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Full text of "Violations of State Department regulations and pro-Castro propaganda activities in the United States. Hearings"

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HARVARD COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 




GIFT OF THE 

GOVERNMENT 
OF THE UNITED STATES 



/ ^ 

VIOLATION OF STATE DEPARTMENT TRAVEL REGULA- 
TIONS AND PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 
IN THE UNITED STATES 

PART 4 



HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OE REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-EIGHTH CONGKESS 

FIRST SESSION 



OCTOBER 16 AND NOVEMBER 18, 1963 
INCLUDING INDEX 



Printed for the use of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities 



JSiTED : 
UNIltD STATES GOVERNMENT 

JAN 8 1964 




U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
98-765 O WASHINGTON : 1963 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Uniteh) States House of REa>BESENTATivEs 

EDWIN E. WILLIS, Louisiana, Chairman 

WILLIAM M. TUCK, Virginia AUGUST E. JOHANSEN, Michigan 

JOE R. POOL, Texas DONALD C. BRUCE, Indiana 

RICHARD H. ICHORD, Missouri HENRY C. SCHADEBERG. Wisconsin 

GEORGE F. SENNER, Je., Arizona JOHN M. ASHBROOK, Ohio 

Francis J. McNamara, Director 
Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., General Counsel 
Alfred M. Nittle, Counsel 
n 



CONTENTS 



Faga 

Synopsis 811 

October 16, 1963 : Testimony of— 

Arnold Indenbaum 830 

June Anita Gard 836 

Peter Gumpert -___ 838 

Durane U. Sherman 842 

Nicholas Bateson 847 

June Anita Gard (resumed) 857 

Afternoon session : 

Brunhilde Linke 858 

Edward R. O'Neill 860 

David Perham 865 

Harold J. E. Gesell 867 

Arnold Indenbaum (resumed) 871 

November 18, 1963 : Testimony of — 

Harold Glenn Wilkes 886 

John Robert Glenn__ 898 

Afternoon session : 

John R. Glenn (resumed) 914 

Marcia Haag Glenn 921 

Index '. i 

m 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946] ; 60 Stat. 
812, which provides : 

* Be it enacted hy the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTE3:S 
* • • * * • • 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine Members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 



(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit- 
tee, is authorized to malte from time to time investigations of (i) the extent, 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Consti- 
tution, and (iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to 
the Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such 
investigation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
has recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, 
and to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued 
under the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or 
by any member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any 
person designated by any such chairman or member. 

* * * * * • 

Rule XII 

LEGISLATIVE OVERSIGHT BY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Sec. 136. To assist the Congress in appraising the administration of the laws 
and in developing such amendments or related legislation as it may deem 
necessary, each standing committee of the Senate and the House of Repre- 
sentatives shall exercise continuous watchfulness of the execution by the 
administrative agencies concerned of any laws, the subject matter of which 
is within the jurisdiction of such committee ; and, for that purpose, shall study 
all pertinent reports and data submitted to the Congress by the agencies in the 
executive branch of the Government. 

IV 



RULES ADOPTED BY THE 88TH CONGRESS 

House Resolution 5, January 9, 1963 

* * * * ■ * * * 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Congress, 

* * * * :|c « * 

(r) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine Members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

» * * . * * * * 

18. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American activities. , 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee, 
is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (1) the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American prop- 
aganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu- 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 

* * * * 4c :|c * 

27. To assist the House in appraising the administration of the laws and in 
developing such amendments or related legislation as it may deem necessary, 
each standing committee of the House shall exercise continuous watchfulness 
of the execution by the administrative agencies concerned of any laws, the subject 
matter of which is within the jurisdiction of such committee; and, for that 
purpose, shall study all pertinent reports and data submitted to the House by 
the agencies in the executive branch of the Government. 



SYNOPSIS 

A subcommittee, composed of Representatives Joe R. Pool, chair- 
man, of Texas; Richard H. Ichord, of Missouri ; and August E. Johan- 
sen, of Michigan, continued hearings on the subject of unauthorized 
travel of U.S. citizens to Cuba at a public session in Washington, D.C., 
on October 16, 1963. On this occasion, the subcommittee was particu- 
larly interested in establishing the true identity of one "Jay" or "J." 
"Jacob" or "Jacobs," who had been mentioned in earlier hearings as 
the purchaser of air travel tickets used by the U.S. students who 
traveled to Cuba by way of Prague, Czechoslovakia, in the summer 
of 1963. 

The first witness to appear at the subcommittee's morning session 
was Arnold Indenbaum, for 10 years a brakeman on the New York 
Central Railroad until furloughed from his job on September 2, 1963. 

Mr. Indenbaum invoked the fifth amendment and other constitu- 
tional reasons in declining to say whether he was aware that a person 
using the names "Jacob" aand "Jacobs" on June 10 and 11, 
1963, had deposited more than $36,000 at the Ottawa, Canada, offices 
of the British Overseas Airways Corporation and the KLM Royal 
Dutch Airlines for flight reservations to Paris, France. He also de- 
clined, for the same reasons, to tell the subcommittee if he was aware 
that a person using a North Carolina driver's license to identify him- 
self as "Jay Jacobs" had collected refunds on unused flight tickets 
from the New York City offices of BOAC and KLM in late August 
1963. 

He declined to answer when asked if he had ever used or been 
known by the name of "Jay Jacob" or "Jay Jacobs." 

At this point Mr. Indenbaum was instructed to stand aside tem- 
porarily while the subcommittee heard other witnesses. 

Miss June Gard, an employee in KLM's main New York City 
office, testified that Levi Laub had visited that office on at least five 
occasions making arrangements for the flight of a group of U.S. 
students to Paris by way of Amsterdam in June 1963. 

Miss Grard said that in June 1963 she had received a telephone call 
from the KLM office in Ottawa and talked to a man who identified 
himself as "Mr. Jacob." He told her he was at the Ottawa KLM 
office to pay for tickets which had been reserved for a group of stu- 
dents by Levi Laub at KLM's New York office. 

The witness also testified that shortly after the students departed 
from New York for Cuba on June 25 she received a telephone call 
from a person identifying himself as "Mr. Jacob," who asked that 
a refund for unused KLM tickets he had purchased be sent to his 
bank account. When she asked for his bank account number, he said 
he had several and would call her back. She also requested that he 
come to the KLM office in person and present identification of 
himself. 

811 



812 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

It was not until about August 26, Miss Gard testified, that a man 
who introduced himself as "Mr. Jacob" and produced a driver's li- 
cense bearing his photograph as identification came to her office and 
applied for a refund from KLM. 

Miss Gard said that the man who had identified himself as "Mr. Jay 
Jacob" and Arnold Indenbaum, the preceding witness, were one and 
the same person. 

Peter Gumpert, a graduate student at the University of North 
Carolina, testified that he had met a person he knew only as "Amie" 
or "Arnold" on July 25, 1963, when the latter spent the night at the 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, residence in which he (Gimipert) shared 
a room with Nicholas Bateson, another graduate student at the univer- 
sity. He said he had no known Indenbamn by the name of "Jacob" or 
"Jacobs" while the latter was in Chapel Hill. (Bateson, according 
to subcommittee information of which Mr. Gumpert said he was not 
aware, had played a leadership role in the formation of a student 
Progressive Labor organization at Chapel Hill.) 

Mr. Gumpert told the subcommittee he had been introduced to a 
Jacob Rosen by Mr. Bateson in late 1962 or early 1963. The witness 
said no information had been brought to his attention, however, con- 
cerning Rosen's affiliation with any Communist group. He said he 
may have learned from Mr. Bateson that Mr. Rosen was connected 
with Progressive Labor. 

Mr. Gumpert testified that he was not a member of either Progres- 
sive Labor or the New Left Club, a group which preceded the Pro- 
gressive Labor organization at Chapel Hill. 

He told the subcommittee that on July 26, 1963, he had obtained a 
rented automobile for Mr. Indenbaum, who needed a vehicle with 
which to take an examination for a North Carolina driver's license. 
That same day, said the witness, he drove Indenbaum to Carrboro, 
N.C., where Indenbaum completed the required tests. Mr. Gumpert 
said he waited outside while Indenbaum took his examination in the 
driver examiner's office and did not accompany Indenbaum during 
thelatter's road test. He did, however, drive tlie visitor back to 
Chapel Hill, after which he did not see him again until the hearing. 

A short time after Mr. Indenbaum's visit, according to the witness, 
Mr. Gumpert and Mr. Bateson ceased to share the same residence, 
each moving to a new location. 

The next witness was Durane U. Sherman, license examiner for the 
North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles. He testified that on 
July 26, 1963, he had received and processed an "Application for 
North Carolina Driver's License" submitted and signed in his pres- 
ence by "Jay Jacobs." The man identifying himself as Mr. Jacobs 
told him that he had not previously been licensed to operate a motor 
veliicle in North Carolina or any other State, said the witness. 

Mr. Sherman said that after "Jacobs" completed the required 
examinations, he collected a fee from the applicant and gave him a 
receipt, which could have served as a temporary license for a period 
up to 30 days. Mr. Sherman testified that he forwarded the applica- 
tion to the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles in Raleigh, N.C., from 
which the permanent license would have been sent directly to the 
applicant at Bateson's post office box, the address "Jacobs" gave on 
the application. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 813 

The subcommittee's counsel introduced the North Carolina driver's 
license application of "Jay Jacobs," bearing stamped number 1230513, 
identified by Mr. Sherman. The witness testified that, under normal 
operating procedures, that number would be the number of the perma- 
nent license issued to "Jacobs" by the Department of Motor Veliicles 
at Raleigh.^ 

Mr. Sherman told the subcommittee that Arnold Indenbaum, 
the man who had preceded him on the witness stand, was the person 
who had represented himself as "Jay Jacobs" when he was examined 
for a driver's license in North Carolina on July 26, 1963. 

The next witness was Nicholas Bateson, an employee of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina who had immigrated to the United States from 
liis native England in 1958, the year after his graduation from Oxford. 
Mr. Bateson said he had had not applied for U.S. citizenship. 

Mr. Bateson invoked the fifth amendment when asked if he 
knew Arnold Indenbaum; whether Indenbaum had visited him on 
July 25-26, 1963, and discussed the need for obtaining a North 
Carolina driver's license; and whether he had been informed by 
Indenbaum that he would represent himself as "Jay Jacobs" for the 
purpose of acquiring the license. 

According to the subcommittee's information, a North Carolina 
driver's license was issued to "Jay Jacobs" on July 29, 1963, and 
mailed to Nicholas Bateson's post office box. 

Mr. Bateson declined to answer for the same reason, when asked 
if he had involved Peter Gumpert in helping Indenbaum obtain a 
license under the name of "Jay Jacobs" without Gumpert's knowl- 
edge of the scheme, and whether he knew that Indenbaum had intended 
to pose as "Jacobs" for the purpose of receiving refunds from KLM 
andBOAC. 

Mr. Bateson said a report in the University of North Carolina 
student newspaper. Daily Tar Heel^ of November 29, 1962, which 
had indicated he planned to accompany a student group to Cuba in 
December, 1962, was erroneous. 

He invoked the fifth amendment when asked whether he had been 
one of the organizers of the Progressive Labor Club at the University 
of North Carolina, but said he had no knowledge that the club had 
recruited and organized students for travel to Cuba. 

The witness cited both the first and fifth amendments in declining 
to say whether he knew Larry Wilford Phelps to be a member of 
the Progressive Labor group at Chapel Hill. In explanation of his 
refusal to answer, Bateson admitted being what he called a "guest" 
member of the Progressive Labor Club and said he felt bound to "the 
rules of this club, and one of the rules of this club is that one is under 
a very solemn and sacred honor not to discuss the names of other 
people who are also on the political left." 

He continued to cite the fifth amendment when asked about sub- 
conmmittee evidence that the Progressive Labor Club was not recog- 
nized by the University of North Carolina and was, therefore, barred 
from using the university's facilities for meetings. 

Mr. Bateson refused, again claiming fifth amendment privileges, 
to confirm or deny a Daily Tar Heel story of September 25, 1962, that 



1 Documents Introduced later In the hearings revealed that the license Indenbaum sub- 
sequently used to identify himself as "Jay Jacobs" was numbered 1230513. 



814 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

he had granted it an interview as a "spokesman" for the Progressive 
Labor Club. For the same reasons, he declined to say how the Pro- 
gressive Labor Club was organized at Chapel Hill; to identify the 
individual from the national office of Progressive Labor with whom 
he conferred in regard to the formation of a Chapel Hill branch; to 
state whether he had been in attendance at the national organizational 
meeting of the Progressive Labor Movement on July 1, 1962; and 
whether, in connection with the formation of the Chapel Hill Progres- 
sive Labor Club, he had conferred with Jacob Rosen, Milton Rosen, 
or Mortimer Scheer. 

Counsel for the subcommittee was requested by the chairman to 
refer a copy of the transcript of Mr. Bateson's testimony to the 
Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization for appropriate review. 

Miss June Gard was recalled by the subcommittee to elab- 
orate upon her earlier testimony. She said that in her capacity 
as an employee of KLM's New York office she had received two tele- 
phone calls from a person or persons identifying themselves as "Jay 
Jacob." The first call was received from Canada in mid-June in 
connection with the payment in Ottawa of money for flight tickets 
for the students. The second telephone call, she explained, was ap- 
parently a local one (made in New York) and concerned a request 
for a refund for tickets which had been purchased but not used. The 
second call was received several days after the June 25 departure of 
the students on their roundabout trip to Cuba. 

Miss Gard testified that the man who later came to the KLM office 
in New York and identified himself to her as "Jay Jacob" was the 
same person who had been the first witness before the subcommittee 
that morning ( Indenbaum ) . 

Following Miss Card's return appearance, the subcommittee re- 
cessed until 2 p.m. the same day. ' 

The first witness during the afternoon session was Miss Brunhilde 
Linke, a ticket agent for the KLM Royal Dutch Airlines office at 609 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. She told the subcommittee that in 
the last week of August a person representing himself as "Mr. 
Jacobs," accompanied by another man, came to the KLM ticket office 
to check on a refund request that had already been initiated. He 
presented a letter from the KLM refund department, she said, which 
had instructed him either to come to the office himself to collect the 
refund or to authorize someone else to do so. Miss Linke said this 
man also presented as identification a driver's license with his picture 
on it, made out to either "Jay" or "J." Jacobs. 

Miss Linke said no company official in a position to authorize the 
signing of a refund check was present on that occasion, so 
"Jacobs" was asked to return the following morning, which he did. 
She told the subcommittee that the refund check was then given to 
"Jacobs" 'by the KLM ticket office manager, Mr. van der Jagt. 

Miss Linke testified that the day's first witness, Arnold Inden- 
baum, was the person previously known to her as "Jay Jacobs," the 
man who had received the KLM refund check from Mr. van der Jagt. 

Edward R. O'Neill, ticket counter manager of the British Overseas 
Airways Corporation's office at 530 Fifth Avenue, New York City, 
was the next person heard by the subcommittee. From records in his 
possession subpenaed for the hearing, Mr. O'Neill testified that the 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 815 

Ottawa BOAC office had telephoned the New York office on June 10 
and 11, IDGS, advising tliat it had received deposits of $5,000 and 
$17,739.20, respectively, from a Mr. "J. Jacobs." The deposits, accord- 
ing; to BOAC records, were to hold 60 seats for travel from New York 
to London to Paris. Reservations for these seats, Mr. O'Neill told 
the subcommittee, had initially been requested by Mr. Levi Laub in 
May, and the deposit on them was supposed to have been made on 
June 6. On Saturday, June 8, however, according to the witness, a 
person identifying himself as Levi Laub had telephoned BOAC's 
New York office from Canada and explained that he was not able to 
make the deposit in Montreal on that date because the BOAC office 
there was closed. 

Mr. O'Neill also testified that on June 13, 1963, Mr. Laub came to 
the BOAC office in New York with a Miss V. Ortiz, who purchased 
a ticket for herself and another for "A. Indenbaum," for a BOAC 
New York-London-Paris flight departing June 16, with an open 
return date. The Indenbaum ticket had previously been reserved 
under a "no-name" booking, the witness explained. 

The subcommittee counsel recalled for the record that on Septem- 
ber 12, 1963, witness Barry Hoffman had testified that the students 
who departed from New York for Cuba on June 25 were joined in 
Prague, Czechoslovakia, by a girl named Victoria Ortiz. 

The counsel for the subcommittee presented to Mr. O'Neill, for 
identification, a copy of a document dated August 26, 1963, signed 
by "Jay Jacobs," acknowledging receipt of a BOAC check num- 
bered D000149, in the amount of $4,134.40. The witness said 
"Mr. Jacobs" had signed this receipt in his presence on the date indi- 
cated at the time he gave the alleged Mr. Jacobs a refund check for 
unused tickets. Mr. O'Neill told the subcommittee he had first estab- 
lished "Mr. Jacobs' " identity from North Carolina driver's license 
number 1230513, which he noted on the refund receipt "Jacobs" had 
signed. The witness also identified a cancelled check shown him by 
the subcommittee as the one he had signed and given "Mr. Jacobs" 
on August 26, 1963. 

Mr. O'Neill further testified that the person with whom he had 
dealt as "Jay Jacobs" was the same person who had testified before the 
subcommittee earlier in the day under the name of Indenbaum. 

David Perham, an employee of the First National City Bank of 
New York, testified that on August 27, 1963, a person identifying 
himself as "Jay Jacob" had appeared at the bank's branch office at 
640 Fifth Avenue to cash check No. 6001, made payable to him, in 
the amount of $2,067.20 by the KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. Mr. 
Perham, who was the branch officer in charge of approving checks 
up to $250 on that occasion, said he took both the check and "Mr. 
Jacobs' " driver's license to another bank official who was authorized 
to approve the cashing of checks m higher amounts. The check 
was approved by the other official and returned to "Mr. Jacob" 
by Mr. Perham, who noted on the back of the check that "Mr. 
Jacob's" identification had been established by a North Carolina 
driver's license. Mr. Perham said "Mr. Jacob" endorsed the check 
in his presence. 

Mr. Perham testified that the person who had negotiated the check 
at his bank, payable to "Jay Jacobs," was the same man who had 



816 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

been identified and had previously testified at the subcommittee hear- 
ing as Arnold Indenbaum, 

Harold J. E. Gesell, chief of the Veterans' Administration's Iden- 
tification and Detection Division and an expert examiner of question- 
able documents, was the next witness heard by the subcommittee. 
On October 8, 1963, the Committee on Un-American Activities had 
submitted to Mr. Gesell for examination four documents bearing 
the signature of "Jay Jacobs." They were: (1) a BOAC check, 
D000149, dated Au^st 26, 1963, endorsed by "Jay Jacobs ;" (2) a KLM 
Royal Dutch Airlmes check, dated August 27, 1963, endorsed by 
"Jay Jacobs;" (3) a receipt, dated August 26, 1963, on a BOAC letter- 
head, signed by "Jay Jacobs;" and (4) the application for a North 
Carolina driver's license signed by "Jay Jacobs." 

After testifying in detail as to the reasons for his findings and 
conclusion, Mr. Gesell said that, in his opinion, the "Jay Jacobs" sig- 
natures had been written by the same person in all four instances. 

Arnold Indenbaum was then recalled for further interrogation. 
He invoked the fifth amendment in response to all questions concern- 
ing the other witnesses' testimony about his activities under the name 
of "Jacob" or "Jacobs." 

In addition, he declined for the same reason to admit that it 
was not he who, identifying himself as "Jay Jacobs" and a friend 
of Levi Laub, had telephoned the New York KLM office from the 
KLM office in Ottawa, Canada, stating he had deposited money with 
KLM's Ottawa agent for the purchase of flight tickets to Paris. 

Mr. Indenbaum also invoked the fifth amendment when asked if 
he had gone to North Carolina and obtained a driver's license under 
the name of "Jay Jacobs" in order to establish identification with 
which he could collect refunds on unused airline tickets purchased 
under that fictitious name. 

At this point in the proceedings, the subcommittee counsel intro- 
duced an affidavit from H. J. van der Jagt, ticket manager of the 
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines office in New York City, who was out 
of the country and unable to appear at the hearings. In this 
statement, Mr. van der Jagt said he had given a KLM refund check, 
dated August 27, 1963, in the amount of $2,067.20 to a person who 
presented a North Carolina driver's license in identifying himself as 
"Jay Jacobs," the purchaser of unused fligl?t tickets. Mr. Inden- 
baum declined, for the same reason, an invitation to say if there 
was any inaccuracy in Mr. van der Jagt's affidavit. 

Repeatedly citing the fifth amendment, the witness refused to dis- 
cuss his acquaintanceship with Nicholas Bateson ; to confirm or deny 
tha,t, when he applied for a driver's license in North Carolina and 
claimed never to have been a licensed operator, he actually possessed 
a valid New York chauffeur's license; to say if he had been aware of 
arrangements made by Levi Laub for travel to Ottawa, Canada, via 
Trans Canadian Air Lines on June 8, 1963, two days prior to the 
date when deposits were made in that city for ticket purchases from 
KLM and BOAC; to testify whether he had flown via BOAC to 
Paris with Vickie Ortiz in mid- June 1963 to make arrangements 
for the reception of Cuba-bound U.S. student groups which arrived 
at the French capital later that month; to explain the source of the 
funds deposited at the KLM and BOAC offices in Ottawa; and to 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 817 

reveal what disposition had been made of the more than $6,000 in 
refunds he had obtained under the names of "Jabab" and "Jacobs" 
from the KLM and BOAC in New York City. 

Mr. Indenbaum continued to invoke the fifth amendment in declin- 
ing to answer questions pertaining to the following subcommittee in- 
formation concerning his background : 

In the New York City primary on August 22, 1950, Arnold Inden- 
baum was elected a delegate from the 21st Assembly District to the 
Second Judicial District Convention of the American Labor Party 
(ALP). . 

In the fall of 1951, Indenbaum's name appeared on an American 
Labor Party petition as a candidate for membership on the ALP's 
County Committee for Kings County, New York. Heading the 
ticket on which he ran was a well-known Conmiunist, Clifford T. 
McAvoy, who sought the presidency of the City Council of New 
•York. 

The witness again invoked the fifth amendment when asked if he 
had been advised to seek office in the American Labor Party by 
anyone known to him to be a member of the Communist Party. 

The subcommittee counsel pointed out for the record that the New 
York City section of the American Labor Party was cited as sub- 
versive by the Special Committee on Un-American Activities in 1944 
and the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee in 1956. 

Mr. Indenbaum, for the same reason, refused to acknowledge hav- 
ing filed with the State Department in 1959 a passport application on 
which he failed to answer questions pertaining to past and present 
membership in the Communist Party. He likewise declined to in- 
form the subcommittee whether he had been a Communist Party 
member at the time he filed the application for a passport in 1959, 
during the time he was a candidate for the ALP County Committee 
in 1951, or when he was a delegate to the ALP convention in 1950. 

The witness also refused, invoking the fifth amendment, to say 
whether at the time of liis testimony he was a member of the Progres- 
sive Labor Movement. 

NO\rEMBER 18, 1963, HEARINGS 

Public hearings on violations of State Department travel regula- 
tions and pro-Castro propaganda activities in the United States were 
continued in Washington, D.C., on November 18, 1963, by a subcom- 
mittee composed of Representatives Richard H. Ichord, of Missouri, 
chairman ; George F. Senner, Jr., of Arizona ; and August E. Johan- 
sen, of Michigan. Of primary interest to the subcommittee were 
the activities of Mr. and Mrs. John R, Glenn, a young couple who 
had traveled to Cuba with the group of 58 students in June 1963, 
but who did not return to the United States until about 6 weeks after 
most of the others had returned at the end of August. 

The first witness was Harold G. Wilkes, a warehouse supervisor 
for a manufacturing company in Bloomington, Ind. He said that 
for a 9-month period, beginning about the middle of August 1962, he 
had rented an apartment in his home to Mr. and Mrs. Glenn, who 
answered an advertisement he had placed in a local newspaper. 

Mr. Wilkes said the apartment occupied by the Glenns was located 
directly beneath his kitchen and dinmg room. He explained that 



818 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

the same heating ducts and a common forced-air register served both 
living areas, making it possible for him, while in his own quarters, to 
overhear conversations taking place in the apartment below. 

The witness testified that the Glenns had received numerous visitors 
and that by January 1963 regular meetings were held in their apart- 
ment. He said he hadn't become particularly concerned about the 
nature of the meetings prior to one which was held in mid-March 
1963. On that occasion, Mr. Wilkes told the subcommittee^ a group 
referred to as the "YSA" was addressed by an instructor identified 
only as "a comrade from New York." 

Mr. Wilkes recalled that the New Yorker addressed members of 
the group as "comrades" and urged them to remain faithful to the 
YSA, which the witness later learned was the Young Socialist Alliance. 
He testified that the speaker called our present form of government 
an "imperialistic, capitalistic system," and stated it was only a matter 
of time before the system would be replaced through the efforts of 
the YSA and other groups. 

The witness told the subcommittee that the meetings, held about 
once a month, continued until the latter part of May 1963. He 
said the gatherings in the Glenns' apartment had been attended 
by groups of from 7 to 15 persons. He recalled that, in addition to 
John and Marcia Glenn, some of the participants had been Ralph 
Levitt, Jim Bingham, Tom Morgan, Bill and Paulann Groninger, 
Jack and Betsy Barnes, and Don and Polly Smith. 

Information developed by committee investigation of the persons 
named by Mr. Wilkes was entered into the record of the hearings, as 
follows : 

Ralph Levitt was the president of the Young Socialist Alliance at 
the University of Indiana in Bloomington, Indiana, in 1962. During 
the period 1961-63 he was associated with the Fair Play for Cuba 
Student Council at the university and was the original lessee of the 
Bloomington post office box used by that organization. 

James Bingham was treasurer and later chairman of the Fair 
Play for Cuba Student Council at the University of Indiana in 1961 
and 1962. In 1962 and at least part of 1963 he was secretary of 
the Young Socialist Alliance at the university. 

Thomas G. Morgan has held offices in both the Young Socialist 
Alliance and the Fair Play for Cuba Student Council at the 
University of Indiana. 

Levitt, Bingham, and Morgan have been indicted for conspiring to 
overthrow the Government of the State of Indiana, in violation of 
an Indiana st-atute. 

Paulann and William Groninger, husband and wife, are members 
of the Young Socialist Alliance. Paulann Groninger is also secre- 
tary of the Committee to Aid the Bloomington Students (the in- 
dicted threesome) . 

Jack Barnes is or was a student at Northwestern University and 
is an organizer for the Young Socialist Alliance in the Midwest. 

According to the testimony of Mr. Wilkes, Marcia Glenn was the 
corresponding secretary for the Young Socialist Alliance. He said 
he became aware of this fact in May 1963, when he overheard Mrs. 
Glenn asking James Bingham whether she should resign as corre- 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 819 

spending secretary, because of adverse local publicity the YSA was 
receiving. 

At this point in the hearing, the subcommittee coimsel introduced 
13 publications which Mr. Wilkes had found in the Glenns' apart- 
ment and recently delivered to the Committee on Un-American Ac- 
tivities. The witness described them as samples of quantities of 
such material he had observed in the apartment on an occasion when 
he entered it to do some repair work. 

Nine of the samples were products of Pioneer Publishers, 116 Uni- 
versity Place, N.Y.C., the same address maintained by the Socialist 
Workers Party and the Young Socialist Alliance of New York City. 
(In 1948 the Socialist Workers Party was cited as subversive and 
(yommunist by the Attorney General of the United States and as a 
dissident Communist group by the Committee on Un-American 
Activities. ) 

The titles of some of the sample pamphlets were Trotskyism and, 
the Cuban Revolution — An Answer to Hoy, In Defense of the Cuban 
Revolution, • An Answer to the State Department and Theodore 
Draper, The Theory of the Cuban Revolution, and The Socialist 
Workers Party, all written by Joseph Hansen, secretary to Leon 
Trotsky until the latter was assassinated by Stalinist agents in 
Mexico in 1940. 

Another pamphlet was entitled IQIfS Manifesto of the Fourth 
International Against Wall Street and the Kremlin, published by 
the Workers Press for the Canadian Section of the Revolutionary 
Workers Party. 

Still another item Mr. Wilkes had obtained as a sample from the 
Glenns' apartment was a song sheet, entitled "Revolutionary and 
Workers' Songs," which contained verses of the "Internationale," 
"The Red Flag" and "Solidarity." 

Mr. Wilkes told the suboommitt«e he had seen four stacks, each 
8 or 4 feet high, of pamphlets in the Glenns' apartment. He said 
he had also seen copies of The Militant (official organ of the Socialist 
Workers Party), the Young Socialist Forum newspaper, and what 
appeared to be a YSA constitution or charter. 

The witness testified that in the Glenns' apartment he had observed 
a bulletin board which displayed a Cuban flag, a post office wanted 
poster of a person named "Williams," and newspaper clippings about 
Communist and socialist victories in the United States. He said 
there had been a mimeograph machine in the apartment from time 
to time. 

The next witness was John R. Glenn, 34, who maintained a post 
office box in Bloomington, Ind., where he formerly resided, but said 
he had been staying with his wife's parents "since we got back from 
Cuba." Mr. Glenn related the following information about his edu- 
cational and employment background. 

He was graduated from high school in Huntington, Ind., in 1947, 
and worked in various laboring and administrative capacities for 
the Erie Railroad until he entered the University of California at Los 
Angeles in January 1949. He transferred to the University of Indi- 
ana in September 1950, but went into the U.S. Air Force '^^fore 
completing a semester. 

While in the service, Glenn received training in the Russian lan- 
guage at Syracuse University and became a Russian linguist for Air 



820 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Force Intelligence, with security clearance for secret, top secret, and 
cryptographic information. Meanwhile, he continued his regular 
college studies through night school and correspondence courses. 
By June of 1953, he had completed all but 6 months of the academic 
work necessary for college graduation and became eligible to partici- 
pate in a unique Air Force program that would permit him to earn 
his degree. Under this program, members of the Air Force who re- 
quired only 6 months of studies in order to qualify for a college 
iegree could be assigned to temporary duty at appropriate schools to 
complete the necessary courses. Thus Glenn, while still receiving 
regular military service pay, including food and housing allowances, 
returned to full-time studies at the University of Indiana where he 
obtained a degree in business administration in January 1954. 

He then resumed active duty with Air Force Intelligence for 
2 more years, including 16 months overseas, before being discharged 
in January 1956, after reaching the rank of staff sergeant. 

Following his separation from the service, Glenn again enrolled 
at the University of Indiana to do graduate work in economics 
and completed all but two papers necessary for obtaining his master's 
degree in this field. 

In the fall of 1957, Glenn entered Indiana University Law School 
as a student. At the same time he taught introductory economics at 
the university. 

During the summer of 1958, he visited the Soviet Union, Czecho- 
slovakia, and Poland for about 40 days as a guide for the Tom Mau- 
pintour Associates, an American travel agency. The next summer 
he toured the same countries, plus Yugoslavia and Rumania, in a 
similar capacity for another travel organization. 

Early in 1961, Glenn received his degree from the Indiana Uni- 
versity Law School and subsequently was admitted to the Indiana 
Bar. 

The witness admitted that in April 1961 he had participated in 
a protest demonstration against the attempted invasion of Cuba.^ 

In response to interrogation by the subcommittee, Glenn freely 
acknowledged the following facts : 

On October 23, 1961, at Bloomington, Ind., he filed a passport 
application with the Department of State, listing Cuba as a country 
he intended to visit. In a letter from the State Department, dated 
November 7, 1961, he was notified that his request for a passport was 
refused. 

On November 14, 1961, Glenn sent a letter to the Cuban Embassy 
in Ottawa, Canada, in which he requested a visa for Cuba. In 
a reply, dated November 21, 1961, the Charge' d' Affaires of the em- 
bassy informed him that, as an American citizen, he would have to 
apply for a Cuban visa at the Czech Embassy in Wasliington, which 
was handling Cuba's business in the United States. He was also ad- 
vised in the same communication that it would be necessary for him 
to have passport validation by the U.S. State Department in order 
to travel to Cuba. 

Glenn told the subcommittee lie contacted the Czech Embassy 
in Washiugton, but was informed by an official there that his request 
for a Cuban visa would have to be forwarded to Cuba, inasmuch 
as the emba ssy was not empowered to grant it. The Czech diplomat 

^ Bay of Pigs invasion on April 17, 1961, by Cuban exiles. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 821 

told Glenn, however, that he had heard Americans could readily 
obtain Cuban visas from the Cuban Embassy in Mexico City. 

The witness confirmed information obtained through an investi- 
gation by the Committee on Un-American Activities that he had 
traveled to Mexico in the spring of 1962 in an unsuccessful attempt 
to get a Cuban visa. Glenn said he learned in Mexico that in 
order to get a visa, someone then in Cuba would have to recommend 
to the Cuban State Department that he be given one. Accordingly, 
Glenn told the subcommittee, he sent a telegram from Mexico to 
George Shriver, a friend and a leader of the Indiana University 
Fair Play for Cuba Student Council. He asked Shriver to write 
Robert Williams, who had fled to Cuba to avoid prosecution by 
U.S. authorities, to see if Williams could initiate action to obtain a 
visa for Glenn. Glenn testified that Shriver knew Williams, whom 
Glenn had met only once in Bloomington. 

The witness said he received a return wire addressed to "Jack 
Glenn, care of the Cuban Embassy to Mexico," which said: "Letter 
sent to Williams. Keep in touch. Venceremos" (a Cuban revolu- 
tionary slogan meaning "We shall conquer"). The message was 
signed "G. S.," making it appear to have been sent by George Shriver. 
Glenn said he later found out the telegram had, been sent by two 
other friends, James Bingham and Ralph Levitt, after Shriver pro- 
crastinated in contacting Williams. 

In any event, Glenn was not successful in getting to Cuba from 
Mexico in the spring of 1962, according to his testimony. He claimed 
to have paid his own expenses for the trip to Mexico. 

Glenn testified that during the Cuban crisis, an Ad Hoc Committee 
to Oppose U.S. Aggression was created by the Fair Play for Cuba 
Student Council and the Young Socialist Alliance at the University 
of Indiana, even though the YSA had not yet been recognized by 
the university at that time. He said that on October 24, 1962, the 
ad hoc committee held a protest march against the United States- 
imposed blockade of Cuba. The witness said that, although he sup- 
ported the march, he did not participate because he had just opened 
his law office in Bloomington and "that would not have been too smart 
a thing to do, of course." 

It was at about this time, the fall of 1962, Glenn told the subcom- 
mittee, that he joined the Fair Play for Cuba Committee. He had 
been a sympathizer of the group much earlier, he said. He admitted 
having written a letter printed in an Indiana University publication, 
dated February 10, 1962, in which he said that "the people in Fair 
Play are willing to argue to anyone who will listen that our govern- 
ment and our press are lying through their teeth [about Cuba]." 

Glenn said that he and liis wife were frequent listeners to Radio 
Havana, and from this source, in December 1962, first heard about a 
trip to Cuba being planned by a group of U.S. students. The 
Glenns were interested in the trip but the Cuban radio had failed 
to say by whom it was being organized in the United States. Ac- 
cordingly, the Glenns wrote inquiries about it to both the Cuban 
Mission to the United Nations and the Fair Play for Cuba Commit- 
tee. He told the subcommittee they did not receive a reply directly 
from either of these groups, but one or both of them had apparently 
forwarded the inquiry to the Ad Hoc Student Committee for Travel 

98-765 O — 63^— pt. 4 2 



822 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

to Cuba, from which the Glenns did receive correspondence contain- 
ing the desired information. - 

The witness admitted that, without having applied for U.S. valida- 
tion, he traveled to Cuba with the group of alleged students who 
departed from New York on a BOAC plane on June 25, 1963. 

Glenn acknowledged the accuracy of the subcommittee's informa- 
tion that on the return trip, after arriving in Spain with the main 
body of U.S. "students" on August 26, 1963, he left the group and 
traveled to Morocco. He said that after he and his wife had learned 
they could stay abroad for a while, they had decided to travel to 
Algeria to observe the political developments there, which were sup- 
posed to be similar to what they had witnessed in Cuba. 

Glenn told the subcommittee that he and his wife requested their 
parents to send money for them to Algiers and that they planned to 
travel in Western Europe as long as the money held out. 

When the Glenns arrived in Morocco from Spain, the witness testi- 
fied, they received an entry permit to Algeria from the Algerian Gov- 
ernment. While hitchhiking their way to Algeria, however, they 
were arrested by the Moroccan police and ordered deported to Spain 
as undersirables. He said he learned from both the American consul 
in Rabat, Morocco, and the Moroccan police that the deportation was 
ordered by the United States Government. 

On the voyage back to Spain, according to Glenn, he and his wife 
threw their Spain-to-U.S. flight tickets, which had been purchased 
by the Cuban Government, into the Mediterranean Sea. They de- 
cided to do this, he said, because they were being returned to the 
United States unwillingly and wanted the U.S., not Cuba, to bear 
the cost of the transportation under those circumstances. 

On October 15, 1963, according to investigation by the Committee 
on Un-American Activities, Glenn reported to the American Embassy 
in Madrid, Spain, that he and his wife did not have a ticket for 
return transportation to the United States. The embassy purchased 
a ticket for them, and they were flown to the United States on an 
Iberian Air Lines plane. 

Mr. Glenn told the subcommittee he did not know who purchased 
the ticket on wliich they were actually transported home. He said 
he had told Iberian Air Lines, however, not to use "our right" to the 
transporta.tion which had been purchased as a gift by the Cuban 
(xovernment. He said he informed Iberian representatives that the 
transportation gift from Cuba was "our property" and was not to be 
used to transport the Glenns "against our express will." 

During the course of his appearance before the subconmiittee, Mr. 
Glenn was quizzed on a variety of additional matters. A summary 
of certain of his responses follow^ : 

John Glenn and a student named Jack Marsh were living at the 
same apartment address in Bloomington at the time Glemi applied 
for a U.S. passport for travel to Cuba in October 1961. Glenn was 
responsible for Marsh's'initial interest in Cuba, which led to the lat- 
t«r's joining both the Youn^ Socialist Alliance and the Fair Play for 
Cuba Committee. (Accordmg to investigation by the Committee on 
Un-American Activities, Marsh rented a post office box for the Y.S.A. 
in Bloomingtoji, Ind., on September 20, 1962.) 

Ralph Levitt attended meetings of the Young Socialist Alliance 
held m the apartment of John and Marcia Glenn, rented from 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 823 

Harold Wilkes in Bloomington. James Bingham and William and 
Paulann Groninger were others who had visited the Glenns' apart- 
ment on different occasions, probably including meetings of the 
Young Socialist Alliance and the Committee to Aid the Blooming- 
ton Students. Mrs. Glenn was a member of the latter group. Mr. 
Glenn believed Mrs. Groninger was the secretary of the Committee 
To Aid the Bloomington Students as well as a member of the Young 
Socialist Alliance. 

Continuing with a summary of Mr. Glenn's testimony: 
He never was a member of the Young Socialist Alliance or the 
Socialist Workers Party. Nevertheless, he accepted the Trotskyist 
viewpoint and cooperated with and worked for the benefit of the 
YSA and the Fair Play for Cuba Student Council. Glenn was not 
always in agreement with the Young Socialist Alliance and the 
Socialist Workers Party. He said he had disagreed with their 
opposition to the student trip to Cuba and their thinking that it was 
unnecessary for persons to have to visit Cuba in order to under- 
stand the revolution transpiring there. 

Wlien Glenn was asked if he had made his apartment in Blooming- 
ton available for YSA meetings and traveled to Cuba for the purposes 
of supporting the Cuban revolution, he replied : 

Yes, I do support the Cuban revolution. * * * I support 
the Cuban revolution and I will defend it. 

Glenn related incidents of the frequent jailing of Trotskyists in 
Cuba. He said the Soviet Union had tried to force Castro to smash 
the Cuban Trotskyists in order to receive aid from the U.S.S.R. The 
witness stated that although Castro had refused to smash the Trot- 
skyists, Cuban authorities did pick them up for a few hours at a time, 
or overnight, without ever filing charges against them. Glenn said 
this did not stop the Trotskyists from supporting the Cuban revolu- 
tion. He said: 

They realize Cuba has to have Russian aid. If little 
things like this have to happen they feel it is no reason to 
stio^ the revolution. 

Glenn attempted to justify mass executions in Cuba by saying all 
of the victims "were murderers under the Batista regime," and they 
"had the blood of Cuban people on their hands — ^,000 of them." 
He acknowledged, however, the same type of charge was made by 
the Communist regime in the Soviet Union to justify mass liquida- 
tions in the 1930's. 

The final witness was Marcia Haag Glenn, wife of Jojin R. Glenn. 
A native of New York City, she was graduated from Cranford High 
School in Cranford, N.J., in the spring of 1957 and entered the 
University of Indiana the following fall. She remained at the uni- 
versity as a student or employee, and sometimes in both capacities 
simultaneously, until 1962. Her employment included positions in 
the Chemistry and History Departments of the university. She also 
was engaged in a Latin American studies program at the University 
of Indiana as she worked toward her master's degree. 

Mrs. Glenn confirmed the subcommittee's information that, under 
the name of Marcia Haag, on December 18, 1962, while in Blooming- 
ton, Ind., she had filed for a U.S. passport, which she received on 



824 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

December 21, 1962. She acknowledged that on the passport applica- 
tion she had listed Venezuela, Colombia, and Peru as countries to be 
visited and indicated December 24 or 25, 1962, as the probable date 
of departure. She told the subcommittee she had been aware of 
the possibility that she might take part in a "student" trip to Cuba 
tentatively scheduled to depart in December 1962, but did not list 
Cuba on her passport application because she was dubious that the 
trip would take place. 

She admitted, nevertheless, that she had not subsequently traveled 
to Venezuela, Colombia, or Peru and that she had traveled to Cuba 
at a later date. 

Mrs. Glenn was queried about a news story which appeared in the 
July 6, 1963, issue of Sierra Maestra^ a Cuban newspaper, and which 
identified her as an American student who had visited Cuba's "Hall 
of Martyrs." She said she had been improperly quoted in the story 
and proceeded to tell the subcommittee what had occurred at that 
time. 

She said she had visited the Hall of Martyrs in Santiago and that 
during the visit, she and her husband were sitting right behind a 
group of Cuban women whose sons had lost their lives in the revolu- 
tion. Mrs. Glenn told the subcommittee that this was a very emo- 
tional experience which made her cry. She stated that at this point 
an American student stood up and said the Americans were to blame 
for the loss of a lot of Cuban lives, because the Americans had initi- 
ated the fighting against the Cuban people. Mrs. Glenn told the 
subcommittee she agreed with the statement. 

When the Sierra Maestra story of the incident appeared, it at- 
tributed to Mrs. Glenn these words: "We shall do what is possible 
when we return to our country to initiate a socialist revolution." 
Mrs. Glenn testified that she had not made that statement at that time. 
However, she informed the subcommittee, she subscribed to the goal 
and objective of seeing a socialist revolution in America. 

In response to questions concerning meetings which had taken 
place in the apartment the Glenns rented from Harold Wilkes in 
Bloomington, Mrs. Glenn testified that the Young Socialist Alliance 
had met there only once, and that had been in January. Other meet- 
ings, she said, were held by the defense committee for the three stu- 
dents who had been indicted at Bloomington. Meetings of the de- 
fense committee, she stated, were attended both by persons who were 
and were not members of the YSA. 

She said Ealph Levitt and James E. Bingham, two of the three 
indicted YSA leaders, were usually in attendance at meetings held in 
the Glenns' apartment. She said further that Levitt, Bingham, and 
Thomas G. Morgan, the third YSA leader under indictment, were all 
personal friends and had been in the apartment on many occasions. 

The witness was questioned about a meeting which Mr. Wilkes 
testified had been held in the Glenns' apartment in mid-March 1963 
by the YSA, at which time the group was addressed by a "comrade" 
from New York. Mrs. Glenn said "this gentleman" had stayed in the 
apartment and was present for several social gatherings, "but these 
were not meetings." She said the New Yorker was a YSA member 
and she thought ne was the secretary of the organization. 

Mrs. Glenn admitted that Jack Barnes, Midwest organizer for 
the Young Socialist Alliance, had attended meetings held in her 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 825 

apartment by the defense committee for the three indicted students. 

Mrs. Glenn denied she had been the recording secretary of the 
Young Socialist Alliance in Bloomington or that she was presently 
a member of the group. She admitted having been a YSA member 
from January until June, in 1963, but said she had resigned because 
the YSA had a policy of "not permitting" its members to ^o on the 
student trip to Cuba. She said she had learned of this policy 
from the national secretary of the YSA. 

She said she had talked to no one from the Socialist Workers 
Party concerning her participation in the trip to Cuba. 

Mrs. Glenn said the YSA's attitude on the student trip notwith- 
standing, there was no doubt the YSA supports the Cuban revolution. 

She admitted having belonged to, and performed services for, the 
Fair Play for Cuba Committee and the Ad Hoc Committee to Oppose 
U.S. Agression, the latter being organized for a one-time demonstra- 
tion agamst the U.S. blockade of Cuba in October 1962. She said the 
latter group had met once in her apartment prior to its protest demon- 
stration, after which it went out of existence. The ad hoc group, 
Mrs. Glenn testified, included students from the Fair Play for 
Cuba Committee, the Young Socialist Alliance, the National Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Colored People, and the Young People's 
Socialist League. 

Mrs. Glenn denied that an undated statement by the Ad Hoc Com- 
mittee to Oppose U.S. Aggression had been reproduced on a mimeo- 
graph in her apartment. She admitted she had participated in the 
demonstration on October 24, 1962, during which time the state- 
ment was distributed, "we oppose united states threat to world 
peace" was the heading of the ad hoc group's statement, which 
accepted the words of Fidel Castro against those of the President 
of the United States, when it said : 

Premier Castro has stated that there are no "offensive" 
weapons in Cuba. This indicates there is no immediate 
threat to the United States. 

Mrs. Glenn admitted she had made no request for State Depart- 
ment validation of her passport for travel to Cuba before going 
to Cuba with the alleged student group in the summer of 1963. 

She testified that her supj)ort- of a socialist revolution in the 
United States would not include forceful overthrow of the 
Government. 



VIOLATIONS OF STATE DEPARTMENT TRAVEL REGU 
LATIONS AND PRO CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIV 
ITIES IN THE UNITED STATES 

Part 4 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1963 

House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington^ D,C.. 
public hearings 

A subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities met, 
pursuant to call, at 10 a.m., in the Caucus Room, Cannon House Office 
Building, Washington, D.C., Hon. Joe R. Pool, chairman of the sub- 
committ^B, presiding. 

Subcommittee members: Representatives Joe R. Pool, of Texas; 
Richard H. Ichord, of Missouri; and August E. Johansen, of 
Michigan. 

Subcommittee members present: Representatives Pool, Ichord, and 
Johansen. 

Committee members also present : Representatives Donald C. Bruce, 
of Indiana ; Henry C. Schadeberg, of Wisconsin ; and Jolin M. Ash- 
brook, of Ohio. ( Appearances as noted. ) 

Staff members present: Francis J. McNamara, director; Frank S. 
Tavenner, Jr., general counsel ; Alfred M. Nittle, counsel ; and Louis 
J. Russell, investigator. 

Mr. Pool. The committee will come to order. 

The subcommittee is convened to continue hearings, begun here in 
Washington on May 6 of this year, on certain matters and for the 
legislative purposes set forth in a committee, resolution adopted April 
24, 1963. I will read the text of that resolution for the record. 

BE IT RESOLVED, that hearings by the Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties or a subcommittee thereof, be held in Washington, D.C., or at such other 
place or places as the Chairmafi may determine, on such date or dates as the 
Chairman may designate, relating to (a) Communist propaganda activities in 
the United States conducted in support of the Communist regime in Cuba, or for 
the purpose of advancing the policies and objectives of the world Communist 
movement in Latin America generally, (b) the activities of United States citi- 
zens acting on behalf ef, or in the interest of, foreign Communist principals, and 
(c) foreign travel uadertaken by United States citizens in connection with such 
activities and in violation of State Department travel regulations for the fol- 
lowing legislative purposes : 

1. To provide factual information to aid Congress in the disposition of pres- 
ently pending legislation (including, but not limited to Sections 709 and 712 of 
H.R. 9o8), or in the proposal of remedial legislation, in fulfillment of the direc- 

827 



828 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

tions contained in the mandate to the Committee by House Resolution 5 of Jan- 
uary 9, 1963, and Public Law 601 of the 79th Congress. 

2. The execution, bj4 the administrative agencies concerned, of the Foreign 
Agents Registration Act of 1938, travel control laws (particularly Title 8 U.S.C. 
1185), and regulations issued pursuant thereto, to a^ist the House in appraising 
the administration of such laws and regulations. 

3. Consideration of the advisability of amending Title 22 U.S.C. 611, by ex- 
tending the definition of the terms "foreign principal" and "agent of a foreign 
principal" so as to remove any doubt as to the true test of the agency relation- 
ship or its application to activities within the intent of Congress as expressed in 
thp Act 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the hearings may include any other mat- 
ter within the jurisdiction of the Committee which it, or any subcommittee 
thereof, appointed to conduct these hearings, may designate. 

At the opening of the hearings in Washington, D.C., the chairman 
read a very complete statement concerning the purposes and subject 
matter of these hearings. I will now summarize that statement : 

Over 12 years ago, on December 16, 1950, the President of the United 
States proclaimed the existence of a national emergency. That proc- 
lamation has not been altered or repealed by succeeding Presidents. 
The emergency continues. Today we must be concerned not only about 
communism in Korea and other distant countries, but in Cuba — just 
90 miles from our shores. 

Fidel Castro has converted Cuba into an advance Communist base 
in this hemisphere. It is supplying inspiration, propaganda, train- 
ing, communications, and technical assistance to Communist and revo- 
lutionary groups in the whole of Latin America. It is also serving 
as an outpost of the Soviet Union from which that country is directing 
certain activities against the United States. 

Central Intelligence Agency Director John McCone, in an appear- 
ance before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs on February 19, 
stated : 

The Cuban effort at present is far more serious than the hastily organized 
and ill-conceived raids that the bearded veterans of the Sierra Maestra led into 
such Central American countries as Panama, Haiti, Nicaragua, and the Domini- 
can Republic during the first 8 or 9 months Castro was in power. 

Today, the Cuban effort is far more sophisticated, more covert, and more 
deadly. In its professional trade craft, it shows guidance and training by 
experienced Communist advisers from the Soviet bloc, including veteran Spanish 
Communists. 

Mr. McCone also pointed out that approximately 1,500 persons went 
to Cuba during the year 1962 from other Latin Ainerican countries to 
receive ideological indoctrination and guerrilla warfare training. He 
said that some of the courses given in Cuba last as long as a year and 
include intensive training in sabotage, espionage, and psychological 
warfare and that the so-called visitors to Cuba also serve as couriers 
for Soviet communications and the financing of Communist subversion 
in various countries. 

United States citizens, too, have been involved in these activities. 
In an effort to prevent such activity by citizens of this country — and 
because, following the severance of diplomatic relations, it could not 
protect U.S. nationals in Cuba — the Department of State issued regu- 
lations, effective January 16, 1961, prohibiting travel to Cuba by 
citizens of the United States unless they possess specially validated 
passports (22 CFR Pt. 53.3, as amended). These regulations are 
based on the security provisions of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act of 1952, regulating travel of citizens and aliens during war or 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 829 

national emergencj', and empowering the President to impose re- 
strictions and prohibitions, in addition to those provided by the 
applicable section of the Act (8 U.S.C. 1185) . 

Present regulations generally require no passport for travel in 
North, Central, or South America. However, when a U.S. citizen 
travels to Cuba, he is then required to have a passport for travel in 
other nations of North, Central, or South America through which 
he may pass in traveling to or from Cuba. 

Despite the ban on travel to Cuba unless a specially validated pass- 
port is obtained, committee investigation has determined that over 
100 American citizens have traveled to Cuba without validation. Com- 
mittee investigation has also revealed that U.S. citizens who had 
traveled to Cuba, some with and some without validation, have been 
rendering propaganda assistance to the Communist Cuban regime 
after their return to this country. 

On January 9, 1963, the late chairman of this committee intro- 
duced H.E. 958, which was referred to the Committee on Un-American 
Activities. Sections 709 and 712 of H.R. 958, dealing with passport 
security and travel control and restrictions on the issuance and use 
of passports, are directed particularly toward the travel of persons 
associated with subversive organizations and with subversive objec- 
tives or aims. 

Other bills have been introduced in the House in an effort to resolve 
these difficulties and have been referred to the Committee on the 
Judiciarj^. The Committee on Un-American Activities has under- 
taken this investigation and hearings pursuant to its mandate to con- 
duct investigations that will aid the Congress in disposition of pending 
legislation. 

Today the committee will inquire particularly into the identity of 
a person or persons who, in financial transactions relating to the visit 
to Cuba last summer by 59 so-called students, used the name, "Jay 
Jacobs" and/or "J," the initial, "Jacob" or "Jacobs." 

The committee's September 12 hearings on this subject revealed that 
the receipt given KLM Royal Dutch Airlines by Levi Laub for the 
student groups' airline tickets bore the notation that they had been 
paid for in Ottawa, Canada, by a "Mr. Jacob." The BOAC, British 
Overseas Airways Corporation, airline receipt signed by Mr. Laub 
identified the person who paid for them in Ottawa as Mr. "J." — that is, 
the initial "J"— "Jacobs." 

Further investigation by the committee indicates that a person us- 
ing the name "Jay Jacobs" has since collected refunds from BOAC 
and KLM Airlines for unused tickets. 

I will now read for the record an excerpt from the minutes of an 
executive session of the Committee on Un-American Activities desig- 
nating the subcommittee to conduct these hearings : 

The Committee on Un-Ameriean Activities met in executive session on Tues- 
day, October 15, 196.3, in Room 225, Old House Office Building, at 3 p.m. The 
following members were present : Edwin E. Willis, chairman ; William M. Tuck ; 
Joe R. Pool ; Richard H. Ichord ; George F. Senner, Jr. ; Augxist E. Johansen ; 
and Henry C. Schadeberg. The staff members present were: Francis J. Mc- 
Namara, director ; Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., general counsel ; Alfred M. Nittle, 
counsel ; and Donald T. Api)ell, chief investigator. 

A motion was made by Mr. Senner, seconded by Mr. Tuck, and unanimously 
carried that Mr. Joe R. Pool be designated as chairman and Mr. Richard H. 
Ichord and Mr. August E. Johan.sen, asso<'iate members, be designated as a sub- 



830 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

committee of the Committee on Un-American Activities to conduct the hearings 
in Washington, D.C., October 16, 1963, at 10 a.m. on certein matters and for the 
legislative purposes set forth in a committee resolution adopted April 24, 
1963. 

Mr. Nittle, will you call your first witness? 

Mr, Nittle. Will Mr. Arnold Indenbaum, please come forward? 

Mr. Pool. Will the witness stand and be sworn ? Do you solemnly 
swear that the testimony you are about to give is the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the t>uth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I do. 

Mr. Pool. Do you aiRrm or swear ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I affirm. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed Mr. Nittle. 

Mr. Faulkner. Mr. Chairman, this morning, I made a request 
through Mr. Nittle that there be an executive session with respect to 
my client. 

Mr. Pool. Let us identify the witness and you as counsel. 

TESTIMONY OF ARNOLD INDENBAUM, ACCOMPANIEDi BY COUNSEL, 

STANLEY FAULKNER 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Indenbaum, would you state your full name and 
residence for the record, please ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. Arnold Indenbaum, 224 Riverside Drive, New 
York. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you spell your name in full for the benefit of the 
reporter, please ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I-n-d-e-n-b-a-u-m. 

Mr. Nittle. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I am. 

Mr. NrrrLE. Would counsel kindly identify himself for the record, 
stating his name and office address ? 

Mr. Faulkner. Stanley F-a-u-1-k-n-e-r, 9 East 40th Street, New 
York 14, New York. 

Mr. Pool. IVff. Nittle, I think counsel wouM like to address the 
Chair now. 

Mr. Faulkner. Mr. Chairman, this morning I requested through 
Mr. Nittle that my client be provided, first, with an executive session 
before appearing before this committee sitting here this morning. 

Frankly, I feel that the same legislative purpose can be served by 
whatever testimony he may give at such executive session. That is my 
first request, and I have a second to make after ypu have ruled on 
that one. 

Mr. Pool. The Chair would like to state that the committee has re- 
ceived a letter asking for a continuance of this hearing and the com- 
mittee, with all members of this subcommittee present, met yesterday 
and considered your request that this hearing be postponed because 
your client, Mr. Indenbaum, was still under subpena by a Federal 
grand jury in the Eastern District of New York. 

I wish to inform you that aft«r full consideration of your request, 
the committee voted, with all members of this subcommittee concur- 
ring, that the hearing should not be postponed. 

Let that show in the record. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 831 

At this time, I "will order about a 5-minute recess to consider your 
request, for an executive session. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Chairman, I would first like to inquire of counsel 
as to the reason for the request for an executive session. 

Mr. Pool. I will withdraw the statement about the recess. We are 
still in session. 

Mr. Faulkner. Mr. Congressman, I think I indicated that any 
testimony that my client may give in executive session or in public 
session will serve the same legislative purpose that this committee 
seeks to achieve and I cannot conceive of any reason to have him 
publicly testify when he can give the same information, if he gives 
any, in executive session. 

Mr. Pool. The committee will now go into a short recesss. 

^ A brief recess was taken at 10 :46 a.m.) 

(The subcommittee reconvened at 10:51 a.m. The same members 
were present as at convening of hearings.) 

Mr. Pool. For the record, I would like to read from the rules of 
the House, section 26 (g) of Rul6 XI : 

All hearings conducted by standing committees or their subcommittees shall 
be open to the public, except executive sessions for marking up bills or for voting 
or where the committee by a majority vote orders an executive session. 

"Wlien the committee met yesterday it also took under consideration 
that, when you were informed that a postponement had been denied, 
you might request that your client be heard in executive session. 

The committee weighed the pros and cons of that matter carefully. 
Because a request for an executive session had not yet been made — and 
because it would be up to this subcommittee to decide the question 
should it be made — the committee merely expressed its recommenda- 
tion that, if a request for an executive session were made, it should be 
denied. 

Since you made your request for an executive session, the subcom- 
mittee has considered it, and reconsidered the issues involved, and it is 
our decision that this hearing should be held in public, rather than in 
executive, session. 

Mr. Faui^kner. Mr. Chairman, may I put in my second request and 
then I will try to keep quiet for the rest of the hearing as much as I 
possibly can. 

I respectfully ask that my letters, dated October 4 and October 11, 
1963, regarding this witness be made a part of the record. Those are 
the letters which you just referred to, Mr. Chairman. This witness 
has testified before a Federal grand jury sitting in the Eastern Dis- 
trict of New York regarding the recent trip to Cuba by certain 
individuals. 

He has convinced me that he is still under subpena, subject to recall 
at any time that this jury directs his appearance. In my opinion, I 
believe it is wholly improper to question this witness under these 
circumstances. It is a direct interference with the judicial processes 
which, in this instance, have preference. 

This witness cannot be ordered and directed by this committee to 
testify to anything he has already testified to before the grand jury. 
To order and direct this witness to testify to what he said before a 



832 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

grand jury would be taken the same as destroying the secrecy of the 
grand jury.^ 

Mr. Pool. We will decide the question of the admissibility of the 
letters at a later date in the session. 

Go ahead and proceed, Mr. Nittle. 

(The subcommittee subsequently decided that, although the general 
content of the letters had been revealed in the record, it would comply 
with Mr. Faulkner's request and include the text of the letters in the 
record. They are as follows:) 

STAIiTLEY FATJLKNEB, 

COUNSELOE AT LiAW 

9 East 40th street, New York 16, N.Y., 

October 4, 1963. 
Hon. Edwin E. Wilxis, 

Chwirman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
Eouse Office Building, 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Congeessman Willis : 

I have been retained by Mr. Arnold Indenbaum who was served with a subpoena 
to appear before your Committee on October 16, 1963. 

I would like to advise you that Mr. Indenbaum is still under subpoena before 
a federal grand jury in the Eastern District of New York. It would seem to 
the writer that in the circumstances it would not be appropriate for Mr. In- 
denbaum to testify before your Ck)mmittee and you might consider whether you 
might not wish to postpone his appearance until he is discharged from his sub- 
poena before the said grand jury. 

May I hear from you at the earliest possible date regarding the subpoena of 
your Committee. 

Sincerely yours, 

/s/ Stanley Faulkneb. 



Stanley Fattlknee, 

COUNSELOE AT LaW 

9 East 40th Street, New York 16, N.Y., 

October 11, 1963. 
Hon. Edwin E. Wilms, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
House Office Building, 
Washington, D.C, Re : Arnold Indenbaum. 

Deae Congeessman Willis : 

On October 4th I wrote you regarding the subpoena that was served upon my 
client, Mr. Arnold Indenbaum which is returnable on October 16, 1963. In that 
letter I advised you that Mr. Indenbaum is still under subpoena before a Federal 
Grand Jury. 

I have not heard from you regarding my request for an adjournment. Would 
you please be kind enough to have your oflSce telephone me on Monday, October 
14th so that I may know whether there will be an adjournment. 

Sincerely yours. 

/s/ Stanley Faulkneb. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Indenbaum, would you please state the date of 
your birth ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. October 15, 1927, in the United States. 

Mr. Nittle. Were you born in Brooklyn, New York ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. That is right. 

Mr. Nittle. Have you in 1950 and 1951 resided at 763 Ocean Park- 
way, Brooklyn, New York ? 



^ Relative to this clalmv see statement of chairman, part 3, pp. 702, 703. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 833 

Mr. Indenbaum. I believe I might have. I don't recall the exact 
dates, but I lived there for a number of years. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you relate the extent of your formal education, 
giving the dates and places of attendance at educational institutions 
and any degrees you may have received ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I received a high school degree from Midwood 
High School. I went to Brooklyn College for approximately 4 years 
from 1947 to 1951. 

I believe my term in high school was from — ended in 1945 — 1941 
to 1945. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That was the Midwood High School in Brooklyn ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. That is right, and Brooklyn College. 

Mr, NiTTLE. What is your present occupation ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I am an unemployed railroad worker. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you been employed since 1953 as a brakeman on 
the New York Central Railroad ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I believe you were furloughed on September 2, 1963. 
Is that correct ? 

Mr, Indenbaum. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, I assume that you are aware that the 
committee is presently investigating Communist propaganda activities 
in the United States conducted in support of the Communist regime 
in Cuba, and foreign travel undertaken by United States citizens in 
connection with such activities. 

The committee has specifically inquired, in the course of these hear- 
ings, into the travel to Cuba of 50-odd alleged students, commencing 
this June, undertaken under the sponsorship of a group called the 
Permanent Student Committee for Travel to Cuba. 

In the course of the investigation, testimony was heard that the 
expenses for this travel to Cuba were allegedly advanced by the Cuban 
Federation of University Students. The committee deems it of im- 
portance to determine the circumstances under which the expenses 
for this trip were assumed and paid. 

We believe that you can assist us in this investigation. 

Now, Mr. Indenbaum, are you aware of the fact that a person 
using the name of "Jay Jacob" or "Jay Jacobs" on June 10, and 11, 
1963, deposited the sum of $22,739.20 in American currency with the 
BOAC office in Ottawa, Canada, for 40-odd reservations for trans- 
po ation to London and Paris ? 

IVa . Indenbaum. I would like to first state, since my lawyer has 
already indicated that I am under subpena by the grand jury and 
they are investigating some violation of some law and since I am 
involved, it is quite obvious to me and apparent that any answers I 
givej since I haven't the slightest idea what this committee is in- 
vestigating, what law is being proposed to investigate, or what law 
is being violated, it is quite obvious that any answer I may give may 
be incriminating. 

It may not be. That is one part of my answer. 

The other part of my answer is, since this committee does not divulge 
its specific purpose in calling me to trial and asking me specific ques- 
tions, that I can only deduce from what has been said by the com- 
mittee and from what has been going on here that the nature and 



834 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

the conduct is entirely political and has very little to do with legisla- 
tive processes. 

Therefore, I wish to state that it is this committee that is in viola- 
tion of the laws of this country and, specifically, the Constitution of 
this country by attempting to prevent American students, Americans 
and citizens, from exercising their right to travel, and the purpose 
that they are trying to do, that is, to prevent Americans from finding 
out the specific nature of the Cuban regime and thereby informing 
the American people that what this Government and this committee 
says about Cuba is an outrageous distortion and lie. 

Mr. Pool. Mr. Indenbaum, counsel sisked you a question, and it is 
all right for you to give your reasons for your answer, but you are 
getting into a long-winded discourse here that is not responsive to 
his question. 

Will you answer his question ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. More specifically I must say that I refuse to an- 
swer that question unless it can be shown that it serves a legislative 
purpose. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, you have heard the opening statement 
of the chairman ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I have. 

Mr. Pool. For the record, I believe the witness was late in arriving 
at the hearing and I do not believe he heard all of the opening state- 
ment. Were you here when the opening statement was read ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I did come late, but I think I heard a good por- 
tion of it. 

Mr. Pool. Then, I think I had better read it to you again. 

(The opening statement was reread by Mr. Pool. See pp. 827-829.) 

Mr. Pool. "Today the committee" — I believe that you were here as 
I read the constituting resolution setting up the subcommittee? 

Mr. Indenbaum. Yes. 

Mr. Pool. I will not read that further. That serves the purpose 
for the hearing. 

The committee has considered the Delaney and Hutcheson cases 
and feels that the Congress has the power to interrogate you. 

Mr. Indenbaum. Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask you a question 
with respect to what you just read. 

Mr. Pool. We have asked you a question and we want an answer 
to it. 

Mr. NrTTLE. Mr. Chairman, I request that the witness be directed to 
answer the outstanding question. 

Mr. Pool. You will answer the question. 

Mr., Indenbaum. Since you read this statement to my previous 
answer I would like some clarification under point one. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Chairman, I suggest that the witness is attempt- 
ing to be argumentative and I suggest the Chair again remind him 
that he is directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Pool. You are directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Indenbaum. I have every intention of answering the question. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. Do you plead the fifth amend- 
ment on this question we just asked you ? 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 835 

Mr, Indenbaum. I will answer the question in a way that I will 
answer it, but you read a statement to me to explain the nature of this 
hearing and you read that one of the reasons was disposition of section 
709 and 712 of H.R. 958. I haven't the slightest knowledge of what 
those laws are. 

Mr. Pool. You have a lawyer there who can advise you. I direct 
you to answer the question for the last time. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I think also, Mr. Chairman, the witness should be 
advised that in the event he fails to answer, or refuses to do so, with- 
out giving legal justification, he will place himself in the position 
of possible contempt prosecution. 

Mr. Pool. You are so advised and you are directed to answer the 
question for the last time. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. Since this committee refuses to clarify to me what 
its position is and what particular laws it is investigating and as they 
pertain to me, if they do, and for the reasons previously stated by my 
lawyer and myself, I now exercise my rights under the fifth amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed, Mr. Counsel, to the next question. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbamn, are you aware of the fact that on 
June 11, 1963, under the name of "Jay Jacobs" an individual 
deposited the sum of $13,436.80 in American currency with the KLM 
offices in Ottawa for 26 reservations for transportation to Paris via 
Amsterdam ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. I believe that question is a reiteration of the first 
one and I merely repeat the same thing I said before. 

Mr. Pool. You are relying on the fifth amendment ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. For my reasons previously stated. 

Mr. Pool. And you are pleading the fifth amendment now ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I am. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed to the next question, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you aware, Mr. Indenbaum, that on or about 
August 26 and 27, 1963, a person identifying himself as Jay Jacobs 
and with a North Carolina driver's license titled to that name ap- 
peared at the New York offices of BOAC for a refund due for eight 
unused reservations and at the KLM offices for a refund due on five 
unused reservations ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, have you ever used or been known by 
the name of "Jay Jacob" or "Jay Jacobs ?" 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that under the grounds previ- 
ously stated. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, I am now going to request of the 
chairman that you be permitted to stand aside while the committee 
interrogates other witnesses whose testimony, in part at least, will 
relate to your activities, after which you will be recalled for further 
testimony. 



836 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. Pool. With those instructions in mind, you will temporarily 
step aside. You will remain in the room. Do not leave the room. 

Mr. Counsel, call your next witness. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would June Gard please come forward ? 

Mr. Pool. Would you stand and be sworn? Do you solemnly 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Miss Gard. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JUNE ANITA GAKD 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you please state your full name for the record, 
please ? 

Miss Gard. June Anita Gard. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you spell it, please, for the benefit of the 
reporter ? 

Miss Gard. G-a-r-d. 

Mr. NiiTLE. You are a resident of the State of New York, are you 
not? 

Miss Gard. Yes. 

Mr. NiiTLE. By whom are you presently employed ? 

Miss Gard. By KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you employed by KLM Airlines at the main of- 
fice, 609 Fifth Avenue, in May of 1963 ? 

Miss Gard. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you recall meeting a person known to you as Mr. 
Levi Lee Laub in May of 1963 ? 

Miss Gard. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you describe the circumstances under which 
you met him? 

Miss Gard. He came to the office accompanied by two other gentle- 
men and requested seats to Paris via Amsterdam for approximately 
40 students at the time. Then the names finally came down to ap- 
proximately 26. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Approximately how many times did you see Mr. Laub 
visit the KLM offices and discuss airline ; reservations for a flight to 
Paris by his group ? 

Miss Gard. At least five times. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Miss Gard I hand you a photograph of five persons. 
The photograph is credited to the UPI. It was taken September 30, 
1963, and we have marked it for identification as "Gard Exhibit No. 1." 
Can you identify any of the persons appearing in the photograph ? 

(Photograph handed to witness.) 

Miss Gard. The one in the center. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I beg your pardon ? 

Miss Gard. The one in the center is Levi Lee Laub. 

Mr, NiTTLE. You are pointing to the person who is the third from 
the left in the photograph ? 

Miss Gard. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You identify him as Levi Lee Laub whom you just 
identified in your testimony ? 

Miss Gard, Yes. 

(Photograph marked "Gard Exhibit No. 1" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 837 

Mr. NiTTLE. Subsequent to the appearance of Mr. Laub in the offices 
of IvLM in May of 1963, did you have occasion to discuss the student 
travel with a Mr. Jacob ? 

Miss Gard. To discuss the student travel, no. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you have occasion to meet a Mr. Jacob in connec- 
tion with airline reservations at KLM ? 

Miss Gard. No. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you meet a person named Mr. Jacob or identified 
to you as such ? 

Miss Gard. No, not at that time. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Subsequent to June 1963, when did you meet him ? 

Miss Gard. In August, the last part of August. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Of what year ? 

Miss Gard. 1963. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you explain the circumstances under which you 
met a Mr. Jacobs ? 

Miss Gard. He came to the office and applied for a refund for the 
four or live tickets which were unused when the students traveled 
to Cuba, via Paris. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was he accompanied by anyone ? 

Miss Gard. Yes. He was accompanied by someone I met previously 
with Mr, Laub. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was that person identified to you ? 

Miss Gard. He identified himself to me previously when he ap- 
peared with Mr. Laub as a Mr. Randolph. 

Mr. NiTTLE. In what way did you come to know Mr. Jacob? 

Miss Gard. When he introduced himself to me at the office. That is 
the first inclination I had of who he was. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Prior to Mr. Jacob introducing himself to you, had 
you received any contact by telephone or otherwise from a person 
identifying liimself as Mr. Jacob? 

Miss Gard. Yes. When the tickets were purchased in Ottawa, I re- 
ceived a call from the KLM office. The party on the other end of the 
line identified himself as Mr. Jacob. He was there to pay for the 
tickets for the students that Mr. Laub had made travel arrangements 
for. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Could you tell us wher you received that call from 
Ottawa? 

Miss Gard. I don't know the specific date. It was in June of 1963. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you receive any other telephone calls from any 
person identifying himself as Mr. Jacob after this initial June 1963 
telephone call ? 

Miss Gard. Yes, shortly after the students had left, a Mr. Jacob 
called and applied for a refund and requested that the check be sent 
to his bank account. 

I asked for the number of the bank account, and he said that he had 
several and he would call me back in a few days. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Miss Gard, have you had an opportunity to view the 
first witness who testified just prior to you and who identified himself 
as Arnold Indenbaum ? 

Miss Gard. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Had you, prior to today, known him as Arnold Inden- 
baum? 

98-766 O — 63— pt. 4 3 



838 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Miss Gabd. In the previous investigation of this matter the name 
was mentioned to me,,yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Who is Arnold Indenbaum ? 

Miss Gard. The gentleman who identifies himself as Mr. Jay Jacob. 
He was identified to me at the time. 

Mr, Pool. When did he identify himself as Mr. Jacob ? 

Miss Gard. I believe it was August 26 when he came to apply for 
the refund in our office. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Miss Gard, could you tell us whether you had any 
conversation with Mr. Jacob on the telephone in June, when he 
requested refund, relating to the necessity lor his appearing at your 
office? 

Miss Gard. We had no indication of who he was. We did know 
that the receipt was signed by a Mr. Jacob in Ottawa, or that the 
money had been received from Mr. Jacob, excuse me. We needed 
identification from this gentleman to prove that he was Mr. Jacob 
in order to receive the refund check. 

I requested that he come to the office and present his identification. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Following that call he did come, I believe you testified, 
in August ? 

Miss Gard. In August, yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. What identification did he give you that he was Mr. 
Jacob? 

Miss Gard. It was a driver's license. 

Mr. NiTTLE. He exhibited a driver's license to you ? Do you recol- 
lect whether you observed the State of issuance of that license ? 

Miss Gard. No, that I am not positive of. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you recollect seeing the license ? 

Miss Gard. Yes, and seeing the picture on it. 

Mr. NiTTLE. What name appeared upon this license? 

Miss Gard. Jay Jacob. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The staff has no further questions of this witness. 

Mr. Pool. The witness is excused. Call your next witness, Mr. 
CJounsel. 

Mr. NiTTLB. Would Peter Gumpert come forward, please ? 

Mr. Pool. Would you stand and be sworn ? Do you solemnly swear 
that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, tlie whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Gumpert. I do. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

TESTIMONY OF PETER GUMPERT 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state your full name and residence for the 
record, please ? 

Mr. Gumpert. My name is Peter Gumpert, G-u-m-p-e-r-t. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you represented by counsel, Mr. Grumpert? 

Mr. Gumpert. No, I am not. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you desire to be represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Gumpert. I do not. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You are aware that you are entitled to be accompanied 
by (X)unsel according to the rules of this committee ? 

Mr. Gumpert. I am aware of this, yes. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 839 

Mr. NiTTLE. Will you state the date and place of your birth ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. Yes. I was bom May 5, 1934, in Bielefeld, Germany. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you spell the name of the place in Germany 
where you were born for the benefit of the reporter ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. It is B-i-e-1-e-f-e-l-d. 

Mr. NiTTLE. When did you enter the United States ? 

Mr. GuinpERT. In 1938. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you a citizen of the United States ? 

Mr. Gtjmpert. Yes, I am. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you relate the extent of your formal education, 
giving the dates and places of attendance at educational institutions 
and any degrees you have received ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. Yes. I went to high school in Yonkers, New York, 
graduated there in 1950 and went to the University of North Carolina 
from 1951 to 1954, received a bachelor's degree from the University of 
North Carolina in 1960. I have attended graduate school at Stanford 
University and at the University of North Carolina since then. 

Mr. NiTTLE. What years did you attend Stanford ? 

Mr. Gtoipert. 1960 to 1962. 

Mr. Nittle. And you have been at the University of North Caro- 
lina since, I assume, the fall term of 1962 ? 

Mr. Gumpert. That is correct. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you state your present residence ? 

Mr. Gumpert. No, I didn't. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you do so ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes. It is Homestead Road, Route #2, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you have any period of military service, Mr. Gum- 
pert? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you state what it was ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes, sir. I was in the United States Air Force from 
1955 until 1958. 

Mr. Nittle. What rank did you attain ? 

Mr. Gumpert. I was discharged as a first lieutenant. 

Mr. Nittle. Are you presently in a reserve status ? 

Mr. Gumpert. No, sir, I am not. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Gumpert, were you present during the testimony 
of the first witness who identified himself as Arnold Indenbaum ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes, I was. 

Mr. Nittle. Have you previously met him ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes, I have. 

Mr. Nittle. By what name or names was he known to you prior to 
today ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Prior to today he was known to me as Arnie or 
Arnold, and I did not recall until subsequent to our meeting what his 
last name was. 

Mr. Pool. "Arnie" or "Arnold," is that what you said ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Nittle. When did you first meet Arnie ? 

Mr. Gumpert. I believe it was on the 25th of July of 1963. 

Mr.IcHORD. 1963? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes. 



840 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

Mr. Pool. Would you talk just a little louder, please? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you ever known Arnie as Jay Jacob or Jay 
Jacobs ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. No, sir, I have not. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did he ever introduce himself by that name ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. No. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did anyone else introduce him by that name ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. Not to me. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you ever hear that name mentioned in your 
presence ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. Not while he was in Chapel Hill. I have heard it 
once since then before he came to this room. 

Mr. NiTTLE. When did you first hear that name ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. I first heard that name when I was asked where I had 
ever heard that name by two special agents of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Gumpert, according to the records of the U-Drive- 
It Auto Company, Durham, North Carolina, on July 26, 1963, you 
rented a 1962 Ford Sedan bearing North Carolina license number 29C. 
Would you tell the committee, in detail, the circumstances leading up 
to the rental and the purpose of it ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes. Mr. Indenbaum came to Chapel Hill 

Mr. Pool. A little louder, please. 

Mr. Gumpert. Mr. Indenbaum came to Chapel Hill on, I believe, 
the 25th of July 1963. He was introduced to me as an acquaintance 
of my then roommate, Mr. Nicholas Bateson, and I believe he spent 
the night, that night, the night of July 25, at the house which Mr. 
Bateson and I occupied at the time. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You say that you were introduced to him on the night 
of July 25? 

Mr. Gumpert. I believe so. 

Mr. NiTTLE. By your roommate Nicholas Bateson ? 

Mr. Gumpert. That is correct. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That is spelled B-a-t-e-s-o-n ? 

Mr. Gumpert. That is correct. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That was at the residence ? 

Mr. Gumpert. That is correct. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Where was the residence located ? 

Mr. Gumpert. At Box 141-B, Route #1, Durham, North Carolina. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Proceed. 

Mr. Gumpert. I don't recall whether it was on the night of July 
25 or on the following morning, but at some time I was made aware 
that Mr. Indenbaum required a driver's license in the State of North 
Carolina. On the following day, Mr. Indenbaum asked me to aid him 
in obtaining a driver's license. 

I agreed to do so, and I was asked whether my car could be used 
for this. I declined the use of my car. It was then suggested to 
me by Mr. Indenbaum that we might rent an automobile. 

I agreed to help Mr. Indenbaum do so. At that point we pro- 
ceeded to Chapel Hill to the Hertz licensee there at a Texaco station, 
who informed us that they didn't have automobiles available there at 
that time. I agreed to drive the first witness to Durham, North Caro- 
lina, to obtain a car. We went to Durham, and I rented the car under 
my name at the Hertz office in Durham. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 841 

We then drove both cars back to Chapel Hill, I driving my car and 
the first witness driving the Hertz car. We proceeded to Chapel Hill. 
I parked my car and drove the Hertz car to Carrboro, North Caro- 
lina, where the office of the driver's license examiner is. 

When we had arrived there, he, Amie, went to take his driver's test, 
during which time I stood outside and waited for him. 

He then came out with the driver's license examiner and took the 
practical portion of the driver's test after which, when he returned, he 
and I returned the car to the Texaco station in Chapel Hill. 

I am quite sure that Amie paid for the rental of the car at that 
point. Subsequent to that time, I did not see the first witness, Mr. 
Indenbaum. 

Mr. N1TTI.E. Now, was there any reason, brought to your attention 
or knowledge by Mr. Indenbaum or by your roommate, Nicholas Bate- 
son, as to why Bateson did not assist Mr. Indenbaum in obtaining this 
license ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. Yes, there was. One reason was that Mr. Bateson's 
car could not be made available for the purpose. There was at that 
time, I recall, some difficulty in the registration of Mr. Bateson's 
automobile due to the fact that he had misplaced or lost the title to 
it. Furthermore, I believe that Mr. Bateson was occupied with some 
research at the time Mr. Indenbaum wanted lo obtain a license. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did Bateson participate in any of these discussions 
between you and Indenbaum as to who should assist him in obtaining 
the license ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. I don't entirely recall. 

Mr. NrnxE. Did Bateson ask you to do this for him ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. No, he didn't. 

Mr. NrrrLE. I hand you a photostatic copy of rental agreement 
Number LA 650306, dated July 26, 1963, which appears to be executed 
between you and the U-Drive-It Auto Co. I ask you if your signature 
appears thereon ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. Yes, sir, it does. 

(Document marked "Gumpert Exhibit No. 1." See next page.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Looking at the agreement, is the vehicle which was 
rented to you identified thereon as a 1962 Ford sedan bearing North 
Carolina license plate 29C ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. It is identified as a Ford sedan bearing license num- 
ber 29C, yes. I don't see the year on here. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How long have you and Bateson lived at Route 1, Box 
141-B, Durham, at which you ment Arnie? 

Mr. Gumpert. We had lived there together. I had moved in with 
Mr. Bateson, I believe, in October of 1962. 

Mr. NiTTLE. And resided there continuously from that date to and 
including July 26, 1963 ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Yes, that is correct. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How long thereafter ? 

Mr. Gumpert. Not very long. 

Mr. Nittle. Where does Mr. Bateson now reside ? 

Mr. Gumpert. He resides at, I believe, 119 Longview Street, Chapel 
Hill. 

Mr, NiTTLE. You are no longer roommates ? 

Mr. Gumpert. That is correct. 

Mr. NiTTLE. But had you been roommates continuously since 1959 ? 

Mr. Gumpert. No, sir. 



842 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 
GuMPHERT Exhibit No. 1 



HEt 



H.C 



,:><. 






AR LiCENSefi 



RENTAL AGREEMENT 



LAf^Sn?(iR 



IWJfclVEJT AUTO COMPANY 
DUS.H,*M, ') C 



J. 



f-l , li 



,\ c 



. ; ^^^>'; ^ L^ 

I "in" I !? / r 

I OUT / 6> <^ f t 

L 



v r ^v^ c 



,-> '^ INITIAL, ..^^ 

-V i HERE 4^^ 






^/. 



->:, .i 




( AC 1 NAMf 



LA650306 



^ 



J* .-?6 



HERTZ 



ruSTOMf ft r- ( HflU_ta*».A». 






bocfc — SAffty? 

PEAD TERMS & CONDITIONS ON PAGE 1 (OFHER SIDE) 



I 



9, / 



J^ 



Mr. NiTTLE. How long have you been his roommate ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. From October 1962 until approximately midsummer 

of 1963. . , . 1 TVT- 1 1 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wlien did you first become acquamted with J\ icholas 

Bateson ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. In 1959. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Where was that? 

Mr. GuMPERT. At the University of North Carolina. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 843 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were yon aware of the leadersliip role played by Mr. 
Nicholas Bateson in the formation of an organization known as Pro- 
gressive Labor at Chapel Hill, N.C. ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. No, I was not. 

Mr. Nrrri^. Had you at any time been introduced to a Jacob Rosen 
by Mr. Bateson? 

Mr. GuMPERT. Yes, I had. 

Mr. NiTTLE. When did you first meet Jacob Rosen ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. I am not sure, but it was, I believe, either late 1962 
or early 1963. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was any fact brought to your attention as to whether 
Rosen was affiliated with any Communist group ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. No such factors were brought to my attention. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was any fact brought to your attention that he was 
affiliated with, or an organizer of. Progressive Labor? 

Mr. GuMPERT. I am not sure whether that was brought to my atten- 
•tion verbally. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How did that come to your attention ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. I am not quite sure. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was that fact communicated to you by Nicholas 
Bateson ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. Yes, I believe he did. I couldn't tell you for sure. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you a member of, or affiliated with, Progressive 
Labor ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. I am not. 

Mr. NiTTLE. With the New Left Club ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. No, sir. 

Mr. Pool. Have you ever been ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. I have never been. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Had Jacob Rosen resided at the residence of Nicholas 
Bateson for any period of time ? 

Mr. GuMPERT. No, sir, not to my knowledge more than one night. 
This might have happened once or twice where he stayed for just 
one night. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The staff has no further questions of this witness. 

Mr. Pool. You are excused. 

Call your next witness, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Durane U. Sherman. 

Mr. Pool. Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about 
to give is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God ? 

Mr. Sherman. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF DURANE U. SHERMAN 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state your full name and residence for the 
record, please ? 

Mr. Sherman. Durane U. Sherman. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Spell your first name. 

Mr. Sherman. D-u-r-a-n-e ; Route 1, Fuquay. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state the date and place of your birth ? 

Mr. Sherman. Orange County, North Carolina, June -3, 1929. 



844 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 



Mr. NiTTLE. Wliat is your occupation and by whom are you 
employed ? 

Mr. Sherman. I am employed by the North Carolina Department 
of Motor Vehicles as a license examiner. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you thus employed on July 26, 1963 '? 

Mr. Sherman. Was I in the employ of the State at that time? 

Mr. NnTLE. Were you employed as a driver examiner on July 26, 
1963 ? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I hand you a document titled "Application for North 
Carolina Driver's License," official form DL-240, upon which the 
signature of the applicant "Jay Jacobs" appears and to wliich you, 
Durane Sherman, as examiner, witnessed his signature. 

Did you receive and process this application on July 26, 1963 ? 

Mr, Sherman. Yes, I did. 
(Document marked "Sherman Exhibit No. 1" follows.) 

Sherman Exhibit No. 1 



iW DL-MO 



APPUCATION for north CAROUNA DRIVER'S LICENSE 



< 



udIdct Bxmifaier UAmlncr 






RESTRICTIONS: 



Jay (None) Jacob a 



Rt. # 1 - Box 141-B 



Stovct or Ra«tc MAr^m 

Digham. N. C. 



Wdifct 



\^_ 



Color 
Hair 



BR 



Lieen*e Nambcr 



123051 



No 



I II i0^ 1. Have you ever been licensed as an operator or cfaaof- 
feur? When Where 

I \\ ^^2. Did yoQ ever have an operator's or chaoffear's license 
canceled, denied, revoked, or suspended ? 
When 19 Where 

I [[ ^•Ib. Have yoD any physical impairments? Describe 



I ll ^^^ Have you ever suffered from epilipsy, heart trouble, 
paralysis, fainting, dizzy spells, been addicted to 
narcotic drugs or intoxicating liquor? State which 
Are you now cured 

1 l( ^^n S- Have you ever been committed to or entered an in- 
stitution for alcoholism or as a mental patient? 
Wheft Name of institution and location 



Were you discharged as cured- 



VThen. 



r^ 



a^ 



4a.'C'a^ 



Si^aturc of Applicant 



Slsnstnre of Parent (Goardian) of Uin 



2-2-32 

Ho. Dot Yoi 



-8 

Ina. 



HZ 



^ m^^v T>ox 



_ AFFIDAVIT OF APPUCATION 

niie above aigM^ applicant statea that the information 
le^^^ornrand subscribed to before me 

"iy of .j^jL_ 




, ^y of ^ 1_ 

>rw Notary Pablic— C. 0. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



845 



Sherman Exhibit No. 1 — Continued 



J«^oobs, Jay (None) 



DUPLICATE 

OR 

RENEWAL 

DATES 




Mr. NiTTLE. Would you relate to the committee the step-by-st^ep 
procedures followed by you from the time the applicant named on that 
form, Jay Jacobs, entered your office? 

Mr. Sherman. Mr. Jacobs entered the office somewhere between 11 
and 11 :30 and quarter of 12 on July 26, 1963, desiring a North Carolina 
driver's license. At that time I advised the individual that it was near 
lunch hour and we may not have enough time to complete the practical 
part of the test, the driving test; that I would appreciate it if he would 
come back at 1 o'clock and I could run him through without too much 
difficulty. At that time he insisted that I give him the test before I 
left for my lunch hour. He also stated that he had a rental car and 
he didn't want to run the cost of it up too much for the purpose of 
taking his test. 



846 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVmES EST U.S. 

Of course, I got him to affix his signature here to this application 
and asked the preliminary questions which are outlined here: 

"Have you ever been licensed to operate a motor vehicle before?" 
And his answer was, "No." 

Mr. NiTTLE. He answered that he had not previously been licensed 
as an operator ? 

Mr. Sherman. That is right, in North Carolina or any other State. 

Mr. NiiTLE. What response did he give as to his birthday ? 

Mr. Sherman. He gave me February 2, 1932. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Proceed. 

Mr. Sherman. Upon filling out the application, on which I re- 
corded the make and model of the car, the result of the eye test, his 
apparent physical condition, the results of the sign test and the results 
of the mental part of the test, I then typed this form up using the 
name of "Jay," no middle name, "Jacobs," Box 141-B, Durham, 
North Carolina ; white ; hair, brown ; weight, 150 ; birth date, 2-2-32 ; 
male ; 5-8 ; color of eyes, hazel. 

Upon completion of this form, we proceeded to the car for the 
purpose of the practical examination. I found a 1962 Ford bearing 
the license plate number North Carolina registration 29C. It took 
approximately 10 minutes to complete this driving test. . . 

At the completion of the test, at which 10 points were deducted, I 
then wrote him a receipt and collected his fee, and he was through. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Following the examination and road test, does the 
applicant receive his license directly from you? 

Mr. Sherman. No, sir. It is not a license until the application is 
forwarded to the Department, checked, numbered, and signed by the 
Commissioner of Motor Vehicles. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was a license subsequently issued to Mr. Jay Jacobs ? 

Mr. Sherman. To the best of my knowledge. I have no way of 
knowing that because it does not come through my office again. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do the facts appear upon the application as to 
whether or not a license has been issued to him upon that application ? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes, sir, it does. There is a number which was 
assigned in the Raleigh office. The license would bear the number 
of 1230513. 

Mr. Johansen. Mr. Chairman, if I may interrupt, it is my under- 
standing that the application is forwarded to the State Department of 
Motor Vehicles and the actual license issued directly to the individual. 

Mr. Sherman. It is mailed out by the department. 

Mr. Johansen. What address did this individual give for the for- 
warding of the actual license? 

Mr. Sherman. He gave me Route 1, Box 141-B, Durham. 

Mr. Johansen. Do you, under North Carolina law, issue a tempo- 
rary license? 

Mr. Sherman. We issue a temporary receipt, yes, sir, which is 
honored there for a period of maybe 30 days, more or less, while this 
can be processed. 

Mr. Johansen. Thank you. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Sherman, were you present today when the first 
witness testified, who identified himself as Arnold Indenbaum ? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes, I was. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 847 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you have an opportunity to observe him? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes, I did. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Had you ever seen this person before? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes, I have. 

Mr. NiTTLE. ^Yho is he? 

Mr. Sherman. Jay Jacobs. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The individual who appeared at your office on July 
26, 1963, and made application for this license? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Pool. Counsel, would you like to introduce that in evidence 
now? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes, Mr. Chairman, I would like to offer the applica- 
tion into evidence. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it will be received. 

I believe you had another exhibit from a previous witness which you 
want-ed introduced into evidence. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes, Mr. Chairman, I would like to introduce that, also. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it may be received. 

You are excused. 

Counsel, call your next witness. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Will Mr. Nicholas Bateson come forward, please? 

Mr. Pool. Stand and be sworn. 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give will 
be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you 
God? 

Mr. Bateson. I do. 

rESTIMONY OF mCHOLAS BATESON, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 

IRA GOLLOBIN 

Mr. NmxjE. Will you state your full name and residence, for the 
record ? 

Mrt Bateson. My full name is Nicholas Bateson. My residence 
is 118 East Longview. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Will you repeat that address, and speak up, please? 

Mr. Bateson. My address is 118 East Longview, Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Bateson. Yes, I am. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would counsel identify himself for the record, stating 
his name and office address, please ? ' i 

Mr. GoLLOBiN. Ira Gollobin, 1441 Broadway, New^ York 18, N.Y. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you a permanent resident of Chapel Hill, or do you 
maintain a domicile in New York State ? 

Mr. Bateson. I am a permanent resident of Chapel Hill. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You have previously resided in New York, is that 
correct? 

Mr. Bateson. No. 

Mr. NiTTLE. At no time ? 

Mr. Bateson. No. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state when and where you were bom ? 

Mr. Bateson. I was born in London, England, on September 29, 
1935. 



848 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVmES IN U.S. 

Mr, NnTLE. When did you enter the United States? 

Mr. Bateson. In 1958. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did yon come to the United States as an immigrant or 
for temporary residence? 

Mr. Bateson. As an immigrant. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you presently a citizen of the United States? 

Mr. Bateson. No, I am not, 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you made application for citizenship ? 

Mr. Bateson. No, I have made no application. 

Mr. NrrrLE. Beg pardon ? 

Mr. Bateson. I have not made an application. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You have not made an application ? 

Mr. Bateson. Yes, I have not made an application. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you relate the extent of your formal education ? 

Mr. Bateson. I went to an English prep school Knoll, and I went to 
an English public school, which is the equivalent of an American pub- 
lic school, in Brighton, Then from 1954 to 1957, I went to Oxford 
College, from which I received a B,A, degree. 

Mr, I^ooL, Counsel, could the witness speak into the microphone, 
please. The committee can't hear you. 

Mr. NnTLE. After coming to the United States, did you have further 
schooling? 

Mr, Bateson. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you state what that was ? 

Mr. Bateson. I am a graduate student and have been, since 1960, 
at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and for one semester 
in 1959 1 was a specialist at that school. 

Mr. Nittle. How do you support yourself ? 

Mr. Bateson. I am a research assistant. 

Mr, Nittle, You are employed by the university ? 

Mr, Bateson. Yes. 

Mr, Nittle, Have you had any other employment since entering the 
United States in 1958 ? 

Mr, Bateson, Yes, I worked for a year as a librarian. 

Mr. Nittle. Where? 

Mr. Bateson. In New Haven, Connecticut, at Yale University. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you have any other employment? 

Mr. Bateson. No. 

Mr. Ntttle. Mr, Bateson, do you know an individual by the name 
of Arnold Indenbamn ? 

Mr, Bateson, I feel that due to the fact that has been brought 
out today, that Mr. Indenbaum is part of a; legal judicial hearing, 
and so far the proceedings today have been conducted so far in the 
form of a judicial legal hearing, it is impossible for me to answer 
that question before this legislative body, and I feel, therefore, I must 
decline to answer on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Pool. You are refusing to answer the question on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment? 

Mr. Bateson. I understand that is the appropriate plea. 
Mr. Pool. You are refusing on the grounds of the fifth amend- 
ment ? 
Mr. Bateson. Yes. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U^. 849 

Mr. NriTLE. Do you honestly believe if you were to testify truth- 
fully as to whether or not you know a person by the name of Arnold 
Indenbaum, that that would incriminate you ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Or might subject you to a criminal prosecution ? 

Mr. Bateson. I think that there is a possibility. I don't know if 
there is a real possibility that it will incriminate me. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed to the next question, Counsel. 

Mr. NmLE. Did Arnold Indenbaum, the first witness to appear 
here today, who identified himself as such, visit you on July 26, 1963 ? 

Mr. Bateson. Again I must decline to answer on the grounds pre- 
viously stated. 

Mr. Pool, On the grounds previously stated ? 

Mr. Bateson. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed to the next question. 

Mr. NnTLE. There was testimony received here from Peter Gum- 
pert that a person known to him as Arnie — and who has identified 
himself as Arnold Indenbaum on the witness stand and has been 
identified by the witness, Mr. Sherman, as Jay Jacobs — appeared at 
Durham, North Carolina, in your company on July 25, 1963. 

Mr. Bateson. Who was this, and what was the date ? 

Mr. NriTLE. July 25, 1963, at Chapel Hill. 

Mr. Bateson. Who appeared with me? 

Mr. NnTLE. Arnold Indenbaum himself, known as Jay Jacobs. 

Mr. Bateson. Again I must decline to answer. I cannot answer 
any questions about Mr. Indenbaum. 

Mr. Pool. You refuse to answer on the grounds previously stated ? 

Mr. Bateson. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NnTLE. Did Arnold Indenbaum on or about July 25, 1963, 
discuss with you Ms need for a North Carolina driver's license? 

Mr. Bateson. I have told you already that I cannot answer any 
question concerning Mr. Arnold Indenbaum on the groimds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed, Mr. Nittle. 

Mr. Nittle. Did Arnold Indenbaum at that time inform you that he 
would represent himself as Jay Jacobs for the purpose of obtaining a 
North Carolina driver's license ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. Pool. You what? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. I decline, as I declined 
before, on the same grounds. 

Mr. Nittle. It is the committee's information that a North Caro- 
lina driver's license was issued to Jay Jacobs on July 29, 1963. This 
was mailed to your box, Route 1, Box 141-B, Durham. Did you mail 
the license on to Arnold Indenbaima ? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. Pool. You make the same declination ? 

Mr. Bateson. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Pool. You will have to speak up. We can't hear you. 



850 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Peter Gumpert testified that you talked to him about 
Amie, who has been identified as Arnold Indenbaum. Did you tell 
Gumpert, on or about July 25, 1963, or July 26, 1963, the facts as you 
knew them about Arnold Indenbaum ? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was Gumpert a roommate of yours at that time? 

Mr. Bateson. Since Gumpert is not the subject of any legal investi- 
gation, I think I am free to say "Yes," he was. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was he a friend ? 

Mr. Bateson. He was a friend, a colleague. 

Mr. NiTTLE. If Gumpert was a friend, did you tell him what was 
the real purpose of enlisting his support to obtain a driver's license 
for Indenbaum ? 

Mr. Bateson. Since this again relates to Indenbaum, I am unable 
to answer that question, and I make the same declination as before. 

Mr. NiTFLE. Did you, according to the testimony of Peter Gumpert, 
involve Gumpert, without his knowledge, in this fraudulent perform- 
ance of Jay Jacobs, also known as Arnold Indenbaum ? 

Mr. Bateson. I think my answer has to be the same as before since 
you are again involving Indenbaum. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Bateson, did you know that Arnold Indenbaum 
intended to pose as Jay Jacobs for the purpose of receiving a refund 
of travel funds from KLM and BO AC ? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. Nittle. Are you personally familiar with the circumstances and 
the identity of the individuals who put up the money in Ottawa, 
Canada, in July of 1963? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. Nittle. If you are not familiar with the circumstances and had 
nothing to do with those individuals and truthfully said so, how 
could that possibly incriminate you ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Bateson, I show you a photostatic copy of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina student paper. Daily Tar Heel^ of Novem- 
ber 29, 1962, which we have marked for identification as "Bateson 
Exhibit No. 1." You will note an article appearing there titled "PLC 
[Progressive Labor Club] Members Hold To Plan For Cuba Trip." 
It identifies you, Nick Bateson, as planning to accompany the student 
group to Cuba last December. Is this a correct report ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr, Nittle. Does the article correctly report you as planning to 
accompany the group to Cuba ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. No, the article does not correctly quote me. 
Mr. Nittle. Did you plan to accompany the student group to Cuba ? 
Mr. Bateson. I did not plan to accompany the student group to 
Cuba. If you would like some explanation about the article, with 

which I am familiar, and the circumstances in relation to this 

Mr. Pool. Mr. Counsel, do you want to offer those as exhibits ? 
Mr. Nittle. Yes, I think that should be offered, subject to a ruling 
upon the explanation. I think he should be entitled to explain why I hat 
is incorrect. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



851 



(Document marked "Bateson Exhibit No. 1" follows.) 



Bateson Exhibit No. 1 
Daily Tar Heel— Nov. 29, 1962 



PLC Members 
Hold To Plan 
For Cuba Trip 

According to DenH^ King,' a 

■mber of the local Progressive 
T iifftn4jlll^' ^6 plans for sever 
students 

over the Christmas holidays have 
been resumed 

King said that there are now six 
people who definitely plan to 
travel to Cuba if they can arrange 
to get support from the Castro 
government. 

The group, which has been deal- 
ing with the Cuban government 
through Castro's New York law- 
yer, is not likely to get State De- 
partment clearance to travel in a 
communist nation. 

Those presently planning to make 
the trip, according to King, ara 
himself, Larry Phelps, John Salter. 
Charles Pratt, Valerie Armstrong. 
and 'Nick Bateson. 



Mr. NiTTLE. Certainly you may make any explanation if you declare 
that the report is inaccurate. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. I would like to say, first of all, that this appeared in 
the student newspaper and, like many student newspapers, this news- 
paper is staffed by amateurs who do not necessarily always stick to the 
strictest accounts of journalism. 

I inquired into this story when it came out and I inquired of the 
editor, and it turns out it was the result of gossip at coffee shops in 
Chapel Hill, and several of the people who were listed were completely 
responsible ; and as far as my own situation goes, as a British citizen 
and one who is not at present planning to apply for American citizen- 
ship, and bearing in mind that the trip to Cuba was a trip that was 
designed to test the validity of the travel ban on American ciiiAcns, 
my own part was completely irrelevant, because I am not an American 



852 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

citizen. There is no ban in Great Britain for travel to Cuba. There- 
fore, my own participation, if it had taken place, would have been 
completely irrelevant, and I never had any plans at all to take part 
in any trip to Cuba. 

Mr. NiTTLE. However, do you know who recruited the North Caro- 
lina participants for this Cuban travel ? 
(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. I do not know if anyone did and, if so, who. 
Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Bateson, I hand you a copy of a letter marked for 

identification 

Mr. Pool. Mr. Counsel, let's get the article into evidence. Without 
objection, it will be received in evidence. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The copy of the letter just handed to you is marked 
for indentification as "Bateson Exhibit No. 2." It is dated Decem- 
ber 7, 1962, and signed by Charles Henderson, Jr., a dean at the 
University of North Carolina, I believe, and it is addressed to Progres- 
sive Labor Club, care of Nicholas Bateson, 146 East Rosemary Street, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Are you the Nicholas Bateson to whom 
this letter was addressed, and did you receive the original of it ? 
(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. I decline to answer that on the gi'ounds of the fifth 
amendment. 

(Document marked "Bateson Exhibit No. 2." See p. 854.) 
Mr. Npttle. Were you one of the organizers of the Progressive 
Labor Club at the University of North Carolina '? 
(Witness confers with counsel.) 
Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Didn't the Progi'essive Labor Club participate in the 
recruiting and organization of students for travel to Cuba ? 
(Witness confers with counsel. ) 
Mr. Bateson. Not to my knowledge. 
Mr. NiTTLE. What? 

Mr. Bateson. The answer is, "Not to my knowledge." 
Mr. NiTTLE. Did you know Larry Wilford Phelps to be a member 
of the Progressive Labor Club of the University of North Carolina ? 
Mr. Bateson. My answer to this question must be that, bearing in 
mind the nature of this committee and bearing in mind the very clearly 
understood feeling that exists among Americans who might be said 
to be the political left and bearing in mind that, as a visitor to this 
country and as sort of a guest member of this informal club, I must 
abide by the rules of this club, and one of the rules of this club is that 
one is under a very solemn and sacred honor not to discuss the names 
of other people who are also on the political left. I do not do this out of 
any sense of expediency or any practical sense because the name of the 
person you mentioned is extremely well known in North Carolina. I 
do it purely on the basis of conscience and principle and feel that this 
is a very sacred bond of honor that I cannot violate and, therefore, I 
decline to answer this question on the grounds of the first amendment. 
Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Chairman, I ask that you direct the witness to 
answer the question. 

Mr. Pool. I direct you to answer the question. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. Am I to understand that this body 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN TJ.S. 853 

Mr. Pool. You will have to talk a little louder. We can't hear 
you. 

Mr. Bateson. Am I to understand that this body is going to revoke 
my privilege under the first amendment of the Constitution? 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Chairman, did I understand the witness to 
testify that he is under an oath or a pledge not to identify or disclose 
information with regard to his associates in this organization ? 

Mr. Bateson. I am not talking about any formal oath. I am not 
talking about any particular organization. It is an oath of my 
own choosing, a voluntary oath. It is not a formally given oath of 
any kind. It is just on the grounds primarily of conscience, an oath 
to my own conscience, and I feel myself unable to go through names 
of other people who are on the political left in the United States. 

Mr. Johansen. In other words then, you are invoking the fifth 
amendment because, under the ruling of the court, you cannot merely 
and exclusively invoke the first amendment in refusing to answer this 
question involving other persons. 

Mr. Bateson. In that case, it seems reasonable that I should also in- 
voke the fifth amendment, since you are revoking my right to invoke 
the first amendment. 

Mr. Pool. You are invoking the fifth amendment? 

Mr. Bateson. That is correct. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The letter which I just handed you advises that "the 
Progressive Labor club is not recognized by the University of North 
Carolina and is therefore barred from the use of University facilities 
for meetings," and so forth. 

Had you, as an official of the Progressive Labor Club, made applica- 
tion to the university for recognition of this Progressive Labor Club ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination as before. 

Mr. Pool. Do you want to introduce the letter in evidence? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes, Mr. Chairman, I offer the letter into evidence. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it is received. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Bateson, I hand you a photostatic copy of an article 
we have marked for identification as "Bateson Exhibit No. 3," titled 
"New Leftist Club 'Solidifies' View," which appeared in the Daily 
Tar Heel of September 25, 1962. You will note that you are identified 
as the "spokesman" of the Progressive Labor Club. Would you tell 
us whether you granted that interview to the Daily Tar Heel as the 
"spokesman for the Progressive Labor Club ? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

(Document marked "Bateson Exhibit No. 3." See p. 855, 856.) 

Mr. Nittle. Would you tell us how the Progressive Labor Club was 
organized at Chapel Hill ? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. Nittle. With whom from the national office of Progressive 
Labor did you confer in forming the Chapel Hill branch of the 
Progressive Labor Club ? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. Nittle. Were you in attendance at the national organizational 
meeting of the Progressive Labor Movement, held on July 1, 1962? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you confer with Jacob Rosen 

Mr. Bateson. What? 

98-765 0^613— pt. 4 4 



854 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES EST U.S. 



Mr. NiTTLE. — about the formation of the Progressive Labor Club 
in Chapel Hill? 
Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 
Mr. NrrTLE. Did you confer with Milton Rosen ? 
Mr. Bateson. Same declination. 



Bateson Exhibit No. 2 
December 7, 1962 



Progressive Labor Club 
c/o Nicholas Bateson 
146 E Rosemary Street 
Chapel Hill, N.C. 



Dear Mr. Bateson: 

I should like to put on record the understanding 
we have up to this point maintained, namely that the Progressive 
Labor club is not recognized by the University of North Carolina 
and is therefore barred from the use of University facilities 
for meetings, etc. 

Would you please relay this Information to your 
membership? 

Sincerely yours. 



Charles Henderson, Jr. 



cc: Dean William G. Long 



'k^ 



\y^ 



\ 



\ 




PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 



855 



Bateson Exhibit No. 3 



Daily Tar Heel. September 25, 1962, p. 1/ 

Plans Po»tieal Acaon 



New Leftist Club 
'Solidifies^ View 



1t9 VANCS BAftMn 

IzatMo. the Proer^ane Ubor 
Club, was fomMd bm tfa^ auxir 
mer espotusiag a A^unifit-Le^nist 
brand of socialism. Vaa club 
pkas to advance its beliefs 
through political action. 

The group conaiato xHiAdpally 
of pec^Ie from the New Left Chib 
^liidi dtebanded last spring. The 
chd> has much more solidified 
views, however, than the "any- 
ivhere left of Kennedy" wMch 
was the orientation of the New 
Left Chib. 

In an interview ye>terdQr, chib 
spolcesman Nick Batesoo said 
that the purpose of Um Progres- 
sive Labor Chib was to "act po- 
litically" in an op«B and above- 
board manna*. 

The orientation of the dub. he 
said, was Marxist-Leninist, but 
that. "Marxism-Leniniara as a 
philosophy was devised to deal 
wit hthe problems <rf Europe one 
hundred years ago. It can only 
be applied by logical inference 
to America today." 

"Conmwnlst Eaemy" 

When aslced whether the group 
had an affiliation with the Com- 
munist Party. Mr. Bateson re- 
plied that the Communlats con- 
sider the Progressive Labor 
movement as a "very deadly 



He said "Political Affau-s" the 
official organ of the Commun- 



ist Party, had severely de- 
nojinced the Progressive Labor 
organization in an unsigned ar- 
ticle. The unsigned articles are 
taken to be official statesmenta 
of party policy. 

Several members of the Na- 
tional Progressive Labor move- 
ment have been members of the 
Commimiit Party* he said, but 
all were either expelled or left oi 
their own accord. None of the 
local members have ever been 
afntiated with the Communist 
Party, he stated. 

Objectims To Cotimniatam 

Batescon said that he hunself 
was dissatJstied "Wtth the Com- 
munist Party. "We don't object 
because they are Communists." 
he said "but i)ecaus.e they are 
a bureaucratic organization, and 
hocause they are an organization 
that lias made very few at- 
tempts to make meanm^^ul con- 
tacts with the American people 
aa a wiiolo. 

"Another reason i& that it is 
sort of a corrupt orsasizatkon. 
Tliere arc fewer than two thou- 
sand members in America now. 
The leaders are reputed to liw 
at a degree of opuloBce iacom- 
paCttto with fbe idoala of social- 
ism. 

"The Communist Party hasii't 
been subversive, it's just beeo 
lazy." He said tlut the party has 
done ootking whatihtM MMcd 
e^abUahiag rinrf<!»n mA iMi 



856 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

Bateson Exhibit No. 3 — Continued 



and tl^ namtng of cMtMOim 
ar«M fn which it mlgM ta^B 
bees eftfective. 

T Jaala ■■■■ 

MOSMtgy 

When quizzed alMut Utte ideohv 
gy of the chib, Bateson said flat 
it was "a democratic organte- 
tioo— with a small 'd.' We b^ 
lieve that the U.S. is a vqy 
anti-democratic nation." No troe 
denv>cracy can exist, he said.Jn 
any country with anuy kind of 
economic anxiety. 

"Freedom can only exist nbare 
there is economic security," ht 
said. "There is no true froates 
until yea have a complete Utk. 
of anidely." 

The New Lefi. which was dis-. 
baadod <m campus last spttaiC 
had DO connection with the Fro- 
gressive Labor Club. accQr<^ng 
to Bateson. He said that the New 
Left was a political discusakm 
group in which anyone "left of 
Kennedy" was welcome. 

"However, we are organized 
for political work, not just poIU 
tical talk." He said that file 
New Left had no ideology ^k1 
didn't need one. It was for "coy' 
one wiw was moderately VbenL** 
No Fomal (^aiiisatlon 
The chib is not organized W 
yet. but Dennis King and Qavid 
Bind tenv been appaiotad 4)^ 
ficial spokesmen. The member- 
ship now consists of eleven per- 
sons, among them Larry Phdps, 
an independent candidate lor 
president of the student body in 
last spring's election. The group 
I^ans to be open and above- 
board in it:> operation. 

Bateson said that there wadd 
be a limit to the extent that ^ 
public could b^ admittel ta Ihft 
P^^m**?i|*; but that this is trod 
of all pditical parUes. "Wo asm 
not as underground iftg^x^xar 
tion." 

I^iile the dub has no deEisite 
^BQi far the future, theie are 
areas in which it plans to op^^r- 
ate extensively, according to 



Bateson. Top priority is to work 
nt unionizing the industries in 
North C:ii</lina. 

He quoted a number of figures 
to the effect that North Carolina 
has the smallest percentage of 
unions in the country, with less 
than eight per cait of the work- 
ers unionized. He also quoted 
Covemor "Terry Sanford as say- 
ing that Noi-th Carolina has the 
lowest industrial wage average 
in the country. "I feel that these 
two are ultimately related," he 
said. 

The other area in which the 
club plans to work is integra- 
tion. Batt'son said that any 
union would have to be fully in- 
tegrated or it could never amount 
to anything. "There must \ye 
some kind of unity among tlie 
workers, lliis basic disunity is 
harmful to both whites and Ne- 
groes. 

B.iteson said that anyone could 
join the club, but thcrt it would 
have to be done with full aware- 
ness of the consequences. He 
said he realized membership 
might mean total social ostra- 
cism. He also sak) that in order 
10 understand Marxism-Leninism 

one would have to l)e prepared 
to do a great deal of study and 
perhaps go through a reorienta- 
has been .scheduled for this fall, 
tion of one's thinking. 

"A k)t of people don't realize 
that We have a class system in 
the U.S. It is going to be a slow 
process to undergo a change in 
our thinking." 

In July the club sent a dele- 
gation to a national Progressive 
Labor meeting in New York. The 
purpose of the meeting was to 
discuss the formation of a politi- 
cal party on a formal basis. 

Thife was not done, but the 
but the delegates returned to 
"expforihg the pos.sibilities of 
starting such a party and broad- 
ening our activities," according to 
David Bland. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 857 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you confer with Mortimer Scheer on that same 
subject? 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination.* 

Mr. NiTTLE. I offer the article in evidence. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it is so received. 

Mr. NiTTLE. As a result of your association with Jacob Rosen, have 
you stated that he changed you from a "Stalinist" to a "Maoist," that 
is, a follower of the Chinese Communist leader Mao Tse-tung? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. I make the same declination. 

Mr. NiTFLE. The staff has no further questions. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Chairman, I ask the chairman to direct the 
committee counsel to refer the transcript of this testimony to the 
Bureau of Naturalization and Immigration for appropriate review 
by that agency. t 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes, sir. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Chairman, I have one question. 

Mr. Pool. It will be so done, Mr. Johansen. 

Mr, IcHORD. I have one question of the witness. You gave a very 
lengthy explanation as to why you did not intend to travel to Cuba. 
I would like to ask the witness whether you aided or assisted any 
American citizens in the organization or arranging of a trip to Coiba? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. Since this seems to be a question that is designed to 
involve Arnold Indenbaum, I feel I must make the same declination 
as before. 

Mr. IcHORD. Did you talk to any students or try to persuade anyone 
to make a trip to Cuba? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Bateson. No, I did not. 

Mr. IcHORD. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Pool. You are excused. 

Counsel, call your next witness. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Chairman, we would like to recall Miss June Gard, 
to clarify certain testimony. Would you come forward, please ? 

IVIr. Pool. Miss Gard, you are still under oath. 

TESTIMONY OF JUNE ANITA GARD-^Resumed 

Mr. Nittle. Miss Gard, you testified, did you not, that you received 
two telephone calls for persons identifying themselves as Jay Jacob ? 

Miss Gard. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. The first call was from Canada ? 

Miss Gard. That is right. 

Mr. Nittle. And concerned the payment of money for the tickets 
in Ottawa, is that not correct ? 

Miss Gard. That is correct. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you recall the date of that call ? 

Miss Gard. No, I am sorry, I don't. It was in June, mid-June 
[1963], I believe. 

Mr. Nittle. The second call, apparently a local one, contained a re- 
quest for a refund for unused tickets ? 

Miss Gard. That is right. 



858 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. It was on this occasion that you informed the caller 
that he would have to appear in person and that he would have to 
have appropriate identification with him ? 

Miss Gard. That is correct. 

Mr. NrrTLE. Do you recall the date of this call ? 

Miss Gard. That was shortly after the students had departed. It 
was at least 3 or 4 days after. 

Mr. NrrTLE. That would be in late June ? 

Miss Gard. lyatejune. 

Mr. NrrTLE. Late June of 1963 ? 

Miss Gard. That is right. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Or possibly the early part of July ? 

Miss Gard. Possibly. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The man who subsequently came to the KLM office and 
identified himself to you as Jay Jacob is the same man who was the 
first witness to testify before the committee this morning ? 

Miss Gard. That is right. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That is all, 

Mr. Pool. There will be a recess until 2 o'clock. 

All the witnesses will report back here who have not been excused. 

(Whereupon, at 12 :30 p.m. Wednesday, October 16, 1963, the sub- 
committee recessed, to reconvene at 2 p.m. the same day.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION— WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1963 

(The subcommittee reconvened at 2 p.m.. Honorable Joe R. Pool, 
chairman of the subcommittee, presiding.) 

(Members present : Representatives Pool, Ichord, and Johansen of 
the subcommittee, and also Representatives Bruce, Schadeberg, and 
Ashbrook.) 

Mr. Pool. The committee will come to order. 

Counsel, call your next witness. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Miss Brunhilde Linke come forward, please. 

Mr, Pool. Stand and be sworn. Do you solemnly swear that the 
testimony that you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Miss LiNKE. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF BRUinilLIXE LINKE 

Mr. NiTTLE. Miss Linke, will you state your full name for the record 
and spell it for the record, please ? 

Miss LiNKE. B-r-u-n-h-i-1-d-e L-i-n-k-e. 

Mr. NiTTLE. By whom are you employed and in what capacity ? 

Miss LiNKE. I am employed by KLM Royal Dutch Airlines at 609 
Fifth Avenue as a ticket agent. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you so employed on August 27 of this year ? 

Miss Linke. Yes, I was. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you ever known a person identified to you as 
"Jay Jacob" or "Jay Jacobs" ? 

Miss Linke. Yes, I have. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you residing in the city of New York ? 

Miss LiNKE. Yes, I am. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 859 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you relate the time and circumstances under 
which you first met Jay Jacobs ? 

Miss LiNKE. It was when Mr. Jacobs, accompanied by another 
gentleman, came to the KLM ticket office to check on a refund pro- 
ceeding that he had initiated there. 

Mr. NiTFLE. Do you recollect the month and the day on which this 
occurred ? 

Miss LiNKE. I believe it was the last week in August. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was it on or about August 26, 1963 f 

Miss LiNKE. Yes, I believe so. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was the gentleman with Jay Jacobs identified to you ? 

Miss LiNKE. I cannot remember for certain, but I think he said 
"Mr. Bennett." 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did Mr. Jacobs make any request of you with respect 
to the refund on tickets ? 

Miss LiNKE. It had been initiated at the time he came in to see me, 
and he asked me to check upon it further, why it had not come 
through. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did he at that time identify himself ? 

MissLiNKE. Yes, he did. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wliat did he say ? 

Miss LiNK^. He had a driver's license, which had his picture on it, 
and he also had a letter from the refund department of my company 
requesting him either to give authorization or to come in person to 
collect the money, and that is what he was there to do at that time. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you personally see the driver's license? 

Miss LiNKE. Yes, I did. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Whose name was on it? 

Miss LiNKE. It was made out to Mr. Jay Jacobs or J. Jacobs, I am 
not sure, and it had a picture of the gentleman on it who was sitting 
in my office. 

Mr. NiTFLE. After that first meeting with Jay Jacobs, did you see 
him again ? 

Miss LiNKE. Yes, I saw him the following morning. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Could you tell us what happened then ? 

Miss LiNKE. At that time he was asked to return. There was no 
one in the company to authorize the signing of the check so he was 
asked to return the next morning, which he did, and at that time the 
check was handed to him. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The check was handed to him on the occasion of his 
second visit to you ? 

Miss LiNKE. That is correct. 

Mr. NiTTLE. By whom was the check handed to him ? 

Miss LiNKE. The manager of the ticket office handed him the check 
personally. 

Mr. NiTTLE. What was his name ? 

Miss LiNKE. Mr. van der Jagt. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you see Mr. van der Jagt hand him this check? 

Miss LiNKE. Yes, I did. 

Mr. NriTLE. Miss Linke, have you had an opportunity to observe 
the first witness, who identified himself in the course of his testimony 
this morning as Arnold Indenbaum ? 

Miss Linke. Yes, I did. 



860 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVmES IN U.S. 

Mr. NiTTL^. Is Arnold Indenbaum the same person known to you as 
Jay Jacobs? 

Miss LiNKE. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Is there any doubt in your mind about that? 

Miss Ijinkk. No. He was the gentleman to whom the check was 
handed in my presence. 

Mr. Pool. You are referring to the gentleman who was the first 
witness here this morning? 

Miss LiNKE. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NrrTLE. No further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Pool. You are excused. 

Call your next witness, Counsel. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Edward R. O'Neill, please come forward. 

Mr. Pool. Stand and be sworn. Do you solemnly swear the testi- 
mony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. O'Neill. I do. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

TESTIMONY OF EDWAED R. O'NEILL 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state your full name for the record, please? 

Mr. O'Neill. Edward R. O'Neill. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You are a resident of New York ? 

Mr. O'Neill. New York ; yes, sir. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. O'Neill, by whom are you employed and in what 
capacity? 

Mr. O'Neill. I am employed by British Overseas Airways Cor- 
poration as ticket counter manager at 530 Fifth Avenue. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How long have you been employed by BO AC airlines ? 

Mr. O'Neill. Since September 1959, a little over 4 years. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. O'Neill, at the time you were subpenaed you were 
requested to bring certain records with you. Have you brought 
them? 

Mr. O'Neill. Yes, I have. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you examine your records to determine whether 
they show what deposits were made in Ottawa, Canada, in the office 
of your airline on June 10 and June 11, 1963, by a Mr. Jay Jacobs? 

Mr. O'Neill. Yes. On June 10, 1963, our Ottawa office called and 
they advised us that they had received a $5,000 deposit from Mr. Jay 
Jacobs and that the balance would be paid on June 11. 

On June 11, Mr. Morgan of our office in Ottawa called to say that 
the remainder of $17,739.20 was paid, bringing the total amount into 
us. 

Mr. NiTTLE. What do the records show to be the purpose of this 
deposit ? 

Mr. O'Neill. The deposit was requested actually to be paid on 
June 6 that we might hold the 60 original seats that Mr. Laub had 
requested earlier in June — in fact, in May — for travel from New 
York to London to Paris. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do your records show the full name of Mr. Laub ? 

Mr. O'Neill. We do have that on our records. Yes, Mr. Levi Lee 
Laub. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIYITIES EST U.S. 861 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you recall whether your New York office received 
any telephone calls from Ottawa, Canada, in June of 1963 which were 
made by a person identifying himself as Mr. Laub ? 

Mr. O'Neill. Mr. Laub called on June 8 — which I believe was a 
Saturday. — to tell us that he could not pay the deposit on that date in 
Montreal because our office was closed. 

On June 10, Monday, when our office advised us that the $5,000 
deposit had been paid, Mr. Laub had spoken at that time to Mrs. 
Gonzalez, who is the agent in my office who was handling the trans- 
action. 

Mr. NiTTLE. In connection with your official duties as manager at 
the BOAC ticket office, did it come to your attention that on June 13, 
1963, reservations had been made on behalf of one V. Ortiz and an 
A. Indenbaum ? 
• Mr. O'Neill. Yes. At that time Miss Ortiz came in with Mr. Laub 
to purchase a ticket for herself and at the same time a ticket for a 
"no-name" booking that we had ; a "no-name" is given when you are 
not sure who is traveling. 

When she came in to pick up her own ticket, she substituted the 
name of A. Indenbaum for the no-name booking we had. 

Mr. NiTTLE. A. Indenbaimi did not call personally at the office? 

Mr. O'Neill. No, he did not not call personally at the office. 

Mr.- Nittle. Was the purchase price of these tickets paid and, if 
so, when and in what manner ? 

Mr. O'Neill. The purchase price, I believe, was paid in cash over 
the counter by Miss Ortiz. Let me check that. I believe it was cash. 
Yes, in cash. 

Mr. Nittle. In what amount ? 

Mr. O'Neill. $516.80 each, $1,033.60 

Mr. Nittle. What was the destination indicated on these tickets and 
for what date were the reservations made ? 

Mr. O'Neill. The tickets were reserved for New York-London- 
Paris leaving on June 16 on BOAC to London and connecting with 
, British Overseas airlines to Paris, with an open return. 

Mr. Nittle. I hand you a photostatic copy of the tickets purchased 
on behalf of V. Ortiz and A. Indenbaum, marked respectively as 
"O'Neill Exhibit Nos. 1 and 1-A." Is that a true cx^py of the records 
in your office and of the actual tickets? 

Mr. O'Neill. Yes, it is. 

Mr. Nittle. Executed for those persons ? 

Mr. O'Neill. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Chairman, I offer Exhibits 1 and 1-A in evidence. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it is so ordered. 

(Document marked "O'Neill Exhibits Nos. 1 and 1-A," respectively. 
See next page. ) 

Mr. Nittle. It may be recalled that Barry Hoffman, a witness 
before this committee on September 12, 1963, testified that he had 
departed from New York with the student group on June 25, 1963, 
and that one Victoria Ortiz joined the group in Prague, Czechoslo- 
vakia, but had not departed from New York with the student group on 
June 25. 

Mr. O'Neill, I now hand you a copy of a receipt dated August 26, 
1963, marked for identification as "O'Neill Exhibit No. 2." It appears 
to be signed by one Jay Jacobs, acknowledging receipt of check 
numbered D000149 for the sum of $4,134.40. 



862 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN tJ.S. 



O'Neill Exhibit No. 1 



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Mr. NiTTLE. Was this receipt executed by Jay Jacobs in your pres- 
ence on August 26, 1963 ? 

Mr. O'Neill.. Yes, sir, it was. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, I offer Exhibit No. 2 in evidence. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it is so ordered, 

(Document marked "O'Neill Exhibit No. 2." See next page.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. I direct your attention to the notation on the receipt. 
Exhibit No. 2, preceding the signature of Jay Jacobs, by which it 
appears Jay Jacobs' identification was established by a North Carolina 
driver's license number 1230513. Was this license exhibited to you by 
Jay Jacobs ? 

Mr. O'Neill. Yes, sir, it was. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you make the entries upon the receipt ? 

Mr. O'Neill. I made the entries myself on the receipt. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did Jay Jacobs sign that in your presence ? 

Mr. O'Neill. Yes, sir, he did. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 863 

O'Neill Exhibit No. 2 



BOM 




British Overseas Airways Corporation 

530 FIFTH AVENUE - NEW YORK 36 • N. Y. 
Telephone: MUrrey Hill 7-8900 • Cables: 'Speedbird' New York 



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This is to acknowledge that I have received ch^ijae 
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864 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



Mr. NiTTLE. I hand you a photostatic copy, Mr, O'Neill, of a check 
dated August 26, 1963, numbered D000149, payable to the order of 
Jay Jacobs Koute #1, Box 141 B, Durham, North Carolina, in the 
amount of $4,134.40, drawn under your signature for BOAC, upon 
the First National City Bank of New York, 42d and Madison Avenue 
Branch. 

We have marked the exhibit for identification as "O'Neill Exhibit 
No. 3." Is this the check you delivered to Jay Jacobs for which he 
gave you a receipt? 

Mr. O'Neill. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I offer that in evidence. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection it is so ordered. 

(Document marked "O'Neill Exhibit No. 3" follows.) 

O'Neill Exhibit No. 3 




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Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. O'Neill, have you recognized the recipient of this 
check (Juring the course of the hearings today ? 

Mr. O'Neill. Yes, sir, the Mr. Jay Jacobs who was in my office is 
the Mr. Indenbaum who testified this morning. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. ' 865 

Mr. Pool. Let the record show that the three exhibits were offered in 
evidence, and there being no objection, it is so ordered. 

Mr. Pool. Does any member of the committee have any questions ? 
If not, you are excused. 

Counsel, call your next witness. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would David Perham please come forward ? 

Mr. Pool. Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about 
to give is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so 
help you God ? 

Mr. Perham. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF DAVID PERHAM 

Mr. NiTFLE. Will you state your full name for the record, please, 
and spell it^? 

Mr. Perham. David Perham, P-e-r-h-a-m. 

Mr. Nittle. You reside in the State of New York, is that correct? 

Mr. Perham. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Nitfle. Mr. Perham, on August 27, 1963, were you employed 
by the First National City Bank of New York at its branch office 
located at 640 Fifth Avenue, New York City ? 

Mr. Perham. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you presently employed by that bank ? 

Mr. Perham. Yes, I am presently employed by the bank. I am 
no longer located at that branch. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you had an opportunity to observe the first wit- 
ness who testified before this committee this morning, identifying 
himself as Arnold Indenbamn ? 

Mr. Perham. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you ever known this person ? 

Mr. Perham. Yes, I knew him as Jay Jacob. 
, jMr. NiTTLE. Mr. Perham, I hand you a photostatic copy of a check, 
dat€d August 27, 1963, numbered 6001, payable to the order of Mr. 
Jay Jacob, Rout« 1, 141 B, Durham, N.C., in the amount of $2,607.20, 
drawn against the account of the KLM Royal Dutch Airlines upon 
the 640 5th Avenue branch of the National City l^ank of New York. 

Does this check refresh your recollection of the circumstances under 
w^hich you first saw it ? 

Mr. Perham. Yes, sir. I was on the platfonri at the time as an 
officer on the platform approving checks, and Mr. Jacob came over 
with this check and wanted to have it approved. I asked him for 
identification. He gave me the North Carolina driver's license which 
was referred to earlier. His picture was on the back of this item. 

I was only authorized to approve checks up to $250, so I made my 
approval and then I took it to an officer with higher signing powers. 

He asked me if the gentleman's picture was the man at my desk. 
I said, "Yes," that it was. I went back to my desk and gave the 
license and the check back to Mr. Jacob. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Does the check bear any notation relating to the means 
of identification utilized by Mr. Jacob? 

Mr. Perham. Yes. We are usually required and it is bank policy 
to take down any identification on the back of the check. 

This is my handwriting, and I took down North Carolina driver's 
license number such-and-such. 



866 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVmES EST U.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That is in your own handwriting? 

Mr. Perham. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Does an endorsement appear upon that check in the 
name of Jay Jacobs ? 

Mr. Perham. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was that executed in your presence? 

Mr. Perham. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That was executed by the person who was identified 
today as Arnold Indenbaum? 

Mr. Perham. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NriTLE. I offer that in evidence, Mr. Chairman, as Perham 
Exhibit No. 1. 

Mr. Pool. If there is no objection, it is so ordered. 

(Document marked "Perham Exhibit No. 1" follows.) 



Perham Exhibit No. 1 



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Route 1. 141 B 
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Mr. NiTTLB. No further questions. 
Mr. Pool. The witness may be excused. 
Counsel, call your next witness. 
Mr. NiTTLE. Harold Gesell. 



EXHIBIT 'J „, 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 867 

Mr. Pool. Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about 
to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, 
so help you God? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF HAROLD J. E. GESELL 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state your full name for the record, please, 
and spell it? 

Mr. Gesell. Harold J. E. G-e-s-e-1-1. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Where do you live? 

Mr. Gesell. I live in Takoma Park, Maryland. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state your occupation, the type of position 
you hold, and what your duties are? 

Mr. Gesell. I am the chief of the Identification and Detection 
Division of the United States Veterans' Administration at the central 
office here in Washington. My duties are principally to examine docu- 
ments and other evidentiary matters for identification purposes for 
not only the Veterans' Administration but also for other Government 
agencies. 

Mr. Nittle. 'Wliat study or preparation have you made for your 
profession and work ? 

Mr. Gesell. I read the principal textbook on the subject and also 
attended various schools regarding the identification of documents. 

Mr. Nittle. How long have you been engaged in this work ? 

Mr. Gesell. About 33 years. 

Mr. Nittle. How much of your time is spent in this work ? 

Mr. Gesell. All of my time. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you hold any degrees and, if so, would you state 
what they are? 

Mr. Gesell. An LL. B. degree. 

Mr. Nittle. From what university ? 

Mr. Gesell. Valparaiso University in Indiana. 

Mr, Nittle. Have you been admitted to any state bar and, if so, for 
what state? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, sir. The Indiana State Bar, the Iowa State Bar, 
and the United States Supreme Court. 

Mr. Nittle. What other educational qualifications do you have? 

Mr. Gesell. I have attended various schools, short courses, on the 
subject of scientific crime detection, principally documents. I am a 
graduate of the scientific crime detection laboratory school at North- 
western University, Chicago, and I am a graduate of the law enforce- 
ment school of the Treasury Department, United States Treasury 
Department. I am a graduate of the FBI National Police Academy. 
Washington, D.C. I am a graduate of the Office of Special Investiga- 
tions Training School of tlie United States Air Force and I also 
instructed there for a year and a half. 

Mr. Nittle. What positions have you held pr^or to your present 
position? 

Mr. Gesell. I have been chief of the identification division of the 
Office of State Bureau of Criminal Investigation and Identification 
located at Des Moines, Iowa, and also a deputy sheriff at Des Moines, 
Iowa, Polk County, for 6 years in charge of the identification bureau 
in that office. 



868 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

Then, I spent 2 years with the United States Treasury Department 
as a special agent of the intelligence unit and was farmed out to an- 
other division of the Treasury Department as an examiner. 

I transferred oter to the Veterans' Administration. I have been 
with Veterans since 1943 except for about 4 years and 7 months while 
1 was in the Air Force. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you delivered lectures on identification of doc- 
uments ? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, I have given numerous of them throughout the 
country — at Iowa State, for instance, peace officers' courses 4 or 5 
years and, of course, the OSI ^ training school, training lecturer in 
crime detection. In fact, I was just over in Europe last April and 
lectured to our OSI people in London, Wiesbaden, and Paris. 

Mr. NnTLE. Have you ever qualified and testified as an examiner of 
questioned documents in any of the courts ? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, sir, on numerous occasions in about 15 States of 
the United States and several district courts in the United States and 
in 6 foreign countries. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Gesell, on October 8, 1963, did you receive from 
the Committee on Un-American Activities certain documents con- 
taining the signature of Jay Jacobs ? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, I did. 

Mr. NrriLE. I now hand you four documents which are identified 
respectively as "Gesell Exhibits Nos. 1 through 4," inclusive. 

Exhibit 1 is a check drawn on the First Natioijal City Bank by 
the British Overseas Airways Corporation numbered, D000149, dated 
August 26, 1963, endorsed "Jay Jacobs" [previously introduced as 
O'Neill Exhibit No. 3. Seep. 864]. 

Exhibit No. 2 is a check drawn on the First National City Bank by 
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, dated August 27, 1963, endorsed "Jay 
Jacobs" [previously introduced as Perham Exhibit No. 1. See p. 866]. 

Exhibit No. 3 is a receipt on the letterhead of the British Overseas 
Airways Corporation dated August 26, 1963, signed "Jay Jacobs" [pre- 
^'iously introduced as O'Neill Exhibit No. 2. See p. 863]. 

Exhibit No. 4 is an application for North Carolina driver's license, 
official form DLr-240, signed "Jay Jacobs" and witnessed by D. J. Sher- 
man [previously introduced as Sherman Exhibit No. 1. See p. 844]. 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, I have them. 

Mr. Nittle. Are those the documents delivered to you on October 
8,1963? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NriTLE. Did you have occasion to examine the signature of Jay 
Jacobs appearing upon the four documents ? 

Mr. Gesell. I had. 

Mr. NriTLE. Have you reached any conclusion with respect to the 
authorship of the signature "Jay Jacobs" upon the four exhibits handed 
to you ? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, I have. 

Mr. Ntttle. Would you state your opinion as to the authorship ? 

Mr. Gesell. All four of the "Jay Jacobs" signatures described as be- 
ing on Exhibits 1 through 4 were written by one and the same person. 



Office of Special Investigations (Intelligence branch of the Air Force). 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 869 

Mr. NiTTLE. Could you kindly tell the committee upon what you 
base that conclusion, briefly, please ? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, sir, I will be very happy to. If there is any ques- 
tion in the exaanining of any document, like anything else, certain well 
defined principles which are the basic factors which serve to dis- 
tinguish one handwriting from another — enable one to detennine the 
genuine from the fake. 

I find that it is ver-y simple to state the basic elements of analysis, 
and it is simply based on the word "due" — d-u-e — you see; (/escribe 
what you see, i/nderstand what you see, and evaluate what you see. 
And then report on it. 

If some of the gentlemen would like to know what some of our 
basic identification requirements are : there musit be a strong combina- 
tion of handwriting similarities and there must not be any unexplained 
major differences in these. 

Cliarts were prepared, which I prepared myself, showing the four 
signatures. I have several with me here if the committee would like 
to follow me. 

Mr. NiTiLE. Kindly hand them to me and I will pass them tx) the 
committee members. 

(Copies of chart handed to committee members.) 

(Chart marked "Gesell Exhibit No. 1." See next page.) 

Mr. Gesell. I might explain this chart, gentlemen. The top sig- 
nature I will refer to as No. 1, the next as No. 2, the third one No. 
3, and the last one as No. 4. 

The first two are those endorsements on the two checks in question. 
The third is from the BO AC receipt form and the fourth one is from 
the North Carolina driver's license application. 

The charts are made principally for the purpose of viewing the 
signatures side by side, so that you can see your similarities or dif- 
ferences as they exist. 

Would you care for me to explain how I arrived at some conclusions 
and the things I used here to arrive at my conclusions ? 

Mr. Pool. Go right ahead. 

Mr. Gesell. I would be very happy to if you gentlemen prefer, 

I would say there are many, many similarities and also there are 
several variations I noticed in the four signatures. I would, first of 
all, like to say just a word about the writing of the individual who 
wrote all four signatures. The writing ability is good, and it is writ- 
ten probably with the same speed all the way through. 

I would say there are combinations or variations that we might see, 
and I would like to point them out in the first two signatures. 

You will notice that the two "A's" in the first signature are printed 
and so is the "A" in the "Jay" in the second signature. The "a's" in 
the third and fourth signatures are the normal style "a." Notice that 
in the entire writing, the entire writing movement is in a circular 
clockwise fashion. There are some variations here, which is true, 
but you will see that in the second "Jacobs" — the "a" in "Jacobs" 
compares very favorably with the other "a's" in three and four, and 
the variation really does not amount to much in that I would say the 
first two signatures, in laymen's terminology, would probably be his 
Sunday signature, so to speak, because there is a lot of money involved 
in these two signatures. 

©8-765 O — 63 — pt 4 5 



870 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

The last one I would say was written more in an informal manner 
because I would say that the person was probably in a huri-y to get out. 
That is why the ending "y" in "Jay" has not been finished. That is 
the outward thrust and the thnist to the right. 



Gesell Exhibit No. 5 




PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN V.S. 871 

I would also say if you turn the chart over to your left and hold it up 
with the 10-inch right side on the top, notice the bottom of ajll of the 
"b's" in the "Jacobs," like the bottom part of a cereal bowl, nice and 
rounded in all four of them ; very good agreement. 

I would also say that the "c's" are very good in the writing agree- 
ment, particularly in signatures two, three, and four. 

You will notice the way they slant in, both the "J's" in "Jay" and 
"Jacobs" are practically the same. There is hardly any deviation at all 
in slant. Notice another similarity, all of the capital "J's" in "Jay" 
have long swinging loops, the final loops, as compared to the final loops 
in the "J" in "Jacobs" and that is another very good similarity, a very 
strong similarity of identity. 

You might also compare the distances, that is, between the letters 
"J" and "A" and "J" and "a" both in "Jay" and "Jacobs." Notice 
there is equal distance practically all the way through. 

By the way, these are all enlarged to the same size, so as far as size 
is concerned they are all of the same length. You will notice that the 
length is the same. They are all about the same length. I could prob- 
ably spend a little more time pointing out spme of the similarities. 
I do not see any other variations, gentlemen, but I think, therefore, 
you gentlemen recognize the similarities I have pointed out and I 
think, as a consequence of this study, most anyone could come to the 
conclusion, and you don't have to be a handwriting expert, that all 
four signatures were written by the same person. That is, in my 
opinion. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, may we mark the photographic chart as 
"Gesell Exhibit No. 5" and receive it in evidence? 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it is so ordered. 

Mr. NriTLE. The staff has no further questions of this witness, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Pool. Thank you for appearing as a witness. 

Counsel, call your next witness. 

Mr. NiTTLE. We would like to recall Arnold Indenbaum. Would 
Arnold Indenbaum please come forward ? 

Mr. Pool. You are still under oath, Mr. Indenbaum. 

TESTIMONY OF ARNOLD INDENBAUM— Resumed 

Mr. NrrrLE. Mr. Indenbaum, have you heard the testimony of the 
witness June Gard, ticket agent for KLM airlines ? 

Mr. Indenbatj3I. I have. 

Mr. Nitfle. Miss Gard testified that in June an individual identify- 
ing himself as Mr. Jacob telephoned her from the KLM office in 
Ottawa, Canada, and represented himself as being a friend of Mr. 
Laub, known to this committee as Levi Lee Laub. This call related 
to the deposit of funds with the KLM agent in Ottawa, Canada, for 
the purchase of airline tickets to Paris, France. 

The question we would like to ask you is : Are you the Mr. Jacobs 
who made the telephone call to Miss Gard from Canada ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 



872 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. Pool. That would be the fifth amendment ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. It involves the question of my being under sub- 
pena by the grand jury and any testimony I make here becomes part 
of the public record. 

Mr. Pool. Do you plead the fifth amendment on this ? 

Mr. Indeostbaum. I said also what I "previously stated." Yes, that 
includes the fifth amendment. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, is it not a fact that you are not the 
person who identified himself as Jay Jacobs in Canada, that that 
person was someone else? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Miss Gard also testified that, when she later received a 
local call from a Mr. Jacob asking that the refund be mailed to him, 
she advised the caller that KLM would be unable to send him the 
refund and it would be necessary for him to come into the KLM office 
and identify himself as Jay Jacob. 

Did not ner request for identification lead to your going to North 
Carolina to secure a driver's license under the false name of Jay 
Jacobs? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You heard Miss Gard identify you as the person intro- 
duced to her as Mr. Jacob in the latter part of August of this year. 
Did she correctly identify you ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, I have before me the affidavit of H. J 
van der Jagt, ticket manager of KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. Mr. 
van der Jagt has returned to Holland for a brief stay and was unable 
to appear personally before the committee today. 

In his affidavit, marked for identification as "Indenbaum Exhibit 
No. 1" which I hand to you, Mr. van der Jagt identifies you as the 
person known to him as Jay Jacobs and to whom he turned over a 
check, dated August 27, 1963, in the amount of $2,067.20, as a refund 
due in connection with a student trip to Cuba. 

Mr. van der Jagt also said Mr. Jay Jacobs presented a North Caro- 
lina driver's license for identification when he received the refund 
check. 

Is there any inaccuracy in the affidavit of Mr. van der Jagt? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr, Chairman, I offer Exhibit No. 1 in evidence. 

Mr. Pool. If there is no objection, it is so ordered. 

(Document marked "Indenbaum Exhibit No. 1" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, I hand you a photostatic copy of the 
check of the KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, to which I have referred, 
dated August 27, 1963, and made payable to the order of Mr. Jay 
Jacob, Route 1, Box 141 B, Durham, North Carolina, which is marked 
for identification as "Indenbaum Exhibit No. 2." Is that not the 
check which was delivered to you by Mr. H. J. van der Jagt at the 
offices of KLM Royal Dutch Airlines on August 27, 1963 ? 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACmVITIES IN U.S. 873 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NriTLE. Mr. Chairman, I oflfer the exhibit in evidence. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it is so ordered. 

(Document previously marked for identification as "Perham Ex- 
hibit No. 1." See p. 866.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you after receiving that check then appear at the 
First National City Bank, 640 Fifth Avenue, New York City, for 
the purpose of cashing it ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you not endorse that check as Jay Jacobs? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. There is a notation likewise upon the check made by the 
paying teller that you identified yourself by a North Carolina driver's 
license, number 1230513. Did you exhibit a North Carolina driver's 
license of that number to the paying teller ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, were you also in attendance as the wit- 
ness Peter Gumpert gave his testimony today ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I was. 

Mr. NrrrLE. He testified that he accompanied you to Oarrboro, 
North Carolina, so that you might make application for a North Caro- 
lina driver's license. Did he correctly relate the circumstances under 
which you made this application for a license? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was Peter Gumpert introduced by you to Nicholas 
Bateson the evening of July 25, 1963 ? 

]\Ir. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did not Nicholas Bateson and Peter Gumpert at that 
time reside at Route #1, Box 141-B, Durham, North Carolina? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you ever resided at that address ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How long have you known Nicholas Bateson ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that question on the same 
grounds. 

Mr, NiTTLE. Do you know him to be a member of the Progressive 
Labor Movement? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you tell us why you, a longtime resident of the 
State of New York, would choose to obtain identification as Jay 
Jacobs in the State of North Carolina, at Carrboro particularly ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. I would like to ask you what particular legisla- 
tive purpose that question has. 

Mr. NiTTLE. We want to inquire whether you did so upon your own 
initiative or at the request of someone else connected with the Pro- 
gressive Labor Movement, a Communist organization, which, accord- 



874 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

ing to testimony before this committee, played an important role in 
organizing this student travel to Cuba. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. I still don't see to my satisfaction that this serves 
any legislative purpose, and you did not answer the question I raised. 

Mr. Pool. The Chair orders you to answer the question. 

Mr. Indenbaum. I will have to refuse to answer that on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Let the record show that the witness does not "have 
to" refuse. The witness elects to invoke the fifth amendment, 

Mr. Pool. Let the record show that. 

Mr. Indenbaum. Let the record show the protection the Constitu- 
tion provides me. 

Mr. Pool. That is right. 

Mr. Nittle. Weren't you in possession of a valid New York chauf- 
feur's license? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Nittle. Wasn't your New York chauffeur's license titled to 
Arnold Indenbaum, your name ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Indenbaum, did you hear the testimony of D. U. 
Sherman, the driver examiner for the North Carolina Department of 
Motor Vehicles ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I did. 

Mr. Nittle. He identified you as the Jay Jacobs to whom he gave a 
driver's examination and road test on July 26, 1963, and as the person 
who made application for a driver's license at Carrboro, North Caro- 
lina. Was there any inaccuracy m the testimony of Mr. Sherman? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Nittle. I now hand you a copy of the application for a North 
Carolina driver's license, form DL-240, which bears the signature of 
Jay Jacobs, the applicant, and that is marked for identification as 
"Indenbaum Exhibit No. 2-A." Is that your signature? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Nittle. I would offer this exhibit into evidence, Mr. Chair- 
man. 

Mr. Pool. Withoutobjection, it is so ordered. 

(Document previously marked for identification as "Sherman Ex- 
hibit No. 1." See p. 844.) 

Mr. Nittle. In this application, Mr. Indenbaum, Mr. Sherman testi- 
fied you responded to the question, "Have you ever been licensed as an 
opera;tor or driver," that you had not ever been licensed. This was not 
true, was it ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Sherman also testified that you gave him informa- 
tion as to your birth date being February 2, 1982. This wasn't true, 
was it ? 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 875 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Pool. State your answer again. 

Mr. Indenbadtvi. I said I refuse to answer 'that on the same grounds. 
Mr. NiTTLE. Having made application on July 26, 1963, for a driver's 
license at Carrboro, this license was not immediately issued to you by 
the Department of Motor Vehicles, was it ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds I previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The committee's investigation shows that the license 
was actually issued on July 29, 1963, and mailed to Jay Jacobs at Route 
#1, Box 141-B, Durham, North Carolina, which was the address 
you gave. 

Would you tell the committee, please, by what means and by whom 
the license was delivered to you after it was forwarded to that address 
in Durham ? ' 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer on the grounds I previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Is it not a fact that you made application for this 
driver's license at Carrboro, in North Carolina, for the purpose of ob- 
taining an identification as Jay Jacobs so that you might obtain the 
refunds claimed from BOAC and KLM Airlines ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the groimds I previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You have also heard the testimony of Miss Brunhilde 
Linke, an employee of KLM Airlines ; have you not ? 
Mr. Indenbaum. Yes. I have. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Miss Lirtke testified that you appeared at the KLM 
offices in New York City in the latter part of August — August 26, 
1963 — at which time you were seeking a rebate for the tickets. She 
testified that you identified yourself as Jay Jacobs. 

She further testified she was present on August 27, 1963, and ob- 
served her superior, Mr. van der Jagt, hand the check to you. 

Do you have any coiTection to make in the testimony of Miss Linke? 
Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you present during the testimony of Mr. Edward 
O'Neill, manager of the ticket office of BOAC? 
Mr. Indenbaum. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. He testified he issued a check to you as Jay Ja obs in 
the amount of $4,134.40. Do you deny the testimony of Mr. O'Neill ? 
Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I hand you a photostatic copy of the check to which I 
have just referred, dated at New York August 26, 1963, drawn by 
BOAC, payable to the order of Jay Jacobs, Route 1, Box 141 B, 
Durham, North Carolina, payable through the First National City 
Bank of New York. The check is marked for identification as "Inden- 
baum Exhibit No. 3." 

Is it not a fact that this a copy of the check that was handed to you 
by Edward R. O'Neill on August 26, 1963 ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds I previously 
stated. 



876 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, I offer Exhibit No. 3 in evidence. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection it is so ordered. 

(Document previously marked for identification as "O'Neill Exhibit 
No. 3." Seep. 864.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you not later endorse tliis check with the name 
"Jay Jacobs" at the National City Bank at 42d and Madison Avenue ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I direct your attention to the endorsement on Exhibit 
No. 3. Is that not your signature ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that quesftion on the grounds I 
previously stated. 

Mr. NnTLE. I also direct your attention to the endorsement appear- 
ing thereon, that the teller identified you from a State of Nor<th Caro- 
lina driver's license number 1230513. Did you exhibit that driver's 
license to identify yourself at the time you sought to cash this check 
at the bank? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds that I pre- 
viously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. O'Neill also testified that his business records 
demonstrate that BOAC issued tickets to two individuals on June 13, 
1963, in the name of A. Indenbaum and V. Ortiz for travel to London 
and Paris. He did not meet with A. Indenbaum or V. Ortiz, on 
whose behalf the ticket was purchased. Are you the A. Indenbaum 
for whom a ticket was purchased from BO^.C at New York on June 
23,1963? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds I previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Barry Hoffman, who participated in the student 
travel to Cuba, testified that one Vickie Ortiz joined the student group 
in Prague, Czechoslovakia, at the time of the arrival of the student 
group there in the latter part of June, but that Vickie Ortiz did not 
travel from New York with the student group. 

Did you travel to London and Paris witn Vickie Ortiz on June 16 
and 17, 1963? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer tKat on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you travel on to Prague, Czechoslovakia, with 
her? 

Mr. Indenbaum. It sounds like the same question, but I repeat my 
answer. 

Mr. Pool. You what ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I repeat my answer to the previous one. 

Mr. Pool. You refuse to answer on the grounds of the fifth amend- 
ment? 

Mr. Indenbaum. That is right, on the grounds also that I pre- 
viously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. When you departed aboard BOAC on June 16, 1963, 
to London and thence to Pans, was it your purpose to travel to Paris 
to make advance arrangements for the reception of the 50-odd stu- 
dents who left New York on June 25, 1963, by BOAC and KLM ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 877 

Mr. NiTTLE. From whom did you receive financial assistance in ac- 
quiring your ticket for travel to London aboard BOAC on June 16, 
1963? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr, NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, did you hear the testimony of David 
Perham, an employee of the First National City Bank at 640 Fifth 
Avenue, New York ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I did. 

Mr. NiTPLE. He testified that when you applied to the bank to. 
cash the KLM check of August 27, 1963, you exhibited to him your 
North Carolina driver's license and a photograph of yourself. Thus, 
you identified yourself as the Jay Jacob named as the payee in the 
check. 

Was there any inaccuracy in the testimony of Mr. Perham ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, the committee's investigation discloses 
that Levi Lee Laub obtained travel reservations and purchased a 
ticket upon Trans Canadian Air Lines Flight 621 for travel to Ottawa, 
Canada, June 8, 1963. This was 2 days prior to the time we are in- 
formed payment was made at Ottawa. 

Were you aware of the arrangements made by Laub for this travel ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Investigation made by staff members of this com- 
mittee has disclosed that the Bank of Cuba has funds on deposit 
with the Royal Bank of Canada at Montreal and with the Bank 
of Nova Scotia in Torr i to, Canada. Our investigation has further 
disclosed that funds from these banks have been transferred from the 
Bank of Cuba account to persons here in the United States, as well as 
in Canada. 

We are also aware that Mr. Laub, together with another person, was 
in possession of large amounts of United States currency while in 
Canada, currency carried in a brown leather briefcase for payment 
to KLM and BOAC in Ottawa. 

Do you have knowledge whether or not the American currency was 
obtained in Canada and, therefore, paid in Ottawa rather than in 
New York? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds I 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you tell us what disposition you made of the 
refund which you obtained from the offices of KLM and BOAC at 
New York amounting in excess of $6,000 ? What did you do with it ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds I previously 
stated. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you deliver this cash to any person known to 
you to be an agent of Fidel Castro ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds I previously 
stated. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Indenbaum, I have before me a photostatic copy 
of a certification of the Commissioners of Elections of the City of 
New York dated August 25, 1950, marked for identification as "In- 
denbaum Exhibit No. 4," which certifies to the election of Arnold 



878 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVmES IN U.S. 

Indenbaum of 763 Ocean Parkway as a delegate to the American 
Labor Party, Second Judicial District Convention, representing the 
21st Assembly District in the County of Kings at the primary election 
held August 22, 1950. 

Are you not the Arnold Indenbaum who was elected on August 
22, 1950, as a delegate to the American Labor Party convention? 

You may review the certification if you wish, I hand you thai 
exhibit. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Now, would you answer the question, please ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds I 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I also have before me, marked for identification as 
"Indenbaum Exhibit No. 5" a photostatic copy of the American Labor 
Party 1951 Fall Primary Designating Petition. I hand you this 
exhibit and direct your attention to the name Arnold Indenbaum, 
which appears upon the petition as a person seeking the party posi- 
tion of Member of the County Committee of the American Labor 
Party from the 21st Assembly District of Kings County, whose ad- 
dress is given as 763 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, New York. 

Are you not the Arnold Indenbaum who is named thereon ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You will also note in the exhibit that the candidate 
for the office of President of the Council of the City of New York is 
named as Clifford T. McAvoy. Mr. McAvoy was a well-known Com- 
munist Party functionary. 

Did you know Clifford T. McAvoy to be a member of the Communist 
Party at the time you sought office with him and others named upon 
the petition? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I also hand you a photostatic copy of the American 
Labor Party 1951 Fall Primary Designating Petition, marked for 
identification as "Indenbaum Exhibit No. 6." I direct your attention 
to the affidavit contained at the lower portion of the petition by the 
witness Arnold Indenbaum, who makes affidavit that he was a duly 
qualified voter and residing at 763 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, New 
York, and that the voters whose names are subscribed to the petition 
subscribed to the same in his presence. 

Is the signature of the witness Arnold Indenbaum, appearing upon 
the exhibit, your signature? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I refuse to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Indenbaum, the New York City section of the 
American Labor Party was cited by the Special Committee on Un- 
American Activities on March 29, 1944 — 

Mr. Pool. Mr. Counsel, just a second. Are you offering these as 
exhibits now ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Pool. It is so ordered, without objection. 

(Documents marked "Indenbaum Exhibits Nos. 4, 5, and 6," re- 
spectively, and retained in committee files. ) 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIYITIES IN U.S. 879 

Mr. NiTTLE. I was pointing out to Mr. Indenbaum that the New 
York City section of the American Labor Party was cited by the 
Special Committee on Un-American Activities on March 29, 1944, 
and by the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee of the Senate 
Judiciitry Committee on April 23, 1956, as a subversive organization. 

The latter committee reported as follows : 

Communist dissimulation extends into the field of political parties forming 
political front organizations such as the * * * American Labor Party. The Com- 
munists are thus enabled to present their candidates for elective oflSce under other 
than a straight Communist laljel. 

The question I would like to ask you, Mr. Indenbaum, is: Were 
you personally counseled or advised to seek office in the American 
Labor Party by any person known to you to be a member of the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Indenbaum. Is the American Labor Party so designated as a 
subversive organization by the Attorney General ? 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I siiggest the witness be directed to answer the 
question. 

Mr. Pool. You are directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Indenbaum. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. Pool. You are refusing to answer on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment and other grounds which you previously stated ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I also have before me an application for a passport 
filed by you on April 2, 1959, with the agent of the Department of 
State at New York City. This application we have marked for iden- 
tification as "Indenbaum Exhibit No. 7," which I now hand to you 
and ask you whether or not that is a true copy of your application? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
I previously stated. 

(Document marked "Indenbaum Exhibit No. 2." See pp. 880-883.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Is not the signature "Arnold Indenbaum," subscribed 
to the affidavit on page 4 of the application, your signature ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I direct your attention to page 2 of the application 
where the questions appear : "Are you now a member of the Communist 
Party ? Have you ever been a member of the Communist Party ?" 

I note that you did not respond to those questions. Was there some 
reason for your not doing so ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Indenbaum. What was that question again, please ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. You did not respond to the questions in your passport 
application form where the inquiry is made of you, "Are you now a 
member of the Communist Party? Have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ?•' Was there some reason for your not doing so ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I decline to answer on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Tndeiibaum, were you a member of the Communist 
Party at the time yon filed your passport application on April 2, 1959 ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I dexiline to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 



880 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

(Document marked "Indenbaum Exhibit No. 7" follows.) 



Indenbaum Exhibit No. 7 



r8nn DSP-ix 

(lJ-ll-47) 



furw • 
Bodfcl 



larfmu No. 47-Ra61.7. 



aCPAMTMCMT OT *TAT« 



PASSPORT APPLICATION 



All QMraMry iDfomMtkm and ffuldsncr will be dvrn applicaot br the clrrfc of tbr Prdenl or wtbortvd 
8Ut« Court, or tht PMtport A(eDt befor* whom this applicmtLon mint br rumtM. Th« k«al fev (or • pus- 
port U 19 plm II for rweattaK applloiloQ (Clrrts of Stat^ Courts arr aathorlxcd to oolkct O for mcutlai 
appllfttoa ) OoD't tmf uiy otb«r k« to aurooe for OUIdk to or fiecutlnf this appllcfttloD or for obuininc 
the pacsport cicrpt piftlagf asd/or necfts^ry irlrphooe or telecrapb chufw. 



f AIT I— TO n COMPtETED lY m APfUOJITS 



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rt^c 1 1? j^^' .^^y^^i ^ .-I 



or THE UNnXD STATES (BY MITTH) (TNROUGH NATUIULIZATIOM). DO HEMBY Am.T TO THE 
OETARTUENT Of STATE FOR A PASSTO«T 



400 aOT UH TUB VACH 



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I HAVE BEEN ASSENT .FROM THE U S. DURING THE PASTS YEARS AT THE FOLLOWING PLACES FOR THE PERIODS STATED (LIST ABSENCES OF 
MORE THAN 2 MONTHS' DURATION) (IF ADDITK3NAL SPACE IS NEEDED A SUPPLEMENTAL SHEET SHOULD BE USED AND ATTACHED i 



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OATCOritAMttASf 



OF H(;SSAMO OR WIFE 



HUSBAND'S OR W1FE3 ftACE OF OIRTM, 



HUSIAND3 O* wm-S DATE OF HRTH 



QwaSKa or Wife Is U. 8. ClUttil 
iD^Smtrad or wi l t H W O T U. 0. CIUm m 



HUStANOO« WIFE NOW RCSIDme AT 



Q.Mtrmc*oo< KnnlnUfld 

C]-MwTlfl«« u i uiUiM ed by (d€aM> (dl r ij iOl) U i l — 



DESCRIPTION OF APPLICANT 



HtWHT 



0rf O ^V 



/^,lei^,^ 



VISIBLE 0ISTIN6UISHIN6 MARKS OA FEATURES 



FIACC or BIRTH 



Bp-^)>-L,.i,' jjy ^1 ^SA 



JFAtnM 



SATE OF BIRTH 
(■ONTNJ (DAY) (ItAR) 



H/t/f -*- 



MY LAST PASSPORT WAS OBTAINED FROM (NOTE IF mCLUOCO^NABOTHER S 
FASBPORT STATE HAME of BEARER) 



LOCATION OF ISSUING OFTICC 



OATEOFOSUANCC 



Nuaber: 

D Sobnlttcd for csneeUntlon 

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MAIL PASSPORT TO 



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(DO NOT UU TMK <PACt) 



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FEE EXEC. TWX POST. 



Mr. Pool. You decline to answer it on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment, is that correct ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. On the gi-ounds of the fifth amendment and the 
other grounds I previously stated. 

Mr. Pool. Proceed. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



881 



i D8P-11 (l»-l^i.') 



(M«T I— CeaOnaO 



PROPOSED TRAVEL PLANS 



TUVtlMe IT OMANIICD TOUR' 



D v« 



KIT or MMriTUIIC 



^ 'C<^ '/iA'- 



NAME OF SHIP OR AIRUNE 



yCAPtS OF TRANSK>ftTATION 

SNIP AIR OTHER 

Dtptftura D ^ D 

Rftum Q ^i D 



PURPOSE or TRIP 



PROfOSCD LEHGTM Of STAY 



3-fv4 /ft,^ (^'^ 



p^ 



APfllOXIMATC DATI Of OCPARTUM 



NUMBER OF PREVIOUS TRIPS 
ABROAD WITHIN LAST M MOMTHS 



/6>.- 



WCULO YOU nCASC INDICATf WHrTHCR YOU 
CXPECT TOTAKE ANOTHER TRIP A9R0AD IN THE 
NEXT 



D VfAT D 2 tttn O » Yean 



LIST EACH CtXIHTRY TO BE VISITED 




ARE YOU NOW A MEMtER OF THE COMMUMlSTntffTVT 

(WHITE ■•YES" OR ' NO ) ^^^""^ 



HAVE YOU EVER BEEN A MEMBER OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY? 

(WRITE "YES OR ' HO ") 



IF even A MEMBCR. STATE RCRIOO Of MEMBERSHIP 



^ 



PERSONS TO BE INCLUDED IN PASSPORT 



THIS SECTION OF PART I TO BE COMPLETED IF WIFE OR HUSBAND OF APPLICANT (WHOSE PHOTOGRAPHIC UKEHESS MUST BE INCLUDED IN GROUP PHOTO WITH 
APPLICANT. ATTACHED TO THIS PAGE) IS TO BE INCLUDED IN APPLICANT S PASSPORT 



(WIFrSt (HUSBAND SI FULL LEGAL NAME 



(WIFE'S) (HUSBAND'S) LAST U. S PASSPORT WAS OBTAINED FROM 



tOCATION Of ISSUING OFFICE 



DAI EOF ISSUANCE 



Number: 
D 8ubniitt«d h«n«ltb 
D Other dlspoeltloo (Sutc> 



THISSECTION OF PART 1 TO BE COMPLETED IF CHILDREN OF APPLICANT (WHOSE PHOTOGRAPHIC LIKENESSES MuST BE INCLUDED IN CROUP PHOTO ATTACHED TO THIS 
PAGE) ARE TO BE INCLUDED IN APPLICANT S PASSPORT 


NAME IN FULL 


PLACE OF BIRTH (CITT. STATE) 


DATE OF BIRTH 


RESIDED IN FROM TO 
THCU S 


HOW RESIDING AT 


NAME IN FULL 


PLACE OF BIRTH (city STATf) 


DATE OF BIRTH 


RESIDCD m FROM TO 
THE U S. 


NOW RESIDING AT 


NAME IN FULL 


PLACE OF BIRTH (OTY. STATt) 


DATE OF BIRTH 


RESIDED IN FROM TO 
THE U S 


NOW RESIDIN6 AT 


ATTACH SHEET GIVING ABOVE INFORMATION ON ANY ADDITIONAL CHILDREN TO BE INCLUDED IN THIS PASSPORT 


NOTE IfAppllcaniorany minor Included In Ihls application was born ouliidelhernUtdStftles on Of »/ler May34. 1«M. of An 9X\tn pai-fol and an AmerUan pvtat. 
> supplemrnUl affldavU will be required rlvinf th« n&mr and date and place of birth of American parent as well as complete daU concerning how and on what date 
parent acquiird American dtltenViip uid tbe periods of resldenoe Lo tbe I'nited States aad ahroftd (Unless such intormatlon 1> already (tlveo In thb application.) 



Mr. NiTTLE. Were you a member of the Communist Party in 1950 
when you held the position of delegate to [Second Judicial District 
Convention] the American Labor Party ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 



882 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



rotm DSP-ii (ii-ia-sn 



IF »NT OnKHMtWTS INCIUOEO. ;T*M Ht«E OWIY- 



MIIT II— TO IE COMPinED lY M *fH.ICMIT WHO lECOME * CITI2EN THK0U6H OWW WWUmiWiOM 



IIUMtCIUTCDTOTHEU S 



I XeSIOCD COMTINUOUM.T M THC U S 
FIIO«(TUIU TO (nM) 



CERTIf ICATC or NATUMUZATIOM 

NO 



D Submliud iMrwItb 
Q Pravlouslr lubinltuil 



I WAS MATUMLnCD KTOOE THE (Mat Or CSUn) 



I HESIDCD AT (CfTC Vkmi 



DATE NATURALIZED 



riACE NATUMIUCD (Omr. tlAII) 



KroME NATURALIZATION I WAS A NATIONAL or (NANC EACH COUNTRT) 



PART III— TO BE COMPLETED IT AN APPLICANT WHO CLAIMS CITIZENSHIP THROUGH PARENT(S) 



PMT IV^TO IE COMPLETED IT AN APPLICANT WHOSE WIFE (II UN li to ta IwluM In »>s«er1). ACQUIRED CITIZENSHIP THROUGH 
NATURALIZATION OF HERSELF. HER FATHER. OR A FORMER HUSIANO 



1 IMMI6MTC0 TO THC U S 

MOKTH VtU • 


1 RESIDED CONTINUOUSLY IN THE U. S 
FnOW(VCAR} TO (TEAR) 


IF FATHER NAruRALIZCD (DATEI 


CERTlFtCATt OF NAtURALlZATION 
MA 

Q Submitted hmvith 
O PravtouBly mbmliMd 


FATHCR NATURALIZED KPME (mw Of CDUin) 


RIACC NATURALIZED <Cirr. STATE) 


FATtttft IteSIDCD COMTIHUOUSLY IN 
THCU S 


MOTHER RESIDED CONTlNUOUSLt IN 
TMEU S 

FROM (TIAR) TO (YEAR) 


IF MOTHER NATURALIZED (DATE) 


CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION 
HA 

O Submitted banwltb 
O Pnvloiuly Kibmittad 


MOTHER NATURALIZED BEFORE (NAMC OF COURT) 


PLACE NATURAUZED (OTT. STATE) 



MV WIFE IMMIGRATED TO THE U. S ON 
(DATE) 



O SHE WAS NATURALIZED ON 

Q HER FATHER WAS NATURALIZED ON 

Q HER FORMER HUSBAND WAS NATURAUZED ON 



BEFORE THE (MHI or COUNT) 



FLACE NATURALIZED (OTT. STATt] 



AS SHOWN BY THE ACCOMFANVIMG CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION NO . 



SINCE NATURALIZATION MY WIFE HAS BEEN ABSENT FROM THE U S. AT THE FOLLOWING PLACES FOR THE FOLLOWING PERIODS 



PLACE (NAiiC EACH C0L>NT1IT VfSITEO) 



FMOM (OATl OF DCMimjnC fNOM TIC U S ) TO (DATE OF NETUIM TO TW a S.) 



PART V— TO BE COMPLETED BY A FEMALE APPLICANT WHO HAS BEEN MARRIED MORE THAN ONCE OR BY MALE APPLICANT 
WHOSE WIFE IS TO BE INCLUDED IN PASSPORT (Strlkt out Ittms In paranthssas below whIcD do not apply) 


(MY) (HER) MAIDEN NAME WAS 


(1 WAS) (SHE WAS) DATE OF PREVIOUS MARRIAGE 
Q Not previously marrlMl 
D Previously marrM on 


NAME OF FORMER HUSBAND 


PLACE OF PREVIOUS MARRIAGE 


FORMER HUSBAND S FLACE OF BIRTH 


MARR 

s 


AGEWASTENMINATEOn gjATE 
D<mlh 
Divorce 


(If married more than twic*. set forth facts in t supplemental siatemenli | 



PART VI— TO IE COMPLHED IT A FEMALE APPLICANT WHOSE HUSIANO OR FORMER HUSIANO WAS NOT lORN IN THE U. S. 



MY Q HUSBAND IMMIGRATEOTOTHEU S. ON 

(OATl) 
U FORMER HUSMND 


Dhe 

g his father (intuit name} 


WAS NATURALIZED (EFORE THE (MHE OF COURTI 


PLACE NATURALIZED (CITT. STATE) 


DATE or NATURALIZATION (H0N1H. OAT TEAR) 


AS SHOWN BY CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION 
NO fl fiilhmlll**1 h^PMunih Q Pr«vinii«ly «iihmiiiMl 



Mr. NiTTLE. Were you a member of the Communist Party in 1951 
when you sought the party position as member of the County Com- 
mittee of the American Labor Party for the 21st Assembly District, 
as appears on the 1951 Fall Primary Designating Petition of the 
American Labor Party ? 

Mr. Indenbaum. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 883 



rvrm D(U«-ii ii>-ia-«7) 



I havf not (and my wife and/«ir my children have not). Rince acquiring Americas cttisenship, been naturaliged aa a 
citiion or asi citizeiui of a foreign «talo; taken an oath or made an Affirmation or other formal declaration of allexiance to a 
foreign state; entered or served in the armed services of a foreign state; accepted or performed the duties of any office, post, 
or employment under the government of a foreign State or political subdivision thereof; voted in a political election In a 
foreign state or participated in an election or plebiscite to determine the sovereignty over foreign territory; made a formal 
renunciation of nationality either in the United States or before a diplomatic or consular officer of the United States in a 
foreign state; ever sought or claimed the i>enefits of the nationality of any foreign state; been convicted by a court of 
competent jurisdiction of deserting the armed services of the United States in time of war, or ol committing or of conspiring 
to commit any act of treason against, or of attempting by force to overthrow, or of bearing arms against the United States; 
departed from or remained outride of the jurisdiction of the United States for the purpose of evading or avoiding training 
and service in the armed services of the United States. 

(//any of Ote above-mentiontd arte or condilunu kate keen ptrformtd by or apply to Uu applitant, or to kit tcift or hit childnn 
{when included in this application), the portion which appliet thould be struck out, and a tuppUmentary itplanatory itatemeru 
under oath should be attached and made a part hereof.] 

I solemnly swear that the sUtemenU made on all the pages of this application are true and that the photograph attached 
hereto is a likeness of me and of those people to be included in my passport. 

OATH OF ALLEGIANCE 

Further, I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, 
foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I take this obligation freely, without 
any mental reservations, or purpose of evasion: So help me God. 



(TO K sesm ST urucun m aUKZ or > odk ofCxmon 



MSSran ACCNT) 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this day of , ig . 

(bkal or conBT) 

Clerk ttfOu i;GEMI..i).^..JjL'.'.';.VCourt a< ...., 

Patsport Agent, Department of SlaU, at'^V.ii.2. y^i^)f. j/K.l.Srr.^ 




AFFIDAVIT Oli^BtTlrnMa WITNESS 

I, the undersigned, solemnly swear that I am a citizen of the United States; that I reside at the address written below my 
signature hereto affixed; that I know the applicant who executed the affidavit hereinbefore set forth to be a citizen of the United 
States; that the statements made in the applicant's affidavit are true to the best of my knowledge and belief; further, 1 solemnly 
swear that I have known the applicant for years. 



IF arTNESS HAS BtEN ISSUED A PASSPOST. GIVE MUMKR IF KNOWN AND DATE OR A^ (to St SICWO BT wmcss IN nssENCX cr A CIISK Of COURT OR PASSKRT ACENT) 

RROXIMATE DATE OF ISSUE. 



. DATE OF ISSUE 



(KlATiaN»aP TO AmJCAMT. r NOT MLATID. » CTATf} 



No iRwyer or oUitr pen«n win br Accepted aa witnMA to A poASPort Appllestloo 
If tie t)A3 received cr eipecte to receive a lec for hb lervloeA lo oonnectlon vltli 
the execution of t)ie APpllCAtlon or obtolnlnf the pMiport. 



B AfiORBAOF afTmS) 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this day of , 19.. 

(seal or coubt) 

Clerk of the _ Court at 

Patsport Agent,- Department of Slate, at 



I S GOVERHHEm MINTING OFTKE 1914—0-456072 



Mr. Pool. Do you now offer that application for passport into 
evidence ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Pool. Without objection, it is so ordered. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you now a member of the Progressive Labor Move- 
ment ? 



884 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. Indenbaum. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, this concludes the staff interrogation 
of this witness. However, in view of the fact that our investigation 
is continuing, it may be desirable to offer additional documentation 
and reports for the record. We request permission to make such 
additions to the record as may appear desirable at a later date. 

Mr. Pool. If there is no objection, it is so ordered. 

Are there any questions from the committee ? 

You are excused. 

The committee is adjourned, pending the call of the Chair. 

(Wliereupon, at 3 :20 p.m. Wednesday, October 16, 1963, the sub- 
committee recessed, subject to the call of the (/hair.) 



VIOLATIONS OF STATE DEPARTMENT TRAVEL REGU- 
LATIONS AND PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVI 
TIES IN THE UNITED STATES 

Part 4 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1963 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington^ D.C. 
public hearings 

A subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities met, 
pursuant to call, at 10 a.m., in Room 445, Cannon House Office Build- 
ing, Hon. Richard H. Ichord (chairman of the subcommittee) pre- 
siding. 

Subcommittee members: Representatives Richard H. Ichord, of 
Missouri ; George F. tenner, Jr., of Arizona ; and August E. Johansen, 
of Michigan. 

Subcommittee members present: Representatives Ichord, Senner, 
and Johansen. 

Committee members also present: Representatives Joe R. Pool, of 
Texas; Donald C. Bruce, of Indiana; and Henry C. Schadeberg, of 
Wisconsin. (Appearances as noted.) 

Staff members present: Francis J. McNamara, director; Alfred M. 
Nittle, counsel ; and Louis J. Russell, investigator. 

Mr. Ichord. The committee will come to order. 

The Chair observes that members of the subcommittee, Mr. Johan- 
sen and Mr. Senner are present ; therefore a quorum is present. 

The subcommittee is convened to continue hearings, begun here in 
Washington on May 6 of this year, on certain matters and for the 
legislative purposes set forth in a committee resolution adopted April 
24, 1963. I will read the text of that resolution and a summarization 
of the chairman's May 6 statement concerning the purposes and sub- 
ject matter of these hearings.^ 

I will now read for the record the order of appointment of the sub- 
committee conducting these hearings : 

NOVEMBEE 14, 1963. 
To : Francis J. McNamara, 
Director, Committee on Un-American Activities. 

Pursuant to the provisions of the law and the rules of this Committee, I 
hereby appoint a subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, con- 



1 For resolution and summarization of chairman's opening statement of May 6, 1963, see 
pp. 827-829. 

98-765 O— 6S— pt. 4 6 885 



886 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN tJ.S. 

sisting of Honorable Richard Ichord as Chairman, and Honorable George F. 
Senner, Jr., and Honorable August E. Johansen as associate members, to conduct 
a hearing in Washington, D.C. on Monday, November 18, 1963, at 10 a.m., on 
subjects under investigation by the Committee and take such testimony on said 
day or succeeding days, as it may deem necessary. 

Please make this action a matter of Committee record. 

If any Member indicates his inability to serve, please notify me. 

Given under my hand this 14th day of November, 1963. 

/s/ Edwin E. Willis, 
Edwin E. Willis, 
Chairman, Committee on Vn-Amcrican Activities. 

A quorum is present. Mr. Counsel, are you ready to proceed? 

Mr. NiTTLE, Yes, sir. Will Mr. Harold Wilkes please come for- 
ward ? 

Mr. IcHORD. Will the witness remain standing to be sworn? 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give 
before this committee will be the trutli, the wliole truth, and nothing 
but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Wilkes. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF HAROLD GLENN WILKES 

Mr. IcHORD. The witness may be seated. Is the witness represented 
by counsel ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes, sir. 

Mr. IcHORD. Is your counsel present in the committee room ? 

Mr. Wilkes. No, not by legal counsel. 

Mr. IcHORD. You are not represented by legal counsel ? 

Mr. Wilkes. No. 

Mr. IcHORD. You do not desire to be represented by counsel? 

Mr. Wilkes. No, 

Mr. IcHORD. Proceed with the preliminary questions. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Wilkes, would you state your full name and resi- 
dence for the record, please ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Harold G. Wilkes, Glenn is my middle name. 

Mr. Nittle. Harold Glenn Wilkes? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. My residence is Rural Route 9, Bloomington, 
Indiana. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you state the date and place of your birth ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Vincennes, Indiana, March 29, 1982. 

Mr. Nittle. By whom are you employed and in what capacity? 

Mr. Wilkes. I am employed by the Franklin Manufacturing Com- 
pany at Bloomington, Indiana. This is a division of the Studebaker 
Corporation. I am employed as the warehouse supervisor. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Wilkes, you are appearing here under subpena 
today ; are you not '? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. In connection with your dwelling at Bloomington, Indi- 
ana, you have an apartment therein which you rent to other persons; 
is that true? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you recall renting this apartment to persons identi- 
fying themselves as Mr. and Mrs. John Glenn ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 887 

Mr. NiTTLE. How did you happen to get the Glenns as tenants ? 

Mr. Wilkes. I inserted an ad in one of the local newspapers, and 
they responded to that ad. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you tell us when this rental to the Glenns took 
place? 

Mr. Wilkes. Around the middle of August. 

Mr, NiTTLE. Of what year ? 

Mr. Wilkes. 1962. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Approximately how long did they remain your tenants ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Approximately 9 months. 

Mr. NiTTLE. After you rented this apartment to the Glenns, did it 
come to your attention that numerous persons were visiting the 
apartment ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. "\^nien did you take particular notice of this fact? 

Mr. Wilkes. We noticed a regularity in the meetings around Janu- 
ary. We didn't take particular notice of it until around the middle of 
March. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. What year was that? 

Mr. Wilkes. 1963. 

Mr. NiTTLE. 'Wliat drew your attention to the meeting in March 
1963? 

Mr. Wilkes. The meeting in March had a spokesman from another 
organization in attendance. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you tell us the circumstances? 

Mr. Wilkes. This person was an instructor from out of State — 
New York, specifically. His manner of speaking, the subject matter, 
and the terminology that he used concerned us very greatly. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you tell us about that in more detail ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Specifically, he encouraged the other people in attend- 
ance to be faithful to the membership in the organization that he was 
addressing. 

He referred specifically to the present system of government as an 
"imperialistic, capitalistic system." He encouraged the members also 
of the group that he was addressing — he didn't encourage them, but 
he stated that it was only a matter of time until, through their efforts 
and other groups' efforts, the system would be replaced. 

Mr. Nitfle. In what manner was he addressed by the group, and in 
what manner did he address the group ? 

Mr. Wilkes. He was identified only as "a comrade from New York." 
He, in turn, addressed the members of the group as "comrades." 

Mr. Nittle. Was any reference made to the name of the group he 
was addressing? 

Mr. Wilkes. TheYSA. 

Mr. Nittle. Were you in a position to overhear the conversations 
which took place in the apartment ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you tell us what made that possible? 

Mr. Wilkes. Through a common system of ductwork — by common, 
I mean the Iieating ductwork for their apartment was the same as the 
ductwork for our living area and the house proper. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you describe their apartment in relation to your 
dwelling? 



888 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. Wilkes. It is below our living area and on the same plane with 
our basement. In other words, due to the lay of the ground, the front 
entrance is on ground level, but the back [basement] entrance is also 
on groimd level. The ground level in the front extends to the back and 
is the second floor in the back. 

Mr. NiTTLE. "VVliat system of heating do you have in your home? 

Mr. Wilkes. Coal furnace; forced air. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Your living room was directly above the apartment? 

Mr. Wilkes. Our kitchen and dining room were directly above.^ 

Mr. NiTTLE. Your kitchen and dining room were directly above the 
apartment ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Is there a connection between the apartment and your 
kitchen and dining room ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes, that particular room has not only common duct- 
work, but a common register. The register in the floor of our living 
area is the same register that's in the ceiling of their living room. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You described the organization mentioned in the course 
of the instructor's convereation with the group as "YSA." Did you 
later learn what the initials "YSA" stood for? 

Mr. Wilkes. The Young Socialist Alliance. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Following this meeting in March, did you observe the 
frequency with which these meetings were held in your apartment? 

Mr. Wilkes. Once a month, generally within the first week of the 
month. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Ordinarily, how many persons were in attendance at 
these meetings? 

Mr. Wilkes. The attendance would vary from 7 to 15 persons. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Over how long a period of time did you observe these 
meetings to take place? 

Mr. Wilkes. Until the last of May. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Can you tell us the names of the persons who attended 
these meetings? 

Mr. Wilkes. There was Ralph Levitt ; Jim Bingham ; Tom Morgan ; 
Bill and Paulann Groninger; the Glenns, of course; Jack and Betsy 
Barnes; and, on some occasions, the Smith couple — that is, Don and 
Polly — attended. On other occasions people attended who I can't 
identify. 

Mr. Nittle. Were Marcia Glenn and John Robert Glenn in at- 
tendance at these meetings? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Chairman, committee information identifies the 
persons mentioned by Mr. Wilkes, as follows : 

Ralph Levitt is or was the head of the Young Socialist Alliance in 
Bloomington, Indiana. He was also associated with the Fair Play for 
Cuba Student Council at the University of Indiana during the period 
1961 to 1963, and was the original lessee of the post office box in 
Bloomington, Indiana, for the Fair Play for Cuba Student Council. 

James Bingham, in 1961 and 1962, was, respectively, the treasurer 
and chairman of the Fair Play for Cuba Student Council of the 
University of Indiana. In 1962 and 1963 Bingham was secretary of 
the Young Socialist All iance at the University of Indiana. 



PRO-CASTHO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 889 

Paulann Gronino^er is a member of the Young Socialist Alliance in 
Bloominofton, Indiana. She is also the secretary of an organization 
known as the Committee to Aid the Bloomington Students, the latter 
having: been set up by the Young Socialist Alliance in Bloomington 
to defend three Indiana University students who have been indicted 
for conspiracy to overthrow the government of the State of Indiana, 
in violation of an Indiana statute. 

The indicted students are Ralph Levitt, James E. Bingham, and 
Thomas G. Morgan, all officers of the Young Socialist Alliance and the 
Fair Play for Cuba Student Council of the University of Indiana. 

William Groninger is a member of the Young Socialist Alliance in 
Indiana at Bloomington and is the husband of Paulann Groninger, 
secretarv of the Committee to Aid the Bloomington Students. 

Jack Banies is or was a student at Northwestern University. He is 
identified as an organizer for the Young Socialist Alliance in the Mid- 
west area of the United States. 

Mr. Wilkes, can you state whether, as a matter within your knowl- 
edge, that from time to time the meetings held by this group in the 
Glenn apartment were addressed by persons who came from other 
States or localities? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Will you tell us about that ? 

Mr. Wilkes. On at least one occasion there was a guest speaker from 
New York. The Barnes were also from out of State. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wliile the Glenns resided at your apartment, did you 
ever hear Marcia Glenn refer to herself as the recording secretary of 
the Young Socialist Alliance ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Could you tell us when that was and the circumstances ? 

Mr. Wilkes. This was in a conversation with James Bingham. 
They were getting a lot of adverse publicity locally at that time, and 
she asked whether she should or should not resign as the correspond- 
ing secretary. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wlien did this conversation take place, approximately ? 

Mr. Wilkes. In the middle of May, around the 20th. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Wilkes, I am going to ask Mr. Russell to hand you 
certain publications marked for identification as "Wilkes Exhibits 
Nos. 1-13," inclusive, which you have delivered to the committee 
recently. 

Exhibit 1 is a pamphlet entitled 1948 Manifesto of the Fourth In- 
ternational Against Wall Street and the Kremlin^ published by the 
Workers Press for the Revolutionary Workers Party, Canadian Sec- 
tion, 4th International, 87 King Street West, Room 5, Toronto, On- 
tario. 

Exhibit 2 is a pamphlet entitled Trotskyism and the Cuban Revolu- 
tion — An Answer to Hoy by Joseph Hansen, reprinted from The Mili- 
tant by Pioneer Publishers, 116 University Place, New York City. 

Exhibit 3 is a pamphlet entitled In Defense of the Cuban Revolu- 
tion: An Answer to the State Department and Tlieodore Draper by 
Joseph Hansen, published by the Pioneer Publishers, 116 University 
Place, New York City, New York. 

Exhibit 4 is a pamphlet entitled The Truth About Cuba by Joseph 
Hansen, also published by Pioneer Publishers. 



890 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Exhibit 5 is a pamphlet entitled A List of Puhlications on Socialism 
and the Labor Movement, published by Pioneer Publishers. 

Exhibit 6 is a pamphlet entitled The Theory of the Cuban Revolu- 
tion by Joseph Hansen, published by Pioneer Publishers. 

Exhibit 7 is a pamphlet entitled Too Many Babies? by Joseph Han- 
sen, published by Pioneer Publishers. 

Exhibit 8 is a pamphlet entitled Only Victorious Socialist R&ooliir 
tions Can Prevent the Third World War!, published by Pioneer 
Publishers. 

Exhibit 9 is a pamphlet entitled The Long View of History by Wil- 
liam F. Warde, published by Pioneer Publishers. 

Exhibit 10 is a pamphlet entitled The Socialist Workers Party by 
Joseph Hansen, published by Pioneer Publishers. 

Exhibit 11 is a booklet entitled History of the International Social- 
ist Youth Movement to 1929, a Younjr Socialist Forum publication. 

Exhibit 12 is a pamphlet entitled Why Can't Everybody Ha/ve a 
Job? by Fred Halstead, bearing the stamp of YSA, P.O. Box 915, 
Bloomington, Indiana. 

Exhibit 13 is a song sheet headed "Revolutionary and Workers' 
Songs" carrying the verses of the "Internationale," "The Red Flag," 
and Solidarity." 

Mr. Wilkes, would you tell us how these publications came into your 
possession ? 

Mr. Wilkes. I had occasion to enter the apartment one time to make 
repairs and I saw these things existed in quantity in the apartment. 
This, in line with what I had heard and saw before, made me seek to 
select, as best I could, a copy of everything there. 

Mr. IcHORD. This was John Robert Glenn's apartment? 

Mr. Wilkes. That is correct. I was not fortunate enough to get a 
copy of everything there because the periodicals were stacked — I saw 
four stacks that probably stood 3 or 4 feet high. I did notice in these 
stacks that there were multiple copies of the same pamphlets. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you also observe copies of a newspaper known as 
The Militant? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes , and another one called the Young Socialist 
Fonmt: 

Mr. NiTTLE. Approximately how many copies of those publications 
did you see? 

Mr. Wilkes. There were more than 10 copies of each. 

Mr. NiTTLE. They were in quantity, were they ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, in connection with these exhibits I 
ought to state for the record that The Militant is the official publica- 
tion of the Socialist Workers Party. 

The Socialist Workers Party was cited as subversive and Com- 
munist by Attorney General Tom Clark in 1948, and as a Trotskyist- 
Communist organization by this committee in the same year. It 
has also been designated by the United States Attorney General under 
Executive Order 10450, which is President Eisenhower's security or- 
der, superseding President Truman's loyalty order of March 21, 1947. 

Pioneer Publishers, which has printed the greater portion of the 
Exhibits 1 to 13 identified by Mr. Wilkes, maintains its offices at 116 
University Place, New York City, which is the address of the Socialist 
Workers Party and the Young Socialist Alliance of New York City. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



891 



Joseph Hansen, the author of several of the exhibits, is identified 
in Exliibit 10 as the secretary to Leon Trotsky until the time of his 
assassination in Mexico by Stalinist agents. 

Mr. Chairman, I ask that Exhibits 1 to 13 be received in evidence. 

Mr. IcHORD. All of these exhibits were gathered by you personally 
in the apartment of John Robert Glenn ? 

Mr. Wilkes. Yes, sir. 

Mr. IcnoRD. The exhibits will be admitted into evidence. 

(Documents marked ''Wilkes Exhibits Nos. 1-13," respectively. 
Exhibits Nos. 1-12 retained in committee files. Exhibit No. 13 
follows.) 

Wilkes Exhibit No. 13 

REVOLUTIONARY AND WORKERS' SONGS 



INTERNATIONALE 



"SeLIDARITY" 



Arise, ye prisoners of StsirvationJl 
Arise, ye wretched of the earth. 
For justice thunders dondemnation, 
A better world's in blttho 
No More tradition's chains shall bindus. 
Arise, ye slaves; no more in thralli 
The earth shall rise on new foundations; 
We have been naught, we shall be all, 

'Tis the final conflict. 
Let each stand in his place. 
The International party shall be 
the human race. 

RESEAT CHORUS. 



THE RED FLAD (Tiien Tannenbaum) 

The workero ' flag is deepest red. 
It shrouded oft our martyred dead • 
And ere their limbs grew stiff and cold 
Their life-blood dyed its every fold, 

CHORUS 

Then raise the scarlet standard high; 
Beneath its folds we'll live and die. 
Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer 
We'll keep the red flag flying here,, 

Jiook 'round, fi the Algerians love its bla 
The fighting Viet-Cong chants its praise; 
In Cuba's vaults its hymns are sung. 
The Mid West swells its surging song. 

It waved above our Infant might 
When all ahead seemed dark as night; 
It witnessed many a dded and vow 
We will not change its color now. 



When the Union's inspiration 
: thru the workersS blood shall 
■ run 

I There shall be no power greater 
! anywhere beneath the sun 
jYet what force on earth is 
I weaker than the feeble 
I strenghlti of one 
I But the Union makes us strong 

I Solidarity forever 
I Solidarity forever 
I Solidarity forever 
I For the Union makes us siroir>6 

It is we who plowed the 

prairies 
Built the cities where they 

trade 
Dug the mines and built the 
worlrrhops : endl&ss miles of 
railroad laid. 
Now we stand outcast and 
starving 'mid tthe wonderc 
we have made 
But the Union makes us strong 
( chorus ) 



They have taken uintold will lens 
that they've never toiled 
ze to earn 

But without our brain and 
mupoles not a single wheel- 
can turn 

We can break their haughiy 
power, gain our freedom 
when we learn 

That the Un6on makes us strong 
( chorus ) 

In our hands is placed a 
power greater than their he 
hoarded gold; 

Greater than the might of 
armies magnified a 
thousand fold. 
We can bring to earth a new 

world from the ashes of ths o] ' 
For the Union makes us strong 



892 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Wilkes, did you observe any other facts of interest 
in connection with the tenancy of the Glenns ? 

]\Ir. Wilkes. There were numerous copies of, I suppose you would 
call it, the constitution of the YSA or the charter for the YSA. There 
was a bulletin board in the apartment that had at the very top of it 
a Cuban flag displayed. Immediately below that, and a little to the 
right, there was a wanted poster from the post office for a "Williams." 
There were other miscellaneous newspaper clippings and articles, and 
so forth, concerning so-called communistic and socialistic victories in 
various areas of the United States. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you observe any equipment within the apartment ? 

Mr. Wilkes. They had, on occasion, a mimeographing machine 
there. By "on occasion," I mean this mimeograph machine was kept 
in circulation, so to speak. Various members or various people that 
T mentioned before had possession of this piece of equipment at dif- 
ferent times. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Before we conclude your interrogation, I want to ask 
you in what way you identified the particular persons whom you have 
named as in attendance at the meetings at the Glenn apartmen^ " 

Mr. Wilkes. When I firet saw them, the first few times I saAv them, 
I didn't know who they were. I knew only their faces and their 
physical characteristics. Later on, they would identify themselves 
in general conversation in the apartment area. I knew names and 
faces, but I had no wav of connecting them until such time as their 
pictures were published in the paper. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The staff has no further questions of this witness, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I wondered if, at this time or later, you planned 
to make any entry into the record as to information the committee has 
regarding the Young Socialist Alliance? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes, sir, we propose to do that in the following 
interrogation. 

Mr. IcHORD. Does the Member from Arizona have any questions? 

Mr. Senner. I have no questions. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Pool ? 

Mr. Pool. I have no questions. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Bruce? 

Mr. Bruce. I have no questions. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Schadeberg ? 

Mr. Schadeberg. I have no questions. 

Mr. IcHORD. Call your next witness. 

There will be order. The Chair would suggest that the conversa- 
tions cease. Mr. Counsel, call your next witness, please. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would John R. Glenn come forward please? 

Mr. Glenn. I don't know why they want to talk to me. I suppose 
it is because they have heard they have completely eliminate racial 
discrimination in Cuba and tliey want to do the same tiling here. 

Mr. IcHORD. Are you Mr. Glenn ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. IcHORD. Do you swear the testimony you are about to give be- 
fore this committee will be the truth, the wliole truth, and notliing but 
the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Glenn. I would like to take an affirmation. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 893 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN ROBERT GLENN, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 

DAVID I. SHAPIRO 

Mr. IcHORD. The witness may be seated. Are you represented by 
counsel ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I am. 

Mr. IcHORD. Will counsel identify himself? 

Mr. Shapiro. David I. Shapiro, 1411 K Street, Washington, D.C. 

Mr, IcHORD. Proceed Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state your full name for the record, please? 

Mr. Glenn. John Robert Glenn. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wlien and where were you bom ? 

Mr. Glenn. Evanston, Illinois, July 26, 1929. 

Mr, NiTTLE. W^here do you now live ? . 

Mr, Glenn. Well, our furniture is stored in Bloomington. We 
stored it before we went to Cuba. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wliere do you maintain your address ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, Post Office Box 625, Bloomington. 

Mr, JoHANSEN. You are living in Bloomington ? 

Mr. Glenn. Our furniture is stored there, 

Mr. NiTTLE, Will you tell us where you presently reside ? 

Mr, Glenn, We just came to town here on subpena. We have been 
staying with my wife's parents since we got back from Cuba. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, would you relate the extent of your formal 
education, giving the dates, places of attendance at educational insti- 
tutions, and any degrees received ? 

Mr, Glenn. Starting with college ? 

Mr, NiTTLE, Starting with high school. 

Mr. Glenn, Huntington High School, Huntington, Indiana, 1943 
to 1947. I graduated in 1947, I started college at UCLA, University 
of California at Ivos Angeles, in January of 1949, I was there for 
three semesters. Then I transferred to Indiana University in Sep- 
tember 1950. 

Before that semester was out, even though I got full credit for the 
semester, I went into the Air Force, Air Force Intelligence, where I 
was a Russian linguist for 5 years, receiving training m the Russian 
language at Syracuse University. 

Wlien I got out of the Air Force in January of 1956 I returned to 
Indiana University. No, I am sorry, I will have to go back a little. 
When I was in the service, the Air Force had a program whereby, if 
you could complete your degree within 6 months, that you would be 
put on temporary duty to do so while in the service, and I had done 
enougli correspondence work and night school work while I was in 
the service so that I was able to do that. 

I went back to Indiana University in June of 1953 and received a 
degree in general business administration in January of 1954. 

Mr. NiTTLE, Were you assisted by the Government in offsetting the 
expenses of your education ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I got my full service pay and housing and food 
allowance. 

Mr, NiTixE, Did you attend Trinity College at San Ant-onio, Texas? 

Mr, Glenn, Yes, I mentioned a couple of night schools. That was 
one of the night schools I went to shortly after I went into the service, 



894 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

in San Antonio. It was just the summer session of 1951. As I say, 
I took correspondence courses from the United States Armed Forces 
Institute while I was in the service. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Could you speak up, please, so that members of the 
committee can hear you ? 

Mr. Glenn. I received full college credit for those. When I got out 
of the service in January of 1956, I returned to Indiana University 
where I was accepted to do graduate work in economics there. I went 
for two semesters and a summer session and I completed all of the 
work for my ma^sters in economics, except for two papers. 

I have two incomplete courses there, so I never did get my degree. 
I resumed — I went to law school in September — started law school 
in September of 1957. 

Mr. NiTTLE. At the Indiana University Law School ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, Indiana University Law School. I received my 
degree in January or February of 1961. "WHiile I was going to law 
school I taught economics at Indiana University for 2 years — be- 
ginning economics. 

Mr. NiTTLE. What years did you teach economics ? 

Mr. Glenn. 1957-1958 and 1958-1959, the first 6 hours of intro- 
ductory economics. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you receive training by the United States Air 
Forc« in Germany? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, that is another one. I studied some German at 
night school — University of Maryland extension — when I was sta- 
tioned in Frankfurt, Germany. Also I had a 1-week refresher course 
in Russian in Manheim, Germany, while I was there. It was an Air 
Force-operated school. 

Mr. NiTTLE. "\Aniat is your present occupation ? 

Mr. Glenn. I am a lawyer. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Of what bars are you a member ? 

Mr. Glenn. Indiana Bar. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I would like to return for a moment to your Air Force 
career. Would you tell us what your major duties were while serving 
in Air Force Intelligence? 

Mr. Glenn. You are not supposed to tell anybody that, and I 
never have. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you in intelligence work while serving abroad? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you tell us where you were abroad and for how 
long a period of time ? 

Mr. Glenn. Total time was in Germany, I&Y2 months; and I was 
in Frankfurt, Germany, for, I would say, 11 months, and Berlin 5 
months. 

Mr. NiTTLE. During what years ? 

Mr. Glenn. Let me see. I went over in September or October of 
1954 and came back just before being discharged in January of 1956. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Since your graduation from high school in 1947, would 
you tell the committee what have been your principal employments? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, there have been quite a few jobs. I worked for 
the Erie Railroad as a section hand, as a fireman, as a truckdriver 
carrying railroad personnel, and also in the office at different times. 
Usually I would work in the summer. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 895 

Mr. NiTTLE. When did you hold that employment? 

Mr. Glenn. It is hard to remember. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Approximately. 

Mr. Glenn. 1947 to 1950, 1 guess. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Then what was your next employment ? 

Mr. Glenn. As an economics instructor at Indiana University. 
One other thing. When I was in law school, I wrote a U.S. travel 
agency here. I saw an advertisement for American citizens to visit 
the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, and Poland and I wrote thern and 
asked them if they had any need for a guide. They said they did, so 
I went to those three countries for about 40 days in the summer of 
1958 and those three countries plus Yugoslavia and Rumania in 1959. 

Mr. NnTLE. Had you previously visited any of those countries for 
which you applied for the position of guide? 

Mr. Glenn. No — No, I didn't. The reason I hesitated, of course 
we passed through East Germany when I was stationed in Berlin, 
but East Germany was not one of the countries visited. Well, that is 
not true either. The first trip we did come from — back through — 
East Berlin to West Berlin from Czechoslovakia. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. What was the name of the travel agency? 

Mr. Glenn. Tom Maupin. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Is that M-a-u-p-i-n 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I think that is the name. 

Mr. NiTTLE. — tour Associates ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, and the second year was some Association for 
Academic Travel Abroad. I believe that is the name. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. These were not Government- financed ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, private U.S. travel agencies that arrange with the 
travel agencies in the Soviet-bloc countries to facilitate tourists visit- 
ing those countries — American tourists. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The Tom Maupintour Associates had their offices in 
Kansas City, did they not? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How did you establish your contact with them ? 

Mr. Glenn. I saw an ad in the student newspaper of Indiana Uni- 
versity to take a tour. I thought with my language competence I 
might have a chance to see these countries myself. 

Mr. JoH ANSEN. You went as an employee or as a tourist ? 

Mr. Glenn. I was an employee, I guess. I was kind of a liaison 
between us and the tour guides provided by the various Soviet-bloc 
tour agencies. In other words, when difficulties arose, I was to try to 
see that these difficulties would be alleviated. 

Mr. Johansen. The distinction I was trying to make is. Were you 
on the payroll of this firm ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, not really on the payroll. I was given expense 
money and that is all. 

Mr. Johansen. You were given your tour by reason of your duties ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, in a sense it was not even the tour agency that 
gave the tour because if you have over 15 going in a group, all of 
these countries provide another person, say as a guide or whatever, to 
go free and the airlines do the same thing, going from here to Europe 
on these tours. 



896 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

If you have 15 or over, the 16th person can go free so, in a sense, 
it didn't cost these companies anything to send me, except for the 
expense money. 

Mr, JoHANSEN. Again to clarify the matter, your trip, of course, 
involved expenses. Was that expense met by the tourist organization 
or by the countries that you visited ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, I don't know. How would you figure this ? I 
simply described what happened. If you get 15 going in a group, it is 
an advantage to them to get a larger number going. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Whom do you mean by "them" ? 

Mr. Glenn. The socialist countries, I suppose, the tour agencies 
there. 

Mr. Johansen. It was the Communist countries that actually pro- 
vided or financed this additional person ? 

Mr. Glenn. If you want to look at it that way. 

Mr. Johansen. It is not a matter of how I look at it. Do you know ? 

Mr. Glenn. As I say, it is the same thing the U.S. airlines do here 
for tours going. 

Mr. Johansen. But it was the host countries that provided it. 

Mr. Glenn. It was also the U.S. airlines that provided the sub- 
sidy for these trips to the Iron Curtain countries, if you want to look 
at it that way. 

Mr. IcHORD. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you not, for a time, operate a small coffee shop in 
Bloomington, Indiana, as well ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, in conjunction with a friend. We owned it ; we 
didn't operate it. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, Mr. Russell will hand you a photostatic 
copy of a passport application dated October 23, 1961, filed with the 
Department of State, bearing the signature of the applicant John R. 
Glenn, marked for identification as "John Glenn Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Are you not the John R. Glenn who executed this ap- 
plication ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I am. 

Mr. NrrTLE. On October 23, 1961, at Bloomington, Indiana? 

Mr. Glenn. That is the approximate date. 

Mr. NriTLE. Mr. Chairman, I offer Exhibit 1 in evidence. 

(Document marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 1" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr, NiTTLE. In this application, Mr. Glenn, you state in response 
to the section headed "LIST each COUNTRY TO BE visited" that 
you intended to visit "Cuba (also, perhaps a number of other Latin 
American countries) ." At the time you filed this application, did you 
not also make request for a validation of your passport for travel to 
Cuba? 

Mr. Glenn. I don't remember whether I asked for a validation of 
the passport. I would not be surprised if I did. I thought that would 
be implicit in the request to go to Cuba. I am not sure whether I did, 

Mr, NiTTLE, Do you recollect whether the Department of State on 
or about November 7, 1961, responded to your request by refusing 
such validation for travel to Cuba? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, they refused me to go to Cuba. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 897 

Mr. NiTTi-E. I hand you a phototrraphic copy of a letter dated No- 
vember 7, 1961, from the Department of State addressed to you, for- 
warded by Edward J. Hickey, Deputy Director, Passport Office, 
marked for identification as "Jolm Glenn Exhibit No. 1-A," in which 
you are advised of that refusal. Did you not receive the original of 
that letter? 

Mr. Glenn. That is true, I did. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, I offer "John Glenn Exhibit No. 1-A" 
in evidence. 

Mr. IcHORD. It will be admitted in evidence. 

.(Document marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 1-A" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. After recei%ang notification that your request for 
validation had been refused, did you then contact the Cuban Embassy 
in Ottawa, Canada, by letter dated November 14, 1961, requesting a 
visa for travel to Cuba ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, that is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I hand you a photostatic copy of a letter dated Novem- 
ber 21, 1961, addressed to you by the Charge d'Affaires of the Cuban 
Embassy in Ottawa, marked for identification as "John Glenn Exhibit 
No. 2." This letter, as you will see, acknowledges receipt of your letter 
of November 14, asking for an application for a visa to Cuba and ad- 
vises you that, as you are an American citizen, you must apply for the 
visa at the Embassy of Czechoslovakia in Washington, which is in 
charge of Cuban business in the United States. The letter also ad- 
vised you that you would need a validation from the United States 
State Department. 

Did you not receive the original of that letter from the Cuban Em- 
bassy in Ottawa ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, that is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, I offer Exhibit 2 in evidence. 

Mr. IcHORD. It is so admitted. 

(Document marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 2" and retained in 
committee files. ) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you, as the letter advised, get in touch with the 
Czechoslovakian Embassy in Washington, D.C. ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I did. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you granted a visa 

Mr. Glenn. No. 

Mr. NiTTLE. on behalf of the Cuban Government ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, I wasn't. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Nevertheless, have you traveled to Cuba at any time 
since October 23, 1961, the date of your last passport application ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I have. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you tell us when you traveled there ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, it was the months of July and August of this 
year, 1963. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That is, you were one of a group of persons who de- 
parted from Idlewild Airport aboard BOAC airlines for London, 
Paris, Prague, Czechoslovakia, and thence to Cuba ? 

Mr. Glenn. 'J'lial is true. 



898 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. And you departed from New York on June 25, 1963, 
with a group of alleged students ? 

Mr, Glenn. Approximately. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wliile in Cuba, you were interviewed by the press and 
radio ; were you not ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, that is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. On July 4, 1963, a Havana radio broadcast in English 
to Europe carried the following announcement : 

In place of our regular youth program, today we present an interview with 
Marsha and Jack Glenn, two of the 59 U.S. students who arrived in Havana 
last Sunday. 

Do you recall being interviewed at Havana by Cuban radio on 
July 4, 1963? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I do. • 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Eussell will hand you a transcript of that inter- 
view in Cuba, marked for identification tis "John Glenn Exhibit No. 
3." 

Mr. Glenn. Do you have a copy I can keep ? 

Mr. Russell. I suppose we can mail you one. 

Mr. NiTTLE. It begins in the middle of the page. I ask you to 
examine that. Do you have any correction to the statements reported 
of you ? 

Mr. Glenn. I have not read it that carefully. I thought you just 
wanted. me to examine it. 

Mr. Shapiro. Can he read it all ? 

Mr. IcHORD. Yes. 

[Witness studies document.] 

Mr. Glenn. It looks accurate. 

Mr. IcHORD. Has the witness had an opportunity to read the tran- 
script ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. And you say it looks accurate? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, sir. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I offer Exhibit 3 in evidence. 

Mr. IcHORD. It is so admitted. 

(Docimient marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 3." See pp. 899, 900. ) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, you made the following statement during 
the radio broadcast of July 4, 1963, in answer to a question as to how 
you had learned of a student trip to Cuba : 

Well, Marsha and I listen to Radio Havana quite often and we heard the trip 
announced last December, when the first attempt was made to come to Cuba. 
The announcement on Radio Havana did not say what group was organizing 
the tour, or what their address was, but we wrote a letter to the Fair-Play-for- 
Cuba committee asking them if they knew about the tour and asking them to 
forward our letter of inquiry. 

Do you recall making this statement on Havana Radio on July 4, 
1963? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, it is true, but it is not quite complete. Marcia 
later reminded me that we not only wrote the Fair Play Committee 
but we also wrote the U.N. Mission asking them if they knew about 
the trip. We wrote those two, and I don't know which of those two 
forwarded the letter on to the Student Committee [for Travel to 
Cuba]. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 899 

John Glenn Exhibit No. 3 



^OujT Youth program) 



) In place of our regular youth program, today we present an 
ew wlthitersha and JackGlenn, two of the 59 U.S. students who 

Sunday. ! All the microphones of Radio Havana a-na 



MTlved in Havana last Sunday ^_j — - . 

ot Oar Youth program are very proud tonight to have Mr. and Mrs. OJena, 
Jack end ftirsha, who are members of the group of 59 students which ha^ 
cane to Havana to visit Cuba. We'll start with Marsha. 

*Annoancer: l*u-8ha, what are the reasons that have brought you to Cuba 
daaplte the official repression and coercion, and so forth? 

l^raha; Well, for the past several years we have seen so many conflicting 
reports in the U.S. press on exactly what is going on in Cuba that we 
benn to doubt very much what the U.S. Government was saying on what 
r»lly wa« happening. When we heard that this trip of U.S. students was 
organized, ve were very intc-rested, and we made every effort to 

on the trip to see for ourselves what the Cubans are doing, what 

is really like today. ' 



* 



Annoxincer: I see. Jack, we would like to know, how did you Join the 
group, how the idea sprang up? 

Jack: Well, Marsha and I listen to Radio Havana quite often and ve h«ard 
the trip announced last December, when the first attempt was mada to 
come to Cuba. The announcement on Radio Havana did not say what group 
was organizing the tour, or \rtiat their address was, but we wrote n letter 
to the Fair- Play,-For- Cuba committee asking them if they knew about the 
tour and asking them to forward our letter of inquiry. 

Marsha: You see, (word indistinct) thit: was the tour that had oi iginally 
been scheduled for Christmas vacation laet December, and was supLJOsed to 
leave from Toronto. A Cuban plane would pick up these students in 
Toronto and ccme to Havana. At the last minute the Canadian Covommcnt 
refused to let the Cuban plane land in Toronto, and therefore the trip 
has been postponed until now. 

Announcer: I see. What way did you take to come here to Havanc? 

Jac}:: VJe left from New York, There were two planes. One \m.B YIM to 
/jr.st^-iam and then on to Paris, euid the other group went by the British 
A:.i\'^-\-z, ■^GAC, from New York to Shannon and London and then on to Paris. 
In I' -lis W3 stayed overnj,~ht, and then went on to Prague by the 
Czscho^lo -akian airline, end stayed there two night;;; and then came to 
Cala by the Cubana Airlines. 

Annc'once.-: Did you have any interference by U.S. authorities when you 
left? 

Marsha; We.H, not when we left New Ycrk. There was a release made 
purposely tha ^ ^ ve vrere Koinp; via Toronto , and there-^ore tne officials in 

Sw York did net stop us, 5ut vnen we aid reach loi-lc.i, and whan the 
other group reached Amsterdam, there were officials from the U.S.. 
Embassies — and also in Paris and Prague — officials wno told us that it 
was aga_.ist the State Department ruling for U.S. citizens to go to Cuba, 
and that when we came back we would be in trouble, that there was a 
5,000 dollar fine ond/oi' a penalty of five years in prison for U.S. 
citizens traveling to Cuba. 



900 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



John Glenn Exhibit No. 3 — Continued 

Jack: I might add to that, the reason the authoHties did not tiry to I 
stop us in New York vhen they thought vj were going by way of Toronto, 
•was triat they knew that the Canadian Government would not permit the trip tt 
go from Canadian soil, as it did not permit the trip to go last December. 

/:L-ijiinc.;r: Jack; what do you do in the states? 

Jack: I cm a lawyer. 

Announcer: How about you, Marsha? 

Maraba: I an a student at Indiana University, in Latin Anerican studies, 

Announoer ; I see. Of course, you have been here in Cuba a very short 
tima^ but have you seen anything? 

^ck: Well, I think the thing that strikes me and strikes nost of the 
group most of all if the overwhelnlnc and spontaneous support of the 
Cuban Government by the people. Just everybody that you run into is 
Just (pauBe~Ed.)— the enthusiasm is Just (another pause~El.)~well, 
you don't know what to make of it. I think there is probably more 
esthUBlasm of the Cuban people for their govcrcaent than for any other 
gtwernment I have ever seen—any other people for any other jovernrjent 
2 have ever seen. 

Announcer: How about you, Marsha? 

Mareba: Yes, I second that wholeheartedly. One other thing we did this 
, aoarning was to travel through Havana by bus and then stop for about 
an hour in the East Havana housing project, which has been entirely built 
by the revolution, about fctr years aco— about three and a half or 
four years ago. And this is a proj3ct that h:lds — how many fanllies? 
(Jack whispers In background: 1,600— Ed.) 1,600 families. People 
vho were taken primarily frci slum areas that now have been removed. 
And moved into the housr.ng p"oject. Most of tl.>e apartments are thrce- 
bedrocQ apartments with a batnroom and a kitchen that Is fully equipped, 
iilth modern refrigerators and stoves, and a dining room- living room 
ooablnatlon aiad a patio. And these people pay 10 percent of their salaries 
-Oa rent per month for these apartments. It is Just pheronenal. Also 
the fact^ too, that these are very highly integrated: there Is no 
apparent difference between white Cubans or black Cubans or people of 
other national! tie s— they all live together as one and are extremely 
happy. 

Announcer: How long do you plan to stay around in Cuba? 

Jack: The trip is planned for one month: Me will be leaviiag about 
1 August, We'll spend about two weeks altogether In Havana, and t-,;o 
veeks In the countryside, but I'm sure we'll be back in Havana fof the 
tenth anni versary of the 26 July movement. 

Announcer: Our Youth program and Radio Havana have spoken to a couple, 
Ack and Ifeirsha Glenn, who are here in Havana as members of a student 
tfl^ai^Xtmt is visiting Cuba. And we can only hope that their visit will 
y^M Vta7 enjoyable one. V/e are very glad to have then here. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. - 901 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you receive a response to your letter ? 

Mr. Glenn. Not from the ones we wrote to, but apparently one of 
them forwarded the letter on to the Student Connnittee. Somebody 
knew, and we got a response from (he Student Committee for Travel 
to Cuba. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was that from the Ad Hoc Student Committee for 
Travel to Cuba that you received a reply ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you recall who w^as the author of the response to 
you, what particular individual ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, I don't. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was it Levi Laub? 

Mr. Glenn. It could have been, but I am not certain. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you, prior to June 25, 1963, correspond with, or 
receive any communication from, Stefan Martinot concerning this pro- 
posed trip to Cuba ? 

IVIr. Glenn. Well, I just don't remember who it was. It could have 
been either one or both of those or it could have been someone else. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I am attempting to refresh your recollection. Did you 
have any correspondence with Anatol Schlosser or Phillip Abbott 
Luce ? 

Mr. Glenn. There might well have been. I don't remember which, 
if any. Names, of course, became very familiar to me on the trip, and 
I don't remember who it was that we coiTesponded with. 

Mr, NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, are you a member of the Fair Play for Cuba 
Committee ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, that is true, 

Mr. NiTTLE, How long have you been a member of that committee ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, I have been a sympathizer longer than I have 
been a member, but I would say I have been a member for about a 
year. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Commencing when ? 

iMr. Glenn. Sometime last fall. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Inland you a copy of a letter to the editor of the iTidl- 
(ina Daily Student^ a campus publication of the Indiana University 
Department of Journalism, issue published February 10, 1962, a date 
prior to your visit to Cuba, which is signed by "John R. Glenn, At- 
torney-at-Law — Law, '61." The exhibit is marked for identification 
as "John Glenn Exhibit No. 4." Are you the author of that letter?- 

Mr. Glenn. That is true. I thought that was a rather good letter, 
as a matter of fact. I 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, I offer Exhibit 4 in evidence. 

Mr. IcHORD. It is so admitted. 

Mr. NiTTi.E. Your letter states, in part : 

I am fully aware that all straight-thinking Americans are supposed to hate 
Castro by now, and think that Cuba is a nightmare of oppression. But the people 
in Fair Play are willing to argue to anyone who will listen that our government 
and our press are lying through their teeth. 

Were you a member of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee at the 
time you wrote that letter? 

Mr. Glenn. I don't know. Let's say I was. It doesn't make any 
difference to me. 

(Document marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 4." See next page.) 

98-765 O — 63 — pt. 4 7 



902 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



John Glenn Exhibit No. 4 



i^^Taters 



Indiana Daily Student 
2/10/62 



Treatment of FPCC Decried 



To the Ediitcr: 

I'm aJltaiasit aipoipHeCtJic wi'Lh 
rage. Some fi^iends of mi'nte in 
Pair Play foi- Cu^ba have just 
T&lalted to me the difificulties 
they've had in amiang'ing' a 
showing of Cubati films this 
weekend, and getting- 'the flact 
aJdvertiseid on campus. 

It won't be necessary to 
nalme names or state in deltail 
the evasi'oois, the 's'tlalling, and 
the trans'parerit hypoei'^iSy on 
the part of numerous adniini- 
stiiat'ive offioials Aiith respect 
to this reicognized campus 
oi-'g'aniziation ; one only has to 
try to imag'ine these same tax- 
sup'poi-ted 'oifficials, with the'ir 
Boy Scout mentality and 
islitapile-imMed "patr'iotism", ac- 
oor^ding slimilar treatment to 
one of the conseirvaltive gtroup's 
alt the Univer'sity — with their 
neo - faxiist, anti - demoCra:tic 
ideias. (Naturally it can't he 
i'mag^ined, since the powerful 
in our cbuntry, the peiople 'w'ho 
"oount," stand behind these 
m iSla.nthroipdc oi-iganizaJti ons. ) 
namesimple- mis- 

If s all right for taxes to 
be taken from left-leaning 
citizens to promote the dis- 
semination of right-wing 
blather at a public institu- 
tion, but of course tax 
money taken from the 
good, conservative, patriotic 
citizens of Indiana can't toe 
used io "further radical 
causes." 

I'm profoundly ashamed of 
• my alma mater. If a sclroiol, or 
even a country, wants to be- 
lOome totalitarian and thi^ottle 
un'poipular minority vie'ws, it 
can do sio if it wants. I would 
not be iq. favor of this, bult it 
can do it if its inclinations are 
' such. But what is moslt galling 
and insufferable is to is«e a 



c'ounti-y or la university no^t 
•only drape itself in the trap- 
pings df freedom but endlesisily 
pimtle »dn aib'out t'heiitr superior- 
iity to others in this respe'ct — 
and at t'he same time use eveiy 
delaying tactile, eveiy clhildish 
teldhnicaUty, evei-y dishonoriable 
trick in the b6ok to prevent an 
opposition vtiewp6int from 
being presented and judged by 
the citizeni-y, or student body. 
I have always wondered w^hy 
iHadioals always seemed so 
touchy, w'hy they always 
seemed to have a chip on their 
shoulder. I think I know why 
now.* Who wouldn't become in- 
fui-iated, seeing the society all 
aiV>und them use every lousy 
defvice ever Tieard of to isiolate 
them ajnd keep them fi^om 
hiaVing an audience — even in 
flagr*ant violation oif the pro- 
fesseid high ideals and piinioi- 
ples that society supposedly 
^ands for? 

My only consolation, as I 
sit here in a state of high 
dudgeon, is in the know- 
ledge that these petty 
tyrants, with their «mall 
souls and morally obtuse 
view of the universe, stand 
in the company of the syco- 
phants and satraps who 
have immemorially snuffled 
and groveled to do the bid- 
ding of the mighty, in the 
hope that a few crumbs 
may fall to them. They 
have done their part, how- 



ever small, to make human ' 
history the wretched chron- 
ical that it' is, and it is in 
this role that they will be 

C judged by in the future. 
I'm fully aware that all 
straight - thinking Americans/ 
are supposed 'to bate CaBtro by 
. now, and think tlhalt Cuba is a 
nig'htmare of oipipreis:^ion. But 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



903 



John Glenn Exhibit No. 4 — Continued 



the peoiple in Fair Play are 
■Will in g to argue to anyone who 
will listen thalt our "goveti'mment 
and our press are lying thix>uigh 
their teethlwhy is it that th« 
people w'ho say that the Flail' 
Pliay'ers ai^e themselves liairS 
always trying to jusit simiyly 
elinilnate them instead 'o>t deail- 
inlg witJh their arguments? Wihy 
so mudh enecrgy devoiteid to 
squeezing down the already 
stifling narrow limits Cf ef- 
fective p^HtiOal discussi'on (for 
a "free" country) to such pro- 
found, pi'incipled lanld 'bal^t cion- 
trovea-sy aJs "shiall we haVe 
more Socilal Security, or less?" 
Weill, I have a word ■olf warn- 
ing to all the 110 per cent 
Ameri'cains and theiir inkjinur 
meiital ignorance oif wlhQJt's 
going on in the World, their 
tomplaicerit arrogance and 
myopic chauvinism, their 
child-like confidence in the" 
good faiith of their govern- 
meht'3 foreign p'oihcy: If 
Americans helieve "'tlheir" gov-' 
ei-nment and coniniunioalta'ons 
niedia about Cuiba, the rieisit of 
the world no longer does. 
The fact is that the vast 
bulk of humanity is begrui- 
ning to turn against 
America. This process has 
picked up markedly in the 
last two weeks, mainly as a 
result of our machinations 
at Punta del Este and sub- 
sequent increased tempo of 
preparations for a new, full- 



scale invasion of Cuba, 
which may well come yet 
this month. * 

Evein if this war, which will 
ndt be declared by Congress 
just as the Korelan "police 
adtion" 'waJs not-Jin contraven- 
tion to the U.S. Constitution — 
does not develop into 'a nufelear 
Third World War, many hun- 
dreids of thousahds of dea'ths 
and casualties will be suffered 
by American sei'Vicemen in 
order to subdue Cuba. The 
Cubans melah it w*he'n they Say" 
they Will fi'ght to the last maa 
— to itihe death — to prevent! 
America fr6m re-^im posing its 
cOlonlilal systetai ion them. Sev- 
enltynfive to 90 per cent of Ithd 
Cu'ban piopulaltion w411 haVe to 
be physi'oallly eliminaJtled in 
oi-der for us to have a regime 
that suits us 'tJhere. 

But those of you who are 
of draft age should remem- 
ber that it is not going to 
be the officers and chief 
stockholders of the expro- 
priated companies who will 
be fighting and dying to re- 
gain these honorable gentle- 
men's "rights" in Cuba. I 
recommend that you drop 
in to Whittenberger AudS- 
toriwn at 8 o'clock tonight 
or Sunday night to get an 
idea of what you will be 
fighting against — and for. 
JolVn R. Olenn 
Attorii ey-<aJt-La*w 
Law, '©1 



Mr. JoHANSEN. What was the date of the letter, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. February 10, 1962. 

Mr. Glenn. No, I wasn't a member then. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you associated with the Fair Play for Cuba Stu- 
dent Council at the University of Indiana at the time you wrote that 
letter? 

Mr. Glenn. Associated? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Or affiliated in any way ? 

Mr. Glenn. I say I was a sympathizer. I think I donated a dollar 
a couple of times to them. I used to go to their meetings, if tjiat is 
what you mean. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, the committee's investigation reveals that 
after leaving Cuba on August 25, 1963, you traveled to Spain, then to 
Morocco, and while in Morocco you sought to enter Algeria. Is this 
correct ? 

Mr. Glenn. That is true. 



904 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

Mr. NriTLE. It is a fact, is it not, that you received an entry permit 
from the Algerian- Government, but you were prevented from using 
it because you were arrested by the Moroccan police and expelled as 
an undesirable? 

Mr. Glenn. That is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you not then deported from Morocco and re- 
turned to Spain ? 

Mr. Glenn. That is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The committee's investigation reveals that on Octo- 
ber 15, 1963, you claimed in Madrid, Spain, that you did not have a 
return trip ticket from there to the United States. The American 
Embassy in Madrid, at its own expense, then furnished you with a 
return ticket. Is that correct? 
Mr. Glenn. A return ticket to the United States ? 
Mr. NiTTLE. Yes. 

Mr. Glenn. No, that is not true at all. They apparently forced 
the Iberian Air Lines to use the ticket the Cuban Government paid 
for. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The American Embassy bought a ticket for you. You 
did not receive the ticket in your possession. You were returned to 
the United States aboard the Iberian Aii- Lines ? 
Mr. Glenn. That is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The committee's investigation now establishes that you 
actually had a return ticket to Idlewild Airport at that time. 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. Well, we didn't have the physical — wait, what 
was the date on that ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. October 15, 1963. 

Mi*. Glenn. No, we didn't have a ticket. We threw it overboard 
into the Mediterranean on the way back. 
Mr. NiTTLE. You threw it overboard ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, we figured if the U.S. wanted us back in this coun- 
try, they were going to pay for it, not the Cuban Government, and we 
had many things stolen from us by the Moroccan police, such as 
Cuban pictures and souvenirs which we considered our private prop- 
erty. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Nevertheless, the United States furnished you with 
transportation from Madrid to New York ? 
Mr. Glenn. I don't know who served it. 

Mr. NiTTLE. And asked you to sign a waiver of rebate on any un- 
used ticket that you might have possessed ? 
Mr. Glenn. No. 

Mr. NnTLE. Didn't you refuse to sign the waiver so that the United 
States Government could not reimburse itself for providing you with 
transportation ? 

Mr. Glenn. I don't know what it was. I refused to sign anything. 

Mr. Johansen. May I interrupt, Mr. Counsel ? I am trying to get 

this straight in my own mind. You did not use the ticket that had been 

paid for and furnished by the Cuban Government to return to the 

United States, is that correct ? 

Mr. Glenn. If you mean the physical ticket, no. I don't know who 
paid for the flight back. I assmned that Iberian was talked into using 
our right to a ticket. That is, our right to get a loss or destroyed 
ticket. Perhaps the Government did pay for it. I don't know. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES EST U.S. 905 

Mr. JoHANSEN. But you did not use the ticket you previously had? 

Mr. Glenn. No, we tore it up and threw it in the Mediterranean 
as we were being shanghaied back. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. You did not return on any ticket for your return 
from Spain to the United States? 

Mr. Glenn. That is true. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Would you tell the committee whether, since re- 
turning to the United States, you have made any effort to obtain a 
refund upon this ticket which you had possessed but had destroyed? 

Mr. Glenn. No, I simply told Iberian that I considered if they had 
used our ticket — which we considered legally would have been a gift 
from the Cuban Government — and it was made out in our names and 
Ihere were no conditions to our using it, and it was good for a year. 
They said — in fact, if we had in fact used our right to that ticket we 
would consider them to a law suit for the value of the tickets, because 
we distinctly told representatives of Iberian in Madrid if we were on 
that plane it was against our express will and they were not to use 
our property in that way. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. But this was property you had already destroyed? 

Mr. Glenn. We had not destroyed — I mean basically the right to 
the ticket exists. The physical ticket was destroyed because we didn't 
want the U.S. Government using it. 

Mr. JohanSen. May I ask what was the reason for your unwilling- 
ness for the United States Government to use this ticket? 

Mr. Glenn. We wanted to travel in Europe. We were on our 
honeymoon. We wanted to come back, but when we were ready to- 

Mr. JoHANSEN. You were returning unwillingly at the time? 

Mr. Glenn. Definitely. 

Mr. IcHORD. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, on October 24, 1962, a group called the Ad 
Hoc Student Committee to Oppose United States Aggression held a 
protest march against the United States blockade of Cuba, which went 
into effect on that date. Did you participate in that demonstra- 
tion ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, I didn't. 

Mr. IcHORD. T^Tiat was the date of that demonstration ? 

Mr. Nitfle. October 24, 1962, Mr. Chairman, at the University of 
Indiana. 

Mr. Glenn, I would have no objection to participating in it, but 
we liad just opened our law office in Bloomington and that would not 
have been too smart a thing to do, of course. 

Mr. NiTTLE. It is our information that the Ad Hoc Student Com- 
mittee to Oppose United States Aggression was created by the Fair 
Play for Cuba Student Council and the Young Socialist Alliance 
at the University of Indiana. Do you have knowledge of this fact? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I think that is true. However, the Young Social- 
ist Alliance was not really an Indiana University alliance at that 
time. I think that came out in the recent articles in Bloomington. 
They were an organization there, but they had not been recognized by 
the university at that time. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Have they been since? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 



906 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN "^ f" 



Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, I hand you a phr' '.ph of a portion of 
the protest march taken on the day of tnai cmonstration, marked 
for identification as "John Gleim Exhibit No. 5." Could you identify 
for the committee the person who appears there carrying a camera at 
the left center of the photograph ? 

Mr. Glenn. Tliat is myself. 

(Photograph marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 5" follows.) 

John Glenn Exhibit No. 5 




Arrow indicates John Glenn. 



Mr. NriTLE. Mr. Glenn, I understood you to say that you had not 
taken part in the protest march on that date ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, I didn't. I think that picture must be from the 
protest march that was held at the time of the April ^ invasion. 

Mr. NiiTLE. A protest march sponsored by the same or^nization, 
the Ad Hoc Student Committee to Oppose U.S. Aggression? 

Mr. Glenn. I don't know. I think it was kind of an ad hoc com- 
mittee. I think people that were interested in it were simply just 
calling other people who would be interested. I don't think they even 
gave themselves a name. 

Mr. Johansen. This was what invasion ? 

Mr. Glenn. The April invasion of Cuba. 

Mr. NriTLE. Would you examine that exhibit again, and I ask 
whether you are acquainted with the person in the center of the photo- 
graph carrying a sign and marching on your left? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, that is George Shriver. 

1 Bay of Pigs, April 17, 1961, invasion by Cuban exiles. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN V£. 907 

Mr. NiTTLE. Is not George Shriver the former president of the 
University of Indiana Fair Play for Cuba Student Council ? 

Mr. Glenn. That is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you ever have contact with him on matters relat- 
ing to demonstrations, picket lines, letter writing, or any other activity 
in support of the Indiana University Fair Play for Cuba Student 
Council ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, he is a good friend of mine, and I have talked to 
him about many things, but any letters I have written have been 
strictly on my own initiative. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Counsel, I suggest the answer is not responsive 
to the question. Could we have the question repeated and the wit- 
ness given an opportunity, to repeat his answer ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes. Did you ever have any contact with George 
Shriver on matters relating to demonstrations, picketing, or any other 
activity in support of the Indiana Fair Play for Cuba Student 
Council ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, at the time of the attempted April invasion, I 
just knew George more or less by name. It was some time after that 
that I became better acquainted with him so I doi;i't think I could have 
had any contact with him regarding this demonstration or any picket- 
ing or any letters. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Again, Mr. Counsel, as I understood the question, 
it was not limited to this particular demonstration. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That is correct. Did you have any contact with re- 
spect to any of the activities of the Fair Play for Cuba Student 
Council ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. When did your contact for that purpose take place ? 

Mr. Glenn. Most of the people who are in the committee are friends 
of mine, and we talk all the time. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How long have you known George Shriver ? 

Mr. Glenn. I think I first met him some time before the April 
invasion; but, like I say, that was just a speaking acquaintance. I 
really didn't know him very well then. It was later that summer, 
after I had taken the bar exam, that I got to know him better. That 
was when I first read C. Wright Mills on Cuba — Listen Yankee — 
and got interested in Cuba. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, we pointed out that, in November o^^ 1961, 
the United States refused to validate your application for a passport 
to Cuba. You then admitted that you made application to the Cuban 
Embassy in Ottawa, Canada, which referred you to the Czechoslo- 
vakian Embassy in Washington, and you were again refused a visa. 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Nevertheless, it is the committee's information that 
you went to Mexico in the spring of 1962. Is this true ? 

Mr. Glenn. That is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you then in Mexico preparatory to traveling to 
Cuba in some way or other ? 

Mr. Glenn. We hoped to, but we did not get our visa. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You did not travel to Cuba at that time ? 

Mr. Glenn. No. 



908 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. While in Mexico in the spring of 1962, were you then 
in contact with George Shriver? 

Mr. Glenn. We sent a telegram to him asking him to write Robert 
Williams in Cuba, seeing if he could help us get a visa because George 
knew Robert Williams. The thing was that you had to know some- 
one presently in Cuba in order to get a Cuban visa, and they had to 
recommend to the Cuban State Department that the person be granted 
a visa. I don't know if that is still true or not. I met Robert Wil- 
liams once in Bloomington, but I knew he wouldn't remember me. 

Mr. NiTTLE. George Shriver has been an officer of the Fair Play for 
Cuba Committee and he would, of course, be the man from whom to 
receive a recommendation, and by whom you might be recommended 
to the Cubans ; is that right ? 

Mr. Glenn. That was the only thing I could think of. 

Mr. NrrTLE. You received a cablegram from George Shriver, did 
you not, in response to your telegram to him ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, it was signed "George Shriver." 

Mr. NrTTLE. I hand you a copy of a cablegram, marked for identi- 
fication as "John Glenn Exhibit No. 6," which was sent April 1, 1962, 
at 6:48 p.m., datelined at Bloomington, Ind., which is addressed as 
follows : "Jack Glenn, care the Cuban Embassy to Mexico" and which 
reads as follows: 

"Letter sent to Williams. Keep in touch. Venceremos." The 
cablegram is signed "G. S." 

Would you examine that exhibit and tell the committee whether 
you received the original of that cablegram in Mexico through the 
Cuban Embassy? 

Mr. Glenn. I did. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I offer that in evidence. 

Mr. IcHORD. It is admitted. 

(Document marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 6" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr, JoHANSEN. Am I to gather from an earlier question that you 
have reason to doubt that this telegram came from Shriver? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I found out later that two friends of mine, who 
were also friends of George Shriver's, in Bloomington were after him 
to write this letter to Williams in Cuba, He was just very negligent 
in doing it. He just kept putting it off, and finally these guys just, 
sent the telegram themselves. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Who were "these guys" ? 

Mr. Glenn. James Bingham and Ralph Levitt. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The "Williams," to whom reference is made there, is 
Robert Williams? 

Mr. Glenn. That is right. 

Mr. NiTTLE, He is presently a fugitive from justice, wanted by the 
FBI for unlawful flight to avoid prosecution. He was then in Cuba ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I met him when I was in Cuba. 

Mr. NrTTLE. He is now lately in Communist China, is that right? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you have knowledge that he is still there ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, I don't. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Have you heard from him ? 

Mr. Gleijn. No, I had just heard that he had gone. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 909 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, would you explain to the committee what 
meaning was conveyed to you by the word "Venceremos" in the cable- 
gram? 

Mr. Glenn. It is a Spanish word that is used as a Cuban revolu- 
tionary slogan now, which means "We shall win." 

Mr. NiTTLE. Or "We shall conquer"? 

Mr. Glenn. "We shall conquer." 

Mr. NiTTLE. From the Latin "vincere," meaning "to conquer"; is 
that right? 

Mr. Glenn. That is right. 

Mr. Johansen. Mr. Counsel, before we proceed, as I understood it, 
vou testified that these "two guys," as you described them, wrote Wil- 
liams. Is it your knowledge that they also were the ones who sent you 
the cablegram ? 

Mr. Glenn. They said they sent the cablegram. They told me later 
after I had returned from Mexico. They said that George was putting 
it off, you know, and we were waiting down there to hear whether or 
not he sent the letter, and they knew we would be anxious to hear. 

Mr. Johansen. Did you ever discuss with George his procrasti- 
nating habits in this connection ? 

Mr. Glenn. I had the idea he didn't want us to go to Cuba and I 
have the idea that that was a subconscious block on his part. 

Mr. Johansen. I gather, then, that the other two did want you to 
go, or at least were agreeable to it. 

Mr. Glenn. We were down there trying to go, and they sought to 
help us if they could. At least, they knew we were waiting for some 
reply because we asked for it in the letter. 

You see, the reason we went to Mexico was, when we talked to one 
of the fellows in the C-^.e^ih Embassy in Washington, he said that they 
would simply have to forward information on to Cuba to see if you 
could get a visa, but he had heard in Mexico City visas were granted 
quite readily to Americans down there. But when we got down there 
we found out that that was not true at all. As a matter of fact, it was 
very difficult to get a visa. 

Mr. Johansen. So the record is complete, you did not get a visa at 
that time through that approach ? 

Mr. Glenn. That is true. 

Mr. Ichord. Can counsel estimate how long the interrogation will 
continue ? 

Mr. NiTTi.E. I would say about 15 more minutes. 

Mr. Shapiro. Excuse me. May I inquire whether or not you are 
going to be calling the next witness, Mrs. Glenn ? 

Mr. IcHORD. The House will be in session at 12 o'clock. Will the 
committee be agreeable to meeting again at 2 o'clock? We will con- 
tinue until 12 o'clock, Mr. Counsel, and recess until 2 o'clock this 
afternoon. 

Proceed with your questioning. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, I now hand you another photograph, 
marked for identification as "John Glenn Exhibit No. 7," also 
taken at the University of Indiana, and we would like you to identify 
the individual to the extreme left of the photograph, standing by the 
automobile and wearing a dark jacket or windbreaker. Is it not Ralph 
Levitt? 



910 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 



Mr. Glenn. It looks like him. I would say it is. 
(Photograph marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 7" follows.) 

John Glenn Exhibit No. 7 




Arrow indicates Ralph Levitt. 



Mr. NnTLE. Were you in attendance on that occasion ? 

Mr. Glenn. I don't know, I don't know what occasion it was. I 
don't know. I wouldn't be surprised. That must have been at the 
time of the April invasion. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You identify that as at the time of the April invasion ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, because I was not in the protest demonstration 
last October. Well, it came by the office. I walked out to look at it as 
the remnants of it came by. That is all. 

Mr, NiTTLE. The committee's investigation reveals that Kalph Levitt 
in November 1961 was the original lessee of post office box 912 in 
Bloomington, Indiana, which was the address of the Fair Play for 
Cuba Student Council of that city. He was also president of the 
Young Socialist Alliance at the University of Indiana in 1962. 

Is it not a fact, Mr. Glenn, that Ralph Levitt attended meetings of 
the Young Socialist Alliance held in the apartment which you had 
rented from Mr. Wilkes ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I hand you yet another photograph, marked for identi- 
fication as "John Glenn Exhibit No. 8." Do you recognize the person 
in the center of the photograph holding a sign which reads, "Leave 
Cuba Alone"? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, it looks like Jim Bingham. 

Mr. NiTTLE. That is James Bingham, is it not ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 911 

(Photograph marked "John Glenn Exhibit No. 8" follows.) 

John Glenn Exhibit No. 8 




Arrow indicates Jim Bingham. 

Mr, NiTTLE. It is not a fact that James Bingham also attended meet- 
ings in your apartment ? 

Mr. Shapiro. Just a minute. 

(Counsel confers with witness.) 

Mr. Glenn. Well, he was at our apartment a number of times. 
There were meetings occasionally. Sometimes there were meetings 
of the Defense Committee for the Bloomington Students. At other 
times it was just parties and social gatherings. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was he not in attendance at your home also as an 
officer of the Young Socialist Alliance? 

Mr. Glenn. I think that there was a meeting or two of the YSA. 
There may have been several. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, postal records show that one Jack Marsh 
rented post office box 915 as the lessee for the Young Socialist Alliance 
for Bloomington, Indiana, on September 20, 1962. Mr. Marsh then 
listed his address as 621 North College Avenue, Bloomington, Indiana. 
Your passport application filed in October 1961, Exhibit 1, contains 
this same address. 

Did Jack Marsh reside with you in October 1961 ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, that is true. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you then know him as a member of the Young 
Socialist Alliance ? 



912 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

Mr. Glenn. No. I was the one that got him interested in Cuba, as 
a matter of fact. After I moved in that apartment, some of the people 
that lived there later moved out ; and I didn't want to move out so I 
asked people that I thought might be interested in moving in. There 
were several rooms up there, and Jack Marsh and his brother moved 
in and he got interested in Cuba as a result of various literature and 
books that I encouraged him to read. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you encourage him to join either the Young Social- 
ist Alliance or the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, or both ? 

Mr. Glenn. He didn't need any encouragement. 

Mr. NiTTLE. By that, I take it you mean he joined both organiza- 
tions ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Wilkes also testified this morning that William and 
Paulann Groninger attended meetings of the Young Socialist Alliance 
held in your apartment on Rural Route 9, Bloomington, Indiana. Did 
the Groningers attend ? 

Mr. Glenn. I suppose they did. Like I say, there were undoubtedly 
several meetings of the YSA there. Mostly, it was the meeting of the 
Defense Committee for the Bloomington defendants because my wife 
was on that committee. Thev were social gatherings. T don't know 
which and when they were out there, but they were certainlv out there. 

Mr. NriTLE. Was Paulann Groninger secretary of the Committee to 
Aid the Bloomington StudentvS? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I believe that is right. 

Mr. NrrTLE. She was also a member of the Young Socialist Alliance, 
is that correct? 

Mr. Glenn. I don't know. I believe she did join, but I am not really 
certain. 

Mr. NrpTLE. Mr. Glenn, you are a member of the Young Socialist 
Alliance; are you not? 

Mr. Glenn. No, that is not true. 

Mr. NrpTLE. Have you ever been ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, T never have been. 

Mr. NrrTLE. Are you a member of the Socialist Workers Party? 

Mr. Glenn. No, I am not. 

Mr. NriTLE. Have you ever been ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, I never have. 

Mr. NnTLE. Whether or not you have ever been formally enrolled 
as a member of either the Socialist Workers Party or the Young So- 
cialist Alliance, that is to say, whether or not you have ever been 
technically and officially enrolled as such, have you ever been in any 
way affiliated with either organization ? 

Mr. Shapiro. Excuse me. Counsel. Would you please define for 
the witness what you mean by "affiliated" ? It is a pretty broad area, 
subject to a great deal of legal dispute. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I thought, being a member of the bar, he would have 
no difficulty with that question. 

Mr. Shapiro. He is just a recent member of the bar and he has dif- 
ficulty with it. I have been a member of the bar for a long time and 
I have difficulty with it. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 913 

Mr. NiTTLE. I will quote for you from the Supreme Court case of 
Killian v. The United States, which had to construe the meaning of 
that term in connection with a prosecution under the Taft-Hartley 
Act. That case was decided December 11, 1961 : 

A person may be found to be "affiliated" with an organization, even though 
not a member, when there is shown to be a close working alliance or association 
between him and the organization, together with a mutual understanding or 
recognition that the organization can rely and depend upon him to cooperate 
with it, and to work for its benefit, for an indefinite future period upon a fairly 
permanent basis. 

Now, conceding that definition and using that as the basis and 
guideline for your response, were you not affiliated both with the Fair 
Play for Cuba Student Council and the Young Socialist Alliance? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I would say so if what you mean by this is: Was 
Trotsky right? I think Trotsky was definitely right. I think any- 
one who is educated recognizes this. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You accepted the Trotsky viewpoint, and you agree 
that you did cooperate with, and worked for, the benefit of these two 
organizations I have mentioned ? 

Mr. Glenn. I would say so ; yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Based upon that explanation and definition of 
"affiliated," would you also say that you are affiliated with the Socialist 
Workers Party ? 

Mr. Glenn. Based on that definition — well, that isn't quite true, for 
instance, the position of the Young Socialist Alliance and the So- 
cialist Workers Party was that you shouldn't go to Ctiba, and Marcia 
and I went, knowing that they were opposed — generally opposed to 
people going to Cuba. They thought it was unnecessary. 

Mr. NrxTLE. You do concede affiliation with the Young Socialist 
Alliance, however? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, if you want to define affiliation that way. I 
wouldn't mind doing things that they think are right and that I agree 
with them on. I thought that they were wrong about traveling to 
Cuba and I went anyway — in fact, in defiance of it, and they don't 
like it. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you, with respect to the Young Socialist Alliance, 
closely work with it? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, not very closely. 

Mr. Nittle. You permitted meetings of this organization in your 
apartment, did you not ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, yes. I said, in a sense 

Mr. Nittle. You concede you are affiliated with the Young Social- 
ist Alliance ? 

Mr. Glenn. By this definition of affiliation, yes. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Counsel, how much further questioning do you 
have ? It is now 12 o'clock. The Chair will announce that the com- 
mittee will be in recess until 2 o'clock and the witnesses under sub- 
pena can return at that time. 

(Whereupon, at 12:03 p.m. Monday, November 18, 1963, the sub- 
committee was recessed, to be reconvened at 2 p.m. the same day.) 



914 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 

AFTERNOON SESSION, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1963 

(The subcommittee reconvened at 2 :37 p.m., Hon. Richard H. 
Ichord, chairman of the subcommittee, presiding.) 

(Members present: Representatives Ichord, Senner, and Johansen 
of the subcommittee, and also Representatives Bruce and Schadeberg.) 

Mr. Ichord. The committee will come to order. 

Two members of the subcommittee being present, a quorum is pres- 
ent. 

At the recess the witness, John Robert Glenn, was testifying. Mr. 
Counsel, you may proceed with the questioning. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN R. GLENN— Resumed 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, do you know Edward W. Shaw ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I have met him. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I asked that question because it is the subcommittee's 
information that he spoke on the campus of the University of Indiana 
imder the auspices of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee on March 2, 
1961. Mr. Shaw, who testified before this committee in hearings in 
May 1963, has been identified as a member of the Socialist Workers 
Party in testimony before another committee of the Congress. He, as 
of the May 7 hearings, revealed that he also traveled to Cuba — to be 
specific, in September of 1961. 

Now, can you explain why he did so if the Socialist Workers Party 
is opposed to such trips ? 

Mr. Glenn. I said they were not completely opposed to it. In gen- 
eral, they were opposed to it and they were specifically opposed to this 
student trip. 

Mr. NnTLE. You mean only that the Socialist Workers Party was 
opposed to this mass public student violation of the ban on travel, but 
not to covert trips by such individuals? 

Mr. GiiBJNN. No, not that. They were opposed generally to people 
traveling to Cuba, not necessarily as a challenge to the travel ban. 
I don't know. I may be wrong about this. This is just my under- 
standing. 

Mr. NiTTLE. When you say it is your "understanding," you do not 
mean to say that you have received directives from the Socialist Work- 
ers Party to that effect ? 

Mr. Glenn. No. 

Mr. NiTTLE. And you do not mean to say that you have received in- 
ctructions or suggestions from members, or persons known to you 
to be members, of the Socialist Workers Party ? 

Mr. Glenn. I have just heard that this was their position. I don't 
remember who I heard it from. 

Mr. NriTLE. But you will not say that you either read that in official 
directives of the Socialist Workers Party, or heard it from persons 
known to you to be members of the Socialist Workers Party? 

Mr. Glenn. No. I don't know where I heard it, and it may be en- 
tirely inaccurate. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Now, for a moment I would like to return to the subject 
of affiliation with the Socialist Workers Party. You admitted affilia- 
tion, as that term is defined by the Supreme Court, with the Young 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 915 

Socialist Alliance. You denied affiliation, however, with the Socialist 
Workers Party- 

This is a point we would like to explore because the distinction be- 
tween your admitting: affiliation with one group and denying it with 
another was not too clear. 

Mr. Glenn. By your definition, I don't see how it could be, because, 
so far as I know, there were no members of the Socialist Workers 
Party around Bloomington. 

Mr. NrrTLiE. Would you not describe the Young Socialist Alliance 
as a youth group of the Socialist Workers Party ? 

Mr. Glenn. My understanding of this is that they say they are in 
''political solidarity" with them, but technically there are no organiza- 
tional ties. They are two separate oi'ganizations. 

I don't claim to be an authority on this. This is just my under- 
standing of it. This is what they have said anyway. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you have any knowledge to the contrary ? 

Mr. Glenn. No, I don't. 

Mr. NrrTLE. The mere fact that a person disagrees with, or even 
defies, a position adopted by a certain organization would not mean 
that they could not be affiliated with it. That would not amount to 
proof of lack of affiliation of any person. Actually, members of an 
organization may disagree on one question or another and still remain 
members. 

Mr. Shapiro. Do you still mean "affiliated" ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes. 

Mr. Glenn. Frankly, I don't care if they are the youth group. 
What difference does it make? The Socialist Workers Party could 
have a youth group if they wanted to, so far as I can see. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Is it true, as Mr. Wilkes testified this morning, that 
quantities of The Milifant, the organ of the Socialist Workers Party, 
were kept in your apartment ? 

Mr. Glenn. I don't know where he got that literature. I doubt very 
much about the quantities, because my wife and I could never afford 
more than one copy of each issue. I doubt that there were quantities 
that he picked from. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was this literature placed in your apartment by you ? 

Mr. Glenn. Whatever literature we might have had there we pur- 
chased to read. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you accumulate several copies of those editions 
for distribution at meetings of the Young Socialist Alliance held in 
your apartment? 

Mr. Glenn. Not that I recall. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You do not deny there was, in your possession, numer- 
ous copies of the Socialist Workers Party organ ? 

Mr. Glenn. I would not take a principle stand against having lit- 
erature there for distribution, if that is what you mean. As a matter 
of fact, I don't think it happened, but it might have. 

If it is literature that I read and agree with, I would want other 
people to read it, too, to see if they agree with it. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You said the Socialist Workers Party had been op- 
posed to visits to Cuba, which is the subject of these hearings. Could 
you tell us why ? 

Mr. Glenn. What was that? 



916 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVTTIES EST IT.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You said the Socialist Workers Party was opposed to 
these visits to Cuba. Could you tell us why ? 

Mr. Glenn. I said they were opposed specifically to this group. 
I don't know what the Socialist Workers Party position was on it. 
I know that I was told that the YSA's position on it was that they 
were against this particular trip and I got the impression that, in 
general, they were against people going down to Cuba on the grounds 
that it was unnecessary. 

You don't have to go down there to understand the Cuban revolu- 
tion. I think they are wrong on this, but that is my understanding 
of their position. I think it would be good. The more people that 
go down there, the better. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I have before me a copy of The MiUtant, the official 
orsran of the Socialist Workers Party; and in its issue of January 23, 
1961, they publish a lead editorial, titled "The Ban on Visiting Cuba." 
This editorial attacks the State Department's regulation for travel 
to Cuba without especially validated passports, and supports the Fair 
Plav for Cuba Committee. 

Mr. Glenn. Fair Play for Cuba ? I didn't know they were taking 
an active role in trying to get people to visit Cuba. I don't know, 
mavbe they are. 

Mr. NirrLE. You are not aware, then, of the position of the Socialist 
Workers Party on travel to Cuba and its support of the Fair Play 
for Cuba Committee's activities in trying to get as many people as it 
can to visit them ? 

Mr. Glenn. I think they are opposed to the travel ban, but they are 
not in favor of people going down there right now and challenging 
it, even though occasionally — well, apparently some of the leaders go 
occasionally. I don't think they are, in general, in favor of the rank 
and file in their organization going down there. 

Mr. NrrrLE. I pointed out to you that the official publication of the 
Socialist Workers Party states its position to the contrary. 

Mr. Glenn. What exactly does it state ? 

Mr. Shapiro. Might we see the article, please, as long as you are 
quoting from it or characterizing it ? 

(Document handed to counsel.) 

Mr. Shapiro. Mr. Chairman, on the basis of the document that was 
just handed the witness, I am going to have to object to Mr. Nittle's 
characterization because I believe it is completely inaccurate and I 
would like the Chairman to see the document. 

Mr. IcHORD. Let the Chair see the document, please. 

(Document handed to chairman.) 

Mr. IcHORD. I think perhaps counsel can rephrase his question there. 

I understand the witness is not a member of the Socialist Party 
organization. 

Mr. Shapiro. Socialist Workers Party. He so testified. 

Mr. IcHORD. He also testified that he does not know the official policy. 

Mr. Shapiro. That is corr««t. 

Mr. Ichord. I think it is outside the knowledge of the witness. Pro- 
ceed with your questions, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, I think the record should reveal at this 
point that the Young Socialist Alliance, formally established at a 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN TJ.S. 917 

founding convention held in Philadelphia in 1960, has stated in its 
founding declaration that it "bases itself on the traditions of Marxian 
socialism as developed by Lenin, Trotsky, Luxemburg and Lieb- 
knecht." • ^ 

The declaration also stated that the Young Socialist Alliance and 
the Socialist "Workei-s Party are the "only revolutionary socialist 
groups in the United States today," that the Young Socialist Alliance 
is in "basic political solidarity, on the principles of revolutionary 
socialism," with the Socialist Workers Party, which is the only political 
party "capable of providing the working class with political leader- 
ship on class struggle principles." 

The Young Socialist, official publication of the Young Socialist 
Alliance, issue of May 1960, stated that members of the organization, 
"as revolutionary socialists, reject completely the concept that social- 
ism can be brought into existence piece-meal. Socialism can only 
come through the complete overturn of the present capitalist 
states * * *. Such a revoluntary development is the end result of 
a irrepressible struggle between the capitalist class and the working 
class." 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Glenn, the International Socialist Review^, a pub- 
lication of the Socialist Workers Party, in the fall 1963 issue, contains 
an article by Farrell Dobbs and Joseph Hansen, previously mentioned 
Socialist Worker Party leaders. 

The article states that : "The Cuban Revolution was marked by the 
predominance of action over conscious revolutionary theory," and that 
the Cubans in turning to Trotskyism "have blazed a trail for millions 
of youth around the globe." 

It also states : "A generation of youth armed on a sufficiently wide 
scale with Trotskyist theory would signify the finish of the capi- 
talist system." 

Do these statements explain your making your apartment available 
for meetings of the Young Socialist Alliance and your travel to Cuba? 

Mr. Glenn. I think it is rather absurd for them to say the Cuban 
revolution has turned to Trotskyism because when we were down there 
we talked to several Cuban Trotskyists, and they said they were picked 
up by the Cuban police for distributing literature and they were not 
permitted to use the press. They claim they support the government, 
but they support it critically. I don't see how they could say the Cuban 
revolution is Trotskyist. Maybe it is partly, but when you put them 
in jail — 

Mr. Nrrn^. Nevertheless, was your travel to Cuba and the making 
available of your apartment for meetings of the Young Socialist Al- 
liance done in support of, or to lend support to, the Cuban revolution ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, I do support the Cuban revolution. I thought 
you understood that. I support the Cuban revolution and I will de- 
fend it. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you agree with the statement published in the 
International Socialist Review, with regard to the cliaracterization of 
the Cuban revolution by the Socialist Workers Party ? 

Mr. Glenn. The one where they say it is Trotskyist ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Yes. 



98-165 O — 63 — pt. 4 8 



918 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. Glenn. Well, it is certainly more Trotskyist than the Soviet 
Union is. The Soviet Union is not Trotskyist at all. 

Mr. NiTTLE. No further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. loHORD. Mr. Senner. 

Mr. Senner. What was the highest rank you att^iined while you 
were in the Air Force? 

Mr. Glenn. Staff sergeant. 

Mr. IcHORD. What was the nature of your security clearance ? 

Mr. Glenn. I had a secret, top secret, and cryptographic clearance, 
which is the highest one granted. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Bruce. 

Mr. Bruce. Mr. Glenn, you support the Cuban revolution. You 
have made that plain. 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. Bruce. You also, iust a moment ago, testified that dissension 
from the police state of the Cuban revolution is punishable by jail. 

Mr. Glenn. I would like to qualify that a little. The people that 
we talked to made it very explicit. They said that the maximum 
that any of their members had ever been in jail was for 50 days and 
then this person was deported to Argentina. 

Mr. Bruce. What were the grounds of the jail sentence ? " 

Mr. Glenn. Well, there is a certain Communist Party influence in 
the government down there. I don't think it is predominant. 

They said that Russia tried to impose conditions on getting Cuban 
aid and that conditions were that they smash the Trotskyists, but 
Fidel has refused to do that. But usually they get picked up for a 
few hours or just overnight, but they have never had any charges 
leveled against them. 

Mr. Bruce. In other words, you say you support a Cuban revolu- 
tion which, in its application, has attained a measure of success and 
uses a police-state measure against the citizens. 

Mr. Glenn. The main reasons I supported it down there is that the 
Trotskyists supported it down there, and the police would throw them 
in [jail] with the counterrevolutionaries and argue why the Cuban 
state* had to be supported, even though they were picked up and were 
put in jail. 

They realize that Cuba has to have Russian aid. If little things 
like this have to happen they feel it is no reason to stop the revolution. 

Mr. Bruce. It is like the liquidation in the thirties ; it is like a means 
to an end. The principle is basically the same. 

Mr. Glenn. If it developed into that, this would be a very serious 
turn for the revolution. I personally don't think it is going to happen. 
It might. I think this is why the Cuban Government ought to change 
this particular policy because this could be the beginning of Stalinist 
development. 

Mr. Bruce. Being a supporter of what is termed the Cuban revolu- 
tion, do you also support the "To the WalF' cries and the execution 
of the opposition in Cuba, or is that just a thing 

Mr. Glenn. So far as I know, the only people who have been exe- 
cuted — in fact, I have never seen in the U.S. press specific details 
about a particular man who was executed or put in jail for a long 
period of time because he opposed the revolution verbally. All of 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. ' 919 

these people were murderers under the Batista regime. They were 
Batista's henchmen and they had the blood of Cuban people on their 
hands— 20,000 of them.^ 

Mr. Bruce. Wasn't that the same charge that was held against those 
who were liquidated in the Soviet Union ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, that is the significance of Trotsky's exile and 
death. 

Mr. Bruce. Then vou would justify the liquidation of Leon 
Trotsky? 

Mr. Glenn. No, of course not. 

Mr. Bruce. Why? 

Mr. Glenn. Because he represented the interests of a majority in 
the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Bruce. Wasn't he charged with being an enemy of the state ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, he was. I say I think tliis is a bad development 
in Cuba. I think it should be gotten rid of, because this is the sort of 
thing that leads into what happened in Russia. I think the balance 
of world forces are such that this is not going to happen in Cuba be- 
cause they are not completely isolated. They get support from the 
Soviet Union even though the Soviet Union is not able to make them 
do everything they want them to do. In fact, the Soviet Union is 
extremely angry because they won't sign the test ban treaty. Cuba 
has kept quiet about it, and this gives support to China and the 
elements in the Soviet Union that think the test ban treaty is wrong. 

Mr. Bruce. What intrigues me is how you can brush away the 
police-state methods. 

Mr. Glenn. I support it critically. If the Russians don't like it — 
I am going to say Trotskyists picked up there and they have not 
formed workers councils, which is the basis of socialism, and I think 
this is the reason they have organizational problems and ineiSciency. 

Mr. Senner. By what means and from what sources did you obtain 
fijiflnces for your trips to Cuba or attempted trips to Cuba? As I 
understand it, you worked part time in the summer and went to 
school. Where did you get your sources of funds ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, from working but, of course, the trip to Cuba 
that actually succeeded was at the invitation of the Cuban Student 
Federation. 

Mr. Senner. Wliat was the source of the money for the trip to 
Mexico where you attempted to get into Cuba ? Wlio financed that ? 

Mr. Glenn. Myself. 

Mr. Senner. Was that from income or savings ? ■ 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, from savings. I think I had about $900 when I 
went down there. 

Mr. Senner. What was the purpose — I didn't quite follow your 
argument — for wanting the United States to pay your transportation 
back to the United States when you were in Spain ? 

Mr. Glenn. Well, if they were going to force us back, and they 
certainly did — the American consul in Rabat admitted to us that 

iDepartmert of State Publication 7171, "Cuba," released April 1961, states: 

"The hlstOi.7 of the Castro Revolution has been • • * the history of the dissolution, 

persecution, imiprlsonment, exile, and execution of men and women who supported Dr. 

Castro — in many cases fought by his side — and thereafter doomed themselves by trying to 

malce his regime live up to his own promises." (p. 5) 



920 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

orders had been out to pick us up and to have us shipped back, and he 
said at one point, he said, "Look, we know they are here, get them." 
It was not Morocco that wanted us out, and the police kept letting it 
slip all along the line both in Morocco and Spain that all of the orders 
were coming from the U.S. Embassy and nobody could do anything 
about it. 

As a matter of fact, the police were very sympathetic with us and 
were appalled at the way we were having to be treated. 

Mr. Senner. Assuming that the United States is to blame and as- 
suming further that they controlled the Government of Kabat 

Mr. Glenn. I wouldn't say they controlled it, but in this particular 
instance the Moroccans seemed willing to go along with the U.S. 
Government. 

Mr. Senner. Let's assume the U.S. had no part in this and you 
were permitted to go about your business. Where did you want to go 
next? 

Mr. Glenn. Down to Algeria. We were hitchhiking, which was 
the only way we could go ; and then we intended to go back up through 
various Western European countries as long as our money held out. 
We wanted to see Algeria, particularly, because we understand the 
political development in Algeria is similar to that of Cuba and we 
thought it would make a good point of comparison. 

Mr. Senner. I take it when you got to Algiers your money went 
out, because when you got to Spain you didn't have enough money to 
come back to the United States. 

Mr. Glenn. We had our return tickets. 

Mr. Senner. I thought that was in the sea. 

Mr. Glenn. We would apply for another ticket. 

Mr. Senner. How would you continue your travels in the various 
countries if you had no money ? 

Mr. Glenn. That was part of the problem. When we found out we 
were able to stay in Europe for a while, we wrote our parents and asked 
them if they would lend us some money and we had it sent to Algiers 
because we were sure it would be there when we got there. We were 
running out of money actually, but we had enough to get to Algeria. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Glenn, when you were in Cuba on the student trip, 
where did you stay ? 

Mr. Glenn. Do you mean in Havana ? 

Mr. IcHORD. Yes and other places. Did you stay in a hotel in 
Havana ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. IcHORD. With the remainder of the students ? 

Mr. Glenn. Yes, the whole group stayed there. 

Mr. IcHORD. Were you present when Mr. Castro visited the group ? 

Mr. Glenn. At the hotel? 

Mr. IcHORD. Yes. 

Mr. Glenn. No, we didn't know he was coming and we were up 
asleep. It was fairly late at night. 

Mr. IcHORD. There was some testimony that he played ping-pong. 

Mr. Glenn. That wasn't then. That was at this resort area, Vera- 
dero, which is about 50 or 60 miles away. We went out to see tliis 
resort area, and he came by while we were eating lunch. 

Mr. IcHORD. You did not see him ? 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES EST U.S. 921 

Mr. Glenn. I saw him then, but not at our hotel in Havana. We 
saw him a couple of other times. 

Mr. IciioRD. Do you have any further questions, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. No, sir. 

Mr. IcHORD. If not, the witness will be excused. 

Mr. NiTFLE. Would Marcia Haag Glenn please come forward. 

Mr. IcnoRD. The witness will remain standing to be sworn. Do 
you solemnly swear the testimony you are about to give before this 
committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the 
truth, so help you God ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MARCIA HAAG GLENN, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 

BAVID I. SHAPIRO 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you state your full name for the record, please ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Marcia Glenn. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Your maiden name was Marcia Haag, H-a-a-g? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. Nitfle. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I am. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would counsel kindly identify himself for the record ? 

Mr. Shapiro. David I. Shapiro, 1411 K Street, Washington 5, D.C. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mrs. Glenn, you are the wife of the prior witness ? 

Mrs. Glenn. That is right. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you tell us when and where you were bom ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I was bom in New York City on March 5, 1939. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wliere do you now live ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Well, as my husband testified, we just returned from 
Europe and we have a post office box as a mailing address and we 
don't liave a residence right now. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you relate the extent of your formal education ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I went to high school and went to college and the last 
year I was working on my master's degree. This was all at Indiana 
University. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Of what high school are you a graduate ? 

JSIrs. Glenn. Cranford High School in Cranford, New Jersey. 

Mr. Nitfle. What year did you graduate? 

Mrs. Glenn. 1957. 

Mr. NiTTLE. What years were you in attendance at the University 
of Indiana? 

Mrs. Glenn. I started there that fall. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Fall of what year ? 

Mrs. Glenn. In the fall of '57 and went for, I think, about 3i/2 years 
or 4 years and then I worked at the university, but I think, at the same 
time, I was taking one or two courses each semester. So, I guess I was 
in school all that period of time except for a couple of semesters I was 
employed there and was not going to school. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Wliat employment did you hold there ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I was working in the Chemistry Department as a 
technical secretaiy. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you do any work on a project or program called 
the Lilly program ? 



922 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I was doing that last year. It was in the History 
Department. 

Mr. NiTTLE. What is your present employment ? 
Mrs. Glenn. I am miemployed. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Would you advise the committee what other employ- 
ment you have held since graduation from high school ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Just jobs during the summer when I was out of college, 
which have all been secretarial jobs. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you at any time employed by the Girl Scouts as 
a camp counselor ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, but that was while I was in high school. I think 
it was the summer of my junior year in high school I was a camp 
counselor. The summer before that I was what they call a counselor 
in training at this Girl Scout camp, which did not pay any money, 
but the next summer I was employed as a counselor. 

Mr. NiTTLE. While at the University of Indiana, did you engage 
in a Latin American studies program of any sort ? 
Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I was working on my master's in that field. 
Mr. NiTTLE. Mrs. Glenn, Mr. Russell will hand to you a photostatic 
copy of a passport application dated December 18, 1962, bearing the 
signature of the applicant, Marcia Haag, marked for identification as 
"Marcia Glenn Exhibit No. 1." Did you, as Marcia Haag, execute 
this application at Bloomington, Indiana, on December 18, 1962? 
Mrs. Glenn. Yes. I am not sure of the date. Yes. 
Mr. NiTTLE. Was that the approximate time that you filed it ? 
Mrs. Glenn. December of 1962, yes. 

Mr. NrrrLE. Mr. Chairman, I oifer Exhibit 1 in evidence. 
Mr. IcHORD. It is admitted. 

(Document marked "Marcia Glenn Exhibit No. 1" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Based on that application, you received a United States 
passport on December 21, 1962 ; did you not ? 
Mrs. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Your application for a passport contained a section 
headed : "LIST EACH COUNTRY TO BE VISITED." Under this section 
you listed Venezuela, Colombia, and Peru as the countries to be visited, 
and you placed a question mark after Colombia and Peru. 

Was this a true statement of your intended travel at the time that 
you filed your application in December 1962 ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Well, there was a possibility that I would be going and 
that is why I put the question mark, because it was not absolutely 
certain. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The question mark is only after Colombia and Peru. 
Mrs. Glenn. I am sorry, I did not make myself clear. There was 
a possibility I would be traveling to South America in conjunction 
with my studies, and the trip would be to Venezuela and northern Latin 
America, and there was a question of continuing on and, if it were 
possible, I would have done so because I was interested in these areas. 
Mr. NiTTLE. Did you travel to Colombia, Venezuela, or Peru ? 
Mrs. Glenn. No, I did not. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Actually, at the time you executed your passport appli- 
cation, you intended to travel to Cuba with members of the student Ad 
Hoc group? 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 923 

Mrs. Gr.ENN. I knew about this trip and I knew there was the possi- 
bility of it, but I was not too sure of the chances of the successof the 
trip, but I knew about it. 

Mr. NiTixE. Didn't you file that application because you thought you 
were going to travel to Cuba, and had no intention at that time to 
travel to Venezuela, Colombia, or Peru ? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, that is not true. I had the intention of traveling 
to Latin America whenever the possibility arose. 

Mr. IcHORD. Including Cuba? 

Mrs. Glenn. Including Cuba. 

Mr. NiTTLE. l^Hiy did you not list Cuba as an intended place of 
travel ? 

Mrs. Glenn. As I said before, I was not certain and I even had 
doubts in June that the trip to Cuba would come off. I was very 
dubious about the whole thing. 

Mr. Nittle. You gave your approximate date of departure as 
December 24 or 25 for those countries. Do you wish to examine your 
statement to that effect in your application ? 

(Document handed to counsel.) 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you not state that you intended to depart for those 
countries on December 24 or 25 ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, as I said before, there was a possibility that I 
would have gone. This is the field that I am studying and I am 
anxious to go to Latin America at every opportunity. 

Mr. NiTTivE. We realize that. 

Mr. Shapiro. Would you mind not interrupting the witness. I have 
to object. I think the witness has an opportunity to answer. 

Mr. IcTiORD. Let the witness go ahead. I don't think counsel in- 
tended to push the witness too far. 

Mrs. Glenn, There were continually arising programs for encour- 
a^ng people to travel to foreign countries. There was also a possi- 
bility I would have gone to Chile for a year on a research grant. I 
did not get the research grant so I did not go. 

Mr. NiTTT.E. Have you traveled to Cuba since December 18, 1962? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I have. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The Cuban newspaper Sierra Maestra in its issue of 
July 13, 1963, at page 6, column 1, carries an article pertaining to a 
visit made by a group of students to the Cuban "Hall of Martyrs." 
This article, in part, states : 

Marsha Glenn, a student of the University of Indiana who travels with her 
husband, also a student, embraced with mothers of the martyrs, Hector Pavon 
and Emiliano Corral. In between sobs which drowned her words exclaimed: 
"We shall do what is possible when we return to our country to initiate a 
socialist revolution . . ." 

Mre. Glenn, did you visit the Hall of Martyrs while in Cuba ? 
Mrs. Glenn. Yes, we did. 
Mr. NiTTLE. Were you correctly quoted ? 
Mrs, Glenn. No, I wasn't. 

Mr. Shapiro. Just a moment. May we see the article you are quot- 
ing from ? 
Mr. IcHORD. Does counsel have the article? 



924 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Chairman, this is a translation made of the article 
in the Sierra Maestra. We do not now have before us the original 
issue of this publication, 

Mr. IciiORD. Did the witness make such a statement ? 
Mr. Shapiro. She denied it. She said she was inaccurately quoted. 
That is the testimony, sir. 

Mr. IcHORD. Could the witness summarize to us what she did say? 

Mrs. Glenn. I don't know exactly, except I remember tliis was a 
misquote, because this was in Santiago where this took place in this 
Hall of Martyrs, and we w*ere there for, I don't know, 3 or 4 days and 
we were stationed in Santiago and we traveled by bus to different 
places in that region to visit different factories, schools, or what haVe 
you, and on the bus we talked to the reporter for the Sierra Maestra 
and Jackie became quite friendly with liim. He asked me after this 
paper came out how I liked the article. I did say I thought I was . 
misquoted. That is why I remember the situation very well. What 
did happen was there were six or eight mothers there of boys who 
had lost their lives in the fighting of the revolution. Some of them 
had lost all of their sons, four or five, and it became quite an emo^^'onal 
experience, and one of the American students stood up and sa. i tnat 
really the Americans were to blame for a lot of the Cubans who lost 
their lives because they initiated the fight. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Because of what? 

Mrs. Glenn. Because it was the Americans who initiated the fight- 
ing against the Cuban people and in one sense the Americans were to 
blame for the loss of these Cuban sons. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Did you associate yourself with that statement? 

Mrs. Glenn. Not at the time, but I agree with it. I didn't have 
anything to do with it, but this is how the meeting became very 
emotional. 

These women were sitting right in front of my husband and myself, 
and I was upset by all of this. I do agree with the statement, and we 
were crying. I know I said that I hoped — that Jack and I had just 
gotten married — but I hoped this would never happen to our sons 
and we hoped we would never be in this position of having our sons 
killed for what I think is a just cause but in an unjust way, and that 
is the basis of what I said. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you make any comment upon your intent to effect 
a socialist revolution in the United States? 

Mrs. Glenn. I am a Socialist and, not only being for socialist 
revolution, I think it is inevitable. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Then, in effect, you do subscribe to that goal and 
objective ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I am sorry, I didn't understand the goal and objective. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I say you do then, in fact, subscribe to that goal and 
objective? 

Mrs. Glenn. Of what, seeing socialist America ? 

Mr. JoHANSEN. A socialist revolution ? 

Mrs. Glenn. In America ? 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Yes. 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I think so. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Then in what particular was this statement in error ? 

Mrs. Glenn. It was just that I didn't say it then. 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 925 

Mr. JoHANSEN. You didn't happen to say it then ? 

Mrs. Glenn. No. 

Mr. IcHORD. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

IVfr. NiTTLE. Mrs. Glenn, were you present this morning when Har- 
old Wilkes testified ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I was. 

Mr. NiTTLE. He testified that during the period you and your hus- 
band rented an apartment from him in Bloomington, Indiana, meet- 
ings of an organization known as the Young Socialist Alliance were 
held in your apartment. Was this a true statement of fact on the 
partof Mr. Wilkes? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, I don't think it is. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you hold meetings in your apartment? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, there were meetings in our apartment. 

Mr. Nfttle. Were the persons who attended these meetings mem- 
bers of the Yoimg Socialist Alliance ? 

Mrs. Glenn. There were many people who came to our apartment 
who were not members of the Young Socialist Alliance. There were 
people who I know were members of the Young Socialist Alliance. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How many persons were in attendance at these meet- 
ings? 

Mrs. Glenn. As many who came. Sometimes there were 5 people, 
10 people. We had parties and there might be 30 people. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you meet during the first week of the month? 

Mrs. Glenn. I think I should clarify one thing. The meetings 
held in the apartment were the meetings for the Defense Committee 
for the three students who were indicted in Bloomington, and there 
were many people who were interested in the indictment of these- 
three students who had nothing to do with the Socialist Alliance and 
were not Socialists. In fact, the dean of the University of Indiana 
donated a number of dollars to the defense of these students. 

These were meeting and they were not involved with the Socialist 
Alliance at all. I have to contradict my husband on this because he 
was not a member and does not know. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you deny they ever held a meeting in your home? 

Mrs. Glenn. I believe they held a meeting at one time when my 
husband was not there. The Young Socialist Alliance was a recog- 
nized organization and it had complete recognition of the university. 
The meetings were held at the miiversity campus in the University 
Building and they were always announced. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Wilkes identified Ralph Levitt as being in attend- 
ance at these meetings. 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, he was. He is one of the defendants. 

Mr. NiTTLE. He was the head of the Young Socialist Alliance in 
Bloomington, was he not ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was James E. Bingham usually in attendance at these 
meetings ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. Shapiro. Excuse me. I hate to interrupt counsel but I would 
like to know — I have read this very carefully. This is the scope of 
the inquiry here, and I would like to know how this question or series 
of questions, this line of questioning, in any way relates to the subject 



926 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES EST U.S. 

matter under inquiry this morning. I may be wrong but I would like 
to know. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Counsel, the Chair stated in the statement at the 
outset of the hearing that the purpose of the legislative inquiry pri- 
marily embraced two things : One, to look into the possibility of tight- 
ening up restrictions of travel abroad for United States citizens and 
also the possibility of broadening the definitions of persons who are 
required to register under the Foreign Agents Registration Act. 
Testimony before the committee has revealed, and the committee in- 
vestigation has led the committee to believe, that the idea of the trip 
originated in Cuba ; that the money which was used to buy the tickets 
on the student trip to Cuba probably came out of Cuba. 

The witnesses today have been very cooperative in giving the com- 
mittee the information that they have about the trip to Cuba. I do 
believe that the question is pertinent and within the scope of the legis- 
lative inquiry, and the Chair will so rule. 

Mrs. Glenn. Let me make it clear, Mr. Nittle, these three students 
who were indicted were officers of the Young Socialist Alliance and 
they were indicted because they were officers of the Young Socialist 
Alliance. I was working on the Defense Committee, and it is only 
normal that the three men who were indicted would come to these 
meetings although they were not always there. Besides that fact, 
these men were personal friends of my husband and I, and they were 
in our apartment on many occasions. 

Mr. Nittle. Weren't they indicted in May of 1963 ? 

Mrs. Glenn. That is right. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Wilkes mentioned March 1963. He testified with 
respect to a person addressed as "Comrade" speaking on the subject 
of the Young Socialist Alliance, a man described as being from New 
York. Was he in attendance prior to May 1963 ? 

Mrs. Glenn. There were no Young Socialist Alliance meetings in 
our apartment. Mr. Wilkes does not live in our apartment. Granted, 
he lives upstairs. He trespassed in the sense that he listened to what 
we were saying ; he took tape recordings of what was going on in our 
apartment; and he has entered our apartment illegally and, by what 
has been given here, he took literature from our apartment, which is 
stealing ; and I hope we get it back. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. The witness said a few moments ago there was at 
least one meeting. 

Mrs. Glenn. One that I can remember and my husband was not 
there. The one I can remember was in January, and it was held there 
at that time because it was in between sessions of the university and 
the universify rooms were not available. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I am just t^ing lo clear the record so there is not 
a conflict. 

Mrs. Glenn. This gentleman from New York that you mentioned 
did stay in our apartment. He was there, and there were several 
social gatherings but these were not meetings. 

Mr. Nittle. Was this gentleman an organizer for the Young So- 
cialist Alliance ? 

Mrs. Glenn. He is a member. I don't know if he is an organizer. 
T think he is a secretary. 

Mr. Nittle. Was not Jack Barnes in attendance at these meetings ? 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 927 

Mrs. Glenn. No. No, Jack Barnes, as nearly as I recall, was not 
there. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was he never in attendance at a meeting of your 
group ? 

Mr. Shapiro. Excuse me. Wliich group are you referring to ? You 
have referred to several. 

Mr, NiTTLE. Was he not present at any of the meetings which took 
place in your home? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, he was present at meetings of the Defense Com- 
mittee. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Is Jack Barnes known to yoti as a Midwest organizer 
of the Young Socialist Alliance ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I believe that is correct, yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Did James E. Bingham attend these meetings? 

Mrs. Glenn. I have already testified to that, Mr. Nittle. 

Mr. Nittle. Was he not known to you as the secretary of the Young 
Socialist Alliance? 

Mrs. Glenn. That is public knowledge. 

Mr. Nittle. Were you not the recording secretary of the Young 
Socialist Alliance ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I most certainly was not. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you hold any position in the Young Socialist 
Alliance? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, I was not. 

Mr. Nittle. Are you a member of the Young Socialist Alliance? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, I am not. 

Mr. Nittle. Were you ever a member of the Young Socialist 
Alliance? 

Mrs, Glenn. Yes, I was. 

Mr. NiTFLE. Wliat months were you a member of the Young Social- 
ist Alliance? 

Mrs. Glenn. From January until June. 

Mr, Nittle. Of what year? 

Mrs. Glenn. Of this year. 

Mr. Nittle. What caused you to discontinue membership in the 
Young Socialist Alliance, if you discontinued it in June of 1963 ? 

Mrs. Glenn. The Young Socialist Alliance has a policy of not per- 
mitting its members to go on the trip to Cuba. I was against this 
policy and I oflfered my resignation, which at the time was accepted. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you receive instructions from any member of the 
Socialist Workers Party not to undertake this trip to Cuba? 

Mrs. Glenn. I talked to no one from the Socialist Workers Party 
concerning going to Cuba. 

Mr. Nittle. From what official source in the Young Socialist Alli- 
ance did you receive information that they opposed this particular 
student trip ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I received information from people in New York who 
form the executive committee of the Young Socialist Alliance — the 
national secretary, I think his title was. 

Mr. Nittle. This is a matter of interest to the committee, Mrs. 
Glenn, because testimony received by the committee indicated, with 
respect to certain activities, that there was a united-front action be- 
tween the Socialist Workers Party and other Communist groups. 



928 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACnVITIES IN U.S. 

And, of course, the committee has received information that this stu- 
dent travel to Cuba was largely planned and principally led by mem- 
bers of the Progressive Labor Movement, a splinter Communist group 
under the leadership of two fonner candidates for the National Com- 
mittee of the Communist Party — Mortimer Scheer ahd Milton Rosen. 

You say you received information at the headquarters of the Young 
Socialist Alliance in New York that you were not to undertake this 
particular trip to Cuba. You did not understand that information 
to be stating a policy that the Young Socialist Alliance was opposed 
to support for the Cuban regime ? 

Mrs. GliEnn. No, the Young Socialist Alliance supports without a 
doubt the Cuban revolution. 

Mr. NriTLE. They support it ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, without a doubt. Their policy position on the 
trip to Cuba was they were against their members going on that trip. 

Mr. NiTTLE. On that particular trip ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. But not generally against travel, under certain circum- 
stances, to Cuba by members of the Young Socialist Alliance? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, I think I would say that generally they were 
against it, but not many members of the Young Socialist Alliance have 
the money to make a trip to Cuba on their own finances. 

Mr. NiTTLE. They would not oppose members of the Young Social- 
ist Alliance going if they went not in association with the Progressive 
Labor Movement ? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, no, no. I am not sure. This has never come up. 
I have never asked the Young Socialist Alliance if they would object 
to my going to Cuba on my own finances, but it is my understanding 
that they do not feel — that it is sufficient enough to know what is going 
on in Cuba in this country, that is', it is not necessary to go to Cuba. 
It had nothing to do with working with the PL or anything. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you a member of the Fair Play for Cuba Student 
Council ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes. I think it is the Fair Play for Cuba Committee. 
It is not called the Student Council. 

Mr. NiTTLE. How long were you a member of that committee ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I joined that this time last year and I suppose the dues 
I paid were for 1 year. I don't know. I may not be a member now 
because I have not paid any dues. 

Mr. NiTTLE. You have not given notice to the Fair Play for Cuba 
Committee that you desire to terminate your membership ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I don't desire to terminate my membership. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you perform any services for the Fair Play for 
Cuba Committee while at the University of Indiana ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I am sure I did. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Were you a member of the Ad Hoc Committee to Op- 
pose U.S. Aggression ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I was. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you perform any services for the Ad Hoc Com- 
mittee to Oppose U.S. Aggression ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Well, the Ad Hoc Committee to Oppose U.S. Aggres- 
sion held a meeting in our apartment. I took part in a demonstra- 
tion held by the Ad Hoc Committee to Oppose U.S. Aggression on 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 929 

October 24, 1962. Tlien the Ad Hoc Committee to Oppose U.S. 
Ap:gression went out of business. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Was it not, in fact, created by and was a front for the 
Fair Play for Cuba Committee and the Young Socialist Alliance? 

Mrs. Glenn. I disagree with that. The Ad Hoc Committee to Op- 
pose U.S. Aggi-ession was made up of a group of students who be- 
longed to various organizations, including the Fair Play for Cuba 
Committee, the Young Socialist Alliance, NAACP, YPSL,^ which is 
another Socialist youth organization of the Social Democrats. One 
lady even said she was a member of the PTA. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you participate in the organization of the Ad Hoc 
Committee ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I did. Well, in that it was just a group of stu- 
dents getting together. That is all there was to organization. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Was it a specific "aggression" that this Ad Hoc 
Committee was formed to oppose ? ; 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, it was to oppose the aggression of the U.S. at the 
time of the Cuban crisis, to oppose the aggression of the blockade. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Russell will hand you a copy of a mimeographed 
throw-away of the Ad Hoc Committee to Oppose U.S. Aggression, 
entitled "WE OPPOSE united states threat to world peace." 
I ask you to examine the document. It is marked for identification as 
''Marcia Glenn Exhibit No. 2." 

Mrs. Glenn, it is the committee's information that you mimeo- 
graphed that document at the University of Indiana during the time 
you were working, I believe, on the Lilly project or program ? Is this 
information correct ? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, it is not correct, 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you mimeograph it ? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, I didn't. 

Mr, NiTTLE. Could you tell us by whom the document was mimeo- 
graphed ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I am really not sure. I think this was a document that 
was distributed during the demonstration, but at the time this Ad Hoc 
Committee was formed, I was working a number of hours a day at the 
time I was going to school, and right up to the time of the demonstra- 
tion I was working. In fact, I got to the demonstration late and I 
didn't have this and I didn't see, but I am pretty sure that that is 
what it was; and in this particular demonstration I did not help to 
make any of the signs or mimeograph this or have anything to do 
with that part of undertaking, I am not sure, but I think that is prob- 
ably what it was used for. 

(Document marked "Marcia Glenn Exhibit No. 2." See next page.) 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mr. Wilkes testified there was in your possession in the 
apartment a mimeograph machine. Do you know whether that docu- 
ment was mimeographed on this mimeograph machine of which you 
were in possession? 

Mrs. Glenn. No. 

Mr. Shapiro. The witness said she didn't know. 

Mr. IcHORD. She can answer the question. 

Mrs. Glenn. The demonstration was in October, and Mr. Wilkes 
did not testify when the mimeograph was in our apartment. 

> Young People's Socialist League. 



930 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

Marcia Glenn Exhibit No. 2 
WE OPPOSE UNIT:ID STATP:S threat to WOPiD PEACE ■ 

VThen President Kennedy announced that the United States 
would enpct a "quarentint,"' against "all ofreiiSlve arms and 
oth-^r mctt-rlale, if necessary,"' he not only endangered the 
llvtis of Ar.erlcrn servicecen, but he willfully and drfastically 
mlsrepr -sented the actual situation within Cuba today. The 
Cub^.n psopLe hews announced that they ere villing to die 
defer.din<5 their country. Remenber the April invssioni The 
Cubrn sov^rnment has announoec time and time again that all 
weapons in Cuba tor^sy are for the defer^e of the Cuban people 
end' their soverei'^ity as guarentecd by the U.N. Charter, the 
Charter of the Cr^erizntion of thta American States, the Rio 
Pact, ancj traoltioml i.itsrnatlonrl Ipw. 

The ratlo3;ele for the bloc'sadr i.2 the alleged presence 
of olfenrive missile air] bomber c -j: :■-■'■ t" in Cube. President 
Kennedy's spe'rch, however, merely i^ro -:*."■ out does not make 
clecr the fcturl presence of such weoo:- "^ That is, the 
President'^ mefsciji? doe.s not nfke cle^r Lh^t there are now 
offer.f^'.ive weapons in Cubr, All thl" nrje&ch said definitely 
was th'Tt there ar^ boec cissle site_3 built and some under 
conrtruction which have been interpreted as beinj^ abl'. to 
acccmitodrte mcQium and lon'3;-ran3e missies , Yesterday, Premier 
C?ctro hts steted that there are no "'offensive" v;eapons in 
Cube. This Indicates thrt there is no inuDodiato thrsat to 
the United States, Therefore, the inter.tion of President 
Kennedy's soeech I-Iondpy nisht Eust be ruepect, since his 
iaolic^tion h'-s re:- alt- d 3n th-3 intcrpretatior that such 
cl Soles ere oresenlly bc!=ed in Cube, 

Pi>€sident Kernedy hr<3 act'^d v.-ithcut any regard for inter- 
national law. On Mry 1, 1961, Ksnnedy srid, "Law is the 
Btror.353t liuk betw-^en rr-n .- nc freedom fnd by strcni5th£nin<5 
the rule of Irw we strengthen freedom and justice in our ov/n 
cour.try rnd oontribute by sxruple to the 30,-1 of Justice 
under l^v: for f 11 lurnkind," Wh?t hops is there for rll inan- 
kind if the U.S. has th-~ strcn-ra^t rrJlit^rv cower delibsr'itely 

and consciously octo in contradiction cf internctionf^l law 
vithcut first consultivi^- any int -motion-- 1 organization? The 
U.S. presented the Unitc-d Nations with a fait ,.g,c,c9.n;,?.l,i » 
BsGcuss the bloclcpde was alr.^ady in p o " 1 1 i o^^vhs n tlie^U . 3 • 
present3d its case before the O.A.S. and the UN, the U.S. in 
fact has seriously restricted other possible alternatives 
to the Caribbe£n situation^ 

The storniu^ of the U.S. E^ribassy in London, the rioting 
and deaunstratin3 in Caracis, Rio, S-ntlaje, snd through out 
Latin Aifiertca inJIcatss thrt v/oric opiiJon is not entirely 
sapi.orfcing the US rction against Cuba. Francs is (ouote) 
"indigant'^. 

As reroonsible citizens we ir.u°t ao'-'e^l to the rationality 
of the people in the Arjerioan ixovernraert. Pll Air-ericans must 
realize that they are Vv?rld citizens exd aust therefore assume 
respon:-lbillty for wor'lc"^=a^£o The -"i::--? ent course of action 
euibfc.r'£ed upon by the'"'"j^>ovirn'L:;nt 13 proven to be a direct 
thrept to >iorld_ocac3 and Iz , ■'n-refore, irresponsible v 

Join us in nr o tL's t inc; the US block-- ee of C.'ubai SUPFORT 
WOli L Pi/ CE . ^ 

'.3 TiOo Cr-pjjit.tee to Cpp:..s6 Uv£^c Aeress.'.cn 



PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 931 

Mr, NiTTLE. You were in possession of the mimeograph at one time. 
Could you tell us if that mimeograph was utilized to mimeograph that 
throw-away ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I said, "No." 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Did this Ad Hoc Committee oppose the Soviet 
threat to world peace also ? 

Mrs. Glenn. I. am quite sure that that is the statement of the Ad 
Hoc Committee and I did not read it while I was sitting here, but I 
think the sole purpose of the committee was to oppose the U.S. block- 
ade of Cuba. It wasn't a pro-Cuba position. It was simply an anti- 
blockade position, and many people accepted that view regardless of 
what they thought of Cuba. They thought the blockade was wrong 
and they thought the U.S. was wrong for organizing the blockade. 

Mr. Johansen. Do we have the approximate date of this? 

Mrs. Glenn. It was October 24, 1962. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The latter part of October 1962, at the time of the in- 
stitution of the blockade by the President. 

Mr. Johansen. I note with interest the statement: "Yesterday" — 
which, if this was issued the 24th, would mean the 23d or the 22d at 
the earliest — "Premier Castro has stated that there are no 'offensive' 
weapons in Cuba. This indicates there is no immediate threat to the 
United States." 

It is obvious that this was after October 22, because it refers to the 
President's Monday night speech which was the 22d, so, apparently, 
this document was still promoting the allegation that there were no 
offensive weapons there, in contradiction to the statement of the 
President. 

Mr. IcHORD. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Do you have any knowledge as to whether or not Ex- 
hibit 2, the throw-away to which we just referred, was distributed on 
the University of Indiana campus by Ralph Levitt, then president of 
the Indiana University Young Socialist Alliance? 

Mrs. Glenn. I just said, as nearly as I know, that that leaflet was 
distributed by those in the demonstration. Mr. Levitt was in the 
demonstration. I was in the demonstration, but I didn't distribute 
any leaflets because I did not have them to distribute. I don't think 
anyone in the demonstration was in a position to demonstrate any- 
thing, if you have read anything about the demonstration at all. 

Mr. NiTTLE. I believe you testified that you took part in this dem- 
onstration, is that right ? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes, I did. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Mrs. Glenn, it is the committee's information that Jack 
Barnes is the Midwest organizer of the Young Socialist Alliance, and 
I believe you testified that you knew him. Is that right? 

Mrs. Glenn. Yes. 

Mr. NiTTLE. And you know him to hold the position of Midwest 
organizer of the Young Socialist Alliance? 

Mrs. Glenn. I knew that last spring that w&, 3 his position. That 
may not be now ; I don't know. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did anyone known to you to be a member of the 
Socialist Workers Party or Young Socialist Alliance urge, advise, or 
recommend that you travel to Cuba without a validated passport? 

Mrs. Glenn. No. In fact, as I testified before, the YSA was very 
much against this on this particular trip. I don't think I ever talked 



932 PRO-CASTRO PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN U.S. 

to them about it, about going on my own, because that opportunity 
never arose. 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you make any request for a validation of your pass- 
port for travel to Cuba ? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, I did not. 

Mr. NiTTLE. The staff has no further questions of this witness. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Senner, do you have any questions ? 

Mr. Senner. No, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Johansen ? 

Mr. Johansen. I just want to ask one further question. In looking 
through this handbill, I find no reference to any threat to world peace 
imposed by the Soviet Union. Are you in a position to say whether 
or not it was the position of this Ad Hoc Committee that Soviet Russia 
imposed no threat to world peace in connection with the Cuban situa- 
tion as of October 22, last year ? 

Mrs. Glenn. The Ad Hoc Committee to Oppose U.S. Aggression 
had no policy on anything except one thing, and that was that they 
opposed the U.S. blockade of Cuba — to my knowledge as an Ad Hoc 
Committee. 

Mr. Johansen. They certainly had some ancillary policies, includ- 
ing the false claim that the President of the United States merely 
implied there were offensive weapons in Cuba and that, in doing so, 
he "willfully" misrepresented the facts and jeopardized the lives of 
American servicemen. Evidently, it is the United States that is all 
wrong, but the position of Soviet Russia in the matter did not concern 
your committee. I think that is obvious. 

Mrs. Glenn. I just said that. 

Mr. Johansen. I just wanted to reinforce it. I find myself in this 
rare instance in agreement. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Bruce. 

Mr. Bruce. I have no questions. 

Mr. IcHORD. Mr. Schadeberg. 

Mjr. Schadeberg. I have no questions. 

Mr. IcHORD. The Chair has one question. You stated that you were 
formerly a member of the Young Socialist Alliance and that you would 
support a socialist revolution in the United States. Would that in- 
clude support of a socialist revolution by force and violence if neces- 
sary? 

Mrs. Glenn. No, I am not trying to say I advocate the forceful 
overthrow of the Government. No, I do not. 

Mr. IcHORD. Does counsel have any other questions ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. I would like to ask that John Glenn Exhibits 5, 7, and 
8, be received in evidence, and that Marcia Glenn Exhibits 1, and 2 be 
received in evidence. 

Mr. IcHORD. They will be received in evidence. 

Mrs. Glenn. May we be able to retrieve the literature which Mr. 
Wilkes took from our apartment ? 

Mr. IcHORD. The committee does have possession of the literature. 
As I understand, the literature was not taken by a police officer. It 
was handed over to the committee by Mr. Wilkes. We will take that 
under consideration at a later time. 

The committee will stand adjourned until further call of the Chair. 

(Whereupon, at 3 :15 p.m. Monday, November 18, 1963, the commit- 
tee was adjourned, subject to call of the Chair.) 



INDEX 



Individuals 

A Page 

Armstrong, Valerie 851 

B 

Barnes, Betsy 818, 888 

Barnes, Jack 818, 824, 888, 889, 926, 927, 931 

Bateson, Nicholas 840- 

843, 812-814, 816, 840-843, 847-857 (testimony), 873 

Batista y Zaldivar Fulgincio 823, 919 

Bennett 859 

Bingham, James E. (Jim) 818, 821, 824, 888, 889, 908, 910, 911, 925, 927 

Bland, David 856 

C 

Castro, Fidel 823, 825, 828, 877, 901, 902, 919, 920, 930, 931 

Clark, Tom 890 

Corral, Emiliano 923 

D 

Delaney, Denis W 834 

Dobbs, Farrell 917 

Draper, Theodore 819, 889 

E 
Eisenhower (Dwight D.) ^ 890 

F 
Faulkner, Stanley 830, 832 

O 

Gard, June Anita 811, 

812, 836-838 (testimony), 857-858 (testimony), 871, 872 

Gesell, Harold J. E 816, 866, 867-871 (testimony) 

Glenn, John Robert 817-824, 886-892, 893-921 ( testimony ) 924 

Glenn, Marcia Haag (Mrs. John Robert Glenn) 817- 

819, 821-825, 886-889, 892, 893, 898-900, 912, 913, 921-932 (testimony) 

Gollobin, Ira , 847 

Gonzalez, Mrs 861 

Groninger, Paulann (Mrs. William Groninger) 818, 823, 888, 889, 912 

Groninger, William (Bill) , 818, 888, 889, 912 

Gumpert, Peter 812, 813, 838-843 (testimony), 849, 850, 873 

H 
Halstead, Fred , 890 

Hansen, Joseph , 889, 890, 891, 917 

Henderson, Charles, Jr 852, 854 

Hickey, Edward J 897 

Hoffman, Barry 815. 861 

Hutcheson, Maurice A 834 

i 

98-765 O — 63 — pt. 4 9 



ii INDEX 

I 

Page 

Indenbaum, Arnold (Arnie) {see also J&cobs) 811,817,830-836 

(testimony), 837-841, 846, 849, 850, 859-862, 865, 866, 871-884 (testimony) 
Indenbaum, Philip 880 

Indenbaum, Rose (Mrs. Philip Indenbaum) 880 



Jacobs (or Jacob), J. (or Jay) (see also Indenbaum, Arnold) 811-817, 

829, 833, 835, 837, 838, 840, 844r-847, 849, 850, 857-866, 868-877 

K 

Kennedy (John F.) 855,856,930 

KlUian, John Joseph 913 

King, Dennis 851, 856 

L 
Laub, Lee Levi. ( See Laub, Levi Lee. ) 

Laub,Levi Lee (born Lee Levi Laub) 811, 

815, 816, 829, 836, 837, 860, 861, 871, 877, 901 

Lenin, V. I 917 

Levitt, Ralph 818, 821, 822, 824, 888, 889, 908-910, 925, 931 

Liebknecht, Karl 917 

Linke, Brunhilde 814,858-860 (testimony), 875 

Long, William G 854 

Luce, Phillip Abbott 901 

Luxemburg, Rosa 917 

M 

Mao Tse-tung 857 

Marsh, Jack 822, 911, 912 

Martinot, Stefan (Steve) 901 

McAvoy, Clifford T 817, 878 

McCone, John 828 

Mills, C. Wright 907 

Morgan 860 

Morgan, Thomas G. (Tom) 818,824,888,889 

O 

O'Neill, Edward R 814, 815, 860-865 (testimony), 875,876 

Ortiz, Vickie (Victoria) 815, 816, 861, 862, 876 

P 

Pavon, Hector 923 

Perham, David 815, 865-866 (testimony), 877 

Phelps, Larry Wilford 813, 851, 852, 856 

Pratt, Charles 851 

R 

Randolph 837 

Rosen, Jacob 812, 814, 842, 843, 853, 857 

Rosen, Milton 814, 854, 928 

S 

Salter, John Frederick 851 

Sanford, Terry 856 

Scheer, Mortimer 814, 857, 928 

Schlosser, Aantol Isaac 901 

Scoggins 842 

Shapiro. David I 893, 921 

Shaw, EJdward W 914 

Sherman, Durane U 812, 813, 843-847 (testimony), 849, 868, 874 

Shriver, George 821, 906-909 

Smith, Don 818, 888 

Smith, Polly (Mrs. Don Smith) 818, 888 



INDEX ill 

T Page 

Trotsky, Lev (Leon) 891,913,917,919 

Truman (Harry S.) 890 

V 
van der Jagt, H. J 814, 816, 859, 872, 875 

W 

Warde, William F 890 

Wilkes, Harold Glenn 817- 

819, 824, 886-892 (testimony) 910, 925, 926, 929, 932 

Williams 819,892 

Williams, Robert F 821,908,909 

Organizations 

A 

Ad Hoc Student Committee for Travel to Cuba {see also Permanent Stu- 
dent Committee for Travel to Cuba) 821,822,898,901,922 

Ad Hoc Committee to Oppose U.S. Aggression 821, 

825, 905, 906, 928-932 

American Labor Party 817, 878, 879, 881, 882 

New York State : 

New York City Area 817,879 

Kings County 817 

Twenty-first Assembly District 817, 878, 882 

Association for Academic Travel Abroad 895 



BOAC. {See British Overseas Airways Corp.) 

British Overseas Airways Corp. (BOAC) 811, 

8ia-817, 822, 829, 833, 835, 850, 860-864, 868, 869, 875-877, 897, 899 

O 

Committee to Aid the Bloomington Students— 818, 823, 824, 889, 911, 912, 925-927 
Cuban Federation of University Students 833,919 

F 

Fair Play for Cuba Committee (FPCC) 821, 

825, 898, 899, 901-903, 908, 912, 914, 916, 928, 929 
Fair Play for Cuba Student Council, University of Indiana 818, 

821, 823, 888, 889, 903, 905, 907, 910, 913, 928 

K 

KLM Royal Dutch Airline 811-817, 

829, 835-837; 850, 858, 859, 865, 866, 868, 871, 872, 875-877, 899 

M 

Maupintour Associates 820, 895 

N 

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) __ 825, 929 
New Left Club (University of North Carolina) 812,843,855,856 



Permanent Student Committee for Travel to Cuba {see also Ad Hoc Stu- 
dent Committee for Travel to Cuba) 833 

Pioneer Publishers (New York CityL- 819,889,890 

Progres.sive Labor Club (University of North Carolina). {See entry 
under Progressive Labor Movement.) 

Progressive Labor Movement 814, 817, 843, 853, 855, 873, 883, 928 

Progressive Labor Club (University of North Carolina) 812-814, 

842, 850-856 



IV INDEX 

R Page 

Radio Havana 1 821, 89&-900 

S 

Socialist Party-Social Democratic Federation : 

Young People's Socialist League (YPSL) 1 "825,929 

Socialist Workers Party 819, 823, 825, 890, 912-917, 927, 931 

T 

Tom Maupin tour Associates. (/See Maupintour Associates.) 

U 

United States Government : 
Senate, United States : 

Internal Security Subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee 879 

University of Indiana ( Bloomington, Ind.) 905,914,931 

See also: 

Fair Play for Cuba Student Council, University of Indiana. 
Young Socialist Alliance, University of Indiana. 

University of North Carolina 813,853,854 

Progressive Labor Club. (See enitry under Progressive Labor Move- 
ment. ) 

Y 

Young People's Socialist League (YPSL). (See entry under Socialist 
Party-Social Democratic Federation. ) 

Young Socialist Alliance (YSA) 818, 

819, 823-825, 887, 888, 892, 912-917, 926-929, 931, 932 

New York City 819, 890, 928 

University of Indiana 818,821-825,888,889,905,910-913,925,926,931 

Publications 

H 

History of the International Socialist Youth Movement to 1929 890 

I • 

In Defense of the Cuban Revolution, An Answer to the State Department 

and Theodore Draper 819, 889 

International Socialist Review 917 

Internationale (song) 819, 890, 891 



List of Publications on Socialism and the Labor Movement 890 

Long View of History, The 890 

M 
Militant, The 819, 890 

N 

1948 Manifesto of the Fourth International Against Wall Street and the 
Kremlin ^ 819,889 

O 

Only Victorious Socialist Revolutions Can Prevent the Third World War. 890 

P 
Political Affairs 855 

B 
Red Flag, The (song) 819,890,891 



INDEX V 

S Page 

Socialist Workers Party, The 890 

Solidarity (song) 819, 890, 891 

T 

Theory of the Cuban Revolution, The 819, 890 

Too Many Babies? 890 

Trotskyism and the Cuban Revolution — An Answer to Hoy 819, 889 

Truth About Cuba, The 889 

W 
, Why Can't Everybody Have a Job? 890 

T 

Young Socialist, The ^ 917 

Young Socialist Forum : 819. 890 

o 






ERRATA SHEET FOR "VIOLATIONS OF STATE DEPART- 
MENT TRAVEL REGULATIONS AND PRO-CASTRO 
PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES, 
PART 4" 



Page 812, lotli line from top, "no known" should read "not known". 

Page 815, last line, "Jay Jacobs" should read "Jay Jacob**. 

Page 817, 2d line from top, "Jabab*' should read "Jacob*'. 

Page 8G1, 12th line from bottom, "Document" should read 
"Documents". 

Page 868, 15th and 16th lines from bottom, "D. J. Sherman" should 
read "D. U. Sherman". 

Page 869, 22d line from top, "Gesell Exhibit No. 1" should read 
"Gesell Exhibit Xo. 5". 

Page 873, 23d line from bottom, "introduced by you to" should read 
"introduced to you by". 

Page 879, 22d line from bottom, "Indenbaum Exhibit No. 2" should 
read "Indenbaum Exhibit No. 7". 

o 



MiV 



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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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