Education, and through the 
catalogues of many comparable 
institutions — we always kept before 
us the goal of a legitimate academic 
program. We did not want to com- 
promise the academic integrity that 
has always been our strength. 

That academic integrity, together 
with a demanding but exciting general 
education program, is the Valley's 
answer to the critics of higher 
education so widely and loudly - 
and at times rightfully — heard 
today. 



Editor's Note: 

Dr. Arthur Ford, chairman of the 
English department, has also been 
chairman since its inception of the 
general education committee created 
two and a half years ago to devise a 
new set of general education 
guidelines. Following are his thoughts 
on the process. 



General Education Program 



1. Communication. 
6 hours. 

All students must take a two- 
semester sequence of courses in English 
composition. Additionally, all general 
education courses should include 
written composition. 

2. Mathematics and Computers. 
3 hours. 

All students must take a one- 
semester integrated course in 
mathematics and computers. This 
requirement can also be met by a one- 
semester introductory computer science 
course and a mathematics course 
involving mathematical reasoning and 
applications. 

3. Foreign Language. 
6 hours. 

All in-coming students must take a 
placement examination in a foreign 
language. Based on that examination 
and on the high school record, each 
student will be placed in one of the 
following categories: 

1. Two semesters of a foreign lan- 
guage at the elementary level. 

2. Two semesters of a foreign lan- 
guage at the intermediate level. 

3. Exemption from the foreign lan- 
guage requirement. 

4. The Historical and Cultural 
Contexts. 

9 hours. 

All students must take the following: 

A. A one-semester context course 
in history. 

"B. A one-semester context course 
in culture. 

C. One disciplinary course which 
supplements one or both con- 
text courses. This course must be 
chosen from the disciplines of 
of political science, economics, 
sociology, psychology and 
geography. 



5. Science and Technology. 
6 hours. 

All students must take two one- 
semester courses in the sciences. 

6. The Aesthetic Experience. 
6 hours. 

All students must take the following: 

A. A one-semester interdiscipli- 
nary course dealing with aes- 
thetics in art, literature and 
music. 

B. A one-semester disciplinary 
course designed to supplement 
in more detail the interdiscipli- 
nary aesthetics course. 

7. Values, Persons, and World 
Views. 

6 hours. 

All students must take two one- 
semester courses in philosophy or religion. 

8. Physical Activity. 
2 hours. 

All students must take two 
one-semester physical activity 
courses. 




The Valley 13 



CAMPUS NOTES 

President Peterson recently 
announced the following new faculty 
and staff appointments: 

Faculty Appointments 

Mirza Ali 

Assistant Professor of 
Mathematical Sciences 

Richard Arnold 

Assistant Professor of Management 

Philip Behrends 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

John Horchner 

Assistant Professor of Management 

Peter Randrup 

Assistant Professor of Management 

Dina Stephenson 

Visiting Instructor in English (one 
year) 

Administrative Appointments 

John M. Barrett II 
Head Soccer Coach 

Veronica Fabian 
Nurse (part time) 

Charles L. Frostick 
Information Officer 

Terry L. Kline 
Athletic Trainer 

Fred Poorman 

Assistant Football Coach 

Thomas Nelson 

Head Lacrosse Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 

New Administrative 
Assignments Also Announced 

Dr. Howard L. Applegate, formerly 
the Vice President for College 
Relations, will assume the new 
position of Vice President for Special 
Programs and Dean of Continuing 
Education. Included in his respon- 
sibilities will be the establishment of a 
new Leadership Development Insti- 
tute to serve managers in both profit 
and not-for-profit organizations in 
South Central Pennsylvania. 



Dr. George R. Marquette, formerly 
Dean of Students, will assume the 
new position of Vice President for 
Student Affairs in recognition of his 
thirty-two years of outstanding service 
to the College and his increasingly 
significant role in student retention 
and community relations. 

Chaplain John Abernathy Smith has 
accepted a half-time assignment as 
Church Relations Officer in addition 
to his responsibilities as Chaplain. Dr. 
Smith will devote much of his time to 
working with clergy and lay leaders of 
the United Methodist Church in the 
Central and Eastern Pennsylvania 
Conferences. 

Mr. Robert L. Unger, Director of 
Alumni Services, will assist President 
Peterson with community relations 
and various special projects 
undertaken by the President's Office; 
Unger also is serving as secretary for 
the President's Staff. 

Recent Faculty Publications 
and Presentations 

Michael D. Fry 

Assistant Professor in Mathematics 
"Automorphisms and Stem 
Extensions" 
Journal of Algebra 

Arthur L. Peterson 

President of the College 
"Two-Party Government's 
Enormous Contribution to 
America," opening chapter. 
Teaching the Excitement of 
Teaching Politics in America (Taft 
Institute) 

John Abernathy Smith 

Chaplain, Church Relations Officer 
Cross and Flame: Two Centuries 
of United Methodism in Middle 
Tennessee. Parthenon Press, 
the United Methodist Publishing 
House, Nashville, TN, 1984) 
Paul L. Wolf 

Professor of Biology 
Chairman of the Department of 

Biology 
"Rhizome and Root Growth Rates 
and Cycles in Protein and 
Carbohydrate Concentrations in 
Georgia Spartina Allerniflora 



Loisel. Plants" (co-authors: John L. 
Gallagher and William J. Pfeiffer). 
A merican Journal of Botany 

Philip G. Morgan, assistant professor 
of voice, presented a recital and a 
three-day master class in vocal 
technique and hygiene at the Univer- 
sity of Idaho last January, and in 
June participated in the first 
American Art Song Festival. Morgan 
was one of twenty performers selected 
from one hundred fifty who 
auditioned for the Festival held at the 
University of Delaware in Newark. 

Dr. H. Anthony Neidig, chairman of 
the department of chemistry, recently 
attended a conference at the University 
of Connecticut at Storrs where he 
presented a workshop on developing 
experiments for use in high school 
laboratories and participated in a 
training session for leaders of similar 
workshops to be funded by the 
American Chemical Society. 

Dr. C. F. Joseph Tom, professor of 
economics at Lebanon Valley College, 
was one of eight Pennsylvania college 
and university professors to present 
research papers at the Pennsylvania 
Conference of Economists recently held 
at Muhlenberg College. Tom's paper 
was entitled: "Money, Demand 
Deposits Creation, and the Hicksian- 
Keynesian Model with BASIC." 

Tom also learned recently that his 
paper "Microeconomic Analysis with 
BASIC" has been published in the 1983 
Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of 
the Pennsylvania Conference of 
Economists. 

Valley Professors Prepare for 
Fall Semester Through Study 
Abroad 

Dr. Dwight Page, assistant professor of 
French and German at Lebanon Valley 
College since 1982, spent June and July 
at the United States Department of 
Education's 1984 Fulbright summer 
seminar in Pisa, Italy. There, at the 
Sculo Normale Superiore, Page 
"enhanced his knowledge of Roman art 
and culture and Italian Renaissance 
painting and sculpture" in preparation 



The Valley 14 



for teaching a course on French 
civilization at the Valley in the Fall. In 
explaining the connection. Page says, 
"The cultures of England and France, 
and consequently American culture, 
were profoundly influenced by the 
traditions, ideas and art of the Roman 
Empire and the Italian Renaissance." 

In July, Dr. James W. Scott, 
associate professor of German at the 
Valley, at the request of the League for 
International Friendship of the German 
Democratic Republic, participated in a 
three-week seminar in Leipzig, East 
Germany. The seminar designed for 
college teachers in German focused on 
the culture and accomplishments of the 
German Democratic Republic (GDR) 
which this year celebrates its thirty-fifth 
anniversary. While in Leipzig, Scott 
learned "from the inside" as much as 
possible about life in the GDR, a 
subject he says is frequently ignored by 
textbook writers. 

Scott is teaching a special topics 
course on the GRD this fall. 

Lebanon Valley College Selected 
For Dow Grant Program 

Lebanon Valley College is one of 
twenty colleges chosen this year by the 
Dow Chemical Company Foundation 
to participate in its highly selective 
Undergraduate Scholarship in 
Chemistry Program. Under the Dow 
program, the College will offer a $5,000 
scholarship each year for four years to 
an outstanding high school senior 
intending to enroll in an undergraduate 
chemistry program and to continue 
graduate study in chemistry through the 
Ph.D. 

Tami Marrone, Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania, is Lebanon Valley's first 
recipient of the prestigious scholarship. 

Anyone interested in more 
information on the program is urged to 
call H. Anthony Neidig, chemistry 
department chairman. 



CLASSNOTES 



'51 



'38 



GERALD L. HASBROUCK, 

Reading Museum Chamber 
Music impresario and clarinetist, has 
re-established a studio on Penn Square 
to become a part of what he calls 
"Reading's renaissance." 

In addition to offering an expansive 
teaching facility, the new studio is being 
used to house a chamber music and cla- 
rinet library. 

He held the chair of principal clarinet 
of the Reading Symphony Orchestra 
for three conductors and was guest 
soloist of the Curtis String Quartet of 
Philadelphia. He founded a number of 
chamber groups which performed over 
a fourteen year period at the Reading 
Museum. 

Soloist of the Ringgold Band, he was 
guest soloist of the Reider String 
Quartet of Reading for three consecu- 
tive years at the Museum. 



'47 



DR. RICHARD F. 
SEIVERLING retired in Jan- 
uary from the Pennsylvania Depart- 
ment of Education with over thirty-five 
years of service in public, private and 
college-level education. 

He is the originator and general 
chairman of the annual Tom Mix Fes- 
tival held in DuBois, Pennsylvania each 
mid-September. This nostalgic event 
has attracted the attention and coverage 
of the national broadcast and print 
media. 

He has published numerous child- 
ren's books and biographies including 
his most recent work, "Tom Mix and 
-Tony: A Partnership Remembered". In 
addition, a Hollywood producer has 
invited him to assist in the production 
of a documentary film about the 
legendary cowboy actor of the silent 
screen era. 

PAUL G. FISHER has been elected 
president of the Lancaster Community 
Concert Association for the 1984-85 
season. 



REV. ROLAND E. GARVIN 

is now Williamsport District 
Superintendent of the Central Pennsyl- 
vania Conference of the United Metho- 
dist Church. He previously served St. 
Paul United Methodist Church in 
Manchester, Pennsylvania, for twenty- 
one years. 

REV. WILSON SHEARER organized 
and coordinated the recent General 
Conference of the United Methodist 
Church held in Baltimore on the 200th 
anniversary of the founding of the 
Methodist Church. 



'55 



DR. LENWOOD B. WERT 

became a "Diplomate Of The 
American Osteopathic Board Of Gen- 
eral Practice" and is celebrating twenty- 
five years of active family practice in 
Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. 

He is secretary of District II (Dela- 
ware & Chester Counties) of the Penn- 
sylvania Osteopathic Medical 
Association and secretary of the 
Delaware County Osteopathic Medical 
Society. He is an elected delegate to the 
House of Delegates of the Pennsylvania 
Association. 



'59 



NEIL AHARRAH was 

recently honored by the Pas- 



saic Valley High School of Little Falls. 
New Jersey for twenty-five years of ser- 
vice as biology teacher and football 
coach. 



'60 



RONALD DIETZ founded 
and directs the York 
Symphony Chamber Singers, a select 
group of four balanced quartets chosen 
from members of the York Symphony 
Chorus. He also directs the Symphony 
Chorus. 



'61 



DR. PETER H. RIDDLE, 

Ph.D. has been appointed 
Dean of the School of Music of Acadia 
University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, 
Canada. 



'^H EVELYN GISH of Hershe y 

^JvF has retired after thirty-seven 
years of giving piano instruction to over 
200 area students. 



The Valley 15 




'62 



CHARLES R. SEIDEL has 

been named plant controller 
for Armstrong World Industries' resil- 
ient flooring plant in Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania. He has been serving as assis- 
tant plant controller. 

He joined Armstrong in 1962 as a 
cost accountant at the company's plant 
in Macon. Georgia, and moved to the 
Lancaster plant in 1964 as a cost 
analyst. 

In early 1983 Seidel became a super- 
vising auditor in the Business Informa- 
tion Services Department. 

JEAN KAUFFMAN MORGAN 

published her first volume of poetry. 
High Priestess of Change, with St. 
Andrews Press, Laurinburg, North 
Carolina. Her poem, "Grafting," won 
the award for the best poem published 
in Southern Humanities Review in 
1983. 

DR. HIRAM E. FITZGERALD, 

Ph.D. received the Distinguished 
Faculty Award at Michigan State Uni- 
versity where he also was appointed to 
the position of Associate Chairperson 
of the Department of Psychology. 



'65 



EDWARD B. RUTH was the 

recipient of the outstanding' 
Pennsylvania Biology Teacher Award 
for 1984. Ed has taught at Milton Her- 
shey School for nineteen years. For 
fourteen years he served as cross coun- 
try coach. This fall he will assume the 
post of assistant athletic director. 




DR. WILLIAM SCOVELL, Ph.D. has 

received a prestigious Individual 
National Research Service Award from 
the National Institute of Health to 
pursue cancer research at the Fox 
Chase Cancer Center near Philadelphia. 
He will spend the year working with 
Dr. Michael Lieberman in the center's 
pathology department. 

Cancer research is nothing new for 
William, a biochemist who holds the 
adjunct faculty position with the Medi- 
cal College of Ohio at Toledo. For the 
past several years he has worked with 
metal compounds in his Bowling Green 
laboratory, attempting to determine 
why some anti-tumor drugs which con- 
tain platinum are successful in slowing 
or stopping the growth of tumors in the 
human bodv. 



'67 



WALTER D. OTTO was 

named incoming president of 



the Lancaster County Easter Seal 
Societv. 



'68 



BROOKS TREFSGAR was 

elected a trustee to the board 
of the Good Samaritan Hospital in 
Lebanon. Pennsylvania. Brooks is pres- 
ident of the Visiting Nurse Foundation 
of Lebanon County. He is an insurance 
broker with the firm of Miller-Trefsgar 
and operates Trefsgar and Company, 
Incorporated, a benefits consulting 
firm. 

JAMES NEWCOMER is the national 
chairperson-elect of the country's orien- 
tation and mobility teachers of the 
blind. Association for Education and 
Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually 
Impaired. 




PAUL B. FOUTZ, Anchorage CPS 
and Vice President of Administration 
and Finance with Pingo Corporation, 
has been elected as a National Director 
to the Board of the National Associa- 
tion of Accountants (N AA). This is the 
first time an Alaskan has held a posi- 
tion on the Board of the Association. 
Paul has been active in the NAA for 
twelve years, serving a two-year term 
on the National Membership and Mar- 
keting Committee 1982-84, and as pres- 
ident of the Alaskan Chapter for two 
years in 1980-82. He is also on the 
Board of Directors of Hope Cottages. 
Inc. and the Anchorage Community 
Mental Health Center and teaches part- 
time as an adjunct professor at the 
University of Alaska, Anchorage. 




5><Q DR. FREDERICK (FRITZ) 

O" DETWILER, Ph.D. has 

joined the faculty of Adrian College in 
Adrian, Michigan as assistant professor 
of philosophy and religion. 



70 



B.THOMAS HENRY 

recently passed the Certified 
Public Accountant Examination. He is 
employed at Harry Ness and Company. 
Tom was previously a member of the 
York Hospital accounting staff, holding 
the position of patient account manager 



The Valley 16 



where he was responsible for over forty 
employees. He served on the Board of 
Directors of the American Guild of 
Patient Account Managers, Keystone 
Chapter and is past treasurer. Tom is 
currently active in the York Chamber 
of Commerce, serves on the Board of 
Directors for Planned Parenthood of 
Central Pennsylvania, and is a member 
of the Pennsylvania Institute of Certi- 
fied Public Accountants. 



74 



GUY L. LESSER was 

appointed Chief of Police for 
the Lower Saucon Township and 
announces the birth of his fourth child, 
a daughter. Crystal Rebecca. 



76 



STEPHEN W. SACHS, 

assistant professor of music at 
Eastern Mennonite College, was 
accepted in two piano competitions this 
summer. 

He was a semi-finalist in the national 
Youth Keyboard Artists Competition 
May 21-25 at Calvin College, Grand 
Rapids, Michigan. 

He was also a participant in the 1 4th 
annual International Piano Festival and 
Competition July 14-21 at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

LISA STEINER COLEMAN has been 
promoted to commercial loan officer at 
the Fulton Bank, Hummelstown Office. 

inn TERRY BONE is instructor 

/ / of secondary strings at Central 
Dauphin School District. 

ROBERT C. SHOEMAKER has been 
named manager of Bank of Lancaster 
County's Quarryville and Buck branch 
offices. 



78 



GREGORY S. GRACE, 

Actuarial Assistant with 
CIGNA of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
has achieved the distinction of Asso- 
ciate in the Casualty Actuarial Society. 
The Associate designation, the second 
highest award granted by the Society, 
can only be achieved through successful 
completion of seven comprehensive 
insurance examinations. 



79 



JOHN D. COFFIN, Senior 
Actuarial Associate with Pru- 
dential Insurance Company of America 
of North New Jersey has achieved the 



distinction of Fellow in the Casualty 
Actuarial Society. The Fellow designa- 
tion, the highest award granted by the 
Society, can only be achieved through 
successful completion often compre- 
hensive insurance examinations. 

PAUL B. BAKER, editor of the Sun- 
day Pennsylvanian, was awarded a 
second place for editorial writing in the 
Keystone Press Awards sponsored by 
the Pennsylvania Newspaper Publishers 
Association and the Pennsylvania 
Society of Newspaper Editors. 

Paul was recognized for an editorial 
on the teachers' strike in the Cornwall- 
Lebanon School District last 
September. 

He joined the Daily News/ Sunday 
Pennsylvanian staff in August 1979 
and was named editor of The 
Pennsylvanian in May 1982. 

ROBERT J. MRAZIK recently has 
been named a Fellow of the Society of 
Actuaries. To be named a Fellow, 
Mrazik successfully completed a 
lengthy course of ten examinations 
administered by the Society on the 
financial analysis of risk and its appli- 
cation to life and health insurance, pen- 
sions, and other security programs. 

MICHAEL A. SETLEY has been 
elected managing editor of the Dickin- 
son Law Review, the scholarly publica- 
tion of The Dickinson School of Law, 
for the 1984-85 academic year. He will 
be a third-year law student next year. 



'80 



KAREN LEWIS NESTER, 

Actuarial Associate with Pru- 
dential Property and Casualty In- 
surance Company of Holmdel, New 
Jersey, has achieved the distinction of 
Associate in the Casualty Actuarial 
Society. The Associate designation, the 
second highest award granted by the 
Society, can only be achieved through 
successful completion of seven compre- 
hensive insurance examinations. 

BRIAN J. McCAFFREY is picture 
editor for Inside Sports magazine in 
Evanston, Illinois. 



BRENDA BENNETT WILLIAMS 

has been appointed to the development 
staff of Eastern College, St. Davids, 
Pennsylvania, as coordinator of com- 
puter operations. In her new position 
she will manage, maintain and imple- 
ment the computer files of the develop- 
ment department. 



81 



MARCY JO DOUGLASS 

will enter the Graduate Pro- 
gram at the University of Nevada, Las 
Vegas this fall and will be employed as 
a graduate assistant. 



'82 



KAREN TULANEY 
MAILEN is employed by the 
Lebanon County Children and Youth 
Services as a casework supervisor of 
Juvenile Delinquency Group Home. 

STEVEN ST. JOHN was elected to the 
Board of Directors and serves as direc- 
tor of Community Affairs with the 
Lancaster Chapter of the National 
Association of Accountants. 

ANDREA CRUDO is teaching seventh 
grade general music in Manalapan- 
Englishtown Regional School District, 
Englishtown, New Jersey. She also 
tutors twenty-seven private piano 
students. 

REBECCA J. NEWCOMB is teaching 
third grade at the Roxborough Campus 
of the Philadelphia-Montgomery Chris- 
tian Academy. 



'83 



JOSEPH KROLCZYK, who 

spent the last year with a CPA 
firm in Baltimore, will attend Carnegie- 
Mellon University this fall. He will 
begin a two-year program leading to a 
Master's Degree in the Graduate 
School of Industrial Administration. 

BONNIE DAVENPORT was 

employed as a resident counselor for 
the Association For The Help Of 
Retarded Children. She also coordi- 
nated the Mental Health Association's 
Rape Crisis Program for Orange 
County, New Jersey. 

In July, however, she and her hus- 
band Michael Orlowski left for 
Darmstadt. Germany where he will 
serve a three-year tour of duty in the 
U.S. Army. 



The Valley 17 



'84 



VIKING DIETRICH will 

spend the coming year 



teaching at Hillcrest School, Jos, 
Nigeria. The Hillcrest School is run by 
missionaries, whose children make up 
half the student body. The other half 
are Nigerian natives. 

LYNN WILDONGER is a student in 
the program of Medical Technology at 
Jersey Shore Medical Center in Nep- 
tune, New Jersey. 

ANN SUMNER is employed by Hill 
International, builders of nuclear 
reactors. 

AMY HOSTETLER is pursuing a 
Master's Degree in Technical and 
Scientific Communication at Miami 
University. Oxford, Ohio. 

GREGG KLINGER has joined Wire- 
mation Industries. Division of Lumsden 
Corporation as customer service 
representative. 

BRYAN ROWE was awarded a 
scholarship to the Julliard School and 
is one of the select few Americans chosen 
to live in the International House. 

CINDIA J. GOTTSHALL has received 
the Alexander E. Loeb Gold Award 
from the Pennsylvania Institute of Cer- 
tified Public Accountants for highest 
achievement in Pennsylvania on the 
November 1983 CPA examination. 
Cindia is also an Elijah Watt Sells 
Award recipient for marks with high 
distinction, awarded by the American 
Institute of Certified Public Accoun- 
tants to recognize the top CPA exam 
scores nationally. She is a junior 
accountant with the firm of Dorward. 
Andrew and Company, Lancaster. 

MARGO SMITH is teaching at the 
East Hanover Elementary School of the 
Lower Dauphin School district in 
Pennsylvania. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

1959 

MARY BEAVER AHARRAH 

received the Master of Arts Degree 
from Montclair State College in Janu- 
ary, 1984. 
1961 

WILLIAM KARL GLASER received 
the Doctor of Minister Degree from 
Phillips University in April. 1984. 



1969 

MICHAEL J. CAMPBELL received 
the Doctor of Arts Degree in Music 
from Ball State University in July, 
1984. 
1970 

ROBERT C. SHERMAN received the 
Doctor of Education Degree in Music 
from the University of North Carolina 
in May. 1984. 
1973 

DONALD R. REINECKER received 
the Master of Arts Degree in Teaching 
Museum Education from George 
Washington University in June. 1984. 
1975 

LONNA SNAVELY THOMPSON 
received the Juris Doctor Degree from 
the Georgetown University Law Center 
in May, 1984. 

MICHAEL ANTHONY HARDISKY 
received the Doctor of Philosophy 
Degree in Marine Studies from the 
University of Delaware in May, 1984. 
1976 

ELYSE R. KEINTZ received the Juris 
Doctor Degree from the Dickinson 
School of Law in June, 1984. 
1978 

SUSAN ENGLE CARNEY received 
the Master of Business Administration 
Degree from Temple University in 
May. 1984. 
1979 

DEBRA JEAN LIGHT was graduated 
from St. Joseph's School of Nursing in 
July. 1984. 
1980 

RICKY E. HARTMAN received the 
Doctor of Osteopathy Degree from 
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic 
Medicine in June. 1984. 
GREGORY ILIOFF received the Doc- 
tor of Medicine Degree from Hahne- 
mann University in June. 1984. 
1981 

SHAWN ALYN BOZARTH received 
the Juris Doctor Degree from Widener 
University's Delaware Law School in 
July, 1984. 

CHERYL L. COOK received the Juris 
Doctor Degree from the Dickinson 
School of Law in June, 1984. 
CYNTHIA SNAVELY was graduated 
from the Drew Theological School and 
was ordained in the United Methodist 
Church in June. 1984. 



BIRTHS 

1967 

To ELIZABETH BEER SHILLING 

and John Shilling, a daughter, Lisa 
Stewart on June 22, 1984. 
1969 

To Terri Wubbena and JAN HEL- 
MUT WUBBENA, a son. Robert 
Wyatt on January 7, 1984. 
1970 

To DONNA LAPP HARDING and 
Lyie Harding, a daughter. Alexa Rae 
on January 19, 1984. 

To MARSHA CHURCH KING 
and Sanford King, a son. Jeffrey 
Andrew on December 3, 1983. 
1971 

To CATHY JOHNSON AUTEN and 
Robert C. Auten. a daughter. Catherine 
Jeanne on March 13, 1981 and 
Jonathan Scott, a son, on July 18, 
1983. 
1972 

To DONNA LYNN GLADHILL 
WINCH and Walter L. Winch, a 
daughter. Ashley Lynn on December 
18. 1983. 
1974 

To Gail Ruehr and SCOTT E. 
Rl'EHR, a son. Michael Scott on Jan- 
uary 1. 1984. 
1975 

To Geri Bull and RANDY BULL, a 
daughter, Meredith Liza on July 7, 
1984. 

To BARBARA SCHROEDER- 
BLICK and Richard Buck, a son, 
Daniel Richard on August 8, 1983. 

To MARLENE STABANAS and 
William Stabanas, a daughter, Kathryn 
Ember on October 25, 1983. 



The Valley 18 



1976 

To BETH EARLY BRANDT and 

Thomas Brandt, a daughter. Hillary 
Beth on April 6, 1984. 
1977 

To Karen Rae Bone and TERRY 
BONE, a son. Caleb Zechariah. on 
June 30. 1984. 
1978 

To AMY HOOPES DELLINGER and 
WESLEY T. DELLINGER 75, a 
daughter. Courtney Cathleen on Feb- 
ruary 2, 1984. 
1979 

To ABBY SPECE DONNELLY and 
Edward Donnelly, a son, Ian Michael 
in May, 1984. 

To Susan E. Showalter and 
ROBERT SHOWALTER, a daughter, 
Kristin Leigh on February 1 1, 1983. 

To DIANE CARROLL PUGH and 
Harold Pugh, a daughter, Janine 
Carroll on February 26, 1984. 
1980 

To SUSAN SLAYBAUGH MRAZIK 
and ROBERT MRAZIK 79, a daugh- 
ter, Cheryl Beth on April 9, 1984. 
1981 

To MARCY JO DOUGLASS and 
Darryl Allen Devine, a daughter, Ariel 
Douglass on November 10. 1982. 

MARRIAGES 

1972 

FRANK R. SOURBEER to Catherine 

Ann Savard. June 16, 1984. 

1975 

MATTHEW J. EISENHAUER to 

Amelia J. Dellinger, January 7, 1984. 

1976 

RONALD J. BENSING to Linda Sue 

Witmer, March 31. 1984. 

KENNTH B. SHOTWELL to 

Kathleen Lynne Sonderleiter, June 1, 

1984. 

1979 

IVAN MARTIN WITTEL, III to Kim 

Yvonne Wolfgang, December 27, 1984. 

Jeffrey A. Heneks to JULIA A. 

WOODS, August 4, 1984. 



1981 

WILLIAM CLOSE to Karen A 

Berger. October 15, 1983. 

RICHARD E. DENISON, JR. to 

BARBARA A. JONES 79. March 17. 

1984. 

1982 

Bruce Gillette to CAROLYN WIN- 
FREY, May 26. 1984. 
KEN HENDERSHOT to MAR- 
GARET HUMMEL '81, August 18, 
1984. 
1983 

Dale E. Lyons to LISA M. ZEIDERS, 
June 2, 1984. 

JEFFREY SCOTT RIEHL to 
SUZANNE HELEN CALDWELL 79, 
June 30, 1984. 

DAVID E. KERR to Kay Allison 
Hahn, June 30, 1984. 




IN MEMORIAM 

1908 

LOUISE KREIDER STRICKLER on 

July 4, 1984 in Annville, Pennsylvania. 
1913 

EDNA YARKERS EHRHART on 
April 28, 1984 in Annville. 
Pennsylvania. 
1917 

RALPH E. MARTIN on May 8, 1984 
in Quincy, Pennsylvania. 
1922 

ERDEAN M. LEREW on March 20, 
1984 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. 
1927 

HENRY LUDWIG on June 14, 1984. 
1931 

EDGAR W. MEISER on July 17, 1984 
in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 
1932 

ALFRED T. GIBBLE on January 10, 
1984 in Hershey, Pennsylvania. 
1934 

ROBERT C. HEATH on December 
25, 1983 in Linwood, New Jersey. 
1938 

HENRY O. SCHOTT on April 14. 
1984 in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. 
1939 

KENNETH L. HOCKER in Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 
1951 

ANNA MAY LIND on January 1, 
1984. 
1956 

CHARLES W. RHOADS, JR. on July 
2. 1984 in Pottstown, Pennsylvania. 
1960 

PENELOPE HALLETT KREPPS on 
June 18, 1984 in Danville. 
Pennsylvania. 



The Valley 19 



Alumni Weekend 1984 



A Dr. Pierce A. Getz '51. professor of 
organ, conducts a rehearsal of the 
Alumni Chorale before its perform- 
ance on Saturday evening. For the 
concert, the Chorale was joined by 
the 1964. 1969. 1974 and 1979 
Concert Choirs. 

B The third annual golf tournament 
was a great success with over twenty 
golfers participating. 

C Old copies of The Quittapahilla were 
available for alumni to browse 
through and take home. 

D Senior Alumni President Lester 
Morrow '27 addresses fellow seniors. 

E President Arthur L. Peterson and 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees 
F. Allen Rutherford share a few 
words of conversation on the lawn 
of Kreiderheim during the picnic 
Saturday evening. 

F Dr. John P. Marbarger receives the 
Distinguished Alumnus Award from 
Alumni Association President Bill 
Kiick in recognition of his work with 
the space program and his continued 
work in medical education. 




The Valley 20 







The Valley 21 




VALLE 1 




i 




Quantity 


Item 


Unit 
Price 


Total 




Flying Dutchman window decal 


*$ .59 






Lebanon Valley College bumper sticker 


.29 






Crew neck sweat shirt 
indicate size: S, M, L, XL 
indicate color: navy blue, white 


11.50 






Hooded sweat shirt 
indicate size: S, M, L, XL 
indicate color: navy blue, white, gray 


15.95 






Exercise pants 
indicate size: S, M, L, XL 
indicate color: navy blue, white, grey 


12.50 






Engle Hall memorial plate 


* 8.95 






"Lebanon Valley College arm chair 
medium pine finish 
black enamel with black arms 
black enamel with cherry finish arms 
black enamel with maple finish arms 


* 145.95 




143.95 




148.95 




148.95 






"Lebanon Valley College Boston rocker 
medium pine 
black enamel 


143.95 




143.95 






■ 



9 9 



Add handling charge: $2.00 for first item, $1.00 for each additional item. 

*PA residents add 6% sales tax. 

"Stock is limited, but if chairs are out of stock, they may be ordered. 

Please make checks payable to Lebanon Valley College. Sorry, no credit card 

orders. 

Send orders to: College Store 

Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, PA 17033-0501 



name 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE ZIP- 





Lebanon Valley College 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 17003 
OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 
PHONE 717- 867-4411 



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
ANNVILLE, PA 



REINHART ANNOUNCES CAMPAIGN CABINET 



Tom Reinhart, chairman of Lebanon Valley College's "1984 
Scholarship Funding Campaign," has announced his campaign 
cabinet and changes in the college's giving club structure. 

Serving on the campaign cabinet, which is responsible 
for overall planning and direction of the campaign, are: 
Edward Arnold, Lebanon; Curvin Dellinger, Lebanon; Rhea Reese, 
Hershey; Morton Spector, Harrisburg; E. Peter Strickler, 
Lebanon; Harlan Wengert, Lebanon; and E. D. Williams, Jr., 
Lebanon. 

Reinhart said the scholarship campaign, which has a 
$750,000 goal, is a change in the college's annual giving 
fund. He explained: "We have made a commitment to earmark 
all funds raised in our annual campaign for scholarships and 
financial aid to students and our new giving clubs reflect 
that commitment." 

Under the new plan, club levels are tied to blocks of 
time on a student's scholarship. For example, the Professors 
Club equals one week's tuition for one student or $170, the 
Deans Club represents a month's tuition for one student, or 
$680, and the Presidents Club, at $1,360, covers 2 months 
of a student's tuition. 

Two new societies have been added and are also tied to 
scholarship aid. Donors of a full year's tuition ($5,850) 
become members of the Founders Society. A gift of $11,700, 
equivalent to a year's tuition for two students, qualifies 
one for membership in the Trustees Associates. 

Reinhart said the new clubs will encourage the idea of 
"people giving to people rather than to bricks and mortar." 
Tentative plans are to kick off the campaign on October 25 
with a luncheon at the college. 



The Valley 23 



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