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Full text of "Visit of General Lafayette to the Lafayette Female Academy in Lexington, Kentucky, May 16, 1825, and the exercises in honour of the nation's guest: together with a catalogue of the instructers, visiters, and pupils, of the Academy"




OyUJU^-' 




Class ^^ 6 7 



Book iM. 



3 



^ / or 

TO THK 



LAFAYETTE FEMALE ACADEMY, 

IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, 

MAY 16, 1825, 

AND THn 



IN HONOUR OF 



iCftc JLation'jgi Ccwri^t: 



TOGETHER WITH A 



CATALOGUE 

Of the Instxucters, Visiters, and Pupils, op the A<:ademy, 



LEXINGTON, KY: 

PRINTED BY JOHN BRADFORD, 

MAY, 1825. 



) p L =■■ 



j'-v-r^/^ 



/7 



OLlDEll OF EXERCISES. 



I. GRAND MARCH ON THE PIANO. 



II. ^mrvC^lS In/-'- ""^**" 

Of the Principal of the AcADtBiy to Gen. Lafatetti;. 

GEiVKRAL, 

Wc bid you welcome! As the fn end of ourconntry, 
us "the guest of the nation," as the fiiend and favourite of our 
once beloved, but now sainted VVasuignton; as tlic fiiend, tJie ad- 
vocate, the liberator of universal man, we bid you welcome! in 
the name of these respectable Fathers and Visiters of the Leering- 
ton Female Academy, we bid you a most cordial welcome, within 
these humble walls, devoted to the cultivation of the female mikd. 

Pardon, Sir, the eager gaze, with which our eyes are fixed up- 
on you. In your venerable features we read the history of half 
a century; a half-century distinguished by the most sj>lcu?lid, the 
most tremendous, the most astonishing events to be found in the 
annals of the world ; events, exhibiting the grand march of hu- 
man intellect, attended with consequences the most interesting 
and benefjcial to man: and, with what propriety might you 
add, in the language of /Eneas, "ei! quomm pars magna fui?'' 

les. Sir, you have lived in an eventful era. You have witness- 
ed the disniptioD of social order, the mighty sliaking of nations, 
the agonizing struggles of the oppressed against the oppressor. 
Nor have you been an idle spectator. No, Sir, you read the signs 
of the times and foresaw the rising tempest. You stood undismay- 
ed on the crater of the bursting volcano; and, like Curtius, for 



the good ol3^ourcuuntry, you plunged into theguit! Vou have i-eeu 
ihrones demolished, sceptres broken, and crowns und diadems trod- 
den underfoot. And, Sir, you have lived to witness a temporary 
retrograde movement of the revolutionary w heel ; to see an unholy 
alliance among the monarchs of Europe, against the rights of man, 
and chains agam rivetfed on the friends of freedom. But for your- 
.self, illustrious Sir, you still remain unchanged; the same undcvi- 
ating friend of rational liberty and the sacred rights of man. 
'i'iius, in your native land, you stood alone, like the venerably 
oak, that has braved the fury of a thousand storms, in silent ma- 
jesty amid surrounding ruins. How naturally then must your 
eye have turned to America, the theatre of your earliest toils, 
and of your brightest glory. You rqsolved at once to cross the At- 
iantick, to visit the garden you had planted; — and it was done. 
You have visited our Eastern, and Southern, and Western borders. 
You have found a land literally Jlowing ■with milk and honey. 
You have visited Boston, the cradle, as you well know, Sir, of 
A.merican Independence; and New York, the grand emporium 
of our wealth and commerce; and Washington, the growing capi- 
tal of our rising empire. You every where behold the astonish- 
ing changes, whether moral, social, or political, which a lapse of 
forty years has produced. You witness every where the march 
of improvement, the progi'ess of civilization, the cultivation of 
science, literature, and the arts. You behold, in successful ope- 
ration, the freest, and at the same time, the lirmest and the best 
government on earth. You fmd a productive system of permanent 
national revenue established; great and efficient plans of internal 
improvement eagerly adopted; and, in short, you every where be- 
hold an infant empire, rising with gigantick strength, like Hercules 
4Vom his cradle, on the broad foundatioh of equal rights and equal 
laws;— a foandation, the grand coiner stone of which you yourself 
Sir, so essentially contributed to lay. Most of your fellow labour- 
ers in the tield of our revolutionary glory are, indeed, gone down 
to the dugt! But some few still remain; some few of those, who 
fought and bled at your side, are still tottering on the verge of 
the tomb, and now grasping your hand in tears c. transport and 
deli«-ht, ready tp exclaim, in the language and spiiit of good Sim- 



EON of old, "Lord, noxv lettcst thou tny servant depart in peacOy 
for mine eyes have seeri''' our country's saviour! Nor is this all: you 
are recoprnised by their posterity. As our political Father, after 
forty years' absence, you now revisit your children, a nation of 
twelve millions of people, and not one of them proves recreant 
or ungrateful. You ever}'- where find, from Maine to Orleans, 
from the Mississippi to the Atlantick, one common burst of feeling, 
the voluntary homage of the heart! It is a triumph, which no hu- 
man being ever before enjoyed; a triumph, as honourable to hu- 
man riaturc, as it is glorious to its object; a triumph, which no 
Alexander, or Cjesar, or Napoleon, could ever command. The 
moral grandeur of such a triumph may indeed he felt j—^hut hu- 
man language is too poor to express it. 

But, Sir, you are now, literally, in a new issorld. When you were 
achieving our National Independence, the spot, where you now sit, 
was the abode of the Indian- Savage beasts and more savage men 
then constituted the inhabitants of this garden of the west. What 
a surprising change is now presented to youreycs! Thewilderness 
already budding and blossoming like the rose ! You now find some of 
the finest states in the Union on this side of the Alleghany^; and 
your name, Sir, has travelled, with the march of our empire, 
beyond the vale of the Mississippi. You every where find the 
same love of liberty, the sam?. republican spirit, the same pa- 
triotick devotion, and the same gratitude to the Fathers of our glo- 
rious revolution. And, if you do not find us equally advanced 
in the walks of science, literature, and taste, with some of our 
older sister states, you find us as zealous, at least, m the cause, and 
moving forward, with a step equally firm and sure. Tran- 
sylvania University has this day presented to your view a splen 
did monument of the munificence of Kentucky, as well as the 
most honourable testimonials of the talents of her sons, and of 
the Genius, which inspires and directs that growing Institution. 
Nor is the cultivation of the female intellect deemed so unimpor- 
tant, as to be overlooked. No, Sir; the infiuence of woman is deep- 
ly felt; it is appreciated; it is respected. We know, that virtuous, 
enlightened, and patriotick Mothers, give us a virtuous, enlighten- 
ed, and patriotick community. With such an impression has this lit- 



6 

tie Seminary been planted, and nurtured, and so liberaHy patronis- 
ed; and with such a view has the honoui of your personal atten- 
dance this day been respectfully solicited; — because, Sir, wherever 
you appear, a new ardour is enkindled ; a new impulse is given, as 
well to our literary, as to our political institutions. Thie Pupils of 
this Academy will study your private, as well asyour publick his- 
tory; and they will find portrayed, in your family circle, whether* 
amid the regal splendour of the gayest court in Europe, or in the 
dark, damp dungeons of Obmitz, or in your rural retreat at La 
Gra}ige,the most perfect models of filial piety, of conjugal love, 
and of religious devotion. These models, they will, in their 
various relations, endeavour to imitate; and the result will be an 
exhibition, in their future lives, of alt the virtues, which constitute 

FEMALK KXCELLENCE. 

Venerable Sir, this infant Establishment is greatly hontJured 
by your visit this day. We shall commemorate it, by styling it, in 
future, the LAFAYETTE FERIALE ACADEMY; and the mem 
bers now present, will, with exultation and pride, tell to j.osterity 
yet unborn, ^^ I have seen La/ay cite P'' while not a pra\ er to Heav 
en will escape their lips, without a cordial Vive Lafavettk! — 
toujovrs — VivF, Lafayette! * 



III. STRIKE THE CYMBAL; 

As adapted to the reception of Lafayette, 5y Mas. Holley, and 
S,u,ng by the Pcpils, accompanied with the Piano by Miss HAw.MO?iB. 

Weecome, welcome, LAFAYETTE ! 
Let the shouts of myriads sound! 

With us uniting. 

For Frkedom fighting, 
Our arms with victory were crowned. 

Never nation, 

Since creation. 



Hailed a Hero like to THEE! 
Spread your banners, 
Shout hosannas, 
Tis Columbia's Jubilee! 

See advances, 

With songs and dancei?, 
Kentucky's band of patriot daughters! 
Catch the sound, ye hills and waters ! 

Spread your banners, 

Shout hosannas, 
Tw Columbia's Jubilee! 

Cannon's thunder 

Rent asunder 
Britain's host and Britain's claiuT, 

When our nation 

Took her station 
Proudly on the roll of fame. 
Thee we hail, our patron, friend! 
Chieftain, noble, good, and great! 
Let joyful notes the welkin rend. 
With WELCOME, welcome, LAFAYETTE '. 



0/ thePvPu.s of the Lafayette Female Academij 
TO GENERAL LAFAYETTE. 
Illustrious Sir: — 

We, a Committee, in behalf of the Pupils 
ofthe LAFAYETTE FEMALE ACADEMY, gratefully acknow- 
ledge the honour done us, by your visit to this our Institution. It 
is an honour we have dared to Avish for, yet hardly dared to ex- 
pect; and one too, of which we shall ever be proud. We regard 
this day, as the happiest of our existence. We behold the "Na- 
tion's Guest," our country's Friend; we see LAFAYETTE: and 
never shall time eflUce from our memory the recollection of this 



8 

day. We ne'^'er shall, wc never can fcrget it . If the reccpltoii 
given you here is not so splendid, as those you have met else- 
where, think not, Noble Warriour, think not, it is less sincere. If 
our feeble pens, or our timid accents, permit us not to express our 
sentiments in that style of eloquence, with all those glowing figure? 
of rhetorick, to which you have been accustomed, attribute it not 
to our feeling less, on this interesting occasion. Believe us, as 
<)ur Father, we love you; as our bountiful Benefactor, we honour 
you; and as the bosom friend ofourimmortal Washington, we shall 
ever revere you. We arc conscious, Noble Sir, that it will be but 
useless to tell you, after your witnessing this day-s rejoicings, 
that, by all the sons and daughters of Kentucky, your visit to 
this state, and particularly to this town, is hailed with joy the most 
sincere, with gratitude the most pure, and with feelings of pleas- 
ure, which words cannot express. Here, we have daily read ac- 
counts of your reception, wherever you have visited on our Atian- 
tick and Southern borders; and cur young hearts have palpitated 
with delight, to behold our country so justly rewarding the val- 
our, the patriotism, and the generosity o^ onv nohle friend. Such 
are our feelings; such are the feelings of all, even of the 
youngest bosom, that throbs within the walls of curAcADEMr. 
For even the youngest, Gallant Warriour, know you; even the 
youngest have been taught to lisp your name, and to tell of your 
glorious deeds; — and they love, whilst offering up their prayers 
for their country's welfare, to the God who created them, to re- 
member, at the same time, their country's Friend, the ^'■JVaiion's 
Guest.'"' 

When you return, to your native land, when you once 
more join your family circle at La Grange, should your thoughts 
sometimes wander across the Atlantick, to retrace the scenes 
you have witnessed in America, may we fondly flatter ourselves, 
thnt they will sometime*^ fall, for" one moment, upon the La- 
faijetie Female Academy. As for yourself. Sir, you can never be for- 
gotten. Your name is too indelibly engraven on our hearts, and 
will be remembered and repeated with pleasure, as long as our vi- 
tal spark remains, or Liberty sheds her beams on this favoured 
land. And should our countrymen ever be inclined, (God grant 



9 

fhey never may) tosaciiike, atthe shrine of tyranny, ambition, of 
lutrigne, that freedom, which our Fathers bought with their blood ; 
should they, for a moment, forget our Washington and his brave 
Companions in arms, we will % to them, even in the field of bat- 
tle, and cry out, with our latest breath, '^Remember Lafayette P^ 
Then shall your name have a charm to awaken their feelings, to 
arouse their patriotism, and to urge them on to deeds of glory and 
renown. Friend of our country ! Veteran Warriour I we bid you 
ivelcome! In the name of our Instructers, in the name of the 
whole School, we bid yow welcome! Here,. let us repeat, here 
will you find grateful hearts, bosoms throbbing with delight, 
and eyes, which can never be weaty, while gazing on your venera- 
ble features. And if you must leave us, if all that your children 
in America can do, cannot detain you from your native Gallia, 
even there our prayers shall attend you! Upon whatever spot of 
the earth you may be, America will bless you! Should misfortune 
again visit your now peaceful country, fly, aged Warriour, fly again 
to us; fly to this asylum of the oppressed, which your own hand 
has so liberally aided to erect, and we shall always exclaim, as we 
BOW do, WELCOME! WELCOME! LAFAYETTE! 

MARY M'lNTOSH, 



For the Committee. 



Mary M'Lntosh, of Georgia, 
Piety L. Umith., of J\lississippi, 
IvEziA G. Campbell, of Alahuma, 
Emza p. Bain, \ 
Mar. Harper, f .yj^,^^, f,„, 
Anne E. GATEwooDr •' ° 

JANECoOrER, 3 



Committee. 



V. twm *"^uxn airns i^tiwe/' 

Composed, and sung by the Pupils, accompanied by Miss Nephe^' 
on the Piano, with the '^ Variations ." [Omitted.] 

We hail thee. Chief of former time! 
Who now, in life's decline, 

B 



10 

Hast left thy genial native clime, 
For scenes of auld lang syne. 

CHORUS. 

Our Friend of auld lang syne has comej 
Our fathers' friend lang syne; 

We welcome him to Freedom's home. 
Our friend in auld tang syne. 

Our Fathers oft to us have said, 

'Twas Heaven's wise design 
Moved thee to give them needful aid, 

Jn days of auld lang syne. 

Our friend S^-c. 

They've told us oft, when Freedom's foes 

Did 'gainst their rights combine, 
And they to brave resistance rose, 

In days of auld lang syne; 

Our friend fyc. 

That Thou didst swear, that Freedom's cause 

hi every land was thine; 
Then fought and bled for Freedom's laws. 

With them in auld lang syne. 
Our friend ifC. 

And thou hast come again to be, 

While waning life is thine, 
Where once thy blood, for liberty, 

Did flow in auld lang syne.' 
Our friend SfC. 

Sure it must grieve' a manly heart, 

A FEELING HEART, like thiuB, 

To find so few, who took a part 
With thee, in scenes lang syne. 
Our friend 4'C, 

But WE, THEIR Daughters, ne'er forget, 
While laurel wreaths we twine, 



11 

Tq twine the fairest for FAYETTfey 
Who fought for us lang syne. 
Our friend ^c. 

Then welcome to our happy land! 

Our blessings shall be thine, 
Since purchased by thy generous hand. 

In days of auld lang syne. 

Our friend of auld lang syne has cotm^ 
Our Fathers' friend lang syne; 

We welcome him tofreedorn's home. 
Our Friend of auld lang synr» 



VI. mntu 

m 

Written by one of the Assistants and Spoken by 
t/Uiss Sarah A. H.Prentiss. 

Hail the Hero, Patriot, Sage! 

Freedom's champion. Friend of man! 
Who, with tyrants, war to w^age. 
To the thickest conflict ran . 

When our Fathers, half-despairing, 

Faintly clung to patriot arms, 
He, with noble, generous daring, 

Sought the battle-field's alarms. 

There, like rock against the wave, 

He 'gainst fin'/aiw's legions stood; 
With the bravest of the brave. 

There he poured his youthful blood. 

Such deliberate self-devotion, 

Freemen never will forget; 
While their hearts can feel emotion, 

Or— their tongues pronounce, Fayette! 



12 

*No\v he comes again, in age, 

Not our Freedom to defend ; 
JVo : but History's brightest page 

Tells, he tt-as .OUR Fathers' Friend*, 

Read in Fame'^s immortal story 
Bright with golden letters set, 

High upon the scroll of Glory, 

^'WASHINGTON and LAFAYETTE!' 

Hail him, then, with acclamatimi, 
Partner of our Fathers' fame ; 

Show the world a grateful nation, 
Bearing a Republic's name. 



VII. mtitfi in :ffvmtK 

t/iddressed to General h AT AY KTTE, and to have been spoken hy 
Miss Kephesv. [Omitted.] 

A^'oila ce Herds, le Nestor de la France! 
Qui, guide parl'honneur, vint affranchir des fers 

Ua peuple vertueux, dent il prit la defense, 
Et qpi, par ses exploits, etonna I'Univers ! 

Toi, qui contribuas au eucces de nos arraes, 

Digne emule de WASHINGTON! 

Sensible ami, que nous estimons ! 
Ah! ne noije causes plus d'alarmes! 

Denotre sort rends ton pais jaloux; 
A de nouveaux dangers n'expose point ta rLel 

Lafayette! vis avec nous; 
Et nos coeurs seront ta .patrie. 

D'une nation, qui te cherit, 
Recois ici le juste hommage; 



1^ 

Et nos descendants, d'age en age, 

Bans leurs coeurs graveront I'image, 

Dn GuEKRiEBj qui les defendit. 



By Miss Nephew, 
Behold this HEBO, the A'estor of Frame! 
Who, guided by honour, came to free from chain^ 
A virtuous people, whose defence he undertook, 
And whose exploits astonished the Universe ! 

Thou, who didst contribute to the success of our arms' 
Worthy rival of WASHINGTON! 
Feeling Friend, whom we esteem I — 
Ah, do not cause us more alarm^! 

Of our [happy] lot render thy country jealous ^ 
To new dangers do not expose thy lite: 

LAFAYETTE ! live with us. 
And OUR HEARTS shall be thy Country? 

Of a Nation, which loves thee, 
Receive here the just homage ; 
And our descendants, from age to age, 

In their HEARTS, will engrave the image 
()f the WARRIOUR, WHO defended them! 



VIII. STolttntrev Etrljrrsi!^ 

To Gen. Lafayette, by Miss Maria Brown Duncan. 

Placed in a situation so new and so deeply enrbarrassing, and 
under circumstances so peculiarly interesting, no tongue can ex- 
press, no language define, no eloquence portray, the emotion, that 



14 

agitates m^ bosom. ■ We sojnstly appreciate the honour done u? 
iiy yonr visit to this our Institution, that I feel n:iyself incompe- 
tent to the pleasing and delightful task assigned me, of offering you 
an expression of the feeling*;, which now heave in every bo- 
som. There have been times and circum-stances, and such 
may probably occur again; when oiir affections have been ai'ous- 
ecl, our sympathies excited, and our feelings agitated; but the 
Sime has never before occurred, nor do I think it ever will again, 
when those feelings will be so signally and so po^verfully awaken- 
ed, as they liave been, by your arrival and your anticipated de- 
parture. This is not the language of deception, or insincerity, 
hat the assurance of grateful and ajfcctionate hearts; of hearts, 
Shat have been, since the earliest period of their recollection, til- 
led with a sense of gratitude, for the important aad distinguished 
services, which you have rendered our now happy country. But a 
kxv hours since. Noble Siu, we hailed your arrival with the most 
enthiistai-ifick sentiments of pleasure; viewing, in the waA'eless and 
Kficlouded mirror of our Country "'s Indjependence, and its present 
(dignified and exulted station, amongst the nations of the earth, one 
of the carlibst and m^stenergetick opposersof that oppression, 
ivhich cur unnatural parents uisbedto eoforceupon us. The period 
on' ihe American Revolution must, v.'hile the fire of Indkpekdekck 
.ind LiBEKTv iliumiuesthe hearts of the virtuous and b^ave,ever 
ie recollected with the most delightful emotions, as constituting 
one of thq most brilliant and glorious epochs of our world; v/hen 
X^cifpeiiiWi was made to tremble on its throne, and Freedom to 
shout the triumph of victory. When our memory reverts to the 
jicn'od, wlien you left a home, .endeared to you by every tender 
coas-ideration, to embark in the cause of Lrierj'y, we are filled 
v/iih astonishment, in witnessing so mucii philanthropy of spirit, 
iivA such unparallelled devotion to the rights of mankind. Not- 
%vit!:standin'T: retrospection presents us with a painful array of 
circumstances, which occurred during our long and arduous strug- 
gle for liberty, yet they are gilded and adorned with such happy 
eveats, as to produce the most delightful associations. They 
tlecply impress our irsinds with veneration and love for thcgreajt 



15 

projectors and accnmplishers of the most glorious work, thjvt.evef 
was wroug'ht by man ; and our hearts glow with the luost unfeigncir 
thanks, to the Superintending PoTvcr, who sanctioned and .sea!-' 
ed the undertaking. In the wilds of America, the Goddess of 
Liberty planted her standard. It was here, when she was driven 
from Greece, and from Rome, an^ found no asylum in the old Con- 
tinent, that she toojc up her abode. Mcthinks I see her roaming; 
from land to land, finding no pco-ple, that would bend at her shrine, 
until, melancholy'' and dejected, she sought Columbia. She then 
found a people, whose souls had never been subje'ct to a monarch^:* 
nod; but who were ready to bow at her altar, and to worship in 
her temple. And when starn necessity made them take arms S.o 
defend and maint:iin their privileges, it was then, that the God- 
dess aroused in your bosom the latent spark, that glowed with sc* 
much briiliancy, and emitted a light, which still continues to blaze, 
and which will shine %vith increasing splendour , while Liberty ha<> 
a friend, or Independence a champion. O gallant LafayettcUve 
feel foryou all, that gratitude and love can inspire. Although iiv 
capacitated from engaging in the active concerns of goveiTimeiit, 
we are deeply impressed with the value of yoarsei'vices, and the? 
intrinsick worth of your character. And, let me assure yoo, as ". 
member of the Lafayette Female Academv, that, while our 
hearts are warmed by the current of life, and reason maintai«.5 
her empire, you, Brave WARRioi'a! shall ever have our fcnenf 
prayers, for your health and happiness; — and oar most ardent 
wishes, that the evening of your life may be as ^jcac^'/i/t and happ^j^ 
as (he morning was useful a.nd< glorious. 

RI AR IA BR O \V N D UNC A^^ . 



.Co Gcncrat Lafayette, hij Miss Caroluve Ci.iffokd Ni;p5ii:v». 

All hail, gallant Warriour, and Friend of our nation! 
All hail i'<^ the Chioftain. so valinntand wise' 



16 

t>h, Welcome, thrice welcome, to Freedom's bright station! 

Long, long may thy praises resound to the skies! 
For the day hus arrived, we have long hoped to see, 
The proud day, LAFAYETTE! now devoted to thee. 

We will hail thee, our Father, our Patriot, and Friend; 

We will strew, in thy pathway, the flowers of delight; 
We will crown thee with roses, where laurels shall blend. 

Not a thorn shall appear in the wreath we unite. 
For Thou wilt not rieiv, with a cold look of scorn, 
What Macedon's Hero with pride might have worn. 

Our land all its beauties for thee shall unfold, 
Ourskies in their brightest of blue shalt thou see; 

Thy deeds, throdgh our clime, shall in story be told ; 
Not a bosom, but throbs a glad welcome to thee. 

For long years have flown, thy compatriots have fled, 

And we greet thee, returned, as a Saint from the dead. 

Oh, yes; every heart hath long treasured thy story, 
Every bosom beat high, at thy hallowed name; 

Every Freeman rejoiced, in thy well-deserved glory. 
And cherished, with ardour, warm Gratitude's flame. 

Then perish the wretch, who could ever forget, 

The godlike achievements of gallant Fayette! 

Oh, yes; for when Tyranny's legions invaded, 

And War's iron tempest loud howled on our strand; 

When naught but Despair every bosom pervaded, 
And deep was the gloom, that o'ershadowed our land; 

Then, then, like the Sun from the darkness of night, 

Thou didst burst from the cloud— a /air a/t^-e/ of light! 

Thou DIDST come! And, though hopeless the prospect before 
thee, 

Thy blade was unsheathed, and hov/ bright was Its flame ! 
The smiles of fair Freedom, like s-unbeams, played o'er thee. 

To illumine thy pathway to glory and fame: 
By WASHINGTON honoured, by Freemen adored, 
Thy name was our bulwark. — our triumph, thy sword. 



Tf 

Avj^l ho'.v bright was tliy Soul, 'mid Adversity's glootii, 
A soul still uncoiiquered, undaunted, and free; 

For tliougli Despots enchained tlice, thouorh Dungeons thy- 
doom, 
Yet ne'er didst thou bend to a Tyrant thy kneel 

Oil! how high, at thy Farm*, o'er NAPOLEOJN' LE GRAND, 

Thoug-h a crown graced his head, and a sceptre his hand. 

And now, when the winter of age is upon thee, 

When Tyrants have reft thee, and fortune depressed; 

There is yet a Free People with love looking on thee, 
There is yet a whole nation, by whom thou art blest. 

Though our Sires are no more, yet their children will glory, 

Through life, and for ages, to tell thy proud story. 

And now, in their arms, with what welcome they greet thee, 
What prayers, tears, and blessings, upon thee are shedt 

Our patriots, our statesmen, with gratitude meet thee, 
While WE twine a wreath to encircle thy head; 

Accept, V^aliant Chief, the pqor homage we pay; — 

Our love cannot fade, though these leaves may decay. 

No diadenis, sceptres, have we to bestow, 

But our hearts, Gallant Sir, are devoted to thee; 
Hearts, that love, and will bless thee, where'er thou mays* 

go. 
A meed worthy u country thy valour made free. 
'Tis a triumph, that greets thee, fi'om Orleans to Maine; 
It is ALL thou tanst ask, and no less ca.nst thou gain. 

Such a triumph! — Proud raonarchs may envy thy glory. 
And wish fair Columbia their own native clime; 

Each Despot may feel his throne shake at thy story, 
For young Liberty'^s march is still on-^ard \i-ith Time. 

At thy name, unborn ages, with transport shall start. 

And hurl, witli defiance, at tyrants the dart. 

"■ *1ja GJlA^GE, 

c 



18 

And now, must tliou leave this bright land oi" thine ounC' — 
Tis decreed; — but thy godlike example remains: 

Thou hast taught uS; hozo poor is the pride of a throne, 
Thou hast witnessed, /ioa; great is a land without chainfF. 

Oh! leave us thy mantle of virtue and truth. 

Of our senates the shield, and the guide of cur youth'. 

And Oh! when again, on old Ocean's green billow, 
Columbia's blue mountains in distance shall die, 

Then soft be the surges, that break round thy pillow. 
And fair the light breeze, and serene be the sky ! 

May the ties of Affection still round thee entwine, 

With the souPs purest sunshine on earPh,- — till GLonY in Hea 
VEw BE Thine! 



As Siung by Miss Nephew, ichile presenting the WRE.-iTK, attended bi 
a group of Utile Girls, and accompanied by Miss Hammo?i'd on the 

Piano. 

We'll pull a bunch of buds and flowers, 

And tie a ribband round them; 
]f you'll but think, in your lonely hours. 

Of the s-'jDeet little Girls that bound ihcm^ 
We'll cull the earliest that put forth, 

And those that last the longest, 
And the bud that boasts the fairest birth. 

Shall cling to the stem the strongest. 

We've run about the garden walks. 

And searched among the dew, Sir, 
These fragrant flowers, these tender stalks^ 

JVeh^e plucked them all for \'0V, Sir, 



ID 

pray, lake this bunch of buds and f lgwek^. 
Pray, lake the ribband round them; 

And sometimes think, in your lonely hours, 
Of the swKET LITTLE GiRLS, that bouud them. 



XL ^riitra! ^Mmjttt'n UmMtt 

TO THE Principal of the Academy. 

Amidst the eminent testimonies of national blessings, and ac- 
<:omplished improvements^, which are to be admired, on this beau- 
tiful and happy spot, no instance of them can be more gratifying 
to the eye and to the heart, than to be introduced to this Female 
AcADRMv, where you have been pLeased to welcome me, in terms, 
which claim my liveliest gratitude. Your observations are so 
correct, with respect to the happy result oC Republican Liberty, and 
so flattering, in the expression of your kindness to me, that I 
shall only add the tribute of my sympathies, in the fon-uier part of 
them, — of my acknowledgements for those that are personal, — 
still more feelingly on account of your afTev^tingy<.jmi7^ allusions; 
and my grateful sense of the honour conferred upon me, by the 
association of My name with this 50 7;e>'v interesiiug Acacemy. 



XII. Mi 

TO Miss MlNTOSIl'S Address. 

I want words to express to you, how much 1 am delighted, witii 
your kind welcome, and the amiable testimonies of your kindness, 
TO theFrie::d of yourForefatiikp.s. They will never be erased 
from my heart; they will be daily shared, by my family, at La 
Grange. Well may this heart, old, but warm in its feelings, 
palpitate, at the youud of your patriotioJt and affectionate ac- 
cents. 



20 

Hbegyour charming CommiUec, your Liitniciers, nnfi au. pt 
tov, Young Ladies, to accept my tender acknowledgement?; 
and, you have authorized me to add, mv paternal blessing/ 

^jij'The alo'je Jlni-i:ers t;cre given in ZKritin^. 



KMiiri 



Theiollowing concise account of the manner^ in which oijrdis 
tinguished GUEST was received, at the Fe.'.jale Agasemy, may 
perhaps gratify the friends of the Institniion residing at a distance, 
Jt is taken from the '■'■Kentucky Reporter"' of May 29th. 

LAFAYETTE'S VISIT TO THE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

At 4 o'clock P.M. the General's arrival was announced.] He ;vas 
tittended by a military escort, and a numerous retinue of distinguish- 
ed individuals, among whom was the Goveruour of the State, Gover- 
jiour Carrol of Tennessee, Col. G. W. Lafayette, M. Le Vasseur,. 
the General's Secretary, &c. &c. He wae received by Col. Dun- 
Dam, the Pji/tct^aZ, under a beautil'ul Arch erected in front of his 
house, on which was inscribed, 

"Lafai'ette in America, at home with ins Children." 
'■'WelcOiiie. Lafayctti'l t'lve Lnjaycttc.'' 

The General was then conducted into the Academical A partmeM, 
■where upwards of a hundred Pupils were handsomely arrarged to re- 
reive lam, and where a brilliant circle of LADIES had previously 
assembled to witness the scene. Alter being" introduced, an Address 
was delivered by the Principal, to which the General made a feeling 
and appropriate reply. An original Ode for the occasion was then 
sung oy tlie young Ladies, accompanied by ?»Iiss Hammond on the 
Piano, to the air of' Strike the C'2jmha I." Miss M'Intosh then deliv- 
ered the Committee's Address in behr.lfof the School, in a style of 
pathos and eloquence, which could not easily be surpassed. The Re- 
ply wa.5 no less feeling and eloquent. Miss S. Prentiss then re- 
cited an Original Ode, and Miss M. B. Duncan an Address, in a neat 
and chaste style, with peculiar effect, to both of which the General 
very feelingly replied. Miss C. C. Nephew's Ode then followed; af 
the close of which she sung, in the most charming manner, '■'Buds ami 
F/ouers." as a sequel to the pde, and at the same time presented a 
wreath. The e feet was electrical, and almost every eye wax in tears. 
We doubt, whether the General has any where witnessed a more inter- 
esting-scene, or expressed higher gratification. He then took earJ; 



21 

.V'upil atfectioija-itly hytlic liacd, as he did every oae present, eacji 
beinj^ introduced .ridividually by name. 

Ho was then .conducted into Mrs. Dunham's Apartments, where 
refreshments ofcake, wine, and punch, were liherally distribcte^ 
to the whole company. 

The decorations of the Academy were peculiarly ■appropriate ar«J 
striking-, and calculated to do great credit to the genius and pencil 
of Mrs. Addelsterrcn, one of tli€ Assistants, indeed, we nLderstand 
no one has contributed more to the efiortp. which all hr.ve made, to 
honour tuc "INatiop's Guest.'' than tliis Lady. Some gnjod paintings 
by the pupils were exhibited jn the room, and amongtiicm fine views 
of the Mansion at Moumt Vernon, and the Tomb of VVashingto.i. 
From the pencil of Mrs. Addelsterrcn were two very fine Portraits 
of Wa-fhington and Ijifaijcttc. Between them, and directly in front of 
the Ge^neral, was a bcautiUil Transparency, representing Fame inscri- 
.bing the nan.'e of LafnycUc \a (he records of the Institution, and over 
it a scroll, with the words ^'Lafayiile Female Acadfwy." 

We will only add, that M'hilewe aresojustly proud o{ TranfiylvarAu 
University, ye e have equal reason to felicitate ourselves, on having a 
Semiaaky no less creditable to the town, for Female Education." 

T he EpiTOr> of the "I{cpcrter,'' after giving a very handsome 

account of the Exercises of Travnjhania lJni-ccrsi1y,\\\\'\c\\coxi- 

sigted of Adphesses, Ode:s, and Poews, in English, French nntl 

Latin, and .which, for their sentiment, purit^', and elegance, \voiild 

certainly have done honoyr to our oldest Universities, further 

says— 

"Such aliterarv reception has not, as far as we remember, been 
given to LAFAYE'I'TF. in any of the colleges of our country. This, 
and the admirablecxhibition at Col. DvjNHAm's Female Academy, 
liighly interesting to all, and eminently honourable to the Institution 
and its Principal, unquestionably gave to the old Hetio a higher idea 
of the real advancement of our state ofsociety in the West, than the 
extrinsick show, or any thing else, which he has witnessed." 

In noticing the personal civilities paid to the General in Lex- 
ington, the Editor further adds — 

"Amoiigother delicate marks of attention to Ihe'feelirgs and com- 
fort of the amiable and gallant old tSoldier. we took notice of two 
beautiful baskets of ripe fresh Oranges and Lemons, tastefiiliy adorn- 
ed with rosesand honey suckles in full f.ower and fragrance, sent b;y 
Mrs. HoLi.EY and Wrs.PvMi.AM, as specimens of thedcgree ofpcr- 
fection, to which Iheexolick fruit of the South may be carried, in cur 
climate, under careful cultivation. '1 hey proved to be highly ac- 
ceptable, and received tlie kindest notice afleiw aids, in the acknow- 
ledgements which were returned." 

The Visit was thus noticed by J. Bradford EsQ.thc vencrahle 
Editor of the '■'■Ktntvcky Gazette.''' 

"It bein"- understood, that the Genehai. would leave Lc\irg1cn 
the next morning, and havii.g engaged to vis/t the Lcxii ^ton Female 



^o 



Jiccidemy that ait^ruoon,a3soonas the dinner was over, he was escort- 
ed to towu and coadiicted to that Institution. It was here tliat as 
s}trces.«/iti an effort was made to gratify our Visiter, as has been 
attempted, in any quarter of the Union, 'i'he address of Col. Duk- 
»AiM was delivered with much feeling; in the course of which he in- 
formed the Geaiival, that in consequence of tlie honour dene the In- 
stitution by his visit, its name had that day been ctianged from the 
"Lcxiiigton," to the "Lafayette" Academy. Jn liis reply, the Gen- 
eral alluded, in a very handsome manner, to the compliment paid to 
him, and to tlie great importance of such institutions in general. As 
soon as Ihs reply of the General ended, an Ode wassung by several 
of the young Ladies, accompanied by the I'jano. 

An addre-,sin prose by Miss M'Iktosh, a poetick piece by Miss 
Prkntiss, and an address in prose by Miss Duncan, were deliver- 
ed in a manner, U'hich brouglit tears and applause from all. Ge^erat, 
LAFAYiiTTE was so gratified, as to acknowledge, that his heart was 
not "too old" to palpitate at such an exiiibition of female talent, worth, 
and beauty. In one of his replies to the charming female addresses, 
he alluded to his gratification at the retlection, Uizt ke had/onght hi 
Jiig youth for a country, which was thus honouring him, from the lips 
of its agod and youthful citizens; that he was proud of the reflection, 
that his history should be so well known to those, whom he adjjrcssed; 
and acknov.'l'^dged and thanked the Principal of the Institution , for 
the honour conferred ou him, in Jiaving named the Institution after 

The exercises conclude(l with ai) original Ooe by Miss Kephe-w, 
and a Song, (accompanied by Miss ILiMriioKn on the Piano) at the close 
of which, she presented the General with a bunch ofilowers tied with 
a white ribband, in a graceful and most pathetick manner. 

The GEiNEUAr,, in conclusion, gave his paternal blessing to all the 
young females of the School. 

THE FOLLOWING CONCLUDING REMARKS, in the 
GeneraPs oxi-nhand xtriti'^g, i^rc nou' in tlie possession oftherniN- 

CIPAL. 

To each of the Jiddrcsscs and Poems, General La- 
fayette expressed his delighted feelings and affec- 
tionate acknowledgements; and, after the last of 
them had been delivered, by Miss Nkphew, he said, 
that the more he had seen and heard, in the Lex- 
ington Female Academy, the njore sensible he was 
of the honour conferred upon hin-; and offered his 
thanks, wishes, and blessings, to the interesting In- 
etitution, which he 7cas proud of the rigid io name. 
^^l^HE LAFAYETTE FEMALE ACADEMY/? 



INSTRUCTERS, VISITERS AND PUPILS, 

OF THE 

LEXmOTOjY, KENTUCKY, JUXE, im:P. 

INSTRUCTERS. 



JOSIAH DUNHAM, A. M. Principal, 

and Teacher in Grannuar, Mhetorick, Logick, Astronomi , Jfatural 

and Moral Philosophy , Languages, Composiiioii and Criticism; 
Mk. JULIUS CLARK, Teaciierin Arithmetick , Geography , Histo' 

ry^ and the variovs branches 0/ jUathematicks ; 
MISS MARY B. REED, Preceptress in the Preparatory Deparl- 

ment; ' 
MISS ABBY VAN HOLT HAMMOND, Teacher on the Piano; 
MRS. LOUISA ADDELbTERREN, Teacher in Dra-wing and 

Painting; 
MISS ANNE M. D. WILSON, Assistant Teacher in the- English 

Departmcrd: 
Du. \y. B. POWELL, Teacher of Chirography; 
ROBEliT BEST, A. M. Occasional Lecturer, in Chemistry and 

Botany; 
P. RATEL, Teacher in Dancijv^. 

YISilERS. 



Hon. HENRY CLAY, r,. l. d. Revd. PRES. HOLLEY, l. r. r-. 

Hon. W. T. BARRY, l. l. v. Revd. Dr. CHAPMAN 

Hon. JAMES HAGGIN, Revd. Dk. FISHBACK, 

JOHN BRADFORD, ) Dr. CHS. CALDWELL ) Jfed 

ROBT. WICKLIFFE, f „ Dr W. H. RICH ARDSON, < Pr^r 
CHARLES WH.KINS,^^*'?^*Dr. ELISHA WARFIELD 

CHS. HUMPHREYS, ) Col. LESLIE COMBS. 



PUPILS. 



In AMES. 
■■Caroline O'Sullivan Addicks, 
Elizabeth Arnold, 
Elizabeth Ashby, 
F.lizabeth Patterson Bain, 
Emily Austin Barbge, 
America Barbee, 
2'erilda Barbee, 
Anne Barnes, 
Cornelia Matilda Bedford, 
Amanda Best, 
Mary Ann Bishop, 
Mary Lane Blanchard, 
Elizabeth Oliver Boggs, 
Frances Miscill Bohannonj 
§arah Ann Bowman, 
Mary E. Bowman, 
Julia Matilda Bradford, 
Eliza Hay Brand, 
Frances Brcckenridge, 
Elizabeth Langhorn Brent, 
Ruth Anne Brown, 
Ally Ann Cahill, 
Kezia G. €-ampbell, 
Charlotte Augusta Chapmati, 
Georgiana Chapman, 
Julia Ann Chipley» 
Eloisa Chipley, 
Charlotte Colbert, 
Amelia Compton, 
p. Compton, 
Anne Jane Cooper, 
Julia Ann Cooper, 
Mary Elvina Cooper, 
Georgiana Cooper, 
Harriet Baldwin CovingloQ, 
Priscilla Spring Crabb, 
Mary Juda Crittenden, 
Priscilla Webb Downing, 
Li. Downing, 
Eliza Drake, 
Tvlaria Brown Duncan, 
Eliza Jane Farrar, 
Mary Farrar, 
Jane Bright Fleming, 
Susan Fleming, 
Mary Jane Foster, 
.i^meiia Green Foster, 



RESIDENCE 

JVew Orleans, 
Paris, 
Richmund: 
Lexington, 



Lov 
Kv 



Port Gibson, 


Miss. 


Florence, 


Ala. 


Lciington, 


Ky. 


Oiford, 


Ohio 


Lexington, 


Ky. 


n 


a 


Versailles, 


(C 


Fayette Co. 


«: 


Shcpherdsville, 


iC 


Lexington, 


<c 


(C 


V 


Fayette Co. 


'f 


Paris , 


IC 


Cynthiana, 


c 


Lexington, 


(( 


Florence^ 


Alaj, 


Lexington, 


Ky. 



Fayette Co. 
Alexandria, 

Lexington, 



Lou. 
Ky. 



Bowling Green, " 
Alexandria, Lou, 
Hnntsville, Ala . 

Lexington, Ky. 



Angusla, 
Lexington, 



aa 



IS AMES. 

Caroline Foster, 

Martha Ann Foster, 

Helen Jane Foster, 

Virginia Catharine Frazer, 

Elizabeth Jane Garnet Frazer, 

Ana Eliza Gatewood, 

illiza Jane Geers, 

Maltha Ann Gist, 

Sarah Han ley, 

Mary Ann Hanson, 

Eliza \V. Hanson, 

Arabella Hanson, 

Mary Plarper, 

Pocahontas Harrison, 

Mary Sophia Hart, 

Maria Higbee, 

Margaret Higgins, 

Catharine Grush Hunt, 

Elizabeth Humphreys, 

Sarah Humphreys, 

Mehitabel Humphreys, 

Eleanor Leavy, 

Sarah Ann Le Grand, 

Mary Morton Le Graud^ 

Jane IjO Grand, 

E. M Le Grand, 

Rebecca Leonard, 

W. Leonard, 

Mary Ann Light, 

Mary Mcintosh, 

Rebecca McNitt, 

Emma Marsh, 

Charlotte Serena Ross Martin, 

Catharine Martin, 

Emily Virginia Mason, 

Catharine Mason, 

Laura Mason, 

Ellen Matthews, 

Susan Hall Meade, 

Martha Ann Meglone, 

Sophia Ann Melien, 

Mary Jane Milliken, 

Elizabetli Montgomery, 

Sarah Ann Moore, 

Elizabeth Morrison, 

Caroline Ciinord Nephew, 

Maria Caroline Noel, 

JMaria Louisa Peck, 

Julia Ann Pike, 

Emma Cory Pike, 

Sarah Potter, 

I) 



RESIDENCte. 

JSlalchcz, 
(( 

<( 

Lexington, 



FayettP Co. 
Lexington^ 



FaTjetlt Co. 
Henderson, 
Fayette Co. 
Lexington, 



Jllexandriix , 

Lexington, 
Mcintosh Co. 
Lexino-ton, 



Mis^ . 



Ky, 



La. 

Ky. 
Ga. 



Lancaster, 


<c 


Lexington, 


<c 


Hindoi,ta:i, 


Lid. 


Port Gibson, 


Jfiss. 


Lexii.gton, 


Ky. 


Cabell Co. 


ra. 


J\Jaysville, 


Ky. 


JDarien, 


Ga. 


Lexington, 


Ky. 



2<S 



NAMES. 

Sarah Ann Hunt Prentiss, 
Gertrude Vanlear Preston, 
Charlotte Reid, 
Mary Robert, 
Josephine Robert, 
EUen Hart Ross, 
Martha: Satterwhite, 
Sarah vSlielby, 
Elizabeth Smedes, 
Piety Lucretia Smith, 
Nancy S. Smith, 
Ann Eliza Sprigg, 
Elizabeth Sprigg, 
Mary Ann Spronle, 
Georgiana Stiidman, 
Amelia Studman, 
Ann McCall Taylor, 
Mary Baxter Tebbs, 
Mary Tilford, 

Catharine Cordelia Trotter, 
Georgictta Trotter, 
Sarah Trotter, 
Matilda Lon-sa Vick, 
Ann Eliza Warfield, 
Mary Jane Warfield, 
Caroline Warfield, 
Julia Warfield, 
Priscilla Brown Webb, 
Lucy Dangerfieid Webb, 
Mary WicklifTe, 
Margaret Wickliffe, 
FrancesWinter, 
Sarah Ann Woodson, 
Anna Wyman, 
Mary Bryan, {Omilted.) 

Matilda Sylvia Cook, " 
Martha Foster, " 

Pupils of the Present Sessi 

I]\STRUCTERS, 
ViSITEUS, 

Total present Estahlishment — 



RESIDENCE. 




Ilindos'an, 


Lid, 


TVinchester, 


K,j. 


TFashinglon, 


t( 


Lexington, 


C( 



Fayette Co. 
<< 

Jaclcson, 

Lexington, 

Alexandria, 

a 

Franklin, 
Lexington, 



Washington, 
Lexington, 



JRss. 
Ky. 

Lou. 

K'f. 



Lmr. 
Ky. 

Kv. 



Vickshiirg, 
Lexcnglon, 


.Mis.i: 
Ky. 


Clark Co. 






Lexington, 


c 




Franklin, Co. 
Jessamitic Co. 
Clarke Co. 
Fayette Co- 
Ficksbxirgh, 
Lexington, 


\A1(>.- 

Ky. 

Ky. 
Ky. 
Jlisf!. 
ivy. 






tsr. 

9 
14 



158 



Of ALL, who /i(ii;e heen Pupils of the Academy, since its Com- 
inenceiaent, July 1st 1821, uotetsurnerutcd above. 

NA]Vl£S. RESIDENCE. 

Maria Aldridge, Lancaster, Ky.- 



27 



NAMES. 

Melloda Ayres, 
Susan Ayres, 
Serena Banton, 
Sarah Barees, 
St SAN Bakrv, 
§usAN Bates, 
Mary Ann Bell, 
Catharine Bell, 
Elizabeth Bell, 
Catharine Bishop, 
Frances A. Bibb, 
Anna Thaxtcr Blake, 
Jane Bledsoe, 
Sarah Bledsoe, 
Ann Isabella Bodley, 
Ann Maria Boswell, 
Davidella Boswell, 
Isabella Bowman, 
Ann Bradford, 
Mary Brand, 
Rebecca Brashear, 
Caroline Brashear, 
Mary L. Brennan, 
Julia Brigjs, 
Mary Brooks, 
Mary T. Brooking, 
EmelineJane Broiigbton, 
Henrietta Broughton, 
Elizabeth Bryan, 
Elizabeth Bryant, 
Louisiana Bryson, 
Margaret Biiford, 
Ann M. Buford, 
Sarah Ann Bull, 
Elizabeth Buruu.s, 
Adeline Frances Butler, 
Minerva Campbell, 
Elizabeth Curr, 
Jane Carr, 
^Elizabeth Challen, 
Adeline Stout Chipley, 
Amanda Bell Chipley, 
Elizabeth Childs, 
Roan Chiles, 
Ann Clay, 
Lucretia Clay, * 
Eliza Clay, 

Mary Jane Clifford, 
Eliza M. Coleman, 
Harriet Collins, 
Susan Corlis, 
Harriet Corlis, 
FraucesE. Corlis, 



RESIDENCE. 




Lexington, 


Ky. 


Christian Co. 


«; 


JDaiiville, 


'' 


Lexingion, 


cc 


Louisville 


a 


Woodford Co. 

iC 




Fayette Co, 


(( 


Oxford, 


Ohio^ 


Frankfort, 


Ky. 


Louisville, 


• ( 


Lexingion, 


i( 



Jltlacapas, 



Fayette Co. 
Clarke Co. 
Lexin^^on, 



Cynihianxt, 
Cincinnati, 
Bourbon Co. 



Lou. 



Cinci/mati, 
Lexington 


Ohiq: 
Ky. 


Clark Co. 
Concordia, 


La. 


Fayette Co. 
Woodjord Co. 
Cincinnati, 
Woodford Co 


Ky. 

Ohio. 
Ky.' 


Louisville, 

Iluntsville 

Louisville 

Richmond, 

Lexington, 


Ala. 
Ky. 
<c 
a 



Ohio. 
Ky. 



•28 



NAMES. 

Millisent Coyle, 

Lucy Ann Craig, 

A. P. Crittenden, 

Ann Venable Crockett^ 

Eliza IS . Crockett, 

Mary Curd, 

Arianna Cunningham, 

Catharine Cunningham, 

M ary A Cunninghanij 

Frances Dallam, 

Letitia Dallam, 

Miriam Dillon, 

Letitia Downing, 

Sarah Ann Dunlap, 

Maria Estill, 

Mary Ann Estill, 

Mary Fitzpatkick, 

Laura Fitzjjatrick, 

Priscilla Fleming, 

Emily M. Flouraoy, 

Amelia Fountain, 

Elizabeth Frazer, 

Eliza Ann Garrard, 

Ann L Gibson, 

Ann C . Haggin. 

Elizabeth Haggik, 

Martha Haggin, 

Susan Haggin, 

Sarah Haggin- 

Sarah Ann Haggin, 

Maria Halsteatl, 

Malvina Harris, 

Elizabeth Hart, 

Sophia Hart, 

Augusta Hawkins, 

Emily Henderson, 

Mary O. Hcrvey, 

Mary Jane Hickey, 

Maruarotta Hickey, 

Arabella Hieronymus, 

America Higgins, 

Harriet Willim4n Holley,- 

Martha O. Hollovvay, 

Susan Emeline HoUoway, 

Mary L. Holderman, 

Mary Hooper, 

Susan Horine, 

Juliette JIoward, 

Julianna Hudson, 

Mary Humphreys,* 

Henrietta H nt, 

Maiy Ann Irvine, ^ 



PtESIDENCE. 

Lexington , 
Fayette Co. 

Cincinnati, 
Fayette Co. 



^cxingtori; 



Woodford Co. 
Lexington, 
Port Gibson, 
Fayette Co. 

iPotirhon Co. 
Henry Co. 
Lexington, 



Lexinston, 



Jefferson Co. 



Ky. 

n 

Ohi 

Ky. 



Fayette Co. 


i- 


Richmond, 




Mdchez, 


Miss. 


a 


11 


Lexington^ 


Ky. 


I^'ayette Co. 


«( 


Louisvitle 


Ky. 


Favctte Co. 


t( 


Clay Co. 


<( 


Port Gibson, 


Mu^. 


Lexington, 


Ky. 



Jefferson Co. 
St. Genevieve, 
.Mount Sterling 
Lexington, 



Fayette Co. 



j\liss. 
Ky.' 



Virginia. 
Ky. 



Ky. 



ii9 



THAMES. 
Matilda January, 
Margaret Keen, 
AuELTZA Kee:>, 
Ethalinda Keen, 
Matilda Keen, 
Sarah Keen, 
Eleonora K'^en, 
Margaret Leavy, 
Eliza Preston Light, 
Mary Jane Le Grand, 
Nancy O. Martin, 
Patsey Martin, 
Eliza Martin, 
Mary E. M. Mason* 
Elizabetii Dickinson McConnell, 
Maria McNitt, 
Eliza Warren McNitt, 
Mary Elvina McCoun, 
Mary T. McDowell, 
Betsey Ann McDovtcIIj 
Mary A. Megowan, 
Jane Megowan, 
Eliza Miller, 
Nancy Moore, 
Sarah Lloyd Moore, 
Mary Morton, 
Mary Ana Miirdock, 
Sarah Murdock, 
Sally Noel, 
Julia Norton, 
Maria Norton, 
Mary Overstreet, 
Eliza Ann Offutt,* 
Elizabeth Ann Oliver, 
Susan M. Overton, 
Amelia Owsley, 
Almira Owsley 
Jane Park, 
Eliza Parish, 
Georgian a Peck, 
Catharine Pilkington,* 
Camilla Picquet, _ 

Ellen Picquet, 
Matilda Picquet, 
Matilda Postlethwaite, 
Frances Postlethwaite, 
Mary Scott Postlethwaite, 
Florida Louisiana Georgia Pope, 
Frances Prevost, 
Elizabeth Potter, 
Kuthy Potter, 



F.ESIDENCE. 




Lexington, 


Kj. 


(C 




Lcxivgion, 
Fayette Co. 




Gcorgetotvn, 
Lexington, 


Ohio. 


Lexington, 



Jlerccr Co. 




Danville, 


^ 


Lexington, 




<c 




Cynthiana, 


t: 


Lexington, 


(f 


Louisville, 


<t. 


Fayette Co. 
Port Gibson 

^4 


Ms 


Lexington, 


Ky. 


(C 


a 


Louisville, 


(< 


Cynthiana, 
St. Genevieve, 


JJt. 


Lexington , 
Lancaster, 


Ky. 


a 


cc 


Lexington, 


i< 



J^atchez, 
Lexington, 

Sprivgfeld, 

Franfj'ort, 

Lexington, 



Tenn, 

a 

JWiSS. 
Kxj: 



30 



NAMES. 
E. Potter, 
Catliarine E. Redd, 
Isabella Reed, 
Lucy Ridgely, 
Ruhamali Riske, 
Kancy Robinson, 
Amanda Robicsoa, 
Susan Rogers, 
Mary Rogers, 
Celeste Robert, 
Sarali Komao, 
Amelia Roper, 
MargarettaPindell Ross, 
Mary Russell, 
Mary Sanders, 
Stisan Shelby, 
Sally Short,' 
Mary Jane Smilli, 
Eleanor Stjlvens, 
Harriet Stickney, 
Louisa SticUney, 
Ann T. Stickney, 
Minerva Stone, 
Tvlilli^eut Studman, 
Eliza T. Studman, 
Evelina Talbott, 
Eliza Talbotl, 
Laura Talbott, 
i^ouisiana Taui, 
Catharine A. Taylor, 
Ann Wilkinson TAYLOii, 
Susanna Agnes Tibbatte, 
Catharine E. Tiffany, 
Mary Thruslon, 
Mary Ann Trotter, 
Elizabeth Venable, 
Rebecca Warfield, 
Ruthy Ann Warfield, 
Sarah \\arfield, 
Virginia Ann Ward, 
Winifred E. Warren, 
fjarah Howard Wicklitfe, 
Nancy Williams, 
Elizabeth Webb, 
Sarah F, Webb, 
Elizabeth Wilson, 
CeliaRussel Wilson, 
Ann Maria White, 
Sarah V/rigglesworlh, 
Mildred Walker Yancey, 
Ruthy Ann Young, 

jV^Small Capitals dlstingn 

Stars,— -J/iojc deceased. 



RESIDENCE. 




LexingtoUy 
<< 


Ky. 


Danville, 


t( 


Lexington^ 


Ky. 


Cincinnati 


Ohio. 


Fayette. Co. 


Ky, 


<i 


ti 


Clark Co. 


i( 


Fayette Co. 


(C 


Lexingto'i, 


<c 


Fayette Co. 


<c 


Fle^ningshurgh, 


" 


Lexington, 


(( 


Belfast, 


Ireland 


Fayette. Co. 


Ky. 


liichland, 




Hopkinsvillc, 


" 


Dayton, 


Ohio, 


Lexington, 


Ky. 


IC 


<( 


<c 


t: 


<( 


(C 


J\]adison Co. 


(I 


Lexington, 


<( 



Winchester, 

Frankfort, 

Jfewport, 

Lcxingtorj,, 

Kaskaskia, 

St Louis, 

Lexington, 

Shclbyville, 

Lexington, 

Cynthiana, 

Fayette Co. 
Winchester, 
Lexington, 
Fayette Co. 
Clarke Co. 
<t 

Lexington, 
Fayette Co. 
Clay Co. 
Lexjjigton, 
Jefferson Co. 
Bedford, 

Lsh those novj Married. 



III. 
Mi. 
Ky. 



SI 

Present Es'iabHshmcnt, ITjC 

Additional Catalogue, 200 



Total, 3C0 



Tuition, in the Englisli Department, $50 a Year, or $29 the Ses- 
sion; 

Ditto, in the Preparatory Department, f 32, or ^16 the Session; 

Extra Branches, each $40, or $'20 the Session; 

Eoard, inchiding necessary accommodations, $130, a year. 

((:;^PuPiLs are tulmitlcd htj the Session, and pAywE^'T required, at 
iCasi (juarierly, in adciuicf. 



There arc Two Sessions in a year, of five months each, beginning on 
llie first Mondays of Sey;<e»i6er and .]/arc,^. In the month of August 
and oi Ftbrnary, there is a Vacation ofj'rur weeks each. 

Pupils, remaining in the family of the Principal through the Va- 
ration, will he instructed, if they choose to study; and none are al- 
lowed to he wholly idle, during the recess. 

As a limited number only can be accommodated, TL'i Boarders, 7i. 
preference, in regard to this privilege, nill be given to Pupils frovi. 
a distance. 

The Health, Planners, and Morals of the Pupils, are diligently 
guarded. Thu Academy is situated in the most liealthy part of tho 
most healthy'^l'own in the Western Country. (l;^iNo Pupil inthc 
fainily has hud a fever, or any serious indisposition, in four years! 

The Dress must always be plain, neat, and simple. Early Ei- 
siNG is required; Two arc accommodated in each room; and all lights 
are to be extinguished at 10 in the evening. 

YOUNG LADIES in the family are expected to attend publick wor- 
sliipon Sundays. 'I'hey are not to receive orentertain Company, ex- 
cept on formal occasions, and with the approbation of the Principal or 
his Lahv. When they ^ittead Parties abroad, or anyplace ofpiibliclc 
resort, they will be accompanied by one, or more, of their Instruct- 
ERS. The company, to which (hey are introduced, will be of the 
first respectability; but even this must not be extended ton far: — ' 
if they wish to f^rce/ as Scholars, their minds must be devoted er- 
cliisiveiy to ^tudy. They caunot promise themselves success, on a;!?/ 
other condition. 

There is a handsome Parterre attached *o the Establishment, with 
a very great variety of fnvfawc/i/rri Shrubs, and Plants, both native 
and exotick, for their recreation and BolanicalJlmnsemer.t. In short, 
every facility is oilered, in the Lafayette Female Academy, for 
jnaking thorough, accoinplished Scholars. 



$2 

The Lexington Female Acadcmij commenced its operation July 2d^ 
1821. The foregoing Catalogue shows the uncommon success, which 
has attended a laudable individual exertion, ^.\Aed.hy ^[ihevdA inOi- 
mdual patronage. Tlie Principal deeply feels his obligation to his 
Patrons, and cheerfully avails liimself of this occasion, respectfully, to 
tender to them his most grateful acknowledgements. 

Tiie number of Pupils is greater, than at any former period. The 
increase of its numbers will bo attended with an increase of exer- 
tion, on the part of its TEACHEr..s, to render the Institution still 
more extensively useful, and more worthy of the reputation it has al- 
ready acquired. 

By a reference to the Ca'talocue, it will be perceived, that more 
than, one third of the Pupils come from abroad. Are not, then, the 
interests of the Tbuj/i, to some extent, identified with the success 
of this Seminary! And if, under individual exertion alone, the 
Guest of the Nation has found it "so interesting" an Establish- 
ment, as to be ^,pro}id of the right to name it, the "LAFAYETTE FE- 
MALE ACADEMY," what might it not heeome, under the foi?lev- 
ing smiles of Ler illative Enact menH —