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Full text of "Venango Voice"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/venangovoice2009oilc 



Suhr Library 

Venango Campus 

Clarion University 

oi Pennsylvania 

1801 West First Street 

Oil City, PA 16301 






VENANGO CAMPUS 



1 



Vt^amo Voice T O • 

Venango voicfz 

YOUR CAMPUS, YOUR PAPER. YOUR VOICE 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1 , 2008 



VOLUME 40, ISSUE 1 



Dare 2 Care Week to be held at Venango Campus 




Preacher moss will 
PRESENT End of Racism 
ON Monday. February 
4. at 7 P.M.. in Rhoades 
Center. 

By Kerri Smayda 

Dare 2 Care Week, a 
week-long celebration of 
diversity, will be held 
Monda\\ Februan. 4 



through Frida> . Februar\ 
8. at Clarion University- 
\enango Campus. This 
is the second \ear the 
Campus Acti\ ities Board 
has sponsored the event, 
and it is free and open to 
the public. 

Dare 2 Care Week is 
"designed to encourage 
students, faculty, staff, 
and the community^ to 
think about, discuss, un- 
derstand, and accept dif- 
ferences in people, in 
such areas as culture, 
sexual orientation, eth- 
nicity. ph\sical appear- 
ance, handicaps, and 
social and economic con- 
ditions."" according to a 
universit)' press release. 

Campus Activities 
Board representative Jon 



Geyer says the program 
is designed to "give stu- 
dents the opportunit} to 
experience diversity in 
different ways... to get 
them thinking and talk- 
ing about people who are 
different from them."" 

Activities during 
Dare 2 Care Week in- 
clude a performance ti- 
tled End of Racism by 
Preacher Moss, a veteran 
comedian, lecturer, activ- 
ist and writer, on Mon- 
day, February 4. at 7 
p.m., in Rhoades Audito- 
rium. According to the 
press release. Preacher 
Moss is well known for 
his ability to create a 
dialogue for diversity- 
See DARE on page 2 



Venango Voice newspaper to see change 



By Kerri Smayda 

The \'encmgo Voice 
is about to receive a ma- 
jor overhaul - in looks 
and content. The Voice 
will leave behind its 
newsletter-style la}out 
over the course of the 
spring 2008 semester and 
graduate to a full-on 
newspaper publication. 
With an enthusiastic staff 
at the helm, the weekh 
will soon include all that 
is expected of a paper - 
campus news and fea- 
tures, local, state and 



national news, comics 
and puzzles, advertise- 
ments and classifieds, 
and much more. 

Technical upgrades 
that will allow a larger 
format for print and more 
opportunities for page 
manipulation, as well as 
the use of photo editing 
equipment will give the 
I'oice its new facade. 
Subscriptions to s>ndi- 
cates King Features and 
the Associated Press will 
allow the Voice to pub- 
lish a plethora of articles 
each week, appealing to 



a wide audience much 
like the one at Venango 
Campus. 

However, though the 
I 'oice will utilize its S} n- 
dicates. many Clarion 
University students will 
also be writing several of 
the campus-centered 
articles that can be found 
on the front page each 
week. From administra- 
ti\e news to the next 
event the Campus Ac- 
tivities Board will spon- 

See VOICE on page 3 



Speciai- points of 
interest: 

♦ Clanon Universit\-— 
\'enango Campus will 
feature Dare 2 Care 
Week Monday, Februar\- 
4 through Friday, Febru- 
aD," 8. Events are free and 
open to die public. 

♦ The I enango T oice news- 
paper will see changes in 
lavout and content in the 
coming weeks of the 
2008 spring semester. 

♦ Lori Secor will run her 
Trash Talk column each 
week to educate students 
and faculty about how to 
be more en^■ironmentally 
responsible. 

♦ Students and facult}- can 
relv on the News Briefs 
section that will feature 
on- and off-campus 
events taking place over 
the course of coming 
w-eeks. 



INSIDE THIS issue: 

Trash Talk 2 

OJ ¥ acuity Feature 3 

News Briefs 4 



Venango Voice 



Brands of coffee may help protect rainforest 




Trash Talk 

WITH 
LORI Secor 



My grandma always told me she 
went to school to learn the three Rs: 
reading. "riting. and "rithmatic 
(apparently spelling \vasn"t part of the 
curriculum). Schools are still focusing 
on the three Rs. but now it"s Reduce, 
Reuse, Recycle. What a wonderful 
thing for all of us to learn! 

I don't claim to be an expert when 



it comes to the enviroiimeni or li\ing 
green. A year ago. I didn't know much 
about the state of our environment. 1 didn't 
know what carbon emissions were and I 
had never even heard about e-waste. 1 was 
content in m\ sheltered comer throwing 
batteries and light bulbs into the trash can. 
unaware of the mess 1 vsas contributing to. 
M> eyes have been opened wide thanks to 
two professors here at Venango Campus. 
Lola Deets and .loan Huber. 

What I have learned so far is this: con- 
suming less energy, less water, and creat- 
ing less trash doesn't mean we have to 
change everything we do or go without all 
the things we love. It doesn't have to bring 
about major life changes. Small changes, 
small alterations of what we do in our dailv 
lives can mean big results. So what can we 
do"? 

**ln the winter, turn down the thermo- 
stat one degree; in the summer turn up the 
.AC one degree. That's it. So what's the 
big deal? First, by doing this, you'll save 
about $100 a year on your utility bill. Who 
couldn't use that? Second, all that enerev 



\ou aren't using means less carbon 
emissions and less natural resources 
being used up. Crank it down another 
notch or two and save even more. If 
ever\ household in America did this, 
we'd save more than $10 billion on 
energy costs. 

**When you buy coffee, tn, out 
varieties with Fair Trade. Bird Friendly, 
or Rainforest Alliance seals. The farms 
these coffees come fi^om use practices 
that preserve or restore rainforest eco- 
SNstems. One household switching to 
this type of coffee for a year is enough 
to protect 9,200 square feet of rainfor- 
est. 1 think 1 may call the Starbucks 
headquarters! 

It is my hope that this column will 
ser\'e as a tool for me to learn and pass 
along to you simple things we can all 
do to lessen our impact on the environ- 
ment. 

All these small changes can add up 
to making a huge difference to our 
world. 1 hope \ou enjov the Journey as 
much as 1 will. 



DARE: Students can sign pledge to get free t-shirt 



Continued from page 1 

and equality, which has made him a 
popular writer in Hollywood. He has 
\\ritten for such well-known actors as 
Damon Wayans. Saturday Night Live 's 
Darrell Hammond, and George Lopez. 

On Wednesday. Februarx 6. 
openly transgender indie folk'rock artist 
Namoli Brennet will perform at noon in 
Rhoades Lounge as part of the 
Live(®Lunch Series, where the public 
can select from a varied menu available 
for purchase while enjoying the per- 
formance. 

Brennet has traveled across the 



country wooing audiences with her deft 
instrumentation, powerful Kricism. and 
uncanny ability to adeptly communicate 
the complexities of the human experience, 
according to the press release. She has ap- 
peared at the San Diego Indie Music Fest, 
DC Pride. The Bitter End in New York, 
Boston's Club Passim, and hundreds of 
coffee shops, clubs, festivals, colleges, and 
house concerts. 

Artist Kevin "the Nerve" Wenner will 
take part in Dare 2 Care Week and the 
LivefaLunch Series on Thursday. Februan. 
7, at noon in Rhoades Lounge. 

Wenner will challense the viewer to 



think about the importance of diversity 
to the human experience. With a clock 
counting down the minutes, he will 
produce oversized paintings in a crea- 
tive and dramatic performance that 
drew raves from the audience when he 
appeared in the fall semester. 

Geyer expects the performances to 
be "really great." and said that 
"hopefulK students can swing by in 
betvNeen classes and check it out." 

Students who sign the Dare 2 Care 
pledge at the info table in Rhoades 
Center will get a free "Dare to Care" t- 
shirt. 



Volume 40, Issue 1 



Secretary Patti Shontz is active on campus 



Editor 's Note: This ariick- is paft of a 
series that will introduce students and 
facidty to the faculty and staff of Clar- 
ion University - I enango Campus. 

Her role as secretar\ for the BSN 
and Radiologic Technology Sciences 
programs in the School of Nursing and 
Allied Health is just a small part of the 
contributions Patti Shontz has happily 
made during her 10-plus years at Clar- 
ion Uni\'ersity. "\ love working at Ve- 
nango Campus and interacting with the 
students," said Shontz. 

Though she is currentK a staff 
member at Venango campus. Shontz 
has worked on both campuses in man\' 
departments, including Student Ser- 
vices. Venango Adminisn-ation Office. 
Keeling Health Center, and School of 
Nursing and Allied Health. 

Shontz does more than punch a 
clock at Venango Campus; she is a stu- 
dent. A non-traditional, part-time stu- 
dent working toward her associate of 



science degree in business administration 
and associate of science degree in legal 
business studies. Shontz looks forward to 
her Ma\ 2009 graduation date. 

However. graduation will be 
"bittersweet," Shontz said, as she is pas- 
sionate about her role as an active member 
and officer of the Alpha Kappa Delta chap- 
ter of Phi Theta Kappa, an academic soci- 
ety for associate degree-seeking students. 

Since part-time students must accumu- 
late 36 credits, it took Shontz three and 
one-half years to be able to apply for mem- 
bership. Her admission into the societ> 
took time and. therefore, made her proud 
of her accomplishment, "i remember how 
proud I felt when this became a realit)'. 
because I had known about Phi Theta 
Kappa as a staff member and all the com- 
munity service Phi Theta Kappa per- 
forms," said Shontz. 

She is looking forward to Phi Theta 
Kappa's Spring 2008 induction ceremony 
on Saturday, February 16. and invites stu- 
dents to become members, as there is still 



time to apply for the spring semester. 

In addition to her time at Venango 
Campus. Shontz also enjoys spending 
time with her family and friends. She 
has been married to husband Ed. Oil 
City High School wrestling coach, for 
more than 26 years and often serves as 
his "paperwork" assistant. 

Shontz has one daughter, a Clarion 
University alumna with an education 
degree as well as a new employee of 
the Health Science Education Center at 
Clarion University, and one son, cur- 
rently a junior marketing major at Clar- 
ion Universirv. 

A new member of the family and 
"a new love in my life." Shontz said, is 
the family's new yellow Labrador re- 
triever. Chloe. 

She joins their calico cat. Speckles, 
and the family's three beagles. Bo, 
Luke and Duke. 



VOICE: Position of 
editor is open to students 



Continued from page 1 

sor. the Voice will be Ve- 
nango's source of campus 
news produced b>' campus 
students. 

After all. the Venango 
Voice - Your Campus. Your 
Paper, Your Voice - is, you 
guessed it, yours! Students are 
always encouraged to become 
a part of the Voice through 
submissions of news articles, 
feature stoines and letters to 
the editor, in addition to other 
odds and ends. But, that's not 
all. There is always room on 



the staff for students who are 
interested in graphic design 
for ad and page layout, mar- 
keting for ad sales, writing, 
photography, and more. The 
position of editor, a paid work 
study position, is currently 
open. 

To become a pan of the 
Venango Voice team, submit 
an article, or for general in- 
quiries or comments, direct 
email to vvoice@clarion.edu, 
call 814-676-6591. ext. 1289, 
or stop by room 226 Mont- 
gomerj' Hall. Venango Cam- 
pus. 



226 Montgomen. Hall 

Clarion Uni\ersit\ -Venango Campus 

Oil Cit>.' PA 16301 

Phone: 814-676-6591. ext. 1289 Email: vvoiceSiclarion.edu 



.4dviser 

Dr. .loan Huber 
Staff 

Charit) Barger 
Frank Rodaers 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Sma\da 



.Ion Cook 
Lori Secor 



Ahssa McGinnis 



Policies 

Tlie Venango Voice is tlie student-run newspaper of Clarion Universit)'- 
Venanao Campus and tlie surrounding communities. The Voice is published 
most Fridaxs during the academic year. 

The editors accept submissions trom all sources, but resene the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity ; the detennination of 
which is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact infomiation. They must be 
received no later than noon on Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to re- 
main anonyTiious. they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Infomiation boxes (including PSAs) are published based on available space 
and at the discretion of tlie executive board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students \\1io fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
aranted a co-curricular. 



Venango Voice 



PRSSA will host MMAJ-CS Organization Fair 



FEBRl ARY 

Preacher Moss, a veteran comedian, 
lecturer, activist and writer, will present 
End of Racism corned) and lecture lour 
Monday. February 4. at 7 p.m.. in 
Rhoades Auditorium. The lecture is pre- 
sented in conjunction with Dare 2 Care 
Week. February 4-8. 

The Public Relations Student Society 
of America club will host the Mass Media 
Arts and Journalism - Communication 
Studies Organization Fair Monday. Febru- 
ary 4. from noon to 7 p.m.. in the Gem- 
mell Rotunda at Clarion L'niversitN. In 
addition to PRSS.A. the National Commu- 
nication Association student club. The 
Clarion Call. Eyrie Magazine. Bazaar 
Magazine. WCUB. WCUC. and other 
student organizations will be present to 
offer information. 

Tomorrow's Educators Start Today 
speaker series will be held through Mon- 
day, February 25. The program is de- 
signed to enhance the professional devel- 
opment of all education majors. 

Students who attend four of the five 
sessions will receive a certificate of par- 
ticipation for personal portfolios. The first 
session was held in .lanuarv. 

The series will be held in Level A of 
Carlson Library at Clarion University, at 7 
p.m. each night. The schedule of speakers 
is as follows: Administration Panel. Inter- 
views and Resumes. February 4: Dr. Pam- 
ela Gent. Service Learning: Differentiat- 
ing Instruction in the Inclusive Class- 
room. February 1 1 ; First Couple of Years 
Teacher Panel. What it is Like to Begin a 
Career as a Teacher. February 1 8; and Dr. 
Brian Maguire. February 25. 

For more information, email Brittany 



McMaster at s bnmcmasteni/'clarion.edu. 

Openly transgender indie folk/rock artist 
Namoli Brennet will perform Wednesdav. 
February 6. at noon in Rhoades Lounge. 

Brennet has traveled across the country 
wooing audiences with her deft instrumenta- 
tion, powerful lyricism, and uncanny ability 
to adeptly communicate the complexities of 
the human experience. 

The LivefS'Lunch Series presentation is 
sponsored by Clarion University - Venango 
Campus Activities Board and is presented in 
conjunction with Dare 2 Care Week. 

".Afghanistan After the Taliban" will be 
presented Wednesday. February 6. at 6:.i0 
p.m.. in Rhoades Auditorium. The DVD pres- 
entation is part of the Satellite Series spon- 
sored by Phi Theta Kappa. 

.Afghan-American author Tamim .Ansary 
will discuss how the Taliban came to power. 
v\ho they were and are. the .American military 
intervention and its consequences, the con- 
tending players on the current .Afghan scene. 
and more. 

Live discussion facilitated by faculty or 
communitv members will follow the film. 

The French Conversation Group will 
hold its first meeting W ednesdav . February 6. 
at 6 p.m.. at Michelle's Cafe. Main Street. 
Clarion. The meeting is open to anyone inter- 
ested in practicing conversational French, 
regardless of fluency level. 

For more information and to RSVP. 
email Dr. Elisabeth Donato at edo- 
natoi'g^clarion.edu. 

Registered nurse and senior Clarion L'ni- 
versity BSN student Linda Robertson will 
discuss and present slides of her experiences 
in Malawi, known as the wann heart of .Af- 



rica. (Ml Wednesday, February 6. at 7:.iO 
p.m.. in room 250-252 Gemmell. Clarion 
University. 

The event is free and open to the 
public and is co-sponsored b\ the Black 
Student Union as part of National Black 
HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. It is part of 
the series "Women in Conflict Zones: 
War, Peace, and Reconciliation" spon- 
sored by the Presidential Commission on 
the Status of W omen and the Women's 
Studies program. 

Artist Kevin "the Nerve" Wenner 
will take part in Dare 2 Care Week on 
Thursday. February 7, at noon in 
Rhoades Lounge. 

\\'enner"s live action painting 
should not be missed. He will challenge 
the viewer to think about the importance 
of diversity to the human experience. 

The Livefrt Lunch Series presenta- 
tion is sponsored by Clarion University - 
Venango Campus .Activities Board and 
is presented in conjunction with Dare 2 
Care W eek. 

"The Vagina Monologues" produc- 
tion will be held on Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, and Fridav. February 13-15, in Hart 
Chapel, Clarion L'niversity, at 8 p.m. 
each night. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. The 
show will be directed by Emily Parroc- 
cini. 

Tickets are $8 for general admission 
and $5 for students. 

Content of the show is sexuallv ex- 
plicit and 
some lan- 
guage may 
be offen- 
sive. 



Email Us! 

WOICE@CLARION 
.EDU! 



Keeping Us Legal 

riic I'cnango I'oice is published periodicall) b\ llie sliidenls of Clarion IJniversitv of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City. PA. 16301 Articles in 
the lenango I'oice reflect the beliefs and/or tlie research of individual authors Ihev 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsvlvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
atTimiative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-12.^2. 814-.^93-2l(W 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 
VENANGO CAMPUS 



YoLiR Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VeM-flMGo \Poice 



Volume 40, Issue 2 



Friday, February 8, 2008 



Tobeco is literary outlet 



By Jon Cook 

Tobeco? \ What in the 
world is Tobeco? 

Tobeco is "our student 
directed literary and arts 
magazine at Clarion," ex- 
plains faculty advisor 
Juanita Smart. Tobeco wel- 
comes students to take the 
opportunity to show their 
literary or artistic talents to 
the Clarion community 
through its journal and 
open-mic nights. 

Professor Smart has 
been the advisor of Tobeco 
for the past four years, tak- 
ing over for professor 
Philip Terman, the founder 



of Clarion's literary journal. 
Terman started Tobeco af- 
ter moving to Clarion Cam- 
pus from the Venango 
Campus in 2000. He ad- 
vised The Oil City Review 
at Venango Campus for 
seven years. Upon arriving 
at Clarion, he and interested 
students, expanded on Clar- 
ion's existing literary jour- 
nal Dare. They changed its 
name and "focused more 
broadly on the campus and 
surrounding community," 
he recalled. 

Terman also instituted 
the popular open-mic nights 
at Michelle's Cafe in down- 
town Clarion. The open- 



mic nights "happen regu- 
larly throughout the semes- 
ter," stated professor Smart. 
The days and times for 
open-mic nights will be 
announced to all interested 
students. 

Tobeco accepts sub- 
missions of poetry, fiction, 
non-fiction, and artwork 
from all Clarion students. 

Any student interested 
in submitting their writing 
or art to Tobeco, or have 
questions should contact 
student editors Megan 
Willis at s_mlwillis 
@clarion.edu or Ryan 
Waterman at s_rmwater 
man(2)clarion.edu. 



Feb. to feature many events 



FEBRUARY 

The Black Student 
Union will hold an AIDS/ 
HIV Awareness Week Bas- 
ketball and Slam Dunk 
Contest on Friday, February 
8, from 7-10 p.m., at the 
Clarion University Recrea- 
tion Center. 

To participate, sign up 
on the BSU door at 262 
Gemmell or on the Face- 
book group page at http:// 
clarion.facebook.com/grou 
p.php?gid=2250714038. 



Winners will receive prizes 
and music and entertain- 
ment will be provided. 

Co-ed honor fraternity 
Phi Sigma Pi will sponsor 
its Speed Dating event on 
Monday, February 11, at 
8 p.m., in room 246 Gem- 
mell at Clarion University. 
Everyone is welcome. 

The Venango Campus 
fitness center, located on 
the around floor of 



Rhoades, is open Monday 
through Friday, from 8 a.m. 
to 8:30 p.m., and Saturday, 
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The 
center is open to students, 
faculty, and staff at Ve- 
nango for no cost. 

Staff will be available 
on the following days/times 
to help students, faculty, or 
staff get acquainted with 
the equipment: Monday, 
February 11, at 8:30 a.m.; 

See EVENTS on page 4 



Attention 
Students, 
Faculty, and 
Staff: 



Please keep in mind 
Venango Voice's 
deadline for submis- 
sions. The Voice is 
sent to the press everj 
Wednesday. Please 
submit all event in- 
formation or writing 
submissions before 
Tuesday morning, as 
Voice staff must al- 
low timefor editing 
and layout. Your 
cooperation is always 
appreciated. 



Inside this issue: 


SB^ 


tobeco 


1 


News Briefs 


1,4 


Trash Talk 


2 


Odd News 


3 



Venango Voice 



Page 2 Venango voi 

What do you do to preserve water? 

■BH^^^ .JHwi ing others dry and in need. It dropping. According to fi,\ it. A leaky faucet was 



Trash 
Talk 

WITH 
LORI SECOR 

What happens when you 
turn on the faucet? Clean, 
fresh water flows without 
pause giving us the fast, easy 
abiUty to clean our clothes, 
cook, and bathe. What if 
nothing happened when you 
turn the faucet? What if we, 
like one billion people world- 
wide, had no easy access to 
fresh water? What if you had 
to walk a mile or more every 
day to get water to drink and 
cook? We all have had to boil 
water before using it for a 
day or so while the city has 
fixed a problem, but can you 
imagine having to do this for 
the rest of your life? What if 
there was no freshwater 
close by? How would you 
live if water was rationed, 
tanker frucks bringing water 
into your city, and you were 
given an allotment of mere 
gallons to last the entire 
week? This is a reality for 
millions of people, and the 
problem is not going to go 
away. 

How much of a problem 
is there, really? There is 
plenty of water on the planet, 
but in many cases, it is con- 
centrated in some areas, leav- 



ing others dry and in need. It 
falls at the wrong place and 
the wrong time. Some argue 
the fact that there is the 
same amount of water on the 
planet that there always has 
been, but then again there 
are a lot more of us today 
than ever in history, and we 
use a lot more water. Two 
thousand years ago, there 
were about 250 million peo- 
ple on the planet. By 2020, 
there will be 400 million 
people along the North Afri- 
can shores and in the Middle 
East alone. It is expected 
that water will, in some 
places, cost as much per 
barrel as oil within a genera- 
tion. 

There is some plainly 
visible evidence of a loom- 
ing global water crisis. The 
level of the Dead Sea has 
dropped more than 32 feet in 
the 20th century. The River 
Jordan is reduced to almost 
nothing due to over- 
pumping to support people 
there. Lake Chad, one of the 
sources for the Nile, is 
shrinking at the alarming 
rate of about 300 feet per 
year. In the middle of the 
20th century, it covered 
9,900 square miles; by the 
beginning of the 21st cen- 
tury, it had shrunk to 580 
square miles. Northern 
China's water tables are 
dropping 3 feet per year, the 
blame being placed on irri- 
gation and its wasteful run- 
off Beijing can supply itself 
only by diverting water from 
farms. Is the United States 
exempt? Will the crisis 
reach here as well? I believe 
the more appropriate ques- 
tion is, how long until the 
crisis reaches here? The 
levels of our lakes are also 



dropping. According to 
the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers, as of Decem- 
ber 2007, each of the 
Great Lakes and Lake St. 
Clair were all five to 
twenty-seven inches be- 
low normal levels. 

We all need to start 
conserving water, lest we 
end up in a situation like 
millions of others: walk- 
ing miles a day to bring 
water back to our homes, 
using the same few buck- 
ets of water to bathe every 
member of a family, and 
fighting wars over who 
has control over which 
lake and river. Vm not 
suggesting anything too 
drastic; let's see what 
small changes could do: 

• Every two minutes 
we spend in the shower, 
we use as much water as a 
person in Africa uses the 
entire day for everything: 
cooking, bathing, and 
drinking. If we shave 
those two minutes from 
our daily shower, it would 
conserve more than 10 
gallons. If everyone in the 
country saved just one 
gallon from their shower, 
it would save two times 
the amount of water 
drawn from the Great 
Lakes every day. 

• When using the 
dishwasher, run it only 
when it is completely full, 
and don't pre-rinse dishes. 
(The newer models don't 
require it.) This will save 
20 gallons per dish load — 
a whopping 7,300 gallons 
per year! That's as much 
water as the average per- 
son drinks in a lifetime! 

• If you have a drip- 
ping faucet, go ahead and 



fix it. A leaky faucet wastes 
as much as 2,700 gallons per 
year. You also can check the 
toilet tank for leaks by put- 
ting food coloring into the 
tank. If it is leaking, color 
will appear in the bowl 
within 30 minutes. Replac- 
ing bent or worn out parts is 
easy and inexpensive. (Flush 
as soon as the test is done so 
you don't stain the bowl.) 

• Turn off the water 
while you brush your teeth 
and save up to 5 gallons a 
day. Throughout the U.S., 
this could add up to 1.5 bil- 
lion — gallons-more than 
New York City uses in a 
day. Brush while you wait 
for the water to heat up for 
your shave, and save up to 
1,825 gallons per year. 
That's enough to fill the tub 
more than 35 times. 

So what's the bottom 
line? As with most every- 
thing else, we waste too 
much water. For example, 
how important is it that our 
grass is lush and green in the 
grand scheme of things? We 
turn on our sprinkler sys- 
tems and hoses, loving our 
lawns at the rate of almost 8 
billion gallons per day. 
Forty percent of the water 
we use in the summer is for 
lawn care. 

Is it responsible for us 
to use up so much of a pre- 
cious resource when so 
many people worldwide are 
lacking? Is it responsible for 
us to waste so much water 
when we could just as easily 
be in the same situation? 
That is exactly what could 
happen if we don't change 
how we use water. 

Remember: small 

changes can bring big re- 
sults. 



Volume 40, Issue 2 



Page 3 



Molasses killed many in Boston 



As with all things in lite, 
time makes us seem to forget 
many things. Be it people, 
emotions, or memories, it is 
no different with history. 

This is the story of one 
of the greatest disasters to hit 
Boston, Massachusetts. On 
January 15, 1919 at approxi- 
mately 12:40 p.m., what 
came to be known as "The 
Great Molasses Flood," 
which killed 21 people and 
injured 150 more, occurred. 

Prohibition was about to 
come into law and Purity 
Distilling was trying to rush 
through one last batch of al- 
cohol before it happened. On 
January 14, they loaded a 
storage tanker that was 50 
feet high and 240 feet around, 
holding 2.3 million gallons, 
or 14,000 tons, of thick, 
sticky molasses. It was a dis- 
aster just waiting to happen. 

Along with the unsea- 
sonably warm weather for 



January (46 degrees) and the 
fresh warm molasses being 
mixed with the cold molasses 
already in the tank, it started 
the process of fermentation, 
which caused gasses to build 
pressure inside of the tank. 

Suddenly, the residents 
of the North End heard a low 
rumble and felt the ground 
shake beneath their feet. A 
wall of molasses said to be 
between 30-50 feet high and 
moving at speeds of up to 50 
mph came rushing down the 
street, destroying everything 
in its path. Neither man nor 
beast could out-run the de- 
struction that was coming 
upon them. 

Men, women, children 
and even horses were sucked 
beneath the gooey thick 
sludge that was estimated to 
reach depths of 8-15 feet. As 
bystanders tried in vain to 
scramble up stairs or to reach 
higher ground for safety, the 



slippery death pulled them 
into it and carried them away 
never to be heard from again. 

The massive wave de- 
stroyed entire buildings, 
many of which were ripped 
completely from their foun- 
dations. The sheer height and 
weight of the wave toppled 
cars, wagons and even 
crushed railroad cars, as if 
they were children's toys. 

It took six months plus 
for the city of Boston to clean 
up after the devastation and it 
is rumored that even today, 
on a hot summer day, you 
can smell the sweet scent of 
molasses as you walk through 
the city's North End. 

If you get a chance to 
visit Boston, check out their 
exhibit in the Boston Library 
to see photos and more de- 
tailed articles on disaster. Or, 
simply go to any search en- 
gine and type in "Great 
Molasses Flood." 





Musician Javier Mendoza performed in Rhoades Center at 
Venango Campus on Monday, February 4. 



Vgnango Voicg 

226 Montgomery Hall 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

Oil City, PA 16301 

Phone: 814-676-6591, ext. 1289 Email: vvoicefadarion.edu 



Adviser 

Dr. Joan Huber 

Staff 

Charity Barger 
Frank Rodgers 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Smayda 



Jon Cook 
Lori Secor 



Alyssa McGinnis 



Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-nm newspaper of Clarion University-Venango Campus 
and the surrounding communities- The Voice is pubh'shed most Fridays during the academic year. 

The editors accept submissions irom all sources, but reserve the right to edit for hbel, gram- 
mar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the 
editor-m-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later 
than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a 
separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available space and at the 
discretion of the executive board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They 
should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their re- 
sponsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



PA(il 4 



Venango Voice 



Events: Valentine Dinner Dance to be held 



Continued from page 1 

Tuesday, Feb. 12, at 4;30 p.m.; 
Wednesday, Feb. 13, at 4:30 
p.m.; and Thursday, Feb. 14, at 
4:30 p.m. 

Upcoming events at Clar- 
ion University Main include the 
following: 

On Monday, Feb. 1 1 and 
Tuesday, Feb. 12, Candy Gram 
Sales will be held in the Gem- 
mell Rotunda. Candy Grams 
will be delivered on Thursday, 
Feb. 14. 

Students can '"buy" a TKE 
brother on Wednesday, Feb. 13. 
The event will take place in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 
at 7 p.m. 

For more inlormation, e- 
mail David Walsh at 
s_djwalsh@gm.clarion.edu. 

The next roundtable meet- 
ings for all RSO presidents and 
advisors will be Monday, Feb. 
1 1 , and Thursday, Feb. 1 4, from 
5-6 p.m., in 246 Gemmell at 
Clarion University. 

Groups representatives are 
only need at the sessions. The 
Student Senate funding process 
will be a major topic and pack- 
ets will be distributed. 

A Spring 2008 Campusfest 
meeting will be held on Tues- 
day, Feb. 12, at 9:15 p.m., for 
those interested in volunteering. 
General information will be 
distributed. 

For more information, e- 
mail Mary Caitlin Mitton at 
s mcmitton@clarion.edu. 

The MOM Group will 



reconvene on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 
at 1 1:30 a.m., in 105 Frame Hall. 
Meetings will be held every 
Tuesday to follow at 1 1 a.m. 

Any mom in any stage of 
MOMhood is welcome to join. 

"The Vagina Monologues" 
production will be held on 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Fri- 
day, Feb. 13-15, in Hart Chapel, 
Clarion University, at 8 p.m. 
each night. Doors open at 7:30 
p.m. The show will be directed 
by Emily Parroccini. 

There will be an open dress 
rehearsal Wednesday, Feb. 13, 
with admittance by donation. 
Tickets are available at the Gem- 
mell Student Information Desk 
and the Women's Studies Center 
(207 Harvey Hall) at Clarion 
University. Tickets are $8 for 
general admission and $5 for 
students. 

All proceeds benefit PAS- 
SAGES, SAFE, and the Katrina 
Fund. Content of the show is 
sexually explicit and some lan- 
guage may be offensive. Parental 
discretion is advised. 

For more information or to 
reserve tickets, call 814-393- 
2720 or e-mail kshirey 
@clarion.edu. 

The Heart of the Campus 
Valentine's Day Dinner and 
Dance will be held Friday, Feb. 
15, at 6 p.m., at the Quality Inn, 
Franklin. A cash bar will be 
available. 

Deejay Phil Close will pro- 
vide entertainment. Semi-formal 
attire is suggested. 

Tickets are on sale now 
through Wednesday, Feb. 13, in 



the book store in Rhoades Cen- 
ter. A student/guest ticket is $10 
each, and a faculty or staff/guest 
ticket is $15 each. 

For more information, e- 
mail s_tlkarasins@clarion.edu. 

College-Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) testing will take 
place Friday, Feb. 15, and Fri- 
day, April 18, at Clarion Univer- 
sity — Venango Campus. 

Students must complete the 
registration and admission form 
and return it to Venango Campus 
no later than one week prior to 
the test date. 

Payment for the non- 
refundable service charge ($20 
payable to Clarion University) 
must be included to secure a seat 
on the requested test date. Pay- 
ment for the test ($60 payable to 
College-Level Examination Pro- 
gram or CLEP) may also be in- 
cluded, but will be accepted on 
test day. As of July 1, payment to 
CLEP will increase to $65. 

The College-Level Exami- 
nation Program offers 34 exams 
that allow people who have ac- 
quired knowledge outside the 
usual educational settings to 
show they have learned college- 
level material so they can bypass 
certain college courses. 

For more information about 
CLEP testing, visit www. college 
board.com/clep or call Flope 
Lineman at 814-676-6591, ext. 
1273. 

Applications are now avail- 
able for the Phi Eta Sigma Honor 
Society Founders Fund Scholar- 
ship. Winners will be awarded 
scholarships from $1,000 up to 



$10,000. The local deadline for 
the scholarship application is 
Wednesday, Feb. 20. 

Applications can be picked 
up at 148 Egbert Hall at Clarion 
LIniversity. The Clarion chapter 
is permitted to enter one under- 
graduate application and an 
unlimited number of graduate 
applications. Applicants must 
be members of Phi Eta Sigma. 

Criteria used for selection 
includes high scholastic record 
with a minimum 3.5 cumulative 
GPA; participation in local Phi 
Eta Sigma chapter activities; 
campus-wide academic recog- 
nition, awards, and leadership 
roles; evidence of creative abil- 
ity; participation in on- and off- 
campus service and leadership 
groups; potential for success in 
chosen field; work experience; 
and letters of recommendation, 
not to exceed three. For more 
information, call Dr. Fricko at 
814-393-2255. 

Venango Campus Activi- 
ties Board will sponsor an Open 
Mic Night on Friday, Feb. 22, 
at 7 p.m., in Rhoades Lounge. 
The event is part of the Coffee 
House Series and is free and 
open to the public. 

Talented area performers 
are invited to step into the 
limelight. Acoustic perform- 
ances and poetry readings 
are encouraged. 

For more information 
regarding set length, per- 
formance pieces, and techni- 
cal specifications, call Emily 
Aubele at 814-676-6591, 
ext. 1269. 



Email the Venango Voice! vvoicE(fl)CLARioN.EDu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301 Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
atTimiative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Can-ier Admmistration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VeM-flMGo \Poice 



Volume 40, Issue 3 



Friday, February 15, 2008 



Presidents' Day holds much history 



B\ The Associated Press 

Today is Monday. Feb- 
ruary 18, the 49th day of 
2008. There are 317 days 
left in the year. This is 
Presidents' Day. 

Today's Highlight in 
History: On ¥eb^ 1 8? 1 885. 
Mark Twain's "Adventures 
of Huckleberry Finn" was 
published in the U.S. for 
the first time. 

On this date: In 1546, 
Martin Luther, leader of the 
Protestant Reformation in 
Germany, died in Eisleben. 
In 1564, artist Michelan- 
gelo died in Rome. In 1861, 
Jefferson Davis was sworn 
in as the provisional presi- 
dent of the Confederate 
States of America in Mont- 
gomery, Ala. 

In 1930, photographic 
evidence of Pluto (now 
designated a "dwarf 



planet") was discovered by 
Clyde W. Tombaugh at 
Lowell Observatory in 
Flagstaff, Ariz. In 1960, the 
eighth Winter Olympic 
Games were formally 
opened in Squaw Valley, 
Calif., by Vice President 
Nixon. In 1967, American 
theoretical physicist J. 
Robert Oppenheimer died 
in Princeton, N.J., at age 
62. In 1970, the "Chicago 
Seven" defendants were 
found innocent of conspir- 
ing to incite riots at the 
1968 Democratic national 
convention; five were con- 
victed of violating the Anti- 
Riot Act of 1968. (Those 
convictions were later re- 
versed). In 1977, the space 
shuttle Enterprise, sitting 
atop a Boeing 747, went on 
its maiden "flight" above 
the Mojave Desert. In 1988, 
Anthony M. Kennedy was 



sworn in as an associate 
justice of the U.S. Supreme 
Court. 

In 2001, auto racing 
star Dale Earnhardt Sr. died 
fi-om injuries suffered in a 
crash at the Daytona 500; 
he was 49. 

Ten years ago: Presi- 
dent Clinton's foreign pol- 
icy team encountered jeers 
during a town meeting at 
The Ohio State University 
while trying to defend the 
administration's threat to 
bomb Iraq into compliance 
with U.N. weapons edicts. 
Sportscaster Harry Caray 
died in Rancho Mirage, 
Calif, at age 83. 

Five years ago: Declar- 
ing that America's security 
should not be dictated by 
protesters, President Bush 
said he would not be 

See PRESIDENT page 3 



Valentine's Day event to be held 



FEBRUARY 

The Heart of the Cam- 
pus Valentine's Day Dinner 
and Dance will be held Fri- 
day. Februar)' 15. at 6 p.m., 
at the Qualit)' Inn, Franklin. 
A cash bar will be avail- 
able. 

Deejay Phil Close will 
provide entertainment. 



Semi-formal attire is sug- 
gested. 

Tickets are on sale now 
in the book store in 
Rhoades Center at Venango 
Campus. A student/guest 
ticket is $10 each, and a 
faculty or staffguest ticket 
is $15 each. 

For more information. 



email s_tlkarasins 

@,clarion.edu. 

Venango Campus Ac- 
tivities Board will sponsor 
an Open Mic Night on Fri- 
day, February 22, at 7 p.m., 
in Rhoades Lounge. The 

See EVENTS page 3 



Attention 
Students, 
Faculty, and 

STAFF: 

• Don 't miss Open Mic 
Night at Venango 
Campus on Friday, 
February 22, at 7 
p.m., in Rhoades 
Lounge. The event is 
part of the Coffee 
House Series and is 
free and open to the 
public. Talented area 
performers are in- 
vited to attend, and 
acoustic performances 
and poetry readings 
are encouraged. 



Inside this issue: 



Presidents' i 
Day 



News Briefs 1/3, 

4 



Trash Talk 2 



Library News 3 



P.\(,r 2 



Venango \'oice 



Beauty may cost more than you think 




Trash 
Talk 

WITH 
LORI SECOR 

We are a nation fixated on 
beauty. We look for the perfect 
shade of eye shadow and lip- 
stick, search for the best hair 
care product to tame the frizz 
and hold the style, and use a 
plethora of products to get 
clean and smell great. We are 
so fixated, in fact, that we 
spend more on health and 
beauty products per year than 
the United States government 
spends on education — seven 
times more. What are we buy- 
ing? 

Take a walk through the 
health and beauty department 
of a major retailer. An ever- 
growing list, new brands and 
varieties emerge almost daily, 
and we very enthusiastically 
take it home to try it. How 
often do we pause to think 
about what we are using — 
what is INSIDE those tubes, 
bottles, and jars? 

Something we should all 
be aware of is this: the FDA 
does not review new cosmetics 
before they hit the shelves (and 
our faces), and cannot order 
recalls of hazardous cosmetics. 



The industry' is largely self- 
regulated: manufacturers decide 
what ingredients to use and if 
they should pull a product off 
the shelves. Our bodies absorb a 
significant amount of what is 
applied to the skin, and some of 
it is ingested directly (think 
lipstick). Cosmetics and skin 
care products contain some par- 
ticularly nasty chemicals and 
not in trace amounts: these 
chemicals are base ingredients, 
as flour is for bread. The aver- 
age person uses nine products 
every day exposing themselves 
to 126 chemicals. Most women 
use many more than the average 
when we add in the cosmetics. 

Phthalates are a family of 
plasticizer chemicals used in 
cosmetics and personal care 
products. They can be found in 
nail polish to help prevent chip- 
ping, in hairspray to avoid the 
'crunchy' look of the 80s, in 
deodorants, shampoos, lotions, 
hair gels, and in fragrances. If 
you peek at the labels on just 
about anything in your bath- 
room cupboard, you'll see 
'fragrance' on the label. 
Chances are, there are phthalates 
in there. Otherwise, some com- 
mon phthalates used in personal 
care products are labeled as 
BzBP, DBP. DEP, and DEHP. 
So what is the problem with 
phthalates? They are endocrine 
disruptor chemicals. They can 
impair reproductive develop- 
ment, particularly in males. 
Phthalates can cause asthma, 
alter liver and kidney function, 
damage the heart and lungs, and 
affect blood clotting. It is a high 
price to pay in the name of 
pretty nails, in my opinion. 

Curious, I headed into the 
bathroom and arabbed a bottle 



of my favorite lotion; 
Aveeno Active Naturals 
Intense Relief Hand Cream. 
The main ingredient is dime- 
thicone. which is derived 
from silicone. Silicone is bad 
news, as thousands of 
women who had to have 
implants removed could tell 
you. Silicone is a known 
tumor promoter and accumu- 
lates in the liver and lymph 
nodes. It is also not biode- 
gradable. 1 found this very 
surprising because of the 
name: Active Naturals. 
Quoted directly from the 
package. Active Naturals are 
"ingredients derived from 
nature". I don't know about 
you, but I have never been 
on a walk and said, "Look, 
distear>ldimonium chloride 
in its natural habitat!" 

A bit disturbed, 1 next 
went for my deodorant. 
.Among the many ingredients 
was propylene glycol, a pe- 
troleum derivative. The EPA 
considers PG so toxic that it 
requires workers to wear 
protective gloves, clothing 
and goggles. Because PG 
penetrates the skin so 
quickly, the EPA warns 
against skin contact to pre- 
vent consequences such as 
brain, liver, and kidney ab- 
normalities. There is no 
warning label on m\ deodor- 
ant, where the concentration 
is greater than in most indus- 
trial applications. Scary! 

Inform yourself about 
the chemicals in the products 
you use by typing the name 
into Google. You can also 
find a list of common haz- 
ardous chemicals found in 
cosmetics at this Web site: 



h 1 1 p : ' / w w w . h e a 1 1 h - 
report.co.uk/ingredients- 
d i r e c t o r y . h t m # t o X i c % 
20chemicals. 

There are 1 1 .000 
chemicals used in personal 
and skin care products. Less 
than 1 1 percent have been 
tested for safe use. One third 
of the chemicals used con- 
tain at least one known or 
suspected carcinogen. Even 
the products that claim 
themselves as pure or natural 
are not necessarily that. A 
product only has to contain 
one percent of natural ingre- 
dients to slap it on their la- 
bel. If a product is toxic to 
the user, it is toxic to the 
maker and toxic to the waste 
stream. If we cut down our 
usage of toxic products, we 
do evervone a favor. 

Our best bet is to 
choose products that have 
ingredients you can recog- 
nize and pronounce. Read 
the labels. Look for ALL 
natural, nontoxic, etc. If the 
selection at your regular 
store seems a bit thin, as 
mine does, check one of the 
local naturals store, or here 
are a few sites that can get 
you started: www. safecos- 
metics.org, wvnv.best organ- 
icsforhealth.com, and 

wwvv.pristineplanet.com. 

Remember, small 

changes can bring big re- 
sults! 

Reference material for 
this article Mas found at: 
The Green Book, w-ww. 
toxicfreelegacy.org. prwat 
ch.org, www.ewg.org, 

www.bodiorganic.com, and 
the aforementioned sites in 
text. 



E-mail the \PfZnQngO Pb/(3j^ at vvoice@clarion.edu 



Volume 40, Issue 3 



Page 3 



PRESIDENT: Yoko Ono turns 75 on this day 



Continued from page 1 

swayed from compelling Iraqi Presi- 
dent Saddam Hussein to disarm. An 
arson attack on two South Korean 
subway trains in tlie city of Daegu 
claimed 198 lives. (The arsonist was 
sentenced to life in prison.) Country 
singer Johnny PayCheck died in Nash- 
ville, Tenn.. at age 64. 

One year ago: A pair of bombs on 
a train headed from India to Pakistan 
killed 68 people. Twin car bombs 
blew up in a mostly Shiite area of 
Baghdad, killed at least 62 people. A 
military helicopter crashed in south- 



eastern Afghanistan, killing eight U.S. 
service members; 14 survived with inju- 
ries. Kevin Harvick nosed out Mark 
Martin in a frantic wreck-filled finish to 
win the Daytona 500. The West routed 
the East, 153-132 in the NBA All-Star 
game. 

Today's Birthdays: Former Cosmo- 
politan editor Helen Gurley Brown is 86. 
Actor George Kennedy is 83. Sen. John 
Warner, R-Va., is 81. Author Toni Mor- 
rison is 77. Movie director Milos For- 
man is 76. Singer Yoko Ono is 75. 
Singer/songwriter Bobby Hart is 69. 
Singer Irma Thomas is 67. Singer Her- 
man Santiago (Frankie Lymon and the 



Teenagers) is 67. Singer Dennis DeY- 
oung is 61. Actress Sinead Cusack is 
60. Producer-director-writer John 
Hughes is 58. Actress Cybill Shepherd 
is 58. Singer Juice Newton is 56. 
Singer Randy Crawford is 56. Rock 
musician Robbie Bachman is 55. Rock 
musician Larr> Rust (Iron Butterfly) is 
55. Actor John Travolta is 54. Game 
show host Vanna White is 51. Actress 
Greta Scacchi is 48. Actor Matt Dillon 
is 44. Rapper Dr. Dre is 43. Actress 
Molly Ringwald is 40. Actress Sarah 
Brown is 33. Singer-musician Sean 
Watkins (Nickel Creek) is 3 1. 
Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. 



Suhr Libraiy's hours will change during Winter Holiday and Spring Vacation 

Winter Holiday hours will be in effect March 8-16. The library will be open Monday through Friday, 
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and closed on the weekend. 

Spring Vacation hours will be in effect March 20-25. The librarj' will be open Thursday and Friday, 
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday and Tuesday, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and closed on the weekend. 

Regular hours, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., will be in effect on Monday, March 17, through Wednesday, March 19. 



EVENTS: Opert Mic 



Continued from pg. 1 

event is part of the Coffee 
House Series and is free 
and open to the public. 

Talented area per- 
formers are invited to step 
into the limelight. Acous- 
tic performances and po- 
etry readings are encour- 
aged. 

For more information 
regarding set length, per- 
formance pieces, and 
technical specifications, 
call Emily Aubele at 814- 
676-6591. ext. 1269. 

The Clarion Univer- 
sity-Venango Campus 
Independent Film Series 
is free and open to the 



public. The series features 
films from independent 
filmmakers from China, the 
United States, Iran, Japan, 
the United Kingdom, Co- 
lombia, and India. All films 
will be shown on Saturdays 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Robert 
W. Rhoades Center Audi- 
torium. 

Films scheduled for 
the Spring 2008 semester 
include "Half Nelson", 
February 16; "Away From 
Her", February 23; "No 
Country for Old Men", 
March 1 ; "Saawariya", 
March 29; "Atonement", 
April 5; "Juno", April 12; 
"Waterhorse", April 19; 

See EVENTS page 4 



Vjznango Voieg 

226 Montgomers Hall 

Clarion Universitj'-Venango Campus 

Oil Cit}'. PA 16301 

Phone: 814-676-6591. ext. 1289 Email: vvoicea'clarion.edu 



Adviser 

Dr. Joan Huber 
Staff 

Jon Cook 
Frank Rodgers 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Sma\'da 

Christine Rodgers 
Lori Secor 



Policies 



The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion Universit)'- 
Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The Voice is published 
most Fridays during the academic year. 

The editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be 
received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain 
anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available 
space and at the discretion of the executive board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfdl their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
granted a co-curricular. 



P\(;i 4 



\'i:\A\'C,<) \'< >\( Y 



EVENTS: Venango will offer open house event 



Continued from 



page 



and "Maria Full of Grace", 
April 26. 

For more information 
about the film series, call 
Emily Aubele at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

Clarion University- 
Venango Campus will host 
an open house for students 
interested in the Electric 
Utility Technology concen- 
tration of the Associate of 
Applied Science in Indus- 
trial Technology Degree, 
which is offered through a 
partnership between 

FirstEnergy Corporation, 
the parent company of 
Penelec, and Clarion Uni- 
versity. The open house 
will be held on Saturday, 
February 23, at 1 p.m., in 
the Robert W. Rhoades 
Center. The program is fi"ee 
and open to all interested 
persons. Tours of the cam- 
pus will be available at 
noon. Additional parking 
will be available at the 
Penelec parking lot at 1600 
West First Street, across 
from the campus. Students 
do not need to pre-register. 

The two-year program 
is designed to educate fu- 
ture electric utility profes- 



sionals with an emphasis on 
overhead line work. FirstEn- 
ergy also provides qualified 
students enrolled in the pro- 
gram free tuition, including 
college fees, books, and pro- 
tective clothing. 

The open house program 
will be presented by represen- 
tatives of FirstEnergy Corpo- 
ration's Power Systems Insti- 
tute (PSI) and Professor Bill 
Hallock, chair of the univer- 
sity's Department of Applied 
Technology. 

To learn more about the 
Applied Technology pro- 
grams, contact Professor Hal- 
Fock at 814-676-6591, ext. 
1307. or whal- 

lockfS'clarion.edu. 

"The Vagina Mono- 
logues" production will be 
held on Friday, February 15, in 
Hart Chapel, Clarion Univer- 
sity, at 8 p.m. Doors open at 
7:30 p.m. The show will be 
directed by Emily Parroccini. 

Tickets are available at 
the Gemmell Student Infomia- 
tion Desk and the Women's 
Studies Center (207 Harvey 
Hall) at Clarion University. 
Tickets are $8 for general ad- 
mission and $5 for students. 

All proceeds benefit PAS- 
SAGES, SAFE, and the 
Katrina Fund. Content of the 



show is sexually explicit and 
some language may be offen- 
sive. Parental discretion is 
advised. 

For more information or 
to reserve tickets, call 814- 
393-2720 or email 

kshirey(®clarion.edu. 

The Department of Pub- 
lic Safety will issue approxi- 
mately 25 more resident 
parking permits. Six will be 
for Lot P and the others are 
for Lot 3. Only upperclass- 
men are eligible for Lot P. 
Those with freshman (Lot 3) 
permits may exchange them 
for Lot P until the permits run 
out. 

Pemiits will be sold on a 
first come first served basis. 
Permits may be purchased at 
Public Safety Monday 
through Friday, from 8 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. Permits will be 
billed to student accounts. 
Students will need the vehi- 
cle's license plate number 
and student ID number to 
complete the application. 

Governor Rendell's Pol- 
icy Office is seeking up to 
five students with an interest 
in public service and govern- 
ment for 2008 summer in- 
ternships. 

Interested students 



should e-mail their resume 
along with a cover letter to 
Patricia Grim at 

pgrimto'state.pa.us. The 

student should indicate the 
policy area for which the\ 
would like to be considered. 
Policy areas include: educa- 
tion; health care reform; 
economic development and 
workforce; criminal justice; 
and environmental issues, 
land use, and infrastructure. 
For more information, 
call Patricia Grim at 717- 
772-9068. 

Applications are now 
available for the Phi Eta 
Sigma Honor Society Foun- 
ders Fund Scholarship. Win- 
ners will be awarded schol- 
arships from $1,000 up to 
$10,000. The local deadline 
for the scholarship applica- 
tion is Wednesday, February 
20. 

Applications can be 
picked up at 148 Egbert Hall 
at Clarion University. The 
Clarion University chapter 
is permitted to enter one 
undergraduate application 
and an unlimited amount of 
graduate applications. Ap- 
plicants must be members of 
Phi Eta Sigma. For more 
information, call 393-2255. 



E-MAIL THE VeNflNSO VOlCe! VVOICE@CLARION.EDU 



Keeping Us Legal 

The I'enango I'oice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street. Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles 
in the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors 
They are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or .staff of 
Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion University is committed to equal oppor- 
tunity and affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, 
activities, and employment. Direct equal opportunits inquiries to Assistant to the 
President for Social Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion, PA. 
16214-1232.814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

IPeNfjNGo \Poice 



Volume 40, Issue 4 



Friday, February 22, 2008 



Venango to host radiologic program 



Clarion University- 
Venango Campus will offer 
a program about its Bache- 
lor of Science in Radiologic 
Sciences program at 6 p.m. 
on Thursday, February 28, 
in the Robert W. Rhoades 
Center auditorium. 

Prospective students 
and their families will have 
an opportunity to learn 
about the program and to 
meet with Professor Renee 
Bloom, chair of the Depart- 
ment of Allied Health and 
advisor to radiologic sci- 
ences majors, and Debra 
Altman, clinical coordina- 
tor of the Radiologic Tech- 
nology Program at UPMC 
Northwest, which serves as 
one of the university's 
clinical education partners 



in the program. Also avail- 
able to provide student in- 
formation will be Dr. David 
Lott, coordinator of the 
Venango Campus Honors 
Program; Emily Aubele, 
director of Student Affairs; 
LaTrobe Bamitz, coordina- 
tor of Admissions and Fi- 
nancial Aid; and represen- 
tatives of Venango Campus 
Student Senate and clubs. 

Radiologic technolo- 
gists assist with the diagno- 
sis and treatment of illness 
and disease by performing 
medical imaging studies 
such as x-rays and other 
radiographic procedures. 
Qualified experienced radi- 
ographers are currently in 
very high demand. Job op- 
portunities for radiologic 



technologists exist in hospi- 
tals, physicians' offices, 
clinics, imaging centers, 
and with mobile imaging 
companies. 

The field of radiologic 
technology affords exciting 
opportunities for career 
diversity in areas such as 
magnetic resonance imag- 
ing, radiation therapy, nu- 
clear medicine, ultrasono- 
graphy, computed tomogra- 
phy, mammography, ad- 
ministration, education, and 
medical sales. 

The program is free 
and open to the public. To 
register or for more infor- 
mation, contact the office 
of Admissions and Finan- 
cial Aid at 676-6591, exten- 
sion 12 11. 



Open Mic Night to be held today 



FEBRUARY 

Venango Campus Ac- 
tivities Board will sponsor 
an Open Mic Night on Fri- 
day, February 22, at 7 p.m., 
in Rhoades Lounge. The 
event is part of the Coffee 
House Series and is free 
and open to the public. 

Talented area perform- 
ers are invited to step into 
the limelight. Acoustic per- 
formances and poetry read- 



ings are encouraged. 

For more information 
regarding set length, per- 
formance pieces, and tech- 
nical specifications, call 
Emily Aubele at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

The Clarion University 
-Venango Campus Inde- 
pendent Film Series is free 
and open to the public. The 
series features films from 



independent filmmakers 
from China, the United 
States, Iran, Japan, the 
United Kingdom, Colom- 
bia, and India. All films 
will be shown on Saturdays 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Robert 
W. Rhoades Center Audito- 
rium. 

Films scheduled for the 
Spring 2008 semester in- 

See EVENTS page 3 



Attention 
Students, 
Faculty, and 
Staff: 

• "Away From Her" will 
be thejeaturedjilm 
shown on Saturday, 
February 23, at 7:30 
p.m., in Rhoades Cen- 
ter. The viewing is 
open to the public and 
is part of the Independ- 
ent Film Series at 
Clarion University— 
Venango Campus. For 
more iriformation about 
the Independent Film 
Series, call Director of 
Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1270. 



Inside this issue: 


Radiologic 
Program 


1 


Events 


1,3, 
4 


Trash Talk 


2 


Experience 
Expo 


3 



Pagi; 2 



Venango Voice 



Nanotechnology in cosmetics can be hazardous 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 

Last week, we explored 
the nasty chemicals going 
into all the products we use 
every day for the sake of 
beauty. What kind of impact 
do these chemicals have on 
the environment? For starters, 
most beauty products are 
petroleum based, like mineral 
oil and propylene glycol, 
which means they are using 
up fossil fuels that don't ex- 
actly process cleanly. Choos- 
ing natural products cut back 
on the use of these nonrenew- 
able resources and cut down 
your exposure to dangerous 
chemicals. 

The use of nanotechnol- 
ogy in cosmetics and per- 
sonal care products has the 
potential to become a serious 



health and environmental 
problem. 

This is a new technology 
rapidly being applied to many 
of our products, increasing 
their penetration into our 
skin. There are many un- 
knowns as to the toxicity of 
nanoparticles, but studies 
have raised numerous red 
flags. 

Nanoparticles of titanium 
dioxide and zinc oxide used 
in large numbers of cosmet- 
ics, sunscreens and personal 
care products are photoactive, 
producing fi"ee radicals and 
causing DMA damage to hu- 
man skin cells when exposed 
to UV light. 

Carbon fullerenes, an- 
other tA'pe of nanoparticle 
used in cosmetics, have been 
found to cause brain damage 
in fish, kill water fleas and 
bacteria, and are toxic to hu- 
man liver cells at low levels. 
They also bind to sediments, 
soil, and contaminants, show- 
ing potential for serious build 
up issues. 

That said, let's talk trash. 
A lot of the cost for us and 
the environment is packag- 
ing. Each of us throws away 
an average of 60 pounds of 
plastic packaging each year. 
Then, there are the hygiene 
products. We're talking two 



billion disposable razors and 
50 million pounds of 
toothbrushes thrown away 
ever> year. 

Most shampoo bottles 
are made from virgin plastic. 
I'm not saying be stinky, 
stop shaving, and don't 
brush your teeth anymore 
(definitely not!). Just be 
mindful when making pur- 
chases. 

Use a good razor with 
refillable blades. If one per- 
son replaced disposables 
with refills, it would save 
enough energy to brew five 
pots of coffee. That will add 
up fast! 

• Consider using a 2-in-l 
rather than separate sham- 
poos and conditioners. 
You'll save money and 
packaging, and time and 
water in the shower. If one 
in seven families did this, 
the amount of plastic saved 
per year would fill a football 
field 27 stories high. 

• If your normal lotion has 
a hand pump, save extra 
pumps from ending up in a 
landfill. Buy refills with a 
flip top and reuse your 
empt>' bottle. If 10 percent 
of U.S. households made a 
one-time purchase of a lo- 
tion bottle without an at- 
tached pump, the plastic 



saved would be an esti- 
mated 250,000 pounds- 
enough lotion pumps to 
fill nearly 1.200 tanning 
booths from floor to ceil- 
ing. 

• Choose products pack- 
aged with post-consumer 
recycled material. This 
helps reduce waste and 
reuse plastics. It takes less 
energ\ to make a bottle 
from recycled plastic than 
it does to make one out of 
virgin plastic. If you buy 
one 13 ounce shampoo 
bottle that contains 25 
percent post-consumer 
materials. the energy 
saved would be enough to 
blow-dn, \our hair for ten 
minutes. If one in ten 
households did it. the en- 
ergy conserved could 
wind power 160 homes 
for year! 

When shopping, 

make mindful purchases. 
Recycling is important, 
but to close the circle, we 
also need to buy products 
made from recycled mate- 
rials. Remember, small 
changes can bring big 
results! 

Reference material 
for this article was found 
at: www.Icta.org and The 
Green Book. 



i Suhr Library's hours will change during Mnter Holiday and Spring Vacation 



Winter Holiday hours will be in effect March 8-16. The library will be open Monday through Friday, 
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and closed on the weekend. 

Spring Vacation hours will be in effect March 20-25. The librarj will be open Thursday and Friday, 
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday and Tuesday, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and closed on the weekend. 

Regular hours, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., will be in effect on Monday, March 17, through Wednesday, March 19. 



Volume 40, Issue 4 



Page 3 



Experience Expo to feature many employers 



By Jon Cook 

The Experience Expo will feature 
more than sixty employers from New 
York, Ohio, Maryland, New Jersey, 
North Carolina, Illinois, and Pennsyl- 
vania looking to fill internships for this 
summer and the 2008-2009 academic 
school year. The event will provide an 
opportunity for students to meet with 
many interested employers, create con- 
tacts, and obtain career advice all in 
one, local, informal setting. 

All students are welcome to attend 



the free event to be held Monday, 
February 25, from 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m., in 
the Gemmell Multi-purpose Room, and 
will be provided with refreshments. 
Students will be asked to sign in upon 
arrival, and will be entered into a draw- 
ing for door prizes, donated by partici- 
pating companies of the expo. 

Notable companies/agencies that 
will attend are Clarion University, 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Holi- 
day Inn, Ocean City Police Department, 
Pepsi Bottling Company, Wal-Mart, 
Walgreen's, Social Security Admini- 



stration, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, and 
the YMCA. A complete, up-to-date 
list of all the employers that will be on 
hand can be found at www.clar 
ion.edu/career/experienceexpo. 

There is no pre-registration 
needed, but Career Services recom- 
mends interested students visit 
www.clarion.edu/career/experience 
expo. Students may also call Career 
Services at 814-393-2323 for helpful 
tips and information that would better 
prepare students for the Experience 
Expo. 



EVENTS: Film series 
will feature movie 



1)0 YOU LIKli! TO WKITli!? 
GOT AN OPINION? 

Send your submissions and letters to the editor to: 

vvoicc@clarion . edu 

or drop them off at 226 Montgomery Hall 



Continued from page 1 

elude "Away From Her", 
February 23; "No Country 
for Old Men", March 1; 
"Saawariya", March 29; 
"Atonemenf, April 5; 
"Juno", April 12; 

"Waterhorse", April 19; 
and "Maria Full of Grace", 
April 26. 

For more information 
about the film series, call 
Emily Aubele at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

Clarion University- 
Venango Campus will host 
an open house for students 
interested in the Elecfric 
Utility Technology concen- 
fration of the Associate of 
Applied Science in Indus- 
trial Technology Degree, 
which is offered through a 
partnership between 



FirstEnergy Corporation, 
the parent company of 
Penelec, and Clarion Uni- 
versity. The open house 
will be held on Saturday, 
February 23, at 1 p.m., in 
the Robert W. Rhoades 
Center. The program is 
free and open to all inter- 
ested persons. Tours of 
the campus will be avail- 
able at noon. Additional 
parking will be available 
at the Penelec parking lot 
at 1600 West First Sfreet, 
across from the campus. 
Students do not need to 
pre-register. 

The two-year pro- 
gram is designed to edu- 
cate friture electric utility 
professionals with an em- 
phasis on overhead line 
work. FirstEnergy also 

See EVENTS page 4 



Vgnango \?oiej2 

226 Montgomerj' Hall 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

Oil City, PAl 6301 

Phone: 814-676-6591. ext. 1289 Email: vvoice(aclarion.edu 



Adviser 

Dr. Joan Huber 
Staff 

Jon Cook 
Frank Rodgers 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Smayda 

Christine Rodgers 
Lori Secor 



Policies 



The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University- 
Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The Voice is published 
most Fridays during the academic year. 

The editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be 
received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain 
anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available 
space and at the discretion of the executive board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
granted a co-curricular. 



P\.,l 4 



\'FNANGO VOlCt 



EVENTS: Electric Utility Technology program 

Continued from page i 

provides qualified students 
enrolled in the program free 
tuition, including college fees, 
books, and protective clothing. 

The open house program 
will be presented by represen- 
tatives of FirstEnergy Corpo- 
ration's Power Systems Insti- 
tute (PSI) and Professor Bill 
Hallock, chair of the Univer- 
sity's Department of Applied 
Technology. 

To learn more about the 
Applied Technology pro- 
grams, contact Professor Hal- 
Fock at 814-676-6591, ext. 
1307, or whal- 

lockfaiclarion.edu. 

Circle K., a community 
service-based organization, 
will hold an ice cream social 
on Tuesday, February 26. at 7 
p.m.. in 146 Gemmell Student 
Center at Clarion University. 

Nominations for officers 
will take place during the 
event. Elections will be held 
the following Tuesday, March 
4. 

For more information, 
email circlek@clarion.edu. 

Governor Rendell's Pol- 
icy Office is seeking up to five 
students with an interest in 
public service and government 
for 2008 summer internships. 

Interested students should 



email their resume along with a 
cover letter to Patricia Grim at 
pgrimfo'state.pa.us. The student 
should indicate which policy 
area they would like to be con- 
sidered for. Policy areas in- 
clude: education: health care 
reform; economic development 
and workforce; criminal justice: 
and environmental issues, land 
use. and infrastructure. 

For more information, call 
Patricia Grim at 7 1 7-772-9068. 

The Experience Expo will 
be held on Monday. February 
25, from 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m., in 
the Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room at Clarion University. 
More than 60 employers and 
agencies will be on hand to 
offer internships for summer 
2008 or the 2008-2009 aca- 
demic year. 

More information about the 
event can be found at 
w w w . c larion . edu/career/ 
experienceexpo or call Career 
Services at 814-393-2323. 

Complimentary refresh- 
ments will be provided by 
Chartwells. Students who com- 
plete an evaluation form at the 
event will qualify for door 
prizes provided by several par- 
ticipating organizations. 

A Getting Started in Voice 
Acting course will be held 
Tuesday. February 26, from 6-8 
p.m., in 109 Still Hall at Clarion 



University. The course covers 
the details of the industry, the 
importance of marketing and 
the demo tape, and is taught 
by a professional voice actor 
from the voice acting training 
company. Voices For All. 
Each student will be coached 
and recorded for a personal 
evaluation. 

Pre-registration is re- 
quired, and the cost for the 
course is $55. 

For more information, 
call the Division of Continu- 
ing Education at 814-393- 
2227. or register online at 
www.clarion.edu/ce. 

Students may sign up at 
the Gemmell Student Center 
Information Desk to go on a 
ski trip to Seven Springs. 

Costs include a lift 
ticket. $40: ski rentals, $18; 
and snowboard rentals. $29. 

Eve Ensler, founder of 
VDay and author of The Va- 
gina Monologues, will be in 
Hart Chapel on Tuesday, 
February 26, at 8 p.m., for a 
meet and greet event. 

Advising and Counseling 
Services will present "What 
Do I Do Next?", a three-part 
workshop (attend one. two. or 
all three sessions), at the 
Health and Sciences Service 
Building. Main Street (next 



to the University Inn). 
Clarion. 

The next session will 
be held Wednesday, Febru- 
arv' 27. at 7 p.m. The final 
session will be held 
Wednesday. March 5. 

To RSVP or for more 
information, call 814-393- 
2255. 

Applications are being 
accepted for the student 
trustee position on the 
Clarion University Council 
of Trustees. 

Eligible candidates 
must be: full-time under- 
graduate students (other 
than freshmen); enrolled 
for at least 12 semester 
hours; and in good aca- 
demic standing. 

Candidates must com- 
plete an application form 
available online at the Stu- 
dent Senate Website at 
http://jupiter.clarion.edu/ 
-senate. Applications must 
be completed and accom- 
panied b>' three letters of 
recommendation and sub- 
mitted to the Student Sen- 
ate Office by 5 p.m. on 
Friday. February 29. For 
more information, call 814- 
393-2318 or email 
s_adzellers(®clarion.edu. 

MARCH 



Email the VeNt^NGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion Universit>' of 
Penns\hania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil Cit>. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The> 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, facultj; or staff of Clarion 
Universit)' of Pennsylvania. Clarion Universit}' is committed to equal opportunii> and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
emplovment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VeM-flMGo \Poice 



Volume 40, Issue S 



Friday, February 29, 2008 



Suhr Library offers useful tips 



With many essays and 
papers due at mid-semester, 
the helpful staff at Suhr 
Library would like to offer 
these useful tips. 

Academic papers rely 
on citing the sources of 
research. Word 2007 can 
make citing sources and 
creating a bibliography 
very easy. 

Adding a source to the 
Source Manager: 

When sources are en- 
tered for the document, the 
information is saved so that 
it is easy to cite the source 
again, and it's also easy to 
compile the bibliography. 

1. Place the insertion 
point where you want to 
insert the citation. 

2. Click the References 
tab on the ribbon and click 



the Insert Citation button in 
the Citation & Bibliography 
group. 

3. Select Add New 
Source and the Create 
Source dialog box appears. 

4. Enter the source 
information in the dialog 
box. 

5. Click OK. A citation 
is inserted in the document 
where the insertion point is 
located. The source is also 
saved, so it can be cited 
again in the document and 
included in the bibliogra- 
phy. 

Insert a citation from 
the Source Manager: 

Once the source has 
been inserted, it is easy to 
create citations from the 
source. 
1 . Click the References tab 



on the ribbon and click the 
Insert Citation button in the 
Citation & Bibliography 
group. A list of citations 
already inserted in the 
document appears. 
2. Select the citation you 
want to reference. The cita- 
tion is inserted in the docu- 
ment. 

Insert a Bibliography: 
Once you have cited 
sources in the document, 
you can create a bibliogra- 
phy that contains all the 
sources in the current list of 
the Source Manager. 

1. Click the References 
tab on the ribbon and click 
the Bibliography button in 
the Citations & Bibliogra- 
phy group. A list of built-in 

See LIBRARY page 2 



Award-winning films to be shown 



FEBRUARY 

The Clarion University 
- Venango Campus Inde- 
pendent Film Series is free 
and open to the public. The 
series features films from 
independent filmmakers 
from China, the United 
States, Iran, Japan, the 
United Kingdom, Colom- 
bia, and India. All films 
will be shown on Saturdays 



at 7:30 p.m. in the Robert 
W. Rhoades Center Audito- 
rium. 

Films scheduled for the 
Spring 2008 semester in- 
clude "No Country for Old 
Men", March 1 

"Saawariya", March 29 
"Atonement", April 5 
"Jimo", April 12 

"Waterhorse", April 1 9 
and "Maria Full of Grace" 



April 26. 

For more information 
about the film series, call 
Emily Aubele at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

Governor Rendell's 
Policy Office is seeking up 
to five students with an 
interest in public service 

See EVENTS page 3 



Attention 
Students, 
Faculty, and 
Staff: 

• "No Country Jot 
Old Men", the 
Jour-time academy 
award winning 
Jilm thatjeatures 
Tommy Lee Jones, 
Javier Bardem and 
Josh Brolin, will 
be shown Satur- 
day, March 1, at 
7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Audita- 



Inside this issue: 


Library Tips 


1 


Events 


1-6 


Trash Talk 


2 


Oil Creek 

News 


3 


Howling Dog 
Cafe 


4 


River Ridge 
Farm 


5 



PAG1-: 2 \ ENANGO \ OICE 

Wasting food is like tossing out your money 

amount of food thrown away gloss_\ paper are toxic to 

, by about the weight of a slice 1 the microorganisms and 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 

We waste a lot of food. 
On average, we throw away 
about one third of the food 
we buy. That's huge! Just 
imagine, if you spend $150 
per week on groceries, you 
are throwing away an average 
of $50 every week, or $2,600 
per year! I don't know about 
you. but I can think of a few 
things to do w ith an extra two 
grand. We can help reduce 
this amount by buying only 
as much as we need to reduce 
spoiling and using the left- 
overs instead of throwing 
them away or saving them 
until they look like a science 
experiment. 

If we could reduce the 



amount of food thrown away 
by about the weight of a slice 
of bread every day, we'd save 
about 20 pounds of food an- 
nually - roughly enough to 
make sixteen meals. If every 
household did this, the sav- 
ings would be enough to pro- 
vide three meals a day for a 
year to this country's 1.35 
million homeless children. 

Now that we've reduced 
the amount of food we throw 
away, let's take it a step far- 
ther. What are we going to do 
with the rest of the food that 
is still inevitably going to hit 
the trash? Composting is a 
way to make an environmen- 
tally beneficial product with 
stuff that would normally be 
taking up space in a landfill. 

How does it work? Food 
scraps and yard waste is bro- 
ken down by microorganisms 
in the presence of oxygen. 
The result is a natural fertil- 
izer that can be safely han- 
dled and applied to a garden 
or a lawn. 

It helps condition and 
replenish the soil, suppress- 
ing pests and diseases on 
your plants. It also reduces or 
eliminates the need for pesti- 
cides, which is definitely a 
good thing. 



"X don't bnow 

about you, but 
I can thinb of a 
few things to 
do with an ex- 
tra two grand." 



What can go into your 
compost? Fruit and vegeta- 
ble waste (peels, skins, 
leaves, etc.), egg shells, cof- 
fee grounds and filters, tea 
bags, paper towels and nap- 
kins, grass clippings and 
yard trimmings. paper, 
newspaper, dryer lint, saw- 
dust, and much more. Some 
things should not find their 
way into your compost bin. 
Meat and dairy products 
cause some nasty odors, and 
if you live near a wooded 
area, it can attract some un- 
wanted guests, like bears. 
Pet waste and litter carry 
diseases and parasites, and 
yard trimming that have 
been treated with pesticides 
should also stay out of com- 
post. Charcoal ashes and 



glossy paper are toxic to 
the microorganisms and 
should be omitted as well. 

There are several 
ways you can start com- 
posting. You can start a 
pile in the back of your 
property . or buy or make a 
bin. Don't have a lot of 
space? No worries, there 
are even small compost- 
ing bins that stay right in 
your kitchen, perfect for 
apartment-dwellers. The 
website www.howstuff 
works.com is a great place 
to start. 

Yard trimmings and 
food residuals add up to 
about 23 percent of the 
trash in our solid waste 
stream. If everyone in the 
U.S. composted their 
kitchen scraps, the waste 
diverted could make a 
three-foot-high compost 
pile to cover San Fran- 
cisco. 

Remember, small 
changes can bring big 
results! 

Reference material 
for this article was found 
at: The Green Book. 
www.epa.gov, www. 

bbc.com, and www. how 
stuffworks.com 



LIBRARY: Hours will change during spring breaks 



Continued from page 1 

options appears. You can choose ei- 
ther of these built-in options to insert 
the bibliography with heading text and 
formatting. Or, select Insert Bibliogra- 
phy to insert only the sources. 

2. Select the built-in bibliography 
you want to insert. The cited sources 
are inserted in the document. 

Suhr Library also would like to 



note a change in hours during the up- 
coming Winter Holiday and Spring 
Vacation. Suhr Library hours will be as 
follows: 

Winter Holiday hours will be in 
effect March 8-16. The library will be 
open Monday through Friday, fi^om 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m., and closed on the week- 
end. 

Spring Vacation hours will be in 
effect March 20-25. The library will be 



open Thursday and Friday, fi-om 8 a.m. 
to 4 p.m., Monday and Tuesday, ft^om 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m., and closed on the week- 
end. 

Suhr Library's regular hours, 8 
a.m. to 9 p.m., will be in effect on Mon- 
day, March 17, through Wednesday, 
March 19. 

For more information or for assis- 
tance, call Suhr Library at Venango 
Campus at 814-676-6591. 



\'OLLii\iE 40, Issue 5 



Page 3 



Oil Creek State Park to hold free Maple 
Sugaring Program at Blood Farm 



The Public Maple Sugaring 
Program at Oil Creek State Park 
will be held two consecutive 
weekends. March 8-9, and March 
15-16, from 11a.m. to 3 p.m., at 
the Blood Farm in Oil Creek State 
Park. 

The free program will include 
guided tours, demonstrations, free 
samples, and working displays of 
a sugar bush. Everyone is wel- 
come. 

Guided tours for the public 
will be conducted Saturday and 
Sunday, March 8-9, and March 



15-16, every hour from 1 1 a.m. to 3 
p.m. (last program begins at 2 p.m.). 
Programs will be located at the 
Blood Farm Day Use Area, one-half 
mile from the Oil Creek State Park 
Route 8 entrance. Organized groups 
of ten or more should contact the 
park at 814-676-5915 for schedul- 
ing tours on weekdays and week- 
ends. 

Any person or group who 
wishes to volunteer or assist with 
the program should call 814-676- 
5915. 

If you need an accommodation 



to participate in park activities 
due to a disability, please contact 
the Pennsylvania Bureau of State 
Parks at 888-PA-PARKS 
(voice), 888-537-7294 (TTY), 
717-558-2711 (Local or interna- 
tional TTY), 800-654-5984 (PA 
AT&T Relay Service). With at 
least three days notice, interpret- 
ers for people who are hard of 
hearing are available for educa- 
tional programs. 

For more information, call 
Stacey Marendt at 814-676- 
5915. 



EVENTS: Graduation applications due on March 3 



Continued from page 1 

and government for 2008 
summer internships. 

Interested students 

should email their resume 
along with a cover letter to 
Patricia Grim at 

pgrim@state.pa.us. Students 
should indicate for consid- 
eration their choice of policy 
area. Policy areas include: 
education; health care re- 
form; economic develop- 
ment and workforce; crimi- 
nal justice; and environ- 
mental issues, land use, and 
infrastructure. 

For more information, 
call Patricia Grim at 717- 
772-9068. 

Advising and Counsel- 
ing Services will present 



"What Do I Do Next?", a 
three-part workshop (attend 
one, two, or all three sessions), 
at the Health and Sciences 
Service Building, Main Sfreet 
(next to the University Inn), 
Clarion. 

The final session will be 
held Wednesday, March 5. at 7 
p.m. 

To RSVP or for more 
information, call Counseling 
Services at 814-393-2255. 

MARCH 

Students who plan to 
graduate in Spring or Summer 
2008 must submit a graduation 
application to the Registrar's 
Office by Monday, March 3. 
Student must have his or her 
advisor, department chair, and 
dean sign the graduation appli- 
cation. 



Graduation applications 
are available online at 
www.clarion.edu/registrar/ 
gradapp.shtml/ 

"American Theocracy: 
Politics, Radical Religion, 
Oil, and Borrowed Money 
in the 2 1st Century" will be 
presented Wednesday, 

March 5, at 6:30 p.m., in 
Rhoades Auditorium. The 
DVD presentation is part of 
the Satellite Series spon- 
sored by Phi Theta Kappa. 

Author Kevin Phillips 
will discuss how, from an- 
cient Rome to the British 
Empire, every world- 
dominating power has been 
brought down by an over- 
lapping set of problems. 

Live discussion facili- 
tated by faculty or commu- 



nity members will follow 
the film. 

The Student Affairs 
department will hold a 
Combat Stress Day on 
Thursday, March 6, from 
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., in 
Rhoades Center at Ve- 
nango campus. The event 
is free. 

Stations will be avail- 
able for pre- and post- 
blood pressure readings 
associated with the stress 
interventions, as well as 
deep breathing and pro- 
gressive muscle release 
techniques, emotional 
freedom techniques, exer- 
cise ball sfretching se- 
quences and chair mas- 
See EVENTS page 4 



PACil 4 



Venango Voice 



New cafe has coffee bar, premium tea, art, 
entertainment, wireless Internet and more 



The Howling Dog Gallery 
Cafe, located in the Oil City 
Arts District, is Oil City's new- 
est coffee bar, featuring a full 
service espresso bar and one of 
the largest selections of pre- 
mium teas in northwest Penn- 



The cafe serxes fresh pastries and 
homemade soups, as well as lunch 
served weekdays from 11:30 a.m. to 
1:30 p.m. XM Radio and wireless 
Internet service are available. 

Acoustic musical perfomiances 
and art displays are featured at the 
cafe, as well. 



The Howling Dog Gallery 
Cafe is open from 6 a.m. to 6 
p.m., Monday through Thursday, 
and from 6 a.m. to midnight, Fri- 
day and Saturday. It is located at 
219 Seneca Street. Oil City. 

For more information, call 
677-2490. 



EVENTS: PR professional Oltmanns to speak 



Continued from page 3 

sages. 

The Clarion University 
Wind Ensemble, directed 
by Dr. Hubert Toney, will 
present its first concert of 
the semester. Festival Cele- 
brations, on Sunday, March 
2, at 3 p.m., in Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. The 
concert is free and open to 
the public. 

For more information, 
call the music department 
at 814-393-2287. 

Robert Oltmanns of 
Skutski and Oltmanns Pub- 
lic Relations and Market- 
ing Communications of 
Pittsburgh will speak on 
Monday. March 3, at 7:30 
p.m.. in 107 Founders Hall 
at Clarion University. The 
event, sponsored by the 
Public Relations Student 
Society of America, is free 
and open to the public. 

Oltmanns will discuss 
careers in the field of pub- 
lic relations, provide vari- 



ous tips to successfully break 
into the field, and answer 
questions related to public 
relations. 

Actor and author B.D. 
Wong will visit Clarion Uni- 
versity's Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium on Tuesday, 
March 4, at 8 p.m. The pres- 
entation is free and open to 
the public. 

Wong's movie credits 
include roles in "Jurassic 
Park" and "Executive Deci- 
sion". He played Dr. George 
Huang on NBC's "Law & 
Order: Special Victims Unit". 
Wong was honored with the 
Tony Award, Drama Desk 
Award, Outer Critics Circle 
Award, Clarence Derwent 
Award, and Theatre Award 
for his performance in the 
Broadway production of M 
Butterfly. 

Carlson Library will hold 
a series of course-integrated 
information literacy instruc- 
tion programs for the spring 
2008 semester. Sessions are 
held in room 201 in Carlson 



Library unless alternate ar- 
rangements are made. 

The first sessions will be 
held Wednesday, March 5. 
"RefWorks: Creating a Cus- 
tomized Citation Database" 
will be held from 1 1 a.m.- 
11:50 a.m. "Is it Plagiarism 
Yet?" will be held from 2- 
2:50 p.m. 

On Thursday, March 6, 
"Evaluating Websites - Trash 
or Treasure?" will be held 
from 11-11:50 p.m. 

"Searching the Internet: Best 
of the Web" will be held 
from 2 p.m. -2:50 p.m. 

Students are permitted to 
attend without a reservation, 
space permitting. However, 
space cannot be guaranteed 
unless a reservation is made. 
To reserve a space, call 
Karen Sheesman at 814-393- 
1841. 

The Office of Continuing 
Education will offer Discover 
SCUBA. A free class will be 
held on Friday, March 7, 
from 6-9:30 p.m., at Tippin 
Natatorium. Students with 
further interest in the course 



can return on following 
Fridays through April 1 1 . 
The cost of the course after 
the free session is $399. 

To register online, 
visit http:// 

www. clarion. edu'ce/. For 
more information, call 814- 
393-2227. 

Applications are now 
available for Clarion Uni- 
versit>''s Miss Clarion Uni- 
versit>' Pageant. Applica- 
tions can be picked up at 
the Gemmell Information 
Desk and at the University 
Activities Board Office, 
249 Gemmell. and must be 
submitted to the same loca- 
tions by noon on Tuesday, 
March 18, in order to be 
considered. 

For more information, 
contact UAB Multicultural 
Chair Erica Pickett at 
s_empickett(2'clarion.edu 
or call 814-393-2312. 

Ballroom Dancing for 
Beginners II Class will 

See EVENTS page 6 



Volume 40, Issue 5 



Page 5 



Local farm was built by former congressman 



Editor 's Note: This article 
is one part of a series 
about the River Ridge 
Farm that will run in fol- 
lowing issues. 

As we travel from 
Franklin to Oil City along 
U.S. Route 8, we can't 
help but notice the huge, 
castle-like mansion that 
sits high above the east 
bank of the Alleghany 
River. This story is not so 
much the history behind 
the man who built it; it is 
more on what it was like 
in its heyday and the work 
that went into building it. 

Joseph C. Sibley, was 
a former elected congress- 
man from our area, who 
earned his fortune from 
being part owner in the 
Sibley-Miller Oil Com- 
pany, later to merge with 
what was to be known as 
Standard Oil. One of his 
most important discover- 
ies was the invention of a 
bright, safe, and long last- 
ing signal oil lantern that 
was not bothered by ex- 
treme cold. This was be- 
fore the day of elecfronic 
switches and signal lights 
that we have now. 

Sibley originally had 
a large house on Elk 
Street in Franklin, which 
sat where the Franklin 
Post Office now sits. He 
and his first wife, Martha, 
lived in luxury and 
wanted for nothing. While 



attending a Fourth of July 
picnic in the park in Frank- 
lin, a picnic in which he 
supplied everything for the 
entire town, a summer storm 
moved in and lasted all day. 
This may be where the story 
of the future of River Ridge 
Farm began and the tragedy 
that made it happen. 

Martha got extremely 
sick because of being in the 
rain all that day, came down 
with pneumonia, and died a 
short time later. 

Sibley soon realized 
that he could no longer 
spend time in his Elk Sfreet 
home without his beloved 
wife and all the memories of 
her that lived there. Wanting 
to leave all these memories 
behind him and to move to 
the country, he purchased 
750 acres from Robert G. 
Lamberton on November 
15, 1911. He was able to 
purchase some surrounding 
land, which brought his es- 
tate to 1,200 acres, from 
which he could build his 
new life and dream. 

Having seen a castle 
while touring Germany, he 
had a vision and a plan for 
what he wanted and how it 
would all be laid out; as a 
matter of fact, he was in 
control of all the work that 
was to take place. It would 
be hard to imagine how 
much money it would take 
to replicate this project to- 
day and if it could all hap- 



pen in such a fast way. 

One of the first con- 
cerns was how to get the 
construction materials 

needed to the site. We have 
to remember, this was 1911 
and it was off the beaten 
path. The solution: build a 
one mile, private railroad 
track that connected to the 
Pennsylvania Railroad and 
ran to the bottom of the hill 
where the mansion would be 
built. However, this was far 
from the only route being 
made to access the property. 
The other project may have 
even been more impressive. 

Information far this 
article was obtained from 
Destiny's Gentleman 
by Jack Mays. 



ODD 

W 

HtSToRY 

with 
FraiA^fe ledgers 



\?(znango \?oie(s 

226 Montgomerj' Hall 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

Oil City. PA 16301 

Phone: 814-676-6591. ext. 1289 E-mail: vvoice(a)clarion.edu 



Adviser 

Dr. Joan Huber 
Staff 
Jon Cook 
Frank Rodgers 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Smayda 

Christine Rodgers 
Lori Secor 



Policies 



The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University- 
Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The Voice is published 
most Fridays during the academic year. 

The editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be 
received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain 
anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available 
space and at the discretion of the executive board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
granted a co-curricular. 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Venango has intramural 3-on-3 basketball 



Continued from pg. 4 

meet six Thursdays begin- 
ning Thursday, March 27. 
Classes meet from 6-7 
p.m. and focus on waltz, 
tango, and cha-cha. 

The cost is $120 per 
couple and $60 per single. 

For more information 
or to register, contact the 
Continuing Education 
Office by phone at 814- 
393-2227, online at 
vvww.clarion.edu/ce, or 
visit 210 Still Hall, Clar- 
ion University. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

The Pregnancy and 
Parenting Recourses Ini- 
tiative (PPRI), composed 
of faculty, staff and stu- 
dents, is working to better 
serve Clarion University 
parents striving to attain a 
higher education. 

Anyone interested in 
participating should e- 
mail Bonita Mullen at 
sbcmullenfSclarion.edu 
or call the Women's Stud- 
ies office at 814-393- 
2720. 

The Oil City YMCA 
is available for use by 
Venango Campus students 
who have paid an activity 



fee. Students are allowed 
access to the weight room, 
pool, track, racquetball 
courts, and fitness center. In 
addition, Venango Campus 
students only pay member 
prices to enroll in classes 
offered at the YMCA. 

Intramural 3-on-3 bas- 
ketball is held for Venango 
Campus students every Mon- 
day night from 7-9 p.m., in 
Rhoades Center. 

Bowling at Seneca Lanes 
is available for Venango 
Campus students every Mon- 
day night from 9-1 1 p.m., for 
$2.50 per student per night. 

Intramural co-ed volley- 
ball is open to Venango Cam- 
pus students every Tuesday 
from 7-9 p.m., in Rhoades 
Center. 

The office of Minority 
Student Services Mentorship 
Program is searching for up- 
per classmen and women and 
faculty members who wish to 
become a part of the Eyes on 
the Prize mentoring program. 
The program assigns mentors 
to incoming minority stu- 
dents to help with the transi- 
tion to college life. 

For more information, e- 



mail Ashley Connor at 
s_arconnor@clarion.edu. 

Circle K. an international 
community service organiza- 
tion, will hold meetings every 
Tuesday, from 7-8 p.m., in 
room 146 in Gemmell at 
Clarion University. Circle K 
works within the campus, in 
the local community, and 
abroad. The main focus of the 
organization is the proper 
care of children. All students 
are invited to attend. 

For more information, 
email circlek@clarion.edu. 

A self defense course 
taught by third degree black 
belt Brian Redick will be held 
every Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday, from 6:30-7:30 
p.m., at the Clarion Univer- 
sity Recreation Complex. The 
course is open to everyone. 
Prior experience is not neces- 
sary. 

For more information, 
email Brian Redick at 
s_bdredick@clarion.edu. 

The Philosophy Club 
meets every Thursday at 7:45 
p.m. in Founders Hall at 
Clarion University. 

Students can talk about 
philosophical ideas and hear 
what others have to offer. 



Each week is a new discus- 
sion on any topic. 

For more information, 
e-mail Kenny Bonus at 
s_kebonus@clarion.edu. 

Rung Fu classes are 
available and open to any- 
one 14 years of age and 
older every Wednesday and 
Friday, from 6-8:30 p.m., in 
Tippin Gymnasium at Clar- 
ion University. The class is 
$100 and runs through 
Wednesday, April 30. 

The class will meet in 
room 208 on Wednesday 
and in room 23 1 on Friday. 

For more information or 
to register, call 814-393- 
2227 or visit 

www.clarion.edu/ce. 

The Clarion University 
Recreation Center is offer- 
ing several classes during 
the spring semester. Yoga, 
power flex, cardio tennis, 
aqua aerobics, kickboxing, 
strength training, and self 
defense are available. The 
center also holds net nights 
five days a week for tennis, 
volleyball, soccer, and bad- 
minton. Faculty, staff, and 
the community can use the 
facility for $50 per semester 
for aerobics or $5 a day for 
the use of all programs. 



E-MAIL THE VeNt^NGO VOlCe! VVOICE@CLARION.EDU 



Keeping Us Legal 

The J'enango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City, PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Fquity'. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

\PeNfiNGo l^o/ce 



Volume 40, Issue 6 



Friday, March 21, 2008 



Primary coming to PA in April 



The 2008 Pennsylvania 
primary election is nearly 
upon us. On Tuesday, April 
22, residents of the Key- 
stone State will find ballots 
for selections for U.S. 
president, U.S. Congress, 
and state legislature posi- 
tions. Are you a registered 
voter? Are you familiar 
with the candidates? 

Though the deadline to 
register for the primary 
election will pass on Mon- 
day, March 24, Pennsyl- 
vania residents have until 
October 6, 30 days before 
the 2008 general election 
on November 4, to register 
to vote. 

According to election 
and voting source 
www.declareyourseIf.com, 
in order to be eligible to 
register to vote in Pennsyl- 
vania, you must: be a citi- 
zen of the United States at 
least one month before the 



next election; be a resident 
of Pennsylvania and your 
election district at least 30 
days before the election; be 
at least 1 8 years of age on 
the day of the next election; 
and you must not have been 
confined in a penal institu- 
tion for the conviction of a 
felony within the last five 
years. 

The candidates hoping 
for your state legislature 
vote in 2008, according to 
www.uselections.com, are: 
Jim Eisenhower (D) and 
John Morganelli (D) for 
Attorney General; and John 
Cordisco (D), Jennifer 
Mann (D), Rob McCord 
(D), Dennis Morrison- 
Wesley (D) and Tom Ellis 
(R) for State Treasurer. 

No candidate has been 
named to replace State 
Auditor General Jack Wag- 
ner (D). 

Eight Republicans and 



three Democrats are com- 
peting for the seat held by 
5th Congressional District 
Representative John Peter- 
son, a Republican retiring 
at the end of his term. Oil 
City, as well as much of 
Venango County, is part of 
District 5. 

The forerunners for the 
presidency running on the 
democratic ticket are Sena- 
tor Barack Obama, D-Ill., 
and Senator Hillary Clin- 
ton, D-NY. 

The leading Republi- 
can nominee for president 
is Senator John McCain, R- 
AZ. 

Mike Huckabee, for- 
mer governor of Arkansas, 
is also currently on the Re- 
publican ticket. 

To learn more about 
voting and the primary and 
general elections of 2008 or 
to register to vote, visit 
www.declareyourselfcom. 



FAFSA forms are due on May 1 



MARCH 

The PHEAA state 
grant deadline to complete 
the 2008-09 Free Applica- 
tion for Federal Student Aid 
is Thursday, May 1 . 

With completed federal 
taxes, students can com- 



plete a FAFSA form at 
www.fafsa.ed.gov. 

The Interdenomina- 
tional Christian Fellowship 
group meets the first and 
third Tuesdays of every 
month, from 12:30-1:30 



p.m., at 105 Frame Hall. 

The group is open to 
anyone and is non- 
denominational. Visitors 
are invited to talk about 
God, faith, and the search 

See EVENTS page 2 



Attention 
Students, 
Faculty, and 

STAFF: 

• Read on to learn 
about Venango's 
own Phi Theta 
Kappa chapter. The 
honor society re- 
cently held a cam- 
pus blood drive and 
inducted several 
new members. Con- 
gratulations to 
those students! 





Inside this issue: 


Elections 


1 


Events 


1-6 


Trash Talk 


2 


PTK Update 


3 


Respect? 


4 


Casino 
Night 


5 



'AGi: 2 



Venango Voice 



Cleaning products are starting to 'go green' 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 

LORI SECOR 



"This is a hazardous 
solid waste. Must be disposed 
of in accordance with local, 
state, and federal regula- 
tions." This is a typical warn- 
ing you may expect to see 
referring to batteries, pesti- 
cides, or paint. Is this a warn- 
ing you would expect to find 
on a product you. your fam- 
ily, and your pets could be in 
contact with daily? 

Guess where it came 
from - 2000 Flushes auto- 
matic toilet bowl cleaner. 
Let's pause a moment to 
think about that... hazardous 
waste... specific disposal 



guidelines... and yet it's 
going directly into our water 
stream. Does that seem 
messed up to anyone else? 
That water comes full circle. 
Eventually, you're going to 
be drinking it. Well, all the 
impurities are cleaned out of 
there before it comes back 
around though, right? 
Wrong. Not all of it. For 
example, loads of over-the- 
counter drugs are in the wa- 
ter that you drink and bathe 
in. But. that's an article for 
another day. 

Cleaning products have 
some nasty chemicals in 
them that can cause a lot of 
health problems: bums, 
rashes, respiratory tract irri- 
tation, irritation to the skin, 
mouth, nose, and throat - 
and that's just the tip of the 
iceberg. In addition to 
plenty of other chemicals, 
toilet bowl cleaners usually 
contain hydrochloric acid 
and hypochlorite bleach, 
both of which are corrosive 
and have some nasty secon- 
dary effects. What's going 
to happen to a child who 
gets into the cleaners and 
drinks from that pretty bot- 
tle, or a dog that drinks from 
the toilet that still has a bit 



of cleaner left in it? All that 
in the name of a clean toilet? 

This latest wave of 
knowledge left me feeling 
more than a bit uneasy. I 
started going through my 
cleaning cupboard, reading 
the warning labels with new 
eyes. Yes, of course, 1 
would never drink cleaning 
products, or lick the inside 
of my bathroom sink after 1 
Mr. Cleaned-it. But, how 
many times has my son 
dropped his toothbrush in 
the sink and I rinsed it off 
and gave it back to him? 
How many times have I 
shooed my cat out of the 
bathroom after she was 
playing in the toilet? (I 
swear, she thinks she's a 
dog.) We are still exposed to 
the chemicals in our clean- 
ing products even if we 
don't touch them directly. 

Don't worry, help is on 
the horizon. At Giant Eagle, 
1 found several companies 
making cleaning products 
that are safe for the environ- 
ment and for us. So, 1 did a 
little research. Mrs. Myers, 
Method, and Seventh Gen- 
eration all make supplies 
that are plant-based only - 
fi^ee of petroleum, chlorine. 



phosphates, harsh chemicals 
and fumes. They have to- 
tally safe fragrances made 
ft"om whole and natural 
plant essence, and, dang, 
they smell good. Imagine 
being able to clean your 
bathroom without wearing a 
gas mask to keep you fi^om 
coughing at the nasty fumes. 
What was surprising to me 
was finding a new line of 
products fi-om Clorox, 
Greenworks. These products 
are over 90 percent petro- 
chemical free. MUCH of the 
ingredients are biodegrad- 
able. Not perfect by any 
means, but it is a definite 
improvement. I think if a 
company as big as Clorox is 
recognizing that consumers 
want a safer product, it is 
only a matter of time before 
the rest of them follow suit, 
and that is a great starting 
point. After all, small 
changes can bring big re- 
sults! 

Reference material for 
this article was found at: 
http: "hpd.nlm. nih.gov , 
www.mamashealth.com, 
www.mrsmyers.com, 
www.methodhome.com, and 
www.seventhgeneration.co 



EVENTS: "Saawariya" will be shown March 29 



Continued from page 1 

for meaning, as well as invited to bring 
a lunch. 

The Clarion University - Venango 
Campus Independent Film Series is free 
and open to the public. The series fea- 
tures films from independent filmmak- 
ers from China, the United States. Iran. 



Japan, the United Kingdom. Colom- 
bia, and India. All films will be 
shown on Saturdays at 7;30 p.m. in 
the Robert W. Rhoades Center Audi- 
torium. 

Films scheduled for the Spring 
2008 semester include "Saawariya", 
March 29; "Atonement", April 5; 
"Juno". April 12; "Waterhorse", 
April 19; and "Maria Full of Grace", 



April 26. 

For more information about the film 
series, call Emily Aubele at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

Governor Rendell's Policy Office is 
seeking up to five students with an inter- 
est in public service and government for 

See EVENTS page 4 



\OLUME 40, Issue 6 



Page 3 



Phi Theta Kappa held blood drive, induction 



Phi Theta Kappa held 
their semi-annual blood 
drive, through the American 
Red Cross. Oil Cit\ Chapter, 
on ThursdaN'. Februan.' 14. 
Through donations from 23 
people, the group was able 
to collect several pints of 
blood. 

Two donors each won 
SIO gift cards for the Ve- 
nango Campus bookstore. 
The group sends congratula- 
tions to Gregory Barnes and 
Ben Vand\ke. 

If you have never do- 
nated blood before, the 
members of PTK ask you to 
please consider doing so. 
"Your support means so 
much to so man\ ." said PTK 
%ice president of public rela- 
tions Shawna Jewell. 
""Thank \ou to all who par- 
ticipated this vear. We hope 
to see \"0u in the fall!" 

The 29th Phi Theta 
Kappa induction ceremony 
was held on Saturday-. Feb- 
ruary 16. at the Quality Iim 
and Conference Center in 
Franklin. Beth Jackson and 
Kelh' Lander serve as chap- 
ter ad\isors for Alpha 
Kappa Delta chapter of Phi 
Theta Kappa. 

Jason Indan. Pennsyl- 
vania State President of Phi 
Theta Kappa, was the guest 
speaker. Latrobe Bamitz. 
coordinator of Admissions 
and Financial Aid. provided 
music at the event. 

The new 2008-2009 
inductees are: Elizabeth 
Austin. Charity^ Barger. 
Zach Bernard. Debra Car- 
baugh. Jonathan Frazier. 
Dee Henrv. Amber Jewell. 
Shawna Jewell. Jean Kin- 
near. Amv Lewis. Tom 



Meier. Daniele Merryman. 
Leslie MoNer. Jamie Ren- 
wick, Pamela Schmader. Lori 
Secor, Andrea Stiller, 
Brianne Vroman, Valerie 
Wonderling. and honorary 
member. Dr. Joan Huber. 

The newly installed 
2008-2009 officers are: Patti 
Shontz. president: Elizabeth 
Austin, vice president of 
community events: Daniele 
Merryman, vice president of 
fundraising: Heather .Almond, 
co-vice president of member- 
ship: Amber Jewell, co-vice 
president of membership; 
Shawna Jewell, vice presi- 
dent of public relations: Ja- 



mie Renwick, secretary; 
and Esther Estes. treasurer. 

Phi Theta Kappa 
serves to recognize and 
encourage the academic 
achievement of two-year 
college students and pro- 
vides opportunities for in- 
dividual grovsth and devel- 
opment through honors, 
leadership, and service 
programming. 

Today, Phi Theta 
Kappa is the largest honor 
society in American higher 
education with more than 2 
million members and 1,200 
chapters located in all 50 of 
the United States. U.S. 



territories, British Virgin 
Islands, Canada. Germany. 
Marshall Islands, Microne- 
sia, United Arab Emirates 
and Palau. 

Phi Theta Kappa mem- 
bers participate in an incen- 
tive gift card drawing the 
last meeting of every month. 
The February winners re- 
ceived a S25 gift certificate 
to Eat-n-Park. The group 
sends congratulations to 
Charity Barger and Beth 
Austin. Phi Theta Kappa's 
next meeting is scheduled 
for March 27, at 4 p.m.. in 
the Rhoades Club Meeting 
Room. 



New inductees in 
tlie top photo 
include ,{\-r), 
Jamie Renwick, 
Amy Lewis, 
Charity Barger, 
Dee Henrj", Jean 
Kinnear, and 
Andrea Stiller. 
In the photo at 
the bottom, ad- 
ditional induc- 
tees include, (1- 
r), Dr. Joan 
Huber, Eliza- 
beth Austin, 
Amber Jewell, 
Shawna Jewell, 
Daniele Merrj- 
man, and Pam 
Schmader. 




PAtii: 4 



\'ENANGo Voice 



Student ponders, 'Is respect lost in classroom? 



By Sara Knapp 

Turn on your television, read 
your local newspaper, or pick up any 
recognized magazine and you will 
come across an issue that bears ac- 
knowledgement - respect. Older gen- 
erations claim respect has diminished 
in recent years, while youth seem to 
dismiss the issue altogether. 

When I interviewed Dr. Carie 
Forden of Clarion's Psychology De- 
partment, and Nursing faculty mem- 
ber Ms. Angela West. I got two com- 
pletely opposite opinions of respect 
in the classroom. Dr. Forden defined 
respect as listening to someone with 



an open mind and heart, while Ms. 
West stated that she believes respect is 
being accountable to yourself and oth- 
ers, and being non-judgmental. 

Dr. Forden thinks that her students 
show her respect by giving her their full 
attention, and being engaged and pre- 
sent each class. 

Ms. West declared that speaking 
considerably, taking personal account- 
ability, and the formality in which stu- 
dents communicate with her. either in 
class or by email, says a lot about their 
attitude on respect. 

When I asked them about how they 
feel when respected, they both re- 
sponded similarly. Dr. Forden said she 



feels heard and recognized, while Ms. 
West feels it is a positive boost to her 
ego. 

Finally. I asked them both if they 
think respect fi^om students has declined 
in the past ten years. 

Ms. West responded with a defmite 
"Yes!", and backed it up with factors 
such as family values, communities, 
messages on TV/video games, etc., as 
being significant factors of respect de- 
clining. 

Dr. Forden disagreed, stating that 
she doesn't think it has declined, saying 
it has always been a problem, but that 
text messaging has played a big role in 
showing disrespect in her classroom. 



EVENTS: Baby Item Drive to be held through April 1 8 



Continued from page 2 

2008 summer internships. 

Interested students should email 
their resume along with a cover letter 
to Patricia Grim at 

pgrim@state.pa.us. The student 
should indicate which policy area 
they would like to be considered for. 
Policy areas include: education; 
health care reform; economic devel- 
opment and workforce; criminal jus- 
tice; and environmental issues, land 
use. and infrastructure. 

For more information, call 
Patricia Grim at 717-772-9068. 

Ballroom Dancing for Beginners 
II Class will meet six Thursdays be- 
ginning Thursday, March 27. Classes 
meet from 6-7 p.m. and focus on 
waltz, tango, and cha-cha. 

The cost is $120 per couple and 
$60 per single. 

For more infonnation or to regis- 
ter, contact the Continuing Education 
Office by phone at 814-393-2227, 
online at www.clarion.edu/ce, or visit 
210 Still Hall. Clarion University. 



A Baby Item Drive will be held 
through Friday. April 18. to benefit 
pregnant and parenting students of 
Clarion University. Clothing, infant 
formula, non-perishable food items, 
toys and other baby-related items are 
welcome. 

Donations can be made through 
Thomas Rourke, 305 Founders Hall, 
ext. 2369; or the Women's Studies Pro- 
gram, 207 Harvey Hall, ext. 2720. 

The Eagle Ambassador President's 
Circle is now accepting applications for 
the 2008-2009 academic year. Any in- 
terested student can find an application 
online at http://www.clarion.edu/ 
groups-orgs/alumni/eagle.html 

Application copies can also be 
picked up at the following locations: 
Career Services, 1 14 Egbert Hall; Pro- 
vost's Office. 115 Carrier Hall; and 
Center for Advancement. Greenville 
Avenue. 

All completed applications are due 
to the Center for Advancement or by e- 
mail to bmurray(fl)clarion.edu by 5 p.m. 
on Friday. March 28. Students who 



complete the application will be con- 
tacted on or before April 1 to schedule 
an interview on April 4. Applicants must 
be available to attend the Leadership 
Conference scheduled for Saturday, 
April 26. (The conference will be held in 
the morning and early afternoon, allow- 
ing students to attend CampusFest.) 

For more information, contact: 
David Reed, Eagle Ambassador Presi- 
dent, at s_dkreed(®clarion.edu or Brooke 
Murray, Eagle Ambassador Advisor, at 
bmurray@clarion.edu or 814-393-1784. 

The annual Presidential Exhibition, 
sponsored by VizArtz. will be held in the 
University Gallery beginning Monday. 
March 31. Any student may submit an 
entry. Drop off dates are Thursday, 
March 27, fi-om 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and 
Friday, March 28, fi^om 2-5 p.m.. in the 
University Galler>'. 

An awards reception will be held 
Thursday. April 3. fi-om 5-7 p.m. 

For more information, contact Mi- 
chelle Peters at s_mlpeters@clarion.edu. 



See EVENTS 



page 



\'OLUME 40, Issue 6 



Pagi: 



Casino Night is slated for Friday, April 4 



Casino Night at Venango 
Campus will be held Friday, 
April 4, from 7-10 p.m., at 
Robert W. Rhoades Center. The 
e\ent, featuring free fr)od. fun 
and prizes, is sponsored by the 



Venango Campus Acti\ities Board. 

Venango Campus faculty and 
staff will ser\'e as dealers during 
Casino Night. 

No gambling will take place 
durina the e\ ent and monev will not 



be exchanged. 

For more information about 
Casino Night at Venango Cam- 
pus, call Emily Aubele at 814- 
676-6591. ext. 1270. or visit 114 
Rhoades Center. 



EVENTS: Praxis available to education majors 



Continued from page 4 

APRIL 

Praxis exams will be 
offered for all education 
majors in the month of 
April for just S20 each. 

The Praxis I Prep, in 
reading will be held 
Wednesday. April 2, from 
7-8 p.m. The Praxis I Prep, 
in writing will be held 
Thursday. April 10. from 
7-8 p.m. The Praxis I Prep, 
in mathematics will be held 
Thursda}'. April 17. from 
7-8 p.m. 

For more information, 
call the Continuing Educa- 
tion office at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1273, or visit 
room 215 Frame Hall. 

The staff at the Ve- 
nango Campus Career Cen- 
ter in 228, 230 Montgomery 
Hall can assist you in 
preparation for t%\'o local 
job fairs in the month of 
April. 

The Oil Region Job 
Fair will be held on Thurs- 
day'. April 10. from 1 1 a.m. 
to 5 p.m.. at the Cranbeny 
Mall, routes 322 and 257 in 
Cranbeny. 

Those in attendance 



will have the opportunit}- to 
meet with area emplo\ers. 
Attendees should prepare 
for on-site interviews by 
bringing a resume and 
"dressing for success". 

A job fair will also be 
held at the Clarion Mall on 
Thursday, April 3. from 1 1 
a.m. to 5 p.m. 

For more information, 
contact Oil Region Career- 
Link at 814-6^78-5050 or 
visit www.cwds.state.pa.us. 

Stor\ieller and per- 
former Meg Allison will 
perform on Friday, April 
18. at 7 p.m., in Rhoades 
Lounge. The event is spon- 
sored by the Venango 
Campus Activities Board 
and is part of the Coffee 
House Series. 

Allison is an emerging 
acoustic artist who writes 
her own melodies and hr- 
ics. She appeared as a fi- 
nalist on USA Network's 
"Nashville Star". 

James Gemmell Stu- 
dent Leader award applica- 
tions are now available. 
The award is named after 
former Clarion University 
president James Gemmell 



and is awarded to a student 
who demonstrates excep- 
tional leadership to the Clar- 
ion Universit)' campus 
(Venango commuters eligi- 
ble). The recipient will re- 
ceive a cash award and have 
their name engraved on the 
Gemmell Leadership award 
plaque which is displa>'ed in 
the Gemmell Student Com- 



plex. The recipient also re- 
ceives a framed print of Gem- 
mell Student Complex painted 
by a local artist. 

Qualifications for the 
award include: undergraduate 
student at Clarion University; 
minimum QPA of 2.50; must 
have demonstrated leadership 

See EVENTS page 6 



Venango Voicjz 

226 Montgomery" Hall 

Clarion Uni\ersit> -Venango Campus 

Oil City.' PA 16301 

Phone: 814-676-659L ext. 1289 Email: woiceSclarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Joan Ruber Kerri Sma} da 

Staff 

Jon Cook Christine Rodgers 

Frank Rodgers Lori Secor 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-mn newspaper of Clarion Universit)- 
Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The Voice is published 
most Frida\s during the academic >ear. 

The editors accept submissions irom all sources, but reserve the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenit)-; the determination of 
which is the responsibilit> of the editor-in-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be 
received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain 
anon\-mous. the\ must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available 
space and at the discretion of the executive board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Onl\ students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
granted a co-curricular. 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Financial aid available for returning adults 



Continued from page 5 

at the Clarion University 
campus; must provide two 
letters of reference from Uni- 
versity faculty or staff; must 
complete the application 
form; and the student must 
provide a resume. 

Application forms, let- 
ters of reference, and resumes 
must be turned in to Greta 
Lutz. Office of Campus Life, 
267 Gemmell. by 4 p.m. on 
Friday. April 1 1. 

Nominees will be invited 
to attend the 6th annual 
Reinhard Awards Ceremony 
to be held at 7 p.m. on 
Wednesday, April 30, in the 
Gemmell MPR, where the 
recipient will be announced. 

Two financial aid oppor- 
tunities for returning adult 
students (24 years of age or 
older) are available. 

The Pennsylvania Higher 
Education Assistance Agency 
(PHEAA) has funded cTarion 
Universit>' to award several 
Workforce Advancement 
Grants for Education (WAGE 
Grant) for the 2007-2008 
academic year. 

To qualify', you must be 
a permanent resident of Penn- 
svlvania, demonstrate finan- 



cial need and have a current 
Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) on 
file, and not already be a 
recipient of a PHEAA state 
grant. 

Graduates, undergradu- 
ates, and associate degree 
students are eligible. Nurs- 
ing students are not eligible. 
Applications must be sub- 
mitted to the Office of Fi- 
nancial Aid by 5 p.m. on 
Tuesday. April 15. 

The Lois Borland 
Fulmer Scholarship for Re- 
turning Adult Students 
Committee is accepting ap- 
plications for the 2008-09 
academic year. Applicants 
must be full or part time 
undergraduate students (or 
post-baccalaureate students 
pursuing teacher certifica- 
tion) with a cumulative 
grade point average of at 
least a 3.00. 

Applications, letters of 
recommendation, and per- 
sonal statements should be 
received by Mar>' Jo Phil- 
lips, Office of Financial Aid, 
by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, April 
15. 

For more information, 
contact the Office of Finan- 
cial Aid, 104 Egbert Hall, or 
by phone at 8 14-393-23 1 5. 



The Clarion University 
Pregnancy and Parenting 
Resources Forum will be 
held Wednesday. April 16, 
from 2-5 p.m.. in Level A. 
Carlson Library. 

The forum will assem- 
ble all of the major univer- 
sity offices that deal with 
students, and work out a 
coordinated program of ser- 
vices to aid pregnant and 
parenting students. 

The forum is open to all 
students, faculty and staff 
and is free of charge. Re- 
freshments will be served. 
Babysitting for parenting 
students will be available. 

The Career Services 
Center is in need of volun- 
teer student ambassadors to 
assist with the 2008 Educa- 
tion Job Fair on Wednesday. 
April 16. from 8 a.m. to 
2:30 p.m.. in Tippin Gymna- 
sium. 

Volunteers are needed 
to help with setup and vari- 
ous other tasks on the day of 
the event. 

For more information, 
e-mail Kayla at ca- 
reersi^clarion.edu as soon 
as possible. Include name, e- 
mail address, phone number. 



and hours available to vol- 
unteer in the e-mail. 

Lil Sibs Weekend will 
be held at Clarion Univer- 
sity main campus Friday, 
April 18 through Sunday, 
April 20. 

The event is free and 
open to all Clarion Univer- 
sity students and their 
guests - brothers, sisters, 
nieces, nephews, sons, and 
daughters. 

Friday will feature a 
Pizza and Pajama Party at 
7 p.m.. in 250/252 Gem- 
mell. The film "The Water 
Horse" will be shown. 

On Saturday, there 
will be several activities, 
including an infiatable Vel- 
cro wall. Spin Art Frisbees. 
limbo contests, dog tag 
making, face painters and 
more, held from noon to 4 
p.m. outside Gemmell. 
"The Water Horse" will be 
shown at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. 
in 250/252 Gemmell. 

Spray paint tattoos will 
be available from 1 1 a.m. 
to 3;30 p.m. on Sunday in 
the Gemmell Rotunda. 

The rain location for 
Lil Sib activities is Tippin 
Gymnasium. 



Email the VeNfiNGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango I'oice is published periodical!}, b},' the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil Citv'. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosoph> or views of the students, facultv. or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion Universit\' is committed to equal opportunit} and 
affinnative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
emplo) ment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to .Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

Veii-flMGo Voice 



Volume 40, Issue 7 Friday, April 4, 2008 



2008 Oil Region Job Fair slated 



The 2008 Oil Region 
Job Fair will be held on 
Thursda\', April 10, from 
1 1 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the 
Cranberr\' Mall, routes 
322 and 257 in Cran- 
berrv'. 

Students may visit 
the Venango Campus 
Career Center in 228/230 
Montgomer\ Hall for 
assistance to prepare for 
the job fair. Fair atten- 
dees should prepare for 
on-site interviews by 
bringing a resume and 
"dressina for success." 



Those in attendance 
will have the opportunity 
to meet with area em- 
ployers. 

Some employers at 
last year's event included 
AFLAC, County of Ve- 
nango, Forever Broad- 
casting, Keystone 
SMILES, National City, 
PA Department of Treas- 
ury, PA National Guard, 
PennDOT, PA State 
Civil Service, U.S. 
Army, Marine and Navy, 
Venango County Assis- 
tance Office, Webco In- 



dustries, Inc., and more. 

Attendees should 
register online prior to 
the event by creating a 
profile on Pennsylvania 
CareerL ink's Website at 
ww"w .cwds.state.pa.us. 

For more informa- 
tion about the 2008 Oil 
Region Job Fair, contact 
Venango Coordinator of 
Career Services Mark 
Conrad at 814-676-6591, 
ext. 1373 or mconrad 
@clarion.edu, or contact 
Oil Region CareerLink at 
814-678-5050. 



Prepare to register for 2008-09 



Registration for 
Summer 2008 sessions 
and Fall 2008 courses 
begins Monday, April 7. 
The Clarion University- 
Venango Campus ad- 
ministration recommends 
students take the follow- 
ing steps to prepare. 

• Watch for an e-mail 
from the Registrar's 
Office regarding 
your registration date 

• Review your course 
degree audit (Web 



for Students) 

• Check for academic 
or financial hold 
flags 

• Meet with your aca- 
demic advisor prior 
to your registration 
date 

• Preview/review 
schedules (http:// 
vvvvw.clarion.edu/ 
registrar/schedule/ 
index.shtml) 

For more informa- 
tion about class registra- 



tion, contact the Ve- 
nango Campus Adminis- 
trative Office during 
regular business hours at 
814-676-6591, or visit 
the office in Frame Hall. 

The Venango Ad- 
minisfrative Office is 
open Monday through 
Thursday, from 8:30 a.m. 
to 6 p.m., and on Friday, 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. 

Register on time to 
ensure v our spot! 



Attention, 
Students, 
Faculty, and 
Staff: 

• Be sure to take 
part in the Earth 
Day activities at 
Venango Campus 
on Thursday, 
April 10. The 
event will take 
place at Rhoades 
Center. 



Inside this issue: 




Job Fair 


1 


Registration 


1 


TrashTalk 


2 


Events 


2-6 


Earth Da^' 


3 


Construc- 
tion 


4 


PTK 


4 


Odd News 


S 



P,\(,i: 



Venango Voice 



Help eliminate e-waste, turn in cell phone 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI Secor 

Cell phones, ipods, com- 
puters, fax machines, print- 
ers, and other electronic 
equipment are known as 'e- 
waste' once they have passed 
their prime and are discarded. 
They contain valuable pre- 
cious metals and other com- 
ponents, most of which hap- 
pen to be extremely danger- 
ous and toxic to people and 
the environment. Exposure to 
these chemicals will cause a 
vast array of serious health 
problems. Some of these 



chemicals are persistent and 
bio accumulative, which 
means they build up in the 
environment, and take a long 
time to diminish, if ever. 

About 80 percent of the 
e-waste fi-om the United 
States is shipped to impover- 
ished countries for 
'recycling', most of it cell 
phones and computers. 
Workers, including children, 
process it by burning, smol- 
dering, melting, and soaking 
parts in acid baths to separate 
the valuable precious metals. 
They are unprotected by 
masks or gloves, and breathe 
in toxic fumes and handle 
dangerous chemicals directly. 
The parts left over, such as 
the stripped circuit boards 
and hard PVC outer shells are 
burned, dumped in rivers, or 
left stacked up to slowly de- 
compose, polluting the 
ground, air, and water. 

Currently, it is not illegal 
for companies in the U.S. to 
ship toxic waste to other 
countries. In fact, cargo ships 
are not even inspected before 



departing our shores. The 
Basal Ban Amendment of 
1995 banned the export of 
hazardous waste (including 
e-waste) fi^om developed to 
developing countries if both 
parties have signed the con- 
vention. Although the US 
has signed the treaty, it is 
the only developed country 
that has not yet ratified it, 
allowing American recy- 
cling businesses to export 
their electronic waste to be 
disassembled elsewhere. In 
fact, electronic waste is of- 
ten exempt from US laws 
governing the export of 
waste, including the require- 
ment to notify the country 
receiving the waste. It is 
also illegal for most of the 
countries that are processing 
e-waste, but governments 
look the other way for the 
sake of money. 

One particularly dis- 
turbing example is the Erren 
River in Taiwan. This area 
used to be one of the fore- 
runners in illegal e-waste 
recycling. In some places 



circuit boards are stacked 
up alongside the river as 
high as eight feet. The river 
is so polluted that a fish 
placed in the water will die 
in about two minutes! The 
cancer rate is almost four 
times greater than the 
United States, and human 
life expectancy is about 50 
years. 

Come to Earth Day 
April 10 in Rhoades Center 
and bring any old cell 
phones you or your family 
have, and enter to win one 
of four $50 Sheetz gift 
cards. After Earth Day, a 
container will remain in the 
bookstore for old cell 
phones to be donated. All 
money brought in fi^om the 
recycling program will be 
used to help make our cam- 
pus more environmentally 
fi^iendly. See you on Earth 
Day! Remember, small 
changes bring big results! 

Reference material: 
www.greenpeace.org, 
www.ban.org, www.nohar 
m.org, and www .etxocis.org. 



Academy nominated "Atonement" to be shown 



APRIL 

The PHEAA state grant 
deadline to complete the 
2008-09 Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid is Thurs- 
day, May I . 

With completed federal 
taxes, students can complete 
a FAFSA form at 
www.fafsa.ed.gov. 

The Interdenominational 
Christian Fellowship group 
meets the first and third Tues- 
days of every month, fi-om 
12:30-1:30 p.m., at 105 
Frame Hall. 



The group is open to 
anyone and is non- 
denominational. Visitors are 
invited to talk about God. 
faith, and the search for 
meaning, as well as invited to 
bring a lunch. 

The Clarion University - 
Venango Campus Independ- 
ent Film Series is fi^ee and 
open to the public. The series 
features films fi^om independ- 
ent filmmakers fi^om China, 
the United States, Iran, Japan, 
the United Kingdom, Colom- 
bia, and India. All films will 



be shown on Saturdays at 
7:30 p.m. in the Robert W. 
Rhoades Center Auditorium. 

Films scheduled for the 
Spring 2008 semester in- 
clude "Atonement", April 5; 
"Juno", April 12; 

"Waterhorse", April 19; and 
"Maria Full of Grace", April 
26. 

For more information 
about the film series, call 
Emily Aubele at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

Governor Rendell's 
Policy Office is seeking up 



to five students with an 
interest in public service 
and government for 2008 
summer internships. 

Interested students 
should e-mail their resume 
along with a cover letter to 
Patricia Grim at 

pgrimfoistate.pa.us. The 
student should indicate 
which policy area they 
would like to be considered 
for. Policy areas include: 
education; health care re- 
form; economic develop- 

See EVENTS page i 



X'OLLiME 40, Issue 7 



Page 3 



Earth Day celebration to be held April 10 



Clarion University-Venango 
Campus will celebrate Earth Day on 
Thursday, April 10. with a series of 
events held in the Robert W. Rhoades 
Center that focus on the critical need 
to protect the environment. All activi- 
ties are free and open to the public. 

From 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., par- 
ticipants can safely recycle their old 
cell phones in exchange for a chance 
to learn about e-waste and win a $50 
Sheetz gift card. 

Instructions for clearing personal 
information from cell phones prior to 
recycling are available at the website 
www.recellular.com/recycling/ 
dateeraser. Cell phone drop boxes 
will remain in the Venango Campus 
bookstore and at the TNT Deli, 401 



Third Street, Franklin, on an ongoing 
basis following Earth Day. 

From 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., partici- 
pants can test their knowledge of how to 
preserve our planet for generations to 
come with a "Sustainability Quiz". The 
first 100 quiz-takers will receive a free 
CFL. the new low-energy compact fluo- 
rescent light bulb that fits into standard 
lamps. 

At 1 p.m. and at 3 p.m., the 2007 
documentary about the environment, 
"The 1 1 th Hour," narrated by Leonardo 
DiCaprio, will be shown in the Rhoades 
Center auditorium. 

Dr. Joshua Pearce. Clarion Univer- 
sity physics professor, will discuss 
"Applied Sustainability" in the audito- 
rium at 5 p.m. 



The jazz/rock group 

"OneWayLane" will perform from 7 
p.m. until 8:30 p.m. outside Rhoades 
Center, weather permitting, or in the 
auditorium. 

During the band's break, Penn 
State Behrend chemistry student and 
environmental advocate, Olivia Hoer- 
mann, will speak. 

Earth Day was launched in 1970 
amid rising concern about the environ- 
ment across the nation, primarily on 
college campuses. Over 20 million peo- 
ple participated that year. The event is 
now observed in 1 75 countries by over 
500 million people each year. 

For more information, contact Pro- 
fessor Lola Deets at 676-6591, exten- 
sion 1217. 



EVENTS: Graduation Fair slated at Clarion University 



Continued from page 2 

ment and workforce; crimi- 
nal justice; and environ- 
mental issues, land use, and 
infrastructure. 

For more information, 
call Patricia Grim at 717- 
772-9068. 

A Graduation Fair for 
Spring 2008 graduates will 
be held Monday, April 7, 
from 1 1 a.m. to 6 p.m., at 
the Clarion University Book 
Center. Balfour, Jostens, and 
Collegiate Cap and Gown 
will be on hand to answer 
graduation questions and 
assist with the purchase of 
cap and gowns, armounce- 
ments, class rings, diploma 
frames, and more. 

Cap and gown packages 
include: bachelor outfit, 
S24.95; master outfit with 
hood, $54.00; and master 



hood only, $27.00. All items 
are available separately. 

Personalized graduation 
announcements will be avail- 
able to order at the fair and 
also online at 

www.balfourcollege.com or 
by phone at 1-877^225-3687. 

Jostens class rings start 
at $239, diploma frames will 
be 20 percent off this day 
only, and graduation t-shirts 
and blankets will also be 
available. 

If unable to attend, stu- 
dent teachers and Web stu- 
dents can order cap and 
gowns online to be shipped 
for $8.99 or be picked up at a 
later date. 

Venango students can 
order cap and gowns at the 
Venango Book Center. An- 
nouncements should be or- 
dered online. 

Sizes cannot be guaran- 
teed after Monday, April 28. 



For more information, 
call the Clarion Book Center 
at 814-393-2696. 

The Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education 
will present On Diversity and 
the University: A Brief, Opti- 
cal Odyssey on Tuesday, 
April 8, at 7 p.m., at Hart 
Chapel. The program is part 
of the Diversity Grant- 
International Speaker Series. 

A Baby Item Drive will 
be held through Friday, April 
18, to benefit pregnant and 
parenting students of Clarion 
University. Clothing, infant 
formula, non-perishable food 
items, toys and other baby- 
related items are welcome. 

Donations can be made 
through Thomas Rourke, 305 
Founders Hall, ext. 2369; or 
the Women's Studies Pro- 
gram, 207 Harvey Hall, ext. 



2720. 

The Praxis I Prep. 
(Writing) will be held 
Thursday, April 10, from 
7-8 p.m, for $20. 

The Praxis I Prep. 
(Mathematics) will be 
held Thursday, April 17, 
from 7-8 p.m. for $20. 

For more informa- 
tion, call the Continuing 
Education office at 814- 
676-6591, ext. 1273, or 
visit room 215 Frame 
Hall. 

The staff at the Ve- 
nango Campus Career 
Center in 228/230 Mont- 
gomery Hall can assist 
you in preparation for two 
local job fairs in the 
month of April. 

The Oil Region Job 

See EVENTS page 6 



P AGl 4 



Venango Voice 



Venango Campus to receive a few changes 



By Jon Cook 

Clarion University-Venango 
Campus is slated to get new look over 
the coming months. The Campus will 
be adding two new residential halls, 
along with renovations to Frame Hall 
and Rhoades Center; and a complete 
renovation and restoration to West 
End Pond. Most of these projects will 
be funded by private donations and 
grants. 

The enhancement and restoration 
of West End Pond was scheduled to 
begin in March and v\ill continue 
through the spring and summer. The 
work will start b>' returning the pond 
to its original size and depth, which 
have been altered over the years by 
overgrowth and silt deposits. After 
restoring the pond to its original ap- 
pearance, work will begin on enhanc- 
ing the amenities around the pond to 
create a recreational area for students 
and the community. The new ameni- 
ties will include lighted walkways, a 
pavilion, picnic benches, a new bridge, 
a fire pit. a four-sided Victorian style 



clock, and plantings of various flowers 
and shrubbery. 

The funding for the restoration was 
raised fi^om many sources within the 
community, including the Venango 
County Commissioners through the 
Growing Greener II and liquid fuels tax 
program, the Samuel Justus Charitable 
Trust, donations from Hank and Beverly 
Suhr, Nancy Cubbon. Libby Williams 
and National City Bank, along with 
grants fi^om Pennsylvania's Department 
of Community and Economic Develop- 
ment and the PA Department of Conser- 
vation and Natural Resources. 

Construction on the two new resi- 
dential halls is expected to start in the 
fall of 2008. This will be the fourth and 
fifth buildings of what is planned to be a 
seven-building student apartment com- 
plex located directly across from the 
campus on West First Street. The new 
three story building will be made possi- 
ble by donations from Joyce and Mike 
Hughes, who previously funded the Ed- 
ward V. and Jessie L. Peters Hall and the 
Michael F. and Joyce I. Hughes Hall. 
The new two-story building will be 



funded by an anonymous donor. The 
buildings should be ready for occu- 
pancy for the Fall 2009 semester. Both 
facilities, like the three existing apart- 
ment buildings in the complex, will be 
fully furnished and handicap accessi- 
ble. The apartments will include a 
kitchen, laundry facilities, and four 
single bedrooms with a dual living 
room dining area. The buildings will 
bring the total Venango student apart- 
ment occupancy to 92. All of the 
buildings in the Venango apartment 
complex are funded through private 
donations from generous community 
members and are owned and operated 
by the Clarion University Foundation. 
Inc. 

Venango Campus will also see 
restoration to two of their older build- 
ings. Frame Hall and Rhoades Center 
are slated for renovation this summer. 
Restrooms on the lower level of Frame 
Hall will be renovated, along with the 
locker rooms on the lower level of 
Rhoades Center. The renovations on 
both buildings will be funded by Key 
93. 



PTK selling Stromboli, will sponsor events 



Phi Theta Kappa will hold its 
April meetings on the following 
dates: Thursday, April 10, and 
Wednesday. April 23. Both meet- 
ings will be held at 4 p.m., at the 
club meeting room. 

Phi Theta Kappa is currently 
holding their Stromboli fundraiser 
through Thursday, April 10. 

Jane"s Stromboli are available 
for purchase in five different fla- 
\ors: broccoli and cheese: pepper- 
oni and cheese: combo - ham. sa- 
lami, pepperoni, green peppers, 
onions and cheese; deluxe - sweet 
sausage, green peppers, onions and 



cheese; and chicken, peppers, onions 
and cheese. 

All meat Stromboli contain tnoz- 
zarella and provolone cheeses. Broc- 
coli Stromboli contain mozzarella, 
provolone, and cheddar cheeses. 

Each frozen, individually 
wrapped Stromboli is $2.50. Strom- 
boli will be delivered Thursday. 
April 17. 

Contact any PTK officer or 
member to order. 

Phi Theta Kappa will sponsor the 
Faculty and Staff Appreciation 
Luncheon on Thursday, April 17. 
The event will be held at Rhoades 



Center from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 
p.m. 

Those who wish to attend 
should RSVP to Beth Jackson by 
Thursday, April 10, at bjack- 
son@clarion.edu or call 676-6591, 
ext. 1336. 

Phi Theta Kappa will also 
sponsor the sale of graduation bou- 
quets, which will be a\ailable for 
$5 at Commencement on Saturday, 
May 10. 

To order in advance, contact 
Joe Tackett, VP of Fundraising, at 
sjatackettirt'clarion.edu or 814- 
242-5385. 



X'OLUME 40, Issue 7 



Page 5 



Farm entrance was ^huge and impressive' 



Editor's Note: This ar- 
ticle part t^^'0 in a series 
about the River Ridge 
Farm. 

From 1991-1912, 
while the one-mile private 
rail track was being con- 
structed, along with its 
own rail station with rest- 
rooms and running water, 
Sibley employed hundreds 
of local men, along with 
surveyors, to construct 13 
miles of roads that would 
cross over six stone 
bridges. 

Guests that would be 
arriving by rail would 
walk under a 2 1 -ton mam- 
moth stone arch that was 
hewn from a solid boulder 
taken from the property. 
They would travel up to 
the mansion along a wind- 
ing road which had mani- 
cured flower gardens run- 
ning the full length on 
either side. It has been 
said that the archway was 
so huge and impressive 
that some people were 
afraid to walk under and 
chose to walk around it 
instead. 

Guests arriving by car 
or buggy would be met at 
the Gate House and es- 
corted to the mansion 
along a winding road 
where some places would 
have a 500-foot sheer 
drop-off down to the 
river. While fraveling 
along the road, guests 



would have the opportunity 
to take in the sheer beauty of 
the landscape and wildlife 
on the property. They would 
see four duck ponds that 
were 50 square feet and a 
larger pond that was 75 
square feet, in which there 
were three Roman-style 
marble sculptures of a 
young boy and girl holding 
an urn. Water would rise 
from heights of 35 feet or 
more from the sculpture. 

It must have been like 
traveling through a wildlife 
park as you drove along the 
valley floor. On the property 
were 14 Wapiti elk, 12 
American buffalo, horses, 
sheep. Angora goats, Poland 
China hogs (one weighing 
more than 1,100 lbs.), Pe- 
king ducks, white swans, 
domestic ducks, wild ducks 
and Canadian geese that 
would fly in for the summer. 

Eventually there would 
be 8.000 stone and concrete 
fence posts, 8-14 feet high, 
interconnected with hedges 
20 feet thick. There were 
also more than 95 varieties 
of flowering shrubs and 
plants around the mansion 
and throughout the property. 
There was a 7-acre under- 
ground sprinkler system and 
an irrigation system that 
extended to 400 acres of 
cultivated fields. 

Remember, it was 1913 
and this would have been 
quite a feat in those days, 
and consider the cost of do- 
ing it today. It had to have 



Got an opinion? Let's hear it] 

Send your signed letter to the editor to: 
vvoice@clarion.edu 



been a gardener's dream and 
makes one wonder what it 
must have looked like with 
everything in full bloom. 

It is no wonder that 
Sibley's mterest in farming 
helped develop many hybrid 
and pure-bred products and 
scientific farming methods. 
He would even invite local 
farmers to come out and 
learn new fanning methods, 
along with new types of 
plants and flowers that they 
could grow. 

Okay, now we have the 
rail line built, the roads and 
bridges all built. It's time to 
start on the major construc- 
tion of the mansion and the 
22 other buildings that 
would complete his dream 
and make it a show place 
where even presidents 
would want to come and 
spend some time. 




Vfznango Vole?, 

226 Montgomen.' Hall 

Clarion Universit>'-Venango Campus 

Oil City, PA 16301 

Phone: 814-676-6591. ext. 1289 Email: vvoice@cIarion.edu 



Adviser 

Dr. Joan Huber 
Staff 

Jon Cook 
Frank Rodgers 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Sma>da 

Christine Rodgers 
Lori Secor 



Policies 



The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion Universitj- 
Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The Voice is published 
most Fridays during the academic year. 

The editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be 
received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain 
anonjTnous. they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available 
space and at the discretion of the executive board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors ma>- earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who ftilfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
granted a co-curricular. 



P\l,l h 



Venango Xoicf 



EVENTS: Meg Allison to perfonn at Rhoades 



Continued from 



Pg- 



3 



Fair will be held on 
Thursday, April 10, from 
1 1 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the 
Cranberry Mall, routes 
322 and 257 in Cranberry. 

Those in attendance 
will have the opportunity 
to meet with area employ- 
ers. Attendees should pre- 
pare for on-site interviews 
by bringing a resume and 
"dressing for success". 

For more informa- 
tion, contact Oil Region 
CareerLink at 814-678- 
5050 or visit 

www.cwds.state.pa.us. 

Storyteller and per- 
former Meg Allison will 
perform on Friday, April 
18, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades 
Lounge. The event is 
sponsored by the Venango 
Campus Activities Board 
and is part of the Coffee 
House Series. 

Allison is an emerg- 
ing acoustic artist who 
writes her own melodies 
and lyrics. She appeared 
as a finalist on USA Net- 
work's "Nashville Star". 

T.J. Wheeler and the 
Smokers, a blues/jazz 
ensemble, will perform 
Monday, April 7, at 7:30 



p.m.. in Hart Chapel, as the 
closing program in Clarion 
University's 2007-08 Martin 
Luther King Jr. Speaker Se- 
ries. The program, sponsored 
by the Martin Luther King Jr. 
Committee and Minority Stu- 
dent Services, is free and 
open to the public. 

Wheeler is a blues and 
jazz guitarist, vocalist, educa- 
tor, and musical activist. 

VizArtz will hold its 
Open Studio Night Friday, 
April 18, at 7 p.m., through 
Saturday, April 19, at 7 a.m., 
in Marwick-Boyd. The event 
is open to all students. Re- 
freshments will be provided. 

For more information, 
contact Michelle Peters at 
s_mlpeters(a»clarion.edu. 

James Gemmell Student 
Leader award applications are 
now available. The award is 
named after former Clarion 
University president James 
Gemmell and is awarded to a 
student who demonstrates 
exceptional leadership to the 
Clarion University campus 
(Venango commuters eligi- 
ble). The recipient will re- 
ceive a cash award and have 
their name engraved on the 
Gemmell Leadership award 
plaque which is displayed in 
the Gemmell Student Com- 



plex. The recipient also re- 
ceives a framed print of Gem- 
mell Student Complex 
painted by a local artist. 

Qualifications for the 
award include: undergraduate 
student at Clarion University; 
minimum QPA of 2.50; must 
have demonstrated leadership 
at the Clarion University 
campus; must provide two 
letters of reference from Uni- 
versity faculty or staff; must 
complete the application 
form; and the student must 
provide a resume. 

Application fonns, let- 
ters of reference, and resumes 
must be turned in to Greta 
Lutz, Office of Campus Life, 
267 Gemmell, by 4 p.m. on 
Friday, April 1 1. 

Nominees will be invited 
to attend the 6th annual 
Reinhard Awards Ceremony 
to be held at 7 p.m. on 
Wednesday, April 30, in the 
Gemmell MPR, where the 
recipient will be announced. 

Two financial aid oppor- 
tunities for returning adult 
students (24 years of age or 
older) are available. 

The Pennsylvania Higher 
Education Assistance Agency 
(PHEAA) has funded cTarion 
University to award several 
Workforce Advancement 
Grants for Education (WAGE 



Grant) for the 2007-2008 
academic year. To qualify, 
you must be a permanent 
resident of Pennsylvania, 
demonstrate financial need 
and have a current Free Ap- 
plication for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) on file, and 
not already be a recipient of 
a PHEAA state grant. 
Graduates, undergraduates, 
and associate degree stu- 
dents are eligible. Nursing 
students are not eligible. 
Applications must be sub- 
mitted to the Office of Fi- 
nancial Aid by 5 p.m. on 
Tuesday, April 15. 

The Lois Borland 
Fulmer Scholarship for Re- 
turning Adult Students 
Committee is accepting ap- 
plications for the 2008-09 
academic year. Applicants 
must be full or part time 
undergraduate students (or 
post-baccalaureate students 
pursuing teacher certifica- 
tion) with a cumulative 
grade point average of at 
least a 3.00. Applications, 
letters of recommendation, 
and personal statements 
should be received by Mary 
Jo Phillips. Office of Finan- 
cial Aid, by 5 p.m. on Tues- 
day, April 15. For more in- 
formation, contact the Of- 
fice of Financial Aid at 814- 
393-2315. 



E-MAIL THE VeNflNGO VOlCe! VVOICE@CLARION.EDU 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The>' 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
empknment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 



VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

{PeNtJNGo \Poice 



Volume 40, Issue 8 Friday, April 11, 2008 



Faculty present at conference 



Dr. Kathleen T. Patter- 
son, director of Clarion 
Universit}''s School of 
Nursing and Allied Health 
located at the Venango 
Campus, and professor 
Renee Bloom, chair of the 
Department of Allied 
Health, presented at the 
Pennsylvania Center of 
Health Careers Conference 
in Camp Hill, Pa., on 
March 27. 

Their presentation 
focused on the Bachelor of 
Science in Radiologic 
Sciences degree program, 
in which students complete 
60 credits of science and 
general education at the 
Venango or Clarion cam- 
puses before progressing to 
a 24-month clinical educa- 
tion program at one of six 
clinical partner sites. These 
sites are UPMC Northwest 




in Seneca, UPMC Horizon 
in Greenville, UPMC Pres- 
byterian in Pittsburgh, 
Armstrong Center for 
Medicine and Health in 
Kittanning, Sharon Re- 
gional Health System in 
Sharon, Clearfield Hospital 
in Clearfield, and Christ 
Hospital in Jersey City, NJ. 
Entitled "Maximizing 
Student Outcomes: Creat- 
ing a Continuous Quality 
Improvement Process Be- 
tween University and 
Health Care Partners," their 



presentation detailed an 
initiative developed in 
collaboration with 
colleagues at UPMC North- 
west to support students 
who are in the clinical edu- 
cation component of the 
program. The template 
created by the university 
and hospital employs an 
interdisciplinary advising 
model that utilizes the di- 
verse resoiirces of both the 
university and hospital to 
improve quality and maxi- 
mize student potential. 



Meg Allison is slated to perform 

Meg Allison will 
appear at Clarion Univer- 
sity-Venango Campus on 
Friday, April 18. at 7 p.m. 
The performance will be 
held in the fourth-floor 
lounge of Montgomery Hall 
and is fi^ee and open to the 
public. 

Allison is a talented 
young pop/rock singer/ 
songwriter fi-om Chicago, 
whose work has been influ- 



enced by such acoustic folk 
artists as the Indigo Girls 
and Patty Griffin. Her first 
CD was entitled Just Get- 
ting My Feet Wet. She co- 
produced her second 
release, I'm With You, with 
Joshua Stevens, infusing a 
country flavor to her Mid- 
west sound. 

Allison has performed 
at four National Associa- 
tion for Campus Activities 



(NACA) conferences, 
booking more than 100 
college shows in 2007. 
Chosen from more than 
20,000 applicants to appear 
as one of 10 finalists on 
USA network's "Nashville 
Star," she made Chicago 
proud, advancing to the 
final six. Her experience on 
"Nashville Star" has given 
her exposure to new fans 
nationwide. 



Attention Stu- 
dents, Faculty, 
AND Staff: 

• The Adult Learners' 
Organization will 
bold a Spring 
Luau/Pig Roast on 
Saturday, April 1 9, 
Jrom 4 p.m. -7 p.m., 
at Montgomery 
Hall. 



Inside this issue: 


Venango 
Faculty 


1 


Meg Allison 


1 


Trash Talk 


2 


E\-ENTS 


2- 
8 


Library News 


3 


Lumber Training 


4 


Oil Creek News 


5 


State, National, 
World Ne\\-s 


6 


Odd News 


7 



Paci 2 



\'ENANGO Voice 



Think again when using that tissue paper 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORl SECOR 

Consumers can make a 
significant difference to the 
environment in choosing 
tissue products: toilet paper, 
facial tissues, napkins and 
paper towels. On average, 
each person in North Amer- 
ica uses 50 pounds of tissue 
products per year. The major- 
ity of the use is toilet paper. 
Not much we can do about 
that is there? Maybe there is. 
We can join a lot of other 
people, like Will Smith and 
most of Japan, and eliminate 



using toilet paper. No, \'m 
not talking a nasty surprise 
for whoever is doing the 
laundry, but installing toilets 
that shoot water at your back 
side to clean it, followed by a 
blast of air to dry. You'll save 
about 34 pounds of toilet 
paper per person every year, 
which translates to about 
$100 savings for a family of 
four in a year, plus a royal 
treatment for your backside. 

The most heavily mar- 
keted brands, such as 
Kleenex, Charmin, and 
Bounty, use virgin fibers and 
harmful bleaching processes 
to make their products. Most 
of the products are made with 
wood chips and sawdust from 
the timber industry'. The chlo- 
rine used to bleach paper 
products to make them 
brighter and whiter end up in 
the air and water, and is 
highly toxic to people and 
fish. 

What can we do to make 
a difference? Whenever pos- 
sible, avoid using disposable 
paper products. 



* Use a washcloth or sponge 
instead of paper towels. If 
every household used three 
less rolls per year, we would 
save 120,000 tons of waste 
and $4.1 million in landfill 
dumping fees! 

* Cloth napkins are better 
than disposable by far, and 
let's face it: using a cloth 
napkin can make even hot 
dogs and mac-n-cheese feel 
a bit more special. 

When we have to use 
disposable products, make 
smart choices. 

* Buy paper products with 
recycled content, especially 
post-consumer fibers. 

* Buy paper products made 
with clean, safe processes. 
Look for TCF (totally chlo- 
rine free) or PCF (processed 
chlorine fi'ee). 

Great brands to look for 
are Seventh Generation, 
Green Forest, and Marcal. 

How much of a differ- 
ence can buying recycled 
make? If ever\ household in 
the United States replaces 
one box of virsin fiber facial 



tissues with 100 percent 
recycled materials, we 
could save 163.000 trees. If 
we replace one roll of toilet 
paper, it could save 
423,900 trees. Paper tow- 
els? Replacing one roll 
saves 544,000 trees, and 
replacing just one package 
of napkins saves one mil- 
lion trees. 

Paper giant Kimberly- 
Clark, which makes 
Kleenex, says, "The op- 
tions are out there for con- 
sumers. They have voiced 
their preferences through 
their purchases." We, the 
consumer, can show the 
corporations that we want 
products that are better for 
the environment by making 
changes in the products we 
use. Remember, small 
changes can bring big re- 
sults! 

Reference material was 
found at: www.nrdc.org, 
www.conservatree.com, 
www.msnbc.com, 
www.coloradotrees.org. 
The Green Book. 



ALO will hold a Spring Luau and Pig Roast 



APRIL 

The Adult Learners' Organization 
will hold a Spring Luau/Pig Roast and 
Membership Drive for students and 
their families on Saturday, April 19, 
from 4 p.m. - 7 p.m., at the Montgom- 
ery Hall lower parking lot. The event 
is free to students and their families. 
Attendees are asked to bring a side 
dish or dessert. 

After the event, everyone is in- 
vited to attend the viewing of 
IVaterhorse, which will be shown at 
7:30 p.m., at the Latonia in Oil City. 

Sign up sheets for the Spring 
Luau/Pig Roast and Membership 



Drive are available throughout Ve- 
nango Campus. 

For more information, e-mail Traci 
at s_tlkarasins@clarion.edu. 

The next Community Playhouse 
production is Proof, which will be held 
April 18. 19. 24. and 25. at 8 p.m. each 
night, at Rhoades Auditorium at Ve- 
nango Campus. 

The production may contain some 
adult language and content. Tickets are 
$10. 

For more information, contact 
Community Playhouse at 814-677- 
7469. 



Rabbi Marvin Tokayer, the world's 
foremost expert on Jews in the Far East, 
will be the keynote speaker for Clarion 
University's Holocaust Remembrance 
observance on Monday, April 14. To- 
kayer will speak at 7:30 p.m., in Hart 
Chapel. The lecture is free and open to 
the public and will include the annual 
Reading of the Names ceremony to be- 
gin at 8 p.m. in Carlson Librarv. 

P.J. Hilbert will be the initial 
speaker in the inaugural College of 

See EVENTS page 3 



Volume 40, Issue 8 



Page 3 



Library offers research tips for students, faculty 



Suhr Librar)' staff would like to 
offer students some helpful informa- 
tion. 

Just in time for final research pa- 
pers, there are some new databases 
available to faculty' and students. The 
JSTOR Life Sciences Collection 
(http://www.jstor.org/search) contains 
160 journal titles spanning topics in 
the biological, health and general sci- 
ences. The collection contains the full 
text, in electronic form, of these titles 
from their inception to a moving wall 
of generally 3-5 years ago. This col- 
lection is a combination of the two 
JSTOR collections previously known 
as the Biological Sciences and Health 
and General Sciences Collections. 

Students and faculty also have 
access to four other JSTOR collec- 
tions: Arts and Sciences I and II, Busi- 
ness, and Language and Literature. 
Acquisition of this collection was 
made possible through the generosity 



of the outgoing Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education Chancellor, Dr. Judy 
G. Hample. 

Another new database is CHEMnet- 
BASE. Chemistry students and faculty, 
CHEMnetBASE is an outstanding resource 
just for you. It (http://www.chem net- 
base.com/) offers a number of basic refer- 
ence works in electronic full-text form, 
such as The Handbook of Chemistry and 
Physics, Combined Chemical Dictionary, 
Polymers: A Property Database, Properties 
of Organic Compounds, Dictionary of Ma- 
rine Natural Products, Dictionary of Food 
Compounds, Dictionary of Carbohydrates, 
and CRCPress Periodic Table Online. 

In addition, you also have access to 
CHEMLIBnetBASE: Chemistry Refer- 
ences Online (http://www.chem libnet- 
base.com/), which includes 330 full-text 
book titles covering the full range of chem- 
istry sub-disciplines. 

GreenFILE is the final new database. 
EBSCO GreenFILE offers well-researched 



information covering all aspects of 
human impact to the environment. 
Its collection of scholarly, govern- 
ment and general-interest titles in- 
clude content on the environmental 
effects of individuals, corporations 
and local/national governments, and 
what can be done at each level to 
minimize the effects. Multidiscipli- 
nar}' by nature, GreenFILE draws on 
the connections between the envi- 
ronment and a variety of disciplines 
such as agriculture, education, law, 
health and technology. 

Topics covered include global 
climate change, green building, pol- 
lution, sustainable agriculture, re- 
newable energy, recycling and 
more. 

The database provides indexing 
and abstracts for approximately 
295,000 records, as well as Open 
Access full text for more than 4,600 
records. 



EVENTS: Waterhorse will be shown at Latonia 



Continued from page 2 

Business Administration Reed Lecture 
Series, April 22, at 3:30 p.m., in Carter 
Auditorium, Still Hall, Clarion Uni- 
versity. Her presentation, "Managing 
in a Time of Crisis: Personal Leader- 
ship Lessons Learned in the Aftermath 
of 9/1 1," is free and open to the pub- 
lic. 

The PHEAA state grant deadline 
to complete the 2008-09 FAFSA is 
Thursday, May I . 

With completed federal taxes, 
students can complete a FAFSA form 
at www.fafsa.ed.gov. 

The Interdenominational Chris- 
tian Fellowship group meets the first 
and third Tuesdays of every month, 
from 12:30 p.m. — 1:30 p.m., at 105 
Frame Hall. 



The group is open to anyone and is 
non-denominational. Visitors are invited to 
talk about God, faith, and the search for 
meaning, and are invited to bring a lunch. 

The Clarion University-Venango 
Campus Independent Film Series is free 
and open to the public. The series features 
films from independent filmmakers from 
China, the United States, Iran, Japan, the 
United Kingdom, Colombia, and India. All 
films will be shown on Saturdays at 7:30 
p.m. in the Robert W. Rhoades Center 
Auditorium, except for "Waterhorse", 
which will be shown at the Latonia in Oil 
City. 

Films scheduled for the Spring 2008 
semester include Juno, April 12; 
Waterhorse, April 19; and Maria Full of 
Grace, April 26. 

For more information about the film 
series, call Emily Aubele at 814-676-6591, 
ext. 1269. 



Governor Rendell's Policy Of- 
fice is seeking up to five students 
with an interest in public service and 
government for 2008 summer in- 
ternships. 

Interested students should 
e-mail their resume along with a 
cover letter to Pafricia Grim at 
pgrim@state.pa.us. The student 
should indicate the policy area they 
would like to be considered for 
which. Policy areas include: educa- 
tion; health care reform; economic 
development and workforce; crimi- 
nal justice; and environmental is- 
sues, land use, and infrastructure. 

For more information, call 
Patricia Grim at 717-772-9068. 

A Baby Item Drive will be held 

See EVENTS page 4 



PAc;ir. 4 



Venango Voice 



Venango to offer lumber inspection training 



For the first time in 
its 60-year history of edu- 
cating lumber inspectors 
throughout the world, the 
National Hardwood Lum- 
ber Association (NHLA), 
headquartered in Mem- 
phis, Tenn., will offer the 
NHLA Lumber Inspection 
Training School off-site, 
thanks to the success of its 
five-year partnership with 
Clarion University- 
Venango Campus. Clarion 
University is the only 
university in the country 
to offer college credit for 
the NHLA program, 
awarding credits toward 
an associate degree 



through the university's 
Department of Applied 
Technology. 

In cooperation with 
Clarion University- 
Venango Campus, Key- 
stone Community Educa- 
tion Council (KCEC). and 
the Allegheny Hardwood 
Utilization Group 
(AHUG), NHLA will offer 
the Lumber Inspection 
Training School at the Ve- 
nango Technology Center 
in Oil City this summer 
from June 2 through Au- 
gust 8. 

Students who wish to 
earn Clarion University's 
Associate of Applied Sci- 



ence in Industrial Technol- 
ogy degree will be able to 
transfer as many as 22 cred- 
its toward the 60 credits 
required for the associate 
degree by successfully com- 
pleting the NHLA Lumber 
Inspection Training School 
curriculum. The balance of 
the coursework consists of 
general education and busi- 
ness courses that can be 
completed at the Venango 
Campus and/or online. 

To register for the 
NHLA Lumber Inspection 
Training School, contact 
Keystone Community Edu- 
cation Council at 814-677- 
4427. 



"This is a tremendous 
opportunity for those inter- 
ested in a career in hard- 
wood lumber inspection," 
said Dr. Christopher Reber, 
executive dean of Venango 
Campus. "Since more than 
100 of the 1.600 world- 
wide members of NHLA 
are located in the region 
served by Clarion Univer- 
sity-Venango Campus, 
offering a program that 
prepares hardwood lumber 
inspectors to move into 
management and owner- 
ship positions supports the 
campus' mission to con- 
tribute to the area's work- 
force development." 



EVENTS: Praxis I Prep, in mathematics slated 



Continued from page 3 

through Friday, April 18, to benefit 
pregnant and parenting students of 
Clarion University. Clothing, infant 
formula, non-perishable food items, 
toys and other baby-related items are 
welcome. 

Donations can be made through 
Thomas Rourke, 305 Founders Hall, 
ext. 2369; or the Women's Studies Pro- 
gram, 207 Harvey Hall, ext. 2720. 

The Praxis I Preparation in mathe- 
matics will be held Thursday, April 17, 
fi'om 7 p.m. — 8 p.m, for $20. 

For more information, call the 
Continuing Education office at 814- 
676-6591, ext. 1273, or visit 215 Frame 
Hall. 

Storyteller and performer Meg 
Allison will perform on Friday, April 



18, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades Lounge. The 
event is sponsored by the Venango Cam- 
pus Activities Board and is part of the 
Coffee House Series. 

Allison is an emerging acoustic art- 
ist who writes her own melodies and 
lyrics. She appeared as a finalist on USA 
Network's Nashville Star. 

VizArtz will hold its Open Studio 
Night Friday, April 18, at 7 p.m., 
through Saturday, April 19, at 7 a.m.. in 
Marwick-Boyd. The event is open to all 
students. Refreshments will be provided. 

For more infonnation, contact Mi- 
chelle Peters at smlpetersfSclarion.edu. 

Two financial aid opportunities for 
returning adult students (24 years of age 
or older) are available. 

The Pennsylvania Higher Education 
Assistance Agency (PHEAA) has funded 
Clarion University to award several 



Workforce Advancement Grants for 
Education (WAGE) for the 2007- 
2008 academic year. To qualif^', >ou 
must be a permanent resident of 
Pennsylvania, demonstrate financial 
need and have a current Free Appli- 
cation for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA) on file, and not already be a 
recipient of a PHEAA state grant. 
Graduates, undergraduates, and asso- 
ciate degree students are eligible. 
Nursing students are not eligible. 
Applications must be submitted to 
the Office of Financial Aid by 5 p.m. 
on Tuesday. April 15. 

The Lois Borland Fulmer Schol- 
arship for Returning Adult Students 
Committee is accepting applications 
for the 2008-09 academic year. Ap- 
plicants must be full- or part-time 
undergraduate students (or post- 
See EVENTS page 5 



\'OLUME 40, Issue 8 



Page 5 



Oil Creek State Park will hold these events 



Oil Creek State Park will 
feature a Bluebird Chat on Fri- 
day. April 18. from 6:30 p.m. to 
8 p.m.. at the Petroleum Centre 
Amphitheater. 

Local bluebird authority 
Toni Piccolin will discuss how 
and where to place boxes, how 
to monitor your bluebird boxes, 
what to look for when insects 
and predation hit. and legal and 



illegal activities. After his discussion, 
he will hold a question and answer 
session. Everyone will receive a free 
bluebird box for attending the pro- 
gram. Hand-outs and information will 
also be available. 

The Great PA Clean-up will be 
held at Oil Creek State Park on Sun- 
day, April 20, from 2 p.m. — 4 p.m. 
Volunteers should meet at Petroleum 
Centre Amphitheater. 



The event will begin with 
a half-hour program entitled 
Lessons in Litter. Volunteers 
will learn how litter affects 
wildlife and the environment. 
After the program, volunteers 
will break into groups to pick 
up litter along the state park 
roads. Scouts are welcome. 
Call 814-677-8076 to regis- 
ter. 



EVENTS: Pregnancy, parenting forum to be held 



Continued from page 4 

baccalaureate students pursuing 
teacher certification) with a cumula- 
tive average (QPA) of at least a 3.00. 
Applications, letters of recommenda- 
tion, and personal statements should 
be received by Mary Jo Phillips, Of- 
fice of Financial Aid, by 5 p.m. on 
Tuesday. April 15. 

For more information, contact 
the Office of Financial Aid, 104 Eg- 
bert Hall, or call at 814-393-23 15. 

The Clarion University Preg- 
nancy and Parenting Resources Fo- 
rum will be held Wednesday, April 
16, from 2 p.m. — 5 p.m., in Level A, 
Carlson Library. The forum will as- 
semble all of the major university 
offices that deal with students, and 
work out a coordinated program of 
services to aid pregnant and parent- 
ing students. 

The forum is open to all stu- 
dents, faculty and staff, and is free of 
charge. Refreshments will be served. 
Babysitting for parenting smdents 
will be available. 



The Career Services Center is in need 
of volunteer student ambassadors to assist 
with the 2008 Education Job Fair on 
Wednesday, April 16, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 
p.m.. in Tippin Gymnasium. Volunteers 
are needed to help with semp and various 
other tasks on the day of the event. 

For more information, e-mail Kayla 
at careers@clarion.edu as soon as possi- 
ble. Include name, e-mail address, phone 
number, and hours available to volunteer 
in the e-mail. 

Lil Sibs Weekend will be held at 
Clarion University main campus Friday, 
April 18 through Sunday, April 20. The 
event is free and open to all Clarion Uni- 
versity students and their guests - broth- 
ers, sisters, nieces, nephews, sons, and 
daughters. 

Friday will feature a pizza and pa- 
jama party at 7 p.m., in 250/252 Gem- 
mell. The film The Water Horse will be 
shown. 

On Saturday, there will be several 
activities, including an inflatable Velcro 
wall. Spin Art Frisbees, limbo contests, 
dog tag making, face painters and more, 
held from noon to 4 p.m. outside Gem- 
mell. The Water Horse will be shown at 2 



p.m. and 7 p.m. in 250/252 Gemmell. 

Spray-paint tattoos will be avail- 
able from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on 
Sunday in the Gemmell Rotunda. 

The rain location for Lil Sib ac- 
tivities is Tippin Gymnasium. 

The Clarion University Graduate 
Council and the Office of Research 
and Graduate Studies have an- 
nounced the call for proposals for the 
seventh annual Clarion University 
Graduate Student Research and Pro- 
fessional Activities Conference, 
"Crossing Disciplines and Establish- 
ing New Frontiers." The conference 
will be held on Sunday, April 20, 
from 2 p.m. — 5 p.m., on Level A, 
Carlson Library. The conference is 
part of the larger Academic Excel- 
lence Series hosted by Clarion Uni- 
versity. 

Submissions are invited from 
any current or continuing graduate 
smdent as well as December 2007 
graduates of any Clarion University 
graduate program. The deadline for 
absfracts is Friday, April II , at 4 p.m. 

See EVENTS page 8 



PAGt 6 



Venango Voice 



State 



Republicans call for voters 



HARRISBURG. Pa. (AP) 
- Pennsylvania Republi- 
cans on Wednesday out- 
lined a strategy to reverse 
the tide of voters aban- 
doning their ranks in favor 
of the Democrats. 

Party leaders said 
they will kick off a state- 
wide voter registration 
drive on primary day — 
April 22 — in a year that 
the intensely competitive 
race for the Democratic 
presidential nomination 
has prompted many Re- 
publicans to switch par- 
ties. 

Republicans will be 
coordinating a grass-roots 
voter signup effort with 
count)' chairmen and have 
been negotiating with a 
firm that would pursue 
cases of fi^audulent De- 
mocratic registrations. 
The state GOP will be 
providing lists of party- 
switchers for volunteers to 
contact, and officials said 
they e.xpect to bring two 
out of five defectors back 
into the Republican fold. 

National 



"We do want them 
back." said John McNally, 
who is in charge of the ini- 
tiative for the Republican 
State Committee. "1 want to 
assure every Republican that 
our party plans to address 
this issue." 

As of Sunday. Democ- 
ratic registration stood at 4.2 
million, up nearly 8 percent 
since the November elec- 
tion. The state had 3.2 mil- 
lion registered Republicans, 
a drop of nearly 2 percent 
from the fall. Voters not 
affiliated with either major 
party numbered 943.000. a 
reduction of just over 4 per- 
cent. 

Republicans said most 
of their decline consists of 
people switching to vote in 
the Democratic primary 
against Sen. Barack Obama, 
eT-III., or Sen. Hillary 
Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y.. 
rather than for one of them. 

Arizona Sen. John 
McCain is the presumptive 
Republican nominee. 
Copyright 2008 The Associ- 
ated Press. 



World 



Father gives up on Diana case 



LONDON (AP) - Mohamed 
Al Fayed said Tuesday that he 
was abandoning a quest to 
prove his belief that Princess 
Diana and his son were killed 
by British secret agents. 

Al Fayed said he reluc- 
tantly accepted a coroner's jury 
ruling that Diana and Dodi 
Fayed were unlawfully killed 
due to reckless speed and 
drinking by their driver, and 
by the reckless pursuit of the 
paparazzi chasing them. 

"Enough is enough." 
Fayed said in an interview 
with ITV News broadcast 
Tuesday night. "For the sake 
of the two princes, who 1 know 
loved their mother." 

Al Fayed, the Harrods 
department store owner, said 
he still believed the couple 
was murdered and that the 
evidence presented at the in- 
quest supported his theory. 

"I'm a father who has lost 
his son and I've done every- 
thing for 10 years. But now 
with the verdict 1 accept it, but 
with reservations," he said. 

"But I have (had) enough. 
I'm leaving the rest for God to 



get my revenge," Al Fayed 
said. "I'm not doing any- 
thing any more ... this is the 
end." 

The coroner. Lord Jus- 
tice Scott Baker, had told 
the jury that Al Fayed and 
his legal team had not pro- 
duced any evidence that the 
Secret Intelligence Service, 
known as M16, was in- 
volved in the fatal car crash 
in Paris on Aug. 31, 1997. 

Prime Minister Gordon 
Brown backed the princess 
as well. "I think the prin- 
cess, William and Harry, 
have spoken for the whole 
country when they say this 
is time to bring this to an 
end," Brown said Tuesday. 

Al Fayed had claimed 
that MI6 agents were taking 
orders from Prince Philip, 
the husband of Queen Eliza- 
beth II. 

When he testified under 
oath, Al Fayed said he 
would accept the jury's ver- 
dict. 

Copyright 2008 The Associ- 
ated Press. 



Olympic torch journey causes security stir in San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Security was 
being tightened around the city Wednes- 
day as officials mobilized for protests in 
response to the Olympic torch's only 
North American stop on its journey to 
Beijing. Before dawn, supporters of 
China's role as host of the games gathered 
on the city's waterfront. 

The Olympic torch's 85.000-mile 
global journey is the longest in Olympic 
history, and is meant to build excitement 
for the games. But it has also been a tar- 
get for activists angered over China's hu- 
man rights record. 



As runners carry the torch on its 
six-mile route Wednesday, they will 
compete not only with people protest- 
ing China's grip on Tibet and its sup- 
port for the governments of Myanmar 
and Sudan, but also with more obscure 
activists. They include nudists calling 
for a return to the way the ancient 
Greek games were played. 

Law enforcement agencies 
erected metal barricades Wednesday 
morning and readied running shoes, 
bicycles and motorcycles for officers 
preparing to shadow the runners cho- 



sen for the relay. 

Local officials say they support 
the diversity of viewpoints, but have 
ramped up security following chaotic 
protests during the torch's stops in 
London and Paris and a demonstra- 
tion Monday in which activists hung 
banners from the Golden Gate bridge. 

The torch is scheduled to travel a 
route hugging San Francisco Bay. but 
security concerns could prompt a 
last-minute change. 
Copyright 2008 The Associated 
Press. 



Volume 40, Issue 8 



Page 7 



Mansion was ornately furnished throughout 



Editor's Note: This article 
is part three in a series 
about the River Ridge 
Farm. 

E\ en though local men 
worked to build the roads 
and bridges on the prop- 
em. Sibley wanted sea- 
soned stone masons to 
build his home. For this 
massive project he brought 
in 75 Italian stonemasons 
who started work on the 
mansion around May 1913. 

The project could 
never be accomplished 
today in the short period 
these workers completed it. 
Sibley moved into the 
house on October 22. 1913, 
though the complete inte- 
rior wasn't finished until 
November 30. 1913. .A.11 in 
all. it took only about seven 
months from start date to 
finish date. As you drive by 
and see how impressive the 
place is. it seems pretty 
amazing that this was ac- 
complished in such a short 
period of time. 

\Miile work on the 
house was underway. 
Sibley met the woman who 
would soon become his 
second wife, and she w ould 
be the one to add character 
in the 33 rooms and 27 
baths that would fill the 
house. The house was built 
with three wings that were 
separate but still coimected 



and nvo towers on either 
end. Each wing had its own 
living room and the main 
wing consisted of a living 
room, librarv. banquet hall, 
and kitchen, with seven 
rooms near the kitchen for 
servants and three full-time 
cooks. 

There were 15 stone 
and brick fireplaces, with 
the largest being 12 feet 
long by 10 feet high and 
made of imported marble 
inlaid with silver and gold 
ore. The smaller fireplaces 
were considered somewhat 
plain because they were 
onl\" inlaid with bronze and 
on\-x. 

No expense was 
spared on the interior. The 
front breakfast room had a 
simken garden with a four- 
foot marble statute of cupid 
that spouted water continu- 
ousl>' from its arrow. The 
main living room had a 24- 
foot coconut palm tree, and 
papava and orange trees. 
There were paintings by 
Lucien W. Powell, hand- 
crafted English and French 
fiimiture. and Italian. Chi- 
nese, and Japanese carv- 
ings. There were also 
sculptures of wood, metal, 
jade, marble, and porcelain, 
Chinese and oriental car- 
pets, and Persian rugs. 

The librarv' was filled 
with rare first-edition 
books in Enslish. French. 



Donl see what you're looking forP 

LET US KNOW! 

Send your ideas for the 

\P(2:nango l^o/e^lO: 
woice@clarion.edu 



Latin, and German, marble 
statutes from Italy and 
Greece, and .\merican In- 
dian and Alaska Eskimo 
wood and bone carvings. 
Some people may have con- 
sidered Sibley a bit eccen- 
tric; he even had an Afiican 
lion carved from a solid 1 1 
oimce diamond. It would be 
hard to fathom the amount 
of money that was spent just 
ftimishing the place; and 
this was just the beginning. 
That was not to mention the 
seven baby grand pianos 
that were arranged through- 
out the mansion or the fur- 
nishings that were bought 
and imported in order to 
finish off the bedrooms. I 
w ill get into that in the next 
part, and Til also tell you 
about the man\' other build- 
ings that were built on the 
property and the purpose for 




Vgnango Voieg 

226 Montgomep. Hall 

Clarion Uni\ersit\- - Venango Campus 

OilCit}'. PA1630l 

Phone: 814-676-6591. ext. 1289 E-mail: \-\ oice2clarion.edu 



Adviser 

Dr. Joan Huber 
Staff 

Jon Cook 
Frank Rodaers 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Sma% da 



Christine Rodgers 
Lori Secor 



Policies 



The Venango Voice is the studeni-nm newspaper of Clarion UniversiU' of 
Pennsylvania-Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The Voice is 
pubUshed most Fridays during the academic >ear. 

The editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenit>"; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be 
received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain 
anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PS.'^sl are published onh based on available 
space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. Publication is not guaran- 
teed. 

Communication majors ma> earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff The> should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Onl\- students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
granted a co-curricular. 



Page 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Clarion UAB is holding photo contest 



Continued from page 5 

Visit www.clarion.edu/ 
gsrc for more information. 

University Activities 
Board will hold a photo con- 
test open to all students. 
Winners will have their pic- 
ture made into a poster and 
hung in the Gemmell Stu- 
dent Center for the follow- 
ing academic year. 

Categories include: 
Greek life, campus/ 
residence life, athletics. 
UAB event, Clarion County 
Nature. Autumn Leaf Festi- 
val, CampusFest. and open 
pictures. 

Pictures must be sub- 
mitted to the UAB office 
(249 Gemmell) by Thurs- 
day, April 24, at 4 p.m. Pho- 
tos should be printed from a 
professional developer 
(CVS, Wal-Mart, etc.). 
Computer print-outs will not 
be accepted. Pictures cannot 
contain any alcohol or ille- 
gal substances and cannot 
have any other university's 
logo in it. 

For more information, 
contact Kristi McManus at 
s_klmcmanus(aiclarion.edu. 

Special Olympics is 



looking for volunteers to assist 
in many ways at the Sunday, 
April 27 event. Volunteers are 
needed to help athletes one- 
on-one. assist with food prepa- 
ration, assist in Olympic Vil- 
lage, and more. 

For more information and 
registration forms, contact 
Erica at clarionsopa2008 
(fliyahoo.com. 

The Writing Center at 
Clarion University has a 
graduate assistantship opening 
for a writing consultant. 

Prior writing center ex- 
perience is not required; all 
individuals receive training for 
the position. 

Graduate assistants who 
work 17 hours per week will 
receive full tuition remission 
plus a stipend for the year. 
Graduate assistants who work 
8.5 hours per week will re- 
ceive half-tuition remission 
plus a stipend for the year. 

Interested individuals 
should be strong writers who 
are responsible, flexible, de- 
pendable, curios, polite, com- 
passionate, professional, open 
to learning how to work with 
writers, and a native speaker 
of English (or have training/ 
experience in teaching Eng- 
lish). 



To apply, complete and 
submit an application form; 
submit a letter addressing 
prior experience, graduate 
experience, and long-term 
goals; and submit a current 
resume to: Dr. Kathleen 
Welsch, Writing Center Di- 
rector, English Department, 
Davis Hall. The deadline to 
apply is Wednesday, April 



MAY 

Clarion University's 
Interfratemity and Panhel- 
lenic councils have joined 
forces with the Make-A-Wish 
Foundation to grant the wish 
of a local three-year-old girl. 
A 5-K race will be held on 
Sunday, May 4. and will be- 
gin at 8:30 a.m. 

For more information 
and the registration form, 
visit www.clarion.edu/ stu- 
dent/ocl/greeklife/5k.htm. 

The University Book 
Center at Clarion University 
is having a sale on music 
CDs through May 10. Take 
20 percent off all in stock 
music CDs. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

The Study Abroad Club 
at Clarion University is de- 



signed to bring students who 
have studied abroad together 
to share experiences. Any- 
one who is interested in 
traveling abroad is also wel- 
come to learn more about 
traveling. 

To join the Study 
Abroad Club, contact Tia 
Younginger at stlyounging 
iS'clarion.edu. Sara Hines at 
s sghinesfgiclarion.edu, or 
Cait Tomeo at scm 
tomeo@clarion.edu. 

The Pregnancy and Par- 
enting Recourses Initiative 
(PPRI). composed of fac- 
ulty, staff and students, is 
working to better serve Clar- 
ion University parents striv- 
ing to attain a higher educa- 
tion. 

Anyone interested in 
participating should e-mail 
Bonita Mullen at 
s_bcmullen@clarion.edu or 
call the Women's Studies 
office at 814-393-2720. 

The Oil City YMCA is 
available for the use of Ve- 
nango Campus students who 
have paid an activity fee. 



Email the VeNfiNGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The I'enango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University' of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil Citv'. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The> 
are not necessarih' the philosophy or views of the students, facultv. or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion Universit}' is committed to equal opportunit> and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunitv' inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

\PeNfjNGo Voice 



Volume 40, Issue 9 



Friday, April 18, 2008 



Venango professor's article was 
published in medical journal 



By Kerri Smayda 

Dr. Ellen Foster, assis- 
tant professor of English at 
Clarion University - Ve- 
nango Campus, first pre- 
sented her article, "A Rig- 
orous Mind Meets Her 
Yielding Body: Intellectual 
Life and Meaning Making 
in Wif, at a medical hu- 
manities conference at 
Bucknell University in Oc- 
tober 2006. 

The article is about the 
cancer-patient play and 
movie "Wit", and 
"examines the intellectual, 
professional and personal 
decisions doctors and pa- 
tients make as they come to 
terms with a terminal ill- 
ness," as reported by The 
ROCK, Slippery Rock Uni- 
versity's magazine. Foster 
received her master of arts 



degree in English at SRU. 

Foster said her article 
was well received, and that 
she was encouraged to pub- 
lish it, specifically in the 
Annals of Internal Medi- 
cine. The journal has a 
rather low acceptance rate, 
Foster pointed out, but a 
very high impact factor. 
Her manuscript was ac- 
cepted, though, and pub- 
lished early in September 
2007. She also was invited 
to give a podcast on the 
article with one of the an- 
nals' editors (You can find 
it online at www. annals, 
org. Follow the audio/video 
link.). 

To her delight, the pub- 
lication of the article 
brought about recognition 
from two physicians, one 
who invited her to "co- 
establish a discussion group 



on the importance of medi- 
cine as an intellectual and 
human experience," said 
Foster. "Most important, to 
me, at least..." Foster 
added, "Margaret Edson, 
the author of "Wit", wrote 
me a personal note, telling 
me that my article brought 
her new insight into her 
work - that the intellectual 
really is an important part 
of professor Bearing's ex- 
perience in approaching her 
own mortality. That was, as 
you might imagine, a pretty 
cool piece of mail." 

Dr. Ellen Foster serves 
as co-chair on the Presiden- 
tial Commission on the 
Status of Women at Clarion 
University and also as a 
member of the faculty sen- 
ate, where she is a member 
of the Venango Campus 
committee. 



Luau, pig roast to highlight ALO event 



APRIL 

The Adult Learners' 
Organization will hold a 
Spring Luau/Pig Roast and 
Membership Drive for stu- 
dents and their families on 
Saturday, April 19, from 4- 
7 p.m., at the Montgomery 



Hall lower parking lot. The 
event is free to students and 
their families. Attendees are 
asked to bring a side dish or 
dessert. 

After the event, every- 
one is invited to attend the 
viewing of "Waterhorse", 



which will be shown at 
7:30 p.m., at the Latonia in 
Oil City. 

Sign up sheets for the 
Spring Luau/Pig Roast and 
Membership Drive are 

See EVENTS page 2 



Attention 
Students, Fac- 
ulty, AND Staff: 

• The Community 

Playhouse production 
of'ProoJ" will he held 
at Khoades Audito- 
rium April 18, 19, 
24, and April 25, at 
8 p.m. each night. 



Inside this issu 


E: 




Professor Pub- 
lished 


1 


Events 


1 
6 


Trash Talk 


2 


Earth Day 
Thanks 


3 


State, 
national, 
World News 


4 


Trivia 


5 


PTK News 


5 



Pa(,i 2 



Venango Voice 



Be earth-friendly when caring for your lawn 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 



Spring is upon us. Soon 
we will be planting flowers, 
treating and watering our 
lawns, and starting gardens. 
How do we get those beauti- 
ful, lush, green lawns? Well, 
if you are like millions of 
other Americans, you'll run 
to the nearest garden section 
and buy weed and feed or a 
quick-release fertilizer. Do 
you really know what is go- 
ing on behind the scenes? 
Almost all of the active ingre- 



dients are made from petro- 
leum, which doesn't exactly 
process cleanly, and, of 
course, increases our de- 
pendency on fossil fuels. 
We use A LOT of them too. 
Every year. Americans use 1 
billion pounds of these ac- 
tive ingredients. But. what 
happens when you put it on 
your lawn? 

To begin with, pesti- 
cides and herbicides aren't 
exactly healthy for your 
lawn. That was a surprising 
bit of information. It's a 
typical unending cycle - 
increased use of pesticides 
can seriously harm the soil 
health and actually increases 
lawn disease, which makes 
it really difficult to get a 
green lawn without the use 
of more chemicals. 

Let's talk chemicals. 
The active ingredients used 
in most lawn care products 
are suspected carcinogens. 
They irritate the skin and 
eyes, and may affect the 
nervous system, hormones, 
and endocrine systems. 
Children are especially sen- 



sitive to toxins such as 
these, and are more likely to 
be exposed. And think, we 
walk through our yards and 
track these chemicals into 
our homes, so even the little 
ones are getting further ex- 
posure while crawling 
around on the carpet. 

Our exposure to these 
chemicals is beyond spend- 
ing time in the yard. Pesti- 
cides travel through the 
storm drains and end up in 
our water supply. We are 
also exposed in food. dust, 
and the air. Once the chemi- 
cals hit the lakes, streams, 
and reservoir, those ecosys- 
tems are also affected. These 
chemicals increase algae 
growth and reduce oxygen 
levels, killing fish and other 
important organisms in the 
water. 

What can we do to get 
that pretty yard without us- 
ing all those chemicals? Use 
compost - it will fertilize 
your lawn naturally. Aerate 
the top 3-4 inches of soil 
when you see water standing 
that isn't being absorbed 



into the ground. Mow 
when the grass is two or 
three inches high and leave 
the clippings on the 
ground. The higher the 
grass, the deeper the root 
systems. That means the 
grass can better withstand 
drought, pests, heat, and 
disease. If you have to w a- 
ter the grass, do it earh in 
the morning. 

Don't worry about a 
few weeds. Seriously, they 
aren't hurting a thing. If 
there are lots of weeds, try 
an organic vinegar-based 
herbicide, available at most 
lawn and garden centers. 
Agway in Oil City also 
carries a line of products 
by Espoma. a compan> that 
makes organic lawn care 
products. Remember, small 
changes can bring big re- 
sults! 

Reference materials 
for this article can be 
found at: www.gov 
link.org, www.epa.gov. 
www.madehow.com, 
www .deliciousorganics.co 



EVENTS: "Proof will be held at Rlioades Auditorium 



Continued from page 1 

available throughout Ve- 
nango Campus. 

For more information, 
e-mail Traci at stlkar 
asins@clarion.edu. 

The next Community 
Playhouse production is 
"Proof, which will be held 
April 18. 19, 24. and 25, at 8 
p.m. each night, at Rhoades 
Auditorium at Venango 



Campus. 

The production may con- 
tain some adult language and 
content. Tickets are $10. 

For more information, 
contact Community Playhouse 
at 814-677-7469. 

The Men's Volleyball 
Club at Clarion University will 
host open practices for all men 
interested in playing competi- 
tive volleyball for the Fall 
2008 - Spring 2009 semesters. 



Practices will be held at 
6 p.m. on Tuesday, April 29, 
and at 7 p.m. on April 23 
and April 30. All practices 
will be held at the Clarion 
University Recreation Cen- 
ter. 

For more information, 
contact Chuck Shoemaker at 
cupmensvballfa)clarion.edu. 

Lift Every Voice Gos- 
pel Family will host their 
annual Spring Gospel on 



Sunda>'. April 20. at 5 
p.m., at Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room. The con- 
cert is free and open to the 
public. 

There will be guest 
choirs, including Youngs- 
town State University's 
Gospel Choir and Califor- 
nia University of Pennsyl- 
vania's Gospel Choir, 
mime teams, and special 

See EVENTS page 3 



\OLUME 40. Issue 9 



Page 3 



Thanks, congrats to participants of Earth Day 



By Lori Secor 

I would like to thank e\e- 
none who took part in the 
Earth Da} activities at Clarion 
Uni\ersit}' — Venango Campus 
on Thursda\. April 10. 

Thank \ou to e\er\one 
who donated their old cell 



phones! You helped us collect 
more than 50 cell phones, e-waste 
that will now be disposed of re- 
sponsibK". 

Congratulations to the follow- 
ing winners, who submitted their 
names in a draw ing after turning in 
their old phones. Each received a 
S50 Sheetz sift card. The winners 



are: Shannon Shuffstall. Nichole 
DeWood}. Patt>^ Shontz, and 
Angle Harriett. 

Just a reminder, the donation 
box to dispose of old cell phones 
will remain in the bookstore. 
Please bring in any unused cell 
phones and batteries you have. 

Thank vou! 



EVENTS: FAFSA state grant deadline is nearing 



Continued from page 2 

guests from Pittsburgh. Philadel- 
phia, and North Carolina. 

PJ Hilbert will be the initial 
speaker in the inaugural College of 
Business .A.dministration Reed Lec- 
ture Series. .A.pril 22. at 3:30 p.m.. in 
Carter .A.uditorium. Still Hall. Clar- 
ion Universip.-. Her presentation. 
"Managing in a Time of Crisis: Per- 
sonal Leadership Lessons Learned 
in the .A.ftermath of 9 1 1 ." is free 
and open to the public. 

The PHEAA state grant dead- 
line to complete the 2008-09 Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid 
is ThursdaN . Ma\ 1 . 

With completed federal taxes, 
students can complete a F.A.FSA 
form at wvwv. fafsa.ed.gov. 

The Interdenominational Chris- 
tian Fellowship group meets the first 
and third Tuesda> s of even, month. 
from 12:30-1:30 p.m.. at 105 Frame 
Hall. 

The group is open to anyone 
and is non-denominational. Visitors 



are in\ited to talk about God. faith, and 
the search for meaning, as well as in- 
\ ited to bring a lunch. 

The Clarion University -Venango 
Campus Independent Film Series is free 
and open to the public. The series fea- 
tures films from independent filmmakers 
from China, the United States. Iran. Ja- 
pan, the United Kingdom. Colombia, 
and India. All films will be shown on 
Samrda\s at 7:30 p.m. in the Robert W. 
Rhoades Center Auditorium, except for 
■"W aterhorse". which will be shown at 
the Latonia in Oil Cit>'. 

Films scheduled for the Spring 2008 
semester include "Waterhorse". April 
19: and "Maria Full of Grace". April 26. 

For more information about the film 
series, call Emily Aubele at 814-676- 
6591. ext. 1269. ' 

Governor RendeU's policy office is 
seeking up to fi\e smdents w ith an inter- 
est in public service and government for 
2008 summer internships. 

Interested smdents should e-mail 
their resume along with a cover letter to 
Patricia Grim at pgrim gstate.pa.us. The 
smdent should indicate which polic\- 
area the%- would like to be considered 



for. Polic)- areas include: education; 
health care reform: economic develop- 
ment and workforce: criminal justice; 
and en\ ironmental issues, land use, 
and infrastructure. 

For more information, call 
Patricia Grim at 717-772-9068. 

Stor\teller and performer Meg 
Allison will perform on Friday, April 
1 8. at 7 p.m.. in Rhoades Lounge. The 
event is sponsored by the Venango 
Campus Activities Board and is part of 
the Coffee House Series. 

Allison is an emerging acoustic 
artist who writes her own melodies 
and Krics. She appeared as a finalist 
on USA Network's -'Nashville Star". 

Viz,Artz will hold its Open Smdio 
Night Friday. April 18. at 7 p.m.. 
through Samrday. April 19, at 7 a.m., 
in Marwick-Bo>d. The event is open 
to all smdents. Refreshments will be 
provided. 

For more information, contact 
Michelle Peters at s_mlpeters 
a clarion.edu. 



See EVENTS page 6 



Paci 4 



\'ENANGO Voice 



State 



Clinton visits university, scheduled for more stops in PA 



INDIANA, Pa. (AP) - For- 
mer President Bill Clinton 
says his wife. Sen. Hillary 
Rodham Clinton, will be 
the best president for small 
towns like Indiana, where 
he was greeted b> hundreds 
of residents and university 
students. 



Organizers of Wednes- 
day's event at Indiana Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania hung a 
large yellow sign saying 
"Rural Country, Clinton Coun- 
try." an apparent reference to 
Sen. Barack Obama's recent 
comments that small town 
folks are bitter because of job 



losses. 

Clinton immediately 
pointed to the sign and 
thanked the audience. He 
says his wife's campaign has 
focused on small towns and 
rural areas because that is 
America. 

President Clinton is 



scheduled to move on to 
appearances in Kittan- 
ning. Clarion, New Castle 
and Cranberry Township 
in Butler County on 
Wednesday. 

Copyright 2008 The As- 
sociated Press. 



National 



Anniversary of VA Tech massacre brings remembrance 



BLACKSBURG. Va. (AP) 
- A sea of people wearing 
orange and maroon flowed 
onto the main lawn at Vir- 
ginia Tech on Wednesday, 
some clutching single 
roses, to remember the 
victims of worst mass 
shooting in modem U.S. 
history. 

They gathered on the 
same field where a white 



candle lit at midnight began a 
day of mourning for the 32 
people killed a year ago by a 
student gunman who killed 
himself as police closed in. 

While this close-knit 
campus of 27.000 has worked 
hard to move on, the anniver- 
sary of the killings has left 
many struggling to cope. 
Some weren't sure how best 
to honor the dead. 



Gov. Timothy M. Kaine 
ordered state flags flown at 
half-staff, and a statewide mo- 
ment of silence at noon fol- 
lowed by the tolling of bells. A 
candlelight vigil was set for 
the evening. 

Commemorations of those 
who were killed started Tues- 
day. A small bouquet of white 
carnations lay outside Norris 
Hall, where uunman Seung- 



Hui Cho and 30 others 
died. 

Other mementoes 
appeared at the ring of 32 
memorial stones placed 
months ago on the main 
lawn. 

No public memorials 
were planned for Cho. 

CopNTight 2008 The As- 
sociated Press. 



World 



Associated Press photographer released by U.S. military 



BAGHDAD (AP) _ The 
U.S. military released As- 
sociated Press photogra- 
pher Bilal Hussein on 
Wednesday after holding 
him for more than two 
years without filing formal 
charges. 

Hussein, 36, was 
handed over to AP col- 
leagues at a checkpoint in 
Baghdad. He was taken to 
the site aboard a prisoner 
bus and left U.S. custody 



wearing a traditional Iraqi 
robe. He was smiling and 
appeared in good health. 

AP President Tom 
Curley said Hussein "is safely 
back with AP and his family, 
and it is a great relief to us." 

The U.S. military had 
accused Hussein of links to 
insurgents, but did not file 
specific charges. In Decem- 
ber, military authorities 
brought Hussein's case into 
the Iraqi court system for 



possible trial. 

But an Iraqi judicial panel 
this month dismissed all pro- 
ceedings against Hussein and 
ordered his release. A U.S. 
military statement on Monday 
said Hussein is no longer con- 
sidered a threat. 

Hussein and the AP de- 
nied any improper contacts, 
saying Hussein was doing the 
nonnal work of a photogra- 
pher in a war zone. He was 
detained by U.S. Marines on 



April 12. 2006 in Ramadi, 
about 70 miles west of 
Baghdad. 

Hussein was a mem- 
ber of the AP team that 
won a Pulitzer Prize for 
photography in 2005, and 
his detention drew pro- 
tests from rights groups 
and press freedom advo- 
cates. 

Copyright 2008 The As- 
sociated Press. 



\'OLUME 40, Issue 9 



PAGI: 5 



Test your trivia wisdom with these facts 



Test \our trivia knowledge 
with tiiese tidbits. 

In the 1400s. a law was set 
forth in England that a man was 
allowed to beat his wife with a 
stick no thicker than his thumb, 
hence, we have "the rule of 
thumb." 

Many years ago in Scot- 
land, a new game was invented. 
It was ruled "Gentlemen only... 
Ladies Forbidden", and thus the 
word 'golf entered into the 
English language. 

Every day, more money is 
printed for Monopoly than the 
U.S. Treasury. 

Men can read smaller print 
than women can; women can 
hear better. 

Coca-Cola was originally 



green. 

It is impossible to lick your el- 
bow. 

The state with the highest per- 
centage of people who walk to 
work: Alaska. 

The percentage of Africa that is 
wilderness: 28 percent (now get 
this...) 

The percentage of North Amer- 
ica that is wilderness: 38 percent. 

The cost of raising a medium- 
size dog to the age of 1 1 years: 
$16,400. 

The average number of people 
airborne over the U.S. in any given 
hour: 61,000. 

Intelligent people have more 
zinc and copper in their hair. 

The first novel ever written on a 
typewriter: Tom Sawyer. 



The San Francisco cable cars 
are the only mobile National 
Monuments. 

Each king in a deck of play- 
ing cards represents a great king 
from history: Spades - King 
David; Hearts - Charlemagne; 
Clubs - Alexander the Great; and 
Diamonds - Julius Caesar. 

111,111,111 X 111,111,111 = 
12,345,678,987,654,321 

Q: Half of all Americans live 
within 50 miles of what? A: Their 
birthplace 

Q: Most boat owners name 
their boats. What is the most 
popular boat requested? A: Ob- 
session 

Q: What is the only food that 
doesn't spoil? A: The only food 
that doesn't spoil is honey. 



PTK is collecting canned 
goods and children's books 



Project Graduation 
was adopted as a civic en- 
gagement initiative in 2002 
by Phi Theta Kappa. 
Nearly 440.000 food items 
and 355.000 books have 
been collected and donated 
to organizations that create 
opportunities for many 
individuals in their com- 
munities. 

April 21 through May 
10, Alpha Delta Kappa, 
Clarion University- 
Venango Campus local 
chapter, will be collecting 
canned goods and chil- 
dren's books. 

Canned goods and 
children's books will be 



donated to the PPC Shelter 
in Oil Cit>'. 

Bins are available in 
Montgomery Hall, Frame 
Hall and Rhoades Center, 
and will be available for 
donations the night of 
graduation. 

Phi Theta Kappa will 
hold its final April meeting 
on Wednesday. April 23. 
The meeting will be held at 
4 p.m., at the club meeting 
room. 

Phi Theta Kappa will 
sponsor the sale of gradua- 
tion bouquets, which will 
be available for $5 at com- 
mencement on Saturday, 



Vgnango Voieg 

226 Montgomer> Hall 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

OilCin. PA 16301 

Phone: 814-676-6591. ext. 1289 E-mail: vvoice(S)clarion.edu 



Adviser 

Dr. Joan Ruber 
Staff 
Jon Cook 
Frank Rodaers 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Sma\da 

Christine Rodgers 
Lori Secor 



Policies 



The Venango I'oice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University- 
Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The Voice is published 
most Fridays during the academic year. 

The editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibilit\ of the editor-in-chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be 
received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain 
anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available 
space and at the discretion of the executive board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
granted a co-curricular. 



Pacl; 6 



X'LNANGO \'OICE 



EVENTS: Graduate research conference slated in Clarion 



Continued from page 3 

Lil Sibs Weekend will 
be held at Clarion Univer- 
sity main campus Friday, 
April 18 through Sunday, 
April 20. The event is free 
and open to all Clarion Uni- 
versity students and their 
guests - brothers, sisters, 
nieces, nephews, sons, and 
daughters. 

Friday will feature a 
Pizza and Pajama Part> at 7 
p.m.. in 250/252 Gemmell. 
The film "The Water Horse" 
will be shown. 

On Saturday, there will 
be several activities, includ- 
ing an inflatable Velcro 
wall. Spin Art Frisbees, 
limbo contests, dog tag 
making, face painters and 
more, held from noon to 4 
p.m. outside Gemmell. "The 
Water Horse" will be shown 
at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. in 
250/252 Gemmell. 

Spray paint tattoos will 
be available from 1 1 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. on Sunday in the 
Gemmell Rotunda. 

The rain location for Lil 
Sib activities is Tippin 
Gymnasium. 

The Clarion University 
Graduate Council and the 
Office of Research and 
Graduate Studies will hold 



the seventh annual Clarion 
University Graduate Student 
Research and Professional 
Activities Conference. 
"Crossing Disciplines and 
Establishing New Fron- 
tiers." The conference will 
be held on Sunday. April 20. 
from 2-5 p.m., on Level A. 
Carlson Library. The confer- 
ence is part of the larger 
Academic Excellence Series 
hosted by Clarion Univer- 
sity. 

Visit www.clarion.edu/ 
gsrc for more information. 

University Activities 
Board w ill hold a photo con- 
test open to all students. 
Winners will have their pic- 
ture made into a poster and 
hung in the Gemmell Stu- 
dent Center for the follow- 
ing academic \ear. 

Categories include: 
Greek life, campus' 
residence life, athletics, 
UAB event. Clarion County 
Nature, Autumn Leaf Festi- 
val. CampusFest. and open 
pictures. 

Pictures must be sub- 
mitted to the UAB office 
(249 Gemmell) by Thurs- 
day. April 24. at 4 p.m. Pho- 
tos should be printed from a 
professional developer 
(CVS. Wal-Mart). Computer 
print-outs will not be ac- 



cepted. Pictures cannot con- 
tain any alcohol or illegal 
substances and cannot have 
any other university's logo in 
it. 

For more information, 
contact Kristi McManus at 
sklmcmanusfaiclarion.edu. 

Special Olympics is 
looking for volunteers to as- 
sist in many ways at the Sun- 
day. April 27 event. Volun- 
teers are needed to help ath- 
letes one-on-one. assist w ith 
food preparation, assist in 
OKmpic Village, and more. 

For more information 
and registration forms, con- 
tact Erica at clarion- 
sopa2008(rt'yahoo.com. 

The University Writing 
Center at Clarion University 
has a graduate assistantship 
opening for a writing consult- 
ant. Prior writing center ex- 
perience is not required; all 
individuals receive training 
for the position. 

Graduate assistants who 
work 17 hours per week will 
receive full tuition remission 
plus a stipend for the year. 
Graduate assistants who work 
8.5 hours per week will re- 
ceive half tuition remission 
plus a stipend for the year. 

Interested individuals 
should be strons writers \sho 



are responsible, flexible, 
dependable, curious, polite, 
compassionate, profes- 
sional, open to learning 
how to work with writers, 
and a native speaker of 
English (or have training/ 
experience in teaching 
English). 

To apply, complete 
and submit an application 
form; submit a letter ad- 
dressing prior experience, 
and graduate experience 
and long-term goals; and 
submit a current resume to: 
Dr. Kathleen Welsch. Writ- 
ing Center Director. Eng- 
lish Department. Davis 
Hall. The deadline to apply 
is Wednesda>. April 23. 

MAY 

An Innovative Interna- 
tional Scholarship opportu- 
nity is available for Clarion 
University students to 
study at Daegu University. 
South Korea. Applications 
and supporting documents 
for the Discover Korea 
Scholarship Program must 
be turned in to the Office 
of International Programs 
by Friday. May 2. at 119 
Becht Hall. 

For more information, 
contact Dr. Young-Gyoung 
Kim at 814-393-2338 or 
email skimS clarion.edu. 



E-MAIL THE VeNf!N60 VOlCe! VVOICE@CLARION.EDU 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion Uni\ersity of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil Cit>. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The\ 
are not necessarily the philosoph) or views of the students. tacult\. or stafT of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunitv and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunitv' inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-39.^-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VeiifiMGo Voice 



Volume 40, Issue 10 



Friday, April 25, 2008 



Venango Voice calling on students 



By Kerri Sniayda 

At the start of this se- 
mester, I promised the stu- 
dents of Venango Campus a 
"full-on newspaper publica- 
tion." And though you 
haven't seen it yet, I will 
stick to my word. 

It has been a challenge 
- acquiring the licensing for 
design software, the fund- 
ing for new equipment, and 
the staff to support the ef- 
fort of "a major overhaul" - 
but I accepted the chal- 
lenge, and I will come 
through. 

However, I need your 
help! This is, after all, 
YOUR paper! 

The staff that has al- 
ready committed their time 
and talent over the past 
semester has done an in- 



credible job of creating 
entertaining, informational, 
and newsworthy articles for 
all of our enjoyment. I ap- 
plaud each of them. 

In the fall semester and 
beyond, I welcome your 
new submissions - poetry, 
news and feature articles. I 
invite you to create a col- 
umn, such as Lori Secor 
and Frank Rodgers have 
done. 

Have news about your 
student organization or club 
on campus? Be a Voice 
liaison to make sure your 
news is heard! 

Next semester we will 
incorporate areas where 
students can demonstrate 
their graphic design, mar- 
keting, writing, and photog- 
raphy skills. 

You can even obtain 



your print co-curricular 
Mass Media Arts and Jour- 
nalism requirement at the 
Venango Voicel 

Be sure to look for the 
new Venango Voice office 
in Rhoades Center at the 
start of the Fall 2008 se- 
mester. There is an Open 
House event tentatively 
scheduled to take place 
during the first or second 
week of class. Stop by to 
learn more about the Ve- 
nango Voice student news- 
paper and your opportuni- 
ties with us! 

If you are interested in 
a position at the Voice or 
have more questions, feel 
fi"ee to contact me, your 
editor, anytime at 
vvoice@clarion.edu, 
s_kasmayda@clarion.edu, 
or 676-6591, ext. 1289. 



U 



Proof to be shown at Rhoades 



APRIL 

The next Community 
Playhouse production is 
"Proof, which will be held 
April 25, at 8 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium at 
Venango Campus. 

The production may 
contain some adult lan- 
guage and content. Tickets 
are $10. 



For more information, 
contact Community Play- 
house at 814-677-7469. 

The Men's Volleyball 
Club at Clarion University 
will host open practices for 
all men interested in play- 
ing competitive volleyball 
for the Fall 2008 - Spring 
2009 semesters. 



Practices will be held 
at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, April 

29, and at 7 p.m. on April 

30. All practices will be 
held at the Clarion Univer- 
sity Recreation Center. 

For more information, 
contact Chuck Shoemaker 
at 
cupmensvball@clarion.edu. 

See EVENTS page 2 



Attention 
Students, 
Faculty, and 
Staff: 

The 2008 Spring se- 
mester Final Exam 
Schedule is included 
in this issue of the 

iPjznango \Poiciz. 



Inside this issue: 


Venango 
Voice 


1 


Events 


1-8 


Trash Talk 


2 


Library News 


3 


PTK, ALO 

News 


4 


Final Exam 
Schedule 


5-6 


State, 
National, 
World News 


7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Plastic bags have harmful effect on environment 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 

Plastic bags are durable, 
cheap and convenient. After 
toting home groceries and 
other purchases, we use them 
in the car, to line our bath- 
room trashcans, and carry 
bottles of water and snacks to 
the park. They can be found 
carrying extra clothes to send 
to daycare for our kids, wad- 
ded up inside another bag 
hanging in the pantry, clutter- 
ing landfills, clogging road- 
side drains, floating in the 
ocean, and in the bellies of 
sea turtles. 

Here are the facts: we 
use them because they are 
much cheaper to make com- 
pared to paper bags. They use 



less energy and water in 
production. They are also 
made from crude oil or natu- 
ral gas. Plastic bags don't 
biodegrade either, they 
photo-degrade. They break 
down into smaller and 
smaller pieces, releasing 
toxins into the soil and wa- 
ter, and enter the food chain 
when ingested by animals. 
This is a long process in 
itself; it can take up to 1,000 
years for a plastic bag to 
deteriorate. Hundreds of 
thousands of sea turtles, 
whales, and other marine 
life are killed every year by 
mistaking floating bags for 
food. 

It is another product 
proven again and again to be 
extremely harmful to the 
environment and still we 
turn a deaf ear. That isn't the 
case everywhere. Ireland 
was the first country to im- 
pose a tax on plastic bags. In 
just weeks, usage dropped 
95 percent; the revenue go- 
ing toward environmental 
enforcement and clean up 
efforts. A year later, they 
weren't outlawed, but they 
were considered socially 
unacceptable to use. San 
Francisco has banned plastic 
bags, and other U.S. cities 



are following suit: Austin, 
New Haven, and Annapolis 
to name a few. Other places 
are jumping on the band- 
wagon and taking steps to tax 
or ban the use of plastic bags 
as well: Germany, Australia, 
Kenya, Paris, London, Bos- 
ton, and Portland; the li.st 
grows every year. Even 
China will be imposing a ban 
beginning in June... but they 
will still be making them for 
us. Worldwide, stores like 
Whole Foods are voluntarily 
banning plastic bags, offering 
their customers reusable 
totes. 

Sadly, the United States 
is years behind the European 
Union in taking steps to tax 
or ban the use of plastic bags. 
This is unfortunate, given the 
sheer volume of the bags we 
use: 100 billion every year. 
That is about 330 every year 
per person in this country, 
well over 1,000 for a family 
of four. Think of it this way: 
if you reduce the number of 
bags per week by two, you'd 
throw away over 100 fewer 
bags per year. If every house- 
hold in America did this, all 
those saved bags tied together 
would make a rope long 
enough to circle the globe 
more than 126 times. Think 



of all that crude oil we 
could save by banning 
plastic bags; even just the 
ones from the grocery 
store. 

How do we take some 
action? If you have a small 
purchase that is easy to 
carry, don't take a bag. Use 
the tote bags for large pur- 
chases. The website 
www.reusablebags.com 
offers durable bags made 
fi"om sustainable materials 
in tons of sizes and styles. 
Finally, encourage local 
politicians to introduce 
legislation taxing or ban- 
ning the use of plastic bags. 
I know it is a scary thought 
to have to pay for a plastic 
bag; would you be willing? 
Me neither. Until that day 
comes, let's do our envi- 
ronment, our children, and 
ourselves a favor: the next 
time you go shopping, take 
your own bags. Remember, 
small changes bring big 
results! 

Material references 
for this article were found 
at: www.worldwatch.org, 
www.nationalgeographic.c 
om, www.stopglobal 
warming.com, 
www.npr.org. The Green 
Book. 



EVENTS: FAFSA state deadline is Thursday, May 1 



Continued from page 1 



The PHEAA state grant deadline to 
complete the 2008-09 Free Application 
for Federal Student Aid is Thursday, 
May 1. 

With completed federal taxes, stu- 
dents can complete a FAFSA form at 



www.fafsa.ed.gov. 

The Interdenominational Christian 
Fellowship group meets the first and third 
Tuesdays of every month, from 12:30- 
1:30 p.m., at 105 Frame Hall. 

The group is open to anyone and is 
non-denominational. Visitors are invited 
to talk about God, faith, and the search for 



meaning, as well as invited to bring 
a lunch. 

The Clarion UniversityVenango 
Campus Independent Film Series is 
fi"ee and open to the public. The 
series features films from independ- 

See EVENTS page 3 



Volume 40, Issue 10 



PAcr; 3 



Suhr Library has news for end of semester 



Papers due? Need assistance 
with tliat research paper or pro- 
ject that is due next week? The 
reference librarians at Carlson 
and Suhr libraries can help. Stop 
by the libraries or call Carlson 
Library at 814-393-2490 or Suhr 
Library at 676-6591. Distance 
education students may use the 
special toll-free number pro- 
vided. 

If immediate feedback is not 
crucial or if it's time when the 
reference librarians are not on 
duty, you may also submit re- 
quests for assistance using the 
Ask a Librarian online reference 



form at http://www.clarion.edu/ 
library/REFForm.htm. It is avail- 
able at the library website under 
the Services and Collection head- 
ing. 

And, don't forget about all the 
tutorials and resource lists that are 
also available on the library web- 
site. 

As the end of the semester ap- 
proaches, Quiet Zones become 
more important to many users. 
Please be considerate. 

If a friend stops by or you re- 
ceive a phone call, please keep it 
brief and quiet or take the conver- 



sation elsewhere. If others are 
not abiding by the spirit of the 
Quiet Zone, please help by re- 
minding them. If problems per- 
sist, please contact the library 
staff at the circulation desk. 

Carlson Library will extend 
its hours beginning Monday, 
April 28. Carlson Library will be 
open 24 hours per day until mid- 
night on the Thursday of finals 
week. 

The exceptions will be 9 
p.m. closings on the Friday and 
Saturday between the last week 
of classes and finals. 



EVENTS: "Maria Full of Grace" is featured film 



Continued from page 2 

ent filmmakers from China, the 
United States, Iran, Japan, the United 
Kingdom, Colombia, and India. All 
films will be shown on Saturdays at 
7:30 p.m. in the Robert W. Rhoades 
Center Auditorium. The final film of 
the Spring 2008 semester will be 
"Maria Full of Grace" on April 26. 

For more information about the 
film series, call Emily Aubele at 81 4- 
676-6591, ext. 1269. 

Governor Rendell's Policy Of- 
fice is seeking up to five students 
with an interest in public service and 
government for 2008 summer intern- 
ships. 

Interested students should email 
their resume along with a cover letter 
to Patricia Grim at 

pgrim@state.pa.us. The student 
should indicate which policy area 



they would like to be considered for. Pol- 
icy areas include: education; health care 
reform; economic development and work- 
force; criminal justice; and environmental 
issues, land use, and infrastructure. 

For more information, call Patricia 
Grim at 717-772-9068. 

Special Olympics is looking for volun- 
teers to assist in many ways at the Sunday, 
April 27 event. Volunteers are needed to 
help athletes one-on-one, assist with food 
preparation, assist in Olympic Village, and 
more. 

For more information and registration 
forms, contact Erica at clarion- 
sopa2008@yahoo.com. 

The University Writing Center at Clar- 
ion University has a graduate assistantship 
opening for a writing consultant. Prior 
writing center experience is not required; 
all individuals receive training for the posi- 
tion. 



Graduate assistants who work 1 7 
hours per week will receive full tui- 
tion remission plus a stipend for the 
year. Graduate assistants who work 
8.5 hours per week will receive half 
tuition remission plus a stipend for 
the year. 

Interested individuals should be 
strong writers who are responsible, 
flexible, dependable, curios, polite, 
compassionate, professional, open to 
learning how to work with writers, 
and a native speaker of English (or 
have training/experience in teaching 
English). 

To apply, complete and submit 
an application form; submit a letter 
addressing prior experience, and 
graduate experience and long-term 
goals; and submit a current resume 
to: Dr. Kathleen Welsch, Writing 
Center Director, English Department, 

See EVENTS page 8 



Page 4 



Venango Voice 



Phi Theta Kappa thanks participants of 
luncheon, hosts guest speaker James Fisher 



Phi Theta Kappa would like to 
thank all who participated for inaking 
this year's Faculty and Staff Appre- 
ciation Luncheon a wonderful suc- 
cess. Gift cards to area businesses 
were given away as door prizes. 
Clubs who donated the prizes were 
Phi Theta Kappa, Adult Learners 
Organization, Ski Club, Student Sen- 
ate, Campus Activities Board, Out- 
door Club, and S-PSEA. 

Winners were Sylvia Wiegel, 
Ellen Foster, Theresa Nestor, Lola 
Deets, Ginny Seybold, Shelly 
Weaver, Patty Shontz, Frank 
Shepard. and Steve Hoover. If you 
didn't win on Wednesday, watch 
your e-mail, maybe you'll get a sec- 



ond chance! 

We, the members of Phi Theta 
Kappa, consider it an honor and a 
privilege to be able to host this lunch- 
eon each year. Thanks again to all the 
faculty and staff for all you do to make 
our time at Venango Campus such a 
wonderful experience! 

Phi Theta Kappa proudly wel- 
comes Dr. James Fisher to Venango 
Campus on Monday, April 28, at 7 
p.m. Dr. Fisher is an associate profes- 
sor of political science at Edinboro 
University. He spoke at Brother Bean 
Coffeehouse in Seneca earlier this 
month, and we have invited him to our 
campus to give everyone an opportu- 



nity to participate in this riveting civil 
liberties discussion. 

The topic is Torture, Law and 
American Values. If you think the 
topic has nothing to do with you, 
think again! This event promises to 
be a discussion you don't want to 
miss! 

Please join us in Rhoades Audi- 
torium on the Monday. The discus- 
sion is free of charge and open to the 
entire campus community and their 
guests, as well as the public commu- 
nity. 

Refreshments will follow the 
discussion group. All viewpoints are 
welcome, and we hope to see you all 
there! 



ALO will say goodbye to long-time president, 
welcomes students to join the organization 



The Adult Learners Organiza- 
tion thanks everyone who attended 
the Luau for making it a success! 
We had an afternoon of great food, 
games, fun, and fellowship. 

We would like to give our sin- 
cerest thanks to Traci Karasinski. In 
addition to taking care of her family 
of six, working full time, and attend- 
ing Venango Campus full time, she 
has been ALO's president. Traci 
will be attending Clarion Campus 
next year, and will be unable to con- 
tinue as our president. 

Without Traci and her amazing 
efforts, none of the events ALO has 
hosted in the last two years would 



have taken place. 

ALO takes pride in providing events 
on cam.pus that are fun for the entire fam- 
ily. Each year, we host the Thanksgiving 
Dinner, which has always been a main- 
stay on our campus. Other events typi- 
cally hosted include the Groundhog Day 
dinner. Storyteller Dinner, and Cookout 
and a Movie. 

This year, ALO hosted a Valentine's 
Dance and the Luau-Pig Roast, both of 
which we hope to do again next year. 
However, without new members we will 
be unable to continue as a group on cam- 
pus next year. 

Anyone who considers themselves a 
non-traditional student in any way is wel- 



come and encouraged to join ALO. 
This could include returning stu- 
dents, younger students who live at 
home, any student who is married 
or who has children; anything that 
you feel is not typical of the aver- 
age college student. If you think 
you don't have time to join a club, 
think again! We would like to con- 
tinue ALO's tradition on Venango 
Campus. 

If you are interested in joining 
or have questions about the Adult 
Learners Organization, please 
email Lori Secor at 
s lasecor@clarion.edu, or Traci at 
s tlkarasins(a)clarion.edu. 



Volume 40, Issue 10 



Page 5 



Spring semester 2008 Finals Week is May 5-9 

All final examinations will be administered throughout the week of May 5-9 according to the schedule outlined below. Ex- 
ams will not be given at times other than those specified on the final exam schedule. Students should report to the same class- 
room used throughout the spring semester unless indicated othenvise. Students with three or more tests on the same day may 
reschedule tests by consulting with the appropriate instructors or the college dean. If a mutually convenient time cannot be 
agreed upon, Friday, May 9, should be used as the alternate test date. 

Courses that begin after the starting times listed on the exam schedule should adhere to the test schedule for that hour, i.e., 
MGMT 320-02 meets MW 12:30 - 1;45PM. therefore, the final exam will be Monday, May 5, 12:00 - 1:50PM. 
MOND.AY, MAY 5 

Test Time: SAM - 9:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday 
at SAM. 



Test Time: 10AM - 11:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or Fri- 
day at 9AM. 



Test Time: 12 Noon - 1:50PM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or Fri- 
day at 12 Noon. 



Test Time: 2PM - 3:50PM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday at 
1PM. 



Test Time: 4PM - 5:50PM 

ELED 330-01 Lang Arts in Elem Sch D. Ellermeyer Chapel Auditorium 

ELED 330-02 Lang Arts in Elem Sch D. Ellermeyer Chapel Auditorium 

ELED 330-03 Lang Arts in Elem Sch D. Ellermeyer Chapel Auditorium 

COURSES THAT MEET AT 4PM OR LATER AND HAVE THE FIRST CLASS MEETING OF THE WEEK 

ON MONDAY EVENINGS WILL TEST AT THE REGULAR MONDAY MEETING TIMES ON MAY 5. 

Test Time: 5PM - 6:50PM 

CHANGE IN LOCATION 

MATH 050-02 Basic Algebra K. Wright 1 12 Still (Aud) 

CHANGE IN TIME AND LOCATION 

MATH 11 0-02 Intermediate Algebra K. Wright 112 Still (Aud) 

Test Time: 6PM - 7:50PM 

MATH 112-01 Excursions Math D. Bhattachary a Peirce Auditorium 

MATH 1 12-02 Excursions Math D. Bhattacharv-a Peirce Auditorium 

TUESDAY, MAY 6 

Test Time: SAM - 9:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at SAM. 



Test Time: 10AM 
9:30AM. 



11:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 



Test Time: 12 Noon - 1:50PM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 2PM. 



Test Time: 2PM - 3:50PM 

ACTG 251-01 Financial Accounting R. Otte 1 12 Still (Aud) 

ACTG 251-02 Financial Accounting R. Otte 1 12 SfiU (Aud) 

ACTG 251-03 Financial Accounting R. Otte 1 12 Still (Aud) 

TUESDAY, MAY 6, 2 - 3:50PM (Continued) 

ACTG 252-01 Managerial Accounting A. Grenci 107 Still 

ACTG 252-04 Managerial Accounting A. Grenci 107 Still 

ELED 324-01 Teh Elem School Math V. Harry Chapel Auditorium 

ELED 324-02 Teh Elem School Math V. Harry Chapel Auditorium 

ELED 324-03 Teh Elem School Math V. Harry Chapel Auditorium 



See FINAL EXAMS page 6 



Page 6 Vhnango Voice 

FINAL EXAMS: Finals will be held May 5-9 

Continued from page 5 

MATH 111-01 Math Cone Grades K-8 R. Carbone Peirce Auditorium 

MATH i 1 1-02 Math Cone Grades K-8 R. Carbone Peirce Auditorium 

MATH 21 1-03 Fund Topics in K-8 Math R. Carbone Peirce Auditorium 

MATH 21 1-04 Fund Topics in K-8 Math R. Carbone Peirce Auditorium 

MMAJ 270-01 Temporal Media R. Nulph 124 Becker 

MMAJ 270-02 Temporal Media R. Nulph 124 Becker 

Test Time: 4PM - 5:50PIVI 

ED 110-01 Intro to Education P. Kolencik 1 12 Still (Aud) 

ED 1 10-02 Intro to Education P. Kolencik 1 12 Still (Aud) 

ELED 329-01 Ed Eval & Auth Assessment J. Brown Chapel Auditorium 

ELED 329-02 Ed Eval & Auth Assessment J. Brown Chapel Auditorium 

COURSES THAT MEET AT 4PM OR LATER AND HAVE THE FIRST CLASS MEETING OF THE WEEK ON 

TUESDAY EVENINGS WILL TEST AT THE REGULAR TUESDAY MEETING TIMES ON MAY 6. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 7 

Test Time: SAM - 9:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday 

at 10AM. 



Test Time: 10AM - 1 1:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or Fri- 
day at HAM. 



Test Time: 12 Noon - 1:50PM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or 
Friday at 2PM. 



Test Time: 2PM - 3:50PM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday 
at 3PM 



COURSES THAT MEET AT 4PM OR LATER AND HAVE THE FIRST CLASS MEETING OF THE WEEK ON 
WEDNESDAY EVENINGS WILL TEST AT THE REGULAR WEDNESDAY MEETING TIMES ON MAY 7. 
THURSDAY, MAY 8 

Test Time: SAM - 9:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 1 1AM. 



Test Time: 10AM - 1 1:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 
12:30PM. 



Test Time; 12 Noon - 1:50PM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 
3:30PM. 



COURSES THAT MEET AT 4PM OR LATER AND HAVE THE FIRST CLASS MEETING OF THE WEEK ON 
THURSDAY EVENINGS WILL TEST AT THE REGULAR THURSDAY MEETING TIMES ON MAY 8. 
FRIDAY, MAY 9 - MAY BE USED TO RESOLVE SCHEDULING PROBLEMS AND MAKE-UP EXAMS. 



V(2:n5ngo Voieiz: wants YOU! 

If you enjoy writing, graphic design, editing, or photography, we have a place for you 
on our staff! Positions are open for Fall 2008 semester! 

For wiore. i\A--forv\A-atlo\A., tv\A.ail the Voicjz: at \/\/oict@cl(A/io\A..td{yi 



Volume 40, Issue 10 



Page 7 



State 



Hillary Clinton, John McCain won PA's primary 



WASHINGTON (AP) - Sen. 
Hillar}' Rodham Clinton won the 
most delegates in Pennsylvania's 
Democratic primar>'. 

Clinton won at least 80 of the 
158 delegates up for grabs in Tues- 
day's contest, according to an 
analysis of election returns by The 
Associated Press. Sen. Barack 
Obama won at least 66, with 12 



still to be awarded. 

The final delegate count was delayed 
because many of Pennsylvania's counties 
are split into multiple congressional dis- 
tricts. Pennsylvania awards delegates ac- 
cording to the statewide vote as well as the 
vote in individual congressional districts. 

In the overall race for the nomination, 
Obama led with 1,714.5 delegates, includ- 
ing separately chosen party and elected 



officials known as superdelegates. Clin- 
ton had 1,589.5 delegates, according to 
the AP tally. 

It will take 2,025 delegates to se- 
cure the Democratic nomination. 

On the Republican side. Sen. John 
McCain clinched the party's nomination 
in March. 

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. 



National 



Researchers concerned about U.S. waterways 



ALONG THE SANTA FE RIVER, 
N.M. (AP) - Rosemary Lowe 
scoops up a shovel of dirt and 
dumps it into a hole around the 
base of a slender cottonwood tree. 
One down, thousands more to 

go- 
Lowe and dozens of volun- 
teers spent a recent day planting 
native trees along a half-mile 
stretch of the Santa Fe River that 
has been reduced to a dry, sandy 
wash. 

Federal agencies, states, tribes 
and concerned citizens are spend- 

World 



ing millions of dollars and thousands of 
hours on waterway restoration projects to 
reverse decades of poor management and 
combat the mounting threats of popula- 
tion and climate change. 

Nationally, there are more than 
37,000 river restoration projects under- 
way, costing more than $1 billion annu- 
ally, according to a study released this 
month by Colorado College. 

Andrew Fahlund, vice president for 
conservation for American Rivers, said 
every region of the country will eventu- 
ally be affected either by water pollution 
or overconsumption. 



Federal researchers at Sandia Na- 
tional Laboratories in Albuquerque pre- 
dict that the fi"esh water supplies of more 
than half of the nations in the world will 
be stressed in less than 20 years, and that 
by 2050 three quarters of the world 
could face fresh water scarcity. 

The U.S. is no exception, said Mi- 
chael Hightower of the lab's Energy Sys- 
tems Analysis Department. Groundwater 
pumping will likely have to be reduced 
in the next 5 to 10 years to prevent the 
depletion of many of the nation's aqui- 
fers, he said. 
Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. 



Bombings, attacks kill 13, wound 24 in Afghanistan 



KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (AP) - 
A spate of suicide bombings and 
other attacks on security forces in 
southern Afghanistan Wednesday 
left 13 people dead and 24 others 
woimded, officials said. 

In Kandahar province, a sui- 
cide bomber blew himself up next 
to a vehicle carrying intelligence 
agents in the border town of Spin 
Boldak, killing three civilians, 
Kandahar Gov. Assadullah Khalid 
said. 

Two children and three intelli- 



gence agents were among the 14 hurt, 
Khalid said. 

Taliban spokesman Qari Yousef 
Ahmadi said the insurgent group was be- 
hind the attack and identified the bomber 
as a man named Gul Mohammad. 

A 1 6-year-old boy who was wounded 
in the explosion said police shot at the 
bomber before he detonated explosives. 

In neighboring Helmand province, a 
suicide bomber struck a police convoy, 
killing two officers and wounding three, 
said district police chief Khairudin 
Shuhja. Shuhja was in the convoy but was 



not injured in the attack. 

As the bomber approached the car, 
guards opened fire, wounding the at- 
tacker, who then blew himself up, 
Shuhja said. 

More than 900 policemen were 
among the 8,000 people killed last year 
in insurgency-related violence, officials 
said. The high death toll comes despite 
some $4 billion the U.S. has spent to 
train and equip the police in the last 
three years. 

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. 



Page 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: International Scholarship open to students 



Continuc'tl from page J 

Davis HaH. The deadline to 
apply is Wednesday, April 

23. 

MAY 

An Innovative Interna- 
tional Scholarship opportu- 
nity is available for Clarion 
University students to 
study at Daegu University, 
South Korea. Applications 
and supporting documents 
for the Discover Korea 
Scholarship Program must 
be turned in to the Office 
of International Programs 
by Friday, May 2, at 119 
Becht Hall. 

Students who are inter- 
ested in securing an appli- 
cation should contact Lynn 
Hepfl or Linda Heineman 
at 814-393-2340. The 
scholarship will only be 
awarded to 2-3 Clarion 
students. International Ad- 
visory Council Scholarship 
committee representatives 
will review all application 
and notify award winners 
by May 8. 

For more infonnation, 
contact Dr. Young-Gyoung 
Kim at 814-393-2338 or 
email ykim@clarion.edu. 



The Clarion Univer- 
sity Activities Board will 
hold a Paint Splatter event 
on Friday, May 2, from 1- 
6 p.m., outside Gemmell 
Student Center. The event 
is free. 

Delta Phi Epsilon will 
host their annual Deepher 
Dude Male Pageant on 
Thursday, May 1, at Hart 
Chapel. All men on cam- 
pus are invited. 

For more informa- 
tion, contact Jessica 
Nixon at 

s_)enixon@clarion.edu or 
Melissa Bluedom at 
s_mjbluedom@clarion.ed 



Clarion University's 
Interfratemity and Panhel- 
lenic Councils have joined 
forces with the Make-A- 
Wish Foundation to grant 
the wish of a local three- 
year-old girl. A 5-K race 
will be held on Sunday, 
May 4, and will begin at 
8:30 a.in. 

For more information 
and the registration fonn, 
visit http://www. clarion, 
edu/student/ocl/greek 



life/5k.htrn. 

The University Book 
Center at Clarion University 
is having a sale on music 
CDs through May 10. Take 
20 percent off all in stock 
music CDs. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Eyrie magazine has an 
article on Passages that it 



wants to publish, but needs 
to find the author of the arti- 
cle. It was likely submitted 
Fall 2006 semester. 

If you wrote the article 
on Passages, contact Dan- 
ielle Reeve at sdmreeve 
@clarion.edu or Dr. Knep- 
per at jknepper 

@clarion.edu. Eyrie wants 
to publish your article! 



Vjznango Voiciz 

226 Montgomery Hall 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Oil City, PA 16301 

Phone: 814-676-6591, ext. 1289 Email: vvoice@clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda 

Staff 

Jon Cook Christine Rodgers 

Frank Rodgers Lori Secor 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania- Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The Voice is 
published most Fridays during the academic year 

The editors accept submissions from all sources, hut reserve the right to 
edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact infomiation. They must be 
received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to remain 
anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation 

Infonnation boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available 
space and at the discretion of the Executive Board Publication is not guaran- 
teed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the 
Voice staff They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be 
granted a co-curricular. 



Email the VeNfiNGo Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



aUIIRUDnARY 



VENANGO CAMPUS 

Your 

SEP 3 zooa 



Campus, Your Paper, ^'our Voice 



;larion univJ 
OF pennsylI 



^NfjNGo \Poice 



Volume 41, Issue 1 Monday, September 1, 2008 



Welcome new, returning students 



By Kerri Smayda 
Editor-in-Chief 

Welcome new stu- 
dents, as well as those of 
>ou returning, to the 2008- 
2009 school year at Clarion 
University-Venango Cam- 
pus. The fall semester looks 
to have plent> in store for 
every student. The first 
week of class brought us an 
ice cream social, a perform- 
ance b\' Justin Parson in the 
cozy Rhoades lounge, a 
show by the always- 
entertaining Improvettes, 
and a drive-in viewing of 
■'National Treasure." As we 
look to the weeks ahead, be 
sure to take advantage of all 
of the activities and oppor- 
tunities Venango Campus 
will provide. 



Academically, keep in 
mind that there are many- 
services on campus to keep 
\ou intellectually in-tune 
with your studies. The 
Learning Support Center 
offers several opportunities 
to ensure your academic 
success, including peer 
tutoring, test preparation, 
academic success work- 
shops, supplemental in- 
struction, the Writing Cen- 
ter, and group and individu- 
alized study sessions, to 
name a few. 

The Career Center also 
offers many services, of 
which will help you hone in 
on your academic focus and 
lead to a satisfying career. 
The Career Center provides 
career assessment and inter- 
est inventories, career ex- 



ploration, job search skills, 
resume review-interviewing 
skills, on-campus job fairs, 
emploN'ment workshops, 
and employer panels. 

For students who have 
children, the Oil Cify 
YMCA Younger Days 
Child Care Center offers 
child-care and preschool 
services in Montgomery 
Hall. 

As always, Cross- 
Rhoades Cafe in Rhoades 
Center is cooking up some- 
thing delicious for Venango 
Campus students. They 
accept Flex dollars. Eagle 
dollars, credit cards, and 
cash for payment. 

Student life activities 
can also be very rewarding 

See WELCOME on pg. 7 



RSOs note first meetings of the year 



September 

Volleyball will be held 
every Tuesday throughout 
the semester beginning 
September 2, from 6-9 
p.m.. in the Rhoades Gym- 
nasium. 

Intramural Volleyball 
will be held every Wednes- 
day throughout the semes- 



ter beginning September 3, 
from 6-9 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Gymnasium. 

The Venango Voice 
student newspaper will hold 
an informational meeting 
for all students interested in 
participating on Thursday, 
September 4, at I p.m. 
Pizza and refi"eshments will 



be available at no cost. For 
more information, contact 
Kerri Smayda at 
vvoice@clarion.edu, or in 
the UAB'newspaper office 
in Rhoades Center. 

Phi Theta Kappa will 
hold its first chapter meet- 
See EVENTS on Jjage 2 



Attention 
students: 



Beginning Tuesday, 
September 2, vehicles 
in student parking 
must display a parking 
permit. Parking regu- 
lations will be en- 
forced. To obtain a 
parking permit, visit 
the administrative of- 
fice in Frame Hall. 



Inside this issue: 


\Vl-JCC)i\1H 


1 


E\'I:NTS 


1-8 


Trash Taik 


2 


State Nia\s 


3 


National 
Niiws 


3 


World Nlws 


4 


DLSTINCillLSliLl:) 

Alumna 


5 


NHLA GRADS 


6 



l'A(,l 



\ H\A\l,i > \( )K;1 



Brown's Plan B 3.0 was "an incredible book 



^9 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 

I had ver\ good inten- 
tions over the summer of 
diving further into learning 
about the problems our planet 
faces, and what may be done 
to help. I thought since I was 
not one of the lucky ones to 
be taking summer classes, I 
might have enough time to 
even write some articles in 
advance and save myself 
some time later. What I did 
not take into account was the 
fact that once the thermome- 



ter gets above 80 degrees. I 
am totally useless. All I want 
to do is be outside in the sun 
- relaxing, playing with my 
two kids - anvthing but think 
about something that might 
possibK be defined as 
"work". 

What 1 did do this sum- 
mer? Well. I did learn a lot; 1 
read a few good books for 
starters. The first one I read 
was The End of .America b\ 
Naomi Wolf If you haven't 
read it yet, I urge every stu- 
dent on this campus to read it 
then pass it along to someone 
else for them to read it as 
v\ell, and do a little side edu- 
cation on what our govern- 
ment has been up to while 
most of us weren't paving 
attention. 

I also read Plan B 3.0 by 
Lester R. Brown. Now this 
was an incredible book! It 
e.xplains aspects of strain our 
planet is facing - from dete- 
riorating food and oil supply 
to desertification to environ- 
mental refugees - and what 
needs to happen to save it. 



Best of all, it is written in a 
manner that is very easy to 
follow. If he throws in techni- 
cal Jargon at all, it is clearly 
defined (good news for me!). 
1 learned a lot from this one. 
It explains what happens 
when a population gets too 
large for the land to support, 
how deseitiflcation happens, 
how many debilitating and 
deadK diseases are linked to 
pollution, and so on. 

I got a bit sidetracked 
from m\ original summer 
plans by Anderson Cooper 
also. It started by turning on 
CNN at night, hoping the 
news would put me to sleep, 
and I found myself listening 
to AC 360 or Larry King and 
*gasp* learning about poli- 
tics of all things. 1 have never 
been interested before, but 
after one night of listening to 
people debate about what 
McCain and Obama were 
planning in regard to climate 
change, energy costs and 
pollution, 1 was hooked. Af- 
ter reading Mr. Brown's book 
and discovering about how 



all of the environmental 
problems entwine, I realized 
politics is going to play an 
enormous role in how our 
country handles itself in the 
years to come. 

This year, m_\ column 
will be a bit different, as I 
won't be looking specifi- 
cally at different products, 
though I may throw a few in 
there. As we get nearer to 
the election in November. 1 
plan to do a short series of 
articles on where each of the 
candidates stands on envi- 
ronmental and energy is- 
sues. I also plan to look into 
exactly what is floating 
around in the water we drink 
and bathe in, what all the 
hype is about BPA and haz- 
ardous food dyes, and how 
climate change is affecting 
the weather, as well as share 
my favorite product finds. 

Hopefull)', we'll all 
learn how we can make a 
difference simply by tweak- 
ing our everyday behaviors 
and habits. Let's have a 
ureat vear! 



EVENTS: ALO will meet on Sept. 8 in Rlioades 



Continued from [)agf 1 

ing on Thursday, September 4, from 
II a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in the small 
conference room at Rhoades Center. 
For more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at s pashontz@clarion.edu or 
Lori Secor at s_lasecor@clarion.edu. 

The Adult Learners' Organiza- 
tion of Venango Campus will hold its 
first meeting on Monday, September 
8, at II a.m., in the lounge at 
Rhoades Center. 



The ALO is a campus organization 
focused on the non-traditional students 
of Venango Campus. The organization 
encourages and provides numerous op- 
portunities to unite as a campus. 

For more information, e-mail Traci 
Karasinski at s tlkarasins@clarion.edu 
or call 814-673-9689. 

Basketball and Dodge Ball will be 
held every Monday throughout the se- 
mester beginning September 8. from 6-9 
p.m.. in the Rhoades Gvmnasium. 



Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meet- 
ing and begin the organization's first 
fundraiser of the year, a Stromboli sale, 
on Monday, September 15. The meet- 
ing will be held from 4:30-6:30 p.m.. in 
the small conference room at Rhoades 
Center. For more information, contact 
Patti Shontz at sj)ashontz@clarion.edu 
or Lori Secor at s_lasecor@clarion.edu. 

Venango Museum's "Oil on the 
Brain" series will be held Wednesdav, 

.See EVENTS on [J.ige S 



Volume 41, Issue 1 



PACiE 3 



State 



Man sentenced 20-40 years in Pa. student death 



READING. Pa. (AP) - A 24-year-old 
man who took part in the fatal beating 
of a university student in Pennsylvania 
Dutch country was sentenced Monday 
to 20 to 40 years in prison. 

Timothy Gearhart, of Allentown, 
was one of three men charged with 
murder in the death of 19-year-old 
Kyle Quinn, a Kutztown University 
sophomore. Quinn was attacked at 
random after the three men left a bar 
looking for someone to beat up, police 
said. 

The September 7 killing was 
Kutztown's first homicide since 1982 
and only the third since 1968, officials 
said. 

"If we can't be safe walking home 
in a place like Kutztown, then there's 
no place one can feel safe," Judge Paul 
Yatron said before handing down the 



sentence. 

Quinn, 19, was from the Philadel- 
phia suburb of Warminster. More than 
40 friends and family were in the court- 
room and several of them read state- 
ments, which Yatron ordered Gearhart to 
bring to prison with him. 

Quinn's mother, Denise, said she 
still makes trips to the cemetery to con- 
vince herself her son is dead. "What he 
did to Kyle was cold-blooded and cruel," 
she said. "No one deserves to die that 
way." 

Gearhart apologized to Quinn's fam- 
ily. 

"Please know that I've thought of 
your son every day and will every day of 
my life," he said to Quinn's parents. "I'm 
sorry to have put so many people 
through pain, but I'm not just sorry for 
Kyle's family, I'm sorry for my family 



and friends as well." 

His public defender, Glenn D. 
Welsh, had been seeking a 10- to 20- 
year prison sentence. 

Gearhart was initially charged 
with first-degree murder, but prosecu- 
tors agreed to drop the most serious 
count when he pleaded guilty August 
6 to third-degree murder. He admitted 
he struck Quinn in the head with a 
scrap of wood from a piece of furni- 
ture on Main Street a few blocks from 
campus. 

Two Allentown brothers, Kenneth 
and Terry Kline, are charged with 
third-degree murder in the attack. 
Their trial is scheduled for November. 

Prosecutors have said Gearhart 
has made no promises to testify 
against the brothers. Their attorney has 
denied the two took part. 



National 



Texas students pack book bags; teachers pack heat 



HARROLD, Texas (AP) - Along 
with normal first-day jitters and ex- 
citement, students in this tiny district 
started school wondering which 
teachers might be toting firearms. 

"It was kind of awkward know- 
ing that some teachers were carrying 
guns," said Adam Lira, 17, a senior. 
"I don't feel like they should be, 
'cause we already have locked doors 
and cameras. But I didn't feel threat- 
ened by it." 

Several parents said they had no 
idea that employees of the K-I2 
school were allowed to carry con- 
cealed guns on campus until recent 
publicity about the school board's 
policy, approved quietly last fall. 
They said they were upset that the 
rural community near the Oklahoma 
border had not been able to give in- 



put. 

While some parents said they felt 
their children were safer, others op- 
posed the plan, which appears to be the 
first of its kind nationwide. 

"As far as I'm concerned, teachers 
were trained to educate my children — 
not carry a gun. Even police officers 
need years of training in hostage situa- 
tions," said Traci McKay, whose three 
children are among the 110 students in 
the red-brick Harrold school. "1 don't 
want my child looking over her shoul- 
der wondering who's carrying a gun." 

But Harrold Superintendent David 
Thweatt said the board approved the 
policy in an October open meeting that 
had been publicized. He said the deci- 
sion was made after nearly two years of 
researching the best school security 
options at the school, which is just off a 



busy highway and 30 minutes away from 
the sheriffs office. 

"When you outlaw guns in a ceilain 
area, the only people who follow that are 
law-abiding citizens, and everybody else 
ignores it," Thweatt said. 

The superintendent said some of the 
school's 50 employees are can7ing 
weapons, but he wouldn't say how many. 
When pressed further, he first said that 
revealing that number might jeopardize 
school security. He then added that he 
considered it to be personnel information 
and not a matter of public record. 

Each employee who wants to carry 
a weapon first must be approved by the 
board based on his or her personality and 
reaction to a crisis, Thweatt said. In ad- 
dition to training required for a state 

See STUDENTS on page 4 



Pac.i 4 



Venango Voice 




Rice: peace deal still possible before Bush leaves 



RAMALLAH. West Bank (AP) _ Sec- 
retary of State Condoleezza Rice said 
Tuesday that "God vsiiiing" there could 
still be a Mideast peace agreement be- 
fore the end of President Bush's term in 
oft'ice. 

"God willing and with the good 
will of the parties and the tireless work 
of the parties, we have a good chance of 
succeeding," Rice said at adjoint news 
conference with Palestinian President 
Mahmoud Abbas. 

Rice was wrapping up a visit to 
Israel and the Palestinian territories in 
hopes of furthering the announced goal 
of brokering a Mideast peace deal by 
year's end, but she has offered few spe- 
cific signs of progress. 

"I've had a series of ver\ good dis- 
cussions here," Rice said. 

She repeated the U.S. position that 
Israel should stop expanding settle- 
ments on disputed territor) . "Settlement 
activity is not conducive to creating an 
environment for negotiations, yet nego- 
tiations go on." she said. 

Abbas said the settlements "are 



undoubtedK a main obstacle in the road 
of the peace process." 

"We reject all the settlement activi- 
ties in principle because they contradict 
with the agreements and the roadmap 
plan and the objectives" of the U.S.- 
sponsored peace conference in Annapo- 
lis, Md. last November, Abbas said. 

He added, "We have discussed the 
importance of reaching complete and 
comprehensive solutions, not partial 
solutions," Abbas said. 

Rice said she was "heartened" that 
talks were "serious and intensive." The 
sides had hoped to reach a final peace 
deal before Bush leaves office in Janu- 
arv', but have acknowledged that target 
is unlikely to be met. 

But Rice held out hope that such an 
agreement was possible. 

"We still have a number of months 
before us to work toward the Annapolis 
goal and we're going to do precisel\ 
that." Rice said. 

The talks have been complicated 
b\ the impending departure of Israeli 
Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, who has 



said he will step down to battle a cor- 
ruption investigation, and the Hamas 
militant group's control of the Gaza 
Strip. 

Israel says it cannot carry out any 
deal until Abbas regains control of 
Gaza from Hamas, which violently 
seized power in the coastal area in 
June 2007. It also says the moderate 
government of Palestinian President 
Mahmoud Abbas, which rules from 
the West Bank, is not doing enough 
against militants operating in areas 
under his control. 

The Palestinians, meanwhile, 
have complained about continued Is- 
raeli construction in the West Bank 
and east Jerusalem — areas the Pales- 
tinians claim for a future independent 
state. Israel captured both areas in the 
1967 Mideast war. 

"In the end of the day, the role of 
the leaders is to try to find a way to 
live in peace in the future, and not to 
let an> kind of noises that relate to the 
situation on the ground these days to 
enter the negotiation room," she said. 



STUDENTS: Other districts allow concealed weapons 



Continued from |>agc" 3 

concealed weapons license, they also 
must be trained to handle crisis inter- 
vention and hostage situations. 

State education officials said they 
did not know of any other Te,\as 
schools allowing teachers to carry guns. 
National security experts and the Brady 
Center to Prevent Gun Violence said 
they did not know of other U.S. schools 
w ith such a polic\'. 

School districts in some states, 
including Florida and Arizona, have 
closed loopholes that allowed guns on 
K-12 campuses. Utah allows concealed 
weapons at public universities but not 



at primary or secondarv schools. 

Thvveatt said the board took e.xtra 
precautions, such as requiring employ- 
ees to use bullets that will minimize the 
risk of ricochet, similar to those used by 
air marshals on planes. 

"1 can lead them from a fire, tor- 
nado and to.vic spill: we have plans in 
place for that. 1 cannot lead them from 
an active shooter." Thweatt said. "There 
are people who are going to think this is 
extreme, but it's easy to defend." 

Judy Priz, who has a third-grade 
daughter, said that "everyone I've 
talked to thinks it's great." She said she 
trusts the teachers with her child's life. 

Gov. Rick Perry has said he sup- 



ports the policy because "there's a lot 
of incidents where that would have 
saved a number of lives." 

The Brad\ Center has spoken out 
against the plan, saying it may not 
comply with Texas law, which bans 
firearms at schools unless carriers 
have given written permission. If the 
board authorizes an employee to carr\ 
a gun, then that person must be a 
peace officer, according to the center. 

Cheryl Mehl. an attorney for the 
district, said the statute the Brady Cen- 
ter cites applies only to security 
guards, not teachers and other employ- 
ees. The district has no security 
guards. 



\'OLUi\iE 41, Issue 1 



Pac;l 5 



Steigerwald named Venango distinguished alumna 



Rlionda L. Steigerwald. vice 
president of patient care services and 
chief nursing officer at UPMC North- 
west, has been named the 2008 Clar- 
ion Uni\ersit\-Venango Campus Dis- 
tinguished Alumna. 

Ms. Steigerwald will represent the 
Venango Campus in the upcoming Oil 
Heritage Festival Parade on Saturda>, 
JuK 26, riding in a car with Dr. Joseph 
P. Grunenvvald, president of Clarion 
Universit), and Dr. Christopher M. 
Reber. executive dean of Clarion Uni- 
versity-Venango Campus. 

She will also be honored on Octo- 
ber 2 with a full day of activities at the 
Venango Campus that culminates in a 
community-wide reception and will 
receive an award the following eve- 
ning at the annual Clarion University 
Alumni Association banquet in Clar- 
ion. 

Established in 1990. this award is 
presented to one Venango Campus 
alumnus each year by the Clarion Uni- 
versit) Alumni Association. Recipi- 
ents are honored for their professional 
accomplishments and extraordinarx 
service to their community and'or hu- 
manitv' which have brought distinction 
to their alma mater. 

Ms. Steigerwald is a shining ex- 
ample of someone who knew what she 
wanted to do. did it verv' well, and rose 
to the top of her profession. She has 
worked her way through the ranks of 
her current employer, joining the staff 
of Northwest Medical Center, which 



later became UPMC Northwest, as a 
staff nurse upon graduation from Clar- 
ion University's nursing program in 
1975. 

In her current position, Ms. 
Steigerwald is part of the leadership 
team of a 189-bed hospital that pro- 
vides acute and ambulatory care to a 
five-county area. She is responsible for 
clinical and financial operations, strate- 
gic planning, program development, 
patient services, and the advancement 
of professional practice. 

From that first position, Ms. 
Steigerwald went on to serve as nurse 
manager of the birthing center, pediat- 
rics, and emergency services before 
being promoted to assistant vice presi- 
dent of nursing in 2004, and her current 
position in 2006. 

Her position gives her an opportu- 
nity to interact with her alma matei\ 
especially in the programs that have 
been developed in partnership with 
UPMC Northwest to prepare existing 
hospital employees to become regis- 
tered nurses. 

Staff from various hospital depart- 
ments attend classes part-time while 
working full-time over a four-year pe- 
riod, graduating with an associate of 
science in nursing degree. 

"It is so exciting to be working 
with the School of Nursing and Allied 
Health at Clarion University-Venango 
Campus to enable us at UPMC North- 
west to be proactive in addressing the 
nursing shortage for our organization," 



said Ms. Steigerwald. "Having the 
availability of educational opportuni- 
ties and venues locally through the 
Venango Campus meets the needs of 
all types of students, traditional and 
non-traditional." 

After earning her associate de- 
gree in nursing at Clarion Univer- 
sity-Venango Campus, Ms. Steiger- 
wald received her baccalaureate de- 
gree in health administration at Ken- 
nedy-Western University in Thou- 
sand Oaks, California. 

She then completed the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh Medical Center's 
Beckwith Fellowship Leadership 
Program before earning her master's 
degree in health administration from 
Kennedy- Western. She also holds 
certifications as a maternal newborn 
nurse and as a neonatal resuscitation 
program instructor. 

Ms. Steigerwald is a member of 
the American Organization of Nurse 
Executives, the Early Head Start 
Health Advisory Board, the North- 
west Pennsylvania Organization of 
Nurse Leaders, and is secretary of the 
MuXi Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, 
the International Honor Society' of 
Nursing. 

She has been recognized by the 
Family Health Council. Inc., with the 
1999 Teen Pregnancy Prevention 
Leadership Award and by Northwest 
Medical Center with the 1992 Excel- 
lence in Nursing Management 
Award. 



EVENTS: Jerome Wincek will perform Sept. 19 



Continued from page 2 

September 17 through Saturday, Sep- 
tember 20, from 6-10 p.m., each night 
in Rhoades Auditorium. 

The Trustees" Dinner will be held 
on Thursdav, September 18, from 3-8 
p.m., in Rhoades Lounge. 



Indie and folk rock artist Jerome 
Wincek will perform on Friday, Sep- 
tember 19, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades 
Lounge. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold its 
"Adopt-a-Highway" event on Saturday, 
September 20. Students interested in 



volunteering should meet at Penn- 
DOT, route 8 south of Franklin, at 9 
a.m. In case of inclement weather, 
the event will be held the following 
Saturday, September 27. For more 
information, contact Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@clarion.edu or 

See EVENTS on page 8 



'AGi: 6 



Venango N'oict 



NHLA held 156th graduation ceremony on Aug. 8 



The National Hardwood Lumber 
Association (NHLA). headquartered in 
Memphis, Tennessee, iield a gradua- 
tion ceremony at the Venango Tech- 
nology Center in Oil City on August 8. 
The ceremony honored the 156th 
graduating class of the association's 
Inspector Training School and the first 
class to complete the program offsite 
in the schoofs sixty-year history. 
Thirteen students from throughout 
Pennsylvania. Wisconsin, and Michi- 
gan graduated. 

For the past five years, NHLA has 
partnered with Clarion University- 
Venango Campus to offer college 
credit for the NHLA program, award- 
ing credits toward an associate degree 
through the university's Department of 
Applied Technology. Clarion Univer- 
sity is the only university in the coun- 
try to offer college credit for the 
NHLA program. 

Because of the success of that 
partnership. NHLA brought the tech- 
nical component of the program to the 
region for ten weeks this summer, in 
cooperation with Clarion University- 
Venango Campus, Keystone Commu- 
nit\' Education Council (KCEC), and 
the Allegheny Hardwood Utilization 
Group (AHUG). Students from out of 
the area lived in the Venango Campus 
student apartment complex during the 
program. 

The world's largest and oldest 
hardwood industry association, NHLA 
represents 1,600 companies and indi- 
viduals that produce, use and sell 
North American hardwood lumber, or 
provide equipment, supplies or ser- 
vices to the hardwood industiA'. It was 
founded in 1898 to establish a uniform 
system of grading rules for the meas- 
urement and inspection of hardwood 
lumber. Since 1980, its headquarters 



have been in Memphis. 

The high value of hardwood lum- 
ber dictates that boards are graded 
each time that they are bought or sold 
within the hardwood industr)' on the 
way from the sawmill to their final use 
in furniture, flooring, or paneling. 
Hardwood lumber inspectors are re- 
sponsible for determining the species, 
grade, and volume of each piece of 
lumber, and are employed by saw- 
mills, di7 kiln operators, wholesale 
lumber distributors, manufacturing 
plants, exporters, importers, and other 
types of firms that utilize hardwood 
lumber. 

More than a century after origina- 
tion, the NHLA standards and rules 
that were once developed to ease re- 
gional trade are now employed world- 
wide for the same reason. To this da\. 



the NHLA Lumber Inspector Training 
School in Memphis is the only school 
of its kind in the world and has at- 
tracted students from Canada, Europe, 
Africa, South America, and Asia. 

More than 6.700 students have 
graduated from the Inspector Program, 
many of whom are now in manage- 
ment or ownership positions. From 
Inspector Training School, where a 
career in the hardwood industry takes 
root, to Leadership Development 
Classes for managers who seek to fur- 
ther their careers, to Technical Short 
Course Training, NHLA educational 
offerings reach all levels of careers 
and all sizes of companies. 

To learn more about the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association and 
the educational opportunities, please 
visit www.nhla.com. 




These men |).irtici|}atcd in the 156th National Hardwood Lumber Asso- 
ciation graduation ceremony on .August 8 at Venango Technology 
Center in Oil City. Students were eligible to earn college credit toward 
an associate degree in .Applied Technology at Clarion Uni\ersity — 
Venango Campus. 



The P'CP/C^eneeds YOU! 
E-mail us today at woice@clarion.edu to become a part of our staff! 



Volume 41, Issue 1 



Pa(;i; 7 



WELCOME: CAB plans 
social, cultural programs 



Continued from page 1 

for Venango Campus stu- 
dents. Student Senate, Cam- 
pus Activities Board, Athlet- 
ics and Recreation, and Clubs 
and Organizations all provide 
outlets for students to demon- 
strate skills and talent 
through these extra-curricular 
entities. 

Student Senate is the 
governing body for student 
life on campus and is respon- 
sible for representing the 
student body and managing 
the Student Activity Fee. 

The Campus Activities 
Board plans social, recrea- 
tional, and cultural programs 
offered to the entire campus 
community. These programs 
include dances, plays, trips, 
and family-oriented events. 

Though Venango Cam- 
pus does not offer organized 
sport, plenty of athletic and 
recreational opportunities are 
available to keep students 



active. Students can partici- 
pate in informal games of 
basketball, volleyball, and 
billiards, as well as bowling, 
golf, and fitness at local ven- 
ues at minimal or no charge. 
In addition, bicycles are 
available to be signed out 
free-of-charge. 

In addition to all of the 
aforementioned services, 

students can take part in vari- 
ous student-run clubs and 
organizations. Some of these 
include Adult Learners' Or- 
ganization, Venango I'oice 
newspaper. Nursing Club, 
Outdoor Club, CAB, Phi 
Theta Kappa. Eagle Ambas- 
sadors, and the Interdenomi- 
national Christian Fellow- 
ship, in addition to many 
others. 

Take full advantage of 
everything Venango Campus 
has to offer, and dive right in. 
There is always a place for 
each student to meet their full 
potential. 



Charles L. Suhr 


Library regular and 


holiday hours 


Regular hours... 


Monday through 


Thursday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. 


Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 


Saturday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 


Sunday CLOSED 


In observance of Labor Day 


weekend... 


CLOSED Saturday, August 30 through 


Monday, September 1 


Normal hours will resume 


Tuesday, September 2 


Charles L. Suhr Library 


814-676-6591 



Vgnango Voicg 

Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

Oil City,' PA 16301 

Phone; 814-676-6591, Ext. 1271 Email: vvoicefa)clarion.edu 



Adviser 

Dr. Joan Huber 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kerri Smayda 



Staff 

Jon Cook Lori Secor 



Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania- Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. 
The Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determi- 
nation of which is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes 
to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors ma\ earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice slalT. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling 
classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



PACl 8 



Venango Voict 



EVENTS: Trina Hamlin to perform September 25 



Continued from page 5 

Lori Secor at sJasecor@clarion.edu. 

Singer songwriter and guitarist 
Trina Hamlin will perform on Thurs- 
day, September 25, at 7 p.m., in 
Rhoades Center. 

October 

Clarion's .Autumn Leaf Festival 
weekend kicks off Thursday. October 
2. Mid-semester break begins at 10 
p.m. In addition, the Distinguished 
.Alumni Reception will be held that 
da\ at 5 p.m.. in Khoades Center. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meet- 
ing Thursda\', October 2, from 1 1 ;30 
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in the small confer- 
ence room at Rhoades Center. For 
more information, contact Patti Shontz 
at spashontz'fl clarion.edu or Lori 
Secor at sjasecorigclarion.edu. 

Acoustic rock artist Adrianne will 
perform on Friday, October 3. at 7 
p.m.. in Rhoades Center. 

Trans gender sintier/sonsiwriter 



Namoli Brennet will perform on Friday, 
October 10, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

The Independent Film Series will be- 
gin Saturda\, October 1 I. at 7 p.m.. in the 
Rhoades Auditorium. The featured tllm 
will be ■■Sv\eet Land." 

Senator Mar) Jo White will hold a 
Student Government Seminar on Friday, 
October 1 7. from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Gymnasium. 

CLEP testing will take place on Fri- 
day. October 17. from 8 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.. 
in room I 18 of Frame Hall. 

"'The Lives of Others" will be shown 
on Saturday, October 18. at 7 p.m.. in the 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction with 
the Independent Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meeting 
Monday, October 20. from 4:30-6:30 p.m.. 
in the small conference room at Rhoades 
Center. 

For more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at s pashontz(fficlarion.edu or Lori 
Secor at s lasecorfa)clarion.edu. 



The first meeting of the Honors 
Seminar Series will be held on Mon- 
day,'. October 20. at 6:30 p.m.. in 
Rhoades Auditorium. 

A murder mystery dinner thea- 
tre will be held Friday. October 24. 
from 6-9 p.m., in the lounge at 
Rhoades Center. 

"Turtles Can Fly" will be 
shown on Saturday, October 25, at 7 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa v\ill sponsor 
the Central Blood Bank Bloodmo- 
bile on Wednesday, October 2^. 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.. in Rhoades 
Gymnasium. For more information, 
contact Patti Shontz at spa 
shontz@clarion.edu or Lori Secor at 
slasecora clarion.edu. 

The Radiologic Science depart- 
ment will hold a breakfast on Fri- 
da_\. October 31. at 8 a.m.. in the 
lounue at Rhoades Center. 



WE HAVE A SPOT FOR YOU! 

The Venango ^b/c^will hold an informational meeting Sept. 4, at 1 p.m., in 

the small conference room at Rhoades Center. 

FREE pizza and refreshments! 



Email the VeNfiNGO Voice! vvoicI':@clark)n.1':du 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion Universilv of 
Pennsylvania-Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil Cit\. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The\ 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students. facult>, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
cniplo\ment. Direct equal opportunit)' inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Bquity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 1 62 1 4- 1 232. 8 1 4-393-2 1 09. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 
VENANGO CAMPUS 



vE^W^Go'S(^l^y^ jCAMPus, YOUR Paper, Your \ oice 



SEP 1 

CLARION U'.NlftK- 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 




P'o/ce 



\OLU.ME 41, Issue 2 



.Monday, September S, 200S 



Pa. voter registration deadline nears 



The deadline to partici- 
pate in the 2008 Presiden- 
tial General Election is just 
a month awa>', as voters 
must register b>' Monday, 
October 6. 

To register to \QXe in 
Pennsyhania, >ou must be: 
a citizen of the United 
States for at least one 
month before the next pri- 
maiy. special, mimicipal. or 
general election; a resident 
of Pennsylvania and the 
election district in which 
you want to register and 
vote for at least 30 days 
prior to the above elections; 
and at least 1 8 >ears of age 
on or before the day of the 
next primar\\ special, mu- 
nicipal, or general election. 

Once you have regis- 
tered to vote, you are not 



required to register again 
unless >ou change >otir 
residence, name, or politi- 
cal part}- affiliation. 

There are se^•eral wa>s 
to register — in person, b}.' 
mail, at the PA Department 
of Transportation, at go^"- 
ernment agencies, or 
online. 

To register in person, 
visit >"our count}' voter reg- 
istration office. 

In order to mail your 
voter registration, down- 
load the form at ww\v. 
votespa.com, or obtain a 
form from any federal, 
state, or municipal office. 

You can also register 
to ^■ote at any Peimsylvania 
Department of Transporta- 
tion photo license center 
when >ou obtain or update 



your driver's license or 
identification card. 

Government agencies, 
such as area Agencies on 
Aging. Centers for Inde- 
pendent Li\-ing and Armed 
Forces Recruitment Cen- 
ters, also provide voter reg- 
istration. 

Or. ^■isit w'w^v.con 
gress.org to register to vote 
online. 

Registration is eas>' 
and free. 

For more information 
about voter registration, 
contact Venango Coimt%" 
Voter Registration Director 
Sue SaltareUi at the Court- 
house Annex, 1174 Elk 
Street, Franklin. b>' phone 
at 814-432-9514. or by e- 
mail at ssaltarelli 
@,co.venango.pa.us. 



Yoga, cardio-kickboxing are free 



September 

Yoga sessions will be 
held ever%- Thursda}". at 1 1 
a.m., in the fourth floor 
lounge of Montgomen.' 
Hall. Classes will be in- 
structed by Libby Jenkins. 
With the conclusion of 
renovations, yoga sessions 
will be held at the Rhoades 
G\"mnasiimi. The sessions 



are free. 

Cardio-kickbo.xing 
sessions wiU be held ever}." 
Wednesday, from 6-7 p.m., 
at the Franklin School of 
Kung Fu. 845 Buffalo St.. 
Franklin. The sessions are 
free. 



Organization of \'enango 
Campus will hold its first 
meeting on Monda>", Sep- 
tember 8, at 11 a.m., in the 
loimge at Rhoades Center. 

The -ALO is a campus 
organization focused on the 
non-traditional students of 
Venango Campus. The or- 



The Adult Learners" See EVENTS on page 3 



Inside this issue: 


\'OTER 
REGISTR.ATION 


^ 1 


Events 


-~ " 


Tr.'\sh Talk 


2 


Alu.mni Lunch 


3 


Book Center 


3 


LSC Schedule 


4 


CONSTRUC- 
TION UPD-=\TE 


"^ 


PTK Upd.ATE 


5 


St.ate News 


6 


X.-\TION.\L 

News 


6 


World New s 


7 



l'\( 



Venango Voice 



What is more important: health or appearance? 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 

During the first week of 
classes, one of my professors 
asked us a question I thought 
deserved a little investigation: 
What is more important, your 
health or your appearance? 
Of course, nearly anyone you 
ask will immediately answer, 
"health." How true is that, 
really? I'm sure everyone 
would rank it above appear- 
ance, but do our actions echo 
our beliefs? 

We have daily rituals we 
do for our health, such as 
taking vitamins and eating 
healthy foods. And, we have 
things we do that benefit our 
health as well as our appear- 
ance, including exercise, 
showering, brushing our 



teeth, etc. There are things 
we do for our appearance, 
however, that can be very 
detrimental to our health. On 
the same note, there are 
things we do in the name of 
improving our health that can 
actually hurt us. 

One of the first things 
that a doctor will tell some- 
one they need to do to im- 
prove their heaUh is to lose 
weight. Losing 10 percent of 
your body weight (if you are 
overweight to begin with) has 
enormous health benefits. A 
lot of times doctors don't get 
into specifics on exactly 
HOW to lose weight, and, 
let's face it, most of us just 
don't know how to eat a 
healthy, balanced diet. 

We turn to diet pills 
without checking to see if 
they have been FDA ap- 
proved, as many have not. In 
increasing numbers every 
year, people turn to major 
surgical procedures to lose 
weight. 

Some doctors help their 
patients by only approving 
the surgery when they feel 
every other option has been 
exhausted, and they require 
mandatory education on the 
type of diet they will have to 
follow and live with after the 
surgery. Great, but way too 



often doctors are too quick 
with the knife - too slow to 
ensure the patient under- 
stands and is committed to 
what their post-op lifestyle 
will have to be. 

The personal care prod- 
ucts we use to improve our 
appearance also have some 
serious health risks most peo- 
ple aren't aware of Read the 
ingredient labels on your 
shampoo, deodorant, lotion, 
and cosmetics. I'd wager 
there are a lot of chemicals 
listed that would take a lot of 
effort to even pronounce, let 
alone find out what they are. 

There are about 1 1 ,000 
chemicals used in personal 
and skin care products. Less 
than 1 1 percent have been 
tested to ensure they are safe 
for use. Some of the chemi- 
cals that can be found in 
these products are known as 
phthalates and can be found 
on labels as BzBP, DEP, and 
DBF. 

They are known to cause 
extensive problems. They are 
endocrine disrupter chemi- 
cals that can impair reproduc- 
tive development, cause 
asthma, cancer, lung or heart 
damage, and alter liver and 
kidney function. Another is 
silicone, which is a known 
tumor promoter that accumu- 



lates in the liver and lymph 
nodes. Propylene glycol, 
found in deodorants and 
other products, is so toxic 
the EPA requires workers to 
wear protective clothing and 
gloves because it penetrates 
the skin very quickly. It 
causes brain, liver, and kid- 
ney damage, but I have yet 
to see a warning label on the 
products that contain it. 

The list of chemicals 
used in these products is 
long and their side effects 
shocking at best, lethal at 
worst. Why are they used? 
Why haven't these products 
been pulled? The health and 
beauty industry is largely 
self-regulated; they decide if 
a product's risks outweigh 
its cosmetic 'benefits'. 

Check out the chemi- 
cals in the products you use 
at http://www. health- 
report, co.uk/ingred lent s- 
directory.htm#toxic% 
20chemicals. 

So, the question posed 
again, "What is more impor- 
tant: health or appearance?" 
Our actions may speak 
louder than words. 

Malerial references for 
this article were found at: 
www.bariatric-surgery.info, 
www.ewg.org, www. toxic 
freelegacy.org. 



Venango Voicjz 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 
Clarion Universit>' - Venango Campus 
Phone: 814-676-6591, Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice@clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Staff 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Jon Cook Lori Secor 

Policies 
The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities The 
Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation Publication is not guaranteed 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



N'OLLi.ME 41, Issue 2 



PA(;;t 3 



Alumni chapter plans informal lunch Sept. 10 



The Venango Campus Alumni Chapter will hold an 
informal networking lunch in the CrossRhoades Cafe in 
the Robert W. Rhoades Center at noon on Wednesday, 
September 10. The chapter was created to bring Ve- 
nango Campus alumni together to socialize and have 
fim while advocating for the campus and its students in 



the community' and beyond. It is open to anyone who 
has attended classes at the Venango Campus or others 
interested in the campus' growth and development. 

For more information, contact Jerri Gent, Director 
of Marketing and University Relations, at 676-6591, 
extension 1215. 



CUP-VC Book Center notes hours, Spirit Days 



The Clarion Universit>-Venango Campus Book Center 
is open Monday through Thursday, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m., and Friday, from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Book Center 
is closed from 2-2:30 p.m. for lunch. 

The Book Center has plenty of CUP memorabilia, from 
clothes to mugs, binders to notebooks, and more. 



Don't forget Spirit Days every Thursday. Students who 
wear Clarion University clothing to the Book Center will 
receive 15 percent off Clarion University merchandise, in- 
cluding sale items. 

For more information, contact the Clarion University- 
Venango Campus Book Center at 814-676-6591. 



EVENTS: PTK will meet, start fundraiser Sept. 15 



Continued from page 1 

ganization encourages and provides 
numerous opportunities to unite as a 
campus. 

For more information, e-mail 
Traci Karasinski at s_tlkarasins 
@clarion.edu or call 814-673-9689. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meet- 
ing and begin the organization's first 
fundraiser of the year, a Stromboli 
sale, on Monday, September 15. The 
meeting will be held from 4:30-6:30 
p.m., in the small conference room at 
Rhoades Center. For more informa- 
tion, contact Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Lori Secor 
at s lasecor(fl>,clarion.edu. 



Venango Museum's "Oil on the 
Brain" series will be held Wednesday, 
September 17, through Saturday, Sep- 
tember 20, from 6-10 p.m., each night 
in Rhoades Auditorium. 

The Trustees' Diimer will be held 
on Thursday, September 18, from 3-8 
p.m., in Rhoades Lounge. 

Indie and folk rock artist Jerome 
Wincek will perform on Friday, Sep- 
tember 19, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades 
Loimge. The performance is sponsored 
by the CAB Coffeehouse Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold its 
"Adopt-a-Highway" event on Saturday, 



September 20. Students interested in 
volunteering should meet at PennDOT, 
Route 8 south of Franklin, at 9 a.m. In 
case of inclement weather, the event 
will be held the following Saturday, 
September 27. For more information, 
contact Patti Shontz at s_pa 
shontz@clarion.edu or Lori Secor at 
s_lasecor@clarion.edu. 

Singer/songwriter and guitarist 
Trina Hamlin will perform on Thurs- 
day, September 25, at 7 p.m., in 
Rhoades Center. The performance is 
sponsored by the CAB Coffeehouse 
Series. 



See EVENTS on page 8 



Corrections 

False information regarding volleyball, basketball, and dodge ball was printed in last week's issue of 
the Venango Voice. Those events will not take place until further notice due to the renovations taking 

place in the Rhoades Gymnasium. 



PACilr 4 



Venango Voice 



Learning Support Center releases fall schedule 



Monday 

Jole Burkett 
1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
3:30-6:30 p.m. 

Joni Brinker 

11:15 a.m. to 

3:15 p.m. 

4:30-6:30 p.m. 

Christina Sterner 
3:30 p.m. to TBA 



Tuesday 

Megan Warner 
1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Melinda Eckman 
5-7 p.m. 



Wednesday 

Megan Warner 
1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Joni Brinker 
1-3:15 p.m. 

Melinda Eckman 
5-7 p.m. 



Thursday 

Jole Burkett 
1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Joni Brinker 
1:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Megan Warner 
12-4 p.m. 

Melinda Eckman 
5-7 p.m. 



Friday 

Melinda Eckman 
1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Christina Sterner 
4 p.m. to TBA 



LSC tutors have knowledge of the following list of courses: 

Jole Burkett Joni Brinker Christina Sterner Megan Warner Melinda Eckman 



ENG 1 1 1 

MUS 111 

A&P I & II 

CIS 217 

Excursions Math 

Math 050 

Gen. Psych 21 1 

Devlp. Psych 260 

Sociology 21 1 

Humanities I 

Biology 1 1 1 

Econ Stats 22 1 

Earth Science 1 1 1 

Nursing 101, 111, 

112, & 102 



A&P I & II 

Nursing 132. 101, 
102, & 131 



TBA 



ENG 1 1 1 

CMST 113 

ENG 265 

Math 111,211 

BIO 111 

HIST 120 

Phys Sci & Astr. 

CIS 217 

Sociology 21 1 

Music 131 

Health 

Ed. Psych 122 

RE 270 

ENG 265 

ECON 212 



Math 050 

CIS 217 

General Psych 



For more information about the Learning Support Center, 

contact Tammy Beach at s_tmdulaney@clarion.edu, by phone at 814-676-6591, 

extension 1344, or visit room 319 at Montgomery Hall. 

The Learning Support Center is located on the third floor of Montgomery Hall in 

room 318. 



Availability of tutors and Learning Support Center times are subject to change. 



\'OLUME 41, Issue 2 



Page 5 



Construction, renovations are still underway 



The East End Pond adjacent to 
Venango Campus is progressing with 
minor delays. The grating and sleuth 
gate have been installed, but the grate 
for drainage is late in arriving. As a 
result, the pond's water level currently 
remains at the three-foot mark. The 
conduit for lighting and top soil are 



ready to be installed and foundation 
designs for the gazebo, bridge and 
clock have been finalized with con- 
struction plaimed to start within the 
week. 

The locker room in Rhoades and 
the rest rooms in Frame are progressing 
at a steady pace. Plumbing drains are 



being installed, an electrical panel 
moved and new lights installed in the 
gym, with painting soon to start. 
There will be some lead time needed 
to receive the tile for the locker 
rooms. This may delay the finished 
work, but should not interfere with 
use of the facilities. 



PTK is active honor society at Venango Campus 



By Lori Secor 
Voice staff 

Phi Theta Kappa is the largest 
honor society in American higher edu- 
cation with more than two million 
members and 1,200 chapters. 

"The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa 
shall be to recognize and encourage 
scholarship among two-year college 
students. To achieve this purpose, Phi 
Theta Kappa shall provide opportimity 
for the development of leadership and 
service, for an intellectual climate for 
exchange of ideas and ideals, for 
lively fellowship for scholars, and for 
stimulation of interest in continuing 
academic excellence." 

Phi Theta Kappa's mission is two- 
fold: to recognize and encourage the 
academic achievement of two-year 
college students; and to provide op- 
portunities for individual growth and 
development through participation in 
honors, leadership, service and fellow- 
ship programming. 

Phi Theta Kappa is a very active 
club on campus, hosting and partici- 



pating in many activities both on and 
off campus, including blood drives, the 
Adopt-a-Highway program, Applefest, 
Better World Books book drives. Fac- 
ulty and Staff Appreciation Luncheon, 
and Graduation Tea. We are looking 
forward to new activities this year as 
well. Members may choose to be as 
active as they prefer, participating in as 
many activities as they like. Meetings 
are held twice monthly on campus. 

On a personal note, PTK has been 
a great group to be a part of We range 
from the young student to the older 
student; from those seeking out a de- 
gree in nursing to early education stu- 
dents; from very active members and 
officers, to those who like to participate 
in just their favorite events. For me, the 
greatest part of PTK is that wonderful 
bunch of students I probably wouldn't 
have otherwise gotten a chance to get to 
know, each bringing something imique 
to the group. It is a wonderfiil satisfac- 
tion to complete a project knowing that 
you helped to make a difference on 
campus or in the community. 

If you would like to know more 



about Phi Theta Kappa and member- 
ship requirements, please contact one 
of the chapter advisors: Beth Jackson 
at bjackson@clarion.edu or Kelly 
Lander at klander@clarion.edu. 
PTK Notes 

Phi Theta Kappa meetings are 
held the first Thursday of each month 
and the third Monday of each month. 
Thursday meetings will be held in 
room 307 of Montgomery Hall, 
where a light lunch will be served. 
Monday meetings will be held in the 
club meeting room at Rhoades Cen- 
ter. 

The Informal Induction cere- 
mony will be held Monday, Septem- 
ber 15, at 5 p.m. 

The Adopt-a-Highway event will 
be held Saturday, September 20, at 
PennDOT, Route 8 south of Franklin. 
Volunteers should meet at 9 a.m. and 
should be finished by 1 1 a.m. 

For more information on these or 
any other PTK events, email Lori 
Secor at s_lasecor@clarion.edu, or 
Patti Shontz at s_pashontz 
@clarion.edu. 



Join our team today! 

The Venango Voice is accepting new writers, photographers, and more! 
Contact the Voice today at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



PAcii: 6 



Venango \'oic 



State 



Retired Pa. teacher charged with raping student 



SOMERSET, Pa. (AP) _ A retired 
western Pennsylvania teacher has been 
charged with raping and sexually as- 
saulting a former student in 2001. 

Fifty-five-year-old Stephen 

Shaffer, of Grove City, is accused of 
assaulting the female student when she 
was 13 and 14 years old on two differ- 



ent occasions in early 2001. 

At the time, Shaffer was a science 
teacher at Somerset Area Junior High 
School. Authorities say he retired in 
2005. 

Shaffer surrendered his teacher's 
license in November. 

Police say the former student. 



now 21, recently came forward. Police 
say Shaffer sent her love letters, cards 
and notes that indicate a physical rela- 
tionship. 

Shaffer was charged with rape, 
statutory sexual assault, aggravated 
indecent assault and other related 



National 



Chicago students skip school in funding protest 



NORTHFIELD, 111. (AP) _ More than 
1,000 Chicago public school students 
skipped the first day of classes Tues- 
day to protest unequal education fund- 
ing, a boycott organizers said would 
continue through the week with help 
from retired teachers who will turn 
office lobbies into impromptu class- 
rooms. 

The students took church buses 30 
miles north to the wealthy suburb of 
Northfield, where they filled out appli- 
cations to enroll in the better-funded 
New Trier district. The move was 
largely symbolic because students 
must pay tuition to attend a school 
outside their home district. 

The turnout fell short of the thou- 
sands organizers expected, and was a 
tiny fraction of the more than 400,000 
students who attend Chicago public 
schools, but protesters and their par- 
ents said they're willing to keep the 
boycott going as long as it takes to 
persuade state officials to give their 
district more money. 

"It's on us kids," said 14-year-old 
Tracey Stansberry, a student at Corliss 
High School. "If we don't, we'll be on 
the bottom." 

Gillie Beal said she will keep her 
12-year-old grandson involved in the 



protest as long as it takes. "You must 
stand for something or you'll fall for 
anything," she said. 

Chicago Public Schools spokes- 
man Mike Vaughn said he did not 
know how many students boycotted 
the country's third-largest district 
Tuesday; attendance figures would not 
be available for a couple of days. Al- 
though district officials agree the sys- 
tem is underfunded, he said, they con- 
sider it a mistake for the children to 
miss any school. 

"We want our kids to start the 
school year strong, and that means the 
fu-st week of school," he said. "The 
first week, it is important for the kids 
to connect with teachers and lay the 
groundwork for the year. And that 
can't happen if kids aren't in school." 

On Wednesday, boycott organiz- 
ers will attempt to set up impromptu 
classrooms at Chicago City Hall and 
the state's James R. Thompson Center, 
as well as in the lobbies of more than a 
dozen Chicago corporations, including 
Boeing Co. and Aon Corp., that sup- 
port Chicago's bid to host the 2016 
Summer Olympics. 

"If we say we're a world-class 
city, then we shouldn't be content with 
having second-class schools," said 



state Sen. James Meeks, who is lead- 
ing the boycott of the district and is 
urging Gov. Rod Blagojevich and state 
lawmakers agreed to address school 
funding disparities. 

Meeks said he had not cleared his 
plans with the city or officials of cor- 
porations where students are expected 
to gather, but expected they would not 
be turned away. 

Jodi Kawada, a spokeswoman for 
Mayor Richard M. Daley, said she'd 
heard that the group might come to 
City Hall but hadn't gotten any confir- 
mation. 

"For protests in general — we 
allow protesters to express their First 
Amendment rights at City Hall," she 
said in a statement. "Our priority is to 
ensure the safety of the building occu- 
pants and the protesters." 

Boeing spokesman John Dem 
said Tuesday that the Chicago-based 
company had not been contacted by 
organizers. 

"If children arrive we would en- 
sure their safety and our ability' to con- 
duct business," Dem said. 

In Illinois, property taxes account 
for about 70 percent of school ftmd- 

Sec STUDENTS on page 7 



X'OLUME 41, Issue 2 



Page 7 



World 



US sends 3rd ship to Georgia, plans $1B in aid 



TBILISI, Georgia (AP) 

A U.S. Navy ship loaded with 
humanitarian aid steamed through the 
Dardanelles on its way to Georgia, as 
the Bush administration prepared to 
roll out a SI billion economic aid 
package for the ex-Soviet republic. 

The multiyear proposal calls for 
spending about half of the total in the 
administration's remaining five 
months in office and recommending 
that the incoming president and his 
team continue funding the project 
when they take over in Januarv', a 
senior official said. 

The White House and State De- 
partment intend to jointly aimounce 
the aid package, which follows a 
fact-findina and assessment mission 



to Georgia by Reuben Jeffrey, a senior 
U.S. diplomat who returned from the 
countr)' last week, the official told the 
AP. 

Jeffrey has recommended that as- 
sistance be sped to Georgia to help it 
rebuild its econom\' and infrastructure 
that was destroyed by Russian tanks, 
troops and airstrikes, according to the 
official, who spoke on condition of 
anonymity^ ahead of the aimouncement. 

The Russian consul in Georgia, 
meanwhile, said Russia closed its em- 
bassy there and halted consular opera- 
tions after Georgia severed diplomatic 
ties following last month's war. 

"A break-off of diplomatic ties is 
an action that has a price," Russian For- 
eign Ministry- spokesman Andrei 
Nesterenko said in Moscow. 



He said the ministrj^ is consid- 
ering other measures. 

The diplomatic break follows a 
five-day war and Moscow's recogni- 
tion of two separatist Georgia re- 
gions. South Ossetia and Abkhazia, 
as independent nations. 

The conflict has brought ten- 
sions between Moscow and the 
West to their highest level since the 
end of the Soviet Union. 

The United States has already 
sent two militarv' ships bearing aid 
to Georgia. 

"We don't imderstand what 
American ships are doing on the 
Georgian shores, but this is a ques- 
tion of taste, it's a decision by our 
American colleagues," Russian 
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said. 



STUDENTS: New Trier is desired school for students 



Continued from 



page I 



ing, meaning rural and inner-citv" 
schools generally end up with less to 
spend per student than suburban 
schools in areas with higher propert)- 
values. 

Chicago Public Schools spent 
511,300 per student last year. New- 
Trier High School spent $17,500 per 
student, near the top in the state. 

Meeks is pushing for a pilot pro- 
gram that would distribute $ 1 20 mil- 
lion to four clusters of schools — 
high schools and their feeder schools 
— on Chicago's West Side, South 
Side, south suburbs and downstate. 
The governor and legislative leaders 
have made no promises. 

"I do not believe that a child's 
education should be based on where 
they live," Meeks said. He compared 
the issue to apartheid in South Africa 



and said the situation makes it difficult 
for children to rise from povert}'. 

"We undereducated these kids' 
parents, we imdereducated their grand- 
parents and now we're in the process of 
undereducating them," Meeks said. 

New Trier Superintendent Linda 
Yonke acknowledged that money 
played a role in school performance, 
along with supportive parents and hard- 
working students. 

"There's also no denying the fact 
that funding allows us to have smaller 
classes, a deep and rich curriculum and 
many extracurricular activities," Yonke 
said. 

She said 1,100 elementary students 
and 150 high school students from Chi- 
cago filled out enrollment applications 
Tuesday for New Trier. 

New Trier student bod>' president 
Matt McAmbridge, a senior, told Chi- 
cago students at a rally in suburban 
Skokie on Tuesday afternoon that stu- 



dents there support the boycotters' 
cause and would help in any way 
they can. 

"We know the sentiment among 
New Trier students ... is really in 
favor of getting better school fund- 
ing for everybody," McAmbridge 
said. 

On the bus ride to the suburban 
district, volunteers told the children 
they were taking part in a historic 
event similar to the bus boycott in 
Alabama in the 1950s. 

Peggy Richmond, who accom- 
panied her 12-year-old granddaugh- 
ter Skyler Williams on the boycott, 
said she was forced to enroll Skvler 
in a private school because of the 
poor quality of the public schools in 
her Chicago neighborhood. 

"I'm still angrv," she said of 
having to pay $650 a month in tui- 
tion to ensure her granddaughter 
gets a good education. 



PA(,n 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Joann Wheeler to display art through Dec. 



Continued from page 3 

Joann Wheeler will display her art 
at Rhoades Center through December. 
Her three-dimensional collages and 
boxes have been exhibited and sold in 
juried group shows in several galler- 
ies. 

October 

Vegetarian Cooking Classes will 
be offered Wednesday, October 1, and 
Tuesday, November 4, from 5-7:30 
p.m., in the community room of the 
Student Apartment Complex. 

Clarion's Autumn Leaf Festival 
weekend kicks off Thursday, October 
2. Mid-semester break begins at 10 
p.m. In addition, the Distinguished 
Alumni Reception will be held that 
day at 5 p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meet- 
ing Thursday, October 2, from 11:30 
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in room 307 of 
Montgomery Hall. For more informa- 
tion, contact Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Lori Secor 
at s lasecor®clarion.edu. 



Acoustic rock artist Adrianne will 
perform on Friday, October 3, at 7 p.m., in 
Rhoades Center. 

Transgender singer/songwriter Namoli 
Brennet will perform on Friday, October 
10, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

The Independent Film Series will be- 
gin Saturday, October 11, at 7 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Auditorium. The featured film 
will be "Sweet Land." 

The Outdoor Club will sponsor a Fall 
Retreat October 16-18. The trip to Ithaca, 
NY, will include waterfall hikes and more. 
The cost is a $15, non-refundable fee per 
person. Spaces are limited. To sign up or 
for more information, email Emily Aubele 
at eaubeIe(rt)clarion.edu. 

Senator Mary Jo White will hold a 
Student Government Seminar on Friday, 
October 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Gymnasium. 

CLEP testing will take place on Fri- 
day, October 17, from 8 a.m. to 1:45 p.m., 
in room 1 18 of Frame Hall. 



"The Lives of Others" will be 
shown on Saturday, October 18, at 7 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a 
meeting Monday, October 20, from 
4:30-6:30 p.m., in the small confer- 
ence room at Rhoades Center. For 
more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at s_pashontz(a)clarion.edu 
or Lori Secor at slasecor 
@clarion.edu. 

The Satellite Seminar Series 
will begin Monday, October 20, at 
6:30 p.m., at the Rhoades Audito- 
rium. The DVD presentation, titled 
"Lessons From Abroad: Opportuni- 
ties in a Borderless World," features 
Dr. Richard Heinzl. 

A murder m\ster>- dinner thea- 
tre will be held Friday, October 24, 
from 6-9 p.m., in the lounge at 
Rhoades Center. It will be "an eve- 
ning to kill for!" 



\NE HAVE A SPOT FOR YOU! 

The 9iznango \Poiefz\s recruiting writer y, 

pbotograpbej-s, araphic designers, and more! 



Email the VeNt^NGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street, Oil City. PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



qiLARION UNIV 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SUHR LIBRAR 
VENANGO CAM 



'EP 1 2 



UK Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



li^NffNeo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 3 



Monday, September IS, 2008 



Jerome Wincek slated to perform 



Jerome Wincek will 
appear in the Robert W. 
Rhoades Center at Clar- 
ion University-Venango 
Campus on Friday, Sep- 
tember 19, at 8 p.m. The 
performance is the first 
of the five-part Coffee 
House Series offered 
through the campus' fall 
cultural arts series. The 
event is free and open to 
the public. 

Wincek is a talented 
folk rock musician from 
western Pennsylvania 
whose work has been 
influenced by such folk 
artists as Tom Waits and 
Willie Nelson. 

Jerome Wincek 
moved to Nashville to 
pursue a career in music 




Jerome Wincek will perforin on Friday, Septem- 
ber 19, at 8 p.m., in the Rhoades Lounge. 



and in 2001 moved to Oil 
City. 

He has since begun 
recording what he enti- 
tles his "living room 
masterpieces" with his 



band, The Old Hats. 

For more informa- 
tion, contact the Office 
of Student Affairs at 
814-676-6591, extension 
1269. 



Phi Theta Kappa will meet Sept. 15 



September 

Yoga sessions will be 
held every Thursday, at 11 
a.m., in the fourth floor 
lounge of Montgomery 
Hall. Classes will be in- 
structed by Libby Jenkins. 
With the conclusion of 
renovations, yoga sessions 
will be held at the Rhoades 
Gymnasium. The sessions 



are free. 

Cardio-kickboxing 
sessions will be held every 
Wednesday, from 6-7 p.m., 
at the Franklin School of 
Kung Fu, 845 Buffalo St., 
Franklin. The sessions are 
free. 



hold a meeting and begin 
the organization's fnst 
fundraiser of the year, a 
Stromboli sale, on Mon- 
day, September 15. The 
meeting will be held from 
4:30-6:30 p.m., in the small 
conference room at 
Rhoades Center. For more 



Phi Theta Kappa will See EVENTS on page 4 



Inside this issue: 


Jerome 
Wincek 


1 


E\'ENTS 


1-6 


Job Postings 


2 


Going Green 


2 


.•\RT Exhibit 


3 


Constitution 
Day 


3 


LSC News 


4 


Chalk Policy 


4 


SPSE.\ 
Meeting 


S 


CLEP Info 


S 



PAcr 2 



Venango \'oicf 



Job openings are available to Venango students 



Career Services has two 
job openings available to 
Venango Campus students. 

The Howling Dog Cafe 
and Art Gallery is looking for 
someone interested in part- 
time employment. Responsi- 
bilities include general food 
prep, coffee and specialty 
drink prep, opening and clos- 
ing responsibilities, cash reg- 
ister, and some general clean- 
ing. 

Previous coffee shop 
experience is a giant plus, but 
not necessary. 



Compensation includes 
minimum wage plus tips, 
opportunities for advance- 
ment, and free food and cof- 
fee drinks, too. 

Apply in person at the 
Howling Dog Cafe, 219 Se- 
neca Street, Oil City, or call 
677-2490 for more informa- 
tion. 

A part-time bank Teller/ 
Branch Customer Service 
Representative in an Oil City 
north side office is needed. 
Job responsibilities include 
processing transactions, in- 



troducing additional bank 
products and services, help 
build and maintain solid rela- 
tionships with customers, and 
work within a team environ- 
ment. 

Job candidates are re- 
quired to have data entry 
skills, familiarity with com- 
puters, strong multi-tasking 
and communication skills, 
six- 12 months experience 
suggesting or referring prod- 
ucts and services to custom- 
ers, six months experience 
handline cash, and a high 



school diploma. Competi- 
tive pay, performance incen- 
tives, and on-the-job train- 
ing are available. 

The opening is posted at 
www.cwds.state.pa.us. An 
updated resume is necessary 
before applying. 

For more information 
about these job openings or 
how to prepare a resume, 
contact Coordinator of Ca- 
reer Services Mark Conrad 
by phone at 676-6591, ex- 
tension 1373, or visit room 
230 Montgomery Hall. 



Going Green course is offered by Lola Deets 



A new non-credit course is being 
offered this semester through the Divi- 
sion of Continuing Education at Clar- 
ion University-Venango Campus. 
"Going Green" Environmental Biol- 
ogy will be taught by Lola Deets, 
Clarion University instructor. 

Food prices, gas prices, tempera- 
tures, and sea levels are rising. Trees, 
ice, biodiversity, and water tables are 
falling. What is happening? How can 
you, one individual out of 6.2 billion, 
have a significant positive impact? 



There are six simple steps that you can 
take that will make a difference. 

This environmental biology course 
will focus on environmental sustainabil- 
ity. 

Discussions include plans for eradi- 
cating poverty and stabilizing popula- 
tions, restoring the Earth's ecosystems, 
feeding eight billion people, designing 
cities for people, raising energy effi- 
ciency in homes, offices, and transporta- 
tion systems, turning to renewable en- 
ergy, and shifting taxes and subsidies. 



Participants in this class will gain an 
understanding of the exploration of 
biological principles of natural eco- 
systems, and how humans affect the 
environment. 

The class will meet Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Sep- 
tember 23 through November 20. 

To register for this class, please 
contact the Continuing Education 
office at 814-676-6591, extension 
1273, or stop by the office at 215 
Frame Hall. 



Vjznango \?oie!2: 

Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion Universit> - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591, Ext. 1271 Email: vvoiceiSiclarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnist 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is tlie student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities The 
Voice is published most Fridays dunng the academic year 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation Publication is not guaranteed 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



jLLiM.E +1. Issue 3 



PAGt 3 



Wheelers' art exhibit hosted in Rhoades Lounge 



.\n exhibit of work by local artist 
Joann Wheeler v\ill open with a recep- 
tion at 7 pjn. on Friday, September 19, 
2008. in the Robert W. Rhoades Center 
at Clarion Universit\-Venango Cam- 
pus. The reception is free and open to 
the public. 

Ms. Wheeler studied at the Carne- 
gie Museum and at the Carnegie- 
Mellon Universit\' School of Fine .\rts. 
She describes her art as "an attempt to 
match external forms with internal 
themes," and uses objects found in eve- 
r\"dav Ufe. 



Her three-dimensional collages and 
boxes have been exhibited and sold in 
juried group shows at the Brickbottom 
Gallerv' in Somerville, Massachusetts; 
the Cambridge Art Association in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts; the Handworks 
Galler\' in Blue HiU, Maine; and De 
Ha\'illand Fine Art in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. Solo shows include the Cam- 
bridge Public Library and the Transit 
Gallery in Oil City, where she was 
named Artist of the Month in July, 
2004. 

A resident of Oil Citv' for twelve 



>ears, Ms. WTieeler was hired to be its 
Arts Champion in 2006 and has since 
coordinated the Oil City Arts Revitah- 
zation and the Artist Relocation Pro- 
gram. Under her leadership, seven 
artists have relocated with their fami- 
nes and 21 artists rent space in the 
National Transit Building. 

Ms. Wheeler's exhibit will remain 
on display through December 2008. 

For more information about the 
exhibit, please contact the Venango 
Campus Office of Student Afeirs at 
814-676-6591, extension 1269. 



Wednesday, September 17 is Constitution Day 



These ten facts about the United 
States constitution were obtained from 
voof. constitutionday. us. 

• The U. S Constitution was written 
in the same Pennsylvania State House 
where the Declaration of Independ- 
ence was signed and where George 
Washington received his commission 
as Commander of the Continental 
Army. Now called Independence Hall, 
the building still stands today on Inde- 
pendence MaU in Philadelphia, di- 
rectly across from the National Consti- 
tution Center. 

• Written in 1787, the Constitution 
was signed on September 17th. But it 
wasn't imtil 1788 that it was ratified by 
the necessar}' nine states. 

• The U.S. Constitution was pre- 
pared in secret behind locked doors 



that were guarded by sentries. 

• Some of the original fi^mers and 
many delegates in the state ratifving 
conventions were very troubled that the 
original Constitution lacked a descrip- 
tion of individual rights. In 1791, 
Americans added a list of rights to the 
Constitution. The first ten amendments 
became known as The BUI of Rights 

• Of the 55 delegates attending the 
Constitutional Convention, 39 signed 
and three delegates dissented. Two of 
America's "founding fathers" didn't sign 
the Constitution. Thomas Jefferson was 
representing his countr>' in France and 
John Adams was doing the same in 
Great Britain. 

• Established on November 26, 
1789, the first national "Thanksgiving 
Day" was originally created by George 
Washington as a way of "giving 



thanks" for the Constitution. 

• Of the written national constitu- 
tions, the U.S. Constitution is the oldest 
and shortest. 

• At 81, Benjamin Franklin of Peim- 
syivania was the oldest delegate at the 
Constitutional Convention and at 26, 
Jonathon Dajlon of New Jersey was the 
youngest. 

• The original Constitution is on 
display at the National Archives in 
Washington, D.C. When the Japanese 
bombed Pearl Harbor, it was moved to 
Fort Knox for safekeeping. 

• More than 11,000 amendments 
have been introduced in Congress. 
Thirty three have gone to the states to 
be ratified and twenty' seven have re- 
ceived the necessary approval from the 
states to actually become amendments 
to the Constitution. 



Got an idea? 

Want your opinion to be heard? 

Email the Venango Voice now! 

woice(S>.ciarion. edu 




PaGI; 4 



Venango Voice 



LSC notes open house event, changes in schedule 



The Learning Support Center will 
be hosting its open house Tuesday and 
Wednesday, September 23-24, from 
8:30 a.m. to 4;30 p.m., each day. Re- 
freshments and door prizes will be 
provided. 

Mark Conrad of Career Services 
will also be there from 10-10:30 a.m. 
and 3-4 p.m. each day for a meet and 
greet. He will be addressing resume 
questions and dilemmas. 



In addition to Learning Support 
Center tutors Megan Warner, Joni 
Brinker, Jole Burkett and Melinda 
Eckman, who were mentioned in last 
week's I'olce issue. Shannon Shuff- 
stall and Charity Hansford will join 
the LSC team. Shuffstall is available 
Monday, Thursday and Friday, from 
9-11 a.m., and Wednesday, from 9 
a.m. to noon. 

She is capable of tutoring in the 
areas of Speech, Writing II, Intro to 



Criminal Justice, Math 050, Chem 1, 
Health, and CIS 217. 

Hansford is available on Friday, 
from 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. She is capable 
of tutoring in the areas of A&P 1 and 
2, Nursing 101, 111, 112, 102, 131 
and 121, and Writing II. 

For more information about the 
open house or the tutor schedule, con- 
tact the Learning Support Center in 
room 318 Montgomery Hall, or email 
stmdulaneyfrticlarion.edu. 



Email us at 
woice@clarion.edu 



Chalking policy 
reminder issued 
by university 

As student groups seek to 
attract new members, please visit 
http://www.clarion.edu/ 
studentrights.pdf and review the 
University's posting policy 
(appendix D). 

The section on chalking 
reads: "Chalking is permitted on 
campus as a means of advertising 
events. 

Chalking is permitted only on 
outside, horizontal, exposed sur- 
faces where rain can wash the 
chalk away. 

Chalking is not permitted on 
vertical surfaces, buildings, under 
overhangs, or on steps, posts, 
trees, tables or similar objects." 



EVENTS: Venango students 
invited to Main Street Program 



Continued from page 1 

information, contact Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Daniele 
Merryman at sdmmerryman 
@clarion.edu 

Venango Campus students are 
invited to a Main Street Program 
meeting to be held on Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 16, at 6:30 p.m., at the Transit 
Building Great Room, 206 Seneca 
Street, Oil City. Suzanne Gagliardo, 
manager of the Community Develop- 
ment Northwest Commission, will 
give a presentation on the Main Street 
Program. A planning and brainstorm- 
ing session will follow. 

Venango Museum's "Oil on the 
Brain" series will be held Wednesday, 
September 17 through Saturday, Sep- 
tember 20, from 6-10 p.m., each night 
in Rhoades Auditorium. 

The Trustees' Dinner will be held 
on Thursday, September 18, from 3-8 
p.m., in Rhoades Lounge. 



Indie and folk rock artist Jerome 
Wincek will perform on Friday, Sep- 
tember 19, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades 
Lounge. The performance is spon- 
sored by the CAB Coffeehouse Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold its 
"Adopt-a-Highway" event on Satur- 
day, September 20. Students interested 
in volunteering should meet at Penn- 
DOT, Route 8 south of Franklin, at 9 
a.m. In case of inclement weather, the 
event will be held the following Satur- 
day, September 27. For more informa- 
tion, contact Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Elizabeth 
Austin at s_edaustin@clarion.edu. 

Singer/songwriter and guitarist 
Trina Hamlin will perform on Thurs- 
day, September 25, at 7 p.m., in 
Rhoades Center. The performance is 
sponsored by the CAB Coffeehouse 
Series. 

Joann Wheeler will display her art 
at Rhoades Center through December. 

See EVENTS on page 6 



Volume 41, Issue 3 



Page 5 



SPSEA to hold organizational meeting Thursday 



The Venango Campus student 
chapter of the Pennsylvania State 
Education Association will hold an 
organizational meeting on Thursday, 
September 18, at 2:30 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Lounge. 

Are you an education major? Are 
you undecided but thinking that edu- 
cation may be the program for you? 
Then SPSEA may be for you. 

Students join SPSEA for many 
reasons, including; 

• Meet new people and get in- 
volved in campus activities 

• Get access to helpful tips and 
advice that allows you to get a 



jumpstart on your career in educa- 
tion 

Enjoy the benefits of a paid mem- 
bership by receiving discounts at 
tons of restaurants, hotels, amuse- 
ment parks, magazine subscrip- 
tions, and more 

Plus get $1 million Liability Insur- 
ance for when you are student 
teaching 

When you enroll in our chapter of 
SPSEA, you will receive member- 
ship into PSEA and NEA 
Get monthly publications from 
NEA (National Education Associa- 
tion) and PSEA (Pennsylvania 



State Education Association), 
which provide you with up-to- 
date information about your 
future career as a teacher 

• You will be affiliated with the 
largest and most well known 
organization for teachers in the 
country 

• Plus enjoy some of the other 
benefits that full teacher mem- 
bers of PSEA and NEA enjoy 
For more information about the 

Peimsylvania State Education Asso- 
ciation, contact Megan at 
s_mswamer@clarion.edu or Dr. 
Foster at efoster@clarion.edu. 



CLEP exams are available for 2008-2009 year 



By Hope Lineman 

Do you feel as if you're taking 
classes on subjects you already 
know? If so, CLEP is for you! What 
is CLEP? 

It is the College Level Examina- 
tion Program which is a way for stu- 
dents to receive credit for what they 
already know. By earning qualifying 
scores on any one or more of the 34 
CLEP tests, students receive credit 
for the non-major classes of their 
choice. The examinations test intro- 
ductory-level knowledge that corre- 
sponds to courses in the disciplines of 
business, composition and literature, 
foreign languages, history and social 
sciences and science and mathemat- 
ics. While students obtain credit and 
not a letter grade, the cost is just a 
fraction of what a normal course 
would cost. The cost of a CLEP exam 
is just $90 including the administra- 
tion fee. CLEP exams are adminis- 
tered by a Certified CLEP Test Ad- 
ministrator and are completed via the 
computer right here at Venango 
Campus, which is an official test site. 
More than 2,900 institutions accept 
CLEP for college credit. 

What are the student benefits of 



taking CLEP exams? First is that it aids 
in reducing student aid debt and or loan 
amounts. It also allows for quicker pro- 
gression to higher-level courses, short- 
ens the time that students have in earn- 
ing a degree, and it decreases the redim- 
dancy of course work. It is also a lower- 
cost alternative to an exfra semester for 
students who come up short in their 
final degree check. Most importantly it 
allows for quicker identification of ca- 
reer goals by helping students move 
through undergraduate courses and into 
those related to their majors. 

There are benefits to the university 
as well. When students CLEP out of a 
course, it allows more available seats in 
entry-level classes as students are able 
to take more advanced courses. It offers 
the advantage of improved "time-to- 
degree" performance, a measure of in- 
stitutional accountability. CLEP also 
allows for a decreased graduate indebt- 
edness, allowing the opportunity for 
increased alumni giving. 

When should you consider taking a 
CLEP exam? It is recommended that 
students consider CLEP early in their 
academic careers. Those students that 
typically take advantage of CLEP ex- 
ams are that of transfer, international, 
returning adult and freshmen students 



that have taken accelerated pro- 
grams during their junior and senior 
high school years. As you are look- 
ing at the courses that you need to 
take and wondering how you will 
pay for your education, give your- 
self a scholarship! Take a CLEP 
exam and shorten the time it takes to 
earn a degree, save money, and 
avoid repeating material you already 
know. 

You may obtain more informa- 
tion on CLEP by visiting the Col- 
lege Board website at 
www.collegeboard.com/highered/ 
clep or stop by the Continuing Edu- 
cation office at 215 Frame Hall and 
pick up a student information packet 
with all of the details on how to 
prepare and how to register. Please 
discuss your intention to take a 
CLEP examination with your advi- 
sor in advance of registering for the 
exam. 

The CLEP test dates for the 2008- 
2009 academic year are: 

Fri., Oct. 17 8:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. 

Fri.,Dec. 19 8:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. 

Fri., Feb. 20 8:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. 

Fri., April 17 8:30 a.m., 1 1 :30 a.m. 



Pagi: 6 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Vegetarian cooking classes are slated 



Continued from page 4 

Her three-dimensional collages and 
boxes have been exhibited and sold in 
juried group shows in several galler- 
ies. 

October 

Vegetarian Cooking Classes will 
be offered Wednesday, October 1, and 
Tuesday, November 4, from 5-7:30 
p.m., in the community room of the 
Student Apartment Complex. 

Clarion's Autumn Leaf Festival 
weekend kicks off Thursday, October 
2. Mid-semester break begins at 10 
p.m. In addition, the Distinguished 
Alumni Reception will be held that 
day at 5 p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meet- 
ing Thursday, October 2, from 11:30 
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in room 307 of 
Montgomery Hall. For more informa- 
tion, contact Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@,clarion.edu or Charity 
Barger at s_clbarger@clarion.edu. 

Acoustic rock artist Adrianne will 
perform on Friday, October 3, at 7 



p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

Transgender singer/songwriter Namoli 
Brennet will perform on Friday, October 
10, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

The Independent Fihn Series will be- 
gin Saturday, October 1 1, at 7 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Auditorium. The featured film 
will be "Sweet Land." 

The Outdoor Club will sponsor a Fall 
Retreat October 16-18. The trip to Ithaca, 
N.Y., will include waterfall hikes and 
more. The cost is a $15, non-refundable fee 
per person. Spaces are limited. To sign up 
or for more information, email Emily 
Aubele at eaubeIe@clarion.edu. 

Senator Mary Jo White will hold a 
Student Government Seminar on Friday, 
October 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Gymnasium. 

CLEP testing will take place on Fri- 
day, October 17, from 8 a.m. to 1:45 p.m., 
in room 118 of Frame Hall. 

"The Lives of Others" will be shown 
on Saturday, October 18, at 7 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction with 



the Independent Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a 
meeting Monday, October 20, from 
4:30-6:30 p.m., in the small confer- 
ence room at Rhoades Center. For 
more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at s_pashontz@clarion.edu 
or Charity Barger at 

s_clbarger@clarion.edu. 

The Satellite Seminar Series 
will begin Monday, October 20, at 
6:30 p.m., at the Rhoades Audito- 
rium. The DVD presentation, titled 
"Lessons From Abroad: Opportuni- 
ties in a Borderless World," features 
Dr. Richard Heinzl. 

A murder mystery dinner thea- 
tre will be held Friday, October 24, 
from 6-9 p.m., in the lounge at 
Rhoades Center. It will be "an eve- 
ning to kill for!" 

"Turtles Can Fly" will be 
shown on Saturday, October 25, at 7 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Independent 
Fihn Series. 



\NE HAVE A SPOT FOR YOU! 

The \P(znango V^oicf^xs recruiting wyitery, 

pbotogc^phers, araphic designers, and more! 



Email the VeNfiNGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion Universit> of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City. PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion Universit>' is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion. PA. 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



VENANGO CAiViRUS i^ 

Youw Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



SEP 1 9 



;larion un!v 
ofpennsyl 



^MNfiMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 4 



Monday, September 22, 2008 



Folk rock artist Hamlin to perform 



S i n g e r - s n g w r i t e r 
Trina Hamlin will appear in 
the Robert W. Rhoades 
Center at Clarion Univer- 
sity-Venango Campus on 
Thursday, September 25, at 
7 p.m.. as part of the five- 
part Coffee House Series 
offered through the cam- 
pus" fall cultural arts series. 
The event is fi^ee and open 
to the public. 

Hamlin graduated with 
a degree in professional 
music from Burklee Col- 
lege in Boston Massachu- 
setts and began playing 
with the Blue Leaves in 
New York City. She has 
written and co-produced 
five albums and was chosen 
as one of the "most wanted 
new artists" at the Falcon 
Ridge Folk Festival. 

Hamlin has performed 




Trina Hamlin will perform on Thursday, Septem- 
ber 25, at 7 p.m., in the Rhoades Lounge. 



with Paula Cole, Duncan 
Sheik. Ricki Lee Jones, and 
John Hiatt. Her songs have 
also been featured on 
Bravo's "Tale Lights", Life- 
time's "The Things We Do 
For Love", MTV's "Real 



World", as well as ABC 
Family's "Beautiful Peo- 
ple." 

For more information, 
contact the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs at 814-676- 
6591, extension 1269. 



LSC to host open house this week 



September 

Yoga sessions will be 
held every Thursday, at 1 1 
a.m., in the fourth floor 
lounge of Montgomery 
Hall. Classes will be in- 
structed by Libby Jenkins. 
With the conclusion of 
renovations, yoga sessions 
will be held at the Rhoades 
Gymnasium. The sessions 



are free. 

Cardio-kickboxing 
sessions will be held every 
Wednesday, from 6-7 p.m., 
at the Franklin School of 
Kung Fu, 845 Buffalo St., 
Franklin. The sessions are 
free. 



Center will host an open 
house event Tuesday and 
Wednesday, September 23- 
24, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m., each day. Refresh- 
ments and door prizes will 
be provided. 

Mark Conrad of Ca- 
reer Services will be at the 



The Learning Support See EVENTS on page 7 



Inside this issue: 


Trin.'X Hamlin 


1 


Events 


1-8 


Trash Taik 


2 


Green Corner 


3 


Recycle Cell 
Phones 


3 


Graduation 
Applications 


3 


State News 


4 


National 
News 


4 


World News 


5 


Marea Harp 


6 


Credit/No 
Record 


6 


LSC Open 

HOUSE 


6 


Career Fair 


7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Renewable energy sources are topic of discussion 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 

As fuel prices continue 
to rise, we hear more and 
more about renewable energy 
sources. Everyone from Un- 
cle Bob to the presidential 
candidates is talking about 
finding and implementing 
reliable "clean" power. To 
get more specific: solar, 
wind, geothermal, tidal, and 
biomass. 

The next few weeks, I'd 
like to take a look at each of 



these - how they work, pros 
and cons, and how they are 
implemented. 

I think we are all a little 
familiar with solar power. 
We know it can be harnessed 
- solar covers for swimming 
pools have been around for 
\ears. and I think just about 
everyone has a solar powered 
calculator. The amount of 
solar energy that makes it to 
the earth's surface is enough 
to meet the energy needs of 
the globe more than 8.000 
times over! All of that power- 
ful energy is reaching us, 
whether we take advantage of 
it or not. 

How do we collect solar 
energy? The most common 
devices are solar cells, or 
photovoltaic cells, which are 
combined into solar panels. 
They turn sunlight directly 
into electricity - with no fuel 
costs, hazardous emissions, 
or pollution. These cells are 
used to heat water and to heat 
homes and other buildings. 
Photovoltaic (PV) arrays can 



be set up anywhere, as large 
as the user needs it to be 
since it does not require any 
additional machinery. One 
exciting new development 
with solar cells comes ft-om 
the Queensland University of 
Technology. Expected to be 
available on the market in 
201 1 are solar windows that 
are clear, clean energy pro- 
viders. Build a skyscraper 
with those and imagine the 
energy it could produce! 

Green water doesn't 
sound very appealing at first, 
but think it through: solar 
water heaters. Heating water 
is a significant part of a 
home's overall energy con- 
sumption. While it may be 
more expensive initially than 
a traditional gas-powered 
water heater, the benefits in 
the long run are immeasur- 
able. Conservative estimates 
of the cost reduction is 50 - 
80 percent, not to mention the 
reduced C02 emissions and 
the security of knowing that 
while the price of natural gas 



continues to climb, sunlight 
is still free. 

The possibilities of so- 
lar power are endless. I look 
forward to seeing what tech- 
nologies arise in the next 
several years as more time 
and money is invested in 
learning to efficiently har- 
ness the power the sun has 
to offer us. As these tech- 
nologies advance, the cost to 
make our homes more en- 
ergy efficient will lower. 
Until then, state, local, util- 
ity, and federal incentives 
are available to homeowners 
and business owners. Infor- 
mation can be found at 
www.dsireusa.org. 

Reference material for 
this article was found at: 
www.solarhome.org, planet- 
green. discovery. com, www. i 
nhabitant.com, http:// 
www.solarhome.org/ 
infowhatissolarpower.html, 
http://planetgree 
n. discovery. com, http:'/ 
www.inhabitat.com/2008/04 
/14/dvesol-solar-windows/. 



\?(2nango \?oic(Z 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice'«;clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnist 

Dr. .loan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities The 
Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the deteniiination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



Volume 41, Issue 4 



Page 3 



Geese offer life lessons we can all learn from 



lloCaVeets... 

\tike QfcCH COFHCF 



Geese flying in a V-formation have 
always been a welcome sign of spring 
as well as a sign that heralds the com- 
ing of winter. 

Not only is this a marvelous sight, 
but there are some remarkable lessons 
that we can learn from the flight of 
geese, because all that they do has sig- 
nificance. 
• As each goose flaps its wings, it 

creates uplift for others behind it. 



There is 71 percent more fly range 
in V-formation than in flying 
alone. 

LESSON: People who share a 
common direction and sense of 
purpose can get there more 
quickly. 

Whenever a goose flies out of for- 
mation, it feels drag and tries to get 
back into position. 
LESSON: It's harder to do some 
thing alone than together. 
When the lead goose gets tired, it 
rotates back into formation and 
another goose flies at the head. 
LESSON: Shared leadership and 
interdependence gives us a chance 
to lead as well as an opportunity to 



rest. 

The geese flying in the rear of the 
formation honk to encourage 
those up front to keep up their 
speed. 

LESSON: Encouragement is moti 
vation. We need to make sure our 
"honking" is encouraging and not 
discouraging. 

When a goose gets sick or 
wounded and falls, two geese fall 
out and stay with it until it revives 
or dies. Then they catch up or join 
another flock. 

LESSON: We may all need help 
from time to time. We should 
stand by our colleagues in diffi- 
cult times. 



Recycle old cell phones at Venango Book Center 



Old, unused cell phones are ac- 
cepted at the bookstore in the Robert 
W. Rhoades Center for safe recycling. 

Why recycle? Cell phones have a 
vast amount of toxic components that 
are devastating to the environment if 
not disposed of properly. Currently up 
to 80 percent of old cell phones are 



sent to other countries for disposal, and 
their practices are not environmentally 
responsible. 

There are an estimated 500,000 cell 
phones sitting around unused in closets 
and drawers. If they are simply thrown 
away, they will add about 312,000 
pounds of lead to landfills. Please bring 



any phones and phone batteries that 
you, your family, and friends have ly- 
ing around and help us to make sure 
that they are recycled responsibly! 

Be safe and clear your personal 
information off your old phone first. 
Visit www.recellular.com/recycling/ 
data_eraser for easy insfructions. 



December, Winter grads must apply by October 6 



Attention December and Winter Inter- 
session Graduates: 

If you are planning on graduating 
in December or Winter Intersession 
2008, graduation applications are due 
in the Regisfrar's Office by October 6. 
You will need to have your advisor, 
department chair, and dean sign the 
graduation application. You must 
complete a graduation application 
regardless of whether or not you plan 
to participate in the commencement 
ceremony. 



Each dean's office will submit re- 
ceived graduation applications for their 
students to the Registrar's Office on 
October 6. 

Students receiving a double degree 
(ex. B.S. and B.S.B.A.) must complete 
a graduation application for each pro- 
gram. 

Students receiving a double major 
(ex. B.S. in Biology and B.S. in Chem- 
istry) only need to complete one 
graduation application with signatures 
from both departments. 



Graduation applications are avail- 
able online at the following website: 
http://www.clarion.edu/registrar/ 
grad_app.shtml . 

If you are not planning on graduat- 
ing in December or Winter Intersession 
2008, please make sure your expected 
graduation term on your Personal Infor- 
mation Form (PIP) is updated and re- 
flects your expected graduation term. 

If you have any questions, please 
contact the Registrar's Office at 
re2isfrar@clari0n.edu. 



Page 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Police, school settle bomb threat suit for $83K 



GREENSBURG. Pa. (AP) _ A west- 
em Pennsylvania high school boy 
wrongly accused of phoning in a bomb 
threat has won $61,000 to pay for his 
college education. 

That's what Hempfleld Area Sen- 
ior High School student Cody Webb 
will receive for settlins his lawsuit 



with the school district and state police 
who charged him in March 2007. 

The settlement also includes 
$22,000 in attorneys fees and other 
costs. 

Webb was 15 when he spent 12 
days in juvenile custody because po- 
lice thought Webb called Hempfleld 



Area Senior High School within min- 
utes of the threat. 

But a judge threw out the charges 
after learning the school had not ad- 
justed its clocks for da>light savings 
time, meaning Webb's cell phone call 
and threat were made more than an 
hour apart. 



National 



Ike leaves Midwest in the dark after rain, winds 



CINCINNATI (AP) _ Facing a third 
straight day without power, residents 
across the Midwest snapped up batter- 
ies, generators and coolers as they 
waited for crews to restore electricity 
knocked out by the remnants of Hurri- 
cane Ike. 

In other parts of the Midwest, 
residents warily eyed rising rivers 
while other waterlogged communities 
began cleaning up the wet, stinky 
mess left behind by floodwaters. Flood 
warnings remained in effect Wednes- 
day across the region. 

As much as 10 inches of rain fell 
in Indiana. Illinois and Missouri after 
Ike hit Te.\as over the weekend. Hurri- 
cane-force wind blew in Ohio and 
Kentucky and a tornado in Arkansas 
damaged several buildings. 

About 1.3 million homes and 
businesses in Ohio alone remained 
without electricity Tuesday, and long 
lines at supermarkets, hardware stores 
and gas stations were common. 

Home Depot stores were short on 
generators, tarps, gas cans and other 
emergency supplies because some 
stock had been sent south to help with 
hurricane relief in Texas and Louisi- 
ana, said Jen King, a spokeswoman for 
Home Depot Inc. 



"I'm pretty well getting empty," said 
Fred Beckert. who owns Beckert Chain 
Saw Supply in Zanesville. Ohio, and was 
having trouble keeping up with the de- 
mand for chain saws and generators. He 
was expecting more shipments later in 
the week but said the generators coming 
in already had buyers. 

Elsewhere, truckloads of batteries, 
ice and coolers were selling as soon as 
they hit the shelves. Grocers and resi- 
dents alike tried to preserve perishable 
food. 

Lines of people waited for bagged 
ice at a bigg's supermarket in Mason, 
Ohio, and Cincinnati-based Home City 
Ice Co. was operating 24 hours a day to 
help meet the heavy demand. 

"We've brought in about 160 semi 
loads of ice from our facilities in 
neighboring states, and even our manag- 
ers and computer and accounting people 
have been bagging and delivering ice." 
said Jay Stautberg, Home City Ice's chief 
financial officer. 

Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland toured 
wind-damaged sections of Cincinnati. 
Dayton and Columbus on Tuesda}, . a day 
after declaring a state of emergency. 

The governors of Illinois, Indiana, 
Kentucky and Pennsylvania have also 
declared states of emergency. The 



storms brought Ike's death toll to at 
least 48 in 10 states from the Gulf 
Coast to the upper Ohio Valley. 

The deluge of rain left road crews 
in northern Indiana working for a third 
straight day to pump water from 
swamped lanes of interstates 80/94 
and 65. 

Other parts of the state were deal- 
ing with power outages caused by 
Ike's high winds. As of Tuesday, more 
than 100,000 Indiana homes and busi- 
nesses remained without power, but 
phone service had been restored. 

In Ohio, the state's utilities said 
they were trying to restore power in 
the shortest amount of time by priori- 
tizing repairs for circuits that serve the 
largest numbers of people. 

"It's just a matter of which way 
the wires go and how they were laid 
out," said Chris Eck, a spokesman for 
FirstEnergy Corp. in Ohio. 

Across Kentucky, power outages 
still affected nearly 300,000 custom- 
ers, the state said, down from as many 
as 600,000 customers at the peak — 
the state's biggest power outage on 
record. Louisville Gas & Electric pre- 
dicted full power restoration in 10 to 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



\'OLUME 41, Issue 4 



Pagh 5 



World 



Official: 10 dead in attack on US Embassy, Yemen 



SAN'A. Yemen (AP) _ A car bomb 
targeting the U.S. Embassy hit the 
front gate of the compound in 
Yemen's capital Wednesday, a U.S. 
spokesman said. A senior Yemeni 
securit)' official said six Yemeni 
guards and four civihans were killed. 

The Yemeni guards were as- 
signed to sentr\ duty outside the em- 
bassy by the Interior Ministry. The 
civilians were three Yemenis and one 
Indian national, the Yemeni security 
official said. 

The official spoke on condition 
of anonymity because he was not 
authorized to speak to the media. 

Ryan Gliha, the embassy spokes- 
man, told The Associated Press by 
telephone that there was a second 
explosion that followed the initial 
one. but did not know what caused it. 

Another Yemeni security official 
said the embassy was hit by two car 
bombs and that heaw gunfire lasting 
around 10 minutes followed the 
blasts. 

Several nearby homes were 
badly damaged by the blasts, he said, 
but had no information on whether 
the heavily guarded embassy sus- 
tained damage too. 



A medical official, meanwhile, said 
at least seven Yemeni nationals were 
wounded and taken to the city's Repub- 
lican hospital. They are residents of a 
housing compound near the embassy 
and included children, he said. 

Both the security and medical offi- 
cials spoke on condition of anonymity 
because they were not authorized to 
release the information to the media. 

Explosions and heavy gunfire were 
heard near the embassy in the eastern 
section of San'a and police swiftly cor- 
doned off the area, according to a gov- 
ernment security official and an AP 
reporter at the scene. 

Regional TV news networks Al- 
Jazeera and AI-Arabiya showed shaky 
footage of the embassy's area following 
the blasts, with a heavy cloud of black 
smoke rising from a spot just beyond 
concrete blocks painted yellow. 

The embassy is ringed by two lay- 
ers of these blocks, according to San'a 
residents familiar with the area. 

The networks also reported that a 
fire broke out in one of the embassy's 
buildings. The AP reporter said a fire 
truck was seen headed to the scene, but 
Gliha, the embassy spokesman, denied 
the report. 



The U.S. Embassy in Yemen, 
which is the ancestral homeland of 
al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, 
has been the focus of violence in the 
past. The terror network is active in 
the impoverished nation in the south 
and southwestern comer of the Ara- 
bian Peninsula. 

In March, three mortar rounds 
targeting the U.S. Embassy crashed 
into a high school for girls next door, 
killing a Yemeni security guard and 
wounding more than a dozen girls. 

In March 2002, a Yemeni man 
lobbed a sound grenade into the U.S. 
embassy grounds a day after Vice 
President Dick Cheney made a stop 
for talks with officials at San'a air- 
port. 

The attacker, who allegedly 
sought to retaliate against what he 
called American bias toward Israel, 
was sentenced to 10 years m prison 
but the sentence was later reduced to 
seven years. 

In 2006, a gunman opened fire 
outside the embassy but was shot and 
arrested by Yemeni guards. 

The gunman, armed with a 
Kalashnikov rifle, claimed he wanted 
to kill Americans. 



NATIONAL: State of emergency was declared 



Continued from page 4 

14 days for their 182,000 affected cus- 
tomers. 

Downed lines also knocked out 
power in western Pennsylvania, where 
about 64,000 customers remained in 
the dark early Wednesday. Utilities 
said they hoped to restore service to a 
majority of customers by Friday. But- 
ler County, north of Pittsburgh, was 
under a state of emergency. 

Across Illinois, officials said elec- 



tricity had been restored to nearly all of 
the 49,000 left without power in the 
wake of the storm. 

Much of the Chicago area also was 
returning to normal Tuesday, as flood- 
waters began to recede. Ike had over- 
whelmed drainage and sewer systems in 
northern Illinois. 

Elsewhere, some Illinois residents 
were waiting to return home. In Morris, 
about 100 people still couldn't reach 
homes in low-lying areas along the Illi- 
nois River, which hit a record when it 



topped 24 feet, or 8 feet above flood 
stage, Assistant Fire Chief Robert 
Wills said Tuesday. 

In suburban Des Plaines, 111., 
where more than 1,000 people were 
displaced by flooding, the Des 
Plaines River was expected to fall 
below flood stage Wednesday, the 
National Weather Service said. 

"The recovery process is under 
way," said Will Soderberg, a city 
spokesman. "And that should take 
the rest of the week." 



PAGi: 6 



Venango Voice 



New counselor on 
campus offers support 



By Maria Harp 
Counseling Services 

Hi! rm Maria Harp and I 
am the new personal coun- 
selor in Counseling Services. 
My office is in 234 Mont- 
gomery Hall and my exten- 
sion is 1281. My email ad- 
dress is mharpfn'clarion.edu. 
My regular office hours are 
Monday fi-om 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. and Wednesday fi'om 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. I am at 
the Clarion campus Tuesday. 
Thursday, and Friday, and 
my extension is 2255 or you 
can call 393-2255 if those 
days work better for you. 

I want you all to be 
aware of upcoming 
"Wellness Wednesdays" 
starting in October. I will be 
addressing some much 
needed topics to ensure your 



mental wellness. October 1 is 
National Alcohol Screening 
Day and October 15 is Na- 
tional Depression Screening 
Day. Both of these days, 
counseling services will be 
set up in Rhoades to offer 
important information, as 
well as to do screenings. We 
will be offering food, a give- 
away, and a drawing for your 
participation in the screen- 
ings. 

If you have concerns that 
you would like addressed 
through Wellness Wednesday 
or in any other fashion, feel 
free to contact me. I am here 
for your support. Please feel 
free to stop by my office to 
introduce yourself or just say 
hello. 

I look forward to work- 
ing with everyone at the Ve- 
nango Campus. 



Credit/No Record, 
Withdrawal forms due 



Credit/No Record and 
Class Withdrawal Fonns 
(which require an advi- 
sor's signature) are avail- 
able in the Academic De- 
partment Offices, the Of- 
fice of the Registrar. 122 
Carrier and the Adminis- 
trative Office, Frame Hall. 
Venango Campus. 

Both fomis must be 
processed in the Office of 
the Registrar by 4 p.m. on 
the dates indicated below. 
Venango Campus students 
may return their forms to 
the Administrative Office, 
Frame Hall. 

The Credit/No Record 
option is available through 
Friday. September 26. 

The requirements for 
the Credit/No Record Op- 
tion are available on the 



Registrar's web page at: 
http://www.clarion.edu' 
registrar/credit 
norecord.shtml. 

Class Withdrawal is 
available through Friday, 
October 24. 

Information regarding 
Class Withdrawal is avail- 
able on the Registrar's 
web page at: http://ww 
w. clarion.edu/registrar/ 
classwithdraw.shtml 

PLEASE NOTE: If 
you are enrolled in 
courses you are not at- 
tending or do not intend to 
complete, you must with- 
draw from the course as 
soon as possible and no 
later than Friday. October 
24 or a failing grade will 
be recorded for the af- 
fected course(s). 



LEARNING SUPPORT CENTER'S 

TWO-DAY OPEN HOUSE EXTRA VAGAN 

Tuesday and Wednesday, September 23-24 

8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day 

318 Montgomery Hall 



<'^-\ 
^m- 




f^ 



1^ 



i^'^.p'- 



Snacks and Refreshments! 
Door prizes and Information! 
Mark Conrad of Career Services will attend)^ 
Come find out what YOU need to SUCCEEB 




\'OLUME 41, Issue 4 



P/\Gli 7 



Fall Campus Recruiting Days Career Fair 
to be held at Clarion's main campus 



Twenty-five employers will 
participate in the Fall Campus Re- 
cruiting Days Career Fair on 
Wednesday, October 8 and Campus 
Interviews on October 9 in Gemmell 
Student Center. 

Recruiters are seeking candi- 
dates for internships and full-time 
jobs. A complete listing is available 
at http://www.clarion.edu/career/ 
recruit/schedule. pdf and found at 
w w w . c larion . edu/career/ 
campusrecruitingday. 

The event is free. Pre- 



registration is not required for the Ca- 
reer Fair. 

However, those who wish to be 
considered for an on-campus interview 
should submit a resume online by the 
September 30 deadline following the 
procedure listed at www.clarion.edu/ 
career/campusrecruitingday. 

Recruiters scheduled to partici- 
pate at the Recruiting Days Career 
Fair include: Abraxas, AFLAC, Al- 
pem Rosenthal, Beard Miller Com- 
pany LLP, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, 
Kersey & Associates P.C, National 



City Bank, Parente Randolph LLC, 
Premier Therapy, Schoedel, Scullin 
& Bestic CPAs, Sea World, Discov- 
ery Cove and Aquatica, U.S. Marine 
Corps. Walgreens, WLMl Radio 
Network, MetLife, NHS Human 
Services, PA State Police, PA De- 
partment of Conservation and Natu- 
ral Resources, and many more. 

For assistance with resume 
preparation, contact Coordinator of 
Career Services Mark Conrad by 
phone at 676-6591, extension 1373, 
or visit room 230 Montgomery Hall. 



EVENTS: "Healthy Meals on a Budget" class slated 



Continued from page 1 

open house from 10-10:30 a.m. and 3- 
4 p.m. each day for a meet and greet. 
He will be addressing resume ques- 
tions and dilemmas. 

Pat McFarland, of Sage Meadow 
in Clarion, will teach a "Cooking 
Healthy Meals on a Budget" session 
on Thursday, September 25, from 6-8 
p.m., in the community center of the 
Venango Campus dorms. 

Singer/songwriter and guitarist 
Trina Hamlin will perform on Thurs- 
day, September 25, at 7 p.m., in 
Rhoades Center. The performance is 
sponsored by the CAB Coffeehouse 
Series. 

Joarm Wheeler will display her art 
at Rhoades Center through December. 



Her three-dimensional collages and 
boxes have been exhibited and sold in 
juried group shows in several galleries. 

October 

Vegetarian Cooking Classes will be 
offered Wednesday, October 1, and 
Tuesday, November 4, from 5-7:30 p.m., 
in the community room of the Student 
Apartment Complex. 

Clarion's Autumn Leaf Festival 
weekend kicks off Thursday, October 2. 
Mid-semester break begins at 10 p.m. In 
addition, the Distinguished Alumni Re- 
ception will be held that day at 5 p.m., in 
Rhoades Center. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meeting 
Thursday, October 2, from 1 1:30 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m., in room 307 of Montgomery 
Hall. For more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at sj)ashontz@clarion.edu or 



Charity Barger at s_clbarger 
@clarion.edu. 

Acoustic rock artist Adrianne will 
perform on Friday, October 3, at 7 
p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

Transgender singer/songwriter 
Namoli Brennet will perform on Fri- 
day, October 10, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades 
Center. 

The Independent Film Series will 
begin Saturday, October 11, at 7 p.m., 
in the Rhoades Auditorium. The fea- 
tured film will be "Sweet Land." 

The Outdoor Club will sponsor a 
Fall Retreat October 16-18. The trip to 
Ithaca, NY, will include waterfall 
hikes and more. The cost is a $15, 

See EVENTS on page 8 



PAGt 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Senator White to hold seminar Oct. 17 



Continued from page 7 

non-refundable fee per person. Spaces 
are limited. To sign up or for more 
information, email Emily Aubele at 
eaubele®clarion.edu. 

Senator Man. Jo White v\ill hold 
a Student Government Seminar on 
Frida\. October 17. from 8 a.m. to 2 
p.m., in the Rhoades G\mnasium. 

CLEP testing will take place on 
Frida>. October 17. from 8 a.m. to 
1:45 p.m.. in room 1 18 of Frame Hall. 

■"The Lives of Others" will be 
shown on Saturday. October 18. at 7 
p.m.. in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Independent Film 
Series. 



Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meeting 
Monda> . October 20. from 4:30-6:30 p.m.. 
in the small conference room at Rhoades 
Center. For more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at s_pashontz@clarion.edu or 
Charity Barger at s_clbarger@clarion.edu. 

The Satellite Seminar Series will be- 
gin Monday. October 20, at 6:30 p.m.. at 
the Rhoades Auditorium. The DVD pres- 
entation, titled "Lessons From Abroad: 
Opportunities in a Borderless World." fea- 
tures Dr. Richard Heinzl. 

A murder mystery dinner theatre will 
be held Friday. October 24. from 6-9 p.m.. 
in the lounge at Rhoades Center. It will be 
■"an evening to kill for!" 

""Turtles Can Fl\" will be shown on 



Saturday. October 25. at 7 p.m.. in 
the Rhoades Auditorium, in con- 
Junction with the Independent Film 
Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will sponsor 
the Central Blood Bank Bloodmo- 
bile on Wednesda\. October 29, 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.. in Rhoades 
G\mnasium. For more information, 
contact Patti Shontz at 
sjDashontz@cIarion.edu or Eliza- 
beth Austin at 
s_edaustin@clarion.edu. 

The Radiologic Science depart- 
ment will hold a breakfast on Fri- 
day. October 31. at 8 a.m.. in the 
lounse at Rhoades Center. 



Attention Nursing Students... 

An opening is available at the Golden Living Center, 81 N. Dillon Dr., Titusville. 
Applicant must be PA certified, have solid work ethics and have good references. 

For more information or assistance with resume preparation, 

contact Mark Conrad, coordinator of Career Services, at 676-6591 , extension 1 373, 

or at room 230 Montgomery Hall. 



\NE HAVE A SPOT FOR YOU! 

The i^iznango \Poieiz'\s recruiting VJrCtery, 

pbotogrgpbef-5, firaphic designers, and more! 



Email the VeNt^NGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil Cit\'. PA. 16301. .'Krticles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The> 
are not necessarih the philosophy or views of the students, faculty . or staff of Clarion 
University of PennsyU ania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunit\ and 
affirmative action for all people invohed in its educational programs. acti\ities. and 
emplo\ment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to .Assistant to the President for Social 
Equit\'. 207 Carrier .Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



tLARiON UNiVLKSi 1 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SUHR LIBRARY 
VENANGO CA^P. 



A'-QiLR Campus, "i'olir Paper, ^'our \'oice 




l^o/ce 



Volume 41, Issue 3 



Monday, September 29, 2008 



Indie rock artist Adrianne to perform 



Singer-songwriter 
Adrianne will appear in the 
Robert V\'. Rhoades Center 
at Clarion Universit}- 
Venango Campus on Fri- 
da\. October 3. at 7 p.m., as 
part of the five-part Coffee 
House Series offered 
through the campus" fall 
cultural arts series. The 
event is free and open to the 
public. 

Adrianne is a talented 
singer-song\\Titer from Los 
Angeles, whose debut al- 
bum made it on Performing 
Songwriter magazines' top 
12 "Do It Yourself 
recording. She has recenth' 
finished her European tour 
and is now touring Amer- 
ica. Her songs ha\e been 
featured on the television 
shows "Men in Trees." 
"Studio 60." "Dawson's 
Creek" and "One Tree 




Adrianne will perform on Friday, October 3, at 7 
p.m., in the Rhoades Lounge. 



Hill." 

In 2006 Adrianne re- 
leased her fourth full-length 
album. She has performed 
with artists such as Bonnie 
Raitt. Jackson Browne. 



Michelle Malone. and 
Melissa Ferrick. 

For more information, 
contact the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs at 814-676- 
6591. extension 1269. 



Art exhibit on display through Dec. 



September 

Joann Wheeler will 
display her art at Rhoades 
Center through December. 
Her three-dimensional col- 
lages and boxes have been 
exhibited and sold in juried 
group shows in several gal- 
leries. 

Yoaa sessions will be 



held even Thursda} , at 1 1 
a.m.. in the fourth floor 
lounge of Montsomen.- 
Hall." 

Classes will be in- 
structed by Libby Jenkins. 
With the conclusion of 
renovations. \"oga sessions 
will be held at the Rhoades 
G>mnasium. The sessions 
are free. 



Cardio-kickboxing 
sessions will be held ever\- 
Wednesday, from 6-7 p.m.. 
at the Franklin School of 
Kung Fu. 845 Buffalo St.. 
Franklin. The sessions are 
free. 



See EVENTS on page 8 



Inside this issue: 


.\DRIANXE 


■" 


Events 


1-8 


Job Postings 


2 


Career 
Sermces 


2 


Construct 
TiON Update 


- 


Applefest Vol- 
unteers 


3 


State News 


^ 


n.ational 
News 


4' 


World News 


3 


Marla Harp 


6 


Alcohol 
Screening 


6 


Breast Can- 
cer Month 


6 


ptk 
Fundraiser 


7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Job opportunities exist for Venango students 



National Fuel currently 
has employment opportunities 
for General Fitters to work at 
the Oil City Service Center, 
located at 1 Relief Street. Oil 
City. 

Candidates must posses a 
high school diploma or 
equivalent and the ability to 
drive and operate a van or 
small truck. Customer Service 
personnel are responsible for a 
variety of customer service 
fiinctions including investiga- 
tion of leak complaints and 
emergency leak re- 
sponse. General Fitters may 



also be responsible for the 
installation and repair of 
main and service lines and 
meters. The position requires 
a valid driver's license, and 
experience in plumbing, heat- 
ing, air conditioning or a re- 
lated field. Experience in 
underground construction and 
equipment operation is pre- 
ferred. National Fuel offers a 
competitive wage and bene- 
fits package. 

Applicants must live 
within a 20-mile radius of the 
Oil City Service Center or be 
willing to relocate. 



Candidates responding to 
this ad must refer to the job 
title General Fitter, position 
#08-033PA in their corre- 
spondence. 

For confidential consid- 
eration, please mail your re- 
sume and cover letter by Sep- 
tember 29. 2009 to: National 
Fuel Gas Company. Human 
Resources Department, Gen- 
eral Fitter. Position #08- 
033PA. P.O. Box 2081. Erie, 
PA 16512. Or, e-mail resume 
and cover letter to: 
jobs^natfuel.com. 



An opportunity is 
available for nursing stu- 
dents interested in applying 
to get the C.N. A. creden- 
tial. The Caring Place is 
always seeking aides, so 
opportunity exists for stu- 
dents to work there while 
in school. 

For more information 
about either position and 
for resume preparation 
assistance, please contact 
Coordinator of Career Ser- 
vices Mark Conrad in room 
230 Montgomery Hall, or 
at 676-6591. e.xt. 1373. 



Student attests to helpful service at Career Center 



Coordinator of Career Services 
Mark Conrad welcomes all students to 
take advantage of the Career Center 
and the services available. The Center 
provides career assessment and inter- 
est inventories, career exploration, job 
search skills, resume review- 
interviewing skills, on-campus job 
fairs, employment workshops, and 
more. Free USB flash drives are still 
available at the Career Center for stu- 
dents who wish to fine tune their re- 
sume. 

Student Senate president and PTK 
member Jaime Renwick took advan- 



tage of the services at the Career Center 
and had this to say about the assistance 
she received there: 

"Mark Conrad helped me out a lot. 
He is a very professional, knowledgeable 
man. 1 learned more about how to build a 
resume in the hour I spent with him than 
in all of the years I have been working 
on my resume. I expect this to better my 
chances of getting a job after 1 graduate 
since my resume now includes the cor- 
rect wording, format, and so forth, that 
most employers look for," said Renwick. 

"I strongly suggest that all students 
who need their resume updated go see 



Mark prior to sending it out to anyone. 
Mark will guide you on the style, for- 
mat, wording, etc.. and make sure it is 
correct. Having the Career Center on 
campus is very convenient for those 
students who are alread> here and can 
just stop by. So. stop by and see Mark 
Conrad, and you'll even receive a free 
flash drive with the help of his resume 
building experience!" 

Contact Coordinator of Career 
Services Mark Conrad today at 676- 
6591. ext. 1373. in room 230 of Mont- 
gomery Hall, or by e-mail at mcon 
rad@clarion.edu. 



Vfjnango Voiesz 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: v\oice(J;clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp Lola Deels 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion Universitv- of Penns>lvania - Venango Campus and tlie surrounding communities. The 
Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity ; the detemiination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays If the author of a lener wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



Volume 41, Issue 5 



Page 3 



Clarion University releases construction updates 



The Clarion UniversiU' Office of 
Finance and Administration has pro- 
vided an update on the major construc- 
tion projects underwaN' at Clarion Uni- 
versity. 

Pedestrian advisor^-: With the be- 
ginning of a new academic \ear. people 
take shortcuts to save time. This in- 
cludes walking on the road next to con- 
struction sites rather than on sidewalks 
or crosswalks. This is dangerous under 
the best of circumstances, but more so 
with the additional vehicles brought by 
a heightened level of construction activ- 
ity'. Don"t take chances, take a few extra 
minutes and walk in authorized pedes- 
trian pathways around construction 
sites and elsewhere on campus. 

At Venango Campus, the West End 
Pond has reached its six-foot deep end 
height, and seeding has been complete. 
The lights are in place and wiring is 
being done. Preparations are underway 
to install the bridge and gazebo. 

Also at Venango Campus, all of 



the underground drains have 
been set and pins are set for 
the floor pour in the 
Rhoades Gymnasium. Over- 
head plumbing for showers 
and sinks is installed, and 
wall studs are going in. Dn. 
wall has also been installed. 

More information about 
construction can be found in 
the minutes of the regular 
meetings of the Facilities 
Planning Committee and 
Parking Committee at http:// 
www.clarion.edu admin ' 
facilitiesmanagement/ 
planning/ 
facplancomm.shtml or 
http://www.clarion.edu/ 
admin/parking/ 
Parking_Committee_Minutes/ 
Parking_Committee_Minutes_ 
Cover_Page.htm. 

Naming opportunities are available 
for projects. 




The West E 
end height, 
continue. 



nd Pond has reached its six-foot deep 
Construction and installation there 



For additional information about 
supporting Clarion's building pro- 
gram, contact Jean Wolf, associate 
vice president for development, at 
(814)393-2572. 



Several volunteers are needed 
for Applefest on October 3-5 



The Community Relations Com- 
mittee of Venango Campus will be 
sponsoring an information booth at the 
2008 Applefest in Franklin, PA. 

Volimteers are needed Friday 
through Sunday, October 3-5, at the 
event. 

The two-hour time slots needed to 
be filled are: 9-11 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1 
p.m., 1-3 p.m.. and 3-5 p.m., each day. 

The Clarion University-Venango 
Campus booth will be located along 
12th Street, facing the Venango 
Count}' Courthouse. 

This event is an opportiuiity to 



fulfill service hours or a service project 
for clubs and organizations. 

Franklm's 26th annual Applefest 
will feature arts and crafts, food, free 
entertainment, and more than 300 ven- 
dors. New to the event this year will be 
the Pennsylvania Preferred Best Chef 
Regional Competition. As always, the 
weekend will hold the Applefest 5K. an 
Apple Pancake Breakfast, an Antique 
and Classic Car Show, an Apple Pie 
Eating Contest, and more. 

For more information, contact 
Theresa Nestor at 676-6591, ext. 1211, 
or e-mail tnestor@clarion.edu. 



M 



ave a 



n id 



ear 



Js something missing? 

(_jot tne inside scoop! 

Let Us ICnow! 

n-mail 
vvoice@clarion.edu 



Page 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Pa. mom admits helping son build weapons cache 



NORRISTOWN. Pa. (AP) _ A woman 
admitted she helped her troubled, bul- 
lied 14-year-old son build a cache of 
weapons by buying a rifle and gun- 
powder, but investigators still don't 
know if she was aware her son was 
planning a deadly school attack. 

Michele Cossey. 46. pleaded 
guilty in Montgomery County Court to 
one count of child endangerment. She 
admitted that she gave him access to a 
rifle with a laser scope and gunpow- 
der, which investigators said he was 
using to build grenades. 

Her son, Dillon, planned an as- 
sault last year on Plymouth White- 
marsh High School, which some for- 
mer schoolmates attended. Cossey. 
bullied over his weight, had left public 
school in seventh grade and was being 
home-schooled. Over time, he fueled 
his revenge fantasies through violent 
Internet sites, his defense lawyer said 
after his juvenile court plea. 

Authorities did not think the 
school attack was imminent, but the 
boy did amass an arsenal — knives, 
swords, BB guns, the rifle and partly 
assembled homemade grenades — in 
his bedroom at his Plymouth Town- 
ship home. 

Police learned of the planned at- 
tack when Cossey invited a fi^iend to 

National 



join him. The friend went to police last 
fall. 

Dillon Cossey is in a juvenile treat- 
ment facility, where he could remain 
until his 21st birthday. 

Michelle Cossey's sentencing 
won't occur for at least three months 
until a psychiatric evaluation is com- 
pleted. The maximum possible prison 
term is 3-1/2 to 7 years, but defense 
lawyer Tim Woodward said she could 
get less than a year — or even proba- 
tion — under sentencing guidelines. 

Montgomery County Assistant 
District Attorney Christopher Parisi 
said he doesn't know if Cossey knew 
about her son's attack plans, but that 
he hopes to learn that before sentenc- 
ing. 

"If it were to come out that she 
knew he was planning an attack ... that 
would certainly increase the severity 
of the crime," he said. 

The judge who sentenced Dillon 
Cossey said that Michele Cossey had 
fostered a "me-and-mom-against-the- 
world" attitude in her only child. Parisi 
said he thought she was trying to "to 
boost his self-esteem, and in some 
way help the child, as misplaced as 
those thoughts may have been." 

Woodward said: "I think it is easy 
to have a bunker mentalitv when vour 



son is constantly being picked on by 
punks at school. Who wouldn't circle 
the wagons?" 

Michelle Cossey used a walker 
coming into court and wept after stat- 
ing her guilty plea. Woodward de- 
scribed her as emotionally "fragile." 
especially over her son's absence from 
the home. 

She now has twice-a-month su- 
pervised visits with him. Woodward 
said. "Her ultimate goal is to be re- 
united with her son." the attorney said. 
"She does admit that she made some 
mistakes." 

The Cossey family once ran a 
hoagie shop near the county court- 
house in Norristown. 

The boy's father. Frank, sat beside 
his wife as she entered the plea. He 
had tried to buy their son a rifle in 
December 2005. but was stymied by a 
prior felony conviction, which he 
failed to note on the application. The 
omission led to a house arrest sentence 
for lying about his criminal record. 

The boy who tipped off police 
was praised for averting an attack and 
later met President Bush — only to be 
arrested himself along with two others 
juveniles, for later breaking into the 
Cossey home to steal video games, air 
5uns and other items. 



Ike-battered Galveston allows residents to return 



GALVESTON, Texas (AP) _ Thou- 
sands of residents streamed back to 
their storm-battered island city, many 
for the first time since tleeing the 
wrath of Hurricane Ike nearly two 
weeks ago. 

Huge lines of traffic backed up on 
the one major highway leading into 
Galveston, but things appeared to go 
smoothly once the city of about 



57,000 started letting people in about 6 
a.m. Many people had been waiting in 
their cars along Interstate 45 since before 
dawn. 

Police officers were stationed to 
direct traffic at major intersections where 
signal lights were ripped away by the 
hurricane's 1 10-mile-per-hour wind and 
12-foot storm surge on Sept. 13. 

Ruben Rosas, 74, one of those who 



had fled to San Antonio, had joined 
the line on 1-45 at about 3 a.m. Once 
he reached his first-floor apartment 
located on a bayou, he found that the 
walls and nearly all his possessions 
were gone. He did find a large cross 
that had been on his father's coffin and 
a small "King of Dads" statue his kids 
gave him when they were young. 

"This is just sad, but the good 



Volume 41, Issue 5 



Page 5 



World 



Pakistan finds suspected US spy drone wreckage 



ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) _ The 
Pakistani army said it found the 
wreckage of a suspected U.S. spy 
plane near the Afghan border, but 
denied claims that it had been shot 
down. 

The incident comes amid 
strained ties between Washington and 
Islamabad over a series of missile 
strikes fi^om American drones at sus- 
pected militants targets on the Paki- 
stan side of the border. 

In more signs that the militancy 
was escalating, a suicide bomber 
killed an 11 -year-old girl and 
wounded 1 1 troops in the frontier city 
of Quetta while security forces killed 
20 militants in another border zone. 

A militant group that claimed 
responsibility for last weekend's Mar- 
riott hotel bombing threatened more 
attacks. The warning came in a cell 
phone message sent to reporters. 

"All those who will facilitate 
Americans and NATO crusaders ... 
will keep on receiving the blows," 
said the message from the group call- 
ing itself "Fedayeen al-lslam" or 
"Islam commandos." 

Authorities were not immedi- 
ately available to comment on the 
threat. 

The Pakistan army statement 
said security forces had recovered the 
crashed surveillance aircraft. It said a 
technical problem appeared to have 
brought it down and that it was inves- 
tigating further. 

The U.S. -led coalition in Af- 



ghanistan said one of its drones, which 
can be equipped with video surveil- 
lance equipment, went down in the Af- 
ghan province bordering Waziristan. 
But it said coalition forces retrieved it 
and that no others were missing. The 
CIA also operates drones in the region. 

Three Pakistani intelligence offi- 
cials earlier had said troops and fribes- 
men had shot down the drone late Tues- 
day near Jalal Khel, a village in Paki- 
stan's South Waziristan region. 

Confirmation of Pakistani forces 
firing on U.S. troops or aircraft could 
trigger a crisis in relations between the 
two countries, who are close but un- 
comfortable allies in the American-led 
war on terrorism. 

Pakistani leaders are condemning 
stepped-up American operations across 
the border from Afghanistan — espe- 
cially a highly unusual raid into South 
Waziristan by U.S. commandos on 
Sept. 3. 

The government says it is trying to 
resolve the dispute diplomatically. 

However, the army has vov.'ed to 
defend Pakistan's territory "at all cost," 
and Tuesday's incident was at least the 
third this month in which Pakistani 
froops have reportedly opened fire to 
counter an incursion. 

President Bush did not directly 
refer to the incursions after he met his 
Pakistani counterpart, Asif Ali Zardari, 
for the first time in New York on Tues- 
day. 

"Your words have been very sfrong 
about Pakistan's sovereign right and 



sovereign duty to protect your coun- 
try, and the United States wants to 
help," Bush said. 

The three Pakistani intelligence 
officials said the drone was hit after 
circling for several hours. Wreckage 
was strewn on the ground, they said, 
speaking on condition of anonymity 
because they were not authorized to 
brief the media. 

A senior U.S. official challenged 
the account. "We're not aware of any 
drones being down," said the official, 
who also asked for anonymity be- 
cause of the diplomatic sensitivity of 
the issue. 

American officials have been 
pressing Pakistan to take stiffer ac- 
tion against militants in its tribal belt, 
a wild mountainous region consid- 
ered a staging ground for attacks in 
Afghanistan and Pakistan, including 
Saturday's massive truck bombing of 
the Marriott Hotel in Islamabad that 
killed 53 people. 

Pakistan insists it is doing what 
it can and complains that cross- 
border raids ftiel Islamic exfremism. 

Troops are already locked in 
grinding campaigns against militants 
in three regions of the northwest. 
Hundreds have died and more than 
500,000 were forced to flee their 
homes. 

Militant warlords have estab- 
lished virtual mini-states in the fribal 
belt, levying taxes and enforcing 
strict Taliban-style social codes and 
justice. 



(jot an opinion? \\e. want to hear it! 

5^nd uour signed letters to the editor to: 

vvoice@clarion,edu 



Pagi: 6 



Venango Voice 



Support is available for military family, friends 



By Maria Harp 
Counseling Services 

With the recent de- 
ployment of our service- 
men in Oil City, it is quite 
apparent that many of us at 
the Venango Campus may 
have been or will be soon 
affected by deployment. If 
this pertains to you, we 
want to help. 

Starting October 8 in 
Rhoades Lounge from 1 1 
a.m. to 1 p.m.. there will 



be a support group for you 
to come and meet others 
facing the same concerns. 

We are looking to as- 
sist you in any way possi- 
ble. ' 

If your loved one has 
already left, you are faced 
with numerous details that 
may seem overwhelming 
and sometimes the best 
help is knowing there is 
support (and where to find 
that support). 

Our hope is that you 



will bring ideas of the 
information that would 
benefit you the most, 
share your concerns, and 
realize that others are 
there for you if you feel 
alone. 

Hear from others who 
have experienced this 
before and will face it 
again. 

This is a difficult 
time and we want to help. 

if you have any other 
questions or would like to 



find out more infonna- 
tion about the group, 
feel free to contact 
Maria Harp. Counseling 
Services, at extension 
1281. 

If you can't make it 
during the time sched- 
uled or for only part of 
the listed time, that is 
okay. Let us know your 
interest. We would like 
to make this an ongoing 
opportunity for your 
support. 



October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month 



Q: What is cancer? 

A: Cancer is a disease that occurs when 
cells become abnormal and divide with- 
out control or order. Each organ in the 
body is made up of various kinds of 
cells. Cells normally divide in an or- 
derly way to produce more cells only 
when they are needed. This process 
helps keep the body healthy. If cells 
divide when new cells are not needed, 
they form too much tissue. This extra 
tissue, called a tumor, can be benign or 
malignant. 

• Benign tumors are not cancer. 
Eighty percent of all breast tumors are 
benign. They can usually be removed. 



and, in most cases, they don't come 
back. Most important, the cells in be- 
nign tumors do not invade other tissues 
and do not spread to other parts of the 
body. Benign breast tumors are not life- 
threatening. 

• Malignant tumors are cancer. The 
cancer cells grow and divide out of 
control, invading and damaging nearby 
tissues and organs. Cancer cells can 
also break away from the original tu- 
mor and enter the bloodstream or lym- 
phatic system. This is how breast can- 
cer spreads and forms secondary tu- 
mors in other parts of the body. This 
spread of cancer is called metastasis. 



Q: What is breast cancer? 
A: Breast cancer is cancer that forms 
in tissues of the breast, usually the 
ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nip- 
ple) and lobules (glands that make 
milk). It occurs in both men and 
women, although male breast cancer is 
rare. 

Q: How many new cases of breast 
cancer were estimated in the United 
States in 2007? 

A: New cases of breast cancer in the 
United states are estimated to be 
178,480 (female): 2,030 (male). Of 
these an estimated 40,460 (female) 
See CANCER on page 7 



Free alcohol screenings are offered to students 



The Counseling Center will be offering free, confiden- 
tial alcohol screenings at Clarion University- Venango Cam- 
pus on Wednesday, October 1, fi-om 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m., in 
the Rhoades Center Lounge. 

Professional counselors will be on hand to give instant 
results. The event is open to students, staff, and faculty. 



If unable to attend the scheduled free screening, please 
call Counseling Services at 814-393-2255 to schedule a time 
that is convenient. 

The program is part of National Alcohol Screening Day 
and is sponsored by Counseling Services, Keeling Health 
Center, and Health Promotions. 



Volume 41, Issue 5 



Page 7 



Phi Theta Kappa holds fall Stromboli fundraiser 



Phi Theta Kappa's fall fundraiser 
is taking place now through Wednes- 
day, October 8. 

Jane"s Strombolis are for sale for 
$2.50 each and are available in five 
different varieties: Broccoli and 
Cheese; Pepperoni and Cheese: 
Combo - Ham. Salami. Pepperoni, 
Green Peppers, Onions and Cheese: 
Deluxe - Sweet Sausage. Green Pep- 



pers, Onions and Cheese; and Chicken, 
Peppers, Onions and Cheese. All meat 
Stromboli contain mozzarella and pro- 
volone cheeses. Broccoli Stromboli 
contain mozzarella, provolone, and 
Cheddar cheeses. 

Strombolis are individually 
wrapped and delivered frozen. The de- 
livery date is Monday, October 20, at 
approximately 1 p.m. All strombolis 



must be picked up before 6 p.m. 

Money must be collected at the 
time of order. Order forms are avail- 
able fi-om any PTK member or in the 
administrative office of Frame Hall 
and the Nursing Office of Montgom- 
ery Hall. 

For more information, contact 
VP of Fundraising Daniele Merry- 
man at s_dmmerryman@clarion.edu. 



CANCER: More than 180,000 cases were estimated 



Continued from page 6 

and 450 (male) will die fi"om the dis- 
ease. (National Cancer Institute fig- 
ures). 

Q: How common is breast cancer in 
the United States? 

A: Breast cancer is the most common 
cancer in women, aside from skin can- 
cer. 

Q: What are the treatments for breast 
cancer? 

A: The basic treatment choices for 
breast cancer are surgery, radiation, 
chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy, 
which may or may not be included in 
the treatment regimen, depending on 
hormonal involvement in the growth 
of the tumor. Local treatments such as 
breast surgery and radiation therapy 
are focused on the breast itself to re- 
move or destroy the cancer cells con- 
fined to the breast. Systemic treatment 
such as chemotherapy aims to destroy 
the cancer cells that may have spread 
throughout the body. 

Newer experimental treatments 
include biologically targeted therapies 
which currently are only available 
through clinical trials. A patient and 
his/her physician will choose the treat- 
ment that is right for him/her, based on 
the location and extent of the cancer. 



patient's age and preferences, and the 
risks and benefits of each treatment. 
Q: What are the breast cancer "risk fac- 
tors"? 

A: To predict when and in whom breast 
cancer will occur, scientists must often 
think like detectives, looking for clues to 
signal which women may be more likely 
than others to develop the disease. These 
clues are called "risk factors." 

To identify risk factors, scientists 
continually examine various trends and 
patterns among women worldwide who 
are diagnosed with the disease. Age, 
individual and family medical history, 
reproductive history, genetic alterations, 
race, economic status, environmental 
exposures to pollutants, and lifestyle 
habits are all examples of the factors that 
can be evaluated. This infomiation tells a 
scientific story that helps experts predict 
with some certainty a woman's odds for 
developing breast cancer. It's important 
to note, however, that this is not an exact 
science and that such predictions are not 
definite. 

Having one or two of these risk fac- 
tors doesn't mean a woman will develop 
breast cancer. But knowing her personal 
risk factor profile and understanding 
what it means will help her and her doc- 
tor plan a course of action that may re- 
duce her chances of developing the dis- 



ease or, at least, to detect it in its earli- 
est, most treatable stages. 
Q: Is mammography reliable as a 
screening tool for breast cancer? 
A: Mammography screening remains 
the best available method to detect 
breast cancer early. In 1992, the U.S. 
Congress passed the Mammography 
Quality Standards Act to ensure that 
mammography facilities throughout 
the country are of high quality and 
reliable. To lawfiilly perform mam- 
mography, each facility must promi- 
nently display a certificate issued by 
the U.S. Food and Drug Administra- 
tion (FDA). This certificate serves as 
evidence that the facility meets quality 
standards. 

Q: How can women get low-cost or 
free mammograms? 
A: For information on low- or no cost 
mammography screening, contact the 
Centers for Disease Control and Pre- 
vention (CDC) at (888) 842-6355 or 
visit their Web site at www.cdc.gov. 
Women seekmg mammograms at a 
reduced rate are urged to make their 
appointment early in the year, as space 
may be limited. To find a breast- 
imaging facility, contact the National 
Cancer Institute at (800) 4-CANCER. 

For additional information, access 
www.cancer.org, or www.nbcam.org. 



Page 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Vegetarian cooking class slated for Oct. 1 



Continued from page 1 

October 

October is Breast Cancer Aware- 
ness month. For more information, log 
on to www.nbcam.org. 

Vegetarian Cooicing Classes will 
be offered Wednesday. October 1 , and 
Tuesday, November 4, from 5-7:30 
p.m., in the community room of the 
Student Apartment Complex. 

Clarion's Autumn Leaf Festival 
weekend kicks off Thursday, October 
2. Mid-semester break begins at 10 
p.m. In addition, the Distinguished 
Alumni Reception will be held that 
day at 5 p.m.. in Rhoades Center. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meet- 
ing Thursday. October 2, fi'om 11:30 
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in room 307 of 
Montgomery Hall. For more informa- 
tion, contact Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Charity 
Barger at s_clbarger@clarion.edu. 

Acoustic rock artist Adrianne will 
perform on Friday, October 3, at 7 
p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

Mid-semester break ends on Mon- 
day, October 6, at 8 a.m. 

Transgender singer/songwriter 
Namoli Brennet will perfonn on Fri- 
day, October 10, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades 
Center. 

The Independent Film Series will 
begin Saturday, October 11, at 7:30 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium. The 



featured film will be "Sweet Land." 

Wednesday, October 15 is National 
Depression Screening Day. For more infor- 
mation, contact Venango Campus coun- 
selor Maria Harp at 676-6591, extension 



The Outdoor Club will sponsor a Fall 
Retreat October 16-18. The trip to Ithaca, 
NY, will include waterfall hikes and more. 
The cost is a $15, non-refundable fee per 
person. Spaces are limited. To sign up or 
for more information, email Emily Aubele 
at eaubele@clarion.edu. 

Senator Mary Jo White will hold a 
Student Government Seminar on Friday. 
October 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Gymnasium. 

CLEP testing will take place on Fri- 
day, October 17, from 8 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.. 
in room 1 1 8 of Frame Hall. 

"The Lives of Others" will be shown 
on Saturday, October 18, at 7:30 p.m., in 
the Rhoades Auditorium in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold an informal 
induction ceremony on Monday, October 
20, at 5 p.m. The event was postponed 
from September 15. For more information, 
contact Patti Shontz at 

s_pashontz@clarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meeting 
Monday, October 20, from 4:30-6:30 p.m.. 
in the small conference room at Rhoades 
Center. For more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at s_pashontz@clarion.edu or 
Charity Barger at s_clbarger@clarion.edu. 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City, PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The\ 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunit> and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 



The Satellite Seminar Series 
will begin Monday. October 20, at 
6:30 p.m., at the Rhoades Audito- 
rium. The DVD presentation, titled 
"Lessons From Abroad; Opportuni- 
ties in a Borderless World," features 
Dr. Richard Heinzl. 

A murder mystery dinner thea- 
tre will be held Friday, October 24, 
from 6-9 p.m.. in the lounge at 
Rhoades Center. It will be "an eve- 
ning to kill for!" 

"Turtles Can Fly" will be 
shown on Saturday. October 25, at 
7:30 p.m.. in the Rhoades Audito- 
rium, in conjunction with the Inde- 
pendent Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will sponsor 
the Central Blood Bank Bloodmo- 
bile on Wednesda). October 29, 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.. in Rhoades 
Gymnasium. 

For more information, contact 
PTK President Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Eliza- 
beth Austin at sedaustin 
@clarion.edu. 

The Radiologic Science depart- 
ment will hold a breakfast on Fri- 
day, October 31, at 8 a.m. in the 
lounge at Rhoades Center. 

November 

"Chronicle of an Escape" will 
be shown on Saturday. November 1 , 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Rhoades Audito- 
riuin in conjunction with the Inde- 
pendent Film Series. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



j/Al^oO O.Mvii 



^JON UN!V 

PENNSYL 



YoqR Campus, Your Paphr, Your Voice 
! 

Veti-flMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 6 Monday, October 6, 2008 



Namoli Brennet will sing on Oct. 10 



Singer-songwriter 
Namoli Brennet will ap- 
pear in the Robert W. 
Rhoades Center at Clar- 
ion University- Venango 
Campus on Friday, Octo- 
ber 10, at 7 p.m., as part 
of the five-part Coffee 
House Series offered 
through the campus' fall 
cultural arts series. The 
event is free and open to 
the public. 

Namoli Brennet has 
toured the country many 
times over, making stops 
at the San Diego Indie 
Music Fest, DC Pride, 
The Bitter End in New 
York, Boston's Club 
Passim, and hundreds of 
coffee shops, clubs, festi- 
vals, colleges, and house 
concerts. 

Along the way she 
has had the privilege of 
sharing the stage with 
Melissa Ferrick, Jill 
Sobule, Michelle 
Shocked, and spoken- 
word artist Alix Olson. 

Namoli has been de- 
scribed as one of the 
most original and excit- 
ing voices to emerge on 




Namoli Brennet will perform on Friday, October 
10, at 7 p.m., in the Rhoades Lounge. 



the music scene in recent 
years. She has per- 
formed several times in 
the Oil City area to an 
increasing fan base. 
Namoli 's music reso- 
nates with authenticity 
and her desire to help 
create a more compas- 



sionate, understanding 
world is made transpar- 
ent by her songs and in- 
teractions with others. 

For more informa- 
tion, contact the Office 
of Student Affairs at 
814-676-6591, extension 
1269. 



Inside this issue: 


Namoli 
Brennet 


1 


Trash Talk 


2 


Job Postings 


3 


Events 


3-8 


State News 


4 


National 
News 


4 


World News 


5 


Scholarship 
Opportunities 


6 


2008 Wash 
Day 


7 


Concert 
Tickets 


7 


THANK YOU 


7 



PAGt 2 



Venango Voice 



Wind energy decreases emissions, saves money 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 



Travel east along the 
Pennsylvania turnpike and 
you will see six 215-foot- 
high wind turbines. Opera- 
tional for about seven years, 
this is just one of the 295 
wind energy projects in Penn- 
sylvania. 

Ranked 16th in the na- 
tion, Pennsylvania has an 



uiditional 272 projects un- 
der construction. All across 
America, wind energy is 
getting a great deal of inter- 
est and attention, and rightly 
so Wind farms produce 
pollution-free electricity 
without depleting natural 
resources or using large 
amounts of water during 
operation. 

What kind of bang do 
you get for your buck? 
Take, for example. Spirit 
Lake, Iowa. A turbine con- 
structed at the local elemen- 
tary school provides all of 
their electricity needs; the 
excess feeds into the local 
utility system, earning the 
school district $25,000 in 
the first five years of opera- 
tion. 

Offshore turbines, as 
demonstrated by Denmark, 
Sweden, the UK, Nether- 
lands, and Ireland, can also 
utilize wind energy. Ger- 



many will join their ranks 
this year with the first of 
their 22 planned projects. 
There are projects in the 
talking and planning 
phases here in the U.S. as 
well. 

Delaware hopes to be 
the first in the states to 
have their offshore project 
up and running - scheduled 
to be completed in 2012. 
New Jersey and Rhode 
Island are not far behind. 

As with any alternative 
energy source, there are 
downsides. Some argue the 
production of the wind 
turbines does give off C02 
emissions, and seriously 
alters the benefits of using 
them in the first place. In 
actuality, wind power cre- 
ates 98 percent less C02 
emissions compared to 
coal, and 99 percent less 
compared to natural gas. 

What about all those 



poor birds that are unfortu- 
nate enough to fly too close 
to the turbines? American 
Wind Energy Alliance has 
actually conducted a study 
to look into it and study the 
impact on our avian friends. 
Amazingly enough, more 
birds die via cell phone tow- 
ers and high-tension lines. 
Besides, in my opinion, the 
birds are better off losing a 
few of their numbers to a 
turbine than losing millions 
as the result of climate 
change due to carbon emis- 
sions. 

Wind energy has the 
potential to provide 20 per- 
cent of the total electricity 
needed in the U.S. by 2030. 

Reference material for 
this article was found at: 
http://www.awea.org; http:// 
www.awea.org/pubs/ 
factsheets/ 
Offshore_fact_sheet.pdf; 
http://www.nrdc.org 



(jot an opinion? vV^ want to hear it! 

^end Ljour signed letters to the castor to: 

vvoice@clarion.eau 



Vfznango Voieg 

Student Affairs, Rhoadcs Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591, Ext. 1271 Email: vvoieefrtclarion.cdu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Hubcr Kerri Smaydu Lori Sccor Maria Harp Lola Deets 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-ran newspaper ot Clarion University of Pennsylvania Venango Campus and the sunounding communiti 
Voice is publistied most Fridays during the academic year 

Tlie Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit tor libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the detennmation ol 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact inlomiation. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays If the author ot a letter wishes to 
remain anonyinous, they must attach a separate letter ol explanation. Publication is not guaranteed 

Communication majors may earn a print co-cunicular as a ineinber of the Voice staff They should schedule their co-eumcular when scheduling classes 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-cunicular 



The 



Volume 41, Issue 6 



Page 3 



Many job opportunities are available for students 



If you desire to stay in this area, 
then consider working for one of Ve- 
nango County's premier manufacturing 
companies. 

Electralloy has announced an entry 
level opening laboratory technician. 
The successfiil candidate will perform 
semi-routine lab assignments of some 
complexity and variety under minimum 
supervision; assist in the development 
and implementation of new and/'or re- 
vised procedures, methods, processes, 
material equipment, formulation, etc.; 
analyze data and prepare written re- 
ports. 

An understanding of the practical 
aspects of steel laboratory production 
chemistry is desirable. Math skills are 
highly recommended. Candidates will 
be required to work all shifts. College 
education is preferred, but not required. 
Ellectraloy has an excellent salary and 
fiinge benefit program. Send resume 
including salary requirements to: Hu- 
man Resource Department, Electralloy, 
175 Main Street, Oil City, PA 16301. 

There is an opening for a recep- 
tionist and fiscal assistant at a Seneca 
location. 

The position is a clerical/ 
accounting position involving the appli- 
cation of bookkeeping principles and 
practices. The position requires an Act 
34 Clearance and one of the following: 
an associate degree from an accredited 
university or college in accounting or 



business administration, including no 
less than six credits in accounting, 
which would include payroll; two years 
of proven experience performing book- 
keeping, payroll, clerical, and account- 
ing work; or any equivalent combina- 
tion of experience and training. 

See the full details at 
www.cwds.state.pa.us. Review your 
resume on that website to ensure it's 
updated. Please verify that it answers 
all the employer's job criteria. 

The Pennsylvania State Capitol 
Police is looking for qualified men and 
women to join their ranks as Capitol 
Police Officers in Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. Through a Statewide recruitment 
effort, the Capitol Police expect to add 
at least 25 officers to their ranks by 
2009. Salaries start at $34,488. 

Applicants must possess a valid 
Pennsylvania operator's license; be a 
resident of Pennsylvania and a U.S. 
citizen and be 21 years of age upon 
appointment. 

Additionally, applicants must pos- 
sess current MPOETC certification OR 
have successfully completed training at 
a MPOETC certified police academy 
and pass the MPOETC certification 
exam prior to date of appointment; as 
well as successflilly complete a back- 
ground investigation, polygraph exami- 
nation, drug test and physical examina- 
tion. 

The Capitol Police would espe- 



cially like to encourage veteran law 
enforcement officers to consider a 
"second career" with them. We cur- 
rently offer competitive medical bene- 
fits and retirement packages. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE: If you 
are interested in a Law Enforcement 
Career with the Pennsylvania State 
Capitol Police but DO NOT have 
MPOETC training, alternatives may 
exist that could still result in a full- 
time position as a Capitol Police Patrol 
Officer. Please contact the Capitol 
Police directly at 717-787-9013 to 
discuss these alternatives. 

The following web sites provide 
additional information: Department of 
General Services at www.dgs.state. 
pa. us; and State Civil Service Com- 
mission at www.scsc.state.pa.us. 

The Capitol Police Department is 
accredited by the Pennsylvania Law 
Enforcement Accreditation Commis- 
sion and the Commission on Accredi- 
tation for Law Enforcement Agencies, 
Inc. 

The Commonwealth of Pennsyl- 
vania is an equal opportunity em- 
ployer. 

For resume preparation assistance 
or for more information about any of 
these employment opportunities, 
please contact Coordinator of Career 
Services Mark Conrad at 676-6591, 
extension 1373, or visit room 230 in 
Montgomery Hall. 



"Sweet Land" kicks off Independent Film Series 



October 

October is Breast Cancer Aware- 
ness month. For more information, log 
on to www.nbcam.org. 

Mid-semester break ends on Mon- 
day. October 6, at 8 a.m. 

Transgender singer/songwriter 
Namoli Brennet will perform on Friday, 



October 10, at 7 p.m., in Rhoades Cen- 
ter. 

The Independent Film Series will 
begin Saturday, October 11, at 7:30 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium. The 
featured film will be "Sweet Land." 

Wednesday, October 1 5 is National 
Depression Screening Day. For more 



information, contact Venango Campus 
counselor Maria Harp at 676-6591, 
extension 1281. 

The Outdoor Club will sponsor a 
Fall Retreat October 16-18. The trip to 
Ithaca, NY, will include waterfall 
hikes and more. The cost is a $15. 

See EVENTS on page 6 



PAGI: 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Pa. courts greatly expand pool of potential jurors 



HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) Avoiding 
jury duty just got much harder in 
Pennsylvania. 

The state court system on 
Wednesday began providing counties 
with a greatly expanded list of names 
from which juries will be selected. 

The 11.5 million name list was 

National 



developed following passage of a new 
state law last year. 

Chief Justice Ronald Castille says 
anyone who votes, pays taxes, drives a 
car or receives welfare or food stamps 
is on the list. 

He says the idea is to enhance the 
administration of justice by improving 



the jury system. 

It's the first such statewide list 
ever established in Pennsylvania, and 
it'll be updated yearly. 

Authorities caution that some 
duplication of names is inevitable but 
hope the new list will make juries 
more diverse. 



The new bailout pitch is... It is NOT a bailout 



WASHINGTON (AP) The Bush 
administration is searching for a new 
way to sell its financial rescue plan 
after acknowledging some blunders 
and missteps in presenting it the first 
time around. One big key: Insist it's 
not a Wall Street "bailout." 

Now it's not about financial insti- 
tutions. The focus has switched to 
everyday Americans. And it's not an 
expenditure of taxpayer money, it's an 
"investment." 

This was clearly evident in Bush's 
grim warnings on Tuesday of 
"economic hardship for millions" if 
the plan can't be revived. He declared, 
"For the financial security of every 
American, Congress must act." 

This emphasis was echoed on the 
presidential campaign trail. 

"Let's not call it a bailout. Let's 
call it a rescue," said Republican John 
McCain. 

Democratic rival Barack Obama 
said, "This is no longer just a Wall 
Street crisis — it's an American crisis, 
and it's the American economy that 
needs this rescue plan." 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's 
take: Its not a bailout but "a buy in, so 
that we can turn our economy around." 
Bush, McCain, Obama and top con- 
gressional leaders agree the plan — 
which would nationalize large num- 
bers of bad mortgages and securities 
tied to them — is needed to unclot: the 



nation's financial arteries. 

But it proved extremely unpopular 
across the country and was rejected on 
Monday in the House, a stunning setback 
to the administration that led to a dizzy- 
ing 778-point plunge in the Dow Jones 
industrials. The Dow bounced back 485 
on Tuesday amid word of efforts to sal- 
vage the plan. 

Language seemed to matter. 

An AP-Knowledge Networks poll 
last week that asked whether people sup- 
ported Bush's proposed federal "bailout" 
of financial institutions found only 30 
percent backing it. Surveys by the non- 
partisan Pew Research Center that asked 
whether people support "investing" or 
"committing" billions to keep markets 
secure found slightly more favoring the 
plan than opposing it. 

White House spokesman Tony 
Fratto agreed the administration's initial 
efforts to explain the legislation to Con- 
gress and the public left something to be 
desired. 

"We need to be able to better dem- 
onstrate that there are impacts for 
American families, for retirees, for small 
businesses, for larger businesses who are 
hiring, for our banking system, for the 
ability to get home loans, for businesses 
to be able to make their payrolls, their 
small-business accounts," Fratto said. 

He said "it's a hard thing to do" be- 
cause of the complexity of both the prob- 
lem and the solution. "There are four or 



five steps involved ... before you get to 
the kitchen table of the average 
American family and how it affects 
them." 

Bush was trying on Tuesday. 

"The dramatic drop in the stock 
market that we saw yesterday will 
have a direct impact on retirement 
accounts, pension fiinds and personal 
savings of millions of our citizens," he 
said. 

From the initial three-page re- 
quest by Treasury Secretary Henry 
Paulson for unchecked powers to 
spend up to $700 billion with no over- 
sight to the confusing explanations for 
why the plan was needed, the Bush 
administration's sales pitch has fol- 
lowed a rocky path. 

Perhaps because he was the for- 
mer CEO of investment bank Gold- 
man Sachs, Paulson talked to lawmak- 
ers about the plan in Wall Street- 
speak. 

The treasury secretary and Fed- 
eral Reserve Chairman Ben Bemanke 
spent more than 10 hours before con- 
gressional committees last week trying 
to explain to skeptical lawmakers why 
the rescue package was not a Wall 
Street bailout. 

It was not an easy sell, in part 
because Paulson and Bemanke occupy 
jobs where most of the time they go 

Sec NATIONAL on page 5 



Volume 41, Issue 6 



Page 5 



World 



Suspected US missile strike kills 6 in Pakistan 



ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) _ A 
missile strike by a suspected U.S. 
drone killed at least six people in a 
Pakistani tribal region near the Af- 
ghan border, two Pakistani intelli- 
gence officials said Wednesday. 

American forces recently ramped 
up cross-border operations against 
Taliban and al-Qaida militants in 
Pakistan's wild border zone, a possi- 
ble hiding place for Osama bin 
Laden. 

The attacks have drawn stiff 
protests from Islamabad, an uneasy 
ally in Washington's seven-year war 
on terror, particularly since a highly 
unusual Sept. 3 raid by U.S. ground 
troops in the South Waziristan re- 
gion. 

The two intelligence officials 
said the missiles struck the home of a 
local Taliban commander before mid- 
night Tuesday near Mir Ali, a town in 
the North Waziristan region. 

The officials, citing reports from 
their field agents, said six people 
were killed. Both officials asked for 
anonymity because they were not 
authorized to speak to media. They 
said a U.S. drone aircraft — not Paki- 
stani forces — fired the missiles. 
They did not identify any of the vic- 
tims. 

Pakistani leaders insist only their 



forces are allowed to carry out opera- 
tions inside Pakistan, and its troops 
recently fired warning shots at U.S. 
helicopters flying over the ill-marked 
frontier. 

American officials have expressed 
frustration at Pakistan's failure to kill or 
capmre militant leaders whom they 
accuse of sending fighters and arms 
into Afghanistan, where foreign troop 
casualties are escalating. 

In Spain, a radio station reported 
that a document marked confidential 
and bearing the official seal of Spain's 
Defense Ministry charges that Paki- 
stan's spy service was helping arm Tali- 
ban insurgents in 2005 for assassination 
plots against the Afghan government. 

The report, which was obtained by 
Cadena Ser radio and posted on the 
station's Web site on Wednesday, also 
says Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelli- 
gence spy agency, or ISI, helped the 
Taliban procure explosives to use in 
attacks against vehicles. 

It alleges that Pakistan may have 
provided training and intelligence to the 
Taliban in camps set up on Pakistani 
soil. 

There have long been suspicions 
that members of Pakistan's shadowy 
spy agency have aided the Taliban, a 
charge that Pakistan has vehemently 
denied. 



In the 1990s, however, the ISI's 
agents helped build up the Taliban. 

Pakistan's chief army spokesman 
Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas said the re- 
port was "baseless, unfounded and 
part of a malicious, well-orchestrated 
propaganda campaign to malign the 
ISI." 

Spain's Defense Ministry and the 
Spanish prime minister's office said it 
had no comment. Cadena Ser did not 
say how it obtained the report. 

Meanwhile, a physician for the 
Taliban and a spokesman for the 
group denied reports that the move- 
ment's top leader in Pakistan, Baitul- 
lah Mehsud, had fallen ill and died. 

"I spoke to him today at 9 a.m. 
on the telephone and he told me that 
he is surprised over rumors about his 
death," physician Lisa Khan told The 
Associated Press. 

Khan said Mehsud had an un- 
specified kidney problem but gave no 
more details. 

Mehsud's spokesman, Maulvi 
Umar, was cited on Geo television 
station as saying he was healthy. 

Officials have accused Mehsud 
of being behind a wave of suicide 
attacks washing over Pakistan since 
the middle of last year, including the 
slaying of opposition leaders Benazir 
Bhutto in December. 



NATIONAL: Rescue package isn't Wall Street bailout 



Continued from page 4 

out of their way to sound upbeat so as 
not to spook investors and send the 
markets crashing. But, as Senate Ma- 
jority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., 
noted after one negotiating session, 
"We deal with Wall Street but we 
also deal with Main Street." 

"Those appointed officials, like 
Paulson and Bemanke, are going to 
have to become more realistic." Reid 



said. To many lawmakers, the request 
to put so much taxpayer money at risk 
was politically toxic — too risky right 
before an election, in a vote that an 
opponent could cast as a bailout for 
Wall Street. 

"Lawmakers were upset because 
Secretary Paulson was asking them to 
give him a blank check and just go 
away. I think some of them were of- 
fended by what he presented to them 
initially," said Sung Won Sohn, an eco- 



nomics professor at the Martin Smith 
School of Business at California 
State University, Channel Islands. 

Bush himself appeared uncom- 
fortable in talking about the crisis at 
first. He used phrases like "a substan- 
tial step to provide additional liquid- 
ity to the U.S. financial system." And 
"the American people can be sure we 
will continue to act to strengthen and 
stabilize our financial markets and 
improve investor confidence." 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



Students invited to apply for these scholarships 



The Press Club of West- 
em Pennsylvania is taking 
applications for its third an- 
nual $5,000 scholarship 
awarded to aspiring journal- 
ists. 

The award is designed to 
encourage outstanding colle- 
giate journalism students in 
print and broadcasting. 

The scholarship will be 
awarded in May 2009 in 
Pittsburgh at the annual 
Golden Quills Awards Din- 
ner sponsored by The Press 
Club. 

Candidates must be en- 
rolled in an accredited col- 
lege or university for at least 
two years. They must be able 
to demonstrate why they 
should receive the award. 
Their primary residence must 
be in one of the 29 counties 
of Western Pennsylvania 
(Venango is eligible). 

The scholarship money 
will be credited to the win- 
ner's account at their univer- 



sity or college. The winner 
also will receive a plaque in 
recognition of the award. 

Deadline for applications 
is January 16, 2009. The 
scholarship committee will 
review applications and select 
finalists. The winner will be 
notified by April 15. 

An application can be 
downloaded from 
www.westempapressclub.org 
or contact The Press Club of 
Western Pennsylvania at En- 
gineers' Building, 337 Fourth 
Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 
15222, or (412) 281-7778, or 
pressclubwpa@yahoo.com. 

For fiirther information, 
contact Senior Deputy Man- 
aging Editor Rick Monti of 
the Pittsburgh Tribune- 
Review, 512 Martindale 
Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15212, 
412-380-5638 or 
rmonti@tribweb.com. 

The Press Club of West- 
em Pennsylvania is a non- 
profit organization compris- 



ing news media and public 
relations professionals, com- 
munity leaders, academi- 
cians and other profession- 
als devoted to first-rate com- 
munication. 

Members of The Press 
Club are dedicated to raising 
the quality of public dis- 
course in Western Pennsyl- 
vania, keeping the region 
vital and relevant. 

It provides a setting, 
atmosphere, and program- 
ming that aim to further 
communication among me- 
dia-related professionals and 
interested members of the 
general public. 

Encouraging and sup- 
porting journalism students 
in the region is also a prior- 
ity. 

For membership infor- 
mation, contact The Press 
Club at (412) 281-7778. 

The Office of National 
Scholarship Advisement and 



the Honors Program is 
pleased to provide infor- 
mation regarding the 2009 
Barry M. Goldwater 
Scholarship Competition 
(www.act.org/goldwater). 

The Barry M. Gold- 
water Scholarship was 
created in 1986 to encour- 
age outstanding students 
to pursue careers in 
mathematics, the natural 
sciences, or engineering, 
and to foster excellence in 
those fields. 

Up to 300 Goldwater 
Scholarships are awarded 
each year, for up to 
$7,500. 

The Clarion Univer- 
sity deadline for com- 
pleted applications to the 
2009 Barry M. Goldwater 
competition is December 
1,2008. 

For additional infor- 
mation, please contact Dr. 
Brent Register at bregis- 
ter@clarion.edu. 



EVENTS: Senator White to hold seminar Oct. 17 



Continued from page 3 

non-refundable fee per person. Spaces 
are limited. To sign up or for more in- 
formation, email Emily Aubele at 
eaubele@clarion.edu. 

Senator Mary .lo White will hold a 
Student Government Seminar on Fri- 
day, October 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., 
in the Rhoades Gymnasium. 

CLEP testing will take place on 
Friday, October 17, from 8 a.m. to 1:45 



p.m. 



in room 1 18 of Frame Hall. 



"The Lives of Others" will be 
shown on Saturday, October 18, at 
7:30 p.m.. in the Rhoades Auditorium, 
in conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold an in- 
formal induction ceremony on Mon- 
day, October 20, at 5 p.m. The event 
was postponed from September 15. 
For more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at s_pashontz@clarion.edu. 



Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meet- 
ing Monday, October 20, from 4:30- 
6:30 p.m., in the small conference room 
at Rhoades Center. For more informa- 
tion, contact Patti Shontz at 
sj)ashontz@clarion.edu or Charity 
Barger at s_clbarger@jclarion.edu. 

The Satellite Seminar Series will 
begin Monday, October 20. at 6:30 
p.m., at the Rhoades Auditorium. The 

See EVENTS on pngc 7 



Volume 41, Issue 6 



PAGI-; 7 



Volunteers needed for Oil City Wash Day 2008 



Faculty, staff and student vol- 
unteers are needed on Wednesday, 
October 8, for Oil City's 2008 Fall 
Wash Day. 

The Venango Campus Crew 
will participate in fall clean-up on 
the south side of Oil City, Central 



Avenue to Second Street and State 
Street from Veteran's Bridge to 
Second Street. 

The Oil City Wash Day event is 
sponsored by Take Pride in Oil City 
and the Oil City Streetscape Com- 
mittee. Clean up will begin at 4:30 



p.m. 

For more information, visit 
the Clarion University-Venango 
Campus Administrative Office at 
Frame Hall or contact Kay Ensle 
in the same office, or at 676-659 1 , 
extension 1277. 



Student Affairs office has free concert tickets 



The Student Affairs Office has 
four tickets that can be used to attend 
any of the 2008-2009 concerts hosted 
by the Venango Community Concert 
Association. 

Upcoming concerts include: On 
Tuesday, October 7, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Franklin High School, Pavlo, a com- 
poser, guitarist and singer who com- 



bines Greek and Flamenco influences, 
will perform. 

On Tuesday, February 10, at 7:30 
p.m., at Oil City High School, Wholly 
Brass will perform. 

On Saturday, April 18, at 7:30 p.m., 
at Franklin High School, the Woods Tea 
Company, a folk music trio, will per- 
form. 



The tickets available are also 
good for Community Concert Associa- 
tion-sponsored concerts in Alliance, 
Ohio; Beaver Valley, Pa.; Clearfield, 
Pa.; DuBois, Pa.; and Puxsutawney, 
Pa.. 

If you are interested in tickets or 
for more information, please stop by 
Student Affairs in Rhoades Center. 



THANK YOU notes those who go above and beyond 



Want to thank someone who has 
helped and supported you this month? 
THANK YOU!, the Venango Campus 
Employee Recognition Program, can 
help. 

At Venango Campus we take great 
pride in our personal and caring atmos- 
phere and our commitment to the 
growth and development of our stu- 
dents and other members of our campus 
community. 

The Venango Campus THANK 
YOU! Employee Recognition Program 
is an opportunity for students, faculty. 



and staff to thank faculty and staff mem- 
bers for efforts made "above and beyond 
the call of duty" to help and support oth- 
ers. 

THANK YOU! forms are available 
at the Rhoades Center Information Desk, 
in the Administrative Office in Frame 
Hall, in Suhr Library, and in the second 
floor lobby of Montgomery Hall. 

Individuals wishing to thank some- 
one on campus for going above and be- 
yond the call of duty to help and support 
others should complete a THA2sK YOU! 
form and place it in a THANK YOU! 



box located at one of the campus 
locations listed above. 

Each month, a name will be 
drawn fi^om the entries that were 
placed in the THANK YOU! boxes 
during the month. The winner will 
receive a free lunch at CrossRhoades 
Cafe. 

The names of all individuals 
recognized during the month will be 
included in the Venango Campus 
Update Memo, printed in the Ve- 
nango Voice, and also posted near 
CrossRhoades Cafe. 



EVENTS: Murder Mystery Dinner Theatre slated 



Continued from page 6 

DVD presentation, titled "Lessons 
From Abroad: Opportunities in a Bor- 
derless World," features Dr. Richard 
Heinzl. 



A murder mystery dinner theatre 
will be held Friday, October 24, from 6- 
9 p.m., in the lounge at Rhoades Center. 
It will be "an evening to kill for!" 



"Turtles Can Fly" will be shown 
on Saturday, October 25, at 7:30 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjuncdon with the Independent 

See EVENTS on page 8 



Page 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: PTK will sponsor Bloodmobile visit 



Continued From p«ige 7 

Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will sponsor the 
Central Blood Bank Bloodmobile on 
Wednesday, October 29, from 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m., in Rhoades Gymnasium. For 
more infomiation, contact Patti Shontz 
at s_pashontz(^;clarion.edu or Eliza- 
beth Austin at sedaustin 
@clarion.edu. 

The Radiologic Science depart- 
ment will hold a breakfast on Friday, 
October 31, at 8 a.m., in the lounge at 
Rhoades Center. 

November 

"Chronicle of an Escape" will be 
shown on Saturday, November 1, at 
7:30 p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium, 
in conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

The 2008 presidential election 
will take place on Tuesday, November 
4. Get out and vote! 

A Vegetarian Cooking Class will 
be offered Tuesday, November 4, 
from 5-7:30 p.m., in the community 
room of the Student Apartment Com- 
plex. 

Phi Theta Kappa will meet on 
Thursday, November 6, from 1 1 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m., in room 307 of Mont- 



gomery Hall. For more information, con- 
tact Patti Shontz at 
sj)ashontz@clarion.edu or Charity Barger 
at s_clbarger@clarion.edu. 

The Wacongo Dance Company will 
perform on Friday, November 7, at 7:30 
p.m., in Rhoades Center. The Wacongo 
Dance Company is a traditional ensemble 
of master drummers, musicians, and danc- 
ers, residents of the Democratic Republic 
of Congo who perform ancestral songs and 
dances of Central Africa. 

"Pan's Labyrinth" will be shown on 
Saturday, November 8, at 7:30 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction with 
the Independent Film Series. 

Cellofourte will perform on Saturday, 
November 8, at 7:30 p.m., at the Latonia 
Theatre in Oil City. The group is com- 
prised of four cellists who "create a musi- 
cally diverse experience by boldly defying 
the boundaries of classical music and 
rock." 

"Into the Wild" will be shown on Sat- 
urday, November 15, at 7:30 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction with 
the Independent Film Series. 

The Satellite Seminar Series will fea- 
ture Dr. Raquel Pinderhughes in a DVD 
presentation of "Pathways out of Poverty 
through Green Collar Jobs: The Role of 
Scholarship in Improving Quality of Life 
for Urban Residents" on Monday, Novem- 



ber 17, at 6:30 p.m., at the Rhoades 
Auditorium. 

"I'm Not There" will be shown 
on Saturday, November 22, at 7:30 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

Thanksgiving holiday begins on 
Tuesday, November 25, at 10 p.m. 
Friday classes meet in place of 
Tuesday classes on this day. 

Miscellaneous 

Yoga sessions will be held 
every Thursday, at 1 1 a.m., in the 
fourth floor lounge of Montgomery 
Hall. Classes will be instructed by 
Libby Jenkins. With the conclusion 
of renovations, yoga sessions will be 
held at the Rhoades Gymnasium. 
The sessions are free. 

Cardio-kickboxing sessions will 
be held every Wednesday, from 6-7 
p.m.. at the Franklin School of Kung 
Fu. 845 Buffalo St., Franklin. The 
sessions are free. 

Joann Wheeler will display her 
art at Rhoades Center through De- 
cember. 

Her three-dimensional collages 
and boxes have been exhibited and 
sold in juried group shows in several 
galleries. 



Email the VeNfiNGo Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University ot 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
;Me not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
attlrmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



iVENANC 



'CT i s 



VcTiiR Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VsMriMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 7 Monday, October 13, 2008 



Depression screenings slated Oct. 15 



By Maria Harp 
CUP-VC Counselor 

Depression and college 
students 

According to the 
American College Health 
Association (ACHA), the 
percentage of college stu- 
dents diagnosed with de- 
pression has increased 56 
percent in the last six years. 
Many college students find 
themselves suffering from 
difficulty being motivated, 
difficulty finding pleasure 
in normal activities, diffi- 
culty sleeping (either too 
much or too little), and ulti- 
mately feeling over- 
whelmed. 

Although these symp- 
toms are normal experi- 
ences from time to time, 
they become problematic 
when they begin to actively 
interfere with students' 
academic and/or personal 
life. 

What are the signs and 
symptoms of depression? 
• An overwhelming feel- 
ing of sadness or de- 



spair 

• A feeling of hopeless- 
ness and that "it's never 
going to get better" 

• A loss of interest in 
activities that typically 
make you happy 

• Physical aches and 
pains, such as back 
pain, that seem to have 
no cause 

• Appetite changes 

• Excessive weight loss 
or gain over a short 
period of time 

• Fatigue 

• Lack of motivation 

• Sleep disturbances 
(either insomnia or the 
desire to sleep exces- 
sively) 

• Strong feelings of 
guilt, worthlessness, or 
low self-esteem 

• Strong feelings of anxi- 
ety 

• Trouble with concen- 
tration 

• Thoughts of death or 
suicide (seek help im- 
mediately!) 

How to get help 



If you are experiencing 
any of the listed symptoms, 
be aware that help is avail- 
able. 

October 15 is National 
Depression Screening Day. 
Confidential screenings will 
be conducted in Rhoades 
Center from 1 1 a.m. to 
1 p.m. You will have an 
opportunity to meet indi- 
vidually with a counselor 
and ask questions or deter- 
mine the best course of 
action for the symptoms 
you are experiencing. 

If you have questions 
about a loved one, feel free 
to stop by and consult with 
a counselor about what you 
can do to help. 

A counselor is avail- 
able outside of those times 
if you are interested in 
seeking assistance - Mon- 
day from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., 
and Wednesday from 8:30 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. are the 
hours you can reach a coun- 
selor at Venango Campus. 
The office is located at 234 
Montgomery Hall and the 
extension is 1281. 



Columbus Day is celebrated this week 



October 

October is Breast Can- 
cer Awareness month. For 
more information, log on to 
www.nbcam.org. 



Monday, October 13 is 
Columbus Day. 

Phi Theta Kappa will 
hold a meeting on Monday, 
October 13, at 4:30 p.m., in 



the small conference room 
at Rhoades Center. For 
more information, contact 
Patti Shontz at 

See EVENTS on page 6 



Inside this issue: 


depression 
Screenings 


1 


Events 


1-6 


Trasei Talk 


2 


Job Openings 


3 


CONSTRUC- 
TION Updates 


3 


THANK YOU 


3 


Fitness Videos 


3 


State News 


4 


National 
News 


4 


World News 


S 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Biomass energy utilizes what we already have 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORl SECOR 



Biomass energy is basi- 
cally creating energy using 
plants and plant-derived ma- 
terials. We've been using 
biomass for ages - burning 
wood for heat and to cook. 
Technology has branched out 
a bit, thankfully. Now, talks 
of biomass energy include 
byproducts from the foresting 
and sugar industries, urban 
and livestock waste, energy 
crops and crop residues, and 
tree and yard waste. For ex- 
ample, using wood wastes 



rather than coal is definitely 
a positive shift. It simultane- 
ously cuts carbon emissions, 
disposes of wood wastes, 
and provides a cleaner 
source of heat and electric- 
ity. 

Many forms of biomass 
energy are clearly a step up 
from oil dependency. An 
example? An increasing 
world population means a 
huge increase in the number 
of livestock as well. More 
livestock means more live- 
stock byproducts. 

According to 
www.epa.gov, livestock 
manure is the largest source 
of methane from human- 
related activities globally, 
third highest in the U.S. 
Also emitted is the potent 
greenhouse gas nitrous ox- 
ide, and carbon dioxide. 
With the spirit of how to cut 
C02 emissions and pollu- 
tion, what do we do with all 
of that manure? Why, poo 
power of course! 

In the U.S. alone, over 
one billion tons of cow ma- 
nure goes to waste in dis- 



posal lagoons or open air. 
Anaerobic digestion, a 
method used to create bio- 
mass energy, could be used 
to create biogas that would 
run turbines creating elec- 
tricity. 

The direct use of crops 
to make ethanol isn't the 
answer to our energy 
needs. The more food 
crops, such as com and 
sugarcane, which are 
grown for biofiiels, the less 
there is to be used as food, 
driving costs up for every- 
one and furthering food 
shortages in poor countries. 
There is also the problem 
of excess land clearing. For 
example, in Malaysia and 
Indonesia, rainforests are 
being cleared at alarming 
rates for palm plantations 
for the production of etha- 
nol. 

I, of course, feel the 
need to assert my opinion 
on biomass energy. Our 
dependence on foreign oil 
obviously has created some 
substantial problems for us. 
Our dependence on oil (no 



matter where it comes from) 
will continue to cause more 
harm than good the longer it 
continues. It is not a re- 
source that will be around 
forever; as the supply de- 
creases, the price will con- 
tinue to rise. 

And, the longer we put 
the majority of our eggs in 
that basket, the worse we are 
for wear environmentally 
and financially. That is in- 
disputable. But, let's be 
clear: all forms of biomass 
energy are NOT created 
equally. 

Before investing mil- 
lions into a new energy 
source, it is my hope that the 
'powers that be' take in ex- 
pert opinion and advice, as 
well as results from studies 
into the pros and cons of 
each. 

Reference materials for 
this article were found at: 
Plan 3.0 by Lester R. 
Brown, http:// 
ecolocalizer.com, http:// 
www.alternative-energy- 
news.info, and http:// 
www.epa.gov. 



Venango Voicfz 

Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591, Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice@ciarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp Lola Deets 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Canipus and the surrounding communities The 
Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity, the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information They must be received no later tlian noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



Volume 41, Issue 7 



Page 3 



Nurse, TSS positions open to Venango students 



A position for a Nurse Assistant is 
available in Oil City. 

This job posting is on 
www.cwds.state.pa.us. Before apply- 
ing, applicants' resumes must be com- 
pletely updated on that website. Even if 
you're not a Nursing student but desire 
to help others, this could be a perfect 
part time job. 

A competitive salary is offered for 
this part time, 20 hours per week posi- 
tion. 

Candidates will work under the 
supervision of LPNs and RNs. They 



will organize and provide care for 
groups of 8-10 residents; and be re- 
sponsible for all residents' ADLs, in- 
cluding: bathing, toileting, dressing, 
feeding, ambulation, and personal hy- 
giene. 

The Youth Advocate Programs 
(www.yapinc.org) has local openings. 
More information about the positions 
will continue to be released. Career 
Services suggests applicants begin re- 
sume preparation now, so when all de- 
tails are forwarded by this agency, ap- 



plicants will be ready. Document work 
experience with any youth programs 
and expected graduation date or 
whether the applicant has accumulated 
60 credits. 

TSS positions begin at $I3/hr. 

This employer is anxious to hire 
those with Associate degrees who de- 
sire to work with troubled/at risk 
youth. 

For more information, contact 
Mark Conrad, Coordinator of Career 
Services, at extension 1373 or in room 
230 of Montgomery Hall. 



Construction continues in locker rooms, at pond 



Construction continues at Clarion 
University-Venango Campus at West 
End Pond, in Frame Hall, and in the 
Rhoades locker room. 

The walkway around the pond is 
being compacted and will be paved 



soon, allowing benches to be installed. 
The gazebo and bridge are still about 
three weeks out, so by the end of the 
month, this part of the project should be 
finished. The ramp going to Rhoades 
still awaits final approval. 



With a long lead time on the ma- 
terial, work has been momentarily 
halted in the Rhoades locker rooms. 
The gym will be painted next week 
and duct will be hung in the locker 
rooms. 



Lineman won THANK YOU lunch at CrossRhoades 



The THANK YOU! Venango 
Campus Employee Recognition Pro- 
gram has recognized the following indi- 
viduals for "going above and beyond" 
during the month of September 2008. 

They are; Tammy Beach, Ginny 
Seybold, Penny Shaughnessy, Deb So- 
bina, and Hope Lineman, the winner of 
the free lunch at CrossRhoades Cafe. 

The Venango Campus THANK 
YOU! Employee Recognition Program 



is an opportunity for students, faculty, 
and staff to thank faculty and staff 
members for efforts "above and beyond 
the call of duty" to help and support 
others. 

THANK YOU! forms are available 
at the Rhoades Information Desk, in the 
Administrative Office in Frame Hall, in 
Suhr Library, and in the second floor 
lobby of Montgomery Hall. 

Individuals wishing to thank some- 



one on campus for going above and 
beyond the call of duty to help and 
support others will complete a 
THANK YOU! form and place it in a 
THANK YOU! box located at one of 
the campus locations listed above. 

Each month, a name will be 
drawn from the entries that were 
placed in the boxes during the month. 
The winner will receive a free lunch at 
CrossRhoades Cafe. 



Fitness videos are available for students to sign out 



The fitness center has the follow- 
ing exercise videos available for check- 
out. They are located in the reserve 
section of the library, and may be 
checked out for one week at a time. The 
name to request at the Reserve section 
is "Fitness Center." 



The videos available are: Crunch/ 
Total Resculpt; Yoga for the Kid in All 
of Us; Kathy Smith/Flex Appeal; A 
Belly Dance Workout; Kathy Smith/ 
Yoga Sculpt; Family Walk/Walk at 
Home; 10 Minute Solution/Pilates Per- 
fect Body; Plus-Size Pilates; The Firm/ 



Pump, Jump n' Jab (cardio kick- 
boxing); and Walk Away the Pounds/ 
Express. 

For more information about these 
videos, contact Emily Aubele in the 
Student Affairs Office at Rhoades 
Center or eaubele@clarion.edu. 



Page 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Pa. widow sues US over Iraq vet-husband's suicide 



PHILADELPHIA (AP) _ The widow 
of an Iraq war veteran who committed 
suicide while in outpatient care for 
depression at a Veterans Administra- 
tion hospital is suing the federal gov- 
ernment for alleged negligence. 

Tiera Woodward, 26, claims her 
late husband, Donald, sought treat- 
ment at a VA hospital in Lebanon, Pa., 
after three suicide attempts but wasn't 
seen by a psychiatrist for more than 
two months. 

She says doctors were slow to 
diagnose her husband with major de- 
pression, and that once the diagnosis 
was made, a psychiatrist failed to 
schedule a follow-up meeting with her 
husband after he informed the doctor 
he had gone off his medication. 

Donald Woodward killed himself 
in March 2006 at age 23. 



"1 intend to make them make 
changes," said his mother, Lori Wood- 
ward. "I have too many friends whose 
kids are in Iraq. I have a nephew now in 
Iraq, in the same unit, and 1 can't have 
my family go through this again." 

Alison Aikele, a VA spokeswoman 
in Washington, said the agency does 
not typically comment on pending liti- 
gation. 

The lawsuit, filed in the Middle 
District of Pennsylvania, seeks an un- 
specified amount for funeral expenses, 
lost income and pain and suffering. 

It echoes other lawsuits nationwide 
over VA mental-health services, despite 
legislation President Bush signed in 
November ordering improvements. 

The family of Marine Jeffrey Lu- 
cey, also 23, has a federal suit pending 
in Massachusetts over his June 2004 



suicide. And two veterans groups sued 
the VA in San Francisco seeking an 
overhaul of its health system, citing 
special concerns about mental health, 
but a judge dismissed the suit in June 
over venue issues. 

More than 150,000 Iraq and Af- 
ghanistan war veterans have already 
sought mental health care from the VA, 
and 200,000 others have sought medi- 
cal care, according to Veterans for 
Common Sense, one of the groups in- 
volved in the California lawsuit. 

"Each tragic veteran suicide is yet 
another painful reminder of the human 
cost of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars 
and VA's abject failure to provide 
timely and appropriate mental health 
care," said Paul Sullivan, the group's 
executive director. "How many wake- 
up calls does (the) VA need?" 



National 



Execs' posh retreat after bailout angers lawmakers 



WASHINGTON (AP) _ Days after it 
got a federal bailout, American Interna- 
tional Group Inc. spent $440,000 on a 
posh California retreat for its execu- 
tives, complete with spa treatments, 
banquets and golf outings, according to 
lawmakers investigating the company's 
meltdown. 

AIG sent its executives to the 
coastal St. Regis resort south of Los 
Angeles even as the company tapped 
into an $85 billion loan from the gov- 
ernment it needed to stave off bank- 
ruptcy. The resort tab included $23,380 
worth of spa treatments for AIG em- 
ployees, according to invoices the re- 
sort turned over to the House Oversight 
and Government Reform Committee. 

The retreat didn't include anyone 
from the financial products division 



that nearly drove AIG under, but law- 
makers still were enraged over thou- 
sands of dollars spent on outing for 
executives of AIG's main U.S. life 
insurance subsidiary. 

"Average Americans are suffering 
economically. They're losing their 
jobs, their homes and their health in- 
surance," the committee's chairman. 
Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif, 
scolded the company during a lengthy 
opening statement at a hearing Tues- 
day. "Yet less than one week after the 
taxpayers rescued AIG, company ex- 
ecutives could be found wining and 
dining at one of the most exclusive 
resorts in the nation." 

Former AIG CEO Robert Wil- 
lumstad, who lost his job a day after 
the Federal Reserve put up the $85 



billion on Sept. 16, said he was not 
familiar with the conference and would 
not have gone along with it. 

"It seems very inappropriate," Wil- 
lumstad said in response to questioning 
from Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md. 

"Those executives should be fired," 
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. 
Barack Obama said at a debate with 
Sen. John McCain on Tuesday, refer- 
ring to the retreat participants. Obama 
also said AIG should give the Treasury 
$440,000 to cover the costs of the re- 
treat. 

But Eric Dinallo, superintendent of 
the New York State Insurance Depart- 
ment, said he could see the value of 
such a retreat under the circumstances. 

See NATIONAL on page S 



x'OLUME 41, Issue 7 



Page 5 



liorld 



Nobel physics prize goes to 2 Japanese, 1 American 



T^vo Japanese scientists and an 
American won the ZOOS Nobel Prize in 
ph>sics for theoretical advances that 
nelp explain the behavior of the small- 
est particles of matter. 

The American. Yoichiro NambiL 
S7. of the Uaiversit}. of Chicago, won 
half the S 1 .4 million prize for mathe- 
maucal work he did neariy a half- 
centiir\ ago. 

"I had almost given up" on getting 
±e Nobel. Nambu said. 

Makoco Kobajashi and Toshihide 
Maikawa of Japan shared the other half 



for a 1972 theory- that forecast the later 
discover>' of a new family of subatomic 
particles. 

The insights of the three scientists 
"give us a deeper imderstanding of what 
happens far inside the tiniest building 
blocks of matter," said the Royal Swed- 
ish Academy of Sciences. 

Or, as physicist Phil Schewe, a 
spokesman for the American Institute 
of Phjsics, put it: "Nature works in 
strange ways, and these three physicists 
helped to explain that strangeness in an 
ingenious way." 



Nambu introduced his description 
of so-called spontaneous broken sym- 
metry into particle physics in 1960. 
The Nobel citation said his theories 
now permeate the Standard Model of 
physics, which is the basic theory of 
how the universe operates. For exam- 
ple, spontaneous broken symmetry 
offers an e.xplanatioQ for how different 
particles acquired different masses. 

The Japanese-bom Nambu moved 
to the United States in 1952 and is a 
professor at the Enrico Fermi Institute 
at the University of Chicago. 



NATIONAL: AIG hid risky financial products 



Continued from 



page 4 



~ Having been at large global com- 
panies and knowing vviiat condition 
.AIG was in ... the absolute worst thing 
ihat could have happened" would have 
beea for employees and undenvriters 
in its lite insurance subsidiary to flee 
the company. 

"I do agree there is some profli- 
gate spending there, but the concept of 
bringing all the major employees to- 
gether ... to ensure that the S85 billion 
could be as greatly as possible paid 
back would have been not a crazy cor- 
porate decisiotL" Dinallo told the 
House committee. 

The hearing disclosed that AIG 
executives hid the fiill range of its 
riskv financial products from auditors 
as losses mounted, according to docu- 
ments released by the committee, 
'•vfaich is examining the chain of events 
diat forced the government to bail out 
the conglomerate. 

The panel sharply criticized AIG's 
former top executives, who cast blame 
on each other for the company^s finan- 
cial woes. 

"You have cost my constituents 
and the taxpayers of this country S85 
billion and run into the ground one of 



the most respected insurance companies 
in the history of oiff coimtry," said Rep. 
Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. "You were 
just gambling billions, possibly trillions 
of dollars." 

AIG, crippled by huge losses linked 
to mortgage defaults, was forced last 
month to accept the $85 billion govern- 
ment loan that gives the U.S. the right to 
an 80 percent stake in the company. 

Waxman unveiled documents show- 
ing AIG e.xecutives hid the full extent of 
the firm's risky financial products from 
auditors, both outside and inside the 
firm, as losses mounted. 

For instance, federal regulators at 
the Office of Thrift Supervision warned 
in March that "corporate oversight of 
AIG Financial Products ... lack critical 
elements of independence." At the same 
time, PricewaterhouseCoopers confiden- 
tially warned the company that the "root 
cause" of its mounting problems was 
denying internal overseers in charge of 
limiting AIG's exposure access to what 
was going on in its highly leveraged 
financial products branch. 

Waxinan also released testimony 
from former AIG auditor Joseph St 
Denis, who resigned after being blocked 
from giving his input on how the firm 
estimated its liabilities. 



Three former AIG executives 
were siunmoned to appear before the 
hearing. One of them, Maurice "Hank" 
Greenberg — who ran AIG for 38 
years until 2005 — canceled his ap- 
pearance citing illness but submitted 
prepared testimony. In it, he blamed 
the company's financial woes on his 
successors, former CEOs Martin Sulli- 
van and Willumstad. 

"When 1 left AIG, the company 
operated in 130 countries and em- 
ployed approximately 92,000 people," 
Greenberg said. "Today, the company 
we built up over almost four decades 
has been virtually destroyed." 

Sullivan and Willumstad, in turn, 
cast much of the blame on accoimting 
rules that forced AIG to take tens of 
billions of dollars in losses stemming 
from exposure to toxic mortgage- 
related securities. 

Lawmakers also upbraided Sulli- 
van, who ran the firm from 2005 until 
June of this year, for urging AIG's 
board of directors to waive pay guide- 
lines to win a S5 million bonus for 
2007 — even as the company lost $5 
billion in the 4th quarter of that year. 
Sullivan countered that he was mainly 
concerned wi± helping other setiior 
executives. 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Alumni Chapter will meet on Oct. 14 



Continued from page 1 

s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Charity 
Barger at s_cibarger@clarion.edu. 

The Venango Campus Alumni 
Chapter will hold a meeting on Tues- 
day, October 14, at 4 p.m., in the 
Robert W. RJioades Center Confer- 
ence Room. The chapter welcomes 
new members and is open to anyone 
who has attended classes at the Ve- 
nango Campus. The group was organ- 
ized in September to bring Venango 
Campus alumni together to socialize 
and have fun while advocating for the 
campus and its students in the commu- 
nity and beyond. 

For more information, contact 
Jerri Gent, Director of Marketing and 
University Relations, at 676-6591, 
e.xtension 1215. 

Wednesday, October 15 is Na- 
tional Depression Screening Day. For 
more information, contact Venango 
Campus counselor Maria Harp at 676- 
6591, extension 1281. 

Student Senate will sponsor Pizza 
with the Dean on Thursday, October 
16, from 4:30-5:30 p.m., at Cross 
Rhoades Cafe in Rhoades Center. Stu- 
dents are invited to meet with Dean 
Reber and discuss campus issues over 
free pizza and pop. 

Don't forget, Thursday, October 
16 is National Boss Day! 

The Outdoor Club will sponsor a 
Fall Retreat October 16-18. The trip to 



Ithaca, NY, will include waterfall hikes 
and more. The cost is a $15, non- 
refundable fee per person. Spaces are 
limited. To sign up or for more informa- 
tion, email Emily Aubele at 
eaubele@clarion.edu. 

Senator Mary Jo White will hold a 
Student Government Seminar on Friday, 
October 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Gymnasium. 

CLEP testing will take place on Fri- 
day, October 17, from 8 a.m. to 1 :45 p.m., 
in room 1 18 of Frame Hall. 

"The Lives of Others" will be shown 
on Saturday, October 18, at 7:30 p.m., in 
the Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold an infor- 
mal induction ceremony on Monday, Oc- 
tober 20, at 5 p.m. The event was post- 
poned from September 15. For more in- 
formation, contact Patti Shontz at 
s pashontz@clarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meeting 
Monday, October 20, from 4:30-6:30 
p.m., in the small conference room at 
Rhoades Center. For more information, 
contact Patti Shontz at 

s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Charity 
Barger at s_clbarger@clarion.edu. 

The Satellite Seminar Series will 
begin Monday, October 20, at 6:30 p.m., 
at the Rhoades Auditorium. The DVD 
presentation, titled "Lessons From 
Abroad: Opportunities in a Borderless 
World," features Dr. Richard Heinzl. 



A murder mystery dinner theatre 
will be held Friday, October 24, from 
6-9 p.m., in the lounge at Rhoades 
Center. It will be "an evening to kill 
for!" 

"Turtles Can Fly" will be shown 
on Saturday, October 25, at 7:30 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

The Radiologic Science depart- 
ment will hold a breakfast on Friday, 
October 31, at 8 a.m., in the lounge at 
Rhoades Center. 

November 

"Chronicle of an Escape" will be 
shown on Saturday, November 1, at 
7:30 p.m., in the Rhoades Audito- 
rium, in conjunction with the Inde- 
pendent Film Series. 

The 2008 presidential election 
will take place on Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 4. Get out and vote! 

A Vegetarian Cooking Class will 
be offered Tuesday, November 4, 
from 5-7:30 p.m., in the community 
room of the Student Apartment Com- 
plex. 

Phi Theta Kappa will sponsor the 
Central Blood Bank Bloodmobile on 
November 6, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 
in Rhoades Gymnasium. For more 
information, contact Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@,clarion.edu or Elizabeth 
Austin at s edaustin@clarion.edu. 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



niiun I IDPAPV 



CLARION UNI 
OFPENNSYl 



VENANGO CAMPUS 
,YOUR 



OCT 2 2008 



Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



Wti-flMGo ?oice 



Volume 41, Issue 8 



Monday, October 20, 2008 



Heinzl will kick off Seminar Series 



Clarion University- 
Venango Campus will host 
the first of two satellite 
seminar presentations on 
Monday, October 20, at 
6:30 p.m. in the Robert W. 
Rhoades Center Audito- 
rium. The program is free 
and open to the public. 

Dr. Richard Heinzl, 
foimder of the Canadian 
division of the Nobel Prize- 
winning humanitarian or- 
ganization Doctors Without 
Borders Medicins Sans 
Frontieres Canada (MSF), 
will present "Lessons from 
Abroad: Opportunities in a 
Borderless World." Author 
of Cambodia Calling, the 
stor\' of his year-long medi- 
cal volunteer work in a re- 
mote area of Cambodia. Dr. 
Heinzl has been named one 
of the "Htmdred People 
Who Make a Difference in 
Canada." 

His travels and work 
have taken him to over 75 
countries, including Cam- 
bodia. Iraq and Mozam- 
bique, where he was an 
MSF volunteer. 

Sharing poignant sto- 
ries about ordinar}' people 
doing extraordinar\ things. 
Dr. Heinzl brings home to 
audiences an inside and 
often unexpected \ iew from 
the world's conflict zones 
and provides insightful per- 



spectives from his experi- 
ences during the fraq War, 
South Africa's first Democ- 
ratic elections, and quieter 
moving moments such as 
seeing the simple joy a 
Frisbee can bring to a child 
at the front lines in a war- 
torn country. 

Heinzl studied medi- 
cine at McMaster Univer- 
sit\' Medical School in 
Hamilton, Canada, a pro- 
gram renowned for its inno- 
vative approach to medical 
education. He later com- 
pleted a master of public 
health degree at Harvard 
and a master of science 
degree at Oxford. 

Based in Oakville. On- 
tario. Heinzl' s current focus 
is eHealth. He was recently 
named CEO of CardioView 
Inc.. a technology company 
that utilizes the Internet to 
advance research and image 
communication in the field 
of cardiology and was the 
founder and CEO of 
MediSpecialist.com. a web- 
based medical consultation 
service. He is the holder of 
numerous awards and hon- 
ors including the "Top 40 
Under 40" Award and an 
honorary' doctorate from his 
alma mater, McMaster Uni- 
versity'. He is a frequent 
speaker at national and in- 
ternational events. 




Dr. Richard Heinzl 

The Satellite Seminar 
Series, sponsored by Phi 
Theta Kappa International 
Honor Society', are DVD 
presentations of previously 
broadcast live seminars. 
Discussions following the 
presentations will be facili- 
tated by Clarion faculty 
members or a member of 
the local community. 

The second presenta- 
tion will be offered on 
Monday, November 1 7, 
featuring Dr. Raquel 
Pinderhughes, professor of 
urban studies at San Fran- 
cisco State University, who 
will present "Pathways Out 
of Poverty through Green 
Collar Jobs: The Role of 
Scholarship in Improving 
Quality of Life for Urban 
Residents." 

For more information, 
contact the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs at 814-676- 
6591, extension 1269. 



Inside this issue: 


RlCH.ARD 

Heinzl 


1 


Letter to the 
Editor 


2 


EXENTS 


2-8 


Job Openings 


3 


Photogr.'\phy 
workshop 


3 


St.'\te News 


4 


N.'\TION.'\L 

News 


4 


World News 


5 


Venango 
Upd.ate 


6 


Especially For 
Women 


7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



New smoking ban does "a disservice" to students 



Editor: 

I am not a smoker. And. 
I could not have been happier 
with the indoor smoking ban; 
1 can finally take my entire 
family out to dinner without 
my grandparents' asthma 
acting up. I am also excited 
that I can eat wings at my 
favorite place in town and 
not smell like a walking 
chimney. With that said, ifs 
a safe assumption that I 



would agree with banning 
smoking on campus as well, 
but I don't. 

People are so worried 
about the rights of non- 
smokers that they are forget- 
ting that smokers also have 
rights. Simply put. smokers 
are being discriminated 
against. How hard would it 
be to place a few picnic ta- 
bles and an ashtray on a 
designated area of campus 
for smokin"? I don't believe 



it would be too difficult. 
It's just easier to ban it 
entirely. 

College is a time for 
self-expression, freedoms, 
and standing up for injus- 
tices. And I believe we are 
doing a disservice to the 
students who are paying to 
attend classes and are being 
told they cannot have a 
smoke during their daily 
breaks. Smokers have just 
as much risht to smoke as 



non-smokers have the right 
to breathe clean air. 1 be- 
lieve we can accommodate 
both sides without infring- 
ing on the rights of others. 

The adage states. "You 
can please some of the peo- 
ple all of the time, and all of 
the people some of the 
time." I believe this is a per- 
fect example of "some of 
the time." 

Heather Ditzenberger 



Phi Theta Kappa will hold meeting, induction 



October 

October is Breast Cancer Aware- 
ness Month. For more information, log 
on to www.nbcam.org. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold an in- 
formal induction ceremony on Mon- 
day. October 20, at 5 p.m. The event 
was postponed from September 15. 



For more information, contact Patti 
Shontz at s_pashontz@clarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa will hold a meeting 
Monday. October 20. from 4:30-6:30 
p.m.. in the small conference room at 
Rhoades Center. For more information, 
contact Patti Shontz at 

sj)ashontz@clarion.edu or Charity 



Barger at sclbarger@clarion.edu. 

The Satellite Seminar Series will 
begin Monday. October 20. at 6:30 
p.m.. at the Rhoades Auditorium. The 
DVD presentation, titled "Lessons 
From Abroad: Opportunities in a Bor- 

See EVENTS on page 7 



(_jot an opinion? vVe want to hear it! 

^end (jour signed letters to the editor in .ooc format to: 

woice@clarion.edu 



Viznango Voicg 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion Uni\ersity - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoicefgiclarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp Lola Deets 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Canipus and the surrounding communities. The 
Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity: the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous. the\ must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



Volume 41, Issue 8 



Page 3 



Many job opportunities are available for students 



Just posted on www.cwds. 
state. pa. us, this ideal opening would be 
a great resume builder for those in busi- 
ness or related majors. Make sure your 
resume has been posted and updated on 
this website before you make formal 
application. 

A broadcasting company is seeking 
a part-time office manager to do gen- 
eral office duties: data entry, answering 
phones, and assisting with radio com- 
mercial production, etc. Work will be 
day shift, Monday through Friday. 
Minimum salary is $8 per hour. 

A full-time AmeriCorps position 
serving youth through the Oil Region 
Career Links is available now. The po- 
sition would involve visiting local area 
school districts during school hours to 
provide career education training. You 
can visit the AmeriCorps Web site at 
www.keystonesmiles.org to download 
an application and/or call 814-221- 
1552. For a 1 year commitment, candi- 
dates will receive a living allowance 
paid twice a month, health insurance 
and a $4,725 college scholarship. 



Review this opening on the Web 
site www.cwds.state.pa.us . 

Positions for Freight Team Associ- 
ates at a Franklin location are available. 
Freight moving experience is preferred, 
but the company will train the right 
individual. Part-time freight associates 
will stock shelves and organize the 
sales floor. Candidates must follow all 
safety rules, operate reach trucks, and 
order pickers to remove merchandise 
from higher shelves. 

Work involves breaking down and 
moving materials fi^om staging areas to 
the floor. The position requires stoop- 
ing, bending, lifting, reaching, climb- 
ing, and walking for long periods of 
time. Candidates must be available 
Monday through Friday for one of two 
shifts: 4-8 a.m. or 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. 
Candidates must pass a drug test, back- 
ground check, and pass the validated 
selection test. The minimum salary is 
$9 per hour. 

An opening for a Secretary Office 
Assistant is available. This part-time 



position requires experience with 
Quick Books, preferably Quick Books 
2008. Candidates must have excellent 
customer service and communication 
skills. Job duties include answering 
phones, taking orders, data entry, and 
booking events. Any experience with 
decorating, parties, or weddings, is 
helpful. The employer prefers that the 
candidates have a valid driver's li- 
cense. 

The accepted candidate will work 
Monday through Friday, 15-24 hours 
per week, but may go full-time when 
business picks up. Minimum salary for 
the position is $7.50 per hour. 

Free USB jump drives are still 
available in the Career Services Center 
in exchange for your completion of 
your prepared resume. 

For resume preparation assistance 
or for more information about any of 
these employment opportunities, 
please contact Coordinator of Career 
Services Mark Conrad at 676-6591, 
extension 1373, or visit room 230 in 
Montgomery Hall. 



Kronmiller to put on fall photography workshop 



Kronmiller Creative Portraiture 
will hold a Fall Weekend Photography 
Workshop for families October 24-26, 
at Two Mile Run County Park, rain or 
shine. 

Clarion students, staff, and faculty 
get 10 percent off the workshop fee 
with an ID card. 

The program will be a quiet, fam- 
ily-based camping/non-camping pho- 




tography workshop that everyone can 
enjoy. 

Participants are asked to leave the 
CD players and other electronics at 
home (cell phones for emergency use 
only) and simply enjoy the great colors 
of fall. 

The weekend will run from Friday 
evening to Sunday around noon. Par- 
ticipants should bring their own tent, 



GOTANIDLAr? 



food, and supplies. 

Hot cocoa and coffee will be 
available, as well as campfire rings, 
electric, water, and a heated shower. 

Space is limited. The cost of 
camping for two nights is $34 (per 
tent), and the Photography Workshop 
is $60 per person for the entire week- 
end. 



We'diilcetolnearit! 

^ena tjour suggestions ana ideas to 

woice@clarion.eau 




Paci; 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



W. Pa. town allows pole dancing studio to open 



PITTSBURGH (AP) _ A Pinsburgh 
suburb will allow a pole dancing stu- 
dio to open, ending a federal lawsuit 
that accused town officials of violating 
the First Amendment rights of the 
prospective business woman. 

The American Civil Liberties 
Union filed the suit in August on be- 

National 



half of 30-year-old Stephanie Babines. 
who wanted to open the studio in Ad- 
ams Township. 

Officials had barred Babines from 
opening the studio, saying it was a 
sexually oriented business. 

The ACLU's legal director in 
Pennsylvania Witold Walczak says he 



is satisfied with the settlement. The 
agreement still needs to be approved 
by a federal judge. 

Babines' classes include pole- 
dancing, power lap dance, strip tease 
and "SeXXXercise." 

They are all taught and performed 
fullv clothed. 



Govt wants kids to buckle up on small buses 



DEATSVILLE. Ala. (AP) _ Smaller 
school buses will have to be equipped 
with lap-and-shoulder seat belts for 
the first time under a government rule 
drafted following the deaths of four 
Alabama students on a school bus that 
nose-dived off an overpass. 

Larger buses also will have higher 
seat backs under the new policy, 
which was announced Wednesday. 
The design change is supposed to keep 
older, heavier students fi-om being 
thrown over the seats in a collision. 

The seat belts will only have to be 
installed in new buses weighing 5 tons 
or less, and the requirement will not 
take effect until 2011. These smaller 
school buses are already required to 
have lap belts, but not the safer, har- 
ness-style belts. There is no seat belt 
requirement for larger buses. 

Transportation Secretary Mary 
Peters said she stopped short of requir- 
ing seat belts for larger buses because 
that could limit the number of children 
that can squeeze into seats, forcing 
some children to travel in ways that 
aren't as safe as school buses. 

School districts sometimes expect 
as many as three younger children to 
share a bus seat, but if there are only 
two belts installed per seat then fewer 
children can ride the bus. 

"We wanted to make sure that any 
measures we put forth don't needlessly 
limit the capacity of the buses and 



then force that school or that school dis- 
trict to have more children walking, rid- 
ing with parents, biking, etcetera," Peters 
told The Associated Press in an inter- 
view. 

At Pine Level Elementary School in 
Deatsville, about 20 miles north of 
Montgomery, Gov. Bob Riley and Dep- 
uty U.S. Transportation Secretary Tho- 
mas Barrett climbed aboard a bus with 
12 schoolchildren who have been using 
the belts in the pilot project. 

It was started after four Lee High 
School teens were killed in Huntsville on 
Nov. 20, 2006 when their school bus 
went over a highway overpass rail and 
plunged to a street below, with dozens of 
students flung ft'om seats. 

"We asked the question at that time 
— would it have been safer if the stu- 
dents on the Huntsville bus had had seat 
belts?" Riley said. "We were amazed to 
find out that no one knew." 

A bus driver who has been part of 
the pilot project, George Caudle, noted 
that keeping children fi-om unclicking 
the belts may be a problem. He said the 
bus cannot start until all are strapped in. 
but sometimes after he starts driving it's 
not long before he hears belts being 
clicked off 

Jacob Chandler. 12, said he was 
worried about the belts. 

"If you were to fiip over in a pond, 
the little ones might not be able to get 
the belt off and they might drown," he 



said. 

But Monessia Smith, another 12- 
year-old, said she supported them. 

"They're good. It keeps kids safe," 
she said. 

Schools buy about 2.500 of the 
smaller school buses each year, the 
Transportation Department said. The 
buses seat about 16 to 20 students. 
Larger buses carry more than 50 stu- 
dents. 

The Transportation Department 
estimates it will cost about S6.I mil- 
lion a year to equip new. smaller buses 
with the three-point seat belts and 
higher seat backs, and $3.6 million a 
year to equip new, larger buses with 
higher seat backs. 

The rule gives schools the option 
of using federal highway safety funds 
to help pay for retrofitting buses with 
seat belts, in addition to other money 
already available through the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administra- 
tion. 

Jonathan Adkins, a spokesman for the 
Governors Highway Safety Associa- 
tion, objected to the use of additional 
federal funds for seat belts on school 
buses. 

"Federal highway safety money is 
very limited and using that money to 
install seat belts on school buses isn't 
supported by crash data." Adkins said. 

See NATIONAL on page S 



X'OLLiME 41, Issue 8 



Paci-; 5 



World 



US troops kill No. 2 leader of al-Qaida in Iraq 



BAGHDAD (AP) _ American troops 
acting on a tip killed the No. 2 leader 
of al-Qaida in Iraq — a Moroccan 
known for his ability to recruit and 
motivate foreign fighters — in a raid 
in the northern city of Mosul, the 
U.S. military said Wednesday. 

The military statement described 
the man, known as Abu Qaswarah, as 
a charismatic leader who had trained 
in Afghanistan and managed to rally 
al-Qaida followers in Iraq despite 
U.S. and Iraqi security gains. 

Rear Adm. Patrick Driscoll, a 
U.S. spokesman in Baghdad, also 
said the military suspected that Ira- 
nian agents were trying to bribe Iraqi 
politicians to oppose negotiations 
over a security pact that would ex- 
tend the presence of American troops 
in Iraq. 

But, he said, the military had no 
reason to believe Iraqi politicians had 
taken the Iranians up on the offers. 

"There are indicators that Iranian 
agents may come across the border 
and use money or other bribes to in- 
fluence Iraqi politicians," Driscoll 
said. "It's a whole different matter 
whether Iraqi politicians would ac- 
cept that." 

U.S. troops killed Abu Qas- 
warah, also known as Abu Sara, on 
Oct. 5 after coming under fire during 



a raid on a building that served as an al- 
Qaida in Iraq "key command and con- 
trol location for" in Mosul, the military 
said. 

Abu Qaswarah — one of five in- 
surgents killed — was later been posi- 
tively identified, the military said, with- 
out elaborating. 

The insurgent leader became the 
senior al-Qaida in Iraq emir of northern 
Iraq in June 2007 and had "historic ties 
to AQI founder Abu Musab al-Zarqawi 
and senior al-Qaida leaders in Afghani- 
stan and Pakistan," the military said. 

It called him "al-Qaida in Iraq's 
second-in-command" as the senior op- 
erational leader for al-Zarqawi's succes- 
sor, Abu Ayyub al-Masri, also known 
as Abu Hamza al-Muhajir. 

Driscoll said Abu Qaswarah di- 
rected the smuggling of foreign terror- 
ists into northern Iraq and reportedly 
killed those who tried to return to their 
homelands rather than carry out suicide 
bombings and other attacks against 
Iraqis. 

The announcement would indicate 
that al-Qaida in Iraq's leadership has 
maintained a presence despite recent 
reports that many had fled to Afghani- 
stan and Pakistan where fighting has 
been on the rise. 

Abu Qaswarah was described by 
the military as a "charismatic AQI 



leader who rallied AQI's northern 
network in the wake of major set- 
backs to the terrorist organization 
across Iraq." 

The death of the senior al-Qaida 
in Iraq leader will cause a major dis- 
ruption to the terror network, particu- 
larly in northern Iraq, the military 
said. 

Nationwide violence has de- 
clined drastically over the past year, 
particularly in Baghdad, but the U.S. 
military has consistently warned al- 
Qaida in Iraq and other insurgents 
remain a serious threat. 

A recent series of killings of 
Iraqi Christians in Mosul, 225 miles 
northwest of Baghdad, has high- 
lighted the continued dangers in 
northern Iraq, where many insurgents 
fled intensive U.S. military opera- 
tions in the capital and surrounding 
areas. 

The number of Christian families 
fleeing violence in Mosul since last 
week has reached 1,390-or more than 
8,300 people, local migration official 
Jawdat Ismaeel said Wednesday. 

Ismaeel said humanitarian teams 
are distributing food and aid materi- 
als to all displaced families, who are 
largely seeking refuge in nearby 
Christian-dominated towns and vil- 
lages. 



NATIONAL: School buses are "incredibly safe" 



Continued from page 4 

"School buses are already an incredi- 
bly safe mode of transportation. We 
are more concerned about the areas 
surrounding schools and bus stops. 
States should not be pressured on this 
issue." 

The new rule also includes a 
performance standard for seat belts 
on new, larger buses so that schools 



that want to voluntarily add belts will 
have guidance on what belts are best, 
Peters said. 

Providing a common standard may 
also lower the cost of adding belts, she 
said. 

The rule increases the required 
height of seat backs on new buses to 24 
inches, up from the current 20 inches. 
Higher seat backs will help keep taller, 
heavier children from being thrown 



over seats in a crash, Peters said. 

The rule will be phased in begin- 
ning in the fall of 2009 and become 
fully effective in 20 1 1 . 

About 25 million children travel 
to school on 474,000 school buses, 
according to the Transportation De- 
partment. 

About six children a year are 
killed in school bus accidents, Peters 
said. 



PMA 6 



Venango X'oice 



Updates for Venango Campus are listed here 



Clarion University- 
Venango Campus 2008 Dis- 
tinguished Alumna, Rhonda 
L. Steigerwaid, was recog- 
nized for her many years of 
outstanding service to health- 
care in the region on Thurs- 
da\, October 2. during a day- 
long celebration. 

The day culminated in a 
reception in her honor in 
Robert W. Rhoades Center. 
Speaking at the reception 
were Dr. Chris Reber, Ve- 
nango Campus Executive 
Dean; Terri Wood, represent- 
ing the Clarion University 
Alumni Association: Neil 
Todhunter, recently retired 
President and CEO of UPMC 
Northwest; and Dr. Kathleen 
Patterson. Director of the 
School of Nursing and Allied 
Health. 

A big "Thank You" goes 
out to faculty, staff, and stu- 
dents who manned the Clar- 
ion University-Venango 
Campus booth during Frank- 
lin's three-day Applefest, 
October 3-5. Your willing- 
ness to give of your time to 
support the campus is greatly 
appreciated. 

In observance of Breast 
Cancer Awareness Month, 
stop in the Venango Book- 
store and pick up a compli- 
mentary pink ribbon from 
Linda Hahn. 

Hometown Heroes 2009 
Calendars are available for 
purchase in the Administra- 
tive Office. The calendar 
features photographs of some 
of our local veterans and ac- 
tive military. Many of those 
pictured will be spending a 



second Christmas away from 
home while serving a 15- 
month tour of duty. If you 
would like to purchase a cal- 
endar, please contact Penny 
Shaughnessy at pshaugh- 
nessyfg'clarion.edu or at ex- 
tension 1206. The calendars 
are $5.00 each. All proceeds 
will go to providing care 
packages for our military 
serving abroad. Thank you, in 
advance, for your generosity. 

Clarion University Com- 
puting Services will offer 
2007 Microsoft Office train- 
ing at Venango Campus be- 
ginning in November. 
Classes will be available for 
both introductory and ad- 
vanced-level programs. Intro- 
ductory sessions will cover 
the fundamentals, while the 
advanced sessions will cover 
more complex features. 

The following is a list of 
the training schedule: Word I: 
Tuesday. November 11; 
Word II: Thursday, Novem- 
ber 13; Excel I: Tuesday, 
November 18: and Excel II: 
Thursday. November 20. 

Employees who are in- 
terested in the fraining are 
asked to contact the Help 
Desk at h e 1 p - 
deskffl'clarion.edu or at ex- 
tension 2640. Be sure to indi- 
cate which session(s) you 
will be taking. You will re- 
ceive an email confirmation 
with additional details. All 
classes will be held in the 
Montgomery Hall Computer 
Lab, Room 311,9 a.m. to 12 
p.m. 

Preliminary work will 
begin on the Fall 2008 final 
exam schedule within the 



next few weeks. Clarion 
faculty who are teaching at 
Venango are reminded that 
Venango Campus does not 
follow Clarion's scheduling 
process. Venango Campus' 
final exam schedule is built 
around regular class times. 
Faculty who have special 
requests regarding the time/ 
date of their final exams 
should contact Cindy Busch 
with the details by October 
24. 

Recycling will begin 
soon at Venango Campus. 
Infomiation will be made 
available as the details are 
finalized and the program is 
ready to launch. Watch your 
Clarion email to find out 
how you can make the recy- 
cling program a success. 

Registration for Spring 
2009 and Winter Interses- 
sion began on Monday, Oc- 
tober 13. Students should 
check their email for the 
date and time that they will 
be eligible to schedule. Any- 
one with questions regard- 
ing "hold flags" should con- 
tact the Administrative Of- 
fice. Students are strongly 
encouraged to make an ap- 
pointment with their advisor 
prior to scheduling their 
classes for the Spring 2009 
semester. 

The next scheduled 
meeting for the Venango 
Forum is Friday, November 
21, at 10 a.m., in Montgom- 
ery Hall, Room 404. Mr. 
Joseph Croskey from the 
Clarion University Aca- 
demic Enrichment Depart- 
ment will be the siuest 



speaker. Please mark your 
calendar. 

Have you alwa\s 
dreamed of being a 
sleuth? As part of the Ve- 
nango Campus Fall 2008 
Cultural Events Series, 
you will have a chance to 
put your investigative 
talents to work. On Friday 
evening, October 24, the 
Murder Mystery Dinner 
Theater presentation An 
Evening to Kill For! will 
be performed at 6 p.m. in 
the Rhoades Lounge. 
Prior to the performance, 
a buffet dinner of tossed 
salad, rosemary pork loin, 
chicken pesto, red parsley 
potatoes, vegetable med- 
ley, and assorted desserts 
will be served. If you 
would like to attend, 
please contact Katie 
Owsianiecki at 
kowsian(®clarion.edu or 
extension 1360. Students 
may attend free of charge; 
the charge is $10 for all 
others. Tickets can be 
purchased at the door, but 
advance registration is 
required. 

Friday. October 24 is 
Venango Tech Day. Tech 
Day is designed to bring 
faculty and support per- 
sonnel together around the 
topic of integrating tech- 
nology into the teaching/ 
learning process. During 
the past several years, 
technology at Clarion 
University has signifi- 
cantly advanced. 

In an effort to provide 

See UPDATES on pg. 7 



\'OLUi\!E 41, Issue 8 



PAGt 7 



Program offers health screenings for women 



Especially for Women, in con- 
junction with Alive & Well: a series of 
health information presentations by 
UPMC. will be presented on Wednes- 
day. October 22. at 4:30 p.m., at Cran- 
berry High School, One Education 
Drive, Seneca. 



UPMC Northwest will partner with 
Adagio Health and Venango Forest 
Cancer Coalition for an evening of 
health and wellness education for 
women of all ages. Complimentary 
osteoporosis, stroke, cholesterol, and 
blood glucose screenings will be avail- 



able. 

The event is free and includes 
refreshments and prizes. Space is 
limited. 

For more information or to regis- 
ter, call 814-677-1463 or 1-800-422- 



UPDATES: Tech Day will feature presentations 



Continued from page 6 



faculty and staff an opportunity to 
understand the technologies that are 
currently available on campus, and 
how these technologies can be used to 
enhance student learning and support, 
Venango Campus and Computing 
Services Learning and Technology 
Center will co-sponsor a professional 
development day that will feature fac- 
ulty presentations, roundtable discus- 
sions, and several mini awareness ses- 
sions to introduce these technologies. 

Presentations: Using Web 2.0 
technologies (podcasts, wikis, blogs, 
screen casting, etc.) to engage students 
and enhance learning. 



Academic Advising: The Nitty 
Gritty (Web for Faculty and online ad- 
vising resources) 

Using Turning Point (student re- 
sponse system a.k.a. clickers) to engage 
students - presented in a faculty roundta- 
ble session. 

Teacliing Online: Faculty sharing 
best practices 

Mini sessions: (demos, hands-on, 
and faculty showcase) 

Smart Classroom Instruction; 
"what if trouble shooting session; 
Smart Tools software demonstration, 
Podcasting, Camtasia Software for 
screencasting; Narrated PowerPoint and 
Impatica; OpScan; Wireless. 

All classes will be held in the lower 
level of Frame, rooms 117-1 18, 9 a.m. to 



3 p.m. Darla Ausel will conduct the 
sessions. 

Student Evaluations will begin on 
Monday, November 3 and will con- 
tinue through Friday, November 14. 
As in the past, log-in forms will be 
available in the Frame Administrative 
Office and Suhr Library for faculty 
who will be completing evaluations 
after 6 p.m. Nursing packets will be 
available for in the School of Nursing 
and Allied Health Office; all others 
may be picked up in the Administra- 
tive Office. Teachers are asked to se- 
cure their own administrator, who 
must be a faculty member. However, 
if this is a problem, please contact 
Cindy Busch for assistance. 



EVENTS: Murder mystery dinner slated for Oct. 24 



Continued from page 2 



derless World," features Dr. Richard 
Heinzl. 

A murder mystery dinner theatre 
will be held Friday, October 24, from 
6-9 p.m., in the lounge at Rhoades 
Center. It will be "an evening to kill 

for!" 

Pumkin Bumkin Fest will be cele- 



brated in Oil City October 24-25. Phi 
Theta Kappa will sponsor features at this 
event. For more information, visit 
www.occhpumpkinfest.com. 

Greg Koon, singer/songwriter and 
acoustic soloist, will perform Saturday, 
October 25, at 7:30 p.m., at the Latonia, 
1 East First Sfreet, Oil City. The show is 
$5 per adult, and children under 12 are 
free. For more information, call the La- 
tonia at 677-1260. 



"Turtles Can Fly" will be shown 
on Saturday, October 25, at 7:30 p.m., 
in the Rhoades Auditorium, in con- 
junction with the Independent Film 
Series. 

The Radiologic Science depart- 
ment will hold a breakfast on Friday, 
October 31, at 8 a.m., in the lounge at 
Rhoades Center. 



See EVENTS on 



pag> 



e8 



Page 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Election Day 2008 is on November 4 



Continued from 



pag 



e7 



November 

"Chronicle of an Escape" will be 
shown on Saturday, November 1. at 
7:30 p.m.. in the Rhoades Auditorium, 
in conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

The 2008 presidential election 
will take place on Tuesday. November 
4. Get out and vote! 

On Tuesda). November 4, at 9 
p.m.. Clarion University-Venango 
Campus will host an open house to 
view the election process unfold as the 
next president of the United States is 
voted into office. It is free and open to 
the public. 

There will be fi'ee food, games 
and activities, door prizes, and more. 

For more information, contact 
Emily Aubele at 676-6591, extension 
1269, or at eaubelerSiclarion.edu. 

A Vegetarian Cooking Class will 
be offered Tuesday, November 4, 
from 5-7:30 p.m., in the community 
room of the Student Apartment Com- 
plex. 

Phi Theta Kappa will sponsor the 
Central Blood Bank Bloodmobile on 
Thursday, November 6, fi^om 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m., in Rhoades Gymnasium. For 
more information, contact Patti Shontz 
at s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Eliza- 



beth Austin at sedaustinfrtclarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa will meet on Thurs- 
day. November 6. from 11 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m., in room 307 of Montgomery Hall. 
For more information, contact Patti Shontz 
at s_pashontzi®cIarion.edu or Charity 
Barger at sclbargerfoiclarion.edu. 

The Wacongo Dance Company will 
perfomi on Friday, November 7. at 7:30 
p.m., in Rhoades Center. 

The Wacongo Dance Company is a 
traditional ensemble of master drummers, 
musicians, and dancers, residents of the 
Democratic Republic of Congo who per- 
form ancestral songs and dances of Central 
Africa. 

Cellofourte will perform on Saturday, 
November 8, at 7:30 p.m., at the Latonia 
Theatre in Oil City. The group is com- 
prised of four cellists who "create a musi- 
cally diverse experience by boldly defying 
the boundaries of classical music and 
rock." 

"Into the Wild" will be shown on Sat- 
urday. November 15, at 7:30 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction with 
the Independent Film Series. 

The Satellite Seminar Series will fea- 
ture Dr. Raquel Pinderhughes in a DVD 
presentation of "Pathways out of Poverty 
through Green Collar Jobs: The Role of 
Scholarship in Improving Quality of Life 
for Urban Residents" on Monday. Novem- 



ber 17. at 6:30 p.m.. at the Rhoades 
Auditorium. 

"I'm Not There" v\ill be shown 
on SaturdaN, November 22. at 7:30 
p.m.. in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

Thanksgiving holiday begins on 
Tuesday. November 25. at 10 p.m. 
Friday classes meet in place of 
Tuesday classes on this day. 

Miscellaneous 

Yoga sessions will be held 
every Thursday, at 1 1 a.m.. in the 
fourth floor lounge of Montgomery 
Hall. Classes will be instructed by 
Libby Jenkins. 

With the conclusion of renova- 
tions, yoga sessions will be held at 
the Rlioades Gymnasium. The ses- 
sions are free. 

Cardio-kickboxing sessions will 
be held every Wednesday, from 6-7 
p.m.. at the Franklin School of Kung 
Fu. 845 Buffalo St., Franklin. The 
sessions are free. 

Joann Wheeler will displa},' her 
art at Rhoades Center through De- 
cember. Her three-dimensional col- 
lages and boxes have been exhibited 
and sold in juried group shows in 
several salleries. 



Email the VeNfiN60 Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion Universit> of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The\ 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students. facult>'. or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 
VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VeM-flMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 9 



Monday, October 27, 2008 



Sign up for Transitions Tour now 



Career Services will 
sponsor the Transitions Bus 
Tour on Friday, November 
21. The trip is for those 
students who plan to transi- 
tion from Venango Campus 
to Clarion University's 
main campus to complete 
their degree within the next 
two years. 

Students who experi- 
ence anxiety about the tran- 
sition will have their wor- 
ries eased, according to 
Coordinator of Career Ser- 
vices Mark Conrad, as 
questions regarding transfer 
credits, parking, housing, 



changing majors, and many 
other topics will be cov- 
ered. 

The free trip will pro- 
vide students a Q&A ses- 
sion with Clarion Univer- 
sity admissions representa- 
tive Bill Bailey, a tour of 
main campus, and a free 
lunch at Chartwells cour- 
tesy of Career Services. 

The bus will leave the 
upper parking lot of Ve- 
nango Campus at approxi- 
mately 9 a.m. and return at 
approximately 4:30 pm. 

The response rate will 
depend on the size of the 



bus reserved, so students 
must RSVP by Friday, Oc- 
tober 31, to Mark Conrad, 
Coordinator of Career Ser- 
vices, at 676-6591, exten- 
sion 1373, or at mcon- 
rad@clarion.edu. In addi- 
tion, sign up sheets are 
available now at the Learn- 
ing Support Center in 
Montgomery Hall, at the 
Student Affairs office in 
Rhoades Center, and at the 
Career Services Center in 
Montgomery Hall. 

For more information, 
contact Mark Conrad at the 
above locations. 



Radiologic Science event is slated 



October 

October is Breast Can- 
cer Awareness month. For 
more information, log on to 
www.nbcam.org. 

The Radiologic Sci- 
ence department will hold a 
breakfast on Friday, Octo- 
ber 31, at 8 a.m., in the 
lounge at Rhoades Center. 

November 

■'Chronicle of an Es- 
cape" will be shown on 
Saturday, November 1, at 



7:30 p.m., in the Rhoades 
Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film 
Series. 

The 2008 presidential 
election will take place on 
Tuesday, November 4. Get 
out and vote! 

On Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 4, at 9 p.m., Clarion 
University-Venango Cam- 
pus will host an open house 
to view the election process 
unfold as the next president 



of the United States is 
voted into office. It is free 
and open to the public. 

There will be free 
food, games and activities, 
door prizes, and more. 

For more information, 
contact Emily Aubele at 
676-6591, extension 1269, 
or at eaubele@clarion.edu. 

A Vegetarian Cooking 
Class will be offered Tues- 
day, November 4, from 5- 
7:30 p.m., in the commu- 
See EVENTS on page 8 



Students, 
Faculty & Staff: 

Please stop in the lobby 
of Frame Hall or the 
administrative office to 
pick up your 2008- 
2009 campus directory. 
They'refree! 



Inside this issue: 



Transitions 
Bus Tour 


1 


Events 


1-8 


TR.'XSH T.alk 


2 


Marla Harp 


3 


State News 


4 


National 
News 


4 


World News 


5 


Job Openings 


5 


Nursing Test 


7 



Paci 2 



\'ENANGO \'01CE 



Candidates vary on environment, energy issues 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 

November 4th is a rich 
day in history. In 1922, the 
Tomb of King Tut was dis- 
covered; in 1948, T.S. Eliot 
won the Nobel Prize; and in 
1979. Iranian radicals took 
90 hostages from the U.S. 
embassy in Tehran. This year 
on November 4th, will be the 
beginning of the ne.xt chapter 
in history. The next president 
of the United States will bear 
incredible burden and im- 
measurable responsibility. 
Not only will he come into 
office with the absolute mess 
that is the economy, the deci- 
sions this president will make 
regarding climate change and 



the environment will be 
instrumental in the global 
steps taken to solve the big- 
gest issue this world has 
ever seen. 

While the economy is 
forefront on the minds of 
nearly all Americans, we 
must remember there are 
other issues to consider 
when deciding whom to 
vote for: health care, civil 
rights, defense, immigration, 
and of course, climate 
change, energy, and the en- 
vironment. I encourage eve- 
r>'one to dissect both candi- 
dates" Web sites and explore 
their positions on the issues 
you feel are most important 
if you haven't already done 
so. Don't take someone 
else's word for it - this is 
too important to not look 
into it yourself The articles 
published in this issue of the 
Voice will be concerning 
each candidate's position on 
energy and climate change. 
All information will be 
taken directly off their Web 
sites to ensure it is accurate. 
I also will do my best to not 
insert personal opinions, 
trying to be neutral. To start: 
John McCain. 

The bulk of McCain's 



energy policy appears to be 
centered around offshore 
drilling and nuclear power. 
He proposes to life restric- 
tions, allowing drilling in 
the Outer Continental shelf 
and to build the infrastruc- 
ture needed to transport 
natural gas throughout the 
country, though no detail is 
given on what that entails. 
He plans to construct 45 
new nuclear power plants 
by 2030; with the ultimate 
goal of 100, similar to 
goals of China, India, and 
Russia. To encourage new 
technologies, he proposes 
to offer a S300 million 
prize for the development 
of a better battery for hy- 
brid cars. 

He also intends to en- 
courage alternative energy 
such as wind, hydro, and 
solar power: "McCain be- 
lieves in an even-handed 
system of tax credits that 
will remain in place until 
the market transforms suf- 
ficiently to the point where 
renewable energy no 
longer merits the taxpay- 
ers' dollars." He seeks to 
improve the electricity 
grid, and commits S2 bil- 
lion annually to promote 



the advancement of clean 
coal. 

McCain promotes a 
"Cap & Trade System" to 
limit carbon emissions. Ba- 
sically, companies, indus- 
tries, etc. buy and sell the 
right to emit greenhouse 
gasses. If Company A does 
not use all of its permits, it 
may sell the extras to Com- 
pany B, earning money in 
the process. The reasoning 
here is that if a company has 
the potential to save money 
by emitting less, it will in- 
vest in or invent ways to 
reduce their emissions. 
McCain focuses on this is- 
sue as primarily it being the 
private sector's responsibil- 
ity to curb emissions, with 
tax credits and incentives 
from the government to do 
so. Emission targets include 
reducing emissions to 18 
percent above 1990 levels 
by 2012; ultimately to be 
reduced to 60 percent below 
1990 levels in 2050. 
McCain plans to apply a 
higher efficiency standard to 
all government buildings, 
home and abroad, as a way 
to set a good example for 

See VIEWS on page 3 



Viznango Voicsz 

Student .^flairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion Universit>' - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice'«:clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Ruber Kerri Sma\ da Lori Secor Maria Harp Lola Deets 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion llniversit> of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities The 
Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reser\'e the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity: the detemiination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesda\s, If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anon\nious. they must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



X'OLUME 41. Issue 9 



Page 3 



Contact Maria Harp to discuss grief, other issues 



By Maria Harp 

Venango Campus Counselor 

Man> of us are dealing with issues 
surrounding an unresolved loss. Often 
times we think about loss in terms of 
the death of a loved one. However, 
losses can include infertilitv'. loss of 
self-esteem, deplovment of a loved one. 
loss of a job. or the loss of a pet. Eliza- 
beth Kubler-Ross pioneered research in 
the area of death and aievins. The 



stages of grief that she described 
(denial, anger, bargaining, depression, 
and acceptance) have helped many to 
normalize what they experience at a 
time of grieving. 

Others of us are wondering how to 
support a close friend or relative who is 
going through a time of grief Some- 
times we avoid the grieving person be- 
cause we feel awkward and don't know 
what to say. The best advice that can be 
siven in this situation is to focus on 



listening, not what to say. Help with 
"instrumental support" - walking the 
dog. doing the laundry, mowing the 
lawn. 

Although grief is one of the most 
difficult emotions that we experience, 
it also provides a great deal of poten- 
tial for growth. 

If you would like to discuss this 
or another topic with me, please con- 
tact me at ext. 1281 or mharp 
{3)clarion.edu. 



VIEWS: Candidates have two different approaches 



Continued from page 2 

private citizens and other countries. 

McCain's Web site lists steps that 
need to happen, in his opinion, to im- 
prove the current energy and climate 
situation: "John McCain... will provide 
leadership for effective international 
efforts... will develop a climate change 
adaptation plan.... will ensure rapid 
technology introduction... will foster 
rapid and clean economic growth..." 
There are quite a few of these state- 
ments, but unfortunately no details are 
available for me to report on how these 
changes will come about under his 
presidency. 

Reference material for John 
McCain's portion of this piece was 
found at: www.thehistorychan 
nel.co.uk, wvvw.johmnccain.com. 

Two men: very different policies, 
very different approaches, very differ- 
ent visions. Now, I'll present the poli- 
cies on energy and the environment of 
Barack Obama. citing information di- 
rectly from his Web site. Obama" s Web 
site provides ftill plans on both the en- 
vironment and energy. I encourage you 
to log on and check them out, as they 
are more extensive than I have room to 
accoimt for in my limited space here. 
However, I will try to hit the major 
points and objectives. 

Obama has a 2oal of reducing our 



carbon emissions by 80 percent below 
1990 levels by 2050. Like McCain, 
Obama also favors a cap-and-trade sys- 
tem, but with sizable differences. An 
overall national cap on emissions will 
be established; companies who don't 
use their allotted emissions will be able 
to sell them for profit, and vice versa, 
the number of allowances declining 
each year to match the reduction in 
emission targets. Here is where the dif- 
ference comes: Obama' s system will 
require pollution credits to be auctioned 
to ensure large polluters pay for every 
ton of emissions they release rather 
than giving them away for free to coal 
and oil companies. Some of the revenue 
generated by auctioning allowances 
will be used to develop and employ 
clean energy, invest in energy effi- 
ciency, and to address fransition costs 
for the public. 

Using money to invest in a clean 
energy economy is key to bring us for- 
ward environmentally and economi- 
cally. Obama's investment plan will 
double science and research funding for 
clean energy projects and invest in job 
training and transition programs to help 
workers and industries adapt to clean 
technology development and produc- 
tion. This plan also invests in key tech- 
nology deployment and sets standards 
to allow the market to invest and inno- 
vate. Obama will require 25 percent of 



total electricity used, and at least 30 
percent of federal government's usage, 
to come from renewable resources by 
2025. Becoming more energy efficient 
is a top priority for this prospective 
administration, their agenda providing 
people the tools they need to begin 
reducing their energy consumption 
and energy bills. 

Barack Obama believes the U.S. 
has to be a leader in combating this 
global issue. He feels we need to re- 
engage the United Nations Framework 
Convention on Climate Change and 
plans to create a new Global Energy 
Forum focusing exclusively on global 
energy and environmental issues. A 
new Technology Transfer Program 
within the DOE will be dedicated to 
exporting climate-friendly technology 
to developing coimtries. He also plans 
to concentrate efforts for clean air, 
clean water, and preserving our land - 
all of which he has details available on 
his Web site. 

On the energy front. Obama 
promises immediate relief in several 
forms, including requiring oil compa- 
nies to take a reasonable share of their 
profits and provide direct relief to con- 
sumers. Individuals will get $500; 
married couples will get $1,000. 
Obama views the energy dilemma as 

See VIEWS on page 7 



P\(,l 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Lawsuit: Paper ballots should be on hand in Pa. 



PHILADELPHIA (AP) _ Several 
voter-rights groups filed suit Thursday 
to seek emergency paper ballots for 
Pennsylvania voters in the event that 
electronic machines break down. 

The groups want paper ballots to 
be available on Election Day if more 
than half of the voting machines at a 
given polling place malfunction. Oth- 
erwise, voters are often left to endure 
long lines, they said. 

"People should be able to exercise 
their right to vote without waiting in 
line for hours or being told to go home 
and come back later," said John Boni- 
faz. legal director of Voter Action, a 
national voter advocacy group that is 
one of several plaintiffs. 



The groups focused on Pennsyl- 
vania because of problems reported in 
the spring primary and a recent state 
directive that, according to the groups, 
say paper ballots should only be used 
if all machines in a polling place fail. 

"We're quite concerned, in light of 
the confluence of high voter turnout 
and these voting machine breakdowns, 
that there will be even longer lines and 
more voter disenfranchisement," Boni- 
faz said Thursday. 

The suit was filed in federal court 
in Philadelphia against Pennsylvania 
Secretary of State Pedro Cortes. 

Leslie Amoros, Cortes' spokes- 
woman, declined comment until the 
department can review the suit. 



The plaintiffs include the National 
Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People, the Public Interest 
Law Center of Philadelphia and Voter 
Action, a voting rights organization. 
They are seeking a preliminary injunc- 
tion to address the situation before the 
election. 

"Thousands of members have 
faced serious delays in voting when 
machines have broken down in the 
past, and this problem will be much 
more severe this year when unprece- 
dented numbers of voters will be com- 
ing to the polls," said J. Whyatt 
Mondesire, the president of the 
NAACP State Conference of Pennsyl- 
vania. 



National 



People nervous about economy, expect it to improve 



WASHINGTON (AP) _ People are 
skittish about the economy's immedi- 
ate future. Ask how things will be in a 
year and you hear a different story — 
and a remarkable show of optimism 
despite economists' widespread expec- 
tations that a serious recession is 
brewing. 

Most expect the economy to gen- 
erally be better and the stock market to 
be rising three months from now, ac- 
cording to an Associated Press-GfK 
poll released Thursday. But that's 
mixed with gloom: Majorities also 
doubt unemployment will fall or home 
values will rise by then, and people are 
split over whether their personal fi- 
nances will improve. 

Extend the timeline to a year and 
the public's mood about the economy 
grows cheerier. Most say they expect 
more jobs and higher real estate value. 
The also think their own financial 
situations will be better a year from 
now, the survey shows. 

"A few months from now, I don't 



see it," said Claudette Davis, 61, a re- 
tired power company supervisor from 
Alpharetta, Ga. "A year from now, it 
may improve. With the $700 billion to 
bail out all those banks, maybe things 
will come around. And maybe the new 
president will have some input." 

That optimism seems to run counter 
to the beliefs of many economists that 
the U.S. is in, or about to enter, a reces- 
sion. Democrats in Congress are looking 
at crafting the year's second economic 
stimulus bill, an idea that's been em- 
braced by Federal Reserve Chairman 
Ben Bemanke and that the White House 
has said President Bush would consider. 

Many said the upcoming presiden- 
tial election will affect the economy's 
performance. Forty-four percent said 
they think the economy will improve if 
Democrat Barack Obama is elected, 
while 34 percent said it would get better 
if Republican John McCain wins. 

With widespread economic worries 
making the stock market lurch wildly 
almost daily, most in the survey were 



eager to keep their distance from it. By 
a 58 percent to 38 percent majority, 
people said this was a bad time to in- 
vest in stocks. However, by a more 
modest 53 percent to 43 percent, most 
said this is a good time to buy real 
estate. 

"The stock market is obvious, it's 
probably not bottomed out," said attor- 
ney Anthony Venditti, 41, of West- 
chester, Pa. But assuming a person can 
get a loan — no easy feat these days 
— "It's a great time to buy a house. 
There's a huge inventory out there." 

About three quarters of active 
investors — people who changed their 
investment mix at least five times in 
the past year — said this is a good 
time to purchase real estate and invest 
in the stock market. Two-thirds of 
people earning at least $100,000 a 
year also said so. But fewer than half 
of those making under $50,000 said 
now's the time to be buying stocks. 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



Volume 41, Issue 9 



Page 5 



World 



US turns over control of 12th Iraqi province 



BABYLON. Iraq (AP) _ The U.S. 
relinquished control of a southern 
province that includes Sunni areas 
once known as the "triangle of 
death." handing security responsibil- 
ity' to the Iraqi government on Thurs- 
day. In the capital, where insurgent 
attacks continue nearly daily, a car 
bomber targeted a government minis- 
ter's convoy, killing at least 13 peo- 
ple. 

Babil is the 12th of 18 Iraqi 
provinces to be handed over and a 
sign of the improving security. U.S. 
forces will remain in the area to assist 
the Iraqis when needed. 

At a transfer ceremony held near 
the ruins of the ancient cit> of Baby- 
lon, Lt. Gen. Lloyd Austin, the No. 2 
U.S. commander in Iraq, said security 
gains have been remarkable — with 
the number of attacks falling about 
80 percent from an average of 20 per 
week a year ago. 

But he cautioned that "while the 
enemies of Iraq are down, they are 
not necessarily defeated." 

With Babil's handover to the 
Iraqi government, the only province 
left under U.S. control in southern 



Iraq is Wasit, a rural desert region that 
borders Iran and has been a conduit for 
the smuggling of foreign fighters and 
weapons into Iraq. 

Other provinces that remain to be 
handed over are north of the capital, 
where violence has been slower to de- 
cline after insurgents fled security 
crackdowns in Baghdad and surround- 
ing areas. 

Salim al-Musilmawi, Babil's pro- 
vincial governor, credited tribal leaders 
and Sunnis who turned against al-Qaida 
in Iraq in a U.S. -funded revolt with the 
downturn in violence. 

"Today's security handover is the 
fruit of the victory over al-Qaida," he 
said. 

In Baghdad, the attacker rammed 
the car into the Labor and Social Af- 
fairs Ministry convoy as it passed 
through the central Bab al-Sharji area, a 
ministr}' spokesman said. 

The Shiite minister, Mahmoud 
Mohammed al-Radhi, escaped un- 
harmed but three of his guards were 
killed, spokesman Abdullah al-Lami 
told al-Arabiya TV station. 

"It is the latest in a series of crimi- 
nal acts that are targeting development 



process in Iraq," al-Lami said. 

At least 10 civilians were killed 
in addition to the guards, and 2 1 peo- 
ple were wounded, according to po- 
lice and hospital officials, who spoke 
on condition of anonymity because 
they weren't authorized to release the 
information. 

Smoke and the smell of gunpowder 
filled the air. Drivers at a nearby in- 
tersection sought shelter behind their 
cars until Iraqi security forces or- 
dered them to evacuate the area. 

AP Television News video 
showed a burned SUV and the 
charred hulk of the apparent car 
bomb surrounded by Iraqi security 
forces. The windows of a nearby 
camera store were shattered, with 
torn pictures left among the glass. 

Youssef Qassim, the 40-year-old 
owner of a nearby clothing store, said 
he peered through a hole in the con- 
crete wall surrounding the market 
and saw at least two cars on fire with 
burning bodies inside. 

"The guards of the government 
convoy opened fire into the air but 
stopped when U.S. forces arrived at 
the scene," he said. 



NATIONAL: People were asked about economy 



Continued from page 4 

People were asked how they 
think seven aspects of the economy 
would be behaving in three months 
and a year from now. They gave 
mixed responses for the near-term, 
but in nearly each case foresaw 
stronger performance in a year. 

Steven Wood, 30, a car salesman 
from Canton, Ga., said he doesn't 
doubt that the economy will rebound. 
"I deal with customers every day, and 
as a whole, even though people are 
down about the economy, they're 
very optimistic about what the fiiture 



holds," he said. 

Just 38 percent said they think un- 
employment would go down in three 
months, but 62 percent said they 
thought it would improve in a year. 
That is counter to what many analysts 
expect: Unemployment is 6.1 percent 
nationally, and economists predict it 
could go as high as 7.5 percent in 2009. 

"I have a job every now and then 
because I know what I'm doing," said 
Pedro Garcia, 22, of Greeley, Colo., 
who finds work as a roofer, a butcher 
and a welder. "I have to look here and 
there all the time." 

Four in 10 people making less than 



$50,000 a year said unemployment 
won't fall in three months or a year, 
making them less optimistic than the 
highest earners. 

Blacks were a bit more optimis- 
tic than whites in the survey that 
home prices will rise in the short and 
long term, and that the economy will 
improve in a year. 

The AP-GfK poll involved land- 
line and cell phone interviews with 
1,101 randomly chosen adults and 
was conducted from Oct. 16-20. The 
margin of sampling error is plus or 
minus 3 percentage points, larger for 
subgroups. 



Pagi: 6 



Venango Voice 



Student assistant is needed at Career Services 



A Student Assistant is 
needed in the Career Services 
Department immediately. 

Applicants should be 
available for the following 
time periods: 15 hrs/week for 
Fall and Spring terms with 
potential for summer employ- 
ment. Hours will be during 
the day, with minimal eve- 
nings (8;30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday). The 
qualified candidate will assist 
the Career Services Coordi- 
nator with multiple projects 
during the year. Pay is mini- 
mum wage. Start date is to 
be on or about November 1 st. 

A qualified candidate 
must possess the following 
qualifications: must have 
very good clerical skills: pro- 
ficient in Microsoft Word and 
Excel computer programs; 
highly responsible and pro- 
fessional; detail-oriented for 
such major projects as Nurs- 
ing and Respiratory Care 
Fairs in the Spring; customer 
service oriented with good 
phone etiquette; department 
is broad in scope thus the 
candidate must be coopera- 
tive with students, staff and 
faculty; strong communica- 
tion skills (written and ver- 
bal); ability to stay on task in 
the event the Coordinator is 
at meetings or other events; 
strong organizational skills; 
ability to meet deadlines and 
manage multiple priorities; 
maintain confidentiality of 
records; manage, update, and 
backup electronic files as 
directed; photocopy as 
needed; write notes or corre- 
spondence as needed/ 
directed; and other related 
duties as assigned. 



A qualified candidate 
must maintain a minimum of 
six credit hours to apply and 
continue in the position. 

Interested students may 
drop off resumes with a com- 
pleted student application 
form (available in the plastic 
box posted on the door of 
room 228 in Montgomery 
Hall) to Coordinator of Ca- 
reer Services Mark Conrad"s 
office in Montgomery Hall. 
Call 676-6591, extension 
1373 for more information. 

St. Anthony's Point has 
an immediate need for new 
employees. It is an excellent 
opportunity for a Psychology 
or Rehab Services major. 

Therapeutic Staff Sup- 
port Workers are needed at 
the Titusville office to assist 
children with emotional or 
behavioral difficulties. 
Bachelor's degree in psychol- 
ogy or related field, or 
Bachelor's and one year ex- 
perience working with chil- 
dren, or 60 credits or an As- 
sociates Degree and three 
years experience working 
with children is required. In 
addition. Act 33/34 and FBI 
clearances are required. Day, 
evening, weekend, and sub- 
stitute work is available. The 
position offers competitive 
wage, health, 40 IK plan, 
mileage reimbursement, and 
other benefits. 

Send application to St. 
Anthony's Point, 3679 East 
State Street, Hermitage, PA, 
16148, or call toll fi-ee 866- 
775-8273. EOE. 

This position, posted on 
www.cwds.state.pa.us, is 



ideal for the student wanting 
to gain practical, hands-on 
field experience while at- 
tending classes. 

The Human Service 
Aide is a part time position 
(18-32 hours per week). The 
position is for a caring, 
flexible, and dependable 
individual to provide a vari- 
ety of supportive services to 
identified MH/MR consum- 
ers in an effort to educate 
and encourage them to be- 
come as self-sufficient and 
independent as possible. 

Duties include, but are 
not limited to. visiting con- 
sumers in their home, assist- 
ing them in the community 
(i.e. shopping, laundry, 
banking, medical); advising 
them of available services; 
and assisting in obtaining 
and monitoring requested 
services as indicated by each 
consumer's individual goals. 
Written and verbal commu- 
nication skills and organiza- 
tional abilities are highly 
desired. A high school di- 
ploma. Acts 34 - 151 clear- 
ances, and a valid PA 
driver's license is also re- 
quired. Normal workweek is 
Saturday through Friday, 
and some evenings. 

Seasonal delivery driv- 
ers are needed at UPS. 

Candidates must com- 
plete an application at the 
employer's Web site to ap- 
ply for this position and 
make an appointment to 
meet with UPS at the Oil 
Region CareerLink on No- 
vember 7th. 

The temporary/seasonal 
position is to last from ap- 



proximately November 16 
through December 24. 
Candidates will work 
Monday through Friday, 
from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
( or until all deliveries are 
made). 

Candidates must be 
21 years old, be able to 
lift up to 70 pounds, be 
able to drive a standard 
transmission, have a cur- 
rent driver's license, have 
a clean driving record for 
the past 12 months, have a 
high school diploma/ 
GED, and have a clean- 
cut appearance. 

There is no guarantee 
of hours, but candidates 
can work 40 hours and 
more each week. There 
are no benefits. 

Candidates should 
apply online at the UPS 
Web site. Successful ap- 
plicants will be given an 
exact appointment time to 
report to the Oil Region 
CareerLink. 255 Elm 
Street, Oil City, on Fri- 
day, November 7. 

Free USB jump 
drives are still available in 
the Career Services Cen- 
ter in exchange for your 
completion of your pre- 
pared resume. 

For resume prepara- 
tion assistance or for more 
information about any of 
these employment oppor- 
tunities, please contact 
Coordinator of Career 
Services Mark Conrad at 
676-6591, extension 1373, 
or visit room 230 in 
Montgomery Hall. 



Volume 41, Issue 9 



Page 7 



Nursing test to be offered at Venango Campus 



Clarion University's School of 
Nursing and Allied Health is begin- 
ning the process of selecting the Asso- 
ciate of Science in Nursing class for 
Fall 2009. 

One of the coinponents of the 
admissions process is taking a Na- 
tional League for Nursing pre- 
admission test, which focuses on Eng- 
lish, Mathematics, and Science. 

The following dates have been 
scheduled for the test: November 21, 
deadline to submit request to test is 
November 7; December 12, deadline 
is November 28; January 16, 2009, 
deadline is January 2, 2009. 

These tests will be held in 
Rhoades Auditorium, Venango Cam- 
pus and will begin promptly at 8:30 
a.m. No calculators may be 
used. Pencils will be provided. 

This NLN test takes approxi- 
mately four hours to complete and the 
cost is $50.00. Because all tests must 



be paid for prior to ordering, the $50.00 
fee is non-refiindable. If you cancel a 
test session, you must submit an addi- 
tional $50.00 when you reschedule test- 
ing for another date. 

The following are additional re- 
quirements of the admissions process: 
application for admission or completed 
Change of Status form (for those cur- 
rently enrolled at Clarion University) 
must be submitted no later than Decem- 
ber 15; an essay of 250 words or less 
entitled "Why I Want to Be a Nurse" 
must be on file in the Nursing Office; 
official High School/GED/and tran- 
scripts from any other schools attended 
must be on file in the Admissions Of- 
fice of Clarion University - do not have 
the transcripts sent to the Nursing Of- 
fice at Venango Campus; and pre- 
requisite courses, specifically basic 
Algebra, basic Biology and Chemistry 
must be completed or in progress for 
consideration (Please see the ASN 



Handbook, online at 
www.clarion.edu . for more detailed 
information regarding admission to 
the ASN Program). 

Please be sure to abide by all 
deadlines. Please speak with your 
assigned advisor regarding your 
status and plan. 

The nursing advisor is the best 
person to work with to be certain that 
you are proceeding correctly towards 
being considered for admission to the 
ASN Program. 

If you do not have a nursing ad- 
visor, please contact Deb Weaver 
(dweaver@clarion.edu or 676-6591, 
ext. 1250) and one will be assigned to 
you. 

For additional information on 
this test or on the Associate of Sci- 
ence in Nursing Program at Clarion 
University, please contact Deb 
Weaver at 676-6591, ext. 1250 or 
dweaver(S)clarion.edu. 



VIEWS: Cast your vote for president on Nov. 4 

Continued from page 3 and creating new job training programs of electricity to come from renewal 

for clean technologies. sources by 2012, and develop and ei 



an opportunity to create millions of 
jobs and get our economy back on the 
right track. Investments in plug-in 
hybrids, the development of commer- 
cial scale renewable energy, advanc- 
ing the generation of biofuels, begin- 
ning the transition to a digital elecfri- 
cal grid, and fraining the manufactur- 
ing workforce will create five million 
new green jobs that cannot be out- 
sourced. Obama also will create the 
"Green Vet Initiative" that will help 
veterans gain skills to enter this rap- 
idly growing field. The process will 
also include turning manufacturing 
centers into clean technology leaders 



and creating new job training programs 
for clean technologies. 

Obama will implement a strategy 
that will allow us to reduce our oil con- 
sumption by more than we currently 
import from the Middle East and Vene- 
zuela within ten years. 

Included in this plan is to invest in 
development to put one million plug-in 
electric vehicles on the road by 2015, 
partner with domestic automakers to 
ensiu-e the cars and their parts are made 
by American workers, and establish a 
low carbon fliel standard so that as we 
reduce our oil consumption we also re- 
duce carbon emissions. 

As for diversifying our energy 
sources, Obama will require 10 percent 



of elecfricity to come from renewable 
sources by 2012, and develop and em- 
ploy clean coal technology. 

Obama is not opposed to flirther- 
ing the use of nuclear energy, but he 
feels there are key issues that must be 
addressed first: the security of nuclear 
fuel and waste, waste storage, and 
proliferation. 

Voting is all about who YOU feel 
will do the best for you personally and 
the nation as a whole. Go to their Web 
sites - read where they stand on the 
issues that are important to you. Most 
importantly - GO VOTE! ! ! 

Reference material for Barack 
Obama 's portion of this piece was 
found at: www.barackobama.com. 



Paci 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Bloodmobile to be on campus Nov. 6 



Continued from page 1 

nity room of the Student Apartment 
Complex. 

Phi Theta Kappa will sponsor the 
Central Blood Bank Bloodmobile on 
Thursday, November 6, from 1 1 a.m. 
to 4 p.m.. in Rhoades Gymnasium. 

To donate, proper identification is 
required. Identification may include a 
Central Blood Bank or militai^ ID, 
driver's license, or employee badge 
with picture and fiill name, as well as 
a birth certificate along with a picture 
ID that includes the donor's full name. 

For more information, contact 
Elizabeth Austin at 814-673-3848 or 
s_edaustin@clarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa will meet on 
Thursday, November 6, fi^om 1 1 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m., in room 307 of Mont- 
gomery Hall. For more infomiation, 
contact Patti Shontz at 

s_pashontz@clarion.edu or Charity 
Barger at s_clbarger@clarion.edu. 

The Wacongo Dance Company 
will perform on Friday, November 7, 
at 7:30 p.m., in Rhoades Center. The 
Wacongo Dance Company is a tradi- 
tional ensemble of master drummers, 
musicians, and dancers, residents of 
the Democratic Republic of Congo 
who perform ancestral songs and 
dances of Central Africa. 



Cellofourte will perform on Saturday, 
November 8, at 7:30 p.m., at the Latonia 
Theatre in Oil City. The group is com- 
prised of four cellists who "create a musi- 
cally diverse experience by boldly defy- 
ing the boundaries of classical music and 
rock." 

"Into the Wild" will be shown on 
Saturday, November 15, at 7:30 p.m., in 
the Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

The Satellite Seminar Series will 
feature Dr. Raquel Pinderhughes in a 
DVD presentation of "Pathways out of 
Poverfy through Green Collar Jobs: The 
Role of Scholarship in Improving Quality 
of Life for Urban Residents" on Monday. 
November 17, at 6:30 p.m., at the 
Rhoades Auditorium. 

Career Services will sponsor the 
Transitions Bus Tour on Friday, Novem- 
ber 21. The trip is for those students who 
plan to transition from Venango Campus 
to Clarion University's main campus. The 
bus will leave the upper parking lot of 
Venango Campus at approximately 9 a.m. 
and return at approximately 4:30 pm. 

The free trip will provide students a 
Q&A session with Clarion University 
admissions representative Bill Bailey, a 
tour of main campus, and a free lunch. 

The response rate will depend on the 
size of the bus reserved, so students must 
RSVP by Friday, October 31, to Mark 
Conrad, Coordinator of Career Services, 



at 676-6591, extension 1373, or at 
mconrad@clarion.edu. In addition, 
sign up sheets are available now at 
the Learning Support Center, at the 
Student Affairs office, and at the Ca- 
reer Services Center in Montgomery 
Hall. 

For more information, contact 
Mark Conrad at the above locations. 

"I'm Not There" will be shown 
on Saturday, November 22, at 7:30 
p.m., in the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

Thanksgiving holiday begins on 
Tuesday, November 25, at 10 p.m. 
Friday classes meet in place of Tues- 
day classes on this day. 

Miscellaneous 

Yoga sessions will be held every 
Thursday, at 1 1 a.m., in the fourth 
floor lounge of Montgomery Hall. 
Classes will be instructed by Libby 
Jenkins. 

With the conclusion of renova- 
tions, yoga sessions will be held at 
the Rhoades Gymnasium. The ses- 
sions are free. 

Cardio-kickboxing sessions will 
be held every Wednesday, from 6-7 
p.m.. at the Franklin School of Kung 
Fu, 845 Buffalo St., Franklin. The 
sessions are free. 



Email the VeNt^NGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The> 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



VCi-J. 



NQV 



;lari^ 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

'■■- ' i 

^Peii-flMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 10 Monday, November 3, 2008 



Venango awarded renovation funds 



By Jaime Renwick 
Student Senate President 

Recently, Venango 
Campus Student Senate 
requested the use of Special 
Project and capital funds 
from the Clarion Student 
Association (C.S.A) to as- 
sist in refurbishing the 
fourth floor lounge in 
Montgomery Hall. This 
space is highly utilized by 
students on a regular basis, 
and often serves as a pro- 
gramming and meeting 
space. The flimiture in this 
area is extremely worn, 
unsightly, and not condu- 
cive to group meetings, 
study sessions, or any type 
of function that requires 
table or workspace. 

On October 7, Emily 



Aubele, Student Senate 
advisor and director of Stu- 
dent Affairs, and I pre- 
sented the proposal at the 
C.S.A. Board of Directors 
meeting and were granted 
approval for the money. 
Our goal for this project is 
to make the area a more 
student friendly, efficient 
workspace for many uses. 
The renovation is set to 
begin in the spring. This is 
a very exciting project and 
we look forward to the 
completion. 

I would also like to 
take this opportunity to 
introduce our Student Sen- 
ate and it's members. Stu- 
dent Senate is the govern- 
ing body of Venango Cam- 
pus. We manage the distri- 
bution allocation of student 



activity fees. It is a great 
way to interact with other 
students, faculty and staff, 
and the general community. 
We are always looking for 
ways to better the campus 
and our community. We are 
here for YOU! If you have 
any issues you would like 
to discuss, please feel free 
to contact any one of our 
members and we will do 
our best to get it resolved! 
We are dedicated to create 
the best possible college 
experience for our students. 
Our members include: 
myself. President Jaime 
Renwick (sjsrenwick 

@clarion.edu). I am a 
Criminal Justice major and, 
in the spring, I will be a 

See FUNDS on page 7 



Vote in the 2008 election on Nov. 4 



November 

The 2008 presidential 
election will take place on 
Tuesday, November 4. Get 
out and vote! 

On Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 4, at 9 p.m.. Clarion 
University-Venango Cam- 
pus will host Up All Night 



- Election 2008 to view the 
election process unfold as 
the next president of the 
United States is voted into 
office. It is free and open to 
the public. 

There will be free 
food, games and activities, 
door prizes, and more. 

For more information. 



contact Emily Aubele at 
676-6591, extension 1269, 
or at eaubele@clarion.edu. 

A Vegetarian Cooking 
Class will be offered Tues- 
day, November 4, from 5- 
7:30 p.m., in the commu- 

See EVENTS on page 7 



Inside this issue: 


Funding 
Awarded 


1 


Events 


1-8 


Job Openings 


2 


Transitions 

Bus TOUR 


2 


Venango 
Update 


3 


State News 


4 


National 
News 


4 


World News 


S 


PTK News 


6 



PAGI: 2 



Venango Voice 



Part time positions are available for students 



A medical administrative 
clerk is needed immediately 
for a part-time (37.5 hours/ 
week) position. This person 
will be responsible for ac- 
counts receivable posting, 
medical insurance verifica- 
tions, medical pre- 
authorization verifications, 
new patient information veri- 
fication, discharge of patient 
charts, medical record main- 
tenance and retrieval of re- 
cords, and other miscellane- 
ous office responsibilities 
that may be requested. 



The US Census Bureau 
is recruiting for the follow- 
ing short-term positions: 
Clerk, Administrative Assis- 
tant, Office Operations Su- 
pervisor, Enumerator 
(Census Lister/Taker), Crew 
Leader Assistant (CLA), 
Crew Leader, Recruiting 
Assistant, and Field Opera- 
tions Supervisor. 

Candidates will use 
government provided laptop 
computers. Field Represen- 
tatives will interview local 



respondents for a number 
of statistical surveys. 

Apply immediately for 
these important part-lime 
positions. 

Candidates must be 
United States citizens, at 
least 18 years old, able to 
pass a 30 minute test, have 
a valid driver's license, use 
of an insured vehicle, a 
private telephone line and 
be available during day, 
evening and weekend 
hours. 

Testing will be con- 



ducted at the Oil Region PA 
CareerLink. Contact Career- 
Link for web address to a 
practice test site. 

For more information 
about this position, access 
www.cwds.state.pa.us with 
an updated resume. 

For resume preparation 
assistance or for more infor- 
mation about job placement, 
contact Coordinator of Ca- 
reer Services Mark Conrad 
at mconrad(«jclarion.edu or 
by phone at 676-6591, ex- 
tension 1373. 



Transitions Bus Tour is slated for November 21 



Career Services will sponsor the 
Transitions Bus Tour on Friday, No- 
vember 2 1 . 

The trip is for those students who 
plan to transition from Venango Cam- 
pus to Clarion University's main cam- 
pus to complete their degree within the 
next two years. 

Students who experience anxiety 
about the transition will have their 
worries eased, according to Coordina- 
tor of Career Services Mark Conrad, 
as questions regarding transfer credits, 



parking, housing, changing majors, and 
many other topics will be covered. 

The free trip will provide students 
a Q&A session with Clarion University 
admissions representative Bill Bailey, a 
tour of main campus, and a free lunch 
courtesy of Career Services at Chart- 
wells. 

The bus will leave the upper park- 
ing lot of Venango Campus at approxi- 
mately 9 a.m. and return at approxi- 
mately 4:30 pm. 

The response rate will depend on 



the size of the bus reserved, so students 
should RSVP as soon as possible, to 
Mark Conrad, Coordinator of Career 
Services, at 676-6591, extension 1373, 
or at mconrad@clarion.edu. 

In addition, sign up sheets are 
available now at the Learning Support 
Center in Montgomery Hall, at the Stu- 
dent Affairs office in Rhoades Center, 
and at the Career Services Center in 
Montgomery Hall. 

For more information, contact 
Mark Conrad at the above locafions. 



Vjjnango Voiesz 

Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591, Ext. 1271 Email; vvoice@clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp Lola Deets 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania Venango Campus and the sunounding communities The 
Voice is pubhshed most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the detemiination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Subinissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonyinous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a inember of the Voice staff They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire seinester will he granted a co-curricular 



Volume 41, Issue 10 



Page 3 



Venango Campus updates include training sessions 



Clarion University Computing Ser- 
vices will offer 2007 Microsoft Office 
training at Venango Campus beginning 
in November. Classes will be available 
for both introductory and advanced- 
level programs. Introductory sessions 
will cover the fundamentals, while the 
advanced sessions will cover more 
complex features. 

The following is a list of the train- 
ing schedule: Word I: Tuesday, No- 
vember 1 1 ; Word II: Thursday, Novem- 
ber 13; Excel I: Tuesday, November 18; 
and Excel II: Thursday, November 20. 

Employees who are interested in 
the training are asked to contact the 
Help Desk at helpdesk@clarion.edu or 
at extension 2640. Be sure to indicate 
which session(s) you will be taking. 
You will receive an email confirmation 
with additional details. All classes will 
be held in the Montgomery Hall Com- 
puter Lab, Room 311, 9:00 a.m. to 
12:00 p.m. 

Student Evaluations will begin on 
Monday, November 3, and will con- 
tinue through Friday, November 14. As 
in the past, log-in forms will be avail- 
able in the Frame Administrative Office 
and Suhr Library for faculty who will 
be completing evaluations after 6 p.m. 
Nursing packets will be available in the 
School of Nursing and Allied Health 
Office; all others may be picked up in 
the Administrative Office. Teachers are 
asked to secure their own administrator, 
who must be a faculty member. How- 
ever, if this is a problem, please contact 
Cindy Busch for assistance. 

Student Affairs will host an "Into 
the Wee Hours" Open House following 
the close of the election polls on Tues- 
day, November 4, beginning at 9 p.m. 
Faculty, staff, students and guests are 
invited to come to Rhoades lounge to 
enjoy free food, participate in games 



and other activities, and register to win 
a door prize. Come and join in the ex- 
citement of watching the presidential 
election results unfold. For more infor- 
mation, you may contact Emily Aubele, 
Director of Student Affairs, at exten- 
sion 1270. 

The Venango Campus Office of 
Admissions and Financial Aid will hold 
an open house on Saturday, November 
8, fi-om 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Rhoades 
lounge. Representatives will be avail- 
able to talk with the prospective stu- 
dents and guests about the various pro- 
grams offered at Venango. Latrobe 
Bamitz will also be on hand to address 
questions on financial aid and the ad- 
mission process. To register for the 
open house, please contact Theresa 
Nestor at extension 1211. 

Students interested in the First En- 
ergy program or other applied technol- 
ogy programs are invited to attend an 
open house on Thursday, November 13, 
from 6-8 p.m. in the Rhoades lounge. 
Bill Hallock, chairperson of applied 
Ttechnology, will address the group. 
Please contact department secretary, 
Cortney Huber, at extension 1275, for 
additional information or to register for 
the open house. 

On Thursday, November 20, Clar- 
ion University- Venango Campus will 
hold its aimual Harvey Center Lecture 
Day. Last year, we expanded the pro- 
grarmning to include programs for mid- 
dle school and high school students in 
the morning and university students in 
the afternoon, as well as the evening 
lecture. This year's programs will be of 
interest to a wide range of students, 
faculty, and staff, and we hope that you 
will encourage student attendance, per- 
haps offering extra credit where appro- 
priate, for either or both programs. 



Our featured speaker is Steve 
Weinberg, University of Missouri pro- 
fessor of journalism and noted author, 
whose most recent book is Taking on 
the Trust: The Epic Battle of Ida Tar- 
bell and John D. Rockefeller. This 
nationally-acclaimed account of Ida 
Tarbell's successful "muckraking" 
efforts that led to the breakup of Stan- 
dard Oil was reviewed by The Wall 
Street Journal: "...his deeply re- 
searched account is scrupulously even- 
handed, fair to both the man who was 
by far the nation's richest tycoon and 
the woman who was its most famous 
reporter." 

The program for Clarion Univer- 
sity students, "Telling History as It 
Was, Not as You Think It Should Be," 
will be presented at 3 p.m., at the 
Rhoades Center. The lecture addresses 
the challenges of judging subjects by 
the standards of their own lifetimes 
rather than that of the writer. Trans- 
portation to and from Venango Cam- 
pus can be arranged 

The evening lecture, "Becoming 
Rich and Famous, Then Watching 
Your Back," will be presented at 7 
p.m., at Rhoades Center. This is a 
topic that is especially timely in an age 
when celebrities and political figures 
face unprecedented media scrutiny. 
The presentation is free and open to 
the public. A dessert reception will 
follow. 

For more information, please call 
Jerri Gent at 1215 or email 
j gent@c 1 arion . edu . 

The next scheduled meeting of the 
Venango Forum is Friday, November 
21. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m., 
in Montgomery Hall, Room 404. Mr. 
Joseph Croskey from the Clarion Uni- 
versity Academic Enrichment Depart- 
ment will be the guest speaker. Please 
plan to attend. 



L 



-mail the Venango yo'icG with uour ideas at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Pacih 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Real Halloween back for long traumatized Pa. town 



OIL CITY, Pa. (AP) For 16 years, 
real horror overshadowed the make- 
believe terror of Halloween in this 
Pennsylvania town, where trick-or- 
treating after dark was banned after an 
1 1 -year-old girl was abducted off the 
street and murdered. 

But on Friday, pint-sized witches, 
princesses and vampires will once 
again be shuffling from house to house 
at night, thanks to a petition drive by a 
fifth-grader. 

Elizabeth Roess gathered signa- 
mres, wrote an essay outlining her 
argument, and persuaded City Council 
two months ago to bring back night- 
tmie trie k-or- treating. 

"I was a little scared that hap- 
pened," Elizabeth said of the 1992 
slaying of Shauna Howe, who was 
kidnapped while walking home from a 
pre-Halloween party. But she added: 
"I did this and now I'm so happy." 

For weeks now, children and their 
parents in this struggling, working- 
class town of 10,000 about 80 miles 
north of Pittsburgh have been eagerly 
anticipating Halloween's return, 
though not without some trepidation. 

Shannon Goodman got a tether to 
make sure her 2-year-old daughter, 
who will dress as a witch, doesn't wan- 
der off while they go door to door. 
"It's going to be a lot of fiin, but every 
parent who cares about their kid 



should have that fear," she said. 

Fifteen-year-old Braden Craig 
said: "I have a gut- wrenching feeling 
something bad's going to happen." 

The police department plans to 
have seven officers on duty Friday 
night, or about twice the usual num- 
ber, in addition to four school security 
guards and all 10 of the town's cross- 
ing guards. 

"If this all goes well, that's great, 
that's fantastic. I long for those days, 
too. But the world has changed," said 
Police Chief Robert Wenner, a father 
of five who was a patrolman when the 
murder occurred. 

The local radio station has been 
running a public service announce- 
ment by Wenner urging parents to 
accompany their children, examine 
any candy before it is eaten and make 
sure kids wear reflective material. 

The police chief said Shauna's 
murder shattered the "Mayberry atti- 
tude" many people in Oil City had 
toward their hometown. 

Shauna, whose family no longer 
lives in the area, was abducted on Oct. 
27. Three days later, her battered body 
was found under a railroad trestle 
eight miles away. 

With the town gripped by fear that 
a child killer was on the loose, trick- 
or-treating the next day was held in 
daylight for the first time. Police 



watched from helicopters as parents 
led their children from house to house 
along quiet streets. 

Residents also began locking their 
doors and driving their children to 
school. And every year afterward, the 
City Council voted to allow trick-or- 
treating in the afternoon only, a move 
duplicated around the same time by 
many other U.S. cities and towns wor- 
ried about children's safety. 

The Oil City murder remained 
unsolved until a witness came forward 
four years ago and police turned to 
DNA evidence. Two brothers were 
arrested and convicted of murder and 
sexual assault. A third man pleaded 
guilty to murder. 

Hoping to move Halloween back 
to night hours, Elizabeth, her mother, 
grandmother and family friends gath- 
ered 175 signatures. The 10-year-old 
also wrote a paper in which she made 
her case. Among her reasons: Hallow- 
een decorations are best appreciated at 
night, and many people aren't home 
during the day to give out candy. 
The council vote was unanimous. 
Elizabeth plans on dressing up as a 
Goth princess bride. 

"Unfortunately, Shauna's tragedy 
seemed to define Oil City for many 
years," Oil City blogger John Noel 
Bartlett wrote on his Web site. "It's 
time to move on." 



National 



US dollar makes comeback, 'bucking' world downturn 



us dollar makes comeback, 'bucking' 
world downturn 

By STEVENSON JACOBS 

AP Business Writer 

NEW YORK (AP) The stock market 
is in shambles, credit markets are 
squeezed and corporate earnings are 
cratering. But one piece of the man- 
gled U.S. economy is making an im- 



probable comeback: The once-almighty 
dollar. 

As the financial meltdown clobbers 
world economies from South America to 
Asia, investors desperate for safe assets 
are plowing money into the battered 
buck — helping it snap a six-year slide 
and reclaim its long-held status as a sta- 
ble asset during rough times. 

"The dollar has become the safe- 



haven play," said Kathy Lien, director 
of currency research at Global Forex 
Trading in New York. "It's a pretty 
monumental move we're seeing." 

Trouble is, a resurrected green- 
back may not be a good thing. 

While a stronger dollar makes 
vacations overseas and commodities 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



Volume 41, Issue 10 



Pagl 5 



World 



Cuba expects new US president to lift embargo 



UNITED NATIONS (AP) Cuba's 
foreign minister says his government 
expects the next U.S. president to 
respond to overwhelming interna- 
tional demand and lift the 47-year- 
old U.S. trade embargo against Cuba. 

After the U.N. General Assem- 
bly supported repeal of the economic 
and commercial embargo by its high- 
est margin ever — 185 to 3 with 2 
abstentions — on Wednesday, Felipe 
Perez Roque said in an interview that 
the winner of the Nov. 4 election 
should heed the message. 

"We expect that the new presi- 
dent will change the policy toward 
Cuba after nearly 50 years," he told 
the Associated Press. 

The United States has no diplo- 
matic relations with Cuba, lists the 
country as a state sponsor of terror 
and has long sought to isolate it 
through travel restrictions and a trade 
embargo. 

The embargo, imposed in 1962, 
has been tightened during President 
Bush's two terms. 

Democratic presidential nominee 



Barack Obama has said he would be 
willing to meet with Cuban leader Raul 
Castro without preconditions and would 
ease restrictions on family related travel 
and on money Cuban-Americans want 
to send to their families in Cuba. 

Republican nominee John McCain 
has called the offer to meet "the wrong 
signal," but also has said he favors eas- 
ing restrictions on Cuba once the 
United States is "confident that the tran- 
sition to a free and open democracy is 
being made." 

Perez Roque said the vote in the 
192-member General Assembly was "a 
clear signal of the feeling of the inter- 
national community in favor of the nor- 
malization of the relations between the 
United States and Cuba, and in favor of 
the lifting of the embargo." 

Following the U.S. election, he 
said, "we hope for the full normaliza- 
tion in the relations between Cuba and 
the United States." 

He said Cuba proposed to the Bush 
administration acting together against 
drug trafficking, human smuggling and 
illegal immigration but this proved im- 



possible "because the current govern- 
ment is opposed and its policy to- 
wards Cuba is a change of regime." 

He said Cuban President Raul 
Castro has said on several occasions 
"that we are ready to begin conversa- 
tion between both parties, of course 
based on respect, sovereignty and the 
right of each country to follow its 
own way." 

In his speech to the General As- 
sembly, the 43-year-old Cuban min- 
ister said the U.S. embargo is older 
than "everyone in my generation." 

"Seven out of every 10 Cubans 
have spent their entire lives under 
this irrational and useless policy 
which attempts, with no success, to 
bring our people to their knees," 
Perez Roque said. 

The new president "should de- 
cide whether he will admit that the 
blockade is a failed policy that ... 
causes greater isolation and discredit- 
ing of his country" or whether the 
United States will continue "to try to 
defeat the Cuban people through hun- 
ger and disease," he said. 



NATIONAL: Dollar's recovery considered 'stunning' 



Continued from page 4 

like oil cheaper for Americans, it also 
makes U.S. e.xports more expensive. 
That could deepen the U.S. downturn 
by hurting companies from Boeing 
Co. to Caterpillar Inc. and Coca-Cola 
Co. that get an increasingly big 
chunk of their earnings from over- 
seas. 

Still, the dollar's recovery is 
stuiming for a currency that until 
recently was considered the dog 
among its main rivals. After reigning 
supreme as the world's dominant re- 
serve currency for decades, the dollar 
began a steep decline in 2002, buck- 
ling under the weight of costly wars 
in Iraq and Afghanistan and an econ- 
omy with an S800 billion armual 



trade deficit. 

Falling U.S. interest rates this year 
sped up the dollar's decline until it took 
$1.60 to buy one euro at one point this 
summer. Shortly after the euro was 
introduced in January 2002, it took only 
88 cents to buy one euro. 

Now, suddenly, the buck looks safe 
by comparison. The economic pain 
spawned by the U.S. subprime mess has 
now crossed the Atlantic, roiling stock 
markets in Britain, France and Ger- 
many and punishing the euro and the 
pound. 

The 15-nation euro this week fell 
to its lowest level against the dollar 
since April 2006 while the pound at one 
point last week lost a staggering 8 cents 
against the dollar — the biggest intra- 
day move since exchange rates became 



freely floated in 197 1 . 

The euro traded at $1.2852 in 
New York late Wednesday, while the 
British pound traded at $1.6314. 

Meanwhile, once-booming 

emerging economies are also slow- 
ing, causing big hedge funds and 
individual investors to fimnel vast 
sums of money out of coimtries like 
Brazil, India and China and into the 
relatively low-risk dollar. 

The stampede into the greenback 
reflects a "crisis of confidence," Lien 
said. While the U.S. economy by no 
means is showing signs of a recov- 
ery. Lien said other countries are 
"just beginning to feel the magnitude 
of the global slowdown, whereas the 
U.S. is maybe three-quarters of the 
way through." 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



Phi Theta Kappa has ongoing fundraisers, events 



Phi Theta Kappa held its 
fall induction on Monday, 
October 20. Five new mem- 
bers were welcomed to the 
group: Melinda Eckman, 
Respiratory Care; John 
Hamm, Applied Technology; 
Charity Hansford, ASN; 
James Langharst, Criminal 
Justice; and Josh McBride, 
Applied Technology. Con- 
gratulations to you all and 
welcome! 

Phi Theta Kappa would 
like to send our sincerest 
"Thank You" to Dr. Joan 
Huber for facilitating the first 
Honor's Seminar. We thank 
her for taking her personal 
time to help make our event a 
success! 

PTK will hold an offi- 
cer's meeting on November 3 
at 4:30 p.m., in the meeting 
room in Rhoades. The next 
general meeting will be held 
on November 17 at 4:30 p.m., 
in Rhoades. 



Phi Theta Kappa is cur- 
rently sponsoring a Soy Can- 
dle sale. Candles are $6 each. 

The following scents are 
available: Candy Apple, Spa, 
Red Delicious Apple, Wild 
Cherry, Passionate Kisses, 
Love Spell, Spiritual Awak- 
ening, Gardenia, Lavender 
Aromatherapy, Lavender 

Silk, German Chocolate 
Cake, Cool Water, Mango 
Mandarin, Sexy as Sin, Sheer 
Seduction, Desire, Black- 
berry Brulee, Scandalous. 
Strawberries and Cream, 
Cherry Crumb Pie, Sweet 
Cinnamon Pumpkin, Citro- 
nella. Whipped Pumpkin Pie, 
Cotton Blossom, Sun Rip- 
ened Raspberry, and Lilac. 

Candles can be bought 
from the following PTK 
members: Jaime Renwick, 
Charity Barger, Beth Austin, 
Daniele Merryman, Charity 
Hansford, Patti Shontz, Ester 
Estes, Deb Carbaugh, 



Melinda Eckman, and Lori 
Secor. 

Phi Theta Kappa mem- 
bers are currently selling 
pies. These pies are the 
same that ALO has sold in 
the past. 

PTK has been chosen to 
host next year's PA Leader- 
ship Convention, and they 
are working hard to raise 
funds for this event. The pie 
sale will run through Thurs- 
day, November 6. The deliv- 
ery date is Thursday, No- 
vember 20. 

The following pies are 
$7.50 each and will arrive 
frozen: Apple, Apple Cara- 
mel Walnut, Apple Crisp, 
Blackberry, Cherry, Peach, 
Peach Praline, Pecan, Pine- 
apple Upside Down, Pump- 
kin, and Strawberry. Straw- 
berry Rhubarb and Very 
Berry are also available for 
purchase. 

The following Ready- 



to-Serve pies are 10 
inches round and are 
$7.50 each: Coconut Me- 
ringue, Lemon Meringue, 
Banana Cream, Chocolate 
Cream, and Brownie Va- 
nilla Cream. 

Other goodies avail- 
able for purchase include: 
Pumpkin Rolls - $6.00 
each; and Apple Dump- 
lings (4 per package) - 
$6.00 each. 

Please see any of the 
PTK officers and mem- 
bers listed below: Patti 
Shontz, Lori Secor, Char- 
ity Barger, Jaime Ren- 
wick, Beth Austin, Esther 
Estes, Daniele Merryman, 
Charity Hansford, John 
Hamm, Tom Meier, Deb 
Carbaugh, or Melinda 
Eckman. 

For more informa- 
tion, contact Patti Shontz 
at s_pashontz 

(« clarion.edu. 



Two PTK leaders presented at state convention 



Patti Shontz, president of 
Clarion University-Venango 
Campus' Alpha Kappa Delta 
Chapter of the international 
honor society Phi Theta 
Kappa (PTK), and Charity 
Barger, co-vice president of 
membership, recently pre- 
sented a paper entitled 
"What Works for Us: Col- 
laboration Within Our Com- 
munity" at the 2008 Pennsyl- 
vania Phi Theta Kappa Lead- 
ership Convention held at 
Delaware County Commu- 



nity College in Media, Penn- 
sylvania. 

The event was attended by 
Phi Theta Kappa members 
from chapters in Pennsylvania, 
the Division I International 
Vice President, and state PTK 
presidents from Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, Delaware and 
Maryland, as well as the Mid- 
dle States Regional PTK Presi- 
dent and Coordinator. 

The Venango Campus- 
based chapter has been se- 
lected as the site of the 2009 



state-wide leadership confer- 
ence. 

Phi Theta Kappa is the 
largest honor society in 
American higher education, 
with more than 1.5 million 
members and 1,200 chapters 
located in the United States, 
U.S. territories, Canada, Ger- 
many, and Japan. 

Its mission is to recog- 
nize and encourage the aca- 
demic achievement of two- 
year college students and to 
provide opportunities for 



individual growth and de- 
velopment through partici- 
pation in honors, leader- 
ship, service, and fellow- 
ship programming. 

The Phi Theta Kappa 
chapter at Clarion Univer- 
sity-Venango Campus 
provides an intellectual 
climate for exchange of 
ideas and information, for 
lively fellowship for schol- 
ars, and for stimulation of 
interest in continuing aca- 
d.emic excellence. 



Volume 41, Issue 10 



Pac;i; 7 




Two Clarion University- 
Venango Campus Phi Theta Kappa 
leaders presented a paper titled 
"What Works for Us: Collaboration 
Within Our Community" at the 2008 
Pennsylvania Phi Theta Kappa 
Leadership Convention held in Me- 
dia, Pa. 

Pictured are PTK President 
Patti Shontz (second from left) and 
Co-Vice President of Membership 
Charity Barger (far right) with in- 
ternational and state Phi Theta 
Kappa leaders. 

See the full story on page 6 of 
this issue. 



EVENTS: Bloodmobile to visit campus on Nov. 6 



Continued from page 1 

nity room of the Student Apartment 
Complex. 

Phi Theta Kappa will sponsor the 
Central Blood Bank Bloodmobile on 
Thursday, November 6, from 1 1 a.m. to 



4 p.m., in Rhoades Gymnasium. 

To donate, proper identification is 
required. Identification may include a 
Central Blood Bank or military ID, 
driver's license, or employee badge 
with picture and full name, as well as a 
birth certificate along with a picture ID 
that includes the donor's frill name. 



For more information, contact 
Elizabeth Austin at 814-673-3848 or 
s_edaustin@clarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa will meet on 
Thursday, November 6, from 1 1 a.m. 

See EVENTS on page 8 



FUNDS: Students can contact Senate with concerns 



Continued from page 1 

sophomore. Vice President Shelly 
Weaver (s_slweaver 1 @clarion.edu) is 
a Criminal Justice/Sociology double 
major and is a junior this year. Mark 
Suavely (s_mesnavely@clarion.edu), 
a sophomore criminal justice major 
and Kiesha Hunsberger (skrhunsberg 
@clarion.edu), a freshman paralegal 
major are the secretaries (VPs). Treas- 
urer Jen Carr (sJlcarrl@clarion.edu) 
is a nursing major and is a freshman 
this year. And last, but certainly not 
least, is our very awesome advisor, 
Emily Aubele (eaubele@clarion.edu). 
Again, if you need us for anything, 
feel free to come to us personally or 



send an e-mail and we will work on the 
situation to get it resolved. If anyone is 
interested in joining Student Senate now 
or in the friture, please contact any one 
of our members. 

Don't miss our upcoming event 
'Celebrate the Seasons' in Rhoades Cen- 
ter on December 3, from 11 a.m. to 1 
p.m. This event is sponsored by Student 
Senate to recognize the various religious 
and cultural traditions celebrated during 
the winter season. There will be a few 
different styles of food for you to try and 
information for you to learn about the 
different cultures. 

Student Senate has also imple- 
mented a food committee amongst our 
members. This committee will work 



with CrossRhoades Cafe to receive 
better food selection, better prices, etc. 
for our students. This is an on-goLag 
effort on our behalf and we will con- 
tinue to work on this. We are also in 
the preliminary stages of discussing 
the feasibility of having health ser- 
vices available to students on our cam- 
pus. These services would include, but 
not limited to, a place for students to 
receive influenza shots, receive basic 
services for students who may live out 
of town and cannot see their regular 
doctor, and, more importantly, a place 
where students may receive services if 
they are injured on campus! 



PAG1-: 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Wacongo Dance Company to perform 



Continued from J)«igf 7 

to 12:30 p.m., in room 307 of Mont- 
gomery Hall. For more information, 
contact Patti Shontz at 
sj)ashontz@clarion.edu or Charity 
Barger at sclbarger@clarion.edu. 

The Wacongo Dance Company 
will perform on Friday, November 7, 
at 7:30 p.m., in Rhoades Center. The 
Wacongo Dance Company is a tradi- 
tional ensemble of master drummers, 
musicians, and dancers, residents of 
the Democratic Republic of Congo 
who perform ancestral songs and 
dances of Central Africa. 

Cellofourte will perform on Satur- 
day, November 8, at 7:30 p.m., at the 
Latonia Theatre in Oil City. The group 
is comprised of four cellists who 
"create a musically diverse experience 
by boldly defying the boundaries of 
classical music and rock." 

"Into the Wild" will be shown on 
Saturday, November 15, at 7:30 p.m., 
in the Rhoades Auditorium, in con- 
junction with the Independent Film 
Series. 

The Satellite Seminar Series will 
feature Dr. Raquel Pinderhughes in a 
DVD presentation of "Pathways out of 
Poverty tlirough Green Collar Jobs: 
The Role of Scholarship in Improving 
Quality of Life for Urban Residents" 



on Monday, November 17, at 6:30 p.m., 
at the Rhoades Auditorium. 

Career Services will sponsor the 
Transitions Bus Tour on Friday, Novem- 
ber 2 1 . The trip is for those students who 
plan to transition from Venango Campus 
to Clarion University's main campus. The 
bus will leave the upper parking lot of 
Venango Campus at approximately 9 a.m. 
and return at approximately 4:30 pm. 

The free trip will provide students a 
Q&A session with Clarion University 
admissions representative Bill Bailey, a 
tour of main campus, and a free lunch. 

The response rate will depend on the 
size of the bus reserved, so students must 
RSVP by Friday, October 31, to Mark 
Conrad, Coordinator of Career Services, 
at 676-6591, extension 1373, or at mcon- 
rad@clarion.edu. In addition, sign up 
sheets are available now at the Learning 
Support Center, at the Student Affairs 
office, and at the Career Services Center 
in Montgomery Hall. 

For more information, contact Mark 
Conrad at the above locations. 

"I'm Not There" will be shown on 
Saturday, November 22, at 7:30 p.m., in 
the Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

Thanksgiving holiday begins on 
Tuesday, November 25, at 10 p.m. Friday 
classes meet in place of Tuesday classes 
on this day. 



December 

Thanksgiving break ends at 8 
a.m., on Monday, December 1 . 

Student Senate will sponsor 
Celebrate the Seasons on Wednes- 
day, December 3, from 1 1 a.m. to 1 
p.m., at Rhoades Center. The event 
will recognize various religious and 
cultural traditions celebrated during 
the winter season. 

"The Darjeeling Limited" will be 
the final film shown in the Independ- 
ent Film Series on Saturday, Decem- 
ber 6, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades Audi- 
torium. 

For more infomiation, contact 
Emily Aubele at 

eaubele@clarion.edu. 

Classes for the fall 2008 semes- 
ter end on Friday, December 5. The 
Final Exam Period will begin Mon- 
day, December 8 and end on Friday, 
December 12. Winter Commence- 
ment will take place on Saturday, 
December 13, in Clarion. 

Miscellaneous 

Yoga sessions will be held every 
Thursday, at 1 1 a.m., in the fourth 
floor lounge of Montgomery Hall. 
Classes will be instructed by Libby 
Jenkins. With the conclusion of reno- 
vations, yoga sessions will be held at 
the Rhoades Gymnasium. The ses- 
sions are free. 



Email the VeN-flNGo Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



NOV 



Your Campus, Your Paphr, Your Voice 

VeiifiMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 1 1 



Monday, November 10, 2008 



Alumni Chapter plans activities 



The Venango Campus 
Alumni Chapter has sched- 
uled two networking events 
for November. 

An informal alumni 
networking lunch will be 
held on Wednesday, No- 
vember 19, from noon until 
1:30 p.m. in the Robert W. 
Rhoades Center. The lunch 
will be held on the 40th 
anniversary of Phi Theta 
Kappa Founder's Day, 
when the campus" chapter 
of the international honor 
society will hold a sale of 



scented soy candles in the 
center from 10 a.m. to 2:30 
p.m. 

The chapter will also 
sponsor refreshments dur- 
ing a faculty-led discussion 
following the film "Into the 
Wild," which will be shown 
in Rhoades Center at 7:30 
p.m. on Saturday, Novem- 
ber 15. 

The film is part of the 
campus' Fall Independent 
Film Series and is free and 
open to the public. 

The chapter welcomes 



new members and is open 
to anyone who has attended 
classes at the Venango 
Campus or is interested in 
getting together to socialize 
and have fun while advo- 
cating for the campus and 
its students in the commu- 
nity and beyond. There is 
no charge to belong to the 
group. 

For more information 
contact Jerri Gent, director 
of Marketing and Univer- 
sity Relations, at 676-6591, 
extension 1215. 



Event set for electric utility students 



November 

Veterans' Day is Tues- 
day, November 1 1 . 

An Open House for 
students interested in the 
Elecfric Utility Technology 
concenfration of the Asso- 
ciate of Applied Science in 
Industrial Technology de- 
gree will be held Thursday, 
November 13, at 6 p.m., in 
the Rhoades Center. The 
program is free and open to 
all interested persons. Stu- 
dents do not need to pre- 
register. 

For more information 



about the open house or the 
Applied Technology pro- 
grams, contact Professor 
Bill Hallock at 814-676- 
6591, extension 1307, or 
whallock@clarion.edu. 

"Into the Wild" will be 
shown on Saturday, No- 
vember 15, at 7:30 p.m., in 
the Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with the Inde- 
pendent Film Series. 

The Satellite Seminar 
Series will feature Dr. 
Raquel Pinderhughes in a 
DVD presentation of 



"Pathways out of Poverty 
through Green Collar Jobs: 
The Role of Scholarship in 
Improving Quality of Life 
for Urban Residents" on 
Monday, November 17, at 
6:30 p.m., at the Rhoades 
Auditorium. 

Phi Theta Kappa will 
hold its Founder's Day Soy 
Candle Sale on Wednes- 
day, November 1 9, from 1 
a.m. to 2:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Center. The sale 
is in recognition of PTK's 

See EVENTS on page 8 



Inside this issue: 


Alumni Events 


1 


Entnts 


1-8 


Trash Talk 


2 


Job Openings 


3 


Transitions 
Bus Tour 


3 


State News 


4 


National News 


4 


World News 


S 


Electric Util- 
ity Open House 


6 


Now Ya Know! 


6 


Course 
Opening 


7 


Venango 
Growing 


7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Geothermal energy is clean, renewable source 

HRB^K all 



Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 



This week I continue my 
quest to find out more about 
renewable energy sources. 
Geothermal energy, simply, 
is a clean, renewable source 
of energy that uses heat from 
within the earth. This is an 
inexhaustible flow of heat 
that can be used for electric- 
ity production, direct use, 
and home heating. 

Geothermal energy can 



be used directly in the form 
of hot water from springs or 
reservoirs near the earth's 
surface by piping it directly 
into buildings and industries 
for heat. This is a successful 
heating system, as shown in 
Reykjavik, Iceland, where 
95 percent of the buildings 
are heated by geothermal 
energy. 

To produce electricity, 
wells are drilled into a reser- 
voir of hot water or steam, 
which lies far below the 
groundwater table. The liq- 
uid is brought to the surface 
and converted into electric- 
ity at a power plant. Geo- 
thermal electric power 
plants, currently in use in 
seven states and in over 20 
countries, produce power 
free from emissions and 
pollution. Amazingly, this is 
not a new technology; the 
first geothermal power plant 
was tested in 1904 in Italy. 
The first in the United States 
was made in 1922 at The 



Geysers Resort Hotel. The 
power plant provided elec- 
tricity to the entire resort, 
but faltered because it was 
not competitive with other 
forms of energy produc- 
tion. The United States 
currently produces more 
geothermal electricity than 
any other country. Cur- 
rently, about six million 
people in the U.S. get their 
household energy through 
geothermal technology. 
About three million people 
get it from geothermal 
power plants. The other 
three million use geother- 
mal heat pumps to provide 
heating and cooling. 

Using geothermal en- 
ergy to provide heating and 
cooling for a house really 
is quite amazing. To cool a 
space, heat is pumped out 
and dissipated into the 
earth; for heating, that heat 
is simply pumped back into 
the space. Able to be im- 
plemented anywhere on 



earth, this is one of the most 
efficient heating and cooling 
systems in existence. 

Curious about this geo- 
thermal pump? I visited 
www.geoexchange.org and 
discovered there are con- 
tractors in western Pennsyl- 
vania that install the system 
- one in Saxonburg, near 
Pittsburgh. 

While it is quite costly 
to drill, when the system is 
added to an existing home, it 
"saves enough in utility bills 
that the investment can be 
recouped in two to ten years 
(consumerenergycenter. 
org)." 

Homeowner incentives 
are available as well; details 
can be found at 
www.dsireusa.org. 

Reference material for 
this article can be found at: 
www.geo-energy.org, 
www.answers.com/topic/ 
geothermal-power, and 
www. consumerenergycenter 



I -mail the y enangp \/o\c& with uour ideas at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Venango Voiefj 

Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice'rtclarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Sma\ da Lori Secor Maria Harp Lola Deets 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The 
Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenit) : the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation Publication is not guaranteed 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff Thev should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes- 
Only students who fultlll their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



\'OLUME 41, Issue U 



Page 3 



Two positions are open to soon-to-be graduates 



Graduating in December? Your 
answer to a good job may be in tiiis 
opening. Include a quality cover letter 
with your resume, noting you will be 
completing your degree so the inter- 
viewer is aware of your pending ac- 
complishment. 

A full-time Administrative Assis- 
tant position with the Titusville Area 
Chamber of Commerce is available. 
The position requires an energetic 
"people-person" with excellent commu- 
nication skills, knowledge of Quick- 
Books Pro 2008, Word and Excel. Sub- 
stantial bookkeeping and secretarial 
responsibilities are to be expected. Send 
resume and cover letter by mail or 
email to: Executive Director, Titusville 
Area Chamber of Commerce, 
202 W. Central Ave., Titusville, PA 
16354, or jerrys@titusvillecham 
ber.com. No phone calls, please. 

If you desire to both live and work 
in the area, then don't miss out on this 
unique opportunity. Candidates should 
apply as soon as possible due to their 
immediate need. 

A Customer Service - Clerical 



Administrative Support person is 
needed immediately. If you are plan- 
ning to graduate soon or have already 
graduated, French Creek Production 
would like to hear fi-om you. 

The company is looking for a full- 
time employee but will consider part- 
time for students who are planning on 
graduating this December. 

The potential candidate will pos- 
sess excellent customer service skills, 
as well as computer skills - Microsoft 
Office Suite experience with a thorough 
understanding of Excel and Outlook. 

A typical day would include: an- 
swering and routing incoming calls 
from potential customers, vendors, 
salespeople and general public; being 
able to proficiently multi-task would be 
an asset; entering sales orders into the 
Microsoft software program -"Great- 
Plains," as well as Excel spreadsheets; 
handling daily computerized accounting 
(AR/AP) as well as numeric keypad 
entry; while you are working, you will 
be establishing rapport with various 
customers; you will also learn and ap- 
ply product knowledge about FCP's 
diverse product line; and typing, filing. 



mailing and sorting incoming mail are 
also essential job duties. 

Pay starts at $9.00 per hour de- 
pending on skill set. The selected can- 
didate will work Monday through Fri- 
day, no weekends. Hours are 8 a.m. to 
5 p.m. - evenings are fi^ee, and an un- 
paid hour for lunch. Seven paid holi- 
days plus one floating holiday per 
calendar year will be given, and one 
week paid vacation is available after 
the first year. Attire is business casual, 
and 40 1 K benefits are coming in Janu- 
ary 2009. Medical benefits will begin 
soon as well. 

Interested applicants need to sub- 
mit an updated resume to: Brook Siar/ 
Human Resource Director, French 
Creek Production, at bsiar@velo 
city.net, or via fax: 814-437-2544. 

Visit www.frenchcreekproduc 
tions.com to learn more about this 
organization. 

For resume preparation assistance 
or for more information about job 
placement, contact Coordinator of 
Career Services Mark Conrad at 
mconrad@clarion.edu or by phone at 
676-6591, extension 1373. 



Sign up for Transitions Bus Tour to Clarion main 



Career Services will sponsor the 
Transitions Bus Tour on Friday, No- 
vember 21. 

The trip is for those students who 
plan to transition from Venango Cam- 
pus to Clarion University's main cam- 
pus to complete then- degree within the 
next two years. 

Students who experience anxiety 
about the transition will have their wor- 
ries eased, according to Coordinator of 
Career Services Mark Conrad, as ques- 
tions regarding transfer credits, parking. 



housing, changing majors, and many 
other topics will be covered. 

The free trip will provide students 
a Q&A session with Clarion University 
admissions representative Bill Bailey, a 
tour of main campus, and a free lunch 
courtesy of Career Services at Chart- 
wells. 

The bus will leave the upper park- 
mg lot of Venango Campus at approxi- 
mately 9 a.m. and return at approxi- 
mately 4:30 pm. 

The response rate will depend on 



the size of the bus reserved, so stu- 
dents should RSVP as soon as possi- 
ble, to Mark Conrad, coordinator of 
Career Services, at 676-6591, exten- 
sion 1373, oratmconrad@clarion.edu. 

In addition, sign up sheets are 
available now at the Learning Support 
Center in Montgomery Hall, at the 
Student Affairs office in Rhoades 
Center, and at the Career Services 
Center in Montgomery Hall. 

For more information, contact 
Mark Conrad at the above locations. 



Page 4 



Venango Voic 



State 



Pennsylvania was a keystone to Obama victory 



PHILADELPHIA (AP) _ Barack 
Obama built his victory in Pennsyl- 
vania along the state's populous east- 
em corridor by carrying not only 
Philadelphia, but also the city's once 
solidly Republican suburbs, the Le- 
high Valley and key counties in the 
northeastern Pennsylvania swing re- 
gion. Like any strong Democratic can- 
didate, he also won Pittsburgh. 

But there were broader undercur- 
rents that kept the state's 21 electoral 
votes beyond the reach of Republican 
nominee John McCain. 

Exit polling by The Associated 
Press found that Obama drew his 
strongest support from voters aged 1 8- 
29 and majority support from those in 
the 45-64 age bracket. He was the 
clear favorite among moderates and 
independents. He also received more 
support fi^om Republicans than 
McCain received from Democrats. 

The candidates split the white 
vote, but Obama was the overwhelm- 
ing choice among blacks and Hispan- 
ics, according to the analysis of infor- 
mation from voters interviewed as 
they left polling places. The interviews 
were conducted for The Associated 
Press by Edison Media Research and 
Mitofsky International. 

An estimated 6 million Pennsyl- 
vanians were expected to vote Tues- 
day, or 65 percent of residents old 
enoush to vote. Even before the last 



votes were counted, the turnout ap- 
peared to be more than 61 percent, the 
largest since 1968. 

At a breakfast with business lead- 
ers \Vednesday in Philadelphia, GOP 
Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter and 
Gov. Ed Rendell, a Democrat, were 
positive about Obama's ability to lead. 

"I'm optimistic that Senator 
Obama will bring some bipartisanship 
back into Washington, D.C., which is 
so sorely needed," Specter said. 

Obama's victory marked the fifth 
straight presidential election in which 
the Democrats carried Pennsylvania. 
With 99 percent of precincts reporting, 
Obama had 3.165.808 votes, or 55 
percent, and McCain had 2.568.544. 
or 44 percent. 

In races for Congress, veteran 
Republican Rep. Phil English was 
defeated by businesswoman Kathy 
Dahlkemper. an anti-abortion Democ- 
rat, but longtime Democratic Reps. 
John Murtha and Paul Kanjorski beat 
back tough re-election challenges. 

In the state government. Attorney 
General Tom Corbett. a Republican, 
and Auditor General Jack Wagner, a 
Democrat, both won second four-year 
terms. Democrat Rob McCord, a ven- 
ture capitalist and newcomer to state 
politics, won the open seat of state 
treasurer. 

Democrats now outnumber Re- 
publicans by more than 1 million in a 



state that last chose a Republican for 
president when it supported George H. 
Bush in 1988. 

In the Democratic primary in 
April, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton 
scored a nearly double-digit victory 
over Obama, a result attributed partly 
to disenchantment with Obama among 
white working-class voters. 

Obama's running mate. Sen. Joe 
Biden of Delaware, sought to help 
Obama win over those same socially 
conservative voters by playing up his 
roots as a native of Scranton in north- 
eastern Pennsylvania. 

But Obama did not help his cause 
when he said shortly before the pri- 
mary that many small-town Pennsyl- 
vanians "cling to guns or religion" 
because of they are bitter about their 
economic plight. Penns\lvania is a 
strong gun rights state with almost 1 
million licensed hunters. 

The outlook for the GOP dimmed 
as Democrats added 600.000 voters to 
their rolls over the past year and the 
Republicans lost ground. McCain 
spent nearly three times as many days 
campaigning in Pennsylvania as 
Obama. but the GOP effort was hurt 
by some missteps. A former Pennsyl- 
vania Supreme Court justice had to 
apologize for a GOP e-mail sent to 
Jewish voters that likened a vote for 
Barack Obama to ignoring warning 
signals that led to the Holocaust. 



National 



Papers sell out as readers seek Obama keepsakes 



NEW YORK (AP) Newsstands from 
Seattle to New York quickly sold out 
of Wednesday's papers declaring 
Barack Obama the nation's first black 
president as some jubilant customers 
picked up two. three or even 30 copies 
as keepsakes. 

The New York Times and the 
Chicaao Tribune in Obama's home- 



town were among papers that restarted 
their printing presses to produce hun- 
dreds of thousands of additional copies 
across the country. 

Entrepreneurs were seeking as much 
as $600 for the Times on eBay Wednes- 
day. 

"Own a piece of history," Walter 
Elliott said as he hawked 90 copies of 



The Sun from a Baltimore street cor- 
ner. 

Some papers devoted their entire 
front pages to a single photo of Obama 
— in the San Francisco Chronicle's 
case, overlaid with ".OBAMA" in 
enormous type and a snippet from his 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



\'OLUME 41, Issue 11 



Page 5 



World 



Africa, and world, celebrate Obama victory 



NAIROBI. Kenya (AP) _ For many 
across Africa and the world. Barack 
Obama's election seals America's 
reputation as a land of staggering 
opportunit>'. 

"If it were possible for me to get 
to the United States on m\' bicNcle. I 
would." said Joseph Ochieng. a 36- 
>ear-old carpenter who lives in 
Kenya's sprawling Kibera shant}- 
town. a maze of tin-roofed shacks 
and dirt roads. 

Kenxan President Mwai Kibaki 
declared a public holiday Thursday in 
the countr>' of Obama's late father, 
allowing celebrations to continue 
through the night and into a second 
day. From Europe and Asia to the 
Middle East, many expressed amaze- 
ment that the U.S. could overcome 
centuries of racial strife and elect an 
.'African-American president. 

Scenes of jubilation broke out in 
the western Ken\"a \illage of Kogelo. 
where many of Obama's Ken\'an rela- 
ti\ es still li\e. People sang, danced in 
the streets and wrapped themselves in 
U.S. flags. A group of exuberant resi- 



dents picked up the president-elect's 
half brother Malik and carried him 
through the village. 

"Unbelievable!" Malik Obama 
shouted, leading the family in chanting. 
"Obama's coming, make way!" 

"He's in!" said Rachel Ndimu. 23. a 
Ken>an business student who joined 
hundreds of others for an election party 
that began at 5 a.m. Wednesday' at the 
residence of the U.S. ambassador to 
Kenya, Michael Ranneberger. 

"I think this is awesome, and the 
whole world is backing him." Ndimu 
said as people raised glasses of cham- 
pagne. 

Obama was bom in Hawaii, where 
he spent most of his childhood raised 
b>' his white mother. He barely knew 
his father. 

But for the world's poorest conti- 
nent, the ascent of a man of African 
heritage to America's highest office was 
a source of immeasurable pride and 
hope. 

Tributes rolled in from nvo of Af- 
rica's groundbreaking leaders. Nelson 
Mandela. South Africa's first black 



president, said Obama gave the world 
the courage to dream. 

"Your victor}.- has demonstrated 
that no person anywhere in the world 
should not dare to dream of wanting 
to change the world for a better 
place." Mandela said in a letter of 
congratulations. 

Liberian President Ellen John- 
son-Sirleaf — the first woman 
elected to head an African country — 
said she did not expect to see a black 
American president in her lifetime. 

"All Afi-icans now know that if 
you persevere, all things are possi- 
ble." she said. 

In Indonesia, where Obama lived 
as child, hundreds of students at his 
former elementary school erupted in 
cheers when he was declared winner, 
pouring into the courtyard where the\- 
hugged, danced in the rain and 
chanted "Obama! Obama!" 

In Britain. The Sun newspaper 
borrowed from Neil Armstrong's 
1969 moon landing in describing 
Obama's election as "one giant leap 
for mankind." 



NATIONAL: USA Today: "America makes history" 



Continued from page 4 

acceptance speech: "Change has 
come to America." USA Today de- 
clared. "America makes history." 

The Plain Dealer in Cleveland 
offered high-quality reprints of the 
front page for S54.95. Below the 
headline "Change Has Come." a 
close-up of Obama covers three- 
fourths of the page. 

John Penle}'. a white man who 
recalled drinking out of the "wrong" 
water fountain as a kid in North 
Carolina, searched New York's 
Lower East Side on Wednesday for 
papers to mark an e\'ent he never 
dreamed possible in his lifetime. 

"There was one copy left at the 
bodega around the comer, and people 



were actualh' fighting for it." said 
Penley. a retired photojoumalist. "I 
can't find a cop}' of an\- paper any- 
where." 

At New York's Port Authority bus 
terminal. Ralston Montaque grabbed 30 
copies of the Times for family and 
friends. 

"Ever\'body has to read (the news), 
brother," he said. 

Say what \'ou want about the Inter- 
net replacing printed newspapers, but 
saving a cop>' of a Web page on a disk 
isn't the same. 

"What it really shows is there's a 
unique value to print." said Steve Hills, 
The Washington Post's president and 
general manager. "It's the abilit)' to look 
at the whole thing and have a piece of 
histop.' in \'our hands." 



A newsstand in Evanston. 111., 
sold 100 copies of the Times in 10 
minutes — even as the major local 
papers, the Tribune and the Chicago 
Sun-Times, mshed to print hundreds 
of thousands of extra copies. 

A convenience store in Mineola. 
N.Y.. saw man>' new faces. 

"I never saw papers sold with 
such a spirit," said Kirit Patel, who 
operates the store. 

"I saw some customers who 
never bu}' a paper, but today they 
bought t\vo copies. They were asking 
for more papers." 

Papers all over the countn,- found 
crowds of customers outside their 
buildings clamoring for copies. A 
one-per-person rule was instituted at 
the Times' headquarters. 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



Electric Utility Open House to be held at VC 



Clarion University- 
Venango Campus will host 
an open house for students 
interested in the Electric Util- 
it\ Technology concentration 
of the Associate of Applied 
Science in Industrial Tech- 
nology Degree, which is of- 
fered through a partnership 
between FirstEnergy Corpo- 
ration, the parent company of 
Penelec. and Clarion Univer- 
sity. 

The open house will be 
held on Thursday. November 
13. 2008. at 6:00 p.m., in the 
Robert W. Rhoades Center at 
the campus. The program is 
free and open to all interested 
persons. 

Tours of the campus will 
be available at 5 p.m. Addi- 
tional parking will be avail- 
able at the Penelec parking 
lot at 1600 West First Street, 



across from the campus. Stu- 
dents do not need to pre- 
register. 

This award-winning two- 
year program is designed to 
educate future electric utility 
professionals with an empha- 
sis on overhead line work. 
Launched in fall 2005 at the 
Venango Campus, it is the 
first such program in FirstEn- 
ergy's Penelec service area. 

The program has been so 
successfijl that FirstEnergy 
doubled the size of the in- 
coming class in 2006. 
FirstEnergy also provides 
qualified students enrolled in 
the program free tuition, in- 
cluding college fees, books, 
and protective clothing. 

The open house program 
will be presented by repre- 
sentatives of FirstEnergy 
Corporation's Power Systems 



Institute (PSl) and Professor 
Bill Hallock, chair of the 
university's Department of 
Applied Technology. 

Information will also be 
available at the open house 
about other concentrations 
of study offered through the 
Department of Applied 
Technology. 

Under this unique 
model, students complete 
general education and busi- 
ness courses at Clarion Uni- 
versity-Venango Campus 
and the technical component 
of the degree through li- 
censed, certified, accredited 
and/or otherwise approved 
technical education provid- 
ers. Graduates receive an 
Associate of Applied Sci- 
ence in Industrial Technol- 
ogy or Administration Tech- 
nolosv desree from Clarion 



University. 

In addition to 
FirstEnergy, the univer- 
sity's Department of Ap- 
plied Technology has 
partnerships with Preci- 
sion Manufacturing Insti- 
tute (PMI) in Meadville: 
The Learning Center in 
Seneca; the National 
Hardwood Lumber Asso- 
ciation in Memphis, Ten- 
nessee; Triangle Tech, 
which has campuses in 
Pittsburgh, Erie, Greens- 
burg, DuBois, and Sun- 
bury, Pennsylvania; and 
Preferred Systems, Inc. of 
Erie. 

To learn more about 
the Applied Technology 
programs, contact Profes- 
sor Hallock at 814-676- 
6591, ext. 1307, or whal- 
lockfrticlarion.edu. 





NOW YA KNOW! 

Q. What is the "lightest" kind of air? 

A. Cold and humid 

B. Cold and dry 

C. Hot and humid 

D. Hot and Dry 



A. Hot and humid! 



Hot air rises because it is lighter. Clouds are in the sky because 
water vapor is actually lighter than air. 






N'OLUME 41, Issue 11 



Page 7 



ENG 307: Business Writing is still open for spring 



Seats are still available in ENG 
307: Business Writing for the Spring 
2009 Semester. 

If you need some help with com- 
posing letters, memos, persuasive mes- 
sages and reports, ENG 307: Business 
Writing is the course for you. 

The course will be taught by Dr. 
Ellen Foster during the spring semester 
and will meet on Tuesdays from 5 - 
7:30 p.m. 

ENG 307: Business Writing is re- 



quired for students who are majoring in 
paralegal studies or business, but is a 
great elective for other majors, too. 

You are eligible to take the course 
as long as you have completed or will 
successfiilly complete English 1 1 1 this 
fall. 

If you are interested in taking the 
course, stop at Dr. Foster's office in 
room 304 Montgomery Hall so that she 
can help you to enroll in the Business 
Writing course. 



If you are a first year student, you 
will not be able to get into the course 
without Dr. Foster's permission. 

If this is the case, contact Dr. Fos- 
ter regarding your interest in the 
course to discuss whether or not she 
may be able to help you enroll. 

For more infonnation about ENG 
307: Business Writing and enrollment 
in the course, contact Dr. Ellen Foster 
at efoster@clarion.edu, or at her of- 
fice. 



Clarion University- Venango continues to grow 



Clarion University-Venango 

Campus shows all the signs of a grow- 
ing regional campus, including grow- 
ing programs and over $3.5 million in 
construction projects currently under- 
way, according to a recent report to 
visiting members of the Clarion Uni- 
versity Council of Trustees. 

Chris Reber, executive dean of 
Clarion University-Venango Campus, 
outlined the various new and growing 
academic programs and highlighted a 
highly visible community project and 
its near completion. 

"We're delighted that the long- 
anticipated renovation of the West 
End Pond is nearly finished," said Re- 
ber. 

"We are planning a community 
event next spring to celebrate the com- 
pletion of the pond and the next two 
student apartment buildings, a two 
story and a three-stor)'." 

Libby Williams, former librarian 
and chair of the Venango Advisory 
Council, proudly reported that the 
Campus had received over $840,000 
in gifts and grants for the project. 

Other Venango accomplishments 
during the past year include: 

The Campus hosted the second 
annual Birding Festival sponsored by 
the Oil Region Alliance of Business, 
Industry and Tourism and a meeting of 
the Clarion University Alumni Asso- 
ciation Board of Directors. 



The National Hardwood Lumber 
Association held its Lumber Grading 
School in Oil City, the first time it has 
been offered anywhere outside of Mem- 
phis, Tennessee. The school attracted 14 
lumber industry professionals from 
Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin, 
earning their lumber grading certifica- 
tion from NHLA during the summer. 
Several will continue their pursuit of 
Venango's associate of applied science 
in industrial technology degree. 

The second annual Barbara Morgan 
Harvey Community History Days cele- 
bration included campus and community 
activities, attracting hundreds of partici- 
pants. Students, faculty, and staff also 
participated in the Oil Heritage Festivals 
in Oil City and Titusville, earning a sec- 
ond-place prize for a float in the Oil City 
parade. 

The School of Nursing and Allied 
Health completed the reaccreditation 
process for the associate and bachelor of 
science in nursing programs, both of 
which will be reaccredited for a full 
eight years. The pass rate on the national 
R.N. certification exam, NCLEX, topped 
90 percent this year. 

Work continues with UPMC North- 
west and Meadville Medical Center to 
provide the A.S.N, to cohorts of hospital 
employees and prospective employees. 
Three cohort groups are currently under- 
way and Venango will begin a fourth 
next spring at Meadville Medical Center. 



Work continues on a self-study 
for national accreditation of the grow- 
ing applied technology program. An 
advisory committee comprised of 
community and industrial leaders has 
also been formed to provide advice 
and input. Future partnerships and 
concentrations could include potential 
programming in sustainability, alterna- 
tive energy, and robotics. 

Faculty are working on two new 
degree proposals, a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Industrial Operations and a 
Bachelor of Science in Health Sci- 
ences. Both would be upper-division 
degree completion programs for stu- 
dents currently in associate degree 
programs and would be offered on 
line. A goal of September 2010 has 
been set for implementation. 

The Venango Honors program 
continues to grow, with over 20 stu- 
dents enrolled and more on the way. 

Continuing education now in- 
cludes non-credit certificate programs 
in Pharmacy Tech and Phlebotomy, 
both in partnership with UPMC North- 
west. 

A new Club Sports program is 
now under development that will pro- 
vide enhanced recreational opportuni- 
ties for students, including club sport 
competition with other campuses and 
colleges. 

The program is planned for a Fall 
2009 start. 



Page 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Harvey Center Lecture slated Nov. 20 



Continued from page 1 

40th Founder's Day Anniversary'. 

An informal alumni networiving 
lunch will be held by the Venango 
Campus Alumni Chapter on Wednes- 
day. November 19, from noon to 1:30 
p.m.. at Rhoades Center. 

The Annual Harvey Center Lec- 
ture will take place on Thursday, No- 
vember 20, at 7 p.m. 

Steve Weinburg, nationally 
known author of Taking on the Trust, 
an account of the defeat of John D. 
Rockefeller at the hands of 
"muckraking" journalist Ida Tarbell, 
which led to the breakup of Standard 
Oil, will speak. 

Career Services will sponsor the 
Transitions Bus Tour on Friday, No- 
vember 2 1 . 

The trip is for those students who 
plan to transition from Venango Cam- 
pus to Clarion University's main cam- 
pus. 

The bus will leave the upper park- 
ing lot of Venango Campus at ap- 
proximately 9 a.m. and return at ap- 
proximately 4:30 pm. 

The free trip will provide students 
a Q&A session with Clarion Univer- 
sity admissions representative Bill 
Bailey, a tour of main campus, and a 
free lunch. 

The response rate will depend on 



the size of the bus reserved, so students 
must RSVP by Friday, October 31, to 
Mark Conrad, coordinator of Career Ser- 
vices, at 676-6591. extension 1373. or at 
mconrad@clarion.edu. In addition, sign 
up sheets are available now at the Learn- 
ing Support Center, at the Student Affairs 
office, and at the Career Services Center 
in Montgomery Hall. 

For more information, contact Mark 
Conrad at the above locations. 

"Fm Not There" will be shown on 
Saturday. November 22. at 7:30 p.m.. in 
the Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

Thanksgiving holiday begins on 
Tuesday. November 25, at 10 p.m. Friday 
classes meet in place of Tuesday classes 
on this day. 

Thanksgiving will be celebrated on 
Thursday. November 27. 

December 

Thanksgiving break ends at 8 a.m. on 
Monday. December 1 . 

Student Senate will sponsor Cele- 
brate the Seasons on Wednesday, Decem- 
ber 3, from 1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Rhoades 
Center. The event will recognize various 
religious and cultural traditions celebrated 
during the winter season. 

"The Darjeeling Limited" will be the 
final film shown in the Independent Film 



Series on Saturday, December 6. at 
7:30 p.m.. at Rhoades Auditorium. 

For more information, contact 
Emily Aubele at 

eaubele(a)clarion.edu. 

Classes for the fall 2008 semes- 
ter end on Friday. December 5. The 
Final Exam Period will begin Mon- 
day. December 8, and end on Friday. 
December 12. Winter Commence- 
ment will take place on Saturday. 
December 13. in Clarion. 

Miscellaneous 

Yoga sessions will be held every 
Thursday at 1 1 a.m. in the fourth 
floor lounge of Montgomery Hall. 
Classes will be instructed by Libby 
Jenkins. With the conclusion of reno- 
vations, yoga sessions will be held at 
the Rhoades Gymnasium. The ses- 
sions are free. 

Cardio-kickboxing sessions will 
be held every Wednesday from 6-7 
p.m.. at the Franklin School of Kung 
Fu. 845 Buffalo St.. Franklin. The 
sessions are free. 

Joann Wheeler will display her 
art at Rhoades Center throughout 
December. 

Her three-dimensional collages 
and boxes have been exhibited and 
sold in juried group shows in several 
galleries. 



Email the VeNtiNGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion Universit> of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, facultj'. or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
emploN'ment. Direct equal opportunit\ inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



NOV 1 9 2nr 



Ybim Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VeiifiMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 12 Monday, November 17, 2008 



Student weighs in on Continuing Ed. 



The Venango Campus 
has a continuing Education 
Department with a variety' 
of options with concentra- 
tions in medical and busi- 
ness fields. This is one stu- 
dent's perspective on the 
Medical Office Assistant 
Certificate Program. 

Freshman Jessica 

O'Neill began her program 
in August and will receive 
her certificate in August 
2009. She developed an 
interest in the program 
based on working as a 
nurse aide in a nursing 
home and a receptionist at 
an audiologist's office. The 
one-year program is very 
concentrated, since she 
takes many evening classes 
for an entire year. Her Sat- 
urday mornings are filled 
with Anatomy, Physiology, 
Medical Codina, and Bill- 



ing classes taught by sea- 
soned professionals. 

She noted, "I wasn't 
sure about jumping into 
Nursing so I thought I 
would ease into the medical 
field with this program. 
You need to be focused 
because there are no long 
vacation breaks like Asso- 
ciate degree students are 
accustomed to receiving, so 
you must always be study- 
ing and not get behind." 

During the summer, 
she'll take an unpaid intern- 
ship at UPMC Northwest, 
which permits hands-on 
learning, focusing on cod- 
ing and billing imder the 
supervision of doctors and 
nurses. She also works in 
the Career Center in Mont- 
gomery Hall and currently 
assists students with job 
search activities, such as 



resume creation. Jessica is 
looking fonvard to the up- 
coming Spring Nursing 
Career Fair as that is her 
long-term goal. 

Other Continuing Edu- 
cation programs include: 
Bookkeeping, Small Busi- 
ness Management, Execu- 
tive Office Management, 
Legal Office Management, 
Medical Coding, Medical 
Office Management, and 
Massage Therapy. New this 
year are the Pharmacy 
Technician and Phlebotomy 
Technician programs and 
the Program Evaluation for 
Public and Non-Profit Or- 
ganizations. 

For more information 
about these programs, con- 
tact Hope Lineman in 
Frame Hall, extension 1273 
or e-mail hlineman 
@clarion.edu. 



Seminar Series continues Monday 



November 

The Satellite Seminar 
Series will feature Dr. 
Raquel Pinderhughes in a 
DVD presentation of 
"Pathways out of Poverty 
through Green Collar Jobs: 
The Role of Scholarship in 
Improving Quality of Life 



for Urban Residents" on 
Monday, November 17, at 
6:30 p.m., at the Rhoades 
Auditorium. 

Phi Theta Kappa will 
hold its Founder's Day Soy 
Candle Sale on Wednes- 
day, November 19, fi^om 10 



a.m. to 2:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Center. The sale 
is in recognition of PTK's 
40th Fotmder's Day Anni- 
versary. 

An informal alumni 

See EVENTS on page 10 



Inside this issue: 


Continuing 
Education 


1 


Events 


1- 

10 


Tr.ash T.-\lk 


2 


Harxey Lecture 


3 


"Into the 
Wild" 


3 


State News 


4 


N.-xtional News 


4 


World News 


5 


Job Openings 


6 


LOTT Presented 


7 


Venango Up- 
dates 


8 


TH.ANK you: 


8 


Marla Harp 


9 


PTK Pie Sale 


9 


Now Ya Know! 


9 



P,\(,l 2 



Venango \'oice 



Careful with that bag of popcorn; it has diacetyl! 



f/"' 

^^'^• 



Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 



Pop ... .pop ... pop ... 
pop... standing in front of the 
microwave waiting, it seems 
to take forever for that bag of 
popcorn to finish. Finally! 
You grab that bag out and rip 
it open trying not to get a 
steam bum and breathe in 
nice and deep....aaaaah, love 
that smell, right? Finally, a 
snack that won't make you 
fat! That nice big bag of 98 
percent fat free butter fla- 



\ored popcorn takes the 
guilt out of movie night for 
millions. A healthy snack. 
Yeah, possibly. 

Here's the deal. That 
buttery smell and taste on 
the popcorn isn't really but- 
ter. If it were, it sure would- 
n't be a '100 calorie snack'. 
It's a man-made chemical 
called diacetyl that makes 
that magic. It is used in the 
microwave popcorn, of 
course, but also in some 
other snack foods, pet foods, 
candies, baked goods, and 
some other food products; 
it's basically found in stuff 
that is meant to taste like 
butter, without the butter. 
(I'm still trying to remember 
if I have ever smelled a pet 
food that resembled butter.) 

So what's the big deal 
about diacetyl? If you check 
out the MSDS sheet, it's not 
a big deal unless you work 
in the plant making the food 
additives or the popcorn. 
OSHA reports several oc- 
currences of 'severe lung 



disease' at microwave pop- 
corn packaging facilities, 
such as fixed airways ob- 
struction, some consistent 
with bronchiolitis obliter- 
ans, which is life threaten- 
ing and non-reversible. 
(Basically, the tiny bron- 
chioles in the lungs are 
plugged up.) Other prob- 
lems reported by employ- 
ees include other respira- 
tory illnesses, eye, nasal, 
and upper respiratory irrita- 
tion and/or bums. 

There have been con- 
sumer reports of problems 
related to microwave pop- 
corn. Symptoms were simi- 
lar in nature to those of the 
workers, although I was 
unable to find just how 
many. 

Apparently there have 
been enough to motivate 
lawyers to advertise online 
for their services in cases 
of 'popcom lung', as it's 
being called. From what I 
gather, the FDA, a federal 
agency in place to protect 



public health (wow, I typed 
that without laughing!), is 
'concerned about potential 
health hazards' posed from 
exposure to both workers 
and consumers. However, 
they, the FDA, instead of 
stopping the use of diacetyl, 
say they will submit a report 
on its PLAN to research the 
issue. Well, at least they 
have a plan. 

What exactly does that 
mean for the popcorn- 
loving, health-conscious 
consumer? Does popcorn 
have to join Doritos and Ben 
and Jerry's on our 'no-no' 
list? My opinion, however 
inconsequential, is this; 
Don't stick your face in the 
bag when you've popped it. 
Find another bag to hyper- 
ventilate into as we draw 
close to finals week. As for 
me, I'll stick with the air- 
popped variety. 

Reference material for 
this article was found at: 
www.osha.gov and 

www.fda.gov. 



P-maii the N/^nango \Jo\cc with uour ideas at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Vjznango Voice 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice@clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp Lola Deets 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion Uni\ersity of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities. The 
Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate lener of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



\'OLLiME 41, Issue 12 



Page 3 



Author to present annual Harvey Center Lecture 



Steve Weinberg, noted author and 
professor of journalism at the Univer- 
sity' of Missouri, will be the guest 
speaker at the fourth annual lecture of 
the Barbara Morgan Harvey Center for 
the Study of Oil Heritage at Clarion 
University-Venango Campus. 

The program, which is free and 
open to the public, will be held Thurs- 
day, November 20, in the Robert W. 
Rhoades Center auditorium at 7 p.m. 

A dessert reception will follow the 
program. 

Mr. Weinberg's lecture, entitled 
"Getting Famous, Then Watching Your 
Back," is especially timely in an age 
when celebrities and political figures 
face unprecedented media scrutiny. It is 
based on his most recent book. Taking 
on The Trust: The Epic Battle of Ida 
Tarbell and John D. Rockefeller. 

According to March, 2008, review 
in The Wall Street Journal, "...his 
deeply researched account is scrupu- 
lously evenhanded, fair to both the man 
who was by far the nation's richest ty- 
coon and the woman who was its most 
famous reporter." 



Steve Weinberg graduated from the 
Missouri School of Journalism in 1970, 
returning later for a master's degree. He 
began his writing career in newspapers, 
moved to magazines so he could write 
longer features, and then shifted to writ- 
ing books. 

Today, Weinberg supplements his 
book writing with freelance magazine 
features, newspaper op-ed pieces and 
book reviews. 

His earlier books include A Jour- 
nalism of Humanity: A Candid His- 
tory of the World's First Journalism 
School (2008); The Reporter's Hand- 
book: An Investigator's Guide to 
Documents and Techniques (1996); 
Telling the Untold Story: How Inves- 
tigative Reporters Are Changing the 
Craft of Biography (1992); Armand 
Hammer: The Untold Stoiy (1990); 
and Trade Secrets of Washington 
Journalists: How to Get the Facts 
About What's Going On in Washing- 
ton (1981). 

The Harvey Center, located in the 
Charles L. Suhr Library, was created in 
memory of Barbara Morgan Harvey by 



TAKINO ON THE 




IDA TAHBEU * 

JOHN 0. 
BDCKEFELLEfl 





her family, who wished to carry on her 
love of local history and desire to 
bring it to life for others. It was dedi- 
cated in October, 2005. 

For more information, call 814- 
676-6591, ext. 1215. 



Student gives her review of film "Into the Wild'' 



By: Elizabeth Austin 

Everyone goes through phases and 
challenges in life. Many times we ques- 
tion our identity, personality, goals, and 
place in this world. We all have a story 
to tell. Some adventures are just more 
extreme than others. . . 

"Into The Wild" is a fibn based on 
a true story. Christopher McCandless, a 
graduate of Emory College in Atlanta, 
takes off on a wild adventure through 
the wilderness. 

Determined to leave his past be- 
hind, he ruins all forms of identification 



and bums all of his money. He tells no 
close family or friends of his plan to 
ultimately survive on his own in the 
Alaskan wilderness. 

The film is a true highlight of his 
travels across the country, hitchhiking 
and gathering supplies for Alaska along 
the way. He acquires basic survival 
skills, makes some unique friends, and 
works odd jobs on his incredible jour- 
ney. 

This movie is not so much the jour- 
ney as it is the mentality behind such an 
unusual search for one's self 

Christopher seems to have it all: 



wealthy family, college degree, intelli- 
gence, charisma, and good looks. Yet 
he has grown to despise the basic stan- 
dards of society, along with money 
and religion. It's as though he has to 
prove to himself that he has the 
sfrength to live outside the confines of 
society. The beauty of Chris's story is 
that it challenges society's norms and 
expectations. He willingly abandons 
all that he knows in search for. . . him- 
self. 

Without ruining a thing, I will say 
that, in the end, he finds exactly what 
he was searching for. 



PAc;t 4 



Venango \oice 



State 



Pennsylvania Lt. Governor Knoll dies at age 78 



HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) _ Catherine 
Baker Knoll, who at age 72 became 
the first woman to be elected as Penn- 
sylvania's lieutenant governor, died 
Wednesday after a four-month battle 
with cancer. She was 78. 

Knoll died at National Rehabilita- 
tion Hospital in Washington, D.C., 
where she was recovering fi-om a viral 
infection she contracted as a result of 
chemotherapy treatment for cancer. 
Gov. Ed Rendell said. 

"Catherine was a wonderfiil per- 
son and that really made her a fine 
public servant, both as state treasurer 
and lieutenant governor," Rendell told 
The Associated Press. "She cared as 
deeply about people and the problems 
they faced as much as any public offi- 
cial who served the commonwealth." 

Knoll was diagnosed with neuro- 
endocrine cancer in July 2008 and 
began radiation and chemotherapy 
treatments before publicly revealing 
her illness in August. 

The Senate's presiding officer, she 
returned for the start of the fall Senate 
schedule in September, but showed 
signs of fatigue. On Sept. 22, she an- 
nounced she would heed the advice of 
doctors, family members and col- 
leagues and take time off, missing her 
first Senate session in six years. 

Rendell said her death surprised 
her family, because she had shown 
progress on Wednesday, standing up 



for the first time while rehabilitating 
from a severely weakened condition. 

"She went down fighting, like she 
did all her career and all her life," 
Rendell said. 

In a statement, her family said she 
loved working for the people of Penn- 
sylvania and was proud of the friend- 
ships she had forged throughout the 
state. 

"She fought this illness with the 
same tenacity she brought to a lifetime 
of public service," her son Albert 
Baker Knoll said. 

A former schooUeacher and De- 
mocratic veteran. Knoll won two 
terms as state treasurer, in 1988 and 
1992, while running unsuccessfully 
three other times. In 2002, she beat out 
eight other candidates in the Democ- 
ratic primary for lieutenant governor, 
and went on to win the office as 
Rendell's running mate. 

Rendell said Knoll's broad con- 
stituency and name recognition had 
helped him appeal to her home turf of 
western Pennsylvania. She was fond 
of saying her age had brought wisdom, 
and that she needed no on-the-job 
training. 

"I happen to think that Pennsyl- 
vania is like a 10-speed bicycle," 
Knoll said on the day she was sworn 
in as the state's 45th lieutenant gover- 
nor in 2003. "We have gears we have- 
n't even fried yet." 



As lieutenant governor, she held 
the gavel in the state Senate and 
chaired the state Board of Pardons, her 
primary tasks. 

She was so committed to presid- 
ing over the Senate that, even cancer- 
stricken, she told Senate Minority 
Leader Robert J. Mellow, D- 
Lackawanna, in September that she 
feh badly about putting down the 
gavel, in case she was needed to cast a 
tie-breaking vote for the party. 

Mellow described a determined 
woman who was passionate about 
being an elected official — she would 
go anywhere, any time to represent the 
state, he said — and serving the 
Catholic church. 

"If there is a Heaven and Hell, 
then when she passed away she went 
straight to Heaven," Mellow said. 

Under the state Constitution, 
Knoll will be replaced by the Senate 
President Pro Tempore, Joseph B. 
Scamati III, R-Jefferson, who plans to 
retain his Senate seat. 

In a statement, Scamati said Knoll 
"embodied the type of character ex- 
pected of true, effective public ser- 
vants." 

U.S. Sen. Bob Casey called her 
life "one of service and sacrifice, cour- 
age and commitment to the common 
good." Knoll is survived by three sons, 
Albert, Kim Eric, and Charles, and a 
daughter, Mina. 



National 



Study: Calif dirty air kills more than car crashes 



FRESNO, Calif (AP) _ Lowering air 
pollution in Southern California and 
the San Joaquin Valley would save 
more lives annually than ending all 
motor vehicle fatalities in the two re- 
gions, according to a new study. 

The study, which examined the 
costs of air pollution in two areas with 
the worst levels in the country, also 



said meeting federal ozone and fme par- 
ticulate standards could save $28 billion 
annually in health care costs, school ab- 
sences, missed work and lost income 
potential from premature deaths. 

The price tag amounts to $1,600 
annually per person in the San Joaquin 
Valley and $1,250 in the South Coast 
Air Basin. 



Researchers at California State 
University -Fullert on sought to assess 
the potential economic benefits that 
could be achieved by reducing air pol- 
lution to levels within federal stan- 
dards. 

"For decades there has been a tug 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



\'OLUME 41, Issue 12 



Page 5 



World 



21 killed in attack on US convoy in Afghanistan 



KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) _ A sui- 
cide bomber rammed his car into a 
U.S. militar>' convoy as it was pass- 
ing through a crowded market in 
eastern Afghanistan on Thursday, 
killing at least 20 civilians and an 
American soldier, officials said. 

The attack outside Jalalabad, the 
capital of the eastern Nangarhar 
province, also wounded 74 civilians, 
said Ajmal Pardes, a provincial 
health official. 

Separately, an explosion in 
southern Afghanistan on Wednesday 
killed two NATO soldiers, the mili- 
tary alliance said in a statement, 
without dislcosing the soldiers na- 
tionalities. 

The bomber struck the convoy 
near a crowded market in the Bati 
Kot district, where people were trad- 
ing sheep, cows, goats and other ani- 
mals, said Ghafoor Khan, the spokes- 
man for the provincial police chief. 

Lt. Cmdr. Walter Matthews, a 



U.S. military spokesman, said at least 
20 civilians and a U.S. soldier were 
killed. 

The soldier's death brings the num- 
ber of U.S. troops killed in Afghanistan 
to at least 148, the highest number of 
troop deaths per year since the U.S. -led 
invasion in 2001. 

There were 111 U.S. military- 
deaths in Afghanistan in the whole of 
2007. 

An Associated Press photographer 
said that an American military vehicle, 
two civilian vehicles and two rickshaws 
were destroyed in Thursday's blast. 

Taliban militants regularly use 
suicide attackers and car bombs in their 
assaults against U.S., Afghan and other 
foreign troops in the country. 

More than 5,400 people, of whom 
nearly 1,000 civilians, have died in in- 
surgency related violence this year, 
according to a tally compiled by the 
Associated Press based on figures pro- 
vided by Afghan and international offi- 



cials. 

On Wednesday, a suicide 
bomber driving a tanker truck haul- 
ing oil detonated his explosives out- 
side an Afghan govenoment office 
during a provincial coimcil meeting 
in the southern city of Kandahar, 
killing six people and wounded 42, 
officials said. 

The blast in the Taliban's former 
stronghold came as the provincial 
council was hearing constituent com- 
plaints. 

Two members of the provincial 
council were wounded in the attack, 
said Kandahar's Gov. Rahmatullah 
Raufi. 

The explosion ripped through the 
council office, flattened five nearby 
homes and damaged the offices of the 
countrj's intelligence service. 

It left a crater some 15 feet into 
the ground. 

Raufi blamed Taliban militants 
for the attack. 



NATIONAL: Calif HP recorded 2,521 deaths in 2006 



Continued from page 4 

of war over what to do about air pol- 
lution," said Jane Hall, lead author of 
the study at Cal State Fullerton. "We 
are paying now for not having done 
enough." 

To illustrate its point, the study 
noted that the California Highway 
Patrol recorded 2,521 vehicular 
deaths in the San Joaquin Valley and 
South Coast Air Basin in 2006, com- 
pared to 3,812 deaths attributed to 
respiratory illness caused by particu- 
late pollution. 

Studies have indicated a relation- 
ship between ozone and particulate 
pollution and asthma and other respi- 
ratory problems, including chronic 
bronchitis. They also have connected 
particulate pollution with an increase 
in cardiovascular problems. 



Hall and colleague Victor Brajer 
analyzed ozone and fme particulate 
concentrations across the two basins in 
5-by-5 kilometer grids from 2005 
through 2007. The researchers applied 
those nimibers to the health affects they 
are known to cause, then assigned peer- 
reviewed economic values to each ill- 
ness or death that could result. 

"It may be tempting to think Cali- 
fornia can't afford to clean up, but in 
fact dirty air is like a $28 billion lead 
balloon on our economy," Hall said. 

The findings were released 
Wednesday as the California Air Re- 
sources Board considers controversial 
new regulations to reduce diesel truck 
emissions, a move that could cost 
170,000 business owners S5.5 billion. 
According to a board staff report, the 
savings in health care costs would be 
$68 billion by 2020 if the regulations 



were adopted next month. 

The Cal State Fullerton study 
says that particulate pollution levels 
must fall by 50 percent in both re- 
gions for health and economic bene- 
fits to occur, something they ac- 
knowledged would be "very difficult 
to achieve." 

If pollution levels were to im- 
prove to federal standards, the study 
says residents of the two air basins 
would suffer 3,860 fewer premature 
deaths, 3,780 fewer nonfatal heart 
attacks and would miss 470,000 
fewer days of work annually. School 
children would miss more than 1.2 
million fewer days of school, a sav- 
ings of $112 million in caregiver 
costs. 

There also would be more than 2 
million fewer cases of upper respira- 
tory problems. 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



Take advantage of these part-time positions now 



Two openings are avail- 
able at the Venango County 
Regional Planning Commis- 
sion. A Planning Intern and a 
GIS intern are needed. 

The Planning Intern will 
perform specialized planning 
activities to provide assis- 
tance in the Planning Depart- 
ment regarding County-wide 
comprehensive plans and 
programs to improve the 
growth and quality of life in 
Venango County. 

Essential functions of the 
job of a Planning Intern in- 
clude: coordinates and imple- 
ments a variety of specialized 
projects and duties such as 
background analysis for com- 
prehensive planning projects, 
recycling and solid waste 
data analysis. Subdivision 
Administration activities, 
studies, and other projects 
depending on specific depart- 
mental needs; prepares re- 
ports and other documents for 
presentation and application; 
establishes and maintains 
statistical databases; presents 
to the public and others re- 
garding specialized projects/ 
programs; assists in conduct- 
ing population, land use, re- 
search analysis and other 
planning studies necessary 
for development of compre- 
hensive plans; and assists in 
programming for recycling 
and waste reduction activities 
including program expan- 
sions, special events, public 
education, grant applications 
and administration. 

The GIS intern will per- 
form GIS mapping and analy- 
sis tasks in support of county 
planning and resource man- 
agement activi- 
ties. Responsibilities include 
compiling and synthesizing 



geographic data into ArcGIS 
database; developing attribute 
data for shape files; maintain- 
ing and updating GIS data- 
bases as new data are col- 
lected; preparing, modifying 
and updating site maps and 
brochures using ArcGIS soft- 
ware and other digital media; 
developing maps, charts, dis- 
plays, presentations, graphics, 
brochures, and drawings; 
collecting data in the field 
using GPS equipment. 

These are temporary 
intern positions with a flexi- 
ble work schedule of up to 20 
hours per week. The duration 
of these assignments is ex- 
pected to be between six to 
twelve months. Compensa- 
tion for this position is Pay 
Grade 1, Step 1 level of S7.95 
per hour. Benefits are not 
included. 

Successful candidates 
will have a background in 
geography, planning, envi- 
ronmental studies, landscape 
architecture, or another re- 
lated field; experience with 
ArcGIS software; and exper- 
tise in cartography and map 
production. This position 
requires attention to detail, 
excellent communication 
skills, the ability to work well 
both in team settings and 
independently, and the will- 
ingness to occasionally work 
in remote settings. Knowl- 
edge of GPS technology, 
ability to interpret topog- 
raphic maps, and familiarity 
with plotters a plus. 

Work is divided between 
the County Planning Com- 
mission office in a group 
environment and some field 
visits to map, photograph and 
collect resource and develop- 
ment data. 



To apply, submit a re- 
sume to the attention of Ju- 
dith Downs, Executive Di- 
rector, PO Box 831, Frank- 
lin, Pa., 16323 by November 
21. Applications/ 
information may be ob- 
tained by calling 814-432- 
9551 or emailing a request 
to jdowns@co.venang 
o.pa.us. 

Kapp Alloy and Wire, 
Inc. has been a leading 
manufacturer of babbitt, 
solder and metallizing 
spraywire for the electronics 
and aerospace industries for 
over 50 years. They are a 
relatively small company, 
with eight employees. Util- 
izing their proprietary Preci- 
sion Microcasting process, 
they create solder wire that 
leads the industry in consis- 
tent quality, fi-om edge to 
edge and end to end. This 
consistent quality dramati- 
cally improves their custom- 
ers' process efficiency and 
product quality, lowering 
their costs and substantially 
lowering defect rates - sav- 
ing them real money. The 
secret to their success is 
"Perfect solder perfectly 
delivered." 

Kapp Alloy and Wire, 
Inc.'s continued worldwide 
growth necessitates the hir- 
ing of an Administrative 
Assistant reporting to the 
company president. 

Required talents, skills 
and abilities include: will- 
ingness, ability and desire to 
learn; self-initiative and the 
ability to work independ- 
ently; excellent oral and 
written communication 
skills; very organized and 
detail oriented to manage 



multiple projects; and 
expert level knowledge of 
Microsoft Office pro- 
grams. 

Starting salary is 
commensurate with edu- 
cation and experience, 
$20K to S24K. There is a 
90-day probationary pe- 
riod, and benefits include 
flexible hours, healthcare, 
bonus pool and profit- 
sharing. 

Interested candidates 
should fax or email a 
cover letter and resume 
directly to the president. 
Jack Crawford, at 814- 
676-5565 or jack@kappal 
loy.com. 

If you desire to both 
live and work in the area, 
then don't miss out on this 
unique opportunity. Can- 
didates should apply as 
soon as possible due to 
their immediate need. 

A Customer Service - 
Clerical Administrative 
Support person is needed 
immediately. If you are 
planning to graduate soon 
or have already graduated, 
French Creek Production 
would like to hear fi^om 
you. 

The company is look- 
ing for a full-time em- 
ployee but will consider 
part-time for students who 
are planning on graduat- 
ing this December. 

The potential candi- 
date will possess excellent 
customer service skills, as 
well as computer skills - 
Microsoft Office Suite 
experience with a thor- 
ough understanding of 

See JOBS on page 7 



Volume 41, Issue 12 



Page 7 



Lott presented at NCHC Conference in October 



Clarion Universin's Honors Pro- 
gram faculU' and students presented 
seminars and papers at the 43 rd Annual 
Conference of the National Collegiate 
Honors Council (NCHC) held in San 
Antonio. Texas, Oct. 22-26. 

Honors Faculty members Dr. 
Ralph Lean,-, professor of English, and 
Barn.' McCauliff assistant professor of 
mass media arts, journalism, and com- 
munication studies, presented a semi- 
nar, "Honors Bootcamp: Providing a 
First Year Challenge Through a Team 
Taught Writing and Speech Course." 

This seminar described the curricu- 
lar model for "Modes of Discourse," the 
foundational course for Clarion's Hon- 
ors Program. Also participating in this 
presentation were graduate assistant 
and Honors alumni Joe Fiedor and 
Bridgett O'Donnell, a sophomore Hon- 
ors Program student. 

O'Donnell, a sophomore Spanish 
and anthropolog\" major, is a daughter 
of Lawrence and Anne O'Donnell of 
Jim Thorpe and is a graduate of Jim 
Thorpe High School. 

Honors Program students Br>'ce 
Davis, Kenny Bonus, Clay Nolan, all 
officers in the Student Honors Associa- 
tion, presented a seminar, "Successful 



Student Engagement in an Honors 
Communitv." The presentation pro- 
vided information regarding the devel- 
opment of student governance and 
strategies for building honors student 
organizations. 

Davis, a sophomore marketing 
major, is a son of Bryce and Sherry 
Davis Jr. of Palmvxa and is a graduate 
of Palm\Ta High School. 

Bonus, a sophomore business man- 
agement major, is a son of Edward and 
Elaine Bonus of Butler and is a gradu- 
ate of Butler High School. 

Nolan, a junior elementary educa- 
tion major, is a son of Brian and Janet 
Nolan of Shinglehouse and is a gradu- 
ate of Oswayo Valley High School. 

Dr. Brent Register, assistant Hon- 
ors Program director, was a member of 
a panel presentation, "International 
Education Forum: Best Practices." The 
presentation was based on the 2005 
Summer Honors Program in Paris 
hosted by Clarion University. 

Dr. David Lott, assistant professor 
of biology and Honors Program faculty, 
presented "Articulation Agreements: 
The Best of Both Worlds." The presen- 
tation was based on new developments 
with the Venango Honors Program, 



successfully established in 2007. 

Dr. Hallie Savage, director of the 
Clarion University Honors Program 
and President of the NCHC delivered 
the presidential address, "Stability in 
the Context of Change." Savage, the 
Honors administration, faculty, staff, 
and students hosted the 2007 National 
Collegiate Honors Council's annual 
meeting in Denver. 

Lynn Hepfl, Honors Program 
coordinator, was appointed to the 
NCHC Finance Committee and will 
serve a three-year term of office. In 
addition to her committee delibera- 
tions, she attended the conference pro- 
ceedings. 

The Honors Program is an aca- 
demic opportunity for students whose 
intellectual and creative interests and 
abilities are beyond conventional uni- 
versity offerings. The program gives 
students the opportunity to enrich their 
education through specially designed 
courses and extracurricular involve- 
ment. Admission is based on: aca- 
demic performance, a written state- 
ment, SAT scores of 1150 or higher, 
graduating in the top 15 percent of the 
high school class, and recommenda- 
tions. 



JOBS: Pay starts at $9/hr at French Creek Prod. 



Continued from page 6 

Excel and Outlook. 

A tvpical day would include: an- 
swering and routing incoming calls 
from potential customers, vendors, 
salespeople and general public; being 
able to proficiently multi-task would 
be an asset; entering sales orders into 
the Microsoft software program - 
''Great-Plains," as weU as Excel 
spreadsheets; handUng daily comput- 
erized accoimting (AR AP) as well as 
numeric ke>pad entr%'; while you are 
working, >'ou will be establishing rap- 
port with various customers; you wiU 



also learn and apply product knowledge 
about TCP's diverse product line; and 
tj-ping, filing, mailing and sorting in- 
coming mail are also essential job du- 
ties. 

Pay starts at $9.00 per hour depend- 
ing on skill set. The selected candidate 
will work Monday through Friday, no 
weekends. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. - 
evenings are free, and an impaid hour for 
Itmch. Seven paid holidays plus one 
floating holiday per calendar year will be 
given, and one week paid vacation is 
available after the first year. 

Attire is business casual, and 40 IK 
benefits are coming in January 2009. 



Medical benefits will begin soon as 
well. 

Interested applicants need to sub- 
mit an updated resimie to: Brook Siar/ 
Human Resource Director, French 
Creek Production, at bsiar@velocit 
y.net, or via fax: 814-437-2544. 

Visit www.frenchcreekproduc 
tions.com to learn more about this 
organization. 

For more information about these 
openings or for restmie preparation, 
contact Coordinator of Career Service 
Mark Conrad at 676-6591, extension 
1373, or at mconrad@clarion.edu. 



Page 8 



Venango Voice 



Updates include calendar sale, holiday hours, film 



Please note that Venango Campus 
no longer has mail service on Satur- 
days. The USPS removed our outside 
pick-up box during the last week in 
October. All mail that is brought to the 
Administrative Office after the mail 
delivery on Friday will be picked up the 
following Monday. If you have any 
time- sensitive mail it can still be 
posted for Friday, but it will be the re- 
sponsibility of that department to de- 
liver it to the post office. 

With less than seven weeks before 
the beginning of the new year, we still 
have a good supply of 2009 Hometown 
Heroes Calendars for purchase. TTie 
calendar features photographs of some 
of our local veterans and active mili- 
tary. Many of those pictured will be 
spending a second Christmas away 
from home while serving a 15-month 
tour of duty. 

If you would like to purchase a 
calendar, please contact Penny Shaugh- 
nessy at pshaughnessv(@clarion.edu or 
at extension 1206. The calendars are 
$5.00 each. All proceeds will go to pro- 
viding care packages for our military 



serving abroad. 

TTie next scheduled meeting of the 
Venango Forum is Friday, November 
21. The meeting will begin at 10:00 
a.m., in Montgomery Hall, Room 404. 
Mr. Joseph Croskey from the Clarion 
University Academic Enrichment De- 
partment will be the guest speaker. 
Please plan to attend. 

"I'm Not There", a movie based on 
seven different interpretations of music 
legend Bob Dylan, will be shown at 
7:30 p.m., Saturday, November 22, in 
the Rhoades Auditorium. The R-rated 
film will present various stages of Dy- 
lan's life including a variety of takes on 
him as a race and sex. It is presented as 
part of the Clarion University-Venango 
Campus Independent Film Series and is 
free and open to the public. 

Faculty, staff and students are re- 
minded that the Friday class schedule 
will be followed on Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 25. Venango offices and depart- 
ments will also be observing Friday 
hours of operation on the November 25 



(see below). 

Observance of the Thanksgiving 
holiday for students will begin at 
10:00 p.m., Tuesday, November 25 
and will conclude with the start up of 
classes at 8:00 a.m., Monday, Decem- 
ber 1. 

Thanksgiving Holiday Hours: On 
Tuesday, November 25, the Venango 
Administrative Office will be open 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Suhr Library, 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m.; School of Nursing and 
Allied Health, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; 
and Venango Bookstore, 9:30 a.m. to 
1 p.m. On Wednesday, November 26, 
the Venango Administrative Office 
will be open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; 
Suhr Library, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; School 
of Nursing and Allied Health, 8:30 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and the Venango 
Bookstore will be closed. 

Please send your news to Cindy 
Busch at cbusch(a)clarion.edu . Penny 
Shaughnessy at pshaugh- 
nessv@clarion.edu . or Jerri Gent at 
igent@clarion.edu . 



THANK YOU! recognized employees in October 



Three Clarion University-Venango 
Campus employees were recently rec- 
ognized by the THANK YOU! Em- 
ployee recognition program for the 
month of October. 

The following individuals have 



been thanked for "going above and be- 
yond." 

Gina Knox, Student Affairs, Dr. 
David Lott, Biology Department, and 
Lola Deets Smith, Biology Department, 
have been recognized by THANK 



YOU! 

Dr. David Lott was the recipient 
of the free lunch at CrossRhoades 
Cafe. 

Congratulations to these excep- 
tional employees! 



My 


GOTANIDEAr? 

We'dliicetoKean't! 

^ena uour suggestions and ideas to: 

vvoice@clarion.edu 


^ '\ .... 



Volume 41, Issue 12 



Page 9 



Get help with anxiety and fear from Maria Harp 



By Maria Harp 

Venango Campus Counselor 

What is anxiety? Fear and anxiety 
are not the same thing. Fear refers to 
perceiving that you are in danger. Anxi- 
ety is your response to fear - apprehen- 
sion, heightened vigilance, hyperventi- 
lating, dilated pupils, sweating, a racing 
pulse and possibly running fast. This is 
a primitive response known as the fight 
or flight response when we are in dan- 
ger. 

However, we often inappropriately 
activate the survival response of anxi- 
ety and we have allowed ourselves to 
perceive safe situations as dangerous. 
We have predicted that non-harmfiil 



things happening today will have harm- 
ful future consequences. Our minds 
create the danger, and we respond with 
the survival reaction, anxiety, as if we 
are in real danger. 

Anxiety is an inevitable part of life. 
It's important to realize that there are 
many situations that come up in every- 
day life in which it is appropriate and 
reasonable to react with some anxiety. 
However, anxiety disorders are distin- 
guished fi-om everyday, normal anxiety 
in that they involve anxiety that 1) is 
more intense (for example, panic at- 
tacks), 2) lasts longer (anxiety that may 
persist for months instead of going 
away after a stressftil situation has 
passed), or 3) leads to phobias that in- 



terfere with your life. (Don't forget 
about that dreaded test anxiety). 

There are simple yet helpfiil tips 
that can assist one to overcome the 
effects of anxiety or panic. For in- 
stance, learning to relax and imple- 
menting deep breathing techniques can 
alleviate symptoms of anxiety /panic at 
times most needed. If you or anyone 
you know suffers fi-om anxiety or 
panic attacks, encourage them to seek 
assistance. 

My office is available on Mon- 
day, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on 
Wednesday fi-om 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Please feel free to stop by and 
make an appointment, call ext. 1281, 
or email me at mharp@clarion.edu. 



PTK pies, desserts to be distributed November 20 



Pies and desserts purchased from 
Phi Theta Kappa members will be dis- 
tributed Thursday, November 20, at the 



second floor lobby of Montgomery 
Hall, at 1 1 a.m. 

For more information about pie 



sales or distribution, contact PTK 
Chapter President Patti Shontz at 
s_pashontz@clarion.edu. 




NOW YA KNOW! 

Q. What are the three most widely spoken 

languages in the world: Those with the 

largest number of speakers? 



N>l./, 






A. Mandarin Chinese 900K, 

Enghsh 46 3K, and Hindustani 

400K 



followed by Spanish 371K, Russian 290K, and Arabic 215K, accord- 
ing to "The Top 10 of Everything 1997." 




P.\(:;i: 10 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Harvey Center Lecture slated Nov. 20 



Continued from page 1 

networking lunch will be held by the 
Venango Campus Alumni Chapter on 
Wednesday, November 19, from noon 
to 1 :30 p.m., at Rhoades Center. 

The Annual Harvey Center Lec- 
ture will take place on Thursday, No- 
vember 20, at 7 p.m. 

Steve Weinburg, nationally 
known author of Taking on the Trust, 
an account of the defeat of John D. 
Rockefeller at the hands of 
"muckraking" journalist Ida Tarbell, 
which led to the breakup of Standard 
Oil, will speak. 

Career Services will sponsor the 
Transitions Bus Tour on Friday, No- 
vember 2 1 . 

The trip is for those students who 
plan to transition from Venango Cam- 
pus to Clarion University's main cam- 
pus. 

The bus will leave the upper park- 
ing lot of Venango Campus at ap- 
proximately 9 a.m. and return at ap- 
proximately 4:30 pm. 

The free trip will provide students 
a Q&A session with Clarion Univer- 
sity admissions representative Bill 
Bailey, a tour of main campus, and a 
free lunch. 

The response rate will depend on 
the size of the bus reserved, so stu- 
dents must RSVP by Friday, October 
31, to Mark Conrad, Coordinator of 



Career Services, at 676-6591, ext. 1373, 
or at mconrad(rt)clarion.edu. In addition, 
sign up sheets are available now at the 
Learning Support Center, at the Student 
Affairs office, and at the Career Services 
Center in Montgomery Hall. 

For more information, contact Mark 
Conrad at the above locations. 

"I'm Not There" will be shown on 
Saturday, November 22, at 7:30 p.m., in 
the Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

Thanksgiving holiday begins Tues- 
day, November 25, at 10 p.m. Friday 
classes meet in place of Tuesday classes 
on this day. 

Thanksgiving will be celebrated on 
Thursday, November 27. 

December 

Thanksgiving break ends at 8 a.m. 
Monday, December 1 . 

Student Senate will sponsor Cele- 
brate the Seasons Wednesday, December 
3, from 1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Rhoades 
Center. 

The event will recognize various reli- 
gious and cultural traditions celebrated 
during the winter season. 

"The Darjeeling Limited" will be the 
final film shown in the Independent Film 
Series Saturday, December 6, at 7:30 
p.m., at Rhoades Auditorium. 



For more information, contact 
Emily Aubele at 

eaubele@clarion.edu. 

Classes for the fall 2008 semes- 
ter end Friday, December 5. The Fi- 
nal Exam Period begins Monday, 
December 8, and ends Friday, De- 
cember 12. 

Winter Commencement will take 
place Saturday, December 13, in 
Clarion. 

Miscellaneous 

Yoga sessions will be held every 
Thursday, at 1 1 a.m., in the fourth 
floor lounge of Montgomery Hall. 
Classes will be instructed by Libby 
Jenkins. 

With the conclusion of renova- 
tions, yoga sessions will be held at 
the Rhoades Gymnasium. The ses- 
sions are free. 

Cardio-kickboxing sessions will 
be held every Wednesday from 6-7 
p.m. at the Franklin School of Kung 
Fu, 845 Buffalo St., Franklin. The 
sessions are free. 

Joann Wheeler will display her 
art at Rhoades Center through De- 
cember. 

Her three-dimensional collages 
and boxes have been exhibited and 
sold in juried group shows in several 
galleries. 



Email the VeNfiNGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CMiPUS 



Your Campus, "i'our Paper, "i'our X'oice 

\PeMfiMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 1 3 Monday, November 24, 2008 



LSC has tips for stressful finals week 



By Tammy Beach 

OK. it's time to face 
the music. The semester is 
quickh coming to a close. 
Finals are right around the 
comer. It's finalh hitting 
home that time is getting 
short and projects are be- 
ginning to close in. Time to 
really hit the books. Panic 
sets in. The echo of rapid 
heartbeats in the classrooms 
begins to poimd through the 
haUs. 

The time has come to 
buckle down and get seri- 
ous. Playtime has come to 
an abrupt stop, as it's finally 
time to open up books for 
the fist time this semester. 

Does this sound famil- 
iar? Don't worry . There are 
many students out there in 
the same boat. Time seems 
to escape one and all as the 
semester comes to an end. 

So what can one do to 
help get through this time 
of sheer panic? Students are 
bombarded with stress and 
pressure throughout the last 
few w eeks of the semester. 
Time management is key 
for an\'one looking to make 
it through the finals week. 
By learning to keep a good 
balance between homework 
and a little rest and rela.\a- 
tion. survival is possible. 



The Learning Support 
Center offers tips for good 
stud\ habits. 

We do, however, stress 
the importance of using the 
whole semester as a review 
for the final. 

Stress and an.xiety 
should not be a problem for 
most students who have 
been preparing for their 
final throughout the entire 
semester. But let's face it. 
not everyone has been pre- 
paring over the past several 
months for these last few 
weeks. Here are some tips: 

1 . Time management 
and scheduling are impor- 
tant during this time 
crunch. Use a planner. It's a 
good idea to write down the 
finals schedule on a calen- 
dar along with the times 
you will study. 

2. Do not confuse re- 
viewing with cramming. 

3. Get a good night's 
sleep and a good breakfast. 
Get at least seven hours of 
sleep. 

4. Remember that it is 
OK and natural to feel 
some concern and anxiety 
over tests. This will help 
\ou focus on the task that 
lies ahead. UTiat happens if 
test anxiety sets in? Relax a 
little. Make sure you sit 
back and take a deep 




breath. Other ways to alle- 
viate test anxiety are getting 
sufficient rest prior to the 
test, developing a positive 
attitude and taking practice 
tests or answering review 
questions. 

5. To help prepare for 
the test, make sure you 
have an attitude of confi- 
dence as you go into the 
test. Visualization is a good 
strategy before the testing 
date. 

6. Arrive at the class- 
room about five minutes 
prior to the testing time. Be 
sure not to arrive too early 
because this could cause 
test anxiety. 

7. When beginning the 
test, be sure to look over 
the entire test. If doing an 
essay, try to make an out- 
line. 

See FIN.A.LS on page 8 



Inside this issue: 


LSC Tips 


1 


Trash Talk 


2 


Job Openings 


3 


State News 


■= 


National News 


4 


World News 


-' 


Final Exam 
Schedule 


6 


GiN'E Thanks 


7 


Library LJours 


7 


Marla Harp 


8 


Madrigal Sing- 
ers 


8 


LSC Schedule 


9 


EX'ENTS 


10 



Paci 2 



Venango Voice 



Be mindful of the environment this holiday season 






Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 



'Tis the season... for lots 
of extra garbage! Throughout 
the holidays, we generate a 
lot of waste. Between all the 
parties, shopping, and gifts, 
we generate tons of waste. 

This week, I'm passing 
on to you lots of tips from the 
Environmental Protection 
Agency that can help you 
enjoy the holidays while 
minimizing the environ- 
mental impact. 
• This is an excellent time 



of year to conduct 
neighborhood clothing 
drives to help those in 
need. 

If you host dinners this 
year, use cloth napkins, 
and forgo the dispos- 
able tableware. 
After the feast, send 
leftovers home with 
your guests in recycla- 
ble or reusable contain- 
ers and fill the dish- 
washer to capacity be- 
fore running. 
If you are going away 
for the holidays, turn 
down your thermostat 
and put your lights on 
timers. 

If like me, you go 
through your kids" toys 
and clothes and weed 
out the unused before 
they get spoiled by the 
grandparents again, 
donate those items to 
the Salvation Army or 
one of the local shelters. 
When you go holiday 
shopping this year, take 
reusable shopping bags 



instead of using the 
plastic ones at the 
store. And, don't take 
bags for the oversized 
purchases that don"t t1t 
in them. 

Wrap gifts in recycled 
or reused wrapping 
paper or reusable gift 
bags. Give gifts that 
don't require much 
packaging like gift 
certificates. Another 
idea is to 'wrap' gifts 
in cloth napkins or 
festive tea towels. 
Send recycled-content 
cards or e-cards this 
Christmas. Recycle the 
cards you receive, or 
let your kids reuse 
them by making a 
holiday collage with 
the pictures on the 
fronts, or let them use 
them to create decora- 
tions for next year. 
Put your Christmas 
lights on timers to save 
energy and help them 
last longer. 
If vou have to have a 



live tree, look for ways 
to recycle it instead of 
sending it to a landfill. 
Check with the local 
communitN solid waste 
department and find out 
if they collect and 
mulch them. 

• Better yet. buy a potted 
tree this year and plant 
it after the holidays. 

• Consider the durability 
of a product before you 
buy it as a gift. If it's 
made cheaply, it will 
wear out quickly. 

• BUY LOCAL! There 
are plenty of shops 
where you can buy fi'om 
local crafters in this 
area. Or you may want 
to venture to Volant, 
just past the outlet mall, 
where you can buy 
handcrafted items from 
the many shops in town. 
Have a wonderful holi- 
day season! 

Reference materials for 
this article M-ere found at: 
www.epa.gov. 



P-mail the \Jcnans^o \/o'\cc with uour ideas at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Vfznango VoicjZ 

Student Afl'uirs. Rhoadcs Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoicefo'ciarion.cdu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp Lola Deets 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities The 
Voice is published most Monday s during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all .sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must anach a separate letter of explanation Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-ciirricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulllll their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



\OLLiME 41, Issue 13 



Pagi; 3 



Positions are still available for qualified candidates 



A local manufacturer has an imme- 
diate opening for a clerical position. 
Using Vista and accounting production 
software, the candidate's responsibili- 
ties will include working with custom- 
ers to expedite customer orders. AP. 
account reconciliation, and filing. Mi- 
crosoft Excel. Word and experience in 
an automated accounting production 
en\ironment are necessar). Prior ex- 
perience with Vista and Access is pre- 
ferred. A degree in business will be 
considered a plus. Also, mandator) are 
strong work ethics, abilirv to work well 
with customers and strong multitasking 
skills. Competitive compensation based 
on experience level is offered along 
with a health insurance package. 401k 
and profit sharing program. 

Send resume with co\er letter de- 
tailing salan. requirement to: Time Ma- 
chine. Inc.. 1746 Pinsburgh Road. Polk. 
PA. 16342. No phone calls please. 

A security' officer is needed in Oil 
Cit} . The part time position is Saturdax 
and Sunda\". 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. each da\. 
plus fill in work as needed for high traf- 
fic industrial site. Securir\ experience is 
preferred: excellent customer ser\ice 
skills, clear criminal background, and 
reliable transportation are a must. Steel 
toes required. Pa\' rate is S7.50 hr. 

Interested persons may complete 
an ,Am-Gard emplo\ment application at 
the Oil Cit} Careerlink. 

Two openings are a\ailable at the 
Venango Count}' Regional Planning 
Commission. A Planning Intern and a 
CIS intern are needed. 

The Planning Intern will perform 
specialized planning acti\ities to pro- 
\ide assistance in the Planning Depart- 
ment regarding counts-wide compre- 
hensi\e plans and programs to impro\"e 
the growth and quality of life in Ve- 
nango Count) . 

Essential functions of the job of a 
Planning Intern include: coordinates 
and implements a varietx of specialized 
projects and duties such as background 



anahsis for comprehensi\e planning 
projects, recxcling and solid waste data 
anahsis. Subdi\ision Administration 
acti\ities. studies, and other projects 
depending on specific departmental 
needs: prepares reports and other docu- 
ments for presentation and application: 
establishes and maintains statistical 
databases: presents to the public and 
others regarding specialized projects 
programs: assists in conducting popula- 
tion, land use. research anahsis and 
other planning studies necessar)' for 
de\elopment of comprehensive plans: 
and assists in programming for rec\- 
cling and waste reduction activities 
including program expansions, special 
events, public education, grant applica- 
tions and administration. 

The GIS intern will perform GIS 
mapping and anahsis tasks in support 
of count)' planning and resource man- 
agement acti\ ities. Responsibilities 
include compiling and s)nthesizing 
geographic data into .ArcGIS database: 
developing attribute data for shape 
files: maintaining and updating GIS 
databases as new data are collected: 
preparing, modif. ing and updating site 
maps and brochures using ArcGIS soft- 
ware and other digital media: develop- 
ing maps, charts, displavs. presenta- 
tions, graphics, brochures, and draw- 
ings: collecting data in the field using 
GPS equipment. 

These are temporar) intern posi- 
tions with a flexible work schedule of 
up to 20 hours per week. The duration 
of these assignments is expected to be 
between six to twelve months. Com- 
pensation for this position is Pa)' Grade 
1. Step 1 level of S7.95 per hour. Bene- 
fits are not included. 

Successfijl candidates will have a 
background in geographv. planning, 
environmental studies, landscape archi- 
tecture, or another related field; experi- 
ence with ArcGIS software: and exper- 
tise in cartograph)' and map produc- 
tion. This position requires attention to 
detail, excellent communication skills, 
the abilir>' to work well both in team 



settings and independent!), and the 
willingness to occasional!) work in 
remote settings. Knowledge of GPS 
technolog). abilit) to interpret topog- 
raphic maps, and familiarit) with plot- 
ters a plus. 

To appi)'. submit a resume to the 
attention of Judith Downs. Executive 
Director. PO Box 831. Franklin. PA. 
16323 b) November 21. Applications 
information ma) be obtained b) call- 
ing 814-432-9551 or emailing a re- 
quest to jdovvns@co.venango.pa.us. 

Kapp Alio)' and Wire. Inc. has 
been a leading manufacturer of bab- 
bitt, solder and metallizing spra)'wire 
for the electronics and aerospace in- 
dustries for over 50 )ears. They are a 
relativel)' small compan)'. with eight 
emplo)ees. The secret to their success 
is "Perfect solder perfect!) delivered." 

Kapp .Alio) and Wire. Inc."s con- 
tinued worldwide growth necessitates 
the hiring of an Administrative Assis- 
tant reporting to the compan) presi- 
dent. 

Required talents, skills and abili- 
ties include: willingness, abilit)' and 
desire to learn: self-initiative and the 
abilit)' to work independenth ; excel- 
lent oral and written communication 
skills: ven. organized and detail ori- 
ented to manage multiple projects: and 
expert level knowledge of Microsoft 
Office programs. 

Starting salan.' is commensurate 
with education and experience. S20K 
to S24K. There is a 90-da) probation- 
ar)' period, and benefits include flexi- 
ble hours, healthcare, bonus pool and 
profit-sharing. 

Interested candidates should fax 
or email a cover letter and resume 
direct!)' to the president Jack Craw- 
ford, at 814-676-5565 or 
jackgkappallo) .com. 

For more information or resume 
preparation assistance, contact Coordi- 
nator of Career Serv ices Mark Conrad 
at mconrad®clarion.edu. 



I'\(,l 4 



X'ENANGO \'OIC t 



State 



Ex-Penn professor to be sentenced in wife slaying 



NORRISTOWN. Pa. (AP) _ A long- 
time Ivy League professor is set for 
sentencing Wednesday in the Decem- 
ber 2006 slaying of his wife. 

Rafael Robb admits he "just lost 
it" during an argument and fatally beat 
his wife Ellen with a metal chin-up bar 
as she wrapped holida\ presents. 



The 58-year-old Robb. once a 
tenured economics professor at the 
University of Pennsylvania, faces a 
likely prison sentence of 4 1/2 to 
seven years. 

He and his 49-year-old wife were 
ending their 16-year marriage. 

Their only child, then 12. was at 



school when her mother was slain at 
the famih's Upper Merion Township 
home. 

Robb. a native of Israel, is an ex- 
pert in game theory. 

He is set for sentencing on 
Wednesday afternoon in Montgomery 
Count). 



National 



Schwarzenegger opens climate summit with Obama 



BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) _ Gov. 
Arnold Schwarzenegger opened his 
international climate change summit 
on Tuesday by upstaging himself with 
an even bigger political star — Presi- 
dent-elect Barack Obama. 

Schwarzenegger, a Republican 
whose efforts to combat global warm- 
ing in California have generated 
worldwide acclaim, wants to show that 
governments can balance environ- 
mental protection and economic 
growth. He hopes his summit will in- 
fluence negotiations over a new cli- 
mate treaty during a U.N. gathering in 
Poland next month. 

In a taped message to attendees, 
Obama said his administration is com- 
mitted to a cause that has all but lan- 
guished at the federal level during the 
term of President George W. Bush. 

"Once I take office, you can be 
sure that the United States will once 
again engage vigorously in these ne- 
gotiations and help lead the world 
toward a new era of global coopera- 
tion on climate change," Obama said. 

U.N. negotiators have a Decem- 
ber 2009 deadline to complete the next 
global warming treaty, which would 
succeed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. That 
treaty, which expires in 2012, does not 
include the U.S. or China — the 
world's largest emitters. 



Negotiators want to cut in half the 
amount of carbon dioxide discharged 
into the atmosphere fi'om transportation, 
industry and power generation by mid- 
century. 

In his roughly four-minute address 
to Schwarzenegger's conference, Obama 
said the U.S. economy would continue to 
weaken if climate change and depend- 
ence on foreign oil are not addressed. 

He reiterated his support for cutting 
greenhouse gas emissions using a cap- 
and-trade system, an approach also fa- 
vored by Schwarzenegger. Obama said 
he would establish annual targets to re- 
duce emissions to their 1990 levels by 
2020 and reduce them another 80 per- 
cent by 2050. 

Obama also promoted anew his pro- 
posal to invest $15 billion each year to 
support private-sector efforts toward 
clean energy. He said tackling climate 
change can create millions of new jobs 
as the U.S. invests in technologies to 
promote solar and wind povser. biofuels 
and cleaner coal-tired plants. 

"I promise you this: When I am 
president, any governor who's willing to 
promote clean energy will have a partner 
in the White House," Obama told the 
participants. "Any company that's will- 
ing to invest in clean energy will have an 
ally in Washington. And any nation 
that's willing to join the cause of com- 



bating climate change will have an 
ally in the United States of America." 

Scientists say the kind of ambi- 
tious goals set by Schwarzenegger and 
Obama must be reached to minimize 
the consequences of rising global tem- 
peratures. 

The U.N.'s Intergovernmental 
Panel on Climate Change has said 
temperatures worldwide could in- 
crease between 4 degrees and 1 1 de- 
grees Fahrenheit by 2100 unless na- 
tions reduce their emissions. 

Just how countries will cut emis- 
sions remains a topic of intense de- 
bate, especially as the world grapples 
with the worsening financial crisis. 
U.S. and foreign businesses, as well as 
some European countries, have ques- 
tioned whether cutting emissions will 
be too costly. 

Schwarzenegger said states, prov- 
inces and countries can cut emissions 
by forming partnerships, as he has 
done as governor. 

"I still have fi-iends in the business 
world that come to me and say that 
this is going to hurt the econonn." 
Schwarzenegger said in his opening 
remarks. "But of course, we believe 
very strongly it is going to help the 
economy." 

Schwarzenegger has signed part- 
See NATIONAL on page 5 



\'OLLiME 41, Issue 13 



Pagi-: 5 



World 



Al-Qaida No. 2 insults Obama with racial epithet 



CAIRO. EgNpt (AP) 

Al-Qaida's No. 2 leader used a 
racial epithet to insult Barack Obama 
in a message posted Wednesday, 
describing the president-elect in de- 
meaning terms that imply he does the 
bidding of whites. 

The message appeared chiefly 
aimed at persuading Muslims and 
Arabs that Obama does not represent 
a change in U.S. policies. 

Ayman al-Zawahri said in the 
message, which appeared on militant 
Web sites, that Obama is "the direct 
opposite of honorable black Ameri- 
cans" like Malcolm X. the 1960s 
Afi-ican-American rights leader. 

In al-Qaida's first response to 
Obama's victory. al-Zawahri also 
called the president-elect — along 
w ith secretaries of state Colin Powell 
and Condoleezza Rice — "house 
negroes." 

Speaking in Arabic. al-Zawahri 
uses the term "abeed al-beit," which 
literally translates as "house slaves." 

But al-Qaida supplied English 
subtitles of his speech that included 
the translation as "house negroes." 

The message also includes old 



footage of speeches by Malcolm X in 
which he explains the term, saying 
black slaves who worked in their white 
masters' house were more servile than 
those who worked in the fields. 

Malcolm X used the term to criti- 
cize black leaders he accused of not 
standing up to whites. 

In Washington, State Department 
spokesman Sean McCormack said the 
latest message was just "more despica- 
ble comments from a terrorist." 

The 11 -minute 23-second video 
features the audio message by al- 
Zawahri. who appears only in a still 
image, along with other images, includ- 
ing one of Obama wearing a Jewish 
skullcap as he meets with Jewish lead- 
ers. 

In his speech. al-Zawahri refers to 
a Nov. 5 U.S. airstrike attack in Af- 
ghanistan, meaning the video was made 
after that date. 

Al-Zawahri said Obama's election 
has not changed American policies he 
said are aimed at oppressing Muslims 
and others. 

"America has put on a new face, 
but its heart full of hate, mind drowning 
in greed, and spirit which spreads evil, 
murder, repression and despotism con- 



tinue to be the same as always." the 
deputy of al-Qaida chief Osama bin 
Laden said. 

He said Obama's plan to shift 
troops to Afghanistan is doomed to 
failure, because Afghans will resist. 

"Be aware that the dogs of Af- 
ghanistan have found the flesh of 
your soldiers to be delicious, so send 
thousands after thousands to them." 
he said. 

Al-Zawahri did not threaten spe- 
cific attacks, but warned Obama that 
he was "facing a Jihadi (holy war) 
awakening and renaissance which is 
shaking the pillars of the entire Is- 
lamic world; and this is the fact 
which you and your government and 
country refuse to recognize and pre- 
tend not to see." 

He said Obama's victory showed 
Americans acknowledged that Presi- 
dent George W. Bush's policies were 
a failure and that the result was an 
"admission of defeat in Iraq." 

But Obama's professions of sup- 
port for Israel during the election 
campaign "confirmed to the Ummah 
(Islamic world) that you have chosen 
a stance of hostility to Islam and 
Muslims," al-Zawahri said. 



NATIONAL: Governor addressed many attendees 



Continued from page 4 

nerships with governors of seven 
Western states and four Canadian 
provinces to develop regional cap- 
and-trade systems. He also has an 
agreement with the state of New 
York to explore linking California's 
future carbon market with a trading 
system in the Northeast. 

The governor also has signed 
agreements with the United Kingdom 
and Australia's premier in Victoria to 
combat climate change. And Schwar- 
zenegger alona with governors from 



Illinois and Wisconsin signed agree- 
ments Tuesday night with government 
representatives from Brazil and Indone- 
sia to combat tropical deforestation. 

Whether countries such as China 
will sign off on emission mandates re- 
mains a point of contention in interna- 
tional negotiations. 

China has argued that the U.S. and 
other industrialized countries should 
take the lead on cutting greenhouse gas 
emissions. 

The nation's top climate bureaucrat 
reiterated that sentiment Tuesday in a 
meeting with reporters. 



"Even now, per capita emissions 
in the U.S. are still five times higher 
than in China." said Gao Guang- 
sheng, director general of the Depart- 
ment of Climate Change at China's 
National Development Reform Com- 
mission. 

He said China's success in reduc- 
ing emissions in the future will de- 
pend on whether the U.S. and other 
countries share technology and invest 
in his country. 

Schwarzenegger addressed atten- 
dees from 19 other countries and 17 
states. 



Pact 6 Venango Voict 

Fall semester 2008 finals slated December 8-12 

All final examinations will be administered throughout the week of December 8-12 according to the schedule outlined be- 
low. Exams will not be given at times other than those specified on the final exam schedule. Students should report to the 
same classroom used throughout the fall semester unless indicated otherwise. Students with three or more tests on the same 
da> may reschedule tests by consulting with the appropriate instructors or the college dean. If a mutually convenient time can- 
not be agreed upon. Friday. December 12. should be used as the alternate test date. Courses that begin after the starting times 
listed on the exam schedule should adhere to the test schedule for that hour. i.e.. BSAD 240-04 meets MW 1 2:30 - 1 :45PM. 
there-fore, the final exam will be Monday. December 8. 12:00 - 1:50PM. 
MONDAY, DECEMBER 8 

Test Time: SAM - 9:50A1VI for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monda\'. Wednesday, or Friday 
at SAM. 

Test Time: lOAIVl - 1 1 :50AIVI for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Mondas . Wednesday, or Fri- 
day at 9AIV1. 

Test Time: 12 Noon - 1:50P1V1 for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monda\. Wednesday, or Fri- 
da\ at 12 Noon. 

Test Time: 2P1V1 - 3:50PIVI for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday. Wednesdav. or Friday at 
IPM. 

Test Time: 4PIVI - 5:50P1VI 

ELED 327-01 Ins Str & Mgmt El & Ech L. Brown Peirce Auditorium 
ELED 327-02 Ins Str & Mgmt El & Ech L. Brown Peirce Auditorium 
ELED 327-03 Ins Str & Mgmt El & Ech L. Brown Peirce Auditorium 
ELED 330-01 Lang Arts in'Elem Sch D. Ellermeyer 1 12 Still (Aud) 
ELED 330-02 Lang Arts in Elem Sch D. Ellermeyer I 12 Still (Aud) 
ELED 330-03 Lang Arts in Elem Sch D. Ellerme\er I 12 Still (Aud) 

COURSES THAT MEET AT 4PM OR LATER AND HAVE THE FIRST CLASS MEETING OF THE WEEK 
ON MONDAY EVENINGS WILL TEST AT THE REGULAR MONDAY MEETING TIMES ON DECEMBER 8. 
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9 

Test Time: 8AM - 9:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 8AM. 
Test Time: 10AM - 11:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 
9:30AM. 

Test Time: 12 Noon - 1:50PM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 2PM. 
Test Time: 2PM -3:50PM 

ACTG 251-01 Financial Accounting R. Otte 1 12 Still (Aud) 
ACTG 251-02 Financial Accounting R. Otte 112 Still (Aud) 
ACTG 251-03 Financial Accounting R. Otte 1 12 Still (Aud) 
MMAJ 101-01 Mass Media & Society J. Washington Chapel Auditorium 
MMAJ 101-02 Mass Media & Society J. Washington Chapel Auditorium 
MMAJ 101-03 Mass Media & Society J. Washington Chapel Auditorium 
MMAJ 270-01 Temporal Media R. Nulph 124 Becker 
MMAJ 270-02 Temporal Media R. Nulph 124 Becker 
PHSC 1 12-03 Bas Phys Sci Phys & Astr L. Gourley Peirce Auditorium 
PHSC 1 12-04 Bas Phys Sci Phys & Astr L. Gourley Peirce Auditorium 
PHSC 1 12-05 Bas Phys Sci Phys & Astr L. Gourley Peirce Auditorium 
Test Time: 4PM - 5:50PM 

ELED 324-01 Teh Elem & Mid Sch Math V. Harry 1 12 Still (Aud) 
ELED 324-02 Teh Elem & Mid Sch Math V. Harry 1 12 Still (Aud) 
ELED 324-03 Teh Elem & Mid Sch Math V. Harry 1 12 Still (Aud) 
MATH 1 1 1-03 Math Cone Grades K-8 R. Carbone Peirce Auditorium 
MATH 1 1 1-04 Math Cone Grades K-S R. Carbone Peirce Auditorium 
MATH 21 1-03 Fund Topics in K.-8 Math R. Carbone Peirce Auditorium 

COURSES THAT MEET AT 4PM OR LATER AND HAVE THE FIRST CLASS MEETING OF THE WEEK ON 
TUESDAY EVENINGS WILL TEST AT THE REGULAR TUESDAY MEETING TIMES ON DECEMBER 9. 

See SCHEDULE on page 7 



VENANGO CAMPUS - Fall 2008 
FINAL EXAM SCHEDULE (Nov 20. 2008) 

All final examinations \\all be administered throughout the week of December 8, according to the schedule outlined below. 
Exams will not be gi\-en at times other than those specified on the final exam schedule. Students should report to the classroor 
listed. ITV classes will be scheduled individually. Confirm with the faculty for test times and locations. 

Students with three or more tests on the same day may reschedule tests by consulting with the appropriate instructors or 
the college dean. If a mutually convenient time cannot be agreed upon, Friday, December 12, should be used as the 
alternate test. NOTE - watch for future updates or changes. Confirm this information with your faculty. 



SATURDAY - December 6 



9:00 a.m. Eng 


111:55 Knepp 


er 307 








MH 












ll:00a.m PS 


210:51 Rourke 101 








MH 












MONDAY, December 8 










8:00 a.m. 












Psy211:51 


404 MH 


Forden 








9:00 a.m. 












Nurs 201 


101 MH 


Moore 








Math 050: 51 


307 MH 


Jackson 








Nurs 101 


R-Aud 


Seybold 








11:00 a.m. 












HPE 1 1 1 


101 MH 


Brennan- 








Caplin 












Eng 111: 51 


404 MH 


Huber 








CMST113:51 


112F 


Kerle 


Monday - continued 






CMST113:54 


112F 


Kerle 








1:00 p.m. 












Math 112: 51 


307 MH 


Jackson 


6:00 












Ntirsl01:55 


ITV 


Seybold 


2:00p.m. 






ANTH211 


108 F 


Prezzano 


SPED 245 


116F 


Wynkoop 








PSY211:52 


404 MH 


Forden 


7:00 






CIS 217: 51 


311MH 


Hunter 


CRJT 245 


208 F 


Klenowski 


ENG 307 


403 MH 


Huber 


S0C211 


101 MH 


Hunchuk 


PHSC 112 


108 F 


Gourley 








5:00 












CRJT 110 


208 F 


Klenowski 








ECON221 


403 MH 


Duespohl 








CMST113:53 


112F 


Kerle 









TUESDAY, December 9 

9:00 

Math 131 
Chem 153 

11:00 

CRJT 265 

01:00 

Eng 1 1 1 : 52 
Math 110 



THURSDAY December 1 1 



307MH 
108F 



112F 



403 MH 
307 MH 



Jackson 
Stevens 



Kerle 



Foster 
Jackson 



03:00 

SPED 128 
Hist 112 
Biol 1 1 1 
CIS 217: 52 
ES 111 

05:00 

Math 112: 52 
CIS 217: 53 
ENG 265 



112F 


Gaginni 


307 MH 


Clark 


101 MH 


Deets 


311 MH 


Hunter 


208 F 


Occhipinti 



307 MH 
311MH 
403 MH 



LaVan 
Hunter 
Foster 



Wednesday, December 10 



09:00 






MGMT 120 


307 MH 


Duespohl 


02:00 






REHB 227 


307 MH 


Kilwein 


Econ 175 


403 Mh 


Duespohl 


ACTG251 


ITV 


Danvers 


3:00 






PHSC 1 1 1 


108 F 


Stevens 


PSY 355 


404 MH 


Forden 


CMST 113:52 


112F 


Kerle 


05:00 






CIS 217: 54 


311MH 


Armberger 


Eng 226 


404 MH 


Huber 


07:00 






CRJT 275 


208 F 


Klenowski 


ART 110 


101 MH 


Turri 



8:00 






PS 211 


112F 


Coulter 


09:00 






10:00 






Nurs 131:51,52 


R-Aud 


Nursing 


12:00 






Eng 1 1 1 : 53 


404 MH 


Foster 


2:00 






Nurs 131:53 


403 MH 


Nursing 


05:00D.ni. 






ED 110 


108 F 


Carrico 


REHB 126 


116F 


Wynkoop 


PSY 211: 53 


112F 


Hollis 


ENG 111: 54 


101 MH 


Foster 


Math 112: 53 


307 MH 


LaVan 


Math 050: 52 


403 MH 


McKain 


HON 129 


304 MH 


Foster (final 


assignment due) 






6:30 D.m. 






PHIL 211 


208 F 


Bowser 


PSY 1 1 1 


404 MH 


Forden 


Psy 211: 53 


112F 


Hollis 



FRIDAY December 12 



9:00 

Mus 1 1 1 
11:00 

Biol 258: 51 
12:00 

Psy 211: 54 



101 MH 



101 MH 



307 MH 



Teske 



Lott 



Potter 



\OLUME 41. Issue 13 



Page; 7 



Remember to give much thanks this Thanksgiving 



B_\ Rcbekah Eakin 

As the Thanksgiving holidav ap- 
proaches. I would like to encourage 
e\er>one to simpi\ remember the rea- 
son for celebrating this season. We all 
are al\\a>s so bus> between famih. 
school and work that we often don't 
find the time to appreciate all that we 
have and give thanks for the jo\s 
we've been granted. 

In this area there are thousands of 
low-income families who will not be 



able to afford the staples of a Thanks- 
giving meal for their families. So. I 
encourage you to get involved and help 
those in need. 

It could often be as simple as invit- 
ing someone \ou know that will be 
spending this Thanksgiving alone to 
join \ou on the holidav for a meal and 
comradeship. 

Several efforts are also made lo- 
cally to help any of those in need, such 
as The Friends for Food Campaign, 
which served over 13.000 families in 



Venango Coimty alone by supplying 
turkey and other side dishes last year. 

As we all know, there are also 
over 162.000 American soldiers cur- 
rently serving in the war who will be 
unable to spend this and many other 
holidays home with their families. 
May we never stop supporting all of 
those brave individuals that support 
our country every day. 

Again. I ask you to please remem- 
ber to give thanks for all of your bless- 
ings, sreat and small. 



Suhr Library Holidav and End-of-the-Semester Hours 

November 25... Sam. -4p.m. December 13-22... S a.m. - 4 p.m.. Closed weekends 

November 26... 8 a.m. -4 p.m. December 23-January 1... CLOSED 

November 2~-30... CLOSED January 2-11... 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.. Closed weekends 

Re2ular hours at Suhr Librar\' resume on Januan 12. 2009. 



SCHEDULE: Dec. 12 to be used for make-up exams 



Continued from pase 6 



WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 10 

Test Time: 8.AM - 9:50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday. Wednesday, or Friday 
at 10AM. 

Test Time: 1 GAM - 1 1 :50.\iVI for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday, Wednesday, or Fri- 
day at 11A.M. 

Test Time: 12 Noon - 1 :50PM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Monday. Wednesday, or Fri- 
day at 2P.M. 

Test Time: 2PM - 3:50P.M for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Mondav, Wednesdav. or Fridav at 
3P.M. 

Test Time: 4PM - 5:50P-M 

ED 1 10-01 Intro to Education P. Kolencik Chapel Auditorium 
ED 1 10-02 Intro to Education P. Kolencik Chapel .Auditorium 
ED 1 10-03 Intro to Education P. Kolencik Chapel .Auditorium 

COURSES THAT .MEET AT 4PM OR L.ATER AND H.A\ E THE FIRST CLASS MEETING OF THE WEEK ON 
W EDNESDA^ E\ E.NTNGS WILL TEST AT THE REGULAR WEDNESDAY MEETING TLMES ON 
DECE.MBERIO. 
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 11 

Test Time: 8.AM - 9:50.AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 11AM. 
Test Time: lO.A.M - 1 1 :50AM for all courses which have the first class meeting of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 
12:30PM. 

Test Time: 12 Noon - 1 :50PM for all courses which have the first class meetins of the week on Tuesday or Thursday at 
3:30PM. 

Test Time: 2P.M - 3:50P.M 

PS 21 1-04 .American Go\emment K. Yenerall Chapel .Auditoriimi 
PS 21 1-05 .American Government K. ^"enerall Chapel .Auditorium 

COURSES THAT MEET AT 4PM OR LATER AND HAVE THE FIRST CLASS MEETLNG OF THE WEEK ON 
THURSDAY EVENINGS WILL TEST .AT THE REGULAR THURSDAY .MEETING TIMES ON DECEMBER 11. 
FRIDAY. DECEMBER 12 - MAY BE USED TO RESOLVE SCHEDULING PROBLEMS AND MAKE-UP EXAMS. 



Page 8 



Venango Voice 



Emotional, cognitive strategies relieve finals stress 



By Maria Harp 

Venango Campus Counselor 

Are you feeling overwhelmed, hav- 
ing difficulty concentrating, irritable 
and restless? These, as well as other 
cognitive symptoms, are an indication 
of stress. Stress is also identified in 
forms of physical symptoms, such as 
headaches, tight muscles, nervous 
stomach, and fatigue, to name a few. 
Understand that relief is possible. 

The end of the semester is near, 
which heightens that sense of stress 
preparing for finals and fmal projects. 
Remember there are things you can do 
to help >ourself alleviate that stress. 
Seek assistance when available, such as 
counseling services or learning support 
services. Additionally, there are numer- 
ous physical and lifestyle strategies that 
can assist in overcoming the nesiative 



effects of stress. Remember that ab- 
dominal breathing and relaxation is 
key. Maintain a low-stress diet, regular 
exercise, have "mental health days". 
take 5-10 minute breaks to relax 
throughout the day. utilize time man- 
agement techniques, sleep, and choose 
a nontoxic environment. 

Emotional strategies to overcome 
stress include developing a social sup- 
port group, self-nurturing, exercise 
good communication, demonstrate as- 
sertiveness (have the ability to say no 
when needed), enjoy recreational ac- 
tivities, allow yourself emotional re- 
lease, and enjoy a sense of humor. 

Cognitive strategies that can assist 
in overcoming stress are to practice the 
ability to counter negative thinking. 
have the ability to distract yourself 
from negative preoccupations, take a 
task-oriented (vs. reactive) approach to 



problems, demonstrate the ability to 
accept/cope with setbacks and demon- 
strate tolerance for ambiguity. 

FinalK. there are philosophical/ 
spiritual strategies to deal with stress 
and these are through having consis- 
tent goals or purposes to work toward, 
establishing a positive philosophy of 
life, and having your own religious/ 
spiritual life and commitments. 

Now with that said, some of you 
may think. "Easier said than done". 
You will find that if you work on the 
strategies listed above and find the 
ones that seem to best work for you. 
you will learn ways to overcome those 
stressful times. 

For more information about stress 
or other questions, contact Venango 
Campus Counselor Maria Harp at 
mharpfrtclarion.edu or at extension 



CUP Madrigal Singers to come to Oil City Dec. 6 



A trio of Madrigal Dinners, includ- 
ing the 3 1 St annual dinner to be held on 
Clarion University's campus, have been 
scheduled by the Clarion University 
Madrigal Singers. 

The on-campus dinner is scheduled 
Friday, Dec. 5, at 6 p.m. in Chandler 
Dining Hall. The menu for Chandler 
Dining Hall includes a choice of pork 
tenderloin with rosemary au jus or 
herb-baked chicken with tossed green 
garden salad, roasted red-skinned pota- 



toes. California vegetable blend, flam- 
ing bread pudding, and wassail punch, 
coffee or soda. 

The tickets are $25 for adults and 
$15 for children under 12. For reserva- 
tions call 814-393-2384 before Dec.l. 

The two off-campus dinners are 
scheduled at Fort Worth Restaurant. 
DuBois. Thursday. Nov. 20 at 6 p.m.: 
and the Arlington Hotel. Oil City, Sat- 
urday, Dec. 6. 7 p.m. Call 814-393- 
1270 for prices, menu, and reservations. 



A Madrigal Dinner is a reproduc- 
tion of a 16th Centur\ English Christ- 
mas Feast. Each phase of the dinner is 
introduced by the Herald trumpeters 
and a carol. Follov\ing dinner, the 
Madrigal Singers perform a concert of 
Christmas and Madrigal music. 

Dr Henry Alviani. associate pro- 
fessor of music and director of choral 
and vocal music studies at Clarion 
University, directs the Madrigal Sing- 
ers. 



FINALS: Visit LSC for help with finals preparation 



Continued from page 1 



8. Change the answers only if you 
are sure they are wrong. 

9. Remember to schedule a time to 
meet with a tutor. The LSC can assist 
with arranging study groups. 



With these steps, getting through 
finals won't be a breeze, but it might be 
a little simpler and more organized. 
Remember to focus and visualize doing 
well on the test. 

The most important aspect of test 
taking is relaxing and being prepared 
for your final exams. 



For assistance u ith finals prepara- 
tion or other academic assistance, con- 
tact the Learning Support Center in 
318 Montgomery Hall, or contact 
Tamm> Beach of the Learning Sup- 
port Center by e-mail at s_tmdu 
laneyfrttclarion.edu or call 814-676- 
6591. extension 1344. 



\OLUME 41, Issue 13 



PAG1-; 9 



Learning Support Center notes schedule, tutors 



Hours 

Monday 
Shannon Shiiffstall 9-12 

JoleBurkett 11-2 
JoniBrinker 11:15-3:15 
JoleBurkett 3:30-6:30 
Joni Brinker 4:30-6:30 

Tuesday 

Megan Warner 1 1 -2 

Daniele Merryman 11-1 

Melissa Rainey 2-3:30. 5- 

6:30 

Melinda Eckman 5-7 

Wednesday 

Shannon Shuffstall 9-11 

Jen7 Burns 11:30-1:30 

Melinda Eckman 12:30-3 

Megan Warner 1 2-3 

Joni Brinker 2-3:15 

Melinda Eckman 5-7 

Thursday 

Shannon Shuifstall 9-11 

Jerr>' Burns 9-3 

JoleBurkett 11-3 

Joni Brinker 11:1 5-2 

Megan Warner 1 0-2 

Melinda Eckman 12-1:30 

Daniele Merryman 4-5 

Melissa Rainey 5-7 

Melinda Eckman 5-7 

Friday 

Shannon Shuffstall 9-11 

Charity Hansford 11-4 

Jerry Bums 3-5 



Learning Support Center Tutors 


Mesan Warner 


Jole Burkett 


Melinda Eckman 


s mswarner@clarion.edu 


sJburkett@clarion.edu 


s mseckman@clarion.ed 


Writing II - ENG 1 1 1 


Writing II - ENG 1 1 1 




: Fund Speech -CMST 113 


Intro Music - MUS 1 1 1 


Math 050 


; Sur. Wom. Lit - ENG 265 


A&P I& II 


CIS 217 


i MATH111&211 


CIS217 


General Psych 


; Basic Biology - BIO 1 1 1 


General Psych 2 1 1 




i HIST 120 


Developmental Psych 260 


Shannon Shuffstall 


i Phys Sci & Astronomy 


Sociology 211 


s_stshuffsta@clarion.edu 


: CIS 217 


Humanities I 




: Sociology 211 


Biology 1 1 1 


Speech 


; Music 131 


App. Micro -CIS 217 


Writing II 


i Health 


Nursing 101, 111, 112, 


Intro to Criminal Justice 


: Ed Psych 122 


102 


Math 050 


i RE 270 




Chem I 


i ECON212 


Melissa Rainey 


Health 




s mjrainey@clarion.edu 


CIS 217 


Joni Brinker 






i sJebrinkerfSclarion.edu 


Math 112 


Charity Hansford 




A&P I&II 


s chansford(a)clarion.edu 


: A&P 1 & 2 


Writing II 




: Nursing 132, 101, 102 & 


Math 050 


A&P I&II 


i 131 


Basic Biology 


Nursing 101. Ill, 112, 
102, 131, 121 


Daniele Merryman 




Writing II 


1 s dmmerryman@clarion. 






i edu 




Jerry Burns 

sJmbums@clarion.edu 


: Math 050 






i Math 112 




Math 112 


: Writing II 




Writing II 


i Basic Biology 




Intro to Business 


: General Psych 




CIS 217 


i Developmental Psych 




Fund, of MGMT 



For additional information about final exam preparation or 

the Learning Support Center schedule, contact Tammy Beach at 

s_tmdulaney@clarion.edu, or call extension 1344. 



Paci 10 



Venango Voice 



Music performances mark the end of semester 



November 

Thanksgiving iioliday begins on 
Tuesday. November 25, at 10 p.m. 
Friday classes meet in place of Tues- 
day classes on this day. 

Thanksgiving will be celebrated 
on Thursday. November 27. 

December 

Thanksgiving break ends at 8 
a.m., on Monday. December I. 

Student Senate will sponsor Cele- 
brate the Seasons on Wednesday, De- 
cember 3, from 1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m.. at 
Rhoades Center. The event will recog- 
nize various religious and cultural 
traditions celebrated during the winter 
season. 

"The Darjeeling Limited" will be 
the final film shown in the Independ- 
ent Film Series on Saturday, Decem- 
ber 6, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades Audito- 
rium. 

For more information, contact 
Emily Aubele at 814-676-6591, exten- 
sion 1270, or e-mail 
eaubele(®clarion.edu. 

Singer/songwriter Adam 

Kowalczyk will perform at Clarion 
University-Venango Campus on Fri- 
day, December 12, at 7;30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Lounge. 

Kowalczyk recently relocated to 



the East Coast from California following 
a four-year stint that included independent 
projects with Dan Vickery of The Count- 
ing Crows, and Gregg Upchurch of 
Eleven, and Puddle of Mudd. 

He was a member of the band Adam 
and the Weight, which garnished a nomi- 
nation for Independent Pop Album of the 
Year by the LA Music Awards 2003 for 
their debut CD "Looking up from the 
Ground," as well as an Honorable Men- 
tion for his song "Never Good at Fight- 
ing" by The International Songwriting 
Competition 2004. 

Kowalczyk's new release is titled 
"The Dream EP." 

For more information about this per- 
formance, contact Emily Aubele at 
eaubelefrt>clarion.edu or at extension 
1270. 

Classes for the fall 2008 semester end 
on Friday, December 5. 

The Final Exam Period begins Mon- 
day, December 8 and end Friday, Decem- 
ber 12. 

Winter Commencement takes place 
Saturday, December 13, in Clarion. 

Winter Intersession begins Monday, 
December 15. Final Exams for Winter 
Intersession courses are Monday, January 



Garrison Starr and Adrianne perform 
on Friday, December 19, at 7:30 p.m., at 
the Latonia Theater in Oil CitN. For more 



information, contact Director of Stu- 
dent Affairs Emily Aubele at 
eaubele@clarion.edu, or at 814-676- 
6591, extension 1270. 

January 

Spring semester 2009 begins 
Monday. January 12. Registration for 
day and evening classes will also be 
held that day. 

Miscellaneous 

Yoga sessions will be held every 
Thursday, at 1 1 a.m., in the fourth 
floor lounge of Montgomery Hall. 
Classes will be instructed by Libby 
Jenkins. 

With the conclusion of renova- 
tions, yoga sessions will be held at 
the Rhoades Gymnasium. The ses- 
sions are free. 

Cardio-kickboxing sessions will 
be held every Wednesday, from 6-7 
p.m., at the Franklin School of Kung 
Fu, 845 Buffalo St., Franklin. The 
sessions are free. 

Joann Wheeler will display her 
art at Rhoades Center through De- 
cember. 

Her three-dimensional collages 
and boxes have been exhibited and 
sold in juried group shows in several 
oalleries. 




Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City, PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The\ 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
atTirmative action for all people iinohed in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunitx inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Fquity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA, 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 
VENANGO CAMPUS 



JAN 2 1 2009 

cLawonunivlj 

-y PENNSVI ^ '' 



'S 

YolIr Campus. Your Paper, "i'our X'oice 

m-flMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 1+ Monday, January 19, 2009 



Free fitness programs at Venango 
Campus offer healthy start to 2009 



Clarion University- 
\enango Campus \\ill offer 
se\eral opportuniries to 
fulfill those New Year's 
resolutions to get fit Take 
ad\antage of these free 
programs. 

Bod> camp classes will 
be held e\ er> Tuesda} be- 
ginning Januar. 27 at 2 
p.m.. in the Rhoades Gym- 
nasium. Classes will be 
taught b}- Jane Horos of the 
Y\VCA. The one-hour 
cardio class will concen- 
trate on strength training, 
but will also incorporate 
traditional step aerobics as 
well as an intenal training 
boot camp class. 

"\'oga classes instructed 
b\' Libb\' Jenkins will bedn 



Thursda}'. Januap.' 29. at 1 1 
a.m.. and be held ever}' 
Thursday- to follow at the 
same time. Yoga classes 
will be held in the Rhoades 
G>Tnnasium. 

"Yes, you can!" quit 
smoking. Smoking cessa- 
tion classes will be held 
everv Thursdav for sLx 
weeks beginning Januan' 
22. at 3:30 p.m.. in the con- 
ference room in Rhoades 
Center. The class will pro- 
\ide students with the tools 
needed to quit smoking for 
good. 

.A. Food For Thought 
cooking class will be held 
Tuesdav. Februar} 10. at 3 
p.m.. at the Commimit\" 
Room in the Student .Apart- 



ment Complex. Here, stu- 
dents learn about foods that 
actualh' help the brain func- 
tion and think better. 

Get active with Dr. 
Lott ever} Tuesday at 3:30 
p.m. Various activities will 
take place throughout the 
semester, including biking, 
hiking, cross countr}' ski- 
ing, cardio and strength 
training, and more. For 
more information, contact 
Dr. Lott at 

dlottS clarion.edu. 

For more information 
about any of these pro- 
grams, contact Kristen 
Colford in ±e Student Af- 
fairs Office at 814-676- 
6591. extension 1271. 



Patterson, Keenan present at conference 



Dr. Kathleen Patter- 
son. Director of Clarion 
Universit}'s School of 
Nursing and .Allied Health, 
located at Clarion Uni\er- 
sit} -\'enango Campus in 
Oil Cit}. and Professor 
Jo} ce Keenan. Chair of the 
Department of Nursing, 
were presenters at the re- 
cent 9th -Annual Interdisci- 
plinary Research Confer- 
ence entitled 



"Transforming Healthcare 
Through Research. Educa- 
tion, and Technolog}""" in 
Dublin. Ireland. 

Their presentation, 
entitled "Bridging the 
Chasm: An Education and 
Health Care Partnership to 
Manage the Nursing Short- 
age in a Rural Commu- 
nit}," explored an iimo\a- 
tive parmership approach 
to meetina the international 



nursing shortage that is 
particularl} critical in rural 
areas as the "bab}' boomer 
generation" is reaching 
retirement age. The authors 
shared the unique partner- 
ship model through which 
Clarion Universit} has 
teamed with UPMC North- 
west and Mead\ille Medi- 
cal Center to ensure a qual- 
it} nursing workforce into 
the future. 



Inside this issue: 


Fitness Pro- 
grams 


^ 


Conference l 


Trash Talk 


2 


St.ate News 




National News 


3 


World News 




PTK News 


_ 


Words of Wis- 
dom 


~^ 


Career Center 
News 


6 


Now Ya Know! 


6 



PAC.i-: 2 



Venango \'oice 



Make your resolution environmentally-friendly 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 



New Year's resolutions 
usually revolve around 
weight loss, exercise, and 
money. What if this year was 
different? Even though we 
are a couple of weeks into 
2009, it doesn't mean we 
can't add a few to the list. To 
get into the mindset. I'll 
share a few ideas. 

One thing we can all 
easily do is participate in a 
local cleanup. Phi Theta 
Kappa picks up trash as part 
of the Adopt-a-Highway pro- 



gram in March: extra bodies 
are always welcome (email 
me). If you cannot find a 
group with which to partici- 
pate, grab a few friends or 
your kids and take a walk 
around your neighborhood 
or the bike trail, or any- 
where and beautify a piece 
of the earth. 

Get rid of those plastic 
bags whenever possible. 
Keep some of the reusable 
bags handy so you have 
them whenever needed. I 
keep some in the trunk of 
my car. and a few by the 
back door. They hold an 
amazing amount of grocer- 
ies, are easier to carry, and 
don't slide all over the 
trunk. They are also quite 
strong. My four-year-old 
loves to climb into one and 
make me carry him around 
the house in it. Though I 
wouldn't recommend you 
test their strength this way, I 
haven't had one rip yet. 

Walk more. This actu- 
ally goes along with the 
weight loss/exercise resolu- 
tions. If your destination is 



in walking distance, walk. 
Walking distance is NOT, 
by the way, the distance 
from the house to the car. 

Carpool! When you 
have errands to run, do 
them with a friend or fam- 
ily member that has to hit 
the same stores. You will 
save money and energy, 
and let's face it - shopping 
is just more fun with a 
fi"iend. 

Make your voice 
heard. Contact the local 
congressman about at least 
one environmental issue 
this year. Show your con- 
cern for wildlife, food ad- 
ditives, or whatever con- 
cerns you most. Track bills 
that are coming up to vote 
and let your voice be heard. 

Recycle. Make a pact 
with yourself that recycla- 
ble materials will make it 
into a recycling bin instead 
of the trashcan. 

Start a compost pile. It 
can be as simple as a cor- 
ner of the garden or yard. 
This reduces the amount of 
sjarbase going into a land- 



fill, and helps your plants 
grow naturally, without 
harsh chemicals. 

Reduce your paper con- 
sumption. Opt for cloth nap- 
kins over paper, and do 
away with the paper towels. 

When you do buy paper 
products, choose types that 
contain post-consumer recy- 
cled fiber. It's available in 
almost every store, even the 
cheaper stores. usualK at the 
same price or slightly more 
than paper made from virgin 
material. It used to be that 
recycled paper was less than 
white, or of a lesser quality. 
Not an>more! 

If everyone in this 
country alone commits to 
one or two environmentally 
beneficial practices, we can 
help turn the tides on the 
state of our planet. 

I'd love to hear your 
comments or things you'd 
like to see in this column. 
Email me at s_lasecor@clar 
ion.edu. 

Remember. small 

changes can bring big re- 
sults! 



Vfznango Voicg 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoiceyclarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. .loan Huber Kerri Sniasda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion Universin of Penns\l\ ania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities The 
Voice is published most Mondays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punclualion. and obscenity; the determmation of 
which is the responsibility of the EdUor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact infomiation. They must be received no later th:ui noon Tuesdaxs If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-currrcular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



Volume 41, Issue 14 



Page 3 



State 



Pa. House speaker sees tough budget choices ahead 



HARRISBURG. Pa. (AP) ~ The new 
speaker of the Pennsylvania House of 
Representatives predicted that the com- 
ing budget season will be one of the 
toughest lawmakers will ever face. 

In his first interview since being 
elected last week to lead the chamber. 
Speaker Keith R. McCall said the 
state's tight finances will limit the Leg- 
islature's ability to address such De- 
mocratic priorities as expanding health 
coverage for the uninsured. 

McCall, D-Carbon, said the chal- 
lenge is more daunting than just ad- 
dressing the projected $1 -billion-plus 
shortfall for the year that ends June 30. 
He is worried that next year's budget 
hole could approach $3 billion to $4 
billion. 

"I don't want to raise a panic, but 
that is the reality that we're dealing with 
in the economy, in the revenue collec- 
tions that we're seeing right now," 
McCall said during a wide-ranging in- 
terview with The Associated Press in 
his Capitol office. 

He said he senses no support by the 
House membership to increase any 
broad-based state taxes, such as on 
sales or income. 

"So where we go is a very tough 



question," McCall said. "And if you're 
not raising any of those taxes, that 
means cuts. And those cuts will be dra- 
conian, in my opinion. But 1 think it's 
something that the public and members 
of this General Assembly have to see 
and come to terms with." 

McCall said he wants to focus over 
the next few months on finding a way 
to delay looming electric rate increases 
for consumers and businesses by push- 
ing back the scheduled expiration of 
regulation-era rate caps. 

"I think we have to delay, there's 
no question about it," McCall said. "I 
think we have to roll up our sleeves and 
figure out a way how we're going to 
mitigate these rates." 

He was elevated to speaker last 
week on a party-line vote in the House 
that Democrats control by five seats 
and took the reins after several years in 
which the Legislature's public image 
has suffered. 

McCall said he was not inclined to 
second-guess how Attorney General 
Tom Corbett has handled an ongoing 
investigation into possible illegal use of 
state money and other resources for 
campaign purposes. 

Some Democrats have complained 



that after two years only members of 
their party have been charged. 

"I don't know what Tom Corbett 
has in front of him and what he's look- 
ing at and what was presented to him," 
McCall said. "So I can't criticize the 
man for the investigation." 

He threw cold water on proposals 
to expand the state's casinos to allow 
table games such as blackjack and 
poker, saying such a decision on the 
matter should not be made until all of 
the facilities authorized by the 2004 
slots law are up and running. 

McCall, 49, was just 23 years old 
and had worked at the Auditor Gen- 
eral's Office when he was elected in 
1982 to the rural northeastern Pennsyl- 
vania seat that was opened by the 
death of the incumbent — his father, 
Thomas. He has served as ranking 
Democrat on the Consumer Affairs 
and Transportation committees, and in 
2006 was elected majority whip. 

He vowed to aim for honest deal- 
ings with lawmakers and said he wants 
to encourage ideas from those lower 
down in the hierarchy. 

"One of the things that my father 
taught me is your ears will never get 
you in frouble," he said. 



National 



Virginia company recalls peanut butter nationwide 



LYNCHBURG, Va. (AP) — A peanut 
butter maker that sells bulk supplies to 
institutions issued a nationwide recall 
of peanut butter from one its plants 
because of possible contamination with 
salmonella. 

Lynchburg-based Peanut Corp. of 
America company issued the recall late 
Tuesday for 21 lots of peanut butter 
made at a plant in Blakely, Ga., plant 



on or after July 1 . 

The company said none of the pea- 
nut butter being recalled is sold through 
retail stores. Its peanut butter is made 
for bulk disfribution to institutions, 
food service indusfries and private label 
food companies. The company said the 
peanut butter is sold under the brand 
name Pamell's Pride and by the King 
Nut Co. as King Nut. 



Health officials on Tuesday con- 
firmed the deaths of two people in 
Virginia and one in Minnesota associ- 
ated with a national salmonella out- 
break that has sickened more than 400 
people in 43 states. 

The health officials had recom- 
mended nursing homes, hospitals. 

See NATIONAL on page 4 



PA(;r 4 



Venango Voice 



World 



UN chief says Gaza negotiations must intensify 



CAIRO, Egypt (AP) — U.N. Secretary- 
General Ban Ki-moon became the latest 
global diplomat to tr\ to put out Middle 
East fires on Wednesday as he began 
his weeklong Middle East trip in Egypt 
with a call for intensifying negotiations 
and an immediate halt to fighting in 
Gaza. 

Egyptian Foreign Minister Ahmed 
Aboul Gheit. whose nation has domi- 
nated the search for a solution to Is- 
rael's battle with Hamas, said it had 
received the militant group's latest pro- 
posal and would convey it to the Is- 
raelis. 

For the past 19 days. Israel has 
been hitting the Gaza Strip in an at- 
tempt to end Hamas rocket fire, killing 
over 940 Palestinians, according to Pal- 
estinian medical officials. 

"My call is (for) an immediate end 
to violence in Gaza, and then to the 
Israeli military offensive and a halt to 
rocket attacks by Hamas," Ban told 
reporters after meeting with Egyptian 
President Hosni Mubarak. 

"It is intolerable that civilians bear 
the brunt of this conflict," he said, add- 
ing that the "negotiations need to be 
intensified to provide arrangements and 



guarantees in order to sustain an endur- 
able cease-fire and calm." 

Late Tuesday, Ban fiew fi-om New 
York to Cairo, where Mubarak 
launched an initiative with France a 
week ago aimed at achieving a tempo- 
rary halt to the fighting to be followed 
by a permanent cease-fire and arrange- 
ments on border security, 

Hamas delegations have been shut- 
tling between Gaza. Cairo and Syria 
and Aboul Gheit indicated that an 
agreement was near, without revealing 
any details. 

"There is a Hamas proposition, we 
will discuss it with the Israelis," he told 
reporters. "We will keep it under a lid 
of secrecy until we reach a cease-fire 
agreement that is followed by several 
interrelated steps to reach a cease-fire, 
ensure withdrawal (of the Israelis), 
open the crossing and secure the return 
of the monitors." 

Israel and Hamas do not meet face 
to face, relying instead on Egypt as the 
mediator. 

The foreign minister added that he 
envisioned a return to the situation just 
before a truce, brokered by Egypt, be- 
tween Hamas and Israel broke down in 



December. However, neither side was 
happy with the situation under the 
truce. Hamas was upset that Gaza was 
still under an intense blockade, and 
Israel was upset Hamas was still able 
to launch rockets into Israel. 

After Egypt. Ban heads to Jordan, 
Israel, the Palestinian-controlled West 
Bank, Turkey. Lebanon, Syria and 
Kuwait. His itinerary does not include 
a stop in Gaza because of the ongoing 
confiict. 

One possible solution to the crisis 
involves the use of Turkish troops as 
monitors, according to diplomats fa- 
miliar with negotiations. Aboul Gheit 
did not reject the possibility outright 
during the press conference with Ban, 
but said it was "premature" until 
agreement fi^om Hamas and the Pales- 
tinian Authority, which is in control of 
the West Bank and has been at odds 
with Hamas, had been reached. 

Efforts of Arab countries to con- 
tain the crisis were riven, meanwhile, 
with their own divisions. Qatar on 
Wednesday managed to get enough 
Arab countries to agree on an emer- 
gency summit meeting in its capital of 
Doha for Friday. 



NATIONAL: Outbreak may have caused 3 deaths 



Continued from 



pag 



e ? 



schools, universities and restaurants 
discard specific containers of peanut 
butter linked to the outbreak. 

The recall was issued after an open 
container of King Nut peanut butter in a 
long-term care facility in Minnesota 
was found to contain a strain of salmo- 
nella. 



"We deeply regret that this has 
happened," Stewart Pamell, owner and 
president of Peanut Corp. of America, 
said in a news release. "Out of an abun- 
dance of caution, we are voluntarily 
withdrawing this produce and contact- 
ing our customers." 

Customers were notified by tele- 
phone and in writing, the company said. 

The Centers for Disease Control 



has said the outbreak may have con- 
tributed to the three deaths. 

Two adults in Virginia and an 
elderly woman in Minnesota had sal- 
monella when they died, though health 
officials said the causes of death hadn't 
been determined. 

Besides the Georgia plant. Peanut 
Corp. of America has plants in Suf- 
folk. Va.. and in Plainview, Texas. 



\OLLiME 41, Issue 14 



Page 5 



PTK will kick off new semester with several events 



Phi Theta Kappa has a brand new 
and exciting program in the works this 
year called "Totes for Tots". This is a 
multi-generational project for our 
communit}', moving full circle from 
our community's elderly to its 
youth and back again. 

It begins with Oil City nursing 
home residents at both Presbyterian 
Home and Golden Living Center. 
They are decorating tote bags that we 
will then take to Oil City Boy Scout 
troops who will fill the tote bags with 
fun and educational items. PTK mem- 
bers will deliver the tote bags to pre- 
school-aged children right here in Oil 
City on "Read Across America Day." 
We will take pictures of the children 
receiving their tote bags and take them 
back to the scout troops, nursing 
homes, and our campus so all the peo- 
ple involved can be a part of the re- 
sults of their generosity. 

All of us at PTK are very excited 
about this project. Not only because it 
will be beneficial to both children and 
older adults, but because it is for the 
people in OUR community. We hope 



you will help us make this a success in 
Oil City so we can extend the project to 
include Franklin and other surrounding 
communities in future years. 

You can help by sponsoring one or 
more totes for $20 each. Unless you pre- 
fer to remain anonymous, you will be 
included in the list of sponsors that will 
accompany each tote bag. 

For more information, please con- 
tact Beth Austin at sedaustin 
@clarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa still has a few pies 
left from the fall sale. The cost is $7.50 
each, and the available flavors are: two 
Peach Praline, two Pineapple Upside 
Down, one Cherr>'. and one Apple Wal- 
nut. 

If you would like to buy one of 
these amazingly delicious treats, contact 
Jaime Ren wick at sjsren 
wick@clarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa has soy candles 
remaining from the fall sale. They are $6 
each, cash and carry. These are locally- 
made and available in several wonderful 




c^ot ai^ Idea? 

1^0 wou. ll\zt to write? 

Hc^ve i^\A. opliA^loiA.? 

we wa\At to hear It! 



B-v\Aail vvDic^e@c^lariD\A..edu \a.dw\ 



scents. To get yours today and support 
local crafters. contact one of the fol- 
lowing PTK members: Jaime Ren- 
wick, Beth Austin, Lori Secor, Daniele 
Merryman, or Melinda Eckman. 

Phi Theta Kappa will present the 
first Honor's Satellite Seminar Series 
of the semester. The Geography of 
Bliss as presented by Eric Weiner will 
be shown Monday, January 26, at 5:30 
p.m., in Rhoades Auditorium. If 
you've ever wondered where the hap- 
piest places on earth are and why they 
are so happy, then this presentation is 
for you. 

Save a life. Donate blood. Join 
Phi Theta Kappa on Thursday, Febru- 
ary 12, from 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Auditorium, to make a differ- 
ence in someone's life. 

Sign-up sheets are available in 
Rhoades, the nursing office, and the 
administrative office. 

For more infomiation, email Beth 
Austin at s_edausfin@clarion.edu. 



yyoras of ^^.^.^ 



'Be kinder than neces- 
sary because eveiyone 
you meet is fighting 
some kind of battle. ' 



PAGI: 6 



Venango Voice 



New Choices-Options Program extends its deadline 



The deadline for applications for 
the New Choices-Options Program has 
been extended to Thursday. January 
29, and now includes both first- and 
second-year students. Applications are 
posted by the Career Center Entrance 
(room 228) in Montgomery. Applica- 
tions are also available at the LSC in 
Montgomery, Rhoades (Student Af- 
fairs) and Frame (Admissions and 
Front Office). 

Scholarships and Supportive Ser- 
vices are available to: non-traditional 
students in a 2-year program including 
women studying for a career in indus- 
trial technology (all 23 concentra- 
tions), applied computer systems, 
criminal justice, and entrepreneurial 



studies, as well as for men studying for a 
career in nursing, medical office assistant/ 
coding, special education/early childhood 
education, pharmacy technician, respira- 
tory technician, and phlebotomy. Single 
parents and displaced homemakers are 
also invited to apply. 

For more information or an applica- 
tion, contact Mark Conrad. Coordinator of 
Career Services, at mcon- 

rad(a)clarion.edu, 814-676-6591. exten- 
sion 1373, or in room 230 of Montgomery 
Hall. 

A part-time Computer Assistant posi- 
tion is available at Child Development 
Centers. The chosen candidate would be 
responsible for loading software, cleaning 



the computers, and general preventa- 
tive maintenance for classroom com- 
puters. 

Work location would vary be- 
tween the Franklin, Hasson Heights 
and Cranberry Centers. The position 
will require 10-15 hours per week 
and flexible work hours are accept- 
able. The salary is S7.50 per hour. 

Computer/I S majors are pre- 
ferred and/or computer experience. 
The position requires Act 33 & 151 
Clearances obtained within one year 
and also requires a recent physical 
and TB test. 

Interested candidates should 
email chaughfrticdcenters.org or fax 
to: 814-437^5926. 




NOW YA KNOW! 

Q. When "it" was unveiled in 1982, one 

speaker at the ceremony said, "Thank you, 

America, for finally reinembcring us." 

What was "it"? 





\.l./, 




A.Vietnam Memorial 
in Washington D.C. 




Email the VeNt^NGO Voice! vvoick@clarion.edu 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion Universit}' of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The_\ 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your \'oice 

VeM-flMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue IS Monday, January 26, 2009 



PTK to kickoff Honor's Satellite 
Seminar Series with Erie Weiner 



Phi Theta Kappa 
proudh presents the 
Honor's Satellite Seminar 
Series once again in 2009. 
The Geograph}' of Bliss 
will kickoff the series 
Monday. January' 26. at 
5:30 p.m.. at Rhoades 
Auditorium. The seminar 
will be presented b\' Eric 
Weiner, author of The Ge- 
ographN' of Bliss: One 
Grump's Search for the 
Happiest Places in the 
\\'orld. 

\\'einer has traveled to 
the places that sune\s 



show are the happiest on 
earth to see what makes 
these people happy. His 
book. The Geograph}' of 
Bliss, is the memoir of 
those travels and it de- 
scribes an extraordinar)' 
take on happiness and the 
cultiiral factors that nurture 
happiness. 

His presentation will 
journey from America to 
Iceland to India, asking 
wh\ Asheville, N.C., is so 
happy. Are people in Swit- 
zerland happier because it 
is the most democratic 



countn.' in the world? Does 
Bhutan's official tracking 
of its Gross National Hap- 
piness help to make them 
happier? His answers are 
drawn from his o\mi per- 
sonal discoveries about 
himself, the insights of 
classical thinkers on happi- 
ness, and anahsis of the 
world's most contented 
cultures. He provides sur- 
prising insights into why 
and how place matters in 
our search for happiness. 

Refreshments will fol- 
low. 















,^_4^; '^^^.p^-'—p^' 


Venango Cam- 


- 




---^ ^w^^ — ' 


pus students 


A 


^i^-^^ 


^S^S^ \juwf!^/~ 


Kristen Colford 
(1) and Erin 
Wincek stand 


W 1 




HHHh|' 


just outside the 


-lS9 


i&^IHP^^m 




National Mall 
on January- 20, 


^^^ 


^^a^^''^^'^H ^ ^ ^i 




waituiCT for the 


^ 




HIk- -' 


inauguration of 


A 




1 


the 44th presi- 
dent of the 
United States, 
Barack Obama. 
For more pic- 
tures, see page 
6. 











Inside this issue: 


Se.mix.ar Series 


- 


in.-xugur.al 
Photos 


1, 6 


Job 
Opportunities 


2 


St.'\te News 


3 


N.ATiONAL News 


3 


World News 




Internship, 
Scholarship 

News 


5 


Words oe 

W^ISDOM 


-^ 


Military Sup- 
port Group 


S 


P.\SS 


6 


Recycle Cell 
Phones 


6 



PA(;t 2 



Venango Voice 



Full, part time positions are available to students 



A full-time receptionist 
position is available for a 
busy two-physician office in 
Titusville. 

Medical office experi- 
ence is preferred. The posi- 
tion includes a 36-hour work 
week, Monda) through Fri- 
day, no weekends or holi- 
days. Full time benefits are 
available. 

Send a cover letter and 
resume to: TAHS. Inc.. P.O. 
Box 302. Titusville. PA 
16354. 

An excellent opportunity 
exists for any student willing 
to work in any of the U.C. 
Claims Centers. The starting 
salary is $14.38/hour. 

You MUST apply on the 
civil service website at 
www.scsc.state.pa.us and 
must be tested and pass the 
exam for consideration. Vet- 
eran's preference is given per 
Commonwealth guidelines 
on eligibility. 

Information below is 
taken directly from that web- 
site for your review. Any 
and all questions should be 



referred to the agencies 
listed. 

A U.S. Claims Intennit- 
tent Intake Interviewer posi- 
tion is available - job code 
06590. pay schedule and 
range S4. In this position, 
you will interview appli- 
cants for unemployment 
claims to determine if they 
qualify for benefits. 

A major portion of this 
work is devoted to the proc- 
essing of initial and ongoing 
claims and related clerical 
work. 

All work is performed 
in a call center environment 
utilizing telephone and per- 
sonal computers. 

Apply online at 
www.scsc.state.pa.us or 
submit your completed pa- 
per application to: State 
Civil Service Commission 
or Pennsylvania CareerLink 
offices. 

A Titusville manufac- 
turing company has an In- 
side Sales position open. 
The position is full time. 
MondaN through FridaN. 8 



a.m. to 5p.m. 

The candidate must 
have computer experience, 
customer service skills and 
be able to work in a fast 
paced office. Benefits will 
include medical, dental, 
and 401k after a probation- 
ary period. 

Email resumes to 
dianebromley@commer 
cialfluidpower.com. 

Premier Foot & Ankle 
Center. P.C, is looking to 
fill a full time or part time 
position, depending on the 
candidate. 

The wage is SlO/hour. 
Benefits include a health- 
care flexible spending ac- 
count. 

They will take the 
right student candidate part 
time until your graduation 
in August. They are look- 
ing for a start date immedi- 
ately. 

For a complete list of 
duties and significant 
points, contact Coordinator 
of Career Services Mark 
Conrad at mcon- 



rad'« clarion.edu, then e- 
mail a detailed resume to 
p r e m i e r f o o t a n k 1 e ^' h o t 
mail.com for consideration. 

Premier Foot & Ankle 
Center is located at 410 
Hillcrest Avenue, Grove 
City, PA 16127. Call 724- 
450-1144 or fax 724-450- 
1 140 for more information. 

An ITV Technician is 
needed for Wednesday 
nights. 6:15-9:15 p.m.. at 
Venango Campus. 

This work is located in 
the Montgomery building 
and there are no required 
skills needed. 

The worker will need to 
show up on time weekly 
(absolutely a must). 

The training will be 
provided. 

Please return an email 
to cmuschweckf'fl^clar 

ion.edu or call 814-393- 
1279 and leave a name and 
phone number where you 
can be reached. This posi- 
tion is open immediately. 



Viznango Voiesz 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice«:clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Sma.\da Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the sludent-run newspaper of Clarion Unixersity of Pennsvivania - Venango Campus and the surrounding comniunilies The 
Voice is published most Mondays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity, the detemimation ol 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information They must be received no later than noon Tuesdavs If the author of a letter w ishes lo 
remain anonymous. the\ must attach a separate letter of explanation Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff They should schedule their co-currlcular when scheduling classes 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



\OLUME 41, Issue 15 



Page 3 



State 



Colleges convert cooking oil into bio-diesel fuel 



DAYTON. Ohio (AP) — Forgive the 
students at Sinclair Community.- College 
if the> get the munchies when the\ pass 
the tractors that cut grass, blow leaves 
or sweep snow on campus: Oil that 
once cooked french fries and onion 
rings is being used to power the vehi- 
cles. 

Students have begun making bio- 
diesel fuel b\ converting used cooking 
oil from the dining hall. Biodiesel saves 
the school a little money on gasoline, 
gives the students lessons in engineer- 
ing and chemistr\. and removes oil 
from the v\aste stream. 

"It ends up as a product that is 
more friendly to the environment. And 
we're teaching with it," said Woody 
Woodruff, director of facilities at the 
65-acre campus. 

Sinclair is among a growing num- 
ber of colleges nationwide making their 
own biodiesel. an alternative fuel pro- 
duced from renewable oilseed crops, 
such as canola or soybean, or from used 
vegetable oil and other fats. The con- 
cept is being driven by greater environ- 
mental awareness among students. 

The State University of New York 
melted down a 900-pound butter sculp- 
ture from the state fair last summer to 
help power its vehicles. Biodiesel ac- 
counts for about 8 percent of the fuel 
used on campus. 

Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa., 
produces 50 to 150 gallons of biodiesel 
each week to power campus lawn mow- 
ers, a garbage truck and farm equip- 
ment. The school has more than dou- 

National 



bled its capacity of biodiesel growing 
from 20-gallon to 54-gallon batches, 
while biodiesel byproducts are being 
used in a composting research project at 
the school's organic farm and to make 
soap sold in the campus bookstore. 

At the Universitv' of Kansas, bio- 
diesel ftiels lawn mowers, backhoes, 
front-end loaders and other construction 
equipment. It is also used as a solvent 
to clean parts and tools and to heat a 
motor-pool building. 

When the school began making 
biodiesel in September 2007. two peo- 
ple were involved. Now there are 25. 

Neil Steiner, an architectural engi- 
neering student, volunteered to work on 
the project last year and is now a paid 
lab employee. 

"I'm really into green buildings, 
and it was the greenest thing I could get 
my hands on," said Steiner, 22, of 
Tulsa. Okla. 

Most colleges make biodiesel by 
chemically converting used cooking oil 
from campus dining halls. The oil is 
transformed through a process called 
transesterification. which removes glyc- 
erine and adds methanol, leaving a thin- 
ner product that can power a diesel en- 
gine. Biodiesel can also be blended 
with petroleum diesel. 

When a question was posted in 
November on the online discussion 
board of The National Association of 
College & University Food Services 
asking what dining halls were doing 
with their fryer oil waste, the board was 
quickly flooded with responses. 



Schools said the>' were either using the 
oil to make biodiesel or selling it to 
companies for that purpose. 

Estimated U.S. sales of biodiesel 
have jumped from 75 million gallons 
in 2005 to 700 million gallons last 
year. 

Sinclair students turn out two 
batches of biodiesel a week. As of 
December, they had produced about 
100 gallons. With the price of diesel 
friel hovering around S2.50 a gallon 
and the cost of making biodiesel $1 a 
gallon, the students saved the school a 
modest $150. 

"It's a gesture." said Bob Gilbert, 
head of Sinclair's center for energv' 
education. "Our first goal is educa- 
tion." 

Sam Spofforth, executive director 
of Clean Fuels Ohio, a statewide 
group that promotes the use of renew- 
able fuels, said the interest in biofuels 
among college students should create 
a pipeline of talent and energy for 
commercial biodiesel production. 

"They realize this is the wave of 
the future," Spofforth said. "There is 
going to be a tremendous need for 
educated people to move into these 
industries." 

Steiner estimates he spends 20 
hours a week on the University' of 
Kansas biodiesel project, which he 
works on between classes. 

He hopes to use his experience 
after he graduates, perhaps as a con- 
sultant helping biodiesel companies 
obtain materials and fundina. 



Microsoft to slash 5,000 jobs, misses on 2Q profits 



REDMOND. Wash. (AP) — Microsoft 
Corp. said Thursday' it is cutting 5,000 
jobs over the next 18 months, a sign of 
how badly even the biggest and richest 



companies are being stung by the reces- 
sion. 

The layoffs appear to be a first for 
Microsoft, which was founded in 1975, 



aside from relatively lunited staff cuts 
the software company made after ac- 

See NATIONAL on page 4 



Page 4 



Venango Voice 



World 



Fidel Castro doesn't doubt Obama's ^honesty' 



HAVANA (AP) — Fidel Castro 
watched the U.S. inauguration on tele- 
vision and says he doesn't doubt Barack 
Obama's "honest)." breaking a month- 
long silence with an essay published 
ThursdaN in Cuba's state-run press. 

The comments by the former Cu- 
ban president were released after a 
meeting Wednesday with visiting Ar- 
gentine President Cristina Fernandez, 
who told reporters that "Fidel believes 
in Obama." 

The meeting with Fernandez dis- 
pelled persistent rumors that the 82- 
year-old Castro had suffered a stroke or 
lapsed into a coma in recent da>'s. 

"I was with Fidel about an hour or 
more," she told reporters at the airport 
as she left. "We were chatting, convers- 
ing. He looked good." Castro himself 
wrote that the meeting lasted 40 min- 
utes and he said the two exchanged 
thoughts about the new U.S. president. 

"I personally did not have the 
slightest doubt about the honesty of 
Obama, the 1 1th president since Jan. 1. 
1959, when he expresses his ideas." 
Castro said he told Fernandez, referring 
to the day his band of bearded rebels 



toppled a dictator and took power in 
Cuba. 

"But despite noble intentions, there 
are still many questions to answer," 
Castro added, singling out the question 
of whether a capitalist system can pro- 
tect the environment. 

Castro's essay was his first such 
writing since Dec. 15 — a silent spell 
that fed speculation his health had taken 
a turn for the worse. 

Fernandez said Castro wore the 
track suit that has become his trade- 
mark since he fell ill in July 2006 and 
vanished fi-om public view. 

"He told me he had followed the 
inauguration of Barack Obama very 
closely, that he had watched the inau- 
guration on television all day," Fernan- 
dez said. 

Obama has said he is not yet ready 
to fully end the U.S. embargo on Cuba, 
but says he will ease limits on Cuban- 
Americans' visits to the island and on 
how much money they can send home 
to relatives. 

He has also offered to negotiate 
personally with Raul Castro, though he 
has said he won't push Congress to lift 



the U.S. trade embargo, at least not 
right away. 

Raul Castro, who took over the 
presidency from his brother 1 1 months 
ago, appeared earlier with Fernandez 
and scoffed at the rumors about his 
brother's health. 

"Do you think if he were really 
gravely ill that I'd be smiling here?" 
Raul Castro said. "Soon I'm going to 
take a trip to Europe. You guys think I 
could leave here if Fidel were really in 
grave condition?" 

Castro. 77. said his older brother 
spends his days "thinking a lot. read- 
ing a lot. advising me, helping me." 

Fidel Castro hadn't held a con- 
firmed meeting with a foreign leader 
since Nov. 28. The presidents of Pa- 
nama and Ecuador visited this month 
but left without saving they had seen 
the elder Castro. 

"Now you know that Fidel is fine. 
and not like the rumors around here," 
Raul Castro said. 

He told reporters earlier in the day 
that Obama "seems like a good man" 
and wished him luck, though he did 
not elaborate. 



NATIONAL: Company reported 11 percent drop 



Continued from 



pag 



e3 



quiring companies. 

The company announced the cuts 
as it reported an 1 1 percent drop in sec- 
ond-quarter profit, which fell short of 
Wall Street's expectations. 

Microsoft shares plunged 7 percent 
in morning trading. 

Microsoft said it was being hurt by 
deteriorating global economic condi- 
tions and lower revenue from software 



for PCs. 

The holiday quarter of 2008 was 
the worst the PC market had seen in 
several years. 

The Redmond-based company said 
profit fell to $4.17 billion, or 47 cents 
per share, from year-ago earnings of 
$4.71 billion, or 50 cents per share. 

Total revenue edged up 2 percent 
to $16.63 billion, as software for corpo- 
rate computer servers helped offset an 8 
percent drop in revenue for PC soft- 
ware. 



The results missed Wall Street's 
forecast for earnings of 49 cents per 
share on sales of $17.08 billion. 

Microsoft said the job cuts will 
reduce operating costs by $1.5 billion 
as it prepares for lower revenue and 
earnings in the second half of the year. 

The company says it is unable to 
offer profit and revenue guidance for 
the rest of the year, because of the 
market volatility. 

Its shares fell $1.34 to $18.04 in 
mornint; tradins. 



X'OLUME 41. Issue 15 



Page 5 



Internship, scholarship applications offered to students 



Senator Robert P. Case\. Jr.. has 
established a new internship program 
in his Washington. D.C.. office. The 
A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr.. Internship 
is open to students who are enrolled or 
plan to enroll in law school and are 
residents of Penns\ivania. 

Each year, one applicant is se- 
lected b\' Sen. Casey to serve as a paid 
A. Leon Higginbotham. Jr.. Intern for 
six weeks during the summer. The 
internship presides the opportunity to 
participate in the legislative process 
while working to further the cause of 
equal justice. 

The official application, detailed 
overview of the A. Leon 
Higginbotham. Jr.. Internship, and 
biographical information on Judge A. 
Leon Higginbotham. Jr.. is available 
online at http: cases. senate. gov . Ad- 
ditional questions mas be answered bs' 
calling Sen. Casey's Washington. 
D.C.. office at 202-224-6324 and^ask- 
ing to speak with the intern coordina- 
tor. 

Deadline for applicants to appl\' 
for the Summer program is March 1, 
2009. 

The Clarion University Alumni 
Association (CUAA) has available 
Scholarship and Leadership Awards 
for undergraduate students for the 
2009-2010 year. Special consideration 
will be given to children of Clarion 
University alumni, as well as members 
of the Eagle Ambassador student 
alumni group. Scholarships are 
awarded up to SI. 500 in the form of a 
tuition credit, with half the amount 
applied in Fall 2009. and the other half 
in Spring 2010. 

The Scholarship and Leadership 
Awards are open to full-time under- 
graduate students who: have earned an 
overall QPA of 3.0 or better; will have 



completed at least 30 credit hours at 
Clarion University prior to the 2009- 
2010 academic year; and will not be 
graduating in or before December 2009. 

Applications are available at the 
Venango Admissions Office. 

Applications must be received b\' 
the Alumni Office on or before Friday, 
Februan. 27. 2009. at 4 p.m. in order to 
be considered. 

For more information contact Kay 
Ensle at extension 1277. 

The deadline for applications for the 
New Choices-Options Program has been 
extended to Thursdas. January 29. and 
now includes both first- and second-year 
students. Applications are posted b>' the 
Career Center Entrance (room 228) in 
Montgomer)'. Applications are also 
available at the LSC in Montgomery, 
Rhoades (Student Affairs) and Frame 
(Admissions and Front Office). 

Services are available to: non- 
traditional students in a 2-year program 
including women studying for a career in 
industrial technology (all 23 concentra- 
tions), applied computer systems, crimi- 
nal justice, and entrepreneurial studies, 
as well as for men studying for a career 
in nursing, medical office assistant' 
coding, special education'early child- 
hood education, pharmacy technician, 
respiratory technician, and phlebotomy. 
Single parents and displaced homemak- 
ers are also invited to apply. 

For more information or an applica- 
tion, contact Mark Conrad, Coordinator 
of Career Services, at mcon- 
rad^clarion.edu, 814-676-6591, exten- 
sion 1373, or in room 230 of Montgom- 
er)- Hall. 

Applications for Venango Campus 
Scholarships are available in the Ve- 
nango Admissions Office and the Ve- 
nango Administrafive Office. These 



scholarships are made available by 
businesses, service organizations, lo- 
cal residents, the faculty of Venango 
Campus, and the Clarion University 
Foundation. 

Even though each scholarship has 
certain criteria, the Scholarship Com- 
mittee requires one (1) application, 
and you will be considered for each 
scholarship for which you are eligible. 

The following guidelines will be 
considered when awarding Venango 
Campus Scholarships: academic 
achievement; extracurricular activities: 
financial need: professional goals: 
criteria specified by the scholarship 
sponsor; majority of your credits will 
be scheduled at Venango Campus; and 
one scholarship per student per year. 

Scholarships will be awarded for 
the 2009-2010 academic \ear. 

The deadline for submitting the 
application is Friday. February 20, 
2009. 

Current and new nursing students 
may want to check with the School of 
Nursing and Allied Health for addi- 
tional scholarship opportunities. 



The Militaiy Support Group Mill resume Wednesdays at noon, in 
Rhoades. All are M-elcome to join and be of support to one another. 

For more information, contact Maria Harp at ext. 1281. 



yYoras of ^ -^ .-. 
Y^isJom ^j^Km 

'A sharp tongue 

can cut your own 

throat. ' 



PACI- 6 



Venango Voice 



Project PASS allows students to develop skills 



Project PASS. Promoting Aca- 
demic Success for Students, is offered 
to all Venango Campus students as a 
resource for developing and enhancing 
their academic skills and increasing 
their familiarity with the services of- 
fered by the campus and the Univer- 
sity. 

By working collaboratively with 
faculty and staff, students participating 
in Project PASS will gain a greater 
understandins of the skills and re- 



sources necessary for reaching their aca- 
demic and career goals. 

The Spring 2009 Semester of activi- 
ties includes: Effective Note Taking and 
Study Skills on Januar>' 29-30; Finding 
Balance: Managing Multiple Priorities 
with Ease on February 5-6; and Overcom- 
ing Math Anxiety on February 12-13. 

All of the sessions combined will be 
offered Saturday. Januar\' 31, from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m.. at 404 Montgomerv' Hall. 
Lunch will be provided for the Saturday 



session. 

Students who participate in all 
four sessions (the first session took 
place before this issue of the Voice 
was distributed) or the combined 
Saturday session are eligible for a 
chance to win a free HP laptop. 

For more information, contact 
Director of Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at eaubelefaiclarion.edu, or by 
phone at 814-676-6591, extension 
1270. 



Recycle cell phones responsibly at Venango bookstore 



By Lori Secor 

I would like to thank everyone 
who donated their cell phones last 
semester at Earth Day and since then 
in the bookstore. By donating your 
phones, we were able to ensure they 
would be reused and recycled respon- 
siblv. 



I recently sent the phones to GRC 
wireless recycling, and am looking for- 
ward to sending another box soon. 

There is an estimated 500.000 cell 
phones sitting around unused in closets 
and drawers. If they are simply thrown 
away, they will add about 3 12.000 pounds 
of lead to landfills. 

Please bring any phones and phone 



batteries you. your family, and 
friends have lying around to the 
bookstore and help us to make sure 
they are rec\cled responsibly! 

Be safe and clear your personal 
infonnation off your old phone first. 
For easy instructions, visit 
www.recellular.coni 'recycling/ 
data eraser. 




In tlic picture to the 
left, Kerri Smayda 
show cd her patriot- 
ism while standinsj 
on tlie lawn of the 
National Mall. In 
the picture to the 
ri^ht, President 
Barack Obama 
oives his inaugural 
address, as viewed 
from a jumbotron 
in front of tlic U.S. 
Capitol building. 




Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion Universit>' of 
Pennsx Ivania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil Cit>'. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The\ 
are not necessarih the philosophy or views of the students. facult>. or staff of Clarion 
llni\ersity of Penns>lvania. Clarion Universit>' is committed to equal opportunit}- and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
emploxment. Direct equal opportunit) inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



FEB 1 2009 



VeMfiMGo ]Poice 



Volume 41, Issue 16 



Monday, February 9, 2009 



Independent Film Series is slated 



The Clarion Univer- 
sit>-Venango Campus In- 
dependent Film Series, 
which features films from 
independent filmmakers 
from Germany. France. 
Ireland. Afghanistan, South 
Africa, and the United 
States, is free and open to 
the public. All films will be 
shown in the Robert W. 
Rhoades Center Auditorium 
at 7:30 p.m. For questions 
regarding the series or any 
of the films, please contact 
Emily Aubele at 676-6591. 
ext. 1269. 

"The Son (Le Fils)" 
will be shown Saturday. 
Feb. 14. 



The practice of work is 
central to Le Fils (The 
Son), a deceptively com- 
plex movie about revenge 
and redemption. The film 
seems straightforward 
enough; Olivier, a carpen- 
ter, takes on a young man 
named Francis as an ap- 
prentice. Francis is newly 
released from juvenile de- 
tention, and Olivier slowh' 
discovers that Francis 
played a part in the death of 
his son some years earlier. 
Francis is unaware of the 
connection he shares with 
Olivier, this asymmetrical 
relationship investigates the 
ideas of forgiveness and 



vindication... "The Son" is 
ultimately a Christian alle- 
gory of one man's inchoate 
desire to return good for 
evil. The film is in French 
with English subtitles. 

"The Great Debaters", 
rated PG-I3. will be shown 
Saturday, Feb. 2 1 . 

The film, based on a 
true story, revolves aroimd 
the efforts of debate coach 
Melvin B. Tolson (Denzel 
Washington) at historically 
black Wiley College to 
place his team on equal 
footing with whites in the 
American South during the 

See FILMS on page 9 



Project PASS to note last session 



February 

The" Project PASS 
(Promoting Academic Suc- 
cess for Students) session 
that still remains is 
"Overcoming Math Anxi- 
ety" on Thursday. February 
12. The session will be 
held at 3:30 p.m., at room 
404 Montgomery Hall. 

Students who partici- 
pate in all four sessions or 
the comprehensive Satur- 
day session are eligible for 
a chance to win a free HP 



laptop. 

For more information 
about Project PASS, contact 
Director of Student Affairs 
Emily Aubele at 
eaubele@clarion.edu or at 
extension 1270. 

Arthur Romano will 
present "Exploring Non- 
Violence" on Monday, Feb- 
ruary 9, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium, in 
conjunction with Dare 2 
Care Week. 



Romano is a certified 
nonviolence trainer and 
accomplished interna- 
tional educator who has 
worked globally to chal- 
lenge violence and pro- 
mote peace. 

A Food For Thought 
cooking class will be held 
on Tuesday, February 10, 
at 3 p.m., at the Commu- 
nity Center in the Student 

See EVENTS on page 7 



Inside this issue: 


Film Series 


1 


Events 


1- 

10 


Trasi-i Talk 


2 


Job Openings 


3 


State News 


4 


National News 


4 


World News 


5 


.Marla Harp 


6 


Health Camps 


6 


PTK News 


7 


Parking Policy 


7 


Charlie 
Whipple 


8 


Words oe Wis- 
dom 


8 


Wear Red Day 


9 



PAcii: 2 



Venango Voice 



Do you know how safe Fluffy's kitty litter is? 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORI SECOR 



Reduce, reuse, recycle; 
insulate, weatherize, winter- 
ize, organic, all-natural, 
chemical-free. When making 
changes to keep the family 
and yourself healthier, don"t 
forget Fluffy. When thinking 
of products used for a pet cat, 
litter is at the top of the Mck' 
list - and for good reason. 
Most cat litters contain 
enough chemicals to make 
your cat's fur stand on end. 

Here's a brief run-down 
of the problem with tradi- 



tional cat litters. Clay litter 
is strip-mined, causing envi- 
ronmental damage; the dust 
the litter kicks up is bad for 
the cat's lungs and can 
cause asthma and respira- 
tory disease. 

Scented litter gets its 
scent from undisclosed 
chemical cocktails including 
phthalates (as is most bath 
and body products people 
use as well). 

Flushable litter is a bit 
of a comple.x issue. It helps 
to biodegrade the litter - 
good thing. But kitty poo 
has a parasite called 
toxoplasmosis - the reason 
pregnant women are to 
avoid the litter box. When it 
is flushed, water treatment 
plants are unable to filter it 
out, so it ends up in the wa- 
terways. 

Silica gel litters are kind 
of new, really expensive, 
and work great to absorb 
and kick odors. The blue 
granules in it may be dyed 
with cobalt (II) chloride (the 
mystery chemical is undis- 
closed by the manufacturers. 



of course). This chemical is 
possibly carcinogenic and 
definitely toxic. 

Never fear, feline lov- 
ers. There are greener, 
healthier choices. First on 
the list is recycled newspa- 
per. This can be bought in 
a store, but what better way 
to use up what's left after 
the kids have paper ma- 
che'ed the house? Get di- 
rections how to make your 
own here: http:// 
alliesanswers.com. 

Sifting boxes are 
probably the best thing for 
the environment (unless 
you do as I do and let the 
cat outside to get back to 
nature when nature calls). 
Sifting boxes entail a sift- 
ing screen with untreated 
pea sized gravel to catch 
the excrement, a box below 
it to catch the wet. I don't 
know about this option - I 
don't think it would do 
much against odor... and I 
don't want to be the one to 
wash those rocks. Avail- 
able at some stores are 
combo deals of wheat. 



corn, alfalfa pellets, and 
ground com cobs - renew- 
able and nontoxic. Always 
choose an unscented litter. 

What to do with the 
waste? We've talked about 
the cat excrement in the 
toilet, but what about bury- 
ing it? That could actually 
contaminate the surrounding 
area and won't kill parasites 
for up to a year. Compost- 
ing? Definitely not! That 
toxoplasmosis, other para- 
sites, and roundworms are 
extremely difficult to elimi- 
nate with composting. 

What is the safest way 
to get rid of it for everyone? 
Trash. Yes, you read that 
right. It goes straight to the 
landfill. But. all things con- 
sidered. I've yet to come 
across a safer way to do it. 
I'll continue to throw 
*ahem* I mean LET the cat 
outside to do her business, 
and avoid the issue alto- 
gether! 

References for this arti- 
cle can be found at: http:// 
www.petsfortheenvironment 



Vjznango Voieg 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice@clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. .loan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communilies. The 
Voice is published most Mondays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the deteminiation of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Onh students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



N'OLLiME 41, Issue 16 



Pagh 3 



Positions are still available for qualified candidates 



A part-time position for a Drop In 
Center Program Coordinator with the 
possibility of going full-time is avail- 
able. This position reports directly to 
the Program Director responsible for 
directing the re-socialization or re-entry 
of consumers in the community. The 
Drop-In Center is located in Oil City. 

The Coordinator will be responsi- 
ble to assist the consumers in empower- 
ing themselves in order to move the 
Center into a consumer driven model. 
The Coordinator will provide assis- 
tance, direction, and supervision to the 
consumers in the planning and imple- 
mentation of all activities which sole 
purpose is to prevent inpatient or emer- 
gency care. 

This position requires Act 34 
Clearance and a minimum of a High 
School Diploma and at least one year of 
experience working directly with con- 
sumers. Specific duties would include 
but would not be limited to the follow- 
ing: Planning, Implementation, Fund 
Raising, and Supervision. 

The Coordinator will be responsi- 
ble for contacting all referrals, opening 
and closing files, obtaining authoriza- 
tions, preparing monthly statistics, 
scheduling staff hours, scheduling staff 
training, developing quarterly surveys, 
providing van maintenance, and dem- 
onstrate efficient work methods. The 
Coordinator will be available to any/all 
consumers who are in need of guidance, 
always referring consumers to the ap- 
propriate person or agency, in addition 
to other duties. 

This job posting can be found at 
www.cwds.state.pa.us. 



A long or short-term job opportu- 
nity is available for a student interested 
in the coffee house business. The Howl- 
ing Dog Gallery Cafe in Oil City is 
hiring. 

The cafe is located in downtown 
Oil City at 219 Seneca Street. Flexible 
hours, from 10 to 30 hours a week, are 
available. The pay is minimum wage 
plus tips. Good people skills, self start- 
ing and a positive attitude are a must. If 
interested, call 677-2490, stop by be- 
tween 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., or email resume 
to sJrwhipple@clarion.edu. 

Bear Creek Camp and Conference 
Center offers 10 weeks of employment 
at their facility as day camp team lead- 
ers with various special- 
ties. Applications are located in the 
Career Center (room 228 Montgomery 
Hall). These applications are very ex- 
tensive so allow plenty of time to com- 
plete the entire package. 

For more information, you may 
call Bear Creek Camp at 570-472-3741 
or e-mail youth@bearcreekcamp.org. 

A Student Assistant(s) in the Con- 
tinuing Education and Admissions De- 
partment is needed. Applicants for Con- 
tinuing Education should be available 
for the following time periods: Summer 
2009, Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 terms. 
Applicants for the Admissions Depart- 
ment should be available for Summer 
2009. Students may apply to one or 
both offices. There are 10 hours per 
week available in each office. Students 
applying for the Continuing Education 
position will help with multiple projects 
during the year which require some 



lifting and moving of classroom sup- 
plies. 

Students should be: highly re- 
sponsible; detail-oriented; strong com- 
munication skills (written and verbal); 
strong reading comprehension skills; 
customer service oriented with good 
phone etiquette; ability to pay atten- 
tion to close detail for sustained peri- 
ods of time; strong organizational 
skills; ability to meet deadlines; ability 
to manage multiple priorities; familiar- 
ity with Microsoft WORD and EX- 
CEL programs; assist with registration 
of new students in certificate pro- 
grams; maintain confidentiality of 
records; manage, update, and backup 
electronic files as directed; photocopy 
as needed; write notes or correspon- 
dence as needed/directed; and other 
related duties as assigned. 

Drop off your resume with a com- 
pleted astudent application form at the 
Admissions Office and/or Continuing 
Education Office located in Frame 
Hall. 

Career Services just received em- 
ployment materials from the Census 
Bureau and it is in the disfribution box 
next to room 228 in Montgomery Hall 
(Career Center) for your review. Infor- 
mation is self explanatory, so take a 
pamphlet and apply as detailed in that 
material. 

For more information about these 
positions or for resume preparation 
assistance, contact Mark Conrad, Co- 
ordinator of Career Services, at mcon- 
rad@clarion.edu, or 676-6591, exten- 
sion 1373. 



i -mail the ^cubu^o \jo\ce, with uour ideas at vvoice@cIarion.edu! 



Pac;e 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Pa. governor calls for 'full-scale' school mergers 



HARRISBURG. Pa. (AP) — Gov. Ed 
Rendell says having fewer school dis- 
tricts in Pennsylvania will ease the 
burden of local education costs on 
people who pay property ta,\es. 

Rendell said Wednesday he wants 
a legislative commission to study the 
best way to consolidate the state's 500 

National 



school districts. Rendell says he'd like 
Pennsylvania to have no more than 
100 public school systems. 

Rendell says having fewer school 
districts would spread the local share 
of school costs over a wider range of 
property owners. 

But Tim Alhvein of the Pennsyl- 



vania School Boards Association says 
his group hasn't found evidence that 
school district mergers save substan- 
tial amounts of money. 

The last major state-ordered con- 
solidation of PennsN Ivania school dis- 
tricts occurred in the 1960s, when the 
state had more than 2.000 districts. 



US auto sales in reverse, plunge to 26-year low 



DETROIT (AP) -- Automakers 
started 2009 in reverse. 

Consumers frightened by the 
prospect of losing their jobs stayed 
away from auto showrooms again in 
January and sent U.S. car and truck 
sales falling 37 percent, a familiar 
refrain for the struggling industry but 
an unwelcome start to a critical year 
for U.S. carmakers. 

Devastated by an economy in 
which few people have the spare cash 
to buy a car or can obtain the financ- 
ing to do it, Chrysler's domestic sales 
for January were less than half what 
they were a year earlier. 

Sales fell 49 percent at General 
Motors and 40 percent at Ford. Toyota 
and Nissan's sales each fell at least 30 
percent. 

"How many ways can you say 
disaster?" asked Aaron Bragman, an 
auto industry analyst with the consult- 
ing firm IHS Global Insight in Troy, 
Mich. "That's across the board. It's not 
unique to one company." 

With January's drop, the indus- 
try's sales have declined for 15 straight 
months when compared with the same 
month in the previous year. There has- 
n't been a year-over-year increase 
since October 2007, when light vehi- 
cle sales rose a paltry I percent, ac- 
cording to Autodata Corp. and Ward's 
AutoInfoBank. 

The industry's sales of 656,976 



vehicles, compared with just over a mil- 
lion in January 2008. translates to a sea- 
sonally adjusted annual sales rate of 9.57 
million, according to Autodata. That's 
the worst performance since June 1982, 
when the nation was mired in a reces- 
sion. 

Huge declines in lo\v-prot1t fleet 
sales to rental car companies made Janu- 
ary an exceptionally bad month, even 
though automakers said they were en- 
couraged that retail sales appeared to be 
stabilizing after four straight months 
with an industrywide sales plunge of at 
least 30 percent. 

"If you're starting from an extremely 
low point, pretty much anywhere you go 
is up." said Bragman. whose company 
has predicted annual sales for this year 
of 10.3 million, down from last year's 
13.2 million and 16.1 million in 2007. 

But executives anticipated a treach- 
erous beginning of 2009 before the mar- 
ket improves. 

George Pipas, Ford Motor Co.'s top 
sales analyst, wasn't sure whether 15 
months of industrywide sales declines is 
a record, but if it is. it won't last long. 

"I can tell you that it's onl\ going to 
last for one month." Pipas said, predict- 
ing year-over-year declines until perhaps 
later in the year. Then, he said, with only 
a small increase, sales should surpass the 
dismal levels seen at the end of 2008. 

U.S. automakers will need sales to 
improve if they want their turnaround 



plans to be successful. After receiving 
$13.4 billion in federal loans to stay 
afloat. General Motors Corp. and 
Chrysler LLC have said they are bas- 
ing their plans on industrywide sales 
this year of 10.5 million and 1 1 . 1 mil- 
lion vehicles, respectively. 

But few people were expecting 
the automakers to start 2009 at such a 
pace. January is typically a slow sales 
month, and the market isn't likely to 
improve until the second half of 2009 
as economic stimulus efforts take ef- 
fect and access to credit improves. 

The hefty incentives automakers 
have rolled out have done little to 
boost sales. 

Chrysler has been offering em- 
ployee pricing, zero-percent financing 
and up to $6,000 in rebates on its vehi- 
cles, and GM said it will launch an- 
other zero-percent financing with the 
help of the $5 billion in federal aid its 
financing ami. GMAC. received late 
last year. 

The biggest dent last month was 
in fleet sales — big volume sales to 
rental car companies and municipali- 
ties — which fell sharply in January as 
production slowed or was shut down 
at many U.S. auto plants for most of 
the month. 

GM said its fleet sales fell 80 per- 
cent to just over 13,000 vehicles in 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



X'OLUME 41, Issue 16 



Page 5 



World 



Injured man dies after rejection by 14 hospitals 



TOKYO (AP) — A 69-year-old 
Japanese man injured in a traffic ac- 
cident died after paramedics spent 
more than an hour negotiating with 
14 hospitals before one admitted him. 
a fire department official said 
Wednesday. 

The man. whose bic>cle collided 
with a motorcycle in the western cit\- 
of Itami. waited at the scene in an 
ambulance because the hospitals said 
they could not accept him. citing a 
lack of specialists, equipment, beds 
and staff according to Mitsuhisa 
Ikemoto. One of the 14 finally admit- 
ted the man when the paramedics 
called it for a second fime. 

It was the latest in a string of 
recent cases in Japan in which pa- 



tients were denied treatment, under- 
scoring the countr\'s health care woes 
that include a shortage of doctors. 

The man. who suffered head and 
back injuries, initially showed stable 
vital signs, but his condition gradually 
deteriorated. He died fi-om hemorrhagic 
shock about an hour and half after ar- 
riving at the hospital, Ikemoto said. 
Hemorrhagic shock occurs when cells 
do not receive enough oxygen and nu- 
trients to fiinction. 

Ikemoto said the victim might have 
survived if a hospital accepted him 
more quickh'. "I wish hospitals are 
more willing to take patients, but they 
have their own reasons, too," he said. 

The death prompted the city to 
issue a directive ordering paramedics to 



better coordinate with an emergency 
call center so patients can find a hos- 
pital within 15 minutes. But hospitals 
still cannot be punished for turning 
away patients if they are already full. 

The motorcyclist involved in the 
Jan. 20 accident was hurt too and was 
also denied medical care by two hos- 
pitals before one accepted him. Ike- 
moto said. He was recovering from 
his injuries. 

More than 14.000 emergency 
patients were rejected at least three 
times by Japanese hospitals before 
getting treatment in 2007, according 
to the latest government survey. In 
the worst case, a woman in her 70s 
with a breathing problem was re- 
jected 49 times in Tokyo. 



NATIONAL: Chrysler's Jan. sales fell 81 percent 



Continued from page 4 

Januan.'. marking their lowest sales 
level since 1975. 

"The overall fleet business. 
rental car companies are holding their 
inventor}.. probabK double to triple 
what the> were a couple % ears ago in 
terms of their turn rates." said Mark 
LaNeve. GM's North America vice 
president of sales, services and mar- 
keting. "There is a definite lack of 
demand." 

ChrNsler said its January' fleet 
sales fell 81 percent from > ear-ago 
le\els. 

Ford said fleet sales fell 65 per- 
cent, but the decline in the auto- 
maker's retail sales had stabilized. 

"WTiat we're looking for is stabi- 
lization. You have to stop falling 
before you can start rising," said 
Emily Kolinski Morris, Ford's top 
economist. 

Chrx'sler attributed part of its 66 



percent drop in car sales and 49 percent 
decline in truck sales to a shortage of 
affordable credit for its customers, not- 
ing that the SI. 5 billion federal loan for 
its financing arm wasn't received until 
the second half of the month. 

One of the few large automakers to 
post a sales increase was South Korea's 
Hyundai Motor Co., which posted a 14 
percent gain. H\iindai credited its offer 
that covers a new vehicle's depreciation 
for customers v\ho want to rettim a car 
because they lost their job. 

"This program gets to the root 
cause of today's economic concerns — 
fear of job loss." Hyundai regional gen- 
eral manager Peter DiPersia said in a 
statement. 

Subaru posted an 8 percent sales 
increase from a year earlier, its second- 
straight month of sales gains. 

To\ota Motor Corp.'s sales dived 
32 percent for the month, as sales of its 
Prius hybrid slid 29 percent. 

Nissan Motor Co.'s sales dropped 



30 percent. 

Honda Motor Co.'s sales fell 28 
percent, but the Japanese automaker 
saw a 6 percent increase in sales of 
its Fit subcompact, and sales of the 
updated Acura TSX sports sedan rose 
1 6 percent. 

Ford shares rose 8 cents, or 4.3 
percent, to $1.96 Tuesday, while GM 
shares fell 4 cents to $2.85. Toyota's 
U.S. shares rose $1.71, or 2.7 per- 
cent, to $65.59. and Honda's shares 
climbed 69 cents, or 3 percent, to 
$23.41. 

The Associated Press reports 
unadjusted auto sales figures, calcu- 
lating the percentage change in the 
total number of vehicles sold in one 
month compared with the same 
month a year earlier. Some auto- 
makers report percentages adjusted 
for sales days. 

There were 26 sales da>'s last 
month, one more than in January 
2008. 



PAcii: 6 



Venango Voice 



See Maria Harp if you're experiencing SADness 



By Maria Harp 

Venango Campus Counselor 

Are you experiencing S.A.D.ness? 

Feeling cooped up? Do you have 
cabin fever? Are you finding yourself 
eating or sleeping more? These are all 
normal reactions to the change in sea- 
sons and with this years winter it seems 
like it will never end. However, some of 
us experience what is known as Seasonal 
Affective Disorder (SAD). There is a 
clear onset of depressive symptoms re- 
lated directly to the change in the sea- 
sons beginning in the fall. SAD can also 
be triggered in the spring'summer. 

Symptoms of Fall and Winter SAD 



(winter depression) include the follow- 
ing: depression, hopelessness, anxiety, 
loss of energy, social withdrawal, over- 
sleeping, loss of interest in activities you 
once enjoyed, appetite changes 
(especially craving foods high in carbo- 
hydrates), weight gain, and difficulty 
concentrating and processing informa- 
tion. Symptoms of Spring and Summer 
SAD (summer depression) include the 
following: anxiety, insomnia, irritability, 
agitation, weight loss, poor appetite, and 
increased sex drive. 

If you think you or someone you 
know is experiencing SAD, seek profes- 
sional assistance. Help is available for 



alleviating the depressive symp- 
toms. Recommended solutions for 
winter SAD are light therapy, medi- 
cations or psychotherapy. It is im- 
portant to seek assistance with your 
symptoms when you feel down for 
days at a time, experience changes 
in sleep or appetite, and begin to 
feel hopeless, suicidal, or feel like 
turning to alcohol/drugs to cope. 

For more information or assis- 
tance, please feel free to contact me, 
Maria Harp, Counselor. I am located 
at 234 Montgomei-y Hall Mondays 
and Wednesdays. My extension is 
1281. 



NW PA AHEC to hold 5th annual health career camps 



The Northwest PA Area Health 
Education Center (NW PA AHEC) is 
now accepting applications for its fifth 
annual health career camps which will 
be held at Clarion University-Venango 
Campus, as well as Thiel College this 
summer. 

The camps will allow students to 
work alongside area health profession- 
als doing hands-on activities and par- 
ticipating in a job shadowing experi- 
ence. The camps will be held June 15- 
19, 2009 at Clarion University- 
Venango Campus, and June 22-26 at 
Thiel College, Greenville, Pa. Students 
are given the opportunity to select 
which week works best for them. 

Students currently in grades 9-11 
from Butler, Cameron, Clarion, Clear- 
field. Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Jef- 
ferson, Lawrence, McKean, Mercer, 
Potter, Venango, and Warren County 
are invited to apply. Camp applications 
can be obtained from their high school 
guidance counselor or students can 
download an application online at 
www.nwpaahec.org. Applications are 
due at the NW PA AHEC office by 
April 17. 

The camps are a collaborative ef- 
fort between the Northwest Healthcare 
Industry Parmership, NW PA AHEC, 



Clarion University-Venango Campus, 
Thiel College, UPMC Northwest and 
UPMC Horizon. 

During the camps, students will be 
able to learn from practicing health pro- 
fessionals in the region and about the 
specific health professions that have the 
greatest demand for qualified workers. 
Camp faculty will discuss with the stu- 
dents the importance of cultural sensitiv- 
ity in health care and some of the situa- 
tions health care personnel encounter. 
Through the use of teamwork, students 
work on a clinical case study to deter- 
mine all of the health careers involved 
with that particular scenario. Students 
are also enlightened about diversity and 
the need to eliminate disparities in health 
care for all populations. 

Students will be exposed to approxi- 
mately 12 different health careers with 
hands-on training over the course of the 
week. They will also be given a job 
shadowing experience at the local hospi- 
tal. 

In addition, both Clarion University 
and Thiel College admissions staff will 
teach students and parents how to pre- 
pare and apply for college or other ad- 
vanced education. The week will culmi- 
nate in a "Grand Rounds" presentation 
of case studies done by the students dur- 



ing the week. 

The camps are free of charge to 
students. All speakers ft^om Clarion 
University, Thiel College, and the 
surtounding health care agencies are 
generously donating their time and 
talents to the camps. 

"We want to reach students early 
to provide them with career choices 
before their minds are set. The career 
camp will allow them a wide variety 
of experience that will be fun and 
informational," said Jane Mullinax. 
M.Ed., and Camp Director. "Our goal 
is to create a health professions pipe- 
line that will help the region in its 
efforts to eliminate disparities in 
health care." 

The AHEC is a nationwide 
health care workforce development, 
recruitment and retention agency 
ftinded partially by the State and Fed- 
eral governments. As part of its mis- 
sion, the AHEC encourages youth to 
enter health careers and practice 
health services in rural and under- 
served communities throughout the 
region. 

For more information on the 
camps and other NW PA AHEC pro- 
grams, please visit 
wwvv.nwpaahec.org. 



\OLUME 41, Issue 16 



Page 7 



Phi Theta Kappa offers a reminder of events 



Phi Theta Kappa will be helping at 
the Oil Cit> Communit> Easter Egg 
Hunt on Saturda\ April 4. If \ou would 
like to come along and help at this flin 
event, please email Lori Secor at 
s_Iasecor®clarion.edu immediately. 

As a reminder, the Faculty/Staff 
Appreciation Luncheon will be here 



before \ou know it! Please turn in the 
gift cards your group is donating for the 
Chinese Auction as soon as possible to 
give Phi Theta Kappa ample time to 
prepare for the event. Thank %ou for 
your donations. 

Save a life. Donate blood. Join 
PTK in Rhoades Auditorium, Thursday, 



Februap. 12. from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.. 
and make a difference in someone's 
life. Sign-up sheets are available in 
Rhoades Center, the Nursing office, 
the Administrative Office, or email 
Beth at s_edaustin'§ clarion.edu. Ask 
your families and co-workers to par- 
ticipate as well: this is not just for stu- 
dents. 



Be sure to follow the parking policy on campus 



The Clarion Universit}- Venango 
Campus administration is asking for the 
assistance of all students, facultv'. and 
staff 

Because of the class schedule for the 
2009 spring semester, the parking lots 
are full on Thursdays. The huge snow 
accumulation has also reduced the park- 
ing areas. Please park carefully, using 
onl\ one parking space. 



If }ou are able to car-pool with 
others, please do. 

If you park on campus. \ou must 
have a permit. Students, please park 
only in the spaces designated only for 
students, not in faculty and staff park- 
ing places. Do not use the visitors or 
handicapped spaces without appropriate 
permits. Do not park in unauthorized 
areas or non-parking areas. Do not 



block stairwa\' entrances, garage 
doors, dumpsters, or other walkways. 

Venango Campus administration 
offers a big thank you for any help 
\'ou can gi\e on Thursdays and every 
da\ to help reduce the parking con- 
gestion this semester. 

For questions about campus 
parking or parking permits, contact 
the administrative office at 676-6591. 



EVENTS: Pizza with the Dean slated for Feb. 1 1 



Continued from page 1 



Apartment Complex. Here, students 
can learn about foods that will actually 
help the brain ftmction and think bet- 
ter. 

Nathan Duprey will perform on 
Tuesday. Februar\' 10, as a part of the 
Spring Coffee House Series. Hailing 
from BrookKn. Duprej's lyrical mas- 
ter\- and captivating musicianship cre- 
ate a memorable evening for am- fan 
of original indie music with an edge. 

Namoli Brennet will perform 
Wednesday, February 11, at 7 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium. 

Transgender folk artist and fre- 
quent speaker Namoli Brennet will 



discuss her journey through gender iden- 
tit\' and the roles that gender pla>- in con- 
temporary society. 

Pizza with the Dean will be held on 
Wednesda}'. February 1 1, from 4-6 p.m.. 
at Rhoades Center. Students, facult\', and 
staff are invited to enjo\' a slice of pizza 
as you discuss an\- campus issues or con- 
cerns you may have with Venango Cam- 
pus Executive Dean Dr. Chris Reber. 

Pizza \\ ith the Dean is sponsored by 
the Venango Campus Student Senate. 

Jim Donovan and Eli Kihonia will 
present ""Rhv-thm. Race and the Transfor- 
mation of Fear" on Thursda\ , February.' 
12, at 7:30 p.m., at the Rhoades Audito- 
rium. 

Award-winning facilitator and 
multi-platinum recording artist Jim 



Donovan and master musician Elie 
Kihonia join together to perform a 
powerfulh' interactive diversity' pro- 
gram, using the universal language of 
music, dance, and storj'. 

Phi Theta Kappa will host a blood 
dri\e on Thursday, February 12, from 
1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Rhoades G^trnia- 
sium. 

Sign-up sheets for the blood drive 
are available at Rhoades Center infor- 
mation desk, the administrative office 
in Frame Hall, and the Nursing Office 
in Montgomery' Hall. 

For more informarion, email Beth 
Austin at s_edaustin a clarion.edu 

The Core Ensemble will present 

See EVENTS on page 8 



PACih 8 



Venango Voict 



Charlie Whipple is featured artist for spring 2009 



Charlie Whipple's artwork will be 
displayed in the Rhoades Student Cen- 
ter for the spring 2009 semester. A re- 
ception for the artist was held last 
week. 

Whipple spent over 30 years on the 
seas siindiindinu Alaska and the West 



Coast before transitioning to a career in 
painting. Most of the paintings on dis- 
play at Venango Campus are for sale 
for $45 and up. You can also see many 
of Whipple's paintings at his cafe in Oil 
City. 

Whipple owns The Howling Dog 



Gallery Cafe on Seneca Street. The 
cafe serves a wide variety of coffee, 
espresso drinks, and teas, all of which 
can be hot or cold. 

The cafe also sells homemade 
cookies, scones, soups, and sand- 
wiches. 




In the photo at the left, Charlie Whipple stands at the counter of the Howling Dog Gallery Cafe in Oil City, sur- 
rounded by many of his paintings. At right, one of Whipple's paintings that is featured In Rhoades Center is shown. 






'Of all the things you 

wear, your expression is 

the most important. ' 



EVENTS: Body camp class moved 



Continued from page 7 

"Ain't 1 a Woman" on Friday, February 
13. at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades Audito- 
rium. 

"Ain't 1 a Woman" is a chamber 
music theatre work that celebrates the 
lives and time of four powerful Afri- 
can-American women: Zora Neale 
Hurston. Sojourner Truth, Clementine 
Hunter, and Fannie Lou Hamer. 

The Credit/T4o Record option is 
available through Frida>, February 13. 
Credit/No Record Forms (which 



require an advisor's signature) are 
available in the Academic Department 
Offices, the Office of the Registrar. 
122 Carrier and the Administrative 
Office. Frame Hall. Venango Campus. 
Forms must be processed in the Office 
of the Registrar by 4 p.m. Frida\. Feb- 
ruary 13. Venango Campus students 
may return their forms to the Adminis- 
trative Office, Frame Hall. 

The requirements for the Credit/ 
No Record Option are available on the 
Registrar's web page. Go to 
www.clarion.edu , click on Quick 

See EVENTS on page 10 



Volume 41, Issue 16 



Page 9 



Wear Red Day is February 12 at Venango Campus 



Clarion University-Venango Cam- 
pus will join the American Heart Asso- 
ciation's fight against heart disease on 
Thursday, February 12, by holding 
Wear Red Day. Everyone is encouraged 
to participate by wearing red to work or 
school and donating $5 to help the 
AHA raise awareness of cardiovascular 
disease and empower everyone to re- 
duce our risk. 



Venango Campus is proud to be 
joining the AHA and concerned compa- 
nies and organizations across America 
in the fight against the number one kil- 
ler of women - as well as of men. 

Wear Red Day is a chance for us to 
arm ourselves with knowledge about 
this devastating disease and to raise 
funds that will help the AHA advance 
its research and education efforts. 



Learn more about the national 
cause to increase awareness and help 
women reduce their risk of heart dis- 
ease at GoRedForWomen.org. 

If you have any questions or 
would like to volunteer to help with 
sign-up or special events, please call 
Ginny Seybold at extension 1264. 

Thank you in advance for sup- 
porting this lifesaving program! 



FILMS: Nicole Kidman stars in one of the films 



Continued from page 1 

1930s, when Jim Crow laws were com- 
mon and lynch mobs were a pervasive 
fear for blacks. In the movie, the Wiley 
team eventually succeeds to the point 
where they are able to debate Harvard 
University . 

"Margot at the Wedding", rated R, 
will be shown Saturday, March 14. 

Margot (Nicole Kidman) is a suc- 
cessful but neurotic writer who brings 
her 1 1 -year-old son Claude (Zane Pais) 
to spend a weekend visiting her free- 
spirited sister Pauline (Jennifer Jason 
Leigh) on the eve of her wedding to 
Malcolm (Jack Black). Margot disap- 
proves of Pauline's choice of fiance, 
which causes tension between the two 
sisters. In short order, the storm the 
sisters create leaves behind a mess of 
thrashed relationships and exposed 
family secrets. 

"Memento", rated R, will be shown 
Saturday, March 2 1 . 

"Memento" chronicles two sepa- 
rate stories of Leonard, an ex-insurance 
investigator who can no longer build 
new memories, as he attempts to find 
the murderer of his wife, which is the 



last thing he remembers. One story line 
moves forward in time while the other 
tells the story backwards revealing more 
each time. A memory inside a memory, 
"Memento" is a complicated head spin- 
ning adventure. 

"The Wind that Shakes the Barley" 
will be shown Saturday, March 28. 

Winner of the PALME D'OR at the 
2006 Cannes Film Festival, "The Wind 
that Shakes the Barley" is a sympathetic 
look at Republicans in early 20th century 
Ireland, and two brothers who are torn 
apart by anti-British rebellion. 

"Cashback", rated R, will be shown 
Saturday, April 4. 

When art student Ben Willis loses 
his girlfriend, he develops insomnia. To 
pass the long hours of the night, he starts 
working the late night shift at the local 
supermarket. There he meets a colorful 
cast of characters, all of whom have their 
own "art" in dealing with the boredom of 
an eight-hour-shift. Ben's art is that he 
imagines himself stopping time. This 
way, he can appreciate the beauty of the 
frozen world and the people inside it — 
especially Sharon, the quiet checkout 
girl, who perhaps holds the answer to 
solving the problem of Ben's insomnia. 



"The Visitor", rated PG-13, will 
be shown Saturday, April 1 1 . 

In a world of six billion people, 
it only takes one to change your life. 
Sixty-two-year-old Walter Vale is 
sleepwalking through his life. Having 
lost his passion for teaching and writ- 
ing, he finds his life changed unex- 
pectedly when he returns from a trip 
to find two illegal aliens living in his 
New York apartment. Writer- 
director Thomas McCarthy has cre- 
ated a wonderfully measured story 
about change and renewal and put it 
all on the shoulders of Jenkins, a 
largely unheralded but masterful per- 
former whose time for renown has 
surely come. 

"Yesterday" will be shown Sat- 
urday, April 18. 

After falling ill. Yesterday learns 
that she is HIV positive. With her 
husband in denial and young daugh- 
ter to tend to. Yesterday's one goal is 
to live long enough to see her child 
go to school. The film realistically 
and sensitively portrays the plight of 
rural South Africans living with HIV 
or AIDS. The film is in Zulu with 
English subtitles. 



PAt.l 10 



\'ENANGO Voice 



EVENTS: "The Son (Le Fils)" slated for Feb. 14 



Continued from page 8 

Links (upper right comer), click on 
Registrar's Office, click on Students 
on the left side of the page. 

The fourth tllm in the Spring 
2009 Independent Film Series. "The 
Son (Le Fils)", will be shown Satur- 
day. February 14, at 7:30 p.m.. at 
Rhoades Auditorium. 

The practice of work is central to 
Le Fils (The Son), a deceptively com- 
plex movie about revenge and re- 
demption. The film seems straightfor- 
ward enough: Olivier, a carpenter, 
takes on a young man named Francis 
as an apprentice. Francis is newly re- 
leased fi'om juvenile detention, and 
Olivier slowly discovers that Francis 
played a part in the death of his son 
some years earlier. Francis is unaware 
of the connection he shares with Oliv- 
ier, this asymmetrical relationship 
investigates the ideas of forgiveness 
and vindication... The Son is ulti- 
mately a Christian allegory of one 
man's inchoate desire to return good 
for evil. The film is in French with 
English subtitles. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact Di- 
rector of Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at 676-659 1 , ext. 1 269. 

Body Camp Class will move 
to the YWCA on Central Street in Oil 
City for the next three weeks, or 
through Tuesday, February 17. The 
class meets from 2-3 p.m. Men are 
welcome to attend, but may not use 
the locker rooms at the YWCA. 

Additionally, yoga classes will be 
moved to the Community Center in 



the Student Apartment Complex for the 
next three weeks, or through Tuesdas. 
February 17. 

For more information, contact the 
office of Student Affairs at extension 
1271. 

Open Mic Night will be held 
Wednesday, February 18, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Center. 

Come share your talent, including 
poetry, music, and other performance 
submissions. 

For more information on guidelines 
and submissions, contact the Student Af- 
fairs office at extension 1269. 

"The Great Debaters" will be fea- 
tured Saturday. February 21, in the Inde- 
pendent Film Series. The film will be 
shown at 7:30 p.m.. at Rhoades Audito- 
rium. 

The film, based on a true story, 
revolves around the efforts of debate 
coach Melvin B. Tolson (Denzel Wash- 
ington) at historically black Wilev Col- 
lege to place his team on equal footing 
with whites in the American South during 
the 1930s, when Jim Crow laws were 
common and lynch mobs were a perva- 
sive fear for blacks. In the movie, the 
Wiley team eventually succeeds to the 
point where they are able to debate Har- 
vard Universit\' . 

For more infomiation about the Inde- 
pendent Film Series, contact Director of 
Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 



March 

"Margot at the Wedding" will be 
shown Saturday, March 14, at 7:30 p.m., 
at Rhoades Auditorium. The film is 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsx Ivania. Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City. PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice retlect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The\ 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, facultv. or staff of Clarion 
UniversitN of Pennsvlvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunit> and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
ciiipkn ment. Direct equal opportunitv' inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-1232. 814-393-2109. 



shown in conjunction with the Inde- 
pendent Film Series. 

Margot (Nicole Kidman) is a 
successful but neurotic writer who 
brings her 11 -year-old son Claude 
(Zane Pais) to spend a weekend visit- 
ing her fi-ee-spirited sister Pauline 
(Jennifer Jason Leigh) on the eve of 
her wedding to Malcolm (Jack 
Black). Margot disapproves of 
Pauline's choice of fiance, which 
causes tension between the two sis- 
ters. In short order, the storm the sis- 
ters create leaves behind a mess of 
thrashed relationships and exposed 
family secrets. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact 
Director of Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at 676-6591, e.xt. 1269. 

Scholarships are available for 
Venango County residents. Applica- 
tions for the following scholarships 
must be submitted by March 15. 

Applications for the following 
scholarships are available in the Ve- 
nango Admissions and Financial Aid 
Offi'ce. 

The Frank and Clara Williams 
Scholarship and the Laura M. Smed- 
ley Scholarship are available to stu- 
dents. 

For more information, contact 
Kay E. Ensle at extension 1277. 

"Memento" will be shown Satur- 
day, March 21, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact 
Director of Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at 676-6591, ext. 1269. 



CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 




Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VcM-flMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 17 



Monday, February 16, 2009 



Open Mic Night slated for Feb. 18 



Talented members of 
the community and students 
are invited to perform at an 
Open Mic Night in the 
Robert W. Rhoades Center 
at Clarion University- 
Venango Campus on 
Wednesday, February 1 8, at 



7:30 p.m. 

Hosted by Mitch Lit- 
tler, local high school stu- 
dent and accomplished gui- 
tarist and singer, the eve- 
ning encourages poets, mu- 
sicians, and other perform- 
ers. 



The event is free and 
open to the public. 

For more information 
about guidelines and sub- 
missions, contact the Ve- 
nango Student Affairs of- 
fice" at 814-676-6591, ex- 
tension 1269. 



Body Camp Class held at YWCA 



February 

Body Camp Class will 
move to the YWCA on 
Central Avenue in Oil City 
for the next three weeks, or 
through February 17. The 
class meets from 2-3 p.m. 
Men are welcome to at- 
tend, but may not use the 
locker rooms at the 
YWCA. 

Additionally, yoga 
classes will be moved to 
the Community Center in 
the Student Apartment 
Complex for the next three 
weeks, or through Tuesday, 
February 17. 

For more information, 
contact the office of Stu- 
dent Affairs at extension 
1271. 

An Open Mic Night 
will be held Wednesday, 
February 18, at 7:30 p.m., 



at Rhoades Lounge. The 
event will be hosted by 
Mitch Littler. 

Come share your talents 
with the world. Poetry, mu- 
sic, and other performance 
submissions are welcome. 

For more information 
on guidelines and submis- 
sions, contact the Student 
Affairs office at extension 
1269. 

"The Great Debaters" 
will be featured Saturday, 
February 21, in the Inde- 
pendent Film Series. The 
film will be shown at 7:30 
p.m., at Rhoades Audito- 
rium. 

The film, based on 
a true story, revolves around 
the efforts of debate coach 
Melvin B. Tolson (Denzel 
Washington) at historically 
black Wilev College to 



place his team on equal 
footing with whites in the 
American South during 
the 1930s, when Jim 
Crow laws were common 
and lynch mobs were a 
pervasive fear for blacks. 
In the movie, the Wiley 
team eventually succeeds 
to the point where they 
are able to debate Harvard 
University . 

For more information 
about the Independent 
Film Series, contact Di- 
rector of Student Affairs 
Emily Aubele at 676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

March 

"Margot at the Wed- 
ding" will be shown Sat- 
urday, March 14, at 7:30 
p.m., at Rhoades Audito- 

See EVENTS on page 3 



Inside this issue: 


Open Mic 
Night 


1 


Events 


1,3 


Trash Talk 


2 


Job Openings 


3 


Words of 
Wisdom 


3 


State News 


4 


National News 


4 


World Ne\\'s 


5 


Marla Harp 


6 



PAc;i; 2 



\'ENANGO Voice 



Take a second look at your flea, tick products 




Trash 
Talk 

BY 
LORl SECOR 



Continuing in tiie spirit 
of pets, something every 
friend to the four-legged 
furry creatures should be 
aware of is flea and tick 
products. Even when used as 
directed on the package, 
these products are poisonous 
for your pet. and harmful to 
people. 

Some of the products 
you want to avoid completely 
include Adam's collars, the 
entire Evercide collection of 
products. Hartz collars. 



sprays and powders. K9 
Advantix, and all Sentry, 
Zodiac. and Sergeanfs 
products. Among a ton of 
other products to avoid and 
use sparingly if around 
young children, these prod- 
ucts contain many toxic, 
and. in some cases, are sus- 
pected as being carcinogenic 
chemicals. 

Propoxur is toxic to the 
nervous system. Permethrin 
is likely to cause cancer and 
very toxic to cats. Pyre- 
thrins. which is in almost all 
of these products, is also 
very toxic to cats, to the 
nervous system, linked to 
allergies and asthma, and a 
possible carcinogen. Tetra- 
chlorvinphos is a suspected 
endocrine disruptor. and 
amitraz is a developmental 
toxin and a possible carcino- 
gen. Those are some serious 
side effects to products that 
are "safe when used cor- 
rectly". 

Even herbal or natural 
products used to treat fleas 
can be harmful. Natural 
products that contain some 



essential oils, such as citrus 
cinnamon, lavender, bay, 
and eucalyptus, should be 
used sparingly. They can 
cause allergic reactions in 
people, and severe reac- 
tions in animals. Avoid 
pennyroyal oil. as it can 
cause seizures, comas, and 
death in pets. Herbal or 
natural products that are 
safer? Those that contain 
cedar wood, lemongrass, 
peppermint, rosemary, and 
thyme are the safest. 

Of course, chemicals 
are not necessary to keep 
your pet (and your ankles) 
happy. Four simple things 
can help keep your pet 
flea-ft-ee. or at the very 
least flea-minimal. 

1 . Comb your pet w ith 
a tlea comb. Drown fleas 
caught in the comb in 
soapy water to kill them. 
Combing on a regular basis 
can help reduce fleas. 

2. Give Fide a bath. 
Not only will he smell bet- 
ter, soap kills fleas. 

3. Wash pet bedding in 
hot water once a week. 



Fleas tend to accumulate 
there, and it helps prevent 
the spread of eggs and lar- 
vae. 

4. Vacuum. Please. 
Really, that should be going 
on alread). but vacuum fur- 
niture too. Immediately take 
the vacuum outside and re- 
move the bag or empty the 
bin to keep them from es- 
caping back into the house. 

5. Throw some salt for 
good luck. Seriously! I 
know someone who used 
this method and got rid of a 
horrible infestation even 
after dangerous 'flea bombs" 
failed. Liberally sprinkle 
ordinary table salt all over 
the carpets, leave it sit. then 
vacuum it up and dispose of 
the bag. How long the salt 
should stay on the carpet is 
debatable. Fve seen on a 
few websites to leave it as 
much as a week, but others 
say 1 8 hours is enough. 

A full listing of flea and 
tick products is available at 
wvvvv.greenpaws.org. Log 
on and check out how your 
products rate. 



Vjznango Voieg 

Student Affairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion Universit) - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice'fliclarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. .loan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion Universit> of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communities The 
Voice is published most Mondays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity ; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonvmous. they must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. Thev should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



Volume 41, Issue 17 



Page 3 



Positions are still available for qualified candidates 



A Student Assistant(s) in the Con- 
tinuing Education and Admissions De- 
partment is needed. Applicants for Con- 
tinuing Education should be available 
for the following time periods: Summer 
2009, Fall 2009''and Spring 2010 terms. 
Applicants for the Admissions Depart- 
ment should be available for Summer 
2009. 

Students may apply to one or both 
offices. There are 10 hours per week 
available in each office. 

Students applying for the Continu- 
ing Education position will help with 
multiple projects during the year which 
require some lifting and moving of 
classroom supplies. 

Students should be: highly respon- 
sible; detail-oriented; strong communi- 
cation skills, written and verbal; strong 
reading comprehension skills; customer 
service oriented with good phone eti- 
quette; ability to pay attention to close 
detail for sustained periods of time; 
strong organizational skills; ability to 
meet deadlines; ability to manage mul- 



tiple priorities; familiarity with Micro- 
soft WORD and EXCEL programs; 
assist with registration of new students 
in certificate programs; maintain confi- 
dentiality of records; manage, update, 
and backup electronic files as directed; 
photocopy as needed; write notes or 
correspondence as needed/directed; and 
other related duties as assigned. 

Drop off your resume with a com- 
pleted a student application form at the 
Admissions Office and/or Continuing 
Education Office located in Frame Hall. 

If you enjoy people and desire a 
good job in the immediate area, this 
Titusville employer offers an opportu- 
nity to use your education in a positive 
environment. 

Salvage Direct is looking to fill a 
full time Customer Service Rep posi- 
tion in its Titusville office. Candidates 
must possess proficient computer skills, 
be customer oriented and possess 
strong multitasking skills. Automotive/ 
salvage/insurance experience is a plus. 



They offer competitive pay and a 
benefits package. Please send resumes 
with references to: Salvage Direct, 
Attn: Human Resources, P.O. Box 
306, Titusville, PA 16354. 

If you need a full time job and 
still want to attend classes during the 
day, then this second shift opportunity 
may be your answer. 

A local company is in need of an 
experienced Shipping and Receiving 
clerk. The candidate must have a 
strong background in Microsoft Word 
and Excel. The candidate will be re- 
sponsible for bills of lading as well as 
tracking shipments. This will be a sec- 
ond shift position (3 p.m. to 1 1p.m.). 

For more information about any 
of these positions or for resume prepa- 
ration assistance, contact Mark Con- 
rad, Coordinator of Career Services, at 
mconrad@clarion.edu or 676-6591, 
extension 1373. 



EVENTS: "Memento" will be shown 



Continued from page 1 

rium. The film is shown in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

Margot (Nicole Kidman) is a suc- 
cessful but neurotic writer who brings 
her II -year-old son Claude (Zane Pais) 
to spend a weekend visiting her fi^ee- 
spirited sister Pauline (Jennifer Jason 
Leigh) on the eve of her wedding to 
Malcolm (Jack Black). Margot disap- 
proves of Pauline's choice of fiance, 
which causes tension between the two 
sisters. In short order, the storm the sis- 
ters create leaves behind a mess of 
thrashed relationships and exposed fam- 
ily secrets. 

For more information about the In- 



dependent Film Series, contact Direc- 
tor of Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 
676-6591, ext. 1269. 

"Memento" will be shown Satur- 
day, March 21, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact Di- 
rector of Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at 676-6591, ext. 1269. 

Dr. Michael Galaty will present 
"Archaeological Evidence for the Ori- 
gins of Affluence" on Monday, March 
23, at 5:30 p.m., at Rhoades Audito- 
rium. " 



IVarc/s of ]^\_ 
Wisdom .^/^ 



^The happiness of your 

life depends on the 

quality of your 

thoughts. ' 



PAGi; 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Lawmakers look for ways to make Pa. schools safer 



HARRISBURG. Pa. (AP) — 

Some of the most serious crimes 
could ban someone for life fi-om work- 
ing in Pennsylvania's schools under a 
bill under consideration in the Legisla- 
ture. 

The Senate Education Committee 
on Wednesday also heard testimony 
about whether to force school employ- 



ees to inform their school districts 
about any criminal conviction. 

There's already a list of offenses 
that could trigger a five-year employ- 
ment ban. 

But a bill sponsored by Education 
Committee Chairman Jeff Piccola 
would expand the list of offenses that 
could triaaer the ban and make it for 



life. 

He's also proposing a 10-year 
employment ban for those convicted 
of first- and second-degree misde- 
meanors. 

Piccola also wants to give school 
administrators greater leeway to con- 
duct a current criminal history record 
check. 



National 



Twisters kill 8 people in Oklahoma, others injured 



LONE GROVE. Okla. (AP) — Emer- 
gency crews on Wednesday searched 
for more victims amid the wreckage of 
homes and businesses smashed by a 
cluster of tornadoes that killed at least 
eight people. 

One young woman was lifted into 
the air as a tornado pulled the roof off 
a house, but her mother and others 
held her down. 

Firefighters moved aside bricks 
and fallen walls as they sought to en- 
sure there were no additional victims 
in Lone Grove, where all of the eight 
victims died Tuesday and 14 people 
were seriously injured, said Oklahoma 
Department of Emergency Manage- 
ment spokeswoman Michelann Ooten. 
Each building that had been searched 
was then marked with a large, spray- 
painted "X." 

Rescuers found one woman in- 
jured but alive under an overturned 
mobile home. 

Ooten said the National Guard 
was sent to help. "We will do every- 
thing we can to get Oklahomans the 
assistance they need." Gov. Brad 
Henry said. 

Buildings were damaged or de- 
stroyed throughout the town of about 
4.600, some 100 miles south of Okla- 
homa City, said Chester Agan, assis- 
tant emergency manager for Carter 
County. 



The eight confirmed deaths included 
seven people in Lone Grove and a truck 
driver who was driving through the area, 
said Robert Deaton. interim chief inves- 
tigator for state Medical Examiner's of- 
fice. 

Most of the deaths were in an area 
of mobile homes that was virtually 
wiped out. said Paul Sund. a spokesman 
for the governor. 

"Some were outside, some were 
inside," said Cherokee Ballard, a spokes- 
woman for the medical examiner's of- 
fice. Most of the deaths appeared to be 
blunt force trauma to the head, some 
apparently hit by t1>ing objects, she said. 

"One victim was found underneath a 
pickup truck the tornado had lifted and 
dropped on him," Ballard said. 

There was no storm shelter near the 
mobile home park. 

Part of the roof blew off the house 
where Lana Hartman crowded into a 
small clothes closet with her two daugh- 
ters, three grandchildren and two friends. 
The twister lifted one of her daughters 
into the air, but everyone grabbed the 
girl, she said. 

"We held onto each other and did a 
lot of praying." said Hartman's friend 
Carole McFarland. 

"1 was in shock. I think I still am." 
Hartman said. "We're alive, thaf s all that 
matters." 

Hartman, who had just moved into 



the rented house on Monday, said 
there wasn't much warning. "We heard 
the sirens blow and it was here," she 
said. 

The National Weather Service 
issued a tornado warning, meaning a 
tornado is imminent and residents 
should take shelter, at 6:50 p.m. An- 
other was issued at 7: 1 5 p.m. when the 
tornado was spotted, and the twister 
hit Lone Grove 10 minutes later. 

Tears rolled down the cheeks of 
Trina Quinton as she stood next to a 
pile of rubble that used to be a furni- 
ture store owned by a cousin. 

"This is where 1 was raised, this is 
where I grew up," she said. 

The furniture store was closed 
when the tornado struck and her 
cousin's family wasn't there. "This is 
how they make their living, rebuilding 
is probably not going to be an option," 
Quinton said. 

Lone Grove resident Joe Horn- 
back, 42, said he and his neighbors 
took shelter in the only cellar on their 
block. "There were 30 of us in a 6 by 6 
underground cellar." he said. 

Shirley Mose was not home when 
the tornado struck but returned 
Wednesday morning with members of 
her family and found her home de- 
stroyed and her pickup truck wrecked. 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



\oLUME 41, Issue 17 



Page 5 



World 



Millions of animals are dead in Australia fires 



S\'D\E^' (API — Kangaroo corpses 
la\ scattered b\ the roadsides while 
wombats that sur\'i\ ed the wildfire's 
onslaught emerged from their under- 
ground burrows to find blackened 
earth and nothing to eat. 

Wildlife rescue officials on 
\\"ednesda> worked frantically to 
help the animals that made it through 
Australia's worst-e%er wildfires but 
the\ said millions of animals likeh 
perished in the inferno. 

Scores of kangaroos ha\e been 
found around roads, where the\ w ere 
o\er%\helmed by flames and smoke 
while attempting to flee, said Jon 
Rowdon. president of the rescue 
group Wildlife \'ictoria. 

Kangaroos that sunived are suf- 
fering from burned feet, a resuh of 
their territorial beha%ior. After escap- 
ing the initial flames, the creatures — 
which prefer to sta) in one area — 
likeh circled back to their homes. 



singeing their feet on the smoldering 
ground. 

"It's just horrific." said Neil Mor- 
gan, president of the Statewide Wildlife 
Rescue Emergenc> Senice in Victoria, 
the state where the raging fires were 
still burning. 

"It's disaster all around for humans 
and animals as well." 

Some wombats that hid in their 
burrows managed to sunive the blazes. 
but those that are not rescued face a 
slow and certain death as they emerge 
to find their food supph gone, said Pat 
O'Brien, president of the Wildlife Pro- 
tection Association of .Australia. 

The official human death toll stood 
at 1 S 1 from w eekend's deadly fires and 
authorities said it would exceed 200. 
While the scope of the wildlife de\asta- 
tion was still tmclear. it was likeh to be 
enormous. Rowdon said. 

"There's no doubt across that scale 
of landscape and gi\en the intensity." of 



the fires, millions of animals would 
have been killed." he said. 

Hundreds of burned, stressed and 
dehydrated animals — including, kan- 
garoos, koalas. lizards and birds — 
ha\e already arrived at shelters 
across the scorched region. 

Rescuers have doled out antibi- 
otics, pain relie\ers and fluids to the 
critters in a bid to keep them com- 
fortable, but some of the severely 
injured were euthanized to spare any 
more suffering. 

"We've got a wallab\- joey at the 
moment that has crisp\- fried ears 
because he stuck his head out of his 
mum's pouch and lost all his whisk- 
ers and cooked up his nose." Rowdon 
said. "They're the ones >our hearts 
really go out to." 

In some of the hardest-hit areas, 
rescuers used \aporizing tents to help 
creatures whose lungs were burned 
h\' the searina heat and smoke. 



NATIONAL: Homes damaged in Oklahoma City 



Continued from page 4 



"I had a little Chihuahua that 
staged in there." Mose said. "We 
found her bed. but not her. I guess 
she's gone." 

A t%vister also damaged homes 
and businesses in the Oklahoma Cit}' 
metropolitan area, but onh' three mi- 
nor injuries were reported. 

-Another tornado was reported in 
north-central Oklahoma, six homes 
were destro\ed near the Oklahoma 
C\x\ suburb of Edmond. and a sepa- 
rate tornado caused property damage 
but no injuries in Springfield. Mo. 

The tornado in northwest Okla- 
homa Cit} apparenth developed near 
Wile\- Post .Airpon and then headed 
northeast, damaging several shopping 
centers and restaurants at a major 
intersection. 



That u\ister then hit the Boulder 
Ridge Apartments, a spread of t\vo- 
ston.' units surrounding a coiut\ard. 

Shawn Tiesman. 33. moved to the 
complex from Iowa about four months 
ago and got his first taste of Okla- 
homa's notorious weather but without 
the same protection of his former home. 

"Where I'm from, we've got base- 
ments." Tiesman said. "I'm amazed that 
there's no basements here." 

He invited his upstairs neighbors 
into his apartment and then used his 
fiiton mattress to barricade them into a 
w alk-in closet. 

While the}' were in the closet, a 
large section of roof was blown off one 
of the complex's buildings and part of a 
wall was blown off another. 

Tornado sirens were sounded in the 
area but some residents said the\' were 
srill caught off guard. 

"I can't behe\'e we didn't hear it." 



said Traci Keil. 37. 

Oklahoma Gas and Electric re- 
ported about 8.900 customers without 
power, nearh 3.500 in Lone Grove, 
according to its Web site. 

Tornadoes in Oklahoma are most 
frequent in the spring, but can occur 
at an\' time, weather service meteor- 
ologist Rick Smith said. 

Since 1950 the state has been 
struck by 44 Februar} tornadoes, said 
weather service meteorologist Doug 
Speheger in Norman. 

The most recent one before 
Tuesday's spurt occurred Feb. 25. 
2000. damaging a bam and power 
lines in Ellis and Harper counties in 
western Oklahoma. 

Outside Oklahoma. howe\er. 
Speheger said an outbreak of nvisters 
on Feb. 5. 2008. killed more than 50 
people in Alabama. Arkansas. Ken- 
tuckv". Mississippi and Tennessee. 



Pac.i 6 



Venango Voice 



Consider suggestions for a healthy relationship 



By Maria Harp 

Venango Campus Counselor 

Do not expect anyone to be re- 
sponsible for your happiness. Accept 
yourself. Respect yourself Love your- 
self first. Take good care of yourself 
Love yourself, so pursue your true 
needs. Light up your true desires. Too 
often relationships fail because some- 
one is unhappy and blames their part- 
ner for making them that way. Your 
life is ONLY under your control. Keep 
reminding yourself you are GOOD 
ENOUGH to have a happy life and a 
healthy relationship. 

Make and keep clear agreements. 
Respect the difference between your- 
self and your partner. Don't expect he 
or she agrees with you on everything. 
Reach mutual agreements or plan, and 
then commit to it. Leave the partner if 
you can't reach any agreement or you 
find he or she always makes excuses 
for breaking the agreement or plan. 
Keeping agreements shows respect for 
yourself and your partner, as well as 
creating a sense of trust and safety. 

Use communication to establish a 
common ground to understand differ- 
ent points of view and to create a mu- 
tual, collaborative agreement or plan. 
You can either choose to be right, or 
you can have a successful relationship. 
You can't always have both. Most peo- 
ple argue to be "right" about some- 
thing. If you can't reach any mutual 
agreement, that doesn't mean either of 
you is wrong or bad, it only means 
you don't suit each other. 

Approach your relationship as a 
learning experience. Each one has 
important infomiation for you to learn . 
When a relationship is not working, 
there is usually a familiar way that we 
feel while in it. We are attracted to the 



partner with whom we can learn the most, 
and sometimes the lesson is to let go of a 
relationship that no longer serves us. 

Tell the unarguable truth. Be truthful 
to yourself and your partner if you want 
true love. Many people are taught to He to 
protect someone's feelings, either their 
own or those of their partner. Lies create 
disconnection between you and your rela- 
tionship, even if your partner never finds 
out about it. 

Do not do anything for your partner 
if it comes with an expectation of recipro- 
cation. The things you do for your partner 
must always be done because you chose 
to do them and you wanted to do them. 
Do not hold your "good deeds" over their 
head at a later time. 

Forgive one another. Foraiveness is a 
decision of letting go of the past and fo- 
cusing on the present. It's about taking 
control of your current situation. Talk 
about the issue and try to reach a mutual 
agreement on how to handle the situation 
in the future and then commit to it. Re- 
spect your partner, when your partner tells 
you to leave them alone, do give him or 
her the time and space. 

Review your expectations. Try to be 
as clear as you can about any expectations 
- including acceptable and unacceptable 
behaviors and attitudes, especially atti- 
tudes towards money. Make sure you 
don't expect your partner to fulfill every 
need in your life. Everybody needs love , 
intimacy, affection, and affirmation, but 
your partner cannot alone give you all of 
that. 

Be Responsible . Here's a new defini- 
tion: Responsible means that you have the 
ability to respond. Respond to the real 
problem, to your true needs. It does nol 
mean you are to blame. If you are un- 
happy in your relationship, get curious 
about why this situation seems similar to 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodicallN b) the students of Clarion Uni\ersity of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs. acti\ ities. and 



others from your past, and how you 
might create a better relationship for 
yourself rather than dwell in anger or 
resentment or try to change your part- 
ner instead. 

Appreciate yourself and your 
partner. In the midst of an argument, 
it can be difficult to find something 
to appreciate. Start by generating 
appreciation in moments of non- 
stress. One definition of appreciation 
is to be sensitively aware so you don't 
have to be sugar-coating anything. 

Admit your mistakes and say 
sorry'. Right after a misunderstanding 
or argument, tell your partner to give 
you some time to think of the wrong 
and right things that you and he/she 
did. Tell your partner to do the same 
thing and talk to them after 10-15 
minutes. Tell your partner to give 
you time to talk and explain to them 
why you were angry, the wrong 
things you did, the things they did 
that you did not like and what you 
would like them to change. Ask your 
parmer to do the same thing and give 
them a fair chance to talk and explain 
also. 

Spend some quality time to- 
gether- No matter how busy you two 
are, there is always an excitement 
when you do something together, 
when you share your precious time. 
You will feel the magic of love and 
connection that you have with each 
other. 

If you would like further infor- 
mation or need assistance, please feel 
fiee to contact me, Maria Harp, 
Counselor, at extension 1281. 234 
Montgomery Hall. This information 
was obtained from http:// 
www.wikihow.com/Have-a-Healthy- 
Relationship. 



CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 




'] 2 200: 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 

VeMfiMGo Voice 



Volume 41, Issue 18 Monday, February 23, 2009 



Reiser named to nursing position 



Dr. Lorraine M. Reiser 
has been has been named to 
a new tenure-track associ- 
ate professor of nursing 
position in Clarion Univer- 
sitN's Master of Science in 
Nursing program offered 
through the School of Nurs- 
ing and Allied Health, 
which is housed at the Ve- 
nango Campus. Dr. Reiser 
will be based at the pro- 
gram's Pittsburgh site at 
West Perm Hospital. 

According to Dr. 
Kathleen Patterson, director 
of the School. "Dr. Reiser 
is an excellent asset to the 
nursing facult}'. She is a 
doctorally-prepared nurse 
practitioner who comes to 
her position with an active 
research and scholarship 
backgroimd, including nu- 
merous paper and podium 
presentations, and is a well- 
respected member of a 



number of professional 
organizations." 

Dr. Reiser most re- 
cently served as director of 
graduate nursing programs 
at Carlow University, 
where she taught since 
1999 and served as coordi- 
nator of the nurse practitio- 
ner program. 

Dr. Reiser earned a 
bachelor's degree in biol- 
ogy from Pennsylvania 
State Universit\', a bache- 
lor's degree in nursing from 
Albright College, and a 
master's degree in nursing 
education from Villanova 
University. She also did 
post-master's study in the 
nurse practitioner program 
at Carlow College prior to 
her emplovment there. She 
earned a Ph.D. from the 
University' of Pittsburgh. 

Dr. Reiser was recog- 
nized by the Nightingale 




Dr. Lorraine Reiser 

Societ) at Albright College, 
where she was also a mem- 
ber of Sigma Theta Tau, the 
international honor society 
of nursing, and received the 
Senior Leadership Award. 
While at Villanova Univer- 
sity, she received the Joan 
E. Large Award for Schol- 
arship in Graduate Studies. 

Dr. Reiser has been 
widely published in profes- 
sional journals, including 

See REISER on page 6 



Yoga held in fitness center on Thu. 



February 

Body Camp Class will 
mo\e to the YWCA on 
Central Avenue in Oil C\\s 
through Tuesda\. Februar\- 
24. The class meets from 2- 
3 p.m. Men are welcome to 
attend, but ma>' not use the 



locker rooms at the YWCA. 

Additionally, yoga 
classes will be moved to the 
Fitness Center through 
Thursday. February 26. 

For more information, 
contact the office of Student 
Affairs at extension 1271. 



March 

"Margot at the Wed- 
ding" will be shown Sat- 
urday, March 14, at 7:30 

See EVENTS on page 7 



Inside this issue: 


New F.-xculty 


1 


E\-ENTS 


1-8 


Trash Talk 


2 


Job Openings 


3 


State News 


4 


N.^TiONAL News 


4 


World News 


5 


Thanks 


6 


Faculty 
Candidates 


6 


Briees 


7 


Words of 
Wisdom 


7 


Now" "i'a Know 


7 



PACl: 2 



Venango Voice 



Lori Secor takes a shot at curing the hangover 







Trash 
Talk 

BY 

LoRi Secor 



We're on the verge of 
Spring Break (and not a mo- 
ment too soon), so I couldn't 
imagine a better time to 
throw this article at you. I 
came across a very interest- 
ing read on webmd.com 
while searching for a proven 
hangover cure. We don't 
need to go into why I was 
looking for it in the first 
place, but the article was 
really informative... and a 
little disappointing. 

A hangover is basically 



your body revolting to being 
poisoned with too much 
alcohol. Alcohol messes 
with the chemicals in your 
brain, and after ail the fun is 
over you pay the price of the 
imbalance with that pound- 
ing headache, cotton mouth, 
fatigue, a weakened immune 
system, and the queasy 
stomach that keeps you sit- 
ting on the bathroom floor 
because if you move... well, 
you know. 

If you are like me. you 
go out with the best of inten- 
tions, "I'll only have a cou- 
ple, and then just soda or 
water." Before you know it. 
after a couple hours on the 
dance floor, you're hot and 
thirsty. Your friends go for 
drinks and instead of just 
coke, you end up with a 
coke and cherry vodka. 

So now that your good 
intentions are shot, pardon 
the pun, how are you going 
to handle that hangover? 

First thing, don't take 
Tylenol or Advil before you 
go to bed. It really doesn't 
help. They peak in about 



three or four hours, so by 
the time you wake up the 
effect is long gone. Plus, 
alcohol disrupts how the 
liver processes it anyway. 
Just assume enough dam- 
age was done to your liver 
with the alcohol and skip 
the medicine. 

AM cocktail? 1 know a 
few people who swear if 
you have a shot of what- 
ever it was you were drink- 
ing the night before, it'll 
get rid of a hangover. 

According to WebMD, 
this is definitely not the 
way to go. The full effect 
of a hangover hits you 
when your blood alcohol 
level hits zero... so it's 
only delaying the inevita- 
ble. 

1 have to mention here 
that if you really HAVE to 
have that morning drink, 
you may want to seek out 
an AA meeting. 

My personal favorite 
once the queasiness sub- 
sides... coffee. 1 just can't 
catch a break here. Turns 
out coffee only leads to 



more dehydration and can 
actually make the hangover 
worse! Water and sports 
drinks are best... especially 
if you spent some time 
■praying to the porcelain 
God'. 

Finally, hangover pills. 
There are various herbal 
remedies out there for this, 
but I wouldn't recommend 
using them unless you know 
what's really in there... and 
good luck with that. There is 
nothing compelling in the 
studies that prove if they 
work or not. 'Prickly Pear 
Cactus" was found to help 
dry mouth and nausea, but 
not the headache. 

So I suppose until a 
very clever chemist comes 
up with a super pill for those 
of us who tend to over-do 
things, we'll just have to pay 
the price. 

I'll just give you these 
words to remember when 
you are out over spring 
break: After your sixth 
drink, do not look at your- 
self in the mirror. It will 
shake your confidence. 



Vjznango \?oie(Z 

Student AfTairs. Rhoades Center 

Clarion University - Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591. Ext. 1271 Email: vvoicertclarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. .loan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion Universit> of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding communilies UK- 
Voice is published most Mondays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Tuesdays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice stall. They should schedule their co-curricular when scheduling classes. 
Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



\'OLUME 41, Issue 18 



Page 3 



Consider the following open positions and internships 



A paralegal/legal assistant is 
needed for a famil> law attorney/law 
firm in Franklin. The applicant must 
have previous legal office experi- 
ence. Computer and transcription 
experience is required. If you can 
maintain your composure while 
working for a perfectionist, meet 
urgent deadlines, and juggle multiple 
projects, please apply. The full time 
position requires hours from 8:30 
a.m. to 5 p.m.. Monday through Fri- 
day. Contact CareerLink at 814-678- 
5067 to have your resume e-mailed to 
the employer. 

Anyone interested in employ- 
ment through AmeriCorps 
(SMILES)? Anyone interested in 
earning an Educational Award 
through AmeriCorps (SMILES)? Do 
}'ou have dependable transportation? 
Would you be willing to drive to 
various employment locations in the 
Oil City area for a tutoring or service 
learning position at a community/ 
service organization? Do you love 
children and people and truly want to 
make a difference? 

Eligible candidates would be 
required to work a minimum of 450 
hours from now through June 30, 
2009. Eligible candidates would earn 
$7.15 per hour, plus, once the 450 
hours of employment are completed 
and documented, an additional 
$1,250 tuition voucher (Ed Award) 
would be awarded to be used against 
a CUP student account. 

Due to the fact these are federal 



work-study positions, students must 
have a current FAFSA on file to deter- 
mine federal work-study eligibility. 

All interested parties please contact 
Linda Defibaugh, Idefibaugh 
@clarion.edu, or stop by the Admis- 
sions Office in Frame for an applica- 
tion. Once applications are received, 
they will be sent to the Financial Aid 
Office for eligibility, then, if eligible, 
students will be contacted at the phone 
number listed on the application. 

The Oil Region Job Fair will be 
held Thursday. April 2, from 1 1 a.m. to 
5 p.m.. at the Cranberry Mall at Routes 
322 and 257. 

For more information, contact the 
Oil Region CareerLink at 678-5050. or 
visit www.cwds.state.pa.us. 

The Oil Region Alliance of Busi- 
ness. Industry & Tourism (a non-profit 
corporation with headquarters in Oil 
City) offers customized internships and 
practicum opportunities to graduate and 
undergraduate students interested 'in 
tackling worthwhile real-life projects as 
part of this sfrategic rural economic 
development endeavor. Build your re- 
sume while making a positive differ- 
ence! 

The Alliance administers the Oil 
Region National Heritage Area; its 
boundaries include Venango County 
plus the Titusville area in eastern Craw- 
ford County, in northwestern Pennsyl- 
vania. Intern projects vary greatly; all 
majors are welcome. Each internship is 
designed in cooperation with the poten- 



tial interns and their educational insti- 
tutions. Here are some examples: his- 
torical research; grant closeout reports; 
building preservation; historical inter- 
pretation: writing interpretive panels; 
nominations for markers; landscaping 
historic sites; writing book reviews; 
special events assistance; on-site sur- 
veys: developing curriculum materi- 
als; cultural coordination; translating 
into other languages; educational ac- 
tivities; Oil 150 product sales and de- 
liveries; and artifact inventories. 

Each internship is structured for 
one semester or shorter, in accordance 
with the student's institution's criteria. 
The intern is directly supervised by 
staff in the Alliance's Heritage Devel- 
opment Department, sometimes with 
additional guidance by Board mem- 
bers. 

A subsidy is available to those 
interns who will be involved at least 
100 hours; compensation is 50 cents 
over the current federal minimum 
wage, paid every two weeks. 

Please make complete internship 
arrangements ahead of time, so you 
can select or design projects that blend 
your academic requirements and areas 
of interest. Contact Mrs. Marilyn 
Black at the Oil Region Alliance; 
(800) 483-6264, Ext. 105; 
mblack(g),oilregion.org . 

For more information about these 
positions or resume preparation assis- 
tance, contact Mark Conrad, Coordi- 
nator of Career Services, at mcon- 
rad(3)clarion.edu, or extension 1373. 



Email the VeNfiNGO Voice! vvoice@clarion.edu 



Pach 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Pittsburgh mayor puts his name on 250 trash cans 



PITTSBURGH (AP) — When Pitts- 
burgh residents think of trash, the 
city's mayor wants them to think of 
him. 

With the May primary looming, 
Mayor Luke Ravenstahl's administra- 
tion is spending more than $250,000 
to buy 250 new trash cans — all with 



his name on them. 

The new cans will be placed in 30 
neighborhoods as part of a program 
which aims to help revitalize 
neighborhoods. 

The mayor's head of neighbor- 
hood programs defends putting his 
name on trash cans. 



Kim Graziani says Mayor Raven- 
stahl wants people to know his ad- 
ministration is responsive to their 
needs. 

Besides, mayor-branded trash 
cans are practically a civic tradition. 
Three former mayors also put their 
names on waste receptacles. 



National 



Hundreds of television stations cut analog signals 



NEW YORK (AP) — About a quarter 
of the nation's TV stations cut off their 
analog signals Tuesday, causing sets 
to go dark in households that were not 
prepared for digital television despite 
two years of warnings about the transi- 
tion. 

Though most viewers were ready 

— and people with cable or satellite 
service were unaffected — some sta- 
tions and call centers reported a steady 
stream of questions from frustrated 
callers. Many wondered how to get 
coupons for converter boxes that 
translate digital signals for older TVs 

— or how to get the devices working. 

"It's kind of an irritation, but I 
understand that everyone will have a 
much better picture. As far as I was 
concerned, they could have left things 
the way they were." said Dorothy 
Delegard, 67, of Minneapolis, who 
bought a converter box because a 
ft-iend gave her a coupon that expires 
Tuesday. 

Phones were ringing off the hook 
at a walk-in information center set up 
by stations in Providence, R.I. 

A volunteer at the center, Jeremy 
Taylor, said he tried to calm agitated 
callers and explain the reasons for the 
disappearance of analog signals, 
which have remained largely un- 
changed since the 1950s. 

"1 try to explain that the digital 



switch is not something we're doing to 
extort them of money," Taylor said. 

The federal government mandated 
the end of analog broadcasts to make 
room on those fi'equencies for wireless 
Internet service, emergency radio traffic 
and other uses. Digital TV broadcasts, 
which began several years ago, take up 
much less of the wireless spectrum. 

Originally, all U.S. stations were to 
cut their analog signals on Tuesday, but 
at the urging of the Obama administra- 
tion. Congress voted this month to give 
broadcasters more time. 

Most stations, particularly those in 
big cities, accepted the offer to wait until 
June 12. Others wanted to stick to Feb. 
17, a date they had spent much airtime 
advertising. Many of them had also 
booked engineering work on their anten- 
nas for that day. 

The Federal Communications Com- 
mission, which wanted to ensure that no 
one would be entirely deprived of analog 
signals, cleared 421 stations to go all- 
digital this week. Another 220 stations 
have already made the switch, including 
all stations in Hawaii. 

The most populous places where 
many or all major-network stations are 
cutting analog this week include San 
Diego and Santa Barbara, Calif; La 
Crosse and Madison, Wis.; Rockford 
and Peoria, 111.; Sioux City, Iowa; Waco, 
Texas; Macon. Ga.; Scranton, Pa.; 



Rhode Island and Vermont. 

In most cases, one station in each 
of those markets will continue sending 
analog signals until June or will offer 
a so-called "analog nightlight" for a 
few months, with limited local news 
and emergency broadcasts, as well as 
information about the digital TV tran- 
sition. 

The back-and-forth over the cut- 
off date threw both TV stations and 
viewers for a loop. 

Jeff Long, manager of WHKY- 
TV, an independent station in Hick- 
ory', N.C.. said the company's analog 
shutdown went smoothly on Saturday, 
but some viewers complained that 
they thought it had been postponed 
until June 12. 

RadioShack Corp. circulars in 
newspapers this weekend had the op- 
posite message, saying Feb. 17 was 
still the date for the end of analog TV. 
Spokeswoman Mary Delagarza said 
the fliers had been prepared two 
months in advance and could not be 
pulled. 

Congress delayed the cutoff in 
large part because the fund that pays 
for $40 converter-box coupons had 
reached its spending limit. Coupons 
are now being issued only as fast as 
old ones expire unused. 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



\'OLUME 41, Issue 18 



Page 5 



World 



US general visits Afghan bomb site for death claim 



RABUL (AP) — A U.S. general 
tra\eled to western Afghanistan on 
Wednesday to investigate claims that 
six women and two children were 
killed in a U.S. airstrike. officials 
said. Photographs of the site showed 
at least one dead bo>. bloodied and 
dirts from the attack. 

Civilian deaths have been a huge 
source of friction between the U.S. 
and President Hamid Karzai. who has 
increased demands that American 
troops a\ oid killing civilians. 

Karzai's office announced 
Wednesday that he had spoken on the 
phone with President Barack Obama 
for the first time Tuesday, four weeks 
after Obama's inauguration. Karzai 
had acknowledged last week that the 
x\\o presidents had not spoken and 
said there was tension in the U.S.- 
.A.fghan relationship, mostly over 
civilian casualties. 

The Afghan Ministry of Defense 
condemned the deaths of civilians in 
Monday's airstrike and said it came 
despite a recent U.S. -Afghan agree- 



ment to increase participation of Af- 
ghan forces in U.S. missions, a step 
aimed at preventing civilian casualties. 

The U.S. coalition said in a state- 
ment that the strike Monda\' in the Go- 
zara district of Herat pro\ince killed 15 
militants and targeted a leader named 
Ghulam YahN a Akbari. 

But Ekremuddin Yavsar. a police 
commander for western Afghanistan, 
said six women and two children were 
among the dead, along with five men. 
He said the group was living in tents in 
the remote Afghan countryside. 

Photographs obtained by The As- 
sociated Press from the site show the 
body of a young bo\' — bloodied and 
dirtied — b'ing on a white shroud. Af- 
ghan men can be seen digging about a 
dozen fresh graves. Dead sheep and 
destroyed tents can also be seen. 

In response to Yawar's allegation. 
U.S. Brig. Gen. Michael R}an traveled 
to Gozara district on Wednesday to 
meet with officials "to see what the 
situation is," said Capt. Elizabeth 
Mathias, a U.S. military' spokeswoman. 



Coalition and Afghan troops 
have been at the site of the operation 
since Tuesday investigating, she said. 
The Afghan army also conducted a 
meeting, known as a shura, w ith local 
leaders over the issue. 

For now, the U.S. is standing 
behind its information that 15 mili- 
tants were killed, she said. 

The Ministry- of Defense said 
seven militants were killed in the 
attack, including three people it 
named as associates of Yahya Ak- 
bari. Neither it nor the U.S. said Ya- 
hya Akbari w as killed. 

The ministry said the militants 
had hidden in civilian houses, caus- 
ing an unspecified number of civilian 
deaths. However, the photographs 
showed no homes — onh' tents — 
and it wasn't clear what the ministry 
was referring to. 

U.S. commanders have requested 
more troops to battle an increasingh' 
blood}' Taliban insurgenc)'. Obama 
has promised to increase the US fo- 
cus on Afghanistan. 



NATIONAL: Converters still may drop channels 



Continued from page 4 

The stimulus bill that President 
Barack Obama signed Tuesda}' con- 
tains S650 million in additional fund- 
ing. Once that mone\' becomes avail- 
able, it can clear the backlog of 4 
million coupons in a few weeks. 
Without a coupon, a converter box 
costs S45 to S80. 

Joe Ghnn, vice president of en- 
gineering at PBS affiliate WVIA-TV 
near Scranton, Pa., said the station 
got a dozen calls in the past two days 
about its planned changeover at 
11:59 p.m. Tuesday. The converter 
boxes have been a fi-equent subject. 

"Unfortunateh'. some of them 



have asked how you get the coupons 
for the converter box. Some of them 
have called asking us if we sell con- 
verter boxes. Others are calling and 
saying 'I got the converter, but I'm not 
getting anything on it' — I'm assuming 
because the}' don't have it hooked up 
right," he said. 

He said most callers acknowledge 
that thej' onh' have themselves to blame 
for procrastinating. 

"Everybody admits it's their fault. 
They knew it was coming," he said. 
"Some people seemed to be mad at 
themselves for not doing something 
sooner." 

Even converter boxes that are cor- 
rectly installed may drop some chan- 



nels. That's because apart from kill- 
ing analog, many stations are also 
changing to new digital frequencies. 
Viewers who were already watching 
the digital signal, either through a 
converter box or a digital TV set, will 
lose the channel until the\' force the 
device to "rescan" the airwaves. 

In addition, man)' households 
will find that they need new anten- 
nas. Digital signals generally come in 
better than analog ones, but they are 
not received well by some older an- 
tennas. Spokeswoman Lea Sloan at 
PBS said that a rising number of calls 
to member stations are from people 
who are getting digital signals, but 
not all the ones thcN' want. 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



Thanks offered for Wear Red Day, blood drive 



To Venango Campus faculty, stu- 
dents, and staff. I thank each of you 
for the part you played in the recogni- 
tion of Wear Red Day for Venango 
Campus this year. You have no idea 
how rewarding it is to see so many 
people decked out in something red, 
whether a tie, socks, t-shirt, sweater, 
or my favorite, Phil Shufstall's red 
screwdriver handle. 

Hopefully, one day per year we 
are reminded of the importance of 
supporting and educating each other 
about heart disease. 

I especially want to thank the Al- 



lied Health club students, nursing club 
students. Shelly Moore, Penny 
Shaughnessy, and Cindy Busch for 
assisting me in making the second 
annual Wear Red Day a success. 

The campus donated $237. I will 
be sending the funds into the Ameri- 
can Heart Association at the end of 
next week, so if someone would still 
like to contribute to the AHA cause, 
please let me know. 

From my "heart". I thank you. 

Ginny Seybold 

Ginny Se\bold, Wear Red Day 



Coordinator and ASN Nursing Instruc- 
tor, can be reached at vsey- 
boldfSclarion.edu. 

Phi Theta Kappa would like to 
thank everyone who donated blood, 
and everyone who tried! Of the 
32 people attempted to donate, the 
American Red Cross was able to col- 
lect 23 units! 

PTK members are "so happy to be 
a part of a campus full of such won- 
derful students, faculty and staff! 
Thank you all for your generosity!" 



Venango Campus faculty candidates to present 



There will be an open forum for 
the following faculty candidates at 
Venango Campus in Frame 208. 

Each candidate will select a topic 
that highlights her teaching ability and 
will lecture for 30-35 minutes fol- 
lowed by a question and answer ses- 
sion. 



At this time, we have not received 
each candidate's vitae for your review. 
Sherry Whalen will present on Monday, 
February 23, from 2-3 p.m., on the topic 
of Speech. 

Erin Batten will present on Friday, 
February 27, from 1:30-2:30 p.m., on the 
topic of Chemistry. 



Administrative personnel, faculty, 
staff and students are encouraged to 
attend. Your presence and support will 
be greatly appreciated. 

For more information about these 
faculty forums, contact Kay Ensle. 
assistant to the executive dean, at 676- 
6591. extension 1277. 



Reiser: Dr. Reiser has presented at nat'l conferences 



Continued from page 1 



Preventive Medicine. Journal of the 
American Academy of Nurse Practitio- 
ners and RN. 

She has presented at a number of 
national conferences, including the 
American Academy of Nurse Practi- 
tioners National Conference and the 
National Organization for Nurse Prac- 
titioners. 

Dr. Reiser is currently a candidate 



for Region 3 Director of the American 
Academy of Nurse Practitioners, a re- 
gion that includes Pennsylvania, Mary- 
land. Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia, 
and Washington. D.C. 

She is a member of the Eta Epsilon 
and Alpha Nu Chapters of Sigma Theta 
Tau, American Academy of Nurse Prac- 
titioners, National League for Nursing, 
National Organization of Nurse Practi- 
tioner Faculties, and Eastern Nursing 
Research Society. 

The School of Nursing and Allied 



Health offers associate, bachelor and 
master's degrees in nursing, a bache- 
lor's degree in radiologic sciences, and 
associate degrees in respiratory care 
and allied health. 

With over 600 students enrolled 
in its programs, the School of Nursing 
and Allied Health is one of the largest 
programs in the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education, with a 
reputation for quality and partnerships 
to meet the Commonwealth's health 
care educational needs. 



\OLUME 41, Issue 18 



Page 7 



Briefly: Please take note of the following items 



Students who are interested in 
taking Frank Shepard's "Wills. 
Trusts, and Estates" class during 
Summer II. should contact Keisha 
Hunsberger at s_krhunsberg 
a clarion.edu. At least 15 students 
are required to enroll in order for the 



course to be held. 

Suhr Library's hours will change 
during the week of Winter Holiday. 
Please note the following schedule 
chanae; 



Libran. u ill be open Monda\ through 
Frida>. from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The 
librar} will be closed on weekends. 

Regular hours will resume on 
Monda\-. March 9. 

For more information, call Suhr 



Februan 28 throush March 8. Suhr Libran- at 676-6591. 



EVENTS: "Margot at the Wedding" to be shown 



Continued from page 1 

p.m.. at Rhoades Auditorium. The 
film is shown in conjunction with the 
Independent Film Series. 

Margot (Is'icole Kidman) is a 
successflil but neurotic writer who 
brings her 11 -year-old son Claude 
(Zane Pais) to spend a weekend visit- 
ing her free-spirited sister Pauline 
(Jennifer Jason Leigh) on the eve of 



her wedding to .Malcolm (Jack Black). 
Margot disapproves of Pauline's choice 
of fiance, which causes tension between 
the t%\o sisters. In short order, the storm 
the sisters create leaves behind a mess 
of thrashed relationships and exposed 
famih' secrets. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact Direc- 
tor of Student .Affairs Emily Aubele at 
676-6591. ext. 1269. 



Scholarships are available for 
Venango Countv' residents. .Applica- 
tions for the following scholarships 
must be submitted b} March 15. 

.Applications for the following 
scholarships are a\ailable in the Ve- 
nanso .Admissions and Financial Aid 
Offfce. 

See EVENTS on page 8 





NOW YA KNOW! 



Q. This mysterious number, the base of a 

natural logarithm, is related to natural 

and exponential growth. What is this 

number called, and what is its decimal 

value? 

/ ILL 

A — .v|3aHiuixojdd? = a3|n3 
c==^<^"^ pjBi{uo3~[ uepu^uiaiptxu 
ssLwg .vq paaaAOOSip ^^^^ -y 







Words 
of 

yyisoom 



'The heaviest thing 

you can carry is a 

grudge. ' 



Pagh 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Williams, Smedley scholarships available 



Continued from 



pag 



e7 



The Frank and Clara Williams 
Scholarship is available to students 
who: are a Venango County resident: 
enrolled in a 4-year program at an 
accredited school; are need-based: and 
are full-time. 

The scholarship is limited to the 
first two years of college, and children 
of National City Bank employees are 
ineligible to apply. 

The Laura M. Smedley Scholar- 
ship is available to students who: are a 
Venango Count)' resident; enrolled in 
an associate degree program at a four 
year accredited school: are need- 
based; and are full-time. 

The scholarship is limited to the 
first two years of college, and can be 
renewed for one year after the initial 
scholarship award. Nursing students 
are eligible, and children of National 
City Bank employees are ineligible to 
apply. 

For more information, contact 
Kay E. Ensle at extension 1277. 

"Memento" will be shown Satur- 
day. March 21. at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunction 
with the Independent Film Series. 

"Memento" chronicles two sepa- 
rate stories of Leonard, an ex- 
insurance investigator who can no 
longer build new memories, as he at- 
tempts to find the murderer of his 
wife, which is the last thing he remem- 
bers. 

One story line moves forward in 
time while the other tells the story 



backwards revealing more each time. A 
memory inside a memop>', "Memento" is 
a complicated head spinning adventure. 

For more information about the Inde- 
pendent Film Series, contact Director of 
Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

Dr. Michael Galaty will present 
"Archaeological Evidence for the Origins 
of Affluence" on Monday, March 23, at 
5:30 p.m., at Rhoades Auditorium. The 
presentation is the second in the Satellite 
Seminar Series sponsored by Phi Theta 
Kappa. 

Dr. Galaty examines that develop- 
ment of social hierarchies, which de- 
pended on differential control of surplus 
goods, land, specialized economies, and 
trade. He examines and discusses the 
original paradox: that humans gave up 
hunting and gathering at all. Settled farm- 
ers worked harder and were less healthy 
than their hunter-gatherer forebears and 
neighbors... so why did they leave that 
lifestyle behind? 

"The Wind that Shakes the Barley" 
will be shown Saturday, March 28. at 
7:30 p.m., at Rhoades Auditorium, in con- 
junction with the Independent Film Se- 
ries. 

Winner of the PALME D'OR at the 
2006 Cannes Film Festival, "The Wind 
that Shakes the Barley" is a sympathetic 
look at Republicans in early 20th century 
Ireland, and two brothers who are torn 
apart by anti-British rebellion. 

For more information about the Inde- 
pendent Film Series, contact Director of 
Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676- 



6591. ext. 1269. 

Miscellaneous 

The artwork of Charlie Whipple, 
owner of the Howling Dog Gallery 
Cafe in Oil City, will be on display in 
Rhoades Center during the spring 
2009 semester. 

Body camp classes will be held 
every Tuesday at 2 p.m., in the 
Rhoades Gymnasium. Classes will be 
taught by Jane Horos of the YWCA. 
The one-hour cardio class will con- 
centrate on strength training, but will 
also incorporate traditional step aero- 
bics as well as an interval training 
boot camp class. 

For more information contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 
1271. 

Yoga classes instructed by Libby 
Jenkins will be held every Thursday, 
at 1 1 a.m. Yoga classes will be held 
in the Rhoades Gymnasium. 

For more information, contact 
the Student Affairs Office at exten- 
sion 1271. 

"Yes, you can!" quit smoking. 
Smoking cessation classes will be 
scheduled based on interest shown. 
The class will provide students with 
the tools needed to quit smoking for 
good. 

If you are interested in smoking 
cessation classes or have questions, 
contact the Student Affairs Office at 
extension 1271. 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus. 1801 W. First Street. Oil City, PA. 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. The> 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs. acti\ities. and 
emplo\ ment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity. 207 Carrier Administration Building. Clarion. PA. 16214-12.^2. 814-.'?93-2109. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 
VENANGO CAMPUS 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



.■'J J 



/. 



e.f^ar>a 



Vol 



Volume 41, Issue 19 



Monday, March 23, 2009 



Legal Symposium slated at Venango Campus Mar. 26 



What if the Supreme Court 
looked like this: all women? A Legal 
Symposium will take place at Clar- 
ion University-Venango Campus on 
Thursday, March 26, at 7 p.m., in the 
Robert W. Rhoades Center gymna- 
sium. A dessert reception will follow 
the program. 

Sandra Day O'Connor was 
named to the U.S. Supreme Court in 
1981, paving the way for women to 
take their rightful places at the top 
of the legal profession. Join the first 
female Pennsylvania Supreme Court 
Justice, Sandra Schultz Newman, 
and other leading female Common- 
wealth jurists as they explore how 
the decisions of the U.S. Supreme 
Court might be different if the panel 



were composed of all women. 

Master of Ceremonies will be 
Senator Mary Jo White, 21st Sena- 
torial District. The panel of justices 
will include: Supreme Court of 
Pennsylvania Justice Sandra Schul- 
tz Newman, ret.; Superior Court 
of Pennsylvania judges Joan Orie- 
Melvin, Maureen Lally-Green, 
Christine Donohue, Jacqueline 
Shogan and Cheryl Allen; Com- 
monwealth Court of Pennsylva- 
nia Judge Renee Cohn Jubelierer; 
and Common Pleas Court judges 
Stephanie A. Domitrovich - Erie, 
and Maureen A. Skerda - Warren. 

For more information, call Jerri 
Gent at 814.676.6591, ext. 1215, or 
email jgent@clarion.edu. 




Retired Supreme Court of Penn- 
sylvania Justice Sandra Schultz 
Newman 



Second Satellite Seminar features Dr. Michael Galaty 



March 

Dr. Michael Galaty will present 
"Archaeological Evidence for the 
Origins of Affluence" on Monday, 
March 23, at 5:30 p.m., at Rhoades 
Auditorium. The presentation is the 

Inside this issue... 



second in the Satellite Seminar Se- 
ries sponsored by Phi Theta Kappa. 
Dr. Galaty examines that devel- 
opment of social hierarchies, which 
depended on differential control 
of surplus goods, land, specialized 



economies, and trade. He examines 
and discusses the original para- 
dox: that humans gave up hunting 
and gathering at all. Settled farm- 
See EVENTS on page 8 



Legal Symposium 


■Pg-1 


World News 


...pg.5 


Events 


.pg.1-8 


PTK Update 


...pg.6 


THANK YO U, Apt. Applications 


■Pg-2 


Eating Disorder Screening 


...pg.7 


Job Openings 


.pg.3 


Smoking Cessation Classes 


...pg.7 


State cfe National News 


■Pg-4 


Words of Wisdom 


...pg.7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



THANK YOU individuals recognized in February 



At Venango Campus, we take 
great pride in our personal and car- 
ing atmosphere and our commit- 
ment to the growth and development 
of our students and other members 
of our campus community. The 
Venango Campus THANK YOU! 
Employee Recognition Program is 
an opportunity for students, faculty, 
and staff to thank faculty and staff 
members for efforts "above and be- 
yond the call of duty" to help and 
support others. 

The following individuals were 
thanked during the month of Feb- 
ruary 2009 for "going above and 
beyond": Tammy Beach (winner of 



lunch at Cross Rhoades Cafe), Mark 
Conrad, Dave Dumey, Hope Line- 
man, Phil Shuffstall, Rick Stevens, 
and Dave Wilson. 

Want to thank someone who 
has helped and supported you this 
month? THANK YOU ! , the Venango 
Campus Employee Recognition Pro- 
gram can help. 

THANK YOU! forms are avail- 
able at the Rhoades Center Informa- 
tion Desk, in the Administrative Of- 
fice in Frame Hall, in Suhr Library, 
and in the second floor lobby of 
Montgomery Hall. 

Individuals wishing to thank 
someone on campus for going above 



and beyond the call of duty to help 
and support others will complete a 
THANK YOU! form and place it in 
a THANK YOU! box located at one 
of the campus locations listed above. 

Each month, a name will be 
drawn from the entries that were 
placed in the boxes during the 
month. 

The winner will receive a free 
lunch at CrossRhoades Cafe. 

The names of all individuals rec- 
ognized during the month will be in- 
cluded in the Venango Campus Up- 
date Memo, printed in the Venango 
Voice, and also posted near Cross- 
Rhoades Cafe. 



Applications for student apartments being accepted 



Clarion University-Venango 
Campus Student Apartment appli- 
cations for housing are now being 
accepted for the 2009-2010 aca- 
demic year. 

Apartment amenities include: 
all utilities, high speed internet, 
basic cable and phone, full kitchen 



and laundry area in each apartment, 
and full furnishings (living room, 
dining room, bedroom). 

Conveniently located across from 
the campus, resident students enjoy 
comfortable accommodations and a 
friendly residential community. 

Rent for 2009-2010 is $570 for a 



ten installment lease or $530 for a 
12 installment lease. 

For more information please 
contact Venango Campus Student 
Affairs at (814) 676-6591, exten- 
sion 1269, or visit the student hous- 
ing web page at: http://www.clarion. 
edu/9322/. 



/^ 



/^ 



Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591 . Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice(2 clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding com- 
munities. The Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; 
the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a 
etter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. Pub 
lication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when 
scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



Volume 41 , Issue 19 



Page 3 



Positions are now available for qualified candidates 



A phlebotomist/clerical staff 
person is needed Monday through 
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., in a doc- 
tor's office in the Seneca area. The 
qualified candidate will draw blood 
samples, obtain urine samples, 
evaluate incoming labs and for- 
ward for doctor's review. He/she 
will also assist with general office 
duties, filing, answering phones, 
coping, faxing, etc. 

For more information, contact 
Mark Conrad, coordinator of Ca- 
reer Services at mconrad@clarion. 
edu. 

A part time Program Coordina- 
tor (formerly caseworker) is needed 
to carry out the Big Brothers Big 
Sisters Service Delivery Model and 
coordinate local fund raising efforts 
in the Titusville area. The qualified 
candidate should expect a flexible 
schedule with some evenings and 
weekends. Requirements include: 
strong organizational and commu- 
nication skills, a positive attitude 
and the ability to interact effective- 
ly with volunteers, clients and the 
public. A degree in social work, hu- 
man services, psychology or other 
related field is necessary. Candi- 
dates must be eligible to obtain Act 
33/34 clearances. Send a resume 
and cover letter to Big Brothers and 
Sisters of Crawford County, Inc. 
912 Diamond Park, Meadville, PA 
16335 or bigscrawfordco@gmail. 



The University Writing Cen- 
ter at main campus is in need of a 
Graduate Assistant: Writing Con- 
sultant for the 2009-2010 academ- 
ic year. The deadline to apply is 



Wednesday, April 15. Prior writing 
center experience is not required. All 
individuals will receive training for 
this position. 

Graduate assistants who work 
20 hours per week are eligible for 
full tuition remission plus a stipend 
for the year. Graduate assistants who 
work 10 hours per week are eligible 
for half tuition remission plus a sti- 
pend for the year. 

Individuals should be strong writ- 
ers who are responsible, flexible, 
dependable, curious, polite, compas- 
sionate, professional, open to learn- 
ing how to work with writers, and a 
native speaker of English (or have 
training/experience in teaching Eng- 
lish). 

An assistantship in The Writing 
Center offers graduate students the 
following learning opportunities: de- 
velop a range of tutorial strategies to 
meet writers' needs; conference one- 
on-one with clients; lead peer cri- 
tique groups; assist in writing class- 
es; introduce students to computers 
and software; assist with library and 
Internet searches; provide computer 
support; observe a variety of teaching 
and classroom management styles; 
and earn College Reading and Learn- 
ing Association Tutor Certification. 

The application process is as fol- 
lows. Complete and submit a gradu- 
ate assistantship application form in 
the Graduate Studies Office. Submit 
a letter of application direcfly to the 
Writing Center director, which ad- 
dresses the following concerns: prior 
experience that makes you a can- 
didate for the position; and how a 
graduate assistantship in The Writing 
Center will contribute to your gradu- 
ate studies and/or to your long term 



career goals. Send the letter, current 
resume, and sample writing (aca- 
demic paper) to Dr. Kathleen Wel- 
sch. Writing Center Director, Eng- 
lish Department, Davis Hall. 

The University Writing Center 
at main campus is in need of an 
undergraduate work/study writing 
consultant for the 2009-2010 aca- 
demic year. The deadline to apply 
is Tuesday, March 3 1 . Prior writing 
center experience is not required. 
All individuals will receive training 
for this position. 

Writing center consultants are 
students committed to excellence 
in writing, assisting student writers, 
learning one-on-one tutoring strate- 
gies, and contributing to the Writ- 
ing Center's services. 

Qualifications, besides being 
responsible, dependable, flexible, 
curious, polite, compassionate, pro- 
fessional and native speakers of 
English, include: excellent writing 
skills as demonstrated by a grade of 
B or better in English 111 or a writ- 
ing intensive course; strong skills in 
grammar and punctuation; familiar- 
ity with at least one research paper 
format (MLA, APA, etc.); knowl- 
edge of Windows and MS Office 
software; ability to work with a 
wide range of individuals; ability to 
work as a respectful team member; 
reliability, punctuality, and ability 
to work independently; and cumu- 
lative GPA of at least 2.9. 

Students must also be able to 
make a full-year commitment to the 
position. 

Interested students should com- 
plete an application (available in the 
See JOBS on page 7 



Pa^e 4 



Vemini>o Voice 



State 



Bats drop in on students at Penn College bat condo 



WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. (AP) - Stu- 
dents at one central Pennsylvania 
college are spring house cleaning at 
their condo — one built specially for 
bats. 

Penn College erected the "bat 
condo" several years ago in Wil- 
liamsport to attract the nocturnal 



creatures away from a nearby church. 
Each year, the creatures' home has to 
be cleaned of the bat droppings. 

Two Penn College students who 
are taking wildlife management class 
used plastic bags to carefully remove 
more than 70 pounds of guano this 
year. That's nearly 20 pounds more 



than last year. 

The bats are hibernating in near- 
by caves and soon will return, again 
filling the condo with guano. 

Professor Donald Nibert says 
bats can catch and eat about 1 ,200 
insects in an hour, which leads to the 
guano production. 



National 



Space shuttle, station crews begin girder work 



CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) 
— The astronauts aboard the linked 
space shuttle and space station be- 
gan their high-priority girder work 
Wednesday, a two-day job that will 
culminate with the installation of 
two new solar wings at the orbiting 
outpost. 

They cranked up the robot arm 
on the international space station 
and used it to latch onto the 45-foot- 
long, 31,000-pound frame structure 
that flew up aboard shuttle Discov- 
ery. The framework, which holds the 
folded-up wings, was then hoisted 
out of the shuttle payload bay. 

Discovery's robot arm was going 
to assist with the work. 

The $300 million girder — 
which has a radiator along with 
the solar wings — is the last major 
American-made piece of the space 
station. And the pair of wings are the 
station's last. 

The space station's skipper, Mike 
Fincke, invited Mission Control to 



watch over Wednesday's activities, 
via on-board TV cameras. 

"We want to share the great ad- 
venture with you all," Fincke said. 

The job is so complicated and 
drawn-out that the astronauts will 
wait until Thursday before actually 
hooking up the girder. Two space- 
walkers will be outside, helping to 
attach the framework to the space 
station. 

Once the wings are unfurled — ei- 
ther Friday or Sunday — the 10-year- 
old space station will finally be at full 
power. Six wings already are in place 
and generating power. 

NASA needs the extra energy to 
boost science research. A bigger crew 
is also needed; the station populafion 
is supposed to double, to six, by the 
end of May. 

The 10 space travelers and flight 
controllers around the world will be 
watching anxiously when the new 
wings are commanded to open. The 
last time new wings were delivered 



in 2007, one got snagged on a guide 
wire and ripped, and spacewalking 
astronauts had to carry out emergen- 
cy repairs to fix it. 

NASA officials said they have 
learned their lessons. The latest 1 15- 
foot wings will be commanded to 
open a small section at a time, and 
Mission Control will make sure 
there is optimal lighting when the 
procedure takes place. Sun glare 
contributed to the 2007 mishap; it 
prevented the astronauts from quick- 
ly noticing that the wing had torn. 

The wings carried up aboard Dis- 
covery are actually the oldest; they 
were used for tesdng on the ground. 
Because they have been packed up 
in boxes for as long as eight years, 
some of the pleated panels might 
stick together. The astronauts have 
techniques to work around that, if 
necessary. 

Discovery will remain at the 
space station until next Wednesday. 
The shuttle arrived on Tuesday. 



Volume 4/ , Issue 19 Page 5 
World 

Iraq is better but its future is shaky, very unclear 

BAGHDAD (AP) — Six years af- year. Iraq are certainly brighter than they 

ter the U.S. invaded Iraq, the end of In the final stage of the war, were before the U.S. troop surge of 

America's costly mission is in sight, America's challenge will be to pre- 2007, when car bombs shook Bagh- 

but the future of this tortured coun- vent ethnic and sectarian competition dad daily and gangs of Sunni and 

try is much less clear. from exploding into violence on the Shiite gunmen ruled the streets. 

With violence down sharply, scale that plunged the nation to the Violence is down 90 percent 

most Iraqis feel more secure than at brink of all-out civil war two years since early 2007. In February, the 

nearly any time since the war began ago. U.S. military recorded 367 attacks 

March 20, 2003 — March 19 in the U.S. commanders successfully nationwide, compared with 1,286 

United States. lobbied President Barack Obama to for the same month last year, ac- 

But violence still continues at maintain a substantial combat force cording to Lt. Col. Brian Tribus, a 

levels that most other countries in Iraq through parliamentary elec- U.S. spokesman, 

would find alarming. tions at the end of the year in hopes As of Wednesday, there have 

Last week, suicide bombers of curbing violence as the country's been at least five deaths of U.S. 

killed a total of 60 people in two religious and ethnically based parties servicemen so far in March — the 

separate attacks in the Baghdad compete for power in the national lowest daily death toll since the war 

area, and an American soldier was balloting. began. 

fatally injured Monday on a combat Damage control is a far less ambi- Much of the country is quiet, in- 
mission in the capital. tious goal than the Bush administra- eluding the three Kurdish provinces 

Fighting still rages in Mosul tion foresaw when the U.S. launched of the north, the Shiite south and the 

and other areas of the mostly Sunni the invasion with an airstrike on Dora Sunni -dominated Anbar province, 

north. Competition for power and Farms in southern Baghdad in a failed where local tribes turned against al- 

resources among rival religious and attempt to kill Saddam Hussein. Qaida. 

ethnic groups is gearing up, even as Missing Saddam in the opening Baghdad's parks are jammed on 

the U.S. military's role winds down, moments of the conflict set the tone weekends with families only now 

Both the Sunni and Shiite com- for what became a war of missteps feeling safe enough to venture from 

munities face internal power strug- and disappointments before the tide their own neighborhoods, 

gles that are likely to intensify ahead turned in 2007. A survey of 2,228 Iraqis ques- 

of national elections late this year. The war was launched to deny tioned nationwide last month for 

Sunni-Shiite slaughter has abated, Saddam weapons of mass destruc- ABC News, BBC and Japan's NHK, 

but genuine reconciliation remains tion and when events proved he had found that 85 percent believed the 

elusive. none, the goal shifted — to establish current situation was good or very 

"If Iraqi leaders don't reconcile a Western-style democracy in the good — up 23 percent from last year, 

and work together, the situation heart of the Middle East. That goal About 59 percent felt safe in 

will deteriorate," veteran Kurdish was only partially achieved. their neighborhoods, up 22 percent 

lawmaker Mahmoud Othman said. Now, the U.S. hopes that it can from last year, the survey said. 

"There is no harmony among Iraqi leave without the country disintegrat- "Iraq will face difficult econom- 

leaders.Their work depends on their ing into chaos. The Americans hope ic situations for long time. ... The 

mood." Iraq will be strong enough to fend off political process is still at a cross- 

At the same time, U.S. combat interference by neighboring coun- roads," Iraq's Shiite vice president, 

troops are due to leave by Septem- tries — notably Iran — and protect Adel Abdul-Mahdi, said last week, 

ber 2010, with all American soldiers itself from a resurgent al-Qaida. "The war is not over but it has just 

gone by the end of the following Prospects for a reasonably stable begun." 



Pa}^e 6 



Venango Voice 



PTK inducts members, sends reminder for gift cards 



The Alpha Kappa Delta chap- 
ter of Phi Theta Kappa held their 
32nd Annual Induction Ceremony 
on February 28 at the Quality Inn 
in Franklin. 

Latrobe Barnitz, Coordinator of 
Admissions and Financial Aid, pro- 
vided accompanying music prior 
to the ceremony. Dr. Chris Reber, 
Executive Dean of Clarion Univer- 
sity-Venango Campus gave the ad- 
ministrative address. Guest speaker 
for the evening was Tammy Beach, 
a Phi Theta Kappa Alumni. Tammy 
is a 2005 Clarion graduate with a 
Bachelor's degree in Business Eco- 
nomics, and will graduate in May 
with a Master's of Science in Busi- 
ness. Dr. Joan Huber gave the in- 
vocation. Beth Jackson, professor 
with the math department at Venan- 
go Campus, has been Alpha Kappa 
Delta's advisor for 10 years. 

Officers for the 2008-2009 aca- 
demic year were Patti Shontz, Pres- 
ident; Beth Austin, Vice President 
of Community Events; Lori Secor, 
Vice President of Public Relations; 
Ester Estes, Treasurer; and Jaime 
Renwick, Secretary. 

Officers for the 2009-2010 aca- 
demic year were sworn in: Jaime 
Renwick, President; Joseph Ion, 
Vice President; Robin Zerres, Sec- 
retary; Esther Estes, Treasurer; and 
Lori Secor, Vice President of Public 
Relations. 

Phi Theta Kappa is the official 
honors society of two-year col- 
leges. The Society has 1200 chap- 
ters worldwide with over 2 million 




The 2009-2010 officers are, from left to right: Joseph Ion, Lori Secor, 
Beth Jackson, Esther Estes, Robin Zerres, and Jaime Renwick. 



members. To be eligible for mem- 
bership, students must have a cu- 
mulative grade point average of 3.5 
or higher on a 4.0 scale. The Alpha 
Kappa Delta chapter is active on both 
the Venango Campus and in the com- 
munity. Among many other projects, 
they co-sponsor the Oil City Com- 
munity Easter Egg Hunt, coordinate 
and host twice-annual blood drives, 
are active in the Adopt-a-Highway 
program, and have just completed 
the first Totes-For-Tots event. It is an 
honor to be invited to join Phi Theta 
Kappa. Please join us in congratulat- 
ing our new inductees: Rachel Al- 
lio, Amanda Boal, Tammy Buchna, 
Jennifer Carr, Terri Clark, Melissa 
Davis, Heather Ditzenburger, Me- 
linda Eckman, Andrew Hagan, John 
Hamm, Charity Hansford, Brittany 



Hargenrader, Joseph Ion, Jenna 
Kalicky, James Kronmiller, James 
Langharst, Joshua McBride, Cheryl 
McLaughlin, Tammy Moon, Sarah 
Myers, Renee Oxenham, Virginia 
Proper, Melissa Rainey, Halbert 
Simmerman, Melissa Spencer, 
Shannon Stitt, Gina Thurston, Su- 
san Traynor, Ann Vogan, Alisa Vro- 
man, John Weaver, Anna Wencil, 
Kayla Williams, and Robin Zerres. 

Attention all clubs! Please re- 
member to turn in your gift card 
donations for the Staff and Fac- 
ulty Appreciation Luncheon to 
Patty Shontz in the Nursing Office 
ASAP! If you are planning to do- 
nate gift cards and have not let us 
know, please contact Patty immedi- 
ately at pshontz@clarion.edu. 



Volume 41 , Issue 19 



Page 7 



National Eating Disorder Screening Day events slated 



Clarion University Counseling 
Services and Keeling Health Center 
will sponsor National Eating Disor- 
der Screening Day with several up- 
coming events. 

Free, confidential screenings 
will take place at both campuses. At 
Venango Campus, screenings will 
take place on Monday, March 30, 
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., in Rhoades 
lounge. 

Counselors will be available to 



discuss eating disorder concerns that 
may affect you or a loved one. 

In addition, there will be educa- 
tional and referral information avail- 
able. 

Additionally, Johanna Kandel, a 
speaker on Eating Disorders Aware- 
ness, will speak at Venango Campus 
on Thursday, March 26, at 12:30 
p.m., in Rhoades auditorium. 

If you are unable to attend the 
screenings or prefer to take the 



screening online, visit the Coun- 
seling Services Web site at www. 
clarion.edu/counseling. 

In addition to eating disorders 
screening, you can take online 
screenings for depression, anxiety, 
and alcohol. You will receive in- 
stant results and referral informa- 
tion. 

If you have any questions, 
please call Counseling Services at 
393-2255. 



Smoking Cessation Class scheduled at Venango Campus 



Family Service & Children's 
Aid Society Tobacco Prevention 
Program will collaborate with Clar- 
ion University-Venango Campus 
to provide a free smoking cessation 
class to students, staff and the com- 
munity. 

To provide support for those 
who have a goal to quit smoking 
in 2009, the American Lung Asso- 



ciation's "Freedom from Smoking" 
cessation program will be offered on 
Mondays at 2 p.m., beginning March 
23 in the Robert W. Rhoades Center 
at the campus. 

The cessation class is eight ses- 
sions over the course of seven weeks. 
Each participant will receive a free 
workbook and possible Nicotine Re- 
placement Therapy. 



"This is a great opportunity for 
smokers to gain a support group 
and learn the tools necessary to quit 
smoking," said Holly Coe, Tobacco 
Prevention Specialist. 

There is no charge, but pre- 
registration is required for adequate 
curriculum. Contact Kristen Col- 
ford, Student Affairs, at 814-676- 
6591 , ext. 1271 , to register. 



JOBS: Writing Center applications accepted by Dr. Welsch 



Continued from page 3 

Writing Center - 101 Davis Hall), 
submit the completed application 
form with a sample writing by the 
deadline, and participate in an in- 



terview. Return completed applica- 
tions to Dr. Kathleen Welsch, Writing 
Center Director, English Department, 
Davis Hall. Contact Dr. Welsch at 
393-2156 or kwelsch@clarion.edu. 



For more information about 
these positions or for resume prep- 
aration assistance, contact Mark 
Conrad, Coordinator of Career Ser- 
vices, at mconrad@clarion.edu, or 
676-6591, extension 1373. 



Words of Wisdom 

'One thing you can give and still keep, 
is your word. ' 




Page 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Coffeehouse Series will feature Rachel Sage 



Continued from page 1 

ers worked harder and were less 
healthy than their hunter-gatherer 
forebears and neighbors... so why 
did they leave that lifestyle behind? 

"The Wind that Shakes the Bar- 
ley" will be shown Saturday, March 
28, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades Audi- 
torium, in conjunction with the In- 
dependent Film Series. 

Winner of the PALME D'OR 
at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival, 
"The Wind that Shakes the Barley" 
is a sympathetic look at Republi- 
cans in early 20th century Ireland, 
and two brothers who are torn apart 
by anti-British rebellion. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact 
Director of Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at 676-6591 , ext. 1269. 

April 

Rachel Sage will perform on 
Wednesday, April l,at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades lounge. 

Independent Music Award win- 
ner Rachel Sage writes what The 
Village Voice calls "lovely and lit- 
erate folk-pop-rock." An innova- 
tive, improvisational keyboardist. 
Sage has earned a loyal following 
for her infectious melodies and po- 
etic lyrics. 

For more information about the 



Coffeehouse Music Series, contact 
Director of Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at 676-6591 , ext. 1269. 

The Oil Region Job Fair will be 
held Thursday, April 2, from 1 1 a.m. 
to 5 p.m., at the Cranberry Mall, Rts. 
257 and 322 in Cranberry. 

Job seekers can meet area em- 
ployers at the event, and should bring 
a resume, prepare for onsite inter- 
views, and dress professionally. 

For more information, contact the 
Oil Region CareerLink at 678-5050, 
or visit www.cwds.state.pa.us. 

BBQ with the Dean will be held 
Thursday, April 2, from 11 a.m. to 1 
p.m., in front of Rhoades center. 

The Student Senate-sponsored 
event will provide students, faculty, 
and staff the opportunity to mingle 
and chat with Executive Dean Dr. 
Chris Reber. Hotdogs, hamburgers, 
chips, pop, and conversation will be 
served. 

Phi Theta Kappa is a co-sponsor 
of the Oil City Community Easter 
Egg Hunt to be held Saturday, April 
4, at II a.m., at Hasson Heights Park 
Pavilion area. 

The event is for children age 3-10 
years. 

The other sponsor of the event is 
KQW FM 96.3/AM 1 120 The Q. 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 1621-4-12.^2. 814-393-2109. 



"Cashback" will be shown 
Saturday, April 4, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunc- 
tion with the Independent Film Se- 
ries. 

When art student Ben Willis 
loses his girlfriend, he develops in- 
somnia. To pass the long hours of 
the night, he starts working the late 
night shift at the local supermarket. 
There he meets a colorful cast of 
characters, all of whom have their 
own "art" in dealing with the bore- 
dom of an eight-hour-shift. 

For more information about 
the Independent Film Series, con- 
tact Director of Student Affairs Em- 
ily Aubele at 676-6591, ext. 1269. 

"The Visitor" will be shown 
Saturday, April 1 1 , at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium, in conjunc- 
tion with the Independent Film Se- 
ries. 

In a world of six billion people, 
it only takes one to change your 
life. Writer-director Thomas Mc- 
Carthy has created a wonderfully 
measured story about change and 
renewal and put it all on the shoul- 
ders of Jenkins, a largely unherald- 
ed but masterful performer whose 
time for renown has surely come. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact 
Director of Student Affairs Emily 
Aubele at 676-6591, ext. 1269. 



CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 




/. 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



&/Ta/]Q 



Vol 



Volume 41, Issue 20 



Monday, March 30, 2009 



Performance by Rachael Sage slated on April 1 



Independent Music Award win- 
ner Rachael Sage will perform in the 
Robert W. Rhoades Center at Clari- 
on University- Venango Campus on 
Wednesday, April 1, at 7:30 p.m., as 
part of the campus' ongoing Coffee 
House Series. 

The event is free and open to the 
public. 

The Village Voice describes 
Sage's original songs as "lovely and 
literate folk-pop-rock." 

An innovative, improvisational 
keyboardist, Sage performs over 150 
dates a year throughout the United 
States, Europe and Asia. 



A grand prize winner in the 
John Lennon Songwriting Contest, 
Sage has earned a loyal following 
for her infectious melodies and po- 
etic lyrics, and has shared stages 
with such artists as Sarah McLach- 
lan, Sheryl Crow, Judy Collins, and 
Ani DiFranco. 

For more information the per- 
formance by Rachael Sage or the 
Clarion University-Venango Cam- 
pus Coffee House Series, contact 
the Office of Student Affairs at 814- 
676-6591, extension 1269. 

The next performance will be 
April 15 with Laura Tsgarris. 




Oil Region Job Fair to feature several employers 



April 

Rachel Sage will perform on Wednes- 
day, April 1, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades 
lounge. 

Independent Music Award winner Ra- 
chael Sage writes what The Village Voice 
calls "lovely and literate folk-pop-rock." 
An innovative, improvisational keyboard- 
ist, Sage has earned a loyal following for 
her infectious melodies and poetic lyrics. 

For more information about the Cof- 
feehouse Music Series, contact Director of 



StudentAffairsEmilyAubele at 676-6591, 
ext. 1269. 

The Oil Region Job Fair will be held 
Thursday, April 2, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 
at the Cranberry Mall, Rts. 257 and 322 in 
Cranberry. 

Job seekers can meet area employers 
at the event, and should bring a resume, 
prepare for onsite interviews, and dress 
professionally. 

For more information, contact the Oil 



Region CareerLink at 678-5050, or visit 
www.cwds .state .pa.us . 

BBQ with the Dean will be held Thurs- 
day, April 2, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in front 
of Rhoades center. The Student Senate- 
sponsored event will provide students, fac- 
ulty, and staff the opportunity to mingle and 
chat with Executive Dean Dr. Chris Reber. 

See EVENTS on page 8 



Inside this issue... 



Rachael Sage 


...pg.l 


World News 


...pg.5 


Events 


...pg.1-8 


PTK & Construction Updates 


...pg.6 


Trash Talk 


...pg.l 


Nursing Fair 


...pg.6 


Internship & Job Opportunities 


...pg.3 


PTK Stromboli sale 


...pg.7 


State & National News 


...pg.4 


Words of Wisdom 


...pg.7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Australia: is it our future in water conservation? 



Trash Talk 

by 
Lori Secor 

Scenario: the government has imple- 
mented new laws concerning water use. 
Each resident is allotted 39 gallons of 
water per day total consumption. This in- 
cludes water for cooking, bathing, laundry, 
drinking, etc. 

Ok, so we make adjustments. We've 
all been there in the hot summer months 
when rain is low. No more watering the 
lawn, washing the car, and, oh yeah, sorry 
kids, no playing in the sprinkler. No filling 
or topping off swimming pools, and closed 
ball fields in some areas means summer 
activities enjoyed for decades come to a 
screeching halt. 



Thirty-nine gallons sounds like a lot, 
right? It may not be as much as you think. 
For example, showers use about 2 gallons 
of water per minute, and the average toi- 
let flush uses 5 gallons of water. A load of 
laundry takes 10 gallons. That could add up 
pretty quickly. 

The average person in the United States 
uses 80-100 gallons per day. Imagine the 
kind of changes you would have to make in 
order to cut your water usage in half. 

This scenario has become reality for 
the majority of people who live in Austra- 
lia. Not all areas of Australia are under such 
harsh restrictions as the 39-gallon-limited 
town of Goulburn, which is near Sydney, 
but all territories have stages of restrictions 
depending on the current water levels. 

If Australia's attempts at new methods 
of water conservation prove successful, 
they may very well set the stage for the rest 
of the world. One such method involves us- 
ing storm water. 

In most towns and cities in Australia, 
storm water runs into drainage systems that 
empty into the ocean. 

An estimated 200 million gallons of 
storm water run from Sydney to the sea 
every year. Research is underway to find 
a technique to filter out the pollutants rain 
waters pick up. 

In addition to high efficiency toilets, 
washing machines, and dishwashers, rain 
water tanks are widely used throughout 



Australia. As their name indicates, these 
tanks capture rain water from the roof of a 
house. Water from the tanks is then used for 
a range of purposes including laundry, toi- 
lets, watering the lawn, and washing cars. 

If you think the United States is safe 
from facing a similar situation, think again. 
At least 36 states are expected to face water 
shortages within five years. 

It's not a crisis yet, but without decent 
planning, it can quickly escalate to catastro- 
phe. 

Major concerns include the Colorado 
River, which supplies water for seven states 
and the Sierra Nevada snowpack, which 
supplies most of California. 

Florida is in a different situation of 
concern. They do not have a rainfall short- 
age, but widespread draining and paving of 
natural wetlands has left the water unable to 
drain back into the soil. 

Bottom line is this: if we don't start 
conserving water voluntarily, most of us are 
going to be in for a huge shock very soon. 

Don't know where to start? Keep an 
eye on the Voice for upcoming tips on water 
conservation. 

Reference material for this article can be 
found at: http://ga2.er.usgs.gov/edu/sq3a- 
ction .cf m , http://www.co .washoe .nv .us/ 
water/wtrconservation/usage.htm, http:// 
wwvv.science.org.au/nova/l05/l05key. 
htm, http://www.moreland.vic.gov.au/, and 
http://www.altemet.org/water/82378/. 



Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University-'Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591 , Ext. 1271 Email: vvoice<§ clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding com 
munities. The Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity 
the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a 
letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. Pub 
licafion is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when 
scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



Volume 41 , Issue 20 



Page 3 



Summer internship is offered at Boston University 



The office of National Scholarship 
Advisement is pleased to offer information 
on the Boston University Summer Study 
Internship Program. This unique program 
is an exceptional opportunity for students 
to gain in-depth knowledge and valuable 
real-world experience that will aid them as 
they prepare for their future careers. 

During the first six weeks of this 12- 
week program, students take two academic 
summer courses chosen from one of eight 
tracks, earning eight credits. For the final 
six weeks of the program, Boston Univer- 
sity places each individual in a relevant, 
professional internship at a Boston-based, 
U.S. -based, or multi-national firm or orga- 



nization. Students also enroll in a two-credit 
internship course, while ongoing workshops 
led by faculty and internship advisors build 
skills in resume writing and interviewing. By 
the conclusion of the summer study intern- 
ship program, students have earned a total of 
10 semester credits. 

The summer 2009 program tracks are: 
applied health sciences, arts and culture, 
business and management, conimunication, 
graphic and web design, international stud- 
ies, politics and public policy, and psychol- 
ogy and social policy. 

The summer study internship program is 
open to undergraduate students who are U.S. 
citizens or permanent residents, and who 



have completed at least one year of college 
by the start of the program. Students must 
be in good academic and judicial stand- 
ing. A minimum GPA of 2.7 is required. 
Applications to the summer study intern- 
ship program are accepted on a first-come, 
first-served basis. Students are encouraged 
to submit applications as early as possible. 
The deadline for all applications is May 8. 
Applications are available from bu.edu/ 
summer/internship or by contacting the 
summer term office directly at 617-353- 
0556. 

For further informafion regarding the 
application process, contact Brent Register 
at bregister@clarion.edu. 



US Census Bureau has part-time positions open 



The US Census Bureau is recruiting 
for the following short-term positions; 
Clerk, Administrative Assistant, Office 
Operations Supervisor, Enumerator (Cen- 
sus Lister/Taker), Crew Leader Assistant 
(CLA), Crew Leader, Recruiting Assis- 
tant, and Field Operations Supervisor. 
Qualified candidates will use government 
provided Laptop computers. Field Repre- 
sentatives will interview local respondents 
for a number of statistical surveys. Apply 
immediately for these important part-time 



positions. Candidates must be United States 
citizens, at least 18 years old, pass a 30 min- 
ute test, have a valid driver's license, use of 
an insured vehicle, a private telephone line 
and be available during day, evening and 
weekend hours. 

Testing for the Basic Skills Test must 
be scheduled through the toll-free number 
provided at www.cwds.state.pa.us and will 
be conducted at the PA CareerLink Oil Re- 
gion. Contact CareerLink for web address to 
a practice test site. Veterans are to provide 



DD-214 and SF-15. Candidates must pro- 
vide two forms of identification from the 
following list: passport, current drivers li- 
cense, social security card or certified birth 
certificate. 

For more information about these 
positions or for resume preparation assis- 
tance, contact Mark Conrad, Coordinator 
of Career Services, at mconrad@clarion. 
edu, or 676-6591, extension 1373. 



Oil Region Job Fair slated for April 2 in Cranberry 



The Oil Region CareerLink has an- 
nounced the eleventh annual Job Fair will 
be held at the Cranberry Mall on Thursday, 
April 2, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. CareerLink 
staff encourages job seekers to prepare a 
resume well in advance of the event. The 
CareerLink Web site, www.cwds .state, 
pa.us, allows users to create a resume plus 
apply for a variety of positions listed on- 
line. Parking at the Cranberry Mall is free. 



Job seekers can match their skills with 
a diverse group of employers that will have 
tables set up throughout the mall's main 
walkways. The focus of this fair is not just 
about employment, but about supportive 
service resources. Diverse social service 
agencies will be present to explain their pro- 
grams, ranging from employment assistance 
to health insurance as well as questions on 
unemployment claims. 



CareerLink is open Monday through 
Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with the 
exception of Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m., and has computers in its modem Re- 
source Center to assist job seekers with on- 
line registration. 

For more information, call 814-678- 
5050, or contact Venango Campus Coordi- 
nator of Career Services Mark Conrad at 
mcoiu^d@clarion.edu or at ext. 1373. 



Email the Venango Voice at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Page 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Pitt to review investment practices in fraud loss 



PITTSBURGH (AP) - The University 
of Pittsburgh has ordered a review of 
its investment practices while it tries to 
recoup $65 million it put in the hands 
of two money managers who are now 
accused of fraud. 

Paul Greenwood and Stephen 



Walsh, two principals with Westridge 
Capital Management, were arrested Feb. 
25 and charged with misappropriating 
more than a half billion dollars from 
public pension funds and universities, 
including Pitt and Carnegie Mellon. 
Two Ohio universities — Bowling 



Green State University and Ohio North- 
em University — say they also may 
have been victimized. 

Pitt officials were unavailable early 
last week to discuss the school's review, 
but Pitt and CMU have already filed 
suit seeking return of their funds. 



National 



AIG executive resigns on NY Times op-ed page 



CHARLOTTE. N.C. ( AP) - An Amer- 
ican International Group Inc. executive 
who received a retention bonus worth 
more than $742,000 after taxes has re- 
signed publicly — in an Op-Ed column 
in The New York Times. 

Jake DeSantis, an executive vice 
president at AIG's Financial Products 
division, said Wednesday he's leaving 
the company and will donate his entire 
bonus to charity. The letter, addressed 
to AIG's CEO, Edward Liddy. criticized 
Liddy for, among other things, agreeing 
to the payments but then calling the bo- 
nuses "distasteful" as he testified before 
disapproving members of Congress. 

"We in the financial products unit 
have been betrayed by AIG and are be- 
ing unfairly persecuted by elected offi- 
cials," wrote DeSantis. who was head of 
business development for commodities. 
"In response to this, I will now leave the 
company and donate my entire post-tax 
retention payment to those suffering 
from the global economic downturn. 
My intent is to keep none of the money 
myself." 

He added: "I take this action after 
1 1 years of dedicated, honorable service 
to AIG. I can no longer effectively per- 



form my duties in this dysfunctional en- 
vironment, nor am I being paid to do so." 

New York-based AIG has been heav- 
ily criticized by government offficials 
and the public after it awarded $165 mil- 
lion in bonuses earlier this month. The 
retention bonuses, payments designed 
to keep valued employees from quitting, 
were paid out whether the employee had 
a great year or a terrible one. 

The bonuses were given to employ- 
ees of the financial products division, a 
global unit that issued derivatives called 
credit default swaps that helped sink 
AIG as a whole last year. 

"Ed deeply appreciates the frustra- 
tion expressed in this letter and believes 
that the recent vilification and harass- 
ment of AIG employees is grossly unfair 
and unwarranted," wrote AIG spokes- 
man Mark Herr in a statement e-mailed 
to The Associated Press. 

Attempts to reach DeSantis were un- 
successful . 

Two days after AIG received its first 
injection from the government in mid- 
September, AIG named Liddy, former 
chairman of Allstate Corp., as chairman 
and chief executive succeeding Robert 
Willumstad, who stepped down after 



three months on the job. 

Liddy told Congress last week 
that the retention payments — rang- 
ing from $1,000 to nearly S6.5 million 
— were not his idea and called them 
"distasteful" Liddy himself is not get- 
ting a bonus and is only drawing $1 a 
year in salary. The bonuses were prom- 
ised in contracts with employees that 
AIG signed early last year, long before 
then-Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson 
asked Liddy to take over the company. 

"I have the utmost respect for the 
civic duty that you are now performing 
at AIG," DeSantis wrote in the letter. 
"You are as blameless for these credit 
default swap losses as I am." AIG had 
invested heavily in credit default swaps, 
extremely risky insurance contracts for 
bonds and other investments. 

Even so, DeSantis said he is dis- 
appointed and frustrated over what he 
called Liddy's lack of support. 

"I and many others in the unit feel 
betrayed that you failed to stand up 
for us in the face of untrue and unfair 
accusations from certain members of 
Congress last Wednesday and from 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



Volume 41 , Issue 20 Page 5 



World 

Mexico captures 1 of 37 'most- wanted' traffickers 

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Soldiers lished Monday. and 13 of their lieutenants, 

captured one of Mexico's most- Officials said Huerta Rios acted Authorities had offered rewards 

wanted drug smugglers, whose nick- as a lieutenant for the Beltran Leyva of up to $2 million for the drug lords 

name "la burra" — female donkey cartel in Monterrey, an industrial hub and up to $1 million for the lieuten- 

— belies his power as the alleged and Mexico's third-largest city. ants, including Huerta Rios. It was 

trafficker controlling drugs flowing They say he directed the cartel's not clear if a reward was paid in this 

through the northern city of Monter- operations there, and even met with case, 

rey. the rival Gulf cartel to divide up the Huerta was nicknamed "La 

Authorities announced the arrest territory. Burra," or female donkey. "Burro," 

of Hector Huerta Rios on Wednes- "We have information that as the or male donkey, is a common slang 

day,just hours before U.S. Secretary representative of the Beltran Leyva word for someone who transports 

of State Hillary Clinton arrives for a cartel he held meetings with mem- drugs, but it was unclear if that was 

two-day visit to discuss security is- bers of the Gulf cartel with the aim of the reason for the nickname. Four 

sues and U.S. support for Mexico's agreeing on drug distribution zones, men identified as his bodyguards 

battle against the drug cartels. in order to avoid clashes between the were detained along with him, and 

Clinton is scheduled to travel to rival gangs," said Marisela Morales, soldiers also seized three assault 

Monterrey on Thursday. the federal deputy attorney general rifles and four grenades from the 

Huerta Rios was detained Tues- for organized crime. suspects, 
day in a suburb of Monterrey, said The capture occurred just two Huerta was arrested on an out- 
Army Gen. Luis Arturo Oliver, days after the government published standing homicide warrant; the 

He was one of 37 top drug sus- alistof rewards for information lead- other four suspects were being held 

pects on a most-wanted list pub- ing to the capture of 24 top drug lords pending charges. 

NATIONAL: "Handful" of AIG execs have resigned 

Continued from page 4 New York Attorney General Andrew AIG came close to collapsing last 

Cuomo said 15 of the top 20 bonus re- September because it had gotten heavily 

the press over our payments," DeSan- cipients agreed to return their money, into the business of insuring mortgage- 

tis wrote in the letter, which was sent In total, about $50 million of the $165 backed securities, the risky investments 

Tuesday to Liddy. million will be returned, Cuomo's office that are at the root of the hundreds of 

DeSantis noted that Liddy had de- said Monday. billions of dollars in losses suffered by 

cided to accelerate by three months the AIG has expressed concern that the banks and other financial institutions 

payout of more than a quarter of the bo- company may not be able to attract and around the world, 

nus money. retain talented employees if they believe Since September, the government 

"That action signified to us your their compensation is subject to adjust- has given AIG $182.5 billion, main- 
support, and was hardly something that ment by the government. taining that without help, AIG would 
one would do if he truly found the con- An AIG spokesman said Monday fail, further disrupingt already stricken 
tracts "distasteful," he said. that a "handful" of senior-level execu- markets and cause more damage to the 

Liddy told Congress last week that tives have resigned from the financial economy, 

some of the employees were willing to products division, and that there will In return for the aid, the government 

give the money back, and on Monday, likely be more resignations to come. took a nearly 80 percent stake in AIG. 



Pa^e 6 



Venango Voice 



Phi Theta Kappa sponsors egg hunt, sells Strombolis 



The Faculty and Staff Appreciation 
Luncheon will be held on Monday, April 
6. Clubs that have gift cards for the event 
should turn them in to Patty Shontz, presi- 
dent of Phi Theta Kappa, immediately in 
the Nursing Office. 

Mark your calendars! The Oil City 
Community Easter Egg Hunt will be held 



Saturday, April 4, at 11 a.m. Bring your kids 
and join Phi Theta Kappa at Hasson Heights 
Park Pavilion for a fun morning. 

Kids in three age groups will search for 
5,000 eggs filled with prizes, ranging from 
candy and McDonalds certificates to free 
bowling, IX amusement park tickets and 
tons of more great prizes! 



Phi Theta Kappa's Stromboli fundrais- 
er is in full swing. 

Strombolis are just $2.50, but this will 
be the last chance to get them at this price! 

PTK members are only selling un- 
til April Fool's Day, so find your friendly 
neighborhood member to order yours to- 
day! 



Career Services coordinator deems fair a success 



By Mark Conrad 
Coordinator of Career Services 

First, I wanted to take the opportuni- 
ty to thank all the ASN 09 grads that at- 
tended the fair and for the cooperation by 
the Nursing Fair staff, especially Professor 
Lana Smith. All employer comments were 
very supportive of your preparedness, as 
well as by the student volunteers that made 
the event memorable. 

Several indicated there are no other 
fairs that make them feel as welcome; oth- 
ers felt the time they spent with the stu- 
dents today showed they were ready for 
careers in the field. 



Any freshmen Nursing students that 
couldn't attend should be aware that Sharon 
Regional Health Systems has internship op- 
portunities available. Professor Smith has 
letters explaining the application process. 
If you desire the names and address for the 
hospitals attending, e-mail or call me and I'll 
do my best to accommodate your requests. 

Again, my thanks to all that this day was 
successful and for the continued support that 
Career Services receives from faculty, staff 
and students. 

The winners of prizes drawn at the Nurs- 
ing Fair include: Presbyterian Home, arti- 
ficial flower basket, Rich Schill; Titusville 



Hospital, party basket, Cheryl Whisner; 
Titusville Hospital, parry basket, Jennifer 
Davis; Meadville Medical Center, lunch 
bag. Matt Knowlson; Meadville Medical 
Center, lunch bag, Jessica Hummer; Mead- 
ville Medical Center, book bag. Kirk Rol- 
lan; Meadville Medical Center, book bag, 
Gretchen Crawford; Presbyterian Home, 
lunch bag. Donna Jones; Presbyterian 
Home, blanket, Lori Costello; Presbyterian 
Home, tote, Jennifer Rex; and Presbyterian 
Home, tote, Stephanie Alderton. 

Prizes are in the Nursing Department 
office for winners to claim. 

Congratulations to all! All of you are 
winners in my expert opinion. 



Construction updates continue at Venango Campus 



The Clarion University Office of Fi- 
nance and Administration has provided an 
update on the major construction projects 
underway at Clarion University. The fol- 
lowing changes have taken place at Clari- 
on University- Venango Campus. 

At the Residence Suites, the roof 
structure and moisture wrap are complete 
for both buildings with window installa- 
tion, interior framing and blocking nearly 



complete as well. Interior rough-in and soffit 
and fascia installation is now underway. Ma- 
sons will begin their work shortly. 

At Venango Pond, a railing is soon to be 
installed on the walkway to the pond. The 
pond and associated dam are working as de- 
signed. 

At the Rhoades/Davis Locker Room, the 
locker room is on hold as glazed block to 
match the exisfing surfaces is delayed with 



only one company able to manufacture it. 
The doors have been installed and the gym 
is available for events. 

More information about construction 
can be found in the minutes of the regular 
meetings of the Facilities Planning Com- 
mittee and Parking Committee, provided 
at: http://www.clarion.edu/admin/facili- 
tiesmanagement/planning/facplancomm. 
shtml. 



Email the Venango Voice at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Volume 41 . Issue 20 



Phi Theta Kappa 

is currently holding its Spring 2009 

Stromboli Sale! 

PTK's spring fundraiser is in full swing! 



Strombolis are jUSt $2.50, 

but this will be the last chance to get them at this price! 



Choose from these delicious options: 

Broccoli & Cheese, Pepperoni & Cheese, 

Combo, Deluxe, and Chicken 



Phi Theta Kappa is selling Strombolis until April Fool's Day, 
so find your friendly neighborhood member and order yours today! 



Words of Wisdom 

^Ifyoii lack the courage to start, 
you have already finished.' 




Page H 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Indie film "Cashback" to be shown April 4 



Continued from page 1 



Hotdogs, hamburgers, chips, pop, and con- 
versation will be served. 

Phi Theta Kappa is a co-sponsor of 
the Oil City Community Easter Egg Hunt 
to be held Saturday, April 4, at 11 a.m., at 
Hasson Heights Park Pavilion area. The 
event is for children age 3-10 years. 

The other sponsor of the event is 
KQW FM 96.3/AM 1 120 The Q. 

"Cashback" will be shown Saturday, 
April 4, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades Audito- 
rium, in conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

When art student Ben Willis loses his 
girlfriend, he develops insomnia. To pass 
the long hours of the night, he starts work- 
ing the late night shift at the local super- 
market. 

There he meets a colorful cast of char- 
acters, all of whom have their own "art" 
in dealing with the boredom of an eight- 
hour-shift. 

For more information about the Inde- 
pendent Film Series, contact Director of 
Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676-659 1 , 
ext. 1269. 

"The Visitor" will be shown Saturday, 
April 1 1 , at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades Audito- 
rium, in conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

In a world of six billion people, it only 
takes one to change your life. 

Writer-director Thomas McCarthy 
has created a wonderfully measured story 
about change and renewal and put it all on 
the shoulders of Jenkins, a largely unher- 
alded but masterful performer whose time 



for renown has surely come. 

For more information about the Inde- 
pendent Film Series, contact Director of Stu- 
dent Affairs Emily Aubele at 676-6591 , ext. 
1269. 

Laura Tsgarris will perform on Wednes- 
day,, April 15, at 7:30 p.m.. at Rhoades 
lounge. 

Independently touring with her acoustic 
guitar and characteristically intimate solo 
show, Laura Tsgarris continues to solidify 
her place within the performance commu- 
nity. 

For more information about the Cof- 
feehouse Music Series, contact Director of 
Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676-6591, 
ext. 1269. 

"Yesterday" will be shown Saturday, 
April 18, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades Audito- 
rium, in conjunction with the Independent 
Film Series. 

After falling ill. Yesterday learns that 
she is HIV positive. 

With her husband in denial and young 
daughter to tend to. Yesterday's one goal is 
to live long enough to see her child go to 
school . 

The film realistically and sensitively 
portrays the plight of rural South Africans 
living with HIV or AIDS. Zulu with English 
subtitles. 

For more information about the Inde- 
pendent Film Series, contact Director of Stu- 
dent Affairs Emily Aubele at 676-6591 , ext. 
1269. 

Natalia Zuckerman, with special guest 
Trina Hamlin, will perform on Thursday, 
April 23, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades lounge. 

The Philadelphia Daily described Zuck- 
erman as a "smokey-voiced songstress. If 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109 



you're a fan of Madeleine Peyroux, Bonnie 
Raitt or even Amy Wmehouse, you'll find 
stuff to connect with here." 

For more information about the Cof- 
feehouse Music Series, contact Director of 
Student Affairs Emil} Aubele at 676-6591 . 
ext. 1269. 

Miscellaneous 

The artwork of Chariie Whipple, own- 
er of the Howling Dog Gallery Cafe in Oil 
City, will be on display in Rhoades Center 
during the spring 2009 semester. 

Body sculpting classes will be held 
ever}' Tuesday at 11 a.m., in the Robert 
W. Rhoades fitness center. Classes will be 
taught by Jane Horos of the YWCA. 

The one-hour cardio class will concen- 
trate on strength training, but will also in- 
corporate traditional step aerobics as well 
as an interval training boot camp class. 

For more information, contact the Stu- 
dent Affairs Office at 676-6591 extension 
1271. 

Yoga classes instructed by Libby Jen- 
kins will be held ever)' Thursday, at 11 a.m. 
Yoga classes will be held in the Robert W. 
Rhoades fitness center. 

For more information, contact the Stu- 
dent Affairs Office at 676-6591 extension 
1271. 

Get active with Dr. Lott ever\' Tuesday 
at 3:30 p.m. ' 

Various activities will take place 
throughout the semester, including biking, 
hiking, cross country skiing, cardio and 
strength training, and more. 

For more information, contact Dr. Lott 
at dlott@clarion.edu. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



/. 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



G/TO/TQ 



Vol 



Volume 41, Issue 21 



Monday, April 6, 2009 



Lumber Inspection Training School to be offered 



The National Hardwood Lumber 
Association (NHLA), headquartered in 
Memphis, Tennessee, will offer the ten-weelc 
NHLA Lumber Inspection Training School 
at Venango Training and Development 
Center in Oil City from June 8 until 
August 14. The program is a collaboration 
of NHLA, Clarion University-Venango 
Campus, Keystone Community Education 
Council (KCEC), and the Allegheny 
Hardwood Utilization Group (AHUG). Ron 
Jones Hardwood Sales, Inc. will donate the 
hardwood to be used for the program. 

This is just the second time NHLA 
has offered the program off-site in the 
organization's sixty-year history of 
educating lumber inspectors throughout the 
world, having offered the program in Oil 
City last summer. NHLA Inspector Training 



School Instructor, Rich Hascher, will again 
travel to Pennsylvania to preside over the 
class, giving students the same tradition of 
excellence they would receive in Memphis. 

NHLA began its partnership with 
Clarion University-Venango Campus 
six years ago, when Clarion University 
became the only university in the country 
to offer college credit for the NHLA 
program, awarding credits toward an 
associate degree through the university's 
Department of Applied Technology. 

After successfully completing the 
NHLA program, students who wish to 
continue on to earn Clarion University's 
Associate of Applied Science in Industrial 
Technology degree will be able to transfer 
as many as 22 credits toward the 60 
credits required for the associate degree. 



The balance of the coursework consists of 
general education and business courses that 
can be completed at the Venango Campus 
and/or online. 

Wood product employers in the 
north central and northwest region of 
Pennsylvania are eligible for tuition 
reimbursement through the AHUG Lumber 
and Wood Industry Partnership. To learn 
more about reimbursement through the 
AHUG office please call 814-837-8550. 

For more information regarding the 
summer school program and enrollment 
contact Lance Hummer at Keystone 
Community Education Council at 814-677- 
4427 or email l.hummer@csonline.net. 

Housing during the program is available 

See LUMBER on page 2 



Transitions orientation program slated April 8 



April 

The registration/orientation program 
Transitions will be held on Wednesday, 
April 8, from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 
Rhoades Center. Students accepted into 
the university will meet with an advisor, 
schedule classes, and learn about student life 
and services, financial aid. Eagle Dollars, 
how the Administrative Office can assist 
you, and have your Student Identification 
Card photo taken. Optional campus tours 
will also be available. 



"The Visitor" will be shown Saturday, 
April 11, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades 
Auditorium, in conjimction with the 
Independent Film Series. 

In a world of six billion people, it 
only takes one to change your life. Writer- 
director Thomas McCarthy has created 
a wonderfully measured story about 
change and renewal and put it all on the 
shoulders of Jenkins, a largely unheralded 
but masterful performer whose time for 



renown has surely come. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact Director 
of Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

"Gun Violence, Awareness, and 
Choices" will be presented by Elaine Surma 
on Tuesday, April 14, from 7-8:30 p.m., at 

See EVENTS on page 8 



Inside this issue... 



Lumber School 
Events 

Nursing Courses 
Job Opportunities 
State & National News 



...pg.l 


World News 


...pg.I-8 


Legal Symposium photos 


...pg.2 


Discovery program 


...pg.3 


Grants available 


...pg.4 


Words of Wsdom 



..pg.5 
..pg.6 
..pg.7 
..pg.7 
..pg.7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Two nursing courses open to students of any major 



The following two BSN nursing 
electives are available to all non-BSN 
students. The non-restricted sections are 
W5 sections. 

Nursing 347 (call number 12050): 
Creating a Wellness Lifestyle - 3 credits 
- introduces the student to the concepts 
of wellness and health promotion from 
a holistic perspective. Within this 
framework, students explore how to gain 
more control over their lives through 
effective stress management, management 



of time and change, and adequate self and 
social support. The course assists students 
in increasing self-responsibility and 
negotiating the health care delivery system. 
The course also discusses health measures 
such as diet, exercise, and sleep as they 
relate to a wellness lifestyle. Nursing 347 
also explores the balance of caring for 
others and caring for self Each student is 
guided in formulating an individualized 
wellness plan. 

Nursing 365 (call number 12051): 



Health Promotion for the Elderly - 3 credits 
- provides students with information and 
strategies related to the promotion and 
maintenance of health in a holistic manner 
for the elderly population. 

The course promotes inquiry and 
stimulates the critical-thinking processes 
of the student by emphasizing health and 
wellness concepts. 

These courses are open to all students. 

Students should speak with his/her 
advisor prior to registering for these courses. 



LUMBER: Students can live in apartment complex 



Continued from page 1 

at the Venango Campus student apartment 
complex. Each apartment is furnished and 
includes a fially-equipped kitchen, utilities, 
high-speed Internet, air-conditioning and 
laundry facilities. For more information, 
contact Emily Aubeie at 814-676-6591, 
extension 1269. 

The National Hardwood Lumber 
Association is a nonprofit association 
composed of more than 1,600 member 
firms that produce, sell, and use hardwood 
lumber or provide services to the hardwood 
industry. The association was founded 
in 1898 to establish a uniform system 
of grading rules for the measurement 
and inspection of hardwood lumber and 
still serves as the administrator of those 



standards. 

The high value of hardwood lumber 
dictates that boards are graded each time 
that they are bought or sold within the 
hardwood industry on the way from the 
sawmill to their final use in furniture, 
flooring, or paneling. Hardwood lumber 
inspectors are responsible for determining 
the species, grade, and volume of each 
piece of lumber, and are employed by 
sawmills, dry kiln operators, wholesale 
lumber distributors, manufacturing plants, 
exporters, importers, and other types of 
finns that utilize hardwood lumber. 

In 1948, NHLA established its fraining 
school in Memphis to teach these rules and 
the application of the grading system to 
help meet an increasing demand for skilled 
lumber inspectors throughout the world. 



To this day, the NLHA Lumber Inspection 
Training School in Memphis is the only 
school of its kind in the world and has 
attracted students from Canada, Europe, 
Africa, South America, and Asia, as well as 
the United States. More than 6,700 students 
have graduated from the Inspection 
Program, many of whom are now in 
management or ownership positions in the 
industry and are sending their children or 
employees to complete the course. 

Clarion University's Department of 
Applied Technology was launched in 2003 
in response to a critical need for high- 
quality technical education in the region and 
beyond, and utilizes a creative partnership 
approach designed to prepare students for 

See LUMBER on page 7 



/e 



/^ 



Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591 , E,\t. 1271 Email: vvoice@clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding com 
munities. The Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenit> 
the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a 
letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information baxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. Pub 
lication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when 
scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



Volume 41 . Issue 20 



Page 3 



Several positions are available now for students 



An Oil Cit>' office is looking for a 
medical biller coder. Experience in the 
optical field is preferred. Experience as a 
receptionist is also preferred. This position 
ma}' be \iewed and applied for at \\-v\-vv. 
cwds. state. pa.us. 

The Venango Count\' Assistance 
Office has available openings for Clerk 
T\-pist 2 and Income Maintenance Worker. 
Periodic openings also exist for LIHEAP 
Energy assistance personnel. Apply on 
the Web site, wwvv.scsc. state. pa.us, to 
schedule an exam. 

It is highly recommended that 
candidates have verv" thorough, detailed 
resumes noting full addresses for all 
employers (with supervisor), beginning 
and ending wages for employers listed, 
and education training applicable to the 
position. 

It is also recommended that 
candidates list multiple coimties in which 
he she will be willing to work in the 
event the Venango slots are filled prior 
to a candidate's exam date. All students 
should review this \\'eb site to ascertain 
if, in fact, other opportimities exist related 
to their field. Potential career options with 
the Commonwealth are available but most 
require civil service testing and patience 
is critical since the hiring process can be 
laborious at times. 

Program Aides are needed. 
Qualified candidates will assist with 
the implementation and management 
of programs and services for older 
Americans who are generally over age 50 
in a designated geographic area, providing 
ser%'ices to approximately 100 older 
individuals, businesses, and communities 
in the greater Meadville Titusville area, in 
Venango and Crawford Counties. 

Primar%' duties and responsibilities 
may include: assists with the recruiting 
of applicants for Experience Works 
special projects; inter%'iews and assesses 
participants to determine appropriate 
training and supportive services plans; 
supports and monitors the training. 



skill development, and performance 
of participants; cultivates commimity 
relationships as well as training and 
emplovTnent opportunities for participants; 
organizes job development services to 
help participants obtain imsubsidized 
emplo>"ment; assess the needs and abilities 
of older persons using JobReady software; 
creates and maintains positive relationships 
with businesses, organizations, and 
commimit>-based organizations; and some 
daily and occasional overnight travel. 

The required qualifications include: 
residence in area served; has a passion 
for enhancing comniimit>' service and 
employment opportimities for older people; 
understands the special employment needs 
of older workers and is creatively able to 
address these needs; able to identify the 
needs and expectations of individuals, 
commimitv^ organizations and employers; 
demonstrated commitment, teamwork, 
and collaboration; effectively works with 
individuals and employers in a positive, 
professional manner; is knowledgeable about 
the range of services available in community 
and able and willing to develop relationships 
to deliver a comprehensive array of services; 
excellent interpersonal skills, strong 
planning and organizational skills, ability to 
work with accuracy and detailed paperwork; 
proven experience with commimity service, 
aging issues, employment coimseling, or 
related transferable competencies; individual 
must be a self-starter who communicates 
effectively, motivates others, and has an 
affinit>' for and a desire to work with older 
people; and education above the high school 
level and appropriate work experience. 

Qualified candidates must possess a 
valid driver's license, acceptable driving 
record, auto liability insurance, and reliable 
transportation. Qualified candidates must 
be proficient with Microsoft Word, Excel, 
and the Internet. Compensation includes a 
competitive salary, excellent benefits, and 
reimbursement of travel expenses. 

Visit http://www.cwds.state.pa.us/ to 
apply. 

A tutor is needed in the Learning Support 



Center at Venango Campus. The qualified 
candidate will be required to work 10 
hours/week (within the LSC published 
schedule) for minimum wage. 

The qualified candidate must be 
dependable; possess an overall GPA of 2.7 
with a GPA of 3.00 in core classes; have 
a schedule of at least 6 credits; effectively 
carry out tutoring in a positive manner to 
students needing assistance in order to 
be successful in their respective area of 
concern; obtain a faculty recommendation; 
work within the published schedule of the 
Learning Support Center; and attend all 
required training and be well versed in the 
guidelines of the L.S.C. Manual. 

Duties of the qualified candidate will 
include: maintain accurate records and 
follow directions per Clarion University 
guidelines on several levels (computer 
usage, LSC Training manual, time/ 
attendance records and other standards as 
dictated by the procedures for the L.S.C); 
work on a one-on-one basis as well as in 
group settings to carry out effective tutoring 
sessions; make referrals for other student 
services as needed; answer all phone 
inquiries and personally greet students; 
maintain L.S.C. library by logging all 
books in/out and return them to proper 
areas; monitor computer areas to assure 
appropriate Internet access; report any 
areas of concerns to immediate supervisor; 
and follow all other assigimients as dictated 
by the L.S.C. manual or as directed by 
University policies. 

To apply, complete an application, 
located in Room 319 Montgomery or in 
LSC Room 318 Montgomery. Include a 
fall semester class schedule; subject areas 
should clearly be noted on the application. 
Attach a faculty recommendation for the 
area in which you wish to tutor. Return 
all forms to Tammy Beach, L.S.C. 
Coordinator, at Room 319 Montgomery. 

For more information about any of 
these positions or for resume preparation 
assistance, contact Coordinator of Career 
Services Mark Conrad at mconrad@ 
clarion.edu or at extension 1373. 



Page 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Pa. health officials warn of measles after 3 cases 



PITTSBURGH (AP) — State and Allegheny 
County health officials are warning people 
about a father and two young children who 
have been sick with the measles. 

Health officials say the man and his 
children, who are both under 5 years old, 
were at UPMC Children's Hospital of 



Pittsburgh on March 10 and 11 while they 
would have been contagious. The three are 
not being identified and were not at the 
hospital because of the measles, though 
health officials won't say why they were 
there. 

The father and his children are from 



neighboring Westmoreland County. 
Investigators are now trying to determine 
how they got sick and whether anybody else 
has caught the measles from them. 

Neither child was vaccinated against 
the disease. The father had one of two 
measles vaccines. 



National 



Fargo businesses reopen as swollen river subsides 



FARGO, N.D. (AP) — Businesses reopened 
and commuter traffic returned Wednesday 
as the bloated Red River fell below the 
sandbags and the top of the permanent 
fioodwalls protecting Fargo, feeding 
optimism the city had escaped a disastrous 
flood. 

Under a cloudy but mostly dry sky, 
roads reopened, people returned to work 
and officials began scaling back their flood 
response. Officials said schools would 
reopen Monday. 

"Our word for the day is restore and 
recharge," Mayor Dennis Walaker said. 

Traffic was bustling during the morning 
rush hour, a far cry fi-om last week when 
the city was virtually shut down. "I had 
to fight traffic to get to work today," city 
commissioner Tim Mahoney said. 

Fargo also began looking ahead to 
the enormous effort of removing the 
roughly 3 million sandbags stacked atop 
the floodwalls. There was no immediate 
indication when that will begin, but Walaker 
wants residents to be aggressive when the 
time comes. 

"We don't want them sitting in their 
living room watching the National Guard 
doing this," he said. "We can't do that. 



People don't understand how many bags are 
out there." 

Fargo also wants to work with state and 
federal officials to come up with a long-term 
flood plan. "It's something that we want to 
get done as quickly as possible," the mayor 
said. 

Less than two inches of snow was 
forecast, giving residents a break from the 
storm that blew about 10 inches of blinding 
snow through the city Tuesday and whipped 
up blizzard conditions elsewhere across the 
northern Plains. 

City officials had said they would 
breathe easier when the river fell to 36 or 37 
feet or lower, and early Wednesday, it was 
down to 37.37 feet. 

The river is still far above flood stage, 
but it's below the top of the floodwalls, 
which are topped with 5 feet of sandbags that 
residents, volunteers and National Guard 
members had stacked. 

Officials caution that the city isn't safe 
just yet. Forecasters say the river could rise 
again when more snow melts. But even 
future crests aren't expected to approach the 
levels feared during the past weekend, when 
the river reached a record 40.82 feet early 
Saturday. 



Freezing weather has limited the 
amount of snow and ice that would 
normally melt and flow into the waterway, 
the National Weather Service said. 

Tuesday's snowstorm added to 
the challenge of monitoring the dikes, 
producing a slippery mix of mud and ice 
and obscuring visibility for engineers who 
walked the earthen levees looking for 
weakness or leaks. 

Across the river in Moorhead, Minn., 
and much of surrounding Clay County, 
officials were going from flood-emergency 
to flood-recovery mode Wednesday. 

"We're gearing our efforts down and 
FEMA's here to do its thing," said Detective 
Jason Hicks with the Clay County Sheriff's 
Office. 

"We still have a lot of work to do. 
Everyone's tapped out." 

Moorhead officials lifted another 
evacuation recommendation, covering the 
southernmost part of town, on Wednesday. 
Only a small area on the north side remained 
under an evacuation recommendation. 

And as the high water in the Red River 
flows north, the Minnesota Army National 
Guard is beginning to shift personnel with it 
to other towns facing the flood threat. 



Volume 41 , Issue 20 Page 5 



World 

North Korea threatens to shoot down spy planes 

SEOLIL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea allegations or the North's threat. Japan has deployed battleships with 

accused the United States of spying on the British Prime Minister Gordon Brovvn antimissile systems oif its northern coast 

site of an impending rocket launch and said at a summit Tuesday with South Korean and stationed Patriot missile interceptors 

threatened Wednesday to shoot down any President Lee Myung-bak that Pyongyang's around Tokyo to shoot down any wayward 

U.S. planes that intrude into its airspace. launch would breach the U.N. resolution, rocket parts that the North has said might 

North Korea says it will send a and he pledged to respond in step with Seoul, fall over the area, 

communications satellite into orbit on a Lee's office said. Tokyo has said it is only protecting 

multistage rocket between April 4 and 8. Lee, in London for the G-20 summit, told its territory and has no intention of trying 

The United States, South Korea and Brown it was important for the international to shoot down the rocket itself, but North 

Japan suspect the reclusive country is community to show a concerted response to Korea said it is not convinced and accused 

using the launch to test long-range missile the North's move, his office said. Japan of inciting militarism at home to 

technology, and they warn Pyongyang Lee and Japanese Prime Minister Taro justify developing a nuclear weapons 

would face sanctions under a U.N. Security Aso also agreed at a summit Wednesday to program of its own. 

Council resolution banning it from ballistic "work together to make sure the international If Japan tries to intercept the satellite, 

activity. community shows a united response" to a the North's army "will consider this as the 

Pyongyang's state radio accused U.S. North Korean launch, a statement from Lee's start of Japan's war of re-invasion ... and 

RC-135 surveillance aircraft of spying on office said. mercilessly destroy all its interceptor means 

the launch site on its northeastern coast, Aso said he will push for new U.N. and citadels with the most powerful military 

according to South Korea's Unification sanctions if the launch takes place, while means," the North's official Korean Central 

Ministry, which is in charge of monitoring Lee "stressed the need to clearly show to News Agency said Tuesday, 

the North. North Korea, through close coordination The International Crisis Group, a 

"If the brigandish United States of the international community, that it Brussels-based think tank that provides 

imperialists dare to infiltrate spy planes cannot always have its own way," South detailed analysis about North Korea — said 

into our airspace to interfere with our Korea's Yonhap news agency quoted Lee's in a report that the country is believed to 

peacefiil satellite launch preparations, our spokesman Lee Dong-kwan as telling South have "assembled and deployed nuclear 

revolutionary' armed forces will mercilessly Korean reporters. warheads" recently for its medium-range 

shoot them down," the ministry quoted the In the Netherlands, U.S. Secretary Rodong missiles, which are capable of 

radio as saying. of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called striking Japan. 

It was unclear what capability North Pyongyang's move "an unfortunate and But its Seoul-based expert, Daniel 

Korea has to shoot down the high-flying continuing example of provocation by the Pinkston, said it is unclear if it has mastered 

Boeing RC-135, which can reach altitudes North Koreans." the technology necessary to miniaturize the 

of nearly 10 miles (15 kilometers). "There will be consequences, certainly, warheads and put them on Rodong missiles, 

The threat came a day after the in the United Nations Security Council if which have a range of 620 to 930 miles 

North claimed the U.S. and South Korea they proceed with the launch," she said. (1,000 to 1,500 kilometers), 

conducted about 190 spy flights over its Clinton also strongly backed Japan's Adding to the complexity of the 

territory in March, including over the sea plans to shoot down any incoming North situation, the North announced Tuesday it 

off the launch site. Korean rocket debris, saying the country "has will indict and try two American joumaUsts 

The U.S. military in South Korea every right to protect and defend its territory ^'^'^"^^'^ °^ '^'■^^^•"g ^^e border illegally 

declined to comment on the spying from what is cleariy a missile launch." ^^^ '^^"^ °" ^^'^^ ^^ ^"'^ engagmg m 

"hostile acts." 



Email the Venango Voice at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 





A Legal Symposium was held at Clarion Uni 
versity- Venango Campus on March 26. The event 
featured eight women from the Pennsylvania judi- 
cial system answering the question, "What if the 
Supreme Court looked like this: all women?" The 
speakers included: (top left photo, 1 to r) Madame 
Justice Sandra Schultz Newman (ret.), first female 
justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court; Judge 
Maureen Lally-Green, PA Superior Court; Judge 
Jacqueline Shogan, PA Superior Court; Judge Cher 
yl Allen, PA Superior Court; Judge Christine Dono 
hue, PA Superior Court; Judge Renee Cohn Jube- 
lirer, PA Commonwealth Court; Judge Stephanie 
Domitrovich, Court of Common Pleas, Erie; and 
Judge Maureen Skerda, Court of Common Pleas 
Warren. In the photo at the top right, Victor Stabile, 
Esq., of Dilworth Paxson LLP, moderates the event. 
Maria Battista Kerle, J.D., Ed.D., a Mass Media 
Arts & Journalism and Communication Studies 
professor at Venango Campus, coordinated the Le- 
gal Symposium (left, middle photo). Judge Chris- 
tine Donohue of the Pennsylvania Superior Court 
(bottom left) looks to the crowd as another judge 
speaks. 



Volume 41 , Issue 20 



Page 7 



Discovery program assists with career decisions 



Career Services has a great program 
called DISCOVERY, which assists 
students in narrowing down their career 
interests. 

Before you leave for the summer, 



consider making an appointment to take 
an assessment - it's quick! And, once you 
receive your individualized usemame, you 
can even take the assessment at home, if 
you desire. 



If you wish to make an appointment to 
get acclimated to this user-friendly research 
tool, contact Coordinator of Career Services 
Mark Conrad by e-mail at mconrad@ 
clarion.edu or at extension 1373. 



Grants are available for undergraduate students 



Student grants are available for 
research and projects, and students can 
now apply for Clarion University student 
grants for undergraduate research and 
scholarly, creative, entrepreneurial, and 
civic projects. 

Undergraduate students in any major or 
program at Clarion University are invited 
to apply for up to $500 in funds to support 
independent research or a scholarly project 
to be conducted in collaboration with a 



faculty or staff mentor. Research is defined 
in a broad context to include any scholarly, 
creative, entrepreneurial, or civic activity 
and is not limited to the traditional concept 
of laboratory studies in the sciences. 

The project must be completed prior to 
the middle of April 2010, when the student 
is expected to present their findings at an 
undergraduate research symposium to be 
held on campus. 

In those instances where the project is 



continuing, the student will present results 
in the following year's symposium. Projects 
can be those of one student or teams of 
students. 

The deadline to apply for grant money 
is Monday, April 13. 

For instructions how to apply and an 
application or for more information, contact 
Kay Ensle at the Clarion University- 
Venango Campus administrative office at 
kensle(®clarion.edu. 



LUMBER: Students will receive Associate degree 



Continued from page 2 

a career path leading to a wide range of 
opportunities and leadership positions. 

Under this unique model, students 
complete general education and business 
courses at Clarion University- Venango 
Campus and the technical component of 
the degree through licensed, certified, 
accredited and/or otherwise approved 
technical education providers. 

Graduates receive an Associate 
of Applied Science in Industrial or 



Administration Technology degree from 
Clarion University. 

In addition to the Hardwood Lumber 
Inspector concenfration, the Industrial 
Technology degree offers concentrations 
of study in Electric Utility Technology, 
CNC Programmer, CNC Maintenance, 
Elecfromechanical Technology, and Electric 
Arc Welding. 

Also offered are Grinding Specialist, 
Milling Specialist, Robotics Technology, 
Robotics Maintenance Technology, Plastics 
Technology, Quality Control, Tool, Die, and 



Mold Technology. 

Additionally, Tooling and EDM 
Technology, Tooling and Machining 
Technology, CADD - Architectural or 
Mechanical, Carpentry and Construction 
Technology, Elecfricity - Maintenance 
and Construction, Refrigeration, Heating, 
Ventilation, and Air Conditioning, Welding 
and Fabrication Technology, and Computer 
and Network Adminisfration are offered. 

Concentrations in the administration 
technology degree program include 
insurance and office technology. 



Words of Wisdom 

'One thing you can Y recycle 
is wasted time.' 




Pages 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Performance by Tsgarris slated April 15 



Continued from page 1 



Rhoades Auditorium. The program will 
cover the realities of gun violence and how 
it relates to substance abuse issues. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at 814-676-6591, 
extension 1269. 

Laura Tsgarris will perform on 
Wednesday, April 15, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades lounge. The event is free and 
open to the public. 

Independently touring with her 
acoustic guitar and characteristically 
intimate solo show, Laura Tsgarris 
continues to solidify her place within the 
performance communify'. 

For more information about the 
Coffeehouse Music Series, contact 
Director of Student Affairs Emily Aubele 
at 676-6591, ext. 1269. 

"Yesterday" will be shown Saturday, 
April 18, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades 
Auditorium, in conjunction with the 
Independent Film Series. 

After falling ill, Yesterday learns 



that she is HIV positive. With her husband 
in denial and young daughter to tend to. 
Yesterday's one goal is to live long enough 
to see her child go to school. TTie film 
realistically and sensitively portrays the 
plight of rural South Africans living with 
HIV or AIDS. Zulu with English subtitles. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact Director of 
Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676-6591, 
exi. 1269. 

Natalia Zuckerman, with special guest 
Trina Hamlin, will perform on Thursday, 
April 23, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades lounge. 

The Philadelphia Daily described 
Zuckerman as a "smokey-voiced songstress. 
If you're a fan of Madeleine Peyroux, Bonnie 
Raitt or even Amy Winehouse, you'll find 
stuff to connect with here." 

For more information about the 
Coffeehouse Music Series, contact Director 
of Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

Miscellaneous 

The artwork of Charlie Whipple, former 
owner of the Howling Dog Gallery Cafe 
in Oil Cify, will be on display in Rhoades 



Center during the spring 2009 semester. 

Body camp classes will be held every 
Tuesday at 2 p.m., in the Rhoades fitness 
center. Classes will be taught by Jane 
HorosoftheYWCA. 

The one-hour cardio class will 
concentrate on strength training, but will 
also incorporate traditional step aerobics 
as well as an interval training boot camp 
class. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1271. 

Yoga classes instructed by Libby 
Jenkins will be held every Thursday, at 
11 a.m. Yoga classes will be held in the 
Rhoades fitness center. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1271. 

Get active with Dr. Lott every Tuesday 
at 3:30 p.m. Various activities will take 
place throughout the semester, including 
biking, hiking, cross country skiing, cardio 
and strength training, and more. For more 
information, contact Dr. Lott at dlott@ 
clarion.edu. 




Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion LIniversity of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301. Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

VENANGO CAMPUS 



/. 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



&/oo/ia 



Vol 



Volume 41, Issue 22 



Monday, April 13, 2009 



Student apartments offer many amenities and more 



Clarion University-Venango Campus 
is currently expanding its student apartment 
complex with two new buildings and con- 
tinues to provide affordable housing with a 
long list of amenities that are hard to find in 
other student housing arrangements. 

Each two- and three-story building 
features two apartments on each floor with 
four private bedrooms and two bathrooms 
in each apartment. 

Students share common laxmdry facili- 
ties, living and dining areas, and a kitchen. 
The student apartments also boast many 
amenities included in the cost of the lease 
such as high speed Internet access, cable 
television, local phone service, and all other 
utilities. In addition, residents receive $200 
in Clarion University dining services flex 
dollars. 

Current residents of the student apart- 
ment complex weighed on the benefits of 



living on campus. 

Slippery Rock University transfer stu- 
dent Jenna Kalicky was satisfied knowing 
that "everything is included. It's complete- 
ly furnished," she said. 

Kalicky also pointed out the conve- 
niences of living in the student apartments. 
"It's nice to be able to walk to campus. 
Having the washer and dryer is nice, too." 

Freshman nursing students Cheyenne 
Kuzma and Alyssa Zigo shared Kalicky's 
sentiments. 

"One of the best features is the washer 
and dryer - and it's fi-ee," said Kuzma. "But 
getting to meet people faster is a perk." 

"It's like your own little community," 
added Zigo. "You make more fi^iends, fast- 
er, and you get together all the time." 

"You have way more coimections 
with people," said Kuzma. 

Kuzma and Zigo pointed to gatherings 



at the picnic tables outside the apartments, 
as well as game nights and PlayStation 
night to describe the social events that are 
"always going on" at the apartments. 

"I think it's always a lot of fiin," said 
Zigo. 

Each building of the complex is named 
in honor of private donations, through the 
generosity of the community, made toward 
the construction of the complex. The build- 
ings were designed by Ligo Architects and 
developed by Whalen Contracting, Inc. of 
Franklin, and are owned and managed by 
the Clarion University Foundation, Inc. 

Elizabeth S. Black Hall was funded 
primarily by the Elizabeth S. Black 
Charitable Trust, Henry B. and Beverly L. 
Suhr, and an anonymous donor. Additional 
donors include the Laura Smedley 

See HOUSING on page 6 



Gun violence awareness presentation slated April 14 



April 

"Gun Violence, Awareness, and 
Choices" will be presented by Elaine Surma 
on Tuesday, April 14, fi-om 7-8:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades Auditorium. The program will 
cover the realities of gun violence and how 
it relates to substance abuse issues. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Ofiice at 814-676-6591, 
extension 1269. 

Laura Tsgarris will perform on 

Inside this issue... 



Wednesday, April 15, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Rhoades lounge. The event is free and 
open to the public. 

Independently touring with her 
acoustic guitar and characteristically 
intimate solo show, Laura Tsgarris 
continues to solidify her place within the 
performance community. 

For more information about the 
Coffeehouse Music Series, contact 
Director of Student Affairs Emily Aubele 
at 676-6591, ext. 1269. 



"Yesterday" will be shown Saturday, 
April 18, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades 
Auditorium, in conjunction with the 
Independent Film Series. 

After falling ill. Yesterday learns that 
she is HTV positive. With her husband 
in denial and young daughter to tend to, 
Yesterday's one goal is to live long enough 

See EVENTS on page 8 



Student Housing 

Events 

Trash Talk 

Job Opportunities 

FAFSA News 



...pg.l 


State & National News 


...pg.1-8 


World News 


...pg.2 


PTKNews 


...pg.3 


Finals Schedule 


...pg.3 


Words of Wisdom 



...pg.4 
...pg.5 
...pg.6 
...pg.l 
...pg.l 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Water isn't unlimited; start to conserve at home now 



Trash Talk 

by 
Loh Secor 

Water may be the most abundant 
resource on Earth, but that doesn't mean 
unlimited. Areas in the United Slates may 
soon join the many countries worldwide in 
water crisis. 

What is the solution here? Will there 
be restrictions put on the amount of water 
each person is allotted? Fines handed out 
to those who don't comply as they are 
doing in many other countries? Maybe, 
if we start to conserve water usage now, 
we can put off the extremes, or at the very 



least we'll be used to using less when the 
rules start being laid down. 

So, for my last article of the semester, 
I'm handing out ideas on how we can all 
reduce our water usage. 

1. Don't let the water run while 
shaving, washing your face, and brushing 
your teeth. 

2. Take shorter showers. Replacing the 
showerhead with an ultra-low-flow head 
will save even more. 

3. For tub baths, close the stopper or 
put in the plug before turning on the water. 

4. Put a plastic bottle or Ziploc bag full 
of pebbles into the toilet tank to use less 
water with each flush. 

5. Repair drippy faucets. A one drip per 
second leak will waste almost 3000 gallons 
per year. 

6. Store drinking water in the 
refrigerator. This way, you don't have to run 
the water to wait for it to get cold. 

7. Don't thaw meats under running 
water. Thaw in the fridge overnight or in 
the microwave. 

8. Don't clean vegetables under 
running water. Instead, use a filled bowl or 
pan. 

9. Installing instant water heaters at the 
kitchen sink or shower eliminate the need 
to run the water to get it hot. It also saves 



money on household heating costs. 

10. Garbage disposals use a lot of 
water to run. Consider starting a compost 
pile and put those scraps to good use. 

1 1 . Wait to run the dishwasher imtil it 
is totally full. 

12. Don't run the washing machine for 
only a few items. Wait until you have a full 
load and be sure to adjust the water height 
correctly unless you have the type with the 
fill sensor. 

13. Using mulch around trees and 
plants outside slows evaporation, reducing 
how often they need watered. 

14. Water plants during cool times of 
the day. And don't water your lawn in the 
rain. (Seriously, I've seen people do it.) 

1 5. When you wash your car, park it on 
the grass and double-duty by watering the 
lawn with the rinse water. 

16. If you have a pool, keep it covered 
when not in use to reduce water lost to 
evaporation. 

And with talks of a pool, I leave you 
with thoughts of summer! What will you 
do with yours? See you in the fall and 
remember: small changes can bring big 
results! 

Reference material for this article may- 
he foimd at: http://www.monolake.org/ and 
http://www.americanwater.com. 



/a 



/^ 



Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591 , Ext. 1271 Email: vvoiced clarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding com 
munities. The Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity 
the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a 
letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. Pub- 
lication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when 
scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 



Volume 41 . Issue 20 



Page 3 



Information about job openings Job fairs available 



Job openings are available 
immediately at Kingdom Kids Nazarene 
Day Care in Oil Cit>, located at 601 East 
Second Street in the basement of the First 
Church of the Nazarene. 

There is a full-time and a part-time 
position open, plus there is a need for 
summer help. 

Kingdom Kids is open Monday 
through Friday, from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; 
the time for the two part-time positions 
open are 11:15 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The full- 
time candidates are needed from 8:30 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. 

Three clearances are required for 
emplojTnent: Child Abuse, Criminal 
Record Check and FBI clearances. 
Applicants are responsible for the fees 
associated with those clearances. A current 
physical and TB test is also required. Pay 
scale depends on )ears of experience with 
children and degree earned; a higher pay 
would be earned for those with at least an 
Associates Degree in Early Childhood or a 
related field. 

Limited benefits are also available. 

To learn more about the positions 
open or to obtain an employment packet, 
contact Pastor Tina, Director, or Jill 
Courson, Assistant Director, at 814-677- 
3355 between 6:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. or 
stop by the day care office to inquire. 

The position of Discovery Leader is 
one that allows you to make a significant 



contribution to Clarion University, the 
Venango Campus, and to new students. 
Discover\' Leaders help incoming students 
and their families make a positive transition 
to the campus and to the challenges of 
academic life. Discovery Leaders are some 
of the best-informed students on campus 
and are part of a dynamic team committed 
to creating a positive, welcoming, and 
supportive campus community. 

Requirements for the position include: 
current!) enrolled as a student at the Venango 
Campus; demonstrated leadership ability' 
and public relations skills; excellent team 
player - you will be part of a staff working 
in a fast-paced, high profile position; high 
energ>' level, enthusiasm, and commitment 
to the Venango Campus experience; group 
facilitation experience - a great deal of time 
will be spent working with and leading 
groups of new students; familiarity with 
Venango Campus resources and services - 
you will be a resource to the incoming class 

- and familiarity with local resources and 
services; maturity and independent judgment 

- you will be representing Clarion University 
and the Venango Campus community; must 
be available to attend two of five Orientation 
Sessions throughout the spring and summer 
months, all of Discovery Weekend, and all 
training meetings; must be in good academic 
standing (an overall GPA of 2.00 or higher) 
though summer term 2009; must be willing 
to give campus tours for the admissions 
office during the following school year; 



and must be available to attend leadership 
development workshops on listed dates. 

Turn in applications to Katie 
Owsianiecki in room 117 at Rhoades 
Center. If you are interested in this 
program, you may pick-up an application 
at the same location. 

Additional applications from 
employers that attended the Oil Region Job 
Fair at the Cranberrj* Mall are available 
in the Career Services Center, room 228, 
Montgomery- Hall. They are located in 
the plastic distribution boxes (in the 
hallway) next to the Career Center. They 
are available on a first come-first served 
basis. A poster with tear-offs from GS A for 
summer camp counselors, along with job 
announcements which require you to apply 
via Internet or mail a formal resume to the 
employer's attention, are also available. 

CareerLink of Clarion County will 
hold the 2009 Clarion County Job and 
Resource Fair on Wednesday, April 15, 
11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., at the Clarion Mall. 

For more information, visit www. 
cwds.state.pa.us. 

For resume preparation assistance 
or for more information about any of 
these jobs, contact Coordinator of Career 
Services Mark Conrad at mconrad@ 
clarion. 



FAFS A is due May 1 for 2009-2010 school year 



Students can apply for federal student 
aid for the 2009-2010 school year using 
the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) on the Web at www.fafsa. 
gov. 

Students will need their Federal 
Student Aid PIN to access the 2009-2010 
FAFSA on the Web application. To request 



a duplicate PEN, visit wwAV.pin.ed.gov and 
select "Request a Duplicate PIN." It may be 
delivered through an online display, within 
an e-mail, or by U.S. postal mail. If postal 
mail is selected, the PIN may be expected in 
the mail within 7-10 days after the request. 

In addition to federal student aid, the 
FAFSA is used as an application for the 



PHEAA Grant. The application is due by 
Friday, May 1 . 

If you prefer a paper FAFSA, call 
1.800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243) to 
request one. 

For more information about the 
FAFSA or other financial aid, contact the 
Office of Financial Aid at extension 1213. 



Email the Venango Voice at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Page 4 



Venango Voice 



State 



Pa. troopers set record for DUI arrests in 2008 



HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — 

Pennsylvania state troopers have a new 
record for the number of arrests for 
driving under the influence. 

State police announced Tuesday their 
officers made more than 16,000 arrests 



for driving under the influence last year. 

That's a 3 percent increase over 
2007 and the highest yearly total in the 
department's history. 

Officials are crediting education, 
training and targeted enforcement. 

They're also conducting more 



evaluations to find drivers under the 
influence of illegal or prescription drugs. 
The number of alcohol-related 
crashes fell 3 percent last year, while the 
number of fatalities ft^om those crashes 
were down by 9 percent from the prior 
year. 



National 



FEMA housing aid runs out for storm victims May 1 



JACKSON, Miss. (A?) — Thanh Nguyen 
will soon give up the cramped travel trailer 
that's been her home for more than four 
years, pack her belongings into an old 
Toyota Corolla and rely on the kindness of 
others for a place to live. 

She has no choice: The government is 
taking back the trailer 

"I'm going to pack everything I have 
in a car and go to my fi-iends' houses and 
move on and on until I find something I 
can afford," the Vietnamese immigrant said 
through a translator. "It's for however long 
they allow me to stay." 

Nguyen is one of nearly 6,000 residents 
in Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama 
who face a May 1 deadline to leave the 
government trailers where they have lived 
since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita raked the 
Gulf Coast. 

The Federal Emergency Management 
Agency said the $5.6 billion housing 
assistance program that began after the 2005 
storms was the largest federal temporary 
housing operation in the nation's history. 

At its peak, 143,000 households along 
the Gulf Coast were living in temporary 
housing units. 

FEMA is urging its remaining tenants 
in travel trailers to work with federal and 
state case managers up to the deadline to 
find permanent housing. TTiose living in 



park model or larger homes have the option 
to purchase the structures. 

Otherwise, FEMA spokesman Jim 
Foster said, on May 1, "they will have to 
move out. That's just the end of the program." 

Advocacy groups, many of them 
established in Katrina's wake, have been 
scrambling to help people who haven't 
found permanent housing. Many displaced 
residents are over 65 or are disabled, said 
Stephen Carr, director of the Mississippi 
Case Management Program. 

The main barrier is affordabilit>. 
Following Katrina, rent more than doubled 
along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Much of 
the affordable housing stock was destroyed 
and insurance rates increased. Hundreds of 
housing units have been replaced within the 
last year, but "developers can't put it on line 
at pre-Katrina rates," Carr said. 

The state also plans to transform 
1,800 so-called Katrina Cottages — billed 
as a sturdier alternative to trailers — into 
permanent structures. The cottages, which 
are state structures, are not affected b>' the 
FEMA deadline. 

Nguyen, 69, lives on a $646 Social 
Security check, said Danny Le, who works 
for Boat People SOS, an organization that 
helps Asian immigrants. 

Le said the minimum cost for a one- 
bedroom apartment in Biloxi is $500. He 



said Nguyen has applied for public housing, 
but hasn't received a response. 

Gov. Haley Barbour has asked the 
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development for 5,000 housing vouchers to 
help storm victims pay rent in newly built 
units, said Lee Youngblood, a spokesman 
for the Mississippi Development Authority. 

But that doesn't help people like Thanh 
Tran, 33, who shares a FEMA trailer with 
his parents and grandmother. 

The Trans, who sell shrimp for a living, 
intend to build a house in Pass Christian, but 
have been unable to get a permit. Tran said 
his family will pitch a tent on their property 
after the trailer is taken away. 

"I'm hoping they will extend the 
deadline more," Tran said. 

Carr also hopes that as the deadline 
looms, FEMA will just begin the lease 
termination process. 

"I don't anticipate a wholesale 
homeless situation created on May 1 ," Can- 
said. 

In Louisiana, an estimated 75 
percent of those receiving FEMA aid are 
homeowners, and many of them may be 
close to completing the reconstruction of 
their homes; said Christina Stephens, a 
spokeswoman for the Louisiana Recovery 
Authority. 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



Volume 4 1 . Issue 20 Page 5 



World 

Obama in Baghdad, tells troops Iraq must take over 

BAGHDAD (AP) — Flying unannounced Obama met with top U.S. commanders and the Czech Repubhc. 

into a still-dangerous war zone. President as well as senior Iraqi leaders on a visit of a Aides said Obama chose to visit Iraq 

Barack Obama told U.S. troops and Iraqi little more than four hours that was confined rather than Afghanistan, where U.S. troops 

officials alike Tuesday it is time to phase to Camp Victory, the largest U.S. military are also in combat, in part because it was 

out America's combat role in a conflict he base in a war that began in 2003 and has close to Turkey and in part because of 

opposed as a candidate and has vowed to cost the lives of 4,265 members of the U.S. upcoming Iraqi elections. 

end as commander in chief. military. Many thousands more Iraqis have In his remarks to the troops, Obama 

Iraqis "need to take responsibility for perished. made no mention ofthe Afghanistan conflict 

their own country," Obama told hundreds A helicopter flight to the heavily — where he has decided to commit 21,000 

of cheering soldiers gathered in an ornate, fortified Green Zone a few miles distant was additional troops — and it was not known 

marble palace near Saddam Hussein's scrapped, but White House aides attributed whether it came up in his meeting with Gen. 

former seat of power. the change in travel plans to poor weather Ray Odiemo, the top U.S. commander, and 

"You have given Iraq the opportunity to rather than security concerns. other officers, 

stand on its own as a democratic country. After a session with Prime Minister Obama announced plans in February 

That is an extraordinary achievement," he Nouri al-Maliki, Obama said he had to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq on a 

told the troops, saluting their efforts during "strongly encouraged" Iraqis to take political 19-month timetable, although a force as 

six years of American fighting and losses. steps that would unite political factions, large as 50,000 could remain at the end 

Just hours before he arrived, a deadly car including integrating minority Sunnis into of that period to provide counterterrorism 

bomb exploded in Baghdad, underscoring the government and security forces. duties. 

the continuing peril despite a recent decline Al-Maliki told reporters, "We assured "I am personally committed to a new 

in violence. But the mood was festive as the president that all the progress that has chapter of American engagement. We can't 

Obama spoke to some 600 troops, quickly been made in the security area will continue." afford to talk past one another, to focus 
gathered for his visit. American commanders told the only on our differences, or to let the walls 

"We love you," someone yelled from president the country is experiencing a of mistrust go up around us." Obama said 

the crowd of photo-snapping men and relatively low level of violence, although the before leaving Turkey, 

women in uniform. car bomb explosion in a Shiite neighborhood The visit to a nation that straddles 

"I love you back," responded the of Baghdad was evidence of a recent Europe and Asia was designed to signal a 

president, repeating a sequence that played resurgence. Obama flew from Turkey, the new era. He had pledged as a candidate to 

out at hundreds of campaign stops on his next-to-last stop on an eight-day itinerary visit a majority-Muslim nation in his first 

successfijl run for the White House last year, that also included Britain, France, Germany 1 00 days in office. 



NATIONAL: FEMA is still paying rent on trailers 

Continued from page 4 money. location of an alternative housing program 

"People need to start thinking now for storm victims. More than 100 displaced 

She said most of the state's storm- about where they're going to live instead families moved into Safe Harbor Estates, a 

displaced renters have moved into a disaster of waiting until May 1," said Stephens, new subdivision of two- to four-bedroom 

housing program operated by HUD, but that "Hurricane season is starting. It's very homes. The rent is based on 20 percent of 

program ends in September. important for people's safety that they be in the household income, she said. 

In the last two weeks, six apartment very permanent shelters." She said the reason many families 

complexes have opened across the state. In Alabama, just 19 households are chose not to transition into the subdivision 

she said, and thousands more rental units under FEMA's deadline and none live in was simple: "When they move to Safe 

will be completed over the next few months FEMA trailers, said Janey Galbraith, a Harbor, they have to pay rent. Where they 

• * £ J J VI. i^ J 1 ui 1 * 1 X ^ T, T T1 .._ ^u are now, they don't. FEMA is still paying 

— projects ninded with federal block grant grants consultant for Bayou La Batre, the ^ . -^ 

for It. 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



Phi Theta Kappa seeks funds for service project 



The Alpha Kappa Delta Chapter of Phi 
Theta Kappa (PTK) at Clarion Universit>- 
Venango Campus is seeking donations to 
continue a successful project to benefit 
area residents fi-om toddlers to older adults. 

"Totes for Tots" is a service project 
that the group started a year ago, with the 
help of residents of Presbjierian Home, 
Golden Living Center, and Oil Cit>' Boy 
Scouts Troop 111. With the help of the 
chapter's treasurer, Esther Estes, nursing 
home residents hand-painted pictures on 
the tote bags. 

PTK members purchased fun. 
educational toys, and scouts filled the 91 
bags that were donated to Oil Cir>' Head 
Start and pre-kindergarten classrooms. 
Each tote bag contained an age-appropriate 



book by an award-winning author, a dr>- 
erase board and marker, a letter or number 
pegboard puzzle, Play-doh, letter and 
number stencils, and lacing letters, along 
with a letter to parents and a sponsor card. 
The children were ver>' appreciative of 
the hand-painted tote bags full of toys and 
enjoyed them with their teachers and PTK 
members. 

PTK would like to expand the project 
into the Franklin and Seneca areas and is 
asking for financial assistance from area 
businesses and residents. Donations can be 
made to Student Activities Venango Campus 
(SAVC) and mailed to the campus at 1801 
West First Street, Oil City, PA 16301, to the 
attention of Beth Jackson, PTK advisor. 
For more information, please contact Beth 



Austin at 814-673-3848 or Beth Jackson 
at 676-6591, ext. 1336. Sample totes are 
on display in the second floor lounge of 
Montgomery Hall at Venango Campus. 

Phi Theta Kappa is an international 
honor society for rwo-\ear colleges, with 
1200 chapters and more than 2 million 
members worldwide. Its mission is 
to recognize and encourage academic 
achievement and provide opportunities 
for individual growth and development 
through participation in honors, leadership, 
service and fellowship programming. To 
be eligible for membership, students must 
have a cumulative grade point average of 
3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale. The Alpha 
Kappa Delta chapter is active on both the 
Venango Campus and in the community. 



Gift card winners, beneficiaries named by PTK 



Phi Theta Kappa would like to 
announce the gift card winners fi-om the 
Faculty' and Staff Appreciation Luncheon: 
Laura Carson - Sheetz gift card, donated 
by Phi TTieta Kappa; Lana Smith - Visa 
gift card, donated by Ski Club; Deb Sobina 

- Fairway Casual Dining gift certificate, 
donated by Nursing Club; Cindy Busch 

- Applebee's gift card, donated by 
Psychology Club; Sylvia Wiegel - Sheetz 
gift card, donated by Phi Theta Kappa; 
Theresa Nestor, Walmart gift card, donated 
by Student Senate; and Renee Bloom, 
Outback Steakhouse gift card, donated by 
Nursing club. Thank you to all the clubs 
who donated gift cards! 



We, the members of Phi Theta Kappa, 
consider it an honor and a privilege to 
be able to host this luncheon each year. 
Thanks again to all of the faculty and staff 
for all you do to make our time at Venango 
Campus such a wonderful experience! 

Phi Theta Kappa is collecting textbooks 
to send to Better World Books. The mone>' 
received by BWB is sent to the Room to 
Read Program, which helps bring books to 
underprivileged countries. 

Please consider donating your unwanted 
textbooks at the end of the term. Donation 
boxes are available in Rhoades Center and 
in the 2nd floor lobby of Montgomery Hall 



ft"om April 20 through May 1. 

Each year Phi Theta Kappa collects 
books and food items to donate to a local 
group. 

This year, we have chosen St. Benedict 
Education Center in Oil City and the 
Venango Count)' Humane Society. 

We will be collecting children's books 
for St. Benedicts and pet supplies for the 
Humane Society (a list of requested pet 
items will be on the donation bins). 

Bins will be placed in Rhoades, Frame, 
and Montgomery from April 20 through 
graduation. Please bring an item or two to 
donate. 



HOUSING: Buildings were named in honor of donors 



Continued from page 1 

Charitable Trust, the Frederick and Ellen 
Fair Charitable Trust, and John K. Henne 
ofTitusville. 

Edward V. and Jesse L. Peters Hall 
was ftinded by the Edward V. and Jessie 
L. Peters Charitable Trust. Mrs. Peters was 
the mother of Michael Hughes. 

Michael F. and Joyce I. Hughes Hall 
was made possible primarily through 



donations by the Edward V. and Jessie 
L. Peters Charitable Trust and the Jessie 
L. Peters Charitable Lead Annuity Trust. 
Additional support was provided by Hank 
and Beverly Suhr and the Dr. and Mrs. 
Arthur William Phillips Charitable Trust. 

Leadership Hall, the new three-story 
building, was made possible by Joyce 
and Mike Hughes, who have also fijnded 
Edward V. and Jessie L. Peters Hall and 
Michael F. and Joyce L Hughes Hall. 



Bradford George Carmack Barnes Hall, 
the new tvvo-story building, was funded by 
Greg Barnes, retired business professor, 
in honor of his late son, Bradford George 
Carmack Barnes. Mr. Barnes also made a 
gift to fijnd the new Gregory Barnes Center 
for Biotechnology Business Development 
at the Clarion campus. 

For more information about the Student 
Apartment Complex, contact the Student 
Affairs Oflice at extension 1269. 



Vohtine 41 . Issue 20 



Page 7 



Venango Campus Spring 09 Final Exam Schedule 



Please watch for announcements of 
changes or confirm with your faculty- 
regarding exam schedule. 

All final examinations will be 
administered Tuesday, April 28 through 
Friday, May 1. Exams will not be given at 
times other than those specified on the final 
exam schedule. Students should report to 
the same classroom used throughout the 
spring semester unless indicated otherwise. 

Students with three or more tests on 
the same day may reschedule tests by 
consulting with the appropriate instructors 
or the college dean. The final exam 
schedule for the spring term does not 
allow for a make-up daj-, therefore make- 
up exams should be scheduled at a time 
convenient for the faculty- and students. 

Saturday, April 25 These classes are 
Dual Enrollment courses. 

0:00 PSY211:53 lOlMHHollis 

11:00 Soc211:52 lOlMHHunchuk 

Tuesday, April 28 

8:00 Cheml54 108 F Stevens 

Geog 257 307 MH Occichipinti 
Eng 230 404 MH Huber 

10:00 Eng 1 1 1 :52 404 MH Huber 

Math 111 307 MH Jackson 

12:00 CIS 217: 51 311MHHunter 

Actg252 108 F Kennedy 

CRJT 235:51 208 F Klenowski 

Soc 236:51 208 F Klenowski 

Math 050:51 307 MH Jackson 

ENG 111:53 101 MH Foster 

ENG 111:54 101 MH Foster 

3 p.m. BIOL 1 1 1 1 1 MH Deets/Smith 

CMST113:53 I12FKerle 



5 p.m. REBH 211 1 1 6 F Wynkoop 

Eng 307 304 MH Foster 

(final assignment due) 
Biol 260 108FBruner 

6:30 p.m. 

CMST 113:51 112F Eamheardt 
CRJT 23 5 : 52 208 F Klenowski 
ECON 222 403 MH Duespohl 
PSY211:52 307 MH Hollis 

Soc 236:52 208 F Klenowski 

Wednesday, April 29 

9:00 Psy21I:51 404MHForden 
MGMT121 403 MH Can- 
Math 112:51 307 MH Jackson 
Nut 102 Aud 
Nur202 101 

12:00 Math 221 307 MH Jackson 

Eng 111: 51 404 MH Huber 

PHSCI12:52 108 F Gourley 

2:00 PHSC 112: 51 108 F Gourley 
Hist 121 lOIMHPfannestiel 

ENG 228 403 MH Huber 

PSY 260: 5 1 404 MH Forden 
PHSC 111 112 F Stevens 

May have to switch rooms with Gourley 
4:00 Psy 325 404 MH Forden 

REHB250 1 16 F Wynkoop 

5:00 Math 1 12: 52 307 MH LaVan 
CIS2I7:53 311 MHArmburger 
ED 225 404MHMertz 

7:00 CRJT 255: 5 1 208 F Kerle 

SOC 211 lOlMHHunchuk 

MGMT 120:51 ITV Can- 



Thursday, April 30 

9:00 CRJT 260 208 F Klenowski 

CMST 112: 54 112 F Kerle 
CIS 217: 52 311 MH Hunter 

11:00 Nurl32 Aud 

2 p.m. CMST 112: 52 1 12 F Kerle 

5 p.m. ECON 212 1 1 MH Duespohl 
ED 122 307MHMertz 

7 p.m. Psy 260: 52 404 MH Forden 

PHIL III 208 F Bowser, D. 

CMST 113: 55 112 F Kerle 

Friday, May 1 

9:00 MusI31 101 MH Johnson 

CIS 217: 54 311 MH Hunter 

11:00 Biol 259 lOlMHLott 

12:00 ENG 267 404 MH Foster 

(final paper due) 

I p.m. HPE 111:51 lOI MH Slautterback 

3 p.m. HPE 1 1 1 :52 101 MH Slautterback 

5 p.m. SPED 129 112FGaggini 

Math 110 307MHLaVan 

6:30 MGMT 227 403 MH Duespohl 

PS 211 404 MH Coulter 

ITV classes 
Friday, May 1 

10:00 MMAJIOO 423 Adams 



Words of Wisdom 

'Your mind is like a parachute, 
it functions only when open.' 




Page 8 



Venani^o Voice 



EVENTS: Zuckerman, Hamlin to perform April 23 



Continued from page 1 



to see her child go to school. The film 
realistically and sensitively portrays the 
plight of rural South Alricans living with 
HIV or AIDS. 

Zulu with English subtitles. 

For more information about the 
Independent Film Series, contact Director 
of Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

Cardio Kick-Butt classes will be held 
at the YWCA on Central Avenue in Oil 
City on Saturday, April 18 and 25, from 
10-11 a.m. 

Venango Campus students are invited 
to attend for free. Please present student 
ID. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1271 . 

Natalia Zuckerman, with special guest 
Trina Hamlin, will perform on Thursday, 
April 23, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades lounge. 

The Philadelphia Daily described 
Zuckerman as a "smokey-voiced 
songstress. 



If you're a fan of Madeleine Peyroux, 
Bonnie Raitt or even Amy Winehouse, you'll 
find stuff to connect with here." 

For more information about the 
Coffeehouse Music Series, contact Director 
of Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676- 
6591, ext. 1269. 

May 

The Free Application for Federal 
Sttident Aid (FAFSA) is due Friday, May 1 . 

For more information, contact the 
Office of Financial Aid or Latrobe Bamitz at 
extension 1213. 

Miscellaneous 

The artwork of Charlie Whipple, former 
owner of the Howling Dog Gallery Cafe 
in Oil City, will be on display in Rhoades 
Center during the spring 2009 semester. 

Self Defense Classes will be held every 
Tuesday and Thursday, from 2-3 p.m., at 
Rhoades Gymnasium. 

The classes are taught by Venango 
Campus professor Paul Klenowski. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1271. 



Body Sculpting classes will be held 
every Tuesday at 11 a.m., in the Rhoades 
fitness center. Classes will be taught by 
Jane Horos of the YWCA. 

The one-hour cardio class will 
concentrate on strength training, but will 
also incorporate traditional step aerobics 
as welt as an interval training boot camp 
class. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at 814-676-6591 
extension 1271. 

Yoga classes instructed by Libby 
Jenkins will be held every Thursday, at 
11 a.m. Yoga classes will be held in the 
Rhoades fitness center. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1271 . 

Get active with Dr. Lott every Tuesday 
at 3:30 p.m. 

Various activities will take place 
throughout the semester, including biking, 
hiking, cross country skiing, cardio and 
strength training, and more. 

For more information, contact Dr. Lott 
at dlottfr?clarion.edu. 




Email the Venango toice at/v voice® clarion.edu! 



Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301 . Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232,81-1-393-2109 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 
VENANGO CAMPUS 



/. 



Your Campus, Your Paper, Your Voice 



e^TO/TQ 



/o/ 



Volume 41 , Issue 23 



Monday, April 20, 2009 




The Venango Pond is 
near completion. The 
West End Pond reno- 
vation has included 
many new features 
such as a gazebo, a 
bridge, plantings, 

lighted pathways, a 
ramp and more. The 
community project is 
a beautiful addition 
to Clarion University- 
Venango Campus. For 
more construction up- 
dates, see page 6. 



Zuckerman and Hamlin to perform on April 23 



April 

Natalia Zuckerman, with special guest 
Trina Hamlin, wiU perfonn on Thursday, 
April 23, at 7:30 p.m., at Rhoades lounge. 

The Philadelphia Daily described 
Zuckerman as a "smokey-voiced songstress. 
If you're a fan of Madeleine Peyroux, 
Bonnie Raitt or even Amy Winehouse, 
you'll find stuff to coimect with here." 

For more information about the 
Coffeehouse Music Series, contact Director 
of Student Affairs Emily Aubele at 676- 

Inside this issue... 



6591, ext. 1269. 

Cardio Kick-Butt class wiU be held at 
the YWCA on Central Avenue in Oil City 
on Saturday, April 25, irom 10-11 a.m. 
Venango Campus students are invited to 
attend for free. Please present student ID. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1271. 



May 



The Free Application for Federal 



Student Aid (FAFSA) is due Friday, May 1 . 
For more information, contact the 
Office of Financial Aid or Latrobe Bamitz 
at extension 1213. 

Miscellaneous 

The artwork of Charlie Whipple, 
former owner of the Howling Dog Gallery 
Cafe in Oil City, will be on display in 

See EVENTS on page 8 



Venango Pond photo 

Events 

Jim Kronmiller 

Job Opportunities 

Phi Kappa Phi 



..pg.l 


State & National News 


..pg.1-8 


World News 


..pg.2 


Construction Update 


..pg.3 


PTKNews 


..pg.3 


Words of Wisdom 



..pg.4 
..pg.5 
..pg.6 
..pg.7 
..pg.7 



Page 2 



Venango Voice 



Through the eyes of a photographer, Jim Kronmiller 



By Hope Lineman 

Continuing Education Coordinator 

The year is 1964 and little did James 
Kronmiller know, but his 10th birthday 
would be the turning point in his life: no 
fanfare or big parade but a simple package 
would take him on a lifelong journey. 
Just like most young boys, he had a list 
a mile long of things that he wanted that 
day. Carefully opening a small box, his 
curiosity peaked; inside, a Kodak Camera 
Kit. To most it did not seem like much, but 
to Jim, it was a way to capture the world. 
Taking pictures of anything and everything 
was exciting but it was developing the film 
that was so fascinating. The prints that he 
would so carefully develop were all but 
one inch by one inch. With still a glint of 
childish excitement, Jim said with a smile, 
"it was science and magic all rolled into 
one." At the time, it was just an awesome 
gift, but this one little gift would take hold 
of something in Jim, which would take 
him through life. Photography has been a 
hobby at times and also a way to support 
Jim"s family at other times, throughout 
his life. Even while facing death himself, 
he uses photography to capture precious 
moments of time for grieving parents. 

Jim credits his high school 



Photography and Graphic Arts teacher for 
pushing him to develop his hidden talent 
and love for the craft. While most teachers 
saw him as a student who did not try very 
hard, this teacher saw the "diamond in the 
rough," who just needed a little polishing. 
He became very active in joining clubs like 
yearbook and the school newspaper, always 
taking and developing pictures, polishing 
his technique and learning the skill of 
photography by trial and error. 

He served time in the military, and 
worked at various jobs, so it was not until 
the late 1980's that Jim decided to make his 
living doing what he does best: photography. 
He opened his own studio in Florida, which 
is where he met his wife in 1989. Though 
successful in the business, they decided to 
move to Pennsylvania in 1993 to help with 
an ailing family member 

"We moved back to care for my 
mother," Jim says solemnly, "she was 
tenninally ill with the same health issues I 
am dealing with." 

Life was dealing Jim one bad card 
after another Dealing with diabetes since 
he was in his early 20"s, he was dealt the 
ultimate blow in 2000. He was diagnosed 
with Congestive Heart Failure and Chronic 
Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), 
and given only five to eight years to live. 



He was told to enjo> what time he had 
left and to get his aftairs in order The 
National Heart Lung and Blood Institute 
register COPD as the fourth leading cause 
of death in the United States. With COPD, 
the airways or tubes that carry air in and 
out of the lungs become partially blocked. 
In Jim's case, such basic tasks as walking 
leave him gasping for air Most often, 
individuals diagnosed with COPD have 
smoked cigarettes or have had exposure to 
pollutants such as dust and strong fijmes. 
Jim, not having been exposed to these 
common causes, is perplexed at how he 
contracted COPD. 

Jim also lives daily with Congestive 
Heart Failure. Commonly referred to as 
CHF, Congestive Heart Failure is described 
by the American Heart Association, as a 
condition in which the heart cannot pump 
enough blood to the body's other organs. 
This is caused by narrowing of the arteries 
that carry blood to and away from the 
heart. First, imagine a water hose, and then 
stepping on the hose to lesson the amount 
of water that travels through that hose. This 
is what Jim's body deals with every day, not 
only with blood supply, but with air as well. 

This upbeat and jovial man - some say 

See KRONMILLER on page 6 



Email the Venango Voice at vvoice@clarion.edu! 



Student Affairs, Rhoades Center 

Clarion University-Venango Campus 

Phone: 814-676-6591 , Ext. 1271 Email: vvoicetaclarion.edu 

Adviser Editor-in-Chief Columnists 

Dr. Joan Huber Kerri Smayda Lori Secor Maria Harp 

Policies 

The Venango Voice is the student-run newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Venango Campus and the surrounding com- 
munities. The Voice is published most Fridays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity 
the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They must be received no later than noon Mondays. If the author of a 
letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. Pub 
lication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a member of the Voice staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when 
scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular 



Volume 4/ , Issue 23 



Page 3 



Several positions are available for employment 



Applicants for the maintenance 
laborer position will be responsible for on- 
going general maintenance and care of all 
buildings, equipment, program facilities 
and grounds of a fiinctioning Girl Scout 
Camp. A working knowledge of carpentry, 
plumbing, electric installation and repair, 
and the ability to operate equipment such 
as mowers, tractors, trucks, log splitters 
and hand tools is required. 

The applicant must possess a valid 
driver's license and pass Act 33/34 
clearances. Pre-employment drug 
screening tests must be passed. 

Search for this job at www. cwds. state, 
pa.us to post your updated resume. 

A well-established Erie manufacturing 
company is looking for an executive 
secretary to assist the president of the 
company. The position will interface with 
all areas, including engineering and sales. 
Applicants must have strong computer 
skills, be self-starters with strong attention 
to detail and be able to multi task. 
Applicants must be willing to work until 
the job is done. Sales background is a 
definite plus. Only those candidates who 
have worked in a manufacturing office will 



be considered. Temp to hire or direct hire 
will be considered for the right candidate. 
Applicants must submit a professional 
resume. 

To apply, visit www.cwds.state.pa.us. 

A law firm in Hermitage is currently 
seeking an experienced paralegal. Qualified 
candidates must have 3-5 years of 
experience. Experience in domestic relations 
is a huge plus. Only candidates with required 
experience will be considered. Qualified 
applicants should visit www.cwds. state, 
pa.us to apply. 

A full-time medical assistant is needed 
to help support the day to day operations at 
an Endocrinology Dept. in Hermitage and 
Greenville. This position will be working 
Monday thru Friday, various shifts between 
7 a.m. and 5 p.m. The medical assistant is 
responsible for assisting physicians with 
various aspects of patient care (including 
clerical, environmental, and organizational 
tasks) ensuring patient satisfaction. 

Responsibilities include: preparing/ 
cleaning patient rooms, setting up 
instruments and equipment; checking 
schedules and organizing patient flow; 



accompanying patients to exam/procedure 
room; collecting patient information/ 
history, taking vitals; may perform 
phlebotomy and EKG's as well as assist 
physicians with procedures; and fialfill 
clerical responsibilities which may 
include, but not limited to, obtaining lab/x- 
ray reports, completing forms, scheduling 
appointments, preparing and managing 
charts. 

Basic qualifications include: high 
school diploma or GED required; 
completion of a medical assistant 
program or equivalent hospital program 
or minimum of one year of direct patient 
care experience; and basic computer skills 
and knowledge of medical terminology, 
examination, diagnostic and treatment 
room responsibilities required. 

Licensure/certification requirements 
include: CPR certification required. 

Qualified applicants may apply now at 
www.cwds.state.pa.us. Reference job ED 
number 1047887. 

For more information or for resume 
preparation assistance, contact Mark 
Conrad, Coordinator of Career Services, at 
extensions 1373. 



Apply for Phi Kappa Phi scholarships, awards 



Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest, 
largest, and most selective honor society 
for all academic disciplines. Clarion 
University has a Phi Kappa Phi chapter. 

TTie Honor Society of Phi Kappa 
Phi's ongoing commitment to excellence 
is reflected in its scholarships and awards 
programs. More than $800,000 is awarded 
each year to outstanding Phi Kappa 
Phi members and chapters through the 
Society's various awards competitions 
outlined below: 

Fellowships - Each year Phi Kappa 
Phi awards sixty Fellowships of $5,000 
each and forty Awards of Excellence of 
$2,000 each to members entering their 
first year of graduate or professional study. 
Each chapter may select one candidate 
from among its local applicants to compete 
for Society-wide awards. 

Study Abroad Grants - Phi Kappa 
Phi Study Abroad Grants are designed to 



help support undergraduates as they seek 
knowledge and experience in their academic 
fields by studying abroad. Fifty $1,000 
grants are awarded each year. 

Emerging Scholar Awards - Emerging 
Scholar Awards recognize outstanding rising 
sophomores studying at Phi Kappa Phi 
member institutions. Each year. Phi Kappa 
Phi grants sixty awards in the amount of 
$250 to qualilying students. 

Love of Learning Awards - Love 
of Learning Awards help fund post- 
baccalaureate studies and/or career 
development for active Phi Kappa Phi 
members to include, but not be limited to, 
graduate or professional studies, doctoral 
dissertations, continuing education, career 
development, travel related to teaching/ 
studies. Recipients of the Fellowship are not 
eligible to apply. Fifty awards, up to $500 
each, are awarded. 

Literacy Grants - The Literacy Grants 



program was initiated in 2003 to mobilize 
members and resources of Phi Kappa Phi 
and the higher education community to 
champion literacy initiatives. Grants of up 
to $2,500 are available to Phi Kappa Phi 
chapters and individual members to fund 
ongoing literacy projects or create new 
initiatives. 

Phi Kappa Phi Scholar & Artist 
Awards - The Phi Kappa Phi Scholar 
and Artist Award honor those individuals 
who demonstrate the ideals of the Society 
through their activities, achievements, 
and scholarship. Each recipient receives 
a $5,000 honorarium, a one-year active 
membership, a recognition certificate, and 
the opportunity to present their work at the 
Society's triennial convention. 

To access additional information about 
each award and to view current and past 
recipients, please visit PhiKappaPhi.org 
and click the Scholarships and Awards tab. 



Page 4 



Venaiii>o Voice 



State 



N.W. Pa. amusement park to reopen after 2 years 



CONNEAUT LAKE, Pa. (AP) — A debt- 
ridden amusement park in northwestern 
Pennsylvania will reopen on Memorial Day 
weekend after being dormant for the last 
two summers. 

The 117-year-old Conneaut (KAW- 
nee-awt) Lake Park has been closed 



because of its heavy debt load, but the public 
trustees who run it say they have a lease with 
a vendor who will operate 90 percent of the 
park's rides. 

The park's main attraction, the Blue 
Streak roller coaster, will not open until at 
least next year, however. 



The coaster has now gone without 
offseason maintenance for three years. Park 
officials say they need to determine how 
much it will cost to ensure the coaster is 
safe before deciding when it will reopen. 

The park's total debt stands at about 
$2.4 million. 



National 



CIA documents shine light on secretive Air America 



DALLAS (AP) — Former naval aviator 
Don Boecker isn't too proud to say he was 
scared out of his wits on that July 1965 day 
in Laos when he dangled by one arm from 
a helicopter while enemy soldiers took aim 
below. 

Boecker had spent the longest night of 
his life in the thick jungle, evading capture 
and certain execution while awaiting 
rescue. The Navy aviator had ejected after 
a bomb he intended to drop on the Ho Chi 
Minh trail exploded prematurely. 

His rescuers that day, however, weren't 
from the American military, who couldn't 
be caught conducting a secret bombing 
campaign in Laos. 

They were civilian employees of Air 
America, an ostensibly private airline 
essentially owned and operated by the CIA. 

Boecker, now a 7 1 -year-old retired rear 
admiral, plans to tell the story on Saturday 
at a symposium intended to give a fuller 
account of an important outfit that alumni 
say is still misunderstood by the American 
public. 

The University of Texas at Dallas event 
coincides with the CIA's release of about 
10,000 previously classified Air America 
records, which will become part of the school 
library's extensive aviation collection. TTie 
CIA declassified the documents following a 
Freedom of Information Act request by UT- 
Dallas. 

"These Air America documents 



are essential to understanding a large 
untold history of America's involvement 
in Southeast Asia," said Paul Oelkrug, a 
coordinator at UT-Dallas' special collections 
department. He said they speak to "the covert 
side ofthe Cold War." 

The records consist mainly of firsthand 
accounts of Air America missions and 
commendation letters from government 
officials, said Timothy N. Castle, a historian 
at the CIA's Center for the Study of 
Intelligence. 

Included are accounts of the chaotic 
evacuation after the fall of Saigon in 1975, 
the investigation into a mysterious 1964 
plane crash apparently caused by sabotage, 
and a letter from President Richard Nixon 
commending employees for their bravery in 
Laos. 

More documents detail the rescue of 
the wounded from a mountainous Air Force 
radar station in Laos known as Lima Site 85, 
where a North Vietnamese raid in 1 968 killed 
1 1 Americans. It was the largest single loss 
of Air Force personnel on the ground during 
the Vietnam War, Castle said. The survivors 
were rescued by Air America. 

Such operations were the norm for 
Air America pilots, and the inspiration for 
the title of the symposium: "Air America: 
Upholding the Airmen's Bond." Between 
1964-65, Air America personnel rescued 21 
downed American pilots. Detailed records 
weren't kept after that, but "we know there 



were scores and scores more (rescues) 
through the years," Castle said. 

"That's the airman's bond. There is 
another airman who is down. Everything 
stops until you try to rescue them, because 
if it were you, you knew they would do it 
for you, too." 

Air America's public face was that of 
a passenger and cargo airline that operated 
in sometimes dangerous places. It formed 
after World War II under the name Civil 
Air Transport, and did contract work for the 
Chinese Nationalists. 

Control of Air America eventually 
shifted to the CL^, which set up shell 
companies to disguise its true ownership. 
Planes kept flying scheduled passenger 
flights out of Taiwan, but they also began 
flying covert missions in Laos and South 
Vietnam to supply anti-communist 
forces. Air America also had numerous 
government contracts, and was involved in 
humanitarian work though a deal with the 
State Department. 

One of Air America's finest — and 
most iconic — moments was evacuating 
American and Vieteamese civilians after 
Saigon fell in 1975. A famous photograph 
shows an Air America helicopter atop an 
apaitment building as a long line of people 
wait to board it. 

Brian K. Johnson, a former Air America 

See NATIONAL on page 5 



Volume 41 .Issue 23 Page 5 

World 

Italy earthquake reconstruction will cost billions 

ROME {PiP) — The region in central Italy The Abruzzo earthquake displaced Berlusconi's conservative government 

ravaged by an earthquake more than a week 55,000 people — including 33,000 who are is expected to approve specially tailored 

ago will need at least €12 billion (about $16 living in the tent camps set up across the recovery measures, which reports say could 

billion) for rebuilding, the countr}"s interior region. include new taxes to help the rebuilding 

minister said. Officials say they aim to have people effort. 

As some children started going back out of the tent cities by winter, which is So far, it has approved subsidies for 

to school, experts were assessing the frigid in the mountainous Abruzzo region, families and business owners, and blocked 

damage at buildings that were still standing. Not all of the 55,000 are homeless — many payments on mortgages and loans until the 

Prosecutors were investigating alleged left their homes out of fear amid continuing end of the year. 

shodd>' construction in the area. aftershocks, which are still being felt by the Berlusconi, who has visited the quake- 
Interior Minister Roberto Maroni population. hit area, is expected to lead a symbolic 
said the government would consult with "'Many families will be able to go Cabinet meeting in L'Aquila next week — a 
local administrators, including opposition back once they have been reassured," said way to signal the government's continuing 
officials, while it seeks resources to rebuild Agostino Miozzo of the Civil Protection commitment. The premier held a Cabinet 
the Abruzzo region. Maroni provided the Department. meeting in Naples at the height of the 
estimate late Tuesday on state television. "By the end of October, we have to garbage collection crisis last year. 

The 6.3-magnirude quake that struck do everything possible so that people who Meanwhile, prosecutors in L'Aquila 

on April 6 killed 294 people. It leveled or today live in tent camps are given a different have opened an investigation into allegedly 

damaged tens of thousands of homes and solution," Miozzo said. Possible solutions shoddy construction practices in the area, 

other buildings. include putting up families in buildings that a factor blamed for many of the deaths in 

Of the 1,467 buildings checked as of were empty before the quake or building the temblor. Experts were looking at the 

Monday, 53 percent were deemed habitable, prefab homes, he said. materials and projects used in the collapsed 

while the rest had various degrees of Meanwhile, some children in the buildings. 

damage that made them at least temporarily quake zone began returning to school on "Buildings that were supposed to be 

uninhabitable, the Civil Protection Wednesday, some attending classes in the cement, modem, anti-seismic ones and 

Department said. tent camps where they now live. so on, have collapsed miserably," chief 

Local officials said the figure estimated "Welcome back everybody!" read a sign L'Aquila prosecutor Alfredo Rossini said, 

by Maroni was credible. The cost of at the makeshift classroom in a tent camp in He blamed those responsible for "causing 

reconstruction after the last major quake in L'Aquila. Children of mixed age were given irmocent deaths." 

Italy, in 1997, was €8 billion for the hardest- pens and sheets of papers to draw and do The prosecutors vowed to remain 

hit Umbria region, though so far only €5.3 math. vigilant during the reconstruction to ensure 

billion has been spent, local officials said. Other students were sent to attend class "^w homes are up to code and prevent 

Another €4 billion was needed in the nearby in a nearby region not touched by the quake, '^filtration by organized crime in building 

Marche region, also damaged by the quake. In the coming days, Premier Silvio ^ ^ 

NATIONAL: Air America crews rescued personnel 

Continued from page 4 heroism, due largely to the 1990 movie "Air conftision, he added. 

America," starring Mel Gibson and Robert UT-Dallas was chosen by the Air 

helicopter pilot and past president of the Downey Jr. The film depicts the company America alumni group as the site of a 

Air America Association, said flight crews as corrupt and its pilots as drug runners. It Vietnam Wall-style plaque listing the names 

would race to be the first to pick up downed remains a sensitive topic among former of the roughly 240 fallen employees, 
military personnel. These untold stories of employees. "Most people don't even know it 

the Vietnam War, he said, could help change "We have done everything we can to occurred. It was a secret society," said 

Air America's image. change that perception, and I think we are Boecker. "They flew in all sorts of danger 

Johnson laments that the perception getting there," Johnson said. The liberal Air ... flying every day in terrible wartime 

of Air America is more about heroin than America talk radio network brought new conditions. They did a beautiful job." 



Page 6 



Venango Voice 



Construction updates continue for suites, pond 



Construction continues at Clarion 
University -Venango Campus. 

At the residence suites, framing, 
blocking and sprinkler installation are 
complete for both buildings with window 
installation and roof complete on building 
four. Contractors are finishing the roofing 
and moving on to soffit and fascia, 
landings, steps, doors and concrete work on 



the outside and dr>^all on the inside. The 
contractor is on track for its scheduled 
opening in August. 

At the Venango Pond, the pond and 
associated dam are working as designed, 
with finishing touches awaited in the near 
fijture. 

At the Rhoades Locker Room, the 
last shipment of glazed block has arrived. 



allowing final installation and project 
completion. The g>'m is available for events. 
More information about construction 
can be found in the minutes of the regular 
meetings of the Facilities Planning 
Committee and Parking Committee at; 
Facilities Planning http://www.clarion. 
edu/50397/?draft-preview=true, and 

Parking http;//www.clarion.edu/57809/. 



KRONMILLER: He teaches children value of education 



Continued from page 2 

he resembles Santa Claus - is not about to 
sit around and wait for the inevitable. Jim 
values his family and thinks foremost of 
them. He finds himself battling with his 
children, just as most parents do, about 
the importance of school and getting an 
education. Jim has decided (what better 
time than the present) to be the example 
for his sons, now ages 13, 16, and 20. 

"I want my children to understand the 
value and importance of education. It will 
open up many doors of opportunity' for 
them," Jim sa>s firmly. 

He had always wanted to go to college, 
but the timing just never seemed to be right. 
He decided to enroll at the local university 
and pursue getting a degree. Focused on a 
liberal arts degree, and maintaining a 3.4 
grade point average, he is discovering the 
benefits of going to school. First, he is 
teaching his sons the valuable lesson that 
"you are never too old to learn" and, if he 
can do it, so can they. Secondly, he has also 
had several strokes that have compounded 
his health issues. Each time these mini 
strokes occur, they leave small lesions on 
his brain, making comprehension and the 
ability to focus extremely difficult and 
challenging. He feels that he is aiding his 
memory and health by continually reading 
and learning. 

"I feel that I am able to focus better 
and to stay on task when I am continually 
pushing myself to learn," Jim declares 
confidently. "I see the results in simple, 
everyday tasks in my life. Now when I 
go to the kitchen I remember what I went 



there for, in the first place." 

Besides his children, Jim wants to 
help his wife. Wanting to leave her with a 
business that will continue to support her, 
he decided that they can be successfijl in a 
field that they both are passionate about - 
photography. Jim is not only teaching his 
wife the ins and outs of running a business, 
but the skill of photography. It is something 
that they do to spend time together and that 
they both enjoy. Just over a year ago, they 
opened up their very own photography 
studio, joining many local artists in the Oil 
City Arts Revitalization. 

Jim shyly admitted, "I know 1 will not 
live forever, so I am preparing Jessica to be 
able to support herself when I am gone." 

They can capture the beauty of the 
world, memories for themselves and for 
others, one photograph at a time. 

Seeing Jim around campus and town, 
students and people passing by wonder what 
this man is all about, carrying an oxygen 
tank with him at all times on one shoulder 
and a backpack full of books on the other. 
At first they may have feelings of sympathy 
and even questions that no one dares to ask, 
but it is only minutes before they no longer 
see the surface of this gentleman, until they 
discover his huge heart of gold. 

The one thing that takes your breath 
away is his sharing of a volunteer project 
that he is most passionate about. He belongs 
to "Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep," which 
is an international group of volunteer 
professional photographers who provide 
infant remembrance, heirloom photography 
for grieving parents. 

The philosophy of this organization 



is that "there is no foot too small that it 
cannot leave an imprint on this world." The 
photographers involved in this organization 
donate their time and talent to families who 
are experiencing the greatest joy in life - 
birth - and the devastation of loss - death - 
often times only having hours or a few days 
to connect with their babies. Jim, along 
with many photographers belonging to this 
organization, captures powerful images of 
love and devotion during this small frame 
of time. 

Here he is, faced with a terminal illness, 
facing death himself, yet he steps completely 
around that threat, goes to college, opens 
a photography studio, volunteers his 
time as part of an international group of 
photographers, and gives of himself so 
freely. Although, at times he looks a little 
tired, he still has that infectious smile and 
personality. How does he do it? 

"1 don't want to just get by" he says, "I 
want to beat the odds." 

There must be someone that he looks 
up to or who encourages him. With a soft 
voice, he responds that there is one person 
who he regards with utmost respect, his 
friend Dr. John Karian, who is a world- 
class nature photographer as well as a 
neurosurgeon. 

"John has mentored me and supported 
me in not only my professional work but 
my scholastic endeavors and personal life. 
He even came to the hospital during my last 
admission and urged me to fight and not let 

go" 

According to Joann Wheeler, who 

See KRONMILLER on page 8 



Volume 41 . Issue 23 



Page 7 




The final two build- 
ings of the Clarion 
University -Venango 
Campus Student 
Apartment Com- 
plex are projected 
to be completed in 
August. The new 
three-story Leader- 
ship Hall and the 
new two-story Brad- 
ford George Car- 
mack Barnes Hall 
are the most recent 
additions to join Mi- 
chael F. and Joyce 
I. Hughes Hall, Ed- 
ward V. and Jesse 
L. Peters Hall, and 
Elizabeth S. Black 
Hall. 



Phi Theta Kappa is collecting books, donations 



Phi Theta Kappa is collecting 
textbooks to send to Better World Books. 
The money received by BWB is sent to 
the Room to Read Program, which helps 
bring books to underprivileged countries. 
Please consider donating your unwanted 
textbooks at the end of the term. 

Donation boxes are available in 
Rhoades Center and in the 2nd floor lobby 
of Montgomery Hall from April 20 through 
May 1. 



Each year Phi Theta Kappa collects 
books and food items to donate to a local 
group. This year, we have chosen St. 
Benedicts in Oil City and the Venango 
County Humane Society. 

We will be collecting children's books 
for St. Benedicts and pet supplies for 
the Humane Society (a list of requested 
pet items will be on the donation bins). 
Bins will be placed in Rhoades, Frame, 
and Montgomery from April 20 through 
graduation. 



Please bring an item or two to donate to 
these organizations. 

A recipient of a gift card from the 
Phi Theta Kappa Faculty and Staff 
Appreciation Luncheon was omitted from 
the last issue of the Voice. Patty Shontz 
received a Country Fair gift card, which 
was donated by SPSEA. 

Phi Theta Kappa members thank all of 
the clubs, again, who donated gift cards. 



Words of Wisdom 

'It isn 't what you have, or who you are, or where you are, or 

what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. 

It is what you think about. ' 

-Dale Carnegie 




Page 8 



Venango Voice 



EVENTS: Self defense classes are held Tue, Thurs 



Continued from page 1 



Rhoades Center during the spring 2009 
semester. 

Self Defense Classes will be held 
everj' Tuesday and Thursday, from 2-3 
p.m., at Rhoades Gymnasium. The classes 
are taught by Venango Campus professor 
Paul Klenowski. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1 271 . 



Body Sculpting classes will be held 
every Tuesday at 1 1 a.m., in the Rhoades 
fitness center. 

Classes will be taught by Jane Horos of 
the YWCA. 

The one-hour cardio class will 
concentrate on strength training, but will 
also incorporate traditional step aerobics as 
well as an interval training boot camp class. 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1271 . 

Yoga classes instructed by Libby Jenkins 
will be held every TTiursday, at 1 1 a.m. Yoga 



classes will be held in the Rhoades fitness 
center 

For more information, contact the 
Student Affairs Office at extension 1271 . 

Get active with Dr. Lott every Tuesday 
at 3:30 p.m. 

Various activities will take place 
throughout the semester, including biking, 
hiking, cross country' skiing, cardio and 
strength training, and more. 

For more information, contact Dr Lott 
at dlott(a)clarion.edu. 



KRONMILLER: Jim frequently helps other students 



Continued from page 6 



heads the local Arts Revitalization, Jim 
is making a difference in the community 
and to those who he encounters on a daily 
basis. 

"It seems no matter where I go in 
the community; Jim is there, helping and 
volunteerine his time." 



LaTrobe Bamitz, Coordinator of 
Admissions at Clarion University-Venango 
Campus, commented that "students look up 
to Jim and feel comfortable asking him for 
help. He is frequently seen helping other 
students." 

Maybe this is perhaps his secret to fully 
living: giving and volunteering, expecting 
nothing in return. 

How can Jim not focus on dying? He 



has surpassed his life expectancy already. 
How can he not be focused on the fact that 
he is living on borrowed time? 

Put simply and honestly from Jim: he 
is too busy just living, not only physically 
but through the lens of his camera. 

He is taking in the beauty of this world, 
capturing it on film and sharing it with all 
who care to view the world through the 
eyes of a photographer. 




Keeping Us Legal 

The Venango Voice is published periodically by the students of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Venango Campus, 1801 W. First Street, Oil City, PA, 16301 . Articles in 
the Venango Voice reflect the beliefs and/or the research of individual authors. They 
are not necessarily the philosophy or views of the students, faculty, or staff of Clarion 
Llniversity of Pennsylvania. Clarion University is committed to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action for all people involved in its educational programs, activities, and 
employment. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social 
Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA, 16214-1232, 814-393-2109. 




CLARION 

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FOR USE IN LIBRARY QT^' 



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