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Full text of "Vindagua"

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1964 




<L Sf 1 S g b> 
LEE COLLEGE, CLEVELAND, TENN. 





VOLUME XXIII 



091949 







The small rivulets wind slowly along their 
old paths into the streams, the streams flow 
gracefully along their courses into the rivers, 
the rivers hurl rapidly over their worn river- 
beds in order to maintain their rendezvous 
with destiny and to render their minute con- 
tribution to the vastness of the high seas. From 
year to year these waters follow approximate- 
ly the same courses; however, small deviations 
in the riverbeds characterize and individualize 
each flowing, thus establishing a new path 
founded upon the old. 

So it is with man. A person gradually ma- 
neuvers through the channels of childhood and 
growth and makes his way through the canals 
of education on the vessel of tradition. Even- 
tually, the time arrives to lift the traditional, 
sheltering home anchors and to venture upon 
the vast sea of life. Afforded with the experi- 
ences and education of college life, man now 
strives to contribute some minute and seem- 
ingly insignificant ripple upon the ocean of 
society and, thus, to mold a new tradition. 

At Lee College the evidence of "The Molding 
of a Tradition" is clearly seen. We no longer 
rely solely upon the customs of our ancestors; 
but using them as a foundation, we establish 
new perspectives and strike out to explore 
these. Extensive intellectual promotion has 
been launched in the minds of the students by 
the employment of advanced curricula and the 
expansion of our literary sources. New and 
modern architectural projects now replace the 
old traditional structures. The spiritual realm 
of Lee is now focused on effective witnessing 
of the great love, truth, and mercy of our Heav- 
enly Father as revealed through Jesus Christ, 
the Son of God. 

The 19G4 VINDAGUA enshrouds these pro- 
jected principles. And by the use of pictures 
and words its pages depict the students of Lee 
College in the progressive process of MOLD- 
ING A TRADITION. 






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Socially 







Spiritually 




1! 




. . . Ask Not What Your Country 
Can Do For You — 
Ask What You Can Do 
For Your Country 




MEMORIAL ADDRESS 



The United States is a nation that enjoys its polities and takes its political 
divisions quite seriously, but the one most serious point of this nation is the 
Republic. 

At the peak of the Republic is its chief executive — the President. For that 
reason we all look with respect upon the office and the person who holds that 
office. 

The President of the United States is my president; I have a tie with him 
and am, in part, identified with him — his failings, his successes, his weaknesses, 
his strengths, his friends, his enemies, his life and his death. 

It is then natural and proper that we should be saddened by the death of 
our Chief Executive, that we should identify ourselves with him when he is 
attacked for no other reason than that he serves us as our President. The attack 
on and assassination of this man was in this light, "For us." 

One hundred years ago, this past week a great American and President de- 
livered a classic description of the Republic of the United States — "A nation 
conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created 
equal." The President of the United States is my symbol to the world of this 
nation so conceived and so dedicated. My freedom, I see in Him. 

This man also dedicated a battlefield "as a final resting place for those 
who gave their lives that that nation might live." 

This man, Abraham Lincoln, stood for all that he described in the Gettysburg 
Address. He died at the hands of an assassin; he died only because he was our 
President and was the symbol of all that is ours — the heritage of Americans. 

Today John Fitzgerald Kennedy will be buried in Arlington Cemetery. 

He too was my President. 

He too was assassinated for no reason but that he stood for me and my liberties. 

I am identified with him in his death. 

— R. Hollis Gause 



DEDICATION 



We, the VINDAGUA STAFF, as represen- 
tative of the Student Body of Lee College proud- 
ly dedicate the 1964 VINDAGUA to the hon- 
orable Ray H. Hughes, President of the College. 

While serving in this office, President Hughes 
has proved himself a guiding light not only to 
Lee College as a whole, but also to the students 
as individuals. Such sincere and undaunted in- 
terest has gained much respect and admiration 
for this man of dignity and valor. By relentless 
determination and projected efforts, he has in- 
debted this campus with innumerable achieve- 
ments, spiritual as well as material. 

And so, it is with unfeigned appreciation 
for his labors of the past and his proposed goals 
for the future that we present this VINDAGUA 
to the man who has served his God, his Church, 
and his School with such inspiration. 



% # %fc • w # 








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• 






N_ 






FEATURES 




ACADEMIC 



ATHLETICS 



ACADEMY 



CAMPUS 



CLASSES 



ORGANIZATIONS ADVERTISING 



10 





n t e n t 







FOREWORD 2 

IN MEMORIAM 6 

DEDICATION 8 

CAMPUS LIFE 12 

FEATURES 42 

Mr. and Miss Lee College 44 

Personalities 46 

Parade of Favorites 50 

Homecoming Queen 60 

ACADEMIC LIFE 62 

Administration 64 

Key Personnel 66 

Faculty 68 

CLASSES 82 

Bible College 84 

Junior College 94 

Who's Who 107 

ATHLETICS 108 

Varsity Vikings 110 

Intramurals 116 

Minor Sports 121 

ORGANIZATIONS 124 

Academic Clubs 126 

Christian Service Department 155 

ACADEMY 160 

Campus 162 

Academy Celebrities 16 4 

Classes 170 

Clubs 176 

Athletics 178 

STAFF 182 

SECOND SEMESTER STUDENTS 184 

ADVERTISING 186 

INDEX 224 

FINIS 232 



11 







12 



ALMA MATER 



In the heart of dear old Cleveland, 

Reared against the sky, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater 

As the years go by. 
Praise to thee, our Alma Mater, 

Molder of mankind; 
Greater glory, love unending, 

Be forever thine! 

Balmy breezes gently wafted 

Through inspiring halls; 
Mem'ries' leaflets, closely twining, 

Shall fore'er recall. 
Yesterdays that waken in our 

Hearts a tender glow, 
Making greater still the love 

That we have learned to know. 

Ever onward! Be our watchword, 

Faithful soldiers we, 
Owe a life of loyal service 

To our dear L. C. 
Praise to thee, our Alma Mater, 

Molder of mankind; 
Greater glory, love unending, 

Be forever thine. 



13 



Do you think this line has an end? 




Registration Rigors 




You go from here to the business office; after that, you're broke. 



14 




Smile, Miss Myers! You're on Candid Camera! 



AT ITS VERY best, registra- 
tion is one of the most hectic 
times of college life. At its 
worst, it is two days of endless lines, 
scrambled schedules, unfamiliar faces, 
and sore feet. 

But registration is a necessary evil of 
the American education system, and the 
brave and hardy collegian plunges in 
with a groan, a grin, and a sturdy pair 
of arch supports. Freshmen are espe- 
cially bewildered at this biennial ordeal, 
but most of them survive, recuperate, 
and gamely prepare for the first day 
of classes. 




Thought I'd never get through that line! 



Is registration REALLY over? 




15 



Hillbilly Heyday 



THE FIRST "FLING" of the '63 and '64 social season 
was the Hillbilly Heyday, an annual affair sponsored in 
early October by the Student Council. An apt in- 
troduction of new students to East Tennessee practices, the 
Heyday featured outlandish hillbilly dress, refreshments of corn- 
bread and apple cider, and talent vaguely reminiscent of Dog- 
patch and Hootin' Holler. 

As always, the highlight of the evening was Charlie Weaver 
and his Mount Idv Svmphonette. "He Puts Out Fires," a tender 
folk song touchingly rendered by Glenda Griffin and Joyce 
Burke, provided listeners with a subject of conversation for the 
rest of the week. Only the strongest willed of the boys could 
soon forget the beautiful hicks presented in the Miss Heyday 
Queen contest. 

After the cornshucks had finally settled and the last bean 
had been counted, Lee's barefooted collegians left the gymnasium 
in enthusiastic agreement that they'd had a cottonpickin' good 
time! 




Mr. and Miss Hillbilly, T963-'64. 




"For he puts out fires. 




Everybody participates! 




Have you enjoyed the 
program tonight? 




The Dogpatch Beauties. 




Our group had 37% fewer cavities. . 



Do you, Charles, take this WOMAN . . . ? 




MOST COLLEGE students will 
agree that a 9- by 15-foot dormi- 
tory room is a poor substitute 
for home. Add to space limitations the 
problems of dorm supervisors, sign-out 
sheets, common telephones, and night owl 
neighbors, and you have an incomplete 
but revealing glimpse of the collegians home 
away from home. 

Whether the name is Walker or Nora 
Chambers or East Wing, the dormitory is 
an important part of any particular stu- 
dent's "life at Lee." 




Ah, what a way to spend study hall 



Dorm Life 




That test pattern surely makes a fine picture. 



Why doesn't Mother send me some money? 





Who can study on a rainy day? 



I told you not to touch that plug, Carolyn! 




Oh! I forgot to get the peanut butter. 




How, Roy, you can't take them all! 




O.K., I'll buy the tickets! 




Sadie Hawkins 



Day 



ONCE A YEAR Lee College's 
traditionally man-seeking fe- 
males get a chance to grab a 
fellow and head for the woods. The oc- 
casion is the Sadie Hawkins Hayride, 
and the woods are well-chaperoned. 

Sponsored by Upsilon XI, Sadie 
Hawkins Day this year attracted atten- 
tion which was virtually unmatched by 
any other social event on campus. The 
ordinarily unheard-of sight of girls open- 
ly and shamelessly chasing boys around 
the cafeteria, clown the street, and into 
trees, became almost commonplace while 
Queen Hawkins reigned on campus. 

The week, wild as it was, culminated 
in a hayride Friday evening. This proved 
to be a mass movement which compared 
with the Hebrew exodus or the Nor- 
mandy invasion. Eventually, over 300 
Lee students and teachers arrived at the 
picnic site, and Sadie Hawkins Day 
closed out like it began — with a bang. 



A mounty ALWAYS gets her man. 



20 



Hit- that ball and run! 





Some just spend the whole day sitting around. 




Sports Highlight Picnics 



THE LEE COLLEGE social calendar 
begins and ends with a picnic. Held 
at the nearby Church of God camp- 
grounds, the spring and fall picnics are among 
the events which students look forward to from 
year to year. 

Athletics provide the biggest part of picnic 
activity, with basketball, Softball, football, volley- 
ball, and horseshoe games involving almost every- 
one who attends. A long, long line forms around 
noon, as hungry Lee picnickers gather for hot 
dogs, potato chips, and soft drinks. 

There seems to be something different at 
every Lee picnic, regardless of the static location. 
At this year's fall outing, the new twist was an 
impromptu hootenanny under the tabernacle, 
which broke up only as the big yellow buses 
loaded for the trip home. 




Everywhere you go, there s 
always a line. 



21 



Religious 



Emphasis 



Week 




Reverend Carl E. Richardson 





Reverend W. E. Tull 



Reverend Paul L. Walker, fall revival evening speaker, 
drives home a point. 



ON A CAMPUS dedicated to the cultivation 
of Christian scholarship, it is natural the 
spring and fall revivals be among the high- 
lights of the school calendar. 

The Reverend Paul L. Walker, pastor of the 
Hemphill Avenue Church in Atlanta, shared in 
the morning and evening fall revival services. Com- 
bining the aggressiveness of youth with the refresh- 
ing distinctiveness of a college-trained intellect, 



Reverend Walker thrilled the student body night 
after night with his sermon series "A Vocabulary 
of Faith." 

The religious emphasis week this spring brought 
to campus the evening evangelist, Carl Richardson, 
of Ashland, Ohio, and W. E. Tull, of Milford, 
Delaware, morning speaker. Again souls were saved, 
Christian lives were enriched, and the Lee College 
campus saw revival! 



22 



"We Dedicate This Building" 



O 



NE OF THE MOST impressive ser- 
vices conducted in the Lee College au- 
ditorium this year was the dedication 
of the new administration building. A highlight 
of the homecoming weekend, the ceremony was 
originally planned as an outdoor event to take 
place on the lawn of front campus but was driven 
indoors by cold, rainy weather. 

A standing-room-only afternoon crowd wit- 
nessed the new building's dedication. The Lee 
College Singers and brass ensemble provided the 
music for the affair, which was directed by 
President Hughes. Following the dedicatory ad- 
dress by General Overseer Wade H. Horton, 
Reverend Charles W. Conn, Assistant General 
Overseer, led the entire audience in the formal 
dedication. 

Among the special guests for the dedication 
included the Lee College Board of Directors and 
Cleveland City Commissioner, C. F. Kelley. 




General Overseer Wade H. Horton 
delivers the formal address. 



The new building. 




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Cupid on Campus 



Oh, you don't mean it? 




WHEN CUPID BENDS his bow 
on the Lee College campus, no 
one is beyond the reach of his 
arrows. Like it or not, campus romances soon 
become campus fixtures if continued long 
enough. Boy meets girl once, and again, and 
again, and again. . . . 

So it is that sweethearts on campus become 
familiar sights to all of us. Here are a few 
you may remember. 




Charlie's got stripes 
in his eyes. 



They LOOK happy enough. 





Wait-, Gene! I have to 
comb my hair. 



M 






Give them about two minutes. They'll make up. 




Yes, I do, too! 



Mr. and MRS. Lee? 



'Drink to me only with thine eyes. . . .' 





I've got $.30, who'll 
give me $.40? 





Guess who bought my pie! 




The Sophomores' 



AN EVENT OF late winter which 
captured widespread campus at- 
tention was the Pie Supper, 
sponsored by the Bible College sophomores. 
Capitalizing on the originality of the idea, 
the sophs corralled an unlikely combination 
of three faculty members, thirty-five pretty 
girls, and fifty pounds of assorted pies to 



roduc 



of fun and entertain- 



ment for hungry Lee men and their dates. 



Congratulations! 



26 



Oh! Please! I'd rather 
do it myself. 



Pie Supper 



Draws Crowd 




Anxiously they bid for that special pie. 




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They're off to the feast. 




Saved to Serve 




Steve Conn gives an enlightening 
message on "Witness Time." 



A P.F.C. invasion group leaves for Alabama. 




Michiko speaks for the Missions Club. 




28 




A 



S MY FATHER sent me, even so send I 
you." With these words ringing in the ears 
of these young people, they have gone forth 
as ambassadors of Christ. From town to town, state 
to state, and country to country they have borne pre- 
cious words of eternal life. The reward has been 
seeing souls rejuvenated with God's power. They have 
witnessed transformation from sin to righteousness, 
from defeat to victory, and from sorrow to joy. They 
have returned shouting: "We cannot win everyone 
to Christ, but we must win those that we can." 



Ready for the trip to West Coast Bible College. 




The soonsor and the president of 
the Ministerial Club map out 
their Easter invasion. 



29 







When if- snows here, it really snows. 



Winter 




Deer Park is visited frequently ... in the spring. 



Christening of the new building. 





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30 





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Wouldn't this make a perfect spot 
for a snowball fight? 




BUR-R-R-R. 



Wonderland 



THE VERY WORD winter speaks of 
heavy coats and falling snow and three 
quilts on every bed. Wintertime in 
Cleveland is a thing which one learns to live 
with, but never quite understands. In 1964 
the winter months followed their characteristic- 
pattern of alternating rain, snow, wind, sun- 
shine, and generally bad weather. 

Even Cleveland wintertimes have occasional 
compensation. Under any conditions, the Lee 
College campus is a pretty one, but with a 
blanket of snow it is strikingly beautiful. And 
this year we have a fountain to freeze over, which 
gives us something to skate on, to throw people 
into, and to steal chunks of ice from. 



One, two, three! 





Christ soid, "I om the way, the truth, and the life. 




Moments alone with God. 



Thy Word have I hid in my heart. 




Meditation 



The Gem of Life 



'Where He leads me, I will follow." 




33 



091949 




El 

My! My! He must be cute! 



In Spite 




Never chew with your fork in your mouth, Karen. 



of Everything, 



We Live! 





Let's see now, the home keys 
are a, s, d, f, and j, k, I, ;. 



Wonder which one will get to the middle first! 



34 








What will it be tonight. Roomie? 



When it rains, it really pours 



Who needs glosses for this job every morning! 





But it's only 11:30! 



Spiritual Growth on Campus 




Holy Communion is observed. 



Sunday afternoons are spent witnessing in the jails. 



Devotions are vital to daily living. 





36 




We own o Do-It- Yourself book! 



Say, Linda, did you hear my new joke? 




Campus Life 



Aw, I'm tired of wishing! 





Here goes that diet again! 



37 




Junus ALWAYS laughs at his own jokes! 





Be careful not to get your socks wet! 



"Friends . . . No. . . . Ladies and Gentlemen . . . Nt 



Don't laugh, girls; if you don't, you should. 



Blow! Blow! 










Spring is in the air. 








"Is that a tennis racket and a chemistry book?' 



Students Will 
Be Students 



Are you teaching today, Jeanne? 



They LOOK as though they had just visited the Credit Bureau. 



Hold it, Chuck! I've got another potato! 




39 





O. K., everybody, it's time for the bus. 




Don't worry, it would be Mickey Mouse to fall 
from here. 




It's home for a nice, long weekend. 



Banquets, 



Weekend trips, 
Birthdays . . . 



Happy Birthday, Roommate! 





Queen Linda delightfully receives 
roses from Queen Linda of 1963. 




Lee Academy Court of 1964. 





His Majesty, King John, presents Her Majesty, Queen 
Wanda. 



Coronation 



The President congratulates the regal lady. 




'64 



1964 Lee College Court of Personalities. 



The two royal couples of the campus: 

Wanda Blackaby, Miss Lee College. 
John Lombard, Mr. Lee College. 
Linda Rose, Miss Lee Academy. 
Richard Bowen, Mr. Lee Academy. 




41 



FEATURE 



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For many years the range of activities has expanded in proportion 
to the growth of the school and the ambitions of its students. These 
ambitious students have formulated the real tradition. This tradition 
has been marked with achievement, honor, success, and scholarship. Daily 
these leaders map the destiny of their children's heritage. 




Annually, Lee College student body selects 
two outstanding students to represent the col- 
lege — its philosophy, its ideals, and its spiritual- 
ity. These students are honored with the titles, 
Mr. Lee College and Miss Lee College. Selections 
are made on the basis of Christian character, 
talent, unique versatility, and personality. The 
two students so honored from Lee this year are 
Mr. John Ashcroft Lombard and Miss Wanda 
Lou Blackaby. 

Miss Blackaby is an honor student, secretary 
of the Pioneers for Christ, active leader in the 
Christian Service program, and a member of 
the Bible College Senior Class. 

Mr. Lombard is president of the Pioneers for 
Christ Club, president of the Pi Delta Omicron, 
president of the Bible College Senior Class, chap- 
lain of Upsilon XI, president of the College 
Sunday School Class of North Cleveland, mem- 
ber of the Evangelism Committee and is chosen 
as a lecturer to attend the Western Witness Con- 
ference held at the West Coast Bible College, 
Fresno, California. 



Mr. and Miss Lee College 




SSSS^I 








■'•• ' : 



44 




Wanda Lou Blackaby 
John Ashcroft Lombard 




45 



Personalities 




Rose Mary Fauber 
Dennis McGuire 



Sl*fetPP^ ; ^ 



Karen Hudson 
Max Gerstman 





Carolyn Lytle 
Junus Fulbright 



48 




Glenda Griffin 



Freddie Killman 



49 



From the auditorium of Lee Col- 
lege at Cleveland in Tennessee, the 
yearbook staff welcomes you to the 
College's big event of the year — 
the second VINDAGUA Parade of 
Favorites. 




And you can't get a man with a gun. 



Parade of Favorites 



"The program tonight is the culmi- 
nation of many weeks of work and 
preparation by these twenty-four Lee 
lovelies whose performances you will 
enjoy. They have engaged in endless 
group sessions, indulged in teas and 
luncheons, practiced smiles, and gen- 
erally speaking they have been abun- 
dantly charming." 

Each young lady was chosen by a 
class, club, or an organization to rep- 
resent it in the entire program. The 
determining criteria of selection are 
grace, talent, Christian leadership, and 
beauty. 

The favorites selected and gave an 
artistic performance of five to six min- 
utes before the student body in one 
performance night. These performances 
included vocal renditions, dramatic 
readings, instrumentals, artistic illus- 
trations, and others too unusual to be 
classified. Ten girls were selected as 
finalists by vote of the audience. 

The following pages are filled with 
the portraits of Lee co-eds who have 
been recognized as Campus Favorites. 
Whether labeled as attractive, dedi- 
cated, or talented each is noticed, ad- 
mired, or envied as an individual. They 
speak with accents which place them 
as southern, northern, or midwestern, 
and they represent the charms associ- 
ated with various parts of the country. 
The VINDAGUA is proud to represent 
these delightful young ladies, each of 
whom is not only intelligent, fun-loving 
and friendly but a favorite in her own 
way as well. 




Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. 




I've got a song to sing. 



50 




HB 



That dreadful silence! 




Beat . . . Beat . . . "The Telltale Heort. 



These are campus beauties. 




51 



Miriam Aldrich 
Judy Young 
Seretha Dean 
Wanda Johnson 
Pat Purvis 
Carroll Everhart 
Carolyn Aldrich 
Kathy Hucklebridge 

(Not Pictured) 

Annette Stancill 

(Not Pictured) 

Pat Young 

(Not Pictured) 




52 







Top Ten Favorites 



53 




Miss Pat Young displays the beauty, poise, and 
charm of a Lee Favorite. 



"A smile that dazzles; a beauty that at- 
tracts" are eight words that spell Miss 
Wanda Johnson. Chosen by Upsilon XI 
as its Sweetheart and representative in 
the Parade of Favorites, Miss Johnson is 
recognized also as the Favorite of Lee Col- 
lege. The only freshman to be elected a 
Lee Belle, this Richmond, Kentucky, 
beauty turned in an award-winning in- 
terpretation of Amy Lowell's Number 
Three on the Docket. 

Chosen from among twenty-four other 
contestants, Miss Johnson has that rare 
ability to win friends quickly with her 
serene personality and warm charm. She 
plans to major in home economics. 



Miss Janet McLain and her escort, Mr. Larry Smith, 
attend the annual tea held for the Favorites. 



These five leading ladies of Lee 
College which are pictured on the fol- 
lowing pages are selected from among 
the twenty-five candidates in the Pa- 
rade of Favorites. Ten girls are selected 
by an audience vote, based primarily 
on the quality of performance in the 
grande finale. Other factors which 
influence the voting besides talent 
are poise, beauty, Christian leadership 
and character. 

A secret committee of judges then 
chooses from these ten ladies the Lee 
College Favorites and ranks them one 
through five. This year's Favorite 
beauties are Miss Wanda Johnson, 
Miss Annette Stancill, Miss Carroll 
Everhart, Miss Kathy Hucklebridge 
and Miss Seretha Dean. 




54 



3. 



avorite 



"Sweet and lovely" is Miss Annette Stancill. A 
Bible College junior majoring in music, this tal- 
ented Favorite is active in the music activities at 
Lee. A native of Chatsworth, Georgia, she plans 
to teach voice and piano. Miss Stancill was spon- 
sored by the Bible College Senior Class. 





56 




3, 



auorite 

"Beauty is only skin deep" is a saving definitely 
disproved by Miss Carroll Everhart. She came to 
Lee from Atlanta, Georgia. Active in the college 
choirs and in Christian service, Miss Everhart is 
one of the campus' best known women leaders. An 
honor student, she represented SNEA. 




3 



uo rite 

"Good things come in small packages" is proved 
in the person of Miss Kathy Hucklebridge. Hailing 
from the Lone Star state, she was selected by the 
junior college freshmen class to be its representative 
in the Parade of Favorites. Miss Hucklebridge is 
active in sports and student publications. 



58 




"A picture of queenly beautv and sophisti- 
cation" are the words that fit Miss Seretha 
Dean as though made for her. An outstanding 
scholar, she has won many honors while at Lee, 
including the editorship of the VINDAGL A. 
From Maryland, Miss Dean plans a career either 
of teaching Romance languages or of politics. 



59 




And here comes the queen! 



Queen Carolyn was crowned in the usual 
regal splendor as old grads and her stately 
court of maids and escorts composed a com- 
pany of loyal subjects. 

Elected for the first time by popular vote 
of the student body, this year's favored maiden 
is a sophomore in the Junior College. She 
is an active participant in sports and other 
extracurricular activities. 




Homecoming Weekend 



Old South architecture and attentive college men 
complement the queen and her court. 





The Queen and her Court. 

■BMK K 



(133 



m ■ m 











ill 1'iSS L^arolun -Artdrich 



r 



Queen 



61 




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The administration and faculty occupy a uniquely influential posi- 
tion in shaping the destiny of a college. These qualified and capable 
leaders are trustees of a great heritage. However, an impressive tradi- 
tion is meaningless unless it provides a challenge for present endeavors 
and for future planning. In terms of the physical plant, it is reflected 
in the developmental program, on the spiritual level in the increasingly 
spiritual atmosphere and inspiring chapel services, and on the intellec- 
tual plane in the realization that our church must adequately pre- 
pare our young people for their chosen field of labor in this modern 
world . 






.'.■' J - 




Board of Directors 




10.000 more in '04 



The Lee Memorial Library now contains over 17,000 
volumes. In order for Lee to retain its accreditation, to 
expand to meet the needs of a growing enrollment, and 
to provide more adequate research facilities, a larger library 
is needed. 

The library hopes to acquire 10,000 more books this 
year. 

Faculty members, friends, churches and businesses have 
already given or pledged to give approximately 4,500 books. 
Two faculty members have raised approximately 400 books 
each. A member of the administration has secured promises 
of over 700 books. A business friend has pledged to raise 
500 books personally. One church has pledged to give $500 
to be used to purchase new books. Miss Le Moyne Swiger 
is the Lee librarian and efficiently heads this department. 




MISS LE MOYNE SWIGER 
Librarian 



64 




The President 



The Reverend Ray H. Hughes 

Since being at Lee College, President Hughes 
has done a superb job. His administration has 
witnessed many improvements such as: the ex- 
pansion of faculty, expansion of curriculum, ex- 
pansion of physical facilities, expansion of the 
library; the renovation of East Wing Dormitory, 
Student Center, Cafeteria and Auditorium; the 
construction of the new Administration Build- 
ing and buying of new furniture, and an un- 
shakable depth of spiritual improvement through- 
out the school. Plans are now being laid to- 
ward a four-year liberal arts program, and other 
campus facilities. 

President Hughes recently stated that Lee Col- 
lege is facing its greatest challenge in the his- 
tory of its educational program. This challenge, to 
produce skilled and well-trained citizens, must be 
met if the youth of our constituency are to be 
successful. 



65 



Key Personnel 



STANLEY BUTLER 

Registrar, 

Dean of Men 




Some of the most difficult, but rewarding, 
responsibilities on campus, rest upon the admin- 
istration. Mr. Butler, as Dean of Admissions, 
organizes and administers records, testing ser- 
vices, counseling and guidance. Varied as his 
administrative work may be, he stands by with 
ability and diligence willing to assist those in 
need. His prayerful understanding and interest 
make him an able leader. 



During her twenty-nine years of faithful ser- 
vice to Lee College, she has served her church 
and her school well. The mission zeal which 
she has portrayed has stimulated and sustained 
hundreds of students over the years as she en- 
deared herself to them. 

The key to the stabilizing influence needed 
by the dormitory supervisors and their residents 
has been Dean Swiger. She has given herself 
wholeheartedly to solving the problems of an 
expanding enrollment of young women. When 
needed she was there to give direction. In con- 
fusion, she was there to give order. In frustra- 
tion, she was there to give tranquillity. 




AVIS SWIGER 
Dean of Women 



MARVIN GOLDEN 
Bursar 




The responsibility for settlement and adjust- 
ment of accounts, as well as the distribution of 
all funds, rests on the shoulders of Mr. Golden, 
the officer in charge of funds. An individual 
dedicated to his task is the Business Manager 
of Lee College. He is willing to go beyond the 
call of duty to give Christian guidance to a 
student, to a faculty member or to another ad- 
ministrative member. His presence in the busi- 
ness office makes us to know that the finances 
of Lee College rest in capable hands. 



66 




HOLDS GAUSE 
Dean, Bible College 



The primary purpose of the Bible College 
division of Lee College is to prepare young men 
and women for the ministry in the Church of 
God. It is dedicated to the doctrinal position 
of the Church of God and to the evangelistic 
and missionary interests of the denomination. 

The Bible College aims to hold a thoroughly 
academic program in relation to Biblical and 
professional education as well as general educa- 
tion. In keeping with this aim, the Bible College 
requires certain liberal courses. 




J. HERBERT WALKER, JR. 
Dean, Junior College 



The basic functional philosophy of the Junior 
College is to provide a general education de- 
signed to develop within its pupils such appreci- 
ations, understandings, abilities, and attitudes 
as are needed for responsible Christian living 
in the home and in the community. 

Broadly understood, "responsible Christian liv- 
ing" includes not only social and personal ade- 
quacy, but also a sense of economic self-suffi- 
ciency as well as intellectual and spiritual insight 
into the problems of human relations. 




HUBERT BLACK 
Principal, Lee Academy 



CHARLES R. BEACH 
Director, Christian 
Service Department 



The purpose of the Academy is twofold. First, 
it is to offer three years of high school training 
in a Christian environment. Boys and girls of 
this age need sympathetic teachers who under- 
stand them and know how to guide them in 
making right decisions. Close association with 
students in the college and Division of Religious 
Education serves as an inspiring influence. Sec- 
ond, it is to give opportunity to mature students 
who have not had the advantage of a high school 
education. 



It is the function of the Christian Service De- 
partment to provide every interested Lee College 
student with ample opportunity to do practical 
work in the field in order that he may apply 
the know-how which he has received in the 
classroom. It is this strong relationship between 
classroom study courses and Christian-service op- 
portunities that has made Lee College outstand- 
ing among present-day Pentecostal institutions 
of higher learning. 



67 



Faculty 



R. H. CAUSE, JR., from Clinton, South 
Carolina, earned his A.B. degree from 
Presbyterian College and Emmanuel Col- 
lege and his B.D. degree from Columbia 
Theological Seminary. Mr. Gause has 
been editor of the Church of God adult 
Sunday School literature and has served 
as Parliamentarian at Church of God 
General Assembly sessions. His book 
Church of God Polity clearly outlines 
the doctrines of the church. Students 
appreciate his sense of humor, and his 
classes are like sitting at the feet of 
Gamaliel. 




ELMER FRANKLIN ODOM has earned 
his B.A. degree from Bob Jones Univer- 
sity and the University of Florida and 
his M.A. degree from George Peabody 
College for Teachers. During World War 
II, Mr. Odom served in the Army Med- 
ical Corps in the Philippine Islands, and 
he received the Commendation Ribbon 
for outstanding service. He continues to 
render excellent service by his interest 
in students and his dedication to his 
profession. 





BEATRICE HAMILTON ODOM has 

received her B.A. degree from Bob Jones 
University and her M.A. degree from 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 
Mrs. Odom is the author of Winning 
the Children and several youth camp 
lessons and Pilot programs. She has lec- 
tured in the National Youth Congress. 
Her hobbies are her children, handi- 
crafts and cooking. 



68 




DONALD N. BOWDLE earned his B.A. 
degree from Lee College, his M.A. degree 
from Bob Jones University, his Th.M. 
degree from Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary and his Ph.D. degree from Bob 
Jones LTniversity. He teaches Greek, re- 
ligion, and history. Dr. Bovvdle gradu- 
ated Magna Cum Landc from Lee Col- 
lege. He received the Samuel Robinson 
Foundation Prize and a scholarship at 
Princeton Lfniversity. 



J. MARTIN BALDREE, JR., earned an 
A.B. degree in Christian Education at 
Asburv College, Lee College, and Lin- 
coln Memorial University, and a M.R.E. 
at Southwestern Baptist Theological Sem- 
inary. Mr, Baldree has written for the 
Evangel and the Lighted Pathway, and 
he assists the editorial staff of the 
church's youth department. He is a popu- 
lar lecturer for many youth conferences. 





AVIS SWIGER has received her LL.D. 
degree from Lee College and Salem Col- 
lege. Dr. Swiger is the author of Old 
Testament Narrative and the popular 
youth column, "Youth Wants to Know." 
Her interest in missionary work has made 
an impact on many young people. 



69 




DURAN PALMERTREE earned his 
B.A. degree from the University of Mis- 
sissippi and his B.D. degree from Duke 
University. At the University of Mis- 
sissippi, he edited the Ole Miss, the 
school annual. At Duke, he attained the 
highest student position, Speaker of the 
House. Mr. Palmertree is President of 
Upsilon XI, and he is an assistant to the 
Editor-in-Chief of Church of God pub- 
lications. 



MARY MORRIS has earned her B.M. 
degree from Lee College and has done 
additional work at the St. Louis School 
of Music. Mrs. Morris was editor of the 
Clarion, Lee's newspaper, and she was 
pianist for the Touring Choir. Individual 
sports, writing, and reading mystery 
stories are crowded into her busy sched- 
ule. 





DELTON ALFORD received the B.M. 
degree from the University of Chatta- 
nooga, the M.E. and Ph.D. degrees from 
Florida State University. He directs the 
band, the Campus Choir, the Lee Singers 
and the Forward in Faith Choir. Dr. 
Alford is a member of the Alpha Society 
of the University of Chattanooga, the 
Phi Kappa Lambda, the honorary music 
fraternity, and the Phi Delta Kappa. He 
has been listed in Who's Who of Amer- 
ican Universities and Colleges. He has 
recently written a choral composition, 
"Magnify the Lord." 



70 




ROOSEVELT MILLER received his 
B.M. degree from "the University of Chat- 
tanooga, Furman University, Lee Col- 
lege, Presbyterian College, Holmes Bible 
College, and Southern Theological Semi- 
nary. Mr. Miller, a popular tenor singer 
in the Church of God, has written about 
fifteen songs. His hobbies are fishing, 
swimming, and golfing. 



GEORGIA STROUD received her B.M. 
degree from the University of Chicago 
and she has done additional graduate 
work at Columbia University. She was 
a student of Mr. Ernest White and Mr. 
Edward Linzel (Columbia University), 
and Mr. Earl Miller (University of Chat- 
tanooga). Miss Stroud, who gives private 
piano and organ classes, has written sev- 
eral compositions. 





RUBY HURST has earned her B.A. de- 
gree in 'piano from the University of 
Chattanooga and Lee College, and she 
has done additional graduate work at 
the University of Chattanooga and Il- 
linois Wesleyan University. Mrs. Hurst 
enjoys writing one minute sermons. 
Many of these have been published in 
the Evangel. She is a member of the 
Red Cross, the Business and Professional 
Women's Club, and the Tennessee Chap- 
ter of the National Music Teacher's As- 
sociation. 



71 




JAMES OSCAR MILLER received his 
Mus.D. degree from Carson-Newman 
College. Dr. Miller is a member of the 
American Academy of Teachers of Sing- 
ing, the highest attainable honor of a 
voice teacher, and the National Associ- 
ation of Teachers of Singing. He has 
been a member of the Rotary Club for 
thirty-five years. 



HELEN IRENE SYMES has earned her 
B.S. degree from the University of Chat- 
tanooga, Lee College and Tennessee Poly- 
technic Institute. Mrs. Symes received 
many dramatic awards in high school 
and college. She enjoys sewing for her 
grandchildren. 





ROBERT OBANNON received his A.A. 
degree from Lee College, and his B.S. 
degree, M.A. degree, and Ph.D. degree 
from the University of Florida. Dr. 
O'Bannon is now making plans to go 
to India as a missionary for the Church 
of God. 



72 




LOIS UNDERWOOD BEACH received 
her B.S. and M.S. degrees from the I Di- 
versity of Tennessee. She has done ad- 
ditional graduate work at the University 
of Paris, and Texas Woman's University. 



KKXATIO.V.I WKTHII M >•! I M 



LACY A. HARLESS has earned his B.S. 
degree from the University of Akron and 
his M.A. degree from Kent State Uni- 
versity. Mt. Harless' hobbies are mathe- 
matic diversions and magic tricks. His 
ministry, teaching and personality have 
inspired the student body. 





CHALMER CHASTAIN, JR., who re- 
ceived his B.A. degree from Atlantic 
Union College, his M.A. degree from 
Walla Walla College and his M.D. de- 
gree from the L T niversity of Tennessee, 
is a well-known physician in Cleveland. 
His practical experience gives him a 
splendid background to instruct his bi- 
ology students. 



73 




DORA P. MYERS earned her A.B. de- 
gree from Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity, the University of Mexico, Nebraska 
Wesleyan University, Johns Hopkins 
University, and the University of Mis- 
souri, and her M.A. degree from Colum- 
bia University. Miss Myers served her 
church as a missionary to India for 
twelve years. For pastime, she enjoys 
music. 



W. WINSTON ELLIOTT received his 
A.B. degree from the University of Den- 
ver and Lee College, and his M.A. de- 
gree from George Peabody College for 
Teachers. Mr. Elliott has done mission- 
ary work in Mexico and has served as 
Sunday School and Youth Director of 
Arizona. He teaches courses in Religion. 
He is very active in sports. 





PEGGY HUMPHREY received her B.S. 
degree from Bob Jones LTniversitv, and 
she has done graduate work at Michigan 
State and Boston Universities. Miss 
Humphrey has been an active worker 
in the Christian Service Department. She 
organized the highly successful Child 
Evangelism Department. 



74 




CHARLES R. BEACH received his B.S. 
degree from the University of Tennessee 
and Lee College, and his M.A. degree 
from the University of Tennessee. He 
has done additional graduate work at 
the University of Paris. Mr. Beach, an 
honor graduate from the University of 
Tennessee, has taught French, Spanish, 
German, Russian, and English at Lee. 



NINA EDGE DRIGGERS has received 
her A.B. degree from Asbury College 
and her M.A. degree from George Pea- 
body College for Teachers and the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. Mrs. Driggers, a 
devoted teacher, an effective counselor, 
and a loyal Christian, has been teaching 
at Lee College for twenty years. Her 
class devotions are an inspiration to her 
students. 





ONEIDA STAPP received her B.S. de- 
gree in Sociology and her M.Ed, degree 
in Education from Sam Houston State 
Teachers College. While at Sam Houston, 
Mrs. Stapp was made an honorary mem- 
ber of four national honor societies: Al- 
pha Chi, Kappa Delta Pi, Alpha Kappa 
Delta, and Pi Gamma Mu. Her hobbies 
are swimming and volleyball. 



75 




STANLEY BUTLER received his B.S. 
degree from Jacksonville State Teachers 
College, his M.A. and Ed.S. degrees 
from George Peabody. Mr. Butler has 
been named Who's Who in the South 
and Southwest. He has distinguished 
himself as a teacher, adviser, and friend. 
He is a sports enthusiast. 



HAL MUNCK earned his B.A. degree 
in journalism from Emory University. 
Mr. Munck is a member of Sigma Delta 
Chi, the professional journalistic fraterni- 
ty. He is a reporter for WBAC, United 
Press International, Knoxville News Sen- 
tinel, and the Chattanooga Free Press. 





HUBERT P. BLACK holds his B.S. de- 
gree from Jacksonville State Teachers 
College and Lee College, and his M.Ed, 
degree from the University of Chatta- 
nooga. Mr. Black, a former athlete from 
Attalla, Alabama, has taught social 
studies and physical education at Lee 
for nine years. His success as basketball 
coach has highlighted the school's sports 
program. 



76 




JAMES W. BILBO earned his B.A. de- 
gree from Lee College and his M.A. 
degree from George Peabody College for 
Teachers. Mr. Bilbo, from Poplarville, 
Mississippi, is a dedicated teacher, a con- 
secrated Christian, and a challenging 
minister. 



A. HONETTE ECHOLS has earned his 
B.S. degree from Tennessee Wesleyan 
College, Lee College, and Jacksonville 
State Teachers College. Mr. Echols is the 
popular dean of Ellis Hall. He partici- 
pates in sports and enjoys music. 






K 





WILLIAM HENRY received his B.S. 
degree from the University of Georgia 
and Lee College and his M.A. degree 
from the University of Georgia. Mr. 
Henry had been evangelizing in the 
Churches of God in Georgia prior to 
coming to Lee. His humor, personality, 
and sincerity has drawn his pupils close 
tt) him. 



77 




KENNETH WOODARD earned his A.A. de- 
gree from Lee College, his B.A. degree from 
Tennessee Wesleyan. He is presently working 
on his M.Ed, degree at the University of Chat- 
tanooga which he will receive in June. Mr. Wood- 
ard from West Virginia plans to enter some 
phase of the ministry. 



ROBERT G. JOHNSON received his A.A. de- 
gree from Lee College, his B.S. and M.A. de- 
grees from Memphis State L^niversity and his 
Ed.D. degree from the University of Houston. 
While at the University of Houston, Dr. John- 
son served as president and vice-president of the 
University of Houston Chapter of the Phi Delta 
Kappa. 





LUCILLE WALKER received her A.B. degree 
from Scarritt College and her M.A. degree from 
George Peabody College for Teachers. Mrs. 
Walker was a missionary teacher for ten years. 
She writes lessons for the Junior High and Sen- 
ior Hi Challenges, and she edits the devotional 
page in the Evangel. 



78 




NORMAN JORDAN received his B.S. and 
M.Ed, degrees from the University of Chatta- 
nooga, and his Ed.S. degree from the University 
of Tennessee. Mr. Jordan, a part-time teacher, 
is principal of Blythe Avenue Elementary School. 
He enjoys reading, hunting, and hee keeping. 



LUCILLE VANCE ELLIOTT received her B.A. 
degree from Fairmont State College and Lee Col- 
lege, and her M.A. degree from George Peabody 
College for Teachers. At Lee College she was 
chosen "Best All Around" student, and at George 
Peabody College she was a member of Delta 
Phi Upsilon. 





MARY EMMALINE WHITE McCALL has re- 
ceived her A. A. degree from Lee College, her 
B.S. degree from East Tennessee State College 
and her M.S. degree from Florida State Uni- 
versity. Mrs. McCall has served as pastor, youth 
director, and evangelist. She has worked with 
State and Federal Civil Service in secretarial 
and supervisory capacities. Her hobbies are re- 
search in canning and freezing foods. 



79 




RUTHANNA CARR received her A.A. degree 
from Lee College. She is at present enrolled 
at Tennessee Wesleyan. Miss Carr teaches girls 
Physical Education and is sponsor for the Girls' 
Athletic Association. Her radiant personality wins 
her affectionate admirers. 



DALE HUGHES has served as president of the 
Western States, vice-president of the BAA, and 
as captain of the basketball team. Mr. Hughes 
anticipates evangelistic work after graduation 
this spring. 





LORRAINE CARROLL earned her A.A. degree 
from Lee College. Miss Carroll, an honor grad- 
uate, served as secretary of the student body 
and received the Balfour History Award. Her 
hobby is sewing. 



80 



THE TEACHER 

Lord, who am I to teach the way 

To my students day by day, 
So prone myeslf to go astray? 

I teach them knowledge, but I know 

How faint they flicker and how low 
The candles of my knowledge glow. 

I teach them power to will and do, 

But only now to learn anew 
My own great weakness thru and thru. 

I teach them love for all mankind 

And all God's creatures, but I find 
My love comes lagging far behind. 

Lord, if their guide I still must be, 

Oh, let my students see 
The teacher leaning hard on Thee. 

Leslie Pinckney Hill 



81 



1 

J L 




\ 
j 




Tradition implies both continuity and change. Accordingly it has 
been the duty of each class to make alterations while still preserving the 
basic forms received from the past. The present students have had the 
accumulated wisdom and experience of forty-six years on which to build. 
Each student has made an indelible imprint upon the history of his 
college. It is their hope that their imprint will provide a solid basis for 
continual growth. 



• 




• 



» 









w^F.-J 




- — ■'*•' ,j? 



# 






■■■■ 




OFFICERS 

President . . . JOHN LOMBARD 
Vice-President . DEAN McKINNEY 
Secy-Treas. . . PATRICIA PETERS 
Sponsor . DR. DONALD N. BOWDLE 



SENIORS LOOK FORWARD TO FULL-TIME 
CHRISTIAN SERVICE. 



Bible College 



THE SENIOR NOW bids farewell to his Alma 
Mater. The past four years have been full 
of never-to-be-forgotten activities. Freshman 
registration, an activity of four years ago, seems to 
some as only yesterday, but to others it is an ancient 
event. 

During the past four years, lives have been changed, 
personalities have been shaped and goals have been 
established. Many of these seniors have found their 
life's purpose which they have begun to pursue and 
will continue to fulfill after graduation until they have 
graduated from the course of life. 

While attending Lee, this class has rovided un- 
limited leadership in campus activiti b. Six of these 
graduates are members of the newiy-organized Pi 
Delta Omicron, the honor society for Bible College 
scholars. 

In recognition of their contribution, leadership 
and testimony, they are placed first in this class sec- 
tion. 



"Smile, Dan, you're on Candid Camera!' 




84 



JOHANNES W. BADENHORST, Salisbury, S. Rhodesia, 
South Africa 



DAVID BARNES, Uhrichville, Ohio 



JAMES BRECKENRIDGE, Lubbock, Texas 



CHARLOTTE PATRICIA CODER, Cottage Grove, Oregon 



PARNELL COWARD, Lake City, South Carolina 



LLOYD HAZZARD, Bassett, Virginia, Re. Ed. 



DALE HUGHES, Phoenix, Arizona 



GERALD JAMES JOHNSON, Bayou La Batre, Alabama 



Seniors 1964 



JOHN A. LOMBARD, JR., Dora, Alabama 



W. DEAN McKINNEY, Greenwood, South Carolina 



BARBARA JEAN MONTGOMERY, Carrollton, Miss. 



PATRICIA ANN PETERS, Mattawamkeag, Maine 



LARRY DEAN PETTY, Urbana, Illinois 



MARIE SATERLEE, Kotzebue, Alaska 



JAMES EDWARD SHOPE, Calhoun, Georgia 



MARSHALL KENNETH SMITH, McCall Creek, Miss. 



THOMAS E. WILSON, Cleveland, Tennessee 



85 





OFFICERS 



President TED BOWMAN 



Vice-President . . SAMUEL ROBEFF 



Secy-Treas. . WANDA BLACKABY 
Sponsor . MR. WINSTON ELLIOTT 



JUNIORS EAGERLY LOOK FORWARD TO SENIOR YEAR. 

THE JUNIORS HAVE gained full stature in college life. 
After three years of college, the students show great 
anxiety as they look forward to their final year at Lee. 
The transition from underclassmen to upperclassmen has come 
easily for these students. Many positions of leadership are held by 
members of this class. The juniors have been very active in the 
summer witness groups that have taken the gospel message to 
various parts of the world. 

As a class project, the juniors have placed a "Declaration of 
Faith" in every classroom, displaying their devotion to the church, 
college and kingdom of God. 

The school is proud of the Junior Class and looks forward to 
their future contributions to the school and to our society as they 
return as seniors next year. 



Bible College 



Mirror, mirror on the wall. 




WILLIAM DONALD PRICE, Salinas, California 



HOB LEE GLENN, Santa Cruz, California 




•*#*< 



dX±A 



WALTER TIMOTHY BATEMAN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
WANDA LOU BLACKABY, Eminence, Kentucky 
THEODORE ALAN BOWMAN, Middletown, Ohio 

JAMES LEWIS BROWN, JR., Chattanooga, Tennessee 



JIMMY WILLIAM BURNS, Cleveland, Tennessee 
CORNELIO M. CASTELO, Nogales, Sonora, Mexico 
O. WAYNE CHAMBERS, Birmingham, Alabama 
FREDERICK L. CROFT, Jacksonville, Florida 



F. DONALD DeFINO, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
ROSE MARY FAUBER, Sevierville, Tennessee 

JUNUS CYMORE FULBRIGHT, Asheville, North Carolina 
HERSCHEL GAMMILL, Meadville, Mississippi 



RICHARD DALE GOODMAN, Winter Haven, Florida 
RONALD WILSON HARVARD, Lake Wales, Florida 
THAMOS T. HOLLINGSWORTH, Attalla, Alabama 
JAMES PAUL JINKS, Charlottesville, Virginia 




f*+ ol *.*#' 



Juniors 1964 



FREDDIE DANIEL KILLMAN, Charlotte, North Carolina 
LONZO T. KIRKLAND, Cleveland, Tennessee 
DOUGLAS LeROY, Bath, South Carolina 

JAMES DAVID LYDA, Newton, North Carolina 



ALBERT MEISTER, JR., Pitman, New Jersey 

ROBERT S. REFFNER, Williamsburg, Pennsylvania 
SAMUEL ROBEFF, Chaco, Argentina 
ERNEST ROBERTS, Plant City, Florida 



RAY H. SANDERS, Bath, South Carolina 

CLARENCE ROBERT SHEPPARD, Savannah, Georgia 
ANDREA P. SHIRLEY, Belton, South Carolina 
JOHN ALFRED SIMS, Sevierville, Tennessee 



J. ANNETTE STANCILL, Chatsworth, Georgia 
RICHARD LEE USSERY, Kansas City, Kansas 
LEONARD WALLS, Winter Garden, Florida 

KENNETH WAYNE WILKINSON, Anniston, Alabama 



87 










lu*..^* 




I *«-- 



IfM 






OFFICERS 



President ROBERT VARNER 



Vice-President . 



WILLIE WEBB 



Secy-Treas. . . . JEAN HAMPTON 



Sponsor MR. ELMER ODOM 



SOPHOMORES HAVE MADE ADJUSTMENTS TO THE 
ROUTINE OF COLLEGE LIFE 



Bible College 



THE BIBLE COLLEGE Sophomore has reached the 
halfway mark in his college career. The basic 
liberal arts courses for graduation are complete, 
and he now begins to do more specialized work in the area 
of theology. Church history, church polity, systematic the- 
ology, and apologetics are courses toward which the student 
now turns. 

The Sophomore Class has shown great potential in the 
social field and will soon turn from club participation to 
club leadership. This class will undoubtedly make vital con- 
tributions to Lee College and to the Church of God. 




JS* 



Aifetf 




MIRIAM J. ALDRICH, Arlington, Virginia 
MUBARAK AWAD, Jerusalem, Jordan 
RONALD E. BEKA, Mansfield, Ohio 

JUDITH FAYE BIXLER, Chicago, Illinois 



LARRY KENT BONDS, San Jose, California 
CLYDE W. EDDINS, JR., Pensacola, Florida 

CHARLES E. FRENCH, New Bern, North Carolina 
JOHN EDWARD GREEN, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 



88 



V. JEAN HAMPTON, Bristol, Tennessee 

CHARLES EDMON HOLLIFIELD, Hampton, Virginia 
CAROL ANN JACKSON, Altoona, Alabama 
HAROLD LEE JONES, Augusta, Georgia 



DENNIE E. LANE, New Castle, Indiana 

JOSEPH ANTHONY LOMBARD, Laurel, Mississippi 

BETTY JO LOVELADY, Birmingham, Alabama 

CAROLYN LILLA McAVOY, Ocala, Florida 



TULLY CLAUDE McCOY, Burnwell, Kentucky 
JERRY VAN McGHEE, Tinley Park, Illinois 

LAWRENCE EDWARD MARTIN, Des Plaines, 111. 
HARRY EDWARD MANN, Lake Wales, Florida 



CAROL J. MILLER, Arab, Alabama 

WAYNE E. MONCRIEF, Lavonia, Georgia 

MARVIN EDWARD NEILL, Cleveland, Tennessee 
JERRY CARL NOBLE, Dayton, Ohio 



Sophomores 1964 



THOMAS JACKSON OAKLEY, JR., Portage, Indiana 
ROBERT L. ORR, Hayesvilles, North Carolina 
JAMES DAVID PARTIN, Lake Wales, Florida 
BEVERLY I. PRICE, Long Island, Alabama 



PERRY BRONWEN PYLE, Brookville, Pennsylvania 
HERMAN TIRAS RAMSEY, Doraville, Georgia 
JAMES E. RATHBUN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
ALFREDO DE LOS SANTOS, Lima, Peru 



DANIEL S. SILVA, Trujillo, Peru 

JIMMY WAYNE STONE, Cleveland, Tennessee 
FRED ANGUS SYLVESTER, Johns Island, S. C. 
MICHIKO TERAMOTO, Kobe, Japan 



ROBERT McCLELLAN VARNER, Roxbury, Pennsylvania 
SILVIO M. VIGO, Chimbotea, Peru 

WILLIE RAY WEBB, Natchez, Mississippi 



£121 




89 








OFFICERS 



President BOB BAILEY 



Vice-President 



. MAX WILSON 



Secy-Treas LINDA STONER 



Sponsor MR. R. H. GAUSE 



FRESHMEN ARE ORIENTED INTO COLLEGE LIFE. 



WITH HIS EYES SET on the goal of a degree from 
Lee College in 1967, the freshman started his col- 
lege career by registering this past September. The 
first few weeks were hectic as he tried to be in the proper class 
at the proper time. 

The freshmen are to be admired for the way they have adjusted 
to college life. With one year behind them in their college career, 
they can surely say, "We all have the joy of knowing the higher 
we climb, the closer we are to where we are going." 



Bible College 








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4ikrt 





EDWIN EARL AKIN, Brownfield, Texas 

LALA JEAN BAGGETT, Petersburg, Virginia 
ROBERT L. BAILEY, Wyandotte, Michigan 

NATHAN LOUIS BAKER, Cleveland, Tennessee 



LARRY GENE BALL, Macon, Georgia 

HAROLD LEE BARE, Cherryville, North Carolina 
FRANKLIN DAVID BARRS, Branford, Florida 
LINDA DIANNE BASKETT, Decatur, Georgia 



JANICE LOUISE BOATWRIGHT, Springfield, Virginia 
DANIEL EDWARD BOHLER, Cleveland, Tennessee 
RONALD EDMOND BROCK, Rome, Georgia 

THOMAS WILFORD BURTON, Chattanooga, Tenn. 



90 



CLAYTON ROY BYROM, Groves, Texas 
STANLEY PHIL CAGLE, Austin, Indiana 
JOHN D. CALLOWAY, Detroit, Michigan 
BERNICE B. CLEM, Addison, Alabama 



J. STEPHEN CONN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
PHILIP LAMAR COOK, Northport, Alabama 
LEON PERCY DENNIS, Verbena, Alabama 
DUDLEY H. DICKSON, Miami, Florida 



CLARENCE LEE DIXON, Norfolk, Virginia 

DONALD LESTER DOUGLAS, Macon, Georgia 
JAMES LUTHER DOZIER, Blakely, Georgia 
L. NADINE FARABEE, Arcadia, Florida 



HERMAN JAY FIELDS, Collinsville, Virginia 

JIMMY BOGART FORD, Chattanooga, Tennessee 
EDITH JOANNE FRAZIER, Woodlawn, Virginia 
LLOYD EARL FRAZIER, Woodlawn, Virginia 



Freshmen 1964 



HELEN FROUD, Fayetteville, Arkansas 

ROBERT GERALD FUNDERBURK, Fort Mill, S. C. 
LaVERNE GOODMAN, Thomasville, Alabama 

JAMES RONALD GOUGH, Morristown, Tennessee 



TEDDY FAY GRAY, Bartlesville, Oklahoma 

KATHERINE MARIE HAGAN, Travelers Rest, S. C. 
F. LAURENE HARDING, Wake Forest, North Carolina 
ED STANLEY HARRIS, Kansas City, Kansas 



ORVILLE BUEL HARRIS, JR., Erwin, Tennessee 
KENNETH RAY HENSLEY, Rutherfordton, N. C. 
HUGH ALLAN HODGES, Knoxville, Tennessee 
ROBERT GENE HODO, Pell City, Alabama 



DOUGLAS MICHAEL LAUGHRIDGE, Hickory, N. C. 

PATRICIA LANE, Everett, Pennsylvania 

JONATHAN DAVID LAYE, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania 

CHARLES BUFORD LINGERFELT, La Follette, 
Tennessee 



91 







1^1 Wk * bl 










Bible College Diploma Course Officers. 




A i mm 







©8 *£. 





"Dem bones gonna walk again" 

IDA MAE McDUFFIE, Okeechobee, Florida 

AMPARO MALDONADO, Catano, Puerto Rico 
JOHN H. MARTINSON, Homestead, Florida 
JIMI HALL, Cleveland, Tennessee 



Bible College 



CURTIS RAYMOND MASSEY, Farmville, North Carolina 
DANNY LEE MAY, Carrollton, Georgia 

RANDALL E. MELTON, Cleveland, Tennessee 
AARON RUSSELL MILES, Lake City, S. C. 



DOUGLAS WAYNE MILES, Laurinburg, North Carolina 
DIANE LEE MOHN, Boscobel, Wisconsin 

GERALD EDWARD MORAN, Danville, Virginia 
W. SHARON MULLINS, Stonewall, Oklahoma 



H. GEORGE MUSHEGAN, Ware Shoals, South Carolina 
JAMES ANDREW PATTERSON, Gaffney, S. C. 
JIMMY LEE PEERY, War, West Virginia 

LINDA CAROL PERRY, Belmont, North Carolina 



CLYDE TOMMY RHYNE, Maryville, Tennessee 
JULIAN B. ROBINSON, Blackshear, Georgia 
GLORIA ANN ROSMAN, Kenosha, Wisconsin 
LYDIA SCHWUCHT, Mossingen, Germany 



92 



From whence did we come? 




CARL DAVID SHARRETT, Bristol, Virginia 

DOROTHY LOUISE SHAW, Everett, Pennsylvania 
DAVID J. SISTRUNK, Bastrop, Louisiana 

Freshmen 1964 



BROADUS JOEL SMITH, Greenville, South Carolina 
JAMES KENNETH SMITH, Ringgold, Georgia 
KENNETH CAMERON SMITH, Jesup, Georgia 
MARVIN J. SMITH, Pinetops, North Carolina 



DAVID MARVIN SOUDERS, Bonner Springs, Kansas 
LINDA FRYE STONER, St. Thomas, Pennsylvania 
DENZELL TEAGUE, Hobbs, New Mexico 
CHRISTEL GERTRUD TECH, Albershansen, 
Germany 



GLEN EUGENE THOMAS, Middletown, Ohio 
GARY MATTHEW TIMBS, Lebanon, Ohio 
MARIO VALENZUELA, Mexico City, Mexico 
SHELDON CHRIS VIK, Wallace, Idaho 



JOE CLEVELAND WATERS, Jesup, Georgia 
JAMES PRINCTON WEBB, Flint, Michigan 
ALLEN E. WILLIAMS, Fort Myers, Florida 
MAX EUGENE WILSON, Grinnell, Iowa 



93 




dik£i± 





OFFICERS 



President 



Vice-President 



JOHNNY JOHNSON 



EARL ROWAN 



Secy-Treas. . . . GLENDA GRIFFIN 



Sponsor MR. JAMES BILBO 



THE JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES HAVE ATTAINED 
ANOTHER PLATEAU IN THE PROCESS OF EDUCATION. 



TWO YEARS HAVE swiftly flown by for the Junior Col- 
lege graduates. When these students enroll in other col- 
leges and universities next September, they will have a 
background in liberal arts and the Bible which will equal any 
in the field of education. 

Lee has made an indelible mark on the lives of these students. 
Many of these students have found their directive in life during 
the past two years. 

Needless to say, Lee holds many precious memories for these 
graduates. Classes, parties, dates, club meetings, and choir trips 
are only a few of the never-to-be-forgotten activities of the two 
years these students have had on the Lee College campus. 




Junior College 



CAROLYN ANNETTE ALDRICH, Arlington, Virginia 
DOLAS DALE BAIN, Mentone, Alabama 

MARGARET ELIZABETH BARBER, Waycross, Ga. 



BRENDA BERNICE BEITLER, Largo, Elorida 

CONSTANCE SUE BIRMINGHAM, Wewahitchka, Florida 
GLANDON C. BROOME, Lockhart, South Carolina 

94 



CAROLYN ANN BROWN, Sevierville, Tennessee 



CAROL JEAN CARDER, Toledo, Ohio 



CHARLES E. CLAYTON, Albany, Georgi; 



LOIS JURA CLAYTON, Albany, Georgia 



WILLIAM GRADY COGDILL, Loekhart, South Carolina 



JANET ELIZABETH COOK, Columbia, Mississippi 



ROBERTA JANE COOK, Detroit, Michigan 



ROGER DALE COURSON, Bartow, Florida 



CHERYLE JANE CREWS, Hilliard, Florid; 



Sophomores 1964 



PATRICIA ANN CROSS, Cohutta, Georgia 



MARY JANICE CUNDIFF, Norwood, Ohio 



JOSEPH EUGENE DAVIS, Bay Minette, Alabama 



SERETHA ANN DEAN, Easton, Maryland 



BRENDA JOAN DRISKELL, Fort Meade, Florida 



HELEN PHAYLENE DUNCAN, Winter Haven, Florida 



TERRY WAYNE DYER, Chattanooga, Tennessee 



CARROLL ELIZABETH EVERHART, Decatur, Georgia 



SANDRA DELORES FRAYLEY, Tucson, Arizon; 



95 





MANCEL H. GERTSMAN, La Belle, Florida 



PAULA MAE GIBSON, Parkersburg, West Virginia 



DONALD RAY GILLIAM, Fort Worth, Texas 



DORIS MAXINE GOODMAN, Cincinnati, Ohio 



LINDA D. GOODWILL, Jackson, Ohio 



CAMILLA RUTH GRAYSON, Indianapolis, Indiana 



GLENDA EVON GRIFFIN, Lockhart, South Carolina 



BARBARA GAIL GUY, Maryville, Tennessee 



MARY JOY HARLESS, Cleveland, Tennessee 



Junior College 



LINDA CLYDE HENSLEY, Dalton, Georgia 



MARY ANN HOLLAND, Natchez, Mississippi 



ALTON LEE HORNBUCKLE, Sevierville, Tennessee 



SHIRLEY MAE HUBBARD, Ripley, New York 



KATHLEEN HUCKLEBRIDGE, Sweetwater, Texas 



BETTY L. JOHNSON, Cleveland, Tennessee 



JOHNNY EDWARD JOHNSON, Okeechobee, Florida 



LOTTIE MAYE JORDAN, Mineral Wells, Texas 



SUSAN KELLNER, Sevierville, Tennessee 



96 



JANICE MARIE KELLY, Jacksonville, Florida 



MARILYN JOANE KENNEDY, Jackson, Mississippi 



NEVA ROSE KERLEY, Chattanooga, Tennessee 



BETTY SUE LOWERY, Cleveland, Tennessee 



CAROLYN L. LYTLE, Shaker Heights, Ohio 



JIM ORVIS McCLAIN, JR., Avondale Estates, Georgia 



EDWARD ARNOLD McGHEE, Tinley Park, Illinois 



GEORGE DENNIS McGUIRE, Kingsport, Tennessee 



RAY C. McMULLEN, Lake Worth, Florida 

Sophomores 1964 



BETTY ANN MEARES, Sarasota, Florida 



MARY LOU MEFFORD, Arkansas City, Kansas 



DIANA CAROL MEREDITH, Shepherdsville, Kentucky 



ELIZABETH PATRICIA MILLER, Augusta, Georgia 



KENNETH HUGH MINOR, Gaffney, South Carolina 



JOEL A. MOREHEAD, Norris City, Illinois 



GLORIA FAYE MORGAN, Soddy, Tennessee 



GERALD WAYNE MULLINS, Corbin, Kentucky 



SHERYL KAYE NEWTON, Springfield, Ohio 



97 







JAMESIE S. NEYMAN, Cleveland, Tennessee 



SHARON C. NICHOLS, Farmington, Michigan 



LINDA FAYH OBENCHAIN, Cincinnati, Ohio 



SHIRLEY ROSE OGDEN, Natchez, Mississippi 



BILLY J. O'NEAL, Eort Worth, Texas 



PHILLIP C. PEARSON, Newport, Tennessee 



MYRNA LEE PETTYJOHN, Cleveland, Tennessee 



ERLENE JANNETTE PHILLIPS, Oneonta, Alabama 



H. LANELDA PHILLIPS, Griffin, Georgia 



PATRICIA RUTH PRICE, Long Island, Alabama 



BARBARA JEAN RANKIN, Memphis, Tennessee 



PATRICIA KAY PURVIS, Memphis, Tennessee 



CHARLES O. REYNOLDS, JR., Arlington, Virginia 



EARL WAYNE ROWAN, Nashville, Georgia 



TWILA JANE ROWLAND, Bisbee, Arizona 



Junior College 



GLORIA ROLANDA SEARCY, Balboa, Canal Zone 
JANET PATRICIA SHARP, Jackson, Mississippi 
BRENDA JO SHELTON, Somerset, Kentucky 

98 



BARBARA ANNE SHEPHERD, Calhoun, Georgia 



SHIRLEY ANN SIMPSON, Anderson, South Carolina 



JAMES CHARLES SMITH, Heflin, Alabama 



CHARLES LARUE SPEARS, Minneola, Florida 



V. YVONNE STEPP, Cleveland, Tennessee 



WANDA SUE STEWART, Mobile, Alabama 



CHARLES DANIEL SWEAT, Lake City, Florida 



THOMAS ELOYD TRAW1CK, Hamtramck, Michigan 



WALTER BARRY VASSEY, Gaffney, South Carolina 



BLANCHE ANN WILSON, Wake Forest, North Carolina 



CONWAY WILSON, JR., Newport, Tennessee 



MARIAN JUNE WILSON, Louisville, Kentucky 



E. WAYNE WOODARD, Cleveland, Tennessee 



HAROLD F. WOODARD, Lakeland, Elorida 



JEWEL FAY WOODARD, Lakeland, Florida 



Sophomores 1964 



BETTY RUTH WOODS, St. Louis, Missouri 



BARBARA LeJEAN WYATT, Richmond, Indiana 



JUDY ANN YOUNG, Smyrna, Georgia 



99 






OFFICERS 



President LARRY SMITH 



Vice-President 



Secy-Treas. 



. PAUL CONN 



GLENNA FAIDLEY 



THESE FRESHMEN HAVE CHOSEN TO BEGIN THEIR 
EDUCATION IN A CHRIST-CENTERED INSTITUTION. 



THESE STUDENTS HAVE recognized their need of at- 
taining a college degree and have begun the process of 
receiving a college education. They have made a wide 
transition from home life to campus life. The initial problems of 
adjustment have been met aptly by this freshmen class. 

Whirling in social life with parties and friendships, coping 
with advanced sciences and languages, making the dean's list, 
and worshiping in a spiritual environment have molded the lives 
of these Freshmen. Realizing that the future belongs to the youths 
who prepare themselves to accept its responsibility, they eagerly 
anticipate returning to Lee Campus in September. 



Sponsor ... MR. WILLIAM HENRY 



Junior College 




'What am I supposed to see in here, Paula?' 



100 



ALICE M. ADAMS, Detroit, Michigan 

MARY CHRISTINE ALTON, San Antonio, Texas 
AURELIA MURIEL AMICK, Bessemer, Alabama 
NORMA GAY AMICK, Bessemer, Alabama 



CECIL AUDELL ANTWINE, JR., Watkinsville, Georgia 
BILL WAYNE ARANT, Pitts, Georgia 
JOHN C. AUSTIN, Grinnell, Iowa 

JAMES MACK AVERY, Troutman, North Carolina 



EUNICE TEEN BAKER, Huntsville, Alabama 

RONNIE WILLIAM BARTON, Fairmount, Georgia 
ERA DELL BATEMAN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
JUDITH ELMEDA BEAVERS, Macon, Georgia 



H. FOSTER BELL, Bristol, Virginia 

SHELBY LEE BLACK, Cordova, Alabama 

JAMES HERBERT BREWER, Frostproof, Florida 

MARY CAROLYN BRIDGES, Sevierville, Tennessee 



Freshmen 1964 



GLADYS JEANETTE BROWN, Chattanooga, Tennessee 
JOYCE ANN BURKE, Hampton, Virginia 
LINDA KAY BUTLER, Cleveland, Tennessee 

THERESA JOYCE CAREY, Kensington, Georgia 



SHIRLEY DIANE CARUTHERS, Ridgeville, Ohio 
CRISS TERRELL CAYWOOD, Cleveland, Tennessee 
BION EUGENE CECIL, JR., Graysonville, Maryland 
JAMES GERALD CHAMBERLIN, Orlando, Florida 



MARY JANE CHAPMAN, Morristown, Tennessee 
JOSEPH SHEPHERD COLLINS, Millsboro, Delaware 
ALMA JOYCE COMPTON, Delbarton, West Virginia 
BETTY JEAN COMPTON, Delbarton, West Virginia 



JAMES RAY COMPTON, Switzer, West Virginia 
CHARLES PAUL CONN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
PATRICK NEAL COOMER, Louisville, Kentucky 
SUE COW ART, Fort Payne, Alabama 



101 




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bhdxm 






4ik.rftjfc 







HAROLD WOODROW CRAWFORD, JR., Cleveland, Tenn. 
SANDRA ANNE CULVER, Macon, Georgia 
M. LARRY CUNNINGHAM, Orlando, Florida 

BARBARA JO DAILEY, Hayesville, North Carolina 



BEVERLY LEE DANSON, Vero Beach, Florida 
GLENNIS JEWEL DAVIS, Saraland, Alabama 

THOMAS EMORY DAVIS, Saraland, Alabama 
JOHN ED DECKER, JR., Long Island, Alabama 

Junior College 

ALBERT DeVENCENZO, Warren, Ohio 

ROSEMARY EARLENE DOUGLAS, Macon, Georgia 
JERRY LINDA EASON, Smyrna, Georgia 

EVA JOSEPHENE ELLIOTT, Big Timber, Montana 



EDWIN MICHAEL ELLIS, Akron, Ohio 

MADONNA ESTELLE ELLIS, Gastonia, North Carolina 
LONETTA JEANETTE ESSARY, Springfield, Missouri 
BRENDA FAYE EVANS, Lula, Georgia 



GLENNA JANE FAIDLEY, Sevierville, Tennessee 

GAILA DAWN FAULKNER, Cuyahoga Falls, Georgia 
BONNIE L. FEARER, Akron, Ohio 

JO ANN FISHER, Cleveland, Tennessee 



ROBERT LEE FOSTER, Akron, Ohio 
JOYCE FOWLER, Detroit, Michigan 
JIMMY DON FOX, Electra, Texas 

EARL WELLS FRANKS, Cleveland, Tennessee 



EVA ALICE GANN, Hixson, Tennessee 

BARBARA ANNE GILBERT, Glen Burnie, Maryland 
LINDA LOUISE GILSTRAP, Big Spring, Texas 
IMOGENE C. GLENN, Santa Cruz, California 



LUCY ANN GLOVER, Kotzebuc, Alaska 

DONALD ARTIE GOODRUM, Selmer, Tennessee 
JAMES B. GOODWIN, McDonald, Tennessee 

LYNDA DARLENE GOSNELL, Seaford, Delaware 



102 



CAROL SUE GRAYSON, South Lebanon, Ohio 
JOAN ANITA GREEN, Fort Pierce, Florida 

SANDRA LYNETTE GREENE, Charlotte, N. C. 
DANIEL KEITH GUNTER, Doraville, Georgia 



MARVIN HARRISON HADSALL, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
RONALD DEWIGHT HAGAN, Sevierville, Tennessee 
ROBERT HALE, Detroit, Michigan 

RUBY LEE HALL, Hixson, Tennessee 

Freshmen 1964 



DONALD DEAN HARGRAVES, Zurich, Switzerland 
HAROLD PASCAL HARRISON, Cleveland, Tennessee 
CAROL PATRICIA HORNE, La Grange, Georgia 
KAREN LEE HUDSON, Wyandotte, Michigan 



ELTON HULSEY, JR., Cleveland, Tennessee 
BRENDA JOY HURST, Cleveland, Tennessee 
CARRIE BELLE JOHNSON, Chadbourn, N. C. 
GLORIA LENORE JOHNSON, Rockford, Illinois 



WANDA MAE JOHNSON, Richmond, Kentucky 
BARBARA JEAN KENNEDY, Shelby, North Carolina 
DEWEY LEE KNAPP, Saraland, Alabama 

JEWELL JUANELL LASLEY, Soddy, Tennessee 



GAYLE LAVERN LOMBARD, Dora, Alabama 
JACKIE ARTIS LONG, New Orleans, Louisiana 
JANET SUE LONG, New Orleans, Louisiana 

SHIRLEY ANN LOVELACE, Cleveland, Tennessee 



DONNA LOUISE McDONALD, Big Spring, Texas 
ROY JAMES McKUHEN, Bloomington, Georgia 
JANET ELAINE McLAIN, Cleveland, Tennessee 
LINDA MILLER MAY, Cleveland, Tennessee 



LLOYD CONWARD MEADE, Rainelle, West Virginia 
HELEN FAYE MILLER, Cleveland, Tennessee 
LEONA OTEEN MILLER, Cleveland, Tennessee 
OTIS CLARENCE MILLER, Cleveland, Tennessee 



103 





Ugh, what's up. Doc? 



JOAN ELAINE MILLS, Birmingham, Alabama 
JIMMIE DALE MITCHELL, Hobbs, New Mexico 
DONALD BENSON MOORE, Lancaster, Ohio 



BARBARA DELORES MOSS, Huntsville, Alabama 
JUDY ANN NICHOLS, Tarkio, Missouri 

JOYCE EVELYN NOEL, Chapmanville, West Virginia 
WILLIAM BENNIE OAKLEY, Portage, Indiana 



EVELYN MAE OBENCHAIN, Cincinnati, Ohio 
DAVID LYNN OWEN, Stranton, Texas 

LAWRENCE GARY OWEN, Lanett, Alabama 

MILDRED FRANCES PARHAM, Savannah, Georgia 



Junior College 



TWYLA SUE PATE, Searcy, Arkansas 

BARBARA E. PETTY, Chattanooga, Tennessee 
DONNA KAY PHARR, Chattanooga, Tennessee 
SIBYLE JEAN PIERCE, Cass, West Virginia 



FLOYD DODSON PITTS, Greensboro, Florida 
MARY LEE PLYMEL, Omega, Georgia 

DOUGLAS ALFRED POLLARD, Lake Placid, Florida 
CAROL DIANE POTEET, Cleveland, Tennessee 



104 



Beek-a-boo, I see you, Jewel. 




KAREN ELAINE POTTER, Jonesboro, Arkansas 
BARBARA ANN POWELL, Lake City, Florida 
BETTY L. PRICE, Santa Cruz, California 



JAMES W. PRICE, Jr., Long Island, Alabama 

MARVIN A. PROPES, West Palm Beach, Florida 
SARAH NELL RAY, Callahan, Florida 

WILLIAM STERLING REDMAN, Orlando, Florida 



JOSEPH LARRY RILEY, Charlotte, North Carolina 
ANNA JOYCE RISH, Wewahitchka, Florida 

CHARLES WHEELER ROSE, Little Rock, Arkansas 
GERALDINE ROWLAND, Gastonia, North Carolina 

Freshmen 1964 



JUDITH ELAINE SCOGGINS, McDonald, Tennessee 
RACHEL SUE SEABOLT, Blue Ridge, Georgia 
PAUL RAPHAEL SEARCY, Balboa, Canal Zone 
PHYLLIS CLAUDETTE SHARPE, Odum, Georgia 



DAVID LeROY SHERBAHN, Kotzebue, Alaska 
LOIS MAY SHERBAHN, Kotzebue, Alaska 

JESSE LEON SMITH, Albany, Oregon 

LINDA SUE SMITH, Waynesville, North Carolina 



105 





MARJORIE ELIZABETH SMITH, Dade City, Florida 
PAUL DOUGLAS SMITH, McCall Creek, Mississippi 
LARRY WINFRED SMITH, Knoxville, Tennessee 
WILLIAM DOUGLAS SMITH, Farmington, Mich. 



WILMON ASHLEY SMITH, Sarasota, Florida 
DONALD WAYNE SPENCE, Wynne, Arkansas 
NAOMI JEAN STEPHENS, Stockton, California 
JOAN KAYE STONE, Bailey, North Carolina 



LINDA SHARON SUMNER, Baltimore, Maryland 
RUSSELL KENNETH TAYLOR, Marietta, Georgia 
RONALD JERRY TAYLOR, Dayton, Ohio 

JOHN MILTON THERRELL, JR., Kannapolis, N. C. 



LINDA SUE THOMPSON, Hayesville, North Carolina 
RAYMOND DAVID THORNTON, Greenwood, Mississippi 
VERNELL THRASH, Sylacauga, Alabama 

ARWIN LLOYD TRIPPETT, Parkersburg, W. Va. 



Freshmen 1964 



ROBERT EDWARD TYNDALL, Norfolk, Virginia 
ALAN J. WALKER, Indianola, Mississippi 
BARBARA ANN WALKER, Naples, Florida 

SANDRA MADGE WALKER, Apalachicola, Florida 



RUBY JANE WALL, Pulaski, Virginia 

JUDITH BURTON WELLS, Sevierville, Tennessee 

HORACE JACKSON WILLIAMS, JR., Jacksonville, Fla. 
LUCIUS MELVIN WILLIAMS, Bradenton, Florida 



SALLY DORIS WILLIAMS, Resaca, Georgia 

HERBERT CHARLES WILSON, JR., Canton, Ohio 
JACK WAYNE WILSON, Newport, Tennessee 

WILLIAM KEITH WINDHAM, Fort Meade, Florida 



ERNESTINE WOOD, Tifton, Georgia 

CLYDE ANN WOOLCOCK, Chapmanville, West Virginia 
LINDA FAYE WRINKLE, Chattanooga, Tennessee 
PATRICIA ANN YOUNG, Pendleton, California 

106 



HERE ARE FEATURED three of the out- 
standing campus leaders. They have been 
chosen for this honor on the basis of charac- 
ter, leadership, scholarship, and contribution to the 
promotion and betterment of Lee College. 

The persons selected for the 1964 Who's Who 
are Mr. Johannes Badenhorst, Miss Lois Jura Clayton 
and Miss Beverly Iantha Price. Mr. Badenhorst, a 
transfer student from Berea Bible Seminary, South 
Africa, is a member of Pi Delta Omicron, the Bible 
College Honor Society, and is vice-president of the 
Missions Club. Miss Clayton is secretary of the Phi 
Theta Kappa, the Junior College Honor Society, and 
the Phi Beta Lambda. Miss Price is the recipient of 
last year's English Award and is a member of Phi 
Theta Kappa. 

Their marked success here points to continual suc- 
cess in the future. 



WHO'S WHO 




MR. JOHANNES BADENHORST 



MISS LOIS JURA CLAYTON 



MISS BEVERLY IANTHA PRICE 





- 



107 



ATHLETI 



1 
J 



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The classroom and what is learned therein is but one facet of a 
college education. A student comes to college to discover life and to 
explore it in all its variety and complexity. Athletics have traditionally 
been the means of bringing at least some life to the student. By his par- 
ticipation in the various sports, spirit is added to the tradition. The 
tradition lies between the "Alma Mater" at the beginning of a contest and 
the cheering fans at the end. Win or lose the event is ours. 



I / 








Don't just stand there! 
Get that ball down! 



Coach Hubert Black's hustling Vikings recorded 
another fine record for the 1963-'64 season. The 
loyal Viking fans experienced many thrilling moments 
as they watched their favorites race to one victory 
after another. Race they did in the truest sense of 
the word. From the beginning of the season it was 
evident that the Vikings were going to have to make 
up for their lack of height by extra hustle. Emphasis 
was placed on speed. Led by Dale Hughes, Billy Miller, 
and Wayne Woodard, the lightning-like fast break 
became a team speciality. 

On October 24, the Vikings, accompanied by the 
Varsity cheerleaders, left the Lee College campus for 
a short tour of Georgia and Florida. The Vikings 
opened their season, October 24, in Atlanta, Georgia, 
with a smashing 97-46 victory over Hemphill. The 
following day the team journeyed to Lakeland, Florida. 
On Saturday night, October 26, Lee made it two 
in a row by trimming Southeastern Bible College 
112 to 48. The Vikings returned to the Lee campus 
with morale boosted and high expectations for a highly 
successful cage season. 

Probably the largest crowd ever to view an athletic 



contest was assembled in the Lee Fieldhouse on 
Thanksgiving afternoon. They were literally "hanging 
from the rafters." The overflow crowd was standing 
around the entire playing court. The Viking sharp- 
shooters began "burning the nets" immediately, evi- 
dently trying to impress the alumni. The Vikings 
jumped out to an early twenty point lead and were 
never headed. Led by Billy Miller, Bob Sherlin, and 
Dale Hughes with 25, 19, and 17 points, respectively, 
they rolled to an impressive 96-72 triumph. 

"A ball game is never over until the final whistle"; 
this seems to be a trite and age-old expression, but 
it was fresh in the minds of many persons on the 
cold Saturday night of December 7. The Vikings were 
upset by the Oak Ridge Blaziers for their first loss 
of the season. Lee led almost throughout the contest. 
With two minutes left in the ball game Lee held a 
92-85 lead. Jim Carter and his Oak Ridge teammates 
then put on a spurt that left almost everyone stunned 
as they left the Vikings on the short end of a 96-95 
score. Thus a fine 30-point performance by Dale 
Hughes and a 28-point effort by Billy Miller went 



in vain. 



1 10 




Wayne Woodard, guard 



Go west — young men, go west! 




Wayne Woodard lays it up and in 




At 3:30 a.m. early Sunday morning, Janu- 
ary 26, the Vikings were eating hot scrambled 
eggs with some of the largest pieces of ham 
ever seen by most of the fellows. At 4:20 a.m., 
their bus was loaded and nine varsity players 
along with "Pop" Muncy headed west on their 
annual tour. Destination was Springfield, Mis- 
souri, where the Vikings met Evangel College. 
They were expected to be one of the most rugged 
opponents of the season and rugged they were. 
The Vikings hit their peak as they slipped by 
Evangel by a slim three-point margin, 111-108. 
Dale Hughes pumped in 34 points to pace his 
team to victory. 

On Tuesday night, January 28, Lee downed 
their arch-rival Assembly of God friends from 
Central Bible Institute by a 102-85 margin. 
The following night playing in Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma, the Vikings were hard-pressed by 
Southwestern Bible College but made it three- 
in-a-row with a four-point victory, 81-77. 

A large enthusiastic group of supporters turned 
out to welcome the team home from their un- 
blemished road trip. A reception was arranged 
in the cafeteria, and each player told the gather- 
ing what the trip had meant to him. Spirits 
were high and the Vikings were really rolling! 




Manager Earl Rowan hard or work. 



112 




Kneeling: Freddie Killman, Don Gilliam, Copt. Bob Varner, Dale Hughes, and Bob Sherlin. 

Standing: Earl Rowan, Manager; Ted Bowman, Emory Davis, Dewey Knapp, Otis Miller, Billy Miller, Wayne Woodard, and Coach 
Hubert Black. 



VIKING SCOREBOARD 



Lee 97- 46 Hemphill All-Stars Atlanta, Ga. 

Lee 112- 48 Southeastern Bible College Lakeland, Fla. 

Lee 87- 81 Ook Ridge Blaziers Home 

Lee 96- 72 Tennessee Temple Home 

Lee 2- (Forfeit) Art Mart Home 

Lee 95- 96 Ook Ridge Blaziers Home 

Lee 2- (Forfeit) Art Mart Home 

Lee 60- 54 East View Home 

Lee 86- 81 Oak Ridge Blaziers Home 

Lee 111-108 Evangel College Springfield, Mo. 

Lee 102- 85 Central Bible Institute Springfield, Mo. 

Lee 81- 77 Southwestern Bible 

College Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Lee 83- 66 Pisgah __ Home 

Lee 74- 86 Tennessee Temple Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Lee 90- 69 Birchwood Y.M.C.A. 

Lee 96-106 Chattanooga Glass Y.M.C.A. 

Lee 77- 69 Oak Ridge Blaziers __ _.__ Home 

Lee 86- 87 Tennessee Temple Home 

Lee 93- 77 Bryan College Home 

Lee 91- 62 Toccoa Falls Bible 

College Franklin Springs, Ga. 



Coach Hubert Black plans 


game strategy with Captain Bob 


Varner. 




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113 




We've got these guys . . . just keep moving that ball! 




Wayne Woodard drives around Rich Painky for a bucket 
as Temple cheerleaders hope it misses. 



Dale Hughes pumps it in from twenty feet. 




114 




Get up Boog! Grab that rebound! 



The highlight of the entire season each year is the Lee In- 
vitation Tournament. Competing in the tournament were the 
Vikings, Tennessee Temple, Bryon College, and the Oak Ridge 
Blaziers. Although the Vikings finished third, fan support was 
at an all-time high. The opening game between Lee and Ten- 
nessee Temple was a real heart-stopper. With only seconds 
to go in the tense overtime battle and the Vikings trailing 85-83, 
Dale Hughes made a beautiful driving lay-up to tie the score 
and was fouled in the process. His free throw was perfect and 
sent the Vikings ahead 86-85. Only eight seconds showed on 
the clock when the Temple Crusaders quickly started up-court. 
Bob Murr, who established a new scoring record of 45 points 
for his team, tried an outside jump shot that rolled off the rim. 
It was tipped once unsuccessfully, and Dan Sherman went high 
in the air for a second tip as the final second ticked off. Pan- 
demonium broke loose as a dispute arose over whether the goal 
was scored before time ran out or the buzzer sounded. The 
officials ruled the goal good and the Vikings suffered another 
heartbreaker. 

Oak Ridge captured the championship by taking the measure 
of Tennessee Temple 79-75 in the finale. Lee won the con- 
solation game over Bryon 93-76. The Vikings won the sports- 
manship trophy and Bob Murr of Temple was voted the most 
valuable player in the tournament. He scored 88 points in two 
games. Dale Hughes and Billy Miller were Vikings' representa- 
tives on the all-tournament team. 




Bob Blozier tries in vain to stop Billy Miller's driving lay-up. 



115 



INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL 




Large crowds, spirited ballplaying, and enthusi- 
astic cheering made the 1963-64 intramural basket- 
ball season probably the best ever at Lee College. 
Eight teams were organized with each team wear- 
ing uniform shirts of eight different colors. 

Tom Trawick paced the Junior College Seniors 
to the regular season championship. The Seniors 
finished the intramural season with a perfect (9-0) 
record. Trawick led all scorers with a 27-point 
average. The Seniors were hard-pressed by Tom 
Burton, the league's number two scorer, Gerald 
Johnson, and their Bible College colleagues. They 
finished with a 7-3 record. 

The most important game of the season proved 
to be the first meeting between the Seniors and 
Bible College. The Seniors trailed throughout the 
hard-fought cage battle; once by a 15-point margin. 
They rallied in the final four minutes to gain a 
thrilling 49-47 victory. This victory gave the Sen- 
iors the incentive they needed to continue rolling 
to victory after victory. Three of the teams: Seniors, 
Freshmen, and Academy received pep and encour- 
agement from their most ardent supporters — their 
flashing cheerleaders. The enthusiasm that opened 
the season never tapered off until the final whistle 
blew ending a most successful basketball season. 



Dale Hughes 
Intramural Director 



What is? Need some "firm grip"? 




116 









Ed McGhee burns one from twenty-five feet. 



Charles Rose fires away despite Jir 
Bourland's outstretched arm. 



drive, 



shoot, 




The going gets rough underneath that 
basket. 



score! 



Teamwork counts, but don't everyone jump at once. 






Roxie Carr 
Girls' Director 



Carolyn drives toward the basket and gets two more points for seniors. 



GIRLS' 



INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL 



The Girls' Athletic Association organized 
varied programs, including such sports as volley- 
ball, basketball, tennis, and softball. These activ- 
ities were available two days a week. 

The climax of a successful basketball season 
was the action-packed tournament. Freshmen I, 
with Joyce Burke and Lanetta Ussery constantly 
pouring in field goals, defeated Seniors in the 
pressure-filled opening contest 3 5-34. Seniors 
recovered and trounced Freshmen II in the sec- 
ond game. The championship battle was filled 
with tension from start to finish. Paced by 
Carolyn Aldrich, who pumped in 22 points, and 
Myrna Pettyjohn who contributed 14 markers, 
the Seniors rallied in the final quarter to defeat 
Freshmen I 44-36. 

A ten-minute playoff resulted. Coach Freddie 
Killman could not get his Freshmen inspired to 
match the exuberance of the high-flying Seniors 
of Coach Ed McGhee. When the final buzzer 
sounded the Seniors had their championship 
trophies by a 13-9 margin. 



Please girls, only one ball per person. 











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118 



a 



fight to 



the finish 




Has the law of gravity 
failed? 





Varsity Cheerleaders in formation. 



Miriam Aldrich 



Helen Miller 




Carolyn Aldrich 




Glenda Griffin 




VARSIH 

CHEERLEADERS 



Encouragement, enthusiasm, and school spirit 
were all a part of the routine of the Vikings' six 
Varsity Cheerleaders. Their great efforts of sell- 
ing mums, doughnuts, and pompoms enabled 
them to go on the Georgia-Florida tour. 

Other important events on the Cheerleaders' 
busy agenda included the presentation of the 
basketball players and the welcoming back of 
the non-defeated Viking Team. 

Two nights a week of practice, often supple- 
mented by Saturday work sessions, resulted in 
many of the new routines developed for the 
school year. 

Miss Roxie Carr, physical education teacher, 
acted as sponsor to the six girls, all with previous 
cheerleading experience. 




Sherrie Newton 




Brenda Shelton 




120 





MINOR SPORTS 



The Lee College Athletic Department believes 
that some period of recreation should be in the 
schedule of every college student. Many stu- 
dents for various reasons cannot participate in 
varsity or intramural sports. They are able to 
receive relaxation and enjoyment by playing such 
sports as Ping-Pong, tennis, shuffleboard, and 



volleyball. Each year both Ping-Pong and tennis 
tournaments are played. After the evening meal 
from 5:00 until 7:00, the recreation room is 
a favorite meeting place for many people who 
wish to play an interesting game of Ping-Pong, 
or just simply sit as a spectator and chat with 
friends. 



Hey fellas — Here comes the boll! 




Look of confidence! 



Come on Jo, smock that bail 
hard! 




Concentration! 



Ron and Brownie — Opponents?? 




Keith Windham survived fierce 
competition from twenty-nine other 
hopefuls in the annual Ping-Pong 
tournament. He captured the cham- 
pionship by defeating Jimi Hall in a 
best-of-five series, three to none. Hall 
finished second. Moby Awad took 
third place by successfully overpower- 
ing Ed McGhee in two consecutive 
games. Spirited action and many thrill- 
ing games characterized the entire 
tournament. 




What form, Sherrie! 



Charlie gets a fast ball away to Evelyn. 




123 



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In every college there is a great opportunity for those who desire to 
take the initiative in exploring areas which are not considered in the 
classroom. Some must investigate the fields of religion, and some search 
for the intellectual expressions. For many years the activities have been 
closely related with the core curriculum. Today they are directed toward 
a wide array designed to serve all of the various intellectual and spiri- 
tual interests of the students. 




President, JOHN SIMS 



Student Body Officers 






p \>C 



Vice-President, JUNUS FULBRIGHT 



PUTTING SERVICE above self-desire 
has been the motivating force of the 
three top campus leaders. The enhanc- 
ing of student life on the campus of the Church 
of God's oldest and foremost institution was ef- 
fected primarily through the leadership of John 
Sims, Junus Fulbright, and Carolyn Lytle. 



Secy-Treas., CAROLYN LYTLE 



126 




Students enjoy the frivolity of canteen life and also 



Student Body 



^p # »$i f) ffi^^ 




The seriousness and deep meditation of study. 



/-^resident J Cabinet 



THE PRESIDENT'S CABINET is composed of 
capable leaders who are working toward the 
betterment of the spiritual and social life 
on the Lee College campus. 

John Sims, President, and the chairmen of each 
of the campus activities comprise the President's cabi- 
net. The chairmen are as follows: Leonard Walls, 
Public Relations Committee; Jim Breckenridge, Chapel 
Program Committee; Janice Kelly, Social Committee; 
Fred Sylvester, Evangelism Committee. 



127 



Student 
Council 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL has been endeavoring to foster 
within each student the pride of Lee College, its progress 
and ideals of scholarship and ethics. We are trying to 
instill a Christian responsibility within each one. The good co- 
operation between the faculty and students has aided in the 
achievement of this goal. 

The Evangelism Committee has endeavored to promote the spir- 
itual attitude among the students. It has organized prayer meetings 
which have encouraged the students to dedicate their lives more 
fully to Christ. 

Numerous well planned assemblies have been presented to the 
Student Body by the Chapel Program Committee. 

The Public Relation Committee has transmitted the Life at 
Lee program from a 1 5 -minute program into a 30-minute program 
of enjoyment and information. This has given to the citizens of 
Cleveland an opportunity to find out more about Lee College. 

This year several delightful functions have been promoted on 
campus by the Social Committee. Their hilarious Hillbilly Heyday 
program gave the students a chance to get acquainted with one 
another. 

This Council has worked diligently for the improvement of 
our campus. It has been successful in installing intercoms in the 
East Wing and Nora Chambers Dormitories, piping soothing dinner 
music into the cafeteria, and establishing longer serving hours in 
the cafeteria for student convenience. 

The Student Council functions to promote school policy and 
a greater fellowship among the students, to promote tolerance and 
understanding among schools, and to create a better cultural at- 
mosphere on campus. 









c M/e/c&tn& S& LEE COLLEGE|f^ 
HOME COMING AND DtD\CAT\OH...M « 




ASSISTING TWENTY-FIVE STUDENTS to the tune of $7,032 marked 
the eighteenth year of operation of the LCAA. The principal of the loans 
is channeled through the Avis Swiger Student Loan Fund which was 
established five years ago on the instance of Mrs. Swiger's twenty-fifth year of 
service to Lee. 

The Association, which was founded on May 31, 1946, promotes fellowship 
among alumni by sponsoring homecoming during the Thanksgiving season. Alumni 
Day during commencement week is a focal point 
for bringing together the members of certain 
classes. Class reunions bring the old grads to- 
gether at five-year intervals. 

In addition to helping students in a material 
way, the LCAA this year helped in the remodel- 
ing of the auditorium by replacing the old in- 
effective lighting system with modern fixtures. 

The money for this project came from the 
cumulative contributions of the Alumni Expan- 
sion Club, adopted in 1962. WJL 

The current slate of officers are: Reverend 
Paul L. Walker, pastor of the Hemphill Avenue 
Church of God in Atlanta, Georgia, president; 
Reverend J. H. Walker, Jr., dean of Lee Junior 
College, vice-president; Philip Morris, assistant 
auditor at the Church of God General Offices, 
secretary; Reverend James A. Stephens, state 
overseer of Virginia, board member; Reverend 
Floyd D. Carey, state youth director of Louisiana, 
board member. 




129 



ON EVERY CAMPUS one can find stu- 
dents who are endeavoring to achieve 
the highest rating of their school. On 
obtaining this level they are eligible for mem- 
bership in an honorary society. The honorary 
organization of the Junior College Division of 
Lee College is the Phi Theta Kappa. 

The goal of this group is to encourage Junior 
College students in their scholastic endeavors 
and to promote fellowship among scholastic 
leaders. Membership admittance in the society 
requires the student to have a two point average 
and have the approval of the faculty as well 
as members of the society. 

The Lee College chapter, Iota Epsilon, pre- 
sents a challenge for membership to every de- 
serving person who is willing to try to obtain 
these standards. 



Phi Theta Kappa 



OFFICERS 


MEMBERS 


President 


LOIS CLAYTON 


BETTY MEARES 


MANCEL GERSTMAN 


PATRICIA CROSS 
JANICE CUNDIFF 


DIANA MEREDITH 
GERALD MULLINS 


Vice-President 


JOSEPH DAVIS 


SHARON NICHOLS 


JANICE KELLY 


SERETHA DEAN 
PHAYLENE DUNCAN 


CAROLYN PALMERTREE 
BEVERLY PRICE 




MANCEL GERSTMAN 


BARBARA RANKIN 


Secretary-Treasurer 


DON GILLIAM 


ROLANDA SEARCY 


LOIS CLAYTON 


DORIS GOODMAN 


SHIRLEY SIMPSON 


BETTY JOHNSON 


CONWAY WILSON, JR. 




JOHNNY JOHNSON 


KEITH WINDHAM 


Sponsor 


JANICE KELLY 


BARBARA WYATT 


DR. O'BANNON 


CAROLYN LYTLE 


JUDY YOUNG 




130 



FROM HIS FIRST day on the Lee Col- 
lege campus, the Bible College student 
is painfully aware of the effort neces- 
sary to make top-notch grades. For those stu- 
dents whose high averages survive the inevitable 
bombardment of research projects, theses papers 
and final exams, the laurel of success is mem- 
bership in Pi Delta Omicron. 

The Pi Delta Omicron Constitution states the 
purpose as being ". . . to develop Christian char- 
acter through the promotion of scholarship. . . ." 
Operating on the premise that scholarship is best 
promoted by recognition and rewards, Pi Delta 
Omicron, the Bible College Honor Society, has 
maintained a reputation of academic excellence 
which makes membership in that group suffi- 
cient reward for the long hours spent in scholar- 
ly pursuits. 



Pi Delta Omicron 




OFFICERS 

President 
JOHN LOMBARD 

Vice-President 
DEAN McKINNEY 

Secretary-Treasurer 
TOM WILSON 

Sponsor 
MR. R. HOLLIS GAUSE 



MEMBERS 

JOHANNES BADENHORST 
JIM BURNS 
WAYNE CHAMBERS 
LONZO KIRKLAND 
DOUGLAS LeROY 
LARRY PETTY 
SAMUEL ROBEFF 
JAMES SHOPE 
JOHN SIMS 



131 




OFFICERS: 

Secretary 
President . 
Vice-President 



ANN WILSON 
. BOB BAILEY 
SERETHA DEAN 



THE PREPARATION and pres- 
entation of plays, pantomimes, 
dramatic readings, debates, and 
speech contests are means through which 
the Forensic Club provides an outlet for 
the talents of students who display an 
interest in speech and dramatics and de- 
sire to foster an appreciation for these 
arts. 

In November this club presented a 
unique assembly program which con- 
sisted of speeches and discussions on the 
subject of "National Politics and Noted 
Politicians." Other activities included on 
the annual calendar were special train- 
ing in club meetings, participation in 
intercollegiate debating, social events, 
and the presentation of a three-act play 
during the second semester. 



Forensic Club 




132 




Music Club 



THE MUSIC CLUB is designed to pro- 
ject interest in all types of music on 
the Lee College campus. Recitals are 
held at club meetings introducing various types 
of music for discussion. 

Members from the Cleveland Music Lovers 
Club and neighboring schools and colleges are 
invited to give programs in club meetings, in 
order to familiarize members to a great range 
of musical subjects. 

The Music Club sponsored a musical variety 
program in March. The proceeds went toward 
a music project designed to benefit all music 
students and the campus in general. 

Jim Burns, president, has capably directed 
the group in presentation of various musical pro- 
grams. Firm in their belief that music is the 
lubricant of living, club members have exerted 
a pivotal influence in the promotion of cultural 
music here on the campus. 



OFFICERS: 

President 
Secretary 
Vice-President 



. . . JIM BURNS 

ANNETTE STANCIL 

HERMAN RAMSEY 




133 




OFFICERS: 

President 
Secretary 
Vice-President 
Chaplain 



DURAN PALMERTREE 
RICHARD GOODMAN 

. . RON HARVARD 
. . TED BOWMAN 



Upsilon XI 



UPSILON XI CONTINUED to be the campus's unique 
group throughout the school year. That company 
which meets at the most unusual hours placed 
great emphasis on the true role of leadership in relation 
to the group's two avowed purposes of fellowship and service. 

It seems as if the Upsies have brought that girl Sadie 
Hawkins to Lee to stay. This year's efforts were capped 
about three hundred times with success. Other big social 
gadabouts were the Christmas party and the spring banquet. 
At these social events Miss Wanda Johnson wore the Sweet- 
heart roses. 

The Lee Chapter of Tammany Hall boosts Junus Ful- 
bright as Student Government Veep while John Lombard 
triples as president of PDO and the Bible College seniors 
and sets forth PFCers. Max Gerstman knows the combination 
to the Vindagua safe and ranks as the chief scholar of Phi 
Theta Kappa. Ted Bowman pounds the gavel for the Bible 
College juniors — Samuel Robeff pinch hits; Johnny Johnson 
heads up Junior College sophs and Phi Beta Lambda. Doug 
LeRoy ranks second to Lombard in PFC while Richard 
Goodman tours with the Lee Singers. Dennis McGuire lends 
that international flavor by guiding the Senors and Senoritas 
of the Spanish Club; Robeff is his second. 

Duran Palmertree is the president of Upsilon XI and 
Ron Harvard backs him up. Richard Goodman scribbles 
and holds the purse strings, while Ted Bowman keeps the 
clan on the straight and narrow. 




134 



Phi 
Beta 
Lambda 



OFFICERS: 

President 
Vice-President 
Secretary . 
Treasurer 



JOHNNY JOHNSON 

CHARLES CLAYTON 

LOIS CLAYTON 

CONWAY WILSON 











THE THETA GAMMA chapter of 
Phi Beta Lambda was organized 
to improve scholarship and de- 
velop qualities that will enable them to 
participate effectively in business, profes- 
sional, and community life. The chapter 
endeavors to develop leadership for busi- 
ness, and business education. 

Members seek to create enthusiasm in 
building a lively, energetic, up-to-the-min- 
ute organization, and acquire personal 
accomplishments, such as tact, patience, 
consideration for others, cooperative ability, 
public speaking, public relations and lead- 
ership. 

This year the Lee Alpha Chapter drew 
up a constitution and bylaws in applying 
for reactivation of the chapter. The spon- 
sor and delegates were sent to the State 
Convention in March; also state contests 
were entered by the chapter. Guest speak- 
ers who are professional businessmen are 
brought in to talk with the members of 
the club. 

Their capable leaders — president, John- 
ny Johnson; vice-president, Charles Clay- 
ton; secretary, Lois Clayton — are encour- 
aging the students to prepare for useful 
service and make an intelligent choice of 
careers. 



135 



S. N. E. A. 




OFFICERS: 

Secretary 
President 
Vice-President 



GLENNA FAIDLEY 
ERNEST ROBERTS 
DOUGLAS SMITH 



THE LOCAL CHAPTER of the Student Na- 
tional Education Association was organized 
at Lee College for students interested in 
teaching or other educational professions. The pur- 
pose of this group is to elevate character, to promote 
personal and professional growth, to develop leadership 
skills, to present an understanding of the history, 
ethics and programs of the NEA, and to participate 
in its activities at local, state and national levels. 

SNEA meets semimonthly and has held regular 
meetings since September. It has conducted several 
business assemblies, elected new officers, and discussed 
ways and means to make the club more profitable 
to all members. The club's desire is to obtain speakers 
from other schools to lecture on various educational 
subjects. It plans to send books to be used in the 
classrooms of former club members who are now 
teaching. 

SNEA also desires to furnish a file of information 
from each state concerning requirements for teacher 
certification, salaries, and other related facts. 

It is the policy of SNEA to present each year a 
fifty dollar scholarship to an active senior member 
of the club, provided that member continues, without 
interruption, his college work. 

In the future the SNEA plans to initiate the for- 
malities necessary to secure membership in the Na- 
tional Association and to acquire a Student NEA 
Charter for the Club. 




OFFICERS: 

Vice-President . . HONETTE ECHOLS 
President . . DURAN PALMERTREE 
Secretary-Treasurer BETTY BALDREE 



FELLOWSHIP WAS the main thrust 
of the activities of this year's Faculty- 
Staff Club. Instead of the pattern of 
monthly meetings which had been followed in 
recent years, the group voted to meet as an en- 
tire body only four times during the year. These 
four sessions included the fall and spring pic- 
nics, the Christmas banquet and a special Easter 
meeting. 



tr—aiiuiiiiiL .my. 




ISSSZJ.m' 1 - W'WW^" 1 




However, small groups met for various ac- 
tivities at regular intervals to participate in sports 
events and family affairs. The Faculty-Staff team 
compiled an admirable record in intramural bas- 
ketball competition. 

The Gauses again involved these leaders of 
Lee College in the warmth of the fellowship of 
their home by staging the annual Christmas- 
with-the-Gause-family party. 

Duran Palmertree called the meetings to order 
while Honette Echols served as the Veep and 
official contact man. Betty Baldree collected the 
minutes, sent out duns and posted notices. 

The club serves effectively as a focal point 
of fellowship and fun for those who give so 
diligently of themselves to make Lee College a 
campus of Christian scholarship. 



FACULTY-STAFF 



137 



PERHAPS THE MOST significant ad- 
dition to Lee's clubs and organiza- 
tions this year is the Alpha Gamma 
Chi, a men's society. 

Begun in September with a charter mem- 
bership of seventeen college men, the Chi is 
the brainchild of Dr. Delton Alford and Dr. 
Donald Bowdle, who are presently senior 
members. Alpha Gamma Chi seeks to forge 
strong bonds of friendship among college men 
representing differing points of view and vari- 
ous campus groups through common emula- 
tion of the "cosmopolitan Christian man." 

Already active in campus affairs, this group 
has served as a "shot-in-the-arm" to social 
life at Lee. Regular social events for members 
and their belles plus affairs planned for the 
school at large made a full calendar for the 
Chi in 1964. 

Membership in Alpha Gamma Chi is se- 
lective. The society's midyear rush week and 
induction was one of the highlights of its 
first year's operation. Initiation, society songs, 
and strikingly attractive blazer outfits have 
all been used by the society to add a dis- 
tinctively collegiate flavor to the Lee College 
campus. 



Alpha Gamma CM 
















OFFICERS: 

Chaplain 
Secretary . 
President 
Treasurer 
Vice-President 



. . BOB VARNER 

HERMAN RAMSEY 

. DON GILLIAM 

MARVIN HADSALL 
. . PAUL CONN 




138 





OFFICERS: 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 



SANDRA MULLINAX 

. . JUNE WILSON 

GAYNELL McNALLEY 



Home Economics Club 



T 



O THOSE LEE STUDENTS who view pros- 
pects of marriage from the distaff side, active 
membership in the Home Economics Club 
is a must. 

According to Mrs. Beach, group sponsor, the Home 
Economics Club exists "to learn today that we may 
be better individuals, better homemakers tomorrow." 

To put this purpose into practical application, the 
Home Economics Club has staged a program of active 
involvement for its members in '63-'64. Local busi- 
nessman Bob Lewis cooperated with club officers in 
guiding members on a tour of Stamper's, one of Cleve- 
land's uptown gift shops. 

Usefulness in the home was the theme of a series 
of guest lectures at club meetings. These included 
an exhibit of do-it-yourself floral arrangements by a 
representative of Marie's Florists and a demonstration 
on covering shoes for evening wear by a local business- 
woman. 





OFFICERS: 

Sponsor 

President 

Vice-President 



MR. MARTIN BALDREE 

. . MUBARAK AWAD 

CORNELIO CASTELO 



WHILE GAZING around the 
campus of Lee College, one 
will find many interesting and 
different people. The students which have 
come to our school from foreign countries 
need an organization to help them adjust 
to the American way of life. The Inter- 
national Club is designed for just this rea- 
son. The club was also organized in order 
to gain knowledge of other countries 
through friendship, to promote goodwill 
and understanding between International 
and American students, and to cooperate 
with activities on campus collectively as a 
group as well as individually. 

During the second semester the Inter- 
national Club served a banquet of buffet 
style in which a meat, representative of 
the nationality of each student, was pre- 
pared and served. 



Secretary-Treasurer 
MOTO 



MICHIKO TERA- 



International Club 





OFFICERS: 

Vice-President 

President 

Secretary 



SAMUEL ROBEFF 
DENNIS McGUIRE 
GAYLE LOMBARD 




Spanish Club 



ON A CAMPUS, locked in by East Tennessee 
mountains and mule-trodden country roads, 
the Spanish Club provides a welcome re- 
spite from rural Southern provincialism for those stu- 
dents attracted by the romance of Latin America. 

The Spanish Club, organized to give its members 
an understanding of customs and social practices of 
the Spanish-speaking world, accomplishes its purpose 
in a delightfully informal manner. This year, as al- 
ways, club meetings were characterized by Mexican 
meals, Latin-American games, Spanish songs, and the 
hesitant chatter of amateur linguists. A Spanish Christ- 
mas party which included the destruction of a free- 
swinging pinata highlighted a year of activity which 
convinced many Lee College Yawquis that life south 
of the border can be fun. 

Not to be tagged solely as Latin-loving socialites, 
members of the Spanish club participated in several 
service projects this year. Their contribution of books 
to the expanding Lee library offered indisputable 
evidence that, though their hearts may be in Latin 
America, Spanish Clubbers are firmly enough estab- 
lished here in the hills to make a valid contribution 
to campus life. 



141 



G A A 



SUPERFICIALLY, NO words seem to be less 
related than these three: "girls," "Christian," 
and "athletics." Properly related and given 
embodiment in a group of seventy-five enthusiastic 
collegians, these words spell out the theme of the 
GAA. 

Though one of Lee's oldest clubs, the Girls' Ath- 
letic Association continues to provide college women 
on this campus with a crammed schedule of athletic 
events. Volleyball, Softball, and basketball leagues are 
but a part of the program of activities sponsored by 
the GAA this year. GAA office) • led by prexy Karen 
Hudson, saw to it that even social events were pro- 
vided in the '64 club calendar. Late January saw the 
unveiling of "Careless Capers," a GAA sponsored vari- 
ety show. Another highlight of the club season was 
the annual spring picnic for members and their beaux. 
A better understanding of competition and sports- 
manship has been achieved through participation in 
these various activities sponsored by the Girls' Athletic 
Association this year. 




OFFICERS: 

Secretary 
President 
Vice-President 



CAROLYN ALDRICH 

KAREN HUDSON 

BRENDA SHELTON 




142 



B A A 




THE PROMOTION of Christian athletics 
and the building of Christian character 
through athletic programs carried on in a 
Christian atmosphere are the major objectives of the 
Boys' Athletic Association. 

The BAA motto, "the body goes along to church 
with the mind and soul," portrays the emphasis placed 
by that group on the necessity of building a healthy 
body. This club also strives, through the varied aspects 
of its extensive program, to build Christians who can 
both live and succeed in this competitive society. 

The desire to build well-developed men is reflected 
in the BAA's program for this year. Besides sponsor- 
ing a preseason Softball tournament and presenting 
a special speaker on flag football, the BAA organized 
altar workers during the Fall Revival, sponsored a 
candidate for Homecoming Queen, and supported a 
favorite for the Vindagua Parade of Favorites. Annual 
projects of the BAA include sponsoring intramural 
basketball and volleyball programs, presenting an an- 
nual banquet, and securing speakers on various phases 
of Christian athletics for club meetings. 



OFFICERS: 

Secretary 
President 
Vice-President 



PAT COOMER 

BOB VARNER 

ED McGHEE 




143 



Campus Choir 



THE CAMPUS CHOIR directed by Dr. 
Delton Alford, presents a varied pro- 
gram of religious music ranging from 
gospel to semiclassical pieces. 



Miriam Aldrich 
Carolyn Aldrich 
Carolyn Bridges 
Lala Baggett 
Brenda Beitler 
Janice Boatwright 
Diane Caruthers 
Betty Compton 
Cheryl Crews 
Seretha Dean 
Donna Ellis 
Sandra Fraley 
Barbara Guy 
Glenna Faidley 
Camilla Grayson 
Joan Green 
Laurie Harding 
Carol Home 
Joy Hurst 
Karen Hudson 
DeRosa Hodges 
Carol Jackson 
Wanda Johnson 
Ruby Hall 



Neva Kerley 
Rachel Seabolt 
Carolyn Lytle 
Carolyn Miller 
Ida Mae McDuffie 
Janet McLain 
Gloria Morgan 
Betty Meares 
Sherry Newton 
Judy Nichols 
Earlene Phillips 
Linda Perry 
Barbara Powell 
Myrna Pettyjohn 
Gloria Rosman 
Gerry Rowland 
Sharon Sumner 
Brenda Shelton 
Joan Stone 
Shirley Simpson 
Andrea Shirley 
Phyllis Sharpe 
Annette Stancill 
Vernelle Thrash 



Linda Wrinkle 

Barbara Walker 

Sandra Walker 

Pat Young 

Nadine Farabee 

Barbara Jean Kennedy 

Judy Young 

Jim Avery 

Jim Burns 

Ronald Beka 

Larry Ball 

Ronnie Barton 

Philip Cook 

Steve Conn 

Paul Conn 

Gerald Funderburk 

Ted Gee 

Teddy Gray 

Don Gilliam 

Richard Goodman 

Ed Harris 

Kenneth Hensley 

Charles Hollifield 

Randall Melton 

Ed McGhee 



George Mushegan 
Dave Partin 
Jim Perry 
Gene Pharr 
Herman Ramsey 
Charlie Reynolds 
Perry Pyle 
Jimmy Reno 
Paul Searcy 
Ashley Smith 
Leon Smith 
Larry Smith 
Paul Douglas Smith 
John Terrell 
Denzell Teague 
Gary Timms 
Arvin Trippett 
Bobby Tyndall 
Roger Vaughn 
Sheldon Vik 
Zeb Morgan 
Don Moore 
Aaron Lavendar 
Allen Williams 




144 



PERHAPS THE MOST spectacular part of 
Lee's music department is its concert band. 
Composed this year of forty members, the 
band is directed by Dr. Delton Alford. 

This year's version of the Lee Band boasts of a 
specially constructed practice room, built this sum- 
mer on the second floor of the music building. Walled 
in, padding six inches thick, and topped by acoustical 
tile, the new band room is virtually soundproof. 

Operating from these premises, this year's concert 
ensemble has produced music of extraordinary quality 
for a second-year group. Playing such works as "Street 
Scenes," "Send the Light," and "Onward Christian 
Soldiers," the band has thrilled audiences at Lee 
throughout this school term. 



Band 




CLARINETS: 



PERCUSSION: 



CORNETS: 



"Barbara Walker 
Madonna Ellis 
Gene Croft 
Cheryl Crews 
Hugo Matta 
Ronald Stinson 
Laurie Harding 
Pat Purvis 

FLUTES: 

"Joy Hurst 
Camilla Grayson 

SAXOPHONE: 

"Raymond Massey 



"Janice Boatwright 
Dave Partin 
Paul Dennis 
Ronny Browning 



TROMBONES: 



"Charles Sweat 
Gene Pharr 
John Austin 
Douglas Laughridge 
Sheldon Vik 



"Max Wilson 
Emory Davis 
Douglas Miles 
Don DeFino 
Stanley Cagle 
Linwood Jacobs 
Marvin Souders 
Larry Martin 
Ron Carver 



BARITONES: 



TUBAS: 



HORNS: 



'Ashley Smith 



"Herman Ramsey 
Harold Bare 
Randall Melton 
Tommy Scruggs 



"John Johnson 
Dale Walker 
Ed Harris 



"First Chair 



145 




WHETHER PERFORMING at Sun- 
day night chapel or at a concert in 
a distant state, the Lee Singers con- 
sistently produce top quality religious music. 

Functioning as "Lee Singers" for the first 
time, this group has acquired in recent months 
many of the earmarks of a college ensemble. A 
distinctive mark of the Singers this year has 
been its outfits of blue blazers and gray slacks 
and skirts. 



Travel carried the sound of the Singers to 
all parts of the East. The group's fall tour in- 
cluded stops in Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Cincin- 
nati, and other northern cities, with the spring 
trip covering much of the Southeast. 

Under the tutelage of Dr. Alford, the Lee 
Singers have achieved with delightful success 
a "new look" on campus, combining collegiate 
appearance and programming with anointed pre- 
sentation of gospel music. 



146 




LEE SINGERS 




Soprano 

Camilla Grayson 
Joy Hurst 
Carol Home 
Sherrie Newton 
Janet McLain 

* Carolyn Miller 
Janice Kelley 
Paula Gibson 
Betty Meares 
Glenna Faidley 

Alternates 
Vernell Thrash 
Laurie Harding 
Barbara Walker 

Tenor 

* Richard Goodman 
Gerald Funderburk 
Don Moore 

Don DeFino 
Gene Pharr 
Larry Smith 
Jim Peery 
Ted Gee 
Bobby Tyndall 

Alternate 
Aaron Lavender 

Organist 
Myrna Alford 



Alto 

*Judy Young 
Carolyn Lytle 
Carol Jackson 
Wanda Johnson 
DeRosa Hodges 
Sharon Sumner 
Pat Young 
Janice Boatwright 
Nadine Farabee 
Gloria Morgan 

Alternates 
Pat Purvis 
Lala Baggett 

Bass 
Dave Partin 
Leon Smith 
Charles Hollifield 
Paul Conn 
* J im Burns 
Sheldon Vik 
Allen Williams 
Don Gilliam 
Ed McGhee 

Alternate 
Ron Beka 

Pianists 
Philip Cook 
Herman Ramsey 



'Section Leader 



Dr. Delton L. Alford, director 



147 




Editor 

Doris Goodman 





SPONSORS: Mr. J. Martin Baldree, Mrs. Mary S. Morris, 
Mr. R. Hollis Gause 



Clarion 



Business Manager 
Cleveland Waters 




THE QUALITY of a student 
body is often reflected in its 
campus newspaper. Using 
the Clarion as a mirror of Lee Col- 
lege caliber, this school stacks up as 
a campus of progressive young col- 
legians. 

The Clarion projects an amazingly 
accurate image. Marshaling a force 
of sharp-eyed reporters and hard-hit- 
ting columnists, Editor Doris Good- 
man has supplied Lee students with 
a first-rate college paper for the '63- 
'64 term. 

Matching Lee's recent trend of 
growth and improvement, the Clarion 



has achieved expansion all its own. 
Two major size changes saw the pa- 
per grow from four to five columns 
and from 17 to 19Vi inches long. 
Another improvement this year was 
the policy adopted which made space 
available to students for classified ads. 
Miss Goodman and Ted Gray, 
Clarion business manager, were not 
without help in their journalistic out- 
put. Section editors, columnists, ad 
men, reporters, and photographer 
Sheldon Vik threw their shoulders be- 
hind the wheel to produce one of Lee's 
most outstanding years in the paper 
business. 



Associate Editor 
Ted Gray 



148 




COLUMNISTS: 



Janice Cundiff 
Glenda Griffin 
Cornelio Castclo 
Donna Philips 
Cameron Smith 
Harold Bare 



■■■■■ 

'••ill 




itril '■"•"" i - " *"~ ^ ■ ■■ . ■.-^■■'■;-f''/y a 




BUSINESS STAFF: 

Twila Rowland 
Sandie Green 
Joe Collins 



Christine Alton 
June Wilson 
Ashley Smith 
Barbara Wyatt 
Harold Bare 



EDITORS: 



REPORTERS: 




Alice Adams 
Linda Wrinkle 
Ruby Hall 
Gloria Rosman 
Sandra Walker 
Lala Jean Baggett 
Sheldon Vik 
Mary Harless 
Tony Akins 
Glandon Broome 
Ronnie Brock 
Lee Dixon 
Donnie Hargravcs 
Steve Conn 





MISS SERETHA ANN DEAN 
Editor 



Vindapa 



THE PRIME objective of Lee 
College yearbook staff is to 
reflect accurately and force- 
fully the ideals and distinctives of 
our school. With this end in mind, 
the 1964 VINDAGUA staff has 
worked to present a permanent record 
of trends and events in Lee's way of 
life during the '63-'64 academic year. 



Miss Seretha Dean, a junior college 
senior from Easton, Maryland, has 
spearheaded VINDAGUA activity this 
year. Working under the direction of 
the sponsors, Mrs. McCall and Mrs. 
Beach, Miss Dean has provided the 
high caliber leadership which is neces- 
sary to direct the talents and energies 
of a score of busy collegians. 



150 



DR. ROBERT JOHNSON 
Co-sponsor 

MRS. LOIS BEACH 
Technical Advisor 

MRS. MARY E. McCALL 
Sponsor 

MR. MARVIN GOLDEN 
Business Consultant 




MANCEL HARREL 
GERSTMAN, 
Business Manager 



-s®&* 






FROM THE TIME that the 
first picture is shot in Septem- 
ber until the last line of copy 
is written in April, the story of the mak- 
ing of the yearbook is a story of produc- 
tion under pressure. Awareness of the 
tremendous precedent of excellence set 
by last year's annual has increased the 
normal strain of VINDAGUA produc- 
tion; and the '64 staff has worked to 
maintain the standard of progressive im- 
provement which has become a Lee Col- 
lege trademark. This year, as always, 
faculty sponsors have carried the brunt 
of the responsibility; with the present 
combination of Mrs. Beach, Mrs. McCall, 
Mr. Golden, and Mr. Johnson's touch, 
we trust that this book will prove to be 
one of the best in recent years. 



Staff 



J. B. DOUGLAS 
LeROY, Associate 
Editor 





CHARLES PAUL 
CONN, Associate 
Editor 



Thorough planning by staff makes easier assimilation of 
the final product. Here staff members Dennis McGuire, 
Carolyn Lytle, Judy Young and Max Gerstman pool ideas. 




151 






GERALD MULLINS 

Class Editor 



CHRISTINE ALTON 
Academic Life 



CAROLYN LYTLE 

Organizations 



■ y^ ■■■■■■■-■■■ .■■■■'••■■. 





ANN WILSON 
Class Editor 



SANDRA WALKER 

Class Editor 



LARRY PETTY 

Class Editor 



152 



_ 






RICHARD BOWEN 
Academy Editor 



LINDA BUTLER 

Features 















^~J 



JUDY YOUNG 
Features 



NEVA KERLEY 
Index Editor 



MARY HARLESS 
Secretary to the Editor 




CAROLYN ALDRICH 

Athletics 



EARL ROWAN 

Athletics 






KATHY HUCKLEBRIDGE 
Campus Life 




154 





OTIS MILLER 
Business Staff 









DENNIS McGUIRE 




GLENDA GRIFFIN 


■:1 

■■■. ;-\i ; : 


Business Staff 


ALICE ADAMS 


Campus Life 




J^^*** r?A 


Artist 


MYRNA PETTYJOHN 








Business Staff 




^ — M Sn 



■ 




AS A CHRISTIAN SCHOOL, one of the primary 
divisions of the college is the Christian Service 
Department. Its function is to provide every student 
with ample opportunity to use on the field what he has 
learned in the classroom. The training process is designed 
to encourage every student to get as broad and as varied 
an experience as possible. It is the philosophy of the Chris- 
tian Service Department that the interested and well-trained 
students have abundant experiences in personal contact wit- 
nessing, in the art of group cooperation, in thorough "be- 
hind-the-scenes" planning of a multiplicity of Christian youth 
activities, in the carrying of vital responsibilities, in varied 
roles of leadership, and in the training of other Christians, 
young and old, in the complex work of winning souls to 
the Lord and in maturing them to full spiritual growth. 

The main purpose of the department is to teach Christians 
how to witness. On weekends, holidays, and during the 
summers, witness teams are sent throughout the United 
States and to foreign countries to witness for Christ. Students 
strengthen weak churches and start new ones through the 
training which the Christian Service Department has as- 
signed them. The members of the department are in hopes 
of covering 100,000 homes during 1964. Their main goal 
is to encourage and train Christian young people to win 
souls for Christ through person-to-person contact. 



Christian 

Service 
Department 



On the spot training is a vital principle in the training offered by the Christian Service 
Department. Carroll Everhart, left, and Ed McGhee, right, make a call in a local home. 






OFFICERS: 

First Vice-President . . RAY SANDERS 
Second Vice-President . DOUG LeROY 
Sponsor .... GERALD JOHNSON 
President .... JOHN LOMBARD 
Sponsor .... PEGGY HUMPHREY 
Follow-up Secretary JEAN HAMPTON 

Treasurer TERESA PETERS 

Secretary . . . WANDA BLACKABY 



Pioneers for Christ 



PIONEERS FOR Christ ex- 
ists to train young men and 
women to become effective 
witnesses for Christ regardless of the 
profession they enter. The motivating 
philosophy of PFC is that the public 
school teacher, the born-again banker, 
and the minister must all tell the lost 
about Jesus Christ. 

From an embryonic beginning in 
the spring of 195 7, Pioneers for 
Christ has grown in size and outreach. 
The youths take the gospel to the 
rich and the poor alike, thus gaining 
experience that will benefit them as 
they carry the gospel around the 
world. 

156 




THE AIM OF THE Mission Club is to 
promote the cause of missions both on 
our campus and in surrounding areas. 
Likewise, through the weekly prayer meetings 
conducted on Wednesday and Thursday, it in- 
fluences the work of the church throughout 
the world. 

Last summer, two representatives of the club 
visited Jamaica. There they supervised a Va- 
cation Bible School, spent much time in visita- 
tion, and conducted evangelistic services. 

Because of the destruction left by a hurricane 
last fall, Haitian Christians were in desperate 
need. Realizing their condition, the Mission Club 
gathered relief funds by visiting churches in 
Florida and North Carolina. Through their ef- 
fort, they collected and sent aid in the amount 
of two hundred thirty-two dollars and sixty- 
six cents. 

The Mission Club sends a monetary gift to 
our missionaries every Christmas. This year it 
sent, through the Mission Board, a total of three 
hundred and sixty dollars. Approximately one- 
third of this was raised in a mission service 
held in the school auditorium. 

This year the activities of the Mission Club 
also included paying tuition for one foreign 
student and securing mission books for the li- 
brary, two services which well exemplify the 
success of this group in promoting missions at 
Lee College. 




Missions Club 




President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 



. . ROBERT ORR 

MICHIKO TERAMOTO 

. SHIRLEY OGDEN 



Vice-President . JOHANNES BADENHORST 



157 



EVERY MINISTER'S wife has a vital part 
to play in her husband's work. Knowing 
this, the members of Ministerial Wives 
Club seek mutual help in preparing for their 
important role. They desire to serve nobly and 
well. 

In the monthly meetings on campus, this 
group receives practical and inspirational help. 
Experienced speakers and teachers bring them 
counsel and instruction concerning a minister's 
wife's privileges and duties. Members are en- 
couraged to be versatile women of God, who 
adorn the gospel of Jesus Christ. 

Recognizing the sacredness of her husband's 
calling, each young woman strives toward a 
high and worthy goal: to be the wife and helper 
her husband needs, to be the mother her chil- 
dren need, and to make the home they all need. 

OFFICERS: 

President JOYCE LANE 

Secretary . CAROLYN HOLLINGSWORTH 
Vice-President . CAROLYN CHAMBERS 





Ministerial 

fives 

Club 



OFFICERS: 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

President 




■ 



LEE COLLEGE STUDENTS who are studying for 
a lifetime in full-time Christian service find col- 
leagues of comniv. interests in the Ministerial Club. 
This campus group serves to provide practical religious 
training while at Lee. Members of the club act as pastors, 
assistant pastors, choir leaders, and Christian education di- 
rectors in many churches in the Cleveland area. 

Following the example of apostolic witnesses, Ministerial 
Club members visit churches to conduct door-to-door visita- 
tion programs. This year's activity took them into several 
states, with teams going to Indiana during October and 
various points in the Northwest during spring vacation. 



159 



1 
J 









m 






The tradition of the college is the heritage of the Academy. This ha- 
ven for young people provides the necessary training to meet the com- 
plexities that involve maintaining a tradition. Their activities and studies 
give them courage and boldness to face their examination of life. Growth 
is sure to continue, for our school's future is given to these competent 
and worthy students. 



0£» 



THE PHILOSOPHY of Lee Academy is 
that God has a plan for every life and 
has equipped every life for a great 
career and a great destiny. Lee helps Church of 
God teen-agers in their quest for these great 
careers and destinies. 

The classroom prepares students for various 
professions. From these classrooms will go mis- 
sionaries, ministers, teachers, journalists, doctors, 
and lawyers. Opportunities are offered for the 
student to build a strong body, a strong char- 
acter, and a cooperative spirit through sports, 
music, and art. 

Dormitory and campus life offers opportunities 
for development. Not only do students learn 
how to make a living, but they also learn how 
to live. 

The religious clubs, prayer meetings, and 
chapel services help the young person find di- 
rection for his life. Philosophies and ideals are 
built which mold the religious experience and 
character of the teen-ager. 




Mr. Hubert Block, principal. 




LIFE IS 



■ ■ 




Harrowing 






Rewarding 



Fulfilling 



163 




THE HIGHEST ELECTED honor that 
can be received by a student at Lee 
Academy is to be chosen Mr. or Miss 
Lee Academy. This title is characterized by the 
following requirements: credits sufficient for sen- 
ior status; grades of at least average quality; and 
persons recognized for their achievements and 
contributions to Academy life. 

Linda Kay Rose, Miss Lee Academy of 1964, 
receives her diploma from the Academy this 
spring. After graduation she plans to continue 
her educational program at Lee College. 

Mr. Lee Academy, Richard Bowen, graduates 
this spring from the Academy. Mr. Bowen plans 
to enter the ministry after receiving his college 
degree. 

These young people have accepted their honors 
with the accompanying responsibility. Their 
worthy precedents in Christian leadership, school 
loyalty and spirit are indicative of their high 
character. 





164 



Mr. and Miss Lee Academy 




165 







Charles Tilley 
Penny Blevins 



. 



1 


f w ' 




It'.-.- 


■ 


x 




' 




si 


1 

1 

• .1 


Personal 


111 


1? 



■VMMN9IP 




Thomas Tioaquen 



Suzanne Vance 




MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED 



167 




Barbara Owens 



Ray Hughes, Jr. 




t 




168 




Academy 

Beauties 



MARTI INGSTROM 





SUE MURPHY 



IT IS NOT OFTEN that a new- 
program is instituted, but this year 
is an exception. Within the Acad- 
emy, there was a need for recognition of 
outstanding beauties to be added to the 
list of Academy superlatives. 

Chosen for this recognition were three 
lovely, friendly and charming young ladies. 
Their outstanding traits make them worthy 
recipients of this honor. 



GAYNELL McNALLEY 



169 






These people are the students who 
are the character of Lee Academy. 
The sophisticated seniors, who make 
the most of their last year, seem to 
be eager to be gone but sad at the 
thought of leaving. 



JOHNNY JOHNSON 
Vice-President 

RENEE STINE 

Secretary 

GAYNELL McNALLEY 

Treasurer 

SANDRA MULLINAX 
President 



Academy 



Smart alecks! 




NANCY SUE ABNEY, Atlanta, Georgia 

BRENDA ELAINE ANDERSON, Savannah, Georgia 
ROBERT AYERS, Prichard, Alabama 



LAWRENCE EUGENE BARTHOLF, Jacksonville, Florida 
HARRY BEGAY, Mentmore, New Mexico 
PENNY BLEVINS, Biggs, Kentucky 



SHARON LEE BRODIE, Seaford, Delaware 
HERBERT BRUMMETT, Cleveland, Tennessee 
RONNIE ELMORE CARVER, Albany, Georgia 



Seniors 



SHIRLEY KAYE CLEVENGER, Detroit, Michigan 
ELLEN ANDREA CREGGER, Manassas, Virginia 
LINDA ANN DAWSON, Section, Alabama 



RICHARD HAROLD ELLIS, Fontana, California 
ALPHA FARABEE, Riviera Beach, Florida 
LARRY FORD, Miamisburg, Ohio 



CONNIE JUNE GADDY, Decatur, Georgia 
ARNOLD RAY GARNER, Pinson, Alabama 

EDDIE GAYLOR GILLETTE, Jacksonville, Florida 





JOHNNY GRAY, Jacksonville, Florida 

EVELAND MARIE HAMBRIGHT, Hartwell, Georgia 
LAVETTA ANN HAMMONTREE, Jacksonville, Fla. 



RONDA P. HAMMONTREE, Jacksonville, Florida 
FLORA PAULETTE HARMON, Massillon, Ohio 
DELBERT HASTINGS, Laurel, Delaware 



VIRGINIA KAYLENE HAWKINS, New Cumberland, W. Va. 
DeROSA HODGES, Wadesboro, North Carolina 

JAMES ROBERT HOLDMAN, Cleveland, Tennessee 



RAY H. HUGHES, JR., Cleveland, Tennessee 
JOHN THOMAS JOHNSON, Arcadia, Florida 

PHYLLIS JENENE MANSFIELD, Ravenna, Kentucky 



MARY DIANE McGRATH, Marietta, Georgia 
GAYNELL McNALLEY, Falkville, Alabama 

SANDRA KAYE MULLINAX, Cleveland, Tennessee 



MAUREEN SUE MURPHY, Orlando, Florida 
REBECCA ANN NIX, Birmingham, Alabama 
CARRIE ANNETTE ODOM, Savannah, Georgia 



DONNA DEIDRE PHILLIPS, Arab, Alabama 
MOZEL PLYMALE, Phyllis, Kentucky 
LINDA KAY ROSE, Middletown, Ohio 



SHIRLEY SHORT, Lockport, Illinois 

PAUL EDWARD SIMPSON, West Palm Beach, Florida 
LARRY ARDEN STANFIELD, Cleveland, Tennessee 



RENEE STINE, St. Louis, Illinois 

RONALD CLYDE STINSON, San Jose, California 
HANNA SUE TACKETT, . Biggs, Kentucky 



ANNIE LAURA THORNE, Selma, North Carolina 
CHARLES LeVERN TILLEY, Knoxville, Tennessee 
THOMAS AURELIO TIOAGUEN, Suffolk, Virginia 



LINDA SUZANNA VANCE, Ada, Oklahoma 

RICHARD TERRY VAUGHN, Saluda, North Carolina 
DWAYNE WALKER, Cleveland, Tennessee 




ARTHUR LAVON WEST, Cocoa, Florida 

RONNIE WAYNE WILLIS, Cleveland, Tennessee 
WALTER YEARY, Richmondale, Ohio 









RICHARD BOWEN 
President 

RICKY POWELL 

Vice-President 

DIANE WALKER 

Secretary 



These people are the students who are 
the character of Lee Academy. The hope- 
ful juniors, become ever more confident, 
gain more successes, and are aware that 
they must fill the role of seniors next year; 
the halting yet impatient sophomores, whose 
capabilities are not yet known, will soon 
be put to the test as they take their place 
in Lee Academy. 



Academy Juniors - 



That's history? 




174 



ANTHONY AKINS, Lincoln Park, Michigan 
BRENDA AKINS, Cleveland, Tennessee 

RICHARD BOWEN, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
PATRICIA BOYLE, Akron, Ohio 



JAMES EDWARD BRUMMETT, Cleveland, Tennessee 
PHYLLIS JUNE BRUMMETT, Cleveland, Tennessee 
JANICE MARYLIN CARTER, Gadsden, Alabama 
ARTHUR T. CHURCH, Fostoria, Ohio 



GORDON DEAN GILBERT, Mineral Wells, Texas 
JUNE HENDRIX, Stonewall, Oklahoma 

HUGO RUDOLFO MATTA, Central America 

RONALD DALE McDONALD, Bridgeton, New Jersey 



RICHARD DENNIS POWELL, Lake City, Florida 
REBECCA WYATT, Baltimore, Maryland 

BOBBY BOYD WILLIAMS, Cleveland, Tennessee 



Sophomores 



DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM, Wewahitchka, Florida 
FERMIN MAGDIEL CHANG, Tequcigalpa, Honduras 
JAMES PAUL DENNIS, Pulaski, Virginia 
JAMES C. GRAHAM, Cleveland, Tennessee 



MIKE STEVEN HOUSEHOLDER, Davenport, Illinois 
LINWOOD ERNEST JACOBS, Los Angeles, California 
BARBARA JEAN OWEN, Bowling Green, Kentucky 
DEWAYNE PAYNE, Cleveland, Tennessee 



WILLIAM THOMAS SCRUGGS, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
LELAND TROY STAPP, Cleveland, Tennessee 

JEAN CARROLL STOCKSDALE, Plant City, Florida 
JEROME TAYLOR SWAN, Philadelphia, Pa. 



DALE JOSEPH WALKER, Cleveland, Tennessee 
DIANE WALKER, Cleveland, Tennessee 




175 




Beta Club 



LET US LEAD BY Serving Oth- 
ers" is the motto of the Lee 
Academy Beta Club, an organ- 
ization for academically superior high 
school students. 

The good high school student spends 
hours of mental anguish as he strives 
to obtain that coveted diploma. It is the 
purpose of the Beta Club to encourage, 
to reward merit, to promote those quali- 
ties and actions which make for good 
citizenship in the school community, and 
to assist students as they strive toward 
graduation. 

Under the leadership of the officers, 
who participated in activities to improve 
the general school program and to create 
a better school environment are Ray 
Hughes, Jr., president; Mozel Plymale, 
vice-president; Renee Stine, secretary; 
Gaynell McNalley, treasurer; and Mr. 
Honette Echols, sponsor of the Beta 
Club. 




176 



Academy Choir 





■full 



WHETHER IN PRACTICE or per- 
formance the Academy Choir sings 
with the zeal of true music lovers, 
who have dedicated their talents to the service 
of God and to their fellowman. 

Mr. Honette Echols and the Academy Choir 
have stimulated the hearts of the student body 
through their spirit-motivated singing. 

Participation in chapel services, the spring 
revival, and the Fall Music Festival have given 
the choir opportunity to demonstrate its great 
potential in song. 

Striving toward a higher goal of communicat- 
ing messages in song, the Academy Choir prac- 
tices five days a week. 



177 




Tigers 

In 

Action 



A GOOD WAY TO express the 
1964 basketball season of the 
Lee Academy Tigers would be: 
excitement, hustle, and enthusiasm. The 
Tigers, who won ten games in a row, kept 
their fans buzzing and their sneakers red 
hot as they played a fast brand of basket- 
ball. Second semester, they received a "shot 
in the arm" as 6'3" Ray Bennett joined 
the squad. Along with Bennett, Robert 
Ayres, Charles Tilley, Ronnie Carver, and 
Ray Hughes, Jr., the Academy had a well- 
balanced scoring attack. 



Ray burns two point's. 





Stonding: Co-captain Charles Tilley, Ray Garner, Ray Bennett, 
Ronald McDonald, co-captain Ray Hughes, Jr. 

Second Row: Larry Ford, Richard Ellis, Johnny Johnson 



Don't just stand there 





Coach Dale R. Hughes 



THE TIGERS WERE at their peak when 
they downed the local Y.M.C.A. team, 65-60, 
with Robert Ayres, cleaning both backboards, 
Charles Tilley, playing outstanding defense, and Ron- 
nie Carver and Ray Hughes, Jr., playing havoc with 
the Y.M.C.A.'s defense with their uncanny long shots. 

Other outstanding games include: Three victories 
over our arch rivals, the Sevierville Hornets, all three 
games included a margin of six points. Mt. Olive, 
Charleston, Sparta, and the Erdmon Street All-Stars 
(twice) were other victims who fell at the hands of 
the Lee Academy Tigers. 



179 





Try to block that one. 



What's wrong, Gay? 



Cheerleaders 



AN INTEGRAL PART of varsity ath- 
letics at Lee Academy is the crowd 
spirit, kept high by the prodding of 
the cheerleaders. With their unique cheers and 
yells, they kept the fans screaming with en- 
thusiasm throughout the season. The squad, 
chosen by the Tiger team, practiced long and 
hard to develop their crowd-pleasing routines. 



Spur Tiger Advances 






Marti Ingstrom, Captain Gaynell MeNalley, Diane Walker, Janice Carter, Sue Murphy 




180 




Let's go. Tigers! We want some action. 




Two coaches are better than one. 




Tigers leave for another trip. 



181 



Versatile Staff Performs A Multitude of Duties 



THE DEPENDABILITY of our 
staff is of great worth to the 
college student in his pursuit 
of an education. His attitudes can be 
influenced, his needs fulfilled, and his 
behavior molded by the example of those 
who function in staff capacities. 

The cafeteria staff strives daily to 
improve service; the maintenance de- 
partment has served beyond the call of 
duty; the dormitory supervisors are our 
parents away from home. Our staff mem- 
bers are the answer to our problems, and 
we are proud to salute them. 





BETTY BALDREE ANDREW BENKER ULNA BLACK 

PBX Switchboard Operator Policeman Bookkeeper 




MARY BLALOCK 

Secretary to Registrar 



ELDRON BOEHMER SYBIL BUTLER 

Maintenance Secretary to Bursar 



EVALINE ECHOLS LOVENA FAULKNER 

Secretary to President Dormitory 




ROY FAULKNER 
Dormitory 



NORA GOINS 

Dormitory 



GRACE GOLDEN 
Postmistress 



CHARLES GRAHAM 

Supervisor of Maintenance 



GRACE GREEN 

Cafeteria 



182 




WANDA GRIFFITH 
Secretary to Registrar 



CLEONE McLAIN 
Assistant Librarian 



EFFIE PARKER 
Nurse 



LORENA HATHCOCK 

Supervisor of Women's 
Residence 



GRADY HURST 
Cafeteria 



MOQUITA HURST 

Assistant Librarian 



LETHA JOHNSON 

Cafeteria 




ALEAN MILLER 
Supervisor of Women's 
Residence 



POLLY MILLER 

Bookkeeper 



NELL MUNCY 
Cafeteria 



ROLLE MUNCY 

Cafeteria Supervisor 




ARTHUR PRESSLEY 

Maintenance 



MARY RATHKE 

Cafeteria 



BETTIE RUSHING 
Snack Shop 



OTIS RUSHING 
Snack Shop Supervisor 




BEATRICE RUTLEDGE TRUDALE SHELTON 
Cafeteria Assistant Librarian 



DELLA SCOGGINS 
Cafeteria 



MARY LOU WILES B. H. WILLIAMS 

Supervisor of Women's Supervisor of Men's 
Residence Residence 



183 



Standing 

Fred Watson 
Thomas Varughesc 
Jimmy Walker 
Larry Presswood 
Tommy Thompson 
Lon Rigney 
Robert Williams 

Seated 

Gail Smith 
Paula Presswood 
Sharon Statts 
Faith Kenton 




Second Semester Students 




Standing 

Grannis Fowler 
Gordon T. French 
Kelly Grissom 
Dorsey Scruggs 
Pat Henderson 

Seated 

Dale Denham 
Raymond Eller 
Ronald Evans 
Winona Flowers 



184 




Standing 

Kyle Hudson 
Ronald Reagan 
Delbert Rose 

Seated 

Joyce Moore 
Carolyn Palmertree 



Standing 

James Daniels 
Walter Daughdrill 
Noble Byrd, Jr. 
Larry Busby 
Gerald Bailey 
Davis Usser 



Seated 

Gladys Boyles 
Carolyn Clark 
Sandie Cole 
Mary Brower 





Standing 

Dwayne McLuhan 
Jerry Miller 
Jerry Moore 

Seated 

Daniel Huff 
Gwyndolyn Keith 
Joe McCoy 



18=5 






A tradition is the result of a cooperative effort. The idea that the 
past is, can, and must be the foundation and guide for future progress 
underlies this concept. Through the years industrial firms, business 
establishments, churches, ministers and friends have assisted this ef- 
fort. We acknowledge them here, for they have sponsored this tradition. 



On the grow 
with Cleveland. 

Brown Stove Works is proud to 
be in Cleveland. . . proud to be 
able to offer job opportunities... 
participate and contribute to the 
growth of the community. 
Our plant expansion best sym- 
bolizes our growth and future 
here in Cleveland. . . where prog- 
ress is a way of life. 




7Z< 



mi 



m 




t 



PRINTERS OF THE 



1964 



VINDAGUA 




CHURCH OF GOD 

PUBLISHING HOUSE 

PATHWAY PRESS 

TENNESSEE MUSIC AND PRINTING COMPANY 

MONTGOMERY AVENUE 
CLEVELAND, TENN. 




189 



■■■■■:.■ 



■ 





MILLER'S INC 

One of the South's Great Stores 

Village Shopping Center 

'Where Lee College Students Are Always Welcome' 



THE HOBBY MART 

Photographic and Hobby Craft Supplies 

17 Broad Street, N.W. 
Phone: 472-6461 



Compliments of 



CLEVELAND CHAIR COMPANY 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



; 



l 



MARIE'S 

Flowers and Gifts 

390 Church Street, N.E. 
Phone: 476-5591 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



CLEVELAND BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 

Complete Banking Facilities 

Use our West Inman Street Branch for convenient Drive-in Facilities. 
Member FDIC 



TIP TOP 




FOOD TOWN 



Compliments of 



i^leueland / laturat Ljad L^i 



CLEAN 



FAST 



ompanu 



ECONOMICAL 



423 North Ocoee Street 
Phone: 472-4531 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



u 



CLEVELAND 

LINCOLN - MERCURY CO., INC. 

550 First St., N.W. 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



v 



Compliments of 

S. S. KRESGE COMPANY 

Cleveland's Newest and Largest 
Variety Store 



Village Shopping Center 



Compliments of 



FIKE FUNERAL HOME 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



ABEL'S 

Two locations to serve you 

"On the Square" 
Hardware and Furniture 
Westinghouse Appliances 

Phone: 476-5531 



5 Points 

Sporting Goods 

Hardware and Paint 



Phone: 476-5535 



California 




State Council (L to R, Back Row) — F. D. Black, Jack 
Hale, Doyle Zachary, A. J. Allen, Doyle McCoy, Lemuel 
Johnson, C. M. Taylor. Seated L to R: James Cooper, 
Floyd Timmerman, Carl Green. 




STUDENTS FROM THE "GOLDEN" STATE 



192 



VILLAGE CAFETERIA 




t 



MM 



CLEVELAND NATIONAL BAM 



Established 1886 

Federal Reserve System 

Member Federal Reserve Deposit Insurance Corporation 

THE VILLAGE BRANCH 

VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER 

HIWASSEE BRANCH 

CHARLESTON, TENNESSEE 



193 



C. C. CARD 
AUTO COMPANY, INC. 




Ford Sales and Service 
Phone: 472-5454 

717 South Lee Highway 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



PARKS - BELK COMPANY 

Clothing for the Entire Family 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




Bradley County's 

Largest Dealer in Real Estate 

F.H.A., V.A. and CONVENTIONAL LOANS 

i^lterohee rJLana C-o. ? ^rnc. 

South Lee Highway (Opposite Kile Motor Co.) 

Phone 472-1571 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



Compliments of 

APLER SHOE STORE 

Serving Cleveland for 25 years 

280 Ocoee Street 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




CLEVELAND ELECTRIC SYSTEM 



194 








State Overseer 
H. D. Sustar 



Three Convenient Locations 

Main Office — Ocoee Street 

Drive-in Branch— 191 Church Street, N.E. 

Drive-in Branch — North Ocoee and 25th Street 

MEMBER of FDIC 



Best Wishes to the Students and Faculty of Lee College from 
the STATE OFFICE AND CHURCHES OF GOD IN KANSAS. 



State Youth Director 
Charles R. Sustar 











JrL'A 1 ft 

m 

B 


RF 


^m 


K^ 


ts w3S 


B' 






'\ 




^ 








■<W( 


wKr k* 



Compliments of 



CLEVELAND'S MEN SHOP 



The Best Place to Buy 
Your Campus Wear 



Compliments of 

COOKE'S FOOD STORE 

Free Parking 
20 Broad, S.W. 



Compliments of 

CALLAWAY GROCERY 

Fourth Generation of Serving 
Cleveland and Bradley County 

CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 





J. H. Hughes 
Stale Overseer 



W. A. (Dick) Davis 
State Youth Director 




STUDENTS FROM THE "GRAND CANYON" STATE 






Twila Rowland 



Dale Hughes 



Sandra Fraley 



196 



KENTUCKY 





T. L. Forester 
State Overseer 



Elmer Whalen 
State Secretary-Treasurer 




W. C. Mauldin 
State Youth Director 




J. H. Chamberlain 




J. C. Dudley 




R. E. Worley 




R. Gabbard 



C. Horn 



J. K. Barrineau 



197 




Collins Manufacturing Co. Sales, Inc* 



Collins Comfort Rockers & Recliners 



CLEVELAND, TENN. 





Compliments of 






MARGARET'S HOUSE OF FASHION 




For the Best in School Supplies 


Smart Clothes for 


Compliments of 


COOPER'S BOOK STORE 


Juniors, Misses, and half-sizes 


LAWSON'S FASHION CENTER 


Phone: 472-2831 


Nationally Advertised Lines 


150 Ocoee Street 




Village Shopping Center 


CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




Phone: 472-2616 


Home of Nationally Advertized Merchandise 




198 



BAILEY MUSIC CO. 

Musician's Headquarters 

619 Cherry Street 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 




vP^ 



a\s*o' 



,c coo 



*\«5» 



P'S 




^5^ 



cakes and cookies 

BISHOP BAKING CO. 



BOX 69. CLEVELAND. TENN 



Compliments of 



EDWARD'S 
BEAUTY SHOP 



Compliments of 



COUNTRY KITCHEN 



All you can eat for one dollar 




ESTEL D. MOORE 
State Overseer 





ROBERT VANCE 
State Youth Director 



STUDENT'S FROM THE "KEYSTONE" STATE 



^ ^m 




199 






John Smith 
State Overseer 




Paul Henson 
State Youth Director 




C. M. Jinkerson 
State Overseer 




OUR BEST WISHES 

TO A GREAT 

COLLEGE 





l Wendell Smith 

State Youth Director 



State Council: Kramer, Harrawood, Heron, Guynn, Jones, 
Golden and May 



200 





Paul L. Walker, Pastor 



Bob Lyons, Christian Ed. Director 



HEMPHILL CHURCH OF GOD 



CONGRATULATIONS, CLASS OF 1963-'64 




Church Council 

A. E. Burell 
Clyde Cole 
W. R. Duvall 
Dewey S. Graham 
Lynwood A. Maddox 
Lacy D. Powell 

Ruth Holt, Church Secretary 



Bill Prather 

J. W. Rickerson 

James Rogers 

Dr. Charles Thompson 

Mark Waldrop 

G. Lee Watson 



201 




P. H. McCorn 
State Overseer 



WEST VIRGINIA 



••4 *«*4« : }, 

I 
■ 

1 II 4 ^^ 









Si 111? A:^, Jsfeti .,i||v- "i|II^I^Silll|i 



Russell Brinson 
State Youth Director 



STUDENTS FROM THE "PANHANDLE" STATE 





STUDENTS FROM THE "PELICAN" STATE 



A. V. Beaube 
State Overseer 





Floyd D. Carey, Jr. 
State Youth Director 



202 




.. ? 








H. B. Ramsey 
State Overseer 



STUDENTS FROM THE "CRACKER" STATE 




GEORGIA STATE COUNCIL 




Wallace Swilley, Jr. 
State Youth Director 



FRONT ROW: Reading L. to R. — W. J. Cothern, J. D. Bright, 
H. B. Ramsey, J. Frank Spivey, Leon Phillips 



BACK ROW: Reading L. to R. — C. N. Bolt, Jim 0. McCain, Hubert 
S. Norris, Clarence Busby, P. H. Hammond, LeRoy Carver 



203 



Compliments of 



! CLEVELAND MILLING COMPANY 



Quality Flours 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



WHITE WING GIFT AND BOOK CENTER 

Gift and books for all occasions 

475 Central Avenue, N.E. 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



Congratulations from 




to the class of '63 



i 






V^:x, ':::': 






The Joe Bailey Family 




The H. L. Rose Family 



STUDENTS FROM THE "LAND OF OPPORTUNITY' 



204 








H. R. Morehead 
State Overseer 




STUDENTS FROM THE "YELLOWHAMMER" STATE 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1963-'64 
FROM ALABAMA 



C. R. Guiles 
State Youth Director 




205 



THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 




YOUTH DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



CHURCH OF COD 



CECIL B. KNIGHT 
NATIONAL DIRECTOR 



DONALD S. AULTMAN 
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 




PAUL L. WALKER 



PAUL HENSON THOMAS GRASSANO HASKEL JENKINS 




J. MARTIN BALDREE, JR. 



L. W. MclNTYRE 



CLYNE BUXTON 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

CliuKcri of Lioa 

WORLD MISSIONS 








These are the people behind the scenes who endeavor to promote the 
Church of God World Missions' cause. 



Alice Josephsen, Publications Secretary — I believe in missions. 

Annette Burt, Department Bookkeeper — Missions is a daily matter. 

Ernestine McGhee, Correspondence Secretary — Every heart without Christ is a mission op- 
portunity. 

Ruth Greene, Secretary and Native Evangelism Clerk — I am my brother's keeper. 

Helen McMullen, Department Secretary — The field is the world. 

Donald D. Rowe, Office Administrator — "Go ye" means you! 



207 






Mrs. Ruth Pettyjohn, Pathway Book Store, Cleveland, Tennessee 



gg|p§: 






W. J. Cothern, Jr., Pathway Book Store, Charlotte, North Carolina 




Mrs. Grace Caldwell, Pathway Book Store, Atlanta 3, Georgia 




Lewis Peeler, Pathway Book Store, Chattanooga, Tennessee 



R. C. Kinnison, Pathway Book Store, Akron, Ohio 





J. A. Lindsay 
Pathway Book Store 
Tampa, Florida 



208 



GRIFFITH CYCLE SHOP 

Harley-Davidson Motorcycles 

Clinton and Briggs & Stratton 
Engines 

94 Church Street, S.E. 

Phone: 472-5551 




FRANK'S ESSO SERVICE 

South Lee Highway and Broad Street 
Phone: 472-5521 



MOORE 
FIVE POINT 
MEDICAL CENTER 
PHARMACIES 

On the Square, Five Point, North Occee 
Where You Are Always Welcome 



Phone 
Phone 
Phone 



472-4538 
476-6521 
476-5547 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



Compliments of 

CHEROKEE HOTEL 

Ocoee and Inman Streets 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




SUPERIOR CASH MARKET 

240 Central Avenue, N.E. 

Phone: 472-6595 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



tmmM'M wsmiBm 



Compliments of 

ZALE'S JEWELRY 

Village Shopping Center 




LOOKOUT 
SPORTING GOODS COMPANY 

Specialists in Sports 

723 Cherry Street 

Phone: AM 5-3464 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



,,413-Sf 



lllllSlifi- 






Compliments of 



Penney's 



A L W AT 5 F ) R S T QUA I IT Y ! 



Always First Quality 



Cleveland's Family Department Store 



GOODYEAR SERVICE STORES 



Phone: 472-4501 



1st and Broad St. 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 

General Electric and RCA 

Appliances and Televisions 

Low as $5 down and $5 a month 



Compliments of 

HOLIDAY HILL RESTAURANT 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 

Telephone 
472-6291 

Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Hyde 
Owners and operators 



Compliments of 

TENNESSEE TRAILWAYS 



* 




Go Trailways 

Charter Bus Service 

Educational 

Exciting 
Economical 

Fast Frequent Daily Stops 

Tennessee Trailways, Inc. 

710 Sevier Avenue 

Phone: 525-0291 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 




SEAL OF QUALITY 




CUSTOMERS COME FIRST 



Compliments of 



STAR VUE DRIVE-IN 



J, A. Cross 
State Overseer 



FLORIDA 




P. G. Roberts 
State Youth Director 



STUDENTS FROM THE "SUNSHINE" STATE 



■>;•;■:-:■:■;■;■:•;■;•:■■>:■;-:•:■>■■;■:■;■:■■:■; x^:- >■:'■■: 







210 




W. P. Stalling* 
State Overseer 




State Council: Back Row — 0. E. Wright, A. J. Fox, Robert White, 
L. L. Green, Othoe Stegall, Wayne Blackshear 

Front Row, L. to R. — Terrell Taylor, C. R. Collins, W. P. Stallings, 
State Overseer; Travis Porter, State Youth Director, and C. C. Rains 



STUDENTS FROM THE "LONGHORN" STATE 




TEXAS 



Travis Porter 
State Youth Director 




211 




F. W. Goff 
State Overseer 





C. Milton Parsons 
State Youth Director 





Seated, L. to R.: C. Milton Parsons, State Youth Director; 
F. W. Goff, State Overseer 

Standing, L. to R.: Raymond Crowley, T. A. Perkins, H. C. 
Jenkins, B. Paul Jones, H. C. Smith, Perry Horton, E. T. 
Stacey and George Lytle 



STUDENTS FROM THE "BUCKEYE" STATE 

f 








HARDWICK STOVE COMPANY 



+^+-.+ :£i^^^<:+:v>>.> 




■ ■ ■■■■.■ "';-'■ ':::■■;'■'■,■ ■■ ■ ■ 



HARDWICK 
The Nation's Leading Manufacturer of Distinguished Cooking Appliances Since 1879 



Since 1879 



CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 



213 




STUDENTS FROM THE "WOLVERINE" STATE 





L. W. MclNTYRE 
State Overseer 




FRED G. SWANK 
State Youth Director 




RALPH E. DAY 



M. L. LOWE 




STATE COUNCIL 

Seated: D. C. Boatwright, Earl P. Paulk, Kenneth Harvell, W. T. Morefield. 
Standing: John Black, Albert H. Botts, Lloyd Jones, E. J. Davis, E. K. Waldrop, 
R. Leonard Carroll, Calvin Wigley. 




EARL P. PAULK 
State Overseer 



TENNESSEE 



STUDENTS FROM THE "VOLUNTEER" STATE 




LEONARD S. TOWNLEY 
State Youth Director 




215 




Rev. and Mrs. Tommie F. Harper and family 

State Overseer 

Church of God Washington State 



STATE FARM INSURANCE 

MORRIS W. GREENE, Local Agent 

Phone: 476-6505, 67 Ocoee Street 

Cleveland, Tennessee 



CONGRATULATIONS 



Alaska 



COLORADO 



R. T. HILL 
State Overseer 



GALE A. BARNETT 
State Youth Director 





D. C. 




Front Row, L. to R.: Harold L. Chesser, State S. S. and Youth Director, 
W. J. (Bill) Brown, State Overseer and W. H. Dean. 

Second Row, L. to R.: S. E. Jennings, W. E. Tull, R. H. Sumner, A. W. 
Ellington, E. M. Abbott 




STUDENTS FROM "THE LAND OF PLEASANT LIVING" 



216 



D. A. BIGGS 
State Overseer 



SOOTH CAROLINA 



THOMAS GRASSANO 
State Youth Director 




STUDENTS FROM THE "PALMETTO" STATE. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

on your accomplishments 
and best wishes for the future 

from the 
South Carolina State Council 



,17 




"mm^r . «■»' 




Doyle Stanfield 
Pastor 



CHICH OF GOD 
NORTH CLEVELAND 



YOUR CHURCH HOME AWAY FROM HOME. 



YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME HERE. 













TOWN HOUSE BAKE SHOP 

Bakes it Better with Butter 
233 Broad Street 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


HARDWICK'S RETAIL STORE 






Clothes for College 






IVIVIl 41J.IU T» UillCll 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




GEORGE BROOME TERRY E. BEARD 




218 


State Overseer State Youth Director 

MHO 

BEST WISHES FROM THE STATE OVERSEER AND 
MINISTERS OF IDAHO 







H. D. WILLIAMS 
State Overseer 



ROBERT HART 
State Youth Director 




STUDENTS FROM THE "TARHEEL" STATE 



219 




DAVID LEMONS 
State Overseer 



STUDENTS FROM THE "HOOSIER" STATE 






REG. U. S. PAT, OFF. 



Holiday Inn 



BANQUET AND MEETING ROOM FACILITIES 
100 MODERN ROOMS 
SEATING CAPACITY 500 



Phone 472-1504 



220 



' 








STUDENTS FROM THE "OLD DOMINION" STATE 




SEATED: Frank Lemons; James A. Stephens, Overseer; Hoyt E. Stone, Youth Director 
STANDING: S. H. Landreth, C. W. Collins, Wayne Briggs, Paul Eure, T. 0. Dennis, 
S. B. McCane, M. S. Home 



221 




Roya 




own 




ROYAL CROWN BOTTLING CO. 

509 EAST MAIN STREET 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 
Makers of 




ROYAL CROWN COLA, DIET - RITE COLA, NEHI 
BEVERAGES AND UPPER - 10 




"Serving the Church of God — Path- 
way Insurance. Consisting of Pathway 
Mutual Insurance Company and Path- 
way Insurance Agency, Inc., 1250 East 
Hillsboro Avenue, Tampa 4, Florida. 
Complete coverage — fire, home, life. 
'Buy with confidence.' Church of God 
owned — Church of God operated." 



Donnie Shaw, bookkeeper; W. J. Bradshaw, solicitor; Janet Wrenn, file clerk; 
Zeno C. Tharp, Jr., general manager; Norris Bryan, solicitor; Erline Doss, 
agent-underwriter; H. L. Chesser, life agent; Emma Higginbotham, office secretary. 



222 



WISCONSIN - MINNESOTA 



Compliments to those who bear the respon- 
sibility of leadership, to the teaching 
personnel and to the student body of 
LEE COLLEGE 
T. W. Day 
State Overseer 




Get a Steal of a Deal in an Automobile at 

CAPITAL MOTOR SALES 

500 South Lee Highway 

Cleveland, Tennessee 

We sell used cars — not all makes — just the best! 
We are your authorized Triumph dealer 




UPSILON XI FOUNDED IN 1962 ON LEE COLLEGE CAMPUS 

• To encourage service to Lee College. 

• To encourage and reward high scholastic attainment among men. 

• To develop leadership and to promote a sense of Christian fellow- 
ship. 



223 



ADVERTISING HEX 



Abel's Incorporated 194 

Alabama, State of 207 

Alaska, State of 218 

Apler Shoe Store 196 

Arizona, State of 198 

Arkansas, State of 206 

Bailey Music Company 201 

Bishop Baking Company 201 

Brown Stove Works, Incorporated 190 

California, State of 194 

Callaway Grocery 197 

Capitol Motors 225 

C. C. Card Auto Company, Incorporated . . . . 196 

Cherokee Hotel 211 

Cherokee Land Company 196 

Church of God Missions Department 209 

Church of God National Sunday School and 

Youth Department 208 

Church of God Publishing House 191 

Cleveland Bank and Trust 192 

Cleveland Chair Company 192 

Cleveland Electric System 196 

Cleveland Lincoln-Mercury 194 

Cleveland Men's Shop 197 

Cleveland Milling Company 206 

Cleveland National Bank 195 

Cleveland Natural Gas Company 193 

Collins Manufacturing Company 200 

Colorado, State of 218 

Cooke's Food Store 197 

Cooper's Book Store 200 

Country Kitchen 201 

Edward's Beauty Shop 201 

Fike Funeral Home 194 

Florida, State of 212 

Frank's Esso Service Station 211 

Georgia, State of 205 

Goodyear Service Station 211 

Griffith Cycle Shop 211 

Hardwick's Retail Store 220 

Hardwick's Stove Company 215 

Hemphill Avenue Church of God . . . . . . . 203 

Hobby Mart 192 

Holiday Hill Restaurant 211 

Holiday Inn , 222 

Idaho, State of 220 



Illinois, State of 202 

Indiana, State of 222 

Kansas, State of 197 

Kay Daniell Studio 215 

Kentucky, State of 199 

S. S. Kresge Company 194 

Lawson's Fashion Center 200 

Lookout Sporting Goods Company 211 

Louisiana, State of 204 

Magic Chef 200 

Margaret's House of Fashion 200 

Marie's Flowers and Gift Shop 192 

Maryland-Delaware, States of, and Washington, D. C. 218 

Merchants Bank 197 

Michigan, State of 216 

Milieu's 192 

Minnesota-Wisconsin, States of 225 

Mississippi, State of 202 

Moore's and Five Point Pharmacy 211 

North Carolina, State of 221 

North Cleveland Church of God 220 

Ohio, State of 214 

Oklahoma, State of 206 

Parks-Belk Company 196 

Pathway Book Stores 210 

Pathway Insurance Company 224 

J. C. Penney Company 211 

Pennsylvania, State of 201 

Royal Crown Bottling Company 224 

South Carolina, State of 219 

Star-Vue Drive-in 212 

State Farm Insurance 218 

Superior Cash Market 211 

Tennessee, State of 217 

Tennessee Trailways 212 

Texas, State of 213 

Tip Top Food Town 193 

Town House Bake Shop 220 

Upsilon Xi 225 

Village Cafeteria 195 

Virginia, State of 223 

Washington, State of 218 

West Virginia, State of 204 

White Wing Gift and Book Center 206 

F. W. Woolworth's Company 212 

Zale's Jewelry Store 211 



224 



■I 



FACEH- STAFF 



Alford, Delton 70 

Baldree, Betty 184 

Baldree, J. Martin 69 

Beach, Charles 67, 75 

Beach, Lois 73 

Benker, Andrew 184 

Bilbo, James 77 

Black, Hubert 67, 76 

Black, Ulna 184 

Blalock, Mary 184 

Boehmer, Eldron 184 

Bowdle, Donald 69 

Butler, Stanley 66, 76 

Butler, Sybil 184 

Carr, Ruthanna 80 

Chastain, Chalmer 73 

Driggers, Nina 75 

Echols, Evaline 184 

Echols, Honette 77 

Elliott, Lucille 79 

Elliott, Winston 74 

Faulkner, Lavena 184 

Faulkner, Roy 184 

Gause, R. Hollis 67, 68 

Goins, Nora 184 

Golden, Grace 184 

Golden, Marvin 66 

Graham, Charles 184 

Green, Grace 184 

Griffith, Wanda 185 

Harless, Lacy 73 

Hathcock, Lorena 185 

Henry, William 77 

Humphrey, Peggy 74 

Hughes, Dale 80 

Hurst, Grady 185 

Hurst, Moquita 185 



Hurst, Ruby 71 

Johnson, Letha 185 

Johnson, Robert 78 

Jordan, Norman 79 

McCall, Mary Emmaline 79 

McLain, Cleonc 185 

Miller, Mean 185 

Miller, Polly 185 

Miller, Roosevelt 71 

Miller, Oscar 72 

Morris, Mary 70 

Munck, Hal 76 

Myers, Dora 74 

Muncy, Nell 185 

Muncy, Rolle 185 

O'Bannon, Robert 72 

Odom, Beatrice 68 

Odom, Elmer 68 

Palmcrtree, Duran 70 

Parker, Effie 185 

Pressley, Arthur 185 

Rathke, Mary 185 

Rushing, Bettie 185 

Rushing, Otis 185 

Rutledge, Beatrice 185 

Scoggins, Delia 185 

Shelton, Trudale 185 

Stapp, Oneida 75 

Stroud, Georgia 71 

Swiger, Avis 66, 69 

Swiger, Le Moyne 64 

Symes, Helen 72 

Walker, John Herbert 67 

Walker, Lucille "8 

Wiles, Mary Lou 185 

Williams, B. H 185 

Woodard, Kenneth 78 



225 



STUDENT INDEX 



Abney, Nancy Sue, 2249 Wisteria Way, Atlanta, Ga. 171 

Adams, Alice M., 240 N. Campbell, Detroit, Mich. . 100 
Akin, Edwin Earl, 812 N. Second St., 

Brownfield, Texas 90 

Akins, Anthony, 1729 Cleveland St., 

Lincoln Park, Mich 175 

Akins, Brenda Darlene, 1016 Gary St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 175 

Aldrich, Carolyn Annette, 745 N. Buchanan St., 

Arlington, Va 94 

Aldrich, Miriam J., 745 N. Buchanan St., 

Arlington, Va 88 

Alton, Mary Christine, 3337 Fredericksburg Rd., 

San Antonio, Texas 100 

Amick, Aurelia Muriel, Rt. 6, Box 886, Bessemer, Ala. 100 

Amick, Norma Gay, Rt. 6, Box 926, Bessemer, Ala. . 100 
Anderson, Brenda Elaine, 3205 Skidaway Rd., 

Savannah, Ga 171 

Antwine, Cecil Audell, Jr., Rt. 1, Watkinsville, Ga. . 100 

Arant, Bill Wayne, P. O. Box 213, Pitts, Ga. . . . 100 

Atkins, Charles K., 225 Academy St., Fort Mill, S. C. 184 

Austin, John C, Rt. 3, Grinnell, Iowa 100 

Avery, James Mack, III, Box 421, Troutman, N. C. . 100 

Awad, Mubarak, P. O. Box 196, Jerusalem, Jordan . 88 

Ayers, Robert, 158 Carpenter, Prichard, Ala. . . 171 



Badenhorst, Johannes, Box 2616, Salisbury, 

Southern Rhodesia, South Africa 85 

Baggett, Lala Jean, 68 Monument Ave., Petersburg, Va. 90 

Bailey, Lonnie Gerald, 457 N. 9th St., Griffin, Ga. . 184 

Bailey, Robert L., 3896 16th St., Wyandotte, Mich. . 90 

Bain, Dolas Dale, Rt. 1, Mentone, Ala 94 

Baker, Eunice Teen, Rt. 3, Box 222B, Huntsville, Ala. 100 

Baker, Nathan Louis, 410 15th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 90 

Ball, Larry Gene, 1648 College St., Macon, Ga. . . 90 
Barber, Margaret Elizabeth, 1700 Littleton, 

Waycross, Ga 94 

Bare, Harold Lee, 802 E. Academy St., 

Cherryville, N. C 90 

Barnes, David, 1507 Roanoke, Uhrichsville, O. . . 85 

Barrs, Franklin, Branford, Fla 90 

Bartholf, Lawrence Eugene, 1022 Huron St., 

Jacksonville, Fla 171 

Barton, Ronnie William, Rt. 1, Fairmont, Ga. . . 100 

Baskett, Linda Dianne, 1376 Midview Dr., Decatur, Ga. 90 

Batemen, Era Dell, 1875 N. Oak, Cleveland, Tenn. . 100 
Batemen, Walter Timothy, 1875 N. Oak St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 87 

Baugh, Edmund Lee, Jr., 461 8th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 184 

Beavers, Judith Elmeda, 3692 Napier, Macon, Ga. . 100 

Begay, Harry, Box 58, Mentmore, N. M 171 

Beitler, Brenda Bernice, 12768 Palm Drive, Largo, Fla. 94 

Beka, Ronald E., 383 5th Ave., Mansfield, Ohio . . 88 

Bell, H. Foster, 120 Keys St., Bristol, Va 100 

Bennett, Ray Oliver, 1819 Dalton Pike, 

Cleveland, Tenn 184 

Birmingham, Constance Sue, Box 297, 

Wewahitchka, Fla 94 

Birmingham, Douglas C, Box 297, Wewahitchka, Fla. 94 

Bixler, Judith Faye, 7025 W. 71st Place, Chicago, 111. 88 

Black, Shelby Lee, Stewart St., Cordova, Ala. . . . 100 

Blackaby, Wanda Lou., Rt. 2, Eminence, Ky. ... 87 

Blevins, Penny, Biggs, Ky 171 

Boatwright, Janice Louise, 5401 Ives Place, 

Springfield, Va 90 

Bohlcr, Daniel Edward, 1941 Magnolia Ave., 

Cleveland, Tenn 90 

Bonds, Larry Kent, 1305 Woodale Ct., San Jose, Calif. 88 

Bowen, Richard, 2315 Wall St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 175 



Bowman, Theodore Alan, 1214 Ellen Dr., 

Middletown, Ohio 87 

Boyle, Patricia L., 2601 Gilchrist, Akron, Ohio . . 94 
Breckenridge, James, 1503 23rd St., Lubbock, Texas . 85 
Brewer, James Herbert, 329 Swingle, Frostproof, Fla. 100 
Bridges, Mary Carolyn, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. . 100 
Brock, Ronald Edmond, 22 Lombardy Way, Rome, Ga. 90 
Brodie, Sharon Lee, 73 N. Pine St., Seaford, Del. . . 171 
Broome, Glandon Carson, Box 111, Lockhart, S. C. . 94 
Brower, Mary H., 1127 N.W. 16th Ave., 

Gainesville, Fla 184 

Brown, Carolyn Ann, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. . 95 
Brown, Gladys Jeanette, 615 E. Lakeview, 

Rossville, Ga 100 

Brown, James Lewis, 615 E. Lakeview, 

Rossville, Ga 87 

Broyles, Gladys P., 110 Monument Ave., 

Greenville, Tenn 184 

Brummett, Herbert, Jr., 1320 Woodmore, 

Cleveland, Tenn 171 

Brummett, James Edward, 1320 Woodmore, 

Cleveland, Tenn 175 

Brummett, Phyllis June, 1320 Woodmore, 

Cleveland, Tenn. . . 175 

Burke, Joyce Ann, Rt. 1, Box 436, Hampton, Va. . 100 
Burns, Jimmy William, 1700 Forest Ridge Dr., 

Cleveland, Tenn 87 

Burton, Thomas Wilford, 3936 Bryant, 

Chattanooga, Tenn 90 

Busby, Larry, 1515 Ardmore St., Chicago, 111. . . . 184 
Butler, Linda Kay, 3020 Clearwater Dr., 

Cleveland, Tenn 100 

Byrd, Noble Carvis, Jr., 702 17th St., Apt. 7, 

Cleveland, Tenn 184 

Byrom, Clayton Roy, 150 11th N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 91 



Cagle, Stanley Phil, 157 S. Seventh St., Austin, Ind. . 91 

Calloway, John D., 5571 Lincoln, Detroit, Mich. . . 91 

Carder, Carol Jean, 1202 Navarre, Toledo, Ohio . . 95 

Carey, Theresa Joyce, Rt. 2, Kensington, Ga. . . . 100 

Carter, Janice Marilyn, 308 Hardin Cr., Gadsden, Ala. 175 
Caruthers, Shirley Diane, 5905 Lear Nagle, 

Ridgeville, Ohio 100 

Carver, Ronnie Elmore, 701 8th Ave., Albany, Ga. . 171 
Castelo, Cornelio M., Revolution 923, Nogales, 

Sonora, Mex 87 

Caywood, Criss Terrell, Rt. 3, Cleveland, Tenn. . . 100 

Cecil, Bion Eugene, Jr., Graysonville, Md 100 

Chamberlain, James Gerald, 1512 Overlake Ave., 

Orlando, Fla 100 

Chambers, O. Wayne, Rt. 7, Box 319, B'ham, Ala. . 87 
Chang, Fermin Magdiel, Box 268, 

Tegucigalpa, Honduras 175 

Chapman, Mary Jane, 320 Hillcrest Dr., 

Morristown, Tenn 100 

Chase, Harry T., Jr., Rt. 5, Charars Rd., 

Cleveland, Tenn 184 

Church, Arthur T., Allen St., Box 345, Fostoria, Ohio 175 

Clark, Carolyn Louise, 165 15th St., N.W., Largo, Fla. 184 

Clayton, Charles E., 211 Marion St., Albany, Ga. . . 95 

Clayton, Lois Jura, 211 Marion St., Albany, Ga. . . 95 

Clem, Bernice B., Rt. 1, Box 238, Addison, Ala. . . 91 
Clevenger, Shirley Kaye, 11856 Wisconsin, 

Detroit, Mich 171 

Coder, Charlotte Patricia, Box 21, Cottage Grove, Ore. 85 

Cogdill, William Grady, N. First St., Lockhart, S. C. 95 

Cole, Mildred Jeanne, 72 Ford, Highland Park, Mich. 175 

Cole, Sandra Jeanene, 787 Franas Place, Atlanta, Ga. 184 

Collins, Joseph Shepherd, Rt. 3, Millsboro, Del. . . 100 



226 



Compton, Alma Joyce, Box 236, Delbarton, W. Va. . 100 

Compton, Betty Jean, Box 236, Delbarton, W. Va. . 100 

Compton, James Ray, Switzer, W. Va 100 

Conn, Charles Paul, 1 140 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 100 

Conn, J. Stephen, 1140 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 91 

Cook, Janet E., 504 Pearl St., Columbia, Miss. ... 95 

Cook, Philip Lamar, Box 72, Northport, Ala. ... 91 

Cook, Roberta Jane, 6116 Lenox, Detroit, Mich. . . 95 

Coomer, Patrick Neal, 4630 S. 1st St., Louisville, Ky. 100 

Courson, Roger Dale, Rt. 2, Box 45, Bartow, Fla. . . 95 

Coward, Parnell, Rt. 4, Box 317, Lake City, S. C. . 95 

Cowart, Sue, 307 2nd St., Ft. Payne, Ala 101 

Crawford, Harold Woodrow, Jr., 3 37 W. Main, 

Somerset, Pa 101 

Crcggcr, Ellen Andrea, Rt. 1, Box 405-B, Manassas, Va. 171 

Crews, Cheryl Jane, Rt. 1, Box 143, Hilliard, Fla. . 95 

Croft, Frederick L., 1547 Wamboit, Jacksonville, Fla. 87 

Cross, Patricia Ann, Box 97, Cohutta, Ga. ... 95 

Culver, Sandra Ann, 2895 Houston Ave., Macon, Ga. 101 

Cundiff, Mary Janice, 3739 Hazel, Norwood, Ohio . 95 
Cunningham, M. Larry, 3210 Wickersham Ct., 

Orlando, Fla 101 



Dailey, Barbara Jo, Hayesvillc, N. C 101 

Daniel, James Dudley, 3813 Monty Dr., Midland, Texas 184 

Danson, Beverly Lee, 1160 35th Ave., Vero Beach, Fla. 95 
Daughdrill, Walter H., 2508 Montezuma St., 

Gadsden, Ala 184 

Davis, Glennis Jewel, 121 King George Way, 

Morrow, Ga 101 

Davis, Joseph Eugene, Rt. 1, Box 395, 

Bay Minette, Ala 95 

Davis, Thomas Emory, Box 236, Saraland, Ala. . . 101 

Dawson, Linda Ann, Rt. 2, Section, Ala 171 

Dean, Seretha Ann, 607 South St., Easton, Md. . . 95 

Decker, John Ed, Jr., Long Island, Ala 101 

DeFino, Donald, 733 Hill St., Lebanon, Pa. . . . 87 

Denham, Dale T., 205 Alpha St., West Monroe, La. 184 

Dennis, James Paul, Box 1057, Pulaski, Va. . . . 175 

Dennis, Leon Percy, Rt. 2, Verbena, Ala 91 

DeVencenzo, Albert, 742 Highland Ave., Warren, Ohio 101 

Dickson, Dudley H., 1600 N. Second Ave., Miami, Fla. 91 

Dixon, Clarence Lee, 2910 Mattox Dr., Norfolk, Va. . 91 

Douglas, Donald Lester, 1048 Walnut, Macon, Ga. . 91 

Douglas, Rosemary Earlene, 2045 3rd St., Macon, Ga. 101 

Dozier, James Luther, Rt. 2, Box 17, Blakely, Ga. . 91 
Driskell, Brcnda Joan, 430 Tecumseh Ave., 

Ft. Meade, Fla 9 5 

Duncan, Phaylene Helen, 1727 34th St., N.W., 

Winter Haven, Fla 97 

Dyer, Terry Wayne, 3110 New York Ave., 

Chattanooga, Tenn 95 



Eason, Jerry Linda, 405 Redbud Ct., Smyrna, Ga. . 101 
Eddins, Clyde W., Jr., 317 Edgewater Dr., 

Pensacola, Fla 88 

Eller, Raymond Dee, Rt. 3, Box 105, Hiawassce, Ga. 184 

Elliott, Eva Josephine, 1st Ave., Big Timber, Montana 101 
Ellis, Madonna Estcllc, 1339 N. Franklin, 

Gastonia, N. C 101 

Ellis, Richard Harold, 17218 Manzanita, 

Fantana, Calif 171 

Engstrom, Marilyn, 1381 Elm, Plymouth, Mich. . . 175 
Essary, Lonetta Jeannette, 1049 W. Webster, 

Springfield, Mo 101 

Evans, Brenda Faye, Box 185, Lula, Ga 101 

Evans, Ronald Douglas, Rt. 3, Box 1404, Lakeland, Fla. 184 
Everhart, Carroll Elizabeth, 4336 Covington Hwy., 

Decatur, Ga 95 



Faidlcy, Glcnna Jane, Box 391, Sevicrvillc, Tenn. . 101 

Farabec, Alpha Theodore, Gen. Delivery, Alva, Fla. . 171 

Farabee, L. Nadine, 607 E. Oak St., Arcadia, Fla. . 91 

Fauber, Rosemary, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. ... 87 
Faulkner, Gaila Dawn, 2562 Elmwood, 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 101 

Fearer, Bonnie L., 2130 Mogadorc Rd., Akron, Ohio . 102 
Fields, Herman Jay, Rt. 2, Lawless Trailer Ct., 

Daniels Creek Rd., Collinsville, Va 91 

Fisher, Jo Ann, Rt. 6, Box 17, Cleveland, Tenn. . . 102 

Flowers, Winona, 411 Buchanan St., Bremen, Ga. . 184 

Ford, Jimmy Bogart, 102 D St., Chattanooga, Tenn. . 91 

Ford, Larry, 520 Carolyn Dr., Miamisburg, Ohio . 171 

Forsyth, Arthur Luke, Rt. 1, Mauk, Ga 184 

Foster, Robert Lee, 724 Chester Ave., Akron, Ohio . 102 
Fowler, Grannis W., 846 Clayton St., 

Lawrencevillc, Ga 184 

Fowler, Joyce, 8034 Alpine, Detroit, Mich. . . . 102 

Fox, Jimmy Don, 503 N. Electra, Electra, Texas . . 102 

Fralcy, Sandra Delores, 1026 E. Windsor, Tucson, Ariz. 9 5 

Franks, Earl Wells, Rt. 1, Box 106, Ocoee, Tenn. . 102 

Frazier, Edith Joanne, Rt. 1, Woodlawn, Va. ... 91 

Frazier, Lloyd Earl, Rt. 1, Woodlawn, Va 91 

French, Charles E., 945 15th St., Cleveland, Tenn. . 88 
French, Gordon T., 15 30 Highland Ave., 

Cleveland, Tenn 184 

Froud, Helen, Rt. 5, Fayetteville, Ark 91 

Fulbright, Junus Cymore, 148V2 Mimosa Dr., 

Asheville, N. C 87 

Funderburk, Robert Gerald, 402 Sidney Johnson St., 

Ft. Mill, S. C 95 



Gaddy, Connie June, 3031 Riders Trail, Decatur, Ga. 171 

Gammill, Herschel, Rt. 3, Meadville, Miss. ... 87 

Gann, Eva Alice, Rt. 3, Hixson, Tenn 102 

Garner, Arnold Ray, Rt. 1, Box 163, Pinson, Ala. . 171 

Gcrstman, Mancel H., Box 61, La Belle, Fla. ... 96 

Gibson, Paula Mae, 505 19th St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 96 
Gilbert, Barbara Anne, 411 6th Ave., N.E., 

Glen Burnie, Md 102 

Gilbert, Gordon Dean, 1308 S.E. 9th Ave., 

Mineral Wells, Texas 171 

Gillette, Eddie Gaylor, Jr., 228 W. 18th St., 

Jacksonville, Fla 171 

Gilliam, Donald Ray, 3404 Brown, Ft. Worth, Texas 96 

Gilstrap, Linda Louise, 1610 Young, Big Springs, Texas 102 

Glenn, Bob Lee, 234 Parker Dr., Santa Cruz, Calif. . 85 

Glenn, Imogene C, 234 Parker Dr., Santa Cruz, Calif. 102 

Glover, Lucy Ann, Box 265, Kotzebue, Alaska . . 102 
Goodman, Doris Maxine, 4618 Simpson, 

Cincinnati, Ohio 96 

Goodman, LaVerne, 717 Brown St., Thomasville, Ala. 91 
Goodman, Richard Dale, Box 703, S. R.R. Road, 

Winter Haven, Fla 87 

Goodrum, Donald Artie, Rt. 1, Selmcr, Tenn. . . . 102 

Goodwill, Linda D., 25 W. Main, Jackson, Ohio . . 96 

Goodwin, James B., Rt. 1, McDonald, Tenn. . . . 102 

Gosnell, Lynda Darlcne, Box 291, Seaford, Del. . . 102 
Gough, James Ronald, Box 1303, 507 Sunrise Ave., 

Morristown, Tenn 91 

Graham, James C, 1360 N. Ococe, Cleveland, Tenn. 175 
Grainger, James Victor, 1532 S. Rugby Place, 

Chattanooga, Tenn 184 

Gray, Johnny, 3032 W. 3rd St., Jacksonville, Fla. . 172 

Gray, Teddy Fay, 1 1 5 S. Wyandotte, Bartlesville, Okla. 91 
Grayson, Camilla Ruth, 4142 Fletcher Ave., 

Indianapolis, Ind 96 

Grayson, Carol Sue, 48 5 State Rt. 48, S. Lebanon, Ohio 102 

Green, Joan Anita, 709 S. 33rd St., Ft. Pierce, Fla. . 96 



STUDENT INDEX 



Green, John Edward, 2204 Beech St., Baton Rouge, La. 88 
Greene, Sandra Lynette, Rt. 5, Box 666K, 

Charlotte, N. C 102 

Griffin, Glenda Evon, Box 194, Lockhart, S. C. . . 96 

Grissom, Kelly M., 5025 30th Ave., Kenosha, Wis. . 184 

Gunter, Daniel Keith, 110 Johnson Dr., Doraville, Ga. 102 

Guy, Barbara Gail, Rt. 7, Maryville, Tenn. ... 96 



Hadsall, Marvin Harrison, 5 519 5th Ave., 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Hagan, Katherine Marie, Rt. 1, Travelers Rest, S. C. 
Hagan, Ronald Dewight, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 

Hale, Robert, 4315 Toledo, Detroit, Mich 

Hall, Jimi, 1204 Key St., Cleveland, Tenn. . . . 
Hall, Ruby Lee, 1802 Hamill Rd., Hixson, Tenn. . . 
Hall, Samuel Ray, 334 N.W. 43 Ct., 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla 

Hambright, Evelyn Marie, Rt. 2, Hartwell, Ga. 
Hammontree, Lavetta Ann, 7045 Rollo Rd., 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Hammontree, Rhonda P., 7045 Rollo Rd., 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Hampton, V. Jean, 100 Auburn, Bristol, Tenn. 
Harding, F. Laurene, Box 374, Wake Forrest, N. C. 
Hargraves, Donald Dean, Box 15, Zurich, Switzerland 
Harless, Mary Joy, 1162 Magnolia Ave., 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Harmon, Flora Paulette, 11741 Rudy St., 

Massillon, Ohio 

Harris, Ed Stanley, 2806 S. 73rd St., Kansas City, Kan 
Harris, Orville Buel, Jr., 109 Belmont, Erwin, Tenn 
Harrison, Harold Pascal, 705 Gale St., Cleveland, Tenn 
Harvard, Ronald Wilson, Rt. 1, Box 440, 

Lake Wales, Fla 

Hastings, Delbert, Rt. 8, Laurel, Del. . . . 
Hawkins, Virginia Kaylene, Rt. 2, 

New Cumberland, W. Va 

Hazzard, Lloyd, Rt. 4, Box 476, Bassett, Va. . 
Henderson, Patricia Lynn, Rt. 1, Merigold, Miss. 
Hendrix, June, Rt. 1, Stonewall, Okla. 
Hensley, Kenneth Ray, 127 Rock Rd., 

Rutherfordton, N. C 

Hensley, Linda Clyde, Dug Gap Rd., Dalton, Ga 
Hodges, DeRosa, 811 N. Green, Wadesboro, N. C 
Hodges, Hugh Allan, 1604 Hoitt Ave., Knoxville, Tenn 
Hodo, Robert Gene, 2019 3rd Ave., Pell City, Ala 
Holdman, James Robert, 1370 Peoples St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Holland, Mary Ann, Rt. 1, Box 510, Natchez, Miss 
Hollifield, Charles Edmon, 12 E. Moreland Dr., 

Hampton, Va 

Hollingsworth, Thomas T., Rt. 2, Attalla, Ala. 
Hornbuckle, Alton Lee, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn 
Home, Carol Patricia, Meadorway Dr., La Grange, 
Hosch, Judy Fay, 125 Avenue "U", B'ham, Ala. 
Householder, Mike Steven, 131 1st., Milan, 111. 
Houston, Richard Allen, Charleston, Tenn. 
Hubbard, Shirley Mae, 16 Loomis, Ripley, N. Y. 
Hucklcbridge, Kathleen, 104 E. New Mexico St., 

Sweetwater, Texas 

Hudson, Karen Lee, 1045 17th, Wyandotte, Mich 
Hudson, Kyle Lester, 1045 17th, Wyandotte, Mich 
Huff, Daniel C, 1763 Giant St., Toledo, Ohio 
Hughes, Dale, 4542 Garfield, Phoenix, Ariz. 
Hughes, Ray H., Jr., 1390 Ocoee, Cleveland, Tenn 
Hulsey, Elton, Jr., 633 Broad St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Hurst, Brenda Joy, 250 Cherokee Dr., Cleveland, Tenn 



Ga 



102 
91 
103 
103 
184 
103 

184 
172 

172 

172 
89 
91 

103 

96 

172 
91 
91 

103 

87 
172 

172 

85 

184 

175 

91 
96 
172 
91 
91 

172 
96 

89 

87 
96 
103 
184 
175 
184 
96 

96 
103 
185 
185 

85 
172 
103 
103 



Jackson, Carol Ann, Rt. 2, Box 294-A, Altoona, Ala 
Jacobs, Linwood Ernest, 3116 W. 63rd, 

Los Angeles, Calif 

Jinks, James Paul, 1017 Grove St., Charlottesville, Va 
Johnson, Betty L., 2511 N. Ocoee St., Cleveland, Tenn 
Johnson, Carrie Belle, Rt. 1, Chadbourne, N. C. 
Johnson, Gerald James, Mars Ave., Bayou La Batre, Ala 
Johnson, Gloria Lenore, 1521 7th St., Rockford, 111. 
Johnson, John Thomas, 205 E. Cypress, Arcadia, Fla 
Johnson, Johnny Edward, Box 544, Okeechobee, Fla 
Johnson, Pam, 814 Fairfield Dr., Knoxville, Tenn. 
Johnson, Wanda Mae, 424 Big Hill Ave., 

Richmond, Ky 

Jones, Harold Lee, 1536 Dade, Augusta, Ga. 
Jordan, Lottie Maye, 415 N.E. 6th Ave., 

Mineral Wells, Texas 



89 

175 
87 
96 

103 
85 

103 

172 
96 
96 

103 
89 

96 



Keith, Gwendolyn, 2617 N. 39th Terrace, B'ham, Ala. 185 

Kellner, Susan, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. ... 96 
Kelly, Janice Marie, 1444 Magnolia Cir., 

Jacksonville, Fla 97 

Kennedy, Barbara Jean, Rt. 1, Shelby, N. C. . . . 103 
Kennedy, Marilyn Joane, 727 Hickory Ridge, 

Jackson, Miss 97 

Kenton, Faith Hope, Rt. 1, Box 317, Lincoln, Del. . 185 

Kerley, Neva Rose, 207 Gadd Rd., Chattanooga, Tenn. 97 
Killman, Freddie Daniel, 263 Ashley Rd., 

Charlotte, N. C 97 

Kirkland, Lonzo T., 360 18th St., N.E., 

Cleveland, Tenn 97 

Knapp, Dewey Lee, Rt. 1, Box 340, Cleveland Rd., 

Saraland, Ala 103 

Lane, Dennie E., 517 St., New Castle, Ind. ... 89 

Lane, Patricia, 252 W. Main, Everett, Pa 91 

Lasley, Jewell Juanell, Box 33, Soddy, Tenn. . . . 103 
Laughridge, Douglas Michael, 133 33rd St., 

Hickory, N. C 91 

Laye, Jonathan David, 32 S. Fayette St., 

Mercersburg, Pa 91 

LeRoy, Douglas, Box 404, Bath, S. C 87 

Lingerfelt, Charles Buford, 209 E. Ash St., 

La Follette, Tenn 91 

Lombard, Gayle Lavern, Box 41, Dora, Ala. . . . 103 

Lombard, John A., Jr., Box 41, Dora, Ala. ... 85 
Lombard, Joseph Anthony, No. 1, Woodland Dr., 

Laurel, Miss 89 

Long, Jackie Artis, 5049 Chef Menteur, 

New Orleans, La 103 

Long, Janet Sue, 5049 Chef Menteur, New Orleans, La. 103 

Lovelace, Shirley Ann, Rt. 2, Cleveland, Tenn. . . 103 

Lovelady, Betty Jo, 3232 Balsam Ave., B'ham, Ala. . 89 

Lowery, Betty Sue, Rt. 1, Cleveland, Tenn. ... 97 

Lyda, James David, 244 13th St., Newton, N. C. . . 87 

Lytle, Carolyn L., 3 589 Hildana, Shaker Heights, Ohio 97 



Madson, Merlin M., 2052 B. Red Robin Lane, 

Sacramento, Calif 185 

Maldonado, Amparo, Calle 4 Final, Catano, 

Puerto Rico 97 

Mann, Harry Edward, Rt. 3, Box 145, Lake Wales, Fla. 97 
Mansfield, Phyllis Jenene, 288 Third St., Ravenna, Ky. 172 
Martin, Lawrence Edward, 561 N.E. River Rd., 

Des Plaines, 111 89 

Martinson, John H., Rt. 2, Box 360, Homestead, Fla. . 92 
Masscy, Curtis Raymond, 504 E. Church St., 

Farmville, N. C 92 



Matta, Hugo Rudolfo, 722 W. Marshall St., 

San Antonio, Texas 175 

May, Danny Lcc, Box 111, Carrollton, Ga. ... 97 

Mav, Linda Miller, 1030 Trunk St., Cleveland, Tenn. 104 
Mayer, Brigittc Helene, Grabenstrasse 9, 

7067 Pluederhausen, Wuertt., Germany . . . 1 8 S 

McAvoy, Carolyn Lilla, 2026 3rd St., Ocala, Fla. . 97 
McClain, Jim Orvis, Jr., 219 N. Clarendon, 

Avondale Estates, Ga 97 

McCoy, Tully Claude, Box 762, Burnwell, Ky. . . 97 
McDonald, Donna Louise, 1209 S. Monticello, 

Big Spring, Texas 103 

McDonald, Ronald Dale, Pier Rd., Greenwich, N. J. 175 
McDuffie, Ida Mae, 103 W. S. Park St., 

Okeechobee, Fla 97 

McGhcc, Edward Arnold, Rt. 2, Tinley Park, 111. . . 97 

McGhee, Jerry Van, Rt. 2, Tinley Park, 111. ... 89 
McGrath, Mary Dianne, 180 Rockinghill Dr., 

Marietta, Ga 172 

McGuirc, George Dennis, 1704 Clouds Ford Rd., 

Kingsport, Tenn 97 

McKinncy, W. Dean, 440 13th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 97 

McKuhcn, Roy James, Rt. 1, Bloomington, Ga. . . 104 
McLain, Janet Elaine, 2123 Oakland Dr., 

Cleveland, Tenn 104 

McLuhan, Dwayne Mervyn, 29 Central Ave., 

Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada . . . . 185 

McMullen, Ray C, 5 30 North D St., Lake Worth, Fla. 85 

McNallcy, Gaynell, Rt. 1, Falkville, Ala 172 

Meade, Lloyd Conward, Box 411, E. Rainelle, W. Va. 104 

E. Rainelle, W. Va 104 

Meares, Betty Ann, 5233 Clark Rd., Sarasota, Fla. . 97 

Mefford, Mary Lou, 802 S. C St., Arkansas City, Kan. 97 

Meister, Albert, Jr., 33 Linden Ave., Pitman, N. J. . 97 

Melton, Randall E., Rt. 7, Cleveland, Tenn. ... 92 

Meredith, Diana Carol, Rt. 3, Shcpherdsville, Ky. . . 97 

Miles, Aaron Russell, 126 Wilmont St., Lake City, S. C. 92 

Miles, Douglas Wayne, Hwy. 74, Laurinburg, N. C. . 92 

Miller, Carolyn J., 208 4th St., N.E., Arab, Ala. . . 89 

Miller, Patricia Elizabeth, 609 West Ave., Augusta, Ga. 97 

Miller, Helen Faye, 325 Central Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 104 
Miller, Jerry Monroe, 1708 Anderson St., 

Charlotte, N. C 185 

Miller, Kenneth Lee, 930 Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 185 

Miller, Leona Otecn, 930 Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 104 
Miller, Otis Clarence, 930 Parker St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 104 

Mills, Joan Elaine, 1213 Woodland Ave., B'ham, Ala. 104 

Minor, Kenneth Hugh, Rt. 1, Box 430, Gaffney, S. C. 97 

Mitchell, Jimmie Dale, 607 E. Durham, Hobbs, N. M. 104 

Mohn, Diane Lee, Rt. 2, Boscobcl, Wis 92 

Moncrief, Wayne E., Rt. 1, Box 17, Lavonia, Ga. . 89 

Montgomery, Barbara Jean, Rt. 2, Carrollton, Miss. . 85 

Moore, Donald Benson, 640 Oakwood, Lancaster, Ohio 104 

Moore, Jerry, Rt. 1, Box 192, Warrenville, S. C. . . 185 

Moore, Joyce, 104 5 17th St., Wyandotte, Mich. . . 185 

Moran, Gerald Edward, 122 Mimosa St., Danville, Va. 92 

Morehcad, Joel A., Norris City, 111 97 

Morgan, Gloria Faye, Rt. 1, Soddy, Tenn 97 

Moss, Barbara Delores, 4004 Pine Ave., Huntsville, Ala. 104 

Mullcr, Gcrlinda, Bilwaskarma, Rio Coco, Nicaragua . 172 
Mullinax, Sandra Kaye, 1901 N. Ocoee, 

Cleveland, Tenn 172 

Mullins, Gerald, 702 Master, Corbin, Ky 97 

Mullins, W. Sharon, Rt. 2, Stonewall, Okla. ... 92 
Murphy, James Arnold, 1642 N. Galloway Rd., 

Lakeland, Fla 185 

Murphy, Maureen Sue, 4803 S. Rio Grande, 

Orlando, Fla 172 

Mushegan, H. George, 36 W. Main, Ware Shoals, S. C. 92 



Neill, Marvin Edward, 1180 Parker St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 89 

Newton, Sheryl Kaye, 1115 East St., Springfield, Ohio 97 

Neyman, Jamesie S., 2140 N.E. Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 98 

Nichols, Judy Ann, 304 Chestnut St., Tarkio, Mo. . 104 
Nichols, Sharon C, 22120 Haynes St., 

Farmington, Mich 98 

Nix, Rebecca, Rt. 7, Box 54, Birmingham, Ala. . . 172 

Noble, Jerry Carl, 507 5 Schroeder Rd., Dayton, Ohio 89 

Noel, Joyce Evelyn, Airport Rd., Chapmanville, W. Va. 104 



Oakley, Thomas Jackson, 397 Parker St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 89 

Oakley, William Bennic, 12410 E. 25th Ave., 

Portage, Ind 104 

Obenchain, Evelyn Mae, 2528 Queen City Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 104 

Obenchain, Linda Faye, 2528 Queen City Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 98 

Odum, Carrie Annette, Rt. 2, Box 450D, Savannah, Ga. 172 

Ogdcn, Shirley Rose, Rt. 1, Box 400, Natchez, Miss. 98 

O'Neal, Billy J., 5425 Vicki St., Ft. Worth, Texas . 98 

Orr, Robert L., Hayesville, N. C 89 

Owen, Barbara Jean, 815 Nutwood Ave., 

Bowling Green, Ky 175 

Owen, David Lynn, 108 W. 4th St., Stanton, Texas . 104 

Owen, Lawrence Gary, 806 8th Ave., Lanett, Ala. . 104 

Palmertree, Carolyn, 897 Trunk St., Cleveland, Tenn. 185 

Parham, Mildred Frances, 19 Pine Dr., Savannah, Ga. 104 

Partin, James David, Rt. 1, Box 281, Lake Wales, Fla. 89 

Pate, Twyla Sue, 24 Mohawk Dr., Searcy, Ark. . . 104 
Patterson, James Andrew, Rt. 1, Box 430, 

Gaffney, S. C 92 

Payne, Dewayne, 730 8th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 175 
Pearson, Phillip C, 1406 Old Knoxville Hwy., 

Newport, Tenn 98 

Peery, Jimmy Lee, Box 223, War, W. Va 92 

Perry, Linda Carol, 113 Lee St., Belmont, N. C. . . 92 

Peters, Patricia Ann, Star Route, Mattawamkeag, Maine 85 

Petty, Barbara E., Rt. 2, Soddy, Tenn 104 

Petty, Larry Dean, 203 W. Green St., Urbana, 111. . 85 
Pettyjohn, Myrna Lee, 1180 Parker St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 98 

Pharr, Donna Kay, Rt. 1, Hixson, Tenn 105 

Phillips, Donna Dcidre, 210 4th S. and N.E., Arab, Ala. 173 

Phillips, Erlene Jcancllc.Rt. 4, Oneonta, Ala. ... 98 

Phillips, H. Lanclda, 805 Sunshine Dr., Griffin, Ga. 98 

Pierce, Sibyle Jean, 150 11th St., Cleveland, Tenn. . 105 

Pitts, Floyd Dodson, Box 212, Greensboro, Fla. . . 105 

Plymale, Mozcl, Phyllis, Ky 173 

Plymel, Mary Lee, Rt. 1, Omega, Ga 105 

Pollard, Douglas Alfred, Box 315, Lake Placid, Fla. . 105 

Potcet, Carol Diane, Route 6, Cleveland, Tenn. . . 105 

Potter, Karen E., Route 3, Box 147, Joncsboro, Ark. . 105 
Powell, Barbara Ann, Rt. 1, Box 108-A, 

Lake City, Fla 105 

Powell, Richard Dennis, Rt. 1, Box 108-A, 

Lake City, Fla 175 

Presswood, Larry Ray, 401 Emmett, Cleveland, Tenn. 185 
Prcsswood, Paula Griffith, 401 Emmett, 

Cleveland, Tenn 185 

Price, Betty L., 104 5 Garner St., Salinas, Calif. . . 105 

Price, Beverly I., Route 1, Long Island, Ala. ... 89 

Price, James W., Jr., Route 1, Long Island, Ala. . . 105 

Price, Patricia Ruth, Route 1, Long Island, Ala. . . 4 8 

Price, William Donald, 1045 Garner, Salinas, Calif. . 89 
Propes, Marvin A., 2822 Melaleuca, 

West Palm Beach, Fla 105 



/ 



229 



STUDENT INDEX 



Purvis, Patricia Kay, 4401 Fiezcr Cove, 

Memphis, Tenn 98 

Pyle, Perry Bronwen, 71 Pine St., Brookville, Pa. . 89 

Ragan, Ronald, Route 1, Lindale, Ga 185 

Ramsey, Herman Tiras, 6163 Buford Hwy., 

Doraville, Ga 89 

Rankin, Barbara Jean, Rt. 1, Box 109, Hilliard, Fla. . 98 
Rathbun, James E., II8OI/2 Parker St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 89 

Ray, Sarah Nell, Rt. 1, Box 297, Callahan, Fla. . . 105 
Redman, William Sterling, 3725 S. O .B. Trail, 

Orlando, Fla 105 

Reffner, Robert S. 410 First St., Williamsburg, Pa. . 87 
Renalds, Charles O., Jr., 5611 Wilson Blvd., 

Arlington, Va 98 

Renner, Patricia, Route 4, Cleveland, Tenn. . . . 185 

Rhyne, Clyde Tommy, Rt. 8, Maryville, Tenn. . . 92 

Rigney, Lon Wallace, Rt. 6, Box 184, Mobile, Ala. . 185 
Riley, Joseph Larry, 1528 Independence Blvd., 

Charlotte, N. C 105 

Rish, Anna Joyce, Box 297, Wewahitchka, Fla. . . 105 

Robeff, Samuel, L. dc la Torre 312 Chaco, Argentina 87 

Roberts, Ernest, 2304 Grandfield Ave., Plant City, Fla. 87 

Robinson, Julian B., 318 Central Ave., Blackshear, Ga. 92 

Rose, Charles Wheeler, 213 Valmar, Little Rock, Ark. 105 

Rose, Delbert, 24 5 5 Kathleen Dr., Monroe, Mich. . 185 
Rose, Linda Kay, 1102 Elmwood Dr., 

Middletown, Ohio 173 

Rosman, Gloria Ann, 6034 22nd Ave., Kenosha, Wis. 92 

Rowan, Earl Wayne, Rt. 3, Nashville, Ga 98 

Rowland, Geraldinc, 147 Cedar, Gastonia, N. C. . . 105 

Rowland, Twila Jane, Box 4312, San Jose, Bisbee, Ariz. 98 



Sanders, Ray H„ Box 785, Bath, S. C 87 

Saterlee, Marie, Box 97, Kotzebue, Alaska .... 85 

de los Santos, Alfredo, Villo Angelica 10, Lima, Peru 89 

Schwucht, Lydia, Mossingen, Germany 92 

Scoggins, Judith Elaine, Rt. 2, McDonald, Tenn. . . 105 
Scruggs, Dorsey Allen, 5323 Kceport Dr., 

Pittsburgh, Pa 185 

Scruggs, William Thomas, 5325 Keeport Dr., 

Pittsburgh, Pa 175 

Seabolt, Rachel Sue, Rt. 1, Box 213, Blue Ridge, Ga. 105 

Searcy, Gloria Rolanda, Box 57, Balboa, Canal Zone . 98 

Searcy, Paul Raphael, Box 57, Balboa, Canal Zone . 105 

Sharp, Janet Patricia, 852 Reaves, Jackson, Miss. . . 105 

Sharp, Phyllis Claudctte, Rt. 1, Odum, Ga. . . . 105 

Sharrett, Carl David, 824 Carter St., Bristol, Va. . . 93 

Shaw, Dorothy Louise, Rt. 3, Everett, Pa 93 

Shelton, Brenda Jo, Columbia St., Somerset, Ky. . . 98 
Shepphard, Clarence Robert, 37 Silvcrstone Cr., 

Savannah, Ga 87 

Sherbahn, David Lcroy, Box 265, Kotzebue, Alaska . 105 

Sherbahn, Lois May, Box 265, Kotzebue, Alaska . . 105 

Shirley, Andrea P., 311 Blue Ridge Ave., Bclton, S. C. 87 

Shope, James Edward, Rt. 2, Calhoun, Ga 85 

Short, Shirley, High Road, Lockport, 111 173 

Silva, Daniel, Pulumayo 222, Trujillo, Peru ... 89 
Simpson, Paul Edward, 161 Post Rd., 

West Palm Beach, Fla 173 

Simpson, Shirley Ann, 104 Nallcy Drive, 

Anderson, S. C 99 

Sims, John Alfred, Cherry St., Scvicrville, Tenn. . . 87 

Sistrunk, David J., Rt. 4, Bastrop, La 93 

Slutz, Barbara Ann, 5414 E. Sparta Ave., 

E. Sparta, Ohio 185 

Smith, Broadus Joel, Rt. 8, Box 90, Greenville, S. C. 93 



Smith, Gail Rose, 1 1 1 S. Lafayette, St. Pauls, N. C. . 185 

Smith, James Charles, Rt. 2, Heflin, Ala 99 

Smith, James Kenneth, Rt. 1, Ringgold, Ga. . . . 93 

Smith, Jesse Leon, 903 S. Hill, Albany, Ore. ... 105 
Smith, Kenneth Cameron, 1012 Memorial Dr., 

Waycross, Ga 93 

Smith, Larry Winfred, 212 Sutton Lane, 

Knoxville, Tenn 106 

Smith, Linda Sue, Rt. 2, Box 60, Waynesville, N. C. . 105 
Smith, Marjorie Elizabeth, 317 N. 14th St., 

Dade City, Fla 106 

Smith, Marshall Kenneth, Rt. 1, McCall Creek, Miss. 85 

Smith, Marvin Junior, Box 261, Pinetops, N. C. . . 93 
Smith, Paul Douglas, Rt. 1, Box 68, 

McCall Creek, Miss 106 

Smith, William Douglas, 22451 Tuck Rd., 

Farmington, Mich 106 

Smith, Wilmon Ashley, 2061 7th Ave., Sarasota, Fla. 106 
Souders, David Marvin, Rt. 2, Box 250, 

Bonner Springs, Kan 93 

Spears, Charles Larue, Box 413, Minneola, Fla. . . 99 

Spencer, Donald Wayne, Rt. 2, Box 126, Wynne, Ark. 106 

Staats, Sharon, 6272 Firestone Rd., Canton, Ohio . 185 

Stancil, J. Annette, Route 4, Chatsworth, Ga. . . 87 

Stanfield, Larry Arden, 510 20th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 173 

Stapp, Leland Troy, 3210 Ocoee St., Cleveland, Tenn. 175 

Stephens, Naomi Jean, 745 S. Gertrude, Stockton, Calif. 106 

Stcpp, V. Yvonne, Rt. 4, Box 262, Cleveland, Tenn. . 99 

Stewart, Wanda Sue, 4408 Calhoun Rd., Mobile, Ala. 99 

Stine, Renee, 714 St. Louis Ave., East St. Louis, 111. . 173 
Stinson, Ronald Clyde, 854 S. Bay wood, 

San Jose, Calif 173 

Stocksdale, Jean Carol, 113 W. Drew St., 

Plant City, Fla 175 

Stone, Jimmy Wayne, 840 College St., Cleveland, Tenn. 89 

Stone, Joan Kaye, Rt. 2, Middlesex, N. C 106 

Stoner, Linda Faye, Box 63, Rt. 1, St. Thomas, Pa. . 93 

Sumner, Linda Sharon, 3804 9th St., Baltimore, Md. 106 
Swan, Jerome Taylor, 4615 Pennypack St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 175 

Sweat, Charles Daniel, Rt. 3, Box 7A1, Lake City, Fla. 99 

Sylvester, Fred A., Rt. 3, Box 13 3, Johns Island, S. C. 89 



Tackctt, Hannah Sue, Biggs, Ky 173 

Tarplay, Hobert Wayne, 431 Hayes St., Ypsilanti, Mich. 107 

Taylor, Ronald Jerry, 9736 Wolfcreek, Dayton, Ohio 106 

Taylor, Russell Kenneth, Rt. 4, Marietta, Ga. . . . 106 

Teague, Denzell, Box 2002, Hobbs, N. M 93 

Tech, Christcl Gertrud, Albershansen, Germany . . 93 
Teramota, Michiko, 14-4 Ikedatanimachi, Nagataku, 

Kobe, Japan 89 

Therrcll, John Milton, Jr., Box 337, Kannapolis, N. C. 106 
Thomas, Glen Eugene, 1918 Well Rd., 

Middletown, Ohio 93 

Thompson, Linda Sue, P. O. Box 161, Hayesville, N. C. 106 
Thompson, Tommy, 15 21 S. Lake Ship Dr., 

Winter Haven, Fla 185 

Thorne, Annie Laura, 706 W. Anderson, Selma, N. C. 173 
Thornton, Raymond David, 2001 Carrollton Ave., 

Greenwood, Miss 106 

Thrash, Vcrnell, Rt. 3, Box 262, Sylacauga, Ala. . . 106 
Tilley, Charles LeVerne, 3203 Kenilworth Lane, 

Knoxville, Tenn 173 

Timbs, Gary Matthew, 466 Crestview Dr., 

Lebanon, Ohio 93 

Tioaquen, Thomas Aurelio, 209 Kilby Ave., 

Suffolk, Va 173 



230 



Trawick, Thomas Floyd, 2486 Grayling, 

Hamtramck, Mich 99 

Trenum, Raymond Lee, 6465 Larraine Dr., 

Middletown, Ohio 185 

Trippett, Arwin Lloyd, Rt. 2, Parkersburg, W. Va. . 106 
Tyndall, Robert Edward, 5134 Windermere, 

Norfolk, Va 106 

Usher, David Harold, 1105 Elm Ridge, Ave., 

Baltimore, Md 185 

Ussery, Richard Lee, 1212 Bunker Ave., 

Kansas City, Kan 87 



Valenzucla, Mario, Madero 74 Sur, Sonora, Mexico 
Vance, Linda Suzanne, 622 N. Townsend, Ada, Okla 
Varner, Robert M., Box 44, Roxbury, Pa. 
Vassey, Walter Barry, 614 Beech, Gaffney, S. C. . 
Vaughn, Richard Terry, Box 51, Saluda, N. C. 
Vigo, Silvio M., Jirown Argguipa 321, Chimbotea, Peru 
Vik, Sheldon Chris, 421 High St., Wallace, Idaho . 



93 
173 
89 
99 
173 
89 
93 



Woodard, Jewel Fay, 619 Crevasse, Lakeland, Fla. . 99 

Woods, Betty Ruth, Box 124, St. Louis, Mo. ... 85 

Woolcock, Clyde Ann, Chapmanvillc, W. Va. . . . 106 
Wrinkle, Linda Fay, 1516 Sholar Ave., 

Chattanooga, Tcnn 106 

Wyatt, Barbara Lejean, 19 South 8th St., 

Richmond, Ind 99 

Wyatt, Rebecca, 610 Old Stage Rd., Glen Burnie, Md. 175 



Yeary, Walter, Box 48, Richmondale, Ohio . . . 173 
York, Gena Mae, 3 5 25 Waterlevel Hwy., 

Cleveland, Tenn 185 

Young, Judy Ann, 115 Gober Ave., Smyrna, Ga. . . 99 
Young, Patricia Ann, 1105 Pendleton St., 

Pendleton, Calif 106 



Walker, Alan J., 112 Clover Dr., Indianola, Miss. . 106 

Walker, Barbara Ann, 1537 Gordon Dr., Naples, Fla. 106 

Walker, Dale Joseph, 340 17th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 175 

Walker, Duane John, 340 17th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 173 
Walker, Diane, Spring Place Rd. and Elrod St., 

Cleveland, Tenn 175 

Walker, Jimmy, 1116 Auburn Ave., Gadsden, Ala. . 106 

Walker, Sandra Madge, Box 317, Apalachicola, Fla. . 185 

Wall, Ruby Jane, Box 1335, Pulaski, Va 106 

Walls, Leonard, Rt. 2, Box 3 5 A, Winter Garden, Fla. 87 

Waters, Joe Cleveland, 385 W. Plum, Jesup, Ga. . 93 
Watson, Fred Ronald, Rt. 1, Box 1489A, 

Haines City, Fla 185 

Webb, James Princeton, 858 Ingleside, Flint, Mich. . 93 

Webb, Willie Ray, 214 Arlington, Natchez, Miss. . 89 

Wells, Judith Burton, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. . 106 

West, Arthur Lavon, 109 W. Fiske Blvd., Cocoa, Fla. 173 

West, Paul Willard, Spears Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn. 185 
Wilkinson, Kenneth Wayne, 125 E. 18th St., 

Anniston, Ala 87 

Williams, Allen E., 4060 Washington Ave., 

Ft. Myers, Fla 93 

Williams, Bobby Boyd, Walker Hall, Cleveland, Tenn. 175 
Williams, Horace Jackson, Jr., 1339 Labelle St., 

Jacksonville, Fla 106 

Williams, Lucius Melvin, Rt. 3, Bradenton, Fla. . . 106 
Williams, Robert Eugene, Rt. 2, Box 106, 

Bryceville, Fla 185 

Williams, Sally Doris, Resaca, Ga 106 

Willis, Ronnie Wayne, 25th St., Cleveland, Tenn. . 173 
Wilson, Blanche Ann, 202 East Cedar Ave., 

Wake Forest, N. C 99 

Wilson, Conway, Jr., Rt. 2, Newport, Tenn. ... 99 
Wilson, Herbert Charles, Jr., 1533 Ocoee St., N.W., 

Cleveland, Tenn 106 

Wilson, Jack Wayne, Rt. 2, Newport, Tenn. . . . 106 

Wilson, Marian June, 18 Ovcrdale, Louisville, Ky. . 99 

Wilson, Max Eugene, 603 Main St., Grinnell, Iowa . 93 
Wilson, Thomas E., 150 11th St., N.E., 

Cleveland, Tenn , 85 

Windham, William Keith, Rt. 2, Box 166, 

Ft. Meade, Fla 106 

W«?od, Ernestine, 1205 Madison Ave., Tifton, Ga. . 106 

Woodard, E. Wayne, Box 922, Cleveland, Tenn. . . 99 

Woodard, Harold F., 1117 W. 13th St., Lakeland, Fla. 99 



231 






/ 



i n i 5 



The 1964 VINDAGUA Staff has attained the opportunity of capturing the spirit of life at Lee 
College during the 1963-64 school term and then reactivating its memorable events by the em- 
ployment of modern layout, realistic photographs, and decisive copy. Our task is now completed. 
This is your 1964 VINDAGUA. 

Although our duty was exacting, it proved to be adventurous, enjoyable, and educational. Our 
assignment was not one of leisure and great comfort but entailed many weary, strenuous hours of 
mental as well as physical labor. We delved deeply into numerous and various subjects, meeting 
many obstacles along the way. But with determination as our motto, we trodded forward, slowly at 
times, but to succeed in the accomplishment of our goals. Whether the goal was the successful pro- 
gramming of the VINDAGUA Parade of Favorites or the feverish work required to meet the dead- 
line, the staff labored diligently and faithfully in order to produce this yearbook. For such outstand- 
ing qualities, this group should be highly commended; several persons merit special notation for 
"service beyond the call of duty." 

Mrs. Lois Beach was the technical advisor and served most efficiently in this capacity. She 
was our "lighthouse" during the times of storm and distress. Without her experienced guidance and 
diplomatic resourcefulness our ideas and plans would never have been projected into reality. 

Mrs. Mary Emmaline McCall, the faculty sponsor, labored untiringly and manifested a source 
of zeal and inspiration from which the staff could draw when weary and depressed. The fact that 
she was readily available when needed appeared very reassuring. 

Dr. Robert Johnson was ever ready and available when called upon or needed. 

Mancel Gerstman, the business manager, discretely directed his staff through a successful 
financial program. The endeavors of this group have made possible the production and publication 
of this book with its many featured attractions. 

Mr. Marvin Golden, bursar, served as financial sponsor of the yearbook. 

The staff would like to express its sincere appreciation to Jerry and Kay Daniel and George 
Keppler for the seemingly endless hours extended into the photography for this yearbook. These 
persons worked with devoted dedication in order to make this VINDAGUA a memorable one. 

Our thanks also go to the Church of God Publishing House, to Mr. Duran Palmertree, the 
publisher's representative, and to the employees of this plant for their unlimited cooperation in the 
printing of this book. 

We, the staff, hold this book very precious in our lives. It has been through the efforts exerted 
on these few pages that our individual characters have been strengthened intellectually, socially, 
and spiritually. Out of dimness we detected purpose; in the midst of confusion we found direction; 
from throes of obscurity we sought goals; and through the overwhelming contradictions of life, have 
made our contribution — this, your 1964 VINDAGUA. 

With these lines from the pen of Ella Wheeler Wilcox in her poem, "The Winds of Fate," 
we summarize our year: 

One ship drives east and another drives west 
With the self-same winds that blow, 

'Tis the set of the sails 

And not the gales 
That tell them the way to go. 

Like the winds of the sea are the winds of fate, 
As we voyage along through life, 

'Tis the set of the soul 

That decides its goal 
And not the calm or the strife. 

— Ella Wheeler Wilcox 

The VINDAGUA Staff 
Seretha Dean, Editor 



232 



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