(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Vocal gems. no. 30. 12 comic songs."



CRAMER'S 



VOCAL GEMS 






No. 30. 

12 COMIC SONGS 



CONTA1N1NG- 



TI1K CROSS OLD BACHELOl!. 

JOCK O' THE MILL. 

POLLEE-WOLLEE-HAMA. 

CHICKABOO 

I'M LIVELY POMPEY JONES. 

A NURSERY LEGEND. 

I WOULD I WERE LORD MA YOU. 

LORD LOVEL. 

FANNY GREY. 

BEN BATTLE. 

THE CORK LEG. 

GILES SOROGGINS' GHOST. 



PRICE SIXPENCE. 



LONDON : 

CRAMER AND CO. LIMITED, 

201, REGENT STREET, W. 

and SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & CO. 



Swift & Co., Regent Press, King Street, Regent Street, \V. 






1 



COMIC SONGS. 



THE CROSS OLD BACHELOR. 



Words by EDWARD FITZBALL, Esq. 
Allegro ma non troppo presto. 



Music by HERBERT RODWELL. 



Piano. 







g^^ 

— — i— i- — «.J— h — «— + — «•-) — i- — «— i- — el, 1 — izrri- -. ^j 






i 1 1 

cres. 



^ 



5 



&r+- 



?— —^L 



gr5£?-^r?-^g 



-I- 4- ,-F F- 



^L*'* 






s 



*=£ 



=K=qv 



5± 



-p — =i— p- 



)ti^=ff=»=rp= 



i^tcrfc: 



r * j 



S— l*- 



-p» — >« — pi — f 



Of 



all the mischievous 
I 



things in life, Such a one may I ne'er 



:*_*zri 



23 



I „ *—+ h 



£=mz 



-*EE*E3E^ 



=P 



=3: 



"» 0—0~ 



P 



P. 






I I T 



t t » 



2£ 



o x; 



F="^ 



=3=£ 



Hl^§ 



-k © — h* 



=rt=S=qs= 



I 



s 



=t 



^=^: 



qP= g J— J- 



r; 



g — p— 1>>— [ ^ i/ - 



catch, oh lor! For gos - sip, for chat-ter, for tu- mult, and strife, As a stin - gy, stin - gy, 
t t 



m 



£^ 



^E£ 



SI 



f 



p 



i-gg^s 



I T t 



VOL. III. 




122 



CRAMERS VOCAL GEMS. 



V 



:s=q*= 



^=£- 






n 



i — 

cross old ba - che - lor, stin 



gy, stin - gy, cross old ba - che - lor. 




1 



-9- P- 



1 






3 



p:-r£=p: 



=fc*=£ 



zm^ttzmz 



z^—P-^r. 



He prys in -to this, 



he peeps in - to that ; 




=^ 



:«=3: 



i*" «8*" «>*" ffi*~ *^ 




Ifaa pj-^g 1ST) f ^=1 



=*:=£: 



zpzr^ 



±^P= 



-=1 — P- 



^=2t 



*=t 



*• g P g 



fc*=tz= 



His will must be fol-low'd,his word must be law; He snarls at the chil-dren, 



) 




m 



T *■ 



-*s^r — *z-a 



*z^& — tj* 



53e 



m 



^E 



:i=« 



i =F 



-P=5 



S 



3=U; 



dt 



fc£ 



^7 



>- 



"y^'g~ g: 



&=&=& 



-3— p- 



St=^r 



he kicks the torn cat, 



The spite - ful, fright -ful, 

f T f 



tiy^r-y 



■+ — +- 



3: 



8 



=g- ?£-(« 



2^£ 



-. i i- 



P 



# 






£=^F 



-b= — r 



_, ■»;-«£ - »g- *g- <*g- 



3E^- 



I g 8 s T* — 



s 



-p-r-^ 



53 



^Eji 



THE CEOSS OLD BACHELOR. 



123 




-STar 



:p=P 



F— F — «- 

u u g 



t3C 



old ba-che-lor, spite - ful, fright - ful ba - cbe-lor. 



all the mis-cbievous 
t 




^Pfeg=F=L^ 




=i- 



=K=S 



S 



*=*=m 



*=?- 



J=J 



* v m 



things 



iu life, Such a one ne'er may I catch, oh lor! For gos - sip, for chat-ter, for 
- ! 




i 



-£-- N— -K 



— fc — - 



-W=£z 



?=2-- 



^ 



V 



tu- mult, and strife, As a stin - gy, stin - gy, cross old ba-che-lor, stin - gy, stin - gy, 



! 




^=^ 



SE 



-F-^r=i*=3=f> 



m 



-£-^-0- 




f^=1E £^~[ 



=£fe 



• & 



3==£ 




2. To nice young men who would early wed, 

Prates he of trouble for lack of gold, 
And calculates wedlock at so much per head, 

Arid swears that wives do nought but scold, 
The stingy, spiteful, cross old bachelor, 

If I had my way — but poor women have not— 
A scarecrow I'd make him, hung up in the straw, 
By all the old maids in the town to be shot, 

The spiteful, frightful, spiteful old bachelor. 
Of all the mischievous things in life, 

Such a one may I ne'er catch, oh lor! 
For gossip, for chatter, for tumult and strife, 

As a stingy, stingy, cross old bachelor. 



a 2 



124 



CRAMER S YOCAL GEMS. 



JOCK O' THE MILL. 



Words by WILLIAM BROUGH. 

Allegro vivace. 



Piano. 



^ 



-*-•:£- 



Music by T. GERMAN REED. 



#-■:£" -*- 



3: 









S£ 



S 






-€- -«- 



s s al -«£- 






^^ ^^^E^j^j^ v^^ faj^$=g^^ = p^-^^ ^ |i-*J^ 



\ 



is 



4— -1— J~\ -0- •■ 



1st 



i 






^ - h 



BS 



/ 



^ 









^^g^^^g^^^g 



H-M 1 



i 



5==^: 



3?^± 



=&= 



:«tafc 



=g -fr— | =g? 



^Ig^li 



==£=* 



Wha's com - in' o'er the hill ? wha's com-in' here ? Las - sie, why smile ye sae, 



-3=3-* 



?=^ 






3S 



¥ 



zzzz — 



=fc=l 



^=rf 



^— -5 



^=^ 



ffi 



-=!=§- 



3^ 



=3=: 



=?-- 



P 



mZ/. 



a tempo. 



^m= 



^}=*t 



S 



be* 



=^= 



— ~y 



EEE 



as he draws near? 



'Tis nae your fa - ther, lass, wrinkled and grey ; 



m 



-« — ! — ^ c 



E23==r£=± 



coRa roce. 



^ 



-I- 



±=^Z 



E =te — 



5Z3-z-=t^- 



-=J=3-^ : 



JOCK THE MILL. 



125 



rail. 



a tempo. 




'Tis nae your bro-ther, lass — why smile ye 

colla voce. 



sae? 



See where he's com-in' now, 




ad lib. 




=s> : 



3* 



3=* 



=g£ 



down frae the 



hill! 



Wha is't ? — I ken him, now, — 'tis Jock 



the mill. 



w 



^y 



■3=x 



* 



colla voce. 



f 



f 



*= 



-^~- 



-=t 



at f 



The note to be held on by the voice with a nasal sound in imitation of the bag-pipes. 



m==^~ 



^r- 



-&- 



*& 



^= 



Sc 



^t 



4> rj ^^^L^- E^:^ 



* 



II 






S3=t 



SS#J 



/ 



SS 



-«« •it 



of? 



t= 



=t= 



* £: 



-£2- 



t=t 



s 



.-*-•-*- 



ist 



J 



^ 



Kg 



rfc^S 



£ 









ft±= 



^ 









£=^=3: 



ff 



^ 



5:§»^ 



ggF= g -> 



^=E 



What brings him o'er the hill ? — what brings him here ? 
Corn ye have none to sell, lassie, I fear ; 
'Tis nae to market, lass, eomes he this way. 
Ken ye his errand, lass ? — why smile ye sae ? 
See where he's comin' now, down frae the hill ! 
What is't that brings ye here, Jock o' the mill ? 



What news frae o'er the hill ? — what news d'ye bring? 
Lassie, why smile ye sae, seeing that ring ? — 
'Tis nae wi' jewels, lass, brilliant and gay — 
Plain, simple, golden, lass — why smile ye sae ? 
What is't he whispers now ? — points o'er the hill — 
What ! ye'll gae back wi' him ? — wi' Jock o' the mill 1 



12G 



CRAMERS VOCAL GEMS. 



POLLEE - WOLLEE - HAMA. 



Allegretto. 



By the Author of " Ka-foozle-um." 



Piano. 




1 



3s=£ 



:Sr 



¥=$ 



>->--»— 5 



atz*- 



J__S— In— ^ 



^=*r 



*=■ 



± 



i 



J^^r 



1. With -in that east-ern isle that you May know is call'd Ja - pan, 

m +-tf£fr % 



Ee 



5 



^=r 



XX* 



"*i— i- 



3=^ 



^— 3- 



«=9f 



/ 



/? 



S * * 



* :g: * 



ttfc 



■ y-i-*- 



CfM. 



^y ^p^N — E — t»>-=ivzg^JzEj 



^S=«E 



K S fc 



3±3t 



?±2=3=3t=J. 



S^S 



sid-ed once the brown Pooh-Pooh, The great two-sworded man ; Of all the braves was none more grand, Or 



( 




cr ? r*v - 



i^r 



^= 



1 



fc£ 



^=S= 



#q 



e 



5i=S= 



&=J=Mz 



2-1* 



^£ 



^1 



^rgW=g=^^=± 



IT M " 1|r * 

bet - ter known to fame, He lov'd a mai-den of that land, Whose pleasant sounding name Was 



! 




ftf & tF **=£ 



fe^ 



22" 



=^ 



3 



POLLEE-WOLLEE-HAMA. 



127 




■> — V- 



5=*c 



1 



-ft * be 



J*=3=it- 



£=£= £=£ 



-I- 



:rft_JJ-fe-^=^=q^ 



*zr«!z:*= 



:*=ii 



g-g-g-£ 



Pol-lee-Wol-lee- Ha - ma - No - go - So - ki, Pollee, who her lov - era us'd to tease, Slo-py of the eyes, a 



=i 1 — i^FF 1 ^ — ! — F 

-0- -9- -•- ~«h -a- -•- 



'- 



£ 



=*=3£^l 



m 



JS. * ^=g: 



^=€ 



:i 



3e 



§ 



=*i 



y Chorus. 



5 



^t ^=S= 9-- 



g=gzg=fc£z 



*3&%=&&*=*- 



3^^ 



J^- 



fcp&r&rzS^iziv 



flat-nosed beau-ty, Pol-lee-Wol-lee, jol - ly Ja- pan - ese. 



Pol-lee-Wol-lee-Ha-ma - No - go - So ■ 

-ft- ■#- 



ki, 





f»=F^=|S= 



-> K- 



*=q 



■$=£zzg=Lg=ze 



.&—& SzzJS fr- 



g— g — g— g^ — ^ ~ 



Det^=S=r*=szzb*: 



Pol-lee, who her W - ers us'd to tease, Slo-py of the eyes, a fiat-nos'd beau 



ty. 




2. Her face was like a pancake flat, 

And round as the full moon ; 
She'd such a many lovers that 

They worried the Tycoon. 
At last that mighty potentate 

Proclaim'd a trial wide, 
Who prov'd of top-spinners most great, 

Should win the dainty bride. 
Chorus. — Sweet Pol-lee, &c. 

3. The lists were rais'd, the sports begun, 

The suitors strove with zest ; 
A thousand whirling tops were spun, 

But Pooh-Pooh's whirl'd the best, 
" Enough !" cried the Tycoon, " 'twill do, 

The pride of all Japan 
I give unto the brown Pooh-Pooh, 

The great two-sworded man !" 
Chords. — Sweet Pol-lee, &c. 



4. But Skink, the minstrel, gaz'd apart 

Upon the maiden's grace; 
He vow'd to win her virgin heart, 

And stole unto her place. 
He struck low chords and sang soft words ; 

She yielded to his arts, 
And fled with him across the hillfl 

That lie in those rum parts. 

Chorus. — Sweet Pol-lee, &c. 

5. When Pooh-Pooh found his promis'd match 

Was laid upon the shelf, 
He tried the happiest despatch 

Upon his noble self. 
But failing solace thus to take, 

He bungl'd with the knife, 
And only got a stomach-ache, 

Which lasted all his life. 

Chorus. — Oh ! Pol -lee, &c. 



128 



CRAMER S VOCAL GEMS. 



CHICKABOO. 



Words by EDWARD FITZBALL. 

Allegretto. .— 



Music by M. W. BALFE. 



Piano. 




i 



=s=£q 



3i 



^=rpn 



^t=:*: 



ssSj- g** g £ -g^te* 



3: 



frrpH w Pri r 



-H-K 



1 



it 
S_ 



1. Zam-bo born in 



q*= 



1 



£gj 



,» » « - » 



i 



*** 



*> 



l »p 






-I 1- 



*^ 






s 



fr T -K- 



=K=f£: 



=S==1^: 



^=*= 



=^=q= 



:*z=^: 



S=*: 



ne - gro land, Pret - ty boy so hand-some grow, What him ail no un - der-stand, 



:=jt 



^F 



-1 1 * 1 



*!^— I 



=S==V 



^-: 



:S 



^: 



T 



§H=3eee 



? 



L; i — SEE 



^=3 — 3— => - q-^q *"-^- 



■=r 



^: 



3 



1 



:*=ft 



:£=£=£=£ 






i- 



*=*-<?=*- 



Fall in lub fall in lub with Chicka - boo. 



m 



£EEE!zE!E 



s^ 



3 



^=s 



5e 









:?*§ab: 



H*£*b^»-^ 



=e= 



rm 



p 



rpr=pE ^ 



P^3E 



SE£ 



CHICKABOO. 



129 



hf, f - 



» * |S= 



§=^ 



^t=M 






I 



Chick - a - boo, oh, beau - ty ere - ter, Skin like ra - ben, teeth like snow, 



In green-wood, by 




t 



-+=J- 



4>=J-- 



ga^gplEfe 



moonligbt, Zam-bo Dance wid her de chouka - tow. 



r^ 



m 






szzw=W- 






Ieeses 



*J 



r—\~ 



-e—t-ft 



-■£=*■ 



-H b== 



:*=£ 



Ob ! ah ' 

_ g:g--g s y-,_ 



sweet cboukatow ! 



EBE=Efc 



t?: 



^ 



W[#* 



EH 



'^ 



i — r 



&^=z 




$ 



=fi 



*-*: 



ob Chicka - boo ! 




Zambo wed, and soon appeary 

Little Zambo, tree, one, two ; 
Like deir fader, berry handsome, 

One was leetle Cbickaboo. 
In de cabin had you seen 'em, 

Yen at night plantation hoe, 
One 'bove toder, fader, moder, 

Dancing all de choukatow. 
Oh ! ah ! sweet choukatow ! &c. 



3. White man come wid big long gun, 
Zambo go shoot cockatoo, 
Pleas'd, him run home, find bad massa 

Kun away vid Cbickaboo. 
But if sad tear from him eye fall, 
Zambo for one drop drink two ; 
And, wid bottle for him chum-chum, 
Dancy still de choukatow. 
Oh ! ah ! sweet choukatow ! &c. 
G 3 



130 



CRAMERS VOCAL GEMS. 



I'M LIVELY POMPEY JONES. 



Words by JOSEPH SULLIVAN. 



Music by CHARLES BLAMPHIN. 



*=#=*> ■¥■ 



^~^~~1 



:*=fi 



m 



p^=g 



5 



W-J— J-L ^=*=g 



S=pc 



Piaho. 



I 



aHbft 



& 



_SuS:_* 



*e=* 



S^s 



fas — tn b«- -l» » — » * 




IE 



^*= 



s 



W=f=f^ 



-1— p- 



t7 



*z=t 



V J » 



1. When first to Richmond town I came, The 



1 







P f , ' ( * 



^ 



S^^^ 



■v- 



■|- 

co- lour'd men they all look'd glum. My eyes so bright, and teeth so white, Were ev' - ry nig - ger 



I 



-*-*- 



E£ 



CJ 



-g j —y-i-gt 



-n-_ 



-#•-*--*--#- 



r* 



3 — =r- 



j^_La» — mi 



■JT-- 1 



^E^ 



-g-*gr 



g; 



3 — =1— 



:g 



¥$ 



g= g— g-^ g: 



-£=fc 



g 1 



ft^-r i r, r i ^ 



i I n ! — g 



t-^ 



:?E=:ie=3E 



3*=8*: 



A 



=*=f£ 



ft* 1 r 



*=*=w 



j*=j =& 



3c± 



=t 



,1's delight. When on the ole ban -jo I play, Oh, how I steal their hearts a - way: For to 



-fe* 



ft=t 



=T 



S 



I 



g=^^^=p ^ =^=g 



s 5 ^ 



=f=T 



1=3?^ 



^..gL J. 1 ^. ■^■■^ - 



-v '0 



BET 



fc=^= J?=SSE : *=^=*=F 



m 



fEEEEiErBE ? — i ac r |it 



=?7 



fczi 



IM LIVELY POMPEY JONES. 



131 



i 



**= 



-Is — Is N- 



^=g=Sz 



$■ 



Z£=3t 



s 



* 



I 



sing, and dance, and rat - tie the bones, Oh, where's the nig - ger like Pom - pey Jones. 

— I- 





=J 



"»=(:, 

* 



'0 V . 



:tg=g: 



:£=p:: 



at 



*=3i 



I'm live - ly Pom - pey Jones, Dats de man dat plays de bones, That's ve - ry well known the 



=1 — \ — — i =tt 

-0 T— 0-0-1 




Repeat in Chorus. 




world a-round, That he's the beau of Richmond town. 




± 



=£^=^ 






-0- 



-<T3- 






rarriat 



--5- Sr 



* + 



-5-s — 3- 



*£ 



zpz 



P>*. 




But if the nigger dance and sing, 

The white man does the self-same thing; — 

He plays the banjo and the bones 

Almost as well as Pompey Jones. 

And so it was, as you shall hear, 

Last week I lost my lovely dear, 

She was the maid at the big hotel, 

And the darling's name was Polly Bell. 

Chorus. — I'm lively Pompey Jones, &e, 



A nigger came to Richmond town, 
He sung Jim Crow and jump'd Jim Brown, 
He play'd the banjo and the bones ; 
" Oh," cried the folks, " that's Pompey Jones ;" 
And when my lovely Polly see 
This black critter, she thought 'twas me, 
And, true as life, the very next day 
With the imitation nigger she ran away. 
Chorus. — I'm lively Pompey Jones, &c. 



132 



CRAMER S VOCAL GEMS. 



A NURSERY LEGEND. 



Piano, 



Moderate* 



-e-AJt. -.*-*:£- ft**.. 



Wr rr^Jir iM 



Composed by HENRY S. LEIGH. 
-*- ft*-«»- — M m -0-'-&- - a 



--£*- 



ft^ 






523Z 



/ 



£§12: 

W 4 



. v *^ i Vp — W- 



4^---rr- r j 

rr i_i — i — i — 



&-£ 



--£=& 



ftt=S= 



i — r 



-•*- -»^ * 



ftt 



=t=P= 



:ei.rz:ar 



-«« — *» — V 



-* — v 



^ 



-K- 



^ : 



^J: 



^= 



:i-^=e= 



*=tiz 



?=i- 



^=? 



5 



^t=d±=^: 



T 



1. Oh, lis - ten, lit - tie children, to a pro - per lit - tie song, 



H 



S 



-* et~ 

-m- -9' 



~m — * — d- 



:*— »r 



-^\=f^ 



3^« 



Of a naugh-ty lit - tie 



-**--m*--0&- 






=fc 



=* 



-8 — N- 



=1*= 



3tr3z 



3 



^t 



=£=q>= 



w- 



<J 



Z^—Jti 



^=*= 



:*=3: 



ur - chin who was al - ways do - ing wrong ; 



He dis - o - hey'd his mam-my, and he 



! 




m 



¥=* 



-^ 



— J- 



T 



i 



J4^!W 



*=*^"EE* 



*q 



mi 



rV=fS= 



3 



*=it 



-f—*- 



dis - o - bey'd his dad, And he dis-o -hey'd his un-cle, which was ve-rynearas bad! 



He 




^S 



-=r 



A NURSERY LEGEND. 



133 




m 



would not learu to ci - pher, And he would not learn to write, 



And he would tear up his 



=T 



=\- 



T- 



3=3= 



3=# 



—m 1 — — ■ 1 — a, 1- 



cres. 9 



— 1 — 1 1 — jj— 1 — 



g: 



_)_ 



I 



3rd*=|fc 



:*=* 



==}s=V 



^: 



:*=3= 



=*=J= 



— • *— -*- 

eo - py - books to fa - bri - cate a kite ; And he us'd his slate and pen - cil in so 



1 



3: 



— 1 — -\ — -j ■ — m — m — » 

^~4 4 Tl=3 



I 



V 



^^ 



^ 



M 



=t 




1 
i 



bar - ba - rous 



way, 



That the grinders of his go - ver - ness got loos - er ev - ry day. 



1= 



9 



g - g- - g - 



=S 



«■- 



-_^r^«r 



3=£: 



*=£ 



1 



At last he grew so obstinate that no one could contrive 
To cure him of the theory that " two and two is five;" 
And when they taught hirn how to spell, he show'd his 

wicked whims 
By mutilating "Pinnock," and mislaying "Watt's Hymns," 
Instead of all such pretty books (which must improve the 

mind) 
He cultivated reading of a most improper kind : 
Directories and Almanacks he studied on the sly, 
And gloated over " Bradshaw's Guide" when nobody 

was by. 



3. 

With such a course of reading you can easily divine 

The condition of his morals at the age of eight or nine ; 

His tone of conversation kept becoming worse and worse, 

Till it scandalized his governess and horrified Lis nurse. 

He quoted bits of " Bradshaw " that were quite unfit to 
hear, 

And recited scraps of almanack, no matter who was near; 

He spoke of Reigate Junction, and of trains both up and 
down, 

And referr'd to men who call'd themselves Jones, Robin- 
son, and Brown ! 



4. 



But when this wicked boy grew up, he found the proverb true, 

That fate some day makes people pay for all the harm they do. 

He was cheated out of money by a man whose name was Brown, 

And got crippl'd in a railway smash while riding up to town. 

So, little boys and little girls, take warning while you can, 

And profit by the history of this unhappy man. 

Read "Dr. Watts" and "Pinnock," dears; and when you learn to spell 

Fight shy of guides, directories, and almanacks as well. 



134 



CRAMER S VOCAL GEMS. 



Piano. 



Allegretto. 




I WOULD I WERE LORD MAYOR. 

Composed by COLENSO. 



5==5E 



=* 



-*~*r 



^zzMzJ. 







J 




*=e= 



q^: 



* J J-* 






lie was a limp young wait-er, With cur - ly legs and weak, 



n^^^ 



And me - Ian - eho - ly 



=P 



q= 



* i #1 



=P 



==1= 



s 



-*- -0- 



m m e m 



— — ■ -m — « — «— 



-*--*--# 



1 



P 



— 5 — fc*-hi* — U- 



r— r = 



e=*z 



| >-*L-J J yf P 



5 



■E-E-U* 



-m* 



^±iz 



zfcrtc 



whiskers, Me - and'ring down his cheek ! And his in- come was but slen-der, And he paid no in-come 



*=t 



=^3= 



d * t 



t=i 



-*-m-m- 



* ^ 



3r " S--S 



s 



■*"* 

]==£ 



p 



-^ — *— #■ 



S S S 



^=^F-^ 



8l 



■> tt ^ 



i=± 



Ie 



5 



-*t^-*t 



^^ 



r p 



-1* h; — F — * 



3: 



^ 



=T* 



trfc 



± 



tax, 



For he wait - ed in a slap-bang shop, Down near St. Ma - ry Axe ! In a 



=£ 



4=* 



i=t 



! 



3: 



aj-aj -al- 



41= 



n*-- 



**= 



*E 



I 



1 



s 



^ 



dolce. 



1E^ 



:f*=s= 



3S: 






1^: 



3* 



:fc=t*i 



zfczft 



slap-bang shop he wait - ed, 




Where ci - ty swells do dine ; And he dai - ly sang a 



dolce. 



^=^= 



^35 



Jfcjfc 



1M- 



I WOULD I WERE LORD MAYOR. 



135 



:#z=^ _fr_.K =E 



m 



v=* 



-Jaz^fs 



±z 



Zf>- 



3EI 



:=£ 



S* 



S^ 






■-Se- 



dan. 



1 1- 



BsaH 



song that rang, With this most dis - mal line: "0 1 wish I were Lord May - or, Or at 



mb*3=?JHt. 



L ^M 



IijSl£ JLJS^jfLti 



3E 



-a- 



3^3 



Repeat in Chorus ad lib. 




2. He was such an earnest spirit, 

That he pass'd his holidays 
In helping other waiters 
To wait at the cafays ! 
'Twas in such loving labour, 
Of which he was so fond, 
That he first beheld his heart's young dream 

At the shrine of Spiers & Pond : 
At Spiers & Pond's she waited, 
In the gloomy Underground, 
And from that sight his heart, once light, 

This pensive burden found : — (In a sepulchral 
key, appropriate to the tunnels of the Metro- 
politan Railway.) 

"0 1 wish," &c. 

3. He saw, and loved, and sickened ; 

Each day he thinner grew; 
His very coat-tail buttons 

His wasted frame shone through ; 
His choker hung upon him 

Unlike a stiffened tie ; 
The beef he served was often damp 

With tear-drops from his eye ; 
His slippers shuffled loosely 

About his shrunken feet ; 
And if you asked him how he did, 

He only would repeat — ( With the sickening 
smile of inferior salubriosity') 
" ! I wish," &c. 

4. The City swells who loved him 

Observed with growing care 
That he took no more delight in 

The daily bill of fare. 
No more the Morning 'Tiser 

With triumph he would spread ; 
No more would sound his cheerful call, — 

" Two porks, two greens, one bread !" 
And if you murmur'd, " Waiter, 

How much have I to pay?" 
No more the fee caused joy to he : 

The sole remark he'd say — (Was, "Boiled 
mutton eightpence, turnips a penny, taters a 
penny, ale twopence, bread a penny, one and 
one ; thank you, nr, but) 
I wish," &c. 



5. He loved, as Shakespeare hath it, 

Not wisely, but too well ; 
For vain Mariar Ann did 

Adore a City swell — ■ 
A clerk in the Post Office 

Amid Saint Martin's damps, 
Who had a mod'rate salary 

Derived from postage stamps ; 
And when their faith they plighted, 

All at the church of Bow, 
No thought they gave on him whose stave 

Thus testified his woe : — (In defiance of the very 
beadle that guarded the temple of felicitous con- 
nubiality) 

" ! I wish," fee. 

6. The slim-hair'd waiter waited 

Within the slap-bang shop : 
A new-wed couple entered 

For broth and mutton-chop. 
He gave one glance upon her, 

He uttered not a cry, 
But he stole down to the kitchen-fire, 

With frenzy in his eye, 
And he tore away his choker 

With madness staring stark, 
And in the simmering broth he plunged, 

With only this remark : — (gurglingly expressed) 
" ! I wish," &c. 

7. The couple ate their dinner, 

Which other waiters brought ; 
Why other waiters served them 

They never gave a thought. 

They dined and they departed 

With little doubts or fears ; 

But indigestion troubled them 

Through all the after years ; 

And in long hours of nightmare 

They dreamt of that slap-bang, 
And from their mucous membrane came 

A still small voice that sang : (And this is what 
the spirit of the deceased warbled about their 
digestive physiology) — 
" ! I wish," &c. 



136 



CRAMEB S VOCAL GEMS. 



Piano. 



LORD LOVEL. 



Allegretto. 




r*-*- 



\£w*W- 



1 



' f-^ - .fffrrr.r ^: 



*fc 



**£ 



W3t^\ 



l *td- 



jgfcgjgLC^jgjgjg jg^ 



F= 



s 









<? 



£Sza£S=; 



8 



g^= 



d 



■F-3-F- 



Pn — S — R= 



4- — N — Iv 



-J-Ur- jz 



3=S= 



-* —*—-j - 



*££=£: 



* I* l» >- 



^=^ 



sal — t*-l 



**—•»-' 



:£1. L3rd Lov-el he stood at his cas - tie gate, Combing his milk-white steed, When 




^b" 



=*=} 



jr— fcr — ^ — p~ ^ 1-- — i 



*=sr^ 



I^^B 



Jv=*= 



^=a-~ 



-£=*=gziL 



=F 



Pv? 



up came La - dy Nan-ey Bell To wish her lovier good speed, speed, speed, Wishing her loviergood speed. 



i=£=t 



*R= 



P 



Si 



^ 



rr 



e3e 



T 



§ 



s±i< 



1 



-J-, 



^EE 



J -^jS 



I 



is 



*=*: 



=T 



SSS' 



fF^FE 






L =T ! I- 



a=t=± 



t==*K 



f^ 



— ta — i — i — i — i — 




2. " Oh ! where are you going, Lord Lovel," she said, 

" Oh ! where are you going?" said she ; 
" I'm going, my Lady Nancy Bell, 
Foreign countries for to see-e-e. 

3. " When will you come back, Lord Lovel ?" she said, 

" When will you be back ?" said she ; 
" In a year or two, or three, or four, 
I'll come back to my Lady Nancee-e-e." 

4. He had only been gone twelve months and a day, 

Foreign countries for to see, 
When languishing thoughts come into his head, 
Lady Nancy Bell he would go see-e-e. 

5. So he rode, and he rode on his milk-white steed, 

Till he came to London town, 
And there he heard Saint Pancridge bells, 
And the people all mourning around. 

6. " Oh ! what is the matter ?" Lord Lovel he said, 

" Oh ! what is the matter?" said he ; 
" A Lord's Lady is dead!" the people all said, 
"And some call her Lady Nancee-e-e." 



7. Then he order'd the grave to be open'd wide, 

And the shroud to be turned down, — 
And then he kiss'd her clay-cold lips, 
While the tears came trickling down. 

8. Then he flung hisself down by the side of the corpse, 

With a shivering gulp and a guggle, 
Gave two hops, three kicks, heav'd a sigh, blew his nose, 
Sung a song, and then died in the struggle ! 

9. Lady Nancy she died as it might be to-day, 

Lord Lovel he died as to-morrow ; 
Lady Nancy she died out of pure, pure grief, 
And Lord Lovel he died out of sorrow. 

10. Lady Nancy was laid in Saint Pancridge 's church, 

Lord Lovel was laid in the choir, 
And out of her buzzum there grew a red rose, 
And out of her lovier's a briar-iar-iar. 

11. So they grew, and they grew to the church-steeple top, 

And they couldn't grow up no higher. 
So they twin'd themselves in a true lover's knot, 
For all lovers true to admire. 



FANNY GREY. 



137 



FANNY GREY. 




Moderate 



m 



»; 



=r 



Composed by The Hon. Mrs. NORTON. 



tt= 



P— ^ 



Piano. 



%jE=S§ 



^M 



jfcEI 



*^=*: 



BE 



*mr- 



^w- 



3 



P2_ 



—I- 



J: 



f-f 



a*: 



3 



H 



m^^^^^ 



^m 



#-P— sj- 



I 



bin 



1. " Well, well, sir ! so you're come at last ! I thought you'd come no more : I've 

I s 



=H 



* 



T- 



T- 



P 



S 



^ 



£ 



^ 



^=¥ 



^Hggg=Pg=g 



>— K - 



F*= 



-jizz^z 



=*=q* 



:^ri = 



wai - ted wiih my bon - net on, From one till half-past four ! 



You know I hate to 



4 4 



m 



r 



j& — J J — r 



*m 



9—$ 



m 



Wz 



-i— r- 



=t 



-I— 



tt 



=*=qv= 



^^^S§3 



K=3*= 



^ 



=#=*= 



3tzi; 



=fc 



sit a - lone, Un - set - tl'd where to go ; You'll break my heart, I feel you will, If 



( 




& 



3*= 



3, 



pz 



^ 



=ff=iE 



=Uf 



138 



CRAMER S VOCAL GEMS. 



— fc-H- 



-£-•— 






ZJ— 



&E^EEE0L-£ZZ 



:*=2= 



you con - ti - nue 



so! 



You'll break my heart, I 



feel you will, If 



) 




'$ 



=}SZ 




$= 



32= 



M 



=ff^ 



P 



& 



::S-;5: 



9 



*' J' 



you con - ti - nue so ! " 



IC) j — m s 
TV 9~ 



-4- 



*==* 



gr J -*" 



->-^- 



:£=*= 



P 



£ 



=? 



: -h — ^^ 



s 



-3=3- 



' Now pray, my love, put by that frown, And don't be - gin to scold ; 



T 



You 



^= 



3=H 



5 



l 



P 



-* 



■*T3- 



B3= 



S 



as 



* 



i fS ' 



3^E 



ZjlT 



^ 



±=N 



^=S= 



I 



€ 



real - ly will per - suade me soon — You're grow-ing cross and old. 

— I —, "" i ■ ' 
— 1 1 



*=* 



3EEz 



-*-* 



on - ly stopp'd at 

1 i ! ' 



3- 



3f 



W- 



SE 



:t: 



i 1- 



=^ 



FANNY GREY. 



139 






m 



3r=N= 



1 



=js= 



rpriz 



=s~ 



P=S: 



^ 



=* 



^T- 



:«-=i; 



1 



Grosv'nor Gate, Young Fan - ny's eye to catch : I won't, I vow, I won't be made To 

3r— , — - — r— - U- I ! i - . N^ fc 



=S=i= 



i I I 



T 




S 



ryw 



9*==£= 



gt= 



i 



r; 



2=^: 



ip^ 



s^ 



r*f= 




£=> : 



± — ± 



J 



keep time like 



watch ! ' 




ss^ 



:?=*z 



'% 



% 



WZMZ 



Mm 



^yr-^v 



'-£=*- 



irnf 



p 



" It took yon then, two hours to bow ?- 

Two hours ! — take off your hat ; 
I wish you'd bow that way to me, 

And apropos of that. 
I saw you making love to her — 

(You see I know it all !) 
I saw yon making love to her 

At Lady Gossip's ball ! " 

3. 

" Now really, Jane, your temper is 

So very odd to-day, 
You jealous — and of such a girl 

As little Fanny Grey ! 
Make love to her ! indeed, my dear, 

You could see no such thing. 
I sat a minute by her side 

To see a turquoise ring ! " 
4. 
" I tell you that I saw it all, 

The whisp'ring and grimace, 
The flirting and coquetting, 

In her little foolish face. 
Oh, Charles, I wonder that the earth 

Don't open where you stand — 
By the heav'n that is above us both, 

I saw yon kiss her hand ! " 



•' I did not, love, or if I did, 

Allowing that 'tis true ; 
When a pretty woman shows her rings, 

What can a poor man do ? 
My life, my soul, my darling Jane, 

I love but you alone ; 
I never thought of Fanny Grey — 

(How tiresome she's grown !) " 

6. 

" Put down your hat, don't take your stick, 

Now prithee, Charles, do stay ; 
You never come to see me now, 

But you long to run away. 
There was a time, there was a time, 

You never wished to go. 
What have I done, what have I done, 

Dear Charles, to change you so ? " 

7. 
" Pooh, pooh, my love, I am not chang'd, — 

But dinner is at eight, 
And my father's so particular, 

He never likes to wait." 
" Good-bye ! good-bye ! you'll come again? " 

"Yes; one of these fine days." 
" He's turn'd the street, I knew he would, 

He's gone to Fanny Grey's." 



140 



CRAMER S VOCAL GEMS. 



BEN BATTLE. 



Allegretto. 



Words by T. HOOD. 



B— 8 z FEg^B 



?^^§^^^^^ 



J=S=S=S=FS=^*=t 



-* z ^ -^-H — fcj — l^-H — b»-t^-i» - 



*--r-- 



-*--*- 



Piano. 






M= 



.g=^i ^ ~~i- 



*-*-*- 



3S 



vw- 



:)=* 



*~»T*-^ 



■ M. S S 



*=i 






•*-*"# 



4=313= 






* 

££ 



s 



-^M 2 - 



-r — *- 



3==*: 



lHHfj 



t: 



att 



i 



^_, 



£=£=g: 



1. Ben Bat - tie was a sol - dier bold, and us'd to wars a 

s 



E^E^?EE^ 



-i- 



=1= 






^=K 



3=3^ 



-I- 



^ 



!&5=S 



^ 



- *— g : 



fe=fc 



=!=*: 



=t=\ &J 



£FM RP 1 * 



*=*: 



r-* 1 ! 



^=3t 



3=£= 



=*=3= 



^=st 



-«U-> : 

larms; But a can -non ball took ofi bis legs, So be laid down bis Arms!.. Now 



■I— « -T*- 



=S 



fc^E3BSEt 



* 



^-* 



=i=^s 






£: * 



-*-=•- 



-*— *- 



5— Jr 






m. 



m 



=i=p= 



^q; 



^ 



: *=^i^ 



-•^-v-a =1- 



3: 



fc 



:«!=:a!zztfi 



^=S=5t 



S 



^3&^ 



-P »_ 



izdzz*=*=*= 



as they bore hirn off tbe field, Said he "let o - thers sboot, 



For here I leave my 



m 



=P 



=1- 



I 



%^^^%^%- 



S^= 



$ 



=3== 



HI 

-I — a — 



^l=^gSP 






s 



s 



BEN BATTLE. 



141 



^~ 



S=d§: 



^=a- 



m 



:r= 



± 



-F— 3- 



-<*-*- 



se - cond leg, And the For - ty - se - oond Foot." 



_tzz*i 



± 



i*=*=r 



.« pS> |ffi_ 



=fcc 



P5^ 



=JE 



-P— 3 



-4— 4=4: 



-*-*- 



w . 






3. 



-J-^tt- 



~*#S- — 8— S — « 




=*=*= 



-m—m — » »■ 



s 



Itzfc 



it: 



£ 



=fcc 



=t 



a(=aj=»!=«|- 



**^1& 



^S 3 -- 



* *"* «2 



The army surgeons made him limbs : 

Said he, — " They're only pegs : 
But there's as wooden members quite, 

Ab represent my legs ! " 
Now Ben he lov'd a pretty maid, 

Her name was Nelly Gray; 
So he went to pay her his devours, 

When he'd devour'd his pay ! 



But when he call'd on Nelly Gray, 

She made him quite a scoff ; 
And when she saw his wooden legs, 

Began to take them off ! 
" Oh, Nelly Gray ! Oh, Nelly Gray ! 

Is this your love so warm ? 
The love that loves a scarlet coat, 

Should be more uniform. 1 " 



Said she, " I lov'd a soldier once, 

For he was blythe and brave ; 
But I will never have a man 

With both legs in the grave ! 
Before yoii had those timber toes, 

Your love I did allow, 
But then, you know, you stand upon 

Another footing now !" 



" Oh, Nelly Gray ! Oh, Nelly Gray t 

For all your jeering speeches, 
At duty's call, I left my legs 

In Badajos's breaches ! " 
" Why then," said she, " you've lost the feet 

Of legs in war's alarms, 
And now you cannot wear your shoes 

Upon your feats of arms .' " 



6 

" Oh, false and fickle Nelly Gray ! 

I know why you refuse : 
Though I've no feet — some other man 

Is standing in my shoes I 
I wish I ne'er had seen your face ; 

But now a long farewell ! 
For you will be my death : — alas ! 

You will not be my Nell ! " 



Now when he went from Nelly Gray, 

His heart so heavy got, 
And life was such a burthen grown, 

It made him take a knot ! 
So round his melancholy neck 

A rope he did entwine, 
And, for his second lime in life, 

Enlisted in the Line! 

8 

One end he tied around a beam, 

And then remov'd his pegs, 
And, as his legs were off, — of course, 

He soon was off his legs ! 
And there he hung, till he was dead 

As any nail in town, — 
For though distress had cut him up, 

It could not cut him down.' 



A dozen men sat on his corpse, 

To find out why he died, 
And they buried Ben in four cross roads, 

With a stake in his inside. 



142 



CEAMEE S VOCAL GEMS. 



THE CORK LEG. 



Piano. 



I 



Moderate. .-. *■ ,-_ ,1 > I JL X 



a 




ii 



qs 



:£=*= 



:p=^ 



S 



-* *- 



3*=tz: 



1. A 

s 



tale I'll tell you with - out a - ny flam, In 



*& 



-fi-- 



$?=£=* 



jgj fr 



e 



*=& 



3^E 



fc3z 



\ 



* 



- 



gfi-n 



Hfl 



:£ : 

_J — 






^ 



^=^ 



±=J=5l: 



:jte: 



±=&*- 



-* — * 



*=&—*- 



Hoi - land there dwelt Myn - heer Yon Clam, Who ev - e - ry morn - ing said, " I am the 



=P 



1 



*»: 



*•: 



d= 



S 



$=*= 



3^ 



-*— r 



1^ 



|=g 



5 



:=* 



:* — r- 



-*=%2- 



?*=&=* 



--&T- 



rich - est mer-chant in Eot - ter - dam." Ei too ral, loo ral, loo ral, loo ral, 



=1= 

St 



m 



^ 



-§* 



sj= 



:3=3fc 



±3* 



Pt 



GILES SCEOGGINS GHOST. 



143 



i 



& 



b J « t | * 



^=p: 



^ 



-=1— P- 



» ' g 



i=fe=t 



too ral, loo ral, ri too loo ral 



lay. 



IS 



^S 



=P=F^ 



I 



S 



8 



s 



T 



3 — i — E 



3 



fc^ 



£ 



*: * 



:£-— 



rP^- 



m 



$=^ 



2. One day he had stuff 'd as full as an egg, 
When a poor relation came to beg ; 

But he kick'd him out without broaching a keg, 
And in kicking him out he broke his own leg. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

3. A surgeon, the first in his vocation, 
Came and made a long oration ; 

He wanted a limb for anatomization, 
So finish'd the job by amputation. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

4. Said Mynheer, when he'd done his work, 
"By your knife I loose one fork, 

But upon crutches I'll never stalk, 
For I'll have a beautiful leg of cork." 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

5. An artist in Botterdam, 'twould seem, 
Had made cork legs his study and theme ; 
Each joint was as strong as an iron beam, 

The works a compound of clock-work and steam. 
Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

6. The leg was made, and fitted right, 
Inspection the artist did invite ; 
The fine shape gave Mynheer delight, 
And he fix'd it on and screw'd it tight. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

7. He walk'd through squares, and past each shop, 
Of speed he went at the very top ; 

Each step he took with a bound and a hop, 
Till he found his leg he couldn't stop. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 



8. Horror and fright were in his face, 

The neighbours thought he was running a race ! 

He clung to a post to stay his pace, 

But the leg, remorseless, kept up the chase. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

9. He call'd to some men with all his might, 
" Oh, stop me, or I'm murdered quite ! " 
But though they heard him aid invite, 

He, in less than a minute, was out of sight. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &e. 

10. He ran o'er hill, and dale, and plain, 
To ease his weary bones, he fain 

Did throw himself down, but all in vain, — 
The leg got up, and was off again. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

11. He walk'd of days and nights a score, 
Of Europe he had made a tour ; 

He died, — but though he was no more, 
The leg walked on the same as before. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

12. In Holland sometimes he comes in sight, 
A skeleton on a cork leg tight ; 

No cash did the artist's skill requite, 

He never was paid— and it sarv'd him right! 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 

13. My tale I've told both plain and free, 
Of the richest merchant that could be ; 
Who never was buried, though dead, you see, 
And I have been singing his LEG. 

Ei too ral, loo ral, &c. 



Piano. 



S 



GILES SCROGGINS' GHOST. 



Words by TOM HOOD. 



Moderato. I 



fcS 



33 



mf 



SE 



m 







*C 



I 



q=H=¥q= 



3 



m W f 



afcjafc: 



S 



P1»h«- 



w 



* J* 



■P I 



^*£. 1 ■ — 



I I I I ^+ =£ 



I* 1 — b » 1 



rpj^rpr— fcaq?= 



qe~at: 



144 



CRAMER S VOCAL GEMS. 



fi 



E?E 



Sz 



Sl^^l 



^=^ 



Fol lol de rol, de rol de ra, The 



V 



1. Giles Scrog - gins court - ed 



Mol - ly Brown, 



^i 



S 



3=i 



iS 



1 



K- u -*- 



*t±=J=*z 



H 



:ti^: 



=£: 



:*==£= 



L_^_JL. 



— K- 



ft-fic 



if=m 



fair - est wench in 



^=^ 



^e 



aa 



all 



the town, 



*=&*=%- 



:s&* 



Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ra ; 



— s- *2<^3r-*2w—3. q i n i § - UeS^r - 



3s3 



He 





■£=e=m 



^^3t: 



-TT- 



1 



bought a ring with po - sy true : If you loves me as 



S te - 



^=2 



^^ 



mm^ 



— *«r— -*r 



ir, 



5^ 



I loves you, No knife shall cut our 

a fr- 



-W*rw~- 



jr?jr 






-m-m^m- 



4=n — ps. 



P 



3***= 



3^**1 



-=1- 



m 



t=u 



eu 




SB 



rf 



£35 



* 



'^ — ^F 



W^r; 



g * ft«t 



-P=? 



love in two. Fol lol de rid - die, lol de ra. 



% 



■m- S 




SE 



* 



§l|i§i|g3|l 



3 



SE3E 



=F^ 



*^r 



^ 



But scissars cut as well as knives, 
And quite unsartin's all our lives ; 
The day they were to have been wed, 
Fate's scissars cut poor Giles's thread, 
So they could not be mar-ri-ed. 



Fol lol. 
Fol lol. 



Fol lol. 



Poor Molly laid her downHo weep, Fol lol. 

And cried herself quite fast asleep ; Fol lol. 

When, standing all by the bed-post, 

A figure tall her sight engross'd, 

And it cried, " I be Giles Scroggins' ghost." Fol lol. 



4. 



Fol lol. 
Fol lol. 



The ghost it said all solemnly, 

" Molly, you must go with I, 

All to the grave your love to cooL" 

Says she, " I am not dead, you fool." 

Says the ghost, says he," vy, that's no rule." Fol lol. 

5. 

The ghost he seiz'd her all so grim, Fol lol. 

All for to go along with him ; Fol lol. 

" Come, come," said he, " ere morning beam." 
" I von't," she cried, and she gave a scream, 
Then she woke, and found she dreamt a dream 
(All about) Fol lol de riddle, lol de ra. 



iohdon: swift & co., regeht pebsb, kibg street, regent street, w. 



V All the following Pianofortes and Harmoniums may be 
obtained through any Dealer in Musical Instruments in 
Town or Country. 



CRAMER'S NEW GRAND PIANOFORTE, 

SIX FEET LONG. 

IN ROSEWOOD 90 GUINEAS. 

IN WALNUT 100 GUINEAS. 

A MOST ELEGANT, CONVENIENT, AND PURE-TONED PIANOFORTE. 

Although it occupies much less space than the ordinary Grand Pianoforte, the third string 

imparts great power and effectiveness. 

CRAMER'S COTTAGE PIANOFORTES!" 

7 Octaves, Rosew ood, 2 unison 3ft. llin. 42 Guineas. 

„ Walnut „ „ 46 

„ Bosewood, 3 unison treble 4ft. lin. 50 

„ Walnut ,, „ „ 55 

„ Bosewood, Check Action 3ft. 9in. 50 

„ Walnut „ , 55 

CRAMER'S PIANETTES. 

65 Trichord Treble, or 7 Octaves, two unison, in Ash 3ft. Sin. 23 Guineas. 

„ „ Black Walnut „ 25 ,, 

„ „ Bosewood, Walnut, or Mahogany , „ 28 „ 

Octaves, superior, Albert Front, Bosewood, Walnut, or Zebra-wood „ 34 „ 

„ Satin and other Fancy Woods, Trusses „ 45 ,, 

„ Solid Mahogany, Closing Keyboard, for Yachts, etc „ 40 „ 

(Walnut 5 Guineas extra) 

„ Walnut-wood, Trusses, and shaped Ends, elegant „ 50 „ 

,, Satin and other Fancy Woods, ditto, ditto 3ft. 5in. from 50 to CO „ 

THE NEW "CRAMER" HARMONIUMS 

Are of the best manufacture, and are so toned as to be the most agreeable Drawing-room 

Instruments. 

These Instruments are at the English Pitch, instead of the French, which is too fiat to admit 

of the ordinary Paris Harmoniums being used with the Pianoforte. The various Stops of the 

" Cramer" Harmoniums are so distinctive in their effects as to preserve their individuality when 

used in the grand ensemble, approaching more nearly the e&s4 of an Orchestra than has hitherto 

been attained. 

£. i. d. 

1 Stop, 4 Octaves, Polished Oak. School Model 6 

1 Stop, 5 Octavos, Polished Oak 

5 Stops, 5 Octaves, Polished Oak 13 

10 Stops, u Octavo's, Oak, 2 sets of Vibrators 10 

13 Stops, 5 Octaves, Oak, Knee Action, 4 sets of Vibrators 27 

19 Stops, 5 Octaves, Oak, Knee Action, sets of Vibrators 42 

IT in Cases of Rosewood or Walnut, from 20s . to COs. extra. If with Percussion Action, £5 extra. 



CRAMER AND CO. LIMITED. 

201 & 209, BEGENT STEEET, LONDON. 
City, 43, Moorgate Sweet, E.G. Brighton, 64, West Street. 



... Girls frequently leave school knowing little or nothing of the principles of music. 
The work before us will prevent any such lamentable failure. It is truly a code of instruc- 
tion in the art of pianoforte playing. . . . "Where the tuition is given at home, it will be 
found more useful still. All trouble beyond turjerintendence is saved to the parent or 
governess ; and a series of the best lessons and " pieces " is provided ready to hand, at less 
tha'- 1 twentieth of the cost of an ordinary half-year's music.—" Orchestra," Aug. 8. 

CRAMER'S EDUCATIONAL COURSE FOE THE PIANOFORTE. 



12 Parts, ONE SHILLING : or 2 Vols, bound, 

CEAMEE'S CELEBEATED TUTOE for the 
PIANOFORTE, containing the Rudiments of Music, 
Principal Rules on the Art of Fingering, Appropriate Exam- 
ples and Exercises, and Lessons in the Principal Major and 
Minor Keys, with a Preludo to each Koy. 

C CEAMEE'S SECOND BOOK, containing Scale 
J Passages, Easy Exercises, Preludes, &c. chosen from 
the works of Cramer, Bertini, Czorny. Logier, &c. &c, com- 
bined with Familiar Arrangements of favourite Sacred and 
Operatic Airs calculated to form and develope the taste of 
the Performer. 

CEAMEE'S THIED BOOK. Containing little 
Fantasias progressive in difficulty, Themes carefully 
selected from the Best Writers, Preludes and Exercises from 
the more advanced works of Clementi, Cramer, Kalkbrenner, 
«fcc. ; Lessons with a special view to the Freedom of the Lett 
Hand, &c. 

CEAMEE'S FOUBTH BOOK will contain 
" Recreations" in Fantasia form, selected from Secular 
and Sacred Works, with a few short Exercises with special 
objects. 

CEAMEE'S FIFTH BOOK. Studies in Various 
Keys, chiefly introductory to the Pieces contained in 
tbe following Book. 



6s. each. Single Parts by Post for 14 Stamps. 

CEAMER'S SIXTH BOOK. Selections from 
the simpler works of tbe Great Writers— Hadyn, Mozart, 
Beethoven, and Mendelssbon, for entering on which the 
pupil will have been in a c"-°°t measure prepared by the 
practice of the studies in B«,k 6. 

CEAMEE'S SEVENTH BOOK. Studies com- 
posed by Cramer, Bertini, Czerny, Moscbeles, Nollet. 

CEAMEE'S EIGHTH BOOK. Half-hours 
with Dussek, Mendelssohn, Cramer, Steibelt, Sterndals 
Bennett, &c. • 

CEAMEE'S NINTH BOOK. Advanced Studies 
from Cramer and the Standard Composers for the 
Pianoforte. 

CEAMEE'S TENTH BOOK. The Modem 
School— Thalberg, Chopin, Gounod, &c. 

CEAMEE'S ELEVENTH BOOK. Sacred 
Music, Fugues, Marches, Chorales, &c. 

CEAMEE'S TWELFTH BOOK will be chiefly 
composed of Cramer's Advanced Studies, for the acqui- 
sition of style. 



. . . This work is a compendium of all the necassary instructions for the cultivation 
or the voice, beginning with the simplest and shortest lesson, and proceeding step by step 
with easy solfeggi to the song, the ballad, the canzonet, aria, duet, trio, part-song, and 
every form of vocal combination. . . . We unhesitatingly recommend it to the school, 
class, drawing-room, and '* my lady's chamber." It includes all those excellences which 
in standard essays have secured a favourable reception from the public, and will materially 
assist in the improvement of the vocalist, and the diffusion of much pretty and excellent 
music.—" Orchestra," Aug. 22. 



CRAMER'S EDUCATIONAL COURSE FOR THE VOICE. 



In 12 Parts, ONE SHILLING each ; or 2 Vols 

CEAMEE'S VOCAL TUTOE, containing the 
Rudiments of Music, and (he Necessary Instructions for 
the Perfect Cultivation of the Voice, with Appropriate Exercises, 
lessons, anil easy Solfeggi, Simple Songs in One and Two Jt'ai ts. 
TJseml for school and class teaching. 

CEAMEE'S SECOND BOOK, containing Exer- 
cises, Solfeggi, &c, in tho Advanced Keys, Songs in Two 
»nd Three Tarts, with Obseriations and Illustrations from the 
works of Bennett, W. Maynard, Crcscentini, Paer, and Pele- 
grlal. 

CEAMEE'S THIED BOOK, containing Exer- 
cises, Solfeggi, &c, carefully selected from the Works of 
Rossini, Kubini, Schira. Garcia ; Tart Songs, ic. &c. 

CEAMEE'S FOUBTH BOOK, containing Lessons 
on tho Italian School of Singing, by Crivelli, Garcia, 
Rossini, Rubini, S h in, and other Italian Masters; with Part- 
Songs by Macfarren and other Composers. 

CEAMEE'S FIFTH BOOK, containing Exer- 
cises and Solfegci by Rubini, Crivelli, <vc. ; Songs and 
Ballads by Gounod, Schubert, Schira, Balie, Wallace, llacfarrer, 
and Hatton. 

CEAMEE'S SIXTH BOOK, containing Duets, 
Trios, and Part-Songs, by ^elebrated Composers. 



6s. each. Single Parts by Post for 14 Stamps. 

CEAMEE'S SEVENTH BOOK, containing Obser- 
vations m the Art of Singing by Mainicl Garcia, Spl'eggi 
'ttoMn celebrated works, and Snu-js for Soprano, Mezzu-Soprano, 
Contralto, Tenor, Baritone and Bass Voices. 

CEAMEE'S EIGHTH BOOK, containing Obser- 
vations on the Art of Simring (continued) by Manuel 
Garcia, Solfeggi from the celebrated works of Cresccntiiii, laer, 
and Pe!egrini, and Duets for Sopiano and Tenor. Mezzo- 
Soprauo and Baritone voices, by W. V. Wallace and Henry 
Smart. 

CEAMEE'S NINTH BOOK, containing Obser- 
vations on the Art of Singing (concluded), by Manuel 
Garcia. Grand Selection : Song by Beethoven, Duet by -Mac- 
farren, and a Trio by Wallace. 

CEAMEE'S TENTH BOOK, containing A 
vanced Solfeggi from the celebrated works of Crescentini, 
Paer, and Pelegrini ; and a Selection fioin the works of Sir Henry 
Bishop. 

C CEAMEE'S ELEVENTH BOOK, containing 
J celebrated Trios from popular English Operas. 

CEAMEE'S TWELFTH BOOK, containing 
Songs by Modern Composers — Uuunod, Balfe, Sullivan, 
David, Ardili, Levey. 



CRAMER'S VOCAL GEMS. 

In Twenty-four Paris, Sixpence each ; or Two vols. 6s. each. Single Parts by post, 7 stamps. 



1.— 15 English Songs. 

?.— 15 Christy Minstrels' Songs. 

S.— 6 Duets. 

4.— 12 Songs by Balfe and Wallace. 

5. — 1'2 £acred Songs. 

fi.— 12 Old English Songs. 

7.— 12 Songs by Schubert. 

8.— 15 Christy Minstrels' Songe. 



9.— 12 Opera Songs. 
10. — Haydn's -Canzonets (1st Set). 
11. — Haydn's Canzonets (2nd Set). 
12.— 15 Christy Minstrels' Songs. 
18.— 14 Irish Melodies. 
14.— 6 Sacred Duets. 
16.— 12 Songs by Dibdin 
16.— 12 Songs by Russell and Knight. 



17.— 12 Songs by Linley. 

18. — 5 Songs by Bishop. 

19.— 15 Christy Minstrels' Songs. 

20.— Ill Scottish Songs. 

21.— 6 Sea Songs. 

22.— 12 Italian Opera So^gs. 

23.— 12 Songs of the Khiucland. 

24.— 15 Christy Minstrels' Songs. 



London : 



CEAMEK & CO. LIMITED, 201, Begent Street, W. 
and SIMPKLN, MARSHALL, & CO.