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Full text of "Vindagua"

For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 






Lee 
College 

William G. 

Squires 

Library 




GIFT FROM 
VINDAGUA STAFF 






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1963 



INDAGUA 



LEE COLLEGE 
CLEVELAND JENNESSEE 

Volume XXII 

Editor James Alan Hubbard 

Art Director Marilyn Ann Sindle 

Business Manager ^ Herbert Lynn Stone 



William G. Squires iibcary 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



^OT TO BE TAKEN OUT 




The "Decade of Destiny — " the 1960's. Prop- 
er destiny is rooted and founded in unshakable 

ORWARD 

Christian truth, but that of the present is being realized 
in revolutionary change. Change in the world's political 
structures: the Common Market, illusory Arab unity, 
numerous Latin American coup d^ etats, the cold "war, 
and kaleidiscopic hot spots; change in the economy of her 
nations: European fluctuation, China's starving millions, - 
Africa's boundless potential, and America's foreign aid. 
It is all involved and very real in this decade. Changes 
are so vast and incomprehensible that the world's popu- 
lation is disillusioned at it all, and frightened at the pros- 
pects. 

Answ^ers to the solutions of the problems of unpredicta- 
ble w^orld change are sought in the undesirable terms of 
w^orld government, pow^er blocs, and disarmament. While 
the world searches, w^e believe that w^e have the answ^er. 

At Lee College w^e return to the old foundation, that 
of Christian truth. Still the "Decade of Destiny," but one 
w^hich is neither based nor realized in change but in truth. 
Change, nevertheless, is inherent in destiny, and forw^ard 
movement is provoked by the impetus of truth. Its evi- 
dence is seen here. Old curricula are being changed, old 
buildings are giving w^ay to new^ structures, old methods 
are being revitalized or giving w^ay to new^ dynamic pro- 
grams, and above all and undergirding all is the revela- 
tion of God in Jesus Christ. 

The 1963 Vindagua embodies within its pages the new^ 
change, the new^ breath of life, and communicates through 
its completely revamped format the spirit of Christian 
principles. 

For a w^orld gone mad, Jesus Christ is the solution. The 
w^orld w^ill resolve its problems w^hen its highest ideal again 
becomes THE CHRISTIAN MAN. 



inWORSHIP 





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from Marino Marini 





" '.LOAi- ff " TiiniiiiiriiT 



THIS DO IN RErf:MBRAN[I OF 



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Welcoming committee greets students 



On Friday, August 31, 1962, three days before registration, a meeting 
of the welcoming committee convened in the student center to help the 
student leaders comprising this committee to become better acquainted 
and better informed of campus activities for the approaching school year. 
President Hughes addressed the group concerning the objectives of the 
student body for the forthcoming term. Discussion groups were organized 
and led by faculty members and student body officers. They discussed 
the relations that the different clubs and organizations have to student 
life. All the class and organization officers of the past year constituted 
the welcoming committee guided by faculty members. The committee 
endeavored to make the new students feel welcome and to help them 
become adjusted to campus life. They met some students at transportation 
centers while they welcomed others on the campus. The committee ended 
the program with a picnic at a nearby park. The 1962 welcoming com- 
mittee is to be commended for a job well done. 




Welcome us, will you? 




Welcome us, will you? 



and helps them 
get settled 




What is that fly doing in my soup? 



How did that mouse get in with all that cheese? 










^^^^n^ 



Registration goes on . . . 



Do you have claustrophobia? 




..:^ 





Pretty miss filling out registration cards. 



Registration! A meaningful word to all students and 
one that is pregnant with memories. 

Those first few days . . . being met by the Welcoming 
Committee, unpacking and trying to find that needed 
object, confronting that new roommate, eating the 
old familiar food or perhaps it is new, getting ac- 
quainted with new people and then . . . instructions, 
long lines, frayed nerves, more instructions, a 3:00 
meeting, chewed pencils, blank check book, another 
long line, business office, registrar's office — whose of- 
fice? 

Then all of a sudden the last card is filled out, the 
last class card is yours, the last line is finished, and 
you're free — with nothing to do! 



Some register while others stand around with their mouth open 




and on and on . . . 




Pre-dawn registration line. 



Half-finished student. 



Rush week emphasis. 



The line-up. 




'^■^ 




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* * 



ia^%^ 




ALMA MATER 



In the heart of dear old Cleveland, 

Reared against the sky, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater 

As the years go by. 
Praise to thee, our Alma Mater, 

Molder of mankind; 
Greater glory, love unending. 

Be forever thine! 

Balmy breezes gently ivafted 

Through inspiring halls; 
Mem'ries' leaflets, closely tw^ining, 

Shall fore'er recall. 
Yesterdays that waken in our 

Hearts a tender glow. 
Making greater still the love 

That w^e have learned to know^. 

Ever onw^ard! Be our w^atchw^ord, 

Faithful soldiers w^e, 
O'we a life of loyal service 

To our dear L. C. 
Praise to thee, our Alma Mater, 

Molder of mankind; 
Greater glory, love unending. 

Be forever thine. 



'Twas not for knowledge 

that we camel 




Say Sis, you don't have to eat that cup! 




•aA * _>■* .-<•■<; ■«% 



Students "preparing" for those anticipated classes. 



Talking about a "sick-cow" look! 







You'll notice that point F under Roman numeral III is 



Cheer up, the worst is yet to come. 



A noisy babble of voices belonging to apprehensive 
freshmen and gay, nonchalant upperclassmen usher 
in the new semester. Long hours are spent in twisting 
queues which seem to lead nowhere and everywhere, 
but registration day is finally ended. 

Confusion attended the first week of classes ... a 
new student strides confidently into room 204 and, 
two minutes later, slips noiselessly into room 202 . . . 
an embarrassed student looks vainly for the library 
in the Alumni building ... a senior loses his schedule 
card and misses his first French class. 

In the halls students chatter excitedly with old 
friends while an earnest junior rushing to his next 
class trips and scatters his books on the floor. The 
bell rings and frantic feet scramble for the nearest 
doorway. 

In the dormitories pyramids of suitcases hide an 
empty corner, and anxious students, rushing to lunch, 
dodge boxes still standing in the hallways. 

A discordant symphony of clattering dishes and 
chattering diners drift from the cafeteria as sludents 
lingering over meat and potatoes renew old acquaint- 
ances and make new ones. 

The first week passes and all to quickly students 
learn that thirty hours must be squeezed into each 
day. This dilemma is remedied by a master schedule 
studiously drawn up during study hall and just as 
studiously revised the following evening. The senior 
still misses French class, the junior still spills his 
load of books, the freshmen still strides into room 204 
and quieUy slinks out, the cafeteria is still a cacophony 
of noise, and teachers still mispronounce names. The 
semester has begun. Life at Lee goes on and on and . . . 



. . . but classes 
started anyway 



"I'm learning my lessons and having a baU!" 




Fall football 




Football panorama. 




And while the band played on, others goofed off, and off, and .... 

becomes a pastime 
for culturally 
minded scholars 





Now boys, the purpose of this game is to cross the goal line. 



If you'd root for the underdog you'd get excited! 



-ir-xl 



. . while Softball leads at the fall outing 




The setting for the fall outing was somewhat dif- 
ferent this year than it has been in the past. Instead 
of the regular Lake Ocoee setting, the student body 
enjoyed a fine outing with sports of all kinds at the 
state Church of God campground at Tyner. Students 
began their day by rushing into the cafeteria for 
breakfast and immediately afterwards, with outfits of 
all sorts, rushing into the auditorium for instructions 
for the day. 

At the campground, activities were begun with 
prayer. Students enjoyed a different game called soc- 
cer with the college students challenging the expert 
foreign students. Of course, most of us know the re- 
sult: aliens over natives. 

Another popular sport of the day was horseshoes. 
Like they say, "Dynamite comes in small packages," 
and Mr. Butler is dynamite in the horseshoe business. 
Students enjoyed seeing "Champions" take turns at 
the game of "hookers," trying to turn the tide against 
Butler & Company. 

As the weather was somewhat cool, swimming was 
not quite so popular as it has been on past outings. 
However a few of the "gents" cooled their epidermal 
covering in the chilly liquid. 

One of the most challenging games of the day was 
volleyball. Different divisions of the college took turns 
defending the "courts of the elite," with Mr. Odom 
and his team taking the initiative in almost all the 
games. 

The noon meal was very suitable for the occasion — 
the traditional sandwiches. 

Devotions were the climax of the day. 



Activity is no stranger 




18 



. . . with 

Hillbilly 
Heyday, 




Tell those two big ones to get off their knees. 



Street services and Sadie Hawkins hayride 




Members of the religious clubs prepare 
for a Saturday street service. 



HILLBILLY HEYDEY 

Scents of new-mowed hay filled the air as guys 
and gals gathered for the annual "Hillbilly Heydey" 
sponsored by the Student Social Committee. Tunes 
on the "ole" banjo set the mood. Those who dressed 
hillbilly style felt right at home in the big red barn. 
What could be more perfect than a visit by Charlie 
Weaver, alias Charles Beach, with a letter from Mama? 
Also visiting was the Mount Idy Symphonette, featui-- 
ing Jim Burns singing our old favorite, "I'll Walk the 
Line." We were brought up to date on the latest styles 
and colors by the lovely models from Swampgrass, 
Tennessee. They presented a variety of fashions in- 
cluding a stunning potato-brown dress, bean-green 
ensemble with matching turquoise accessories, and 
a Carole Grindstaff original wedding dress. Uncle A T. 
dropped in with his mouth harp and all joined him 
in song. Straight from the West came Judy Young 
singing "Don't Fence Me In." To show off our "best 
dressed" we held a contest and chose Doris Dennison 
as "Best Looking Girl" and Jim Burns as "Best Look- 
ing Boy." Oh yes, vittles were served. All in all, it was 
a rustic, gala affair. 



Don't let the stars get In your eyes, nor the hay in your hair. 





Fall Revival 



"If my people which are called by my name, shall humble them- 
selves, and pray, and seek my face . . . then will I hear from Heav- 
en . . ." Once again this command and promise was proved to be un- 
failing as the Lee College faculty and student body banded together 
in unity, seeking God for another outpouring of His Spirit. As the 
shekinah of God's glory filled the Temple in the days of David and 
Solomon, so did He fill the Lee College auditorium from the opening 
of the revival to the closing night. 

The soon appearing of God's Son was made real to us through the 
preaching of the Reverend James L. Slay. One of Reverend Slay's 
most memorable sermons was his relating of the description of the 
four animals listed in Proverbs 30, which he so vividly described in 
the sermon, "The Four Feeble Folk." 

Several students were saved, others sanctified, and many baptized 
with the Holy Ghost; this revival will live forever in the minds and 
the hearts of many as a time of having received Divine direction from 
God relative to their future To those who had found it hard to live 
a consistent Christian life. Reverend Slay's sermons, "Victory Through 
Christ," gave strength and courage. 

The audience seemed to look forward with expectation from night 
to night to the variety of music which was presented. Included in 
the musical program of this holy convocation were the Forward in 
Faith Trio, campus choir, glee club, band, several instrumental en- 
sembles, and other vocal groups. 

This revival, the peak of the semester's spiritual services, will serve 
as a constant stream of devotional refreshment for those persons 
whose lives received direction and guidance from the Fount of our 
salvation. 



Revival night in the altar. 




The Reverend James L. Slay 



20 





We worshipped through the preaching of the Word . . 



offering of prayer 



Community Union Service 



Thanksgiving, a time for all peoples of 
America to lay aside requests and to lift 
thankful hearts for their ancestral herit- 
age, their accomplishments of the present, 
and their hopes for tomorrow, was observed 
by the churches of Cleveland. Desiring to 
fulfill this custom, they gathered together 
in the Lee College auditorium November 20, 
1962, at 7:30 p.m. for the annual Union 
Thanksgiving Service sponsored by the 
Bradley County Ministerial Association. 

Immediately preceding the message, the 
one hundred thirty-voice Lee College cam- 
pus choir sang their praises with "All Hail 
the Power of Jesus Name" under the di- 
rection of Mr. A. T. Humphries. Reverend 
Doyle Stanfield, North Cleveland Church, 
of God pastor, gave an inspiring Thanks- 
giving message and concluded with the con- 
gregation singing, "Make Me a Blessing." 

The benediction and the postlude, "Now 
Thank We All," concluded the time of praise 
and thanksgiving. 




and singing of praise 



21 




Does he have varicose veins? 




Hey, it's snowing down south! 



One Miss cops crown while another . . . 



Amid a stormy barrage of catcalls and wolf whistles, a new Miss America 
began "her" royal reign on November 9, 1962. 

Vivacious Delilah Lambert, wearing a stimning red sheath, waltzed regally 
into the hearts of all Lee College students as S.N.E.A.'s new Miss America. 

The new queen was chosen from a bevy of beefy belles from Walker and 
Ellis Halls. As the dormitory names imply these gorgeous gorgols, who por- 
trayed their "girlish" charm in various instrumentals, songs, and dramatic 
readings, were of the male sex. 

The contestants were judged on their talent, poise, and mastery of the art 
of walking in high heels, as well as the completeness of their take-off on the 
fairer sex. 

Last year's Miss America, gorgeous Gertrude Stout, presented Delilah with 
the regal crown. 

The Miss America contest, emceed by Dean Gause of the Bible College, was 
presented to acrue capital for a scholarship fund which will enable some de- 
serving S.N.E.A. member to continue his education to prepare him for a career. 



Is that a string of suckers? 




cops clown 




\^' 



Take one boy, add one girl, and, for spice, throw in a couple of textbooks for 
English literature or pastoral theology and the product is a college marriage. 

A number of students at Lee combine the responsibilities of marriage with 
the pursuit o^' a college education. In many cases only one of the partners attends 
college while the other works to help meet the budget. A few couples, however, 
are able to meet their obligations while both complete their education. 

Among the married students presently enrolled, some of whom now have fami- 
lies, many met on this campus — and perhaps not really by chance. Here one 
often finds someone who shares his convictions, goals, dreams and ambitions. 
It usually begins in the cafeteria. A boy saunters slowly through the crowd and 
is "unable" to find a seat anywhere but near the one he has been noticing. Or 
a girl somehow manages to be at the right place at the right time. The announce- 
ment that this meeting has produced a steady couple is usually made from the 
shower stall. But, love is neither blind nor handicapped by classes, assignments, 
restrictions, or cold showers! 

Be it June or long week-end, wedding bells ring. 



23 



Freshman play draws capacity crowd 




THE CLOSED DOOR 

On the initial evening of Home-coming Week, No- 
vember 23, 1962, the freshman class presented the 
comedy-drama, "The Closed Door," written by Wil- 
burn Braun. 

To a packed hoiise, the romantic antics of the 
heroine with an adventurous young stranger were de- 
lightful and the play a relaxing affair. "The Closed 
Door" is almost unique in content for although it is 
romantic and a comedy, it also contains strong ele- 
ments of religious sentiment. 

The eleven-man cast revolved around one, Portia 
Gray, a young and beautiful lady-lawyer. Portia was 
dedicated to her blind sister Louise Gray and in her 
efforts to have her sisters sight restored, the family 
is reunited with the Winslow family next door. The 
Winslow's and the Grays had been fast friends for 
years even to the point of having an inside door con- 
necting their homes. Upon the outset of a feud this 
door was nailed shut not to be reopened for years 
until the occurrence of a providential accident. 

A delightful three-act drama, and sobering too as 
the two families unite in common thankfulness at 
the healing of Louise. The "closed door" is open yes, 
but even more important a new world is open to the 
once blind Louise Gray. 






Canteen Caucus! 



"Sixteen hours and what do I get? 
Another day older and . . . ." 




. . . and so does 
the student center 




mf 




Competent brickcleaners earn, 
three dollars per one thousand 
bricks. 



Progress continues 



A cloud of dust settles and a heap of bricks, wood and 
memories are all that remain of Old Main. Dedicated in 
1885 by Dr. J. B. McFerrin, the three-story center section 
housed Centenary College for Methodist girls. The north 
wing was built and paid for by C. L. Hardwick and John L. 
Parker and appropriately called the Hardwick-Parker wing. 
After a donation of $10,000 from Dr. Morrow of Nashville, 
other additions were made. 

In 1947 the Church of God purchased the property, which 
was at that time Bob Jones College, and named it Lee 
College in honor of F. J. Lee, a great leader and former 
General Overseer of the Church of God. 

Through the years improvements have been made on 
the buildings, faculty members have been added to the 
staff, wider varieties of curriculum have been established, 
all of which play an important role in the progress of Lee 
College. 

Ironic enough, that which was the beginning of this in- 
stitution must now be demolished for the betterment and 
progress of the institution. One day soon a modern, more- 
accommodating building will stand where Old Main once 
stood. 




So let the sunshine in 





"Next time take a bus and leave the driving to us.' 



especially in 

extra-curricular activities 





Not everyone can shoot two baskets at once. 



27 



Variety is the spice of campus life 



The student social committee sponsored a series of lec- 
tures on "Courtship and Marriage." To begin the series, 
Dean J. H. Walker, Jr. told of the problems encountered 
during the courtship and engagement period. Each student 
was given a self-evaluation sheet to determine his own 
conception of proper boy-girl relations. 

The following night, Mr Chalmer Chastain, Jr., M.D., 
lectured on the "Physical Aspects of Marriage." This frank 
and sensible presentation answered many "unspoken" ques- 
tions of the students and clarified various mysteries of the 
physical adjustments in marriage. 

The Reverend Charles W. Conn, D.Litt., presented the 
next lecture on the "Religious Viewpoint of Marriage," in 
which he made us realize the necessity of basing a Chris- 
tian marriage, from its outset, on the Scriptures. 

The final lecture was given on the "Practical Preparation 
for Marriage" by the Reverend E. Warren Rusk, pastor of 
the First Baptist Church, Cleveland, Tennessee. He gave 
unusually deep insight into the more intricate problems 
0^" social adjustments in marriage. 

Each night a filmstrip was shown in conjunction with 
the subject discussed and a question-answer period was 
conducted. 

The series was climaxed by a social on Friday night and 
the showing of the film AS FOR ME AND MY HOUSE. 



with lectures, 



receptions 




Dr. Chastain, Lecturer 



President and Mrs. Hushes meet class and club Favorites. 





"And de Lawd. he say 'dat's good" 




Miss Billie Ruth Syphurs crowned by previous year's 
queen, Janice Hughes Greeson. 



drama, 




Attendant Betty Byrd and her escort. 



and honor 




The gangs all here — Alumni Day 



29 



Semester exams inspire resolutions 




You're not cooperating, K.K. 



I'm going to ace this test. 



The last two were true, so 



OOPS! 




\ 





Are you still using that greasy kid's stuff? 



We've got to study next semester 



I KNOW that wasn't In my notes 





"Where ambition turns to dust" 




31 




Invasion group No. 4 please meet 



Campus Corn Courier 



Next semester comes 



and resolutions are forgotten 




Spring fever! 




In some schools 

they congregate 

in telephone booths, 

in others 

they take 50 mile hikes; 

here they fill rooms 

with newspapers! 




Locked out again? 





Altogether now, uno, dos, tres 



William G. Squires Library 
Cleveland, Tennessee 




The lineup. 



Except for a few new students, 

it's the same ole faces 



"Oh, those endearing: young charms." 






'What you got there Ed?' 







'Pickles" 



'Will it be a letter or a summons?" 



t 











'From the house of unclaimed blessings." 



. . . in the same ole places 



35 



College royalty are crowned in 



French court of 1763 milieu 




Attencion! Attencion! 




"After the Ball was Over'' 




Ladies-in-waiting for French gentlemen 



36 




Court minstrel and jester 



37 




The day's first problem: crossing Ocoee 



Early morning dilemma 

ushers in another day 




7:30 a.m. exasperations 




If at first you don't succeed, forget it! 



38 




One more letter before postage rates go up 




Pi Delta Omicron induction 



You see? I told you it was a frog! 




39 





'Swing into Spring" was the theme for the G.A.A. fashion show which featured outfits for school, weather, sports, and evening wear. 

Fashion show and forensic play highlight 



Samuel Robeff helps raise funds for an Easter invasion group. 



Newspaper carriers have changed 
since the pony express days. 



I 





40 




Who says it's all work? 



ARSENIC AND OLD LACE 



evening entertainment 



Glenda Griffin puts finishing touches on 
Lieutenant Rooney. 




"Charming, simply charming," and so goes the play, 
Arsenic and Old Lace, as its fourteen-member cast 
bow on and off stage to the delight of a near-capacity 
crowd. Held on the night of March 29, this rollicking 
three-act comedy brought two hours of imaginative, 
hilarious drama to an audience which had not seen 
a major comedy produced at Lee College in over three 
years. 

Aunts Abby and Martha Brewster have charitably 
poisoned eleven gentleman and had their half-wit 
nephew Teddy bury them in the basement. Teddy, 
fancying himself to be President Teddy Roosevelt, 
does so under the illusion that these men are yellow 
fever victims. He buries them in graves, ostensibly 
locks of the Panama Canal, dug out of the hard- 
packed basement soil. Romance and horror combine 
to make author Kesselring's play one of excellence. 
The Forensic cast, directed by a student, Garland 
Stout, made a fine performance to give the student 
body another great program. 

Silence is broken as Teddy appears. 




'.:) 



Study 




42 







e College Ushers serve efficiently: Richard Goodman, Junus Fulbright, Jim McCIain, Wendell Scull, Roger Courson, 
ouglas Slocumb, Rabun Haddock, Garland Stout, Don Shoemaker, Jackie Home, Duane Lambert. 



**«n 




Steady giving the cuts. 



Did you say the hospital called? 




. . . in contrasts 




43 




Why, under our man the foreign students will be the most 



Heated election . . 



Back on the farm we don't fertilize — we Lytleize. 




Thursday, April 25 at four o'clock in the after- 
noon: There were seven nominations for Student 
Body offices. For president there were two; for 
vice-president there were three; and for the office 
of secretary-treasurer there were two. 

Campaigning began with the vice-presidential 
candidates. Seemingly, through most of election 
week enthusiasm was highest among those can- 
didates running for the positions of vice-president 
and secretary-treasurer. Qualified in every respect 
these students and their campaign managers ran 
a strong, hard, clean race for their positions. 

Among the presidential hopefuls, Mancel Gerst- 
man and John Sims, things were not going so 
smoothly Student body opinion was sharply divided 
and became more so as these candidates made last- 
minute plays for votes. Words were exchanged, tem- 
pers flared, and opinions were discussed on every 
campus step. Through it all the candidates them- 
selves remained cool while their backers fought to 
win the campaign. 

All election events climaxed with the speech- 
making in student assembly on Thursday, May 2, 
1963. Candidates, pushed by friends, made their 
entrances and exits according to plan. Undecided 
voters reached decisions, latent spirits stirred, and 
enthusiasm triumphed as one by one the campaign 
managers and their candidates gave short, well- 
prepared, and telling speeches. 

A record number of voters turned out at the polls 
and cast their all-powerful vote. Often in student 
elections the most popular person carries the vote: 
in this one the consideration was different — more 
mature. Some of the questions asked were: "Who 
will be the best for the school?" "Which one of 
the several candidates is the more qualified?" "Can 
this one perform efficiently the duties of the of- 
fice for which he is running?" The voters decided: 
John Sims, president; Junus Fulbright, vice-presi- 
dent; Carolyn Lytle, secretary-treasurer. 



Campaigning doesn't stop with signs — v 
have to have mannequins, too! 




44 




Our local lobbyists! 




"What, me worry?" 



sees record turnout at polls. 



Election speeches stir enthusiasm among the student body on voting day. 



MAX 

"r PRESIDENT.. 



\ \ , \ \ 






We made it in spite of them! 



Where's the welcoming committee now? 



Convocation marks ending and beginning 



We made it in spite of them! 




It's all over now, that is, the school year 1962-63 ; 
but it need not be forgotten, for it has been pre- 
served in these pages. 

Registration . . . class forums . . . cafeteria lines 
. . . chapel . . . mail call . . . the library . . . exams . . . 
couples on the lawn . . . it's all here for you to glance 
at, read and remember. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Campus Life 8 

Features 48 

Organizations 66 

Academic Life 102 

Classes 114 

Athletics 142 

Academy 158 

Advertising 184 

A year is a lot of things. The laughter and tears, 
achievements and failures, dreams and nightmares of 
campus life leave a lasting impression that will linger 
in each student's memory. These memories are treas- 
ured possessions for which we express our thanks to 
those who helped enrich this year. 



47 



It is often thought by others and ourselves that there are 
more important days than those of college years. It is not 
so. The present marks the most important moment of life. 
If one ■were to span an entire life for some envisioned goal, 
putting no consequence on any but that, mometary pleasure 
only -would he his. Live for today; it is sufficient. 

The men and women within these pages are distinctive 
within their own right. These honors are as Important as 
will be those of any other day. They mark achievement, suc- 
cess, and honor. 

These students are the men and ^^omen who cause Lee 
College to fulfill its greatest destiny— -that of being a cam- 
pus of Christian scholarship. 



FEATURES 





Parade of Favorites 



From the auditorium of Lee College in Cleveland, Tennessee, the 
yearbook staff welcomes you to its first Vindagua Parade of Favor- 
ites. 

"This program tonight is the culmination of many weeks of work 
and preparation by the twenty-four young ladies whose perform- 
ances you will enjoy. They have engaged in private interviews, in- 
dulged in teas, practiced smiles and generally speaking have been 
just charming." 

Each young lady was chosen by a class, club, or an organization 
to represent it in the program. Determining criteria of selection 
were grace, talent, Christian leadership and beauty. 

The Favorites selected and gave an artistic performance of five 
to six minutes before the student body in one performance night. 
These performances included vocal renditions, dramatic readings, 
instrumentals, pantomimes and poetic recitations. Ten girls were 
selected as finalists by vote of the audience. 

The following pages are filled with the portraits of Lee coeds 
who have been recognized as campus favorites. Whiether labeled 
as attractive, dedicated, or talented each is noticed, admired, or 
envied as an individual. They speak with accents which place 
them as southern, northern, or midwestern, and they represent 
the charms associated with various parts of the country. The 
Vindagua is proud to present these delightful young ladies, each 
of whom is, not only intelligent, fun-loving, and friendly, but is 
also a Favorite in her own way. 




'Our next contestant 



Lee College reveals the 1962-63 Parade of Favorites! 








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Beautiful gowns, radiant smiles, and attentive escorts combine for effective presentation of contestants. 




Intensive interviews were one phase in the selection of the 19S3 favorites. 




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POPULAR VOTE SHEET 

Miss Gail LaN'ernc Harvard 
Miss Wanda Faye Thompson 
Miss Genie Mae Ard 
Miss Brenda Marlenc Roberson 
iVIisi Joyce Marie Williams 
Miss Doris Mae Clayborn 
Miss Martha Lou Short 
Miss Brenda June Stepp 
Miss Charlotte y\nn Miller 
Miss Maxie Carol Denmark 
Miss Doris Jeanette Dennison 
Miss Helen Faye Miller 
Miss Barbara LeeJean Wyatt 
Miss Marilyn Sue McGhee 
Miss Billie y\nn Roberts 
Miss Marjorie Ann Johnson 
Miss Gloria }'aye Morgan 
jVIiss Patsy Jeanne Nicks 
Miss Tannis jVIarie Alford 
Miss Mary Janice Cundiff 
Miss Lanelle Harper 
Miss Betty Jo Byrd 
Miss Carolyn Sue Legg 
Miss Judy Ann Young 



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Miss Betty Jo Byrd 

Chosen by the Clarion staff as their Fa- 
vorite, Miss Betty Byrd is recognized also 
as the Favorite of Lee College. Playing the 
popular Clair de Lune, in the Parade of 
Favorites, this southern lady has made a 
notable achievement. From twenty-four oth- 
er contestants she has brought to the fore- 
front her talents and graces in beautiful 
style. 

A resident of Lakeland, Florida, Miss 
Byrd, nineteen and a junior college sopho- 
more, plans to continue her schooling in 
the field of education. Basketball and music 
are her hobbies. 



The Parade of Favorites program in its entirety is a new campus feature this year. Initiated 
in the interest of cultural attainment, this program motivates yoimg women of Lee to become 
socially aware of existing mores and norms of etiquette. 

The capstone is the talent finale — the Parade of Favorites itself. This year the production 
topped the list of campus presentations in planning, staging, and effect. 

Months in advance every detail was worked out in preparation for a successful event. The 
stage was completely evaluated; curtains were re-hung, lighting was changed and implemented, 
stage crew was trained, and the stage completely readied. 

Stage manager Rabun Haddock was particularly proud that his crew could provide, not 
only every prop asked for by the concerned young ladies, but could execute their transference to 
and from the stage without any delay in performance. This is commendable when one realizes 
that these props included a grand piano, an organ, a flight o^ stairs, and a set of risers. 

The crowd was pleased. Praise ranged from commendation for the superb performance 
given by Master of Ceremonies Duran Palmertree, to the versatility of stage and performers. 
This was an event of benefit, one rewarding in experience, and a never-to-be-forgotten presenta- 
tion. These now are the five Favorites of Cleveland's Lee College. 



54 



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MISS MARJORIE ANN JOHNSON 

Miss Marjode Ann Johnson, a junior col- 
lege sophomore, is very active in the Chris- 
tian service activities of the school. This 
vivacious young lady represented the Mis- 
sions Club. Her plans involve teaching in 
a foreign country. 



MISS GENIE MAE ARD 

As the daughter of a missionary. Genie 
Ard claims as her home the Virgin Islands. 
An excellent student and a versatile par- 
ticipant in activities, she plans to teach. Miss 
Ard was sponsored by the Forensic Club. 





MISS BILLY ANN ROBERTS 

As the only Academy finalist, represent- 
ing the Beta Club, this young lady enjoys 
a unique position in the Parade of Favorites. 
Her home is Tallahassee, Florida. Miss Rob- 
erts' hobby is song directing. 



MISS DORIS JEANETTE DENNISON 

A native of Cleveland, Doris Dennison 
is planning to continue her education at- 
taining a major in journalism. An active 
person serving on the student council, par- 
ticipating in sports, and singing in the 
choirs, she represented the Campus Choir. 





w 

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H 
O 



Lee College is a training ground for strong Christian leaders. 
Leadership on the campus is developed as students participate in 
various activities; each position of responsibility, faithfully exe- 
cuted, trains its holders to accept greater obligations. Three of 
the outstanding campus leaders are featured here. Lee students 
receiving this distinction were recognized for outstanding records 
in both academic and extra-curricular activities. 

The members that are chosen for this honor are selected on 
the basis of character, leadership, scholarship, and contribution 
to the promotion and betterment of Lee College. 

Recommended and selected by the faculty, these people rep- 
resent the best in the realm of the spiritual, the social, and the 
academic. Chosen because their past accomplishments are in- 
dicative of future success as well, these individuals exemplify the 
term "leaders of tomorrow." 

The persons chosen for the 1963 Who's Who are Mrs. Carolyn 
Palmertree, leading honor student in the Junior College, past 
President of Phi Theta Kappa and recipient of the science award; 
Mr. James Alan Hubbard, president of the Missions club and 
editor of the Vindagiia; Mr. Philip C. Morris, president of Pi Delta 
Omicron. 

Their influence has made an indelible imprint on student life. 
We feel that they have added to the ever-increasing heritage which 
is the spirit of Lee College and have cast a pattern for future 
students to follow. 



Philip Crockett Morris 



Carolyn Turnage Palmertree 





--rss»?^ 



James Alan Hubbard 




59 





Mr. and 




Lee College 



The highest elected honor that can be received 
by a student at Lee College is to be chosen Mr. 
or Miss Lee College. Embodied in these titles 
are the following characteristics: Christian char- 
acter, individual talent, unique versatility, all- 
around sportsmanship, and appealing congenial- 
ity. These qualities are searched for in two stu- 
dents chosen annually through petition, presen- 
tauon, and voting by the student body. 

Marilyn Sue McGhee, Miss Lee College of 1963, 
is working toward her Bachelor of Music degree 
in Music Education with an emphasis on choral 
work. 

Mr. Lee College, James Alan Hubbard, is a 
graduating senior and will receive a Bachelor 
of Arts degree in Biblical Education. After grad- 
uate study, Mr. Hubbard plans to minister among 
servicemen as a civilian pastor. 

Rare, indeed, it is when two individuals are 
developed to such high caliber. When found it 
is a glorious reflection of God's immeasurable 
grace as His image is restored in man through 
the miraculous work of redemption. 





Marilyn Sue McGhee 



James Alan Hubbard 



RINERS UP; 




MISS LEE COLLEGE 



John Ashcroft Lombard 



Doris Jeanette Dennison 



62 



Homecoming Queen 

Miss Billie Ruth Syphurs 




63 



PERSO 




Jimmy Burns 



Genie Mae Ard 



ILITIES 




I 



Joyce Marie Williams 



Robert Earl Blackaby 



U 



PERSON 



PCap*C^!^i 




Lawrence Dale Huff 



Tannis Marie Alford 



ILITIES 




Wanda Lou Blackaby 



Ted Ray Gee 



In every society there are those organizations wliicli serve 
the vital functions of that fellowsliip. 

Need on. a Cliristlan caiii,pus is determined by lack and. 
is tempered •with the wisdom of divinity given by God to 
His sons^ Through realization of a need and planning to meet 
itj this society has been augmented by progressive organi- 
sations* 

College functions tor the gaitnit in variety from student 
government to faculty social groups. Each is an, outlet of 
legitimate expression and serves its constituency by pro- 
viding experience in a particular area and Christian fellow- 
ship* 



ORGANIZATIONS 



jK{ii«isr-:rw 




-.j'-ia 





STUDENT BODY 




Building on the principle that the chapel and the 
classroom are integrally connected, these students 
depart from a regular morning worship service to 
return to class or to lounge in the Student Center. 



The most obvious element on any college campus 
is its student body. The college itself is rated by the 
size and quality of its student body. Since a collective 
student body is human, it has its moods, pet peeves, 
likes and dislikes, its good days and its bad days, its 
appreciative and unappreciative moments, as does 
any individual. 

Aware that all. of these factors are involved in the 
spirit, growth, and reputation of a school, the ad- 
ministrative officials, and particularly the president 
Ray H. Hughes, have endeavored to improve campus 
facilities to such an extent as to foster school pride 
and growth potential. 

During the past year new dormitory space has been 
provided, the canteen and dating parlor have been 
refurbished and modernized, the recreational facilities 
in both the gymnasium and recreation hall have been 
improved. As was anticipated the student body met 
all of these changes with an air of expectancy and 
approval. 

A great boon to our student body this year has been 
its officers. Elected in hardfought campaigns last 
spring, Douglas LeRoy and Ted Gee became president 
and vice-president respectively to serve their con- 
stituency. Through their efforts and those of the sec- 
retary-treasurer Murlene McCoy, the student govern- 
ment has made great strides, both in representation 
and campus accomplishment. 

A tribute is due not only those officers who have 
served us well, but the fine student body which they 
have served. May student bodies in the future con- 
tinue to grow in strength, loyalty, and progressive 
outlook for the betterment of Lee College and its 
testimony as molders of Christian men. 





Mr. Ted Gee, vice-president. 



Miss Murlene McCoy, secretary-treasurer. 



70 




MR. DOUGLAS LEROY 

PRESIDENT OF STUDENT BODY 



71 



The 
STUDENT 






President's cabinet 



Leadership to create a fresh spirit of 
campus unity, sense of pride, purpose, 
and dedication to the future potential 
of the College characterize this year's 
President's Cabinet as one united for 
service. 

The president, Doug LeRoy, and the 
chairmen of each of the campus activity 
committees comprise the President's 
Cabinet. The chairmen are as follows: 
Robert Blackaby, Evangelism Commit- 
tee; Leonard Walls, Public Relations 
Committee; Garland Stout, Chapel Pro- 
gram Committee; Tannis Alford, Social 
Committee. 



72 





STDDENT COICIL 



"Voyage of the Viking — upward ever onward." In- 
spired by this slogan our Student Council has en- 
deavored to meet the needs of the student body and 
to develop fully the materials that we have for the 
students' benefit. The participation of every student 
has enabled us to achieve many of our goals. 

Our Social Committee has sponsored a variety of 
activities. Their workshops on courtship and marriage 
made a great imprint on the lives of those who at- 
tended. 

Our Evangelism Committee has promoted the re- 
ligious aspects of Lee life. Their courses of instructions 
have given needed direction to new converts. 

Our Chapel Program Committee has publicized the 
achievements of Lee College. Life at Lee, our weekly 
radio program, has shown the citizens of Cleveland 
the cultural and academic offerings of Lee. 

The Student Council has functioned for the purpose 
of meeting the needs of each student. The following 
is a list of some of the Council's accomplishments 
during the current school year: a study room for off- 
campus students, an intercom for Simmons and Nora 
Chambers residence halls, longer library hours, the 
publishing of a student body bulletin, and a trophy 
case which was presented to the Athletic Department. 
Also delegates were sent to the National Student As- 
sociation Convention sponsored by the Divinity School 
of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. 

The Student Coimcil has this year taken an ever- 
increasing role in leading student affairs, always 
striving to work with the Administration in an en- 
deavor to make Lee the best administrated school 
possible. These accomplishments have given impetus 
to the acceptance of a stronger voice for student gov- 
ernment. 



Vice-president Gee posts daily announcements. 



73 




DELTA OMICRON 





The Pi Delta Omicron is the Bible College Honor Society existent for 
the promotion of scholarship. The purpose of this society is to develop 
Christian character through the promotion of scholarship, the cultivation 
of responsibility, and the fosterage of a spirit of fellowship: thereby, 
fashioning a fuller understanding of the ideals that should be embraced 
by all the Christian ministries.' 

The insignia of the Society is a key embodying the Greek letters Pi, 
Delta, and Omicron. These three letters stand for the Greek words mean- 
ing pastor, teacher, and steward, and are represented by the symbols 
staff, torch, and Bible. 

New members are elected each semester with an installation service 
being held during the second semester. One hundred per cent of the 
faculty and seventy-five per cent of the active membership of the Society 
must approve nominees before acceptance. 

Pi Delta Omicron endeavors to aid its constituency in the following 
manner: It shall encourage the pastor to lead his flock with the staff 
of righteousness; the teacher to hold high the torch of knowledge for 
the enlightenment of his pupils; the steward to give of his best in the 
promotion of God's kingdom with the Bible as his guide. We, as a society 
in complete subjection to God, shall endeavor to show forth by these 
principles all the Christian ministries: pastor, teacher, and steward. We 
shall give of ourselves for the betterment of mankind and for the up- 
building of the kingdom of God as set forth in the teachings and life 
of Christ. 



Philip Crockett Morris, president 

Herbert Lynn Stone, vice-president 

John Ashcroft Lombard, secretary-treasurer 

Mr. R. Hollis Gause, sponsor 

George Reynold Cooper 

Dr. Charles W. Conn, honorary member 

Ronald Edward Ducroq 

Ruby Mae Hewett, alumni member 

M. I. Joseph 



Lonzo Travis Kirkland, alumni member 

Edmond Lamar McDaniel 

Marilyn Sue McGhee 

William Dean McKinney 

Aubrey Daniel Maye 

Heinrich Christoph Scherz 

Dr. Avis Swiger, honorary member 

Thomas Ellie Wilson 

Jimmy Don Wood 




74 



PHI THETA KA 



The good college student spends hours of physical and mental anguish 
as he strives to obtain that coveted sheepskin. He often becomes dis- 
couraged because progress is so slow and his accomplishments seem un- 
merited. It is organizations such as Phi Theta Kappa, the national junior 
college honorary fraternity, that push through the clouds of discourage- 
ment and bring a ray of inspiration to the deserving student. Election 
into Phi Theta Kappa should boost the student's ego and give him a 
positive attitude, for Phi Theta Kappa's rules for qualification are quite 
rigid. To be a member of the society, one must be a deserving student 
who excels scholastically and has the approval of the faculty and mem- 
bers of the society. He must also be in the upper ten per cent of the 
junior college class. 

Any student given the vote of confidence into Phi Theta Kappa can 
press on toward the attainment of his educational aspirations with the 
added zeal of an outstanding accomplishment made. 

The Lee College chapter, Iota Epsilon, each year provides a scholarship 
for some deserving student to continue their education. 





Carlotta Menard Gregory, president 
Lawrence Dale Huff, vice-president 
Tannis Marie Alford, secretary-treasurer 
Mr. Jimmy Welch Bilbo, sponsor 

Margaret Louise Adams 
Lyla Joan Bruhl 
Barbara Louise Burnette 
Iris Jeanette Byrd 
Jacqueline Carla Cook 
Velma Lucille Cornelison 
Doris Jeanette Dennison 



75 



Norman Robert Epps 
Diane Priscilla Guthrie 
Marjorie Ann Johnson 
Norma Jean Jones 
Marian Childers Maye 
Brenda Sue Morgan 
Carolyn Turnage Palmertree 
Beverly lantha Price 
Roberta Joyce Short 
Shirley Ann Simpson 
John Alford Sims 
Wanda Faye Thompson 





XI 




Upsilon Xi was founded on the Lee campus in Sep- 
tember, 1962, by a group of eight close friends. These 
men took as their main purposes the fostering of 
Christian fellowship on the campus and of being of 
service to the college, which aims are signified by 
the two Greek letters which denote fellowship and 
service. 

To insure that its members do not forget the pri- 
mary aim of a service organization, the UX members 
have helped out with the ushering at such important 
gatherings as our regular Sunday evening worship 
and the Parade of Favorites. They have also done 
some repair jobs such as painting buildings and 
bleachers. . . . Chipping in on the social side, they 
sponsored their first Sadie Hawkin's Day which was 
iced off with a hayride. 

The group is led by Duran Palmertree while Dale 
Huff serves as his assistant. Duane Lambert writes 
letters and guards the safe, and Ronald Harvard 
takes over as chaplain. Their colors are black and grey. 

A long list of dignitaries include Ted Gee as Stu- 
dent Government Veep and President of J. C. Sopho- 
mores while Jim Hubbard doubles as Editor of the 
Vindagua and President of the Missions Club; Jim 
McClain cracks the whip over the Junior College 
Freshmen, and Junus Fulbright dictates projects to 
the B. C. Sophomores . . . Dale Huff runs the Forensic 
Club while Duane Lambert continues to monopolize 
the title of "Miss America." 




MDSIC CLUB 



The Music Club, attempting to instill in each student 
a deeper appreciation and respect for various kinds 
of music, desires to better the school's cultural environ- 
ment by active participation in musical functions. 
Through the presentation of diverse programs illus- 
trating the many different types of music with which 
the college student should be familiar, the Music Club 
has made the student body aware of the many cultural 
and educational benefits that can be derived from good 
music. 

Early in the year, the Music Lovers Club of Cleveland 
presented a program to the Music Club that greatly 
stimulated interest in the community concert series. 
Members of the Music Club promoted the very successful 
concerts, and as a result of this promotion the students 
were able to enjoy a series of highly entertaining per- 
formances. 

Jimmy Burns served as president of the Music Club 
for the past year. Under his capable leadership, the 
members of the group made lasting contributions to 
the music program at Lee as they successfully carried 
out the club's goal of making students aware of the 
school's musical activity. 




Sue McGhee, vice-president, and Jim Burns, 
president, show leadership in serving as officers 
of the Music Club. 



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FORENSIC CLUB 





An orator's commanding voice . . . Applause ... A 
debater's scintillating wit . . . Applause ... A dram.- 
atist's well-graced performance . . . Applause. 

These sounds are cherished by the Forensic Club 
members, for they depict a job well done. They de- 
scribe not only a purpose accomplished but a hope 
fulfilled and a talent utilized. 

This school year the Forensic Club has endeavored 
to place good talent before the student body. God's 
Trombones was presented on Lee Alumni Day, with 
assistance from the one hundred and thirty-voice 
Campus Choir. The speech contest finalists presented 
the winning speech in a chapel program, which was 
followed by a debate between the Forensic Club and 
a speech class. 

Arsenic and Old Lace, the famed Broadway hit, was 
the Forensic's final presentation for the year. The 
setting is in Brooklyn dramatizing the life of two sup- 
posedly sedate old maids, who had the ingenious hob- 
by of helping old men out of their misery by giving 
them a good dose of arsenic in a glass of elderberry 
wine. Turning the house into fits of hilarity were the 
antics of their half-wit nephew, Teddy, as he buried 
the ill-fated mefi in his private "Panama Canal." 



Officers of the Forensic Club are Mrs. Beatrice 
Odom, sponsor; Dale Huff, president; Garland Stout, 
vice-president; Iris Byrd, secretary-treasurer. 



78 



SNEA 



g>af«i IS 



A professional organization that offers 
interesting insight on education to fu- 
ture teachers is the Student National 
Education Association. It is designed 
to promote the teaching profession and 
to encourage students to enter this field 
whether it be teaching in public schools 
or on the mission field. 

The SNEA not only includes debates, 
lectures, and guest speakers in its pro- 
gram, but it encounters an element 
which is a prerequisite in any organi- 
zation — fun! Every year the club spon- 
sors a mock beauty pageant — an activity 
which is considered by the students as 
one of the high-lights of the school year. 
The "beauty" title has gone to the de- 
serving Miss "Delilah" (Duane) Lam- 
bert for the past two out of three pag- 
eants. 

The highest honor that a member of 
the SNEA can receive is to be awarded 
the SNEA scholarship which is given to 
one who is making teaching his career. 





The S.N.E.A. leaders are Margaret Adams, 
vice-president; Paul Harris, president; 
Ida Chico, secretary-treasurer. 



79 





PHI BETA LAMBDA 



One of the clubs to be re-organized on our campus this 
year was the Phi Beta Lambda. This club is a national 
organization with the objectives of promoting education, 
leadership, and service. One of its main purposes is to 
better acquaint its members with the Cleveland business- 
men in anticipation of securing summer employment. 
The members hope to learn the techniques of a success- 
ful business through their acquaintances. 

In the near future the PBL plans with great ex- 
pectation to assemble an honorary division of the club 
which will be based on leadership, service and scholastic 
achievement. 

Phi Beta Lambda has chosen "Leaders in the business 
field mean economic yield," as its motto. The officers 
of the club are: Glenda Hobbs, secretary; Anita Douglas, 
treasurer; David Douglas, president; and Lois Keil, vice- 
president. 



80 




"Sing to serve" is the expressed desire of the Campus Choir 
in their endeavor to lead the congregation in worship. Their 
prayer is that each heart will feel the conviction of the saving 
grace of our Lord to better them in their Christian pilgrimage. 

Whether in practice or performance the choir sings with the 
zeal of true music lovers, who have dedicated their talents to 
the service of God and to their fellow men. 



CAMPUS CHOIR 



81 



CAMPUS CHOIR 



SOPRANO 

Rose Bradshaw 
Lyla Bruhl 
Doris Clayborn 
Roberta Cook 
Mary Sue Cox 
Alexis Day 
Carole Doss 
Stella Durand 
Sandra Fitzgerald 
Sudie Fugate 
Paula Gibson 
Doris Goodman 
Wanda Gore 
Camilla Grayson 
Glenda Griffin 
Carole Grindstaff 
Jolene Grubbs 
Velva Hampton 
Kaye Howe 
Susan Kellner 
Janice Kelly 
Pat McConnell 
Betty Meares 
Carolyn Miller 
Charlotte Miller 
Pat Miller 
Jane Musgrave 
Yvonne Nelson 
Patricia Price 
Billie Roberts 
Rolanda Searcy 
Fay Selby 
JoAnn Short 
Roberta Short 
Marilyn Sindle 
Calida Smith 
Leah Tow 
Barbara Wyatt 



A. T. Humphries, director 
Sue McGhee, accompanist 



TENOR 

Robert Bibler 
Manuel Bonilla 
Jerry Craig 
Donald DeFino 
Clyde Eddins 
John Evans 
Glenn Fox 
Delton Futral 
Ted Gee 
Walter Goff 
Richard Goodman 
Wilkie Green 
James Hancock 
Harvey Harkins 
Dan Harris 
Charles Hollifield 
Anthony Lombard 
Gordon Lee 
Dennis McGuire 
Albert Meister 
John Miller 
James Murphy 
Joe Owens 
Dave Partin 
Phillip Pearson 
Larry Rushing 
James Slay 
Garland Stout 
Philip Tapley 
Jerry Tow 
Wayne White 



BASS 

Gordon Bloodworth 
Jimmy Burns 
David Douglas 
Harold Douglas 
James Forester 
David Hadsall 
Marvin Hadsall 
Delbert Hastings 
Kenneth Hensley 
Dale Huff 
Duane Lambert 
Ed McGhee 
Billy O'Neal 
Grey Robinson 
Roland Sharp 
Jerry Starnes 
Donnie Sumner 
Lewis Thomas 
Ronald Walker 



ALTO 

Gail Barnwell 
Joan Bickers 
Brenda Bowden 
Sandra Bridges 
Carolyn Brown 
Wanda Chambers 
Doris Dennison 
Helen Duncan 
Gloria Etheridge 
Carroll Everhart 
Rosemary Fauber 
Ruth Freelan 
Diane Guthrie 
Linda Hensley 
Pat Higginbotham 
Carol Jackson 
Jean Jones 
Lois Keil 
Winona Kerns 
Carolyn Lytle 
Carolyn Maguire 
Brenda Morgan 
Gloria Morgan 
Gail Newman 
Helen Obenchain 
Linda Obenchain 
Ruth Rathbun 
Juanita Reed 
Brenda Roberson 
Brenda Shelton 
Martha Short 
Shirley Simpson 
Annette Stancill 
Judy Stephens 
Emily Terry 
Judi Welch 
Jewel Woodard 
Brenda Yates 
Judy Young 



TOURING CHOIR 



SOPRANO 

Lyla Bruhl 
Doris Clayborn 
Wanda Gore 
Camilla Grayson 
Jolene Grubbs 
Roberta Short 
Marilyn Sindle 
Calida Smith 
Leah Tow 



ALTO 

Sandra Bridges 
Doris Dennison 
Carroll Everhart 
Jean Jones 
Lois Keil 
Janice Kelly 
Gloria Morgan 
Billie Roberts 
Martha Short 



TENOR 

Manuel Bonilla 
Walter Goff 
Richard Goodman 
Anthony Lombard 
Albert Meister 
John Miller 
Dave Partin 
Phillip Pearson 
James Slay 
Garland Stout 
Wayne White 



BASS 

Jimmy Burns 
David Douglas 
David Hadsall 
Kenneth Hensley 
Dale Huff 
Grey Robinson 
Donnie Sumner 
Ronnie Walker 



BAND 



This year the Lee College campus was blessed by 
the presence of a group of stimulating and interest- 
ing musicians that comprised the concert band. In- 
stituted with the arrival of Dr. Delton Alford, the 
band went through a year of vigorous and expansive 
growth. Numbering about fifty, the band was the 
largest in the history of the school and was the first 
in recent years. 

Drawing from a standard college repertoire with 
an emphasis on modern contemporary music, the 
band entertained and delighted the student body at 
various performances throughout the year. In its per- 
formance at the Fall Music Festival, the group pre- 
sented a program demonstrating entertainment in 
a wide variety of musical styles. 

On a mid-semester promotional tour, the band pre- 
sented programs at various churches and schools in 
the South, and did much to promote the music de- 
partment of our school. The mixed concert with the 
University of Chattanooga concert band and occasion- 
al work with musicians in the city broadened the 
band's musical scope and indoctrinated the group 
in the level of performance that they soon adopted 
as their own. The band progressed from a disordered 
array of talented and semi-talented musicians to a 
confident, capable group that has achieved an ad- 
mirable reputation for outstanding work and per- 
formances. 



Durwood Daniels, Baritone 
David Hadsall, Baritone 
John Evans, Clarinet 
Bill Reid, Clarinet 
Pat Higginbotham, Clarinet 
Barbara Walker, Clarinet 
Robert Shepperd, Clarinet 
James Murphy, Clarinet 
Billy O'Neal, Clarinet 
Brenda Roberson, Clarinet 
Camilla Grayson, Flute 
Jerry Slay, Horn 
Wendall Scull, Horn 
Helen Obenchain, Horn 
Carla Cook, Percussion 



Betty Byrd, Percussion 
Janice Boatwright, Percussion 
Renee Stein, Percussion 
James Forester, Percussion 
Martha Short, Percussion 
Junus Fulbright, Saxophone 
Roberta Short, Saxophone 
Genie Ard, Saxophone 
Rabun Haddock, Saxophone 
Wanda Justice, Saxophone 
Jerry Tow, Trumpet 
David Cochran, Trumpet 
Larry Martin, Trumpet 
Donald DeFino, Trumpet 
Lowell Brannen, Trumpet 



CAMPUS CHOIR 



SOPRANO 

Rose Bradshaw 
Lyla Bruhl 
Doris Clayborn 
Roberta Cook 
Mary Sue Cox 
Alexis Day 
Carole Doss 
Stella Durand 
Sandra Fitzgerald 
Sudie Fugate 
Paula Gibson 
Doris Goodman 
Wanda Gore 
Camilla Grayson 
Glenda Griffin 
Carole Grindstaff 
Jolcne Grubbs 
Velva Hampton 
Kaye Howe 
Susan Kellner 
Janice Kelly 
Pat McConnell 
Betty Meares 
Carolyn Miller 
Charlotte Miller 
Pat Miller 
Jane Musgrave 
Yvonne Nelson 
Patricia Price 
Billie Roberts 
Rolanda Searcy 
Fay Selby 
JoAnn Short 
Roberta Short 
Marilyn Sindle 
Calida Smith 
Leah Tow 
Barbara Wyatt 



A. T. Humphries, director 
Sue McGhee, accompanist 



TENOR 

Robert Bibler 
Manuel Bonilla 
Jerry Crai^ 
Donald DeFino 
Clyde Eddins 
John Evans 
Glenn Fox 
Delton Futral 
Ted Gee 
Walter Goff 
Richard Goodman 
Wilkie Green 
James Hancock 
Harvey Harkins 
Dan Harris 
Charles Hollifield 
Anthony Lombard 
Gordon Lee 
Dennis McGuire 
Albert Meister 
John Miller 
James Murphy 
Joe Owens 
Dave Partin 
Phillip Pearson 
Larry Rushing 
James Slay 
Garland Stout 
Philip Tapley 
Jerry Tow 
Wayne White 



BASS 

Gordon Bloodworth 
Jimmy Burns 
David Douglas 
Harold Douglas 
James Forester 
David Hadsall 
Marvin Hadsall 
Delbert Hastings 
Kenneth Hensley 
Dale Huff 
Duane Lambert 
Ed McGhee 
Billy O'Neal 
Grey Robinson 
Roland Sharp 
Jerry Starnes 
Donnie Sumner 
Lewis Thomas 
Ronald Walker 



ALTO 

Gail Barnwell 
Joan Bickers 
Brenda Bowden 
Sandra Bridges 
Carolyn Brown 
Wanda Chambers 
Doris Dennison 
Helen Duncan 
Gloria Ethcridge 
Carroll Everhart 
Rosemary Fauber 
Ruth Freelan 
Diane Guthrie 
Linda Hensley 
Pat Higginbotham 
Carol Jackson 
Jean Jones 
Lois Keil 
Winona Kerns 
Carolyn Lytle 
Carolyn Maguire 
Brenda Morgan 
Gloria Morgan 
Gail Newman 
Helen Obenchain 
Linda Obenchain 
Ruth Rathbun 
Juanita Reed 
Brenda Roberson 
Brenda Shelton 
Martha Short 
Shirley Simpson 
Annette Stancill 
Judy Stephens 
Emily Terry 
Judi Welch 
Jewel Woodard 
Brenda Yates 
Judy Young 



TOURING CHOIR 



SOPRANO 

Lyla Bruhl 
Doris Clayborn 
Wanda Gore 
Camilla Grayson 
Tolene Grubbs 
Roberta Short 
Marilyn Sindle 
Calida Smith 
Leah Tow 



ALTO 

Sandra Bridges 
Doris Dennison 
Carroll Everhart 
Jean Jones 
Lois Keil 
Janice Kelly 
Gloria Morgan 
Billie Roberts 
Martha Short 



TENOR 

Manuel Bonilla 
Walter Goff 
Richard Goodman 
Anthony Lombard 
Albert Meister 
John Miller 
Dave Partin 
Phillip Pearson 
James Slay 
Garland Stout 
Wayne White 



BASS 

Jimmy Burns 
David Douglas 
David Hadsall 
Kenneth Hensley 
Dale Huff 
Grey Robinson 
Donnie Sumner 
Ronnie Walker 



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Wayne Thomas, Trumpet 
Joe McCoy, Trumpet 
James Brummet, Trumpet 
Carl McDonald, Trumpet 
Esdras Betancourt, Trumpet 
Jack Boatwright, Trombone 
Dale Denham, Trombone 
Charles Sweat, Trombone 
John Miller, Trombone 
Gene Pharr, Trombone 
Wilkie Green, Trombone 
Harvey Harkins, Trombone 
Donnie Sumner, Tuba 
David Partin, Tuba 




Dr. Delton Alford, director. 



FACDLH - STAFF CLUB 



The Faculty-Staff Club has one purpose: that purpose 
is to serve as an agent for drawing the faculty and staff 
into a tighter knit unit through social intercourse. 

They meet once a month at some member's home or 
at designated places on campus for a time of relaxation, 
recreation, and verbal concourse. 

Last spring this group voted and spent several hun- 
dred dollars on refurbishing the dating parlor, besides 
donating many hours of personal labor in doing finish 
work in the parlor and arranging its furnishings. 

Under the guidance of its officers, president Jimmy 
Bilbo; vice-president, Duran Palmertree; and secretary- 
treasurer, E valine Echols, this group this year has ful- 
filled its function as a social unit, by arranging several 
successful monthly parties, including an initial outing 
at Lake Winnepesauka and another outdoor picnic at 
nearby Deer Park, and by serving as a uniting element 
among the Lee College faculty and staff. 




Duran Palmertree, vice-president; Jimmy Bilbo, presi- 
dent; Evaline Echols, secretary-treasurer; comprise the 
Faculty-Staff officers. 




UA 




GIRLS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

The Girls' Athletic Association, an organization that 
regulates and administers the girls' intramural pro- 
gram, has as its purpose the active participation of 
its members in a comprehensive intramural sports 
program. It is designed to aid each girl in learning 
the basic principles of sportsmanship. 

Through participation in various sports — volleyball, 
basketball, and softball — the girls acquire a new un- 
derstanding of team play and learn the rules of 
"graceful losing." Activities of the Club have helped 
all the girls on campus to broaden their understand- 
ing of fair play and sportsmanship and have initiated 
a spirit of friendly competition among the girls of 
varibus classes. 

Led by president Betty Byrd, vice-president Doris 
Dennison and secretary-treasurer Shirley Bridges, the 
GAA officers provided the competent leadership nec- 
essary for the successful fulfillment of the club's 
goals. Enthusiastic participation of the members con- 
tributed greatly to the very successful year that the 
Girls' Athletic Association has just completed. 



G A.A. is under the direction of Miss Roxie Carr, spon- 
sor; Shirley Bridges, secretary-treasurer; Betty Byrd, 
president; Doris Dennison, vice-president. 




BAA 




BOYS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Stimulating activity in the boys' intramural 
program, furthering the principles of Christian 
fellowship on the athletic field, and instilling 
in its members a comprehensive understanding 
of the principles of sportsmanship that are so 
important to successful school life are purposes 
of the Boys' Athletic Association. 

The organization regulates the boys' intra- 
mural activities at Lee College, and this year 
vice-president Dale Hughes directed the program. 
Tefiros in the major sports of basketball, foot- 
ball, and Softball were entered by the different 
classes. A high spirit of competition fostered an 
atmosphere of excitement on campus as the 
respective groups battled for the crown in the 
various sports. 

One of the more prominent activities of the 
Boys' Athletic Association was the sponsoring 
of the candidates for the Homecoming Queen. 
The Homecoming Festival highlighted the intra- 
mural football season, and the Association de- 
serves commendation for the successful organi- 
zation of the Homecoming activities. 

The officers of the group, president, Dickie 
Davis; vice-nresident. Dale Hughes; and secre- 
tary, John Pigg; are to be commended for the 
time and effort they have expended in leading 
the organization through the past year. The 
boys have enjoyed an active and successful pro- 
gram and have greatly benefited the Athletic 
Department of Lee College. 



John Pigg, secretary; Dale Hughes, vice-president; 
Dickie Davis, president; comprise the B.A.A. officers. 




The 




Jack Barron, editor 
Lanelle Harper, associate editor 
Douglas Youngblood, business 
manager 




Jl. 



Mrs. Mary Morris and 
Mr. Duran Palmertree, 
sponsors 






Darlene Allen, columnist; Dale 
Denham, sports reporter; Earl 
Rowan, sports reporter; Joe Bry- 
son, reporter. 



Features reporters: Lyla Bruhl, 
Terry Whidden, Sharon Nichols, 
Louise Harbour. 



Expansion characterized the 1963 Clarion. Being 
changed from a magazine format to the larger tabloid 
newspaper size, it contained more cartoons, pictures 
and advertisements. Lively editorials and stimulating 
letters to "Reader's Response" helped to create greater 
interest. Articles featuring a teacher, an alumnus and 
two outstanding students were included in each issue. 
Devotional, educational and entertaining articles also 
filled its pages. 

The Clarion reported significant news of events and 
issues in the college community. For the first time 
it became a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, 
enabling it to report news of happenings on other col- 
lege campuses across the nation. 

Staff members will long remember the hours spent 
in the Clarion office; sometimes they were fun-packed; 
at other times they were tiresome. Nevertheless, the 
frenzied staff and bewildered editors squeaked by the 
deadline to produce another monthly Clarion. 




Business staff: Fay Selby, Carolyn 
McAvoy, Judith Martin, Barbara 
Wyatt, Carol Parker. 




Marilyn Sindle, artist; Ida Chico, 
artist; Leon Daniel, news reporter; 
Barbara Klaus, society reporter; 
Doris Clayborn, society reporter. 



The 




Jack Barron, editor 
Lanelle Harper, associate editor 
Douglas Youngblood, business 
manager 




Mrs. Mary Morris and 
Mr. Duran Palmertree, 
sponsors 






Darlene Allen, columnist; Dale 
Denham, sports reporter; Earl 
Rowan, sports reporter; Joe Bry- 
son, reporter. 



Features reporters: Lyla Bruhl, 
Terry Whidden, Sharon Nichols, 
Louise Harbour. 



Expansion characterized the 1963 Clarion. Being 
changed from a magazine format to the larger tabloid 
newspaper size, it contained more cartoons, pictures 
and advertisements. Lively editorials and stimulating 
letters to "Reader's Response" helped to create greater 
interest. Articles featuring a teacher, an alumnus and 
two outstanding students were included in each issue. 
Devotional, educational and entertaining articles also 
filled its pages. 

The Clarion reported significant news of events and 
issues in the college community. For the first time 
it became a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, 
enabling it to report news of happenings on other col- 
lege campuses across the nation. 

Staff members will long remember the hours spent 
in the Clarion office; sometimes they were fun-packed; 
at other times they were tiresome. Nevertheless, the 
frenzied staff and bewildered editors squeaked by the 
deadline to produce another monthly Clarion. 




Business staff: Fay Selby, Carolyn 
McAvoy, Judith Martin, Barbara 
Wyatt, Carol Parker. 




Marilyn Sindle, artist; Ida Chico, 
artist; Leon Daniel, news reporter; 
Barbara Klaus, society reporter; 
Doris Clayborn, society reporter. 



10/, 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 








Vol. 12 



NOVEMBER 22, 1962, CLEVELAND 



No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PLANS HOMECOMIN( 



STORY TOLD OF ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 

The Lee College Alumni Association 
endeavors to promote fellowship among 
its members, to foster a greater school 
"spirit among its graduates, to create an 
interest in prospective students, and to 
promote the general progress of Lee Col- 
lege. 

The Alumni Association was founded 
May 31, 1946, at the Bible Training 
School and College in Sevierville, Ten- 
nessee, with E. M. Tapley as its presi- 
dent. In May 1947 the constitution was 
adopted, and in 1961 revisions were 
made. 

The Avis Swiger Student Loan Fund, 
which was organized May 22, 1958, is 
one of the functions carried on by the 
Alumni Association. This loan fund 
makes loans to students who are second 
year, have good deportment, have a 1.5 
(C + ) average, and are a good spiritual 
influence on the Lee College campus. 
Since the founding of the loan fund in 
1958, it has helped twenty-three worthy 
students in the amount of $6,000. The 
fund is perpetuated by pledges from in- 
dividual members of the Alumni Associ- 
ation. 

The Association began the Lee Alum- 
nus in May 1958. It is a quarterly four- 
page publication which includes infor- 
mation from the alumni as well as fea- 
tures from the school. 

The Association has established an 
annual Thanksgiving Home-coming 
which co-ordinates the arrangements 
for home-coming each fall with planned 
activities which are of special interest to 
Lee alumni. 

The national association issues char- 
ters to state chapters when they are 
organized and have met the require- 
ments which are outlined in the con- 
stitution. These state chapters in turn 
financially assist students from its par- 
ticular state. 

Two films — Lee College in Action made 
in 1949, and Decision for Destiny made 
in 1960 — were produced by the Associ- 
ation to promote Lee College. 

At the annual meeting November 21, 
1962, the motion was carried to found 
a 10-20 Club which would make possible 
the establishment of a permanent alum- 
ni office on the campus of Lee College. 




James R. Winters 



WINTERS ELECTED PRESIDENT 

Reverend James Robert Winters, 33, 
Cincirmati, Ohio, was elected president 
of the Alumni Association at its annual 
fall meeting November 21. 

He graduated from Lee Junior College 
in 1946, later attended Miami University 
and graduated from the University of 
Cincinnati. He married AUene Daniel 
in June, 1954, and they now have two 
children, Jimmy Jr., and LaVoy. 

Winters is presently the pastor of the 
Quebec Road Church of God in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. He is also part-time teach- 
er in the Cincinnati secondary schools 
and is doing graduate work at the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. He was instru- 
mental in establishing the Cincinnati 
Bible College, which began this year 
with an enrollment of forty-two stu- 
dents. Winters expects the enrollment 
to increase to nearly eighty students 
second semester. Also he is trying to 
get CBC accredited as an extension of 
Lee College. 

—PLEDGES SERVICE— 

"I am honored to serve in this capac- 
ity, and I appreciate the confidence 
placed in me by the alumni," the new 
president stated. "I pledge my all to 
the Association that we may contribute 
to the progress of Lee College. Our main 
aim for the future is to bring Lee Col- 
lege and the church laymen closer to- 
gether. The question t>o be asked by 
members this year is not, 'What can 



the Alumni Association do for me?', but 
'What can I do for the Alumni Associ- 
ation?' he concluded." 

Other officers for the ensuing year 
are: Floyd J. Carey, Jr., Vice-president; 
Philip Morris, Secretary; James A. Ste- 
phens and Paul LaVern Walker, Board 
Members. 

HOME-COMING SCHEDULE FOR 1962 

Each year the Alumni Association 
plans the Home-coming week schedule 
for the week involving and immediately 
following Thanksgiving day. This year 
those days, November 21 and 22, were 
activity-filled. 

Beginning November 21, Thanksgiving 
day, and continuing through Friday, the 
next day, the Alumni Association of Lee 
College planned an active schedule of 
events for its constituency. 

Meeting at 8:30 Thanksgiving morn- 
ing the Association fed registering mem- 
bers donuts and coffee over which they 
conversed with old acquaintances. Fol- 
lowing this was their annual business 
meeting in which their officers were 
elected for the year, goals and gripes 
were aired, and organization of ideas 
was prop>osed. 

The most inspiring part of home-com- 
ing week is the 11:00 Thanksgiving mes- 
sage delivered annually by the Reverend 
Mr. R. Hollis Gau.<5e. Dean of the School 
of Religion, Lee College. His "Praise ye 
the Lord" resounded through the hearts 
of all present. 

Other activities fo'- the two days in- 
cluded an Alumni All-stars versus Lee 
College football game. The game was 
lost by the Alimini as was the All-stars 
basketball game on Friday. 

The Fall Music Festival directed by 
A. T. Humphries and broadcast over 
radio WBAC came as a fitting and tri- 
umphant conclusion to the Thanksgiv- 
ing days activity. A visiting choir from 
the Church of God Home for Children, 
led by alumnus Miss Henrietta Pawluk 
implemented beautifully the superb per- 
formances of the Campus and Touring 
Choirs. 

Friday morning at 10:00 the newly 
elected Alumni Association president, 
James Winters of Cincinnati, Ohio gave 
his initial address to the association and 
student body. 

The entire weeks activities were cli- 
maxed by the Freshman play presenta- 
tion of "The Closed Door" on Friday 
night. 



90 



VINDAGUA 



"The story cannot be told only with pictures, nor 
can it be effectively told without good pictures." This 
advice was the basis upon which we have built this 
book. Our first objective was to get good pictures and 
then to plan effective word stories to complement 
them. Telling the story of Lee College in 1963 has 
not been an easy task, but it has been challenging 
and rewarding. 

Changes within the Vindagua this year are to be 
found in the larger book with its 160-point college- 
board binding, a revamped and expanded Campus 
Life section, a combined section of organizations and 
clubs, a new Academy division, and throughout the 
book, diverse usage of color. 

A special word of appreciation is extended to Mr. 
Duran Palmertree and his fellow sponsors. Without 
his interest and advice this book would not have at- 
tained the quality that it has. Throughout the history 
of the 1963 Vindagua, its calm and tempestuous times, 
we have relied heavily upon his counsel and encour- 
agement. 

To the students: we hope you treasure this, your 
1963 Vindagua. 




James Alan Hubbard, editor. 



Safely made is the com- 
ment that yearbook spon- 
sors are of all the most 
worked. It is not their 
function to serve only as 
guide, but advisor. From 
them come many of the 
ideas incorporated into 
this the 1963 Vindagua. 
From the beginning, the 
chairman and the others 
have worked In suggesting 
ideas, seeing them carried 
out, checking rough lay- 
outs, approving final copy, 
and even delivering it to 
the printers. To these per- 
sons, then, we owe much. 




Sponsors: Mrs. Lois Beach; Mr. Duran Palmertree, chairman; 
and Mr. Marvin Golden. 



Iris Jeanette Byrd, associate editor. 



Herbert Lynn Stone, business manager. 






Carolyn Legg, 
Campus Life 



Sue McGhee, 
Features 





Dennis McCauley, 
Academic Life 




Judy Stephens, 
Organizations 

Joe Bryson, 
All-Class Editor 









Marilyn Sindle, 
Art Director 



Jack Boatwright, 
Literary Editor 





Paul Gregory, 
Layout Artist 



Lavice Laney, 
Literary Editor 





Lanelle Harper, 
Class Editor 




Wayne Underwood, 
Class Editor 

Christine Alton, 
Class Editor 





Dale Denham, 
Athletics 



Linda Butler, 
Academy Editor 






V/'.'/i •'•?■'/ f~ 



Dale Huff, 
Business Staff 



:if:;-ff 








Ida Chico, 
Artist 



vi^'i-?:^ 



A -*■• ■'.- ' 



Martha Short, 
Artist 







Seretha Dean, 
Business Staff 




Ann Wilson, 
Business Staff 



Wanda Stewart, 

Business Staff 



Garland Stout, 
Business Staff 








SERVICE 



Mr. 15each and his bus. 




It is the function of the Christian service 
department to provide every interested Lee Col- 
lege student vi^ith ample opportunity to do prac- 
tical work on the field in order that he may apply 
the know-how which he has received in the class- 
room. It is this strong relationship between class- 
room study courses and Christian service oppor- 
tunities that has made Lee College outstanding 
among present-day Pentecostal institutions of 
higher learning. This high correlation between 
the theoretical and the practical in training of- 
fers the student the greatest opportunity to de- 
velop his whole Christian character and to gain 
an evident spiritual maturity in almost every 
phase of his Christian life. In the house-to-house 
witnessing area alone, Lee College students are 
annually visiting between fifteen and twenty 
thousand homes with the gospel of Christ. 

The results of the training offered by the Lee 
College Christian service department will nec- 
essarily depend upon the speed and thorough- 
ness with which any student completes each 
phase of the process of training. The ultimate 
hope of the department is that the training will 
develop students who become practicing witness- 
es, competent teachers, fundamental expositors 
of the Word, able leaders, patient counselors, 
and sound spiritual administrators who will, con- 
sequently, be capable of better fulfilling future 
offices of youth leaders, Sunday School teachers, 
Christian education directors, missionaries, evan- 
gelists, pastors and of district, state, national, 
and world leaders in the work of winning souls 
for our Saviour. 




~ -.■^g-^' ^h? I" * 



Christian service class 
studies modern-day cults. 



95 







From the lofty spires of Boston's Old 
North Church . . . 



ye shall be witnesses 



This past summer fifty-two students walked through 
the portals of our school and stepped into five new 
and strange centers of service. These students had 
no idea as to what was lying just ahead for them; 
all they knew to expect was sacrifice and hard work. 
Our witnesses were carrying the message of the Cross 
to thousands of strangers. They had but one Person 
on whom they could depend, one real security and 
that was the Person of God. He would be with them, 
and they made prayer for His guidance a continuous 
activity. Had but one person found Christ as his per- 
sonal Saviour the work would not have been in vain. 
Nevertheless, the results of the work of the witness 
teams were very satisfying; for in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, a city of Catholism and vice, and in Salt 
Lake City, Utah, the heart of Mormonism, new mis- 
sions were established. Latest reports from Salt Lake 
indicated a Sunday school attendance of over fifty. 

In Matthew 9:38 we find Christ saying, "Pray ye 
therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send 
forth laborers into the harvest." The harvest is truly 
ripe and ready for gleaning. 







... to the grass-thatched 

roof of a Mediterranean preaching station. 





"Dixie Highway"— a typical scene on 
Cat Island, Babamas. 



Our team in Salt Lake City and its 
Vacation Bible School. 




Sunday-go-to-meeting time in the Bahama Islands. 



Children's class 
in Boston. 



unto me . . . 




MISSIONS CLUB 



TO THE REGIONS BEYOND 




The Missions Club has been led by Heinrich Scherz, treasurer; Avis Swiger, 
sponsor; Joyce Williams, vice-president; Doris Short, secretary; James Hub- 
bard, president. 



Try to meet the needs of as many 
churches as possible . . . stir within 
the student body an intense vision 
for the lost of the world . . . help the 
missionaries at home and abroad. 
With these aims in mind the Missions 
Club implemented its program with 
some new ideas in presentation of 
the desperate need of world-wide mis- 
sions. 

In preparing to travel to a church 
the group would select a specific 
project of great urgency in some part 
of the world. This need would be pre- 
sented to the local church and its 
pastor and left with them. It was 
a joy to see the way these churches 
responded, meeting needs aroimd the 
globe. This program, properly fol- 
lowed, will accomplish two very im- 
portant things: first, it will help a 
church to become interested in one 
field and to meet the need of that 
area, and second, it will, through cor- 
respondence with the missionary who 
is notified of this church's gifts, cre- 
ate a desire in the hearts of the peo- 
ple of the church to continue to meet 
these needs. 

This has been the prominent goal 
of the Missions Club. In these serv- 
ices missions is taught through the 
Sunday school classes, through song, 
testimony, films, and the preached 
Word. 



On-campus activities include a 
Wednesday noon prayer service, and 
a Thursday evening mission meeting 
for the student body Missionaries on 
furlough often speak in these meet- 
ings. As a result other students have 
seen the need for laborers and with 
Isaiah have said, "Here am I, Lord, 
send me." 




98 



iLAi 



PIONEERS 

FOR 

CHRIST 





Officers of the P.F.C. are Wanda Blackaby, treasurer; Robert Blackaby, 
first vice-president; Marian Maye, secretary; Gerald Johnson, president; 
Ray Sanders, second vice-president; Darlene Allen, follow-up secretary; 
Aubrey Maye, sponsor; Miss Peggy Humphrey, sponsor; John Lombard, tliird 
vice-president. 



Striving to make the Church of God witness con- 
scious within ten years, the Pioneers for Christ has 
gone beyond the goal which it set five years ago. The 
untiring zeal of a few dedicated individuals made 
the achievement of this goal possible in half the time. 
Although little response was shown at first, the PFC 
has now become a "lighthouse" to the unsaved for 
the Church of God. 

Largely through faith, the Pioneers for Christ has 
made trips to twenty-seven states and three foreign 
countries: Jamaica, Barbados, and Trinidad. PFC In- 
ternational came as a result of their being featured 
at the 1962 General Assembly. Only two summers 
of their witness work yielded the establishment of 
churches in Boston, Massachusetts; Salt Lake City, 
Utah; Providence, Rhode Island; Albuquerque, New 
Mexico; and Buzzard's Bay, Massachusetts. Lee's Pio- 
neers for Christ is helping to establish other PFC 
clubs in various Church of God congregations all over 
the United States. 



House-to-house witnessing is foremost program of 
the group. 




MINISTERIAL CLOB 




The Ministerial Club is under the leadership of George Mabe, secretary-treas- 
urer; Winston Elliot, sponsor; Robert Owens, vice-president; Walter Bateman, 
president. 




The Ministerial Club, organized for the purpose of 
promoting fellowship and working out problems which 
arise among the student ministers, gives it members 
many new and different experiences which will prove 
invaluable to them in their pastoral and evangelistic 
work. All student ministers who participate in the 
Ministerial Club enjoy the fellowship and opportunity 
of service which the club offers. Doing service for the 
Lord in several nearby states on week-ends, these 
young people minister in young people's clubs, jails, 
churches, and on the streets. 

Mark 16:15 characterizes the chief goal of the 
Ministerial Club: "Go ye into all the world and preach 
the gospel." 



100 



I MINISTERIAL 





"He that findeth a wife, findeth a good thing. . . ." 
Much of the credit given to a successful minister is 
actually due to the sincere prayers, and unending 
encouragement of his wife. 

Trailers and apartments, husbands and children 
are left behind once every month as the ministers' 
"better half" congregate to share their experiences 
and to enjoy the blessings of the Lord. Fellowship 
among persons with like ambitions, mutual under- 
standings of their present problems and those which 
they are eventually to encounter, sharing of daily 
joys and victories — all these contribute to the molding 
of the wives' character into that which will be an 
asset to their husbands' ministries and give helpful 
knowledge for their favorite interest, the rearing of 
their own children in the fear of the Lord. 

The capable officers of the Ministerial Wives Club 
are Mrs. L. H. Aultman, sponsor (standing) ; Mrs. A. M. 
Phillips, co-sponsor (standing); Lisa Scherz, vice- 
president; Rebecca Jenkins, president; Vonceil Smith, 
secretary-treasurer. 




Qualified men are available j capable men are hard to find. 
Fortunate indeed is Lee College in having so many well- 
qualified, capable leaders. Creating within their charges not 
a thirst for Christian expression in the spirit of Christ, 
these men fulfill the very highest ideals of Christian admin- 
istration and scholarship. 

Incorporated within the following pages are the lives and 
r.^l^it^ ^f i^Q jiiejEj and women who make the policies for our 
^^e who carry them o«tj and the faculty who in- 
£ the minds of their students those facets of knowl- 

ii' f ^ wisdom which engender the best interests of the 



*.??hasizing the importance of the classroom, our faculty 
grayed in the light of their chosen fields. 



ACADEMIC LIFE 



■^'. 



!lW«i-i. 





i 




Paul Stallings, A. V. Howell, James Stephens, Chairman D. C. Boatwright, Virgil 
Smith, David Lemons, Lee Watson 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



The task of educating ministers and church members toward more rewarding 
stewardship is complementary to the task of winning the lost in the Church of 
God. The responsibility for the execution of this task rests primarily on the Lee 
College Board of Directors and the Lee College President. Directors are appointed 
biennially in such a way that does not allow a replacement of more than two 
members at a time. The duties of the board are to elect and to employ the Presi- 
dent and faculty; to set, in session with the President, salaries for the faculty 
and staff; and to direct the finances of the college. 

Directly responsible to the Board of Directors is the college President. His duty 
is to execute the administrative and educational program of the school in ac- 
cordance with the prescribed policies adopted by the Board. He is elected by 
the Board of Directors with the approval of the General Executive Committee 
and the Supreme Council sets his salary. 

President of Lee College is the Reverend Rayford Harrison Hughes. Since the 
Reverend Mr. Hughes has been serving in this administrative position, he has 
done much to promote the school and to give the campus a more pleasant at- 
mosphere for study and social life. Among accomplishments in his administration 
are the remodeling of the student center, cafeteria, and recreation room, and 
the opening of the East Wing dormitory. Old Main was razed this year and a 
new campus building is now in progress. The Reverend Mr. Hughes has proved 
himself to be a qualified spiritual and administrative leader. 



104 






The J. Herbert Walkers 




I 




The Reverend and Mrs. R. HoUis Gause 




R. HolUs Gause, B.D. 
Dean, Bible College 



J. Herbert Walker, Jr., 

M.A., B.D. 

Dean, Junior College 



Stanley Butler, 
M.A., Ed.S. 
Dean of Men 



The Butler family 



Some of the most difficult, but rewarding, re- 
sponsibilities on campus, rest upon the adminis- 
tration. They organize and administer the curricula 
and schedules, give guidance to students, faculty, 
and dormitory deans. From the library, to the class- 
room, and on the field their influence is felt. 
Varied as their jobs of administrative work may 
be, they are united in purpose and dedication. One 
thing which makes these leaders so outstanding 
is their concern for the students. With ability and 
diligence, they are always standing by to assist 
a student or another administrative member. Their 
understanding and prayerful interest make them 
not only able leaders, but also faithful friends. One 
may be sure that Lee College rests in capable hands. 





Marvin Golden 
Business Manager 




The Goldens 





Avis Swiger, LX,.D. 
Dean of Women 




Le Moyne Swiger, M.A. 
Librarian 



Mr. and Mrs. Swiger 



Mr. and Mrs. Beach and Sharlinda 




Charles R. Beach, M.A. 
Director, Christian 
Service Department 




Bible College strives to develop spiritual leadership 




R. Hollis Gause, B.D. 
Religion 



Elmer Odom, M.A. 
Religion 



-Beatrice Odom, M.A. 
Christian Education 









Donald Bowdle, Ph.D. 
Religion 



J. Martin Baldree, Jr., M.R.E. 
Christian Education 



Avis Swiger, LL.D. 
Missions 



The Bible College, which was established 
January 1, 1918, has made significant ad- 
vancement in these forty-five years. The 
early beginning, with only six students, no 
building, and no finances, scarcely indi- 
cated the phenomenal progress that be- 
came characteristic of the development of 
Lee College. 

It is the aim of the Bible College to hold 
a thoroughly academic program in rela- 
tion to Biblical and professional education 
as well as general education. It seeks to 
develop in the students, not only a Biblical 
concept of God, man, and Christ, but an 
understanding of his culture, himself, 
scientific inquiry, knowledge, and the arts 
and sciences as related to the Biblical 
studies and the professional training of 
the students. The instructors strive to teach 
the skills of personal evangelism, preach- 
ing, counseling, teaching, and administra- 
tion of public worship along with a knowl- 
edge of the entire Bible. 



Old Testament terrain becomes a familiar object of study in Mr. Odom's survey course. 






A. T. Humphries, B.M. 
Choir 



Private instrumental lessons, as well as concert band, are directed by Professor Alford. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 




Roosevelt Miller, B.M. 
Voice 



Delton Alford, Ph.D. 
Band 



The Music Department of Lee College, 
dedicated to the development of vocal and 
instrumental talent, has made great prog- 
ress in recent years. The touring choir, 
which has traveled over much of the United 
States, is an inspiration to all who hear, 
the campus choir adds to campus events, 
and the newly organized band is a special 
attraction on campus and on tour. 

A select male chorus and a girls' chorus, 
directed by Roosevelt Miller and Mary Mor- 
ris respectively, were re-organized second 
semester to attain greater choral diversity 
within the student body and to build a 
musical environment contributory to the 
church. 

The department welcomes Mrs. Mary 
Morris and Dr. Delton Alford to the staff. 
By consolidation with the Bible College, 
the department assumed accreditation. The 
band, a new listening room, new piano 
studios, and risers for the choir are sig- 
nificant achievements to be accredited to 
this department. 




Georgia Stroud, B.M. 
Organ 



Ruby Hurst, B.A. 
Piano 



Mary Morris, B.M. 
Theory 



Helen Symes, B S. 
Piano 





Duran Palmertree, B.A., B.D. 
Religion, Biology 



Under the supervision of Mrs. Beach, the chemistry laboratory provides 
application for scientific principles. 



THROUGH SCIENCE, MAN UNDERSTANDS 
HIS ENVIRONMENT. 




Lois Beach, M.S. 
Chemistry 



Through the study of science, man becomes more 
aware of his environment and understands the 
phenomena that control nature. Since Lee College 
adheres to the orthodox position that God can be 
partially understood through His creation, the in- 
stitution also believes that by the student's con- 
frontation with these facts through the study of 
the basic sciences, he is able to arrive at a better 
understanding of God as Creator, Judge, and Re- 
deemer. To implement this understanding, the col- 
lege offers biology, chemistry, algebra, trigonome- 
try, and physical science. 





Honette Echols, B.A. 
Science, Academy 



Barbara Tiller, M.A. 
Algebra 



110 



LiL. 






Nina Driggers, M.A. 
English 



Winston Elliot, M.A. 
Speech, Spanish 



Charles R. Beach, M.A. 
German, French 




Dora Myers, M.A. 
Spanish, Psychology 




J 



Peggy Humphrey, B.S. 
English, Academy 



LANGUAGES FIND PROGRESSION IN 
SPEECH AND LITERATURE. 

The English program at Lee begins with a course in the review of English 
grammar and the fundamentals of composition. Practical application of 
these fimdamentals is required in a term paper and periodical themes. 
Poetry and prose from the fifth century to the present constitute the study 
of English literature, along with the biographies and works of the leading 
authors, such as Shakespeare, Milton, Bunyan, and Brownine. American 
literature is a brief survey of the authors of our nation from the colonial 
period to the present day, with emphasis on such writers as Irving, Emerson, 
Whitman, and Lanier. 

The foreign language department of Lee College offers efficient instruction 
in Spanish, French, and German. Two-year courses in each develops the 
student's vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar. Laboratory classes are 
directed by foreign students who acquaint the students with proper pro- 
nunciation. 

Platform theory and public speaking are a further implementation of 
the school's emphasis on communication. The student is given the oppor- 
tunity to do advanced work in public performance in dramatic presentation. 



Grammar recordings implement the student's knowledge of foreign 
language in Mr. Beach's German class. 




EXPANDED PROGRAM OFFERS 
NEW CHALLENGE. 





LucUle Elliot, M.A. 
Business Education 



Advanced typing, directed by Mrs. Elliot, is part of the business education program. 





Lee Junior College prepares the futui'e 
businessman and secretary with the courses 
that will best benefit them in their life's 
occupation. To do this, an adequate pro- 
gram of commercial training is made avail- 
able to the student. A two-year course pre- 
pares the student for further commercial 
education in college. For those who do not 
wish to further their business education 
beyond junior college, there is provided a 
two-year terminal course, either in sec- 
retarial science or in accounting, for the 
person interested in business. 

The Business Department boasts of some 
new instructors, twenty new typewriters, 
a rejuvenated curriculum, and facilities 
necessary for proper business education. 



Dudley Pyeatt, M.A. 
Business Education 



Terrell McBrayer, M.A. 
Business Education 



JL. 





James Bilbo, M.A. 
History 



J. Herbert Walker, Jr., M.A., B.D. 
Sociology 




Mr. Bilbo's history class reveals the development of our democracy. 



SOCIAL SCIENCES LINK WORLD SOCIETIES, 

YESTERDAY AND TODAY. 



Social sciences form an integral part of 
the college student's education. Lee offers 
a broad curriculum of these studies to give 
the student a better understanding of him- 
self in relationship to his fellow men. A 
course in geography explains why man has 
settled the earth in the manner he did 
and what makes varioiis parts of the earth 
different or similar. Also, the occupations 
of the people of the world are studied in 
economic geography. From the pre-literary 
era to the present time, world history dis- 
closes the economic, religious, cultural, and 
political background of civilization. Thus, 
we see the rise of the present world powers 
from an origin of scattered tribal civiliza- 
tion. American history gives us an appreci- 
ation of our American heritage and an 
understanding of the persons and events 
that have helped form our democratic way 
of life. Political science defines the Amer- 
ican governmental system — national, state, 
and local. By studying psychology we ac- 
quaint ourselves with habits and problems 
of man and how we adapt ourselves to 
them. 





Hubert Black, M.Ed. 
History, Education 



113 



Ruthanna Carr, A.A. 
Physical Education 



Of all the definitions made clear in college life, perhaps 
the one of classification is the most closely dra'wn and recog- 
nized. Being a senior or a freshman makes a big difference. 
This is good, for the fact of being a senior is a mark of at- 
tainment. Certain goals are inherent in this class distinction, 
and met and fulfilled in adYancing in its realms. 

Herein lie our classes; the freshmen and the seniorSj the 
sophomores and the juniors, all in their places showing what 
they as individuals have accomplished, whether much or 
little, in their respective years of college life. 

Leading are the Bible College enrollees followed by their 
Junior College colleagues. 



i 



CLASSES 






President William Davis 

Vice-President Ronnie Ducroq 

Secretary-Treasurer Jane Musgrave 

Sponsor Mr. R. Hollis Cause 




FOUR YEAR DRAMA ENDS WITH 
GRADUATION 

For the senior, the curtain is slowly closing and bring- 
ing with it an end to the four-year drama, which has been 
an integral part of his Hfe. The academic search for knowl- 
edge has almost ended. 

The hours of work on the newspaper or the yearbook, 
that last minute touchdown, and the fall and spring picnics 
are now treasured memories. These are the memories that 
enhance the senior's intangible spirit of pride in Lee Col- 
lege, his alma mater. 

The senior is truly a part of all that he has met. In this 
all-important year comes the realization of those goals and 
ideals for which he has aspired. 

The class of 1963 is not without its own marks of dis- 
tinction. From its ranks came the first to number in the 
newly-organized Pi Delta Omicron honor society for recog- 
nized Bible College scholars. Alsa this class of over thirty 
graduates has the highest group grade-point average of any 
preceding matriculated senior class. 

As a tribute to this great class, they lead the classes in 
this book as they have the school this year and will the 
Church in the years to come. 



116 




DAVID BARNES 
Uhrichsville, Ohio 



JACK BARRON 
Shelburn, Indiana 




ESDRAS BETANCOURT ERNEST BLACK 

Neil' York, New York Pocahontas, Arkansas 




ROBERT BLACKABY GEORGE COOPER 

Eminence, Kentucky Lakeland, Florida 




WILLIAM DAVIS RONALD DUCROQ 

Greenwood, Delaware Nkana, Northern Rhodesia 




JAMES HUBBARD 
Ripley, New York 



JAMES JENKINS 

Chicago, Illinois 



M. I. JOSEPH 
Kerala, India 



LAMAR McDANIEL 

Waycross, Georgia 



AUBREY MAYE 

Fitzgerald, Georgia 




PHILIP MORRIS 
Crisfield, Maryland 



JANE MUSGRAVE 
Fairfiel/l, Illinois 



ROBERT OWENS 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 



BETTY ROBBINS 

Roswell, Georgia 



HARMON ROBERTS 

Detroit, Michigan 




HEINRICH SCHERZ 

Krchwirtkel, Germany 



LYNN STONE GARLAND STOUT CLAUDE THOMPSON JACK WILKERSON 

Kingsport, Tennessee Chincoteague, Virgiftia Kennedy, Alabama Durham, North Carolina 




JOYCE WILLIAMS JIMMY WOOD 

Raleigh, North Carolina Martinsville, Virginia 



LEMMIE YOUNG 

Sparta, Tennessee 



117 




President John Lombard 

Vice-President Dean McKinnev 

Secretary-Treasurer Teresa Peters 

Sponsor Dr. Donald Bowdle 



BIBLE COLLEGE JUNIORS 



JUNIORS HAVE UNRAVELLED THE 
MYSTERIES OF COLLEGE 

By the time one reaches his junior year, the mystery of 
college life has finally unraveled itself. With his increase 
in rank, a junior also finds an increase in his responsibilities; 
he is more frequently asked and expected to lead the col- 
lege's activities. 

To the junior, daily campus life is no longer of primary 
concern, but in addition, he must now worry about com- 
pletion of required courses, acquisition of a high quality 
point average, and those very essential courses from the 
dean. 

Re-electing their Sophomore president, John Lombard, 
the class has forged ahead under his steady and competent 
leadership. They had installed last spring and finished pay- 
ing for this year, the abused yet much needed intercom- 
munications system in Walker Hall. 

Another of their projects was unique in nature as could 
be observed as they served the meals at all of the banquets 
held in the Lee cafeteria this year. This was a trying task 
at times, but rewarding in monetary returns. 

A warm feeling of satisfaction is the possession of the 
Juniors now. Three years of preparation completed and their 
Senior year to come — a most promising prospect! 



DARLEEN ALLEN, Flint, Michigan 

WALTER BATEMAN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
JAMES BRECKINRIDGE, Lubbock, Texas 

CECIL COWARD, Lake City, South Carolina 
THOMAS HOLLINGSWORTH, Attalla, Alabama 
DALE HUGHES, Phoenix, Arizona 

GERALD JOHNSON, Bayou La Batre, Alabama 
DUANE LAMBERT, Live Oak, Florida 
JOHN LOMBARD, Dora, Alabama 

DAVID LYDA, Newton, North Carolina 
SUE McGHEE, Tinley Park, Illinois 

WILLIAM McKINNEY, Cleveland, Tennessee 

RAY McMULLEN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
EUGENE MARTIN, Flint, Michigan 
' DOROTHY MASSEY, Batesville, Mississippi 

BARBARA MONTGOMERY, Carrolton, Mississippi 
PATRICIA PETERS, Mattawamkeag, Maine 
CHARLES PITTMAN, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

ERNEST ROBERTS, Plant City, Florida 
GREY ROBINSON, Lakeland, Florida 
MARIE SATERLEE, Kotzebue, Alaska 

PHILLIP SHEARER, Anderson, South Carolina 
MARTHA SHORT, Stanford, Kentucky 

KENNETH SMITH, McCall Creek, Mississippi 

LEAH TOW, Claysburg, Pennsylvania 

THOMAS WILSON, Cleveland, Tennessee 



118 



WANDA BLACKABY, Eminence, Kentucky 
MANUEL BONILLA, Sonora, Mexico 

THEODORE BOWMAN, Middletown, Ohio 
LOWELL BRANNEN, Monroe, Louisiana 
JIMMY BURNS, Independence, Oregon 
DANIEL BURT, Cleveland, Tennessee 






k^k 




**./. 




VSVSS -i--> 



President Jiinus Fulbright 

Vice-President M.I. Joseph 

Secretary-Treasurer P^ggY Richardson 

Sponsor Mr. Duran Palmertree 



BIBLE COLLEGE SOPHOMORES 



INITIATION INTO COLLEGE LIFE IS 
COMPLETE ... 

The Sophomore Bible College student is in a period of 
transition, a transition between the "period of adjustment" 
of his freshman year and the heralded senior year with 
its cherished diploma. The sophomore looks back on mem- 
ories of friends acquired and the old crowded student center. 
He looks forward to more Christ-centered education . . . 
Greek . . . systematic theology, church history . . . that 
special someone he has been looking for! 

But this transition stage is not a period of dormancy. 
At present he is growing spiritually and mentally in the 
classroom and socially in the new student center. His first 
year was spent almost entirely in taking liberal arts courses, 
but this year has seen the real beginning of his professional 
training in courses such as Church of God history and polity. 

Their class government has the altruistic project of 
placing a "Declaration of Faith" in every classroom. This 
shows a desire to uplift the school, students, and the king- 
dom of God. The school is proud of this the present sopho- 
more class and looks to them for signifcant contributions 
in the future. 



120 



M. V. CHACKO, Kerala, India 

WAYNE CHAMBERS, Birmingham, Alabama 
JAMES CODY, Pine Bluff, Arkansas 
CARLOS DIAZ, San Jose, Costa Rica 
MARIA DIAZ, San Jose, Costa Rica 

HAROLD DOUGLAS, Talladega, Alabama 

JUNUS FULBRIGHT, Asheville, North Carolina 
RICHARD GOODMAN, Winter Haven, Florida 
RABUN HADDOCK, Mount Dora, Florida 
HARVEY HARKINS, Cleveland, Tennessee 
RONALD HARVARD, Lake Wales, Florida 
LLOYD HAZZARD, Basset, Virginia, Re. Ed. 

JACKIE HORNE, Greenwood, South Carolina 
JOYCE HUTSON, St. Louis, Missouri, Re. Ed. 
JAMES JINKS, Cleveland, Tennessee 
HAROLD JONES, Augusta, Georgia 

WINONA KERNS, Hazelhurst, Georgia 
DOUGLAS LEROY, Bath, South Carolina 

ARCHIE MILLER, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
JOHN MILLER, Pompano Beach, Florida 
BILLY O'NEAL, Fort Worth, Texas 

DAVID PARTIN, Lake Wales, Florida 

ATANASIE RAILEANU, Draper, North Carolina 
JAMES RATHBUN, Flint, Michigan 

ROBERT REFFNER, Williamsburg, Pennsylvania 
PEGGY RICHARDSON, Williamsburg, Pennsylvania 
SAMUEL ROBEFF, Chaco, Argentina 
RAY SANDERS, Bath, South Carolina 
ROBERT SHEPPARD, Savannah, Georgia 
ANNETTE STANCILL, Chatsworth, Georgia 

RICHARD USSERY, Kansas City, Kansas 
ROBERT VARNER, Roxbury, Pennsylvania 
LEONARD WALLS, Winter Garden, Florida 

WAYNE WHITE, Rocky Mount, North Carolina 



I 




Sophomores attain full rank in the 

Lee community 



121 




President Kenneth Hensley 

Vice-President Harold Jones 

Secretary-Treasure'- Carolyn Legg 

Sponsor Mr. Elmer Odom 



BK COLLEGE FRESHMl 



FROSH RUN HEAD-ON INTO THE 
INTRICACIES OF COLLEGE LIFE. 

Bundle of nerves . . . new roommate . . . vmpacking . . . 
endless meal lines . . . initiations . . . and adjusting were 
the experiences of every new freshman. Although the proc- 
ess of getting settled was upsetting, everyone finally calmed 
themselves, and experienced no mental breakdowns. 

The Freshman Class portrays potentials of the ultimate 
hope of the Bible College, which is that of training well- 
developed students who will become practicing witnesses, 
competent teachers, fundamental expositors of the Word, 
able leaders, patient counselors, and sound sniritual ad- 
ministrators. It is the desire of the college that these stu- 
dents will, consequently, be capable of fulfilling in a more 
efficient manner the offices of youth leaders, Sunday school 
teachers, Christian education directors, missionaries, evan- 
gelists, pastors and of serving as dedicated district, state, 
national, and world leaders in the work of winning souls 
for our Saviour. 



122 



MUBARAK AW AD, Jerusalem, Jordan 

JOHANNES BADENHORST, Kroonstad, South Africa 
JUDITH BIXLER, Chicago, Illinois 

GWENDOLYN BLAND, Cleveland, Tennessee 
RICHARD BOLTE, Pittsburg, Kansas 

GLANDON BROOME, Lockhart, South Carolina 

CORNELIO COSTELO, Sonora, Mexico 
JERALD CODY, Pine Bluff, Arkansas 

WILLIAM COGDILL, Lockhart, South Carolina 
MARY COX, Somerset, Kentucky 
JERRY CRAIG, Atlanta, Georgia 

DURWOOD DANIELS, Goldshoro, N. C. 

ALICE DAVIS, Logan, West Virginia 
ALEXIS DAY, Cambria, Virginia 

DONALD DEFINO, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
STELLA DURAND, Melbourne, Florida 
CLYDE EDDINS, Pensacola, Florida 

CARROLL EVERHART, Decatur, Georgia 

JAMES FORESTER, Lexington, Kentucky 
RUTH FREELAN, Xenia, Ohio 

RONALD FUSON, Trenton, Michigan 
DELDON FUTRAL, Athens, Alabama 
LAQUETTA GRANT, Pittsburg, Kansas 
JOHN GREEN, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

JOLENE GRUBBS, Monroeville, Pennsylvania 
VELVA HAMPTON, Bristol, Tennessee 
PAUL HARRISON, Babson Park, Florida 

KENNETH HENSLEY, Rutherfordton, N. C. 
DAVID HOUSEHOLDER, Neivport News, Va. 
KAYE HOWE, Ontario, Canada, Re. Ed. 

DON HURST, Cleveland, Tennessee, Re. Ed. 
CAROL JACKSON, Altoona, Alabama 
K. K. JOHN, Kerala, India 

PAUL JOHNSON, Cleveland, Tennessee 
ERNESTINE KLEIN, Portland, Oregon 
JANICE LAIR, Pittsburg, Kansas 



Education is the apprenticeship of life 




123 




RELIGIOUS EDUCATION OFFICERS 

President Lloyd Hazzard 

Vice-President Jeanette Ducroq 

Secretary-Treasurer Virginia Webb 

Chaplin Joyce Stephens 

Sponsor Mrs. Helen Symes 



CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT IS THE 
GREAT, IF NOT THE SOLE, AIM OF 
EDUCATION. 



"A man isn't truly educated until he has accepted the 
teachings of his Lord and Master." 

With this tenet ever in mind the curriculum and purpose 
of the Religious Education division point always to mental 
and spiritual Christian development. Students are trained 
in two main divisions of Christian service, the missions 
emphasis and the preaching ministry. These courses are 
designed to instruct Christian leaders, thereby producing 
competent servants for the Kingdom. Completion of these 
courses qualifies the student for acceptance into an ad- 
vanced Bible College curriculum. 

Each Religious Education student takes pride in his de- 
partment. By performing certain projects such as raising 
money and donating it to one of the school's religious clubs, 
he benefits his fellow students, school, and the Lord Jesus 
Christ. 



124 



DENNIE LANE, Kokoma, Indiana 

CAROLYN LEGG, Clovis, New Mexico 
CLOVIS LEWIS, Gilbertown, Alabama 

BETTY LOVELADY, Birmingham, Alabama, Re. Ed. 
CAROLYN McAVOY, Ocala, Florida 
TULLY McCOY, Biimwell, Kentucky 

GEORGE MABE, Ecorse, Michigan 

HARRY MANN, Lake Wales, Florida 

LAWRENCE MARTIN, Des Plaines, Illinois 
ALBERT MEISTER, Pitman, New; Jersey 
MARVIN NEILL, Lewisburg, Tennessee 
YVONNE NELSON, Dayton, Ohio 

HELEN OBENCHAIN, Cincinnati, Ohio 
PHILLIP PEARSON, Pikesville, Tennessee 

JOYCE PHILLIPS, Pittsburg, Kansas, Re. Ed. 
RUDOLPH RAMBARAN, Trinidad, B. W. I. 
JERRY RATHBUN, Flint, Michigan 
RUTH RATHBUN, Flint, Michigan 

RONALD ROBERTSON, Springfield, Virginia, Re. Ed. 
ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ, Ponce, Puerto Rico 
ALFREDO DE LOS SANTOS, Lima, Peru 
DANIEL SILVA, Trujillo, Peru 

DOUGLAS SLOCUMB, Pasadena, Texas 
DONALD SMITH, Seneca, South Carolina 

MARJORIE SMITH, Cleveland, Tennessee 
ROBERT SNELLER, Milford, Delaware 

JOYCE STEVENS, Cleveland, Tennessee, Re. Ed. 
JIMMY STONE, Kingsport, Tennessee 

EMILY TERRY, Florence, South Carolina 

MARIO VALENZUELA, Sonora, Mexico, Re. Ed. 

SILVIO VIGO, Chimbotea, Peru, Re. Ed. 
RONALD WALKER, Augusta, Georgia 

VIRGINIA WEBB, Logan, West Virginia, Re. Ed. 
WILLIE WEBB, Natchez, Mississippi 

HERMAN WHITE, Jamestown, North Carolina 
FRED WILSON, Franklin, Ohio 

PAUL WILSON, Warrenville, South Carolina 
BETTY WOODS, Couch, Missouri 

SAMUEL YOUNGBLOOD, Louisville, Kentucky 




125 




President Ted Gee 

Vice-President Jerry Tow 

Secretary Marian Maye 

Treasurer Tannis Alford 

Sponsor Mrs. Nina Driggers 



JUNIOR COLLEGE SOPHOMORES 



ANOTHER LEVEL OF EDUCATION 
ATTAINED THROUGH JUNIOR COLLEGE 
GRADUATION. 

At last it seems wonderful to be called by the fabulous 
word SOPHOMORE. Lee's sophomores have participated 
in many outstanding events during the past two years . . . 
Orientation . . . dorm life . . . registration . . . English pop 
tests . . . sandwiches for Sunday night supper . . . Christ- 
mas holidays . . . examinations . . . mail calls . . . term 
papers . . . the razing of Old Main . . . week-end inva- 
sions . . . 4:00 suppers . . . bug and leaf collections for 
biology . . . graduation. . . . 

Many memories of Lee College encircle the sophomores. 
For two years, it has provided them a home and has given 
them valuable training and experiences which will assist 
them when they accept future challenges. 

The challenges to which they have been exposed at Lee 
Junior College have been met. They feel that they have 
prepared them for the immediate future to the extent that 
they may continue their academic training at other insti- 
tutions confident that they may successfully meet any chal- 
lenge offered them. Thus they may be led to greater and 
more noble accomplishments. 



126 




MARGARET ADAMS 

Middletown, Ohio 



MIRIAM ALDRICH 

Arlington, Virginia 




TANNIS ALFORD GENIE ARD 

Charleston, South Carolina St. Thomas, Viroin Islands 




GAIL BARNWELL 
Linden, Alabama 



FREDRICK BEHERS 

Tucson, Arizona 




DAVID BIBLER 
Sarasota, Florida 



JOAN BICKERS 
Arlington, Virginia 




RUDELL BLOOMFIELD JOHN BOATWRIGHT SELVA BOWDEN 

Bradshaw, West Virginia Springfield, Virginia Bridgeville, Delaware 



SANDRA BRIDGES SHIRLEY BRIDGES 

Sevierville, Tennessee Chattanooga, Tennessee 




JAMES BROWN 

Rossville, Georgia 



LYLA BRUHL 

Covington, Louisiaria 



JOE BRYSON BARBARA BURNETTE RUDOLPH BURROUGHS 

Cartersville, Georgia Atlanta, Georgia Anderson, South Carolina 




BETTY BYRD 

Lakeland, Florida 



IRIS BYRD 
Perry, Florida 



IDA CHICO 

Brooklyn, New York 



DORIS CLAYBORN 

Sevienullc, Tennessee 



CARLA COOK 

Marietta, Georgia 




VELMA CORNELISON 
Fackler, Alabama 



ROGER COURSON 
Bartow, Florida 



LEON DANIEL BARBARA DEMPSEY DONNA DEMPSEY 

Midland, Texas Walhalla, South Carolina Walhalla, South Carolina 



127 



Council of ten is new 

addition to sophomore 

class government 



The first objective of the newly organized Sophomore 
Council of Ten was to write a class constitution— some- 
thing never before accomplished or possessed by any class 
at Lee College. 

These members are appointed to their position as council 
members on the basis of their leadership ability, scholastic 
standing, Christian character, and personality. 

Besides drawing up the class constitution, the Council 
serves as an advisory board to the president on matters of 
class interest. 

Each member begins his term in office with five points 
to his credit. For each absence from Council meeting one 
point is deducted. If a member misses five meetings his 
position is filled by a new appointee. 

While expediting proper class organization this group's 
efforts have resulted in better planned class-meetings and 
has noticeably raised the standards of Sophomore Class 
participation and interest. 




DORIS DENNISON LOCHIE ELLER 

Gainesville, Florida Hayesville, North Carolina 





ROBERT EPPS 

Peoria, Illinois 



GLORIA ETHERIDGE 

Natchez, Mississippi 




ROSE MARY FAUBER TED GEE 

Sevierville, Tennessee Lando, South Carolina 




WALTER GOFF 

Columbus, Ohio 



FLAVIUS GREEN 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 




CARLOTTA GREGORY DIANE GUTHRIE 

East St. Louis, Illinois Douglas, Georgia 



DONNA GUY 

Maryville, Tennessee 



DAVID HADSALL LANELLE HARPER 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania Ocilla, Georgia 




PAUL HARRIS 

Phoenix, Arizona 



GAIL HARVARD 

Lake Wales, Florida 



CHARLOTTE HICKS 

Cleveland, Tennessee 



JOHN HINKLE 

Cleveland, Tennessee 



GLENDA HOBBS 

Lakeland, Florida 




DALE HUFF MOQUITA HURST MARJORIE JOHNSON REGINA JOHNSON JEAN JONES 

Cleveland, Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Richmond, Kentucky Tampa, Florida Jolliet, Illinois 




WANDA JUSTICE BILL KERLEY 

Hustontown, Pennsylvania Dunlap, Tennessee 



BARBARA KLAUS 
Dearborn, Michigan 



LAVICE LANEY 
Daltoti, Georgia 



WALTER McCANTS 
Tampa, Florida 



129 



Titrating radioactive iodine 131 for counting. 




Geiger-Mueller Counter 



130 




DENNIS MCCAULEY 
Fort Worth, Texas 



ROSIE MCCOY 

Vernon, Texas 




ED MCGHEE 
Tinley Park, Illinois 



LYNN MATTHEWS 
Clei'eland, Tennessee 




MARION MAYE ALEAN MILLER 

Gadsden, Alabama Warrenton, North Carolina 




CHARLOTTE MILLER BRENDA MORGAN 

Scaford, Delaware Soddy, Tennessee 




GLENDA O'NEAL 

St. Charles, Missouri 



LOCKIE OSBORNE 
Eden, Maryland 



JOSEPH OWENS CAROLYN PALMERTREE JOHN PIGG 

Bremen, Georgia Lenoir, North Carolina Cleveland, Tennessee 




GERALDINE REED 

Spring City, Tennessee 



JUANITA REED 

Glen Lyn, Virginia 



WILLIAM REID 

Baltimore, Maryland 



BRENDA ROBERSON 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 



DORA ROGERS 

Cleveland, Tennessee 




ROLAND SHARP BEVERLY SHIFLETT 

Campaign, Tennessee Arlington, Virginia 



DORIS SHORT 

Stanford, Kentucky 



ROBERTA SHORT 
Warren, Michigan 



MARILYN SINDLE 

Cleveland, Tcnttessee 




JAMES SLAY SYLVIA STARLING 

Cleveland, Tennessee Stark, Florida 



JUDY STEVENS 
Roanoke, Virginia 



JUNE STEPP EVIE STEWART 

Cleveland, Tennessee Bay Minette, Alabama 



131 




study Break! 



132 




PHILLIP TAPLEY 

Phoenix, Arizona 



ALTON THOMPSON 

Mattawamkeag, Maine 




WANDA THOMPSON 

Winter Haven, Florida 



JERRY TOW 
Gadsden, Alabama 




DONALD WATT KENNETH WILKINSON 

Pelzer, South Carolina Anniston, Alabama 




GENA YORK 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



DOUGLAS 
YOUNGBLOOD 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Chapel exodus marks recommencement of classes 




-*"^'VSi.»-*.< ' ^. .--!fr 




President Jim McClain 

Vice-President Anthony Lombard 

Secretary Brenda Yates 

Treasurer Gloria Morgan 

Sponsor Mr. Jimmy Bilbo 



JUNIOR COLLEGE FRESHMEN 



FRESHMEN CAPTURE THE RECORD FOR 
NUMBER ENROLLED. 



Someone has aptly said, "To be conscious that you are 
ignorant is a great step toward knowledge." As college 
freshmen enter the door to an institution of higher educa- 
tion, some of them have the misconception that they know 
a great deal and little is left to be gained during their col- 
lege years. To accept their own ignorance is often difficult 
for them. To attain this education is a never-ending task, 
and no one can obtain all the knowledge available. How- 
ever, to attain this knowledge should ever remain a chal- 
lenge to all freshmen. 

On September 4, 1962, students making up the largest 
class at Lee College, arrived on the campus. Hectic regis- 
tration brought its usual problems of distress to these fresh- 
men: however, with the capable help of the faculty advisors, 
most of these students were guided in the right direction. 

The class of 1964 shares many experiences they will 
never forget — dormitory life, initiations, parties, banquets, 
dates, choir, invasions, and religious services. Life at Lee 
will constitute indelible experiences for them. 



LINDA ABELL, Lake Orile, Michigan 

CAROLYN ALDRICH, Arlington, Virginia 
RONALD AYERS, Fairdale, Kentucky 
DOLAS BAIN, Mentone, Alabama 
TEEN BAKER, Huntsville, Alabama 
ANGELA BALLENGER, Cocoa, Florida 

MARGARET BARBER, Waycross, Georgia 
BRENDA BEITLER, Largo, Florida 

SANDRA BIGGS, Greenville, South Carolina 

CONSTANCE BIRMINGHAM, Wewahitchka, Florida 
GORDON BLOODWORTH, Cleveland, Tennessee 
PAUL BLOOMER, Newport News, Virginia 

JIMMY BOURLAND, Roscoe, Texas 

BRENDA BOWDEN, Bridgeville, Delaware 

ROSE BRADSHAW, Columbia, South Carolina 
BRENDA BRANCH, Cullman, Alabama 
JAMES BRANCH, Cullman, Alabama 

DALPHINE BRAY, Pikesville, Tennessee 

CAROLYN BROWN, Sevierville, Tennessee 
PATRICIA CAMERON, East Lynne, Missouri 
CAROL CARDER, Toledo, Ohio 

WANDA CHAMBERS, Tifton, Georgia 
BUDDY CHAPMAN, Lafayette, Georgia 
CURTIS CLARK, Cleveland, Tennessee 

CHARLES CLAYTON, Albany, Georgia 
LOIS CLAYTON, Albany, Georgia 
RONNIE COMBS, Middletown, Ohio 
ROBERTA COOK, Detroit, Michigan 

EDDIE COOPER, Shreveport, Louisiana 
CHERYLE CREWS, Hilliard, Florida 

PATRICIA CROSS, Cohutta, Georgia 
JANICE CUNDIFF, Nonvood, Ohio 

JOSEPH DAVIS, Bay Minette, Alabama 

DALE DENHAM, West Monroe, Louisiana 
CARROLL DOSS, Tatnpa, Florida 

ANITA DOUGLAS, Talladega, Alabama 

DAVID DOUGLAS, Talladega, Alabama 

BRENDA DRISKELL, Fort Meade, Florida 

PHAYLENE DUNCAN, Winter Haven, Florida 
WAYNE DYER, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

LARRY ELLIS, Pine Level, North Carolina 
JOHN EVANS, Cambridge, Maryland 




135 



Noon cafeteria line 

gives welcome break 

from classes 




136 



SUE FITZGERALD, Covington, Louisiana 
GLENN FOX, Electra, Texas 

SUDIE FUGATE, Sevierville, Tennessee 

EDDIE GADBURY, Carlsbad, New Mexico 
WAYNE GAINES, Washington, D. C. 

MANGEL GERSTMAN, La Belle, Florida 

PAULA GIBSON, Parkersburg, West Virginia 
DONALD GILLIAM, Ft. Worth, Texas 
JOHN GOFF, Harbcson, Delaware 

DORIS GOODMAN, Cincinnati, Ohio 
LINDA GOODWILL, Jackson, Ohio 

LORETTA GRANGER, Lockhart, S. C. 

SAMUEL GRAY, Arlington, Virginia 

CAMILLA GRAYSON, Indianapolis, Indiana 
GLENDA GRIFFIN, Lockhart, South Carolina 

CAROL GRINDSTAFF, Greenville, South Carolina 
BARBARA GUY, Maryville, Tennessee 

ROBERT HALL, Gastonia, North Carolina 

JAMES HANCOCK, Ninety Six, South Carolina 
JANICE HARRELSON, Owasso, Michigan 
DANIEL HARRIS, Jefferson, lou^a 

JERRIE HEASTON, Greenville, South Carolina 

JO ANN HEDRICK, Lawton, Oklahoma 

LINDA HENSLEY, Dalton, Georgia 

PATRICIA HIGGINBOTHAM, Tampa, Florida 
CARL HOBBS, Cleveland, Tennessee 

MARY HOLLAND, Natchez, Mississippi 

CHARLES HOLLIFIELD, Hampton, Virginia 
ALTON HORNBUCKLE, Sevierville, Tennessee 
SHIRLEY HUBBARD, Ripley, New York 

LOUISE JENKINS, Covington, Louisiana 
HOWARD JOHNSA, Atlanta, Georgia 

JOHNNY JOHNSON, Okeechobee, Florida 
RUTH KEAR, Knoxville, Tennessee 

SUSAN KELLNER, Sevierville, Tennessee 
JANICE KELLY, Jacksonville, Florida 

MARILYN KENNEDY, Jackson, Mississippi 
PERRY LAMEY, Lexington, Alabama 
GORDON LEE, Haines City, Florida 

JOYCE LILLY, Blackville, South Carolina 

ROBERT LLEWELLYN, Knoxville, Tennessee 
ANTHONY LOMBARD, Columbia, Mississippi 




137 



Biology experiments 

are a high spot 

in freshman curriculum 



"Squeal like a stuck pig" does not apply to these specimens 
belonging to Mr. Duran Palmertree, the biology instructor. 




138 



BETTY LOWERY, Cleveland, Tennessee 
CAROLYN LYTLE, Shaker Heights, Ohio 
LLOYD MCAFEE, Daisy, Tennessee 
JIM MCCLAIN, Decatur, Georgia 

PATRICIA MCCONNELL, Candler, N. C. 
JOSEPH MCCOY, Lindale, Georgia 

CARL MCDONALD, Gadsden, Alabama 

JACOUELYN MCELROY, Birmingham, Alabama 
BENJAMIN MCGLAMERY, Mineral Bluff, Georgia 
DENNIS MCGUIRE, Kings-port, Tennessee 
KAREN MAPLES, Chillicothe, Missouri 

CAROLYN MAGUIRE, Port Huron, Michigan 

BETTY MEARES, Sarasota, Florida 

NORETTA MEDFORD, Cleveland, Tennessee 

"MARY LOU MEFFORD, Arkansas City, Kansas 
DIANA MEREDITH, Shepherdsville, Kentucky 
CAROLYN MILLER, Arab, Alabama 
PATRICIA MILLER, Augusta, Georgia 

KENNETH MINOR, Gaffncy, South Carolina 
GLORIA MORGAN, Soddy, Tennessee 
RONA MORSE, Miami, Florida 

GERALD MULLINS, Corbin, Kentucky 
IRIS MYERS, Covington, Louisiana 
JAMES MYERS, Louis, Kentucky 

GAIL NEWMAN, Kennedy, Alabama 

JAMESIE NEYMAN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
SHARON NICHOLS, Farmington, Michigan 
PATSY NICKS, San Diego, California 
VERNON NORRIS, lacksonville, Florida 
SHIRLEY OGDEN, Natchez, Mississippi 

DEBRA OGLE, Miami, Florida 

JACQUELINE PANNELL, Cleveland, Tennessee 
FRANCES PARKER, Flint, Michigan 
CARLA PAYNE, KnoxviUc, Tennessee 
LORETTA PAYNE, Tallapoosa, Georgia 
HUGH PECK, Oxon Hill, Maryland 

ERLENE PHILLIPS, Onconta, Alabama 
LANELDA PHILLIPS, Griffin, Georgia 
BEVERLY PRICE, Long ]sland, Alabama 
PATRICIA PRICE, Long Island, Alabama 
BARBARA RANKIN, Hilliard, Florida 

CHARLES REYNOLDS, Arlington, Virginia 




139 



Learning 

without thought 

is labor lost 




STANCE RIGNEY, Mobile, Alabama 
EARL ROWAN, Nashville, Georgia 

LARRY RUSHING, Cleveland, Tennessee 
REBECCA SALMON, Odenton, Maryland 
ROLANDA SEARCY, Balboa, Canal Zone 
CAROLE SEAY, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

FAY SELBY, Bowling Green, Kentucky 
JANET SHARP, Jackson, Mississippi 

DONALD SHOEMAKER, Dade City, Florida 
STELLA SILVERS, Allen Park, Michigan 

SHIRLEY SIMPSON, Anderson, South Carolina 
CALIDA SMITH, Orlando, Florida 

CHARLES SMITH, Heflin, Alabama 

LEWIS SMITH, Greenville, South Carolina 
CHARLES SPEARS, Winter Garden, Florida 
ROSEMARY STANG, Oxford, Ohio 
JERRY STARNES, Phoenix, Arizona 

YVONNE STEPP, Cleveland, Tennessee 

WANDA STEWART, Mobile, Alabama 

CECILIA SUMNER, Cleveland, Tennessee 

CHARLES SWEAT, Lake City, Florida 

LARRY SYKES, Jackson, Mississippi 

LAWAINE THOMAS, Live Oak, Florida 
JOYCE TODD, Logan, Illinois 

THOMAS TRAWICK, Hamtramck, Michigan 
WAYNE UNDERWOOD, Lake Wales, Florida 
BARRY VASSEY, Gaffney, South Carolina 
CAROLYN WAINWRIGHT, Starke, Florida 
LEON WALKER, Chickamauga, Georgia 
JUDI WELCH, Chamite, Kansas 

EDITH WELLS, Gastonia, North Carolina 
TERRY WHIDDEN, Fort Pierce, Florida 

ANN WILSON, Wake Forest, North Carolina 

CONWAY WILSON, Newport, Tennessee 

JANE WILSON, Louisville, Kentucky 

JAMES WINDHAM, Fort Meade, Florida 

JEWEL WOODARD, Lakeland, Florida 

WAYNE WOODARD, Cleveland, Tennessee 
BARBARA WYATT, Richmond, Indiana 
BRENDA YATES, Glens Falls, Neiv York 

KATHLEEN YEOMANS, Cleveland, Tennessee 
JUDY YOUNG, Smyrna, Georgia 




141 



"I press toward tke mark for the jprize of the high calling 

in Christ Jesus." — ^Pawl 

For college strndents^ participation in athletics furnishes 
the release necessary for continued study. It provides re- 
laxation, diversion, comradeship, and an outlet for practical 
Christian living. 

Basketball, football, champions, and losers together com- 
bine in athletics for total coverage of the year's events. There 
have been many athletic encounters and all have begun with 
prayer in recognition of the all-wise God who is interested 
in OUT every act. 



ATHLETICS 



j««*— "^K?; 






p-.: 




Hubert Black 
Coach and Athletic Director 




First Row: Wayne Woodard, Bob Varner, Captain Don Jenkins, Don Gadbury, Co-captain John Pigg. 
Second Row: Joel Jinkerson, Bob Llewellen, Archie Miller, Dale Hughes, Ken Hyde, Joe McCoy, Ted Bowman. 




Don Jenkins, center 



144 





Pre-game crowd at Southwestern game. 



Winning the final game of the Lee Invitational 
tournament, one of three tournaments won by the 
Lee quintet, the Vikings put down the Southwestern 
Bible College team 101 to 45. A close defense and a 
fast break enabled Lee to pass the one hundred mark 
in this championship game. 

The first ten minutes of the game saw the starting 
team rolling up a 27-5 lead. Bob Sherlin was on fire 
in this first quarter as he scored twelve points. At the 
9:50 point of the first half Coach Black put in his 
reserves. Even this part of the Viking's squad was 
too powerful for the Oil-men. When the buzzer sound- 
ed, the home team took a 53-22 lead into the second 
half. 

As the second half got under way the starting five 
of both teams began to move the ball, but again Lee 
caught fire and again they ran the score to a bigger 
margin of 84-22. In the final period the Assembly of^ 
God school began to freeze the ball in hopes to hold 
down the Lee College score, but the reserves also 
proved powerful once more. They built the score to 
99 points when Billy Miller stole the ball and scored 
the 101st point with a little less than a minute left 
in the game. 

Bob Sherlin who had a hot first half led all scorers 
with 20 points. He was followed by Bob Aired and 
John Pigg who each added 12 points to Lee's 101. Peany 
Clark led Southwestern with 17 points while Ron 
Beadles and Jerry McNabb added 9 and 8 points re- 
spectively. 



Bob Sherlin (25) soars high above Southwestern opponenton a driving layup. 



Lee sinks Southwestern 



During the Lee Invitational Tournament Lee College 
was "red hot and still heating." Over the season the 
boys laboured hard in many hours of practicing and 
planning. As the second semester got under way, Lee 
saw some new faces on the squad, as registration 
brought with it 6'4" Ken Cloud, 6'4" Bob Aired, 6'2" 
Bob Sherlin, and 5'9" Billy Miller. These new men 
along with Bob Varner, Dale Hughes, and Don Jenkins 
seemed to round out the nucleus of the Lee varsity, 
which has compiled a 24-2 record. One such victory 
was at the expense of Sou'.hwestern Bible College of 
Oklahoma City. 



Lee 


78 


Lee 


78 


Lee 


46 


Lee 


78 


Lee 


125 


Lee 


81 


Lee 


80 


Lee 


65 


Lee 


85 


Lee 


87 


Lee 


64 


Lee 


76 


Lee 


79 


Lee 


94 


Lee 


98 


Lee 


94 


Lee 


98 


Lee 


94 


Lee 


78 


Lee 


104 


Lee 


109 


Lee 


101 


Lee 


88 


Lee 


84 


Lee 


92 


Lee 


114 



62 Oak Ridge Church . . . Home 

68 White House Home 

22 Hemphill Church .... Atlanta, Ga. 

56 Gulf Oil Atlanta, Ga. 

46 Southeastern Bible College Lakeland, Fla. 
82 Art Mart Home 

68 Pegues-Patten Y M C.A. 

60 Lee Alumni Home 

102 Art Mart Home 

80 Oak Ridge Church . . . Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

52 White House Home 

52 Pecxies-Patten Home 

76 Central Bible Institute . . Springfield. Missouri 

70 Agnew Christian .... Oklahoma City, Okla. 

60 Southwestern Bible College Oklahoma City, Okla. 

78 Midwest Christian .... OVlnhoma City. Okla. 

70 Tvler Church Tyler, Texas 

85 Piseah Church Home 

58 Emmanuel College . . . Franklin Springs, Ga. 

43 Central Bible Institute . Home 

47 Fmmanuel College . . . Home 
46 Southwestern Bible College Home 
78 Oak Ridge Church . . . Home 

82 Cumberland College . . . Y.M.C.A. 

85 Cleveland V.F.W Y.M.C.A. 

84 Chattanooga V.F.W. . . . Y.M.C.A. 



145 







Dale Hughes, guard 



Joan Bickers, Miriam. Aldrich, Shirley Bridges, Pat Nicks, and Genie Ard cheer 
the Vikings on to victory after victory. 



Lee loses to Art Mart 




John Pigg, forward 



On January 11, 1963 at Lee College field house, the 
Vikings found their undefeated record gone as they 
were upset by a hometown team, Art Mart 102-84. 

This was different and a little hard on the Vikings 
since they had been used to being on the large end 
of the scoring. The game started in fine fashion as 
both teams seemed to be red-hot. Ray Haulk of Art 
Mart and Don Gadbury of Lee were ripping the nets 
as they scored 18 and 15 points respectively for their 
teams in the first half. When the buzzer sounded at 
half-time the Vikings found themselves at the short 
end of a 51-39 score. 



As the second half unfolded things really began to 
look dim for Lee. The whole Art Mart team seemed 
to be going wild and before 10 minutes were gone 
the Vikings were out of the contest. Without the serv- 
ices of high scorer Dale Hughes it seemed hopeless and 
hopeless it was, for Art Mart, led by Ray Haulk's scor- 
ing, (27 points) and Ron Meagher's rebounding, came 
out as the first and only team to defeat Lee in the 
1962-63 season. Don Gadbury's 28 points went void 
as the rest of the team effort was not enough to pass 
the century mark for a victory. 



Art Mart's Billy Miller (37) races to intercept Viking Wayne Woodard (14). 




The Lee College Vikings after a successful tour of 
Florida, returned home to begin its home season with 
a 72-55 victory over Oak Ridge. Lee got off to a fine 
start as Viking Varner dumped in a bucket. The Atom- 
ic Tovi?ers quickly got revenge to even the score 2-2, 
and again at 4-4. Dale Hughes then quickly hit two 
goals in succession to give the varsity an 8-4 lead 
which they never relinquished. Oak Ridge gave a fine 
chase, but could not subdue the charges of Coach 
Hubert Black. When the buzzer sounded at half-time 
the score, 41-24, gave Lee College a 17 point lead to 
take to the locker-room. 

As both teams took the floor for the second half 
the lead quickly began to fade as Lynn Haun, 6'4" 
center for Oak Ridge, hit for four successive buckets. 
Following a time out the Vikings again found them- 
selves and the lead was soon regained. With a little 
more than five minutes to go Coach Black put in his 
reserves. They did their jobs well as they scored 5 
points while holding their opponents to 7 points. 

The victory was due to team effort on the part of 
the Vikings who had four men in double figures. Lead- 
ing the squad was Wayne Woodard with 15, John Pigg 
adding 14, and Varner and Hughes each contributing 
13 to the victory. Lynn Haun who caught fire, scoring 
15 points in the second half, was high man for Oak 
Ridge scoring 26 points for a losing cause. 




Unidentified Viking jumps with an opponent in the Oak Ridge game. 



Oak Ridge beat by Vikings 





Bob Varner, forward 




Don't cry, just give me the ball! 



Don Gadbury, guard 



147 



The football season got under way as always 
with grunts, groans, aches, and pains. 

Three teams were organized: the Seniors, the 
Freshmen, and the Academy. The boys spent sev- 
eral weeks developing themselves physically for 
the rough contact ahead. 

School spirit was high as was evidenced by 
the large turnout for the opening contest be- 
tween the Seniors and Academy. A pep band 
and the flashing Academy cheerleaders added 
extra enthusiasm to the gridiron battle. The 
Seniors demonstrated their superiority in a lop- 
sided 28-2 victory. 

Demonstrating a fine pass-run attack led by 
Leon Walker and Hugh Morris, the Freshmen 
rolled over the Academy Tigers 36-0 with a 
strong running attack. The last game between 
the Seniors and Freshmen, the Seniors ground 
out a 12-6 decision over the Freshmen. This gave 
the Seniors the right to play the all-stars com- 
posed of players from both the Freshmen and 
Academy teams. The Seniors won 26-6. 

The game which has to be labeled game-of- 
the-year was the second meeting between the 
Seniors and Freshmen. The Freshmen were hun- 
gry for revenge, and the Seniors were just as 
eager to clinch the intramural championship. 
The game was a thriller from start to finish. 
It was a defensive struggle until midway in the 
second quarter when the Seniors climaxed a 69- 
yard drive with a 27-yard touchdown pass from 
Dan Burt to Dave Partin. 

The Seniors jumped to a 14-0 lead early in 
the third quarter when quarterback Dan Burt 
fired a bullet pass to halfback Ted Gee in the 
end zone. The Freshmen stormed back and cut 
the deficit to 14-8 on a 22-yard pass from Hugh 
Morris to Joe McCoy. 

Early in the fourth quarter the Freshmen tied 
it up after recovering a fumble on the Senior 
11-yard line. Dan Burt then returned the en- 
suing kick-off 52 yards for a touchdown to as- 
sure the jubilant Seniors the crown. 




"Blockers, blockers, have I none," says Academy's LaVoy Newton as he is 
thrown for a humiliating twenty-three yard loss by charging seniors. 




Don Gilliam (51), Hugh Morris, and Jimmy "Ninety-six" Hancock (50) 
watch anxiously to see who has retrieved the fumbled pigskin. 






The "bear hug" is applied to Hugh Morris by Academy's Yeary. 




" *«^ -■ ^e^^'- 



FOOTBALL 



"Will the seniors never cease," asks Vern 
Morton as six seniors throw him for a loss. 



Quarterback Newton for the Academy heaves a short pass to teammate Walter Yeary (11). 
















ij*' 



-^ /ij^**?'-^^ 




FOOTBALL 




College Seniors 





College Seniors 




BASKETBALL 




INTRAMDRAL BASKETBALL 




One of the highlights of the basketball season at 
Lee College is the boys' intramural tournament. This 
season found Jimmy Bourland, Bob Reffner, Wilkie 
Green, Al Hornbuckle, Ed McGhee, Dr. Alford and 
Dean Walker leading in the scoring and rebounding. 

The second round of the tournament was probably 
the most exciting game of the year. The Bible College 
Sophomores and the Junior College Freshmen II met 
for the second time of the year. In the first game 
the B. C. managed to win by pulling a 26-24 decision 
out in the last few seconds. But this time things were 
a little different. 

Bob Reffner, the Bible College leading scorer and 
second in the league, could only manage seven points 
as he was guarded closely by Delton Futral, who barely 
stayed in the game with four fouls. While Reffner 
wa^ being held down teammate Dickie Davis scored 
fourteen points. These points, along with the ten of 
John Sims, proved to be short as the Freshmen, led 
by Jerry Noble's thirteen points, defeated the Sopho- 
mores 32-31 in a real nail-biter. 



Ed McGhee, trying to pass off, is trapped in a corner. 



Dean Walker blocks senior McCant's shot. 





Jimmy Bourland hits as teammate Don Gilliam 
follows the shot. 



Futral fails to block Davis' shot. 



Earl Rowan hits for two points. 



Wilkie Green is fouled by Delton Alford as he drives for a lay-up. 








O 1^ ^^^ 




Senior championship team: Coach Ed McGhee, kneeling; 
Genie Ard, Judy Stevens, Doris Dennison, Brenda Bowden, 
Sue McGhee, Captain Betty Byrd, Shirley Bridges, Donna Guy. 




Miss Roxie Carr 
Physical Education Director 



GIRLS' INTMMDRALS 



Freshman Wanda Stewart guards senior Betty Byrd closely, 
too closely at times. 




Are you two going to hold hands or play basketball? 




154 



Champions of the girls' intramural basketball 
program are the Senior girls coached by Ed Mc- 
Ghee. Captained by Betty Byrd, this well-organ- 
ized team rolled to an easy victory over their 
opponents on every occasion. For two years this 
group of girls coached by McGhee has been un- 
defeated. 

The girls' league is made up of three teams: 
the Seniors, the Freshmen, and the Academy 
team. These three played in a tournament series 
at the end of the regular playing season. 

The first game was between the Academy and 
the Freshmen with the Academy coming out on 
top with a score of 21-14. Playing the Seniors 
the next night in this double-elimination series, 
the Academy was beaten soundly by the more 
sure senior six. The final score was 38-15. The 
final game of the tournament was played be- 
tween the already once-beaten Frosh six and 
the confident Seniors. The game was close 
throughout with the Freshmen trying their best 
to match the scores with their highly touted 
opponents. The hard-fought game finally ended 
at 21-20 for the Seniors. 

Coach McGhee later voiced his unfailing con- 
fidence in his girls' ability to win the game. It 
was a good tournament and a good season. 

Girls' athletic director, Miss Ruthanna Carr, 
was pleased with the interest and participation 
of the girls. She anticipates more teams in the 
league next year and even greater interest than 
was shown this year. 




Coach Wilkie Green instructs his girls, but they lose to 
the Seniors by one point. 



Too quick in the lane — all six of you! 




Edith TuUis' teammates watch anxiously as she scores on a well-hit return in volleyball. 






Ready and waiting. 



'King-around-the-rosie. . . ." 



Volleyball and shuffle board are popular sports 




You'll have to shuffle faster than tha-t to win: 




Somebody help that girl. That ball is too heavy for her. 



156 




MINOR SPORTS 



%. 




Champion ping pong and tennis player, Jimmy Bourland. 



Girls' table tennis champion, Wanda Justice, returns on a volley. 



Although not enjoyed by everyone, minor sports 
are sources of real enjoyment for participants 
and on-lookers. Lee ran two minor sports tourna- 
ments this year in the realms of table tennis 
and tennis. 

Participating in the table tennis matches were 
sixteen boys, vying for positions in the sixteen- 
game, double-elimination matches. Elimination 
was in two brackets. Ed McGhee lost in the semi- 
finals to Jim Bourland, and had to play Dickie 
Davis, top man in the losers bracket. Winning 
this again qualified McGhee for a match against 
paddle-handy Bourland in the championship 
match. The outcome: Bourland over McGhee. 

The tennis matches ended surprisingly with 
the same results — Bourland on top. Runner-up 
to Bourland out of the twelve matches was en- 
trant Rusty Slay. Bourland beat Slay, Pat Coo- 
mer, Ted Bowman, Jesse Macintosh, and Rudy 
Burroughs for the tennis championship. 




Runner's-up match between Dickie Davis and Ed McGhee. 



157 



T' Jook is a first 

jbaven for 

aries' chil- 

"^ -^1 while 

_.s none- 



g ;S to 

C- - -^ -. - 



Sfi 



ACADEMY 





LEE ACADEMY 




High school students feel that it Ls a great advantage to attend Lee 
Academy. What a privilege it is to have Christian classmates with whom 
to associate! Sitting in classrooms under the instruction of Spirit-filled 
teachers causes the high school youth to develop into a mature Christian 
young man or woman who knows how to live. 

Lee Academy gives the student an opportunity to develop intellectually, 
spiritually, physically, and socially. Basketball, football, volleyball, base- 
ball, tennis, and other sports give the high school youth an opportunity 
to develop himself physically. The classroom gives him an opportunity 
to develop intellectually in a Christian atmosphere. The chapel services 
along with Pioneers for Christ, mission prayer services, and dormitory 
prayer meetings develop him spiritually. Wholesome boy-girl relations 
allow him to develop socially. 

High school students are active in many other school activities, such 
as the school paper and the school annual. 

The Beta Club gives recognition to the honor students which presents 
a challenge to the student to achieve in his studies. 

Band, glee club, and class plays offer opportunities for the talented 
student to display his talent. 

High school students agree that Lee Academy is the greatest place 
in all the world! 



'It's the principle of the thing!' 



Students congregate in the classroom 





in the canteen . 



and in prayer. 




161 



Mr. and Miss Lee Academy 




It's not often that a new program is instituted, but 
this year is a year of exceptions. Within the Academy 
there was need for recognition of outstanding stu- 
dents; therefore, the Vindagua staff created the titles 
Mr. and Miss Lee Academy. 

These are positions of honor and may be considered 
the highest possible titles in Lee Academy. Require- 
ments for these titles are: credits sufficient for senior 
rating; grades of at least average status; and persons 
recognized for their achievements and contributions. 

The two elected for these honors are Ray Hughes, 
Jr. and Linda Butler, both excellent students and 
favored choices of the student body. 

As always responsibility accompanies privilege and 
honor. To these young people the responsibility is 
given to set worthy precedents in Christian leader- 
ship, scholarship, school loyalty and spirit. 





162 




Eugene Pharr 



Christine Alton 



MOST DEPENDABLE 




Lois Keil 



LaVoy Newton 



BEST PERSONALITY 




Don Gadb 



ury 



Billie Ruth Syphurs 

MOST ATHLETIC 




Sandra Guthrie 



Richard Bowen 



WITTIEST 



"Let Us Lead By Serving Others" is the motto of the Lee 
Academy Beta Club, an organization for academically su- 
perior high school students. Its purposes are to encourage, 
to reward merit, to promote those qualities and actions 
which make for good citizenship in the school community, 
and to encourage and assist students to continue their edu- 
cation after high school graduation. 

Being a member of the Beta Club encourages students 
to render service to the school and community, and acts 
as a stimulus to the student to develop strong character. 

Under the leadership of the officers, Ray Hughes, Jr., 
president; Helen Miller, vice-president; Linda Butler, sec- 
retary-treasurer, and Mr. Stanley BuLler, sponsor, the Beta 
Club participated in activities to improve the general school 
program and to create better school environment. 






BETA CLUB 



ACADEMY CHOIR 




Mrs. Mary Morris and the Academy Choir have stim- 
ulated the hearts of the student body through their 
spirit-motivated singing. 

Enthusiasm among the group members has con- 
tinued at a high ebb as their efforts have repeatedly 
been rewarded by pleasing audience reception. 

Participation in chapel services, the spring and fall 
revivals, the Fall Music Festival, and off-campus en- 
gagements have given the choir opportunity to demon- 
strate its potential in song. 

Having been organized for five years, this choir 
is constantly striving toward that goal of communi- 
cating message in song. Working primarily with sacred 
numbers, the Academy Choir practices three days a 
week. 



Mrs. Mary Morris, director 



169 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 




Homemaking is the art of living and 
the purpose of the Home Economics Club 
is to develop socially through homemak- 
ing. Girls are instructed in skills of fam- 
ily living. 

At each club meeting the girls par- 
ticipated in panel discussions on family 
relations and teen-age problems, and un- 
der the direction of the sponsor, Mrs. 
Lois Beach, had lessons in cooking, sew- 
ing, embroidery, crocheting, decorating, 
and etiquette. 

Officers of the club are Linda Butler, 
president, Sandra Mullinax, vice-presi- 
dent, and Jane Clayton, secretary-treas- 
urer. 

A goal of the Home Economics Club 
this year has been to become affiliated 
Vi^ith the Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica, an organization of national status. 




170 



^•v 









'j* . 




<* 



'< 







sj.;< 



♦^; '*^tt 




















Coach Hazard, Don Hargrave, Herbert Brummett, Vernard Morton, Ira Scott, R. L. Ard, Howard Morton, 
Clay Shelton, Walter Yeary, Jerry Slay, James Brummett. 



Tigers have rough season 



"The bear hug kid" 






Academy girls take time out during final tournament game 
with Seniors. 




Varsity Tigers meet Emmanuel College 2nd team. 



Academy! Academy! Rah! Rah! Rah! Making up a considerable por- 
tion of the Lee intramural program among girls and boys were the 
Academy teams in football, basketball and minor sports. Playing with 
spirit and drive these teams became the favorites of many regular "game- 
goers." 

The Academy varsity basketball squad played fine ball as they were 
led by their captain, Ray Hughes, Jr. On many occasions this team 
played with the Vikings as a j.v. team, very seldom losing. Their record 
was 14 games won, 2 games lost. 

Good sports, good losers, and joyous winners — a tribute to our Academy 
teams. 



High school volleyball team returns on a volley. 




173 




President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary . 
Treasure . 
Sponsor 



. Christine Alton 
Linda Butler 

.Marvin Hadsall 

Billy Ruth Syphurs 

Mr. Honette Echols 





SENIORS PASS IMPORTANT MILESTONE. 

After the last graduation exercises have been completed 
and another phase of life has begun, the seniors can look 
back to the "good old days" at Lee and recall vividly the 
athletics, school activities, and lasting friendships which 
they formed while in Cleveland. 

Lee Academy provides a well-organized academic pro- 
gram for students; some high school courses are taught 
by college teachers. The academy students are privileged 
to have >access to the biology lab, the library, musical train- 
ing on the college level, and other college advantages. The 
work done in the Academy is accrediated by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and all cred- 
its are transferable. 

Actually when the high school work is evaluated and 
when the worth of the academic program is assessed, what 
is learned in the classroom and laboratory has the greatest 
intrinsic worth. 




ROSE MARY ALLEN 

Fort Pierce,. Florida 



CHRISTINE ALTON RUBBY ARD JUDITH BEAVERS 

Lake Park, Florida St. Thomas, Virgin Islands Macon, Georgia 



KENNETH BLAND 

Cleveland, Tennessee 




JANICE BOATWRIGHT 
Springfield, Virginia 



MARY KAY BOONE 

Memphis, Tennessee 



LINDA BUTLER 

Cleveland, Tennessee 



BEVERLY DANSON 

Cleveland, Tennessee 



SERETHA DEAN 

Easton, Maryland 



174 




MAXIE DENMARK 

Perry, Florida 



MARY DORRIS SHELIAH DUFFIELD JERRY FITZGERALD DON GADBURY 

Phoenix, Arizona Cliarleston, West Virginia Hudson, Florida Carlsbad, New Mexico 




BARBARA GILBERT EVELYN GRESHAM JULIA GUILLEN SANDRA GUTHRIE MARVIN HADSALL 

Glen Biirnie, Maryland Cleveland, Tennessee Honduras, Central America Oxford, Alabama Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 




MARIE HAGAN LOUISE HARBOUR 

Travelers Rest, S. C. Whitehaven, Tennessee 



DON HARGRAVE SHARYN HARRIS DELBERT HASTINGS 

Zurich, Switzerland Capitol Heights, Maryland iMurel, Delaware 




CAROL HENRY KENNETH HYDE 

Langley, South Carolina Sevicnillc, Tennessee 



TRULA JONES 

Cleveland, Tcniicsscc 



SALLY JUSTINN 

Cleveland, Tennessee 



LOIS KEIL 
Doravillc, Georgia 



175 




Beta Club induction 



Long-awaited senior trip 
becomes a reality 



176 




NEVA KERLEY JUDITH MARTIN 

Chattanooga, Tennessee Connersville, Indiana 




BEVERLY MILLER HELEN MILLER 

Cleveland, Tennessee Cleveland, Tennessee 




JAMES MURPHY 

Lakeland, Florida 



LAVOY NEWTON 
Jacksonville, Florida 




EVELYN OBENCHAIN RITA FERINE 

Cincinnati, Ohio Belle, West Virginia 




EUGENE PHARR 

Norfolk, Virginia 



LYNDA PHILLIPS 

Alachua, Florida 



DOROTHY PRINE 

Lakeland, Florida 



NORMA RENFROW BILLIE ROBERTS 

Central City, Kentucky Tallahassee, Florida 




DONNA SHAVER BRENDA SHELTON CLAY SHELTON, JR. JO ANN SHORT PATRICIA STEWART 

Phoenix, Arizona Cumberland, Kentucky Cumberland, Kentucky Stanford, Kentucky West Point, Mississippi 




DONNA STRICKER 

Hallandale, Florida 



SHARON SUMNER BILLIE SYPHURS LYNDA TAYLOR BARBARA ANN WALKER 

Baltimore, Maryland Birmingham, Alabama Baton Rouge, Louisiana Naples, Florida 




RACHEL WARD 

Monticello, Florida 



SANDRA WELBORN DONNA WILLIAMSON 
Arlington, Virginia Naples, Florida 



RONNIE WILSON 
Muncie, Indiana 



PAUL WITHROW 

Sedan, New Mexico 



177 




President Ray Hughes, Jr. 

Vice-President Jerry Slay 

Secretary , Penny Blevins 

Treasure Connie Gaddy 

Sponsor Miss Peggy Humphries 




FROM CONTEMPLATION ONE MAY 
BECOME WISE, BUT KNOWLEDGE COMES 
ONLY FROM STUDY. 



Lee Academy offers three years of high school train- 
ing in a Christian environment. It also affords op- 
portunity for mature students who have not had the 
advantage of a high school education to terminate 
their secondary education. The character of students 
is molded imder the guidance of sympathetic teachers 
and through close association with college students. 
From this training they become capable leaders and 
useful citizens in our society. 

The sophomore and junior classes this year have 
co-operated in arranging entertaining programs for 
each regular class meeting. They now look forward 
to next year when they will be going on the senior 
class trip. 



178 



ERMA BLEVINS, Biggs, Kentucky 

JO ANN CHANNELL, Tampa, Florida 

JANE CLAYTON, Mercersbnrg, Pennsylvania 
DAVID COCHRAN, Miami, Florida 

MILDRED COLE, Highland Park, Michigan 
CONNIE GADDY, Atlanta, Georgia 

RAY HUGHES, Cleveland, Tennessee 
CAROL KEYT, Chattanooga, Tennessee 
DAVID MONTGOMERY, Miami, Florida 
HOWARD MORTON, Portland, Maine 
VERNARD MORTON, Portland, Maine 
GERLINDA MULLER, Nicaragua, C.A. 

SANDRA MULLINAX, Cleveland, Tennessee 
DONNA PHILLIPS, Birmingham, Alabama 
IRA SCOTT, Greenfield, Indiana 

PATRICIA STOVER, LawrericeviUe, Georgia 

THOMAS THOMPSON, Winter Haven, Florida 
EDITH TULLIS, Mansfield, Ohio 

JENNIE WELBORN, Arlington, Virginia 
WALTER YEARY, Richmondale, Ohio 



BRENDA AKINS, Cleveland, Tennessee 

RICHARD BOWEN, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
HERBERT BRUMMETT, Cleveland, Tennessee 
JAMES BRUMMETT, Cleveland, Tennessee 
JANICE HAMILTON, Everglades, Florida 

RHONDA HAMMONTREE, Jacksonville, Florida 
PEGGIE HILL, Hamynond, Indiana 

MOZEL PLYMALE, Phyllis, Kentucky 

DENNIS SHEALY, Greenville, South Carolina 
JERRY SLAY, Cleveland, Tennessee 
RENEE STINE, St. Louis, Illinois 

LINNIE THORNTON, Mobile, Alahaina 

REBECCA WYATT, Glen Burnie, Maryland 




179 




Dishpan hands! 




Versatile staff aids in 
campus administration 



Little noted, but of great note; desirous of 
service rather than that of office are character- 
istics of the staff at the college. Their duties 
range from the checking of lights to feeding the 
hungry. Whatever the need, staff members are 
the answer to your problems. 

The dependability of our staff is of great worth 
to the college student in his pursuit of an edu- 
cation. His attitudes can be influenced, his de- 
sires gratified, his needs fulfilled, and his be- 
haviour molded by the example of those who 
function in staff capacities. 

During this past year the maintenance depart- 
ment painted or remodeled the East Wing dor- 
mitory, Ellis Hall, Melody Hall, the cafeteria 
and the gymnasium. This in addition to their 
normal work load is a noteworthy accomplish- 
ment. 

The cafeteria staff has endeavored to improve 
the service and to enhance the delectability of 
food served. The facility with which the "nutri- 
tion department" made the transition is worthy 
of commendation. 

Showered with little honor, but known to 
everyone, are our dormitory supervisors. They 
have kept tabs on and have been responsible 
for some four hundred dormitory residents. Sure- 
ly these are examples of Christian principles in 
action — in the lives of Christian men and women. 
We are proud to salute our staff and a few of 
their accomplishments. 



180 




ANDREW BENKER 
Policeman 



ULNA BLACK 

Bookkeeper 




MARY BLALOCK 

Secretary to Principal 



ELDON BOEHMER 

Maintenance 




SYBIL BUTLER 

Secretary to Business 
Manager 



WILLIAM CORNWELL 

Supervisor of Men's 
Residence 



1^^^^ ^jg^^illMMBM^ ^^ \^^nn\\ 


7^ 




^^ 


mik 


Hfl 



EVALINE ECHOLS 

Secretary to President 



LOVENA FAULKNER 

Dormitory 




ROY FAULKNER 

Dormitory 



NORA COINS 

Dormitory 



GRACE COLDEN 

Postmistress 



WANDA CORE CHARLES GRAHAM 

Secretary to Registrar Sttpervisor of Maintena72ce 




GRACE GREEN 

Cafeteria 



LORENA HATHCOCK 

Supervisor of Women's 
Residence 



GRADY HURST 

Cafeteria 



CLEONE McLAIN 

Assistant Librarian 



NELL MUNCY 

Cafeteria 



ROLLE MUNCY 
Cafeteria Supervisor 



ARTHUR PRESSLEY 

Maintenance 



MARY RATHKE 
Cafeteria 




OTIS RUSHING BEATRICE RUTLEDGE DELLA SCOGGINS MARY LOU WILES 

Snack Shop Supervisor Cafeteria Cafeteria Supervisor of Women's 

Residence 



POLLY MILLER 

Bookkeeper 




BETTIE RUSHING 
Snack Shop 




SECOND SEMESTER STUDENTS 



Trends in second semester enrollees often prove to 
be revealing. Who enters school in the second semester? 

Many are those who have lor some leason cropped 
out of school for one or more semesters and have then 
decided to return; others are transfer students who 
desire the particular emphasis available at Lee; while 
some are new college freshmen able for the first time 
to attend. 

Regardless of their reasons or scholastic history, these 
students have all met with similar circumstances: the 
destruction of Old Main, the difficulty of adjusting to 
an established environment strange to the new or re- 
turning student, and the old story of trying to pick up 
advanced material in the middle of the year. 

Entering college in the second semester is an experi- 
ence not encountered by many, and to the few it is a 
doorway to immediate challenge. 



182 



ROBERT BAILEY, Wyandotte, Michigan 
LINDA BASKETT, Decatur, Georgia 
BILLIE BEAUBE, Lowden, Tennessee 

JO ANNE BURKHART, Greeley, Colorado 
MARGARET CLARK, Canon, Colorado 

SHIRLEY CLEVENGER, Detroit, Michigan 

PATRICK COOMER, Louisville, Kentucky 
NANCY DEWBERRY, Dacula, Georgia 

GLENNA FAIDLEY, Sevierville, Tennessee 

HOWARD COINS, KnoxviUe, Tennessee 

CAROLYN GORE, Oxford, Alabama 

CAROL GRAYSON, South Lebanon, Ohio 

JIMMY HARRIS, Birmingham, Alabama 
JOY HESTERLY, Centralia, Illinois 
. VIRGINIA HUCKELBRIDGE, Sweetwater, Texas 
. KAREN HUDSON, Wyandotte, Michigan 
DANNY MAY, Carrollton, Georgia 

JOEL MOREHEAD, Norris City, Illinois 

SHANNA NIELSON, Murry, Utah 
JERRY NOBLE, Dayton, Ohio 

JAMES PADGETT, Rivcrview, Florida 
LARRY PETTY, Urbana, Illinois 
FLOYD PITTS, Greensboro, Florida 

KAREN POTTER, Jonesboro, Arkansas 

PATRICIA PURVIS, Jacksonville, Florida 
PERRY PYLE, Brookville, Vemisylvania 

LARRY RILEY, Charlotte, North Caroli/a 

ROGER RODRIGUEZ, Long Island, New York 
FRED SCOTT, Plymouth, Michigan 
JAMES SHOPE, Calhoun, Georgia 

ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Milford, Delaware 
LINDA SMITH, Waynesville, North Carolina 
VERA SMITH, Fort Meade, Florida 

JACKLYN STEPHENS, Laxvrenceville, Georgia 
CAROLYN SWEAT, Lake City, Florida 
FRED SYLVESTER, Johns Island, S. C. 

ALLEN WILLIAMS, Fort Myers, Florida 
KEITH WINDHAM, Fort Meade, Florida 
MORRIS WOOD, Muncie, Indiana 

HAROLD WOODARD, Lakeland, Florida 



"Friendsliip impro'ves happinessj and abates misery, by dou- 
bling owr joy, and dividing our grief."— Addison. 

One's life cannot be built upon a foundation that contains no 
friendships; likewise his works, Ms plans cannot but fail with~ 
out the sustaining strength of loyal friends. 

This book is an expression of Lee College. Within its pages are 
recorded the experiences of six hundred students; their laughs, 
their trying tieieSj their relaxed moments and those which tie 
them in knots. The spirit of the school and its administration are 
on record for time in this Yindagua, Without our friends this 
expression would never have been attempted. 

Numbered among them are industrial firms, business estab- 
lishmentSj churches, and Church of God state officials. To these 
we owe a debt of gratitude and a wealth of appreciation. 



ADVERTISING 






V. 




\ 





The Brown touch means prestige, performance, and 
profit for Cleveland. For over a quarter of a century 
we have been privileged to add our strength toward 
the goal of a greater community and, in return, to 
enjoy the healthy commercial climate that is 
Cleveland. Brown and the community mean much 
to each other. 




Over a quarter century proved performance 
BROWN STOVE WORKS, INC., CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




PRINTERS OF THE 



1963 



VINDAGUA 




CHURCH OF GOD 

PUBLISHING HOUSE 

PATHWAY PRESS 

TENNESSEE MUSIC AND PRINTING COMPANY 

MONTGOMERY AVENUE 
CLEVELAND, TENN. 




# # # 



187 







MILLER'S INC 

One of the South's Great Stores 

Village Shopping Center 

"Where Lee College Students Are AUvays Welcome" 



THE HOBBY MART 

Photographic and Hobby Craft Supplies 

17 Broad Street, N.W. 
Phone: 472-6461 



THE REBEL DRIVE-IN 

South Lee Highway 

Home of the Lotta Burger 
Order from your car for quick service. 



MARIE'S 

Flowers and Gifts 

390 Church Street, N.E. 
Phone: 476-5591 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



CHATTANOOGA FISHERIES 



338 E. 10th Street 



CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



ADVERTISING INDEX 



Abel's, Inc 213 

Alabama, State of 222 

Apler Shoe Store 218 

Arizona, State of 199 

Arkansas, State of 200 

Bailey Music Co 218 

Bradley Motors 192 

Brown Stove Works, Inc 186 

Burger Bar 199 

California, State of 197 

Callaway Groceries 206 

Canton, Ohio, Church of God 190 

C. C. Card Auto Co., Inc 196 

Chattanooga Fisheries 188 

Cherokee Hotel 211 

Cherokee Land, Inc 196 

Church of God Missions Department 201 

Church of God Publishing House 228 

Church of God Sunday School and Youth Department 214 

Cleveland Bank and Trust Co 192 

Cleveland Electric System 196 

Cleveland Federal Savings and Loan Co 213 

Cleveland Home Improvement 211 

Cleveland Milling Co., Inc 200 

Cleveland National Bank 213 

Cleveland Natural Gas Co 194 

Cleveland Water System 205 

Cleveland Men's Shop 218 

Colorado, State of 199 

Cooke's Food Store 206 

Cooper's Book Store 212 

Country Kitchen Restaurant 211 

Dayton, Ohio, Church of God 225 




Don's Furniture Mart 199 

Dooley's Drug Store 191 

Fike Funeral Home 205 

Florida, State of 204 

Frank's Esso 211 

Georgia, State of 219 

Graber's Stores, Inc 218 

Griffith Cycle Shop 199 

Hardvvick Stove Co 206 

Hardwick's Retail Store 213 

Hobby Mart 188 

Holiday Hill Restaurant 205 

Illinois, State of 197 

Indiana, State of 212 

Jack's Laundry and Cleaners 191 

John Bava Record Club 190 

Kay Danicll Studio 215 

Kentucky, State of 210 

Lawson's Fashion Center 218 

Lonas Construction Co 198 

Lookout Sporting Goods 202 

Louisiana, State of 211 

Magic Chef 189 

Margaret's House of Fashion 193 

Marie's Flower Shop 188 

Maryland-Delaware-D.C, States of 202 

Mel's Restaurant 199 

Merchants Bank 191 

Michigan, State of 217 

Mississippi, State of 205 

Moore's and Five Point Pharamcies 218 

The National Church of God 220 

Nebraska, State of 200 





189 



SEAL OF QUALITY 




CUSTOMERS COME FIRST 



JOHN BAVA GOSPEL RADIO CLUB 



DAVIS, WEST VIRGINIA 



RECORDS, BOOKS 



Heard Sunday on WELD 9:05 
My Slogan is "Keep the Gospel on the Air" 



SNACK HOUSE NUMBER TWO 



Where Lcc College students meet 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



PARKS - BELK COMPANY 



Clothing for the Entire Family 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




CHICH OF GOD 



9th and Gibbs St. 
Canton, Ohio 



Services 

Wednesday Night 

Friday Night— Y.P.E. 

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. 

Morning Worship 10:45 a.m. 

Sunday Evening Service 7:00 p.m. 



Daily Radio Broadcast 

9:00-9:15 a.m. 

Station WTOF— FM 98.1 



CHURCH COUNCIL 



190 



m 



Compliments of 

DOOLEY'S DRUG STORE 



The Rexall Store 



Ed Dooley, Proprietor 



Phone: 476-5516 






m 



^^Kt^ 



Prescriptions called for and delivered 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 





Two Convenient Locations 

Main Office — Ocoee Street 

Drive-in Branch — 191 Church Street, N.E. 






Compliments of 




JACK'S CENTRAL AVENUE 
LAUNDRY AND CLEANERS 




Peivney's 






:M w AM;:-,^M§;:m It r i 






Cleveland's Newest and Finest 
Always First Quality 




Our Customers Wear the Cleanest Clothes in Town 

It is a genuine pleasure to serve your College 

480 Central Ave., N.E. 

CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 







Congratulations from the "Land of Enchantment" 

When passing thru New Mexico visit one of our beautiful churches and friendly congregations. 

The church pictured is located at 263 3 Dakota St., N.E., Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Carolyn Legg Don Gadbury Eddie Gadbury Paul Withrow 



State Overseer 
W., M. (Doc) Horton 





D. E. Ellis 
Youth Director 



TOWN HOUSE BAKE SHOP 

Bakes it Better with Butter 
233 Broad Street 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



CLEVELAND BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 

Complete Banking Facilities 

Use our West Inman Street Branch for convenient Drive-in Facilities. 
Member FDIC 



BRADLEY MOTOR COMPANY 
CHEVROLET 

Chevrolet Sales and Service 
Phone; 476-6571 
260 Inman Street 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 
192 



■iiLc. 



TIP TOP 




FOOD TOWN 



RADIO SALES & FURNITURE CO. 

Complete Home Furnishings 

Television-Appliances 

80 Second Street, N.E. 

Phone: 472-4594 



MARGARET'S HOUSE OF FASHION 

Smart Clothes 
for Juniors, Misses, and half-sizes 

Nationally Advertised Lines 

Village Shopping Center 

Phone: 472-2616 






HEX - Continued 

New Mexico, State of 192 

North Carolina, State of 209 

North Cleveland Church of God 195 

Northwest Bible College 226 

Ohio, State of 221 

Oregon, State of 202 

One Hour Martinizing 212 

Parks-Belk Co. . 190 

Pathway Book Store 208 

Pathway Insurance Co 194 

Pennsylvania, State of 198 

J. C. Penny Co., Inc 191 

Pcques and Patten Insurance 193 

Pinion Jewelry 212 

Radio Sales and Furniture Co 193 

Rebel Drive-In 188 

Record Mart 218 

S. S. Kresge Co 218 

Snack House 190 

South Carolina, State of 227 

Stampers 196 

State Farm Insurance 199 

Superior Cash Market 211 

Tennessee, State of 223 

Texas, State of 203 

Tip Top Food Town 193 

Town House Bakery 192 

Town House Restaurant 202 

Village Cafeteria 216 

Virginia, State of 207 

West Virginia, State of 224 

Western Auto Associate Store 202 

Wood's Jewelers 206 

Woolworths 190 

Zale's Jewelry 211 



Compliments of 




i^ieueiana f /aiupat CyaJ 


(^ompanu 


CLEAN FAST 

423 North Ocoee Street 


ECONOMICAL 


Phone: 472-4531 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 

>• 









"Serving the Church of God — Path- 
way Insurance. Consisting of Pathway 
Mutual Insurance Company and Path- 
way Insurance Agency, Inc., 1250 East 
HUlsboro Avenue, Tampa 4, Florida. 
Complete coverage — fire, home, life. 
'Buy with confidence." Church of God 
owned — Church of God operated." 




Donnie Shaw, bookkeeper; W. J. Bradshaw, solicitor; Janet Wrenn, file clerk; 
Zeno C. Tharp, Jr., general manager; Norris Bryan, solicitor; Erline Doss, 
agent-underwriter; H. L. Chesser, life agent; Emma Higginbotham, office secretary. 



194 



CHICH OF GOD 
NORTH CLEVELAND 




V 



Doyle Stan field 
Pastor 




YOUR CHURCH HOME AWAY FROM HOME. 



YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME HERE. 



Eddie Boyd 
Music and Educatio)i Director 




FACULTY 

Alford, Dclton 109 

Baldrec, J. Martin 108 

Beach, Charles 107 

Beach, Lois 107 

Benker, Andrew 180 

Bilbo, James 113 

Black, Hubert 113 

Black, Ulna 180 

Blalock, Mary 180 

Boatwright, David C 104 

Boehmer, Eldron 180 

Bovvdle, Donald 108 

Butler, Stanley 106 

Butler, Sybil 180 

Carr, Ruthanna 113 

Cornwell, William ISO 

Driggers, Nina HI 

Echols, Honette 110 

Echols, Evaline 180 

Elliot, Lucille 112 

Elliot, Winston HI 

Faulkner, Lovena 180 

Eaulkner, Roy 181 

Cause, R. Hollis 106 

Coins, Nora 181 

Colden, Crace 181 

Colden, Marvin 107 

Core, Wanda 181 

Craham, Charles 181 

Green, Crace 181 

Hathcbck, Lorena 181 

Howell, A. V 104 

Hughes, Ray H 105 

Humphrey, Peggy Ill 



STAFF INDEX 

Humphries, A. T 109 

Hurst, Crady 181 

Hurst, Ruby 109 

Lemons, David 104 

McBraycr, Terrell 112 

McLain, Cleone 181 

Miller, Polly 181 

Miller, Roosevelt 109 

Morris, Mary Smith 109 

Muncy, Nell 181 

Muncy, Rolle 181 

Myers, Dora Ill 

Odom, Beatrice 108 

Odom, Elmer 108 

Palmertree, Duran 110 

Pressley, Arthur 181 

Pyeatt, Dudley 112 

Rathke, Mary 181 

Rushing, Bettic 181 

Rushing, Otis 181 

Rutledge, Beatrice 181 

Scoggins, Delia 181 

Smith, Virgil 104 

StalHngs, Paul 104 

Stephens, James 104 

Stroud, Ccorgia 109 

Swiger, Avis 107 

Swiger, LeMoyne 107 

Symes, Helen 109 

Tiller, Barbara HO 

Walker, John Herbert 106 

Watson, Lee 104 

Wiles, Marv Lou 181 



195 



C. C. CARD 
AUTO COMPANY, INC. 




Ford Sales and Service 

Phone: 476-1552 

125 Inman Street, N.E. 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



PARKS - BELK COMPANY 

Clothing for the Entire Family 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



Compliments of 

CHEROKEE LAND, INC. 

Complete Realty Services 

430 N. Ocoee Street 

Phone: 472-1571 Cleveland, Tennessee 



STAMPER'S 



Compliments of 




CLEVELAND ELECTRIC SYSTEM 



196 





STUDENTS FROM THE 'PRAIRIE' STATE 




C. M. Jinkerson 
State Overseer 



W. Smith 
Youth Director 



i» 









California-Nevada State Council: G. C. Grove; L. Johnson; F. McCUing; C. M. Taylor; A. J. Allen; J. Hale: D. McCoy; 
F. G. Swank, Youth Director; W. C. Hill; C. Green; F. Timmerman, State Overseer. 



197 



INDEX FOR STUDENTS 

Abell, Linda, 676 Fair Cedge 135 

Adams, Margaret, 4000 Lewis Street 126 

Akins, Brenda, 1016 Gary Street 179 

Aldrich, Carolyn, 745 N. Buchanan Street . . . . 135 

Aldrich, Miriam, 745 N. Buchanan Street .... 126 

Alford, Tannis, 522 St. Andrews Blvd 126 

Allen, Darleen, 727 Hazelton 119 

Allen, Rose, 911 Angle Road 174 

Alton, Christine, 344 Baybcrry Drive 174 

Ard, Genie, P. O. Box 787 126 

Ard, Rubby, P. O. Box 787 174 

Awad, Mubarak, P. O. Box 196 123 

Ayers, Ronald, 10730 Jefferson Hill Road .... 135 

Badenhorst, Johannes, Box 40 123 

Bailey, Robert, 3896 16th 183 

Bain, Dolas, Route 1 135 

Baker, Teen, Route 3, Box 222 B 135 

Ballenger, Angela, 344 Bay 135 

Barber, Margaret, 1700 Littleton 135 

Barnes, David, 1507 Roanoke Avenue 116 

Barnwell, Gail, Box 455 126 

Barron, Jack, 34 S. State Street 116 

Baskett, Linda, 1376 Midview Drive 183 

Bateman, Walter, 512 Ridge Drive 119 

Beaube, Billie, 910 Mulberry Street 183 

Beavers, Judy, 3692 Napier 174 

Behers, Eugene, 2933 Sunland Vista 126 

Beitler, Brenda, 12768 Palm Drive 135 

Betancourt, Esdras, 55 Delaney Street 116 

Bibler, David, 6124 Beechwood Avenue 126 

Bickers, Joan, 743 N. Edison Street 126 

Biggs, Sandra, 2 Woodland Way 135 

Birmingham, Connie, Box 297 135 

Bixler, Judith, Wastcna St., Benton, Illinois . . . 123 



Compliments of 

LONAS 
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 





W. R. Pettit 
State Overseer 



STUDENTS FROM THE "KEYSTONE" STATE 




Robert Vance 
Youth Director 




198 



Compliments of 


COLORADO 


STATE FARM INSURANCE 


DON'S FURNITURE MART 




State Farm 
Insurance 




R. T. Hill 


MORRIS W. GREENE 




State Overseer 


Local Agent 


122 Inman Street 




Phone: 476-6505 




Leroy Vance 


67 Ocoec Street 




Youth Director 




CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 





STUDENTS FROM THE "GRAND CANYON' STATE 



J. H. Hughes 

State Overseer 



J. Victor Fraley 
Youth Director 




BURGER BAR 

Home of the 
"Big Daddy Burger" 

Complete 
Carry Out Service 

Phone: 476-5162 



GRIFFITH CYCLE SHOP 

Harley-Davidson Motorcycles 

Clinton and Briggs & Stratton 
Engines 

94 Church Street, S.E. 

Phone: 472-5551 



199 



Compliments of 

MEL'S RESTAURANT 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



NEBRASKA 



W. L. Edgar 
State Overseer 



Max Kent 
Youth Director 





Compliments of 



CX^^^TEXAJOl MLII.MMO concp^^iJinr 



Cleveland ,TETsnsrEssEE 




J. Best; H. L. Rose, State Overseer; J. Bailey, Youth Director 
E. Maddox, W. R. Vick, D. Froud, J. P. Simms, F. Ramsey, C. Cody 



200 



Growth and prosperity for Church of God World Missions will depend upon many 



LEE COLLEGE GRADUATES 




Congratulations 



and remember the commission is more urgent each day! 

"Go out quickly into the streets . . . and compel them 

to come in, that my house may be filled/' 

Luke 14:21,23. 



201 



Complimejits of 

TOWN HOUSE RESTAURANT 

Country Ham Dinners 

Ice Box Pies 

233 Broad Street 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



LOOKOUT 
SPORTING GOODS COMPANY 

Specialists in Sports 

723 Cherry Street 

Phone: AM 5-3464 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



JACK JONES 
WESTERN AUTO 

ASSOCIATE STORE 

Batteries Tires-tubes Radios 

JACK JONES 

70 Chiurch Street 

Phone: 476-4361 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



Congratulations from 



OREGON 



To the Class of '63 





■D.C. 




W. Brown 
State Overseer 



Jk}/*"*!! 





Harold Chesser 
Youth Director 



STUDENTS FROM THE "LAND OF PLEASANT LIVING' 



202 



TEXAS 




W. p. Stallings 
State Overseer 



Travis Porter 
Youth Director 





STUDENTS FROM THE "LONE STAR" STATE 



203 




204 





John Smith 
State Overseer 





\l 



r 


n * 


1 

1 


jl li ■ ij u 


J 



»l*i*ab 



rv iRi ! 


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1 


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, 1 


Sli 


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n 



Paul Henson 
Youth Director 



STUDENTS FROM THE "MAGNOLIA" STATE 



Compliments of 

CLEVELAND WATER SYSTEM 

Mgr. Floyd Humphrey 



Compliments of 

HOLIDAY HILL RESTAURANT 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 

Telephone 
472-6291 

Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Hyde 
Owners and operators 



Compliments of 

FIKE FUNERAL HOME 

CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 



INDEX FOR STIEHTS 




Black, Ernest, Engelbergh, Pocahontas, Arkansas . . 116 

Blackaby, Robert, Route 2 116 

Blackaby, Wanda, Route 2 119 

Bland, Gwcndalyn, 1804 Parkway Drive . . . . 123 

Bland, Kenneth, 32401/2 Andrita 174 

Blevins, Erma 179 

Bloodworth, Gordon, 108 Dogwood Drive . . . . 135 

Bloomer, Paul, 56 Copeland Lane 135 

Bloomfield, Rudell, 206 11th 127 

Boatwright, Janice, 5401 Ives Place 174 

Boatwright, John, 5401 Ives Place 127 

Bolte, Richard, 401 W. 5 Street 123 

Bonilla, Manuel, Col. Ortiz Rubia 119 

Boone, Mary, 3921 Raleigh Fraeper 174 

Bourland, Jimmy, 600 Maine 135 

Bowden, Brenda, Box 18 135 

Bowden, Selva, Box 18 127 

Bowen, Richard, 2315 Wall Street 179 

Bowman, Ted, 1214 Ellen Drive 119 

Bradshaw, Rose, 6232 Walton 135 

Branch, Brenda, Route 7, Convent Road . . . . 135 

Branch, Jgmes, Route 4 135 

Brannen, Lowell, Georgia Street 119 

Bray, Dalphine, 2121 N. Ocoee Street 135 

Breckenridgc, James, 1503 - 23d Street 119 

Bridges, Sandra, Box 391 127 

Bridges, Shirley, 917 McHann Drive 127 

Brown, Carolyn, Box 391 135 

Broome, Glandon, Box 111 123 

Brown, James, 615 E. Lakeview 127 

Bruhl, Lyla, Box 215, Lee Road 127 

Brummett, Herbert, 1320 Woodmore Drive . . . 179 

Brummett, James, 1320 Woodmore Drive .... 179 

Bryson, Joe, Route 2 127 

Burkhart, Jo Anne, 213 11th Avenue 183 



205 



INDEX FOR STUDENTS - continued 



Burnctle, Barbara, 2151 Jonesboro Road . . . . 127 

Burns, Jimmy, 666 E Street 119 

Burroughs, Rudy, 3021 S. Main 127 

Burt, Daniel, 193 5 Maple Street 119 

Butler, Linda, 3020 Clearwater Drive 174 

Byrd, Betty, 84 Lakewire Drive 127 

Byrd, Iris, 1008 S. Center Street 127 

Cameron, Pat, Box 27 135 

Carder, Carol, 1202 Navarre 135 

Castelo, Cornelie, Calle 18 #656 123 

Chacko, M. V., Pampady, Kotayam 121 

Chambers, Wayne, 1548 Wharton Ave., Tarrant, Ala. 121 



Chambers, Wanda, 817 Wilson 135 

Channell, Jo Ann, 1601 E. Henry 179 

Chapman, Buddy, Route 3 135 

Chico, Ida, 472 51st Street 127 

Clark, Curtis 135 

Clark, Margaret, 2405 E. Main 183 

Clayborn, Doris, Box 391 127 

Clayton, Charles, 211 Marion Street 135 

Clayton, Leona, 13 Bennett Avenue 179 

Clayton, Lois, 211 Marion Street 135 

Clevenger, Shirley, 11856 Wisconsin 183 

Cochran, Dave, 2260 N.W. 34th Street .... 179 



COOKE'S FOOD STORE 



on the Square 



Free Delivery 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



WOODS JEWELERS 



Woods for Diamonds 



73 Ocoee Street, N.W. 



CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 



Compliments of 

CALLAWAY GROCERY 



Fourth Generation of Serving 
Cleveland and Bradley County 



Ocoee Street 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



HARDWICR STOVE COMPANY 




HARDWICK 
The Nation's Leading Manufacturer of Distinguished Cooking Apph'ances Since 1879 

Since 1879 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



209 





SEATED: Frank Lemons; James A. Stephens, Overseer; Hoyt E. Stone, Youth Director 
STANDING: S. H. Landreth, C. W. Collins, Wayne Briggs, Paul Eure, T. O. Dennis, 
S. B. McCane, M. S. Home 




STUDENTS FROM THE "OLD DOMINION" STATE 



THE PUBLISHING HOUSE 




Serves the Church Through 



PATHWAY BOOR STORES 



208 



H. D. Williams 

State Overseer 



Robert Hart 
Youth Director 






STUDENTS FROM THE "TARHEEL" STATE 



"Congratulations 



on your accomplishments 

and best wishes for the future from 

the North Carolina State Council." 



209 



KENTUCKY 




Elmer Whalen 
State Sec. -Treasurer 



T. L. Forester 

State Overseer 



W. C. Mauldin 
State Youth Director 




C. Horn 



J. B. Youngblood 



J. C. Dudley 



210 



CompUntents of 

COUNTRY KITCHEN 

South Lee Highway 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


Compliments of 

CHEROKEE HOTEL 

Ocoee and Inman Streets 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


SUPERIOR CASH MARKET 

240 Central Avenue, N.E. 

Phone: 472-6595 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


FRANK'S ESSO SERVICE 

South Lee Highway and Broad Street 
Phone: 472-5521 


Compliments of ' 

CLEVELAND HOME IMPROVEMENT 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


Compliments of 

ZALE'S JEWELRY 

Village Shopping Center 




A. V. Beaube 
State Overseer 




Floyd Carey 
Youth Director 




STUDENTS FROM THE "PELICAN" STATE 



211 



liEX FOR STODENTS - Continued 

Cody, James, 406 E. 5th 121 

Cody, Jerald, 406 E. 5th 123 

Cogdill, William, Box 302 123 

Cole, Mildred, 72 Ford Highland Park 179 

Combs, Ronnie, 6740 Aljin Road 135 

Cook, Carla, 503 Worth St., Acworth, Georgia . . 127 

Cook, Roberta, 6116 Lenox, Detroit, Michigan . . 135 

Coomer, Patrick, 4639 S. 1st Street 183 

Cooper, Eddie, 434 W. 75th Street 135 

Cooper, George, 155 - 12th Street, N.E 116 

Cornelison, Velma, Route 1 127 

Courson, Roger, Route 2, Box 45 127 

Coward, Cecil, Route 4, Box 317 119 

Cox, Mary Sue, 146 Carter Avenue 123 

Craig, Jerry, 1581 Dresden Drive 123 

Crews, Cheryle, Route 1, Box 143 135 

Cross, Patricia, Box 97 135 

Cundiff, Janice, 3739 Hazel 135 

Daniel, Leon, 3813 Monty 127 

Daniels, Durwood, 1017 Aycock Street 123 

Danson, Beverly, 1160 35th Ave., New Beach, Fla. . 174 

Davis, Alice, Box 595 123 

Davis, Joseph, Route I, Box 395 135 

Davis, William, R. D. J2 116 

Day, Alexis, Box 602 123 

Dean, Seretha, 607 South Easton 174 

DeFino, Donald, 733 Hill Street 123 

Dempsey, Barbara, 312 S. John Street 127 

Dempsey, Donna, 312 S. John Street 127 

Denham, Dale, 205 Alpha West 135 

Denmark, Maxie, P. O. Box 141 175 

Dennison, Doris, University of Florida 128 

Dewberry, Nancy, Route 1 183 



For the Best in School Supplies 

COOPER'S BOOK STORE 



Phone: 472-2831 



Compliments of 

PINION JEWELRY COMPANY 



Cherokee Hotel Corner 



ONE HOUR "MARTINZING" 

The Most in Dry Cleaning 

233 Inman Street 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 





David Lemons 
State Overseer 




STUDENTS FROM THE 



212 



m. 



CLEVELAND NATIONAL BANK 



Established 1886 



Federal Reserve System 



Member Federal Reserve Deposit Insurance 



Corporation 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



Home Office 



The Village Branch 



HIWASSEE BRANCH 



CHARLESTON, TENNESSEE 



HARDWICK'S RETAIL STORE 



Clothes for College 

Men and Women 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



ABEL'S INC. 



Formerly Abel Hardware Company 

Furniture and Hardware 

Phone: 476-5531 

5 5 First Street, N.W. 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 






CLEVELAND FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Fike Building 

Where you save does make a difference 

We arc ready to serve you 



213 



THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 




YOUTH DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



CHURCH OF COD 



•'■iiiiiiiiHiit'lf'ih. 
CECIL B. KNIGHT 
NATIONAL DIRECTOR 



DONALD S. AULTMAN 
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 




PAUL L. WALKER 



PAUL HENSON THOMAS GRASSANO HASKEL JENKINS 




J. MARTIN BALDREE, JR. 



L. W. MclNTYRE 



CLYNE BUXTON 




INDEX FOR STIENTS 



Continued 



Diaz, Carlos, Box 4464 121 

Diaz, Maria, Box 4464 121 

Diaz, Roger, 47 - 52 - 39 Street 183 

Dorris, Mary, 3005 Belmont 175 

Doss, Carole, 9408 Semmcrs 135 

Douglas, Anita, 122 Morgan Street 135 

Douglas, David, 122 Morgan Street 135 

Douglas, Harold, 122 Morgan Street 121 

Driskell, Brenda, 430 Tecumseh Avenue .... 135 

Ducroq, Ronald, 40 Kantanta Street 116 

Duf field, Sheilah, 1819 Oakridge Drive . . . . 175 

Duncan, Phaylene, 1227 - 34th Street, N.W. . . . 135 

Durand, Stella, 273 Lee Road 123 

Dyer, Wayne, 3110 New York Avenue 135 

Eddins, Clyde, 317 Edgewater Drive 123 

Eller, Lockie, Hayesville 128 

Ellis, Larry, Route 2 135 

Epps, Robert, 1316 S. Laramie Street 128 

Ethridge, Gloria, 1210 Magnolia 128 

Evans, John, 400 Robbins Street 135 

Everhart, Carroll, 4336 Covington Highway . . . 123 

Faidley, Jane, Box 391 183 

Fauber, Rose Mary, Box 391 128 

Fitzgerald, Jerry, P. O. Box 171 175 

Fitzgerald, Sue, Box 228, Lee Road 137 

Forester, James, 404 Chinoc 123 

Fox, Glenn, 503 N. Electra 137 

Freelan, Ruth, 387 Charles Street ...... 123 

Fugate, Sudie, Box 391 137 

Fulbright, Junus, 1481/2 Mimosa Drive 121 

Fuson, Ronald, 2905 3rd Street 123 

Futral, Dcldon, Route 5 123 



Gadbury, Donald, 208 Maple 175 

Gadbury, Edward, 208 Maple 137 

Gaddy, Connie, 90 Warren Street 179 

Gains, Howard, 3 520 South Harron Road . . . . 183 

Gaines, Wayne, 4551 Wheeler Hill Road . . . . 137 

Gee, Ted, P. O. Box 113 128 

Gerstman, Mancel, Box 61 137 

Gibson, Paula, 505 - 19th Street 137 

Gilbert, Barbara, 411 6th Avenue, N.E 175 

Gilliam, Donald, 3404 Brown 137 

Goff, John, no street address 137 

Goff, Walter, 1478 Wilson 128 

Coins, Howard, 3 520 S. Haven Road 183 

Goodman, Doris, 4618 Simpson Street i 37 

Goodman, Richard, Box 703 5 R. R. Road . . . . 121 

Goodwill, Linda, 25 W. Main 137 

Gore, Carolyn, 2222 Miller Street 183 

Granger, Loretta, Mill Street, Box 2 137 

Grant, Laquetta, 1105 N. Taylor 123 

Gray, Samuel, 5731 N. 6th Street 137 

Grayson, Camilla, 4142 Fletcher Avenue . . . . 137 

Grayson, Carol, 485 State Route 48 183 

Green, Flavius, 2509 Stuart Street 128 

Green, Johnny, 2204 Beech Street 123 

Gregory, Carlotta, 7003 Shipley Lane 129 

Grcsham, Evelyn, Box 130 175 

Griffin, Glenda, Box 194 137 

Grindstaff, Carole, 206 Wilbanks Street .... 137 

Grubbs, Jolene, 4622 Bert Drive 123 

Guillen, Julia, 4a Avenue, 10-11 Street 175 

Guthrie, Diane, 314 West Cherry Street .... 129 

Guthrie, Sandra, 704 Hale 175 



215 



iDEX FOR STUDENTS - continued 



Guy, Barbara, Route 7 137 

Guy, Donna, Route 7 129 

Haddock, Rabun, 1215 E. 9th Avenue 121 

Hadsall, David, 5519 5th Avenue 129 

Hadsall, Marvin, 5519 5th Avenue 175 

Hagan, Katherine, Route 1 175 

Hall, Robert, 1507 W. Overman 137 

Hamilton, Donald, Forrest View Drive 

Hamilton, Janice, P. O. Box 101 179 

Hammontree, Rhonda, 7045 Rollo Road .... 179 

Hampton, Vclva, 100 Auburn 123 

Hancock, James, 101 Saluda Street 137 

Harbour, Louise, 1438 Statcline Road 175 

Hargrave, Donald, P. O. Box 15 175 

Harkins, Harvey, 145 13th Street, N.E 121 

Harper, Lanelle, 209 Beech Street 129 

Harrelson, Janice, 1401 Allendale 137 

Harris, Daniel, 503 S. West Jefferson 137 

Harris, Jimmy, 2805 33rd Avenue 183 

Harris, Paul, 4142 N. 41st Place 129 

Harris, Sharyn, 212 61st Avenue . 175 

Harrison, Paul, P. O. Box 102 123 

Harvard, Gail, P. O. Box 694 129 

Harvard, Ronald, Route 1, Box 440 121 

Hastings, Delbert, R. F. D. 3 175 

Hazzard, Lloyd, Route 4, Box 476 121 

Heaston, Jerrie, 9 Beth Drive 137 

Hedrick, Jo Ann, 600 2 Maple 137 

Henry, Carol, 101 - 41 116th Street 175 

Hensley, Kenneth, 127 Rock Road 123 

Hensley, Linda, Dug Gap Road 137 

Hesterly, Joy, 924 E. Second Street 183 

Hicks, Charlotte, 1323 Highland Avenue .... 129 

Higginbotham, Pat, 8006 46th Street 137 



Hill, Peggie, 1516 169th Street, Lot 134 . . . . 179 

Hinkle, John, Route 1 129 

Hobbs, Carl, 159 11th Street, N.E 137 

Hobbs, Glenda, 501 Simpson 129 

Holland, Mary Ann, Route 1, Box 510 137 

Hollifield, Charles, 12 East Moreland Drive . . . 137 

Hollingsworth, Thamas, Route 2 119 

Hornbuckle, Alton, Box 391 137 

Home, Jackie, Route 1, Box 153 121 

Householder, David, 3611 Madison Avenue . . . 123 

Howe, Kaye, 653 St. Joseph Street 123 

Hubbard, James, 16 Loomis . . 117 

Hubbard, Shirley, 16 Loomis 137 

Huckelbridge, Virginia, 1043 New Mexico . . . 183 

Hudson, Karen, 1045 17th Street 183 

Huff, Dale, 693 Parker 129 

Hughes, Dale, 4542 E. Garfield 119 

Hughes, Ray, Jr., 1390 Ocoee Street 179 

Hurst, Don, Box 250 123 

Hurst, Moquita, 618 Blount Avenue 129 

Hutson, Joyce, 3810 Lafayette 121 

Hyde, Kenneth, P. O. Box 391 175 

Jackson, Carol, Route 2 123 

Jenkins, James, 475 11th Street 117 

Jenkins, Louise, Lee Road 137 

Jinks, James, 165 5 N. Ocoee Street 121 

John, Kaiyalethe, Kadakampallil House 123 

Johnsa, Howard, 1040 Church Street 137 

Johnson, Gerald 119 

Johnson, Johnny, Box 544 137 

Johnson, Marjorie, 424 Big Hill Avenue . . . . 129 

Johnson, Paul, 850 Montgomery Avenue . . . . 123 

Johnson, Regina, Route 6, Box 177 129 

Jones, Harold, 1536 Dade Street 121 



VILLAGE CAFETERIA 










216 





L. W. Mclntyre 
State Overseer 





STUDENTS FROM THE "WOLVERINE" STATE 



J. Lemons 
Youth Director 




L. Maguire, E. E. Winters, 

O. W. Polen, C. E. Chapin, 

E. D. Moore, P. H. McSwain, 

L. E. Painter 



217 



HEX FOR STUDENTS - continued 



Jones, Jean, 1718 Fredrick 129 

Jones, Trula, 2800 N. Ocoee 175 

Joseph, M. I., Mt. Zion 117 

Justice, Wanda, Box HI 129 

Justinne, Sally, 1080 Parker 175 

Kear, Ruth, 506 Emerald Avenue 137 

Keil, Lois, 2636 Jewel Street 175 

Kellner, Susan, Box 391 137 

Kelly, Janice, 1444 Magnolia Circle 137 

Kennedy, Marilyn, 727 Hickory Ridge 137 

Kerley, Bill, Box 87 129 

Kerley, Neva, 207 Gadd Road 176 

Kerns, Winona, 106 Walton Way 121 



Keyt, Carol, 6019 Pinehurst Avenue 179 

Klaus, Barbara, 4235 Huron 129 

Klein, Ernestine, 3829 S.E. 63rd ...... 123 

Lair, Janice, 1608 North Rouse 123 

Lambert, Duane, Route 4, Box 256 119 

Lamey, Perry, 7120 Lee Highway 137 

Lane, Dcnnie, 517, New Castle, Indiana . . . . 125 

Laney, Lavice, 1211 New E. Morris 129 

Lee, Gordon, 2104 Melbourne 137 

Legg, Carolyn, 902 E. Grand 125 

LeRoy, Douglas, Box 404 121 

Lewis, Clovis, Route 1, Box 232 ....... 125 

Lilly, Joyce, 1315 Enid 137 



VMW&Mf ff ^\ 



Compliments of 

THE RECORD MART 

Village Shopping Center 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



Compliments of 

LAWSON'S FASHION CENTER 

150 Ocoee Street 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 

Home of Nationally Advertized Merchandise 







Compliments of 

GRABER'S STORES, INC. 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 
Phone: 472-5592 



E.*?"* 



Compliments of 

S. S. KRESCE COMPANY 



MOORE AND FIVE POINT PHARMACIES 



Cleveland's Newest and Largest 
Variety Store 
in 
Village Shopping Center 






CLEVELAND'S MEN SHOP 

Home of 3 for $10.00 dress pants 

The Best Place to Buy 
Your Campus Wear 

Downtown live Points 
Phone: 472-6012 







i^:*^^^^^i^fe.....>^A .;. 



Compliments of 

APLER SHOE STORE 

Serving Cleveland for 25 years 

280 Ocoee Street 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



218 



Where You Are Always Welcome 

Phone: 472-4538 
Phone: 476-6521 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 






BAILEY MUSIC CO. 

Musician's Headquarters 

619 Cherry Street 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



\ 



\ 



V^ 





H. B. Ramsey 
State Overseer 



Wallace Swilley, Jr. 
Youth Director 





STUDENTS FROM THE "CRACKER" STATE 




219 



INDEX FOR STIENTS - continued 



Llewellyn, Robert, Smithland Lane 137 

Lombard, Anthony, Route 4, Box 658 137 

Lombard, John, P. O. Box 41 119 

Lovelady, Betty Jo, 3232 Balsam Avenue .... 125 

Lowery, Betty, Route 1, Dalton Pike 139 

Lyda, David, 233 13th Street 119 

Lytic, Carolyn, 3589 Hildana 139 

McAfee, Lloyd 139 

McAvoy, Carolyn, 2026 Wyomina 125 

McCants, Walter, Route 6, Box 462A 129 

McCauley, Dennis, 18 Main Street 130 

McClain, James, 219 N. Clarendon 139 

McConnell, Pat, P. O. Box 705 139 

McCoy, Murlene, 759 Vine Street 130 

McCoy, Joseph, P. O. Box 256 139 

McCoy, Tully, P. O. Box 762 125 

McDaniel, Lamar, Route 4, Box 594 117 

McDonald, Carl, Jr., 100 Coosa Street 139 

McElroy, Jackie, 8209 - 7th Avenue, N 139 

McGhee, Edward, Route 2, Box 78 130 

McGhee, Sue, Route 2, Box 78 119 

McGlamery, Ben, Route 1 139 

McGuire, Dennis, 1704 Clouds Ford Road .... 139 

McKinney, Dean, 440 136 Street, N.E 119 

McMuUen, Ray, 530 North D. Street 119 

Mabe, George, 4403 10th Avenue 125 

Maguire, Carolyn, 3305 10th Avenue 139 

Mann, Harry, 2515 17th St., Tuscaloosa, Alabama . 125 

Maples, Karen Sue, Box 391, Sevierville, Tennessee . 139 

Martin, Eugene, 23 Frelingburysen Street . . . . 119 

Martin, Judith, 2304 Whitewater Street .... 176 

Martin, Larry, 561 N.E. River Road 125 

Massey, Dorothy, Route 5, Box 227 119 

Matthews, Lynn, 165 N.E. 11th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 130 

Maye, Danny, Box 1 1 1 183 



Maye, Aubrey, Route 1, Box 72A 117 

Maye, Marion, 93 5 Litchfield Avenue 130 

Meares, Betty, 5233 Clark Road 139 

Medford, Noretta, 860 Harle Avenue 139 

Mefford, Mary Lou, 802 South C Street .... 139 

Meister, Albert, Jr., 33 Linden Avenue 125 

Meredith, Diana Carol, Route 3 139 

Miller, Alean, General Delivery 130 

Miller, Archie, Route 2 121 

Miller, Beverly, 120 Gale Street 176 

Miller, Carolyn, 208 4th Street, N.E 138 

Miller, Charlotte, Box 225, Route 2 130 

Miller, Helen, 325 Central Avenue, N.E 176 

Miller, John, 731 S.W. 10th Street 121 

Miller, Patricia, 609 West Avenue 139 

Minor, Kenneth, Route 1, Box 430 139 

Montgomery, Barbara, Route 2 119 

Montgomery, David, 2800 S.W. 81st Avenue . . . 179 

Morehead, Joel, Norris City, Illinois 183 

Morgan, Brenda, Route 1 130 

Morgan, Gloria, Route 1 139 

Morris, Philip, 1160 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tennessee 117 

Morse, Rona, 7200 S.W. 84 Court 139 

Morton, Howard, 63 Irving Street 179 

Morton, Vernard, 63 Irving Street 179 

Muller, Gerlinda, Bilwaskarma, Rio Coco . . . . 179 

Mullinax, Sandra, 1901 N. Ocoee 179 

Mullins, Gerald, Master Street 139 

Murphy, James, 1642 N. Galloway Road .... 176 

Musgrave, Jane, 813 W. Main 117 

Myers, Iris, 610 W. 21st Avenue 139 

Myers, James, 1743-K Patton Court 139 

Neill, Marvin, Route 1 125 

Nelson, Yvonne, 833 Merrick Road 125 

Newman, Gail, Route 1 139 



S. E. Jennings 
Pastor 





Bill Wooten 
Minister of Youth 



3456 Pennsylvania Ave. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 




NATIONAL CHICH OF GOD 



220 




SEATED: C. M. Parsons, Youth Director; F. W. Goff, State Overseer 

STANDING: R. Crowley, T. A. Perkins, H. C. Jenkins, B. P. Jones, H. C. Smith, 
P. Horton, E. T. Stacey, G. Lytic 





H. R. Morehead 

State Overseer 



MM 










STUDENTS FROM THE "YELLOWHAMMER " STATE 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS 
OF 1962-63 FROM ALABAMA 



C. R. Guiles 
State Director 




222 



TENNESSEE 



Tabernacle on Highway 11 '%Af. 
North of Chattanooga 





STUDENTS FROM 
THE "VOLUNTEER" STATE 




State Office 
Cleveland, Tennessee 





p. H. McCarn 

State Overseer 

Kenneth Dupree 
Youth Director 





STUDENTS FROM THE "PANHANDLE" STATE 



INDEX FOR STIENTS - continued 



Newton, LaVoy, 609 N. Ridgcwood Dr., Sebring Florida 176 

Neyman, Jamesie, 2140 N.E. Road 139 

Nicols, Sharon, 22120 Haynen Street 139 

Nicks, Pat, 4665 Olney Street 139 

Nielsen, Shanna, 4716 S. 1st W 183 

Noble, Jerry, 5075 Schroedcr Road 183 

Norris, Vernon, Route 5, Box 503-B 139 

Obenchain, Evelyn, 2528 Queen City Avenue . . . 176 

Obcnchain, Helen, 2528 Queen City Avenue . . . 125 

Ogden, Shirley, Route 1, Box 400 139 

Ogle, Dcbra, 1530 N.W. 29th Street 139 

O'Neal, Billy, 5425 Vicki Street 121 

O'Neal, Glcnda, 124 South 5th Street 131 

Osborne, Lockic, Route 131 

Owens, Joseph, Pacific Avenue 131 

Owens, Robert, 7120 Lee Highway 117 

Padgett, James, Box 234 183 

Palmcrtree, Carolyn, 165 5 Ocoee Street . . . . 131 

Pannell, Jacqueline, 8th Street, N.E 139 

Parker, Carol, 1001 Knapp Street 139 

Partin, David, Route 1, Box 281 121 

Payne, Carla, Wright Road 139 

Payne, Loretta, 13 Mays Street 139 

Pearson, Phillip, 1406 Old Knoxville Highway, 

Newport, Tennessee 125 

Peck, Hugh, 724 5 W. Fort Foote Terrace .... 135 

Pcrine, Rita, 2306 West Riverview Drive . . . . 176 

Peters, Patricia, Star Route 119 

Petty, Larry, 203 W. Green Street 183 

Pharr, Gene, 1119 Land Street 177 

Phillips, Donna, 121 North 80th Street .... 179 

Phillips, Erlene, 1021 Montgomery Avenue . . . 139 

Phillips, Joyce, Route 4 125 

Phillips, Lanelda, 805 Sunshine Drive 139 

Phillips, Sharon, P. O. Box 192 177 



Pigg, John, 1450 Parker Street 131 

Pittman, Charles, 6104 Vance Road 119 

Pitts, Floyd, Box 212 183 

Plymale, Mozel, Phyllis, Kentucky 179 

Potter, Karen, Route 3, Box 147 183 

Price, Beverly, Route 1 139 

Price, Patricia, Route 1 139 

Prine, Dorothy, Route 6, Box 2275 177 

Purvis, Patricia, 5 50 E. 61st Street 183 

Pyle, Perry, 71 Pine Street 183 

Raileanu, Atanasie, Burd Street 121 

Rambaran, Rudolph, Ryan Street 125 

Rankin, Barbara, Route 1, Box 109 139 

Rathbun, James, 4101 Brookside Drive 121 

Rathbun, Jerry, 2443 Coldwater Street 125 

Rathbun, Ruth, 2917 Yale Street, Flint, Michigan . 125 

Reed, Geraldine, Third Street 131 

Reed, Juanita, P. O. Box 87 131 

Reffner, Robert, 410 First Street 121 

Reid, William, 1204 Fourth Road 131 

Renalds, Charles, Jr., 5611 Wilson Boulevard . . 139 

Renfro, Norma, 136 Reservoir Avenue . . . . . 177 

Richardson, Peggy, R. D. 1 121 

Riley, Larry, 1528 Independence Boulevard . . . 183 

Rigney, Stance, Jr., 4611 Union Church Road . . 141 

Robbins, Betty, 444 Maxwell Road, Roswell, Georgia . 117 

Robeff, Samuel, L. de la Torre 312 121 

Roberson, Brenda, 505 N. Market Street . . . . 131 

Roberts, Billie, 1517 Yancey Street 177 

Roberts, Ernest, 2304 Grandfield Avenue . . . . 119 

Roberts, Harmon, 8105 Chamberlain 117 

Robertson, Ronald, P. O. Box 275 125 

Robinson, Grey, Route 4, Box 284 119 

Rodriguez, Roberto, Bda. Ponce de Leon 219 . . . 125 

Rogers, Dora, 1904 Georgetown Road 131 



224 



HEX FOR STUDENTS - continued 



Rowan, Earl, Route 3 141 

Rushing, Larry, P. O. Box 637 141 

Salmon, Rebecca, Box 343 141 

Sanders, Ray, Box 785 121 

Santos, Alfredo de los, Villa Angelica 125 

Saterlee, Marie, Box 97 .... ' 119 

Scherz, Heinrich, 7061 Krehwinkel 117 

Scott, Fred, 1725 Brookline Street 183 

Scott, Ira, 308 Douglas 179 

Searcy, Rolanda, P. O. Box 57 141 

Seay, Carole, 1525 Maxwell Rd., Chattanooga, Tenn. . 141 

Selby, Fay, 1927 Gary Avenue 141 

Sharp, Janet, 852 Reaves 141 

Sharp, Roland, P. O. Box A32 131 

Shaver, Donna, 3338 West Northview Avenue . . 177 

Shcaly, Dennis, 13 Achlcy Road 179 

Shearer, Phillip, 301 Boston 119 

Shelton, Brenda, Freeman Street 177 

Shelton, Clay, Jr., 301 Freeman Street 177 

Shcppard, Robert, 37 Silverstone Cr 121 

Shiflett, Beverly, 122 N. Cleveland 131 

Shoemaker, Donald, 606 Lock Street 141 

Shope, James, Route 2 183 

Short, Doris, Route 2 131 

Short, Jo Ann, Route 2 177 

Short, Martha, Route 2 119 

Short, Roberta, 8311 Packard 131 

Sievers, Stella, 6529 Pelham 141 

Silva, Daniel, Epana 1701 Int. 3 125 

Simpson, Elizabeth, 1000 S. Walnut Street . . . 183 

Simpson, Shirlev, 104 Nalley Drive 141 

Sindle, Marilyn, 1230 Magnolia Avenue, N.E. ... 131 

Slay, James, Ocoee Street . . 131 

Slay, Jerry, Ocoee Street 179 



Slocumb, Douglas, 3217 Bond 

Smith, Calida, 4615 Almark Drive 

Smith, Charles, Route 2 

Smith, Donald, 117 Crockett Street 

Smith, Edwin, 851 Walker, N.E 

Smith, Fred, Route 8, Box 90 

Smith, Kenneth, 

Smith, Linda, Rou^e 2, Box 160 

Smith, Marjorie, 317 N. 14th Str., Dade City, Fla. 

Smith, Vera, Box 524 

Snellcr, Robert, 615 N. Walnut 

Spears, Charles, P. O. Box 413 

Stancill, Annette, Route 4 

Stang, Rosemary, 6751 Oxford-Milford Road . . 

Starling, Sylvia, Route 2, Box 84 

Starnes, Jerry, 1207 N. 44th Street 

Stephens, Jacklyn, Route 1, Box 176 

Stephens, Judy, P. O. Box 5537 

Stepp, June, Route 4, Box 262 

Stepp, Yvonne, Route 4, Box 262 

Stevens, Joyce, 110 Hiwassee Drive 

Stewart, Evie, Rabun Rt 

Stewart, Patricia, S. Division 

Stewart, Wanda, Calhoun Road 

Stine, Renee, 714 St. Louis Avenue 

Stone, Lynn, 1160 Peoples Street 

Stone, Jimmy, 800 Federal Street 

Stout, Garland, Ridge Road 

Stover, Patricia, 171 Maddox Street 

Strieker, Donna, 116 W. Lake Drive 

Sumner, Cecilia, 830 Augusta Street .... 
Sumner, Sharon, 3804 9th St., Baltimore, Maryland 

Sweat, Carolyn, Route 3, Box 7A] 

Sweat, Charles, Route 3, Box 7Al 



125 
141 
141 
125 

141 
119 
183 
125 
183 
125 
141 
121 
141 
131 
141 
183 
131 
131 
141 
125 
131 
177 
141 
179 
117 
125 
117 
179 
177 
141 
177 
183 
141 



EAST FOURTH ST. CHURCH OF GOD 



2601 East Fourth St. 
Dayton 3, Ohio 




E. T. Stacey Minister 



Dayton — The City Beautiful 



You are welcome to visit one 

of the fastest growing churches and 

Sunday Schools in our movement. 



The Church where everybody 

is somebody 

and visitors arc honored guests. 



Phone 253-8i42 
256-0881 



225 





NORTHWEST 

BIBLE 

COLLEGE 




Write: Registrar 
Box 509 
Minot, North Dakota 



B. A. IN RELIGION 



A. A. IN LIBERAL ARTS 



MUSIC 



Scholarships: Ministerial 
Work 
Academic 




226 



Sykes, Larry, 137 Sykes Road 141 

Sylvester, Fred, Route 3, Box 133 183 

Syphurs, Billic, 3304 Ellis Avenue 177 

Taplcy, Philip, 150 11th Street 132 

Taylor, Lynda, 2207 Huntzinger, Farmington, N. Mcx. 177 

Terry, Emily, P. O. Box 864 125 

Thomas, Lawainc 141 

Thompson, Alton 132 

Thompson, Claude, P. O. Box 21, Fayette, Alabama . 117 

Thompson, Tommy, 1521 S. Lake Shipp Drive . . 179 

Thompson, Wanda, 3103 Avenue T, N.W 132 

Thornton, Linnie, 167 Stile 179 

Todd, Joyce, Box 41 141 

Tow, Jerry, 733 Noccalula Drive 132 

Tow, Leah, Route 1 119 

Trawick, Thomas, 2486 Grayling 141 

Tullis, Edith, 53 Park Avenue 179 

Underwood, Wayne, 408 N. First 141 

Ussery, Richard, 1212 Bunker Avenue 121 

Valenzuela, Mario, Madero 74 Sur 125 

Varner, Robert, Box 44 121 

Vassey, Barry, 614 Beech 141 

Vigo, Silvio 125 

Wainwright, Carolyn, 627 Walnut 141 

Walker, Barbara, 1537 Gordon Drive 177 

Walker, Leon, Route 1 141 

Walker, Ronald, 1083 Bertram Road 125 

Walker, Sherman, Route 7 

Walls, Leonard, Route 2, Box 35A 121 

Ward, Rachel, N. Jefferson 177 

Watt, Don, Route 1 132 

Webb, Virginia, Box 145, Holdcn, W. Va 125 

Webb, Willie, 214 Arlington 125 

Welborn, Jennie, 633 N. Nelson Street .... 179 

Welborn, ^Sandra, 633 N. Nelson Street .... 177 

Welch, Judi, 25 S. Forest 141 



FOR STUDENTS - continued 

Wells, Edith, 820 N. Weldon 141 

Whiddcn, Terry, 308 24th 141 

White, Wayne, 73 3 Burton Street 121 

White, Herman, Route 1, Box 435 125 

Wilkerson, Jack, Box 435 117 

Wilkinson, Kenneth, 1408 Kilby Terrace . . . . 132 

Williams, Allen, 4060 Washington Avenue . . . 183 

Williams, Joyce, 71 3W North, Raleigh, N. C. . . . 117 

Williamson, Donna, P. O. Box 246 177 

Wilson, Ann, 202 East Cedar Avenue 141 

Wilson, Conway, Jr., Route 2 141 

Wilson, Fred, 3779 Sterling Drive 125 

Wilson, June, 18 Overdale 141 

Wilson, Paul, Route 1, Box 276 125 

Wilson, Ronnie, 2400 N. Elgin 177 

Wilson, Thomas, 723 N.W. 1st Avenue . . . . 119 

Windham, James, Route 2, Box 100 141 

Windham, Keith, Route 2, Box 100 183 

Withrow, Paul 177 

Wood, Jimmy, 1045 Graves Street 117 

Wood, Morris, 2201 Worth Wolf 183 

Woodard, Harold, 1117 W. 13th Street . . . . 183 

Woodard, Jewel, 619 Crevasse 141 

Woodard, Wayne, Box 922 141 

Woods, Betty, Box 124 125 

Wyatt, Barbara, 19 South 8th 141 

Wyatt, Rebecca, 610 Old Stage Road 179 

Yates, Brenda, 20 Fifth Street 141 

Yeary, Walter, P. O. Box 48 179 

Yeomans, Kathleen, 1006 E. Force, Valdosta, Ga. . . 141 

York, Gena Mae, 3 525 Waterlevel Highway . . . 132 

Young, Judy, 115 Gober Avenue 141 

Young, Lemmie, Route 4 117 

Youngblopd, Douglas, 2331 Bonnycastle 132 

Youngblood, Samuel, 2331 Bonnycastle 125 



Congratulations from 



SOOTH CAROLINA 



STUDENTS FROM THE PALMETTO STATE 




227 



/ 



L n L 5 



An opportunity to tell the story of Lee College in one year was ours, and it 
is completed. The task has been demanding, exciting, enjoyable and a learning 
experience. It began with ideas. The ideas were formulated on layout sheets, 
and have become realities in this volume. This is your Vindagna, telling in many 
pictures and many more words of a wonderful life spent for one year by six 
hundred students at Lee College. 

Without the aid of many people, this book would have been an impossible 
venture. The staff has worked exceedingly well in producing this annual; on 
our staff there are a few who deserve special recognition. 

Mr. Duran Palmertree, the faculty sponsor, has had an indelible influence 
upon this Vindagua as he has suggested ideas, criticized our layouts, inspired 
our lagging minds, and spent hours that we know nothing of in trying to make 
this a memorable book. 

Marilyn Sindle, our art director, has been an invaluable helper, spending 
hours beyond the demands of her responsibility working with our layouts and 
serving as the indispensable liason between the staff and the Publishing House. 

Lynn Stone has been a successful business manager. Without the aid of his 
staff this book would not contain its present features. His success has made 
our work possible. 

At this point we would like to express our appreciation to our associate editor, 
Iris Byrd, for her faithfulness. Most of the year she has not received due recog- 
nition for her work in planning parties, checking layouts, contacting individuals, 
setting up pictures, counting election ballots, and being a dependable source of 
help. 

These individuals have been the core of the staff. 

The staff also wishes to thank Jerry Daniell of the Kay Daniell Studio for 
his willingness to come to the campus and make a seemingly endless number 
of pictures. 

Then to the Church of God Publishing House, to Mr. Lee Bell and to his 
associates go a last thank you for their willingness to co-operate in every phase 
of the printing of the book. 

With Author John Keats we offer these lines: 

A thing of beauty is a joy forever. 
Its loveliness increases: it will never 
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep 
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep 
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. 

— Endymion 

May the meaning of this poem become a reality through the pages of this 
your 1963 Vindagua. 



^ 



Cleveland, T2nn-rr'^3 



The Vindagua Staff 
James Hubbard, editor 



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