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Full text of "Vanguard (1972)"

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ifferent View 
Vanguard 1972 
Northwest High School 
Indianapolis, Indiana 







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Table of contents 

Brainwork 1 2 

Relations 28 

Law and Order 42 

Escape 50 

Sweat 66 

Culture 92 

Maturity 1 16 

Album &» 128 



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"Defore games, after ggmes, after 
school, sometimes even during 
school, students frequent Burger 
Chef to meet friends, enjoy a 



c, and discuss school problems. 





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aglecreek Resevoir located rr 
Northwest gave students a place to 
take a long walk, have a private 
talk, or get away from the crowd as 
shown by a young couple on a win- 






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As a rider flashes by, participants 
in the Little 500 show concern for 
Students ex- 
mt, 
thrills, and disappointments in- 
volved in teamwork. 








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took fldvantd 
facilities of the libr 
aftefischool, and during study peri- 
ods. Library use during study peri- 
ods was limited for students receiv- 
ing in any subject a failing mark for 
the grading period; this ruling 
caused much debate among stu- 
dents and teachers alike. 






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NCA HOT DOS 










(a) /n fhe schoo/ con- 
ference room, Principal 
Kenneth Smartz leads an 
NCA committee meeting 
with Mrs. Betty Niles, 
English department chair- 
man, and James Ray, 
English teacher. 





(b) Steering committee 
member James Poalston 
studys the NCA Evaluative 
Criteria Sheet, with Mrs. 
Doris Bradford and Mrs. 
Beverly Robinson. 




(c) With a new position 
of leadership at Green- 
wood High School, Vice- 
principal Harold Crawford 
prepares to leave North- 
west. Mr. Crawford 
joined the faculty in 
1 966 as the head of 
guidance operations. 






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ffl&35URE UP? 





he North Central Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary schools, a regional accrediting agency which oper- 
ates in nine midwestern states, evaluated Northwest for 
the second time in the school's history. 

The purpose of the evaluation, which occurs every 
seven years, was to determine if the curriculum, the fac- 
ulty, and the educational program as a whole met the 
high quality standards set by NCA. The curriculum was 
judged on the basis of whether or not it met the individ- 
ual needs of the students. The community's position in 
relation to the school's philosophy was taken into con- 
sideration, and the administration and faculty teaching 
methods were also appraised. Another responsibility of 
NCA was to determine if there was a wide enough vari- 
ety of extra-curricular activities in which students could 
participate. 

The entire evaluation consisted of three phases. The 
first phase was a self-evaluation of the faculty and 
classroom procedures. A team of administrators, teach- 
ers, and college officials completed the second phase in 
March when they visited and made an objective rating 
of Northwest. The final phase consisted of a study of 
the changes made as a result of the NCA evaluation. 

Various committees were formed to aid in the fac- 
ulty's self evaluation. Until his move to the principalship 
of Greenwood High school in January, Harold Craw- 
ford, vice-principal, acted as chairman of the steering 
committee. Principal Kenneth Smartz assumed Mr. 
Crawford's duties as chairman and director of guidance. 
The steering committee included: Mrs. Doris Bradford, 
English teacher; Peter Davis, guidance counselor; Mrs. 
Alice Hauss, physical education teacher; and Mrs. Judy 
Hinshaw, business education teacher. 

Other members of the committee were: James Poals- 
ton, physical education department chairman; James 
Ray, English teacher and director of publications; Jo- 
seph Reynolds, art department chairman; and Mrs. Be- 
verly Robinson, English teacher. 



(a) Miss Elizabeth Brayton 
seems satisfied as she listens 
to her French students recite in 
the foreign language lab. 

(b) Intent on accuracy, chem- 
istry students Bonnis Martin 
and Yvonne Morton, /un/'ors, 
try to determine a compound 
by noting its characteristics. 



(c) Striving to become a multi- 
media center, the library at- 
tracts many students during 
study halls for research or 
leisurely reading. 

(d) Encouraged by "Race the 
clock" on the wall, students 
make ready for a timed read- 
ing in a new course, speed 
reading, initiated for college- 
bound seniors. 




5CHQ0L CURRICULUM ADJUSTS 




Research papers for English classes 
involved a great deal of work for 
teacher and student alike. After the 
student has taken notes, outlined, 
written and rewritten, the teacher 
must evaluate each paper individ- 
ually, checking for content, form 
and grammar. Mrs. Doris Bradford 
tabulated the number of grammar 
errors committed by her English 7 
classes, with the following results: 



punctuation errors 


2,221 


spelling errors 


819 


incorrect use of pronoun 


363 


dangling modifiers 


262 


shifts in tense of verb 


223 


faulty paralleism 


207 


faulty diction 


139 


misplaced modifiers 


125 


sentence fragments 


87 


run-on sentences 


68 



I o provide Northwest students with the most com- 
prehensive education possible, several depart- 
ments added new courses to the curriculum and 
employed new equipment as well as updated 
teaching methods. 

Northwest's curriculum, which included 307 
courses, was planned with the students' individual 
needs and interests in mind. Some courses were 
added to the curriculum by the request of the par- 
ents; for example, ROTC was initiated by the par- 
ents in 1968. Parents also suggested a course in 
automobile mechanics, but due to lack of sufficient 
automobile facilities, it was questionable if this 
course would become reality. 

The English department, which assigned students 
to classes on the basis of teacher recommenda- 
tions, reading test scores and IQ scores, concen- 
trated its efforts on improved reading and spelling. 
English classes were given routine spelling and vo- 
cabulary tests and new reading machines were 
also used to increase reading speed and com- 
prehension. In the spring, the English department 
organized mini-courses which lasted 1 days and 
were concerned with subjects including astrology, 
sports literature, creative writing, debate and im- 
promtu speaking. These courses required no tests 
or homework and grades were based on the 
pass/fail system. The mini-courses helped students 
develop reading, writing, speaking and listening 
skills. 

In keeping with this improved reading policy, 
students enrolled in French 9 read the full-length 
French novel, L'Etranger while Spanish students 
made in-depth studies of lessons offered in their 
textbooks, (continued, p. 18) 



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The science department furnished a number of Physics 
and Chemistry students with the opportunity to travel to 
the University of Chicago, November 1 3. While touring 
the university, these students examined the science facil- 
ities and listened to lectures on a wide range of topics, 
opportunity to travel to the University of Chicago, No- 
vember 1 3. While touring the university, these students 
examined the science facilities and listened to lectures 
on a wide range of topics. 

For students completing General Math 1 -2 and desir- 
ing to continue in math, Geometry IX was added to the 
curriculum. The math department also offered advanced 
computer math using the school's computer terminal and 
the basic machine language. 





The business department obtained the first computer; 
given to a school business department in Indianapolis. 
The new computer was used by data processing, ma- 
chine calculus, and bookkeeping classes; teachers in this; 
department received special training for its operation.. 
Business opportunities, a new course which helped stu- 
dents recognize what vocations they were best suited 
for, was also added. 

The Apprenticeship Information Center of the Indiana 
Security Division loaned the industrial arts department 
its films concerning apprenticeship programs. Students s 
learned what programs were available and what the? 
qualifications were for each. 

The music department employed revised teaching; 
methods with the A, B, and D bands and during specific 
grading periods, the Concert Choir adopted a self-grad- 
ing system. 

The library, which circulated approximately 1,339 off 
its 24,825 volumes monthly, completely changed itsi 
traditional image to that of a multi-media center. By 
compiling all audio visual equipment, pamphlets, over- 
lays, and books in a single card catalogue, students t 
were able to do all research work in one location. The; 
library also obtained a copying machine which allowed 1 
students to duplicate materials as opposed to the usual 
routine of checking them out. In addition, new reader 
printers with microfilmed occupational briefs students 
discover job opportunities in the surrounding community. 

Miss Cynthia Werner directed a new special educa- 
tion program which was created to provide certain stu- 
dents with individual attention. The program was di- 
vided into three classes composed of approximately 14 
students each and dealt with such subjects as English, 
citizenship, and guidance. Students in these classes 
were allowed to pursue the different topics for extended 
periods of time. 



(a) Using a vice and elbow 
grease, Lonny Grimes, senior, 
employs his manual skills in a 
a metal shop class. 

(b) After adding figures man- 
ually, Christy Campbell, jun- 
ior, rechecks her work with a 
machine calculator. 



(c) Home economices teacher 
Mrs. Pat Thomas shows Dawn 
Outerbridge, sophomore, how 
to measure cloth to fit a 
pattern. 



(d) Stacy Loncar, senior, con- 
centrates on forming the fine 
lines of her clay sculpture. 

(e) With nimble fingers, Vend- 
etta Green, junior, brings a 
melody from her violin in 
orchestra. 




TO flEET ACADEMIC CHALLENGES 




CODE 



85590 



INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOL- 
GRADE REPORT 

NORTHWEST HIGH SCHOOL 



HR or CC024Q NAME 



SUBJECT 



TEACHER 



NAME 



CR. 



VALUE 



1ST SIX WEEKS 



POINTS COM 



2ND SIX WE 



0096PUB TEL 

NG 6G 
5IUS HIS 2 

C MATH 1 

2 



01 




07I0 

08 



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RAY 

YOUNig 
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0B 
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^ HONOR POINTS AVERAGE- 



A9\E BRdCBTH^T 



^•n February 3, 1972, an unusual overcrowding situ- 
ation occured at Northwest: the conference room adja- 
cent to the main office, traditionally the site where prin- 
cipal Kenneth Smartz awarded certificates to straight 
"A" students for their work, could not accommodate 
the record 42 8.0 average students, and the group was 
forced to move to the science lecture hall. Compared 
with the first grading period at Northwest in 1 963, 
when 157 achieved honor roll status, including one with 
an all-A record, the first semester final mark of 434 
honor students in the 1971-72 year greatly surpassed 
the initial figure. At the other end of the grading scale, 
471 students received one or more failing grades on the 
semester-end reports. But how well an F or straight A's 
define a student's abilities was a question that many, 
students and teachers alike, asked. 

Through the years, educators have come to realize 
the necessity for effective methods of evaluating stu- 



PHONE 921«"13 

e.sch. 0108 date Q4/2s 



3RDSIXWIEKS 



All POINTS 




222 



RENT'S COPY (OVER) 



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dents' abilities. The marking system consisting of the let- 
ters: A-honor standing, B-High, C-average, D-low, F-fail- 
ing, l-incomplete, E-conditional and W-withdrawl, and a 
series of code numbers indicating insufficiency in such 
areas as l-attendance, 2-daily preparation, 3-class re- 
sponse, 4-interest, 5-tests, and 6-citizenship was 
created to fulfill this need. The Carnegie Unit, a meas- 
urement of the amount of time required to attain one 
credit, was devised as an additional means of eval- 
uation. There existed, however a variety of contrasting 
ideas regarding the actual purpose and validity of the 
letter grade system. 

Some believed that grades served as a kind of outlet 
for students' natural competitiveness; others felt that 
grades helped students to establish personal identities 
since they provided the opportunity for comparison of 
academic achievements. "This is a competitive world 
and if students don't learn to compete now, they will 



never be able to make it later in life," commented Mrs. 
Arwilda Burton, guidance counselor. 

Of those who opposed the present grading system, 
most offered the pass /fail system as a replacement. 
This would hypothetically de-emphasize the sometimes 
heated competition many students dislike, and shift im- 
portance to the amount of learning gained from a class. 
Dr. Gilbert Shuck, guidance counselor, disagreed, be- 
lieving that dispensing with grades would prove to be 
unjust because students who work to maintain high aca- 
demic standards would receive equal recognition as 
those who put forth no effort at all. In. addition, col- 
leges, universities and future employers would have 
little or no criterion on which to base their evaluations of 
students' individual qualifications. 

Dissatisfaction with the grading system did not reach 
a high enough level to warrant a serious revamping; it 
seems unlikely that it will within the near future. 



(a) The moment of truth comes 
as Mr. Harold Hines, biology 
teacher, shows John Teskey, 
sophomore, the outcome of his 
six weeks work. 



(b) Mrs. Sondra Hayes, Span- 
ish teacher, laughs as Pat 
Johnson, sophomore, and 
Rodney Jackson, freshman, try 
to weasle out a better grade 
for the six weeks. 



(a) Representatives to Boy's 

and Girl's State were Chris 

Galloway, Kathy Leamon, 

Sandy Smith, Stacia Loncar, 

and Richard Schenk, seniors. 

(b) While attending the 

Indiana University Newspaper 

Workshop, seniors Fred 

Miller, Scott Daniels, and 

Charles Van Sant make plans 

for the school newspaper, 

Telstar. 

(c) As a student in the IU 

Honors Abroad Program, 

Sharon Switzer, senior, had 

the opportunity to live in St. 

Brieuc in the province of 

Brittany, France, and explore 

the rocky coast of the English 

Channel. 



(d) Named best cheerleaders 
in the state at the Indiana 
State Fair were: (top) Pat 
Scudder; (middle) Sheryl 
Davidson, Tina Litmer, Sharon 
Adkins; (bottom) Terry 
Switzer, Susie Raub, Susan 
Pearson, Lisa Griffin. 

(e) Becky Moore, junior, Steve 
Gano, senior, and Judy 
Pierson, junior, spent two 
weeks in August at the Ball 
State Yearbook Workshop. 




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W hile most students were anxious for school to end, 
others faced the prospect of summer school which be- 
gan the Monday after the regular school year ended. 
Of the 1 100 students expected, 737 students made it 
through the hot summer months. This was one of the 
smallest numbers of students ever enrolled in summer 
school. Summer school principal George Gale said, 
"The reason for the drop in attendance in summer 
school was the fact that many students were unsure as 
to whether they would attend Northwest or Attucks in 
the fall." 

Driver education was the most popular subject with 
262 students enrolled; 70 per cent of the students in 
driver education took health, a required subject. Many 
of the students taking summer school did so to gain 
enough credits to graduate a semester early. 



ffyjMTJDM QFF 

Sixu journalism students , made ptarss for ^^GL? 
sch^p»|wblicatio|^clBWaci summer workshe ; 
members of the Vqngvarci staff, Steve Gano, 
son, and*Becky Moore, juniors. atterf^^H^^H 
University Ymyjjrbaok Workshop, August 1-12. D 
the workshop, tnijpw up won an award for superior 
sign work. Steve won the John M. Butter Award for ex 
* ceptional work, and the 1971 Vdffguard was judged 




second best of the 94 high school yearbooks repre- 
sented. Seniors Scott Daniels, Fred Miller, and Charles 
Van Sant, Telstar staff members, attended the Indiana 
University Newspaper workshop July 1 1-23 where they 
improved their writing and design skills. Charles re- 
ceived awards for good citizenship and newspaper 
editing. 

Making uniforms and practicing every day from 8 
a.m. to 10 p.m. for two weeks this summer paid off for 
the Northwest Varsity Cheerleading Squad. Entering 
cheerleading competition at the Indiana State Fair for 
the first time, they were judged best in the state. Varsity 
and reserve cheerleaders also attended a 1 0-day in- 
stitute at Vincennes University. Susan Pearson, varsity 
cheerleader, was named one of the top ten girls in the 
"Miss Cheerleader" contest at Vincennes. The girls par- 
ticipated in nightly competition and were awarded sec- 
ond and third place medals. 

Boys State and Girls State, sponsored by the Ameri- 
can Legion for high school juniors, was at Indiana State 
University June 1 3-20. Stacy Loncar, Sandy Smith, and 
Kathy Leamon, seniors, attended Girls State while Chris 
Galloway and Richard Schenck attended Boys State. 
These students were given the opportunity to learn the 
principles of government and to participate in mock 
elections. 

Sponsored by the Indiana University Honors Abroad 
Program for high school students, Sharon Switzer, sen- 
ior, spent eight weeks this summer in France. She spent 
one week of her stay in Paris enjoying the food, movies, 
and local places of interest. After a brief stay with a 
French family, where she acquainted herself with Eu- 
ropean customs, Sharon attended Lycee Technique d' 
Etat, a French high school where she furthered her stud- 
ies of the language. 




TD TM£ PirTQRS 



I he acceptance of an assortment of honorary titles and 
awards highlighted a number of Northwest students' 
high school careers. 

Senior Gail Baker, one of the two students in the Eng- 
lish department to achieve honors, won honorable men- 
tion in the National Council of Teachers English writing 
contest. Gail wrote a theme based on a pre-determined 
topic as well as submitting additional examples of her 
work. Missy Byron, junior, successfully competed in the 
Voice of Democracy Contest, sponsored by the Veter- 
ans of Foreign Wars. In this contest, Missy was required 
to write and present a speech dealing with the theme 
"My Responsibility to Freedom." 

Journalism students also participated in a wide range 
of contests offered at workshops held throughout the 
state. The Indiana High School Press Association spon- 
sored one of these workshops at Franklin College where 
senior Fred Miller attained second place in the news 
writing division and Steve Gano, also a senior, acquired 
a second place trophy in yearbook design. 

Results of the National Merit Scholarship test re- 
vealed the finalist status of Dennis Adams, Gail Baker, 
Sandra Conner, and Steve Gano, all seniors. 

After mastering a standardized examination furnished 
by the General Mills Company, Diane Herkless, senior, 
also brought honor to Northwest when she was be- 



stowed the title "Betty Crocker Future Homemaker of 
America." This title signified her eligibility along with 25 
other girls for a state scholarship. 

Northwest art students fared exceptionally well in the 
Regional Scholastic Art Awards Competition. Competing 
against approximately 4,000 art student's entries from 
a 51 county area, these students had 26 pieces of work 
chosen for exhibit, 1 3 of which received Gold Medals. 
Their work was displayed in the L.S. Ayres auditorium 
February 25 through March 4. Those receiving Gold 
Medals included: seniors Sue Nolton, Debbie Green, 
Gary Crist, Steve Corn, Ron Harris, and Leslie Malone, 
and juniors Laura Huber, Judy Hayden, and Greg 
Zeiher. 

Competitors in the State Solo and Ensemble Contest 
were also rated outstanding. Among those who 
achieved first place in the various divisions were: clari- 
net—Jeff Smith, senior; snare drum— Jay Cummings and 
Keith Huston, seniors; snare drum and xylophone— sen- 
ior Danny Paul; brass quintet— Gary Cirrincion, Jeff 
Downs, Phil Wright, Steve Russell, and Sonny Hall, all 
seniors; drum ensemble— seniors Keith Huston, Danny 
Paul, Jay Cummings, and Mark Rusk; low voice— Kathy 
Phipps and Suzanne Mormance, seniors. Belles also at- 
tained a first place standing. 







ONI' 





(a) Intent upon the book she is 
reading, senior Gail Baker 
completes her daily studies. 

(b) Concentrating on his wrist 
movements, Jay Cummings, 
senior, practices a rhythmic 
beat. 

(c) Senior Dennis Adams 
searches his memory for the 
correct answer to an Excercise 
in Knowledge question. 

(d) Senior Homecoming 
Queen candidate and Na- 
tional Merit finalist Sandy 
Connor radiates feelings of 
quiet excitement. 

(e) Junior Missy Byron 
struggles to find the correct 
word for her Voice of Democ- 
racy speech. 



(f) With an air of satisfaction, 
junior Steve Corn adds the fin- 
ishing touches to an art 
project. 





(a) After acting out an ancient 
Roman marriage ceremony 
Jim Wetzel, senior juantily 
carries his bride Bonnie Mar- 
tin, senior over the threshold. 

(b) Members of the Latin club 
made their first initiation cere- 
monies interesting and origi- 
nal by dressing in the tradi- 
tional Latin dress. 



(c) The combined forces of the 
foreign language clubs made 
their annual Christmas party 
an international event. 

(d) The Red Cross Club col- 
lected toys and candy to fill 
Christmas stockings for under- 
privilaged children. 



CLUB 5UA17117QA5 



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ith the acquistion of jobs and the development of 
distinctive outside interests, Northwest students found 
little, if any, time for participation in school-sponsored 
academic clubs. Many students' class assignments 
ended after eighth period and they displayed no desire 
to wait until after ninth period to attend club meetings. 
Consequently, the majority of these clubs' memberships 
were significantly decreased, some to the point of the 
complete disintegration of the club. 

In as short a time as three years, six academic clubs 
including the history, science, and business activities 
clubs dissolved due to insufficient time and interest. Yet 
a few academic clubs continued to have regular meet- 
ings with fairly stable memberships. Members of Future 
Teachers of America learned the many facets of the 
teaching profession through films and guest speakers. A 
computer math club for students who were interested in 
operating the math department's computer terminal was 
also available. The chess club, which was composed of 
students who enjoyed playing and improving their 
game, also met occasionally. Among this club's activ- 
ities was experimentation with three-dimensional chess. 

Officers of the Northwest Thespian troupe believed 
that the lack of interest, especially for underclassmen, 
was a result of limited knowledge of the clubs that ac- 
tually existed at Northwest. Thespians, therefore, in- 
itiated a "Get Involved" plan in which they talked with 
the officers of other clubs and learned about their differ- 
ent projects. A list of these clubs and summaries of their 
activities was then compiled and included in the North- 
west High School Student Handbook. Thespians hoped 
that this plan would help to remedy the situation of 
growing disinterest among students. 




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"pposite — Black and white, 
young and old, boy and girl, 
teacher and student, man and na- 
ture, man and God— merged inside 
and out of Northwest. The inter- 
relationship of these extremes al- 
ways generated the entire range of 
human emotions: love, anger, con- 
fusion, frustration, dispair as a re- 
sult, Northwest students learned 
from their associations. 





The people on tNe 
bus qo up & dowN 



L/esegration shall not mean the assignment of stu- 
dents to public schools in order to overcome racial imba- 
lance." Many parents and concerned residents felt that 
the action taken by the Indianapolis Public School Sys- 
tem in assigning white students from Northwest High 
School feeder schools to Crispus Attucks High School 
contradicted the Civil Rights Act of the 1 964 clause 
stated above. Despite heavy resistance, the formerly 
black-dominated Attucks was integrated with the aim of 
achieving 60 per cent white while Northwest enrollment 
dropped 1 5 per cent. 

Attucks was built in Indianapolis in 1 927 by a Ku 
Klux Klan dominated school board to segregate blacks 
from whites. For this segregation, assignment of schools 
was necessary and blacks had no choice but to send 
their children to Attucks. 

Students were again assigned to certain schools out- 



Sill 




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side of their normal districts in September 1971. To 
avoid the shift in assignments, families had the choice of 
moving to another school district, enrolling in private 
schools or not attending school at all. Attendance 
records at Attucks revealed that there were at least 400 
absences daily during the first month of school as a re- 
sult of rebellious parents refusing to send their children 
to school. 

Supporters of the integration plan felt it could have 
easily worked if it had been backed by all the parents, 
and perhaps interpreted the actions of anti-busing par- 
ents as being prejudiced. Those who adhered to the 
principle of forced desegration stressed the idea of 
brotherhood to prevent situations similar to these from 
arising in future years. 

According to respected psychologists, young adults 
would gain respect for members of other races if they 
went through the learning process with them. Whites 



would learn that not all blacks are hostile and blacks 
would realize that they are not inferior in the minds of 
their white classmates. Most importantly, students 
would whole-heartedly believe that everyone is equal. 
This may have been the ultimate goal, but NHS parents 
such as Mrs. Marguerite A. Brown disagreed with the 
methods used to unite blacks and whites in the North- 
west area. ". . . busing of white children will not undo 
the injustice done to the blacks. Two wrongs do not 
make a right." She stressed that parents paid increased 
taxes to build schools in the immediate area for their 
children. Mrs. Brown added that several did so without 
any complications. 

Transporting students from Northwest to Attucks was 
an effort to promote brotherly relations between blacks 
and whites but due to opposition, the situation became 
a tense confrontation between parents and the school 
system. 



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StucIent CouncH 

ilMVESTS IN 

school spiithr 



The student council led almost 
all activities promoting school 
spirit: (a) Jim Dimitroff and 
Laura Munn, seniors, and 
Jerry Francis, junior, make 
signs for the cafeteria with a 
personal footprint. Using the 
new sign-making machine, (b) 
Terry McKusky, sophomore, 
selects stencils for a project, 
and (c) Donna Cullins, junior, 
adjusts a stairway sign boost- 
ing the wrestlers, (d) At the 



pep assembly climaxing a pre- 
sectional school spirit week, 
seniors Ton/a McKusky and 
Susie Ellcessor lead students in 
impromptu cheers. Another 
activity of school spirit week 
was the sale of gum during 
lunch periods by council repre- 
sentative, like Russel Calvin 
(e). 




I he purpose of Northwest's Student Council was to 
promote better student-faculty understanding, and to 
represent the ideas and opinions of the entire student 
body. 

Sponsoring and engineering Homecoming and the 
Little 500 were among Student Council's major activ- 
ities. A large portion of the Council's funds were spent 
on a $500 sign-making machine complete with the nec- 
essary paper and multi-colored inks. The school spirit 
committee designed and posted signs made with this 
machine encouraging various Northwest clubs and 
teams on to victory or success. Occasionally, the Coun- 
cil planned after-game dances complete with live bands 
including "Leghorn," a city-wide known group. 

Student Council also voiced girls' wishes to wear 
slacks to school and suggest student lounges and the en- 
closure of the mall. Miss Diane Hibbeln, dean of girls, 
considered the suggestions and either rejected them or 
presented them to school adminstrators. 

A student Council function that involved every Pio- 
neer was the election of representatives and officers. 
Each homeroom selected one Council member and an 
alternate. Only those freshmen having third period 
study halls were eligible for Council membership while 
all sophomores, juniors, and seniors were allowed to 
run. The candidates prepared and delivered campaign 
speeches that included statements of their qualifications 
and reasons for wanting to join Student Council. 

Officers John Case, president; Russel Calvin, vice- 
president; Carmelita Kosh, secretary; Loreena Sandlin, 
treasurer; Tonja McKusky, historian, were elected at the 
end of the school year by a popular, all-school vote. 
Preparing the minutes of council meetings for the home- 
room representatives to read to their rooms was part of 
the cabinet's responsibilities. The representatives dis- 
cussed Council functions with the class and offered their 
suggestions to the Council. A suggestion box, located in 
the school library, was also available. 

The success of Student Council was largely depend- 
ent upon the basic principal of give and take. Council's 
duty was to fully represent the student body; in turn, the 
student body's obligation was to provide members with 
something worthwhile to represent. 



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(a) Sifting on the floor added 
to the relaxed atmosphere of * 
the "Up With People 7 ' 
concert. 
| 

(b) Mole eyes were glued to 
the Japanese singer in "Up 
With People" as a lead singer 
goes relatively unnotice. 





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44 



EvERybody SiNq AIonq 



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Excitement and eager anticipation vibrated the packed 
gymnasium February 16 as students enjoyed the "Up 
With People" concert presented at Northwest High 
School. 

The purpose of "Up With People," a cast of high 
school and college age students of varying backgrounds 
and nationalities, was to journey through different coun- 
tries around the world conveying their message of faith 
in mankind. Numerous families offered the young 
people their homes and hospitality during their week- 



long stay in Indianapolis. Contributions from local busi- 
nessmen made this concert possible. 

"Up With People" received a warm response from 
Northwest students who clapped, stomped, and sang 
along with the performers without hesitation. The 
spokesman for the group was greeted with deafening 
applause and boisterous cheers as he urged the students 
to "do whatever they felt like doing." Perhaps this dis- 
play of simple trust and understanding was the key to 
the overwhelming success of the concert. 




. . £J»$ .,; mi- 




(c) The influence of the "Up 
With People " concert encour- 
aged Mark Brown, senior, to 
get involved. 

(d) Students, and teachers are 
caught up by the sound of one 
of fhe lead singers of the "Up 
With People". 




44 



Peace On 



I insel, gaily-wrapped packages, lighted Christmas 
trees, and mistletoe were all part of Northwest High 
School students' annual Christmas preparations. Caught 
up by the spirit of the season, the Student Council fur- 
nished and decorated an evergreen for the main lobby 
and dotted the halls with a variety of signs that con- 
veyed messages of holiday cheer. Presenting an assort- 
ment of traditional carols as a gift to the students, fac- 
ulty, and surrounding community, a number of 
Northwest musical groups also contributed to the festive 
atmosphere. 



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EartIi, Good Will To Men 



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For some students, this season was simply a time for 
warm greetings, gift-giving, and general feelings of 
good will; but others related deeper, sometimes spiritual 
meanings to the yearly observance of Christmas. Senior 
Allen King, who celebrated Christmas as the coming of 
Christ, explained the reasons for his faith in God. "I be- 
lieve in God because He showed me He is real. I feel 
His love all the day and night." Delores Davis, soph- 
omore, expressed a similar conception of an almight 
being. "To know there is God you have to be aware of 
the things around you and trust the things that are hap- 



pening and learn not to underestimate them." Delores 
continued saying that she felt God held the powers of 
destruction and eternity. Supporting his acceptance of a 
divine creation, junior Dave Burks added, "Blind chance 
could not have produced living things. An intelligent 
force caused things to exist." 

Although Christmas took on numerous meanings for 
different people, the holiday season was a time when 
the majority of students felt a kinship with others as they 
shared the hope that "peace on earth, good will to- 
wards men" might someday become reality. 










**./ m 



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o. 




ANd qiRls TOqEThER... 



(a) Taking a break from the 
regular routine, sophomores 
Jeff Riggs and Sherrie King 
have fun playing 
"Chopsticks." 

(b) Deciding at last upon a ? 
"sweetheart" ring is Frank 
Taylor, senior. 

(c) "Don't you think this one 
will do?" asks freshman Brian 
McKinley of freshmen Karen 
Wing and Sandy Smith. 

(d) Juniors Chris Black and 
Connie Denton and soph- 
omore Johnny Plummer and 
junior Debbie Winiger meet 
together for a day at La- 
fayette Square. 



J ane said that John said he was going to ask you to 
the show, but he has to wait until he can break up with 
Mary because she doesn't know and he wants to break 
it to her, but he told me to tell you that he really digs 
you." 

It could not be called romance, yet it was probably 
more serious than grade school "puppy love." Dating in 
high school was the beginning of newly-meaningful rela- 
tionships between boy and girl. The conditions for these 
relationships were ripe at high school age; teens as- 
sumed the responsibilities of driving and working, thus, 
problems of transportation and money that students en- 
countered in earlier years were alleviated; and teens 
achieved the maturity necessary to relate intelligently to 
one another. 

Junior high activities that did not require extensive 
transportation or money supplied the foundation for 
high school dating. "I went to after school dances and 



parties in junior high," commented Jerry Chapman, jun- 
ior, "but you can't really date until you have a driver's 
license and a car." After entering high school, most 
freshmen and sophomores looked to the social security 
of group dating to provide a transition to going out in 
pairs. Sophomore Karon Lawrence believed, "You can 
have a better time when there's a whole group of kids. 
You don't have to be the one to start a conversation." 

Driver's licenses and car keys in hand, Northwest stu- 
dents advanced to double and single dating. With ac- 
ceptable transportation, the variety of places to go in- 
creased. Most students chose movies, sports events, and 
miniature golf as their favorite dates, as well as sea- 
sonal activities like picnicking, bicycling, and swimming 
in summer and sledding and ice skating in winter. 

Sitting at home watching television or just being to- 
gether was an all-seasonal activity that most enjoyed. "I 
like to go on casual dates where a couple can just be 




together in their natural relaxed selves," Jeff Riggs, 
sophomore, said. 

Whether or not to date steadily posed an interesting 
question for upperclass Pioneers. Most agreed that dat- 
ing several people was important not only in finding the 
right person, but also in enjoying different people's com- 
pany. Supporting this idea, senior Susan Pearson felt, 
"Dating a variety of people is a lot of fun because it 
always creates new circumstances and problems." Esti- 
mates of how many people Northwest students dated 
ranged from one to 1 ,000, but Kevin Boyd, junior, 
dated "enough to know what type of girl I like." 

Finding the right person was important for boys and 
girls; symbols of a lasting relationship, exchanged rings, 
matching shirts and blouses, sometimes "sweetheart" or 
"first promise" rings adorned many couples. Reasons 
for steady dating varied. "I think when you enjoy some- 



one's company a lot and get along well it's good to 
date steady," stated Evelyn Jones, junior. Some felt 
that in order to explore each other's personalities, 
steady dating was the best method. "Steady dating is 
better," commented Susie Muir, sophomore, "because 
it gives you a chance to really get to know one particu- 
lar guy and find out if he is really right for you." Dutch 
dating, sharing the expenses of an evening out, was a 
practice both boys and girls thought should be reserved 
for firmly established relationships. "Dutch dating is 
nice if you are dating a guy steadily; it is not fair for him 
to have to pay all the time," said Tonja McKuskey, sen- 
ior. However, some objected to it no matter what the 
circumstances were. Freshman Rita Moore decided, 
"Dutch dating doesn't appeal to me because you lose 
your femininity." 





(a) Prom Queen Mary Vann, 
'71, her escort Doug Jones, 

'71, take a break in dancing 

to talk with Loreena Sandlin, 

senior 

(b) Hidden by the prom table 
decorations, John Patterson, 

71, and Kay Shipp, senior, 

discuss their plans for the 

weekend. 

(c) Diane Pullins and Leonard 

Whorton, seniors, pass the 

evening by dancing to the 

music of the George Nicholoff 

Orchestra. 

(d) Mary Ann Perkinson, 

senior, and Lee Briggs 

Speedway High, enjoy a 

lighter moment on the dance 

floor in the Egyptian Room. 

(e) Military Ball Queen Cheryl 
O' Riley, '71, and her escort 

Mark Thomas '69, dance 
among ROTC cadets and their 
dates in the school cafeteria. 

(f) Enjoying the refreshments 
at the Military Ball are Jo 

Stephens, junior and Garland 
Zeiher, senior. 




A MAN & 



In the spring of 1971, Northwest 
High School sponsored two annual 
dances that enabled the students to 
express their relationships formally. 
Months of making ready involving 
traditional preparations bordering 
on resemblance to rituals pre- 
ceeded the events. Buying or mak- 
ing a formal, renting a tux, saving 
money weeks in advance to cover 
expenses all added to the building 
excitement of the dance. The actual 
occasion was usually followed by 
dinner at one of Indianapolis' for- 
mal restaurants and, in the case of 
the prom, a picnic the next day. 

In the school cafeteria, on April 
27, students in ROTC attended the 
Military Ball with its theme of 
"Somewhere My Love" as related 
musically by the Steve Belmar 
Band. Officers, cadets and their 
dates danced in the surroungings of 
flowers, posters and floating can- 
dles. ROTC student sponsor Cheryl 





O' Riley was crowned queen of the 
event. 

The junior and senior proms were 
combined amid controversy which 
climaxed with the vote of the junior 
and senior classes in favor of the 
unified effort. In past years, the jun- 
ior prom took place in the cafeteria 
while the senior prom occured in a 
formal ball room. The idea of a 
combined prom was initiated by 
students who considered the ex- 
pense of two proms prohibitive. 



OMAN EMERqE FoRMAlly 




The Prom Committee chose the 
Egyptian Room of the Murat Temple 
for the Junior-Senior Prom on June 
4. Chosen by couples who attended 
the event, Mike Kirkman and Mary 
Vann, 71, reigned as king and 
queen. A tiered fountain standing 
eight feet high dominated the ball- 
room as the George Nicholoff Or- 
chestra played the theme song 
"We've Only Just Begun," and 
along with others for the dancers. 



V 




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tudents rush by Sergeant John Jones, 
Indianapolis Policeman assigned to North- 
t, as they seek to exit the building be- 
the beginning of ninth period. 






FrnmWs, 




<&&2B> WMMWWM9 



\Jn a crisp January morning, two senior boys snuck 
stealthily to a car situated in the school parking lot. 
Their plan? To unleash a "greased" pig in the cafeteria 
during the fourth hour lunch period. The "lookout" 
glanced nervously around as the crate containing the 
pig was unloaded and addressed his companion. "I 
wonder where old Heaton is?" he asked. Little did the 
conspirators realize that Mr. Paul Heaton, dean of boys 



was cleverly concealed between two cars only a few 
yards away and had observed the entire proceedings. 
Just as the two were nearing the school's entrance, Mr. 
Heaton revealed himself to the culprits and declared, 
"Here's 'old Heaton'." The boys made an abrupt about- 
face and returned the pig safely to the trunk of the car. 

This minor incident, humorous as it was, illustrated 
the need for strict enforcement of rules and regulations 
to maintain order at Northwest High School. "The rules 
that may seem severe to some were created to benefit 
the students and the school,," said Mr. Heaton. "They 
are all a part of the impression that Northwest gives to 
others." 

At the beginning of the school year, each new student 
and all incoming freshmen were issued the Northwest 
High School Student Handbook consisting of the basic 
rules and policies that students were required to follow. 
Outlined in this booklet were guidelines concerning at- 
tendance, hall passes, health services, program sched- 
uling, lockers, the bookstore, the library, protection of 
school property, and standard rules of courtesy. 

In the event that a student willfully disobeyed school 
ordinances, he was sent to either of the two deans, Miss 
Diane Hibbeln or Mr. Paul Heaton, who were respon- 
sible for essentially all disciplinary measures. "We work 
together," commented Miss Hibbeln. "I take the girls 
and Mr. Heaton takes the boys." Problems that were 
most often brought to the deans' attention included tar- 
diness, truancy, questions about dress, and general dis- 
orderly conduct. 

Conferences, which usually involved a 40 minute pe- 
riod after school; suspension; or, in some cases, ex- 
pulsion were punishments commonly administered to 
those in violation of the rules. Statistics showed that the 
record number of summons' to the dean's office was 
held by a junior girl with a total of 66, while the boy's 
record was acquired by a senior with 31 call slips. 

Only one case of vandalism was reported at North- 
west. The incident, which occurred in the fall, involved 
the setting of Mr. Heaton 's office of fire. However, 
through much investigation, the responsible parties were 
finally apprehended and charged with arson. In spite of 
this unfortunate mishap, Mr. Heaton was well pleased 
with Northwest's overall record and appearance. 
"While it has been necessary for most every school in 
Indianapolis to be painted, this one has never had to," 
he claimed. "I really mean this ... I'm proud of +hese 
kids." 




mw&msj Mwm mMWWE>MWE%wt& 



"Students' rights is an extremely vague and confusing 
area of the law. Students are somewhat like aliens in 
society: they have been granted a few rights, but they 
are not considered citizens and have little power to af- 
fect the institutions that govern them. Since there is no 
constitutional law on student rights, there are as many 
different sets of rules about student behavior as there 
are principals." 



state outlined guidelines 7 for attendence rules and trie 
deans strictly complied with these." 

Inevitably as long as rules and regulations exist, so 
will protests. Always seeking smooth function of trS|- 
school, the administration will maintain an organized 
system of law and order. 



—from Up Againsl 



lean Strouse. 



'tudents rights were at times, a difficult concept for 
many Northwest High School students to grasp. As prin- 
cipal of the high school, it was Mr. Kenneth Smartz's 
duty to uphold the disciplinary policy organized by the 
Indianapolis Public School system. This policy was de- 
signed to provide an environment of good order for stu- 
dents so they might achieve ° the primary goal of 
education. 

Each student was obligated to respect established au- 
thority, which included adherence to school rules and 
regulations as well as community, state, and national 
laws. The ultimate decisions of which rules applied to 
Northwest were left up to Mr. Smartz. These basic rules, 
outlined in the Northwest High School Student Hand- 
book, were created to "preserve the rights of individ- 
uals and for living harmoniously together," but, occa- 
sionally, students did object to certain restrictions. 

The deans disagreed on what they felt the most pro- 
tested rules were. Miss Diane Hibbeln, dean of girls, be- 
lieved tardiness to be the most violated rule. "Everyday 
there are large numbers of students lined up in the at- 
tendance office waiting to receive admittance slips," 
she explained. "Tardiness is a difficult rule to enforce 
because of the numerous excuses for lateness; however, 
the only acceptable excuses are late buses and illness." 
Mr. Paul Heaton, dean of boys, believed that students 
most often disobeyed the regulation concerning smoking 
on school property. "I don't think this is due so much to 
the habit of smoking as it is a challenge of the rules." 
Directly related to this issue was the question if a law 
prohibiting smoking actually existed, (see story at right). 
Students also disputed some rules concerning the dress 
code and attendance. According to Mr. Heaton, North- 
west had no written dress code. "No overalls, no 
muscle shirts, shirttails tucked in, and the boys must 
wear socks are my only requests," he said. Miss Hib- 
beln reported that the only basis for enforcing the dress 
code was "discretion of the deans and parents. The 








O moking is legally impossible on school gounds be- 
cause there is a state law which prohibits any smoking 
on school property." This quotation from Vice Principal 
George Gale was in direct contrast to the word of the 
State Fire Marshall's Board which stated, "There is no 
state or city ordinance pertaining to the subject of stu- 
dents smoking in schools. This matter is left entirely u| 
to the superintendent or the principal of the school." 

Who were students to believe? 

Some Marion County schools experimented with 
smoking lounges to observe the effects they had on stu- 
dents. Discipline problems increased immensely and 
most of these schools abolished the lounges due to the 
debris and safety hazards that resulted. Superintendent 
of Schools Stanley Campbell approved one such ex- 
periment at Carmel High School. In addition to the diffi- 
culties mentioned above, Carmel encountered com- 
plications in relation to the Anti-Cigarette Law which 
denied minors the right to purchase cigarettes. 

Despite the conflicting views of Mr. Gale and the fire 
board, prohibition of smoking in Northwest remained. 



WmMwiSm 



Officer John Taylor (back- 
ground) of the Indianapolis, 
Public School Security Divi- 



school spirit of North 
students. 



(c) f 

tional police an 
the Northwest stadium or gym 
' i order should the 



(d) Looking in on a class, Ser- 
ried to keep u[ 
f the 







What do we need cops for? This isn't a jail, it's a 
school." This was the reaction of a great many North- 
west students when they discovered that security guards 
had been placed in their school. 

Captain John Quatman of the security division of th 
Indianapolis School Board explained that security 
guards were not stationed at schools to police students, 
but rather to protect them. Every school in Indianapolis 
was required to have at least two security guards; 
placement of additional guards was dependent upon the 
students' general attitudes and behavior. In some 
schools throughout the city, it was also necessary to 
have policewomen especially for the girls. "Northwest 
has not yet come to that and I doubt if it ever will," 
stated Paul Heaton, dean of boys. "In my opinion, Ser- 
geant Jones and Officer Taylor do an excellent job and 
are a great help in controlling disturbances. They 
achieved their primary purpose of keeping outsiders 
from entering the building and protecting the students 
as well as the facilities," he explained. "They also at- 
tained their secondary goal of maintaining order within 
the building itself." 

As a security guard at Northwest, Sergeant John 
Jones expressed how he felt. "I don't like acting as a 
Dolice officer over Northwest students, but I do like 
working with them and attempting to communicate with 
fhe students," he said. "I consider them all my children 
when I come into this building. I may have to raise some 
:ane with them once in awhile," he continued, "but no 
Dne from the outside will be permitted to cause trouble 
as long as I'm here." 

Officer Robert Taylor, IPS security guard, revealed 
similar thoughts about the students and atmosphere at 
Northwest. "I look to examine the students' opinions on 
ife and look back to compare our values. I feel I can 
elate their views with mine and I have really learned 
: rom the students." Officer Taylor added that North- 
vest had fewer problems with school disturbances than 
any other school. "I think the students want it this 
vay," he explained. 



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I o avoid doing homework on a 
weekend night is the goal of these 
Northwest students who gather for 
food and friendship at their popular 



pizza hangout. 





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Room 118 Diner 



(a) Though table man- 
ners were sometimes 
lost during the hurried 
lunch hours, Terri Bush, 
junior, manages to eat 
her meal with grace. 

(b) A cook prepares a 
popular dessert role 
that was often on the 
cafeteria menu. 

(c) Lunch itself rarely 
took the entire 40-min- 
ute period, leaving time 
to refresh, as shown by 
junior Diane Corbin. 

(d) Don Coffey, junior, 
begins his meal with 
chocolate milk, one of 
several beverages of- 
fered on the menu. 














We try to prepare a wide variety of foods," said 
Mrs. Roberta Smith, head dietitian. "But if Mr. Smartz 
had his way, we would serve chili every day." Of the 
various foods offered in the cafeteria, chili, hamburgers, 
and hot dogs rated high in popularity. When ham- 
burgers were included on the menu, students consumed 
2,218 of them. On days when fish and chips were 
served, 522 pounds of french fries were prepared. 
Cooks baked an average of 1 25 pies daily and proudly 
claimed that there were usually none left at the end of 
the day. 

Since school was converted to a nine period day, 
lunch was served only during periods four through 
seven. "This made it harder on the cafeteria staff," ex- 
plained Mrs. Smith. "Lunch lines were longer and there 
was less time for counters to be set up." 

Cafeteria personnel consisted of 34 cooks, a custo- 
dian who emptied trash, and a student employed to mop 



the floor each evening. For each lunch period, two or 
three students were hired for $2.68 a week to stack 
trays. 

After establishing just how much food was prepared 
each day in the cafeteria, it was understandable why 
between $4,400 and $5,000 was spent monthly on 
food supplies. The cafeteria was operated on a totally 
non-profit basis. In 1971, the government organized a 
plate lunch program for students in need of financial 
aid. Students were given the opportunity to purchase 
meal tickets for $2.25. A choice of two set meals was 
then provided each day for a week. The government 
also continued the special student milk rate which was 
five and a half cents. For convenience, five cents was 
charged the first semester and six cents the next. Be- 
cause of President Richard Nixon's wage-price freeze 
that lasted until November, cafeteria food prices were 
temporarily prevented from rising. 

Students often wondered why the purchase of iced 
tea was restricted to members of the faculty. Lack of the 
proper ice facilities to serve 2,339 students kept tea 
from the students. 

The cafeteria also provided students with an ideal 
place for playing pranks on each other. Tripping fresh- 
men as they made their way to the lunch lines or slipp- 
ing a spoon or knife into an unsuspecting classmate's 
pocket were stunts that frequently occured. For a price, 
students purposely tripped with their lunch trays in 
hand; their efforts were always greeted with uproarious 
applause. 

The prank of the year was students returning their 
trays to clean-up all at the same time. 



Lf * 



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m 



Sports spectacles 
are relaxing... 

I he Northwest school calender was dotted with dates 
on which large numbers of students congregated in the 
stadium or the gym for an athletic event. Aside from the 
game itself, other aspects of these activities were impor- 
tant to the high school community. As a part of the so- 
cial life, they provided students with a chance to escape 
the pressures of school. Two of the occasions, Home- 
coming and Little 500, featured the selection of a queen 
and a court, a custom in high school for many decades. 
The school also benefited by retaining the gate receipts. 
How important football or basketball games were so- 
cially depended a great deal on attendence, which, 
some felt depended on how well the teams were doing. 

54 




In recent years, attendence at football games was fai 
to poor; during the 1971 season, in which the tear 
gained a 2-8 record, many of the stadium benches wer 
empty. Basketball, however, was a different story. Wit 
winning seasons and back-to-back sectional titles, th 
basketball team attracted near-capacity crowds for a 
home games. Evidence of the varsity squad's drawin 
power was seen at the Attucks game, when the stand 
were filled and spectators stood at courtside to watc 
the action, and the Ritter game, which was change 
from the Ritter gym to the Northwest gym to accorr 
odate the crowd. 

After certain games, the school sponsored dances i 
the cafeteria for Northwest students. Admission varie 
according to whether there was live or recorded mush 
as did the attendence. The first indoor dance of 1 97 
was after the basketball game with Manual, with liv 
music by Stonewall, a Northwest band; the dancr 
though it did not reap overshelming profits, was succes 







(a) Sophomore Wanda 
Johnson leads her enthu- 
siastic friends in vocally 
spurring on the Northwest 
basketball team against 
Manual. 

(b) Her face beaming with 
excitement, Little 500 
queen Mary Huber, '71, 
accepts a bouquet of roses 
with 1970 queen Debbie 
Hopton, '70, Gail Hinderli- 
ter, sophomore, and Terry 
Swizer, junior. 

(c) Anxiously anticipating 
the announcement of the 
winner, Homecoming 
queen candidate, and 
eventually queen, senior 
Sue Pearson and her escort 
Dick Beuke, senior, walk to 
the infield platform for the 
ha If time Homecoming 
ceremonies. 



ful by providing an activity for students. However, the 
number of dances sponsored declined each year as dis- 
turbances with students from other schools increased. 
Two well-attended events, the Homecoming football 
game in the fall and the Little 500 in May, marked spe- 
cial occasions for Northwest students. Weeks in ad- 
vance, the Student Council built up interest through 
posters and homeroom announcements done by the 
School Spirit Committee. The Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica club sponsored a contest between homerooms for 
Homecoming which involved displays outside of each 
homerom to promote school spirit. Ribbons were 
awarded to the best displays from each class. During 
the week preceeding Homecoming and Little 500, stu- 
dents nominated candidates for queen. The senior class 
chose six senior girls as Homecoming queen candidates; 
for Little 500, each class selected the nominees from 
their own classes. Both queens were voted on the day of 
the event; during halftime at Homecoming and between 
races at Little 500, the winner was announced and 
toured the cinder track in front of the stadium. The 
1971 Little 500 queen Mary Huber, '71, and her court 
Alison Kemery, senior; Amelia Potenza and Terry Swit- 
zer, juniors; and Pam Dalton and Gail Hinderliter, soph- 
omores, rode in official Indianapolis 500 pace cars do- 
nated for the occasion by local car dealers. Corvettes 
loaned by the Indianapolis Corvette Club carried 1971 
Homecoming queen Sue Pearson and the other candi- 
dates—Sandra Conner, Lauretta Cork, Pat Scudder, 
Sandy Smith, and Debbie Waldron. (continued) 






Looking at these events from a business angle, thei 
profits from home football and basketball games madef 
the school's role worthwhile. According to Georgei 
Gale, vice-principal in charge of building and finances,! 
the cost of these games was as low as $7.00, which; 
paid for the printing of tickets, done in the printing, 
classes. At 75 cents for advance tickets and $1.25 fon 
gate admission, the school was apt to make a great; 
deal, though attendance was again a factor. The con- 
cession stands at the south end of the gym and the newi 
stadium concession stand were manged by the North- 
west Parent-Teachers Association, with all profits going! 
to their projects. Game programs for football and bas-i 
ketball games were produced by the Northwest Booster! 
Club and sold for 1 5 cents. Besides including team pic- 
tures, the programs had advertisements from local busi- 
nesses which helped pay for printing costs. 

Little 500 was also a money-making project. Mr.i 
Gale attributed good weather as the reason for high at- 
tendance and the activity's success. Ticket sales plus am 
entrance fee from bicycle and tricycle teams helpedi 
overcome the cost. Approximately $700 to $800 was: 
spent in preparation for the Little 500. Renting tricycles/ 
smoothing the track, building a scoring table, buying! 
shirts for the teams, and buying flowers and gifts for thei 
queen candidates had to be considered, but despite thei 
high overhead, the school came out ahead. 

Homecoming was probably the only school-sponsored; 
event ending up in the red. The main problem concerned: 
the traditional Homecomong mums which were pur- 
chased by the school for resale to students. Too much 
was invested in mums to be recovered from the football 
crowd according Mr. Gale. The loss, however, was not 
so great to warrent discounting the festivities. 



□ ) Empty stadium benches 
fere common at many home 
ootball games; jobs, dates, 
r lack of spirit kept many Pio- 
eers away. 



(b) As a lap counter for the 
Little 500, junior Jerry Chap- 
man keeps an eye to the track 
and to the scoreboard to 
watch his team's progress. 



•••and fill th< 

fir : §i*pr~~~ 



(c) Students gather in groups 
to dance or talk in the cafe- 
teria for the dance after the 
basketball game with Manual, 
November 24. 




^» 



"I 

1 1 shall be unlawful for the pupils in any of the ele- 
mentary or high schools in this state to form secret so- 
cieties, fraternities, or other similar organizations in 
such schools." 

Vice-Principal George Gale explained the reason for 
this state law which was first enacted in 1 907. "Organ- 
izations which consist of students under college age can- 
not be recognized legally by the school because they do 
not permit everyone to join," he said. The law further 
provided that students would be subject to suspension 
or, if necessary, expulsion if they failed to comply with 
these rules. The fact remained, however, that social 
clubs did exist in many Indianapolis schools. 

DD's Delts, Jadettes, and Black Soul Sisters, all girl's 
clubs; and two boys' clubs, Barons and Puds existed at 
Northwest. Members of these clubs consisted of only 
approximately 1 2 per cent of the student body. All of 
the clubs met on Tuesday nights except the Black Soul 
Sisters, who had their meetings on Wednesday nights. 
Meeting places of the individual clubs rotated each 
week to different members' homes. Elections of new of- 
ficers including president, vice-president, secretary, 
treasurer, sergeant-at-arms, and historian occured every 
semester. Each club had a written constitution estab- 
lishing rules all members were required to follow. Mem- 
bers of these clubs were also expected to pay weekly 
dues of 25 cents which was generally used for parties 
or dances. 

Two of the longer-established clubs' DD's and Delts, 
had 50 members. Barons had a membership of only 20 
due to the fact that many of their members graduated in 




Social club activities ranged ^W- 
from the sublime to the t 



ridiculous. 

(a) While going through the 
process of initiation, rushees 
take time out from selling to- 
liet paper at a football game 
to flash a toothless smile. 

(b) Participating in ceremonies 
typical to college sorority in- 
itiations, new members take 
the group's pledge at a sol- 
emn candlelight service. 




It sh 



law 



lass of '71. Organized i 
Puds also had 20 mei 
ip of 23 and Black Soul di 



jum upon demar 
?s performed su 
iends or skiDDinc 



members of their 



— icially 

oted in. With the exception of Puds who had no in- 
lation, all the clubs planned and carried out rush activ- 
les once a semester. 

Girls being initiated into clubs were usually required 
o braid their hair in tiny braids all over their heads or to 



wear pony Tans, u 
for a week Some 



iates' lunch trays for them 
TTiieii a rushee completed initiation to the satisfac 
of the other clubmembers, it was then decided whether 
or not he should become an active member. If he wc " 
uc v»<j:> permmed to participate in all thai 
club's activities. Members of some social clubs possesed 
symbols of distincition such as T-shirts imprinted with 
their club names or emblems or having all their members 
'ear a certain outfit. 

dished that there were both positive 
I negative sides to social clubs. Whether students' 
reasons for joining the clubs were prestige, security, the 
close association between friends, climbing the social 
ladder, or simply that "there was nothing else to do." 
rere definitely conflicting viewpoints concerning 
their value for the individuals involved and the effects 
they had on those not included. 

Yet 1 2 percent of the student body ignored parents 
administration, as well as state statutes, which banned 
social clubs because the clubs' activities excluded the 
remaining 88 per cent of Northwest students. 



V^onfused, disgusted, or harrassed by the surrounding 
pressures of school and work, Northwest students often 
escaped into another world of a book, a movie, or a 
television show and lost themselves completely in fan- 
tasy or philosophy. 

Money often limited what students read— newly pub- 
lished books, usually unavailable at libraries because of 
long waiting lists, were read several months to a year 
after publication when they were printed in paperbacks. 
Nevertheless, Northwest students enjoyed a wide vari- 
ety of literature; that individuality reigned was evident 
in that no one book could be labeled "most popular 
book of 1971-1972." There was a general trend to- 
wards non-fiction, which might indicate youth's stability 
or search for reality. Some of the more prominent 
books, Future Shock by Alvin Toffler, a look into the ef- 
fects of society's rapid change; The Greening of Amer- 
ica by Charles Reick, about, as it is subtitled, "how the 
youth revolution is trying to make America livable;" The 
Female Eunuch by Germaine Greer, which relates the 
development to a woman's role to today's society; Eve- 




Storytellers like 



rything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex by Dr. 
David Reuben, a handbook on sex in question and an- 
swer format; Hard Times by Studs Terkle, which chroni- 
caled with personal interviews the Depression; and Kent 
State: What Happened and Why by James Michener, a 
novelist-reporter's account of the May, 1 970, Kent 
State University demonstrations that ended in the death 
of four students, reflected interest in society and youth's 
role in it. The scope of fiction popularity ranged from 
J.R.R. Tolkien's fantasies The Hobbit and the Lord of the 
Rings trilogy to the existentialist Crime and Punishment 
by Fiodor Dostoyevsky, read by the modern literature 
class. Students enjoyed more contemporary works like 
The Godfather by Mario Puzo, Love Story by Erich Se- 
gal, Going All the Way by Dan Wakefield as well as re- 



quired reading for certain English courses, A Separate 
Peace by John Knowles, Tess of the D'Urbervilles by 
Thomas Hardy, Lord of ffie Flies by William Golding, 
and The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne. 

Regular publications, following the recent trends of 
specializing and catering to individual tastes, enjoyed 
patronage by students. Mad and National Lampoon 
competed as satire reviews; with advertising and articles 
directed towards college and young businessmen, Es- 
quire and Playboy caught the attention of students, 
male and female; sports fans generally turned to Sports 
Illustrated and The Sporting News; fashion magazines 
like Seventeen, Vogue, and Glamour and liberated Cos- 
mopolitan were read by Northwest girls; for the socially 
conscious, journals reminiscent of the muckraking 




1900's were Consumer Reports and Ramparts; Rolling 
Stone shook off its underground image to emerge as an 
important critique of music and the music society; and 
perennial favorites of male students of Northwest were 
the countless different car, hot rod, and motorcycle 
magazines. With the folding of the long-extablished va- 
riety magazine, took, in November, 1971, the transi- 
tion of magazines to suit specialized tastes was nearly 
complete. 

Cartoonists captured the fancy of Northwest students 
as they also experienced a period of transition. In the 
daily comic strips, "Peanuts" by Charles Schulz and 
"Tumbleweeds" by T. K. Ryan were not only valid social 
and philosophical comment, but also among the favor- 
ities of students. Comic Books, from True Romance to 
Green Lantern enjoyed a revival. New cartoonists, imi- 
tating the style of animated films of the 1 930's, contrib- 
uted to the underground press; Robert Crumb, Gilbert 
Shelton, Ken Greene, and others created cartoon char- 
acters in such counter-culture comic books as Zap, Mr. 
Natural, Tooney Loons, and Noof Unnies. 

it is today 



The motion picture rating system kept students under 
18 from attending movies with R (Under 1 8 requires ac- 
companying parent, guardian, or spouse) or X (Under 
18 not admitted) ratings, limiting them to those rated G 
(All ages admitted) or GP (All ages admitted— parental 
discretion advised). Most Northwest students selected 
Billy Jack as the year's best. Starring relatively unknown 
Tom Laughlin, the story revolved around a half breed 
veteran of Vietnam who has dropped out of society to 
study ancient Indian lore and protect kids at Interracial 
Freedom School from uptight citizens. Students also 
mentioned as movies important to them: Two-Lane 
Blacktop, starring Warren Oates and singer James Tay- 
lor; Academy Award-winning actor George C. Scott's 
Patton, a film biography of Army General George Pat- 
ton; futuristic science-fiction thriller Andromeda Strain; 
Summer of '42, a story of young, inexperienced love; 
Little Big Man, with Dustin Hoffman as the only living 
white survivor of the Battle of Little Big Horn; and clas- 
sics Gone With the Wind and Dr. Zhivago, re-released 
to capture new audiences. 

The medium that stole moviegoers from the theatre, 
television, filled many hours of students' lives. There 
was little question on which program was most popular; 
Emmy-Award winner All in the Family (CBS), with Carroll 
O'Conner, Jean Stapleton, Bob Reiner, and Sally Stru- 
thers, shocked and amused people with its frankness 
and subject matter. Archie Bunker, played by O'Conner, 
became the hero or the enemy for viewers with his 
middle-class, conservative, sometimes prejudiced opin- 
ions. Outspoken announcers Howard Cossel and Don 
Meredith on Monday Night Football (ABC) entertained 
Northwest football fans with their between-play banter. 
Laugh-In (NBC), and hour of fast-paced comedy skits 
and black-outs hosted by Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, 
was toppled from its pinnacle of popularity by All in the 
Family and newer shows. Other shows, Nichols (NBC), 
with James Gardner as a motorcycle-riding sheriff of a 
western town at the turn of the century; Mike Conners 




and Gail Fisher in Mannix (CBS), about a private detec- 
tive; comedian Flip Wilson's The Flip Wilson Show 
(NBC); Sesame Street (PBS), a show directed to pre- 
school youth, but with appeal to all ages; Great Ameri- 
can Dream Machine (PBS), a highly acclaimed television 
newsmagazine; Mary Tyler Moore, as a young, unmar- 
ried assistant producer of a news program in the Mary 
Tyler Moore Show; and Room 222 with Lloyd Haines as 
a high school teacher with special insight into his stu- 
dents' problems, all figured prominantly in Northwest 
students' television schedules. 

Whether graphic, cinematic, or electronic, escape 
routes from reality offered by 1971-1972 media were 
gladly taken by frazzled Northwest students. 

(a) Looking in on Archie 
Bunker on All in the Family, 
Randy Dewees, freshman, 
judges his opinions. 



(b) Senior Sherri Norton and 
Scott Swanson, '71 graduate, 
take in a winter favorite, Dirty 
Harry. 

(c) To expand his knowledge 
beyond the classroom, senior 
David Dukes explores the 
world of books. 



^r 



w. 







hat were the alternatives when the pressure built up 
inside Northwest students, when no amount of dever- 
sions or recreations could solve the frustrating ex 
periences of living in the middle of childhood and adult- 
hood? To escape the pressure, many students ultimately 
walked down several avenues of release, each on a dif- 
ferent level of gravity. 

An impending test or class presentation sent many 
students to the nurses's office with dizzy spells or an up-i' 
set stomach. Mrs. Lillian Resnick, the school nurse saw 
50 to 75 students daily in her first floor office. Although 
some were imposters, most that visited the nurse were 
ill. When a student entered the office, Mrs. Resnick tried 
first to ascertain what was wrong. If the illness involved; 
fatigue, headache, or other minor maladies, the studenli 
would rest on a cot; should the sickness be of a more; 
serious nature, Mrs. Resnick contacted the student's par-< 
ent's if he was to be sent home. With regulations defin-; 
ing a school nurse's role, Mrs. Resnick was permitted tc! 
administer "reasonable first aid." Any dispensing o\[ 
medication without perscription was illegal. 

Excuses for going to the nurse's office ranged from! 
humorous to grim. Mrs. Resnick recalled a most unusual! 
reason from a boy who suffered from acute itching. In-' 
vestigation revealed that the boy's mother had washed! 
his underwear with fiberglass curtains, leaving irritants! 
in the cloth. The most serious accidents she had dealt' 
with involved bone fractures, though there were few. 1 
Occasionally a student sought the nurse's aid after tak- 1 
ing a drug that they could not cope with. However, Mrs. 
Resnick felt that the nurse's office was the last place a 
person with a drug problem would have gone. 

Awareness of drug use on the high school level was 
underscored by the schedule of guidance counselor Dr, 1 
Gilbert Shuck; while most faculty members' ninth periodji 
involved preparatory periods of teaching freshman or; 
sophomore classes, Dr. Shuck's schedule read "Narcot- 
ics—Room 176." His duties entailed educating North-jj 
west of the modern problems of drug use. In February 
and March, Drug Scene.- Indianapolis, a free exhibit at 
the Indianapolis Children's Museum, illustrated the vio-; 
lence of drug abuse with 1 9 photomurals, each explain- 
ing one of last year's city deaths attributed to a drug 
overdose. 

The range of dangerous drugs some students turned 
to included alcohol and mentally— and physically— alter- 
ing drugs; reasons for their use ranged from social ac- 
ceptance to physical need. Discovering the actual num-i 
ber of drug users in the Northwest student body was an) 
impossible task; most kept their habits concealed, and* 
many non-users felt that social status would increase 
with tales of experiments with alcohol or marijuana. 



Escape from class. . . 
escape from life. 



>ressures of school work and outside jobs were cited as 
:auses for use of uppers and downers, pills to increase 
alertness or induce sleep; with habitual use, their con- 
venience often became dependence. Hallucinatory 
irugs and alcohol were more socially-oriented drugs; in- 
ormal get-togethers sometimes became beer or pot par- 
ies, even with the great risk of being raided. 

Legal or not, drug use continued for many students, 
o combat it, Dr. Shuck attempted to form a committee 
>f students to discuss and offer alternatives to drug use. 
ie felt that students could better fight drug abuse at 
Northwest than adults. 

Legal drinking was within arm's reach for Pioneers 
|»ver 1 8 years old when the state legislature passed a 
>ill permitting the sale of alcoholic beverages to all men 
ind women 1 8 or older. As the bill waited for Governor 
dgar Whitcomb's approval or veto, opinions poured 
hto his office; at first, letters ran heavily against the 
tneasure, but later support came from college towns. 
[he late support failed to convince Whitcomb, as he ve- 
ped the bill, claiming it was "not in the best interest of 
le people." The legislature upheld the veto, leaving 
8— to— 20 year olds with partial adult rights. 




(a) Checking the authenticity 
of his illness, Mrs. Resnick 
takes the temperature of 
freshman David Harless. 



(b-c) As part of Drug Scene: 
Indianapolis at the Children's 
Museum, these two photo mur- 
als illustrate two casses of 
drug abuse. 





Two signs of a dropout: a 
clearance card, the clerical 
work that makes him a statis- 
tic; and a lonely figure outside 
Northwest, thinking of op- 
portunities lost. 



CLEARANCE CARD 

X7 John L-ce 
Name 


H. R. 3*8 


Date of Loss l/l6/?2 


Age at. Date of Loss *° 


Grade in School 
Reason for Withdrawal 


... Progress: Good Fair Failure ^air 


age 16 


Child Lives With 

Occupation 

Referred to Social Service . 


Father Mnt.hpr 
Father sales re P- Mother housewife 
Yes No X 



Drop in 

on Mrs. West, 

or maybe 

drop out. 



H 



elping students over emotional problems was the job 
of Northwest social worker Sarah West. In her office 
three afternoons a week, Mrs. West talked to students 
about their experiences with or desires of running away 
from home, pregnancy, absence from school. With help 
from the deans and teachers, Mrs. West was able to 
confer with six to ten students daily, the majority of 
them girls. 

Students were usually referred to the social worker 
by a teacher or counselor, but many came in of their 
own accord. Talks with Mrs. West lasted around 20 
minutes; if there was a need for deeper investigation 
into the student's background and thoughts, another ap- 
pointment was arranged. At first, most were apprehen- 
sive, but Mrs. West's manner put them at ease; by lis- 
tening, an act many youth thought adults could not 
perform, she overcame their misgivings and delved into 
the root of their problem. 

64 



Lack of the type of personal attention that Mrs. West 
gave the Northwest students influenced some to make 
the final escape from high school— dropping out. North- 
west's annual dropout rate reached 13 per cent in 
1971; although a comparatively low figure, it still de- 
notes a failure somewhere. Reasons for dropping out 
sometimes reflected a student's attitude towards school; 
with such words as "regimented administration," "giant 
social club," or "irrelevant," dropouts expressed thein 
displeasure with high school. Almost as often, diffi- 
culties at home caused students to leave school. One< 
Northwest girl dropped out, saw her error and returned* 
to night school, but dropped out again because of "con-f 
flicts at home." In his book, The Dropout: Causes andt 
Cures, Lucius F. Cervantes stated: "The dropout isi 
reared in a family of less solidarity, less primary related- 
ness, and less personal influence than is the family in 
which the graduate is reared." 

Perhaps the saddest excuse given for withdrawal was 
simply "age 1 6," meaning that the student has reached 
the age when he can legally leave school, and he has 
done so. 

Through individual efforts of the faculty, a potential i 
dropout was recognizable early and was given special' 
attention. In an endeavor to realize the discovery of 
such students, the Indianapolis Public Schools increased 
their facilities with guidance, and psychological and so- 
cial services, such as the social worker. 







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tudents listen attentively as 
Thomas Briccetti, associate con- 
ductor of the Indianapolis Sym- 
phony Orchestra, explains the story 
behind the next selection to be 
presented during a special fall 
assembly. 




I 




■4, * ,_^ 



-*^ 



I * A ^ % 







The Man Who Came to Dinner 


by Moss Hart and George Kaufman 


Northwest Production Directed by Miss Phyllis Walters j 


Hubert Fryman 


Sheridan Whiteside 


Laura Huber 


Maggie Cutler 


Chris Galloway 


Bert Jefferson 


Carol Wolfe 


Lorraine Sheldon 


Dave Garrison 


Banjo 


Renee Mormance 


Miss Preen 


Jo Waldron 


June Stanley 


Cliff Bennett 


Richard Stanley 


Chuck demons 


Mr. Stanley 


Barb Horn 


Mrs. Stanley 



(a) Amazed at her fiance's un- 
usual behavior, Maggie 
(Laura Huber) stares open- 
mouthed at a drunken Bert 
Jefferson (Chris Galloway) 
while her boss, Sheridan 
Whiteside (Hubert Fryman), 
reserves judgement. 



(b) Banjo (Dave Garrison), 
Whiteside's comic friend, 
makes an impressive entrance 
with White's nurse, Miss Preen 
fRenee Mormance). 

(c) Confined to a wheelchair 
throughout the Christmas sea- 
son, Sheridan Whiteside 
stretches out his cramped 
muscles. 




/\ mummy case may be a strange Christmas present, 
but it was only one of the many unusual gifts that were 
delivered to the Stanley residence in the Pioneer Play- 
ers' fall production of Moss Hart and George Kauf- 
man's three-act comedy, "The Man Who Came to Din- 
ner." The play was focused on a famous author of the 
late 1930's who, confined to a wheelchair, managed to 
disrupt the lives of the entire Stanley houshold. 

Miss Phyllis Walters, English teacher, directed the 
play with Hubert Fryman, senior, portraying the lead 
character, Sheridan Whiteside. Also appearing in major 
roles were Laura Huber, junior, as Maggie Cutler; and 
Chris Galloway, senior, as Bert Jefferson. 

Members of Pioneer Players joined with stage man- 
ager Jared Jamison, senior, and the stagecraft class to 
prepare the sets. A technique used for the first time, 
scrumbling, which involved dipping a cloth in paint and 
rolling it onto a hard surface, simulated wallpaper for 
the Stanley home. A wheelchair borrowed from the 
Civic Theatre and a mummy case made by the stage- 
craft class also added realistic touches to the set. 

The single performance of "The Man Who Came to 
Dinner" was presented in Northwest's auditorium No- 
vember 19, 1971. 




South Pacific 


A Musical by Richard 


Rogers 


and Oscar Hammerstien 


Northwest Production 


Directed by Miss Phylis Walters 


Suzanns Mormance 




Nellie Forbush 


Fred Taylor 




Emile de Beque 


Konnie Hornsby 




Bloody Mary 


John Carlile 




Lt. Joseph Cable 


Gaylene Hurt 




Liat 


Hubert Fryman 




Luther Billis 


Cliff Bennett 




Commander Harbison 


Kevin Huston 




Colonel Brackett 


Bob Hahn 




Henry 



— I 



"£U& fit* i* <*$*£•• 








^L#r -V-«~ 





any parents would have appreciated their sons get- 
ting haircuts— any kind of haircuts. This hope became 
reality for parents whose sons were in the cast of 
"South Pacific," Northwest's spring musical. Striving to| 
make the play as authentic as possible, the boys had 
their hair cut in "burrs," similiar to those required by 
U.S. Army regulations of the 1940's. 

"South Pacific" took place on two small islands in the 
Pacific Ocean during World War II, and revolvec 
around the battles that were fought there and the im- 
pressions they left on four people's lives. Two love af 
fairs developed during the course of the story. One in 
volved Nellie Forbush, an American nurse and Emil de 
Beque, a native French planter of the islands; the othei 
concerned Lieutenant Cable, a United States Marine of- 
ficer and Liat, a beautiful native girl. The underlying 
theme of the play as a whole dealt primarily with racia 
prejudice. 

Efforts to obtain genuine costumes and properties 
were also made. Uniforms for the soldiers were ac 
quired from the Naval Armory as well as a number o; 
other sources. The scenery created some difficulty, how 
ever, as students enrolled in stagecraft were asked tc 
construct a mountain with a real waterfall. 

The pit orchestra performed Rogers and Ham 
merstein's musical sore at both presentations of "Soutl 
Pacific" March 24 and 25 in Northwest's auditorium. 




(a) Nellie and Ngana (Lisa 
Fryman) exchange warm 
greeting- much to Emil's 
approve!. 

(b) Bloddy Mary and Hat per- 
form "Happy Talk" for Lieu- 
tenant Cable's enjoyment. 

(c) Commander Harbison 
relays curt orders to enlisted 
men (Jeff Riggs and Frank 
Taylor) 

(d) Native dancers (Rene 
Mormance and James White) 
perform a tribal ceremonial. 

(e) Luther Billis dances up a 
storm as Nellie Forbush helps 
him practice for the island's 
upcoming Thanksgiving show. 





1 

1 






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Si 






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ith precision, skill, and harmony, the Northwest 
Marching Band with Director Darrel Horton stepped to 
several awards and distinctions. 

Beginning at the end of school, the music department 
offered a haff-credit band course in summer school; the 
course not only taught the basics of band marching, but 
also served as a testing ground for formations and rou- 
tines. Several Silverettes and feature twirlers Shirley 
Cash, senior, and Sherrie Williamson, junior, attended a 
week-long summer workshops at Vincennes University, 
while majorette Karon Lawrence, sophomore, partici- 
pated in the Smith-Walbridge Drum Major Camp. Sum- 
mer work was climaxed by two weeks of concentration 
practice in the August heat in preparation for the North- 
west Jamboree, August 28. 

An attraction at all home football games was the 
half-time show provided by the marching band, Silve- 
rettes, and feature twirlers. The ensemble treated foot- 
ball fans to programs like the one that gained them their 
fourth consecutive first division rating in the advanced 
Group I at the State Marching Contest at Southport 
High School, October 9. Veteran's Day Parade specta- 
tors also had an opportunity to watch the band in action 
as they marched in the October 25 event downtown. 

Band uniforms, purchased in Spring, 1 970, were still 
being paid off with receipts from the band's annual 
candy sale in October. Members sold the familiar 
chocolate-almond bars to neighbors and students for 50 
cents. A $300 gift certificate from Nick Craig Studios 
went to senior Steve Clear for selling the most candy. 



(a) With their performance completed, band members Melanie 
Leet, sophomore; Deborah Baker, Frank Spikes, and Chris Gal- 
loway, seniors await the judge decision and . . . 



(b) 



rejoice at the news of their first division rating. 



(c) Silverettes and Majorette Karon Lawrence show the fruits of 
many hours of practice with a precise routine at the State Marching 
Contest. 

(d) As their instruments blast out contemporary melodies, North- 
west marchers close ranks at the end of a football halftime show. 

(e) Waiting to take the field at the State Marching Contest, Silve- 
rettes nervously watch the competition. 








y X^jH*^^*^t tfUHdj 



Under the direction of Darrell 
Horton and Miss Karol Ruby, 
the band (a) and orchestra (b) 
perform in the annual Christ- 
as concert. 



(c) The Concert Choir sings 
Handel's "Messiah" at St. An- 
drews Presbyterian Church, 
during the yule season. 



(d) Members of 
practice for an 
performance. 



the Belles 
upcoming 





orthwest Vocal and instrumental 
groups were active in a variety of 
contests and concerts throughout 
the city. 

The band directed by Darrell 
Horton started off the year with the 
routine switch from marching to 
concert season. For the first time 
ever, the band was divided into A, 
B, and C groups; A band was com- 
posed of seasoned performers, B 
band consisted mostly of freshmen, 
and C band was a group of individ- 
uals just learning to play an in- 
strument. A band participated in 
the Christmas, spring, and awards 
concerts as well as a band contest 
in April. 

Dance Band, a select group of 
band members, specialized in music 



with a jazz flavor. They performed 
at such school and community func- 
tions as PTA meetings, the Toy and 
Hobby Show at the State Fair- 
grounds, and various local dances. 
They attended clinics to learn meth- 
ods for improving their sound and 
also entered stage band contests at 
Vincennes and Notre Dame in the 
spring. Several individuals , as well 
the group as a whole, competed in 
the State Solo and Ensemble con- 
test. They formed the nucleus of the 
pit orchestra for "South Pacific," 
and ended the year performing in 
Northwest's annual spring jazz 
concert. 

The orchestra, playing music of a 
more classical nature, was another 
major Northwest instrumental 
group. This group also performed in 
the Christmas, spring, and awards 
concerts, and entered a state con- 
test in the spring. A few members 
of the orchestra formed a string 
quartet which competed in the Feb- 
ruary Solo and Ensemble contest. 
Several orchestra members assisted 
the Dance Band in playing music for 
"South Pacific," the spring musical. 

The Concert Choir, directed by 
James Kantarze, was the largest 
ever. Performing in the three major 
department concerts, they also en- 
tered a choir contest and choir fes- 
tival in late spring. Choir sang at 
several community functions, sang 
Christmas carols on the Circle 
downtown, and performed 
Handel's Mess/ah at St. Andrew's 
Presbyterian Church. 

Swing Choir, a group of mixed 
voices, sang more contemporary 
tunes. Belles, an all-girl ensemble, 
also presented popular music. Both 
groups performed at several func- 
tions outside of school and were 
featured in the "Strictly Jazz" con- 
cert in the spring. 

Madrigals was a newly-formed 
mixed voice group and sang cen- 
tury old songs in a cappella style. 
Madrigals entered the Solo and En- 
semble contest in February. 

Performing a variety of songs 
ranging from classical to modern, 
the Concert Club sang in the Christ- 
mas and Spring concerts at North- 
west. They also entered a state vo- 
cal contest and sang in the all-city 
concert club festival in the spring. 




/Viusic, be it rock or symphonic, nonsensical or mean- 
ingful, contributed immensely to students' cultural lives 
for it provided an ideal expression of youth's constantly 
changing moods. 

Radio, a common source of musical satisfaction, was 
produced in a variety of portable and transitorized mod- 
els and was therefore, easily accessible to the majority 
of students. WNAP (FM) which primarily featured hard 
rock in stereo with hourly news broadcasts was a favor- 
ite with many. Chris Conner, generally accepted as the 
most amusing disc jockey, entertained his listening au- 
dience with such recordings as Don McLean's "Ameri- 
can Pie," Melanie's "Brand New Key," and "The Con- 
cert For Bangla Desh" by George Harrison and Friends. 
For those preferring AM radion stations, WIFE, also spe- 

102 



cializing in popular music, was rated number one. In ad- 
dition to newscasts which were furnished every thirty 
minutes, listeners enjoyed the Carpenter's "Hurting 
Each Other," Badfinger's "Day After Day," and James 
Taylor's You've Got A Friend. "Both of these stations 
rated Three Dog Night's "Joy To The World" as the 
number one song for 1971. WTLC (FM) offered "soul 
stereo for the black community" and introduced the 
characteristic disc-jockey, Spiderman. "Spider" de- 
lighted his audience with the Stylistics' "You Are Every- 
thing," Isaac Hayes' "Theme From Shaft," and the 
Temptations' "Just My Imagination." 

Record and album sales also mirrored students' musi- 
cal tastes and preferences. Among the top-selling single 
hits were "I'd Like To Teach the World to Sing" by the 




Expression in dance and music 
music exudes from (a) Tim Pot- 
ter, sophomore, Steve Cook 
(B-D) and Steve Parmerlee (e), 
juniors and members of the 
rock group, Stonewall, at a 
school dance following the 
Manual basketball game, (f) 
Selection of recorded music is 
also a good example of musi- 
cal taste as shown by Janet 
Beasley and Diane Pillow, 
sophomores. 



New Seekers Hillside Singers, Jonathon Edward's "Sun- 
shine," and Nilsson's "Without You." Some of the most 
widely purchased albums were Carole King's "Music," 
Chicago's "Chicago At Carnegie Hall," Isaac Haye's 
"Black Moses," "Concert for Bangla Desh" by George 
Harrison and Friends, and Melanie's "Gather Me." 

Students found additional musical fulfillment as they 
attended concerts by noted groups and vocalists making 
personal appearances in Indianapolis at Clowe's Me- 
morial Hall and the Coliseum located on the State Fair- 
grounds. Tickets for these concerts ranged in price any- 
where from $4 to $10, and there were invariably "full 
house" audiences when groups like Three Dog Night, 
Chicago, the Jackson Five, Beach Boys, and Rare Earth 



performed. Diana Ross, Tom Jones, Sonny and Cher, 
and Neil Diamond were a few of the individual vocalists 
who attracted record-breaking crowds to their concerts. 
Although dancing was formerly one of the most prev- 
alent methods of self-expression for youth, the novelty, 
somehow, wore off. While dances such as the "Break- 
down," the "Jed Clampett," and the "Penguin" were 
successful with students; for the most part, those who 
did dance preferred to create original steps to suit their 
distinctive personalities. 






KJ riginalitity was the keynote to fashion trends; hot 
pants, wedgies, crocheted shrink vests, bodysuits, 
capes, and the layered look were all characteristics of 
students' wardrobes. While some favored the midi, 
which varied in lengthfrom just below the knee to just 
above the ankle, others preferred above-the-knee hem- 
lines or coordinated pantsuits. Knickers and gauchos ac- 
cessorized with laced-up suede or leg-hugging stretch 
boots were also stylish. A considerable number of boys' 
wardrobes included vividly colored wide ties and wall- 
paper print shirts; and sweaters with animal designs, 
hearts, and ships were a success with boys as well as 
girls. 



1 fipi 

Br a 3H 

^1 Bf JB 




Evidence of primitive influence appeared in embroi- 
dered peasant blouses and accessories made of wood, 
shells, stones, beads, and leather. Laced up Victorian- 
style and hammered with decorative studs, belts were 
hard and wide with ornate buckles of slim and soft mac- 
rames. The furred, fringed, suede and tapestry shoulder 
bags were usually pouchy and soft. 

Blue jeans, a casual and comfortable favorite with 
many, were trimmed with studs in the shapes of stars 
and eagles, colorful embroidery, and flag emblems, 
^my boots, denim jackets, and flannel shirts completed 
fhe unconventional look. 

Wide-banded Mickey Mouse and Spiro Agnew wrist- 



watches were a hit and wire-rimmed glasses were worn 
most often than not. "Smiley" faces appeared on eve- 
rything including clothing, jewelry, purses, candles, mo- 
biles, cards, and stationery. 

Girls generally favored hairstyles that were either 
long and straight or short in layered shag cuts. For the 
most part, boys wore their hair long; full sideburns, 
beards, and mustaches became more commonplace. 



Sporting apparel and acces- 
sories that represent individ- 
ual tastes are-, (a) Michelle 
Jones, senior, wearing a midi 
and platform-heeled boofs,(b) 
Karen White, junior, comfort- 
able in a peasant blouse, 
jeans, and a tapestry shoulder 
bag,(c)senior Louis Motley 
with a colorful wallpaper 
coaf ; (d) ROTC Girls' Drill 
Team members, trying on 
white stretch boots for their 
uniforms;(e) Beth Chasteen, 
sophomore, in a hotpants out- 
fit, crocheted hat, and leg- 
hugging stretch boots; and (f) 
junior Diane Williamson and 
senior Michele Davenport 
wearing popular hot pants, 
and senior Jo Waldron in tra- 
ditional skirt and blouse, at 
Homecoming half-time 
ceremonies. 





"Right now I feel great! I feel as though I could 
say 'hello' to a complete stranger and that he'd 
say 'hello' right back. I feet so great inside, I 
love to be happy, everything is going great. It's 
a beautiful day. I feel good!" Lqora Munn 

"/ feel pot unlike a hundred pounds of hot 
stuffed inside a ninety pound bag." Lynn 
Terhune. 




i 6t»hjJUte jl^wei" 



"I kind of feel free. Because blue jeans and a T- 
shirt use to make me feel free but now since I 
wear them so much getting dressed up gives me 
the same thrill. Does that mean that feeling free 
is all in one's mind?" Gary Cirrincione 



"/ feel very uncomfortable in this get up. After 
almost dragging my tie through a plate of food 
in lunch, I am now ready to take it off!! On a day 
like today it also gets very hot in these clothes. 
I'm glad we don't do this every day." Jim Blair 





senior Recognition day was one occa- 
sion when even the most anti-estab- 
lishment students enjoyed swapping their 
every-day blue jeans and T-shirts for 
their Sunday best. High spirits and red 
roses purchased with senior dues identi- 
fied seniors on this special October 1 3 
event. 

Mrs. Doris Bradford gave her senior 
English 7 students an opportunity to 
record their feelings that day and have 
them presented in Vanguard. 



Showing that Senior Recognition Day brightened 
the regular routines of a school day are (a) Sam 
Dotlich, Jim Dimitroff, and David Dukes; (b) Phil 
Wolfe; (c) Chef Crump and junior Jerri Poland; 
(d) Gloria Edmundson; (e) Leslie Malone. 




PuUUsfaow wky 




(a) News Bureau members 
Bonnie Salmon, senior, and 
Konnie Hornsby, junior, look 
for story ideas in Telstar. 

(b) VANGUARD editor Steve 
Gano aids Vicki Marchetti in 
her work on the senior section. 

(c) Sorting underclass pictures 
was a tedious task for VAN- 
GUARD staffers Ruth Horn 
and Judy Pierson, juniors. 

fd) Preparing for the pages of 
Northwest Passages to arrive, 
vocational printing students 



clean the school's offset press 

(e) Fall semester Telstar editor 
Scott Daniels, senior, takes 
advantage of adviser James 
Ray's experience, while sports 
editor Bob Rees, senior, checks 
a page plan. 

(f) Working many hours eval- 
uating student writing, North- 
west Passages staff members 
Brenda Obenchain, Mary Mal- 
loy, and editor Nancy Harris, 
juniors, concentrate on their 
thoughts. 



!D 



J 





1 o j communicate individual 
thoughts and the ideas of others, 
some styjfCnts found a sufficient 
outlet in working for school-spon- 
rored publications. They did this 
with a good jat^gjee of independ- 
ence, for censorship wdl^teually 
nonexistent^ ****" ::, Ot 




News Bureau, Northwest's link 
with local and city newspapers, 
provided such an outlet for senior 
Bonnie Salmon. "I really get a lot 
of satisfaction working on News 
Bureau," she said. "Our job is to 
give credit to all deserving stu- 
dents—not just the 'big names' that 
are always written about." News 
Bureau director Konnie Hornsby, 
junior, added that it was sometimes 
hard for students to realize how 
much copy was actually written be- 
cause what was printed depended 
on the editors of each paper. 

Students' imaginative thoughts 
received attention in Northwest 
Passages, an annual anthology of 
student writings. With the ex- 
ception of editor-in-chief, who was 
appointed by Mrs. Doris Bradford, 
adviser, staff members were se- 
lected by ballot in sophomore and 
junior English classes. Editor Nancy 
Harris, junior, explained the literary 
magazine's new format: "We used 
pages of photography and quota- 
tions from David Burk's poem 'Re- 
flections' to divide the book into 
sections. The poem was used as our 
central theme and was written out 
entirely in the middle of the book." 

VANGUARD, with adviser Mrs. 
Gwen Mannweiler, took an original 
approach to reporting the history of 
the year through Jhe use of a 
magazine format and a theme deal- 
ing with the the entire students' life 
rather than only its school-related 
aspects. "In order to better repre- 
sent the entire scope of a student's 
life," said editor Steve Gano, sen- 
ior, "we are using more graphics 
and a freer design than every 



\0Jl64 



before." 

To clarify the fact that Telstar 
was a student paper, the staff 
added to their masthead: "Opinion 
expressed are not necessarily those 
of the school administration." Sen- 
ior Scott Daniels, fall editor-in-chief 
explained, "We changed the make- 
up of Telstar from a traditional 
style to one which arranges type 
into blocks and panels so as to 
create a more appealing paper." 
Revised staff appointments made 
by spring editor, Fred Miller, senior, 
and adviser James Ray attempted 
to make the paper's production 
more efficient. 



(a) Vocational radio and tele- 
vision students Kevin Huston 
and Charles Van Sant, sen- 
iors, examine news bulletins at 
IPS radio station WIAN. 



(b) Debating national high 
school debate topic— "Re- 
solved: that the jury system in 
the United States should be 
significantly changed"— soph- 
omores John Teskey and Jerry 
Douglas listen to a Brebeuf 
debater while Kathy Kirpis, 
sophomore, keeps track of 
time. 



(c) Performing one of thi] 
duties of an audio-visual de\ 
partment worker, senior Davit' 
Skinner distributes equ/pmeri 
to classrooms for use the foi 
lowing day. 

(d) A-V club member Davi 
Robertson, junior, tapes a re 
hearsal of the spring musical 
"South Pacific," for pet' 
formers to evaluate thei 
work. 



1 



O tudents experimented with sight 
and sound to express themselves 
with speech and debate, audio-vis- 
ual activities, and radio and tele- 
vision broadcasting. 

Although debating has always 
taken a back seat to speech at 
Northwest, Mrs. Betty Fryer, Eng- 
lish teacher, organized the school's 
first debate team. Formed from stu- 
dents of her speech classes, the 
team competed with novice and ad- 
vanced teams from surrounding 
schools as well as intramurally to 
gain experience in the new area. 

Members of the audio-visual 
club, sponsored by Norman Tripp, 
industrial arts teacher, learned the 
intricate procedures of operating 
closed-circuit taping instruments. 
Other groups benefitted from the 
club's activities; tapes of Pioneer 
Player rehearsals, football and bas- 
ketball games, and marching band 
and Silverettes performances 
helped the groups realize and cor- 
rect their errors. 

Applied radio and television, a 
two-credit vocational course taught 
at the Indianapolis Public Schools' 
Instructional Broadcast Center, pre- 
pared Charles Van Sant and Kevin 
Huston, seniors, for future work in 
broadcasting. They drove to the 
center each day to work with the 
studio's cameras, video consoles, 
and radio equipment for IPS radio 
station WIAN and video tapes for 
the use of the public schools. "The 
purpose of the course, said 
Charles, "is to take people who 
know little or nothing about broad- 
casting and make them 
broadcasters." 





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MMxiCUd** 



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Progress 

I remember when my grandfather 
used to go out and plow for hours and 
hours so he could plant his crops. 
When he came home he would be 
tired and disgusted because his crops 
would never grow. It took him awhile, 
but after ten years of babying that 
soil, he finally started getting some re- 
sults. And then progress came along 
and took his farm away from him. Be- 
cause he never learned how to use the 
great mass of machinery that replaced 
his old horse and plow, he was forced 
to quit doing what he loved to do 
most. Now he is a lonely and forgot- 
ten man with nothing to do but dream 
of the farm he had years ago before 
progress took over. 

Pam Alexander, junior 



The culture of high school life in 
volved many modes of expressions] 
the most permanent of these ex; 
pressions are graphic— writing one 1 
art. With the cooperation of Mrsi 
Don's Bradford, Northwest Pas! 
sages adviser, and Joe Reynolds,, 
art department chairman, this coll 
lection of original student com- 
positions and artwork is presentee 
as representing the scope of creati 
vity of Northwest students. 



4 



3^ 



— «*v 




V v M. 



^ 



Kathy Viles, senior 
I. l 



Life 



stai rcase 



life- 
o '<y 



climb 



must 



itsvtf §- 

CO 



Gail Wa I dron, sophomore 



Ay Pal Budgie 

Mile Budgie didn't live during my 
:hildhood, he didn't quite live dur- 
ng my adulthood either. Budgie 
vas an additon to my life during 
,ixth grade— 1 966. It had been 
about five years since a parakeet 
lad lived at the Van Sant house, 
md both my mother and I decided 
o get another one. 

We drove one evening to the old 
Cresge's store (now Golf-O-Mat) in 
iagledale Plaza and walked back 
o the bird section. We selected a 
jreen parakeet with dark aqua-blue 
ail. When the saleslady tried to 
>ring him out, however, the bird be- 
jan to flutter about. We lost track 
>f that one so she pulled out an- 
>ther one— Budgie. It was the best 
nistake she ever made. 

Once we took him home and got 
lim in his cage, he became a skilled 
icrobat. On his perch, he would 
urn sommersaults. When we let 
im out, he would fly wildly back 
nd forth in the kitchen. As Budgie 

came familiar with our house, he 
ould fly almost anywhere we'd 
using our shoulders as a perch. 



He would spend hours with me in my 
room chirping. Soon I learned to 
mimic him, and he would chirp back. 
This pleased him and soon we would 
have regular conversations in para- 
keetese. I began to actually under- 
stand his tone of voice and would 
mimic back in like manner. 

When he chirped like that, he 
would bob his head up and down. I 
started to do it, too, and soon every 
time I shook my head, Budgie would 
shake his, too. Though I was his mas- 
ter, he trained me how to be a bird. 

We became so accustomed to each 
other, he would fly down to my plate 
and eat my food. His favorite treat 
was to nibble at my bacon in the 
morning. He once even sipped my 
cola, perched on my glass. There was 
no food he wouldn't try. 

His bathtime was also something to 
behold. I would turn the water on 
sprinkle, cup my hands beneath it, 
and Budgie would fly down. He 
waded through my water-filled hands 
like a pond duck. There was so much 
he did that there is no room to tell it. 
He was as close to a human being as 
a bird could be. 

I mention him now because last 




night (Sunday) at about 6:55 Budgie 
died. I lost the best pal I ever had— a 
parakeet. 

Charles Van Sant, senior 




/ Steve Corn, junior 

As the blossom opens up to the morn, 
I feel a warm, awakening breeze 

upon my heart. 
As the day slowly disappears, 

silently, magically, 
I recall . . . 
As the sun's warm rays shine gallantly 

upon the petals, 
And as the flower reaches out to 

the sky, 
I reach out also 
But . . . 

As a shadow falls over the flower, 
And its petals begin to close, 
Hiding from the dark emptiness of 

the night, 
I realize 

Pain, happiness; sorrow, joy; 
Love 
Is it worth it? 

Cathy Kiefer, junior 



The Desert 

When I was a child, I lived in Las 
Vegas for two years. There I lived 
with my grandparents. I enjoyed play- 
ing in the desert. It was hot and dry. 
The drab colors were very soothing to 
my eyes. I liked the soft brown of the 
sage brush and the tan sand of the 
dunes. In the background were large 
mountains with long, stretching shad- 
ows across the barren land of the 
West. There, I could think of my prob- 
lems and straighten them out. The air 
was clear. I could see a hundred 
miles. It was quiet; everything was 
still. I enjoyed the desert; my mind 
was set free. 

Mark Brezko, freshman 




Leslie Malone, senior 



Whe 



I laughed 

when the leaves colored 

when the sun smiled 

when the clouds danced 

because I was alone. 
I cried 

when the leaves died 

when the sun sank 

when the clouds gathered 

because I was lonely. 

Dee Norris, senior 




A Double Existence 

"I do not want to be part of my 
brother." Chang told doctor after 
doctor. "I want to be separate!" 
But the greatest surgeons refused 
to undertake an operation that was 
feared might kill them both. It 
seemed hopeless. 

After endless years of seeking 
physical separation, bitterly dis- 
appointed, Chang began to drink 
heavily. Even though Eng protested, 
Chang would ignore him and find 
peace within his bottle. 

Their lives were lived as freaks. 
They were exhibited throughout Eu- 
rope as the rarest aspect of life. In 
America they were displayed to 
thousands of people by P. T. 
Barnum. They were a popular at- 
traction and brought many custom- 
ers so they had saved a small for- 
tune after working many years for 
Barnum. 

But even their fortune could 
never buy them separation or hap- 
piness. They were bound to each 
other for life by a band of flesh at 
their torsos. Chang and Eng were 
the inseparable Siamese twins. 
God and man made no attempt to 
separate them. 

After 45 years of constant com- 
panionship and with no hope of 
separation, Chang and Eng became 
very bitter towards one another. 
Chang would result to violence and 



sometimes cruelly beat his brother 
and then turn towards his bottle for 
comfort. Eng withstood his brother's 
blows physically, but mentally he was 
building a burning hatred toward his 
brother. His heart had turned cold ano 
he had changed. No more did he talk 
but retreated into a world of silence 
Each day it grew worse; days went by 
without a word spoken. 

Finally, one night after finishing his 
bottle, Change broke the silence 
"What in the hell's wrong with you? 
You know it's torture for me, too! 
Speak!" 

No reply came from Eng but c 
blank look. Chang violently struck his 
brother, causing him to lose his breath 
and gasp. 

"I hate you, my brother!" cnec 
Eng. 

Chang began to laugh and Enc 
once again withdrew into his world o 
silence and no more was spoken. 

Three long years passed as the> 
continued their bitter fighting ant 
quarreling. Chang suffered from bron 
chitis because of his drinking. Enc 
could not return to reality and showec 
signs of insanity. Their fortune ha< 
disappeared, and they were left perv 
niless. They joined a small circus, bu 
the money they made could not sup 
port them both. With this new prob 
lem Eng became vey violent inside 
His hatred had grown so much that h( 
could no longer hold back. 

That night, a terrible bloody screarr. 
disturbed the silence. 

"Oh, my God! What are yoi 
doing?" cried Chang. 

But nothing could stop Eng. Hi 
hands were painted with blood whil' 
he muttered "I'll soon be free." 

Change tried to put up a struggh 
but became sick to his stomach whil 
Eng continued his evil deed. Blooi 
was all over as he hacked at the bant 
of flesh. Although he was weak 
something inside made him continue 
Freedom from his brother was his in 
sane thought. Soon Eng completed hi 
crude operation. He put down hi 
knife and lay beside his brother. Hi 
body was weak from loss of blood. 

Now he looked at his brother an> 
touched him saying "We are free. 
But no reply came from his brother' 
cold lips. Eng didn't realize death wa 
payment for this freedom. And now 
realizing what he had done, he re 
treated back into his world of silenc 
forever. 

Patricia Johnson, sophomore 



Elepha 

They are big and fat, 
Circuses have lots of ther 
They look like grey walls. 



Danny Crump, freshmar 



dfull of Hdpp 



9) /eaj 01 ;3 8 * 



n Arthur, sophomore 



M/ltHi \4rfo64jp£ct*4/t CAA6foy*Ay 




No different from anyone else, I have 
my likes and dislikes. But there are 
times when you really dislike some- 
thing all because you don't think you 
can do it and it presents a challenge 
to you. With me it was boxing. 

Everyone had been telling me I 
should try boxing. I didn't know any- 
thing about it, and I thought it would 
be fun to try. Thus, I got on the boxing 
team at the Community Center and 
began my training. 

After about a month, I was sched- 
uled for my first bout. I was confident, 
but confidence doesn't win a fight, 
and I took a beating. I left the ring 
with an extra lip, a broken nose, and 
a broken heart. I lost my second bout 
also. Now I felt like quitting. I had 
made it up in my mind that I hated 
boxing. But there was something in 
me that wouldn't let me. I kept trying 
to improve my style and technique 
with no real objective in mind. It's no 
fun training day after day and getting 
hurt. But what makes you keep on de- 
spite the risks? I think that my hate for 
boxing is really my love for it. 

Clarence Moreland, sophomore 






'^ 




(a)Working as a 

veteranarian's assistant at the 

Westside Animal Clinic gives 

junior Becky Moore a chance 

to work with all types of 

animals, from dogs to 

iguanas. 



(b) During a break in her 

secretarial work at the 

Indianapolis Museum of Art, 

senior Sandy Smith enjoys a 

spare moment in the museum 's 

gift shop. 



(c) While earning money for 

college or personal expenses, 

David Carter, junior, finds his 

job at Baskin-Robbins Ice 

Cream a good chance to 

observe human nature. 





I he working world outside is so different— so adult. 
The sudden responsibility made me realize how much 
growing up I had to do. It's such a change from high; 
school— they don't spoon-feed you out there." 

Northwest students agreed that school life and em- 
ployment were two separate worlds; they felt thati 
knowledge gained from individual experiences proved:' 
as valuable as the money. 

Over 60 per cent of Northwest upperclassmen were 
employed at some time during the year and the majority i 
of these did not work to support themselves or their I 
families, but were saving for extra expenses and for the j 
future. Laura Munn, senior, felt that her job helped her 
to learn to budget her time as well as her money, "Just 
about all of my money went into the bank for college," 
she said. Gregg Shires, senior, felt that it would have 
been hard to get alone without some financial assist- 
ance from his parents. "All of the money I earned went 
into the bank for college or I used it for dates," he { 
explained. 

Searching for a job was a problem for students due to 
the high rate of unemployment and a lack of available 
time. In general, those who did find jobs considered 
themselves lucky and enjoyed their work. 

David Carter, junior, felt that his job at an ice cream 
store provided him with the opportunity to study people. 
"It's interesting trying to guess what kind of ice cream 



TH 





people aft^Qjng to buy 

are reflected bjfathe ice cream the)§ 



Lafayette 
provided stu 
the-counter 
house jobs 
worked in res 
ferred to babysit or delive 



ther loo 

iriety of cashier 

ell as stockroom 



srcentage of, students 
stores, others pre- 
their spare time. 




us. We jusffry to fino* jobs that fit students' personalitieSj 
and schedules." Guidance office files held information 
regarding types of employment, qualifications 
and applications for various positions. Mr. Cummj 
also placed calls to several businesses searching for 
openings. "A lot depended on the person's initiativ<J 
simply introduced students to the possibi lities of 
ment because I had access to the resouTS 



Becky / 
mal Cli 
really li 

Senk 
more frc 
departr 
own two 
own and b 
confidence." 

Although job placement was not a required duty of 
guidance counselors, students found willing assistance 
from this department. MraKtchard Cummins, head of the 
guidance department saia; "It is no inconvenience for 



he gained much 
e job I had in a 
to stand on my 
decisions on my 
ilt up my\|elf- 



- 



placement for students was Miss Diane Hibblen, 
girls. "I knew of girls whose abilities suited the jol 
merely told them about it," she said. Sandy Smif 
ior, accredited Miss Hibblen with alerting her to 
for secretarial work at the Indianapc 
vrt. "I really appreciated Miss Hibblen] 
leal— I choose my own hours so th« 
conflicT^Wh school activities or homework." 

Business department head, Miss Marguerite | 
also went out of her way calling various firms 
quiring about job openings. Employers had sucl 
luck with Northwest students, that they began 
Miss Lamar to ask if there were others she could] 
mend. In addition, Miss Lamar helped students er 
lege, obtain scholarships, and find interesting bi 
oriented careers. "I enjoy dealing with the 
personal lives," she said. "I just try to find a nic| 
can fit into." 



of 



op- 



>n't 




W hen she first found out she was pregnant, her first 
impulse was to run away. But at 1 7, and unmarried, 
where could she go? She ended up facing her parents 
with the trruth. The conflicts and tensions resulted in her 
parents' divorce. She completed school, was graduated, 
and then married in her sixth month of pregnancy. 

The story of this Northwest girl was in no way a new 
one, although the attitudes towards the situation be- 
came more open and honest. It was unlikely that the 
problem of teenagge pregnancies could remain Amer- 
ica's "skeleton" in the closet," for statistics bore a 
startingly high figure of unplanned births. A newscast 
disclosed the fact that Chinese teenagers were respon- 
sible for only one percent of their country's birthrate, 
while American teens were answerable for 1 7 per cent. 

Sociologists and other researchers of human behavior 
stated that young adults tended to act out the per- 
missive sexual ethic, which was based on the attitude 
that sex before marriage was all right if the two people 
loved each other. 

Why this trend of permissiveness? It was not just an- 
other of the changes in time, brought about a new gen- 
eration. Psychologists believed it to be more deeprooted 
than that. According to these behavioralists, young 
adults were seeking a security and fulfillment of emotio- 
nal needs that the family failed to provide them. The ba- 
sic unit of society, the family, underwent considerable 
turmoil and change in its living patterns. At any rate, the 



occurence of pregnancy out of wedlock did exist, and in 
increasing numbers. 

At Northwest, like any high school of its size, it was 
not uncommon for girls to withdraw as a result of preg- 
nancy. Individual teachers who knew of these situations 
spent extra time giving whatever help could to the girls. 
There were also two home economic courses, home 
nursing and family living, which dealt with the physical 
and emotional needs of high school girls. Mrs. Pat 
Thomas, home economics teacher, felt that the attitude 
of most Northwest teachers was one of concern. Preg- 
nant girls were allowed to remain in school as long as 
their health permitted if they did not disrupt the learning 
atmosphere. It appeared that this open approach less- 
ened the curiosity and the gossipers. As one girl com- 
mented, "My pregnancy just hurried things; I was get- 
ting married anyway. I acted naturally excited about it, 
like it was nothing unusual, and I think my attitude in- 
fluenced people around me." 

A program in California, New York, Maryland, and a 
few other states allowed pregnant girls to continue 
school. These girls studied home care in the morning, 
and academic subjects in the afternoon. After the birth 
of the child, if she had no one to care for him, the 
mother was permitted to bring the baby to classes with 
her. This program strengthened the attitude of accept- 
ance towards out-of-wedlock pregnancies and helped 
the mothers regain their self-respect. The atmosphere 
benefited everyone including parents, teachers, and stu- 
dents. The boys cleaned up their language, began open- 
ing doors, and even offered to push strollers. Frank, 
open honesty towards the unwed mother may have 
been the solution to an old, old problem. 

However, not all teenage marriages were forced, by- 
products of pregnancy; some married at high school age 
simply because they felt they were both physically and 
emotionally ready. Yet other students believed that they 
had not had enough experience to know what they truly 
wanted from life, and were, consequently, unprepared 
to face the responsibilities that marriage involved. 



1 



nc 



-S £ 



an 



(a) Members of the ROTC flag 
detail John Fiorentin, Jim 
Peavler, and Larry Elmore 
demonstrate proper care of 
the flag when raising it each 
morning and folding it at the 
end of school. 

(b) As the highest-ranking ca- 
dets in the Northwest Batal- 
lion, the ROTC staff officers 
share the responsibility of run- 
ning ROTC (front) C/Ut. Gar- 
land Zeiher, C/2Lt Gene La- 
baw. (back) C I 1 Lt Greg 
Labaw, C/Maj Jeff Whitten, 
C/Cpt Ron Willis, H/Maj 
Chris Hickman, C/2U Robert 
Hallagan, C/Sgm Thomas 
Anthony. 

(c) Preceding each athletic 
event is the national anthem, 
here played by Phil Wright, 
senior, while the ROTC color 
guard presents the national 
and school colors to the 
crowd. 





aving a birthday on either of the days March 6 or 7 
would seem unimportant to most people, yet to able- 
bodied American males turning 1 9 years of age during 
1 972, those days have a special significance, for they 
were drawn first and second in the 1 973 draft lottery. 

"All my life I was never number one in anything so 
why now?" pleaded the luckless future draftee. Ang- 
uished cries such as this were not numerous around the 
halls of Northwest, but some senior 18 year-olds turn- 
ing 19 during '72 were a little anxious as they were as- 
signed lottery numbers in February. 

A group of 1 05 Northwest youth did not have to wait 
on the draft to catch up or receive enlistment orders be- 
fore they understood what the army meant. They com- 
prised the cadets of ROTC. The cadets served in various 
capacities; a high morale was maintained with the aid of 
girl ROTC sponsors. 

Cadets received military instruction in four levels of 
increasing complexity. The primary purposes of ROTC 
were not solely militarily-oriented. Of prime concern 
was the preparation of the cadet to be a better citizen. 

Like other new courses, ROTC has undergone 
changes since its introduction to the Northwest curricu- 
lum four years ago in the fall of 1 968. The classroom 
grading system was somewhat different. Sergeant Rich- 
ard Heady, ROTC instructor, explained that a change in 
teaching routine allowed for a greater amount of stu- 
dent-cadet teaching. 



Activities in ROTC increased. Besides fielding a rifle 
team, and award-winning drill team, ROTC also added a 
girls' drill team. In addition, the NHS ROTC sponsored a 
Military Ball for cadets, sponsors, and their dates. 

Perhaps the greatest honor to verify the worth of 
ROTC came in February as NHS's own cadet Colonel 
James Whitaker, senior, was appointed to the United 
States Military Academy at West Point. The highest 
ranking cadet in the Indianapolis Public School System, 
Jim served this year as brigade commander. Jim was in 
charge of 1 ,600 cadets and sponsors throughout the 
IPS district. 

With Jim as an example to follow, ROTC continued to 
aid in the development of fine citizens. The 1 05 hard- 
working youths enrolled in ROTC bore evidence of this. 

The fact that a lottery took place in February pretty 
much summed up the military news of the 1971-72 
school year. That is to say that the war in Southeast 
Asia continued. Yet fewer call-outs reduced U.S. partici- 
pation in Vietnam ground action. The slow but gradual 
withdrawal of troops combined with the lessened draft 
calls to create a serious manpower shortage in the Na- 
tional Guard and Reserve units. Of course the move by 
national draft officials to give 1 9 year-olds the lowest 
priority for enlisting in those units did not help either. 

On November 2, 1 972, the Selective Service System 
established several new classifications and abandoned 
other unusable ones to smoothe the administrative han- 
dling of the lottery draft. A new classification, 1 -H, an 
administrative holding category, was created for those 
not old enough to be drafted and those who passed the 
year of their prime draft exposure. All new registrants 
were classified 1 -H and kept there until after the lottery 
drawing for their age group except for registrants who 
entered the service of joined Reserve units. A 1 -H cutoff 
number was set by the National Director as a process- 
ing ceiling. Those registrants with lottery numbers below 
the 1-H cutoff were to have their files activated and 
were considered for reclassification into 1-A, or into 
other appropriate classifications. 

These changes were effected with the eventual 
changeover to an all-volunteer force in mind. Univer- 
sity, junior college, trade and technical school defer- 
ments were phased out of the system. This move was 
important to eliminate what was considered an inequity 
of the former system. 

The clamor for the all-volunteer army was at an all- 
time high but it was just this intenese want of such a sys- 
tem that may have prevented its attainment. Yet, for 
nearly every point in favor of all-volunteers, an equal 
and opposite view was taken. It was believed, however, 
that rugged, adventurous types would not be attracted 
to military service because of salary raises but rather be 
more concerned with professional pride, prestige, and 
elite status. 






123 




(a)Sharing a solemn moment 
at the commencement of 
"Little 500" festivities, Chuck 
Wentzel '71 and Mayor Rich- 
ard Lugar display their respect 
for the American flag. 



(b) To obtain a better under- 
standing of the voting con- 
cept, seniors Randy Thompson 
and Richard Rich experiment 
with a voting machine in their 
government class. 

(c) Senior Darryl Rupe drew 
this cartoon, also printed in 
Telstar, to depict Governor 
Edward Whitcomb's negative 
vote for the passage of 18- 
year-old rights. 



lor American youth, the passage of the twenty-sixtf: 
Amendment, which achieved final ratification June 30 
1971 and granted suffrage to all citizens 1 8 years anc 
older, was a milestone event. It climaxed youth's grow 
ing involvment in national issues marked by expression: 
ranging from concern to violence. 

Before the amendment was passed, Northwest stui| 
dents selected symbolism and the press to display their 
interest in the government. Though long hair and cloth 
ing of the counter-culture lost much of their impact wher 
they became a common fashion for the masses, it never 
less remained. The peace hand sign, created by British 
Prime Minister Winston Churchill as the "V for Victory;' 
the peace symbol initiated by British "Ban the Bomb' 
groups; the earth-green ecology flag; and the clenchec, 
fist salute also became practically meaningless through 
their mass-reproduction on T-shirts, buttons, and bumped 
stickers. However, the newspaper proved a more poten 
voice. Not only did the school paper, the Telstar, take; 
editorial stands on the anti-war Moratorium Day, the' 
SDS, drug abuse penalties, Earth Day, and school dese 
gregation, but also an "underground" newspaper, pub 
lished by Northwest students gave its opinions in the 
few short weeks of its existence. 

But still, no matter how creatively opinions were ex- 
pressed with appearance or symbols, no matter how 
eloquently the press spoke out, the fact remained thai 
students had no direct connection with their govern- 



1 




merit. Yet, with the proposal of the twenty-sixth Amend- 
ment to the Constitution, Northwest students built their 
hopes on its ratification; for they would then be able to 
make mature decisions that would have an effect on the 
government. Robin Downing, an 1 8-year-old senior, 
said, "I feel I'm important and responsible enough to 
express my thoughts and opinions, and to let people 
know how I feel." 

A large portion of students agreed with Robin's opin- 
ion. Boys, however, added to her ideas with the often- 
voiced thought that if a young man is old enough to 
fight in Vietnam, he is old enough to vote. Joe Ambers, 
senior explained, "Since at 1 8, the government will ex- 
pect us oo go over and fight for our country, we should 
at least have the opportunity to choose who we want to 
fight and die for." 

There were skeptics, even among those who stood to 
benefit from the measure. "I believe that young people 
are not sincere in a lot that they do," commented Dan 
Gagen, senior. "I feel that most of them will be apathe- 
tic about voting." 

Whatever the opinions, on June 30, 1971, the Ohio 
House of Representatives voted 81-9 in favor of the 
Twenty-sixth Amendment, making it the thirty-eighth to 
do so, and completing the two-thirds majority needed to 
ratify the revision. 

Though only a handful of Northwest students 18 



years or over were directly effected by the change, the 
remaining students anticipated the new responsibility as 
a welcome addition or alternative to other modes of ex- 
pression. Social studies courses took on new meaning as 
students prepared for the experience of voting; while 
some classes experimented with a mock voting machine, 
others discussed the major issues of the 1 972 election. 

On November 4, 1971, the new voters were given 
their first opportunity to vote. The major Indianapolis 
contest, that for mayor, between Democrat Dan Burton 
and Republican incumbent Richard Lugar, ended, as 
forecast, with Lugar on top; the 1 8 to 20 year-olds had 
not appreciably altered the outcome in either direction. 
yet the important fact was that enough youth voted, 
thus proving their sincerety in the matter. Senior Dick 
Beuke reasoned, "People went to all the trouble to get 
18-year olds the privilege to vote; I figure I owe it to 
these people to show I'm responsible enough to deserve 
it." 

The true test of 1 8 to 20 year-old suffrage will be the 
presidential election of 1972. Most of the Northwest 
Class of 1 972 will have the right to vote. Whether or 
not they will live up to the pre-suffrage concern over na- 
tional issues, whether they will unite behind one candi- 
date or will make individual decisions, whether or not 
they are prepared to accept the responsibility of govern- 
mental participation remains to be seen. 










lS always, seniors greeted graduation with mixed 
emotions — joy for the end of childhood, the coming 
of age; sadness for their departure from North- 
west, friends, and security. From the beginning of 
the school year, they were a select group. Their 
schedule included Senior Parent Night, September 
29; Senior Recognition Day, October 1 3; cap and 
gown measurements, November 1 2; end of the fall 
semester, when 61 Northwest seniors completed 
graduation requirements, Januray 28; Senior Class 
Day, June 1; Vespers, June 4. And Com- 
mencement. Diplomas went to 534 students— di- 
plomas containing the last words of a four-year 
book of many chapters. June 7, 1 972, graduation, 
the Class of '72, the end of the beginning. 



W V 



• ^j, B V 



(a) Silhouetted by the set- 
ting sun, two 1971 gradu- 
ates march in the com- 
mencement procession to 
the tune of "Pomp and 
Circumstance. 



(b) Sen/or class president 
Chuck Haberman, '71, 
leads the Class of 1971 in 
the traditional tassel 
ceremony. 



(c) At the 1971 graduation 
exercise, vice-principal 
George Gale introduces 
Mary Huber and Donna 
Loffland, '71, co-vale- 
dictorians. 





GOLF Jerry Hoover, Gregg Shires, Scott Heimbuch, John Sprouse, Coach Jim Albright. 



NHS 






5 


Howe 


7 


204 


Manual 


204 


8 


Brebeuf 


4 


10 


Ritter 


2 


339 


Southport 


336 


204 


Lawrence Centra 


198 


12 


Wood 





12 


Shortridge 





335 


Bloomington 


307 




North Central 


309 




Carmel 


311 


231 


Speedway 


245 




Washington 


275 


10 


Scecina 





194 


Washington 


233 




Cathedral 


197 


427 


North Central 


396 


2nd 


City Tourney 




12 


Tech 





10 


Chatard 


2 


8 


Plainfield 


4 


252 


Warren Central 


232 


159 


Decatur Central 


169 


207 


Greenfield 


199 


Record: 


11-10-1 





Tennis 






NHS 









Ben Davis 


7 




1 
6 


Broad Ripple 

Shelbyviile 

Wood 


7 
6 

1 





Mooresville 


7 


1 



Shortridge 
Cathedral 


6 

7 


7 


Scecina 








Howe 


7 


4 


Greenwood 


3 


1 
4 


Speedway 
Plainfield 


6 
3 


5 
5 


Crispus Attucks 
Tech 


2 
2 




1 


Arlington 
Marshall 


7 
6 


6 


Danville 


1 


1 


Manual 


6 


Record: 


7-11 






TENNIS Front row. Doug Kendall, Bruce Weisman, Coach Don Thompson. Second row-. Joey- 
Baker, Steve Clear, Jim Blair. Back Row: Ed Bornstein, Charles Ballard, Jim Hintz, Sonny Hall. 



^ J&S*f $< 




r 



*^« w>*"** ^ w f *•*■** f^^ HW ;]W f 






I 



Baseball 




VARSITY BASEBALL Front row: Mike Kirkman, Mike Corn, Rod Davis, Gary Brewster, Mark 
Moore, Gary Wier. Second row: Greg Gillespie, Bill Dunham, John Pourchot, Tom Reed, Dar- 
rell Bohall, Dick Beuke, Lynn Snyder, Dave Morgan, Mike Hinderliter, Dave Cassell, Paul Hollo- 
well, Manager Mike Robinson. 





Zf. 



.7 



I 



#%< 



^fc^tynanWflb^ 




\ 7 \i 



RESERVE BASEBALL Front row.- David Dukes, Mike Martin, Rod Davis, Bob Ranee, Gary Brews- 
ter, Mark Moore, John Stegmoller. Second row.- Coach Bob Groomer, Gary Wier, Darrell Bo- 
hall, Greg Gillespie, Rick Long, John Lacy, Mike Smith, Manager Dave Wilson. 





Varsity 



NHS 






5 


Ben Davis 




6 


Attucks 


5 


5 


Decatur Central 


1 


12 


Manual 


6 


3 


Arlington 


13 


5 


Chatard 





4 


Speedway 


3 


7 


Lebanon 


1 


6 


Marshall 


3 


Pike Tourney * 




9 


Shortridge * 


1 


17 


Broad Ripple * 


5 





Washington 


3 


City Tourney # 




1 


Broad Ripple # 


8 


7 


Howe 


4 


10 


Broad Ripple 


2 


2 


Brebeuf 


4 


2 


Ritter 





2 


Secina 


8 


6 


Lebanon 


2 


6 


Cathedral 


3 


1 


Plainfield 





4 


Latin School 


1 


6 


Tech 


2 


Sectiona 






1 


Pike 


2 


Record 


18-7 





Junior 


Varsity 




NHS 






5 


Decatur 





8 


Manual 


1 


5 


Arlington 


8 


5 


Chatard 


2 


4 


Speedway 





5 


Brownsburg 


2 


5 


Marshall 


3 


11 


Washington 





1 


Cathedral 


3 


4 


Speedway 


1 


7 


Howe 


6 


2 


Ben Davis 


4 


11 


Broad Ripple 





5 


Secina 


1 


1 


Brebeuf 


2 


5 


Ritter 


4 


5 


Lebanon 


4 


16 


Tech 


9 


10 


Latin School 


2 


Recorc 


15-4 






FRESHMAN BASEBALL Front row: Jim Hines, Julio Campins, Terry HofFer, David Szalaiy, Larry 
Downard, Manager Paul Burger. Second row.- Scott Weddle, Bob Baker, Pete Donahue. Third 
row: Mike Smith, Larry Phipps, Doug Berty, Mike Adams, Doug Burries, Bob Giltner, Gary 
Giltner, Coach Rick George, Dave Benninger. 




JUNIOR VARSITY TRACK Front row. Randy Page, Greg Westrick, Dana Standefer, Jett Kirk- 
man, Jim Beck, Louis Garrison, George Williams, Eric Doolin. Second row.- Greg Robertson, 
Terry Meyers, Kenneth Madry, Scott Jones, Dan Bowers, James Walker, Tim Johnson, Rodney 
Zigler. Third row: Matt Autry, Doug Gandy, Pat Troy, John Myers, Willie Wright, Jesse 
Meyers. 



Varsity 




NHS 




44 Howe 


71 


80 Secina 


43 


Ritter 


18 


58 Speedway 
43 Marshall 


60 
20 


2nd Northwest Invitational 


4th Arlington Invitational 
6th City Meet 
15th Sectional 


Record 2-2 




Junior Varsity 
NHS 




63 Southport 
78 Secina 


42 
47 


Ritter 


16 


54 North Central 


50V 2 


Warren Central 


39V 2 


63 Speedway 
40 Marshall 


42 
20 


Record 4-1 




Freshman 




NHS 




30 Howe 


86 


6th City Meet 
Record 0-1 






VARSITY TRACK Front row.- Manager Ed Rasnick, Coach Bill Ritter, Coach Vernon McCarty, 
Coach Larry Compton. Second row. James Hester, Joe Walters, Steve Wilbur, Paul Cubert, 
Anthony Morton, Grover Benge, Bob Blevins, Randy Webber, Mike Cherry, Harry Myers, 
Bruce Kendall, Jeff King, James Collins, Mike DeJaegar, Eric Doolin. 




Football _ aaMBlf _ 



VARSITY FOOTBALL-Fronf Row.- Jim Dimitroff, Randy McKinley, Mark 
Haab, Greg Dunn, Tim Johnson, Sam Dotlich, Steve Queen, Casey Vann, 
Joe Warren, Bob Price, Ken Madry. Second Row: Mike Martin, Dana 
Standefer, Roy Byrd, Chip McQueen, Harry Myers, Eric Bolden, Jett Kirk- 



man, Gary Wier, Bob Kinley, Rick Harris, John Lester, Mark Boston, Mike 
Mutz. Third Row.- Jack Hersol, Eric Doolin, Ron Thomas, Vance Stratton, 
James Hester, Paul Morgan, Mark Sandlin, Tim Case, Mike Johnson, John 
Myers, David Jacobs, Bob Tillery 



&W l *it , yf?!jf '■ i " *£°J£° it 41 JF 



» ' CO i> dV& 3C 14 1 *1 ,••}! 



>*» .• , J 






JUNIOR VARSITY FOOTBALL— Front Row.- Tim Case, Charley Beamon, Mark Sandlin, Ron Blue, Bob 
Price, Mark Freeland, Doug Berty, Joe Warren, Robin Short, Pete Donahoe. Second Row: Matt Autry, 
Max Lambirth, Russell Calvin, Rick Crouch, Tim Potter, Rick Harris, Dave Riley, Mike Kane, Duane Ha- 
berman, Mike Martin. Back Row.- Roger McKee, Casey Vann, Dennis Blackwell, Bob Selby, Gary Spratt, 
John Meyers, Mark Boston, John McQuery, Mike Johnson. 



H'/ < 






2* 



a ; SB <*a 









FRESHMAN FOOTBALL-Front Row.- Dean Collins, Steve Kurpis, Phil Giddens, Jim Slavins, John Hester, 
Garry Ranee, Gary Crawford, Daron GifFord, Pete Teater, John Rosenberger, Tony Pappas. Second 
Row.- Mark Boston, Ron Malone, Dan Roach, Mark Mutz, Curt Richmond, Roger Haygood, Steve Strid- 
ing, John Robinson, Jim Polsgrove, Glenn Clawson, Bill Youck, Steve Franklin. Back Row.- Mike Mize- 
rack, Rick Johnson, Julius Reed, Darrell Smith, Chuck Wood, Paul Reames, Jim Reed, Ron Rumble, Mike 
Scheaffer, Vic Malloy, Chuck Schuford, Jack Gammon, Eric Decker. 




Football 




Varsity 




NHS 






13 


Broad Ripple 


23 


6 


Shortridge 


32 





South Vigo 


18 





Chatard 


49 





Southport 


34 


30 


Wood 


21 


23 


Howe 





6 


Washington 


48 





Ben Davis 


13 





North Central 


30 


Record 2-8 




Junior 


Varsity 




NHS 






20 



Broad Ripple 





Shortridge 


6 





Chatard 


12 


14 


Southport 


8 


14 


Wood 


6 


14 


Howe 


16 


14 


Washington 


14 





Ben Davis 


8 


Record 3-4-1 




Freshman 




NHS 






18 


Broad Ripple 


6 


6 


Shortridge 


8 





Chatard 


6 


16 


Westlane 


16 


38 


Wood 


8 


6 


Howe 


24 


2 


Washington 


22 





Speedway 


6 


Record 2-5-1 











Varsity 




NHS 






38 


Howe 


17 


38 


North Vigo 


17 


15 


Ritter 


50 


9th 


Ben Davis Invitational 


37 


Manual 


29 




Washington 


79 




Arlington 


86 


58 


Ben Davis 


24 




Speedway 


47 


5th 


Washington 
Invitational 




31 


Manual 


24 


27 


Lawrence 


28 


45 


Tech 


18 


6th 


City Meet 




15 


Plainfield 


49 


15 


Broad Ripple 


48 


20 


Marshall 


43 


7th 


Sectional 




Record 1 0-6 













VARSITY CROSS-COUNTRY-Steve Wilbur, Jim Yates, Louie Garrison, Terry Myers, Greg Westrick, 
•Mike Blevins, Anthony Morton, George Williams. 




Junior Varsity 


■i 


NHS 




40 Howe 


15 


58 Washington 


17 


Manual 


47 


65 Ben Davis 


23 


Speedway 


38 


23 Manual 


32 


29 Lawrence 


27 


42 Tech 


27 


1 5 Broad Ripple 


45 


4th City Meet 




20 Marshall 


40 


Record 5-6 




Freshman 




NHS 




27 Wood 




36 Westlane 




Record 1 - 1 





JUNIOR VARSITY CROSS-COUNTRY- 
Front Row: Terry Emon, Jesse Myers, Mark 
Chambers, Dennis Obenchain. Back Row.- 
Kevin Williams, Dean Price, Mike Beck, 
Mark Amon, Tim Long, Herbert Springer. 



Varsity 






NHS 






85 


Manual 


82 


89 


Brownsburg 


64 


71 


Washington 


66 


67 


Attucks 


62 


84 


Broad Ripple 


55 


57 


Arlington 


67 


84 


Ritter 


56 


64 


Beech Grove 


52 


86 


Decatur Central 


65 


69 


Marshall 


76 


88 


Wood 


65 


City Tourney* 




75 


Wood* 


60 


51 


Washington* 


56 


81 


Howe 


54 


52 


Chatard 


42 


73 


Ben Davis 


81 


73 


Southport 


74 


64 


North Central 


65 


58 


Pike 


71 


60 


Plainfield 


61 


Sectional* 






78 


Speedway 


83 


Record 12-9 






m 

Basketball 



VARSITY Front row.- Mike Corn, Coach Robert Broomer, Coach Bill Ritter, Bob Ranee. Back 
row: John Pourchot, Charles Rose, Jim Fowler, Greg Gillespie, Dale Tayler, Dick Beuke, Jim 
Collins, Danny Dunbar, Roy Byrd. 







prA . 






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WW* 


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44H 


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JUNIOR VARSITY Front row.- Bob Ranee, Ken Madry, Jeff Scott, Gary Stonehouse, Jim Hines, 
Steve Rae, Jett Kirkman, Tom Pearson. Back row: Coach Bob Groomer, Bob Baker, Dana 
Standefer, Brian McDonald, Mark Baker, Greg Gillespie, Tim Potter, Coach Bill Ritter. 



Freshman 




NHS 




30 


Arlington 45 


35 


Washington 57 


47 


Roncalli 44 


36 


Chatard 42 


24 


Cathedral 44 


64 


Shortridge 65 


41 


Ritter 1 7 


52 


Pike (Pike Tourney) 55 


51 


Brebeuf (Pike Tourney) 




49 


34 


Speedway 48 


42 


Howe 36 


34 


Attucks 4 1 


45 


Wood 42 


37 


Attucks 41 


44 


Manual 40 


42 


Scecina 47 


21 


Broad Ripple 34 


42 


Marshall 49 


Record 5-8 



Junior Varsity 




NHS 




37 Manual 


31 


38 Brownsburg 


36 


36 Washington 


39 


42 Attucks 


45 


55 Broad Ripple 


32 


39 Arlington 


38 


67 Ritter 


27 


56 Beech Grove 


32 


57 Decatur Central 


53 


38 Marshall 


39 


58 Wood 


54 


28 Attucks (City Tourney) 




33 


53 Howe 


44 


37 Chatard 


42 


37 Ben Davis 


54 


54 Southport 


52 


36 North Central 


42 


59 Pike 


47 


40 Plainfield 


39 


Record 10-6 


■ 




FRESHMAN Front row. Jim Slavins, John Robinson, Earlon Hollowell, John Hester, Steve Kirpis, 
Scott Mucho. Second row: Coach Jim Berger, Dave Hunt, Mike Miszerak, Mark Smallwood, 
Roger Languell. Back row: Rodney Jackson, Dean Ransom, Paul Reams, Terry Moore, Mike 
Collins. 




VARSITY Front row. Kevin Clayton, Dave Carter, Brent Carter. Second row.- Mark Freeland, 
Doug Berty, Pete Donohoe, Robin Short, Greg Dunn, Mike Martin. Back row: John Klemen, Ken 
Alderson, Vance Stratton, Bob Tillery, Gary Wier, Don Klemen, Martin Morgan. 



Varsity 






NHS 






12 


Manual 


35 


60 


Attucks 


9 


21 


Howe 


27 


11 


Bloomington 


48 


27 


Arlington 


18 


20 


Chatard 


26 


39 


Broad Ripple 


12 


11 


Cathedral 


30 





Ben Davis 


49 


30 


Carmel 


25 


24 


Washington 


27 


17 


Speedway 


29 


13th 


City Meet 




9th 


Sectional 




13th 


Regional 




Record 


4-8 




Junior Varsity 




NHS 






48 


Attucks 


24 


15 


Howe 


48 


3 


Bloomington 


54 


12 


Arlington 




17 


Chatard 


57 


39 


Broad Ripple 


36 


11 


Cathedral 


21 


24 


Ben Davis 


37 


30 


Carmel 


33 


12 


Washington 


25 


33 


Speedway 


39 


10th 


City Meet 


12 


Record 


4-7 





1 Freshman 






NHS 






18 
12 


Washington 
Carmel 


56 
51 


6 


Chatard 


37 


38 


Howe 


29 


44 
34 


Arlington 
Attucks 


23 
12 


33 
44 
32 


Shortridge 
Broad Ripple 
Cathedral 


33 
15 
17 


52 

1 

26 


Brownsburg 

Ritter(forfeit) 

Manual 


12 



26 


9th 
Record 


City Meet 
7-3-2 






JUNIOR VARSITY Front row,- Ken Fulk, Julius Reid, Carl Ragland, Paul Dombrosky, Don Lin- 
ville. Second row: John Rosenberger, Rusty Schenke, Doug Dunn, Ember Wertz, Dave Hensel, 
Dwane Rasnick. Back row: Craig Spade, Darrin Gifford, Tony Pappas, Mike Williams, Hardy 
Sandlin, Bill Youck, Coach Ezell Marrs, Coach Ron Schmink. 



FACULTY 

W hile the primary objective of teachers was to 
help students learn, they, too, had time to pur- 
sue their own interests and broaden their educa- 
tions. Mrs. Berry Niles, English department 
chairman and Mrs. Mable Pritchett, English 
teacher, attended the National Council of Eng- 
lish Teachers in Las Vegas where they served on 
committees discussing ways to enliven English 
teaching. Mr. James Ray, English teacher, was a 
speaker at a session for journalism teachers at 
the Annual Conference of Columbia Scholastic 
Press Association in New York City. 

Two foreign language teachers had the op- 
portunity to discover Europe in the summer. Mrs. 
Doris Bradford, English and Latin teacher, vaca- 
tioned with her family in Rome and England. 
Miss Elizabeth Brayton, French teacher, at- 
tended classes at Alliance Francaise, Paris Uni- 
versity. While touring Europe, Miss Brayton also 
visited Germany, Italy, Switzerland, and Hol- 
land. Mr. Joseph Reynolds, art department 
chairman, displayed two pieces of sculpture in 
the Bethlehem Art Competition. A free standing 
sculpture of brass and bronze and a welded 
steel construction were exhibited at the Bethle- 
hem Lutheran Church of Indianapolis November 
14-28. 

Outside activities in which all faculty were in- 
vited to participate were the annual faculty pic- 
nic in September at Bridgeport Nutrition Camp 
and the smorgasboard in May in the school 
cafeteria. Statistics compiled showed the factual 
picture of the staff. The Northwest faculty con- 
sisted of 1 08 members, 60 men and 48 women. 
The average age was 39 years while the aver- 
age amount of teaching experience was 1 3 
years. The average salary earned by the teach- 
ing staff was approximately $12,000. Of the 
62 that taught at Northwest in its first year, 27 
teachers remained. Of the three administrators 
that opened Northwest in 1 963, Mr. Kenneth 
Smartz, principal, and Mr. George Gale, vice- 
principal remained; Mr. Harold Crawford, vice- 
principal, joined the staff in 1966. 

In addition to the teaching staff, Northwest 
employed 34 cafeteria workers, 20 custodial 
and maintenance personnel, 10 secretaries and 
clerks, a nurse and a social worker. 



Accompanying the photo of each faculty mem- 
ber is a personal statement of their philosophy 
of life, teaching goals, or an idea that they feel 
explains their existance at Northwest. Reflecting 
the mood or personality of each individual, the 
faculty wrote their own statements, borrowed 
from another's ideas, or refrained from making 
any comment. 

138 




KENNETH SMARTZ, principal: 
Most of our problems today could 
be solved if everyone would live 
by the Golden Rule— "Do unto 
others as you would have others 
do unto you." 




JAMES BOLIN, business: The less 
you study the more knowledge 
you lose when you graduate. 




MRS. ARWILDA BURTON, guid- 
ance: Learn to assess your values. 





HAROLD 
principal 



CRAWFORD, vice- 



€1 



MRS. DORIS BRADFORD, english, 
foreign language: If my students 
can look at life more honestly, 
share a greater concern for life's 
problems, and appreciate more 
fully beauty of life, our classes 
have been worthwhile. 




ROBERT CANNER, science depart- 
ment head: An education can only 
be earned, not given. 



PETER DAVIS, guidance: "People 
may think you're stupid, but don't 
open your mouth and convince 
them." Poor Richard's Almanac 




^f 






GEORGE GALE, vice-principal 



% 



MISS ELIZABETH BRAYTON, for- 
eign language: Effort is the true 
measure of success. 




MRS. PHYLLIS CARROLL, busi- 
ness: Count and Circle your errors. 



EDWARD DWYER, social studies: 
Never look backwards in life, but 
instead always look forward to 




MRS. DORA FREED, business: To 
sow kindness is the best in- 
vestment one can make. 




MICHAEL ABBETT, physical educa- 
tion: Work to the best of your abil- 
ity at all times 




ROBERT BRINKMAN, socail stud- 
ies: My philosophy is to help stu- 
dents better face tomorrow today. 




cy 



\ ^ 



JAMES ALBRIGHT, science: I've 
never been wrong in my life, but 
when I am, I'll tell you. 




MRS. TREVA CARROLL, home 
economics: "Where there is no 
struggle, there is no progress." 
Frederick Douglass 




MRS. BETTY FRYER, English: Smile 
and the world smiles with you. 



RAY BROWN, english: Education 
should never be measured in terms 
of earning potential, gut rather in 
terms of potential personal 
development. 



TO 



MRS. PHYLLIS CASSELMAN, 
head librarian: "You don't have to 
be listed in Who's Who to know 
What's What." Anonymous 




RICHARD GEORGE, English: A 
good school is like a finely woven 
fabric which appears unvarying 
but, on closer examination, shows 
various textures and colors that 
give strength, warmth and value. 




m" 



MISS JUDITH ALTMAN, social 
studies: "The person who is limited 
in heart and thought is inclined to 
love that which is limited in life." 
Kanlin Gilran 




JAMES BURCH, social studies 




JOHN COMBS, English: If man 
had no past of greatness, he 
would have no future of greatness. 




MRS. BETTY GOODMAN, busi- 
ness: Feet on the floor, eyes on 
the book-TYPE! 




JAMES BALLINGER, math: If you 
care enough to express an opin- 
ion, stand by it. 




JAMES BERGER, industrial arts: I 
aim to help develope the student's 
skills and interest him in occupatio- 
nal opportunities in the industrial 
world. 




MRS. DOROTHY BURKLE, art: 
"And above all, to thine own self 
be true, and it must follow, as the 
night the day; thou canst not then 
be false to any man." 
Shakespeare 




LARRY COMPTON, social studies: 
Success is dependent upon the 
ability to improvise, modify and 
adjust to the challenge and situ- 
ations of the future. 




ROBERT GROOMER, industrial 
arts: Above everything else be- 
lieve in yourself and whatever you 
want to be— be your best. 



ROBERT BURNS, math: "Learning 
without thought is labor lost; 
thought without learning is peril- 
ous," Confucious 






RICHARD CUMMINS, guidance: I 
shall pass through this world but 
once. Any good, therefore, that I 
can show to any human being, let 
me do it now. 




DONNA GRUBBS, 
\ = L + P, asdfjkl; 




MRS. JUDY HINSHAW, business: 
You get from something what you 
put into it. 




JAMES KANTARZE, music: "In 
spite of all thou may'st left behind, 
live each day as if life were just 
begun." Mon Goethe 






WALLACE MACK, math: Use of 
the mind before the mouth will of- 
ten eliminate the latter. 




MRS. ALICE HAUSS, physical 
education: Life is too short to not 
have fun. Just be sure your fun is 
not detrimental to the welfare of 
others. 





MRS. SONDRA HAYES, foreign 
language: Listen attentively to 
what you fellow man is saying and 
you will find a whole new world of 
communication. 




MRS. MARTHA HOBBS, English: 
"Hold fast to dreams, for without 
dreams, life is a broken-winged 
bird that cannot fly." Langston 
Hughes 




WILLIAM KEARBY, industrial arts: 
I believe we should follow the old 
adage of "Work hard when we 
work and play hard when we 
play." 




MRS. GWEN MANNWELLER, 
English: Keep an open mind You'd 
be surprised how much room in it 
hasn't been used up. 



MRS. JEANNE HOLLINGS- 
WORTH, librarian: The happiest 
people seem to be those who have 
no particular reason for being 
happy except they are. 



* 



w* 



MRS. CONSTANCE KOCHMAN, 
English: Whatever you've heard 
about me is not true. It's worse. 




LARRY MARKER, business: "A 
wise man will make more opportu- 
nities than he finds." 




SGT. RICHARD HEADY, ROTC di- 
rector: Never tell people how to 
do things. Tell them what to do 
and they will surprise you will their 
ingenuity. 




MR. THOMAS HOPKINS, math: It 
you were to do the same quality 
work for an employer that you 
turn in at NHS would you be 
fired? 




MISS MARGUERTTE LAMAR, busi- 
ness department head: "If you 
didn't get the grade you wanted, it 
is highly possible I didn't get the 
work I wanted . . ." Unknown 




EZELL MARRS, science: Doing 
your thing is not doing nothing. 
There is something in school for 
everyone. 




PAUL HEATON, dean of boys: My 
primary objective is to create a be- 
havioral atmosphere which is con- 
ducive to good learning 
experiences. 



a 




RALPH HORN, social studies de- 
partment head: "The paradox of 
the times in which we live is that 
the biggest problems are really 
small— the atom, the ovum, and a 
touch of pigment . . ." Brunzel 




ROGER LASH, math: You must 
learn to listen before you can lis- 
ten to learn. 




NICHOLAS MATES, industrial 
arts: If today was average your 
heart beat 103,389 times, you 
breathed 23,040 times, spoke 
4,800 words, moved 750 major 
muscles, and used 7,000,000 
brain cells. The first two were in- 
voluntary; the second two depend 
on you; the last one on NHS 




REX HEDEGARD, science: Unless 
you want events and blind fate to 
control you, you will have to set 
your sights and master yourself 
and your environment. 




MISS NANCY HELME, business: 
"The best work is done by those 
whose conscience won't allow in- 
ferior work." Public Service 




DARREL HORTON, music head: 
Never depend on someone to do 
the job, but do the job as though 
everyone else depends on you. 




CHARLES LEAMON, science, ath- 
letic director: If you wish to 
change the established way of 
doing things, bring forth a better 
method or idea, and the change 
will be worthwhile. 




MRS. MARYLEE McCAMMACK, 
home economics: "To thine own 
self be true." Shakespeare 




MRS. ANITA ILG, home 
ics: "Be content with your sur- 
roundings but not with yourself til 
you have made the most of 
them." Unknown 






*l\ 



C 



LELAND LEMME, science: "To 
thine own self be true and it shall 
follow as the night the day; thou 
canst then be false to any man." 
Shakespeare 






VERNON McCARTY, physical 
education: Run for your life. 




MISS DIANE HIBBELN, dean of 
girls: Act like ladies! 




STANLEY IRWIN, science: Physics 
is fun. 




MRS. MARTIN LINTHECOME, 
business: "I play it cool and dig all 
jive. That's the reason I stay alive. 
My motto, as I live and learn, is 
Dig and be dug in return." Lang- 
ston Hughes 




HUBERT McHARGUE, social stud- 
ies: As a teacher it is my wish that 
I shall have be afflicted by narrow 
mindedness or indifference, but 
rather that I may hear and help my 
students. 



H 



DAVID HINE, physical education 





HAROLD HINES, science: Genius 
is an idea perfected through hard 
work. 




MRS. MILDRED JONES, business: 
We are all blind until we see that 
in God's given plan nothing is 
worth the making if it does not 
make the man. 




MRS. NORA JONES, English: "I 
must face life as it is, with cour- 
age, hope and understanding 
These three, and the greatest of 
these is understanding" E. B. 
Rivinius 




MRS. PHYLLIS LOFFLAND, sci- 
ence: "If a little knowledge is dan- 
gerous, where is the man who has 
so much as to be out of danger?" 
Thomas H. Huxley 






CLAUDE MCKINSEY, social stud- 
ies: My first wish is that all men 
should be educated fully to full hu- 
manity; not only one individual, 
nor a few, nor many, but all men 
together and singly. 



PETER LUKASHIK, art: "An eye to 
see, a mind to trasmute, and in 
transmuting, delight." 




RICHARD MOORE, social studies: 
"The time for thinkers has come. 
Truth, independent of doctrines 
and time-honored systems, knocks 
at the portal of humanity." Mary 
Baker Eddy 



s 

CM 




MRS. JACQUELINE REDMOND, 

English: My philosophy? I love life! 




MISS YOVANKA SAVICH, social 
studies 




CLEVE THRASHER, social studies: 
I tell it like it is! 




MRS. JANET MORGAN, home 
economics: "Be not only good but 
good for something." Thoreau 




MRS. LILLIAN RESNICK, nurse: 
"Four things come not back: the 
spoken word; the sped arrow; time 
past; the neglected opportunity." 
Omar Ibn Al-Halif. 



3 



*S. 



RONALD SCHMINK, science: Be 
yourself; life will be a false impres- 
sion if you make false impressions 
of yourself. 




NORMAN TRIPP, industrial arts 
audio visual director 




MRS. RUTH NELSON, foreign lan- 
guage: Youth is not a time of life: 
it is a state of mind . . . People 
grow old by deserting their ideals. 




JOSEPH REYNOLDS, art depart- 
ment head: Craftmanship and con- 
cern for quality are important val- 
ues in our contemporary 
environment. Set perfection as 
your standard of quality. 




MRS. JOAN SHOEMAKER, home 
economics: The art of living is be- 
ginning where you are. 




ALONZO WALKER, math: Live 
your life and let others live theirs. 
Be as critical of yourself as you 
are of others 




MRS. BETTY NILES, English de- 
partment head: You have but one 




MRS. FEMIE RICHIE, foreign lan- 
guage department head: A loser is 
someone who does not approach 
every stranger as a potential 
friend. 




DR. GILBERT SHUCK, guidance: 
Every student should take advan- 
tage of the opportunity to develop 
his abilities to his highest 
potential. 




MISS PHYLLIS WALTERS, English, 
director of dramatics: Speak up. 




MARK NUTTAL, social studies: 
Never let your schooling interfere 
with your education. 




J. WILLIAM RITTER, Physical edu- 
cation: "Many compete but only 
one can win the prize; run to win 
I the prize." 1 Corinthians 9:23 






i 



JAMES SPARKS, art: If beauty is 
in the eye of the beholder than it is 
beholding of me to observe that 
most teens are ignorant in the art 
of beholding. 




MRS. MARY JO WARD, physical 
education 




RICHARD O'BRIEN, guidance: I 
am at NHS to be of service to the 
students, that is to do everything 
that I can to help them solve their 
problems personal, social and 
educational. 




MISS SUE RITTER, English: What- 
ever is worth doing is worth doing 





WILLIAM PERT, business: The less 
you bet, the more you lose when 
you win. 




MRS. BEVERLY ROBINSON, Eng- 
lish: Knowledge is power. 




> 



ALBERT SPURLOCK, industrial 
arts, chairman: Teachers must help 
students identify and develop their 
skills and talents for youth is a na- 
tion's most valuable resouce. 




MRS SARAH WEST, social 
worker: Each of us is as 3 persons: 
as we know ourselves, as other 
know us, and a third person not 
yet known to either. 



MISS MARY LOU STEED, foreign 
language: Laut und schoen und 
deutlich 




I? 



JAMES POALSTON, physical 
education 




MISS KAROL RUBY, music: "No 
one can be called educated who 
will not do something that he 
would rather not do at the time it 
ought to be done." N.M. Butler 




DONALD STONE, science: Teach- 
ing success comes through student 
awareness of the necessity for 
goals, long range as well 
immediate. 



MRS. JANEEN WILCOX, math: If I 
gave my students the grade they 
really deserve they would really 
complain. 




MRS. LOTTIE WOOLRIDGE, 
math: "The end of study should be 
to direct the mind towards the 
enunciation of sound and correct 
judgements on all matters that 
come before it." Rene Descartes 



* 

4 y 



MRS. MABEL PRITCHETT, English: 
Grant me wisdom to make proper 
choices and the grace and strength 
to bear the consequences. 




MRS. MILDRED RYAN, social 
studies: I operate on the premise 
that you are young adults, and un- 
til you prove to me otherwise, I'll 
treat you that way. 




MRS. PATRICIA THOMAS, home 
economics: Life is what you make 






JAMES RAY, English, director of 
publications: Curiosity makes the 
difference between life and living. 




WILLIAM SALER, math depart- 
ment head: Mathmetics is: hard 
work, sweat, frustrating, and fun, 
satisfaction, rewarding (financially 
sometimes). Some for everyone— 
alot for some. 





BART YORK, industrial arts: 
Today's youth enjoy being individ- 
uals, Being individuals while hav- 
ing the ability to work successfully 
is important to me. 



DON THOMPSON, English: He 
who laughs last didn't get the joke 
at first. 



h, ; 



*> 



: 



MRS. PHYLLIS YOUNG, English: 
"If a man does not keep pace with 
his companions, perhaps it is be- 
cause he hears a different drum- 
mer." Thoreau 



(0 

u 



m 

c 



TAW 



DENNIS CHARLES ADAMS: Science Club (9); German 
Club (9,10); "Little 500" (10,11,12); Exercise in 
Knowledge 11,12; Intramural Basketball (11,12); Na- 
tional Honor Society (1 1,12) 
JANICE ELAINE ADAMSON 

SHARON LOUISE ADKINS: Cheerblock (9); Cheer- 
leader (9,10,1 1 ,1 2); "Little 500" (10) 
KENNETH RAYMOND ALDERSON: Latin Club (9); 
Football (9); Baseball (10,11,); Wrestling (10,1 1,1 2); 
"Little 500" (10,1 1,12); Letterman's Club (12) 




BETTY JO ALLEN: Cheerblock (9); Bowling (10) 

CYNTHIA JANE ALLEN: Red Cross Club (9); Pioneer 

Players (10,11); Student Council (11); Plays (11); 

Prom Committee (11); Thespians (11, 12) 

JOHN JOSEPH AMBERS 

LANA MARIE ANDERSON: "Little 500" (11); Prom 

Committee (11); National Honor Society (1 1,12) 



i 



MICHELLE ANDERSON 

PATRICIA ANDERSON 

THOMAS WAYNE ANTHONY: intramural Basketball 

(11,12) 

JOSEPH G. ASHER: Band (9,10,11,12); Pep Band 

(11,12); Intramural Basketball (11,12); Tennis 

(11,12); 



TONYA SUE ASHLEY: Cheerblock (9,10); Telstar, Busi- 
ness Manager (1 1 ); "Little 500" (11); Prom Committee 
(11); Bowling (1 1,12); Pioneer Players (1 1,12); Plays 
(12); Thespians (12) 
DEWAYNE BACON 

DEBRA LOUISE BAKER: Band (9,10,11,12); Bowling 
(11); National Honor Society (1 1,12) 
GAIL LYNN BAKER: Science Club (9); Chess Club (9); 
Orchestra (9,10,11,12); Future Teachers of America 
(11); National Honor Society (11,12); Altrusa Merit 
Award (11); National Council of Teachers of English 
Contest Runner-up (12) 



rom 



KEVIN BALL: Band (9,10); Wrestling (9,10,1 1); "Little 

500' (9, 10,1 1,12); Football (9,ll) ; Student Council 

(10,12); Letterman's Club (11,12) 

TERESA MARIE BANKS 

CATHY ANNE BARKER: Spanish Club (9); Red Cross 

Club (9) 

DIANE BARNES 

VICKI SUE BARNHART 



JEANNE BARTON 

JONATHAN ROBERT BASORE: Football (9); Wrestling 

(9,10) 

MICHAEL BASTIN: Plays (10); Concert Choir 

(10,11,12); Swing Choir (10,11,12) 

PAUL BATEMAN: Intramural Basketball (11,12) 

DALE BRUCE BATES: West Worwick High School 

(9,10); National Honor Society (1 1.12) 



CAROL BATMAN: Jefferson High School, Okla. (9); 

Cheerblock (9); Northwest Passages, editor (10); 

"Little 500"(10,1 1,12); Bowling (1 1 ,1 2); National 

Honor Society (11,12); Vanguard (12) 

DEBORAH ANNETTE BEARD 

JANET ELAINE BEAVER: Prom Committee (11) 

LINDA CHRISTINE BECKHAM: Prom Committee 

(11,12) 

RONALD KARL BEHNKENDORF 



GARY BEISEL 

DONALD L. BENNETT: Northwest Passages (10); His- 
tory Club (10); "Little 500" (11); National Honor So- 
ciety (11,12) 

KEVIN JOSEPH BERINGER: Latin School (9,10) 
MARSHA BERNHERDT: French Club (9) 
GREGORY P. BERNITT: Baseball (9,10) 



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MM1 



MALINDA KAY BERRY: "Little 500" (11) 
MATT D. BERRY: Baseball (9); Wrestling (9,10); Stu- 
dent Council (9,10); Football (9,10,1 1) 
RICHARD A BEUKE: Basketball (9,1 0,1 1,1 2); Baseball 
(9,10,11,12); Student Council (11,12) 
DEBBIE J. BISHOP 

JAMES JOSEPH BLAIR: Track (9); Basketball (9,10); 
Baseball (10); Tennis (11,12); Bowling (11,12); In- 
tramural Basketball (12) 

ERIC BOLDEN 

DONNA M. BOLTON: Majorettes (10); Silverettes 

(11); Pioneer Players (10,11,12); Student Council 

(11); Prom Committee (11); Thespians (1 1,12) 

EDWARD GEORGE BORNSTEIN: Track (9); Cross 

Country (9,10); Tennis (11,12); Intramural Basketball 

(11,12); National Honor Society (11,12) 

DENNIS LEE BOWEN: Plays (9); Pioneer Players (9); 

German Club (10); Intramural Basketball (12) 

RICHARD BOWEN 

THOMAS B. BOWMAN: Track (9); Football (9) 
KENNETH BRANAM 
CYNTHIA ANN BRIGHT 
PAMELA JANE BRIGHT 

CHUCK A. BROOKS: Basketball (12); Intramural Bas- 
ketball (12) 

CONNIE BROWN: Prom Committee (1 1 ); "Little 500" 
(11) 



KENNY BROWN 

MARK ALAN BROWN: Track (9,10); Wrestling 

(9,10,12) 

R. BROWN 

TIMOTHY MYLES BROWN: ROTC Drill Team (1 1,12) 




BRUCE BRYANT 

CAROL JEAN BRYANT: Northwest Passages (10); 

"Little 500" (11)1 National Honor Society (11,12); 

Student Council (12) 

VIRGINIA MAE BUCHANAN: Intramural Softball (11); 

National Honor Society (11,12) 

GREGORY A. BUCKLEY: Student Council (12T 

JUDITH A. BURKS: Student Council (9) Cheerblock 

(11,12) , , 

MARCIA KAY BURNICLE: Cheerblock (9,10) 
NICKI DENISE BURRELL: Future Teachers of America 
(9); Red Cross Club (10) 

GREG BYARD: Football (9); Basketball (11); Intramural 
Basketball (11) 

JANICE LOUISE CAMPBELL: Red Cross Club (10); Busi- 
ness Activities Club (11) 
WILLIAM PHILLIP CAMPBELL II 

ANNETTE CANNON: Plays (9,10,11,12); Orchestra 

(9,10,11,12); Concert Choir (1 1,12); Belles (11) All 

City Orchestra (12) 

GINA JO CARDWELL 

LAURA SUE CARNAGUA: "Little 500" (10) 

TIMOTHY MARK CARPENTER 

FREIDA SUE CARTER 

JOHN D. CASE: Football (9); Band (11); Student Coun- 
cil (11), president (12) 

THOMAS PATRICK CASE: Football (9); Student Council 
(12) 

TIM CASE: Football (9,10,11) 

SHIRLEY CASH: Student Council (9,10); Feature Twir- 
ler(10,ll); Silverettes (12) 

STEVEN L. CASS: Football (9); ROTC Drill Team 
(9,10,11,12) 



LINDA SHARON CHANCE: Cheerblock (9); Future 
Teachers of America (10); Silverettes (10,11,12); Plays 
(11); Prom Committee (11) 
JOHN A. CHARLESWORTH 

JAMES CHILDERS: Track (9); Golf (9,10); Bowling 
(9,10,11,12) 
MARJORY RUTH CHRISTY 
RONDA LARAE CHRISTY 

GARY CIRRINCIONE: Bowling (1 1 ) ; Plays (11); Band 
(12); Orchestra (12) 

KEVIN J. CLAYTON: Track (9); Wrestling 
(9,10,11,12) 

STEVEN L. CLEAR: Band (9,10,11,12); Tennis 
(9,10,11,12); Bowling (10,11,12) 
STEVE CLINE 

DAVID ALAN CODY: Student Council (9); Basketball 
(9,10,11); Concert Choir (10,11,12); Intramural Bas- 
ketball (12) 
WAYNE COLE 

DONNA KAYE COLLINS: Girls Track (11) 
MICHAEL COLLINS 

SANDRA KAY CONNOR: Bowling (9,10); Orchestra 
(9,10,11,12); Northwest Passages (10); Plays 
(10,11); Concert Choir (11,12); National Honor So- 
ciety (11,12); Belles (12) 
KENNETH CONSTABLE 
DONALD COOK 
ROCKY COOK 

NANCY ANN COOPER: Silverettes (10) 
CATHY CORBETT 

JAMES CORBIN: Football (9,10); Intramural Basketball 
(10) 

LAURAETTA CORK: Attucks High School (9); Red Cross 
Club (10); Homecoming Queen Candidate (12) 
MICHAEL CORN: Basketball (9,10,11,12); Baseball 
(9,10,11,12); Student Council (10); "Little 500" 
(11,12 
CATHY COX 

RONALD ALLEN COX: Science Club (9); Band 
(9,10,1 1 ,1 2); Plays (9,10,1 1,12); National Honor So- 
ciety (11,12) 
CHRIS ERIC CRAVENS 





I 



MARK DAVID CREVISTON: Vanguard (12) 
DAVID KIM CRIPE: Bowling (12); "Little 500" (12) 
GARY WAYNE CHRIST: Football (9) ; Intramural Bas- 
ketball (11) 

MARIANNE NADINE CROSLEY 

JAY CUMMINGS: Band (9,10,11,12); Plays 
(9,10,11,12); Orchestra (11,12) 

ROGER CURL 

TIMOTHY DAVID CURTISS: Lawrence Central High 
School (9,10,11) 

JAMES VINCENT DALRYMPLE: Canfield High School, 
Ohio (9); Speedway High School (10) 
BARBARA ANN DALTON: Business Activities Club (1 1 ) 
SCOn DANIELS: "Little 500" (11); Telstar (11), edi- 
tor (12); Quill & Scroll Society (11), vice-president 
(12); Prom Committee (12); National Honor Society 
(12); Intramural Basketball (12) 

MICHELE GAY DAVENPORT: Softball (9,10); Bowling 
(9,10,11) ; "Little 500" (10,11,12) 
BRUCE DAVIDSON 

DEBORAH JEAN DAVIS: Student Council (9); Softball 
(9); Cheerblock (10); French Club (9,10) 
RODNEY LEE DAVIS: Baseball (9,10,11,12); In- 
tramural Basketball (1 1,12); Letterman's Club (12) 

scon DAVIS 




STEPHANIE R. DAVIS 
WAYNE DAVIS 

SANDRA LOUISE DAYVOLT: Cheerblock (9) 
EVELYN DIANE DEVINE: Band (9,10,1 1,12) 
DEBBIE DEWEES: French Club (9,10,1 1); "Little 500" 
(9,10,11,12); Telstar (10,11); Northwest Passages 
(10,11); Quill & Scroll Society (11); secretary (12); 
News Bureau (11); Prom Committee (11); Student 
Council ( 1 2); historian (11); Speech Club (10,1 1); Na- 
tional Honor Society (1 1,12) 

JAMES MICHAEL DIMITROFF: Football (9,10,11,12); 
Golf (9,10,11,12); Basketball (9); Letterman's Club 
(10,11,12); Student Council (1 1,12) 
TIMOTHY SCOTT DOROTHY: Wrestling (9,10); Band 
(9,10,11,12) 

SAMMY M. DOTLICH: Wrestling (9,10); Football 
(9,10,11,12); Track (10); Letterman's Club 
(10,11,12) 

DON DAVIS DOTY, JR: Science Club (9,10); Football 
(9,10); German Club (10) 

ROBIN ELAINE DOWNING: French Club (9,10); Girls 
Track (9,10); "Little 500" (9,10,11,12); Student 
Council (10,1 1); Silverettes (10,1 1,12) 
DIANE DAWN DUBROSKY: Bowling (9,10,1 1,12) 
DAVID ARTHUR DUKES: Wrestling (9) ; Baseball 
(9,10,11,12); "Little 500" (11); National Honor So- 
ciety (1 1,1 2); Prom Committee (1 2); Intramural Basket- 
ball (12) 

DANNY RAY DUNBAR: Basketball (9,10,11,12); 
"Little 500" (11) 
DEBRA DUNCAN 
JOHN DUNCAN 

DEBRA TOWANA DURHAM: "Little 500" (9) 
COZETTA EANS 
JOHN ECK: Science Club (9) 

DENNIS J. ECKERT: Chess Club (9,10); president 
(11,12); National Honor Society (1 1,12) 



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GLORIA EDMONDSON: Red Cross Club (10) 
ANTHONY LEON ELAM: Track (9); Cheerblock (9); 
Concert Choir (11,12); National Honor Society (11,12) 
SUSAN JANE ELLCESSOR: Cheerbbck (9); "Little 
500" (10); Student Council (10,1 1,12) 
DAVID ENDICOTT 

MARY ERB: Hesston High School (9,10,1 1) 
CHERIE LEE ERSKIN: Northwest Passages (11); Na- 
tional Honor Society (1 1,12) 
JEANNIE RENEE ESTES: Plays (9) 
MARK WAYNE EULISS: "little 500" (10) 
MARK ROBERT EVANS: Audio-Visual Club (9); Bowling 
(9,10,11); Intramural Basketball (11); Cross Country 
(11,12) ^ 

WILLIAM G. EVANS: German Club (9,10); Bowling 
(9,10,11,12); Concert Choir (1 1,12); Plays (11,12); 
Swing Choir (12) 

SUSAN LYNN EVERMAN: "Little 500" (10); Broth- 
erhood Club (11) 

RICK FAWCETT: Tennis (9); French Club (9,10); Wres- 
tling (9,10) 

REGINALD BRUCE FERGUSON: Student Council 
(9,10,11), cabinet (9,10,11); "Little 500" (9,10); 
ROTC Drill Team (10,11); Inter City Teen Council 
(10,1 1); Brotherhood Club (11); Telstar (11) 
BILL FISHER: Chess Club (10,11,12); Intramural Bas- 
ketball (11,12) 

GERALD DEA FLYNN: Bowling (10); Intramural Basket- 
ball ( 1 1 ) 



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MIKE FODDRILL 

KENNETH E. FODRIE: Football (9); Bowling 

(9,10,11,12) 

CATHERINE JANE FOLKERTH: 

JAMES B. FOWLER: Football (9); Track (9); Basketball 
(9,10,11,12); Band (9,10,11,12); "Little 500" 
(1 1,12); National Honor Society (1 1,12) 
EDWARD E. FOXWORTHY: Bowling (11) 

DONALD MICHAEL FRANKLIN: Intramural Basketball 
(11,12) 

YVONNE ANNETTE FREELAND: Concert Choir 
(11,12); Plays (11,12); Student Council (1 1,12); Bel- 
les (12) 

WILHELMINA HELENA FRENCH: Red Cross Club 
(9,10,11,12); "Little 500" (9,10,11,12); Silverettes 
(11,12); Fashion Board (12) 

HUBERT FRYMAN, JR: German Club (9,10); Plays 
(9,10,11,12); Orchestra (9,10,11,12); Pioneer Play- 
ers (9,10,11,12); Thespians (9,10,11,12); Concert 
Choir (11,12); Swing Choir (12) 

JANET L. FULTZ: George Washington High School (9); 
"Little 500" (10) 




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DANIEL H. GAGEN: German Club (9); "Little 500" 
(10,11); Science Club (10,11); Bowling (11), In- 
tramural Basketball (11,12); Exercise in Knowledge 
(12) 

DEBBIE GALE 

CHRISTOPHER L. GALLOWAY: Band (9,10,11,12); 
Boys State (11); Plays (11,12); Concert Choir (12) 
STEVE GANO: Football (9); Baseball (9); Student 
Council (9); cabinet (9); Northwest Passages ( 1 0); Van- 
guard, sports editor (10), layout editor (11), editor-in- 
chief (12); "Little 500" (10,11,12); National Honor 
Society (11); vice-president (1 2); Quill & Scroll Society 
(11), president (12); National Merit Scholarship Semi- 
Finalist (12) 

BARBARA GARNER: Softball (9, 10); Volleyball (9, 10) 
LYLE R. GEDDES: Wrestling (9); Cross Country 
(9,10,1 1); Science Club (10); "Little 500" (10,1 1,12) 
KEVIN GEORGE: Wrestling (9) 
SCOTT RAY GEORGE 

WILLIAM J. GIEBEL: Basketball manager (9,10,1 1); In- 
tramural Basketball (11,12) 

ROBIN FLOYD GILL: Track (9,10,1 1); Cross Country 
(10,11) 

DEBORAH ANN GORMAN: Student Council (10); Bel- 
les (11); Concert Choir (11,12) 
DIANA SUE GARBER: Columbus High School (11) 

MELVIN GRAHAM 

CHARLES GRAMES 

DIANE GRAY 

PAMELA YVONNE GRAYSON 

ANN ELIZABETH GREEN: Orchestra (9); Future Teach- 
ers of America (9,10,11); Cheerblock (10); Bowling 
(10,11); Band (10,1 1,12); "Little 500" (11); Pioneer 
Players (11,12) 

DEBORAH GREEN: National Honor Society (11,12) 
GERALD GREEN: Lawrence Central High School (10) 
DEBRA LOIS GREGORY 

BRENDA SUE GRESHAM 

KATHY SUE GRIDER: Spanish Club (9); Northwest Pas- 
sages (11); Student Council (11); Brotherhood Club 
(11); National Honor Society (11,12); Telstar (12) 

LONNIE JOE GRIMES: George Washington High 
School (9,10); Wrestling (12) 

STEVE CRAIG HABERMAN: Wrestling (9); Track (9); 
Football (10) 




DENISE L. HADDIX: Lincoln High School (9,10); "Little 
500" (11 ,12); Prom Committee (12) 
PAMELA J. HAG AN: 

EARL F. HALL; Baseball (9); Plays (9,11,12); Band 
(9,10,11,12); Orchestra (9,10,1 1 ,1 2); Intramural Bas- 
ketball (11,12); Tennis (12); Bowling (12) 
BEVERLY ANN HAMILTON 

DEANNE ELAINE HAMILTON: Red Cross Club (9); 
Cheerblock (9, 1 0, 1 1 ); Brotherhood Club (11) 
GARY HAMM 
GARY L. HANCOCK 

TRUDY JEAN HANFT: Majorettes (10); "Little 500" 
( 1 0); Musical (11), Silverettes (11,12); National Honor 
Society (11,12) 

DEBORAH JO HANKINS: Cheerblock (9) 
MARSHALL HARPER 





*TO§ 





TONYA SUZETTE HARBIN 

JACQUELINE LEE HARRIS: Student Council (9,10); Mu- 
sical (10); GAA (10); Silverettes (11,12) 
RONALD DALE HARRIS: Student Council (12) 
JACKIE HARRISON 

DAVID LEE HARTZLER: Student Council (9); German 
Club (9,10); "Little 500" (10,11,12); Band 
(10,11,12); Audio-Visual Club (11,12); National 
Honor Society (11,12); Intramural Basketball (12); Ex- 
ercise in Knowledge (12) 
VAUIN HARRELL 
KEITH A. HARVEY 
GERALDINE HASSELBURG 
NANCY G. HASSELL 
CINDY MARIE HAUN: Silverettes (10) 
KEN ALLEN HAYDEN: Bowling (9) 
ANNA MARIE HAYES: Westland Junior High School 
(9) 

CINDY HAYES 

MARK HAYGOOD: Hall High School (9,10); Wrestling 
(10); Football (11) 

BUFF HAYSLEY: French Club (9); Student Council 
(9,10,12); J. J. Pierce High School (11) 
BARBARA HEINRICH: Cardinal Ritter High School 
(9,10,11) 

DEBRA ANN HELVEY 

VICKY LYNN HENDRICKS: Cheerblock (9,10,11); 
"Little 500" (10,1 1); Bowling (10,1 1); Student Coun- 
cil (11); Vanguard (11); Northwest Passages (12) 
CYNTHIA SUE HENRY 

DIANNE FRANCES HERKLESS: Brotherhood Club (11) 
JOHN HERKLESS 

BRENDA LEE HERSHBERGER: Bowling (9,10,11); Na- 
tional Honor Society (11,12); Student Council (12) 
CHRISTINE ANN HICKMAN: Bells (11,12); Concert 
Choir (11,1 2); Swing Choir (12) 
DEBRA SUE HIGGINS 
DEBORAH ANN HILBERT 
GARY PAUL HILL 

LINDA GAIL HILLERS: Bowling (9); Orchestra 
(9,10,11,12) 
LINDA D. HINES 

JIM PETER HINTZ: Track (9); Cross Country (9,10,1 2); 
Concert Choir (10); Tennis (11,12); Chess Club 
(11,12) 
CAROL HODGES 



■■■■' 



CONNIE LYNN HOLT 
CYNTHIA HOLT 

JERRY ALAN HOOVER: Cross Country (9); Basketball 
(9,10); Golf (9,10,1 1,12); Boys State (11); National 
Honor Society (11,12); "Little 500" (11,12); Senior 
Class President (12) 
SHELLY J. HOPPER: Cheerblock (10) 
GUS HORN 

CAROLYN KAY HOWARD: Student Council (10,11); 
Silverettes (10,11,12); National Honor Society 
(11,12) 

REGINA ANN HOWARD 

SHANE THOMAS HOWARD: Track (9); Wrestling 
(9,10); "Little 500" (11,12); Intramural Basketball 
(12) 

JOHN R. HUBER 

DAVID ANDREW HUDDLESTON: ROTC Drill Team 
( 1 0); ROTC Rifle Team ( 1 0); Bowling ( 11 ); Tennis ( 1 1 ) 
DIANE LYNN HUFFAKER: National Honor Society 
(11,12); Concert Choir (12); Belles (12) 
CHARLES HULL: Brotherhood Club (11) 
RICHARD NORMAN HUNTLEY 

ROBERTA JEAN HURLEY: Student Council (10,1 1,1 2); 
Concert Choir (11,12); Plays (11,12); Swing Choir 
(12) 

WALLACE W. HURT: Orchestra (9, 10, 11, 12); Stu- 
dent Council (11, 12); Intramural Basketball (12) 
RONALD KEVIN HUSTON: German Club (9, 10); 
ROTC Drill Team (10); Brotherhood Club (11); Musical 
(12) 

BECKY LYNN IRVIN 
BILLY IRVIN 

CHERYL LYNN ISENBERG 
CARLA ISON 




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WILBUR JACKSON 

JARED VAN JAMISON: Plays (9,10,11,12); Pioneer 
Players (9,10,11,12); Thespians (9,10,11), president 
(12); Concert Choir (11,12); Madrigal Choir (12) 
DAVID JOHNSON 

MARIANNE JOHNSON: Silverettes (10, 11, 12); 
Plays (11, 12); Pioneer Players (11), vice-president 
(12),- Thespians (12) 

TIMOTHY JOSEPH JOHNSON: Baseball (9); Wrestling 
(9, 10, 11); "Little 500" (10); Football (10, 1 1, 12); 
Track (11); Intramural Basketball (12) 
VIRGINIA ARLINDA JOHNSON: Latin Club (9, 10); 
BONNIE JONES: Crispus Attucks High School (9) 
JAMES THOMAS JONES: Track (9); Football (9, 10); 
Basketball (9, 10); Intramural Basketball (11, 12) 
LARRY DEVON JONES: Basketball (9); Intramural Bas- 
ketball (11, 12) 

MICHELLE DENISE JONES: Shortridge High School (9, 
10) 

TERRY JONES 
WILLIAM F. JONES 
PAM KECK 

ALAN JEFFERY KEERS: Spelunking Club (11); In- 
tramural Basketball (11, 12) 

MARK LOUIS KEGLOVITS: Concert Choir (9, 10, 11, 
12); Football (10) 

LINDA ANNE KELLOGG: Bowling (9, 1 1 , 1 2) ; Silve- 
rettes ( 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); GAA ( 1 0); Spelunking Club (11) 
TIMOTHY WARREN KELLY 

ALISON SUE KEMERY: Cheerleader (9, 10, 1 1) ; Con- 
cert Choir (10, 11); Swing Choir (11); Plays (11); 
"Little 500" Queen Candidate (11); National Honor 
Society (11, 12) 

CINDY LYNN KEMP: Cheerblock (9, 10, 11); Student 
Council (10, 11) 

STACEY ANN KENDRICK: Pioneer Players (9); Silve- 
rettes (10, 11, 12); "LitHe 500" (9, 10, 11); Girls 
Track (11) 






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ALAN DALE KENNEDY: "Little 500" (9, 10, 11) 

DEBRA LOUISE KENNEDY: Silverettes (10, 11, 12); 

Concert Choir (12); Belles (12) 

DIANE KAY KENNEDY: Softball (10) 

KERRY KENNINGTON: Chess Club (10); Audio-Visual 

Club (10, 11, 12) 

MELODY KAY KENT: Business Activities Club (11); 

Bowling (11) 

LOU ANN KERR: "Little 500" (9); Cheerblock (10) 

JERYL WAYNE KIMBROUGH 

MICHAEL RAY KIMBROUGH: Football (9, 10, 11); 

Track (9, 11) 

ALLEN KING: Audio-Visual Club (10); German Club 

(10, 11) 

GREGORY RICHARD KING 

ROBERT THOMAS KINLEY: Football (9, 10, 12) 

THOMAS CHARLES KISTLER: History Club (10); Latin 

Club (10, 11); "Little 500" (11); Student Council (11, 

12) 

JOHN MICHAEL KLEMEN: Wrestling (9, 10, 11, 12); 

Spelunking Club (11, 12); Letterman's Club (12) 

SUSAN LORRAINE KLINGER 

LAURA KLINTWORTH: National Honor Society (11, 

12) 

WILLIAM EDWARD KNIGHT: Football (9); Intramural 

Basketball (11, 12); 




CARMELITA JO KOSH: Cheerblock (9, 10); Student 
Council (10, 11, 12); secretary (12); Prom Committee 
(11); "Little 500" (11) ; Telstar (11, 12) 
KIM A. KRUSE 

LOREN GREGG LABAW: ROTC Drill Team (9); "Little 
500" (9, 1 0, 1 1 ) ; ROTC Color Guard ( 1 0); Chess Club 
(11, 12); Spelunking Club (11, 12) 
CHERYL ANN LAMBERT: "Little 500" (11) 
JUDY LANE 

ALESIA DENISE LANIER: Silverettes (10, 11, 12) 
LINDA LOU LAYTON: German Club (9, 10); Prom 
Committee (11) 

KATHLEEN ANNE LEAMON: Orchestra (9, 10, 11, 
12); All City Orchestra (10); Plays (10, 11); National 
Honor Society (11, 12); Telstar (12); Quill & Scroll So- 
ciety (11, 12) 
MARCIA L. LEE 
LINDA LENTZ 

MARILYN SUE LESLIE: George Washington High 
School (9, 10) 

MICHAEL SWIGHT LEWIS: Student Council (9); Chess 
Club (9); Audio-Visual Club (9, 1 0); Concert Choir (9, 
10, 11, 12); Homecoming Committee (11) 
PAUL LIGHTLE 

CHRIS FREDRICK LOGGINS: Bowling (9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2) 
STACIA LONCAR: Pioneer Players (9); Softball (9), 
"Little 500" (9, 10, 11, 12); 500 Art Award (10)! 
Gold Key Award (10); Telstar (10); Cheerblock (10) 
National Honor Society (11, 12); Senior Class Vice- 
President (12) 

GARY L. LONG: George Washington High School (9); 

Concert Choir (11, 12) 

VIKI EILEEN LONG: Prom Committee (11); National 

Honor Society (11, 12) 

BENNY ARNOLD LOUDEN: Concert Choir (11); Plays 

(11) 

DAWN LOVE 

ELLEN LUHMAN 




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TONI LYNCH 

RICHARD LEE MAGEE: Petaluma Senior High School, 

California (10, 11) 

JOSEPH P. MAHONEY 

LESLIE EARL DORAN MALONE: 500 Art Award (9); 

Scholastic Art Award (10, 11); Gold Key Art Award 

(11) 

GARY WAYNE MANDABACH: Wrestling (9); Student 

Council (9); Football (9, 1 0) 

DAVID RAY MANN 

VICKI LYNN MARCHETTh Red Cross Club (9); Student 

Council (10); "Little 500" (11,12); Silverettes 

(10,11,12); Vanguard (11); senior editor (12); Prom 

Committee (11,12) 

NORINE ANNE MARKIEWICZ 

DONNITTA PEARL MAY: Pleasant View High School, 

Ohio (9, 10) 

BRENDA MAYNARD 

MIKE MCCORMICK: Audio-Visual Club (10) 

SUSAN KAY MCINTYRE 

RANDY MCKINLEY: Basketball (9); Track (9); Stadium 

King Candidate (9); Football (9, 10, 11, 12); "Little 

500" (10, 11); Letterman's Club (11, 12) 

DENISE KAREN MCKINSTER: Spanish Club (9, 10); 

Business Activities Club (10); National Honor Society 

(11,12) 

TONJA LYNN MCKUSKY: Cheerblock (9); Student 

Council ( 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); National Honor Society (11,12); 

Inter City Student Council ( 1 2) 

ALBERT L. MEADOWS: Cross Country (9); Intramural 

Basketball (11, 12) 

ANDREA LEE MERRIMAN: St. Agnes Academy (9); 

Prom Committee (11); "Little 500" (11); National 

Honor Society (11, 12); Student Council (12) 

MARILYN ANNE MILAN 

BECKY MILLER 

CHARLES F. MILLER, JR.: Student Council (9, 10, 11, 

12); "Little 500" (10, 1 1, 12); Quill & Scroll Society 

(11), treasurer (12); National Honor Society (11), 

president (12); Telstar (11); editor (12); Senior Class 

Treasurer (12) 

RANDY MILLER: Football (9); Baseball (9); Wrestling 

(10) 

TERRIE MILLER ^ 

TIM MILLER: Cross Country (9); Track (9, 10); "Little 

500" (12); Intramural Basketball (11, 12) 

BLANCHE MARIE MILLES: Red Cross Club (9, 10) 

ROGER MINTER: Intramural Basketball (11, 12) 





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RAYMOND ERNEST MITCHELL: Bowling (11, 12) 
THERESA GENE MITCHELL 

DOUGLAS MOFFITT: Basketball (9); Intramural Basket- 
ball (12) 

THOMAS LOREN MOONEY, JR.: Wrestling (9); Stu- 
dent Council (10, 11, 12); Brotherhood Club (11); 
Prom Committee (11) 

MARK ALAN MOORE: Baseball (9, 10, 11, 12); In- 
tramural Basketball (12); "Little 500" (12) 
PHILIP A. MOORE 

CANDACE L. MOOTS: "Little 500" (10, 11); Concert 
Choir (11, 12) 

JULIET SUZANNE MORMANCE: Plays (9, 10, 11, 
1 2); Pioneer Players (9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Thespians (9, 1 0, 
11); vice-president (12); Concert Choir (10, 11, 12); 
"Little 500" (11) 
CHARLOTTE MAE MORRICAL 
KENNETH MORRIS 




PATRICIA MUIR: Telstar (11, 12) 

LAURA LEIGH MUNN-. Cheerblock (9, 10); Student 

Council (11, 12) 

MANDARIN MYERS 

RANDALL MYERS 

KEITH NICHOLS: Band (10, 11, 12); Concert Choir 

(10, 11, 12); Musical (11) 

KELLY NICHOLS: Football (9); Wrestling (9); In- 
tramural Basketball (11, 12) 

KIMBERLY NIEDERPRUEM: Red Cross Club (9) ; Bowling 

(11); National Honor Society (11, 12) 

SUSAN NOLTON: French Club (9); 'Little 500" (9, 

10, 11); Student Council (10); Cheerblock (10); Prom 

Committee (11); Scholastic Art Award (11); National 

Honor Society (12) 

DENISE NORRIS: Telstar (10, 11, 12); Quill & Scroll 

Society (11, 12); National Honor Society (12) 

SHERRY LYNN NORTON: Spanish Club (9); Student 

Council (9); Bowling (9, 10, 1 1, 12); Cheerblock (10); 

Softball (10, 11); Band (10, 11, 12) 

MARILYN SUSAN NORWOOD 

JOHN NUNLEY 

SONDRA S. OBENCHAIN: Student Council (9, 10); 

Musical (10); Northwest Passages (11); National 

Honor Society (11, 12) 

KAREN EARLEAN O'DAY 

TIMOTHY EUGENE OLSON: Tennis (9, 10, 11); Band 

(9, 10, 11, 12); Stage Band (10, 11, 12); Pep Band 

(10, 11, 12); Orchestra (10, 11, 12); Plays (10, 11, 
12); Concert Choir (12). 

LUCINDA COLLEEN O'ROURKE: "Little 500" (10, 
11) 

REGINALD OSBORNE: ROTC Rifle Team (9); Pioneer 
Players (9, 10); Chess Club (9, 12) 
WANDA JOYCE PACE 
CONSTANCE PAPALAZAROU 

PATTI ANN PAQUIN: French Club (9); "Little 500" 
(10, 11, 12); Student Council (11, 12); Prom Com- 
mittee (11, 12); National Honor Society (12) 
SHERRI LYNN PARKER: Cheerblock (9); Student Coun- 
cil (9); "Little 500" (11) 
ANNE LESLIE PARSONS 
DWAYNE PATTERSON 
RENEE PATTON 
PATRICIA ANN PEARSON 

SUSAN M. PEARSON: Cheerleader (9, 10, 11, 1 2); 
Homecoming Queen (12) 
JUDY PERCIVAL 
MARY ANN PERKINSON 

WILLIAM CHARLES PETRANOFF: "Little 500" (9, 10, 
11,1 2); Wrestling (10, 11); Prom Committee ( 1 2); In- 
tramural Basketball (12) 

ALISA MARIE PETRUZZI: National Honor Society (11, 
12); Fashion Board (12); Student Council (12) 



GENE ALLEN PETTIGREW 

DONNA MARIE PHILLIPS: Fort Know High School (10, 
1 1 ); Spanish Club (10); Red Cross Club ( 1 0, 1 1 ); Con- 
cert Choir (10, 11); National Honor Society (11, 12) 
RICHARD CLAYTON PHILLIPS: Baseball (9); "Little 
500" (10); Intramural Basketball (10); Bowling (12) 
KATHY SUE PHIPPS: Spanish Club (10, 1 1, 12); Con- 
cert Choir (10, 1 1, 12); Belles (11, 12); Pioneer Play- 
ers (1 1, 12); Thespians (11, 12); National Honor So- 
ciety (11, 12) 

MARK ALLEN PICKETT: "Little 500" (1 1) 
KATHY GRACE PIERCE: Cheerblock (10) 
NANCY LYNN PIERCE 
SHELIA LYNN PIKE 
VICKY J. PIKE 
JAMES WILLIAM PITTAWAY 



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SUE ANN POLSGROVE: Cheerleader (10); Student 
Council (10); National Honor Society (11, 12) 
BONNIE POOL: Cardinal Ritter High School (9, 10) 
KAREN L. POOLE: Spanish Club (9); Cheerblock (9); 
Pioneer Players (9, 10); Future Teachers of America, 
vice-president (11); president (12); "Little 500" (11); 
Concert Choir (12) 

JOHN ROBERT POURCHOT: Basketball (9, 10, 11, 
12); Baseball (10, 11, 12) 

RHONDA J. PREWITT: Bowling (9); Student Council 
(9); Cheerblock (11); "Little 500" (11); Prom Com- 
mittee (11) 

RICHARD ALAN PRUETT: Football (9); Orchestra (9); 
Band (9, 1 0); Bowling (11); Intramural Basketball ( 1 2) 
DIANE PULLINS: Red Cross Club (10); Intramural Bas- 
ketball (10) 
SHERYL LYNN RADER 

ALAN DEWITT RANDLE: Intramural Basketball (11 
12) 

ROGER L. RATCLIFF 
DENNIS LEE REED 

ROBERT JOSPEH REES: Student Council (11); Telstar 
(11, 12); Intramural Basketball (11, 12) 
PAMELA L. REINBOLD 

WILLIAM JOSEPH RENEAU: "Little 500" (11) 
JOYCE RHODES 





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DOUGLAS RICE: Baseball (9); Concert Choir (9); Bas- 
ketball (9, 10); Intramural Basketball (11, 12); Na- 
tional Honor Society (11); treasurer (12); Vanguard 
(12) 

RICHARD RICH: Bowling (11); Intramural Basketball 
(11, 12) 

DEBRA SUE RICHWINE: Cheerblock (10) 
CONSTANCE AMELIA RIGGS: GAA (9); Future Teach- 
ers of America (9); "Little 500" (10, 11); Northwest 
Passages (11); Prom Committee (11, 12); Telstar (11, 
12) 

DENNIS RINKER: Baseball (12) 
VICTOR RINKS: "Little 500" (11, 12) 
TONYA ROBERTS 
BILL ROBERTSON: Wrestling (9) 
CATHE ANN ROBINSON: Brotherhood Club (11) 
MICHAEL ROBINSON: Football Manager (9, 10, 11, 
12); Basketball (9, 10, 11, 12); Baseball manager (9, 
10, 11, 12); Intramural Basketball (11, 12) 
SANDRA LEE ROBINSON: Band (10, 11, 12) 
BECKY J. ROBISON: Student Council (9); Cheerblock 
(10); "Little 500" (10, 11, 12) 
SANDRA LEE ROGERS 

KENNETH D. RONEY: Track (9) ; Wrestling (9); Foot- 
ball (10, 11, 12); Letterman's Club (1 1); Brotherhood 
Club (11) 

CHARLES EDWARD ROSE: Baseball (9, 10); Football 
(9, 10, 11); Basketball (9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Student Coun- 
cil (9); Cabinet (10, 11, 12); Letterman's Club (11, 
12); Track (12); Brotherhood Club (12) 
CINDY LYNN ROSE 

JULIO ROSSELLO: Track (9); "Little 500" (10); Stu- 
dent Council (9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2) Football ( 1 0); Telstar (11, 
12); Vanguard (12) 
DARRELL GENE RUPE 
JOHN RYAN 
THOMAS ST. MARTIN 

BONNIE JOAN SALMON: Student Council (9); 
Cheerblock (9); "Little 500" (9, 10, 11, 12); News 
Bureau (11, 12); Senior Class Alumni Secretary (12); 
National Honor Society (12); Quill & Scroll Society 
(12) 

SHARON ANN SALZER: Student Council (9); Cheerb- 
lock (9); Speech Club (10); Northwest Passages (11); 
Belles (11); Concert Choir (11) 
LOREENA F. SANDLIN: Cheerblock (9); GAA (9, 10); 
"Little 500" (9, 10, 11, 12); Student Council (11); 
treasurer (12) 
DEBORAH KAY SCALES 

RICHARD LEE SCHENCK: Tipton High School (9); Cin- 
cinnati Shroder Junior High School (9); Decatur Central 
High School ( 1 0); Boys State Candidate (11); Concert 
Choir (11,12); Swing Choir ( 1 2); Student Council ( 1 2) 









MARK HARRISON SCHLAnER: Brownsburg High 
School (9); Band (9, 10, 11., 12); Tennis (10); Stage 
Band (10, 11, 12) 

DONNA JEANNE SCHNITTGEN: Cardinal Rirter High 
School (9); Business Activities Club (11, 12) 
JIMMY LEE SCHUSTER: Football (9, 11) 
DAVID LEE SCOGGAN: Intramural Basketball (1 1,12) 
DONNA ELIZABETH SCOTT 

REBECCA JUNE SCOTT: Brownsburg High School (9, 
10) 

SHIRLEY J. SCOn 

PATRICIA ANN SCUDDER: Bowling (9); Cheerblock 
(9); "Little 500" (9, 1 1 ); Silverettes (10); Track Queen 
(10); "Little 500" Queen Candidate (10); Jamboree 
Queen (11); Prom Committee (11); Cheerleader (11, 
12); Homecoming Queen Candidate (12); Fashion 
Board (12) 

MICHAEL CRAIG SCURLOCK 
DEBRA MARCELLA SEDAM 

JAMES EDWARD SELBY: Orchestra (9, 10); Track (9, 
10); Cross Country (9, 10); "Little 500" (9, 10, 11, 
12); Prom Committee (12) 
FAYE SHAFFER: Cheerblock (9) 

DAVID N. SHARP: Wrestling (9); Band (9, 10); In- 
tramural Basketball (11, 12) 
DEBBIE E. SHARP: Cheerblock (12) 
LINDA SUSAN SHAW: National Honor Society (11, 
12) 



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KAY SHIPP: ROTC (10, 1 1, 12); ROTC Queen Candi- 
date (10, 11, 12); Prom Committee ( 1 1 ); "Little 500" 

(11) 

GREGORY PETER SHIRES-. Concert Choir (9); Basket- 
ball (9, 10); Football (9, 10, 11); Golf (9, 10, 11, 
12); "Little 500" (10, 11, 12); Intramural Basketball 
(11,12) 

LEONDRA SHOBE: Concert Choir (11) 
JULIE ANN SHORT: Speech Club (%); Future Teachers 
of America (9); Pioneer Players(9, 10, 11, 12); Plays 
(9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Thespians ( 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Concert Choir 
(11, 12); Belles (12) 

MARGARET JANE SHRACK: Bowling (10, 12); Plays 
(10, 11, 12); Concert Choir (11, 12); Belles (12); 
Swing Choir (12) 
ROSEMARY LISBETH SHREVE 
DONNA SHULER 

LINDA JEAN SIMMONS: Bowling (10); Spelunking 
Club (11); Intramural Softball (11) 
DEBORAH ANN SIMON: Burton Junior High School, 
Michigan (9); Spelunking Club (11); National Honor 
Society (11, 12) 

DAVID LEE SKINNER: Band (9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Pep Band 
(10); Basketball (10); "Little 500" (11); Intramural 
Basketball (11, 12); National Honor Society (11, 12); 
Audio-Visual Club (12) 
PEARL ROSE SLATER: Cheerblock (10) 
JON SLAUGHTERBACK: Football (9); Student Council 
(11); Bowling (11) 

CARLA JANINE SMITH: "Little 500" (11); Prom Com- 
mittee (11) 

CURTIS ALAN SMITH: ROTC Drill Team (10); ROTC 
Color Guard (10, 11, 12); Brotherhood Club (11) 
HARRY SMITH: Football (9); Bowling (9, 10); In- 
tramural Basketball (11, 12) 

JEFFERY ALLEN SMITH: Band (9, 10, 1 1 , 1 2); Orches- 
tra (9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); All-City Orchestra (9, 1 0, 1 1 ); Pep 
Band (9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Stage Band ( 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Plays 
(9, 10, 11, 12); All-State Orchestra (10, 11, 12) 
KEITH VERNON SMITH 

MICHAEL LEE SMITH: "Little 500" (10, 1 1, 1 2); Foot- 
ball (11); Baseball (11, 12) 

NORMAN EUGENE SMITH, JR.: Student Council (11) 
SANDRA L. SMITH: Health Careers Club (9); Pioneer 
Players (9, 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Swing Choir ( 1 0, 1 1 ); Concert 
Choir (10, 11, 12); Plays (10, 11, 12); Girls State 
(11); Thespians (11, 12); National Honor Society (11, 
1 2) Student Council ( 1 2); Homecoming Queen Candi- 
date (12) 



SYBIL SMITH 

TONY SMOCK: Speech Club (11) 
FRANK ESTHER SPIKES: Band (9, 10, 11, 12); Dance 
Band (10, 11, 12); Spelunking Club (11, 12) 
YOVANKA SUE SPREMO: "Little 500" (10, 11, 12); 
Prom Committee (12) 
SHARON STALLARD 
RICHARD STAMBRO 

LENORA JOYCE STATZER: George Washington High 
School (9); Latin Club (10, 11, 12); Plays (10, 11, 
1 2); Pioneer Players (11,12); Thespians (11,12); Na- 
tional Honor Society (11, 12) 
MILFORD CURTIS STEPHENS 
TERRY LEE STEWART: Cheerblock (9, 10) 
DAVID EDWIN STRANGE: Triton Central High School 
(9) 

VANCE J. STRATTON: Basketball (9); Baseball (9); 
Football (9, 10, 11, 1 2); Wrestling (10, 11, 12); Let- 
terman's Club (10, 11, 12) 
BEVERLY STUDOR 

FRED SUDLER III: Intramural Basketball (12) 
GARY SULLIVAN 
LINDA SUMMERS 

EVELYN EVE JOHANNA SUTOR: Cheerblock (9); Ger- 
man Club (9, 10); "Little 500" (11) 
CHARLICE LISA SUTTICE: Chess Club (9) 
KATHLEEN S. SWIFT: "Little 500" (9) 
SHARON JEAN SWITZER: "Little 500" (9),- Stadium 
Queen Candidate (9); Vanguard Queen Candidate (9); 
Cheerblock (9, 10); French Club (9, 10, 1 1, 12); Tel- 
star (10, 11); "Little 500" Queen Candidate (10); 
Speech Club (10. 11); Student Council (10, 11, 12); 
cabinet (10); secretary (11); Indiana University Honors 
Program in France (11); National Honor Society (11, 
1 2); Senior Class Secretary ( 1 2) 

DONNA KAY TACKITT: Latin Club (9, 10, 11); 
Cheerblock (10) 



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RICHARD TAFFLINGER 

BARBARA JOANNE TAYLOR: French Club (9); Cheerb- 
lock (9); "Little 500" (9, 11, 12); Student Council 
(10); Telstar (11, 12); Business Manager (12); Prom 
Committee (12) 

FRANK S. TAYLOR: Concert Choir (10, 1 1, 12); Plays 
(11, 12); Swing Choir (12) 

FRED TAYLOR: Cross Country (9); Pioneer Players (9, 
1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Plays (9, 1 0, 11 , 1 2); Thespians (10,11, 
1 2); Swing Choir (1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Concert Choir ( 1 0, 1 1 , 
12) 

THERESA ANN TEAGER: German Club (10); Plays 
(10); "Little 500" (11) 

MICHAEL L. TEAGUE: Latin Club (9); Band (9, 10, 1 1); 

Audio-Visual Club ( 1 0, 1 1 ); Dance Band ( 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2) 

LYNN TERHUNE 

JODY THACKER 

PAMELA KAY THAYER: Arlington High School (9) 

CATHY THOMAS 

JERE LEE THOMAS: National Honor Society (11, 12) 

GARY THOMPSON 

RANDY L. THOMPSON 

VERNON DALE THOMPSON: Student Council (9); 

Tennis (9, 10, 11); Intramural Basketball (12) 

DUANE ANTHONY TURNER 







BILLY JOE TURNS: Football (9, 10, 11); Intramural 
Basketball (11) 

LEAH TWEEDY: Ben Davis High School ( 1 0) 
ALLEYN VAN HORN 

CHARLES DAVID VAN SANT : Audio-Visual Club (9, 
10); Telstar (10, 11, 12); Plays (11, 12); Student 
Council (11, 12); Quill & Scroll Society (11, 12) 
KATHY SUE VILES 
VICKI KAY VINCZ: ROTC (11, 12) 
SANDRA ELAINE WAGAMAN: Student Council (9, 
10); Intramural Softball (10); Musical (12); Swing 
Choir (12) 

JO ELLEN WALDRON: Spanish Club (10); Pioneer 
Players (10, 11, 12); Thespians (10, 11); secretary 
(12); Antipollution League (10); Future Teachers of 
America (11); vice-president (12); Spelunking Club 
(11); "Little 500" (11); Plays (11, 12); National 
Honor Society (11); secretary (12); Exercise in Knowl- 
edge (12) 

KAREN LYNN WALKER: Future Teachers of America 
(9); French Club (9); Latin Club (10, 11); Plays (10, 
11); "Little 500" (11) 

NATHANIEL LEE WALKER: Chess Club (9); Basketball 
(9, 10, 11, 12); Football (10, 11); Baseball (10); 
"Little 500" (11, 12); Spanish Club (12) 
PAUL WALLACE: Pioneer Players (9, 10, 11, 12); 
Plays (9, 10, 11, 12); Thespians (11, 12); Bowling 
(12) 

DEBORAH JO WALROND: John Marshall High School 
(10); Silverettes (11, 12); Homecoming Queen Candi- 
date (12) 
LINDA WATSON 

BRUCE LYNN WEISMAN: Baseball (9, 11, 12); In- 
tramural Basketball (11, 12); Tennis (12) 
MARSHA WESTMORELAND 
JAMES WETZEL 

MAXINE ARDEN WHISLER: Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica (9, 11, 12); Pioneer Pbyers (12); Concert Choir 
(12) 

JERRY WHITAKER 
JAMES WHITAKER 
LINDA DARLENE WHITE 

JEFFREY L. WHITTEN: German Club (9); ROTC Color 
Guard (10); National Honor Society (11, 12); In- 
tramural Basketball (12) 
LEONARD ANTHONY WHORTON 
CHARLES MICHAEL WIEGHARD: Shortridge High 
School (9, 10); Wrestling (11); "Little 500" (11, 12); 
Letterman's Club (11, 12); National Honor Society 
(11, 12); Student Council (12) 

GARY NELSON WIER: Football (9, U), 11,1 2); Wres- 
tling (9, 10, 11, 12); Baseball (9, 10, 1 1, 12); Letter- 
man's Club (10, 11, 12) 
KENNETH R. WILBER 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Bonnie Salmon, alumni secre- 
tary; Fred Miller, treasurer; Sharon Switzer, secretary; 
Stacia Loncar, vice-president; Jerry Hoover, president; 
Principal Kenneth Smartz. 





WILUAM STEVEN WILBUR: Cross Country (9, 10, 11, 
12); Track (9, 10, 11, 12); Letterman's Club (10, 11, 
12); Intramural Basketball (11) 

PATRICIA ANN WILBURN: Beech Grove High School 
(9, 10); Monrovia High School (11) 
DORIS WILLIAMS: Spanish Club (9); Bowling (9, 10, 
11, 12); "Little 500" (11); National Honor Society 
(11, 12) 

ELAINE WILLIAMS 

KEITH HARRISON WILLIAMS: Intramural Basketball 
(12) 

DONALD EUGENE WILLIS: Football (11); Intramural 
Basketball (12) 

PATRICIA ANN WILLS: Orchestra (9, 10, 11, 12) 
TERESA ANN WILSON 
VIRGINIA L. WILSON 

DEBBY LYNN WINEINGER: Cheerbbck (9, 10, 11); 
Student Council (12) 
PHILIP A. WOLFE 

ROBERT MICHAEL WOLTER: Business Activities Club 
(9); Latin Club (9); Debate Club (9); "Little 500" (9); 
Spelunking Club (11) 
JANEY WORTHINGTON 
BRENDA SUE WOZNY 

ERIC LYNN WRIGHT: German Club (9); Spelunking 
Club (11) 

PHILLIP ARTHUR WRIGHT: Track (9); Band (9, 10, 1 1, 
12); Pep Band (9, 10, 11, 1 2); Stage Band (9, 10, 11, 
1 2); Orchestra (10, 11, 12); Plays ( 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2); Na- 
tional Honor Society (1 1, 12); Prom Committee (12) 
RITA WRIGHT 

DANNY WYATT: Football (9); Baseball (9); Basketball 
(9, 10) 

DAVID YOUNG 
JAMES MICHAEL YOUNG 
GARLAND ZEIHER 




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SENIOR STUDENT COUNCIL Carmelita Kosh, Tom Case, Kevin Ball, 
Mike Johnson, Dick Beuke, Teresa Banks, Charles Rose, Ron Harris, 
Roberta Hurley, Loreena Sandlin, Jim Dimitroff, Sharon Switzer, Debbie 
Dewees, Patti Paquin, Fred Miller, Laura Munn, Tonja McKusky, Wally 



Hurt, Tom Mooney, Mike Wieghard, Sandy Smith, Susan Ellcessor, Tom 
Kistler, Charles Van Sant, Debbie Wineager, John Case, Richard 
Schenk. 



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Cherie Adams, Leland Adams, Teresa Albright, Pam 
Alexander, Keith Allen, Ricky Allen, Mark Amon, 
Kathleen Annarino, Mark Annarino 



Susan Archer, Timothy Armstrong, Beth Arnot, 
Diane Athey, Mary Austin, Kenneth Bacon, Jackie 
Bailey, Larry Baldwin, Damon Bales 



Bobbi Ball, Rodney Banks, Valerie Banton, Connie 
Bapalazarou, Sonja Barker, Twilb Barrow, Susan 
Barta, Debra Bartlett, Roger Bates 



Melanie Battson, Roberta Beeler, Cinda Bell, Cathy 
Benefiel, Grover Benge, Clifford Bennett, Helen 
Bennett, Henry Bennett, Kathy Bennett 



Linda Bennett, Stefan Bennett, David Berry, Cheryl 
Berty, Debra Bueke, Becky Bever, Delia Bibb, Chip 
Bickley, Yvonne Biehl 



Gary Bivens, Chris Black, Dennis Blackwell, Paula 
Blake, Rose Bland, Robert Blevins, Paul Bobo, Dar- 
rel Bohall, Cynthia Bohl 



Luana Bohlander, Eric Bolden, Nathan Booth, Randy 
Boring, Mark Boston, Kevin Boyd, Teresa Boyd, Jeff 
Boyers, Greg Brack 



Becky Brazzell, Brian Brown, Louise Brown, Sandra 
Brown, Tonia Brown, Edward Browning, Jim Bu- 
chanan, Bob Burcham, Charles Burnett 



Shelia Burns, Daisy Bush, Russell Bush, Terri Bush, 
Ray Burner, Ernest Byrd, Roy Byrd, Missy Byron, 
Carolyn Cabage 



Michael Cain, Russell Calvin, Christy Campbell, 
Jeanne Campbell, Dolores Campins, John Carlisle, 
Teresa Carlton, Barbara Carrico, Nancy Carroll 



Juniors 



David Carter, Linda Carter, Karen Cartnell, Becky 
Casey, Wayne Cervo, Jerry Chapman, Janet Chelf, 
Danny Cherry, Don Coffey 



Patricia Collings, Jim Collins, Thomas Comisso, 
Dean Conant, Mary Cooper, Bill Corbin, Diane Cor- 
bin, Janet Corder, Ava Cork 



Donna Cork, Greg Corn, Steve Com, Steve Corya, 
Mark Cotrill, Judy Creason, Danny Crouch, Rick 
Crouch, Donna Cullings 



Alice Cummings, David Curtis, Kenneth Daily, Steve 
Daily, Doug Danfourt, Mark Daniel, Sheryl Darrah, 
Karen Davidson, Sheryl Davidson 



Student Council 




JUNIOR STUDENT COUNCIL: (top) Randy Olds, Henry Mosley, She- 
ryl Vaughn, Jerry Francis, Bruce Hickman, Shannon Roach, Mary Mal- 
loy, Debbie Scott, Karen Kimsey, Donna Cullings, Becky Casey, 
Jeanne Campbell, Carol Revell, Luana Bohlander, Angie Jacobs, Dina 
Hacker, Russell Calvin, Greg Dunn 




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NEWS BUREAU Front row.- Sandy Sutherland, Konnie Hornsby, Tomi 
Worthington. Back row.- Carol Kirkpatrick, Bonnie Salmon, Karen 
Vincent. 





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• Gail Davis, Karen Davis, Lorna Davis, Sharon 
Davis, Mike DeJaeger, Therese Denning, Connie Den- 
ton, Gary Dial, Debbi Dill, Randy Dill, Mack Dobbins, 
Peter Donahue, Cindy Donahue, David Doran. 

• Ben Dosseff, Jeff Downs, Carolyn Dozier, Greg 
Dunn, Steve Dunnam, Cassie Ealy, Greg Easter, 
Laura Eaton, Michael Ebbing, Danny Eckel, Yvonne 
Edmonds, Ardell Edmondson, Mary Edwards, Kath- 
erine Eggleton 

• Sherry Eicholtz, Nancy Eller, Jeni Ellis, Kenneth Em- 
berson, Carol Evans, Ray Evans, Phil Fallowfield, 
Craig Farley, Michael Ferrentino, Scott Finch, Greg 
Foltz, Bob Ford, Richard Foster, Billy Fowler 

• Jerry Francis, Wanda Frick, Debra Fulk, Carlo 
Fullen, Mike Fullen, Debra Gagen, Priscilla Galvin, 
Douglass Gandy, Jamellza Gardner, Joe Garrett, 
Louis Garrison, Mike Garvey, Mike Gerbick, Christina 
Giles 

• Bill Gillespie, Greg Gillespie, Dianna Giltner, Peggy 
Gliva, Carolyn Goff, Michaiel Goodlet, Kathy Grady, 
Sandy Graham, Ronda Grant, Jim Green, Vendetta 
Green, Robin Greenlee, Curtis Gregory, Lisa Griffin 

• Linda Grounds, David Gryszyowka, Kenneth Gu- 
genheim, David Guidry, Cheree Gulledge, Mark 
Haab, Rodina Hacker, Linda Hackley, Bob Hahn, Ted 
Haines, Donna Hall, Robert Hall, Robert Hallagan, 
James Hambrick 

• Anne Hamilton, Barbara Hamilton, Robbin Handy, 
David Haney, Marilyn Hanover, John Hanson, Mark 
Harper, Curtis Harrington, Diana Harris, James Har- 
ris, Nancy Harris, Rick Harris, Deborah Hartley, Alan 
Harvey 

• Dennis Hauser, Cheryl Hayden, Judy Hayden, Juan- 
ita Hazel, Sheri Head, Brent Headley, Greg Heady, 
Pandora Hedges, Scott Heimbuch, Gary Hendricks, 
James Hensel, James Herron, James Hester, Bruce 
Hickman 

• Kathy Hill, Danita Hilliard, Maria Hines, Lisa Hin- 
man, Doug Hinshaw, Thomas Hoage, Randall Hobbs, 
Sandy Hodges, Sument Holman, Brent Holmes, Dale 
Hopkins, Ruth Horn, Konnie Hornsby, Laura Huber 

• Nick Hundley, Jeff Hunt, George Hunter, Gaylene 
Hurt, Gary Huston, Keith Huston, Jack Imel, Deborah 
K. Jackson, Deborah L. Jackson, Pam Jackson, Angie 
Jacobs, Sally Jacobs, Terry James, Patti Jenkins, 
Diane Johnson, Marce Johnson 

• Mary Johnson, Shirley Johnson, Kenneth Joltiff, 
Becky Jones, Clyde Jones, David Jones, Evelyn Jones, 
Owen Jones, Rick Jones, Shirley Jones, Bob Joshlin, 
Cathy Keifer, Bill Keller, Sally Keller, Doug Kendall, 
Karen Kernodle 








iX v> ;V,*v±m 




• Kenneth Kernodle, Bill Kersey, Karen Kimsey, Gary 
King, Gary Kirk, Carol Kirkpatrick, Cindy Kistler, Ron 
Klinge, Rita Knight, Monica Komlanc, Herb Kreutzer, 
Linda Kutz, Gene Labaw, John Lacy, Debbie Lakin, 
Jeannie Lambert 

• Maxie Lambirth, Nedra Lambirth, Jeff Lammert, 
Debbie Lane, Richard Lane, Richard Larrimore, Mar- 
sha Larrison, Sally Larson, Michael Lawler, Randy 
Lawrence, Phillip Layfield, Mike Lee, Peggy Lee, John 
Leming, Bob Leonard, Donald Lessel 

• James Lester, Linda Lewis, Michael Lindsay, Mae 
Lindsey, Bill Lind, Gary Links, Pam Linville, Tina Lit- 
mer, Richard Long, Craig Lowe, Tarrie Ann Lynch, 
Cheryl Malcndro, Mary Malloy, Cinda Mann, Toni 
Marchetti, Bonnie Martin 

• Mike Martin, Sue Martin, Helen McCleary, Kay 
McClure, Karen McCracken, John McCreary, Julie 
McCullough, Terri McCutchan, William McGowan, 
Terry McHargue, Gary McKamey, Roger McKee, Jim 
McLaughlin, Richard McMasters, Cliff McMillian, Chip 
McQueen 



• David Mendez, Kevin Merriman, Jessica Messamer, 
Louis Meyer, Gary Michener, Mark Mikita, Karl Mil- 
hon, Betty Miller, Cathy Miller, David Miller, Randy 
Miller, Steve Miller, Martin Miszerak, Steve Mitchell, 
Sheryl Mobley, Jerry Mohr 













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CONCERT CHOIR Front row. Debbie Kennedy, Su- 
zanne Mormance, Bonnie Read, Judy Perkins, Renee 
Mormance, Konnie Hornsby, Diane Huffaker, Larry 
Hall, Jed Jamison, David Keglovits, Hubert Fryman, 
John Sprouse, Karl Milhon, Charles Bennett, Robert 
Price, Tim Olson. Second row: Annette Cannon, Cinda 
Bell, Donna Rhodes, Maxine Whistler, Sandy Smith, 
Candy Moots, Valerie Banton, Krista Niemann, Laura 
Huber, Yvonne Freeland, Mark Senter, Mike Roberts, 
Steve Tafflinger, Gary Long, Keith Allen, Mark 
Turner. Third row: Sandy Conner, Mary Jo Wright, 
Phyllis Buckner, Roberta Hurley, Julie Short, Sharon 
Taylor, Becky Brazzell, Sheryl Darrah, Chris Hickman, 
Bill Evans, James White, Jeff Riggs, Bobby Bowens, 
Henry Mosley, Wilber Jackson. Back row: Samella 
Payne, Gwen Edwards, Kathy Phipps, Rhonda 
Schmidt, Peggy Shrack, Mary Hamler, Idella Walker, 
Mary Johnson, Bobbi Summers, Chris Giles, Peggy 
Smallwood, Frank Taylor, Fred Taylor, John Carlile, 
Richard Skink, Tim Potter, Phillip Mosley, Roger 
Gossett. 



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• Robert Smith, Diane Snoddy, Phil Snyder, Vicki 
Snyder 



• Sandy Sorrell, Rebecca Spears, John Sprouse, Paul 
Spurlin 



• Teresa Standifer, Linda Staples, Anita Statzer, John 
Stegemoller 



• Donna Steinmetz, Joe Stephanoff, Jo Stephens, 
Elaine Strange 



• Doug Street, Doris Summers, Sandy Sutherland, 
Ken Suffice 



* Michael Monger, Becky Moore, Chris Moore, Mike 
Moore, Paul Moore, Teresa Moore, Barbara Moor- 
head, John Morgan, Layman Morgan, Paul Morgan, 
Anthony Morton, Yvonne Morton, Henry Mosley, Phil- 
lip Mosley 



• Debra Mundy, Mike Mutz, Harry Myers, Jeff 
Myers, Steve Neeb, Patrick Newby, Aaron Nixon, 
Jeff Nixon, Cindy Noe, Glenna Nowling, Virgil Oats, 
Brenda Obenchain, Kay Off, Virginia Oldham 



• Randy Olds, Dorothy Oliver, Gregg Oilier, Francis 
Orr, Theresa Orr, Paul Osting, Joan Ottenweller, Bob 
Ottinger, Theresa Overby, Terri Owen, Eleanor 
Owens, Eva Owens, Ed Pallay, Elgin Pallay 



• Gary Palmer, Mike Pardee, Linda Parks, Steve Par- 
merlee, Ajaykumar Patel, Smita Patel, Patty Patrick, 
Kim Patterson, Lisa Patterson, Danny Paul, Samella 
Payne, Vicki Perkins, Debora Peters, Glenda Phillips 



• Karen Pickel, Phillip Pickett, Judith Pierson, Debbie 
Pifer, Chris Plunkett, Terri Poland, Amelia Potenze, 
Angeio Poulos, Bonnie Pourchot, Andy Prairie, Susan 
Pranger, David Price 



• Kevin Price, Steven Price, Dan Pringle, Cheryl 
Pruett, Connie Pugh, Gerald Pyles, Steve Queen, 
Gary Quillman, Jody Rademacher, Judy Rademacher, 
Cindy Ralson, Fred Ramos 



■ Robert Ranee, Susan Raub, David Ray, Bonita Read, 
Stephen Reeves, Terri Reinbold, Vanessa Reinstatler, 
Carol Revell, Debora Rice, Melanie Richards, Lisa 
Richardson, Jerry Richey 



• Vicky Riordan, Alan Ripley, Shannon Roach, Bill 
Roberts, Debra Roberts, Judith Roberts, Mike Roberts, 
David Robertson, Glenn Roesler, Elwood Rogers, Dan 
Rowley, Jeanette Russell 

• Steve Russell, James Ryan, Toni Sampson, Ana 
Sanchez, Dave Sanders, Janet Scalf, Joyce Scalf, 
Bruce Schaedel, Eric Schaffer, Patricia Schlagel, Dar- 
ryl Schlake, Rhonda Schmidt 



• Linda Schubert, Thomas Schumacher, Debra Scott, 
Jeffrey Scott, Margaret Sears, Gail Secor, Daniel 
Shaffer, Karen Shaffer, Charlene Shedd, Anthony 
Sheeks, Melinda Shinkle, Crystal Shipp 

• Terri Sholar, Heidi Shreve, Fred Siddons, Dean Sig- 
ler, Karen Skiles, Vickie Slusher, Peggy Smallwood, 
Cathy Smith, Cindy Smith, Debra Smith, Donald 
Smith, Michael Smith 







North-west Passages 

*\ 

TELSTAR Front: Carmelita Kosh. Second row: Diane Gray, Bob Rees, Barb Taylor, Fred Miller, 
Dee Norris, Patti Muir, Sandy Sutherland. Back row-. Scott Daniels, Charles Van Sant, Connie 
Riggs, Bonnie Martin, Janice Campbell, Marsha Weaks, Jim Wetzel, Greg Brack. 
NORTHWEST PASSAGES Cherylin McCarty, Gail Hinderliter, Janet Flynn, Mrs. Doris Brad- 
ford, Helen Bennett, Brenda Obenchain, Nancy Harris, Greg Brack, Rhonda Schmidt. 



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• David Sutton, Regina Swails, Teresa Switzer, Frank 
Tabaras, Dale Taylor, Vernie Taylor, Connie Thomas, 
Teresa Thomas, Darryl Thompson, Natalie Thompson, 
Becky Thornell, Kenneth Threlkeld 



• Debra Thurman, BobTillery, Diana Tingle, Henry 
Tipps, John Tolson, Victor Trammel, James Tsareff, 
Steven Tsareff, Shirley Turner, Randy Turns, Karen 
Urbancic, Paula Utterback 



• Jeff Van Treese, Sheryl Vaughn, Mark Vester, Ka- 
ren Vincent, Deborah Wagaman, Debra Walker, 
Idelia Walker, Jeff Walton, Susan Ward, Becky War- 
ren, Joe Warren, Viola Warren 



• Robin Watkins, Becky Watson, Joe Watson, Mari- 
lyn Watson, Dennis Wayt, Marcia Weaks, Randy 
Webber, Patricia Weiss, Beverly Wells, Carol West- 
fall, Greg Westrick, Karen White 

• Sherry Wilcox, Gloria Wilkerson, Danny Williams, 
Gordon Williams, Kathy Williams, Laura Williams, 
Mark Williams, Denise Williamson, Diane Williamson, 
Sherry Williamson, Bill Wislon, Dave Wilson 

• Joe Wilson, Richard Wilson, Russell Wilson, Joseph 
Winegard, Debbie Wininger, Arthur Winterown, Mary 
Beth Wise, Peggy Wise, Charles Wodtke, Carol 
Wolfe, Denise Wolfe, Vicki Wolfe 

• Tari Woltz, Candace Wooden, Mary Joe Wright, 
Steve Yant, Mario Yedlowski, Bill Young, Chris 
Young, Jeff Young, Michael Zarifis, Greg Zeiher, Cyn- 
thia Ziko, Sharon Zoretich 




VANGUARD— Front row: Pam Gaither, Becky Moore, Carol Batman, Carol Kirkpatrick, Me- 
lanie Battson, Ruth Horn, Le Rae Herron. Back row.- Doug Rice, Steve Gano, Judy Pierson, 
Luana Bohlander, Sharon Zoretich, Theresa Orr, Barbara Hamilton, Vicki Marchetti, Becky 
Casey. 



CONCERT BAND Front row: Theresa Finn, Ann 
Green, Sheri King, Karan Lawrence, Mary Jo Wright, 
Debbie Baker, Melanie Leet, Evelyn Divine. Second 
row: Jeff Smith, Paula Utterback, David Haney, Karen 
Davis, Paul Wagaman, Julius Reed, John Elmore. 
Third row: Julie McCullough, Mike Roberts, Sherry 
Norton, Denise Jett, Phyllis Lane, Mark Linthecum, 
Terry McKuskey, Sandy Robinson. Back row: Tim 
Green, Linda Lewis, Henry Mosley, Terry Hickman, 
Jeff Lammert, Carolyn Cabage, Mike Teague, Danny 
Williams, Mark Schlatter, Chuck demons. 




CONCERT BAND Front row.- David Hartzler, Scott Dorothy, Danny Paul, Jay Cummings, Keith 
Huston, John Lacy, Keith Nichols, Mark Rusk. Second row: Sonny Hall, Ron Cox, Paula Davis, 
Sherry McCoy, Steve Clear, Debbie Wagaman, Tim Olson. Third row-. Dan Rowley, Charles 
Wodke, Joe Asher, Janet Flynn, Jeff Downs, Becky Hastings, Phil Wright. Fourth row: Jim 
Green, Steve Russell, Gary Cirrincioni, Chris Galloway, David Skinner, Frank Spikes, Dave 
Robertson. Bade row.- Bill Fowler, Roger Gossett, Keith Allen, Randy Miller, Robert Hallagan, 
Jim Fowler, James McLaughlin. 



• Jo Ann Abroms, Mike Adams, Paul Adams, Brenda 
Adamson, Bob Adkins, Steve Ahrendt, Jackie Alexan- 
der, Rick Alexander, Maria Allen, Ron Andrews, Mike 
Arkanoff, Ellen Arthur, Mart Autry 



• Vicki Avery, Debbie Bacon, Bob Baker, Chuck Bal- 
lard, Lorrie Barnard, Roger Barnett, Rick Bartlett, 
Elaine Bash, Ron Baskerville, Jan Bateman, Jean Bate- 
man, Cathy Bates, Dwayne Beamon 

• Melita Beard, Janet Beasley, Mike Beck, Bill Beisel, 
Bob Beisel, Cheryl Benefiel, Dave Beninger, Steve 
Benson, Pam Bernett, Kathi Berry, Doug Berry, Dian 
Bettis, Deb Bilendo 



• Steve Bishop, Debbie Black, Herbert Bobb, Donita 
Bond, Herman Bond, Marcie Bowen, Bob Bowens, 
Danny Bowers, Pam Boyers, Denny Brenan, Pat Bren- 
ner, Karolyn Brents, Mark Brezco 



• John Briggs, Bessi Brooks, Bill Brooks, John Brooks, 
Bruce Brown, Cecil Brown, Linda Broyles, Georgia Bu- 
chanan, Phyllis Buckner, Warren Bufore, Donna 
Burge, Jo Ann Burge, Anita Burnett 










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• Terri Burns, Lisa Burrows, Jeff Busby, Tim Bush, 
Susie Burner, Dick Byard, Joni Cade, Katie Carbin, 
Julio Campins, Sally Carden, Matt Carpenter 



• Brent Carter, Willy Carter, Terry Case, Mark Cham- 
bers, Beth Chasteen, Deb Christian, Susan Clawson, 
Chuck demons, Joy Clingeman, Carrol Coffey, Mary 
Collins 



• Mary Colmey, Jeff Conners, Stephanie Cooper, Do- 
rothy Coyle, Dean Crawford, Bob Crawford, Pam 
Creekbaum, Kathy Crick, Linda Crosby, Randy Cupp, 
Vonni Dakner 



"MAM ?I? & 



Becky Daily, Steve Daniel, Delores Davis, Paula tT \ SMI m»*\ J^-li ^^C PW 



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Davis, Sandy Davis, Terry Davis, Debbie Dickinson, 
JeaH Dixon, Peter Donahue, Scott Dooley, Eric Doolin 



* * SK 




• Janet Doran, Tom Dorothy, Jerry Gouglas, Pam Do- 
ver, Sonji Dover, Larry Downard, Doug Dunbar, Beth 
Duncan, Mike Duncan, Cindy Dunham, Mike Dunnam Wk \M , J **$&& SK^^ '- ' 





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• Mike Durrett, Ed Dye, Joe Earl, Karol Ebbing, Gwen 
Edwards, Jack Ehle, Jerry Ehmen, Shonda Eller, John 
Elmore, Thara Emerson, Mike Endicott 



• Julie Evans, Rick Evans, Sherry Everman, John Eu- 
liss, Donna Farmer, Marcia Faust, Mary Feeley, Doug 
Feltner, Jan Felts, David Fenner, Terry Ferguson 



• Theresa Finn, John Fiorentin, Frank Fisher, Bob 
Flanagan, Mike Flanagan, Janet Flynn, Chuck Fodrie, 
Jan Folderth, Fred Follmar, Duane Ford, Sharon Ford 



• Jim Fox, Debbie Franklin, Mark Freeland, Watana 
Fryman, Pam Gaither, Norman Garrett, Lisa Geddes, 
John Genrty, Sheree Ghere, Max Gill, Bob Giltner 



• Sam Ginn, Bonnie Golden, Bob Goldey, Roger 
Gossett, Drema Graves, Teresa Graves, Tim Green, 
Evelyn Greene, Judy Grimes, Phyllis Grimes, Paul 
Grundy 

• Ken Guamery, Jose Guitana, Duane Haberman, 
Julie Hodley, Margo Haley, Larry Hall, Ken Hamilton, 
Ron Hamm, Linda Hanson, Tony Harbin, Dewayne 
Harris 



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• Rick Harris, Tina Harris, Nancy Harrison, Larry Har- 
per, Randy Hartley 



• Becky Hastings, Cindy Hayes, Mark Hazzard, Jon 
Heinrich, Phil Heller 



• Becky Hendricks, Terry Hendrickson, Sherri Her- 
man, Morris Herring, LeaRae Herron 



• Barry Hickman, Terri Hickman, Tom Hill, Pam- 
Hilliard, Vicki Hillman 



• Gail Hinderliter, Cathy Hines, Jim Hines, Nancy 
Hodges, Maria Hogdin 





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Sophomore Student Council 1 




SOPHOMORE STUDENT COUNCIL Denise Little, Diane Pillow, Linda Crosby, Lynn Jameson, Lana 
Milan, Gail Hinderliter, Mary Lou Collins, Janet Flynn, Jeff Riggs, Georgia Buchanan, Karon 
Lawrence 

BELLES Front: Rhonda Schmidt, Yvonne Freeland, Chris Hickman, Sheryl Darrah, Cinda Bell, Carol 
Wolfe, Julie Short, Konnie Hornsby, Bobbi Ball. Back: Kathy Phipps, Sandy Connors, Bobbie Sum- 
mers, Krista Niemann, Debbie Kennedy, Sharon Taylor, Judy Perkins, Peggy Schrack, Diana 
Huffacker. 



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• Terry Hoffer, John Holland, Diane Holt, Sonda Holt, 
Barbara Horn, Rhonda Humes, Bill Hunt, Marty 
Hunter, Lynn Hurt, Mike Irwin, Marsha Isenberg, De- 
lila Jackson 



• Kathy Jackson, David Jacobs, Mary Jacobs, Caro- 
lyn James, Lynn Jameson, Denise Jett, Brad Johnson, 
Mark Johnson, Pat Johnson, Vanessa Johnson, 
Wanda Johnson, James Jones 



• Scott Jones, Cindy Kaiser, Celia Kann, Diana Karn, 
Dave Keglovits, Mike Kellogg, Mary Kidder, Mark Kil- 
gore, Mike Kimberlin, Rhonda King, Sherri King, Jim 
Kinley 



■ William Kinley, John Kirby, Jett Kirkman, Jackie Kis- 
tler, Lois Kleeman, Don Klemen, Nicki Knowber, Terry 
Koontz, Kathy Kurpis, Dean Kyle, Frank Lambert, Su- 
san Lammert 



• Phyllis Lane, Judy Larson, Randy Lasiter, Karon 
Lawrence, Melanie Leet, Steve Lessel, Susie Liming, 
Lola Lindsey, Mark Linthecum, Mike Linza, Denise 
Little, Pam Longberger 



• Adonis Long, Bill Lucas, Vicki Lynch, Ken Madry, 
Deana Magee, Jim Mann, Jan Mansfield, Mark 
Maple, Randy Marlar, Darcy Martin, Gina Massey, 
David Maxey 



• Bill McAdams, Cherylin McCarty, Cherie McCoy, 
Debra McCracken, Brian McDonald, Terry McKusky, 
Ken McLaughlin, Linda McMillian, Kevin McMullen, 
Rocco Mediate, Janel Meetz, Stephanie Merriman 

• Dana Milan, Lana Milan, Diane Miller, Garry Miller, 
Randy Miller, Randy Miller, Becky Mills, Jeff Mitny, 
Cheryl Money, Yvonne Montani, Carol Moody, Dan 
Mooney 

• Brian Moore, Kym Moore, Clarence Moreland, Mar- 
tin Morgan, Renee Mormance, Cheryl Morton, Susi 
Muir, Jesse Myers, John Meyers, Terry Meyers, Curtis 
Neal, Brice Neeb 



• James Newton, Gwen Nicholson, Krista Niemann, 
Dyan Oakes, Danielle Oates, Michelle Oliphant, Tom 
Oilier, Cheri O'Riley, Chuck Osburn, Brian Outlaw, 
Connie Owens, Vicki Owens 



• Randy Page, Cheryl Palmer, Mark Palmer, Kathy 
Paquin 



• Keith Parker, Debbie Partlow, Ronad Pates, Layne 
Pavey 



• Tommy Pearson, Mona Pemberton, Judy Perkins, 
Sherry Peterson 



• Kim Petruzzi, Alverna Phillips, Larry Phipps, Kathy 
Pickel 



Pon Pierson, Diane Pillow, David Piatt, John 



Tim Potter, Don Power, Shere Prewitt, Bob Price 



• Robin Pritchett, David Pryor, Joe Pyles, Rick 
Quinette 



• Steve Rae, Sandy Rairdon, Ronita Rane, Ralph 
Raney 



Cheri Reed, Diane Reed, Dana Reid, Donna Reid 



• Don Reinbold, Patti Renner, Donna Rhodes, Phil 
Richards 



Mil 

All! 




AAtK 



SWING CHOIR Steve Cook, guitar; Judy 
Perkins, piano; Craig Lowe, drums. Front 
row.- Jeff Riggs, Russell Bush, John 
Sprouse, Hubert Fryman, Bonnie Reid, Val 
Banton, Becky Brezzell, Mary Jo Wright, 
Peggy Schrack. Second row: Bill Evans, 
Frank Taylor, Phil Mosley, Mike Bastin, 
Karl Milhoun, Suzanne Mormance, Phyllis 
Buckner, Stacia Loncar, Roberta Hurley. 
Back row: Keith Allen, James White, Rich- 
ard Schenk, Fred Taylor, John Carlile, 
Sandy Wagaman, Laura Huber, Chris 
Hickman, Sherry Darrah. 




*** 


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• Sue Richardson, Francis Richey, Jeannette Richey, 
Rita Richie 



Jeff Riggs, Dave Riley, Donna Riley, Eugene Rinker 



• Davie Roach, Earl Robertson, Becki Robinson, Susan 
Roether 



Von Ross, John Roth, Juck Ruff, Lemar Rushin 



• Mark Rusk, Larry St. Martin, Tom Salzer, Leonard 
Sanders 



• Bill Sandlin, Terry Sandford, Tom Saur, Cindy 
Schmidt 




R.O.T.C. DRILL TEAM: Front: C/1LT Gene Labaw, C/CPT Dave Sanders, C/SSG Doug Street, 
C SFC Brent Holmes. Back: H/2LT Ruth Horn, C/SSG Rob Sutherland, C/MSG Tim Brown, 
C MAJ Mack Dobkins, C/SGT Kevan Price, C/CPT Garland Zeiher, C/2LT John Leming, 
C SSG Duane Beamon, H/1LT Gayla Whitten. 



ORCHESTRA Front row: Annette Cannon, Jim Wetzel, 
Jeannie Campbell, Debbie Partlow, Cathy Waltz, Va- 
lerie Banton, Laura Eaton, Gail Baker. Second row: 
Gaylene Hurt, Sandra Conner, Rita Moore, Linda Hill- 
ers, Diane Johnson, Trudy Hanft, Tanya Eaton, 
Norma Chelf, Carol Selby, Hubert Fryman, Bob 
Goldy, Randy Hobbs. Third row: Linda Crosby, Wall- 
ace Hurt, Frank Tabares, Brenda Adamson, Diane Pil- 
low, Karon Lawrence, Sheir King, Ann Green, Teresa 
Finn, Jeff Smith, Paula Utterback, David Haney, Paul 
Wagaman, Karen Davis. Fourth row: Vendetta 
Green, Karolyn Brents, Debbie Williams, Lynn Jami- 
son, Steve Clear, Debbie Wagaman, Phil Wright, 
Sherry McCoy, Paula Davis, Ron Cox, Sonny Hall, 
Chris Galloway, Gary Cirrincioni, Frank Spikes, John 
Elmore. Back row.- Beth Chasteen, Danny Paul, Jay 
Cummings, Ken Gugenheim, Charles Bennett, Howard 
Hurley, George Williams, Roger Gossett. 




German Club f 

.3 




• Becky Schirrell, Joe Scott, Tanya Seagraves, Dawn 
Seals, Randy Seals, Bob Selby, Mark Senter, Benny 
Shobe, Brenda Shobe, Leslie Short, Robin Short, Terry 
Short, Paul Simon, Julie Simpson 

• Tim Simpson, Tom Sloan, Trudy Small, Mike Small- 
wood, Chris Smith, Debra Smith, Jean Smith, Kedrick 
Smith, Mike Smith, Ruth Smith, Toni Snyder, Debra 
Soots, Debbie Spaulding, Bob Spikes 

• Gary Spratt, Dana Standefer, Deana Stanley, Don 
Stedman, Pam Stelman, Jeff Stewart, Tina Suhr, Rob- 
erta Summers, Rob Sutherland, Tim Swartsell, Dan 
Swift, David Szalaiy, Roland Tabares, Steve 
Tafflinger 

• Francis Taylor, Mark Taylor, Sharon Taylor, Patty 
Teague, Joanne Teater, John Teskey, Dewayne 
Thomas, Henrietta Thomas, Ron Thomas, Beth Thomp- 
son, Michael Thurman, Sheryl Thurston, Mark Tillery, 
Patsy Tipps 

■ Julie Tower, Thea Trammell, Lloyd Tut. 'er, Deborah 
Turner, Mark Turner, Debbie Turns, Di i Tweedy, 
Casey Vann, Gail Waldron, David Walk r , James 
Walker, Sherry Walker, Teresa Walker, Steve 
Walton 

• Cathy Waltz, Pam Ward, Bob Waren, Mike 
Warner, Jay Warner, Jan Warren, Scott Weddle, 
Jerry Weiser, Debbi Wheat, Betty Whtaker, Danny 
White, Jim White, Pat White, Gayla Whitten 

• Cathy Wieghard, Ron Wier, Cheryl Williams, Mi- 
chael Williams, George Williams, Laura Williams, 
Lindsay Williams, James Wilson, Mark Wilson, Teddy 
Wilson, Vickie Wilson, Pam Wineinger, Sharon Wing, 
Mike Winn 

• Jackie Wise, Kim Wittman, Rita Wittman, Tomi 
Worthington, Marilyn Wright, David Yant, Debra 
Yates, Genia Yedlowski, Chris Yezagelian, Howard 
Young, Cindy Zadoorian, Rod Zigler 



GERMAN CLUB Front: Renee Mattingly, Sharon Casper, Miss Mary Lou Steed. Back: Krista 
Niemann, Patty Weiss, Bill Weiss. 

RED CROSS CLUB Front row: Wilhemina French, Sally Robertson, Mary Comly, Laura Lentz. 
Second row: Cynthia Schmidt, Karen Bickley, Grace Bowers, Norma Chelf, Melody Bessinger, 
Linda Lentz, Terry Thomas. Back row. Jessica Messamer, Debbie Yates, Julie Baker, Terri Milli- 
gan, Donna Reid, Karon Lawrence, Cindy Kaiser. 










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Sophomores 





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Debbie Adams, Debra Adams, Vicki Adams 



Lila Albert, Gregg Allen, Debra Anderson 



Jennifer Anderson, Mick Anderson, Robin Annarino 



Norma Archer, Wade Arnold, Griff Atwater 



Norma Bacon, Doug Bailey, Evonne Baird 



George Baker, Julie Baker, Kathy Baker 



Mark Baker, Diana Randy, Rick Baron 



Bonnie Barrett, Pam Bartlett, Kurt Beard 



Allen Bennett, Charles Bennett, Jill Bennett 



Jim Bennett, Floyd Bennett, Melody Bensinger 



Doug Bernitt, Charles Berry, Tim Berry 



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Bonnie Bever, Karen Bickley, Ken Bickley 



• Debra Bingham, Brenda Bishop, Paul Blankenship 



Tony Bond, Jeff Boston, Mark Bowen 



Grayce Bowers, Donna Bracy, Bob Bray 



Steve Briggs, ?-indra Bright, Dawn Brillo 





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• Greg Britney, Jeff Brooks, Cindra Brown, Julia 
Brown, Kim Brown, Debra Bruce, Lavet Burkeen, Cav- 
elle Burwell, Barbara Bush, Donna Butler, Mike Ca- 
bage, Melinda Caine 



• Nancy Carnagua, Diane Carter, Sharon Casper, 
Norma Chelf, Terri Christian, Al Christmon, Rita 
Christy, Glenn Clawson, Sharon Clay, David Cobb, 
Monica Coburn, Cameron Coder 



• Sherry Collier, Dan Collins, Gilbert Collins, Mike 
Collins, Sharon Collins, Tom Collins, Mike Condre, 
Mary Conover, Connie Cook, Lindy Cope, Charles 
Cordon, Diane Cornett 



• Sherry Cox, Bill Craig, David Cranfill, Gary Craw- 
ford, Jackie Crouch, Dan Crump, Mike Cunningham, 
Leroy Curry, Bryan Curtis, Tina Dalton, Bella Darden, 
Rodney Davidson 



• Candi Davis, Doral Davis, Ken Davis, Eric Decker, 
Pete deGrysa, Bob Denning, Leroy Devine, Randy 
Dewees, Lisa Dickinson, Brenda Dillman, Debbie Dil- 
lon, Jerri Doll 



• Cynthia Dollard, Paul Dombroski, Chris Donahoe, 
Beth Doran, Delores Doran, Kathy Doran, Mark Do- 
ran, Ken Douglas, Mike Downs, Jackie Drake, Jay 
Dubroski, David Duncan 



• Debra Duncan, Patricia Duncan, Pam Dunham, 
Doug Dunn, Pam Duty, Tanya Eaton, Susan Eble, 
Sherry Edgar, Loretta Edmonson, Tom Edwards, David 
Eicholtz, Carlo Eller 



• Larry Elmore, Ron Endicott, Erin Farrell, Brian Fel- 
tner, Pam Ferguson, Carla Finch, Tom Finely, Mary 
Fiorentin, Susan Fleser, Sharon Fletcher, Debra Foley, 
Tim Fork 

• Genita Foster, Patricia Fowler, Sheilla Fox, Fred 
Foxworthy, Steve Franklin, Steve Frazer, Angela 
Freeman, Ken Fulk, Laura Fultz, Harle Gaddis, Jack 
Gammon, Linda Gammon _, 



• Sharon Gandy, Bryan Garmon, Leslie Garrett, Wil- 
liam Garrett, Dave Garrison, Clara Gary, Daron Gif- 
ford, Debbie Greene, Matthew Gregory, Robert Gre- 
gory, Ladon Guthrie, Bill Haaf 

• Teresa Hacker, Pam Hadaway, Linda Hastead, Be- 
linda Hanna, Dixie Harman, Sheri Harmon, Ken Har- 
meson, Vernon Harper, Donna Harris, Richard Harris, 
Karen Harvey, Jimmy Hassell 



FRESHMAN STUDENT COUNCIL front: Dawn Brillo, 
Debbie Adams, Kevin Williams. Back; Bill Craig, Pam 
Duty, Cassandra Thompson 



SILVERETTES First row: Dana Milan, Gaylene Hurt, 
Lana Milan, Beth Hamilton, Susan Clawson, Becky Be- 
ver, Cathy Kiefer, Patty Schlagel, Susan Lammert, 
Stacy Kendrick. Second row: Carmeiita Kosh, Trudy 
Hanft, Alisha Lanier,Linda Kellogg, Mariann Johnson, 
Carolyn Howard, Debbie Kennedy, Robin Downing, 
Wilhelmina French, Vicki Marchetti, Linda Chance. 
Third row: Connie Thomas, Michelle Oliphant, Linda 
Crosby, Terri Owen, Sharon Zoretich, Terri Burns,. 
Lynn Jamison, Kym Moore, Pat Brenner, Rhonda 
Schmidt. FEATURE TWIRLERS Gina Cardwell, Sherrie 
Williamson. 




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Darla Hazelwood, Joanne Heffley, Jenny Heifer, 
Stephan Hendricks, Edward Henning, Collin Henry, 
Dave Hensel, Jodea Henzman, John Hester 

• Marcia Higgs, Nina Holbrook, Debora Holden, Earl 
Hollowell, Cindy Hopkins, Cynthia Hopton, Jeana 
Housel, Kurt Howard, Joyce Huffman, James Hughes, 
David Hunt 



• Jeff Hunt, Robin Imel, Bobby Irvin, Shelley James, 
William James, Dennis Johnson, Judy Johnson, Larry 
Johnson, Rhonda Johnson, Richard Johnson, Edward 
Jones, Joseph Jones 



• Mike Jones, Nina Jones, Jay Joshlin, Mark Kaiser, 
Pat Keers, Merla Keller, Sandra Kemery, George 
Kemp, Jim Kennington, Barbara Kent, Steve Kim- 
brough, Sharon Kimbrough 



■ Sulvia King, Paul Kirkpatrick, Karen Kissick, Nicki 
Knoebel, Chris Koehl, Mark Krug, Steve Kurpis, Geri 
labaw, Velda Lambirth, Lesa Landrey, Gary Lane, Ro- 
ger Lenguelt 



• Connie Lee, Frankie Lee, David Lehr, Mary Leming, 
Elizabeth Lewis, Becky Linely, John Linvtlle, Lynda 
Lloyd, Cathy Loggins, Don Lonberger, Tim Long, Mary 
Lott 



• Don Lynch, Karen Mahone, Bob Majors, Ron Ma- 
lone, Vic Malloy, Lisa Mann, Randy Mann, Gene 
Markiewicz, Debra Martin, Mike Martin, Rick Martin, 
Scott Martin 



• Steve Mason, Jackie Matthews, Yvonne Matthews, 
Rene Mattingly, David Maul, Aaron Maxey, Evelyn 
McClain, Michel McClain, Denise McClaren, Mike 
McCormack, Donata McCray, Diana McElyea 



• Tracy McGrew, Brian McKinley, Pam McLaurin, 
John McMullen, Bill McNeal, Penny McVay, Jack 
Mears, Darrek Miller, Donna Miller, Janet Miller, 
Jerry Miller, Mark Miller 



• Ruth Miller, Tammy Miller, Terri Milligan, Marilyn 
Mtmms, Mike Miszerak, Cynthia Mobley, Darla Mob- 
ley, Sally Montgomery, Glenn Moore, Keith Moore, 
Rita Moore, Terence Moore 



• Keith Morrow, Scott Mucho, Steve Murdock, Mark 
Mutz, Charles Neal, Carol Neeb, Kyle Niederpruem, 
John Nixon, Dennis Oberchain, Mike O'Connel, 
Sherry Olson, Jim O'Neil 





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• Lana Oniones, Pam O'Rourke, Patti Orr, Charles 
Osbom 



• Cherry Otterbein, Monica Owens, Teresa Owens, 
Sarah Pace 



• Janice Padgett, Jennie Padgett, Dick Paff, Lynn 
Page 



• Jo Palmer, Tony Pappas, Harvey Parido, Kathy 
Patterson 



• Vicki Paxton, Jim Pearson, Mark Pearson, Jit 
Peavler 



• Martha Peete, Carol Pell, Dick Perkins, Emmet 
Perkoski 



• David Petsel, Earlie Phelps, Jody Phillips, Patricia 
Pickett 



Joyce Pike, Roger Pike, Amber Pitt, Penny Pittman 



• Louise Poehler, Rebecca Poehler, Connie Poland, 
Jim Polsgrove 



• Brian Poole, Terry Poole, Tandra Porter, Dean Price 



• Karen Prince, Mike Pringle, Lauri Proffitt, Debra 
Pucilowski 



AUDIO-VISUAL CLUB Front row.- Kevin McMullen, 
Mike Ferrentino, David Hartzler, Matt Autry, Janel 
Meetz, Cathi Waltz, Robert Hallagan, Kerry Kenning- 
ton. Back row: Jeff Stevens, Cole Reski, David Petzel. 
CHESS CLUB Front row; Frank Spikes, Denny Eckert, 
Chris Young, Martin Miszerak. Sack row: Claude 
McKinsey, Don Triutt, George Williams. LATIN CLUB 
front row-. Mrs. Doris Bradford, Lynn Statzer, Mel 
Battson, Sue Flesor, Martin Miszerak, Gordon Wil- 
liams, Sharon Zoretich, Sheryl Darrah. Second row: 
Bonnie Martin, George Hunter, Wanda Frick, Nina 
Jones, George Baker. Back row.- John Tesky, Tom 
Hoage, Diane Oakes, George Williams, Len Sanders, 
Martin Hunter, Howard Hurley, David Petzel, Bill 
Craig, Jim Wetzel, Nedra Lambrith, Robert Gregory. 





*.^fT / 



PIONEER PLAYERS Front row: Gail Waldron, Margo 
Haley, Diane Miller, Renee Mormance, Bob Hahn, 
Tonya Ashley, John Carlile, Mariann Johnson, Debra 
Yates. Back row: Judy Larson, Borb Horn, Erin Farrell, 
Kyle Niedrepruem, Linda Hanson, Carol Selby, Bill 
Evans, Debbie Gagen, Debbie Wagaman, Jeff 
Brooks, Grayce Bowers, Paul Wagaman, Mark Sen- 
ter, Dave Roberts, Dave Garrison, Andy Schmidt, Jim 
Green, Sheree Ghere. 

FTA Keren Poole, Valerie Whitlock, Maxine Whistler, 
Jo Ellen Waldron, Bob Hahn, Gail Waldron, Mrs. Ar- 
wilda Burton. 



• Cindy Quackenbush, Mari Quackenbush, Sherry 
Quilter, Debbie Quinn 



• Carl Ragland, Gary Ranee, Gerald Ransom, Dua- 
wayne Rasnick 



Debbie Ray, Paul Reams, Jim Reed, Karen Reed 



Pam Reed, Sherrie Reed, Mike Reeves, Julius Reed 



• Deborah Renner, Cole Reski, Mike Rhine, John 
Rhodes 



• Curt Richmond, John Ringenberger, Gene Rinker, 
Greg Rippy 



• Cindy Riordan, Vicky Riordan, Dan Roach, David 
Roberts 



• Cheryl Robertson, Sally Robertson, Anthony Robin- 
son, John Robinson 



• Myla Robinson, Vicki Rogers, Bethany Roland, Ruth- 
ann Rose 



• John Rosenberger, Joe Ross, Max Ross, Ron Rumble 



Mike Ruse, Jim Rush, Joyce Rushin, Cheryl Ryan 



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Kathy Schenck, Mike Schnitker 



• Bryan Scoggan, Cathy Scott, Carol Selby, Cynthia 
Shaffer, Joe Shaffer 



• Jean Sharp, Tyna Shaw, Brenda Sheeks, Carlo 
Sherrel, Ralph Shinkle, Mike Shoffler, Chuck Shuford, 
Leslie Shuford, Andrea Shute, Mike Sibbing, Dennis ; 
Simion, Jean Simon, Jim Slavens, Mark Smallwood 



• Darrel Smith, Darrel Smith, Janice Smith, Phil 
Smith, Robert Smith, Sandra Smith, Susan Smith, Do- 
rothy Smoot, Keith Sowers, Craig Spaid, Debbie. 
Speir, Herb Springer, Debbie Standifer, Gary Starnes 

• Carlene Statzer, Cathy Steen, Debbie Stephens, 
Jeff Stephens, Paul Stergar, Elizabeth Stewart, Lisa 
Stewart, Luann Stone, Steve Stribling, John Strolle, 
Karen Strouce, Ron Studer, Ruth Sturgis, Mark 
Szalaiy 

• Pam Talbert, Dame Taylor, Phil Taylor, Hubert Tea- 
ter, Paul Thomas, Richard Thomas, Cassandra Thomp- 
son, Cathy Thompson, John Thompson, Melanie 
Thompson, Pat Tibbs, Dan Tingle, Greg Thompkins, 
Walson Tooley 

• Dan Trammell, Don Trivett, Jeff Trout, Vicki Turley, 
Cliff Turner, Ramona Valentine, Debbie Vannoy, Mark 
Vest, Linda Viles, Stephen Wadlington, Paul Wa- 
gamna, Martin Wagner, Linda Walker, Roylane 
Walker 

• Andre Wallace, Rita Wallace, Sarah Walton, 
George Ward, Patricia Ward, Connie Warren, Julie 
Warren, Rebecca Warren, Dennis Watson, Rosemary 
Watson, Kevin Weaver, Debra Webber, Michelle 
Webster, Vicki Weese 

• Todd Weisman, Bill Weiss, Sheryl Wheat, Pearl 
Wheeler, Dave White, Deborah White, Ronni White, 
Valerie Whitlock, Debra Wilber, Kevin Williams, Mar- 
tin Williams, Michael Williams, Rick Williams, Delila 
Williamson 



• Lavada Willis, Andre Wilson, Bailey Wilson, Kevin 
Wilson, Susan Wilson, Karen Wing, Cathy Winter- 
rowd, Carl Wise, Anita Wolle, Kathi Wolter, Charles 
Wood, David Wright, William Wright, Dee Yant 



•Jim Yates, Bob York, Bill Youck, Mark Young, Dar 
zella Zeiher, John Ziats, Kathy Ziegler 




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Index 



/\bbett, Michael 138 
Abrams, JoAnne 1 66 
Ackims, Debbie 1 72 
Adams, Daborah 1 72 
Adams, Dennis 22, 144 
Adams, Leland 1 58 
Adams, Michael 132, 166 
Adams, Paul 1 66 
Adams, Vicki 1 72 
Adamson, Brenda 166, 170 
Adamson, Janice 1 44 
Adkins, Bob 166 
Adkins, Sharon 22, 144 
Ahrendt, Steve 166 
Albert, Lila 1 72 

Albright, James 70, 82, 130, 138 
Albright, Sandy 82 
Albright, Teresa 158 
Alderson, Ken 68, 84, 136, 144 
Alexander, Jacque 166 
Alexander, Dana 1 24 
Alexander, Pam 112, 158 
Alexander, Ricky 1 66 
Allen, Betty 144 
Allen, Cindy 144 
Allen, Greg 1 72 

Allen, Keith 158, 162, 163, 1 64, 1 < 
Allen, Marie 1 66 
Allen, Ricky 158 
Altman, Judith (Miss) 138 
Ambers, John 124, 144 
Amon, Mark 132, 134, 158 
Anderson, Deborah 1 72 
Anderson, Jennifer 172 
Anderson, Lana 144 
Anderson, Michelle 144 
Anderson, Mike 1 72 
Anderson, Patricia 144 
Andrews, Ronnie 1 66 
Annarino, Kathy 158 
Annarino, Mark 1 58 
Annarino, Robin 158, 172 
Anthony, Tom 1 44 
Archer, Norma 1 72 
Archer, Susan 158 
Arkanoff, Mike 1 76 
Armstrong, Tim 158 
Arnold, James 1 72 
Arthur, Ellen 166 
Asher, Joseph 144, 164 
Ashley, Tonya 1 44 
Athey, Diane 158, 188 
Atwater, Griffith 1 72 
AUDIO VISUAL CLUB, 110, 174 
Austin, Mary Alice 158 
Autry, Matt 132, 134, 166, 174 
Avery, Vicky 1 66 



B 



aeon, Debbie 1 66 
Bocon, Dewayne 1 44 
Bacon, Ken 1 58 
Bacon, Norma 1 72 
Bailey, Doug 172 
Bailey, Jackie 158 
Baird, Evonne 1 72 
Baker, Debbie 98, 144, 164 
Baker, Gail 22, 144, 170 
Baker, George 1 72, 1 74 
Baker, Julie 170, 172 
Baker, Joe 1 30 
Baker, Kathy 1 72 
Baker, Mark 136, 172 
Baker, Robert 132, 136, 166 
Baldwin, Larry 158 
Bollinger, James 138 
Bailies, Damond 158 
Ball, Bobbi 158, 166 
Ball, Kevin 68, 144, 158 
Ballard, Charles 98, 100, 130, 164 
BAND, 98, 99, 164 
Bandy, Diane 172 
Banks, Rodney 158 
Bonks, Teresa 158 
Banton, Valerie 158, 162, 163, 168 



Bapalazarou, Connie 1 58 

Barker, Cathy 144 

Barker, Sonja 1 58 

Barnard, Lorrie 1 66 

Bames, Diane 1 44 

Bamett, Roger 166 

Bamhart, Vicki 1 44 

Baron, Rick 172 

Barrow, Twilla 158 

Barta, Susan 158 

Bartlett, Debbie 1 58 

Bartlett, Pam 1 72 

Bartlett, Rick 166 

Baskerville, Ron 166 

Basore, John 1 44 

Bastin, Mike 144, 168 

Bateman, Jan 1 66 

Bateman, Jean 1 66 

Bateman, Paul 144 

Bates, Cathy 166 

Bates, Dale 144 

Bates, Roger, 158, 164 

Batman, Carol 1 44, 1 64 

Battson, Melanie 158, 164, 174 

Beamon, Duane 70, 134, 166 

Beard, Debbie 1 44 

Beard, Kurt 1 72 

Beasley, Janet 102, 166 

Beaver, Janet 1 44 

Beck, Mike 132, 134 

Beck, Jim 132 

Beckham, Linda 1 44 

Beeler, Bobbi 158 

Behnkendorf, Ron 144 

Beisel, Bill 166 

Beisel, Bob 166 

Beisel, Gary 144 

Bell, Cinda 158, 163, 166, 188 

BELLES 100 

Benefiel, Cathy 158 

Benefielk, Cheryl 166 

Benge, Grover 132, 158 

Benninger, Dave 84, 132, 166 

Bennett, Allen 1 72 

Bennett, Charles 162, 163, 170, 172 

Bennett, Clifford 96, 158 

Bennett, Don 144 

Bennett, Helen 158, 162 

Bennett, Henry 158 

Bennett, Floyd 1 72 

Bennett, James 1 72 

Bennett, Kathy 158 

Bennett, Linda 158 

Bennett, Stefan 158, 188 

Benson, Steve 1 66 

Bensinger, Melody 1 72 

Berger, James 90, 1 36, 1 38 

Beringer, Kevin 1 44 

Berngerd, Marsha 1 44 

Bernitt, Doug 172 

Bernitt, Pam 1 66 

Bernitt, Greg 144 

Berry, Charles 1 72 

Berry, Kathy 166 

Berry, Matt 144, 186 

Berry, Melinda 1 44 

Berry, Jim 1 72 

Berty, Cheryl 158 

Berty, Doug, 84, 1 32, 1 34, 1 66, 1 88 

Bettis, Diane 166 

Beuke, Debbie 158 

Beuke, Dick 54, 88, 132, 136, 144 

Bever, Becky 158, 172 

Bever, Bonnie 1 72 

Bibb, Delia 158 

Bickley, Chip 158 

Bickley, Karen 172, 179 

Bickley, Ken 1 72 

Biehl, Yvonne 158 

Bilendo, Debbie 166 

Bingham, Debra 1 72 

Bingham, Brenda 1 72 

Bishop, Brenda 1 72 

Bishop, Debra 144 

Bishop, Steve 166 

Bivens, Gary 158 

Black, Chris 38, 158 



Black, Debbie 166 

Blackwell, Dennis 134, 158 

Blackwell, Steve 159 

Blair, Jim 70, 106, 130, 144 

Blake, Paula 158 

Bland, Rose 158 

Blankenship, Paul 172 

Blevins, Bob 72, 80, 132, 158 

Blue, Ron 134 

Bluestein, Malcomb 1 66 

Bobb, Herbert 1 66 

Bobo, Paul 158 

Bohal, Darrell 74, 132, 158 

Bohl, Cindy 158 

Bohlander, Luana 158, 160, 164 

Bolden, Eric 134, 144, 158 

Bolin, Jim 1 38 

Bolton, Donna 144 

Bond, Anthony 82, 172 

Bond, Donita 166 

Bond, Herman 1 66 

Booth, Nathaniel 158 

Boring, Randy 159 

Bornstein, Ed 1 30, 1 44 

Boston, Jeff 1 72 

Boston, Mark 134, 159 

Bowen, Dennis 1 44 

Bowen, Marcy 1 66 

Bowen, Richard 144 

Bowen, Mark 1 72 

Bowens, Bobby 163, 166 

Bowers, Grace 1 70, 1 72 

Bowers, Danny 132, 166 

Bowman, Tom 1 44 

Boyd, Kevin 38, 159 

Boyd, Teresa 1 59 

Boyers, Jeff 1 59 

Boyers, Pam 1 66 

Brack, Greg 1 59, 1 62 

Bracy, Donna 1 72 

Bradford, Doris (Mrs.) 14, 14, 106, 

162 
Bragg, David 84 
Branam, Ken 1 44 
Bray, Bob 1 72 

Brayton, Elizabeth (Miss) 16, 138 
Brazzell, Becky 159, 163, 168 
Brenner, Dennis 1 66 
Brenner, Patti 1 66, 1 72 
Brents, Karolyn 166, 170 
Brewster, Gary 1 32 
Brezsco, Mark 114, 166 
Bridgewater, Sherry 1 72 
Briggs, Lee 40 
Briggs, John 1 66 
Briggs, Steve 172 
Bright, Cindy 1 44 
Bright, Pam 144 
Bright, Sandy 1 72 
Brillo, Dawn 1 72 
Brinkman, Bob 1 38 
Brittian, Steve 172 
Britney, Greg 1 72 
Brooks, Betsy 166 
Brooks, Bill 1 66 
Brooks, Chuck 1 44 
Brooks, Jeff 1 72 
Brooks, John 1 72 
Brooks, William 172 
Brown, Brian 159 
Brown, Bruce 1 66 
Brown, Cecil 1 66 
Brown, Cindra 1 72 
Brown, Connie 144 
Brown, Louise 1 59 
Brown, Julia 1 72 
Brown, Kim 172 
Brown, Kenny 1 44 
Brown, Lonny 1 59 
Brown, Mark 1 44 
Brown, Ray 138 
Brown, Tammi 1 59 
Brown, Tim 1 44, 1 70 
Brown, Tonia 1 59 
Browning, Ed 1 59 
Broyles, Linda 1 66 
Bruce, Debra 172 



Bryant, Carol 1 44 

Bryant, Ruth 144 

Buchanan, Georgia 1 60, 1 66 

Buchanan, James 1 59 

Buchanan, Virginia 1 44 

Buckner, Phyllis 163, 166, 168 

Buckley, Greg 1 44 

Bufore, Warren 166 

Burch, James 1 38 

Burcham, Bob 1 59 

Burge, Donna 1 66 

Burge, JoAnn 1 66 

Barken, Levetta 1 59 

Burkeen, Lavet 172 

Burkle, Dorothy (Mrs) 1 38 
Burks, Dave 36, 114 

Burks, Judy 1 44 
Burnett, Anita 166 

Burnett, Charles 159 

Burnide, Marcia 1 44 

Bums, Robert 84, 1 38 

Burns, Shelia 1 59 

Burns, Terri 1 66, 1 72 

Burton, Arwilda (Mrs) 20, 138, 176 

Burrows, Lisa 78, 1 66, 1 86 

Burrell, Nicki 1 44 

Burries, Doug 74, 1 32 

Burwell, Cavelle 1 72 

Busby, Jeff 1 66 

Bush, Barbara 172 

Bush, Daisy 1 59 

Bush, Russell 159, 168 

Bush, Terri 52, 159 

Bush, Tim 166 

Bush, Vanessa 1 66 

Butler, Don 172 

Butler, Ray 159 

Butner, Susie 1 66 

Byard, Greg 144 

Byard, Richard 1 66 

Byrd, Ernest 159 

Byrd, Roy 78, 88, 134, 136, 159 

Byron, Missy 22, 22, 159 



V^alvin, Russell 32, 32, 134, 159, 

160, 170 
Cabage, Carolyn 1 59, 1 64 
Cabage, Mike 1 72 
Cade, Joni 1 66 
Caine, Terry 70 
Caine, Melinda 1 72 
Caines, Mike 1 34, 1 59 
Campbell, Christi 159 
Campbell, Janice 1 44, 1 62 
Campbell, Jeanne 159, 160, 170, 190 
Campbell, Stanley (Dr.) 46 
Campins, Dolores 1 59 
Campins, Julio 1 66 
Campbell, William 144 
Conner, Anita 1 70 
Conner, Robert 1 38 
Carbin, Katie 1 66 
Cardwell, Regina 144, 172 
Carden, Sally 1 66 
Carlile, John 159, 162, 168 
Cannon, Annetta 144, 163 
Carlton, Theresa 1 54 
Camague, Laura 1 44 
Camague, Nancy 1 72 
Carpenter, Matt 166 
Carpenter, Tim 1 44 
Carrico, Barbara 1 59 
Carroll, Nancy 159 
Carroll, Phyllis (Mrs.) 138 
Carroll, Treva (Mrs.) 138 
Carter, Brant 1 36, 1 66 
Carter, David 118, 136, 159 
Carter, Diane 1 72 
Carter, Freida 1 44 
Carter, Linda 159 
Carter, Randy 159 
Carter, Willie 1 66 



Cartnell, Karen 159 

Case, John 32, 1 44 

Case, Terry 1 66 

Case, Tim 134, 144, 158 

Case, Tom 144, 158 

Casey, Becky 159, 160, 164 

Cash, Shirley 98, 1 44 

Casper, Sharon 1 71 

Cass, Steve 1 44 

Cassell, Dave 1 32 

Casselman, Phyllis (Mrs.) 138 

Cervo, Wayne 159 

Chambers, Andrea 1 44 

Chambers, Mark 134. 166 

Chance, Linda 1 46, 1 72 

Chapman, Jerry 38, 56, 159 

Charlesworth, John 1 46 

Chasteen, Beth 170, 172 

CHEERLEADERS 22, 58, 59, 91 

Chelf, Janet 159 

Chelf, Norma 1 70, 1 72 

Cherry, Danny 159 

Cherry, Mike 132 

CHESS CLUB 26, 1 74 

Childers, Jim 1 46 

Christian, Debbie 1 66 

Christian, Terrie 1 72 

Christmon, Alvin 1 72 

Christy, Marjory 1 46 

Christy, Rita 172 

Christy, Ronda 146 

Cirrincione, Gary 22, 106, 146, 164, 

170 
Clay, Sharon 1 72 
Clayton, Kevin 84, 1 36, 1 46 
Clawson, Glen 134, 172 
Clawson, Susan 163, 172 
Clear, Steve 70, 98, 130, 146, 164, 

170 
demons. Chuck 1 64, 1 66 
Cline, Steve 146 
Clingerman, Joy 1 66 
Cobb, David 1 72 
Coburn, Monica 1 72 
Coder, Cameron 1 72 
Cody, David 146 
Coffey, Carroll 1 66 
Coffey, Don 52, 159 
Cole, Wayne 1 46 
Collier, Sheryl 1 72 
Collings, Patty 1 59 
Collins, Daniel 1 46 
Collins, Donna 1 46 
Collins, James 72, 159 
Collins, Gilbert 1 72 
Collins, James 88, 132, 136 
Collins, Mary 1 66 
Collins, Mike 136, 146, 172 
Collins, Sharon 1 72 
Collins, Steve 1 34 
Collins, Tom 1 72 
Colmey, Mary 1 66, 1 70 
Combs, John 1 38 
Comisso, Tom 1 79 
Compton, Larry 76, 132, 138 
COMPUTER MATH CLUB 26 
CONCERT CHOIR 7 00 
Condre, Mike 1 72 
Conant, Dean 1 59 
Conners, Jeff 1 66 
Connor, Sandy 22, 22, 54, 146, 163, 

166 
Conover, Mary 1 72 
Constable, Kenny 146 
Cook, Connie 1 72 
Cook, Don 146 
Cook, Richard 146 
Cook, Steve 1 02, 1 68 
Cooper, Mary 159 
Cooper, Nancy 146 
Cooper, Stephanie 1 66 
Cope, Linda 172 
Corbett, Cathy 1 46 
Corbin, Diane 159 
Corbin, James 1 46 
Corbin, William 1 59 
Corder, Janet 1 59 
Cordon, Cathy 1 46 
Cork, Ava 159 
Cork, Donna 1 59 
Cork, Lauretta 1 46 
Corn, Greg 159 
Corn, Mike 132, 136, 146 
Corn, Steve 7 12, 159 
Cornett, Dianne 172 
Corya, Steve 159 
Cotteral. Christina 159 



Cox, Cathy 1 46 


Davidson, Bruce 1 46 


Doran, Delores 172 


Cox, Ron 1 46, 1 64, 1 70 


Davidson, Karen 1 59 


Doran, David 160 


Cox, Sherry 1 72 


Davidson, Rodney 1 72 


Doran, Janet 1 67 


Coyle, Dorothy 1 66 


David 


on, Sheryl 22, 159, 186 


Doran, Kathy 1 72 


Craig, Bill 1 72 


Davis, 


Becky 190 


Doran, Mark 1 72 


Cranfill, David 1 72 


Davis, 


Candy 172 


Dorothy, Tom 1 67 


Cravens, Chris 1 46 


Davis, 


Deborah 146 


Dorothy, Tim 146 


Crawford, Dean 1 66 


Davis, 


Don 173 


Dorothy, Scott 164 


Crawford, Gary 172 


Davis, 


Delores 36, 166 


Dosseff, Benji 160 


Crawford, Harold 14, 14, 138 


Davis, 


Doral 172 


Dotlitch, Sam 78, 106, 14< 


Crawford, Robert 1 66 


Davis, 


Gail 160 


Doty, Don 146 


Creason, Judy 1 59 


Davis, 


Karen 160, 164, 170 


Douglas, Jerry 110, 167 


Creekbaum, Pam 1 66 


Davis, 


Ken 172 


Douglas, Ken 1 72 


Creviston, Mark 146 


Davis, 


Lorna 1 60 


Dover, Pam 1 67 


Crick, Kathy 1 66 


Davis, 


Paula 164, 166, 170 


Dover, Sonja 1 67 


Cripe, David 1 46 


Davis, 


Peter 14, 139 


Downard, Larry 132, 167 


Crist, Gary 22, 146 


Davis, 


Rodney 132, 146 


Downing, Robin 124, 146, 


Crosby, Linda 166, 170, 172 


Davis, 


Sandy 1 66 


Downs, Jeff 22, 160, 164 


Crosley, Marianne 1 46 


Davis, 


Scott 146 


Downs, Mike 1 73 


CROSS COUNTRY 80, 1 34 


Davis, 


Sharon 1 60 


Dozier, Carolyn 1 60 


Crouch, Danny 159 


Davis, 


Stephanie 1 46 


Drake, Jackie 1 72 


Crouch, Jackie 172 


Davis, 


Terry 1 66 


Dubroskey, Jay 1 72 


Crouch, Rick 1 34, 1 59 


Davis, 


Wayne 146 


Dubroskey, Diana 1 46 


Crump, Chet 106 


Dayvolt, Sandy 146 


Dukes, David 61, 106, 13: 


Crump, Don 7 14, 172 


Decke 


, Eric 134, 172 


Dunbar, Danny 88, 146 


Cubert, Paul 1 32 


Degryse, Peter 1 72 


Dunbar, Doug 1 67 


Cullings, Donna 32, 1 64 


Dejaeger, Mike 132, 160 


Duncan, Beth 1 67 


Cummings, Alice 1 59 


Denning, Robert 1 72 


Duncan, David 1 74 


Cummings, Jay 22, 146, 164 


Denning, Theresa 1 60 


Duncan Debbie 146, 173 


Cummings, Richard 17 8, 138 


Denton, Connie 38, 160 


Duncan, John 1 46 


Cunningham, Mike 1 72 


Devint 


, Evelyn 146, 164 


Duncan, Mike 1 77 


Curl, Roger 146 


Devine 


, Leroy 1 72 


Duncan, Patricia 1 73 


Curry, Leroy 1 72 


Dewees, Debbie 146, 158 


Dunham, Bill 74, 132 


Curtis, Bryan 172 


Dewees, Mike 166 


Dunham, Cindy 1 67 


Curtis, David 159 


Dewees, Randy 61, 172 


Dunnam, Steve 160, 167 


Curtiss, Tim 1 46 


Dewees, Richard 146 


Dunn, Greg 72, 76, 78, 84 


Cupp, Randy 1 66 


Dewey 


, Brian 172 


160 




Dial, Gary 1 60 


Dunn, Doug 1 73 




Dickin 


on, Debbie 1 66 


Durham, Debra 1 46 




Dickinson, Lisa 172 


Durrett, Mike 1 67 


\J akner, Vonnie 1 66 


Dietz, 


Valvet 138 


Duty, Pam 1 72 


Dill, Debbie 160 


Dwyer, Ed 78, 84, 1 38 


Dailey, Ken 159 


Dill, Randy 1 60 


Dye, Eddie 167 


Daily, Becky 166 


Dillman, Brenda 1 72 




Daily, Steve 159 


Dillon, 


Debbie 172 




Dalton, Barb 146 


Dimitroff, James 32, 78, 106, 134, 




Dalton, Pam 54 


146, 158 


L aly, Cassie 1 60 


Dalton, Tina 90, 1 72 


Dixon, 


Gayla 166 


Dalrymple, James 146 


Dobkins, Mack 160, 170 


Eans, Cozetta 1 46 


DANCE BAND 100 


Doll, Jerrie 1 73 


Earl, Joe 1 67 


Danforth, Doug 159 


Dollard, Cindy 1 73 


Easter, Greg 1 60 


Daniels, Mark 1 59 


Dombrosky, Paula 1 73 


Eaton, Laura 160, 170, 17 


Daniel, Steve 1 66 


Donahoe, Peter 82, 84, 1 34, 1 36, 1 60 


Ebbing, Caroll 67 


Daniels, Scott 22, 22, 1 1 2, 1 46, 1 62 


Donah 


ue, Cindy 1 60 


Ebbing, Mike 1 60 


Darden, Bellary 1 72 


Donah 


ue, Peter 132, 166 


Eble, Susan 1 73 


Darrah, Sherry 159, 163, 166, 168, 


Dooley, Scott 167 


Eck, John 1 46 


174 


Doolin 


, Eric 132, 134, 167 


Eckel, Danny 160 


Davenport, Michele 104, 146 


Doran 


Beth 172 


Eckert, Dennis 146, 174 




CUSTODIAL STAFF Front row: Norma Cheatham, Rufus Cline, Jesse Harlam, Albert Lehr, Harold Land, How- 
ard Stickles, Millard Stephens. Back row-. Hilbert Bell, Charlie Marshall, William Gorham, William Hargis, 
Kevin Blanford, James Meiswinger, Fred Sudler, Curtis Schorling, Spencer Lohrman, Hershel Garrett. 



CAFETERIA STAFF Front row: Lucille Fields, Arizona Stephens, Kath- 
lene Coleman, Betty Bever, Lucille Osborne, Viola Greene, Dorothy 
Mangle, Mary Ballinger, Stella Stratman. Second row: Ethelyn Divine, 
Lenora Overman, Norma Trout, Edna Paris, Buela Clingerman, Margie 



Goldey, Barbara Oliphant, Lorraine Nettles, Roberta Smith, Dolores 
Hall, Alta Melton. Back row: Helen Cunningham, Betty Hodges, Mary 
Harrington, Esther Brunson, Helena Carter, Grace Barrett, Helen 
Daily, Barbara Morgan. 




r> i-j*ft 



^ 



Cafeteria Staff , h 



Edgar, Sherry 173 


Finley, Thomas 1 73 


Gaither, Pam 164, 167 


Green, Ann 148, 160, 164, 170 


Edmonds, Yvonne 1 60 


Finn, Teresa 1 64, 1 67, 1 70 


Gale, Debbie 148 


Green, Debbie 22, 1 48 


Edmonson, Arnell 1 60 


Fiorentin, John 1 67 


Gale, George 46, 56, 58, 126, 138 


Green, Jim 1 64 


Edmondson, Gloria 106, 146 


Fisher, Billie 146 


Galloway, Chris 22, 94, 148, 164 


Green, Tim 1 64, 167 


Edmondson, Lauretta 1 73 


Fisher, Frankie 1 67 


Galvin, Pris 160 


Green, Vendetta 1 8, 1 60, 1 70 


Edwards Gwen 163, 166 


Flanagan, Mike 167 


Gammon, Jackie 1 73 


Greene, Debbie 1 73 


Edwards, Mary 1 60 


Flanagan, Robert 1 67 


Gammon, Linda 1 73 


Greene, Evelyn 1 67 


Edwards, Tom 1 73 


Fleser, Sue 1 73 


Gandy, Doug 132, 160 


Greenlee, Robin 1 60 


Eggleton, Cathy 160 


Fletcher, Sharon 173 


Gandy, Sharon 1 73 


Gregory, Curtis 84, 160 


Ehle, Jack 166 


Flynn, Gerald 1 46 


Gano, Steve 22, 108, 148, 164 


Gregory, Debra 1 48 


Ehmen, Terry 1 34 


Flynn, Janet 1 62, 1 64, 1 66, 1 67, 1 90 


Gardner, Jamilliza 1 60 


Gregory, Matt 1 73 


Ehmen, Terry 1 34, 1 66 


Fodrie, Chuck 167 


Garmon, Bryan 1 73 


Gregory, Robert 1 73, 1 74 


Eicholtz, David 173 


Fodrie, Ken 1 48 


Garner, Barbara 1 48 


Gresham, Brenda 148 


Eichortz, Sherry 160 


Fodrill, Mike 148 


Garret, Joe 160 


Grider, Cathy 148 


Elam, Anthony 146 


Foley, Debra 173 


Garret, Leslie 173 


Griffin, Lisa 22, 160 


Ellcessor, Susan 32, 146 


Folkerth, Cathy 148 


Garret, Norman 1 67 


Grimes, Judy 1 67 


Eller, Carlo 1 73 


Folkerth, Jan 1 67 


Garrison, Dave 1 73 


Grimes, Lonnie 1 48 


Eller, Nancy 160 


Follman, Fred 1 67 


Garrison, Louis 80, 132, 134, 160 


Grimes, Phyllis 167 


Eller, Shonda 167 


Foltz, Freg 160 


Garvey, Mike 1 60 


Groomer, Robert 90, 132, 136, 138 


Ellis, Jenny 1 60 


FOOTBALL 76-78, 134 


Gary, Clara 1 73 


Grounds, Linda 1 60 


Elmore, John 164, 167, 170 


Ford, Dwane 1 67 


Geddes, Lisa 1 67 


Grubbs, Donna (Mrs.) 138 


Elmore, Larry 1 73 


Ford, Robert 160 


Geddes, Lyle 148 


Grundy, Paul 1 67 


Emberson, Ken 1 60 


Ford, Sharon, 1 67 


Gentry, John 1 67 


Gryszowka, David 1 60 


Emerson, Thara 1 67 


Foster, Genita 1 73 


George, Kevin 1 48 


Guarnery, Ken 1 60 


Endicott, David 146 


Foster, Richard 160 


George, Richard 74, 78, 132, 138 


Gugenheim, Ken 1 60 


Endicott, Mike 167 


Fowler, Bill 160, 164 


George, Scott 148 


Guidry, Dave 160 


Endicott, Ron 173 


Fowler, Jim 88, 136, 148, 164 


Gerbick, Mike 1 60 


Gulledge, Cheryl 1 60 


Erb, Mary 146 


Fowler, Patricia 173 


Ghere, Sheree 1 67 


Guthrie, Ladonna 1 73 


Erskine, Cherrie 146 


Fox, Jim 1 67 


Giddons, Bill 1 34 




Estes, Jeanie 1 46 


Fox, Sheila 173 


Giebell, Bill 148 




Euliss, John 1 67 


Foxworthy, Fred 1 73 


Gifford, Darron 1 34, 1 36, 1 73 




Euhss, Mark 146 


Foxworthy, Ed 148 


Giles, Chris 160, 162 




Evans, Carol 1 60 


Francis, Jerry 32, 1 60 


Gill, Max 1 67 


i~l aab, Mark 76, 1 34, 1 60 


Evans, Mark 1 46 


Franklin, Debra 167 


Gill, Robin 148 


Evans, Julie 1 67 


Franklin, Don 148 


Gillespie, Bill 160 


Haff, Bill 1 73 


Evans, Ray 1 60 


Franklin, Steve 134, 173 


Gillespie, Greg 74, 90, 1 32, 1 36, 1 60 


Haberman, Chuck 1 26 


Evans, Rick 167 


Frazer, Steve 1 73 


Giltner, Diana 160 


Haberman, Duane 134, 167 


Evans, William 146, 163, 168 


Freed, Dora (Mrs.) 138 


Giltner, Doug 132 


Haberman, Steve 148 


Everman, Sherry 167 


Freeland, Mark 134, 136, 167 


Giltner, Rick 50, 68 


Hacker, Rodina 160 


Everman, Susan 146 


Freeland, Yvonne 148, 163, 166 


Giltner, Robert 132, 167 


Hacker, Teresa 1 72 




Freeman, Angela 1 73 


Ginn, Sammy 44, 167 


Hackley, Linda 160 




French, Willie 148, 163, 166 


Gliva, Peggy 160 


Hadaway, Pam 172 




Frick, Wanda 1 60 


GOLF 70, 131 


Haddix, Denise 148 


c 


Fryer, Betty (Mrs.) 110, 138 


Goff, Carolyn 160 


Hadley, Julie 1 67 


1 allowfeld, Phil 1 60 


Fryman, Hubert 94, 96, 148, 162, 


Golden, Bonnie 1 67 


Hagan, Pamela 1 48 


Farley, Craig 1 60 


168, 170 


Goldy, Bob 1 67, 1 70 


Hahn, Bob 96, 1 U, 174, 160 


Farter, Donna 167 


Fryman, Watana 167 


Goodlet, Mike 160 


Haines, Ted 1 60 


Farrell, Erin 173 


FTA 26, 54, 1 76 


Goodman, Betty (Mrs.) 138 


Haley, Margo 1 67 


Faust, Marcia 1 67 


Fulk, Debra 160 


Gorman, Debbie 148 


Hall, Donna 160 
Hall, Larry 162, 167 
Hall, Robert 1 60 


Fawcett, Rick 146 


Fulk, Ken 1 60 


Gossett, Roger 163, 164, 167, 170 


Feeley, Mary 167 


Fullen, Carlo 160 


Graber, Dave 68 


Feltner, Brian 173 


Fullen, Mike 1 60 


Graber, Diane 148 


Hall, Sonny 22, 46, 130, 148, 164, 


Feltner, Doug 167 


Fultz, Janet 1 48 


Grady, Cathy 148 


170 


Felts, Janice 167 


Fultz, Laura 173 


Graham, Melvin 148 


Hallagan, Robert 160, 164 


Fenner, David 1 67 




Graham, Sandy 1 60 


Hambrick, James 1 60 


Ferguson, Pam 1 73 




Grames, Charles 1 48 


Hamilton, Ann 1 60 


Ferguson, Reginald 146 




Grant, Ronda 160 


Hamilton, Barbara 160, 164 


Ferguson, Terry 1 67 


V7addis, Harley 173 


Graves, Dreama 167 


Hamilton, Beverly 148 


Ferrentino, Mike 160, 174 


Graves, Teresa 1 67 


Hamilton, Deanne 148 


Finch, Carlo 1 73 


Gagen, Dan 124, 148 


Gray, Diane 148, 162 


Hamilton, Ken 1 67 


Finch, Scott 160 

180 


Gagen, Debbie 160 


Grayson, Pam 148 


Hamler, Mary 163 

■1 



Hamm, Gary 148 

Hamm, Ron 1 67 

Hancock, Gary 148 

Honey, David 1 60, 1 64, 1 70 

Handy, Robin 160 

Hanft, Trudy 148, 172 

Hankins, Deborah 148 

Hanna, Belmda 1 72 

Hanover, Marilyn 1 60 

Hanson, John 1 60 

Hanson, Linda 167 

Harbin, Tonya 1 48 

Harbin, Tony 1 67 

Harman, Dixie 1 72 

Harman, Sheri 1 72 

Harmeson, Ken 44, 1 72 

Harper, Larry 1 67 

Harper, Mark 1 60 

Harper, Vernon 1 72 

Harrington, Kurtis 86, 1 60 

Harris, Dewayne 1 67 

Harris, Diane 160 

Harris, Jacqueline 98, 148 

Harris, James 1 60 

Harris, Nancy 114, 160, 162 

Harris, Rick 1 72 

Harris, Rick 1 60, 1 67 

Harris, Ron 22, 148, 158 

Harris, Tina 1 67 

Harrison, Jackie 1 48 

Hamison, Nancy 60, 167 

Hartley, Debbie 1 60 

Hartley, Randy 1 67 

Hartzler, David 106, 148, 164, 174 

Harvel, Valjin 148 

Harvey, Alan 1 60 

Harvey, Karen 1 72 

Harvey, Keith 148 

Hassell, Jimmy 1 72 

Hassell, Nancy 148 

Hasselburg, Geraldine 148 

Hastead, Linda 1 73 

Hastings, Becky 164, 167 

Haun, Cindy 1 48, 1 67 

Hauser, Dennis 1 60 

Hauss, Alice (Mrs.) 14, 140 

Hayden, Cheryl 1 60, 1 74 

Hayden, Judy 22, 1 60 

Hayden, Ken 148 

Hayden Sharon 1 74 

Hayes, Anna 1 48 

Hayes, Cindy 1 48 

Hayes, Sondra (Mrs.) 20, 140 

Hayes, Teresa 1 74 

Haygood, Mark 1 48 

Haygood, Roger 78, 134, 174 

Haysley, Buff 148 

Hazel, Juanita 1 60 

Hazelwood, Darla 174 

Hazzard, Mark 1 67 

Head, Sheri 161 

Headley, Brent 161 

Heady, Greg 82, 161 

Heady, Richard (Sgt.) 140 

Heaton, Paul 44, 46, 50, 1 40 

Hedegard, Rex 82, 140 

Hedges, Pandora 161 

Heffley, Joanne 1 74 

Heimbuch, Scott 130, 161 

Heinrich, Barbara 148 

Heinrich, Jon 1 67 

Heifer, Jenny 1 74 

Helme, Nancy (Miss) 1 40 

Heller, Phil 1 67 

Helvey, Debra 148 

Hendricks, Becky 1 66 

Hendricks, Gary 161 

Hendricks, Vicki 1 48 

Hendricks, Steve 1 74 

Hendrickson, Terry 1 66 

Henning, Edward 1 74 

Henry, Collin 1 74 

Henry, Cynthia 1 48 

Hensel, Dave 1 74 

Hensel, James 136, 161 

Henzman, Jodea 1 74 

Herkless, Diane 22, 148 

Herkless, John 148 

Herman, Sherri 166 

Herring, Morris 1 66 

Herron, James 161 

Herron, Lea Rae 164, 166 

Hershberger, Brenda 148 

Hersol, Jack 1 34 

Hester, Jim 78, 84, 132, 134, 136, 

161 
Hester, John 78, 1 34, 1 40, 1 74 

Diane (Miss) 44, 46, 118 141 



Hickman, Barry 1 74 

Hickman, Bruce 84, 160 

Hickman, Chris 82, 148, 163, 166, 

168 
Hickman, Sherry 1 66 
Hickman, Terri 164, 166 
Higgs, Marci 1 74 
Higgins, Debra 148 
Hilbert, Debra 1 48 
Hill, Gary 148 
Hill, Kathy 161 
Hill, Tom 1 66 
Hillers, Linda 1 48, 1 70 
Hilliard, Danita 161 
Hilliard, Pam 1 66 
Hillman, Vicki 1 66 
Hinderliter, Gail 54, 54, 1 62, 1 66 
Hinderliter, Mike 74, 132, 140 
Hine, David 159 
Hines, Harold, 20, 1 40 
Hines, Linda 1 66 
Hines, Jim 132, 166 
Hines, Maria 1 6 1 
Hinman, Lisa 1 6 1 
Hinshaw, Doug 161 
Hinshaw, Judy (Mrs.) 14, 140 
Hintz, Jim 130, 148 
Hooge, Tom 161, 174 
Hobbs, Martha (Mrs.) 140 
Hobbs, Randall 161, 170 
Hodges, Carol 148 
Hodges, Nancy 1 66 
Hodges, Sandy 161 
Hotter, Terry 132, 168 
Holbrook, Nina 1 74 
Holland, John 1 68 
Holden, Debora 1 74 
Hollingsworth, Jean (Mrs.) 140 
Hollowel, Earl 90, 1 36, 1 74 
Hollowel, Paul 1 32 
Holman, Sument 161, 170 
Holmes, Brent 161 
Holt, Cindy 1 50 
Holt, Connie 1 50 
Holt, Diane 168 
Holt, Sonda 168 
Hopkins, Cindy 1 74 
Hopkins, Dale 161 
Hopkins, Thomas 1 40 
Hopton, Cynthia 1 74 
Horn Barbara 168 
Horn, Gus 150 
Horn Ralph 140 
Horn, Ruth 1 08, 1 60, 1 64 
Hornsby, Konnie 96, 108, 160, 161, 

162, 166 
Horton, Darrell, 100, 140 
Hoover, Jerry 71, 131, 150, 156 
Hopper, Shelly 1 50 
Housel, Jeana 1 74 
Howard, Carolyn 1 50, 1 72 
Howard, Dana 68 
Howard, Kurt 174 
Howard, Shane 1 50 
Huber, John 1 50 

Huber, Laura 22, 94, 161, 163, 168 
Huber, Mary 54, 1 26 
Huddleston, David 150 
Huffaker, Diana 150, 162 
Huffman, Joyce 1 74 
Hughes, James 1 74 
Hull, Charles 1 50 
Humes, Rhonda 168 
Hundley, Rick 150, 161 
Hunt, David 90, 1 74 
Hunter, George 161, 1 74 
Hunter, Martin 168 
Huntley, Richard 1 50, 1 74 
Hurley, Roberta 150, 158, 163, 168, 

170 
Hurley, Howard 1 74 
Hurt, Gaylene 96, 161, 170, 172 
Hurt, Lynn 168 

Hurt, Wallace 150, 170, 158 
Huston, Gary 86, 161 
Huston, Keith 22, 164, 161 
Huston, Kevin 96, 110, 150 



I Ig, Anita (Mrs.) 140 
Imel, Jack 161 
Imel, Robin 1 74 
INTRAMURALS 86 
Irwin, Becky 1 50 
Irwin, Billy 150 
Irwin, Bobby 1 74 
Irwin, Mike 1 68 



Irwin, Stanley 82, 1 40 
Isenburg, Cheryl 1 50 
Isenburg, Marsha 1 68 
Ison, Carlo 1 50 



J ackson, Delia 1 69 

Jackson, Deborah 1 6 1 

Jackson, Deborah L. 161 

Jackson, Pam 1 6 1 

Jackson, Rodney 20, 90 

Jackson, Wilbur 150, 163 

Jacobs, Angie 160, 161 

Jacobs, David 84, 168 

Jacobs, Mary 1 68 

Jacobs, Sally 1 6 1 

James, Carolyn 168 

James, Shelly 1 74 

James, Terry 1 6 1 

James, William 1 74 

Jameson, Lynn 166, 168, 170, 172 

Jamison, Jed 1 50, 1 62 

Jenkins, Patty 78, 161 

Jett, Denise 164, 168 

Johnson, Brad 168 

Johnson, David 1 50 

Johnson, Denise 82 

Johnson, Dennis 1 74 

Johnson, Diane 161, 170 

Johnson, Judy 1 74 

Johnson, Larry 1 74 

Johnson, Marcy 1 6 1 

Johnson, Mariann 46, 1 50, 1 72 

Johnson, Mark 158, 168, 186 

Johnson, Mary 161, 163 

Johnson, Mike 134, 158, 186 

Johnson, Pat 20, 114, 168 

Johnson, Rhonda 1 74 

Johnson, Richard 134, 174 

Johnson, Shirley 161 

lohnson, Tim 78, 132, 134, 150 

lohnson, Vanessa 1 68 
Johnson, Virginia 1 50 

lohnson, Wanda 54, 168 

lolliff, Kenneth 161 

ones, Becky 1 6 1 
;, Bonnie 150 

iones, Clyde 1 6 1 

ones, David 1 6 1 
Jones, Doug 40 

ones, Edward 1 74 

'ones, Evelyn 1 6 1 

Iones, James 150, 168 
Jones, John (Sgt.) 42, 48, 50 

ones, Joseph 1 74 

Iones, Larry 1 50 
Jones, Michelle 104, 150 

Iones, Mildred 140 

Iones, Mike 1 74 
Jones, Nora 150 
Jones, Owen 1 61 
Jones, Rick 161 
Jones, Scott 132, 168 
Jones, Shirley 161 
Jones, Terry 1 50 
Jones, William 1 50 
Joshlin, Bob 161 
Joshlin, Jay 1 74 



K 



aiser, Cindy 168, 170 
Kaiser, Mark 1 74 
Kamm, Celia 168 
Kantarze, James 1 00, 1 40 
Karn, Diane 1 68 
Kearby, William 1 40 
Keck, Pam 150 
Keeps, Alan 1 50 
Keers, Pat 1 74 

Keglovits, Dave 150, 162, 168 
Keifer, Kathy 112, 161, 172 
Keller, Bill 161 
Keller, Merla 1 74 
Keller, Sally 161 
Keller, Linda 172 
Kellog, Linda 150, 172 
Kellogg, Mike 1 68 
Kelly, Tim 1 50 

Kemery, Allison 54, 118, 150 
Kemery, Sandra 90, 174 
Kemp, Cindy 44, 1 50 
Kemp, George 1 74 
Kendall, Bruce 132 
Kendall, Doug 130, 161 



Kendrick, Stacey 1 50, 1 72 

Kennedy, Alan 151, 190 

Kennedy, Debra 98, 151, 162, 166 

Kennedy, Diane 1 5 1 

Kennington, Jim 1 74 

Kennington, Kerry 151, 1 74 

Kent, Barbra 174 

Kent, Melody 151 

Kernodle, Karen 1 6 1 

Kerr, Luann 1 5 1 

Kersey, Bill 161 

Kidder, Mary 1 68 

Kilgrove, Mark 1 68 

Kimbrough, Jeryl 1 5 1 

Kimbrough, Michael 72, 151 

Kimbrough, Sharon 1 74 

Kimbrough, Steve 1 74 

Kimsey, Karen 160, 190, 161 

King, Allen 36, 151 

King, Gary 1 61 

King, Gregory 1 5 1 

King, Jeff 132 

King, Rhonda 1 68 

King, Sherry 38, 164, 168 

King, Sylvia 1 74 

Kinley, Jim 168 

Kinley, Robert 76, 78, 134, 151 

Kinley, William 168 

Kierby, John 1 68 

Kirk, Gary 84, 161, 86 

Kirkman, Jeff 76, 132, 134, 136 

Kirkman, Mike 40, 133 

Kirkpatrick, Paul 1 74 

Kirkpatrick, Carol 160, 161, 164 

Kissick, Karen 1 74 

Kistler, Cindy 161 

Kistler, Jackie 168 

Kistler, Tom 151 

Kleeman, Lois 1 68 

Klemen, Don 84, 136, 168 

Klemen, John 84, 136, 151 

Klinge, Ron 84, 161 

Knight, Rita 161 

Knoebel, Nicki 1 74 

Knowber, Nicki 168 

Kochman, Constance (Mrs.) 140 

Koehl, Chris 1 74 

Komlanc, Monica 1 6 1 

Koontz, Terry 1 68 

Kosh, Carmelita 32, 158, 162, 172 

Kruetzer, Herb 1 61 

Krug, Mark 1 74 

Kurpis, Kathy (16, 168 

Kurpis, Steve 78, 1 34, 1 36, 1 74 



L> abaw, Gene 161, 170 

Labaw, Geri 1 74 

Lacy, John 132, 161, 164 

Lakin, Debbie 161 

Lamar, Marguerite, (Miss) 114, 140 

Lambert, Frank 168 

Lambert, Jeanne 1 6 1 

Lambirth, Maxie 134, 161 

Lambirth, Nedra 161 

Lambirth, Velda 1 74 

Lammert, Jeff 82, 161, 164 

Lammert, Susie 168, 172 

Lammert, Steve 71 

Landrey, Lisa 1 74 

Lane, Debbie 161 

Lane, Gary 1 74 

Lane, Phyllis 164, 168 

Lane, Richard 1 6 1 

Languell, Roger 136, 174 

Lanier, Alesia 1 72 

Larrimore, Richard 1 6 1 

Larrison, Marsha 1 61 

Larrison, Mike 72 

Larson, Judy 1 68 

Larson, Sally 1 6 1 

Lash, Roger 140 

Lasiter, Randy 168 

LATIN CLUB 26, 175 

Lawler, Mike 1 6 1 

Lawrence, Karon 38, 98, 164, 166, 

168, 170 
Lawrence, Randy 1 6 1 
Lawrence, Linda 68 
Lawrence, Randy 1 6 1 
Lawton, Jim 70 
Layfield, Philip 161 
Leamon, Charles 140 
Leamon, Kathy 22 
Lee, Connie 1 74 
Lee, Frank 1 74 

181 



Lee, Mike 161 

Lee, Peggy 161 

Leet, Melanie 98, 164, 168 

Lehr, David 174 

Lemme, Leland 1 40 

Leming, John 161, 170 

Leming, Mary 1 74 

Lentz, Linda 1 70 

Linfz, Laura 1 70 

Leonard, Bob 1 61 

Lessel, Don 161 

Lessel, Steve 168 

Lester, James 1 61 

Lester, John 1 34 

Lewis, Elizabeth 1 74 

Lewis, Linda 161, 1 64 

Liming, Susie 1 68 

Lind, Bill 161 

Lindsay, Maebeth 161 

Lindsay, Lola 1 68 

Lindsey, Michael 1 61 

Links, Gary 161 

Linley, Becky 174 

Linthecome, Marian (Mrs.) 140 

Linthecome, Mark 1 64, 1 68 

Linville, Don 1 36 

Linville, John 1 74 

Linville, Pan 161 

Linza, Mike 168 

Litmer, Tina 22, 161 

Little, Denise 166, 168, 188 

Little 500, 8, 68 

Lloyd, Lyndia 1 74 

Loffland, Donna 1 26 

Loffland, Phyllis (Mrs.) 140 

Loggins, Cathy 1 74 

Loggins, Chris 46 

Lonberher, Don 1 74 

Lonberher, Pam 168 

Loncar, Stacia 22, 18, 156, 1 ( 

Long, Adonis 1 68 

Long, Richard 132, 161 

Long, Gary 162 

Lont, Tim 1 74 

Lowe, Craig 161, 168 

Lucas, Bill 168 

Lynch, Don 174 

Lynch, Tarri 1 61 

Lynch, Vicki 1 68 



McClaine, Evelyn 1 74 

McClain, Mike 1 74 

McClaren, Dennis 1 74 

McCleary, Helen 160 

McClure, Kay 160 

McCormick, Mike 152 

McCormick, Mike 1 74 

McCory, Sherry 164, 168 

McCracken, Debbie 168 

McCracken, Karen 1 68 

McCray, Don 1 74 

McCreary, John 134, 160 

McCullough, Julia 1 60, 1 64 

McCutchan, Terri 1 60 

McDonald, Brian 136, 168 

McElyea, Diane 1 74 

McGowen, Bill 160 

McGrew, Tracy 90, 1 74 

McHargue, Terry 1 60 

Mclntyre,Kay 152 

McKamey, Gary 1 60 

McKee, Roger 1 60 

McKinley, Brian 38, 174 

McKinley, Randy 68, 78, 134, 152 

McKinsey, Claude 1 40, 1 74 

McKinster, Denise 152 

McKusky, Terry 164, 168 

McLaughlin, Jim 160, 164 

McLaughlin, Ken 168 

McLauren, Pam 1 74 

McMasters, Richard 160 

McMillian, Cliff 1 60 

McMillian, Linda 168 

McMullen, John 1 74 

McMullen, Kevin 168, 174 

McNeal, Bill 74 

McQueen, Chip 160 

McVay, Penny 174 

Meadows, Al 1 52 

Mears, Jack 174 

Mediate, Rocco 168 

Meetz, Janel 1 68, 1 74 

Mendez, David 160 

Merriman, Andrea 152 

Merriman, Kevin 1 60 

Merriman, Stephanie 168 

Messamer, Jessica 1 60, 1 70 

Meyers, Louis 160 



Meyers, John 1 68 

Meyers, Terry 1 68 

Michener, Gary 1 60 

Mikita, Mark 1 60 

Milan, Dana 168, 172 

Milan, Lana 166, 168, 172 

Milan, Marilyn 152 

Milhon, Korl 160, 162, 168 

Miller, Becky 152 

Miller, Betty 160 

Miller, Cathy 1 60 

Miller, Darrel 1 74 

Meller, David 1 60 

Miller, Diane 168 

Miller, Donna 174 

Miller, Fred 22, 1 14, 156, 162 

Miller, Gary 168 

Miller, Janet 1 74 

Miller, Jerry 1 74 

Miller, Mark 1 74 

Miller, Randy 152, 160, 164 

Miller, Randy 168 

Miller, Ruth 174 

Miller, Steve 160 

Miller, Tim 152 

Miller, Tammy 1 74 

Milligan, Terri 1 70, 1 74 

Mills, Becky 168 

Mills, Blanche 152, 190 

Mimms, Marilyn 1 74 

Minter, Roger 152 

Miszerack, Martin 1 60 

Miszerack, Mike 1 34, 1 36, 1 74 

Mitchell, Ray 152 

Mitchell, Steve 1 60 

Mitchell, Theresa 152 

Mimy, Jeff 1 68 

Mobley, Cynthia 1 74 

Mobley, Darla 1 74 

Mobley, Paula 1 74 

Mobley, Sheryl 1 60 

Moffrrt, Doug 152 

Mohr, Jerry 1 60 

Money, Cheryl 1 68 

Monger, Mike 162 

Montani, Cheryl 1 68 

Montgomery, Sally 1 74 

Moody, Carol 1 68 



Mooney, Dan 168 

Mooney, Tom 152, 158 

Moore, Becky 112, 118, 162, 164, 

168 
Moore, Chris 1 62 
Moore, Glenn 1 74 
Moore, Keith 1 74 
Moore, Kym 1 68, 1 72 
Moore, Mark 74, 132, 152 
Moore, Mike 1 62 
Moore, Paul 1 62 
Moore, Phil 152 
Moore, Richard 140 
Moore, Rita 38, 174 
Moore, Terence 1 74 
Moore, Teresa 1 62 
Moorhead, Barbara 1 62 
Moots, Candy 152, 163 
Moreland, Clarence 114, 168 
Morgan, Janet (Mrs.) 142 
Morgan, Janet 1 62 
Morgan, Layman 1 62 
Morgan, Martin 84, 1 36, 1 68 
Morgan, Paul 78, 134, 162 
Mormance, Renee 96, 162, 168 
Mormance, Suzanne 96, 152, 162 
Morrical, Charlotte 152 
Morris, Kenneth 1 52 
Morrow, Keith 1 74 
Morton, Anthony 1 34, 1 62, 84 
Morton, Cheryl 1 68 
Morton, Yvonne 16, 162 
Mosley, Henry 164, 160, 162, 163 
Mosley, Phil 1 62, 1 68 
Mucho, Scott 174 
Muir, Patty 153, 38, 162 
Muir, Susan 1 68 
Mundy, Debra 162 
Munn, Laura 106, 152, 32, 158 
Murdock, Steve 1 74 
Mutz, Mark 1 34, 1 74 
Mutz, Mike 76, 78, 1 34, 1 62 
Myers, Jeff 162 
Myers, Jessie 132, 134, 168 
Myers, Harry 78, 80, 134, 162 
Myers, John 132, 134 
Myers, Terry 132, 134 
Myers, Randy 152 



M 



i alandro, Cherl 1 61 
Malone, Leslie 22, 106, 114, 152 
Malone, Ron 1 34, 1 74 
Malloy, Mary 114, 160, 161 
Malloy, Vic 1 34, 1 74 
Mandabach, Gary 152 
Mann, Cinda 1 6 1 
Mann, David 152 
Mann, Jim 168 
Mann, Lisa 174 
Mann, Randy 1 74 
Manner, Pam 68 

Mannweiler, Gwen (Mrs.) 114, 140 
Mansfield, Jan 168 
Maple, Mark 168 
Marchetti, Toni 161 
Marchetti, Vicki 36, 1 14, 152, 164, 

172 
Marder, Larry 1 40 
Marlar, Randy 1 68 
Markiewicz, Gene 1 74 
Markiewicz, Norine 152 
Marrs, Ezell 136, 140 
Martin, Bonnie 16, 161, 162, 174 
Martin, Darcy 1 68 
Martin, Debbie 1 74 
Martin, Mike 1 36, 1 74 
Martin, Mike 84, 132, 134, 160 
Martin, Rick 174 
Martin, Scott 174 
Martin Sue 160 
Mason, Steve 1 74 
Massey, Gina 1 68 
Mates, Nicholas 140 
Matthews, Jackie 1 74 
Matthews, Yvonne 1 74 
Mattingly, Rene 174 
Maul, David 1 74 
May, Donnitta 68 
Moynard, Brenda 152 
Maxey, Aaron 1 74 
Maxey, David 1 68 
McAdams, Bill 168 
McAdams, Bob 84 
McCammack, Marylee (Mrs.) 140 
McCarty, Cherylin 168 
McCarty, Vernon 72, 80, 132, 140, 

162 

182 




OFFICE STAFF Front row. Fran Eberhard, Vivian Eaton, Mary Jane Patterson, Jo Armin, Jeanne Harman, Hen- 
rietta Loftiss, Back row. Rose Mary Bonham, Betty McFall, Miriam Brown, Marion Baughman. 



N 



eal, Charles 1 7 A 
Neal, Curtis 168 
Neeb, Brice 1 68 
Neeb, Carol 1 74 
Neeb, Steve 1 62 
Nelson, Ruth (Mrs.) 1 42 
Newby, Patrick 162 
NEWS BUREAU 1 1 3 
Newton, James 168 
Niederpruem, Kimberly 152 
Niederpruem, Kyle 1 74 
Niemann, Krista 163, 168 
Niles, Betty (Mrs.) 14, 142 
Nixon, Aaron 1 62 
Nixon, Jeff 162 
Nixon, John 1 74 
Noe, Cindy 162 
Nolton, Susan 152, 22 
Norris, Denise 111, 152, 162 
NORTHWEST PASSAGES 1 1 4 
Norton, Sherry 152, 164, 61 
Norwood, Marilyn 152 
Nowling, Glenna 162 
Nunley, John 152 
Nuttal, Mark 1 42 



\J akes, Dyan 1 74, 1 69 
Oates, Danielle 168 
Oats, Virginia 1 62 
Obenchain, Brenda 114, 1 62 
Obenchain, Dennis 1 74 
Obenchain, Sondra 152 
O'Brien, Richard 142 
O'Connel, Mike 1 74 
O'Day, Karen 152 
Off, Kay 1 62 
Oldham, Virginia 162 
Olds, Randy 1 60, 1 62 
Oliphant, Michelle 1 69, 1 72 
Oliver, Dorothy 162 
Oilier, Greg 162 
Oilier, Tom 1 68 
Olson, Tim 152, 162, 164 
O'Neil, Jim 1 74 
Oniones, Lana 1 74 
ORCHESTRA 100 
O'Riley, Cheri 1 69 
O'Riley, Cheryl 40, 1 40 
O'Rourke, Cindy 152 
O'Rourke, Pam 1 74 
Orr, Francis 162 
Orr, Patti 1 74 
Orr, Theresa 1 62, 1 64 
Osborne, Reginald 152 
Osburn, Chuck 1 69, 1 74 
Osting, Paul 1 62 
Otterbein, Cherry 1 75 
Otterweller, Joan 1 62 
Ottinger, Bob 162 
Owen, Terri 162, 172 
Owens, Connie 1 69 
Owens, Dleanor 1 73 
Owens, Eva 173 
Owens, Monica 1 75 
Owens, Teresa 1 75 
Owens, Vicki 1 69 



I ace, Sarah 1 75 

Pace, Wanda 152 

Padgett, Janice 1 75 

Padgett, Jennie 1 75 

Paff, Dick 1 75 

ru;je, Lynn 1 75 

Page, Randy 132, 169 

Pallay, De 162 

Pallay, Elgin 162 

Palmer, Cheryl 169 

Palmer, Gary 162 

Palmer, Jo 1 75 

Palmer, Mark 1 69 

Papalazarou, Constance 152 

Pappas, Stefe 175 

Pappas, Tony 1 34, 1 36, 84 

Paquin, Kathy 169 

Poquin, Patti 1 52, 1 58 

Pardee, Mike 1 62 

Parido, Harvey 175 

Parker, Harvey 1 75 

Parker, Kieth 1 69 

Parker, Sherri 152 

Parks, Linda 1 62 



Parmelee, Steve 102, 162 

Parsons, Anne 152 

Partlow, Debbie 1 70, 1 69 

Patel, Ajaykumar 1 62 

Patel, Smita 1 62 

Pate, Ron 169 

Patrick, Patty 1 62 

Patterson, Dwayne 152 

Patterson, Kathy 1 75 

Patterson, Kim 162 

Patterson, Lisa 162 

Paul, Danny 22, 164, 162, 178 

Paveu, Layne 1 69 

Pacton, Vicki 1 75 

Payne, Samella 162, 163 

Pearson, Jim 1 75 

Pearson, Mark 1 75 

Pearson, Susan 22, 54, 152 

Pearson, Tommy 1 69 

Peavler, Jim 1 75 

Peete, Martha 1 75 

Pell, Carol 1 75 

Pemberton, Mona 169 

Percival, Judy 152 

Perkins, Kick 1 75 

Perkins, Jusy 162, 166, 169, 168 

Perkins, Vicki 1 62 

Perkinson, MaryAnn 40, 152 

Perkoski, Emmet 1 75 

Pert, William 142 

Peters, Deborah 162 

Peterson, Sherry 1 69 

Petranoff, William 152 

Petruzzi, Lisa 152 

Petruzzi, Kim 169 

Petsel, David 1 75 

Pettigrew, Glen 152 

Phelps, Earlie 1 75 

Phillips, Alverna 1 86, 1 69 

Philips, Donna 152 

Phillips, Glenda 162 

Phillips, Joella 1 75 

Phillips, Richard 152 

Phipps, Kathy 152, 163, 166 

Pickel, Karen 1 62 

Pickel, Kathy 1 69 

Pickett, Mark 152 

Pickett, Patricia 1 75 

Pickett, Phill 162 

Pierce, Kathy 152 

Pierson, Judy 22, 114, 164, 162 

Pierson, Ron 169 

Pifer, Debbie 162 

Pillow, Diane 102, 166, 169, 170 

Pike, Joyce 1 75 

Pike, Roger 1 75 

Pike, Sheila 152 

Pike, Vicki 152 

PIONEER PLAYERS 1 77 

Pitt, Amber 1 75 

Pittaway, Jim 152 

Pittman, Penny 175 

Piatt, David 169 

Plunkett, Chris 1 69 

Plummer, John 38, 169 

Poalston, James 14, 142 

Poehler, Louise 1 75 

Poehler, Rebecca 175 

Poland, Connie 175, 188 

Poland, Terri 106, 162 

Polsgrove, Jim 1 75 

Polsgrove, Sue 1 54 

Pool, Bonnie 42, 154 

Poole, Brian 43, 175 

Poole, Karen 44, 1 54, 1 76 

Poole, Terry 45, 175 

Porter, Tandra 46, 175 

Potenza, Amelia 1 7, 54, 1 62 

Potter, Tim 48, 134, 136, 163, 169, 

188 
Poulos, Angelo 1 62 
Pourchot, Bonnie 162 
Pourchot, John 74, 88, 132, 136, 154 
Power, Don 1 62 
Prarie, Andy 162 
Pranger, Susan 162 
Prewitt, Rhonda 154 
Prewitt, Shere 169 
Price, Bob 78, 134, 162, 169, 190 
Price, David 162 
Price, Dean 1 34, 1 75 
Price, Kevan 162, 170 
Price, Steve 162 
Prince, Karen 1 75 
Pringle, Dane 162 
Pringle, Mike 1 75 
Pritchett, Mabel (Mrs.) 142 
Pritchett, Robin 169, 67 
ProffHt, Lauri 68, 1 75 



Pruett, Cheryl 162 
Pruett, Rick 154 
Pryor, David 1 69 
Puciloski, Debra 1 75 
Pugh, Connie 1 62 
Pyles, Gerald 1 62 



Q 



uackenbush, Cindy 1 76 
Quackenbush, Mari 1 76 
Queen, Steve 162 
Quillman, Gary 
Quilter, Rick 
Quinette, Rick 
Quinn Debbie 
Quintana, Jose 1 67 



l\ odemacher, Jody 162 

Rodemacher, Judy 162 

Rader, Sheryl 1 54 

Roe, Steve 1 69 

Ragland, Carol 1 36, 1 76 

Rairdon, Sandy 1 69 

Ralson, Cindy 1 62 

Ramos, Fred 162 

Ranee, Gary 1 34 

Ranee, Bob 90, 132, 136, 162 

Randle, Alan 1 54 

Rane, Ronita 169 

Raney, Ralph 169 

Ransom, Gerald 90, 1 76 

Rasnick, Duwayne 136, 176 

Rasnick, Ed 1 32 

Ratcliff, Roger 1 54 

Raub, Susan 22, 162 

Ray, David 162 

Ray, Debbie 1 76 

Ray, James 14, 14, 114, 114, 142 

Ray, Steve 1 36 

RED CROSS CLUB 26, 170 

Read, Bonita 162, 168 

Reams, Paul 90, 134, 136, 168 

Redmond, Jacqueline (Mrs.) 142 

Reed, Cheri 1 69 

Reed, Dennis 154 

Reed, Diane 169 

Reed, Jim 1 34, 1 76 

Reed, Julius 84, 134, 164, 176 

Reed, Karen 1 76 

Reed, Pam 176 

Reed, Sherry 1 76 

Reed, Tom 74 

Rees, Bob 114, 132, 154, 162 

Reeves, Mike 1 76 

Reeves, Stephan 162 

Reid, Dana 169 

Reid, Donna 169 

Reid, Julius 1 36 

Reinbold, Don 169 

Reinbold, Pam 1 54 

Reinbold, Terri 162 

Reinstatler, Jim 70 

Reinstatler, Vanessa 162 

Reneau, Bill 154 

Renner, Debbie 1 76 

Renner, Patti 169 

Reski, Cole 1 74, 1 76 

Resnick, Lillian (Mrs.) 62, 142 

Revell, Carol 160, 162 

Reynolds, Joseph 14, 112, 142 

Rhine, Mike 1 76 

Rhodes, Donna 163, 169 

Rhodes, John 1 76 

Rhodes, Joyce 1 54 

Rhodes, Joyce 154 

Rice, Deborah 162 

Rice, Doug 154, 164 

Rich, Richard 1 24, 1 54 

Richards, Melanie 162 

Richards, Phil 1 69 

Richardson, Lisa 1 62 

Richardson, Sue 1 68 

Richey, Fimie (Mrs.) 142 

Richey, Francis 1 68 

Richey, Jeannette 1 68 

Richey, Jerry 1 62 

Richey, Rita 168 

Richmond, Curt 78, 1 34 

Richwine, Debra 1 54 

Riggs, Connie 154, 162 

Riggs, Jeff 38, 96, 163, 166, 168 

Riley, Dave 134, 168 



Riley, Donna 168 

Ringenberger, John 1 76 

Rinker, Dennis 154 

Rinker, Eugene 168 

Rinker, Gene 1 76 

Ritter, Bill 156, 142 

Ritter, Sue (Miss) 142 

Riordan, Cindy 176 

Riordan, Vicki 1 62, 1 70 

Ripley, Alan 162 

Rippy, Greg 1 76 

Roach, Dan 134 

Roach, David 1 86, 1 76 

Roach, Shannon 78, 160, 162 

Roberts, Bill 162 

Roberts, Debra 162 

Roberts, David 176 

Roberts, Judith 162 

Roberts, Mike 82, 162, 163, 164 

Robertson, Cheryl 1 76 

Robertson, Dave 110, 162, 164 

Robertson, Earl 168 

Robertson, Greg 1 32, 1 70 

Robertson, William 1 54 

Robinson, Anthony 154 

Robinson, Becky 1 68 

Robinson, Beverly (Mrs.) 14, 142 

Robinson, Cathy 1 54 

Robinson, John 134, 136, 176 

Robinson, Michael 132, 154 

Robinson, Myla 1 76 

Robinson, Sandy 154, 164 

Robinson, Rebecca 1 54 

Roesler, Glen 1 62 

Roether, Susan 168 

Rogers, Elwood 1 63 

Rogers, Vicki 1 76 

Roland, Bethany 1 76 

Roney, Kenneth 1 54 

Rose, Charles, 84, 88, 154, 158 

Rose, Cindy 154 

Rose, Ruthann 176 

Rosello, Julio 154 

Rosenberger, John 1 34, 1 36, 1 76, 1 84 

Ross, Joe 1 76 

Ross, Max 1 76 

Ross, Von 168 

Roth, John 168 

Rowley, Dan 162, 164 

Ruff, Jack 168 

Ruby, Karol (Miss) W0, 142 

Rumble, Ron 1 34, 1 76 

Ruse, Mike 1 76 

Rush, Jim 1 76 

Rushin, Joyce 1 76 

Rushin, Lamar 1 86 

Rusk, Mark 164, 168 

Russell, Jeanette 162 

Russell, Steve 162, 164 

Ryan, Cheryl 1 76 

Ryan, James 1 62 

Ryan, John 153 

Ryan, Mildred (Mrs.) 142 



\J t. Martin, Larry 154, 168 

St. Martin, Tom 1 86 

Saler, William 142 

Salmon, Bonnie 114,154,156,160 

Salmon, Debra 1 76 

Salzer, Sharon 1 54 

Slazer, Tom 1 68 

Sampson, Toni 1 62 

Sanchez, Ana Marie 162 

Sanders, Dave 162,170,176 

Sanders, Leonard 1 68 

Sandlin, Bill 1 68 

Sandlin, Howard 136,176 

Sandlin, Loreena 32,40,154,158 

Sandlin, Mark 1 34 

Sandford, Terry 1 68 

Saurs, Tom 1 68 

Savich, Yovanka (Miss) 142 

Scales, Deborah 1 54 

Scalf, Janet 162 

Schaedel, Bruce 162 

Schaffer, Eric 162 

Schenck, Kathy 1 76 

Schenck, Richard 22,154,162,168 

Schenck, Rosey 88,136 

Schogel, Patty 1 72 

Schirrell, Becky 1 70 

Schlake, Darryl 162 

Schlatter, Mark 154, 164 

Schmidt, Cindy 168,170 

Schmidt Rhonda 162,163,172 

Schmink, Ron 136, 142 



183 



Schniter, Mike 1 76 

Schnitgen, Donna 1 54 

Schubert, Linda 1 62 

Schumacker, Tom 1 62 

Schuster, Jimmie 1 54 

Scoggan, Bryan 154,176 

Scott, Debra 160,162 

Scott, Donna 154 

Scott, Jeff 136,162 

Scott, Joe 1 70 

Scott, Rebecca 154 

Scott, Shirley 154 

Scudder, Patty 54, 154 

Scurlock, Mike 154 

Seagraves, Tony, 1 70 

Seals, Down 170 

Secor, Gail 1 62 

Sedam, Debra 154 

Selby, Bob 134,170 

Selby, Carol 170,176 

Selby, Jim 154 

Senter, Mark 163,170 

Shaffer, Cynthia 1 76 

Shaffer, Danny 1 14,162 

Shaffer, Eric 170 

Shaffer, Faye, 154 

Shaffer, Joe 1 76 

Shaffer, Karen 1 62 

Shaffer, Mike 1 34 

Sharp, David 154 

Sharp, Debbie 1 54 

Sharp, Jean 1 76 

Shaw, Linda 1 54 

Shaw, Tina 1 76 

Shedd, Charlene 162 

Sheeks, Anthony 1 62 

Sheeks, Brenda 176 

Sherrel, Carlo 1 76 

Shinkle, Melinda 50,162 

Shinkle, Ralph 1 76 

Shipp, Crystal 162 

Shipp, Kay 40, 154 

Shires, Greg 71, 118, 154, 130 

Shobe, Benny 1 70 

Shobe, Leondra 1 54 

Shoemaker, Joann 142 

Sholar, Terri 162 

Shoffler, Mike 1 70 

Short, Julie 154, 162 

Short, Robin 88, 134, 136, 170 

Short, Leslie 1 70 

Short Terry 1 70 

Shrock, Peggy 154, 162, 166, 168 

Shreve, Heidi 1 62 

Shreve, Rosemary 1 54 

Shuck, Gilbert (Dr.) 20, 142 

Shuford, Chuck 1 76 

Shuford, Leslie 1 76 

Shuler, Donna 1 54 

Shute, Andrea 1 76 

Siboing, Mike 1 76 

Siddons, Fred 162 

Sigler, Dean 1 62 

Simion, Dennis 1 76 

Simions, Linda 1 54 

Simon, Debra 1 54 

Simon, Jean 1 76 

SILVERETTES 98, 173 

Simon, Paul 1 70 

Simpson, Julie 1 70 

Simpson, Tim 1 70 

Skiles, Karen 1 62 

Skinner, David 1 10, 154, 164 

Slater, Pearl 1 54 

Sloughterback, Jon 154 

Slovens, Jim 78, 134, 136, 176 

Sloam, Tom 1 70 

Slusher, Vickie 1 62 

Small, Trudy 1 70 

Smallwood, Mark 136, 176 

Smallwood, Mike 170 

Smallwood, Peggy 162, 163 

Smartz, Kenneth 14,46, 52, 1 J 4, 156 

Smith, Carlo 154 

Smith, Cathy 162 

Smith, Chris 170 

Smith, Cindy 162 

Smith, Curtis 154 

Smith, Darrell 1 76 

Smith, Debra 162 

Smith, Debra 170 

Smith, Donald 162 

Smith, Harry 154 

Smith, Janice 1 76 

Smith, Jean 1 70 

Smith, Jeff 22, 1 54, 1 64 

Smith, Keith 1 54 

Smith, Kendrick 1 70 

Smith, Mike 74, 1 54 



Smith, Mike 132, 162 

Smith, Norman 1 54 

Smith, Phil 176 

Smith, Roberta (Mrs.) 52 

Smith, Robert 162, 176 

Smith, Ruth 170 

Smith, Sandy 38 

Smith, Sandra 22, 22, 54, 118, 90, 

154, 162, 176 
Smith, Susan 68 
Smith, Sybil 156 
Smock, Tony 1 56 
Smoot, Dorothy 1 76 
Snoddy, Diane 162 
Snyder, Lynn 1 32 
Snyder, Phil 162 
Snyder, Tony 1 70 
Snyder, Vicki 162 
Soots, Debbie 1 70, 1 76 
Sorrell, Sandy 1 62 
Sowers, Keith 1 76 
Spaid, Craig 1 36, 1 76 
Sparks, James 1 42 
Spaulding, Debbie 170 
Spears, Rebecca 1 62 
Spear, Debbie 1 76 
Spikes, Bob 1 70 

Spikes, Frank 98, 1 56, 1 64, 1 70, 1 74 
Spratt, Gary 1 70 
Spremo, Yovanka 106, 156 
Springer, Herb 1 76 
Sprouse, John 130, 162, 168 
Spurlin, Paul 162 
Spurlock, Albert 142 
Standerfer, Dana 90, 78, 132, 134, 

136, 170 
Standifer, Debbie 176 
Standifer, Teresa 162 
Stallard, Sharon 1 56 
Stambro, Richard 156 
Stanley, Deana 1 70 
Staples, Linda 162 
Starnes, Gary 1 76 
Statzer, Anita 162 
Statzer, Carlene 1 76 
Statzer, Lenora 1 56, 1 74 
Steed, Marylou, (Miss) 142 
Steen, Cathy 1 76 
Stedman, Don 1 70 
Stedman, Pam 1 70 
Stegemoller, John 132, 162 
Steinmetz, Donna 162 
Stephanoff, Joe 162 
Stephens, Debbie 176 
Stephens, Jeff 1 74, 1 76 
Stephens, Jo 40, 162 
Stephens, Curtis 1 56 
Sterger, Paul 176 
Steward, Terry 1 56 
Stewart, Elizabeth 1 76 
Stewart, Jeff 1 70 
Stewart, Lisa 1 76 
Stone, Luann 1 76 
Stone, Don 74, 142 
Stonehouse, Gary 90, 1 36 
Strange, David 1 56 
Strange, Elanie 1 62 
Stranton, Vance 66, 78, 84, 1 34, 1 36, 

156 
Stribling, Steve 134, 176 
Street, Doug 162, 170 
Strolle, John 1 76 
Strouce, Karen 1 76 
Stuart, Terry 1 90 
Studer, Beverly 156 
Studer, Ron 176 
Sturgis, Ruth 176 
Sudler, Fred 156 
Suhr, Tina 1 70 
Sullivan, Gary 1 56 
Summers, Doris 1 62 
Summers, Linda 1 56 
Summers, Roberta 163, 166, 170 
Sutherland, Rob 170 
Sutherland, Sandy 160, 162 
Sutor, Evelyn 1 56 
Suttice, Charlice 1 56 
Suttice, Ken 162 
Suttons, David 164 
Swails, Regina 1 64 
Swanson, Scott 61 
Swartsell, Tim 1 70 
Swift, Dan 170 
Swift, Kathy 156 
SWING CHOIR 100 
Switzer, Sharon 22, 22, 156 
Switzer, Terry 22, 54, 78, 118, 164 
Szalaiy, David 132, 170 
Szalaiy, Muik 176 



I abares, Frank 1 64, 1 70 

Tabares, Roland 170 

Tackitt, Donna 156 

Tafflinger, Richard 1 56 

Tafflinger, Steve 1 63, 1 70 

Talbert, Pam 1 76 

Taylor, Barbara 156, 162 

Taylor, Dale 88, 1 36, 1 64 

Taylor, John 48, 50 

Taylor, Darrie 1 76 

Taylor, Francis, 1 70 

Taylor, Frank 96, 156, 162, lc 

Taylor, Fred 96, 1 56, 1 58 

Taylor, Mark 84, 1 70 

Taylor, Phil 1 76 

Taylor, Sharon 1 63, 1 66, 1 70 

Taylor, Vernie 84, 164 

Teager, Theresa 1 56 

Teague, Mike 1 56 

Teague, Patty 170 

Teater, Hubert 1 34, 1 76 

Teater, Jody 1 70 

TENNIS 70, 131 

Terhune, Harold 7 06, 156 

Tesky, John 110, 1 74 

Thayer, Pam 1 56 

THESPIANS 26 

Thomas, Cathy 1 56 

Thomas, Connie 1 64, 1 72 

Thomas, Dale 77 

Thomas, Dewayne 1 70 

Thomas, Gary 1 56 

Thomas, Jere 1 56 

Thomas, Mark 40 

Thomas, Pat (Mrs.) 18, 142 

Thomas, Richard 18, 142, 176 

Thomas, Ron 134, 170 

Thomas, Theresa 164, 170 

Thompson, Beth 1 70, 1 72 

Thompson, Cassandra 1 76 

Thompson, Don 1 30, 1 42 

Thompson, Natalie 164, 190 

Thompson, Vernie 1 64 

Thornell, Becky 156 

Threlkeld, Kenneth 1 24, 1 64 

Thurman, Debra 1 64 

Thurman, Mike 1 70 

Thurston, Sheryl 1 70 

Tibbs, Pat 1 76 

Tillery , Bob 1 64 

Tillery, Mark 84, 1 70 

Tillery, Mike 68 

Tingle, Dan 84, 1 70, 1 76 

Tingle, Diana 1 64 

Tipps, Henry 1 64 

Tipps, Patsy 170 

Tomkins, Greg 1 76 

Tooley, Walson 1 76 

Tolson, John 1 64 

Tower, Julie 1 70 

TRACK 72, 1 32 

Trammell, Dan 1 76 

Trammell, Thea 1 70 

Trammell, Victor 1 64 

Tripp, Norman 142 

Trivett, Dan 1 76 

Trout, Jeff 78, 1 76 

Troy, Pat 132 

Tsareff, James 1 64 

Tsareff, Stephen 1 64 

Tucker, Lloyd 68, 1 70 

Turley, Vicki 1 76 

Turner, Anthony 1 76 

Turner, Cliff 1 76 

Turner, Deborah 1 70 

Turner, Dewayne 1 56 

Turner, Mark 1 63, 1 70 

Turner, Shirley 1 64 

Turns, Billy 1 56 

Turns, Debbie 1 70 

Turns, Randy 1 64 

Tweedy, Dan 1 70 

Tweedy, Leah 1 56 



VANGUARD 164 

Vannoy, Debbie 1 76 

Van Sant, Charles 22, 1 06, 1 1 0, 1 58 

Van Treese, Jeff 1 64 

Vaughn, Sheryl 1 60, 1 64 

Vest, Mark 1 76 

Vester, Mark 1 64 

Viles, Kathy 112, 156 

Viles, Linda 1 76 

Vincent, Karen 160, 164 

Vincz, Vicki 1 56 



w, 



u 



rbanic, Karen 1 64 
Utterback, Paula 1 64, 1 70 



T alentine, Ramona 1 76 
Vann, Casey 84, 134, 170 
Vann, Mary 40 
Van Horn, Allyn 1 56 



adlinton, Stephen 1 76 
Wagaman, Debbie 164, 170 
Wagaman, Paul 64, 1 70, 1 76, 1 88 
Wagaman, Sandy 156 
Wagers, John 1 76 
Wagner, Martin 1 76 
Waldron, Debbie 54, 1 56 
Waldron, Gail 1 70, 1 76 
Waldron, Jo 1 05, 1 76, 1 56 
Walker, Alonzo 1 42 
Walker, David 170 
Walker, Debra 1 64 
Walker, Idelia 163, 164 
Walker, Linda 1 76 
Walker, Karen 156 
Walker, Nathaniel 156 
Walker, Roylane 1 76 
Walker, Sherry 1 70 
Walker, Teresa 1 70 
Wallace, Andrew 1 76 
Wallace, Paul 156 
Wallace, Rita 176 
Walters, Joe 132 

Walters, Phyllis (Miss) 94, 96, 142 
Walton, Jeff 94, 1 64 
Walton, Sarah 1 76 
Walton, Steve 1 70 
Waltz, Cathy 1 70, 1 74 
Ward, George 1 76 
Ward, Mary Jo (Mrs.) 142 
Ward, Pam 1 70 
Ward, Patricia 176 
Ward, Susan 1 64 
Waren, Bob 1 70 
Warner, Jay 1 70 
Warner, Mike 1 70 
Warren, Connie 1 76 
Warren, Jan 1 70 
Warren, Joe 1 34, 1 64 
Warren, Julie 1 76 
Warren, Viola 1 64 
Watkins, Robin 164 
Watson, Becky 164 
Watson, Dennis 176 
Watson, Joe 1 64 
Watson, Linda 1 56 
Watson, Marilyn 1 64 
Watson, Rosemary 1 76 
Wayt, Dennis 164 
Weaks, Marcia 1 62, 1 64 
Weaver, Kevin 1 76 
Webber, Debra 1 76 
Webber, Randy 80, 164 
Webster, Michael 1 76 
Weddle, Scott 132, 170 
Weese, Vicki 1 76 
Weiser, Jerry 1 70 
Weisman, Bruce 1 30, 1 56 
Weisman, Todd 1 76 
Weiss, Bill 1 76 
Weiss, Patricia 164 
Wells, Beberly 164 
Wentzel, Chuck 1 24 
Werner, Cynthia 7 6 
Wertz, Ember 1 36 
Westfall, Carol 1 64 
Westmorland, Marsha 1 56 
West, Sarah (Mrs.) 64 
Westrick, Greg 80, 132, 134, 164 
Wetzel, James 26, 84, 1 56, 1 62, 1 70, 

174 
Wheat, Debbie 170 
Wheat, Sheryl 1 76 
Wheeler, Pearl 1 76 
Whistler, Maxine 156, 163, 176 
Whitaker, Betty 170 
Whitaker, James 122, 158 
Whitaker, Jerry 1 58 
White, Danny 170 
White, David 1 76 
White, Deborah 1 76 
White, Jim 96, 162, 168, 170 
White, Karen 104, 164 



White, Linda 158 

White, Pat 1 70 

White, Roda 1 76 

Whitlock, Valerie 1 76 

Whitten, Gayla 1 70 

Whitten, Jeff 1 58 

Whorton, Leonard 40, 158 

Wieghard, Cathy 1 70 

Wieghard, Mike 158, 186 

Wier, Gary 74, 76, 78, 132, 134, 

136, 138, 158 
Wier, Ron 84, 1 70, 1 86 
Wilber, Debra 1 76 
Wilber, Kenneth 158 
Wilbur, Steve 1 32, 1 34 
Wilburn, Patricia 1 65 
Wilcox, Sherry 1 64 
Wilcox, Janeen (Mrs.) 143 
Wilkerson, Connie 1 64 
Wilkerson, Gloria 164 
Williams, Cheryl 1 70 
Williams, Danny 164 
Williams, Debbie 1 70 
Williams, Doris 156 
Williams, Elaine 1 58 
Williams, George 132, 134, 158, 170, 

174 
Williams, Gordon 1 64 
Williams, Kathy 164 
Williams, Keith 158 
Williams, Kevin 1 34, 1 76 
Williams, Laura 1 64, 1 70 
Williams, Lindsay 84, 170 
Williams, Mark 1 64 



Williams, Martin 1 76 

Williams, Mike 1 36, 1 70, 1 76 

Williams, Rick 1 76 

Williamson, Delilah 1 76 

Williamson, Denise 1 64 

Williamson, Diane 105, 164 

Williamson, Sherry 98, 164, 172 

Willis, Lavade 1 76 

Willis, Ron 158 

Wills, Patricia 158 

Wilson, Andrew 82, 176 

Wilson, Bailey 1 76 

Wilson, Bill 1 64 

Wilson, David 132, 164 

Wilson, James 1 70 

Wilson, Joe 164 

Wilson, Kevin 1 76 

Wilson, Mark 1 70 

Wilson, Richard 1 64 

Wilson, Russell 1 64 

Wilson, Susan 1 76 

Wilson, Teddy 1 70 

Wilson, Teresa 1 58 

Wilson, Vicki 1 70 

Wilson, Virginia 159 

Winegard, Joe 1 64 

Wineinger, Pam 170 

Wineinger, Debbie 38, 1 64 

Wineinger, Debbie, 158 

Wing, Karen 38, 1 76 

Wing, Sharon 1 70 

Winn, Mike 1 70 

Winterrowd, Arthur 1 64 

Winterrowd, Cathy 1 76 



Wise, Carl 1 76 

Wise, Jackie 1 70 

Wise, Mary Beth 164 

Wise, Peggy 164 

Wittman, Kim 1 70 

Wittman, Rita 1 70 

Wodtke, Charles 1 64 

Wolf, Carol 1 64, 166 

Wolf, Denise 1 64 

Wolfe, Phillip 106, 159 

Wolfe, Anita 1 76 

Wolfla, Scott 72 

Wolfe, Vicki 82, 164 

Wolter, Kathy 1 76 

Wolter, Robert 159 

Woltz, Tori 1 64 

Wood, Charles 1 76 

Woode, Candace 1 64 

Woolridge, Lottie (Mrs.) 142 

Worthington, Janey 159 

Worthington, Tomi 1 60, 1 70 

Wozney, Brenda 159 

Wright, David 1 76 

Wright, Eric 159 

Wright, Marilyn 1 70 

Wright, Mary Jo 162, 164, 1< 

Wright, Phil 32, 150, 164 

Wright, Rita 1 59 

Wright, William 1 32, 1 76 

Wyatt, Danny 159 



ant, David 170 



Yant, Dee 1 76 
Yant, Steve 1 64 
Yates, Debbie 1 70 
Yates, Jim 80, 1 34, 1 76 
Yedlowski, Gina 1 70 
Yedlowski, Mario 165 
Yezaglian, Chris 1 70 
York, Bart 143 
York, Bob 1 76 
Youck, Bill 1 34, 1 76 
Young, Bill 1 64 
Young, Chris 1 64, 1 74 
Young, David 159 
Young, Howard 1 70 
Young, James 1 59 
Young, Jeff 1 64 
Young, Mark 1 76 



£— adorian, Cindy 1 70 

Zarifis, Michael 1 64 

Zigler, Ron 132, 170 

Zeiher, Dorzell 1 76 

Zeiher, Garland 40, 158, 170 

Zeiher, Greg 1 64 

Ziats, John 1 76 

Ziegler, Cathy 1 76 

Ziko, Cynthia 1 64 

Zoretich, Mike 70 

Zoretich, Sharon 164, 172, 174 




Lisa Burrows, sophomore; Sheryl Davidson, junior; 
football game 




Michael Johnson, sophomore, football game 





Alverna Phillips, sophomore, French class 



Bob Rees, senior, senior recognition day 




Laura Eaton, junior, Orchestra practice 




Ronnie Weir, 
soph 
football game 



Mike Weighard, Darrel 
Rupe, Tom St. Martin, 
Matt Berry, seniors, 
after a basketball 





Bob Tillery, junior, 
football game 




Connie Poland, freshman, home economics class 




Denise Little sophomore, Girl's Chorus 



^y*^<^> 



Doug Berty, sophomore, football game 

Tim Potter, sophomore, pep assembly 








Stefan Bennett, junior, nurse's office 



Debbie Partlow, sophomore, orchestra 




Paul Wagaman, freshman, stadium concession stand Cinda Bell, junior 



etf-s 



Jeanne Campbell, junior; Karen Kimsey, 
junior,; Janet Flynn, sophomore; Little 
500 



Robert Price, sophomore, Little 500 




Marie Mills, senior, Spanish class 




;bbie Lakin, junior,- Becky Davis, soph- 
tore; football game 



Natalie Thompson, junior, cafeteria 





Manual basket- 



ball game 



Patrons 



Big Hoss Pizza 

4822 West 34th Street 

291-1460 

Bill Murphy Real Estate 

2802 North Lafayette Road 

925-2802 

Collins Oldsmobile 

4080 Lafayette Road 

293-5900 

Dakota Engineering Company 

7927 South Eastern Avenue 

862-2481 

Dorothy's Speedway, Inc. 

Lafayette Square Shopping Center 

293-6510 

Dotlich Brothers 

4400 West 10th Street 

247-6611 

Eagle Bowl 

2802 Lafayette Road 

926-5393 

Eagledale Florist 

3615 West 30th Street 

924-4249 



Eisner Food Stores 

3805 North High School Road 

297-2550 

Em-Roe Sporting Goods Company 
20 West Washington Street 
634-3446 

Golden Guernsey Farms, Inc. 
7500 South Emerson Avenue 
787-2234 

Herff Jones Company 

1411 North Capitol Avenue 

317-635-1554 

Locasio's Villa Pizza West 
6141 West 38th Street 
291-3446 

Pottenger Nursery & Landscaping G 
3401 Lafayette Road 
291-4470 

Short Stop Food Market 
3410 Georgetown Road 
291-0089 

Turn-Style Family Centers 
6250 West 38th Street 
293-8900 




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