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Full text of "Vindagua"

Lee 
College 

William G. 

Squires 

Library 




GIFT OF 

DR. EDWARD L. WILLIAMS 




presenting Lee College . 



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1966 



Vindagua 



VOL XXV 
LEE COLLEGE 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




Editor: CHARLES PAUL CONN 
Business Manager: ALLEN WILLIAMS 

NOT JO BE TAKEN OUT 

William G. Squires Library 
260 1lih St. I 
Cleveland, TH 87311 



Lee College 

Cleveland, 
Tennessee 



A Campus of Christian Scholarship 



3<foO 7-73 
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Table of 





by the Internet Archive 
12 with funding from 
bers and Sloan Foundation 




http://archive.org/details/vindagua1966leeu 



Foreword 



No two of the nine hundred students 
on the Lee College campus are exactly alike. 
At Lee one may find every extreme of in- 
terest, temperament, and personal charac- 
teristics. 

Yet the Lee College student body has a 
personality all its own. Hundreds of stu- 
dents have worked, played, laughed, cried, 
shouted, whispered, studied, goofed off, 
argued, courted, prayed, sung, eaten, and 
griped together for nine months. From this 
mass fusion of diverse personalities and 
common activity, there has emerged a com- 
posite Lee Collegian. 

The Lee Collegian of 1965 '66 was here 
in an exciting year. As always, he got off 
to an uncertain start, searching for unfa- 
miliar classrooms and stumbling his way 
through the chapel "college benediction." 

But as the year progressed, he began to 
find his identity as a Lee College student. 
By the time May rolled around he found 
himself strongly attached to his school — 
to its campus, its students, its ideals and 
standards of fundamental Christian faith. 

Who was the 1966 Lee Collegian? What 
was he like? How did he spend his time 
from September to May? In the following 
pages, in words and pictures, the '66 Vin- 
dagna answers these questions in a candid, 
accurate record of his year on campus. 




the 1966 Lee Collegian . . . 



SIMMONS HALL 





He is gregarious, and likes to 

go where the action is . . . 

but sometimes he wants to 
be left alone. 





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When he 
goofs off, 

he does it 








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with all his heart . 



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but he knows 

that those who study 

will be the ones who 



get 



ahead. 



He is often moody, sometimes 
openly emotional, and always 
intensely expressive. 



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He tackles the 
little problems 
of life 



with gusto . . 





he competes fiercely, 

because he hates to be beaten 

at anything. 



13 





He treasures times 
of pride, 

and tension, 

and excitement, knows 

how to 

enjoy a spring 

day in the mountains . 








and remembers 
with nostalgia 

familiar sights 
and secret 



moments. 




15 



He doesn't have all the answers spiritually, 

but he is sincerely searching for 
them, and in his search he places 



great confidence in 





Reverend W. E. Tull, 
to whom 

this book is 
respectfully dedicated. 



The Reverend W. E. Tull, 

chaplain and Christian Service Director, 

is pastor, 

counsellor, 

and friend to the 1966 Lee Collegian. 

In a time of doubt and uncertainty, 

he preaches a message 

and lives a life 

of positive, consistent, Christianity. 

With gentle conviction 

he points us to God. 

We present to him our most precious possession, 

the 1966 Vindagua. 




17 









■ : 



Campus Life 



Life on campus at Lee College 

is a cascading mass of memories. 

It is bull sessions in the dorm, 

ball games, 

first dates with someone you weren't really sure 

you wanted to go out with, 

services on Sunday night that leave you feeling 

all cleaned out inside, 

a hamburger and fourteen cents change, 

raw knees in scuttlebut. 

It speaks in questions like 

"What is?", 

and "Got a tie I can borrow?", 

and "Have you been asked to the senior banquet yet?". 

It is being broke. 

It is phone calls from home, and 

sitting against a tree on the grass on front campus 

while the sun goes down. 

It is day after day after day 

on a campus 

with nine hundred other people. 



the 1966 Lee Collegian . . . ho\V he lived 








19 




It all started with 



renewed friendships 



Nine hundred students descended on the Lee College 
campus September 7. Almost half were there for the 
first time as students. The rest were happily hugging 
familiar necks and renewing old acquaintances. 

After the task of moving in came the ordeal of regis- 
tration, testing, and orientation. By the end of the day, 
freshmen for the most part were tired, confused, and 
thoroughly frustrated. 

The Upperclassmen, who had been through it all be- 
fore, took the day in stride. 



Gary Vincent, drafted for unloading duty by the 
welcoming committee, struggles with Brenda 
Pruett's shoe boxes. 



Blinds from a basement window frame freshmen as they wait in registration lines outside 
the Alumni Building. 




and the freshman flood. 




New students discuss the intricacies of registration as they wait to be processed. 



An unidentified freshman finds rest for her ach- 
ing feet on the Library Building steps. 





21 




Frosh get acquainted with the 
vets at the bulletin board, a 
favorite campus conglomera- 
tion point. 



Lulu Tyner and Chuck Atkins renew old acquaintances 
with Bev Voliva and Peggy Johnson outside the student 
center. 



Normal conditions 

finally prevailed 




It didn't take long for things to settle down 
to normal. Roommates soon learned to tolerate 
one another's peculiarities, the sophomore boys 
began to notice freshman girls, and things gen- 
erally began where they left off in May. 

New students were introduced to campus in- 
stitutions early. Vindagna picture-taking, chapel 
attendance, outside reading, club meetings, and 
those never-to-be forgotten trips to the cafeteria 
began the first week of school. 

Campus clubs were presented to the student 
body in a special chapel program by the Student 
Council. Club presidents made speeches to the 
assembled studentry, who all promptly rushed 
out and joined. 

And so, a day at a time, the year got under- 
way. 



22 



Vindagua picture time 
conies early at Lee. Here 
sponsor Honette Echols 
works with staff members 
Ray McCormick and Gin- 
ger Fleming. 



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when 900 students 
settled down. 



Same old food! Sophomore Bar- 
bara Newton faces the dreary 
prospect of another year of eat- 
ing away from home. 



Wanda Wilbanks — finally regis- 
tered — relaxes over a coke. 






Featured performers were the 
Tradewinds, popular folk singing 
group. 



Entertainment came 



in a music revue 



Kathy and Wanda Smith 'Yuk it up' in hillbilly fashion. 



Dale Cannon blows a hot sax. 







Stan Cagle finds himself in the midst of girls contemplating 
their chances of catching a feller. 



and five 
wagon loads 

of hay... 



Lee's brand new student body didn't have 
to wait long for organized entertainment. 

The Music Club kicked things off with 
a Music Revue October 2. The two-hour 
music show featured favorite campus per- 
formers from the year before, and intro- 
duced several first-year students. 

Delta Zeta's entertained freshmen girls 
a week later with a Wild West party in an 
old barn a few miles outside of town. 

Upsilon Xi sponsored its annual Sadie 
Hawkins Day the next weekend. In a hectic 
"chase day," normally shy girls shamelessly 
tracked down their men. The whole affair 
ended in a hayride on Friday night to a 
small lake in the countryside. 

Things started with a bang. 




Linda Harris closes in on helpless Rick Corley. She got him! 



Load 'em up! After a 45-minute wait, hayriders filled the wagons. 





Bible College freshman, Bill Wilson, re- 
flects the excitement of the Vikings 
opening game with Kentucky Christian. 




»:«:♦:♦ 



As we cruised, 



The fast pace of activity continued into the 
chill of late fall and early winter. 

Alpha Gamma Chi hauled a hundred fresh- 
men to the Tennessee River in late October for 
a moonlight boat trip. The fifty couples were 
hosted by Chi-men and their dates in a cruise 
up the river to Chickamauga Lake, then back 
again in time to reach campus by curfew. 

The next week came Fall Revival, followed 
by "long weekend" vacation. 

Upon returning in early November, students 
gathered on the ball field and paid a dime a 
whack to batter a helpless old Ford in demonstra- 
tion of their school spirit. Two days later they 
screamed and hollered from the sidelines while 
Kentucky Christian beat the Vikings in the first 
of twenty exciting basketball games. 



26 




Jym Avery, Kathy Hitte, Gene 
Pharr, and Darlia McLuhan on the 
rail during the Chi Cruise. 



crashed, and hollered 
through the fall. 



our 



way 



With admirers looking on, Earl 
Rowan and Dale Cannon pound 
happily away. 





Homecoming 
brought 

hundreds to a 
campus 

alive with 
activity. 



Co-captains Kenny Phillips and 
Bob Varner carry the Homecoming 
Queen's crown to center court dur- 
ing halftime ceremonies Thanks- 
giving Day. 



Thanksgiving Day and Homecoming combined to make 
November 25 a big day at Lee College. 

Hundreds of friends and alumni came to Cleveland for 
the Homecoming weekend. The clay began with a special 
Thanksgiving service at 10:00 a.m., when Dean R. Hollis 
Gause addressed the assembly. The rest of the morning was 
filled with class reunions and misty-eyed reminiscence. 

The big attraction of the afternoon was a basketball game 
between the Vikings and the Bryan College Lions. Lee won 
the game, and at halftime crowned Miss Janice Crafton 
'66 Homecoming Queen. 

The day was climaxed by the annual Thanksgiving Music 
Festival, when Dr. Delton L. Alford led four choirs and 
the brass ensemble through a three-hour religious concert. 
Special guest performer was Max Morris, piano stylist from 
Greenville, South Carolina. 




Guest artist Max Morris performs. 



A hushed crowd watches the candlelight finale of the Thanksgiving Music Festival. 




Worship was an important 

part of campus life 

From their first Sunday night on campus, Lee students learn that worship 
is a prominent part of school life. Religious chapel is required three morn- 
ings weekly, in addition to regular Sunday evening services. 

Campus interest was dominated the third week of October by the Fall 
Revival. Morning speaker for the week was the Reverend Frank Lemons, 
pastor of the Church of God in Alexandria, Virginia. Reverend J. Frank 
Spivey, pastor from Atlanta, Georgia, preached each night. The Fall Revival 
emphasized the theme of "total commitment," with music and messages 
integrated around that phrase. 

Students took a thorough look at the doctrine of the second coming of 
Christ in the Premillenial Conference, an event of January 7-9. President 
Hughes packed six services into the weekend, invited Reverend George Britt, 
Reverend George Alford, and Reverend George Lemons to speak at the 
conference. Each treated a different area of the doctrine of the premillenial 
return. 




Reverend Wade H. Horton, general 
overseer, was a special Sunday night 
speaker. 

Reverend J. Frank Spivey. 



Reverend Frank Lemons. 



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30 



The major religious event of the 
second semester was the Spring Re- 
vival, another annual event which 
this year came the second week of 
March. 

The Reverend Dr. Charles W. 
Conn, first assistant general over- 
seer of the Church of God, was the 
morning speaker for the convoca- 
tion. The executive liaison officer 
for the Lee College Board of Di- 
rectors, Dr. Conn had been to cam- 
pus on two previous occasions as 
revival speaker. 

A young pastor from Lakeland, 
Florida, the Reverend Carl Rich- 
ardson spoke to overflow crowds in 
the Spring Revival evening services. 
Reverend Richardson was here as 
night evangelist in 1964.. 





Reverend Charles W. Conn. 



Reverend Carl Richardson. 



President Hughes in a Sunday 
night service. 



Lee's Campus Choir, frequent performers in chapel services, are 
shown here during the Fall Revival. 





31 




A scene from the award-winning film, WINE OF MORNING. 




Miss Janet Morgan, talented young pianist. 



Musical and dramatic events 



Dr. and Mrs. Morris Taylor, duo-pianists just returned 
from England. 




Musical recitals and concerts provided a large 
part of the entertainment at Lee in '65-'66. 

Besides its two annual music festivals, the 
Music Department this year presented two ora- 
torios, performed by the Campus Choir and se- 
lected soloists. These were portions of Messiah, 
a familiar work of Handel (December 14), and 
Crucifixion, by Sir John Stainer (March 31). 

Mr. Porter Heaps came to campus March 27 
for an organ recital. A native of Evanston, Il- 
linois and graduate of Northwestern University, 
Mr. Heaps has performed before more Americans 
than any other living organist. He was warmly 
received at Lee. 

April 14 was the date of a concert by duo- 
pianists Dr. and Mrs. Morris Taylor. The hus- 
band-wife team has just returned from a year 
in England, now serve on the music faculty at 
Southern Missionary College in Collegedale, Ten- 
nessee. 

Musical Pomposity, a gospel concert which 
drew a near-capacity crowd, came to campus un- 
der the auspices of LTpsilon Xi. It featured pianist 
Max Morris and the Ministers' Trio. 



Miss Janet Morgan, talented young artist from 
Tulsa, Oklahoma, performed in concert in the 
Lee Auditorium May 12. Miss Morgan is the 
niece of faculty teacher Jim Bilho, has performed 
as soloist with several symphony orchestras in 
the South and Midwest. 

An audience of over 700 watched the screen 
showing of Wine of Morning, an event of March 
17. Presented by Alpha Gamma Chi, this film 
is billed as "the most honored evangelical movie 
of our time." It projected a fictional account of 
the life of Barrabas. 

The Forensic Club staged The Night Owl, 
a three-act comedy-mystery by Frank Spahn. The 
play centered on the adventures of a group of 
stranded travelers in a "haunted" house. It was 
directed by Robert Humbertson, presented on 
March 18 and 19. 




Organist Porter Heaps, photographed during his March concert 
here. 



filled the school calendar . . . 



The entire acting cast of Forensic-sponsored THE NIGHT OWL. 




33 



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Cleveland, T^ 37311 j 



Relieving the 
relentless pressure 
of classes 
and books 
and exams. 




Lee College is a school, though we sometimes 
resent the fact. 

Weary minds and sagging eyelids notwith- 
standing, the academic process goes on. There 
are many things to aid the student in his study: 
periodical and closed-stack libraries, tape labs 
for modern language drills, listening stations for 
music study, scientific experimentation labs, off- 
campus field trips. Teachers obligingly scatter 
term papers through the year to keep things in- 
teresting. 

Exams are our ever-present ulcer stimulant. 
They make the campus a giant pressure cooker. 
Final semester exams this year came on January 
18-22 and May 21-26; Bible College compre- 
hensives, on April 19. 

Those who survived will probably come back 
next year for more. 



Lab assistant Ray McCormick helps Glenda 
Cleghorn chase fungi across a microscope 
slide. 




34 



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At the library's main circulation desk, eve- 
ning always finds a crowd. 




The front row of a music theory class can be 
a frightful spot — inhabited in this case by Larry 
Lecroy, Dwayne McLuhan, and Gene Pharr. 



Modern language students spend two hours week- 
ly in the fifteen -station tape lab. 




35 



We gradually adjusted to 

the demands of communal livin 





The favorite pastime in all four girls' dorms is 
rolling hair. Priscilla Berry illustrates. 



36 



Over two-thirds of Lee's 900 students live on cam- 
pus in one of six dormitories. Men call Ellis or Walker 
Hall home; coeds can choose from Simmons, Nora 
Chambers, East Wing, and New Dorm. 

Whatever the name on the outside of the building, 
staying there is not quite like living at home, (under- 
statement). Probably the most difficult thing to adjust 
to is dorm rules. This is especially true for the girls, 
whose myriads of regulations are closely enforced by 
their supervisors. The boys usually get off more lightly. 

Though communal living brings some restrictions 
and problems, it has its compensations. Many of the 
lasting memories of college days hark back to cold 
showers and midnight water fights and those eternal 
bull sessions. The rough-and-tumble of dormitory life 
breeds a special brand of togetherness. 








The confines of dorm life make savages of these usually gentle guys, whose 
victim is Bill Winters. Destination: shower-room. 



Supervisor B. H. Williams takes 
on John Wheeler in Walker Hall 
checkers, as Wayne Wilder raids 
the refrigerator for cow juice. 





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! 






Nora Chambers dorm has a girl-to-phone ratio of 
approximately 75-to 1. The result is a waiting line 
like the one Linda Blevins encounters here. 




3^-^*4/ 



37 






With quite a bit of help 



from some older people. 





Momma and Poppa Muncy, cafeteria bosses. 



B. H. Williams, daddy of Walker Hall. 




Mr. and Mrs. Rushing, guardians of the 
between-meal snack. 



Mrs. Grace Golden, who distributes the 
goodies from home. 




38 













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Mrs. Hathcock, who runs the show at 
Simmons Hall. 



Jean Hampton, campus pill-pusher. 



Very few could survive the rigors of campus 
life without a little adult help. 

It takes the Muncys to cook the food, the 
Goldens to sort the mail, the Hamptons to inject 
the needles, the Rushings to fix the snacks, the 
Hathcocks and Wiles and Greens and Millers 
to tuck the little girls in at night, the Williams 
and Robinsons to ride herd on the young bucks. 

These members of the Lee College staff are 
the ones who get down to the student level and 
rub shoulders with them every day. They defi- 
nitely are an important part of campus life at 
Lee College. 




Mrs. Wiles, who tucks 'em in at Nora 
Chambers. 



New Dorm supervisor Alean Miller. 






Mrs. Green, who keeps East 
Wing: girls in the "straight 
and narrow." 



We tolerated fads 



and learned to accept 



One of Jym Avery's more con- 
servative paisley ties. 



Sharon Godfrey sports white go- 
go boots. 






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IN 



the unusual 



Fads are as common as rain, and Lee 
has its share of both. Only here could 
the half-baked expression "What is?" be- 
come as widely accepted on campus as 
semester exams and 'C students. 

This year saw the return of the wide, 
super-loud paisley tie and the rapid 
spread of the attache case craze. The 
girls continued to wear textured hose and 
some began to put them in white boots. 
Shaggy forehead bangs and blocked hair- 
cuts were "in" for the guys. 

At least there were no yo-yo's or hula 
hoops. 





The attache case, prerequisite for the 
dashing-young-man-about-campus look. 



Textured hose adorn the legs of Carol 
Morgan. 



These shaggy locks cover a head which 
belongs to Ron Ferguson. 






Gary Sharp and Joyce Fithian, 
campus dress-alikes. 



If this were a pagan campus, Cupid would 
win an election for "Favorite God" with no com- 
petition. 

Of course, he works hard enough for it. On 
a warm spring day, anything that moves is prob- 
ably a couple. On front campus, in the student 
center, in the cafeteria, people seem to come in 
boy/girl pairs. 

Lee students are allowed to date off campus 
until 11:30 on Friday and Saturday nights, after 
chapel until 11:00 on Sundays. All dating is 
done in groups of four or more, with the privilege 
withheld from students having more than ten 
demerits. 

With Cupid being the smoothie that he is, 
permanent-type couples are bound to emerge 
from the social maelstrom. A few are pictured 
here. 



And some decided to face the 



Larry Brittain and Inez Wilcox 
react differently to the camera. 



Sonny Chambley and Peggy 
Johnson pause outside the can- 
teen. 




42 




Steve Gwaltney and Pam 
Osborne, barely six inches 
apart, blow "sweet noth- 
ings" into a common coke. 





Bill Avery and Brenda Davis in the 
"sweet sorrow" of parting on the East 
Wing steps. 



world in pairs. 



Sharon Townley smashes David Hinely 
in a student center checker game. 






Remember those packed-house crowds at the ball games? 



And that was 1965-66, a year 

jam-packed with 



and the long lines at registration? 




. . . and the madness of Sadie Hawkins 
Day? 



44 




warm, 
wacky, 

wonderful 

memories. 




. . . and the day in chapel when President and Mrs. 
Hughes received this gift from the faculty? 



It was a terrific year. Like all the rest, it had a way of slipping 
past before we quite knew what was happening. It was crammed 
with strange people and big nights and hard tests and warm 
friendships and crazy moods. 

The people who keep the records will somewhat stiffly label 
it the "1965-'66 school term"— but we'll probably always re- 
member it as The Year. 

We were lucky to be here. 



45 



Academics 



Academics is what school is all about; 

it is why we came here. 

It mixes the musty odor of the lab 

with the surging thrill of discovery. 

Academics embraces the blatant noise of the practice studio 

and the death-like silence of the library 

all at the same time. 

It can speak in the droning voice of a professor 

or the angry shriek of a class bell 

or the grunts and groans of a freshman phys ed class 

on the gym floor. 

In the language lab it is microphones and headsets. 

In the classroom it is pen and notebook. 

In the library it is closed stacks and Readers' Guide. 

It is tibia and fibula 

and ibid and op cit 

and 1066 was the Battle of Hastings and don't forget it. 

Behind it all is people with brains 

and the will to use them. 

The president, 

and administrators, 

and teachers, 

and hopefully someday many of us. 






the 1966 Lee Collegian . . . what he Studied 



46 







47 



President 
Ray H. Hughes 



The Reverend Doctor Ray H. Hughes has served with honor and distinction 
since 1960 as president of Lee College. 

His administration has been exciting and progressive. The history of the school 
since he came is a phoenix-from-the-ashes story. He assumed the leadership of 
a struggling, anemic school and in six years has made it into a bustling, growing 
college. 

President Hughes' administration has seen unprecedented progress in every 
area. Physical property improvements include a new Administration Building, 
new Science Building, new gymnasium, remodeled auditorium, cafeteria, and 
student center. Academically, the junior college has achieved regional accredita- 
tion and set up the four-year liberal arts program to be initiated next year. In 
enrollment the school has grown from less than 400 to the present record figure 
of 894. 

Since 1941 President Hughes has been a minister in the Church of God, 
serving with singular success in many different areas of church work. He at- 
tended Lee College (then BTS) in ministerial preparation, and was honored for 
outstanding service to his church and alma mater in 1964 when the Board of 
Directors bestowed on him the Degree of Doctor of Letters. 

President Hughes holds the B.A. degree from v Tennessee Wesleyan College 
with a double major in religion and education, and the M.S. degree from the 
University of Tennessee in educational administration and supervision. He is 
a candidate for the Ed.D. degree at the University of Tennessee, with completion 
of the program projected for June, 1966. 



48 



P"^ 




■■■■■H 



Board of Directors Makes 



Plans for "66 




Rapid growth has kept the board unusually active in 
the '65-'66 school year. The group met with the Presi- 
dent's Council in November, oversaw the completion 
and • dedication of the New Science Building, and set 
up academic departments for the liberal arts expansion 
projected for next September. As is traditional, the en- 
tire board participated in cap-and-gown exercises at the 
closing of school. 

The Reverend H. D. Williams was appointed chair- 
man of the Lee College Board of Directors in early No- 
vember by church officials. He moved into the spot left 
by the Reverend D. C. Boatwright. Taking Williams' 
chair on the board was Dr. Donald Gibson. Williams 
now serves as state overseer of North Carolina, and re- 
sides in Charlotte. He has been a member of the Board 
of Directors for five years. 

Members of the Lee College Board of Directors in- 
clude Williams, Gibson, Cecil B. Knight, James Stephens, 
W. Paul Stallings, all Church of God ministers, along 
with Lee Watson and Grady P. O'Neil, businessmen. 

Duties of the board include appointment of president 

and faculty members, setting of salaries, and deciding 

general school administration policy. The group meets 

quarterly. 

Left to right: D. C. Boatwright, Paul Stallings, James Stephens, H. D. Williams, Charles W. Conn, Cecil B. Knight, Lee 
Watson, Grady P. O'Neil. 



Rev. H. D. Williams 




50 



Administration Sets 
Mood for Progress 



STANLEY BUTLER serves as registrar for the school. 
He holds a B.S. from Jacksonville State College and an 
M.A. and Ed.S. from George Peabody College for Teach- 



ers. 



MARVIN GOLDEN is business manager of Lee Col- 
lege. A Church of God layman, he had considerable ex- 
perience in business before joining the school's admin- 
istrative staff. 

J. H. WALKER, JR. is dean of the junior college. 
He is a key figure in the four-year expansion program, 
holds the B.A., M.A., and B.D. degrees, with classroom 
work completed toward a Ph.D. at the University of Ten- 
nessee. 

R. H. GAUSE, back at Lee after a year's sabbatical 
leave, serves as Bible College dean. His educational back- 
ground includes a B.A., B.D., and work toward a Ph.D. 
at Emory University. 




Stanley Butler 




Marvin Golden 




J. H. Walker, Jr. 



R. H. Gause 




51 




Dr. Hubert P. Black 



Administration 



DR. HUBERT P. BLACK serves this year as the school's 
first Dean of Students. A former Academy principal, he holds 
the Ed.D. from the University of Tennessee and is the admin- 
istrative officer in charge of all student affairs. 

DR. TERRELL McBRAYER, also a recent Ed.D. graduate 
from the University of Tennessee, is Lee College Guidance Di- 
rector. Besides his campus duties, he serves in several important 
posts of civic and community responsibility. 

The Reverend D. C. BOATWRIGHT, until October chair- 
man of the Board of Directors, now is Development Director, 
a two-year-old position created to steer and nurture the expansion 
of the college. 

The Reverend EDWIN TULL is in his second year as chap- 
lain and Christian Service Director. He came to Lee from Mil- 
ford, Delaware, and directs religious life on campus. 

DR. AVIS SWIGER handles student affairs on the distaff 
side as Dean of Women. She holds an honorary Litt.D. from 
Lee College. 




Dr. Terrell McBrayer 




Rev. D. C. Boatwright 




Rev. Edwin T? 



Dr. Avis Swiger 



52 




Nine Handle 
Office Tasks 

A smooth-running administrative operation depends up- 
on an efficient staff. Lee's corps of hard-working secretaries 
and office aides provides adequate assistance to the college 
administration. 

An advancement this year for the Lee secretarial crew 
came in November when Evaline Echols joined local sec- 
retaries in organizing a Cleveland chapter of the National 
Secretarial Association and was elected as an officer of the 
new group. 




Mrs. Polly Miller, Business Staff 



Mrs. Betty Baldree 
PBX Switchboard Operator 





Mrs. Ulna Black 
Business Office Manager 



Mrs. Sybil Butler, Business Staff 




Office Staff 




Mrs. Evaline Echols, Secretary to the President 




tf 



Brenda Johnson, Registrar's Staff 





Mrs. Brenda Hughes, Business Staff 




Mrs. Mary Blalock, Registrar's Staff 



Mrs. Wanda Griffith, Registrar's Staff 



54 



Library Staff Keeps 
Pace With Expansion 



Lee's growing library continued to keep pace 
with the rapid development of the school in 
1965-'66. Miss LeMoyne Swiger handled the 
staff again this year. 

The library has been the object of an inten- 
sive expansion drive for the past two years in 
preparation for next year's move into a third 
year of liberal arts. Students returning to Lee 
this September found both PFC room and lan- 
guage lab overflowing with used books gathered 
from various sources by friends of the school. 
Last year the library expanded its physical facil- 
ities to include separate floors for periodicals 
and a philosophy/religion department. 

Two new staff members joined the library 
workers this year. Mrs. French Arrington began 
work with the staff in a full-time capacity, mov- 
ing to that spot from the college faculty. Also 
added was Mrs. Clifford Dennison, night librar- 
ian. 



Miss LeMoyne Swiger, librarian 





Mrs. Jo Ann Humbertson, Philosophy/Religion 



Mrs. Clifford Dennison, night librarian 




55 



Library Staff 




Mrs. French Arrington 




Miss Moquita Hurst 




Mrs. Cleone McLain, Circulation Librarian 




Mrs. Doris Tull, Periodicals Librarian 



56 





In the final analysis, what really matters about 
a school is its 



Curriculum 



In the crazy kaleidoscope of college life, the jumbled 
colors often shift so rapidly that basic patterns are over- 
looked in the spectacular bursts of color. 

Athletics, musical events, dating, elections, school trips, 
club activities, committee meetings, parties, play rehearsals, 
dormitory bull sessions all combine to make the college 
pace a fast and furious race against clock and calendar. 
In this hurry-hurry atmosphere, the area of campus which 
is usually thought of least is the classroom. 

What goes on in the classroom is the heart of college 
life. Tiring as the routine of classes and reports and exams 
may become, it doesn't take long for the student to realize 
that what he does academically is the thing that really 
counts in the long run. All the pruning and chiseling and 
refining that ultimately produces the capable, alert young 
man or woman must be done in the long hours of classes 
and study periods. 

And thus it is that, to a great extent, the value of a col- 
lege to its students is determined by its offerings in the 
academics, by which realization the following pages are 
devoted to curriculum at Lee College. 




Ministerial students find a whole new world in 



Theolo 




Lee College was founded in 1918 for the training of ministers 
for the Church of God. Since that time the educational thrust 
of the school has broadened to include many other areas of study, 
but still perhaps the most vital subject area at Lee is theology. 

Lee College offers a B.A. in Biblical Education which requires 
two years of Greek and basic theological study. Dean of the Bible 
College is R. H. Gause, who returned to the college this fall to 
resume his duties after a year's sabbatical leave in graduate study 
at Emory University. 

Credit hours required for graduation were reduced this year 
from 139 to 130 hours for the Biblical Education degree, with 
many standard courses reduced. 










Dr. Donald Bowdle, who holds a Ph.D. 
in Greek studies, teaches three years of 
Greek, Philosophy, and Apologetics. 



First year theology students take notes 
furiously in Mr. Arrington's Introductory 
Doctrines class. 



Mr. William Henry teaches a full slate of Old 
and New Testament survey classes. 



58 





I 



*•' j 



The new Philosophy and Religion section of the library 
helps theology students in research. Junior Smith is 
pictured here. 





An authority in the area of church history, 
Mr. Elmer Odom spent the summer study- 
ing in the Holy Land. 



Mr. French Arrington, who 
taught summer sessions in the- 
ology here, lectures to upper- 
classmen. 




The Rev. J. H. Walker, a former general overseer of the 
Church of God, teaches religion part-time in the Bible 



College. 




59 



Scores of Lee's students are attracted by the 
department of 



Music 



Certainly the most spectacular curriculum 
area at Lee this year is music. A part of the 
Bible College division, the music department is 
growing more rapidly than any other academic 
area of study. 

Lee now offers baccalaureate degrees in 
Church Music and Music Education. Depart- 
ment head is Dr. Delton L. Alford, who holds 
the Ph.D. in Music Education from Florida State 
University. 

New faculty members in the music depart- 
ment this year are Miss Sue McGhee, teaching 
piano, and Mr. Jerold Teachey, voice instructor. 
Both hold the masters degree and teach in the 
classroom as well as in the studio. 

Practical areas of music receive great atten- 
tion in the music department with each music 
major required to meet certain recital require- 
ments. Students may receive classroom credit 
for work with several performing groups, in- 
cluding Lee Singers, Campus Choir, Ladies' 
Choir, and Concert Ensemble. Men's Chorale 
was organized on campus in September of '65 
becoming the departments newest musical group. 



■B ^H 




1 ] 




■H 


* 




Mr. Teachey, bass-baritone voice 
teacher, was a featured soloist in the 
presentation of Handel's MESSIAH. 



mws 





Dr. Alford leads the Lee College Sing- 
ers in warm-up exercises before a 
chapel performance. 



60 





Miss Sue McGhee graduated from 
Lee in 1963, now is back to teach piano 
and direct ladies' choir. 



Mrs. Bertha Gugler is a class- 
room instructor, and teaches 
piano and organ. 



m> 



Mrs. Ruby Hurst teaches piano 
and sponsors the Music Club in 
her spare time. 



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mm 1 





s / s s ' ' 



Roosevelt Miller, voice teacher, enjoys 
singing any time, any place, any where. 



Miss Stroud gives assistance to 
organ student Aurelia Amick. 



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61 



Bible College teaches the philosophy 
and methods of 

Christian 
Education 



Those interested in an area of full-time Chris- 
tian service outside the pulpit find learning in 
the Christian Education program of study which 
leads to a B.A. in the Bible College. 

The CE curriculum includes seminars and 
field study work in practical Christian education 
problems. All students are required to fill weekly 
reports of Christian service activity. Heading up 
the CE faculty is J. Martin Baldree, Jr., one of 
the Church of God's leading authorities in the 
field of Christian Education. 



Mrs. Beatrice Odom meets a special ap- 
pointment with a Vacation Bible School 
student. 





Application of principles learned in class is a phase 
of Christian Education courses. Here Mike Errington 
teaches a kindergarten class. 




Filmstrips help Mr. Baldree in his Christian 
Education classes. 



Visual Aids are instrumental in gaining insight into 
practical aspects of Christian Education. 




62 



Greek, French, German, Spanish are Lee's offerings 



in 



Foreign Languages 



All Lee's degree programs call for at least two years of a foreign 
language. Students may choose from Greek, German, French, 
or Spanish. A fifteen-station language lab helps in the conver- 
sational aspect of the study. 

The classical language program got a boost this year when 
the Bible College added a third year of Greek to its curriculum. 
This makes it possible for a religion major to take eighteen hours 
for a Greek minor. 

Charles Beach, who has studied at the University of Paris in 
France, heads the foreign language department. 



Fluency best describes Charles Beach, who teach- 
es both French and German. 





Mr. Winston Elliott adds interest 
to Spanish class with available 
audio aids. 



Language students meet required sessions 
twice weekly in the language lab, located 
in the Library Building basement. 



Occasionally sleep overcomes even the most in- 
dustrious bilinguist, as Bill Winters here. 




63 




No one escapes without taking a course in 



English 



Lee's English department has received special attention in the 
last two years as the core of the upcoming liberal arts expansion. 

This year the English faculty gained a new member in Philip 
Morris, who holds the M.A. in English from the University of 
Tennessee. Miss Peggy Humphrey also joins the college faculty 
after teaching for several years in the Academy. Hal Munck and 
Lucille Walker teach part-time in the English department. 

Regular offerings from the English department were in the 
curriculum this year, with one third year course, Group Discus- 
sion, presented in anticipation of next year's expansion. 





A student receives practical help from speech instructor, 
Mr. Robert Humbertson. 



Miss Peggy Humphrey, a lover of drama, 
joins the college faculty after several years 
of Academy teaching. 



While students are taking test, Mr. Philip 
Morris waits patiently. He recently re- 
ceived his M.A. from the University of 
Tennessee. 





64 




Mr. Hal Munck reads excerpts from latest 
Newsweek to his class. For several years 
he has taught a night class of journalism. 



Besides a publishing house position, Mrs. 
Lucille Walker teaches a course in English 
Composition. 





Mrs. Nina Driggers is a lecturer of English 
and American Literature. 




Mrs. Helen Symes accepts term paper from one of her 

eturiontc 



students 




Jim Forrester applys face makeup to Leon Mainer for 
drama production. 



Lee offers two-year terminal and preparatory course in 

Commercial Arts 



Lee's most thoroughly mechanized department is that 
of commercial arts. Early this year the school purchased 
IBM computers to make possible classes in data processing 
and punched card methods. Another new course for '66 is 
a third-year course in secretarial development taught by 
Mrs. Lucille Elliott. 

Presently students work in commercial arts in either 
the two-year terminal course or a two-year program pre- 
paratory to work toward a B.A. at another school. By spring 
of 1968 Lee plans to offer baccaluareate degrees in business 
administration. 





Shorthand proves to be a solemn task 
for Anne Roberts. 



Putting studied skills to practice is 
profitable for commercial arts stu- 
dents. 





Through a direct teacher-to-student 
approach, Mr. Fabiani helps students 
better understand IBM. 



"Practical" seems to describe the secretarial courses taught by 
Mrs. Elliott. 




In a three-hour night class, Mr. Cox 
teaches Punched Card Methods. 



66 



Hard muscles and quick reflexes are valuable assets in 

Physical Education 

Training the body is the business of Lee's physical education 
department. P.E., as it is commonly tagged, is required for all 
first and second-year students. The overflow of students this 
year made Phys. Ed. one of the few courses to be scheduled 
for Saturday classes. 

Both men's and ladies' classes "work out" twice weekly in the 
gymnasium. Dale Hughes and Roxie Carr teach physical education 
at Lee. Besides normal calisthenic and sports activity, Hughes 
this year required papers and performance critiques of his stu- 
dents. Miss Carr spiced her classes with lectures on athletics 



and swimming lessons at the local YMCA. 







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Playing tennis is a most enjoyable 
pastime for Miss Ruthanna Carr, 
girls' physical education teacher. 



A strenuous, action-packed physical education class helps to 
make a full day for the girls. 




In a break from the exhausting physical fitness program this 
class of boys enjoys softball. 



Mr. Dale Hughes, 
Physical Education 
Director and Var- 
sity Coach renders 
a little extra in golf 
instruction. 




Lee keeps pace with growing national interest in 



Mathematics 



Sputnik I in 1956 triggered a nationwide obsession with 
science and mathematics. The demand for math at Lee has re- 
flected the national trend with definite increase in recent years. 

Still one of the school's smallest departments, mathematics 
at Lee consist largely of basic math, college algebra, and plane 
trigonometry. Calculus, originally to be added to the curriculum 
in '65-'66, now has been rescheduled for inclusion next year. 

Twenty-five Lee students use facilities at Bradley High School 
each week for the study of Engineering drawing and graphical 
analysis. Mathematics 108, a freshman course in modern math, 
is taught this year for the first time as part of an expanded 
offering in mathematics. 




Involved explanations of ledger sheets 
are a unique feature of Mr. Kersey's 
bookkeeping class. 



M 







Teaching a heavy load in Math keeps 
Mr. McDaniels rather busy. 




A few helpful explana- 
tions add a great deal 
to Mr. Clabo's Basic 
Math class. 



68 




Putting the proper lines in the proper place is 
the task confronting Gaynor Newsome. 




Though it may look cluttered, this mechanical 
drawing class is organized. 





Mr. Dave Boat w right 
teaches a part time load 
in Trigonometry and Alge- 
bra. 



Making fine corrections is 
only a part of the job for 
Mr. Adams, mechanical 
drawing instructor. 



69 



Psychology, sociology, history and education are included in the 

Social Sciences 



Lee's move next year into a four-year liberal arts pro- 
gram will see distinct departmental lines drawn between 
social science and education, which are presented together 
here. 

Teacher training is presently one of the biggest attractions 
of Lee's liberal arts program. A full schedule of courses 
in this area includes study of descriptive statistics, educa- 
tional psychology, educational history, and child psychology. 
These courses are on the 300 level, and anticipate next 
year's expansion. 

The scope of offerings in social studies also is being 
enlarged to facilitate a full third-year course of studies for 
'66-'67. Second semester saw the addition to the curriculum 
of Sociology 3 1 1 , a three-hour course in introductory social 
work. 




A new teacher to the campus, Mr. Donald 
Rowe, converses with students between 
classes. 





Learning is increased by the group discus- 
sion method employed by these psychology 
students. 



With a smile on his face, Mr. Lillard, 
a part time teacher, lectures to his 
history class. 




During a free hour these students take a look 
at the Vietnam situation. 



70 






In one of his free moments out of 
history class, Mr. Jimmy Bilbo visits 
the Library. 



Mr. Gilbert, an Education and 
Psychology teacher introduces a 
new course, Marriage and the 
Family, to the curriculum. 



A former missionary to India, Miss Dora P. Myers 
lectures in Missions and Psychology. 



Mr. Honette Echols, instructor in Sociology 
and History, watches students as they leave 
class. 




Illustrative filmstrips help Mr. Jordan provide 
an interesting instruction for his students. 





71 



Lee's newest building houses the 
expanding department of 

Science 



The recent erection of a new, quarter- 
million-dollar science building sets the 
stage for continued growth by Lee's 
science department. The move this spring 
from the basement of Tharp Hall to 
Ocoee Street is the most significant de- 
partmental advance made at Lee in 
years. 

Mr. Clifford Dennison rejoins the 
science faculty this year after two years 
absence for advanced study. Lee's ad- 
ministration this year expanded science 
offerings at the first year level, dividing 
biology into two full-year courses in 
botany and zoology. 




Teaching a full load of Biology doesn't hinder Mr. Morris 
Riggs from extra research. 




Interesting labs help Mrs. Charles Beach make 
Chemistry a more interesting course of study. 




After additional studies in science, Mr. Clifford 
Dennison returns to Lee College to teach Physics 
and Biology. 




It falls the lot of the frog 
to suffer cruel biology dis- 
sections. 




Dr. Chalmer Chastain, a local physician, doubles 
as night-class zoology instructor. 



Physical science is taught by 
part-time instructor, Duran 
Palmertree. 





Lab assistant Ray McCormick prepares a slide for 
class reviewing. 



73 



Features 



Features is the special domain 

of the head-and-shoulders-above-the-crowd man. 

It is a salute to strength, 

a respect for accomplishment, 

a recognition of superiority. 

Features takes us down the ramp at Parade of Favorites; 

it takes us into the speakers stand 

with the man who finished first in his class; 

it takes us into the ballot box 

with Mr. and Miss Lee College. 

It is all glamour and spotlights 

and honor and applause 

and little gold achievement medals. 

But not quite. 

It is also long hours of study 

or practice 

or painful self-cultivation. 

It is the fruit of a dogged determination 

to do something, 

to be somebody. 

And it is our tribute to those few 

in our own ranks 

to whom "potential" is not an empty word. 






the 1966 Lee Collegian . . . what he achieved 



74 




75 



MR. 
LEE 



COLLEGE I 






Mr. Kyle Hudson 



Mr. Lee College for 1965-'66 is Mr. Kyle Hudson, a Bible College 
junior from Wyandotte, Michigan. Elected by vote of the student body, 
Mr. Hudson is at Lee in preparation for the Christian ministry. 

Presently Mr. Hudson serves as vice-president of the student body 
and president of Upsilon Xi. He is an active member of Pioneers for 
Christ, leading a summer witness team to Oregon in 1965. Since com- 
ing to Lee two years ago, he has served on the Student Council, Concert 
Band, and Campus Choir. 

Mr. Hudson was graduated from the Junior College last May with 
an A. A., now is working toward a B.A. in Biblical Education. He plans 
further seminary work in the future. 



76 




Miss Dawn Wooderson 



Miss Dawn Wooderson was chosen by the student body as Miss Lee 
College for 1965-'66. She is in her second year in the Music Depart- 
ment at Lee, working toward a B.M.E. with a major in organ. Her 
three-semester grade point average stands at 2.7. 

The daughter of a Church of God minister, Miss Wooderson came 
to Lee from Durban, South Africa, in 1964. She lived briefly in London, 
England before crossing to the United States. 

Since being at Lee, Miss Wooderson has been in Campus Choir and 
Lee Singers, serves as chaplain of Delta Zeta Society, and was fourth 
runner-up in the '66 Parade of Favorites. She presently maintains South 
African citizenship, but has "no plans to return there permanently." 





MISS 

LEE 

COLLEGE 




Leading their classes 



66 Honor 



Mr. Denny Dennison 



Miss Linda Sue Nettles 



DENNY DENNISON, second year liberal arts 
major, is valedictorian of the Junior College. At 
the end of three semesters, his cumulative grade 
point average is 2.943. Mr. Dennison resides 
in Cleveland, Tennessee. He is a member of Phi 
Theta Kappa, and plays intramural basketball 
and softball. He plans to stay at Lee for two 
more years. 



LINDA NETTLES, a native of New Orleans, 
Louisiana, maintains a 2.843 average to take 
salutatorian honors in the Junior College. Miss 
Nettles is a commercial arts major, serving as 
president of Phi Beta Lambda. She is a member 
of Phi Theta Kappa and the Vindagua staff. 



78 




Graduates 



Mr. Jack Oakley 



Mr. Denzell Teague 




m j | 



i 

3 3 M I 3 8 





]ACK OAKLEY is 1966 valedictorian of the 
Bible College. He maintained a 2.826 grade 
point average for three and a half semesters as 
a Biblical Education major. Mr. Oakley is study- 
ing for the Christian ministry, and is presentlv 
vice-president of Pi Delta Omicron. He now lives 
in Cleveland, Tennessee. 



DENZELL TEAGUE, Bible College saluta- 
torian, has a 2.703 grade point average. He is 
a Biblical Education major, and now serves as 
president of Pi Delta Omicron. In previous years 
at Lee he has been a member of the Lee Singers 
and associate editor of the Vindagua. Mr. Teague 
is a native of Hobbs, New Mexico. 



79 





Kenny Phillips 

Men's Athletic Award 




Dawn Wooderson 
Music Award (Academic) 



Bob Varner 

Tharp Award 





Darlia McLuhan 

Music Award (Performance) 



Jym Avery 

Art Award 



Denzell Teague 

Balfour Award 



Academic Awards 




One of the highlights of commencement week at Lee each spring 
is Honors Night, this year an event of May 22. On that occasion the 
year's academic awards are presented to the student body. 

All academic awards winners are chosen by vote of the faculty, with 
the exception of the Math Award, which is determined by competitive 
exams. 

The Tharp Award is given to the graduating senior each year who 
in the opinion of the faculty is most likely to make the greatest con- 
tribution to the Church of God. 

The Balfour Award is given for general excellence in loyalty, schol- 
arship and citizenship. 





Marilyn Webb 

Women's Athletic Award 




Denny Dennison 

Science Award 



Bob Varner 

Classical Language Award 




Anne Roberts 

Commerce Award 



Jack Oakley 

Bible Award 








Dennis McGuire 

Student Government Award 




Joyce King 

English Award 




Danny Keller 

Modern Language Award 




Wayne Parrish 

History Award 




Special guests at the Parade of Favorites tea were 
President and Mrs. Hughes, here being presented to 
Linda Harris and escort Bill Avery by Paul Conn. 



On January 14 the Vindagna presented its 
fourth annual Parade of Favorites, a four-hour 
talent and beauty extravaganza. This event is 
the school's most outstanding student production 
each year, dominating campus interest for weeks. 

Twenty campus groups were invited in No- 
vember to elect a "favorite girl" to represent them 
in the pageant. Escorts were chosen for all the 
girls, and the forty participants met with POF 
director Paul Conn and Vindagna personnel for 
a kickoff dinner December 8. 

The week of the pageant was a hectic one. 
The girls attended a luncheon, a formal tea, 
private interviews with the judges, and count- 
less rehearsals. Charlie Rose and his crew spent 
night-long sessions working on the stage with 
artist Jym Avery. 

Judges for the event scored contestants on 
a 1 to 10 scale in each of four areas (talent, 
gown appearance, interview, and total impact) 
to arrive at final scores from which to select win- 
ners. 

The week was full of recognition, excitement, 
and pressure. 



Twenty Coeds Compete in 




Panel of judges interviews Jane Colquitt in the Student Center. 



Nadine Farabee charms escort Don 
Goff at the POF tea. 



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82 




Linda Copley and Phil Greeson in a late-night ramp re- 
hearsal. 



Stage crew members Jim Stephens 
and Ronnie Hyde lower one of 
many scenes into place. 




Fourth Parade of Favorites 




Serving at the POF tea were VIN- 
DAGUA staff members Pam Os- 
borne, Aurelia Amick, Sandy Mulli- 
nax, Sharon Godfrey and Jane 
Starnes. 



Darlia McLuhan Wins "66 Title 



Pageant judges selected Miss Darlia McLuhan as the winner of the '66 Parade 
of Favorites. Sweetheart of Alpha Gamma Chi for '65-'66,'she represented that 
society in the spectacular January presentation. 

This was Miss McLuhan's second year as a POF contestant. Previously she 
placed as first runner-up. For her talent appearance, the attractive brunette 
presented a unique piano duet, playing the part for two hands against a tape 
which she had made before the show. Her selection was "Brazileira," a portion 
of Scaramouche by Darius Milhaud. She 
was escorted in the pageant by Mr. Tommy 
Russell of Washington, D. C. 

Miss McLuhan recently moved to Cleve- 
land, Tennessee, after spending nine years 
in Africa with her missionary parents. She 
is president of Delta Zeta and a member 
of Campus Choir and Lee Singers. 

A Bible College sophomore, she plans 
to major in Music Education. 





Miss McLuhan receives congratula- 
tions from Max Wilson and Tommy 
Russell. 



Roses in arm, the winner makes her 
last trip down the ramp to the warm 
applause of audience and runners-up 
in the background. 



84 













■ 






*i»> 




When "The Night" came, the Lee College Auditorium 
was filled with slightly nervous students and visitors. Many 
out-of-town guests were on hand for the gala affair. 

Honette Echols, Vindagua sponsor, handled the emcee 
chores throughout the evening. The curtain went up at 
7:00 p.m. on a Parisian sidewalk cafe scene, with the 
twenty favorites seated around small ta- 
bles in casual sweater outfits. Echols in- 
terviewed them all briefly. 

Next came the talent section, with 
each girl singing, acting, or performing 
in five-minute appeafances. Lighting and 
staging crews did miracles throughout 
this part of the show. The talent offer- 
ings ranged from slapstick humor to 
classical music to Shakespearean drama. 
The audience was warm and receptive. 

The formal gown scene followed, with 
escorts guiding their girls across the floor 
to the long, lighted ramp, then back 
again into a magnificent ballroom scene. 

The curtain rose again on the twenty 
contestants, still in formal gowns, ar- 
ranged against a blue backdrop. Then 
came the long white envelopes from the 
judges, that last walk down the ramp, 
and the evening was over. 

That was "The Night." 




These are the guys 



these are the girls. 



Favorites Provide Top-Notch 



Opening scene of the pageant, with emcee Honette Echols interviewing the favorites in a Parisian cafe scene. 





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Peggy Johnson sings 
a medley from "Mary 
Poppins." 



Entertainment 



Judges for the '66 Parade of Favor- 
ites met each of the contestants in a 
private interview, later met them for- 
mally at the POF tea. The night of per- 
formance they watched the action from 
a special box in the auditorium balcony. 

Chairman of judges was H. Bernard 
Dixon, sales and promotion manager of 
the Church of God Publishing House. 
Other judges were Mrs. Dale Hughes, 
a POF runner-up in 1963; Mrs. Conrad 
Finnell, dramatics coach at Bradley High 
School and director of the Miss Cleve- 
land pageant; Bennie S. Triplett, pro- 
gram director of Forward in Faith radio 
program; and Mrs. Lynn Turpin, Miss 
Lee College and editor of the Vindagua 
in 1950. 




Couples fill the stage 
in a lavish tux-and- 
gown appearance, the 
pageant's finale. 




Nadine Farabee plays 
"One-Note Samba." 



Martha Timmerman 
in the comic mono- 
logue "Little Alice." 




Hilda Hughes in a 
song-and-script com- 
bination called "Dear 
Diary." 









» w i p i m - ***> 



Pageant Judges Pick 




mmmmE. 



MISS MARTHA TIMMERMAN was named first 
runner-up in the '66 Parade of Favorites. She was 
the favorite of the Men's Christian Athletic Associa- 
tion, was also the nominee of that group in the Home- 
coming Queen exercises. Miss Timmerman was the 
last girl to appear in the pageant, doing a comic skit 
entitled "Little Alice." She hails from Fresno, Calif- 
ornia, and was escorted by Mr. Buddy Dunson of 
Adanta, Georgia. 



Second runner-up was MISS KATHY HITTE, jun- 
ior college senior from Tampa, Florida. She sang a 
medley of three popular songs entitled "Downtown," 
representing the Varsity basketball team. Miss Hitte 
was president of Delta Zeta, associate editor of the 
VINDAGUA, and a Lee Singer until she left Lee at 
end of first semester. She was escorted in the pageant 
by Mr. Steve Daugherty of Bridgeville, Delaware. 







jg$&S» 3 mm IS 






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Parade of Favorites contestants pictured on page 88-89 are first row, 1. to r., Wanda Smith, 
Carol Morgan, Priscilla Berry, Peggy Johnson, Wanda Wilbanks, JaJnice Crafton, Linda Copley, 
Brenda Davis, Linda Harris, Joyce Fithian; back row, Darlia McLuhan, Nadine Farabee, Jane 
Colquitt, Hilda Hughes, Cathy Smallwood, Dawn Wooderson, Martha Timmerman, Maria Cleghorn, 
Kathy Hitte, Kathy Smith. 



Four Runners-Up 




MISS KATHY SMITH won third runner-up honors 
with an original monologue and medley entitled "Luap 
the Marionette." She was the Sweetheart and repre- 
sentative of Upsilon Xi. A native of Fairborn, Ohio, 
Miss Smith was escorted by Mr. Gene Pharr of Nor- 
folk, Virginia. She was a favorite with the pageant 
audience, drawing warm, prolonged applause on the 
ramp. 



The favorite of the Lee Singers and fourth runner- 
up is MISS DAWN WOODERSON. She performed 
on both piano and organ in classical and popular style. 
Miss Wooderson is a native of Durban, South Africa, 
and Miss Lee College of 1966. She was escorted by 
Mr. Gaynor Newsome of Savannah, Georgia. 




91 




,*•■-># 




\96S-66 



HOMECOMING 



QUEEN 




Lee's 1965-'66 Homecoming Court 
included Hilda Hughes, Joyce 
Fithian, Queen Janice Crafton, 
Martha Timmerman, and Kathy 
Hitte. 



Jane Starnes helps with a cor- 
sage before the coronation. 




Miss Janice Crafton, Junior College freshman from 
Birmingham, Alabama, reigned as Homecoming Queen 
at Lee College for 1965-'66. She was elected by popu- 
lar vote of the student body. Other candidates and 
members of Miss Crafton 's court were Kathy Hitte, 
Tampa, Florida; Martha Timmerman, Fresno, Calif- 
ornia; Hilda Hughes, Birmingham, Alabama; and 
Joyce Fithian, Dearborn, Michigan. 

Miss Crafton was crowned Queen in a halftime 
ceremony at the Homecoming basketball clash between 
the Lee Vikings and Bryan College on November 24. 
She was the candidate of the Junior College freshmen 
class, and was escorted by Mr. Bill Avery. Mrs. Pat 
Purvis Sims, Homecoming Queen a year ago, crowned 
the new monarch to the applause of the standing- 
room-only crowd. 

The '66 Homecoming Queen is a member of Phi 
Beta Lambda and a group secretary in Pioneers for 
Christ. She was also a candidate in the Parade of 
Favorites in mid-January. 



Mrs. Pat Purvis Sims, last year's 
Queen, presents Miss Crafton 
with roses and a kiss. 




93 




MR. DANNY PETE KELLER was 
elected to the Hall of Fame for his 
achievement in ACADEMICS. A junior 
college freshman, he pulled a solid 3.0 
in his first semester at Lee, plans to 
stay for a liberal arts B.A. Mr. Keller 
is from Columbus, Ohio, where he grad- 
uated 3rd in his high school class of 540. 



' '" I 



*igi r? Ji - ; 



HALL OF FAME 



The Vindagua Hall of Fame honors students who have made the 
greatest accomplishments while at Lee in five major areas of campus 
activity. The areas are Academics, Athletics, Christian Service, Per- 
forming Arts, and Student Leadership. 

Membership in the Hall of Fame is determined by vote of the stu- 
dent body after a general nominating ballot. The 1966 inductees into 
the Hall of Fame were selected on March 25 from a field of over 
100 nominees. Each is the leading student on campus in the area 
which he represents. 




MR. CHARLES KENNETH PHIL- 
LIPS represents the area of ATHLET- 
ICS. He has started at guard for the 
Vikings basketball teams for two years, 
this year was elected co-captain by his 
teammates. Mr. Phillips played varsity 
baseball at Bradley High School in Cleve- 
land, Tennessee, and is a standout short- 
stop in intramural Softball here. He is 
a junior college senior. 



94 





MR. JOSEPH ANTHONY LOM- 
BARD leads the student body in CHRIS- 
TIAN SERVICE. He now serves as 
Pioneers for Christ president, the most 
strategic student Christian service posi- 
tion on campus. He has been a member 
of that group for four years, has led 
a summer witness team each year. Mr. 
Lombard is a Bible College senior from 
Laurel, Mississippi, a Biblical Educa- 
tion major. 




MR. MAX EUGENE WILSON is 
honored for his excellence in the PER- 
FORMING ARTS. From Grinnell, Iowa, 
he is student conductor of the Brass En- 
semble, president of the Lee Singers, 
Campus Choir bass section leader, and 
a popular trumpet soloist. Mr. Wilson 
is a Bible College junior majoring in 
Music Education. 




MR. GEORGE DENNIS MCGLTRE 

has distinguished himself in STUDENT 
LEADERSHIP. He is a senior Christian 
Education major from Kingsport, Ten- 
nessee. Mr. McGuire has served as PFC 
group leader, Upsilon Xi vice-president 
and student council representative and 
vice-president. He is presently student 
council president, highest elected office 
on campus. 



95 





Organizations 



Organizations at Lee College 

is the story of 

eleven clubs, 

and five societies, 

and one honorary fraternity, 

and five performing groups, 

and two publications staffs, 

all meeting and planning projects and 

sponsoring things. 

It is the drama of twenty-four groups 

crammed onto one small campus, and all 

acting 

and interacting 

and reacting. 

Organizations is how the Lee Collegian 

feels his muscle 

and finds an outlet for his ideas and energy. 

There's something about singing in a choir, 

or presiding at a meeting, 

or taking a candlelight pledge 

that makes Lee a better place to go to school. 

That something is called involvement, 

and is what makes organizations tick. 



the 1966 Lee Collegian . , , what he did ill grOUpS 



96 



,^ 





97 




McGuire, Hudson 
Lead Student 
Government 



Led by president Dennis McGuire and vice- 
president Kyle Hudson, the Student Council con- 
tinued to operate on campus in '6 5 -'6 6 as the 
official student governing body. 

Projects successfully completed by the council 
this year include Hillbilly Heyday in late October, 
Patriotism Week the second week of November, 
decorating the campus during the Christmas sea- 
son, installing color TV in the student center 
for the World Series, sponsoring the "Life at 
Lee" radio broadcast, and coordinating student 
activities for the April 23 College Day. 

The end of the first semester saw a change 
in office of the Student Council secretary-trea- 
surer. Wonney Waters left school at that time, 
and was succeeded by LaVonna Bost, a junior 
college senior. Mr. Elmer Odom served all year 
as faculty advisor, with Mr. Stanley Butler as 
the administration's representative. 

As a campus unit, the Student Council had 
a new look this year. Members sported matching 
camel and brown blazer outfits, and worked in 
a new office, a remodeled section of the Student 
Center. 



Dennis McGuire, President 



Kyle Hudson, Vice-President 

. " t *tt -f - -r~ ■ ■ i 



Wonney Waters, Secretary-Treasurer 




f 




98 



Council and 
Committees 



Much of the important work of the Student 
Council is done by its standing committees. Ap- 
pointed by the council administration, these com- 
mittees function independently of the council 
proper, but are answerable to it. 

For 1965-'66 Alan Walker headed the Public 
Relations Committee; Cameron Smith worked 
over Christian Service; Gary Sharpe chaired the 
Social Committee; and Keith Windham served 
as Chapel Committee head. Ethues McGowan 
worked under appointment as the editor of Col- 
legian's Calendarium, a council-sponsored week- 
ly announcement sheet. 




Committee chairmen are Alan Walker, Keith Windham, 
Cameron Smith, and Gary Sharp (not pictured). 



Seated — Stanley Butler, Kyle Hudson, Dennis McGuire, Wonney Waters, Elmer Odom. Standing — Gayle Lombard, Wanda 
Smith, Larry Gentry, Carol Morgan, Ray McCormick, Carolyn Walker, Gary Sharp, Shirley Moser, Anthony Lombard, 
Pat Ard, Tommy Russell, Linda Harris, Jimmy Hood, Bill Winters. 







^ 



PI DELTA OMIGRON 



Academics in the Bible College speaks of Greek verbs and augmented chords 
and the principles of systematic theology. 

To be a scholar in the Bible College, one must combine a good mind with 
hard work to overcome the natural hurdles of upper-level religious study as 
conducted by Gause, Bowdle, Arrington, Odom, Elliott, Baldree, and Alford. 

Pi Delta Omicron honors those who survive at least two years of classroom 
work with the degree of academic respectability needed to maintain a 2.0 grade- 
point average. Membership in the school's highest honor society is by invitation 
only, with thorough screening of candidates by the faculty and society members 
as a part of the qualifying process. 

Campus activity by PDO is limited to its monthly meetings, which often 
feature special speakers and programs. This year PDO members measured seniors 
for caps and gowns in late February, conducted a chapel-time induction on 
March 22, and held a late April banquet for new members. 

President of Pi Delta Omicron for 1965-'66 was Denzell Teague. Other officers 
were Thomas Oakley and Bob Varner. Dean Gause returned after a year's ab- 
sence as faculty sponsor. 



OFFICERS 

President 
Denzell Teague 

Vice-President 
Thomas Oakley 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Bob Varner 

Sponsor 

R. H . Gause 



MEMBERS 



Judy Bixler 
Michiko Teramoto 
Fred Sylvester 
Rene Howell 
A. Agapito Sagisi 
Dennis McGuire 
Ronald Walker 



Paul Conn 
Percy Dennis 
Lloyd Frazier 
Ruby Hall 
Sharon Mullins 
Keith Windham 















PHI THETA KAPPA 



Academics in the Junior College speaks of algebraic graphs and dissected frogs 
and Elizabethic sonnet forms. 

From the widely diversified student body of the liberal arts curriculum, a few 
students emerge each year as scholars. For those who post a minimum 2.0 average 
for their first year, membership in Phi Theta Kappa is available upon unanimous 
approval by the faculty and group membership. 

Phi Theta Kappa on the Lee College campus is the Iota Epsilon chapter of 
the national honorary fraternity by that name. This school year is its last here 
at Lee, as the development next year into a three-year liberal arts program will 
mark the passing of the Junior College and thus end the need for a junior college 
honorary fraternity. 

Jane Colquitt served as president of Phi Theta Kappa for 1965-'66. Vice- 
president was Wayne Parrish; secretary-treasurer, Glenda Cleghorn. The group 
began the year with three members, later grew to nineteen. 






OFFICERS 

President 
Jane Colquitt 

Vice-President 

Robert Wayne Parrish 

Secre tary-Treasurer 
Glenda Faye Cleghorn 

Sponsor 
Jim Bilbo 



MEMBERS 

William Paul Avery 
Kenneth Eugene Beard 
Priscilla Berry 
Maria Rae Cleghorn 
Denny Clifford Dennison 
Alice Marie Dover 
Richard Don Holland 
Gwendolyn Inez Hoskins 



\ / 
\ / 



Sarah Joyce King 
Ray Allen McCormick 
Betty Jean Muncy 
Wonney Rea Waters 

Godfrey 
Anne Jeanette Roberts 
Linda Netdes 
David McClure 



UPSILON 



nHHi 




H 



Upsilon Xi's fourth year on the Lee College campus was marked 
by several mid-year changes in leadership. Kyle Hudson moved 
up in January from vice-president to president, replacing Duran 
Palmertree, prexy since the formation of the group in 1963. 
Other officers for second semester include veep Alan Walker, 
secretary David McClure, treasurer Buddy Dunson, and chaplain 
Duran Palmertree. Robert Humbertson served as sponsor of the 
group, the first in its history. 

Upsilon was again active in campus affairs. The group spon- 
sored the highly successful Sadie Hawkins Day, October 15. In 
mid-February the Upsilons presented to the campus "Musical 
Pomposity," a concert featuring pianist Max Morris and the Min- 
isters' Trio. Frequent socials dotted the Upsies calendar, including 
a Christmas banquet, a November picnic at Lake Ocoee, a mid- 
February Valentines Party, and an early May banquet. 

Miss Kathy Smith was elected Upsilon sweetheart in Septem- 
ber. She left campus at the end of first semester, and was suc- 
ceeded by Miss Wanda Smith, sophomore brunette from Valdese, 
North Carolina. 



1&L< 



Rick Corley and Wayne Parrish serve their Upsilon 
brothers at a mid-term social. 





Miss Kathy Smith 



102 







• 




Upsilon Xi members pose for a formal shot in front of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. 





H 




All aboard for the Sadie Hawkins Day hayride. 




Upsilon's new sponsor, Mr. Humbertson, looks over 
the program at the annual Upsilon Christmas banquet. 



103 






ALPHA 

GAMMA 

CHI 




<A/ 



Alpha Gamma Chi's third year on the Lee College campus 
was one of continued Chi-style fellowship complemented by an 
expanding service emphasis. President Fred Killman led the 
group, with assistance from Vice-president Paul Conn, Secre- 
tary Bill Avery, Treasurer Dwayne McLuhan, and Chaplain 
Bob Varner. Senior members are Dr. Delton Alford and Dr. Don- 
ald Bowdle. 

Chi began the year with a pre-registration conclave, at which 
basic group principles were emphasized and the year's work was 
planned. The society's constitution was also revised in the meeting. 

One hundred freshmen were guests of Chi-men in mid-October 
at the Chi Cruise, a late-night boat jaunt up the Tennessee River 
from Chattanooga. Tickets for the event were sold out two weeks 
in advance, with response to the cruise overwhelmingly enthusi- 
astic. 

Social events were high on the list for the burgundy-clad 
Chi-guys. Through the year they enjoyed such diverse activities 
as a formal banquet in April, an October weekend trip to the 
Smoky Mountains, a party and carolling at Christmas time, in- 
formal dinners through the winter, and very informal picnics 
in the spring. 

The group elected Miss Darlia McLuhan as Sweetheart of 
Alpha Gamma Chi for 1965-'66. Miss McLuhan, a sophomore 
music major, walked off with top honors at the Parade of Fa- 
vorites in January, and served as "a beautiful and charming 
sweetheart" all year, according to her admiring Chi-men. 




Chi-men often meet at local restaurants for their weekly 
meetings. Shown here at such a time are Paul Conn, Fred 
Killman, Dwayne McLuhan, Ray McCormick, Charlie Rose, 
and Dr. Donald Bowdle. 




Miss Darlia McLuhan 



104 




Alpha Gamma Chi members pose for their picture at Hardwick's Farm. 





A freshmen crowd watches the entertainment on the Chi Cruise. 




Tommy Russell, donk No. 3, 
shines his masters' shoes 
as a prelude to initiation. 



105 





Delta Zeta, Lee's girls in scarlet and white, continued to operate 
this year as the only women's greek letter group on campus. 

The DZ's firmly established themselves in '65-66 as the 
school's most charming hostesses. They served at the Alabama 
Day tea in November, the faculty Christmas Party in December, 
the Parade of Favorites luncheon in January, and the College 
Day banquet in April. The school administration called on the 
Zetas Thanksgiving Day to coordinate information and ticket 
sales for Homecoming. 

The Delta Zetas had their share of fun during the year. In 
September the group sponsored a Western Party for all Lee girls 
at the Princess Bryant Barn. In November they spent a cold 
night in cabins on Lake Ocoee, and in May held their annual 
spring banquet. 

Miss Kathy Hitte led the DZ's first semester as president, 
followed by Miss Darlia McLuhan, who has filled the post since 
January. Other officers are vice-president Pam Osborne, secretary 
Peggy Johnson, treasurer Sandy Mullinax, and chaplain Dawn 
Wooderson. Miss Sue McGhee, member of the music faculty, 
is the group's sponsor. 

Delta Zetas elected Mr. Max Wilson as their beau for 1965- 
'66. Mr. Wilson is a Bible College junior from Grinnell, Iowa. 



Sandy Mullinax and Darlia McLuhan serve as host- 
esses at Miss McGhee's recital. 




Mr. Max Wilson 



106 



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The Student Center provides an appropriate setting for members of Delta Zeta. 






Members of DZ relax during a regular weekly meeting. 




New inductees are served refreshments at their formal 
initiation. 




107 



SNEA Develops Future Teachers 



The Student National Educational Association, 
Lee College's society of future teachers, continued 
this year to provide instruction and social outlet 
for its members. 

Charles Pigg served as SNEA president for 
the '65-'66 school year. Vice-president was Jim 
Price; secretary-treasurer, Marie Dover; chaplain, 
Louis Hulsey. Faculty sponsor was Earl Gilbert. 

Highlight of the SNEA social activity was its 
February 1 5 Valentine Party in the Student Cen- 
ter. Another party was held in May for members 
and their dates. 

Mrs. Collier, state advisor for all Tennessee 
chapters of the Student National Education As- 
sociation, visited the Lee College campus on 
March 16. The week before, members of the 
Lee chapter traveled to the Southern Missionary 
College campus in Collegedale, Tennessee. There 
they met with SNEA members from SMC and 
the University of Chattanooga to compare ideas 
on student education activity. 




Ginger Fleming distributes NEA Journals to club 
members. 



SNEA members pose casually on steps of Administration Building. 



'"■ ■ ■ 




«j^MBif 



if// "^ X 



.1 w ■ »* * 



i ■ i«iir»-~ *• — ] 




President Linda Nettles leads this year's group of fu- 
ture business leaders. 



Linda Nettles served as president 
of Phi Beta Lambda for the '65-'66 
school year, leading all activities 
of the campus group of future busi- 
ness leaders. 

Assisting Miss Nettles in club 
leadership were vice-president Lin- 
da Kayes, secretary Ruth Wesson, 
and treasurer Anne Roberts. Mrs. 
Lucille Elliott was sponsor of the 
group again this year. 

Phi Beta Lambda members 
worked on two projects through the 
year to bring money into the club 
coffers. They washed cars from 
dawn till dusk on November 13, 
and sold school pennants and pins 
throughout the fall. 



Phi Beta Lambda Washes Cars, 
Sparks Commercial Interest 



PBL members sponsored a car wash in October to 
fatten up the club treasury. 





The largest membership ever poses for picture on south bleachers of Lee's baseball field. 



WCAA Heads Girls Athletics 



Girls participate in volleyball through WCAA. 




The Women's Christian Athletic Association 
continued in 1965-'66 to lead campus interest 
in the somewhat limited area of girls' athletics. 

Officers for WCAA this year were Hilda 
Hughes, president; Sandi Hitte, vice-president; 
Barbara Harper, secretary-treasurer; Aurelia Am- 
ick, chaplain; and Roxie Carr, faculty sponsor. 

WCAA worked closely with the girls' physical 
education classes in setting up and directing a 
program of sports throughout the year. Basket- 
ball and volleyball were popular winter sports, 
with spring bringing a renewal of interest in 
softball and twice-weekly visits to the swimming 
pool of the local YMCA. 

WCAA members and their dates "headed for 
the hills" in a group picnic organized by the 
girls in early May. 



110 




MCAA, pictured on bleachers, works closely with Coach Hughes and the Lee Athletic Department. 



MCAA Sponsors 
Intramurals 



Intramural athletics on the Lee College cam- 
pus is the special charge of the Men's Christian 
Athletic Association, the school's second largest 
student organization with some 120 members. 

Steve Daugherty directed the activities of 
MCAA this year as its president, with assistance 
from vice-president Kenny Phillips; secretary- 
treasurer Dale Goff, and chaplain Gerald Bailey. 
Coach Dale Hughes, athletic director, served 
again this year as faculty sponsor. 

The never-ending project of MCAA is the 
management of the massive intramural sports 
program. This year an eight-team basketball 
league played a full regular season, ending with 
a week-long double elimination tournament. The 
same teams also competed in softball in April 
and May. At press time the annual MCAA ban- 
quet was scheduled for mid-May, with profes- 
sional quarterback Bill Wade slated to appear 
as speaker and special guest. 



Earl Rowan calls balls and strikes for Paul Ayers 
in fall intramural softball game. 




Paul Holcombe of the J. C. Senior I team clashes 
with Bill Winters and Jay Gilbert, of the J. C. 
Freshman III, during an intramural basketball 
game. 





Members of the Spanish Club receive Christmas napkins to sell for a fund-raising project. 



Spanish Club Sells Dolls, Napkins 



The Spanish Club members are pictured on the steps 
of the library with their sponsor, Miss Myers. 




Under the leadership of president Dave Mc- 
Clure, the Lee College Spanish Club became one 
of the most active groups on campus. '6 5 -'6 6 
will probably be remembered as the year of its 
revitalization. 

Other officers this year were John Laye, vice- 
president; Joyce Fithian, secretary-treasurer; Jean 
Hampton, chaplain. Miss Myers is the group 
sponsor. 

Spanish Club members met at Chilhowee No- 
vember 9 for a fall picnic, gathered again at the 
Holiday Hill for a Christmas banquet in Decem- 
ber. The group met twice monthly in regular 
sessions, which often featured special Latin- 
American programs and speakers. 

Aiming toward a service project perhaps next 
year, the club worked to fatten up the treasury. 
During Sadie Hawkins week they made and sold 
yarn dolls, and during the weeks before Christ- 
mas sold decorated holiday napkins. 



112 



International Club Collects Viet Nam 

School Supplies 




During a club meeting Agapito Agngarayngay conducts 
a lively discussion concerning club projects. 



One of the newest groups on campus, the In- 
ternational Club, increased its campus activity 
this year with broadened campus interest in its 
program. 

Officers for the '6 5 -'6 6 school year were Presi- 
dent Agapito Agngarayagay, and vice-president 
Alan Walker. Martin Baldree is the faculty spon- 
sor. 

March was an active month for the Interna- 
tional Club. The group presented to the student 
body a program featuring foreign languages and 
customs in mid-March. This program introduced 
the club's International Week, an event of March 
21-28. During the week different items of school 
supply were gathered from the student body for 
shipment to the school kids of South Vietnam. 
Included in the shipment were pencils, note- 
books, erasers, scissors, and crayons. 



The International Club is comprised of a "pot pourri" of students from many different countries. 





The PFC is one of the largest groups on campus. 




Pioneers For Christ 
Leads Witnessing 



On their way for an invasion in Mexico, Dennis McGuire 
and Gary Sharpe go through customs. 

PFC members, Dianne Baskett and Gerald Fun- 
derburk participate in house-to-house witness- 
ing. 




114 



Pioneers for Christ began the 1965-66 school year 
with a workers' retreat September 10-12 at the Church 
of God campground in Chattanooga. There they 
planned the year's work and heard from special speak- 
ers, who were Dr. R. Leonard Carroll, the Reverend 
W. E. Tull, and the Reverend Ralph E. Williams. 

Ten witnessing teams operated under the direction 
of the PFC this year, with each involved in local 
church evangelism in the Church of God. The teams 
employed "invasions," street services, and door-to-door 
witnessing, methods of outreach traditionally popular 
with PFC. 

Members of the group also attended weekly prayer 
meetings, and conducted jail, street, and aged home 
services in Cleveland and Athens. The club was led 
by president Anthony Lombard, vice-presidents Earnest 
Roberts and Gerald Funderburk, secretary Jean Hamp- 
ton, treasurer Sharon Mullins, and sponsor Charles 
Beach. 



Perhaps the most highly publicized of 
all PFC activities is its summer witness 
program. Endorsed by the National Sunday 
School and Youth Department and now 
underwritten by the President's Council, 
the summer witness program is fast becom- 
ing the most significant activity of Pioneers 
for Christ. 

Team members will leave campus June 1 
to spend two months doing different kinds 
of church work in sixteen different states. 
Among them will be a group working with 
the Navajo Indians, and another group 
working among the Indians of North Caro- 
lina. 

The summer work will end July 27, 
when members of all teams will gather in 
Memphis, Tennessee, for a final, joint evan- 
gelistic effort in that city. 




Sharon Mullins and other members of the PFC group work hard to 
promote Christ to the Navajo Indians while visiting their reservation. 




Harvey Begay is shown here working with his native Navajo 
tribe as a part of the PFC summer witness program. 



As customary, PFC team prays for guidance before leaving for an invasion. 



fit** 




M SIM MONS HALL ■ 




EH -wBi^t 1 1 1 1 




III 


~~ 




The singing of hymns is an important part of the Mission Club Wednes- 
day night prayer meeting. 



Through a variety of programs, the Mis- 
sions Club sought to instill in the minds 
of students and of the church a new pro- 
spective outlook toward the mission field, 
the missionaries, and the work they are do- 
ing. 

Officers for the club are Fred Sylvester, 
President; Bill Welborn, Vice-President; 
Renee Meredith, Secretary; and Michiko 
Teramoto, Treasurer. Mrs. Avis Swiger and 
Mr. Winston Elliott served as the 1965-'66 
club sponsors. 

The club was represented by a group 
at the National Missionary Convention in 
Indianapolis, Indiana on October 16 and 
17. 

Several socials proved successful as a re- 
sult of hard labor and cooperation among 
the club members. Over three hundred stu- 
dents attended the "get-acquainted" social 
in early October. A "Christian" social was 
also sponsored by the club. The club brought 
various films of interest to the student body 
pertaining to the lives of Christians. 



Missions Club 



Attends National Convention 



Sponsors, Dr. Avis Swiger and George Elliott, pose with the Mission Club for their group portrait. 




Ministerial Club 
Active In 
Local Area 




Comprised solely of ministers and future ministers, members of the 
club assist churches in many capacities throughout the area. 



Thomas Oakley, an active member of the Min- 
isters' Club, preaches the Sunday morning wor- 
ship service at the North Cleveland Church of 
God. 




The Lee College Ministerial Association operated 
on campus this year to provide its members with prac- 
tical instruction and on-the-field experience in the 
area of the pulpit and pastoral ministry. 

President Jim Stone led the group of young min- 
isters during the '65-'66 school term, assisted by vice- 
president Jerry McGhee and secretary-treasurer Ronald 
Walker. Mr. Earl Gilbert served as group sponsor. 

Outstanding among the activities of the Ministerial 
Association this year was its supplying the North Cleve- 
land Church of God pulpit for its 9:00 a.m. Sunday 
morning services. Members of the group preached 
there weekly. The Association .provided its members 
with monthly lectures by prominent ministers, among 
them Dr. Charles W. Conn, Rev. Donald S. Aultman, 
Rev. Walter Pettitt, and Dr. R. Leonard Carroll. Guest 
speakers delivered these lectures in the chapel of the 
Church of God Publishing House. 



117 




Clarion 
Joins ACP, 
Wins High 
Rating 



Editor in chief, Bill Avery oversees all staff action. 



The Clarion, Lee's student newspaper, operated in 
1965-66 on campus for its first year as a member of 
the Associated Collegiate Press. As a part of ACP, issues 
of The Clarion were graded and criticized throughout 
the year by professional newsmen. 

Editor Bill Avery continued this year in The Clarion 
tradition of competent coverage and commentary on cam- 
pus events. Several new features (among them Campus 
Inquirer and the Student Forum) were instituted in this 
year's expanded six-page paper. 

Dave Dowdy, business manager, and Jane Colquitt, 
associate editor, filled key positions on the '65-'66 staff. 
Mr. Phillip Morris, first-year English teacher, and Mr. 
William Henry served The Clarion as sponsors. 



Business manager Dowdy assumed his post after the 
school year began, still shattered all previous ad sales 
records. Total advertising was up 50% over last year. 

An evaluation booklet and competitive scoring sheet 
received from ACP by The Clarion in late April gave 
the paper a Second Class rating, the highest ever received 
by a Lee College paper. The Clarion scored 3,080 points 
out of a possible 3,700, with layouts, inside news, and 
the editorial pages winning special commendation. Judges 
called The Clarion "very good," said it showed "thoughtful 
effort" in a "workmanlike manner." 

Scoring was based on the first three issues of the paper. 
A second critique is expected soon with an evaluation 
of the second semester's work. 



Jane Colquitt 
Associate Editor 



David Dowdy 
Business Manager 



Faculty Advisors 

Philip Morris and William Henry 




118 




Linda Blevins and Brenda Davis discuss a "galley 
proof" while Linda Copley is busy typing. 




Ads are sold by business staff members Bev Voli- 
va, Mike Sutton, Diane Dover, and Max Atkins. 




Editors Gwen Hoskins, Bill Squires, and Sharon Conn dis- 
cuss an upcoming paper with their editor-in-chief. 



Society staff, Priscilla Berry, Norma Bray, Carolyn Walker, and Nell Led- 
better, covers main social events. 




CLARION 





Circulation manager, Sonny Chambley, points out 
route that Bill Eddins and Larry Bennett will be tak- 
ing to deliver THE CLARION. 




Sports reporters Charlotte Donaldson and David 
Hinely compare notes at an intramural basket- 
ball game. 



Columnists Helen Miller and Dennis McGuire take a 
last minute look at their work before handing it in for 
publication. 



The news staff, Elayne Perry, Janice Simmons, Denny Dennison, Bill Nichols, Danette Hommer, and Jeanette Knipp, work 
together preparing the layouts of an upcoming edition. 




Presenting the 



1966 Vindagua Staff 





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Associate Editor 
Stephen Gwaltney 



The quality of a yearbook depends ultimately on the people who do 
the work, which in this case is the 1965-'66 Vindagua staff. 

This year's staff was organized around an editor-in-chief and three 
assistants, one in business, one in management, and one in yearbook 

journalism. Top man was Paul Conn, 
with right-hand-man-type assistance 
from business manager Allen Wil- 
liams, managing editor Wayne Par- 
rish, and associate editor Steve Gwalt- 
ney. Honette Echols, instructor in his- 
tory and sociology, served as sponsor 
of the staff, his first year at such a 
post. 

Under these staff heads came six 
section editors and eighteen workers, 
all of whom helped to make '65-'66 
a banner year for Vindagua. In addi- 
tion to the routine work of yearbook 
production, the staff presented on 
various occasions campus-wide events. 
In January the staff produced and 
directed the fourth annual Parade of 
Favorites, introducing the first sig- 
nificant changes in the gala affair 
since its inception. The '66 event was 
widely acclaimed as the greatest Pa- 
rade of Favorites in the history of the 
pageant. 

Mr. and Miss Lee College were 
selected by the student body and pre- 
sented on campus by the Vindagua. 
Breaking with the traditional "corona- 
tion" approach, the staff presented 
the couple in a chapel program and 
honors banquet, both events of March 
24. 

Staff morale and esprit de corps 
were sky-high all year. The Vindagua 
room became the liveliest spot on 
campus — a place where things were 
happening. Staff parties, planned and 
spontaneous, spiced the work sessions. 
In that little room in the basement 
of the Library Building, there was a 
firm conviction that all work and no 
play makes for a dull staff. 

About the most gratifying thing that can be said about a yearbook 
staff is that it completed its task. And so on the next four pages are 
pictured the members of the 1965-'66 Vindagua staff — the people who 
got the job done. 




Sponsor 
Honette Echols 



* p» 1 


i S 1 




K 
II 




Editor-in-chief 
Paul Conn 



121 




WAYNE PARRISH 

Managing Editor 




PAM OSBORNE 
Academic Editor 




DONALD GOFF 

Organizations Editor 



PEGGY JOHNSON 

Features Editor 






tp fff r * 


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> < 



ray Mccormick 

Class Editor 




CAROL MORGAN 

Campus Life Editor 




DIANE PLUNKETT 

Features 




MARTHA TIMMERMAN 

Organizations 




MARLA CLEGHORN 

Secretary to Editor 




GINGER FLEMING 

Organizations 



SHARON GODFREY 
Athletics 





EARL ROWAN 
Athletics Editor 




SHARON CONN 

Class 




ALLEN WILLIAMS 

Business Manager 




LINDA BLEVINS 

Class 




SANDY MULLINAX 

Business Staff 



NATHAN RIDGEWAY 

Business Staff 





LULU TYNER 

Secretary to Business Manager 




RUTH WESSON 

Business Staff 




JANE STARNES 
Index 




JYM AVERY 

Artist 




BRENDA DUNN 

Campus Life 






WANDA SMITH 
Index 



LINDA NETTLES 
Index 





DALE CANNON 

Business Staff 




LaVONNA BOST 

Index 



Music Club Presents Annual Revue 




Despite a mid-year change in leadership, the 
Music Club completed one of its most successful 
years on the Lee College campus in 1966. 

President Phil Cook directed the group's ac- 
tivities first semester, then transferred to another 
campus, leaving group leadership in the hands 
of vice-president Wanda Smith and secretary- 
treasurer Tommy Russell. Mrs. Hurst served as 
club sponsor throughout the year. 

Music Revue, a two-hour display of vocal and 
instrumental talent, was sponsored by the Music 
Club in early October, and was the school's first 
entertainment feature of the year. A similar pro- 
gram was slated for the spring semester, but did 
not materialize. 



The Music Club is made up of music majors, music minors, and others 
who have an interest in music. 




The Music Review opened with the madrigals performing 
"It's A Grand Night For Singing." 



126 




Marvin Neill instructs members of the Forensic Club. 



Forensic Club Stages Two 
Performances of 
The Nieht Owl' 



Lee's only society for the performance of dramatic 
arts, the Forensic Club operated on campus this year 
under the direction of president Marvin Neill and faculty 
sponsor Robert Humbertson. 

Aiding Neill in the leadership of the group was vice- 
president Bill Wilson and secretary-treasurer Lynn 
Sharpe. 

Highlight of the school year for the Forensic Club 
was its March production of "The Nidit Owl," a three- 
act mystery comedy by Frank W. Spahn. The play, staged 
on three successive evenings on the weekend of March 
19, was sparked by stellar performances by the fourteen- 
man cast, all Forensic Club members. 



Forensic Club members pictured in auditorium. 



127 




Campus Choir Presents 'Messiah' 




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The Campus Choir performs for Lee students during 
convocations and Sunday night chapel services. 



The Campus Choir is the massive, 160- 
voice performing group at Lee College 
which is a combination gospel choir and 
concert oratorio society. 

Most outstanding of the campus choir's 
activities in '65-'66 was the campus pres- 
entation of the Christmas portion of Han- 
del's Messiah in the school auditorium De- 
cember 16. Choral sections of the work 
were sung by the choir, with Nadine Fara- 
bee playing the piano accompaniment. This 
performance wa? followed up by an Easter- 
week presentation of Crucifixion, a well- 
known oratorio by Sir John Stabler. 

Worship services in chapel and revivals 
occupied a great amount of the Campus 
Choir's attention this year. The group also 
performed at each of the two music fes- 
tivals presented in the spring and fall by 
the music department. 



In formal attire, the Campus Choir participates in the Fall Festival. 






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The Brass Ensemble plans to make a short tour of several high schools and 
colleges. 



Lee's only officially recognized instru- 
mental performing group is the Brass En- 
semble. The group consists of about twenty 
members, and is directed by Dr. Delton L. 
Alford, music department head. 

Besides its routine performances at cam- 



pus musical and religious events, the Brass 
Ensemble traveled to Greenville, South 
Carolina in February for a recording ses- 
sion. While there they recorded instrumen- 
tal accompaniments for the Lee Singers, 
the Ministers' Trio, and Max Morris. 



Brass Ensemble 
Plays on 
Campus 



Sonny Chambley, Ron Carver, and Max Wilson are featured 
in a trumpet trio during the Fall Festival. 





The new outfits for the Ladies' Choir are cranberry dresses and 
white gloves. 



Ladies' Choir Has Active Year 



Miss McGhee, the new leader of the Ladies' Choir, directs during 
a convocation service. 



' The light, feminine sound often heard at 
Lee College belongs to the Ladies' Chorus. 

Reorganized last year after several years of 
inactivity, the Ladies' Chorus with its delicate 
sound and arrangements provides a pleasant di- 
version from the male-oriented approach which 
characterizes mixed groups. Miss Sue McGhee, 
piano instructor who graduated from Lee in 
1963, now serves in her first year as director 
of the choir. 

The Ladies' Chorus performed routinely on 
campus during the school year, singing in Fall 
and Spring revivals, Sunday night chapel services, 
Thanksgiving Music Festival, Spring Music Con- 
cert, and a special Christmas concert in Decem- 
ber. 




130 



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The Men's Choir performs for various occasions. 



Teachey Organizes 

Men's Choir 



Men's Choir practice hard during rehearsal to present outstand- 
ing programs. 




Male group singing, defunct on the Lee cam- 
pus since 1962, was revived this year with the 
formation of the Men's Choir, a group of thirty 
male voices. The choir is under the direction of 
Mr. Jerold Teachey, voice teacher who joined 
the music faculty in September. 

The new performing group sang often in its 
first year on campus. They were the featured 
special singing group one night during each re- 
vival of the school year. Teaming with their 
distaff friends in the Ladies' Chorus, they pre- 
sented a chapel time concert the second week 
of December. 

Accompanist for the Men's Choir is Miss Jane 
Colquitt, sophomore from Chattanooga, Tennes- 
see. 



131 



Presenting the Lee Singers . . 



Lee's Top Performing Group 
Plans Tour Through Southwest 



The Lee College Singers, directed by Dr. 
Delton L. Alford, continued in '6 5 -'6 6 to re- 
ceive recognition as one of the top college choirs 
in American church circles. 

Winding up a highly successful year, the 
Singers leave May 3 1 for a twenty-day tour of 
the Southwest. They will sing in Mississippi, 
Oklahoma, Texas, Arizona, and Mexico. They 
will perform in local churches and conventions, 
and are invited to sing at the 3,000-member 
Calvary Temple in Denver, Colorado. 

The year began early for the Singers, who 
traveled the first week of school to Cincinnati 
where they were the featured guest at the Church 
of God National Sunday School Convention. A 
fall tour took the group on a ten-day jaunt 
through Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, highlighted 



by a performance at Bethel College in South 
Bend, Indiana, on December 2. 

Dr. Alford took the Singers to Greenville, 
South Carolina, in mid-February to record the 
group's third long-play album. This outing was 
the most significant of several weekend trips. 

The concert program which the Singers per- 
formed in '6 5 -'6 6 is a two-part presentation of 
various types of religious music. The program 
begins with a robed processional followed by a 
forty-minute section of heavy religious works and 
gospel music. The choir then leaves the risers 
for a twenty-minute break, during which the 
audience hears choir soloists and trios. 

The Singers come back onto the risers in 
blazers for a section of spirituals, then a final 
group of gospel songs. 



The 1965-66 Lee College Singers— shown here in the casual riser arrangement which is a part of their on-the- 
road performance. 





Sopranos Wanda Smith and Dawn Wood- 
erson flank their section in a Singers 
rehearsal. 



The "Singers' sound," so distinctive in performance, 
is created in daily rehearsal periods. Practice sessions 
may come on a rolling bus, on the risers minutes be- 
fore service, or in the Music Building rehearsal hall. 

After the notes are learned, practice sessions be- 
come a matter of communication between director 
and singers. In the long hours of rehearsal, rapport 
between the two is forged and the fluid mobility which 
characterizes the Singers' sound is born. 



Creator and guardian of the Singers' sound is Dr. 
Delton L. Alford, now in his fourth year as head of 
Lee's Music Department and director of the Singers. 
Communication is Dr. Alford's forte. Throughout re- 
hearsals and concerts, he "talks" to the choir with 
hands, mouth, and eyes. Dr. Alford is equally out- 
standing in the field of music research. He addressed 
a March 18 session of the Music Educators National 
Conference in Kansas City, Missouri, speaking at the 
invitation of the conference research council on the 
findings of his doctoral study at Florida State Uni- 
versity. 



"... a matter of communication." Dr. 
Alford asks for more sound, and David 
Helms, second bass, strains to produce. 





133 



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For Sunday night chapel 



At the Thanksgiving Music Festival 




Dr. Alford calls 
the shots . . . 



Fighting stuck 
zippers . . . 






Sineers Is 



Singers is a million things. It is night- 
long bus rides, nervous moments back- 
stage, high C's and low E-flat's, sticky 
robe zippers, hot coffee and a pep talk before 
going on. It is listening to replays at recording 
sessions, meeting new people in strange cities, 
praying before service for something special. 

Singers is missing lunch on MWF. It is getting 
up early and staying up late, singing Mozart 
in country churches and "Amazing Grace" at 
the World's Fair. It is tight schedules and over- 
heated choir lofts and tired voices and everyone 
pulling together to achieve something worthwhile. 




A whispered conversation backstage 



At the Cincinnati convention 



134 



Impressions of a Singer . 







From The Fourth Row 



You start way out at the back of the church in your robe and when you 
hear the organ you begin to count and ten steps later you're halfway through 
the first verse of "He Leadeth Me" and on the carpet six pews down the aisle. 

The processional is always an exercise in self-consciousness. You never 
quite get used to walking through all those people singing like that. "He lead- 
eth me, oh precious thought. . . ." 

Then almost before you know it you're on the risers and ready to go. Get 
set. Move that tenor over to the right. Plant your feet and watch Dr. Alford 
and listen while Darlia leads into the piano intro. "Praise to the Lord. . . ." 
Get in there, sopranos. Get together. In come the altos. You can't see them 
but you hear them coming in over on the left and you're conscious of audience 
interest shifting that way. They sound good and you're pulling for them. 

You're six bars away from the men's entrance. Make it good. Start up on 
an Ab. Count. Watch Dr. Alford. Now sing! "Oh, my soul praise him. . . ." 
Concentrate. Keep the pitch up. Get ready for the big chorus. "Let the amen . . . 
(two, three) . . . sound from his people again. . . ." 

Now you're through with that one and the people liked it and you feel 
good and you're glad you're where you are. The service is started now and 
the songs go fast. You work hard. It gets hot and you're glad you're up on 
the back row so you can get the wind up your robe. You concentrate. You 
watch Dr. Alford. You drive the notes home. The sound crashes around you 
and something surges up inside and breaks out in goose bumps and you're 
flushed and thrilled like a little boy. "Somebody changed my life, I'm really 
living now. . . ." You feel the music pouring out of your soul and wrapping 
itself around the people and it gets to you. 

An hour later, your shirt is wet and your voice is tired and you feel good 
from the bones out. And although you can't explain it to anyone very well, 
you know that being a Lee Singer happens a note at a time. 




Athletics 



Athletics repeats in every event, 

in every generation, 

the age-old saga of competition. 

At Lee College it is the story of twelve men 

in maroon and white 

who five at a time 

bear into battle the honor of Alma Mater. 

It can be heard in the referee's whistle 

or in the frenzied roar of nervous fans 

or in the soft swish of nylon nets. 

We find its spirit in the close conflict 

of the handball floor, 

and in the graceful arc of a 

tennis racket in backcourt, 

and in the crisp exactness of a 

line drive past the shortstop. 

Athletics has its moments of truths — 

like losing to Morristown, 

or missing a foul shot against the Junior College seniors, 

or being struck out by a treshman. 



the 1966 Lee Coiiegian . . . how he competed in sports 



136 



Lee Vikines Post Best Record Ever 




Vikings get instructions from Coach Hughes during Ken- 
tucky Christian lidlifter. 



Coach Dale Hughes, in his second year at 
the helm of the Lee College Vikings, discovered 
some rich basketball talent in fall tryouts and 
molded a cage group that could run and shoot 
with the best of small college teams. The Vikings 
surpassed last year's won-lost chart, played be- 
fore more fans, and played their toughest schedule 
in the history of the school. Lee, as in previous 
years, was lacking in height this season. How- 
ever the '65-'66 Vikings were probably the most 
experienced group of cagers to don the maroon 
and white. Speed was the strong point of the 
Vikings' attack. 

The Vikings opened the season against highly 
regarded Kentucky Christian College and despite 
a strong second-half surge sparked by David 
Montgomery's 25 points, the Knights hung on 
for an 86-82 verdict. Following this set-back 
the Vikings reeled off five consecutive victories 
— in all of which they topped the century mark. 
The Vikings were "red-hot" as they handed the 
Crusaders of Tennessee Temple a sound beating 
130-97. David Montgomery, Hugh Watson, and 
Dale Cannon led the blazing attack with 26, 25, 
and 19 points respectively. 



'Puppet on a string" describes Dale Cannon scoring in Homecoming game against Bryan. 





Vlt 









Kneeling left to right: David McClain, Hugh Watson, Jerry Dunn, Dale Cannon, Kenny Walston, co-captain Kenny Phillips. 
Standing left to right: Coach Dale Hughes, Artie Ellis, co-captain Bob Varner, Ed Ford, Robert Ayers, David Montgomery, 
Athletic Assistant Earl Rowan. 



Athletic Director Dale Hughes 






SUMMARY 




kings 




Oppont 


82 


Kentucky Christian ____ 


.... 86 


in 


Toccoa Falls 


80 


no 


Tennessee Temple -___ 


_.__ 97 


n4 


- _ _ Atlanta Christian . 


61 


110 


. Bryan 


.... 69 


1 10 


Covenant 


59 


58 


. . West Georgia 


_.__ 73 


83 


Southeastern .... . 


-.. 31 


93 


.. . ___. Bryan (overtime) 


.___ 95 


104 


Emmanuel 


.... 75 


99 


Atlanta Christian . . 


51 


70 


Oklahoma Christian .... 


._ 80 


94 


Gregory 


.... 70 


86 


Southwestern 


_._. 82 


77 . 


.... Oral Roberts University 


____ 125 


159 


C.B.C. 


128 


100 


Tennessee Temple ____ 


___. 105 


1 1?, 


Covenant 


73 


Ml 


Toccoa Falls 


67 


87 


Atlanta Feds 


.... 77 


90 


. Morristown 


.... 93 


89 


Morristown 


91 




Lee Invitational Tournament 


89 


.. . Covenant 


___. 47 


78 


Morristown 


_... 79 



139 




Team Tops 100 . . 




Hugh Watson "lays it up and in" in Bryan game. 



Kenny Phillips drives goalward in season opener 
with Kentucky Christian. 



Would you believe a little round ball has this 
much attention? 



Vikings plan second half strategy during Em- 
manuel game. 





140 



Five Times Straight 



The Lee gymnasium was overflowing with 
fans on Thanksgiving afternoon for the annual 
Homecoming game. The Vikings preserved their 
record of having never lost a Homecoming battle 
by trimming Bryan College by a comfortable 
110-69 count. 

Hugh Watson promptly gave the Vikings an 
early lead and went on to tally 32 points in the 
contest. He was aided by Dale Cannon with 16 
points and Kenny Phillips with 14. 

The big guns of the Vikings were silenced 
and their five-game winning streak snapped by 
West Georgia College. It was simply a case of 
too many Vikings going cold on the same night. 
Cannon and Phillips remained true to form with 
16 and 14 points respectively. 

The long lay-off over the Christmas holidays 
did the Vikings no good. It had been more than 
five weeks since the Viking sharpshooters had 
put the ball through an opponent's hoop. The 
result was a heartbreaking 95-93 defeat to Bryan 
College in a tense overtime struggle. 

Lee found the winning combination again as 
they trounced their long standing rivals from 
Emmanuel College 104-75. Bob Varner spear- 
headed the Vikings by grabbing 23 rebounds 
and scoring 14 points. Dale Cannon had 15 
points in the victory and Ed Ford and David 
Montgomery pitched in 14 apiece. Hugh Watson 
and Kenny Phillips added 12 points each. 




s't.Tfcj 



Hugh Watson takes careful 
aim and fires. 





Varner (44), Ford (32), and Watson converge for the rebound. 



Tour Through Midwest Brings 



So you've been introduced, now beat Temple. 




The Vikings toured the Midwest January 23- 
3 1 , playing five games in Oklahoma City, Okla- 
homa for four days. Lee was tripped in the open- 
er by a strong Oklahoma Christian College cage 
crew 80-70. It was a hard-fought battle with 
the Vikings trailing by only three with 1:30 
left in the ball game, but OCC put the game 
away as the Vikings went stale. The Vikings 
little 5 '9" "quarterback," Kenny Phillips turned 
in an outstanding performance with 19 points 
and flawless floor play. 

Gregory College of Shawnee, Oklahoma "bit 
the dust" the following night. The Vikings 
romped 94-70, and following the game Coach 
Hughes stated, "This was the finest all-around 
effort of the season." Praise especially went to 
Dale Cannon, who was at his best scoring 23 
points. Ed Ford pitched in 21 and David Mont- 
gomery netted 18. 

The Vikings won a squeaker over Southwestern 
College 86-82 primarily on the rebounding of 
Bob Varner, the outside shooting of David Mont- 
gomery, and the driving lay-ups of Ed Ford. 
Varner hauled in 20 rebounds and Montgomery 
and Ford tallied 2 5 and 21 points respectively. 



142 



At Southwestern, Cannon and Phillips were 
the men of the hour. With the score deadlocked 
at 82 and 22 seconds showing on the clock, 
Cannon sank a 20-foot jumper and with 9 sec- 
onds remaining Phillips "iced the game" with 
two crucial free throws. 

The sub-zero temperature evidently affected 
the Vikings as they invaded the beautiful and 
modern campus of Oral Roberts University. They 
couldn't find the range and were never in the 
game as the Lee cagers dropped their fourth 
game of the season. 

The O.R.U. loss was quickly forgotten as the 
Vikings celebrated a record-shattering 159-128 
victory over Central Bible College. This set a 
Lee College scoring record for a single game. 
Also a record 85 points were scored in the first 
half. Kenny Phillips established a school record 
for assists in one game with twelve. David Mont- 
gomery led the scoring parade, in which every 
Viking scored, with 30 points. Bob Varner 
chipped in with 23 and Jerry Dunn and "Dizzie" 
Ford had 21 each. The Vikings returned to the 
friendly confines of Lee somewhat weary, happy 
to have a winning road trip behind them. 




A bucket for Watson and an assist for Phillips in Bryan game. 



Three Victories, Two Defeats 



Tension on the bench. 



Corky Whitlock and Charlie Kuyker 
broadcast Viking games. 





143 




Ken Walston drives in tournament opener against 
Covenant. 



The annual Lee Invitational Tournament was played in the 
new Lee gymnasium on March 4 and 5. The tourneys opening 
game saw Lee soundly thrash Covenant College with all Viking 
players seeing action. The second game of the evening was a see- 
saw battle between Morristown College and Tennessee Temple. 

Bob Murr led Temple to a 78-61 victory over Covenant in 
the Saturday afternoon consolation game. A sell-out crowd was 
on hand to witness the championship clash. The Vikings led 
momentarily, but soon Morristown began to pull away. The Vi- 
kings were down by eight with three minutes left in the half, 
but closed the gap and were trailing by a scant two points at 
halftime, 40-38. 

The Vikings fought an uphill battle the entire second half. 
They grabbed the lead with only 25 seconds remaining in the 
pressure-packed contest on a 2 5 -foot jumper by David Mont- 
gomery. The Viking lead was short-lived, as John Lockette sank 
a 6-foot jumper from the side that broke the Vikings' backs. 
Viking hopes died as Hugh Watson's attempted basket rolled off 
the rim. Morristown captured the big trophy they came for and 
their 6'5" center, Earl Thorne was named the most valuable 
player in the tournament. 



Tourney Ends Winning Season 




Viking fans cheer for dear ol' Lee in the championship game. 



144 




David Montgomery guns a 25-foot jumper. 




The final shot . . . missed. 





The bench comes to life. 



Vikings receive the runner-up trophy. 



All-tournament team (1. to r.): Carter, Varner, Thome, Murr, 
Lockette, Watson, Montgomery. 





"66 Vikim 



David Montgomery, 6'2" freshman forward. 
Dave is nineteen years old and is a hometown 
boy. Dave was a mainstay last year on the Brad- 
ley County Bears cage team. He was the Viking 
rebound leader this season with a total of 225. 
He did his share of the scoring also, finishing 
with a 15.9 average for the season. He was one 
of the Viking representatives on the all-tourna- 
ment team in the Lee Invitational. 



Ed "Dizzie" Ford, 6'2" freshman center. "Diz" 
developed more than any other Viking during 
the season. He is nineteen years old and played 
three years of varsity ball at Louisville Male High 
School, Louisville, Kentucky. Ed had the second 
highest average on the team at 16.2. He was 
also third in total rebounds with 138. "Diz" came 
into his own on the midwestern road trip, scor- 
ing 101 points in five games. He hit the single 
game high for the season, 41 points against Mor- 
ristown. 





Kenny Phillips, nineteen-year-old 5 '9" sopho- 
more guard from Cleveland, Tennessee. He was 
one of the four returning lettermen from last 
year's squad. Ken was definitely the quarterback 
of this year's team, calling the offensive set-up 
and sparking the defense. He averaged 10.8 
points per game and topped the regulars in field 
goal percentage, hitting 50.3% of his shots from 
the floor. He was also the team leader in assists, 
getting a record twelve in the CBC game. 



146 



Standouts 



Hugh Watson, 6' sophomore guard-center. 
Hugh was a transfer student from Hiwassee Col- 
lege, where he played varsity basketball. He is 
married and the father of a two-year-old boy. 
Hugh led the Vikings in four departments this 
year: total points, 388; best average, 22.8; most 
field goals made, 140; and most free throw at- 
tempts, 160. He was the only Viking this year 
to hit in double figures in every game. Hugh also 
made the all-tournament squad in the Lee In- 
vitational Tournament. 





Bob Varner, 6'2" senior forward. Bob is 22 
years old and another married man. The only 
graduating senior on the squad, Bob has played 
varsity ball four years at Lee, has answered the 
starting buzzer in 91 games for the Vikings. He 
served as co-captain this year for the third con- 
secutive season. Bob was second on the team in 
rebounding with a total of 209. He was charged 
with only seven floor mistakes — the fewest of 
any Viking. He was selected as a member of the 
Invitational All-Tournament Team. 



Dale Cannon, 61" sophomore guard from 
Marietta, Georgia. Dale transferred to Lee in 
January of '65 from the University of Georgia. 
He is a consistent, well-rounded player. Dale 
scored a total of 307 points this year for an even 
14-point average. He hit 46% of his field goal 
attempts and picked off 82 rebounds from his 
outside guard position. He was third on the team 
in total assists. 




147 




The Lee College Vikings cheerleading squad 
continued to serve in '65-'66 as the official school 
morale booster and school spirit stimulant. 

Tryouts for cheerleading positions began in 
mid-October, with the field gradually eliminated 
in preliminary sessions to a group of fifteen can- 
didates. From them the student body chose the 
squad. 

Miss Becky Campbell, junior college freshman 
from Sumitton, Alabama, led the group all year 
as head cheerleader. The squad operated with 
nine members, including two alternates who saw 
cheering action at almost every game. Through- 
out the season, both at home and on the road, 
the cheerleaders led Viking fans in vocal support 
of their team. 



Cheerleading squad in action during halftime at the Lee In- 
vitational Tournament. 



Cheerleaders Back Vikings 
and Boost School Spirit 



1966 Cheerleading Squad, left to right: Penny Walker, Lulu Tyner, Aurelia Amick, Cheryl Bethune, captain Becky 
Campbell, Carol Graham, Barbara Goolsby, Sharon Godfrey, and Gloria Trimm. 





Linda Gail Harris 




Carol Graham 




Gloria Trimm 




Cheryl Bethune 




W. ' 


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Barbara Goolsby 



Becky Campbell, captain 



lgdt 



Penny Walker 



Aurelia Amick 



/ M . ■ _ 



Lulu Tyner 






Sharon Godfrey 








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r 





JC Seniors Champs In 
Intramural Basketball 




Intramural director Earl Rowan 



Senior champions, (standing 1. to r.) Ron Leader. Randy 
Phillips, Gary Sharp, Dave Dowdy, Ken Beard, Orlo Fuller, 
Dale Goff; (kneeling 1. to r.) Glen Thompson, Warren 
Wilson, Coach Ken Walston. 




Intramural basketball enjoyed another 
banner year during the past season. Game 
attendance was good; enthusiasm was high 
throughout the season as fierce rivalry de- 
volped between several evenly-matched ball 
clubs. 

Intramural basketball competition con- 
tinues to improve each year. As a result 
of the increased enrollment this year, more 
ballplayers are on campus with high school 
experience, many of them former schoolboy 
varsity players. 

Eight teams participated in the action. 
A rugged thirteen-game regular season 
schedule was played, followed by a grueling 
double-elimination tournament. Every team 
was beaten at least twice. Seniors I took 
the championship this year, winning twelve 
of thirteen games during the regular season, 
and claiming four out of five wins during 
the hotly-contested tournament. This 
marked the fifth consecutive year that a 
junior college senior team has taken "all 
the marbles." 

Intramural basketball stars were honored 
at the annual WCAA banquet, held on May 
10. Trophies were presented at that event 
to varsity and intramural standouts. 




Gerald Lillard ignores Gary Sharp's 
defense. 




Tony Lombard expresses the frustration of trying to stop Dale 
Goff in close. 



McCoy and Phillips go up the ladder in championship battle. 




. Vfc 





y 



Unidentified baserunner is safe at home as catcher, umpire and spectators look on. 



Lee Intramural 



Fred Killman about to connect. 




Warm weather and softball go together 
on the Lee campus like the Mets and 
last place. Lee's intramural softball pro- 
gram begins in the fall, stops for the 
long, cold winter, then starts up again 
as soon as spring rolls around. 

The Bible College Sophomore-Senior 
team copped the fall championship be- 
hind the strong pitching of Bill Parsons 
and Joe McCoy. 

Opening day for the spring program 
was March 28. A league of eight teams 
was organized according to student classi- 
fication. These teams played a seven- 
week schedule which ended in late May. 





Earl Rowan follows through. 



Jim Combs crosses the plate with a run for the Jr. College 
frosh. 



Softball League Plays Split Season 



Catcher Cannon awaits the ball. Oakley has other plans. 



Umpire Steve Daugherty takes a close look 
at home-plate action. 





153 



tj sT" • 




Gerald Lillard (foreground) and Sonny Chambley in a late afternoon doubles match. 



Minor Sports Dominate Spring 



Bill Avery watches with mild concern as Brenda Davis goes after the ball. 

' - . J 




Individual sports dominate campus action in 
the spring when the student body, tired of being 
spectators all winter, join the ranks of the ath- 
letes with racket, paddle, or handball gloves. 

Tennis, perhaps the fastest growing minor 
sport on campus in participation and interest, 
had its biggest year in 1965-'66. The two courts 
in the southeastern corner of the campus were 
full almost constantly. The Athletic Department 
slated an open tennis tournament for the first 
week of May. 

Since a one-wall handball court was built in 
the gym last year, that sport has been popular 
with Lee College men. Action this year focused 
in the Lee Invitational Handball Tournament, 
an event of March 2-5. The double teams of 
Dale Hughes and Paul Henson won the cham- 
pionship and big trophy, smashing Honette 
Echols and Joe Milligan in the final round of 
the tourney. 

Ping pong, a perennial favorite, continued to 
involve many Lee students. Lengthened recre- 
ation-room hours this year helped to make tables 
open to more students. 




Harry Sessoms plays it cool on an easy return shot. 



Dale Goff slams an overhead shot toward the handball wall. Also seen are Dave 
McClain (1.) and Paul Ayers. 




Classes 



The time has come to change 

from broad generalities 

to something more specific. 

Up to this point in the book 

we've been saying 

student body, 

and young collegians, 

Now we begin to say 

Smith, 

and Davis, 

and Webb. 

This section matches names with faces. 

It is full of words like 

Roxbury, 

and Kerala, 

and Cherryvillc. 

It tells us that Chuck's full name is 

Charles Howard, 

which doesn't mean a lot to anyone 

except Chuck. 

But then, 

one nine hundredth of us is Chuck. 



the 1966 Lee Collegian . . . who he WaS 



156 





J 




157 



Bible College Seniors 




Jerry McGhee 





Judy Bixler 



Bob Varner 



The pressure of books and school bells has thinned the ranks 
of the class of '66 to less than half the number entering four 
years ago. Graduating are twenty-eight seniors who have passed 
the requirements for baccalaureate degrees. Thirteen receive the 
B.A. in Biblical Education and fifteen in Christian Education. 

This year's graduating seniors were led for the past two years 
by President Jerry McGhee and Vice-President Bob Varner, with 
Judy Bixler assisting. Mr. Odom has sponsored the class since 
1962. The class last year sponsored a pie auction, has sold chicken 
dinners and candy this year. They plan to spend their class 
treasury for campus beautification. 

Many of the class of '66 have already accepted ministerial ap- 
pointments, some still await assignment, and a few plan to begin 
graduate work next fall. 



^^^^m 



158 






APAPITO AGNGARAYN- 
GAY 

Ilocos Norte, Philippines 

Christian. Education 




JUDY BIXLER 
Chicago, Illinois 
Christian Education 




CLYDE W. EDDINS, JR. 
Pensacola, Florida 
Christian Education 




WILFREDO ESTRADA 
Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 
Christian Education 




LAVERNE GOODMAN 
Thomasville, Alabama 
Biblical Education 



JEAN HAMPTON 
Bristol, Tennessee 
Christian Education 




RENA MAE HOWELL 
Greensboro, North Carolina 
Christian Education 




HAROLD LEE JONES 
Augusta, Georgia 
Biblical Education 



FREDDIE D. KILLMAN 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
Biblical Education 



ANTHONY LOMBARD 
Laurel, Mississippi 
Biblical Education 










159 




JERRY V. McGHEE 
Tinley Park, Illinois 
Biblical Education 



GEORGE D. McGUIRE 
Kingsport, Tennessee 
Christian Education 




K. J. MATHEW 
Cleveland, Tennessee 
Christian Education 




JOHN RALPH MILLER 
Dade City, Florida 
Christian Education 




MARVIN EDWARD NEILL 
Louisburg, Tennessee 
Biblical Education 



THOMAS J. OAKLEY, JR. 
Portage, Indiana 
Biblical Education 




P. S. PHILIPOSE 
Kerala, India 
Christian Education 



JAMES E. RATHBUN 
Flushing, Michigan 
Biblical Education 



ERNEST ROBERTS 
Plant City, Florida 
Biblical Education 





GREY ROBINSON 
Lakeland, Florida 
Biblical Education 




160 



EARL WAYNE ROWAN 
Nashville, Georgia 
Christian Education 



MICHIKO TERAMOTO 
Kove, Japan 
Christian Education 




JIMMY W. STONE 
Bluefield, Virginia 
Biblical Education 





FRED A. SYLVESTER 
Johns Island, S. C. 
Christian Education 




DENZELL TEAGUE 
Hobbs, New Mexico 
Christian Education 



ROBERT M. VARNER 
Roxbury, Pennsylvania 
Biblical Education 



RONALD WALKER 
Augusta, Georgia 
Biblical Education 



WILLIAM E. WELBORN 
Forestville, Maryland 
Christian Education 




161 



Bible College Juniors 




Ted Gray 





Marie Hagan 



John Laye 



Just a year away from senior status, the Bible College class 
of '67 continues to dwindle in number. The class this year num- 
bers 48 juniors, which includes several transfers from last year's 
junior college graduating class. 

Most significant of the activities of the class of '67 has been 
its introduction on campus of the Lee College blazer crest, au- 
thorized for sale by the Student Council in 196 5- The class 
earlier sold doughnuts and washed cars as fund-raising efforts, 
cars as fund-raising efforts. 

Ted Gray takes over this year as class prexy from Gayle Lom- 
bard, who led the class two years consecutively. Vice-president 
is John Laye, secretary is Marie Hagan, and sponsor is Mr. Ar- 
lington. 



162 



Larry Leon Benz 
Rudy Burroughs 
Stanley P. Cagle 
Charles Paul Conn 
James Stephen Conn 



Philip Lamar Cook 
Sue Cowart 

Harold W. Crawford, Jr. 
Percy Dennis 
Dudley Dickson 



Donald L. Douglas 
Nadine Farabee 
Lloyd E. Frazier 
R. Gerald Funderburk 
George W. Geesey 



Donald A. Goodrum 
Ted F. Gray 
Joan Anita Green 
K. Marie Hagan 
Jimi Hall 





Ruby Hall 

F. Laurene Harding 

Samuel W. Home 

Kyle L. Hudson, Jr. 

< 

i Brenda Johnson 



*ikd 



jQ0i Carl Richard Johnson 

Douglas Laughridge 
Jonathan D. Laye 
' k. Gayle L. Lombard 

Joseph L. McCoy, Jr. 



163 





■ f^; --*» ■ ■ *w* > 



.^tsn 








Sharon Mullins 
Shirley R. Ogden 
Jim. Peery 
Benjamin Perez 
Gene Phar^ 



Clyde Thomas Rhyne 
Dorothy Louise Shaw 
Douglas W. Slocumb 
Cameron Smith 
Marvin J. Smith 



Annie Laura Thorne 
Alan J. Walker 
James P. Webb 
E. Allen Williams 
Lucius M. Williams 



Fred C. Wilson 
Max Eugene Wilson 
William Keith Windham 



Juniors 



Student journalists Gwen Hos- 
kins (left) and Jane Colquitt, 
mix CLARION staff work with 
cokes and popcorn in a dormi- 
tory work session. 




Bible College Sophomores 




Gerald Bailey 





Renee Meredith 



Barry Lombard 



Going into its second year on the Lee campus, the Bible Col- 
lege class of '68 continues to gain notice as a well-organized, 
hard-working class. 

Led for the second straight year by President Gerald Bailey, 
the sophomores this year named Barry Lombard and Renee Mere- . 
dith to aid him as officers. Dr. Bowdle sponsors the class. 

President Bailey states that the goal of the class is a senior 
trip year after next. Funds are "coming in constantly" from the 
sale of name tags, sweatshirts, and Roll-writes. 



165 




Class of '68 




166 






James Mack Avery 
Robert Ayers 
L. Gerald Bailey 
H. D. Barker 
James Floyd Baxter 
Richard Ralph Beatty 
Janice L. Boatwright 
John Carl Briggs 



Dan Browning 
Wilfredo Calderon 
C. H. Chambley, Jr. 
Thomas L. Copeland 
Katherine Covey 
Robert Albert Crick 
Raymon Dee Eller 
V. Michael Errington 



Gerald Fox 
Jorge Abel Guerra 
Stephen L. Gwaltney 
James Joel Harris 
Priscilla Dianne Hart 
Robert Evans Hinson 
Jimmy Neal Hood 
Louis Guy Hulsey 



Buddy Jackson 
Joseph W. Laing 
Vicente Landeo 
Larry F. LeCroy 
Barry H. Lombard 
Judy Lee McKinney 
Darlia M. McLuhan 
Dwayne M. McLuhan 




Paulette R. Meredith 
Reddi K. Murty 
Billy Don Prewitt 
Bill E. Parson 
Wayne Prosser 
Ronald Ragan 



Robert Lee Rathbun 
Ruth Ann Ringo 
Edward Rodgers 
Gary E. Shealy 
Lois Sherbahn 
Katherain C. Smith 



Robert Wallace Smith 
Wanda Kaye Smith 
Joyce Ray Stevens 



Richard L. W. Swisher 
Hobert W. Tarpley 
Victoria M. Teran 



V. Wynell Thornton 
R. Joel Trammell 
Roland E. Vaughan 



Gary D. Vincent 
E. LaJoy Walker 
Joe C. Waters 



Dennis Perry Wilkes 
Francis L. Williams 
Delia Jean Wilson 



Calvin Wood 
Dawn C. Wooderson 
Kenneth W. Woodfin 




167 



Bible College Freshmen 




Bud Short 





Sandi Hitte 



Bill Wilson 



Eighty aspiring theologians and musicians began their four- 
year quest for the sacred sheepskin at Lee Bible College this 
September. Among this number were many music majors, with 
others studying in the religion curriculum. 

The Bible College frosh got off to a good start in their first 
year on campus, though perhaps somewhat less active than their 
junior college peers. Standing committees have been set up, and 
tentative plans drawn for financial drives and service projects. 

Heading up the Bible College frosh is 'Bud' Short, from West 
Frankfort, Illinois. He is assisted by Bill Wilson and Sandi Hitte. 
Sponsor is Mr. McDaniels. 




168 



A. V. Abraham 
Pedro Pablo Abreu 
Glenn Earl Acree 
Gertrude Aldrich 
Thomas G. Anastasi 



Nathan Duane Arnold 
Harry Begay 
L. M. Bennett, Jr. 
Douglas Hayden Bird 
Joyce A. Boothe 





% 






£». 



mkm* 





Class of '69 




Brady M. Boozer 
Terry T. Bowden 
Larry A. Brittain 
James Robert Butler 
Jon D. Cadenhead 



Dale E. Cannada 
Roger Dale Cash 
Fred E. Cason, Jr. 
Robert Causey 
Arthur T. Church 



Lorraine E. Coates 
C. W. Cornwell. Jr. 
Robert Edward Cripe 
John Edward Crosby 
Linda C. Davidson 



George Terry Easton 
Betty Jo Eller 
Mary Annette Ellis 
Carmen J. Estrada 
Jessie Frazier 



169 




Who says freshmen can't play it cool? A casket, rolled into the Alumni Building hall for a demon- 
stration speech, brought only disinterested stares from this freshman class. 



Ernest W. Fuson 
Clement E. Gibson 
Eddie G. Gillette 
Terry L. Godfrey 
Juan A. Guadalupe 



Sheila M. Harbour 
Carlton Wayne Harris 
Larry K. Henry 
James E. Hill 
Judy Juannell Hitte 



Sandra Kaye Hitte 
Ronald Edward Hodge 
Milton B. Jackson 
James R. Johnson 
Sandra Kay Kirtley 



Brenda Marzell Land 
Rafael J. M. Lastra 
L. Louis Lowery 
David W. McCard 
Thomas J. Maharrey 




^1 k±\ ± 





J 70 




Jerry Martin 
Ron D. Martin 
Helen Susanne Miller 
Lloyd E. Miller, Jr. 
Lai Mohammed 



Bruce W. Moore 
Shirley J. Moser 
Glenda Nicholson 
K. W. Northcutt 
John F. Oxford 



William T. Pawluk 
Ronald B. Perry 
Sheryl L. Powell 
Danny Orval Pryor 
Margaret Ann Pugh 



Bible College Frosh 



Freshman Donna Wilbanks apparently enjoys holding hands — two at a time in this case, with Wayne 
Harmon and Gene Pharr providing the hands. Twin Wanda looks in. Color her jealous. 




171 




Aaron Clyde Reaves 
Billy Joe Rodgers 
Charles Monroe Rush 
Thomas W. Russell 
Betty Joyce Shearon 



Ruth Ann Sherbahn 
Dwight E. Shirley 
Charles H. Short 
Michael Virgil Sinks 
Maynard Junior Sisk 



David Marvin Souders 
Paul R. Stanken 
C. Charlotte Sterling 
Gwendolyn Taylor 
Virginia Toler 



Bill Tull 
John F. Turner 
Bobby Lee Vaughn 
Harriet F. Wachowski 
Patty Sue Wall 



Bible College Frosh 



J. Randy Weeks 
A. W. F. Welch, Jr. 
John H. Weston, Jr. 
John Lloyd Wheeler 
Terry D. Wigley 



Faye Inez Wilcox 
Bill W. Wilson 
C. Calvin Woodring 
Marvin Eugene Woods 
Bernard Leon Wotton 




172 



Junior College Sophomores 




Paul Holcombe 





Judy Owens 



Don Goff 




An era passes this May when Dean J. H. Walker, Jr. awards 
Associate in Arts diplomas to approximately 150 junior college 
seniors. This year's graduates are the last to receive the A. A. 
from Lee College, which next year moves into a four-year liberal 
arts program. 

The '66 junior college class has been one of the most active 
ever. Leadership has come from presidents Ethues McGowan 
and Paul Holcombe. The class has sold doughnuts and Sadie 
Hawkins dolls to pay for class flings which included a Christmas 
party and annual spring picnics. '66 Vice-president is Don Goff; 
secretary is Judy Owens. Sponsors are Dr. McBrayer and Mrs. 
Driggers. 

College administrators are counting heavily on '66 junior col- 
lege graduates to form the nucleus of next year's liberal arts 
student body. And so it is that this class may graduate again in 
1968 — the last of the old and the first of the new. 



173 




DANNY JAMES ACORD 
Beckley, West Virginia 

AURELIA M. AMICK 
Bessemer, Alabama 

CECIL AUDELL ANTWINE, JR. 
Watkinsville, Georgia 



CONNIE S. ARIVETT 
Fontana, California 

CHARLES KAY ATKINS 
Port Mill, South Carolina 

WILLIAM P. AVERY 
Troutman, North Carolina 



HAROLD L. BARE 
Cherryville, North Carolina 

DIANNE BASKETT 
Decatur, Georgia 

EDMUND LEE BAUGH, JR. 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



Class o! 




KENNETH E. BEARD 
Flint, Michigan 

LARRY H. BECK 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

PRISCILLA BERRY 
Jacksonville, Florida 



V. LaVONNA BOST 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

J. A. BOYNTON 
Greenville, South Carolina 

LARRY BRADDOCK 
Jacksonville, Florida 



174 



1 



JAMES HERBERT BREWER 
Frostproof, Florida 

LOLA LUALLEN BREWER 
Forrest City, Arkansas 

CAROLYN BRIDGES 
Gatlinburg, Tennessee 



MILFORD BROCK 
Sevierville, Tennessee 

MARY H. BROWER 
Gainesville, Florida 

RANI MARGARET ROSE BUJAN 
Trinidad, West Indies 



SHIRLEY ANGELA BUJAN 
Trinidad, West Indies 

KATHLEEN J. BURKHOLDER 

Newville, Pennsylvania 

LYNDA IRENE BURRIS 
Cleveland, Tennessee 





DRUCILLA BYRD 
Rossville, Georgia 

JAMES NELSON BYROM 
College Park, Georgia 

GLENDA CLARA CALDWELL 
Charleston, Tennessee 



DALE F. CANNON 
Marietta, Georgia 

MRS. MARY RUTH CARTER 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

THOMAS J. CASON 
Jacksonville, Florida 




175 




HOWARD T. CHASE 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

GLENDA CLEGHORN 
Royston, Georgia 

MARLA CLEGHORN 
Royston, Georgia 



FRANK LESTER COLLUM 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

JANE COLQUITT 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

ROSEMARY CRANE 
Rossville, Georgia 



SAM DALE 
Berryton, Georgia 

STEVE DAUGHERTY 
Bridgville, Delaware 

BRENDA KAY DAVIS 
Springfield, Ohio 



Class of 



RICHARD EUGENE DAVIS 
Greenville, South Carolina 

MARTHA YVONNE DAWSON 
Mount Dora, Florida 

DENNY CLIFFORD DENNISON 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



MELVIN DAVID DIXON 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

MARIE DOVER 
Okeechobee, Florida 

DAVID W. DOWDY 
Anderson, South Carolina 




176 



PAUL L. DOWDY 
Anderson, South Carolina 

ROBERT E. DRAWBAUGH 
Newville, Pennsylvania 

JERRY RAY DUNN 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



JUDY E. ELLIS 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 

RICHARD D. EVANS 
Live Oak, Florida 

KARLENE E. FARABEE 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



JOYCE ELAINE FITHIAN 
Dearborn, Michigan 

BILL EDWARD FLYNN 
Cherryfield, Maine 

JAMES R. FORESTER 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



'66 





DAVID LAMAR FRANKLIN 
Applegate, Michigan 

M. DIANNE FULCHER 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

ORLO V. FULLER 
Seattle, Washington 



ELIZABETH J. GARBE 
Hazel Park, Michigan 

C. LAVENIA GENTRY 
Lakeland, Florida 

DAVID C. GILMER 
Buford, Georgia 



177 



DALE W. GOFF 
Beckley, West Virginia 

DONALD WAYNE GOFF 
Beckley, West Virginia 

MATTIE GOODMAN 
Thomasville, Alabama 





: it--- ». 

A : - fc rfi'Mllh 

ftlKI 



CAROL JEANE GRAHAM 
Smyrna, Georgia 

CAROLE RUTH GRINDSTAFF 
Greenville, South Carolina 

JUNE ANN HALE 
Thomasville, Alabama 



DONALD ROY HARKINS 
Greenville, South Carolina 

WAYNE HARMON 
Greenville, South Carolina 

BARBARA HARPER 
Little Rock, Arkansas 





Junior College 




CHARLES BRENT HARRIS 
Clearwater, Florida 

CAROLYN ELIZABETH HARRIS 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

MARY HELEN HARRISON 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



JUDITH ANN HARVARD 
Lake Wales, Florida 

ROBERT E. HAWKINS 

New Cumberland, West Virginia 

DAVID E. HELMS 
Scottsboro, Alabama 



178 




F. EUGENE HENDERSON, II 
St. Louis, Missouri 

JANICE FAYE HITCHCOCK 
Rock Island, Tennessee 

KATHRYN ANN HITTE 
Jacksonville, Florida 



PAUL AMOS HOLCOMBE, JR. 
Memphis, Tennessee 

MARY MARGARET HOLDMAN 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

RICHARD D. HOLLAND 
Birmingham, Alabama 



GWENDOLYN INEZ HOSKINS 
Middlesboro, Kentucky 

HILDA JEANETTE HUGHES 
Florence, Alabama 

SUSAN ANN HUNT 
Valdese, North Carolina 



Seniors 



MARGARET M. INGRAM 
Hazlehurst, Georgia 

PEGGY ANN JOHNSON 
Greenville, South Carolina 

JEANETTE JONES 
Hapeville, Georgia 



LINDA RUTH KAYS 
Louisville, Kentucky 

JOYCE KING 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

PATRICIA ANN LANE 
Everett, Pennsylvania 




179 




DONALD FRANK LAWSON 
Mineral Point, Missouri 

WANDA F. LAWSON 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

RON LEADER 
Hapeville, Georgia 



MARY NELL LEDBETTER 
East Canton, Ohio 

MARY M. LEE 
Whiteside, Tennessee 

LEO LOTT 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



Junior College 



JERRY L. MADDOX 
Cullman, Alabama 

LEON S. MAINER 
Flint, Michigan 

JACK ANTHONY MARTIN 
Charleston, Tennessee 



DAVID ARTHUR McCLURE 
Jacksonville, Florida 

RAY ALLEN McCORMICK 
Sevierville, Tennessee 

IDA MAE MCDUFFIE 
Okeechobee, Florida 



JEWELL McGHEE 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

ETHUES McGOWAN 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

HELEN MILLER 
Cleveland, Tennessee 




180 



Seniors 



JERRY M. MILLER 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

OTEEN MILLER 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

CAROL MORGAN 
Soddy, Tennessee 



BETTY J. MUNCY 
Hamilton, Ohio 

LINDA NETTLES 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

KATHY NEWHAM 
Sevierville, Tennessee 





BARBARA NEWTON 
Jackson, Mississippi 

WILLIAM DONALD NICHOLS 
Williamson, West Virginia 

CHARLES H. OSBORNE 
Sidney, Ohio 



JUDY OWENS 
Rossville, Georgia 

ROBERT WAYNE PARRISH 
Norfolk, Virginia 

ELAYNE R. PERRY 
North Canton, Ohio 



ALMA ELMINA PHILLIPS 
Daisy, Tennessee 

CHARLES KENNETH PHILLIPS 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

ROBERT LEE PHILLIPS, JR. 
Atlanta, Georgia 



181 



CHARLES F. PIGG 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

MOZEL PLYMALE 
Phyllis, Kentucky 

ANITA LOUISE POLATTA 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



FRANCES ELAINE POLATTA 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

JAMES PRICE 

Sand Mountain, Alabama 

BRENDA RHAE PRUETT 
Knoxville, Tennessee 




1 






Jl a. 




JUDY T. RATCLIFFE 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

EULA VAN RIGNEY 
Eight Mile, Alabama 

JAMES WILSON RIGNEY 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



ANNE ROBERTS 
West Point, Mississippi 

MRS. GREY ROBINSON 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

LINDA ROSE 
Franklin, Ohio 



THOMAS EDWIN RUTLEDGE 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

JOSEPH GARY SHARP 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

SANDRA F. SHARPE 
Covington, Louisiana 



182 




DONALD EDWARD SHOUPE 
Tampa, Florida 

CATHY SMALLWOOD 
Everglades, Florida 

BEDFORD H. SMITH, JR. 
Ypsilanti, Michigan 



dHJMtnfcrfc 



JOHN WILLIAM SMITH 
Gastonia, North Carolina 



LARRY EUGENE SMITH 
Parkersburg, West Virginia 

DWIGHT JAMES STAFFORD 
Cohutta, Georgia 



Seniors 



JANE ELIZABETH STARNES 
Phoenix, Arizona 

ANITA STEPP 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

ROGER SUMLER 
Christiansburg, Virginia 



LINDA SHARON SUMNER 
Baltimore, Maryland 

NANCY CAROLYN SWARTOUT 
Etowah, Tennessee 

PATRICIA EVELYN TAYLOR 
Lake City, Tennessee 



JEAN THOMASON 
Sumiton, Alabama 

MARTHA TIMMERMAN 
Fresno, California 

THOMAS A. TIOAQUIN 
Cleveland, Tennessee 




183 



MARY LOUISE TYNER 
Greenville, South Carolina 

PHYLLIS VAUGHAN 
Kingsport, Tennessee 

BEVERLY ANN VOLIVA 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



DAVID VOLIVA 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

WONNEY REE WATERS 
Lakeland, Florida 

MARILYN GAYLE WEBB 
Reliance, Tennessee 



MARJORIE JEAN WELLS 
Sevierville, Tennessee 

RUTHIE WESSON 
Birmingham, Alabama 

JOSEPH ALFRED WHITMIRE 
Dalton, Georgia 




Seniors 



NORMAN JERALD WILSON 
Pinson, Alabama 

JESSIE VEE WILLIAMS 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

JOHN MICHAEL WILLIAMS 
Hanover, New Jersey 



JOYCE FAYE WILSON 
Sevierville, Tennessee 

GEORGE WARREN WILSON 
Pinson, Alabama 

BETTY JEAN WOMACK 
Hampton, Virginia 




184 



Junior College Freshmen 




Kic Kennedy 





Diane Plunkett 



Rick Corley 




College freshmen have become almost legendary on the Amer- 
ican campus scene in their unbecoming combination of naivete 
and brashness. This year's crop at Lee College at first provided 
little occasion to refute the image, but by now are well assimi- 
lated into the Lee student body. 

The class, Lee's largest group of frosh ever, came on 321 
strong in September. They chose Ric Kennedy, from Yakima, 
Washington, as their president, Rick Corley as vice-president, 
and Diane Plunkett as secretary. Kennedy provided the most 
imaginative leadership seen in the freshman class in recent years. 
Sponsor is Mr. Riggs. 

The frosh turned out for a moonlight cruise sponsored for 
them by Alpha Gamma Chi in October, headed up a pep rally 
and car crash later in the semester, and made significant con- 
tributions to campus life throughout the year. They assessed 
class dues early in October, a "first" in class fund-raising here. 



185 




Billy Daris Adams 
Sharon Elaine Agee 
Brenda D. Akins 
Rosemary Aldridge 
Jo Ann Anderson 



Rita Joyce Anderson 
Sandra Mae Anderson 
Joan L. Anglin 
Edith Patricia Ard 
Thomas H. Ashley, Jr. 



Maxine Atkins 
Paul Bohrman Ayers, Jr. 
James William Bacon 
Melvin E. Baird 
Larry A. Baker 



Autumn oi '65 



Larry Dean Banks 
James A. Baskett 
Jeanne Bass 
Earlene Beasley 
Sandra Bentley 



Norman Benz 
Cheryl Bethune 
Carolyn Rose Bielawski 
G. John Blackard 
Albert Andrell Blackwell 



Betty Josephine Blair 
Elaine Marie Blair 
Ron Blankenship 
Linda Sue Blevins 
Dalphus Lynn Bloomer 




Linda Nell Boland 
Linda Joyce Booth 
Carol Jean Bray 
Norma Jane Bray 
Susan Louise Brewer 



James Nathan Brown 
Judy Marie Brown 
Peter J. Brown 
Randall F. Burnett 
Ina Gail Burnsed 



Joyce Ann Byrd 
Rebecca Ann Campbell 
Herbert Gurney Cannon 
Donald W. Caruthers 
Becky Lou Chamberlain 







Brought to Campus 




Bernice Champion 
Russell Lee Chaney 
Linda Dale Childa 
Margaret E. Clawson 
Sandra Elaine Clayton 



Sharon Lee Cleis 
Steven Brooks Clifton 
Sandra Cline 
Brenda Lois Coates 
Shirley E. Cobb 



Jim D. Combs 
Sharon Lois Conn 
Linda Ruth Copley 
Frederick R. Corley 
Mary Lou Cox 



187 



Janice Crafton 
Saundra Crisler 
Bob J. Curtsinger 
Barbara L. Danehower 
Janice Rae Daniel 



Carol Daniels 
Faye Elizabeth Davis 
Nelda A. Davis 
Teresa Gail Deans 
Judith Carol Denham 



Diane Marie Dingess 
Charlotte A. Donaldson 
Roger Dale Doss 
Charles Fredric Dotson 
Diane Dover 




A Record Number 





dkmM 



Joann Patricia Drews 
Brenda Jean Dunn 
Judy Gale Dunn 
C. LeRue Dunson 
Jerry Lee Dunson 



Artie G. Ellis 

Mike Ellis 

Ronald Earl Ferguson 

Virginia Sue Fleming 

Rosemary Z. Ford 



Thurman Edward Ford 
Judith Lynn Fortner 
Jimmy Fowler 
Gordon French 
George W. Fricks 




Russell James Fuller 
James William Gee 
Janet Marie Geitner 
Larry J. Gentry- 
Nelson J. Gilbert, Jr. 



Jerry Wayne Gillilan 
Gail Sue Ginn 
Sharon Lynn Godfrey 
Charley L. Goff 
Jimmy Doyle Goodrum 



Barbara Oaile Goolsby 
Linda Karleen Grant 
Wanda Joy Gray 
Sally Ann Green 
Philip Wayne Greeson 



oi Enthusiastic, 



Deborah Lee Gregg 
Sherrill E. Griffin 
Linda Joyce Griffith 
Wanda Mae Grogan 
Wanda Lynell Hall 



Paula Dee Hamblin 
Janice Lanell Hamilton 
Linda M. Hanley 
Linda Gail Harris 
Evelyn Carral Harrison 



James D. Harrison, Jr. 
Sandy Gale Harvey 
Donna Faye Hastings 
Joyce C. Hemphill 
Gloria Jeanette Herman 




189 




Billy Wayne Hill 
Patricia Sue Hill 
Larry W. Hillebrand 
David Marrion Hinely 
Eunice L. Hinson 



DeRosa Hodges 
Terry Rowan Hoke 
Eddie Roger Hollis 
David Lee Holloway 
Danette Sue Homner 



Jane Elizabeth Horton 
Billy Joe Howe 
James Henry Huett 
David Ray Hunt 
Ronnie Lance Hyde, Jr. 



Martha Inman 
Janice Annette Isely 
Dianne Jenkins 
James Vearl Jent 
Brenda Jo Johns 



Ambitious. Homesick. 



Alice Victoria Johnson 
Michalene A. Kadar 
Danny Pete Keller 
Richard W. Kennedy 
Terry Lee Kile 



Brenda Gail Kilpatrick 
Charlotte Ann Kimble 
Buddy Eugene Kimsey 
Luther L. King, Jr. 
Jeanette R. Knipp 






****** 




190 



Mary Esther Knox 
Mary Kathleen Kumler 
Theresa Ann Lane 
Linda Diane Lawrence 
Earnestine Jeanette Lee 



Vickie Lee 
Joseph Lee Lemons 
Judy Lemons 
Anna C. Lewis 
Filbert Lewis 



Cecelia Ann Lindsay 
Dot Lombard 
Ova Doris Lott 
Tyrell C. Lyle 
Charles M. Martin 



Rachel Ann Masters 
Linda Faye Maxwell 
Claudette May 
Mona Dale McBurnett 
David Harold McClain 




Excited, Energetic, 




Virginia K. McClanahan 
Alfred Darrell McDaniel 
Max McKelvy 
Patricia Gayle McLain 
Herchell Paul McMillan 



Elwanda McMurry 
Harry Marshall Miller 
Regina A. Miller 
Marcia G. Millsaps 
Sandra Mitchell 



191 



Sammy Mize, Jr. 
David Montgomery 
Joy Moore 

Ann Kathryn Moreland 
Ronald Darell Moreland 



Ruth Moreno 
James Isaac Morris 
Jerry Moss 

Robert Fredrick Mudd 
James Danny Mundy 




Carefree, Spirited, 




Herbert R. Myers 
Lynda Sue Nelson 
Sylvia Gail Newell 
Larry Dwane Lakley 
Kenneth Lavoy Ogle 



Ricky Reese Organ 
Pamela Deland Osborne 
Ella Sue Osment 
Sharon Ann Overbay 
Jerry Lee Patrick 



Charles David Payne 
Walter Wayne Perdue 
Steve Petty 

Randall La Von Phillips 
George Howard Pillow 



Glenda Diane Plunkett 
Dewitt Poole 
Linda Cheryl Powell 
Rickey Powell 
Sandra Powers 



192 




Arlene T. Prewitt 
Phyllis Ann Pruett 
Jerry Wayne Querry 
Jesse D. Quinn 
Joe Taylor Raburn 



Bonnie Lou Reffner 
Bruce Renner 
Patricia Carol Renner 
Wendell Richardson 
Groce Randall Robinson 



Vivacious, Confused, 



Janice Evelyn Robinson 
Gwenda Joyce Roland 
Ruby Mae Rollers 
Alice Rose 
Ruth Rose 



Darryl William Ross 
Roger James Runion 
Terry A. Rushing 
Rosa Christine Russell 
Linda Varnell Sewell 



Judith Lynn Sharpe 
Joyce Sherrill 
Geraldine Short 
Robert G. Short 
David Leroy Shreve 



Terry D. Shumaker 
Susan Elizabeth Siebold 
Jannie Lee Simmons 
Louella Sloan 
Judy Sue Smith 





m^"«r k 


I fv 


■E" " " •t 





193 




Margaret Louise Smith 
Ray La Von Smith 
William G. Squires, Jr. 
Worth Edward St. John 
Adena Gail Stapleton 



Dorothy L. Stephens 
James David Stephens 
James Paul Stephens 
William L. Stradt 
Connie Lynn Stringer 



Green Freshmen! 



Charles Roy Suits 
John Dale Summers 
Michael Anthony Sutton 
Mary Charlotte Taylor 
Thomas Franklin Taylor 



Connie Darlene Teague 
Wilma Jean Teaster 
Glenn Thompson 
Sharon R. Townley 
Juanita E. Trantham 



Gloria Trimm 
Joan C. Tripp 
Nancy P. Tyner 
Dreama Laudean Via 
Carolyn Gladys Walker 



Dianne Sharon Walker 
Penny Geraldene Walker 
Ruby Wall 

Kenny David Walston 
Anne Marie Watkins 




194 



Harvey M. Watson 
Judith Ann Webb 
John Walter Welch 
Arthur Lavon West 
Linda Gray West 



Connie Ralph Westbury 
Charles Arch White 
Hayden T. Whitmire 
Howard Ray Wiggs 
Donna Elaine Wilbanks 





J © 9) 



AM <^^ti AM 



diM JiMJiM 



Lynda Wilbanks 
Wanda Jane Wilbanks 
Billy Wayne Wilder 
Shelby Jean Wiley 
Judy Ann Willhoit 



Avanah Marie Williams 
Bobby Boyd Williams 
Bobby Gene Williams 
Raymond Phillip Wilson 
Bill Winters 



Gary H. York 

Thomas H. Zimmerman 





The night-class break began five min- 
utes ago, but this first-year botany 
student is still stunned by the bar- 
rage of lecture notes. 



195 



Advertising 



Advertising in this book tells 

where the Lee Collegian 

buys books 

and washes clothes 

and trades cars 

and takes his girl after the ball game. 

It tells where he came from, 

whether Tennessee 

or Texas. 

It tells who cares enough about him 

to patronize his college venture 

by supporting his yearbook. 

It is the names and pictures and slogans 

of scores of firms and businesses 

in a small southern town 

whose neon signs 

he has grown accustomed to seeing 

and has somehow 

become attached to them. 



the 1966 Lee Collegian . . . who Were hlS SUppOrterS 



196 







197 




H. D. Williams 

State Overseer 






Students from the Tar Heel State 



Congratulations 

to the graduating class of 1966 

from the North Carolina State Office 



Bill Sheeks 

Youth Director 



198 




TOWN HOUSE BAKE SHOP 

Bakes It Better With Butter 

233 Broad Street 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


STATE FARM INSURANCE 

190 Ocoee, S.W. 
Phone: 472-1741 

George B. McKenzie, Local Agent 




COOKE'S FOOD STORE 

Free Parking 




Besf Wzs/ies 

from the 

State Overseer, State Council, 

ministers and laity 

of 

North Dakota 

and 

South Dakota 


Free Delivery 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


Compliments of 

CALLAWAY GROCERY 

Fourth Generation of Serving 
Cleveland and Bradley County 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 






Three Convenient Locations 

Main Office — Ocoee Street 
Drive-in Branches — 191 Church Street, N.E. 
North Ocoee and 25th Street 
Member of FDIC 



199 




Hollis Green 

Administrative Assistant National Sunday 

School and Youth Department 




Donald Aultman 

National Sunday School and 

Youth Director 




Paul Henson 

Assistant National Sunday School 

and Youth Director 



CHURCH OF GOD 



SUNDAV SCHOOL AND VOUTH 





SUNDAY SCHOOL AND YOUTH BOARD 




LEMONS TILE COMPANY 



1650 S. Church St. 



Over 26 Years Experience 



CERAMIC TILE — MARBLE -— TERRAZZO 



Compliments of 



FIRE 





CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 

Cleveland's Oldest — Since 1894 



Holiday Inn 




YOUR HOST FROM COAST TO COAST 

Banquet and Meeting Room Facilities 

144 Modern Rooms 

Seating Capacity — 500 

Phone 472-1504 



201 




date's Oktttartronj g>tyap 



For the past thirty years, it has been our privilege to serve the people of the Cleveland area. 
As Cleveland has grown, Law's Men's wear has taken great strides forward. Now we are 
proud to announce the opening of the Canterbury Shop, a store built especially for you, 
the teen man and his father. The Canterbury Shop will specialize in the newest styles and 
fashions and will have trained and experienced personnel to help you in your selections. 
We invite the students of Lee College to come in with friends and browse around in the 
friendly atmosphere of Cleveland's newest and most unique traditional shop. 





A. G. Thompson, 
State Overseer 





Students from the Pelican State 



S. S. Horstick, 
Youth Director 



202 





MILLER'S INC. 

One of the South's Great Stores 

Village Shopping Center 

'Where Lee College Students Are Always Welcome' 



CLEVELAND NATIONAL BANK 



Established 1886 

Federal Reserve System 

Member Federal Reserve Deposit Insurance Corporation 

THE VILLAGE BRANCH 

VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER 

HIWASSEE BRANCH 

CHARLESTON, TENNESSEE 



203 





Students from the Buckeye State 




H. B. Ramsey 

State Overseer 




Floyd Carey 

State Youth Director 



STATE COUNCIL 

- .r> 




MARIES FLOWERS AND GIFTS 




FLOWERS AND GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Down the street from LEE 



390 Church Street, N.E. 



Phone: 476-5591 



Congratulations to the Graduating Seniors 
from 





•™- r ™,* r , / ™ 




Magna vox S FRIGIDAIRE 



LARRY PETTY. MANAGER 

1601 S. Lee Highway 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 37311 

Phone 472-8262 



205 





JOHN D. SMITH 

State Overseer 






ROY HORTON 

State Sunday School 
and Youth Director 



ELMER E. GOLDEN 

State Evangelism 
Director 



CLARENCE BUSBY 

State Sec.-Treas. 



STATE COUNCIL 









P. H. HAMMOND 



LEROY CARVER 



HUBERT NORRIS 




CLYDE BOLT 




LEWIS STOVER, JR. N. C. RIDGEWAY 



L. O. PROSSER 



K. K. JEFFORDS PAUL L. WALKER 



^onc^ratuiationd to <JLee d 



a 



eoraia 



p 



linden 



Is 




STUDENTS FROM CRACKER STATE 



CAPITAL MOTOR SALES 



THE SOUTH'S LARGEST 







t " ; . _ % 




iiS^r? 5 


|k~^; 


■ MOT 

■ »*»■ 


5^ 


Ommwr^-.q 


SBba^JP 


lw»- r 3t \\ -* 


T 


'^-^ 


^S: 


*w&*sjadttwi 


•it&Ci 




"*"*^ 







^♦i^of finest oualit* 



TRIUMPH 



I 



b^*«*SBk 



Indirect Dealers in all makes of New Cars. We specialize in the Finest of 
Used Cars. Quality is Always First. 



Chattanooga, Tennessee 

5808 Lee Highway and 

4103 Ringgold Rd. 



Cleveland, Tennessee 
South Lee Highway 



WE SELL TO SELL AGAIN 




Compliments of 



TIP TOP 
FOOD TOWN 



208 




CLEVELAND ELECTRIC SYSTEM 





HARDWICK STORE, INC. 


PARKS - BELK COMPANY 




Clothing for the Entire Family 


85 First Street, N.E. 


CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




Suppliers of Distinctive Attire 




for the 




Fashion Conscious Stude?its 








of 




Penney's 




Lee College 




ALWAYS FIRST QUALITY! 






Always First Quality 




ABEL'S FURNITURE 


Cleveland's Family Department Store 






AND HARDWARE 


Compliments of 


ON THE SQUARE 


SHERWIN-WILLIAMS CO. 


Phone: 476-5531 




55 First Street, N.W. 


310 Inman Street 


CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


Cleveland, Tennessee 






Phone: 476-4531 







209 





CECIL B. KNIGHT 

State Overseer 

DAVID BEATTY 

Youth Director 




STUDENTS FROM THE HOOSIER STATE 



CONGRATULATIONS FROM THE 
MINISTERS AND LAITY OF INDI- 
ANA TO THE CLASS OF '66. 



210 





STATE OFFICE 







F. L. MULLER 
STATE OVERSEER 




LAMAR VEST 
YOUTH DIRECTOR 




STUDENTS FROM THE SOONER STATE 




HALE'S MUSIC, INC 

1647 Roswell St., Marietta, Ga. 
Phone: 427-1375 



New and Used, Easy Terms 
Serving Southeast with free delivery 
within 300 miles of our store. 
Call today for! prices. 



The Nation's Top Brands 

PIANOS ORGANS 

BAND INSTRUMENTS 

GUITARS 




Klmbell, Lowery, Henry P. Miller, Ivers and Ponds, 

Eplphone, Kay, Harmony Guitar and amplifiers, King, 

Buffet, Cleveland, Evette and Schoffer Band Instruments. 



211 



FLORIDA 




Students from the Sunshine State 

THE LAITY AND MINISTRY OF FLORIDA CONGRATULATE 
THE CLASS OF '66 





JAMES A. CROSS 

State Overseer 



DONALD T. PEMBERTON 

State Youth Director 



212 




F. W. GOFF 

State Overseer 



WEST 




West Virginia State Council 

Standing: W. H. Compton, Earl Piking, A. J. Gardner 

Seated: Ray Rodeavor, E. J. Gibson, F. W. Goff, William D. Colter and Eugene 
C. Garner 






RUSSELL BRINSON 

State Youth Director 



Students from Panhandle State 



213 




A community is known by the companies 
it keeps . . . Brown Stove Works, Inc. is 
happy to be one of the progressive 
companies who call Cleveland "home." 





BROWN STOVE WORKS, INC. • CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



214 



CLEVELAND BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 



Complete Banking Facilities 



Use our West Inman Street Branch for convenient Drive-in Facilities. 
Member FDIC 



SEAL OF QUALITY 




CUSTOMERS COME FIRST 





California-Nevada State Council 




Seated: I. L. Benge; Floyd Timmerman, State Overseer; and B. L. Kelly, 
State Sunday School and Youth Director 

Standing: Jack Hale, O. H. Wolff, Robert E. Fisher, Floyd McClung, 
Thomas Griffith, Sr., Louis Rushing, F. D. Black, and Lemuel 
Johnson 








Compliments of 


GRIFFITH CYCLE SHOP 


GOODYEAR SERVICE STORES 


LAWSON'S FASHION CENTE 


Harley-Davidson Motorcycles 




150 Ocoee Street 


Clinton and Briggs and Stratton 


Phone: 472-4501, First and Broad Sts. 


CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


Engines 


CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




94 Church Street, S.E. 






Phone: 472-5551 


General Electric and RCA 


Home of Nationally Advertized Merchandise 


Schwinn Bicycle 


Low as $5 down and $5 a month 





215 




MYRNA L. STANLEY 

State Sec.-Treas. 



T. L. FORESTER 

State Overseer 



LARRY TIMMERMAN 

State Youth Director 




issippi 



B. L. Roberts 





* 7<V. *■* 






Students from the Magnolia State 



A. D. Gommill 



I. H. Beard 





■ 



HA 

John D. Statum 



A \ 



< 



J. M. Cain 






Marshall Poplin 




W. D. Watkins 



Hulon Evans 



216 






State Youth Parsonage — State Parsonage 





JOHN LEMONS 

State Youth Director 



D. A. BIGGS 

State Overseer 



New Improvements on 
South Carolina Campground 





New Cafeteria 



Drinking Fountain 



217 



Congratulations from the 
STATE OF MISSOURI 

To the Class of 1966 




PAUL T. STOVER 

State Overseer 



HOWARD D. HANCOCK 

State Youth Director 



M. H. KENNEDY 

State Overseer 





B. D. SCROGGINS 

State Youth Director 




Wtm t I I I I I I I I. « * ; 





I 




Home Office 

1250 E. Hillsboro Avenue 

Tampa 4, Florida 




Seated, L-R: Emma Higginbotham, 
Zeno C. Tharp, Jr., Donna Shaw. 
Standing, L-R: William J. Brad- 
shaw, Brenda Johnson, H. L. Ches- 
ser and Erline B. Doss 




218 



BAILEY MUSIC CO. 

Musician's Headquarters 

619 Cherry Street 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



LOOKOUT 
SPORTING GOODS COMPANY 

Specialists in Sports 

723 Cherry Street 

Phone: AM 5-3464 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



Wc Invite You to Open a Charge 
Account 

ZALE'S JEWELRY 

Phone: 476-5554 

Village Shopping Center 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



FORWARD IN FAITH 

THE RADIO AND TELEVISION VOICE OF 

THE 

CHURCH OF GOD 




Radio and Television Board 

Seated: Rev. G. W. Lane, Radio Minister; Rev. Clifford Bridges, 
Chairman; Dr. R. Leonard Carroll, Third Assistant General Overseer; 
Rev. Bennie S. Triplett, Program Director. 

Standing: Rev. J. O. McClain, Rev. Edward L. Williams, Rev. 
Marshall Roberson, Rev. Harold Douglas. 



SUPERIOR CASH MARKET 

240 Central Avenue, N.E. 

Phone: 472-6595 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



MARGARET'S HOUSE OF 
FASHION 

Smart Clothes for 

Juniors, Misses, and half-sizes 

Nationally Advertised Lines 

Village Shopping Center 

Phone: 472-2616 



Congratulations from 




To the class of '66 




Collins Manufacturing Co, Sales, Inc. 



Collins Comfort Rockers & Kecliners 



CLEVELAND, TENN. 



219 



CHURCH OF GOD 

EVANGELISM AND HOME MISSIONS 




fit 

Walter R. Pettitt 



WALTER R. PETTITT, DIRECTOR 




BOARD MEMBERS 



C. R. Spain 
John D. Smith 
W. H. Compton 



J. F. Culpepper 
John Nichols 
Gene Rice 



ARCHITECTURAL COMMITTEE 



Lowell Shoemaker 



M. Fred Taylor 



i# Royal Crown Cola 



ROYAL CROWN BOTTLING CO. 

509 EAST MAIN STREET 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Makers of 

ROYAL CROWN COLA, DIET - RITE COLA. NEHI 
BEVERAGES AND UPPER - 10 




220 




TENNESSEE 




L. H. AULTMAN 

State Overseer 



. 




MILTON PARSONS 

State Youth Director 



JULIAN ROBINSON 

State Secretary-Treasurer 




Students from the Volunteer State 



STATE COUNCIL 






tti 




Charles Tilley 



Garland Griffis 



Lloyd Jones 



Cleo Watts 






Paul H. Walker 



E. J. Davis 



Hubert Adams 



Edwin Webb 



Norman Sims 



221 




STUDENTS FROM THE LAND OF PLEASANT LIVING 



NEW JERSEY EVANGELISM AND HOME MISSIONS CONGRATULATES 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1966, AND INVITES YOU TO JOIN 

US IN NEW JERSEY TO GO: "INTO THE NEXT TOWNS" 




Evangelism and Home Missions Committee 



New Jersey Students 




Front row: B. J. Kenner, State Youth Director; Wayne S. 
Proctor, State Overseer; Terry Beaver, Chairman 

Second row: T. L. Williams, Horace E. Rountree, Marvin 
McDonald, Lewis Daughenbaugh 



222 




TEXAS 







^^^^^=m 






\ 




1BT~ iB A J 


Am/ 1 k 




^H 1| SB 1 


— J! — ,'. im mm Wk 



Students from the Lone Star State 



Texas State Council 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE TEXAS STUDENTS 
FROM THE TEXAS STATE OFFICE 




H. L. ROSE 

State Overseer 




STUDENTS FROM ILLINOIS 








&£&&£, * ^-iw^- ./. 




JIM MADISON 

State Youth Director 





Compliments of 




APLER SHOE STORE 




Serving Cleveland for 28 Years 




280 Ocoee Street 


C. C. CARD 


CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


AUTO COMPANY, INC. 




^rP^r 


FRANK'S ESSO SERVICE 




South Lee Highway and Broad Street 


vhwmil 


Phone: 472-5521 


^ 




Ford Sales and Service 


CLEVELAND MEN'S 


Phone: 476-1552 


SHOP 


717 South Lee Highway 




CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


Home of 




Three Pairs of Dress Pants 




$10 




Downtown Five Points 




Cleveland, Tennessee 





State Council 
T. F. Harper, State Overseer 




Bob Moore, State Youth Director 




Students from the Land of Opportunity 



224 




MICHIGAN STATE COUNCIL 




Standing: W. P. Stallings, Cecil E. Chapin, M. L. Love, S. J. 
..- . Chandler 

Seated: O. W. Polen, Ralph E. Day, LaVail Maguire 





L. W. McINTYRE 

State Overseer 



FRED G. SWANK 

State Youth Director 




STUDENTS FROM THE WOLVERINE STATE 



225 







orthwest 







ible 




olleg< 



1900 EIGHTH AVENUE S.E. * MINOT, NORTH DAKOTA 58701 * PHONE 836-8120 












OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 









Christian Greetings to the student body of Lee College from 
a Sister Institution who is celebrating her thirty-second year 
as a "Fortress of Truth". 

Our prayers and best wishes are with you as you prepare to 
serve God and Man in an institution worthy of your admiration, 





^3 

Laud O. Vaught, Presidei 
Northwest Bible CollegeC/ 




SOUTH CLEVELAND 

Church of Cod 



REV. LLOYD L. JONES, pastor 



940 South Ocoee Street 



Modern auditorium 

Adjoining. Sunday school plant 

Completely air-conditioned 



"A GROWING CHURCH IN A GROWING CITY" 




CHURCH OF GOD 

AZALEA GARDEN AND BEAMON ROAD 
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 23513 

PAUL J. EURE— Pastor C. M. DUNCAN— Treasurer 

E. O. CLARK— Clerk MAVIS SAWYER— Secretary 

Church Study 855-0406 



YOU'LL NEVER LOOK YOUNGER 



Keep Your Today Looks Forever 



Look at yourself, the picture of a smart contemporary, living today's life to 
the fullest. It's your special time of life, and it's speeding past. Now is the time 
for a fine professional portrait ... to keep today safe from time's jealous hand. 
You'll never look younger . . . but today's looks will never fade if captured in 
a good professional portrait. 



COPPINGER BROS. STUDIO 



PHONE NOW FOR AN APPOINTMENT 



WE SPECIALIZE IN NATURAL COLOR PORTRAITS 



Compliments of 


• 




HALL CHEVROLET, INC. 


THE HOBBY MART 






260 Inman Street 


Village Shopping Center 


Cleveland, Tennessee 


Cleveland, Tennessee 


Phone: 476-4557 


Phone: 472-6461 





227 



Compliments of 

TENNESSEE TRAILWAYS, INC. 



Go T railway si Charter Bus Services Educational 
. . . Economical Fast Frequent Daily Schedule 



. Exciting 



TENNESSEE TRAILWAYS, INC. 

710 SEVIER AVENUE, KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 

PHONE: 525-0291 or 523-1923 




There Is Always a Christian Welcome 
Here 

L^nurcn of Ljod 



James T. Pitts, 
Pastor 



E. Buffalo at Tenth 
TAMPA, FLORIDA 

Parsonage 

1016 E. Buffalo Ave. 

236-5981 

Church Office 

1002 E. Buffalo Ave. 

236-5981 




CHEROKEE HOTEL 

IN DOWNTOWN CLEVELAND 

Modern Rooms 

AH Air-Conditioned 



COOPER'S BOOK STORE 

School Supplies 

and 

Sporting Goods 

160 Ocoee Street 



Compliments of 



CtEVELAlVD MILLIMi COMPANY 



makers of Velvo Flour 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



ANNA BALL WHITE 



Phone: 476-7294 



VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



Congratulations from 

MINNESOTA 

Bert F. Ford, Overseer 

Delbert Bosie, Youth Director 

State Council 

Harold A. Beemer 

W. Thomas Haley 

W. M. Earl Shultz 



INMAN STREET CAR WASH 

Car Wash With Purchase of 
Gasoline 

"A Clean Car Rides Better" 



228 




CongzatuCatiom 
1966 graduated 
o/f Jiee Cofflege 



Pearl M. Stark 

George Savchenko 

Roman O'Mary 

Irva O'Mary 

Ladson Outzs 

Eleanor Outzs 

George White 

Mrs. George White 

Bobby G. Johnson 

Betty Johnson 

Tulane D. Mooneyham 

Lucille Mooneyham 

Harold Stansky 

W. E. Raney 

Henry C. Stoppe 

Carl J. Hughes 

Mrs. Carl J. Hughes 

Jack Pope 

Evelyn Harris Pope 

Wayne McAfee 

Charlotte Hewitt 
McAfee 

Bill E. Watson 

Rhoda Rundell Watson 

Mary Frances Poe West 
Millie Crosswhite 

Ruth Crawford 

Janet Carter 

Winston Simms 

Mabel Mullins 

Graham L. Stlllwell 

Jackie Scott 

Hoyle Case 

Mildred Blackwell Case 

Sixto Molina 

Lola Mae Robertson 

Molina 
Chancel E. French 
Ellen B. French 
Pedro Abreu 
Carnie E. Allred 
Ruth Allred 
William D. Alton 
Lorraine Alton 
Juan Alzamora 
Ruth Carmine 

Alzamora 
Flemon J. Ard 
Joan Ashby 
Johannes Badenhorst 
Rhoda Badenhorst 
Virginia Green Beaty 
Esdras Betancourt 
Mary Elizabeth Bran- 

non Betancourt 
L. T. Bolan 
Mrs. L. T. Bolan 
Duby Boyd 
Fred A. Brannen 
Frances Hildreth 

Brannen 
James C. Beaty 
Rachelle Pelegri Beaty 
Leonore Shoal Horton 

D. B. Hatfield 
O'Neil McCullough 
Inez Chambers 

McCullough 
Paul Marley 
Cecil Edge Marley 
Walter Lauster 
Paul Lauster 
Patsy Fitzgerald 

Lauster 
Lambert DeLong 
Mary Lauster DeLong 

E. Lamar McDaniel 



Luther Carroll 
Dorothy Pullin Carroll 
William R. McCall 
Frances Jane Baker 

McCall 
Vergil E. Wolf 
J. H. Walker, Jr. 
Lucille Settle Walker 
Odine Morse 
Wayne Heil 
Virginia Heil 
Laverne E. Heil 
Letha Petty Heil 
Warren E. Coleman 
Norma Coleman 
Grier W. Hawkins 
Juanita Hicks Hawkins 
Ronnie Helton 
Lucy Helton 
Orville P. O'Bannon 
Robert H. O'Bannon 
Nancy Crouch 

O'Bannon 
Lovell R. Cary 
Virginia Glass Cary 
Lewis R. McMahan 
Fia McMahan 
Josue Rubio 
Doile A. King 
Paul S. Cook 
Emily Cook 
David L. Lemons 
Alva Mae McClure 
Samuel L. Peterson 
Robert E. Stevens 
Vessie D. Hargrave 
Bessie Mae Hargrave 
C. Charles Hargrave 
Paul J. Searcy 
Dorothy J. Searcy 
Robert Evan Headley 
Dorcas Sharp Headley 
Alice Josephsen 
Margaret Gaines 
Alonzo E. Justice 
Wanda June Thomas 
Hugh Chase 
Robert Dawkins 
Rose Douglas Dawkins 
Edward Call 
Betty Shewmaker Call 
Rlcardo Gonzalez 
Charles H. Matthews 
T. Raymond Morse 
Vernice Wiggins Morse 
Abel Sanchez 
Martha Ann Smith 
Herbert Wilson 
Judy Ann Wilson 
Samuel Robeff 
Carole Doss Robeff 
Cornelio Castelo 
Annette Stancel 

Castelo 
Bernard Lacombe 
Howard Long 
Marjorie Pyle Long 
Lawrence Walston 
Samuel A. White 
Barbara White 
Dora P. Myers 
Zelion E. Cagle 
James L. Slay 
Rubv Slay 
Gilbert J. Scotti 
Frances Evans Arch 
(and possibly others) 



Missionaries, past and present, 
who have attended Lee College, 
recall experiences of preparation 
and growth on the campus to 
which you refer now, too, as alma 
mater! Although we are num- 
bered among the "foreign am- 
bassadors," you have joined our 
ranks. We wish you God speed, 
and rich rewards in every under- 
taking. 



from the 

WoM m 

oDeijartm en t 



iSSioni 



mrecL°\? 0d W i° rl £ Mi «°" S ' 108 ° Mont & ome, T Ave., Cleveland, Tennessee. Vessie D. Hargrave, General 
Director. James L. Slay, Field representative. 





O. C. McCANE 

State Overseer 



WILLIAM A. "DICKIE" DAVIS 
State Youth Director 



Students of the Grand Canyon State 



Brighten your kitchen 




Lighten your cooking 




Gas and Electric freestanding, slide-in and built-in ranges, quality range hoods 



HARDWICK STOVE COMPANY 



o ra *=> o 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 37312 



230 



Compliments of 




Joe Rodgers Office Supply & Equipment Company 

Telephone 476-7527 

Office Supplies and Equipment 

Corner Central and Worth 

Cleveland, Tennessee 



TREMONT AVENUE CHURCH OF GOD 



W. E. JOHNSON 

Pastor 



SCHOLARSHIP 




MAX MORRIS 

Education Director 



Students from Tremont Avenue Church of God 



WHITE WING GIFT AND BOOK CENTRE 




Gifts and Books for All Occasions 
475 Central Avenue, N.E. 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



TOWN HOUSE 
RESTAURANT 

Italian Pizza by Candlelight 

225 Broad Street 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



231 





HOUSTON R. MOREHEAD 

State Overseer 



Congratulations to 
the Class of 1966 







CECIL GUILES 

State Youth Director 




STUDENTS FROM THE YELLOWHAMMER STATE 

232 



One 



HOUR 



RIRRJIPIL 



w 



themostinDtrfClEMm 



233 INMAN STREET 

CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 

Phone: 472-6122 

Gene Norflerr, Owner 



VILLAGE CAFETERIA 



'Fastest Service in Town' 



VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER 



Congratulations 

from 

EDWARD'S BEAUTY SHOP 




STUDENTS FROM THE KEYSTONE STATE 



ESTEL D. MOORE 

State Overseer 



ROBERT C. VANCE 

State Youth Director 



Congratulations to the 

1966 Graduating Class 

from 

BROOKLYN CHURCH OF GOD 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Rev. R. H. Sumner 



GROVER CANNON, OWNER PHONE 428-6542 
BILL COOK. Sales Mgr. OR 428-5308 



A bar G 

TRAILER SALES & PARKS 

1310 ATLANTA ROAD a 220 S. FOUR LANE 

MARIETTA. GEORGIA 



A BAR G PARK - WESTBROOK PARK - PINE RIDGE PARK 



233 




VIRGINIA STATE COUNCIL 




Students from the Old Dominion State 





Students from the Blue Grass State 



STATE COUNCIL 



KENTUCKY 




Seated, left to right: Raymond Gabbard, State Youth Director; 
W. C. Byrd, State Overseer; Elmer Whalen, State Secretary- 
Treasurer 

Standing, left to right: State Council Members Otis Riggs, W. E. 
Holcombe, Levi Henson, E. C. Hutchison, Jeffery Simpson, Wal- 
ter C. Mauldin, W. H. Morgan, J. K. Barrineau, E. C. Campbell 



235 



HEMPHILL 
CHURCH OF GOD 





PAUL L. WALKER 

Pastor 




^siliiii!$?^ 



■r± ; -' ; "ii3 >^-^::r->^;.h^. .'■■.. '■■>■■ ■■'-'■-.":-"' 



JOE BAILEY 

Christian Ed. Director 



i^onara tu la L 



if 



ions 



CLss of 1966 




236 



PINION JEWELRY COMPANY 






DIAMONDS • WATCHES • CLOCKS 

SILVERWARE 

Phone: 476-5621 

Cherokee Hotel Corner Cleveland, Tenn. 




CHANDLER'S FABRIC SHOP 



393 BROAD STREET, N.W. 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



You're Always Welcome at Your 
WALGREEN AGENCY 

CENTRAL DRUG CO. 

DRUGS — FINE FOODS 
Walgreen Agency Drug Store 
Van Stickley and A. B. Jones Owners 
Phone: 476-5561 Cleveland, Tenn. 



Best Wishes 

to the Class of '66 

From the 

'gung-ho' 

VINDAGUA STAFF 



na 



STAMPER'S 



'ON THE SQUARE" 




ihdh & Sc 



ons 



- -. -je Signs 



A C o m p I e f e 



170 Can', ji Avenue, N.c. 
CUVELANb. rENN£SS££ 




5 e r v i c 



Phone 472-4461 



Compliments of 



Cleveland f latural kjciS 

A Division of Chattanooga Gas Company 



CLEAN 



FAST 



ECONOMICAL 




423 North Ocoee Street 
Phone: 472-4531 




CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



237 




W. Doyle Stanfield 
Pastor 



NORTH CLEVELAND 
CHURCH OF GOD 



YOUR CHURCH HOME AWAY FROM HOME. 



YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME HERE. 



BISHOP'S 

Leaked ana i^oohl 



ed 



BISHOP BAKING CO 



Box 69 



CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 




Cleveland Washateria And Service Station 

Corner Central Avenue 

and 

Parker Street 

Cleveland's largest coin-operated laundry Oldest home-owned, and independent gas station 

Students' Business is 

appreciated 




CDRTS H D PREMIUM MOTOR OIL 



Represented in: 






OKLAHOMA 


ARKANSAS 


TENNESSEE 


TEXAS 


KENTUCKY 


GEORGIA 



PATHWAY 
BOOK STORES 










nr '"" " f ' 

Mrs. Ruth Pettyjohn, Cleveland, Tennessee 




W. J. Cothern, Jr., Charlotte, North Carolina 



V '-" " 




Mrs. Grace Caldwell, Atlanta 3, Georgia 










<«»iSf 





to* 



■v rjs * 




A ' 



R. C. Kinnison, Akron, Ohio 



Lewis Peeler, Chattanooga, Tennessee 





Dale Hartness, 
Tampa, Florida 




I 



CHURCH OF GOD PUBLISHING HOUSE 
PATHWAY PRESS 



TENNESSEE MUSIC AND PRINTING COMPANY 

MONTGOMERY AVENUE, CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 37311 



241 



Index 



Ernest Adams 69 

B.S., M.A., Engineering 

DeltonAlford 60 

B.M., M.M.E, Ph.D., Music 

Frances T. Arrington 56 

B.S., M.A., Library Science 

French L. Arrington 59 

B.S., B.D., Religion 

J. Martin Baldree, Jr 62 

B.A., M.R.E., Christian Education 

Charles R. Beach 63 

B.S., M.A., Languages 

Lois Underwood Beach 72 

B.S., M.S., Science 

James W. Bilbo 71 

B.A., M.A., Social Studies 

Hubert P. Black 52 

B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Education 

David Boatwright 69 

B.S., Mathematics 

Donald N. Bowdle 58 

B.A., M.A., Th.M., Ph.D., Religion 

Stanley Butler 51 

B.S., M.A., Ed.S., Social Studies 

Ruthanna B. Carr 67 

B.A., Physical Education 

Chalmer Chastain, Jr 73 

B.A., M.A., M.D., Science 

A. E. Clabo 68 

B.S., M.Ed., Mathematics 

A. R. Cox 66 

B.A., Business Education 

Clifford Dennison 72 

A.B., M.A., Science 

Nina Edge Driggers 65 

A.B., M.A., English 

Honette Echols 71 

B.S., M.A., Social Studies 

Lucille Vance Elliott 66 

B.A., M.A., Business Education 

Winston Elliott 63 

A.B., M.A., Spanish, Religion 

William J. Fabiani 66 

B.S., Business Education 

R. H. Gause, Jr 51 

A.B., B.D., Religion 

Earl J. Gilbert 71 

B.A., M.A., Education, Psychology 

Bertha Gugler 61 

B.M., M.M., Music 

William Henry 58 

B.S., M.A., Religion, Education 



Dale R. Hughes 67 

B.A., Physical Education 

Robert Humbertson 64 

A.B., M.A., Speech 

Peggy Humphrey 64 

B.S., M.A., English 

Ruby Hurst . . 61 

B.A., M.M., Music 

Norman W. Jordan 71 

B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S., Education 

Gerald B. Kersey 68 

B.A., Accounting 

Roy Lillard 70 

B.A., M.A., History 

Terrell McBrayer 52 

B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Education 

Roland McDaniels 68 

B.A., B.D., Mathematics, Religion 

Sue McGhee 61 

B.M.E., M.M.E., Music 

Roosevelt Miller 61 

B.M., Music 

Philip Morris 64 

B.A., M.A., English 

Hal Munck 65 

B.A., Journalism 

Dora P. Myers 71 

A.B., M.A., Spanish, Psychology 

Beatrice Hamilton Odom 62 

B.A., M.A., Christian Education 

Elmer Franklin Odom 59 

B.A., M.A., Religion 

Duran Palmertree 73 

B.A., B.D., Science 

Morris Riggs 72 

B.A., M.A., Science 

Donald Rowe 70 

B.B.A., L.L.B., M.A., Political Science 

Georgia Stroud 61 

B.M., Music 

Avis Swiger 52 

Litt.D., Religion 

LeMoyne Swiger 55 

B.A., M.A., Library Science 

Helen Irene Symes 65 

B.S., Accordion, English 

Jerold Teachey 60 

B.M., M.M., Music- 
Lucille Walker 65 

B.A., M.A., English 

John Herbert Walker, Jr 51 

A.B., M.A., B.D., Social Studies 

John Herbert Walker, Sr . 59 

Religion 



Student 

Directory 

1965-66 



Abraham, A. V., Ayirookuzhiyil, Tunalur, India. 
Abreu, P. P., P.O. Box 2330, Managua, C. A. 
Acord, Danny James, 336 S. Eisenhower Dr., Beckley, W. Va. 
Acree, Glennis Earl, Rt. 1, Mount Orab, Mt. Orab, Ohio 
Adams, Billy Dans, 1155 Fairmont Ave., Sidney, Ohio 
Adkins, Vernon, 45 N. Miami, Miamisburg, Ohio 
Agee, Sharon Elaine, Rt. 2, Northport, Ala. 
Agngarayngay, Agapito Sagisi, Sangil No. 38, Ilocos Norte, 

Phil. 
Akin, Edwin Earl, 815 North Second, Brownfield, Tex. 
Akins, Elma Louise, 1920 Maple, N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Akins, Brenda, 1920 Maple St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Aldrich, Gertrude, 745 N. Buchannan St., Arlington, Va. 
Aldrich, Joyce Anne, P.O. Box 36, Cohutta, Ga. 
Aldrich, Rosemary, 613 20th St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Alford, Charles Edward, Rt. 2, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Allen, Donald, Vista Drive, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Allen, Harlin Doyle, Rt. 2, Decatur, Tenn. 
Amick, Aurelia, Rt. 6, Box 883, Bessemer, Ala. 
Anastasi, Thomas Gary, Rt. 5, Shady Lane, Ringgold, Ga. 
Anderson, Jo Ann, Rt. 1, Copperhill, Tenn. 
Anderson, Rita Joyce, 102 S. Main St., Sharidan, Mich. 
Anderson, Sandra Mae, 3118 Phone Dr., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Anglin, Joan L., P.O. Box 44, Duluth, Ga. 
Antwine, Cecil Audell, Jr., Rt. 1, Watkinsville, Ga. 
Ard, Edith Patricia, Box 787, St. Thomas, V. I. 
Arnold, Nathan Duane, 1920 Fairgrove Ave., Hamilton, Ohio 
Ashley, Thomas Hazel, Jr., 215 Saluda St., Chester, S. C. 
Arivett, Connie, 15446 Athol St., Fontana, Calif. 
Atkins, Charles Kay, 225 Academy St., Ft. Mill, S. C. 
Atkins, Maxine, P.O. Box 94, Ft. Mill, S. C. 
Avery, James Mack, P.O. Box 421, Troutman, N. C. 
Avery, William P., P.O. Box 421, Troutman, N. C. 
Ayers, Paul Bohrman, Jr., 10803 Grafton Hall Rd., Valley 

Station, Ky. 
Ayers, Robert, 114 W. Carpenter St., Prichard, Ala. 



Bacon, James William, 505 Taten Ave., Savannah, Ga. 

Bailey, L. Gerald, 457 N. 9th St., Griffin, Ga. 

Baird, Melvin E., 515 Haines Rd., Laurel, Md. 

Baker, Larry A., 3610 Kibler Toot Rd., Warren, Ohio 

Baldree, Betty Joyce, 2216 Brentwood Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Baldree, Betty W., 950 Ocoee St., S.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Baldree, Edith B., 3012 Pine Drive, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Baldree, James Milton, 2216 Brentwood Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Ballard, Jerry, Rt. 1, Box 319, McCloly, Ark. 

Banks, Larry Dean, 2629 Symphony Way, Dayton, Ohio 

Bare, Harold, 802 E. Academy St., Cherryville, N. C. 

Barker, H. D., W. J. Parks Hts., Apt. 47B, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Barringer, Marion A., 131-13 St., N., Breckenridge, Minn. 

Baskett, James A., 1376 Midview Dr., Decatur, Ga. 

Baskett, Linda Dianne, 1376 Midview Dr., Decatur, Ga. 

Bass, Jeanne, Rt. 4, Box 2, Ohoskie, N. C. 

Baugh, Edmund Lee, Jr., 461 8th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Baxter, James Floyd, R.R. 1, St. Paris, Ohio 

Beamer, David C, 21 N. 6th St., Pulaski, Va. 

Beard, Jerry, Old Fort, Tenn. 

Beard, Kenneth Eugene, G-3162 Herrick St., Flint, Mich. 

Beasley, Earlene, 106 Sycamore St., Jesup, Ga. 

Beaty, James Keith, 2700 Pine Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Beatty, Richard Ralph, R.D. 2, Vandergrift, Pa. 

Beck, Larry, 1205 Key St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Begay, Harry, Box 58, Mentmare, N. Mex. 

Belt, Charley, 3340 N. Lee Hwy., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Bennett, Lawrence, 786 East 27th St., Hialieah, Fla. 

Bentley, Sandra, 4336 Hunt Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Bentz, Larry Leon, 145 5th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Bentz, Mary R., Rt. 1, Jefferson, S. C. 

Benz, Norman D., 145 5th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Berry, Priscilla, 5122 Able Lane, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bethune, Cheryl, 1039 E. 9th St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bielawski, Carolyn Rose, 403 McCrea Ave., Dennison, Ohio 

Bingham, Larry David, 1106 Club Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Bird, Douglas Hayden, 433 N. Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Bird, Linda Connell, 1017 Greenwood St., Orlando, Fla. 

Bixler, Judy, 7025 W. 71st St., Chicago, 111. 

Blackard, G. John, 10413 Haverford Rd., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Blackwell, Albert Andrell, Rt. 1, Box 430, Goffrey, S. C. 

Blair, Betty Josephine, 533 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Blair, Elaine Marie, 533 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Blankenship, Ron, Rt. 1, Box 360, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Blevins, Linda Sue, 208 Cresswell Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Bloomer, Dalphus Lynn, 56 Copeland Lane, Newport News, 

Va. 
Boatwright, Janice Louise, 5401 Ives Place, Springfield, Va. 
Boatwright, John C, Jr., 5401 Ives Place, Springfield, Va. 
Boland, Linda Nell, Rt. 2, Box 250, Choctaw, Okla. 
Booth, Donald Quenton, Jr., Box 68, Chattaroy, W. Va. 
Booth, Linda Joyce, 1607 - 20th Ave., Northport, Ala. 
Boothe, Joyce A., 912 Goddard Ave., Orlando, Fla. 
Boozer, Brady M., 108 Cathran St., Ninety Six, S. C. 
Boxt, V. LaVonna, 1701 Greenfield St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Bowden, Terry T., Bridgeville Box 18, Bridgeville, Del. 
Boynton, Arden James, 108 W. Croft St., Greenville, S. C. 
Braddock, Franklin Larry, 1938 Florida Ave., Jacksonville, 

Fla. 
Bray, Carol Jean, R.R. 1, Box 27, Bellflower, 111. 
Bray, Norma Jane, R.R. 1, Wapella, 111. 
Braziel, Dwane Eldon, Rt. 1, Pitts, Ga. 
Brewer, Elizabeth Faye, 849 Frayser Circle, Memphis, Tenn. 



244 



Brewer, James Heubert, 329 Swingle St., Frostproof, Fla. 
Brewer, Lola Luallen, Box 386, Forrest City, Ark. 
Brewer, Susan Louise, Rt. 3, Waynesvillc, Ohio 
Brewster, Patti, 1106 Crestview Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Bridges, Mary Carolyn, P.O. Box 345, Gatlinburg, Tenn. 
Briggs, John Carl, 2619 Cornell Dr., Roanoke, Va. 
Briggs, Zona F., 2619 Cornell Dr., Roanoke, Va. 
Brittain, Larry A., Rt. 2, Box 686, Connelly Springs, N. C. 
Brock, Charles Milford, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 
Brock, Leland Paul, 1714 Forrest Ridge Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Broome, Glandon C, South 2nd St., Lockhart, S. C. 
Brown, James Nathan, 305 E 12th St., Sylacauga, Ala. 
Brown, Judy Marie, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 
Brown, Peter John, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 
Browning, Dan, 273 5 Freat Rd., Adrian, Mich. 
Bujan, Angela Shirley, 53 McFnoy St., Trinidad, W. Indies 
Bujan, Rani Margaret Rose, 53 McFnoy St., Trinidad, W. 

Indies 
Burk, Charlie Thomas, Jr., 3147 Winifred Way, Macon, Ga. 
Burkholder, Kathleen Joyce, R.D. 3, Newville, Pa. 
Burnett, Randall Fredrick, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 
Burnsed, Ina Gail, Box 162, Macclenny, Fla. 
Burris, Lynda Irene, 1901 Dalton Pike, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Burroughs, Rudy, 1033 Parker, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Burton, Thomas Wilford, 3936 Bryant St., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Butler, James Robert, P.O. Box 423, Cain, Ga. 
Byrd, Drucilla Terrell, 22 Mary St., Rossville, Ga. 
Byrd, Joyce Ann, 84 Lake Wire Dr., Lakeland, Fla. 
Byrom, James Nelson, 4980 Lynn Dr., College Park, Ga. 

Cadenhead, Jon Douglas, 2615 E. Main, Lincolnton, N. C. 

Cagle, Ernest T., Rt. 1, Box 174 A,- Cleveland, Tenn. 

Cagle, Stanley, 442 St. Peter, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Calderon, Wilfredo, 3rd Calle 13-62 Zone 3, Quelzalteroupe, 
C. A. 

Caldwell, Glenda Clara, Rt. 2, Charleston, Tenn. 

Callaway, Mary Lou, 373 Centenary Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Campbell, Margaret, Copperhill, Tenn. 

Campbell, Rebecca Ann, Rt. 1, Box 36-A, Dora, Ala. 

Caniz, Jarge, 14 Avenida, Quatemala, C. A. 

Cannada, Dale Edwin, 1230 South Emporia, Wichita, Kan. 

Cannon, Dale, 1310 Adanta Rd., Marietta, Ga. 

Cannon, Herbert, 1406 Worth St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Cansey, Robert, 406 Grove, Lindale, Ga. 

Carter, Mary Ruth, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Caruthers, Donald Wayne, 5905 Lear Nalge Rd., N. Ridge- 
will, Ohio 

Carver, Ronnie E., 701 8th Ave., Albany, Ga. 

Caryl, Gerald Lee, 1091 Genessee St., Flint, Mich. 

Cash, Roger Dale, Rt. 1, Box 225, Monroe, Va. 

Cason, Fred, Jr., 4-1 0th St., Greer, S. C. 

Cason, Thomas J., 2390 Gayland Rd., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Cate, Lela R., 1323 Brown Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Cato, Linda Gail, 110 Newlyn St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Chamberlain, Becky Lou, 417 N. Main, Benton, 111. 

Chambley, Clarence Henry, Jr., 114 Andrews St., Rossville, 
Ga. 

Champion, Bennice, Rt. 4, Box 184X, Live Oak, Fla. 

Chaney, Russell Lee, R.D. 1, Bridgeville, Del. 

Chappell, Jean M., 1206 Cookedale Trail, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Chase, Harry T., Rt. 5, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Chase, Kitty Sue, Rt. 6, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Cheek, Denzil, Rt. 2, Fair Grove, Mich. 

Chesney, L. C, 1955 Harle Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Childs, Linda Dale, 1080 Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Churd, Arthur, 156 Allen St., Fostonia, Ohio 

Cissom, Faye B., 4000 N. Hawthorne St., Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Clawson, Margaret, Rt. 1, Box 324, Edwardsburg, Mich. 

Clayton, Sandra, 624 Cordele Rd., Albany, Ga. 

Cleghorn, Glenda, Box 3 52, Royston, Ga. 

Cleghorn, Maria, Box 3 52, Royston, Ga. 

Cleis, Sharon Lee, 535 Boquet St., Carnegie, Pa. 

Clifton, Steven, Box 224, Altoona, Ala. 



Clina, Sandra, 5922 S. 4th St., Arlington, Va. 
Cloud, Ginger G., 1308 Hawn St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Cloud, Ruth Anne, 622 S. Ocoee St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Coates, Brenda Lois, 3 502 35th St., Tampa, Fla. 
Coates, Lorraine, 2440 Coronette Ave., Dayton, Ohio 
Cobb, Shirley, 1080 Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Collins, Joseph, Rt. 3, Millsboro, Del. 

Collins, Tona Faye, 1011 McKinney St., Lenior City, Tenn. 
Collum, Frank Lester, 823 Ocoee St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Colquitt, Jane, 808 S. Sweetbriar Circle, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Combs, Jim, 43 58 Old Colony Dr., Flint, Mich. 
Conn, Charles Paul, 1140 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Conn, James Stephen, 2040V2 Oak St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Conn, Sharon, 1140 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Conovaloff, Onya Elizabeth, Rt. 4, Box 818, Phoenix, Ariz. 
Cook, Philip, Box 72, Northpart, Ala. 
Copeland, Thomas, 707 David's Lane, Mansfield, Ohio 
Copley, Linda Ruth, 360 Todd Place, Hamilton, Ohio 
Corley, Frederick Robert, 2119 North Cocoa Blvd., Cocoa, Fla. 
Cornwell, Charles, 1689 Kenmore Rd., Columbus, Ohio 
Cornwell, William, 360 17th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Cottrell, Donna Delores, 2207 Glenwood Dr., Cleveland, 
Tenn. 




245 



Maria Cleghorn in a Parade of Favorites performance 
of "Were You There?", by James Weldon Johnson. 



Student Directory, 
con't. 



Covey, Katherine, Rt. 2, Box 156, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Cowart, Sue, 307 2nd St., Ft. Payne, Ala. 
Cox, Mary Lou, Rt. 5, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Crafton, Janice, 1122-4th St., Birmingham, Ala. 
Craighead, Charles, 1655 Ococe, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Crane, Rosemary, 1 1 Opal Rd., Rossville, Ga. 
Crawford, Harold, 337 W. Main St., Somerset, Pa. 
Crick, Robert, 1969 Young Rd., Chamblec, Ga. 
Cripe, Robert Edward, 696 Williams St., Macon, Ga. 
Crisler, Saundra, Rt. 1, Box 107, Pangburn, Ark. 
Crosby, John, 53 32 Kildare Dr., Charlotte, N. C. 
Cupp, Dora Marie, 1436 S. Buchanan, Fremont, Ohio 
Curtsinger, Bob J., Box 52A, Star Rt., Lawton, Okla. 

Dale, Sam, General Delivery, Bcrryton, Ga. 

Danehower, Barbara LaVonne, Rt. 2, Box 15 5, Forrest City, 

Ark. 
Daniel, Janice Rae, Rt. 1, Wrens, Ga. 
Daniels, Carol, 4007 Laurel Dr., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Daugherty, Steve, Box 42, Bridgeville, Del. 
Davidson, Linda Carrol, 2558 Eden Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Davis, Brcnda Kay, 221 North Belmont Ave., Springfield, 

Ohio 
Davis, Faye Elizabeth, 82 West 32nd St., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Davis, Glennis J., 1757 Pryor Rd., Apt. 3, Atlanta, Ga. 
Davis, Judy Dean, R.R. 1, Box 130, Silas, Ala. 
Davis, Nelda Alice, Rt. 6, Box 136, Eight Mile, Ala. 
Davis, Richard Eugene, Rt. 6, Bindfield Dr., Greenville, S. C. 
Dawson, Martha Yvonne, Rt. 1, Box 42, Mount Dora, Fla. 
Deans, Teresa Gail, 821 Cedarbrook Dr., Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Denham, Judith Carol, 608 Maple St., Hazard, Ky. 
Dennis, Percy, Rt. 2, Verbena, Ala. 
Dennison, Denny Clifford, 440 Centenary Ave., Cleveland, 

Tenn. 
Dickson, Dudley, Peoples St., Apt. 8, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Digcnnaro, Richard S., 3615 Bowman Cir., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Dingess, Diane Marie, 7620 Bedford Lane, Clinton, Md. 
Dixon, Eddie Richard, Box 343, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Dixon, Lee, Box 1082, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Dixon, Melvin David, Rt. 7, Box 66, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Donaldson, Charlotte A., 3614 McKenzie Dr., Macon, Ga. 
Doss, Roger Dale, Bakewell, Tenn. 

Dotson, Charles Frcdric, 106 S. Pepper St., Christiansburg, Va. 
Douglas, Donald Lester, 1048 Walnut St., Macon, Ga. 
Douglas, Rosemary E., 2045 3rd St., Macon, Ga. 
Dover, Diane, 600 Banks St., Fort Mill, S. C. 
Dover, Marie, Box 544, Okeechobee, Fla. 
Dowdy, David, Box 594, Anderson, S. C. 
Dowdy, Paul LaRue, 307 Lewis St., Anderson, S. C. 
Drawbaugh, Robert E., R.D. 3, Newville, Pa. 
Drews, Joann Patricia, 910 W. Palm Lane, Phoenix, Ariz. 
Duncan, Richard B., Northwood Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Dunn, Brenda Jean, Crestwood Circle, Rt. 3, Salisbury, Md. 
Dunn, Jerry Ray, 905 17th St., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Dunn, Judy Gale, 645 Linden Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Dunson, C. LeRue, 521 Experiment St., Griffin, Ga. 
Dunson, Jerry Lee, 521 Experiment St., Griffin, Ga. 
Duprce, Annette, 1254 Gilmore Lane, Louisville, Ky. 



Easton, George Terry, 113 Ardennes Ave., Mishawaka, Ind. 
Eddins, Clyde W., Jr., 317 Edgewater Dr., Pensacola, Fla. 
Edwards, Hugh R., 440 Neal St., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Edwards, Wanda Jeanne, 440 Neal St., N.W., Cleveland, 

Tenn. 
Eller, Betty Jo, Box 347, Old Fort, N. C. 
Eller, Raymon Dee, Rt. 3, Box 105, Hiawassee, Ga. 
Ellis, Artie G., 2001 Ogle Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Ellis, Edwin Michael, 1114 Briarfield Rd., Newport News, Va. 
Ellis, Judy, 6223 S. Utica, Tulsa, Okla. 
Ellis, Mary Annette, Box 94, Newport News, Va. 
Epperson, Robert Larry, Box 407-A, Rt. 4, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Errington, Michael, 516 Baw Mar Ave., Vicksburg, Miss. 
Estrada, Carmen Julia, Box 149, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 
Estrada, Wilfredo, Box 149, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 
Evans, Richard, R.F.D. 4, Box 233-B, Live Oak, Fla. 

Farabce, Karlene Elizabeth, Rt. 6, Box 318, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Farabee, Nadine, 3936 Seminole Ave., Ft. Myers, Fla. 
Faulkner, Mary Jane, 1003 Phillips St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Faw, Brenda Janice, 109 Bellview Cir., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Ferguson, Ronald Earl, Box 241, Sumiton, Ala. 
Filyaw, Betty June, Rt. 3, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Fink, Carl D., 1820 Maple St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Finnell, Wayne E., Rt. 7, Box 13, Bates Pike, Cleveland, 

Tenn. 
Fithian, Joyce Elaine, 4419 Weddel, Dearborn, Mich. 
Fiveash, Martha E., 1020 5th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Fleming, Virginia Sue, 1157 Sledge Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 
Flynn, Bill Edward, R.F.D. , Cherryfield, Me. 
Ford, Jimmy Kenneth, 10 "A" St., Jacksonville, Ala. 
Ford, Rosemary Z., 520 Carolyn Dr., Miamisburg, Ohio 
Ford, Thurman Edward, 455 5 Southern Parkway, Louisville, 

Ky. 
Forester, Jim, Hamilton Apts. 8, 17th St., N.W., Cleveland, 

Tenn. 
Forester, Shirley, 917 Mehann Dr., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Fortner, Judith Lynn, 122 Parker St., Langley, S. C. 
Foster, Lois Evelyn, 298 Camp, New Albany, Miss. 
Fowler, Jimmy, 228 N. 2nd St., West Helena, Ark. 
Fox, Gerald Thomas, 2915 Henderson Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Franklin, David Lamar, 2557 Cash Rd., Applegate, Mich. 
Frazier, Calvin Eugene, Box 136, Bradley, Fla. 
Frazier, Jessie Lee, 1070 Parker St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Franzier, Lloyd E., Rt. 1, Woodlawn, Va. 
Fredenburg, John Warren, 9608 Beachy Ave., Pacolma, Calif. 
Freeman, Clyde Amos, 1217 17th St., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Freeze, Brenda JoAnn, Rt. 1, Waynesville, Ohio 
French, Ellen B., College Arms No. 4, Centenary Ave., Cleve- 
land, Tenn. 
French, Gordon, 1370 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Fricks, George W., 14 Speed St., Greenville, S. C. 
Fulcher, M. Dianne, 3 510 Robin Hood Rd., Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 
Fuller, Orlo, 8044-23 N.W., Seattle, Wash. 
Fuller, Russell James, 8044-23 N.W., Seattle, Wash. 
Funderburk, Gerald, 402 Sidney Johnson St., Fort Mill, S. C. 
Fuson, Ernest W., 803 Colby Rd., Crestline, Ohio 
Gann, Robert Gary, 1885 Baugh St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Garbe, Elizabeth Judy, 712 E. Roberts, Hazel Park, Mich. 
Gatlin, Billy David, Gatlin Road, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Gee, James William, Rt. 5, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Gee, Ted R., 190 15th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Geesey, George William, 727 E, Anchorage, Alaska 
Geitncr, Janet Marie, 155 Dooley St., S.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Geitner, John L., Jr., 155 Dooley St., S.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Gentry, Christina Lavenia, 517 Oppitz Lane, Lakeland, Fla. 
Gentry, Larry J., 110 Alaska Way Box 2139, Fairbanks, 

Alaska 
Geren, George W., Rt. 2, Charleston, Tenn. 
Geren, Lewis Randy, Dyersburg, Tenn. 
Gibbons, James T., 1223 7th N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 



246 



Gibson, Clement E., 505 19th St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Gibson, Judith, Rt. 2, Charleston, Tenn. 

Gilbert, Mabel H., Beckley, W. Va. 

Gilbert, Nelson J., Jr., Laws St., Bridgeville, Del. 

Gillette, Eddie Gaylon, 786 E. 27th St., Miami, Fla. 

Gillilan, Jerry Wayne, Rt. 6, Boaz, Ala. 

Gilmer, David C, 121 W. Broad St., Buford, Ga. 

Ginn, Gail Sue, 1426-5 1st Ave., N., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Godfrey, Terry T., 823 Ocoee, N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Godfrey, Sharon Lynn, Rt. 8, Box 1139A, Birmingham, Ala. 

Goff, Charley L., Box 205, Everglades, Fla. 

Goff, Dale W., 414 N. Kanawha St., Beckley, W. Va. 

Goff, Donald Wayne, 414 N. Kanawha St., Beckley, W. Va. 

Goins, Peggy S., McDonald, Tenn. 

Goins, Robert Elmer, 408 Fairview Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Goode, Wade Calvin, Rt. 4, Box 434, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Goodman, Laverne, 717 Brown St., Thomasville, Ala. 

Goodman, Mattie Ellis, Box 694, Thomasville, Ala. 

Goodrum, Donald Artie, R.F.D. 1, Box 120, Selmer, Tenn. 

Goodrum, Jimmy Doyle, R.F.D. 1, Box 120, Selmer, Tenn. 

Goodwin, Bruce, 2321 Dalton Pike, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Goolsby, Barbara, 9325 Bear Lake Rd., Orlando, Fla. 

Graham, James Cecil, 1360 N. Ocoee St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Graham, Carol Jeane, 195 Brown Circle, Smyrna, Ga. 

Graham, Lenny Crawford, Rt. 2, Charleston, Tenn. 

Grant, Gary Allen, 1105 N. Taylor, Pittsburg, Kan. 

Grant, Linda Karleen, Rt. 1, Daisy, Tenn. 

Gray, Teddy F., 100 N. Comanche, Bartlesville, Okla. 

Gray, Wanda Joy, Box 1106, Haines City, Fla. 

Greene, Betty Nance, 1243 King Edward, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Green, Joan Anita, 709 S. 33rd St., Ft. Pierce, Fla. 

Green, Sally Ann, 100 Mirror Dr., Sanford, Fla. 

Greeson, Philip Wayne, 110 Wilbanks St., Buford, Ga. 

Gregg, Deborah Lee, 1363 Harle Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Griffin, Sherrill Elizabeth, 2401 Randolph St., Bristol, Va. 

Griffith, Linda Joyce, 512 Timberlinks Dr., Signal Mtn., 
Tenn. 

Grimes, Wayne B., Rt. 4, Durkee Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Grindstaff, Carole Ruth, Rt. 1, White Horse Rd., Greenville, 
S. C. 

Grogan, Wanda Mae, 407 Charlotte Ave., Sanford, N. C. 

Guadalupe, Juan A., Caguas, Puerto Rico 

Guerra, Jorge Abel, Xon. Independencis, Totonicapan, Guate- 
mala 

Gwaltney, Stephen L., 67 McCall Rd., Englewood, Fla. 

Haddock, Jack Rabun, 1215 39th Ave., Mt. Dora, Fla. 



Hagan, Marie, Rt. 1, Travelers Rest, S. C. 

Hale, June Ann, Box 275, Thomasville, Ala. 

Hall, Jimi, 1204 Key St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Hall, Ruby, 1802 Hamill Road, Hixson, Tenn. 

Hall, Wanda Lynell, Box 65, Monroe, N. C. 

Hamblin, Paula Dee, 336 Worth St., Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Hamilton, Janice Lancll, 2880 Peters Ave., Naples, Fla. 

Hammer, Robert J., 1010 East Southern, Mesa, Ariz. 

Hampton, Billy C, 2002 Glenwood Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Hampton, Jean, 100 Auburn, Bristol, Tenn. 

Hanley, Linda M., R.D. 2, Boyertown, Pa. 

Harbour, Sheila Marie, 2728 Guyan Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 

Harding, F. Laurene, Box 374, Wake Forest, N. C. 

Hardwick, Judith Anne, 1133 Harle Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Hargrave, Don, 420 25th St., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Harkins, Donald Roy, 13 Speed St., Greenville, S. C. 

Harmon, Alton Wayne, 800 Pendleton St., Greenville, S. C. 

Harper, Barbara, 2 Wanda Lane, Little Rock, Ark. 

Harris, Carlton Wayne, 1445 E. Conant, Bartow, Fla. 

Harris, Charles Brent, 808 Lotus Path, Clearwater, Fla. 

Harris, Carolyn Elizabeth, Rt. 5, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Harris, James Joel, 2805 North 33rd Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 

Harris, Linda Gail, 2202V2 South St., Leesburg, Fla. 
Harris, Veta, 2035 Broomfield Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Harrison, Evelyn Carrah, 1411 Lee St., Plateau, Ala. 
Harrison, James D., Jr., Box 419, R.D. 6, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Harrison, Mary Helen, 705 Gale Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Hart, Priscilla Dianne, Rt. 1, Box 104-A, Wellford, S. C. 
Harvard, Judith Ann, Rt. 1, Box 440, Lake Wales, Fla. 
Harvey, Joel Wayne, R.D. 3, Parker, Pa. 
Harvey, Sandy Gale, 485 Dooley St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Hastings, Delbert, R.F.D. 3, Laurel, Del. 
Hastings, Donna Faye, Rt. 2, Box 127, Laurel, Del. 
Hatcher, Joan Deloris, 125 Lee Circle, Dillon, S. C. 
Hawkins, Robert E., R.D. 2, New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Hawkins, Shirley E., Bible Place, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Hayes, Sonya Sue, 1404 Blount Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Helms, David E., Rt. 1, Scottsboro, Ala. 
Hemphill, Joyce Christina, 211 Hazen Ave., Ellporo, Ellwood, 

Pa. 
Henderson, F. E. II, 7300 Park Dr., St. Louis, Mo. 
Henry, George R., Rt. 1, McDonald, Tenn. 
Henry, Gwendolyn W., Rt. 1, McDonald, Tenn. 
Henry, Larry K., 4059 Gwinn Dr., Norcross, Ga. 
Henry, Lydia, Maple St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Henry, William M., 1820 Maple St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 



- - 




Scene from the banquet honoring Mr. and Miss Lee College, a VINDAGUA-sponsored event of March 24. 



Student Directory, 
con't. 



Hcnson, Gerry, 160 15th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Herman, Gloria Jeanette, 2433 Willow Ave., Sanford, Fla. 

Hicks, Troy K., 1119 Lang St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Hill, Billy Wayne, No. 2, Box 19, Lake City, Tenn. 

Hill, James E., 175 Central Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Hill, James R., Box 67, Charleston, Tenn. 

Hill, Kathleen, 15531/2 Church St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Hill, Patricia Sue, R.R. 2, Grove, Okla. 

Hillebrand, Larry W., 54550 Clover Rd., Mishawka, Ind. 

Hinely, David Marrion, 2819 Dixie Ave., Savannah, Ga. 

Hinson, Eunice Louise, Rt. 1, Oakbora, N. C. 

Hinson, Robert Evans, Rt. 2, Warsaw, Va. 

Hitchcock, Janice Faye, Rt. 1, Rock Island, Tenn. 

Hitte, Judy Juanell, 727 Cahoon Rd., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hitte, Kathryn Ann, 727 Cahoon Rd., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hitte, Sandra Kaye, 2003 South Dixie Ave., Dayton, Ohio 

Hobbs, Vera M. Rt. 5, Box 23 5, Greenwood, S. C. 

Hodge, Ronald Edward, 4551 Wheeler Hills Rd., Oxon Hill, 

Md. 
Hodges, DeRosa, 811 N. Green St., "Wadesboro, N. C. 
Hoka, Terry Rowan, Rt. 2, Mooresvillc, N. C. 
Holcombe, Paul Amos, Jr., 902 Inman Rd., Memphis, Tenn. 
Holdman, Carmen J., 2514 Carroll Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Holdman, Mary Margaret, 1080 Parker St., Apt. 1, Cleveland, 

Tenn. 
Holland, Mary M., 2514 Carroll Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Holland, Richard D., 449 Henry St., Birmingham, Ala. 
Hollis, Eddie Roger, Butler Rd., Rt. 1, Nashville, Tenn. 
Holloway, David Lee, Rt. 6, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Homner, Danette Sue, 2505 Milburn Blvd., Mishawaka, Ind. 
Hood, Jimmy Neal, 320 El Paso Vista, Crystal Lake, 111. 
Home, Samuel Watson, 1810 Clemmer St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Horton, Jane, 6491 Tifton Place, Orlando, Fla. 
Hoskins, Gwendolyn Inez, 409 North 15th St., Middlesboro, 

Ky. 
Houston, Juanita S., 2020 Central St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Houston, Richard A., Charleston, Tenn. 
Howard, Frank E., 201 Westover Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Howe, Billy Joe, 215 4th St., Buffalo, Iowa 
Howell, Rena Mae, 1511 Holbrook St., Greensboro, N. C. 
Hubbard, Johnnie F., Bates Pike, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Hudson, Kyle L., Jr., 1045 17th St., Wyandotte, Mich. 
Huett, James Henry, Box 25, Center Hill, Fla. 
Hughes, Hilda Jeanette, 2222 Houston St., Florence, Ala. 
Hulsey, Louis Guy, 150 11th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Hunt, David Ray, Rt. 1, Charleston, Tenn. 
Hunt, Susan Ann, 720 Maple Ave., N.W., Valdese, N. C. 
Hyde, Ronnie Lance, Jr., 1320 Johnson Blvd., Cleveland, 

Tenn. 

Ingram, Larry, Rt. 5, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Ingram, Margaret Melbaline, Rt. 3, Hazlehurst, Ga. 
Inman, Martha, 1053 Church St., Williston, S. C. 
Isely, Janice Annette, Box 343, Midale, Sask., Canada 



Jackson, Buddy, Rt. 2, Box 771, Odessa, Tex. 
Jackson, Milton Bryan, 515 S. 16th Ave., Dillon, S. C. 
Jacob, Lee Hammons, Jr., 6510 Argyle St., Orlando, Fla. 
Jenkins, Dianne, 1109 Sayne St., Montgomery, Ala. 
Jent, James Vearl, 1001 Barham St., Johnston City, 111. 
Johns, Brenda Jo, 227 North 30th St., Camp Hill, Pa. 
Johnson, Alice Victoria, Box 111, Everglades, Fla. 
Johnson, Brenda, 702 17th St., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Johnson, Carl Richard, 365 8th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Johnson, Charlene Faye, 1321 Bonackee Ave., Hamblin, Ohio 
Johnson, Harold E., Rt. 4, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Johnson, James Richard, Rt. 1, Box 626, Daisy, Tenn. 
Johnson, Peggy Ann, 202 Tremont Ave., Greenville, S. C. 
Johnson, Shirley F., 365 8th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Jones, Byrom M., 2230 Edgewater Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Jones, Catherine Jeanette, 3222 Oakdale Rd., Hapeville, Ga. 
Jones, Harold Lee, 1536 Dade St., Augusta, Ga. 
Jones, Willie Mae, 2230 Edgewater Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Kadar, Michalene A., R.D. 1, Box 671, Elizabeth, Pa. 
Kabagul, F. Gringor, Muncheu 45, Hanfling Weg 2f, Germany 
Kayleo, Darrell F., Rt. 4, Ladd Springs Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Kays, Linda Ruth, 4243 Tuscarora Wax, Louisville, Ky. 
Keller, Danny Pete, 829 S. Terrace Ave., Columbus, Ohio 
Keller, Donald Larry, 2006 Ohio Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Keller, Ella Jo, Rt. 6, Leadmine Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Kennedy, Richard Wayne, 1402 S. 6th Ave., Yakima, Wash. 
Kile, Terry Lee, 2101 S. Fern Creek, Orlando, Fla. 
Killman, Freddie Daniel, Rt. 1, Box 128, Mt. Holly, N.E., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Kilpatrick, Brenda Gail, 2458 St. Patrick St., Atlanta, Ga. 
Kimble, Charlotte Ann, 1545 Tenth St., Douglas, Arizona. 
Kimsey, Buddy Eugene, 1707 Stuart St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
King, Joyce, 1370 Parker St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
King, Luther Lawrence, Jr., Rt. 4, Dalton, Ga. 
Kirtley, Sandra Kay, Rt. 1, Milton, W. Va. 
Knipp, Jeanette R., 4866 Lovers Lane, Lavenna, Ohio 
Knox, Mary Esther, Rt. 1, Harrison, Tenn. 
Kumler, Mary Kathleen, Rt. 1, Box 16, Bellflower, 111. 

Laing, Joseph W., 533 Trunk St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Land, Brenda Marzell, 1881 Volberg St., N.W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Landeo, Vicente, Apdo. 3536, Lima, Peru 

Landreth, Elbert Theodore, Jr., 3 Sunderland Dr., Greenville, 
S. C. 

Landreth, Elbert Theodore, Jr., 115 Altavista Ave., Charlottes- 
ville, Va. 

Lane, Patricia Ann, 252 W. Main St., Everett, Pa. 

Lane, Teresa, Rt. 2, Charleston, Tenn. 




Part of the candlelight finale of the Thanksgiving 
Music Festival. 



248 



Lastra, Rapael L., Cuauthcmoc 208, Navojoa, Sonora, Mexico 

Laughridgc, Douglas Michael, 1180 Parker St., N.E., Cleve- 
land, Tenn. 

Lawrence, Linda Diane, 2314 Swayze St., Flint, Mich. 

Lawson, Donald Frank, Rt. 1, Mineral Point, Mo. 

Lawson, Wanda F., Rt. 5, Benton Pike, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Laye, Jonathan David, 32 S. Fayette St., Mercersburg, Pa. 

Leader, Ron, 306 Kenwood Dr., Hapevillc, Ga. 

LeCroy, Larry F., Rt. 2, Walhalla, S. C. 

Ledbetter, Mary Nell, 7077 Westfall St., E. Canton, Ohio 

Ledford, Charles Brent, 2805 Blackburn Rd., Cleveland, 
Tenn. 

Lee, Earnestinc Jeanette, Rt. 7, Blockhouse Rd., Maryville, 
Tenn. 

Lee, Mary M., Box 143, Whiteside, Tenn. 

Lee, Russell Wesley, Rt. 2, Charleston, Tenn. 

Lee, Vickie, 400 Crarien St., Hampton, Va. 

Lee, William Russell, Box 1147, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lemons, Christine Beyer, 2509 Pine Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lemons, Joseph Lee, 981 Montgomery Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lemons, Judy 2503 Oakland Dr., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Leonard, Donald Wayne, 3644 Spring St., Chamblee, Ga. 

Lewis, Anna C, Box 198, MacArthur, W. Va. 

Lewis, Filbert, 115 Sussea St., Bridgeville, Del. 

Lewis, Hodges Alvin, Box 1303, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lillard, Gerald S., 1115 Cookedale, N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lindsay, Cecelia Ann, 3229 Gurley Ave., E. Gadsden, Ala. 

Logan, Margo Gail, 241 Highland Ave., S. Portland, Maine 

Lombard, Anthony, Rt. 1, Woodlawn Dr., Laurel, Miss. 

Lombard, Barry Harvey, Box 41, Dora, Ala. 

Lombard, Dot, Box 517, Lucedale, Miss. 

Lombard, Gayle Lavern, Box 41, Dora, Ala. 

Lott, Leo, 220 13th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lott, Ova Doris, 220 13th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lovelace, Shirley Ann, Rt. 2, Haywood Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lowe, Walter Eugene, Rt. 5, Dalton, Ga. 

Lowery, L. Loyis, Box 105, E. Forrest St., Rome, Ga. 

Lowery, Mildred Louise, Box 1209, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Lyle, Tyrell C, 1409 Second St., Radford, Va. 

McBrayer, Faye A., 2611 Blue Springs Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 
McBurnett, Mona Dale, Rt. 1, Tallapoosa, Ga. 
McCard, David W., 217 Wesley Ave., Thomaston, Ga. 
McClain, David Harold, 5208 32nd Ave., Washington, D. C. 
McClain, Emma Jean, 80 Virginia, Pontiac, Mich. 
McClanahan, Virginia Kaye, Harmoor Apts., Cleveland, Tenn. 
McClure, David Arthur, 4111 Lenox Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. 
McClure, Raymond, 3019 7th St., Rockford, 111. 
McCorley, Alfred Eugene, 1419 S. 8th St., Lanette, Ala. 
McCormick, Ray Allen, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 
McCoy, Joseph, Box 475, Seneca, S. C. 
McDaniel, Alfred Dannell, 1617 Downey St., Radford, Va. 
McDuffie, Ida Mae, 103 Park St., Okeechobee, Fla. 
McEachin, Leroy, Rt. 1, Box 289, Hodehurst, Ga. 
McGhee, Ed, Cleveland, Tenn. 
McGhce, Jerry V., Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
McGhee, Jewell, 1533 Ocoee St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
McGowan, Ethues, 2756 Rysolt, Indianapolis, Ind. 
McGuire, George Dennis, 1704 Clouds Ford Rd., Kingsport, 

Tenn. 
Mcintosh, Jane, Box 241, Roscoe, Tex. 
McMahan, Floyd R., 924 Church St., S.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
McKelvey, Max, Rt. 1, Delmar, Md. 
McKinney, Judy Lee, Rt. 2, Box 475, Valdese, N. C. 
McLain, Patricia Gayle, North Lee Highway, Cleveland, Tenn. 
McLuhan, Darlia Mere, 3926 Sycamore Dr., Burlington Hts., 

Cleveland, Tenn. 
McLuhan, Dwayne Meruyn, 3926 Sycamore Dr., Burlington 

Hts., Cleveland, Tenn. 
McMillan, Herchell Paul, Jr., 517 Sherwood Ave., Athens, 

Tenn. 
McMullen, Helen L., 1820 Maple St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
McMurry, Elwanda, Rt. 3, Box 32, Toccoa, Ga. 




A Student Council committee meets in the new 
Student Center office. 



McPherson, Jimmy, 1626 Bedford Rd., Glenn Burnie, Md. 

Maddox, Jerry L., Rt. 3, Cullman, Ala. 

Maddox, Shirley Bob, Mohawk Dr., Rt. 2, Sequoia, Ga. 

Mahaffey, Frank Delton, Box 148, Easley, S. C. 

Maharrey, Thomas, 1409 Parr Ave., N. Chicago, 111. 

Mainer, Leon S., 1408 W. Hill Rd., Flint, Mich. 

Martin, Charles M., Rt. 6, Harrison Pike, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Martin, Jack Anthony, Rt. 1, Charleston, Tenn. 

Martin, Jerry Paul, Box 331, Dora, Ala. 

Martin, Ron, 119 N. McCrary St., Ashcboro, N. C. 

Masters, Florence, 919 Merry St., Augusta, Ga. 

Masters, Rachel Ann, Box 23, White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 

Mathew, K. J., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Matthews, Roberta N., 93 5 Mimosa Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Maxwell, Linda Faye, Rt. 1, Silver Creek, Ga. 

May, Claudette, 609 Brair Ct., Kokomo, Ind. 

May, Lewis Douglas, Rt. 1, Gilbertown, Ala. 

Meirs, Martha Sue, Cohutta, Ga. 

Melton, Randall E., Rt. 7, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Mercer, Hilri Joseph, Jr., Rt. 2, Box 25, Pioneer, La. 

Meredith, Pulette, 6325 Leyte Dr., Washington, D. C. 

Messer, Evelyn C, 1070 Gordon St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Millard, Merrill, 1519 Hickory Valley Rd., Chattanooga, 

Tenn. 
Miller, Alean, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Miller, Douglas, Rt. 2, Charleston, Tenn. 
Miller, Harry Marshall, 910 Isaac St., Winchester, Va. 
Miller, Helen, 325 Central Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Miller, Helen Suzanne, Rt. 1, Box 102, Union, Maine 
Miller, Jerry M., 1708 Anderson St., Charlotte, N. C. 
Miller, John Ralph, 504 N. 21st St., Dade City, Fla. 
Miller, Leona Otecn, 930 Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Miller, Lloyd Edwin, Jr., 3940 Lake St., Granite City, 111. 
Miller, Otis, 1780 Greenwood Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Miller, Regina A., Rt. 10, Box 88, Tyler, Tex. 
Millsaps, Harrill, 1820 Maple St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Millsaps, Marcia Glendora, 1820 Maple St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Mitchell, Sandra, Rt. 1, Emory, Tex. 
Mize, Sammy, Jr., 523 Oak Lane, Waynesboro, Va. 
Mohammad, Lai, 31 Cross Crossing, San Fernando, Trinidad 
Mohamed, Verita Mrs., 31 Cross Crossing, San Fernando, 

Trinidad 



249 



Student Directory, 
con't. 



Montgomery, David, Rt. 4, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Moore, Bruce Wayne, Rt. 1, Empire, Ala. 

Moore, Jackie, 3719 Woodland Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Moore, Joy, 27842 Dartmouth Dr., Madison Heights, Mich. 

Moreland, Ann, Box 46, Mt. Storm, W. Va. 

Moreland, Ronald Darell, Rt. 7, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Moreno, Ruth, Calle 68 No. 17-33, Bogoto 2, Cundinayarca, 

Colombia, South America 
Morgan, Carol, Soddy, Tenn. 

Morris, Carl Ronald, 643 Warkins St., Spartanburg, S. C. 
Morris, James Isaac, 1106 Joyner St., Gibsonville, N. C. 
Moser, Shirley Joyce, Rt. 3, Madisonville, Tenn. 
Moss, Jerry, 7404 Dixie Highway, Florence, Ky. 
Mudd, Robert Fredrick, 14 Val Page St., Farmingdale, N. Y. 
Mullinax, Sandy, 3730 Hillside Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Mullins, Sharon, Rt. 1, Stonewall, Okla. 
Mullins, Shirley, Rt. 3, Box 63-C, Corbin, Ky. 
Muncy, Betty J., 5755 Princeton-Glendale Rd., Hamilton, 

Ohio 
Mundy, James Danny, Rt. 1, Marble, N. C. 
Murray, Jimmy, Rt. 3, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Murray, Linda, Rt. 3, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Murty, Reddi Krishna, Church of God, Kakinada-Andhra, 

India 
Myers, Herbert R., 815 1st St., Goldsboro, N. C. 
Neill, Edward Marvin, 1180 Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Nelson, Lynda, Rt. 3, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Nettles, Linda M., 131 S. White St., New Orleans, La. 
Newell, Sylvia Gail, Box 82, Birchwood, Tenn. 
Newham, Kathy, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 
Newman, Ann, 20 St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Newsome, Gaynor J., 7 Lorweed Dr., Savannah, Ga. 
Newton, Barbara Ann, Rt. 1, Box 262-A, Jackson, Miss. 
Nichols, William Donald, 10 E. 5th St., Williamson, W. Va. 
Nicholson, Glcnda F., 663 Spring St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Northcutt, Kenneth Wayne, 54 Carol Plantation Rd., Mobile, 

Ala. 




Oakley, Larry Dwanc, Rt. 3, Brookville, Ind. 
Oakley, Thomas J., Jr., 12410 E. 25th Ave., Portage, Ind. 
O'Daniel, Shirley, 10193 3rd St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Ogden, Shirley R., Rt. 1, Box 400, Natchez, Miss. 
Ogle, Kenneth Lavoy, 2605 Blackburn Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Organ, Ricky Reese, 4506 Dumal St., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Osborne, Charles H., 327 Enterprise Ave., Sidney, Ohio 
Osborne, Pamela Delane, 356 Parker Rd., Morristown, Tenn. 
Osment, Ella Sue, 2701 Woodlawn Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Overbay, Sharon Ann, Box 333, Iaeger, W. Va. 
Owen, Lawrence G., Irmo, S. C. 

Owenby, Bobby D., Simrita Circle, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Owens, James Edward, 540 Johnson Blvd., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Owens, Judy, 710 Short St., Rossville, Ga. 
Oxford, John Franklin, 4127 East Ridge Dr., Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Palmer, Charlotte Joan, 32000 Bradner Dr., Warren, Mich. 

Park, Eugenia Eola, Rt. 3, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Parker, Peggy, Zion Lane, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Parrish, Robert Wayne, 3139 Humboldt St., Norfolk, Va. 

Parson, Bill E., 535 8th St., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Patrick, Jerry Lee, Rt. 2, Box 422, Bluefield, Va. 

Pawluk, William Thomas, Box 33, Richeyville, Pa. 

Payne, Charles David, Rt. 1, Holland, Va. 

Payne, Chester Dewayne, 730 8th St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Peery, Jim, Box 223, War, W. Va. 

Pegues, Gary Lynn, Rt. 1, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Perdue, Walter Wayne, 237 3rd St., Barberton, Ohio 

Perez, Benjamin, 202 East 112 St., New York, N. Y. 

Perry, Elayne R., 6115 Melody Lane, N.E., N. Canton, Ohio 

Perry, Ronald Branham, Rt. 2, Box 210, Rising Sun, Md. 

Pettit, Jane, P.O. Box 985, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Petty, Steve, 5441 Longview St., Hixson, Tenn. 

Pharr, Gene, 119 Land St., Norfolk, Va. 

Pharr, Glorida Ann, Box 35, Red Bud Dr., Golden, Miss. 

Philipose, P. S., Mount Zion, Mulakuzha, Kerala, India 

Phillips, Alma Elmina, Lovelady Rd., Daisy, Tenn. 

Phillips, Charles Kenneth, 550 6th St., S.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Phillips, Donald, 3460 Edgewood Cir., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Phillips, Randall LaVon, 605 Layfield Rd., Chattanooga, 

Tenn. 
Phillips, Robert Lee, Jr., 514 Rocksprings Rd., N.E., Atlanta, 

Ga. 
Pigg, Charles F., 1450 Parker St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Pillow, George Howard, Rt. 2, Box 311, Orlando, Fla. 
Plunkett, Glenda Diane, 2717 13th Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Plymale, Mozel, Phyllis, Ky. 

Polatta, Anita Louise, 879 Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Polatta, Frances Elaine, 879 Parker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Poole, Dewitt, Rt. 1, Condrum, Ga. 
Pope, Hoyt, Rt. 3, Box 135F, Leesburg, Fla. 
Powell, Linda Cheryl, P.O. Box 123, Homerville, Ga. 
Powell, Rickey, P.O. Box 137, Zellwood, Fla. 
Powell, Sheryl Louaine, Box 494, Pitts, Ga. 
Powers, Sandra, 7441 Darwood Rd., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Prevatt, Gwen, P.O. Box 1341, Ft. Myers, Fla. 
Prewitt, Arlene T., Rt. 2, Box 2, Corbin, Ky. 
Prewitt, Billy Don, Rt. 2, Box 2, Corbin, Ky. 
Price, James William, Long Island, Ala. 
Price, Trudy L., Rt. 6, Box 1, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Prosser, Wayne, 7971 Old Jonesboro Rd., Atlanta, Ga. 
Pruett, Brenda Rhae, 1600 Berry Dr., Knoxville, Tenn. 
Pruett, Phyllis Ann, 1600 Berry Dr., Knoxville, Tenn. 
Pryor, Danny Orval, 2531/2 15th St., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Puckett, Rose, Rt. 1, Meadobrooks Dr., Norcross, Ga. 
Pugh, Margaret Ann, R.F.D. 1, Willard, Ohio 



Charlie Rose, Sonny Chambley, and Jim Stephens 
work on a fallen stage setting. 




Homecoming Queen candidates Kathy Hitte, Martha 
Timmerman, and Joyce Fithian nervously await the 
halftime ceremony. 



Qucrry, Jerry Wayne, 122 Buckworth Dr., Kokonis, Ind. 
Quinn, Jesse D., White Marsh, Md. 

Raburn, Joe Taylor, Rt. 2, Box 309, Cleveland, Term. 
Ragan, Ronald M., Rt. 1, Lindale, Ga. 
Raines, William Herbert, 520 Arnold, Richmond, Va. 
Ratcliffe, Judy I., 201 Grove Ave., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Rateliff, Robert, 2051 Clarkdale, Detroit, Mich. 
Rathbun, James E., 1243 Ocoee St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Rathbun, Robert Lee, 722 Rierson St., Flint, Mich. 
Rayhill, Danny, 7322 Arnoldtovvn Rd., Louisville, Ky. 
Reaves, Aaron Clyde, 612 N. Bell, Brownfield, Tex. 
Reffner, Bonnie Lou, 303 First St., Williamsburg, Pa. 
Reid, Dennis Earl, 205 Walker St., Spartanburg, S. C. 
Renncr, Bruce, Rt. 7, Box 63, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Renner, Patricia Carol, 110 Lynn Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Reynolds, Jack E., 2800 Peerless Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Rhyne, Clyde Thomas, 440 Trunk St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Rhync, Elizabeth Ann, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Richardson, Wendell, Box 70, Benton, Tenn. 
Ridgeway, Nathan Clement, 5406 Bloomfield Rd., Macon, Ga. 
Rigncy, Eula Van, Rt. 6, Box 184, Eight Mile, Ala. 
Ringo, Ruth Ann, 503 Cliche St., Borgcr, Tex. 
Roberson, Patricia Ann, P.O. Box 288, Winston, Ore. 
Roberts, Anne, 512 Georgia Pacipie, West Point, Miss. 



Robert, Ernest, 1160 Peoples St., Apt. 9, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Roberts, Patricia A., 124 More Ave., Dayton, Ohio 

Robinson, Grey, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Robinson, Mrs. Grey, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Robinson, Groce Randall, E. Cherokee Gardens, Cleveland, 

Tenn. 
Robinson, Janice Evelyn, Rt. 3, All Good Rd., Chattanooga, 

Tenn. 
Robinson, Jeanne, 3909 Laurel Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Rodgers, Billy Joe, 150 17th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Rodgers, Edward C, 150 11th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Roland, Gvvenda, 7518 N. Chicago St., Portland, Ore. 
Roller, Ruby Mac, Rt. 3, Salem, N. J. 
Rose, Alice, 2260 Central Dr., Hamilton, Ohio 
Rose, Charles W., 1548 Homepark, Decatur, 111. 
Rose, Linda, 112 Moore Dr., Franklin, Ohio 
Rose, Ruth C, 254 Sherman Dr., Franklin, Ohio 
Ross, Darryl William, Red Hill Parsonage, Rt. 1, Cleveland, 

Tenn. 
Rowan, Earl Wayne, Rt. 3, Nashville, Ga. 
Runion, Roger James, 2 Blake St., Greenville, S. C. 
Rush, Charles Monroe, 818 W. 3rd St., Thomasville, Ala. 
Rushing, Terry A., P.O. Box 637, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Russell, Emerson Edward, 3611 Ida Belle, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Russell, Rosa Christine, 1403 May Ve., Gastonia, N. C. 
Russell, Thomas Wayne, 4709 Ritten House St., Riverdale, 

Md. 
Russell, Henry George, McDonald Rt. 1, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Ruthledge, Thomas Edwin, Rt. 2, Box 332, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Ryals, Ethel Naomi, Rt. 1, Box 90, Loxley, Ala. 

Schrader, Frank J., 570 18th St., N.W., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Scgraves, Patricia Ann, 2709 Pine Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Sells, Larry J., Rt. 2, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Self, James O., McDonald, Tenn. 

Sessoms, Harry Preston, Hughes St., Sanford, N. C. 

Sewell, Linda Varnell, Rt. 2, Heflin, Ala. 

Shankle, Kathleen L., Rt. 1, Daisy, Tenn. 

Sharp, Edward C, Box 63, Calhoun, Tenn. 

Sharp, Joseph Gary, Rt. 5, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Sharpe, Judith Lynn, 529 W. 21st Ave., Covington, La. 

Sharpe, Sandra F., 529 W. 21st Ave., Covington, La. 

Shaw, Dorothy Louise, Rural Rt. 3, Everett, Pa. 

Shcaly, Gary Earl, 103 Hawthorne, Rome, Ga. 

Shcaron, Betty Joyce, 707 W. Anderson St., Selma, N. C. 

Sherbahn, Lois, 2803 Eide St., Spenard, Alaska 

Sherbahn, Ruth Ann, 2803 Eide St., Spenard, Alaska 

Sherrill, Joyce, 1775 Highland Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Shields, Mary M., Texas 

Shirley, Dwight E., 1501 Bucna Vista Cir., Decatur, Ala. 

Shoemaker, Bobby Jean, 4010 Laurel Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Short, Geraldine, R.R. 2, Stanford, Ky. 

Short, Charles H., 701 E. 7th St., West Frankfort, 111. 

Short, Robert G., 701 E. 7th St., West Frankfort, 111. 

Shoupe, Donald Edward, 5120 21st, Tampa, Fla. 

Shrcve, David Leroy, 3129 Penna Ave., Weirton, W. Va. 

Shumaker, Terry D., 801 9th Ave., Childersburg, Ala. 

Siebold, Sue, 18840 Sun Jase, Lathrup Village, Mich. 

Simons, James Philip, 1312 Riehl, Waterloo, Iowa 

Simmons, Jannie Lee, Rt. 2, Landrum, S. C. 

Simpson, Paul Edward, 161 Post Rd., West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Sinks, Michael Virgil, 114 Glennell, Mokena, 111. 

Sisk, Maynard, 430 8th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Slack, Marlin D., 1211 Chippewah, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Sloan, Louclla, R.D. 2, York Springs, Pa. 

Slocumb, Douglas W., 1173 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Slocumb, Esther J., 1173 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Smallwood, Catherine Lynn, Box 95, Everglades, Fla. 

Smith, Carbara, Rt. 2, Box 62, Carrallon, Miss. 

Smith, Bedford, Jr., 97 Devonshire, Ypsilanti, Mich. 



251 






Student Directory, 
con't. 



Smith, John William, 108 Church St., Gastonia, N. C. 
Smith, Judy Sue, 176 Stanton Rd., Mobile, Ala. 
Smith, Katherain, 120 Ebony Lane, Fairborn, Ohio 
Smith, Kenneth Cameron, 1012 Memorial Dr., Waycross, Ga. 
Smith, Larry Eugene, 823 Fairview Ave., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Smith, Margaret Louise, Rt. 2, Heflin, Ala. 
Smith, Marvin J., Box 261, Pinetops, N. C. 
Smith, Robert Wallace, 115 W. 16th St., Anniston, Ala. 
Smith, Ray LaVan, 227 Burning Bush Rd., Ringgold, Ga. 
Smith, Wanda Kaye, P.O. Box 584, Valdese, N. C. 
Sneller, Robert C, 406 Shunee Rd., Milford, Del. 
Snyder, Charles L., 145 21st St., N.E., Cleveland, Tenn. 



Souders, David Marvin, 715 Lakewood Rd., Bonner Springs, 

Kan. 
Spencer, Joe Ralph, 590 20th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Spivey, Henry David, N. Claradon Ave., Avondale Estates, Ga. 
Squires, William, 2200 Mecklensburg Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 
St. John, Worth E., Box 42, Cawood, Ky. 
Stafford, Dwight James, Rt. 1, Cohutta, Ga. 
Stalcup, Judy Lynn, 1430 21st St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Stanfield, Linda G., 510 20th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Stanken, Paul R., 224 Court St., Covington, Ky. 
Stapleton, Adena Gail, 2016 Lauretta Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 
Starnes, Jane Elizabeth, 1207 N. 44th St., Phoenix, Ariz. 
Stephens, Dorothy Loretta, Rt. 2, Box 407, Easley, S. C. 
Stephens, James David, P.O. Box 5537, Roanoke, Va. 
Stephens, James Paul, Rt. 1, Box 174A, Crisfield, Md. 
Stepp, Anita, Rt. 4, Box 262, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Sterling, Carrie Charlotte, 1940 Hawtharne St., Savannah, Ga. 
Stevens, Joyce Ray, Lang St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Stevison, Hugh Gary, Rt. 2, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Stone, Jimmy W., 102 Highland, Bluefield, Va. 
Stradt, William L., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Stringer, Connie Lynn, 103 Piedmont Rd., Oak Ridge, Tenn. 
Suits, Charles Roy, Rt. 3, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Suits, James Randall, 115 Woodlawn Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 




One of Miss Carr's phys. ed. classes in action. 




Fans pour onto the gym floor and head for the exits 
after the Kentucky Christian ball game. 



Sumler, Roger Lee, P.O. Box 283, Cambria Station, Chris- 

tiansburg, Va. 
Summers, John Dale, 4 Rochester Ave., Kingston, Jamaica 
Sumner, Linda Sharon, 3804 9th St., Baltimore, Md. 
Sutton, Michael Anthony, 5 Howard St., Rock Hill, S. C. 
Swartout, Nancy Carolyn, Rt. 1, Box 1'66, Etowah, Tenn. 
Swiger, Mary Sue, 2611 Blue Springs Rd., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Swisher, Richard Lee, 909 Georgetown Pike, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Sylvester, Fred, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Talbott, Reba Dunn, Rt. 7, Box 73, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Talley, William E., 918 Gary St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Tarpley, Hobert Wayne, 7090 Denton Rd., Bellerville, Mich. 
Taylor, Gwendolyn, Rt. 2, Box 128, Kennedy, Ala. 
Taylor, Mary Charlotte, Rt. 3, Box 258, Marianna, Ark. 
Taylor, Patricia Evelyn, R.R. 2, Lake City, Tenn. 
Taylor, Thomas Franklin, Lake City, Tenn. 
Teague, Connie Darlene, 1815 Hollywood Dr., Chattanooga, 

Tenn. 
Teague, Denzell, 40-A Parks Hgts., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Teaster, Wilma Jean, 5505V2 66th St., St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Tech, Christel, 720 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Teramoto, fc Michiko, 144 Chome, Kobe, Japan 
Teran, M. Victoria, Ortiz Mena No. 12, Hermosille, Mexico 
Thomas, Proattean, F. B. Marine Hurlock, Md. 
Thomas, Robert M., Rt. 1, Box 69, Franham, Va. 
Thomason, Jean, P.O. Box 187, Sumiton, Ala. 
Thompson, Glenn, 302 Broadmoor Bid., Monroe, La. 
Thorne, Annie Laura, 706 W. Anderson St., Selma, N. C. 
Thornton, Wynell, 2007 Gary Ave., Albany, Ga. 
Tidwell, Clyde H., 1033 Highland, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Timmerman, Martha, 3108 N. First, Fresno, Calif. 
Tioaquen, Thomas A., 823 N. Ocoee, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Toler, Virginia Lee, Box 302, East Bank, W. Va. 
Townley, Sharon Rebecca, Box 72, Bastian, Va. 
Trammell, R. Joel, 1160 Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Trantham, Juanita, 987 5th St., N.E., Homestead, Fla. 
Trimm, Gloria, 4402 Byrd Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Tripp, Jon C, Rt. 2, Box 156, Ayder, N. C. 
Triplett, Bennie, 2718 Mac St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Tucker, Carroll, 904 Tallahassee, Hazlehurst, Ga. 
Tull, Bill, College Arms, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Turner, John Frederick, 3706 Vernier Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio 



Turvey, Virgil Lamra, Box 3, Cisco, Ga. 

Tyner, Mary Louise, 64 Allen St., Greenville, S. C. 

Tyner, Nancy, 108 Carter Ave., Greenville, S. C. 

Van Leuven, Jerald Judd, 1758 Cheshite, Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Varner, Robert M., Box 44, Roxbury, Pa. 
Vaughan, Phyllis, 1433 Sevier Terrace Dr., Kingsport, Tenn. 
Vaughan, Roland Edward, 4201 White Horse Rd., Greenville, 

S. C. 
Vaughn, Bobby Lee, 2917 Woodlawn Ave., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Vest, Lois Mary, 2784 Bates Pike, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Via, Dreama Laudean, 212 Oliver Ave., Princeton, W. Va. 
Vincent, Gary, 316 Park Ave., New Castle, Ind. 
Voliva, Beverly Ann, 507 22nd St., Virginia Beach, Va. 
Voliva, David, Virginia Beach, Va. 

Wachowski, Harriet Frances, 1130 N. Dawton St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
Walker, Alan, 112 Clover Dr., Indianola, Miss. 
Walker, Carolyn Gladys, 112 Clover, Indianola, Miss. 
Walker, E. Lajoy, Rt. 1, Box 260, Doddsville, Miss. 
Walker, Joseph Dale, 340 1 7th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Walker, Minnie Pearl, Rt. 1, Jacksboro, Tenn. 
Walker, Penny Geraldene, Box 93, Bulpitt, 111. 
Walker, Ronald, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Walker, Dianne Sharon, 3301 Weeks Circle, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Wall, Parry Sue, Peoples St., Cleveland, Tenn. 



253 



Student Directory, 
con't. 



Wall, Ruby, Peoples St. Apts., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Walston, Kenny David, Jacksonville Rd., Crisfield, Md. 

Wallace, Suzanne N., P.O. Box 525, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Waters, Joe, Anderson Dr., Jesup, Ga. 

Waters, Wonney Rec, 418 Oppitz Lane, Lakeland, Fla. 

Watkins, Anne Marie, 1779 Bartram Cir., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Watson, Harvey, R.F.D. 1, Box 184, Bridgeville, Del. 

Watson, Hugh, Rt. 3, Sweetwater, Tenn. 

Wattenbarger, Esther, Rt. 2, Box 180, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Watts, Rebecca Lucille, Rt. 3, Dillon, S. C. 

Webb, James P., 633 Walker St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Webb, Judith Ann, 117 Larchmont Dr., Madison, Tenn. 

Webb, Marilyn Gayle, Reliance, Tenn. 

Weeks, J. Randle, 1117 North Craft Hwy., Prichard, Ala. 

Welborn, William, 7669 Walters Lane, Forestville, Md. 







Welch, A. W. Finicc, Jr., 2520 W. Utah, Carlsbad, New Mex. 
Welch, John Walter, Rt. 3, Georgetown Pike, Cleveland, Tcnn. 
Wells, Marjorie Jean, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 
Wesson, Ruthie, 2803 25th Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 
West, Arthur Lavon, 109 Fishe Blvd., Cocoa, Fla. 
West, Linda Gray, Box 224, Warrentown, N. C. 
Westberry, Connie Ralph, P.O. Box 983 Avon Park, Avon 

Park, Fla. 
Weston, John, 36 Pitman Cir., Greenville, S. C. 
Wheeler, John Lloyd, 205 S. Ill Ave., Wcllston, Ohio 
Weible, Margaret, RR 2, Bonne Terrc, Mo. 
White, Charles Arch, Rt. 8, Box 1156, Sanford, N. C. 
Whitmire, Hayden Timothy, P.O. Box 761, Dalton, Ga. 
Whitmire, Joseph Alfred, P.O. Box 761, Dalton, Ga. 




Wiggs, Howard, Rt. 2, Box 169-A, Roanoke, Va. 

Wigley, Terry DeWayne, 6898 Continental, Warren, Mich. 

Wilbanks, Donna Elaine, Rt. 3, Dalton, Ga. 

Wilbanks, Lynda, 30 - 25th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Wilbanks, Wanda Jane, Dalton, Ga. 

Wilcox, Inez Faye, 111 Gilmer St., Lenoir, N. C. 

Wilder, Billy Wayne, 218 S. "D" St., Hamilton, Ohio 

Wiley, Shelby Jean, Rt. 1, Box 95, Edgemoor, S. C. 

Wilkes, Dennis Perry, 601 Gay, Charleston, Miss. 

Willhoit, Judy Ann, 910 Second St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Williams, Allen, 4060 Washington Ave., Fort Myers, Fla. 

Williams, Avanah Marie, Rt. 1, Box 474, Ft. Myers, Fla. 

Williams, Bobby Body, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Williams, Bobby Gene, Rt. 1, Box 36, Franklinville, N. C. 

Williams, Frank L., 1314-41st, Lubbock, Tex. 

Williams, Jessie Vee, 2073 Church St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Williams, John Michael, 13 Overlook Ave., Hanover, N. J. 

Williams, Lucius, 150 11th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Wilson, Delia Jean, Box 18, Seth, W. Va. 

Wilson, Fred, 961 Trunk St., Cleveland, Tenn. 

Wilson, George Warren, Star Rd., Pinson, Ala. 

Wilson, Joyce Faye, Box 391, Sevierville, Tenn. 

Wilson, Max Eugene, 603 Main St., Grinnell, Iowa 

Wilson, Norman Jerald, Star Pt., Box 25, Pinson, Ala. 

Wilson, Raymond, 211 Hamby Rod, Morutto, Ga. 

Wilson, William Wesley, P.O. Box 185, Locust, N. C. 

Windham, William Keith, P.O. Box 666, Jasper, Fla. 

Winters, Bill, 2728 Vida Place, Columbus, Ohio 

Womack, Betty Jean, 3318 Sunnyside D., Dampton, Va. 

Wood, Calvin, 1221 N.W. 12th St., Okeechobee, Fla. 

Wooderson, Dawn Claudia, Cleveland, Tenn. 

Woodfin, Kenneth Warren, 1500 Twilight Lane, Richmond, 

Va. 
Wooding, C. Calvin, 5242 Todd Rd., Flint, Mich. 
Woods, Marvin Eugene, 1128 Rozell St., Memphis, Tenn. 
Wotton, Bernard Leon, R.F.D. 2, Warren, Maine 
Wright, Billy H., 444 9th St., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Wright, Robert F., 2054 Officer, Cleveland, Tenn. 
Wyatt, Rebecca, 610 Old Stage Rd., Glen Burnie, Md. 

Young, Gwendolyn, P.O. Box 643, Lotta, S.C. 
Youngblood, Victoria D., 2901 Holmes Dr., Cleveland, Tenn. 
Younker, Stephen Allen, Main St., Stonington, 111. 
York, Gary H., Rt. 1, Sautee, Ga. 

Zimmerman, Thomas Harry, 2811 Sherrod Ct., Cocoa, Fla. 



Back where it all started — the registration day lines. 



. . . a few final words 






Here is your 1966 Vindagua. We won't waste this page writing about the effort it took to 
put it together for you. We worked hard. You already know that. 

We must not forget to thank the Church of God Publishing House and all its employees 
for their careful attention to the production of this book. Especially helpful were Bernard Dixon, 
Lee Bell, Flavius Lee, Charles McKinney, George Keppler, Gene Cannon, Dee Golden, and 
Charles Browning. 

Special thanks are due to Wayne Parrish, Steve Gwaltney, and Allen Williams, each of 
whom was invaluable in the production of the book. Wayne helped to manage the adminis- 
trative duties of the staff operation. Steve supervised and directed the journalistic efforts of all 
six section editors. Allen kept the coins straight and set an all-time record for ad sales. 

We on the staff are all grateful to Mr. Honette Echols for an ideal working relationship 
between him and us. His bearing toward the staff and its operation has been terrific, and a 
great factor in our success. 

The person on the staff whose presence and work have meant the most to me personally 
is Maria Cleghorn. I learned early to rely heavily upon the high quality of her work and the 
consistent encouragement of her attitude. She is a skillful, sensitive person. I couldn't have made 
it without her. 

Each of the six section editors did a top-notch job. Ray McCormick was the first to finish 
his work; Carol Morgan produced the most interesting section; Pam Osborne handled the new 
"curriculum" idea like an old pro. Don Goff did a terrific job with the book's largest section; 
Peggy Johnson showed real originality and creativity in the dual role of Features editor and 
chief planner of special events. Earl Rowan missed all the staff meetings except the ones he 
stumbled upon, still met every deadline on time and wrote the best copy in the book. 

There isn't room here to mention the rest of the staff, except to say that they all pulled 
their share of the load. We had the delightful challenge of presenting in a book the heartbeat 
of the greatest college in America, and telling the story of one of its greatest years. Every staff 
member has worked hard to meet that challenge. 

For the Vindagua staff, producing this book has been a tremendous experience. We have 
no regrets. The pace was exciting. The company was stimulating. The coffee was good. What 
you hold in your hands now is the product of our common passion. We present it to you as a 
sincere, articulate expression of our concept of this year at Lee College. 



QH.#r/ei tW OcW 



Charles Paul Conn 

WHIIsm G. Squires Library CJ . 4 . , . ■ 

... . . _ Editor-in-chier 

Cleveland, Tennessee 
g/ai JO BE TAKEN dlCJf 



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