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Full text of "Victory: History of the 805th Pioneer Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces"

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History of the 

805th Pioneer Infantry 

American Expeditionary 
Forces 



By Major Paul S. Bliss 

With Histories of Organizations within the Regiment by 
their Officers and Enlisted Men 



COPnUGRT, 1919, BT FAUL •. BUSS 
ST. PAUL. UlNN. 



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COLONEL CHAUNCEY BENTON HUMPHREY 

Commanding Officer 805th 

Pioneer Infantry 



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^^nHIS Book is dedicated 
^^^ to tke Enlisted Men of 
tke 8o5tK Pioneer Infantry, 
faitkful participants in tke 
Great War. Heeding tke call 
of tke nation, tke^) ckeerfuUj) 
went wkere dutp called, per- 
forming \?itk a wkole keart tke 
difpcult tasks set tkem, and so 
conducting tkemselves tkat 
tkey won tke reputation of 
being tke most soldierly) col- 
ored regiment in tke Army 
of tke United States. 



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^^^=^HIS kistory of tke 
i\J 805tli Pioneer In- 
^^ fantry kad its 
Degmning at firest.^ i^nen 
almost all tke men and 
officers subscribed to a 
fund for its publication. 
Major Paul S. Bliss, 
Adjutant, ivas appointed 
Historian by Colonel 
G. B. Humpbrey and ivas 
autborized to proceed witb 
tne publication of tne 
volume. Company officers 
co-operated generously, and 
provided kistories of tbeir 
organizations *and rosters. 
It IS boped tbat it ivill 
meet ivitb tbe approval of 
all members of tbe regiment. 



October, 1919 



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PAGE 

History of the Regiment 11 

Inspection by General Pershing 43 

Roster of Officers 46 

The Bearcat Chateau 49 

Where the Regiment Got its Men 54 

Our Right to the Ribbon 55 

From the Correspondence Files 57 

Headquarters Company 61 

Supply Company 69 

Medical Detachment 75 

Company "A" 87 

Company "B" 93 

Company "C" 101 

Company "D" 107 

Company "E" 115 

Company "F" 123 - 

Company "G" 133 

Company "H" 141 

Company "I" 147 

Company "K" 157 

Company "L" 169 

Company "M" 179 

Motor Truck Detachment 185 

First Battalion 189 

Second Battalion 193 

Third Battalion 195 

Presenting "Billy" Higgins 203 

Bearcat Baseball Team 205 

Regimental Band 207 

War Verses 211 

Last Official Act 222 

Individual Biography 224 



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rVT. WIl^^ON JACKSON . , Supph Cotnp^itf 


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PVT. WILL BREWSTER . . 


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PVT, ?JED BKO<>KS . . . 


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PVT COXY CHERRY . . . 


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Coirtpun^ "B" 


PVT, PAUL DEARBO>E . . , 


CooLpony "B" 


PVT. ALBERT O. HELENCAMP 


Lafnonnr "B" 


PVT. CHARLIE HiGGlNflOTHAM Company "J" 


PVT, WALTER MOUSt , . . 


Ctrmpany "S" 


PVT. HENRY W. 10H\S0N . 


Company "fl" 


PVT, TOM MILAM . . , 


Company "3" 


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Company "B"* 


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Company "M" 


PVT. VA?H WILEY , . . . 


Company "'B" 


PVT. LE\1 H. WOODiS . . 


Ca/npaity ^'B*' 


PVT. CHARLEY flLAlR . . 


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PVT. WILLIS UALES . . . 


Compunf "L" 


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ACTING under authority conferred by Sections 2, 8, and 9 of the Act of Con- 
^ gress, "To authorize the President to increase temporarily the Military Es- 
tablishment of the United States," approved May 18, 1917, President Wilson directed 
May 23, 1918, the organization of eight colored infantry regiments. Two of these 
were ordered to be raised and equipped at Camp Funston, Kan., in a War De- 
partment letter dated June 27, 1918, which follows: 

WAR DEPARTMENT 
The Adjutant GeneraTs Office, 

Washington, June 27, 1918 
From: The Adjutant General of the Army. 
To: The Commanding General, Camp Funston, Kansas. 

Subject: Numerical designations and location of eight colored infantry Regi- 
ments directed organized as National Army Camps. 
1. You are informed that the colored Infantry Regiments directed organized 
at the following Camps, in a letter from the Adjutant General dated May 23rd, 
1918, are numerically designated as listed below: 
Camp Funston, 805th Infantry, National Army, (Colored) 
Camp Funston, 806th Infantry, National Army, (Colored) 

By order of the Secretary of War. 
(Signed) Roy A. Hill, 

Adjutant General. 

General Leonard Wood, commanding at Camp Funston, lost no time in getting 
at his task. He named Lieut. Colonel Lawrence P. Butler, of the 164th Depot 
Brigade, as commanding officer of the 805th Infantry, and the Depot Brigade under 
Par. 8, S. 0. 165, dated July 5, ordered five captains, four first lieutenants and thirty- 
one second lieutenants to report to Colonel Butler for duty. 

Three officers from the Regular Army were assigned under separate special 
orders, and on July 8 the first written order that passed over the Adjutant's 
desk made its appearance. It was issued at Headquarters, Detention Camp No. 2, 
Camp Funston, Kan., a military camp of which Colonel Butler had not yet been 
relieved of command, and made the following assignments: 



Field Officers 
Lieut. Col. L. P. Butler, Commanding. 
Major A. C. Evans, 1st Battalion. 
Major J. E. Creed, 2nd Battalion. 
Major A. D. Cowley, 3rd Battalion. 



Adjutant 
Captain Paul S. Bliss. 

Personnel Adjutant 
1st Lieut. Theodore M. Gleason. 



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Headquarters Company 

2nd Lieut. Harold E. Johnson. 
2nd Lieut. Raymond F. Olinger. 

Supply Company 

2nd Lieut. Warren G. Cook. 
2nd Lieut. W. S. McFarland. 
2nd Lieut. G. W. SteagalL 

First Battalion 
Company **A** 
Captain Onan C. Adkins. 
2nd Lieut. W. W. Locke. 

Company "B" 
2nd Lieut. Carl F. Cranz. 
2nd Lieut. Malcolm R. Ingraham 
2nd Lieut. George A. Kingsley. 

Company **C" 
Ist Lieut. Harry V. Replogle. 
2nd Lieut. Walden P. Hobbs. 

Company "D" 
2nd Lieut. O. F. Ireland. 
2nd Lieut. L P. Lengendre. 



Machine Gun Company 

Captain F. D. Moses. 
2nd Lieut. M. P Lewis. 
2nd Lieut. James Keeble, Jr. 
2nd Lieut. Frank T. Knox. 



Second Battalion 

Company "E** 

2nd Lieut. William H. Hubbard. 
2nd Lieut. Orley E. Ooley 

Company "F" 

2nd Lieut. Edward J. Puryear. 
2nd Lieut. W. H. Leatherwood. 

Company "C" 

Ist Lieut. George M. Bragan. 
2nd Lieut. Albin DeBerry. 
2nd Lieut. James H. Lansing. 

Company "IT* 

Captain 0. R. Reed. 

2nd. Lieut. Louis C. Henin. 



Company *7" 
1st Lieut. H. C Carpenter. 
2nd Lieut. Frederick H Jones. 
2nd Lieut. Harold L, Hemstreet. 

Company *'L" 
2nd Lieut. James M. Moore. 
2nd Lieut. Sidney B. Outlaw 



Third Battalion 

Company "K" 
Captain A. C. Woodruff. 
2nd Lieut. Robert E. Maris. 
2nd Lieut. Eklgar D. Johnson. 

Company "^' 
2nd Lieut. Charles Y. Martin. 
2nd Lieut. Henry H. Middleton. 



The order also stated that the work to be taken up during the remainder of 
the regiment's stay at Detention Camp would be target practice — special course 
"C," W. D., changes No. 20, which would be completed by Saturday night, July 13. 
This, in itself, was a seemingly impossible task. Already, however, it was known that 
the 805th Infantry, and its sister, the 806th, would be "rushed out" with all pos- 
sible dispatch. 

The officers named were engaged with colored provisional companies from which 
the enlisted men of the new regiment were to be drawn. They were to remain with 
those organizations but were to turn over company funds to other officers who were 
to relieve them. 

It was a tremendous task they had to do. It involved the preparation of innumer- 
able lists and constant checking of records. The heat, winds, and rain, not to 
mention the dust, made work in pyramidal tent orderly rooms difficult. Many 
candle lights flickered until far into the night. But no one complained: it was a 
furious pace, but the need was great. 

Meanwhile, barracks in Camp Funston itself, at the eastern end of the cantonment 
formerly occupied by the 92nd Division, had been assigned, and the Adjutant had 
arranged for the remodeling of one of the office buildings, and had assigned 
barracks to the various companies. This was not without its difficulties, for an 
Engineer Service Battalion, whose orders to move were delayed in coming, was 
in place. 



Pate 12 



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THE MEUSE-ARGONNE AREA, FRANCE 



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On July 12 the following memorandum was issued: 

The 805th Infantry will march to iu quarters in the 18th and 19th Units, 
Camp Funston, Kansas, Monday, July 15, at 6:30 a. m. Order of march: 
1st Bn., 3rcl Bn., 2ncl Bn. The Headquarters Company will be attached to the 
Ist Bn.; M. G. Co. to Srd Bn.; Supply Co. to 2nd Bn. 

The leading company will set a pace of 2\^ miles per 50 minutes. First halt 

end of first 30 minutes for 15 minutes; thereafter every 50 minutes for 10 minutes. 

All officers of the 805th Infantry who are now in the 2nd Prov. Regt. 

have been ordered to report at Hdq., 1st Prov. Regt. at 4:30 A. m., Monday, 

July 15. 

Officers* messes will be by battalion, and Headquarters.: 1st Bn. Mess, Bldg. 
1806; 2nd Battalion Mess, Bldg. 1805; 3rd. Bn. Mess, Bldg. 1904; Headquarters 
Mess, in which officers of the Headquarters Co., M. G. Co., and Supply Co., 
will participate, Bldg, 1902. 

Officers receiving service records will examine them prior to Sunday night and 
see that they contain all the information necessary. 

By order of Lieutenant Colonel Butler: 

Paul S. Buss, 
Captain Infantry, R. C. 
Adjutant. 
Headed by Colonel Butler and his adjutant, both horsed, the column moved out 
as scheduled and reached Funston in time for dinner, which had been prepared by 
cooks from each company sent in two days ahead. There were .1,100 enlisted men 
in the organization at the time. They came in under Par. 3, S. 0. 169 Headquarters, 
164th Depot Brigade, dated July 9. Three hundred of these were attached and were 
transferred late in July to an organization called the "August Automatic Replace- 
ment Draft." 

Colonel Butler immediately inaugurated an intensive "I. D. R." program, which 
kept his officers and men well occupied. He began an equitation class which all 
officers entitled to mounts gladly attended. As he had been a cavalry officer, and 
always a polo player, his methods of instruction were careful, yet sure, and rapid 
progiess was made. 

Meantime copies of an extract of Par. 205, S. 0. 143, War Department, dated 
June 25, had been received. They read as follows: 

Colonel Chauncey B. Humphrey, Infantry, is relieved from his present assign- 
ment at Panama Canal Zone and will proceed to Camp Funston, Fort Riley, 
Kan., reporting upon his arrival for duty with a colored infantry regiment. 
Colonel Humphrey had been assigned to the 805th Infantry by General Wood. 
The regiment awaited his coming with interest. He arrived July 23, tanned with 
three years in the tropics, a tall, powerfully built officer, light on his feet as a cat, 
giving the impression of tremendous nervous energy. 

All that he asked of his officers and men was — perfection. His expression, 
**Why not Excellent?", which often appeared on his memoranda to company of- 
ficers, was the hammer with which he drove home his points. He asked that bricks 
be made — and somehow the straw was found. 

In his first talk to his men he told them he wanted them to be "Bearcats." 
It was a name that stuck. The regiment was known in Funston as the "Bearcat" 
Regiment. 

A white dog, woolly, well-bred, a fighter from the drop of the hat, strayed into 
camp — "Bearcat," that was his name from the start. He looked the part. Pvt. 
Parks, later corporal, the Colonel's orderly, took charge of him. "Bearcat" was and 
is the regimental mascot. On being "demobilized" he went to live with Colonel 
Humphrey's family in New York. 

Headquarters was a busy place. The myriad details connected with insurance, 
allotments, service records, equipment, training, rationing, played their now forgotten 
part. 

The Depot Brigade was under orders to turn over 1,500 more men. It was 
preparing to fill the officer personnel to requirements. 



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THE BOSS OF THE 'BEAROCTS" 

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COUC. B, HUMPHREY 

»E WAS ALWAYS 'ON T^tC JOB" 



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The "Daily Bulletin" which was published at 11 A. M. each day meant work 
in every paragraph. The heat was terrific. Dust storms came up in three minutes 
and buried papers and books, filled eyes and noses with scorching particles. 
There came the following telegram: 

Washington, D. C, 4 p. m., July 27, 1918. 
Commanding General, 

Camp Funston, Kansas: 
Direct Eight Hundred Fifth and Eight Hundred Sixth Infantry now organizing your 
camp under series A Tables of Organization to organize under Table One 
Hundred Three Tables of Organization series B March 27 nineteen hundred 
eighteen and designate regiments as Eight Hundred and Fifth and Eight Hundred 
and Sixth Pioneer Infantry, respectively. 

McCain, 405 pm. 

"Pioneer" — the word was fraught with meaning. Conversation was plentiful. 
It meant immediate change. The tables referred to showed no machine gim com- 
pany. Special Order 34, Par. 1 and 2, Hq. 805th Pioneer Infantry, was the result: 
it transferred the officers and men of this company, of which Captain F. D. Moses 
was commander, to other organizations within the regiment. 

Eight more pioneer infantry regiments were to be organized — two, the 815th and 
816th, at Camp Funston. A letter from the Adjutant General of the Army so ordered. 

Promotions, changes followed in due course. The eagles replaced the silver leaf 
on Colonel Butler's shoulders, and he was informed that he would command the 
815th; Major Evans was transferred to the same organization, under a War Depart- 
ment order dated August 12. 

The Depot Brigade assigned 50 officers; revoked the order, and on August 8, 
under Par. 17, S. 0. 217, Hq. Camp Funston, Kan., 8 captains, 36 first lieutenants, 
and 7 second lieutenants came to share the fortunes of the "Bearcat" Pioneers. 
The 806th was similarly provided. The captains were: Henry B. Abbett, J. W. 
Finley, James R. McCabe, George B. Otte, Ewart W. Dick, Thomas A. Immell, 
Thomas R. Lindsey, and Herbert M. Nelson. 

Colonel Humphrey drew up a concise weekly program of instruction which was 
issued on the regimental mimeograph machine. 

The enlisted strength of the command was constantly being augmented. A 
Depot Brigade order of July 30 added 1,256 men. Approximately the same number 
was added under an order dated August 15. 

From the 25th Infantry, then in Hawaii, came 25 enlisted Regulars. 

Specialists came in as follows: 

38 mechanics and motor drivers from Training Detachment, Prairie View, Tex. 
20 horse shoers and men chiefly skilled in care of horses, from Training Detach- 
ment, Howard University, Washington, D. C. 

The regulars and specialists were distributed among the companies except that 
the Supply Company drew all but one from the Tuskegee Detachment, and that the 
Headquarters and Supply Companies absorbed most of the mechanics and motor men. 

Five days before we left Camp Funston the Depot Brigade added 123 more men. 

These orders totalled 3,526 men, but the regiment entrained with an enlisted 
strength of 3,226 and 99 officers. The tables called for 3,450 men and 101 officers. 
The losses are accounted for chiefly by transfers of enlisted men because of physical 
disability. 

There are many pleasant memories of August. 

General Wood called for a regimental review daily on the parade ground op- 
posite the Zone. The 805th passed the stand on several occasions, and made an 
excellent showing. Colonel Humphrey had obtained some additional mounts, superb 
animals from the Mounted Service School at Fort Riley. 

Boxing had been taken up by the officers and men. The equitation class con- 
tinued. Lieut. Malcolm R. Ingraham was made athletic officer and games were 



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A* It Looked to tbe Aviator 



THE FAMOVyS ARGONNE FOREST FRANCE 

WhERC 25.000 AMERICANS LOST TMEIR LIVES 



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plentiful. The officers had a game the day Colonel Humphrey reported, and one or 
two more were played. Colonel Humphrey was interested in tennis. Games were 
frequent. A tournament was started but was not concluded. 

Several quartets were organized. The men sang in their barracks. Bugler Sam 
Cobb from the 25th Infantry took the buglers in hand. 

Musical instruments had been requisitioned but did not come until after the 
regiment was gone. An effort was made to enlist an entire band but was fruitless. 
Pvt. Billy Higgins, formerly a professional actor, was transferred to the organ- 
ization from the Depot Brigade and became famous over night. 

The entire regiment attended a vaudeville show at the Liberty theatre, given 
by Higgins and a large assemblage of assistants. It was a great success and established 
the Regimental Fund. 

The Y. M. C. A. and Knights of Columbus secretaries did notably acceptable 
work among the men. 

A regimental exchange had been opened with Lieut. M. P. Lewis in charge. 
It was a success. One week of August brought a wind so scorching that to face it 
was like standing before a smelter door. It shriveled Kansas corn, turning it from 
green to brown over night. Lieut. Lewis' soft drink emporium prospered. 

Work at Regimental, Battalion, and Company Headquarters rarely stopped 
before midnight. 

Drilling went on daily, and Colonel Humphrey usually conducted a tactical march 
Saturday morning. One of the last weeks was spent at the range "firing" those 
who had not yet sent bullet to target with the new "Enfield." 

At 9 P. M., Saturday, August 24, 1918, it was learned on a "tip" from the trans- 
portation department of the Union Pacific that trains for movement of the 805th 
Pioneer Infantry were set for Monday, August 26. Camp Funston issued the follow- 
ing the next day: 

Headquarters, Camp Funston, Kansas 

August 25, 1918. 
Special Orders, No. 234. 

EXTRACT 

Par. 14, Pursuant to telegraphic instructions from the Adjutant General 
of the Army, dated August 24, 1918, 805th Pioneer Infantry (colored), consisting 
of approximately ninety-four (94) officers and three thousand three hundred 
eighteen men, (Lionel Chauncey B. Humphrey, National Army, Commanding, will 
proceed without delay to Camp Upton, New York, upon arrival reporting to 
Commanding Officer at that place. 

The Quartermaster Corps will furnish the necessary transportation and travel 
rations at the prescribed rate for the necessary number of days; also funds for 
the purchase of liquid coffee at the rate of 21 cents per man per day for 
the necessary number of days. 

The travel directed is necessary in the military service. 

By conmiand of Major General Wood: 
S. M. Williams^ 
Major, General Staff, 

Executive Officer, 

Early movement had been expected in view of a coded telegram received at Camp 
Funston Headquarters, August 6, signed "McCain," which ordered the 805th and 
the 806th Pioneer Infantry to prepare "at the earliest practicable." 

But it must be admitted that the following telegram, which precipitated mat- 
ters, was sudden: 

IHD GE 220 Govt. Rush 1 ex PM Hq. Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, Aug. 24. 
CMDG General, Camp Funston: 

T445 Request you send to Camp Upton earliest possible moment and not later 
than noon, August 29, if possible, 805th Pioneer Inf. colored . . . It is abso- 
lutely essential that this organization be in Camp Upton August 29. . . SHANKS. 



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Tlie battle ground of giant forces — the First Army Battle area between the Meuse 
and the Aisne rivers. The line ran from Brieulles-sur-Meuse to Binarville when the 805th 
Pioneer Infantry arrived at Clermont (just off the southern edge of this map below 

Neuvilly). 



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The Camp Funston order of Sunday, August 25, ordering the regiment to move, 
was actually obeyed within 36 hours of its receipt. 

The immediate steps taken following the advance "tip" from the railroad au- 
thorities were to wire the few officers on leave: "Return at once," and to notify 
officers by telephone who were in Junction City and Manhattan. All through the 
night of August 24-25 they came hurrying back. 

There lay ahead forty-eight hours with only snatches of sleep. Accounts of 
companies with grocers and the quartermaster had to be settled, clearances ob- 
tained, goods packed, travel rations issued. 

The Army Bank of Camp Funston came to the aid of the officers and cashed 
their August pay vouchers. 

The first train pulled out at 9:30 Monday night, and the other sections fol- 
lowed as soon as train equipment could be brought up. The last train left 
Thursday. 

Camp Upton! 

Draw the curtain upon the toil and moil there. It was confusion, it could not 
help but be, when it was necessary in two days' time to equip an entire regiment with 
clothing, shoes, caps, underwear, and puttees, and so much other quartermaster and 
ordnance property, diat it was bewildering. 

It was expected that the port of embarkation would be Hoboken, but certain 
ships were in Canadian ports ready to steam out, and the following orders were 
received : 

Headquarters, Camp Upton, New York 

August 30, 1918. 
Confidential Orders, No. 361. 

Pursuant to instructions contained in Confidential Letter Lr526, Headquarters, 
Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J., August 28, 1918. On Ship 450. 

Ist Battalion, 805th Pioneer Infantry, consisting of twenty-six (26) officers 
and one thousand (1000) men. Item Q-208, Phase 2. 

Attached Medical Personnel consisting of three (3) officers and twenty-four 
(24) men will proceed so as to arrive at Montreal, Canada, on Monday, 
September 2nd, 1918. 

The travel directed is necessary in the military service. 

By order of Colonel Mallory: 
Official: P. L. Thomas, 

Frank S. Booth, Major* ^valry, 

Captain, Infantry, Executive Officer. 

Acting Adjutant. 

The First Battalion, under Captain O. C. Adkins, entrained at Camp Upton, 
pursuant to the foregoing orders, Sunday, September 1. It entered Canada and 
boarded "The Haverford" at Montreal September 2. 

The remainder of the regiment was included in the following order: 

Headquarters, Camp Upton, New York 

August 31, 1918. 
Confidential Orders, No. 364. 

Pursuant to instructions contained in Confidential Letter L-526, Headquarters, 
Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J., August 28, 1918. On Ship No. 639. 

3rd Battalion, 805th Pioneer Infantry, consisting of twenty-six (26) officers 
and one thousand (1000) men. Item Q-208, Phase 2, 

Attached Medical Personnel, consisting of two (2) officers and twelve (12) 
men will proceed so as to arrive at Quebec, Canada, on Tuesday, September 
3, 1918. On Ship No. 360. 

The Headquarters, Headquarters Company, Supply Company, and 2nd 
Battalion, 805th Pioneer Infantry, consisting of forty (40) officers and fourteen 
hundred and fifteen (1415) men. Item Q-208, Phase 2, 



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Attached Medical Personnel consisting of three (3) officers and twelve (12) 
men will proceed so as to arrive at Quebec, Canada, on Tuesday, September 
3, 1918. 

The travel directed is necessary in the hiilitary service. 

By order of Colonel Mallory: 

P. L. Thomas, 
Official: 

Frank S. Booth, 
Captain, Infantry, 
Acting Adjutant. 



Major, Cavalry, 
Executive Officer, 



Troops moving under the foregoing order crossed the Canadian line also on 
September 2. The entire regiment thus dates its foreign service from September 2. 

The First Battalion sailed September 2, on the Haverford. After being out several 
days this vessel put back, and went to Quebec. The troops were transferred to 
H. M. S. Novara, and the journey began again September 12. The vessel came 
to an anchor at Tilbury docks, near London, September 25, but because of a railroad 
strike, disembarkation was delayed until September 27. 

The Battalion went to Romsey, and sailed from Southampton to Cherbourg, 
France, continuing on to Rolampont (Haute Marne) after five days of slow and pain- 
ful railroad travel. It remained there for a few days to complete its equipment, then 
entrained for Clermont-en-Argonne (Meuse), where it arrived at 7 A. M. of 
October 10. 




HEADQUARTERS OFFICERS AT DOORWAY OF CHATEAU DE CHEHERY. 

Note the mark of a high explosive shell. From left to right they are: Lieut. Van de 

Visse, Lieut. Colonel Bacon, Colonel Humphrey, Major (then Captain) 

Bliss, Chaplain Custer, Lieutenant Lewis. 



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The remainder of the regiment reached Quebec before noon September 2, and the 
Third Battalion boarded H. M. T. Orita, where Major A. D. Cowley, commanding 
the battalion, was senior officer and hence in charge of all the American troops 
aboard. 

Colonel Humphrey was in command of all U. S. troops and units aboard the 
R. M. S. Saxonia, of which Captain W. H. Hossack was skipper. 

The First Battalion of the 335th Infantry (white troops), under Major Hefner, 
and two nurse units (No. 56, under Miss Kathryn Morgan, and No. 67, under Miss 
Cecilia Brennan), each 100 strong, were also on the passenger lists, so that with the 
805th contingent, the staunch old Cunarder carried slightly more than 2,700 
U. S. citizens. 

In the early night hours of September 3 the Orita and the Saxonia weighed 
anchor and began dropping down the St. Lawrence. From many ports there now 
gathered a great convoy of camouflaged shipping. The number reached 22 during 
the night of September 9-10, and a four-funnelled British destroyer took post at the 
same time at the left corner. Ahead a stocky British cruiser, which came on duty 
at the mouth of the St. Lawrence, showed the way. 

The ships rode so steadily in their assigned places that it seemed as though they 
were all united by some powerful subsurface framework. Now and again, in 
instant obedience to some signal from the man-o'-war, there was a momentary dis- 
alignment as the convoy wheeled to right or left in perfectly executed and timed 
movement and set off upon a new course. As Europe was neared and a fleet of 
U. S. destroyers joined, the course was changed with great frequency. 

Aboard the Saxonia all went well. The most rigid discipline was maintained; yet 
there was always time for play when work was done. Daily at 4:30 P. M. a dance 
was in progress, usually on B deck, and it continued, after dinner, in the saloon. 

Colonel Humphrey made an inspection daily, deck by deck. The ship's first officer, 
Mr. Robinson, and Mr. Bedford, the chief steward, always went on these trips, and 
one day, early in the voyage, Captain Hossack did also. 

"She looked cleaner the second day out than she ever did before a week from 
shore," he said, "and she is cleaner now than in all her twenty years." 

Every company was held responsible for its section, and officers were told off 
to areas the common property of all. 

With the assistance of the mimeograph machine, a Daily Bulletin was issued 
and posted each morning on all decks and in the companion ways. It announced 
the guard, rules regarding lights and messing and set the time for the daily dances, in 
short, served as the ship's newspaper. 

At least once a day and often three times the bugle sounded Boat Call, and 
thereupon every one hurried to his assigned place. Fire drill often accompanied boat 
drill. 

Each vessel bore a heavy gun astern and howitzers forward for firing depth 
bombs. Details were told off to help serve the guns. During the last four days 
officers were posted alternately with enlisted men on submarine lookout posts, 
sio that there were five officers and five enlisted men continually on this duty, in 
addition to the regular guard. 

Port holes were closed at dusk throughout the entire voyage, and no smoking out- 
side was permitted after dark. Silence on decks was also prescribed after dusk on 
the last four days. No bugle calls were permitted in foggy weather. 

Fortunately all those precautions were unnecessary. 

Good ships, however, had gone down in the same area, and there were times 
when there was anxiety. At 1 :06 p. M. of September 14, Colonel Humphrey and Capt. 



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Hossack sighted a mine which the ship passed by about 60 feet. The matter was 
flashed to the destroyers who went to the spot and dropped depth bombs. Two 
days from land, word was received that a submarine had been sighted by a destroyer 
guard dead ahead. At the same time the cruiser signaled and the entire convoy literally 
"went by the left flank." From that time on the course was changed every few 
minutes. 

Land was in sight on the 16th, and the convoy soon entered the Mersey and headed 
for Liverpool. 

Europe was now ringing with cheers for the Americans. They had proved their 
mettle at Chateau Thierry and the straightening out of the St. Mihiel salient on a 
35 kilometer front, with the capture of many thousands of prisoners and 400 canons 
September 12-13, and all this was now only three days old. 

These successes were probably reflected in the cordial reception in all towns and 
villages accorded the passers-by from the 805th. Major Cowley's battalion, which 
disembarked the moment the ship docked at Liverpool, reported being received 
cordially everywhere. Troops off the Saxonia had the same experience. The arrival 
of the convoy had been greeted with the noisy blasts of whistles in the harbor. The 
news was carried in brief dispatches. The Manchester Guardian in its September 17 
issue reported the following: 

"Further large numbers of American troops have arrived in the Mersey." 

For the time being the Third Battalion took the lead. It was shipped to the 
American Rest Camp, Southampton, and then took a channel boat for Le Havre. 
It reached Rolampont September 20. 

Following in the same course, the Saxonia troops arrived at Rolampont Septem- 
ber 22. One Dodge limousine, two Harley-Davidson motorcycles with side cars, 
and three Nash-Quads were waiting. 

Rolampont, a small town between Chaumont and Langres, Department Haute 
Marne, will live long in the memories of troops of this regiment. 

It was necessary to camp in pup tents rather than spread the men out in small 
villages for billeting, in order that issuance of complete battlefield equipment and gas 
training might be expedited. 

There was considerable rain, and the camping ground soon became muddy be- 
yond belief. The men kept dry with difficulty. Through it all, however, the best 
of spirits was maintained. Strict sanitary rules were enforced, and the camp had a 
well-kept appearance. 

The men suffered from influenza, but the regiment had much less trouble from 
this epidemic than was expected. 

Daily drill at quickened cadence was ordered, and on one occasion a regimental 
parade was held, with the assistance of the 802nd Pioneer Infantry Band. 

The burden lay upon Captain T. R. Lindsey, regimental supply officer, and his 
assistants, and they responded nobly. Long night trips to Is-Sur-Tille had to be 
made in the Quads and arrangements made for supplying helmets and gas masks, 
bolos and trench knives, and for filling shortages of every nature. 

"Putting the regiment through gas ' was rapidly and thoroughly done by Lieut, 
(later Captain) A. W. Gauger of the Army Gas School, Fort St. Menge, and his 
officers. 

Rolampont was also the scene of the first funeral of an 805th Pioneer in Europe. 
Pvt. Everett Johnson of Company "M" died at the hospital at Humes of spinal 
meningitis. He was given military honors, and buried in the American cemetery at 



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Rolampont, where French women covered his grave with flowers and wept during the 
service. 

Telegraphic orders were received as follows: 

Nogent-en-Bassigny, September 30, 1918. On instruction from G. H. Q. 
C. G. directs 805th Pioneer Infantry proceed at once by rail to Clermont-en- 
Argonne (Dept. Meuse). reporting upon arrival thereat to Chief Engineer 
First Army for duty. Advance billeting party should precede regiment. Wire 
Troop Movement Bureau G-4 G. H. Q. number officers, men, animals, tons 
baggage, so that rail transportation can be arranged. Notify G. H. Q. and 
these headquarters by wire upon arrival new station. This movement should 
be expedited. Acknowledge receipt advising date of departure. 

Colonel Humphrey and his staff, the Third Battalion, Headquarters and Supply 
Companies and Companies *'E" and 'T" entrained and left Rolampont at 3:12 
p. M., October 2. 

Before night fell the train had come so near the front that artillery could be 
heard, and the roar was loud and continuous when it drew into Clermont shortly 
before midnight. Detrainment was postponed until the following morning. 

Companies "F" and "G" entrained also on October 2, but did not arrive 
until the following night and detrained October 4. 

Clermont-en-Argonne, near the southern end of the famous Argonne Forest, and 
directly upon its eastern edge, played a considerable part in the Argonne-Meuse cam- 
paign. It was occupied by German troops for a few days in September, 1914, 
when the line of farthest advance passed from Verdun to Clermont, to Revigny, and 
thence west to Meaux, only 28 miles from Paris. 

But when the wave rolled or was swept back and the opposing forces 
settled down to entrenched positions, the line passed east and west through Vauquois 
and Boureuilles, just south of Varennes and westward through the Argonne. Here 
it remained for four years. The forest, ravined, densely wooded, and underbrushed, 
offered everything to the defender, nothing to the attacker. Apparently the French 
had given it up as hopeless or not worth the cost. 

During all this time Clermont had been occasionally shelled, for the Germans 
well knew that at the top of Butte St. Anne, the steep, pine-crowned escarpment 
against which the city nestles, the French were keeping ceaseless watch over the 
valley of the Aire. 

But shortly after the St. Mihiel drive, American troops were brought up secretly, 
and Clermont was to be shaken into activity. The "jump-off" came September 26, 
when General Pershing's men began the offensive which was to break the dead- 
lock and end in the winning of the war. 

There was no stopping the Americans. The line was forced north of Varennes, 
and the Boche was soon out of range. The last shell fell upon Clermont about 
September 28, and except for air raiders, the city was comparatively safe. 

Its railhead was soon to ration more than 80,000 American troops, and its 
ruins shook with the thunder of Allied trucks. Clermont is located at the junc- 
tion of the main road from St. Menehould to Verdun, and the straight road run- 
ning north to Neuvilly and Varennes. The French used the former in shifting 
troops from the Champagne to the Verdun sector, and up and down the latter plied 
an endless double line of staunch American trucks, carrying food and supplies and 
bringing divisions up to and back from the front. 

This was the situation when the 805th Pioneer Infantry arrived and established 
headquarters, which it was to maintain there, as it turned out, for many months. 

October 3 was spent in establishing the troops under canvas at the top of Butte 
St. Anne, in Camp Bondet. There were buildings, but occupancy was delayed for 
fear of vermin. Pup tents were arranged beneath trees, and, in addition, were well 
camouflaged against the eye of the aviator. 



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OF BARS, 
SILVER LEAVfeS 
AND SUCH^ 




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The men watched Allied airplanes overhead darting now low, now high, occa- 
sionally grouped in ''V" formation for battle and in that case usually so far up that 
they appeared like slowly swimming minnows of the air. 

From their high butte they saw the white roads of France winding among low, 
green hills to battered villages, and to the north the straight way to Neuvilly and 
Varennes, swarming with scurrying black insects (for so they appeared from the 
height) which were trucks, plying to and from the front. 

Colonel Humphrey and his adjutant went to Souilly, which was Advance Headquar- 
ters of the American Army at the time, and the regiment was reported to Brigadier 
General Jay J. Morrow, chief engineer. 

The following order was received: 

Headquarters, First Army American Expeditionary Forces, Office of the Chief Engineer 

October 3, 1918. 
Orders No. 3. 

2. The 805th Pioneer Infantry is assigned to duty under the Department of 
Light Railways and Roads (Office of the Giief Ejigineer, First Army) report- 
ing upon arrival to Colonel E. D. Peck for duty. 

By direction of Brigadier General Morrow: 

T. H. Dillon, 
Col. Eng. U. S. A. 

The headquarters of the Department of Light, Railways, and Roads was at 
Vraincourt, 2 kilometers east of Clermont, and October 5 orders were issued which 
enabled the 805th Pioneer Infantry to put its shoulder to the wheel and do its 
part in the great war. 

The morning had been spent in giving Clermont a thorough clean-up, in which 
troops of the 219th French Field Artillery, the headquarters of which regiment 
was there, heartily co-operated. 

In the afternoon movement began. Companies "E" and "F" under Major H. F. 
Chinner, who reported at Clermont, set out for Auzeville, there to work upon the 
railhead. Company "I" late in the afternoon marched to Neuvilly, there to build an 
ammunition dump and work on the railhead, while Companies ''K" and "L," under 
Major Cowley, set out for Aubreville, where they were joined by Company "M" 
the next day, for the purpose of making and repairing roads and working the railhead. 

On October 6 Companies **G" and "H," under Major J. E. Creed, took the road 
to Avocourt, where some time they had the honor of being farthest toward the front. 
Roadmaking was also their task. 

The Headquarters and Supply Companies remained at Clermont, performing 
their regimental functions, but also rendering great assistance to the railhead and all 
other work in the vicinity which tended to advance the general cause. 

The First Battalion, as soon as it arrived was put at work upon the Clermont- 
Neuvilly road, a stretch which thereafter was frequently called "A-B-C-D Boulevard." 

The work on the road consisted largely of patching, surfacing, shouldering, widen- 
ing, and scraping. The men took the attitude that every stone pounded into a hole 
to smooth the way meant as much as the discharge of a shell or a clip of cartridges, 
and worked faithfully and without complaining, in all weathers. 

Their business was to put the traffic through, and they disregarded their own 
comfort. If a truck slid off the road they lifted it on, night or day, that food 
and ammunition might be hastened to the front. 

The work of the companies to November 18, when the First Army turned the 
regiment over to its Salvage Service, is summarized as follows : 

A — First 2,000 meters of Clermont-Neuvilly road from Clermont road past 
Apremont. 

B — Second 2,000 meters of Clermont-Neuvilly road; Charpentry cut-off road. 



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C — Locheres crossroad on Clermont-Neuvilly road north 2,000 meters; roads at 
Very. 

D — Clermont-Neuvilly road from point 1,000 south of Neuvilly bridge to Neuvilly; 
ammunition detour road at Neuvilly; Charpentry roads. 

Fi — Auzeville railhead; Varennes railhead; railhead work at St.Juvin, Marcq, 
and Briquenay. 

F — Auzeville railhead; Varennes railhead; roads at Montblainville; roads at 
Landres et St. Georges. 

G — Roads at Avocourt; roads at Sommerance. 

H — Roads at Avocourt; roads at Fleville. 




THE ROAD FROM CLERMONT TO THE FRONT 

Here is a picture full of meaning to every Bearcat and, indeed, to all American Divi- 
sions in the Argonne fighting. It leads straight north from Clermont-en-Argonne (Meuse), 
France, to Varennes, and to Grand Pre. Up it went troops, ammunition, food. Back on 
it came the wounded. It was black with trucks, in two lines, one going, one coming, all 
day and all night. By night the trucks rumbled and roared without lights. 

On Butte St. Anne, from top of which this picture was taken, all troops of the 
805th Pioneer Infantry have camped. Indeed, the Supply Company knew no other home 
during its stay in the Argonne district. Picture taken Nov. 5, 1918. 



I — Construction of ammunition dump, Neuvilly, and railhead construction be- 
tween Neuvilly and Varennes and Apremont; railroad repair work Marcq and St. 
Juvin; construction of Verdun-Etain railroad from November 11. 

K — Railhead details and road work Aubreville; road work Varennes and Char- 
pentry. 

M — Road and railhead work Aubreville; road work Varennes. 

The outlying companies were continually in immediate sight of the sausage 
balloons and witnessed many an air battle. Raids were frequent. 



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Clermont itself was bombed on three nights (on one occasion twice in one night) . 
Its converging traffic streams, its railhead, and the aviation field of the 50th U. S. 
Observation Unit were Boche targets. 

No slackening of work was permitted, despite the signing of the armistice 
November 11. Sunday was no holiday. 

A concentration had been ordered at Varennes November 18, and several com- 
panies had taken up their abode there or at Camp Mahout; but to carry out the 
salvage program outlined by Lt. Colonel Jeremiah Beall, chief salvage officer. 
Battle Area, First Army, a re-distribution over the Argonne-Meuse area had to be 
effected immediately. 

The area assigned the 805th Pioneer Infantry extended from Boult-aux-Bois almost 
due south to a point one kilometer west of Les Islettes; thence to Clermont; thence 
to Aubreville and Avocourt and Esnes; thence to Montfaucon via Bethincourt and 
Cuisy; thence north through Nantillois and Cunel to Bantheville; thence southwest 
through Romagne, Gesnes, and Exermont to the main road just south of Fleville; and 
then north to Boult-aux-Bois through Fleville, St. Juvin, Grand-Pre and Briquenay. 

The area comprised all of the Argonne Forest from Clermont north and the 
Varennes-Malancourt-Montfaucon-Romagne sections. More than 500 square miles of 
battlefield was included. 

A list of the articles to be salvaged would require a page. Chiefly they were 
Allied and enemy weapons and cannon, web and leather equipment, clothing and 
blankets, rolling stock, aviation, electrical, and engineer equipment. It was a gigantic 
task, and did not near completion until the first week in March, when more than 
3,000 French carloads had been shipped. 

The immediate assignment to stations November 20 was as follows: 

A — Briquenay; B — Chevieres; C — La Forge; D — Chatel; Hq. 1st. Bn. — Chatel; 
E — ^Binarville; F — La Chalade; G — Florent; H — 3 kilometers north of Aubreville; 
Hq. 2nd. Bn. — Camp Mahout, later Varennes; I — ^Malancourt; K — Very; L — Bar- 
racks near Cunel, later Cunel; M — Varennes, later near Eclisfontaine; Hq. 3rd. Bn. 
— Very. 

For some weeks truck transportation was scarce, and work was slow, and con- 
sisted largely in getting material to roadsides. 

Captain George E. Thompson, Q. M. C, was given charge of the salvage work 
in the First Army Battle Area, and on January 1, 1919, the following units were 
placed by him at the disposal of Colonel Humphrey for the purpose of expediting the 
work; 339th Labor Battalion, Truck Companies A, B, C and F of 3rd Corps Artillery 
Park, and the 313th, 305th, 309th, and 317th Salvage Units. 

The regiment had remained in the First Army one month after the signing of 
the armistice, but December 11 it was transferred to the Advance Section. 

This assignment was made by Par. 1, S. 0. 702, Hq. First Army, at the direction 
of General Hunter Liggett, who succeeded General Pershing in command early in 
October. 

No change in technical work resulted. Administrative matters, however, now were 
referred to Brigadier General William R. Sample and his staff, whose headquarters 
had been moved from Nogent to Neuf chateau (Vosges). 

Captain Thompson's action in placing so many diversified units at the disposal 
of Colonel Humphrey testified to the efficiency of the latter and to the organization 
which he had built up. In Regimental Headquarters at Chateau de Chehery tele- 
phone lines had been installed, and by means of Ford trucks courier service put 
in which reached all companies of the regiment daily. 

There came orders January 25 which placed additional heavy responsibilities on 



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Colonel Humphrey, and it was necessary to operate as a general headquarters. The 
order follows: 

Headquarters Advance Section Services of Supply American Expeditionary Forces 

January 25, 1919. 
Special Orders, No. 25. 

42. Colonel C B. Humphrey, Inf., will assume administrative control and 
supervision of the Advance Section, S. 0. S. troops, within the battle area now 
being salvaged by S. 0. S. troops and lying approximately between the Meuse and 
Aisne rivers and north of an east and west line through Souilly. He will ii:^in- 
taln close communication with the 'staff officers directing the technical work upon 
which the troops are engaged and co-operate with them in the accomplishment 
of their mission. 

By command of Brig. Gen. Sample: 
John S. Switzek, 
Official: Colonel, A. G. 

Frank L. Irwin, Chief of Staff. 

Captain, Infantry, 
Adjutant, 

Representations were immediately made of the need of more transportation, and 
the Advance Section responded by adding 100 trucks to the Third Corps Artillery 
Park strength, and by turning over a considerable number to the "Salvage Officer, 
Battle Area, First Army" (Captain Thompson). This was to result later in the for- 
mation of a Motor Truck Detachment in the 805th Pioneer Infantry, of which Cap- 
tain H. B. Abbett, of Company "I," was placed in command. 

As companies of the 805th neared the completion of their areas they were put 
to work at the railheads where they helped load the salvage they had gathered and 
that which many other organizations of the area had brought, and sent it on its way 
to designated depots. 

Company "A" was thus brought to Senuc and then to Dun-sur-Meuse. Company 
**B" worked at the Marcq dump and then at Grand-Pre and Senuc. Company "C" 
was employed with Company "D" at the Chatel-Chehery railhead. Both were later 
sent to Brieulles-sut-Meuse, from which place Company "D" moved to Mouzon. 

Company "E" came in from the wilds of the "Lost Battalion" at Charlevaux 
(near Binarville) to Chatel-Chehery; Companies "F" and "H" were brought to 
Varennes and Company "G" to Clermont — all for railhead shipping work. 

The Third Battalion, occupied with a large and difficult area, did no railhead work. 
It lent its share of assistance to the Ordnance Department for demolition work, and 
Company "L" had rather more of this kind of service than any other company of the 
regiment. 

The staff of the regiment was augmented December 16, when Lieut. Colonel Willis 
Bacon, who had been with the 51st Pioneers, reported for duty. 

With the slackening of the salvage work, the regiment found a few days 
when it was possible to devote time to drilling, athletics, and study. School and 
agricultural books were obtained in large numbers, and each company organized 
classes which, though compulsory, were eagerly attended by the men. 

Curtailment of this work was necessitated by instructions from Advance Sec- 
tion Headquarters to assist in every way possible the restoration of French farm 
lands to a point where they could be cultivated. 

This meant principally the filling of trenches across fields, and upon this work 
the regiment entered March 15 with all its strength, except what was required for the 
functioning of railheads not yet closed. 

Regimental Headquarters was for a few days at Billet 28 at Clermont and was 
moved across the street when the French 219th Artillery departed. This building 
was large and commodious and in an excellent state of repair. No shell had touched it. 



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AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

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The square, black "A" of the First Army was worn by the 805th 
Pioneer Infantry, except during the winter of 1918-19, when the Advance 
Section insignia was authorized. This was the circular insignia shown 
in the lower right hand corner. The "A S" signified Advance Section, 
and the cross is the cross of Lorraine. Resumption of the "A" was author- 
ized as soon as the regiment reached Brest, bound for home. 



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WHERE COMBAT DIVISIONS GOT THEIR TROOPS. 

The first eight divisions of the United States Army were composed chiefly of regulars with 
a large number of troops of both National Guard and selective draft origin completing the full 
complement. 

The other combat divisions were constituted as follows: 

26. "Yankee" — New England National Guard. 

27. "New York"— New York National Guard. 

28. "Keystone" — Pennsylvania National Guard. 

29. "Blue and Gray" — National Guard from New Jersey, Dist. of Columbia, Maryland, Vir- 

ginia and Delaware. 

30. National Guard of the Carol inas, Tennessee and District of Columbia. 

31. "Dixie" — National Guard of Georgia, Alabama and Florida. 

32. National Guard troops of Michigan and Wisconsin. 

33. "Prairie" — Illinois National Guard. 

34. National Guard of Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Minnesota. 

35. National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. 

36. "Panther" — National Guard of Texas and Oklahoma. 

37. "Buckeye"— National Guard of Ohio. 

38. National Guard of Indiana, Kentucky and West Virginia. 

40. "Rattlesnake" — National Guard of California, Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico. 
42. "Rainbow" — National Guard from all sections of the United States. 

77. "Metropolitan" — Selective Draft men from New York City, Long Island and Hudson 

River counties. 

78. "Lightning" — Selective Draft men from New York, New Jersey and Delaware. 

79. Selective Draft men from northeast Pennsylvania, Maryland and Dist. of Columbia. 

80. "Blue Ridge" — Selective Draft men from western Pennsylvania, Virginia and West 

Virginia. 

81. "Wildcat" — Selective Draft men from North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Porto 

Rico. 

82. Selective Draft men from Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee. 

85. "Custer" — Selective Draft men from Michigan and eastern Wisconsin. 

86. "Blackhawk" — Selective Draft men from Chicago and other parts of northern Illinois. 

87. Selective Eh-aft men from Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and southern Alabama. 

88. Selective Draft men from North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa and western Illinois. 

89. Selective Draft men from Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, Colorado and New 

Mexico. 

90. Selective Draft men from Texas and Oklahoma. 

91. "Wild West" — Selective Draft men from far western and Pacific Coast states. 

92. Selective Draft Colored troops from all parts of the country. 

93. Colored Troops who served chiefly with the French whose blue helmet was used as 

insignia. 



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TO HELP MAKE THE WORLD SAFE!" 



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Palatial as it seemed among its battered neighbors, this building was not to be 
compared with Chateau de Chehery. The chateau is located at Chatel-Chehery, 
between Apremont and Fleville, and one kilometer west of the main Grand-Pre road. 
It is the property of Captain Emile Longuet La Marche of the 243rd French Artillery, 
and his brother, Lieut. Charles Longuet La Marche, of the same regiment. 

Regimental Headquarters was moved to the chateau November 25, and the 
Headquarters Company took quarters in its outlying buildings the following day. 
Captain T. H. Gleason, personnel adjutant, remained at Clermont headquarters with 
his assistants, as did Captain Lindsey and the Supply Company. 

Late in March it had been apparent that the stay of the regiment in the Argonne 
Forest was nearing its end. The French were coming back, and the Advance Sec- 
tion itself was expected to close in June. 

There were valuable dumps of material at Marcq, St. Juvin, Mouzon, Dun-sur 
Meuse, Varennes, Grand-Pre, Senuc, and other towns. These were inventoried, and 
in conjunction with officers of the War Material Board and the French chefs de dis- 
trict, were turned over to the French. 

For relaxation baseball was taken up, and the level field near Chateau de 
Chehery in the Aire valley was the scene of many an exciting game. The Head- 
quarters ' Company Team won from all comers, and on April 18 beat the First 
Battalion Team and laid the foundations for the organization which later^ at Brest, 
was to win fame for the "Bearcats." 

Down at Varennes Lieut. De Berry, adjutant of the Second Battalion, was busy 
constructing the "Bearcat Opry House." This consisted of a large superstructure 
covered with tarpaulins. The "opry" house had a large stage, a pit for the orchestra, 
and seats for about 800 persons. It was built entirely by the troops of the Sec- 
ond Battalion. Thither all troops at Varennes repaired nightly for entertainment. 

Electric lights had been installed, and visiting show troups of many organizations 
gave entertainments there. Most of them were amazed to find on the edge of the 
Argonne forest a theatre so complete. 

Meanwhile the ruined Argonne was reclothing itself in the habiliments of Spring. 
Beside the thousands of little crosses which marked the graves of brave American 
soldiers, there sprang up the "pierce-niege" (snow drop), and the fields bloomed 
with the ever-present "cocou" (a species of yellow primrose). 

The rains were less frequent, and there were many days of such beautiful 
weather that men who had come to the conclusion that there was no sun in France, 
changed their minds. 

A telegram arrived April 22, from Headquarters Advance Section, at Neuf chateau 
(Vosges), ordering the regiment to move to Le Mans. The band and vaudeville 
show had been booked for a ten days' trip at and around Neufchateau, and it was at 
first decided to cancel the journey, but as the regiment would probatly remain at its 
new station for several days, the merrymakers were sent on their way in charge 
of Chaplain J. Earl Custer. 

Telegrams and telephone messages were flying about. There were arrangements 
to be made with the Troop Movement Bureau at Chaumont, and many details to be 
completed. And suddenly the telegrams changed the destination of the regiment to 
Brest. 

All troops except the First Battalion boarded French "Hommes 40-Chevaux 8" 
trains on Friday, May 2, from Chatel-Chehery and Clermont. The First Battalion 
train equipment did not arrive at Dun-sur-Meuse until Monday. 

It was a pleasant trip to Brest. Each company had plenty of room, and one 
car per company was fitted up as a kitchen. The field ranges were installed on beds 
of brick and clay. The full garrison ration was drawn. No traveling regiment 
ever was better fed en route. 



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was replaced by Captain Geer, who had just been assigned to the regiment. Cap- 
• tain Leslie reported and was placed in command of Company "F," but was trans- 
ferred out and replaced by Captain Delf. 

Captain John J. McGrady of Company "E" was taken sick and went to the hos- 
pital. He was replaced by Captain Walker L. Schmitz, who was promoted late in 
May. 

After the disbandment of the Motor Truck Detachment, Captain Abbett was 
returned to Company "I," which he had commanded before being placed in charge of 
the truck fleet, and Captain Onan C. Adkins, who commanded in the meantime, was 
placed unassigned. 

Just before leaving. Captain Moses was held over because he' was a witness 
in a court-martial case against a man in his company who was too free with a 
pistol, and Lieut. Mayberry took command of Company "D.'* 

Captain Bliss, Adjutant, was promoted to major May 28, and was placed in 
conunand of the First Battalion when Major Patch was transferred to be military police 
officer at Pontanezen. Major Bliss continued in his duties as Adjutant, besides 
commanding the First Battalion. 

Promotion also came to Captain Gleason, Personnel Adjutant, and he was re- 
lieved to take a position in the Courier Service, Paris. He was succeeded by Lieut. 
Dornfeld, and Lieut. Barton was made assistant personnel adjutant. 

Friday the thirteenth' is not a bad date. At any rate, June wore along, and 
on the 13th, which was Friday, the longed-for orders arrived. The transport Zep- 
pelin was designated as the ship aboard which the Bearcats would journey homeward. 

There were the usual complicated details to be arranged, but on June 16 Com- 
panies "A*' and "B" and Headquarters Company marched aboard, to be followed on 
Tuesday, June 17, by the remainder of the regiment. 

It was a sunny France as the Zeppelin eased away and slipped out into the 
Goulet de Brest. The band played as it left. The ship steam^ past the George 
Washington, the President's ship, and was soon out to sea. 

Men and officers could not avoid a feeling of sadness. Their love of France 
was strong. They had done their duty there. They said farewell with a pulling 
of the heartstrings. 

Other troops aboard besides the "Bearcats" were the 10th Field Signal Battalion, 
under Major Felix La Crosse; the 13th Veterinary Hospital company; and Brest 
Casual companies 1719, 1723, 1724, 1725, and 1726. There were many casual 
officers, too, and several nurses, members of the Educational Corps, Ordnance women, 
and forty-four French brides, most of them with their husbands. 

The Navy personnel totalled 650 souls, under Commander W. W. Galbraith. 
Lieut. Commander F. L. Shea was executive officer. Aboard also were Commander 
Albert C. Read, who accomplished the trans-Atlantic air flight in the NC 4 seaplane, 
and the other naval aviators in that epoch-making event. Commanders Read and 
Richardson gave lectures on their trip. 

It was apparent that with big news afloat regarding peace, there was need of a 
newspaper. Consequently Colonel Huniphrey, who was in command of all Army 
troops aboard the Zeppelin, appointed 1st Lieut. Karl A. Heinzen of the Headquarters 
Company and Field Clerk George Britt, the latter of the "Stars and Stripes," to 
publish daily the "Dirigible." 

The paper was published on the mimeograph machine and made a name for 
itself immediately. It appeared at 2 p. M., and there was always a flutter of excite- 
ment at press time. 

Great credit is due the editors, but to the memlpers of the N. C. 0. staff of 
the 805th Pioneer Infantry belongs much praise. It was their task to run off the 
paper on the mimeograph machine, and especially when it ran six and seven pages 
it was a tremendous task. 



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THE US. A, 



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As usual, where the 805th was concerned the greatest attention was paid to 
cleanliness, and the high compliments of the ship's officers testified to the hard work 
the men put in. 

The voyage was pleasant; there was little seasickness. For most it was a chance 
to rest a little, and long hours were spent out on the decks. The troops had two 
meals daily — and they were full meals. 




REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS AT CLERMONT-EN-ARGONNE 

This building was one of the few in Clermont not badly shot up. It was occupied by 
the 219lh French Field Artillery headquarters when the 805th first reached Clermont. 
The 805th headquarters was in a small building directly across from this one until the 
French regiment left late in October. Old Glory was immediately hung out when the 
armistice was signed. Note the hole caused by a shell in the building next door, where an 
805th sentry is standing. During the drive, especially at night when divisions were go- 
ing through, it was often necessary to wait twenty minutes before a sufficient gap in the traf- 
fic to make it safe to cross the street would occur. The building in the lower right- 
hand corner, down the road, was for a time occupied by the 802nd Pioneer headquarters. 

All too quickly the miles flew behind, and the Bearcats were in New York enjoying 
the excitement when aeroplanes, seaplanes, and destroyers came out to welcome the 
NC men aboard. 

They had been abroad and got back, terminating on this date, June 27, 1919, 
a foreign service of nine months and twenty-five days. 

They wound through the Red Cross station at Pier No. 3 and had pie and coffee 
and ice cream. A Salvation Army lassie put a cake of chocolate in each man's 
overseas cap as he passed. Just before entering the ferry for Long Island City the 



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Knights of Columbus gave each man and officer chewing gum and a Utile kit con- 
sisting of handkerchiefs, candy, and the like. At Long Island City somebody 
handed out oranges. In a drizzling rain they boarded the Long Island trains for 
Camp Upton, where they arrived during the night and immediately started out for 
the delousing plant. 

During Saturday, June 28, all moved to District No. 5 at Upton, and com- 
pany commanders spent their time preparing papers of all kinds. Travel pay 
affidavits had to be made out for each man, and it was a stormy period of work. 

The weather was beautiful, and that helped. Sunday was another busy day, 
and at 2 p. m. orders came stating that the regiment would leave Upton on Tuesday, 
July I. 

There came now a division and the men from the several states were ordered 
sent to the camp as follows: 

Officers Men Camp Officers in Charge 

3 24 Gordon, Ga Captain G. M. Bragan 

2 5 Meade, Md Ist Lieut. W. E. Barton 

1 4 Fort Oglethorpe, Ga 1st Lieut. G. W. Steagall 

10 897 Camp Taylor, Ky Captain T. A. Immell 

6 940 Shelby, Miss Lieut. Colonel Willis Bacon 

15 448 Camp Funston, Kan Captain A. Harvey 

5 50 Bowie, Tex 1st Lieut. W. T. Hubbard 

1 8 Grant, 111 (529th Eng. officer) 

1 128 Pike, Ark 2nd Lieut. M. J. King 

4 2 Fort Russell, Wyo Captain H. B. Abbett 

1 27 Jackson, S. C 2nd Lieut. C. F. Martin 

3 Ft. Bliss, Tex (529th Eng. officer) 

6 5 Sherman, Ohio Captain O. C. Adkins 

1 1 Presidio, Cal Captain A. C. Woodruff 

1 33 Lee, Va 2nd Lieut. E. D. Lemmon 

1 Custer, Mich (Eng. Sergeant.) 

3 5 Dix, N. J Ist Lieut. J. Goldstein 

2 78 Dodge, la 1st Lieut. W. Brenneman 

Totals 62 2659 

In addition twelve officers to be discharged at Upton and the regular Army officers, 
Colonel Humphrey, Majors Cowley and Musham and Captain Geer were relieved at 
the last moment. 

Regimental Headquarters with Lieut. Col. Bacon, Major Bliss, Adjutant, Lieut. 
Dornfeld, Personnel Adjutant, and Lieut. Preston, Supply Officer, and Regimental 
Sgt. Major Perry, and Battalion Sgt. Major Taylor went with the group to Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

Good-by day was Monday, June 30 — and it was most impressive. 

The entire regiment assembled at the Y. M. C. A. auditorium at 3 P. M., where 
a representative group of Kansas citizens assembled to welcome the Kansas men 
and the entire regiment back to the United States. 

The hall was beautifully decorated. The regimental flag and colors hung over 
the stage. 

The speakers were in order: Adjutant General Charles L Martin of Kansas, 
representing Governor Allen specially; Mr. Elisha Scott, an attorney of Topeka, 
Kansas; Miss Helen K. Ostertag of Atchison, Kansas, New York Secretary of 
thfc Kansas Welcome Association; Colonel C. B. Humphrey and the Rev. S. E. J. 
Watson, pastor of the Shiloh Baptist church, Topeka, Kansas. 

Major Paul S. Bliss, Adjutant, acted as chairman. Miss Vickery of the Y. M. 
C. A. sang beautifully, and Corp. Theo. Tyus of the band played upon the saxophone. 
The 805th Band played as it had never played before. 



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There was a spirit of unity. When Colonel Humphrey arose he was cheered with 
an enthusiasm which was touching. 

"Who was it got there in time to help put it over?" he began. 

"The Bearcats," came the answering roar. 

"Who was it took $13,000,000 worth of war material out of the Argonne when 
it was all over?" 

"The Bearcats." 

"Who was it got a band together in December that can play as this one can?" 

"The Bearcats." 

"Who had the best vaudeville show in the A. E. F.?" 

"The Bearcats." 

"Who had a baseball team that beat everything in the American Expeditionary 
Forces and was never beaten?" 

"The Bearcats." 

The Colonel then gave a short talk filled with good advice. One of the Topeka 
visitors rose and led a rousing song in honor of the Colonel. 

Major Bliss announced that the regimental history fund had totaled $6,821 and 
passed the bank book around showing the money to be deposited to the credit of the 
history fund in the Guaranty Trust Bank of New York. 

Then the band played feelingly the Star Spangled Banner, while all stood at 
attention, following which everyone went to the Y. M. C. A. and had ice cream, the 
gift of the Kansas visitors. 

It is doubtful if any regiment in the American Expeditionary Forces, white or 
colored, eyer had an assembly in which regimental feeling ran so high. A pro- 
nounced impression was made upon the visitors. 

Night fell and a glorious sunset lay in the west, and above, a new moon shone 
out as if in benediction. 

Good-by was on all lips, and there were tears in many eyes. 

A great regiment, undoubtedly the greatest colored regiment in the history of 
America, heard taps for the last time, and on Tuesday morning, July 1, it scattered 
to the four winds. Colonel Humphrey bade good-by to each train as it pulled away. 




REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS, 805TH PIONEER INFANTRY, AT 
CAMP PONTANEZEN, BREST. 



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Inspection by General Pershing 




THE 805th Pioneer Infantry had the honor of being inspected at Brest June 4, 
1919, by General John Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

The inspection took place upon a level field east of Camp Pontanezen, and the 
troops were lined up and gridironed across this field, front ranks facing the rear 
ranks. Colonel C. B. Humphrey, 805th Pioneer Infantry, acted as "Commander of 
Troops Present," with Major Paul S. Bliss, 805th Pioneer Infantry, acting as his 
adjutant. 

General Pershing appeared upon the field at 1:30 P. M. and was greeted by 
Colonel Humphrey. Field music of the 803rd, 804th, 805th and 808th Pioneer 
Infantry Regiments, which had signalled "Assembly" when the Commander-in- 
Chief appeared, now signalled "Attention," followed by a long blast, whereupon 
all troops were brought to "Present Arms." The field music then delivered four 
flourishes in honor of the Commander-in-Chief and played the "General's March." 
Troops were brought to the "Order" upon a second blowing of "Attention," and the 
Conunander-in-Chief then began his march through the ranks. 

As he approached each organization commander, the organization commander 
reported and then the company or detachment commander fell in beside the Com- 
mander-in-Chief and accompanied him past his troops. The Commander-in-Chief 
asked many questions of each company commander, usually touching upon appear- 
ance of men and urging that they be sent back to the States better men, physically 
and morally, and stating, if this were not the case, the company commander must 
be blamed. 

In order to review the troops. General Pershing marched a total of five and 
one-half miles at top speed. The sun was unusually hot. All hedges and view points 
were crowded with spectators. 

After the inspection General Pershing repaired to the north end of the field, 
where a platform had been erected, and delivered an address, after which he went 
to another field, where the First Battalion, 805th Pioneer Infantry, was assembled, 
and decorated with Distinguished Service Medals, Major General Eli A. Helmick, in 
command of Base Section No. 5, S. 0. S., and Brigadier General Smedley D. Butler, 
in command of Camp Pontanezen. The officers to be decorated were reported 
"Present," following the formation, by Colonel Humphrey, and after the decoration 
the First Battalion passed in review. 

General Pershing, in his speech to the assembled troops directly after the inspec- 
tion, touched upon the entry of the American nation into the great war. He spoke 
of the spring of 1917, when the Allied armies were in a low state of morale, 
and of die dark days of the spring of 1918, when the Allied armies and the 
civilian populations also, felt that the cause was lost. Then the United States sent 
in some partially trained troops and demonstrated to the Allies and to the enemy that 
a new force had to be reckoned with. Cantigny was captured by the First Division 
on May 28, 1918. On July 2 the Second Division and the Marines were thrown 



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against the Boche on the Paris-Metz Road, near Chateau-Thierry, and from that 
moment on the Americans were continually in battle until victory was won. There 
followed other successful efforts, and then, under the First Army, the tremendously 
successful St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne victories were won. There were no drones 
in the American Army. There were no time servers. All came with an inspira- 
tion well-nigh religious. The Commander-in-Chief said that in giving much, the 
American troops had received much : Depth of Character, breadth of vision, practice 
in leadership. The victory is a moral victory for the world. The Commander- 
in-Chief thanked the troops, if he might presume to do so, upon behalf of the entire 
American people. 

The 805th Pioneer Infantry was located in the middle of the field. The Com- 
mander-in-Chief saluted the colors when he entered the first 805th lines. The 
Commander-in-Chief found the 805th Pioneer Infantry worthy to be inspected, and 
complimented many of the company commanders on the good appearance of their 
men. 

In general, the remarks of General Pershing to company commanders of all 
troops were as follows: ''If you see a man in an unmilitary position and do not 
correct him, you confirm his error and concur in it. This is true of any fault you 
do not correct." He wanted the 
men sent home erect, vigorous, 
jvell-clad. He emphasized the pow- 
er of example and warned all of- 
ficers of their tremendous respon- 
sibility in this respect. 

Troops appeared, where so 
equipped, with full pack, gas 
masks, helmets, and bayonets 
fixed. Officers were in helmets 
and wore side-arms. The 805th 
Pioneer Infantry was thus 
equipped. 

In honor of the occasion the 
805th Pioneer Infantry Regimen- 
tal Colors bore for the first time 
a beautiful ribbon sent to the reg- 
iment by General Pershing before 
it left the Argonne Forest, on 
which was the legend "Meuse-Ar- 
gonne Offensive, October 3, 1918, 
to November 11, 1918," October 
3, 1918, being the date when the 
regiment reached Clermont-en- Ar- 
gonne (Meuse) and began its du- 
ties with the First Army in the 
great drive of September 26 to 
November 11. 

The 805th Pioneer Infantry 
troops and officers each wore 
upon the left shoulder the square, 
black broadcloth "A", indicative 
of the First Army. 

THE COLORS AT THE INSPECTION 

Sgt. Steemer carrying Old Glory and Sgt. Hig- 

gins carrying 805th Regimental flag. 




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OFFICERS OF THE 805th PIONEER INFANTRY 

Regimental Headquarters 

CHAUNCY B. HUMPHREY, Colonel. Commanding. War Department, Washington, D. C. 

WILLIS BACON, Lieutenant-Colonel. Tiffin. Ohio. 

PAUL S. BLISS. Major, Adjutant.* 1684 Van Burvn St.. St. Paul, Minn. 

THEODORE M. GLEASON. Major, Personnel Adjutant, Transferred to Postal Express Service, Hotel Crillon. Paris. 

RAOUL A. DORNFELD, First Lieutenant, Personnel Adjuunt, 664 Orchard St., Kenosha, Wis. 

F. D. PRESTON. First Lieutenant. Supply Officer. 3301 CVfton Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio. 

WALTER A. BARTON. First Lieutenant, assistant Personnel Adjutant. 

MAYLAND P. LEWIS, First Lieutenant, assistant to AdjuUnt, Nahant. Mass. ' 

Third Battalion 

ARCHIBALD D. COWLEY. Major. Commanding. 481 University Ave.. Palo Alto, Cal. 
HUBERT C. CARPENTER. First Lieutenaut, Adjutant, Lincoln County National Bank, Stanford. Ky. 

Second Battalion 



HARRY A. MUSHAM, Major. 741 Rush St., Chicago, 111. 
ALBIN DeBERRY, First Lieutenant, Adjuunt. 919 Franklin St., 



Lexington, Mo. 



First Battalion 

PAUL S. BUSS. Major. Commanding. 1684 Van Buren St.. St. Paul, Minn. 
LEO A. NOBLE. First Lieutenant, Adjutant, 1116 5th Ave., Longmont, Colo. 

* (Major John D. Patch commanded the First Battalion from January until June when he was transferred to Head* 
quarters Camp Pontanezen, Brest. Major Bliss, AdjuUnt, who had been promoted May 28, was placed in command of 
the First Battalion but retained his duties as Adjutant of the regiment.) 

Chaplain 

J. EARL CUSTER, First Lieutenant, 523 Buttonwood Ave., Norristown, Pa. 

Unassigned or Attached for Return to United States 

ONAN C. ADKINS, CapUin, McCordsville, Ind. 

LESLIE E. DELF, Captain. Calumet, Mich. 

JOSEPH W. GEER, Capuin. Care of O. P. Geer. 37 Wall St.. New York. 

SYDNEY PORTER, Second Lieutenant. Town Major. 



Headquarters Company Supply Company 



CAPT. GEORGE M. BRAGAN 
1ST LIEUT. KARL A. HEINZEN 
1ST LIEUT. FRANK T. KNOX 
1ST LIEUT. L. R. LEGENDRE 
1ST LIEUT. HAROLD E. JOHNSON 



1ST LIEUT. FRANK D. PRESTON, 
1ST LIEUT. G. W. STEAGALL 
1ST LIEUT. WM. S. McFARLAND 
1ST LIEUT. JAMES KEEBLE, JR. 
2ND UEUT. GEORGE W. SPAINE 



First Battalion 



COMPANY "A" 
CAPT. ARTHUR HARVEY 
1ST LIEUT. PAUL R. POWELL 
1ST LIEUT. WM. F. HUBBARD 
2ND LIEUT. EDWIN B. KNUDSON 

COMPANY "fi" 
1ST LIEUT. HARRY V. REPLOGLE 
1ST LIEUT. WM. H. TAUBERT 
1ST LIEUT. WM. H. BROOKS 
1ST LIEUT. GEO. A. KINGSLEY 

COMPANY "C" 
CAPT. THOMAS A. IMMELL 
1ST LIEUT. PAUL V. FREED 
1ST LIEUT. A. L. DODSON 
2ND LIEUT. CHAS. H. GRAHL 

COMPANY "D" 
CAPT. FRANK D. MOSES 
1ST LIEUT. H. C. MAYBERRY 
1ST LIEUT. W. D. STEINHAUER 
2ND LIEUT. R. F. OLINGER 
2ND LIEUT. MILTON E. HICKS 



Second Battalion 

COMPANY '•£'• 

CAPT. WALTER L. SCHMITZ 
1ST LIEUT. J. F. FARRINGTON 
1ST LIEUT. ORUE E. OOLEY 
2ND LIEUT. W. W. LOCKE 
2ND LIEUT. R. F. HAAR 

COMPANY "F" 
CAPT. RAYMOND C. LESLIE 
1ST LIEUT. E. K. BROCKWAY 
1ST LIEUT. WARREN G. COOK 
2ND LIEUT. WM. H. LEATHER- 
WOOD 

COMPANY "C" 
CAPT. JOSEPH W. GEER 
1ST UEUT. L. T. REYNOLDS 
1ST LIEUT. L. W. FRANZHEIM 
1ST LIEUT. H. WALLENSTEIN, JR. 
1ST LIEUT. SAM P. MOYER 

COMPANY "H" 
CAPT. RALPH DB CLARKE 
1ST LIEUT. E. J. PURYEAR. JR. 
2ND LIEUT. LOUIS C. HENIN 
2ND LIEUT. EDW. D. LEMMON 



Medical Detachment 

MAJOR WALTON I. MITCHELL 

1ST UEUT. ALTON B. REDDICK 

1ST LIEUT. JACOB S. GOLDSTEIN 

1ST LIEUT. GLEN R. INGRAM 

1ST LIEUT. GEORGE A. RUSH 

1ST LIEUT. WILLIAM J. LEWIS 

Third Battalion 

COMPANY "/" 
CAPT. HENRY B. ABBETT 
^ 1ST LIEUT. H. I. HOLLISTER 
2ND LIEUT. C. T. MOREHEAD 
2ND LIEUT. GEO. A. WILLIAMS 

COMPANY "K" 
CAPT. ABRAHAM C. WOODRUFF 
1ST LIEUT. CHAS. E. PERSONS 
1ST LIEUT. W. H. BRENNE.MAN 
1ST LIEUT. D. FRANKENBERGER 
2ND LIEUT. R. E. MARIS 

COMPANY "L" 
CAPT. HERBERT M. NELSON 
1ST UEUT. T. P. GALLAGHER 
2ND LIEUT. CHAS. Y. MARTIN 
2ND LIEUT. MICHAEL J. KING 

COMPANY *'M" 
CAPT. GEORGE B. OTTE 
1ST LIEUT. EDWIN K. CROWLEY 
1ST LIEUT. RICHARD W. ARNETT 
1ST LIEUT. H. H. MIDDLETON 
2ND LIEUT. LEON G. ELLIS 



Officers Left Behind at Schools 

EDWARD QUINN. First Lieutenant, Company I, Univtrsity of Winchester, England. Care of Williams College, Williams- 

town. Mass. 
MARION R. MARSTON, First Lieutenant, Company I. University of Toulouse, France. Brunswick, Mo. 
FREDERICK H. JONES. First Lieutenant. Supply Company, University of Toulou9e. 108 Broadway St., Youngstown, Ohio 
CHARLES B. PARMER, Company D, University of TouIousm-. 1905 Hayes St., Nashville, Tcnn. 
WALDEN P. HOBBS, Second Lieutenant, Company C. University of Toulouse, 21 Gardner St., AUston. Mass. 
JAMES H. LANSING, Company G. University of Toulouse, care of Hugh H. Lansing, Watervliet. N. Y. 
CLARENCE BENDER. Second Lieutenant, American Expeditionary Forces University, Beaune, Cote D*Or. 
MARTIN VAN dk VISSE, American Expeditionary Forces University, Beaune. 769 Lafayette Ave. N. E., Grand Rapids, 

Mich. 



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THE FIRST ROSTER AFTER THE COMPLETE OFFICER 
PERSONNEL WAS RECEIVED 



C. B. Humphrey Colonel 

L. P. Butler Lieut. Colonel 

1st. Lieut. T. M. Gleason, R. C. 
A. C. Evans, N. A. . Major first Battalion 



Capt. W. I. Mitchell, R. C. . . Surgeon 

Capt. p. S. Bliss, R. C. . . . Adjutant 

Capt. H. M. Lindsey, R. C. . Supply Officer 
. . . Personnel Officer 

J. E. Creed, N. A. . Major Second Battalion 



A. D. Cowley, N. A. . Major Third Battalion 



COMPANY '*A** 

Capt. O. C. Adkins 
1st Lieut. L. A. Noble 
1st Lieut. P. R. Powell 
1st Lieut. W. J. Schmitz 
2nd Lieut. W. W. Locke 
. 2nd Lieut. C T. Morehead 

COMPANY '*B" 

1st Lieut. A. C. Garrison 
1st Lieut. Wm. H. Brooks 
1st Lieut. Paul V. Freed 
1st Lieut. W. H. Taubert 
2nd Lieut. Carl I. Cranz 
2nd Lieut. G. A. Kincsley 



COMPANY "E" 

Capt. J. R. McCabe 
1st Lieut. F. D. Preston 
1st Lieut. J. F. Farrincton 
2nd Lieut. W. H. Hubbard 
2nd Lieut. O. E, Ooley 
2nd Lieut. W. D. Stein hauer 

COMPANY "F" 

Capt. J. W. Finley 
1st Lieut. E. K. Brockway 
1st Lieut. L. J. Capen 
1st Lieut. Robert Schmidt 
2nd Lieut. W. H. Leather- 
wood 
2nd Lieut. E. J. Puryear, Jr. 



COMPANY "C 
Capt. E. W. Dick 
1st Lieut. H. Harvey 
1st. Lieut. R. C. Phipps 
1st Lieut. B. A. Radford 
1st Lieut^ H. B. Replocle 
2nd Lieut. W. P. Hobbs 

COMPANY "Z>" 

Capt. T. A. Immell 
1st Lieut. L. W. Franzhein 
1st Lieut. C. B. Parmer 
1st Lieut. H. C. Mayberry 
2nd Lieut. O. F. Ireland 
2nd Lieut. L. R. Lecendre 

SUPPLY COMPANY 

Capt. T. R. Lindsay, Reg. 

Sup. Officer 
2nd Lieut. J. G. Cook, Asst. 

Sup. Officer 
2nd Lieut. G. W. Steagall, 

(Comdg.) 
2nd Lieut. W. E. Barton 
2nd Lieut. James Keeble 
2nd Lieut. M. R. Marston 



COMPANY " 


G" 






1st Lieut. 


G. 


M. 


Bracan 


1st Lieut. 


R. 


A. 


DORNFELO 


1st Lieut. 


L. T. : 


Reynolds 


1st Lieut. 


H. 


, Wallenstein, 


Jr. 








2nd Lieut. 


J. 


H. 


Lansing 



COMPANY "//" 
Capt. O. R. Reed 
1st Lieut. H. E. Dalton 
1st Lieut. H. J. Longnecker 
1st Lieut. N. E. Tarble 
2nd Lieut. C. R. Bender 
2nd Lieut. L. C. Henin 

HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 
Capt. F. D. Moses 
1st Lieut. W. H. Brenneman 
1st Lieut. K. A. Heinzen 
2nd Lieut. H. E. Johnson 
2nd Lieut. F. T. Knox 
2nd Lieut. R. F. Ollincer 



COMPANY 'T 

Capt. H. B. Abbett 
1st Lieut. H. I. Hollister 
1st Lieut. E. Quinn 
1st Lieut. A. J. Vargo 
2nd Lieut. H. E. Hemstreet 
2nd Lieut. F. H. Jones 

COMPANY "^" 

Capt. A. C. Woodruff 
1st Lieut. D. Frankenberger 
1st Lieut. C. E. Persons 
1st Lieut. Sam P. Mover 
2nd Lieut. E. D. Johnson 
2nd LiEiJT. Robert E. Maris 

COMPANY "I" 

Capt. H. M. Nelson 
1st Lieut. T. P. Gallagher 
1st Lieut. R. A. Patton 
2nd Lieut. M. J. King 
2nd Lieut. James Moore 
2nd Lieut. S. B. Outlaw 

COMPANY "M" 

Capt. George B. Otte 
1st Lieut. R. W. Arnett 
1st Lieut. E. K. Crowley 
1st Lieut. J. J. McGrady 
2nd Lieut. H. Y. Martin 
2nd Lieut. H. E. Middleton 

2nd Lieut. M. P. Lewis 
Exchange Officer 

2nd Lieut. W. S. McFarland 
Regimental Mess Officer 

1st Lieut. H. C. Carpenter 
Adjutant 3rd Battalion 

2nd Lieut. M. R. Incraham 
Act, Adjutant 1st Battalion 

2nd Lieut. A. DeBerry 

Act. Adjutant 2nd Battalion 



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UpcUkrt 



CHATEAW DE CHBHERY 
AT CHATEL -CllgHERY 
(ARDENNES FRANCE) 



aO'jT" REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS 

NOV. 2^.1916 TO MAY 2.1919 



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The Bearcat Chateau 




CHATEAU de Chehery, situated on the eastern edge of the Argonne Forest, just 
across the Aire river from Chatel, and some twelve kilometers southeast of 
Grand-Pre (Ardennes), France, owes its origin to an abbey founded in 1147 by the 
Chapter of Our Lady of Rheims. 

According to tradition, it was erected by monks of the order "Citeaux," who 
came from the Abbey of La Chalade in the center of the Argonne. 

The abbey became one of the most important in the diocese and so continued 
until it was ruined in 1657 during the "Guerres de Religion — la Fronde," in which 
Louis XIII sought to impose his will on the feudal lords of northern France. 

The chateau at present is only a part of the abbey, which the monks rebuilt 
about the middle of the 18th century. 

The French revolution made the chateau a private residence. It was sold as 
national property to the "de Melcy" family, from the last members of which it was 
purchased shortly before the present war, by Messrs. Charles Longuet la Marche 
and Emile Longuet la Marche, who, during the war, were officers in the 243rd French 
Field Artillery. 

In 1914-'15 the chateau was used by the Germans as a hospital. Small ceme- 
teries were laid out in the yards where German soldiers of all ranks are interred. 
From 1916 to 1918 it was occupied by many German staffs as headquarters. The 
building was left in good condition, although most of the furniture and works of 
art had been moved. 

The library, done in oak wainscoting with tapestries above and paneled ceiling, 
retains much of its original splendor. The fireplace is of oak with four carved 
caryatids. A carved oak chandelier of large dimensions hangs over the table. In 
one corner there remains a huge carved sideboard in which the Germans placed some 




At left — Colonel Humphrey and Madame Longuet la Marche; center — Major Bliss, 
Captain Emile Longuet la Marche, Madame Longuet la Marche, and Lieutenant Colonel 
Bacon; at right — Capt. Longuet la Marche with Major Bliss and Lieutenant^ Hemstreet. 
The la Marches were the owners of Chateau de Chehery, regimental headquarters. 



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of the books of the formerly impressive collections. Over the mantel is a good 
copy of Rubens' "Descent from the Cross" 6 ft. x 8 ft., which was removed from 
the chapel in December, 1918, to preserve it from rain. 

The building bears everywhere the scars of explosive shells. The roof was much 
pierced but was repaired by troops of the Headquarters Company, 805th Pioneer 
Infantry, U. S. Army. Unlike most French chateaux, this one is situated under 
rather than on top of a hill and hence escaped being used as an artillery target. 








Regimental Headquarters enlisted staff, 805th Pioneer Infantry, photographed in 
front of Chateau de Chehery, Chatei Chehery, France, standing by a captured German 
77, which was pulled out of the forest by troops of the 805th Pioneer Infantry, March, 
1919. FVom left to right— Battalion Sergeant Major William W. Riley, First Battalion; Bat- 
talion Sergeant-Major Fay E. Taylor, Second Battalion; First Class Private Emmitt Bass, 
clerk; Corporal Charlie Glover; Regimental Sergeant-Major George W. J. Perry; Private 
James Stucky. 

Rear, from left to right — Regimental Color-Sergeant William Higgins (the last on 
canon); Corporal Thomas H. Parks, orderly for Colonel Humphrey; Private William 
Sullivan; Private Henry Nichols; Regimental Color-Sergeant Morris Steemer, and Ser- 
geant Thomas R. Davis, Regimental Mail Orderly. • 

Note: — Regimental Sergeant-Major Henry O. Mariott and Battalion Sergeant-Major 
Julius M. Tyler, also members of the Regimental Enlisted staff, do not appear on this pic- 
ture as they were on detached service, attending school at the University of London, and 
A. E. F. University, Beaune, France, respectively. Regimental Sergeant-Major Qarence 
R. A. Banks was in the personnel office at Clermont at this time. 

For a few days early in November, the chateau was used as a headquarters by 
the First Corps, U. S. Army, and from November 25, 1918, to May 2, 1919, was 
occupied by Colonel C. B. Humphrey and staff and the officers of the Headquarters 
Company, 805th Pioneer Infantry. The outlying buildings were occupied by the 
Headquarters Company during this period, and also by the Motor Truck Detachment. 

The regimental guardhouse was also located at Chateau de Chehery. The band 
occupied several comfortable German-built cottages nearby. To the chateau came 
many officers of high rank when their duties called them into the area. Colonel 
Humphrey and his officers were hosts to 300 members of the General Staff College, 



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Qvllfrtl MiiAadtT* *n4 ,Ln Aidt 



When the Congressional Committee on Military Affairs, escorted by officers from G. H. 

Q., dropped in. 



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students, and instructors on their final staff ride over the First Army Battle Area 
during the second week of January, 1919. 

Representatives of several divisions, especially the 82nd, which had occupied the 
chateau as headquarters in October, returned and were guests while looking over 
their battle grounds. The First Corps U. S. A. Headquarters used the chateau at 
one time. 

With the 82nd Division groups came Major G. E. Buxton of the Providence 
Journal, who was Divisional Historian and Corporal (later Sergeant) Alvin C. York, 
who distinguished himself by capturing some 132 Germans near Cornay, single- 
handed — only a mile from the chateau. 

To write Corp. York's story came also George PattuUo of the Saturday Evening 
Post. 

A notable occasion was the arrival of Ambassador John Davis, American envoy 
to England, who brought with him March 11, several high ranking British and 
American officers, among whom were: 

Lord Peel, Under Secretary for War, England. 

Lord Burnham, Owner of London Daily Telegram. 

Lieut. Gen. Sir A. J. Godley, 22nd Corps, British Army. 

Major Gen. H. K. Bethell, British Army. 

Major Gen. C F. Boyd, British Army. 

Brig. Gen. C. M. Wagstaff, Chief of British Mission, at American Headquarters. 

Brig. Gen. R. J. Burt, U. S. A., General Staff. 

Brig. Gen. D. F. Nolan, U. S. A., General Staff. 

Lieut. CoL A. Moreno, U. S. A., General Staff. 

Lieut. Col. Lloyd Griscom, U. S. A., General Staff. 

Captain H. F. S. Law, British Army, Aide to Gen. Godley. 

Captain J. G. O. Marriott, British Army. 

The following members of the Congressional Committee on Military Affairs, 
and Officers of the U. S. Army who escorted them, were guests at Regimental Head- 
quarters, 805th Pioneer Infantry at Chateau de Chehery (Ardennes) France, Tues- 
day, April 22, 1919: 

Congressman S. H. Dent, Montgomery, Ala. 

Congressman D. R. Anthony, Jr., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Congressman Sam J. Nicholls, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Congressman John Q. Gilson, New Haven, Conn. 

Congressman F. La Guardia, New York. 

Congressman Chas. P. Caldwell, Forest Hill, Long Island, N. Y. 

Congressman W. Fields, Olive Hill, Ky. 

Congressman John F. Miller, Seattle, Wash. 

Congressman John M. Morin, Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Congressman Thomas S. Crago, Waynesburg, Penn. 

Congressman Harris E. Hull, Williamsburg, la. 

Congressman L W. Harrison, Winchester, Va. 

Congressman Frank L. Greene, St. Albans, Vt. 

Officers 

Major General James W. McAndrew, Chief of Staff, American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

Major General Charles P. Summerall, Commanding 4th Corps American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

Major General William J. Snow, Chief of Field Artillery, American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

Brigadier General Fox Conner, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

Brigadier General Briant H. Wells, General Staff, American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

Brigadier General Frank Le J. Parker, Visitors' Bureau, Paris. 

Colonel George C. Marshall Jr., General Staff, American Expeditionary Forces. 

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas W. Hammond, General Staff, American Expeditionary 
Forces (who escorted the Congressional parly from Washington, D. D.) 

Lieutenant Colonel Roy W. Holderness, G-2, Tours, American Expeditionary 
Forces. 



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Lieutenant Colonel N. D. Ballentine, Signal Corps, American Expeditionary 

Forces. 
Lieutenant Colonel R. J. West, American Expeditionary Forces. 
Major Parker C. Kalloch Jr., General StafiF, American Expeditionary Forces. 
Major J. D. Pilcher, Medical Corps, American Expeditionary Forces. 
Captain C. S. Blaisely, Captain, Field Artillery, American Expeditionary Forces. 
First Lieutenant George W. Seaton, American Expeditionary Forces. 
First Lieutenant E. H. Riddle, Motor Transport Corps, American Expeditionary 

Forces. 

Captain and Lieutenant Longuet la Marche visited the chateau in December, 
1918. Captain Emile Longuet la Marche brought his wife to the chateau for a 
brief visit in the winter, and the two spent the month of April, 1919, there, laying 
plans for its restoration and refurnishing, and for the rehabilitation of the surround- 
ing country, in which work the 805th Pioneer Infantry rendered considerable 
assistance. 

Members of the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus, Salvation Army, 
and the Society of Friends were frequent guests at the chateau. 

Men of the Headquarters Company dragged a German '77 from St. Juvin and 
placed it in front of the building in the round plat formed by the circular drive- 
way. Here it will remain, no doubt, for many years to come. 

With what feelings will members of the regiment look upon this gun and upon 
the chateau when, as no doubt many of them will, they go back many years from 
now to the terrible, yet wonderful, familiar Argonne Forest? When they do go 
back they will go also to Romagne, a few kilometers away, there to pay homage 
to 22,000 American soldiers, buried on the side of a gentle hill, in a beautiful 
cemetery which, for a few days while they were awaiting movement orders, two of 
the 805th Pioneer Infantry companies had the honor of helping build. 



A Letter from Captain la Marche 

CHATEL-CHEHERY 
Par Grandpre, Ardennes 

20 Dec. 1918 . 

La tristesse que j*eprouve a voir ma pauvre maison demolie, a etc grandement 
attenuee par I'accueil charmant et amical que j'y ai re<;u a deux reprises de la part du 
Colonel et des Officiers de Tfitat-Major du 805e Regiment de Pionniers d'Infanterie 
Americaine. 

De meme que je n'oublierai jamais les excellents moments passes avec eux, de meme, 
je pense,rai toujours que c'est grace a leurs travaux que le Chateau a pu resister aux 
rigueurs de rhiver. 

Je suis heureux de leur adresser ici mes meilleurs remerciements avec I'assurance de 
mes sentiments amicaux. 

Emile Longuet la Marche. 



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Where the Regiment Got Its Men 



DiM 



STATE 


A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


c 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


HQ SUP MED 


TOTAL 


Alabama 


7 


2 






















1 


8 




19 


Arkansas 


4 




4 




1 








7 










5 




22 


Arizona 










1 






















1 


California 







1 














1 












4 


G)lorado 
































1 


Connecticut 


1 






















^ ^, 




8 




9 


Florida 


1 
























1 






2 


Georgia 


1 




, . 












, , 


, , 


, , 






, , 




1 


Idaho 


• • ■ • • • • 




, , 


, , 










, , 


, , 


, , 




, , 


, , 




1 


Iowa 




















1 










1 


3 


Indiana 






1 


1 






1 






1 






1 




1 


6 


Illinois 




1 


2 




















1 


3 




7 


Kansas 


3 


1 


17 


24 


17 


5 


1 


14 


10 


79 100 


81 


77 


17 


13 


459 


Louisiana 


.... 50 


38 


4 


19 


52 


70 


68 


58 


58 


40 


49 


38 


56 


15 


5 


620 


Mississippi 


28 


12 


3 


26 


52 


36 


28 


49 


47 


6 


11 


34 


6 


18 


6 


363 


Missouri 


.... 58 


79 


97 


80 


69 


77 


84 


71 


73 


77 


50 


35 


44 


13 


11 


918 


New York 


3 


4 

1 


•• 


•• 




•• 


•• 


*i 




•• 


•• 


•• 


3 
2 






10 


New Jersey 




4 


Nebraska 


4 


6 


5 


6 


2 


2 


8 


9 


9 


2 


6 


9 


3 


2 




73 


North Carolina 


14 


11 


•• 


3 




i 


*i 


i 




•• 


•• 




1 






27 


New Mexico 




6 


Ohio 






, , 


, , 




2 


1 






i 




i 


i 






6 


Oklahoma 




23 


27 


12 






27 


2 




4 




1 


29 


28 




157 


Pennsylvania 






, . 






i 


, , 










, , 


1 


, , 




2 


South Dakota 






1 


. , 




1 


1 


, , 




, , 




, . 


1 






6 


South Carolina 


.... 6 


4 




























10 


Texas 


.... 11 


6 


2 


3 


2 


1 


2 


3 


3 


1 


2 


3 


5 


10 




53 


Tennessee 


.... 2 


, , 


, , 






, , 


, , 


, , 


1 


, , 


, , 


.. 


, , 


, , 




3 


Virginia 


.... 2 


5 




, , 








1 




, , 




. , 


2 


1 




11 


West Virginia 





, , 


. , 




i 




, , 




, , 


, . 












1 


Washington 






















i 






4 




5 



Total 195 194 164 174 199 1% 223 208 208 213 225 203 235 134 39 2810 

Glimpses of the Morning Reports 

Men Total 



Date 


Officers 


Attached 


Assigned 


Men 


Commanding Officer 


July 15, 1918 


4-1 


312 


801 


1113 


Colonel Butler 


July 23, 1918 


47 


303 


836 


1139 


Colonel Humphrey 


August 8, 1918 


99 


6 


2067 


2073 


Colonel Humphrey 


August 27, 1918 


99 




3222 


3222 


Colonel Humphrey 


September 5, 1918 


98 




3178 


3178 


Colonel Humphrey 


September 17, 1918 


94 




2968 


2968 


Colonel Humphrey 


October 10, 1918 


95 




2776 


2776 


Colonel Humphrey 






(lost 


191 sick at Rdlamponl) 




November 11, 1918 


100 




2723 


2723 


Colonel Humphrey 


November 25, 1918 


100 




2722 


2722 


Colonel Humphrey 




(Nov. 


27 wc had 80 


replacements. All to 


A and C Companies) 




December 25, 1918 


100 




2788 


2788 


Colonel Humphrey 


February 25, 1919 


109 




2807 

(Sick men returned) 


2807 


Colonel Hu^nphrey 


March 25, 1919 


108 




2777 


277*1 


Colonel Humphrey 


April 29, 1919 


107 




2751 


2751 


Colonel Humphx y 


June 17, 1919 


81 




2699 


2699 


Colonel Humphrey 


June 30, 1919 


79 




2683 


2683 


Colonel Humphrey 


Total loss 539. 













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General Headquarters, American Expeditionary Forces, France 

April 19, 1919. 
From: Commander-in-Chief, American Expeditionary Forces. 
To: Commanding Officer, 805th Pioneer Infantry, 

Subject: Battle Participation. 

Following is a list of the battle engagements of the 805th Regiment of Pioneer Infantry during 
the war with Germany, including organizations which are entitled to the silver bands awarded 
under paragraph 244, Army Regulations. The ribbons herewith are furnished in lieu of the 
bands which will be supplied later by the Adjutant General, U. S. Army. 
1. MEUSE-ARGONNE OflFensive, France, 3 Oct. 11 Nov., 1918. 
Organization entitled to silver band: 

By Command of General Pershing; 

J. J. Jones, 
20910-A-65 Adjutant General, 



General Headquarters, American Expeditionary Forces, France 



April 19, 1919. 
From: The Adjutant General, American Expeditionary Forces. 
To: Commanding Officer, 805th Pioneer Infantry, 

Subject: Ribbons. 

1. Herewith is a copy of the order issued at these headquarters on the subject of the award 
of silver bands, to be engraved and placed upon the pike of colors or lance of the standards of 
the organizations which have served in the American Expeditionary Forces. Even if we could 
get here in France the prescribed silver bands, it would be impossible to have the engraving done 
in time to present them to the organizations entitled to them. For that reason, each organization 
is given a ribbon which shows in which battles it participated. This ribbon will be retained 
until the proper silver band is presented by the War Department. 

2. The Commander-in-Chief directed me to send the ribbons to you, and to ask you to present 
them with appropriate ceremonies to the units for which they are intended. He regrets very 
much that this cannot be done by him in person. 

By command of General Pershing; 
20910-A-65 J. J. Jones, 

Adjutant General. 



Hq., 805th Pioneer Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces, 29 April, 1919. — To all troops of 
this command. 

1. The foregoing letters speak for themselves. Copies will be furnished every officer and 
enlisted man of this regiment. They should be preserved. 

2. The ribbons will be fastened upon the pikestaff of the regimental colors. 

C. B. Humphrey, 
Colonel, Infantry, U. S. A. 

Commanding. 



Official: 



Paul S. Bliss, 

Captain, Infantry, U. S. A., 

Adjutant. 



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AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

OFFICE OF THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF 

To Departing Officers of the A. E, F. 

After honorably serving your Country in a great war, you are about to embark for the 
homeland. Remember that the bearing of their officers is reflected in the behavior and discipline 
of the men you are commanding homeward bound. I most sincerely trust that no single act 
may occur to stain the splendid record won by our troops in Europe. My confidence and best 
wishes follow you and them as you cross the sea, and in your future service in the Army or 
elsewhere. John J. Pershing. 



January 14, 1919. 



ARMY GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES, FRANCE 

From: Director, Army General Staff College. 

To: Commandant, Army Schools. 

Subject: Courtesies Extended to StaflF Class by 805th Pioneer Infantry. 

1. During the recent historical ride, the staff class was the guest of the 805th Pioneer Infantry 
at Chateau Chehery. Colonel C. B. Humphrey, 805th Pioneer Infantry, his officers and men 
were most hospitable and energetic in their efforts to provide comfort and entertainment to the 
members of the class. 

2. Through your office I desire to express my appreciation and that of the class for the many 
courtesies and kindnesses, which made our visit a most enjoyable one. 

M. C. Kerth, 
Colonel, G. S., 
Director. 
1st Ind. 

Headquarters' Army Schools, A. P. O. 714, A, E. F, 

January 15, 1919. 
To Commanding Officer, 805th Pioneer Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces: 



1. Approved. 



F. E. Bam FORD, 

Brigadier General, 
Commandant. 



WINDSOR CASTLE 

Soldiers of the United States, the people of the British Isles welcome you on your way to 
take your stand beside the Armies of many Nations now fighting in the Old World the great 
battle for human freedom. 

The Allies will gain new heart and spirit in your company. I wish that I could shake the 
hand of each one of you and bid you God speed on your mission. 

George R. I. 
April, 1918. 



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HEADQUARTERS 

U. S. TROOPS ABOAAD R. M. S. SAXONIA 

September 14, 1918 
From: C. 0. Troops aboard R. M. S. Saxonia. 
To: Capt. W. H. Hossack, Comdg., R. M. S. Saxonia. 

Subject: Efficiency of Ship's Officers and Men. 

1. I wish to express my appreciation and that of all officers, nurses, and enlisted men aboard 
the R- M. S. Saxonia, of the efficiency of the navigating officers and crew and all other members 
of the ship's company. 

2. Every attention was paid to the comfort and good care of officers, nurses, and enlisted 
passengers. 

3. Our best wishes are extended to Capt. Hossack, the kindly and efficient officers under him, 
and to the crew, with the hope that they may have good weather and no mishaps in all their 
subsequent voyages. 

C B. Humphrey, 

Colonel, 805th Pioneer Infantry, 
Commanding. 

AMERICAN RED CROSS 

ON ACTIVE SERVICE WITH THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

November 25, 1918. 
From: Lieut- H. 0. Johnson, A. R. C. 
To: The Commanding Officer, 805th Pioneer Infantry. 

This little note comes to you, conveying the thanks and appreciation of the Red Cross for 
your kindness in furnishing men to help in our work here. 

The work done by your men has been very important, and has helped us get our supplies to 
the hospitals and men at the front promptly. 

H. 0. Johnson, 
Lieut. A. R. C, 

In charge of Warehouse, 
Clermont. 

I certify this is a true copy: 
Mayland p. Lewis, 
1st Lieut, Inf., U- S. A., 805th Pioneer Inf. 



HEADQUARTERS 805th PIONEER INFANTRY 

ROLAMPONT, FRANCE 

October 1, 1918. 
From: C. 0. 805th Pioneer Infantry. 

To: Capt. A. W. Gauger, Army Gas School, Ft. St. Menge. 

Subject: Report on Instruction. 

1. I wish to express my appreciation of the excellent manner in which our regiment was 
instiucted in gas by representatives of your school, especially Lieut. J. H. Dupre. I also wish 
to thank you for the mimeograph copies of the Gas School Weekly Summary. 

2' I am confident that when our regimental gas officers and non-commissioned gas officers 
return from your school they will have been most thoroughly instructed. 

3. Our first battalion, which was delayed in convoy, will arrive at Rolampont on October 4th 
or 5th. This battalion, or about two-thirds of it, has had some preliminary gas instruction at 
Camp Funston, Kansas, U. S. A., but I wish you to disregard this instruction and give them 
complete gas instruction as soon as they arrive. Their gas masks have been drawn for them 
and will be left here so that you can give them their training at once. General Headquarters 
advises us that they will linger in Rolampont only two days. 

C. B. Humphrey, 

Colonel, Inf., U- S. A., 
Commanding, 



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HEADQUARTERS, FIRST ARMY 

OFFICE OF CHIEF ENGINEER 

From: The Chief Engineer, First Army. 

To: The Commanding Officer, 805th Pioneer Infantry. 

Subject: Services Rendered During OflFensive. 

1. The Chief Engineer desires to express his highest appreciation to you and to your Regi- 
ment /or the services rendered to the First Army, in the offensive between the Meuse and the 
Argonne, starting September 26, and the continuation of that OflFensive on November 1, and 
concluding with the armistice of November 11. 

2. The success of the operations of the Army Engineer Troops towards constructing and main- 
taining supply lines, both roads and railway, of the Army, was in no small measure made 
possible by the excellent work performed by your troops. 

3. It is desired that the terms of this letter be published to all the officers and enlisted men 
of your command at the earliest opportunity. 

4. A copy of this letter has been sent to the Ciiief of StaflF, Firt Army. 

George R. Spalding, Col. Engrs. 
I certify this is a true copy: Chief Engineer, First Army, 

Paul S Bliss American Expeditionary Forces. 

Capt. Inf.,'u. S. A. 

Adjutant. 

HEADQUARTERS AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

visitors' BURFJIU 

Paris, 37 Rue de Bassano, May 1, 1919. 
My dear Humphrey: 

The Congressional Committee returned to Paris last night, and I am taking advantage of this 
first opportunity to drop you a line, and tank you once again for the courtesies and hospitality 
extended by yourself and your oflFicers to the Committee and to those accompanying it during their 
stop at Chatel Chehery. 

The luncheon and vaudeville entertainment were very much enjoyed by us all, and we ap- 
preciate greatly the trouble that you took to make the visit to Chatel Qiehery such a pleasant one. 
With kindest regards. 

Very sincerely yours, 

F. Le J. Parker, 
Brigadier General, U- S. A. 
Colonel C. B. Humphrey, 

805th Pioneer Infantry, 
Chatel Chehery, Ardennes. 



AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

HEADQUARTERS SERVICES OF SUPPLY, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF QUARTERMASTER 

Tours, May 29, 1919. 
Colonel C. B. Humphrey, 

805th Pioneer Infantry, Camp Pontanezen, Brest. 
Dear Humphrey: 

Your letter of May 26 reached me this morning, and I am sending it by endorsement and 
special messenger to the Director, Motor Transport Corps in Tours, who handles the automobiles. 
Sorry not to see you again before you leave. As a matter of information 1 want to let you 
know that while at Neufchaleau I recommended that you be given a Certificate of Meritorious 
Service. Whether you will get it or not 1 do not know, but I wish you to know that I made 
the recommendation. 

With very best regards and good wishes, I am. 

Sincerely yours, 

William E. Horton, 
Colonel, Q. M. C. 



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By Lieut. Karl A. Heinzen 

HEADQUARTERS Company had its beginning June 20, in a row of tents at De- 
tention Camp No. 2, Camp Funston, when Captain F. 0. Jenkins, Lieut. Harold 
E. Johnson, Lieut. Frederick H. Jones, and Lieut. Raymond F. Olinger received the 
first recruits for what was then Headquarters Company, First Provisional Regiment. 

By orders dated July 5, the 805th Infantry was formed, and Lieut. Johnson and 
Lieut. Olinger assigned to duty with Headquarters Company of the new organization. 
Ten days later these two officers and seventy-three men marched to Funston, where 
the Headquarters Company was placed in buildings 1839 and 1939. Soon afterward 
the regiment became the 805th Pioneer Infantry. 

In Funston the training of the organization progressed rapidly. July 30, the 
company's strength was increased by the addition of 197 recruits. August 10, with 
the breaking up of the Machine Gun Company, Captain Frank D. Moses. and Lieut. 
Frank T. Knox were added to the Headquarters Company's list of officers, with 
Captain Moses in command. They brought with them a number of men, placing the 
strength of the company at nearly 300. On August 12, Lieut. Walter H. Brenneman 
was assigned to the company, and Lieut. Karl A. Heinzen reported the following day. 

Preparations for departing for overseas service were now being rushed, officers 
and men working night and day to place the company in first class shape. Specialists 
were added to the enlisted personnel, and surplus men were transferred. 

At 10:45 P M., August 27, six officers and 240 men who made up the company 
entrained at Funston for their long trip, and arrived in Camp Upton, N. Y., early in 
the morning of August 31. There was little sleep for anyone at Upton. Paper work, 
equipment, and other preparations for embarking kept all busy. On the morning of 
September 2, the company left for Quebec, and sailed from there on the night of 
September 3, on the Saxonia, a Cunard liner. 

Fourteen days later, on the moining of September 17, Headquarters Company, 
which then numbered six officers and 236 men, landed on European soil at Liver- 
pool, leaving immediately for Southampton. The following night came the dash 
across the channel, and the morning of September 19 found the company safely in 
Le Havre, France, from which the start was made for Rolampont, Haute Marne, 
September 20. Rolampont was reached September 22, and here for ten days the 
company camped in a field near the village, being equipped for service at the front, 
drilling and receiving instruction in the use of gas masks. 

On October 2 the company again boarded a train, and left for some destination 
which had not been announced. Early the following morning, when everyone jumped 
from the cars and lined up, the noise from an intense artillery fire, apparently not 
many miles away, made it certain to all that the front was somewhere nearby, and 
it was soon known that the pretty little shell-swept village in which the company 
had arrived was Clermont-en-Argonne, a few miles back of the line where the 
American First Army had jumped off in the Meuse-Argonne drive a few days before. 

The company was immediately marched to the top of Butte St. Anne, overlooking 
Clermont, where shelter tents were pitched. After a few days the men were moved 
into barracks nearby, which had formerly been occupied by the French. The com- 
pany remained billeted on this hill during the remainder of the drive. 



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On October 18 Lieut. Knox and Lieut. Johnson were made first lieutenants. 
Lieut. Knox, who had been in charge of regimental gas instruction in Funston, took 
charge of the same work, and as regimental gas officer was responsible for the safety 
of the men of the regiment in gas attacks. 

On October 21 the company received its "baptism of fire" when a group of 
German airmen flew over Clermont and dropped enough bombs to have done consid- 
erable damage had their aim been a little better. Although there were plenty of 
dug-outs nearby, curiosity overcame any other feeling, and most of the men showed 
a desire to see just what happened during an air raid. The experience was repeated 
two nights later. 






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On October 24 Captain Moses and Lieut. Olinger left the company to go to 
Company "D", and Captain T. A. Immel and Lieut. 0. F. Ireland were assigned to 
the organization. Lieut. Ireland left November 1, and Lieut. Leonce R. Legendre 
was assigned November 5. On November 14 Captain Immel left to take command 
of the Second Battalion of the regiment, and Captain George M. Bragan was assigned 
to take charge of the company. 

On November 26 the company left Clermont to take up new quarters at Chateau 
de Chehery, which was then advance headquarters of the regiment. Men of the com- 
pany assisted in putting the chateau into good condition and aided in the salvage 
operations in which the regiment was then engaged. They showed their ability and 
ingenuity in a number of ways, in helping bring order to the wrecked Argonne 
region. Electrical specialists repaired wrecked German electric plants, strung wires 



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for light and communication, and made the chateau a pleasant place in which to 
live. 

Men of the company were of great assistance in the entertainment of the Staff Col- 
lege and other groups of officers who visited the chateau. 

Early in the year it was decided to organize a band. Instruments were secured, 
the regiment was searched for men of musical ability, and all were assembled at 
Headquarters Company, under the direction of Lieut. Leonce R. Legendre. Pvt. 
George L. Polk, later made assistant band leader, worked hard with this material, 
and in a few weeks it was evident that the band would be a success. At the same 
time, Pvt. William Higgins, afterward made color sergeant, who had entertained the 
regiment and its guests since leaving Funston, gathered together a number of enter- 
tainers and started work on a theatrical production, which during the winter and 
spring not only provided entertainment for the companies of the 805th, but also 
played with great success in almost every town in the Argonne-Meuse sector, and 
later went to Neufchateau and nearby places. At Camp Pontanezen, Brest, this 
show was one of the most popular in the big embarkation center. 

On January 14 Lieut. Brenneman, who had been with the company since it 
left Fimston, was sent to Company "E'* on special duty, and later was transferred 
to Company "K." 

Educational work was started in the company on March 6, classes being formed 
in a variety of subjects, ranging from elementary to high school studies. These 
classes were held whenever possible. 

About this time, athletics began to occupy the minds of the men of the company, 
and a baseball team was formed, which played a series of games on diamonds built 
near the chateau. Battalion and company teams from within the regiment were 
played, and the schedule was gone through without a defeat. 

On March 16 the six-month period of service in the American Expeditionary 
Forces was completed, and little time was lost in sewing on the left sleeve the little 
gold chevron which marks the veteran. 

On April 22, after almost five months spent in the chateau, the company, with 
the rest of the regiment, received orders to go to Le Mans. Two days later these 
orders were changed, and the organization was ordered to Brest. The start was made 
from Chatel Chehery May 2, and Brest was reached May 5. 

In a short summary of the work of the company in France, the spirit of the men 
and their willingness to do the tasks assigned them can not be spoken of too highly. 
Every member of the company showed a spirit of co-operation with the company 
officers. A good staff of non-commissioned officers, including First Sgt. Daniels, 
Supply Sgt. Allen, Mess Sgt. Beauchamp, Color Sgt. Steemer, who acted also as 
provost sergeant and regimental gas non-com., was of great assistance. The duty 
sergeants, who included some trained men from the 25th Infantry, were active at 
all times. This spirit filled every non-com. and private in the company. 

While there were numerous changes during the period of service in France, in 
the personnel of the company, a large majority of the men who came to France 
with Headquarters Company, returned with the same organization. 

Death took two men: Corporal William Ward, who died in February, following 
an operation for appendicitis, and Pvt. Sam Jackson, who died in October from 
pneumonia. 

Through the long days of the Argonne campaign, the dreary days of the winter 
which followed the armistice, and the more pleasant spring days in the Aire valley, 
which perhaps made the separation from home felt more keenly, the men kept at 
their duties with good spirits; but when orders came at Brest which brought the 
company home there was not need for a word of warning here and there to hasten 
the work of packing. Headquarters Company climbed aboard the transport and 
looked to the West with a feeling: that their work had been done to the best of their 
ability, and that their record in France was one which justified a feeling of pride. 



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HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 



Off^ 



icers 



BRACAN. GEORGE M., Captain Infantry. U. S. A 

HEINZEN. KARL A.. Pint Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A. . 
KNOX, FRANK T., Fir«t Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A. . . 
LEGENDRE. LEONCE R.. First Lieutenant Infantry U. S. A. 
JOHNSON. HAROLD E., Fint Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A. 



. . 1516 S. ISth St.. Birmingham, Ala. 

301 Haxlette Ave.. N. W., Canton, Ohio 

. . 3405 E. 27th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Cutoff, La. 

Ballston Lake. N. Y. 



BANKS. CLARENCE (transferred) . . 3316944 
MARIOTT. HENRY O. (transferred) . 3300939 

PERRY, GEORGE W. J 3300902 

RILEY, WILLIAM W 3300900 

TYLER, JUUUS M 4260924 

TAYOR. FAY E 4260010 

POLK. GEORGE L 4152468 

DANIELS, MADISON L 3301100 

STEEMER, MORRIS R 3320505 

HIGGINS, WILLIAM W 3785848 

BEAUCHAMP, JOE 3300975 

ALLEN, DAWSON 3301148 

HILL, ROBERT J 3320467 

JOHNSON, CESCO H 3320574 

RATHMAN. JOHN P 3319631 

WASHINGTON, ULRIC L 3300822 

BEACHAM. WILLIAM 3316951 

BREDA, LEONARD 3300956 

DAVIS THOMAS R 3302168 

DEALEY, FRANK 4260074 

DINKINS, WILLIE 335062 

DUNCAN, LAWSON 3301481 

FERGUSON, JAMES R 335776 

FOXALL, PARKER C 3301289 

LAWSON, ISAIAH J 3301064 

LkDUFF, ALFRED 3301062 

NEVINS. HOWARD 3317217 

POLK, MIDDLETON B 3301272 

RIVERS, FRANK 335613 

TOUSSAINT, JACK 3300955 

LOCKE. NAPOLEON 3320664 

POWDRILL. QUINCY D 3300873 

TYUS, THEO 3319715 

WASHINGTON. FRED C 3303756 

WILLIAMS, SAMUEL 4150204 

WILSON, ROY A 3317440 

BODY, WAYMAN 3317331 

CHARLES, CADWALL L 3300911 

FAIRFAX, JOHN L 3320339 

FRAZIER, EMMETT 3303104 

GLOVER, CHARLES 3320481 

GRAY, JAMES U 3300879 

GRIFFITH. HENRY ^2?^ 

HALE. HENRY S. 3320393 

iONES, WILL 3320470 

LaBLUE, FELIX 3300942 

LaDELL. CHARLES E 3320431 

LANE, EVERETT H 3317432 

MILLER, WALTER L 3303395 

MORRIS, OSCAR 3301050 

NEELY, ALBERT J 3320508 

PARKS. THOMAS H 3302543 

RHINEY, ELMER G 3301912 

RICHARD, SAM 3301236 

RICHMOND. GEORGE W 330109* 

ROSS, ALBERT V 3320419 

SEALS. SPENCER J 4259775 

SMITH. JEROME 4259098 

STEWART, LAWRENCE H. . . . 2921446 

THOxMAS. BRYANT 3303478 

MULDREW, BENJAMIN H. . . . 4259750 

BLACKBURN, HUGH R 4258432 

CREEK, CLARENCE 3320491 

GREEN. OTHELLO 4258507 

JOHNSON. CHARLIE 3320579 

JOHNSON, EARL H 3320488 

NEVILS. EDWARD T 42593CT 

BROWN. ALONZO 4260038 

CARROLL, WILLIAM P 3320819 

DUHON. WILLIS 3302961 

HAMPTON. JOSEPH 4259040 



Men 

Regimental Sergeant Major . 2039 E. 18th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Regimental Sergeant Major Boley, Oklahoma 

Regimental Sergeant Major Box 312, Boley, Okla. 

Battalion Sergeant Major Box 74, Boley, Okla. 

Battalion Sergeant Major Box 308, Boley, Okla. 

BatUlion Sergeant Major . . 1811 Merrill St., Trenton. Mo. 
Assistant Band Leader . . . 103 Monrovia Ave., Smyrna, Del. 

First Sergeant 625 Lee Ave., Alexandria, La. 

Color Sergeant 1601 Viiiginia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Color Sergeant 1414 N. 5th St., Kansas City. Kan*. 

Mess Sergeant 1512 9th St., Alexandria, La. 

Supply Sergeant R. F. D. 2, Box 63, Alexandria, La. 

Band Sergeant .... 1059 Freeman Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Band Sergeant 2106 N. 3rd St., Kansas City, Kans. 

Band Sergeant Wellington, Lafayette Co., Mo. 

Band Sergeant Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Sergeant 2723 Cumberland St., Little Rock, Ark. 

Sergeant Box 141, Alexandria, La. 

Sergeant Box 556, Frcdericktown, Mo. 

Sergeant 406 N. 9th St., Hannibal. Mo. 

Sergeant 237 Woods St., Hamilton, O. 

Sergeant Box 185, Monroe. La. 

Sergeant 345 Beale Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 

Serffeant 1102 Opvlosa* St., Uke Charles, La. 

Sergeant 727 Lee St., Alexandria, La. 

Sergeant 518 Bol*on Ave.. Alexandria, La. 

Sergeant Holden, Johnson Co., Mo. 

Sergeant Gen. Del. Alexandria, La. 

Sergeant 212 Muhlenbcr« Place, Plainfield, N. J. 

Sergeant 524 Watkins Ave., Alexandria, La. 

Band Corporal Bonner Springs, Kans. 

Band Corporal Taft, Okla 

Band Corporal 820 M St., Atchison, Kans. 

Band Corporal 410 Dauphine St., New Orleans. La. 

Band Corporal 252 W. 124th St., New York, N. Y. 

Band Corporal .... 2623 Highland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal 28A S. Channing Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Corporal R. F. D. 2, Box 123, Boley, OkU. 

Corporal 317 Tracy St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal Ludington, La. 

Corporal 1125 Main St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal Wilburton. Okla. 

Corporal R. F. D. 3. Box 25, Okmulgee, Okla. 

Corporal 2043 N. 3rd St., Kansas City, Kans. 

Corporal 400 Rowland Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Corporal 833 Kansas Ave., Port Arthur, Texas 

Corporal 530 Troupe Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Corporal 4248 W. Belle Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Corporal , Donaldsonville, La. 

Corporal R. F. D. 1, Box 61. Boyce, La. 

Corporal 1003 Nebraska Ave.. Kansas City, Kans. 

Corporal Box 77. Frrriday, Li. 

Corporal Clarcyville, Perry Co., Mo. 

Corporal Glenmore, La. 

Corporal Box 41. Jonps, Morehouse Pnrish, La. 

Corporal 1027 Charlotte St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal 1912 E. 13th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal 915 N. K St., Fort Smith, Ark. 

Corporal 64 Sawyer St., Roxbury, Mass. 

Corporal 6101 St. Claude St., New Orleans. La. 

Corporal 1116 Pulaski St., Little Ro-k, Ark. 

Musician Firat Class . . . 2930 Main St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Musician Fint Class . . 1146 Freeman Ave., Kansas City. Kans. 
Musician Firat Class ... 926 Highland Ave., Kansas City. Mo. 
Musician Fint Class .... 74 Ewing St., Kansas City, Kans. 
Musician First Class . . 2409 N. Hallock St., Khhsis CUv, K-n. 
Musician Firat Class . . . 2223A Tracey Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Musician Second Class 821 Walnut St.. Fulton, Mo. 

Musician Second Class .... 709 E. 6th St., Topeka, Kans. 
Musician Second Class . . R. F. D. 3, Box 41, Lafayette. La. 
Musician Second Clasa . . . . 319 E. 7th St., Abilene, Kans. 



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MOULTRY, JULIUS 3302112 

STOUT, FRANK D 4152951 

THOMPSON. HENRY 4261128 

TILLIS, BENJAMIN A 2921457 

WALKER. JOHN H 3317716 

WILLIAMS, WILLIE F 3320661 

WITHERS, ROBERT 3320421 

BRANNUM. PAUL 4262815 

CARTER, ERNEST M 3320735 

CHANEY, ARTHUR 1968016 

DIMERY, STEPHEN 3320613 

HARRIS. ANDREW 3303382 

JOHNSON, ABRAHAM 4262073 

REED. WILLIS A 3301889 

ROBBS. McKINLEY W 3318068 

SIMPSON, SAMUEL 3300714 

TERRY, WILLIAM R 3320563 

ESNAULT, NOR BET 3301227 

MILLS, JOE 3301211 

MONTGOMERY, LONNIE .... 3300931 

WALLER. AUSTIN 3301003 

DAUGHERTY, HENRY 4259512 

DUKE. ALVIN T 4262063 

ALEXANDER. HICIE 4258661 

BASS. EMMETT C 3317175 

CHURCH. FRANK 3301322 

DODD. JOHNNIE 3317127 

FRANKLIN, JOHNIE 330122* 

JACOBS, CLAUDE 3320396 

JOHNSON, CLARENCE M 3301505 

OATMAN, WILLIAM R 4259110 

ROGERS. WILLIAM M 3320540 

SAGE. EUGENE H 4260790 

SMITH, CLINTON 3301177 

TAYLOR, ROBERT A 3317434 

WHITFIELD. NAPOLEON .... 4259129 

ABINGTON. MURREL C 3317293 

ANDERSON, LOUIS 3300901 

ANDERSON. W1LUAM A 3301021 

BAKER, ELVIN 3320429 

BANKS, COLEMAN C 3317149 

BARNS, JOHN 3316963 

BASTOIN, ALBERT 3317195 

BOWIE. SIMON 3301044 

BRAMLET, EDGAR 3320497 

BROWN, HENRY 2807903 

BUFORD, ROBERT A 3320397 

BUTLER, GRANT 33009*1 

BUTLER. OTTO ST. E 4259325 

CADE, EMORY 3320464 

CALDWELL, CHESTER 1169547 

CHAFFOLD, SAM 3301261 

CHAPTOR. WILLIAM 3301027 

CHILDERS, JESS 3320411 

COCKRELL. JACK 3301257 

COLTHARP. JOHN 3320427 

COOK. WILLIAM 3300932 

COOPER, SAM 3301282 

CROSBY, ERNEST 4258394 

CRUMP, CHARLES H 3320506 

DAVIS. BARNEY 3300998 

DAVIS, JIM 3300954 

DENNIS. JUNIA W 3320298 

DOBBINS. BARNEY 3320422 

DUNBAR. JOSEPH 1 3320510 

FLOYD. LINELL 3301184 

FORD. CHARLIE 3301180 

FOSTER. CLIFFORD N 4261024 

FRAZIER, ELVIN 3320392 

GIBSON. GEORGE W 3320415 

GORDON, WALTER C 3320440 

GREEN. RICHARD 3301329 

HALL, DAVE 3317351 

HALL, GEORGE 3320514 

HAMMONDS, LESSLY 4261012 

HANKINS. GEORGE W. D. . . . 3317173 

HARDISON, KENNETH 3301239 

HARRIS. CALVIN 3301151 

HARRISON, JAMES .3320516 

HENDERSON, ARTHUR 4259753 

HILL, JESSE 3320519 

HOLMES. JOHN 3301215 

HUBBARD, UNIA 3300936 

HUGHES, ZOROASTER H. ... 4261572 

HURT, MELVIN H 3317369 

JACKSON, CHARLIE 2813070 

JACKSON, CLEVELAND .... 3301185 

JACKSON, CORTEZ 3320477 

JOHNSON, ALBERT 3301218 



Musician Second Class Rockdale, Tex. 

Musician Second Class . . 22 Burlington St., Bordentown. N. J. 
Musician Second Class .... 1406 Quincy St., Topeka, Kans. 
Musician Second Class .... 705 Richard St., Columbia, S. C. 

Musician Second Class Blue Rapids, Kans. 

Musician Second Class . . . 1419 S. 3rd St., Leavenworth, Kans. 
Musician Second Class . 400 Oakland Ave., Kansss City, Kans. 

Musician Third Class .... 316 College Ave., Kennett, Mo. 

Musician Third Clsss 410 Lime St.. Topeka. Kan. 

Musician Third Class .... 2213 E. 35th St., Cleveland, Ohio 
Musician Third Class . . 1309 New Jersey St., Lawrence, Kans. 

Musician Third Class Plattenville, La. 

Musician Third Class New Florence, Mo. 

Musician Third Class Langston. Okla. 

Musician Third Class R. F. D. 1, La Junta, Col. 

Musician Third Class . . . . 311 N. Frankfort St., Tulsa, Okla. 
Musician Third Class ... 808 E. 12th St., Lawrence, Kans. 

Cook Gen. Del. Alexandria, La. 

Cook Box 226. Elizabeth, La. 

Cook 317 Oakland Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Cook 614 St. Ann St., Alexandria, La. 

Mechanic 1315 East 14th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Mechanic Box 307 New Madrid, Mo. 

Private First Class Paola. Kans. 

Private First Class .... 1501 E. Clark Ave., Psrsons, Kans. 

Private First Class Box 1, Grant St., Natchez, Miss. 

Private First Class 1530 Wilson Ave., Parsons. Kans. 

Private First Class ... Homer, La. 

Private First Class . . 925 A Nebraska Ave.. Kansas City, Kans. 

Private First Class R. F. D. 3, Bastrop, La. 

Private First Class . . . 1817 Washington Ave., Springfield, Mo. 
Private First Class ... 627 Franklin Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 
Private First Class .... 609 Steptoe Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private First Class Ragley. La. 

Private First Class 4207 Cook Ave.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private First Class 305 E. 7th St.. Joplin, Mo. 

Private 323 Montrose Ave.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Box 143 Weleetka, Okla. 

Private Box 453, Brinkley, Arit. 

Private 228 Virginia Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private Overton, Mo. 

Private . «L Kent Store. La. 

Private 423 S. Ransom St., Fort Scott. Kans. 

Private Box 265, Pineville. La. 

Private 2043 N. 3rd St.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 423 W. Magnolia Ave., San Antonio, Tex. 

Private 924 Freeman Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private R. F. D. 2, Box 127, Boley, Okla. 

Private 1833 Chariotte St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 712 N. 12th St.. Kansas City, Kans. 

Private P. O. Box 650, Round Rock, Tex. 

Private Box 64. Merrouge, La. 

Private Box 104 Alexandria, La. 

Private 2010 E. 9th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 829 Washington St.. Alexandria, La. 

Private 203 Franklin St.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 609 E. 6th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 5010 Vernon St., Ruslon, La. 

Private 734 Locust St., Kansts City, Mo. 

Private Eudon, Kans. 

Private 2131 Third St., Alexandria, La. 

Private 817 St. James St., Alexandria, La. 

Private Woodville. Miss. 

Private 441 Freeman Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private 417 Georgia Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private Oak Grove, Ls. 

Private Glenmore, La. 

Private R. F. D. 3. Box 31, Orrick. Mo. 

Private 623 Virginia Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private 42 S. Ewing St., Kansss City, Kans. 

Private 403 Cleveland Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private R. F. D. 1, Box 57. West Uke, U. 

Private 316 Montrose Ave., St. Louis. Mo. 

Privite 341 Oakland Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private Pilot Grove, Mo. 

Private 1449 Clark St., Fort Scott, Kans. 

Private Woodworth. La. 

Private 1013 Lee St.. .Alexandria. La. 

Private 635 Garfield Ave., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 1721 Lydia Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 326 State St., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private Box 202, Elisabeth, La. 

Private 518 5th St., Okmulgee, Okla. 

Private 2210 North 27th Ave.. Omaha, Nebr. 

Private Armstrong, Howard Co., Mo. 

Private . . . . R. F. D. 1, Box 107. Elysian Fields, Tex. 

Private 1049 Johnson St.. Alexandria. La. 

Private 343 Greeley Ave.. Kansas City, Kans. 

Private Box 244, LeComptc, La. 



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JOHNSON, DAN 3301250 

JOHNSON, GARRETT 3100672 

JOHNSON. ISAAC 3316966 

JOHNSON. JOHNNIE 3317164 

JONES, EDWARD F 4152683 

JONES, JULIAN 3320446 

JONES. ROBERT 3320417 

JORDON. WILLIAM 3320414 

LAVALAIS, WILUE 3301136 

LEWIS, ELMER 3320549 

LEWIS, THOMAS 4148277 

LOCKE. JOHN R 4259848 

LOCKRIDGE. NAPOLEON .... 3300689 

LOVE, CHARUE 3300689 

LUNSFORD. THOMAS 3300848 

McCLANAHAN, GRAYS 3320445 

McCEE. BRYAS F 3316953 

McGEE. ISAAC W 3300922 

MANN. CLARENCE 3320463 

MARTIN. ARLINGTON 3301157 

MAUL. FRANK E 3317258 

MAXEY. SAMUEL G 3319117 

MOORE. CICERO 3301271 

MOORE. JOSEPH 3317423 

MOSLEY. ELMER 2203560 

MURRAY, OTIS 3320525 

NEWELL. CHARLEY 3320483 

NICHOLS, HENRY 3317275 

NOBLES. SAMUEL 3320432 

NOGGINS, JOHN 3301186 

OSBORNE. CHARLES 3300851 

PARKS, HENRY L. 4261124 

PERRY, CHRISTOPHER 3301205 

PHILLIPS, ERNEST 3320517 

PIPES. WALTER 3317337 

PORTER. FRED L 3320512 

QUINN. WILLIE L. 3300937 

RAWLS, FRANK H 4261647 

RAY. JAMES S 3320532 

REED. HARRY 3320518 

REID. W. CLARENCE 4150485 

ROBERSON. NATHAN 3320299 

ROBINSON, ARTHUR 3317222 

ROBINSON. LEE 3317404 

ROBINSON, PRESTON ..... 3317155 

ROGERS. EARL 4261066 

ROGERS. ROY 3320484 

ROSS. FRED W 4262053 

RUSSELL, ANDREW 3300917 

RUSSELL, HANNIBAL R 3300868 

RUSSELL. VAN D 3320542 

SANDERS. LOUIS 3320509 

SANDERS, LUCIUS 3300693 

SHIELDS. LLOYD L 3320402 

SIMS. WALTER R 3300934 

.SMITH. IRVING L 4260684 

SPEARMAN. WILLIAM T 3320526 

STAPLES, CLARENCE 3320493 

STEEL. HAZLE 3300856 

STOUT. JOHN 4261979 

STUCKEY. JAMES W 3320475 

SULUVAN, WILLIAM 3320523 

SYKES. ROY 3320389 

SYKES, WILLIAM 3320394 

TAYLOR. EARL 3320489 

TAYLOR, ENIS 3320468 

THATCHER. HENRY J 3320391 

THOMAS, McKINLEY 3301197 

THORNTON, LEO 3320442 

TOLES. FRED 3301246 

TOLSON. CHARLEY 3.120460 

WADE, DOCK 3301156 

WADE. WILLIAM M 3317297 

WASHINGTON, ABRAM .... 3320466 

WASHINGTON. LEE 3301193 

WATSON. GEORGE 3320405 

WHITE. LODOWICK 3301286 

WILLIAMS. JOE 3320520 

WILLIAMS, MURLEN 3320409 

WILMER, ALONZO 3301128 

WILSON, SILAS 3320225 

WOODS, THOMAS H 3317211 

YOAKUM, JOSEPH E 3317150 

YOUNG, HENRY W 3317347 

YOUNG, HENRY Y 3301086 

YOUNG, JAMES 3300963 

YOUNG. RALPH E 3317392 



Private Zimmerman, La. 

Private 519 Asratioti Street, St. Louis., Mo. 

Private 218 E. Arclier St., Tulaa, Okla. 

Private Booneville. Mo. 

Private 2460 7th Ave., New York. N. Y. 

Private 210 Edgerton Ave., Kansas City. Kana. 

Private 1016 Oaicland Ave.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 125 Garfield Ave.. Kansas City, Kanaas 

Private Chanceyville. La. 

Private R. F. D. 5, Lawrence, Kans. 

Private 50 E. 133rd St.. New York, N. Y. 

Private 308 S. 22nd St.. St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Box 136. Boynton, OkU. 

Private R. F. D. 3, Box 124, Wetumka, Okla. 

Private 321 N. Exeter St., Tulsa, Okla. 

Private 1940 N. 3rd St., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 319 E. Monument St.. Jackson, Miss. 

Private Box 94, Weleetka, OkU. 

Private 2938 N. 5ih St.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private R. F. D. 3. Box 109 Okmulgee. Okla. 

Private Box 27. Kimmswick. Mo. 

Private .... . . . R. F. D. 4. Hiawatha. Kans. 

Private Selma La. 

Private 1714 Biddle St.. St. Louis. Mo. 

Private Care Geo. Books. Maud, Mis^ 

Private 509 N. 9th St.. Lawrence. Kans. 

Private 95 S. James St.. Kansas City, Kans. 

Private 4142 Cook Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 707 Walker Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Box 221, Alexandria, La. 

Private 626 N. Everest St.. Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Private 217 W. 6ih St., Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Private R. F. D. 1, Stephens. Ark. 

Private 326 Walker St., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 306 Park Ave., ColumhU, Mo. 

Private Route 1, Box 133, Mulberry, Kans. 

Private 342 Garfield Ave., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 123 N. 39th St.. Omaha. Neb. 

Private Eudora. Kans. 

Private 411 Minnesota Ave.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private Box 428, Suffolk, Va. 

Private R. F. D. 1, Ecru. Pontotac Co., Miss. 

Private 4214 Cook Ave.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Silver Creek, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. 2, Porter. Okla. 

Private Box 324. Richmond, Mo. 

Private 346 Greeley Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private 1217 N. 4th St., Atchison, Kans. 

Private Okmulgee, Okla. 

Private 503 N. Detroit St., Tulsa, Okla. 

Private 1043 Oakland Ave.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 429 State St., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private Taft, Okla. 

Private IIS Lafayette Ave.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Woodvillc. Marshall Co., Okla 

Private 2445 Euclid Ave.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 749 Walnut St., Lawrence, Kans. 

Private 934 Freeman Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private Tulsa, Okla. 

Private 2606 N. St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private 319 Virginia Ave., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 2804 N. 5th St.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 946 New Jersey Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 925 Washington Blvd., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 2039 N. Water St., Kans.n8 City. Kans. 

Private 344 Everett Ave., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 1514 N. 5th St., Kansas City, Kana. 

Private 228 Virginia Ave.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 647 Winona St., Kansss City, Kans. 

Private Lc Compt. La. 

Private 620 State St., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private Sheibum, La. 

Private 1907 Lucas Ave.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 320 Walker Ave., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private LeCompt, La. 

Private 533 State St., Kansas City, Kane. 

Private R. F. D. 3, Coushatia. La. 

Private 539 Nebraska Ave.. Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 2039 N. 3rd St.. Kansas City, Kans. 

Private R. F. D. 3. Alexandria. La. 

Private Garlandville. Miss. 

Private . .... 4284 West Corte Briellinlr. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 323 W. MisMuri Ave.. St. Joseph. Mo. 

Private 3432 Lawton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 919 Lee St., Alexandria. La. 

Private Box 199. Alexandria, La. 

Private 522 .N. Walnut St., Cameron, Mo. 



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J\0^^^f^^p'^ 




Company "G" in the rear and the Supply Company in the foreground, at Clermont-en- 

Argonne. Note Butte St. Anne, cypress-crowned in the distance. The 

officers left to right are: Capt. Thomas R. Lindsey, Lieut. Henry 

Wallenstein, Lieut. W. S. McFarland and Lieut. James Keeble. 




PAY IN SIGHT FOR THE BEARCATS 
Lieut. F. D. Preston (center), Regimental Supply Officer, and Lieut. James Keeble, Jr. 
(right) coming into camp with bags containing $101,945.94, the final pay of the 805th 
Pioneer Infantry in the Expeditionary Forces, at Camp Ponlanezen, Brest, June 14, 1919. 
Regimental Supply Sergeant Jack I. Warren (left) isn't going to let any unauthorized 

persons get the money. 



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By Lieut. F. D. Preston 

THE S. 0. S. of the 805th Infantry, as the 805 Bearcats were then known, like a great 
many of the other important and really good things of the Army, was organized 
in July of 1918, by the second lieutenants. These lieutenants became firsts, and at 
one time there was a captain with the company, but the first official record of the 
company, the morning report of July 15, shows that 2nd Lieut. G. W. Steagall and 
2nd Lieut. W. G. Cook, with sixty-five recruits, constituted the S. 0. S. of the regiment. 
2nd Lieut. W. S. McFarland had been thrown in for good measure, but Regimental 
Headquarters, being at that early stage expert in the grabbing game, had requisitioned 
him as regimental mess officer. 

Out there in Funston, where the wind and the sand and the dust blow in a con- 
tinual procession, where the state of Kansas passes in daily review, and where every 
one feels dirty and looks dirty; where the customary Monday morning grouch is a 
perpetual affair, the Supply Company was officially born. The records do not show 
any particular nebular disturbance, but it is a safe assumption that the wind was 
blowing with its accustomed force, and that the tents out mere in Detention Camp 
No. 2 had the usual inch of dust all over the floors before the first of the long 
series of memoranda came out ordering every one to police up. 

The tents were of the usual uncomfortable kind, and the future S. 0. S'ers got 
their baptism into the army in the shape of a shot in the arm and a vaccination, and 
then started in to learn the business of soldiering. The few remarks which follow 
will show that they learned the lesson well, and being in charge of real second lieu- 
tenants, they got away to a flying start that kept the Supply Company in the lead 
all through the experiences of the regiment. 

Taking a look at the early records of the company, one finds that the first man to 
get his name mentioned in the official reports was Pvt. Ulysses S. Balls, who closely 
followed in file by Arrington, Smith, White, and Wicks was ordered on special duty. 
The honor of being the first man to go to the hospital goes to Pvt. Jesse Thompson, 
who started singing that he didn't want to get well on the 16th, after only one day 
in his new home. Then Gus Morris broke into the limelight, and grabbed off the 
prize of being the first man to come back from the hospital, for on the 21st he dis- 
covered that the nurses were not beautiful at all. 

In the army, someone is always being appointed to something. Company Order 
No. 1 disturbed the peace of the windy morning of the 19th of July by appoint- 
mg Pvt. Sherman Pearson to the exalted position of bugler. He was obeyed and 
respected accordingly, and bugled the command out for reveille, until he was busted 
and transferred to the medical detachment, where they pay no attention to reveille 
and do not need buglers. It was a sad ending for so noble a beginning, but the history 
of many great artists can be written only in sad words. It seems that in the early 
days. Twine had the greatest pull with the camp authorities, for S. 0. 200, Headquar- 
ters Camp Funston, gave him the first leave of absence. The remarkable thing about it 
is that he got back on time, and you will find his name mentioned again later. The 
first non-commissioned officer in the company was Jack Warren, who dropped in 
for lunch one day with the three stripes of sergeant on his right sleeve, and taught 
the men to pronounce all the syllables of his title. He is the same Jack who has 



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since been redecorated with the three other stripes of a regimental supply sergeant, 
and the same one whom you all went to see when you lost your extra shoe laces, and 
wanted to replenish the supply without the knowledge of the supply sergeant. 

Every one remembers the long hike into Camp Funston proper, the birth of the 
Bearcat, the hot days on the range with the service rifle, and the elusive bull's-eye. 
The records do not show it, but the authors will wager a freckled doughnut that the 
first man to get out a base ball was none other than the Foote who has since pitched 
the company and the regimental teams to all those victories. 

Another 2nd Lieut., James Keeble, Jr., joined August 10, and the next day Captain 
Thomas R. Lindsey relieved Lieut. Cook as Regimental Supply Officer, and 2nd Lieut. 




Walter E. Barton joined Lieut. Steagall with the company. The horses and wagons 
arrived about the same time, and the business of getting ready to lick the Hun went 
merrily on. 

It was generally known, even at that early date, that the 805th Infantry ("Pio- 
neer" was added somewhat later) was to be sent overseas as soon as it could be 
prepared. That the regiment was ready to move, every man with a full equipment 
of everything that could be issued at Camp Funston, was largely due to the efficient 
work of Captain Thomas R. Lindsey, of Louisville, Ky. With his staff" of officers and 
men, he worked unceasingly, and the company was always ready to handle the tons 
of equipment. On the arrival of the company at Camp Upton, two days of feverish 
activity began. Captain Lindsey, Lieut. Cook, Lieut. Marston, another "second" who 
had joined in the meantime, with Sgt. Warren, and Smith, now also a regimental 



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Ration Dump of 1st Division, showing one day's rations in reserve for the doughboys. 
Very, Meuse, France. October 4, 1918. 



f^^^M 


mfmM 


^^ 


B^ 


^ 


IP 










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Ammunition Dump of 1st Division ablaze, showing two 155's with tractors afire. Char- 
pentry, Meuse, France. October 4, 1918- 



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supply sergeant, and Wicks were busiest. Tons of cotton equipment was exchanged 
for the wool overseas equipment. Everyone said that it could not be done, but the 
Supply Company made history in those two days, and every man left for France 
with a new overcoat, woolen clothing, spiral puttees, and everything needed by a 
regiment that was to be issued in the States. There was no time to think of eating 
or sleeping, but the regiment was equipped, and the S. 0. S. call had been answered. 

The company sailed for France with Regimental Headquarters, second battalion 
and the Headquarters Company on the good ship Saxonia. In spite of the day and 
night work at camp, every one was happy, and if there had been any "subs" around, 
there are those willing to bet anything from "c c" pills to corned beef that the 
Supply Company would have seen them first. After landing in France, and passing 
the inspections of Liverpool, Southampton, and Le Havre, the company arrived 
in Rolampont, and again drew a few tons of ordnance, helmets, tents, shoes, and 
such things. They then proceeded to Clermont-en-Argonne, and took up the watch 
on Butte Ste. Anne, where history tells us Peter the Hermit started the First Crusade. 
The first few days were mainly consumed in watching the aeroplanes darting to 
and fro, for this hill was the beginning of the front, and all airplanes flew over it 
for the purpose of taking their bearings. 

The hill looked safe and imposing, so the supply company settled down, dug 
in for the winter, arid stayed right there until the eventful morning exactly eight 
months later when the train of familiar "Hommes 40, Chevaux 8," rolled away for 
Brest and kitchen police. Despite the nightly visits of the inquisitive Jerry with his 
humming motor, and ofi'erings of the deadly bomb, causing a natural inclination to 
sleep in a dug-out, the company had plenty of work. The regiment quickly became 
scattered, and the problem of distribution of rations and supplies became in- 
creasingly harder. We are unable to find any one who was either naked or hungry, 
so we pat ourselves on the shoulder and think about the long, weary nights when 
there were twenty-six men out on guard; when the salvage dump and the gasoline 
station had to have men; when a lick on the road was sending ten pounds of bacon 
to the men in the front line; when the road so painfully and carefully built up to 
the camp had washed out, and had to be rebuilt; when the various regiments moved 
to or from the front through Clermont, and the company turned out the next morn- 
ing and once more cleaned and policed up the town; to the times when wood had to 
be carried from the railhead; and to the millions of other little things that were 
cheerfully done. 

Due to the difficulty of making selections from the many good men in the com- 
pany, no non-commissioned officers were appointed until in October. Then Walter 
Payne was made "top", and Adams, Smith, Powell, Wicks, Andrews, Pressley, and 
Anderson adorned themselves with sergeants' chevrons. Twine, Odum, Primer, Beck- 
holm, and Simpson became corporals. Payne was later deposed from the throne, and 
Anderson, another 25th Infantry man, inherited the disc of the 1st sergeant. 

About the same time. Ordnance Sergeant Dewey Messeral joined the company 
and became of invaluable assistance to the supply officer in caring for the details 
of the ordnance equipment of the regiment. 

Among the officers, many things had happened. The company mourned with 
Captain Lindsey the death of his father, and wished him Godspeed when he left 
the company to return to the States as a casual to look after the interests of his 
sisters. All of the second lieutenants who had started the company had earned their 
silver bar. Lieuts. Cook and Marston had been transferred to line companies; 2nd 
Lieut. George W. Spaine had joined; and 1st Lieut. F. D. Preston had finished the 
argument with the lieutenant-colonel concerning the relative merits of the beers 
of Cincinnati and Tiffin, and joined as regimental supply officer. 

At Brest the company again handled the tons of equipment necessary to give each 
man a complete outfit of serviceable clothing on the arrival in the States, and 
became quartermasters with the same willingness that they had displayed as true 
pioneers. 



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SUPPLY COMPANY 



Officers 

PRESTON, FRANK DAVIS, First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 3301 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 

STEAGALL, G. W.. First Lieutenant Infantry, U.S.A Tullahoma, Tenn. 

McFARLAND. WILLIAM SYLVESTER. First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Ladonia, Texas 

KEEBLE, JAMES. JR.. First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Elgin, Texas 

SPAINE, GEORGE WILUAM, Second Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 546 W. 147th St.. New York, N. Y. 



WARREN, JACK 1 337006 

SMITH, GIBBS WAYNE 3300786 

ANDERSON, EDWARD 335007 

SMITH. MARCELLUS 3302034 

ANDREWS. CHARLES HENRY . . 3300673 

ARRINGTON. DANIEL M 3300764 

POWELL, CALVIN E 2921617 

ADAMS, THOMAS 3300731 

ODUM, ANTHONY G 1169625 

PETERS. GEORGE L 4149925 

PRIMMER. BEN 3300773 

TWINE, WILLIAM HENRY. JR. . . 3300769 

BASS, CARMIE 3317162 

BRACKEEN. JOSEPH D 3300757 

MORRIS, LOUIS D 3303780 

PAGE. RESWELL 3319642 

TAYLOR. JOHN 3300691 

CHILDES, JAMES 1169549 

JORDAN, EDWARD L 1169606 

McQUEEN. ARTHUR 3300791 

HARRISON, LEWIS 2735841 

JACKSON, JAMES E 2735869 

MERRELL. JESSE JAMES .... 2921410 

JOHNSON. HOLSIE E 3300761 

BLANTON. LAWRENCE O. . . . 3320686 

CAMPBELL, IVORY PEARL . . . 3320621 

DODD. JODIE 1169562 

FOOTE. WILUAM 1169576 

JOHNSON, LAWRENCE F. . . . 3303792 

OWENS. JESSE 2921610 

RICHARDSON, ED. D 2921432 

SIMPSON, CHARLEY 2921441 

CRISP. RALPHAEL W 3300694 

KELLEY. FLOYD B 3300669 

KIRKSY. ROBERT 3301266 

McNEAR, MONT C 4261978 

MITCHELL, KELSO 3301167 

ROBERTS, WILLIAM F 3300810 

TAYLOR, FOREST 3319666 

WRIGHT, GEORGE 3300750 

WYATT, JOE 3300790 

ALLEN, CORNELIUS C 1169517 

ALLEN, OSCAR 1169519 

ANDERSON, DENNIS J 3300667 

AUGUSTA. DAVID 3319924 

BAILEY, ARTHUR 917187 

BALLARD. CHINK 3300710 

BARNETT. JOSEPH 3300727 

BECKHOM, CHESTER A. ... 3300745 

BENTLEY, HARVEY F 4261096 

BENTON, SYLVESTER 3319660 

BOGGS, WILLIAM H 4258397 

BOOKER. WILLIE 3319876 

BOYD, DAVID 3300815 

BOYD, JIMMIE 3319654 

BRIGHT. JESS 3319707 

BRITTENUM. JIM 3300826 

BROWN. CLARENCE 3300824 

BUTLER, FRANK M 3320840 

CARTER, THOMAS 3303716 

CLARKE, ELMER B 3300678 

COLFAX, STEPHEN B 3320709 

CRUEL, ED 3300841 

DAVIS, ABB 3300724 

DAVIS, WILLIAM E 3300770 

Dc GRAFFENREID. REUBEN E. . . 3300763 

DONN\HUE, DONNIE 1169563 

DOUGLAS. CHARLEY 3319684 

DOWNING, JOHN 3319926 



Men 

Regimental Supply Sergeant Chicago, 111. 

Kegimental Supply Sergeant 715 Fond Du Lac St., Muskogee, Okla. 

First Sergeant 825 W. Davis St., Jackson, Miss. 

Mess Sergeant Higginsville, Mo. 

Supply Sergeant 1540 Merricll St., Trenton, Mo. 

Supply Sergeant .... 626 Fond Du Uc St., Muskogee. Okla. 

Supply Sergeant Eutaw, Ala. 

Sergeant Eufaula. Okla. 

Corporal Conroe, Tex. 

Corporal 9-11 W. 99th St.. New York, N. Y. 

Corporal 200 1-2 S. 2nd St., Muskogee, Okla. 

Corporal 635 S. 4th St., Muskogee. Okla. 

Cook S. Park Del., Merrian, Kans. 

Cook Eufaula. Okla. 

Cook 2015 Bourbon St., New Orleans, La. 

Cook 4 Wellington, Mo. 

Cook Bragfs, Okla. 

Horse Shoer 611 Calhoun St., Temple, Tex. 

Horse Shoer 2809 Glass St.. Houston. Tex. 

Horse Shoer Route 1, Atkins. Ark. 

Mechanic White Plains, Va. 

Mechanic . . . 2223 Cleveland PI. N. E., Washington, D. C. 

Mechanic 164 Clinton St., Detroit. Mich. 

Saddler 619 N. 16th St., Muskogee, Okla. 

Wagoner 400C West St., Hutchinson, Kan. 

Wagoner 938 Splitlog Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Wagoner Brenham, Tex. 

Wagoner Wharton, Tex. 

Wagoner 1631 Saratoga St., New Orleans, La. 

Wagoner Hillsboro, Ala. 

Wagoner Sebring, Fla. 

Wagoner Palm Dale, Fla. 

Private First Class Boynton, (Mela. 

Private First Class Weston, Mo. 

Private First Class Oakdalc, La. 

Private First Class 2511 P St.. Omaha, Neb. 

Private First Class Oakviile, La. 

Private First Class .... 421 Kcclcy Ave., Bartlesville, Okla. 

Private First Class Montgomery City, Mo. 

Private First Class Wagoner. Okla. 

Private First Class .... 926 S. Main St., Muskogee. Okla. 

Private Brenham, Tex. 

Private Kenelton, Tex. 

Private Platte City, Mo. 

Private Leland, Miss. 

Private 1019 New Jersey Ave., Kansas City, Kans. 

Private Gibson Sution, Okla. 

Private Checotah, Okla. 

Private 1816 Dcnnison St., Muskogee. Okla. 

Private 522 West 8th St., Yankton, S. D. 

Private Higginsville, Mo. 

Private 611 1-2 Charlotte St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Rolling Fork, Miss. 

Private 716 E. 7th St., Coffeyville. Kans., 

Private Ripley. Miss. 

Private 610 N. 1st St.. Atchison. Kans. 

Private Holly Grove. Ark. 

Private 324 1-2 North 2nd St.. Muskogee, Okla. 

Private 1018 Washburn Ave., Topeka, Kans. 

Private 498 Walnut St.. New Orleans. La. 

Private Plattsburg, Mo. 

Private 1012 Lime St., Topeka. Kans. 

Private Route 2. Porter, Okla. 

Private Tullahassee, Okla. 

Private 903 W. Harris Ave.. McAlesler. Okla. 

Private 323 45th & Dennison Sts., Muskogee, Okla. 

Private Ill Bridge St., Waco, Tes. 

Private 575 Grand Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Helm. Miss. 



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EDWARDS. HARRY 3319732 

FIELDS. ABRAM 3302692 

GRAHAM, CLIFTON E 3320190 

GRAY. JAMES A 3300743 

GROVES. RALPH E 4261638 

HALL, LEON A 3320745 

HARRIS. SANFORD 3319718 

HESTER, CUFTON 3302585 

HOLMES, HENRY E 3319677 

HOWELL, LOUIS 3320804 

IVEY, JAMES 3300783 

JOHNSON, CUNTON 3319730 

JOHNSON, DECATER 3319900 

JOHNSON. ELBERT 3300716 

JOHNSON. EMILE 3303470 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM A 2735893 

JONES, ANTHONY 3302660 

JORDAN. CARL 3319667 

LOVE, EUGENE 2921596 

LEE, HOWARD C 2735859 

LOVEJOY, JOHN 3319722 

LUCAS, GEORGE W 2735866 

LUCKEY, JAMES E 3300799 

McGEE, BEN 3319872 

McGOVERN. ENIEL 3302572 

McNEAL, WILLIAM 3319950 

MOORE, ARCHIE 3300668 

PAYNE, NATHANIEL W 2921421 

PERRY, FRANCIS 3319747 

PINDAR, RICHARD JR 2921422 

POE, HENRY 2921616 

RASBERRY, ANDERSON 3319765 

REED, JOHNNIE 3319785 

REED, JOHN D . 3300779 

ROBERTSON, WADDY 2921624 

ROSS. WILLIAM F 3319716 

ROUNDTREE. GILES 3319737 

RUSS, MOSES 2921435 

SANDERS, ARTHUR 3302758 

SCOTT, DAVID 3319938 

SHACKLEFORD, OLLIE 2921627 

SIMMONS, CURTIS 3301249 

SMITH, ALTO 2921442 

SMITH, DAVID 3300688 

SOLOMON, D. BAPTIST 3300784 

STEVENS, A. 1 1169654 

STOCKTON, HERBERT V 3319709 

TERRY, TOM JAMES B 3300707 

WALKER, CLARENCE 3319683 

WATSON, WILLIAM 3300774 

WEDDINGTON, WALTER .... 3320740 

WICKS, JAMES 3300682 

WOLDRIDGE. HARRY E 4259*50 

WRIGHT, OLLIE 3319717 

YOUNG. DAVID 3912026 



MESSERALL. DEWEY (while) 



Private 712 N. 1st St., Atchison. Kans. 

Private Lake Providence, La. 

Private Carson, Misa. 

Private 740 Indianapolis Ave., Muskogee, Okla. 

Private 822 N. 23rd St., Onuha, Neb. 

Private 921 E. 10th St., Topeka. Kan. 

Private 812 Atchison St., Atchison. Kans. 

Private Royville, La. 

Private Wilmington, N. C. 

Private 912 Yuma St., Manhattan, Kans. 

Private Stringtown, Okla. 

Private Richcy, Miss. 

Private Berthshirc, Miss. 

Private - Wybark. OkU. 

Private Donaldsonville. La. 

Private ... 641 South Carolina Ave., S. E.. Washington, D. C. 

Private Lake Providence, La. 

Private 801 Pacific, Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Verbina, Ala. 

Private 1412 27th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

Private Route 1, Atchison, Kans. 

Private 2427 F. St., N. W. Washington. D. C. 

Private Route 4, Box 60, Stratford, Okla. 

Private Thru, Miss. 

Private Clayton. La. 

Private ... NitU Yuma, Miss. 

Private Pittsfield. III. 

Private 903 Jesse St., Jacksonville. Fla. 

Private Nitta Yuma. Miss. 

Private 494, Sanford, Fla. 

Private Longston, Ala. 

Private Helena, Ark. 

Private Fayette, Miss. 

Private Madison, Ark. 

Private Huntsville. Ala. 

Private Route 1, Oak Mills, Kan. 

Private Route 1, Corning, Kans. 

Private Bay Harbor, Fla. 

Private East Carrol Parish. Sondheimer, La. 

Private Nitta Yuma, Miss. 

Private Covin, Ala. 

Private Tillman. La. 

Private Marianna. Fla. 

Private Route 2, Boynton, Okla. 

Private 976 Tampora St., Muskogee, Okla. 

Private Route 3. Box 42, Hallettsville. Tex. 

Private 1305 L. St., Atchinson, Kans. 

Private Salpulpa, Okla. 

Private Route 6. Box 7, Ripley, Miss. 

Private 404 N. 9th St., Muskogee, Okla. 

Private 634 College Ave., Topeka, Kans. 

Private 931 12th St., Des Moines, li. 

Private 1229 Michigan St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Anguilla, Miss. 

Private Pinckney, Ark. 

Ordnance Sergeant Caledonia, Minn. 



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By Major Walton I. Mitchell 

ON July 11, 1918, the following order was issued from the office of the camp 
surgeon, Headquarters Camp Funston, Kansas: 

"Office Order No. 11, Par. 1. Captain Walton I. Mitchell, M. R. C, and First 
Lieut. James E. McManis, M. R. C, Sgt. John S. Grassfield, Jr., Pvts. 1st cl. Carl 0. 
Nordeen and Edgar Malcom, Pvts. Edward C. Colin and Milford Wedel will report 
for temporary duty July 14, 1918, with the 805th Infantry (colored). Captain 
Mitchell will take over Infirmary No. 19, receipting for all medical property therein 
to the surgeon, 530th Engineers' Service Battalion.' 

All these officers and men had been on duty at Infirmary No. 5, 164th Depot 
Brigade, Camp Funston, Kansas, for several months, both Capt. Mitchell and Lieut. 
McManis having been in service for over a year previously. Captain Mitchell was 
assigned to the Depot Brigade from Company 8, M. 0. T. C, Ft. Riley, September 
28, 1917, as a 1st lieutenant. He was promoted to a captaincy March 20, 1918. Lieut. 
McManis came to the Depot Brigade from the 356th Infantry, 89th Division, just 
previous to the departure of the division overseas. 

Sergeant Grassfield and the other members of the enlisted personnel attached by 
this order had served under Captain Mitchell at Infirmaries 15 and 5, and Sgt. Grass- 
field had also been in the Brigade Surgeon's office for some time, and was an 
experienced paper-work man. On August 4, Pvt. Icl. Nordeen received his warrant 
as sergeant, and on August 14 Sgt. Grassfield was warranted as sergeant first class. 

First Lieut. Arthur F. Schopper, D. R. C, with his enlisted assistant, Pvt. Icl. 
Charles M. McWilliams, were attached to the organization at the same time, as dental 
surgeon and assistant, both coming from Dental Infirmary No. 1, Camp Funston. 

On reporting for duty on July 14, at Infirmary No. 19, we found it occupied by 
the Medical Detachment of the 530th Engineers, and were forced to share the build- 
ing with them until their departure overseas about two weeks later. At this dale we 
were kept busy examining new recruits, holding sick-call, and slowly attempting to 
pick out satisfactory material suitable for transfer from the line to the medical de- 
partment. 

On August 12 we succeeded in obtaining twenty-one picked men who were at 
once put through a thorough course of "drill for sanitary troops," including litter 
drill, and were the only men of the detachment who received any drill of any kind 
prior to arrival overseas. Captain Mitchell was definitely assigned as Regimental 
Surgeon August 12, and Sgts. Grassfield and Nordeen also; and on August 25 
Pvts. Icl. Malcom and Wedel received their permanent assignments. Our final 
personnel of twenty men had been selected from their qualification cards on file 
at the Camp Personnel office. Several of them had had more or less medical or 
pharmaceutical experience, and all of them an education above the average, being 
mostly high school graduates and university men. 

Owing to preparations then in full blast for our movement overseas, these men 
received practically no instruction of any kind in adequate preparation for their 
duties until the regiment arrived overseas. But they rapidly assimilated from their 
companions who had received instruction, and were by no means "rookies." Efforts 
had been made almost weekly through the camp surgeon to have our full permanent 



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complement of officers assigned to us, but it was not until August 22, five days 
before entraining, that a telegram was received from the Adjutant General assigning 
us from the Medical Officers' Training Camp at Ft. Riley, the following six m^ical 
officers: 1st Lieuts. Glen R. Ingram, Earl C. Lightfoot, William J. Lowis, Avery 
L. Myrick, Amos H. Rhodes, and George A. Rush. All reported on this date, 
completing the detachment with the exception of two privates, as we were informed 
by the Surgeon General's Office that the tables of organization did not include any 
dental officers or assistants. This was bad news, as many of our newly acquired 
men were sadly in need of dental work, which they did not receive until the following 
January, when two colored dental officers were assigned from the 92nd Division and 
remained with the regiment until we arrived at Brest the following May. 




The first trains left August 26, carrying us to Camp Upton, New York, the 
Medical Detachment being split up into sections, under charge of one officer 
on each separate train. The last train left the night of August 27. En route, Lieut. 
Lightfoot was taken sick with an acute attack of appendicitis and was transferred 
to the hospital at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, the first of our losses in officers. 
At Camp Upton, Lieut. Rhodes was left at the camp hospital with a strangulated 
hernia, for operation, on August 31; and October 4, at Rolampont, France, we lost 
Lieut. Myrick, transferring him to the camp hospital at Humes with a severe attack 
of sciatica, from which he never recovered sufficiently to rejoin us. He was dis- 
charged in San Francisco after his evacuation to the States. 

Owing to a severe epidemic of the Spanish flu at Rolampont, while in the train- 
ing area, from September 22 to October 1, we temporarily lost Lieut. Ingram. He 
was transferred to the camp hospital at Humes, but we were all mighty glad to 



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have him rejoin us at Clermont on October 17, and after that date the hoodoo among 
the oflFicers seems to have deserted us. 

Almost immediately after arriving at Clermont-en-Argonne, on October 2, the regi- 
ment was scattered to the four winds, one company to a locality usually, without 
ambulance facilities of any kind, and with but three medical oflFicers for the entire 
regiment. It may easily be seen that we had a man's sized job on our hands. Time 
and again we were forced to transport our sick in open "Nash Quads" a distance of 
thirty to forty kilometers to the nearest hospital that would receive our patients. The 
field, mobile and evacuation hospitals close to us were full of the wounded from the 
front and did not take the sick. Thus while our headquarters remained at Clermont, 
for a considerable length of time we had to transport our sick to Evacuation Hospital 
No. 9, at Vaubecourt, thirty-five kilometers from Clermont. The flu epidemic which 
had hit our Second and Third Battalions so hard at Rolampont, hit the First Battalion 
soon after its arrival at Clermont, which was eight days after our headquarters, 
Second and Third Battalions had arrived. With the utterly inadequate number of 
oflficers and our lack of transporation, it presented a problem which was partly 
remedied by our finally having a "G. M. C." ambulance with two white drivers at- 
tached to us from Field Hospital No. 116, at Futeau, on October 20. Shortly after- 
wards we obtained a Ford ambulance, and after the armistice was signed, when 
transportation was not so badly needed, we drew four Ford ambulances and two 
"G. M. C." ambulances, which were entirely adequate for our needs, but several lives 
could probably have been saved had we been supplied with suitable and adequate 
transportation when it was so badly needed. 




^. 



MEDICAL DETACHMENT AT CHATEAU DE CHEHERY. 



Major Mitchell (near the German 77), Lieut, (later Capt.) King, and Sgt. Nordeen are 

in front of the line. 



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Lieut. Jacob S. Goldstein and Lieut. Alton B. Reddick, M. C, arrived October 11 
from Camp Hospital No. 27, at Tours, assigned to fill the vacancies caused by the 
loss of Lieuts. Lightfoot and Rhodes. They were immediately sent to Avocourt and 
Auzeville, respectively, and thereafter our troubles were small compared to what they 
had been with but three medical officers to look after the welfare of the entire 
regiment, scattered over such a wide area. 

To the credit of Lieuts. Ingram, Lowis, and Rush, be it said that, coming in as 
raw rookies almost, after but three weeks of training, fresh from civilian lite, they 
took hold of their duties like old timers, making no mistakes, working hard and 
faithfully during the days when everything seemed against us. Not a word of com- 
plaint came from any of them. They gave the best that was in them at all times; 
were courteous at all times to officers and men alike, and were loved by all with whom 
they served. 

Lieuts. Goldstein, ^^Goldie" to all of us, and Reddick were old timers, having been 
in service at the hospital several months before coming to us, and with the exception 
of Lieut. Goldstein's aversion to arising before having his breakfast in bed and hold- 
ing sick-call before 8 a. m., and Lieut. Reddick's pet hobby, solitaire, were always 
on the job and mighty valuable assets. 

Lieut. Rush, with headquarters at Clermont, after Regimental Headquarters were 
moved to Chatel-Chehery, had undoubtedly the hardest work of any of us, as 
he made rounds in the ambulance of from four to six companies daily, during all 
kinds of weather and along all kinds of roads, and also, towards the last of his 
stay in Clermont, opened up a small six-bed hospital which remained in operation 
for transient cases until the regiment left for Brest. 

The entire Medical Staff has had the full co-operation and assistance of Colonel 
Humphrey in every way. Co-operation has been the watchword both ways, and 
every medical officer has aimed to be on his toes, ready and willing to do his bit 
towards remedying any defects in sanitation as well as keeping the general health of 
the command in the excellent condition it has been throughout our stay in 
France. This condition was unexpected in a regiment of troops half of who^i were 
transplanted from sunny southern climes to wet, rainy, muddy, northern France. 
The rate of venereal diseases was extremely low, being only three-tenths of one 
per cent (.0035) for several months in succession and often less. 

On October 18, when promotions finally arrived from the States, Captain Mitchell 
received his commission as major. It had reached Camp Funston the day after the 
regiment left, August 28, and was none the less welcome, if tardy. 

A word of appreciation for our non-commissioned officers is in order. Very 
few medical detachments, be they white or black, have been favored with as earnest, 
appreciative, and willing workers as the 805th. Our "Top" spt., "Johnnv" Grassfield, 
has been the pet of the outfit. Everybody knows, likes, and loves "Johnny," the 
best paper-work man in the detachment, and jack-of -all-trades. 

Sgt. Carl Oscar Nordeen, nicknamed Pinky from the roseate hue of his quite 
prominent aquiline nasal apoendage, also called The Bi^ Swede, is about as " hard 
boiled" as they mak 'em. He had done the bulk of the drilling of the men since we 
have been concentrated, and has done it well. He's the most military man in the 
outfit, even salutes in his sleep. 

Sgt. Milford Wedel, our registered pharmacist, used to fill the "C. 0."s prescrip- 
tions in civil life in Wichita, Kansas, so he knows the writer too well for him to 
make any adverse comments. 

Sgt. Edgar Malcom, hailing from Tryon, Oklahoma, is there with the goods when 
it comes to almost everything. 



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CHATEAU DE CHEHERY 

At Chatel-Chehery (Ardennes) France. For six months regimental headquarters of the 

805th Pioneer Infantry. The rustic porch was built by the Germans while the chateau 

was used by them as stafif headquarters. 



MORE ABOUT THE MEDICOS 
By Pvt. IcL. Percy Young 

OF the states represented, Kansas takes the lead with thirteen men. Missouri sent 
eleven, Louisiana five, Mississippi six, Oklahoma two, and Indiana one. 

After noting the various states represented, it is natural to consider the schools. 
Pvts. Icl. Henry Dillard, John E. Lowry, and Percy Young, and Pvt. Homer Thomp- 
son are former students of Kansas State University. Pvt. Icl. Henry Dillard graduat- 
ed from the School of Pharmacy, Pvt. Homer Thompson, who had the great good 
fortune to return home soon after the armistice, is now a junior in the School of 
Pharmacy. Pvt. Icl. John E. Lowry and Pvt. Icl. Percy Young are classed as juniors 
in the School of Arts and Science. 

Sgt. Fred K. Rogers completed his premedical course at Kansas State University, 
and his course in medicine at Illinois University. He was later interne at the City 
Hospital of Kansas City, Mo. He is a true son of the Sunflower State and is the only 
colored sgt. in the detachment. 

Howard University School of Medicine, which ranks well among other institutions 
of medicine, is represented by Pvt. Icl. Louis K. Berger. Pvt. Icl. Philip B. 
Johnson was a student of chemistry at Fisk University. The law school of Chicago 



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University is represented by Pvt. Icl. Houston Shelton. Pvt. Icl. Fred D. Wood 
attended the State University of Nebraska, where he was elected to the Greek fra- 
ternity Kappa Alpha Psi. Pvt. Leroy R. Young attended the State Agricultural Col- 
lege of Kansas at Manhattan. 

Of the smaller schools and colleges having former students in the detachment are 
the following: Barton High School of St. Joseph, Mo., of which Alonzo E. Allen is a 
graduate; Alcorn A. and M. College at Alcorn, Miss., attwided by Pvt. Henry Sias; 
Waldon University, attended by Pvt. Thomas Gray; Western University, Kansas City, 
Kan., attended by Pvt. George Madison; Washburn College, Topeka, Kan., attended 
by Pvt. Icl. Leon Evans; City High School of Muskogee, Okla., attended by Pvt. 
Icl. Nicholas N. Smith. 

The duties of our men really began upon their arrival at Rolampont, France, 
September 21. On September 26 a few men were sent to Field Hospital No. 7, at 
Humes, for instruction in the care of the sick. Those who went were: Pvts. F. 
Brown, L. Carter, L. Evans, E. R. Nelson, H. Sias, N. N. Smith, F. Wood, L. Young, 
and P. Young. According to the hospital attendants, there had been little to do 
until the arrival of the 802nd and 805th Pioneer Infantry Regimente at Rolampont. 
But from that time until the departure of these regiments for the front, every ward 
in that large hospital did a capacity business. And at the time of the arrival of the 
men from the detachment the attendants were well nigh worn out. On October 1 our 
men were recalled. 

The troops were loaded October 2 on trains that were to carry them to the front. 
And since the Medical Detachment was the last to be provided for, we were forced 
to ride in a car half filled with anununition. It was not a pleasant prospect, and 
some were a little suspicious of such accommodations. When we awoke October 3, in 
the midst of the flash and boom of cannon, we knew not whether to crouch closer 
to those boxes of ammunition which had served us as beds, or to bounce out of the 
car before a bomb came crashing along. 

At Clermont-en-Argonne the detachment was again brought together. Those who 
had been with the "Lost Battalion" had arrived. But within another few days there 
came another general distribution. Pvts. Alonzo Allen and French Brown, with 
Lieut. Rush in charge, were on duty with Companies "C" and "H" at Avocourt, which 
were closest to the firing line. They pitched their pup-tents directly beneath those 
sausage balloons around which such terrific air battles were sometimes waged. On 
three different occasions the gas alarm was sounded. 

A few days later a detachment of nine enlisted men and one sergeant was sent 
with Lieut. Lowis on detached service to Aubreville. They were: Pvts. Henry Dil- 
lard, Leon Evans, Leonard Fields, Thomas Gray, Fred Rogers, Henry Sias, Fred 
Wood, Leroy R. Young, and Percy Young. 

From Aubreville we were moved to Varennes, a little closer up to the line. Here 
we remained under the sound of those tremendous guns, in si^ht of air battles, and 
exposed to air raids until the armistice was signed. And at Varennes things really 
happened. This was the huge rail-head that was supplying the troops who were 
attacking in the Argonne sector. Also there was a large mobile hospital located a 
dangerously short distance from our camp. Now, on moonlight nights, hospitals and 
rail-centers were much sought by Boche airplanes. 

It was on the night of the 26th, or thereabout, when we received our first taste 
of bombs spilled from mid-air. About nine o'clock the irregular whirr of a German 
plane nlunged the camp into silence. A few moments later the hills and valleys 
resounded with the echo of exploding bombs. For the space of an hour there was 
quiet overhead. But at ten Fritz appeared again, and at eleven he appeared for the 
last time that night. This same performance was repeated for several nights. 

On the night of the last raid we stood outside our tents. Presently a bomb dropped 
at a distance too short to be safe. One man leaped into a nearby shell-hole, another 



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Varenne8-en-Argonne, retaken from the Germans September 26. This is where 

Louis XVI was captured at the time of the French revolution, 

in 1793, while trying to escape from France. 



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rushed for a dugout, while the rest dived into their tents just as bits of iron went 
scattering through the trees. 

Those were strenuous days at Varennes. Everybody's nerves were keyed to the 
highest pitch. The continuous roar of the guns, the trembling of the earth, and the 
incessant humming of passing motor trucks bound for the line kept things in a 
strained condition. Something had to break. And it did. It was somebody's nerve. 
As a result, somebody was put on K. P. duty for some trivial matter and was set to 
pealing great barrels of potatoes. On the night of his third day of duty he awoke 
the tent with the cry: "I'm not going to peel any more potatoes." When someone 
was kind enough to wake him from his nightmare, he smiled and dropped off to 
sleep again. Well, we laughed and we relaxed. 

Life seemed to hold neither past nor future. The past had dropped away like 
a faded vision. As one man put it while we were talking of home one evening: 
"The past seems like a dream; sometimes I even wonder if I ever had a home." 

At Clermont, Pvts. Louis Houston, Sam Hughes, Clyde Jones, Albert Smith, 
Nicholas Smith, and Henry Sias, under Major Mitchell, were experiencing air raids 
also. 

Late in October the following Pvts.: Louis Berger, Francis Booker, Louis C. Carter, 
Frank B. Jennings, Tom King, John Lowry, Jeff Turner, George Madison, E. R. 
Nelson, Houston Shelton, and Julius B. Williams, under Lieut. J. S. Goldstein, M. C, 
moved from Avocourt to Charpentry. It was while here they were under shell fire. 

Pvts. Alonzo Allen, French Brown, Louis Houston, Henry Sias, Nicholas N. 
Smith, and Homer Thompson were recalled to Clermont-en-Argonne. Pvt. Homer 
Thompson was later taken sick and removed to the hospital. This was the second 
attack, the first coming shortly after arriving at Rolampont, France. 

By the first of November things became mighty hot; and it began to look as if 
the Bearcat Regiment was going to be called to the firing line. There was need to 
have one more sergeant in the detachment. Accordingly, Major Mitchell called in 
the following privates for examination: Henry Dillard, Leon Evans, Sherman 
Pearson, Fred Rogers, Henry Sias, Fred Wood, and Percy Young. Alonzo Allen, 
who had previously been called to Clermont, also took the examination. The highest 
grade was made by Pvt. Fred Rogers; next highest was made by Pvt. Percy Young. 
Pvt. Rogers was made sergeant immediately, and eleven privates first class were 
appointed a few days later. 

During the latter part of November and in the early days of December there was 
another general shifting of the detachment. Headquarters was moved from Cler- 
mont-en-Argonne to Chateau de Chehery, and preparations were made for the men 
to take up winter quarters, though the troops did not know at that time that such 
was the case. The lieutenants and enlisted men were assigned anew and things soon 
settled down to a general routine. 

With the rain and the snow and the sleet it was a dreary winter, with here and 
there a ray of sunshine. And the fortunes of the various members of the detachment 
varied little one from another. Yet it was during this season that some of the men 
were assigned to the real duties for which they were gathered into the organization; 
and opportunity for individual effort was given. 

At Clermont-en-Argonne, Pvt. Icl. Nicholas N. Smith, under Lieut. Rush, had 
charge of the work in the infirmary and prophylactic station. His work in this 
capacity was creditable. Pvt. Henry Sias was assigned to duty as assistant to Lieut. 
Brock, D. C. When the former was removed from this work he was proficient in 
extracting teeth and putting in cement or silver fillings. At Chateau de Chehery 
Pvt. Id. Philip B. Johnson became proficient in his duties as assistant to Lieut. 
King, D. C. So thorough did Johnson become that, when Lieut. King was transferred 



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"Helene," one of the big railway guns used by the French who assisted the Americans 
on the Verdun ofiFensive, beginning September 25. 1918. Near Rarecourt, Meuse, France. 

September 26, 1918. 




VERDUN, FROM AEROPLANE 



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and became Captain King, Pvt. Icl. Johnson was transferred with him as his author- 
ized assistant. 

Pvt. Icl. Albert J. Smith became indispensable as an orderly to Major Mitchell. 
Pvt. Charley Moore also did excellent work as orderly to Lieut. Ingram while on 
detached service at Dun-sur-Meuse. Pvt. Icl. Louis K. Berger and Pvt. Icl. Thomas 
King did excellent work as mechanics and ambulance drivers. Pvt. Id. Sherman 
Pearson, Pvt. Icl. Houston Shelton, and Pvt. Icl. George Madison became members 
of the Regimental Band, but the latter two discontinued those duties. Pvt. Icl. Sher- 
man Pearson, however, continued this work, and is considered an expert cometist. 

Pvt. Leroy Young was given the opportunity to practise veterinary surgery at 
various times. While under the instructions of Lieut. Lowis, Pvt. Icl. Percy Young 
gained much useful information. The work of Pvt. Icl. Henry W. Dillard, who 
was on detached service with Pvt. Aaron B. Jackson, is worthy of commendation. 
Pvt. Icl. John E. Lowry, working under Lieut. Reddick, M. C, was able to render 
Company "M" of the Third Battalion important services. 

Those who served as instructors were Pvt. Louis C. Carter and Pvt. Icl. Percy 
Young. The work of Pvt. Louis C. Carter as teacher attracted the attention of his 
superior officers. 

The winter was long, but it could not last forever. When spring came the fol- 
lowing men were granted leaves: Pvt. Thomas Gray; Pvt. Icl. Philip Johnson; 
Pvt. George Madison; Pvt. Icl. Albert J. Smith; Pvt. Icl. Nicholas N. Smith; Pvt. 
Icl. Houston Shelton. Upon their return the men told the story of their hospitable 
reception by the French and of the wonderful scenes in southern France. The com- 
mon expression was, "It is the most beautiful you ever saw." 

We may now consider the losses of the detachment. Since its organization it 
has lost through death Pvts. Fred Howard and Thomas Griffin. Those lost through 
illness were: Pvts. Leonard Fields, Homer Thompson, and Henry A. Thomas. Pvts. 
Harper Johnson, Louis Lamb, and Berman Smallwood never left the States. 

The transfer of Pvt. Icl. Philip B. Johnson has already been noted. 

We have learned of the organization of the detachment, and of its work; we now 
come to the concluding words. It may be said, and without undue presumption, that 
the morale of this small organization was equal to that of any other organization in 
the regiment. Disciplinary measures were taken in a few instances, but such was true 
in every other organization. 

These few noncombatants lived the typical life of combatants; sleeping in dug- 
outs, tramping through mud and rain, and suffering with the others — ^the inevitable 
privations of war. And even though there was no chance for advancement, there was 
on every hand a willingness and determination to do the "bit" that it was necessary 
to do. 



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MEDICAL DETACHMENT 



Officers ' 

MITCHELL, W. L. Major. Medical Corps. Surgeon 3210 E. lit St.. WichiU, Kan. 

GOLDSTEIN, JACOB S., First Lieutenant, Medical Corps, Assistant Surgeon . 2308 E. Cambria St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

INGHAM. GLEN R.. First Lieutenant, Medical Corps, Assistant Sungeon 43 £. Niles St., Tuscolo. 111. 

LOWIS. WILLIAM J., First Lieutenant, Medical Corps, AssisUnt Surgeon Colby. Kan. 

REDDICK. ALTON B., First Lieutenant Medical Corps. Assistant Surgeon Sylvania, Georgia 

RUSIf, GEORGE A., First Lieutenant, Medical Corps, AssisUnt Surgeon . . .2613 Brooklyn Ave.. Kansas City. Mo. 



GRASSFIELD, JOHN S. JR. . . . 2202786 

MALCOM. EDGAR 2202790 

NORDEEN. CARL 2202803 

ROGERS, FREDERICK K 3320606 

WEDEL, MILFORD N 3297012 

ALLEN. ALONZO E 42S9076 

BERGER. LOUIS K 42S8686 

DILLARD. IfENRY W 4258272 

EVANS, LEONS 3319686 

KING. TOM 3319746 

LOWRY. E. JOHN 4258659 

PEARSON, SHERMAN 3300776 

SMITH. ALBERT J 4261029 

SMITH, NICHOLAS N 4261045 

SHELTON, HOUSTON 4259475 

WOOD, FRED D 4259479 

YOUNG, PERCY 4258478 

BOOKER, FRANCIS T 4258194 

BROWN. FRENCH 4259454 

CARTER, LOUIS C 4259269 

GRAY. THOMAS H 3319819 

GRIER, FRED 3319674 

HOUSTON. LOUIS 3301245 

HUGHES. SAM 3319887 

JACKSON. AARON B 3304155 

JENNINGS, FRANK B 4258316 

JOSHUA. THOMAS 3301243 

LEMELY, WALTER 3319906 

MADISON, GEORGE J 4258115 

MOORE, CHARLEY 4262821 

NELSON. ELLIS R 3301279 

SEARS. JOHN H 3300666 

SIAS, HENRY 3319910 

TURNER. JEFF 3319937 

WILLIAMS. JULIUS B 3301208 

YOUNG, LEROY R 4258416 



Men 

Sergeant First Class Paris, Iowa 

Sergeant Tryon, Okla. 

Serifcant Concordia, Kans. 

Sergeant 623 N. 3rd St., Lawrence, Kans. 

Sergeant Moand Ridge, Kans. 

Private First Class. . . . 208^ North Uth St., St. Joseph, Mo. 
Private FirM Class .... 3412 East 21st St.. Kansas City. Mo. 
Private First Class . . . 2306 Sherman Ave.. Kansas City, Kan. 
Private First Class .... 576 Lydia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Fir»t Class Planes. Kans. 

Private First Class Butler, Mo. 

Private First Class Box 81. CoweU, Okla. 

Private First Class . . . 2418 Sherman Ave.. Kansas City, Kan. 
Private First Class . . 2312 1-2 Highland Ave., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private First Class 1824 Pasco St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Tint CUss . . . 19th and Vine Sts.. Kansas City, Mo. 
Private First Class .... 1725 Tennessee St., Lawrence. Kan. 

Private 1115 Washington St., Great Bend. Kan. 

Private 1119 Garfield Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 822 Athon St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Private Rosedale, Mias. 

Private 1607 Virginia Ave., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Elisabeth, La. 

Private Benoit. Mia*. 

Private Box 967, Shreveport, La. 

Private 34 Franklin Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Oakdale, La. 

Private Vicksburg. Miss. 

Private 1215 O St., Atchison. Kan. 

Private Kinnet, Mo. 

Private 716 W. 2nd St., Crowley, La. 

Private Paducah, Ky. 

Private Boleshed, Misa. 

Private Chotard, Miss. 

Private Flora, La. 

Private 1117 New York St.. Lawrence, Kan. 



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View of Dun on eastern bank of Meuse River, showing hill which was a strong German 
defence. Dun-sur-Meuse, Meuse, France. November 8, 1918. 




View of the valley of the Aire, showing American soldiers' camp and camp fires early 
in the morning. Near Apremont, Ardennes, France. October 16, 1918. 



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By First Sct. Clyde H. Anthony 

("^ OMPANY "A" became an organization July 1, 1918, at Camp Funston, Kan. 
^It is composed of men drafted from the states of Louisiana and Mississippi, and 
was first officered by Captain Onan C. Adkins and Lieut. W. W. Locke. On August 20 
the company was increased to almost full army strength by men from Missouri and 
Kansas, its officers then being Lieut. W. L. Schmitz, conmianding the company, and 
Lieuts. P. R. Powell, L. A. Noble, W. W. Locke, and C. T. Morehead. 

After a very short training, the company on August 26 was almost fully equipped 
and ready for service overseas. The organization left Camp Funston August 26, 
and after several days' traveling arrived at Camp Upton, N. Y. There it was more 
fully equipped. After a brief stop on September 2 with other members of the First 
Battalion the company left for foreign service. 

Misfortune seemed to be in the path of the company, for after several days of 
voyaging, developments arose which caused the transport on which the company 
sailed to be turned around. On September 12 it was back at Quebec, Canada, where 
the first fatal misfortune fell upon the company: Corp. Lott Goines succumbed to 
illness from the short voyage out to sea. 

With a number taken out as unfit to proceed overseas, the company again set 
sail with about two hundred men, on Friday, September 13, this in itself being 
spoken of as an ill omen for the voyage. 

On September 25, after a very successful voyage the company was landed in 
England. It shortly proceeded on to France, where it landed on the night of 
September 27, at Cherbourg. 

From this time on the history of Company "A" is memorable as well as inter- 
esting. There still was much distance to cover before the company would be in a 
position to be of service. From Cherbourg it traveled by rail in "40 Hommes- 
8 Chevaux" to Rolampont. 

Living in shelter tents was made more miserable by rains which caused a sea of 
mud. The men being inspired by a sense of duty, no word of grtunble came from 
anyone. In a short time the company was in the Argonne only slightly removed 
from the fiercest of operations. 

Clermont-en-Argonne was the home of the company from early October until 
November 1. Here was the scene of many thrilling experiences. No one can forget 
the exhausting climb to the summit of that hill, nor the ensuing days of excitement. 
Now indeed was no closer touch with actual warfare necessary to impress upon all the 
seriousness of a soldier's life. 

The life in shelter tents was resumed for a time under very bad conditions. 
Not many kilometers away, heavy barrages sounded nearer, railroad guns roared. 
Overhead was heard the purring throbs of airplanes, lines of communication flowed 
with traffic to and from the front. Conjecture then arose as to what the company 
would do, when one day orders came for the company to report for duty. On that 
great traffic way north from Clermont, the company toiled laboriously. The work 
was dangerous and tedious, yet the first lap of that way stands to the company's 
credit. 



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Nightly, with cautious care, the men found rest in the darkness and the damp 
beneath their shelter tents. Several days had passed, the roar of big guns was no 
unusual thing, and the men were becoming accustomed to the thrill of being behind 
the lines. Every day brought some new experience. During the early quietness 
of a beautiful moonlight night on October 21, Fritz produced the thrill which was 
long to live in the minds of the members of Company "A." 

About nine o'clock, when most of the men had gone to their bunks, three 
thunderous reports broke the stillness of the night. Awakened from their sleep 
and frightened out of their wits, from the bustle and stir within the barracks, men 
came forth, stumbling, running, falling into the bright moonlight. Most of them 



Corporal . 
L. Gaines. 



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undressed, some equipped with rifles only, some with gas mask and helmet, some with 
full pack came bolting from the quarters. There were imprecations and prayers alike 
upon their lips, half crazed they knew not where they went. Some few preached 
the folly of going forth as targets, but had a drill been practised and carried on it 
could not have been more prompt and regular. 

The rapid purr of airplanes was heard and shells were bursting overhead. 

It all passed as quickly as it came, hearts beat more easily, and slowly the men 
resumed sleep in their bunks. A small few could not be persuaded from the security 
of the dug-outs. Again, on the night of October 23, a second part was played by that 
thrilling actor, Fritz. The fear of the former night's experience still remained 
with many, yet the raid passed without any serious results. 

After several weeks' labor at Clermont the company left Clermont Hill November 
3, Captain Arthur Harvey then being in command. With full packs the company 



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marched toward Varennes. The start was lovely, the afternoon was beautiful, but 
several hours brought a change; the men grew tired, and the night came cloudy 
and cold. 

With the night a steady rain began to fall, and as the company came into 
Varennes it was falling heavily. The night was dark, and the men, drenched and 
chilled, were ordered to pitch tents on the slope of a hill. The grass felt like a river, 
and everything was wet. 

Not many tents were pitched in that gloom, yet all, sleeping upon blankets 
with shelter tents and overcoats over them, rested for the night. The morning found 
the company moving farther on. It stopped one night to sleep beside the road, 
then moved on to quarters in an old building near the road to Apremont. Work on 
the roads was resumed, and here for three weeks the company aided in keeping up 
traffic ways. Ere the company moved again the armistice was signed, and with 
the war's end almost assured, the men felt more cheerful, speculating as to when 
they would be sent home. 

On November 21 the company hiked to Briquenay, a muddy little torn up village 
in Ardennes. Here the company began salvaging. In this task the work of the 
company in their area stands against the record of any company in the regiment 
for a similar period of time. Over those hills and through those woods surrounding 
Briquenay not one salvageable thing was unfound, unseen, unmoved, from the 
smallest to the largest article used in war. The expression, "carried them bombs from 
Briquenay to Senuc" is aptly put. Many burdensome loads were brought from 
places in the hills through almost impassable roads. On one occasion, after pa- 
tiently and laboriously ridding the country for miles around of bombs and am- 
munition and collecting it in a specified place, the company was ordered to carry the 
entire collection back into the hills and blow it up. 

After a time of salvaging came the dangerous work of demolition. Many tons 
of ammunition was demolished by the company, and many are the marks upon 
the fields in this area. 

December 24 saw the company moving to Senuc to continue in the work of 
salvaging and demolition. Here the men found quarters in an old chateau, and 
here it was that life as a soldier took on its brightest hue. The place was a palace, 
comparatively speaking, and everyone was comfortable. The ensuing days were 
cheerful and the men were content, though the work was still dangerous and hard. 
Twas very much like home, and with a few conveniences the men lived a very 
pleasant life. After a time work slackened, and the men were put to drilling. On 
January 28 the company moved to Dun. 

The move to Dun did not, however, have any reference to work of the company 
being done; seemingly it had only begun. That great dump of everything salvaged 
from the surrounding miles of country was taken in. charge and literally cleaned 
up. This work, though tiring, was not so hard. Dun proved to be a very interesting 
place to live in. 

The men, grew to like it. After a while the days became more pleasant, and as 
the work was playing out again the men were drilled and given a few -days of going 
to school. It was generally felt that a short time would see them on their way 
home. Finally, on May 4, with other companies of the 1st Battalion they left for Brest 
and was soon bound for the U. S. A. 



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COMPANY "A' 



Officers 

HARVEY, ARTHUR, Capuin Infantry, U. S. A 255 So. 7th St., Salina, Kan. 

POWELL. PAUL R., First Lieatraant Infantry, U. S. A 404 Coleman Ave., Hammond, La. 

HUBBARD, WILLIAM F., First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Timpson. Tex. 

KNUDSON. EDWIN B., Second Lietuenant Infantry, U. S. A Scobey, Mont. 



ANTHONY, CLYDE H 4260391 

PUCH. ROBERT 3301474 

CARTER. MANUEL 3301438 

CROSS. HAMILTON E 4259227 

WILLIS, ROY 3301406 

BIRTON, EDDIE 330I36S 

BURKES. LICE 3301364 

ZEDD, GEORGE W 3301484 

WILLIAMS. MANUEL 3301539 

HENDERSON, ALBERT 3301356 

SAMPLE, DEWEY 3301340 

PELIOT, DANIEL 3289145 

HALL, WILUE 3303806 

EMERY, SHELLY 3301352 

JACKSON, SIDNEY 4260231 

LUCIAN, FRED 3303885 

JEFFERSON, JAMES 3301298 

ANDREWS. RUFUS 3301503 

ELEBY. HENRY 3303954 

HUNTER, JESSE A 4260229 

BUFORD, CARTER 4261975 

HENDERSON, CHARLIE .... 3301501 

DAVIS. AL 2517984 

BROWN, BERNEST 4261905 

BUTLER. RICHARD 3301478 

JACKSON. FRANK 4260198 

JOHNSON. OLIVER 4260414 

PERKINS. ROLLA 4260420 

WATTERS, JAMES H 4260395 

WILLIAMS, JESSIE 4260255 

EDWARDS. OSCAR " . 42619*7 

SIMS. ROBERT 3301516 

WHEELER. ALEXANDER .... 3301557 

ALBERT, GAY 3301431 

BROWN. WILLIAM 3301336 

PREMORE. CHESTER 3301300 

McNABB, WALTER 3784682 

CURL. R. E 1169558 

JOHNSON, GEORGE T 4260370 

COX. DAN 3301343 

LEWIS. JOHNIE B 2812353 

BURKETT, CHRISTOPHER C. . . . 4152484 

CLARKE, GEORGE S 4149963 

FARIS. ARCHIE 3178280 

HARRISON. AMBROSE 2343620 

JONES. KING E 2865186 

ABNER. WESLEY 2811676 

BALLARD. TOM 3301489 

BAUKNIGHT. EUGENE W70766 

BEARD, CARTER 3301362 

BELL, HENRY 3781615 

BELL. TURNER B 3972102 

BELT, FRANK 3784801 

BENNETT. ERNEST 4281859 

BOLDEN. RICHARD 3319913 

BOYD. WILLIE 3784641 

BOYKIN. OSCAR 4231736 

BRADLEY. HILLARD 3301254 

BRICKLEY, ISRAEL 3303810 

BRIDGES, MARVIN 4075322 

BRYANT. WASHINGTON . ... 3003824 

BURRELL. CARTER 3319914 

BURRELL, JOE 3784730 

BUTLER, MORRIS 3303973 

BUTLER PETER 3303937 

CARPENTER, JAMES 3784728 

CARTER. GRAYSON 3301461 

CHARLES. ESSA LEE 3784667 

CHEATMAN. WILLIAM 3303944 

CHERRY. JOE A 1889223 

COFFREY, FRANK 3303984 



Men 

First Sengeant 5902 Michigan Ave.. St. Louts, Mo. 

Mess Sergeant 1014 Grammoit St., Monroe, La. 

Sergeant 911 Adams St., Monroe, La. 

Sergeant 2424 Montgall Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No. 1, Monroe, La. 

Sergeant Portland, Ark. 

Sergeant Monroe, La. 

Sergeant 327 N. 8th St., Monroe, La. 

Corporal Molley, La. 

Corporal 1400 Desiard St., Monroe>, La. 

Corporal Alexandria. La. 

Corporal Hardeeville, S. C. 

Corporal 607 St. Ann St., Baton Rouge. La. 

Corporal Carson, La. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 3, California. Mo. 

Corporal 1131 Rampart St., New Orlems. Li. 

Corporal Linco, La. 

Corporal Aurelle, Ark. 

Corporal 1405 Partridge St.. New Orleans. La. 

Corporal 402 North Lamine St., Sedalia, Mo. 

Corporal 2505 "P" St., Omahs, Neb. 

Corporal 1101 Breard St., Monroe, La. 

Corporal Fisk. Trxss 

Corporal 100 N. Williams St., Moberly, Mo. 

Corporal Monroe. La. 

Corporal 1312 N. Lynn St.. Independence. Mo. 

Corporal 1021 E. 5th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal 3108 Magasine St.. St. Louis. Mo. 

Corporal 2225 1*2 Walnut St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Corporal Tipton, Mo. 

Corporal 1210 S. 11th St., Omaha. Neb. 

Corporal Bogolusa, La. 

Corporal Monroe. La. 

Cook Sulphur, La. 

Cook Box 439. Monroe. La. 

Cook Rayne. La. 

Cook R. F. D. No. 1, McComb City, Miss. 

Mechanic Nacogdoches, Texas 

Mechanic R. F. D. No. 2, Warrensburg, Mo. 

Bugler West Monroe. La. 

Bugler Sanford St.. Marahall. Texas 

Private Firat Class 322 W. 52nd St.. New York City 

Privste First Class . . 86 State St.. Flushing. Long Island. N. Y. 

Private First Class Lee St., Warrenton. Va. 

Private First CIsss Cottage Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Private First Class Elliott, Miss. 

Private 919 E. 1st St., Fort Worth. Texas 

Private Monroe. La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 33. Ward, S. C. 

Private Oakdale. La. 

Private Ruleville, Miss. 

Private Hutto, Texas 

Private Port Gibson, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Box 86. Clinton, N. C. 

Private Mayeraville, Miss. 

Private 117 31st Ave. & 2nd St., Meridian, Miss. 

Private Goldsboro. N. C. 

Private Danville. La. 

Private Hahnville, La. 

Private 14 Harrison St., Newberry. S. C. 

Private Toft, La. 

Private Benoit. Miss. 

Private Gainsville. Ala. 

Private 321 Saratoga St.. New Orleans, La. 

Privste S. Murrst St.. New Orleans, La. 

Private Hcidelburg, Miss. 

Private Monroe. La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4. Meridian. Miss. 

Privote Georaiana, AU. 

Private Woodville, N. C. 

Private 205 S. Robinson St., New Orleans. Li. 



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COLE. LEVELL 3784710 

COLEMAN. CHARLEY 3319779 

COTTON. JOHN B 3784695 

CRADLE. WILUAM 4182513 

CULBERT, AUSTIN 3974065 

CULVER, JIM 2561029 

DARENSBOURC, WALTER .... 3303820 

DAVIS, ESTER 4259606 

DAVIS, REUBIN 4235316 

DAVIS, TOM 4234617 

DICKEY, FRED L 3784607 

DRUMMOND, JAMES W 4071516 

DUNCAN, GEORGE E 3301467 

EBRON. JOSEPH 4234586 

EDMUNDSON, GEORGE F 4235577 

EDWARDS, NOEL 3971750 

EDWARDS, WRIGHT 4235010 

ESTELL, JOHN 3972195 

FARMER. FRED 3784636 

FORD, LORENZO 3304047 

FOWLER, HENRY 4262045 

FRANKLIN, CHARLEY 2561399 

FREEMAN, WILLIE 2562677 

GARDNER, ORVILLE D 4149612 

GATES, WALTER 4260-101 

GIBBS. ALEX . 4075234 

GOLDEN, CHARLEY W 4260747 

GOODWIN. WILLIE J 4260337 

GOVERNOR. MURPHY A 3303903 

GRAY, JOHNNY 4261851 

GRAY. WILLIAM W 4261942 

GRAYER. BENNIE 3784724 

GREEN, JOE 3303953 

GREEN, ROBERT 4235013 

HALL, JOHN 3784711 

HALSEY, JOHN 3784644 

HARDY, WALTER 3784796 

HARRIS, LUKE 3303965 

HART. WILLIE 3784694 

HAYNES, WILLIE 3303884 

HAWKINS, JAMES 1885945 

HAWKINS. WILLIAM E 4235342 

HEATHMAN, TONEY W. W. . . . 4261999 

HEIDELBERG, CALL 3784706 

HINTON, JOHN 3784703 

HOLLOWAY, SCOTT 2813349 

HOLMES, BARNEY 4260287 

HOLMES, JOSEPH 3303826 

HOPKINS. HARRY 4260330 

HUFF, GILBERT 4260313 

HUNTER, FONIE 4234646 

HUNTER. GEORGE L 4260227 

HUNTLEY, CHARLIE 4235047 

JACKSON TOM 3301437 

JENNINGS, GEORGE J 3303776 

JOHNSON, ANTOINE 3303851 

JOHNSON, FRED 3304012 

JOHNSON. JOHN 3303822 

JOLLY. EDDIE 3301404 

JONES. BERNARD 3784700 

JONES. CORRY 2114591 

JONES, SEYMORE 3303990 

KING, ERNEST 4258473 

LAMPKINS, CUFFORD H. ... 4260220 

LAWRENCE. BLANCH 3303987 

LEWIS. CHARLIE 4231357 

LEWIS. HARRY 4260283 

LEWIS, JUNE 3301369 

UVINGSTON, JAMES 2865235 

LONON, NOBLE H 4183948 

McCLEARY. JAMES 4260377 

McDonald, EDDIE 3784766 

McDowell, sid 4260341 

McKELLER. JOHN H 2811941 

MALONE. LEON 2813236 

MANLEY. ROBERT 4260322 

MARTIN. JOSEPH E 3784788 

MATHEWS. CHARLES 4260381 

MILLER, OLIVER 4262489 

MINES, WALTER L 3301476 

MORGAN, HEROD 4262605 

MORRIS, ARTHUR W. 4262820 

NELSON. DONNIE . 3301427 

NEWBILL. NATHANIEL 4260252 

NORRIS, LEONARD 4260371 

ODEY. WILUE 4260368 

PARKER. COLEMAN 4262435 

PARKER. HENRY 4262510 

PENNEY, JOE 4262530 



Private R. F. D. No. 3. Daleville, MIm. 

Private Oldenburg. MiM. 

Private Enondale.. Miss. 

Pilvate . 83 Eaton St.. New Haven, Conn. 

Private Groveton, Texas 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Newell. Ala. 

Private Sellers, La. 

Private 1108 Vine Street, Kanaaa City. Mo. 

Private . . . R. F. D. No. 2, Box 42, Lumber Bridge, N. C. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Box 9, Stantonburg, N. C. 

Private Corinth, MIm. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Duncan, S. C. 

Private 1409 Adams St., Monroe. La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4, Windsor. N. C. 

Private R. F. D. No. 5, La Grange, N. C. 

Private Royse City. Texas 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 42, Stantonburg. N. C. 

Private Baileyville, Texas. 

Private . 1818 16th St., Meridian. Misa. 

Private Blanchard, La. 

Private New Madrid, Mo. 

Private Lapine, Ala. 

Private 229 Channel St.. Montgomery. Ala. 

Private 171 W. 137th St.. New York City 

Private 127 E. Haven St.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Pinopolis, S. C. 

Private 1720 N. 8th St.. Kansas City. Kan. 

Private Montserrat. . Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, New Orieans. U. 

Private Rochepori, Mo. 

Private 1211 Missouri Ave.. Omaha. Neb. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Carrollton. Miss. 

Private 1125 Podges St., New Orieans, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4, Box 106, Grifton, N. .C 

Private BoniU, Miss. 

Private "A*' St.. Brothers Ave.. Meridian. Miss. 

Private Newton. Miss. 

Private 2800 Perdido St., iNew Orleans. La. 

Private Meridian, Miss. 

Private Pattison, La. 

Private . . . . R. F. D. No. 1, Box 35. Effingham. S. C. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Box 41, Enfield. N. C. 

Private Madison. Mo. 

Private ShuberU, Miss. 

Private Bucatunna, Miss. 

Private Petty. Texas 

Private 307 Spruce St.. Boonville, Mo. 

Private 2719 Willow St., New Orieans, La. 

Private 421 W. Morgan S.. Sedalia. Mo. 

Private 321 West Ming St. Warrensburg. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1. Clayton. N. C. 

Private Tipton. Mo. 

Private Lyonburg. N. C. 

Private CoUiston, La. 

Private New Orleans, La. 

Private Luling, La. 

Private 315 Saratoga St., New Orleans, La. 

Private Kenner, La. 

Private Moscow, Aric. 

Private Uniontown, Ala. 

Private 620 Dewey St., Mansfield. La. 

Private Florence, Miss. 

Private Lexington, Mo. 

Private Osage City, Mo. 

Private 430 S. Liberty St.. New Orieans. La. 

Private McDonald. N. C. 

Private Pilot Grove, Mo. 

Private Lake Charles, La. 

Private De Witt. Ark. 

Private 959 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Private 410 N. Ohio St., Sedalia, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 93, Rose Hill, Miss. 

Private 810 E. High St., Boonville, Mo 

Private 321 N. 3rd St.. Corsicana. Texas 

Private Ball & Central St., Dallas, Texas 

Private 208 Poplar St.. St. Louis. Mo. 

Private Summerland, Miss. 

Private 5514 Michigan Ave., St. Louis. Mo. 

Private 4005 Westminster Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 1307 Desiard St„ Monroe, La. 

Private 1812 Fillmore St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 2937 Simple Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Glenmore, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 8, Sedalia, Mo. 

Private 553 Market St.. Marshall, Mo. 

Private 416 S. 23rd St., St. Louis. Mo. 

Private Deering, Mo. 

Private Caruthersville, Mo. 

Private 213 S. Loriemer St., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 



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PENNY. HENRY 4262431 

POINDEXTER, ALFRED N 4260280 

PORTER. CHARLES 4260258 

POWELL, EDWARD 4260366 

RAY, JAMES S 4262575 

RICE. SILAS W. P 4260253 

RICHARDS, DAVID F 4260183 

RIDGNAL. SAMUEL 4262472 

ROBINSON, OSCAR 4262527 

ROSS. FRANK 4260223 

RUSSELL. WILLIAM M 4260225 

SHELTON. GEORGE 4260190 

SINGLETON. LOUIS 4262490 

SMITH, SAMUEL 4260307 

STOKES, BUD 4262455 

SUTHERLIN, LEON J 4260212 

TAYLOR, ALBERT 4262619 

TAYLOR, IRVIN H 4260309 

THOMAS. CLIFFORD 4260205 

THOMPSON, JOSEPH 3301581 

THORNTON. JOHN 4260196 

WEAKLEY, PORTER 4260397 

WEBB. ARNETT B 4261701 

WILKERSON, LESLIE 4260195 

WILLIAMS. LEONARD E 4260232 

WILLIS. BROWDER 3301366 

WOODARD. UN 4261687 

YOUNG, MILLARD 4260247 



Private Drcring, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Blackwater, Mo. 

Private Otterville, Mo. 

Private . . 6618 S. Broadway, St. Loula, Mo. 

Private 425 W. 49th Ave., Meridian. Mist. 

Private R. F. D, No. 1, Beaman, Mo. 

Private 709 N. Monitor St., Sedalia, Mo. 

Private Canithersville, Mo. 

Private Raymond, Miia. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Caldwell. Kan. 

Private Centertowii, Mo. 

Private 617 E. Linn St.. Jefferson City, Mo. 

Private 1709 E. 19th St., Kaniaa City, Mo. 

Private Speed, Mo. 

Private Caruthcrsville, Mo. 

Private Star Route. Longwood, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Clarlctdale, Misa. 

Private 417 N. Osage St.. Sedalia, Mo. 

Private 134 E. Maple St., Independence, Mo. 

Private Central, La. 

Private 920 Monroe St., Jefferson City, Mo. 

Private 219 North St., Nashville, Tenii. 

Private 2805 Bernard St., St. Louis. Mo. 

Private 615 Bolivar St.. Jefferson City, Mo. 

Private 204 W. Cooper St.. Sedalia, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Monroe. La. 

Private Dixon, Tenn. 

Private 509 W. Pettis St., Sedalia, Mo. 




COMPANY "A" AT DUN-SURMEUSE. 
Capt. Arthur Harvey (left); Lieutenant Edwin Knudson (right). 



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History of Company "/<' 




By First Lieut. Harry V. ReploCle 
and First Sct. Thomas Davis 



ABOUT June 15, 1918, 2nd Lieut. Carl F. Cranz received instructions to proceed 
to Detention Camp No. 2 at Camp Funston. There he was assigned to Com- 
pany **B", 1st. Prov. Reg. Colored. It was "some" company, for as yet no men 
had been assigned. 

On June 18 many second lieutenants from the third camp were assigned to 
the Depot Brigade and thence to the 1st. Prov. Reg. Colored. Lieuts. Ingraham 
and Kingsley were assigned to Company "B." On the 19th the men com- 
menced to pour in by truck loads. Then came the hard work of making out locator 
cards, etc. for the personnel office. During the next two or three weeks the time was 
taken up in examinations, physical and psychological, vaccinations, inoculations, etc. 
It was a problem for the officers, for they had to be 1st sgt., company clerk, mess 
sgt., and almost everything else in the company. 

Lieut. Cranz had some difficulty in getting the men to know what he meant by 
"fall out," and the first time they were ordered to do so, flat they went on their 
stomachs. Some men would answer to the last name and some would not answer 
unless their first names were called, so it was a problem each time the roll was called. 

General Wood inspected the regiment several times while at the detention camp. 
The men were put through an intensive drill schedule preparatory to entering Camp 
Funston. They were given rifles, and the next morning after were started on the 
rifle range. Some of the men made very good scores from the start, but the majority 
had a hard time finding the target. After the men had gone over the course 
the officers were instructed to pick out the men that they would take into Funston 
with them. Seventy-five were picked out, twenty of whom were eventually going to 
be hurried across as replacements. 

Early in July orders were out making the First Provisional Regiment the 805th 
Infantry. We were marched into Funston July 15. From that time on we were very 
busy with drill schedules. 

On July 29 two well dressed soldiers pulled into camp and were assigned to 
Company "B.*' They popped into the orderly room like a house afire. It was a 
relief to find men that were snappy and well dressed. These men turned out to be 
Thomas Davis and Chester K. Sewell, both from the 25th Infantry. Both later were 
made sergeants, and Sgt. Davis was made 1st sergeant. 

Lieut. Garrison (later made captain) and Lieut. Taubert, and Freed and Lieut. 
Wm. H. Brooks were later assigned to the company. Lieut. Garrison was in command. 

The rest of the story is well told by 1st Sgt. Davis: 

Our company left Camp Funston at 9:30 P. M., on August 26, 1918, arriving at 
Kansas City at 4:30 a. m., August 27. We left Kansas City two hours later, arriving 
in Moberly, Mo., at 11 :00 A. M., the same day. We were taken off the train and taken 
on a hike through the city. At the city square we were served by the colored Red 
Cross. 

Leaving Moberly, our next stop was at Springfield, 111., but we did not get 



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off at this place. Our next stop was at Peru, Ind., on the morning of August 28. 
We traveled through a part of Ohio and then into Michigan, stopping at Detroit 
about 12 noon. 

Leaving the train, we boarded a ferry and went across the Detroit river and 
debarked at Windsor, Canada. We were taken on a march through the city. The 
people of Winsdor were enthusiastic, cheering us on our march. After the march 
we again boarded the train. We left Windsor at 6:00 P. M., and on the morning 
of the 29th we were at Niagara Falls on the Canadian side. We had a look at the 
falls and, boarding the train, we came back into the U. S., making our first stop 
about 4:30 P. M., at Sayre, Penn. 




We left our train and had a swim in the Susquehanna River. Leaving Sayre, 
we passed over a range of mountains, and the morning of the 30th found us at Jersey 
City, N. J. We boarded a large ferry and crossed Long Island Sound and had a 
view of the Statue of Liberty. We landed in Brooklyn and boarded another train for 
Camp Upton. We arrived at Camp Upton at about 2:00 o'clock, staying there that 
night, the 30th, and the night of the 31st. 

We left Camp Upton on September 1, and made our first stop at Hartford, 
Conn., thence to Springfield, Mass., thence through a portion of New Hampshire. 
Our third stop was made at Brattleboro, Vermont. The morning of the second found 
us at Montreal, Canada, where we were checked onto the boat. 

We sailed out of Montreal for Quebec, where we waited for the rest of the con- 
voy. After the convoy was ready we started for France. We were several days out 



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A view which gives an idea of the congestion of the roads leading to the front. 
Malancourt, Meuse, France. September 28, 1918. 




Near Grandpre in valley of Aire, Anti-Aircraft shrapnel bursts. Here the French Army 
ceased and the American Army began. Senuc, Ardennes, France. October 29, 1918. 



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when we were turned back for some unknown reason and debarked at Quebec on 
the 13th, and embarked on H. M. S. Novara. 

We sailed along with fifteen other ships. Icebergs were sighted. On the morning 
of the twentieth, we were in the danger zone. Here we were met by destroyers and 
later by a few aeroplanes. 

We landed at Tilbury Docks the morning of the twenty-fifth and debarked on 
the morning of the 26th. Boarding one of the funny looking trains, we were taken 
to Romsey, England. Here we staid for the night and left in the morning for South- 
ampton, where we boarded the Archangel, and the morning of the twenty-ninth 
found us at Cherbourg. 

We remained here for a few days and then boarded the train for Rolampont, 
where we were issued ammunition and more rifles and pistols. 

We arrived at Clermont October 10, stayed there one day, and left the next day 
for Locheres. For a short time we were in pup tents and lost a number of our 
men from sickness. We then moved back a little way and were billeted in some 
old German shacks which we found up in the forest. On the twenty-eighth Lieut. 
P. V. Freed was transferred to Company "C" and Lieut. Replogle was assigned to 
Company "B." 

We left Locheres November 3, for Varennes. Here we staid till the twenty-first, 
when we moved to Chevieres. 

We found things more comfortable at this place, as we were able to have fires 
in our rooms. There were German officers' barracks, built during 1914. This 
place was entirely destroyed but for the barracks. We policed up for a day or so, 
then started salvaging. 

The area we were assigned to covered approximately ten square kilometers. It 
was a big job and gave us an idea of what the cost of war was. Our time was 
taken up entirely with salvaging. Sunday was no holiday. Later we had time 
for a little drill and athletics. Lieut. Kingsley organized a football team. The 
first game was with the 316th Engineers, and the score was 40 to in our favor. 

The next Sunday we were to play Company "C," but for some reason or other 
we did not connect. We played them later, however, and the score was tied at 
15 to 15. The next game we played with the 807th, and the score was again tied at 
30 to 30. We played the 807th the following Sunday and were defeated 12 to 6. 

About the end of the month Lieut. Taubert took two platoons over to Senuc, 
and Lieut. Cranz also was with him. Captain Garrison was relieved January 30, 
and Lieut. Replogle assumed command. 

The entire company was soon moved to Senuc, as the quarters were far better, 
and our work took us over to that section of the country. We worked at the dump 
at Grand-Pre and cleaned it up. Then work slackened and we were given a good 
bit of drill. 

On February 12, 2nd Lieut. J. S. Knight joined the company and was placed in 
command of the third platoon. Later he was transferred to Company "H" of this 
regiment, much to the regret of the entire company. 

Our stay at Senuc was appreciated by all officers and men, and we were all glad 
that we were left at this place till orders came to move to where we joined the 
rest of the Battalion. 

We left Dun May 5, arrived at Brest on the seventh, and were billeted in area 
nine. We were later moved to area six and assigned to Dun duty with the Fuel and 
Forage Department. 

While we did not have to go over the top, our work was enough to keep 
us busy thinking. At Clermont we had a few night raids by the Boche planes, 
and it was considered decidedly unhealthy outside the dugouts. 



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In later years we will all look back and be glad that we had a chance to do 
our little bit for Uncle Sam. 

Sgt. Turner will always be remembered by the entire company as the good- 
natured Supply Sgt., and we will always remember the cooks well, for without 
them things would have been pretty tough £rt times. 

The officers will remember and appreciate the way all of the N. C. O.'s and 
men have worked for them, and I know they all wish them the best of luck when 
they get back to civilian life. 

Most of this history has been taken from the notes of Sgt. Davis, and we are 
indebted to him in more ways than one. By his hard work, and the work of the 
other N. C. O.'s of the company, the men were able to grasp what the officers tried 
hard to teach them. 



COMPANY "B' 



Offi 



icers 

REPLOGLE, HARRY V.. First Lieutenant Infantrr. U. S. A Kent. Ohio 

TAUBERT, WILLUM H.. Fir»t Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 282 Rich Ave., Mt. Vernon, New York, 

KINCSLEY. GEORGE A., Firat Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 228 Summit Ave., Portland, Ore. 

BROOKS, WILLIAM H., First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 906 Fremont St., Manhattan, Kan. 



DAVIS, THOMAS 336170 

CYRUS, ANDREW E 3301697 

TURNER, DAVE 3301699 

BRISCOE, JAMES 2861082 

SEWELL, CHESTER K 336436 

KENNEDY. HOUSTON J 3301684 

HARRIS. WILLIE 3301718 

CARMACK, CHARLES 3317891 

STERUNG, VOLTAIRE 3301786 

PRYOR, THOMAS 3178013 

KELLY, MATTHEWS 3301751 

LEWIS, LEVY 3301798 

WEBB, CHARLIE 3301465 

CLARK, ALDRICH 3301755 

COLLINS, STANLEY 3301681 

JONES, IRA C 3317583 

M MILLAN, LUCIUS H 4261686 

WALKER, JOHN 3301680 

WALKER, LUCIUS T 4259177 

MAYHO, WATKIN 3301626 

STYLES, WILUAM N 4152390 

CORUM, HENRY 4262430 

RICHARDSON, JOHN 3301758 

SMITH. WILLIAM 3317659 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM H 4261584 

BROWN, FRANK 4260394 

COOPER, LOUIS A 3317583 

BROWN, EVARISTE 3301678 

HUGHES, GEORGE E 4261927 

TURNER, WILLIE 3301609 

BAKER, EUGENE 3301709 

HAYNES, ISAIAH 3301644 

LANDRY, JOSEPH 3301611 

LEWIS, MOSES B 3301616 

DAGGETT, NAT 1169559 

WHITE, WILUE 3301669 

ALEX, VICTOR 4260028 

JONES, RILEY L 2167064 

BAKER, CLARENCE 4260143 

BROWN, FRANK 3317896 

CHASE, JOHN L 4260216 

COGER, GEORGE H 4260774 

CRUSE, GEORGE 3301116 

DANIELS, DEWEY A 4262506 

DAVIS, WALTER A 4260145 

DONALDSON, JAMES 3301776 

DREW, TODD M 3317530 

FLETCHER, LESTER 4260403 



Men 

First Sergeant Paw Creek, N. C. 

Meas Sergeant .... 1849 Convention St., Baton Rouge. La. 

Supply Sergeant St. James, La. 

Sergeant 1126 Piety, New Orleans. La. 

Sergeant Jersey City, N. J. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No. 4, Baton Rouge, La. 

Sergeant 917 St. Joseph St., Baton Rouge, La. 

Sergeant 423 West Phelps Ave.. Springfield, Mo. 

Sergeant 166 Bonyaaxe St., Baton Rouge, La. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 1, Box 40, Riaviesta, Va. 

Corporal 1325 Center St.. Baton Rouge, La. 

Corporal 333 Leon, Baton Rouge, La. 

Corporal Tallulah, La. 

Corporal Scotland, La. 

Corporal Baker, La. 

Corporal Hamilton, Miss. 

Corporal 2616 Burdette St., Omaha, Neh. 

Corporal Feitel P. 0., St. James Parish, La. 

Corporal 307 E. Kansas Ave., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Corporal Burton, La. 

Corporal 1642 Mellwood Ave., Louisville, Ky. 

Corporal Canithersville, Mo. 

Corporal 650 Palmer St., Baton Rouge, La. 

Corporal 449 Antelope St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Corporal Eudora, Kan. 

Corporal 2348 Chestnut St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Corporal 2719 A Lucas Ave.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Corporal St. James, La. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 1, Higbce, Mo. 

Corporal Norwood, La. 

Cook 726 Persimmon St., Baton Rouge, La. 

Cook 723 Persimmon St., Baton Rouge, La. 

Cook Convent. La. 

Cook 88 St. Mary's St.. Natchcs, Miss. 

Mechanics Ft. Worth, Texas 

Mechanics 238 Posey St.. Baton Rouge, La. 

Buglers 228 E. 2nd St., Chillicothe, Mo. 

Buglers 531 Oak Ave., HuntsviUe, Ala. 

Private First Class R. F. D. No. 1, Palmyra, Mo. 

Private First Class Caldwell, Kan. 

Private First Class Longwood, Mo. 

Private First Class . . . 520 E. Armour Blvd. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private First Class Woodville, Texas 

Private First Class . . 328 Rear Fountain St., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
Private First Class .... P. O. Box 556, Frcdricktown, Mo. 

Private First Class 908 East Blvd., Baton Rouge, La. 

Private First Class . ..... 707 Ash St., Columbia. Mo. 

Private First Class .... 2345 Chestnut St., St. Louis. Mo. 



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FORD. JOHME 4260034 

GARRISON. PHIL 3301634 

GIVENS, PEARL 4260122 

GREEN. WILLIE 4260257 

HOWARD, ALFRED T 4261950 

JAMES, HARDY 3318420 

KIRBY. WILUAM C 4261919 

MONTGOMERY, TOM 3302004 

PAYTON, RICHARD 3971758 

REED, RANDOLPH 4150044 

RICHBERG, HENRY 4150135 

RIGGINS, BYER 3277250 

SANDERS. ROBERT 3318746 

SIMMONS. JERRY 3301790 

SPARKS, GEORGE 3971793 

STEMMONS, JOHN 4259246 

TAYLOR, OSCAR 3177335 

WATSON, BEN 3301827 

WHITE, ISHMAEL 4150147 

ABERNATHY, WILLIE J 3317899 

ALLS. HOMER 4260144 

ANDERSON, JOHN J. .... . 4260185 

BAKER. BENJAMIN F 4260141 

BASTON. BRAXTON W 4262483 

BIAS, ALONZO 4260155 

BINKLEY, JAMES 4260356 

BLAKE. CASWELL C 4260234 

BOWENS, WILLIAM 3317745 

BOYD, BEN 4260071 

BUCKNER, HARRY 4261596 

BUCKNER. LEVI L 4260214 

BURNS, ROY A 4260293 

BURRIS, ARCHIE 4260302 

BYNUM, JOHNSON 3317586 

BYRD. GEORGE 4260392 

CAMPBELL, ARTHUR 42602S6 

CARRELL. JOSEPH 3301769 

CARTER. CECIL 3317773 

CASTLE. BRICE 3301619 

CHASE, EPHRIAM 4260245 

CLARK. RAYMOND D 4260201 

COLDWELL, HOUSTON 4262497 

COLEMAN, WAYT 4260275 

COLLINS, ALLEN 3302806 

COLLINS, FREDERICK 4260320 

CONWAY, RALPH 3319661 

COX. PLEX 4260090 

DANDRIDGE, GEORGE 4259964 

DANIELS, JOSH 4260012 

DAVIS, ELDRIDGE 4260094 

DIXON, LAWRENCE 4260242 

DONLEY, VANDELL 4260147 

DRAKE WILIAM P 4260276 

DUNCAN. HERBERT 4260305 

ENGLISH, PAUL B 4260218 

EVANS, LONEY 4260286 

EWING, SAMUEL 3317524 

EWING, WILUAM 4260210 

FELIX. HERMAN 4260418 

FERRELL, VAN 33i?647 

FIELDS. LOUIS 3301637 

GAINKS, JAMES A 4260374 

GOLDtN. ADDIE A 4260285 

GOOSEBERRY. ERNEST .... 4260268 

HILL, GEORGE H 42619(>'» 

HILLIARD, ARTHUR [ i3i8519 

HOGAN, ALFRED JjiSsie 

HOLDEN,- LEONARD .... * ^61906 

HOLTS, BOB W " iSJSV 

HOPSOX. ABNY .... ' ' 1^2292 

JEFFERSON. WALTER 0. .' 4261995 

JINES, IKE ..... ^^iRtiQ 

JOHNSON, HENRY ..." * ' 33 SJ? 

JONES, EDWARD ....'■ f^V^ 

KENT. JAMES .... tfiiul 

•LANCHORN. BONNIE . . ." ' 4262006 

McKINZIE, ACE , ' 4233127 

McMillan, edcar 423'i089 

MOORE. JIM iaoS 

MOORE. DOCK . . , ' ' 33?^ 

MOORE, HAZEL ' " 3287250 

MOSES. GEORGE .... 330i7*in 

MURCHISON. FRED ....'.' 397I86R 

NEWKIRK, HENRY 423456n 

NEWM.AN. OLIVER 401W10 

NICHOLSON. JIM 3318724 

OWENS, RAYMOND 41833.53 

PARTEE. NICK 3318179 

PATERSON, WILLIE C 3971868 



Private Pint CUm . . . . 330 N. Salt Pond St., BCanhall. Mo. 

Private First CUm Belle Alliance, La. 

Private First Class . . . . 414 W. Lemon St.. Hannibal, Mo. 
Private First Class . . . . 210 W. Spring St., Booneville. Mo. 

Private First Class 4824 S. 25tli St.. Omaha, Neb. 

Private First Class R. F. D. No. 4, Canton. Miaa. 

Private First Class R. F. D. No. 4, Huntsville, Mo. 

Private First CUss . . . . R. F. D. No. 1. HallsviUe, Texaa 

Private First Class La Fate, Texas 

Private First CUss . . . 431 W. Field Ave., East Roselle, N. J. 
Private First Class ... 820 Dawson St., New York Citj, N. Y. 

Private First Class Dolham. N. C. 

Private First Class 454 S. Roach St., Jackson, Miss. 

Private First Class Winoak. Aik. 

Private First Class .... 2731 Williams St., Dallas, Texas 

Private First Class R. F. D. No. 4, Fayette, Mo. 

Private First Class Rockville, Va. 

Private First Class ... 315 S. 5th St.. Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

Private First Class Felt CotUges, Seagate. N. Y. 

Private First Class .... 1039 East Olive St., Springfield, Mo. 

Private First Class 617 Collier St., Hannibal, Mo. 

Private 428 N. Washihngton St., Sedalia. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1. Palmyra, Mo. 

Private 1601 Forest Ave.. Kansas City .Mo. 

Private » Palmyra, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Bounceton. Mo. 

Private 616 N. High St., Independence, Mo. 

Private 5826 Waterman Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 823 Hill St., Hannibal, Mo. 

Private Norbome. Mo. 

Private Smithton, Mo. 

Private 1315 S. Grand Ave., Sedalia. Mo. 

Private 404 W. Morgan, Sedalia, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Glasgow. Mo. 

Private 2630 Lawton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Bunceton, Mo. 

Private 923 Main St., Baton Rouge, La. 

Private Sweet Springs, Mo. 

Private Lutcher, La. 

Private Napton, Mo. 

Private 814 N. Osage St.. Sedalia. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Columbia, Tenn. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Wooldridge, Mo. 

Private Tallulah, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, AuUvillc, Mo. 

Private Wellington, Mo. 

Private 1328 Euclid Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private MooresvlUe, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Millington, Md. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4, Palmyra, Mo. 

Private 308 W. Jefferson St., Sedalia, Mo. 

Private Palmyra, Mo. 

Private 1204 Harrison St., Sedalia, Mo. 

Private .... Overton, Mo. 

Private 3443 Lawton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Booneville, Mo. 

Private Fayette, Mo. 

Private Fayette, Mo. 

Private 2024 Carr St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 716 Comick St., Centralia, 111. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 57, Farmcrville, La. 

Private 2310 A. Eugenia St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Pleasant Green, Mo. 

Private Booneville, Mo. 

Private ForistcU, Mo. 

Private Flora, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Otterville, Mo. 

Private Moberly, Mo. 

Private Bunkie, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Box 46, Bedford City, Va. 

Private Fulton, Mo. 

Private Madison Station, Miss. 

Private Love Station, Miss. 

Private 31 17 Rinpo St., Little Rock, Ark. 

Private 4407 W. Bell, St. Louis, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Higbcc, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 57, Whitpvillc, N. C. 

Private Lowenberg, N. C. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Homer, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 6. Winona, Miss. 

Private York Co., N. C. 

Private 511 Railroad Ave., Baton Rouge, La. 

Private 1600 Polk, Amnrillo, Texas 

Private Fremont. N. C. 

Private Markham, Va. 

Private 4541 Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 

Private Bagdad, Fla. 

Private Looxhoma. Miss. 

Private 2801 Trinidad St., Dallas. Texas 



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PENNY. BIALVIN 2813340 

PERRIN. LOUIS J 3318518 

PETERSON, HOUSTON 3318763 

PHILUPS, DAVE 3301726 

PITTMAN, LEON 3318393 

PRICE, FRED N 3317705 

RICHARDSON, CLARENCE .... 3177487 

RICHARDSON, DANNIE 3319878 

RILEY, JOHN 3301727 

RUCKER, ERNEST 2811881 

RUSSELL, CHARLIE 2561632 

SHUMAN. ISAIAH 788116 

SIMMONS. EDWARD L 4231777 

SIMMONS, MACK 1872631 

SIMMS, PAUL 4234655 

SINCLETARY, HENRY D 4075227 

SMITH, ED 3318488 

SMITH, RUEL 3318493 

SOLOMON. WILL ........ 1880674 

STANCIL, ALBERT 4234657 

TAYOR, HAMP 3839199 

TURNBO, NORMAN 3318661 

TYNER, PLUMMER 4234604 

VILLAVASO. VANDERBILT .... 3301645 

WALL, CHARLIE 4231481 

WALLACE. WILUAM 1887760 

WARD. JAMES 3671616 

WARREN, FRANK 3318400 

WASHINGTON, JOHN 4259373 

WHEELER, ROBERT 4231779 

WHITAKER. McKINLEY 1888345 

WICKHAM, DONALD 4149847 

WIGGINS, JESSE R 4234520 

WILLIAMS, GARRET 4232270 

WILLIAMS, ROY 4234665 

WILLIAMS, SULLIVAN 3301572 

WINSTON, MELL 3318514 

WOODS, WYLIE 4259223 

WRIGHT, GEORGE 4259414 

YOUNG, CLARENCE 3177470 



PriTAte Harmon, Texat 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Brookhaven, Misa. 

Private 116 S. 13th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private 610 Canal St., Baton Rouge, La. 

Private 410 Chippewa, Brookhaven, Misa. 

Private 4016 A Papin St., St. Louia, Mo. 

Private Nitro, Weat, Va. 

Private Carniu, Misa. 

Private Baker, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Ledbctter, Texas 

Private Suspension, Ala. 

Private 730 Minnigh, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Private Vista, N. C. 

Private Mt. Holly, S. C. 

Private Microw. N. C. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4, Vox, S. C. 

Private 417 N. 2nd St., Brookhaven, Miss. 

Private Canton, Miss. 

Private South Miami. Fla. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Box 16, Sclma, N. C. 

Private Twist, Aric. 

Private McCool. Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 27 Merry Hill, N. C. 

Private St. James, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Box 115, Clayton, N. C. 

Private 609 Chestnut St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Private 681 Catherine St.. Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Batesville, Miss. 

Private Jones, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Box 76, Bingow, N. C. 

Private Murpheesboro, N. C. 

Private 328 W. 59th St., New York City, N. Y. 

Private Spring Hope, N. C. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 13, Cheater, S. C. 

Private P. O. Box 286, Clayton, N. C. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4, Box 94, Vachirie. U. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Canton, Mias. 

Private New London, Mo. 

Private Hardaway, Ala. 

Private 1424 E. Lexington St., Baltimore, Md. 




The little village in the exact center of the picture is La Forge. In the upper left 
hand corner is Chateau de Chehery. The town in the foreground is Chatel-Chehcry. 
The tall building just below La Forge is the Chatel-Chehery railroad station from which 
many 805th troops left this area May 2, 1919. 



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XT 



Iru- 



History of Company "C 




By Corporal Wiluam W. Frazier 

ORGANIZATION of Company "C" was begun at Detention Camp No. 2, Camp 
Funston, Kansas, with an assignment from the receiving station, 164th Depot 
Brigade, consisting of 249 men. It was then known as Company "C," 3rd Pro- 
visional Regiment. First Lieut. Ira M. Snoffer was in conunand of the tem- 
porary organization. To him much credit is due for his untiring efforts in 
dealing with his men justly during their crude state as recruits. He was admired 
by every one who came under his command for his fairness. This caused all 
to work in harmony and created a friendly competition that made "Excelsior" 
the motto. This has been the slogan since the organization's infancy. 

After the required time (twenty-one days at the detention camp), under medical, 
physical, and psychological treatments and tests for military fitness, the organiza- 
tion commander was ordered to recommend fifty-four men with an attachment 
of twenty men to be taken to Camp Funston for the purpose of making permanent 
an organization of Company "C." It was during this time that our commander 
was transferred from the intended unit, 805th Infantry, to the sister unit, the 806th 
Infantry, then organizing. 

The selected men of the then Company "C," 3rd Provisional Regiment, marched 
from Detention Camp No. 2, Camp Funston, Kan., to Camp Funston, Kan., on the 
morning of July 15, 1918. On this date the organization was made permanent 
and was known thereafter as Company "C," 805th Infantry. This new Company 
"C," though small in number, yet daring and ambitious, had only two officers at 
this time, 1st Lieut. Harry V. Replogle, who commanded the company during its 
origin, and 2nd Lieut. Walden P. Hobbs, who had been with the organization since 
it was provisionally formed. 

Vim and vigor characterized every man, and the work was executed with a 
snap, yes, "pep" was in every man. These excellent officers proved their military 
skill by stimulating their men with timely lectures which in a few weeks made 
Company "C" one of the best drilled and disciplined companies of the regiment. 

The War Department, on or about July 30, 1918, transferred from the 25th 
Infantry (Regular Army) twenty-five men to be distributed among the companies 
of the 805th Regiment, of whom Company "C" 's share was two : Pvt. Icl. William 
L. Lucas and Pvt. Joseph Booher, both of whom have done untold good by instilling 
into the selected men military tact, discipline, and order. Both attained for them- 
selves higher rank as sergeants. 

The twenty "attached" men of Company "C" were transferred to a provisional 
company which was designated as a replacement unit, and about the same time 
seventy-five men were transferred to Company "C" from Detention Camp No. 
2, Camp Funston, Kan. The company thereafter was given officers and men by 
transfer until the strength had reached six officers and 221 men. 

Every man gaily sung the anthems which aroused most his war-like spirit and 
felt that he would willingly pay the supreme sacrifice for the loved ones at home 
and for true Democracy. 



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At last orders for movement came, and Company "C" left Camp Funston, Kan., 
under the command of Captain E. G. Dick, August 26, 1918, and arrived at Camp 
Upton, N. Y., August 30, 1918. Here the company received its overseas quarter- 
master equipment and left Camp Upton September 1, 1918, for Montreal, Canada, 
arriving there September 2, 1918. Here the company embarked with Companies 
"A," "B," and "D," the other organizations which constituted the First Battalion 
of the 805th Regiment. We embarked aboard H. M . S. Haverford and sailed from 
Montreal, Canada, September 2, 1918. 




Everybody was in high spirits as the Haverford coasted her way down the St. 
Lawrence river. After four days at sea, engine troubles developed, which com- 
pelled the Haverford to put back to port, and on September 10, 1918, she arrived at 
Quebec, Canada, Company "C" together with Companies "A," "B," and "D," 
was transferred from H. M. S. Haverford to H. M. S. Navara. Captain T. A. 
Immell, who was commanding Company "D," of the First Battalion, by virtue of 
seniority, was commanding officer of troops aboard the vessel, and 1st Lieut. Howard 
C. Mayberry was temporarily placed in command of Company "D." We sailed 
from Quebec on Friday, September 13, 1918. Without any serious difficulties we 
arrived at Tilbury docks, England, September 25, and because of railway complica- 
tions, the organizations were compelled to remain in docks until the morning of 
the 26th, when the company left the Tilbury docks for Romsey, England. 

In the suburbs of Romsey was a rest camp where the company remained over 
night, and beginning early the next morning, September 27, Company "C," to- 



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gether with companies "A," "B" and **D," experienced its first hike of a dis- 
tance of about 12 kilometers — from Romsey to Southampton, England. Here 
the company boarded the Channel transport, Archangel, on the night of September 
28, arriving at Cherbourg, France, on the morning of September 29. 

The people all along showed every welcome possible, and the cities exhibited 
very much the scarcity of man-power. The company entrained at Cherbourg, France, 
September 30, for Rolampont, France, arriving on the morning of October 4. 
Here the organization received new supplies and took the "gas" test. At this 
time and point things looked very gloomy, but in spite of that fact, everybody was in 
good spirits. On October 8, the company entrained at Rolampont for Clermont-en- 
Argonne, arriving there October 10. This point being the active American sector, 
the roar of artillery was continuous. 

The company left Clermont-en-Argonne October 12, and marched to Locheres, a 
distance of six kilometers. It was here that the company tasted some real war- 
fare but stood the test as men. On October 13, while at Locheres, Pvt. William 
Whittaker, of Company "C," was wounded by an enemy's bullet which was thought 
to have come from an enemy airplane. The ambulance was summoned and the 
patient was hurried to a base hospital. After an interval of a few months he was 
able to return to the company. It was here that the company was assigned to duty 
with the 23rd Engineers. 

Here the company engaged in work in which the majority of its men had 
little or no experience, and probably far different from what they had expected. 
But in spite of their determination to do their bit by going into the trenches, they 
disregarded the nature of the work and got pleasure out of the thought that it 
was done for the sake of humanity. 

On October 25, the company hiked from Locheres a distance of eight kilometers 
and was billeted in dug-outs west of Boureuilles-en-Argonne. It was this sector that 
the French regarded as being hopeless. For centuries to come signs of ruin will 
still be exhibited, but the daring Americans accomplished the impossible and put the 
enemy to flight, marking one of the great turning points of the war. 

It was during the company's stay in this vicinity that they experienced fre- 
quent visits of "Fritz and Jerry," the enemy's airplanes. 

On October 27, the company hiked to Very, France, where the company ex- 
hibited some of the skill it had acquired from the 23rd Engineers. The roads 
were put in excellent condition and this of course helped the First Army to render 
the decisive blow which terminated in the armistice of November 11. 

The company was frequently visited by Colonel Humphrey who spoke very 
highly of the good work done by it. 

On November 21, 1918, the company hiked from Very to La Forge (Chatel- 
Chehery). It was during this time that Captain E. G. Dick was relieved and 
1st Lieut. Baily A. Radford assumed command. 

Here the company engaged in salvage and demolition. 

Captain Thomas A. Immell took command January 24, 1919, coming from 
duties as commander of the Second Battalion. 

He and his staff* of officers put forth every possible effort in making Com- 
pany "C" an ideal military organization. 

The company moved by trucks from La Forge to Brieulles-sur-Meuse on January 
28, taking charge of a railroad located there. Here great credit was given the 
company by the district commander. Colonel Chapman, for the way the railroad 
was handled. 

The company left Brieulles-sur-Meuse May 4, and arrived at Brest, Finistere, 
France, May 7. 



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COMPANY "C 



Officers 

IMMELL, THOMAS A.. Captain Infantry, U. S. A 5370 Vrrnon Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

FREED. PAUL V.. First Ueutenant Infantry, U. S. A 4028 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

DODSON, Alonio L., First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Little Rock, Ark. 

GRAHL. CHARLES H., Second Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 653 ISth St.. Des Moines, Iowa 



BOOHER, JOSEPH 336387 

MASON. OSCAR M 3301823 

CURTlS: ERNEST C 3317892 

LUCAS, WILUAM L 336946 

BROWN. EDDIE 3301943 

ARMSTEAD, WILLIE 3301914 

WHITESIDE. THEODORE .... 3301854 

MASTON. WILLIE 3302022 

HORNE, GEORGE 3301946 

SPEARS. MACK C 3317746 

CLEMONS. HENRY 3301354 

MOORE, ERNEST L 3317748 

GOODRICH, LON 3302018 

KENNEDY WARNER 3301875 

SCOTT. SAMUEL C 3317808 

PRUITT, JOHNNIE 4260146 

BAZILE, ANTHONY A 3301930 

HENRY, EDDIE DEE 3301863 

FREEMAN. CASTELL 3317757 

FRAZIER, WILLIAM W 3301959 

FIELDS, FINLEY W 3317733 

BASTINE. POWELL L 4262505 

HATCHER, SCHERL 4259956 

KING, JOHN C 3301971 

ROLUNS. BURETTE 3301890 

STANLEY, THEODORE R 3301846 

SMITH, JOHN H 4260086 

WOODS, RUFUS N 3302059 

BULLOCK, HENRY 330184^ 

HICKS, ALFRED 4259083 

FOSTER, REUBEN J 3317770 

MADISON, LEONARD L 3317784 

WHITE, JAMES H 3317820 

CAMPBELL, JOHN 3302046 

MOORE. EMERY P 3302027 

SIMPSON, SHADROCK 3301983 

TURNER, STEWART C 4261337 

DAVIDSON, L. B 3301966 

HARRIS, JOHN R 3303434 

BERRY, CARL 3317858 

BOSTIC. GEORGE W 4259629 

BREEDLOVE. CHARLES .... 4259791 

CHISM. HENRY 3301965 

CHRISTOPHER, HERMAN .... 3301820 

FLOYD, HE^NRY 3302041 

GREEN, EDDIE W 4260142 

GREEN, WILLIE 3317919 

HOLLAND, LUE 4260046 

HUTT, TULLIE 3317815 

JACKSON, ALLEN 3301988 

JONES DitWlTT H 3301944 

JUDE, ELLIS D 3301935 

MALLORY, FRANK B 4260098 

MASON, ELEX 4262474 

MILLER. CLELLIE 3317850 

MIDDLETON. CHESTER 3317704 

MINER, ALFRED 3317742 

MINES, BERT 3302045 

MOREHEAD. ERMAN C 3317956 

McAULEY. JOE 4260117 

PRICE, WILUAM 4260109 

WHITFIELD, JAMES C 3317976 

WRITTEN, IRVING B 3317871 

ALLISON, TOMMY A 4262785 

ANDERSON, WILL 4262818 

AMONS, JAMES 3301910 

AUSTIN, WILL 4259378 

BAKER. LEWIS 4259716 

BASKIN. MOZELL 3317797 

BARNES. NEALY 1169525 

BENNIN'GS. HARVEY 3317922 

BILLINGSLY. ROBERT 3301995 

BLYTHE, LEWIS N 4259828 



Men 

First Seifeant Muncie, Ind. 

Mess Seifeant New Haven. Mo. 

Supply Sergeant 212 McDaniel St., Springfield, Mo. 

Seifeant Denver, Colo. 

Sergeant 621 North Idaho St.. Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Sergeant Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Sergeant 413 North St., Cape Girardeau. Mo. 

Sergeant Kiricwood, Mo. 

Sergeant Broken Bow, Okla. 

Sergeant ... .... 605 North Hasel St., Hope, Aik. 

Sergeant 1314 Wood St., Monroe, La. 

Sergeant 4142 Cooke Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Sergeant Allenton. Mo. 

Corporal Bison, Okla. 

Corporal 800 North 7th St., Louisiana, Mo. 

Corporal 706 North I8th St.. Independence. Kan. 

Corporal Ste. Genevieve, Mo. 

Corporal R. F. D. Lisbon, La. 

Corporal 811 North 20th St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Corporal 422 East 2nd St., OkUhoma City, OkU. 

Corporal 2217^ Franklin Ave., St. Louis. Mo. 

Corporal 1531 East 11th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal Neosho. Mo. 

Corporal Motor Route B East.. Kingfisher, Okla. 

Corporal Jackson. Mo. 

CorporsI Pacific. Mo. 

Corporal Box No. 311. Ardmore, Mo. 

Corporal 203 North Van Buren St., Kirkwood. Mo. 

Corporal Homer. La. 

Corporal 123 North Detroit St., Tulsa, Okla. 

Corporal Care of Lincoln Inst., Jefferson City, Mo. 

Corporal Slater, Mo. 

Corporal 1216 North Nolan St., Independence, Mo. 

Cook Waurika, Okla. 

Cook 811 Wichiu S., Wichiu, Kan. 

Cook Wewoka, Okla. 

Cook 1108 North Washington, Junction City. Kan. 

Bugler Ardmore, Okla. 

Bugler Belle Helene. La. 

Private Fint Class . . 200 East Farmer St.. Independence. Mo. 
Private First Class 204 West Excelsior St., Excelsior Springs, Mo. 
Private First Class . . . 1215 Woodland Ave.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Fint Class Tecumseh, Okla 

Private First Class So. Billings St., Springfield, Mo. 

Private First Class . . . . R. F. D. No. 4, Texarkana, Ark. 
Private First Class . . . 1236 Nebraska Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Fint Class Jefferson. Texas 

Private Firat Class ... So. Park Voris Station, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Firat Class Troy, Mo. 

Private First Class Poteau. Okla. 

Private First Class . . 531 Kelham Ave., Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Private First Class ... 313 East 2nd St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Private Firat Class . . . . R. F. D. No. 4. Monroe City. Mo. 
Private First Class . . . R. • F. D. No. 1. Carutheraville. Mo. 
Private FiratCIass . 890 West Railroad St., Independence. Kan. 

Private Firat Class ManhatUn, Kan. 

Private First Class .... 2915 Morgan St.. St. Louis, Mo. 
Private First Class . 618 North Idaho St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Private First Class Longwood, Mo. 

Private Firat Class Batesville, Ark. 

Private Firat Class 1228 Broadway, Hannibal. Mo. 

Private First Class Rome, Ga. 

Private First Class . . . 2515 South lOth St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private 1921 Howard St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Hughesville, Mo. 

Private Seminole, Okla. 

Private Ridgeland, Miss. 

Private 1915 East 10th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Delmar & Clair Sts., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private R. R. No. 3, Box 118, San Augustine, Texas 

Private Eskridge, Kan. 

Private Chickasha, Okla. 

Private 823 Walnut St., Fulton, Mo. 



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BRITT. RUBIN 4262495 

BU.VCH, BENJAMIN H 4259687 

CARTER, CLYDE K 4262802 

CLARDY, GEORGE 3301970 

CLAY. ROY E 4262789 

CLAYTON. PERRY 3317730 

COLEMAN, NELSON H 4262561 

COOPER. ALBERT 4262512 

COOPER. WILUAM H 4262579 

CULBERSON. FRED 3300798 

DAVE. LLOYD A 3320418 

DAVIS. NORMAN 4262449 

DAVIS, PERCY F 3301908 

DORAN. SHALER 4262539 

DUNBAR. TOM 3302655 

DUNN. WILLIAM 3319658 

EVANS. GLENN 3317739 

FRAZIER. GROVER C 3302019 

GOODLEY. JOSEPH 4260181 

GREEN. CLARENCE W 4260116 

GREEN. FREDERICK 4260040 

HACKNEY. THOMAS 3318010 

HARRIS. GRATON 4260044 

HARRIS. OBE 4260121 

HENDERSON. AUBREY 4259998 

HICKS. ABE 3301881 

HIERONYMOUS, WILL 4261867 

HODGES, JUNE 4260172 

HOLLAND. ADOLPH A 3317778 

HOLT. VERNIE 4261964 

HOUSTON. RUFUS A 4260168 

HUTCHINSON, WILUAM .... 4260030 

IRBY. SAM 4261908 

JACKSON, EDWARD E 3317600 

JACKSON. THOMAS ..".... 3317732 

JOHNSON. HENRY A 4259987 

JONES, EVERETT 3317921 

JONES. ISAAC 3301936 

JONES. JAMES F 4260049 

JONES, PHIL 3318052 

KEARNEY. ERNEST 4262523 

KERCHEVAL. RICHARD L. . . . 4260125 

KING. HENRY 4260101 

MABION. MOODY 4263388 

MARSHALL, ROY 3785063 

MARTIN, HENRY R 4260029 

MASON. FRED 3318067 

MAST. ALBERT 3300908 

MILES. GILES 4260092 

MILLER. MAURICE 3317816 

MILLET, MANSFIELD 3301990 

MONTGOMERY. UBERTY .... 4259975 

MOORE. COLLINS 4260009 

MOORE, THOMAS 4262439 

MORRIS. WILLIAM M 4260068 

MYERS, JOHN P 3318034 

McCARTHA. FRED 4259376 

MeCOY. SAMUEL 3301219 

OUVER. WILL 4262027 

PHILLIPS, ISADORE 4261973 

PHILLIPS, WILUAM 4260129 

PORTER, FRANK 336750 

REA. JAMES 3318042 

RICHARDSON. ADAM 4263389 

RIXEY, RUDOLPH 3320487 

SANDERS, HERBERT 4259964 

SANDRIDGE, C. C 3301975 

SERCEY, WILUE 3320426 

SHARON. JESSE 3317789 

SHARP, ARTHUR 3318027 

SHELEY. CASSIE 3317286 

SHIELDS, PETER 4261891 

SHROPSHIRE, JOHN 4260035 

SIKES, STEWART 3301952 

SIMMONDS, GERARD 3317821 

SMITH. RICHARD H 3317750 

SMITH. WILLIAM J 3317779 

SOLOMON, OSCAR A 4260054 

STANDFIELD, MINOR 4260124 

TATE, JIMMIE Z 3301969 

TERREL, FRANK 4259966 

TERRELL. JAMES 3317872 

THOMAS. GEORGE 3317747 

TINNER. BENJAMIN H 3317361 

TURNER, JOSEPH W 3317740 

TURNER. NOAH H 3317828 

TYLER. HOWARD M 3317774 

TYRE, OSCAR 33in90 

VAUGHN. JAMES H 3317800 



Private Aubrey, Arit. 

Private Huntington, Ark. 

Private 275 So. Shaw St., Richmond, Mo. 

Private 19 Northeast "E" St.. Ardmore, Okla. 

Private 920 Central St., Kanna City, Mo. 

Private 919 No. 16th St., St. Loui>, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 5, Boonville, Mo. 

Private 4225 Coxcna Ave.. St. Louis. Mo. 

Private Callao, Mo. 

Private Boley, Okla. 

Private 1907 East lOlh St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 2122 Chestnut St., St. Louis» Mo. 

Private 315 West Perkins St., Guthrie. Okla. 

Private 2339 Wash St., St. Louis. Mo. 

Private Yoknea, Miss. 

Private 1017 Pacific St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 106 East West St.. Hutchinson, Kan. 

Private ......... R. F. D. No. 22. Centaur, Mo. 

Private Huffhesville, Mo. 

Private Woodland, Mo. 

Private 3428 La Clede Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Point Pleaaant. Mo. 

Private 1227 Highland St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Carbon Hill, Ala. 

Private 301 North 3rd A M St.. Atchison. Kan. 

Private 314 Summit Ave.. East St. Louis. III. 

Private Fayette. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. Hughesville. Mo. 

Private 3316 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 2MVk North 4th St.. Columbia. Mo. 

Private Daville, Texas 

Private 624 Main St.. Marceline, Mo. 

Private 1518 North 24th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private 4125 Finney St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Fayette. Mo. 

Private 132 So. Mulberry St.. Ottawa, Kan. 

Private Eskridgc, Kan. 

Private 710 East 1st St., Oklahoma City. Okla. 

Private 557 So. S3rd St.. Omaha. Neb. 

Private Glendora, Miss. 

Private 1211 East 16lh St.. Kanaas City, Mo. 

Private Spearfish. S. D. 

Private De Soto. Mo. 

Private 2405 So. Seventh St., St. Joseph. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. PhiladelphU, Miss. 

Private Versailles. Mo. 

Private 2409 Humboldt St., Denver, Colo. 

Private Boley. Okla. 

Private Slater, Mo. 

Private Mexico, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Wewoka, Okla. 

private Jamcsport, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1. Bluffton, Mo. 

Private 210 Scott St., Gainesville. Texas. 

Private 222 So. 16th St., Louisiana. Mo. 

Private Box No. 171 Cherokee, Kan. 

Private 509 West 18th St., Junction City, Kan. 

Private Pawnee. La. 

Private 6009 So. 27th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private Rocheport, Mo. 

Private St. Marys. Mo. 

Private Charlottesville, Va. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Haselhurst. Miss. 

Private 34th Ave. & ISth St.. Meridian. Misa. 

Private 1012 N. 3rd St.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private .... 1313 Garfield Ave.. 2nd floor. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Wewoka. Okla. 

Private 1319 Ann Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Slater, Mo. 

Private 1020 Sherman St., Springfield. Mo. 

Private Mexico, Mo. 

Private Estill. Mo. 

Private Roswell. N. M. 

Private Broken Bow, Okla. 

Private 1314 Morgan St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 4244 West Labadie St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private . 212 So. 22nd. St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Crysul City. Mo. 

Private Garden City. Kan. 

Private Brooksville. Okla. 

Private 2017 Charles St.. St. Joseph. Mo. 

Private 106 South Main St.. Eldorado. Kans. 

Private 3009 Madison St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 6518 Water St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Clarkesville, Mo. 

Private 210 North Plasenton St.. Independence, Kan. 

Private New Florence, Mo. 

Private 1817 Flora Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Route No. 2, Guthrie, Mo. 



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WATTS. THOMAS 3317715 

WHITAKER, WILL 3317890 

WHITE, CHARLES S 4260154 

WHITE. JAMES L 3301987 

WHITTLER, HENRY A 3317830 

WILLIAMS, JAMES 3317846 

WILSON, EMMITT 3301294 

WILSON, HERBERT 3317986 

WILSON, JOHN H 4260045 

WILSON. OLLIE 3317908 

WOODALL, HARRISON 4260148 

WOODEN, WILL 3318028 

WOODS, CLYDE 4260050 

WOODS. REGINALD 3317772 

WOODS, WILLIAM 3301955 

YEARBY. EZRA 3301149 

YOUNG, ANDREW J 2208632 



Private Armttrong, Mo. 

Private Caruthersville, Mo. 

Private Utica, Mo. 

Private Ashdown. Ark. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, New Bloomfield, Mo. 

Private 1922 So. 5th, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private West Lake, La. 

Private 2103 North Mich. Ave., Pituburg, Kan. 

Private 1609 East 10th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private . . . . R. F. D. No. 2, Box 125. Caruthersville, Mo. 

Private 406 Bolan Ave., Hannibal, Mo. 

Private 905 Colorado St., Coffffeeville, Kan. 

Private 1320 East Gordon St., Hannibal, Mo. 

Private 772 West Eastwood St., Marshall, Mo. 

Private 230 East 2nd St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Private Rochelle. La. 

Private 409 Washington St., Bllozi. Miss. 




COMPANY "C" AT BRIEULLESSURMEUSE. 
First Sgt. Lucas in foreground. 



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By Corporal Henry L. Robinson 

FIRST let me apologize, for I keenly feel my inability as a writer, but not 
knowing how to say *'no," I accepted the honor thrust upon me by my comrades. 

It was a wonderful night, August 25, 1918, when we departed from Camp 
Funston, on our way to take our part in helping to shape the destiny of nations. 
We left Camp Funston via the Union Pacific at 1:40 a. m., arriving in Kansas City 
at 8:00 a. m., where we were met by friends and relatives. In fact it seemed as 
though all of Kansas City was there to give us a real American send-off. Leaving 
over the Wabash, we arrived in Moberly, Mo., where we paraded, and were served 
by the colored citizens of that town. Continuing our journey we arrived in Detroit, 
where we crossed into Canada by ferry. The following morning we visited Niagara 
Falls on the Canadian side, there taking the Lehigh Valley, which brought us into 
New York. 

We arrived in Camp Upton in the afternoon of August 30, 1918, where we 
found everything and every one in a rush. It was hustle from the word go. We 
were outfitted with new uniforms, shoes, in fact everything that a soldier needs. 
Mosquitoes were plentiful; they made one think that they were Pro-German the 
way they would charge constantly, day and night. Well, we laid a barrage of 
smoke on them and that about defeated them. Then order was passed around: *'A11 
fires out." Sure was some sad bunch. 

September 1st we started for somewhere, and on the following morning we found 
ourselves in dear old Montreal, Canada. That same morning we boarded H. M. S. 
Haverford and were given two postal cards to mail in Montreal, telling 
our loved ones at home that we had arrived safely over seas. What we tried to 
understand was. Why mail them in Montreal? Well, we found out later — so that 
the enemy would not know where we were. About noon the same day the famous 
Haverford pulled in her gang plank, and moved silently out into the St. Lawrence 
river. I said silently, but can not back up that statement as I was unconscious of 
what was going on around me — still trying to dope out about those postal cards. 
The following morning we found ourselves in the outer harbor of Quebec. Every 
one was happy and full of pep, wild to get to France for one crack at the Hun. 

Leaving Quebec we passed into the Gulf of St. Lawrence. My, but that Gulf 
surely started in upsetting many a good party. The sharks and sea gulls followed 
us all the way out to sea, and back to Quebec. Of course no doubt you are 
wondering how we got back to Quebec. Well, after going out to sea about 900 
miles we got lost from our convoy, and returned there, boarding H. M. S. 
Navara and leaving Quebec a second time on Friday, September 13. Of course you 
can imagine what every one thought about that date. But nevertheless, on Sep- 
tember 23 we arrived at Tilbury Docks, England, on the outskirts of the great city 
of London, where we received the news that we would have to stay on the boat, as 
there was a railroad strike on in the land. King George sent us all a letter telling us 
how glad he was that we came over. We were served by the Red Cross while aboard 
ship. 



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We boarded a train September 25, and started for Camp Romsey, England, a 
rest camp. Upon arrival we were informed by previous service soldiers at that 
camp that chow was slim, which we found out to be a fact. The bill of fare for 
supper was bread, jam, and tea. But our officers knew about what they call emer- 
gency rations, so we got a good meal, the best we had had for a long, long time. 
It was a hard night's rest at the rest camp and two blankets and a hardwood floor 
to sleep on. My, how we wished we had smuggled our hanmiocks off the boat 
so we could get off" the floor and escape the cold, chilly air that was coming under 
out tents. 




Bright and early on the morning of September 28, we received our iron rations 
— bully beef and hardtack — and marched out of Camp Romsey on our way to 
Southampton, a distance of eight miles. Before we arrived there with full packs 
it seemed as though it were eighty-eight miles. We stopped at Manchester for 
lunch, and were wonderfully served by that mother to us all, the Red Cross. 

Harry Allen, who at that time was corporal, kept the spirits of the boys at 
a high pitch with his songs, also ours. The song hits of Company "D" at that 
time were "Takes a Hard Fight to Whip the Kaiser," and "Didn't he Ramble," also 
"Pack up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag and Smile, Smile." During the sing- 
ing the feet of our beloved Sgt. Gooch ran hot, and his pack rode him like a 
nightmare. He sent out a S. 0. S. and after a consultation by the non-coms 
yours truly, Buck Pvt. Robinson, whose pack was comfortably sitting on a truck, 
was detailed to carry his pack until relieved, which was on the boat that took us 



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Gun firing at two Germans who were attempting to set up a machine gun on the road to 
Champigneulles, 305th Machine Gun Battalion, 78th Division. St. Juvin, Ardennes, France. 

November 1, 1918. 




Battery "A," 108th Field Artillery, in action, firing toward Chatel Chehery, Ardennes. 

This battery was under the fire of the enemy gas shells when this picture was taken. 

108th Field Artillery. Varennes-en-Argonne, Meuse, France. October 3, 1918. 



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out of England, and into France. Had no kick coming, though; had no business 
being a buck. 

Well, we arrived in Southampton, in the language of the army we will say **on 
or about'' 4:45 P. M., where we boarded a Channel transport, and crossed the Eng- 
lish Channel, arriving the following morning in Cherbourg, France. Right here 
I am forced to make a note. A detail was gathered to go with a truck, to protect 
company property. The word was passed on that "it's a five-mile hike." Every 
one fell out in a company front for the detail. Well, we all arrived in camp 
0. K., were conducted to our apartments and given two more blankets. About 
2:00 A. M. the thermometer dropped about 88 degrees. It was impossible to 
linger in the apartments any longer, so everyone was up doing the marathon 
around the camp; but as usual, some one cracks wise, and that way the kitchen 
was discovered. Most of Company "D" spent the night there, the next day we 
were moved from the lowlands of said camp to the highlands. Everything was all 
right until Sunday afternoon, October 3, when a storm which resembled a Kansas 
cyclone blew tents down, and we found ourselves under the dripping canopy of 
the heavens. After considerable work we managed to get under shelter about night- 
fall, only to have that same storm repeat the performance. We gave the tents 
"as you were" and went to bed. 

Left Cherbourg October 4 by way of "side door Pullman" for Rolampont. Each 
car had the following printed on its sides; "Chevaux (meaning horses) 8" and 
"Hommes (meaning men) 40." So you can see we came all the way to France 
to ride palace horse cars. Again and again the Red Cross did their wonderful 
work for us all. Arriving in Rolampont we set up our shelter halves, better known 
to the boys as "pup" tents. This was our first time living in them. There is an 
art of getting in or out, rather hard for beginners. But after learning the 
combination, it comes easy. You go in by counts the same as you do when taking 
shooting exercises in the prone position. In the words of our own Napoleon, 
"very simple." 

We were a busy bunch there — got some more new clothes, had "gas" by the 
nimobers, met a couple of soldiers just from the front, who entertained us with 
how many Huns they killed, and at the same time introducing the most noted 
animal in captivity, the "cootie." It was here that Pvt. Hugh Henton, former hotel 
man in the U. S. A., made his reputation as head waiter. It was the story of Hugh . 
that made Pvt. Fred Straughter, of Moberly, Mo., shoot at what he thought was — 
a Hun submarine. Well, any way, that just goes to show that he knew his 12th 
General Order. . 

Midnight, October 8, found us leaving Rolampont via side door Pullman, on 
our way to Clermont-en-Argonne. We arrived at said town about 7:30 A. M. We 
were now three miles from the firing line. Of course we could hear the roar of 
the cannon, and everywhere the sky was full of air-men. No other excitement, until 
we started up a hill about 45 degrees with full packs. The blues were written in 
Memphis, but say, you should have heard them sung that morning. Some more 
pup tents — the barracks were just too full of pets to sleep in. Well, that night 
Sgt. Harry Allen yelled "gas." Some of the boys had let their gas masks stray 
from them, and it was a fight for life, some one wanted to go fifty-fifty, but nothing 
doing. I beg your pardon: date of arrival in Clermont October 10, 1918. 

October 12 we departed for a little town that the Germans wiped off the map, 
called Neuvilly. We were assigned to the 23rd Engineers and the whole companv 
went in for road work. It was here we realized what a wonderful thing a sick 
book is, but after a lecture by our officers, it was not long before every man, sick 
or well, who was able to go, was on his toes, to do his part in helping win the war. 



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"Fritz" took a notion that he should pay us a visit, so one beautiful moon- 
light night he paid us one, and my, how he made things hum. In those days 
lights were put out at nightfall. Corp. Willie Jones and Pvt. Thomas Freeman 
were peacefully asleep with their house on fire and "Fritz" dropping bombs all 
around us. The fire was discovered by Captain Immell, who saved them from being 
burned to death, and our camp from being a direct target for the enemy. He 
then called Pvt. Straughter to tell everyone to put on his gas mask and lie close to 
the ground. 

The first part of the order was all right, but the latter was not necessary, as there 
was only a straw between us and the ground. The first one to leave home was 
Sgt. Dudley, then Sgt. Goodwin. Corp. Anderson brought up a mean third, 
but say, why? why? weren't you there to see Sgt. Allen bring up the rear? 
The wire entanglements saved him from being A. W. 0. L. Sgt. Sims of the 25th 
did not run, in fact he broke all records for not breathing. Just could not move. 
Lieut. Mayberry used force and everything to get Sgt. Wright from under bis bed, 
but nothing doing. Of course Wright lived in a dugout. Well, it got so com- 
mon that everybody rested at ease when Fritz came over. 

Colonel Humphrey gave us many nice talks while there: each rock we put in was 
a sack of sugar to the front, a can of dear old bully beef and hardtack. We sent 
it abundantly. Corp. Harry Madison and Pvt. Oscar Richardson were put in charge 
of the tool house. And, just think, right next to the 339th L. B. They both proved 
to be good policemen. 'NufF said! 

It was at this town that our new Captain Frank D. Moses made a famous remark 
about 5:15 A. M. "You corporal get those men out, or I'll get you." On October 
31, Company "D" moved to Aubreville, where we spent five days in Hotel De Barn, the 
best we could get in that city; but still we had no kick coming, for long before then 
we found out that the war was all Old Sherman said it was. 

November 4 found us in a little town called Charpentry. At this place we did 
fast work keeping lines of communication open. Trucks with supplies for the 
front were always on the move. We were here November 11, when the armistice 
was signed. It was a wonderful night, every one was wild with joy because Uncle 
Sam's boys had brought home the bacon. 

November 21 we moved to Chatel-Chehery in the Argonne forest. This is where 
we first met Old Man Salvage. Well, we policed up the old woods. In this town 
we had the pleasure of seeing a one-man detail drilled by our Colonel. " 'Bout 
face! My gracious, just as bad in back as you are in front. Forward, march! 
Report to your Captain." 

We also had a few promotions. In this town Fred A. Cook was made supply 
sergeant, officially known as the dope man, always dealing in the latest despatches. 

On February 10 we moved to Brieulles-sur-Meuse. We stayed nine days, then 
went to Mouzon-en-Ardennes, spent our first night in the church. The following 
day we moved into a castle said to be 400 years old. It was here we came in close 
touch with old Generals Yin Rouge and Blanc. 

On April 22 we moved to Dun-sur-Meuse and some set out for Brest. 

It would be an injustice to close this chapter without saying a word about 
the kindness of our officers. Captain Moses, who was with us the greater part of 
our time in France, has won a place in the heart of every man in the company. So 
has Lieut. H. C. Mayberry. Just as is said of his state, "Old Kentucky," we find him 
a thoroughbred. We had two lieutenants from the Sunflower State of Kansas — 
Lieuts. Walter D. Steinhauer and Raymond F. Olinger. We like them all for their 
fairness toward us, and never tiring efforts in making everything as pleasant as 
possible. Lieut. Parmer was away from us quite some time — but shall not be 
forgotten. 

Well, here's good luck to all of you — ^hope to meet all again. 



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COMPANY "D' 



Officers 

MOSES, FRANK D.. CapUin Infantry. U. S. A Care of Y. M. C. A., Indianapolis, Ind. 

MAYBERRY, HOWARD C, First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Shively, Ky. 

STEINHAUER, WALTER D.. First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 315 N. 4th St., Leavenworth, Kan. 

OLINGER. RAYMOND F., Second Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A Buxton, Kan. 

HICKS. MILTON E., Second Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Cowrie, Iowa 

Men 



ALLEN, HARRY 4259741 

MOORE. EDDIE 3302123 

COOK, FRED A 4259702 

GOOCH, LUTHER E 3302079 

SIMS, ROY 335772 

HAYTER. RALEIGH A 3302057 

ROBINSON. ELIJAH 3302048 

WHITE, EUGENE 3302100 

ALLEN. CHARLES P 3784292 

ANDERSON, MORRIS 3302064 

JONES, WILLIE R 3784166 

MADISON, HARRY W 4261747 

MAGEE. HOLUS 3302102 

MARTIN, CARL 3302160 

PIERSON, WILLIAM Mc 4261656 

STRADER. GEORGE 3784118 

SCHRADER, WILLIAM C 42599*9 

BRAXTON, ROY 4259107 

CHAMBERLAIN, FRANK P 3302096 

PAGE, SHERMAN 4259734 

HAYES, ROY 4258941 

JACKSON, WILLIAM H 4259889 

PRICE, TALTON 4262005 

ROBINSON. HENRY L 4261939 

SMITH, CORNEUUS 3302249 

STEPP, THOMAS 3784254 

WYATT, ROBERT 4259632 

TASSIN, MITTCHELL 4261861 

WIUAMS, JAMES 3303486 

GIBSON, CLEM 3302116 

HENDERSON, BOWLER 3302205 

JOSEPH. FRANK 3302236 

SHAW. CLARENCE 3302148 

WALKER, RAYFIELD 3302071 

HUBERT, JAMES 3303446 

ABERNATHY. ROBERT H 4259089 

ALLEN, JASON E 4258957 

ANDERSON, JOHN 3301656 

ARMSTEAD, GEORGE .... 4259721 

BARKER, OLUE 3302119 

BAUGH, DANIEL 3784084 

BLAND. ROLLA 3302107 

BRAZLEY, JAMES 3320993 

BEENE, S.\MUEL 3330923 

BROWN, TURNER 4259765 

BRUNER. WELUNGTON 3302137 

CARVER. LEMMIE 3784117 

CAMPBELL. BEN 3303343 

CHENEY, THERON 3302095 

CLARK. CHANCEY 3784041 

COLLIN, CURTIS J 4259939 

COOK, ELMER 3320942 

COTTON, ALBURN H 3302121 

CRAIG. LAWRE.NCE 42.S9886 

DAVENPORT, RALPH A 3320917 

DADE, LUTHER 4259685 

DAVIS. CHESTER 4259848 

DAVIS. REED E 4260057 

DEGRAFTENREED, LILBURN . . . 3302111 

DONOHIE. OSCAR C 4259777 

DUDLEY, CONRAD R 4259385 

DUDLEY, PRESLEY 4259831 

DUNCAN, CLARENCE 3302295 

ELBY, GEORGE 42:^9582 

ELLIS, DODD 3.W2108 

EWING. ALBERT 4258128 

KARRIS. CHARLEY 4259796 

FINNIE, WILLIE 3784080 

FOWLER, GEORGE W. 3320835 

FRANKLIN, TOLTON 37&H95 

FREEMAN, THOMAS 3784160 



Serteant 1316 Euclid Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Sergeant 1706 Mock Street, Muncie, Ind. 

Sergeant Blue Rapids, Kan. 

Sergeant R. F. D. 12, Kirkwood, Mo. 

Sergeant . . . ' Pleasant Green, Mo. 

Sergeant 1221 New Jersey Street. Lawrence, Kan. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No. 1, Clear View, Okla. 

Sergeant Hobart, Okla. 

Corporal 1123 North 5th Ave., Columbus, Miss. 

Corporal Kirkwood, Mo. 

Corporal Helena. Ark. 

Corporal 828 North Wichiu St.. Wichita, Kan. 

Corporal Angie, La. 

Corporal Neosho, Mo. 

Corporal 1121 Davenport St., Omaha, Neb. 

Corporal Lyons, Kan. 

Corporal 421 North Hickory St., Ottawa, Kan. 

Corporal 2341 Champa St., Denver, Colo. 

Corporal 740 West 3rd St. Oklahoma, City, Okla. 

Corporal 2028 East 19ih St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Corporal 211 West Missouri Ave., St. Joseph. Mo. 

Corporal 823 Lincoln St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Corporal 4826 South 25th St., So. Omaha, Neb. 

Corporal 20 Jackson Ave., Nyack-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Corporal 407 South Elm St., Charleston, Mo. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 5. Columbus, Miss 

Corporal 1912 East 14th St., Kansas City, Mo 

Corporal 2821 14th St., New Orleans, U 

Corporal 2224 Howard St., New Orleans, La 

Cook R. F. D. No. 1. Wewoka. Okla. 

Cook Uke ViUage, Ark. 

Cook New Roads, La. 

Cook El Dorado, Ark. 

Buglers Lavacca, La. 

Buglers New Orleans, La. 

Private 850 St. Louis Street, Springfield, Mo. 

Private 685 West Eastwood Street, Marshall, Mo. 

Private Clinton, La. 

Private 1904 WoodUnd Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Neosho, Mo. 

Private Route 1, Box 64. Red Wing, Kans. 

Private Festus, Mo. 

Private Pascagoula, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 50, RatlifT. Miss. 

Private 23rd & Woodland Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Lima OkU. 

Private Stovall, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Box 18, Grand Cane, La. 

Private 524 North Mcgregor Street, Carthage. Mo. 

Private 458 Lawrence Ave., Leavenworth. Kan. 

Private 9 West High Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

Private 1216 Merrill Street Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Charleston, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Box 3B, Independence, Mo. 

Private 1823 Mashachusetts Ave., Topcka, Kan. 

Private 1103 South 9th Street, Muskogee, Okla. 

Private 1409 West 10th Street, Little Rock, Aik. 

Private Tebbetls, Mo. 

Private Sprio, Okla. 

Private 2114 Woodland .Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1514 East 10th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1. Box 64. Readsville, Mo. 

Private New Roads, La. 

Private 1116 B East 16th Street, Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 22 East 10th St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Private 1162 Lane St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Louisiana, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Nettleton, Miss. 

Private Tonganoxie, Kan. 

Private Box 273. Elwood, Kans. 

Private Coahoma, Miss. 



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FULCHER, JAMES W 3301163 

GASKIN, WILLIAM D 4259918 

GIBSON, JAHLEEL 4359807 

GILBERT, EUGENE 4262*68 

GLOVER, EARNEST 4259888 

GOODWIN. ARTHUR 4262136 

GOODWIN. EDWARD 4259674 

GUNTER. HOLSIE 3784216 

HAM. HARRISON 3320934 

HARRIS, JAMES 378W37 

HARRIS. FLOYD 3319727 

HART, WILLIAM H 4259925 

HAYDEN. SIDNEY 3784011 

HAYNES. COLONEI 3320960 

HENDERSON. JUNIUS 3784191 

HENTON. HUGH 3.302056 

HOPSON, JORDAN 3784061 

HUGHES, PRINCE 4259867 

HERRON. CL.\RENCE 378U79 

HOUSTON. WILLIAM 4259853 

IRBY. FRED G 4259926 

JACKSON. GEORGE W 42.59819 

JACKSON, JOHN E 3784141 

JACKSON, LINDSLEY 3784174 

JACKSON, WILLIAM H 33021.15 

JENKINS. ISA[AH 3303.131 

JONES. ALBERT 42r)%72 

JOHNSON, GABRIEL 3302066 

JOHNSON, HENRY 3302235 

JOHN.SON. JACK 42.5%75 

JOHNSON, WILLARD H 4259799 

JOHNSON, WILLIE 1169605 

KAISER. ARTHUR W 4262438 

KEYES. WILLIAM 3320922 

KING, OVIE 4259917 

LANE, LEE 4262471 

LANDRUM. EDDIE 3302110 

LEE. IRVIN T 4259788 

LYLE, OTIS R 42.19829 

LANDIS, DAVID S 42598.36 

MAJORS, PROFFESSOR H 3320941 

MANSUR, HIAWATHA 4261 101 

MARTIN. LAWRENCE 3784064 

MOFFETT, JOSEPH 3784066 

MOORE. THOMAS 3603331 

MORRISON, CLARENCE E 4259954 

NARSSE. PHILANDER 3303246 

NEAL, ARTHUR 4262146 

OLIVER, OTIS 3302117 

OUSLEY, GEORGE W 42.59701 

PETTIS. WALTER 4259725 

POINSON, ADA.M 3303337 

RANDALL. ISAAC .... . 3302270 

REDMON, BENJAMIN H 3302174 

RICHARDSON, OSCAR T 4259729 

RICHSHION, ODIES A 4259738 

ROBNETT, GEORGE A 4261916 

ROYSTON. EARL F 4259932 

RUCKER, GULLIVER 42.59882 

RUSSELL, CARR R 3784047 

SALLEE, JAMES H 4259806 

SCOTT, ALFED 3303411 

SCOTT. ROBERT T 37840.59 

SHELTON. CHARLES 426218^4 

SHIP, ORA 4262002 

SIMS. LEE 3321000 

SIMON. ISAAC C 4261877 

SLAUGHTER, GRANT 4262420 

SMITH, DAVE No. 1 3302252 

SMITH, DAVE No. 2 3303397 

SMITH, HARRY A 4261956 

SMITH, JOSEPH B 42.59773 

SPURGES, CLEM 3320970 

STARKS, FRANK 3784014 

STARKS. JOSEPH 4261938 

STEWART. JAMES Z 3784074 

STRAUGHTER. FRED 4261952 

SULLIVAN. HORACE 4259922 

SWINK. SYLVESTER 4262499 

TAYLOR, HERMAN R 4259684 

TAYLOR, HENRY 3303504 

TAYLOR, PORTER 4261994 

THOMAS. MARSHALL F 3320901 

THOMPSON, WILLIE 4261142 

THOMPSON. BENJAMIN F 33209.35 

THOMPSON, JOHN W 4259780 

THOMPKINS, FINES 3302139 

THORNTON, CLARENCE .... 4259696 

TIBBS. WILLIAM H 4259711 



Private Booncville, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Fulton, Mo. 

Private 1907 East 13th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Brinkley, Ark. 

Private 317 West Silver Ave.. Albuquerque, N. M. 

Private Hayti, Mo. 

Private 1810 Locust St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4, Columbus, Mia». 

Private Shererd, Mistt. 

Private Topeka, Kans. 

Private Shaw, Miss. 

Private 1408 North 45th St., BirminKham, Ala. 

Private Lyons, Miss. 

Private 1266 North Jeflerson St., Topeka Knns. 

Private Sheard, Miss. 

Private .3020 East 2nd St., Oklahoma City. Okla. 

Private Lyons. Miss. 

Private South College St., Marshall, Mo. 

Private Cloverhill. Miss. 

Private 472 Redman St., Marshall, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Cresrent, Okla. 

Priv.ite R. F. D. No. 1, Portland. Mo. 

Private 332 Lawrence St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Lula, Miss. 

Private .... ... 823 Lincoln St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. Box 129. Mansfield, U. 

Private 1529 East 11th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 905 W. Noble Ave.. Guthrie, Okla. 

Priv.ue House 50, Lottie. La. 

Private 1120 Camel St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1530 Tracy Ave.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Dclvalle, Texas 

Private New Haven, Mo. 

Private Union Depot, Leavenworth, Kans. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, New Bloomfield, Mo. 

Private .... Care of U. S. Government Fleet, Barfield. Ark. 

Private Hulbert, Okla. 

Private Hatton, Mo. 

Private 908 North Main St., Clinton, Mo. 

Private Cherryvalc, Kan. 

Private 14th & Balis St., Leavenworth. Kan. 

Private Richmond, Mo. 

Private Gautier, Miss. 

Private Pascagoula. Miss. 

Private . . . . . R. F. D. No. 1, Box 63, Cotton Valley, La. 

Private 119 North Ball St., Webb City, Mo. 

Private 138 Dale St., Liberia, La. 

Private Swifton, Mo. 

Private 1119 B East 17th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1832 Tracey Ave., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1704 E. 18th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Klotzville, La. 

Private Foules, La. 

Private 804 E. Chestnut St.. Carthage, Mo. 

Private 319 Oakland Ave.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1324 Vine St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 8. Columbia, Mo. 

Private 1717 Bartley St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Malta Bend, Mo. 

Priv^ate 8 Lumbarg St., Kansas City. Kans. 

Private 1020 Ave. A.. Council Bluffs, la. 

Private St. James, I^. 

Private Hillhouse. Miss. 

Private 117 South Leonard Ave., St. Louis. Mo. 

Private R. R. No. 3. St. Paul, Mo. 

Private Hamilton, Miss. 

Private 907 North 21st St., Ohama. Neb. 

Private 1822 East Clay St., Vicksburg, Miss. 

Private Winnsboro, La. 

Private St. James, La. 

Private Huntsville, Mo. 

Private 1517 Michigan Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private NVttleton. Miss. 

Private Guntown, Miss. 

Private 2638 Hamilton, Omaha, Neb. 

Private Sterling, Kan. 

Private Moberly, Mo. 

Private Alfalfa, La. 

Private Herculaneum, Mo. 

Private 2316 Fulton Ave., Evansville, Ind. 

Private 2409 Josephine St., New Orieans. La. 

Private Warrenton, Mo. 

Private 605 East 2nd St., Hutchinson, Kan. 

Private 505 2Sth St., Sikton, Mo. 

Private 22 & Madison St., Topeka. Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 6, Dresden. Tenn. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Hartville. Mo. 

Private 1226 Highland Ave., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1909 Tracy. Kansas City, Mo. 



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TOOKE. JAMES 4259696 

TROWER, FERNAN 4239731 

WALKER. CHARLES H 3320961 

WALKER. LEWIS 4259814 

WARD, LEE 4259692 

WASHINGTON. RALPH 4262026 

WATSON, ADDIE 3784246 

WELCH, ED 4262036 

WELCH. JESS 4262060 

WHITE JOE 3784056 

WHITLEY, EARNEST 3784017 

WHITLEY, SIMMON 3784033 

WILLIAMS, ROBERT 4261961 

WILLIAMS, WALTER S 3320897 

WILSON. LLOYD 4262056 

WILSON. WILLIE 3303296 

WISE. ALFRED 4259661 

WOOTEN, HOWARD L 1169602 

WORKCUFF, WILSON 4259713 



Private 1904 Woodland, Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1011 Michigan Ave., Kansaa City. Kan. 

Private 931 Freeman St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Fulton, Mo. 

Private Glasgow, Mo. 

Private 500 So. Ault St., Moberly, Mo.' 

Private Friar Point, Miss. 

Private Wright City, Mo. 

Private 1425 North llth St., Omaha. Neb. 

Private Egypt, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 6, Aberdeen, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 6, Aberdeen. Miss. 

Private Okmulgee, Okla. 

Private Bonner Springs, Kan. 

Private .... ... New Madrid, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 127, Mansfield. La. 

Private 1510 East 17th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Fodice, Texas 

Private 1517 Virginia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 




COMPANY "D" AT MOUZON (just south of Sedan). 
At the extreme right are Capt. Frank Moses and Lieut. Raymond Olinger. 



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History of Company "E" 



By First Lieut. Orue E. Ooley 




WHEN in the course of a nation's existence it becomes necessary to take up arms in 
defence of rights or principles, that defence often calls into service many types 
and colors of citizens. This was the case when the United States declared war 
on the German Empire and set about getting together a cosmopolitan army to defend 
the rights of Democracy and Humanity. 

At three a. m., June 21, in the year of Our Lord nineteen hundred and eighteen, 
the calm and peaceful repose of Detention Camp No. 2, Camp Funston, Kan., 
was broken by the arrival of a multitude of motor trucks b<*^ring an overload of 
men direct from the receiving station at Camp Funston. On their arrival at De- 
tention Camp No. 2, they were unceremoniously unloaded and turned over to officers 
awaiting their arrival. 

They appeared in partial deshabille. Some had their shoes laced, some had 
not, others had not had time to put on leggings or coats, for still fresh on their 
minds was the receiving station refrain: "You can't stop here," and "One on and 
one in your bag." Two hundred and fifty-one of these rookies were turned over to 
2nd Lieut. Orlie Ooley, to be later turned into soldiers for overseas service. 

The first thing was to get a kitchen force. So, as the different groups arrived, they 
were asked, "Can you cook?" Many could, and these were at once put into the 
kitchen to prepare breakfast, the others were shown their tents, and cots were drawn. 

June 22 brought 2nd Lieuts. W.F. Hubbard and H. E. Hemstreel. The men were 
sized and formed into temporary squads, and their initiation into the mysteries of 
soldier life began in earnest. They were taught to distinguish between their left and 
right hands and feet; also to keep step. The Articles of War were also read, which, 
as one man put it, means "As the court-martial may direct." 

The companies were formed and lettered and came to be known as the First 
Provisional Colored Regiment. This designation lasted until July 15, when the 
entire regiment moved into barracks in Camp Funston and became the 805th 
Pioneer Infantry, and soon after came under the command of Colonel Chauncey 
B. Humphrey. The drill and other exercises and duties became more svstematized 
and assumed definite shape. The men of Company "E" had great pride in their 
company and always tried to do their best. It became quite common on parades 
to have the reviewing officer pass favorable comments on their good appearance 
and alignment in march. Company "E" had the distinction of giving a special 
exhibition of their proficiency before General Leonard Wood on their drill ground 
on August 8, 1918. Their work was pronounced good by the General and in the 
presence of the Battalion Commander, Major John E. Creed. The proficiency of 
the different individuals was constantly watched and the best selected as acting non- 
commissioned officers. This company soon developed a fairly proficient non- 
com, staff, with Pvt. George Fisher as 1st sergeant and Pvts. W. Hare, William 
Haney, and William Moore as sergeants, with Pvt. M. White as mess ser&:eant. 
On August 10 many new officers were assigned to the regiment from the 164th Depot 



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Brigade. Company "E" was given Captain James R. McCabe, 1st Lieuts. Frank 
D. Preston and John F. Farrington and 2nd Lieut. Walter Steinhauer. Lieut. Pres- 
ton was attached to Regimental Headquarters. The work took on the nature of 
combat drill and field manoeuvers, with hikes and assumed attacks. 

August 25 is a momentous date in the history and lives of the men of Company 
"E," for that was the day that we received the orders, long expected, to go over- 
seas. To some it seemed their final call, for they did not have the least hope or 
idea of ever seeing their home or friends again, and the parting was hard. Some 
laughed, some sang, and some prayed. We entrained August 27. 




The trip to Camp Upton was pleasing as to weather conditions and interesting 
as to scenery. The troops were cheered as they passed through the towns and 
cities. The Red Cross workers distributed hot coffee, candy, and tobacco to the men 
as we passed along. The troops from our train were taken for a march in Niagara 
and saw the Falls from the Canadian side. 

The brief stay in Camp Upton was a very busy one. Here the men were equipped 
with final issues of clothing and ordnance. Passenger lists were made out, and other 
paper work necessary and incidental to the embarkation of the troops finished. 
Some of the officers worked continously for eighteen hours. 

We entrained again September 1, at 2:00 A. M., for Quebec, Canada. The 
trip through New England was very interesting and pleasant. Quebec was reached 
about nine o'clock, September 3, and we went aboard the transport "Saxonia" at 
11:00 A. M. Some of the men got "religion" as soon as their feet left the soil 



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Hon Argonne Orates. 



At ttt ilaym> I^T QI»U4catkhM7 



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of Canada and retained an attitude of prayerful expectation until we landed after an 
uneventful voyage at Liverpool, England, on September 16. 

We crossed the island to the port of Southampton, where we again halted foi 
a brief respite and to make more passenger lists, etc. The crossing of the Channel 
followed, and we landed on the Continent at the port of LeHavre, France, September 
21, 1918. The Second and Third Battalions went into camp outside the port of 
Havre for a short rest; the First Battalion had not been heard from since leaving 
the States. 

We entrained again September 23, and arrived at Rolampont, Haute-Marne, 
where we detrained and spent a most miserable period from September 25 till 
October 1. The men pitched pup-tents on the rain-soaked fields, and slept in 
them with nothing but a blanket between them and the ground. Officers fared 
little better, their billets being stables, servants' quarters, garrets, and any place 
they were fortunate enough to find. The time here was spent in officers' meetings 
and a few drills in accelerated cadence for the men. Gas masks were issued and 
lectures were given as to their use and application. 

The regiment moved to Clermont-en-Argonne and was distributed over the 
area occupied by the First Army, and was attached to the Engineers for road work. 
Companies "E" and "F" were sent to Auzeville, a small village near Clermont, to 
work on a railhead. The camp was a poor one, and many men were sent to the 
hospital with dysentery or fever. 

It was also at Auzeville that Company "E" received its introduction to "Jerry," 
as the German airmen were called. Here also they could hear the big guns on the 
front, some twelve kilometers away, and see the ambulances carrying back the 
wounded. 

Company "E" moved to Varennes October 8, and took up the repair of the 
roads and railhead at that place. Here we were under nightly bombardment by 
Hun planes seeking to destroy the railhead and hospital, also the ammunition 
dumps between Varennes and Cheppy. Here Sgt. Hayden made his famous asser- 
tion that, "It's a hell of a war where a fellow has to work all day and run all 
night." Here, during one of the bombardments, Pvt., afterwards Sgt., Lee, made 
his exception to the twelve General Orders, by saying, "If Jerry comes over while 
I'm on post, I'll consider myself properly relieved." 

October 20 Captain McCabe was relieved of command, and Lieut. Preston 
was sent from the security of Regimental Headquarters to take over the company, 
which he did in a capable manner, until November, when he was again needed 
at headquarters and Captain John J. McGrady became our commander. 

November 7 Company "E" received orders to move to St. Juvin; left its old 
camp at 2:30 P. M., and arrived at the new camp at 8:00 P. M., which is making 
a record hike. Here the company found a hot supper and comfortable quarters 
awaiting them. The officers were quartered in an old brewery and the men in a 
large warehouse. Plenty of good water and fuel, and everybody was happy. Here 
the company was assigned to the roads from St. Juvin to Landres-St. Georges, which 
were soon repaired, and it was while we were thus engaged that news came of 
the signing of the armistice. It was a unique distinction that Company "E" of all 
the troops in this region should be the first to receive this news. The wireless 
station was near us, and the operators messed with us. Thus we received the glad 
tidings through them, and immediately the men began to celebrate by using their 
rifles and proceeded to fill the roof of their quarters with holes. No thought of 
future rains entered their heads. The news was quickly taken along the roads, 
and every passing truck and ambulance became the herald of joyful news. The 
eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918 will long be 
remembered by the officers and men of Company "E." 



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November 14 the company was moved to Briquenay, and here again we were 
lucky in finding good quarters. Here we saw men returning from the front, victorious 
and soon to be homeward bound. We worked the roads to Grand-Pre and Boult 
Lieuts. Ingraham and Steinhauer were here relieved from duty with Company "E" 
and assigned to its First Battalion. 

November 19 we re-traced our steps to a camp about three kilometers west 
of Varennes to the region said to have been occupied by the Bavarian prince, 
Rupprecht. Here we had almost luxurious quarters in concrete dugouts, highly 
finished inside and outside with paint and fresco. Here we wished to have a long 
stay, but received orders at noon that we would move the next day. 

November 21 we moved to Binarville, an extinct village in the heart of the 
Argonne Forest. Here at first we were quartered in old dug-outs that were very 
damp, but the usual energy was displayed by officers and men, and the quarters 
were made fairly comfortable until the heavy rains began. We were put on salvage 
work, and given the district running eastward to Apremont, south nearly to Varennes 
and west to Vienne Chateau, embracing altogether about thirty-six square kilo- 
meters. 

Salvage work went on, and we found several bodies of both German and American 
soldiers, which we buried with appropriate honors. And an old German bath-house 
was repaired and the men enjoyed weekly shower baths, which helped a great deal to 
sustain their morale. Lieuts. Ooley and Locke and some of the men succeeded in 
getting fresh game occasionally, which helped the mess. Plenty of deer, boar, and 
hare were to be had in the forest, also many partridges. 

December 14 we moved again about two kilometers to the dug-out city of 
Charlepaux. This is the camp that Company "E" made famous and that made 
Company "E" likewise famous. Here we had most excellent quarters for officers 
and men in the hastily abandoned quarters of the German High Command, lo- 
cated in the region of tragic atmosphere and heroic endeavor. Near at hand was 
the grave-yard of the 77th Division's "Lost Battalion." About one kilometer south 
was the scene of their struggle. Every day visitors came to our camp, first to see 
the scenery and get the story of the tragedy; finally they came to visit our camp 
and eat at our mess. Under the rigid discipline of Captain McGrady, our camp 
became known at G. H. Q. as the best in the Advance Section, S. 0. S. 

It was a common sight to see generals and colonels galore at our table, and 
that they enjoyed their fare was evident from their remarks and appetites. Mess 
Sgt. White was much praised. General Vollrath and staff and Colonels Hoffman • 
and Eggleston took dinner with us December 30. 

Weather conditions now were bad ; snow and rain were continuous. The men kept 
in good spirits and boxing and shows were scheduled in the evening in our own 
theatre. January 23, Field Mass was read, and moving pictures were made at the 
graves of the Lost Battalion dead. A platoon fired a salute and taps was blown. 

Monday, February 10, we moved to Chalel-Chehery and went into quarters 
recently occupied by Company "D." We took over the railhead and dump at 
La Forge, sorted and loaded the salvage, then went on with road work in and 
around the village. After this we marked time with drills and moving pictures, 
road work, baseball, etc., awaiting the time to go westward. 

May 2, 1919, we again entrained with joyful expectations of soon being aboard 
ship. After a long but pleasant trip through Central France and beautiful Nor- 
mandy, we arrived at the port of Brest and went into quarters at Camp Pontanezen, 
as "transient troops." Soon, however, we moved to another section as "permanent 
troops" and here remained until June 17, when the Zeppelin took us home. 



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COMPANY "E' 



Officers 

Mc GRADY. JOHN J., Captain Infantry, U. S. A 113 ArkanMS Ave, Lorraine, Ohio 

SCHMITZ, WALTER L., Captain Infantry. U. S. A 805 Washington Ave., S*. Louis, Mo. 

FARRINCTON. JOHN F., First Licuten.mt Infantry, IJ. S. A 292t -N. NcwsK-ad Ave.. Si. L.mi-. Mo. 

OOLEY, ORLIE E., First Lieutenant Infantry U. S. A Spencer. Indiana 

LOCKE. WLNTHROP. Second Lieutenant Infantry U. S. A Lexington. Mass. 

HAAR, RUDOPH F., Second Lieulemnt Infantry Phihidelphia, Pa. 

Men 



HANEY. WILLIAM 3.^^02.520 

WHITE, MAl'RICE W 378H.S7 

CALDWELL. FRANKLIN 42.S9172 

HAYDE.N. HARRY 33.i223 

HARE WALTER 3302111 

JOHNSON, LOUIS 3302315 

JOHN.SON. STEVE 330.3311 

LEE, ARTHUR 42.->9r>l3 

MOORE. WILLIAM 3302365 

Mc(;UlRT, ALBERT E 4262778 

SPEARS. JOHNSON 3302360 

McCRAY, GEORCE 3320988 

BROWN, SAMUEI 3302106 

COOPER, WALTER 42.i0614 

EMERY. WILL 3302319 

MORRIS. ELLA 3302.531 

PARKER, LEONARD .3302526 

BRISCOE. LIGE 3302489 

DAVIS. L.\WYER 3302191 

BOOKER n 3.W2153 

CARR BENNIE 42.59.518 

BARTON. JAMES N 1169.526 

LAWSON. WILLIAM 3302420 

CIJLLINS. CARNEAL 3302164 

EBERT. STEPHEN 3302452 

HAYNES, PHILLIP 3302514 

BROWN. LEAMON L 3302196 

MOSELY, CHARLES 3302142 

THOMAS, GEORGE 3302194 

WILSON, LESLIE 3320827 

GRADY. HENRY 3320513 

REDMON, LUTHER 3320992 

SEDDON, ROBERT 3320403 

TENSIL. BEN 3302303 

THOMAS. TAYLOR 3302523 

ALEXANDER, JOSEPH 4262822 

ALLEN. GEORGE 3303319 

ANDERSON. WILLIE 4259622 

ANDREWS. EARI 4259171 

BAKER, BRADFORD 3320951 

BARRY. MASON 4259197 

BECKWITH, JAMES 3784287 

BILBO. HENRY . 378J038 

BRIGGS. HAROLD 4259581 

BROCKI.NGTON. JOHN 4259562 

BROWN, EDMOND 3781215 

BBOWN, HENRY G 3781116 

BROWN, JESSE 42.59585 

BURTON, BENJAMIN 4259515 

BUTLER, CLARENCE 3784156 

CARTER, CLAYTON 4259546 

CARTER, LEONARD 42.59494 

CARTER. WALTER N 4259416 

CHRIST.MAN, LOUIS 4259509 

CLARBUSH. JOHN 3302469 

CLARK. SAUL 3302465 

COOPER. EALONZIE 3320969 

COOPER, GEORGE 3302194 

CROSBY. MIKE 3784021 

CUNNINGHAM, ALEXANDER . . . 3302490 

DICKSON, V. L 4259528 

DONALD. GEORGE 37841M 

FARSON. JACK 3784244 

FAULKS, EARSEY 4259460 

FRAZIER, GEORGE M 4259566 

FRENCH. LUCIEN 3784042 

FULLER, CLIFTON 3784100 

GARY, ALBERT 3784018 

GEORGE DEE 4259523 

GILL. ALFRED 42.59464 

GREEN, ERNEST 3302460 



First Sergeant Vidalia, La. 

Mess Sergeant 719 Gladys Ave.. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Supply Sergeant 1610 Euclid Ave., Kan«»:is City, Mo. 

.Srreeant Bedford City. Va. 

Sergeant Delta Bri«iue, La. 

Sergeant Plaqueniine, La. 

Sergeant Addis, La. 

Sergeant 1612 E. I2lh St.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Sergeant Port Allen. La. 

Sergeant Boley, Okla. 

Sergeant Innis, La. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No 2, Minler, Ala. 

Corponil Addis, La. 

Corporal 1315 Highland Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal Vidalia, La. 

Corporal Willetls. 1^. 

Corporal ... Fort Adams, Miss. 

Corporal Vidalia, La. 

Corporal Ferrida, La. 

Corporal Joice, La. 

Corporal 1706 Paseo. Kan»<s City. Mo. 

Corporal Itasca, Hill Co.. Texas 

Corporal Lohdell, La. 

Corporal Box 31, St. Joseph, La. 

Corporal Box 81, Rayville, La. 

Corporal .... Mangham. La. 

Corporal Winnfield, La. 

Cook Rayville, La. 

Cook 1218 5th St., Natchitoches, La. 

Cook 20.53 Western Ave., Topeka, Kan. 

Cook 522 N. A. St., Arkansas City, Kan. 

Mechanic Grantville, Kan. 

Mechanic Waterproof, La. 

Mechanic Chamherlain, La. 

Mechanic ... WinnBeld, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Bcggs, Okla. 

Private 1212 Iberville St.. New Orleans, La- 

Privat- 1621 Locust St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Hartville, Mo. 

Private 105 Michigan Ave.. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private 1911 E. 17th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4, Columbus, Miss. 

Private Gautier, Miss. 

Private New Haven, Mo. 

Private . . 1607 Lydia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1522 9th .Ave. North. Columbus, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Lion, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Miami, Mo. 

Private 1523 Lvdia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Quincy, Miss. 

Private 1820 Vine St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1820 Vine St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Macon, Mo. 

Private 711 Albermarle St., St. Joseph. Mo. 

Private Ravenwood. La. 

Private St. Joseph. La. 

Private Jonestown, .Miss. 

Private .... . .5717 East Central Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Private .Aberdeen, Miss. 

Private 2804 Palmer Ave., New Orleans, La. 

Private 1709 E. Uth St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Glen Allen, Miss. 

Private Grace, Miss. 

Private 1303 Vine St.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1705 Michigan Ave., Kansas City, Mo, 

Private Route 2, Aberdeen, Miss. 

Private Aberdeen, Miss. 

Private Dublin, Miss. 

Private . . .... Greenwood & Archie St., TuIhi, Okla. 

Private 4425 Virginia Ave, KnnFas City. Mo. 

Private Rayville, La. 



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GREEN, GARRETT 4259170 

GREEN, JESSE 4259571 

GREEN. LEVI 3320910 

GRIER. BURNS 4259636 

HACKETT. WILLIAM 4262457 

HALLIDAY. BREMOND 4259577 

HAMILTON. FLETCHER 4262573 

HAMILTON. WILL 42-j9->70 

HARDIN, RICHARD 3320888 

HARDY, MOSES 3784069 

HARRIS, DAVID 4259607 

HARRIS, JAMES 4262811 

HARRIS, LEALON L 4259525 

HARRISON. BENJ.AMIN 3784K39 

HARRISON. EARLY 4262.536 

HART. NAPOLEON 3319898 

HAWKINS. BILL 3781161 

HAYES. FLOYD 4259520 

HENDRICKSON, PEARL R. . . . 3784013 

HENDERSON, FRANK E 4262,581 

HENDERSON. WILLIAM .... 4259605 

HENRY, JOSEPH 3319651 

HINKLE, GLEN 4259618 

HINKLE, ROBERT 4259600 

HOLIMON, CLIFTON W 3784086 

HOLLAWAY. HERMAN 4263302 

HOLLY. CLEVELAND 3302456 

HOWARD. JOHN 3319980 

HOWLETT. WARNER 3319676 

HUGHES, JAMES 4262520 

HUGHES. MOSE 3302709 

HURSTON. RILEY 3319719 

HUNT. FOREST 37841.55 

HUTCHISON. ERNEST F 4259634 

JACKSON. ISAAC 4261741 

JACKSON. JEFFERSON 3318114 

JACKSON, JIMMIE P 3784261 

JARREAU, ALEXANDER 3302312 

JENKINS. NEBRASKA 4262564 

JEROLD. BEVLY 3784196 

JOHNSON, CLABORN 3303317 

JOHNSON, CLEVE 3302501 

JOHNSON, FRANK 42.59575 

JOHNSON, FRED H 4259051 

JOHNSON ISAIAH 4262816 

JOHNSON, MELVERN 4258639 

JOHNSON. MOSE 3302540 

JONES, ARCHIE E 4259601 

JONES. CLARENCE E 42.59,565 

JONES, DAVID E 4259521 

JONES, EVAN 4262475 

JONES, WILLIE 4262508 

JONES. WILLIS 3302333 

KELLY. AMOS 3302500 

KILLIN, BENJAMIN D 4259532 

LAFAYETTE, JAMES 3319964 

LEE, CLIFFORD M 4259633 

LEE. EDWIN 4262803 

LITTLETON, ED 1169611 

LINCOLN, LOUIS 4262790 

LOVE, FEDDOW 4262566 

LUCAS, WILLIAM 42.59154 

LYLE. PERCY 3320933 

McCARY. CONI.EY 3784229 

McCLURE, ALEX 4262504 

McDowell, frank 4259518 

McGregor, william 4262502 

McGUGIN, HENRY 4262.580 

McKINNEY, CHARLES G 4262426 

McKELPHIN, OLIVER 4262478 

McQueen, ALI C 4262576 

MARKS, KING E 4259260 

MARSHALL. JAMES 4262507 

MASSEY. JAMES 4259.533 

MESSLEY, RUBE 4259461 

MILLER, LAWRENCE 4262800 

MINOR. KELLY 3318089 

MITCHELL, JOHNIE 3318183 

MITCHELL, LEROY 3320916 

MORRISON. LEVI 4259661 

MORTON, JACOB Q 4258132 

MOORE, FLANDON 3784058 

MORRIS. ARTHUR 3784241 

NELSON. CLIFTON 3320204 

NEYLAND, SAM 3302468 

ODEM, GEORGE 3303350 

OWENS, TOM 3784034 

PARKER, CLARENCE 4259529 

PARKS, GENERAL 3302475 

PEGG, SAMUEL 4259480 



Private PaoU, KanMt 

Private 1216 Michigan Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Neitlcton. Miu. 

Private 2058 Bunvell St., Spnngfteld. Mo. 

Private Halleltsvillc. Texas 

Private 1908 Grove St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Charleston, Mo. 

Private 1019 Pacific St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 325 Kiowa St., Leavenworth, Kans. 

Private R. F. D. No. 7, Aberdeen, Miss. 

Private 325 Kiowa St., Leavenworth, Kans. 

Private 725 New Jersey St., Lawrence. Kan. 

Private 1802 E. 16th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Muldon, Miss. 

Private 2316 La Salle Ave.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Lorman, Miss. 

Private Clarksdale. Miss. 

Private 1313 Michigan St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1214 Buchanan St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 610V6 Polk St., Memphis. Tenn. 

Private 2121 Flora St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Bay St. Louis, Miss. 

Private Lahadie, Mo. 

Private Labadie, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No, 1. Aberdeen. Miss. 

Private 1532 S. 2nd St., St. Louis. Mo. 

Private Waterproof, La. 

Private Inglcside, Miss. 

Private 900 Independence Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1317 Woodland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Winnfield, La. 

Private 1010 Spruce St., Atchison, Kan. 

Private Richard, Miss. 

Private 2437 Flora Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1615 N, 32nd St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Wesson, Miss. 

Private Clarksdale, Miss. 

Private New Roads, La. 

Private Raymond, Miss. 

Private 7ih Ave. N., Columbus, Miss. 

Private Keachie, La. 

Private 1421 Levee St„ Vicksburg. Miss. 

Private 1908 Grove St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 509 Bevely St., Brookfield. Mo. 

Private Gilead. La. 

Privat»» 717 S. Silver St.. Paola. Kan. 

Private Rayville, La. 

Private New Haven, Mo. 

Private 1916 Woodland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1304 Euclid Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Amory, Miss. 

Private Newport, Arkansas 

Private Arbroth, La. 

Private Ashwood, La. 

Private Muskogee, Okla. 

Private Fitlers, Miss. 

Private Lawrence, Kansas 

Private 1800 E. 16th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Heame, Texas 

Private Chetopa. Kansas 

Private 2113 S. 16th St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Fuget, Mo. 

Private . . .• Courtland. Ala. 

Private Columbus, Miss. 

Private 3331 Lauden St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 1620 S. Menor St., Winfield, Kan. 

Private 1209 E. 18th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 5. ChilHcothe, Mo. 

Private 806 N. 2.3d St.. Omaha. Neb. 

Private . . . 914 S. 14th St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Box 61, Round Lake. Miss. 

Private 15th ft High St., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private Lula, Miss. 

Private 1703 E. 13th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1605 Forrest Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 718 N. 16th St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 519 Galiton St., Jackson, Miss. 

Private R, F. D. No. 4, Waller Valley, Miss. 

Private Natchitoches, La. 

Private 1012 Vine St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 415 S. Margrave St., Ft. Scott, Kan. 

Private New Albany, Miss. 

Private . . Renalara, Miss. 

Private Wamella, Miss. 

Private Gloster, Miss. 

Private 2919 S. 4th St., New Orleans, U. 

Private Shannon. Miss. 

Private 2113 Harrison St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Waterproof, La. 

Private 1024 Woodland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 



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PERTY. J. T 4259551 

PETTIS. LEON 4259547 

POINDEXTER. HENRY 3302409 

POREA. HARRY 3303396 

PRESCOTT, CHARLES 3303421 

RANEY, PETER 33202U 

REED LOUIS 3301132 

ROBINSON, MURRAY 3781201 

ROSS. LEONAKD 332J193 

SHIN ALL. ERNEST 3320439 

SLMS, CHARLES 3784123 

SMITH. ABRAHAM 3301268 

SMITH, DUKE 3784146 

SMITH. WILL 3320921 

STEVENS. ALLEN 378J289 

SYKES, ARTHUR 3320913 

TAYLOR, WILLIE 3303379 

THOMAS, JOHN 3320291 

THOMAS, WILL 3781213 

TYLER. AMBROSE 3302 r>0 

WALKER, BEN 3302321 

WALKER, GEORGE . . ... 378J106 

WALKER NELSON C 3320893 

WATKINS. LEROY 3784245 

WHITE, ALEX 3784122 

WHITE, JUDGE 3781002 

WILSON. JESSE 3332128 

WILLIAMS, JAMES 3320921 

WILLIAMS, LEROY 3784260 

WILLIS, FRED 3784137 

WILSON, JESSE 3.302128 

WILSON. SIDNEY 3784257 

WINN. LUCIUS 3302532 

WOOD, WALTER 3302319 

YOUNG FRED E 4259649 

YOUNG, JAY J 4259719 



Private 1836 Lydia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 5628 E. 34th St., Leeds, Mo. 

Private Clayton. La. 

Private 1750 Carondalet St., New Orleans, La. 

Private MansBcld, La. 

Private Lawrence, Miss. 

Private 4 Winn St., .\Iexandria, La. 

Private Triininham, Miss. 

Private Woodville, Miss. 

Private 813 Walker Ave.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Prairie. Miss. 

Private 702 Jackson St.. Lake Charles, La. 

Private Revrs. Mo. 

Private Hudspeth, Ark. 

Private Columbus, Miss. 

Private Shannon. Miss. 

Private Mansheld, La. 

Private Centerville, Miss. 

Private Jonestown. Miss. 

Private St. Joseph, La. 

Private Arbroth. La. 

Private Matson, Miss. 

Private Ruby Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Renalara, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Okolona. Miss. 

Private Care of Wm. McMillan, Lumberlown. Miss. 

Private AUendeal, La. 

Private 430 3rd Ave., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private Clarksdale. Miss. 

Private Green Grove, Miss. 

Private Port Allen. La. 

Private Stovall. Miss. 

Private 1143 Europe St., Baton Rouee, La. 

Private New Roads. La. 

Private 1114 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

P.-ivatc 1316 Woodland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 




A BRIGHT SUNDAY MORNING AT CHATEAU DE CHEHERY. 

Troops, left to right — Company "E," Motor Truck Detachment, Medical Detachment 

and Headquarters Company. Officers left to right — Lieuts. Haar, Locke, Ooley, Preston, 

Capt. McGrady, Capt. Abbett, Chaplain Custer, Major Bliss, Colonel Humphrey, Lieut. 

Col. Bacon, Major Mitchell, Capt. Bragan and Lieuts. Heinzen, Knox, Legendre, Hubbard, 

Johnson and Lewis. 



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By First Lieut. Edqar K. Brockway 

COMPANY "F" was organized at Detention Camp No. 2, Camp Funston, 
Kan., on June 22, 1918, as Company "F" of the First Provisional Regiment, 
164th Depot Brigade. On that date 250 men were received from Louisiana, Mis- 
sissippi, and Missouri. The majority were from Louisiana. 

Their first night in the army will not be quickly forgotten, for they arrived late 
in the afternoon at the receiving station. Getting the men assigned to tents and 
searching out good men to become acting non-coms., and drawing of supplies con- 
sumed the entire night. 

The next two weeks were full of work for all. The men were frequently exam- 
ined, and vaccinated. When they had nothing else to do they were on the field being 
taught the first principles of infantry drill regulations or being given lectures on 
military courtesy and discipline. 

After the company had been organized two weeks it began transferring men 
into other organizations, and when it was made Company "F" of the 805th Infantry 
and moved into Camp Funston, on July 16, there were only sixty-five of the 
250 left. They were the very best that could be selected from the 300 or more 
that had been handled up to that time, and most of them later became non-com- 
missioned officers or first class privates. 

Shortly after reaching Camp Funston we received more men and the drilling 
really began. We drilled from 8:00 a. m. each day until 1:00 P. M., and the 
rest of the day was soent in receiving instruction in wig-wag and semaphore 
signaling. Company "P' proved equal to the task and was soon drilling so well 
as to surprise the veterans. 

On August 11, 1918, Captain James W. Finley, 1st Lieut. Robert Schmidt, and 
1st. Lieut. E. K. Brockway were assigned to the company, and these officers were 
heartily welcomed, as there had been only two officers with the company prior 
to this time. 

From now on the daily program was drill from morning to night with many 
casualties from the extreme heat, though we are thankful to say that none were 
very serious. Toward the latter part of August rumors began to circulate thick 
and fast as to our leaving for overseas duty, and when overseas clothing and 
equipment began to be issued it seemed assured that "Der Tag" was not far off. 

Finally, Saturday evening, August 24, the fateful word came, and from then 
on all was hustle and bustle. Some were away on leave and had to be wired, 
and as the regiment was to leave immediately if not sooner there were a thousand 
and one things to be done at once. So it proved to be rather a trying time for 
officers and men both. Finally, however, all was ready, and it was then a case of 
watchful waiting until 2:40 a. m., August 27, when the train pulled out in charge 
of our own Captain Finley. 

From Camp Funston to Camp Upton, N. Y. (our intermediate destination 
or jumping-off place as it were), the trip was a continual ovation. People along 



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the way tried their best to make it a pleasant trip and undoubtedly succeeded as 
evidenced by the rows of smiling faces and waving arms at the windows of each 
car. The trip was made even more pleasant by a short stop at Niagara, where 
the entire company was taken for a little hike to the Falls to stretch their cramped 
legs and view the wonderful sight. Camp Upton was reached safely at 11:00 
p. M., August 30, and after a little hike all were tucked away for the night in Sibley 
tents. They should have gone to dreamland at once but, sad to relate, it was soon 
discovered that the wearers of khaki were not the only occupants of that camp. All 
the mosquitoes of New Jersey seemed to have come to Upton on a still hunt, and 
they had a wonderful feast that night. 




Next morning the news was broken to us that we were to prepare for im- 
mediate embarkation, and then the fur did fly, for there were passenger lists to be 
made, records to be checked, and more overseas clothing and equipment to be 
issued. There was very little rest for anyone until the wee small hours of the 
morning of September 1, when all was ready. 

At 5:30 that morning we entrained again, with Headquarters this time, bound 
for some point in Canada, and late that night arrived at Montreal, which, it had 
been rumored, was our destination. "You can't stop here," however, was the slogan, 
so on we went again, and finally arrived at Quebec near noon, September 2. It 
looked as though even the ocean would not stop that train, for we were rushed 
right out on the docks and hustled over to the good ship "Saxonia," of the Cunard 
Line. Company "F" was not so fortunate as to embark at once, however, for there 



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<f!5Bf ^''S^-^^ ^^ 



^^X iiiffSj 





■m'^^'mS 



General View of an American army encamped in the valley through which flows the 
River Aire just west of Apremont. Organizations represented are 307th Ammunition Train, 
82nd Division; 149th F. A. (Formerly 1st 111. F. A.), 42nd Division; 327th Supply Train, 
82nd Division; 328th Supply Train, 82nd Division; and four machine gun battalions of 
the 2nd Division. Between Apremont and the main road to Fleville, Ardennes, France, 

October 29, 1918. 




Artillery moving up through Buzancy, between Briquenay and Grand Pre, Ardennes, 

November 3, 1918. 



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was much baggage to be loaded on the ship, not only of our own regiment, but 
of 202 army nurses who were to share the fortunes of the trip. So it was late in 
the afternoon before the company embarked and was assigned quarters. 

With regard to the details of that trip across the Atlantic, as historian, 

1 should go bravely on and do my duty; but as a participant I will merely make 
one or two remarks and then draw the curtain. Of course, we weren't sick — 
that is, those of us who weren't, loudly and gleefully proclaimed that fact — but 
alack and alas, how few such fortunates there were amongst us. Even that old sea 
salt, Sgt. Weakley, was sometimes seen hanging his wistful, mournful head from a 
port hole. As for guard duty, boat and fire drills, and submarine watches — why 
dwell upon such painful subjects? 

September 16 was a day long to be remembered, for we sighted land, and 
that evening .steamed up the Mersey to Liverpool, England, flags flying and bands 
playing on every side. That night was a happy one on board ship, and next morning 
early we landed, marched across the city and entrained on what looked to us like 
a toy train, drawn by a 'Hin lizzie" locomotive, bright with red paint and shining 
brass. And such a funny little shrill whistle. Our respect for that engine grew, 
however, as it whisked us along and few of us will ever forget the beautiful coun- 
try we saw that day in Merry Old England. 

Our destination was Southampton, where we arrived about six P. M., and, upon 
detraining, marched up through the quaint old city to an American rest camp — 
of course we are not complaining, but we had just as soon they would refrain from 
calling those camps "Rest Camps." 

Next morning early, Company "F" again had the honor of hiking down to the 
docks, and loading the regimental baggage on the big freighter "Archimedes," 
with the assistance of a detail from Company "H." At 4:20 P. M., when this was 
completed, we embarked, and soon after started across the Channel. About the 
only incident worthy of mention on this voyage, was the dropping of an infernal 
machine in the shape of a can of hot cofi'ee amongst the men in their quarters. Corp. 
Stanley, I believe, draws the credit for the resulting remark, "Lord, she's going 
to bust! RUN! !" 

September 19 we set foot on the soil of France, in the city of Havre, and, with 
the exception of those unfortunates who had to unload the ship, we marched up 
the hill with eyes and mouths agape at the strange sights, to another American 
rest camp, where we spent the night. 

We were beginning to think that now we were started, nothing would stop us 
until we hit the Hindenburg line, and perhaps even that wouldn't, so we were not 
much surprised when we started out again the next afternoon down to the rail- 
road yards, where we were herded into French box-cars, each one with that now 
familiar sign, "Hommes 40, Chevaux 8," and started bumping and jerking toward 
that well known spot which is named, "Somewhere in France." The farther we 
went, the farther we seemed to get from that elusive point, but finally sneaked 
up and pounced upon it in all our glory, September 23, only to End that it went 
by that commonplace name, Rolampont, Haute-Marne, familiarly known amongst 
us as "Rolling Point." 

The men pitched pup tents here, and the time from the arrival until October 

2 none of us will ever forget, for as in the immortal "Casey at the Bat," there 
was no joy in Mudville those days. The flood-gates of the Heavens must have been 
opened, for it rained and rained, and then, all of a sudden, when you were least 
expecting it — it rained some more. 

As for mud — well, like the clay puddlers of old — we reveled in it, rolled in 
it, and ate it, until we actually began to think our name was "MUD." There were 



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moments, however, when we managed to dodge between drops, practising rapid fire 
drill and spiral leggin wrapping. One memorable night we took a pleasant little 
jaunt up to Ft. St. Menge to watch a demonstration of the use of Stokes mortars, etc. 
A bit of excitement was caused there by a bomb, which, because of a weak propelling 
charge, was projected only a few feet from the muzzle of the Stokes mortar. For- 
tunately, it was a well-behaved bomb, and refused to explode. Of course none of 
us could read what was in that bomb's mind, so we didn't run, we just FLEW. The 
historian never yet, however, has heard who really started the row. For every man 
questioned said he was just running to keep the crowd behind him from running 
over him. 

On October 2 we started again in box-cars, etc., for "Somewhere in France," 
and this time reached Clermont-en-Argonne in the First Army Area, amid the roar 
of the big guns at the front. Our stay here was a short one, for on October 5 
the company moved to Auzeville, a very short distance away, where in conjunction 
with Company "E" we started work re-building a French railhead, enlivened by 
occasional airplane battles and the continuous roar of the guns. 

October 18 we suddenly received orders to move up to Mt. Blainville, some 
five kilometers north of Varennes, and that hike will be long remembered by the 
members of this company who participated, for, because of the congested roads, 
it was necessary to detour, the resulting route leading over Vauquois Hill and making 
it twenty-two miles all told. Needless to say, everybody was about all in, but 
when welcomed by a salvo of Austrian "88's" which exploded near-by with a 
racket guaranteed to wake the dead, we forgot that weariness. It was dark when 
the company arrived (or rather part of it, for the lost man, Willie Brooks, by 
the way, came trudging gamely in at five P. M. next day) ; and as no lights 
could be shown in that neck of the woods, it was, to say the least, a difficult 
job to find the men's packs which had been hauled up there in trucks. As a result, 
many slept with the stars for cover that night (fortunately it was a pleasant night), 
and next day the camp was made as comfortable as possible. 

Again the historian hesitates to dwell upon the details of the remaining days 
of October. The days were all right with their aeroplane battles, anti-aircraft 
gun action and exciting, hair-raising parachute jumps from observation baloons 
shot down by Boche planes. But oh, those clear, moonlight nights, the double 
hum of the Jerry motors overhead and that nerve-wrecking,. "Crumpf," Crumpf" 
as Jerry kicked the tail-gate out and dumped his load of bombs around rather care- 
lessly. I say carelessly, because, upon one occasion three of the blasted things 
landed in our front door-yard, killing two men across the road and slightly wound- 
ing one of our men, Pvt. John Fowler. 

Those were the nights standing room in a nice deep dug-out was selling at a 
premium, and, in passing, I might state that the historian and other officers often 
thought longingly of those dug-outs, or wished themselves as deep down in fox- 
holes as some of the men had burrowed, rather than in a two-story, palatial palace 
of tarpaulin. 

Of course there were amusing incidents, as, for instance, when somebody wouldn't 
stop to hunt the door of his tent, but walked off with tent, pole, rope, and all. 
Somebody would get tangled up in barbed wire and vainly whoop for help, and 
the historian would be almost willing to bet a good American dollar against a 
plugged five centime piece that Corp. Stanley's gas mask was about worn out from 
putting it on and taking it off so often. But we are all agreed that at that time 
anybody else could have had all that fun who wanted it. During this time we 
were Dlugging away on the roads in the vicinity of Mt. Blainville in order that 
supplies might be rushed up to the men in the front lines. 

November 1 we moved again after the last big drive had started in the Meuse- 



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Argonne offensive, up toward the advancing front lines, to Fleville. But the 
First Army advance was so rapid that it was another case of "You can't stop here," 
so on November 5 we started out again, and landed this time between St. Georges 
and Landres, where we continued our work on the roads, moving again on November 
8 to the outskirts of the village of Landres. While there the news of the 
signing of the armistice was received, and many a heart was gladdened. What a 
relief it was to be able to have lights and rest again without hearing Jerry coming 
to take all the joy out of life. It was here, however, that the company was sad- 
dened by the death of two of our men, Corp. George Cisco and Pvt. Benjamin 
Howard, who died within four days of each other and were buried at the edge of 
the camp, with appropriate honors. 

November 18 we moved into billets in Landres on account of the extreme cold 
weather, and were just getting comfortably settled when we received orders to 
proceed to Varennes. It was rather a long, hard hike, but that night we were quite 
comfortable in the fine German concrete dugouts of the old Hindenburg line, near 
Varennes. Again our stop here was brief, for the next day at two P. M. we 
started again for a designated spot in the heart of the Argonne. We failed to locate 
our destination, so were forced to take pot luck in the woods all night — rather 
a chilly adventure too, by the way. Next morning we settled in Camp Kopf, La 
Chalade, an old French rest camp. After moving out to another camp to allow 
combat troops passing through to spend a night or so, we moved back into Camp 
Kopf and started salvaging a large area of the forest in that neighborhood. 

From that time until January 24, we toiled at salvaging our area, and in spite 
of our being; buried in that desolate spot with no opportunities for recreation, the 
time passed somehow. On January 24 we moved to Varennes again into old 
German dug-outs, where we had at least a Y. M. C. A. tent for recreation. There 
we operated a flying truck squadron, collecting salvage throughout the First Army 
area, worked at the salvage dump and helped police up the town of Varennes. 
The last week of our stay here was made very pleasant by the opening of the best 
theatre in the advance section of the S. 0. S., constructed entirely by the 2nd 
Battalion (mostly Company "H"), in which we had the opportunity of seeing 
some very good shows and boxing bouts. 

April 25 we hiked to Clermont on the first leg of our journey to the coast, but 
instead of our stop at Clermont being only a day os so, it lengthened into a 
week, and a miserable one at that, with rain, sleet, snow, and cold. At la?t, how- 
ever, on May 2, we entrained once again in box cars, and after a tiresome, unevent- 
ful trip, arrived in Brest at 3:30 A. M., May 6, only to find that our troubles 
were just beginning; for in Camp Pontanezen we were shuttlecocks in the hands 
of fate, going home "Toot Sweet" one day, and told we were to stay forever 
the next. But one sweet day our trials, tribulations, and disappointments were 
over, and we sailed June 17 for God's country. 



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COMPANY "F" 



Officers 

FINLEY. JAMES W.. CajiUin Infantry, U. S. A Chanute, Kan. 

BROCKWAY, EDGAR K..Fir»t Lieutenoni Infantry U. S. A 903 MichiKon Ave, Evantton, III. 

COOK, WARREN G., First Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A 823 N. C. St., WellinKton. Kan. 

PURYEAR, EDWARD J.. First Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A Greenville. Ky. 

LEATHERWOOD. WILLIAM, Second Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Merit, Texat 



WEAKLEY. JOHN H 337091 

MOORE, GEORGE 3302593 

BROWN, ROBERT 3302622 

HINES. JOHNNIE 3302544 

HARRIS, JOHN M 3302560 

JOHNSON, ALBERT 4259192 

WALKER, ODOM 3302604 

LITTLE. BENJAMIN F 4259422 

RAY. OTTO 4259539 

WATKINS, WALTER D 4262793 

GRIFFIN, WEDDIE 3302752 

HOLLIDAY, JOSEPH H 3302747 

JACKSON. SULLIVAN 3302689 

CRANDISON, PRINCE A 3302691 

DAVIS, JOE 3302638 

STAGNER, IRA 3302717 

McGLOTHEN. LONNIE 3302621 

MAY, OVERTON T 3302674 

STANLEY, THOMAS 3302629 

JACKSON. RICHARD 4259372 

DADE. MONE 4259339 

DAVIS, JOHN W 3302628 

BLACKMAN. LINZY 3302798 

CLARK, GEORGE B 4261816 

HART, SAM 3302656 

HAYES, RUFUS 4259196 

JAMES. SYLVESTER 4259305 

SHARP, OLIVER 4259740 

UNDERWOOD, RELL 4259596 

GRISHAM, RICHARD H 4259420 

McGINNIS, NATHANIEL 3302646 

STEWART, ARTHUR 3302664 

CROCKETT, ED 3303066 

GUYNES, RUBIE 4262779 

KELLAR. GREEN 3302663 

PETERSON. DAVID 3302805 

SINGLETON. JIM J 3302553 

FARMER, HARRY 4259216 

BENJAMIN. ROBERT JR 1169527 

NEWMAN, MACK 3302736 

BELL, ORVILLE J 4259313 

ATKINSON, LUTHER S 4260949 

BEASELY, ELIGA 3784591 

BEVERLY, PHILIP 3302559 

BROWN, FRED 3784538 

BROWN, JIM J 378*379 

BROWN, TOM N 3784390 

BROWN, WILLIAM 3303764 

COLEMAN, ELIJAH 3784386 

COLUNS, EDWARD 3302615 

CRAWFORD. JOSEPH A 3303619 

DAUPHINE, ADOLPH 3784389 

DAVIS, CLYDE C 4259397 

EDWARDS. CLYDE 3784495 

FACEN, THOMAS 3302725 

FINCH, JERRY 4259261 

FOSTER. JACK C 4262801 

GIBONEY, ALZIE G 4259272 

GRAHAM, ERIE 3784534 

GREEN, JOHN T 4259410 

HARPER, JOSEPH 3303801 

HARRIS, HENRY 3302637 

HARRIS, LESLIE 4259440 

HESTER. LEWIS 37at384 

JACKSON, DANIEL 3319724 

JAMES. ROBERT L 4259326 

POSTON. ROBERT 4259495 

ROSS, ELVIN W 4259561 

SAMUELS, LOUIS E 4260906 

SMART, KIOME 3302726 

STARKS, FRANK 4259635 



Men 

First Sergeant 1201 N. 3rd Ave., Columbus, Kan. 

Mess Sergeant Elmgrove, La. 

Sergeant St. Joseph, La. 

Sergeant Ferrida; La. 

Sergeant 109 Railroad St., Vidalia. La. 

Private Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

Private Selma, La. 

Sergeant 916 Nebraska Ave.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Sergeant 110 N. lOth St., Lexington, Mo. 

Sergeant Maitlana, Colo. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No. 2, Lake Providence, La. 

Corporal , Lake Providence, La. 

Corporal Roosevelt, La. 

Corporal Crowville, La. 

Corporal Cotton Valley, La. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 1, Lake Providence. La. 

Corporal Springhill, La. 

Corporal Taylor, Aric. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 3, Box 82. Minden, La. 

Corporal 205 Iowa Ave., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Corporal Canton. Mo. 

Corporal Couchwood, La. 

Corporal . . . .- Tallulah, La. 

Corporal 1040 Georgia Ave.. Omaha. Neb. 

Corporal 123 Vine St., Vicksburg. Miss. 

Corporal 1710 Messenia St.. St. Joseph. Mo. 

Corporal 124 Arthur Ave., Webster Grove, Mo. 

Corporal 1419 Michigan Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal Little Rock, Ark. 

Corporal 1006 E. I7th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal Lake Providence, La. 

Corporal 1512 9th St.. Alexandria, La. 

Corporal Box 426, Fullerton, La. 

Cook R. F. D. No. 2, Merigold. Miss. 

Cook Lake Providence, La. 

Cook Lake Providence. La. 

Cook R. F. D. No. I. Gansvillc, U. 

Mechanic Charleston, Mo. 

Mechanic R. F. D. No. 1. Box 46 Bethany, La. 

Bugler Lake Providence, La. 

Bugler R. F. D. No. I. Kingston. Mo. 

Private Firet Class .... 2608 Highland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 
Private Fint Class . . . . R. F. D. No. 2, Brooksville. Miss. 

Private Fint Class Box 100, Waterproof, La. 

Private Firet Class Macon, Miss. 

Private Firet Class Newton, Miss. 

Private Firat Class Drew, Miss. 

Private First Class .... 3616 Denver St., New OHeans, La. 

Private Firat Class Drew, Miss. 

Private First Class Bismark. Okla. 

Private Firat Class White Castle, La. 

Private Firet Class Duncan, Miss. 

Private First Class 316 E. 4th St., Macon, Mo. 

Private First Class R. F. D. No. 3, Starksville. Miss. 

Private First Class Lake Providence, La. 

Private First Class .... 1624 Forest Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Firat Class Wivillc, Ark. 

Private First Class . . 332 S. Fountain St., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Private Firat Class Brooksville, Miss. 

Private Fint Class Marianna, Ark. 

Private Firat Class New Orleans. La. 

Private Firet Class . . . . R. F. D. No. 3. Box 82, Minden. La. 

Private First Class 134 N. 10th St.. Lexington, Mo. 

Private First Class Jonestown. Miss. 

Private First Class 1325 Kansas Ave., Atchison, Kan. 

Private Firet Class . . . R. F. D. No. 2. Box SO. Union. Mo. 
Private Firet Class . . . 2105 Campbell St., Kansas City, Mo. 
Private First Class .... 603 E. I9th St.. Kansas City. Mo. 
Private First Class .... 419 S. 6th St., Forth Smith. Ark. 

Private Firet Class Holly Grove, La. 

Private Firat Class . . . . 728 E. 17th St., Kansas City. Mo. 



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THOMAS. BURL L 4259519 Priratc 

WILBURN. MILTON 4262808 Private 

WILLIAMS. JULE 4259536 Private 

WILSON. EDWARD 4262553 Private 

WOODFORK. ROBERT A 4262545 Private 

ALDERSON. FRANK 4231937 Private 

ALEXANDER. JOHN W 4262058 Private 

ANDREW, IRVING 3302649 Private 

BAILEY. EDWARD 3302679 Private 

BARRETT, BENJAMIN W 4259423 Private 

BATSELL, EARL W 4259276 Private 

BELCHER. WILLIAM 3302787 Private 

BILLINGSLEY, WILLIE 4259338 Private 

BINDER, HOLLIDAY 3784451 Private 

BISHOP. FLORENCE 4261923 Private 

BLACKMAN, ROBERT 4262040 Private 

BLOCKWOOD. FRANK 3302755 Private 

BLOODSAW, HENRY 3784432 Private 

BROOKS, CLARENCE 3784293 Private 

BROOKS, WILLIE N 3784552 Private 

BROWN. GEORGE B 3784315 Private 

CALENDER, FREDERICK .... 3303665 Private 

CAMPBELL, PLEASIE 3784407 Private 

CONNOR, SIDNEY 3303770 Private 

CARTER, PEARUE 3784388 Private 

CATO, PAYL 4259195 Private 

CEZAIRE, LUCIEN 3303786 Private 

CHASE, ALEX 3303637 Private 

CHESTER, RICHARD 4259292 Private 

CLARK, ORA W 4262047 Private 

CLAY. HARRISON H 4259366 Private 

CLAYBON, KENNER 4261940 Private 

CLEMENTS, FRANK 4259251 Private 

CLIPPARD, TURNER J 4259151 private 

CODIE. ARTHUR 4259387 Private 

COFFEE, JOSEPH 3303703 Private 

COKER, LOGAN M 4259278 Private 

CANNON, SIDNEY 3784335 Private 

COOLIE, WILLIE 3303812 Private 

COWARD TERIAN 3303689 Private 

DAVIS. WALTER T 4259237 Private 

DELOACH, KIRT 3302724 Private 

DEVILLE, EZEBE . 3303606 Private 

DILWORTH. JOHN 3784602 Private 

DOUGLAS, MAJOR 3302641 Private 

EDDIE. LEO 4259310 Private 

EDWARDS, SAMUEL 3302606 Private 

ESTON. OTIS H 4259289 Private 

EUGENE, EDWARD 3303740 Private 

EVANS, EARNEST 3784378 Private 

FLIM, WILL 4262797 Private 

FORD. FRANK 3784498 Private 

FOWLER, JOHN 4259230 Private 

FOWLER. WILUE 3784368 Private 

FREEMAN. FORD 3303686 Private 

FRITZ, FERDINAND 3303729 Private 

GARNER, WILL 3784342 Private 

GAUFF, AMEDE 3303571 Private 

GILMORE, CHARLEY 3303630 private 

GLENN. WALTER 4262519 Private 

GODBAY, HENRY 4259370 Private 

GRAY, ALEX 3303655 Private 

GRAY, LEWIS 4259297 Private 

GREEN, MITCHELL 3303558 Private 

GREER. WALTER 3784436 Private 

HALE. GEORGE 3784314 Private 

HALL. FRANK 42S9235 Private 

HAMILTON, JOHNNIE 3784460 Private 

HAMILTON, LOUIS 3303721 Private 

HANDY, GUS 378V>35 Private 

HARMON, TOM G 4259199 Private 

HARRIS. JAMES 4262486 Private 

HARVEST. CHARLEY 3303737 Private 

HATCH, FREEMAN 3303584 Private 

HAYES, ISRAEL 378i'i65 Private 

HICKS, EMANUEL 3302804 Private 

HICGS, ROSCOE 42-9204 Private 

HOLLOWAY, JOHN C 3784525 Private 

HOULSTEAN, WILLIE 3.302732 Private 

HOUSTON. ROBERT 3303710 Private 

HUMPHRIES. CHESTER A. ... 3781310 Private 

HUNTER. FRED 4259167 Private 

HUTCHINSON. JACKSON .... 4259347 Private 

JETT. CHARLIE 3301210 Private 

JOHNSON. MARSHALL 4259164 Private 

JONES, FRED F 4259392 Private 

JONES. HENRY 3319896 Private 

JONES, SAM 33027% Private 

KENNER, HILLERY 3303738 Private 



First Claas 
Pint CUm 
Firat Class 
First Class 
First Class 



1025 Woodland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Hannibal, Mo. 

. 1909 E. 9th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

. 1369 Edith Place, Memphis, Tenn. 

. . R. F. D. No. 2, Waltfaill. Neb. 
. ... 233 Hedge Ave., Moberiy. Mo. 
. . . 308 S. Linville St., Edina, Mo. 

Shepard. Ark. 

Lake Providence, La. 

. . 1108 E. 17th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 
. ... 256 E. Maple St., Canton, 111. 

Delhi, U. 

. . . 2626 Franklin Ave., Oniaha, Neb. 

Drew, Miss. 

Wright City, Mo. 

. . . P. O. Box No. 7, Lilboum, Mo. 

Millikin, La. 

Lulu, Miss. 

Thomasville, Ark. 

Macon, Miss. 

118 8th St., Columbus, Miss. 

Blackburn, La. 

Sunflower, Miss. 

Killiona, La. 

. . . R. F. D. No. 1, Clarksdale, Miss. 
514 S. Frederick St., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Monmouth, La. 

Pineville, La. 

Clayton, Mo. 

Montgomery City, Mo. 

R. F. No. 2, Union. Mo. 

Mexico, Mo. 

Huntsvllle. Ala. 

Jackson, Mo. 

NeelyviUe, Mo. 

Plaquemine, La. 

922 North St., Joplin. Mo. 

. . . R. F. D. No. 5, Quitman, Miss. 

Diamond, La. 

Redell, U. 

Macon. Mo. 

Winnfield, La. 

Chet Point, La. 

. . . . R. F. D. No. 1. Corinth. Miss. 

Transylvania, La. 

Crosno, Mo. 

Cotton Valley, La. 

Maywood, Mo. 

. . . 339 N. Liberty, New Orleans. La. 

Clarksdale, Miss. 

Dockery, Miss. 

. . Shaw. Miss. 

. . . 1806 Walnut St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Gerald. Miss. 

Ville Platte, La. 

. . 1233 Dauphine St., New Orleans, La. 

Bobo, Miss. 

Reserve, La. 

Gold Dust, La. 

. . . 6105 Colorado St., St. Louis, Mo. 
. 311V& W. Missouri Ave., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Wilhelm. La. 

. . R. F. D. No. 1, Springfield, Mo. 

Edgard, La. 

Inverness, Miss. 

Inverness, Miss. 

. . . 2326 S. 7th St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Swiftown. Miss. 

Hahnvillc. La. 

Whallak. Miss. 

. . . 925 Topeka Ave., N. Topeka, Kans. 

Caruthersville, Mo. 

Destraham, La. 

Edgard. La. 

Shuqualak, Miss. 

Millikin, U. 

. . . 909 S. Grant St.. Springfield. Mo. 

Scooba, Miss. 

Wisner, La. 

. . . 502 S. Blvd. St., Baton Rouge, La. 
. . . 413 10th St. S.. Columbus, Miss. 

Old Appleton, Mo. 

Sedalia, Mo. 

Elizabeth, La. 

Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

Higginsville, Mo. 

Mound City, Miss. 

Mound, La. 

Sellers, La. 



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KING. LEWIS N 4259184 

LECARDY. STACY 4259404 

LEWIS, NELSON 3302620 

McDANIEL, SPURGEON .... 3302670 

NICHOLS, FLINN 3302789 

PRESTON. HERMAN 4261972 

RICHARDSON, CLARENCE F. . . . 4259331 

RICHARDSON. PAUL 4262085 

SCOTT, NATHANIEL 3302650 

SHOALS. CYRUS 4259595 

STAPLES, LONNIE 4261924 

THOMAS, JESSIE E 4259487 

THOMAS, LEE 4259451 

TILLMAN, EDWARD H 3320413 

TOPPINS, CHARLIE 3320159 

TURNER. GEORGE W 3320425 

TURNER, WILL 4259535 

WALLS. DORSEY 4259484 

WAMSLEY. FLETCHER 3301260 

WARD, KELLOGG 3301299 

WARREN, JOE 3320423 

WASHINGTON, FRANK 3320294 

WEBB. RAYMOND 4262525 

WHITAKER, TOUSE 4262443 

WILLIAMS. CHAU.NCEY D. ... 4259609 

WILLIAMS, RUDOLPH 4262516 

WILSON, HOWARD 4262583 

WILSON. WILLIAM 4262788 

WISDOM, ROBERT 4262534 

WOODS, GARY 3320116 

WOODS. JOHN 4262526 

WRIGHT. SAMUEL 4259621 



Private Jackson, Mo. 

Privato 914 HiKhUnd Ave., Kanaaa City, Mo. 

Private Lake Providence, La. 

Private Lake Village, Ark. 

Private Tallulah, La. 

Private 1024 High St., St. Louia, Mo. 

Private 820 Jefferson St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Montgomery City, Mo. 

Private Lake Providence, La. 

Private 1327 Woodland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 700 N. Uth St., St. Louis. Mo. 

Private 1211 Highland Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Pacific, Mo. 

Private 709 State St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Pond. Miss. 

Private 2210 N. 2nd St.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 1212 E. 17th St.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1122 Osoand Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Mansfield, La. 

Private 138 Morris St., Lake Charles. La. 

Private 76 S. Young St., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private Woodville, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Hartsville, Mo. 

Private Caruthersville, Mo. 

Private 1907 E. 13th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1923 Whitter St.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Box 125, Caruthersville, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Meridian. La. 

Private Gadsden, Tenn. 

Private Amot, Miss. 

Private 307 Market St., Charleston, Mo. 

Private Macon, Mo. 




Showing contrast in masks used for man and horse. The 
fact that the horse never breathes through his mouth makes 
a gas mask a simple object to make for him. Horses have 
been known to live several hours through a gas attack with- 
out a mask and still show no ill effects. 82nd Division, 
Chatel-Chehery, Ardennes, France. October 27, 1918. 



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\. .4 







.^. -:\.j ^.3 j«-i-. 

Vanona ^iboihtr view}. 



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h. 










By First Lieut. Leonard T. Reynolds 

COMPANY "G" was organized July 5, 1918, at Dentention Camp No. 2, 
Camp Funston, Kan., with Lieut. Albin DeBerry in command. He had as 
his company staff Lieuts. James H. Lansing and Henry H. Middleton. 

The members of the company were selective draft men from Missouri, Kansas, 
Louisiana, and Mississippi, with a sprinkling from other states. 

In the midst of a strenuous campaign of ^'squads east and west" under the 
blazing sun that seemed peculiar to Dentention Camp No. 2 alone, the order was 
received to move to Area 19, the former home of the 92nd Division. 

Here the work of training the men, who mostly heretofore had been concerned 
mainly with how the next crop of "tatoes," etc., was coming out, began in earnest. 

Captain George M. Bragan (then a lieutenant) was assigned to the 805th Pioneer 
Infantry and took command of Company "G." 

Captain Bragan showed the results of his Regular Army experience as a drill 
master, and Company "G" began to look and work like a good company. 

On August 12, 1918, Lieuts. Leonard T. Reynolds, Raoul A. Dornfeld, and 
Henry Wallenstein, Jr., were assigned to the 805th Pioneer Infantry and to duty 
with Company "G." 

Lieut. DeBerry had been selected to act as battalion adjutant with Major 
Creed, to which duty he was afterwards permanently assigned. 

August 20. a draft was received which nearly gave us our full complement, 
and August 25 brought the remainder. 

At last the time to make the "big move" came with a suddenness that was 
almost overwhelming, and many and varied were the feelings in Company "G" 
as expressed by its various members; but on the whole the predominant feeling 
seemed to be one of relief that at least we were going to "get over." 

Camp Upton is best passed over quickly; the attendant hurry and bustle, issuing 
of clothes, turning in of clothes, and the thousand and one things necessary to 
make ready for "overseas" left no room for poetic impressions. 

The incidents of the trip into Canada, the embarkation, and the trip across 
have been described elsewhere, as has the journey down through England, across 
the English Channel to Le Havre. On reaching the "Rest Camp," Sgt. Randolph 
said, "If this is a rest camp, show me a make-you-tired camp." 

After the long and tiresome journey overland, which ended at Rolampont, the 
company pitched "pup-tents" in a drizzling rain. The ground was a mass of 
"gumbo," and the "pup-tents" served merely to strain the rain instead of keeping 
it out. 

Nevertheless the "esprit de corps" of Company "G" prevented excessive grum- 
bling. The men just went ahead and made the best of things as true soldiers should. 

Unfortunately, though, the dampness and the new climatic conditions caused some 
sickness, and a few deaths. 

We soon moved, however, this time into the zone of operations. Clermont-en- 
Argonne was reached October 3. 



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Here we got our first glimpse of the havoc wrought by modern warfare, and it 
brought home to us as never before the magnitude of the game we were engaged 



m. 



At this time we endeavored to obtain a full quota of non-commissioned officers. 
This was done mostly by a process of elimination, those who showed exceptional 
qualities of leadership and initiative being chosen. 

Sgt. Frederick Penn, who had previous military experience, was made 1st 
sergeant, John W. Garner was made acting mess sergeant, Sgt. Edmund Dejean 



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was made acting supply sergeant, both of the latter being confirmed later. Sgt. 
Harry Smith and Sgt. Alfred Joseph were the "gas" non-commissioned officers. 

After a brief stay at Clermont, Company "G," together with Company "H," 
moved out on the morning of October 6, for Avocourt, which gave them the privilege 
of being the farthest advanced units of the 805th Pioneer Infantry. Their posi- 
tion was in the support and reserve lines of the American First Army in this sector. 

Here it was that the company began to work more or less independently and 
that it had an opportunity to develop its individuality as a company. The com- 
pany's duties were to repair and maintain the important Avocourt-Esnes road for 
a distance of about two kilometers, and to furnish details for getting out rock for that 
purpose. But their activities did not stop here. Whenever a heavily loaded truck 
carrying food or ammunition to the front, or a piece of artillery was stuck, as was 



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Battery of sixteen machine guns in action north of St. Juvin, Ardennes, France. Novem- 
ber 1, 1918. 




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Transport and men of the 42nd Division on way to Front up winding hill going to town 
of Champigneulle. St. Juvin, Ardennes, France. November 3, 1918. 



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frequently the case, everybody put his shoulders to the wheel, whether day or 
night, and something had to give. 

Here it was that a gas attack was tried, but owing to previous excellent training 
and efficiency of the gas officer, Lieut. Ooley, and the gas non-commissioned 
officers, Sgts. Harry Smith and Alfred Joseph, confusion was eliminated and no 
casualties resulted; here, too, we were shelled at long range, and each moonlight 
night (and they were many) brought visits from the Germans in the form of bombs 
dropped from their planes. 

Captain Bragan received notice of his promotion to a captaincy, but shortly 
afterwards went to a hospital for a minor operation. Lieut. Reynolds assumed 
command of the company and remained in command until the company reached 
Varrennes on its way to Sommerance, where Captain Robert Schmidt joined and 
took command. Captain Bragan was assigned to command Headquarters Company 
on his return. 

Company "G" moved November 4 from Avocourt to Sommerance, where the 
same sort of work was done as before on the Sommerance-Landres-St.-Georges 
road, and here the signing of the armistice was celebrated on November 11. 

November 20 the Second Battalion being assembled at Varennes, Company 
"G" was ordered to march to Le Nefour and commence salvage operations in 
the lower end of the Argonne Forest. Billets were obtained in an old French camp 
near Mon-Dieu Farm. After a couple of weeks' stay at Le Nefour the next move 
was to Flprent. 

Company "G" had the largest area to clean up in the district allotted to the 
regiment, but tackled the job with a thoroughly characteristic Company "G" manner. 

After the cleaning up of this section of the forest was accomplished, the com- 
pany moved to Clermont, the scene of their start four months before. 

Here the company got together and subscribed enough for a party with speeches, 
solos, quartets, beer, 'n' everything. 

Captain Schmidt having been sent to Beaune, Cote D'Or, as an instructor 
at the American Expeditionary Forces University, Captain John A. Ditto, who had 
until a short time before been with the 82nd Division, was given command of 
Company "G." 

It is not the purpose of this history to make individual mention because space 
will not allow. Company "G," since its inception, has been "on top" all the 
way through. 

The men have been loyal to themselves, their officers, and non-commissioned 
officers, and their country, and they hold a place of high esteem in the eyes of 
their officers. 

They can return to civil life with a consciousness of a task well done and carry 
with them always the memories of their various careers as members of Company 
"G" of the 805th Pioneer Infantry, the most efficient colored regiment in France. 



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COMPANY "C 



Officers 

DITTO. JOHN A.. Captain Infantry, U. S. A Fort Monroe, Va. 

REYNOLDS, . LEONARD T., First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 305 S. Profeuor St., Obrrlin, Ohio 

FRANZHEIM, LAWRENCE W., First Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A Wheeling, W. Virginia 

WALLENSTEIN, HENRY, Ja., First Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A Wichita, Kans. 

MOYEK, SAM P. First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 835 Massachusetts St., Lawrence, Kans. 



PENN, FREDRICK 335591 

CARNER, JOHN W 4261721 

DE JEAN, EDMOND 3302956 

JOSEPH, ALFRED 3302932 

SMITH, HARRY 4259353 

MOORE, CARL L 3303417 

PIERCE, JAMES 3303616 

HARRIS, HARVEY 3303058 

RUCKER, JACK 3302823 

ANDOLPH, McKINLEY 3302785 

TOUSANT, JOE 3303026 

CROSS, OLLIE 4261864 

GILBERT, MURRAY 4253293 

PARKER, CLARENCE 3302999 

BOONE, WALTER 3302898 

BRAGG. JOHN T 4262111 

CELESTINE, WHITFIELD .... 3302936 

STUPID. ADAM 3302993 

NICHOLS. SOLOMON J 3318341 

ANDERSON. EARL S 4259091 

BOONE, EDWARD 4261953 

HENRY, SIMON 3302992 

JOHNSON, FLANDER 3784484 

KENNEDY, ISRAEL 3303565 

KING. ADDIE 3303054 

LORICK, EUGENE 3784544 

MONTANA, ALFRED 3303663 

MOORE, FRANK 4262049 

PETTY, RUFUS 4259182 

RIBEAU. ALONZO B 4259317 

SLAUGHTER, ALFRED 4259362 

THOMAS, AMOS 3302W3 

WILLIAMS, SAM 4259252 

WINSTON, POMPEY J 3302753 

KEY, BENJAMIN 3302994 

STRONG, HOBSON 3784450 

GAUL, LOUIS J 3302922 

HOWARD, ROBERT H 3302871 

KENDRICKS, ERNEST 3303618 

FIELDS, CORNELIUS 4260437 

ANDREWS, WILLIAM S 4259000 

BELLAR, AMOS 3302960 

BROWN, FLOYD 4259724 

CAPDEVILLE, EDWARD .... 3302880 

COLE, FOY 4259787 

DAVIS, CHARLES H 4261795 

DEGAR. JOHN 3302945 

DELACROIX, JOSEPH 3302934 

ERVIN. LANSON 4261982 

GUERY, PAUL 3302875 

HARRIS, MONROE 3302852 

JEFFERSON, LOUIS 3303615 

JONES, THOMAS 3303762 

KELLEY, JOSEPH 3303643 

KITTS, SIDNEY E 3303005 

LaNEER, EARL 4260894 

LEMELLE, GEORGE 3302909 

LOUIS, FERGUST J 3303592 

LUNDI, PHILIP 3303704 

MARR, LEE R 4262093 

MILES. JOHN 3303625 

MILLER, CLEVELAND 3784320 

MITCHELL, CHAKLES 4261955 

MONTJOY, WALTER L 4250302 

MOZEE, JAMES 4262028 

NASH. DOBY 4259367 

PERN ELL, WILL 3303032 

POE, DAVID 3784508 

POLK, CONNIE 1160635 

QUARLES. JOSHUA 4261960 

RHODES. ISAAC H 4263319 

ROBINSON, A.MOS 4259438 



Men 

First Sergeant Indianapolis, Indiana 

Mess Sergeant . R. F. D. No. 4. Box 42, Sandersvillc, Georgia 

Supply Sergeant . Box 8, Elton, La. 

Sergeant 419 Washington St., Lafayette, La. 

Sergeant 1813 E. 16th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Sergeant Bowling Green, Mo. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No. 2, Plaqueraine, La. 

Sergeant Lcesville, La. 

Sergeant Mounds, La. 

Sergeant Roosevelt, La. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No. Natchitoches, La. 

Sergeant 101 S. Logan St., Moberly, Mo. 

Sergeant Slater, Mo. 

Sergeant 217 Oak Ave., Lafayette, La. 

Corporal St. Joseph, La. 

Corporal 1516 N. 16th St., Omaha Neb. 

Corporal 612 W. Congress St., Lafayette. La. 

Corporal Lafayette, La. 

Corporal 303 N. Academy St., Canton, Miss. 

Corporal .... care of Meriam Delivery. South Park, Kan. 

Corporal Rocheport, Mo. 

Corporal Jennings, La. 

Corporal Tulwilcr, Miss. 

Corporal Napolconvillc, La 

Corporal Bedsole, La. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 1, Corinth. Miss. 

Corporal 131 St. Anthony St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 1, Bluffton, Mo. 

Corporal Neelyville. Mo. 

Corporal Ste. Genevieve, Mo. 

Corporal 2405 S. 7ih St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Corporal Eunice, La. 

Corporal 1523 S. 6th St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Corporal Lake Providence, La. 

Mechanic 102 Olive St., Lafayette, La. 

Bugler Indianola, Miss. 

Cook Hays, La. 

Cook 514 Miller St., Helene, Ark. 

Cook Plaqucmine, La. 

Cook 2209 E. 8th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private First Class .... 1322 Holman St., St. Joseph. Mo. 

Private First Claaa Nome, Texas 

Private First Class . . . 1717 Tracy Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private First Class Jennings, La. 

Private First Class Auxvaussc, Mo. 

Private First Class 9043 Lafayette St., Mexico, Mo. 

Private First Class Welch, La. 

Private First Class Lafayette. La. 

Private First Cbss 5622 S. 32nd St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private First Class . . R. F. D. No. 2, Box 48, Lake Charles, La. 

Private First Class Waterproof, La. 

Private First Class . R. F. D. No. 2. Box 116, B, Plaquemlne, La. 

Private First Class Taft. La. 

Private First Class Whitecastle, La. 

Private First Class Plaquemine, La. 

Private First Class .... 2153 Vine St., Kansas City, Mo. 
Private First Class . . . . 215 E. Congress St., Lafayette, La. 

Private First Class Edgard, La. 

Private First Class .... 1310 Barrack St.. New Orleans, La. 

Private First Class New Madrid, Mo. 

Private First Class Carville, La. 

Private First Class 912 N. 16th St.. Columbus, Miss. 

Private First Class 521 Park St., Mexico, Mo. 

Private First Class Medley, Mo. 

Private First Class O'Fallon, Mo. 

Private First Class Neelyville, Mo. 

Private First Class Fullrrton, La. 

Private First Class Shugualak, Miss. 

Private First Class . Box 605, Mort McClellon County, Texas 

Private First Class 5442 S. 24th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private First Class . . 1039 Grandview Blvd., Kansas City, Kan. 
Private First Class .... 1503 E. 18th St., Kansas City. Mo. 



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ROBINSON, LAFAYETTE .... 4259222 

SHROUT. CHARLES 42S9193 

SIBLEY, COLEMAN 3303019 

SMITH, DAVID R 37a4523 

SMITH. THOMAS B 4260133 

THOMAS. JOE 3302959 

TYSON, REUBEN 3303544 

WARE. ROBERT 2209122 

WEDDINCTON, WILLIE 4259445 

WILLIAMS. WATSON 3784322 

ARSON, WILLIAM 3302930 

ALEXANDER. ALFRED 4261881 

BAKER, LEE 4262055 

BARNES, CHARLEY 4258994 

BARNES. TITUS A 4258992 

REAL, LINZY 4259931 

BELL, WILLIE E 3302872 

BENSON. JOEL 1169528 

BRITT. JOHN C 4261889 

CARREL. OTTO W 4260114 

CARROLL, CLELL C 4259909 

CONLEY, ROBERT 4262048 

CORBIN, HOWARD 4261987 

CROPP, HENRY M 4262101 

DANIELS, DENNIS 4263316 

FARLOW. ERNEST 3302808 

FONTENOT, JOSEPH 3302883 

GARRETT, ED 4258190 

GOLSON. NATHANIEL 4261929 

GRAHAM, BUD 3303025 

HANNER, WILLIAM M 4259005 

HARRIS. JAMES 3302927 

HARRISON HARRIS 4261869 

HENRY, WYMATH 3302885 

HUNT, TODD 3784349 

HUTCHINSON. ABRAHAM .... 3303713 

JOHNSON, BENJAMIN 3302837 

JOHNSON. STEPHEN 3302578 

JONES. JAMES L 3784509 

JOSEPH, OSCAR 3303683 

KEYS, ALBERT L 4262078 

KING, FERRICE 3784395 

KING, ISAIAH 3784459 

KNOX. JESSE J 3784529 

LAFLEIER, LEONARD 3303659 

LANG. COY 3784354 

LE BLANC. PIERRE 3303693 

LEE, TOMMIE 3784465 

LEE, WALTER 3302759 

LOCHE. JOHN L 3301124 

LOFTON. JOSH 3303012 

LONG. PERCY W 4259296 

LOWELLS, BEN 3319957 

LYLE. HARRISON 4259364 

MABERY. GEORGE 4259.^)84 

MACK, GUS 3303725 

MANSFIELD. JOHNNIE 4261880 

MAXWELL. OZIA 4261989 

MAY, LEON 4261961 

McCALLAHAN, HENRY .... 4259009 

McCOY. REUBEN 4259380 

McKINZIE, MACK 3784313 

MEYERS, SYLVAN 3303804 

MICKENS. OSCAR 4259172 

MITCHELL, JULIUS 3303561 

MOBRAY, GUSTAVE 3303720 

MONROE, LON W 4259228 

MOORE, DELAREN L 4259284 

MOORE, JOHN E 4259379 

MOORE. ZACHARIAS 4262041 

MORGAN, JERRY W 3303654 

MOUTON, LOOMIS 3302957 

NASH. ANDREW 3784506 

NEWBY. CHARLES 4261577 

NEWCOMB, FAITH 4259202 

NICHOLSON, WHOTE 3784587 

NICHOLSON, WILL 3784528 

NOLAN, WILLIAM A 4259163 

PALIDORE, ALEXANDER .... 3305882 

PALMER, ARTHUR L 4259327 

PALMER, MARION 4259382 

PALMER. WALTER 4261951 

PENDLETON, HURDLE 4261918 

PERKINS. WALTER 4259161 

PORTER, HENRY 3303586 

RATLIFF, WALTER 3303567 

REED, LUCIOUS B 37813M) 

REED. PEARL 4259191 

RENTER, JULIUS 3303607 



Private Fint Class R. F. D. No. 2, Hiawatha, Kan. 

Private Firat Clasi Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

Private First Clasa Cravens, La. 

Private First Class Brooksville, Miss. 

Private First Class ... 411 Minelamottc St., Fredricktown. Mo. 

Private First Class Elton, La. 

Private First Class . . . 4602 Magnolia St.. New Orleans. La. 

Private First Class Cohay, Miss. 

Private First Class . . . 1124 E. 17th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private First Class . . R. F. D. No. 5, Box 67, Columbus, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1. Idabell, Okla. 

Private Marshall, Mo. 

Private Mineola. Mo. 

Private 88 W. Boyd St., Marshall, Mo. 

Private Nelson, Mo. 

Private 1713 Olive St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1234 12th St., Meridian Miss. 

Private Mort McLennon County, Texas 

Private Ash and 6th St., Columbia, Mo. 

Private Osceola, Mo. 

Private Osceola, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Marsion, Mo. 

Private 1113 E. 22nd St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Glasgow. Mo. 

Private Box No. 98. Camden. Aric. 

Private Lacour, La. 

Private St. Martinville, La. 

Private 403 E. 2nd St., Coffeyville. Kan. 

Private 2319 S. 16th St., Omaha. Neb. 

Private 507 Waco St., Houston. Texas 

Private 3017 N. 9th St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Omega, La. 

Private Denver, Colo. 

Private Opelousas, La. 

Private Edward. Miss. 

Private Kennoo, La. 

Private Clayton. La. 

Private Spring Hill. La. 

Private Moorhead, Miss. 

Private Whitecastle. La. 

Private Hickman. Ky. 

Private Thomasville, Ark. 

Private Greenville, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Starkvillc, Miss. 

Private Ville PUlte, U. 

Private Langsdale, Miss. 

Private Opelausas, La. 

Private Halstcad. Miss. 

Private Shelby, La. 

Private Coleston, La. 

Private Lakewood, Fla. 

Private Bonne Terre, Mo. 

Private Magna VisU, Miss. 

Private 3021 Brent St.. St. Louis. Mo. 

Private 503 N. Miller St.. Liberty. Mo. 

Private 1033 Peters St.. New Orleans. La. 

Private 104 N. Ault St.. Moberley, Mo. 

Private 106 W. Ash St., Columbia, Mo. 

Private 5216 S. 28th St., Omaha. Neb. 

Private 810 N. 3rd St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private 1229 Michigan St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Tutwiler, Miss. 

Private Dcsprvham, La. 

Private 115 W. "D" St.. Joplin. Mo. 

Private Donaldsonville. La. 

Private 1215 Prieur St., New Orleans, La. 

Private Liberty. Mo. 

Private Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Private 1607 Lydia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Warrenton. Mo. 

Private White Castle, La. 

Private 314 Lafayette St., Lafayette. La. 

Private Macon, Miss. 

Private 2012 N. 27th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private Charlestown, Mo. 

Private Shugulak. Miss. 

Private Wahalak, Miss. 

Private 323 N. Frederick St., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Private Franklin, La. 

Private 1411 E. 16th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1919 E. 14th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Sturgeon, Mo. 

Private Trousdale, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, New London, Mo. 

Private Canadian. Okla. 

Private Varado. La. 

Private 95 4th St., Clarksdalc, Miss. 

Private 4524 Kini; Hill Ave., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Grosse Tete, La. 



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RIFFE, LUTHER 4259391 

ROBINSON. ARTHUR 3784490 

ROBINSON. JAMES A 4259294 

ROUTT, TOLBERT W 4261917 

RUSSELL, JOHN B 4259428 

SCOTT, JOHN 3784334 

SHERWOOD, WARREN 4259171 

SHERWOOD, WILLIAM 4259157 

SIGHTS, IRA 3303767 

SIMMONS, JOSEPH C 4259147 

SKINNER, WILL 4263314 

SLEIGH, GEORGE 378451* 

SMITH, DODSON 3303556 

SMITH, JOHN 3303007 

SMITH. WALKER 4259279 

SPIKES. CLARENCE A 4259330 

STAPLETON. MATTHEW .... 4259285 

STEPHENSON. GORDON 42.S9024 

STEVENS, ROBERT 4259257 

STEWART, WILLIE 3303802 

STRONG, STEVE 4259208 

SUMNER, HENRY 4259169 

SWINK, PERCY A 4259301 

TERRELL, EUGENE 4259308 

THOMAS, MOISE 3303680 

THOMPSON, EDWIN M 336378 

THOMPSON, ROY 4259443 

THOMPSON, THOMAS G 4250247 

TILLMAN, HENRY 4259333 

TRIPLETT, JAMES 3784533 

TURNER. JOHN 4259436 

WEBSTER, RAY 4259203 

YOUNG, ANDERSON 4259226 



Private R. F. D. No. 3, Liberty. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4, Winona. Mis*. 

Private 405 N. Miller St., Liberty, Mo. 

Private Huntiville, Mo. 

Private 603 Steptoc Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private HilUhouae, Mias. 

Private 220 N. Spanish St., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Private 535 S. Frederick St., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Private Rosedalc, La. 

Private Boley, Okla. 

Private 2615 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Mound Bayou, Miss. 

Private Care of C. W. Harper, Napoleonville, La. 

Private Leesville, La. 

Private Mexia, Texas 

Private 1812 Forest Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1317 Locust St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1033 Sherman St.. Springfield, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Private Grosse Tete, La. 

Private Allenville. La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Hunnewell, Mo. 

Private Farmington, Mo. 

Private 810 Duncan St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Ville Platte, U. 

Private Sacramento, Cal. 

Private . . .... 1120 Highland St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Missouri City, Mo. 

Private 2508 Mosaney St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Brooksville, Miss. 

Private Neelyville, Mo. 

Private Wolf Island, Mo. 

Private 332 W. Missouri Ave., St. Joseph, Mo 

- i 




Major General James H. McRea at Chatel Chehery, 
Ardennes, France. October 26, 1918. 



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Prisoners of 160th, 174th, and 241st German Infantry Regiments ready to start for First 

Army Corps Headquarters. They were captured by the 8Qth Division. Chatel-Chehery, 

Ardennes, France. November 1, 1918. 




German Officers of the 169th, 174th, and 241st German Infantry Regiments captured by 
the SOlh Division. Chatel-Chehery, Ardennes, France. November 1, 1918. 



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History of Company "i/' 




By 2nd Lieut. Louis C. Henin 



TO be historically accurate, we must trace the history of Company "H," 805th 
Pioneer Infantry, back to the hot, sultry days of the early part of July, 1918, 
in the dusty fields of that part of Camp Funston, Kan., known as Detention Camp 
No. 2. It was there, on a hot afternoon, that several Q. M. trucks unloaded their 
burdens of newly uniformed colored men, fresh from civilian life. These particular 
men were assigned to Company "H," First Provisional Colored Regiment, and were 
immediately placed in tents, where their introduction to army life began. 

Very few of the new arrivals had any conception of what army life and discipline 
was like, and the most humorous incidents were of constant occurrence. The men 
very soon formed the conclusion that their mess kits were their best friends and 
used to wear them strapped to their bodies at all times, even sleeping with them. 
It took several days of the most arduous work to establish an orderly mess line. 
Reveille was an astonishing innovation to the men, and it became necessary to 
rouse them from their sleep about an hour before first call. 

After a few days of elementary drills, hikes and medical inspections, about 
fifty of the most promising men we're assigned to Company "H" of the newly 
formed 805th Infantry with the idea of forming a nucleus for a full war strength 
company. These men were at once put through a brief course of instruction at the 
rifle range with their newly issued Enfield rifles. They were quick to learn the 
art of shooting straight and proved themselves quite proficient, considering the 
fact that most of them had never handled a rifle before. 

The first officers assigned to Company "H'* were Captain Reed and 2nd Lieuts. 
Merriwether and Henin, but Lieut. Merriwether was transferred soon after the arrival 
of the regiment at Camp Funston proper. It was at Camp Funston that the 
real, strenuous preparation for the big effort began. The schedule was indeed a 
strenuous one for new troops, including close order drill, rifle and bayonet drill, 
extended order drill, physical exercises and games, long hikes and patrol and 
combat exercises. The men bore up remarkably well under the constant stress, and 
adapted themselves with amazing rapidity to their changed mode of life. After 
Colonel Humphrey took command of the regiment, parades were frequent and the 
men were soon marching and drilling like veterans. 

Shortly before the departure of the regiment for France, the company was 
filled up to its full war strength by additions from Detention Camp No. 2, 
and Lieuts. Dalton, Tarbell, Longenecker, and Bender were assigned to the com- 
pany. These new men were immediately introduced to the strenuous schedule 
and soon fell into the stride of the older men. The long, hot days of arduous 
drill upon the steep hills of Funston will not soon be forgotten. 

The physical and mental weaklings were gradually weeded out and a distinctive 
company spirit and sense of comradeship began to develop. During this period 
of training, the spirit of whole-hearted co-operation, the strict discipline and unhesitat- 
ing obedience of the men, and the cordial relations of mutual respect between the 
officers and men are worthy of mention. 



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It was not long before the last retreat was held at Camp Funston and the men 
of Company "H," in the highest spirits, were riding in Pullmans on their way 
to the port of embarkation. At Camp Upton, N. Y., the men received their final 
overseas equipment and resumed their journey to Quebec, where they boarded the 
good ship "Saxonia." During the entire voyage. Company "H" was cited for having 
the cleanest quarters on the boat at several inspections. This reputation, once 
gained, was thereafter maintained by Company "H" during the entire stay of the 
regiment in France. Company "H" was continually commended by inspectors for 
its clean and sanitary quarters and kitchens. 






HOIOH ROLL . 



PrlTftt»a . 



V, Oftlloway* 
0. Majors. 
S. Floyd, 






CCMPANYll' 



^±M,X\ 






'JL^tXk A: ■ ■ iJL ^^ 



It was after the arrival of the regiment in France, when Company "H" began 
to operate more or less independently, that its real distinctive history as a company 
began. After a few days in pup tents at Clermont-en-Argonne Companies "H" 
and "G" had the distinction of being the first companies of the regiment to advance 
into the actual fighting area of the Meuse-Argonne offensive. 

It was on October 6, 1918, that Company "H" started on its hike to Avocourt 
and got its first glimpse of the actual battlefields with their numerous shell holes, 
trenches, dug-outs, barbed wire, and scarred forests. On the very night of the 
company's arrival at Avocourt, while we slept peacefully in our pup tents on the 
side of a hill, the Boches sent over a gas attack, but owing to the excellent gas 
training which the men had received at Rolampont, no casualties resulted. 

From then on, during about a month's stay at Avocourt, the company was under 
continuous shell fire while the enemy planes bombed the little camp practically 



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every night. During all this time, the men worked feverishly in constructing, re- 
pairing and maintaining roads so that the unprecedented rush of troops and supplies 
for the big drive might continue uninterruptedly. 

About November 1 the company left Avocourt and hiked to Charpentry, where 
it continued its work on the roads in the vicinity, under constant shell fire. It 
was during the company's stay at Charpentry that rumors began to circulate to the 
effect that an armistice had been signed. A notable demonstration ensued which 
had to be ended by the company officers because of the danger involved to the 
men. This rumor was confirmed a few days later while Company "H" was at 
Fleville. 

After the signing of the armistice. Company "H" was moved back to the 
vicinity of Vauquois, where day after day, in rain and mud for the most part, 
the men were out salvaging valuable war material left by the Allied troops in 
their onward drive. Here also Company "H" furnished large details of men to 
assist the ordnance sergeants in blowing up the numerous ''duds" scattered through- 
out the area. This was extremely dangerous work, and Pvt. Morris Gray and Sgt. 
McCoy were so seriously injured by explosions that they had to be carried to the 
hospital. During this period, though the weather was most miserable, the work 
unpleasant, and the men were living in cold, damp dugouts, the morale of the 
company continued high throughout. The men began to stage various entertain- 
ments for their owfi amusements, and considerable musical talent was uncovered, 
including the famous "Argonne Quartet," composed of Pvts. Oatman, Taylor, and 
Whitfield and Sgt. Dealey, which later became the regimental quartet. 

From Vauquois, Company "H" moved to Varennes, where the men worked at 
the salvage depot until their departure for Brest. Here although working in 
heavy rains continually, they never relaxed their cheerfulness and hilarious spirits. 
There were two "Y's" and numerous entertainments at Varennes, which helped to 
make life bearable during the long wait for the homeward journey. It was at 
Varennes that the men of Company "H" put up a large, beautiful theatre which 
soon became known far and wide as the "Pioneer Opry House," and which will 
remain as a permanent memorial of Company "H" to the stricken people of Varennes. 

It was here that the company, with the deepest regret, saw leave in rapid suc- 
cession. Captain Reed and Lieuts. Dalton and Tarbell. Lieut. Longenecker assumed 
command of the company for a short time, after which he too left the company 
together with Lieut. Bender, leaving Lieut. Henin as the sole representative of 
the original officers of Company "H." Lieut. Hubbard then took command of 
the company and was succeeded by Captain Clarke upon the departure of the 
regiment for Brest. Lieut. Spaine was with Company "H" for a short time at 
Varennes and had charge of the school which was formed in the company and 
held every afternoon. He was succeeded by Lieut. Knight, who left the company 
at Brest, where Lieuts. Puryear and Lemmon, formerly with Company "F," were 
assigned to Company "H." 

It was at Varennes that baseball teams were organized and a friendly com- 
petition started between the teams from the four platoons of the company. Out 
of this abundant material a "cracker- jack" company baseball team was organized 
under the captaincy of Pvt. Eddie Miller. 

Finally, a word must be said in tribute to the efficiency and unswerving loyalty 
of the non-commissioned officers of Company "H," especially the sergeants. Sgt. 
James Austin, the popular "top-kick," although small of stature, was big of voice 
and heart and strong in ability and personality. Of him it may literally be said 
that he ruled the company with an iron hand and a kindly heart. With a reproof 
on his lips but a smile in his eye, he was without a doubt the most popular man 
in the company and one of the best top-sergeants in the regiment. To Sgt. Cabot 



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Addison must be given the credit of performing the delicate task of feeding the 
men, with efficiency and tact. To Sgt. Gordon goes the credit of keeping the men 
looking "natty" at all times. To Sgts. William Jackson, Robert Boxley, George 
Murray, and Dave Ross goes the credit of the efficient leadership of their respective 
platoons. 

And to every jingle private of Company "H" goes the honor and satisfaction 
of duty well done and hard tasks conscientiously performed through trying times. 
The men have all done their "bit" in the greatest war of all times, and feel justly 
proud of their efforts. They have been through many varied experiences, the 
memories of which will live with them forever. By virtue of the many hardships 
and triumphs shared together, the men of Company "H" have developed a distinc- 
tive pride and loyalty to the company and they will always look back with pleasure 
and pride to the many achievements of Company "H." 



COMPANY "ff 



Offi 



icers 

CLARK. RALPH, Dep. Captain. Tank CorpB 1106 Nott St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

LONGENECKER, HAROLD J., Firit Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A 1029 Tennessee St., Lawrence, Kan. 

HENLN, LOUIS C, Second Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 374 Forest Park Ave., Spring&eld, Masa. 

LEMMON, EDWARD D.. First Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A 606 6th Ave., Roanoake. Va. 



AUSTIN, JAMES 3303178 

ADDISON, CABOT 3320044 

GORDEN, CLARENCE 4262072 

JACKSON, WILLIAM 336972 

MURRAY, GEORGE G 3303074 

ROSS, DAVE 3303107 

BREEDER. JOHN 3303055 

BOXLEY, ROBERT 3303071 

HARRIS. BURRELL C 3303175 

MEEKS, GEORGE 4259127 

ZENO. CHARLEY 3303748 

BASSETT, STEPHEN 3303120 

BLANTON. LeROY 1169531 

ROSS, CHARLEY 3303234 

DAVIS, JOSEPH 3303184 

ODUM. FRANK 3303110 

HARDISON. BUSTER 3303125 

COLEMAN, IRBY 3303112 

NEWMAN, LEWIS 3303072 

NORMAN, SIMMIE 3303174 

KELLY. EMMETT 3303080 

JACKSON. HENRY 3303044 

KING. ALBERT 3303092 

MULLEN, JOHN 3303106 

ANTHONY, WILLIAM 4258940 

SIMMONS JERRY 3303068 

MOON. PHILIP 3320052 

LINDSAY, SAM 3303170 

BANKS, CHARLES C 3317128 

BROWN, CYBURNIS 4259140 

CIPSON. FRED 4259128 

HALL, CHARLEY 3303169 

WILLIAMS. JOHN 3303151 

LAWSON. JAMES 3303214 

BATES. COURTNEY 3303307 

HOGANS THOMAS 

BEMFELD.. ISAAC 3303165 

ALLEN. SAM 3303062 

ALLEN. WILLARD 4258670 

BETHEL. HENRY 

BLUFORD, JAMES 4258936 

BOOZE. HILLARD 4258553 

BOWIE. CLYDE 3303129 

BRADLEY, LOUIS 4258911 

BROWN, CHESTER 4258927 

BROWN, DANIEL 3303081 

CHAMBERS, W1LLI.\M 4261870 



Men 

First Sergeant Mansfield, La. 

Mess Sergeant Port Gibson, Miss. 

Supply Sergeant 3116 Corby St. Omaha, Neb. 

Sergeant Morristown, N. J. 

Sergeant Box 154, Merryyille, La. 

Sergeant Sweetville, La. 

Sergeant Robeline, La. 

Sergeant Zwolle, La. 

Sergeant Box 191, Merryrille, La. 

Sergeant 931 Everett St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Corporal 1221 St. Claude, New Orleans, La. 

Corporal Oakwood, Texas 

Corporal 505 W. Walker, St. Dennison, Texas 

Corporal Lodi, Texas 

Corporal Nasley, La. 

Corporal Gnbow, La. 

Corporal .... Alexander, La. 

Corporal Fisher, La. 

Corporal Alexander, La. 

Corporal Oakdale, La. 

Corporal Sweetville, La. 

Corporal Harmans, La. 

Corporal Zwolle, La. 

Corporal Ragley, La. 

Corporal Box 37, Wilberton, Okla. 

Corporal De Bidder, La. 

Corporal Box 65, Tunica, Misa. 

Corporal Lundington, La. 

Corporal 511 N. Water St.. Warrensburg, Mo. 

Corporal 221 Lynn St.. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Corporal 110 Byers St., Joplin, Mo. 

Corporal R. F. D. 2, Wyatt, La. 

Cook Hoy, La. 

Cook Aldenbridge, La. 

Cook Kingston, La. 

Cook 

Musician Many, La. 

Private Firm Class Florine, La. 

Private First Class . . . .2108 N. Trcmont, Kansas City, Kan. 

Private First Class 5235 S. 24th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private First Class 607 S. Oak St., Nevada, Mo. 

Private Fimi Cluss Gandy, La. 

Private First Class R. F. D. Box 2, Paxico, Kan. 

Private First Class Gilliam, Mo. 

Privatf First Class Bear, La. 

Private First Class 1010 Franklin St., Moberly, Mo. 



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COLE, ROBERTS S 3003138 

DOUGLAS, HOMER 4259135 

ELMORE. IRA 4262044 

EMBRAY. CHARLES 4259159 

FLEMMING, CLAUDE 3320072 

GARNER. JERRY 4259055 

GREEN. TILMAN 3319996 

HARRISON. OCIE 3320100 

HAYS. EDGAR 3320158 

INGRAM. SOLOMON 3319882 

JOHNSON, GABE 3320021 

McCALPIN, TOM 3320062 

McDUFFIE. ED 3303181 

MOSS. CHARLEY 3300787 

MILLER. THEODORE 3319963 

OLDHAM, WILLIAM 3303223 

POLK. JOHN B 3320189 

RAMSEY. ED 3303093 

ROBERTS, WILLIAM F 4259086 

THOMPSON. CLAYTON 3303206 

TOWNER. MINOR 4261895 

WALLACE, HENRY 3303685 

REDDEN. JOHNNY 4259041 

WHITE. CHARLEY 4259080 

WILLIAMS. DAN 3784309 

WILSON. SCOTT 4259048 

WISE. ROBERT 3784520 

WOLLARD, HAYWOOD 4259002 

ADAMS, LEE 4258715 

ANDERSON, ALFRED 4258577 

ANDERSON. SAMUEL 4259144 

ATKINS. JESS 4258555 

ATLAS. CHARLES 3319979 

BARNETT. PRINCE 3302850 

BEATTY, CLAUDE 4258934 

BELL, JESSE 4259001 

BERKLEY. SAM 3302819 

BERRYHILL, JOHNNY 4258658 

BLACKSON. RANEL 4261910 

BRIGHT, CARL 4258647 

BRITT, LEWIS J 4258958 

BROWN, ALBERT 3320149 

BROWN, CLEM 4259068 

BROWN, EMMETT 4258959 

BRUNNER, FORREST 4261897 

BUSH. WILLIAM F 4259104 

CARTHER, GEORGE 4259084 

CARPENTER, BUSTER 3302842 

CARRLYLE. WILLIAM 4261925 

CARTER, CHARLES 4261922 

CARTER, EARL 3320187 

CHASE Y, SIMUEL 3320194 

CHESHIRE. EVRON 4259125 

CLARK, HENRY 3319986 

COLE, HENRY 3302856 

COLEMAN, ANDY 4261957 

CONRAD, WILLIAM 4262010 

DAVID, CHARLES L 4261926 

DAVIS, DAVID 3320120 

DAVIS, WILLIE 3320182 

DEAN. WILUAM 3320259 

DkBERRY, OSO^R 3320064 

DENNIS, DONLV 3320175 

DOWNING, WALTER 4259156 

DUKE, FESTUS 

ECHOLS, WALTER 4259082 

ELMORE. JAMES 3302225 

ESTILL. WILLIAM 4261921 

FARROW. SAM 3300242 

FINCH, WILLIAM 3320254 

FITZHUGH, JULIUS 3319992 

GARRETT. SPENCER 3320224 

GIBSON, HOBART 4262469 

GRAY. ALBERT 4262018 

GRAY, CEBRON 3303218 

GRAY. MORRIS 3320209 

GREEN, CLYDE 4262066 

HAI.EY, JOSEPH 4259081 

HARRIS, BENTON 4261163 

HARRIS, CHARLEY 3320002 

HARRIS, WILLIAM 4259073 

HARVEY, ROY 4261971 

HAWKINS, JAMES 4259004 

HEDRICK, GARRISON 3319903 

HICKMAN. ALLIE 4259112 

HICDON, WILLIAM F 4259053 

HODGES. LOUIS 4259023 

HOUSTON. GERMAN 3303251 

HUNTER, FRANK M 4259013 



Private First ClaM Many, La. 

Private First Claoa Le Grange, Mo. 

Private First Ciau Warrington. Mo. 

Private First Clasa Granby, Mo. 

Private First Class Port Gibson, Miss. 

Private First Class Joplin, Mo. 

Private First Class Eliaabeth, Miss. 

Private First Class Shuqualak, Miss. 

Private First Class Lesley. Miss. 

Private First Class Mctcalf, Miss. 

Private First Class Port Gibson. Miss. 

Private First Class Hankinson, Miss. 

Private First Class Sanders, La. 

Private First Class 421 Emporia St., Muskogee, Okla. 

Private First Class BeuUh, Miss. 

Private First Class Keatchie, La. 

Private First Class Trentiss, Miss. 

Private First Class Dc Bidder, La. 

Private First Class 902 N. St., Joplin. Mo. 

Private First CUas De Ridder, U. 

Private First Class R. F. D. Box 57, Yates, Mo. 

Private First Class Jamestown, La. 

Private First Class R. F. D. Box 2, Miami, Mo. 

Private Firat Class 619 W. Mills St., Springfield, Mo. 

Private Firat CUss Lula, Miss. 

Private First Clasa 2840 Patte St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private First Class Inverness, Miss. 

Private First Class 520 Pine St., Springfield, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. Box 1, Chandler, Texas 

Private 712 Lake St., Lawrence, Kan. 

Private 402 N. Main St., Joplin, Mo. 

Private 505 E. 6th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private West Side, Miss. 

Private '. Afton, La. 

Private Route 1, Box 19, Hoffman, Okla. 

Private 456 W. Washington St., Marshall, Mo. 

Private TalluUh, La. 

Private 207 Bilbo St., Lake Charles, La. 

Private 2611 Jefferson St., Omaha, Nebr. 

Private 595 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Slater, Mo. 

Private 26 Beaumont St., Natches, Miss. 

Private West Bainbridge, Ga. 

Private Arrow Rock, Mo. 

Private 5617 S. 30th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private 213 Kiowa St., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private 311 Pawnee St., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private Kellogg, La. 

Private 2616 North St., South Omaha, Neb. 

Private 1902 Dorcus St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private R. F. D. Box 2, Bassfield, Miss. 

Private Hamburg, Miss. 

Private 1013 S. 20th St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Burdette, Misa 

Private Lake Providence, La. 

Private 1015 W. 7th St., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Private 1219 S. 6th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private 1213 Mo. Ave., Omaha, Neb. 

Private Tunica, Miaa. 

Private Woodville, Miss. 

Private McNair, Miss. 

Private Dobbs, Miss. 

Private Tunica, Misa. 

Private Monticello, Mo. 

Private Topeka, Kan. 

Private 129 Penn. St., Joplin, Mo. 

Private Eros, La. 

Private Fayette, Mo. 

Private Lafayette Springs, Miss. 

Private Dockery, Miss. 

Private Greensville, Miss. 

Private 5225 E. 53rd St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Wright City, Mo. 

Private Anglum, Mo. 

Private Atkins, La. 

Private Pinckneyville, Miaa. 

Private Danville, Mo. 

Private 220 John St., Joplin, Mo. 

Private 421 N. Washington St., Wichita, Kan. 

Private Lcland, Miss. 

Private 248 Powell St., East Macon, Ga. 

Private 532 Winchester St., Moberly, Mo. 

Private 406 N. 2nd St., St. Joseph. Mo. 

Private Port Gibson, Misa. 

Private La Grange. Mo. 

Private 1709 Beattie St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Arrow Rock, Mo. 

Private Grand Cane, La. 

Private 2027 Fredrick Ave., St. Joseph, Mo. 



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JACKSON. CRAWFORD 3303149 

JACKSON. ED 3302681 

JOHNSON, EDWIN 

JOHNSON. MAT 3320166 

JONES, GEORGE 3320065 

JONES. SAM 3320058 

JONES, THOMAS 3320183 

LEMONS. THEODORE 4259062 

LEWIS, WARNER 4258989 

LEWIS, DAVE 4259139 

LINDSAY, FRED 4259141 

MACK, FRANK 4261934 

MAROY, JUNE 3302021 

MASON, JAMES 3320055 

McGEE, TALMOR 4259058 

MENIFIELD. CHARLES 3319710 

MILLER, EDDIE 4259433 

MILLER, JOHN 3319848 

MITCHELL CLARENCE .... 42S1932 

MJZELL, JOHN 3319856 

MONDANE, EDWARD 3319943 

MOORE. RICHARD 3302587 

MOORE. WILLIAM 4261970 

MORRIS. WILL 3319880 

PRICE, CHARLES 3319647 

RICHARDSON. OCIE 3319965 

RIPLEY, ELWOOD 4258924 

ROACH, MARION 4261890 

ROSEBY. MANUEL 4259017 

MARTIN. DOCK 3319944 

SANDERS, CLARENCE 3319711 

SANDERS, HENRY 3319630 

SHORT, SHELBY 3300711 

SMITH, HOUSTON 4259122 

SMITH, ROBERT 4258991 

TATE. FRANK 3784590 

TOLSON. CARL 4262001 

THORNTON. CLAY 3320500 

TUCKER, FRED 4262019 

VINING. EUGENE 3303745 

WADLEY, THORNTON 4259022 

WALDRON, FRED 4259132 

WALLS, ALEX 3784430 

WARD. JAMES 3784553 

WASHINGTON. LEON 4259052 

WATKINS. ROLAND 3303590 

WELLS. GEORGE 3784440 

WHITE. ARTHUR 3784564 

WICKS, HENRY 3303622 

WILHITE. JOHNNIE 4262008 

WILLIAMS, ANDREW 3303585 

WILLIAMS. IZIE 3303611 

WILLIAMS, LOYD 3303652 

WILIAMS, OSCAR 3303553 

WILLIAMS, SCOTT 3784332 

WILLIAMS, W 3784408 

WILSON. ABRAHAM 3303714 

WILSON. THOMAS 3320236 



Privalc Evergreen, La. 

Private Minden, La. 

Private Natchei, Mioa. 

Private New Hebron, MIm. 

Private Indianola, Miss. 

Private Hermanville, MiM. 

Private Hollywood, Mioa. 

Private 218 East Isadore, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Mount Leonard. Mo. 

Private New London, Mo. 

Private Osweco, Kan. 

Private Columbia, Mo. 

Private Lake Providence, La. 

Private Jeffries. Miss. 

Private .... Cor. Webster & Nettleton St., Springfield, Mo. 

Private Kickapoo, Kan. 

Private 1109 5th Ave.. St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Roxie, Miss. 

Private Molino, Mo. 

Private . .' Cameta, Miss. 

Private Chourd. Miss. 

Private Winnfield, La. 

Private 215 Hancock St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Patose, Miss. 

Private Wellington, Mo. 

Private Leland. Miss. 

Private Slater, Mo. 

Private 2513 M St.. Omaha. Neb. 

Private 1409 Short St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Benoit, Miss. 

Private 15th & Oak St., Atchison. Kan. 

Private 595 Troost Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. 3, Box 40. Boynton. Okla. 

Private Neosho, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. Box 5, Sweet Springs. Mo. 

Private Stocksville, Miss. 

Private Huntsville, Mo. 

Private 647 Winona St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Anglum, Mo. 

Private 223 N. Roman St., New Orleans. La. 

Private Oxford. Miss. 

Private R. F. D. Box 5, Neosho, Mo. 

Private Malvina, Miss. 

Private 115 Gillispie St., Stocksville. Miss. 

Private 218 N. 2nd St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Linneus, Mo. 

Private Lambert, Miss. 

Private Crawford, Miss. 

Private 606 Hays St., Plaquemine. La. 

Private Rocheport, Mo. 

Private Edgard, La. 

Private Ville Platte, La. 

Private Care of Schwinet Lbr. Co., Placquemine, Lo. 

Private Donaldville. Lo. 

Private Pickens, Miss. 

Private Dwyer, Miss. 

Private Reserve, La. 

Private Sibley, Miss. 




None of these in the 805th. 



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wt 




By "Rear Rank 



THE days of reporting to our local boards and entraining for our training camps 
are a jumble of impressions. Here we got our initiation in falling into line 
and taking our turn. That never-to-be-forgotten day we entered the cattle gates at 
Funston will always remain with most of us, for we were shouted at, undressed 
by the numbers, bathed in record time, had new clothes thrown at us to be worn 
whether they fitted or not, told our personal and family history to a dozen officers, 
and so wrapped ourselves up in finger prints, physical examinations, etc., that we 
felt ourselves in a prison from the start. 

From this madhouse we were trucked to Detention Camp No. 2, and after 
a few weeks of examinations, inoculations, and initiations to I. D. R. and C. M. 
M., while in a provisional company we formed Company "I" of the SOSth 
Pioneer Infantry. This took place on July 15, 1918, with Lieut. Carpenter in com- 
mand of the company. Lieuts. Hemstreet and Jones were assigned at the same time. 
On the same day we were marched to Camp Funston and immediately took up our 
part as a real organization, granting ourselves the privilege of calling all new 
comers by the name of rookie. 

The supply office began to issue guns and bayonets, and our drill and training 
followed definite schedules. 

July 17 saw Lieut. Carpenter relieved of duty with the company and Lieut. 
Hemstreet was given command. Somehow we always connect incidents with the 
change of our commanding officers, and with Lieut. Hemstreet we connect the 
teaching of wearing our hats just so, chin strap bow tied just so, the way to care 
for our rifles, how to "fall in" and "fall out," how to march at ease and double time, 
how to police ourselves and line up our shoes, and a million other wild stunts; 
but I guess they were all necessary, for if we showed signs of a doubt our "top" 
gave us extra K. P. or the officers read the Articles of War. 

On August 11 Captain Abbett, Lieut. Vargo, and Lieut. Quinn were assigned, 
and a few days later Lieut. Hoi lister reported. How we sized up these new officers 
and wondered what all the change meant! But rumors have a little way all their 
own, and news was soon breezed about that we would probably be on our way to 
France before long. To substantiate the rumor we were marched to the rifle 
range and put through the course. 

The black-and-blue arms, the heat, the dust, our camp, are indelibly stamped 
in our minds. As usual, everybody seemed to be in a hurry, and a soldier would 
hardly finish pulling the trigger on his last shot before the officers would hurry him 
out of the trench so another man could take his place even before he could read his 
score. After five days of such conditions we returned to camp with actual dope on 
an immediate departure and began equipping in earnest. Drill all day and draw- 
ing of supplies at night was the routine. 

The orders for our departure came like a thunderbolt, and with push and jam 
the company property was gotten into shape and either turned in to the Camp Quar- 



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termaster or boxed for shipping. All night of August 26, we waited to entrain but 
did not get off until 6:30 A. M., of the twenty-seventh. Company "K" was on 
the same train with us. We lost no time in crossing the States, but we didn't go 
any too fast at that, for our car room was limited and the porter service wasn't 
good at all; but the Red Cross made up for the train service and fed us coffee and 
doughnuts and gave us cigarettes at every large city we passed through. They were 
so considerate of our wants that they would awaken us in the middle of the night 
to pass out their "chow." Every town we went through gave us a good send-off 
and made all of the boys feel proud that they were American soldiers. 




We detrained in New York in the early morning of August 30, and ferried 
across to Long Island, arriving in Camp Upton about noon. We were the first of 
the 805th to arrive there. But from the very beginning every one felt that he would 
not like Camp Upton. This premonition proved correct, for if you are going to 
call Funston a madhouse, I am at a loss to find a name for this camp. Clothes were 
again issued here, and we received our overseas caps and spiral leggins. I thought 
we never would learn to get those leggins wrapped correctly, and I am sure the 
officers thought the same, for they were always after us and many of the boys got 
special lessons. 

Seems as if Uncle Sam had a mania for moving us in the night. Maybe he 
thought he could mix us up and we would not know where we were going. About 
3 A. M. of September 2, we entrained for Quebec and arrived there the next day. 
Before we could get our bearings we were unloaded and embarked on H. M. S. Orita. 



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We lay in the harbor until sometime in the night and then put out to sea. But 
our ship was not the only one, for they put us in a convoy and gave it a cruiser 
as a guide and protector. Between spells of seasickness, policing the boat, boat 
drills, and physical exercise, every man kept his eye on the water for the sign of a 
periscope of a German submarine. 

Our ship arrived in England September 16, 1918, where we again unloaded in 
the dark and boarded our first European train for "Somewhere." Such trains! 
We thought we were cramped for room in the U. S. A., but we had to give credit 
to the English for beating us on this point of inconveniences. The next morning 
found us in Southampton, where we actually began our marching, and the boys 
found out how heavy their packs were. The English gave us a most hearty welcome 
as we marched through the town to our rest camp. Did I say "Rest Camp?" 
Well, that is what they called it, but we were there about two hours when we 
slung packs and marched back to the docks. 

This time we were loaded on a dingy old boat and packed so tight we could 
hardly get around, but our trip only lasted for the night, and we landed at Le Havre 
on the morning of September 18. 

Our first impression of France will always be linked with one of the hardest 
hikes with full packs and empty stomachs that we ever made. We were doomed to 
visit another English rest camp, and true to form we left the same day and entrained 
for an unknown station in France. 

Who will forget the box car sign "40 Hommes-8 Chevaux"? And I am 
certain that they had forty of us in one of those toy box cars. Rations were put 
in each car and many was the hungry eye turned in the direction of those field 
rations, for we had only two meals per day. The French peasants and children 
lined the way and incessantly called for cigarettes and souvenirs. 

They sidetracked us at Rolampont, France, on September 20, and the remainder 
of the outfitting was completed here. Our introduction to French mud and rain 
came at this place, and many of the boys contracted pneumonia from exposure. Here 
we pitched our first "pup" tents, which were to be our sleeping quarters for many 
weeks to come. 

We felt more like soldiers now with our complete equipment, and to top the 
whole affair we entrained for the front on October 2, 1918. 

The early morning of the third found us wide awake, for our train had stopped 
and we could hear the distant boom of artillery and see the dull flashes against the 
sky. The place was Clermont-en-Argonne. The regiment detrained here and went 
into camp using some French barracks and some "pup" tents. 

As we awaited orders which would decide what was to be our part in the offen- 
sive, we policed the town, which was in a terribly unsanitary condition, and did 
a little drilling on the side. But the scenes of war were about us, and we could not 
help watching the current of transportation going to and coming from the front. 
Stories of hard fighting reached us and were proven by the procession of ambu- 
lances carrying the wounded. 

In the late afternoon of October 5 we broke camp in record time and moved 
toward the front. We were to report to the Twenty-third Engineers at Neuvilly for 
the purpose of building an ammunition dump. Camp was made in the dark that 
night, for no lights were allowed for fear of detection by the enemy air craft. Every 
man was dead tired and could have gone to sleep anywhere. 

The second night in this place held a surprise for us, for Fritz began dropping 
his bombs, and this was a new sensation to all of us. Many of the boys were frank 
in admitting that they took safety in flight. 

After completing the dump we were assigned to railroad construction, and on 
October 15 we moved to Varennes, where we were attached to the Sixteenth En- 



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gineers. Work was carried on night and day in eight-hour shifts, rain or shine. As 
the railroad moved northward, camp was broken and we moved, to Baulny. Fritz 
seemed to have a grudge after this move, and after we had worked all day he persisted 
in keeping us awake all night with aero-bombs. While at this camp we were 
fired upon by artillery, but either the Germans were poor shots or we were lucky, for 
not one disturbed us or our camp. 

At last, after carrying thousands of ties, digging cuts, making fills and laying 
rails, the road between Aubreville and Apremont was completed for emergency 
purposes. 

We all felt as if the Americans were going to put on something big about this 
time, for the troops were moving into the line day and night and an unending 
stream of anununition was on its way. At last the big drive came, the Boche lines 
were broken, and the Germans took to their heels. 

After the big push the company moved to Marcq and then to St. Juvin, where 
we began the repair of tracks and switches which had been demolished by German 
engineers. While we were here the armistice was signed, November 11, 1918. 

But we hardly had time to enjoy the temporary peace, for at 6:00 a. m. of the 
twelfth we broke camp and entrained for Verdun the same day. What a trip 
that was! Our train went thirty miles in two days, and if we were not off the track 
our engine was broken or it was out of water. Rations came near running short, 
too. We unloaded at Verdun and marched through some of the most desolate, 
devastated, bleak country in all of France. 

We pitched camp near the ruined town of Aubaucourt and in a perfect swamp 
at that, but it was the best site to be had. The next day we fell to making rail- 
road for the use of the Army of Occupation. Connected with this work will always 
come the sight of the prisoners of war returning to Verdun after being turned 
loose by the withdrawing Germans. The men were from all the nations engaged 
in war against Germany, and such poorly clad, hungry looking, yet happy, cheer- 
ful fellows we never saw in all our lives. 

During this piece of construction work Pvts. Louis Williams and Ed. Anderson 
were badly wounded by an enemy tank mine which was near the railroad track 
and which was accidentally set off. These were the only casualties suffered by the 
company. 

Completing our work the last of the month, we moved by truck to another desolate 
town called Malancourt, which was destined to be our home for most of the winter. 
At this place our company took up the salvaging of some twenty-five square miles 
of the Meuse-Argonne battle area. This area included the Bois de Montfaucon and 
the Bois de Malancourt. Our quarters were wooden barracks, and by the addition 
of a bath house and good walks we made ourselves quite comfortable for the 
winter, despite the continuous rainy weather. 

While here, work was far from agreeable, for we searched for, carried, piled, 
and loaded into trucks tons of clothing, ammunition, rifles, artillery, signal property, 
and engineering material, all of which had been captured from the Germans or left 
by our troops during the fighting. Mud and rain always add to the contentment 
of troops, and we had more than enough of both during our work here. 

With the setting in of winter Captain Abbett was loaned to the Motor Truck 
Detachment, and Captain Adkins took his place. Lieut Marston and Lieut. Quinn 
were sent to school. Salvaging was about over then, and life was a little easier. 
On March 10 we moved our quarters to Very, where Company "K" was billeted. 
Drill, games, and cleaning up work occupied most of our time. 

On March 27 we entrained at Brieulles for Doulevant le Chateau. Just before 
we left, Lieut. Morehead reported to the company. Our work at this place chiefly 
consisted of road work and some quarry work. 



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Ste'.,* 



View of Montfaucon looking northeast. The ruin left of center is Cathedral de Mont- 
faucon, located in the ruin of which is a machine gun position and an observation post 
used by the crown prince and his staff during their Verdun offensive. The road on the 
left passes directly in front of Chateau-de-Montfaucon and around the hill to Nantillois, 
coming into view again at the right center of picture. The Chateau-de-Montfaucon was 
the home of the crown prince during the above mentioned German offensive. The cross- 
roads on the extreme right lead south to Cheppy, southeast to Malancourt, east to the 
Meuse, and northeast to Nantillois. The woods shown on the right semi-background of 
the picture were very difficult to take and at one time were the position of a large German 
siege gun. These woods later, after Montfaucon fell, served as concealment for American 
troops and the jumping-off place of our forces when they started the second phase of the 
American offensive. Montfaucon was particularly favorable to both Germans and Amer- 
icans as observation post, because this position offered a commanding view of the sur- 
rounding country. 




Standard guage track demolished by Germans by blowing out the joints. Marcq, Arden- 
nes, France. 



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On April 27 the company entrained for Brest, France, and remained there 
until June 17, policing camp, digging trenches, unloading coal, and doing a dozen 
other jobs, all of which were steps in marking time for our expected embarkation 
to the States. Delousing and refitting of clothing took place while here. Captain 
Abbett here returned and took command. 

In the morning of June 17 we boarded the U. S. S. Zeppelin and spent ten 
quite comfortable days crossing the ocean. We landed at New York on the twenty- 
seventh. The first day of July saw the entire company broken up and officers 
and men placed in detachments for their home camps. 

Such is the history of Company "I." 




COMPANY "1" AT VERY. 
Lieutenant Harold I. Hollister (left) and Lieutenant George A. Williams (right). 

COMPANY "I" 

Officers 

ABBETT, HENRY B.. Cnptain Infantry. U. S. A Brighton, Colo. 

VARCO. ALEX J., First Lipuienant lnfantr>-, U. S. A 2789 E. 119lh St., Cleveland, Ohio 

HOLLISTER. HAROLD L. Fir.l Lieulmanl Infantry. U. S. A Quincy, Kan. 

MARSTON, MARION R.. Fir.t Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Brunswick. Mo. 

MOREHEAD, CHESTER T.. Srcond Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A. . . . 1717 College Ave.. Fort Worth, Texaa 
WILLIAMS, GEORGE A., Second Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A 3714 Locust St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Men 

JORDAN. VINCENT 33.^383 First Sergeant 1026 Lewis. Jacksonville, Fla. 

JONES. FRED . 42S8.333 Mess Sergeant 215 Oak St., Kansas City. Mo. 

MAGKE. EDGAR 3303560 Supply Sergeant Franklinlon, La. 

ALEXANDER, BEN 3303445 Sergeant Scotland, La. 



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HAYNES. LAWRENCE 3303402 

LEAVINGS, JONAS 3303443 

RODERICK. LOUIS L 3320092 

WASHINGTON. JOHN A 3303459 

WINFREE. WALTER 3303490 

CHAVOURS, HAROLD H 3320150 

KIRKLAND. FRANK 3302828 

LEDBETTER, FRANK 3303362 

EED. LEON 3320088 

BIRD. JEFFERSON 3319649 

BLAKE. WILL 4261679 

BRISTO, ABB 3303346 

BROWN, DICK 4261773 

BYERS, HAYDEN 4261704 

CAIN, SHERMAN 4258919 

CANTT. JOHN A 3303321 

GIBBON, GEORGE H 4258660 

HARRIS. FRED 3303487 

HOLLOWAY, FRED B 4258629 

HURLEY, HARISON 3303436 

JACKSON, ED 3319993 

NAPUE, JOHN 4258504 

PERKINS, OZEME 3301293 

ROBINSON. HENRY 3320212 

SMITH. ROBERT 3303296 

SHARKEY, UTILLIS 3303870 

THREAD, HERBERT 3303309 

WEST, EDWARD A 3320045 

SNYDER, JAMES L 3303378 

STEWART. VICTOR 3303476 

HALL. WILLIE P 4258946 

JONES, HAMETT 3303313 

PLAYER. MOSES A 3303340 

PLEASANT, LUCLIEN 3303422 

KELLEY. ARTEAL 3303469 

DANIELS. EDWARD 3303435 

ASH. SOLOMON 3303500 

ANTHONY, ROBERT 4261865 

BALDWIN, DAVID 3303327 

BARTLEY. EMMETT 4261712 

BATES. CECIL M 4261780 

BATSELL, ROGER 4261789 

BINGHAM. JAMES 3319827 

BOGGS. MACK 3303324 

BOONE, EDDIE 4261784 

BOOTHE, DAVE L 4261831 

BRADLEY, ARTHUR 3303400 

BRAGG, HOMER 4261872 

BRANDON, NATHANIEL 3319901 

BRITON, ANDREW 4261829 

BROWN, FRANK 4258631 

BROWN, WARD 1169543 

BRYANT, MOSES 4261850 

BUCKNER. PAYTON E 4258965 

CAMPBELL, DANIEL 3303393 

CAMPBELL. GEORGE R 4258657 

CANTON, WERT 4261794 

GARDEN. WILLIAM H 4258770 

CARROLL. ARTHUR 4261882 

CASON. NOBLE J 4261882 

CHESTER, ISAAC T 3300683 

CHINN, OSBORNE N 3319668 

CLAY, OLIVER 3303481 

COLE. FRANK C 3303483 

COLEMAN, NATHANIEL 3319846 

COLLIER, WILLIAM 4261724 

COOK, EUGENE 4261838 

COOK, MANUEL 4261810 

CONNOR, JAMES S 4261787 

DARTON, JAMES L 4258952 

DAVIS, HENRY S 4261753 

DAVIS. ONDEE 4258748 

DENME, JAMES R 3303499 

DENNY, LESLIE 4261873 

DICKERSON, WALLACE 3303456 

EDWARDS. ROMIE 3320241 

EVANS. CHARLES D 4258666 

FLEMING. WILLIAM H 4258678 

FONTENOT. JOHN H 3302970 

CAUSE, JOHN 4258925 

GEE, JOHNIE 4258634 

GIPSON, LESLIE 4258975 

GLOVER, OLIE 4258378 

GOLDSMITH, GEORGE 4258628 

GRAHAM, PEARL 4258654 

GRANT. EDGAR L 4261838 

GRAVES. LEONARD 4261821 

GREEN. DELATOR 4261746 

HACKLEY. JAMES 4258505 



Sergeant Darrow, La. 

Sergeant Donaldsonvillc. La. 

Sergeant 200 Oak St., Natchez. Miss. 

Sergeant 2052 St. Andrew St., New Orleans. La. 

Sergeant Paradiae, La. 

Sergeant Sibley, Misa. 

Corporal Lake Providence, La. 

Corporal 514 S. 3rd St.. Louiaiana, Mo. 

Corporal 515 N. Wall St., Natchez. Mias. 

Corporal England. Ark. 

Corporal Armstrong, Mo. 

Corporal Naborton. La. 

Corporal 301 N. 3rd St., Columbia, Mo. 

Corporal 1109 S. I4th St., Omaha. Neb. 

Corporal 2724 Miami St., Omaha, Neb. 

Corporal La Grange, Mo. 

Corporal 300 S. Harding St., Fort Worth, Texaa 

Corporal Donaldaonville. La. 

Corporal 842 Connecticut St., Lawrence. Kan. 

Corporal 1621 2nd St., New Orleans. La. 

Corporal Tallulah, La. 

Corporal 907 N. Topeka, Topeka, Kan. 

Corporal West Lake, La. 

Corporal Windsbur, Mias. 

Corporal Yancopin, Ark. 

Corporal Griffin, La. 

Corporal 723 Josephine, New Orleans, La. 

Corporal Tillman, Miss. 

Corporal Fullerton, La. 

Corporal 2714 Ramport St., New Orleans, La. 

Cook Peabodj, Kan. 

Cook Natchitochea. La. 

Cook Plaindealing, La. 

Cook 2033 Washington, New Orleans, La. 

Mechanic Baton Rouge, La. 

Bugler Home Solemn, La. 

Private Donaldaonville, La. 

Private 1524 Linden, St. Louis Mo. 

Private 319 St. James St., Mansfield, La. 

Private Centralia, Mo. 

Private CarroUton, Mo. 

Private Paris, Mo. 

Private Fayette, Miss. 

Private Canton, Mo. 

Private 1121 S. 2nd St., Columbia, Mo. 

Private Richepart, Mo 

Private Napoleonville, La 

Private . 215 W. 2nd St., Fulton, Mu 

Private . . Benoit, Miss. 

Private Lake Common. Miss. 

Private 119 Riley St., Granville, S. C. 

Private Beaumont, Texas 

Private 1412 N. 22nd St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private Miami, Mo. 

Private Napoleonville, La. 

Private 311 7th St . Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Private CoIumbU Mo. 

Private 3508 N. 3rd St., Omaha. Neb. 

Private 507 Cherry St., Jefferson City, Mo. 

Private Glasgow, Mo. 

Private 745 S. 2nd St.. St. Louis. Mo. 

Private Aullville, Mo. 

Private 1819 Phillip, Now Orleans, La. 

Private 3813 Tchoupitoula, New Orleans, La. 

Private Union Church, Miss. 

Private 1423 N. 21si St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private Slator, Mo. 

Private 616 N. 17th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private Moberly, Mo. 

Private N. Side Frisco Shop, Springfield, Mo. 

Private 2926 R. St., S., Omaha, Neb. 

Private 171 1 Forest St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 920 Cypress St.. New Oricans. La. 

Private Moberiy, Mo. 

Private 714 Hillaroy. New Orieans, La. 

Private Pontotoc, Miss. 

Private 1702 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 2115 Highland Ave., Kanaas City, Mo. 

Private Jennings. Mo. 

Private Brownsville, Tenn. 

Private 1919 Enlid Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 881 S. Main, Springfield, Mo. 

Private 914 New Jersey Ave.. Kansas City, Kans. 

Private 2312 Woodland, Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 914 Bell. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Macon, Mo. 

Private Fayette. Mo. 

Private Paris. Mo. 

Private 222 N. 8th St., Lawrence, Kan. 



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HAMLETT, JOE 425867S 

HARDING. CHARLES M 4258588 

HOPKINS, ISAAC 3320095 

HARRIS. ROBERT 3320006 

HAYTHORNE, ABE 3320908 

HOPKINS. HORACE 3320050 

HOWARD, HARRY R 4258663 

HUDSON. CLARENCE 3317709 

HUGHES, ELEY 3303413 

JACKSON, ALBERT B 4258703 

JACKSON, CLEVE 4258987 

JAMES, FRANK B 4261985 

JOHNSON, ED 3320235 

JOHNSON, FRANK 3320215 

JOHNSON. JAMES H 4258604 

JOHNSON, PERRY M 4258945 

JOHNSON. WALTER 4261826 

JONES. CHARLIE 3303492 

JONES, PAUL 3303426 

KING. OMER M 3303339 

KNIGHT. WILSON 3320071 

LENORE. BISHOP 4258648 

LEWIS, HENRY 3320068 

LEWIS, JAMES 3303406 

LOGAN. HUDSON 4258643 

MARSHALL, LURTY 3303510 

MILLER, CARENCE 4258650 

MITCHELL, FELIX 4258710 

MONDAY. ROY 4258602 

MONROE, FRED 4258656 

MORTON. HENRY J 4261818 

MYLES. CASSIUS 3320161 

NASH, ED 3319982 

NEAL. ROBERT 3320048 

NEFF, EDWARD E 4258944 

NOBLES. WILLIE R 3320192 

NOBLES. JESSE 4258601 

NELSON, ALBERT 3319860 

NETTERS, CLARENCE 3303502 

PARKER, WILLIAM 4258640 

PERKINS, JAMES E 4258733 

PERRY, NATHANIEL H 4261533 

PIPER. ESLA J 4258921 

POWELL. DAVE 4258809 

PRICE. FRED 3303423 

RANDOLPH. BENNIE 3319977 

RAY. WILLIAM 3320174 

RAYMOND, WILLIAM 4258311 

REECE, FRAZIE 3320133 

REED, IRA 4258608 

REEDER. FREDERICK 3301318 

RICHARDSON, HENRY G 3320117 

RIPPATOE, ROBERT L 3320276 

ROBERTSON, LESLIE 3303150 

ROBERTSON, EDWARD W. . . . 4258343 

ROBINSON, JOHN H 4258700 

ROBINSON, JAMES 1169645 

ROBINSON, WILLIE 3320157 

ROGERS, ERNEST 3320083 

ROGERS. JONAS 3320078 

ROGERS, MANUEL 3319997 

ROSS, CUFTON 3320199 

SANFORD. PAUL 4258768 

SCOTT, WALTER 3303386 

SHERMAN, GEORGE 3320205 

SHIELDS, GEORGE 3319988 

SILAS. JOHN 3320167 

SIMMONS. JOE N 3320216 

SIMMS. CLARENCE 3320039 

SIMPSON. WONDERFUL 3303301 

SMITH. CHARLES H 4258779 

SMITH. WILLIAM 4258570 

SMITH. RICHARD 3320038 

SMOOT. CHARLIE 3320148 

SOUTHERN. ROBERT 4258576 

STAMPLEY. RILEY G 3320029 

STEVESON. CLARENCE S 4258598 

SVnrTCHLER, EDWARD 4258598 

TALLEY, BERT 4258374 

THOMPSON, CARL T 4261915 

THOMPSON, CLARENCE .... 3320061 

THOMPSON, LEO .3.320186 

THOMPSON, WILLIAM D 4258633 

THORNTON. EDDIE B 3320121 

TILLMAN, BUD 4258702 

TRIPLETT, DEE 3320179 

TURNER, SAM ........ 4258752 

THOMAS, GEORGE W 3320079 

VAUGHN, CORNELIUS 4258731 



Private 709 Magee St., Kanaas City, Mo. 

Private 418 Independence, Lawrence, Kan. 

Private 204 S. Catherine Natchez, Miaa. 

Private 318 Ave., "V", Vogaluaa, U. 

Private Lake Providence, La. 

Private Port Gipson, Mim. 

Private Paola. Kan. 

Private 1617 Washington St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Magdade. La. 

Private 909 Magee St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Eskridge, Kan. 

Private 1105 S. 13th St.. Omaha, Neb. 

Private Woodville, Miss. 

Private Woodville, Miss. 

Private 502 S. 2nd St.. Muskogee, OkU. 

Private R. 9, Box 45, Lawrence, Kans. 

Private Winlaville, Mo. 

Private 3111 Liberty St., New Orleans, La. 

Private Donaldsonville, La. 

Private Monticello, Mo. 

Private 545 Peach Tree St., Greenville, Miss. 

Private 1702 Locust St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Box 1, Natchcx. Miss. 

Private Donaldsonville, La. 

Private Topeka, Kan. 

Private 2723 Jackson, New Orieans, La. 

Private 509 E. 17th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1812 Locust St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 717 E. 17lh St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Quindaro, Kan. 

Private WintxviUe, Mo. 

Private 256 St. Catherine St., Natchex, Miss. 

Private Port Gipson, Miss. 

Private Jefferies, Miss. 

Private Slator, Mo. 

Private Clyde, Miss. 

Private Muskogee, Okla. 

Private Rosedale, Miss. 

Private 709 W. 3rd St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 917 N. Topeka Ave., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 1315 Clark St., Parsons, Kan. 

Private 2859 Miami St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private Gillman, Mo. 

Private 1726 Campbell St., Kansss City, Mo. 

Private 507 Orange St., Argentary, Kan. 

Private Burdette, Miss. 

Private Whitaker, Miss. 

Private Bonner Springs, Kan. 

Private Roxic, Mo. 

Private 618 Cottage Lane, Kansas City, Mo. 

Private West Uke, La. 

Private Fouler, La. 

Private Butler, Mo. 

Private Prairieville, La. 

Private 914 W. 18th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1103 S. 9th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Holletsville. Texas 

Private 618% York St., Helena, Ark. 

Private Lula, Miss. 

Private Lula. Miss. 

Private Centcrvillc, Miss. 

Private Prentiss, Miss. 

Private 1104 Chariotte St., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private 2025 1st St., New Orieans. La. 

Private Torras. La. 

Private 107 Lake St., Greenville, Miss. 

Private 625 S. lat St., Brookhaven, Miss. 

Private Pontotoc. Miss. 

Private Grand Gulf. Miss. 

Private ^ Benson, U. 

Private Dresden, Mo. 

Private Blanchard, La. 

Private White Apple, Miss. 

Private No. 2, Madison St., Natchez, Miss. 

Private Independence Kan. 

Private Port Gipson, Misa. 

Private Maltabend, Mo. 

Private 1108 Oak St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1722 Madison Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private St. Johns, Kan. 

Private Newton, Miss. 

Private Bassfield, Miss. 

Private St. Johns, Kan. 

Private Tunica, Miss. 

Private Mclvin, Okla. 

Private Plattsburg, Miss. 

Private 928 Campbell St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 19 Lincoln Ave., Natchez, Miss. 

Private 912 Indiana Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 



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VAUGHNS. JOHNIE 3303528 

VESSEL, JAMES L 3320147 

WADE. ANDERSON ...... 3320098 

WAKEFIELD. JOSEPH W 4258547 

WALKER. M. P 3303029 

WARREN, ZENITH 4258545 

WASHINGTON. GEORGE 3320080 

WASHINGTON. SAM 3302840 

WEATHERS, MARCUS J 3319981 

WESLEY, FRANK 4258616 

WHITEN, FATE 3302988 

WILLHOITE. JOHN 4258612 

WILLIAMS. CLEVELAND .... 4258383 

WILLIAMS, FRANK 4258976 

WILLIAMS, HOUSTON 3302890 

WILLIAMS. JOHN H 4258758 

WILLIAMS. JAMES W 3320152 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM A 4258174 

WILSON, ARTHUR 4258942 

WING, JOSEPH 3303465 

WINSTON, OLIVER 3320099 

WRIGHT. WILUAM H 3303338 

YARBROUGH. JAMES A 4258437 



Private L«tcher. La. 

Private Dundee. MiM. 

Private 628 Canal St., Natchez, Misa. 

Private 1613 Cherry St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private .... Texarkana, Texas 

Private 215 Oak St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Bryarfield, Miss. 

Private Cherryville, La. 

Private .... Winterville, Mis*. 

Private 924 Riley St., ManhatUn, Kan. 

Private Granville, La. 

Private 2457 Michigan Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Okmulgee, Okla. 

Private Marshall, Mo. 

Private Sondheimer, La. 

Private 1324 9th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Martin, Texas 

Private Garden City, Kan. 

Private Slator, Mo. 

Private 2323 SW. Charles St., New Orleans, La. 

Private 148 St. Catherine, Natchez, Miss. 

Private Savannah, Mo. 

Private 1015 Wyandotte, Kansas City, Kan. 




Monument erected by First 

Division at Exermont 

France. 



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Lieut. Colonel Herbert Parsons (builder of New York subways), who built new roads 
and repaired destroyed bridges in the American advance. Near Boureuilles, Meuse, 

France. September 28, 1918. 




56th Coast Artillery Corps, Battery "E," 1st Division, backing up Division with 155's. 
Near Charpentry, Meuse, France. October 5, 1918. 



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r\ 



\j 



\ff' 



History of Company "/iC" 




By First Lieut. Charles E. Persons 



THIS company was organized at Camp Funston, Kan., July 15, 1918, when 
Captain A. C. Woodruff and 2nd Lieuts. Robert E. Maris and Edgar D. Johnson 
took over fifty-three men of Company "K," 2nd Provisional Regiment. On August 
10 1st. Lieuts. Charles E. Persons, Sam P. Moyer, and Donald Frankenberger 
joined the company, having been transferred from the 164th Depot Brigade. Under 
these officers the outfit came overseas. Changes in the officer personnel have been 
few. Lieut. Moyer, the always energetic and efficient conmfiander of the 1st platoon, 
left by transfer to Company "G" on January 7, 1919. Platoon, company, and officers 
have never ceased to regret his absence. The strain of solitude, absence from home, 
and the continual sight of unrelieved desolation and devastation bore heavily on the 
spirits of all, and on December 17, 1918, it was necessary that Lieut. Johnson be 
sent "from duty to hospital." News of his arrival in New York on January 28, 
1919, was later received together with the cheering statement that his nervous 
trouble was yielding to treatment in a happier environment. 

On February 12, 1919, 1st Lieut. Walter H. Brenneman from Company "E" 
of the 805th and 2nd Lieut. George W. Spaine, who had seen service with the 
82nd Division, reported for duty. Lieut. Spaine was transferred to Company "H" 
on February 28. Despite the shortness of his stay he is well remembered in the 
company for capacity and cheerfulness of spirit. Thus, of the six officers originally 
assigned to Company "K" four were still on duty with it after ten months of 
foreign service, while a fifth was in the regiment. Only eight officers were assigned, 
and of these, five were with the organization for the trip home. Captain Woodruff, 
who held conunand from July 15, 1918, to disbandment, is a veteran of the Phillipine 
Insurrection and has had extensive service with the Kansas National Guard. No 
officer ever held more completely or deservedly the respect and loyalty of his sub- 
ordinates. There was never a day that he did so little as his full duty; and no 
act of his official career was governed by any motive less worthy than the highest 
sense of duty and the strictest sense of honor. 

The original fifty-three enlisted men consisted of picked troops from a com- 
pany of 250 men and were chiefly from Alabama and Mississippi. Additions 
were made from the 164th Depot Brigade of seventy-four recruits on July 30; sixty- 
seven men on August 20; thirty-five on August 22; and a final sixteen on August 
25. This gave the company a total strength of 237 men, and with this number 
it came overseas. Of the total enlisted personnel some thirty-eight per cent were 
from Kansas, thirty-seven per cent from Missouri, twenty per cent from Louisiana, 
and three per cent from Mississippi. 

The company left its original home at Detention Camp No. 2 on July 15 
and marched to Building 1935 in Camp Funston to undergo a course of training 
necessarily hasty. In order to understand how intensive the training of the com- 
pany was expected to be, it is necessary to remember that its date of departure 
for overseas was August 27. At that date 137 men had been with the organization 



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less than ten days and over fifty men less than five. Up to August 14, the time 
had been spent in close and extended order drill and in preliminary instruction pre- 
paratory to the rifle range. August 14 to 18 were devoted to Special Course "C" 
on the rifle range. The great majority of the 125 men in the company had never 
fired a high powered rifle, many had never held a fire arm. They had, however, 
had the benefit of some preliminary instruction. Quite different was the situation 
of 100 men turned over by the Depot Brigade. In their case the preliminary course 
of instruction was rapid in the extreme, being compressed into thirty minutes. 
Kansas dust, wind, and sun aided in making the work heavy, and the hours were 
long. 




The company returned to its barracks — or "home," as the men preferred to say — 
on Sunday, August 18. The following week was spent in drawing and issuing 
supplies and making general preparations for departure. It is believed that few 
organizations had a more rapid trip to France and that few traveled more con- 
tinuously than Company "K" and the 3rd Battalion. Leaving Camp Funston 
August 27, 1918, and traveling via England, they pitched shelter tents at Rolampont, 
Haute-Mame, on September 20. Aside from two nights at Camp Upton, they had 
never been stationary a full night in the intervening period. And since the time at 
Camp Upton was completely utilized in outfitting, these nights are not counted as 
rest time. Consider the entries of the morning report covering this period: "August 
27. Companies "I" and "K" entrained at 6 a. m., for Camp Upton, N. Y." (in 
Pullmans, be it noted). "August 30, 2:30 p. M., arrived Camp Upton; September 



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2, 4:00 A. M., entrained for Quebec; September 3, 10 A. M., arrived at Quebec, de- 
trained and embarked on H. M. S. Orita at once; September 16, arrived at Liverpool 
4 p. M.; disembarked at 10 P. M. and entrained at once for Southampton; arrived at 
7 A. M.; marched to — in our case — Rest (less) Camp; 2 p. M., returned to dock; 
embarked 6 p. M., on H. M. S. St. George for Le Havre; September 18, debarked 
at Le Havre at 7 a. m., marched to the "restless" camp; left at 11:30 P. M., marched 
to station, entrained at 2 a. m., the ninteenth — a true zero hour — for Rolampont; 
September 20, arrived Rolampont, detrained and encamped on the mud flats in 
shelter tents/' Aside from its extreme rapidity, features of the trip were the descent 
by stages from Pullmans to the French box cars; the constant attendance of Red 
Cross members as the train passed through the United States and Canada; the 
overcoating of the company in thirty minutes in the hectic hours at Camp Upton; 
the lightless nights on the close formed convoy of transports, when sentries kept 
a close watch for submarines and saw none; the consumption of three meals 
in the "restless'* period at Le Havre; and the enthusiasm displayed by the English 
over the arrival of American troops. 

At Rolampont the outfitting of the company, begun at Camp Funston and con- 
tinued at Camp Upton, was finally completed. The company made its first non- 
commissioned officers. Progress was made in close order drill and the company, 
drilled for the first time as a unit, in a measure found itself and developed some 
beginnings of cohesion. Here was held a regimental parade — at 140 to the minute. 
The men and officers were introduced to gas and wept lachrymatorily over the devil- 
ishness of the Hun. In these crowded days gas instruction and instruction in the 
adjusting of gas masks were given officers and men. And here the officers first 
made acquaintance with the intimate meaning of the billeting system. 

The advancing offensive of the American Army on September 26, furnished 
the call for the entry of the company on its pioneer work, and on October 2 
the company entrained French style for Clermont-en-Argonne. The flash and roar of 
the big guns some twenty kilometers northward welcomed the arriving troops, 
and in Clermont, on October 3, during the march to Camp Bondet, officers and 
men saw the first scenes in war's devastation. At Clermont, Regimental Headquarters 
established itself for what proved to be a lengthy stay. From this camp Com- 
panies "K" and "L," under Major Cowley, marched three miles north to Aubre- 
ville on October 6. 

This move brought the company on the battle side of the largest guns. "Big 
Betsy," some two kilometers in their rear, punctuated the night and shattered silence 
while launching her shells over the camp to the point of delivery to the Germans. 
At this sample of the "best ruined villages of France," the company labored by 
day and night to disentangle the railhead. Here they were entertained their first 
night by aeroplanes, and the sentries adopted the motto: "Lights Out." By day 
they studied and practised the gentle art of camouflage on shelter tents and kitchen. 
At this place Major Cowley invented, constructed, and popularized the Bearcat 
Bungalow, a structure on the simple, right, strong lines of the newest war time 
American architecture, securing the maximum of comfort and shelter at the minimum 
of expense of effort and material. 

The advancing offensive called for a further move on October 13, to Varennes, 
whose historical buildings had been pounded to pieces in the first days' fighting 
and where the company entered for the first time territory long held by the German 
forces. This move brought the outBt to its closest range of the "parteeing" enemy, 
whose lines held, with minor changes until November 1, some twelve to fourteen 
kilometers to the northward. Entry into Varennes was made inausnir.iouslv in 
competition with a profanely struggling tangle of trucks, through hampering mud, 



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rain, and darkness. The company and its captain mutually lost each other, and 
another officer, separated from the command, spent unavailing efforts and hours, 
following the misinformation supplied by the M. P.'s. Morning found the company 
disposed on a hillside, in close proximity to a pile of abandoned German ammuni- 
tion, on whose wicker cases two officers lightheartedly slept. In a shell hole to 
the left twelve Americans had been freshly buried. Over the closely shell pitted 
area, under the torn remains of an ancient orchard, trenches and entanglements 
straggled. Under the lee of every hillside the Germans had thoughtfully left com- 
modious and strong dugouts as a refuge for any pioneer afflicted with insomnia on 
the occasions of a Boche aviator's visit. Company "K's" contribution to the cause 
of Democracy consisted of an ammunition dump, filled almost before completion, 
and a hospital site, together with assistance in re-establishing a railhead and switch 
yard. 

On October 20 Lieuts. Moyer and Maris with a hundred men of the first and 
second platoons were sent to Charpentry to build a second ammunition dump. They 
established their kitchen cosily in a shattered church with its steeple rakishly askew, 
the officers occupied dugouts, and the detachment pitched shelter tents on a sheltered 
hillside. Here the company came nearest to being under fire. No casualties re- 
sulted, though shell-bursts in the vicinity of the work were not infrequent. At 
Charpentry also occurred the only case of "missing" in the annals of the company. 
Corp. Lawrence Brown disappeared one agitated night, and after a period of missing 
was reported as passing through the triage of the Forty-second Division suffering 
from a gunshot wound in his left hand. The mystery of his disappearance and 
wounding has never been explained. At Varennes and Charpentry the company 
celebrated, prematurely as later appeared, the signing of the armistice and the com- 
ing of peace. The expenditure of ammunition and burning of signal lights was on 
a scale commensurate with the joy of the troops. 

The temporarily stationary lines surged northward on November 1, and as usual 
the Pioneers moved in consequence. On November 10, Company "K" was ordered 
to move "three kilometers" to St. Juvin and there meet a guide to the next camp. 
The three kilometers became on translation eight miles on the American scale, and 
at St. Juvin the company was directed to continue to Grand-Pre — the farthest north 
for the company — on the northern edge of the Argonne forest. In Grand-Pre the 
company found quarters in the spacious rooms of Chateau Ste. Marguerite. The 
kitchen was placed in a birch pavillion, built in the best German style and but 
recently the scene of officers' gatherings. In the grounds, with its shell torn trees 
and summer houses, and its melancholy aspect of former beauty, were the graves 
of American soldiers. 

The house had been swept clean of furnishings and furniture by its German 
occupants, its roof was shattered, its walls broken by shells. In part payment, no 
doubt, for this damage the conquerors had constructed an addition in the nature 
of a deep, strong, and commodious dugout in which one may picture the conquerors 
taking their lordly ease and planning the operation of their subordinates, undis- 
turbed by any tinge of personal fear. 

The owner of the chateau visited his home during the stay of the company, 
accepted their hospitality in his own dwelling, manifested the deepest interest in 
the German "improvements" thereto, scorned all proffers of sympathy in view of 
the armistice terms, of which he brought the first reliable outline, and dug from 
the grounds in thrifty French fashion an amount of money and treasure sufficient 
to make the late German tenants commit "hari kari" when they learn of it, as one 
trusts they may right speedily do. 

The assignment at Grand-Pre to road work was comparatively light, for the 



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roads had been well kept under German control and had suffered little on their 
retirement. The region round about was liberally strewn with the debris of battle 
and it was possible to read on the ground the story of the changing fortunes in 
that field. Here were seen the first unburied dead, French, Algerian, and German. 
One records thankfully that no American unburied were found. But the retreat 
and pursuit were too rapid from this point northward to permit of a thorough 
mopping up of the field. In Grand-Pre, after the armistice, the Pioneers for the 
first time in the period of their active service were granted a Sunday holiday, a 
respite well earned and thankfully received. 

The signing of the armistice and the subsequent rapid forward movement ef- 
fectually separated the 805th Pioneers from the First Army. On November 19, 
Company "K" moved back to the familiar shell holes of Varennes and on November 
26 went into winter quarters at Very. This village takes first rank in the "best" 
destroyed French towns known to Company "K." Of the buildings which before 
the German occupation sheltered 800 people a scant half dozen in various stages 
of dilapidation remained. The church was represented by the graveyard, its stones 
had been used for various repairs in the shell broken roads. In the months spent 
at Very no civilians were seen save a few chance visitors, no church bells were 
heard, no domestic animals were seen or heard; all the customary sights and sounds 
of civilization were absent. 

The environment was a waste of destruction and desolation, seamed with 
trenches, pitted with shell holes, hideous with barb wire entanglements, and grue- 
some with its thick sown crosses over the American dead. Here Company "K" 
spent the months to March 8. The military settlement was increased by the 
coming of Major Cowley and his official family, and later by the advent of 
Company "C" of the Third Corps Artillery Park. The can^p consisted of adequate 



f . 





COMPANY "K" AT CUxNEL. 
Captain A. C. Woodruff is at the head of the column. Lieut Waher Brenneman is at the 
left, and between is Lieut. Chas. E. Persons. 



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American-built tar paper barracks and abundant space. It was carpeted thick with 
salvage and built on the undisturbed ruins of Very. However, the barracks were 
fortunately small and the twenty man family became standard. Extensive improve- 
ments were undertaken. The salvage was removed, the grounds policed, ruined 
walls leveled, and the stones utilized in laying down a complete system of walks. 
The truck company gave expert assistance in establishing a bath house, utilizing 
the waters of the Aire river, and later in re-establishing the German electric 
plant deriving its water power from the same source. After these labors the camp, if 
not homelike, became habitable and, remembering that the company had sheltered 
in "pup" tents save for the Grand-Pre interval, it seemed at least comfortable. 
Wood was plentiful, and the Germans kindly furnished stoves from the numerous 
dugouts of the Hindenburg line. 

The work assigned the company was the salvaging of the triangle of territory 
whose vertices were Varennes in the south, Montfaucon on the northeast, and Apre- 
mont on the northwest. The ten square miles of territory included within these 
famous boundaries had witnessed some of the severest fighting of the Meuse-Argonne 
oflfensive. A single division which fought from Cheppy to the line of Apremont 
required for the refitting of the remaining men 150 three-ton truck loads of 
ordnance and quartermaster property. And Company "K" testifies that all of those 
450 tons, doubled by the equipment of the dead and wounded, was certainly left 
on the ground. Large contributions to the job had been made also by other 
divisions and by the defeated Germans. In addition were vast quantities of ammuni- 
tion, including a complete artillery dump, and spent shell cases. On this ground 
were carloads of engineer material, railroad supplies, sheet iron shelters in the 
abandoned camps, and barb wire of German and American origin. 

From the area the company salvaged over fifty pieces of captured German 
artillery and hundreds of wheeled vehicles, wagons, watercarts, and caissons. The 




Albert A. Stevens, explaining to his fellow soldiers why he was joining the Church, and 
urging them to do likewise. Baptismal service 811th Pioneer Infantry, Companies "F* 
and "K," 312lh Labor Battalion. Service conducted by Chaplain Edward C. Kunkle, 
U. S. Army, and Orrington C. Hall, Colored Y. M. C. A. Secretary. Rochefort-Sur-Mer, 
Charente-Inferieure, France. January 26, 1919. 



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painful story of the struggle to salvage this territory in the face of literally con- 
tinuous rains, driving worn out trucks over all but impassable rqads, will be com- 
pressed into the statement that the toil was completed and the territory left clean. 

Outstanding events to break the monotony of the life at Very were few. Civilians 
drifted back chiefly to dig in the ruins seeking wine vaults and buried treasures. 
Singularly enough, these visitors met a fair amount of success. The early bird 
caught the wine. Titles were uncertain and knowledge of location obviously 
intimate. One can imagine the chagrin of the German masters if they could know 
what opportunities for loot escaped them. The returned French were rather a 
problem. They expected bed and board at the officers' table. The climax came 
when one ancient dame surreptitiously bunked her horse with herself in the com- 
pany infirmary. Thereafter instructions in American customs were issued all visitors 
on arrival. At Very, also, the company made its first capture of Germans. It 
is recorded that Company "K" took a total of two Germans during its period of 
active service. The captured Huns were turned over to the prison camp at Varennes 
and receipts received. 

The fresh beef supplies failed to arrive, and the quartermaster passed out 
"corned willy" for Christmas dinner, but the kindness of Base Hospital 42, 
who loaned a quarter of beef, prevented this truly doleful threatened catastrophe. 
The company sustained its reputation as a "go-getter" by drawing thirty-seven pounds 
of the total forty-eight pounds of the much advertised American Expeditionary 
Forces candy which reached the ration dump at Varennes. This was the first 
to reach the company. The Y. M. C. A. furnished a much appreciated Christmas 
gift, and with the addition of tobacco from the company stores, the men of the 
company received their Christmas stockings on time. As much can not be said for 
the Christmas boxes which drifted in through January and February. For the 
officers, under the leadership of Major Cowley, battalion pistol competitions were 
arranged by each of the companies in turn. In these contests Lieut. Frankenberger 
attained fame. 

The history of the company subsequent to Very days may be briefly recited. 
On March 8 the move to Cunel began. Here the stay was brief but long enough 
to build a complete company camp, comprising five buildings and accessories. The 
assignment was to the Grave Registration Service. On March 27, the company 
moved to Brieulles, where it entrained next morning in company with Companies 
"F* and "L." The destination of Company "K" was Bourmont, Haute-Marne, thus 
coming full circle into its first home department. Here some weeks were spent in 
pleasant populated surroundings and adequate barracks, in salvaging barracks, road 
work, and filling trenches. Late in April the long awaited and much desired orders 
came for movement to Brest. On April 27 the company marched to Liffol le Grand 
under Major Cowley, without incident, and on April 30 were billeted among the duck 
boards of Camp Pontanezen. 

Of the original 237 men who embarked with Company "K" from the United 
States, 205 arrived at Brest April 30, in that organization. Ten had been transferred 
to other companies of the regiment, mainly as musicians to the band and as truck 
drivers to the supply company, and were still with the regiment. Twenty-two were 
admitted to hospitals and not returned to the company; Two of these men, Pvts. 
Ernest Walker and Edward Thomas, have been reported deceased. Two were sent 
back because of accidental injuries incurred in line of duty. Some half dozen 
have been reported happily back in the U. S. A. Two periods of exceptionally 
heavy losses may be noted. The first was at Rolampont, when the unseasoned trooos 
"flopped" in the mud and endured the raw, wet climate of the region. A dozen 
hospital admissions date from this period, and nearly every officer and man suf- 
fered in some degree. The second period was during the stay of the detachment at 



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Charpentry, where the water supply was mainly responsible for the numerous 
hospital cases, and for unknown reasons the men sent were invariably permanent 
losses to the company. With these exceptions, the health of the company was 
good, even excellent, as the record of 215 of the original 237 men remaining in the 
regimental rolls witnesses. 




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COMPANY "K" 



Officers 

WOODRUFF, ABRAHAM C, Captain Infantry, U. S. A 314 Beverly Court. Riverside, Calif. 

PERSONS, CHARLES E.. Firat Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 31 Alhambra Court. Columbus, Ohio 

BRENNEMAN, WALTER H., First Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A Wessincton Springs, So. Dak. 

FRANKENBERGER. DONALD, First Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A Emporia. Kan. 

MARIS, ROBERT E., Second Lieutenant Infantry. U. S. A Franlclin, Texas 



HARRIS, WILLIE 3303667 

GERARD, HORACE 3303754 

FINLAYSON, SOLOMON S 3303602 

CORE, SAMUEL C 3320734 

HENDERSON, ZEBEDEE H. . . . 3303656 

PEACH, HAYWOOD 335661 

POREE. EDGAR F 3303749 

ROUSSELL. RAMOS 33035n 

MESSIAH, JAMES A 3303755 

THOMAS, JULIUS 3303793 

BUNCH. ROBERT E 3320678 

ROBINSON, HENRY 3301140 

ANTOINE, AMACUS 3303790 

AUGUSTIAN. AUGUST L 3303730 

BAUGH, JOHN W 4262452 

BISHOP. CLARENCE ' 3320568 

COTTRELL, JERRELL 3303658 

ELLIS, SAMUEL 3303554 

HICKMAN. EMERY E 4261703 

HOLMES. HENRY 4258405 

JOHNSON, CLIFFORD L 4259868 

THOMPSON, JOSEPH E 3303772 

WALKER. CLAUDE E 4261740 

WHITE, WALTER 3303783 

BELL. CLARENCE 3320672 

BOLTON, BARNEY 4258607 

CARTER, MANZER 4258135 

GAY. JAMES 4258486 

HARRIS, CLARENCE C 3320642 

HARRIS, TEE R 4258488 

MATTINGLY, HARRY B 4258479 

WILLIAMS. GEORGE E 4258497 

CHAUVIN, JOSEPH 3303785 

FLENARD. GEORGE A 3303789 

SMITH, CHARLES 3303661 

BORNE. SERGINE 3303595 

CHAPMAN, GEORGE C 33208.'i5 

HARDIN. MACK 4261086 

PHELAN. SHERMAN 3303775 

COLLINS, RALPH E 3320689 

ABERNATHY. ORIS H 4258484 

ALLEN, SHERIDAN 3320675 

ALSTON. JAMES 3320707 

ANDERSON. AUGUST G 3320722 

ANDERSON, JAMES HOWARD . . .4258337 

ANDERSON, LUXCY 3320690 

ARTHUR, JESSE 4258465 

AUSTIN, HARRY D 3320786 

AUSTIN, HAROLD L 3320892 

AUSTIN, MARCUS M 3320852 

BAILEY, ISAAC 3320594 

BAILEY, SIBBLITT S 3320841 

BANKS. HILLIARD 42S834S 

BAPTISTE. LEE 3303795 

BARNER. BURNIA 4258341 

BEAN. CLAUDE A 3320764 

BENNETT, ARTHUR 3303568 

BERRY. ALPHONSO 3320630 

BESS. ROBERT 3303603 

BEVERLY, JAMES 4258470 

BOOKER. VENERABLE 3320741 

BOSTIC. TOM 4258143 

BOUGGESS. CHARLES L 3320614 

BOUTAN, WALLACE 3303744 

BOYD. HERMAN 33205% 

BRODNAX, JOE 3320607 

BROOKS, ABE C 4258355 

BROWN, GOLDIE 4258422 

BROWN, HENRY M. S 3320720 

BROWN JOE 3303237 

BROWN. JOHN P 4258371 

BROWN. PAUL 3303042 



Men 

First Sergeant Bayou Goula, La. 

Supply Sergeant Killona. La. 

Mess Sergeant North Birmingham, Ala. 

Sergeant 1182 Buchanan St., Topeka, Kan. 

Sergeant Sunshine, La. 

Sergeant Indianapolis, Ind. 

Sergeant 414 N. Roman St., New Orleans, La. 

Sergeant Lucy. La. 

Sergeant 2019 Iberville St., New Orleans, La. 

Sergeant Hahnville, La. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No. 27, Topeka. Kan. 

Sergeant Oakdale, La. 

Corporal 2305 Conti St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal 1220 N. Priner St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 4, Box 93A, Dow Okla. 

Corporal 127 Parallel Ave.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Corporal ...... 400 North Greenwood St., Tulsi, Okla. 

Corporal Napoleonville, La. 

Corporal 514 S. 31st Ave., Omaha, Neb. 

Corporal 119 N. 1st St., Atchison, Kan. 

Corpoiml 1211 HighUnd, Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal . . . .3811 Annunciation St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal 2016 Charles St., Omaha, Neb. 

Corporal 1623 S. Liberty St., New Orleans. La. 

Corporal 227 Dakota St., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Corporal 1120 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal 1913 N. 6th St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Corporal 127 Tyler St., Topeka. Kan. 

Corporal Eudora, Kan. 

Corporal R. F. D. No. 4, Holly Grove, Ark. 

Corporal 903 E. 8th, Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal 926 Charlotte St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Mechanic 2217 Denver St., New Orleans, La. 

Mechanic 1311 S. Johnson St., New Orleans, La. 

Mechanic 2301 St. Anthony St., New Orleans, La. 

Cook Edgard, La. 

Cook Bonner Springs, Kan. 

Cook Louisburg, Tenn. 

Cook 1710 8th St., New Orleans, La. 

Bugler 1003 Shoemaker Ave., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private 2363 Market St.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 1224 N. Washington St., Chanute, Kan. 

Private 144 S. 24th St., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Topeka, Kan. 

Private 220 Troup Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 326 S. 8th St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 1605 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Burlingamc« Kan. 

Private 2222 Fillmore St.. Topeka. Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Pawnee, Okla. 

Private 2525 N. 7th St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 616 N. Everest St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Private 554 Lydia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1213 Howard St., New Orleans, La. 

Private I7I2 Campbell St.. Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1416 Van Buren St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Burkeville. Texas 

Private 742 Oakland Ave., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private 301 W. Helm St.. BrookBeld, Mo. 

Private 1527 Lydia St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 919 .^dams St., Great Bend, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 8. Nashville, Tenn. 

Private 315 Parallel St., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private Plattenville, La. 

Private 1612 N. 2nd St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 2042 N. 4th St., Kansas. City, Kan. 

Private 828 N. Santa Fe St.. Wichita, Kan. 

Private 3tl9 E. 19th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1739 Woodland Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Bossier City, La. 

Private Cedar. Okla. 

Private Pinewood, La. 



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BROWN, YANCY 4258440 

BURNETT, JESSE 3320806 

BURNETT, OSCAR 3320728 

BURTON, LOUIS 3320659 

BUSH. JOHN 4258342 

CAMPBELL. MATTHEW 4258509 

CARMONS. NONIE 3320693 

CARTER. HENRY 3303103 

CARTER, LEVERETT 3320880 

CARTWRICHT, EARL L 4259757 

CLAY, EDWARD 4258480 

CLEAVER. ISAIAH 3320902 

CLOYD, ISAAC T 4258357 

COLDMENS, DOUGLAS 3320603 

COLEMAN, LUTHER 3320798 

COLLLNS. FRED 3320848 

COOK. WILLIAM F 3320836 

COTTON, BURNIE 3320680 

CRAIG. HENRY 3303722 

CRAWFORD, BENJAMIN F. . . . 3320810 

CRAWFORD, HENRY 3317651 

CUMMINGS. OSA 4258449 

CUNNINGHAM, FRANK 3320751 

CUSHMAN, LOVE 4258332 

DANIELS. LAWLER P 3303634 

DAVIS, CAKL R 4258935 

DAVIS, CLEVELAND 3320815 

DAVIS, ISAAC 3320551 

DAVIS, JAMES 3303182 

DENNIE, AARON 3320860 

DOUGLAS. SAM 3303646 

DOZIER, CHARLES 3320715 

DUNCAN, WINSTON 3303186 

DUPREE, ARCHIE R 4258459 

DYKES. FRANK 4258338 

EAGLESON, JAMES L 4258517 

EDMONDS, ARTHUR 3320831 

EDMONDS, JIM 3320896 

ENYART, BIRT 4258474 

E SEX, HOUSTON 3320616 

EVANS, DROYD 4258435 

FIGGINS. LEON US 4258420 

FISHBACK, JOHN C. Z 3320637 

FISHER, JACK 3320626 

FOUST, CLARENCE B 3320774 

FRANCOIS. PHILIP 3303562 

FULLER. WALTER L. 3303763 

GATEWOOD, JOHN W 4258516 

GRANT, JOSEPH H 4258463 

HANNON, GILLESPIE R 3320838 

HARRIS, JAMES A 4258368 

HARRIS, NOBLE 3320684 

HAWKINS, IRVIN 4259555 

HILL, ARTHUR 4261800 

HILL, CHARLES 4259776 

HILL, ELMER 4258535 

HILL, FLETCHER 4258583 

HOARD, HENRY J 4258372 

HOSKIN. IKE 4258525 

HOUZAH, LONDON 3319953 

HUBBS. AMBROSE 3303678 

HUFF. CHARLES A 4258485 

JAMES, CHARLEY 3303633 

JOHNSON, JOHN D 4258502 

JORDAN, SHERMAN 4258438 

JOYNER, CHARLIE 4258336 

KEMP. JAMES R 42ri9786 

KELLEY, HOWARD 4258539 

KINGSBURY. HAROLD 4258493 

KINNEY. BENJAMIN 4258558 

LEE. NED C 4258431 

LEWIS, GUS 3303741 

LUCKEY, SIDNEY 4258457 

MACK. PEARL W 4258510 

MANSION, HENRY A 3303672 

MILLER, WILLIE 3303709 

MOKFETT HENRY C 4258*02 

MONTEGUT, LUKE 3303774 

MURRAY. SHERIDAN 4258339 

O'NEAL. CLARENCE ...... 3319893 

PAGE. CORNELILS 4259887 

PIERSON. ISAAC 4258401 

REED. THOMAS 4258403 

REYNOLDS WALTER 3319834 

RICHARDSON, EDWARD .... 4258406 

RICHARDSON. HERSIE 4259709 

ROBERTS. GILL 4258560 

ROSS. OTTO 3319792 

ROYSTON, CHARLEY 4259726 



Private 1122 Belvedere St., Kanaa* City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Oskalooaa, Kan. 

Private Oakaloosa, Kan. 

Private 15ih & Cherokee, Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private 200 Silver Ave., Argentine, Kan. 

Private White Cliff, Ark. 

Private Strong City, Kan. 

Private Boguechetto, Miaa. 

Private Garden City, Kan. 

Private 1323 Garfield St., Kanaas City, Mo. 

Private 506 Clairmont St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Garden City, Kan. 

Private 309 N. 2nd St., Kanaaa City, Kan. 

Private 1610 N. 4th St.. Kansas City. Kan. 

Private ' . 1810 Locust St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1003 Sumac Ave., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private 117 Avenue E. West, Hutchinson, Kan. 

Private Oskaloosa, Kan. 

Private 1927 Iberville St., New Orleans. La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1. Aberdeen, Misa. 

Private 1532 Morgan St., St. Lonis, Mo. 

Private 228 N. Ist St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 2015 Metropolitan Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 1109 E. 16th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Plaquemine, La. 

Private Marshall, Mo. 

Private 1751 S. 21st St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 314 New Jersey St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Elmore, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Crescent, Okla. 

Private White Castle, La. 

Private 561 S. 3rd St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private De Bidder, La. 

Private 129 N. Monroe St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 724 Lines St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 1137 Boawell St., Tokepa, Kan. 

Private 1324 Van Buren St.. Topeka, Kan. 

Private Mooreville. Miss. 

Private 2005 Terrace Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Dunlap, Kan. 

Private 705 Walker St.. Kansas City. Kan. 

Private 1036 Mississippi St., Lawrence. Kan. 

Private 2044 Tennessee St.. Lawrence, Kan. 

Private 31 N. 2nd St.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 442 W. 8th St.. Winfield, Kan. 

Private Donaldsville, La. 

Private 318 N. Priner St., New Orleans, La. 

Private 1717 Lydia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1716 Euclid Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 505 Bigger E. Hutchinson, Kan. 

Private 537 Campbell St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Cottonwood Falls, Kan. 

Private ,. . Lexington, Mo. 

Private Fayette. Mo. 

Private 1635 Broadway, Denver, Colo. 

Private 577 Troost Ave., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 609 Oak St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1108 E. 4th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Ferriday. La. 

Private Fitlers, Miss. 

Private Plaquemine, La. 

Private .... 802 Independence Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Plaquemine, La. 

Private 106 Madison St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 709 Independence Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1107 East 16th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Guthrie, Mo. 

Private 715 Independence Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 44 Ewing St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 1607 Tracy Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Holton, Kan. 

Private 814 Dcslonde St.. New Orleans, La. 

Private 603 . Colorado Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 727 Lime St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 1023 N. Liberty St., New Orleans, La. 

Private Napoleonville, La. 

Private 724 Charlotte St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1306 St. Claude St.. New Orleans, La. 

Private 2337 Ruby Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Mayersville, Misa. 

Private Harrisonville, Mo. 

Private 420 E. 6th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 809 Pacific St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Red Lick. Miss. 

Private Revess Station. Muskogee, Okla. 

Private 1110 West Kennedy St., Kokomo. Ind. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Luther. Okla. 

Private Cannonsburg. Miss. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Clinton, Mo. 



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RUCKER, FAY 4258439 

SARVER, EDWARD 4258490 

SCATES, ELIJAH 3301234 

SHELTON, ARGELL S 3319646 

SIMS, JAMES 4258424 

SIMS, SIMON 4258762 

SMITH, CICERO 3303691 

SMITH, WILLIAM M 3323583 

SUTTON. LOUIS 4258613 

SWINDELL, LAWRENCE E 4258376 

TAYLOR, ABRAHAM 3303575 

TERRELL. CLARENCE 4258396 

THOMAS, WALTER C 4258536 

THOMPSON. NATHAN 4259892 

TOOLEY, BOYD 4258419 

TURNER, WILLIAM J 4258482 

WALKER, ALEXANDER 3303596 

WALKER. WILLARD E 4258410 

WALKER, WILLIAM 4258444 

WALLACE. JOHN 4258986 

WATTS, SAMUEL 3303629 

WEST, SAMUEL 4258413 

WHITE, LEWIS 4261754 

WHITE, MANUEL 4261756 

WHITWORTH. WILLIAM 4258334 

WILEY, OREION M 4258498 

WILHOITE, FRED 4258646 

WILLIAMS, CLAYTON 4258775 

WILLIAMS, JOEL A 4258578 

WILLIAMS. NATHANIEL .... 4261843 

WILLIS, KEITH R 4258417 

WILSON. IVORY 4261793 

WILSON. JOHN T. W 4258409 

WINSTON, SAMUEL L 3303662 

WOODS, ARTHUR P 4258543 

WOODS. EDWARD 4258489 

WOOLERY. EDGAR H 4258937 

WRIGHT. DOZIER 4258508 

YOUNG. GEORGE 4258506 



Private 413 GHUm St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private 1724 Holmes St., Kansaa City, Mo. 

Private Oak Ridge, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 32. Ferguson, Mo. 

Private 1019 E. 5th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 575 Harrison St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private St. Gabriel, La. 

Private Cuero, Texas 

Private 420 E. 6th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 715 Independence Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Reserve, La. 

Private 1015 E. 5th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Van Buren. Ark. 

Private Pleasant Hill, Mo. 

Private 1404 Cliff St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 724 Campbell St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Dow, Okla. 

Private 912 Independence Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 563 Campbell St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 810 Bumville St., Springfield, Mo. 

Private Main St., Plaquemine, La. 

Private 609 6th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private CarroUton, Mo. 

Private 305 E. Elm St.. Fayette, Mo. 

Private 1111 E. 8th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1320 E. 16th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 809 W. Wea St., Paola, Kan. 

Private 819 E. 10th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4. North Topcka, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Chariesion. Mo. 

Private Bristow, Okla. 

Private R. F. D. No. 38, Bridgeton, Mo. 

Private 1747 Terrace St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Plaquemine, La. 

Private 25th & Madison St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 23 Madison St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 364 W. Marion St., Marshall, Mo. 

Private 2935 W. Prospect Place, Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 604 Oak St., Kansas City, Mo. 



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Company **I/' 3rd Battalion, 317th Infantry, 80th Division, returning from the front aftpr 
their great feat. St. Juvin, Ardennes, FVance. November 9, 1918. 




«^ 




6th Field Artillery, Isl Division, advancing. Baulny, Meuse, France. October 4, 1918. 



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By First Sgt. Joseph A. Thornton 

THIS company was composed of drafted men from the states of Kansas, Missouri, 
and Louisiana. The first of these men were those of the June draft of 1918. 
They were from the state of Louisiana. Their arrival at Camp Funston, Kan., 
June 22, 1918, and subsequent assigament for duty at Detention Camp No. 2 
was the beginning of Company "L," 805th Pioneer Infantry. 

In its infancy this company was known as Company "L," Second Provisional 
Regiment (colored), 164th Depot Brigade. It numbered four officers and 250 men. 
The first duty of the officers was to classify the men for the different branches 
of the service for which they were fitted. Their object was to call out the men 
that were unfitted for any service whatever and to see that they were discharged 
and sent home so they would be out of the way. This being done, the remainder 
were classified after physical and mental examinations into three classes — overseas 
combatant, overseas labor, and domestic labor. After this work had been com- 
pleted. Company "L", 805th Pioneer Infantry, was organized July 15. 1918. with two 
officers and fifty-two men as "overseas combatant." 

With 2nd Lieut. Sidney B. Outlaw in command and 2nd Lieut. James M. More, 
the company marched to Camp Funston, a distance of about six miles. 

This was the first real step toward transforming the raw recruit into the 
strong, sturdy soldier. They were taught the godliness of cleanliness, the value of 
their health and physical well-being to the government and to themselves, and 
most important of all, obedience to orders of their superiors. The value of this 
training, as a contributing factor to the efficiency of the company, has w«^ll borne 
its fruit. 

The move to Camp Funston proper put new life into the men. They were no 
longer awkward "rookies." The change may be likened unto a bunch of kiddies 
being promoted to a higher grade in school. Then, too, the living conditions were 
better. The earthen floors were covered with wood, and instead of tents the men 
were housed in good, substantial wooden structures. Canvas cots were replaced 
with iron spring beds; candles had been relegated to the past. 

However, the realization of the purpose for which they were here had not been 
sufficiently impressed upon them. A new day had dawned. The drill grounds 
of Funston were located upon the tops of the hills that surround the camp. There 
the company marched twice a day, morning and afternoon, for the purpose of in- 
struction in drill and minor tactics of warfare. The men were awakened to the fact 
of a real purpose — to help right prevail. 

In the month of August there were assigned to the company 137 recruits from 
the state of Kansas. This addition brought the company strength up to 189. In 
the same month, August 10 and 12, Captain Herbert M. Nelson, 1st Lieuts. Thomas 
P. Gallagher and Ralph A. Patton, and 2nd Lieut. Michael J. King were assigned 
to the company and reported for duty. To the men, new officers implied an im- 
mediate departure for overseas. 



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Each day the requirements were greater. The brevity of time and seriousness 
of the situation overseas demanded that the men be developed to the highest grade 
of efficiency. 

Between August 21 and 27 there were added to the company forty-five recruits. 
Its strength was now 234 men and six officers. With this number it began the 
journey toward the Atlantic coast. 

The night of August 27 was quite eventful. The men realized that they would 
be separated from home, country, and loved ones for a long period. A spirit of 
sadness filled the air. Notes of sadness from many voices united in one harmonious 




chord. They were bidding farewell to the wheat fields of Kansas, the cane farms 
of Louisiana, to homes and loved ones. At 11:45 p. M. the men entrained at Camp 
Funston, Kan. They traveled four days, within which time they crossed seven states. 
To the majority the journey was an education in itself. Many had not seen the 
numerous manufacturing cities of the East, the industrial centers of the United 
Stales. The activities around the large and spacious harbor of New York had a 
marked effect in impressing them with the great foreign commerce of their coun- 
try. The Goddess of Liberty inspired them with the ideals of the government. 
Their determination became dogged. Their love of liberty was as fixed as the 
statue which symbolized it. 

On the night of August 31, at 11:00 P. M., the company arrived at Camp Upton, 
N. Y. There the men experienced several minor inconveniences. Candle and 



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sperm light appeared. Canvas tents again sheltered them from the damp atmosphere 
coming from the Atlantic ocean. Mother earth seemed to have prepared herself 
with a soft padding of sand. Their rest was peaceful. The sweet lullabies of the 
mosquitoes were very enchanting. The audience was respectful. "Attention" was 
the order. 

The next day all the men were fitted out with new clothing and fully equipped 
for overseas service. The rapidity with which the company was equipped at Camp 
Upton gave occasion for thought. The company entrained at 3:00 a. m., Septem- 
ber 2. Where was it going? Surely not overseas, for it was leaving the greatest 
harbor in the world, the place of departure for the majority of troops bound over- 
seas. One day's travel brought it into a strange country. En route the men 
came in contact with a foreign tongue. The customs and usages of the people 
were new. The people were French Canadians, for we crossed the line into Canada 
the night of September 2. 

At 11:00 A. M., September 3, we detrained at Quebec, and marched to the ship 
dock where the British transport, H. R. M. Orita, was waiting to carry us to the 
Old World. 

At 10:00 p. M., September 3, 1918, the ship left her moorings and silently 
crept down the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on out into the deep blue waters of the 
Atlantic. About four days out, trouble began. To some the world might have 
ended there and then. Seasickness became prevalent. It was a common occurrence 
for men to lie in a corner of the ship's hold for hours at a time, and it became 
necessary to watch them closely and force them out into the fresh air. Finally 
this sickness was overcome. 

There were many ships in the convoy. Our protection for about half the 
voyage was one battle cruiser. About this time a convoy that sailed from New 
York joined us, and we felt safer because of our numbers. Only a few days 
before the completion of the voyage, we awakened one morning to be told that if 
we watched we could see a fleet of torpedo boat destroyers join the convoy. From 
then until these destroyers joined the convoy, the rail was crowded. The first intima- 
tion that our new protection was near, was when the cruiser signal flags flashed 
and she started full speed ahead. The lookout had sighted the first destroyers, 
but whether friend or foe he could not tell. The cruiser had only traveled a very 
short distance when it dropped back to its original place and new signals flashed, 
for the destroyers' commander had answered the cruiser's wireless signal. This 
incident proved to us that a Hun U boat had small chance of torpedoing the ships 
of our convoy, but the addition of the destroyers was most welcome as we were 
nearing the most dangerous part of the voyage and "Old Glory" looked more beau- 
tiful than ever floating from the flag masts of our "Sea Greyhounds." Every 
precaution was being exercised. Men were not allowed to sleep below and must 
wear a life preserver at all times. Evidently the U boats did not care to expose 
themselves, for we reached Liverpool the afternoon of September 16, and the 
first troops marched onto the dock about 5:30 P. M. 

We did not tarry in Liverpool. Many wanted to make purchases, as tobacco and 
cigarette supplies of the boat had given out entirely. In making up the trains to 
carry the troops, the company was split into two sections. Lieut. Gallagher, in 
command of the first, proceeded to Southampton and marched his section to a rest 
camp about three miles from the docks, only to receive orders to feed the men 
and march back to the docks. We were thankful that they told us it was a 
"Rest Camp," for otherwise we would not have known it. The second section left 
Liverpool at 2:30 a. m., September 17, and proceeded direct to the docks at 
Southampton and was joined by the first section. During the march of the first 
section to and from the rest camp, the men were looked upon with wonder by the 



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inhabitants. They had not seen this type of American troops in such large num- 
bers. At every opportunity they engaged in conversation with the men. Some even 
went so far as to examine the different textures of hair. The variety of their 
colors was a curiosity to them. It was at the rest camp that the company lost its 
first member. Pvt. Thomas Dunn was taken sick and died the next day. It was 
the deep regret of the entire company that they could not be the ones to pay 
the final honors to "one who did his bit;" but at 6:00 p. M. the company received 
orders to embark upon the British transport, St. George. The St. George sailed 
at 8:00 p. m. and, after an uneventful voyage across the English Channel, docked 
at Le Havre at 5:00 a. m., the 18th. 

Here the company made another hike to a rest camp only to receive orders to 
entrain at 10:00 p. m. for the front. At this camp the first non-commis- 
sioned officers' warrants were handed out. The men to receive warrants were: 
Joseph A. Thornton, Gloster Knox, Harrison C. Murray, Lemuel Durley, and Guy 
Lennox. They received their warrants from Major A. D. Cowley, commanding the 
3rd Battalion. During the march to and from the rest camp, the company had 
an escort of street urchins who engaged the men in conversation. The words 
"cig-rett, souvenir, and pennie" could be heard from all sides. Also "Bon Jour," 
and "Comment vous portez-vous?" 

At 11:00 P. M., September 18, the company entrained in box cars, and Rolam- 
pont was the next stop, on September 20. If the reader will look back over the 
dates of the moves, he will see that from August 27 to Sepember 20 the company 
did not spend a night except on the move. Here it might be well to add that Com- 
pany "L," with Company "M" and Third Battalion Headquarters, was the last to 
leave Camp Funston and the first to reach France, so it was necessary to wait at 
Rolampont. In due time the other companies arrived, and the drill and instruction 
the company had been going through were continued. The supply officer drew 
additional clothing and battle equipment for the troops. 

Rolampont is a quaint, quiet village, except for the movement of troops, and 
billets not being available, the troops were compelled to camp in their shelter tents 
(pup tents) on the mud flats. This was the company's first experience of the rough 
fare of the soldier. It was hard for the men to conceive how two men could crawl 
in under a shelter tent and sleep with any degree of comfort. Men of six feet and 
over had a hard time keeping their head and feet under cover at the same time. 
One man, Sgt. Knox, clashed with his bunkie for spitting in his face, but he after- 
wards learned that it was only falling frost. The company stayed here twelve days, 
and during that time received instruction in the use of the gas mask and in- 
tensive drill in the use of the bayonet. Here also the company lost Lieut. M. 
J. King and twenty-two men. 

Influenza did everything it could to help the Hun, but all returned to duty after 
the company had moved closer to the front. 

Leaving Rolampont on October 2 (via box cars), we were awakened about 
2 A. M. the next day by the booming of heavy artillery. Flashes of fire were 
followed by a roaring, rumbling sound. It seemed as if the heavens were being 
rent in twain. The order "gas alert" somewhat demoralized the troops. Darkness 
prevailed. Those who had misplaced their masks were bewailing their predicament. 
With the coming dawn quietness prevailed. 

The company detrained and marched up the steep incline of a hill to Camp 
Bondet, which at one time was the dividing line between the French and the 
German forces. This camp provided our first introduction to the "cootie." Bar- 
racks had to be cleaned and smoked out before the troops could use them. 

During the stay here something of the frightfulness of war was revealed. 
Troops with parts of their limbs shot to pieces were being brought through Clermont 



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on their way to the hospitals. Prisoners of war were marched through the 
town. The buildings bore evidence of the brutality of the Huns. Churches were 
destroyed. The whole area bore evidence of destruction. 

Leaving Clermont 3 P. M., September 5, with Company "K," the battalion 
commander, Major A. D. Cowley, marched us about three miles to the village of 
Aubreville, and the company again pitched shelter tents, as this village had also 
been destroyed. For the next six months we lived in or near destroyed towns. This 
was the only kind there was. A naval gun of the fourteen-inch type was stationed 
at Aubreville in rear of the company's camp. Its first shot was heard about 6:00 
P. M. the next day. The shock jarred the earth. The gun was shelling a bridge 
at Apremont, about fifteen kilometers, or ten miles away. During the night of 
October 7, and many nights thereafter, the Hun paid visits with his bombing planes. 
He searched for the big gun but without success. The hum of his machine made 
one feel as if a vulture was about to swoop down. 

At Aubreville the company did its first real work toward defeating the Ger- 
mans. It was ordered to unload trains of railroad material and supplies of all kinds. 
It was here that the officers and men from the hospital at Rolampont began to re- 
join the company. Lieut. King was the most pleased officer of the company as his 
"bunkie," Lieut. J. M. Moore, rejoined the company here. 

On October 13 Companies "K" and "L" were ordered to report to the 23rd 
Engineers at Varennes. In the meantime Company "M" had joined the camp, so 
Battalion Headquarters decided to '^sit tight." The companies started on their 
fifteen kilometer hike about 1:00 p. M. The company commanders had gone ahead 
to find a suitable camp site for the troops. Lieut. R. A. Patlon, in command of the 
company, started it out by platoons. Lieut. T. P. Gallagher with the first led 
off, followed by Lieut. S. B. Outlaw, Lieut. J. M. Moore, and Lieut. M. J. King 
with the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th platoons, respectively. It was a hard, long hike. The 
troops could not use the roads on account of the heavy traffic and the danger of 
being shelled. There was nothing for them to do except to hit the fields. These 
were full of shell holes, and the continual downpour of rain added to their discom- 
fort. 

About one-fourth of the company fell by the way. When the men began to 
fall out, Sgt. Thornton was detailed to stay behind and pick up the men who fell 
from exhaustion. It would be hard to describe this march and the night spent by 
Sgt. Thornton and his men at Varennes, for each has his own version of it. At 
7:30 the next morning Sgt. Thornton found his company camped on the side of a 
hill just east of Varennes. 

At this time the armies of the American Expeditionary Forces and the Allies were 
meeting with marked success on all fronts. In order to hold the advantage gained, 
roads, railroads, and supply lines had to be maintained as a means of transportation 
and communication. This work was assigned to the 23rd Engineers, to which this 
company was reporting for duty. 

A railhead at Varennes was necessary. The proof of this was shown when by 
actual count the trucks passing one point totaled 180,000 in one day. 

The orders were for the railhead to be completed by November 1. Track must 
be laid, platforms built, and warehouses constructed. Captain Buck of the 23rd 
Engineers assigned Company "L" the task of building the platform, and the after- 
noon of the fifteenth they began clearing the ground covered by wrecked houses. 
During the night of October 30 a train load of supplies was set on tracks, and on 
the morning of November 1, trucks drove on to the platform and were loaded with 
supplies for the front lines. This sounds like a simple piece of construction work, 



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but wait. During the fifteen days there was almost continual rain. Hie men 
worked both day and night. Part of the time they ate cold sandwiches at noon and 
immediately returned to work — this to save time and complete the task as soon 
as possible for the benefit of the men in the front lines who were undergoing 
the greatest hardships. 

During the process of construction the enemy tried time after time to destroy 
the work by aerial bombs. He came close but not once did he hit his mark. 'Tritz 
will be over tonight," became a common expression. Some slept in dugouts, and 
those who were brave enough to sleep in their tents were quite frequently aroused 
from their slumber and could be seen ^'beating" it for safer shelter. However 
serious the situation, there was always some humor displayed. These were exciting 
times. Shelter tents were camouflaged with leaves and branches of trees, but the 
kitchen with its white canvas covering was quite prominent. The chief cook, a 
quaint and antiquated man anywhere between the ages of 35 and 45 years, was 
most apprehensive concerning his safety. "Dat kitchen gotta be hood-winked (camou- 
flaged). Fritz got it in for us cooks anyhow, an ah sho wants to see ma ole lady 
agm! 

Quite frequently the men went without their supper, for the approach of the 
enemy's planes would be signaled by search-lights. Then and there lights were 
put out, and the cooks left for shelter. 

The company remained at Varennes until November 21, during which time it 
repaired roads damaged by shell fire and heavy traffic. It was here that they 
celebrated the signing of the armistice. That was a happy time. Here also the 
company lost its first officer. Lieut. James M. Moore, who had recently been 
promoted from second lieutenant, was sent to the hospital for an operation. He never 
returned to us, but was sent home, and his last letter stated that he was fully re- 
covered. His loss was a sad blow, for he was an efficient officer at all times, well 
liked by the men, and to the officers he was a real "pal." 

November 21 the company moved to Romagne, about twelve kilometers north. Here 
the company stayed in dugouts east of town, until the ruins of Cunel could be 
cleaned and repaired enough to protect the men from the winter weather. Here 
they remained four months. 

The work had changed. The regiment was assigned to the Salvage Department 
of the Service of Supplies. Company "L" was assigned the area lying between 
Bantheville, Romagne, Gesnes, Nantillois, and Cunel. This area was to be cleared 
of the debris of the war. Clothing, rifles, machine guns, shells, cannon, and in fact 
all the implements of warfare were to be found in this area. 

The men were cautious, but it was inevitable that some of them should be injured. 
Pvt. Fred D. Lytle had his hand mutilated by explosion. The cause will never be 
known, as the explosive was hidden in firewood used in Lytle's quarters. Pvt. Robert 
Anderson and Pvt. Frank Sartin were severely burned by mustard gas from a 
leaky shell. 

Winter came and found the company in very comfortable quarters. Trips were 
made by truck to towns outside of the battle area, and additional supplies were 
bought. A "Y" moved into Romagne, which was only two kilometers away. This 
added to the comfort of the men, for they could purchase at any time. A "Y" 
hut was brought in, and the men of Company "L" soon had it erected. Entertain- 
ments were now possible, and everybody took a hand in furnishing something. 
Company "L" quartet, composed of Sgts. Brown and Jordan and Corps. Fulcher and 
Ross, soon became popular. Not satisfied with this, Sgt. Durley organized a Jazz 
Orchestra. Their instruments were homemade, but produced the "goods." Soon 
a piano was salvaged, and here Alphonso Holmes proved that he was a "diamond 



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in the rough." About the first of March a ball team was organized. The equip- 
ment was furnished by the Romagne "Y." 

Here I want to say a word about something that is not company history. Secre- 
tary McMehan of the Romagne "Y" deserves more credit than he will ever get. He 
worked day and night, and I have known of more than one time when he has come 
in at one or two o'clock in the morning with a load of supplies, only to start for 
another before eight o'clock the same morning. To him, many men owe pleasures 
and luxuries they would not have had otherwise, for I have never seen another 
"Y" so completely equipped. One illustration is his purchasing of eggs with his 
own money and selling them to the men at the same price as he paid. 

Cunel was the scene of another sad loss to the company. Lieut. Sidney B. Out- 
law, who was promoted to a 1st lieut. at the time Lieut. Moore was promoted, was 
transferred to Company "C." Lieut. Outlaw was the first companv commander, a 
very efficient officer, and to know him was to like him. They helped to ease the 
hurt by sending 1st Lieut. Paul V. Freed to the company. He was known to the 
officers and a welcome was awaiting him. 

2nd Lieut. George A .Williams was assigned to the company February 3. He had 
just been assigned to the regiment, and his qualities were unknown to us; but 
one month later, when he was transferred to Company "C," everybody was sorry 
to see him go. 

The day Company "L" left Cunel, Lieut. M. J. King was assigned to temporary 
duty as acting battalion adjutant. Two officers were away, on leave, and to strengthen 
the commissioned personnel of the company, 2nd Lieut. Charles Y. Martin was 
transferred to us from Company "M." He was a welcome addition. 

The company left Cunel March 27. Marching to Brieulles that afternoon, they 
entrained at 7:00 a. m. the 28th, and that night at 10:00 P. M. arrived at Liffol-le- 
Grand, Vosges, France. Here a warehouse 500 feet long and 48 feet wide was 
turned over to the company for quarters. The men built their beds and mess hall. 
Pvt. James Barrow showed his 'Vares" as a brick mason. 

While at this station, the company was inspected by the Conunander-in-Chief 

of the American Expeditionary Forces, General Pershing. His expression to the 

Company Commander showed his pleasure as the result of the inspection. ''You 

. have a fine looking company," and, "You are directed to convey my compliments 

to your company for their splendid record and appearance," he said. 

Good weather began to improve the spirits of the men. Athletics began to 
thrive. Every man competed in the All Point Company Championship. Some 
men who were temporarily crippled hobbled through the courses by the aid of 
canes. Following this, twenty men were sent to the S. 0. S. athletic meet at Dijon 
and then to Le Mans. At Dijon, Sgt. Durley won the 120 yard high hurdles, Walter 
Perry took second in the 220 yard dash, and Corp. William Hudson jumped nine 
feet three inches and took second in the standing broad jump. The tug of war team 
pulled all teams off the field. 

At Le Mans the company did not do quite so well, but was competing against 
the record holders of the world. The spectacular feat of the entire meet was the 
defeat of Company "L" tug-of-war team after a pull of over four minutes. 

Company "L" lost another officer while at this station. Lieut. Paul V. Freed 
was transferred to Company "C." To express the feeling of the officers and men 
at this loss, it is only necessary to repeat what has been said of other officers. 

\ great and glad surprise came to the company in form of an order to proceed 
to Brest, France — Brest, that most important city in the American Expeditionary 
Force«^ — the city from which departure meant home. 



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COMPANY "L' 



Officers 

NELSON. HERBERT M., Captain Infantry U. S. A 1605 E. 35th St., Kanaaa City, Mo. 

PATTON. RALPH A., Firat Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A 4 Hazel Court, Mason City, lows 

GALLAGHER, THOMAS P., First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Junction City, Kan. 

MARTIN. CHARLES Y., Second Lieutenant Infantry, Albermare, La. 

KING, MICHAEL J., Second Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Parkinson Hotel. Okmulgee, Okla. 



THORNTON, JOSEPH A 3303838 

KNOX, GLOSTER 3304001 

MURRAY. HARRISON C 3303892 

AMBROSE, FELIX C 3303889 

BROWN, OLIVER 3304018 

DELONDE. JOHN 3303905 

DURLEY. LEAMANUEL 336168 

FORBES. GEORGE L 4258178 

GRAHAM, ALFRED J 3303834 

HARVEY, WILUAM C. R 4261709 

JACO, COLIE 3320718 

JORDAN. JAMES 3320858 

LENNOX, GUY 4258538 

McPIKE. CHARLES W 3320578 

ben, ernest 3303887 

braxton, adolph . ^ . . . . 3303900 

cole, paul a 42.58446 

cooper, charley 4259883 

cowden. eugene j 4259834 

davy, ralph 4258159 

frazier, edgar e 4261108 

fulcher, arthur m 4258294 

gentry, minus 4258264 

gibson, ben 4258207 

harvey, thomas a 4261064 

hawkins, william j 3320663 

hudson, william 3320760 

johnson, ezekiel 3303931 

jones. claude e 3320681 

kipper, harrison 4261821 

McClelland, charles j. . . . 3303803 

monroe, waldo w 3320581 

newton, alvey l 3320846 

palmer, bennie w 3320633 

pierce, maurice 4258469 

ragland, harlen 4258426 

robinson, alphonso 4258166 

ross. cl-\rence 330.3952 

sartin. frank 3303832 

saunders, charles 4261735 

simmons, henry 3303943 

white. adolph 3303888 

williams, alphonso 4259442 

duncan. henry 3303870 

daniels, john c 3303873 

hillard, manuel 3304017 

perkins. leonard 3320839 

hayden, william j 3320743 

poche. george 3303950 

anderson, robert 4258175 

bass. james 4258179 

britt, john l 4259691 

britton. daniel 4259769 

broom. benjamin 3301034 

burton, willie 4261804 

camper. george e 4261811 

cash. calvin 4258102 

cheathem. huey 4258187 

chess er. david 3303881 

earls. milton e 4261745 

edwards, jarrett e 4258288 

feast. victor • . 3303846 

fisher. owens 4258266 

granson, arthur 330w46 

griffin. eldon 4261778 

harman, frank w 1169584 

johnson. fess 3303245 

jordan, george 3320761 

king, clarence 3320747 

king. theodus 3320799 

kyles, arrin 3320660 

lovell, allie 4261837 



Men 

First Sergeant 2118 Conti St., New Orleans, La. 

Mess Sergeant .... 116 So. Franklin St., New Orleans, La. 
Supply Sergeant .... 1209 Saratoga St., New Orleans, La. 

Sergfant 707 Lafayette St., Gretna, La. 

Sergeant 538 So. Liberty St., New Orleans, La. 

SiTgeant Kcnner, Lt. 

Sergeant San Francisco, Calif. 

Sergeant 717 C Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Sergeant New Orleans, La. 

Sergeant 108 East Coats St., Moberly, Mo. 

Srrgeant 607 East 7th St., Topeka, Kan. 

Sergeant 121 Railroad St., Topeka, Kan. 

Sergeant R. F. D. No. 1, Box 165, Harrisburg, III. 

Sergeant 842 Mississippi St., Lawrenre. Kin. 

Corporal 1132 So. Liberty St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal 2614 Cleo St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal Baxter Springs, Kan. 

Corporal Fulton, Mo. 

Corporal 813 Pine St.. Fulton, Mo. 

Corporal 809 W. 13th St., Junction City, Kan. 

Corporal 200 Oiive St., Hannibal, Mo. 

Corpora] 1419 Sauliner St., Houston, Texas 

Corporal 1224 Lincoln St., Topeka, Kan. 

Corporal 1303 Morphy St., Great Bend, K-tn. 

Corporal 522 W. 8th St., Yanktown, S. D. 

Corporal Reno, Kan. 

Corporal 406 S. Cottonwood St.. Emporia, Kan. 

Corporal 1828 College St., New Orleans. La. 

Corporal Star Route, La Junta, Colo. 

Corporal Paris, Mo. 

Corpora] 2101 Gould St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal 527 Caiifomia St., Lawrence, Kan. 

Corporal New Albany, Miss. 

Corporal 4028 Sullivan St., Rosedale. Kan. 

Corporal 728 Idaho Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Corporal 1303 Vine St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal 219 No. 8th St., Arkansas City, Kan. 

Corporal 2424 Gravier St., New Orleans, La, 

Corporal McComb City, Miss. 

Corporal 2537 Burdett St.. Om^ha Neh. 

Corporal 212 So. Liberty St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal 2912 Thalia St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal 1818 E. 9th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Cook Schriever, La. 

Cook 2212 Howard St., New Orleans. L\. 

Cook 535 Berbigny St., New Orleans, La. 

Cook 920 West 8th St., Topeka. Kan. 

Bugler Box 2W Valley Falls, Kan. 

Mechanic Jefferson, La. 

Private First Class Culbert, Okla. 

Private First Class 711 Walker Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private First Class Higginsville, Mo. 

Private Firet Class Bonner Springs, Kan. 

Private First Class Gilliam. La. 

Private First Class 311 N. Garth Ave., Columbia, Mo. 

Private First Class .... 2617 Cummings St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private First Class Howden, Okla. 

Private First Class .... Box 13. R. F. D., Seminole, Okla. 
Private First Class .... 1234 Saratoga St., New Orleans, La. 
Private Firat Class . . . .706 Holmes St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private First Class 1420 Ave. M., Galveston, Texas 

Private First Class . . . 1213 Magnolia St., New Orleans, La. 

Private First Class Sniro. OW|i. 

Private First Class .... 628 Maurice Ave.. New Orleans. La. 
Private First Clans . . . .109 No. 3rd St., Columbia, Mo. 

Private Firat Class Cameron. Texas 

Private Firat Class McDalia, La. 

Private First CIuiik . 1404 Mersington Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private First Cla«» 2220 Filmore St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private First Class Boley, Okla. 

Private First Cla^s .... 323 No. 1st St.. Kansas Citv, Knn. 
Private First Class Marthasville, Mo. 



Page 176 



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OGLESVIE. CLEAD E 3320758 

PACE. WILUE 3303830 

PETERS, SAMPSON A 3320895 

WASHINGTON, WALLACE .... 3303898 

WHITENER, CHARLES L 4259277 

ABBOTT, ROY 4258289 

ADAM, PLACID 3303925 

BACKUS, LAWRENCE 3304022 

BANKS, OLLIE 4261691 

BARNETT, WALTER C 4258273 

BARROW, JAMES 3303807 

BEATTY. HARRY 4258262 

BERGERON RICHARD 3303821 

BERRY, JAMES P 4259682 

BERRY, WILLIAM 4258389 

BISHOP, PAUL 4261855 

BLAYTON, ST. JOSEPH 4258143 

BONNER, JAMES 1 1169534 

BOYD, GEORGE D 4259843 

BROWN, WILLIAM J 4259823 

BURKLEY, LINCOLN 4261856 

CALDWELL, AUGUST 4258250 

CAVIN, ROY 4258215 

CAMPBELL, CHESTER 4258219 

CARNS, HOWARD P. C 4258249 

CHRISTMAN, TONY 4258201 

COMBS. GEORGE 4258393 

CUMMINGS, CLARENCE R 4258110 

DALLAS, JOBE 4261885 

DAVIS, JAMES E 4258125 

DILLARD. WALTER 4258197 

DORSEY, WILLIAM H 4258141 

DUNCAN, PETER D 4258131 

DYSART, CLARK 4261794 

ELLIOTT, BENJAMIN F 4258134 

ELLIOTT, CHESTER A 4258217 

ELUS, GEORGE 4258251 

ESTES, WARREN C 4258202 

FLEMING, ELMER 4258139 

FLOYD, HARRY J 4258284 

FORD, FRANK 4258117 

FULLER, ROSCOE L 4258119 

GATES, DANIEL 4258162 

GENTRY. HENRY M 4258240 

GIBSON. OVERTON 4258232 

GRANDBERRY. LEE 4258290 

GRANT, ULYSSES H 3320778 

GRAVES. LEE R 4261825 

GRAVES. McKINLEY 4261806 

GRAVES, ZACK 3320636 

GRAY, BENJAMIN 3320587 

GRAY, MERVIL A 4258467 

GRIFFIN, MACK 3320809 

GRIMES, JAMES 3320857 

HACKLEY, CHARLES L 3320673 

HAMILTON, GEORGE 3303207 

HARPER, TOM 4259695 

HARTWELL, DAVID 3304004 

HARVEKL, ROBERT 4258308 

HATTON, GEORGE M 4261830 

HAWKINS, IRVING 4260685 

HENRIE, GEORGE 3320598 

HERNDON. LUTHER 4261716 

fflCKS, HENRY 3320682 

HINDMAN, WILLIE 3319772 

HOLMES, ALPHONSO 2735831 

HOUSTON, JOHN 4258317 

HOWARD, AUGUST 3303956 

HUDSON. OTTO 3319812 

HUFF. MATHEW 3320830 

HUGHES, MORRIS 3303796 

HUNTER, DAN 3320780 

HURSTON. HENRY 3319794 

ISON. HARRY R 3303895 

JACKSON, ALBERT R 3320726 

JACKSON, ALEX 3320632 

JACKSON, EDWARD ...... 3320651 

JACKSON, GEORGE W 3320792 

JAMISON, ELLIS 4258111 

JILES, WILLIS 4258414 

JOHNSON, ANTHONY 3303945 

JOHNSON. ARTHUR 3320894 

JOHNSON, JOHN 3320617 

JOHNSON, JOHN H 4258124 

JONES, FRED B .3320627 

JONES, IRVING 3319855 

KELLEY, WILLIAM 3320612 

KENNEDY. JAMES 4258236 

KIRKPATRICK. HENRY M 3320810 



Private Fim Clau 1048 Gnnd Ave., Topeka. Kan. 

Private Fi«l Class Rosedale, La. 

Private Firat Class 1237 Buckanan St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private First Class . . . 1231 So. Thomas St., New Orieana La. 

Private First Class Appleton, Mo. 

Priv«tc 1021 Washington St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 3533 Calvea St., New Orieans, U. 

Private 636 Dersenwa St., New Orieana, La. 

Private New Franklin, Mo. 

Private 1719 No. 3rd St., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private New Franklin, La. 

Private 336 No. James St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 320 Rosbabla St., New Orleans, La. 

Private 1316 Michigan Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1856 Terrace Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 710 E. 12th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Meridian, Okla. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1. Fairfield. Texas 

Private 525 E. Jackson St., Marshall, Mo. 

Private Clinton, Mo. 

Private Vandalia, Mo. 

Private 1300 N. 3d St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 110 Troup St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 838 Freeman Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 630 Western Ave., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 2219 P St., Uncoln, Neb. 

Private 2020 Summit St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Box 13 R. F. D. No. 7. Ft. Scott, Kan. 

Private 1405 HighUnd Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 109 So. State St.. Emporia, Kan. 

Private 2044 No. 3d St.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Emporia. Kan. 

Private 1017 E. St., Emporia. Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Huntsville, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Montezuma, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2, Montezuma. Kan. 

Private 419 Oakland Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Baxter Springs, Kan. 

Private 1719 East Pine St., Ft. Scott, Kan. 

Private Hugoton, Kan. 

Private 2604 Morgan St., Parsons, Kan. 

Private 424 Ransom St., Ft. Scott, Kan. 

Private 414 No. White St., Grand Island, Neb. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Bonner Springs, Kan. 

Private 633 Garfield Ave.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 510 Nebraska Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 404 Mills St., Rosedale, Kan. 

Private Yates, Mo. 

Private 417 So. Sturgeon St., Moberly, Mo. 

Private 927 Freeman Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3, Quindaro, Kan. 

Private 619 West Gordan St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private New Albany, Miss. 

Private 429 East Euclid Ave.. Topeka, Kan. 

Private 222 No. 8th St., Lawrence, Kan. 

Private Eros, La. 

Private 300 Tatnell St., Milledgeville, Ga. 

Private 2000 Cypress St., New Orieans. La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 2. Pawnee, Okla. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1, Huntsville, Mo. 

Private 618 State St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 5, Baldwin, Kan. 

Private 6 No. 3d St.. Columbia, Mo. 

Private Tonganoxie, Kan. 

Private Anguilla, Miss. 

Private 1615 No. J Ave., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Quindaro. Kan. 

Private West Wego, La. 

Private Fayette, Miss. 

Private R. F. D. L Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private Plaqueminc. La. 

Private 906 Dakota St.. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private 1019 Spruce St., Atchinson, Kan. 

Private 1714 Saratoga St., New Orieans. La. 

Private 206 Pawnee St., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 5, Tonganoxie, Kan. 

Private Rosedale, Kan. 

Private 1020 Washburn Ave., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Buffville, Kan. 

Private 2020 Terrace St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Wallace, La. 

Private 304 Ea»t Santa Fe St., Garden City, Kan. 

Private 100 S. 9th St., Leavenworth. Kan. 

Private 2027 Coming Ave., Parsons, Kan. 

Private 416 Michigan St., Lawrence, Kan. 

Private McBride, Miss. 

Private 4021 Adams St., Rosedale, Kan. 

Private 826 Clay St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 201 East 18th St.. Topeka, Kan, 



Digitized by 



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LAWHORN, CURTIS 3320782 

LEE. MANUEL 4261799 

LEE. WILLIAM 3303886 

LEWIS. ESTLE E 3320850 

LEWIS, JOHN P 3320609 

MACE. CLAUDE 4261697 

MACK. FRED 3320811 

MACK. HUNTLEY A 3320853 

McCEE. JAKE 3320597 

McGEE. THOMAS 4258379 

McPHERSON, MARVIN 3320842 

McROBERTS. PEARL 4261857 

MARCELIN. FELIX 3304006 

MASON, JACOB 3302548 

MASON. WILLIAM M 3320817 

MATHEWS. BENNIE 3320803 

MATHEWS, ROBERT 4258513 

MILLER. HERMAN 3320730 

MILLER, JOSEPH C 3320641 

MILLER. ROY 4261878 

MITCHELL. WILLIAM S 3320615 

MONROE. CARL H 3320625 

MOREHEAD. JAMES L 3320553 

MORRIS. WYATT T 4261750 

MOTEN. ACE 4258348 

MURRAY. CODY E 4258380 

NEAL. HARRY 3320552 

NESBIT. SAM 3303213 

NEWTON. HUGH 3320849 

NORTH, THOMAS 3320759 

OSBORNE. QUINCY A 3303274 

PAYNE. CLARENCE 4261680 

PELTON. HARRY 4258531 

PENNINGTON, FREDDIE .... 3320748 

PERRY. WALTER M 3320694 

FERRYMAN. LOUIS 4258327 

PHELPS, ROBERT 4258475 

PIPES, JERRY 4261846 

POWELL, MANUEL 3320557 

RALLEN, FRANK 4261843 

REAVES, CLARENCE C 3320691 

REDMON, WILLIAM C 4261827 

RICHMOND, DAYTON 3303195 

ROBERTS, EVERETT W 4261796 

RUSSELL, ROBERT 4261862 

SAUNDERS, CLAUDE 4261748 

STEWART, LESTER 3319954 

TAYLOR. EDDIE 3319869 

THIRKLES, WELBORN 3319653 

THOMAS, ERNEST 3319990 

TOPLER, JOHNNIE 3302390 

WARREN, OSCAR 3319864 

WATSON. OCIE 4261115 

WATSON, RUSSELL A 4259720 

WILLIAMS, ALBERT 3303920 

WILLIAMS, CLEVELAND .... 3303996 

WILLIAMS, JOSEPH J 3304021 

WILSON. JAMES H 3318738 

YOUNG. LUTHER 3320662 

COOK, LEE 3303926 

COOK, WILLIAM 3304013 

HAMILTON. ED 4261089 

HOUSTON, JAMES 425a428 

JACKSON, FLOYD 3320812 

JOHNSON. FRED 4258221 

KIRKPATRICK, CARL 4258292 

LYTLE. FRED D 4258464 

McCULLUM. JOHN C 3320561 

NEELY, HARTINCE 4259626 

PITTS, YANK 4258253 

WILLIAMS, LEVI 3303998 



Private Fultoo, MIm. 

Private 24 F. West St., Hutchinson, Kan. 

Private Aineville, La. 

Private 1009 No. 7th St., Atchison, Kan. 

Private 1009 Everett St.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Parkville, Mo. 

Private 106 Madison St., Topeka. Kan. 

Private 727 Lime St., Topeka. Kan. 

Private 1904 East 11th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 332 New Jersey Ave., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private 703 Jones Ave., Garden City, Kan. 

Private Hassburs, Mo. 

Private Killoma, La. 

Private Wildville, La. 

Private 2003 Belleview Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Nuby. Kan. 

Private 810 East 3d St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 711 East 8th St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private . 631 East 8th St., Hutchinson. Kan. 

Private 757 Hill St.. Ft. Scott. Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 9, Lawrence, Kan. 

Private 527 California St.. Lawrence, Kan. 

Private 1723 Forest Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Huntsville. Mo. 

Private 1440 20th St.. Argentine. Kan. 

Private 1116 Washington St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 1324 East 16th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private McDade, La. 

Private R. F. D. No. 4. New Albany, La. 

Private 1520 So. Manning St., Winfield. Kan. 

Private Princeton, La. 

Private 9 So. 2nd St.. Columbia, Mo. 

Private 122 Cleveland Terrace, Leavenworth. Kan. 

Private 430 3rd Ave.. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 1. Lamed. Kan. 

Private 113 East 5th, CofTeyville. Kan. 

Private CoweU. Okla. 

Private 105 Ash St., Columbia, Mo. 

Private 938 So. 26th St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Mexico, Mo. 

Private 107 East Wet St., Hutchinson, Kan. 

Private CarroUton, Mo. 

Private Fordyce. Ark. 

Private R. F. D. No. 32, Ferguson, Mo. 

Private 514 West McKinley. Moberiy. Mo. 

Private 2534 Hamilton. Omaha. Neb. 

Private Mayersville. Miss. 

Private Rosedale. Miss. 

Private Lexington, Mo. 

Private Disson, Miss. 

Private Good Pine, La. 

Private Catchings, Miss. 

Private 925 N. 19ih St.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 1907 Linwood, Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Kener, La. 

Private Springridge. La. 

Private 1528 Bonvillian St., Houma, La. 

Private Water Valley. Miss. 

Private 909 Division St., Rosedale, Kan. 

Private 2208 Erato St.. New Orleans, La. 

Private 

Private 2943 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 1304 Vine St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1721 Van Buren St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 44 So. Ewing St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private R. F. D. No. 3. Box 123, Waskom. Texas 



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By Captain George B. Otte 



THIS company was organized at Camp Funston, Kan., with Lieut. Charles Y. 
Martin as company commander. It was gradually filled up until it reached a 
strength of 229 men, 228 of whom crossed the pond for service in the American 
Expeditionary Forces. On August 11, 1918, its company commander, the 
writer, took charge of the outfit, and was its commander all of the time since 
that date. He was ably assisted by a group of excellent officers, to whom is 
due any credit that this company may have received, for they were always "on the 
job'' and had only one desire. That was to make this the best in the regiment. 
To accomplish this end the officers of this company always had the able and 
unselfish assistance and counsel of the commander of the Third Battalion, Major 
A. D. Cowley, a real soldier, who was always the "older brother" of every officer 
of his command. We wish to take this opportunity to place in print our apprecia- 
tion of OUR MAJOR. 

As a part of the Third Battalion we crossed the ocean and became a part of the 
great American Expeditionary Forces, to try to do our part in the great world war. 

After unloading the Orita at Liverpool, while the men of a certain machine 
gun battalion and aero squadron looked on, we proceeded to Southampton by way 
of those inglorious English toy cars which would cause almost any American legis- 
lature to lower the passenger rate to half a cent per mile. From Southampton 
we crossed the Channel on an old freighter and landed at Le Havre, France, on 
September 18, 1918, and were marched to an alleged "Rest Camp," where we worked 
and stayed until night, when we boarded the train made up of "40 Hommes-8 
Chevaux," and were taken to Rolampont, Haute Marne, France, for a short course 
of intensive training. Here occurred the first death in the regiment, that of Pvt. 
Everett Johnson, of this company. He was buried in the little U. S. cemetery near 
Rolampont, with military honors. 

From Rolampont we proceeded to Clermont-en-Argonne, and after a few days' 
stay there were moved to Aubreville, France. Up to this time the work of this com- 
pany had consisted mostly of short spurts of military training, interrupted by hur- 
ried issuance of equipment. It seemed that at each place stopped at an attempt 
was made to see how much equipment a man could actually carry. The day at 
Camp Upton will always remain in memory as being one where bedlam reigned 
supreme, for the officers were kept busy for thirty hours issuing equipment and 
getting the men ready for foreign service. 

At last the company was ready for duty, and it was assigned to road work and 
building sidings at Aubreville, and was also set at work unloading ammunition and 
other war materials. It was engaged in this work at that place from October 6 to 
November 5, when it was moved to Varennes, and continued on practically the same 
kind of work until the latter part of November, when it was put on salvage work. 
Some air raids were experienced but did no damage. 

We lived in pup tents until December 12, when part of the company was moved 



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to Cheppy and part north of Epinonville. After six days the whole company was 
concentrated near Epinonville, where it was kept busy, rain or shine, at salvage 
work until Feb 21, 1919. Even Sunday forenoon was utilized for company inspec- 
tions, no time being given on week days for this. In spite of the constant exposure 
to the wet weather, for it rained almost every day all winter, the men kept re- 
markably well. Under orders from Regimental Headquarters, six-sevenths of the 
whole company strength was kept at work each day. 

After February 21, some time was spent in drill and school work, and on 
April 25 we moved to Dun-sur-Meuse, from which point we entrained for Brest 




on May 4. During this time Company "M" was attached to the First Battalion, 
under command of Major Patch, our own battalion having been near LifFol Le 
Grand for some time previous. The "orphan" company, as it was called by Major 
Cowley, was treated with every courtesy by Major Patch, and our short service 
with him was enjoyed; but we were, nevertheless, very glad to be a part of our 
own battalion again, which we joined at Camp Pontanezen, Brest, France. 

Although we had hoped to sail quite promptly when reaching Brest, as usual 
we were doomed to disappointment, and the men were put at all kinds of fatigue 
work, both day and night, many of the details working from 12 to 13 hours each 
shift. It was extremely trying to the patience of everyone, but like the good soldiers 
they were trained to be, the men went ahead with whatever work was given them 
to do, and performed it as well as they could. 



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COMPANY "M' 



Officers 

OTTE. GEORGE B., Captain Infantry, U. S. A Clark. So. Dak. 

CROWLEY, EDWIN K., First Lieutenant Infantry, U. .S A Leavenworth, Kansas 

ARNETT. RICHARD W., First Lieutenant Infantry U. S. A Glcndale Calif. 

MIDDLETON, HENRY H.. First Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A StonewaU. La. 

ELLIS, LEON C, Second Lieutenant Infantry, U. S. A Blue Ridge Summit. Pcnn. 



HOWARD, FRANK H 3320785 

TWAITES, HENRY A 3320826 

BLANKS. OTIS 2208538 

CROWDER, OLLIE ....... 3304136 

JONES, LYMAN H 336719 

KING. WILLIAM 2204065 

NORRIS, CHARLES E 3320619 

ROBERSON, VAUDRA 3320868 

TELLERY, BENJ. F 4258645 

LOTT, JOE N 2193977 

BRADFORD. RICHARD W 3320640 

COSTLEY, JAMES 2203798 

GRIFFIN. ARCHIE 3304156 

HOPKINS. FISHER 3304146 

JACKSON, JESSIE 2204622 

JONES. WILLIAM 3317957 

RADFORD. GEORGE H 4258230 

ROUSE, THOMAS 3320887 

SCOTT, PATRICK 3320558 

SMITH, DAVID 3304099 

SMITH, HARRY R 3320879 

STOVALL, ALBERT 3320543 

WALTON, WIRT D 3320671 

WINCHESTER. TERRENCE M. . . 3320686 

YOBER, HAZELTON 3320607 

RUTLEDGE. STEVE 3320622 

WILSON, ROBERT J 3320580 

WILLIAMS. SAMUEL 3320723 

MARTIN. EUGENE 3320654 

KITE, JIM 2208966 

MAJORS, WILUAM V 3320687 

RODGES, ARCHIE 3320806 

TUCKER, ROBERT F 4262421 

WHITE, WILLIE 1169672 

ADAMS. TOM 3304100 

ARMOUR, WILLIAM H 2209138 

BACCHUS. JOHN 3304082 

BANER, HUGO 3301182 

BELL, LAWRENCE, C 4259375 

BLAKE. CARLTON 3304121 

BOWMAN, OBIE 3320437 

BROWN, JOHN 3318220 

BRYAN, HASKALL J 3318261 

BURRELL, HENRY 3301224 

BURTON, SHERMAN 4261742 

BAILEY. HENRY 3320450 

CASTELLE, FEUX 3301117 

COTTON, STERLING 3319650 

CUNNINGHAM, ARGUSTER . . . 3317301 

DAVENPORT. GEORGE 2209161 

DAVIS. PARIS 3318065 

DOLBY, LUTHER 4258189 

DUVALL, ROBERT H 4258257 

EARLS. WILLIE 3320289 

EDWARD, CLARENCE 3301187 

FINNIE, ETHEL 4259388 

GAINES, WILLIAM J 2203809 

GRAY, LOUIS 3301284 

GRAY. WALTER 3320396 

GARRETT. JASPER 3301281 

HASKALL. OSCAR 4263287 

HALL, CLAUDE 3304084 

HALL HERBERT 4258186 

HARRIS. JOHN S 4258203 

HAGETT, SIDNEY 4259977 

HAYDEN, ALPHOUR 4261782 

HAYNES, WILLIAM R 4259174 

HENDERSON, TOMMIE 3320623 

H1CKS0N, CARL 3320646 

HILL. OLIVER 3318127 

HOCKETT. JAMES 3320522 

HUGHES. WILLIE 4259258 



Men 

First Sergeant 721 East 10th St.. Topeka, Kan. 

Mesa Sergeant Williamstown, Kan. 

Sergeant 23 Walnut St., Mobile. Ala. 

Sergeant 3233 Wabash Ave.. Chicago. III. 

Sergeant 246 East 10th St., Covington, Ky. 

Sergeant Percy, Miss. 

Sergeant .... 809 23rd St. N. W., Washington D. C 

Sergeant Garden City, Kan. 

Sergeant 1418 Euclid Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Sergeant Cloneytown, Misa. 

Corporal Quindaro, Kan. 

Corporal Pace, Misa. 

Corporal Shreveport, La. 

Corporal 1513 Hitchkiss St., Shreveport, La. 

Corporal Thornton, Misa. 

Corporal Scdalia, Mo. 

Corporal 1823 Van Buren St., Topeka, Kan. 

Corporal 1019 Hancock St., Topeka, Kan. 

Corporal 1601 E. 4th St., Fort Worth, Texas 

Corporal 617 Dryades St., New Orleans, La. 

Corporal 1011 Lime St., Topeka, Kan. 

Corporal 641 Virginia Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Corporal 823 PotUwatomie St., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Corporal 326 N. E. St., Arkansas City, Kan. 

Corporal 1046 Boswell Ave., Topeka, Kan. 

Corporal 540 Lydia Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Corporal 1624 Charlotte St.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Corporal 1157 Line St., Topeka, Kan. 

Corporal 2201 Adams St., Topeka, Kan. 

Cook College Park, Ga. 

Cook 14th and Vilas Sts., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Cook 1801 Kansas Ave., Topeka, Kan. 

Cook 603 Alabama St., Memphia, Tenn. 

Mechanic Livingston, Tezaa 

Private Timpson, Texaa 

Private Buckhead, Ga. 

Private 626 Dorgenois St., New Orleans, La. 

Private Colllnston, La. 

Private Kingston. Mo. 

Private Shreveport, La. 

Private 1951 N. 3rd St., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private Comb City, Misa. 

Private Galena. Kan. 

Private Oak Ridge. U. 

Private 219 Parallel Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 1617 N. 10th St.. Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Glenmore, La. 

Private , Plettenberg, La. 

Private Rogers/ lie, Ala. 

Private Madison, Ga. 

Private 121 E. North St., Coffeyville, Kan. 

Private Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

Private 451 Virginia Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Wilkinson. Miss 

Private Natchitoches, La 

Private N(>pdyviIIe, Mo 

Private Barlow. Miss 

Private Cheneyvillc, La. 

Private 1710 Charlotte St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Boyre, La. 

Private 802 E. Center St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Floumoy, La. 

Private 709 Oakland Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Aurora. Neb. 

Private MansBold, La. 

Private 2519 Hamilton St., Omaha Neb. 

Private Neeleyville, Mo. 

Private 441 Arkansas Ave.. Lawrence, Kan. 

Private 1027 Walker Ave.. Kansas City. Kan. 

Private Sardis, Miss. 

Private 740 Oakland Ave., Kansas City. Kan. 

Private 1709 Home St., Kansas City, Mo. 



Pag* iSl 



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HUNTER. ROY 3320474 

JACKSON, DOCK 2209183 

JACKSON. LACEY 3318094 

JACKSON, LEON 3304183 

JACKSON, WILLIAM 2203845 

JAMES. WILLIE 2204107 

JANITER, EARLY 3318107 

JOBE, HARRISON B 4258136 

JOHNSON, JACK 3320710 

JOHNSON, MARTIN V. B 3304062 

JOHNSON, WALTER ...... 4258246 

JOHNSON, WEBSTER 3318223 

JOHNSON, WILLARD 4261820 

JOHNS, ALONZO 4258309 

JO ,ES. BILLIE M 2204078 

JONES, CLONUS 3304131 

JONES, JOHNNIE 3304088 

JONES, PETER 3301135 

KELLEY, CAL 3318097 

KNIGHT, BEVERLY 3301172 

LASPY, FRED 3120629 

LEE, CLIFFORD S 4261828 

LINDSEY, FRED 3301259 

LEONARD, CLARENCE E 4261823 

LOWERY, GEORGE 3304116 

LYTLE. RALPH T 4258293 

McFARLAND, SYLVESTER .... 3318279 

McKINNIE, DUTCH 4259425 

MARSHAL, JAMES 3301127 

MARTIN, WILLIAM C 3320714 

MAY, RICHARD 4259250 

MAYHAM, WILBERT 4259403 

MINOR, CHARLES W. 4262832 

MONTGOMERY. ELMER .... 4259288 

MOORE. WALTER 4262544 

MORRISON, ALEX 3304081 

MOSELEY, MORRIS 4258214 

NASH, JOHNNIE 3318248 

MOTON, JESSE B 4262558 

NELSON. JOHN W 4258171 

NUNLEY. BENJ. F 4261788 

NUNLEY, TAYLOR 4261685 

OLIVER, JOSEPH 4258374 

PARKER, FREEMAN 4283280 

PARKER, GEORGE 4262532 

PARKER, SHERLING 4261715 

PERRY, ISH 4262496 

POWELL, PRESTON 3304123 

PRITCHELT, ROSEVELT .... 4262521 

RAY, MITCHELL 3303114 

RAMBO, TAYLOR 3303090 

REED. MACK D 3318265 

RHODES, EARL J 3302829 

RICHARDSON, EUGENE 3320716 

ROBERTS. SAMUEL 3318398 

ROBINSON. LINCOLN 5258148 

ROBINSON. WILLARD 4262787 

ROSE. LEVI 4261726 

SAUNDERS, ROBERT, R 4262H7 

SANDERS, WILLIAM 3319788 

SCOTT, DANIEL 3320757 

SIMPSON. CLARENCE 42.->8199 

SIMS, RICHARD 3915780 

SISSON, GEORGE 2204271 

SMITH, CHRISTOPHER 3320713 

SMITH, ED 3320605 

SMITH, GROVER 3320822 

SMITH, JERRY 4262477 

SMITH. TOM 3319742 

SMITH. TRUITT 3320586 

SPAULDING, JOHN 4262563 

STANLEY, ALBERT 3320602 

STARK, LLOYD S 3320721 

STEELE. THOMAS 4258213 

STEVENSON. HARVEY 3319820 

STUGAIS, WILLIAM 3320867 

STONE, ROBERT 4261807 

TAGGART, ERVIN 4261797 

TAYLOR. JOE 4261714 

TAYLOR, WILL 3303131 

TEAMER, OSIE 4258144 

TERRY. MONROE 3319761 

THOMAS, BENNIE 3303231 

THOMAS, EARL A 4259315 

THOMAS, HUGH 4258239 

THOMAS, JEFF 2201653 

THOMAS, JERRY 3303753 

THOMAS. JESSE S 4258243 

THOMPSON, JASPER 3303161 



Prirate 2044 N. 3rd St., Kanni City, Kan. 

Private 358 B Port St., AtlanU, Ga. 

Private 1102 Geycr St., Little Rock, Ark. 

Private Slireveport, La. 

Private Shelby, Misa. 

Private Greenwood, Misa. 

Private Haielhurat, Miaa. 

Private 1201 Eskridgo St., Emporia, Kan. 

Private Lombard Ave., Kanaas City, Kan. 

Private 438 S. Franklin St., New Orleans, La. 

Private 70 S. Jamea St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Balesville, Miss. 

Private 821 S. Davis St., Mexico, Mo. 

Private 46 Clinton St.. Rosedale, Kan. 

Private Greenwood, Misa. 

Private 1008 Louisiana St., Shrcveport, La. 

Private 2113 Jackson Ave., New Orleana, La. 

Private Dobs, La. 

Private 115 E. 12th St., Pittaburg, Kan. 

Private Cherryvale, La. 

Private Edwardsvillc, Kan. 

Private 11 A South 8th St., Columbia. Mo. 

Private CoUinston, La. 

Private 4017 W. Liberty St., Mexico, Mo. 

Private 909 Texas Ave.. Shreveport, La. 

Private 1651 S. Oak St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Water Valley, Miss. 

Private 1202 E. I9th St.. Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Alex, La. 

Private 1610 Mansfield St.. Winfield, Kan. 

Private 212 Clayton St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Allenville, Mo. 

Private 2102 Charlotte St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Excelsior Springs, Mo. 

Private Hutchinson, Kan. 

Private New Orleans, La. 

Private 1617 N. 8th St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Canton, Miss. 

Private Caruthersville, Mo. 

Private 403 S. 8th St., Lincoln, Nebr. 

Private Carrolton, Mo. 

Private Carrolton, Mo. 

Private Luther, Okla. 

Private VidalU, Ga. 

Private Salina, Kan. 

Private Centralia, Mo. 

Private Clarkadale, Miss. 

Private 1237 Hunter St., Shreveport, La. 

Private 1023 Morgan St., St. Louis. Mo. 

Private Colfax, La. 

Private Bivens. Texas 

Private Senatobia, Miss. 

Private 414 Lime St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Topeka, Kan. 

Private Meridian, Kan. 

Private Oswego, Kan. 

Private 310 Oakland Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 117 N. 37th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Private North Platte, Neb. 

Private Panterbum, Miss. 

Private Beaumont, Texas. 

Private Maplehill, Kan. 

Private Pueblo, Colo. 

Private Sunflower, Miss. 

Private 1017 Chariotle St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 418>^ E. 6th St., Kansas City. Mo. 

Private Monroe. La. 

Private Alexandria, La. 

Private Fayette. Miss. 

Private 126 Franklin Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private W:dn«rs, Ark. 

Private 228 N. 1st St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Grrat Bend Km. 

Private Topeka, Kan. 

Private Anguilla, Misa. 

Private 216 W. Ist St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Columbia, Mo. 

Private St. Charles, Mo. 

Private Mexico, Mo. 

Private De Bidder, La. 

Private Fort Scott, Kan. 

Private Fayette, Miss. 

Private Shreveport, La. 

Private St. Joseph, Mo. 

Private Konsas City, Kan. 

Private ... Tchula, Miss. 

Private B'voii i il '., Li. 

Private 510 W. Mill St., Independence, Mo. 

Private Homer, La. 



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COMPANY "M" 
Company "M'* on main road between Charpentry and Romagne, near Ex^lisfontaine. 
Left to right — Lieut. A. B. Reddick, Lieut. Henry H. Middleton, Captain George B. Otte, 
Lieut. Edwin K. Crowley, Lieut. Leon G. Ellis. 



THOMPSON, JESSE 3300722 

THOMPSON, SAM 4262533 

THOMPSON, GUSS 3320832 

TOLBERT, MARK 4258271 

TOLBERT, WILLIAM H 4258146 

TRICE, WILLIAM B 4261729 

TURK, ROBERT 4258112 

TURNER, JAMES 4262796 

TUTT, AUGUSTUS 4259071 

TYREES. JOSEPH 4259212 

WALLACE, HENRY H. . . . . . 4259254 

WALLS, FRANK E 4258121 

WALLER, RAY 3320595 

WALLACE, KEEFER 3303139 

WARFIELD, HARRY 4258185 

WASHINGTON, JOHN H 3303248 

WASHINGTON, HUGH 4261815 

WATKINS, CICERO 2208608 

WATTS. LESLIE 4258210 

WATTS. WALTER 3320801 

WHEELER, GEORGE C 4258177 

WHITE WALTER A 4258242 

WHITE. WALTER H 3320793 

WIGGINS. SANDY 3303227 

WILLIAMS. BERT 4258130 

WILUAMS, ED 3319824 

WILLIAMS, FRED 4258142 

WILLIAMS, GENIA 3303559 

WILIAMS, JOHN A 3319771 

WILLIAMS, LEDUE 3301228 

WILLIAMS. LUTHER 4258329 

WILLIAMS, RICHARD 3320565 

WILLIAMS, ROBERT 4258176 

WILLIAMS. SAM 3318607 



Private TuIIahassce, Okie. 

Private Clarkudale, Miaa. 

Private 2040 North St., Kanaaa City, Kan. 

Private Piper, Kan. 

Private Atchiaon, Kan. 

Private 2838 Walnut St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private Fori Scott. Kan. 

Private Necleyvillc, Mo. 

Private Joplin, Mo. 

Private Liberty, Mo. 

Private Boucourt, Kan. 

Private Paxico, Kan. 

Private Eldorado, Kan. 

Private Baton Rouge, La. 

Private " Newton. Kan. 

Private Mansfield, La. 

Private Rowitsport,' Mo. 

Private 2918 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Private 814 E. I2ih St.. Topeka. Kan. 

Private 309 E. First St., Tppcka, Kan. 

Private 1037 Freeman Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private 1421 Euclid Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private 1204 W. Norria St., Topeka, Kan. 

Private Mansfield, La. 

Private 2048 Holdridse Ave., Lincoln, Neb. 

Private Anguilla, Miss. 

Private 1034 Everett St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Private Junction City, La. 

Private Fayette, Miss. 

Private Lccompte, La. 

Private 1137 Pacific St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Private Eskridge, Kan. 

Private Akron, Colo. 

Private Winona, Miss 



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WILLIAMS. WILLIE 3319916 Private 

WILLIAMS. WILLIAM 4258325 Private 

WILSON, ARTHUR A 3320608 Private 

WINROW. CLARENCE 4258114 Private 

WINSTON, JAMES 3319889 Private 

WOODARD. THOMAS 3301193 Private 

WOODS, OSCAR 3320788 Private 

WRIGHT, ALONZO E 3320610 Private 

YOUNG, OLLIE 3320571 Private 



Greenwood, Miss. 

572 Harrison St., Kansas City, Mo. 
Rosedale, Kan. 
Atchison, Kan. 
Pine Ridge, Miss. 
Alexandria, La. 
Topeka, Kan. 
Box 316, Hugo, Colo. 
1309 Pennsylvania Ave., Lawrence, Kan. 



Roster of Men who were formerly members of Company ""M" 



JOHNSON, GESCO H 3320574 

BATES, FRANKLIN J 3320407 

LOCKE, NAPOLEON 3320664 

PAYNE, SIRELOUS 4258123 

BELL, JAMES R 4261860 

MARSHALL, ED 

DUPREE. ALBERT 3304107 

FORD. LOUIS L 4263291 

JACKSON, LESS 2203501 

JOHNSON, EVERETT 3318581 

JOHNSON, CHARLIE 3320579 

JUUAN, LEWIS L 3317236 

KEYS, ANDERSON 4261431 

MARKS. CHARLEY 3301263 

NELSON, SOLOMON 4258158 

RQBBS. McKINLEY W 3318068 

RICHARDSON, LAWRENCE . . . 

STEMMONS, JAMES 3300767 

STEWART. CEPHAS 4259358 

TERRY, WILLIAM R 3320563 

THOMPSON. WILEY L 3320866 

TIVIS. RALPH W 4262772 

WILLIAMS. SOL 3319866 

WILLIAMS. WILLIE F 3320661 

WARNELL, HENRY 



Supply Sergeant . . . Transferred to Hq. Co. 805th Pion. Inf. 

Corporal Transferred to Hospital 

Corporal Transferred Hq. Co. 805th Pion. Inf. 

Corporal Transferred to Hospital 

Cook Transferred to Hospital 

Cook Transferred to Ho^ital 

Private Transferred to Hospital 

Private Transferred to Hospital 

Private Transferred to Hospiul 

Private .... Transferred to Hospital. Died Sept. 25, 1918. 

Private Transferred to Hq. 805 Pion. Inf. 

Private Transferred to Hospital 

Private Transferred to Hospital 

Private Transferred to Hospital 

Private Transferred to Hospital 

Private Hq. Co., SOSth Pion. Inf. 

Private Transferred to Hospiul 

Private Transferred to Hospiul 

Private Transferred to Hospiul 

Bugler Transferred to Hq. Co., 805th Pion. Inf. 

Private Transferred to Hospiul 

Private Transferred to Hospital 

Private Transferred to Hospiul 

Private Transferred to Hq. Co., 805 Pion. Inf. 

Private Transferred to Hospital. Died. 




mm 




General view of the Battle Field north of Fleville. The shell bursts indicate the American 
position. The fighting here was quite different from the dense forest fighting the boys had 
to do to get the Germans in the open. Fleville, Ardennes, France. October 14, 1918. 



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History of Motor Truck Detachment 




By One of 'Em. 



WHAT a piece of luck when I came across a memo to Captain Abbett the other 
day, signed by Major Bliss. Of course I knew I was snooping, but when you 
see a good chance in a million slipping by, you just can't help making a grab for 
it. Here I've been hanging around since the first of 1919, observing and making 
notes, and along comes a chance to put some dope to good use — making history. 

Well, that's what Fm going to do, for the memo read something like this: 
"Please write an account of the Motor Truck Detachment for our regimental history, 
bringing out some of the difficulties surmounted." 

Gee-whizz — ^such room for development! 

As for me, I left the Slates like the rest of you fellows, properly inducted into 
the service and assigned. In due course of time I came across the submarine pond. 
For days I didn't see daylight because of the mud, and every fibre of me ached 
from the strain. I never saw such a guy as had charge; seems to me he never 
slept. But the day I landed at the Chateau at Chatel Chehery, France, will never, 
never be forgotten, 

I saw that I was in for something novel. Just about this time, January 7, 1919, 
I believe, I had a terrible jolt and rattled along on my jog for a couple of days, and 
then got lost at the garage in one of those wild morning scrambles staged by 
the boys and another fellow who was always spoken to as "Lieutenant, Sir." Later 
I heard his name was Van de Visse. That was sure some fortunate day for me. 

After a few days Sgt. Jack Toussaint picked me up and, thereafter until January 
19, I was his constant companion. 

All of us were new to the job and had been brought together in a hurry to handle 
a large amount of transportation which had been temporarily assigned to the 
regiment for salvage purposes. Nothing went right at the start, and to add to the 
disagreeableness of a new job, cold weather had to set in to muck up affairs which 
would have have been bad enough with the best of weather conditions. Nobody likes 




■ Xr^ (Ht*4* 



THE MCmifl m/CK OCTACtlMCNT 




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to fool around with cold, muddy tools, with insufficient covering for the hands, and 
certainly much less with tools that do not fit. Then the old chapel in which the 
men were quartered was cold and the mess was not our own. Everything seemed 
wrong at first. 

The personnel of cars consisted of eight Light Delivery Fords, one Cadillac 
Touring Car, one broken Dodge Sedan, twelve Liberty Trucks, one Mack Truck, 
one Pierce Arrow Truck, and fourteen F. W. D. Trucks. 

The "Cad" was a fine boat, but I sure got tired of the care they gave her; the 
Dodge was the Commissioned Officers' first car in France and had done her duty 
under the careful handling of Corp. Miller, but her ignition had burned out and 
they let her stand; the Fords, God only knows where they all came from; the 
Mack was salvaged by Company "M" and made to run by the patient endeavor 
of the officers and Pvts. Martin and Johnson of this company; the Pierce Arrow 
came from a salvage dump, and if you want the tale of grief connected with this 
junk pile you will have to get the story first hand from Sgt. Toussaint. The Liberties 
and F. W. D.'s were assigned from the Salvage Department, 1st Army battle area. 

An old barn had been prepared for a garage through the able assistance of 
the Headquarters Company officers and men, and gave good shelter for the cars, 
but the trucks had to be parked outside for lack of room. 

The real job was ahead, for there were more trucks than drivers, and only a 
few mechanics to keep them running. Sgt. Toussaint, who was made acting "Top," 
had a hard job, I can vouch for that; but Corps. Boddy, Peten, and Kennedy, 
who guided the repair work, had a much harder one. No tools or machinery were 
at hand, nor could they be procured. Of course you all know that a pioneer 
organization does not usually have so many cars and trucks, and somebody over- 
looked the repair question. However, Lieut. Van de Visse started salvaging and 
collected some of the necessary first aid tools, burkets, etc. 

During one of the exciting mornings when Sgt. Toussaint was endeavoring to 
get the cars out on time, with cold engines, carburetor trouble and gassing up, I 
got misplaced. But on January 25, Captain Abbett came walking through the 
garage and picked me up and pocketed me on the spot. During the day's conver- 
sation I concluded that we had a new boss. 

More men must be had, and the officers devoted considerable time in going to 
companies of the regiment, procuring men, and organizing a detachment according 
to regulations laid down for a truck company. 

Then came the question of barracks for the new men. An old residence near 
the garage was cleared out, shell holes repaired, and this building from that time 
on was called home by the boys of the Motor Trucks. Certainly none of the boys 
will ever forget Corp. Snyder, for he had to carry out all the barrack orders handed 
out by the Captain, and let me tell you right here that he had no easy job, for 
the men were out late and had to be pushed to the policing job. However, in due 
time they got a bath tub and tubs to wash clothes in, and this helped affairs con- 
siderably. 

I often heard the officers say that some of the companies had played a trick on 
them and sent men to drive cars who didn't know a hammer from a monkey wrench. 
I hardly believe that they meant this, but just on principle they started a school 
to help educate the boys on motor diseases and first aid. Many of the drivers used 
to yawn through that hour of night school, and I know that they would have gone 
to sleep if they had not been compelled to stand up most of the time. 

Repairs were hard to get, but Blacksmith Moultry performed miracles at his 
forge and was able to keep ahead of breakages by putting in long hours. Tools 
had to be made, and those on hand had to be worked over so as to fit special parts. 



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On March 10, 1919, the F. W. D.'s were turned over to the Motor Transportation 
Corps, and life took on a brighter aspect. 

With early spring and the appearance of our smudge pots, Lieut. Van de Visse 
left for school, and Lieut. Barton took his place. 

About this time, for reasons unknown to me, for I was able to catch only bits 
of conversation and get a glimpse of memoranda now and then, a change took place, 
for we began to have daily inspections. I often heard my name called out by the 
Colonel along with the names of grease cups, cross eyes, etc., but you can wager 
I kept still. Everybody seemed up in the air, and I noticed that no transportation 
moved, and the men spent most of their time cleaning and shining cars. 




Spring had set in by this time, and every man warmed up to his job and 
took more interest in it. Every salvage dump in the country was gone through 
in an endeavor to find machinery to equip a shop, pumps were salvaged, and a 
couple of Ford engines were brought to the shop and overhauled for power pur- 
poses. In due time a wash rack was built and a good pump installed, which was a 
great help in keeping up with American Expeditionary Force regulations. Prepara- 
tions were under way for installing one of these engines in the shop so as to pro- 
duce power for a grind stone, an emery wheel, and the blower, when along came 
the good news of our expected departure. 

The day the regiment left for Brest, France, all transportation was signed over 
to the M. T. C. representative of Romagne, and with that day. May 5, 1919, the 
story of the Motor Truck Detachment ended and I was forgotten; but, if in the 
future you should reminisce, please do not forget my little part. 



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MOTOR TRUCK DETACHMENT 



Officers 

ABBETT. HENRY B., Capuin Infantry. U. S. A.. Commandinc. 

VAN DB VISSE. MARTIN. Firat Ueutenant Infantry U. S. A., Transferred March 

BARTON. WALTER E.. Firat Lieutenant Infantry U. S. A.. Assifned March 28. 



Sergeants 

TOUSSAINT, JACK 
LANE. EVERETT H. 

Corporals 

KENNEDY, WARNER 
ABBINGTON MURREL C. 
PRUITT. JOHNNIE 
STEWART, VICTOR 
PRIMMER. BEN 
SNYDER. JAMES L. 
WHITE. JAMES H. 
HICKMAN. EMERY E. 
PETERS, GEORGE L. 
BODY. WAYMAN 
SMITH, WILLIAM 
KING. JOHN C. 

Mechanics 

DAGGETT, NATT 
JONES, LEROY 
LUCAS, GEORGE W. 
MOULTRY. JULIUS 

ITagoners 

RICHARDSON. ED. D. 
SIMPSON, CHARLEY 



Men 

ROBERTSON. WADDY 
BLANTON. LAWRENCE C. 
CAMPBELL. IVORY P. 
OWENS. JESSE 
JOHNSON. LAWRENCE E. 



First Class Privates 

EARLS. MILTON E. 
JOHNSON. CLARENCE M. 
KING, CLARENCE 
OGGLESVIE. CLEOD 
PETERS, SIMPSON 

Privates 

ALLEN, ROBERT L. 
ALSTON. JAMES 
AMBROSE FELIX C. 
ASH, SOLOMON 
ANDREWS EARL 
BELL, HENRY 
CHASE, ALEX 
CHASE. EPHRAIM C. 
CRAIG, HENRY 
DADE, LUTHER 
FARRIS. CHARLEY 
FAULKS, EARSY 
FOUST. CLARENCE B. 
FREEMAN, THOMAS 



GLENN. WALTER C. 
GRANT, ULYSSES H. 
GRAY. JAMES A. 
HACKLEY. CHARLES L. 
HANNON. GILLESPIE R. 
HARRIS. OBE 
JOHNSON, EZEKIEL 
JOHNSON, JACK 
JOHNSON. WILLARD N. 
JONES. JAMES F. 
KENNEDY. JAMES 
KING, LEWIS N. 
LEE, HOWARD G. 
MARTIN, WILLIAM C. 
MITCHELL, LEROY 
MOSLEY, ELMER 
PARKS, GENERAL 
PAYNE, NATHANIEL W. 
PINDAR, RICHARD JR. 
PIPES, WALTER W. 
RICHARDSON. CLARENCE F. 
RUCKER, FAY O. 
SHACK LEFORD. OLLIE 
SHERWOOD, WILLIAM 
SYKES, ROY 
TALOR, HENRY 
TYNER. PLUMMER 
WILLIAMS, CHAUNCEY D. 
WILLIAMS. JAMES 
WISON, EMMETT 
WRIGHT, WILLIAM H. 



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History of First Battalion 



By First Lieut. Leo A. Noble 







THE First Battalion passed its days of organization with the rest of the regiment 
in Detention Camp No. 2, Camp Funston, in late June and early July, 1918. 
Major Arthur C. Evans was in command of the battalion from then until the time 
for the departure of the regiment for France. The adjutant and director of athletics 
was Lieut. Malcolm R. Ingraham. The days at Funston were hurried days of drill 
and range practice, not omitting some warm hikes. The First Battalion was the 
first of the regiment to be entrained. It moved by two trains September 26, towards 
Camp Upton, going by way of Detroit and Niagara Falls, and the scenic Lehigh 
route. The time en route was largely spent at singing and getting acquainted with 
com beef and corn beef hash, or accepting hospitality in the form of ice cream, ' 
cookies, or cigarettes from the townspeople at every stop. At Sayre, Pa., it took 
the form of a fire-hose shower-bath and swim. Then, at Upton came two days and 
nights when the oflBcers and mosquitoes stayed up to keep the men awake, during the 
issue of overseas equipment. 

But the battalion, moving again in two trains, crossed the Canadian border on 
the morning of September 2, and embarked aboard H. M. T. Haverford, at Mon- 
treal. While dropping down stream and waiting at Quebec for convoy, the bat- 
talion was introduced to boat drill and the comfortable life-preserver. Three days 
out from Quebec and just off the southern coast of Newfoundland, the Haverford 
fell behind the rest of the convoy and was ordered to return. That putting to the 
rear was in something of a storm, and the First Battalion was concerned with its 
stomach, and many an earnest prayer went up. So it was, that not until that lucky 
Friday-the-Thirteenth did the battalion again leave Quebec, and this time boarded 
His Majesty's Transport Novara, with another convoy. Sightseeing was far from 
being the objective, but the St. Lawrence was no undesirable or unpicturesque place 
to travel; and a moon-light night with an aurora borealis and distant light-houses, 
flaring at various intervals to right and left, illuminated a memorable passage through 
the Strait of Belle Isle. 

That was on Sunday night. The next morning the sun was just striking the 
last rocks off the coast of Labrador, as the battalion got its final view of North 
America. Soon afterward the convoy sailed between two good-sized icebergs and 
passed a few smaller ones. A comparatively quiet sea made an easy trip, till the 
last three days, when a strong breeze put a surface on the water that, together 
with the zig-zagging course of the ship, made sailing a little more exciting to some. 
But the much expected submarine never appeared. Landing at Tilbury Docks, 
near London, on the twenty-fifth, the battalion was taken by rail on the follow- 
ing day to Romsey, near Southampton, where it embarked on the following day 
aboard the Archangel, for Cherbourg. After a rest of two days, the battalion started 
in quest of the regiment. The routing was by way of Le Mans, Tours, Bourges, 
Nevers, Dijon, Is-sur-Tille, and Rolampont, where a stop of five days was made for 
gas instruction and issue of more equipment. 

Entraining again October 8, the battalion moved out, traveling by night only, the 



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following day being spent at St. Dizier, and a morning later all were aroused by 
the sound of the big guns taking their morning exercise. It was at Clermont-en- 
Argonne, and there the battalion joined the scattered regiment. Roads in the 
Argonne were very much in need of improvement, and the First Battalion went 
to work at once to put one in shape from Clermont to Varennes and finally to 
Apremont. Major Harry F. Chinner, with Lieut. Leonce R. Legend re as adjutant, 
was placed in command of the battalion at the time of its arrival at Clermont, 
and made his headquarters at Locheres. There were six weeks of hard work and 
long hours, but the realization that better roads were badly needed was a spur to 




MAJOR PAUL S. BLISS AND THE FIRST BATTALION AT BREST. 

efforts; for every bad hole delayed the already crowded traflBc to and from the 
front. During this time there were three occasions when a part of the battalion 
was entertained by the midnight frolics of the Boche bombers, the only serious 
result being the loss of some valuable sleep. 

Captain Onan C. Adkins was placed in command of the battalion November 26, 
with Lieut. Orville F. Ireland as adjutant, and Battalion Headquarters was located 
at Varennes. About ten days after the signing of the armistice, the battalion found 
itself detailed to a new task — that of salvaging; and Battalion Headquarters was 
moved to Chatel-Chehery. Collecting all the equipment and ammunition scattered 
over the hills and through the timber, and carrying it to improved roads, sometimes 
two kilometers distant, was a husky man's job, yet it is pleasing to remember that 
it was done with continual song, even when six weeks of steady rain ensued. 

Major Joseph D. Patch took command of the battalion December 31, 1918. Soon 
after the work of demolition began, assisting the work of ordnance men, and the 
First Battalion delved into the duties of ordnance. The importance of the work 



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was obvious, but none the less it was a precarious job for beginners. But the proper 
spirit entered in, and danger diminished with experience. 

The battalion's reputation for effective work was the cause of its companies 
being placed in charge of railheads and salvage dumps. All the battalion, except 
Company "B," was detailed along the Meuse, and that company was left at that 
work in Grand-Pre. Making order out of a chaos of scattered salvage of all kinds 
and leaving it all standing at attention, was the next task learned and developed 
by the battalion, together with the art of loading and shipping salvage, captured 
guns, and rolling equipment of all sorts. Major Patch moved his headquarters to 
Dun-sur-Meuse February 10, and with the opening of spring weather began to 
promote the baseball spirit, in addition to routine work and drills. Immediate 
results were appreciable, and Pvt. Ernest of Company "A," David P. Drake, 
Chester K. Sewell, and Plez Coz of Company "B" and Corp. James White of Com- 
pany ^*C," were found to be able representatives from the battalion in the 805th 
team that made itself famous at Brest. 

Lieut. Ireland was transferred from Battalion Headquarters and started on his 
way home, when he lost his right arm through an auto accident April 9. Lieut. 
Leo A. Noble succeeded him. Sgt. -Major W. W. Riley, of the First Battalion, 
who had been on duty at Regimental Headquarters since being warranted, joined 
the battalion just a few days prior to departure for Brest. 

Major Patch was relieved June 6 to take the position of military police officer 
at Camp Pontanezen, and Major Paul S. Bliss assumed command and brought 
the battalion home. 

The work of road building required care and interest; salvaging required effort 
(much of it) and care to see that valuable property was not overlooked; demolition 
demanded nerve and hard work; taking care of salvage dumps required an eye to 
neatness and a thorough interest. The First Battalion has had as much esprit 
de corps in its feeling of confidence that every job assigned it was thoroughly 
finished and with interest, as it has in its accomplishments as a military organiza- 
tion otherwise. 

It moved into dirty quarters left by the Huns and made them attractive homes. 
It built its own telephone and electric light systems from salvaged material. It 
built some of its own barracks and most of its conveniences. The First Battalion 
goes home with the realization that there are more ways than one of ascertaining 
die soldierly qualities of a man, and that its men have been well tried, and found 
true and dependable. 



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American Engineers repairing the Grand Pre bridge, which had been destroyed three 

times by the Germans. This was very hazardous work for our boys, as this bridge was 

constantly being shelled by the Hun. Company **B,*' 303rd Engineers, 78th Division. 

Grand Pre, Ardennes, France. October 29, 1918. 




Varennes-en-Argonne, Meuse, France. September 28, 1918. 



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By First Lieut. Albin de Berry 

July 5, 1918 — ^The 2nd Battalion was first formed at Detention Camp No. 2, 
Camp Funston, Kan. 

August 27, 1918 — Entrained at Camp Funston, Kan., for Camp Upton, N. Y. 

August 30, 1918 — Entrained at Camp Upton, N. Y., for Quebec, Can. 

September 2, 1918 — Sailed from Quebec. 

September 16, 1918 — Arrived at Liverpool, England. 

September 17, 1918 — Enroute Liverpool to Southampton, England. 

September 18, 1918 — Enroute Southampton, England, to Le Harve, France. 

September 20, 1918 — Enroute Le Havre to Rolampont, France. 

September 22, 1918 — Arrived at Rolampont, France, for equipment. 

October 2, 1918 — Enroute Rolampont to Clermont-en-Argonne. 

October 6, 1918 — Battalion Headquarters and Companies "G" and "H" marched 
to Avocourt, for roadwork. Companies "E" and "F" to railhead at Auzeville. 




MAJOR HARRY A. MUSHAM AND THE SECOND BATTALION AT BREST. 



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November 4, 1918 — Battalion Headquarters Company **G" moved to Varennes 
(Meuse) ; Company "H*' to Fleville, Company "E" to Varennes, Company "F" to 
Montblainville for roadwork. 

November 6, 1918 — Battalion Headquarters moved to Sommerance; Company 
"F" to Landres et St. Georges, for road work. 

November 14, 1918 — Major John Creed transferred to 6th Infantry. Captain 
T. A. Immell in command. 

November 16, 1918 — Battalion Headquarters and all companies moved to Camp 
Mahout, two miles southwest of Varennes (Meuse) ; Battalion Headquarters in 
Prince Rupprecht's dugout. 

November 17, 1918 — Company "E" moved to Binarville; Company "F" to 
La Chalade, Company "G" to Florent; Company "H" to Aubreville; salvage work. 

November 28, 1918 — Battalion Headquarters moved to Varennes (Meuse) . Major 
Erastus Williams, Captain John A. Ditto, and finally Major Harry Musham were 
successively in command. 

January 26, 1919 — Company "F" moved to Varennes — duty at salvage dump. 

February 4, 1919 — Company "G" moved to Clermont for salvage work. 

February 5, 1919 — Company "H" moved to Varennes; duty at salvage dump. 

February 10, 1919 — Company "E" moved to Chatel Chehery for salvage work. 

April 30, 1919 — Company "F" and Company "H", Battalion Headquarters moved 
to Clermont-en-Argonne. 

May 2, 1919 — Entrained for Brest, France. May 5, 1919 — Arrived at Brest, 
France, placed on duty as camp troops. June 17, 1919 — Sailed from Brest to New 
York. June 27, 1919— Landed at New York. 




Theatre built al Varennes by Lieut. Albin de Berry and troops of the Second Battalion, 

805th Pioneer Infantry. 



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By Its Adjutants: 1st Lieut. H. C. Carpenter and 
2nd Lieut. M. J. King (Acting) 

MAJOR A. D. Cowley was one of the three Regular Army majors who reported to 
the 805th Infantry for duty. He was assigned to the command of the Third 
Battalion. Although he was young, his service in the Regular Army had extended 
over a period of ten years. It soon became common knowledge, as many situations 
arose and many problems confronted us requiring a broad knowledge of Army 
procedure combined with seasoned judgment, that Major Cowley could be depended 
upon for assistance. Before being promoted Major Cowley was a captain in com- 
mand of Company ^^A," 24th Machine Gun Battalion. 

When Major Cowley reported to the Provisional Regiment, 164th D. B., from 
which the 805th was to draw its nucleus, he found Lieut. H. C. Carpenter in com- 
mand of the 3rd Battalion, as well as Company "I" of that regiment, and later 
designated him as his adjutant. 

Until Rolampont, Haute Marne, was reached, the services of a sergeant major 
were not required.^ When it seemed likely that the battalion might be separated 
from the regiment and function independently, Pvt. Julius M. Tyler, Headquarters 
Company, was selected for the position and promoted to the rank of sergeant major. 
The battalion arrived at Camp Upton at midnight, and after fighting the '^battle 
of mosquitoes and overseas equipment" for 24 hours, entrained for Quebec, Canada. 
Here on Sept. 2 the entire Third Battalion and Third Battalion Headquarters went 
aboard that good ship H. M. T. Orita, that was to bear us across the ocean to 
do our bit to beat the Boche. 

There were about 1,800 men and fifty-three oflBcers aboard, including a machine 
gun battalion of the 84th Division and an aero-squadron. 

Major Cowley was the senior officer aboard and took command. A little excite- 
ment was caused at the dock before putting to sea on account of a fire breaking 
out in the forward hatch. However, it was extinguished before any serious damage 
was done. This incident seemed to inspire everyone aboard with a spirit of 
expectancy. 

Battalion Headquarters was kept very busy issuing orders for the troops abroad. 
Inspections, boat-drills, compliance with embarkation and debarkation regulations, 
and the nightly watch kept us busy. The ship\ officers were very courteous in doing 
all possible for our comfort and information. Who does not remember Mr. Kirkwood 
with his characteristic, genial smile, and cap tilted on the back of his head? 

The trip across was a novelty to most of us, and besides the usual experiences 
to be encountered avant la guerre, it was marked by a burial at sea of one of the 
ship's crew, the presence of some twenty odd other ships in our convoy, signalling 
of the ships to each other at night by wig-wag, the sounding of the fog-horn, a near 
collision in the fog at dawn, the appearance of destroyers to escort us, flying the 
Stars and Stripes, and the fact that the Saxonia had aboard 200 Red Cross nurses 
and we none. 



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Arriving at Liverpool September 16 we rapidly went ashore, marched across the 
city and entrained for Southampton in two sections. 

King George was expecting us at Liverpool, so had a representative there to 
convey his greetings and good will in the form of a letter to each soldier and 
oflScer. 

Southampton was reached early in the morning, Sept. 17, where we were promptly 
detrained and rushed out on a several mile hike to a rest camp. Here we found 
orders to get out "Toot Sweet.'* It was necessary to arrange for a medical inspec- 
tion for the two companies composing the first section (the second had not arrived 
at Southampton), draw travel rations, and get breakfast and lunch, between 9:00 A. M. 
and 12;00 noon. Also more passenger lists had to be prepared before we could 
proceed, and our boat left at 5:00 P. M. The transport officer on the Orita had 
taken up all the passenger lists that were prepared, so typewriters were requisitioned 
and pressed into service at the dock. The march back was severe on all, as we 
carried heavy packs, and had had very little exercise in more than two weeks. That 
was some "rest" camp! In the meantime the second section arrived at Southampton 
and had not been fed, so it was necessary to get some food. They did not have 
time to avail themselves of the hike to the rest camp, so were content to stretch out 
on the platform beside their packs and stacks of rifles with the other troops. 

.At 7:00 P. M., September 17, we found ourselves aboard another ship not 
nearly so well appointed as the Orita. Other troops were also aboard for the 
trip across the channel. Major Cowley again was in command and ranked some 
officers of another organization out of the choice staterooms they had settled in. 
He was furnished with the secret message code which had to be studied out by 
flash-light. 

The trip across the English channel was without incident, so on the morning of 
September 18, at 7:00 A. M., we landed at Le Havre — we were actually "over there" 
— in "Sunny France" at last! 

Here as at Southampton the companies were formed and we started on a several 
mile hike to another "rest" camp. Ye gods! 

The French greeted us along the way with glances of interest and smiles of 
approval. Even the Major had to discard his dignity at times to return the smiles 
of a "jolie" mademoiselle. 

On one long hill we halted (already some of the troops had been forced to 
fall out), and at this time the deputy mayor of Le Havre met the Major, presented 
him with a beautiful bouquet of flowers (which he was too modest to accept, so 
conferred the honor upon his adjutant) and welcomed us in the name of France. 

This was the only bright spot in the memory of Le Havre Rest Camp. We finally 
reached the rest camp sore of foot and fatigued in spirit. The American adjutant 
waited upon us promptly with a ^ack of orders, rules, and regulations, blank forms 
to fill out, certifying that we carried no more equipment than the law allowed, by 
means of which we were relieved of battalion dishes, company reconnaissance out- 
fits, carpenter's tool chest and other things. 

it would have taken a week to digest that bunch of rest camp orders, but 
fortunately we were not destined to remain so long. We were to have no rest. 
In about two hours, just as our baggage arrived, we received orders to get out 
that night. (We rarely waited for daylight or to sleep when a several mile hike 
with full pack could be provided). 

The American adjutant on being reminded that we were anxious to do our 
bit but did not approve of being "rushed to death," that our troops had had limited 
training, remarked, "Well, one bombardment makes a veteran out of the greenest 
troops." He was going to shove us out, without a bath even, and the men had 
had one on the trip, at Rochester. 



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This was a British camp, so the British adjutant was located and induced to 
open the bath house after hours, so our men got the last real bath they were to 
enjoy for some time. 

We marched back (all that were able — the others went on trucks that hauled 
the baggage) to Le Havre that night and entrained for Rolampont, the regimental 
rendezvous. The men were loaded in the "Hommes 40-Chevaux 8," and the oflBcers 
had first-class French coaches, but do not confuse these accommodations with our 
American Pullman service. 

An interpreter was furnished us, who was a source of much information. On the 
next afternoon our train was delayed near Versailles, and we had our first glimpse 
of the Eiffel tower in the distance, at gay Paris, but not so gay at that particular 
time as it was destined to be later. We arrived at Rolampont, Hte-Marne, Sep- 




MAJOR A. D. COWLEY AND THE THIRD BATTALION AT BREST. 



tember 20, where we were met by the American town major. Captain Barbour, who 
showed us a bit of field where we pitched tents for our troops. We had barracks 
for the oflScers. He very graciously found accommodations for the major and his 
adjutant in a substantial French home. 

The Third Battalion was the first of the 805th to arrive at Rolampont. Hence 
it devolved upon Major Cowley to assume the initiative, and the ability with which 
he handled the situation will be testified to by all. 

G. H. Q. was located quite near, at Chaumont, so it saw that our comfort was 
looked after. It devolved upon the adjutant to proceed to an adjacent town, take 
over for the regiment our assignment of Nash Quads, Dodge car, and "Harleys." 
There are parts of France in the rear and south of the war zone that then were 



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beautiful to behold. Battalion Headquarters and oflScers of the battalion were kept 
busily on the move for the next several days. Truck drivers had to be selected 
and tried out, as well as motor-cycle drivers. Then there were trips to the historic 
city of Langres, the seat of the school for officers of the line, that was visited to 
purchase Sam Browne belts and other things we were imable to get before 
we left the States. 

The evenings were quite pleasantly spent getting acquainted with the French 
language and customs, and the exchange for ours was mutually engaging to the 
French. 

In a few days Colonel Humphrey and staff arrived with the 2nd Battalion and 
the Headquarters and Supply Company, so almost instantly things began to hum. 
Camps in the town were thoroughly policed and placed in the proper sanitary 
condition. 

It is an increasing wonder to us modem Americans with all our sanitary safe- 
guards, how the French do not all die with disease or germs. 

Tin cans were flattened and arranged in neat piles according to regulation. A 
regimental parade was held on a rough field at a cadence of about 180, while specta- 
tors in airships looked down upon us, and we wondered if there was not someone yet 
higher who watched over us. 

The Third Battalion Headquarters was finally relieved of most of its responsi- 
bility and of all of its transportation. Here at Rolampont we received our first 
intimate impression of the French people and customs, also our equipment com- 
plete for battle, thanks to that gentlemanly and greatly over-worked officer. Captain 
Lindsey, then Regimental Supply officer. 

We had instructions in gas warfare and a practical demonstration of its opera- 
tions and effects. 

The weather conditions were quite unfavorable to the men in tents. Sleeping on 
damp ground resulted in considerable sickness and several deaths. 

Finally, on October 2, we entrained for the advanced area. As we approached 
Clefmont-en-Argonne, our destination, the roar of the cannon, now loud, again 
faint, as the bubbling of boiling water, told us in eloquent fashion a mighty story 
— at last but not least, WAR, no doubt of it. At daylight we detrained, the earth 
trembling beneath us in sympathetic vibration with the reverberating cannon near. 

The grounds about were generally in a most untidy and unsanitary condition, 
so Colonel Humphrey immediately ordered straddle trenches constructed and guards 
posted over the water supply. 

March column was formed after a hasty breakfast of corned "willie" served 
on the railroad tracks, and we proceeded to the top of Butte St. Anne and Camp 
Bondet. 

Here were available some filthy quarters, which were policed thoroughly for 
occupancy, and some elected to pitch shelter tents under trees rather than risk gain- 
ing those bosom friends, the "cooties," in the barracks. 

This camp commanded a comprehensive view in every direction. It overlooked 
the valley of the Aire River and the lines of communication to the front which were 
infested and congested with the multitude and variety of operations incident to war. 
Above us there was an incessant buzz of aeroplanes flying to and fro as busy as 
bees and accompanied always by the rat-tat-tat-a-tat burst from the machine guns 
answered by the same friendly signal. 

After a couple of nights here fraught with speculation as to what the immediate 
future held in store, as our ears recorded the dull rumble from the front, and the 
more audible rattle all around us, Third Battalion Headquarters and Companies 
"K" and "L" proceeded to Aubreville by marching about three kilometers. 



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Uh i. 8 1>fi'1.nii;i:ri nl Snt 



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Tents were pitched in a neat little apple orchard on a hill that overlooked the 
railroad yards and main road. 

The Engineers to whom Major Cowley reported were to receive us and assign 
quarters. They seemed surprised to see us, but furnished us with information as to 
the location of the water supply and the fact that there was plenty of space around 
them in what was No-Man's-Land, and no doubt we could find a place to camp. 

The troops must be fed if they were to work day and night, keeping the roads 
in repair and unloading cars, etc. So transportation for Battalion Headquarters to 
haul rations from the railhead at Clermont became a necessity. In a few days' 
time we were the recipients of admiring and curious glances as we traveled the 
roads in a Boche truck. 

At night we were highly entertained by the activities of a huge French naval 
gun, sending ^'peace proposals" over our heads towards the Boche lines. Then the 
Boche air-bombers made frequent visits in search of this eloquent peace-maker, 
but never touched us. The Boche usually came just after supper and at the first 
cry of "lights out" we knew that the show was on. 

About the middle of October the Third Battalion Headquarters was ordered to 
move to Varennes to join Companies "K" and "L," so the Adjutant proceeded a few 
days in advance of the Major, who was sick. This was not his first trip to Varennes, 
for one morning a few days previous he had accompanied Colonel Humphrey there 
in search of an engineer officer at whose disposal we wished to place some 
troops. Traffic was congested — solid lines in either direction and a division was 
being relieved. At this stage of the situation on the crest of the highway, Fritz 
decided upon a game of ten-pins, so proceeded to bowl a few over. 

While the Adjutant had nursed a decided hatred for the Boches for some 
eighteen months, this was the first personal insult he had been subjected to at their 
hands. A generous shower of fragments, clods, and stone descended upon our 
unhelmeted heads at regular intervals as Fritz bracketed the road and finally found 
his target. A French ammunition truck was caused to spill its load of peace mes- 
sages in the road, but this is one time our energetic C. 0. did not order a general 
police of the area. ' 

Varennes, that village of Marie Antoinette fame, occupied by the Germans 
for nearly the entire period of the war, was even more frequently bombed than 
Aubreville. There was a railhead here, built by our own Company "L," the tank 
park. Red Cross supply, Y. M. C. A., ammunition dump at Charpentry, attended 
by Company "K," and mobile hospitals met the eye in every direction. The area was 
crowded with troops, and through it all passed the main road to the Argonne 
American front. Varennes was, during the drive, and later one of the livest 
"villages" in the Argonne sector. The railhead rendered it quite popular, as 
thousands of troops were rationed there. The "Y" handed out daily papers and 
chocolate, besides having a stock of supplies for sale. The "Stars and Stripes" 
was also on sale each week, so after the armistice the newspapers and mail from 
home were a very important part of our existence. 

We shall never forget the night that Varennes was flooded with light, and a 
celebration broke loose on the strength of the reported signing of the armistice. 
It proved to be a few days premature, but nevertheless it was "fini la guerre." 

During the drive the hospitals brought up to receive the non-transportable cases 
were taxed to their capacity and overflowed. We also remember quite well visiting 
one of the hospitals as it waited in readiness to receive the inevitable wounded. 
Somehow it became known that a new offensive would be launched that night, so 
we sat out in No-Man's Land and waited for H-hour and the voices of the cannon that 
were banked almost hub to hub. 

The hours passed slowly, but finally, like a flash, all the furies of Hell seemed 
to break loose. No one could doubt the determined, business-like effect of this volume 



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of artillery preparation. It meant the doom of those damnable Boches as the fire 
played on their positions hour after hour. Then just as suddenly as it had been 
broken, silence rushed over the earth, though for a minute the mighty roar seemed 
still audible. Before noon the next day unmistakable evidence of the result of the 
attack was produced. Long lines of ambulances turned into the hospitals loaded 
with our gallant boys. And equally long lines of German prisoners were being 
escorted to the rear. 

Third Battalion Headquarters located in "pup" tents just above the cemetery 
remained in Varennes until the day after Thanksgiving. As the weather was be- 
coming disagreeable, it was decided to move into barracks at Very, the station of 
Company "K." This was the logical place for Battalion Headquarters with respect 
to the station of the other companies of the Battalion Regimental Headquarters 
and the personnel office. 

Our troops were turned over to the salvage service, so the difficult, endless, 
monotonous, yet at times exciting job was entered upon, seven days per week. 
Company "C," 3rd C. A. P., Captain Ogilvie commanding, was also stationed at 
Very. He furnished us trucks, and his specialists soon had an electric lig^t plant 
in operation, the power furnished by water. They also installed bath-houses. Even- 
tually a telephone was installed. In addition to a truck assigned for rationing, 
we had a motor-cycle and a "flivver." All of these and more were necessary to 
keep in touch with the several companies and transact such business as devolved 
upon us. 

Plans for the transportation never did pan out, not in a single instance. It was 
either a broken chain on the motor cycle or flat tires on the "flivver" etc. So finally 
the truck would be sent out to get the transportation home. 

At last Sunday was ordered a holiday, so Major Cowley took advantage of 
this to assemble the officers of the battalion at the stations of its companies on 
alternating Sundays. This gave the officers of the battalion a chance to see each 
other, show how each was living, etc.; and it was also the occasion for pistol com- 
petition. A team from each company and Battalion Headquarters entered — and 
beaucoup eats afterward. The Battalion Headquarters team made the highest team 
and individual scores in three out of four meets. 

This was mainly due to the excellent marksmanship of Major Cowley, who won 
the highest individual score. 

During the long winter months much pleasure was derived from a phonograph 
supplied by the Salvation Army at Clermont. Two of the companies who had no 
musical instruments also had the use of it. 

The Salvation Army was ever ready to serve in any way possible, and in appre- 
ciation of the spirit in which they served as well as for donations of nuts, crates 
of oranges, etc., the officers and men of the battalion made it a substantial volun- 
tary off'ering through the adjutant. 

Nor must we fail to mention the good work done by the Knights of Columbus. 
St. Menehould was the nearest civilian town of importance, so it was frequently 
visited by the adjutant, shopping for the battalion. Each trip the K. of C. loaded 
the rear end of the "flivver" with magazines, stationery, cigarettes, etc., which were 
distributed throughout the battalion and were quite welcome indeed. 

The town of Very was very most anything but a desirable place to live in. All 
the buildings were completely destroyed, and we witnessed the return of many of 
its former citizens, furnishing them with food and shelter overnight. Oftentimes 
these French would go to the site of their old homes, look about for a marker, sti^p 
off various numbers of steps and dig. The wonder is, that almost invariably they 
located treasure. Sometimes it was wine, again it was beaucoup francs, and at other 
times jewelry. When they failed to find it, it was marked by a characteristic shrug 
of the shoulder and a cussing of the Boche. 



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Winter passed and springtime was in the air — ^still no orders for home. 

An educational and athletic program was instituted. The regimental commanding 
officer ordered the appointment of battalion athletic oflBcers. So Third Battalion 
Headquarters gained an additional member in the person of 1st Lieut. R. W. Amett, 
the former University of Kentucky athlete. Before Arnett's plans matured new 
orders were issued which made it impossible to carry out his program. 

About this time an opportunity was presented to apply for the American Ex- 
peditionary Forces University at Beaune, Cote D'Or. The understanding was that 
those selected might complete the course which ended June 7 and then rejoin the 
organization if it was still in France, or join before that time if they so desired, 
provided the regiment was proceeding home. It looked like a safe bet, so Battalion 
Headquarters lost three to the American Expeditionary Forces University — ^the adju- 
tant, athletic oflScer, and sergeant-major. Lieut. M. J. King of Company "L" was ap- 
pointed acting adjutant. The first week in May word reached the members of the 805th 
at the American Expeditionary Forces University, that their organization was bound 
for Brest and home. 

There was much discussion as to whether it was better to quit the interesting 
university courses to get home a little earlier by joining our organization, or to 
complete the course and return as part of the University Regiment. 

The majority felt an irresistible force drawing them toward a decision of 
selecting the quickest way home. So the adjutant, athletic oflBcer, and sergeant- 
major were among those who returned to their organization for speedy return home. 
All resumed their duties at Battalion Headquarters except Lieut. Arnett, who reported 
to Company "M." 

Lieut. King of Company "L" reported for duty on March 27. At that time Bat- 
talion Headquarters. was located in a box car, bound for Liffol-le-Grand (Vosges), 
France. 

Once more the Third Battalion was in the lead, but not complete, as Company 
^^M" was to remain behind with the regiment in the Argonne. Some two days later 
Third Battalion Headquarters and Company ^'L" arrived at LiffoMe-Grand, Com- 
pany ^'L" was to handle the excess equipment of home going divisions. Company 
^T' was located at Dommartin, St. Rue, some seventy-five kilometers west and was 
soon busily engaged in wrecking American barracks. Company *'K" was located some 
twenty-five kilometers south, at Bourmont (Haute Marne), reporting for duty with 
the local engineers. 

The following two weeks were busy ones for Battalion Headquarters, keeping in 
touch with companies by flivvers and with Captain Gleason by 'phone. It was 
also necessary to build a Battalion Headquarters and oflBcers' quarters, as our new 
home was in the south end of a huge warehouse. But with the united efforts of all 
the oflScers of Battalion Headquarters and Company "L", we soon had very comfort- 
able quarters. 

It was quite an agreeable change for both men and oflBcers, and there was 
something doing in the entertainment line almost every night. 

During our short stay at Liffol-le-Grand, Lieut. Gallagher of Company "L" 
built up a very creditable track team, which later took part in the Advance Section 
Athletic Meet at Le Mans. 

But no sooner were we settled and making a name for the Third Battalion when 
the news came that we were to report for duty with the Engineers at Le Mans. 
But such news was short lived, as it was straightway cancelled, and instead, we 
were soon on our way to Brest. 

April 30 the Third Battalion, as usual still in the lead, had arrived at Brest, and 
the rest is easy — home June 27. 



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'TOOKY yonder, looky yonder!" 
ij It's 



Color Sgt. Billy Higgins, dressed up in overalls, a cutaway coat, a derby 
hat, and a red bandana handkerchief, with a 50-carat stove polish shine on his face 
and an inch-wide border of pink grease paint around his mouth. 

Billy was the star of the vaudeville show. 

He was still languishing out in Detention Camp No. 2, where all recruits who 
came to Camp Funston were sent until the Medicos were sure they hadn't anything 
catching, when word got about of his presence. 

A regimental show was in the wind and the colored troops at Funston and 
the outlying camps were combed for talent. Higgins had been an actor in his 
civilian days and he was borrowed and given a pass to go to Kansas City and 
get his make-up. 

As all who attended will testify, the first regimental show at the Liberty theatre 
was a grand success. Everybody was there. 

Billy Higgins took the house by storm. The packed theatre was in a roar from 
the moment he came upon the stage. 

^^Higgins must be in the 805th!" Colonel Humphrey decreed, and the necessary 
applications were put in and followed up. And Pvt. Higgins joined the regiment 
just before it left for Europe. 

Whenever the train stopped and the men filed out to get a bite of Red Cross 
sandwiches, Higgins would get on a chair and sing ^'Everything," or ^'Miason-Dixon 
Line," and other ditties that were irresistible. 

When the Bearcats landed in Camp Upton, N. Y., and started for Europe on 
board the Saxonia, Higgins was the chief entertainer during the entire trip of 
fourteen days. 

After moving headquarters to Chatel Chehery, the organizing of a regimental 
show began. The men got together and soon were entertaining the many guests of 
the 805th Pioneer Infantry, among whom were the Congressional Conmiittee on 
Military Affairs, the Staff College of the American Expeditionary Forces, and many 
other visitors of high rank. They were glad to meet the 805th and spoke of the 
regimental show all over the American Expeditionary Forces. 

Consequently, prior to our leaving for Brest, a tour of the Advance Section 
S. 0. S. was arranged, and the Bearcat Elntertainers made a hit wherever they played. 
When they rejoined the regiment in Brest, the Bearcat show was billed almost every 
night. Some of the popular songs that Higgins starred with were: 

"Somewhere between here and Yonder." . 

"Shooting across the Rhine." 

"There's a great Day coming when you Lay that Gang Plank down." 

"Oh! Doc, then I'll go with you." 



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One of Billy Higgins' "features" was a prayer which went as follows: 
"Our father which art in Washington, 
"Baker be thy name. 

"May the telegrams fly to Chatel-Chehery, as they do at G. H. Q. 
"Fprgive the mess sergeant and the top-kicker, and all those who wear bars 
and trespass against us. 

"Oh, lead us not into the Army of Occupation, 

"And deliver us from another service stripe. 

"Give us a boat that we may see some blue water and go to God's country, 

"And live in peace forever and ever — eight Men." 

The choruses of some of the most popular songs are here given: 

''Bull Frog Hop' 

Chorus: Conmience to wiggle from side to side. 
Git away back and do the Mobile Glide; 
Then you do the shimmy with so much spice. 
Stoop low, hey Bo! 

Stew the rice, do the seven-year itch and the possom trot. 
Then you scratch the gravel in a vacant lot. 
Slap your hands and then you squat — 
That's that bullfrog hop. 

''You'll Find Dixie Land in France' 

Chorus: You remember dancing Mose, 
Folks all called him tickle-toes. 
You'll find him over there in France; 
Alexander's band left old Dixie Land. 
They used to play the lovin' blues for everyone, 
But now they play the blues upon the gattlin' gun. 
Don't forget old Shimmy Sam, finest boy from Alabam, 
He went a- way in kha-ki pants!!! 
Instead of pickin' melons off the vine. 
He's pickin' Germans off the Rhine — 
You'll find old Dixie Land in France. 

Other favorites were: 

"There's Lump of Sugar Down in Dixie." 
"And Everything." 
"Somebody's done me Wrong." 

One of his best military songs was: 

"Shootin Cross the Rhine" 

Chorus: The first thing you do is when attention's called, 

Stand up straight, one and all, 

Forward march, column right — keep your interval — 

Then you close up tight. 

Company halt — 'bout face — 

Stand at ease with style and grace. 

Squad's right and double time — 

That's the dance that made the Kaiser 

Get back 'cross the Rhine. 
Lieut. Leonce R. Legendre of the Headquarters Company was in charge of the 
show and the band. 



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As soon as the opening of the 1919 spring permitted, baseball got under way. 
Athletic equipment was obtained from the Y. M. C. A. and the Knights of Colum- 
bus, and almost every company put a team in the field. 

The diamond at Chateau de Chehery, between the road and the Aire river, 
was the scene of many encounters. 

Captain George M. Bragan of the Headquarters Company took a great deal 
of interest in his team and was made manager of the Regimental Team with au- 
thority to call upon any company commander for the services of any enlisted man 
in the regiment whom he might want. Almost every company was represented. 

As soon as the regiment reached Camp Pontanezen, the value of its spring train- 
ing up in the Argonne showed to advantage. As the accompanying scores will 
show, it was never beaten. 

Blackburn, Foote, Drake, and Keyes were the main pitching stars, and they were 
all very popular with the regiment. 

The final game with the 807th was played when both teams were somewhat 
stale, and the score was 10 to 9. In no other game did the Bearcats allow their 
opponents more than three runs. 

At some of the games the attendance was more than 5,000. The team brought 
fame to its regiment. Its motto was, like that of the regiment: Why Not Excel- 
lent? It could not think of losing. 

Colonel Humphrey was almost always present. 




THE FAMOUS 805th BASE BALL TEAM. 

Players from left to right — standing — Withers (mascot), Rucker (left field). Keys 
(pitch), Foote (pitch), Ray (catch). Cox (catch), Drake (pitch), Greene (3rd base). 
Sitting — left to right — Crump (catch). Porter (right field), Wyatt (catch), Sewell 
(short stop), Blackburn (pitch), Johnson (pitch), Demery (left field), King (2nd base). 



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DESPITE the fact that the regiment contained from the start a large number of men 
who were skilled musicians, it was impossible to organize the band until after 
the regiment had been in Europe for some time. Instruments were requisitioned at 
Camp Funston, but they had not been received when the regiment departed. 

There was at Kansas City, Missouri, a band of colored men, whose leader was 
anxious to have them enlist collectively in the 805th Pioneer Infantry. Colonel 
Humphrey, who was very anxious to enlist this band, took the matter up with General 
Wood, who wired the War Department as follows: 

"Permission is requested to accept the voluntary enlistment of forty-five colored 
men for the 805th Pioneer Infantry Regiment, this Camp. These men are now 
organized as a band in Kansas City, and Regimental Commander, 805th Infantry, 
desires their enlistment with a view to forming a Regimental Band. Wood." 

This telegram was endorsed back by the War Department under date of August 
3, as follows: 

"The request for authoriy for the enlistment of forty-five men collectively for the 
band, 805th Pioneer Infantry, is not approved. The enlistment from this band of 
all individuals not within the draft age who are qualified is authorized. Attention 
is invited to the form enclosed herewith showing the manner in which applications 
must be made for the induction of men within the draft age. By order of the 
Secretary of War. Alfred L. Nusakiski, Adjutant General." 

Before this was received, however, the War Department issued an order prohibit- 
ing enlistments of this kind. Consequently, it was necessary to discontinue efforts 
to organize a band in this manner. 

Requisition was again put in for instruments in the American Expeditionary 
Forces, but was returned with the information that only Regular Army regiments 
could draw instruments. 

It looked as though the regiment, brimming over with music, was to be required 
to go without. On December 28 Colonel Humphrey sent Captain Paul S. Bliss 
with an order to "bring back a set of band instruments." Captain Bliss brought 
the case before the Entertainment Committees of the Y. M. C. A. and Red Cross, 
and the Y. M. C. A. immediately contributed a small bass drum and a snare drum 
and some "effects", and promised some more instruments later. The Red Cross, 
through Major Harold Auber, responded immediately, and provided a large box 
of instruments. 

Captain Bliss brought these back by "grande vitesse" (express). With the 
assistance of the baggage-master at Bar-le-Duc he transferred his freight between 
three o'clock and six, January 1, 1919, from the wide guage to the narrow guage 
station, and it was necessary to transfer the freight again en route, but he arrived 
finally at Auzeville and brought the instruments to the chateau at Chatel-Chehery, 
via Clermont, in time for New Year's dinner. 

The box was unpacked with the assistance of the musically inclined members of 
ihe Headquarters Company, with all the officers looking on, and it may be said 
that the band dated from that moment, for it was actually playing music that 
afternoon. 



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First Lieut. Leonce R. Legendre of the Headquarters Company was placed in 
charge of the musicians. Pvt. George L. Polk was made assistant leader, and soon 
promoted to that grade, and Sgt. Middleton B. Polk was made drum-major. 

The band men took up their quarters in the large, partly-demolishec) house in 
the rear of the chateau and set to work. Before any one was aware of it, Lieut. 
Legendre announced that the band would give its first concert. Two weeks after 
its organization it played a concert for the members of the General Staff College, 
who were guests at the chateau on a staff ride. 

About this time Major Erastus H. Williams, Second Battalion, returned from a 
trip to St. Aignan with a large box of additional instruments which he had picked 
up in various quarters from friends in the service. 

It was now possible to complete the band's personnel. The first outside concert 
was given at Evacuation Hospital No. 10, Froidos. 

The band was formally organized as a band under Special Order 55, Par. 1, 
Headquarters, 805th Pioneer Infantry, dated February 24, 1919, when twenty-five 
enlisted men of various grades from other companies in the regiment who had been 
on special duty were formally transferred to the Headquarters Company, and were 
given various band grades. Those in the Headquarters Company were given band 
grades under Par. 3, Special Orders 55, same date. 

One section of the band was developed as a "Jazz Orchestra," and soon gained 
fame over the Argonne-Meuse Area. The band was sent out to various companies 
of the regiment and to other organizations as often as opportunity permitted. 

It continued to improve, and until the regiment was disbanded a day seldom 
passed that did not see the band in action. 



£ 




COLONEL HUMPHREY AND * HEADQUARTERS" AT BREST 

Headquarters Company on Right; Supply Company on left with all the officers of the 
Regiment in the foreground. The Band is shown in the center of ihe picture. 



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The following three poems are regarded as among the best 
the war has produced. Published by permission. 



The Soldier 

If I should die, think only this of me: 

That there's some corner of a foreign field 
That is for ever England. There shall be 
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed; 
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made 
aware. 
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways 
to roam, 
A body of England's, breathing English air. 
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of 
home. 

And think, this heart, all evil shed away, 
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less 
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by 
England given; 
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as 
her day; 
And laughter, learnt of friends; and 

gentleness. 
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven. 

Rupert Brooke. 

(The unforgetable tribute to his native 
England^ by an English poet who died at 
Gailipoli,) 



I Have a Rendezvous With Death 

I have a rendezvous with Death 

At some disputed barricade; 

When Spring comes back with rustling shade 

And apple blossoms fill the air — 

I have a rendezvous with Death 

When Spring brings back blue days and fair. 

It may be he shall take my hand 

And lead me into his dark land. 

And close my eyes and quench my breath — 

It may be I shall pass him still. 

I have a rendezvous with Death 

On some scarred slope of battered hill. 

When Spring comes round again this year 

And the first meadow flowers appear. 

God knows 'twere better to be deep 
Pillowed on silk and scented down. 
Where love throbs out in blissful sleep. 
Pulse nigh to pulse, and breath to breath. 
Where hushed awakenings are dear — 



But ' I've a rendezvous with Death, 
At midnight in some flaming town. 
When Spring trips north again this year. 
And I to my pledged word am true, 
I shall not fail that rendezvous. 

Alan Seeger. 

{American poet who died on the battlefield 
of France. He was a student at Harvard 
University.) 



In Flanders Fields 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow 

Between the crosses, row on row. 

That mark our place; and in the sky 
The larks, still bravely singing, fly 

Scarce heard amid the guns below. 

We are the Dead. Short days ago 
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow. 

Loved and were loved, and now we lie 
In Flanders fields. 

Take up our quarrel with the foe. 
To you from failing hands we throw 

The torch; be yours to hold it high. 
If ye break faith with us who die 
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow 
In Flanders fields. 

John McCrae. 

{Canadian Lieutenant Colonely Mediccu 
Corps, who died in his own hospital of 
pneumonia. ) 



Here are some from *^ Yanks" a collection 
of verse written by men of the A. E. F. and 
sent to the ''Stars and Stripes," the Expedi- 
tionary Force newspaper: 

Just Thinkin^ 

Standin' up here on the fire-step, 
Lookin' ahead in the mist, 
With a tin hat over your ivory 
With a rifle clutched in your fist; 
Waitin' and watchin' and wond'rin' 
If the Hun's comin' over tonight — 
Say, ain't the thing you think of 
Enough to give you a fright? 



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Things you ain't even thought of 
For a couple o' months or more; 
Things that 'uU set you laughin'. 
Things that 'ull make you sore; 
Things that you saw in the movies. 
Things that you saw on the street. 
Things that you're really proud of. 
Things that are — not so sweet. 

Debts that are past coUectin', 
Stories you hear and forget, 
Ball games and birthday parties. 
Hours of drill in the wet; 
Headlines, recruitin' posters. 
Sunsets 'way out at sea. 
Evenings of pay days — golly, 
It*s a queer thing, this memory! 

Faces of pals in Homeburg, 

Voices of women folk, 

Verses you learnt in schooldays. 

Pop up in the mist and smoke. 

As you stand there, grippin' that rifle, 

A-starin', and chilled to the bone, 

Wonderin' and wonderin* and wonderin', 

Just thinkin' there — all alone! 



"Father will write," Well, some day p'raps he 
will— 

There's lot of funny prophecies come true; 
But if he just keeps promisin' to, still, 

I'll understand, and dad'U know I do. 



CorpWaTs Chevrons 

Oh, the General with his shiny stars, leadin' 

a parade. 
The Colonel and the Adjutant a-sportin' of 

their braid. 
The Major and the Skipper — none of 'em look 

so fine 
As a newly minted corp'ral comin' down 

the line! 

Oh, the Bishop in his mitre, pacin* up the 

aisle. 
The Governor, frock-coated, with a votes-for- 

women smile. 
The Congressman, the Mayor, aren't in it, 

I opine. 
With a newly minted corp'ral comin' down 

the line! 



When will the war be over? 
When will the gang break through? 
What will the U. S. look like? 
What will there be to do? 
Where will the Boches be then? 
Who will have married Nell? 
When's that relief a-comin' up? 
Gosh! But this thinkings hell! 

Hudson Hawley, Pvt., M. G. Bn. 



Dad^s Letters 

My dad ain't just the letter writin' kind — 
He'd rather let the women see to that; 

He's got a mess o' troubles on his mind. 
And likes to keep 'em underneath his hat. 

And p*raps because he isn't very strong 
On talkin*, why, he's kind o* weak on ink; 

But he can work like sin the whole year long. 
And, cricky, how that dad o' mine can 
think! 

When I set out from Homeville last July, 
He didn't bawl the way my sister did; 
He just shook hands and says, *'Well, boy, 
goodbye." 
(He's got his feelin's, but he keeps 'em 
hid.) 

And so when mother writes about the things 
That I spend half my time a-thinkin' of. 

There's one short line that every letter brings: 
"Father will write, and meanwhile sends 
his love." 



Home is Where the Pie is 

"Home is where the heart is" — 

Thus the poet sang; 
But "home is where the pic is" 

For the doughboy gang. 
Crullers in the craters, 

Pastry in abris — 
Our Salvation Army lass 

Sure knows how to please! 

Watch her roll the pie crust 

Mellower than gold; 
Watch her place it neatly 

Within its ample mold; 
Sniff the grand aroma 

While it slowly bakes — 
Though the whine of Minnie shells 

Echoes far awakes. 

Tin hat for a halo! 

Ah, she wears it well! 
Making pies for homesick lads 
Sure is "beating hell;" 
In a region blasted 

By fire and flame and sword. 
Our Salvation Army lass 

Battles for the Lord! 

Call me sacrilegious, 

And irreverent, too; 
Pies? They link us up with home 

As naught else can do! 
"Home is where the heart is" — 

True, the poet sang; 
But, "home is where the pie is" 

To the Yankee gang! 



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The New Army 

Who are those soldiers 
Who go marching down? 

They're the young fellows 
Of your old home town. 

The butcher's son, the baker's. 
His Honor's lad, too; 
The old casual mixture 
Of Gentile and Jew. 

Don't they march manly! 

Ay, they step light; 
And soon by the papers 

Ye'll see they can fight! 

R. R. Kirk, S. S. U. 



The Tank 

Oh, she's nothin' sweet to look at an' no 
symphony to hear; 
She ain't no pome of beauty, that's a 
cinch — 
She howls like Holy Jumpin' when a feller 
shifts a gear. 
But she's sure a lovey-dovey in a pinch. 
Just head her straight for Berlin and no 
matter what the road. 
Or whether it's just trencher, trees and 
mud. 
And I'll guarantee she'll get there with her 
precious human load 
And her treads a-drippin' red with Ger- 
man blood. 

Oh, you tank! tank! tank! 
She's a pippin, she's a daisy, she's 
a dream! 
Where the star-shells are a-lightin' up the 
thickest of the fightin'. 

She'll be sailin' like a demon through 
the gleam. 

If the way is rough and stony and the 
vantage point is far. 
Just slip her into high and hang on tight. 
Shove your foot down on the throttle and to 
hell with all the jar — 
She'll take you clean from here to out of 
sight. 
'Course you've got to clean and scrub her 
same as any piece of tin 
That's worth the smoke to blow her up the 
flue; 
But just whisper to her gently, pat her back 
and yell "Giddap!" 
And there ainH a thing she wouldn't do 
for you. 

Oh, you tank! tank! tank! 
She's a Lulu, she's a cuckoo! 
She's the goods! 
When the Boches see you comin', they will 
set the air to hummin' 

A-wavin' of their legs to reach the 
woods. 



When the last great rush is over and the 
last grim trench is past. 
She will roll in high right through old 
Berlin town. 
Her grim old sides a-shakin' and her innerds 
raisin' hob. 
Intent on runnin' Kaiser William down. 
Then she'll find him and we'll bind him to 
her grindin', tearin' treads. 
And we'll start her roUin' on the road 
to hell. 
Shove her into high and leave her, tie her 
bloomin' throttle down — 
We'll say she's lived her life and lived 
it well. 

Oh, you tank! tank! tank! 
She's a devil! She's a dandy! 
She's sublime! 
When her grimy hide goes hurlin' through 
the dirty streets of Berlin, 

Watch the goose step change to 
Yankee double time! 

Richard C. Colburn, Sgt., Tank Corps. 



Letters 



My buddy reads his letters to me, and, say, 

he sure can write! 
I have to sit and chew my pen and even 

then 
The way it reads when I get through I know 

it's pretty sad 
As far as composition goes; the grammar, 

too, is bad. 
But talk about — gee, he can sling the ink to 

beat the band. 
And picture everything he's seen a way that 

sure is grand. 

I got him to write a note to my gal and, 

golly, it was fine! 
I copied it and signed my name, but, all 

the same,' 
It didn't seem to please her, for she wrote 

in her reply 
She'd read it several times and it didn't 

sound like I 
Was sayin' exactly what I meant and was 

I feelin' good; 
I'm kind of glad she took it so^in fact, I 

hoped she would. 

Mel Ryder, Sgt. Major, Inf. 



Toujours le Meme 

No matter how wise or how foolish 

The company's cook may be. 

When down at the table we're seated. 

Two things we all plainly can see; 

When we look at the chow 

There's the bosom of sow. 

And beans — beans — beans. 



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If quartered in city or country. 

The cook never misses his aim; 
If messing in swamp or on mountain. 
Two things will remain quite the same; 
Though it may cause a row. 
We get bosom of sow, 
And beans — beans — beans. 

When tasks for the day are all ended. 

And weary are body and brain. 
Small matter it makes if we're eating 
Indoors, or outside in the rain, 
The cook makes his bow 
With the bosom of sow. 
And beans — beans — beans.' 

Of all that I've learned in the Army, 
This fact I am sure I know well — 
And others are certain to tell you — 
The soldier's worst picture of hell 
Is thrice daily chow 
With the bosom of sow. 
And beans — beans — beans. 

Vance C. Criss, Corp., Engrs. 



/ Love Corned Beef 

I LOVE corned beef — I never knew 

How good the stuff COULD taste in stew! 

I love it WET, I love it DRY, 

I love it baked and called MEAT PIE. 

I love it camouflaged in HASH — 

A hundred bucks I'd give — in CASH 

To have a BARREL of such chow 

A-standing here before me now. 

I say "YUM YUM" when '^soupie'* blows, 

I SNIFF and raise aloft my nose: 

CORNED WILLIE! Ha! Oh, BOY, that's 

FINE! 
Can hardly keep my place in LINE. 
I kick my heels and wildly yell; 
"Old Sherman said that *WAR IS HELL,' 
But GLADLY would I bear the heat 
If corned beef I could get to eat!" 
I love it HOT— I love it COLD, 
Corned Willie never WILL grow old. 
I love it — now PAUSE — listen, friend: 
When to this war there comes an end 
And PEACE upon the earth shall reign, 
I'll hop a boat for HOME again. 
Then to a RESTAURANT I'll speed- 
No dainty MANNERS will I heed— 
But to the waiter I will cry: 
"Bring me — well, make it corned beef PIE! 
And — better bring some corned beef STEW, 
And corned beef COLD— I'll take that, too. 
And — man, don't think I'm CRAZY, 
But could you bring a corned beef CAN? 
And— WAIT!— I'm not through ORDERING 

yet — 
I want a SIRLOIN STEAK— you BET, 
With hash browned SPUDS— now, LISTEN, 

friend, 
I've got the CASH, you may depend — 



Right HERE it is— let's see, I'll try— 
Oh, bring a piece of hot MINCE PIE 
And ALL this stuff that's printed here; 
My appetite is HUGE, I fear." 

Then, when he's filled my festive board 
With all these eats, I'll thank the Lord, 
(For that's the PROPER thing to do). 
And then I'll take the corned beef STEW, 
The corned beef PIE, and corned beef COLD, 
The corned beef CAN 111 then take hold 
And RAM the whole WORKS into it 
And say: "NOW, damn you, THERE you'll 

sit. 
You've haunted every DREAM I've had — 
You don t know what shame IS, egad ! 
Now SIT there. Bo — See how you FEEL — 
And watch me eat a REG'LAR meal!" 

A. P. B. 



HoggM It 

Well, I've eaten food sublime, and I've eaten 

food that's rotten. 
From Alaska's coldest corner to where the 

landscape's cotton; 
At times there has been plenty, then there's 

times when there's been none. 
And I've kept me upper stiffest, for com- 

painin' I'm not one. 
But it's now that I'm protestin' — oh, I've 

suffered silence long — 
It's fancy food I'm cravin,' for me system's 

going wrong. 

Oh, it's bacon, bacon, bacon. 
Till your belly's fairly achin' 
For some biscuits or some hot cakes that in 
your mouth would melt; 

There's no German dog could dare me. 
No fear of death would scare me. 
If I only had some chicken a la King be- 
neath me belt. 

Now I read where Mr. Hoover tells the folks 

to lay off hoggin'. 
We'll be needin' lots of grub to put the Fritz 

on the toboggan; 
And the way that they've responded makes 

you feel so awful proud 
That you'd like to meet old Bill to take his 

measure for a shroud. 
Lord, it's plenty that we're gettin', but I'd 

be dancin' jigs 
If they'd pass an order home to stop a-killin' 

off the pigs. 

For it's bacon, bacon, bacon. 
Till your very soul is shakin' — 
If I could pick me eatin', it's a different song 
I'd sing; 

I'd not miss a raidin' party. 
For patrol I'd be quite hearty. 
Oh, I'd swap me chance of Heaven for some 
chicken a la King. 

Med. Miq. 



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Allies 

The French, the British, and the Portugee, 
Captain, or colonel, or king though he be. 
Gives a salute in response to me. 
Buck private in Uncle Sam's Infantry. 
There's much that a soldier's salute implies. 
But it means the most when it means, 
"We're Allies!" 

In Belgium and France and Italy 
They talk in ways that are Greek to me. 
But the speech of soldiers' courtesy 
Is a Lingua Franca wherever you be. 
With a single gesture, I recognize 
That I am one of the Twenty Allies. 

I never could tell just why it should be 
That the first salute should be up to me 
In this queer, new army democracy. 
But every commander must answer me, 
British, or French, or Indo-Chinee, 
Captain, or colonel, or king though he be. 

There's much that a soldier's salute implies. 
But it means the most when it means, 
*' We're Allies!" 

Merritt Y. Hughes, Pvt., Inf. 



The Old Overseas Cap 

The war of the Trojans and all the Greek 

crew 
Was fought for the sake of a fair lady who 
Went absent without leave, for weal or for 

woe. 
And took her permission to Paris to go. 

All Greeks grasped steel helmets and trench 
knives and tanks 

And wheel teams and chariots and fell into 
ranks. 

Shipping boards gave no trouble with quar- 
rels or slips: 

The beauty of Helen had launched all the 
ships. 

All cautioned their sweethearts that since 

they must go. 
To keep home hearths heated, on flirting 

go slow; 
For each warrior was off to the battle and 

strife 
To make the world safe for a good looking 

wife. 

But they'd never have fought if they'd read 

Helen's note. 
Which just before leaving she hastily wrote: 
"Menelaus just entered our once happy home 
With an overseas cap on the top of his 

dome!" 

Fairfax D. Downey, Ist Lt., F. A. 



Trench Mud 

We have heard of Texas gumbo 
And the mud in the Philippines, 
Where, if we had legs like Jumbo, 
The mud would cover our jeans. 
But never did we get a chance 
To feel real mud till we hit France. 

Our shoes are deep in it. 
We often sleep in it. 
We almost weep in it — 

It's everywhere; 
We have to fight in it. 
And vent our spite in it. 
We look a sight in it. 

But we don't care! 

The mud that lies in No Man's Land 

Is as thick on the other side. 
And where the Germans make their stand 

Is where we'll make them slide. 
For our hob-nailed shoes will force a way, 
And we'll knock them cold — for the U. S. A. 

Though we must eat in it, 
Wash our feet in it. 
Try to look neat in it. 

This mud and slime; 
Though we get sore in it. 
Grumble and roar in it, 
JTe'/Z win the war in it 

In our good time! 

John J. Curtin, Sgt., Inf. 



To Buddy 

It's a tough fight for you, Buddy, 
And it takes a heap of grit 

To stick and win 

And keep your grin 
When you're in the thick of it. 

It's no cinch for you. Buddy, 

When the dreams with which you came 

Melt into naught 

As you are taught 
The horrid, bitter game. 

It's a hard pull for you. Buddy, 
And oft times it look damned blue, 

But square your chin 

And vow to win. 
And play the game clean through. 

For there's a great time coming. Buddy, 
A time worth waiting for, 

Wlien Kultur's done 

And all is won. 
And the boys come home from war. 

Oh, she'll be waiting. Buddy, 
And the lovelight in her eye 

Will shine with joy 

As Her Big Boy 
Goes proudly marching by. 



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It*s a hard road for you. Buddy, 
But it's more than worth the game 

To buck all fears 

So Mother's tears 
Will be for joy, not shame. 

Howard J. Green, Corp., Inf. 



Goodbye 

Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. 

We're on the seas for France, 
We're on our way to make them pay 

The piper for the dance. 
To starboard and to port 

Our paint-splotched convoys toss. 
Grim thunderbolts in rainbow garb. 

We jam a path across. 
Our guns are slugged and set 

To smack the U-boat's eye — 
God help the Hun that tries his luck — 
Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. 

Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. 

The decks are deep with men. 
We're going to God knows what. 

We'll be back God knows when. 
Old friends are at our sides. 

Old songs drift out to sea. 
Oh, it is good to go to war 

In such a company. 
The sun is on the waves 
That race to meet the sky, 
Where strange new shores reach out to us — 

Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. 

Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, 

A long and weary while. 
Through all the drab and empty days. 

Remember us and smile. 
Our good ship shoulders on 

Along a lane of foam. 
And every turn the screw goes round 

Is farther still from home. 
We'll miss the things we left, 

The more the white miles fly. 
So keep them till we come again — 

Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. 



Poilu 



You're a funny fellow, poilu, in your dinky 
little cap 
And your war worn, faded uniform of blue. 
With your multitude of haversacks abulge 
from heel to flap. 
And your rifle that is 'most as big as you. 
You were made for love and laughter, for 
good wine and merry song. 
Now your sunlit world has sadly gone 
astray. 
And the road today you travel stretches rough 
and red and long. 
Yet you make it, petit soldat, brave and 
gay. 



Though you live within the shadow, fagged 
and hungry half the while. 
And your days and nights are racking in 
the line. 
There is nothing under heaven that can take 
away your smile. 
Oh, so wistful and so patient and so fine. 
You are tender as a woman with the tiny 
ones who crowd 
To upraise their lips and for your kisses 
pout. 
Still, we'd hate to have to face you when the 
bugle's sounding loud 
And your slim, steel sweetheart Rosalie is 
out. 

You're devoted to mustaches which you twirl 
with such an air 
O'er a cigarette with nigh an inch to run. 
And quite often you are noticed in a beard 
that's full of hair. 
But that heart of yours is always twenty- 
one. 
No, you do not "parlee English," and you 
find it very hard. 
For you want to chum with us and words 
you lack; 
So you pat us on the shoulder and say, *Nou8 
sommes comarades." 
We are that, my poilu, pal, to hell and 
back. 

Steuart M. Emery, Pvt., M. P. 



When the General Came to Town 

We wuz workin* in th' offus — 
That is, all exceptin' me — 
An' I wuz jest a-settin'. 
As a orderly should be. 

When a feller wearin* eagles 
Perchin' on his shoulder straps. 
Poked his head right in th' winder. 
An' he talks right out an' snaps, 

*'Who's th' officer commandin' 
Over this detachment here?" 
An' th' looey he salutes him. 
While us rest wuz feelin' queer. 

"I am, sir," th' looey tells him, 
Wonderin' what th' row's about. 
"Pershing's comin' in five minits," 
Says th' kernel. "All troops out." 

Gosh, how we did hurry. 

For we looked a doggone fright — 

Some had hats a-missin', 

An' they warn't a coat in sight. 

First we cleaned up in th' offus. 
Then we swept up in th' street. 
An' it wasn't many seconds 
Till th' place wuz hard t' beat. 



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Next we hunted up our clothin', 
Borried some an* swiped some more, 
Then th' looey got us standin* 
In a line afore th' door. 

Mighty soon around th* corner 
Come two scrumptious lookin' cars. 
An' they wasn't any license 
On th' first one — 'cept four stars. 

When th' car had stopped right sudden. 
Then th' gineral he stepped out. 
An' without much parley-vooin' 
He begin t' look about. 

An' th' Frenchmen come a-flockin'. 
An' they couldn't understand 
Why he warn*t a-wearin' medals. 
An' gold braid t' beat th' band. 

Then he made a little lectur, 
Givin' all them Frenchman thanks. 
Since they'd acted mighty kind-like 
In a-dealin' with his Yanks. 

All th' peepul started clappin' 
When his talk kum to a close, 
An' a purty little lassie 
Offered him a dandy rose. 

Shore he tuk it, smilin' pleasant. 
Like a gift he couldn't miss — 
An' th' little maid wuz happy 
When he paid her with a kiss. 

When he stepped into his auto, 
An' he hurried on his way — 
While us guys went back t' workin', 
Feelin' we had had SOME day. 

Vance C. Criss, Corp., Engrs. 



Seicheprey 

A handful came to Seicheprey 
When winter woods were bare. 
When ice was in the trenches 
And snow was in the air. 
The foe looked down on Seicheprey 
And laughed to see them there. 

The months crept by at Seicheprey; 
The growing handful stayed. 
With growling guns at midnight. 
At dawn, the lightning raid. 
And learned, in Seicheprey trenches. 
How war's red game is played. 

September came to Seicheprey; 
A slow-wrought host arose 
And rolled across the trenches 
And whelmed its sneering foes. 
And left to shattered Seicheprey 
Unending, sweet repose. 

J. M. H. 



The Return of the Refugees 

They pick their way o'er the shell-pocked 
road 

As the evening shadows fall, 
A man and woman, their eyes a-gleam 

With awe at war's black pall. 

The straggling strands of her snowy hair 
Are tossed in the wind's rude breath; 

His frail form shakes as the whistling gusts 
Sweep o'er the fields of death. 

With straining eyes, hearts beating fast. 

They seek to gaze ahead 
To where they left their little home 

When from the Hun they fled. 

'Neath the heights of a hill o'erlooking the 
vale. 

Half hid in a purple shade. 
The dim outline of the town comes to view. 

And they hasten down the glade. 

At last the town, the street, and home! 

But God! Can it be this?— 
This pile of stones, this hideous hulk. 

This gaping orifice? 

The sun has set. The evening star 

Sends down its soothing light. 
Gone are the tears; their hearts are strong — 

"For God, for France, and Right!" 

Frederick W. Kurth, Sgt., M. T. D. 



As the Trucks Go Rollin' By 

There's a rumble an' a jumble an' a bumpin' 

an' a thud. 
As I wakens from my restless sleep here in 

my bed o' mud, 
*N' I pull my blankets tighter underneath 

my shelter fly. 
An' I listen to the thunder o' the trucks 

a-rollin* by. 

They're jumpin' an' they're humpin' through 

the inky gloom o' night, 
'N* I wonder how them drivers see without a 

glim o' light; 
I c'n hear the clutches roarin' as they throw 

the gears in high. 
An' the radiators boilin' as the trucks go 

rollin' by. 

There's some a-draggin' cannons, you c'n spot 

the sound all right — 
The rumblin' ones is heavy, an' the rattly 

ones is light; 
Tlie clinkin' shells is pointin' up their noses 

at the sky — 
Oh, you c'n tell what's passin* as the trucks 

go rollin' by. 



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But most of 'em is packin' loads o' human 

Yankee freight 
That'll slam the 'ol soft pedal ontuh Heinie's 

hymn o' hate; 
You c'n hear 'em singin' "Dixie," and the 

"Sweet Bye 'N' Bye," 
'N' "Where Do we Go from Here, Boys?" 

as the trucks go rollin' by. 

Some's singin' songs as, when I left, they 

wasn't even ripe 
(A showin' 'at they's rookies wot ain't got 

a service stripe). 
But just the same they're good aid Yanks, 

and that's the reason why 
I likes the jazz 'n' barber shop o' the trucks 

a-rollin' by. 

Jus' God and Gen'rul Pershing knows where 

these here birds'll light. 
Where them bumpin' trucks is bound for 

under camouflage o' night. 
When they can't take aero pitchers with 

their Fokkers in the sky 
Of our changes o' location by the trucks 

a-roIlin' by. 

So altho' my bed is puddles an' Fm soaked 

through to the hide. 
My heart's out with them doughboys on their 

bouncin', singin' ride. 
They're bound for paths o' glory, or, p'raps, 
to fight 'n' die — 
God bless that Yankee cargo in the trucks 

a-rollin' by. 

L. W. SUCKERT, 1st Lt., A. S. 



**Hommes 40^ Chevaux 8" 

Roll, roll, roll, over the rails of France, 
See the world and its map unfurled, five 

centimes in your pants. 
What a noble trip, jolt and jog and jar, 
Forty we, with Ex^uipment C in one flat- 
wheeled box-car. 

We are packed by hand, 
Shoved aboard in 'teens, 

Pour a little oil on' us 
And we would be sardines. 

Rations? Oo-la-la! and how we love the 

man 
Who learned how to intern our chow in a 

cold and clammy can. 
Beans and beef and beans, beef and beans 

and beef, 
Willie raw, he will win the war, take in your 

belt a reef. 

Mess kits flown the coop, 
Cups gone up the spout; 

Use your thumbs for issue forks. 
And pass the bull about. 



Hit the floor for bunk, six hommes to one 

homme's place; 
It's no fair to the bottom layer to kick 'em 

in the face. 
Move the corp'ral's feet out of my left ear; 
Lay off, sarge, you are much too large, I'm 

not a bedsack, dear. 

Lift my head up, please. 
From this bag of bread; 

Put it on somebody's chest. 
Then I'll sleep like the dead. 

Roll, roll, roll, yammer and snore and fight. 
Traveling zoo the whole day through and 

bedlam all the night. 
Four days in the cage, going from hither 

hence ; 
Ain't it great to ride by freight at good old 

Unc's expense? 



// / Were a Cootie 

If I were a cootie (pro-Ally, of course), 
I'd hie me away on a Potsdam-bound horse. 
And I'd seek out the Kaiser (the war-mad- 
dened cuss). 
And I'd be a bum cootie if I didn't muss 
His Imperial hide from his head to his toe! 
He might hide from the bombs, but I'd give 

him no show! 
If I were a cootie,, I'd deem it my duty 
To thus treat the Kaiser, 
Ah, oui! 

And after I'd thoroughly covered Bill's area, 
I'd hasten away to the Prince of Bavaria, 
And chew him a round or two — under the 

Linden — 
Then pack up my things and set out for old 

Hinden — 
(Old Hindy's the guy always talking 'bout 

straffing) — 
To think what I'd do to that bird sets me 

laughin ! 
If I were a cootie, I'd deem it my duty 
To thus treat the Prince and old Hindy, 
Ah, oui! 

I'd ne'er get fed up on Imperial gore — 

I might rest for a while, but I'd go back for 

more. 
I'd spend a few days with that Austrian 

crew, 
And young Carl himself I'd put down for a 

chew; 
They'd be no meatless days for this cootie, I 

know, 
They'd all get one jolly good straffing or so. 
For if I were a cootie, I'd deem it my duty 
To thus treat their damnships. 
Ah, oui! 

A. P. BowEN, Sgt., R. T. 0. 



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Me— And War Coin* On 

Me! — a-leadin' a column! 

Me!-^that women have loved! 

Me, a-leadin' a colmun o' Yanks, an' tracin' 

Her name in the Stars! 
Me, that ain*t seen the purple hills before all 

mixed in the skies 
With the gray dawn meltin' to azure there; 
Me, that ain't a poet, growin' poetic; 
An' the flash o' the guns on -the skyline. 
An* red wine— an' France! 
An' me laughin' — and War! 
An' Slim Jim singin' a song; 
An' a lop-eared mule a-kickin' a limber 
An' axles 'thout no grease hollerin' Maggie 

at me! 
Me, that women have loved — 
An' War goin' on! 

Mornin' comin'. 

An' me — a-leadin' a column 

Along o' them from the College, 

Along o' them from the Streets, 

An' them as had mothers that spiled them, 

and them as hadn't, — 
Lovin' names in the Stars, 
An' Slim Jim singin* a song. 
An' Folks to Home watchin' them, too. 
An' Maggie that never had loved me, lovin' 

me now, • 

An* thinkin' an' cryin' for me! — 
For me that loved Maggie that never loved 

me till now. 

Mornin' comin', 

An' me — a-leadin' a column. 

An' a town in the valley 

Round the bend in the road. 

An* Ginger strainin' his neck 

An' thinkin' o' Picket Lines — 

An' me an' the rest o' them thinkin* o' home 

and eggs down there in the village. 
An' Coney startin' to close at Home 
An' Maggie mashed in the crowd — 
An' me a-leadin' a column — 
An' War goin' on! 

Me that hollered for water. 

With a splinter o' hell in my side; 

Me that have laid in the sun a-cursin' the 

beggars and stretchers 
As looked like they'd never a-come; 
Me that found God with the gas at my 

throat 
An* ravin' like a madman for Maggie, 
An' wanted a wooden cross over me! 
Me — an' Slim Jim back o' me singin'. 
An' tracin' a name in the fade o' the Stars! 
Me — knowin' that some'll, be ridin' that's 

walkin' tonight — 
Knowin' that some'U never see Broadway 

again, 
An' red wine. 
An' Little Italy, 
An* Maggies like Mine, — 
Me! — a-murmurin' a prayer for Maggie 



An' stoppin' to laugh at Slim 

An' shoutin' **To the right o* the road for 

the Swoi-zant-canze ! " 
Them babies that raise such hell up the 

line. 
An' marchin'. 
An' marchin' by night, 
An' sleepin' by day. 
An' France, 
An* red wine. 
An' me thinkin' o' Home, 
Me — a-leadin' a column, — 
An' War goin' on! 

John Palmer Cummincs, Inf. 



Old Lady Rumor 

There is nothing like a rumor just to set the 
gang afire. 

They receive it. 
And believe it. 
Does it matter who's the liar? 
No, it doesn't. For as often as we hear of 
something new. 

Though it's doubted, 
It is shouted 
By our gossip loving crew. 
Conversation is a morsel, and, with greedy 
appetite. 

How we chew it. 
As we brew it. 
Be it daytime, be it night. 
Back in the States it started and continues 
o'er the foam. 

And we'll swally 
It, by golly. 
When we join the Soldiers' Home! 

A-h-h-h — men-n ! 
C H. MacCoy, Base Hosp. .38. 



The R. T. O. 

Oh, hear the song of R. T. 0. 

With his "40 Hommes or 8 Chevaux." 

He works in the day and he works at night. 

For the men must go or the men can't fight. 

They call him here and they call him there. 

They ask him Why and they ask him Where. 

Oh, his cars don't come, but his cars must go. 

Be it wet or dry or rain or snow. 

If they call for Hommes or they want 

Chevaux. 
Thus goes the song of the R. T. 0. 

Oh, it's "How we love you, R. T. O. 

With your *40 Hommes or 8 Chevaux!' 

Say, whadja do before the war — 

Work in a packin' house? Lor'! 

We got an army in here now. 

And we ain't got room for our packs and 

chow. 
They's 40 Hommes aboard, you KNOW, 
So come ahead with your 8 Chevaux, 
And shout *Allez' and away we'll go. 
Oh, how we LOVE you, R. T. 0.!" 



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Heaven help the R. T. 0. 

With his "40 Hommes or 8 Chevaux!" 

He's got five hundred men to load 

On a few cars and a busy road. 

Oh, the war won't end if he don't make good, 

'Cause he's got to send 'em the men and 

food, 
Be it wet or dry or rain or snow. 
And they call for Hommes or they want 

Chevaux, 
There's hell to pay if the stuff don't go. 
So Heaven help the R. T. O. 

A. P. BowEN, Sgt., R T. 0. 



The Doughboy Promises 

SHE 
When you come back — 
Ah, 'twill be such returning 
As only lips like mine can sanctify! 

Then will my arms, that ache with endless 

yearning. 
Find sweet surcease from the regret of 
learning 
To give you up, if need there be, to die. 

Should you come back 
Aged from the toil of fighting. 
Marred, it may be, though perfect you set 
out. 
What matters, so your heart has known no 

blighting. 
Your soul has met the test without affright- 
ing? 
What is there, dear one, after that, to doubt! 

OA, but you must come back to me, beloved! 
ITounded or no, you must come back. 

HE 

When I come back. 
Beneath my helmet muddy. 
There'll be a smile, stored through the strife, 

for you; 
There'll be a kiss, tender and warm — aye, 

ruddy 
With hint of Gallic skies, for my real 

buddy 
(That's soldier talk, and soldier talk rings 

true). 

As I come back, 
Down the street flags adorning. 
Half seeing all the pomp for sight of you, 
Foretaste I'll know of gladsome days a-born- 
ing 
For us, come out of Night at last to 
Morning 
From the Long Trail that terminates for two. 

OA, but I will come back to you, my Mother! 
Wounded? Why, no!., . . I will come 
back! 

Arthur McKeogh, Lt. Inf. 



Road to Montfaucon 

"M. P., the road to Avocourt 

That leads to Montfaucon?" 

"The road, sir, black with mules and carts 

And brown with men a-marching on — 

The Romagne woods that lie beyond 

The ruined heights of Montfaucon — 

"North over reclaimed No Man's Land 
The martyred roadway leads. 
Quick with forward moving hosts 
And quick with valiant deeds 
Avenging Rheims, Liege, and Lille, 
And outraged gods and creeds. 

"There lies the road from Avocourt 

That leads to Montfaucon, 

Past sniper and machine gun nest. 

By steel and thermite cleansed. They're 

gone— 
And there in thund'rous echelon 
The ruined heights of • Montfaucon." 

Harold Riezelman, 1st Lt., C. W. S. 



There* s About Two Million Fellows 

There's about two million fellows from the 

North, South, East, and West, 
Who scurried up the gang plank of a ship; 
They have felt the guy ropes paying and the 

troopship gently swaying 
As it started on its journey from the country 

of the blest. 
They have washed in hard salt water, bucked 

the Army transport grub. 
Had a hitch of crow's nest duty on the way; 
Strained their eyes mistaking white caps for 

a humpback Prussian sub 
Just at twilight when *Hhe danger's great, 

they say." 
When their ship had lost the convoy they 

were worried just a bit. 
And rather thought the skipper should be 

canned ; 
And the sigh of heartfelt feeling almost set 

the boat to reeling 
When each of those two million sighted 

land. 

There's about two million fellows that have 
landed here in France, 

They're scattered, GOD and G. H. Q. know 
where; 

By the cranes where steamers anchor, 
schooner, tramp, or greasy tanker. 

There's an 0. D. outfit waiting just to make 
the cargo dance. 

They are chopping in the forest, double- 
timing on the roads. 

Putting two-ways where a single went be- 
fore; 

In the cabs of sweating engines, pushing, 
pulling double loads 

When the R. T. O.'s in frenzied tones implore. 



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For it's duty, solid duty with the hustling 

men behind. 
From the P. of E.*8 on up to No Man's Land; 
And there's never chance of shirking when 

the boys up front are working — 
Night and day must go the answer to the 

front line's stem command. 

There's about two million fellows and there's 

some of them who lie 
Where eighty-eights and G. I.'s gently drop; 
Where the trucks and trains are jamming and 

the colonel he is damning 
Half the earth and in particular the Service 

of Supply. 
They have had a stretch of trenches, beat the 

Prussian at his best. 
Seen their buddies fall like heroes right 

beside ; 
But — there's nigh two million fellows from 

the country of the blest 
Who know the cause for which their com- 
rades died. 
Who have crossed the sluggish shallows 

where their little life streams ran 
And broadened just a trifle, you will find; 
And their vision's cleaner, clearer, and they 

hold just that much dearer 
The great and glorious land they left behind! 
Albert J. Cook, 
Sgt., Hq. Detch., Army Corps. 



The Lost Towns 

Beneath the new moon sleeping 

The little lost towns lie; 
Their streets are very white and hushed, 

Their black spires tilt the sky. 

Across the darkened meadows 

A plaintive night bird calls; 
The sea of fog that clouds the fields 

Rolls softly to their walls. 

Within their shuttered houses 

No midnight candles glance; 
Their womenfolk are all abed. 

Their menfolk fight for France. 

They dream, the little Ipst towns 

Of Alsace and Lorraine, 
The vision of the patient years, 

The old frontier again. 

Sleep on, nor cease your dreaming, 

Who pitted men and crowns. 
We'll bring you back, well bring you back, 

little, long lost towns. 

Steurt H. Emery, Pvt., M. P. 



When the Bugles Blow Again 



When the bugles blow again. 
Across the misty fields — 
For silently they long have lain. 
Their lips by orders sealed — 
I know that all is well with us, 
That war and death are o'er 
That soon I'll hear a mother's voice, 
Sweet, as in days of yore. 

When the bugles blow again. 

As clear as Sabbath bells, 

I know that fever, cold and pain. 

And gas, and mud, and bursting shells 

Are memories: that we have won! 

That ne'er again shall we go forth 

Full battle fledged to fight the Hun, 

Though mindful evil's still on earth. 

When the bugles blow again — 
Revell-y, taps, tattoo — 



The notes as sweet as summer rain, 

So clearly phrased, a-new 

Stir in my heart a love of life, 

A fierce, long hope, and I 

Who laughed at flame and shot and knife, 

No longer wish to die. 

When the bugles blow again, 
The echo comes from you. 
Across the land, across the plain. 
To tell me you are true. 
Bugles that erstwhile sounded strife, 
Sound with the same notes, home; 
Sound with the same notes, life; 
Sound with the same notes, home. 

Paul S. Bliss. 

Written at Chateau de Chehery, Nov. 28, 

7979, when fatigue call was blown by Sam 

Cobb. Note: the bugle was never used near 

the front until after the Armistice was signed. 



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IT is a hot day — July 8, 1919. The place is Camp Shelby, Miss. The exact 
time is 2:45 p. M. 

At this minute the 805th Pioneer Infantry becomes history, for Lieut. George 
F. Doyle, personnel adjutant at Camp Shelby, has just signed his name to the 
following document: 

"Received of Lieut. Colonel Willis Bacon, 805th Pioneer Infantry, complete 
records of the 805th Pioneer Infantry, checked and found 0. K." 

As the regimental historian writes this, the last official act is taking place: 

Lieut. Colonel Bacon, sweating, and Lieut. F. D. Preston, also sweating, are 
"policing up" Building 320 at Camp Shelby, for the enlisted staff is gone. They 
are raising plenty of dust. There is much paper to be gathered up. Both are 
stripped to their undershirts. 

They call upon the regimental adjutant and historian for assistance. A type- 
writer box filled with papers and trash, also one "G. I.'* can, are carried out 
behind the building, and Lieut. Preston stoops, and with lighted match touches off 
the funeral pyre. 

For three days the Personnel Adjutant has been working night and day getting 
records in shape to be sent to the Adjutant General of the Army. There are 
morning reports, retained copies of pay rolls — a million and one things. 

He stands, does Lieut. R. A. Dornfeld, looking over my shoulder, his sleeves 
rolled up; a handl^erchief, soaking wet, upon his head. 

He heaves a sigh of relief. 

There is a lull — just a moment of quiet. 

And Colonel Bacon comes back with a big motor car which is to take us to 
Hattiesburg to catch our trains for home. 




Lieutenant F. D. Preston 
Performing the Last Of- 
ficial Act. 



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FINIS. 



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Biography of the Owner of this Book 

His Name 

His Birth 

His Father 

His Mother 

His Wife 

His Enlistment and Date of Call 

His Age at that Time 

His Branch of the Service 

His Cantonments 

His Unit 

His Departure for ''Over There' 

His Commanding Officers 

His Transports 

His Promotions^ Honors^ etc 

His Greatest Experience 

His Proudest Moment 

His Final Rank 

His Return 

His Discharge 



PRINTED AND 
BOUND BY 



Digitized by 



Goog 













Digitized by 



Google 



ilif ' I f*l^ 



--* 



I