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Full text of "A volume of memoirs and genealogy of representative citizens of the city of Seattle and county of King, Washington, including biographies of many of those who have passed away"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 08178400 5 



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THE NEW YORK 

PtiBtIC LIBRARY 






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■— '";g •—yr.s.nry I'ZL-yi'zz- \ir Qh;r,n gc 



A.A.DENNY 



A VOLUME OF MEMOIRS AND GENEALOGY 



OF 



REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



OF 



THE CITY OF SEATTLE AND COUNTY OF KING 



WASHINGTON 



INCLUDING BIOGRAPHIES OF MANY OF THOSE 
WHO HAVE PASSED AWAY 



ILLUSTRATED 



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NEW YORK AND CHICAGO 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

19 3 



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THE NEV/ \C]SLK 
PUBLIC LJ&RAf^r 

ASTOR. LENOX AND 
flLDEN POUNDATIONo 



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preface: 




'jI^UT of the depths of his mature wisdom Carlyle wrote, 
"History is the essence of innumerable biographies." 
Beheving this to be the fact, there is no necessity of 
advancing any further reason for the compilation of 
such a work as this, if reliable history is to be the 
ultimate object. 

The section of Washington embraced by this volume has sustained 
within its confines men who have been prominent in the history of the 
state and even of the nation. The annals teem with the records of 
strong and noble manhood, and, as Sumner has said, "the true grand- 
eur of nations is in those qualities which constitute the greatness of the 
individual." The final causes which shape the fortunes of individuals and 
the destinies of states are often the same. They are usually remote and 
obscure, and their influence scarcely perceived until manifestly declared by 
results. That nation is the greatest which produces the greatest and most 
manly men and faithful women; and the intrinsic safety of a community 
depends riot so much upon methods as upon that normal development from 
the deep resources of which proceeds all that is precious and perma- 
nent in life. But such a result may not consciously be contemplated by 
the actors in the great social drama. Pursuing each his personal good by 
exalted means, they work out a logical result. 

The elements of success in life consist in both innate capacity and deter- 
mination to excel. Where either is wanting, failure is almost certain in the 
outcome. The study of a successful life, therefore, serves both as a source 
of information and as a stimulus and encouragement to those who have the 
capacity. As an important lesson in this connection we may appropriately 



4 PREFACE. 

quote Longfellow, who said: "We judge ourselves by what we feel capa- 
ble of doing, while we judge others by what they have already done." A 
faithful personal history is an illustration of the truth of this observation. 

In this biographical history the editorial staff, as well as the publishers, 
have fully realized the magnitude of the task. In the collection of the ma- 
terial there has been a constant aim to discriminate carefully in regard to 
the selection of subjects. Those who have been prominent factors in the 
public, social and industrial development of the county have been given due 
recognition as far as it has been possible to secure the requisite data. 
Names worthy of perpetuation here, it is true, have in several instances been 
omitted, either on account of the apathy of those concerned or the inability 
of the compilers to secure the information necessary for a symmetrical 
sketch; but even more pains have been taken to secure accuracy than were 
promised in the prospectus. Works of this nature, therefore, are more reli- 
able and complete than are the " standard " histories of a country. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



INDEX. 



Abrams, Robert, 248 
Adams, Frank E., 712 
Ainsworth, Elton E., 240 
Albertson, Robert B., 13 
Allen, John B., 207 
Allmond, Charles H., 367 
Alvord, Irving T., 484 
Alvord, Thomas M., 537 
Anderson, Alexander J., 561 
Anderson, Charles M., 557 
Anderson, John L., 449 
Andrews, Lyman B., 281 
Ankeny, Rollin V., 74 
Arney, William, 273 
Arthur, John, 304 
Austin, Charles G., 53 



Breece, Enoch E., 473 
Bremer, William, 27S 
Briggs, Benjamin F., 690 
Brinker, William H., 471 
Brooke, George A., 706 
Brookes, Albert M., 214 
Brown, Amos, 476 
Brown, D. McL., 757 
Brown, Dana W., 104 
Bryan, Edgar, 189 
Buck, Franklin A., 38 
B-uhtz, Albert, 312 
Bunce, James A., 633 
Burnett, Hiram, 195 
Btirwell, Austin P., 274 
Byers, Alphius, 611 



Backus, Manon F., 19 
Bagley, Herman B., 56 
Baker, Charles, 80 
Ballard, William R., 234 
Battle, Alfred, 259 
Beach, Abijah I., 100 
Beattie, William, 664 
Bebb, Charles H., 672 
Beers, Alexander, 654 
Bell. Orvill J., 24 
Benjamin. Amos O., 336 
Bigelow, Harry A., 392 
Bigelow, Isaac N., 244 
Bissell, Edwin R., 314 
Blaine, Elbert F., 300 
Blekum, Harald, 365 
Blethen, Alden J., 294 
Bode, Henry A., 498 
Bogart, Mrs. S. J., 416 
Boone, William E., 2.30 
Bothwell, James, 441 
Bowden, Edmund, 675 
Bowmen, David W., 366 
Bowman, Alonzo C, 120 
Brace, John S., 310 
Brawley, Dewitt C. 512 
Brawley, William R., 742 



Caine, Elmer E., 87 
Calderhead, Samuel C. 700 
Calhoun, Isaac P., 430 
Cann, Thomas H., 237 
Carkeek, Mtorgan J., 644 
Carman, George C, 567 
Carroll. Francis M., 692 
Carroll, James, 638 
Carter, Robert E., 684 
Chesbro, Horace H.. 143 
Chilberg, Andrew, 82 
Chilberg, Nelson, 640 
Clark, Seth W.. 29 
Claussen, Hans J., 358 
Clise, James W., 171 
Closson, John H., 6s 
Cochrane, William, 646 
Colkett, William J., 485 
Collier, William H., 620 
Collins, Charles R., 320 
Collins, John, 605 
Colman, James M., 178 
Colvin. Oliver D., 751 
Compton, John R., 623 
Condon, John T., 616 
Cook, Ralph, 339 
Cooper, Isaac, 511 



INDEX. 



Corson, H. R., 424 
Cotterill, George F., 538 
Coulter. Clarence W., 736 
Crawford, Ronald C, 528 
Crawford, Samuel L., 460 
Cudihee, Edward, 112 
Curtiss, William M., 584 

Davis, J. W., 510 
Dawson, Lewis R-, 614 
DeBruler, Ellis, 357 
DeCurtin, William, 583 
De Long, Willard W., 348 
Denny, Arthur A., 9 
Denny, D. T., 432 
Densmore, Milton, 482 
Dickson, E. C. 599 
Dilling, George W., 436 
Dorman, John W., 378 
Dow, Matthew, 228 
Drew, Edward L., 19 
Drew, Michael S., 17 
Duggan, Frank M., 481 
Duhamel, Edward J., 698 
Dyer, Luther A., 137 

Eckliart, W. F., 425 
Edsen, Eduard P., 41 
Emmons, Ralph W., 321 

Fafara, Michael, 429 
Fay, John P., 192 
Field, John, 271 
Fisher, Fred F., 580 
Fisher, Thomais M., 696 
Folsom, Frank H., 406 
Ford, Charles B., 324 
Fowler, Charles E., 182 
Frink, John M., 132 
Frye, George F,, 26 
Fuhrman, Henry, 487 
Fulton, Walter S., 84 
Furth, Jacob, 184 

Gabriel, George W., 595 
Gasch, Fred A., 285 
Geske, Charles, 395 
Gibson, W, E., 518 
Gillespy, Sherwood, 158 
Gilson, George N., 588 
Goddard, Albert J., 509 
Godwin, J, W., 302 



Goodrich, Sylvester, 414 
Gormley, Matt H., 642 
Gowen, Herbert H., 374 
Graham, Richard J., 760 
Graves, Edward O., 603 
Gray, John G., 327 
Gray, Louis H., 91 
Guye, Francis M., 126 

Haller, Granville O., 200 
Haller, Theodore N., 200 
Hallock, George E., 398 
Hanford, Frank, 454 
Harkins. Fred H., 648 
Hart, James, 505 
Hart, Volly P., 73 
Hartman, John P., 421 
Hartranft. William G., 71 
Hawkins, Erastus C, 108 
Hayden. James R., 76 
Hayes, Patrick C. 547 
Hemer, J. Henry, 150 
Hemrich, Alvin M., 493 
Hemrich, Andrew, 419 
Hemrich, Louis, 686 
Herren. Archibald L., 468 
Hickmgbottom, Robert, 719 
Hicks, Sylvester B., 129 
Hight, Albert W., 390 
Hill, Frank A., 488 
Hill, George A., 140 
Hillman, Clarence D., 439 
Hinckley, Timothy D., i6g 
Hoffman. Carl, 95 
Hofmeister, Christian, 371 
Hoge, James D.. Jr., 220 
Hopkins, Paul, 568 
Horton, Dexter, 172 
Horton, Elwood, 729 
Horton, George M., 333 
Horton, Julius, 724 
Houghton. Edwun W., 608 
Howe, John P., 292 
Howley, Timothj^ J., 708 
Hughes, Elwood C, 523 
Hughes, Patrick D., 388 
Hull, Alonzo, 403 
Hurd, Frederick H., 155 
Hussey, Ernest B., 289 
Hutton, John, 600 
Hyman, Frank V., 726 



INDEX. 



Irving, John H., 535 

Jackson, Daniel B., 577 
Jacobs, Harry R., 486 
Jacobs, Orange, 210 
James. George, 669 
James, William, 305 
Janson, Ivar, 376 
Jeflfs, Alexander S., 695 
Jeffs, Richard, 714 
Jenner, Charles K., 187 
Jenott, Joseph L., 739 
Johnson, C. E., 671 
Johnston, Richard C, 157 
Jones, Daniel, 263 
Jones, R. A., 369 
Jones, Richard S., 368 
Jones, Thomas E., 495 
Josenhans, Timotheus, 93 
Jnlien, Jacob, 596 

Kellogg, Jay A., 609 
Kelsall, Albert L., 270 
Kemp, G. Ward, 658 
Kerry, Albert S., 52 
Kilbourne, Edward C, 33 
Kindred, Christian A., 591 
Kirschner, Frederick, 549 
Kleinschmidt, Carl, 744 
Knapp, Lyman E., 246 
Koepfli, Charles A., 307 
Kumnrer, George W., 252 

LaFarge. Oliver H. P., 125 
Lafromboise, Samuel. 501 
Lamping, George B., 89 
Langston, John, 687 
Lee, James, 86 
Levy, Benjamin C, 663 
Lilly, Charles H., 49 
Llwyd, J. P. D., 531 
Lohse, Henry, 701 
Lord, William H., 66r 
Lucas, John B., 379 
Lyon, John M., 217 

Haddocks, Moses R., 68 
Markey, Henry W., 32 
Mason, James R., 762 
McCabe, Kearin H., 709 
McClintock, James, 749 



McConnaughey, John W., 322 

McDermott, Mrs. Josephine P., 325 

McEachern, John A., 512 

McGilvra, John J., 720 

McGraw, John H., 225 

Mclntyre, J. D., 328 

MtLachlan, William, 679 

McNatt, William F., 514 

McVay, David, 717 

Miegrath, John, 637 

Mehlhorn, August, 198 

Metcalfe, James B., 572 

Miller, Christian, 351 

Mitchell, Frank W., 256 

Mitchell, Mrs. J. F. f., 631 

Moore, James A., 747 

Morgan, Frank V., 145 

Morrison, Ellis, 589 

Muchmore, Augustus, 458 

Mueller, John, 417 

Muldoon, Frank M., 15 

Nadeau, Ira A., 758 
Nagle, John H., 438 
Nettleton, Clark M., 704 
Neville, L. Charles, 765 
Newell, James H., 626 
Noble, H. A., 462 
Nugent, James, 764 

O'Brien, Charles V., 676 
Osgood, Frank H., 408 
Osner, Charles, 451 

Palmer, Alfred L., 204 
Parker, Isaac, 164 
Payne, J. H., 743 
Pells, Frank E., 372 
Peter, John W., 502 
Peterson, John C, 550 
Peterson, Neil S., 36 
Piper, George U., 571 
Poison, Perry, 316 
Powles, John B., 533 
Prefontaine, Francis X., 360 
Preston, Harold, 163 
Preston, Simon M., ir8 
Prosser, William F., 552 

Raser, Harry A., 411 
Ratcliffe, Edward M., 345 



8 



INDEX. 



Rathbun, Samuel F., 652 
Rawson, Zephaniah B., 465 
Reed, Thomas C, 383 
Remsberg, Charles E., 680 
Renick, Frank H., 61 
Riplinger, John, 559 
Robinson, Alver, 318 
Roohister, Junius 617 
Ronald, James T., 121 
Root, Milo A., 363 
Rounds, Edgar J., 597 
Rowe, Lewis S., 152 
Row ell. Fired R., 46 
Rude, Hans P., 233 
Runkel, Philip L., 443 
Russell, William M., 341 
Rutter, Washington C, 334 

Sackett, George E., 656 
Sandahl, Christian N., 343 
Sander, Fred E., 78 
Sanders, Thomas, 288 
Sands, Alva C, 66 
Schertzer, John F., 621 
Schmid, Vitus, 308 
Schwagerl, Edward O., 353 
Scott, Eustace B.. 593 
Scott, William T., 754 
Seagrave, Arthur A., 148 
Shorrock, Ebenezer, 546 
Shuey, Henry O., 146 
Sizer, Henry L., 40 
Smalley, Byron D., 381 
Smith, Charles J., 22 
Smith, Henry A., 264 
Smith, John D., 682 
Smith, Robert O., 678 
Smithers, Erasmus M., 96 
Soelberg, Axel H., 453 
Spear, Frank W., 222 
Stanley, William, 496 
Stedman, Livingston B., 396 
Stewart, Alexander B.. 579 
Stewart, George M., 297 
Stone, Corliss P., 167 
Strout, Edwin A., 734 
Struve. Frederick K., 400 

Taylor, John, 59 
Taylor, John S., 48 
Taylor, William H., 520 



Terry, M. Frank, 344 
Thomsen, Moritz, 565 
Thomson, Reginald H., 767 
Tibbetts, George W., 666 
Titus, James H., 276 
Tonkin, James, 138 
Trenholm, James D., 582 
Turner, Frank, 630 
Twitchell, Frank A., 64 

Upper, Herbert S., '/2'] 

Van De Vanter, Aaron T., 730 
Verd, Charles, 516 
Vernon, William H., 592 
Vilas, Calvin E., 79 

Wallingford, John N., 267 
Ward, Dillis B., 445 
Ward, George W., 286 
Waring, Isaac, 347 
Wayland, Confucius L., 490 
Webster, George E., 613 
Weeks, W. C, 741 
Weir, James, 716 
Weitzel, Irvin K., 710 
Wenzler, John, 401 
Westerman, Robert G., 242 
Wheeler, Frank L., 756 
White, Harry, 763 
White, William H., 44 
Whitmore, Jesse K., 504 
Whitney, Eleazer P., 409 
Whittlesey. Charles F., 586 
Wilhelm. Fridolin, 88 
Willard, Rufus, 624 
Williams, James, 628 
Williams, Sidney J., 629 
Williamson, John R., 161 
Willis, Stephen P., 527 
Wilson, Michael, 525 
Winsor, Richard. 113 
Wold, Ingebright A., 521 
Wood, Robert, 479 
Wood, W. D., 261 
Wooding. John, 703 
Wyckoff, Ambrose B., 385 
Wyckoff, Ursula, 160 

Yandell, Henry. 770 
Young, M. H., 426 



REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 

OF 

SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY 



ARTHUR A. DENNY. 



In the year 1898 Arthur Armstrong Denny departed this Hfe, but while 
Seattle stands his memory will be revered and his name will find an hon- 
ored place on the pages of its history, for he was its founder and for al- 
most a half century was connected with the majority of the interests which 
contributed to its welfare and progress. The dangers and privations of 
pioneer life were known to him through experience, but with brave heart 
and determined purpose he met these and persevered in his determination 
to establish a home in the western district. More enduring than a monu- 
ment of stone is the work which he has accomplished in the founding of this 
valuable commonwealth in the Sunset state. 

Mr. Denny was born on the 20th of June, 1822, near Salem, Wash- 
ington county, Indiana, and was of Scotch-Irish descent, his ancestors hav- 
ing originally removed from Scotland to Ireland and thence to America at 
a very early epoch in the history of Pennsylvania. David and Margaret 
were the progenitors of the family in the United States. Their son, Robert 
Denny, the grandfather of our subject, was born in 1753 and served in 
Washington's command in the Revolutionary war. In 1787 he removed to 
Frederick county, Virginia, and about the year 1790 was married to Miss 
Rachel Thomas, who was a daughter of one of the Revolutionary heroes. Not 
long after their nuptials were celebrated they removed to Mercer county, 
Kentucky, where John Denny, the father of our subject, was born on the 
4th of May, 1793. He was reared amid the wild scenes of pioneer life, and 

when in his twentieth year he served his country in the war of j8i2, being 
1 



10 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

a Kentucky volunteer in the regiment commanded by Richard M. John- 
son. He was an ensign in Captain McAfee's company and fought under 
General Harrison, being present at the defeat of General Proctor and at the 
death of the noted Indian Tecumseh, who is said to have been killed by 
Colonel Johnson. In 1816 he removed from Kentucky to Indiana and later 
took up his abode in Illinois, becoming one of the distinguished men of that 
state and a representative in the legislature of 1840-41, being a colleague 
of Lincoln, Yates and Baker. He was originally a Whig, and his opposi- 
tion to slavery led to his identification with the Republican party, which 
was formed to prevent the further extension of slavery into new territory. 
In 185 1 he crossed the plains to Oregon and was the first candidate of his 
party for governor of the state in 1858. He was a most able speaker, strong, 
in argument and logical in his deductions and he kept thoroughly informed 
on all questions concerning the welfare of city, state and nation. He pos- 
sessed an even temperament and a genial disposition and was well fitted 
for leadership. On the 25th of August, 1814, Mr. Denny was married to 
Miss Sarah Wilson, a native of Bladensburg, near Washington, born on 
the 3rd of February, 1797. She was of Scotch lineage, although her peo- 
ple were among the early settlers of America. She departed this life March 
25, 1841, and the honorable and useful career of John Denny was terminated 
in death on the 28th of July, 1875, in the eighty-third year of his age. He 
located in Seattle in 1859 and there spent the remainder of his life. 

It was while the family were residing in Washington county, Indi- 
ana, that Arthur Armstrong Denny was born, and his education was ob- 
tained in a little log schoolhouse in Illinois. He also pursued an academic 
course and learned surveying, a knowledge of which was of much value 
to him in the days of his early residence on Puget Sound. He was married 
on the 23rd of November, 1843, to Miss Mary Ann Boren, and two chil- 
dren were bom to them in Illinois : Cathrine Louisa, who is now the wife 
of George Frederick Frye, of Seattle; and Margaret Lenora, who is residing 
in a beautiful home with her mother in Seattle. It is to the latter that we 
are indebted for the material from which we have compiled the sketch of her 
honored father. 

In 185 1 Mr. Denny crossed the plains to Oregon, accompanied by his 
family. The party started from Illinois on the loth of April, making the 
hazardous journey across the plains with horse teams. They were attacked 
by Indians near the American Falls, but succeeded in escaping and keeping 
the red men at bay, although they were fired upon many times by the sav- 
ages. Perilous incidents were met and hardships endured, but at length 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. xi 

the journey was safely accomplished. For a time the party had no flour, 
and other trials were endured on the long journey, but at length they reached 
Portland, Oregon, on the 22nd of August, 1851. Malaria attacked the 
party, and learning that the health conditions around Puget Sound were 
very much better and desiring to locate near salt water, Mr. Denny decided 
to go to the coast, expecting to be more immune from malarial fever. Ac- 
cordingly he took passage on the vessel Exact, and on the 13th of Decem- 
ber, 1 85 1, was landed on the bank of Elliott bay. It was raining and the 
ladies of the party took shelter in the bushes. It was a dreary prospect 
with the lowering clouds above and a wild new country all around inhab- 
ited by savages and wild beasts. Dangers threatened, but these pioneer 
people had great courage and determination and resolved to make the best 
of the situation. The members of the party, in addition to the Denny fam- 
ily, were John N. Low and his family, C. D. Boren and family, William N. 
Bell and family, and Charles C. Terry. There was also David T. Denny, 
a brother of Arthur Denny, and Lee Terry, making in all twelve adults 
and twelve children. The landing was made at Alki Point, Avhere they 
built log houses. At least fifteen hundred Indians spent the winter in that 
vicinity, some of them occupying part of the ground which the pioneers 
had cleared, but the latter thought it unwise to antagonize the red men by 
refusing the privilege of camping in this district. In the spring Mr. Denny 
and some of his friends began to seek more favorable locations for claims, 
and he accordingly located three hundred and twenty acres of land, upon which 
D portion of the city of Seattle now stands. The party arrived just too late 
to receive the benefit of the six hundred-and-forty-acre donation act, the 
amount of a claim having been reduced one half only a short time before. 
On this property his first log house was built on the bluff at the mouth of 
the gulch, which extends to the bay in front of where Bell Hotel was after- 
ward built. This proved an inconvenient place for the little home and 
shortly afterward Mr. Denny built a residence where Frye's Opera House is 
now located. 

Pioneer conditions existed; the mail was brought to the little colony 
by express at a cost of twenty-five cents per letter, and the last mail that 
was delivered in that way contained twenty-two letters and fourteen news- 
papers. A postofiice was then established. Mr. Denny was appointed post- 
master and cared for the mail in his little log cabin for several years. His 
next residence was a frame house of six rooms and for 3^ears this was 
headquarters for all new comers. As the city grew he subdivided his land, 
made several additions to the town and as the property increased in value 



12 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

his wealth hkewise proportionately grew, and he became one of the most 
substantial residents of Seattle. He made judicious investments in prop- 
erty, and his careful management and keen business sagacity resulted in 
the acquirement of a handsome estate. It was in Oregon that Mr. Denny's 
eldest son Roland was born on the 2nd of September, 1851, only a short 
time after the arrival of the family, and he was but an infant when they 
came to Seattle. In the city schools he was educated and has been identi- 
fied with the growth and development of the city, and now has charge of 
his father's large estate. The second son, Orion, was born :n Seattle and is 
now extensively engaged in the manufacture of vitrified brick and tile. 
Another son, Arthur Wilson, was born in Seattle and is a book and sta- 
tionery merchant, while the youngest son, Charles, is a member of the 
Denny Blaine Land Company, doing a large real-estate business. The fam- 
ily has ever been one of the most honored, respected and prominent in 
Seattle, the sons sharing in the work of the father and continuing it since 
his death. 

Mr. Denny was a life-long Republican and from the time of "his ar- 
rival in Washington took an active part in political affairs. He was elected 
a member of the first legislature of the territory and was also elected a 
delegate to the United States congress, where he did much for the terri- 
tory in promoting its interests and welfare. During the early years of his 
residence he was identified with business affairs of the city as a merchant 
and later became a member of the firm of Dexter, Horton & Company, 
bankers, owners of the first bank of Seattle. This institution did a large 
and successful business, but it did not claim all of Mr. Denny's attention, 
for he was known as an active factor in nearly every enterprise that contrib- 
uted to the growth, progress and prosperity of the city. He gave all of his 
time, means and influence for its promotion. He assisted in organizing 
the First Methodist church, and for years was an active member of that 
denomination, but in his later days was more closely identified with the 
Congregational church. He always took a deep interest in all religious 
work and was ever ready to assist in Christian and educational enterprises. 
At this point it would be almost tautological to enter into any series of 
statements as showing Mr. Denny to have been a man of broad intelli- 
gence and genuine public spirit, for these have been shadowed forth between 
the lines of this review. Strong in his individuality, he never lacked the 
courage of his convictions, but there existed as dominating elements in this 
individuality a lively human sympathy and an abiding charity, which, as 
taken in connection with the sterling integrity and honor of his character, 
have naturally gained to him the respect and confidence of men. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 13 

ROBERT BROOKE ALBERTSON. 

* 

i 

Earnest offort, close application and the exercise of his native talents 
have won Robert B. Albertson prestige as a Seattle lawyer, a fact which is 
highly complimentary, for no bar has numbered more eminent and prominent 
men. He is to-day a member of the law firm of Lewis Haj-din and Albertson, 
his partners being Colonel James Hamilton Lewis and Thomas B. Hardin. 

Mr. Albertson was born in Hertford, North Carolina, December 21, 
1859. His ancestors emigrated from Amsterdam more than two hundred 
years ago and for several generations the family has been represented in the 
old North state. Elias Albertson, the great-grandfather of our subject, was 
born in that state on the 24th of September, 1763, and became an influential 
and leading citizen, who served as inspector of revenues under the first admin- 
istration, being appointed by President George Washington in 1792. His 
son, Anthony Albertson, the grandfather of our subject, was also a native of 
North Carolina and became a prominent citizen and planter, who died about 
the beginning of the Civil war, in the seventieth year of his age. Jonathan 
White Albertson, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Per- 
quimans county, North Carolina, September 5, 1826. On the eighth day of 
January, 1854, he married Miss Catherine Fauntleroy Pescud, of Petersburg, 
Virginia. Her maternal grandfather was Peter Francisco, who won fame 
in the Revolutionary war. He possessed phenomenal strength and was an 
expert swordsman. Enlisting in the Revolutionary war, he distinguished 
himself for valor and ability as a fighter, and his efforts proved greatly detri- 
mental to the enemy. li: is known that in a certain charge he engaged six 
British soldiers at one time and succeeded in slaying all of them. He said 
he could rest better after he had killed a number of the enemies of his country. 
He was such a valiant and brave soldier and accomplished so much for the 
colonial cause that the legislature of his state rendered thanks to him by reso- 
lution. In the early history of the Albertson family all were identified with 
the Society of Friends. In ante-bellum days Jonathan W. Albertson opposed 
the secession movement urged by the south, but after the war was inaugurated 
he endorsed the course of his native section, although he did not enter the 
army. In religious faith he became an Episcopalian, although reared as a 
member of the Society of Friends. A lawyer of marked ability, he was con- 
nected with much of the important litigation tried in the courts of this dis- 
trict and won eminence as a member of the bar. He served as prosecuting 
attorney of his district, was judge of the- Superior court and was United 
States attorney under President Hayes. He also was a member of the legis- 



14 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

lature, and of the constiUitional convention of North CaroHna, and he left 
the impress of his individuahty upo'n the organic law of his state. Unto the 
parents of our subject were born six children, of whom five are yet living. 
One of the sons is Jonathan W., telegraph editor of the Post Intelligencer 
of Seattle, and Thomas E. is a soldier in the Philippines. The father of this 
family died in 1898 at the age of seventy-two years, but the mother is yet 
living in North Carolina at the age of seventy-five years. 

Robert Brooke Albertson was educated in the University of North Caro- 
lina, being graduated in 1881 with the degree of Ph. B. He studied law 
in the same university and was admitted to the bar by the supreme court of 
North Carolina on the 6th of February, 1883. Since that time he has been 
admitted to practice in all of the courts of the United States. In the fall 
succeeding his admission he came to Seattle. He had no means, and in order 
to provide for his support he accepted employment at piling lumber for the 
Seattle and Commercial Mill Company, later spending six months as city 
editor of the Seattle Morning Chronicle, and for two years he was a law 
clerk, first employed in that capacity in the office of Burke & Raisin, and 
afterward in the office of Struve, Haines & McMicken. In 1885 he entered 
into a law partnership with George Hyde Preston and later became a mem- 
ber of the firm of Lewis, Flardin & Albertson. Mr. Albertson is widely 
known as a talented and reliable attorney. His practice is extensive and of an 
important character. Pie is remarkable among lawyers for the wide re- 
search and provident care vvdth which he prepares his cases. 

On the 24th of August, 1892, Mr. Albertson was married to Miss Nancy 
De Wolfe, a native of Charlotte, North Carolina, and a daughter of Captain 
F. S. De Wolfe, who was formerly a ma}-or of that city and is now a resident 
of Seattle. Our subject and his wife hold membership in the Episcopal 
church and are very highly esteemed by a host of warm friends. Mr. Albert- 
son is acknowledged to be one of the most active, influential and prominent 
members of the Republican party in the city. He has served w4th mucli 
ability as chairman of the King county Republican central committee, filling 
the office until 1889. In that year he was elected corporation counsel of 
Seattle, was elected a representative from the Forty-second district of the 
state legislature in 1895 and re-elected in 1900. He was nominated by his 
party while absent at Nome, Alaska, the nomination being made without his 
solicitation or knowledge. He was unanimously endorsed by the King 
county delegation for speaker of the house, to winch position he was elected, 
and in that place of high lionor and responsibility he displayed such executive 
force and thorough knowledge of pariiamentnry usage as to win the com- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 15 

mendation not only of his own party, but of tlie opposition as well. He was 
also speaker at the special session held in June, 1901. Mr. Albertson is a 
member of the Sons of the American Revolution, having first been identified 
with the Maryland chapter and now with the Washington chapter, of which 
he is the historian. He belonged to the old hook and ladder company of the 
city up to the time when a paid hrc company was installed. For five years he 
was a member of the Washington state m.ilitia and served with ability during 
the Chinese riots in 1887. He is the present chancellor commander of the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity, and is one of the honored citizens of the city 
'.vhere he has won prominence at the bar and as a statesman, 

FRANK M. MULDOON. 

Frank M. Muldoon, an ex-member of the city council of Seattle, is a 
progressive and well known business man of the city, where he has made 
his home for the past fourteen years, and during all this time he has been 
prominently identified with the real-estate interests, both on his own account 
and for eastern capitalists. He was born in Montpelier, Vermont, on the 
6th of December, 1848. His great-grandfather in the paternal line came to 
this country from Ireland, and was the progenitor of the family on American 
soil. He took up his abode on a farm in Keysville, New York, there spending 
the remainder of his life. His son, John Muldoon, was born in that city, and 
he, too, became an industrious and respected agriculturist, spending his en- 
tire life in the town in which he was born, his death occurring at the age of 
eighty-four years. His son, Thomas B. Muldoon, became the father of our 
subject, and he also claimed Keysville as the place of his nativity, being there 
born in 1820. He subsequently removed to Montpelier, Vermont, where he 
learned the carriage manufacturer's trade, and was there married to Miss 
Maria Daggett, a native of that city. She was of Scotch and English 
ancestry, and for many generations her ancestors had resided in the Green 
Mountain state. In 1854 Mr. and Mrs. Muldoon took up their abode in 
Madison, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the manufacture of carriages and 
farm implements, in parmership with Daniel JM. Thurston, the father of 
United States Senator Thurston, where he remained ten years, afterward 
removing to Hammond, that state, there ijecoming one of the most extensive 
farmers and land owners in that section of the state. He gave close attention 
to his business interests, and the measure of his influence upon the best devel- 
opment of his locality was widely felt. For m.any years he held the ofiice 
of alderman of his city. He was called to his final rest in 1870, at the age 



i6 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

of fifty years, passing away in the faith of the Episcopal church, of which he 
was long a worthy and consistent rnen.iber. His wife died in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, in 1885, when she had reached the age of sixty-one years. Unto 
this worthy couple were born six children, of whom three still survive. 

Frank M. Muldoon, the only representative of the above described family 
on the Pacific coast, received his education n^ the State University at Madi- 
son, Wisconsin, and after leaving that institution assisted his father in his 
extensive farming operations until 1870. In that year, in Hammond, Wis- 
consin, he embarked in the hardware and machinery' business, later continu- 
ing the same occupation in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and his business rela- 
tions were carried on in partnership with his brother, James D. Muldoon. 
In the latter city our subject was also engaged in the real-estate business, and 
he was in St. Paul, Minnesota, before the advent of the railroads into that 
section. Owing to the ill health of his family he thought it advisable to seek 
a change of climate, and accordingly, in 1888, he came to Seattle. Washing- 
ton, where he has ever since been actively and deeply interested in the growth 
and development of the city. Throughout his residence here he has been 
numbered among the leading real-estate dealers of the northwest, and in this 
line of business his services have been of incalculable value to Seattle and the 
surrounding country. After a residence here of only one year he was hon- 
ored by his fellow citizens by being made a member of the city council, and 
he has since been the incumbent of that important position, which proves that 
his services therein have been trustworthy and capable. He was prominent 
in advocating the cutting down of the great Denny Hill and using the con- 
tents to fill in the water front and also in opening the streets through it to 
the north. As chairman of the street committee this proposition was his, 
and he is entitled to the full credit of this great improvement. At his own 
expense he has recently made a trip to the eastern cities, gathering valuable 
data in regard to the methods of street improvement, bridge building, sewer 
construction, the care of garbage and all such subjects, and this service has 
been of great value in improving the streets of Seattle. To him is accorded 
the honor of having platted and placed on sale the ]\larket street addition to 
the city, which has been largely sold and improved, and he is now entrusted 
with the business of various eastern capitalists, making investments for them 
and caring for their real estate. 

In 1874 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. ]\Iuldoon and ^liss Sarah 
L. Ducolon, a native of the Empire state. Two children have come to 
brighten and bless their home — Jay F. and AJlie B. The family reside in a 
beautiful home in Seattle and are members of the Baptist church. ]\Ir. Mul- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 1.7 

doon is a member of belli branches of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and has retained his membership in his lodge in the east, with which 
he has been identified for (.hirty years. He is also a member of the order of 
Ben Hur, and in politics is a life-long- Republican. He has earned for him- 
self an enviable reputation as a careful man of business, always known for 
his prompt and honorable methods of dealing, which have won him the 
deserved and unbounded confidence of his fellow men. 

MICHAEL S. DREW. 

Michael S. Drew, one of the highly esteemed pioneer citizens of 
Seattle, is numbered among the native sons of the Pine Tree state, his birth 
having occurred in Machias, Maine, on the 5th of January, 1827. His par- 
ents were Alexander and Zylpha (Small) Drew, both of whom were natives 
of Maine and Congregationalists in religious faith. The father was a car- 
penter and farmer, whose life was characterized by industry and uprightness. 
He died in 1833 at the age of forty-five years, and of the ten children born 
of his marriage only three are now living, although all attained to a good old 
age. As the family was large and the financial resources were limited, Michael 
S. Drew had little opportunity to secure an education, but as the years passed 
he gained much general information, constantly adding to his knowledge in 
the school of experience. He earned his own living from a very early age. 
He remained in Machias, Maine, until he attained the age of fifteen, and 
at that time he had depended upon his own resources for nine years. He first 
worked in a lathe mill, receiving twenty-five cents per day, and continued 
in the lumber business until as he grew in size and capability he acquired 
a complete knowledge of the lumber business in all its departments. In 
1848, having attained his majority, he came to the west upon the tide of 
emigration, which was still flowing toward the setting sun. On reaching 
Minnesota he was pleased with that state and took up his abode at St. An- 
thony Falls, then a new town, having just been established upon the western 
frontier. He had made the journey part of the way overland and part of 
the way by means of the rivers and lakes, as no railroads extended in the west- 
ern district at that time. While enroute he camped at Chicago, which was 
then but a small town, a tract of swamp land constituting the site of what is 
now he second city of the Union. 

In Minnesota Mr. Drew engaged in lumbering, but the discovery of gold 
in California attracted him to the far west, and he resolved to seek the Eldo- 
rado of the west, hoping that he might readily gain a fortune upon the Pacific 



1 8 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

coast. In order to reach that country he made his way to New York city 
where he took passage in a ship to San Francisco, going by way of Panama. 
He reached his destination in safety on the 26th of October, 1852, and had 
about five cents left when he landed. For fourteen months he was engaged 
in placer-mining in Nevada, meetrng with success and making considerable 
money. He also worked in a sav/mill in Grass Valley, being paid four 
hundred dollars per month in conjpensation for his services. He continued 
in that position for two years and then spent a year in the Red Woods, near 
Redwood city, California. At one time he had eighteen hundred dollars in 
California slugs, worth fifty dollars each. Later he went to the middle and 
more southerly mining districts of California and there spent what he had 
previously saved. In 1855 he returned to San Francisco and secured a 
passage on the bark Live Yankees, in which he sailed to Port Gamble, arriv- 
ing on the 22nd of September, 1855. There he obtained work with the 
Puget Mill Company as saw-liler, and after two years was promoted to the 
position of assistant foreman under Cyrus Walker, now a wealthy and re- 
spected pioneer of the state. 

Mr. Drew continued in that capacity until 1871, at which time he was 
appointed collector of customs of the Puget Sound district by President 
Grant, filling the position capably for two years, during which time he resided 
at Port Townsend. He then resigned and returned to Port Gamble, again 
resuming his position w^ith the mill company, with which he continued until 
J 890, when he was elected a member of the first state legislature of Wash- 
ington. He removed to Seattle, taking up his abode in the comfortable 
and commodious residence in which he has ever since lived. When in the 
legislature he was an active and valued member, doing all in his power to 
promote the best interest-i of the state. At the close of his term of service 
he returned to Seattle, where he has largely, lived a retired life, although he 
has dealt to some extent on his own account in city property and has engaged 
in loaning money. 

Mr. Drew was married on the 13th of October, 1864, to Miss Susan 
Isabella Biles, a native of Yazoo county, Mississippi, and a daughter of James 
Biles, a planter belonging to an old Virginian family. He brought a large 
emigrant train to Washington in 1853, Olympia being their destination. 
He had married Miss Nancy Carter, a southern lady, and was accompanied 
by his wife and their seven children on the journey to the northwest in 1853. 
Mr. Biles was a strong temperance man and a devoted member of the Meth- 
odist Church. He was also a prominent Mason and took a very active part 
in organizing the first Masonic lodge in the territory of Washington, travel- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. i9 

ing over this portion of the country and installing lodges at various places. 
He died at the age of seventy-six years and was buried at Olympia, his 
good wife surviving for some time and passing away in the eighty-fourth 
year of her age. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Drew have been bom seven children, 
three of whom are living. Fred, a practicing dentist, died at the age of 
twenty-five years, leaving a wife and one child. He was prominent in his 
profession, was highly esteemed and his loss was very deeply felt by his 
family and many friends. One daughter, Abbie, is a musician of note, 
having studied in Europe and Boston. Edward L. is a partner in the man- 
agement of the Third Avenue Theater of Seattle. Cyrus Walker is in the 
Seattle Hardware store, one of the large wholesale and retail establishments 
of this city. 

Mr. Drew received the sublime degree of a Master Mason in 1858 at 
Port Gamble, and is past master of his lodge, still retaining active member- 
ship there. He has remained upon the Pacific coast for more than half a 
century, being a pioneer of California and Washington. He has contributed 
in a large measure to the development of the mining and industrial interests 
of the northwest and through legitimate channels of business has attained 
very creditable success. 

Edward L. Drew, to whom we are largely indebted for the facts con- 
tained in this biographical sketch, was born at Port Townsend September 
2, 1 87 1. He was educated in the public schools and in the State University 
of Washington, and was engaged in the lumber business until 1893, at which 
time he became a partner in the management of the Third Avenue Theater, 
being associated with Mr. Russell in this enterprise in which they are meet- 
ing with marked success. He is a member of the Woodman of the World and 
of the Knights of Pythias fraternity, and is a young man of excellent busi- 
ness and executive ability, popular and esteemed in Seattle. 

MANSON F. BACKUS,. 

Manson F. Backus, president of the Washington National Bank, is one 
of the most enterprising and successful business men of Seattle. He was 
bom in South Livonia, Livingston county, New York, on the nth of May, 
1853, and is of old English ancestry, the family having been established in 
Saybrook, Connecticut, in 1635. They became prominent in the early his- 
tory of New England, and from that section of the country representatives 
of the name removed to New York. John Backus, the grandfather of our 
subject, was born in Washington county, in tliat state, whence he early 



20 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

removed to Livingston county. Here be followed the life of a frugal, indu«?- 
trious farmer, and attained the advanced age of eighty-eight years. His 
son, Clinton T. Backus, the father of our subject, was born in South Livonia, 
Livingston county, and became a stock raiser, raising and dealing in fine 
horses and cattle. In 1S59 he removed to Union Springs, New York, where 
he was engaged in the milling business until 1863, at which time he pur- 
chased a large interest in a gA-psum mine. He was engaged in that line of 
work throughout the remainder of his life, and under his management the 
various g}^psum mines and mills were consolidated under the name of the 
Cayuga Plaster Company. In 1865 he was associated with Gen. William 
H. Seward, Jr., Gen. Henry W. Slocum, E. P. Ross, J. N. Napp and others, 
m the organization of the Merchants Union Express Company, which was 
subsequently consolidated with the American Express Company, and of the 
latter Mr. Backus was a director for many years. In 1866 he became a 
stockholder in the First National Bank of Union Springs, New York, and 
was president of the institution until 1890, at v/hich time he liquidated the 
bank and continued the business as a private banking house. Although 
extensively connected with manufacturing and financial affairs, he always 
maintained his interest in farming and stock raising, and continued business 
along that line until the time of his death. At his death he was the largest 
land owner in his town, and his chief pleasure consisted of visiting his vari- 
ous farms and inspecting the fine stock raised thereon. He was a gentleman 
of superior executive ability and keen discrimination, and his business judg- 
ment was rarely at fault. He carried forward to successful completion 
whatever he undertook, and his wise counsel proved a potent element in the 
conduct of many profitable concerns. He departed this life September 5, 
1897, at the age of seventy years, and over the record of his career there falls 
no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. He left to his family not only a 
handsome competence, bur an untarnished name. 

In 185 1 yi. Backus v.-as united in marriage to Aliss Harriet N. Groes- 
beck, a native of Rensselaer county, New York, born in 1828. They had 
two children, a daughter and a son; the mother died in 1854. 

Manson Franklin Backus pursued his education in Oakwood Seminary, 
at Union Springs, and graduated from that institution with the class of 1871. 
He then attended the Cetitral New York Conference Seminar}- at Cazenovia, 
New York, and is one of its graduates of the class of 1872. Upon the com- 
pletion of his literary course he entered the employ of the First National 
Bank of Union Springs. In 1874 he was appointed teller and the following 
year became cashier, a position which he filled acceptably and continuously 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 21 

until 1888, when he determined to improve the excellent opportunities offered 
by the northwest and ally himself with the business interests of Washington. 
Accordingly, he came to Seattle in 1889, and in connection with others or- 
ganized the Washington National Bank, of which he served as the cashier 
and chief executive officer until 1897, when he was chosen vice-president. In 
1900 he was elected president. The bank has always been conducted along 
most conservative lines, and its growth and success are quite remarkable, its 
deposits now aggregating three and one-half million dollars, while its sur- 
plus and undivided profits are equal to three times its capital. This result 
has largely been attained through the personality and energy of Mr. Backus. 
Other business interests have also profited by his managerial ability; while 
in Union Springs he had ihe management of the plaster company from 1879 
to 1888, during which tmie its business increased tenfold. Mr. Backus 
studied law as an accomplishment, and was admitted to the bar at Buffalo, 
New York. He was appointed postmaster at Union Springs by President 
Garfield in 188 1, In 1893 he was appointed by the United States Court 
receiver of the Seattle Consolidated Street Railway Company, and also of the 
Rainier Power and Railway Company, two of the largest corporations in the 
state of Wasliington. He is now (1902; president of the Seattle Clearing 
House Association, and was a member of the clearing house committee 
\vhich was instrumental in carrying the Seattle banks through the panic of 
1893 without a failure among its members. In November, 1896, in con- 
nection with Mr. E. O. Graves, he organized the banking house of Graves 
& Backus, the firm afterward becoming Graves, Backus & Purdy. This 
institution is located at \Vhatconi, Washington, and has been remarkably 
successful. Mr. Backus is also a director of the Columbia & Puget Sound 
Railway Company. It will thus be seen that his business connections are 
of a comprehensive and important cliaracter. 

In April, 1873, Mr. Backus was united in marriage to Miss Emma C. 
Yawger, who died in 18S4, leaving two children, Irene, now the wife of Dr. 
R. M. Harlan, of New York; and Leroy M., a graduate of Harvard Uni- 
versity, class of 1902. In 1886 Mr. Backus was again married, his second 
union being with Miss Lue Adams, of King Ferry, New York, who died 
in February, 1901. Socially he is connected with the Rainier and several 
other clubs. In his politics he is a Republican, but aside from exercising 
his right of franchise in support of the men and measures in which he be- 
lieves, he has taken no active part in political affairs since coming to Wash- 
ington. He is a liberal contributor to local charities and public enterprises, 
and has done his full share toward promoting the prosperity of his adopted 



22 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

city. Honored and respected, few men in Seattle occupy a more enviable 
position than Manson F. Backus in mercantile and financial circles, not alone 
on account of the success he has achieved, but also on account of the hon- 
orable, straightforward business policy he has followed. He possesses un- 
tiring energ}', is quick of perception, forms his plans readily, is determined 
in their execution, and his close application to business and his excellent man- 
agement have brought him the high degree of prosperity which he at present 
enjoys. He has demonstrated that success is not the result of genius, but 
the outcome of judgment, vigilance and hard work. 

CHARLES J. SMITH. 

Charles Jackson Smith belongs to the little group of distinctively rep- 
resentative business men who have been the pioneers in inaugurating and 
building up the chief industries of this section of the country. He early had 
the sagacity and prescience to discern the affluence which the future had in 
store for this great and growing countr}% and, acting in accordance with 
the dictates of his faith and judgment, he has garnered, in the fullness of 
time, the generous harvest which is the just recompence of industry, integ- 
rity and enterprise. He is now connected with many extensive and import- 
ant business interests of a private nature and has earned the proud Ameri- 
can title of a self-made man, for all that he has is the reward of his own 
enterprise and industry. 

Charles Jackson Smith was born in Nicholasville, Jessamine county, 
Kentucky, on the 13th of ]\Iarch, 1854, and is of Scotch-Irish lineage. His 
paternal grandfather emigrated to New York in 1795, while the maternal 
grandfather became a resident of North Carolina, whence he removed to 
Kentucky, settling in the Blue Grass state during its pioneer days. Charles 
F. Smith, the father of our subject, was born in Easton, Delaware county, 
New York, in the year 181 3, and was united in marriage to Miss O. A. 
Jackson, whose birth occurred in Kentucky in 1826. The wedding took place 
in the Empire state, whither the bride had removed with her parents. Mr. 
and ]\Irs. Smith remained in New York until 1857, when they took up their 
abode in Kansas City, Missouri, where they passed the residue of their days, 
the father dying in 1877 at the age of sixty-four years. He was a mer- 
chant and for a time served as internal revenue collector. Four of the five 
children are yet living and Mrs. Smith still survives in her seventy-fifth 
year, her home being at Portland, Oregan. Like her husband, she holds 
membership in the Presbyterian church and since coming to the northwest 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 23 

has made many warm friends, who esteem her highly for her lovable traits 
of character. Two of her sons, L. E. and Charles J., are residents of Seattle. 

The latter pursued his education in private schools of Kansas City and 
is a graduate of Blackburn University of Carlinville, Illinois. Soon after 
the completion of his literary course, he became connected with railroad serv- 
ice as a clerk in the motive power department of the Kansas City, Missouri 
River, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad Company. He was promoted to the audit- 
ing department and did the auditing of the Leavenworth, Lawrence & Gal- 
veston Railroad. In 1878 he became auditor for both roads and soon after- 
ward the auditing departments of those roads and of the Kansas City, St. 
Joseph & Council Bluffs and the Atchison, Nebraska Railroads were removed 
to Kansas City and consolidated in one office — Mr. Smith being made assist- 
ant auditor of the consolidated department. 

It was in the year 1880 that our subject became a resident of the north- 
west, at which time he removed to Portland, Oregon, and accepted the 
position of assistant comptroller of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Com- 
pany. The following year he was made comptroller of the company and 
of the Oregon Improvement Company, and in 1886 he went to New York 
city as secretary and treasurer of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Com- 
pany, the Oregon Improvement Company, and the Oregon & Transconti- 
nental Company. Soon after this the Oregon Railroad was leased to the 
Union Pacific and the Oregon & Transcontinental Company had a change of 
management. Mr. Smith then left New York for Omaha to become gen- 
eral land commissioner for the Union Pacific Company, continuing in that 
capacity until 1889, at which time he returned to Portland, Oregon, as gen- 
eral manager of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company. There he 
remained until 1890, when he came to Seattle and was made vice-president 
and general manager of the Oregon Improvement Company, which posi- 
tion he filled continuously until 1895, when he was appointed receiver of 
the company, acting in that capacity until 1897. He was then appointed 
general manager of the Pacific Coast Company, the successor of the Oregon 
Improvement Company, but in January, 1899, he left the company and has 
since given his attention to the supervision of his private interests. He is con- 
nected with a wholesale mercantile house in Portland, is also interested in 
milling and coal mining and has various other enterprises of importance. 
He is a gentleman of wide experience and marked executive ability and his 
business career proves conclusively what a power in the industrial world are 
enterprise, resolution and straight-forward business methods. 

In 1880 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Smith and Miss Elizabeth 



24 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

McMullen, a native of Bloomington, Illinois, and unto them have been born 
five children, Myra, Elizabeth, Katharine, Charles Howard and Prescott 
Kirkland. The family are Presbyterians in religious faith and are held in 
high esteem, while their home is the center of a cultured society circle. As 
a Republican Mr. Smith takes a deep and abiding interest in the growth and 
success of his party and does everything in his power to secure reform in 
municipal government. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and 
is a most public-spirited citizen, co-operating in all measures for the general 
good. 

ORVILL J. BELL. 

One of the prominent and respected citizens of Seattle is Orvill J Bell, 
a man whose history furnishes a splendid example of what may be accom- 
plished through determined purpose, laudable ambition and well directed 
efforts. Starting at the very bottom round of the ladder, he has steadily 
worked his way upword, gaining success and winning the public confidence. 

Mr. Bell was born in Calhoun county, Michigan, on the 12th of Febru- 
ary, 1847, and is of Scotch and Irish ancestry. His grandfather, Andrew 
Bell, was bom in Scotland and came with his father to America, they be- 
coming early pioneers of Calhoun county, Michigan, where they secured 
twelve hundred acres of land. They became well and favorably known 
among the early settlers of that part of the state, and were prominent mem- 
bers of the Baptist church. The grandfather filled many positions of honor 
and trust in his locality. The father of our subject, Allison A. Bell, was 
born in Erie county, New York, in 1820, and as a life occupation he fol- 
lowed farming and merchandising. For some years he made his home at 
Olivet, Michigan, where he was connected with the college of that place, and 
was an active Republican in the early history of that party. He married 
Miss Mary Fish, also of Erie county, New York, and their union was blessed 
with two sons, — Merton A., now deceased; and Orvill J. The father was 
called from this life in the forty-fifth year of his age, and his loving wife 
passed away at the early age of twenty-seven years. 

Or\'ill J. Bell received an excellent education in Olivet College, and 
when the time came for him to assume the duties of life on his own re- 
sponsibility he engaged in the tilling of the soil. In 1863, when the great 
Civil war was at its height and the demand for volunteers became urgent, 
this lad of seventeen years offered his services to his country, and in the 
Sixth Michigan Artillery he rendered valuable aid in the preservation of 



THE NEW YORK 

fUBUCUBRART 



AtTMl, LBNOK AN* 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 25 

ihe Union. He participated in the engagements in the vicinity of Mobile, 
at Fort Morgan and Fort Gains. While engaged in service he received a sun- 
stroke, from the effects of which he has ne\'er fully recovered, but he con- 
tinued at his post of duty and at the close of the war received an honorable 
discharge. He served his country faithfully and well, and his war record is 
one of which he has every reason to be proud. Since the war liis business 
interests have been varied, and for the first few years after its close he fol- 
lowed the life of -an agriculturist, while for a time thereafter he was engaged 
in the boot and shoe business. While a resident of Crawford county he was 
elected on the Republican ticket to the office of county clerk and register 
of deeds, thus serving for six years, and during that time be also read law 
under the preceptorship of Judge J. B. Tuttle. Admitted to "he i^ar in 1889, 
be then began the practice of his chosen profession, and a short time after- 
ward was elected by his fellow townsmen to the position of prosecuting 
attorney of Crawford county. On account of impaired health, however, 
he was obliged to seek a change of climate, ajid he accordingly came to Se- 
attle, casting in his lot with the citizens of this favored section in 1893. 
He was thus obliged to resign the office he was so ably filling, and he arrived 
in this city entirely without means, but by indomitable perseverance he has 
worked his way upward from comparative obscurity to a position of afflu- 
ence. His first work here was in preparing kindling wood, for which he 
received ten cents a basket, and in a short time he was able to carry on this 
business in a wholesale way, supplying the grocery houses of the city. In 
1895, however, his business was destroyed by fire, and he was again obliged 
to begin at the bottom round of the ladder, this time embarking m the cigar 
and tobacco business. In the same year he also engaged ni the manufac- 
ture of apple cider and vinegar at 601 First avenue, south, beginning the 
business with a small hand press, but he now does both a wholesale and 
retail business. His success is largely due to his capable management, ex- 
ecutive ability, untiring efforts and firm purpose, and as the architect of his 
own fortune he has builded wisely and well. 

The marriage of Mr. Bell was celebrated in 1869, when Miss Sarah 
E. Porter became his wife. She is a native of Jackson county, Michigan, 
and is of Scotch and Pennsylvania Dutch ancestiy. Three children have 
been born unto this union, — Frank A., the prosecuting- attorney of j\Iar- 
quette county, Michigan; E. W., an insurance man in the same county; 
and Harry P., who is engaged in business with his father. Mr. Bell is 
independent in his political views, voting for the men whom he regards as 
best qualified to fill positions of honor and trust, and he is a member of the 



26 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Masonic fraternity, holding membership in both the blue lodge and chapter. 
He is also connected with the Knights of Pythias, the Foresters, the Star 
of Bethlehem and the Grand Army of the Republic. 

GEORGE FREDERICK FRYE. 

One of the most prominent and influential pioneer settlers who has long 
been connected with Seattle and her history is George Frederick Frye, who 
arrived on the site of this beautiful and progressive city in 1853. He is 
a native of Germany, his birth having occurred in Weiser, Hanover, on the 
15th of June, 1833. Fie represents an old German family. His father, 
Otto Frye,. was born in that country and passed his entire life there. For 
a number of years he served as burgomaster of his town and was a promi- 
nent and respected citizen. He married Sophia Pranga, also a native of 
the same locality. They were members of the Lutheran church, faithful 
to its teachings and were recognized as people of the highest respectability 
and moral worth. The father lived to be sixty-nine years of age, and the 
mother passed away in 1857. In their family were ten children. 

George Frederick Frye was their seventh son, and in his native land 
he pursued his education until he had attained the age of sixteen years, when 
he emigrated to the new world. This was in 1849, ^'^'^^ ^'^^ made his way to 
the United States that he might have l^etter business opportunities in this 
land. He located in Lafayette, Missouri, where his sister was then living, 
and iDcgan work as a farn: hand at eight dollars per month. He was indus- 
trious, honest and frugal and was willing to perform any service that would 
yield him an honest living. He became an expert driver of oxen, and this 
rendered his services peculiarly valuable in tlie new country where he lived. 
He was but nineteen years of age when, ni 1852, he engaged to drive four 
yoke of oxen across the plains to Oregon in order to pay his passage. ^Ihere 
were nine deaths in the party ere they reached their destination, for it was 
the year of the great cholera scourge, and along the line of travel were many 
newly-made graves. The part}^ suffei'ed the usual hardships and trials inci- 
dent to the trip. Their stock was at one time stampeded but they succeeded 
in recovering them, and in September the party arrived safely in Dallas, Ore- 
gon. Mr. Frye spent the winter there in charge of the stock belonging to 
Mr. Hayes, with whom he had made the journey, but most of the cattle died. 
In January, 1853, he r'eached Portland. Oregon. It was his intention at the 
cutset of the journey to go to the gold fields of California, but, like other 
members of the party, he was induced to make Oregon his destination. He 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 27 

spent three months in Portland, and during that time he used np tlie capital 
which he had hrought with him. He then secured work in a livery stable 
at twenty-five dollars per month and board. It was small wages but much 
better than being idle, and as lie did not have to pay his living expenses he was 
enabled to save some money. In the spring, in company with A. H. Butler, 
who had crossed the plains with him, he made his way to Olympia, Wash- 
ington. They took with them oxen with v.-hich to engage in getting out 
piles. They were accompanied by J. Enn.is and E. M. Smithers, and, having 
no trouble with the Indians, they arrived safeh^ at Alki Point, where Mr. 
Frye secured work at three dollars per day. 

In 1855, however, the Indians began to threaten war and he was one 
of the volunteers who offered to protect the white settlers. At the time 
of the Indian attack on Seattle he was stationed at that place. He had 
assisted in building the tort there and in sav/ing the lumber in the sawmill 
which was used in the construction of this house of defense. He was very 
active and helpful all during the time when great danger threatened the 
little settlement. After the vvar he operated the Yesler sawmill for almost 
ten years, and during six years of that time was in partnership with Arthur 
A. Denny as proprietor of the mill, the firm name being Denny & Company. 

On the 25th of October, i860, Mr. Frye was united in marriage to Miss 
Louisa C. Denny, a daughter of A. A. Denny. He was one of Seattle's first 
settlers and a citizen of very high reputation and influence who rightfully 
acquired the name of "father of the town." After their marriage Mr. Frye 
built a small house on the present site of the Stevens hotel. He had a 
tract of land there, forty feet square, for which he paid two hundred dollars. 
Their first home in Seattle was not a pretentious one, as it contained only 
three small rooms, but it was a pioneer period when luxuries and con- 
veniences were almost unknown and other buildings of the town were scarcely 
any better, while many were not so commodious. Mr. Frye opened a meat 
market and in his new enterprise met with a high degree of prosperity. He 
also established a bakery, and in this enterprise Mr. Denny was his partner. 
He applied himself so closelv to his work, howe\'er. that his health failed and 
he was obliged to dispose of his bakery and abandon business for a long 
time in order to regain his lost sirength. ^'Vhen he was once more able to 
become an active' factor in industrial circles lie engaged in steam-boating on 
the J. B. Libby. His first position was that of purser, but finally he became 
captain and commanded the boat for four years, during which time he was 
also mail agent, carrying the mail from Seattle to Whatcom and Sameyami, 
making one trip a week. During a period of very high water he almost 



2 8 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

lost liis boat, which ran aground, and the expense of getting the vessel off 
amounted to ten thousand dollars. 

Some time after this Mr. rrve obtained three hundred acres of land 
on White river and was engaged \\\ raising h^iy and stock, also devoting 
considerable attention to the making of butter. Later, however, he sold 
the farm for seven thousand dollars and returned to Seattle, where, in com- 
pany with Z^Ir. Denny, he conductea a tiiisiiop. When he retired from that 
business he became a stockholder in a co-operation store of which he was 
placed in charge, conducting the business for about four years. He was then 
again taken ill and for a long time was in poor health. In 1884 he erected 
the Frye Opera Hall, a large building one hundred and twenty by one hun- 
dred and twenty feet. It was built of brick and was the first opera house in 
the town, but in the great five of iSSq it was destroyed, causing him a loss 
of about eighty thousand dollars. He Avas ill at the time of the conflagra- 
tion but recovered so soon afterward that his friends often laughingly claim 
that the fire cured him. In the work of reclaiming Seattle after its destruc- 
tion he built the hotel Stevens, one of the finest blocks in the city, and is still 
its owner. He is also one-fourth OAvner of the Northern Hotel, which is a 
splendid business structure, and in addition he has a number of buildings on 
Yesler way, one of the best business and residence avenues of the city. With 
this fortunate pioneer the day of small things has passed away, and his large 
investments and business ability have made him. one of the capitalists of the 
fair city which he has aided in building. He is now living retired, merely 
superintending his property interests. He was the pioneer meat-market 
man and baker of the city and also erected the first opera house here. His 
loA'e of music led him to establish the first brass band of the city, he per- 
forming upon the E flat horn. 

The home of Mr. a.nd ]\Irs. Frye has been blessed with six children, 
namely : J- JMarion, who is married and has two children ; Mary Louisa, 
now the widow of Captain George H. Fortson, who was killed in the service 
of his country in Manila; Sophia S., who is living at home; George Arthur, 
who passed av/ay when twenty- four years of age; Roberta G. and Elizabeth, 
both at home. In politics Mr. Fr}^e is a Republican and has served as a 
member of the city council. He and his family have a ver)'- pleasant home on 
Pike street, where they hnve resided for tliirty-five years: No resident of 
Seattle enjoys in a higher degree the good will, respect and esteem of his 
fellowmen, or is more worthy of their regard than this honored pioneer, who 
for a half century has been an important factor in the improvement and up- 
building of Seattle. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 29 

SETH \V. CEARK. 

The late trouble between the United States and Spain has given the 
younger generation of Americans a faint idea of the horrors and anxieties of 
war, but the great Civil conflict waged fiercely for four years between broth- 
ers of the north and south, people of one blood, similar aims and manners, 
essentially of one family, was a contest so terrible that the whole world 
looked on and shuddered, as the contestants were much more equally matched 
and the outcome of such vast moment. To the brave boys who wore the 
blue and fought for the Union, that their opponents are now glad was pre- 
served, tributes of praise are freely given by a grateful people, and none who 
went forth in defense of the countr}^ deserves them more than the subject of 
this biography, 

Seth William Clark was born in Eller}-, Ch.autauqua county, New York, 
on the 22nd of February. 1832, and is of English ancestry on the paternal 
side and of Scotcii lineage on the maternal side, his ancestors having come to 
the United States at a very early period in American history, the date of their 
arrival being about 1680. A settlement was first made in New England, and 
later on the Hudson river, in New York. Abijah Clark, the grandfather of 
cur subject, was born in 1754 and became an officer in the Revolutionary war, 
being with General Washington during the trying and ever memorable wi'.i- 
ter at Valley Forge. He was a great admirer of the commander, who justly 
came to be known as the father of his country. After the war Abijah Clark 
settled near Peekskill, New York, and when the subject of this review was 
a little lad of six years he often sat upon his grandfather's knee and listened 
to his stories of the Revolution. At that time his grandfather gave him 
three pieces of Continental script which are still in his possession and are 
a treasured heirloom. The grandfather removed to Ballston, Saratoga 
county, New York, and it was there that his son, Seth Clark, the father of our 
subject was born on the 20th of March, 1795. Very early in the history of 
Michigan the grandfather removed to that state and died at Ann Arbor 
in March, 1838. A part of the city of Rochester, New York, is built upon 
a farm which he once owned. Seth Clark was married, in Cayuga county. 
New York, to Miss Content Ingraham, a native of Massachusetts, born of 
Scotch parentage. Her father was a giant in stature, being almost seven feet 
high. He settled with his family in Schenectady county. New York, and 
served as an ensign in the war of 1812, participating- in the defense of Buffalo. 
After the close of hostilities he tinned his attention to farming. In religious 
faith he was a Baptist and was an extensive reader and a broad-minded man. 



30 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

His life was a splendid example of morality to his children and at his death, 
which occurred three days prior to the eightieth anniversary of his birth, 
he left to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. His 
v.'ife died in 1866, at the age of sixty -six years. In their family were five 
children, but only three ai^e now living. 

Seth William Clark was reared \ipon the home farm, working out 
through the summer mouLlis, as he aided m tilling the soil and harvesting the 
crops. In the winter he pursued his educarion in the little red school house, 
and later was graduated in. a first-class academy and collegiate institute. Not 
desiring to follow the plow as a lite work, hut Avishing to devote his energies 
to a profession, he took up the study of law and was admitted to the bar just 
a short time before the great Civil war broke upon this country. In answer 
to President Lincoln's call for volunteers he at once enrolled himself as a 
private in Company C, Ninth Regiment, New York Cavalry, and was with 
liis regiment throughout the ^^•ar. I]e participated in the great battle of 
Gettysburg and went through that fearful ordeal without receiving a scratch. 
The regiment now has a g'ranite monument on the battle field. He was 
wounded on the 31st of August, 1862, at the battle of Chantilla, being struck 
by a bullet in the right leg. He was off duty for a time, but remained with 
his regiment. On the 2nd of February, 1863, at Rappahannock Station, 
he sustained a gun-shot wound in the rigiit shoulder which caused him to 
carry his arm in a sling, but he remained with his company and was. on the 
skirmish line, using his sabre with his left hamd. In a charge at Brandy 
Station on the 9th of June, 1863, he received a sabre wound on his chin, 
which was cut to the bone, and again he had to retire from active field serv- 
ice, but he declined to leave his regiment, and as soon as possible returned 
to active duty. \Adiile on the march in 1863 he was shot in the side by a 
bushwhacker, the ball lodging in his vest pocket. On the 1 1 th of June, 
J864, at the battle of Trevillian Station, he was again wounded, and his right 
hip joint dislocated. He still carries this ball, and the wound has never 
healed. He laid on the battle field under an apple tree for five days and for 
some time was supposed to be dead but at last was carried to the old tobacco 
warehouse in Richmond, Virginia, by the enemy, after which he was put in 
Eibby prison and remained there until fall. His ]jed was but the hard floor 
and his rations consisted of a small piece of corn bread once each day. Late 
in the fall of 1864 he was exchanged, and when he left the prison he was 
hardly more than skin and bones, so emaciated had he become through the 
hardships of southern prison life. He was exchanged for a man who had 
been well kept and could fight. In December, 1864, Mr. Clark was paroled 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 31 

and sent to the hospital ar, Annapohs, whiere he remained until the following 
spring-. After entering the service he had only stood guard for two hours 
until he was promoted to the rank of corporal, and when mustered out he 
was first lieutenant. He vvoald have been captain, but his commission was 
given to another man when he was reported dead, but in the spring of 1865 
the governor of New York commissioned him a major. When the war 
was ended Mr. Clark went to Washington to settle his accounts with the 
government. He had hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of quarter- 
master's stores to account for, and up to the time that he was disabled by his 
last wound his accounts were found to be exact, and he was highly compli- 
mented upon his records, but after he was wounded so severely and held as 
a prisoner other officers' statements were taken and he had no trouble in the 
settlement. At Washington he was appointed to a clerkship in the govern- 
ment land office on December 23, 1865, and underwent a civil service examin- 
ation as a technical civil engineer and draftsman. He was ifirst given a salary 
of twelve hundred dollars, after which he was promoted to sixteen hundred 
dollars, while subsequently his salary was raised to eighteen hundred dol- 
lars. He was chief clerk' of preemption claims, chief clerk of the division 
of railroad lands and chief of the military boundary lands division, and was 
jnade recorder of the government land office in JMay, 1876. He served in that 
position for ten years and at times acted as commissioner. He had from 
fifty to one hundred and fifty clerks under his supervision and signed from 
seventy-five to one hundred thousand patents per year, but when a change 
came in the presidential administration his offixe was given to another. Sec- 
retary Lamar, however, appointed him to a clerkship in the pension office, 
in wliich he served until 1890, when his health failed and he resigned in 
order to come to the ^^ est, hoping that a change of climate would prove bene- 
ficial. Mr. Clark then opened a law office in Seattle as land and pension 
attorney and is now engaged in that department of practice. 

On the 25h of December, 1866. Mr. Clark was united in marriage to 
Miss Nelhe Maude Hall, a native of Maine, and unto them have been born 
two daughters, Cora Annetta, the wife of J, Albert Jackson, a resident of 
Dawson, and Gertrude Ingram, now the wife of Ernest Inglee Foster, also 
of Dawson. Mr. and IvTrs. Clark are well known people of Seattle, and the 
hospitality of their pleasant home has made it a favorite resort with their 
many friends. They are valued members of the Episcopal church and take 
a deep interest in its work. Mr. Clark cast his first presidential vote for 
Abraham Lincoln, and since that time has been a stanch adherent to the 
Republican party, believing firmly in its principles. He has been an active 



32 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

and highly esteemed member of the Grand Army of the Repubhc and served 
as commander of Stevens Post, No. i. of Seattle. He also served as assistant 
adjutant-general for the department of Washington and Alaska. For seven 
years he was president of the Kings County Emigrant Society, and during 
his residence in this city he has taken a deep interest in its welfare and growth, 
doing all in his power for its material advancement and substantial upbuild- 
ing. His has been an honorable career largely devoted to his country's 
ser\ ice, either in military or civil oltice, and his loyalty and fidelity are among 
his most marked characteristics. No trust reposed in him has ever been 
betrayed in the slightest degree, and his fidelity stands as an unquestioned 
fact in his life. As long as memory remains to the American people they will 
hold in grateful recognition the work accomplished by the boys in blue, and 
among the number who went in defense of the Union there was no truer 
or braver soldier than Seth William Clark. 

HENRY W. MARKEY. 

Henry W. j\Iarkey is the owner and manager of the Commercial Street 
Boiler Works of Seattle and now stands at the head of one of the excellent 
industrial concerns of the city, being extensively engaged in the manufac- 
ture of steam boilers of even,^ description, from the smallest in size to the 
■<ery largest. Desiring to make Seattle the base of his business operations 
he arrived in this city in 1887, when it was comparatively a small place, but 
it then gave promise of reaching its present metropolitan proportions. i\Ir. 
J\Iarkey arrived here and began working at his trade of boiler making for 
Air. Penny, being thus employed for a year and a half and then recogniz- 
ing the splendid business openings in the Queen city of the northwest he 
established a business of his own on King street and had entered upon a 
prosperous career when the great fire swept over the city on the 6th of 
June, 1889. He thereby met with very heavy losses and to a man of less 
resolute purpose such a disaster would have been utterly discouraging, but 
Mr. JMarkey did not give way to discouragement or let misfortune triumph 
over him. He purchased his present location, erected his shops and soon 
had all the business he could attend to, his trade taxing the capacity of his 
plant to the utmost. He manufactures all kinds of marine and mill boilers, 
also sheet iron work of e^'ery description. He is a thorough and practical 
mechanic himself and is therefore capable of superintending the labors of 
the men whom he employs. He gives close attention to the work and the 
fullest satisfaction is guaranteed, so that his liberal and honorable business 






/ / 



<i^^ 




THE NEW YORK 

F>i I BUG LIBRARY 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 33 

methods have secured for him a well earned success and a wide and favor- 
able acquaintance in Seattle. 

This enterprising citizen was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 
loth of September, 1855, and is of Scotch and Irish ancestiy. His par- 
ents were Patrick and ]Mary (jNlcKensie) Markey, who when young people 
came to Canada and were there married. Unto them were born eight chil- 
dren, three of whom reside upon the Pacific coast : James, a contractor and 
builder of Seattle; John, a mason, residing in San Francisco, and Henry W. 
The parents have both passed away. 

Henry Markey received his education in the public schools of Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin, and after putting aside his text books he learned the trade 
of boiler making there. After mastering the business and gaining a good 
practical knowledge of the work in all its departments he removed to Grand 
Forks, South Dakota, where he opened a shop, conducting it for three years 
prior to his arrival in Seattle. From the time he came to this city his ad- 
vancement in business affairs has been continuous and the passing years 
have credited to his account a splendid success. 

In 1 89 1 Mr. Markey w^as united in marriage to Miss Bertha Cahill, a 
native of Wisconsin, and their union has been blessed with four children : 
Francis, Joseph, Henry and Helen. In his political views Mr. Markey is 
a Republican, but has neither sought nor desired political preferment, his 
attention being full occupied by his business interests and the enjoyments 
of social life. His history is an illustration of what may be accomplished 
through determined purpose, indefatigable energy and straightforward busi- 
ness methods. 

EDWARD C. KILBOURNE. 

Prominent among the energetic, far-seeing and successful business men 
of western Washington is the subject of this sketch. His life history most 
happily illustrates what may be attained by faithful and continued effort in 
carrying out an honest purpose. Integrity, activity and energy have been 
the croAvning points of his success and his connection with various business 
enterprises and industries has been a decided advantage to this section of the 
state, promoting its material welfare in no uncertain manner. Seattle owes 
much to his efforts, for his varied business interests have been of such a 
character as to promote the general growth, upbuilding and prosperity while 
leading to individual success. 

Dr. Kilbourne is a native of Vermont, his birth having occurred at 



34 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

St. Johnsbury on the I3tli of January, 1856. Far back into the early annals 
of England can his family history be traced, for there are records con- 
cerning the Kilbournes as early as 1000 A. D., while the connection of the 
family with America dates from 1640, at which time representatives of the 
name became residents of Boston. Everet Horatio Kilbourne, the father of 
the Doctor, was born in Berkshire, Vermont, in 1S23, and became a very 
prominent member of the dental profession, his superior skill and ability 
winning him marked prestige which made him known throughout the coun- 
try. After his removal westward he served as president of the Illinois 
Dental Society and of the Anierican Dental Association. It was in 1858 that 
he took up his abode in Aurora, Illinois, ^vhere he spent his remaining days, 
his research and investigation in the line of his profession enabling him to 
advance its interests and promote the efficiency of the labors of its repre- 
sentatives throughout the country. Dr. Kilbourne was united in marriage 
to Miss Frances A. Stone, a native of Chelsea, Vermont, and a daughter 
of Colonel Stone, who commanded a regiment in the Revolutionary war, 
liis loyalty to the cause making him a valued soldier. Unto Dr. E. H. Kil- 
bourne and his wife were born live children, all of whom are yet living. 

Dr. Edward Corliss Kilbourne was the third in order of birth. Fie 
was educated in the public schools of Aurora, Illinois, and under the direc- 
tion of his father he studied dentistry, which he practiced for ten years 
before his removal to tlic west. He vvas fortunate in having a preceptor 
whose knowledge was so broad and accurate and thus he laid the foundation 
for a successful career in his chosen profession: In 1883 he arrived in 
Seattle, and for five years continued the practice of dentistry, winning an 
extensive patronage. He also organized the State Dental Society, was 
elected its first secretary, and jvas instrumental in securing the passage of the 
fi^'st law in the territory regulating the practice of dentistry, which was the 
means of maintaining a high standard in the profession and preventing char- 
latanism from gaining a hold here. Fie had the honor of being the presi- 
dent of the first territorial board of dental examiners, and during his active 
connection with the profession he was one of its most interested and able 
representatives. 

Becoming deeply impressed with the great future before Seattle, in 1888 
he retired from the practice of dentistry in order to give his attention to the 
promotion of vafious enterprises intended to advance the city's growth and 
progress. Fortunate has it been for the city that he took this step, for his 
sagacity, prescience, enterprising and unconcjuerable energy have proven a 
most potent element in the upbuilding of Seattle — so aptly termed the "queen of 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 35 

the Avest." He became extensively interested in city real estate and lias handled 
much valuable property. He was one of the organizers of the first success- 
ful electric railway system on the Pacific coast and in the United States, and 
was thus largely instrumental in the upbuilding of the prosperous town of 
Freemont, suburb of this city. The new company formed was consolidated 
with the Seattle Street Railway Company, which was then operating its line 
with horses, and took the name of the Seattle Electric Railway & Power Com- 
pany. The line was constructed from Main street on Commercial, on James 
to Second avenue and to Pike, with a branch to Lake Union and another to 
the foot of Queen Ann hill, north. Dr. Kilbourne was first made secretary 
of the company, later its president and subsequently treasurer. He was also 
general manager of the Green Lake Electric Railway Company, and became 
a director and stockholder of the Freemont IMilling Company, the Lake Union 
Transportation Company and the Standard Electric Time Company. In 
1890 he became interested in another enterprise of much importance to the 
city, organizing the Pacific Electric Liglit Company, which soon absorbed 
the Commercial Light Company and later absorbed the Seattle General 
Electric Company, which was the original one. The company as thus 
formed became the Union Electric Company, with a capital of one million 
dollars, and having practically all the lighting of the city. Recently the 
Union Company united with the various street railway companies, form- 
ing the Seattle Electric Company, with a capital of eight million dol- 
lars, the Doctor being manager of the light and power department. The 
Doctor was also one of the original organizers of the company which is 
now the Denny Clay Company, extensive manufacturers of brick, terra cotta 
and other products. His business interests have been of so important and 
varied a character that they have been closely associated with the material 
development and progress of Seattle, and he seems to have realized at any 
one point of his career the full measure of success possible at that time. He 
forms his plans readily and is determined in their execution and always his 
labors have been in strict conformity to the highest standard of commercial 
ethics. 

In 1886 Dr. Kilbourne was united in marriage to Miss Leilla Shorey, 
who was born at Steilacoom, Pierce county, Washington, and has lived at 
Seattle since early childhood. Ihey are active and consistent members of 
the Plymouth Congregational church and are interested and valued workers 
in the Sunday-school. He was a trustee when the new church was built and 
was chairman of the committee that recently raised the thirty thousand dollars 
to clear the church property from del^t. Both he and his wife enjoy the high 



36 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

regard of all who have the pleasuie of their acquaintance and the hospitality 
of their pleasant home renders it a lav^orite resort. Mr. Kilbourne is one of 
the active members of the Young Men's Christian Association and does all 
in his power to promote its growth and welfare. In 1890 he was honored 
with an election to its presidency, ^^•as continued in that office for six years 
and is still a trustee, the society makmg satisfactory advancement during that 
time. He was one of the first to start the movement among the young men 
of the city to raise a fund of twelve thousand dollars with which to purchase a 
lot, on which they now have a fine and commodious home, the property having 
since largely increased in value, owing to the growth of the city. The Doctor 
was likewise interested in militar}^ affairs and became a charter member of 
the Seattle Rifles. His success in life can be unquestionably attributed to 
his untiring industry, energy and enterprise, as well as to his high integrity 
of character. He has never selfishly hoarded his means, but has always been 
a generous, contributor to the support of all movements intended to advance 
the welfare of the city. "The liberal man deviseth liberal things and by 
liberal things he shall stand." No wonder that Seattle has become the queen 
city of the northwest when so many of her representatives have shown untir- 
ing devotion to her interests and have put forth every effort for her upbuild- 
ing. Moral, intellectual nnd material progress have all received encourage- 
ment from Dr. Kilbourne, and his worth to the community ranks him among 
ner most honored and respected men. 

NEIL S. PETERSON. 

The subject of this sketch was born on the sixteenth day of January, 
1852, on the Island of Zealand, Denm.ark. He passed his early boyhood on a 
farm. Pie attended the public schools of Denmark, from which he was 
graduated, after which he took a course of instruction under private tutors 
in the city of Copenhagen. This course included natural history studies 
and languages, and the English tongue and literature formed one of the 
principal features. 

In 1870, ]\Ir. Peterson left Denmark on a vessel bound via Cape of Good 
Hope for Australia, where he arrived in the spring of 1871, first landing at 
Brisbane, Colony of Queensland. He resided some years on the Island Con- 
tinent, which he left in 1878 for San Francisco. In August, 1878, he went 
from San Francisco to Salt I ake City and joined his brother, J. C. Peterson, 
who had preceded him to America. The brothers thereafter engaged in a 
general merchandise business at Dillon, Montana, from which point their 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 37 

business followed the construction of the Utah & Northern Railway to Silver 
Bov, Junction. They afterwards settled in Shoshone, Idaho, which was 
then the western terminus of the Oregon Short Erne. Here they carried on 
Tt mercantile business until 1886, when they disposed of all their interests and 
removed to Seattle, where they entered into a general investment business. 
After the great fire of June 6, 1889, they dissolved pa.rtnership. 

Neil S. Peterson took to the study of law and was in due time admitted 
to the bar. During his student days he served as clerk in charge of the pro- 
bate business in the office of the clerk of the superior court at Seattle. This 
service gave him close familiarity with probate practice, and a larg-e propor- 
tion of his business since he entered upon independent practice has consisted 
in the settlement of estates. He is of a highly cautious temperament, a close 
and critical reader of statutes and decisions, and therefore particularly adapted 
to the conduct of a branch of practice requiring the utmost care and particu- 
larity. He is a most conscientious and trustworthy member of the bar, and 
commands in an eminent degree the respect of his professional brethren and 
of his clients. 

Mr. Peterson was married in the year 1890. His wdfe died in 1896, 
leaving a son and daughter, respectively John Franklin and Eva Marion. 
He has not remarried. 

Mr. Peterson was made a Freemason on March 27, 1878, in Australia, 
in Leinster Marine Eodge, No. 266 on the registry of the Grand Eodge of 
Ireland. From this lodge he took a demit and affiliated with Argenta Lodge, 
No. 3, Salt Lake City, from which in time he demitted to become a charter 
member of Bethany Lodge, No. 21, at Shoshone, Idaho. From this latter 
lodge he took a demit and affiliated on May 25, 1889, with St. John's Lodge, 
No. 9, Seattle, and ever since that time he has been closely identified with the 
work and history of that lodge. He served as its master in 1893, and has 
since 1897 continuously served as its secretary. His well known carefulness, 
accuracy and love of system have made him the model lodge secretary of the 
state of Washington. He has taken all the degrees of the York rite. On 
May 23d, 1888, he was exalted to the August degree of the Royal Arch in 
Seattle Chapter, No. 3, R. A. M. Here, too, he went to the lop by sheer force 
of ability and character, and in 1894 presided over this chapter as M. E. High 
Priest. Since 1897 he has served continuously as secretary of this chapter. 
He was one of the charter members of Seattle Council, No. 6, Royal and Se- 
lect Masters, organized in 1894, and attained the highest position in it, that 
of Thrice Illustrious Master. In this section of Masonry he became the 
head of the organization in the state. In due time he was created a Knight 



38 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Templar in Seattle Commandery, No. 2, of which he is still a member. Be- 
sides being a member of Lorraine Chapter, No. 6, Order of the Eastern Star, 
Mr. Peterson joined the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine 
in Afifi Temple at Tacoma, and he still retains his membership there. He 
is also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. The char- 
acteristic of his mind in lodge as well as in other work which he nndertakes 
is thoroughness. He does nothing by halves ; he hesitates at no labor neces- 
sary to render himself perfect in any part or position which he assumes. 
He is very highly esteemed among his brethren of the Mystic Tie, as he is 
in the community at large. 

FRANKLIN A. BUCK. 

When the discovery of gold in California attracted to the Pacific coast 
men from all sections of the country Franklin A. Buck made his way with 
others to the mming regions, ana tliC liistory of t'lose days in the early annals 
of the state which now read almost like a fairy tale is familiar to him through 
practical experience. Since 1889 he has been identified with business inter- 
ests in Seattle, and as the years have passed prosperity has attended his efforts 
and he is now a citizen of affluence. 

Mr. Buck was born m 1826 at Bncksport, Maine, a town named in honor 
of his great-grandfather, Jonathan Buck, who \vas the first settler there and 
owned the land on which the village was built. He had removed from 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, to the Pine Tree state, and was of English descent, 
his ancestors having arrived in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1636, William Buck 
having been the progenitor of the family in the new world. Jonathan Buck 
served as a colonel in the Continental arm.y during the Revolutionary war 
and his house was burned by the British, but his efforts were not in vain, the 
glorious victory of the American arms giving rise to the greatest republic on 
the face of the 2-lobe. All of the early members of the Buck family were 
Puritans in their religious faith. Daniel Buck, the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, and wedded Mary Sewall, a 
daughter of Colonel Dummer Sewall. a prominent ship builder who also 
owned a number of vessels. Daniel Buck carried on merchandising and 
farming. He had inherited one hundred acres of land, an equal share going 
to each of the children of the great-grandfather's household. Daniel Buck 
died in the seventieth year of his age. 

Rufus Buck, the father of our subject, was also born in Bucksport, in 
1797, He became a proniinent business man and liad a sawmill and store. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 39 

He married Sarah Somerby and they spent the entire period of their married 
hves in Bucksport. The father was a very prominent and influential citizen 
and was honored with pubHc office, serving as cohector of customs and as a 
member of the state legislature. He died in 1878, at the age of eighty-two. 
years, and his wife passed away at the age of seventy years. They were 
members of the Congregational church, and in their family were three children, 
of whom the subject of this sketch is the only survivor. 

Franklin A. Buck spent his early life in the town of his nativity and 
after attending the common schools became a student in Phillips Academy, 
at Andover, Massachusetts. At the age of twenty years he left home and 
started out to make his own way in the world, going to New York city, 
where he remained until January, 1849. In the previous fall gold had been 
discovered on the Pacific coast and in the hope of readily acquiring a for- 
tune men were making their wav to that district from all sections of the 
country. Mr. Buck joined the California argonauts and also sailed in search 
of the golden fleece on the brig George Emery for San Francisco. He 
went as supercargo. They made the long passage around the Horn in 
safety, arriving in San Francisco, on the 6th of August, 1849. ^^r- Buck 
then left the ship and went to Weaverville and Downeyville, being engaged 
in placer mining in 1850, 1851 and 1852, but he only met with ordinary 
success, and resolved that he would seek a fortune in some other way. 

In 1855 Mr. Buck built a sawmill in Trinity county, on the north 
fork of the Trinity river, and his lumber sold for fifty dollars per thousand 
feet at the mill. He continued to prosper in this undertaking until 1858, 
at which time he returned to the east by way of the Isthmus of Panama. 
He remained in the east for a year, during which time he was married 
at Bucksport, to Miss Jennie M. Pierce, a native of that town. He brought 
his bride with him on his second trip to California, and for seven years re- 
mained at Weaverville, during which time two children were born to them : 
Arthur, now in business in Seattle, and Emma Louise, the wife of Homer 
F. Norton, of Seattle. Two other children were afterward added to the 
family : Mary Sewall, who was born in Red Bluff, California, and is now the 
wife of B. T. Carr, of Seattle; and Rufus, born in Pioche, Nevada. 

In 1866 Mr. Buck removed with his family from Weaverville, Cali- 
fornia, and spent three years in Chico and Red Bluff, that state, where he 
was engaged in buying and selling stock. In 1869 they removed to Pioche, 
Nevada, where he continued his stock business for ten years. He had a 
cattle ranch and was also interested in mining enterprises and in lumber- 
ing. His next place of residence was at Napa Valley, California, where he 



40 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

had charge of a large ranch of live hundred acres and did all kinds of farm- 
ing. He also engaged in the manufacture of wine there. In 1889 he came 
to Seattle, bringing with him a stock of California wine, and engaged in 
the sale of that product, his business ultimately developing into an exten- 
sive wholesale liquor business. It is now incorporated and his son Arthur 
is the president and manager, while Mr. Buck is the vice president. Since 
1898, however, he has been practically retired from active business, save 
that he is engaged in loaning money and in the supervision of his private 
interests. 

In 1899 Mr. Buck was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife. She 
was devoted to her family and her place in the household is one wdiich can 
never be filled, while many friends outside of the family also miss the com- 
panionship of Mrs. Buck. Mr. Buck is a member of the Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, and in politics he has been a Republican 
from the organization of that party. He has built several residences in 
Seattle, and has great faith in the future of the city. Coming to the Pacific 
coast among the '49ers he is one of the honored pioneers of this portion 
of the country and is ver}' widely known and honored. 

HENRY L. SIZER. 

Henry L. Sizer, one of Seattle's thoroughly reliable business men, act- 
ively engaged in the real-estate and insurance business, was born in Fonda, 
Montgomei-y county. New York, on the 14th of February, 1853, and was 
descended from Holland ancestry who settled in central New York at a 
very early day, becoming pioneers of that part of the state. Edwin Sizer, 
father of our subject, was born in Montgomery county, and through his 
business career carried on merchandising and farming. He was a devoted 
member of the Dutch Reformed church and a man of sterling worth, reli- 
able in business and trustworthy in all life's relations. He married Miss 
Anna Mariah Loucks, who was born in his own country and was also of good 
old Holland stock, which became so prominent in the settlement of tlu 
Empire state. Both the Sizer and Loucks families were represented in the 
Revolutionaiy war by those of the name who espoused the cause of the col- 
onies and fought for American independence. The mother of our subject 
departed this life in the fiftieth year of her age, while Air. Sizer reached the 
age of sixty-seven years. They were quiet, industrious people, who had 
many friends and no enemies and. their meinory is still enshrined in the 
hearts of many who knew them. They were the parents of three children, 






/ 




/THE NEWlrfyRK] 

PUBtlCUBKAjRY^ 



^^fmn, Lenox ANB 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 41 

two of whom are living. The daughter, Mrs. James M. Cole, resides at the old 
home in Fonda, New York. 

Henry L. Sizer was educated in the public schools of his native town 
and in academies at Poughkeepsie and Geneva, New York, and began his 
business career as a representative of mercantile interests. He continued 
in that business for a number of years in the east and in the fall of 1890 
he came to Seattle and established a fire insurance agency, to which a little 
later he added the life insurance business and subsequently extended the field 
of his labors by adding a real-estate department. By persistent and hon- 
orable effort he has gradually assumed a paying business. He has become 
an investor and handles real estate both on his own occount and for others. 
He is also general agent for a number of strong insurance companies, includ- 
ing the Pennsylvania Mutual Life and the old Quaker Company. As a 
business man and citizen he has earned an enviable reputation. 

Mr. Sizer was happily married, in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1878, to Miss 
Ida May Manning, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and a daughter of 
Edward Manning of that state. The union has been blessed with four sons : 
Glen Dumont, Harry Edward, Burton DeBaun and Lawrence Manning. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sizer are valued members of the Plymouth Congregational 
church, of which he is one of the deacons and superintendent of Sunday- 
school. He has also served as state secretary of the Young People's Soci- 
ety of Christian Endeavor, of the State Sunday-school Association and of 
the Washington Bible Society. He is also a member of the Law and Order 
League of Seattle and the Anti-Saloon League, taking an active interest in 
everything tending to promote moral development and uplift humanity. 
During the twelve years of his residence in Seattle he has become widely 
known in connection with such work, and as a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce he is brought in touch with the business interests of the city. 

In national politics Mr. Sizer is an active, earnest Republican, support- 
ing the policies of his party at home and on the stump. Though never ac- 
cepting office, he has acted as campaign chairman of Republican organiza- 
tions at his old home in New York state and in Seattle. Locally Mr. Sizer 
votes independently for those whom he believes to be the best men. 

EDUARD P. EDSEN. 

A man of distinction in political, professional and literary circles, and 

equally prominent socially, Eduard Polonius Edsen well deserves mention 

in this volume, for he has left the impress of his individuality upon the 
3 



42 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

progress and upbuilding of Seattle in many lines. He has accomplished 
much in the period of his earthly pilgrimage, having become a celebrated 
lawyer of the northwest, a writer of considerable ability, while in political 
circles he wields a wide influence, although he has never been connected with 
political work for the rewards of office, in fact has steadfastly refused to be- 
come a candidate for any political preferment. 

Mr. Edsen is a native of Husum, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, his 
birth having there occurred on the 29th of April, 1856. He is a representative 
of one of the old families of his native land. EIis father, Hinrich J. Edsen. 
was born near the same town in 1825, and Avas a civil engineer and an officer 
in the German army, serving in the war of 1848-50 that shaped the destiny 
of the German empire. He married ]\Iiss Lucie J. Peterson, who was a na- 
tive of his own town, born in 1831, and descended from a long line of mili- 
tary officers. H^e died in 1866, at the age of forty-one years, and his wife 
passed a\A'ay in 1900, in the se\-entieth year of her age. They were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church and so lived as to gain the esteem and good will 
of a large circle of friends. They had five children, three sons and two 
daughters, four of whom are living, Eduard and his sister, ]\Irs. H. F. Nom- 
mensen, being the only members of the family in Washington. 

Eduard P. Edsen was educated in the schools and colleges of his home. 
After completing his education he spent four years in travel and arrived in 
Portland, Oregon, on the i8th of November, 1876. He had received a 
classical and military education in his native land, but being unfamiliar with 
the English language in his countr}^ he accepted a position on the farm of 
William Freels near Sandy postoffice, Oregon, where he remained until 
March, 1877, and as far as possible in that time gained a knowledge of the 
English tongue. At the date just mentioned he turned his attention to sal- 
mon fishing, which he followed for a year, at Brookfield, ^^^ashington, and 
then pursued a course in a business college in Portland, perfecting himself 
in English under private tutors. Subsequently he worked as a deck hand on 
the Columbia river, followed by six months spent at lumbering and in filling 
contracts for wood at Walla Walla. In the spring of 1879 he found employ- 
ment in Stahl's brewery and wholesale liquor business in Walla W^alla, where 
by reason of his faithful attention to business he was rapidly advanced to 
the position of general manager. About this time he made an unfortuiiate 
investment of the greater part of his savings. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Edsen began conducting a real-estate and insurance agency 
at Walla Walla, in partnership with V. D. Lambert. In the summer of 1883 
he visited the Sound, finally locating at Seattle in December. In the fol- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 43 

lowing January he was admitted to the bar of the supreme court at Olympia, 
and on April 4, 1894, was admitted to the supreme court of the United 
States at Washington, D. C. His mastery of no less than seven languages 
soon secured him the major portion of the foreign law business of the city. 
'He readily gained recognition as a leading member of the bar and his busi- 
ness affairs prospered while his popularity grew with his wide circle of 
acquaintances. In November, 1889, Mr. Edsen formed a lav,- partnership 
with the Hon. Will H. Thompson and the Hon. John E. Humphries, under 
the style of Thompson, Edsen & Humphries, which partnership continued for 
eight years and the firm became recognized as a leading one on the Pacific 
coast. The partnership terminated vvhen Mr. Thompson became attorney 
for the Great Northern Railway Company, and Mr. Edsen is now practicing 
his profession alone, with offices in the Hotel Seattle block. 

He has taken a deep interest and has been an important factor in pro- 
moting the military organizations of the state of Washington. In 1884 he 
was the organizer of Company D, First Regiment of the National Guard of 
Washington, and became its first captain. Being an expert drill master, his 
company, as well as Rainier Division, No. 18, Uniformed Rank of the 
Knights of Pythias, organized by him in 1892, ranked among the best in the 
many competitive drills held at Seattle, Tacoma and New Westminster, B. 
C, carrying off prizes at each meet. He has held the ofiice of assistant judge 
advocate general of the Washington brigade, filling the position with dis- 
tinction since 1892, and was aide de camp on the staff of Governor William 
A. Newell, with the rank of colonel. It should also be stated that in 1878 he 
was one of the organizers of the Walla Walla Artillery, which is now the old- 
est military company in the state, under the name of Company A, Second 
Regiment, N. G. W. 

His membership in social and fraternal organizations is extensive and 
includes the Knights of Pythias ; Knights of ]\Ialta ; Knights of the Golden 
Eagle; Ancient Order of Druids; the Ancient Order of United Workmen; 
the Royal Arcanum ; the Order of Chosen Friends ; the four branches of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which order he is now serving his 
tenth term as president of the general relief committee ; and the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, for which order he wrote the rituals for the Grand Aerie and Sub- 
ordinate Aeries, complete with all its additional ceremonies, etc., as well as 
the complete code of laws for the government of the order named. In the 
last named order he holds the highest ofiice, that of chief justice, with rank of 
past grand worthy president. He was one of the founders of the Seattle 
Turn Verein and since 1889 has been president of the George Washington 



44 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Branch of the Irish National League. In 1894. Colonel Edsen was the ac- 
credited representative from the state of Washington at the World's Fair 
at Antwerp, Belgium, being present at its formal opening by King Leopold 
II, on May 5th. The Colonel has also made numerous creditable contribu- 
tions to periodical literature in both prose and verse, having shown particular 
ability in the latter in his mastery of the frontier and miner dialects. In 
politics he has ever been a stanch Republican, but though a recognized party 
leader and frequently urged to accept nomination for office he has steadfastly 
refused to become a candidate. For several years, however, he has been 
president of the German American Republican Club of the state of Washing- 
ton, as well as of the local branch at Seattle. 

Colonel Edsen was happily married, on the ist of Jnly, 1901, to ]\Iiss 
Blanche Marie Clark, and thev now reside at his countrv residence, Eden- 
wild, in Kitsap county, Washington, whence he each day goes to his office in 
the city. Mrs. Edsen is a daughter of Charles Clark, a native of England 
and a resident of Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Edson's mother was formerly 
Miss Elizabeth Sutton, also a native of England. Colonel and Mrs. Edsen 
are members of the Lutheran church and stand ven,- high in the social circles 
of the city in which the Colonel has made such an enviable record. On April 
13, 1902, a bouncing boy was born to them, who received the imposing name 
of Edward Clark McKinley Edsen. Colonel Edsen is a man of powerful 
physique and commanding presence and is what he appears to be — a man of 
integrity, energy and resourcefulness. 

WILLIA^I HARBAUGH WHITE. 

William Harbaugh ^^'hite is one of the ablest lawyers practicing at the 
Seattle bar. A man of sound judgment, he manages his cases with masterly 
skill and tact, is a logical reasoner and has a ready command of English. 
He was born in Sewickley, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, on the nth 
of November, 1859, and is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He is a lineal descend- 
ant of Hughey White, who came to this country from the north of Ireland 
at a very early day in its history and settled in Virginia near Jamestown. 
Our subject's maternal great-great-grandfather Hoey was also a representa- 
tive of an old Virginian family, and on both sides his ancestors participated 
in the Revolutionary war. His great-grandfather White was a native of 
the Old Dominion, as was also his grandfather, John White, but his father, 
J. W. I. White, was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, and spent 
his entire life in that state. He served as justice of the common pleas court 



SEATTLE AXD KING COUNTY. 45 

of Alleghen\' county for many years, and was still on the bench at the time 
of his death, which occurred Xovember 6, 1900, when he v\-as eighty years 
of age. Religiously he was an active and prominent member of the ^leth- 
odist Episcopal church, and was an official member of the same. He attended 
the first Republican convention, and assisted in organizing the party in his 
section of the state, where he was a recognized leader in public affairs. In 
early life he was united in marriage with ]\Iary Thorn, also a native of Penn- 
sylvania, ^^■ho is now in her seventy-fifth year, and is still living at the old 
home in Sewickley, honored and respected by all who have the pleasure of 
her acquaintance. They were the parents of six children, five sons and one 
daughter, of whom live are still living. 

William Harbaugh \Miite passed his boyhood and youth in his native 
state and was educated at Allegheny College, where he was graduated in 
1880. He read law with his father, Judge White, and for two years was 
also a student in the office of Slagle & Wiley of Pittsburg. After his admis- 
sion to the bar in 1882, he engaged in practice in that city for a time, and 
in 1888 was elected to the Pennsylvania legislature, in which he served one 
term. 

Shortly afterward ^Ir. \\'hite came to Seattle and from 1893 until 1895 
was a member of the law hrm of Pratt & White, but since that time has 
been alone in practice. Coming here a stranger it was some time before 
he became well acquainted, but his ability in his chosen profession is now 
widely recognized and he is at the head of a large civil law practice, being 
attorney for a number of prominent corporations. He is not only a good 
lawyer but is a good business man as well, in fact possesses unusual abil- 
ity in that direction, and is to-day a stockholder in a number of corporations 
and business enterprises, which have not only promoted individual prosperity, 
but have materially advanced the interests of his adopted city. He was one 
of the organizers and builders of the Seattle Central Railroad. 

In 1887 Air. \\'hite married ]Miss Kate Erwin, a native of his own birth- 
place, and to them ha\-e been born three daughters, Kathryn, Esther and 
Emma. The family ha^-e a delightful home, where hospitality reigns su- 
preme. 'Mr. and Airs. White are active members of the Baptist church, of 
which he is one of the trustees, and he is also connected with a number of 
fraternal societies, including the Independent Order of Foresters, the \\'ood- 
men of the World, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. Politically he is an ardent 
Republican, and in 1900 was a candidate of his party for prosecuting attor- 
ney of the city. Public-spirited and progressive, he takes an active interest 



46 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

in public affairs, and withholds his support from no enterprise calculated 
to advance the general welfare. His genial, pleasant manner makes him 
quite popular in both business and social circles, and he is recognized as a 
valued citizen of the community. 

FRED RICE ROWELL. 

Fred Rice Rowell is actively connected with a profession ^vhich has im- 
portant bearing upon the progress and stable prosperity of any section or 
community, and one which has long been considered as promoting the public 
welfare by furthering the ends of justice and maintaining mdividual rights. 
His reputation as a lawyer has been won through earnest, honest labor, and 
his standing at the bar is a merited tribute to his ability. He now has a very 
large practice and is particularly well known in connection with the depart- 
ment of mining law. 

Although the extreme northwestern portion of the country is now his 
place of residence, the birth of ■Mr. Rowell occurred in the extreme north- 
eastern section of this fair land, for he first opened his eyes to the light of 
day in South Thomaston, Knox county, j\Iaine, on the 29th of December, 
1856. He is descended from English ancestors who were early settlers of 
Nottingham, New Hampshire. His great-grandfather, William Rowell, was 
born in 1755, and removed to Thomaston, Maine, where he spent the re- 
mainder of his life. He volunteered for service in the Revolutionary war 
and became a private in the company which was commanded by Captain 
Henry Dearborn and was attached to the regiment under command of Col- 
onel John Stark. He participated in the battle of Bunker Hill and in other 
engagements rendered valuable service to the cause of liberty. He departed 
this life on the 30th of September, 181 1. His son. Rice Rowell, the grand- 
father of our subject, became one of the early business men of South Thomas- 
ton, Maine, Vv^here he owned a sawmill and engaged in the manufacture of lum- 
ber. He owned a farm upon which he resided and where he died when about 
seventy years of age. 

His son, Luther H. Rowell, the father of Fred Rice, was born on the 
farm at South Thomaston and our subject was the representative in the 
fourth generation of the family born in the same room. Such a fact is quite 
unusual among the migratory people of this country and shows that the 
Rowells believed in letting well enough alone. The property is still in pos- 
session of a member of the family and thus for more than a century it has 
been known as the Rowell homestead. Luther Rowell was united in mar- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 47 

riage to Sarah W. Matthews and they continued to reside upon the farm 
until the time of her death, which occurred when she was forty-nine years 
of age. She left five children, all of whom are yet living. The father is 
now retired from active business and is living in Seattle, at the age of sixty- 
eight years, respected and honored by all who know him. He has been a 
life-long Democrat and in his early life served as selectman of his town, was 
also town clerk and held other local offices, filling every position to which he 
was called with ability and integrity and enjoying the fullest confidence of 
his fellow men. All of his family now reside on the Pacific coast. 

Fred Rice Rowell, the eldest member of his father's family, obtained 
his early education in the public schools, later went through the work of the 
senior year in the Cobern Classical Institute, at Waterville, Maine, and is a 
graduate of Colby College, in the class of 1881. Wishing to engage in the 
practice of law^ as a life work, he then began reading in the office of the Hon. 
A. P. Gould, in Thomaston, and was admitted to the bar. For five years 
thereafter he practiced law with success in Rockland, Maine, and wdiile resid- 
ing in South Thomaston was elected town clerk and school superintendent. 

In May, 1888, Mr. Rowell arrived in Seattle and was first associated 
with Judge I. M. Hall, in the practice of his profession. Later he was alone 
in business and then entered into partnership with Judge John O. Robin- 
son, the relationship being maintained for a number of years, while the firm 
enjoyed a satisfactory and lucrative general practice. Mr. Rowell, how- 
ever, is now again alone in business, and for the past two years he has 
delivered lectures to the class in mining at the state university. His 
clientage is large and his ability as a prominent lawyer is widely acknowd- 
edged. 

On the 1 6th of January, 1884, Mr. Rowell was united in marriage to 
Mary Florence Stetson, a native of the town in which his birth occurred, and 
a daughter of Emory L. Stetson. Both Mr. and Mrs. Rowell hold member- 
ship in St. Mark's Episcopal church. He is also a member of the Brother- 
hood of St. Andrew and a member of its council in the United States. He 
takes an active part in church work and does much for the upbuilding of the 
cause. Like his father he has adhered to the Democratic party and is a 
strong believer in its principles as advocated by the Hon. W. J. Bryan. He 
has done much effective campaign work for the party and has taken a deep 
interest in the affairs of his city, doing all in his power for its substantial im- 
provement. He belongs to the Washington State Historical Society and is 
a gentleman of broad general information and scholarly attainments, wdiose 
courtesy is unfailing and whose integrity is above question. 



4« REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

JOHN SANFORD TAYLOR. 

Prior to the g-reat fire of 1889 which destroyed the cit}- of Seattle and 
yet gave rise to the growth of a new center in the northwest, John San- 
ford Taylor took up his abode here. He is one of the upright and pro- 
gressive men that Scotland has supplied to the United States. He was 
born in the land of hills and heather on the i8th of February, 1830, and was 
brought to America by his parents when he was but a baby, \\lien he was 
a youth of only nine years both his father and his mother died, lea\ing a fam- 
ily of five children, of which he is now the only survivor. When left an 
orphan he went to live at the home of Allen McDermit, with whom he re- 
mained until his twenty-first year, residing most of that time in Canada. 
The educational privileges which he enjoyed were very limited and he can 
be said to be a self-educated man, but is now a citizen of broad general 
knowledge because of his reading and his wide thought and research, as 
well as his observation. He began life on his own account in the lumber 
w^oods as a chopper and by the time he had attained the age of twenty- 
six years he was a superintendent of a sawmill. Thus he had steadily 
worked his way upward. His mechanical skill in the work, his abil- 
ity in controlling business affairs and his marked enterprise won for 
him steady advancement, ^^'hen twenty-six years of age he embarked 
in the manufacture of lumber, on his own account, at Saginaw, Mich- 
igan, and was thus employed for thirty years. From that place he removed 
to Duluth. Minnesota, where he built a large sawmill and was there en- 
gaged in lumlDcr manufacturing for eight years. 

On the expiration of that time ]\Ir. Taylor came on a pleasure trip 
to Seattle and was so well pleased with the country, its natural resources 
and its advantages that he returned to his former home, sold his property 
there and immediately afterward came to Seattle to reside, arriving here 
in 1889. He invested sixty-thousand dollars in property in this place, build- 
ing one sawmill and a planing mill, and purchased a portable sawmill, to- 
gether with the other necessary buildings and secured all the equipments 
needed for the construction of a large lumber business, but in 1895 there 
came a land slide, seventy-five acres of land moved down to the lake in one 
body and washed away his large plant, together with sixteen dwelling 
houses. By this disaster he met with a very serious loss, but he still owns 
land and considerable other property. At present he is building a saw- 
mill at Rainier Beach, with a capacity of forty thousand feet of lumber per 
day. It is fully ecjuipped with a lath mill, shingle mill, etc. At the present 




Q^ , /f, <^^jH^^r^ 



THE NEW YORK " 

PUBLICLIBRARY 



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SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 49 

time he is living in a pleasant and commodious home, wliere he is sur- 
rounded with all of the comforts and many of the luxuries that go to make 
life worth living. 

In 1853 Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Jeanettc Louthian, 
a native of Canada who, like her husband, was of Scotch ancestry. Their 
union has been blessed with four children: William D., who is now a resi- 
dent of Seattle; David P., who is engaged in the lumber business at Daw- 
son; Margaret, now the wife of M. R. Metcalf and a resident of St. Paul, 
Minnesota, and John S., who makes his home in Seattle. There are also 
eight grandchildren. For many years Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have been lead- 
ing and influential members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
he is now a trustee, while for thirty-two years he has been superintendent 
of the Sunday-school and has also taken an active part in the important 
Avork of training the young to meet the moral obligations of life. Pie be- 
came a charter member of a council of the Royal Arcanum upon its or- 
ganization at Saginaw, Michigan, and has since changed his membership to 
Rainier Council, No. 1399, in Seattle, of which he served as chaplain. He 
lias made an excellent record as an honorable business man and he and his 
estimable wife enjoy the good will and confidence of all with whom they 
have been associated. From early boyhood he has had few advantages given 
to him. All that he is and all that he has acquired are the result of his own 
efforts, his remarkable ambition and his determination to progress in life, 
along moral, material and intellectual lines. His is a strong manhood, 
strong in its honor and good name and his life record may well serve as a 
source of inspiration and encouragement to others. 

CHARLES H. LILLY. 

The name of Lilly figures conspicuously in connection with the com- 
mercial history of Seattle, for our subject is the president and traesurer of 
the firm of Lilly, Bogardus & Company, incorporated, doing the largest 
wholesale business in the northwest in the purchase and sale of all kinds of 
cereals, flour, feed, seeds, poultry supplies and fertilizers. The business, 
which has now reached mammoth proportions, is largely the outcome of 
the enterprise and executive power of our subject, who began life amid un- 
favoring circumstances upon an Illinois farm, but through his own unaided 
efforts has advanced to a position prominent among the leading representa- 
tives of commerce in this section of the country. Of America is the self- 
made man a product, and the record of accomplishments in this individual 



50 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

sense is the record which the true and loyal American holds in deepest regard 
and highest honor. In tracing the career of the subject of this review we 
are enabled to gain a recognition of this sort of a record and for this reason 
there is particular interest attaching to the points which mark his progress 
in life. 

Charles Hervey Lilly is a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred 
in Champaign county, on the 20th of January, i860. He is of Scotch an- 
cestry on the paternal side and of Irish lineage on the maternal. His father, 
Robert Hervey Lilly, was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and married Miss 
Valeria Gordon, of Oswego, New York. He was an ordained minister of 
the Presbyterian church and an owner of farm lands in Illinois, where he 
had settled in 1842, becoming one of the well known and highly esteemed 
early residents of Champaign county. He departed this life in 1873, at the 
age of sixty-three years, leaving his widow and six children, of whom Charles 
H. Lilly, the eldest, was then but thirteen years of age. His large farm was 
heavily mortgaged and the vridow and her son Charles made herculean ef- 
forts to pay for and save the property. Mr. Lilly assumed the management 
of the farm and from early morning until dewy eve worked in the fields, 
aided by the good counsel of his mother, who was a woman of superior busi- 
ness judgment. They struggled on under the debt for five years, the crops 
sometimes suffering from frosts, sometimes from excessive rains and again 
from drouth, but they succeeded in selling some of the farm and thus sav- 
ing one hundred and sixty acres of it. It was a discouraging experience 
for a boy to undergo, for all this happened between his thirteenth and eight- 
eenth years, but perhaps it worked for his good after all, developing in him 
a strength of character, self-reliance and manliness which have proved the 
foundations upon which he has builded the success of his later life. He suc- 
ceeded in paying the interest upon the farm mortgage and at the same time 
enabling the younger children to continue in school, and at length gained 
a clear title to one hundred and sixty-four acres of land and the farm build- 
ings, which the family continued to own until 1890, when the property was 
sold. 

Mr, Lilly also eventually managed to acquire a good education for 
himself by entering the State University of Illinois, in which he was grad- 
uated with the class of 1884, the degree of Bachelor of Science being con- 
ferred upon him. He then turned his attention to merchandising in Thom- 
asboro, his partner being Mr. Bogardus, with whom he is still associated in 
business. In the winter of 1885-6 he purchased his partner's interest and 
continued the business alone there for two years. During his residence there 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 51- 

he was made postmaster of the httle town, but in 1889 he disposed of his 
interests in the east and came to Seattle. 

Since that time Mr. Lihy has been closely associated with the interests 
of this city and his labors have placed him in the front ranks of business 
circles. From March until November he was engaged in street contracting 
and in hauling building materials. Mr. Bogardus, his former partner, had 
gone to California after selling his property in Illinois, but came from the 
Golden state to visit Mr. Lilly in Seattle. They looked the city over together, 
agreed that its possibilities were good, its future promising, and then formed 
a partnership, which has since been maintained. They first did teaming, and 
in 1889 established their present business in a small store with a paid-up 
capital of three thousand dollars. They gave their business the closest at- 
tention and it grew rapidly so that they were soon obliged to secure additional 
buildings in order to increase their warehouse room, until they had the 
largest grain and feed business of the northwest. In 1894 the firm was in- 
corporated, each member still owning a half interest. At the same time they 
opened a branch house at Whatcom and the business was incorporated under' 
the name of Lilly, Bogardus & Bacon, continuing under that style for four 
years. At the end of that time the branch at Whatcom was discontinued, the 
partners deeming it best to concentrate their efforts at Seattle. In 1897, owing 
to the discovery of gold in the Klondike, the business received a fresh im- 
petus and increased still more rapidly, and in 1900 Judd M. Elliott, who had 
formerly been in the employ of the firm and had gone to Alaska, where he 
had been very successful in his search for gold, returned to Seattle and pur- 
chased one half of Mr. Bogardus' interest — the style of Lilly, Bogardus & 
Company, incorporated, being then assumed. Their efforts have not been 
confined alone to dealing in cereals, seeds, etc., for they are also the pro- 
prietors of the new North Coast Flouring Mills, of Seattle, and they have 
the largest and best arranged storehouses and warehouses and mill, all under 
one roof, to be found in the west. The dock which adjoins the large ware- 
house is one hundred and five by four hundred and sixty feet, and the wharf 
building is eighty by four hundred and sixty feet, and the largest building 
under a single roof in the city. The main brick edifice, which has been erected 
especially for their business, is one hundred and twenty-five by two hundred 
an4 six feet, is three stories in height and is supplied with all modern appli- 
ances and apparatus to accommodate and expedite business. Their new 
roller process flouring mill has a capacity of three hundred and fifty barrels 
per day and can be increased to five hundred barrels. The company are 
also agents for thirteen steamers called the Mosquito Fleet of Puget sound. 



52 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Thus the efforts of the firm liave been extended into broader fields of labor. 
The partners are all men of good business ability and carry forward to suc- 
cessful completion whatever they undertake. 

In 1885 Mr. Lilly was happily married to Julia Putnam, of Champaign, 
Illinois, and their union has been blessed with four children, as follows : 
Henry Wilmot, Farwell Piatt, Phebe E. and Marion F. The parents are 
members of the Presbyterian church and Mr. Lilly is a Knight Templar 
Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the 
Modern Woodmen Camp, the National Union, the Chamber of Commerce 
and the Merchants' Association. He has attained a distinguished position in 
connection with the great industrial and commercial interests of the state 
and his efforts have been so discerningly directed along well defined lines 
that he seems to have realized at any one point of progress the full meas- 
ure of his possibilities for accomplishment at that point. A man of distinct 
and forceful individuality, of broad mentality and mature judgment, he 
has left and is leaving his impress upon the business world of Seattle and 
his enterprises add not alone to his individual prosperity, but also advance 
the general welfare and upbuilding of the city in which he makes his home. 

ALBERT S. KERRY. 

The prosperity of any community depends upon its business activity, and 
the enterprise manifest in commercial circles is the foundation upon which 
is builded the material welfare of town, state and nation. The most im- 
portant factors in public life at the present day are therefore the men who 
are in control of successful business interests and such a one is Albert S. 
Kerry, the well-known president of the Kerry Mill Company of Seattle and 
one of the most prominent and successful business men of that city. 

Mr. Kerry was born in Kingston, Canada, on the 15th of April, 1865, 
and is a worthy representative of a good old English family that for many 
years has been engaged in the milling business. His father, Aaron Kerry, 
emigrated from England to Canada in 1846, but for the past thirty-three 
years has made his home in Port Huron, Michigan. Throughout his active 
business life he was a carriage manufacturer, but now, at the age of sev- 
venty-four years, is living retired. He is held in the highest esteem by a 
large circle of friends and acquaintances, who appreciate his sterling worth. 
In politics he is a Democrat, and in religious faith is a Methodist. When a 
young man he was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Wilson, who was 
horn in the city of Toronto, Canada, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and was the 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 53 

daughter of George D. Wilson. She departed this Hfe in 1873. Of her 
eleven children nine are still living, and four of that number make their home 
in Washington, these being J. W., Almond, Arthur and Albert S. 

In the public schools of jMichigan Albert S. Kerry acquired a good prac- 
' tical education during his boyhood and youth, and since attaining his ma- 
' jority has devoted his entire time and attention to the lumber business. In 
1886 he came to Seattle, Washington, and found employment in the sawmill 
of the Oregon Improvement Company as tallyman, and from 1887 until 
1894 had charge of their large sawmill. Tvlr. Kerry embarked in his pres- 
ent business in 1895, and two years later the Kerry Mill Company was in- 
corporated with him as president, in which official capacity he has since 
served. They have met with some misfortunes, their mill property being 
burned in 1897, at a loss of sixty-five thousand dollars, and although they 
at once rebuilt fire again destroyed their mill in July, 1901, this time their 
loss amounting to fifty-two thousand dollars, but they carried thirty-nine 
thousand dollars worth of insurance. Notwithstanding these disastrous 
events the company has steadily prospered and now has assets and timber 
lands amounting to two hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars. At the 
present writing they are building a larger and better mill in every respect. 
Aluch of the success of the enterprise is due to ]\Ir. Kerry, who is a wide-awake, 
energetic and reliable business man, who i§ not discouraged by adversity and 
is very progressive. 

In 1889 he was happily united in marriage with ^liss Aviary Monroe, 
who was born in Saginaw, Michigan, and this union was blessed by a charm- 
ing little daughter, but at the birth of her baby Mrs. Kerry died, leaving 
a loving husband and many friends to mourn her loss, for she was a lady of 
many admirable qualities and was very popular socially. 

In his political views Mr. Kerry is a stalwart Republican. He is a 
prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, having taken all of the Scottish 
lite degrees up to and including the thirty-second. A man of keen perception, 
of unbounded enterprise, his success in life is due entirely to his own efforts, 
and he deserves prominent mention among the leading and representative 
business men of his adopted city. 

CHARLES G. AUSTIN. 

Well known as an attorney of Seattle and ex-police justice of the city, 
Judge Austin has been prominently connected with the substantial improve- 
ment and upbuilding of the northwest along many lines that have contrib- 



54 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Lited to the general good. He was one of the pioneers in the grain trade 
of this section of the country, but is now giving his attention ahiiost exclu- 
sively to the demands of a constantl}- increasing law practice. A native of 
Ohio, he was born in Avon, Lorraine county, on the i8th of ]\Iarch, 1846, 
and is of English and German descent. His great-grandfather, Lewis Aus- 
tin, when a young man emigrated from England and settled in the state of 
New York, becoming one of the early residents of Auburn. His son, Lewis 
Austin, the grandfather of our subject, was born in that city and was a soldier 
of the Revolutionary war, who fought for /Vmerican independence. He 
afterward became an early settler of Avon, Ohio, where Jerome A. Austin, 
the father of the Judge was born, being the youngest of a family of eleven 
children. The grandfather and his family formed a part of the Black River 
colony that settled in Ohio about fifteen miles from Cleveland, first reclaiming 
the wild tract for the use of the white man. 

After arriving at years of maturity Jerome A. Austin was married to 
Miss Electa Teachout, a native of Germany, ^vho ^vas brought by her parents 
to the new world when but two years old, the family joining the Black River 
colony. The father was a minister of the Lutheran church and was sent 
as a missionary to the colony and became one of the pioneer preachers of 
that faith in Ohio. Unto the parents of Judge Austin were born six chil- 
dren. The father died on the 21st of ^lay, 1898, at the age of eighty-two 
years, while his wife departed this life in her sixty-seventh year. One of 
the daughters is ]\Irs. E. A. Dodge, of Seattle, while Mrs. Alec M. Smith, 
another daughter, resides in Springer, Washington. Arthur A. is in ]\Ionte- 
video, Minnesota, and Mrs. Ada George is also living in that state. 

Judge Austin was educated in the public schools of Ohio and Wiscon- 
sin, but in answer to President Lincoln's call for volunteers to put down 
the spirit of rebellion in the south that threatened the destruction of the 
Union, he put aside his books, and in September, 1864, although only eight- 
een years of age, enlisted in Company G, Eirst Minnesota Heavy Artillery. 
With his regiment he participated in the battles of Nashville, Chattanooga, 
Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain, and was afterward in the infantry 
service. Following the engagement at Dalton he was detailed to the ord- 
nance department of the Army of the Tennessee as clerk and served in that 
capacity until the close of the war, when he was honorably discharged at 
Nashville and was paid off at St. Paul, Minnesota. After his return home 
Judge Austin worked in a grain elevator and also took up the study of law 
under the direction of his uncle, William Teachout, being admitted to the bar 
in 1869. He had learned the milling business with his father, who was a 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 55 

mill owner, and ^^•as in the grain and milling business in Minnesota until 1877, 
which was the year of Judge Austin's arrival in Washington. He first lo- 
cated in Walla Walla, where he was engaged in the grain trade for a short 
time and then removed to Almota, on Snake river, when he entered the flour 
and milling business. Subsequently he removed to Colfax and had charge 
of the collections of the Frank Brothers Implement Company for all the 
district east of the mountains. This brought him continually into the courts 
in the trial of cases in which the company was involved. In 1883 he removed 
to Pomeroy, Garfield county, w^iere he was engaged in the grain business 
and also served as clerk of the courts for the first judicial district, filling 
that position until Grover Cleveland became president of the United States. 
He continued in the grain trade at that place until 1889, during which time 
he built up a very extensive business, having thirteen warehouses on the line 
of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company, and handling most of the 
grain raised in that part of the country. He has the honor of being the first 
wheat buyer in the county. 

In the fall of 1889 jMr. Austin was elected a member of the first state 
senate of Washington, representing Garfield, Columbia and Asotin coun- 
ties. He was a member through two sessions and was chairman of the im- 
portant committee on tide lands. In 1890 Judge Austin came to Seattle and 
organized the Seattle & Terminal Railway Company and built the elevator 
in West Seattle, of which he was the manager. He shipped the first cargo 
of grain from Seattle, sending it on the Mary L. Burrell. This brought 
the railroad to terms and gave to the city equal opportunities with Tacoma 
in the export business. Mr. Austin continued in the grain business until 
1896 and was the owner of a mill in Moscow. He thus becamiC a promi- 
nent factor in the commercial interests of the northwest and contributed 
largely to the commercial prosperity upon which the growth and improve- 
ment of any sections largely depends. In the latter year, however, he was 
again called to public office, being nominated and elected police judge 
of Seattle. He served for a term of two years and was also justice for a 
year and a half, capably discharging his duties, his impartiality and knowl- 
edge of the law rendering him an efficient officer. In January. 1901, he 
opened his law practice in partnership with F. M. Jeffrey and is now prac- 
ticing, his clientage increasing constantly. His first presidential vote was 
cast for Abraham Lincoln. 

Judge Austin was married on the 25th of December, 1873, to Miss 
Emma L. Grow, a native of East Randolph, Vermont, and a daughter of 
Mason B. Grow, who was descended from an old family of the Green Moun- 



56 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

lain state, prominent in its affairs. They now have four children : Ward 
C, Jennie L., the wife of V. J. Hahn, Herbert A. and Jay C. The family 
have a pleasant home at No. 1323 Third avenue, west, and are members 
of the Episcopalian church, of which Judge Austin is serving as a vestry- 
man, while his wife also takes an active and helpful interest in church work. 
Socially the Judge is a Mason, having become a member of the fraternity in 
Minnesota, and is a past master. He received the Ro3^al Arch degree in 
Pomeroy Chapter, No. 10, R. A. 'SI., and became a Sir Knight in Seattle 
Commandery, No. 2, K. T. He is also a member of Alfifi Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine, in Tacoma. His life history is in some respects not unlike 
that of many other citizens of this land, where opportunity is not hampered 
by caste or class. Quick to note and utilize an opportunity, earnest and dis- 
criminating in carrying out his plans, he has succeeded in the lines of work 
to which he has directed his energies and in the practice of law is also win- 
ning distinction. 

HERMAN B. BAGLEY, M. D. 

Dr. Herman Beardsly Bagley, now deceased, was one of the fir? 
homeopathic physicians and surgeons in the western part of the territor}^ of 
Washington — having come to this section of the country long before the 
admission of the state into the Union. He was a graduate of the homeo- 
pathic college of Cleveland, Ohio, and of the Bellevue Hospital of New York 
and was elected professor of the principles and practices of surgery in the 
Michigan IMedical College at Lansing, Michigan. He and his father, who 
was also an eminent member of the medical fraternit}', were instrumental in 
continuing the great struggle to obtain a chair of homeopathy in the Michi- 
gan State University at i\nn Arbor and it was largely throagh their efforts 
rhat this desired result was at last obtained. Well equipped for the import- 
ant life work which he chose Dr. Bagley came to the northwest, a gradu- 
ate of both schools of medicine, thoroughly understood the great laws gov- 
erning the science and made a record as an eminent physician. 

The Doctor was born at Auburn, New York, on the 12th of March, 
1845, ^^^ "^vas of English and Dutch ancestry. His grandfather, Herman 
Van Valkenberg, was descended from one of the noted Dutch families that 
first settled in New York, and was in his honor that Dr. Bagley was given his 
first name, Herman. The Doctor's father. Dr. Alvin Bagley, was born in 
the Catskill mountains of New York and was a member of the same family 
to which Governor Bagley of IMichigan belonged. He became well known 



PUBilCiiBRARY' 



ACTWI, LOrcoS Af»t 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 57 

as a medical practitioner in New York, Ohio and Michigan, and in the year 
1872 arrived in Seattle, where he resided until his death, which occurred 
in 1885, when he was eighty-four years of age. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Jane Van Valkenberg. 

When Dr. Herman Beardsley Bagley was only five years of age the 
family removed to Marshall, Michigan, where he was reared to manhood. 
He began his medical studies under the direction and guidance of his father 
and was graduated in the Homeopathic Medical College of Cleveland, Ohio, 
with the class of 1868. The following year he took a post-graduate course 
in the Bellevue Hospital of New York and in 1872 was elected to the pro- 
fessorship of the principles and practices of surgery in the Michigan Med- 
ical College at Lansing, which position he acceptably filled until 1874. In 
that year he resigned because of ill health and desire to join his father at 
Seattle. 

Soon after his arrival Dr. Bagley became sufficiently well to resume the 
practice of his profession and almost immediately took high rank as a member 
of the medical fraternity and during the remainder of his active life he stood 
at the head of his school of medicine in what was then the territory and later 
the state of Washington. In 1889 he was elected president of the King 
County Homeopathic Medical Society and in 1890 was chosen president of 
the Homeopathic Medical Society of the state of Washington. In ' May, 
1890, he was appointed a member of the state board of medical examiners 
and throughout his career here he was regarded by the profession and the 
public as one of the most eminent representatives of the- homeopathic school 
in the northwest. In addition to his high attainments as a physician and 
surgeon the Doctor also possessed marked business ability and good judg- 
ment, so that he was very successful in his real-estate investments in the 
growing city, being one of the city's most active promoters. He was pos- 
sessed of generous and liberal impulses and was a ready contributor to 
every public enterprise that had for its object the improvement and advance- 
ment of the best interests of this place. He was the friend and was in 
touch with the best and most prominent men in Seattle — the men who 
shaped her destiny. He was associated with D. T. Denny, George Kinnear 
and E. M. Smithers in organizing an enterprise for connecting Lake Wash- 
ington with Lake Union by a canal and for some time he was the presi- 
dent of the Seattle Improvement Company. In 1888 when the Washington 
National Bank was organized he was made one of its directors and at one 
time he was also a member of the city council. His influence was felt in 
many important public movements that contributed to the substantial de- 
velopment and progress here. 
4 



58 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

In politics the Doctor was an ardent Republican, a lover of liberty and 
a despiser of oppression of any form. While in Ohio, before the great 
Civil war, his father's home was one of the stations on the famous under- 
ground railroad, whereby many a negro was befriended and aided as he 
was making his way to Canada, where he might obtain freedom from bond- 
age. In the practice of his profession Dr. Bagley showed forth his real 
nature, for he was exceedingly kind and devoted to the poor and needy and 
by his many acts of helpfulness and kindness he endeared himself to both 
rich and poor, and thus as citizen and professional man he enjoyed the con- 
fidence and esteem of all with whom he came in contact. 

In the year 1864 the Doctor was happily married to ]\Iiss Catherine 
Minerva Sweet, a native of Battle Creek, ]\Iichigan, and a daughter of 
Daniel Sweet of that city, who was of English ancestry and belonged to 
an old New York family. In addition to his other investments the Doctor 
had become the owner of a fine farm of over six hundred acres of rich land 
at Renton, and there on an eminence overlooking the town of Renton and 
the Black River Valley he built a beautiful residence and there he and his 
wife lived ver\' happily, surrounded by beautiful scenery and enjoying all 
the comforts that go to make life worth the living; but death entered this 
peaceful home, the Doctor being suddenly called to his final rest on the 8th 
of February, 1889. His loss was a sad bereavement to his devoted wife 
and to the whole community. ]\Irs. Bagley had entered heartily and with 
deep sympathy into all her husband's plans and had been a valued help- 
meet to him. Both were Episcopalians in religious faith, holding member- 
ship in the Trinity church of Seattle. Such had been the Doctor's suc- 
cess in business that he left his wife in possession of a very good fortune, 
but in 1892 a disastrous fire burned the beautiful residence to the ground. 

Mrs. Bagley in 1901 gave her hand in marriage to her present husband. 
Colonel Mitchell Glenn, a native of Newark, New Jersey, and a veteran of 
the Civil war, having volunteered on the 17th of April, 1861, as a mem- 
ber of Company I, Eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which com- 
mand he served until the close of the war. He and one of his brothers 
were in the Union army and they had three brothers in the Confederate 
army. B}^ an act of great bravery Colonel Glenn recaptured the flag of his 
regiment, but in so doing sustained a very severe wound in his hand, the scar 
of which he still carries, and for this and other acts of valor he was from 
time to time promoted until he rose from the ranks to become the colonel 
of his regiment. His war record is a brilliant one, but like many of the truly 
brave men who fought for the Union, he is very reticent concerning his army 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 59 

life and his achievements during the period of his mihtary service. After 
the war he became engaged in the manufacture of engines and boilers in 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he continued until his removal to the Pacific 
coast. He has always been a stanch believer in the principles of Democracy 
and while a resident of Minneapolis he held various offices of honor and 
trust. He came within one hundred and thirty-seven votes of being elected 
mayor of the city on the Democratic ticket, although it is well known that 
Minneapolis is a Republican stronghold. 

Colonel Glenn and his wife have just completed the erection of a splen- 
did home on the site of the one destroyed by fire, and in planning this have 
exhibited much taste, both in the exterior adornment and interior finish. It 
is one of the most delightful homes in the whole northwest country, not 
only because of the introduction of a cultured and refined taste, but also on 
account of the generous hospitality which is ever extended to their many 
friends. 

JOHN TAYLOR. 

John Taylor, an honored veteran of the Civil war, who is now so effi- 
ciently serving as a member of the city council of Seattle, Washington, was 
bom in Adams county, Ohio, on the 22nd of August, 1836. His ancestors 
came to America from England at an early day in the development of this 
country and settled in Virginia, and his great-grandfather Taylor was one 
of the men who fought so bravely for the freedom of the colonies in the 
Revolutionary war. Jesse Taylor, our subject's grandfather, was born in 
Frederick county, Virginia, and in pioneer days removed to Adams county, 
Ohio, becoming one of the prominent and wealthy farmers of that locality. 
He died at the age of seventy-four years, leaving to each of his three chil- 
dren five hundred acres of land. 

His son, James W. Taylor, the father of our subject, was also a native 
of Frederick county, Virginia, born in 181 5, and at an early day accom- 
panied his father's family on their removal to Adams county, Ohio, where 
he grew to manhood. There he was united in marriage with Miss Cather- 
ine Laney, who was from his native county, her father having also removed 
to Ohio with his family at an early day. Throughout his active life James 
W. Taylor followed farming, and died at the age of seventy-two years. His 
wife had passed away in middle life. Both were devout Christians, hold- 
ing membership in the Methodist church, and assisted in building the Eben- 
ezer Methodist church near their old home in Ohio. In the family of this 
worthy couple were five children, three of whom are still living. 



60 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

John Taylor, oldest of the surviving members of the family, was reared 
in his native county, educated in its public schools and engaged in stock- 
farming until after the Civil war broke out. Prompted by a spirit of patriot- 
ism, he enlisted on the 24th of October, 1861, as a private of Company H, 
Seventieth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, but was afterward pro- 
moted to the rank of second lieutenant. During the hard fought battle of 
Shiloh he received a gunshot wound, which took from him his good right 
arm. Being unfitted for further service he was then honorably discharged 
on the 1st of November, 1862, after having served his country faithfully and 
well for over a year. 

Returning to his home in Adams county, Ohio, Mr. Taylor was elected 
sheriff of the county on the Republican ticket in 1863, and creditably filled 
that office for four years, after which he was engaged in mercantile business 
in West Union, the county seat of Adams county, until 1873, when he was 
again elected sheriff. He also served as master commissioner and deputy 
United States marshal, and acquired a wide and favorable reputation 
throughout his section of the state. He entered upon the duties of his office 
as sheriff in January, 1874, and this time served most acceptably for two 
years. 

In 1875 Mr. Taylor was united in marriage with Miss Clara S. Mullon, 
who was also born in Adams county and is a daughter of T. J. Mullon, a 
member of the bar of Brown county, Ohio. Unto them were bom three 
children, namely : Anna S., John L. and Louis Hicks. 

At the close of his second term as sheriff, Mr. Taylor resumed mer- 
chandising at West Union, and also served as postmaster of that place dur- 
ing President Arthur's administration. He continued in business there until 
1890, when he sold out and came to Seattle, Washington, arriving here on 
the 6th of January, that year. He at once became connected with James H, 
Wilson in the pension agency, but has now been alone in that business for 
some years. In 1894 he was appointed license inspector for the city and 
elected a member of the city council, to which office he has since been re- 
elected on three different occasions. He is now filling a four years' term, 
and is very active in promoting the best interests of the city of his adop- 
tion. He took a very prominent part in securing the municipal ownership 
of the splendid water system of Seattle, whereby the city now has an inex- 
haustible supply of pure mountain water, there being no better system in 
any city in the Union. For the past seven years Mr. Taylor has been actively 
identified with all the improvements that have made Seattle the delightful 
city which we to-day see. Politically he has been a life-long and ardent Re- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 6i 

publican, and fraternally is an honored member of the Masonic order, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Loyal Legion, and the Grand Army of the Republic. 
He has been a very prominent and influential member of the post at Seattle 
since its organization, has taken an active part in all of its work and for the 
past five years has been chairman of the relief committee. Public-spirited 
and enterprising, he is recognized as a valued citizen of the community, and 
vv^ell merits the high regard in which he is universally held. 

FRANK H. RENICK. 

The rapid growth of Seattle in recent years, the introduction of vast 
and undaunted. John Hamilton Renick, the grandfather, removed from 
made a great demand for property and has enlisted in the real-estate field 
many business men of marked ability and keen discrimination. As a mem- 
ber of the firm of F. H. Renick & Company, his partner being John C. Wat- 
rous, Frank Hamilton Renick is successfully conducting real-estate opera- 
tions, placing investments and selling property. He is also doing a loan 
and insurance business and his efforts are bringing to him creditable pros- 
perity. 

A native of Hartford, Connecticut, he was born August 4. 1864, and 
is of English and Welsh ancestry, the family having been established in 
Pennsylvania at a very early period. Robert Renick, the great-grandfather, 
was a soldier in the war for independence and served through the Mad River 
campaign, in which he won the reputation of being an intrepid fighter, brave 
and undaunteid. John Hamilton Renick, thei grandfather, removed from 
the Keystone state to Springfield, Ohio, and there took up government land, 
becoming one of the first settlers in that portion of the state. Subsequently 
he removed to Bellefontaine, Logan county, where he reared his family of 
seven children. He was a Presbyterian in his religious belief and a Whig 
in political faith in early life, but when that party ceased to have an exist- 
ence he joined the ranks of the new Republican party. His death occurred 
when he was seventy-four years of age. 

James Henry Renick, his son and the father of our subject, was born 
in Huntsville, Ohio, in 1832, and when he had reached adult age he married 
Josephine Sophia Dunklee, a native of Plymouth, New Llampshire. She 
was of English descent, her ancestors having come to America during the 
colonial epoch in our country's history. Mr. and Mrs. Renick removed to 
Hartford, Connecticut, and later to Brooklyn, New York, where they re- 
mained until our subject was eight years of age, when they went to Port 



62 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Huron, Michigan. Some years afterward they removed to Cleveland, Ohio, 
where the father died in 1874. He had for many years been prominently 
engaged in lumbering and had sold large amounts of lumber to the govern- 
ment, doing an extensive and prosperous business. In religious faith he was 
a Presbyterian, was an excellent citizen and an upright, reliable business man. 
His wife still survives and is now in the fifty-ninth year of her age. She 
resides in Detroit, Michigan. In the family were four children, three of 
whom are living : Grace is the wife of S. T. McGraw, of Detroit, Mich- 
igan, a member of a very prominent family of that city. Carrie has become 
the wife of Frank W. Osborne, a prominent citizen of Detroit and descended 
from one of its oldest families. 

In the schools of Concord, New Hampshire, and Buffalo, New York, 
Mr. Renick of this review pursued his education. For her second husband 
his mother married Egbert C. Bradford, the partner of her first husband. 
There was one child by that marriage, Walter G. Bradford. The family 
resided in Detroit and our subject attended the Bryant & Stratton Business 
College of that city, after which he became very active in the manufacture of 
lumber, also acquiring a practical and intimate knowledge of the business in 
all its departments from the purchase of the logs to the operation of the mills, 
the bookkeeping and the sales made. 

On the 13th of April, 1888, Mr. Renick arrived in Seattle with the 
intention of continuing in the lumber business, but an outlook over the busi- 
ness opportunities of the city decided him to turn his attention to real-estate 
dealing, in which he has since been successfully engaged. He was here 
during the great fire of 1889 and since that time has been an active factor 
in the rapid and substantial growth of the city, which emerged from the 
ashes to take its place as the queen city of the northwest. He passed through 
the financial panic successfully and has platted and sold several additions to 
the city. The business of the firm has grown constantly since its organize- 
tion and they have become investors for prominent eastern business men and 
have acquired a high reputation for ability and trustworthiness. 

In 1889 Mr. Renick was married to Miss Alice Caldwell, a native of 
California and a daughter of Dr. Robert G. Caldwell, now deceased. This 
union has been blessed with two children : Josephine Bradford and Grace 
Frances. The parents are valued and helpful members of the Baptist church. 
In politics Mr. Renick takes quite an active and influential part and is now 
treasurer of the Republican city central committee. He belongs to St. John 
Lodge, No. 9, F. & A. M. ; Seattle Chapter, No. 3, R. A. M., and is a mem- 
ber of the Order of Foresters. While an enterprising and active business 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 63 

man, he is also interested in scientific research and investigation, especially 
along the line of ornithology, and has made a large collection of the eggs 
of Washington birds. His study in this direction has resulted in furnishing 
to the United States valuable information on the subject and lie was the 
means of correcting a mistake made in the Smithsonian Institute, proving 
to them that the eggs which were labeled those of the black swift were the 
eggs of the purple martin. His varied interests have made Mr. Renick a 
well rounded character. He is not so abnormally developed in any one direc- 
tion as to be called a genius, but his business life, supplemented by study 
and research, by political work and the pleasures of social life, have made 
his a strong manhood. Elis business reputation is unassailable and among 
his many friends he is popular because of his genial and courteous manner. 

JOHN H. CLOSSON. 

John H. Closson, of the drug firm of Closson & Kelly, of Seattle, has 
been a resident of this city since April, 1889, and during all this time he has 
held the respect and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. He 
claims Vermont as the state of his nativity, his birth there occurring on the 
14th of August, 1866, and he is descended from English ancestry, who for 
about six generations have resided in the United States. His fatlier's mater- 
nal grandfather, Ichabod Safford, served as a member of the Vermont mili- 
tia during the Revolutionary war. His great-grandfather Closson was a 
prominent divine, while his paternal grandfather followed the legal profes- 
sion as a life occupation, and his granduncle, H. W. Closson, was a graduate of 
West Point and rendered his country valiant services as a soldier during the 
great Civil war. For generations the family have been identified with the Con- 
gregational church, and they have ever been people of the higliest respectability 
and worth. The father of our subject, Gershom Closson, has for many 
years been numbered among the leading business men of Springfield, Ver- 
mont, and he has now reached the age of sixty-three years. He married Miss 
Lina Loveland, a native of the Empire state, and also a member of an old 
English family, wdio were among the early settlers of Connecticut. Her fa- 
ther was a prominent manufacturer. She had now reached the age of sixty 
years, and is the mother of two sons, the elder being Gershom, who is now 
preparing for the medical profession, 

John H. Closson received his primary education in the public schools 
of Springfield and Hartford, and when the time came for him to choose 
a life occupation he began learning the drug business in West Lebanon, New 



64 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Hampshire, while for four years he was in Boston, two years of the time 
being spent in the city hospital and in the College of Pharmacy. After his 
arrival in Seattle he was employed by the large drug house of Stewart & 
Holmes until the 15th of December, 1890, when he opened business at his 
present location and with his present partner. His store is located at the 
corner of Occidental and Washington streets, where they carry a complete 
line of everything to be found in a first-class drug store. The business ca- 
reer of Mr. Closson is indeed creditable. Strong determination, persistence 
in the pursuit of an honorable purpose, unflagging energy and careful man- 
agement, — these are the salient features in his career, and his life stands in 
unmistakable evidence that success is not a matter of genius, as held by some, 
but the outcome of earnest and well directed effort. In his political views 
he is an unswerving Republican, and socially is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

The marriage of Mr. Closson was celebrated in 1894, when Miss >\Iil- 
dred Blair became his wife. She is a native of Wisconsin. They reside in a 
delightful home on Queen Ann Hill, and the household is noted for its 
charming hospitality, while its inmates have the warm regard of a large 
circle of friends. 

FRANK A. TWICHELL. 

In 1885 Frank A. Twichell became a resident of Seattle and by his 
life exemplifies the true western spirit of enterprise and progress. He was 
born in Washington county, Minnesota, on the 15th of November, i860. 
A family of English lineage of the name of Twichell was early established 
in New England and to that line our subject traces his ancestry. Soin 
Twichell, the grandfather of our subject, was born in New Hampshire 
in 1775, the opening year of the Revolutionary war. He became a well 
known and respected farmer of the "Old Granite State." His Jion, Ebene- 
zer C. Twichell, the father of our subject, was born at Pulaski, Oswego 
county. New York, in 181 8 aiid after arriving at years of maturity he 
married Miss Polly Twichell, a native of his own county and descended 
from another branch of the family, so that she was a very distant relative. 
In 1850 they removed to Illinois and in 1854 became residents of Wash- 
ington county, Minnesota, where the father acquired the owaiership of a 
large farm. He spent the remainder of his life there as an industrious and 
honorable citizen — one whose well spent life commanded for him the con- 
fidence and good will of many friends. An earnest Republican in politics 



THE NEW YORK^ 

PUBtiC LIBRARY 



TILDEM «>OUN0/TION8 



_; 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. , 65 

!ie ne\'er wavered in his allegiance to the party, yet he never sought or 
desired office for himself. He departed this life in 1887, at the age of sixty- 
nine years. His good wife survives him and now resides with her sons 
at Seattle, in the seventy-eighth year of her age, honored and respected 
by all who have the pleasure of her acquaintance. The family numbered 
eight children, five of whom reached years of maturity. The eldest son, 
Newton Twichell, at the age of eighteen years, volunteered for service in 
the Union army and was in numerous hard-fought battles. On one oc- 
casion he was wounded and as a result of his injury he died in 1864. 

Frank A. Twichell attended school in his native town and was also 
a student in the high school at Hastings, Minnesota. During the months 
of vacation he knew what it was to work hard upon the farm. He began 
earning his own livelihood as a teacher in the district schools and in early 
manhood also engaged in clerking in stores and to some degree mastered 
the carpenter's trade. For three years he was employed as a salesman in 
a grocery store, after wdiich he accepted a similar position in a wall paper 
and notion store. Later he learned the trade of paper-hanging and decor- 
ating. 

Believing that the far west offered excellent opportunities because of 
its rapid growth, he determined to establish his home in Seattle and arrived 
in this city in 1885. For two years he engaged in the wall-paper busi- 
ness and was then, in 1887, appointed deputy county auditor under Lyman 
Wood and was continued in the same position under W. R. Forest. On 
his retirement from the office in the fall of 1890 he received the unanimous 
nomination of the Republican county convention and was elected county 
auditor by a good majority. The duties of the office then included those 
v/hich are now performed by both recorder and clerk of the board of King 
county commissioners; also those of the purchasing agent for King county 
public institutions. The clerical work of the office was so great that it 
demanded a force of from fifteen to forty men. He performed the various 
duties with such ability, superintending the work of the office wath such 
fidelity that in 1892 he was again the unanimous choice of his party for 
re-election and received the largest majority of an)^ candidate on the county 
ticket. He was also elected and for two terms served as a member of the 
city council of Seattle, filling the office during the period of the re-organiza- 
tion of the city after the great fire. From 1894 until 1896 he was manager 
and part owner of the Cedar Mountain Coal Company. He then sold out 
and in 1897 went to Skagway, Alaska, as agent for the Oregon Improve- 
ment Company. In January, 1899, he became the general storekeeper for 



66 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the Pacific Contract Company which constructed the White Pass Railway 
and upon the completion of the road he returned to Seattle. At that time 
he was given charge of the government work at Everett Harbor in the 
employ of the Seattle Bridge Company, this work being completed in April, 
1902. 

In Hastings, Minnesota, in 1884, Mr. Twichell was united in marriage 
to Miss Estella M. Stanley, a daughter of William P. Stanley, and their 
marriage was blessed with one child, Marjorie A., who is now the wife of 
Walter Cuir. After fourteen years of happy married life Mrs. Twichell 
was taken from her home by death in 1898. Three years later in April, 
1901, Air. Twitchell was again married, his second union being with Mrs. 
Nellie Johnson, a native of Petersboro, Ottawa, Canada. They have a pleas- 
ant home which Mr. Twichell erected at No. 513 Thirtieth avenue south. 
He was a valued representative of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
in all of its branches and of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He 
is a past master workman and past grand master workman of the state 
of Washington and also past supreme representative. He belongs to the 
Degree of Honor, to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and in 
these various societies is a popular member because of his good fellowship 
and his fidelity to the teachings and principles of the fraternities. Pie was 
one of the delegates from Seattle to the Republican state convention held 
at Tacoma in 1902, and his influence is widely felt in political circles, as 
well as in various fraternities and in business life. He is a man of much 
knowledge, of high ability and of unquestioned integrity and he and his 
family have a warm circle of friends among the best citizens of Seattle. 
Many positions of trust and responsibility have been conferred upon him 
and in all he has discharged his duties in a manner that has gained him 
commendation, respect and confidence. 

ALVA C. SANDS. 

Alva C. Sands is the district manager of the Sunset Telephone and 
Telegraph Company, with headquarters at Seattle. He has resided in Wash- 
ington for the past eighteen years, having come here when it was still a ter- 
ritory, the year of his arrival being 1883. Mr. Sands is a native of Ohio, 
his birth having occurred on a farm near Cadiz, in Harrison county, on the 
:ist of January, 1851. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry on the paternal side 
and Scotch on the maternal side. His paternal grandfather emigrated from 
county Kildare, Ireland, and settled in the city of Philadelphia at a very 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 67 

early date in the development of that place. He was the progenitor of the 
family in America. His son, Robert Sands, the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was born in Philadelphia, and became a farmer, following agricultural 
pursuits throughout his life. He was an old-school Presbyterian of the 
strictest kind and his life was ever in harmony with his religious belief. He 
died in 1879, at the age of eighty-four years. In his family were two sons 
and a daughter and one son is still living, namely, Jolin Sands, a resident of 
Fairfield, Iowa, who is now eighty-one years of age. 

Edmund Thomas Sands, the father of our subject, was born in Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, in 1822. Pie married Miss Mary A. McFad- 
den, who was born in Cadiz, Ohio. They were members of the United 
Presbyterian church and the father was a successful agriculturist, devoting 
his attention to the work of farming through many years. He was also very 
prominent and influential in public affairs and was one of the organizers 
of the Republican party in his part of the county. He loved liberty and de- 
spised oppression and in ante-bellum days was strongly opposed to the intro- 
duction of slavery into the land of the free. An upright, useful and influ- 
ential citizen, he commanded the respect and confidence of all with whom he 
came in contact. He died in 1880, at the age of fifty-eight years, and his 
wife, long surviving him, departed this life in April, 1900, at the age of 
seventy-six years, being then a resident of Tacoma, Washington, making 
her home with the subject of this review. By her marriage she had four 
children, three sons and a daughter, and the sons are yet living, namely : R. 
G., who resides in Whitmore county, Washington; B. M., a resident of Ta- 
coma, Washington ; and Alva C. 

The last named was educated in the public schools of Iowa, whither the 
family had removed in 1855, the father having developed and unproved a 
farm in that locality. During the summer months our subject aided in 
the work of the field and meadow, laboriously attending to the duties of 
farm life, while in the winter season he pursued his education in the common 
schools during a term of three months. He was also for one year a student 
in a school of De Witt, Iowa. He remained at home until he attained his 
majority, after which he became connected with the theater business as a 
manager, and in that capacity traveled all over the country, spending six 
years in that way. Returning then to the old farm in Iowa he made it his 
home until. 1883, when he came to Washington, settling in Tacoma. Since 
that time he has been continuously connected with the telephone business 
and has held various positions, being promoted from time to time until he 
is now the manager of the largest telegraph office in the state, it being head- 



68 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

quarters for the whole Puget Sound district, which includes all west of the 
mountains and Yakima and Kittitas counties east of the mountains. Five 
hundred employes are found in the offices and Mr. Sands has entire super- 
vision, being in charge of the work in all of the counties of the state. In 
the control of the extensive business which this implies he has developed 
excellent executive force, keen discernment and superior powers of man- 
agement. 

Mr. Sands has been twice married. In 1879 he wedded Miss Mary 
King, a native of Syracuse, New York, but after nine years of happy mar- 
ried life she was called to the home beyond, in 1886. In 1890 Mr. Sands 
was again married, his present wife having borne the maiden name of Miss 
Nellie Clayton. She was a native of Evansville, Indiana, and like her hus- 
band attends the Unitarian church. Mr. Sands belongs to the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen and in his political affiliations is a Republican. Dur- 
ing his residence in the northwest he has built several homes in Tacoma and 
owns property in different places in Washington, thus judiciously investing 
his capital so that it returns to him a good income. He has the entire confi- 
dence of the corporation which he serves and is regarded as the right man 
in the right place in the position which he is so capably filling. 

MIOSES REDOUT MADDOCKS. 

Moses Redout Maddocks, a representative pioneer settler of the state 
of Washington, came to this territory in 1858. He was born in Bucksport, 
Maine, on the 13th of November, 1833, and is of Welsh ancestry. His 
grandfather, Ezekiel Maddocks, was born in Whales and on crossing the At- 
lantic to the new world took up his abode in Massachusetts, but later came to 
the Pine Tree state, where his son, Ezekiel Maddocks, Jr., was born in 1789. 
Later he married Esther Blood, of English and Puritan ancestn^, her people 
having located in New England at an early epoch in colonial history. The 
grandparents of our subject were members of the Congregational church. 
The grandfather died in the fifty-third year of his age, leaving a widow 
with four children, but she only survived him seven year and was laid to 
rest by his side in the cemetery at Bucksport, Maine. The old homestead 
there is still in the possession of their descendants. After the death of the 
parents, Abigail Maddocks, the eldest daughter, performed the duties of the 
iiousehold and made a home for the younger members of the family, the 
sons operating the farm. Mr. Maddocks' father was the youngest member 
of the family. He was only seven years of age when his father died, while 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 69 

at the age of fourteen he was left an orphan. After the death of his mother 
he spent two years with his uncle, John Boyd Blood, continuing to work on 
the farm in the summer, while in the winter months he attended the dis- 
trict school. Desiring to attain a more advanced education he went to Bucks- 
port and for two years was a student in the seminary, working for his board 
in the Bucksport Hotel, attending the stock and also acting as chore boy on 
the place. In 1851 he joined his brother, M. B. Maddocks, and engaged in 
farming and lumbering near the town of Brewer, where he continued until 
the fall of 1856, when he became imbued with the desire to go west and see 
more of the country. 

Mr. Maddocks then started for Minnesota, traveling by rail from Port- 
land, Maine, to Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. There he met two men by the 
name of Smith, who had formerly lived in ]\Iaine and who had come to the 
west on an errand similar to his own. They traveled together up Wolf 
river to Gill's Landing, where they purchased a team and then crossed the 
divide to the Mississippi river, proceeding on to St. Paul, and to St. An- 
thony, where Mr. Maddocks secured work in the timber and logging camps. 
In the spring of 1857, in partnership with two others, he purchased a port- 
able sawmill at the mouth of Rum river, where every prospect seemed pro- 
pitious, but shortly afterward the grasshopper plague swept through Minne- 
sota and destroyed crops and crippled their line of business. Mr. Maddocks 
continued his business under adverse circumstances until August and then 
came to the conclusion that he had not profited by his removal to the west, 
Therefore he decided to sell out and return to his native state. He sold his 
business for what he could get and took his pay in western money, which he 
disposed of at a heavy discount. He then returned to Portland, Maine, after 
one year, though he had left with the intention of remaining for five years, 
i^reading the ridicule of his accpaintances he turned about and went to New 
York city to take passage for California. After writing a letter to his sis- 
ter, he started as a steerage passenger by way of the Isthmus of Panama 
and landed safely in San Francisco on the ist of October, 1857. He thence 
proceeded by steamer up the Sacramento river to the city of Sacramento and 
on by stage to Oroville, where he engaged in placer mining at eight dollars 
per day and board, sleeping on a rude bunk in the open air. He there con- 
tinued to work until the fall rains and high water made further mining im- 
possible. In partnership with two others he then purchased a claim and 
one mile of ditch, and there mined for several months, but meeting with poor 
success they sold out their ditch for irrigation purposes and abandoned the 
claim. He then decided to try some lumbering country and returned by way 



70 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

of Sacramento to San Francisco, proceeding thence to Humboldt Bay, where 
he accepted a position in a sa^^"mill at forty dollars per month, but hard times 
came on and lumber brought but little price, so that the mill was shut down 
after ]\Ir. Maddocks had remained there but three months. 

Our subject again returned to San Francisco and and took passage on 
the steamer Columbia for Puget Sound, landing at Port Gamble in March, 
1858. There he found employment at good wages and after working for 
a short time received a contract for cutting logs to cover a period of one year, 
after which he purchased an ox team and continued logging for the company 
for six years. He not only made and saved money, but became one of the 
prominent and reliable citizens of the community. In the fall of 1863 he 
was nominated by the Democratic party for the legislature and ^^'as elected. 
He then sold out his logging business to Amos Brown and served in the 
territorial legislature in the winter of 1863-4, being very active and zeal- 
ous in doing what he could to promote the best interests of the territory. 
He made a gratifying record as a valued member. 

In the spring of 1864 Mr. Maddocks came to Seattle, and in partner- 
ship with Amos Brown and John Condon, he built the Occidental Hotel, 
where the Seattle Hotel now stands. He owned a third interest and took 
charge of the erection of the building. They purchased Ihe location for 
fifteen hundred dollars and for about a year conducted the hotel together, 
after which Mr. Maddocks sold his interest to John Collins, and purchased an 
interest in a drug business, in connection with Gordon Kellogg. This part- 
nership continued for about eighteen months, when Mr. Maddocks became 
sole proprietor and successfully conducted the enterprise for seventeen years, 
selling out in 1882, since which time he has been engaged only in caring for 
and superintending his property interests, having invested quite extensively 
in city and country real estate. He lost quite heavily in the great fire of June, 
1889, but before the smoking embers had died down, at the corner of Madi- 
son and Front streets, he had begun the erection of a new brick building, and 
thirty days later it was leased for a term of years, the rents for the first 
year paying for the building. He has been very fortunate in his investments. 
At one time he purchased a lot for five hundred dollars which recently sold 
for $70,000, and from the property he had received forty thousand dollars 
in rents. The lots on which he built his commodious residence, at the cor- 
ner of Fourth avenue and Cherry street, cost two hundred and fifty dollars. 
The property is now worth forty thousand dollars. He purchased four hun- 
dred acres of land -on the While river bottom and all of this property he has 
sold at a good profit with the exception of a tract of seventy acres on which he 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 71 

has built a nice summer residence, and is now conducting a dairy, having 
twenty Durham and Jersey cows, with several good horses. The product 
of the dairy is sold to the Condensed Milk Factory and he finds relaxation 
there in superintending his fine ranch and splendid stock, Mr. Maddocks 
was married at Seattle, in 1866, to Miss Susie Williamson, of New York. 
She is a valued member of the Episcopal church and Mr. Maddocks be- 
longs to the Masonic fraternity, having been made a Mason in Franklin 
lodge at Port Gamble, in 1862. His life has been one of untiring industry 
and activity, characterized by honorable dealings with his fellow men. 
Splendid success has crowned his efforts, yet his prosperity has been so 
justly w^on and so worthily used that the most envious cannot grudge him 
the same. He is to-day one of the most prominent men of the northwest 
and Seattle's history would be incomplete without the record of his life. 

WILLIAM GRANT HARTRANFT. 

It is a widely acknowledged fact that one of the most important works to 
which man can devote his energies is that of teaching, whether it be from 
the lecture platform, from the pulpit or from the school room. Such work 
tends to the elevation of man, prepares him for the duties and responsibili- 
ties of life and causes him to look upon life from a broader standpoint. Pro- 
fessor Hartranft has gained a prominent position in educational circles as a 
man of marked ability and to-day is serving as superintendent of schools 
in King county. He is a native of the state of Michigan, his birth having 
occurred in the city of Battle Creek, on the ist of December, 1866. Pie 
comes of German Quaker ancestry. His great-grandfather, Tobias Hartranft, 
emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1734 and was identified with the Society of 
Schwenkeld, a branch of the Quaker society having come to America in 
order to enjoy religious liberty. John F. Hartranft, a cousin of Professor 
Hartranft, served with much distinction in the great war of the Rebellion 
and for gallant and meritorious conduct was promoted to the rank of brig- 
adier general, while later he was elected governor of Pennsylvania, and the 
legislature of that state has erected a statue to his memory. He was one of 
the most prominent and influential citizens of the commonwealth and left 
the impress of his individuality upon its public policy and its substantial de- 
velopment. Daniel Hartranft, the father of Professor Hartranft. Avas born 
in Pennsylvania and is now sixty years of age. He makes his home in Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota, retired from active business. He has been a life-long 
Republican and has exercised considerable influence in political affairs. He 



72 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

married Miss Effie Stetler, a native of Ohio, and a representative of an old 
eastern family that early established a home in the Buckeye state. Four sons 
and three daughters were born of this marriage and the mother departed this 
life in the thirty-eighth year of her age. Two of the daughters, Mattie and 
Ethel, are now residents of Seattle, making their home with him whose name ' 
introduces this review. 

Professor Hartranft was educated in the public schools of Wisconsin. 
At the age of seventeen years he entered upon what he has made his life 
work, the profession of teaching, being employed in the public schools of 
bis native state until 1889, when he came to Washington. Here he accepted 
the position of principal of the school at Bucoda and was appointed on the 
board of teachers' examiners at Olympia. He taught at Port Orchard, while 
in 1893 ^^^ became principal of one of the city schools of Seattle. Under 
his careful guidance the school made rapid and satisfactory progress, many 
improvements being introduced. The people of King county manifested their 
confidence in him by electing him to the office of county superintendent of 
schools. He was a candidate for the position in 1898, but in that year was de- 
feated by a majority of ninety-seven out of a vote of thirteen thousand. Nearly 
the entire ticket suffered defeat, but he polled a much larger vote than was 
given to many of the candidates. Professor Hartranft was later appointed 
principal of the Queen Ann School in Seattle and in 1900 was again unani- 
mously nominated for the position of superintendent of schools of the county. 
He made a successful canvass throughout the county and at different 
places displayed the text books which had been adopted by the state 
board of education and which he believed were totally inadequate to the needs 
of a first-class educational system. The people recognized the correctness 
of his views and gave their endorsement thereto by electing him to 
the office by one of the largest majorities given to any candidate on the 
ticket. Professor Hartranft at once entered upon the duties of the office and 
with much energy undertook the work of improving the schools of the 
county. He visited the different schools and organized the county into 
five districts, in which teachers' associations are held once a month. There 
r)apers are read and addresses are delivered on methods of leaching and this 
plan is proving both beneficial and interesting and has contributed in a large 
measure to the progress of the schools. The Professor deserves the credit 
of having introduced this system into the west. His efforts against the text 
books have prevailed and those which were in use when he began his cam- 
paign have been discarded throughout the whole state. Only words of com- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 73 

inendation are heard concerning the work of Professor Hartranft, whose zeal 
and interest in his work inspires those who labor under him. 

In 1890 was celebrated the marriage of the Professor and Miss Mary 
Adams, an accomplished teacher and lady of superior intelligence and re- 
finement. She was born in Wisconsin and is a daughter of James N. Adams, 
wdio at the time of his death was the nearest living relative of John Quincy 
Adams. Mrs. Hartranft was a teacher in the Ellsworth public schools, and 
both the Professor and his wife are members of the Plymouth Congrega- 
tional church. He also belongs to the Masonic fraternity and has taken all 
of the degree of the Scottish Rite up to and including the thirty-second. He 
is connected with the Woodmen of the World, and has been a stanch Repub- 
lican since attaining his majority. Both he and his wife occupy a very en- 
viable position in social circles where true worth and intelligence are received 
as the passports into good society. It would be almost tautological in this 
connection to enter into any series of statements as showing our subject to 
be a man of broad knowledge and scholarly attainments, for these have 
been shadowed forth between the lines of this review. Though a man of 
strong convictions and fearless in their defense, he is always gracious and 
considerate in advancing his views. He is a man of strong individuality, 
keen mentality and of broad humanitarian spirit, whose interest in his fel- 
low men is sincere, while his work is ever permeated by a desire to advance 
the cause of education, which is the bulwark and strength of this nation. 
During the year 1902 Professor Hartranft attracted attention as one of the 
leading- instructors in the teachers' institutes of the state. 



'fe 



VOLLY P. HART. 

Volly P. Hart, to whose life history we now direct attention, has by 
earnest endeavor attained a marked success in business affairs, has gained 
the respect and confidence of men and is recognized as one of the distinctivel}- 
representative citizens of Seattle. He is the general manager of the New 
York Life Insurance Company in Washington, and has that keen discrimina- 
tion and sagacity in business affairs which when coml^ined with energy and 
industry lead to success. 

Mr. Hart is a native son of the Blue Grass state, his birth occurring at 
Hartford, Ohio county, Kentucky, in December, 1855, and he is of Englisli 
and Scotch descent. His ancestors were among the early pioneers of \^ir- 
ginia, and in a very early day the paternal grandfather of our subject located 
in Kentucky, where the father. John K. Hart, was born. He was there 



74 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

married to Elizabeth Woodward, whose ancestors were also from Virginia 
and Kentucky. When our subject was but two years of age his father was 
shot, being' mistaken for another rnan, and thus a truly noble life was sacri- 
ficed and a wife and t\\'0 little sons were bereft of a loving husband and 
father. His widow survived until the age of fifty-three years and the eldest 
son, John K., died in Los Angeles, California. 

Volly P. Hart was reared and received his education in his southern 
home, and when the time came for him to engage in the active battle of life 
on his own responsibility he entered the employ of a railroad company, 
eventually attaining to the position of conductor. For a number of years 
he was with the Chicago o: Northwestern Railroad, and for a few years there- 
after was an employe of the Missouri Pacific Company, at the expiration of 
which period he was caught in a wreck, thus being incapacitated from further 
railroad service. Since arriving* at mature years he had given a stanch sup- 
port to Democratic principles, and was elected by his party comptroller of the 
city of Sedalia, Missouri. On the expiration of his second term in that 
office he was appointed by President Cleveland as postmaster of that city, 
and served during the remainder of the latter's administration. The year 
1898 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Hart at Seattle, and since that time he 
has filled the position of general manager of the New York Life Insurance 
Company, his territory covering the state of Washington. His systematic 
business methods, his sound judgment, his enterprise and his laudable ambi- 
tion have all contributed to make his business career a prosperous one, and 
since assuming his present relations the business of the company has in- 
creased threefold. 

The marriag'e of Mr. Hart occurred in 1880, when Miss Kate R. Varey 
became his wife. She is a native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and a descendant 
of one of America's most distinguished families, being a relative of ex-United 
States Senator Charles Sumner and of Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase. The 
union has been blessed with four children, — Lela, Marion, jvate and Payton. 
Mr. Hart is a member of the order of Railway Conductors and of the Knights 
of Pythias. He enjoys the high regard of his fello^^• men in all the walks 
of life, and is widely and favorably known in Seattle and King county. 

ROLLIN VALENTINE ANKENY. 

In financial circles of Seattle, Rollin Valentine Ankeny is well known, 
for he is now acceptably filling the position of cashier in the Puget Sound 
National Bank. He was born in Freeport, Illinois, on the ist of Septem- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 75 

ber, 1865, and comes of French and German ancestr)-. The Ankeny family- 
was early established in Washington county, Maryland, and representa- 
tives of the name were conspicuous in connection with events which mark 
the history of Maryland in pioneer times and during the period of the Rev- 
olution. Ewalt Ankeny, the great-great-grandfather of our subject, joined 
the Colonial forces at the time when the Colonies threw off the yoke of 
British oppression and became captain of the Fifth Company of the Bedford 
county, Virginia, militia. He served throughout the war and his efforts 
were of value in promoting the cause of his country. Peler Ankeny, the 
great-grandfather of our subject, was a citizen of Maryland in early life 
but became one of the pioneer settlers of Ohio, while Joseph, the grand- 
father, was born in the Buckeye state and later became a factor in its busi- 
ness affairs, carrying on merchandising there. His son, Rollin V. Ankeny. 
Sr., was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1830, and for many 
years was engaged in the drug business but is now retired from active busi- 
ness "and makes his home in Des Moines, lov^'a. He married Sarah Irving, 
a lady of Scotch ancestry, and unto them were born five children but only 
two are now living, and the mother has also passed away. 

Mr. Ankeny of this review was educated in Des Moines, Iowa, where 
his parents removed during his early youth. He also entered upon his busi- 
ness career there as collection clerk in the Citizens National Bank and was 
associated with that financial institution for five years, during which time 
his close application, his ability and his fidelity won him promotion and 
when he severed his connection with the bank he was filling the position of 
bookkeeper. In 1888 he came to Seattle to accept a position in the Puget 
Sound National Bank, and since that time he has assisted in the conduct of 
the affairs of this institution, filling all positions up to anrl including that 
of cashier. He is now acceptably serving in the last named capacity, his 
incumbency continuing for more than six years. In 1895 the bank was cap- 
italized for six hundred thousand dollars and it does a very large business. 
All of the officers, from Jacob Furth, the president, down, are considered 
people of the highest ability, known as financiers of worth and regarded as 
reliable business men throughout the city. Mr. Ankeny devotes his entire 
energies to the duties of the office. Always courteous and considerate with 
patrons of the bank, he is at the same time ever alive to the interests of the 
institution which he represents and his labors have contributed not a little to 
its splendid reputation. 

In 1890 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ankeny and Miss Eleanor 
Randolph, a native of Des Moines, Iowa, and a daughter of Jacob Ran- 



76 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

dolph of that city. They now ha\e one son, Irvine. Their attractive home 
is situated at No. 812 Second avenue, west, and its characteristic hospi- 
tahty is enjoyed by their large circle of friends. Mr. Ankeny votes with 
the Republican party and socially is connected with the Elks and the Ma- 
sonic fraternities. Throughout his entire business career he has been iden- 
tified with banking and is thoroughly familiar with this important depart- 
ment of business in every particular. He occupies an unassailable position 
in financial circles at Seattle and the city numbers him among the valued 
additions to its business ranks. 

ja:\ies r. hayden. 

James Rudolph Hayden, cashier of the People's Savings Bank, is one 
of the state's best known and highly esteemed citizens. He has resided in 
Seattle for more than twenty years, making a most creditable record as a 
thoroughly reliable and successful business man. His course has ever been 
deserving of comniendaioii, for not only is he trustworthy in business, but 
as a public official he has manifested his fidelity to the public trusts and when 
his country was involved in civil war he was found among the loyal defenders 
of the Union upon southern battle-fields. 

]\Ir. Hayden was born in Oswego county. New York, February 22, 
1837, and is of Irish lineage. His father, Jarnes R. Hayden, was born in 
Dublin, and in his native city was married to Miss Alesia Connoly. In the 
year 1835 ^^ severed the ties that bound him to his native land and sailed for 
the new world, locating first in Canada, but after a short time taking up his 
residence in Oswego county, New York. The mother of our subjecr died 
when he was only three years old, and it was also his misfortune to lose his 
father bv death when he was but six vears old. He was then reared until his 
fourteenth year by a family named Fagan, who removed to Chicago, Illinois, 
in 1850. There he was sent to school and afterward was employed in *^he 
gallery of Mr. Straw, a celebrated photographer of that city, in whose studio 
lie was working \\'hen the great Civil \A"ar burst upon the country. In answer 
to President Lincoln's call for volunteers to put down the great rebellion 
he enlisted on the 14th of April, and served in the state forces until the i6th 
of June, when he joined Company A, Nineteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
with which he served in ^Missouri, Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia and Ten- 
nessee. The first important battle in which he participated was at Stone 
river, and later he met the enemy in the engagements at Chattanooga, Resaca, 
Missionary Ridge and Kenesaw jMountain. He was with General Sherman 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. ^7 

in the Atlanta campaign and at all times was tound at his post of duty, faith- 
ful to the cause which he espoused. In the engagement at Missionary Ridge 
he was hit in the belt by a ball which knocked the breath out of him, and he 
had other very narrow escapes, but was never seriously injured. While in 
service in Chicago he was a member of Colonel Ellsworth's Zouaves and was 
recommended by many of the members of his regiment for the office of 
colonel, but served instead as a staff and ordnance officer. In March, 1870, 
he v\^as presented w:ith a magnificent watch by the Chicago Zouaves. 

After being mustered out Mr. Hayden returned to Chicago and filled 
the position of supervisor of West Chicago for two years, while for several 
years he was deputy sheriff. In 1870 he was appointed by President Grant 
to the position of assessor of internal revenue for Washington and served in 
that capacity from 1876 until 1884. He was afterward appointed receiver 
in the Washington land office, with headquarters at Olympia, and filled that 
position for three years, alter which he was for a time in the insurance and 
real-estate business. In 1885 he was appointed receiver of the land office at 
Seattle, and entered upon the duties of the position just six days before the 
great fire which devastated the city. His teniu"e of that office continued until 
August. 1890, and then on his retirement from that position he aided in or- 
ganizing the People's ^Savings Bank, of Seattle, since which time he has been 
its cashier and manager. Under his able conduct the business of the bank has 
continually increased and each year the institution has been able to declare 
good dividends, showing that the business is conducted profitably. It is 
now numbered among the solid financial institutions in this part of the state. 

In 1863 Mr. Hayden was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Daul. a 
natives of New York city, and unto them have been l^orn seven children, of 
whom four are yet living The elder son, John L., is a graduate of the 
West Point Military Academy, and is now a captain of United States Ar- 
tillery. James Rudolph is now in Alaska. The elder daughter is Mrs. 
Wellington Park, of Walla Walla, and the }'ounger daughter, Alesia Ada- 
line Louisa, is at home with her parents. Mr. Hayden has erected a de- 
lightful residence on one of the beautiful sites of Seattle, and the family 
enjoy the highest regard of all with whom they have been associated. He 
is a prominent member of the Grand Army of the Republic and was senior 
vice commander in Chicago, and in Olympia past commander of George 
H. Thomas Post. He is also a past commander of the military order of 
the Loyal Legion for the strife of Washington, and takes an active interest 
in everything pertaining to military affairs. He was made a Master Mason 
in Chicago, in 1868, was past master of Olympia Lodge and deputy grand 



yS REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

master in 1874, also grand master of the territory of Washington in 1875, 
He is a past higli priest of Olympia Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M., and has 
attained the thirty-third degree of the Scottish rite, being the only active thir- 
ty-third brother in the state of Washington and Alaska. He has. been the active 
thirty-third of the Southern jurisdiction of the United States since 1883. 
He is undoubtedly the most eminent representative of the order in this state, 
thoroughly familiar with the work of the craft in all its departments and 
promotes the cause materially througli his well directed efforts in its behalf. 
He is also a member of the Ancient Order of United W^orkmen and has been 
a lifelong Republican, never swerving in his allegiance to the party v.hich 
he believes contains the best elements of good government. From 189 1 to 
1895 he was a member and the president of the board of regents of the State 
University and it was during his incumbency that the buildings were erected. 
His life has been varied in service, constant in honor, fearless in conduct and 
stainless in reputation, and his career lias been one of activity, full of incidents 
and results. 

FRED E. SANDER. 

Mr. Sander has been actively and extensively connected with railroad 
building in the northwest. Through this means he lias assisted in opening 
up to civilization a vast region with unlimited resources, providing for every 
kind of labor, giving homes to the miner, the farmer and the commercial 
man. The advent of railroads has marked advancing civilization in all coun- 
tries, and has been the means of uniting the different portions of America, 
making it an inseparable union. The labors of Mr. Sanders have therefore 
been of such a character that his efforts have benefited the public as well as 
advanced his individual prosperity. 

From his boyhood up to the time he came to Seattle he was a sailor. 
' The year 1880 witnessed his arrival in this city, where he first engag'ed in 
bookkeeping. In the meantime he read law under the direction of the Hon. 
William H. White, now supreme judge of the state. He also began to 
invest in city real estate and a little later became interested in the building 
of street railroads. He built the Yessler avenue cable line, which he owned for 
a number of years, and also constructed the Grant street electric line. He was 
one of ten v.dio built the Front street line, and one of those who built tlie 
James street lines, and was the original mover in tlie enterprise of building 
a line between Seattle and Tacoma. He is still extensively engaged in rail- 
road enterprises. Since 1883 ^""^s office has been located at the southeast cor- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 79 

ner of Yessler Way and First avenue south. Here he was burned out in 
the great conflagration of 1889 and met with a large loss, but immediately 
he resumed business at the old place. He has made a numbei" of additions to 
the city of Seattle, and in connection with others has done much building. 
He is still engaged in the erection of public buildings and private residences, 
also in otherwise improving- the city. For years his attention has been 
chiefly devoted to real-estate dealing and to railroad construction, and his 
efforts along these lines ha\-e become of great volume and importance. 

CALVIN E. VILAS. 

Among the best citizens of Seattle, esteemed alike for his sterling- worth 
of character and his activity in the business world, is Calvin E. Vilas, the 
vice-president and manager of the Washington National Building, Loan & 
Investment Association, of Seattle. He is a native of Ogdensburg, New 
York, where he was born on the 4th of November. 1856, and is of old English 
ancestry. His descendants w^ere among the early settlers of New Hampshire, 
and there his grandfather, Nathaniel Vilas, was born. He served as a sol- 
dier in the war of 1812, and was afterward a pensioner of that war. He 
was a prominent manufacturer and also postmaster of his town, where he 
attained to the ripe old age of eighty-three years. 

Erastus Vilas, his son and the father of our subject, was born in Ant- 
werp, Jefferson county, New York, in 1824, and now resides in Ogdensburg, 
that state, at the age of seventy-four years. He married Miss Emma Lake, 
a native of Chautauqua county, New York. Throughout his active business 
career he has been a manufacturer of and dealer in leather, and has long been 
recognized as one of the leading citizens of his town, in which he has held 
many positions of honor and trust. For many years he was a. member of the 
board of education, was at one time a water commissioner, and has been the 
recipient of many other honors within the gift of his fellow townsmen. He 
is a prominent and worthy member of the Baptist church, and since the form- 
ation of the Republican party has been an active worker in its ranks. Mrs. 
Vilas w^as called to the home beyond in 1883, at the age of fifty-one years, 
and she, too, was a devoted Christian, and was a faithful and devoted wife 
and mother. Two sons were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Vilas, the brother of 
our subject being George B., now a freight ngent for the Northwestern Rail- 
road at Milwaukee. 

Calvin E. Vilas received his elementary education in the public schools 
of his native place, and later supplemented the knowledge there gained by 



8o REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

a course in the State Normal School, in St. Lawrence county, New York. 
His business training was received under the careful direction of his father, 
and he continued to devote his attentjon to the leather business until 1890, 
in which year he came to Seattle, and has since been identified with the best 
interests of this city. He is engaged principally in loaning money and is also 
the vice-president and manager of the Washington National Building, Loan 
& Investment Association. Throughout his residence here he has taken a deep 
interest in everything pertaining to the welfare of the community, and is 
a progressive and public-spirited citizen who gives a loyal support to all 
measures for the public good. 

Mr. Vilas was happily married in 1882, when Miss Jennie L. Vilas, his 
third cousin, became his wife, and they have had two children, but the little 
son died at the age of se\ en and a half years. The sur\'iving child is Helen 
L. The family reside in a beautiful home in Seattle, where they extend 
a gracious hospitality to their many friends. Throughout the years of his 
manhood Mr. Vilas has given his political support to the Republican party, 
and while a resident of St. Lawrence county, New York, he held the office of 
supervisor, and was also city clerk of Ogdensburg, the place of his birth. 
He is an active and valued memljer of St. Mark's Episcopal church and in all 
the relations of life he has won the high regard of his fellow citizens. 

CHARLES BAKER. 

Forty years have passed since Charles Baker took up his residence in 
Seattle. When he arrived here he found a very small town, giving little prom- 
ise of rapid future development, yet it had natural advantages \Ahich Mr. 
Baker recognized and he tlierefore believed that he would take 3 wise step 
by casting in his fortunes with the new^ and growing town. Through all 
these years he has been interested in eveiT measure for the general good 
and has been a wide awake and progressive citizen, who from pioneer times 
down to the present has labored earnestly and effectively for the advance- 
ment of the northwest. 

Mr. Baker is a native of Cleveland, Ohio, his birth having occurred 
there on the i8th of November, 1840. He is of English ancestry and his 
parents were John O. and Charlotte Helen (Hopewell) Baker, the former 
a native of Portsmouth and the latter of London, England. They emi- 
grated to the Lmited States when young people and located at Cleveland, 
Ohio, wdiere they were married. He devoted his energies to the practice of 
medicine and surgery, as a representative of the regular school, being 





/^^k^6t4^ 



THE NEWVoKkI 

IPtJBUCUfiHARr 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 8i 

first located at St. Stephens, New Brunswick, and later a member of the 
medical profession at Collis, Robbinston and East Machias, Maine. In 1875 
he came to the northwest, locating in Seattle and for tw^elve years was a 
prominent member of the medical fraternity of this place, continuing as 
an active practitioner up to tjie time of his death, which occurred in Octo- 
ber, 1887. He was in the sixty-seventh year of his age. He w"as very 
devoted to his profession and attained eminence in his chosen calling, both 
because of his remarkable ability in the diagnosing of diseases, and also because 
of his skill in applying" correct remedies and in the use of surgical imple- 
ments. He was a gentleman of broad humanitarian principles and his deep 
human sympathy made it a pleasure to him to carry on his professional 
work and alleviate the suffering of his fellow men. He never stopped to 
consider whether his patients were poor or rich but gave his services to 
the former as to the latter and many a family had reason to bless him for 
his helpfulness in the hour of need. His wife departed this life some time 
previous to the death of her husband, being forty-three years of age when 
called to her final rest. Both were members of the Episcopal church and 
their Christian faith w^as exemplified in their noble and helpful lives. They 
were the parents of a son and daughter, but Charles is now the only sur- 
viving member of the family. He was called Charles John Frederick 
Beverly, in honor of friends wdio bore those names, but Mr. Baker says he 
never finds time to write all of the lengthy name and has dropped each one 
of the Christian names except that of Charles. He obtained his early edu- 
cation in the Washington Academy of jMarine and when fourteen years 
of age went to sea. follow'ing the life of a sailor for nearly seven years, 
during which time he visited many of the ports of the civilized world and 
gained broad and interesting knowledge concerning foreign lands and the 
manners and customs of various peoples. 

In December, 1862, wdien not quite twenty-one years of age, Mr. Baker 
arrived at Seattle, becoming engaged in the luml3er business, getting out 
logs for various sa\v mills. He afterward went to Cariboo, British 
Columbia, at the time of the mining excitement there, but has spent the 
greater part of his life since attaining to his majority in tl:.e Puget Sound 
country. For a number of years he was engaged in the grocery business 
ar Lowell in Snohomish county, successfully conducting his enterprise 
until 1880, when he sold his business there and established a grocery store 
in north Seattle. Here he prospered from the beginning and continued 
in the business for fourteen years or until 1894, when he sold out and re- 
tired from active business. He is now enjoying a well merited and well 



82 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

earned rest. In later 5^ears he has built a commodious dwelHng at 2344 
East Lake avenue and had made other investments in Seattle city property 
which have returned him a good income. 

On the 8th of February, 1871, was celebrated the marriage of ]Mr. 
Baker and Miss Emma Seavey, of East Machias, ]\Iaine, a daughter of 
S^dvanus and Cynthia Seavey, both of whom were of English ancestry, 
but several generations have resided in this country and representatives of 
the family were participants in events which form the early history of Amer- 
ica and in the Revolutionary war. Her father attained to the ripe old age 
of eighty-five years and his wife reached the extreme old age of ninety- 
one years. They were honest and industrious farming people and followers 
of the Christian religion. ^Ir. and jMrs. Baker have had six children : Ed- 
v.-ard H., who was born in Seattle; Charlotte H., whose birth occurred in 
Snohomish; Cynthia Elma, Avho was bom in the same place and is now 
the wife of R. G. ]McCausland; and Julia, Avho is attending the city high 
school. Two sons are now deceased: Charles, born February 8. 1873, 
died March 25, 1877; Albert, who died December 9, 1879. The family 
attend ser\nces at the Congregational church and members of the house- 
hold have the highest respect of the iDCst citizens of Seattle. Air. Baker 
has been a life-long and stanch Republican and in 1902 was the candidate 
of his party for the ofhce of supervisor of King count3^ He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, having received the sublime degree of a Master 
Mason of Warren Lodge, No. 2, F. and A. i\I., of East Machias, Maine. 
He now holds membership with the Eureka Lodge, No. 20, F. and A. M. 
of Seattle. His record is that of a man who through earnest and honor- 
able endeavor in business life attains success and also achieves a character 
that is above reproach. 

ANDREW CHILBERG. 

Andrew Chilberg, president of the Scandinavian- American Bank of Se- 
attle, AVashin.gton, is one of the leading bankers of the city and rapidly work- 
ing his way to a foremost position among the prominent financiers of the 
state. He has made an enviable reputation in business circles and occupies 
a position of no little prominence in connection with public affairs, although 
he has never sought political preferment. Llis life demonstrates what may be 
accomplished through energy, careful management, keen foresight, and the 
utilization of the powers ^^■ith which nature has endowed one. and the oppor- 
tunities with which the times surround him. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 83 

Mr. Chilberg was born in Sweden March 29, 1845, ^^^^^ "^'^'^s only a year 
old when brought to America by his parents, Charles John and Hannah 
(Johnson) Chilberg, who were also born in that country of Swedish ancestry. 
They were farming people and members of the Lutheran church. In 1846 
the parents, accompanied by their four children, James P., Nelson, Isaac and 
Andrew, took passage on a sailing vessel bound for the new world and were 
eleven weeks in crossing ihe Atlantic. They located on a farm southwest 
of Ottumwa, Iowa, where the father pre-empted and homesteaded lands, and 
there he successfully engaged in farming for many years. Other children 
were added to the family, these being Benja)iiin A., Joseph, Charles F. and 
John H., but Charles F. died in the thirty-second year of his age. Tlie 
father is now ninety years of age and the motlier died Jul}' 3, 1902. In 1882 
this worthy couple celebrated their golden wedding, and they traveled 
life's journey together for the remarkable period of seventy years, sharing 
with each other its joys and sorrows, its adversity and prospeity. In 1872 
they came to Seattle r^nd the father now resides at La Conner, honored an'd 
respected by all who know him. 

Andrew Chilberg was principally reared near Ottumwa, Iowa, and is 
indebted to the schools of that city for his educational privileges. In i860, 
at the age of fifteen years, he went with iiis* father and brother Nelson, to 
Pike's Peak during the gold excitement in that locality. There our subject 
worked on a farm while his father and brother engaged in prospecting and 
mining until the winter of 1863, when they returned to Iowa. 

The following spring Andrew Chilberg crossed the plains to California, 
driving horses, for which service he was boarded and permitted to go with 
the company. During that arduous journey he acquired indigestion from 
the poor food he was given, and from its effects he has never fully recovered. 
His fine constitution is all that has carried hirii through. The company 
"with which he traveled was four months on the road from Omaha to Sacra- 
mento. His brother James P. had preceded him to California and was farm- 
ing in Yolo county, and for some time our subject worked for him and other 
farmers, at twenty-five dollars per month. He subsequently went to Stock- 
ton, wdiere he worked in a large nursery for sometime, and also attended 
school at that place. 

Owing to ill health Mr. Chilberg fmall}' returned to Iowa by way of tlie 
Nicaragua route and New York city, and again attended school in Ottumwa. 
Subsequently he eng-aged in teaching- school for three years, and also clerked 
in a wholesale and retail dry goods house in Ottumwa for four years. In 
1874, at Ottumwa, he Avas united in marriage with Miss Mary, daughter of 



84 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

John and Hannah (Swenson) Nelson, now both deceased, and born at Bishop 
Hill, Illinois. The following year they came to Seattle, Washington. In 
the fall of 1875 ^'^^ embarked in the grocer)^ business with his brothers, James 
P. and Nelson, and together they conducted the store until 1882, when he 
sold his interest to his brothers, having been elected assessor of King county 
on the Democratic ticket. 

Mr. Chilberg creditably filled that office for two years. While ejigaged 
in the grocery business lie has been appointed by the Swedish government 
vice-consul for Sweden and Norway, and has since satisfactorily filled that 
position. He was also a member of the city council two years, and in 1884 
was appointed city treasurer, in Avhich capacity he also served two years. 
In 1885 he was appointed city passenger and ticket agent for the Northern 
Pacific Railway, and held that position until 1802, when he resigned to accept 
the presidency of the Scandinavian American Bank, of which he was one of 
the organizers. This bank was opened for business on the ist of May, 1892,, 
with a paid-up capital of forty-five thousand dollars, which was increased 
in 1 901 to one hundred thousand dollars, while its deposits now amount to 
over two million dollars. In the past nine years it has had an unparalleled 
growth and is to-day one of the sound financial institutions of the state. 
Aluch of its success is due to Mr. Chilberg, the safe and conservative policy 
which he inaugurated having commended itself to the judgment of all, and 
secured a patronage which makes the volume of business transacted over its 
counters of great importance and magnitude. In 1895 he was elected a school 
director, in which capacity he served for three years, and was president of 
the school board one term. Socially he is a charter member of Columbia 
Lodge, A. O. U. ^^^. and politically has always been a stanch supporter of the 
Democratic party. He is a man of prominence in the business world, his 
upright, honorable life having g'ained for him the confidence and high regard 
of his fellow citizens, and his popularity is justly deserved. He has one 
son, Eugene Chilberg, who was born October 29, 1875, who has been in 
Nome for three or four years and is secretary and treasurer of the Pioneer 
Mining Company, also interested ni the Hot Air Mining Company. 

WALTER SHEPARD FULTON. 

The name of Fulton has long figured conspicuously on the pages of 
American history, and he of whom we write has become an eminent citizen of 
Seattle. Although but a young man he has already attained distinction at 
the l^ar and is now serving as prosecuting attorney of King county, making 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 85 

his home in Seattle. He was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, on the loth 
of August, 1873, his ancestors having come to this country from the north 
of Ireland. Robert Fulton, the first of the name here, took up his abode in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, at a very early epoch in its history. Pie 
was the great-grandfather of our sul^ject, and fought in the Revolutionary 
war on the. side of the colonists. William P. Fulton, the father 
of Walter S., was born in Pennsylvania in 1840, and after arriving at vears 
of maturity married Martha ^^^^ite, a native of Wellsburg, Virginia. 
Throughout the greater part of his business career he carried on merchandis- 
ing but is now living retired, his home being in Akron, Ohio. He has always 
been a stanch advocate of the Republican party and in religious faith is a 
Presbyterian. 

Since the age of eight years Walter Shepard Fulton has resided with his 
uncle, Judge William H. White, now justice of the supreme court of Wash- 
ington. He acquired his early education in the public schools of this city and 
afterward attended the University of Washmgton. In one year's time he 
completed a two years' course in the University of Michigan at xA.nn Arbor, 
and was admitted to the bar before the supreme court of that state in 1894. 
He then returned to Seattle and began his law practice. He has succeeded 
because his equipment was unusually good, because he has applied himself 
closely, because he has been most diligent in his work and devoted to the 
interests of his clients. For three years lie served as deputy prosecuting 
attorney under Mr. McElroy and was then nominated by the Democratic 
party for the office which he is now filling. He made a brilliant campaign, 
delivered many stirring campaign addresses and was triumphantly elected. 
He ran far ahead of his party ticket and the signal victory which he won indi- 
cates his great popularity :n the county in which he vras reared and educated, 
and was also a tribute to his professional skill. Since entering upon the 
duties of the office he has tried a number of very noted criminal cases which 
he has prosecuted successfully, among those being the Nordstrom murder 
case, which resulted in the punishment of the criminal, notwithstanding the 
very able defense and untiring- efYorts of the opposing counsel. 

In November, 1898, Mr. Fulton was united in marriage to Miss Etta 
Nugent, of Port Blakely, Washington, a daughter of Captain Joseph Nugent,- 
now of Seattle. He is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution and 
of the legal Phi Delta Phi fraternity of the University of Michigan. Both 
our subject and his wdfe have a large circle of friends and are held in the 
highest regard in the city and state in which they have so long' made their 
home, spending almost their entire fives here. The hospitality of the best 



86 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

homes of Seattle is cordially extended them. In professional ranks Mr. 
Fulton is also widely known and his strong mentality, laudable ambition and 
force of character indicate that his will l^e a successful future. 

JAMES LEE. 

For u number of years an active factor in the industrial interests of 
Seattle, James Lee, through his diligence, perseverance and business ability, 
has acquired a handsome competence and has also contributed to the general 
prosprity through the conduct of an enterprise which has furnished employ- 
ment to others. Reliability in all trade transactions, loyalty to all duties of 
citizenship, fidelity in the discharge of every duty reposed in him — these are 
his chief characteristics and through the passing years have gained for hin-i 
the imqualified confidence and respect of his fellow men. 

Mr. Lee is a native of Canada, being l;orn in Woodstock, Ontario, on 
the 25th of August, 1865, and he is of English ancestry. His father, James 
Lee, emigrated to this country from England in 1840, and after his arrival 
took up his abode on a farm in Ontario. . He was accompanied on the jour- 
ney by his wife, who bore the maiden name of Emma Cholcraft. They 
were members of the Episcopal church, in which he was an active Avorker for 
many years, and his death occurred in Canada in 1884, his wife joining hiin 
in the spirit world in 1898. They l^ecame the parents of eight children, seven 
of whom are still living. 

James Lee, the only representative of the above family on the Pacific 
coast, received his literary education in the schools of Woodstock, Canada, 
while his business training was received in the Ontario College of Pharmacy, 
,in Toronto, in which he was graduated in 1886. For a year thereafter he 
served as a clerk in a drug store in that city, and then came to Seattle, where 
a similar period was spent as a drug clerk. In i8go he embarked in the drug 
business on his own account, at his present location, at the corner of Second 
avenue and Columbia street, where he has a storeroom twenty-four by one 
hundred feet, filled with a complete stock of such goods as are usually kept 
in a first-class city drug store, ife is recognized as one of the most straight- 
forward, energetic and successful business mien of Seattle, and in trade cir- 
cles he is an important factor. He is public spirited and thoroughly inter- 
ested in whatever tends to promote the moral, intellectual and material wel- 
fare of the city, and is numbered among its valued and honored citizens. 

The marriage of Mr. Lee was celebrated on the 24th of February. 1896, 
when Miss Elizabeth Paddock became his wife. She is a native of the Golden 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. By 

slate, her Ijirth occurring in San t rancisco, where her mother, Mrs. Nathaniel 
C. Paddock, is now residing. Two children have Ijeen born of this union, — • 
IJeatrice E. and Edith C. Mr. and 2\'irs. Lee are members of the Episcopal 
church, and he is also idenlified with the Masonic fraternity, exemplifying its 
beneficent principles in his every day life. He also holds membership relations 
with the National Union and the Ancient Order of LTnited Workmen. Li po- 
litical matters he affiliates with the Republican party, but has never been a 
seeker for political preferment, choosing rather to give his undivided time to 
lis business interests. 

ELMER E. CAINE. 

Prominently connected with the shipj)ing interests of the great north- 
west, Elmer E. Caine makes his home in Seattle, where he superintends his 
extensive business interests as the president of the Pacific Clipper Line. Na- 
ture has made this portion of America rich in resources, l)ut it remains for 
man to utilize these, and one of the most important elements in the business 
development of any section is transportation facilities, whereby products and 
manufactures niay be sent to markets. The gold fields of Alaska, which are 
being* so largely worked at the present time, have made a demand for means 
of transporting passengers and freight to and from that country, and it is 
to this enterprise that Mr. Caine is now giving his attention, his splendid 
business ability and executive force being manifest in his capable control of 
the vessels Avhich now constitute tlie Pacific Clipper Line. 

]Mr. Caine is a native of Wisconsin, h.is Ijirth having occurred at White 
Lake, near Muskegon, on the 31st of May, 1863. He is a son of Alfred A. 
Caine, who was descended in the maternal line from one of the Harpers of 
rlie famous family of that name at Harpersburg, New York. The father 
was a man of considerable means. After leaving school Elmer E. Caine 
v/ent to Chicago, Illinois, where he was employed in a notion house for four 
years. He afterward went with the Wisconsin Central Railroad Company, 
accepting the position of passenger agent at Minneapolis, Minnesota, and 
spending three years in that city. In 1889 he arrived at Seattle, where he 
became connected with the steamboat business on his own account as the 
senior member of the firm of E. E. Caine & Company, operating freight and 
lug boats on the Sound. He carried this on until he organized the Pacific 
Clipper Line in 1898, for the Alaska trade. The company owns some of its 
own vessels, but is mostly acting as agent for other owners. They reach 
Skagway, Cape Nome and other Alaska points during the summer season. 



88 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

In 1890 they built the steamer G. A\'. Dickinson, with a capacity of sixteen 
hundred tons, which has since been sold to the g-o\-ernment for one hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars. The company has also built two sailing vessels, 
of seventy-five thousand dollars ^■alue, -which were completed in 1901. They 
now operate ten vessels in the Alaska trade and receive a liberal patronage, 
so that the business, while provmg a profitable source of income to the stock- 
holders, is also of the g'reatest value as a means of advancing" the develop- 
ment and progress of the extreme northwest. 

Captain Caine is a man of resourceful business ability, enterprising and 
far-sighted, and in addition to controlling his navigation interests, he has 
made judicious investments in real estate in Seattle. He has erected a num- 
ber of residences, now owning' nine or ten good properties of that class, and 
in addition has other city realty. 

The Captain was married in ^Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Miss Minnie 
A. Roberts, and they ha\'e an attractive home in Seattle, ^^hicll is celebrated 
for its gracious hospitality. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks as one of its life members. A man of great 
natural ability, his success in business from the beginning of his residence 
in Seattle has been uniform and rapid. He possesses untiring energy, forms 
his plans readil}'^ and is determined in their execution, and has demonstrated 
the truth of the saying that success is !iot a matter of genius, but the outcome 
of clear judgment and experience. 

FRIDOLIN \\TLHELM. 

More than a third of a century has passed since Mr. \\'ilhelm came to 
what was then the .erritory of Washington, arriving here in the year 1866. 
The previous year he had made his way to California by the Isthmus of 
Panama route. He was bora in Germany on the 14th of September, 1841, 
and came of good German Catholic parentage, his father being Nathan 
Wilhelm. He w^as a farmer, following that occupation throughout his 
entire life. He reared a family of six children, four sons and two daughters. 
He lived to be eighty-four years of age. His wife, however, had passed 
away 'ten years prior to his death. 

Mr. Wilhelm was educated in b.is native country and there learned the 
cabinet maker's trade. In 1858, when he had attained his eighteenth year, 
he left the land of his birth for he had heard favorable reports concerning 
America, its opportunities for improvements and for progress. He sailed 
for New Orleans, his father furnishing him the money to pay his passage 



;|THE NEW rO-RK 



.t 



i 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 89 

west, enabling him to make a start in the land of the free. Proceeding 
northward he traveled to Kentucky and there worked at the cabinet maker's 
trade. He then went to Cincinnati and went to public school one winter. 
On the I St of July, 1863, the great need of the country for volunteers caused 
him to enlist in Battery E of the United States army, becoming a member 
of the Ninth Army Corps. He was in the three days' battle of the Wil- 
derness and was in many engagements, including the assault on Fort Sand- 
ers and in Campbell's station in east Tennessee. After Lee's surrender he 
proceeded with his command to Washington and participated in the grand 
review in that city when the victorious Union troops marched before the 
stand upon which the President of the United States watched his returning 
army. He never received a wound but had suffered with disease, having 
been afflicted with yellow fever. A part of the time he acted as a wagoner 
and was in the quartermaster's employ. At length he received an hon- 
orable discharge from the regular army in 1868 at San Juan Island, near 
Washington territory. 

As stated, Mr. Wilhelm made his way to the Pacific coast in the year 
1865, and in 1866 came to the territory. After receiving his discharge from 
military service he settled at Seattle and began working at the carpenter and 
builder's trade. In 1876 he built his first home in the city, on the lot where 
he now has an attractive residence. No. 622 Fifth avenue. It was in the 
same year that he was united in marriage* to IVliss Regina Bolhert, a native 
of Germany. Their family comprises three sons and a daughter, all of 
whom were born in Seattle. These are: John H., Frank Joseph, Frita 
A., and Ann Regina. Mrs. Wilhelm is a member of the Catholic church. 
Mr. Wilhelm belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and to 
the Grand Army of the Republic, and in his political views is a Republi- 
can, having firm faith in the principles and tenets of the party. He has 
taken a deep interest in the building of Seattle and has here a good brick 
store and other property. He has wisely invested his means and the 
judicious placing of his money has brought him a good financial return. 
He is a man of intelligence and ability and one of the valued citizens that 
Germany has furnished to Washington. 

GEORGE B. LAMPING. 

A new chapter has been written and added to the history of the United 
States within the past few years and it is one which reflects credit upon the 
country and her annals. It shows her military and naval strength and has 

6 



90 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

gained her a prominent place among tlie great powers of the world. His- 
tory is never the work of one or even a few men, but is the aggregate en- 
deavor of many who work in unison with a single purpose and aim. George 
B. Lamping" is among the number contributing to the new record, for he 
>vas a loyal soldier during" the Spanish-American war and in the Philippines 
faithfully upheld the honor of the starry banner that had been planted on 
foreign soil. 

A native of Spencer county, Indiana, he was born on the 20th of ]\Iarch, 
1875, and is of German, English and Scotch lineage. At an early date in 
the development of this land the Lamping family was established in Penn- 
sylvania, our subject being of the fourth generation born in this country. 
His father, Samuel W. Lamping, was a native of Kentucky, whence he re- 
moved to southern Indiana and was there married to Miss IVIary E. Butler, 
a native of Grandview, that state. For a number of years he was engaged 
in business as a commission merchant and in 1890 he came to Seattle as special 
agent for the United States land department. In politics he was a stalwart 
Republican and was a veteran of the Civil war who served the Union as a 
lieutenant-colonel in the Fifty-second Indiana Regiment at the time the coun- 
try was imperilled by the spirit of secession in the south. He was with Gen- 
eral Sherman on the celebrated march, to the sea which showed that the mili- 
tary force of the Confederacy was almost exhausted. He escaped injury, 
returning in safety to his liome a'fter rendering his country valuable service, 
in his religious views he was a Methodist and departed this life in that faith 
in 1893. His wife now resides in Seattle, respected by all who know her. 
Six children were born unto them and all are living upon the Pacific coast; 
Evart, who is the cashier of the German Insurance agency in San Francisco; 
L. F., a special insurance agent at Portland, Oregon; Clifton, a teller in the 
Boston National Bank of Seattle; Samuel, who is deputy auditor of King 
county under his brother, George; Frederick, who is attending school in 
Seattle; and Anna, also a student. 

George B. Lamping pursued his early education in the schools of his 
native state and at the age of fifteen accompanied his parents to W^ashing- 
ton, where he completed his literary course in the university of the state.' 
For a time he occupied the position of bookkeeper in the Puget Sound Na- 
tional Bank of Seattle, but when the war with Spain was declared he put 
aside business and personal interests, offering his services to the govern- 
ment. He was appointed second lieutenant of Company D, First Washing- 
ton Volunteer Infantry, and served throughout the war with Spain and in the 
Philippines. He ^^•as promoted to the rank of captain in the Eleventh United 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 91 

States 'Cavalry, and because of meritorious conduct was commended by Gen- 
eral Otis and General L.awton. He also served on the staff of the latter. 
Since returning from the v;ar he has been appointed liteutenant-colonel of 
the First Regiment of the Washington National Guard, since which time he 
has been promoted to colonel, with headquarters at Seattle. In November, 
1900, he was elected to his present office as county auditor and recorder on the 
Republican ticket, receiving the largest majority ever given to any candidate 
for an office in the county, running fifteen hundred votes ahead of his ticket. 
He is the youngest man that has ever held a county or state office in Wash- 
ington, now having charge of the business connected with the position in a 
county containing one hundred and eighty thousand inhabitants. He has 
under his direction thirty clerks. He was not long in demonstrating that the 
trust reposed in him was well placed, for his ability, keen discrimination, 
sound judgment and executive force would do credit to the administration 
of a man many years his senior. Colonel Lamping is connected with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men and the Woodmen of the World, and as a citizen and a soldier he has 
made a most praiseworthy record, his life work well deserving a place in the 
histoi*y of his adopted county. 

LOUIS HENRY GRAY. 

The above named, who is no\v actively engaged as traffic agent of the 
Pollard Steamship Company and in the shipping and commission business at 
Seattle, is a native of Pennsylvania and of Scotch and German ancestry. 
Plis paternal great-grandfather emigrated from Scotland to the new world, 
settling on the Hudson not far from Tro}^, New^ York. Henry Gray, 
the grandfather of our subject, was born there and was one of the 
first men connected with the operating" and mechanical departments of 
the old New York & New Haven Railroad in the days wdien wooden rails 
were used. In his religious belief he was a Presbyterian, and living- an up- 
right life he attained the age of seventy years. His son, Theodore Gray, the 
father of our subject, was bcrn in Troy, New York, in 1832, and married 
Miss Anna Sourbeck, whose birth occurred in Mechan.icsburg, Pennsylvania, 
and who was of German ancestry, although for generations her people had 
been residents of this country. Her father, George W. Sourbeck, was on the 
engineer corps in the construction of the Pennsylvania Railroad in the bridge 
department. After his marriage Theodore Gray resided in Allegheny city 
for about twenty years and was employed in the operating department of the 



92 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company. He was a gentleman of the old school 
and a personal friend of the late President William McKinley. Removing 
to Chicago. Illinois, Mr. Gray there continued in the mechanical department 
of railroading and as an expert on ice making machinery for a number of 
years. He died at East Brewster, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, August i, 1902. 
His good wife survives and is a valued member of the Presbyterian church. 
They had but two children, the daughter being the wife of Captain E. G. 
Brooks, of the United States Regular service. 

The son, Louis Henry Gray, was born at Allegheny city, October 4, 
J 859, attended the public schools of his native city and is a graduate of the 
Newell Institute in the class of 1878. He then left home for Wyoming, 
where for three years he was actively engaged in stock-raising. He made 
money rapidly there and on the expiration of that period sold out and re- 
moved to Chicago, where he opened a men's furnishing goods store and did 
a successful business for two years. He then disposed of his store and 
became a resident of New York city, where he accepted a position as- special 
agent with the Trunk Line Association, and after a year was transferred to 
tlie Central Traffic Association at Chicago. His connection with that busi- 
ness lasted seven years, and he w-as then given the position of contracting 
agent of the Great Northern Railroad Company at Seattle, arriving in this 
state in 1894. After nine months he was promoted to the general agency of 
the company at Seattle, \\'hich position he later resigned to accept that of 
general traffic manager of the famous White Pass and Yukon Railroad 
Company. After continuing in that capacity for a year, according to the 
terms of his contract, he severed his connection in order to engage in an in- 
dependent venture, turning his attention to the shipping' and commission 
business, in which he is meeting with marked success. His business activity 
in the northwest has extended to other lines and he is now a stockholder in 
several steamships and sailing vessels. 

In 1893 ^'^^'- Gray was united in marriage with ]\Iiss Halcon, daughter 
of John Robertson, of Jamestown, New York. The latter was formerly one 
of the most prominent oil operators in Pennsylvania, also served as sheriff 
of Chautauqua county. New York, for a number of years, and died in 1891. 
The Robertson family was of Scotch lineage, but through many generations 
its representatives have been connected with this country. Mrs. Gray is an 
active and valued member of the Advisory Board of the Ladies' Relief So- 
ciety of Seattle and is now serving as its chairman. She is also chairman of 
the Advisory Board of the Charity Organization Society of this city and oi 
the Advisory Board of the Seattle Day Nursery, taking a deep interest in the 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 93 

little orphan children. Her philanthropy and her benevolences have made 
her a valued friend to many unfortunate people. She belongs to St. Mark's 
Episcopal church and in her life exemplifies the true spirit of Christianity. 
Mr. Gray has attained a high rank in Masonic circles, having taken the 
Knights Templar degree and the Scottish Rite, up to and including the thirty - 
second degree. He is also a member of the Mystic Shrine, and in politics is a 
Republican. Both Mr. and Mrs. Gray have a large circle of friends in Seattle 
and the hospitality of the best homes is extended to them. In business Mr. 
Gray has attained very creditable and honorable success, and those who have 
been associated with him and are fully conversant with his life and his business 
niethods speak of him in terms of highest praise, considering him as one of the 
best posted traffic men on the Pacific coast. 

TIMOTHEUS JOSENHANS. 

Among the leading business men of .Seattle who have been prominently 
identified with the upbuilding of that city is numbered Timotheus Josenhans, 
the senior member of the well-known firm of Josenhans & Allan, architects, 
with office at 74 and 75 Hinckley Block. Here he has made his home since 
1888. He was born near Stuttgart, in the province of Wurtemberg, Ger- 
many, on the nth of October, 1853, and is a son of Jonathan Josenhans, 
who was engaged in mercantile business in that country until 1855, when 
he brought his family to the United States and settled on a farm that is no\\' 
within the corporate limits of Ann Arbor, Michigan. There he continues 
to make his home, being now eighty-six years of age, while his wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Charlotte Weigle, is about eighty years old. Unto 
them were born twelve children, seven sons and five daughters. 

The early education of our subject, acquired in the public schools of 
Michigan, was supplemented by a course at Ann Arbor University, where 
he was graduated in the civil engineering department in 1878. He also 
took up the study of architecture under W. L. B. Jenny, now of Chicago. 
On the completion of his education he taught German in the public schools 
of McGregor, Iowa, for a year, and then went to New Mexico, becoming 
connected with the engineering corps in the construction of the Atlantic & 
Pacific Railroad. After a year and a half he was forced to leave the territory 
on account of ill health and went to San Diego, California, where he became 
interested in the construction of the California Southern Railwav, from that 
place to San Bernardino, and was with that company until the completion 
of the road. Riverside was just being laid out at that time. 



94 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

On leaving California Mr. Josenhans went to Portland, Oregon, and 
entered upon his career as an architect in the office of Mr. Sherwin, an 
English architect, with whom he remained until the latter's death. He was 
next with \V, H. Williams, the most prominent architect of the city, and 
since then he has been connected with architectural work rather than engi- 
neering except when he had charge of the construction of the West Point 
light house in King county. Being pleased with this section of the country, 
lie located at Seattle in the spring of 1888, and for a time was employed as 
foreman by H. Steinman. Three years later he started in business on his 
own account, and at the end of two years entered into partnership with 
James Stephen, a connection which continued until the latter went to Alaska 
in 1895. During the following two years Mr. Josenhans was again alone in 
business, but in 1897 formed his present partnership with Norris B. Allan. 
Among the many important public buildings and residences he has erected 
may be mentioned the administration building and dormitory of the Agri- 
cultural College, and he is now putting up two other buildings for the samie 
institution — one the gymnasium and armory, the other the chemistry build- 
ing. He also erected two dormitories for the State University and is now 
building the science hall and power house for that college. He built the fine 
residences of Alden J. Blethen, Jr., at the corner of Highland Drive and 
Fifth avenue west; that of Rev. Wallace Nutting, now owned by Mary M. 
Miller; the homes of A. M. Cadien and P. L. Runkle; and a double house 
for A. Hancock. While with Mr. Steinman he also designed many of the 
warehouses of Seattle, the power houses for the cable and electric railways, 
and many blocks that are now standing, besides numerous buildings that 
were destroyed in the great fire that swept over the city in 1889. 

On the 15th of May, 1889, Mr. Josenhans was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma L. Parsons, who was born in Sivas, Asia Minor, where her 
parents were missionaries at the time, but she was educated at Ann Arbor, 
?\Iichigan. Her father. Rev. Benjamin Parsons, was a native of New Jersey. 
His son, Henr}^ Parsons, who was also born in Sivas, became a noted chem- 
ist and was connected with the agricultural department at Washington, D. C. 
Later he was a professor at Ann Arbor University. Charles Parsons, an- 
other son, is editor of the Pharmaceutical Era of New York, published by 
D. O. Haynes, of the Commercial Advertiser, who was a classmate of our 
subject while in college. Mr. and Mrs. Josenhans have two children: Sarah 
Charlotte and Margaret Parsons. The family have a pleasant home in 
Seattle which has been remodeled and greatly improved since it came into 
possession of our subject. They hold membership in the Plymouth Con- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 95 

gregational church and have a large circle of friends and acquaintances in 
their adopted city. 

Politically Mr. Josenhans generally affiliates with the Republican party, 
but at local elections votes independently of party lines, supporting the men 
whom he believes best qualified for office. He served as building inspector 
for a year and a half and then resigned. He occupies an enviable position in 
business circles, Avhere his true worth is widely recognized. He is a man of 
strong force of character, purposeful and energetic, and keen discrimination 
and sound judgment are shown in the capable management of his business 
affairs. 

CARL HOFFMAN, M. D. 

Dr. Carl Hoffman is one of the younger men of Seattle who has be- 
come firmly established in the medical profession here as one of its ablest 
representatives and is also well known in the musical circles of the city, his 
talent in this regard rendering him a favorite among the music lovers. The 
Doctor is a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Washington, near 
the city of Peoria, in 1872. His father, A. G. Hoffman, who is now re- 
siding in Omaha, Nebraska, was born in Germany and when twenty years 
of age came to America. He has been engaged in business in Illinois and in 
Florida and for fifteen years has been connected with the business interests 
of Omaha. He was married in Illinois to Miss Sarah Kelso, who is of Scotch 
descent, members of the family having come from Scotland to this country 
prior to 1700. The Doctor is the elder of two sons born unto his parents, 
his brother being now a resident of St. Louis. 

In the schools of his native state Dr. Hoffman began his education, 
which was continued in Florida, to which state he accompanied his parents 
when fourteen years of age. As there were no good pul)lic schools there he 
was instructed by private tutors while in the south, afterward attended 
Creighton University, in Omaha, and subsequently took up the study of medi- 
cine there, having formed a desire to make its practice his life work. That 
this step was wisely taken is proven by the success which has since attended 
his efforts in the medical field. He was graduated in the John A. Creighton 
Medical College with the class of 1896, and subsequently opened an office in 
Omaha, beginning practice alone. After a year he removed to Moscow, 
Idaho, from which place he came to this city. He was called here in con- 
sultation and was so pleased with the city and its prospects that he deter- 
mined to locate here. Accordingly he returned to Moscow, closed out his 



96 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

business there and in the course of six weeks was estabHshed in his office 
here. From the beginning he has enjoyed a good practice in both medicine 
and surgery. He is continuahy reading in order to broaden his understand- 
ing of the human system and its needs in health and disease, and the profes- 
sion as well as the public accords to him a prominent place in the calling 
which he has chosen as a life worl^. He is now the physician for the county 
jail, and in addition, to this he has a large private practice. 

Dr. Hoffman was married in Omaha, in November, 1896, to Aliss 
Ina, a daughter of H. B. Kennedy, of that city, and they have one son, Carl. 
The Doctor is a Republican in politics but takes no active part in political 
work. He belongs to the Bene\'olent and Protective Order of Elks and in 
the line of his profession is identified vrith the King County Medical Asso- 
ciation, the Washington State Medical Association and the American Medi- 
cal Association. Both the Doctor and his wife are prominent and popular 
in musical circles and both possess considerable ability in the art. The Doc- 
tor possesses a fine bass voice and has studied in Omaha and Seattle and also 
under W. H. Niedlinge, a successful composer and teacher. He and his wife, 
together with Professor F. W. Zimmerman and Aliss Alamie Grove, have 
given some very delightful and successful concerts here and have rendered 
some of the finest operas in a manner superior to anything ever given in 
Seattle. The Doctor has also done considerable in church choir work. He 
is a member of the Trinity Parish church choir and has also sung in St. 
Mark's church. Aside from music, fishing is his chief source of recreation 
from the arduous demands of a profession, which is making greater and 
greater claims upon his time, but whose successful practice has given him 
standing among the foremost representatives of medical science in the city. 

ERASMUS M. SMITHERS. 

The gentleman whose life history we now take briefly under re\"iew 
has the distinction of being one of the honored pioneers of the Pacific coast 
and the founder of the attractive and thriving little city of Renton, King 
county, Washington, since he settled on the land where the town is now 
located in 1853, his farm being fifteen miles distant from what is now the 
great city of Seattle, while at the time of his location here there was not 
a white settler other than himself at a point nearer than the city mentioned, 
which was then a mere frontier settlement. In a retrospecti\'e way those 
of the present generation may gain from the narratives and reminiscences 
of Mr. Smithers an idea of the wonderful transitions that have taken place 







^<f<f^t4^i 




yn-RK ' 
/vRY 



TILOEK <»OUND,«TlCKV3, « 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 97 

since he first located in what is now a great and opulent state, and it is a 
satisfaction to here enter a perpetual record concerning the life and labors 
of this honored pioner, though the limitations of this publication will not 
justify the entering into the manifold details of his experiences, though the 
record could not fail to prove of interest. 

Erasmus M. Smithers is a native of Virginia, where he was born on 
the 17th of February, 1830, the family being of English origin and rep- 
resentatives of the name having been numbered among the early settlers 
in Virginia and North Carolina. His father, Samuel Smithers, was like- 
wise born in Virginia, and there he married a Miss Hale, also a represen- 
tative of one of the old families of that great commonwealth, where was 
cradled so much of our national history. The father was a planter and 
was a man of strong mentality and sterling character, both he and his 
estimable wife having passed their entire lives in Virginia. Erasmus M. 
was reared to maturity in Virginia and his early education was. very limited 
in scope. He has, however, gained the valuable lessons of experience 
through personal application and through active association with the prac- 
tical affairs of life, being thus self-educated, even as he is the architect of 
his own fortunes. When nineteen years of age he left the old home and 
set forth to l3ecome one of the venturesome and intrepid pioneers of the 
great west. It may be said that he had no intention of coming through to 
Oregon, his starting forth on the long journey being largely a matter of 
accident, as a friend had informed him that two young ladies were about 
to- start for this section with a company, and that one of the members of 
the party desired to secure the services of a young man to aid him during 
the journey across the plains. The information thus, conveyed indirectly 
led Mr. Smithers to have an interview with the man mentioned, Green 
Olds, who was a brother of the captain of the company. Our subject was 
at that time a slender youth, his appearance not indicating that he could 
endure much hardship, and after looking him over Mr. Olds stated that 
he did not want him. Mr.' Smithers then asked what he would charge to. 
take him along with the company, and upon a price of fifty dollars being 
set he immediately accepted the proposition. On the 8th of May, 1852, 
the company, with twenty wagons drawn by ox teams, started on the long 
and perilous journey, Mr. Smithers doing no active work on the start, as 
he had paid for his passage, but he soon grew weary of his inactivity and 
began to assist in the work incidental to the trip and proved not only his 
endurance but his marked facility in discharging the duties which he vol- 
untarily assumed. While enroute they encountered many vast herds of 



98 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

buffalo, and our subject killed a number of these noble beasts and other 
game, with which to supply the larder of the party. That was a year of 
extensive emigration, and many died of cholera while making their way 
to the far west, but the company of which Mr. Smithers was a member 
fortunately escaped the ravages of this scourge. When ■ fifteen miles west 
of Omaha, Nebraska, a large band of Indians met them at a bridge and 
demanded a payment of one dollar a wagon before they passed on. The 
captain refused to pay, and drove his team across the bridge, and as Mr. 
Olds hesitated, fearing results, our subject took the whip and drove the 
wagon across, this having been the second to make the attempt, and the 
oxen in the lead was seized by one of the Indians, who held it by the horn 
until he was felled with a whip. The savages gave the war cry, greatly 
frightening the women of the party, but the men showed their determina- 
tion to fight and the Indians finally withdrew, though they continued to 
follow the party for three or four days, rendering it necessary to main- 
tain a guard every night. During the last of the trip Mr. Olds was ill, 
and Mr. Smithers made himself very useful and helpful, a strong friend- 
ship being thus cemented. Our subject has lost trace of his old-time friend, 
whom he pronounces one of the best men he has ever known, and he ex- 
presses the wish that this tribute be incorporated in this article, hoping 
that Mr. Olds is still living and that this acknowledgment of his kindness 
may come to his vision. Six months were consumed in making the trip 
from Iowa City to The Dalles, Oregon, from which point they continued 
their way to Portland, where Mr. Smithers secured employment in con- 
nection with the building of a mill. In April, 1853, he came to Seattle, 
and here secured employment in getting out piles, which were shipped to 
San Francisco. He brought with him from Portland three yoke of cattle, 
and with these he hauled the first logs that were used in the building of 
Fort Madison mill. When the Indian war of 1855 broke out he volunteered 
for service, and continued a member of the volunteer militia until 1856, 
having rendered valuable assistance in the protection of the lives and prop- 
erty of the pioneer settlers. 

In November, 1857, Mr. Smithers was united in marriag-e to Mrs. 
Diana Tobin, a native of Maine, and shortly after this important event in 
his life he came to his present location, taking up homestead and donation 
claims and securing a total of four hundred and eighty acres. At the time 
he came here five hundred or more Indians were encamped near, engaged 
in fishing. The land was a veritable wilderness, and the nearest white 
neighbors were at Seattle, fifteen miles distant, as has already been noted. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 99 

He and his young wife were without a dollar when they established their 
home in the primitive wilds, the land being covered with a dense growth of 
trees and vines. They built a little shack, which constituted their home 
during the first years of their happy married life, and there their children 
were born. Their son, Edward M., is now the superintendent of the shoe 
department of the company store at Roslyn, and the daughter, Ada, who 
]S the widow of Robert L. Thorn, is living at the parental home, as are 
also her four children, — Robert Maxwell, Herbert E., Jeanette and Vivian. 
Mr. Smithers is now passing the evening of his useful and honorable life 
in an attractive and commodious residence which he erected in 1875, and 
is enjoying that independence and freedom from care which is the just 
reward for his earnest and indefatigable industry during a long, active and 
worthy life. The city of Renton is located on a portion of the land which 
he secured from the government in the early days and which he has brought 
under a fine state of improvement. He platted the town and placed the 
lots on the market, and it has been a great pleasure and satisfaction to 
him to witness the development and progress of the city of which he was 
the founder and in whose affairs he has maintained a lively interest. He 
also discovered the deposit of coal here and inaugurated the w^ork of de- 
velopment, finally disposing of the mine at a figure which insures him in- 
dependence for the residue of his life. 

Notwithstanding the fact that Mr. Smithers began life in the woods 
of Washington as a poor man, such was his reputation for honor and in- 
tegrity that he received necessary accommodations from merchants who 
refused credit to others, and his life has been ever directed upon a high 
plane of rectitude, so that he commands unqualified confidence and esteem 
in the state of which he is a worthy pioneer and representative citizen. He 
has given his allegiance to the Democratic party from the time of attaining 
his majority, his first vote having been cast in support of Hon. Isaac I. 
Stevens for governor of the territory. He is a member of the Washington 
Pioneer Society and during the war of the rebellion he was initiated into 
the mysteries of the Masonic fraternity, being one of the first members of 
St. John's Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., of Seattle, one of the first lodges 
instituted in the territory. He is a stockholder and one of the board of trustees of 
ihe South Prairie Coal Mining Company, and has other important capital- 
istic interests. He was appointed by Governor Terry and once b}^ Governor 
Solomon a trustee of the State University and was elected president of the 
board of regents. Mr. Smithers was appointed one of the administrators 
of the estate of his friend C. C. Terry, of Seattle, wdiich at the time of his 



...jj >f^/ 



UI^^R-i 



100 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

death was involved to the amount of nineteen thousand dollars, the prop- 
erty owned extending from Yessler Way to Madison street, in the city of 
Seattle, and being a large and very valuable tract. * The administrators paid 
off the indebtedness, kept the family in the meanwhile and finally turned 
over to the five children one hundred and fifty thousand dollars each, the 
fidelity shown in handling the affairs of the estate causing the judge who 
discharged the administrators to say that it had been managed with eminent 
ability and honor. 

ABIJAH I. BEACH, M. D. 

The medical fraternity in Washington has an able representative in 
the person of Dr. Beach, whose is the distinction of being the pioneer phy- 
sician and surgeon of the thriving little city of Renton. wlrile the high es- 
timation in which he is held in the community is signalized by the prefer- 
ment which is his at the time of this writing, since he is mayor of the city and 
has gained uncjualified endorsement for his able and discriminating admin- 
istration of municipal affairs. His life has been one of marked devotion 
to the work of his noble profession, in which he has attained distinctive 
prestige, and his career is properly taken under review in a compilation of 
this nature. 

Abijah Ives Beach is a representative of families which have been long 
identified with the annals of American history, and he is a native of the 
Buckeye state, having been born in New Haven, Huron county, Ohio, on 
the 8th of February, 1836, his lineage on the paternal line tracing back to 
stanch English progenitors, while it is a matter of record that the original 
American ancestors settled on Long Island during the colonial epoch. There 
the great-grandfather of the Doctor passed the closing years of his life 
and thence two of his sons removed to the state of Connecticut and three 
to New Jersey, one of the Connecticut brothers being Samuel Beach, the 
grandfather of our subject. He was a civil engineer by profession and be- 
came the pioneer surveyor of the Connecticut Western Reserve in Ohio. 
The maidai name of his wife was Lois Ives and she was a member of one 
of the old and prominent families of Connecticut. Their son Asahel. the 
father of the Doctor, was born in Wallingford, New Haven county, Con- 
necticut, whence he accompanied the family on their removal to Ohio, where 
he passed the residue of his life, having been engaged in the banking busi- 
ness for many years and having been one of the honored and influential 
men of that locality. He married Miss Hannah Clum, a native cf Holland, 






11 



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I 




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THE NEW TORKJ 

PUBUC LIBRARY 



TILBEN ^UNO^TlOm. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. loi 

who died at the age of twenty-nine years, leaving three children, of whom 
two survive, the Doctor, and Hannah E., who is the widow of Benjamin O. 
Smith and who maintains her home in Bellville, Richland county, Ohio. 
The father was summoned . into eternal rest at the age of fifty-four years. 
Moses Y. Beach, an uncle of the Doctor, was at one time owner of the 
New York Sun and his son, Alfred E., was one of the founders of tlie Scien- 
tific American. 

Dr. Abijah I. Beach enjoyed exceptional educational advantages in his 
youth, having completed a preliminai-y course of study in the academy at 
Ashland, Ohio, after which he went to Europe and entered the preparatory 
department of the celebrated University of France, taking the course in the 
school of arts and trades and passing all the examinations in connection with 
these important departments. He was later in the Ecole de Medicine of 
the city of Paris, where he continued his studies for some time and then 
returned to Ohio and entered the Western Reserve Medical College, in the 
city of Cleveland, where he was graduated as a member of the class of 1856, 
being but little more than twenty years of age at the time. This fact is 
significant, as showing that he had thoroughly improved the advantages 
which had been afforded him, and he was particularly well equipped for 
the active work of his profession while still a youth, and his judgment and 
wisdom had been singularly matured by the discipline which had been his 
and by his devotion to study. After receiving his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine he entered upon the practice of his profession in Pleasantville, 
Hancock county, Ohio, where he continued about a year, removing to Kan- 
sas in 1857 and becoming one of the pioneer physicians of that state, which 
was at that time the scene of much excitement and turbulence, owing to 
the protest against the extension of slavery into the territory, — a protest 
which had much to do with precipitating the war of the rebellion. The 
Doctor was engaged in practice at Waterloo, Lyons county, for a time and 
afterward removed to what is now Rice county, which was then practically 
in its primitive condition, having few settlers and being on the very fron- 
tier of civilization. The Doctor constructed a bridge over the Little Ar- 
kansas river, on the old Santa Fe trail, and also constructed the stone corral, 
and there he was associated with William Wheeler in conducting a trading 
post, bartering with the Indians and travelers on the Santa Fe trail, and 
it is hardly necessary to state that the Doctor met with many thrilling ex- 
periences and narrow escapes while thus living on the border. After a year 
had elapsed he sold his interests and removed to Cow Creek, a point about 
twentv miles west, and that much farther removed him from civilization. 



I02 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

There he improved a ranch, constructed two bridges and engaged in the 
practice of his profession among the Indians and the white settlers who 
began to come in and take up the excellent land. In 1858, soon after locat- 
ing there, the Doctor had two desperate encounters w^th the Indians, and 
in each of these instances he showed almost incredible bravery, while his 
escapes from death at the hands of the savages seem almost phenomenal. 
On the occasion of their first attack Dr. Beach was absent from his ranch, 
which he had left in charge of two men. The savages succeeded in captur- 
ing the ranch, but the two men escaped and met the Doctor as he v\-as re- 
turning in the night, being about five miles distant from the ranch when 
he thus learned of the treachery of the Indians, wdiom he had ahvays treated 
with utmost fairness and kindness. He took the two men into his w^agon 
and proceeded on his way to the ranch. He approached and made a care- 
ful reconnoisance, and discovered that the Indians had found the whisky 
on the premises and had partaken so liberally of the "fire-w"ater'' as to be 
in a state of absolute intoxication. He entered the house in the darkness, 
secured all their arms and ammunition, and the entire band, comprising 
about twenty in number, were then driven from the ranch by the Doctor and 
his tw^o employes. Knowing well the character of the savages, the Doctor 
felt sure that they would return and attempt to obtain revenge, and he 
and his men prepared themselves for the attack as best they could. Three 
Aveeks later the Indians returned, surprising John Burr in the yard and captur- 
ing him. The Doctor w-ent to his rescue and succeeded in getting him into 
the house, but a number of the Indians also effected an entrance at the same 
time, and there followed a desperate hand-to-hand fight. The chief suc- 
ceeded in getting behind the Doctor and then garroted him with his arm, 
while the other savages proceeded to cut and slash at him with their knives. 
The arm wath which he endeavored to w^ard off the blows was cut in many 
places bet\\'een elbow^ and wrist, the sleeves of his garments being literally 
cut to pieces. Finally he received a blow on the head which caused him 
to fall to the floor, with his head covered with blood. He fell face for- 
ward into a sack of flour, and when he regained his feet and turned his 
face, made ghastly wnth the combined blood and flour, the savages fled from 
the house wath his companions, the Doctor pursuing them, notwithstand- 
ing his severe injuries. In the yard he picked up a pole which he had cut 
for a sled runner, and threw it at one of his dusky foes wdth such force 
and precision as to break his leg and they fled in dismay, evidently believ- 
ing the Doctor bore a charmed life and that they could not compass his 
death. The encounter was one which left our subject incapacitated for 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 103 

many days, his injuries having been severe, and to-day he bears on his 
arms and other parts of his body scars which perpetually mark the wounds 
received in that desperate struggle. After the fight a party of men return- 
ing from Pike's Peak came along and took the Doctor and his man Burr, 
who was also badly cut, to the stone corral on the Little Arkansas, and 
it was many months before the Doctor recovered from his injuries. He 
soon afterward disposed of his ranch property and removed to Council 
Grove, Morris county, where he engaged in the practice of his profession, 
while from 1862 until January, 1864, he held the office of acting assistant 
surgeon with the government troops, during- the Civil war, and from Jan- 
uary, 1864, to the end of the war as assistant surgeon in the Ninth Kansas 
Cavalry and serving in the Trans-Mississippi department, in Kansas, Mis- 
souri, Arkansas and Indian Territory, his command being a part of the 
Seventh Army Corps. After the close of the war Dr. Beach returned to 
Council Grove, where he was successfully engaged in the practice of his 
profession until 1878, when he came to Washington, first locating in Fort 
Madison and thence coming to Seattle. He held for two years the appoint- 
ment as physician at the Tulalip Indian agency, in Snohomish county; was 
later engaged in professional work at Port Blakely for a few months, and 
then came to Renton, where he became physician for the Renton Mining 
Company and also held for a time a similar connection with the Black Dia- 
mond mine, while he soon succeeded in building up a representative private 
practice as the pioneer physician and surgeon of the town. His prestige is 
unmistakable and his semces have been enlisted by the greater portion of 
the people of this locality, where he is well known and held in the highest 
esteem as a citizen and as one of the able members of his profession. The 
Doctor has ever been a close student and during his long residence in the 
w^est has kept in touch with the advances made in the sciences of medicine 
and surgery, so that he holds rank with the leading members of his pro- 
fession in the state, while his experience in practice has been of exception- 
ally wide and varied character. During his early residence in Rice county. 
Kansas, he conducted the Cow Creek post, and the valley wdiere he resided 
was then known as Beach valley, having been named in liis honor, as its 
pioneer settler. He was one of the organizers of the county and one of 
its first commissioners, while later he also held the position of superintend- 
ent of public instruction and county commissioner of jMorris county for 
a number of years. 

Since the war Dr. Beach has been unfaltering in his allegiance to the 
Republican party, and has ever been known as a progressive and public- 



I04 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

spirited citizen, giving his influence and practical aid in support of all meas- 
ures for the general good and thus contributing to the material prosperity 
of the communities in which he has maintained his residence. The city 
of Renton was incorporated on the 31st of August, 1901, and to Dr. Beach 
cam.e the distinction of having been elected its first mayor, in which ca- 
pacity he is still serving, bringing to bear his progressive ideas, mature 
judgment and marked business acumen in the administration of municipal 
cift'airs and taking a deep interest in all that prohiotes the advancement 
and substantial upbuilding of his home city. The cause of education has 
found in him a stanch supporter, and he has served his district as school 
director for the past nine years. In 1871 Dr. Beach was raised to the mas- 
ter's degree in Council Grove Lodge, No. 36, A. F. & A. M., and is past master 
of his lodge, while he is also prominently identified with the Grand Army 
of the Republic and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His history 
has been one exceptionally interesting and varied, and to enter nito details 
concerning his experiences in connection with pioneer life in the west would 
be to write a narrative which would constitute a volume in itself. His 
life has been one of signal usefulness and honor, and it is a pleasure to 
ofifer even this brief resume and tribute. 

On the 20th of October, i860. Dr. Beach was united in marriage to 
Miss Rachel P. Vanderpool, a native of Kentucky and daughter of Hon. 
William Vanderpool, who was a member of the legislature of Missouri and 
became one of the pioneer settlers in Kansas. Dr. and Mrs. Beach have two 
children : William, who is engaged in the practice of medicine at Sheldon, 
Mason county, Washington; and Ellen E., who is the wife of Fred G. 
Smithers, of Renton. 

DANA W. BROWN. 

There are few men of Mr. Brow^n's years who have an intimate per- 
sonal knowledge of the early history of California, but in early boyhood 
he made the long journey across the plains and from that time forward 
has been an interested witness of the remarkable development of the west- 
ern country and at the present time he is a most important factor in the 
growth of a city which is rapidly rising to prominence on the northern 
Pacific slope — West Seattle. He has noted the methods which have led to 
the growth of California, has kept in touch with the times along the various 
lines promoting material progress, and is well qualified to have in charge 






Mi^n^ CiJ^/O^^fUr?^ 



pyBtlC LIBRARY 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 105 

a business looking to the growth and upbuilding of this portion of Wash- 
ington. 

Mr. Brown was born in the historic city of Baltimore, Alaryland, on 
the 28th of April, 1852, a son of Smith and Chloe (Thayer) Brown, both 
representatives of old New England families and of English descent. The 
father was born in Rhode Island, the mother in Massachusetts, and after their 
marriage, which was celebrated in New England, they removed to Balti- 
more, and in 1852 crossed the plains to California. The father was a foun- 
dryman and owned quite a large foundry in Baltimore. Air. Bucks, the 
patentee of the Bucks stove, was a foreman in his foundry, and there manu- 
factured his first stove. Mr. Brown had made arrangements to sell his 
foundry at a good price, but before the transfer had been effected the plant 
was destroyed by fire and the father was left almost bankrupt. This was 
the second time he had suffered heavy losses by fire, and too discouraged 
to make another attempt in business in the east, he decided to go west. 
He stopped at St. Joseph, Missouri, looking' for a location, and while there 
became infected with a strong attack of the gold fever, in consequence of 
which he purchased some fine teams and organized a company of eight or 
ten men with whom he started across the plains for California. When he 
reached Salt Lake City the men who had agreed to drive his teams for 
their transportation made a claim for wages. A trial was held and they 
were put in the chain gang. Mr. Brown then secured other drivers and 
proceeded on his way. There w'as much stock along the trail that had 
!)een abandoned by previous emigrants wdien the animals had become foot- 
sore and worn out, but after resting for a time these horses had become 
as good as ever and were quite valuable. This abandoned stock Mr. Brown 
collected and upon reaching San Bernardino he had one hundred head. 
He proceeded to San Francisco, where he opened a livery stable. He also 
located one hundred and sixty acres of government land at the Presidio, 
which he afterward sold. In 1858 he located at Napa, where he engaged 
in the livery business, conducted a hotel and established a stage line, being 
one of the first owners of the early stage lines of the state. He played a 
prominent part in the frontier development of his portion of California and 
was active in public and official life. He served on the state board of equal- 
ization and in various other offices, and his efforts were of benefit to the 
commonwealth in many .ways, both in the material development and in 
establishing the legal and moral status of the state. He died November 
28, 1901. He had been an honored pioneer settler who had aided in laying 
broad and deep the foundation upon which the present progress and pros- 



io6 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

perity of the state rest. His widow still survives him and is now living 
in Napa, at the age of seventy-eight years. They were the parents of five 
children, two of whom died in Baltimore. Frances B. became the wife of 
Henry Edgerton but both are now deceased. The surviving sister of our 
subject is Summit, the wife of Homer S. King, a banker of San Francisco. 
She was born during the journey to California on the summit of the Sierras, 
hence her name. 

Dana W. Brown was only a few months old when his parents left 
Baltimore and started westward on a journey that eventually brought them 
to the Pacific coast. He was reared in San Francisco and Napa, acquiring 
a common school education. At the age of eighteen years he accepted the 
position of express messenger for the Wells-Fargo Express Company, his 
route being between San Francisco and Calistoga — at that time a much 
more responsible and dangerous position than it is to-day under the present 
organized system. The distance was eighty miles by rail and boat and 
the trip was made daily. 'Mr. Brown continued to fill the position for 
two years and then entered the Pacific Business College, at San Francisco, 
in which institution he was graduated on the completion of the course. He 
ihen received a government position as inspector of revenue along the line 
between Alexico and the United States, from San Diego eastward to Fort 
Yuma, a distance of three hundred miles. This was an arduous and hazard- 
ous position in a desert country where smugglers were numerous and were 
often of a desperate character. For a year Mr. Brown acted in that ca- 
pacity and then resigned to become manager and overseer of a large ranch 
near Napa. He had spent a year there when his father purchased the La 
Jota ranch, near St. Helena, a tract of forty-four hundred acres, of which 
our subject purchased two hundred acres of rich meadow land, to \Ahich 
he gave his attention for three years. This place has since become a popular 
resort on account of its fine scenic location and the village of Anquin is 
now located there. 

Mr. Brown next turned his attention to the lumber business, in which 
he embarked at St. Helena, in 1873, there remaining for two years, but 
the enterprise proved a failure. He next associated himself with G. A. 
Meiggs in the lumber business in San Francisco, having charge of the red- 
wood branch of that gentleman's enormous business, and he filled that place 
successfully for four years, when the business was merged into that of 
the jMeiggs Lumber & Ship Building Company, of which Mr. Brown be- 
came a stockholder. This, however, ended in failure and ]\Ir. Brown thereby 
lost all that he had saved. Turning his attention to prospecting and min- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 107 

ing in the vicinity of Tombstone, Arizona, after a year lie was taken ill 
with fever and returned to California. When he had reco\ered his health 
he accepted a position as express messenger and baggage agent on a new 
railroad which was being builded southward from Mound House, its ulti- 
mate destination being Majave. The road had then been completed for only 
one hundred miles and was known as the Carson & Colorado Road, being 
now a part of the Southern Pacific system. Mr. Brown remained in the 
employ of the road for six years, and during the last four years of that time 
served as a conductor. He next received a government appointment as 
weigher in the refining department of the United States mint, at Carson 
City, remaining there for three years, after which he came to Seattle. 

Mr. Brown arrived in this city in 1893 ^^^^^ spent one season on the 
Sound, engaged in shipping and towing, owning an interest in the tug 
Volga. He then returned to California and again entered the employ of 
the Wells-Fargo Express Company as local agent at Napa, filling that posi- 
tion for three years and in 1896 he came to Seattle. This was an arrange- 
ment whereby he was to temporarily relieve the agent in charge of the 
Seattle Land & Lnprovement Company, but the result was that he was elected 
to his present office, that of manager of the business of the company. He 
is also the secretary of the company. This company was formed and in- 
corporated in 1888 by Thomas Ewing, of San Francisco, who at that time 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land and later interested other 
California capitalists. Other lands were purchased till their holdings com- 
prised five hundred acres, now known as the first, second and third additions. 
The old site of the town was known as Freeport and upon it was one of 
the largest lumber mills on the Sound, owned by Mr. Marshall. When the 
town plat was made the name was changed from Freeport to West Seattle. 
The first and second additions have been almost entirely sold out. The site 
includes most of the water front and extends from the elevator of the Seattle 
& San Francisco Railroad & Navigation Company to the Haller estate on 
the west side of the peninsula. The business of the company was first under 
the management of James H. Ewing, later of James H. Watson and in 1897 
Mr. Brown assumed the management. West Seattle is without question des- 
tinued at no distant day to become one of the most desirable and popular resi- 
dence portions of the city. Its site is one of the most beautiful and picturesque 
locations on the Sound, situated as it is on a peninsula, surrounded on three 
sides by water, and the land rising to a height sufficient to give an unob- 
structed and commanding view of land and water — a beautiful expanse of 
bay, forest and mountain, together with a panoramic view of Seattle, sit- 



loS REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

iiated like Rome of old upon seven hills. Since ]\Ir. Brown has been in 
charge of the property interests he has taken measures to bring this desirable 
realty to the notice of the public and has disposed of a great deal of it. The 
company also owns the West Seattle ferrs', which plies between this place 
and Seattle, and in his capacity of manager Mr. Brown also controls this. 
A cable road was built up the hill from the w^ater front to the residence por- 
tion of West Seattle and arrangements made for cable car service across 
the railroad trestle to the city, but complications arose and the work was 
discontinued. Under the supervision, enterprise and untiring activity of Mr. 
Brown the business of the company has grown in volume and importance, 
and his efforts have contributed to the benefit of the city in marked degree. 

On the 24th of December, 1885, Mr. Brown was united in marriage, in 
Carson City, to Jeanette Sutherland, wdio was. born in jMarkleyville, Nevada, 
but her parents were natives of Edinboro, Scotland. They have one son, 
Stuart S., now a student in the high school. Mrs. Brown is a member of 
St. Mark's Episcopal church, at Seattle. Fraternally ]\Ir. Brown is con- 
nected with the Order of Railway Conductors and with the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, of wdiich he is a past master. In politics he is an un- 
swerving Republican and during his residence in Nevada took an acti\-e 
part in political w'ork and since coming to this place he has served as a dele- 
gate to A^arious Republican conventions. Capable of controlling extensive 
business interests, he is accounted one of the representative business men of 
the northwest. 

ERASTUS C. HAWKINS. 

The name of Erastus Corning Hawkins is a familiar one throughout 
engineering circles in this country and the fame of Mr. Hawkins in the line 
of his chosen profession has also extended to Europe. The man that has 
bridged over space and practically annihilated time by his inventive genius 
deserves to be numbered among the benefactors of the race. This is an age 
of progress, wdien vast commercial transactions, involving millions of dol- 
lars, depend upon rapid transportation. The revolution in business that the 
past half centurv^ has witnessed has been brought about by means of the rail- 
roads. Through this means there has been opened to civilization a vast 
region wdth unlimited resources, and now Alaska is being reclaimed for the 
uses of the English-speaking race. No man engaged in the work of develop- 
ing this distant territory is more deserving of gratitude than Erastus Corn- 
ing Haw'kins, the engineer having in charge the construction of the railroad,. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 109 

one of the most difficult pieces of mechanical engineering that has ever been 
executed in the history of the world. It is no wonder, therefore, that he has 
gained a national reputation or that Seattle is glad to number him among 
lier business men and valued citizens. 

Mr. Hawkins arrived in this city in March, 1898, and has since made 
it his headquarters while performing* his important work. He was born in 
South Haven, Suffolk count}^. New York, September 8, i860. His father, 
Bartlett Tuttle Hawkins, was also a native of that state, where the family 
had resided from an early period in its development, the original American 
ancestors having come from Devonshire, England, in 1628. The family was 
represented in the Revolutionar}- war and also in the war of 181 2. Early in 
life the father was a seafaring man in the merchant marine service, sailing 
from Boston to South America. He married Clarissa Barteau, also a mem- 
ber of an old family, descended from the Dutch settlers on Long Island. 
They had four children, but Erastus C. Hawkins is the only member of the 
family on the Pacific coast. He acquired his early education in the public 
schools, and soon after the death of his father, which occurred when the son 
was nineteen years of age, he entered the engineering oflice of Smith & 
^Veston in Jersey City, having studied under noted histructors of the day. 
In January, 1880, he entered the office of Smith & Weston, of New York 
city and Jersey City, and was engaged in street improvements and harbor 
work in the vicinity of New York until the spring of 1883, when he suffered 
from malarial fever and went west to Denver on a two months' vacation. 

Mr. Hawkins was so well pleased with the country that he decided to 
remain and became connected with railroad engineering in the mountains of 
Colorado. He was ^vith the first train that reached Leadville from Breck- 
inridg'e, on the South Park system, being with that company from the time 
when the preliminary work was begun in the spring of 1883 until the road 
was completed and in operation to Leadville. The first camp was eleven 
thousand three hundred and eighty-three feet high, on Fremont Pass. ]\Ir. 
Plawkins was afterward engaged in other sur\ e}'s in the vicinity of Monte- 
zuma, Graymont and Keystone. In the summer of 1S84 he was in the San 
Luis valley as a civil engineer on the large irrigation works, having charge 
of the construction of the Citizens' canal, under the famous T. C. Henry. 
This was an irrigation enterprise extending from Del Norte, and covering 
the western portion of the San Luis valley to the Mexican line. He was 
connected with that work for a year and had some rough experience in that 
country, having ridden as many as eighty miles in a sing'le day. Walter H. 
Graves, now in the government service, an expert irrigation engineer, had 



no REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the supervision of the work. He is a man unequahed in that Hne, says Mr. 
Hawkins, and our subject appreciated the opportunity offered of being con- 
nected with such an experienced man during his first experience with irri- 
gation work of that character. This irrigation system is now owned by the 
Travelers' Insurance Company. 

From there Mr. Hawkins went to Wyoming, in January, 1885, and 
had charge of much irrigation work in the southern and central part of the 
state until the financial panic was felt in that country, when, in 1887, all of 
the companies making improvements there went into bankruptcy, causing 
the suspension of all that kind of work. In March, 1887, Mr. Hawkins re- 
turned to Denver and made that city his headcjuarters until his arrival in 
Seattle. Under the appointment of Governor Alvah Adams he served as 
assistant state engineer and had charge of all irrigation investigation and 
hydrographic work under J. S. Greene, state engineer, also the compiling 
of all the reports and statistics on irrigation and the sources and extent of 
the water supply. Later Mr. Hawkins was engaged in making the United 
States geological survey under Major Powell from Texas north in the arid 
region, studying up possibilities for an extensive reservoir system for the 
reclamation of the entire arid Avest. This gave him an exceptional oppor- 
tunity to inform himself concerning all the possibilities of that region. 
When the appropriation was exhausted he returned to Denver and was con- 
nected with various irrigation works in Idaho and with public works there. 
In 1890 he was again connected with railroad work in the neighborhood of 
Golden, and was one of the first to use seventy-five-pound rails for the high- 
est roads. In 1891, in Idaho, he served as chief engineer for the Payette 
Valley Canal Company, and in a similar capacity was connected with the 
construction of a canal in the Boise valley. In the spring of 1893 the coun- 
try again suffered from a financial panic and improvements were at a stand- 
still in that locality. 

Mr. Hawkins then took up the Amity canal enterprise, in the Arkansas 
valley of Colorado, which was backed by the strongest financiers of New 
York. In July, 1893, he started upon this work and planned the entire con- 
struction of what is now one of the greatest systems in the country. There 
are five large reservoirs, having a capacity of four hundred and eighty-three 
thousand square feet of v-atcr. The building of this system was a work 
requiring an immense amount of study and inventive genius to cope with 
all the various hindrances arising from floods, waterspouts, quicksands and 
other material causes. The system is now known as the Arkansas Valley 
Sugar Beet & Irrigated Land Company. It begins four miles west of La 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. iii 

Junta and extends thirty miles east of the state Hne into Kansas. It includes 
the Amity, the Buffalo and the Fort Lyons canals. Mr. Hawkins was con- 
nected with the work until its completion, except during the construction of 
some minor laterals. He finished the work in the spring of 1898 and was 
then called to New York on a cable message from London. 

Arriving in the eastern metropolis Mr. Hawkins was asked to under- 
take the construction of the railroad into the Klondike and assumed charge 
of the work on the 15th of March of that year. After consulting with the 
originators of the project he at once started west, and was directed to Port- 
land, but after making a thorough investigation as far north as Vancouver 
he decided to make Seattle his headquarters. On the 5th of April he em- 
barked on the Queen to make personal investigation of the ground, as no 
reliable information could be obtained on which he could base the possibilities* 
of the work, other than the wild tales of prospectors. His report was favor- 
able, and at 10:30 p. m. on the night of May 17th he received word that the 
construction would be undertaken. At that time the company had not a 
dollar's worth of property here, but he began making the necessary pur- 
chases of materials the following morning-, as his authority was unlimited. 
The money was furnished and deposited here in his ovsai name without bond 
of any kind, and his written authority consisted of but four lines, giving 
him power to do all the work necessary for the completion of the road. 
0\\'ing to the danger and uncertainty no contractor would engage in the 
undertaking, and so the work in all its phases was carried on by the com- 
pany, a subsidiary company being- formed for the purpose, known as the 
Pacific Contract Company, of which Mr. Hawkins held the position of chief 
engineer and was also chief engineer of the railroad company and engineer 
for the trustees. 

On the 28th of May, 1898, actual work was begun at Skagway, and 
in August, 1900, the road Avas completed into White Horse. The most 
difficult part of the work was from Skagway up to the summit of White Pass, 
which was reached February 18, 1899. The engineers and workmen were 
often suspended by ropes while performing their labor, nearly all of which 
was heavy rock work and much of which had to be done in places that were 
absolutely inaccessible except by the means mentioned. By the 6th of ]u\\ 
the track w-as laid and trains were in operation to Lake Bennett, where over 
one thousand dollars' worth of tickets were sold before rails or locomotive 
were in sight. From the start the work progressed continuously night and 
day, notwithstanding a stampede of eight hundred men at the time of the 
Atlin excitement, until Bennett was reached, in July, 1899. From there on 



112 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the work was let to M. J. Heney, who had previously been connected with 
the work of constructing the line, and then completed it to White Horse. 
Mr. Hawkins was chief engineer and general manager until the road w^as 
completed and in good working order, and in the purchase of materials and 
supplies handled millions of dollars for the company. Being impressed with 
the natural resources of Seattle and a firm believer in the future of the city, 
he abandoned the idea of returning to Denver and has cast in his lot with 
the residents of this city. He purchased the E. O. Graves place, at No. 1120 
Jefferson avenue, and has since remodeled the house, making it an attractive 
residence. 

In Denver, in 1885, Mr. Hawkins was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma, daughter of Charles Sullivan, of New York, and they have five chil- 
' dren, three sons and tw^o daughters : Gilberta, Mason, Clarissa, Ruf us and 
Howard. The family attend St. Mark's church, of which Mrs. Hawkins is 
a member. In his political views Mr. Hawkins is a Republican. Comment 
on his life work would be superfluous. It speaks for itself. His labors in 
many sections of the country are matters of record and of history and much 
Jias been written about the construction of the railroad in Alaska under his 
supervision. He has certainly attained well merited fame and deserves praise 
and honor for what lie has accomplislied in a Avork of ^'ast benefit to the 
world. 

EDWARD CUDIHEE. 

Edward Cudihee, of Seattle, is an honored citizen in whom the people 
hiave manifested their confidence by electing him to the position of sheriff of 
King county. He is now discharging the duties of that office with marked 
promptness and fidelity, and with such men at the head of public affairs a 
community may feel assured that its interests will be administered with the 
strictest honesty and after the most approved business methods. 

A native of the Empire state, Mr. Cudihee was born in Rochester on 
the 26th of Janual*}^ 1853. and is of Irish ancestry. His father, Daniel 
Cudihee, was born in the town of Callan. county of Kilkenny, Ireland, but 
in 1826, when eighteen years of age, he emigrated to America, taking up 
his abode in Rochester, New York. In that city he was married to Miss 
Anna Comeford, also a native of the Emerald Isle. During the early years 
of his life Mr. Cudihee followed the stone-mason's trade, but later became 
a farmer, and is now living in quiet retirement at his home in Jackson, Mich- 
igan. His wife was called to her final rest in 1900, at the age of seventy-four. 



1^ 








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?UBi.IC LIBRARY 



] TiLDEN «»OUN0>STIOM3, ? 
1 i^ 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 113 

years. This worthy couple became the parents of ten children, six of whom 
are now living, and one son, John Cudihee, has recently removed from Seattle 
to Alaska. 

Edward Cudihee received his education in the public school of Orleans 
county, New York, and in early life learned the stone-mason's trade of his 
father. After following that occupation for a time he turned his attention 
to agricultural pursuits, and later embarked in the mercantile business. In 
March, 1889, he came to Seattle, Washington, and soon aftenvard became 
an active and valued member of the police force. He discharged the duties 
of that office without fear or favor, and was instrumental in ridding the 
county of many of its notorious law breakers, but at the same time he is n 
kind-hearted man and no prisoner in his charge has ever had reason to com- 
plain of ill treatment. In the year 1900 he was the choice of his party for 
the office of sheriff of King county, and on the 6th of November, following", 
was elected to that position by a majority of two thousand six hundred and 
five votes, running far ahead of his ticket, and only one other Democrat was 
^iuccessful at that election. In the discharge of the duties of this important 
office he has manifested the same loyal spirit which has characterized his 
entire life, and he commands the respect of his fellow men by his sterling 
worth. Prior to his removal to Seattle he was for six years a member of the 
police force in Colorado, and for a portion of that time was also chief of 
police, having been elected to that position by the vote of the people. 

Mr. Cudihee is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and also of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a man of 
strong mentality, keen discernment, great tact and resolute purpose, and is 
therefore well fitted for the position which he now so ably fills. 

RICHARD WINSOR. 

"Biography," said Carlyle, "is the most universally profitable and in- 
teresting of all studies." The purpose of biography is not merely to preserve 
a written record of individuals ; it has a higher purpose, in furnishing to the 
young of this and future generations examples worthy of emulation, to set 
before them lessons for guidance, to awaken in them desire for honorable 
success, and to inspire them with the thought that man controls his own 
destiny and makes of his life what he will. For this reason biography should 
treat of the lives of those whose worth, socially, morally and intellectually, 
commands the unequivocal respect of the public, which is a discriminating fac- 
tor and invariably distinguishes the ring of the true metal from the disson- 



114 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

ance of the baser. In the possession of admirable quaHties of mind and heart, 
in holding marked precedence as a distingxiished member of the legal profes- 
sion, and in being a man of high attainments and distinct executive ability, 
Mr. Winsor challenges attention as one distinctively eligible for representa- 
tion in this compilation, while his earnest and upright career, his fine geneal- 
ogical record and his position as a man of affairs, but serve to render the more 
consonant an epitome of his life histors' in this connection. 

Judge Winsor comes of fine old English stock and is himself a native of 
the dominion of Canada, having been born in Middlesex county, province of 
Ontario, on the 25th of April, 1839, the son of Richard Winsor, Sr., who 
was born in London, England, and who was a contractor and builder by 
vocation. He was the first of the family to come to America, and after lo- 
cating in Canada he erected many buildings of pretentious order, notably in 
the little city of London, Ontario. He married Elizabeth Longworth, and 
of their nine children the subject of this review was the eldest and is one 
of the seven who are living at the present time. In 1856 the family re- 
moved to Huron county, Michigan, where the father became a pioneer, tak- 
ing up a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of land on Lighthouse bay. 
There he erected a dwelling of hewed logs, and this primitive domicile be- 
came the family home. During the summer seasons Richard Winsor, Sr., 
gave his attention to his trade in the city of Detroit, while in the vrinters 
he worked assiduously in the clearing and improving of his land. While 
going from Huron City to his home, on the 13th of April, i860, the boat 
in which he was making the trip was capsized and both he and his son John 
were drowned. The subject of this sketch had not attained his legal ma- 
jority at the time, but this sad fatality rendered it necessary for him to as- 
5;ume to a very large extent the responsibility of managing the affairs of 
the farm and providing for the maintainance of the family. Judge Winsor 
has never been known to flinch from an ordeal or to neglect the calls of duty, 
and the mettle of the man was clearly shown when the grave responsibilities 
were thus forced upon him when but twenty years of age. Before proceed- 
ing farther in narration of the personal career of our subject, it may be well 
to advert somewhat in detail to his ancestral history. His grandfather, who 
likewise bore the name of Richard Winsor, was a native of Devonshire, Eng- 
land, and was an architect by profession. He had charge of the building 
operations of the Duke of Kent, father of the late lamented Queen Victoria, 
and was a man of no slight distinction. The maternal grandfather was 
Captain John Longworth, of the British army, and it is a matter of record 
that he served under the Duke of Wellington in the Peiiinsular war, his 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 115 

record for gallantry being such that he was made the recipient of several 
medals in token and recognition of his valiant services. He emigrated to 
Canada in 1830 and was there engaged in the construction of many public 
buildings and works, passing the remainder of his life in the dominion and 
living to attain the patriarchal age of nearly ninety-four years. His death 
occurred on the 17th of January, 1883. His first wife, the grandmother 
of our subject, bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Bruce, and her paternal 
lineage is traced in a most definite way over a period of five centuries in 
Scotland, the family being the same as that of the renowned patriot, Robert 
Bruce. 

Richard Winsor, of this sketch, was seventeen years of age at the time 
when the family removed from Ontario to the state of Michigan, and his 
early education had been secured in the excellent schools of his native 
province. In 1859 the family home was destroyed by fire, while he was 
absent in Huron City, where he had employment, and after this disaster, 
which was followed by the still greater one, in the loss of the husband and 
father, the family removed to Huron City, and our subject purchased in that 
vicinity a tract of land, which he cleared and improved, placing the same 
under cultivation and thus managing to keep the family together until the 
younger children were able to care for themselves. In the midst of all the 
responsibilities and labors which thus fell to his portion, Judge Winsor found 
time to continue his technical study and reading, having determined to pre- 
pare himself for the legal profession and holding no obstacle as insuperable. 
He prosecuted his legal studies under the preceptorship of John Divine, of 
Lexington, Michigan, and in 1867 he was admitted to practice before the 
state courts, having been previously in practice in the circuit courts. In 
December of the year mentioned he removed to Port Austin, where the 
county-seat of Huron county was then established, and there he entered vig- 
orously upon the practice of his profession, in which he soon attained an 
excellent reputation and a representative clientage, his abilities and fidelity 
to the cause of his clients gaining him deserved recognition. He was one 
of the most progressive and public-spirited citizens of his county and was 
one of the prime factors in securing the entrance of railroad and telegraph 
lines in that section of the state. He eventually admitted to partnership in his 
legal business Horace G. Snover, ex-member of congress from the tenth dis- 
trict of Michigan, and the two gentlemen erected a fine building in Port Austin 
and there established a successful banking business, also carrying on an 
extensive insurance business and controlling the largest law pratice in that 
section of the Peninsular state. Judge Winsor also made quite extensive 



ii6 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

investments in land, engaging in farming operations and the raising of live 
stock, and becoming also heavily interested in the lumbering industry and 
in the salt business, his interests in these lines becoming of wide scope and 
importance, and all being wisely handled, since his executive ability and 
infinite capacity for details proved equal to all emergencies. Judge Winsor 
naturally took a deep interest in public affairs, and his prominence in po- 
litical circles indicated his strength as an advocate of the cause which he 
espoused, that of the Republican, party. In 1862, when but twenty-three 
years ol age, he was elected to represent his district in the lower house of 
the state legislature, was re-elected in 1864, dclining the renomination in 
1866. In the following year he was elected a member of constitutional con- 
vention of Michigan, this being one of the most notable assemblies of talented 
men ever called together in that commonwealth and the work accomplished 
being one that reflects perpetual credit upon those participating and also 
upon the state itself. In the fall of 1868 Judge Winsor was given a still high- 
er mark of popular confidence and esteem, being elected to the state senate, 
in which he served during the sessions of the two ensuing winters. In 1880 
the senatorial honors were again conferred upon him, his election being com- 
passed by a majority of three thousand three hundred votes. In the session 
of 1882 he introduced the bill for the organization of the twenty-sixth judi- 
cial circuit and was also one of the prime movers in securing the extra session 
of the legislature in order to devise ways and means for the relief of the 
suffers from the great fire in Huron, Sanilac and Tuscola counties, the need 
for prompt assistance being imperative. For twenty-five consecutive years 
Judge Winsor was chairman of the Republican county central committee of 
Huron county, and no man has ever wielded a more potent or beneficial influ- 
ence in the political affairs of that locality than he, while for many years he 
was also a member of the state central committee, though he often ser^'ed in 
this capacity at a sacrifice of his personal interests. 

In the year 1889 Judge Winsor made a change of location, leaving the 
.'■tate which had so long been his home and in which he had attained dis- 
tinguished honors, and came to Seattle, the change being prompted by the 
fact that his health had become much impaired, making it necessary for him 
to seek different climatic environment. His son had previously located in 
Seattle, and this fact determined his choice to a degree also. He has made 
extensive investments in this locality, but still retained valuable property 
interests in Michigan until 1901, when he disposed of the major portion of his 
holdings there. The Judge has become thoroughly identified with the indus- 
trial and professional life of Seattle and has shown his confidence in the future 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 117 

of the state by investing in real estate upon a quite extensive scale. For about 
two years after his arrival he gave his attention principally to looking after 
his investments, in the meanwhile thoroughly recuperating his physical ener- 
gies upder the influences of the gracious climate of the state, and he then 
entered upon the general pratice of his profession and has attained prece- 
dence as one of the leading members of the bar of his adopted state. He 
has one of the few law libraries that escaped in its entirety from destruction 
by the great fire which swept the city in 1889, and the same is one of the 
best private collections of the sort in this section of the Union. The Judge 
has avoided as far as possible practice in the criminal courts, but his powers 
in this line have become so well known that he has occasionally been drawn 
into such cases, his sympathy for and willing defense of the oppressed and 
<lowntrodden leading him to spare neither time nor personal interests when 
he could aid those thus afflicted and insure the ends of justice. Though he 
was counsel and advocate in many of the most important criminal cases in 
Michigan during the long years of his residence there, he is enlisted in this 
service in Seattle only when strongly importuned or wdien his sympathies 
are appealed to in the righting of wrongs. Since locating in Seattle Judge 
Winsor has continued to maintain a lively interest in public affairs, and 
keenly discerning the drift of political matters, he could not but appreciate 
ihe trend toward the development of political favoritism in permitting the 
accumulation of large property interests in the hands of a favored few, and 
thus, in the fall of 1892, he engaged actively in the campaign work as an 
advocate of the principles of the People's party, also taking part in the cam- 
paign in Oregon at the time of the candidacy of Governor Penoyer. He 
entered into a joint debate with Congressman Tong in the city of Hills- 
boro, and his able and forcible marshalling of facts and arguments made 
his speech one of the most potent in results in all that were delivered dur- 
ing that campaign. He is a ready, forceful and eloquent speaker, his ut- 
terances bearing the marks of absolute sincerity and honesty, c.nd he has 
done most effective service on the political rostrum and also through able 
contributions to the newspaper press and through the circulation of cam- 
paign documents written by him. Thirty thousand copies of a pamphlet 
written by him on the financial question were published and circulated in 
1892, and proved most effective in result by reason of his masterful sum- 
ming up of the case. He has been importuned to accept nomination for 
offices of distinct trust and responsibility in the state, among the most not- 
able overtures being that made in 1896, when he was urged to accept nomina- 
tion for the office of associate justice of the supreme court of the state, an 



1 18 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Iionor which he felt obho-ed to dechne bv reason of the condition of his 
health at the time. In the winter of 1897, unknown to himself, his name 
was prominently brought forward in connection with nomination for the 
United States senate. He was a member of the committee which framed 
the present municipal charter of the city of Seattle, and his interest in all 
that concerns the welfare of his home city and state is vital and insistent. 
He has been a member of the board of regents of the state university since 
1897, and the cause of education finds in him a warm friend. When twen- 
ty-three years of age the Judge was initiated into the mysteries of the time- 
honored Masonic fraternity, and has advanced to the degree of the Scottish 
Rite. His religious faith is that of the Unitarian church, and he has served 
as a member of the board of trustees of the church in Seattle. In Seattle 
cur subject has acquired valuable residence properties, including his own 
dttractive home, at the corner of Sixth avenue and Lenora street, and his 
summer home is located across the Sound, in Kitsap county, where he has 
acquired a large tract of land. 

In the city of Lansing, Michigan, on the 23d of June, 1863, Judge 
Winsor was united in marriage to Miss Martha Turner, w^ho was born in 
Ingham county, that state, the daughter of John and Rebecca (Hayner) 
Turner, and they are the parents of four sons and one daughter, namely : 
Richard, Jr., who is engaged in the mercantile business in Kitsap county; 
Amos T., who is superintendent of construction at the state university; 
Irwin B., who is engaged in the steamship supply business in Seattle; Bessie 
L., who has been secretary of the Federation of Women's Clubs in the state 
from the time of its organization; and Horace G.. who is attending the state 
university. 

GENERAL SIMON M. PRESTON. 

Far removed from the place of his birth is the home of General Simon 
Manly Preston. He is a native of Vermont, his birth having occurred in 
Strafford on the 14th of April, 182 1, and he comes of English ancestry. 
His Grandfather, Alexander Preston, settled at Strafford, in 1780, married 
Mary Durgan and died in 18 16, but she long survived him and reached a 
very advanced age. By profession he was a teacher and kept a private 
school, W'hich he capably conducted, being a man of intelligence and abilitv. 
His wife was identified with the Society of Friends. Warner Preston, the 
father of General Preston, was born at Strafford, Vermont, in 1799. and mar- 
ried Esther Brown, a native of his own town and a daughter of Absalom and 
Abigal (Bean) Browm. The father w^as a valued member of the Freewill 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 119 

Baptist church, being a charter member of the congregation at Strafford. 
They had nine children and reared to maturity seven of this number, of 
whom four are yet hving. The father departed this hfe in 1871 at the age 
of seventy-two years and his good wife passed away in 1855. 

General Preston is the only member of the family living in Washing- 
ton. He was educated in Norwich Universit}-, a military school in which 
he was graduated in 1845 and in addition to his other studies he acquired 
c. thorough knowledge of military tactics and drill. Subsequently he was 
for two years professor of military drill and tactics in that school and his 
teaching also included seven years elsewhere spent. On the expiration of 
that period he engaged in civil engineering in Illinois. In 1850 he removed 
to Chicago and later to Rockford, that state, where he resided for fifteen 
years, engaged in the practice of his profession — surveying for the location 
of railroads and engineering their construction. 

In 1861, in answer to President Lincoln's call for volunteers to put 
down the rebellion of the slaveholders in the south, he tendered his services 
to his country^ and was mustered in as a member of the Fifteenth Regi- 
ment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He became a first lieutenant and served 
as quartermaster. After thirty days with his regiment he was appointed 
by the president assistant adjutant general of volunteers, with the rank of 
captain, and served on the staffs of Generals Hulbert, Halleck and Wright. 
In 1864 he received a commission as colonel of the Fifty-eighth United 
States Colored troops, which was a new regiment, and Colonel Preston took 
just pride in making them proficient in drill, as a result of which the com- 
mand won considerable renown. Such are the eminent services that our 
subject rendered his country, in reward for which he was breveted brigadier- 
general, and as such was mustered out of service on the 30th of i\pril, 1866. 
After the close of the war General Preston settled at Natchez, Missis 
sippi, and resumed his profession of civil engineering. He was appointed 
by President Grant collector of internal revenue, which office he very satis- 
factorily filled for four j^ears. Having resided eight years in Mississippi 
he decided to return north, and for some time thereafter was engaged in 
building railroads in Iowa and Kansas. He had charge of the construc- 
tion of the eastern branch of the Iowa Central Railway and that position 
claimed his attention until 1890, in which year he came to Seattle to re- 
side. He had charge of the Seattle National Bank building and has been 
otherwise identified with business affairs here. He was receiver for the 
Hopkins property and was auditor in the reconstruction of the Yeslerway and 
Jackson Street railroads. 



I20 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

On the 1 2th of December, 1848, occurred the marriage of General Pres- 
ton to Miss Martha Harriet Sargent, a native of New Hampshire and a 
daughter of Captain Jacob and Pattie (Webster) Sargent. They were of 
Enghsh ancestry and were early settlers in Massachusetts. Mrs. Preston, 
the only daughter in a family of eight children, was educated in a female 
seminai-y of her native state and for three years prior to her marriage was 
a successful teacher in North Carolina. General Preston and wife have the 
following named children : Edward L., .who is a civil engineer on the Chi- 
cago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad and resides in the state of Missouri; 
Harold, who is a prominent member of the bar of Washington and candi- 
date of his party for the office of United States senator; Clarence S., who 
is a practicing attorney of Seattle: and Alice Pauline, the only daughter, 
who is the wife of General E. M. Carr, an eminent member of the Seattle 
bar. 

Mrs. Preston is a valued member of the Congregational church. She 
says that her part in the great Civil war was in the care of their children 
through that period of excitement and danger and a part of the time she 
was in camp with her husband. That she performed her part well is evi- 
denced by the notable family she has reared, her children all being an honor 
to her name. The General is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and has been a lifelong Republican, unfaltering in his advocacy of the party 
platform. His three sons have also followed in the political footsteps of 
their father. Both the General and his wife enjoy the esteem of all who 
know them and the respect of a large number of friends. They have a 
beautiful home in which to spend the evening of their days and are most 
worthy representatives of Seattle. The General is as true and loyal to his 
country in all matters pertaining to her welfare and protection as he was in 
rhe dark hours of peril when he followed the starry banner of the nation upon 
the battle fields of the south. 

ALONZO COSTILLO BOWMAN. 

The gentleman above mentioned is serving as United States commis- 
sioner for the district of AVashington. He was born in Cass county, Mis- 
souri, March 24, 1859, and is of English ancestry. His father, James Har- 
vey Bowman, was born in the state of Pennsylvania and now resides in Seat- 
tle in the seventy-sixth year of his age. He married Miss Amanda Fuller, 
a lady of French lineage, although the family has been represented in Amer- 
ica through many generations. The father of our subject served his country 




(Jjcjyf^^-C^^^^ 



.THE NEWYCmt- 



I TltDEK SfOUND/TIONCJ, 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 121 

valiantly in the Civil war as a defender of the Union, for three and a 
half years, becoming a member of the Eleventh Kansas Cavalry, but 
notwithstanding the fact that he was in many battles and often in the thickest 
of the fight he escaped wounds and capture and at the cessation of hostilities 
received an honorable discharge. In the family were three children : C. E.. 
Bowman, a prominent member of the Seattle bar; Laura, the wife of A. 
Furry, also of this city, and Alonzo C. 

During his early boyhood our subject was taken by his parents to Kan- 
sas and in the public schools of that state pursued his education and entered 
upon his business career in the newspaper field, in Burton. He also became 
the official stenographer for that district, filling the position for three and 
a half years, during which time he took up the study of law, using his leisure 
hours for the mastery of the principles of jurisprudence. He was there ad- 
mitted to the bar, but believing the business opportunities of the Mississippi 
valley did not equal those of the Pacific coast he came to the northwest, set- 
tling in Seattle, on the 15th of January, 1882, since which time he has been 
largely engaged in stenographic work, being an expert in that Inie, having 
remarkable speed, facility and accuracy. He is now a member of the firm 
of Bowman, Bolster & Eaton, law stenographers, doing the principal busi- 
ness in their line in Seattle. 

In 1880 Mr. Bowman was united in marriage to Miss Georgia Mat^ 
thews, who was born in the state of Mississippi and is descended from an 
old New England family. Unto them have been born two children : Otha 
C. and Fleta C. Theirs is one of the delightful homes of Seattle, celebrated 
for its gracious hospitality and a favorite resort with their many friends. 
Mr. Bowman is a Republican in his political views and is a very prominent 
Mason, having taken all of the degrees of the York Rite and all of the 
Scottish Rite up to and including the thirty-second. He is also a member 
of the Mystic Shrine and is grand chancellor of the grand lodge of Wash- 
ington of the Knights of Pythias. He is likewise identified with the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks and is accounted a valued representative 
of these various oro-anizations. 



'fe' 



JAMES THEODORE RONALD. 

One of the prominent attorneys of Seattle and member of the firm 
of Ballinger, Ronald & Battle, has attained to a position of distinction as a 
representative of the legal fraternity and his reputation extends through- 
out the state of Washington. He was born at Caledonia, Washington 

8 



122 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

county, Missouri, on the 8th of April, 1855, and is descended from Lord 
Ronald, the Scottish chieftain who fought under Bruce and was prominent 
in regaining the liberty of Scotland. The great-grandfather of our subject 
was Andrew Ronald, who was born in the land of hills and heather, and is 
a son of the last Lord Ronald. He emigrated to Virginia and became a 
noted lawyer, for a time serving as counsel for the crown prior to the Revo- 
lutionary war. He was the progenitor of the family in this country and 
in his profession gained marked prominence. He was associated with Pat- 
rick Henry in a number of cases and was also his opponent in cases of great 
imoortance. The various venerations of the family have been born in Vir- 
ginia up to the time of Onslow G. Ronald, our subject's father. Andrew 
Ronald, the grandfather of our subject, was a devout member of the Meth- 
odist church and an educated Christian gentleman of the most admirable 
•character. He had great love for liberty and although reared amid slavery 
he was never a slave owner, his love for the whole human race being too 
^reat for that. He attained the age of seventy-five years and died in Wash- 
ington county, Missouri, where he had emigrated with his family a few 
years before. His son, Onslow Gemmel Ronald, was born in Virginia on 
the 22nd of February, 1822, and was educated in Missouri. He married 
Miss Amanda Carson, of Virginia, who was descended from the same an- 
cestry as Kit Carson, the renowned mountain guide and Indian fighter. 
Mr. Ronald acquired a farm in W^ashington county, where he led an indus- 
trious and honorable life and there his children were born and reared. His 
farm comprised two hundred and sixty-six acres of land and is still owned 
by our subject and his brothers and sisters. The mother died there at the 
age of forty-six years, while the father passed away at the age of seventy. 
He was one of the substantial pioneer citizens of that portion of Missouri, 
and was for many years one of the most prominent and devout members of 
the Methodist church. In their family were nine children and by a sec- 
ond marriage the father, had five more children. 

James T. Ronald was reared upon the old homestead and attended the 
public schools, also pursuing his studies in the seminary of his native town. 
In 1873 he entered the State Normal School at Kirksville, vrhere he com- 
pleted a three years' course in two years, being graduated in Ji^ine. 1875. 
Immediatel)- afterward he started for the Pacific coast, arriving in Sacra- 
Inento, California, on the 26lh of July, with just ten cents in his pocket. 
\Vilh this he bought three postage stamps, for which he then paid three 
cents each. One was used on a letter to his father, another on a letter to his 
sweetheart, the third he saved to write to her again. A week later he secured 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 123 

a small school in the valley, but on account of his inexperience he was con- 
sidered incapable, and after one term was not again employed. He then 
removed to Plumas county and tliere was more successful in his educational 
work and demonstrated his ability to impart clearly and concisely to others 
the knowledge he had acquired. He taught the Snake Lake Valley school, 
later was employed as principal of the Greenville school, and acceptably 
filled that position for three years, so that his efforts at pedagogy 
proved successful. On the 4th of July, 1876, he borrowed a copy of 
Blackstone from Judge E. T. Hogan, of Quincy, California, and earnestly 
began the study of law, improving every leisure moment before and after 
school, ev^en studying well into the night. He continued his teaching and 
the study of law until 1880, when he was called to take charge as principal 
of the Lincoln Grammar School, at Lincoln, California, remaining at that 
place for two years. During his vacation in the summer of 1881 he spent 
five weeks in the law office of Judge Cheney and Honorable Edward Bruner 
at Sacramento. On the 27th of May, 1882, he was admitted to the bar by 
the superior court of Placer county, California. 

On the 26th of February, 1877, Mr. Ronald had been happily married 
to Miss Rhoda M. Coe. She was born in Knox county, Missouri, the daugh- 
ter of Jamison Coe, a repiesentative of an old Virginia iamiiy of great 
vorth. She was the girl he had left in Missouri when he came to California, 
and tlie marriage was a very happy one, in every w^ay congenial. She had 
been his schoolmate in childhood and came to California to become his wife. 
The eldest daughter, Norma Vane, now a beautiful young lady, was born 
at Greenville, Plumas county, California, and two other daughters, Eva 
i'.nd Mabel, have been added to the family in Seattle. While pursuing his 
law studies Mr. Ronald had been studying the several places on the Pacific 
coast in search of a new field in which to engage in the practice of his pro- 
fession, and finally gave Seattle the preference, a choice which he has since 
iiad no cause to regret, notwithstanding that the beginning was anything 
I'Ut auspicious. He arrived in Seattle on the 26th of July, 1882, accom- 
panied by his wdfe and little daughter, and bringing with him his household 
effects and four hundred and eighty dollars in money. The city then con- 
tained a population of about five thousand, including a large number of law- 
yers. Mr. Ronald had no experience, but he hung ou.t his shingle and 
awaited business, but two months passed before any came. In that time his 
funds had become largely exhausted, but he sold some real estate on com- 
mission in order to provide his family with the necessaries of life. He 
contracted for two lots in the woods back of Lake Union, on wlr'ch he l)uilt 



124 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

a three-room house. He was to pay for this land and house by instahments 
of twenty dollars per month, and a grocer of the city allowed him to pur- 
chase some necessary supplies on credit. He cleared the lots, painted and pa- 
pered his little home, dug his own well and in this honorable and praiseworthy 
way provided for his wife and family. Mr. Ronald has ever since remem- 
bered with the greatest gratitude the gentleman who trusted him for the 
few groceries that they so much needed and when the panic came on in which 
so many of the business men of Seattle were forced to the wall Mr. Ronald 
proffered his services to his kind friend, piloted his benefactor through the 
trying time in safety and has ever since cheerfully given him his legal advice 
free and they have ever been the warmest of friends since those early days 
when ]Mr. Ronald was attempting to get a start here. In August, 1883, Mr. 
Ronald was appointed deputy prosecuting attorney of King county at a salary 
of twenty dollars per month. The town was then over-run with criminal char- 
acters and a lamentable state of affairs prevailed. Feeling that this was 
his opportunity to lay the foundation for his future success, Mr. Ronald 
applied himself to gaining a thorough understanding of the criminal code of 
Washington and began such a campaign against law-breakers as had not 
been before experienced in the county, with the result that the city was great- 
ly benefited and fines to the amount of five thousand dollars were col- 
lected during his first year and put into the school funds. In this suc- 
cessful work Mr. Ronald laid the foundation of his reputation as a suc- 
cessful and capable lawyer and in the fall of 1884 he was the nominee of 
the Democratic party for the office of prosecuting attorney for the district 
comprising the counties of King, Kitsap and Snohomish and was elected 
with a majority of one thousand one hundred and fifty-three votes in a 
district formerly giving a Republican majority of twelve hundred. He com- 
pleted his term of two years in such a satisfactory manner that he was re- 
elected in 1886 with an increased majority of one thousand seven hundred 
and ninety-three. He filled the position until March 4, 1889, when he re- 
tired from office, having discharged its duties with honor and distinction. 
In 1886 he took in as a partner Mr. S. H. Piles and the firm of Ronald & 
Piles conducted a general practice in all the courts of the state, meeting 
with the most flattering success. In 1892 Mr. Ronald's Democratic friends 
prevailed on him to permit his name to be used in connection with the can- 
didacy for mayor of the city. To this he reluctantly consented and was 
elected by a very large majority and while chief executive of the city he 
put forth every effort to make his administration one that would be bene- 
ficial and satisfactory to all law-abiding citizens. Along many lines he ad- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 125 

vanced the interests of Seattle. The city's debt was reduced fifty-eight thou- 
sand dollars and the city's credit greatly improved. In 1894 his term ex- 
pired. In 1900 he was requested by his party to accept the nomination as 
a candidate for the United States congress, and although he did not desire 
this position, and it was only at the solicitation of prominent members of 
the party that he accepted, he made a vigorous canvass and ran far ahead of 
his ticket, receiving twenty-five hundred more votes than Mr. Bryan and 
carried his own city and county. While Mr. Ronald has never desired office, 
he has ahvays taken an active part in politics, his influence carrying weight 
in the councils of his party wdiile his efforts have been effective in promoting 
its growth and success. As the years have passed Mr, Ronald has made 
judicious investments in property, acquiring much valuable realty. He is 
president of the Una Mining Company, president of the North Star Min- 
ing Company and also of the Hester Mining Company, the properties of all 
of wdiich are now being rapidly developed with prospects of soon returning 
a good income to the owners. Mr. Ronald has affiliated with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows for about twenty years, during which time he 
has filled all of the offices in its branches. He is also a member of the An- 
cient Order of United Workmen and of the Woodmen of the World, while 
his wife and daughters are valued members of the Grace Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and with them he attends its services. They now have a beauti- 
ful home in Seattle and are most highly respected there, having a large 
circle of friends. 

OLIVER H. P. LaFARGE. 

The ancestry of Oliver H. P. LaFarge as far back as their history can 
be traced in the annals of America are noted for the sterling traits of char- 
acter wdiich mark the valuable citizen of this great republic. At all times 
they have been ready to uphold rig-hteous and just laws, to promote the 
Avelfare of the land of their nativity, and, if needful, to lay down their li\-es 
on the altar of her liberty and maintenance. 

Mr. LaFarge was born in Rhode Island, on the loth of July, 1869, and 
is of French and English ancestry, who were among the early settlers of 
JMassachusetts and were active participants in all the early history of the 
country. His paternal grandfather, John LaFarge, was born in France, but 
in 1806 eimgrated to the new world, taking up his abode in New York city, 
where he became well and prominently known as a merchant and banker. 
His death occurred in that city at the age of seventy-five years. His son. 



126 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

John LaFarge, claimed the Empire city as the place of his nativity and he 
became an eminent artist, standing at the head of the profession in America. 
His brother, Alphonse LaFarge, served as colonel of a New York regiment of 
volunteers during the Civil war. The mother of our subject bore the maiden 
name of Margaret Perry, and she is a native of Newport, Rhode Island. Her 
ancestors came to America as early as 1634, and her great-grandfather, Chris- 
topher Raymond Perry, was an active participant in the colonial struggle for 
independence. She is a granddaughter of Commodore Perry, of the United 
States navy, whose fame goes down in history as the hero of Perry's victory, 
while her granduncle, Commodore Matthew C. Perry, opened by treaty the 
ports of Japan to this country. Mr. and Mrs. John LaFarge, the parents 
of our subject, are still living in New York city, the father having attained 
the age of sixty-five years, while the mother is sixty-one. He has the honor 
of being president of the Academy of Designe and is an officer in the Legion 
of Honor, of France. They became the parents of nine children, seven of 
whom are still living. 

Oliver H. P. LaFarge, the immediate subject of this review, is a grad- 
uate of the School of Mines of Columbia University, of New York, of the 
class of 1 89 1, and, and after completing his studies he engaged in the 
profession of engineering, in the employ of the Metropolitan Street Rail- 
way Company, of New York city, and expert on fire proof construc- 
tion for the New York Fire Underwriters' Tariff Association. In 1898 
he made a business trip to Alaska, during which he visited Seattle, and be- 
coming convinced of the great future which lay before this city he decided 
to make it his future place of abode. In 1900 the present firm of Bond & 
LaFarge was organized for the purpose of doing a general real-estate and 
insurance business. They have made many investments in both city and coun- 
try property, and this enterprising firm now occupy a leading position in the 
"business circles of Seattle. Mr. LaFarge is a man of business capacity and 
resourceful ability, his resolute purpose and keen discrimination enabling 
him to carry forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes, and 
he has gained for himself an enviable reputation in social and business cir- 
cles. He is a Republican in his political preferences. 

FRANCIS M. GUYE. 

From an early period Francis M. Guye has been identified with the 
history of the Pacific coast, being a pioneer of California, Oregon and Wash- 
ington, and he has done efficient service in developing the mineral resources 




FRAHCIS M. GUYE 



•TT ^^~VT YOKE 

- fBRARY 



Yi<_rvrf.- WX'NO* TIOK3. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. . 127 

of this commonwealth. His birth occurred in Greene comity, Indiana, on the 
7th of January, 1833, and he is of Scotcli and EngHsh descent. His ancestors 
were among the early settlers of Virginia and Tennessee, and were active 
participants in the early histor}' of the colonies and in the Revolutionary 
war. Samuel Guye, the father of our subject, was born in Tennessee, and 
was there married to Miss Susanna Bidwell, a native of Virginia and a 
member of a prominent old family of that state. The mother was called 
to her final rest at the comparatively early age of forty years, and Mr. Guye 
was a second time married, becoming the father of ten children, five sons 
and five daughters, .of whom but three of the sons and one daughter sur- 
vive. He reached the psalmist's limit of three score and ten. 

Francis M. Guye, the only representative of the family on the Pacific 
coast, was reared to years of maturity on the farms which his father owned 
in Indiana, Missouri and Iowa, and in the public schools of the three states 
he received his education, attending school during the winter months, while 
in the summer seasons he assisted his father in the work of the fields. Re- 
maining at home until his twentieth year he crossed the plains to California 
in 1853, his party consisting of about a dozen people, and in order to .defray 
the expenses of the trip he drove a large herd of cattle. At that time the 
trail was lined with emigrants as far as the eye could see, and they made 
a safe journey, arriving at Hangtown, now Placerville, California, in Sep- 
tember, 1853. For a time after his arrival there he received sixty-five dol- 
lars a month and his board in compensation for his services, but he left his 
money with the firm by whom he was employed and on account of their fail- 
ure he lost his entire earnings. For some time afterward he was profitably 
engaged in freighting from Sacramento to the mines and was also engaged 
in placer mining. In 1858 he went to the Frazier river gold fields, but his 
mining venture there was not crowned with success, and after a year thus 
spent he came to Seattle, arriving here in June, 1859. For a short time 
thereafter he worked on the military road then being constructed to Belling- 
ham Bay, after which he was successfully engaged for a number of years in 
lumbering, cutting, selling and delivering logs at Salmon Bay. The money 
which he thus made was invested in Seattle property, on Yesler way, Com- 
mercial street and Washington avenue, and he also built several bridges at 
these places, but when the great fire of 1889 swq^t over the city he was a 
heavy loser. Since that time i\Ir. Guye has devoted the greater part of his 
time and attention to prospecting, and has discovered large quantities of 
iron and coal. He has developed much mining property in different parts 
of the state, and is now the owner of one thousand acres of valuable mining 



128 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

land. Among his rich mines is the Industry, located on Guy's Mountain, at 
the head of the south fork of the Snoquahnie river, near Snoquahiiie Pass, 
in the Cascade mountains, which covers an area of two hundred and forty 
acres and contains bodies of magnetic iron ore from fifty to one hundred 
feet in depth. On the same property is found large quantities of white and 
mottled marble of great beauty and value. His Bessemer mine, on the middle 
and north forks of the Snocjualmie river, covers an area of one hundred and 
sixty acres and contains large deposits of the very best magnetic and red 
liematite iron ore. At the Bald Hornet mine he owns sixty acres of land, on 
which is located rich deposits of gold and silver, and this property is located 
in the vicinity of the Bessemer mine. His Washington coal mine, in the 
Squak mountains, about eighteen miles southeast of Seattle, extends over 
an area of six hundred and forty acres and contains large deposits of semi- 
anthracite, cannel and bituminous coal. In the development of these prop- 
erties he has discovered several veins from three to nine feet in thickness and 
extending to a great depth, at an angle of forty degrees. Mr. Guye has made 
a close study of geology and mineralogy, and his opinions are considered as 
authority on the subject. 

In the year 1872 Mr. Guye was happily married to Mrs. Eliza (Dunn) 
Plympton. She is a native of Maine and a daughter of Josiah and Sarah ( Jor- 
don) Dunn, of Oxford, Oxford county, that state, and of Scotch and English 
descent. Her grandfather, Joshua Dunn, arrived in America at the com- 
mencement of the Revolutionary war, and although but eighteen years of age 
he joined the colonial forces and espoused the cause of the colonies. He lived 
to the age of seventy-eight years. Josiah Dunn removed to Massachusetts 
in 1840, and died in Maine at the age of eighty-six years. Mrs. Guye was 
first married in Boston, when a young girl, to Josiah Ingalls Plympton, by 
whom she had four children, two sons and two daughters, but only one of 
the number, Charles Edward Plympton, is living. He was reared by Mr. 
Guye, and still lives in Seattle. During the Civil war Mr. Plympton en- 
tered the Union service as a captain, but on account of meritorious service 
on the field of battle he was soon promoted to the rank of colonel and was 
soon to have been made a general. He had expected to return home on a 
furlough in a few days, when with his regiment he was ordered into battle 
at Deep Bottom, and in that engagement, on the i6th of August, 1864, 
Vvdiile in command of his regiment, he laid down his life on the altar of his 
country. He was a brave and loyal soldier, and his loss was deeply felt by 
his little family and friends. ]\Irs. Guye is a lady of culture and refinement, 
and she, too, has made a close study of minerals. When sixty years of age 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 129 

she took the Chautauqua course of study with a large class of ministers and 
teachers, and at the close of the course she stood at the head of the class, with 
an average of ninety-five in each study. She has a large and well assorted 
library, and spends many happy hours among her books. Mr. Guye is a life- 
long Republican, and, although at all times a public-spirited and progressive 
citizen, he has never been an aspirant for political preferment, preferring to 
Q-ive his entire attention to his business interests. He is an enthusiast on 
the mineral wealth of the state, and during the World's Fair at Chicago he 
shipped at his own expense three thousand pounds of mineral exhibits, in- 
cluding marble, iron, coal, fine clay and moulding sand, to the Exposition. 
Mr. and Mrs. Guye reside in a pleasant home at No. 1627 17th avenue, 
south, where they extend a gracious hospitality to their many friends. 

SYLVESTER B. HICKS. 

As one of the representative business men of the city of Seattle, where 
he has maintained his home for nearly a decade and a half, contributing in no 
small measure to its development and material prosperity through his well 
directed enterprise and public spirit, and as one whose ancestral record be- 
speaks long and prominent identification with the annals of Am.erican his- 
tory, there are many points which render particularly consonant a specific 
and prominent mention of Mr. Hicks in this compilation, and it is a work 
of satisfaction to thus perpetuate a record of worthy and useful life. 

Mr. Hicks was born on a farm near the city of Rochester, in Monroe 
county. New York, on the i8th of June. 1846, and is a descendant of dis- 
ringuished English stock, the ancestry being traced back in direct line, from 
records still extant, to Sir Ellis Hicks and to the date of September 9, 1356. 
This ancestor was knighted by Edward, the "Black Prince," of England, 
for great bravery and gallantry displayed in capturing the colors of the 
French in the battle of Poictiers. His lineal descendant, and the progenitor 
of the American, sailed from England in the good ship "Fortune" and landed 
at Plymouth, in the Massachusetts colony, on the nth of November, 1621, 
one year after the arrival of the "Mayflower." Our subject's ancestors in 
the direct line continued to reside in the state of Massachusetts until his 
great-grandfather, Samuel Hicks, removed to Parma, Monroe county. New 
York, becoming one of the pioneers of that section. His son and namesake, 
Samuel, Jr., grandfather of the subject of this sketch, had located in that 
county about two years previous to the arrival of his father and had the 
distinction of being the first white settler in Monroe county, and two years 



I30 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

elapsed before any other white person made settlement there. Samuel Hicks, 
Sr., was a valiant soldier of the Continental line during the war of the Rev- 
olution, and the same intrinsic loyalty was manifested by his son Samuel, 
who was an active participant in the war of 1812, in which he held the im- 
portant office of commissary. His grandson, to whom this sketch is dedi- 
cated, has in his possession the gun carried by this honored patriot, together 
v;ith a pewter plate which had been used in his household, while he also 
owns eighty-nine acres of the extensive farm on which his grandfather re- 
sided for so many years and which was owned by him during the long period 
of his residence in Alonroe county, New York, where he became one of 
the prominent and influential farmers of the state. He departed this life in 
1849, at the age of sixty-nine years. In his early life, amid the pioneer wilds 
of that section of the state of New York, he devoted his attention largely 
to hunting and trapping, and later he reclaimed the farm previously mentioned 
and placed it under effective cultivation. His wife, whose maiden name w'as 
Sherwood, was likewise of English lineage, and the second white woman to 
cross the Genesee river, the first having been Aneka Janes, and the two were 
well acquainted. She attained the age of eighty-four years. Grandfather 
Hicks left his fine farm to his two youngest sons, and in course of time their 
affairs became involved and the property passed out of their hands, with the 
exception of eighty-nine acres which was bequeathed to an aunt of our sub- 
ject, this, too, being incumbered. In 1899 Sylvester B. Hicks, our subject, 
[)urchased this portion of the old farm and cleared off the obligations, and 
he finds satisfaction in there providing a home for his venerable aunt, to 
whom the property had been given, but who had no means of freeing the 
place from the mortgage resting upon it. The property near the city of 
Rochester, which had l^een purchased by Grandfather Hicks for se\-en York 
shillings per acre, is likewise still owned by members of the family. 

John Hicks, father of him whose name initiates this article, was born 
on the old homestead farm in ^Monroe county. New York, in the year 181 1, 
and was there reared to maturity. He married Miss Elsie Olmsted, who 
was born at Burnt Hill, Saratoga county. New York, in 181 3. and they 
became the parents of eight children, of whom only three are now living. 
John Hicks passed away in 1866, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, his death 
being the result of an organic disease of the heart. He had been a successful 
merchant in the citv of Rochester for manv vears and was a man of sterline 
character and marked ability. His widow^ long survived him, passing away 
at the venerable age of eighty-three years. Both were devoted members of 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 131 

the Baptist church and to them was ever accorded unequivocal respect and 
esteem by all who knew them. 

Sylvester B. Hicks was the seventh in order of birth of the eight chil- 
dren of John and Elsie (Olmsted) Hicks, and he received his early education 
in the excellent public schools of the city of Rochester. In 1864 he took 
the position of accountant in the service of the government, and as such con- 
tinued to be employed, in Tennessee, for a period of two years. He then 
accepted a position as traveling salesman for a manufacturing house in the 
city of New Haven, Connecticut, and in this capacity visited all the larger 
cities in the Union, continuing to remain in the employ of this concern 
until 1883, thus gaining a valuable business experience and an exceptionally 
wide circle of acquaintances. After leaving his position as a traveling rep- 
resentative Mr. Hicks engaged in tlie hardware business in Aberdeen, South 
Dakota, this line of enterprise being that with which he had familiarized 
himself as a commercial traveler, and he continued at the point noted for a 
period of about five years, his efforts having been attended with a due 
measure of success. He disposed of his interests there in 1889 and came to 
Seattle, where he arrived on the ist day of July. For a few months he was 
in the employ of the hardware firm of Campbell & Atkinson, and was then 
tendered a position and a stock interest in the Schwabacher Hardware Com- 
pany, of which he became vice-president and also acted as manager until 
1899, at which time he resigned, for the purpose of engaging in business on 
his own responsibility, inaugurating the new enterprise by organizing the 
firm of S. B. Hicks & Sons. The establishment of the firm is one of the 
most important of the sort in the northwest, the stock handled comprising 
all lines usually carried in a metropolitan house of the kind, and a branch 
store is also maintained by the firm in the city of Portland, Oregon. Mr. 
Hicks is familiar with every detail of the business and his long experience 
makes him a particularly careful and discriminating buyer, so that he is 
able to handle his business with great facility and to offer the best service to 
his patrons. The house of which he is the head has gained a high reputa- 
tion and is recognized as one of the leading business concerns of the city, 
a specially extensive trade being handled in the line of heavy hardware. Mr. 
Hicks is also a large stockholder in the Z. C. Miles-Piper Company, a 
prominent hardware and house-furnishing concern of this city. Our sub- 
ject is thoroughly public-spirited and progressive and has ever taken a deep 
interest in all imdertakings and enterprises projected for the benefit of the 
city and its people. He came here at the time when the ever memorable 
fire of 1889 had left the major portion of the city in smoldering ruins, and 



132 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

he has not only been a witness of the splendid rehabilitation of the place, 
but has also contributed a due quota to the upbuilding of the city and to 
insuring its advancement along normal and legitimate lines of industrial en- 
terprise. His political support has ever been given to the Republican party 
and he and his wife hold membership in the Baptist church, of which they 
are liberal supporters. 

April 21, 1868, Mr. Hicks was united in marriage to Miss Henrietta 
West, who was born in New York city, the daughter of Beer West, a prom- 
inent jeweler of the national metropolis at that time. Of this union three 
children have been born, namely: Adelbert M. and Frederick W., both 
of whom are associated with their father in the hardware business, while 
the latter of the two is also a member of the directorate of the Z. C. Miles- 
Piper Company; and Elizabeth Alice, who is the wife of Arthur L. Piper, 
one of the interested principals in the company just mentioned. 

JOHN M. FRINK. 

The industrial activities which have given the city of Seattle such marked 
prestige and precedence within the lapse of comparatively few years, have 
been fostered and pushed forward by men of business capacity, sterling char- 
acter and progressive spirit, — men who have had appreciation of the natural 
advantages here afforded and prescience as to what the future would bring 
forth. Among the honored and representative business men of Seattle is Mr. 
Frink, president and manager of the Washington Iron Works, one of the 
leading industrial concerns of the Evergreen state. 

Mr. Frink claims the old Keystone state of the Union as the place of 
his nativity, having been born in Montrose, Susquehanna county, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the 2 1 St of January, 1845, the family being of stanch Norman 
French ancestry and having been established on American £oil in the early 
colonial epoch. The original American progenitors located in the Carolinas 
in 1667, and later the family became one of prominence in Connecticut, New 
York and Pennsylvania, while in each successive generation have been found 
men of ability and honor and women of refinement. Rev. Prentiss Frink, 
the father of the subject of this review, was born in Madison county. New 
York, in the year 181 5, and was a clergyman of the Baptist church, devot- 
ing his life to the work of his noble calling and being a man of high intel- 
lectuality and lofty ideals. He married Miss Deidamia Millard, who was 
about his own age and who was born in Schenectady county. New York. 
In their early married life they lived for a number of years in Pennsylvania, 



:-rE "hew YORK] 

uBUC LIBRARY^ 






r,or.., j. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 133 

thence returning to New York, where they remained until 1858, when they 
removed to Kansas, of which state the father of our subject became one of 
the pioneer clergymen, and there he passed the residue of his life, passing 
away in 1861, at the age of forty-six years, and leaving his widow and eight 
children, of whom six survive at the present time. The devoted wife and 
mother long survived her husband, being summoned into eternal rest at the 
old home in Fairview, Kansas, in 1897, at the venerable age of seventy-six 
years. 

John M. Frink, who was the eldest son, was but sixteen years of age 
at the time of his father's death, and thus the care and maintenance of the 
family devolved upon him to a very large extent while he was still a mere 
youth. The texture of his character was shown at that time, for he valiantly 
assumed the responsibilities which were placed upon his shoulders, contin- 
uing to work the homestead farm and to care for his mother and the younger 
children until all became able to assume personal responsibilities and provide 
for their own maintenance. He thus continued at the homestead for a period 
of ten years, and has never regretted his devotion to the welfare of those 
near and dear to him, considering his labors at the time as haA'ing consti- 
tuted a privilege rather than a burden. His father had been in ill health for 
a number of years prior to his death, and this necessitated our subject's with- 
drawal from school at the immature age of twelve years, in order that he 
might take up the work which he so ably continued after the demise of his 
father, and from that early age he received no farther specific scholastic train- 
ing save for two terms of study in the preparatory department of Washing- 
ton College, at Topeka, Kansas. That to one of such alert and receptive 
mentality this technical deprivation practically constituted only a slight handi- 
cap, needs scarcely be said, and he effectively supplemented his school disci- 
pline by personal reading and study in the evenings, at the noon hour and 
on Sundays, making each moment of leisure count for definite development. 
Though he may thus be said to be self-educated, it can not be gainsaid that 
the subjective proved an able instructor, for Mr. Frink is a man of broad 
and exact knowledge and is keenly appreciative of the intellectual elements, 
while his powers of absorption have ever been of pronounced type. 

In 1870 Mr. Frink was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Phillips, 
who was born in Westchester, Pennsylvania, and shortly after this import- 
ant event in his career he removed to southern Kansas, where he secured a 
farm of his own, and there continued to devote his attention to agricultural 
pursuits for a period of eight years, his energy and discriminating methods 
being so directed as to result in a gratifying and unec|uivocal success. While 



134 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

residing in the Sunflower state Mr. Frink enlisted in the Twenty-second 
Kansas Home Guards, at the time of the Indian massacre of 1863, and he 
also served in defending the country against the invasion of the Confederate 
General Price during the war of the Rebellion, and also in repelling Ouant- 
rell at the time of the burning of the city of Lawrence, in that troublous 
epoch in our national history, when the state of which he was a resident con- 
sistently gained the sobriquet of ''bleeding Kansas." 

Mr. Frink was reared in the west, and is typically western in spirit and 
sentiment, being dominated by that progressive energy which has brought 
about the magnificent development of the great western section of our na- 
tional commonw'ealth. In the year 1875 he disposed of his interests in 
Kansas and removed to San Francisco, California, where he remained but 
a short interval, coming thence to Seattle and casting in his lot with this 
city of destiny. He began his career here in a most obscure capacity, and his 
progress has indeed kept pace with that of the beautiful metropolis of Wash- 
ington, and the one is to be viewed with as great satisfaction as the other. 
He secured work by the day on the streets of the ambitious little western 
town, which at that time gave slight evidence of its future prestige, and also 
worked in the coal bunkers, later turned his attention to carpentry and finally 
entered upon a notably different sphere of endeavor, becoming a successful 
t^chool teacher. He has ever had the deepest appreciation of the dignity of 
honest toil and is signally free from that false pride which has proved the 
undoing of many a man. In his pedagogic work Mr. Frink served as prin- 
cipal of the Belltown school and later was similarly incumbent in the public 
schools of Port Gamble, Kitsap county, where he remained two years. In 
188 1 he engaged in the foundry business in Seattle, beginning operations 
upon a most modest scale, but giving inception to an enterprise which was 
to develop into one of the leading industries of the city and state. He en- 
tered into partnership w-ith L. H. Tenny, under the firm name of Tenny & 
Frink, and they equipped their plant in such a way as to meet the demands 
placed upon it at the time. In the year 1882, such had been the success at- 
tending the first year's operations, it was deemed expedient to augment the 
scope of operations by the enlargement of the facilities of the enterprise, and 
this was duly accomplished by the organization of the Washington Iron 
Works Company, which was duly incorporated under the laws of the terri- 
tory of Washington. Mr. Frink was at once made president and manager 
of the company, and in this capacity he has served to the present time, his 
fine executive and administrative powers, his marked business discrimination 
and his indefatigable energy having been the factors in accomplishing the 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 135 

success which has attended the enterprise and brought it into a place of 
prominence and to the controUing of a business of wide scope and import- 
ance. To the original foundry was added a machine shop, and later a black- 
smith and boiler shop, and the plant was well equipped at the time of the 
great fire which devastated the city in 1889. This memorable conflagration 
practically wiped out the property of the company, as it did many other of the 
most prominent and important business concerns in the city, and the loss entailed 
to the Washington Iron Works Company reached the aggregate of about eigh- 
ty-five thousand dollars, over and above the insurance indemnity. At the time 
of the fire the company controlled a large business and gave employment to 
a corps of one hundred and sixty-five workmen. With that indomitable 
spirit and courage which animated the business men of the city after this 
disaster and which eventuated in the more substantial upbuilding of its ma- 
terial resources, the company forthwith began the construction of a new 
plant, and the same now covers two blocks, while its equipment and access- 
ories are of the most modern and improved type. The business has con- 
stantly increased in scope and represents today one of the important 
industries of the state, while employment is afforded to two hundred work- 
men, so that the enterprise has distinct bearing upon the public welfare of 
the community, while furthering the individual prosperity of the interested 
principals. 

Mr. Frink has ever stood as one of the loyal and public-spirited citi- 
zens of the great state of Washington, to whose material development and 
civic progress he has contributed in no small measure, and he is honored 
as one of the sterling pioneers of the commonwealth. He was one of the 
organizers of the first electric light companies in Seattle, in :886, but event- 
ually disposed of his interests in the same. Other public enterprises of the 
greatest importance have received his co-operation, notably that involving 
the construction of street railways, in which he has taken a very prominent 
part, being at the present time president and manager of the Seattle City 
Railway Company, in whose stock he has a controlling interest. He has also 
been conspicuously identified with the building interests of the city, having 
erected a large number of business and residence structures and being the 
owner of property in all divisions of the city: He erected what is known as 
the Washington Iron Works Block, at the corner of Occidental and Jack- 
son streets, the original site of the iron works, and he has built a number 
of fine residences, including his own beautiful and distinctively modern 
home, at the corner of Weller street and Thirtieth avenue, south, the same 



136 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

being of attractive architectural design and equipment and standing as one 
of the handsomest places in the city, its erection having been completed in 
1882. In politics ]\Ir. Frink gives a stanch allegiance to the Republican 
party, and has been prominent in its councils in the state of his adoption. He 
was a member of the board of aldermen of Seattle at the time when the first 
cable and electric street railways were installed, and he did all in his power 
to facilitate the construction of this important municipal improvement, while 
at all times his aid and influence have been given in support of every enter- 
prise and project for the general good. In 1891 he was elected to represent 
iiis district in the senate of the state legislature, was chosen as his own suc- 
cessor, and thus served for a period of eight years, proving a capable and 
loyal legislator and being ver}^ active in guarding and protecting the inter- 
ests of his district, and those of the state at large. His prominence in the 
ranks of the Republican party in the state, and the appreciative estimate 
placed upon his abilities and character led to his nomination for the dis- 
tinguished office of governor of the state in 1900, but his defeat was com- 
passed through a split in the ranks of the party, owing to a disaffection on 
the part of a certain faction. j\Ir. Frink was for a number of years a most 
active and zealous member of the board of education in his home city, having 
been president of the body for two out of the five years of sen^ice in this ca- 
pacity. During his tenii of service all save two of the fine school buildings 
of the city were erected. He has ever stood as one of the progressive busi- 
ness men and public-spirited citizens of the state of Washington, and his 
course has been such as to command unequivocal confidence ?nd esteem. He 
has attained a high degree of success in his business operations, being dis- 
tinctively a man of affairs, and this is the more to his credit since it represents 
the results of his own efforts, which have been directed on a high plane of 
honor and integrity. He is a prominent member of the First Presbyterian 
church, with which his family are also identified. 

Mrs. Hannah (Phillips) Frink entered into eternal rest in 1875, five 
years subsequently to her marriage, and in 1877 Mr. Frink was united in 
marriage to Miss Abby Hawkins, who was born in the state of Illinois, be- 
ing a daughter of Almon Hawkins. They have five children : Egbert I. 
is treasurer of the Washington Iron Works Company; Gerald is assistant 
superintendent and master mechanic of the works; and Francis Guy is secre- 
tary of the company; the two daughters, Helena and Ethena remain at the 
parental home, which is a center of gracious and refined hospitality, the fam- 
ily taking a prominent part in the social life of the city. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 137 

LUTHER A. DYER. 

Though no land is richer in opportunities or offers greater advantages 
to its citizens than America, success is not to be obtained through desire, 
but must be persistently sought. In America "labor is king" and the man 
who resolutely sets to work to accomplish a purpose is certain of success 
if he but has the qualities of perseverance, untiring energy and practical 
common sense. Captain Luther A. Dyer, president of the Forty-fifth Con- 
solidated Mining Company, through his diligence and persistent purpose, 
has won a leading place in the financial circles of King county. 

A native of Maine, he was born at Addison Point, Washington county; 
on the 27th of February, 1840, and is a member of a prominent old family 
of that commonwealth. The progenitor of the family on American soil was 
Lemuel Dyer, the great-great-grandfather of our subject, who came to this 
country from old England. The grandfather of our subject, also named 
Lemuel Dyer, was born in Maine, and became a ship builder and sea captain, 
the Dyers for many generations having follow- ed a sea-faring life. Captain 
Luther Dyer, the father of him whose name introduces this review, also 
claimed the Pine Tree state as the place of his nativity, and he, too, fol- 
lowed the sea, his career as a sailor covering a period of fifty-five years. 
In 1863 his ship, the Fannie W. Bailey, was wrecked outside the bar at San 
Francisco, and with the exception of two all on board were lost, the brave 
captain going down with his ship. He had married Miss Delana A. Look, 
who was born at Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, and was descended 
from an old American family. They became the parents of two sons, the 
brother of our subject being G. C. Dyer, an employe of the American Rub- 
ber Company at Boston. 

Captain Luther A. Dyer received his primary education in the public 

schools of his native locality, and later became a student in the Washington 

Academy, there receiving superior advantages. When fourteen years of 

age, following the footsteps of his ancestors, he went before the mast, his 

first voyage being from New^ York to Australia, and during his career of 

fifteen years as a sailor he visited all parts of the world and was in many 

shipwrecks. For the subseciuent fifteen years he was the master and owner 

of ships, and after a sea-faring life of thirty years he sold his ships at Boston 

and in 1887 came to Seattle, Washington, where he has since been interested 

in the discovery of the rich mineral deposits of this locality. The company of 

which he is now president own property in the Sultan district, in the Cascade 

Mountains, where they have taken out one hundred and ninety thousand 
9 



138 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

dollars worth of ore, the ore running from fifteen to one hundred and 
twenty-six dollars a ton in silver and gold. The mine which they are now 
operating is a very valuable one, and in addition they have thirty-two claims. 
Mr. Dyer is one of the leading miners of the locality, and in both business 
and social circles he is well known. His political support is given to the 
Democracy, but he has never been an aspirant for public honors. 

The marriage of our subject was celebrated in 1867, when Miss Direxa 
J. Leighton became his wife, but after a happy married life of nine years 
this union was dissolved by the hand of death, the wife bemg called to her 
final rest in 1875, leaving one son, Luther H., who is now at sea. From 
early life Mr. Dyer has been identified with the Masonic fraternity, and 
he is also a member of the Red Men. 

JAMES TONKIN. 

As the progress and prosperity of the nation and of any community 
represents the aggregate result of the endeavors of the individual citizens, 
so the history of the nation is the record of the composite achievements of 
its people. Biography thus becomes the very foundation on which must 
rest the general history of mankind. The importance of making a per- 
manent record of the life-work of men who are worthy such distinction, 
can not be overestimated. The subject of this re\'iew stands forward as one of 
of the honored and representative citizens of the thriving little city of Renton, 
with whose progress and development he has been intimately identifi.ed, having 
been the pioneer merchant of the place and having gained a high position 
in the esteem and confidence of the people of the community. The busi- 
ness which he established so many years ago is now carried successfully for- 
ward by his sons, who conduct a well equipped general merchandise estab- 
lishment, under the firm name of Tonkin Brothers. 

Mr. Tonkin is a native of Cornwall, England, and in his makeup have 
Ijeen signally manifested those sterling characteristics for which the Cor- 
nishman has ever been recognized and honored. He was born en the 29th 
of September, 1834, the son of William and Phoebe (Knight) Tonkin, 
both representatives of stanch old English families. The father w^as iden- 
tified with the great mining industry in Cornwall and passed his entire life 
in his native 'land, passing away at the age of sixty-five years. He was 
a man of upright character and sterling worth, and both he and his wife 
were devoted members of, the Methodist Episcopal church, she having sur- 
vived him a few years. They became the parents of eight children, and the 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 139 

subject of this sketch is the only member of the family in the state of Wash- 
ington. 

James Tonkin was reared to maturity in liis native land, where he re- 
ceived a good English education, after which he became identified with 
quartz mining in Cornwall. In the year 1865 he was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary Ann Stanton, and to them have been born three sons and 
one daughter. The daughter, Amelia, is the wife of Thomas Tonkin, of 
Cornwall. Of the sons we enter the following record : Wilham is identi- 
fied with the operation of the Renton mine; Edwin is an attache of the 
office of the Great Northern Railroad, in Seattle; and Josiah is associated 
with his father in conducting- the mercantile business, in which the other 
sons are also interested. The children are all married, and our subject has 
twelve grandchildren. 

In April, 1866, Mr. Tonkin made a trip to South Africa, and there 
passed a year, being employed in the mines at Capetown. He then returned 
to England, and in 1867, in company with his young wife, he started for 
America, landing at Castle Garden on the ist of May, and thence proceed- 
ing to Colchester, McDonough county, Illinois, where he was employed in 
the coal mines, and where he continued to reside until 1882, in November 
of which year he came to Washington and secured employment in the Ren- 
ton mine, being thus engaged until 1884, when he opened a grocery in the 
town, which was then scarcely more than a hamlet of a few houses, and he 
inaugurated operations in a very modest way, carrying a small stock of 
groceries and provisions. With the growth of the town his business enter- 
prise increased in scope and importance, and the establishment ihiw has a 
select and comprehensive line of general merchandise and controls a trade 
of representative order, the fair dealing and honorable methods ever brought 
to bear in the conducting of the enterprise having brought a popular ap- 
preciation and confidence and insured the steady expansion of the business. 
Mr. Tonkin's success has been due to his close attention to business, to his 
unvarying courtesy and to his absolute integrity of purpose, and he retains 
the unequivocal confidence and esteem of the people of the community, being 
known as a progressive and public-spirited citizen and as one who has 
done his part in furthering the advancement and material upbuilding of 
the little city with whose history he has been identified for a score of years. 

In politics Mr. Tonkin formerly gave his support to the Republican 
party without reservation, but he now maintains an independent position, 
exercising his franchise in support of those men and measures meeting the 
approval of his judgment. He has never sought or held office, preferring 



140 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

to devote his entire time and attention to his personal business. Fraternally 
he is an honored member of the Masonic order, having been raised to the 
master's degree in St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 35, A. F. & A. M., of Renton, 
of which he has held the office of treasurer for years. He is also a member 
of the auxiliary branch, the Order of the Eastern Star, and he was one of 
the charter members of Colchester Lodge, No. 30, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, in Illinois. His life has been one of signal usefulness and honor 
and the success which is his has come as the result of his own efforts. He 
and his wife have a pleasant home in Renton, and their children are all 
established in homes of their own, the family having ever been prominent 
in the social and business life of the city and well meriting the esteem in 
which the various members are held. 

GEORGE ALFRED HILL. 

George Alfred Hill has for eighteen years been a member of the Seattle 
bar and, the distinction which comes through merit and ability has been won 
by him. He was born near Nashville, Tennessee, on the 24th of Decem- 
ber, 1842, and is of Scotch-Irish lineage. His ancestors emigrated to Vir- 
ginia prior to the war of the Revolution, and later became residents of Ten- 
nessee and Kentucky. The subject of this review was also connected with 
the Hanks family, equally prominent and well known in Virginia. George 
Hill, the great-grandfather, and George Fair Flill, the grandfather of our 
subject were both heroes of the Revolution, who valiantly aided in the strug- 
gle for independence, and the latter became one of the early settlers of Ken- 
tucky. Reuben C. Hill, the father of him whose name introduces this review, 
was born in Kentucky, but spent the greater part of his life in Tennessee. 
He studied medicine and for many years successfully practiced his profes- 
sion. In 1850 he crossed the plains to California and earned a large amount 
of money. He was a skilled physician of generous impulses and humani- 
tarian principles and his aid was never solicited by the poor and needy in 
vain. Every movement for the general good received his support and co- 
operation and for many years he was a much beloved and zealous minister of 
the Baptist church. He took a deep interest in educational matters and en- 
dowed the McMinville Baptist College, in McMinnville, Oregon. He mar- 
ried Miss Margaret Lair of Kentucky, who was associated with him in much 
of his work in behalf of humanity. The journey across the plains to Cali- 
fornia was made with oxen and for two years he remained on the Pacific 
coast, meeting with excellent success in his labors. In 1852 he returned to 



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AtVWA, i.£ftOX ANB 
TW.BCN ••UNO^ TIOK*. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 141 

his wife and children and the following year brought them with him across 
the plains, this time taking up his abode in Benton county, Oregon. Sub- 
sequently he removed to Albany, where the remainder of his days were passed 
in the active practice of the medical profession and in preaching the gospel 
of peace and good will to men. He was thus closely identified with two of 
the most important callings to which man can devote his energies — the al- 
leviation of human suffering, and the work of preparing men, not only for 
the duties of this life, but also for the glories of the life to come. He died in 
Albany at the ripe old age of eighty-four years, but his memory remains as 
a blessed benediction to all who knew him and his example is yet a potent 
influence in the lives of those with whom he came in contact. He was so- 
licited by his fellow citizens to represent them in the legislature of Oregon 
and held that position of honor and trust for a number of terms, always 
putting forth his best efforts for the good of the young state. He left the 
impress of his individuality upon many lines of life, promoting lasting prog- 
ress and improvement, and high on the roll of honored pioneers of the Pa- 
cific coast is his name enshrined. His wife was a brave pioneer woman, who 
met courageously the conditions of frontier life and shared with her husband 
in the good work which he accomplished and the influence which he exercised. 
She departed this life at the age of eighty-three years. Nine children were 
born unto them, three daughters and six sons, of whom two of the sons and 
one daughter have passed to the great beyond. The surviving sons of the 
family are : W. Lair, an eminent attorney of San Francisco ; J. L., a physi- 
cian of Alban}^ Oregon; Taylor, a capitalist residing in Prineviile, Oregon; 
and George Alfred. 

George Alfred Hill Avas a vouth of onlv eleven vears when, with his 
parents, he crossed the plains to Oregon in 1853. Lie was educated in the 
common schools of the Sunset state and was reared upon the home farm, 
assisting his father and continuing his education until nineteen years of age, 
when he became a school teacher. He was twenty years of age when the 
country became excited over the discovery of gold at Boise, Idaho, and mak- 
ing, his way to that place he there engaged in placer mining for three years, 
also in prospecting and digging, enduring all the hardships, dangers and ex- 
posures that come to the miner who invaded a new region, where the com- 
forts of an older civilization were unknown. Like all miners he met with 
success and reverses and after these experiences he returned to his home in 
Albany, Oregon, where he was engaged in the drug business. He also read 
medicine, acquired a knowledge of chemistry, and successfully continued in 
the drug business for six years. While living in Albany he also served as a 



142 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

member of the city council for two years and was recognized as one of the 
leading and influential men of the community. In 1874 he was elected 
county clerk of Linn county, which office he satisfactorily filled for two 
years. 

In the meantime Mr. Hill began reading law and acquired a taste for 
iJie profession, but his health becoming impaired he was advised by his 
physician to seek outdoor employment and he removed to eastern Oregon, 
where he engaged in stock raising, which proved a very profitable source 
of income, as well as giving him the necessary outdoor exercise, which soon 
restored his health. For three years he was engaged in that pursuit, but re- 
reverses overtook him and Indian depredations also robbed him of his profits, 
so that he abandoned the business after losing nearly everything that he had 
saved from his former business undertakings. In the fall of 1880 he passed 
an examination before Judges Hanford, White and Jacobs, whereby he was 
admitted to the bar. He then actively entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession and soon secured a good clientage. For a number of years he was 
in partnership with Harold Preston, of whose ability Mr. Hill speaks in the 
very highest terms. This partnership was terminated in 1884, at which time 
Mr. Hill was elected police magistrate. He proved a most capable official 
and at the close of his term resumed the private practice of law, in which he 
has gained distinction, owing to his comprehensive knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of jurisprudence and the clearness with which he applies his learning 
to the points in litigation. He has likewise become largely interested in 
real-estate transactions and has done much for the improvement of the city 
along building lines. He has platted several additions to the town, which his 
foresight told him would be in time a good source of income, for he be- 
lieved that the future would witness the rapid development and substantial 
growth of the west and time has proven the wisdom of his opinions. 

In 1870 was celebrated the marriage, in Albany, Oregon, of Mr. Hill 
and Miss Julia A. Driggs, a daughter of Jeremiah Driggs, a brave Oregon 
pioneer of 1847. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hill have been born three children, two 
of whom are living: Victor, who is clerk in a drug store in Seattle, and 
Donald V. S., who is yet in school. Recently Mr. Hill has erected a nice 
residence in the southern part of town on a five-acre tract of land, and has 
made it a valuable and pleasant home. Both he and his wife are widely 
and favorably known, and their home is celebrated for its courteous hos- 
pitality. As the years have passed Mr. Hill has taken a very active and influ- 
ential part in many lines of activity that have contributed to the progress, 
improvement and prosperity of Oregon and of Washington. While in the 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 143 

former state he was a member of the Albany Volunteer Fire Department, 
from 1872 until his removal from the city, and on coming to Seattle he en- 
tered that service here, remaining with it up to the time that it became a 
paid fire department. During the great fire which destroyed the city in 1889, 
he rendered valuable service in saving the building in which his office and 
books were located, his previous experiences as a fireman enabling him to 
take up the work on the spur of the moment. Of the Masonic fraternity 
Mr. Hill is a representative, having been made a Master Mason in Corinthian 
Lodge, No. 17, F. & A. M., in Albany, in 1869. He is a past master of Ionic 
Lodge, No. 90, and became a member of Bailey Chapter, No. 8, R. A. M., 
while at the present time he belongs to Seattle Chapter, No. 3. He like- 
wise holds membership relations with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Improved Order of Red Men, and the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. He is an agreeable and cordial gentleman and is a worthy and esteemed 
citizen and pioneer. To the soldier who, upon the field of battle has risked 
life in defense of his country, the United States owes a debt of gratitude 
which can never be repaid, but she is equally indebted to the brave pioneers 
who faced the dangers, hardships and trials of the west in carrying civiliza- 
tion into frontier regions. Their tasks demanded courage and resolution, 
and their work has been a benefit, not alone to themselves, but will be en- 
joyed by generations to come, and it is fitting that their name should be 
found upon the pages of history. 

HORACE H. CHESBRO. 

Among the successful and popular young business men of the city of 
Seattle is the subject of this sketch, who is senior member of the firm of 
H. &; LI. Chesbro, here engaged in the handling of all kinds of musical instru- 
ments and merchandise, while both members of the firm are skillful musicians 
and have taken a prominent part in the development of the interests of the 
"divine art" in the community, being held in high estimation in both busi- 
ness and social circles. 

The family of which our subject is a representative in the agnatic line 
is one which has been long identified with the annals of American historv, the 
original ancestor in the new world having come hither from England and 
taken up his residence in the colony of Massachusetts in the early part of the 
seventeenth century, while he later became the founder and first white settler 
of Killingly, Connecticut. Representatives of the name, which has been 
variously spelled by different branches of the family, — Cheesebrough, Chese- 



144 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

hroiigh, Chesbro, etc., — became prominent in the history of New England, 
while from a comprehensive genealogical ^^•ork to be published within the 
present year by a descend ent of the line in New York city, it is shown that 
the family now has representatives in nearly all sections of the Union, while 
on the list are many in the various generations who have become distin- 
guished in connection with the political, professional and civic affairs of the 
nation. (For the benefit of Mr. Chesbro, the writer would say that he is 
in the maternal line of tliis same family and knows these facts to be true, 
the work mentioned having been compiled in extenso by Mrs. Cheesebrough- 
Wildey, of New York, and being very comprehensive. — Editor). 

Horace Hastings Chesbro is a native of the state of Connecticut, hav- 
ing been born on the 21st of May, 1875, the son of Dr. George Edward and 
Delia (Cook) Chesbro, who now maintain their home in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, the father having devoted his entire business life to the practice of 
medicine and surgery and being an able and honored member of his pro- 
fession. His wife was born in the state of IMaine and is a representative of 
one of the old and distinguished families of that commonwealth. Of the 
seven children of Dr. and JN'Irs. Chesbro five are living at the present time, 
the subject of this review having been the second in order of birth. Florace 
H. received his early educational discipline in the public schools of Portland, 
Oregon, and he completed the scientific course in Valparaiso, Indiana, being 
graduated as a member of the class of 1897, while he also received a very thor- 
ough musical education in Valparaiso, Indiana, having a comprehensive the- 
oretical and technical knovvledge and showing marked facility and talent in 
his interpretations. He became a successful teacher of pianoforte music and 
his interest in all that touches this great art, which embellishes all phases 
of life, is insistent and enthusiastic. J\Ir. Chesbro arrived in Seattle in INlay, 
1S89, two weeks prior to the ever memorable fire which so nearly obliterated 
the business section of the city, and he was for a time in the employ of the 
firm of Venen & Vaughan and later in that of ^Vinter & Harper, both promi- 
nent music firms of this city. In 1897 he entered into business on his own 
responsibility, becoming associated with Charles H. Harper in the establish- 
ing of the same, and this alliance continued until the death of Mr. Harper, 
in 1890, the relations having been most harmonious and the strongest mutual 
confidence and friendship having existed between the interested principals. 
Upon the death of Mr. Harper our subject admitted to partnership his 
brother, Harry N. Chesbro, who is also a talented musician, and they have 
built up a successful business in the handling of pianos, organs and other 
musical instruments and merchandise, having an eligibly located, well 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 145 

equipped and attractive establishment at 1207 Second avenue, and receiving 
a supporting patronage of representative order, the personal popularity of the 
two principals contributing not a little to the advancement of the business. 
They handle the Weber, tlie Henry F. Miller, the Kurtzman and the Kohler 
and Campbell pianos, of New York, being exclusive piano and organ dealers. 
In politics Mr. Chesbro maintains an independent attitude, giving his support 
to those candidates whom he considers most eligible and best fitted for prefer- 
ment, and fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen of the World. The 
firm has gained an excellent reputation in the city and the business is con- 
ducted with that ability and fairness that insures a continuous expansion in 
its scope and importance. 

On the T6th of February, 1901, Mr. Chesbro was united in marriage 
to Miss Ella Holm, who was born in the state of Minnesota, the daughter of 
Charles Flolm, one of the well known citizens of Seattle. 

FRANK V. MORGAN. 

One of the prominent and representative business men of Seattle, Wash- 
ington, is Frank V. Morgan, the present manager and one of the stockhold- 
ers of the Seattle Ice Company, which was established in that city in 1882 
by W. B, Bushnell and was purchased by the present corporation in 1897. 
Their plant is located on the corner of First a\'enue south and Charles street, 
and the}^ also have a factory in Tacoma. I'hey manufacture distilled water 
ice, and in connection with that business conduct a cold storage- and are 
largely engaged in fish freezing. Their ice is shipped to all parts of the Sound, 
and so large is their trade that they can hardly manufacture ice enough to sup- 
ply the demand. 

Mr. Morgan, the experienced manager of this enterprise, was born in 
Newton, Massachusetts, on the 7th of April, 1867, and is of Welsh descent. 
The progenitor of the family in America first located in Connecticut, but 
shortly afterward removed to New Hampshire, in which state our subject's 
father, Henry B. Morgan, was born in 1828. His maternal ancestors were 
members of th.e Avery family, which can be traced back to the fourteenth 
century. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were 
quite prominently identified with the early history of that state, many of the 
family being distinguished ministers. Our subject's father was for many 
years engaged in the express business, and was a stanch Republican in poli- 
tics, being one of the organizers of the party in his locality. He married Miss 
Martha Ann Jones, also a native of the old Granite state, who departed this 



146 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

life when in her thirty-fourth year, while he lived to be sixty-six years of age. 
They w^ere the parents of six children, four of wdiom are still living. 

During his boyhood and youth Frank V. I\lorgan attended the public 
schools, completing his education, how^ever, at Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio. 
On coming west he first located at Sacramento, California, where he was en- 
p-a2:ed in the ice business for six vears, wdiile his brother, Fred, who is now 
bookkeeper of the Seattle Ice Company, was engaged in the same business in 
Sacramento for nine years. At that time they shipped ice from Tincker, 
Colorado, as there were then no ice plants in successful operation. Together 
our subject and his brother came to Seattle and purchased their present busi- 
ness, and being men of experience and ability in that line they are now meet- 
ing with marked success. They are members of the Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation, and occupy a foremost position in the business circles of the city with 
W'hich their lot is now cast. 

In 1895 Mr. Frank Y . jNIorgan was united in marriage with ]\Iiss Ger- 
trude Holt, and this union has been blessed by a little son, to whom they have 
given the name of Percy Avery. In his social relations Mr. Morgan is a 
member of the Knights of P3l;hias fraternity, and in politics is identified ' with 
the Republican party. Public-spirited and progressive, he takes a deep inter- 
est in the affairs of his adopted city, county and state, and does all in his power 
to advance the public welfare, but he has never cared for political honors. 
He applies himself closely to his business, and has made for himself an envia- 
ble record as an upright, honorable business man. 

HENRY OWEN SHUEY. 

In financial circles the name of Henry O. Shuey is an honored one and 
stands as a synonym for integrity. This gentleman is proprietor of the H. 
O. Shuey & Company Bank of Seattle, and also the Bank of Ballard. He is 
likewise the manager of the . Equitable Building, Loan & Investment Asso- 
ciation of Seattle, and his labors have ever been of a character that has con- 
tributed to public progress and improvement and to the general prosperity as 
well as to his individual success. 

Mr. Shuey is a native of the state of Indiana, where his birth occurred 
on the 29th of April, 1861. His father, Daniel Shuey, was a native of Vir- 
ginia, and in 1827 removed to Indiana, where he was married to Miss Nancy 
Owen, whose birth occurred on May 5, 182 1, in the state of North Carolina. 
In the Hoosier state they became prominent farming people, the father own- 
ing large tracts of land and in addition to its cultivation he w^as extensively 




!5*r=^. 






>fEW~yORK| 

-..IC LIBRARY 






J 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 147 

engaged in stockraising. His wife was a valued member of the Methodist 
church for twenty years, but later in life she became a member of the Chris- 
tian church and remained one of its adherents until called to the home pre- 
pared for the righteous. She died in 1899 at the age of seventy-eight years, 
having long survived her husband, who departed this life in 1868, at the 
age of fifty-nine. The three sons of their family are as follows : Rev. 
Thomas J. Shuey, a minister of the Christian church located in Rock Island, 
Illinois; James B., a prominent and influential farmer living on the old home- 
stead in Indiana; and Henry Owen. 

After his father's death the last named remained with his mother upon 
the home farm until nineteen years of age, attended the schools and on leav- 
ing home went to Valparaiso, Indiana, where he worked his way through 
the Northern Indiana Normal School, providing for the expenses of the 
course by sawing wood and by following any honest pursuit that would en- 
able him to acquire an education. He was graduated in 1885. and soon 
afterward was married to Miss Hessie Sherrill, who was born in his own 
county and was a daughter of the Rev. James W. Sherrill, a Baptist minister 
of Indiana. 

]\Ir. Shuey engaged in farming in the east for two years and in Feb- 
ruary, 1888, arrived in Seattle, where he embarked in the insurance and 
loan business, in which he met with a splendid degree of success. As his 
financial resources increased and his opportunities broadened he became iden- 
tified with the various interests of the city and state and acquired a wide 
and favorable acquaintance throughout Washington. He has made hosts of 
friends among all the people with whom he has come in contact and with' 
whom he has transacted business, and his record is a most creditable one, 
for no one has ever sustained a loss through him on account of poor loans. 
His reliability and integrity are beyond question and his efliorts while bring- 
ing to him prosperity have also been of great benefit to his fellow men, he 
having assisted hundreds of people to acquire homes or enable them to en- 
gage in business for themselves. He has worked his way up through the 
most honorable methods and he is now one of Seattle's most highly respected 
citizens, having acquired wealth, which returns to him an annual income of 
over twenty-five thousand dollars. He is now the heaviest stockholder in the 
two successful banking houses previously mentioned. He takes great de- 
light in his business, possesses unflagging energy and keen discrimination 
and is notably prompt and reliable. His business policies have been perfect 
system, careful economy, and the strictest punctuality, and to such a course 
his success can be justly attributed. 



148 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

In his political views Mr. Shuey is a Republican, but is not an office- 
seeker. He is an active and earnest member of the Christian church, in which 
lie is serving as elder and has been largely instrumental in the building of 
the several mission churches of the city, while he deserves the credit of hav- 
ing built one of the best churches of his denomination in the state at Everett. 
He has also taken a deep interest in the work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association and of the different religious societies of the state. His influ- 
ence is ever on the side of the right, the true and the beautiful. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shuey have had two sons : Charles E., who died when 
six years and nine months of age, and Clyde S., who was born April i, 
1897. They have a beautiful home in Seattle and a host of warm friends in 
the city of their adoption, where Mr. Shuey has won such brilliant success 
that is so worthily earned. 

ARTHUR A. SEAGRAVE. 

Arthur Amasa Seagrave, the proprietor of the Occidental Hotel, at the 
corner of Third avenue and Cherry street, has been a resident of this city 
since 1887. He was born in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, on the 25th of July, 
j'841, and he traces his descendants back to Lord Seagrave, of England. His 
ancestors were among the brave and heroic band of Pilgrims who landed on 
the rock-bound shores of Massachusetts from the Mayflower, coming to this 
country in search of that religious liberty which was denied them in the 
mother country. They were participants in all the early history of the col- 
onies, and the great-grandfather of our subject, John Seagrave, was a mem- 
ber of that noble band of patriots who fought so valiantly for the liberty 
of the colonies. The father of Arthur Seagrave was born in Uxbridge, 
Massachusetts, on the 20th of January, 1808, and he was there married to 
Miss Almena Ross, who w^as born in Connecticut in 1812. Her father, Ziba 
Ross, served his country as a drummer in the War of 1812. During the early 
years of his life Mr. Seagrave was engaged in agricultural pursuits, but later 
he became a contractor and manufacturer of building stone. He had also 
followed the profession of teaching, and was a surveyor of much ability. 
At the organization of the Republican part}^ he joined its ranks, and ever 
afterward remained a loyal supporter of its principles. He departed this life 
on the 8th of March, 1880, at the age of seventy-two years. Two of his 
sons, Austin and Orville, served in the United States navy during the Civil 
war, the former as paymaster and the latter as assistant in that capacity. 

Arthur Amasa Seagrave is indebted to the public school system of his 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 149 

native town for the educational privileges which he enjoyed in his youth. 
The days of his boyhood and youth were spent on his father's farm, and 
during the period of the Civil war he was employed in the Burnside Rifle 
Manufactory, where they were engaged in making guns for the government, 
they having manufactured several hundred thousand rifles while he w^as there 
employed. He was drafted for service during the struggle, but the 
company rather than spare him from their shops paid three hundred dol- 
lars for a substitute, which amount the state of Rhode Island afterward re- 
turned to the company, for it was believed he performed better service for 
the government in manufacturing guns than he could have possibly done 
in the field. After the close of the struggle Mr. Seagrave engaged in the 
sale of woolen goods which had been manufactured by his relati\^es, many 
of the Seagraves being prominent woolen manufacturers, and later he re- 
moved to Omaha, arriving in that city on the 21st of May, 1868. In con- 
nection with his brother and a cousin he there established a private school, 
wdiich he conducted for a number of years, and then entered the employ of 
the Union Pacific Railway Company, first as an express messenger and was 
later placed in charge of the construction department. He v/as subsequently 
transferred by that company to the Oregon Short Line, where he had charge 
of the material department and construction train, and to him is accorded 
the honor of being the first conductor on that division. Removing to Port- 
land, Oregan, in 1882, he issisted in the establishment of the Northern Pa- 
cific Express Company, in which he was associated with Superintend- 
ent Browning. After two years spent in that connection Mr. Seagrave re- 
moved to Olympia, Washington, where he organized a company for the 
manufacture of wooden pipes, of which he was made the president, and he 
was also one of the leading stockholders of the company, remaining with 
it for a number of years. Since 1887 he has made his home in Seattle and 
immediately after his arrival here he began investing in city property, but 
during the great fire of 1889 he suffered a loss of several thousand dollars. 
He had previously built and was the owner of the Seagrave block, at the 
corner of Virginia and Third avenues, and after the destruction of the city 
by fire he was urgently requested by the mayor and the councilmen to con- 
vert this into a hotel, which he did, and thus became the proprietor of the 
Seagrave Hotel. He subsequently removed into a large brick building, 
erected by Jesse W. George, at the corner of Main and Occidental avenues, 
and there he conducted his hotel for about seven years, but about this time, 
owing to reports published in the newspapers, the building was considered 
unsafe, and Mr. Seagrave thus lost many thousands of dollars. In 1894 he 



ISO REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

came to his present location, where he is the proprietor of the Occidental 
Hotel. He is a kind-hearted and obliging host, and his hotel enjoys a large 
and lucrative patronage. He is also the owner of a ranch just outside the 
city limits, where he raises a large variety ot small fruits and vegetables and, 
also poultry and hogs, and thus he not only furnishes his table with many 
of the delicacies of the season but gains that healthful exercise which he 
so much needs and enjoys. In addition to supplying his own table with 
meat he lias also sold as high as fifty swine in a single year. 

The marriage of Mr. Seagrave was celebrated in 1874, when Miss 
Selina S. Glass became his wife. Several children came to bless their union, 
but only one daughter, Mabel A., now survives, and she is now a student at 
\\'ellesley College, of Alassachusetts. She graduated in the Seattle high 
school as the valedictorian of her class, and she is also a fine equestrian and 
a member of the Seattle Equestrian Club. Mounted on her black horse, 
Frank, she has ^^"on many prizes for fine riding. She is also an active and 
valued member of the ]\[ethodist church, and she has hosts of warm and 
admiring friends in this city. After eleven years of happy married .life the 
union of I\Ir. and Mrs. Seagrave was dissolved by the hand of death, the 
wife and mother being called to the spirit world. On the 19th of May, .1888, 
Mr. Seagrave married Sarah Chattam, a descendant of Lord Chattam, of 
England. For ten years prior to her marriage she had been a popular and 
successful teacher in the public schools of Seattle, and religiously she is a 
charter member of the Second Presbyterian church of this city. In his fra- 
ternal relations ]\Ir. Seagrave is a i\Iason and a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, while in his political affiliations he is a stanch 
and unwavering Republican. 

J. HENRY HEMER. 

Few men of Seattle are more widely known throughout the state of 
Washington and the northwest than J. Henry Hemer, the grand recorder of 
the Ancient Order of United' Workmen of this state. He maintains his 
residence and office at Seattle, where he is known as a citizen of integrity and 
a man of sterling worth, having many friends in this state. As his name im- 
plies, !Mr. Hemer is of German lineage, and was born in the fatherland No- 
vember 29, 1857, his parents being Conrad and Catherine (Goebel) Hemer. 
Both were natives of Germany and the father served throughout his entire 
life there as a revenue officer. He and his wife held membership in the Luth- 
eran church and were people of the highest respectability. His death occurred 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 151 

in 1884, when he was seventy years of age, and his wife departed this hfe in 
1897, at the age of sixty-eight years. They never left Germany, but con- 
tinued to be residents of the land of their nativity until called to the home 
beyond. In their family were eight children, of whom seven are yet living. 

J. Henry Hemer acquired a college education in his native land and also 
mastered the business of bookkeeping there, but to a young man of an ambi- 
tious nature, strong purpose and a keen outlook for future possibilities, the 
new W'Orld was more attractive tlian the old, and in 1872 he sailed for the 
American metropolis. For eight years he remained a resident of New 
York city, being employed there in various occupations but spending most 
of the time as a stationary engineer. In 1882 he removed to Denver, Colo- 
rado, and first secured a position in the Windsor hotel. Later he was en- 
gaged in business on his own account and met with gratifying success. In 
1889 he disposed of his business interests there and made a trip to his native 
country, taking with him his ^^■ife and daughter. He spent seven months 
abroad, visiting his relatives and numerous friends and also looking upon 
many scenes of historic interest in the old world. 

Through the advice of J. W. Clise Mr. Hemer, upon his return to Amer- 
ica, came to Seattle, arriving in this city in November, 1889. He then en- 
tered the employ of Mr. Clise, having supervision of the men's work under 
that gentleman. He received the appointment to the position of deputy as- 
sessor of King county, filling the position very acceptably for two years. 
He then turned his atterition to the barber business and for six years was a 
member of the firm of Hemer & Noyes. During this period he saved his 
money and successfully passed through the financial panic which this city 
underwent after the great fire, being able to retain possession of his prop- 
erty during that epoch. Mr. Hemer had joined the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen in Colorado, and, transferring his membership to Seattle, he took 
a ^-ery active part in the W'Ork of the order here and became thoroughly posted 
in all departments connected with the organization. He became one of its most 
acti^-e representatives and Avas appointed deputy by Grand Master Jones, after 
which he traveled extensively over the whole of the western part of the state 
in behalf of the fraternity, visiting every town and nieeting with great suc- 
cess in his undertakings, and doing much for the good of the order, adding 
many, members thereto. So effective were his efforts that in April, 1890, he 
was elected grand recorder, filling that office to the satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. In 1 89 1 he was re-elected on the first ballot, and in 1902 he re- 
ceived the unanimous "vote of the grand lodge, a fact which indicated how 
hiighly his services were appreciated and how valuable were his eft"orts in 



152 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

behalf of the society. He is hkewise a member of the Knights of ^lacca- 
bees and the Degree of Honor. In pohtics he athhates with the Democracy. 
Mr. Hemer is ever zealous and earnest in his advocacy of what he believes to 
be right, and the same devoted loyalty is manifest in his connection with the 
political party of his choice. He has been endorsed by the Democratic Cluh 
for office, but has not cared to seek public preferment in recognition of his 
party fealty. 

Mr. Hemer was happily married in 18S.3 to 3^Iiss Robina Gumming, a 
native of Scotland, and their union has been blessed with one daughter, Anna, 
now a beautiful young lady. She is a valued member of the Episcopal church 
and with her parents enjoys the confidence and high esteem of all who have 
the pleasure of their acquaintance. They have a ^'ery attractive home on 
Queen Ann Hill, one of the most beautiful residence portions of the city, and 
Mr. Hemer also has valuable property in Ballard. Mr. Hemer has made 
good use of his opportunities. He has prospered from year to year, has con- 
ducted all business matters carefully and successfully, and in all his acts dis- 
plays an aptitude for successful management. He has not permitted the 
accumulation of a competence to affect in any way his actions toward those 
less successful than he, and has always a cheerful word and pleasant smile 
for all with whom he comes in contact. 

LEWIS S. ROWE. 

Lewis Solomon Rowe is a pioneer settler of the Pacific coast, having 
established his home in California in 1854, and now he is the treasurer of 
the pioneer society of Washington. A wealthy and respected citizen of 
Seattle, there is much in his life histor}- 01 interest to his many friends 
throughout this part of the countr}^ He was born in IMadison, ^Maine, on 
the 31st of August, 1834. and is of English and Scotch ancestry, the fam- 
ily having been founded in New Hampshire at an early period in its his- 
tory. Solomon Rowe, the father of our subject, was born in the old Granite 
state, and married ^liss Betsey Richardson,, of Maine, a lady of Revolu- 
tionary ancestry. Their union was -blessed with nine children, but only four 
are now living. The father was an- industrious farmer, and had large tracts 
of land, which were largely operated by his sons, while he devoted his time 
to the work of the ministry as a preacher of the Baptist denomination, leav- 
\ng his home in order to pronoimce a wedding ceremony or perform the last 
sad rites over the departed. His life was an honorable and helpful one and 
he made many friends, who deeply mourned his loss when at the age of sixty 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 153. 

years he was called to his final home. His wife passed away at the age of 
sixty-seven years. 

Mr. Rowe of this review was the youngest of the family. He attended 
the public schools and when about fourteen years of age left home to make 
his own way in the world, walking fifty miles alone to Bangor, Maine, where 
he bound himself for three years to John Wingate to learn the carriage 
makers' trade, being paid thirty dollars for the first year and sixty for the 
second, but during the third year he concluded that his employer was not 
treating him fairly and left him. He then went to work in a locomotive fac- 
tory, in which he was paid a dollar and a half per day. After remaining 
tliere for two years he took passage on a sailing vessel for San Francisco. 
The ship was the Orizaba. He had gone aboard as a stowaway, intending 
to work his passage, and washed dishes during the voyage. When he ar- 
rived in San Francisco he blacked boots, for which he was sometimes paid 
a dollar, but soon he got employment which offered better opportunities. 

In 1856 Mr. Rowe returned to New Hampshire and entered the employ 
of Abbott & Downmg, carriage manufacturers, and remained there five years, 
and in April, 1861, again went to California, sailing on the steamer North; 
Star from New York. The vessel encountered a severe storm, in which" 
it lost a mast and was then obliged to put into port for repairs. Upon his- 
return to San Francisco Mr. Rowe secured employment with Kilbourne & 
Bent, carriage manufacturers, at the corner of Third and Market streets. 
At first he was paid five dollars per day and was then put in charge of the 
shop, working by the piece. In this vvay he made from sixty to seventy dol- 
lars per week. In 1862 he went to Honolulu to take charge of a carriage 
shop there, but did not like the place and after three months returned to 
vSan Francisco. Afterward he went east to Topeka, Kansas, and remained 
there one year, then going to Newton, Kansas, and started the first store in 
that town, hauling the lumber for thirty miles with which to build his store. 
There he secured an extensive business and when the Santa Fe Railroad was. 
built he shipped his goods by the carload, but Newton became a very hard 
town. Drunken Texas cowboys and railroad men, engaged in building the 
Santa Fe, were continually fighting and while Mr. Rowe was in Newton 
thirty-seven men and one woman were killed. A ball crashed through his 
store window, passed over his head and lodged on the shelves behind him. 
Soon afterward he closed out his business there and went to Pueblo, Colo- 
rado, and was in business there for two years, after which he returned to 
California, where he was ill for some time. 

In 1875 Mr. Rowe came to Seattle and started a small store on Front 
10 



S54 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

avenue, at the foot of Cherry street, having a small stock of groceries worth 
two hundred and thiry dollars. He had lost almost everything he had made 
and on account of his illness had been reduced in weight to one hundred and 
fifteen pounds. He sold his goods at a small profit and soon built up a fine 
trade. Mr. Yesler built a store for him and he continued the business with 
success for nine years. In the meantime he had invested in city property 
when realty was very cheap and it was considered very foolish to put one's 
money in property here. Mr. Rowe sold out his business and was very ill 
for two years, but his health improved and he turned his attention to his prop- 
■erty interests. Where his fine residence now stands in the midst of a beauti- 
ful and populous city, there was a timber tract. He obtained five acres for 
four hundred dollars, has a splendid residence thereon now and the property 
is very valuable. On Front street he built six stores, which brought him 
good rental. He also became engaged in the carriage business and had a 
large repository and sold many carriages. He has lately built fifteen flats 
•on Union street, at a cost of over twenty thousand dollars. In this enterprise 
lie was associated with the Hon. C. P. Stone, and they were very success- 
ful, purchasing their carriages in car lots. They had control of the goods 
of the Cortland, New York, factory and other factories and did a large busi- 
ness. He bought bis partner's interest in the business and gradually closed 
■out the stock, retiring from active business except for the supervision of 
Jiis city propery. He has property which he purchased for six 
hundred dollars, which is now worth forty thousand. He now has at Port 
Orchard a town site of forty acres, which he has platted and is selling, having 
named it Veneta, in honor of his daughter of that name. The place joins 
Bremerton, the government navy yard, and the property is selling rapidly at 
good figures. In 1893 he went to the Colville reservation and located the 
Veneta gold mine. It is capitalized for $700,000 and is a fine property. Mr. 
Rowe is the president and treasurer of the company and has a controlling in- 
terest in the stock. 

Mr. Rowe has been twice married. In 1856 he wedded Miss Cynthia 
Clifford, and they had one daughter, Lizzie Ella, the wife of C. F. Dean; 
jMr. Rowe afterward married Miss Miranda F. Hummel and they have a 
daughter, Veneta, who is now the wife of Edward Maxwell. 

Mr. Rowe has always had firm faith in Seattle, believing that it would be- 
come a great city and time has proven the wisdom of his opinions. He has 
made the golden rule the leading principle of his life and has risen from a 
jOwly position to one of affluence in financial and social circles. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 155 

■ FREDERICK H. HURD. 

Frederick Henry Hurd, of Seattle, is one of the representative bnsiness 
men of the city, where he is engaged in deahng in hay, grain, flour and feed. 
He has made his home here since 1S87, coming from Missouri. He was 
born in Chnton, Middlesex county, Connecticut, on the /th of October, 1843, 
and is of English lineage, his ancestors having emigrated from England to 
America at a very early epoch in our colonial history. There were three 
brothers who came together, and one of them, Nathaniel Hurd, the great- 
grandfather of our subject, became a resident of Pennsylvania. His son, 
Nathaniel Hiu'd, the grandfather of our subject, was captain of a brig en- 
gaged in trade with the West Indies, and at the time of the Revolutionary 
war he and his vessel were captured by the English. Fie lost the brig and 
was himself held as a prisoner at Calais until the close of hostilities, after 
which he continued the life of a sea captain. In religious faith he was a 
Universalist, was a man of upright character and lived to the age of seventy- 
nine years, 

Nathaniel Albert Flurd, the father of Frederick H, Hurd, was born in 
Clinton, Connecticut, and after arriving at years of maturity married Miss 
Mary Wright, who was born in the same county — Middlesex. They became 
the parents of seven children. The eldest son, Edwin Albert, was a volunteer 
in the Union Army, was wounded in the battle of Fort Henry and died in 
the hospital at Quincy, Illinois. Another son, Alva A., is a Presbyterian min- 
ister, now acting as pastor of a church in Portland, Oregon. One of the 
daughters, Mrs. Mary Dudley, is county superintendent of schools in Iowa, 
while her brother, George Benjamin Hurd, has been principal of the schools 
-of New Haven, Connecticut, for fifteen years, and for nine years filled a 
similar position in Bridgeport, Massachusetts. He is also connected with a 
boot and shoe business in New Haven. 

Frederick Henry Hurd pursued his education in the public schools and 
the academy of his native city and put aside his text books in order to enter 
the Union army in answer to President Lincoln's call for troops. He be- 
came a member of Company G, Fourteenth Connecticut Infantry, in July, 
r862, participated in the battle of Antietam, in several skirmishes and in the 
battle of Fredericksburg. He was with the Army of the Potomac until after 
the battle of the Wilderness, fought under command of General Hooker, 
when his health failed him and he was forced to remain in the hospital for a 
short time. He was once slightly wounded by a, shot that killed two and 
wounded five others and on another occasion his canteen was pierced by a 



156 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

bullet. At the close of the war it was his good fortune to participate in the 
grand review, a memorable occasion, as it was the most celebrated military 
pageant ever seen on the western hemisphere. In June, 1865, he was mus- 
tered out and gladly returned to his home, for though he had been a brave 
and loyal soldier, like others throughout the north and south he felt great 
relief when the long contest was over. 

^Ir. Hurd remained in his native town for about eight months after the 
war and then went to ]\Iichigan, but soon afterward located in Quincy, Illi- 
nois, where he learned the miller's trade and was for some time engaged in 
the milling business, rising to the position of head miller in a mill having a 
capacity of one hundred barrels of flour per day. Subsequently he removed 
to Clarksville, Alissouri, where he successfully engaged in milling on his 
own account for eight years, but his mill was then destroyed by fire and he 
lost all that he had made. He then established another mill, of which he was 
superintendent, but being troubled with malaria he determined to seek 
another climate and removed to Lewis county, \Vashington, in 1884. Three 
years later he came to Seattle, arriving in the month of August. He has since 
conducted a good business here in grain, flour, feed and hay, securing a good 
patronage and winning public confidence by honorable methods and dealing. 

In 1868 I\Ir. Hurd was united in marriage to Miss Julia Catherine Lit- 
tlejohn, a member of the prominent family of that name. Bishop Littlejohn, 
the renowned divine, being her uncle. Mr. and Mrs. Hurd were accom- 
panied on their removal to the west by their three children: Jessie Emmal, 
who is now the wife of R. G. Holly, of Seattle; Mary Grace, who is now 
acting as her father's bookkeeper; and Leroy, who is also associated with his 
father in business. The family have many friends in the community, the 
members of the household occupying an enviable position in social circles. 

Mr. Hurd has been a life-long Republican, having firm faith in the prin- 
ciples of the party as conserving the best interests of the national govern- 
ment as well as local welfare. From 1894 to 1898 he was a member of the 
city council of Seattle, and was re-elected for a term of two years, which 
indicates his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him by his 
fellow townsmen. He was chairman of the important committee on finance, 
also of the committee on fire and water, and has been instrumental in pro- 
moting many measures of value to the city. He assisted in securing the 
splendid water system, unsurpassed in any city of the size in the country, 
and was also active in securing the paving of Pike street, which is in his own 
ward. He and his family are valued members of the Plymouth Congrega- 
tional church, in whicli he has serxed as deacon, while now he is a trustee. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 157 

He is also a prominent member of the Grand Army of the RepubHc, and was 
inspector general for the department of Washington and Alaska. He also 
served as district deputy and aided in organizing a number of posts in Mis- 
souri. As the years have passed Mr. Hurd has invested in city property and 
now has some very valuable realty in Seattle. His trade relations, too, have 
been an excellent source of income, and from the time of his return from the 
war Mr. Hurd has steadily advanced in the business world, overcoming diffi- 
culties and obstacles and working his way upward to a position of affluence 
and honor. 

RICHARD C. JOHNSTON. 

Nature has seemed to designate the kind of business which shall be the 
dominant industry of different localities. The great forests provide occupa- 
tion for the lumbermen, the broad plains and rich prairies make agriculture 
the logical occupation of the settlers and the mineral resources of 
still other divisions of the country seem to indicate that mining shall 
be the chief labor of the people there. The rich ore deposits, of central 
Washington leave no question as to the principal pursuit of those who inhabit 
this section of the state, and one of the leading representatives of mining 
interests here is Richard C. Johnston, of Seattle. 

A native of the state of Iowa, he was there born in Dubuque on the 1 3th 
of January, 1847, and is of old English ancestry, who were among the early 
settlers of New England. His paternal grandfather became a prominent 
factor in the early history of Ohio, and in that commonwealth his son, Charles 
B. Johnston, was born. The latter was married in the state of his nativity 
to Miss Catherine Smith, also a native of the Buckeye state, and they be- 
came prominent farming people and the parents of seven children. From 
Ohio they removed to Iowa, and in 1852, with his wife and seven children, 
Mr. Johnston set out on the long and arduous journey across the plains to 
California, with two ox and two horse teams, five months being spent on the 
way. As the father had previously fought in the Black Hawk war he was 
able to protect himself and family from the Indians, and the journey was 
therefore made in safety. On their arrival in the Golden state they took 
up their abode at Lakeport, Sierra county, and in that commonwealth the 
parents continued to reside until their labors were ended in death, the father 
passing away in 1883, in his seventy-third year, while his wife survived him 
many years, dying in 1901, at the age of eighty-six years. Six of their seven 
children are now living. 



158 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Richard C. Johnston was but five years of age when he was taken by his 
parents to the Pacific coast, and in the pubUc schools of the Golden state he 
received his educational training. At the early age of eighteen years he 
engaged in mining pursuits, while later his attention was claimed by the livery 
and stock business, and in both lines of endeavor he met with success. In 
1880 he visited the state of Washington, and in 1897 he took up his perma- 
nent abode in Seattle. In addition to his extensive holdings in this state he 
is also interested in oil and coal mines in Alaska, the property being bonded to 
an English company for two million and a half dollars, and they are now 
developing the claims. [Mr. Johnston is interested in a copper, gold and silver 
mine at Darrington, Snohomish county, \\''ashington, where the ore yields 
an average of twenty dollars a ton, and this is considered a very valuable 
property. 

The marriage of Air. Johnston was celebrated in Humboldt county, Cali- 
fornia, when Miss Clara C. Runvon became his wife. She is a native of Wis- 
consin, and this union has been blessed with four children, — Frank P., Ray 
C, Pearl J. and Carrie Ann. Religiously 'Sir. and Mrs. Johnston are Chris- 
tian Scientists. Politically our subject afiiliates with the Republican party, 
in the councils and work of which he is active and influential, and while re7 
siding in California he served for some years as a deputy sheriff. He has filled 
all the offices in the Knights of Pythias fraternity and is also a member of 
the order of Foresters. As a citizen he is esteemed for his public spirit and 
his helpfulness toward all worthy measures. 

SHERWOOD GILLESPY. 

Sherwood Gillespy, the general agent of the Alutual Life Insurance 
Company of New York, came to Seattle in his present capacity in 1896 and 
has since had jurisdiction over the territory of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, 
British Columbia and Alaska. He is a man of excellent business and ex- 
ecutive ability and the company which he represents finds him a valued factor 
in the control of their business in the northwest. 

Mr. Gillespy was born in Saugerties, New York, on the 4th of Novem- 
ber, 1853, ^^*i is of Scotch lineage, although at an early day in the history 
of Ulster countv. New York, the familv was established in Saugferties. The 
great-grandfather, John I. Gillespy. the grandfather. John Gillespy, 
and the father. Peter Gillespy, as well as the subject of this review, were all 
bom on the old family homestead there, and there Peter Gillespy is still 
living in the ninety-third year of his age. This property has been in pos- 



THE NETV^^ YOKK'' 

PliBUGUBRARY 



T<t»«*» "wj^of r-<^.H». 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 159 

session of the family for two hundred and fifty years. John I. Gillespy, the 
great-grandfather, joined the American army at the time of the Revolu- 
tionary war and served with the rank of captain in the struggle for inde- 
pendence, while John Gillespy, the grandfather, was a soldier in the war of 
1 81 2. Peter Gillespy was for many years engaged in merchandising in New- 
York city, and later turned his attention to the banking business, 
but is now living a retired life. He married Miss Caroline Nering, 
of Catskill, New York. They w^ere valued members of the Dutch Reformed 
Presbyterian church and very prominent people in Saugerties. In their fam- 
ily were four sons and a daughter, of whom three are still living. 

Mr. Gillespy of this review is the only one on the Pacific coast. He 
was educated in the public schools of his native town, after which he was 
engaged in the dry goods business in Albany, New York, for five years, 
with John G. Meyers. He then turned his attention to the life insurance 
business, becoming connected with the Northwestern Life Insurance Com- 
pany, of Milwaukee, with which he was connected for five years. Since that 
lime he has been with the Mutual Life Insurance Company, of New York, 
covering twenty years. As their general agent he came to Seattle in 1896, 
taking charge of their extensive business in the northwest, with headquarters 
at Seattle, and has met with very gratifying success here, his service being 
highly satisfactory to the company and profitable to both the company and 
himself. When he came to Seattle he purchased for the company the Mutual 
Life Building, which he had remodeled and fitted up with all the latest im- 
provements, making it one of the most elegantly equipped office buildings in 
the northwest. He recently purchased the adjoining property for fifty thou- 
sand dollars and will erect a seventy-thousand-dollar building. It has proved 
for the company a paying investment. Mr. Gillespy is regarded by the com- 
pany as one of its best and most capable general agents and he also enjoys 
the confidence, good will and esteem of the business public of Seattle. 

In 1885 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Gillespy and Miss Maria 
Z. Simpson, a native of New York city and a daughter of Wilson Simp- 
son, of that place. They now have three children: Ella L., Robert S. and 
Carrie N. He and his family are members of the Episcopalian church and 
are people of prominence in the community, the hospitality of many of 
the best homes of Seattle being extended to them. Mr. Gillespy has become 
deeply interested in Seattle and its welfare since becoming identified with the 
city and has contributed to its upbuilding. He was one of the organizers 
of the Independent Telephone Company, a long-distance line of this city, and 
is found as the champion of many movements for the general good. 



1 60 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

URSULA WYCKOFF. 

Mrs. Ursula Wyckoff, who has made her home in Seattle during the 
past fifty years, has the credit of being the first white woman to locate in what 
is now South Seattle. Slie nobly bore the trials and hardships incident to a 
life on the frontier, and now in her declining years is blessed with the love 
and respect of all who have the pleasure of her acquaintance. She was born 
in Clarksville, Missouri, on the 25th of June, 1827, and is the daughter of 
John Hughes. He was of North Carolina nativity but became an early set- 
tler of both Kentucky and Missouri, where he reared a large family of eight 
children, two sons and six daughters. He departed this life in the fifty-fifth 
year of his age, passing away in the faith of the Methodist church, of which 
he was long a worthy and consistent member. 

Mrs. \\'yckoft', the only survivor of this once large family, was reared 
to young womanhood in Missouri, and on the nth of June, 1846, she there 
gave her hand in marriage to George N. McConaha, a native of Ohio. In 
1850 they crossed the plains to Sacramento, California, and during the long 
journey their second child was born, its place of nativity being near Fort 
Henry, and they gave her her mother's name of Ursula. The journey was 
accomplished in safety, and after their arrival in the Golden state they set- 
tled in the then new town of Sacramento, where Mr. McConaha resumed the 
practice of law. His ability as a leader soon became recognized, and he was 
made a member of the state legislature. In 1852, with his wife and little 
family, he started for Portland, Oregon, going by way of Seattle, where his 
wife and children remained while he continued on his journey. He had 
previously been promised the high office of judge on his removal to Portland, 
but from some cause did not receive the appointment and he accordingly re- 
turned to his family in Seattle, where he again took up the practice of his pro- 
fession. During the following winter he was elected a member of the ter- 
ritorial council, of Avhich he was made president, and while returning to his 
home after the close of the session he, with Captain Boston and two Indians 
that were with them in the boat, were drowned, and Mr. jNIcConaha's body 
was never recovered. His Avidow and her three little children suffered a 
sad bereavement, but after partially recovering from the terrible shock of her 
loss she took up the battle of life with the courage and fortitude which has 
ever characterized her course. She worked at any occupation that presented 
itself in order to support lier little family, thus laboring in their behalf for 
seven years. On the 29th of August, 1859, she was united in marriage to 
Lewis V. Wyckoff, a native of New York, and at the time of their marriage 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. i6i 

he was serving as head sawyer in a large mill. After a time, however, he 
was elected sheriff of King county, in which position he continuously served 
for twenty-two years, and the efficiency with which he discharged the duties 
incumbent upon him in this important office is attested by his long continu- 
ance therein. During the riot of 1882 his duties were very exciting and dan- 
gerous, and from the effect of his arduous service he died suddenly of heart 
disease on the 20th of February, 1882. He was a trustworty and reliable 
official, a loving and indulgent husband and father and a kind and considerate 
neighbor, and his loss was felt by the entire community. He left to his widow 
a good property, which has increased in value as the years have passed by, 
until she is now able to enjoy all the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. 
Mrs. Wyckoff's eldest son, George M. McConaha, was born in 1848, 
and his education w^as received in the schools of New York city and in the 
Washington University. After completing his literary education he began 
the study of law under the preceptorage of Ifon. John J. McGilvery, and was 
admitted to practice when but twenty-one years of age. In the same fall he 
was elected a member of the territorial legislature, and on the expiration of his 
term of service he was made the prosecuting attorney of King county. While 
thus serving Judge Hanford read law in his office. Mrs. Wychoff's second 
son, John Vandyne Wyckoff, was born in 1862, and on attaining to mature 
years he was made deputy sheriff under Hon. John H. McGraw, and he also 
served in that capacity under Sheriff Cochran. He was later appointed and 
served as custom house officer, but has also been a member of the city fire de- 
partment and now resides with his mother. Her daughters have passed away. 
Eugene McConaha resided with her mother until the 21st of March, 1890, 
when she was called to her final rest, passing away at the age of forty-four 
years. Mrs. Wyckoff became converted to the Christian faith very early in 
life, and is now the only surviving member who joined the first Presbyterian 
church at its organization, and in which she has ever been a faithful and val- 
ued member. Her life has been filled with many privations and hardships, 
but through all her Christian fortitude has sustained her, and she is now one 
of the loved and esteemed pioneers of Seattle. 

JOHN R. WILLIAMSON. 

John R. Williamson, a worthy pioneer of Seattle, who crossed the plains 
in 1852 and has since made his home on the Pacific slope, is a native of Al- 
bany county, New York, born February 14, 1826, and is descended from 
good old Revolutionary stock, his paternal grandfather, John Williamson, 



1 62 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

having fought through the entire war for independence. He was one of the 
fifteen hundred men who volunteered lo attack the Enghsh in their camp- 
at twelve o'clock at night. They were at first repulsed, but the army soon 
afterward landed and wei'e victorious. It was in this engagement that Ar- 
nold lost his leg. Air. Williamson was present at the surrender of Lord Corn- 
wallis and his army. He was of Quaker ancestry and lived to the advanced 
age of ninety years. 

Peter Williamson, the father of our subject, was born within sixteen 
miles of Albany, New York, and on reaching manhood married Miss Sarah 
Olin, who was a native of Montgomery county. New York, and was also a 
Quaker by birthright. By occupation he was a merchant. He died at the 
age of sixty-six years and his wife was seventy-eight at the time of her death. 
In the family of this worthy couple were five children, three of whom are 
still living, namely: John R., of this review; Mary, now the widow of James 
Visher; and Susan, wife of j\I. R. Maddox. All make their home in Seattle. 

After the death of his father John R. Williamson went to live with his 
grandfather. He had little opportunity to attend school, but, possessing a 
genius for mechanics, he soon mastered the blacksmith's trade. In early life 
he became a subscriber for the Scientific Am.erican and has since been a con- 
stant reader of that magazine. He is thoroughly posted on steam engines 
and engineering, of which he has made somewhat of a hobby, and is consid- 
ered authority on everything pertaining to steam engines and combustion. 
Because of his great knowledge of these subjects he is familiarly called "Old 
Combustion,"' at which title he takes no offense, and it is believed that on 
the laws of combustion he has no equal in the great northwest. To the Scien- 
tific American he gives the credit for his extensive knowledge on these sub- 
jects. 

As before stated, Mr, Williamson came overland to the Pacific coast in 
1852, and went direct to the mines in Yuba county, California, but met with 
but small success in his mining operations. A\'e next find him in San Fran- 
cisco, where he worked at his trade of blacksmithing, but after spending two 
years in California he removed to Port Gamble, Washington, where he found 
employment with the firm of Pope & Talbert, now the Puget Mill Company,. 
with whom he remained two years and a half as a general mechanic and 
machinist, receiving one hundred and fifty dollars per month and board in 
compensation for his labors. On leaving liie firm he was asked if he had 
kept an account of his extra work, and on replying that he had not he was 
presented with a check for seven hundred and fifty dollars above his monthly 
wages, so highly were his services appreciated l)y the company. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 163 

Mr. Williamson then turned his attention to lumbering and the sawmill 
business, building a good mill at Seabeck, which he operated for four years 
with good success. He sold out in 1863 ^^'^^^- removed to West .Seattle, where 
he opened a sawmill and machine shop, doing all kinds of machine work and 
repairing. The machinist tools were subsequently sold to the Moran Broth- 
ers, who have made it one of the most important enterprises of the kind in the 
state. Subsequently Mr. Williamson engaged in building and running steam- 
boats, among which were the Etta White, the Celilo and the Mary Woodruf, 
which he finally sold and retired from that business. Smce then his services 
have been in great demand as an expert machinist in setting up and putting 
in operation machinery of all kinds and making expert reports. Although 
now well advanced in years he still takes great delight in the business on which 
he has so thoroughly posted himself. 

In 1857 Mr. Williamson married Miss Julia Finn, a native of Ireland, 
and two children blessed this union. William, now captain of the Floyer ply- 
ing between Seattle and Tacoma, was born at Seabeck, Washington, and was 
practically reared at sea. He could sail a ship and had a captain's license 
when only fifteen years of age. Although the law prohibited so young a 
man from commanding a boat, he was so thoroughly skilled in the art that 
he was made an exception to the rule, and is to-day one of the most popular 
and experienced captains on the Sound. In 1899 he married Mary Ann 
Fagin, and has two children. Mary, the daughter of our subject, is now the 
wife of Mat McElroy, of Seattle, who is engaged in the logging business. 
The wife and mother departed this life in 1894. She was a noble woman 
and too much cannot be said in her praise. 

Mr. Williamson has never joined any religious or secret societies, but is 
a believer in the Great Architect of the Universe, and his upright, honorable 
life has gained for him th.e confidence and high regard of all with whom he 
has been brought ni contact. Politically he has been a life-long Democrat. 

HAROLD PRESTON. 

Harold Preston was born at Rockford, Illinois, on the 29th of September, 
3858, and comes of a family which for several generations had been estab- 
lished in the east. His father, Simon M. Preston, was born in Vermont and 
married Alartha H. Sargent. Prior to the Civil war he removed to 
Illinois, and when the slavery question brought on the great Rebellion he 
offered his services to the government to aid in the preservation of the Union. 
He held the rank of captain and served on the staff of General Hallock, later 



i64 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

becoming colonel of the Fifty-second Mississippi Colored Regiment, and for 
gallant and meritorious services was bre\"etted by President Lincoln a briga- 
dier-general. After the war was over he remained in the sonth, as president 
of the first freedmen's bureau and was also internal revenue collctor for the 
first district of Mississippi, which appointment he received from President 
Grant. During his residence in the south he was also chief engineer of the 
Natchez, Jackson & Columbus Railroad. In 1874 he removed to Iowa, was 
engaged in railroad building and became chief engineer of the Chicago, Bur- 
lington & Pacific Railroad Conipany. In 1891 he came to Seattle and at 
the age of seventy-nine years is now living retired from active business. He 
has been a stalwart Republican from the organization of the party and enjoys 
the high respect which is ever given to an honorable and worthy life. Unto 
him and his wife were born three sons and a daughter, all of whom are now 
residents of Seattle. 

In the public schools of Natchez, Mississippi, Harold Preston obtained 
his elementary education, which was supplemented by study in Iowa College, 
and by a course in Cornell University. He read law in Iowa, 
was admitted to the bar there in 1883 and immediately afterward came to 
Seattle, where he engaged in the practice of his profession. In 1885 he 
formed a partnership with E. M. Carr, which has since been continued, in 
1897 ^^^- Gilman became a member of the firm under the style of Preston, 
Carr & Gilman, and they are engaged in the general practice of law. 

Since acquiring the right of franchise Mr. Preston has been an earnest 
Republican, and his efforts in behalf of the party have not been without re- 
sult. In 1898 he was elected to the state senate, in which body he was made 
chairman of the railroad committee and member of the judiciary committee. 
He is the author of the railroad commission bill, which unfortunately was 
defeated. 

In 1887 ^Iv. Preston was married to Miss Augusta Morgenstern, a na- 
tive of San Francisco, and they have two children, Theresa and Frank. Mr. 
Preston belongs to the Rainier and the Athletic Clubs. 

ISAAC PARKER. 

Almost a half century has passed since Isaac Parker came to the terri- 
tory of Washington and since the 2nd of January. 1851, he has resided upon 
the Pacific coast, for on that day he arrived at San Francisco. Time and 
man have wrought many changes in the western district of ihe country dur- 
ing its decades, and no one has taken a more commendable pride and interest 




(2£.d^^t^<^ '-^^c-^T^/t^^ 



ipUBlirUBBABYl 

r.usEN ■txtv^'- ■■'■■■■"'■ I 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 165 

in the public welfare and progress than Isaac Parker, who as a loyal and 
progressive citizen has contributed his full share to the general good. A 
native of Massachusetts, he was born in Waltham on the 4th of March, 1829, 
the day on which President Jackson was first inaugurated as the chief execu- 
tive of the nation. The family is of English lineage and the first of the name 
to seek a home in America was Thomas Parker, who left his native England 
in 1635 and became a resident of New England. He traced his ancestry 
back in England to the twelfth century and the family has been one of prom- 
inence, both in the mother country and in the new world. Many of its rep- 
resentatives gained eminence and distinction in various walks of professional 
life. Among the number is Theodore Parker, so widely known throughout 
this land. The great-grandfather of our subject removed to Ohio and be- 
came one of its first settlers, while Isaac Parker, the grandfather, was there 
born and reared. His son, who also bore the name of Isaac, and who be- 
came the father of our subject, was born in Watertown, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 19, 1802. Pie married Miss Lucy Dinsmore, a nativeof Lunenburg, 
?vlassachusetts, and devoted the greater part of his life to agricultural pur- 
suits. He made his home in Waltham, where he occupied a prominent posi- 
tion in public regard. For forty years he served as a deacon in the Uni- 
tarian church and died on the ist of October, 1875, at the age of seventy- 
three years, respected by all who knew him. His wife survived him and 
passed away in her eighty-sixth year. He had been very prominent in edu- 
cational affairs and was one of the organizers of the Rumfort Institute, in 
connection with which was a very costly and extensive library. Mrs. Parker 
was a lady of superior culture and refinement, who left the impress of her 
individuality upon the minds and characters of her children. Five of her 
nine children are yet living, one of the daughters — Mrs. Mary H. Lewis — 
being now a resident of San Francisco. The others are in Lowell and Walt- 
ham, Massachusetts. 

Isaac Parker was the second in order of birth in the family and was 
reared and educated in Waltham. He learned the machinist's trade in Bos- 
ton and followed that pursuit for three years. During the close of that period 
he assisted in building the first locomotive sent to California. He came with 
it, making the voyage around Cape Horn, for to him was assigned the duty 
of putting the engine together and seeing that it was in successful operation. 
He secured a position in what afterward became the Union Iron Works, 
where he remained until the 9th of February, 1853, when he came to Puget 
Sound to build a sawmill at what was then Apple Tree Cove, but is now 
the city of Kingston. He continued as master mechanic for the company for 



1 66 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

about four years, receiving one hundred and fifty dollars per month and his 
expenses. He also worked at Utsaladdy in the same capacity until Novem- 
ber, i860, at which time he accepted a cargo of lumber for his work, char- 
tered the ship Leonidas and with his lumber proceeded to China, where he 
found a ready sale for the cargo at remunerative prices. After visiting Yoko- 
hama and other points in Japan, he returned to San Francisco and thence to 
Puget Sound, where he once more entered the service of the company by 
which he had formerly been employed. Soon afterward he became inter- 
ested in a company carr}dng lumber and machinery to Shanghai, China, 
and there engaged in the construction of a steamer to sail on one of 
the large rivers of that country. Intent on that enterprise he set sail on 
the Jeff Davis, but on arriving at San Francisco he sold his interest in the 
enterprise and in 1864 went to lower California to superintend the erection 
of a quartz mill, where he remained as master mechanic for three years. 
Since that time he has been engaged in mechanical work on Puget Sound, 
and at the first establishment of a local board of inspectors of steam vessels 
for Washington territory in 1872 he was appointed inspector of steam boilers, 
being the first to fill that position on the sound. He early became interested 
in Seattle city property and has the credit of erecting the first brick house 
built in the city for rental purposes. He also erected a frame dwelling, but 
lost both in the great fire of 1889. Like many other enterprising men he 
then built two brick blocks known as the Parker blocks, also a handsome 
residence which he occupies. His home is a beautiful and attractive resi- 
dence on a lawn which is one hundred and twenty by one hundred and twenty 
feet. The lot is valued at twelve thousand dollars and the residence was 
erected at a cost of seventeen thousand dollars, its location being No. 1120 
Eighth avenue. From this handsome abode Mr. Parker can look out over 
the city which he has helped to build and whose interests have been materially 
advanced through his efforts. 

On the 9th of September, 1867, Mr. Parker was united in marriage in 
Seattle to I\Iiss Lydia G. Rowell, a native of Brewer, Maine. Three sons 
have been born unto them: George F., who is an electrician and engineer; 
Benjamin S., a marine engineer; and Isaac C, who is at home with his par- 
ents. The family have a wide acquaintance in Seattle and their circle of 
friends is almost coextensive. Mr. Parker is an exemplary member of the 
Masonic fraternity, having received the sublime degree of a Master Mason 
in Mission Lodge, No. 169, F. & A. M., of San Francisco. He is a past 
master of the blue lodge, and past junior grand warden of the grand lodge 
of Washington. He also belongs to Seattle Chapter, No. i, R. A. M., and 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 167 

Seattle Commandery, No. 2, K. T., while in the Scottish Rite he is a shriner and 
has attained the Thirty-second degree of the consistory. He is also a valued 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and past noble grand and 
has been sent as a representative to the grand commandery of his state. He 
exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
Republican party and in 1888 he was chosen by his fellow citizens to the 
position of treasurer of Seattle. In all the relations of life this brave pio- 
neer of 185 1 has shown himself to be an upright citizen, enterprising and 
competent in business and at all times worthy of the esteem which is uni- 
formly extended to him. Coming to the west in its pioneer days, his labors 
have been of the greatest benefit in the line of mechanical construction upon 
the Pacific coast and his efforts have ever been directed along the lines of the 
greatest good to the greatest number. 

CORLISS P. STONE. 

Forty years have passed since Corliss P. Stone became a resident of 
Seattle and in this period he has contributed in large measure to the exten- 
sion and improvement of the city through his real-estate operations, while 
his business activity along other lines has promoted commercial prosperity. 
He arrived here in February, 1862, and through the intervening period has 
steadily advanced until he now occupies a leading position among the men 
of prominence here. 

Mr. Stone was born in Franklin county, Vermont, on the 20th of March, 
1838, and is of English lineage, although for many generations representa- 
tives of the family have been residents of America, the great-great-great- 
grandfather having been one of the early colonial settlers of Connecticut, while 
Benjamin Stone, the grandfather of our subject, served in the Colonial army 
during the war of the Revolution. He was identified with the Congregational 
church in religious faith and lived to the advanced age of eighty-six years. 
He married a Miss Corliss, a member of the family that became famous as 
the manufacturers of the Corliss steam engines. James Corliss Stone, the 
father of our subject, was born in Connecticut and married Miss Charlotte 
Lathrope, a native of Chelsea, Vermont, and she, too, was of English lineage 
mid a representative of an old Vermont family. She attained the age of 
sixty-six years, while Mr. Stone reached the venerable age of eighty-four 
years. For a number of years he held the office of justice of the peace, and 
his decisions were rendered without partiality or bias. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Stone were active and devout members of the Congregational church and 



i68 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

their labors contributed to its upbuilding. Their family consisted of three 
sons and three daughters. 

Corliss P. Stone was educated in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, attending 
the public schools and the academy there, and entered upon his business career 
as a clerk in a dry-goods store. Later he engaged in business on his own 
account for three years before coming to the Pacific coast. He made the 
voyage around the Horn in the Archer, a clipper ship, which in a gale lost 
a mast and was in imminent peril, but she stopped for repairs and afterward 
continued the voyage in safety, casting anchor in the harbor of San Fran- 
cisco after one hundred and ten days. Mr. Stone had followed Horace 
Greeley's advice to young men and had come to the west, hoping to find good 
business opportunities in this section of the country. He possessed a strong 
body, willing hands and a clear head, but little else to serve him as capital. 
His first work in Washington was at Port Madison, where he was employed 
as a salesman in a store for f'xe years. In 1867 he established a store of his 
own in Seattle and conducted a successful business until 1884, when he sold 
out and became interested in city real estate. Many other enterprises have 
also claimed his attention and he is widely known as a man of resourceful 
business ability, who not only has the talent for planning successful enter- 
prises but also the ability to put them into good working order. He became 
one of the organizers of the Union Electric Company, furnishing light and 
power for the city, and is now the president of the Cascade Laundry Com- 
pany, which is doing a large business in the city. He also continues his opera- 
tions in Seattle real estate and has platted several additions to the city, 
the first being in 1884. This was the Lake Union addition, including 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, on which great improvements have 
been made. His next was the Edgewater addition of thirty acres, which is 
also all built up at the present time. He then platted Stone's extension to the 
same addition, which has also been improved, many fine buildings having been 
erected there. He is now handling the C. P. Stone home addition, of twenty 
acres, adjoining Lake Union. It will thus be seen that he has been a promi- 
nent factor in the improvement and upbuilding of the city and has done his 
full share toward the promotion of many movements which have contrii:uted 
to the public welfare aside from his individual interests. 

In 1864 Mr. Stone was married to Clara Boyd, and unto them were 
born two children, but only one is now living — Corliss L., who is now in the 
office of his father, and is a young man of excellent business ability. In 
1874 Mr. Stone was again married, his second union being with Almira L. 
Crossman, a native of Montreal, Canada. In politics he has been a lifelong 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 169 

Republican and had the honor of being elected mayor of the city in 1872. 
He exercised his official prerogatives for the improvement and substantial 
progress of Seattle and has labored earnestly for the advancement of this part 
of the state. Regarded as a citizen and in his social relations, he belongs 
to that public-spirited, useful and helpful class of men whose ambitions and 
desires are centered and directed in those channels through which flow the 
greatest and most permanent good to the greatest number. 

TIMOTHY D. HINCKLEY. 

For more than a half century Timothy Duane Hinckley has resided on the 
Pacific coast and for forty-nine years has been a resident of Seattle, which he 
has seen emerge from villagehood to take rank with the most important 
cities of the great north->vest.' No man has felt a keener interest in the 
progress and development of the place or labored more earnestly and inde- 
fatigably for its improvement. The fine brick block on Second street which 
bears his name stands as a monument to his business thrift and enterprise 
and he also owns a fine farm in the suburbs. 

Mr. Hinckley is a native of St. Claire county, Illinois, born on the 30th 
of June, 1827, and is a descendant of the Hinckleys who were pioneer settlers 
of Hamilton county, Ohio. His father, Timothy Hinckley, was born in 
Maine, and followed the ship carpenter's trade in Bath until 1816, when he 
removed to Ohio. He was married to Hannah Smith, a native of his 
own town in Maine, and after making their home in Ohio for a time they 
removed to St. Clair county, Illinois. Mr. Hinckley owned a farm there 
and also worked at the builder's trade in St. Louis, Missouri. In politics he 
was a Whig and for a number of years acceptably filled the office of justice of 
the peace. He and his wife were valued members of the Baptist church. 
He died at the age of fifty-five years and his wife survived him for some 
time, passing away at about the same age. They had eleven children, of 
whom but three are living. One of the daughters is Maria Louise, the 
wife of the Hon. John B. Hay, of Belleville, Illinois. Pauline is now a widow 
and resides in Middletown, Virginia. 

Timothy D. Hinckley, the only living son, acquired his education 

in the public schools and afterward learned engineering, which he followed 

during the greater part of his early life. In 1850 he crossed the plains from 

Missouri with a mule team, in company with a party that started on the 30th 

of April and included his brothers, Samuel and Jacob. They met with no 

thrilling incidents on the trip, but had plenty of buft'alo meat and the time 
11 



170 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

passed pleasantly. While in the Snake river country they met with two In- 
dians who had a fine mule for which one of the company traded an old horse 
and some blankets. Soon after, however, they were overtaken by the real 
owner of the mule, and the man who had made the trade was afraid to go 
back for his horse and blankets. But Mr. Hinckley said he would accom- 
pany the man who owned the mule, and they were out all night on the expe- 
dition, but succeeded in regaining possession of the horse and blankets. Af- 
ter traveling for three months the party reached Hangtown, now Placerville, 
California, where Mr. Hinckley and his brothers separated and the former 
engaged in placer mining at Cold Springs, meeting with only moderate suc- 
cess. He afterward went to the middle fork of the American river, and 
engaged in mining near Georgetown, but was not successful. He proceeded 
thence to Volcano and on to the Trinity country, mining at Weaverville, 
where he met with much better success. 

In March, 1853, Mr. Hinckley came to Seattle and took up a ranch on 
Lake Washington, but soon abandoned the farm, as there was no market for 
the products. He then remo\'ed to Port Madison, where he ran an engine for 
three years, after which he went to Port Orchard, where he also secured a 
position as engineer. Subsequently he erected a nmnber of buildings in Se- 
attle on the site of the Phoenix Hotel and land adjoining it, but lost them 
in the great fire a little later. Mr. Hinckley then sold that property and 
bought nine acres of land on Lake Union, where he has built a fine home, a 
fitting place for the brave pioneer to spend the evening of a busy, eventful 
and useful life. He built the Hinckley block in 1889, just after the great fire. 
It is one hundred and twenty by one hundred and eight feet and is five stories 
and a basement in height. Substantially built of brick, the first floor is used 
for storage and the upper floors for office purposes. It is a valuable and 
paying property. Mr. Hinckley still retains four acres at Lake L^nion, in 
connection with his residence. 

In 1867 Avas celebrated the marriage of our subject and Mrs. jMargaret 
E. Hinckley, the widow of his brother. She is a native of Ireland and by her 
former husband had five children: Kate, now the wife of Perry Poison, a 
prominent merchant of Seattle; Ferdinand, who died at the age of twenty- 
six years; Walter H., who has charge of Mr. Hinckley's business and is one 
of the representative men of the city ; Ira and Lyman, at home. Mrs. Hinck- 
ley has been a resident of this section of the country since 1854, and has lived 
in both California and Washington in poineer times. 

In politics Mr. Hinckley has been a lifelong Democrat and for many 
years filled the office of justice of the peace, his even-handed justice "winning 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 171 

golden opinions from all sorts of people." For three terms he served in the 
territorial legislature of Washington and was active in promoting many use- 
ful measures. He was largely influential in securing the passage of a liquor 
license law obliging the payment of five hundred dollars annually as a license, 
and he was also the author of the bill creating and organizing the county of 
Kitsap. He worked diligently for all measures which he deemed of value 
to the territory, his course reflecting credit upon himself and proving of value 
to the district which he represented. He has seen the whole of the phe- 
nomenal growth of Seattle and takes great pride in the wonderful develop- 
ment of the city. 

JAMES W. CLISE. 

James W. Clise, the well known president of the Seattle chamber of 
commerce, and one of the most active and successful business men of the city, 
has through a long period been closely associated with its progress and 
material upbuilding. In the edition of the Trade Register, published on the 
13th of July, 1901, appears the following: "James W. Clise, who so ably 
fills the important office of president of the Seattle chamber of commerce, 
and has, as an active business man of the Queen city, invested hundreds of 
thousands of dollars in realty and buildings in this city and the Evergreen 
state, was born in Lancaster, Wisconsin, in 1855. He was educated in the 
Lancaster schools and when twenty years of age went to Stockton, California, 
where he was engaged in mercantile business until 1879. He then located in 
Denver, Colorado, where he was in the lumber business until 1889. The year 
of the Seattle fire he came to Seattle and organized the Clise Investment Com- 
pany, of which he has since been president and general manager. Besides 
handling real estate and other investments, Mr. Clise has been agent for a 
number of prominent eastern capitalists who have purchased and erected a 
large number of business blocks in Seattle. Mr. Clise is also manager of the 
Globe Navigation Company recently organized which has purchased three 
large steamships and is building a large sailing fleet to take part in the com- 
merce of the Pacific, which farsighted business men realize will rapidly de- 
velope into enormous proportions and make Seattle the American Pacific 
Gateway for the far eastern trade with the continent. Mr. Clise promoted 
and built the Selah & Moxel irrigation canal in Yakima county and is in- 
terested in other stock business projects. Since 1890 he has been an active 
member of the Seattle chamber of commerce, serving as trustee, vice-pres- 
ident and has been elected president for two successive terms by the unani- 



172 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

mous vote of the board of trustees. Mr, Clise has always been an enthusi- 
astic worker in all matters affecting Seattle's interests and this cit}* is greatly- 
indebted to him for the success of many projects, especially in securing the 
location of the Fort Lawton army post and the quartermaster's office at this 
point." 

The ancestors of our subject came form Holland in 1700 and settled in 
Virginia, the home of the family being known as Whitehall. Samuel Frank 
Clise, the father of our subject, removed from the Old Dominion to Wiscon- 
sin, where he was married to Miss Nancy McKenzie, who removed to that 
state from Glasgow, Kentucky. After their marriage they continued to reside 
in Lancaster, Wisconsin, and reared their family there. The father became 
a man of marked influence and prominence, holding various offices of honor 
and trust in his county. He was also a member of the Episcopal church 
and departed this life when comparatively a young man, at the age of forty- 
two. His wife still survives him and is now in her seventieth year. 

Mr. Clise was married in 1886 to Miss Anna Herr, a native of the same 
town in which his birth occurred. They have three children, Ruth, Charles 
Francis and James William, Jr. The parents are members of the 'Episcopal 
church and their home is one of the beautiful residences that adorn Queen 
Ann hill. 

DEXTER HORTON. 

Dexter Horton is one of the honored and prominent pioneer business 
men of Seattle and his history is closely linked with the development of the 
pioneer west. People of the present period can scarcely realize the struggles 
and dangers which attended the early settlers, the heroism and self- 
sacrifice of lives passed upon the borders of civilization, the hardships 
endured, the difficulties overcome. These tales of the early days read almost 
like a romance to those who have known only the modern prosperity and 
conveniences. To the pioneer of the early days, far removed from the 
privileges and conveniences of city or town, the struggle for existence was 
a stern and hard one, and these men and women must have possessed indomit- 
able energies and sterling worth of character, as well as marked physical 
courage, when they thus voluntarily selected such a life and successfully 
fought its battles under such circumstances as prevailed in the northwest. 

Mr. Horton was born in what is now Schuyler county, New York, near 
the head of Seneca Lake on the 15th of November, 1825, and is of English 
lineage, the family, however, having been established in New England at 



PUBUCUBHARYj 



\ 

TILSEN POUNDS TIOWS. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 173 

a very early epoch in the history of that section. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject was a resident of Massachusetts, while his son, Darius 
Horton, the father of our subject, was born in Massachusetts January 23, 
1790. He removed to the Empire state and was married there to Miss 
Hannah Olmstead, whose birth occurred February 4, 1790. In 1840 Darius 
Horton removed with his family to De Kalb county, Illinois, his new home 
being seventy miles west of Chicago. There he entered land from the gov- 
ernment and transformed the wild prairie into a richly improved farm on 
which he resided until his death, which occurred in 1847, when he had at- 
tained the age of fifty-four years. He was a very industrious and thor- 
oughly honest man, a kind and obliging neighbor, and a devoted husband 
and father. His widow continued to reside in Illinois until after the Civil 
war, when she came to Seattle, spending her remaining days in the home 
of her son, where she died in her seventy-sixth year. She was the mother 
of six children, of whom three are now living, namely : Mrs. Harriet Mar- 
tin, who is now in her eighty-first year; Julius, a resident of Georgetown; 
and Dexter. 

The last named had but limited school privileges. For about three 
months in a year he was a student in a little school house in a small district 
in New York, but during the remainder of the year his time was occupied 
with the work of the farm. When a youth of fifteen he accompanied his 
parents to Illinois and as he was then as large and strong as a man he did 
a man's work in the fields, attending school only through two months of 
the year, the remainder of the time being devoted to the arduous task of 
reclaiming the wild land for the purposes of civilization. His school books 
were a Cobb speller, and a Daboll's arithmetic, in which he advanced no 
further than the rule of three, but in the school of experience Mr. Horton 
has learned many valuable lessons and through reading and observation he 
has become a well informed man of practical ideas in business and broad 
in his views concerning the world and the great questions which affect 
humanity. While residing in Illinois he took up a claim of eighty acres 
near his father's home and when he could obtain any leisure from assist- 
ing in the improvement of his father's farm, he devoted the time to the 
cultivation of his own land. When but sixteen years of age he became an 
expert with the axe, cutting and splitting in oak, ash and black walnut 
timber two hundred rails a day. With these he fenced all of the land. In 
1847, when about nineteen years of age, Mr. Horton was happily married 
to Miss Hannah E. Shondy and unto them were born three children while 
they were residents of Illinois, but they lost two in infancy. In 1852 Mr. 



174 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Horton, accompanied by his wife and little daughter Rebecca, started across 
the plains to the Pacific coast. Five families traveled together, taking with 
them sixty horses. There were in the company, eight men, six v/omen, and 
six children, -and a little one was born on the plains. They arrived at The 
Dalles in safety on the 6th of SeptemlDcr, although they had encountered 
many hardships and trials when on the way. The Indians at one time attempt- 
ed to steal their horses, but failed. The year of their emigration was the one 
in which so many settlers suffered from the cholera and newly-made graves 
along the way marked the route of the wagon trains. IMr. Horton was 
stricken with the dread disease and when very ill was providentially saved 
by a heavy dose of morphine. A lady said to his wife, 'Tf that was my 
husband I would give him a large dose of blue mass," which advice was 
rejected. Mr. Horton recovered, but the lady took the dread disease, and 
although she took the remedy which she had recommended, she died in less than 
twenty-four hours. j\Ir. Thomas Mercer also lost his wife at the Cascades, 
but the remainder of the party reached their destination in safety. Mr. 
Horton and his family spent the winter at Salem, Oregon. During that 
Avinter the territory of Washington was formed, the country lying to the 
north of the Columbia river benig included within its borders. In the spring 
of 1853 our subject and several others walked to Olympia, thence proceed- 
ing to Seattle, where Mr. Horton secured work with Mr, Bell, chopping 
piles at two dollars and fifty cents per day. He also went to Port Town- 
send, where he cleared two lots for a man and was paid ten dollars per day 
for his work. On the first of July he returned to Salem, expecting to 
secure work at han^esting, but the great emigration of that year had brought 
many unemployed men to thi? portion of the country and he was only able 
to get one day's work. On the first of September of that year Mr. Mercer 
and his four daughters and Mr. Horton and his family started with a 
team for Seattle. They came by the way of Portland, ferried their horses 
across the river and the family proceeded in a scow to Monticello and then 
in canoes to the upper landing on the Cowlitz. There Mr. Horton met 
his family and the ladies of the party with the horses, and putting the 
wagon together brought them to Olympia, where he left his wife and daugh- 
ter while he returned after their household effects. They arrived in Seattle 
on the 15th of September, 1853, at which date he had not a dollar in his 
pocket and worse than that was indebted to Mr. Mercer in the sum of fifty 
dollars for bringing him to this country with his team. They were met 
on the beach by parties from Port Gamble and Mr. Horton and his wife 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 175 

were offered one hundred and thirty dollars per month with board to go 
there and cook for a camp of men. He and his faithful pioneer wife worked 
in that way for nine months and then gave up the position for the camp 
had increased to sixty men and the work was too heavy for them. When 
they went to Port Gamble Mr. Horton had a pair of overhauls, a jumper, 
a hat and old boots, and his wife was as poorly clad, but while there they 
managed to pay off their indebtedness, to acquire a good wardrobe and to 
save eleven hundred and sixty dollars in gold. Our subject afterward worked 
in a mill owned by Mr. Yesler, while his wife did the cooking for four- 
teen men for five months. He began work at one o'clock at noon and was 
released at twelve o'clock at night. He had purchased some lots and after 
obtaining rest in sleep he would devote the remainder of his time before one 
o'clock. to clearing his lots. All the money possible was saved and stored 
in an old trunk. About this time our subject became interested in mer- 
chandising. A. A. Denny had purchased a small stock of goods on com- 
mission and Mr. Horton became his partner in the new enterprise. They 
were also joined by David Phillips, who had some experience as a merchant 
and uniting their capital they purchased more goods and thus became iden- 
tified with early commission interests in this section of the country. During 
the first year they managed to pay all expenses and made three hundred 
dollars each. At the end of the year Mr. Denny was called to the upper 
house of the territorial legislature and Mr. Phillips to the lower house, so 
Mr. Horton purchased his partners' interests, giving them credit for their 
share of the business and he traded on this. Mr. Horton went on a sailing 
vessel to San Frascisco to purchase more goods, but a severe storm over- 
took the ship and it was two months before he was able to return with his 
merchandise, making the voyage on the same vessel on which he had gone 
to San Francisco. At twelve o'clock at night they passed Port Townsend. 
An hour before they had heard a cannon and knew there must be trouble 
with the Indians at Seattle. Captain Boyd decided to land in the darkness 
at Port Madison, and while approaching the shore he fired a pistol. His 
boat was then hailed and he was told that if he did not answer they would 
be blown out of the water. It proved to be the mill hands who made this 
speech and who told them that they had been fighting at Seattle all day. 
This occasioned Mr. Horton great anxiety concerning the safety of his 
family. In the morning he asked an Indian to take him in his canoe to 
his home, but the Indian refused until Mr. Horton insisted strongly and 
they started. When they reached the other side of the bay the Indian stopped 



176 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

and looked for canoes, but seeing none they re-crossed and were hailed by 
the Decatur, on board of which Mr. Horton found his wife safe. The 
Indians in great numbers had attacked the settlers in the town but the De- 
catur had shelled the Indian camp and succeeded in making them retire 
after a day's fighting. The ship on which Mr. Horton had returned from 
San Francisco did not unload his goods for thirty days more, having to 
stop at other points in the meantime. The news of the Indian outbreak 
brought a number of United States ships to the sound and thus a market 
was created so that within six weeks he had sold the greater part of his 
stock. He paid off his indebtedness, but later Mr. Phillips again formed a 
partnership with him, the new relation being maintained for five years, 
during which time they established a store at Olympia. Mr. Horton con- 
tinued merchandising for sixteen years and became a very popular and suc- 
cessful merchant, enjoying the good will and confidence of a large patron- 
age because of his reasonable prices, his honorable dealing and his unfail- 
ing courtesy toward his customers. He was in business all through the 
time of the Civil war and was greatly benefited by the advance in prices. 

At the close of the war he had the business sagacity to sell out and 
became the founder of the Dexter Horton Bank, the first bank established 
in the territory of Washington. He was made its president and for eigh- 
teen years continued in the banking business, profiting largely by the same 
honorable business methods which he employed in merchandising and which 
actuated all his transactions in commercial life. When he had been in active 
business for thirty-four years, he sold his bank to W. S. Ladd, of Portland, 
Oregon, but the old name was continued and the institution is still one of 
the most reliable and best patronized in this portion of the country. A. 
A. Denny, the friend and first partner of Mr. Horton was also in the bank- 
ing business with him for sixteen years and both sold out at the same time, 
reserving, however, some of their bank stock. All this occurred before the 
great fire of 1889, which swept over the city, almost wiping Seattle out of 
existence. At once, however, Mr. Horton began to rebuild and completed 
the Seattle block in three months, it being the first new block occupied after 
the fire. It has a frontage of one hundred and twenty feet on third street 
and one hundred and twenty-six feet on Cherry street and is four stories 
high on the street and five on the alley. A year later Mr. Horton erected 
the New York building, which is one hundred and twenty by one hundred 
and twelve feet and seven stories in height. It is a modern structure, 
equipped with all the latest accessories and improvements and is a credit 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 177 

to the city. These buildings stand as monuments of Mr. Horton's industry 
and business enterprise. 

In 1873 he erected a nice residence at No. 1206 Third avenue. It 
stands on a sHght eminence overlooking the bay and is one of the attractive 
homes of Seattle. There with his good wife and accomplished daughter 
he is spending the evening of life enjoying a well merited rest and the 
comforts which his years of former toil have brought to him. He is en- 
tirely without ostentation or display but his history is so well known in 
Seattle that all accord him the respect and honor which is his just due. 
After the family arrived in this city a little son, Alfred, was born, but his 
death occurred when he had reached the age of twenty months. A daugh- 
ter, Nettie, is now the wife of the Reverend W. G. Jones, of Everett. Mrs. 
Horton departed this life on the 30th of December, 1871. She was a brave 
pioneer helpmate, the wife of his youth, and her loss was very deeply felt by 
her devoted husband and by all who knew her. On the 30th of September, 
1873, ^^- Horton married Miss Caroline E. Parsons and this union was 
blessed with a daughter, Caroline E., now a young lady who is the light and 
life of the household. She has just graduated from the state university. 
Her mother was only spared to Mr. Horton for five years, passing away 
on the 4th of March, 1878. Four years later he made a trip to the east 
and on the 14th of September, 1882, he married Miss Arabella C. Agard, 
a daughter of Eaton Agard, of Mr. Horton's native county. They had 
been schoolmates in their childhood days and the marriage has proved a 
very happy one. 

Mr. Horton has long been an active and acceptable member of the 
Protestant Methodist church, with which he became identified in 1849. He 
has served as an officer and has always been most active and liberal in ad- 
vancing the interests of religion and church building in his city. He has 
taken special interest and pleasure in Sunday-school work and for ten years 
he filled the office of Sunday-school superintendent. In his early manhood 
he had no sympathy with the oppression of the slave holders, and therefore 
became a Freeholder. Later, when the Republican party was formed to 
prevent the further extension of slavery, he joined its ranks and has since 
remained one of its advocates, but has never desired or sought office. The 
secret of his success in business is found in his persistency of purpose and 
in the untainted honor and unswerving integrity which have ever marked 
his career. He stands to-day strong in his good name, commanding re- 
spect and enjoying the unqualified confidence of all with whom he has been 
associated through the long years of his residence on the Pacific coast. 



178 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

JAMES MURRY COLMAN. 

The days of chivalry and knighthood in Europe cannot furnish more 
interesting or romantic tales than our own western history. Into the wild 
mountain fastnesses of the unexplored west went brave men, whose cour- 
age was often called forth in encounters with hostile savages. The land 
was rich in all natural resources, in gold and silver, in agricultural and 
commercial possibilities, and awaited the demands of man to yield up its 
treasures, but its mountain heights were hard to climb, its forests difficult 
to penetrate, and the magnificent trees, the dense bushes or the jagged rocks 
often sheltered the skulking foe, who resented the encroachment of 
pale faces upon their hunting grounds. The establishment of homes 
in this beautiful region therefore meant sacrifices, hardships and oftimes 
death, but there were some men brave enough to meet the red man in his 
own familiar haunts and untertake the task of reclaiming the district for 
purposes of civilization. The rich mineral stores of this vast region were 
thus added to the wealth of the nation; its magnificent forests contributed 
to the lumber industries and its fertile valleys added to the opportunities 
of the farmer and stockraiser, and to-day the northwest is one of the most 
productive sections of the entire country'. That this is so is due to such 
men as James M, Colman, whose name is inseparably interwoven with the 
history of the region. No story of fiction contains more exciting chapters 
than may be found in his life record, but space forbids an extended ac- 
count of these. He who was to become such an improtant factor in the 
development of the northwest first came to Seattle in 1861. He is a native 
of Dumfermline, Fifeshire, Scotland, born on the 17th of June, 1832. His 
ancestors lived in the highlands many generations remote, but later 
removed to the lowlands. His father, Bartholomew Colman, married Miss 
Isabelle Z^Iurray. He and his wife were people of the highest integrity and 
respectability and were devout members of the Presbyterian church. The 
father departed this life in his forty-fifth year and the mother passed away 
in her sixty-second year. They were the parents of seven children, of whom 
three sons and a daughter still sundve, 

James M. Colman, their second child, after acquiring his education, learned 
the machinist's trade and also mastered the principles of engineering in his 
native land. In 1854 he took passage on a sailing vessel. The Bogart, bound 
for the United States. They had not been long at sea before they encountered a 
severe storm which so badly damaged the ship that she was obliged to put 
back to Liverpool. Nothing daunted by this misfortune, our subject sailed 






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THE NEW YORK 



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PUB^JC LIBRARY 



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SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 179 

from the latter port and after a voyage of six weeks reached the harbor of 
New York. He did not tarry long in the eastern metropolis but proceeded 
at once across the country to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he had a cousin 
living. Mr. Colman was then a young man of twenty-two years. He en- 
joyed excellent health, had mastered a good trade, and had a cash capital 
of one hundred dollars. Thus he started out in the land of the free. He 
knew that he could earn a good living but determined to do something more. 
He accepted work in a machine shop and was soon found to be such a cap- 
able and intelligent workman that he was made foreman of the enterprise 
and held that position for seven years, but believing that diere were better 
business oportunities for him on the Pacific coast, he severed his connec- 
tion with the firm which he had so long represented and in 1861 sailed for 
San Francisco, proceeding to California by way of the Isthmus of Panama. 
Upon his arrival at his destination he entered into an engagement to take 
charge of a large sawmill at Port Madison and for three years successfully 
conducted that enterprise. He entered upon an agreement to work for one 
hundred and thirty dollars per month, but after noting his efficiency his em- 
ployers gave him two hundred and fifty dollars per month. He remodeled 
and rebuilt the mill and after a year his wages were increased to five hun- 
dred dollars per month. In 1864 he embarked in business on his own ac- 
count, purchasing a mill at Port Orchard, but the building was in rather 
dilapidated condition so he rebuilt it, securing new equipments and con- 
tinued its operation until 1869, when the plant was utterly destroyed by fire 
and he lost everything, he had in a material way. His reputation as a ma- 
chinist and millwright and as an honest man still remained to him, how- 
ever, and were the means of securing him a good position within a very 
short time. The firm of Hanson, Ackerman & Company desired to rebuild 
the mill at Tacoma and increase its capacity and they paid Mr. Colman six 
hundred dollars a month to do the work. Well may he be proud of the fact 
that he was given higher wages than any other man for such work on the 
Pacific coast. When the mill was completed and in good running condi- 
tion he supposed his work was at an end, but the firm desired him to con- 
tinue its operation at the same wages which he was receiving and he re- 
mained with them for two years altogether. Anxious, however, to again 
engage in business on his own account, he accordingly leased the Yesler 
sawmill at Seattle, which was then standing idle. This he successfully con- 
tinued until it was also destroyed by fire, having caught from a conflagra- 
tion in adjoining buildings. Once more he met with heavy losses, large 
quantities of his lumber being destroyed by the flames. He had, however, 



i8o REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

been most prosperous in the operation of his mill and had accumulated about 
forty thousand dollars. ■ ■ 

Up to this time no railroad had reached Seattle, notwithstanding the 
citizens had made great efforts to secure the terminus of the Northern Pa- 
cific. The company, however decided in favor of Tacoma, and Seattle was 
thus left. without railroad communication with the outside world. To offset 
this the citizens tried, but unavailingly, to secure eastern capital in order to 
build a road to Walla Walla, but Mr. Colman saw that whatever was ac- 
complished must be done by Seattle's men themselves, and with a most pro- 
gressive and enterprising spirit he proposed that they build a road to Renton, 
a distance of thirteen miles, where there was a coal mine being operated. 
Eventually he made the proposition to put in twenty thousand dollars if 
other citizens of Seattle would raise forty thousand dollars. This was 
agreed upon and Mr. Colman went to San Francisco, wdiere he purchased 
with his own money tw^enty-seven thousand dollars worth of rails, and re- 
turning at once engaged in the construction of the road. There was much 
enthusiasm over the project at first and even the citizens w'orked to some 
extent on the road, but interest lagged after a time and he never received 
but twenty-five hundred dollars of the forty thousand dollars promised. 
However, his good name and credit enabled him to keep on with the work, 
but the miners at Renton decided to remove their works to New Castle and 
this obliged him to continue the road to the latter place, notwithstanding it 
was a much harder task. However, with an indomitable spirit the work 
was accomplished by this remarkable man of genius -at a total cost of three 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars. He did his own engineering, superin- 
tending the work, purchased the material and ultimately received a dollar's 
w^orth for every dollar which he had expended. It was a magnificent achieve- 
ment, showing the greatest determination and splendid business and ex- 
ecutive ability, and for this accomplishment Mr. Colman deserv^es the great- 
est credit and praise. He conducted the road for a year and a half most 
successfully. It was contemplated that the road would be ultimately ex- 
tended to Walla Walla across the Cascades by way of Snoqualmie Pass 
and thus reaching the vast wheat fields of eastern Oregon. With this end 
in view Mr. Villard purchased the road and Mr. Colman not only obtained 
what he had invested, but also made some profit. 

All this time our subject had been operating his sawmill in Seattle and 
w^as anxious to be relieved of the arduous duties attending on that work, but the 
new company would not hear to his severing his connection. He argued that he 
was overworked and needed rest but they insisted that he needed work and 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. i8i 

that they would reheve him of much of the task devolving upon him. They 
offered to give him railroad passes to go wherever he liked if he would only 
direct the operations of the enterprise. Finally he consented and remained 
with them for two and one-half years, receiving good remuneration for his 
work but he had no use for the railroad passes. All his labors brought 
about one very important result — the checkmating of the Northern Pacific 
and in making Seattle the greatest shipping and commercial city of the Sound 
which we find it to-day. On severing his connection with the business in- 
terests before mentioned, Mr. Colman made a trip to Europe, accompanied 
by his wife and two sons, in order to visit many points of modern and his- 
toric interest in the old world and also to see again Scotland, his native 
land. After his return he engaged in coal mining, but soon abandoned that 
enterprise in order to give his attention to the improvement of his Seattle 
property. He was the builder of the Colman block which extended from 
Front street to the water and of which he was the sole owner, but all this 
was swept away in the great fire which cost him a loss of two hundred thou- 
sand dollars, on which he only had forty thousand dollars insurance. He also 
lost a brick block at the same time. Before the fire he had an income of 
three thousand dollars per month from his property and it was reduced to 
one hundred dollars. Again his indomitable energy, resolution and strong 
force of character were manifest. He did not repine but with resolute pur- 
pose started to work to obliterate the traces of the fire and built a fine three 
story and basement brick block, one hundred and eleven by two hundred 
and forty feet. He also erected a block of buildings where the Union depot 
now stands and built the court building, also a fine business structure on 
Main street. In 1884 he erected his splendid residence on Fourth street, 
located on a beautiful hill surrounded by tasteful grounds upon which has 
been lavished the art of the landscape gardener. There he is now residing 
with his family; a fit home in which to spend the evening of a life of great 
activity and usefulness. He is still one of the extensive property owners of 
the city, and though he has met with many reverses and discouragements, 
he has to-day valuable realty holdings which make him one of Seattle's most 
substantial residents. 

Mr. Colman was happily married in Waukesha, Wisconsin, to Miss 
Agnes Henderson, a native of Glasgow, Scotland. They had but two sons, 
Lawrence J., who is married and resides in the family residence above men- 
tioned, and George A., who is also at home. The sons are now managing 
the business. The father has taught them the trade which he mastered in 
early youth and in which he still retains great interest, having a shop of his 



1 82 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

own. He built a number of steam yachts for his own pleasure and is now 
building- a very splendid one, eighty feet in length. He began his yacht 
building when his boys were approaching manhood in order to find some- 
thing to interest them and to induce them to stay with him. In this he has 
succeeded and father and sons have together continued their work in yacht 
building and in superintending his investments. He has the strong filial 
love and devotion of his "boys'' to whom he has been not only a father, but 
companion and friend as well. 

Mr. Colman has been a life-long Republican, casting his first presidential 
vote for John C. Fremont, the first standard bearer of the party. He has 
never been an office seeker, but sen-ed for five years on the civil service com- 
mission. He belongs to the Plymouth Congregational church and for many 
years was one of its trustees, while to its support he has been a most liberal 
contributor. Nor has his aid been confined alone to this one organization, 
but has benefited many church societies and benevolent institutions. His 
has been a practical life in which his business career has been marked by 
nothing visionary. Endowed by nature with excellent mechanical genius, 
he has improved his talents and by his unfaltering industry he has advanced 
to a conspicuous position in the business world. Few men connected with 
the northwest have been more important factors in the development of this 
section of the country and the work which Mr. Colman accomplished in con- 
nection with railroad building is of itself sufficient to class him among those 
whose enterprise has been the foundation of the prosperity and the prog- 
ress of Seattle. 

CHARLES E. FOWLER. 

Charles Evan Fowler, president of the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredg- 
ing Company, has a wdde reputation as a bridge builder in the United States. 
His knowledge of the scientific principles which underlie the work, together 
with a thorough imderstanding of the practical construction, has enabled 
him to advance to a position prominent in civil engineering circles, particu- 
larly in the line of his specialization, that of bridge building and engineering 
construction. 

Mr. Fowler is a native of Washington county, Ohio, having been born 
near the city of Marietta, on the loth of February, 1S67. The family is of 
English origin, and was established in America at an early day in the history 
of the colonies where representatives of the name took up their abode. Ben- 
jamin Fowler, the great-grandfather of our subject, lived in IMaryland, and 
subsequently his descendants took up their abode in northeastern Ohio in the 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 183 

early part of the nineteentli century. Caleb Fowler, his grandfather, settled 
in Washington county in 1838, being one "of the first settlers of that part 
of the Buckeye state, and there impro\Td a farm in the midst of the forest, 
thus reclaiming the old hunting ground of the Indians for purposes of civili- 
zation. He and his ancestors were identified with the Society of Friends, 
or Quakers, and were people of the highest moral character. 

C. T. Fowler, his son, and the father of our subject, was born in Ohio 
in 1840, and in 1872 removed to Marietta, that state, near which place he 
was engaged in the manufacture of lumber and in bridge building. He con- 
tinued in business in Ohio until his removal to the Pacific coast, since which 
time he has been connected with the lumber trade in Seattle. He married 
Miss Phebe Hobson, a native of Jefferson county, Ohio, who is also living, 
and the members of the household enjoy the high regard of all with whom 
they are associated in their western home. In the family were four children, 
three of whom are living: J. Ernest Fowler, who is deputy county auditor 
of Chillicothe, Ohio; Ella M., a successful teacher, of Seattle; and Charles 
Evan. 

The last named was reared in the state of his nativity, and after acquir- 
ing his preliminary education in the common schools completed his course 
in the Ohio State University, where he mastered civil engineering as taught 
in that institution. After leaving college he accepted a position with the 
Hocking Valley Railroad Company as bridge engineer, and during his con- 
nection with that company he completed several large bridges. He was 
afterward with the Indiana Bridge Company as engineer of construction. 
In 1890 he went to Los Angeles, California, where he engaged in civil engi- 
neering and contracting along that line. While residing there he was mar- 
ried, and after his marriage he removed wath his young bride to Youngs - 
town, Ohio, where he accepted the position of chief engineer with the 
Youngstawn Bridge Company, and for several years had charge of their 
work. While thus engaged he constructed ' a large number of bridges for 
highways and for railroad companies. He did work in every state and terri- 
tory in the Union, and superintended the construction of several very large 
bridges, including one at Youngstown and one over the Tennessee river at 
Knoxville, Tennessee, one third of a mile in length and one hundred and ten 
feet above the water. He resigned his position at Youngstown because the 
company went into a trust. 

Mr. Fowler then removed to New York city, where he opened an office 
as consulting engineer, and there he made numerous plans, including those 
for the erection of the Manhattan portion of the new East River bridge, be- 



i84 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

tween New York and Brooklyn. In 1900 he came to Seattle to take charge 
of the work and business of the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Company, 
and is now engaged in executing numerous large works of public improve- 
ment. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers; is a 
member of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, and is one of its trustees and 
chairman of its committee on railroads, and a member of the committee on 
Lake Washington canal; is first vice-president of the Pacific Northwest So- 
ciety of Engineers ; and an active member of the Seattle Park Commission. 

On the 4th of December, 1890, Mr. Fowler was united in marriage to 
Miss Lucille H. Doyle, a native of Chillicothe, Ohio, and a daughter of 
R. J. Doyle, then a resident of Los Angeles, California. She is also a niece 
of General Samuel LI. LJ.urst, of Chillicothe, who served with distinction in 
the great Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Fowler have two sons and two daugh- 
ters, Harold D., Robert C, Louise and Margaret E. They reside on Ma- 
drona Heights, one of Seattle's most beautiful suburbs. 

Mr. Fowler has written extensively for the technical journals and maga- 
zines, among his contributions being "The Cofferdam Process for Piers/* 
a treatise on ordinary foundations, published by John Wiley & Sons, of New 
York city. He is also the author of "Engineering Studies," a work in twelve 
parts, giving views of notable masonry engineering structures, and "Gen- 
eral Specifications for Steel Roofs and Buildings," both published by the 
Engineering News of New York city. 

JACOB FURTH. 

Among those who have come from foreign lands to become prominent 
in business circles in Washington is Jacob Furth, the president of the Puget 
Sound National Bank, of Seattle, and a man whose varied business interests 
have contributed in large measure to the substantial upbuilding of the city 
wdth which he .has allied his interests. His success in all his undertakings 
has been so marked that his methods are of interest to the commercial world. 
He has based his business principles and actions upon strict adherence to 
the rules which govern industry, economy and strict and unswerving in- 
tegrity. His enterprise and progressive spirit have made him a typical Amer- 
ican in every sense of the word and he well deserves mention in this volume. 
What he is to-day he has made himself, for he began in the world with noth- 
ing but his own energy and willing hands to aid him. By constant exertion, 
associated with good judgment, he has raised himself to the prominent posi- 
tion which he now holds, having the friendship of many and the respect of 




1* J* ft ', 



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. -•'w'Vo-RK ' 

..iC LIBRARY 



4«T9H, lHHOX AN» 

Tii-»ew "'ouwo/ Tiowt. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 185' 

all. He has been identified with business interests on the Pacific coast since 
1858 and his enterprises are of mammoth size and of a very important char- 
acter. 

Mr. Furth was born in Schwihau, Bohemia, Austria, on the 14th of 
November, 1840, a son of Lazar and Anna (Popper) Furth, both of whom 
were natives of that land and were of the Hebrew faith. The father was a 
merchant, successfully following that line of business throughout the years 
of his manhood. Both he and his wife spent their entire lives in that coun- 
try and he attained to the very advanced age of ninety-six years. They 
were the parents of ten sons and two daughters, and eight of the number 
came to the United States. The eldest son served as a captain in tlie Austrian 
army for fourteen years and afterward held an important government posi- 
tion in Vienna. 

In the schools of his native land Jacob Furth pursued his education 
and when eighteen years of age he bade adieu to home and friends in order 
to try his fortune in California — the Golden state, where he arrived in 
1858. He had only ten dollars in his pocket when he reached Nevada City, 
but scorning no employment which w^ould yield him an honest living he ac- 
cepted a clerkship in a store and soon gained a good knowledge of Amer- 
ican business methods. His industry and economy enabled him soon to 
engage in business on his own account and he established a store at North 
San Juan, where he conducted a successful business until 1870, at which 
time he removed to Colusa, California. There he conducted a general mer- 
cantile store for twelve years, his business constantly growing in volume 
and yearly adding to his income. He prospered greatly but his health be- 
came impaired and hoping that he might be benefitted by a change of climate 
he came to Seattle in 1882. 

Here Mr. Furth established the Puget Sound National Bank and acted 
as its cashier until 1893, vv^hen he was elected its president. The bank has 
always been managed by him and its almost unparalleled success is attributa- 
ble almost entirely to his financial ability and keen discernment, he being 
recognized as one of the ablest fi.nanciers not only of the city but of the state. 
He is a gentleman of marked executive force, sagacity and unfaltering deter- 
mination and his aid and counsel have been of the greatest value in the suc- 
cessful conduct of many other enterprises of magnitude and importance. He 
was one of the organizers of the extensive street railway system of Seattle, 
controlling one hundred miles of street railway now in operation here and 
doing a paying business. He is president of the company which is now build- 
ing an electric line to Tacoma and is also president of the Vulcan Iron Works, 
12 



1 86 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

now a very extensive enterprise which has grown from a small beginning. 
He is likewise president of the California Land & Stock Company, owning 
thirteen thousand acres of choice farming land in Lincoln county, Washing- 
ton, where they are engaged in farming and stock-raising on a mammoth 
scale. Mr. Furth is also quite extensively interested in real-estate in Se- 
attle and in the erection of buildings has contributed to the improvement of 
the city. He stands ver}^ high in the esteem and confidence of business peo- 
ple tliroughout the state. 

In 1865 Mr. Furth was united in marriage to Miss Lucy A. Dunton, a 
native of Indiana and a representative of an old xA.merican family. Her 
grandfather was a veteran of the Mexican war and her father was a mer- 
chant of Indiana. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Furth has been blessed 
with three daughters* Jane E., now the wife of E. L. Terry, of Seattle; 
Anna F., who married Frederick K. Sturve, of Seattle; and Sidonia, who 
is at home with her parents. 

Mr. Furth arrived in the United States just before the organization 
of the Republican party and from its formation has given to it an unwaver- 
ing support, although he has taken no part in its work as an office seeker. 
Everything pertaining to the welfare and improvement of Seattle, however, 
elicits his interest and co-operation, and for several terms he rendered effec- 
tive service to the city as a member of its council. He has also had the honor 
of serving as president of its chamber of commerce for two terms. He still 
holds to the religious faith of his ancestors but is broad minded and liberal 
?.nd has been most generous in his contribution to various church and benev- 
olent enterprises. He was made a Master Mason in Colusa county, Cali- 
fornia, in 1870, and became so interested and proficient in the work that 
he was elected and served as master of his lodge. Lie is also a Royal Arch 
Mason and in his life exemplifies the teachings of the craft which is founded 
upon the principles of the brotherhood of mankind. In many respects his 
has been a remarkable career. Coming to this country a young man of 
eighteen years, without capital, without knowledge of the language or of the 
customs of the people, he has steadily worked his way upward until he has 
few peers in the business circles of the state. What he has accomplished 
in the world of commerce and industry cannot be told in words. It is cer- 
tainly not asserting too much to say of one who can direct and control busi- 
ness interests of such magnitude as those with which he is connected that 
his must be a master mind, that he must possess, aside from commercial fore- 
sight and sagacity, the happy faculty of reading and judging men, com- 
bined with unusual powers of organization and executive ability. And yet 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 187 

if one will seek in his career the causes of his success they will be found along 
the lines of well tried and old-time maxims. Honesty and fair-dealing, 
promptness, truthfulness and fidelity — all these are strictly enforced and ad- 
hered to, and thus he has advanced to a position prominent in the business and 
financial world. 

CHARLES K. JENNER. 

Charles Kirkham Jenner is one of the distinguished representatives of 
the legal fraternity in Seattle, making a specialty of the department of land 
and mining law. Professional advancement in the law is proverbially slow. 
The first element of success is, perhaps, a persistency of purpose and effort 
as enduring as the force of gravity. But, as in any other calling, aptitude, 
character and individuality are the qualities which differentiate the usual from 
the unusual; the vocation from the career of the lawyer. For twenty-five 
years he has been a representative of the legal fraternity of this city, and 
the qualities which insure success are his and have met their just reward. 
He is likewise extensively engaged in real-estate dealing and has prospered 
in this department of activity. 

Mr. Jenner was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 15th of September, 
1846, and is descended from English ancestors who became early settlers of 
Connecticut. His grandfather, Edward H. Jenner, was born in Rutland, Ver- 
mont, and served in the war of 181 2. He was a distinguished mathematician 
and successful teacher, and among his pupils who have attained marked promi- 
nence was Stephen A. Douglas "the little giant of Illinois.'' In 1850 Mr. 
Jenner's father crossed the plains to CaHfornia, where he engaged in mining. 
He also possessed remarkable inventive genius and when searching for gold 
on the Pacific coast in pioneer times he invented a pump to force water up to 
the mine, one hundred and ten feet. He made a model of his invention in 
pure gold, the first and only one of its kind ever sent to the patent office in 
Washington. As soon as he had completed one invention he started to work 
upon another, his mind being completely occupied with such work. About 
T854 he invented the system of Browning gun barrels, and many other evi- 
dences of his genius in this direction were found upon the market, but he 
did not possess ability as a business manager and therefore never secured 
the financial returns which he deserved for his labors. For some years he 
was also a successful dentist in San Francisco. He spent the greater part 
of his life in that city but also resided for a time in Sonoma county, Cali- 
fornia. Prior to the Civil war he gave his political support to the Democ- 
racy, but at the time the south attempted to overthrow the Union he joined 



1 88 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the Republican party. He was united in marriage to Ann Jane Wilby, of 
Rochester, New York, and with her famil}^ of four children she accompanied 
her husband to San Francisco in 1850. Three years later she departed this 
life at the age of thirty-three years, while the father of our subject was called 
to his final rest on the 14th of January, 1879, at the age of sixty-seven years. 
All their four children are yet living. Sylvester, who learned the printer's 
trade in California, is now on the force of the San Francisco Examiner. 

Charles K. Jenner was only four years of age when he arrived in Cali- 
fornia with his parents. He pursued his studies in San Francisco and at 
the Sotoyome Institute in Sonoma county, read law with Colonel L. A. Nor- 
ton, in Healdsburg, and was admitted to the practice on February 21, 1871. 
Since that time he has been admitted to all the courts of the United States 
and has had a large number of cases tried in the supreme court of this coun- 
try. He practiced law in Flealdsburg, California, until 1876, at which time 
he came to Seattle, where he has resided for more than a quarter of a century. 
For a short time he was employed in the office of Judge Orange Jacobs, and 
then entered into partnership with him — an association that was maintained 
for fourteen years, during which time they enjoyed a large and lucrative legal 
business. Subsequently Mr. Jenner was for some years in partnership with 
his son-in-law, Louis Henry Legg, and Solon T. Williams, but is now alone 
in business. His clientage is of a distinctively representative character and 
he has been associated with some of the most important litigation tried in the 
courts of this district and state, and also in the United States courts. During 
his residence in Seattle he has had much to do with real-estate interests and 
has been a partner in the platting of a number of additions to the city. The 
first ten acres was called the Brawley addition, after which he was associated 
in the platting of forty acres on Queen Ann Hill, which is now one of the 
finest residence portions of the city. The Comstock addition, containing 
forty acres, was named in honor of his wife's mother, a lady whom he held in 
very high esteem because of her amiable disposition and beautiful character. 
He has handled much city property and has done his full share in the up- 
building and improvement of this splendid metropolis of the northwest which, 
almost as if by magic, has grown to its present extensive proportions. One of 
the most notable works with which Mr. Jenner has been connected was the 
entering of the school section through which the New Castle coal veins now 
run. He had the honor of establishing the precedent of securing that kind of 
land from the government and subsequently he sold it to the New Castle 
Company, which has operated its coal mines thereon for many years. In 
the legal points concerned in this matter he differed from the opinions of 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 189 

eminent jurists and displayed a profound and deep knowledge of the land 
laws of the United State^ carrying his point and establishing an important 
precedent. He is counsel for the Forty-five Consolidated Mining Company, 
which owns a valuable mine that has already produced twenty thousand dol- 
lars. He was also at one time the manager of the Denny iron mine, but has 
sold his interest. That was the hrst mineral entry made on Puget Sound 
and proved to be a very valuable mine, containing the finest Bessemer steel 
ore in the United States. This mine will ultimately prove of great value. 

On the 9th of June, 1870, Mr. Jenner was joined in wedlock to Cornelia 
E. Comstock, a native of Tioga county, New York, born near the city of 
Oswego. They became the parents of five sons and a daughter, namely: 
Helen, the wife of Louis Henry Legg; Earl Robinson, who has charge of 
the court work for the Boothe Whittlesey Abstracting Company; Ernest 
Comstock, who is the twin brother of Earl, and is a sketch artist for the Post 
Litelligencer ; Theodore, who is a clerk with the Osborn, Tremper Abstract 
Company; Herbert and L. G., wdio are both in Seattle. Ernest served in 
the war with Spain and Vv^as for two years in the art room of the San Fran- 
cisco Chronicle. November 4, 1891, the mother of this family, a most estima- 
ble lady of broad charily and humanitarian principles, was called to her final 
rest. She served as president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, 
was one of the organizers of the Woman's Relief Corps and was chairman 
of the Advisory committee to investigate needy cases and furnish them with 
supplies. In her home she was a devoted wife and mother and was a con- 
sistent Christian woman whose loss was deeply felt. November 14, 1892, 
Mr. Jenner was again married, his second union being with Clara J. Hough, 
a native of Wayne county, Ohio, and they have a son and a daughter, Cor- 
nelia E. and Edward Hough. In politics Mr. Jenner was long an active 
Republican, but differing from his party on the money question he is now 
independent, for he believes that both gold and silver should be used as the 
money standard of the country. While he is one of the distinguished mem- 
bers of the bar of this city he is entirely free from ostentation or self-laudation 
and this fact has made him one of the most popular citizens of Seattle, with 
whose history he has been long and prominently identified. 

EDGAR BRYAN. 

Edgar Bryan, who is secretary and ex-president of the Pioneer Associ- 
ation of the state of Washington- and makes his home in Seattle, was born in 
Lawrence county, Illinois, on the 24th of P'ebruary, 1841. His father, Eli 



190 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Bryan, was a native of North Carolina and after arriving at years of maturity 
married Nancy Laws, a native of Illinois. The former died when our subject 
was only seven years of age and the mother married again and reached the 
advanced age of seventy-three years. By her first marriage she had six 
children, and her second marriage was to a gentleman who had nine chil- 
dren. Our subject and his eldest sister, Mrs. Esther Perkins, now of British 
Columbia, are the only survivors of the first family. 

After the mother's second marriage it seemed that the family was too 
large for one household, and when he was only eleven years of age he, with 
a younger brother and two sisters, left home and went with their grandfather, 
John Laws, across the plains, with ox teams, to Oregon, his grandfather be- 
ing captain of a company which made the long and wearisome journey across 
the wide deserts of sand and through the mountain passes. The year was 
1852 and they were seven months and one week upon the way. Amos 
Pettys was the only man out of twenty-one who died during the entire trip, 
but difficulties and hardships were endured, such as cannot be imagined by 
the traveler of today who speeds across the country in a palace car. The 
stock was stampeded by Indians on several occasions, but the emigrants al- 
ways succeeded in recovering their horses and cattl^. While near Snake 
river Mr. Laws went on ahead of the company to look for a good place to 
encamp for the noon hour and was attacked by an Indian on horseback but 
managed to escape. The company settled in what was then Oregon, near 
Vancouver, remaining there through the first and very hard winter, and in 
the spring went to the beautiful Turlitin plains in Oregon. There Mr. Laws 
and his family remained during the harvesting season, after which they pro- 
ceeded to Lynn City, opposite Oregon City. In the fall of that year he removed 
with his family to Olympia, Washington Territory, where he conducted a 
hotel during the v.-inter of 1853-54. In the succeeding spring he secured a 
government land claim of three hundred and twenty acres on the Miami 
Prairie, which property he improved, transforming it into a rich farm and 
made his home thereon for many years. Energetic, industrious and hon- 
orable, his was a successful busmess career. He held membership in the 
Baptist church and died in Chehalis county at the age of seventy-four years. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Goen, attained the very ad- 
vanced age of ninety-three years. She was a typical pioneer woman, courage- 
ously braving the trials and dangers of frontier life and on the journey to 
the Pacific coast she drove her own team the greater part of the distance 
across the plains, and for fifteen years after arrival did her own housework 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 191 

on the farm, and was never known to get angry enough to quarrel with any 
person. 

Edgar Bryan was educated in the common schools of Olympia and at 
the Washington State University, the first term of which he attended, and 
he also attended the Puget Sound Wesleyan Institute at Olympia in early 
days. He first worked at the carpenter's trade and afterward engaged in 
teaching school for several terms. Subsequently he was employed as a clerk 
and filled the position of bookkeeper for the Washington Mill Company at 
Seabeck. The plant was a large one and an extensive business was carried on. 

In 1865 Mr. Bryan was united in marriage, at Seattle, to Edna Ann 
Whipple, a descendant of the old Puritan family of Whipples. After their 
marriage the young couple took up their abode in Seattle, which was then 
a small town, and he followed contracting and building for ten years. He 
then suffered from paralysis and was obliged to retire from his business 
operations. Removing to Coupeville, Island county, he took charge of a 
large store, but subsequently returned to Seattle and received the appoint- 
ment of deputy assessor of the county. He was also clerk of the Seattle 
school district for many years, and after serving as deputy assessor he was 
elected assessor of King county, serving a term of two years, during which 
time he manifested such ability that he was again elected and continued in 
the office through the second term, but declined to serve a third. Since his 
retirement he has been engaged in dealing in real estate, besides conducting 
otlier interests, and is now controlling the white bronze monument business. 
He is a gentleman of keen sagacity and marked enterprise and carries forward 
to successful completion whatever he undertakes. The home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Bryan has been brightened by the appearance of seven children : Albert 
W., who is now in Manila; Alberta, at home; Jessie, who became the wife 
of E. H. Crowe; Hugh L., who is a clerk in the postoffice at Seattle; Minnie, 
the wife of Samuel I. Robeson, of Seattle; Arthur A., at present a resident of 
Dawson, Northwest Territory; and C. Ernest, who is living at home. In 
1893 Mr. Bryan was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who de- 
parted this life on the 15th of December of that year. She was a devoted 
wife and mother and a valued member of the Methodist Protestant church, 
so that her loss was deeply felt, not only in the family circle but also in the 
church organization and by her many friends. Mr. Bryan's daugliter, Al- 
berta, is now acting as his housekeeper, their pleasant home being located at 
No. 330 Fourth avenue north. In his political affiliations Mr. Bryan has 
been an active Republican since casting his first presidential vote. He was 
assistant United States marshal in 1870 and was postmaster while in Coupe- 



192 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

ville in 1875-76. For several years he has been a member of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and is a gentleman of high character, of strong 
purpose and sterling worth. Few men of his years have spent so long a 
time upon the Pacific coast as has Mr. Bryan. The history of the won- 
derful development of this section of the country is familiar to him. A half 
centurj' has passed since he came ^vith his grandparents to the northwest, 
which was then largely the domain of the red race. The forests stood in their 
primeval strength, the ri^'ers were unbridged and the land uncultivated. He 
has taken a just and commendable pride in everything pertaining to the ad- 
vancement and progress of this section of the country and has borne his 
part in the work of improvement in the city in which he has so long made 
his home. Well does he deserve the honor which Avas conferred upon him 
by his election to the position of secretary of the Pioneer Association of the 
state for five consecutive terms after having served as its president. Mr. 
Bryan could give many interesting reminiscences of the Indian war of 1855-56 
in Oregon, Washington and Idaho, l^ut was not then old enough to join 
the Volunteers. He was made useful in looking after the interests of the 
farm, which was about five miles from the fort where all families of the neigh- 
borhood had assembled for mutual protection, and members were accus- 
tomed to visit the farms occasionallv to look after stock and other matters. 
On one of those trips he vras detained over night and of course supposed to 
be murdered, but tin^ned up all right and found a posse ready to go and search 
for him. 

JOHN P. FAY. 

The subject of this sketch, Hon. John P. Fay, has long been promi- 
nent in the legal profession of the state and as a citizen is honored and re- 
spected by all. In his public utterances, always governed by his convic- 
tions, he has been a leader in thought and action in the public life of the 
state. His name is a familiar one in political and professional circles 
throughout the northwest. 

The "Fay Family" is one of the oldest in ^Massachusetts. The pro- 
genitor, John Fay, emigrated to the Llassachusetts colony in 1660 from 
England. His eldest son, John Fay, with two younger brothers, in the early 
years of 1700 acquired from the Indians a large tract of land, the greater 
portion of which is now divided into many beautiful homes that make the 
towns of Westborough and Southborough in the east central part of Massa- 
chusetts. Here a home w^as established which has since been known as the 
"Old Homestead" of the Fay family. 



THE NEW YORK 

PU^UCUBRARY 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 193 

Deep religious traits characterized the family and the church records 
throughout New England give evidence of the large number of descendants, 
bearing the family name, who as ministers did splendid service in Chris- 
tian work. Almost with the first settlement came the Congregational church 
of Westborough. Of this John Fay was the first deacon and for more 
than one hundred and twenty-five years afterwards some member of the 
Fay family was a deacon in this church. Though the family is rapidly 
diminishing in numbers, there are many local landmarks that bear the name 
which, with the Fay Public Library at Southborough, will keep the family 
name for many years to come in honored remembrance. One place in par- 
ticular, carved out of the Fay homestead, will always be shown with pride 
by the townsfolks. It is the birthplace of Eli Whitney, the famous inventor 
of the cotton gin. His mother was the daughter of Benjamin Fay, son 
of John Fay. Although not buried in Westborough, a substantial monu- 
ment on the old burial ground in the center of Westborough evidences the 
respect of the community for the talents of Eli Whitney. 

Joseph Brigham Fay, the father of our subject, was born in West- 
borough July 3, 1816. He was a descendant on his grandmother's side from 
the Brigham family, an old and honored family in New England, the most 
distinguished member of which was a cousin, the late Chief Justice Brigham, 
of the supreme court of Massachusetts. In middle life he was married 
to Sarah Houghton Purinton, a woman of singular beaut3^ grace and no- 
bility of character. The early years of his life were spent in New York 
city, where he was clerk in a bank and later served in the then well known 
house of Temple Fay & Company, bankers and brokers. Subsequently, tired 
from the bustling activities of metropolitan life, he returned to the old 
homestead of the Fay family, which he bought and where he died at the 
age of sixty-seven, a few years after the death of his beloved wife, who was 
called to her final rest in 1877, at the age of fifty-two years. They were 
life-long attendants of the Congregational church and were honored and 
respected by all who had the pleasure of their acquaintance. To this wor- 
thy couple two children were born, Charles Brigham Fay, the elder, and 
John Purinton Fay, the subject of this review. 

The last named was born in Westboro, Massachusetts, August, i, 
1 86 1. He was educated at the Westboro high school and graduated in 
1881 from Phillips Exeter Academy, of New Hampshire, one of the old- 
est institutions of learning in the east. After two years' special study in 
the academic course of Harvard University and at the Harvard Law School 
Mr. Fay removed to Eureka, Nevada, where he commenced the practice 



194 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

of law. While there he served as superintendent and principal of the Eureka 
high school. In the winter of 1889 he was clerk of the Nevada senate. The 
following spring Mr. Fay came to Seattle and immediatel}'' entered into a 
law partnership with Mr. John P. Gale; but two years later this partner- 
ship was ended by the death of Mr. Gale, after which the firm of Fay, Gest 
& Henderson was organized. This relationship continued until 1895, but 
two years of this time were spent by Mr. Fay in Oregon, as attorney for 
the eastern bondholders in their litigation with the Oregon Pacific and 
Willamette Valley Railroad Companies, and subsequently he was made at- 
torney for the receiver of the roads. The litigation with which he has been 
connected has embraced many of the most important cases, involving large 
sums of money and property, tried in the courts of this state and Oregon. 
Among them might be mentioned the Farmers' Loan & Trust Company of 
New York vs. Oregon Pacific Railroad; the same vs. the Willamette Valley 
Railroad; trustees vs. Oregon Development Company; Deschutes Military 
Wagon Road Land Grant, involving three hundred thousand acres in east- 
ern and central Oregon; the famous Valentine Scrip cases, involving the 
business water front of Seattle, Tacoma and Port Townsend, besides fill- 
mg the position of arbitrator in several important mining controversies. In 
all these cases Mr. Fay won from his opponents of marked ability the com- 
pliment of sound judgment, keen analysis and a broad knowledge of legal 
principles. 

In 1889 Mr. Fay was married to Miss Alice Ober, of Beverly, Massa- 
chusetts, a young lady of rare intellectual endowments, the sister of the dis- 
tinguished author, Fred A. Ober, and herself the valedictorian of her class, 
though its youngest member, at the commencement exercises in 1881 of 
Wheaton Seminary, the oldest college for the education of young ladies in 
Massachusetts. Unto this union have been born five children, three sons 
and two daughters, namely : Dorothy Wheaton, Alice Ober, Temple 
Sedgwick, John Bradford and Winthrop Herrick. 

Until 1896 Mr. Fay gave his political support to the Republican party, 
but in that year, his views on the money question not being in harmony with 
the party, he joined the Fusion forces and became an earnest and aggressive 
leader in the ranks of that political organization, delivering many schol- 
arly and effective speeches in its behalf during the following campaign. In 
conipany with Judge Richard Winsor, he was chosen by the Fusion state 
central committee to hold a joint debate on the money cjuestion. The Re- 
publicans selected as • his opponent Hon. Andrew F. Burleigh, a prominent 
attorney and at that time receiver of the Northern Pacific railroad, and 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 195 

Hon. Frank W. Cushman, now a member of congress from this state. 
The debate was held at Yakima, Washington, October i, 1896. and more 
than ten thousand people were present. In his speech Mr. Fay evinced a 
thorough knowledge, wide study and complete mastery of his subject. Flis 
peroration will always take high rank in choice literature for elegance of 
expression and diction. Mr. Fay left the platform a victor, with a reputa- 
tion as a speaker that brought him immediate and earnest solicitation to 
the platform from many different states. The success of the Fusion forces 
in Washington that year was largely due to his able efforts and in the 
Fusion legislature that followed his name was frequently mentioned in con- 
nection with the United States senatorship, although at no time did he place 
himself on record as a candidate. Mr. Fay's political work had been freely 
given in deference to a sense of duty to deep convictions upon the great 
financial questions of the hour. He sought no reward, but later he had the 
honor of accepting an appointment by the governor to the board of regents 
of the University of the state of Washington. There his experience and 
knowledge of educational work and methods of teaching were quickly recog- 
nized and he was soon made president of the board of regents. This posi- 
tion he held until a difference of views arose in the board as to the propriety 
of eliminating the subjects of "Ethics" and "Moral Philosophy" from the 
university curriculum of studies. Mr. Fay insisted upon the retention of 
these subjects in the course of study and a fierce controversy arose. Un- 
willing to yield to executive pressure, after seeing the subjects firmly rein- 
stated in the college course of studies, Mr. Fay in deference to his own 
deep convictions retired from the board. His honesty and integrity in po- 
litical matters has never been the subject of question, even among his po- 
litical enemies, while as a polished and educated gentleman his social posi- 
tion is and always has been of the highest standard. Mr. Fay is just in his 
prime and there is no position of honor that he might attain that would 
cause surprise to any one. 

HIRAM BURNETT. 

More than a half century has passed since this gentleman arrived on the 
Pacific coast and he is justly numbered among the honored pioneers and 
leading citizen of this portion of the country. He has been prominentl}'j 
identified with business interests in many ways. liis is the honorable rec- 
ord of a conscientious man who by his upright life has won the confidence 
of all with whom he has come in contact. He has reached the age of eighty- 



I9& REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

five years, and although the snows of many winters have whitened his hair he 
has the vigor of a much younger man. and in spirit seems yet in his prime. 
Old age is not necessarily a synonym of weakness or inactivity, nor need 
it suggest, as a matter of course, want of occupation or helplessness. There is 
an old age that is a benediction to all that comes in contact with itj that 
gives out of its rich stores of learning and experience and grows stronger 
intellectually and spiritually as the years pass. Such is the life of Mr. Bur- 
nett; an encouragement to his associates and an example well worthy of emu- 
lation by the young. 

Hiram Burnett is a native of Massachusetts, his birth having occurred 
in Southboro, Worcester county, on the 5th of July, 181 7. He is descended 
from English and French ancestors who were early settlers of New England 
and representatives of the family were active participants in the events which 
form the early history of this country. Charles R. Burnett, his grandfather, 
joined the colonial army that sought to throw off the British yoke of op- 
pression and at length won the victory which ended the English rule in the 
American colonies. He was a prosperous farmer, a worthy member of the 
Congregational church, and lived and died at Southboro, Massachusetts.' 
Brazella Pond, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was also a native of 
ulasschusetts and he, too, was a member of the patriotic army of the Revolu- 
tionry war. His religious faith was also that of the Congregational church 
and he was a citizen of the highest respectability. 

Charles Burnett, the father of our subject, was born in Southboro, Mas- 
sachusetts, on the 1 2th of March, 178S, and married Keziah Pond, a native 
of Franklin, that state. They were industrious and respected farming peo- 
ple, holding to the faith of the Congregational church, and in their family 
were five children, of whom only two are now living: Hiram and a sister, 
who is eightv-six vears of age and resides with her brother. The father died 
in the sixty-eighth year of his age, while his wife was taken from him by death 
in her forty-sixth year. 

Hiram Burnett obtained his education in the public schools of Massachu- 
setts and in his youth worked at the carpenter's trade. Ultimately he became 
the owner of a planing mill and was engaged in the manufacture of sash, 
doors and blinds. Attracted by the opportunities of the golden west he 
resolved to seek his fortune on the Pacific coast and in 1852 sailed from 
New York for San Francisco by way of the Isthmus of Panama, reaching 
his destination in February. He remained in San Francisco for four years, 
at the expiration of which time he returned to the east for his family, having 
been married on the loth of April, 1845, ^^ Elizabeth JNI. Gibbs, of Farming- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 197 

ham, Middlesex comity, Massachusetts. She was born March 3, 1824, and 
while residing in the east they became the parents of two children : Charles 
H. and Nellie M. With his wife and children Mr. Burnett again made his 
way to San Francisco and after a year's residence there came to Washington 
Territory in 1859, settling at Port Gamble, wdiere he remained for four years, 
engaged in the operation of a planing mill. In this enterprise he met with 
success and in 1863 came to Seattle, erecting the first house on Fourth street, 
between Fourth and Fifth avenues and Marion and Columbia. He engaged 
in the operation of a planing mill in West Seattle, in Port Madison, and in 
Port Ludlow. His affairs were conducted with strict regard to commercial 
ethics and as a result of his enterprise, combined with integrity in all trade 
transactions, he not only won prosperity, but also secured the confidence and 
good will of all with whom he had business relations. His reputation in 
industrial circles is above question and the policy which he has ever followed 
serves as an example well worthy of emulation. 

Of the two children who accompanied Mr. and Mrs. Burnett to the west, 
Charles H. is now superintendent of the Southprairie Coal Mine at Burnett, 
Pierce county, Washington, a town which was named in honor of his family. 
The daughter became the wife of Stephen P. Andrews, by whom she had 
three children. 

In his political affiliations in early manhood Mr. Burnett was a Whig 
and voted for General Scott for president. When the Republican party was 
formed he endorsed its principles and has since remained in its ranks. After 
returning from San Francisco the first time he went to Kansas and did what 
he could to make that a free state, being there throughout all the exciting 
period when the border ruffians were determined to introduce slavery. While 
in Kitsap county he was elected and served as judge of the probate court, 
and in 1866 he was elected county commissioner of King county, evincing 
in the conduct of that office the same good judgment and conscientiousness 
that have always characterized the conduct of his private business. In 1890 
he removed to Edgewater, where he had built for himself a commodious 
home, and there he is spending the evening of his life in contentment and 
peace. In his youth he was a Congregationalist, but in 1865, at Seattle, he 
aided in the establishment and building of the Episcopal church. He was 
also prominent in building the first Trinity church. When in Port Ludlow, 
as there was no minister there, he read the church services for four years in 
a most acceptable manner. He aided in organizing the first Episcopal Sun- 
day-school in Seattle and was its superintendent for many years, and his 
efforts in behalf of Christianity have been highly appreciated. He and his 



198 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

good wife have passed the fifty-seventh anniversary of their wedding day 
and are greatly beloved by a wide circle of friends. Mr. Burnett has attained 
his eighty-fifth year, his wife being now in her seventy-eighth year, and this 
venerable couple received in high measure the honor and respect from all 
with whom they have been brought in contact. 

AUGUST MEHLHORN. 

August ]\Iehlhorn, one of Seattle's prominent old residents, was born 
in Saxony, Germany, on the 20th of March, 1842, his parents being Fred- 
erick and ]\Iaria (Cupp) ]\Iehlhorn, both of whom were natives of Saxony. 
The father, who was engaged in the luitchering business, died at the advanced 
age of eight}^-four years, while his wife passed away at the age of eighty- 
eight years. They were industrious and upright people and highly respected 
in their native land. They were members of the Lutheran church, and be- 
came the parents of three children, all of whom are living. 

August Mehlhorn was educated in his native country and learned the 
brick mason's trade and also that of a weaver. In 1867 he crossed the At- 
lantic to the new world, believing there were better business opportunities 
to be found in America, and upon arrival made his way to Chicago with 
the firm purpose of achieving success. Although he was unfamiliar with the 
language of the country, and was a poor young man, he possessed a vigorous 
constitution, a bright and active mind and honesty and industry were num- 
bered among his chief characteristics. His first work was on a farm in 
Indiana, for which he was paid sixteen dollars per month, and this he con- 
tinued for eleven months. He then returned to Chicago and worked at 
brick laying at three dollars per day, but did not have a steady business. 
However, he was pleased with his prospects, for in his own country he could 
not have earned over fifty cents per day. After this he worked for about a 
year in an oil and lead works, and in 1870 he came to Washington territory, 
going first to Steilacoom, where there was a colony being established, but 
which afterward was abandoned, and Mr. IMehlhorn went to Gray's Harbor 
to look for land for the colony, but they could not find as large a district as 
they wanted in that locality. In connection with ]\Ir. Rupp he there cut 
one hundred and fifty cords of wood for a brewery, for which they were paid 
one dollar and fifty cents per cord. ]Mr. Alehlhorn saved his money and took 
up his abode on Hangman's Prairie. The land had not been surveyed and 
it was seven miles to any habitation from his home. Henr}' Rupp and Charles 
Greger were his nearest neighbors, but they left the locality and ]\Ir. ]\Iehl- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 199 

horn remained for only nine months, for the country was then very wild and 
rough and gave little promise of a speedy development. In 1873 ^^ came to 
Seattle, and for twenty-two months worked for Mr. John J. McGilvra upon 
his farm on Lake Washington. He drove piles with the horse-power pile 
driver and in that way built the first wharf on the lake. He next came to 
Seattle, where he secured a position as driver on a beer wagon for the firm 
of Smiech & Brown, and during the year thus engaged he saved his money. 
Mr. Brown sold his interest to Mr. Smiech, whose wife afterward died, and 
desiring to dispose of the business Mr. Mehlhorn purchased it and thus be- 
came the owner of the Northern Pacific Brewery, which was located on a 
lot one hundred and twenty feet square and is the ground on which the Mc- 
Dougal &: Southwick store now stands. He engaged in the manufacture of 
steamed beer for eight years, meeting with excellent success. He also became 
the owner of a lot of thirty-five feet front on which the Union Block now 
stands, and at one time he could not sell this at any price. He built three 
buildings on his lots, and these were occupied by a wholesale liquor house, a 
barber shop and a restaurant. However, the buildings were destroyed by 
fire and he suffered a very heavy loss, but the era of prosperity later dawned 
upon him and he became connected with the saloon business as a partner of 
George Brobst, a relation that was maintained until 1886. As the city grew 
his property also increased in value and he sold a portion of his land, eighty 
feet front, for forty-eight thousand dollars. In J 876 he had been united in 
marriage to Julia Wilhelmina Wild, who was born near Boston, Massachu- 
setts, the daughter of Emil Wild, of German ancestry and a veteran of the 
Civil war. In 1888 Mr. Mehlhorn and his familv returned to the old conn- 
try, remained in Germany for six months, visiting relatives and friends, and 
then returned to Seattle. The children who accompanied them were August 
F. and Ann Gertrude, their daughter Louisa having died when only eleven 
months old. Mr. Mehlhorn has been a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows for the past quarter of a century and has filled all of the 
chairs in both branches, not only once, but twice. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. He still holds considerable property, including part of the Union 
Block; on Second street he has a building with a sixty-feet front, and also 
owns a German hotel on Sixth and James streets. In 1889 he built his pleas- 
ant and attractive residence at No. 813 Ninth avenue, where he now resides, 
retired from active business, giving his attention to the improvement of his 
grounds. The home is an attractive one and a fitting place for this worthy 
old couple to spend the evening of their days enjoying the fruits of their 
industrious lives. July 17, 1901, Mr. and Mrs. Mehlhorn celebrated their 



200 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

silver wedding, on which occasion a large party of friends were present, 
wishing them many happy returns of the day. The Reverend j\Ir. Damon, 
who had performed the marriage ceremony for them twenty-five years before, 
was present and the occasion was a most delightful one, long to be remem- 
bered by all who participated. 

THEODORE NEWELL HALLER. 

Among Seattle's most prominent and influential business men is num- 
bered Theodore N. Haller, who is a pioneer of this state, being but six months 
old wdien he came to the territory with his parents. He was born on the 4th 
of January, 1864, in Pennsylvania, where his ancestors have made their home 
for several generations. The family came originally from Germany. George 
Haller, our subject's grandfather, was. a native of York, Pennsylvania, as 
was also his father, the distinguished soldier, citizen and pioneer, Colonel 
Granville Owen Haller, who was born at that place, January 31, 18 19. The 
Colonel was only two years old when his father died leaving the mother with 
four small children, but notwithstanding her limited means she succeeded in 
giving them all a good education. He attended the schools of his native 
town. Early in life he chose a military career, and being examined by a 
board of military officers at Washington, D. C, in 1839, he was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant in the Fourth Regiment, United States Infantry, 
although only twenty years of age. In 184 1-2 he participated in the Florida 
war, taking part in the battle of Big Cypress Swamp and the engagement 
which resulted in the capture of Halleck Tushnugger's band and ended the 
struggle. He was adjutant of the Fourth Infantry from the ist of Janu- 
ary, 1843, until he resigned September 10,. 1845. .He was brigade major 
of the Third Brigade, United States Regulars, under General Taylor in 
Texas in 1845, and during the war with Mexico had command of his com- 
pany from the siege of Vera Cruz until the capture of the city of Mexico, 
participating in all the battles in the valley of Mexico, the attack upon the 
fortification of San Antonio and the storming of El Molino del Rey. For 
his valiant service on the last named occasion he was breveted major. He 
took part in the capture of the city of Mexico and the skirmishing within itSi 
walls on the following day, and was reported for his distinguished gallantry. 
On the I St of Januarys 1848, he was promoted to captain in the Fourth In- 
fantry, after which he was for some time engaged in recruiting duty. 

In 1852 Majors Sanders and Haller, with their respective commands, were 
ordered to the department of the Pacific. They sailed on the United States 





ot.v-^^^ CAjij G--:f\C^.^MjLjQ^^ 



pUBaCUBRAR"Y| 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 201 

store-ship Fredonia, by way of Cape Horn, and arrived at San Francisco in 
June, 1853, havmg spent se\'en months on the voyage. Major Haher and 
his company proceeded at once to Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory, 
and soon after to Fort Dallas, Oregon, after which he was in active service, 
punishing the Indians for atrocities and murders inflicted by them on the 
settlers. He was all through the Indian war of the northwest and rendered 
valuable service to the government and to the brave pioneers who were 
peopling this district and laying the foundation for the present development 
and progress. In the fall of 1856 Major Haller received orders to establish 
a fort near Port Townsend, and this work, notwithstanding many formidable 
difficulties, was satisfactorily accomplished, since which time the fort has 
been garrisoned. While there the Major and his men were a most efficient 
force in protecting the settlers, and well does Major Haller deserve mention 
in the history of the northwest, for his efforts contributed in larger measure 
than the vast majority to the development of this region, for had it not been 
for the protection which he gave to the settlers the Indians would have ren- 
dered impossible the labors of the pioneers in the work of reclaiming the 
wild land for purposes of civilization and planting the industries which have 
led to the material upbuilding of this portion of the country. 

For some time Major Haller was with his command on board the United 
States ship patrolling the waters of the Sound and removed all foreign Indians 
from the district. While thus engaged he also participated in the occupa- 
tion of San Juan island until the boundary question was settled. In i860 
he was assigned to Fort Mojave, in Arizona, and while stationed there he 
treated the Indians with such consideration and justice that when his com- 
mand had withdrawn he had so gained the good will of the red race that the 
miners had no hesitation about continuing their operations there, and did 
so without molestation. In 1861 came orders for Major Haller to proceed 
with his command to San Diego, California, and afterward to New York 
city to join the army then being organized by General McClellan. He had 
previously been brevet major, but on the 25th of September, 1861, was pro- 
moted to major of the Seventh Infantry, but the members of the regiment 
were being held as prisoners of war in Texas and Major Flaller reported 
to General McClellan and shortly afterward was appointed commandant gen- 
eral at the general headquarters on the staff of McClellan and the Ninety- 
third Regiment of New York Volunteers was placed under his command 
as guard of the headquarters. Major Haller was thus employed under Gen- 
eral McClellan throughout the Virginia and Maryland campaign and the 
subsequent campaign of General Burnside and also for a short time under 

13 



202 J' REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF ""^ • 

General Hooker. He was then designated pro\ost marshal general of ]Mar}'- 
land and later was detached and sent to York and Gettysburg to muster in 
volunteers and to get all the information possible of the movements of the 
■enemy, also to order the citizens to remove the stock and property across the 
Susquehanna out of the v/ay of the Rebel army. 

While thus busily engaged in the service of his country Major Haller 
was wrongfully reported for disloyalty to the government, and in the latter 
part of July, 1863, he was dismissed from the service without a hearing. 
Astonished beyond measure, he demanded a hearing, which was refused. Not 
satisfied to submit to such a great wrong, after sixteen years of waiting he 
secured a hearing and was fully exonerated. His honor was fully vindicated 
and he was reinstated in the army and commissioned colonel of infantry in 
the United States Regulars. His command was the Twenty-third Infantry, 
and he continued as its colonel from December 11, 1879, to February 6, 1882, 
at which time he was retired, being over sixty-three years of age. 

During the time of his dismissal from the service he had resided in the 
territory of W^ashington and improved a fme farm on Whidbey island, in 
Avhich he clearly demonstrated the possibilities Washington for the produc- 
tion of products of nearly every description. He was also engaged in the 
manufacture of lumber and in merchandising to quite a large extent and his 
business interests greatly facilitated the settlement and improvement of the 
<;ountry, for lie was very liberal in giving credit to the settlers who wished 
to buy provisions and implements and thus enabled many to gain a good start, 
thus carrying on the great work of upbuilding the commonwealth. \Miile 
he was engaged in business he also acquired large grants of land, which were 
at first of little value, but as the state became more thickly settled and land was 
in demand it rose in value and improvements also increased its selling price, 
so that it became a large source of income to Colonel Flaller and his family. 
Upon his retirement from the service he returned to the state to which he 
had become warmly attached during his former periods of residence here, and 
with his family located in Seattle in 1882. 

The Colonel had been happily married on the 21st of June, 1849, ^^e 
lady of his choice being Miss Henrietta Maria Cox, a representative of a dis- 
tinguished Irish family descended from Sir Richard Cox, who was her great- 
grandfather and who served as lord chancellor of Ireland. Her people lo- 
-cated in Pennsylvania, where she was reared, educated and married. The 
union was blessed with li\'e children : Morris, the eldest son, had settled in 
:Seattle before the parents took up their abode here and had become promi- 
•nent as an attorney. He was the organizer of extensive business enterprises 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNT\;. 203 

\vhich have proven of the greatest value and benefit in the upbuilding of the 
material interests of the state. He was one of the organizers of the Seattle, 
Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad Company and various other business affairs 
of great magnitude which contributed not alone to the success of the indi- 
vidual owners and stockholders but also to the general prosperity. In 1889 
he was accidentally drowaied •while he was on a hunting and fishing trip in 
company with T. T. Minor and E. Louis Cox. His loss was deeply felt 
throughout the state, for his genial nature and sterling worth had gained him 
many friends and his prominence in business affairs had made him a most 
valued factor in public life. Alice Mai Haller, the eldest daughter, became 
the wife of Lieutenant William A. Nichols and departed this life, leaving 
two children. Charlotte Eleanor, the surviving daughter, is at home, as is 
the son, Theodore Newell,, who has so kindly furnished us with the material 
for the sketch of his honored and distinguished father. Colonel Haller de- 
parted this life on the 2d of May, 1897, ^^'^^ thus ended a most honorable 
career. He was the president of the State Pioneer Society and had attained 
to a distinguished position in the Masonic fraternity, in which he was hon- 
ored with the office of grand master of the grand lodge of the state. He 
was also a Scottish Rite Mason and had attained the thirtv-second degree of 
the consistory. He was considered authority on Masonic usages, tenets 
and rites and in his life exemplified the beneficent spirit of the craft. He was 
also the commander of the military order of the Loyal Legion of Washing- 
ton. From the advance in realty values and from other sources he had ac- 
cumulated considerable wealth and w-as enabled to leave his family in very 
comfortable circumstances. The greater part of his life was devoted to his 
country's service, to which he was ever most loyal. He performed a work 
for the northwest in protecting the settlers and in establishing business inter- 
ests here that is of incalculable benefit and cannot be measured by any of the 
known standards of time. His influence was ever on the side of right, of 
progress and advancement, and the social qualities of his nature made him 
a favorite in all communities with which he was for any length of time con- 
nected. 

His life was noble and the elements 

So mixed in him that Nature might stand up 

And say to all the w^orld, "This w^as a man." 

Theodore Newell Haller js now the manager and largely the owner of 
the extensive property interests left by his father. The estate includes the 
splendid Haller block and numerous other buildings in the city, among which 



204 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

is a very fine residence. There are also extensive tracts of valuable farming 
land, and the careful manner in which T. N. Haller controls his affairs makes 
them a source of profitable income. As before stated, he was only six months 
old when brought to Washington, where he lias since resided. He acquired 
his elementary education in the public schools on the Sound, later continued 
his studies in Portland, Oregon, at Peekskill "on the Hudson and then en- 
tered Yale College. He studied law with the firm of Burke & Haller, the 
latter being his elder brother. His attention is now largely occupied with 
his extensive business afrairs. tie is a Republican in his political views but 
has never aspired to political honors. He enjoys in high degree the con- 
fidence and esteem of a large circle of friends and he is numbered among the 
leading representatives of invested interests here, in the control of which he 
manifests superior business ability and executive force. 

ALFRED L. PALMER. 

One of the finest business blocks of Seattle, the York Hotel, stands as 
a monument to the enterprise and business ability of Alfred Lee Palmer, 
who has resided in this city since 1882 and has taken a deep and active inter- 
est in the growth and development of the municipality. He is a native of 
Mayyille, Chautauqua county. New York, born on the nth of June, 1835, 
and is descended from English ancestors, who emigrated to that state prior 
to the Revolutionary war. Plis grandfather, David Palmer, a Revolutionary 
soldier, owned a farm upon which a part of the city of Rochester, New York, 
has since been built. Joseph Palmer, the father of our subject, was born 
on the old family homestead and after arriving at years of maturity he wed- 
ded Miss Mary Hill, a native of Vermont. • In the year 1839 they removed 
to Iowa. The territory had been organized only the year prior and they 
became prominent families of the locality. The father, a leading and influ- 
ential citizen, filled the ofiice of probate judge and also served as superin- 
tendent of public instruction. They were members of the Baptist church 
and people of the highest respectability, leaving a deep impress for good upon 
the moral, intellectual and material advancement of the state with which 
they became connected in pioneer times. The father departed this life in the 
seventieth year of his age, while his wife passed aw^ay in her fifty-sixth year, 
and of their four children the subject of this review is now the only survivor. 

In the public schools of his native town Alfred L. Palmer began his edu- 
c:ition, which was continued in ]\It. Morris, Illinois, and also in Oberlin 
College, of Oberlin, Ohio. With a broad general knowledg-e to serve as a 





(L^i/yV-iAJiV 



THE NEW YOHK 

PUB^LIC LIBRARY 



AST»K, LENOX AN8 
TILBEN POUNDS TION8. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 205 

foundation upon which to rear the superstructure of professional learning, 
he entered the Albany I>aw School, and after graduation was admitted to 
practice by the supreme court of New York. He then opened an office and 
engaged in the prosecution of his profession in Jackson county, Iowa, where 
we find him at the time Fort Sumter was fired upon. In the fall of 1861 he 
closed his law office, sold his books and joined his country's service, enlist- 
ing in Company I, Twelfth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He was sworn in as 
z private but his company elected him second lieutenant. The regiment was 
formed at Dubuque, Iowa, and thence ordered to St. Louis, where it re- 
mained during the fall and part of the winter. Their barracks were made 
of green lumber of logs which floated down the Mississippi river and dur- 
ing the winter the ice froze right on the logs and thus offered but little pro- 
lection from the cold winds, so that many of the soldiers were made ill. Mr. 
Palmer was detached to do recruiting service and secured one hundred men 
for the army. At the battle of Shiloh his regiment was captured, and he, 
with other recruiting officers, was ordered to bring up his men in order to 
fill up the ranks. He reported near Corinth, Mississippi, to General Grant 
and was assigned to the Eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, being made captain 
of his company. This regiment, together with other recruits, was formed 
into a union brigade. At the battle of Corinth he was shot through the 
right lung, and being thus unfitted for further duty he was honorably dis- 
charged, but the wound did not heal for years. The ball was taken from 
his shoulder blade and weighs one and one-fourth ounces. 

Being mustered out at St. Louis in 1863, Captain Palmer returned to 
his home and as soon as he had sufficiently recovered his health resumed 
the practice of his profession. He was elected county judge of Jackson 
county and held that office for four years. Hearing that the capital of Ne- 
braska was to be located at Lincoln, he attended the sale of lots there, 
for the town had just been platted by commissioners appointed by the state 
legislature, and made several investments. The money received by the com- 
missioners for these lots was used in the erection of its public buildings, and 
enough lots were disposed of to pay for the entire number of public structures 
erected, consisting of the capitol building, the state universities, insane 
asylum and state penitentiary. Mr. Palmer was quite fortunate in his in- 
vestments there and made money by his real-estate dealings. For fourteen 
years he remained a resident of Lincoln and also engaged in the practice of 
law, winning a desirable clientage, vvhile for two terms he acceptably served 
as county judge. 



206 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

The year 1882 witnessed j\ir. Palmer's arrival in Seattle, where he 
purchased property and at once became identilied with the progress and up- 
building of the city. He also made some investments in Tacoma, and in 
addition to the care of his property interests he practiced his profession. 
He built the Palmer house and in 1889 erected the fine brick York hotel. 
He has also built a residence on Lake Washington, where he now resides. 
The York hotel occupies a very desirable site on First avenue and is one of 
the finest buildings of the northwest. It is sixty by eighty feet and five stories 
and basement in height and is composed entirely of brick. Its owner has 
prospered in all his undertakings, for he is a man of keen foresight, unfalter- 
ing determination and strong purpose. To-day he stands among the most 
successful business men of his adopted city and well does he deserve his 
prosperity, for it has been attained by the most honorable business methods. 

In i860 was celebrated the marriage of our subject and Miss Lydia 
Butterworth, but she was only spared to him for a few years and at her death 
left two children, both of whom are now deceased. One of the daughters 
married John Denny and died, leaving two children, Harold and Annie Denny, 
For his second wife Mr. Palmer chose Miss Rocelia A. Chase, a native of Ver- 
mont, and their union has been blessed with seven children, five sons and two 
daughters, all of whom are still living: Frank, who is now in the real-estate 
business; Hattie, the wife of Donald B. Olson, of Dawson; Don H., who is 
now a student in his third year at the Rush Medical College in Chicago ; Leet 
R., who is in college; Lee Chase, a student in the high school ; Ben B., also at 
school ; and Esther, also attending school. 

In his political views Mr. Palmer was formerly a Douglas Democrat but 
when he became a member of the Grand Army of the Republic he joined the 
Republican party and was one of its active and earnest supporters until the 
money question became the dominant issue before the people. Believing that 
gold and silver should both be established as a standard and the Republicans 
acknowledging only the gold standard, he withdrew his support and is now 
independent in his political views. Mr. Palmer was made a Mason in 
Bellevue, Iowa, and had just received an entered apprentice degree when he 
went into the army. When lying wounded and almost dying of thirst the 
kind offices of a brother Mason were the means of saving his life. In 1888 
he was honored with the office of eminent grand commander of Knights 
Templar of the state of Washington. He has now retired from active practice 
of his profession, his attention being fully occupied with the supervision of 
his investments. His has been a career worthy emulation and deserving the 
highest commendation. The promptness with which he responded to what 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 207 

he believed to be his duty m the Civil war has always been a characteristic of 
his life and to-day he stands among the honored, respected and successful 
men of his adopted state. 

JOHN BEARD ALLEN. ^' '^^ \^:^ 

The above named gentleman has been a conspicuous figure in the legis- 
lative and judicial history of the state. The public life of few other illus- 
trious citizens of Washington has extended over a longer period and cer- 
tainly the life of none has been more varied in service, more fearless in con- 
duct or more stainless in reputation. His career has been one of activity, 
full of incidents and results. In every sphere of life in which he has been 
called upon to move he has made an indelible impression and by his excel- 
lent public service and upright life he has honored the state which has hon- 
ored him with high official preferment. He is now giving his entire atten- 
tion to the practice of law as a member of the firm of Struve, Allen, Hughes 
& McMicken, of Seattle, which occupies a leading position at the bar of this 
commonw^ealth. 

Mr. Allen is a native of Indiana, his birth*having occurred in Craw- 
fordsville, that state, on the i8th of May, 1845. He is descended from En- 
glish ancestors who at an early epoch in the history of Pennsylvania took 
up their abode in that state. They were members of the Society of Friends, 
or Quakers, and were noted for their uprightness of character. Joseph Allen, 
the great-grandfather of our subject, became one of the pioneers of Indiana 
and w^as a mill-owner and manufacturer in the early history of that state. 
His son, Joseph Allen, Jr., the grandfather of John B. Allen, was born in 
Pennsylvania and with his father removed to Indiana. He became a well 
educated man, was an expert civil engineer and surveyed many of the 
national roads in that state before the rails had marked the path of travel 
with steam as the motive power of transportation. His son, the third to 
bear the name of Joseph Allen, was born in Indiana, in 1814, and was a 
physician and surgeon. When the country became .involved in Civil war he 
offered his aid to the government in caring for the sick and wounded and 
was commissioned surgeon of the Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. A 
part of the time he was attached to the Fourth Brigade under General 
Thomas. After the war he settled in Rochester, Minnesota, where he prac- 
ticed his profession for a number of years, and then removed to Washington. 
Later he was stricken with paralysis, which incapacitated him for the further 
performance of professional duties, and he departed this life in 1874, at the 



208 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

age of sixty years. He was a well informed and faithful medical practitioner 
and his skill and ability were recognized in the liberal patronage accorded 
him. He held membership in the Presbyterian church and was a most worthy 
citizen and honorable man. 

In the years of his early manhood Dr. Joseph Allen had chosen for his 
Avife Miss Hannah Cloud Beard, a native of Indiana and a daughter of Hon. 
John Beard, a gentleman who was closely identified with the organization 
and promotion of nearly all of the public institutions of the state of Indiana. 
For a period of thirty years he was a member of the state legislature, serving 
continuously either in the house or senate. He took a special interest in the 
building of the institution for the deaf and blind of his state and he left the 
impress of his individuality for good upon many measures which have been 
of the greatest benefit to that commonwealth. Unto Dr. x\llen and his wife 
were born eight children, of whom only three are now living. The wife and 
mother died in the forty-ninth year of her age. She was a devout Christian, 
whose life was in harmony with her professed belief as a member of the 
Presbyterian church. She was devoted to her family, was of most amiable 
manner and kindly disposition and was beloved by all who had the pleasure 
of her acquaintance. 

John Beard Allen, who was the fourth member of Dr. Allen's family, 
obtained his literary education in Wabash College, and then determining to 
make the practice of law his life work he began studying in the ofhce and 
under the direction of the Hon. Charles C. \Vilson, of Rochester, IMinnesota, 
after which he took the law course in the Michigan Imiversity at Ann Arbor, 
and was admitted to practice in the fall of t868. Opening an ofiice in Ro- 
chester, ^Minnesota, he was engaged in practice at that place for a year, and 
in the spring of 1870 came to \\^ashington, locating at Olympia, where he 
prosecuted his profession for a year. The district was then a new country 
and it was dif^cult to get along for some time, but gradually his patronage 
grew into a large and paying business. 

While residing in Olympia ]\Ir. Allen was appointed by President Grant 
to the position of United States attorney for the territory and was re» 
appointed by both Presidents Hayes and Garfield. During his ten years in- 
cumbency in that ofiice he was practically a circuit rider, for it was the era 
preceding the advent of railroads, when travel was by stage over the rough 
mountain roads. He proved a most capable official, faithfully defending the 
legal interests of the state and gaining prominence by his masterly handling 
of intricate legal problems. While residing in Olympia Mr. Allen also edited 
volumes one and two of the reports of the supreme court of the territory, 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 209 

from the time of its establishment until 1883. In 18S1 he removed to Walla 
Walla and continued practice in eastern Washington and in the supreme 
court. In 1888 he made the canvass for the position of delegate to congress 
on the Republican ticket. This was one of the most exciting and arduous 
campaigns ever made in the history of Washington. His party had been 
defeated at the two preceding elections, but he was elected by a very large 
popular vote, receiving a larger majority than had ever been given to any 
previous candidate. Before he took his seat Washington was admitted to 
the Union and he was then elected United States senator by the first state 
legislature. Three states were admitted to the Union during that session 
of congress, the two Dakotas and Washington. The members of the sen- 
ate were divided into tliree classes, the term of one-third expiring every two 
years, thus constituting the senate a continuous body. As a new state is 
admitted its senators take places for the terms of office in the uncompleted 
classes. In order to conform to this rule the three states just admitted were 
required to draw lots for their class position and after that the senators from 
each state had to draw lots between themselves to determine the length of 
their respective terms. Mr. Allen drew the four-years term, which expired 
March 4, 1893, and was again a candidate before the legislature for the 
ofiice. In the legislature of one hundred and twelve members, seventy-five 
were Republicans, the balance being Populists and Democrats. In a Repub- 
lican caucus thirty-eight would have constituted a majority sufficient for a 
nomination, but a minority of the party refused to caucus and fifty members 
went into caucus, of whom forty-nine cast their ballots for -Mr. Allen. While 
he had a continuous support of fifty-two or fifty-three members throughout 
the session, the legislature failed to' elect and his supporters declined to as- 
sent to his withdrawal, so that the legislature adjourned without choosing 
a United States senator. He was then appointed to the position by Governor 
John H. McGraw. A like failure occurred in Montana and in Wyoming, 
but the senate declined to seat the appointed senator on account of a 
precedent in similar cases, and that precedent has since been followed. 

After Mr. Allen's retirement from the senate the present law firm of 
Struve, Allen, Hughes & McMicken was formed in Seattle. Its members 
are all men of superior education and broad experience, standing high in the 
profession, and their practice embraces much of the most important litiga- 
tion of the state. Mr. Allen now devotes his entire attention to his practice. 
He has a keenly analytical mind and determines with accuracy the strong 
points in a suit without losing sight of the details. He is exacting in the 
research and care with which he prepares his cases and in argument he is 



2IO REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

strong. His ability has drawn to him a large practice, and his success indi- 
cates his mastery of the principles of jurisprudence. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss Cecelia M. Bateman, 
a native of the city of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and a daughter of the Hon. 
Hiram Bateman, a man of prominence and influence in his state, who has 
served as a member of the legislature and has been acti\'e in molding public 
policy. He and two of his sons served their country in the Union army 
throughout the Civil war, strong in their love for the Union and their loy- 
alty to the flag. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Allen have been born five children, two 
sons and three daughters. Mrs. Allen is a member of the Congregational 
church and has served for two terms as president of the Red Cross Societ}'' 
of the state of Washington. 

Not only in positions of pc^litical preferment has Mr. Allen served his 
country, for he, too, at the time of the war of the Rebellion joined the boys 
in blue. He enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Regi- 
ment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in 1864. His service was in eastern Ten- 
nessee and Alabama and at the close of the war he received an honorable 
discharge. He was but nineteen years of age when he volunteered and it 
was at the time when the great war had become a tremendous struggle. 
Many thousands of the brave men from both north and south had been killed 
and vast numbers maimed for life, and at no time in the history of the san- 
guinary struggle did it require more devoted love of country or rriore bravery 
to enlist. The same fearless devotion to duty has ever marked the career of 
Mr. Allen and has "won for him the highest respect and admiration. In man- 
ner he is quiet and unassuming, yet is of the highest type of our American 
manhood, a fine representative of our citizenship, a lawyer of broad learning 
and at all times a man of the very highest honor and integrity, whose record 
reflects credit upon the city in which he makes his home and upon the bar of 
the state. 

ORANGE JACOBS. 

Perhaps there is no part of this history of more general interest than the 
record of the bar. It is well known that the peace, prosperity and well-being 
of every community depend upon the wise interpretation of the laws, as well 
as upon their judicious framing, and therefore the records of the various per- 
sons who have at various times made up the bar will form an important part 
of this work. A well known jurist of Illinois said : "In the American state 
the great and good lawyer must always be prominent, for he is one of the 



^^>t^7% 




<f^ im,, 



ORANGE JACOBS 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 211 

forces that move and control society. Public confidence has generally been 
reposed in the legal profession. It has ever been the defender of popular 
rights, the champion of freedom regulated by law, the firm supporter of good 
government. In the times of danger it has stood like a rock and breasted 
the mad passions of the hour and finally resisted tumult and fraction. No 
Political preferment, no mere place, can add to the power or increase the 
honor which belongs to the pure and educated lawyer." Orange Jacobs, of 
Seattle, is one who has been honored by and is an honor to the legal fraternity 
of Washington. He stands to-day prominent among the leading members of 
the bar of the state, a position which he has attained through marked ability. 
He has moreover been honored with the highest judicial office within the gift 
of the state and upon the bench sustained the dignity of the law which stands 
as a conservator of human rights, liberties, life and justice. 

Judge Jacobs is a native of Geneseo, Livingston county. New York, born 
on the 2nd of May, 1829, and is of English ancestry, the family, however, 
having been founded in ^Massachusetts at an early epoch in colonial history. 
Captain Hiram Jacobs, the father of our subject, was born in New Hamp- 
shire and won his title by service in the Black Hawk war. Pie married Aliss 
Phebe Jinkins, a native of Massachusetts. They removed to Sturgis, Michi- 
gan, in 1830, and became pioneer farming people of that portion of the ter- 
ritory. Captain Jacobs was an earnest Christian man who served as a class 
leader in the Methodist church and was active in promoting the cause of 
Christianity in every possible way. He was also a leader in public affairs 
and in the early history of his county filled the office of deputy sheriff, while 
for many years he was overseer of the poor. In 1849 ^e crossed the plains 
to California, meeting with excellent success in his undertakings, where he 
remained for three years. He was a man of the highest probity of character 
and died at the ripe old age of ninety years, departing this life in 1897. His 
wife also lived to an advanced age and shared with him in his Christian work 
and in rearing their family of noble children. They had six sons and three 
daughters, and with one exception all are living. 

Judge Jacobs, who is the second in order of birth, pursued his education 
in the primitive log school house that was founded on the frontier and in 
Albion Seminary, while later he was a student in the State University of 
AJichigan at Ann Arbor. When a young man he engaged in teaching school 
and also took up the study of law, intending to make its practice his life work. 
In 1852 he was admitted to the bar, and believing that he might have better 
opportunity in the new and growing west he crossed the plains to Oregon, 
locating first in Marion county, near Salem. In 1857 he removed to Jackson 



212 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

county, where for several years he had a large law practice. He was also an 
important factor in shaping public sentiment in favor of the Union and 
against secession, and in order to promote opposition to slavery for a num- 
ber of years he edited and published the Jacksonville Sentinel. Through its 
columns he took a strong position against oppression and the secession move- 
ment of the south. When the Republican party was formed to prevent the 
further extension of slavery, he joined its ranks, and such was his ability and 
his prominence in the party that he lacked but one vote of becoming its can- 
didate for the United States senate. At last, however, the good work that 
he had done for the party and for the government during the dark days of the 
great Civil war was recognized by President Grant, and in 1867 he received 
the appointment of associate justice of the supreme court of Washington 
territory, while in less than a year, without solicitation on his part, the legis- 
lature of the territory asked the president to give him the appointment of 
chief justice of Washington. President Grant immediately complied and for 
six years Judge Jacobs continued on the bench, filling that high and honor- 
able office in a manner that showed forth his good judgment and great legal 
ability and reflected credit upon the judicial history of the state. In 1879 he 
resigned the office after being nominated as the Republican candidate for the 
office of delegate to the United States congress. He made an efficient can- 
vass and was elected, serving his territory in a distinguished manner in the 
Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth congresses. He was ver}' active in trying to 
secure its admission into the Union, also in gaining increased postal facilities 
for the territory and in the passage of the light house bill. It was also ow- 
ing to his efforts that the law was enacted for the relief of the settlers who 
had taken up their residence along the original survey of the Northern Pa- 
cific railroad. Had it not been for the passage of this bill many of those 
settlers would have lost their land and homes, for they had taken possession 
thereof in good faith and had probably invested their all in obtaining the 
property. After serving for two terms in congress Judge Jacobs declined 
a re-nomination and returned to Seattle, where he resumed the practice of 
his profession. 

While his efforts in behalf of the state have been recognized as of great 
value, his labors in Seattle have been of much benefit to the city. In 1880 
he was elected mayor and while serving in that capacity did all in his power 
to secure reforms in the financial management of the city and in the police 
force. His administration was one of progress and improvement and re- 
ceived the endorsement of the majority of the best citizens of Seattle. At 
the close of his term he declined a re-election, but in 1884 he was again called 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 213 

to public life, being elected a member of the territorial council, in which he 
served as chairman of the judiciary committee and of the committee on edu- 
cation. He became very active in securing the appropriations for the peni- 
tentiary, the insane asylum and the university and for many years he took 
a very deep and active interest in promoting the welfare of the university. 
He served for many years on its board of regents and for ten years acted 
as treasurer of the board. He is certainly entitled to much credit for placing 
the university in its present high position among the institutions of learning 
in this country. In 1899 Judge Jacobs was elected a member of the com- 
mission to form a new charter for the city of Seattle and here his signal 
ability and knowledge of law proved of great value in securing the paper 
which gives a legal existence to the city. This charter was adopted by the 
people in 1890 and under the new charter he had the honor of being elected 
corporation counsel. In 1896 he was elected one of the supreme judges 
of King county, in which position he most ably served for four years, hav- 
ing charge of the criminal department most of the time. During the whole 
of his long service on the bench very few of the cases decided by him were 
carried to the stipreme court and he had but three criminal cases reversed. 
Judge Jacobs is still in the active practice of law under the firm name of Jacobs 
& Jacobs, his sons, Hiram J. and A. L., being his efficient partners. His 
law practice is large and remunerative, and has connected him with the most 
important litigation heard in the courts of his district through the past two 
decades. He has won for himself very favorable criticism for the careful and 
systematic methods which he has followed. He has remarkable powers of 
concentration and application, and his retentive mind has often excited the 
surprise of his professional colleagues. As an orator he stands high, es- 
pecially in the discussion of legal matters before the court, where his com- 
prehensive knowledge of the law is manifest and his application of legal 
principles demonstrates the wide range of his professional acquirements. The 
utmost care and precision characterize his preparation of a case and have 
made him one of the most successful attorneys in Seattle. 

On the I St of January, 1857, was celebrated the marriage of Judge 
Jacobs and Miss Lucinda Davenport, a native of Ohio and a daughter of 
Doctor Benjamin Davenport, of the Buckeye state, who became an Oregon 
pioneer of 1850. Seven children have been born unto the Judge and his 
wnfe, all of whom have been reared to maturity and the family circle yet re- 
mains unbroken. In order of birth they are as follows: Hiram J.; Abra- 
ham Lincoln; Harry Edwin; Orange; Estella, now the wife of A. L. Clark, 
of Seattle; and Donna and Jessie, who are at home with their parents. The 



2 14 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Judge has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fehows since 
1848 and has filled all of the offices in the subordinate lodge. He is one of 
the oldest representatives of the fraternity in the state and he is also identi- 
fied with the Masons, having reached the sublime degree of a Master Mason 
in Sturgis, Michigan, in 1852. He is a man of unimpeachable character, 
of unusual intellectual endowments and stands as one of the ablest repre- 
sentatives of his profession in the state, but while his legal practice has gained 
him distinction, his work in behalf of the commonwealth and of humanity 
has made him loved and respected throughout Washington. He has con- 
tributed to the intellectual development, has aided in forming the policy of 
the state, as manifest along many lines of progress, and his ability and keen 
discrimination have resulted to the general good. 

ALBERT M. BROOKES. 

In a history of the men whose business activity has won Seattle com- 
mercial prominence, Albert Marsdon Brookes deserves honorable and promi- 
nent mention. His business career has been one of continual advancement, 
and from a position of little importance he has worked his way upward until 
he stands to-day among the wealthy men of the city, respected and honored 
by all on account of the straightforward methods which he has ever fol- 
lowed. His residence here dates from March, 1877, his early life having 
been passed in the middle west. 

Mr. Brookes is a native of Galena, Illinois, his birth having occurred on 
the 2d of September, 1843. The family is of English origin. His grand- 
father, Samuel Brookes, was a distinguished botanist of England and im- 
ported into that country the first chrysanthemums, which were brought from 
Japan. Joshua Brookes, a great-uncle of our subject, was a celebrated sur- 
geon and at one time a director of the Zoological Gardens. Samuel Mars- 
don Brookes, the father of our subject, was born in England and attained 
great skill and renown as an artist. His specialty was the painting of still 
life, and many valuable works from his brush are scattered over the world. 
His pictures sold for very high prices and his work commanded great praise 
from the critics. Leaving his native country he emigrated to Chicago in 
1834, when it contained only about six hundred inhabitants, including the 
garrison. Mr. Brookes was a pioneer of Milwaukee, and remained there 
until i860, when he removed to San Francisco, where he continued his 
painting. One of his canvases, life-size portrait, sold to Mrs. Hopkins for 
twenty-five hundred dollars. A rather humorous incident is told concerning 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 215 

one of his paintings, but it illustrates how remarkably true and life-like was 
his work. On one occasion he had completed a painting of a full-sized salmon 
which had just been caught, the water still dripping from its tail. A gen- 
tleman greatly admired it and wished to buy it, the price being fifteen hun- 
dred dollars, but before deciding to take the picture he brought his wife to 
see it. She objected to his making the purchase, saying she wouldn't like it 
because it was so real and she felt just as if she could smell fish. Samuel M. 
Brookes had great enthusiasm and zeal in his work and his art won high 
praise. In religious faith he was a strict Presbyterian. He departed this 
life in San Francisco, at the age of seventy-six years, while his good wife, 
who was about five years his junior, survived him for about that period. 
She was the mother of fourteen children, of whom five died in infancy, while 
nine reached mature years. 

In the public schools of Milwaukee Albert M. Brookes began his edu- 
cation, which was continued in the academy there. When he was only 
eighteen years of age the great Civil war burst upon the country. He was 
too young to enlist at the first call, but when President Lincoln asked for 
three hundred thousand men the following year he responded, enlisting on 
the 1st of August, 1862, as a member of Company K, Twenty-fourth Regi- 
ment, Wisconsin Infantry. The regiment was sent to the front under com- 
mand of Colonel Larrabee, and the division was first under General Nelson 
and later under General Phil Sheridan, who remained in command until 
transferred to Virginia. The first battle in which Mr. Brookes participated 
was at Perryville, and later he took part in the engagements at Murfreesboro, 
Stone River, Tullahoma, Chattanooga and Missionary Ridge, where the 
Union forces covered themselves with glory, winning a splendid victory 
against great odds. He was afterward in the battles of Rocky Face Gap. 
Resaca, Dallas Court House, Kennesaw Mountain and the siege of Atlanta, 
besides many intermediate engagements. He then returned with General 
Thomas and participated in the battles of Franklin and Nashville. His regi- 
ment went out with eleven hundred and fifty men and returned after three 
years' service with only two hundred and fifty. Mr. Brookes was mustered 
out at the close of the war, having served his country most faithfully. He 
never lost a single day and seemed to be possessed of a charmed life, for 
neither wounds nor ill health prevented his response to roll-call or the valor- 
ous performance of duty upon the field of battle. He returned to the north at 
the age of twenty-two years, a victor and a veteran, and his is a grand mili- 
tary record equalled by few of the brave volunteers who went forth in de- 
fense of countrv. 



2i6 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

In the meantime Mr. Brookes' parents had removed to San Francisco 
and he joined them on the Pacific coast early in September, 1865. Ahnost 
immediately thereafter he received an appointment as clerk in the San Fran- 
cisco postoffice, General Randall, the postmaster-general, being a friend of 
his father's. He filled various positions in the postoffice, discharging hi^ 
duties so satisfactorily that he was three times promoted during the twelve 
years of his connection with the mail service of San Francisco, beginning in 
a humble capacity and terminating his service in the position next to assist- 
ant postmaster. In 1877, however, he resigned m order to come to Seattle — 
a step which he has never had occasion to regret. 

Upon his arrival he became a partner with his brother-in-law in the 
wholesale liquor and cigar business. In 1885 he became interested in a gen- 
eral mercantile store at Black Diamond and remained there for two years, 
after which he returned tc Seattle and purchased an interest in the cracker 
factory, being made president of the company which owned it. The business 
met with very gratifying success and j\Ir. Brookes is still a large stockholder 
in the enterprise. In 1889 he had the honor of being appointed postmaster 
of Seattle by President Benjamin Harrison, his long connection with the 
postoffice in San Francisco eminently fitting him for the work. He had been 
in charge only a short time when the great fire swept over the city and the 
postoffice was the only brick building which escaped, but great efforts were 
put forth to save it and the task was at length accomplished. WHien Mr. 
Brookes took charge of the office he at once set to work to systematize it and 
succeeded in making it one of the best in the entire country and a credit to 
the city. His arrangements made it possible to conduct the business with 
great accuracy and dispatch, and for this he received very high commenda- 
tion. After two years' service he resigned to accept the position of cashier 
in the Boston National Bank, which was organized by him and other promi- 
nent business men, and of this institution he has been a stockholder and 
director from the beginning. The duties of the cashiership he has dis- 
charged to the fullest satisfaction of all concerned, and it is owing to his 
efforts, in a large measure, that the bank has won its creditable position 
among the financial enterprises of the state. The bank is capitalized for one 
hundred and eighty thousand dollars and from its opening has enjoyed a 
constantly growing business. ]Mr. Brookes is also a director and stockholder 
in the Diamond Ice Company and has acquired a large amount of city real 
estate. 

^Ir. Brookes has built a beautiful home, adorned with all that wealth 
can secure and refined taste suggest and standing in the midst of magnificent 






-N POUND/ TIQUja, 





^W'^./^ 




C-K^ 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 217 

grounds, showing the art of the landscape gardener. In 1873 ^^^'- Brookes 
was united in marriage to Miss Laura Hannath, a native of Toronto, Canada. 
They have one daughter, Ehse. They are all members of the Episcopal 
church, Mr. Brookes having aided in building the first church of that denomi- 
nation in the city and also the present St. Mark's church. He is an active 
and valued member of the Grand Army post, being one of the first repre- 
sentatives of the order on the Pacific coast, and in 1886 he had the honor of 
being elected department commander. His life has been an upright and 
straightforward one, his success has been achieved along the lines of legiti- 
mate activity and unfaltering energy and he has well earned the uniform 
regard that is extended to him by the business men of the state. 

JOHN M. LYON. 

The days of chivalry and knighthood in Europe cannot furnish more 
interesting or romantic tales than oiir own western history. Into the wild 
mountain fastness of the unexplored west went brave men, whose courage 
was often called forth in encounters with hostile savages. The land was 
rich in all natural resources, in gold and silver, in agricultural and commer- 
cial possibilities, and awaited the demands of man to yield up its treasures ; 
but its mountain heights were hard to climb, its forests were difficult to pene- 
trate, and the magnificent trees, the dense bushes or the jagged rocks often 
sheltered the skulking foe, who resented the encroachment of the pale faces 
upon their hunting grounds. The establishment of homes in this beautiful 
region therefore meant sacrifices, hardships and oft times death, but there were 
some men, however, brave enough to meet the red man in his own familiar 
haunts and undertake the task of reclaiming the district for purposes of civi- 
lization. The rich mineral stores of this vast region were thus added to the 
wealth of the nation; its magnificent forests contributed to the lumber indus- 
tries and its fertile valleys added to the opportunities of the farmer and stock 
raiser, and today the northwest is one of the most productive sections of the 
entire country, That this is so is due to such men as John M. Lyon, whose 
name is inseparably interwoven with the history of the region. 

John Miron Lyon was born in the city of Jackson, Michigan, March 
73, 1840, and is of Scotch and German ancestry. His father, John Lyon, 
was born in Rochester, New York, and there married Miss Charlotte C. 
Cramer, of the same place. Her father was born in Germany and her mother 
was a member of the noted Sherman family of the United States. Soon 
after their marriage the parents of our subject removed to Michigan, which 

14 



2i8 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

was then a A\'estern district, in which the work of progress and civiHzation 
had scarcely been begun. Mr. Lyon secured three hundred and twenty acres 
of land, on part of which the city of Jackson now stands. He w-as the 
founder of the city, he and others building a number of the first houses in 
the place. Being taken ill with brain fever he died, leaving to his wife the 
care of their three children. She was afterward married again. The estate 
which ]\Ir. Lyon left was badly managed but the w4dow retained eighty acres, 
which is now within the corporation limits of Jackson. By her second mar- 
riage she had five children, of w^hom three are living. She was born in 1810 
and departed this life in 1865, at the age of fifty-five. Of the first marriage 
only two are living, D. B. Lyon, of Red Bluff, who was a pioneer on the 
Pacific coast in 1852; and John M. 

The latter was educated in the public schools of his native state and 
pursued a preparatory course in Ann Arbor. Two of his brothers were upon 
the Pacific coast, and in 1S60, when in his twentieth year, he took passage at 
New York for San Francisco, where he arrived safely after a voyage of 
twenty-two days. The ship upon which he made the voyage upon the Pacific 
w-as the well known John L. Stevens. Upon his arrival Mr. Lyon proceeded 
up the Sacramento river to Red Bluft and engaged in clerking for his brother, 
who was in the book and jewelry business there. His other brother con- 
ducted the telegraph and express office in the same building and John M. 
Lyon remained in their employ for a year and a half. During that time he 
acquired a knowledge of telegraphy and he also read law for some time in 
the office of Earl & Myrich, but having quickly acquired a knowledge of 
telegraphy he was offered a position in Portland, Oregon, and became man- 
ager of the Western Union Telegraph office at that place. A year later he 
was sent through Oregon and Washington to establish offices for the com- 
pany and give instruction to the operators. He also put the instruments in 
order and upon the completion of the line to New Westminster, in British 
Columbia, connecting with the Western Union extension, Mr. Lyon was 
given charge of the office at that place, but soon afterward the Atlantic cable 
was laid and this caused the extension of the Russian line to be abandoned. 
However, six hundred miles had been constructed at a loss of one million 
one hundred thousand dollars. While Mr, Lyon w^as at Westminster the 
queen's potlatch was gi^^en to the Indians, who were invited from all along 
the coast. They came in such large numbers that the supply of presents was 
exhausted and trouble was only avoided by the agents buying out a hard- 
ware and grocer}?- store and presenting the goods to the red men. Great 
excitement prevailed, but the arrival of three gunboats prevented the outbreak 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 219 

and no doubt saved the lives of many white settlers. In the fall of 1865 jMr. 
Lyon came to Seattle, which city had been made the headquarters of the tele- 
graph company. He received the appointment of circuit manager of all the 
lines north of Portland, and continued in that capacity until 1882, at which 
time he resigned and severed his connection with the company, which, how- 
ever, was very loath to dispense with his services. He had also been agent 
of the Puget Sound Telegraph Company, in control of their lines connect- 
ing Seattle with Port Townsend. 

Mr. Lyon, on abandonmg telegraphic work, opened a book and station- 
ery store in this city, successfully carrying on operations in that department 
of mercantile activity until 1887, when he closed out his store, having been 
appointed by President Cleveland to the position of postmaster of Seattle. 
He filled that position most capably until a change occurred in the presidential 
administration. During his term of office he established the letter carrier 
system in the city and the receipts of the office increased from twelve to fifty- 
five thousand dollars per year. Mr. Lyon also served three terms in the city 
council and was chairman of the committee on streets and finance. On his 
retirement he was for some time engaged in the supervision of his real-estate 
and other business interests, and later he purchased the store which is ownd 
and controlled by himself and his son, F. A. Lyon. It is a well-appointed 
book and stationery store located at No. 207 Pike avenue and the firm re- 
ceives a large patronage, owing to their excellent business ability, capable 
management, reasonable prices and straightforward policy. 

In 1865, at Claquato, Lewis county, Washington, Mr. Lyon was united 
in marriage to Miss Livonia Huntington, a daughter of Jacob Huntington, 
a pioneer of 1852, who crossed the plains with a band of cattle in that year, 
also bringing his family with him. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lyon have been 
born four children : Callie, the wife of Benjamin F. Cobb ; Charlotte, who 
is the wife of A. L. Washburn and resides with her parents ; F. Arthur, who 
is with his father in business; and Susan Gertrude, at home. The family 
are members of St. Mark's Episcopal church. They have a very pleasant 
home, their lawn being adorned with flowers and shrubs of their own plant- 
ing. The family is widely and favorably known in this state and they are 
members of the Pioneer Society. The work which has engrossed the greater 
part of Mr. Lyon's life has been of a most important character, proving not 
only a source of livelihood for himself, but of the greatest possible benefit 
to his fellow-men in the northwest, for the establishment of telegraphic com- 
munication has had marked influence upon the commercial history of this 
section of the country. Mr. Lyon thoroughly enjoys home life and takes 



220 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

great pleasure in the society of his family and friends. He is always cour- 
teous, kindly and affable, and those who know him personally have for him' 
warm regard. A man of great natural ability, his success in business, from 
the beginning of his residence in Seattle, was uniform and rapid. As has 
been truly remarked, after all that may be done for a man in the way of giv- 
ing him early opportunities for obtaining the requirements which are sought 
in the schools and in books, he must essentially formulate, determine and 
give shape to his own character; and this is what Mr. Lyon has done. He 
has persevered in the pursuit of a persistent purpose and gained the most 
satisfactory reward. His life is exemplary in all respects and he has ever 
supported those interests w^hich are calculated to uplift and benefit humanity, 
while his own moral worth is deserving of the highest commendation. 

JAMES DOSTER HOGE, Jr. 

The president of the First National Bank of Seattle is the youngest 
national bank president in the entire United States, but his ability as a finan- 
cier, his keen discrimination and his executive power do not seem to be lim- 
ited by his years. He is a native of Zanesville, Ohio, born on the 21st of Sep- 
tember, 1 87 1, and is of Scotch lineage, his ancestors having left the land of 
hills and heather to establish a home in Virginia when that state was num- 
bered among the colonial possessions of the English. They were people of 
the highest respectability and were widely and favorably known in connec- 
tion with the early histor}^ of the Old Dominion. Israel, the grandfather of 
our subject, was born at AA^inchester, Virginia, in 1802, aiid was there mar- 
ried to Betsey Doster, who also represented an old Virginia family connected 
with the Society of Friends. In 1840 the grandparents removed to Ohio, 
becoming pioneer settlers of Zanesville, where the grandfather engaged in 
the manufacture of matches, being one of the first representatives of that line 
of business in the entire country. He was also a chemist and druggist and 
his business interests were important and lucrative. His political support 
was given the Democracy and he had the honor of being appointed by Presi- 
dent James Buchanan to the position of postmaster at Zanesville. He was 
in manner most cordial, courteous and hospitable, a representative of the old 
type of true southern gentlemen. He died at the age of eighty-four years, 
his death resulting from injuries caused by a fall. His wife had departed 
this life in her fortieth vear. 

Their son, James D. Hoge, Sr., the father of our subject, was born in 
Zanesville in 1836, obtained his education there and became a prominent 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 221 

electrician. For many years he was manager of the local Western Union 
telegraph office aiid had the reputation of being the champion telegrapher 
of the world at that early day in the development of the science. He was 
opposed to slavery and to the secession sentiment which was growing in the 
south, and therefore joined the Republican party, which was formed to pre- 
vent the further extension of slavery. He still strongly endorses its prin- 
ciples and yet makes his home in Zanesville, where he is very highly re- 
spected. He married Miss Anna Slack, a native of his own county, and a 
daughter of John B. Slack, an Ohio pioneer of prominence. Her father was 
an earnest member of the Baptist church and equally strong in his political 
faith, which was that of the Democracy. His life was so honored and up- 
right that he commanded the esteem and respect of all who knew him. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Hoge were born a son and a daughter. The latter became the 
wife of Hon. Frederick James Grant, a gentleman of marked literary promise 
who resided in Seattle, but who lost his life in a shipwreck at sea. 

James Doster Hoge, Jr., obtained his preliminary education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native state and also attended the high school, while later he 
pursued a commercial course in a business college. Thinking the west would 
offer better opportunities for young men just starting out in business, he 
came to Seattle when eighteen years of age and accepted a position as stenog- 
rapher with ex-governor John H. McGraw. The following fall he was given 
a position in the First National Bank of this city, serving first as messenger 
boy and stenographer, but his ability, willingness and ready mastery of the 
duties intrusted to him soon won recognition and he was promoted from time 
to time until he was finally given charge of the notes, discounts and collections. 
In 1894, in partnership with his brother-in-law, Frederic J. Grant, he pur- 
chased the Post Intelligencer from L. S. J. Hunt. Mr. Hoge then spent 
a few months in the east acquainting himself with the workings of daily 
papers, and in the fall of that year he assumed the business management of 
the journal, of which he became general manager a year later, continuing in 
that capacity with marked ability until September, 1897, at which time he 
sold the paper to the Piper Brothers. He had applied himself to his work so 
strenuously that rest for recuperation became necessary, and to gain this he 
made a tour around the world, nine months later returning to Seattle. He 
purchased an interest in the First National Bank of Seattle, and in September, 
1898, was elected its president, which position he has since filled in a manner 
reflecting credit upon the institution and upon himself. He has also been 
one of the organizers of the Bank of Cape Nome, in Alaska, and is to-day its 
president. He has various other business interests, but devotes his atten- 



222 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

tion almost exclusively to the management of the First National Bank, of 
which he is the popular president. A prompt, energetic business man, a 
capable and careful financier, merit has secured his advancement to the posi- 
tion which he now occupies. He is thoroughly informed concerning the 
business interests of the city and is highly esteemed by the patrons of the 
bank and by the business men of Seattle. 

In his political views Mr. Hoge is an active Republican, and is treasurer 
of the Republican state central committee, using his influence and aid to ad- 
vance the cause in which he so firmly believes and which he feels sure will 
best promote the welfare of state and nation. 

In December, 1894, Mr. Hoge was married to Aliss Ethel Hanna, a 
native of Mattoon, Illinois, and a daughter of John W. Hanna, of Seattle. 
Their union has been blessed by the birth of two daughters, ]\Iary Louise and 
Anna Roberta. The parents are members of St. Mark's Episcopal church, in 
which Mr. Hoge is serving as one of the vestrymen. The first chapter of an 
eventful, prosperous and honorable business career has been written, but it 
is not difficult to imagine what his future history will be, for his salient char- 
acteristics are well known. He possesses the enterprising and indomitable 
spirit of the west, combined with good judgment and foresight, and, more- 
over, his business principles and conduct will bear the closest investigation. 

FRANK W. SPEAR. 

No compendium such as the province of this work defines in its essen- 
tial limitations will serve to offer fit memorial to the life and accomplish- 
ments of the honored subject of this sketch — a man remarkable in the 
breadth of his wisdom, in his indomitable perseverance, his strong individu- 
ality, and yet one whose entire life has not one esoteric phase, being an open 
scroll, inviting the closest scrutiny. True, his have been "massive deeds and 
great" in one sense, and yet his entire life accomplishment but represents the 
result of the fit utilization of the innate talent which is his, and the directing 
of his efforts in those lines where mature judgment and rare discrimination 
lead the way. There is in Frank W. Spear a weight of character, a native 
sagacity, a far-seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose that commands the 
respect of all. A man of indefatigable enterprise and fertility of recourse, he 
has carved his name deeply on the record of the commercial, industrial and 
philanthropical history of the state which owes much of its advancement to 
his efforts. 

Mr. Spear was born in Plymouth, Wisconsin, in 1849, ^^'^^ is a son of 







<^/vu^ 1/V, ^ 



L.ri^ h^y^r\srvryr icn— ytcni—ur' Cniccr.^ 




(iun^ 



fTHE NEW YORKk 

buBiulC LIBRARY 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 223 

Eleazar Parmley Spear and Gulie Elma Marie (Chase) Spear, On the pater- 
nal side he is of Scotch-Irish lineage, the family having been founded in Amer- 
ica prior to the Revolutionary war. On the maternal side he is of English and 
Dutch descent and the maternal ancestors were among the first of the Puritans 
to settle in New England. Two genealogies of the Chase family have been 
published, tracing their origin back to the time of Henry the Eighth. His 
forefathers on both sides bore arms as followers of Cromwell at the time the 
"Iron Chancellor" attempted to establish a Republican rule in England, 
Through five generations the family has been represented in the military 
service of the country when the United States has become involved in war. 
This history for patriotism and loyalty is one that the family have every 
reason to be proud of. 

In early manhood Mr. Spear determined to make the practice of law his 
life work, and after completing his literary education began studying for the 
bar and was admitted to practice in Ellsworth, Wisconsin, in 1873. Be- 
lieving that he would have better opportunities in the west, he sought a home 
in Dakota in 1880, and there resided for seven years, after which time he 
came to Seattle in 1887. Time has proved the wisdom of this step, for here 
he has found business opportunities and has molded conditions until they have 
served his ends. He has been largely engaged in commercial pursuits and 
in mining, and through the development of the rich mineral resources of this 
portion of the country he has attained a splendid fortune. He has, moreover, 
gained a business reputation that is unassailable — one which any man might 
be proud to possess. He has ever made it a rule to meet an engagement and 
fulfill the terms of a contract and to conduct all of his transactions along 
the strictest lines of commercial ethics. 

For many years Mr. Spear served in the National Guards of Wash- 
ington, rising to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He was also a member of 
the Independent Battalion of Washington Volunteers during the Spanish- 
American war. A man of broad humanitarian principles, with deep interest 
in the race, he has ever felt attracted to any movement for the benefit of man- 
kind, especially along educational lines which augment the powers of the 
individual. Since the late war with Spain and the acquirement of colonial 
possessions, Mr. Spear's attention has been directed toward the people of 
the Philippines with deep interest and sympathy. He now has in contempla- 
tion the founding of an industrial school on the island of Luzon, patterning 
it somewhat after the school established by Booker T. Washington, at Tuske- 
gee, Alabama, and if the conditions are favorable he intends to secure a site 
about the beginning of the year 1905, so that the buildings may be erected and 



224 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the school in operation by the year 1910. In the Post InteUigencer, of Seat- 
tle, appeared an article which explains his project. It was headed: "Cash 
award of twenty-five dollars offered to State University students;" and it 
read as follows : "A wealthy philanthropist who is interested in the estab- 
lishment of an industrial school on the Island of Luzon, Philippine Islands, 
has deposited with Rev. T. C. Wiswell twenty-five dollars, to be paid as a. 
cash prize to the student of the State University who shall write the best 
essay or article upon the establishment of an industrial school in the Philip- 
pines, the name of the school to be 'Luzon Industrial School.' The subject 
to be divided into five subdivisions, as follows : First. — Location and site. 
Second. — Buildings, Apparatus and Machinery. Third. — Faculty and Cur- 
riculum. Fourth. — Government and Control. Fifth. — Support. The pro- 
moters of the school are considering the matter of having it under the con- 
trol of some religious denomination for the present, and eventually turning 
it over to the future state of Luzon. The site and building fund are to be 
provided by the promoters, but the permanent support of the school must be 
provided in some other way. The following have been asked to act as a 
committee to pass upon the articles written and award the prize : Griffith 
Davis, Chairman; Michael Philips, John W. Pratt, Z. B. Rawson and T. C. 
Wiswell. All students of the University of Washington are eligible to com- 
pete for the prize. The articles when prepared should be mailed to Rev. 
T. C. Wiswell, University Station, Seattle, on or before June i, 1902." 

Mr. Spear has been twice married, and has three children : ' Leonard 
P., the eldest soil, served with distinction in the First Regiment of Wash- 
ington Volunteers, in the Spanish-American war and in the Philippine insur* 
rection, and upon his return from the Philippines he was promoted to the rank 
of first lieutenant in the National Guard of Wahsington. He is married 
and is now twenty-two years of age. Blanche E., aged twenty- four, and 
Frank W., a little lad of nine years, complete the family. The two eldest 
children, Henry P. and Maude Marie, both died when twenty-one years of age. 
The Luzon Industrial School will be erected as a memorial to them, for both 
were intensely interested in educational and reform work of all kinds in- 
tended to better the condition of mankind. The family home is a beautiful 
one, erected in Ravenna, a northern suburb of Seattle. In national politics 
Mr. Spear has always been Republican, and, although not taking any active 
part in political affairs, has always favored reform measures. Among the 
reforms favored by him may be mentioned : First. — The Australian Bal- 
lot. Second. — Primary Election Law. Third. — Torren's Land System of 
Registration. Fourth. — Merit System in Civil Service. Fifth. — Munici- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 225 

pal ownership of Lights and Telephones, and Government ownership of Tele- 
graph Lines, Railways and Mines. Sixth. — Old Age Pensions to all em- 
ployes of government and corporation. Seventh. — Army reform and the 
complete breaking down of the social distinction between commissioned of- 
ficers and enlisted men; the employment of the military forces of the United 
States in internal improvements; the building of roads, canals, etc. Last, 
but not least, Mr. Spear favors the settlemicnt of international disputes by 
arbitration, and takes an active interest in everything tending to that end. 

While Mr, Spear has attained a fortune which classes him among the 
most wealthy residents of the northwest, his success has been so w^orthily 
won and used that the most envious could hardly envy him his prosperity. 
Charitable and benevolent, he has given freely of his means in support of 
worthy charity, but one of his great qualities lies in his encouragement and 
material assistance to those who were willing to help themselves. Indis- 
criminate giving often fosters idleness and vagrancy on the part of the re- 
cipients, but aid given to those who are anxious to make the most of their 
opportunities will develop self-reliance and honorable business men who be- 
come the bulwarks of the nation. 

JOHN HARTE McGRAW. 

An enumeration of the men of the present generation who have won pub- 
lic recognition for themselves and at the same time have honored the state to 
which they belong would be incomplete were there failure to make promi- 
nent reference to the gentleman whose name is mentioned above. He holds, 
precedence as a most capable and far-sighted business man, as a statesman of 
broad understanding of the issues of the day and as one who occupied a most 
unique and trying position during one of the most exciting periods in the 
history of Seattle, in which connection he bore himself wnth such dignity as 
to gain the respect of all true-minded men. He has been and is distinctively 
a man of affairs and one who has wielded a wide influence. A strong men- 
tality, an invincible courage, a most determined individuality have so en- 
tered into his character as to render him a natural leader of men and a direc- 
tor of public opinion. The highest official honors within the gift of the 
people of his state have been conferred upon him and his career illustrates 
clearly the recognition that America accords to true worth. 

The width of the continent separates Governor McGraw from his birth- 
place, for he is a native of Penobscot county, Maine, born October 4. 1850. 
He is descended from Irish ancestry, and his parents, Daniel and Catherine 



226 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

(Harte) McGraw, were both natives of the Emerald Isle, whence they 
crossed the Atlantic to New York in 1848. They took up their abode, how- 
ever, in Penobscot county, Maine, and there the father engaged in the lumber 
business until 1851, when he was accidentally drowned. He was a man of 
industry and marked probity of character, and his loss to his wife and three 
children was very great. His widow afterward married again and in 1890 
departed this life. Our subject and a brother in Maine are now the only 
surviving members of the family. 

In the schools of the Pine Tree state John H. I\.IcGraw obtained but a 
limited education, for not wishing to remain at home with his mother and 
stepfather, he obtained the former's consent and left home, from which time 
forward he was dependent upon his own resources for a livelihood. As soon 
as he was large enough he obtained a position in a store and rapidly acquired 
a knowledge of merchandising, becoming a most successful salesman as the 
result of his obliging manner and his reliability. He saved his earnings, and, 
at length, as the result of his industry and economy, he started in business on 
his own account. 

Attracted by the opportunities of the west, in 1876 he crossed the con- 
tinent to San Francisco, where he arrived in July, and a little later in the 
same year he came to Seattle, reaching his destination on the 28th of De- 
cember, 1876, so tha.t for more than a quarter of a century he has reside^ 
here. The first business position which he occupied here was a clerkship in 
the Occidental Hotel, and later he conducted a small hotel on his own ac- 
count, which some time afterward was destroyed by fire. Thus he was not 
only deprived of his business but of all he had saved through former toil. 
Many misfortunes had he encountered up to this time in spite of his reso- 
lution and perseverance, and now, in order to make a living, he sought a 
position on the police force, which then numbered four members. This 
seemed to him a very dark hour in his history, but it proved to be the hour 
before the dawning of a brighter day. It has ever been his habit to do well 
whatever he undertakes and his efficiency as a police officer attracted the 
attention of his fellow citizens, who, recognizing his ability, elected him city 
marshal after he had served on the police force for three years. He was 
elected on the Republican ticket and the city council also made him chief of 
police. In these positions his popularity as a citizen and officer continued 
to grow, and a year later he was nominated by his party as its candidate for 
sheriff of the county of King to fill an unexpired term. He was elected and 
twice re-elected to the sam.e office, and it was during his third term that the 
anti-Chinese trouble began. A serious conflict was threatened between the 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 227 

law-abiding and law-defying citizens, but it soon became known that Sheriff 
McGraw would uphold law and order, no matter what it might cost him 
personally, and by his tact and capable management the trouble and conflict 
were averted, but notwithstanding the commendable course taken by him, it 
seriously detracted from his popularity, arousing the opposition of those who 
sympathized with the lawless element and when he was nominated for re- 
election in 1886 he was defeated, together with the others on the ticket. 

While serving as policeman, marshal and sheriff Mr. McGraw had be- 
come largely conversant with law, and after his retirement from office began 
its study, successfully passed an examination and was admitted to the bar. 
Soon afterward he became a partner of Judge Roger S. Green and Judge 
C. H. Hanford, both eminent jurists, and not long afterward Joseph Mc- 
Naught was taken into the firm, which then became Green, Hanford, Mc- 
Naught & McGraw. Its reputation was that of being one of the strongest 
law firms in the entire state, and thus Governor McGraw entered upon a 
successful and enviable professional career, but his popularity with his party 
was not at an end, and in 1888 he was prevailed upon to again become a 
candidate for sheriff, his supporters urging that it would be well for him to 
accept the nomination in order that the people of the county might have the 
chance to show that in the opportunity for calm judgment which had come 
they approved his course in connection with the anti-Chinese riots, which by 
his former defeat they had seemed to condemn. Thus it was that he again 
became a candidate and was elected by an overwhelming majority. He filled 
the office with marked ability and to the fullest satisfaction of all concerned, 
but in 1890 positively declined to accept the nomination again, retiring from 
the office in order to give his attention to the business of the First National 
Bank, of which he had been elected president some time before and in which 
capacity he served for seven years. 

Mr. McGraw was then chosen by his party to be its standard bearer in 
the state and by popular ballot was elected to the high office of governor, in 
which he served most faithfully from January, 1893, until Januar}^, 1897, 
reflecting credit upon the state of his adoption and adding an untarnished 
page to its political history. At the close of his administration the notices of 
the press were most favorable and commendatory concerning the work he 
had accomplished in the gubernatorial chair and the dignity and ability with 
which he sustained the honors of the office. One journal, said : "It is to the 
lasting credit of the ex-governor that general public sentiment approves his 
administration as honest, faithful, zealous and conspicuously business-like. 
He has been the tool of no combination, but has preserved clear-sighted mas- 



228 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

tery of his own convictions at all times. Bis state papers have been models 
of clearness and directness and show a mind well stocked and well balanced. 
American 'gumption' pervades these papers and no lover of the state will 
ever turn from their perusal with lessened respect for their distinguished 
author." A paper of the opposition party said: "He is a growing man; 
has studied and worked hard to make himself competent to discharge the 
duties devolving upon him, and his administration has been creditable to 
himself and party." Since his retirement from office he has been interested 
in mining on the Yukon river in Alaska, and is very extensively engaged in 
real-estate transactions in that distant territory. 

In 1874 Mr. McGraw was married in Maine to Miss May L. Kelly, a 
native of the Pine Tree state and a representative of an old New England 
family. Two children have been bom to them: Kate Edna, now the wife 
of Fred H. Baxter, of Seattle, and Mark Thomas, who is now engaged, in 
mining in Alaska. 

The Governor is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
taken the degrees of both the York and Scottish rites, attaining the thirty- 
second degree of the latter. His is in many respects a remarkable history. 
With very limited advantages in his boyhood he started out in his early youth 
to fight life's battles, and has certainly come off conqueror in the strife. He 
is a gifted man who has developed his latent powers by the faithful and con- 
scientious performance of every duty, whether humble or great. In manner 
he is courteous, kindly and approachable and his friendship, which is highly 
prized by all who know him, can be won by true merit. Fearless in conduct 
and stainless in reputation, he stands out conspicuously as one of the strong- 
est and most distinguihed residents of the state. 

MATTHEW DOW. 

MattJiew Dow, one of the most prominent and successful contractors and 
builders of Seattle, with office at No. 45 Colman Block, is a worthy repre- 
sentative of the land to which he owes his birth — Scotland. Thoroughly 
imbued with the strong religious ideas as held by the Scottish people, he is 
a man not to be swerved from principles which he believes to be right, and 
in all his dealings of both a business and political nature he has strictly ad- 
hered to those principles, even when they -have worked to his immediate per- 
sonal detriment. In the long run this characteristic has made him thor- 
oughly appreciated by those Avho at the time were thwarted by his rugged 
honesty. His life has been a very eventful one, but even when threatened 







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I'.^^ NEW YORK 

pUBi-lCUBKARY 



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T(L»EH POUND* TIONt 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 229 

by death he was not to be moved from the path which he beheved to be right. 

Mr. Dow was born on the 29th of July, 1849, seven miles south of 
Glasgow, Scotland, and is the oldest of the thirteen children in the family of 
Andrew and Maggie (Steel) Dow. In his native land the father followed 
farming, and contmued to follow that occupation to some extent after com- 
ing to America, having emigrated to this country about four years after our 
subject sought a home here. He was the hrst man to raise Irish potatoes 
in Texas. During his residence m the United States he practically lived re- 
tired most of the time, and spent his last days in Seattle, Washington, where 
he died at the ripe old age of eighty-three years. He was a strong adherent 
of the Presbyterian church, in which his father, Andrew Dow, Sr., had served 
as a ruling elder for many years. 

In the schools of his native land Matthew Dow acquired his literary educa- 
tion, and in that country also learned the builder's trade, which he followed 
there until twenty-four years of age. At that time he came to the new world, 
and after spending about two years and a half in Lexington, Kentucky, went 
to Fort Worth, Texas, where he did considerable building. There he was 
joined by his brother a year later, and together they went to Belton, Bell 
county, Texas, which was then about forty miles from any railroad. They 
soon secured a good trade in their line of business and erected buildings for 
the most prominent people in the place. When the Santa Fe Railroad reached 
the place an era of progress was inaugurated. Mr. Dow built the court 
house, jail and most all of the better buildings and residences there. He 
leased the city water works and operated them at a good profit for three and 
a half years. An offer was made the city that if they would donate ten acres 
of land within the corporate limits and give thirty thousand dollars the Boyler 
Female College would be moved there. Mr. Dow was chosen to draw up the 
plans, and after visiting the different institutions in the state he made suitable 
plans which were accepted and the college built there. He accepted no pay 
for this work, but the corner stone, which has his name as architect and 
superintendent inscribed upon it, is a lasting monument to the good work he 
did. To show their appreciation the institute offered him five scholarships 
for his two daughters, but he would not accept that, though they attended 
the college while residing there. After thirteen and a half years spent at 
Belton, and having earned the esteem of all citizens, he decided to come 
north, and in 1889, realizing the splendid building prospects in Seattle, he 
came to this place and since that time has been a prominent factor in thQ 
development of the city. He erected the Pacific building, the Victoria Ho- 
tel, the Seattle Athletic Club house, the one-story block opposite the Rialto, 



230 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

and has done all the work for the Great Northern in the building line, includ- 
ing the stores on Jackson street and many other buildings of a business 
character. In Ballard, where he made his home until 1902, Mr. Dow erected 
the Methodist and Baptist churches, his own building at the corner of Second 
and Broadway and other brick business blocks there. In 1901 he built his 
fine residence on Pontius avenue, Seattle, where he is now living. 

]\Ir. Dow has been twice married, having before leaving Scotland wedded 
Miss Maggie ]\IacGregor, and to them were born four children, two sons 
and two daughters, but the eldest died at the age of eight months. Those 
living are: Jeanie, now the wife of John Kyle, a grocer of Ballard; Alex, 
who married Mamie Alford and resides in Interbay; and IMaggie, wife of 
Fritz Herbert Leather, who is the promoter of newspapers published in Japan 
and America. The mother of these children died after the removal of the 
family to Seattle, and in January, 1901, j\lr. Dow married her half sister, 
Agnes Smith. 

Mr. Dow is a member of the Presbyterian church and is connected with 
with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. The Republican party usually 
finds in him a stanch supporter of its principles, but he is somewhat inde- 
pendent in politics, preferring to give his support to the men whom he be- 
lieves best qualified for office, regardless of party lines. While a resident 
of Ballard he served as mayor of the city one term and refused a re-election. 
During his term a special election was held and the town bonded for forty- 
five thousand dollars. The water works were also put in and he vetoed a 
bill for the purchase of a plant, by which the city was saved a large sum of 
money. Never were the reins of city government in more capable hands, 
for he is a progressive man, pre-eminently public-spirited, and all that per- 
tains to the public welfare receives his hearty endorsement. He also served 
as a member of the city council, and his various official duties have been dis- 
charged with a promptness and fidelity worthy of the highest commendation. 

WILLIAM E. BOONE. 

In past ages the history of a country was the record of wars and con- 
quests ; to-day it is the record of commercial activity, and those whose names 
are foremost in its annals are the leaders in business circles. The con- 
quests now made are those of mind over matter, not man over man, and the 
victor is he who can successfully establish, control and operate extensive 
commercial interests. William E. Boone is one of the strong and influential 
men whose lives have become an essential part of the history of Seattle 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 231 

and of the northwest. Tireless ' energy, keen perception, honesty of pur- 
pose, genius for devising and executing the right thing at the right time, 
joined to every-day common sense, guided by great will power, are the 
chief characteristics of the man. Connected with building niterests he has 
contributed in very large measure to the substantial improvement of Seattle, 
is numbered among its pioneer architects and builders and in many of the 
finest structures of the city are seen the evidences of his handiwork. 

In a little log school house in his native state Mr. Boone pursued his 
education. He remained at home until his eighteenth ,year and devoted 
three years to mastering the carpenter's trade. He then went west to Chi- 
cago, where he entered the service of the Central Railway Company, 
whose line was in process of construction. He was soon given charge 
of the erection of its buildings all along the road and had at times as many 
as one hundred and fifty mechanics working under his direction. He con- 
tinued with the company until the road was completed and afterward resided 
for three years in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he engaged in business 
as both an architect and builder, having recently pursued the study of archi- 
tecture. Through his own efforts he became very proficient in that line and 
while in Minneapolis he erected many of the buildings in that then rapidly 
growing city. The year 1859 witnessed his arrival on the Pacific coast. 
He made his way to San Francisco and thence to the Cariboo mines. He 
became a mine owner and operator, his possessions at times comprising five 
different mines. It was the time of the great mine excitement in California, 
and Mr. Boone made money rapidly but lost it just as rapidly. Returning 
to San Francisco, he there resumed work at his chosen vocation and was 
engaged in contracting and building for a number of years, becoming very 
prominent in that direction. He had under contract in one year over one 
million dollars worth of work. He was acknowledged the leading repre- 
sentative of his line of business in the city and many of the finest structures 
there stand as monuments to his skill and handiwork. Among the costly 
buildings which he erected was the Institution for the Deaf, Dumb and 
Bhnd. 

During the Dennis Kearney excitement and the trouble which arose 
concerning the change in the state constitution, fully forty thousand people 
left San Francisco in a single year and Mr. Boone was among the number. 
He chose Seattle as the scene of his future business operations, arriving in 
what was then a city of about thirty-five hundred people. He has been 
connected with this place during the whole of its magnificent growth and 
has been deeply interested in its progress and prosperity. In the line of 



232 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

his business he has been a most important factor in its improvement and 
a large majority of its fine business houses and residences have been erected 
under his supervision. One of these is tlie New York building and no finer 
business block can be found on the northwest Pacific coast. He also ex- 
ecuted the plans for the building of the magnificent high school which is 
alike a credit to Seattle and to its designer. During his residence in Seattle 
all of its fine structures have been built and to his skill and enterprise are 
largely due the attractive appearance of the city to-day. He has the honor 
of being the president of the Washington State American Institute of Arch- 
itects. Mr, Boone sustains an unassailable reputation as a business man. 
Probably in no line of industrial activity is there better opportunity for 
fraud and dishonesty than in building, and the unqualified confidence of his 
fellow townsmen, which Mr. Boone enjoys, is an unmistakable evidence of 
his integrity and honesty in all business transactions. 

In 1 87 1 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Boone and Miss Mercy 
Slocuni, of Syracuse, New York, a representative of one of the old Ameri- 
can families, and a niece of the distinguished General Slocum. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Boone are highly respected by all who have the pleasure of their 
acquaintance. From the organization of the Republican party he has been 
one of its stalwart advocates, but has never desired or held office, content 
to give his support to the party without hope of reward. He^ has been a 
worthy member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for many years 
and has filled all the offices in both the subordinate lodge and encampment. 
While residing in Minneapolis in 1857 he joined the Masonic fraternity and 
Avas exalted to the sublime degree of a Master Mason, since which time he 
has filled nearly all of the offices in the blue lodge and is a past master. He 
has taken all of the York rite degrees, becoming a Sir Knight Templar, and 
in the Scottish rite he has attained the thirty-second degree, being pro- 
claimed a sublime prince of the royal secret. He has thoroughly studied 
the tenets of the craft and in his life has exemplified its beneficent principles. 
He. has not only been a good Mason, but a good citizen as well. After the 
great fire of Seattle, he was made a member of the committee of five ap- 
pointed to straighten and widen the streets and the present beautiful city 
attests how well the work was accomplished. ]\Ir. Boone stands to-day 
among the strong men of the northwest. Strong in his citizenship, strong 
in his honor and good name, the work which he has accomplished in behalf 
of the city of his adoption is of such a character that his fellow towns- 
men owe to him a debt of gratitude and extend to him their unqualified 
regard. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 235 

HANS P. RUDE. 

Hans P. Rude, a member of the Seattle city council and a prominent 
merchant tailor of the city, is a native of the land of the Midnight Sun, 
his, birth occurring in Norway on the 4th of March, 1861, and he is of Nor- 
wegian ancestry. His parents, Hans and Agnete (Pedersen) Rude, were 
also born in Norway, and were there reared and married. Four children 
were born to them in their native land, and there the mother died at the 
age of thirty years. In 1884 the father came to America, settling in Pierce 
county, Wisconsin, where he is still residing. He was a member of the 
Lutheran church, and was honorable and upright in all his dealings. Three 
of his children are residents of the Pacific coast, two of whom, Hans P. 
and Mathias, make their home in Seattle, and Martenas is a resident of 
San Francisco, while the daughter. Miss Augusta, resides in Minneapolis. 

Hans Peter Rude received his education and learned the tailor's trade 
in the land of his nativity, and when but fifteen years of age he left the 
parental roof to make his own way in the world. He learned his trade in 
Christiana, and in 1881 came by way of Quebec to the United States, locat- 
ing first in Chicago, from wdience he continued his westward journey to 
Red Wing, Minnesota, where he lived three years, engaged part of the time 
in work at his trade, after which he went to Minneapolis. He came to this 
country a poor boy, a stranger in a strange land, and he was obliged to 
earn the money to pay for his passage after his arrival here. He soon began 
attending a night school, and in a short time became well informed con- 
cerning the laws and business customs of this country. Coming to Seattle 
in February, 1891, he was here employed as a cutter until 1894, when he 
opened business on his own account, and since that time has been numbered 
among the leading business men of the city, progressive, enterprising and 
persevering. Such qualities always win success, sooner or later, and to 
])dr. Rude they have brought a handsome competence as a reward of his 
well directed efforts. Since becoming a citizen of the United States he has 
studied closely the issues and questions of the day, and as a result he has 
allied himself with the Republican party, to which he gives an intelligent 
and loyal support. He had been a resident of Seattle but five years when, 
in 1896, he became the choice of his party for the ofiice of city councilman, 
to wdiich he was re-elected two years later, running against a strong fusion 
of the opposing parties. His second election demonstrates the fact that he 
had proved himself a useful and honorable member of the Ijoard of coun- 
cilmen. 

15 



2 34 REPRESEXTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Such has been the uprightness of his character and bus'ness career that 
he was deemed ehgible to become a member of the ]\Iasonic fraternity, and 
he received the subhme degree of a ^Master Mason in Doric Lodge, No. 92, 
of Seattle, thereafter being advanced until he is now a Royal Arch Alason, 
a Sir Knight Templar and a member of the ]\Iystic Shrine. He is also 
affiliated with the Elks, the Knights of Pythias and other fraternities. ]\Ir. 
Rude is a life member of the Alaska Geographical Society. In 1882 Mr. 
Rude was united in marriage to Miss Lena Sophia Martenson, also a native 
of Norway, and the children resulting from their union are Henry ]Mc- 
Clair, George Albert, Lillie Palma and Alorris Oscar. The family are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church, and they share in the high regard of a large 
circle of friends. 

WILLIAAI R. BALLARD. 

i 

It is a well attested maxim that the greatness of the state lies not in 
its machinery of government, nor even in its institutions, but in the sterling 
qualities of its individual citizens, in their capacity for high and unselfish 
effort and their devotion to the public good. Rising above the heads of the 
mass there has always been a series of individuals, distinguished beyond 
■others, who by reason of their pronounced ability and forceful personality 
have always commanded the respect of their fellow men and who have 
revealed to the world those two resplendent virtues of a lordly race, per- 
severance in purpose and a directing spirit which never fails. Of this class 
William Rankin Ballard stands as an excellent illustration. The goal to- 
ward which he has hastened during his manv vears of toil and endeavor is 
that which is attained only by such as have by patriotism ?nd wise counsel 
given the world an impetus toward the good, such have gained the right 
and title to have their names enduringly inscribed on the bright pages of 
history. 

William R. Ballard has been a resident of Washington for thirty-seven 
years and while he has not sought prominence in the line of political pre- 
ferment no man in Seattle has done more to advance the city's welfare 
through the establishment of important industrial and commercial interests 
that have contributed largely to the public good than 'Mr. Ballard. He 
was born in Richland county. Ohio, on the 12th of August, 1847, ^^'^^^ ^^ 
descended from English ancestry who became early settlers of New Eng- 
land and for many years were respected and influential residents of New 
Hampshire. In that state his father. Dr. Levi Ballard, was born, his birth- 



SEATTLE AND KIXG COUNTY. 235 

place being the town of Hillsboro. Hillsboro county, and the date Decem- 
ber 21, 181 5. Removing from the old Granite state to New Jersey he there 
began reading medicine and later was graduated in the Cleveland Medical 
College, of Cleveland. Ohio, with the class of 1844. He was married that 
year in Richland county, Ohio, to IMiss Phoebe A. McConnell and there they 
began their domestic life, the Doctor engaging in the practice of medicine. In 
1850 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died leaving 
two sons, Irving, who became an attorney of King county, Washington, 
and died in 1880, and William Rankin. 

In 1852 the father crossed the plains to California, where he remained 
for only a few months and then returned to the east by way of the Isthmus 
route. In 1855 he once more crossed the plains, locating in Oregon, and 
was the surgeon of a regiment of volunteers during the Indian war. In 
1857 he again returned to the east by way of the Isthmus of Panama and 
was married to Miss Mary E. Condit. Accompanied by his wife and two 
sons, in 1858 he made his way to Oregon and practiced his profession 
in Roseburg until 1865, at which time he removed to Auburn, W'ash- 
ington, where he retired from his profession, spending his last days in the 
enjoyment of a well earned rest. He departed this life on the 12th of Jan- 
uary, 1897, at the age of eighty-two years, and thus closed a career that 
w^as marked by honor, integrity and usefulness. In politics he was a Re- 
publican and in religious faith a Presbyterian. He was a conscientious and 
faithful practitioner and would always respond to the call of the sick and 
suffering at no matter wdiat personal sacrifices, never stopping to question 
whether his labors would ever be recompensed by pecuniary remuneration. 
There were five children by his second marriage and his widow still sur- 
vives him. 

William Rankin Ballard was a youth of eleven years when his father 
crossed the plains with his family and since that time he has been identified 
with the development of the northwest. His preliminary education was 
supplemented by study in the academy at Wilber, Oregon, and in the Wash- 
ington State University. He acquired a good knowledge of civil engineer- 
ing and began life on his own account in that line of activity. He secured 
various government contracts for surveying public lands, among which was 
the Yakima Indian reservation, the largest government surveying contract 
in the state, requiring three years for its completion. Some complications 
arose in regard to receiving his pay and in 1875 he found it necessary to 
go to Washington to attend to that and other business. In the summer 
of 1876 he accepted the position of mate on the steamer Zephyr, wliich 



236 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

was owned by his brother and pHed between Olympia and Seattle. In 1877 
he was made captain and in i88i became part owner of the vessel, his part- 
ners being George Harris and John Leary. In 1886 he became sole owner 
and continued in command until 1887, when he sold his ship. Under Cap- 
tain Ballard's management she was very popular and made larger earnings 
than any other local steamer then plying on the Sound. 

While engaged in conducting the trips of this steamer Captain Ballard 
became convinced that Seattle had a brilliant future before it and began to 
invest in city property. In 1883, in partnership with Judge Thomas Burk 
and John Leary, he purchased seven hundred acres of land on Salmon Bay, 
upon which is now located the prosperous city of Ballard, a suburb of Seattle, 
containing five thousand and four hundred inhabitants. His property there 
has been subdivided and from lime to time he has sold lots on which he has 
realized very largely, as the land was purchased for only a few dollars per 
acre and is now worth as many thousands. Captain Ballard had the man- 
agement of his company's affairs in the handling of the property and to 
him belongs great credit for the success which has attended the enterprise 
and for the large fortunes resulting therefrom. He has' also been closely 
associated with the financial circles of the city, being one of the organizers 
of the Seattle National Bank, which was established in 1890 with a capital 
stock of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. He was elected its vice- 
president and his business ability and wise counsel were important factors 
m its success. The company erected a six-story bank building, one of the 
finest of its kind in the entire northwest. For three years he was manager of 
the bank, during which time it was attended with most gratifying success. 
He was one of the organizers of the Seattle Savings Bank, of which he 
remained president until 1897, and also president of the First National 
Bank of Waterville, Washington, and one of the directors of the North 
End Bank of Seattle and the Fairhaven National Bank. In the organiza- 
tion of the West Street and North End Electric Railway Company he was 
prominent, becoming one of the heavy stockholders of the company and 
also its vice-president. He was also a large stockholder and director in 
ihe Terminal Railway & Elevator Company and thus it can be seen that 
he has done his full share in the improvement and upbuilding of the city 
through the establishment of many extensive business concerns which have 
been of the greatest value in promoting material progress and prosperity. 
He has always had great faith in the future of Seattle and believes it is 
destined to attain still greater prominence as a metropolis of the northwest. 
He is now president of the Mutual Land Company of the city and is push- 



SEATTLE AXD KING COUNTY. 237 

ing its interests. He is likewise a member of the Chamber of Commerce 
and Lake Washington canal committee and a trustee of Whitworth College 
of Tacoma. The influence of such a life cannot be measured but all familiar 
with the history of Seattle acknowledge the city's indebtedness to his efforts. 
Li 1882 was celebrated the marriage of Captain Ballard and Miss Es- 
telle Thorndyke, a native of Rockland, Maine, and they knd five children, 
but four died in infancy, the surviving son being Stanley. The best homes 
of the city are open for their reception and they are leading representati-. es 
of the social circles of Seattle. Mr. Ballard belongs to the First Presby- 
terian church of Seattle, and for many years has been one of its elders. He 
was made a Mason in St. John's Lodge, F. & A. M., of Seattle, in 1871, 
and has always been a worthy exemplar of the teachings of the craft. His 
is a well rounded character in which due attention has been given to phy- 
sical, mental and moral development, as well as to business, social and public 
affairs. He stands out conspicuously among the leading spirits to whom 
Seattle owes her upbuilding, her progress and substantial improvement and 
his name is inseparably linked with her history. 

THOMAS H. CANN. 

The name of Judge Thomas H. Cann ranks high among his profes- 
sional brethren of the King county bar and we are pleased to present to 
his numerous friends and acquaintances this sketch of his useful life. The 
Judge is a native of the Prairie state, his birth having occurred in St. Clair 
county, Illinois, on the i8th of July, 1833, ^'^'^^ ^^^ is of Scotch-Irish descent. 
His ancestors were among the early settlers of Virginia, and his grandfather, 
William Cann, served under General Washington throughout the struggle 
for independence. He was one of the early pioneers of Kentucky, and lived 
to the extreme old age of one hundred and six years, but during the last 
seven years of his life he was totally Ijlind. The father of our subject, 
James Cann, was born in Hart county, Kentucky, in 1792, and was there 
married to Nancy Miller, a- native also of that commonwealth, where her 
people were among the early pioneers. Unto this worthy couple were born 
nine children, six sons and three daug"hters, but of this family only t^vo 
sons are now^ living, the brother of our subject being John B. Cann. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Cann removed to Indiana, settling 
on the Wabash river, where they were among the early settlers, i:)ul: in 1820 
they left that state for St. Clair county, Illinois, taking up their abode near 
where Belleville now stands. In that early day Chicago, now the second city 



238 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

in size in the United States, had not even been begun. During the period of 
the Civil war their son, John B., enhsted for service in the Union Army, 
joining the Sixteenth Army Corps, and he served under General A. J. Smith 
and General Buell. During his services he was promoted from the ranks 
to a • captaincy, and during the battle of Shiloh he was wounded. His 
younger brother, Elias Cann, was also a vokmteer in the service of his 
country, and lost his life at the battle of Wilson Creek. The father of this 
family was called to his final rest at the age of fifty-six years, his death result- 
ing from an accident, passing away in the faith of the ^Methodist church, of 
which he was one of the early members and for a time a local minister. By 
his teachings and example he led many to the higher life, and as a minister he 
was ranked with the Rev. Peter Cartwright and other noted divines of that 
day. 

Thomas H. Cann received his early education in the public schools of his 
native locality. In 1854, after reaching his twentieth year, he crossed the 
plains to California, and after his arrival on the Pacific coast he mined at 
Ha:ngtown, now Placerville, Coloma, Shasta and Yreka, goipg from one min- 
ing excitement to another, and in 1861 he went to Orofino, now in Idaho, but 
during his mining experience he met with only moderate success. At the last 
named place he was made a deputy sheriff, but after a year's service therein 
he resigned the position to enter the employ of Wells, Fargo & Company, car- 
rying their express from the mines to Lewiston, making the journey princi- 
pally on horseback, but when the snow was very deep he packed the express 
on snow-shoes. While thus engaged the exposure during the winter was 
very severe, the danger from road agents was imminent and it was a position 
which only a man of heroism would have undertaken. Continuing in that 
capacity for a year, he w^as then employed on the company's steamboats on the 
Snake and Columbia rivers, for which he received an excellent salary and 
thus continued until 1870. In that year he received from the governor the 
appointment of Oregon State land commissioner, which office he filled with 
credit for eight years. During this time he also read law and was admitted 
to the bar, beginning the practice of his chosen profession at Salem, Oregon. 
After a residence in that city of ten years he removed to Seattle. In 1864, 
he had been married at Portland, Oregon, to ^liss Louisa A. Gephart, a 
native of Hamburg, Germany. On his arrival in this city Mr. Cann's family 
consisted of his wife and three children: Adoline, at home; Thomas H., a 
lawyer by profession and now employed as master of a steamship ; and Louisa, 
the wife of Professor Raunam, professor of mathematics in the Washington 
State University. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 239 

When the family took up their abode in Seattle this new thriving city 
was but a mere hamlet, but Mr. Cann immediaely opened an office for the 
practice of his profession, in which he continued 'with steadily increasing suc- 
cess for a year. He was then appointed to the important office of police 
judge, serving in that capacity for four years, and on the expiration of that 
period he again resumed the private practice of the law. In 1898 he was 
again called to public life, this time being elected to the office of justice 
of the peace and shortly afterward he was appointed police judge by 
Mayor Humes. Since 1892 he has served as police judge, which position he 
has filled to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. He is recognized as a 
man of exceptional attainments, and in all the positions which he has been 
called upon to fill he has been true to himself and to the duties and obligations 
resting upon him. 

To Air. Cann is accorded the honor of being one of the oldest Alasons on 
the Pacific coast, having been made a Master Mason at The Dalles, in 1863, 
and in the same year he received the Royal Arch degree. He was a charter 
member of the first Scottish Rite body that met in the west, and he has re- 
ceived all the degrees in Scottish Rite Masonry up to and inclading the thirty- 
second degree. In 1877 ^^^ became a member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen at Salem, Oregon, and he is a charter member of the second body 
of that fraternity organized in the state, while at the present time he is a mem- 
ber of the committee on laws in the grand lodge of the state of Washington. 
Since the organization of the Republican party he has been an ardent sup- 
porter of its principles, his first presidential vote being cast for John C. Fre- 
mont in 1856, and he has ever been an active and efficient worker in the ranks. 
In 1884 Mr. Cann erected his present beautiful and commodious home, where 
his attractive lawn, one hundred and twenty feet square, is cared for by him- 
self and family, and they have planted many beautiful flowers, shrubs and fruit 
trees. ' In this charming home Mr. and Mrs. Cann expect to spend the re- 
mainder of their days, surrounded by the comforts and luxuries which former 
labor has brought to them. In religious faith he is a member of the Methodist 
church, while his wife and daughter are members of St. Mark's Episcopal 
church. The parents are also members of the Pioneer Society. He is always 
ready to assist in any movement which has for its object the rmprovement and 
upbuilding of the city of his choice, and he is justly called the "father of the 
police court of Seattle." 

A leading member of the bar in speaking of Judge Cann said : " I con- 
sider him one of the most active, thorough and successful members of the 
profession. During his term of service on the bench here he made himself a 



240 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

terror to the evil doers, and did much to improve the moral tone of the com- 
munity. He had to a remarkable degree that rare ability for detecting truth 
from falsehood, for unearthing fraud and hypocrisy, which is so necessary 
in a committing magistrate. In his practice he has received a large clientage, 
and is intrusted with many important interests. He has the unbounded con- 
fidence of his clients, and is, I believe, in the enjoyment of as remunerative 
practice as any lawyer in Seattle." 

ELTON E. AINSWORTH. 

Elton E. Ainsworth, general manager of the Pacific Packing & Navig'a- 
tion Company, of Seattle, is a striking example of what may be accomplished 
in the rapidly developing section of the country when determined perseverance 
is seconded by native ability. His rise in about twelve years to the position 
which he now occupies is indicative of his especial fitness for the work to which 
he is devoting his energies. Under his capable direction the business of the 
company has grown to mammoth proportions, so that the enterprise is one 
of the most important contributing to the commercial activity and conse- 
quent prosperity of the northwest. 

Mr. Ainsvrorth is a native of New York, his birth having occurred at 
Cape Vincent, Jefferson county, on the 24th of May, 1865. He is of English 
ancestry. His father, Willard Ainsworth, was born in Cape Vincent, and 
in early life followed agricultural pursuits, but later turned his attention to 
merchandising, carrying on business successfully along that line until about 
fifteen years ago, since which time he has lived retired. He was also identi- 
fied with the fishing industries of the country, having been president of the 
Lake Ontario Fish Company. Politically he has been interested in the suc- 
cess of the Republican party from its organization, but the honors and emolu- 
ments of office have had no attraction for liim. .\n active member of the 
Presbyterian church, he has filled offices in the organization with which he 
is identified, and his influence has ever been on the side of the right, the true 
.and the beautiful. He wedded Mary Llerrick and they are the parents of six 
children, but our subject is the only one living in the west. 

During the summer months, while not attending school, Elton Ains- 
worth gained a knowledge of the fish business under his father's direction, 
and this practical experience acquired in his youth well qualified him for the 
work which he undertook in later years. AVhen he reached the age of twenty 
years he went to Detroit. Michigan, and for a year and a half was con- 
nected with the Ixobinson Brothers Lumber Company, but on the expiration 




v-^ 



%' 




SFUdiAC LIBRARY! 



I T!tlȣN i^OUWO^TIOWB. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 241 

of that period he determined to go to the Pacific coast. He first made his 
way to San Diego, Cahfornia, but finding that business was not very active 
at that point he decided to make his way to the Puget Sound country, and 
purchased a ticket to Tacoma, but when the boat upon which he had taken 
passage stopped at Seattle he went ashore and was so pleased with the city 
and its prospects that he immediately determined to remain, and lost no time 
in having his baggage transferred from the boat to the town, and thus, in 
August, 1888, took up his residence here. 

It was then the custom for nearly everyone who came to this locality to 
take a claim, and Mr. Ainsworth went to the Olympic Mountains and secured 
a tract of land of one hundred and sixty acres on Lake Cushman, where he 
remained for six months. He then sold his claim and returned to the city, 
where, in connection with Arthur G. Dunn, he became engaged in the fish 
business at the corner of Second avenue and Pike street. Since that time 
the partnership has existed and the business has constantly increased. They 
soon extended the field of their operations to the wholesale canning busi- 
ness. In 1896 they built a cannery at the foot of Pike street, and in 1898 
another at Blaine, Washington. In 1901 the consolidation of a number of the 
canneries on Puget Sound and in Alaska was consummated and the Pacific 
Packing & Navigation Company was formed, ]\lr. Ainsworth taking charge 
of the affairs of the company as its general manager. The company owns 
and operates seventy-five steamers, tugs and other vessels and has several 
very large canneries on Puget Sound and twenty in Alaska, the pack averag- 
ing from one million and two hundred and fifty thousand to fifteen hundred 
thousand cases annually, tlie product being shipped to all parts of the world. 
That Mr. Ainsworth is a man of exceptional business ability and executive 
force is indicated by his capable control of the mammoth business of the 
company, requiring keen discernment, marked foresight and a genius for 
dispatch in business and for planning and executing the right thing at the 
right time. 

In August, 1894, in Victoria, British Columbia, Mr. Ainsworth was 
tmited in marriage to Miss Helen Schroeder. They lost their only son, Wil- 
lard, who died in April, 1900, at the age of three years. Their beautiful 
home, at the corner of Minor avenue and University street, was erected in 
1901, and is the center of many brilliant and pleasing social functions, par- 
ticipated in by many of the leading residents of Seattle. Mr. Ainsworth 
votes with the Republican party, is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
of the Ranier Culb and the Seattle Golf Club. He belongs to the group 
of distinctively representative business men who have been active in promot- 



242 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

ing and building up the chief industries of this section of the country. He 
had the sagacity and prescience to discern the eminence which the future had 
m store for this great and growing city, and acting in accordance with the 
dictates of his faith and judgment, he has garnered, in the fulhiess of time, 
the generous harvest which is the just recompense of industry, integrity and 
enterprise. 

ROBERT G. WESTERMAN. 

There is no rule for achieving success, and yet in the life of the successful 
man there are always lessons which might well be followed. The man who 
gains prosperity is he who can see and utilize the opportunities that come in 
his path. The essential conditions of human life are ever the same, the sur- 
roundings of individuals differ but little, and when one man passes another on 
the highway of life, reaching the goal of prosperity in advance of others who 
perhaps started out before him, it is because he has the power to use advan- 
tages which probably eiicompass the whole human race. To-day among the 
leading residents of Seattle stands Robert G. Westerman, who is prominently 
known throughout this locality as the president and manager of the Wester- 
man Iron Works. 

;Mr. Westerman was born in the city of Coldwater, ^lichigan, in 1843, and 
is of Swedish ancestr}'-, his parents, Peter and Peternella (Nystrom) Wester- 
man, having both been natives of that country. In 1841, however, they left the 
land of their birth and came to the United States, taking up their abode in 
^Michigan. Three of their children remained for a time in their native land^ 
but subsequently joined their parents in this country. Whi]e a resident of 
Michigan the father was engaged in agricultural pursuits, but in 1849 he 
crossed the plains to California and there followed placer mining'. In 1855, 
on account of the ill health of his wife, he returned with his family to Europe, 
and there she died at the age of forty-six years, but her husband reached the 
age of seventy-two years. He was reared in the Lutheran faith, but during 
his residence in America was identified with the Prebyterian church. This 
worthy couple became the parents of eleven children, but only two are now 
living, the brother of our subject being Charles Westerman, the manager of a 
railroad in Caritiba, Brazil. 

Robert G. Westerman received his early education under his mother's 
careful guidance, he having been permitted to attend school only four months 
in Sacramento. California, but by constant reading, observation and experi- 
ence he has greatly added to his knowledge and is now a well informed man. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 243 

When but ten years of age he began learning the blacksmith's trade under the 
direction of his uncle. In 1867 he removed to Chicago, Illinois, where for 
eleven months he was employed in the shops of the Illinois Central Railroad, 
and later worked for the Central Pacific Railroad Company in California and 
Nevada. He was also chief engineer and blacksmith for the consolidated 
Virginia Mine and was connected with other prominent mining interests. 
Subsequently Mr. Westerman went to Arizona on a mining expedition, and 
after working for a time with the Contention Mining & Mill Company he en- 
gaged in mining on his own account at Tombstone, that state, there remaining 
for a year and a half. Selling his possessions there, he went to Mexico in the 
interest of a prominent mining company, where he was engaged in erecting 
mining machinery in different places, but subsequently left that state with the 
intention of going to Alaska. He changed his plans, however, and instead 
went to the Idaho mines, at Eagle City, where he mined with excellent success 
for three years, but before leaving that place he lost his eiitire earnings. 
Coming thence to Seattle in 1886, he worked for wages for a year and a half, 
and in 1888, with only one forge, engaged in business for himself at the foot 
of Marion street. Under his able management the business grew rapidly, 
and in January, 1889, it being necessary for him to secure larger c[uarters, 
he removed to Western avenue, where he erected a commodious and substan- 
tial building, containing seven forges. This building was completed on the 
20th of May, and on the 6th of June was entirely destroyed by the terrible fire 
which visited the city, thus sweeping away in a few moments the savings of 
many years. With undaunted energy, however, he set about to retrieve his 
lost possessions and erected a shop at the corner of Fifth and Main streets. 
In a short time he was enabled to rebuild his shop on Western avenue, and 
thus he has the credit of erecting three shops in one year. As lime passed 
business grew to such proportions under his skillful direction that it again be- 
came necessary to secure larger quarters and he accordingly purchased the 
buildings which he now occupies. In 1898 the business was incorporated 
under the name of the Westerman Iron Works, with Mr. Westerman as 
president and A. T. Timmerman as secretary. The latter is a business man 
of ability and worth, and the two gentlemen own the entire plant. Their re- 
putation for reliability in business circles is unassailable and in all life's rela- 
tions they command the respect of those with whom they have been brought 
in contact. 

The marriage of ]\Ir. Westerman was celebrated in 1883, when Mrs. 
Hattie (Ray) Compton became his wife. She has one son by her former 
marriage, John Ray Compton, who was reared by Mr. Westerman and is still 



244 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

n member of his household. The union of our subject and wife has also been 
blessed with one son, Frank, who is now in school. The family ccupy a 
beautiful home at 1521 Twelfth avenue, south, on Beacon Hill. 'Mv. Wester- 
man is a Royal Arch Mason and a stanch supporter of Republican principles. 
The most honorable business methods have ever characterized his dealings, 
his duties of citizenship are faithfully discharged, and in private life he is 
known as a loyal husband, father and friend. 

ISAAC N. BIGELOW. 

Isaac N. Bigelow, one of the builders of the city of Seattle, is a native of 
King county, Nova Scotia, born on the 15th of May, 1838. He represents 
one of the oldest families of this country, tracing his ancestry back to John 
Bigelow, who emigrated from Essex county, England, to Massachusetts, in 
1630. He was a freeholder and a select man of Watertown, a member of 
the Congregational church and died on the 14th of July, 1703, at the age of 
eighty-six years. His son, Samuel Bigelow, born in Watertown, in 1653, 
was proprietor of an inn and one of the influential men of the community. He 
serv'ed as a sergeant in the militia and represented his town in the general 
court. His will bears date 1720. His son, Isaac Bigelow, born in Water- 
town in 1 691, held a commission from the governor as sergeant of the colonial 
militia and his death occurred in 1744. His son, Isaac Bigelow, Jr., the next 
in line of succession, was born in Colchester, Connecticut, on the 4th of May, 
1 71 3, and removed to Nova Scotia, where he received land grants from the 
government for settling there, but later he returned to Colchester, Connecti- 
cut, and reared his family there. He died in 1792. His son, Amasa Bigelow, 
the great-grandfather of our subject, was born in Colchester, Connecticut, 
in 1755, was a ship carpenter and lost his life by accident in 1799. He mar- 
ried Roxana Cone and their son, Ebenezer Bigelow, was born in Cornwall, 
Nova Scotia, about the year 1779. The latter married Nancy Rand in 1804 
and died in i860. He was also a ship builder and became a very prominent 
representative of that department of industrial activity. His son, David 
Bigelow, the father of our subject, was born in 1813, married Martha Jane 
Weaver, and died in 1847, ^^ the age of thirty-four years. He had learned 
the ship-builder's trade under the direction of his father, carried on a large 
and successful business and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. His 
wife departed this life in the fifty-ninth year of her age. She was the mother of 
seven children, of whom four are living, three being residents of the Pacific 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 245 

coast, namely: H. Allen of Oakland, California; Rebecca, who is living in 
Seattle; and the subject of this review. 

Isaac N. Bigelow obtained his education in the public schools of his 
native town and in early life learned the carpenter's trade. Lor a number of 
years he was engaged with his brother Benjamin in ship-building and re- 
mained in the east until 1875, at which time he came to Seattle, where he be- 
came identified with the business interests of the city as a contractor and 
builder. His marked skill in that vocation and his honorable business meth- 
ods soon secured him an extensive patronage, whereby his labors became very 
profitable. As his financial resources increased he made extensive invest- 
ments in real estate and purchased and platted what is known as Bigelow's 
addition to the city. He also platted Bigelow's second addition and the 
Lake Union addition, all of which have become greatly improved, being trans- 
formed into residence districts of the city. Both before and since the great 
fire in Seattle in 1889 Mr. Bigelow has been extensively engaged in building 
in this city, his labor in this direction, however, being largely the improvement 
of his own property. He built and owned one of the largest sawmills north 
of San Francisco but later, selling his interest in the property for thirty 
thousand dollars, he invested that amount in the Seattle Dime Savings Bank, 
of which he was the president and principal stockholder for four years. At 
the expiration of that time he was obliged to suspend, but he has the gratifi- 
cation of having paid one hundred cents on the dollar. Honesty has ever 
been one of the salient features of his character and no one can say aught that 
is detrimental concerning his business life. He has erected many residences 
on his property and also built the Bigelow block on Pike street and another 
large building on Second avenue and Union streets. He is now living retired 
with a good competency and makes his home in a nice residence at No. 912 
Queen Ann avenue. He is an active and valued member of the Congrega- 
tional church, in which he is serving as a trustee and deacon and also as super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. He takes an active and acceptable part in all 
church work and his labors in that behalf have been very effective. He has 
also contributed in large measure to the improvement and progress of Seattle 
and obtained the first street railway franchise. He also secured the paving 
of Pike street with brick and in many ways has contributed to the substantial 
improvement of the city. He is a Master Mason, having been made a mem- 
ber of the craft in Nova Scotia in 1863. 

Li the same year Mr. Bigelow was married to Miss Emeline Davidson, 
also a native of King county, with wdiom in youth he attended the same 
school. Their union has been blessed with two sons and a claugliter : David 



246 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

E., a mineral expert and assayer now in Cedoras Island, Mexico; E. Victor, 
a Congregational minister, now serving as pastor of Elliott church, in Lowell, 
Massachusetts ; and Clara M., who is at home with her parents. Rev. Bige- 
low is a graduate of Washington University and also of Yale College and has 
taken a post-graduate course in Harvard College. Mrs. Bigelow, like her 
husband, is actively engaged in church work, and both are most highly res- 
pected by a host of friends in Seattle. His purpose has ever been commend- 
able, his actions manly, his conduct sincere and above all his life has been in- 
fluenced by a sense of conscientious obligation concerning his relations to his 
fellow men and his duties of citizenship. 

LYMAN E. KNAPP. 

The profession of law, when clothed with its true dignity and purity and 
strength, must rank first among the callings of men, for law rules the uni- 
verse. The work of the legal profession is to formulate, to harmonize, to 
regulate, to adjust, to administer those rules and principles that underlie and 
permeate all government and society and to control the varied relations of 
man. As thus viewed there attaches to the legal profession a nobleness that 
cannot but be reflected in the life of the true lawyer, who, conscious of the 
greatness of his profession and honest in the pursuit of his purpose, embraces 
the richness of learning, the profoundness of wisdom and the firm.ness of in- 
tegritv. A prominent representative of the Washington bar is Lyman Enos 
Knapp, and he also has the honor of being the third American governor of 
Alaska. 

Air. Knapp was born in Somerset, Windham county, \^ermont, Novem- 
ber 5, 1837, and is a representative of a prominent old English family. The 
founder of the family on American soil emigrated to this country from York- 
shire, England, in 1640, and located in Brighton, Massachusetts, but later re- 
moved to Taunton, that state, and subsequently settled in Douglass, Massachu- 
setts. The great-great-grandfather of our subject, Joseph Knapp. resided in 
Taunton, and his son. Job Knapp, fought throughout the Revolutionary war, 
serving as lieutenant of a company in Colonel Reid's regiment from Doug- 
lass, Massachusetts. When the war was over he married his colonel's daught- 
ter, Ruth Reid. Their son, Cyrus Knapp, removed to Dover, Vermont, and 
there married Thankful Sterns. Their son Hiram was born in Dover, A'^'er- 
mont, in 1803. He married Elvira Stearns, and they continued to reside in 
Dover until just previous to our subject's birth, when they removed to Somer- 
set, Vermont. Hiram Knapp was an ofiicer in the state militia. By his 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 247 

marriage he became the father of nine children, of whom seven are still living-, 
lie passed away in 1858, at the age of fifty-six years, but his widow survived 
him many years. They were members of the Congregational church and 
were people of the highest respectability. Their son Velosco J. Knapp is a 
resident of Anacortes, Washington, where he is serving as the postmaster, and 
he and our subject are the only representatives of the family on the Pacific 
coast. 

Lyman Enos Knapp received his literary education in the Burr & Burton 
Seminary and in the Middlebury College, of Vermont, graduating in the latter 
nistitution in 1862, and within a week after leaving school he offered his serv- 
ices to his country, becoming captain of Company I, Sixteenth Regiment, 
Vermont Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was first engaged in defending 
the city of Washington, after which it was attached to the Army of the Poto- 
mac, and his first battle was the memorable engagement at Gettysburg, in 
which he received a flesh wound in the shoulder. He participated in all the 
battles in which the glorious Army of the Potomac took part until the sur- 
render of General Lee, when the war was over and he marched with his regi- 
ment in the grand review at Washington. At the battle of Spottylsvania 
Court House Mr. Knapp was a second time wounded, being struck with a 
bullet in the head on May 9, 1864, the ball cutting a furrow in his scalp, but 
the second day thereafter he was able to return to duty. At the battle of 
Petersburg on the •21st of April, 1865, while storming Fort Mahone, a shell 
exploded above him and a portion of it struck him just below the shoulder, 
causing a severe bruise and disabling him for a long time thereafter. Al- 
though disabled he continued with his command, and in acknowledgement 
of his distinguished service he was promoted to the rank of major, was later 
breveted lieutenant colonel and afterward received the full command. Dur- 
ing his army career Mr. Knapp participated in many of the important and 
hard-fought battles of the war, and was ever at his post of duty, faithfully and 
cheerfully performing the tasks assigned to him. 

When the war was over and the country no longer needed his services 
he returned to his home in Vincent, where he studied law and was admitted 
to the bar in 1876. In the meantime he had served as editor and publisher 
of the Middlebury Register, was also a justice of the peace, was judge of the 
municipal court of the city for twenty years, and from 1879 until 1889 was 
judge of the probate and insolvency courts. While filling the latter position he 
received a telegram from the president offering him the governorship of 
Alaska. He received the appointment under the administration of President 
Harrison, and, resigning his judgeship in Vermont, he served for four years 



248 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

and six months as governor of Alaska. During that period he did all in his 
power to advance the interests of that territory, having organized local mili- 
tia companies, opened new postal routes, established a territorial library 
and instituted many other valuable improvements, filling the position with the 
most marked ability and fidelity. On retiring from that position he was left 
free to return to Seattle, a course which he had long before contemplated. 
Accordingly he arrived in this city in September, 1893, and engaged in the 
practice of law, his abilty soon winning him a distinctively representative 
clientage. He devotes his attention principally to civil practice, and is the 
attorney for several banks and many large corporations. He has also invested 
largely in city property, has erected several residences and is one of Seattle's 
most public-spirited and progressive citizens. 

The marriage of Mr. Knapp was celebrated on the 23d of January, 1865, 
when Misss Martha A. Severaner became his wife. She is a native of Mid- 
dlebury, Vermont. Unto this union have been born four children, two sons 
and two daughters: George E., a graduate of the Middlebury College; 
Frances A., the wife of Everett R. Morgan, of Seattle; Edwin L., who for 
the past four years has been an employe in the Puget Sound National Bank; 
and Mary A., at home. Mr. and Mrs. Knapp are valued members of the 
Plymouth Congregational church, of which he is one of the leaders. He is 
also a member and past commander of Miller Post, G. A. R. He ranks high 
at the bar and in political circles, and Seattle numbers him among her leading 
and influential citizens. 

ROBERT ABRAMS. 

Among those honored citizens of Seattle who are entitled to considera- 
tion as pioneers of Washington and as founders and builders of our great 
and beautiful commonwealth, a place of no secondary rank must be accorded 
the gentleman whose name initiates this paragraph, for he has maintained 
his residence in Washington for more than forty-five years, having come 
hither in 1857, when the work of development and progress had scarcely been 
inaugurated in even an incipient way, when the locality was isolated to a 
large extent, having no railroad facilities, and when it remained on the very 
frontier of civilization, the red men, in their motley garb, still disputing do- 
minion with the few and scattered white settlers and with the beasts of the 
field. Mr. Abrams has been a witness of the transitions which have marked 
the development of the Evergreen state, has been an active participant in the 
work of advancement and is to-day one of the sterling and highly honored: 












^ Ov^^-'-y^L^ 



PT 






L .ewe* A»0 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 249 

pioneer citizens of Seattle, where he is engaged in the hvery business, hav- 
ing his place of business at 2107" Western avenue. As before stated, he 
came to the territory of Washington in 1857, ^^^^ Seattle has been continu- 
ously his home from the year 1869, when it was a straggling village of the 
most primitive sort, and he still owns land here which he purchased thirty-six 
years ago. The brave, energetic and loyal old pioneers are fast passing 
away, and it is a pleasure to yet be able to meet one of the hardy band of the 
former days, to listen to the tales of adventure and privation bonie without 
flinching, and it is a duty to perpetuate their records insofar as possible, that 
future generations may have appreciation of their lives and labors when all 
shall ha\e l)ccn summoned to that "undiscovered country from whose bourne 
no traveler returns." 

Robert Abrams comes of stanch New England stock of Scotcii-lrish 
type, and he claims the old Ray state as the place of his nativity, having been 
born in Berkshire county. Massachusetts, on the 10th of December. 1836. 
His lather, Richard Abrams. was a native son oi the fair Emerald Isle, where 
he was reared and educated and whore he became prominently identified with 
the ni.inur.icturing df the justly famed Irish linen, with whivh line of indus- 
try the family had boon conconied \ov a number of generations. The products 
of Ihc Inoiiis found their way to the I iiitod States, and the trade thus .built 
lip was ill a l.ir<;o <K'-riv responsible for the cniigtatibn of Richard Abrams 
to this rouiitiv. I lis home was in the north oi Ireland, near the line of Scot- 
land, and in the latiei' eouiitr\ was born the estimable ami gentle woman who 
beeanu- his wife, hor maiden name having Ikvu l*!li:''abeih "Ovnes. Shortlv 
after tiieir m.iiiiage they came to America and located in Massachusetts, but 
n few years Liter they e.nne westward .md became numbereii among 
the pioneers o\ the state i^\ Wiscinisin. being .among the early settlers 
in \\\c \ieimiy ^^\ the piesent city of CVhkosh, where they located in 
the ye.ir iS|t). .it whieh lime the settlors in the locality wore few and the 
land practically iinieelaiiiKd fiiMU the virgin forests. There the father of 
our suh'jeei developed a good farm, prospering in his eflforts with the lapse of 
years ancl beonming one of (ho prominent .ami honored citizens of the Badger 
f-taie, wlien' hoili he and his wife passed the remainder of their days, each 
livinu to a venerable ai^e The father died .u the age of ninetv-two vears, 
his cherished and (Kwoted wife lia\ ing passed away at the age of eighty-one. 
Kieliard Aluams w.is ;i man of strong nientality. was, prominent in religious 
woik and in ilie establishment and maim. lining of .schools, and both he and 
his wiU' wcMc .ealous witrkers in the Episcopal ohiuTh. with which they be- 

e.iiiu> i.lciitilic.l :'f(er their renio\al to Wisconsin, there having boon in the 
Id 



2 50 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

vicinity of their iiome no organization of the Presbyterian faith, to which 
they had previously held. In politics Mr. Abrams was a stanch advocate of 
the principles of the Democratic party. in his family were six sons and 
five daughters, and of the number the subject of this sketch is the only rep- 
resentative on the Pacific coast. Three of the sons sacrificed their lives while 
defending the Union during the war of the Rebellion. William was wounded 
in the engagement at Pittsburg Landing and died from the effects of his 
injuries. He was a graduate of Appleton College, in Wisconsin, and had been 
a successful teacher prior to entering the army. John Abrams still maintains 
his home in Wisconsin; George was killed at Pittsburg Landing, having 
been on the "Mound City" at the time when the vessel was blown up by the 
Confederate soldiers ; Henry met his death in the foundering of the "Brother 
Jonathan" off the coast of California; and Richard is engaged in mining in 
New Zealand. Of the five sisters, three are living at the present time. 

Robert Abrams was but ten years of age at the time when the family 
removed from Massachusetts to Wisconsin, and there he was reared under the 
sturdy and invigorating disciphne of the farm, his early educational training 
having been secured in a log school-house of the primitive type, but improve- 
ments were soon made in the facilities afforded, his father having been an 
earnest worker in behalf of the cause of education, as has been already stated. 
Robert remained on the old homestead farm, assisting in its development and 
cultivation, until he had attained the age of nearly twenty-one years, ^A'hen 
he set forth to face the problems of life on his own responsibility, his equip- 
ment consisting of a sturdy physique, a self-reliant nature, a good common- 
school education and a determination to make the best of the opportunities 
presented, while his integrity of purpose was unbending and insistent. He 
started forth at the age mentioned and made his way to California, via the 
Isthmus of Panama. After passing a few months in California he came by 
boat to Oregon, where he remained about a year and then came to W^ashington 
territory, where he became identified with the lumbering business, getting out 
spars and masts for vessels. At the time when he located here there were 
no steamboats on Puget Sound. In company with two companions he came 
to the Sound country and they camped near where Dexter Horton had his 
trading post, the triumvirate harmoniously dividing their labors, Mr. Abrams 
acting as the Nimrod of the party and supplying the larder with game, while 
one of his companions was the fisherman and the other acted as cook, so that 
they found themseh'es well placed, even in the wilds of the new country. 
At that time Mr. Abrams prophesied, basing his ideas upon the topography 
and natural advantages and upon information gathered from the Indians, 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 251 

that there would eventually be a great city on the Sound and that in all prob- 
ability the site would be that of the present city of Seattle. The total num- 
ber of buildings on the site at that time was but twenty-five. Mr. Abrams 
continued to devote his attention to the lumbering business in the line noted for 
a period of five years, and then established the first livery business in Seattle, 
bringing in the first carriage used in this section. He continued this enter- 
prise successfully for a period of sixteen years, and simultaneously carried 
on successful operations as a dealer in live stock, raising the same quite ex- 
tensively, as he became the owner of a tract of land soon after his arrival and 
has ever since been the owner of farm property. His present farm, located 
four miles south of the city, has been in his possession for twenty years, and 
he has been the owner of other valuable farm properties in the state, but his 
present real-estate investments are principally in city property, of which he 
has extensive and valuable holdings. He has platted ten acres of land which 
is known as Abrams' addition to South Seattle, and he has given his atten- 
tion to building and improving his realty in the city and its environs, erect- 
ing many residences and business buildings and placing the property on the 
market at terms in harmony with intrinsic values, his dealings having been 
conducted upon that high plane of integrity and fidelity which implies popular 
confidence and co-operation. He is one of the most progressive and public- 
spirited men of the city and state to whose upbuilding he has so largely con- 
tributed, and his success cannot but be viewed with pleasure by all w4io have 
cognizance of his earnest efforts and worthy career as a capable business 
man. He erected his present beautiful residence on Lake Union about twelve 
years ago, and every house in which the family had previously lived was also 
erected by him. 

Ever true to the duties of citizenship, taking a lively interest in all that 
affected the welfare of his city and state and standing as a stalwart sup- 
porter of the principles and policies of the Republican party, it is but natural 
that Mr. Abrams should have been called upon to serve in positions of dis- 
tinctive public trust and responsibility. In 1875 he was elected to represent 
King county in the territorial legislature, where he proved a valuable and 
zealous worker. He was one of the principal factors in securing the passage 
of the bill providing for the closing of all saloons on election days ; was instru- 
mental in securing the legislation providing for the opening of the Snoqual- 
mie road, connecting the eastern and western parts of the state, and he did 
most effective and timely service in securing appropriations for the state uni- 
versity. In connection with these bills he was specially active and inde- 
tatigable, and through his efforts was brought about their enactment. He 



2 52 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

served several terms as a member of the city council, and here his mature 
judgment and business sagacity were again brought into valuable play for 
the promotion of the best interests of the people. He held the office of county 
commissioner for a period of four years, though he did not make any personal 
canvass at the time of his nomination and had no desire for the office, his own 
personal business demanding his attention, but he was elected by a large 
majority and did his best to discharge his duties faithfully, and that he did 
thus discharge them is evident when it is recalled that such was the popular 
appreciation of his services that he was chosen as his own successor, serving 
for a second term. He and his family are attendants of the Congregational 
church, and fraternally he is identified with St. John's Lodge, No. 9, F. &. 
A. M., in the administration of whose fiscal affairs he has been prominent. 

In what is now the town of Renton, on the i8th of June, 1872, Mr. 
Abrams was united in marriage to Aliss Mary H. Brown, daughter of Captain 
Robert and Charlotte (Heppingstone) Brown, of New London, Connecticut. 
She is the fourth in order of birth of a family of ten children. Both father 
and mother are deceased. Her brothers and sisters are all in Seattle with the 
exception of one brother, who resides in San Francisco. Eight of the chil- 
dren are living. Richard H. married Martha Anderson, of Skagit county, 
Washington, and they have three children. Mr. and Mrs. Abrams are the 
parents of three sons and three daughters, namely: Richard H., who is a 
contractor and builder in this city, as is also Robert W. ; Norman B., who is 
engaged in the real-estate business with his father; Mary, the wife of 
Arthur Lawley, a resident of Boston, Massachusetts, where he is engaged in 
the ship building business ; and Violet and Mildred, who remain at the parental 
home, where a gracious hospitality is ever in evidence and where is found a 
favorite rendezvous for the wide circle of friends which the family have gath- 
ered about them. 

GEORGE W. KUMMER. 

The student of the history of Seattle has marvelled at the rapid growth 
and advancement of the city in recent years, especially since the work of build- 
ing had to be begun anew after the great fire of 1889. But although much 
has been accomplished, there is much still to be done and the opportunities 
and possibilities of this metropolis of Washington are attracting men of 
marked business ability from all sections of the country. Among this number 
is George W. Kummer, a stockholder and the general manager and secretary 
of the Denny Clay Company of Seattle, which is engaged in the manufacture 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 253 

of sewer pipe, drain pipe and all kinds of brick and ornamentations for de- 
corating the outside of brick buildings. 

A native of Pennsylvania, George W. Kummer was born in Allentown, 
July, 6, 1 85 1, and is of French, Spanish and German ancestry. The Kum- 
mers are of German lineage, but John Kummer the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was born in Madrid, Spain, whence he emigrated to Philadelphia, rear- 
ing his family in that city, where he engaged in the manufacture of woolen and 
linen goods, becoming a prominent representative of its commercial interests. 
He lived to be eighty years of age, but he lost his wife when they were on 
shipboard coming to America. They were bringing with them their entire 
family of twelve children, but the vessel encountered storms and adverse 
winds and every member of the family died with the exception of the father 
and one son, Jacob Kummer, who became the father of the subject of this 
review. Jacob Kummer was born in 181 6 and pursued his education in Phil- 
adelphia. He became extensively engaged in merchandising there and in 
partnership with another man, brought his goods form the New York market 
to Philadelphia in large wagons. For some time they enjoyed a very suc- 
cessful trade and Mr. Kummer had acquired eighty thousand dollars, when 
his partner absconded and left him with very little. However, he managed 
to continue in business and later engaged in the manufacture of bed spreads 
and other such articles. This enterprise also proved profitable and in course 
of time he largely retrieved his lost possessions and became a successful man. 
He married Rebecca Huntsberger, a representative of an old Virginian fami- 
ly of planters and slave-owners. Mr. and Mrs. Kummer removed to Aliens- 
town, Pennsylvania, where he continued to carry on his business. They were 
members of the German Reformed church, living in consistent harmony with 
their professions, doing naught that would reflect discredit upon the church 
of tlieir choice. Mr. Kummer departed this life in 1885. His widow, how- 
ever, still survives and is now living in her eighty-second year at Loyal Oak, 
Ohio, where her husband passed away. They were the parents of twelve 
children, but only three are now living: Alfred, who is pastor 01 the First 
Methodist Episcopal church of San Jose, California; Anna M., who became 
the wife of George Hanson and resides with her mother in Loyal Oak, Ohio; 
and George W. 

George W. Kummer was reared in the Buckeye state and pursued his 
education in the public schools. He was only eight years of age when he 
earned nine dollars and a half by carrying water to the men who were 
working on the construction of the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad. 
When a youth of ten years he left home to work on a farm and for the first 



254 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

two years his pay was a wagon-load of corn. As he grew older and was 
able to perform more service, he was given wages proportionately high, 
yet most of the time he had to take his pay in corn, for there was but 
little money in circulation in the country. He continued farm work until 
his nineteenth year. When he left home nine years before, his mother had 
given him a half dollar, which was the only money he handled during all 
of that period. That fifty cents he has kept through all life's vicissitudes 
and when a little daughter came to bless his home, a hole was made in the 
coin and a ribbon put through it and it was hung about the little one's 
neck. Mr. Kummer still has this coin which he prizes very highly. 

When nineteen years of age Mr. Kummer, not content with his lot, 
ran away from the farm on which he was employed and made his way to 
Akron, Ohio. He was without money but he went to a hotel and the people 
of the place being pleased by his appearance gave him work at fifty cents 
per day, but he did not like the associations there and at the end of the 
week he left the hotel and secured a position in a printing office in the 
capacity of printer's devil at two dollars and a half per week. He was 
thus employed for a year. Board in the place was three dollars per week 
but he got an old colored man to furnish him meals for two dollars and a 
half per week and he slept on the book-binder's table in the office. The 
rats ran around the room in search of the paste used in the establishment 
and his quarters were certainly not luxurious, but he made the best of his 
surroundings, eagerly watching, however, to improve his condition. The 
first day of his service in the printing office he told one of the editors that 
he could scarcely read or write, but that he desired to learn, and the man 
furnished him with reading matter. The second year he was paid three 
dollars per week, and the third he was given the position of city reporter 
at ten dollars per week. For three years he was in the editorial room and 
became correspondent for the Cincinnati Inquirer and for newspapers of 
Chicago, Boston, Pittsburg and other cities. He spent two years in the 
composing room as foreman and when the bookkeeper defaulted, Mr. Kum- 
mer assisted in straightening out the books and became bookkeeper and 
manager's assistant. During this time he attended night school, taking up 
a college course. He was retained in the business department of the paper 
for three years and then was promoted to the position of city editor, in 
which capacity he served for six years. He was with the Akron Daily 
Beacon for eighteen years in all and in that period rose from the most 
humble position in the office to the highest. This brief account, however, 
gives one little knowledge of the hardships which he had to endure in gain- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 255 

ing his start. His health broke under the arduous stress of business and 
study and when he left the office he only weighed one hundred and two 
pounds. His strength had completely given way and one day he fell faint- 
ing upon the street and was picked up for dead. 

It was then that Mr. Kummer decided to seek a change of climate by 
establishing his home upon the Pacific coast. He arrived in Seattle one 
week after the great fire, coming to this place in order to write up the sit- 
uation for eastern papers. He remained for three months, during which time 
he wrote many articles about the country and its prospects. He then re- 
turned to the east, sold out his interests there, gave up his newspaper cor- 
respondence, and accepted a position on the Pacific Christian Advocate in 
Portland, in September, 1889, having charge of the business management 
of that paper. Subsequently the Puget Sound Fire Clay Company made 
him a proposition to take stock in it and doing so he was elected secretary 
and treasurer of the company, entering upon the duties of his new office in 
February, 1890. That company sold out to the Denny Clay Company and 
he was elected to his present position as general manager and secretary, in 
which capacity he has since served, giving the highest satisfaction to all 
concerned by his faithful performance of duty, his capable supervision and 
his effective labors in increasing the business. The plant represents the in- 
vestment of four million dollars and is operated to its full capacity. All 
kinds of sewer and drain pipe are manufactured, together with brick and 
ornamental work for decorating the outside of brick buildings. The pro- 
duct is sold in Alaska, British Columbia, South Africa and all over the 
Pacific coast, and a very extensive business is being done, a fact which is 
largely due to the efforts and capable management of Mr. Kummer. Our 
subject has the honor of being the president of the Manufacturers As- 
ciation of Seattle, but devotes the greater part of his attention to the large 
business which he is controlling so successfully. 

In 1872 Mr. Kummer was united in marriage to Miss Jennie N. Robin- 
son, of Wisconsin, and unto them have been born three children, but they 
had the misfortune to lose their eldest daughter, Ruby Grace, who died at 
the age of twenty-two years. She had just been married to W. L. Blackett 
and was a most accomplished and brilliant young woman who had a host 
of friends in the city, so that her death was deeply mourned. The elder son, 
John Alfred, is now a student in Vashon College, and George W. is pur- 
suing his education in the public schools of Seattle. Mr. and Mrs. Kummer 
are valued members of the Methodist church and he belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 



2 56 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

and the Seattle Athletic Club. He is also a member of the Seattle Chamber 
of Commerce, of which he was formerly the vice-president. His political 
support is given to the Republican party, but aside from supporting the men 
and measures in which he believes he takes no active part in politics. He 
indeed deser\^es mention among the most prominent of Seattle's merchants 
and among her representative citizens, and should find a place in the history 
of the men of business and enterprise in the great northwest whose force 
of character, sterling integrity, control of circumstances and whose marked 
success in establishing great industries have contributed in such an eminent 
degree to the solidity and progress of the entire country. His life has been 
manly, his actions sincere, his manner unaffected and his example is well 
worthy of emulation. 

FRANK W. MITCHELL. 

Frank W. Mitchell occupies a commanding position in the business cir- 
cles of Seattle, being the vice-president and manager of the store belonging 
to the Mitchell, Lewis & Staver Company, extensive dealers in mining and 
milling machinery, wagons and carriages. It is true that he entered upon 
a business already established, but many a man of less resolute principles 
could not have carried on the work, increasing the business of the house as he 
has done, and in his labors he has shown marked enterprise, keen discernment 
and strong purpose. Mr. 'Mitchell is a native of Washington and his family 
is of Scotch lineage. The grandfather, Henry Mitchell, was born in Scot- 
land on the nth of March, 1810, and in 1833 crossed the Atlantic to the 
new world, taking up his abode in Chicago, Illinois, where he engaged in the 
manufacture of the INIitchell wagon. In 1856 he removed to Kenosha, Wis- 
consin, where he established the Bain J\Ianufactory, which he afterward sold 
to E. Bain. His next place of residence was Racine, and there he became 
the founder of the Mitchell & Lewis Company, which carried on a very ex- 
tensive business there, manufacturing thirty thousand wagons yearly. Mr. 
Mitchell died on the 23d of October, 1893, at the advanced age of eighty- 
three years. 

William Henry Mitchell, the eldest son, and the father of our subject, 
was born in Chicago in 1S34 and accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Kenosha. The year 1853 witnessed his arrival on the Pacific coast. He 
crossed the plains with oxen, leaving his Wisconsin home in April and arriv- 
ing in Olympia, Washington territory, in the following October. He was 
a single man at that time, but while enroute met the lady who afterward be- 



I PUWC LIBRARY] 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 257 

came his wife, for she traveled in the same wagon train and the acquaintance 
thus formed ripened into love that was consummated by marriage. She bore 
the maiden name of Martha T. Johns and was a native of Tennessee. Her 
father was Bennett L. Johns, who came direct from Missouri to the north- 
west and located in Seattle in 1853, becoming a pioneer resident of the town. 
At Olympia William Henry Mitchell was lirst engaged in cutting cord wood, 
but soon turned his attention to blacksmithing and later to the butcher busi- 
ness. As he prospered he enlarged the field of his activity until he became 
actively engaged in the wholesale cattle business and for a short time was 
also in the grocery business. He likewise conducted a bakery and became 
interested in a saw mill at Tumwater, near Olympia, as a member of the firm 
of Ward & Mitchell. He afterward owned a mill in Olympia, there carrying 
on business for a number of years. His enterprise grew in volume and im- 
portance and he became one of the builders of a railroad extending from 
Olympia to Tenino, of which line he had the entire control. In 1882 he sold 
this and in that year he made his first visit back to his old home in Racine, 
from which he had been absent twenty-nine years. Later he returned to 
Portland, Oregon, for the purpose of representing the Michell & Lewis Com- 
pany on the Pacific and introducing their wagons into this part of the coun- 
try. He found a good market for the products of the factory which his 
father had established, and continued in the business until 1892, at which 
time the present Mitchell, Lewis & Staver Company was formed, of the Mich- 
ell & Lewis Company general agency and the Staver & Walker Company. 
The new company was incorporated in Portland in February, 1892, and Mr. 
Mitchell, the father of our subject, became its president. He retired from 
active participation in the business, however, in 1897 and is now spending 
the evening of life in a well earned rest at Tumwater, near Olympia. He 
is, however, the nominal head of the company. He has a most beautiful 
property and well he merits an honorable retirement from labor. His career 
has certainly been one of remarkable success, deserving of the admiration 
and respect of all. His efforts, too, have been such as command uniform 
confidence and his career has ever been characterized by sterling integrity, 
by keen foresight and managing ability that far exceeded that of the average 
person. The lady who shared with him in all the pioneer experiences of life 
in the northwest was called to her final rest in 1896 when fifty-six years of 
age. Mr. Mitchell has been a lifelong Democrat, but is not a bitter partisan. 
He has filled various offices, including that of sheriff of Thurston county, in 
which he was an incumbent in 1857. He was likewise a member of the Wash- 
ington territory legislature, being widely recognized as a leader of public 



258 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

thought and opinion as well as in industrial and commercial circles. Mr. 
and Mrs. Mitchell were the parents of five children, four of whom are yet 
living : H. W., who is now manager of the business of the Mitchell, Lewis 
& Staver Company in Portland, and is secretary and treasurer of the corpora- 
tion ; Edith, the wife of A. McCoquadale, an employe of the Oregon Railroad 
and Navigation Company, at Portland; and Albert B., who is with his father 
at Tumwater. 

Frank W. Mitchell was educated in the schools of his native city and 
in a business college in San Francisco, California. In 1882 he became con- 
nected with his father's business as a bookkeeper, also performing other of- 
fice duties, and the latter went upon the road as a traveling salesman through 
the northwest, selling the products carried by the house. He also opened a 
branch hodse in Walla Walla, conducting it for a year, at the end of which 
time he again went upon the road. In 1887 he returned to the office and 
continued his connection with the business in Portland until 1894, at which 
time he came to Seattle to assume the management of the extensive trade 
which is controlled from this point, the house having been established here 
at the time of the incorporation of the company in 1892. They deal on an 
extensive scale in mining and milling machinery, wagons and carriages, their 
goods being shipped to many parts of the United States. His business abil- 
ity, executive force and keen insight have been largely instrumental in pro- 
moting the business in the northwest, bringing to the corporation a high de- 
gree of prosperity. 

In 1887 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Mitchell and Miss Georgie 
May Riggen, of Portland, who was born in California. They became the 
parents of one daughter, Mildred May, who was left motherless in 1897 by 
the death of Mrs. Mitchell. On the ist of January, 1900, Mr. Mitchell was 
again married, his second union being with Miss Marie Histermann, a native 
of Germany, who in her childhood was brought to America by her parents, 
who located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Later she returned to the father- 
land and was educated in some of its best schools. In 1889 she came to 
Seattle, just after the great fire here. Both Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell have 
a host of warm friends in this city, the hospitality of many of its best homes 
being accorded them. Mr. Mitchell is one of the native sons of Washing- 
ton, having always been identified with the interests of this state. He votes 
with the Republican party and is deeply interested in all that pertains to the 
progress and improvement of the northwest. He is thoroughly informed 
concerning his business, Jiaving made a close study of it in principle and de- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 259 

tail. He stands to-day, strong in his manhood and strong in his honor and 
good name, a most prominent and active factor in the commercial hfe of 
the northwest. 

ALFRED BATTLE. 

The history of the Seattle bar shows that Alfred Battle has been con- 
nected with almost every case of importance, especially in the branches of 
civil law, that has been tried in the courts of this district during the past 
fifteen years. He has attained to a position of distinction as a representa- 
tive of the legal fraternity and is a member of the law firm of Ballingery 
Ronald & Battle, one of the most celebrated law firms in the state of Wash- 
ington. Our subject is a_ native of Texas, his birth having occurred in Mc- 
Lennan county on the 22d of March, 1858. The family is of French line- 
age and at an early period of American history was established in North 
Carolina and Virginia. It was well represented by valiant soldiers in the 
Revolution, and members of the family largely aided in establishing the 
policy and course of the old Dominion during an early period in their set- 
tlement. Thomas E. Battle, the grandfather of our subject, was born in 
Virginia, whence he removed to Georgia and was there married and reared 
his family. He held membership in the Methodist church and became one 
of the early representatives of that denomination in the south. He took 
a very active part in church work and was a man of great usefulness and 
influence. "His days were long upon the land" for he attained the ripe 
old age of ninety-six years, leaving behind him a memory that was long 
enshrined in the hearts of those who knew him. 

Nicholas William Battle, the father of our subject, was born in Georgia, 
and pursued his education in Virginia. He married Miss Ann Cabanass, 
also a native of Georgia, and when the country became involved in Civil 
war, true to his love for the land of the south he joined the Confederate 
army and served his country with the rank of colonel. After the close of 
hostilities he removed to Waco, Texas, where he practiced law during the 
remainder of his business career. He is now residing in Seattle at the ven- 
erable age of eighty-one years, but the lady of his choice, who so long 
traveled life's journey with him, sharing in its joys and sorrows, its adver- 
sities and prosperity, was called from his side on the 3d of February, 1900, 
departing this life at the age of seventy-two years. Like her husband she 
was a devoted member of the Baptist church and enjoyed the respect and 
warm regard of many friends. Unto this worthy couple were born eight 



26o REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

children, of whom four are yet Hving, Thomas E. and Mrs. L. W. Goodrich 
being still residents of Texas, while Edgar and Alfred make their home in 
the city of Seattle. 

Alfred Battle pursued his education in Waco University, now the Bay- 
lor University, in which institution he was graduated with the class of 1878, 
winning the first honors of that class and becoming its valedictorian. He 
acquired his legal education in his father's law office and in the Vanderbilt 
University of Nashville, Tennessee, and was admitted to the bar in Marlin, 
Texas, entering upon practice in connection with his father, in Waco, Texas, 
where he remained until March, 1887. The following year he came to 
Seattle and opened an office, practicing alone until 1889, when he entered 
into partnership with S. M. Shipley, this association being maintained until 
1897, when Mr. Battle became the junior member ;n the present well known 
and prominent firm of Ballinger, Ronald & Battle. 

In the great fire which swept over the city on the 6th of June, 1889, 
Mr. Battle lost his fine library and all of his nice furniture, which w^as un- 
insured. After the fire, at the time the streets were remodeled and re- 
graded, there arose much heavy litigation in which the city was involved and 
Mr. Battle was employed by Seattle to assist the corporation counsel. One 
of the first cases of this kind was that brought by the Seattle Gas and Elec- 
tric Light Company against the city to recover one hundred thousand dol- 
lars for damages alleged to have been sustained by reason of the change 
in street grading. Mr. Battle won this suit for the city and afterward won 
the suit brought by the Oregon Improvement Company, involving the right 
and title to a portion of certain street property. Other cases came up in 
rapid succession in which he took such a conspicuous part and so demon- 
strated his superior ability that he became a candidate of his party for cor- 
poration counsel. He had not sought the office, but made the race, running 
several hundred votes ahead of the Democratic ticket, but the entire Re- 
publican ticket was elected. The large vote which he polled, however, proved 
his present popularity and the confidence reposed in him by many of the 
opposition as well as those of his own party. Mr. Battle has since been re- 
tained as counsel, either for the plaintiff or defendant in almost every nota- 
h\e suit that has arisen in this district since that time. Among these may 
l3e mentioned the suit of Dexter, Horton & Company, versus Sayward, 
involving the Port Madison Mill property and the franchises of the Con- 
solidated Street Railways in Seattle. In this case be was employed by the 
petitioners. Beginning with the month of Februar}', 1896, he has repre- 
sented possibly four-fifths of the litigated cases and proceedings relating 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 261 

to the Seattle tide lands; and in fact has made a specialty of tide land liti- 
gation, which, together with corporate and municipal litigation, has con- 
stituted a large part of his practice. He has acquired the reputation of 
being one of the ablest land lawyers in the state. He has a most compre- 
hensive and accurate knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence bearing 
upon these departments of litigation and there is added to his superior talent 
in the line of his chosen calling a keen mentality, a strong determination, a 
logical turn of mind that cause his arguments to follow a regular sequence. 
Mr. Battle was united in marriage in June, 1900, to Miss Ma'dge Fow- 
ler, a native of Newton, Kansas, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. 
Fowler, of Brighton Beach, Washington, near Seattle. Our subject has 
always been an advocate of the Democracy and is a recognized leader in the 
ranks of his party in Washington, although he has never been a politician 
in the sense of an aspirant to office. He belongs to the Bar x\ssociation 
and the Ranier Club, also the Seattle Athletic Club and in social circles is 
very prominent, while at the bar he has made a most brilliant record. He 
has ever occupied a prominent position in the legal ranks of the practitioners 
of Seattle. His life has been one of untiring activity and crowned with 
a high degree of success, yet he is not less esteemed as a citizen than as a 
lawyer, and his kindly impulses and charming cordiality of manner have 
rendered him exceedingly popular among all classes. The favorable judg- 
ment which the world passed upon him in his early years has never been 
set aside nor in any degree modified. It has, on the contrary, been em- 
phasized by his careful conduct of important litigation, his candor and fair- 
ness in the presentation of cases, his zeal and earnestness as an advocate, 
and the generous commendation he has received from his contemporaries, 
who unite in bearing testimony as to his high character and superior mind. 

W. D. WOOD. 

On the Pacific coast W. D. Wood has spent his entire life and to-day 
he is numbered among Seattle's leading and influential citizens. His birth 
occurred in Tomales, California, on the ist of December, 1858. He comes 
of English ancestry. His father, Guy M. Wood, was born in Canada and 
in 1852 came to the new world, taking up his abode in California, so that 
he was the progenitor of this branch of the Wood family in the United 
States. He married Miss Sarah J. Bell, a native of Canada, and in order 
to provide for his family devoted his attention to farming and daii7ing, 
following the dual pursuit in the Golden state for many years. In 1891, 



262 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

however, he left Cahfornia and with his wife came to Seattle, where they 
are now esteemed residents of the city, the former being: ni his seventieth 
year, while Mrs. Wood is sixty-three years of age. Both are ^•alued mem- 
bers of the Methodist church. Unto them were born se^•en sons and a 
daughter. 

Of this family W. D. Wood is the eldest. In the public schools of 
his native state he acquired his preliminary education and later became a 
student in Napa College, after which he pursued a two years' course in the 
law departm.ent of the University of California and was admitted to the 
bar of that state in 1882. He immediately selected Seattle as a city in 
which to begin his professional career, believing that he might here achieve 
success. He became a partner of the Hon. J. T. Ronald and they prac- 
ticed together for about two years. On the expiration of that period Mr. 
Wood entered into partnership with Judge I. M. Hall. He had previously 
learned shorthand reporting and in addition to his practice did court re- 
porting for some time. In 1885 he was elected probate judge of King 
county, sendng with ability in that office for two years and in 1888 he be- 
came associated with Eben S. Osborne in the title and abstract business 
under the firm name of Wood & Osborne. This was the beginning of the 
business now conducted by the Osborne Temper Company. 

In 1889 Mr. Wood withdrew from the firm to become connected with 
a large real estate investment and improvement company. He secured an 
extensive amount of property in the vicinity of Green Lake and with others 
constructed the Green Lake Electric Street Railway with the result that 
extensive improvements were carried on in that part of the city, greatly 
benefitting Seattle thereby. In 1889 ]\Ir. Wood was elected by popular 
ballot as a member of the first state senate of Washington, representing 
King county for a term of one year. In 1893 he was appointed a member 
of the board of regents of the University of Washington, in which office 
he sen'^ed for two years, and in 1895 ^^ "^'^'^^ appointed mayor of Seattle 
to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of the Hon. Frank D. Black. 
During his incumbency as the chief executive of the city Mr. Wood ex- 
ercised his highest powers to advance Seattle's interests along every line 
of substantial improvement and progress. He made an excellent record 
in office, winning the high commendation of the general public. In 1897, 
at the time of the Klondike excitement, he went north to engage in the 
work of transportation and in merchandising in the Yukon country, and 
with others organized the Seattle- Yukon Transportation Company. Since 
that time Mr. Wood has given his entire attention to that work, having the sue- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 263 

cessful management of the business in the north, while Mr. A, L. Hawley 
had the management of the business in Seattle. Mr. Wood spent more 
than half of his time in the Yukon country during this period,, the enter- 
prise having grown to a gross business of one million dollars per annum. 
At the termination of four years the Seattle- Yukon Transportation Com- 
pany sold out to the consolidated company and Mr. Wood spent the season 
of 1 90 1 in closing up his business affairs in the north, having recently re- 
turned to Seattle to remain permanently here. 

In 1883 occurred the marriage of Mr. Wood and Miss Emma J. Wall- 
ingford, a native of the state of Minnesota, and a daughter of Captain John 
N. Wallingford, of Seattle. Four children have been born to them, but 
only one is now living, Paul, who is with his parents. Our subject and his 
wife are members of the Plymouth Congregational church and occupy an 
enviable position in social circles. Mr. Wood has been a life-long Republi- 
can and is a citizen of the highest integrity and respectability, having made 
for himself a creditable record in every position which he has filled, whether 
of a public or private nature. 

DANIEL JONES. 

Daniel Jones, who for the past twelve years has been extensively en- 
gaged in real estate dealing in the city of Seattle, is a native of Blossburg, 
Pennsylvania, where his birth occurred on the 4th of March, 1856. 

Daniel Jones was only about four years of age when the family re- 
moved to Iowa and therefore he was reared in the west, becoming imbued 
with its progressive, enterprising spirit. He pursued his education in 
Grinnell College of that state, in which he was graduated in 1881. 
He engaged in teaching school for several terms and then wishing to make 
the practice of law his life work entered upon a course of study in Colum- 
bia College of New York city, where he was admitted to practice in 1883. 
In that year he removed to Fargo, North Dakota, where he opened an office 
and engaged in practice, but afterward took up his residence in Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota. There he became interested in real estate, and his new 
venture so occupied his time and attention that he abandoned the practice of 
law. In 1888, he arrived in Seattle, where he began dealing in real estate 
and in June, 1889, after the great fire, he became associated with G. C. Phin- 
ney in leasing the ground where the Butler Hotel now stands and erecting 
the block that is now upon that site. In the fall of 1891 Mr. Jones sold 
his interest in the property to his partner. Mr. Phinney died in 1893 and 



264 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

since that time our subject has had charge of his estate. He is now handhng 
real estate on his own account and for others does a loaning, renting and 
insurance business. He is thoroughly informed concerning the value of city 
property, and is a most reliable business man. It was Mr. Jones who sold 
Woodland park to the city, and through his efforts in that direction met 
with great opposition at the time, all give him credit now, for at this day 
the property is worth at least fifty thousand dollars more than it cost the 
city. 

Mr. Jones is a stanch Republican, unswerving in his advocacy of the prin- 
ciples of the party, but he has never sought or desired office. He is a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

HENRY A. SMITH, M. D. 

The subject of this review is one whose history touches the pioneer epoch 
in the annals of the Pacific coast and whose days form an integral part of 
that indissoluble chain which links the early formative period with that of 
latter-day progress and prosperity. When Washington was cut off from 
the comforts and advantages of the east by the long, hot stretches of sand 
and the high mountains he made his way across the plains, braving all the 
trials and hardships of pioneer life in order to make a home in the north- 
west — rich in its resources, yet unclaimed from the dominion of the red man. 
For a half century he has resided in this section of the country and was the 
first physician to locate in the little settlement which has developed into the 
beautiful city of Seattle. 

Dr. Smith was born near Wooster, Wayne county, Ohio, on the nth 
of April, 1830, and is of German lineage on the paternal side, while on the 
maternal he is of English ancestr}', the two families being founded in America 
during an early epoch in her history. His great-grandfather, Copleton 
Smith, served his country in the Revolutionary war. He owned one thous- 
and acres of land, over which the city of Philadelphia has since spread and 
from which he was driven by the Indians, who murdered his wife. Later, 
when he returned to his property, he found that it had been taken by others, 
who met him with rifles and would have killed him had he pressed his claim. 
He was a man of wonderful physical endurance and lived to the very advanced 
age of one hundred and twenty years. When one hundred years old he cut 
ten new teeth. 

Nicholas Smith, the father of the doctor, was born in Pennsylvania 
in 1799. He married Abigail Teaff, a native of Virginia, and they removed 



piJBiLlCLlBHART] 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 265 

to Wooster, Ohio. He was a minister of the Christian church and engaged 
in preaching during the greater part of his Hfe. He died in his fiftieth year, 
but his wife, long surviving him, passed away at the ripe old age of eighty 
years. She came west with her son, the Doctor, and acted as his housekeeper 
throughout the pioneer period in Seattle's development. A most earnest and 
devoted Christian woman, she belonged to the church in wdiich her husband 
was a minister and her influence was widely felt for good aiid left an indeli- 
ble impression upon the lives and characters of her children. She was the 
mother of nine children. The only surviving one, with the exception of the 
Doctor, is Samuel T. Smith, who resides in Horida. 

Dr. Smith was educated in the public schools and Alleghany College 
at Meadville, Pennsylvania. He also began the study of medicine in the last 
named place and continued it in Cincinnati, Ohio. For some time he en- 
gaged in practice in Keokuk, Iowa, and then resolved to make his home on 
the Pacific coast, which was then being rapidly developed, although pioneer 
conditions yet largely existed. In 1852 he crossed the plains with oxen and 
mules, California being his objective point. He traveled with a large com- 
pany and fortunately took with him a big supply of medicine, which came 
into good play, for it was the year of the cholera scourge, when so many 
emigrants suffered from that dread disease. Dr. Smith was instrumental in 
saving the lives of many and also made considerable money by the exercise 
of his professional skill. 

When he arrived at the Nevada mountains he decided to go to Oregon, 
and arrived at Portland on the 26th of October, 1852, 'the place being then 
a logging camp containing a few hundred people. General Stevens was en- 
gaged in surveying a road to the Sound and the Doctor concluded that was 
a very favorable outlook for the development of the country, so he decided 
to go on. Leaving his mother and sister at Portland he followed the road up 
the Cowlitz river, reached Olympia in safety and on shipboard proceeded 
down Puget Sound. He became enamored with the beauty of the scenery/ 
and resolved to make a home in this portion of the country. He made a 
claim of one hundred and sixty acres on one of the little bays which jut 
inland from the Sound, and the place naturally took his name, being called 
Smith's cove. To the south of his location there was a large bay, beside 
which was a sawmill and a few log cabins. He became the physician of the 
little settlement, which is now the magnificent city of Seattle. There was 
little sickness in the camp and therefore but slight opportunity for Dr. Smith 
to earn a living at his profession, so he planted potatoes and these largely sup- 
plied him with the necessaries of life at an early day, but gradually the set- 

15 



266 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

tlement grew, his professional services were more and more in demand and 
in course of time he had a large and lucrative practice. After some years 
had passed he built a hospital and patients were brought to him on boats from 
other places and his business became a great success. For many years he 
practiced in King and adjoining counties, doing much to alleviate human 
suffering and to restore health, and distinction came to him by reason of his 
professional skill. Flis property also grew in value. He became possessed 
of eight hundred acres of land and sold a portion of this for $75,000, retain- 
ing, however, fifty acres. Subsequently this became worth more than the 
part which he had sold. He built a wharf at the foot of Pike street and a, 
brick block at the corner of James and Second avenues. After the fire he 
also erected a number of tenement houses. His real estate investments 
brought to him a handsome fortune, owing to the increase in the value of 
property. He was likewise a stockholder in the IMerchants National Bank. 

But many years had passed and it required the combined efforts of many 
enterprising citizens to make Seattle the beautiful city which we to-day find 
it. Dr. Smith recalls many incidents of pioneer days, when life was fraught 
with hardships and ofttimes with danger. During the time of the Indian 
war he was obliged to lep.ve his claim and take refuge in the town and his 
home and others outside the town were destroyed. The Doctor volunteered 
and was surgeon of Company A and Company H of the Sixth Regiment, 
receiving his commission from Governor Stevens. Their duty was to guard 
the town and scour the surrounding country while the families remained in 
safety within the stockade. In December, 1856, the Indians attacked the 
town, the fight lasting all da}'. The government ship Decatur had just en- 
tered the bay and took a part in the battle which saved the town. The ship 
shelled the Indians, who were filled with great consternation at the balls 
which shot twice. An Indian saw a ball from the ship fall, and, thinking 
that he had found a prize, ran and picked it up. Just then it exploded and 
killed him and several others. Only two white men lost their lives in that 
struggle. 

In 1862 Dr. Smith was happily married to IMiss ]\Iary A. Phalen, a 
native of Wisconsin, and unto them liave been born a son and seven daughters, 
and with one exception all are yet living. Lula became the wife of J. R. H. 
Pennefather, an attorney of Seattle; Luma married George Linder, Jr.. of 
Boston, who is now a resident of this city; Maude became the wife of Charles 
Teaff, of San Francisco, and' died from the effects of a surgical operation in 
J 899; Laurine is at home; Ralph W. is engaged in mining in Alaska; May 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 267 

is with lier parents; Lillian married \Villiani Tompkins; and lone married 
C. H. Graff, a professor in the University of Wisconsin. 

The Doctor has been a Repubhcan since the organization of the party 
and has four times been elected by his fellow citizens to the lower house of the 
legislature, where he served with honor and credit, leaving the impress of 
his strong and upright nature upon the legislation enacted during that period. 
He never sought office, never asked for a vote and never was defeated in an 
election, and while he was presiding officer in the council there was never 
an appeal taken from his rulings. His political record in these regards is 
almost without a parallel, and indicates in unmistakable terms not only his 
personal popularity but also the unqualified confidence reposed in his ability, 
loyalty and trustworthiness. Dr. Smith has written a number of valuable 
reminiscent articles concerning the early times, which have been published 
by the press and are of much historical mterest and value. One of these was 
a description of the Indian chief Seattle, for whom the town was named, and 
also gave an account of one of the chief's oratorical efforts, of which the 
Doctor had taken notes. The measure of good which Dr. Smith has ac- 
complished in the world cannot be estimated, but all who know aught of his 
history acknowledge his worth, first in his professional capacity, then as a 
citizen who has contributed to the material upbuilding of the city which he 
has chosen as his home and again as a public official, over whose record there 
falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. 

JOHN N. WALLINGFORD. 

It has been truly said that the real-estate dealer may make or mar a 
city. If he has a deep interest in the welfare and improvement, not only 
because of the prosperity which may accrue to him, but also because of a 
loyal and progressive public spirit, he will so conduct his transaction that 
die beauty of the city will be enhanced and the improvements carried on 
along those lines which bring substantial upbuilding and material progress. 
In this respect ]\Ir. W^allingford is an ideal citizen and his labors have been 
of much benefit to Seattle. He is both widely and favorably known here 
and his life history therefore cannot fail to prove of interest to many of 
our readers. 

The width of the continent separates Mr. Wallingford from his birth- 
place, for he is a native of Athens, Somerset county, Maine, where he first 
opened his eyes to the light of day on the 4th of July, 1833. The family 
is of English lineage. The grandfather, Jacob Wallingford, was born in 



268 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

England and on crossing the broad Atlantic took up his abode in Rochester^ 
New Hampshire, where he reared his family, among whom was Jonathan 
Wallingford, the father of our subject, who was born in Rochester, on the 
7th of Jnly, 1762. In 1780, when but eighteen years of age he volunteered 
for service -in the Revolutionaiy war and was stationed at West Point, where 
at the close of the long struggle which brought independence to the nation 
he received an honorable discharge. He married Miss Betsey Bunker, a 
native of Pittsfield, New Hampshire, and they removed to the Pine Tree 
state, where he cleared and developed a farm upon which he spent his re- 
maining days, his death occurring when he had attained the age of eighty- 
five years. His wife survived him and lived to the very advanced age of 
ninety-three years. They were the parents of ten children, of whom Mr, 
Wallingford and his sister, !Mrs. Betsey Durkee, of Minnesota, are now the 
only survivors. 

John N. Wallingford was educated in the public schools of his native 
town. When fourteen years of age he lost his father, after whi(;h he re- 
moved to the western part of Maine and later to the western part of Mas- 
sachusetts. Subsequently he sought a home in western Minnesota, and in 
April, 1861, in response to President Lincoln's call for aid to crush out the 
Rebellion, he enlisted in Company H, Second Regiment, Minnesota Volun- 
teer Infantry. He had watched with growing interest the progress of events 
in the south, noticed the attitude brought about by the slavery question and 
resolved that if the southern states attempted to secede and thus overthrow 
the Union he would strike a blow in its defense. His regiment was as- 
signed to the Western Army under General Thomas and the first engagement 
in which he participated was at Mill Springs, after, which he took part in 
the hard-fought battles of Pittsburg Landing, Perryville, Stone River and 
various skirmishes. The regiment made a splendid record, never suffering 
defeat in a single engagement. Mr. Wallingford joined the army as a 
private but was promoted to the rank of orderly sergeant and afterward 
to second lieutenant. Taken ill, because of his disability, he was honorably 
discharged, but when he had sufficiently recovered his health he raised a 
company, which filled up the depleted ranks of the First Minnesota Infantry, 
and of which he was made captain. With his company he proceeded to 
the front and served on the Potomac until General Sherman had made his 
way to the sea and General Lee had surrendered his forces to General Grant, 
thus practically ending the great sanguinary struggle, which had been car- 
ried on with such sacrifice of the brave boys of both the north and the south, 
but which resulted in the perpetuation of the Union that stands to-day 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 269 

stronger than ever before. Mr. Wallingford had the honor of being one of 
the participants in the grand review which passed through the streets of 
Washington and before the stand upon which the President cheered the boys 
in bkie who had so vahantly fought for their country — the most celebrated 
mihtary pageant ever seen on the western hemisphere. In the fall of 1865 
Mr. Wallingford was mustered out and returned to his home a veteran 
and a victor. 

Again taking up the peaceful pursuits of civil life he established a gen- 
eral mercantile store in Rochester, Minnesota, conducting the enterprise for 
some time with signal success. He also became the owner of a farm, to the 
operation of which he gave his personal supervision, but having become tired 
of the cold winters of Minnesota he removed to California in 1873. Locat- 
ing in Napa City, he there established a lumber business and was foreman 
of the yard for fourteen years. 

In 1888 Mr. Wallingford arrived in Seattle and here began dealing in 
real estate. He has principally handled his own property at Green Lake, 
where he has platted eighty acres, a part of it in Wallingford Park and the 
remainder in Wallingford division to Green Lake. The land there is being 
rapidly built upon and improved and recently there has been erected a fine 
school at a cost of thirty-five thousand dollars. The Green Lake car line 
extends to his property, making only a twenty minute ride to the business 
portion of the city. Mr. Wallingford has made judicious investments 
and closely watching market values he has so handled his prosperity that 
it has brought him an excellent return upon his investment. 

In 1857 occurred the marriage of Mr. Wallingford and Miss Arabelle 
J. De Groot, a native -of New York city and unto them have been born a 
son and a daughter. Noble, whose home is in Seattle, is now engaged in 
mining in Alaska, while the daughter, Emma J., is now the wife of the 
Hon. William D. Wood, ex-mayor of Seattle and ex- judge of the probate 
court of King county. Mrs. Wallingford is a valued member of the Meth- 
odist church and our subject attends its services and contributes to its sup- 
port. In Seattle he built a family residence, which he afterward sold for 
twenty-seven thousand dollars and with his family he is now living in the 
beautiful suburb of Green Lake. 

In politics Mr. Wallingford has ever been a faithful adherent of the Re- 
publican party, firm in his belief that its platform contains the best elements 
of good government. While residing in Minnesota he served for two years 
as deputy sheriff and in Seattle has twice been a member of the city council 
and for two terms was police commissioner. He belongs to the Society of 



2 70 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Sons of the American Revolution, aided in organizing the Giand Army Post 
in Napa City, Cahfornia, and since the formation of that society has been 
one of its worthy supporters. For more than twenty years he has been an 
exemplary member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and at all 
times is faithful to its teachings which inculcate a fraternal spirit. A man 
of strong indivduality and indubitable probity, one who has attained to a 
due measure of success in the affairs of life, and whose influence has ever 
been exerted in the direction of the good, the true and the beautiful, this 
honored veteran of the Civil war assuredly demands representation in this 
volume. 

ALBERT L. KELSALL. 

Albert L. Kelsall is president and manager of the Northwestern Iron 
Works, doing business at the foot of University street, in Seattle, and his 
enterprise is one of the paying industrial concerns of the city. A native of 
New Jersey, ]\Ir. Kensall was born in Newark, February lo, 1859. His 
great-grandfather 'on the maternal side was Elias Hall, who was a scholar 
and literary gentleman of note in his day. He was the author of several 
works on geological subjects, one of which ]\Ir. Kelsall now has in his pos- 
session and prizes very highly. His father, Henry Kelsall, was born in 
England and came to the United States in 1840. He was a hatter by trade 
and engaged in business along that line in the east until the Civil war began, 
when he volunteered in defense of the government of his adopted country, 
enlisting in the Twenty-ninth Regiment, New Jersey Infantry, for nine 
months' service, and on the expiration of that period he enlisted in the 
Thirty-third Regiment, New Jersey Zouaves, serving as a valiant defender 
of the Union cause until the close of the war, but he died from effects of his 
arduous army life, passing away at his home in Newark, New Jersey. He 
had married Aliss Ann Vernon, a lady of English ancestry, and unto them 
were born eight children. After the death of her first husband, she married 
again and had three children by the second marriage. Of the first family, 
Theodore E., is secretar}- and treasurer of the Northwestern Iron Works. 

Albert L. Kelsall was educated in the public schools, learned the ma- 
chinist's trade in Oskaloosa, Iowa, and has since made that his life work. 
He was for several years in Chicago and other important cities and in 1888 
came to Seattle. After remaining in the city and watching business condi- 
tions and opportunities for six months he engaged in business with the 
Charles Hicks Company, and in 1897 bought out 3>Ir. Hicks' interest and 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 271 

incorporated the Northwestern Iron Works, being associated with his 
brother, previously mentioned, Ole Stanwick and M. A. Kelsall. The firm 
manufactvires all kind of marine, mill and mining machinery, and has se- 
cured a large and successful business. 

In 1885, Mr. Kelsall was united in marriage to Miss May A. Perry, a 
native of Ohio, and they have three children : Harry Cadwallader Kelsall, 
who was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, Ray Roland Kelsall and Lillian Altheo 
Kelsall, who are natives of Seattle. Mrs. Kelsall is a member of the Meth- 
odist church, but Mr. Kelsall gives his preference to the Congregational 
church. He is a very prominent Mason, having been initiated into the mys- 
teries of the Order in Tri Luminar Lodge, No. 18, F. & A. M., of Oskaloosa, 
Iowa. He now affiliates with Eureka Lodge, No. 20, of Seattle, and of this 
lodge he is a past master. He belongs to Oriental Chapter, No. 19, R. A. 
M., and to Seattle Commandery, No. 2, K. T., and in all of these he is a 
valued working member. In the Scottish Rite he has attained the thir- 
tieth degree, and is also a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, his membership being in Afifi Temple, at Tacoma. 
Thus he has gained a knowledge of almost all that is to be learned in con- 
nection with the great fraternity and the teachings of the craft which pro- 
mote all that is uplifting, ennobling and helpful in life. In politics he has 
always voted with the Democracy but is not bitterly partisan and desires the 
best interest of the country, no matter along what avenue the advancement 
is secured and promoted. 

JOHN FIELD. 

Among the citizens of Kent to whom is vouchsafed an honored retire- 
ment from labor, as the reward of a long, active and useful business career, 
is John Field, who through an extended period has been connected with the 
hiterests of King county. He was born in Kent, England, on the 20th of 
November, 1837, a son of Peter and Betsy (Sullow) Field, both also natives 
of that place, the father born in 1802 and the mother in 181 7, and there they 
spent their entire lives, the father being called to his final rest in 1870, while 
the mother survived until 1885. 

John Field received his early education in the parish schools of his native 
place, and later attended a private boarding school in that city Fie remained 
on the old home farm with his parents until i860, and in October of that 
year came to America, spending the first year here on a farm in New Jersey. 
In the spring of 1862 he removed to Sussex, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, 



272 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

where in the following August he enlisted for the Civil war, joining the 
Twenty-eighth Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry, with \\hich he served for three 
years, being mustered out at Brownsville, Texas, in August, 1865, while his 
discharge was received at Madison, Wisconsin, shortly afterward. After a 
.short visit at his former home in Sussex, Wisconsin, ]\Ir. Field located at 
Pine Bluff, on the Arkansas river, where he was employed as overseer of a 
large force of negroes on a cotton plantation during the winter of 1865-6. 
For the succeeding five years he worked in the lumber camps of Eau Claire, 
Wisconsin, and for three months during the year of 1874 he found employ- 
ment in the vineyards of Santa Cruz and San Jose, California. His next 
place of residence was at Port Gamble, \\'ashington, to which place he re- 
moved in the fall of 1874, and for the following six months was engaged as 
a watchman in the sawmills there. In ^lay, 1875, he took up his abode in 
Seattle, and in the fall of the same year rented a farm in the Wliite river val- 
ley, four miles from the present town of Kent, where he followed agricultural 
pursuits until 1890, and during this time also secured residence lots in Kent 
and Seattle and a small farm in Lewis county, but in 1891, on account of ill 
health, he sold his entire possessions and for the following two years was an 
inmate of the Soldier's Home at Orting. Since 1893, however, he has made 
his home in the l^eautiful little town of Kent, where he owns a pleasant and 
attractive home. His energy and enterprise, capable management and honor- 
aDle dealings brought to him a comfortable competence, and therefore he is 
able to put aside all business cares and rest in the enjoyment of the fruits of 
former toil. 

At Sussex, Wisconsin, in April, 1867, J\Ir. Field was united in marriage 
iO Aliss Mar}^ Ann Greenland, who was born in Vermont in 1837, and was 
of English descent. Her death occurred at Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in 1872, 
leaving one child, William T. Sherman Field, who is now engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits in Waukesha county, that state. At Kent, Washington, in 
T896, our subject was again married, Mrs. Georgiana Ziegler becoming his 
wife. She was born at Paducah, Kentucky, on the 12th of May, 1849, ^^^ 
when a child was taken to Indiana and afterward to Illinois, where, in Gal- 
latin county, in 1866, she was married to John N. B. Coombs, a farmer. He 
was called to his final rest in 1872, and at Harrisburg, Illinois, his widow was 
married to Eli Ziegler. who departed this life on the 3d of January, 1894. In 
die following year she came to Kent, \\"ashington, and in this city, in 1896, 
she gave her hand in marriage to Mr. Field. By her first marriage she be- 
came the mother of two children : Lillie, the wife of Ed Richardson, of 
Kent, and William, also of thi? citv. Unto the union of ^Ir. and ^Irs. Ziegler 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 273 

five children were born, namely: Eva, who became the wife of Edward 
Zeeum, of Kent; Anna, the wife of Oliver Cavanaugh, of this city; and 
Stella, Lulu and James R., at home. In his political affiliations jMr. Field is 
allied with the Democracy, but during Lincoln's second race for the presidency 
he supported the Republican party, his vote being cast at Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas, where he balloted with one hand while with the other he held his 
musket. During his residence in the White river valley he served for twelve 
years as constable. In his fraternal relations he is a member of Hiram Ver- 
non Post, No. 76, Grand Army of the Republic, in which he is serving as 
senior vice commander. His reputation in business has ever been unassailable, 
and in all the walks of life he is found true to duty and to the trusts reposed 
in him. 

WILLIAM ARNEY. 

William Arney is the senior member of the firm of Arney Brothers, 
dealers in general merchandise and also extensively interested in dairy farm- 
ing and other enterprises at Kent and Blaine, Washington. He was born in 
Somersetshire, England, on the nth of April, 1862. His father, Jesse 
Arney, was born in the same locality in 181 9, and his death there occurred in 
1886. He, too, followed the vocation of farming, and he obtained an honor- 
able position in the business of the community. The mother of our sub- 
ject, who bore the maiden name of Sarah Duckett, was also born in Somerset- 
shire, in 1838, and in 1888 she came with her family to America, locating at 
Forest, Livingston county, Illinois, where she made her home until 1890. In 
that year the family came to Kent, Washington, and she now resides on the 
farm owned by her son William. 

William Arney went to New South Wales, Australia, in 1880, where he 
was engaged in the dairy business for four years and after his return home he 
accompanied the family on their removal to the new world. In 1890, with 
the other members of the family, he came to Washington where during the 
first year he was employed on the Hewett farm, one mile south of Kent, and 
during the following two years he farmed that place as a renter. In 1902 he 
became the owner of one hundred and forty-five acres of land one mile south 
of Kent, where he and his mother still make their home. Forty acres of the 
place have since been sold in small tracts, and until May, 1902, the remainder 
of the place was devoted to dairying purposes, but since that time they have 
carried on general farming. This is one of the banner farms of the valley. 
In 1 90 1 three of the Arney brothers, William, John and Frank, purchased 



274 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

a dairy farm of two hundred and seventy acres near Blaine, W^ashington, 
where they keep one hundred milch cows and also carry on general farming, 
the place being under the management of John Amey. William and Frank, 
as partners, have a forty-acre farm on Suise creek, three ir.iles from Kent, 
on which is a large cheese factory, established in 1901, and they there handle 
from four to five thousand pounds of milk daily. In 1896 the two brothers 
also established a general mercantile store on Front street, in Kent, and in 
1901 they purchased their present handsome and commodious store building 
on that street, this being one of the most important mercantile establishments 
in the White river valley. W' ith the exception of a prospecting tour to Alas- 
ka in 1900, \\'illiam Arney has resided in Kent continuously for twelve years, 
and during all this time he has so lived as to win and retain Lhe friendship and 
esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. His political support is 
given to the Republican party, and in his fraternal relations he is a member of 
the Ancient Order of United \\^orkmen, of Kent. 

Frank Arney, the junior member of the firm of Arney Brothers, was 
born near Bristol, England, on the 14th of ^lay, 1872, and he was there 
reared and educated. Removing with the family to the new world in 1888, 
he resumed his studies in Illinois for a time, and after completing his educa- 
tion he was employed at farm labor until he became established in business 
with his brother William. He was married at Kent, in 1896, to Carrie Reed, 
and they have two children, ^lay and William Rodney. 

The other members of the Arney family are : John, the manager of the 
dairy farm at Blaine; Rodney Jesse, an Episcopal minister at Seattle; 
Edward, a civil engineer at Perth, Australia ; and George, a minister in the 
Methodist church and now located at Bremerton, Washington. 

AUSTIN P. BURWELL. 

Austin Peck Burwell, \\ho for se\'eral years has been the president of 
the Seattle Cracker & Candy Company, occupies a foremost position in com- 
mercial circles in this city, having achieved splendid success through business 
methods that will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. He is a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in the city of fiercer, in 
]\lercer county, January 31, 1848. He is of English ancestry and the line 
of descent in this country can be traced back to John Burwell, who came to 
^Massachusetts when the ]\laviiower made its second vovasfe. He located 
near ^Nliddletown, Connecticut, and Eiias Burwell. the grandfather of our 
subject, was born in New Haven, Connecticut. When he had arrived at 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 275 

man's estate he married Miss Amy Piatt, of Milford, Connecticut, In the 
Charter Oak state lie engaged in business as a manufacturer of clocks. He 
held membership in the Congregational church and lived an upright life, but 
was called to his final rest at the early age of thirty-three years, dying of 
pneumonia. His wife long survived him and attained the advanced age of 
eighty-two years. Their son, Austin Smith Burwell, the father of our sub- 
ject, was born on the 12th of February, 18 14, and married Miss Susan Peck, 
of Orange, Connecticut. He, too, engaged in the manufacture of clocks and 
also conducted a cabinet-making business in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. In 
1847 li^ remoN^ed to Mercer, that state, where he opened a large general mer- 
cantile establishment, continuing in business there until 1871, when he was 
succeeded by his two eldest sons, A. P. and A. S. Burwell. In 1885 ^^ came 
to Seattle, where he remained until his death, which occurred on the 23d of 
March, 1901, when he had reached the age of eighty-seven years. He was a 
most public spirited gentleman, taking a deep interest in every measure and 
movement calculated to .advance the general welfare. For two terms he 
served as mayor of the city and wa-s a most honorable and upright officer. 
Both he and his wife were consistent Christians and the influence of their 
characters is seen in the lives of their children. They had -four sons and 
three daughters, all of whom became identified with Christian work at an 
early age. They lost one son, Harvey, when only seven years of ag-e. 

Austin Peck Burwell obtained his early education in the public schools 
of his native town and supplemented it by a five years course in Oberlin 
College, where he was graduated with the class of 1870. He then engaged 
with his brother in the conduct of the business which their father had estab- 
lished and in which they met with gratifying success. After conducting the 
enterprise for eighteen years they sold the store, and in 1885 came to Seattle, 
which was then a city of about ten thousand population. Here the three 
brothers, Austin P., Anson S. and Edward, became identified with business 
affairs. They organized the Seattle Hardware Company, carrying on a whole- 
sale and retail business which grew to very large proportions. In fact, this 
is now the most extensive enterprise of the kind in the state of Washington. 
Mr. Burwell remained in the firm for nine years and then sold his interest 
to his brothers who still continue the store. In 1894 he aided in organizing 
the Seattle Cracker & Candy Company and was elected its president and man- 
ager, continuing in control of its affairs with marked success until 1899, when 
the business was sold to the Pacific Biscuit Company, a large corporation 
which now controls the greater part of the business in this line for the state, 
Mr. Burwell being retained as manager of the branch in Seattle and also of 



2/6 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the business throughout rhe state of Washington to western Idaho and to 
Alaska. They manufacture all their own goods, including a very large line 
of confectionery of every description. ^Ir. Burwell gives his entire atten- 
tion to the management and operation of the important and extensive busi- 
ness which is under his control, yet has various other investments which ma- 
terially increase his annual income. He is a member of the chamber of com- 
merce of the city and for two terms sen-ed as one of its trustees. 

On the 3d of August, 1871, was celebrated the marriage of Austin P. 
Burwell and ]\[iss Anna Nourse, who had been one of his classmates at Ober- 
lin College. They have two daughters, ]\Iary Elizabeth, now the wife of 
G. F. Waterhouse, of Honolulu, and Susan B., who is with her parents. All 
are valued members of the Congregational church, of which IMr. Burwell is 
a deacon. He is also active in the work of the Sunday-school, teaching one 
of the adult Bible classes and for several terms has served most acceptably as 
Sunday-school superintendent. He contributes liberally to the support of the 
church and does all in his power to promote the moral progress of the com- 
munity with which he has allied his interests. Plis political support is given 
the Republican party but he has never been an office seeker. The cause of 
education finds in him a warm friend, and for a number of terms he has , 
served as one of the school directors, several of the fine school buildings of 
the city having been erected during his official connection with educational 
interests here. He has never neglected an opportunity to do his city a good 
service. Mr. Burwell and each of his brothers have built expensive and 
beautiful homes which stand side by side, their lawns being undivided by 
fences. The business relations between them have ever been of the most 
harmonious character and all are regarded as upright and honorable men 
who have deservedly won a score of friends in the city of their adoption. 
Surrounded at his home by a large circle of friends who appreciate his true 
worth, and admired and esteemed by the citizens of the community, the name 
of Austin P. Burwell will be honored for many generations as that of one of 
the most enterprising business men of Seattle — a man who has acted well 
his part and who has lived a worthy and honorable life. 

JAMES H. TITUS. 

The name of James H. Titus is inscribed high on the roll of King county's 
honored pioneers and eminent men, and the part which he took in founding 
and developing the county well entitles him to prominent mention in this 
volume. He established the town of Kent, in which he has long made his 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 277 

home, laboring for its promotion and welfare. He is honored and esteemed 
by his many friends and acquaintances, and the influence of his life upon the 
community has been most beneficial. 

Mr. Titus was born in Kennebec county, Maine, on the 26th of Septem- 
ber, 1823, and his ancestors settled in that locality when the territory was 
known as Massachusetts. They are of English descent. His father, James 
Titus, was born in the same house in which he first saw the light of day, his 
birth there occurring in 1792, and he died at old family home in 1880. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Gould, was of Scotch and Eng- 
lish descent, and was born in Kennebec county, Maine, March 3, 1799. She 
passed to her final reward in 1870. 

James H. Titus received his education in the district schools of his native 
county, and until his fourteenth year remained under the paternal roof, after 
which he spent one year as a shoemaker, while for a similar period he was em- 
ployed in an oil-cloth factory. He next served an apprenticeship at the 
blacksmith's trade at Augusta, Maine. In 1844 he left the ancestral home 
and removed to Michigan, where for a year he worked at the blacksmith's 
trade in Kalamazoo and Marshall, and for the suceeding foui years made his 
home at Springfield, Massachusets. Returning to Maine in 1849, he pur- 
chased a farm in Kennebeck county, but in that year the gold excitement in 
California attracted him, and selling his possessions in the old Pine Tree state 
he made the journey, via Cape Horn, to the Pacific coast in the fall of 1849. 
During the first four years in the Golden state he worked at his trade in 
Marysville, while for the succeeding ten years he was the proprietor of a hotel 
at Oroville, and in 1872 he came to Seattle, Washington, purchasing and 
making his home on a farm on the Dwamish river for two years. In 1874 
he took up his abode at Maddoxville, on the White river, where he followed 
the dual occupation of farming and blacksmithing for five years, on the ex- 
piration of which period he became the owner of one hundred acres of land, 
and on a portion of this place the town of Kent was afterward built. When 
the Northern Pacific Railroad was constructed through this section, in 1884, 
Mr. Titus disposed of a part of the farm on the east side of the track to 
parties who laid it out into town lots, but he has since held the remainder, con- 
sisting of about thirty lots, on which he has erected many residences, and the 
property is situated on the west side of the railroad track. He is practically 
the founder of the town of Kent, which stands as a monument to his enter- 
prising spirit. In its infancy this place was given the name of Titusville, but 
at the request of the post office department the name was afterward changed 
to Kent. His political support has ever been given to the Republican party 



278 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

and on its ticket he was made the second mayor of Kent, being elected to that 
position in 1892. While a resident of California he held the office of justice 
of the peace for a number of years. In his fraternal relations he is a charter 
member of Titusville Lodge. Independent Order of Odd Feilows, with which 
he has been identified since its organization in 1886. 

The marriage of Air. Titus was celebrated in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
in 1846, \\'hen Miss Sarah Ketchum became his wife. She was born in 
Brownhelm, Lawrence county, Ohio, on the 26th of June, 1828, and in the 
maternal line she is of English and Irish descent, while her paternal ancestors 
were of Dutch descent and were among the early settlers of Massachusetts. 
Eight children were born unto the union of Air. and Mrs. Titus, but the family 
circle has been broken by the hand of death, George Henry, who was born in 
1848, having died in California at the age af twenty-two years, while a 
daughter, Carrie L., born in 1857, died in Whatcom county, Washington, in 
1893. The living children are: James Arthur, a resident of Kent; Edward 
Everett, a farmer near that city ; Alelvin, who is engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits in V/hatcom county; Edith j\I., the wife of James G. Jones, also of Kent; 
Lillie E.. the wife of James Shoff, of Ladner, British Columbia; and Leroy 
C, at home. For many years this worthy couple has lived and labored to 
goodly er.ds among the people of King county, and they are leaving the im- 
press of their individuality upon the public life, the substantial growth and 
material development of the region. 

« 

WILLIAM BREAIER. 

So composite is the social fabric of our republic that we can as yet 
scarcely be said to have developed a national type, and among the many ele- 
ments that have entered into the makeup of our populace there is none which 
lias been of more vital and valuable order than the German, from which 
America has had much to gain and nothing to lose. From the great German 
empire have come many of our most progressive citizens, — men of sterling 
worth of character and endowed with that pragmatic ability which has pro- 
moted advancement along all lines of material industry and has ever stood 
for social stability. Among the representative young men of German birth 
who have attained distinction in connection with the industrial life of the 
state of Washington is Mr. Bremer, who has maintained his home in the Pu- 
get Sound district for the past fourteen years and who has attained marked 
precedence as an able and enterprising business man, — one who has con- 
tributed in no small degree to the work of development and improvement 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 279 

through legitimate hnes of endeavor. He is well deserving of representation 
in this publication as one of that progressive type of men who ha\'e made the 
Evergreen state what it is to-day. He is the owner of the town site of Bre- 
merton, was one of the founders of the village of Sidnev and throueh his 
real-estate operations and well directed enterprise has done much to forward 
the material development of this section of the state, maintaining his home and 
business headquarters in the city of Seattle, where he commands unequivocal 
confidence and esteem. 

William Bremer was bom in the town of Seesen, duchy of Brunswick, 
Germany, on the 12th of June, 1863, being a son of Edward and Matilda 
(Mader) Bremer, representatives of stanch old families of the German father- 
land. Edward Bremer was a man of prominence in his locality, having been 
engaged in the banking business and having attained considerable wealth and 
exercised notable influence in local affairs. He passed his entire life in his 
native land. He and his wife became the parents of eight children, of whom 
the subject of this review was the fifth in older of birth. He received his 
educational discipline in his native land, having completed a course in the 
Jacobson Institute, at Seesen, the same being an institution of more than 
national reputation. In his youth Mr. Bremer became identified with the 
banking business, which he learned in all its details, this training having 
proved of inestimable value to him in his subsequent business career. After 
serving what may be termed an apprenticeship in a banking house in his 
native town he went to the city of Hamburg, where he was identified with a 
similar line of enterprise for a period of two years. When in his twentieth 
year Mr. Bremer bade adieu to home and native land and came to America, 
whither his elder brother, Charles E., had preceded him, being now a pro- 
minent capitalist and business man of Aberdeen, South Dakota. Our subject 
passed about one year in Minnesota and the following three years were spent 
in South Dakota. When but twenty-one years of age he was appointed state 
agent for the John Gund Brewing Company, of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and 
was incumbent of this responsible position for a term of two years, and since 
that time he has never worked on salary, having attained a position of inde- 
pendence and conducted operations on his own responsibility, — a fact that is 
significant, as indecatory of his exceptional business and executive ability, 
and the more notable by reason of the circumstance that w'hen he came to the 
United States he had but slight knowledge of the English language. He was 
for a year engaged in agricultural operations in South Dakota, and at the ex- 
piration of that period, in January, 1888, he came to Washington. Here, 
associated with three others, he purchased the land upon which the town of 



280 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Sidney, Kitsap county, is now located, and they became the founders of the 
town, platting the same and placing the lots upon the market. The village is 
now in a prosperous and thriving condition and its further advancement is 
assured. It should be noted in this connection that Mr. Bremer has bought 
and sold land in nearly every section of Kitsap county, being one of the prime 
factors in its development and his straightforward and honorable course is 
shown by the fact that he has never been compelled to enter into litigation 
with any person to whom he thus sold property. Ever since his arrival in 
Washington Mr. Bremer's principal field of business operations has been in 
Kitsap county, which is on the w^estern shore of the Sound, and he has been 
conspicuously identifijsd with the development of its resources, the building 
up of its towns and the advancing of its material interests. It is a recognized 
fact that in his real-estate transactions in that county he had done more busi- 
ness than that representing the aggregate of all other operators in this line, 
and he is well entitled to the distinction of being designated as one of the 
founders and builders of that section of our great commonwealth, while the 
statement made affords an idea of the great scope and importance of his work. 
In 1891 yir. Bremer platted the town of Bremerton, in the county men- 
tioned, and through his energy, discrimination and far-sighted policy the de- 
\-elopment of this attractive village was brought about, while the town has 
an assuredly bright future before it, since he continued to be actively identified 
with its interests. At that point he sold to the federal government eighty- 
six acres of land at a sacrifice to himself of fifty dollars an acre, in order to 
insure the location of the naval station there, thus indicating his public spirit 
and showing his confidence that the future would justify his course, for a 
more eligible location for the navy yard on Puget Sound could not be found, 
and while he lost forty-three hundred dollars on the immediate transaction 
he firmly believed that his action was politic from a personal as well as general 
standpoint, and time is proving the wisdom of his attitude. This station has 
the only dry dock on the Pacific coast that wnll accomodate the largest type of 
war vessels, and the significance of this statement can not fail of appreciation 
even at a cursory glance. ]\Ir. Bremer has not only thus brought about the 
development of town property, but he has also been extensively engaged in 
the handling of farming and timber lands in the county, usually buying the 
property outright and then placing it upon the market, while in numerous 
instances he has made! valuable improvements before selling. He passes 
Wednesday and Saturday of each week in Bremerton, but maintains his home 
in the city of Seattle and has his ofiice headquarters in the Bailey building, 
suite 404. In politics Mr. Bremer gives a stanch support to the Republican 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 281 

part}^ but he has never had personal ambition in a poHtical way and has taken 
no active part in pnbhc affairs of this nature. His success has been of pro- 
nounced type and he is known as one of the representative young business 
men of the state, in whose future and greater precedence he has the utmost 
confidence, while a more loyal and enthusiastic citizen of the commonwealth 
cannot be found. 

On the 25th of March, 1891, in the city of Seattle, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Bremer to Miss Sophia Hensel, who was born in Portage, 
Wisconsin, a daughter of William Hensel, a well known business man of 
Seattle, and of this union three children have been born, namely : Matilda, 
William and Edward. 

LYMAN B. ANDREWS. 

To the energetic natures and strong mentality of such men as Lyman 
B. Andrews, is due the success and ever increasing prosperity of the Republi- 
can party in this state, and in the hands of this class of citizens there is every 
assurance that the best interests and welfare of the party will be attended to, 
resulting in a culmination of the highest ambitions and expectations enter- 
tained by its adherents. Given to the prosecution of active measures in 
political afifairs, possessing the earnest purpose of placing their party beyond 
the pale of possible diminution of power, the Republican leaders in Washing- 
ion are ever advancing, carrying everything before them in their irriesistible 
onward march. Certainly one of the most potent elements in the success of the 
Republican movement in Washington has been exhibited in rlie personality of 
Lyman B. Andrews, who throughout his life has been a loyal citizen, imbued 
with patriotism and fearlessness in the defense of his honest convictions. He 
is now filling the position of receiver in the land office at Seattle. Other 
positions of trust have been filled by him with marked capability. Most 
loyally he has advocated the cause of the party whose principles he believes 
will best advance the welfare of the Nation. 

Mr. Andrews was born in Ontario county. New York, Februaiy 10, 
1829. His father, William Andrews, was a native of Connecticut, born 
April 17, 1804. The ancestral line can be traced back to John and Mary 
Andrews, who emigrated from England to the new world, settling in Connec- 
ticut in 1640. The line comes down from John and Mary through Daniel, 
Daniel, Joseph, Joseph, George and William to our subject. George An- 
drews, the grandfather, was born in Connecticut and on leaving the state of 
his nativity took up his abode in Rutland county, Vermont, whence he after- 

18 



282 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

ward went to western New York. He was a ship carpenter, and also a house 
carpenter and joiner. \\'ilham Andrews, the father of our subject, was mar- 
ried in the Empire state and was engaged in agricultural pursuits there but 
by trade was a brick layer and plasterer. He wedded Hannah Pierson Vvho 
was descended from one of the old Holland Dutch families of New Jersey, 
Vvhence representatives of the name came to the Empire state at an early day. 
Henry Pierson. the maternal grandfather of our subject, was born ^lay i6. 
1752, and died at the advanced age of ninety-two years, on the fifteenth 
birthdav of his grandson, Lvman B. He was one of the heroes of the Revo- 
lutionary war who fought for the independence of the nation and was with 
Washington when he crossed the Delaware on the bitterly cold Christmas 
night, surprising the troops at Trenton, and winning one of the glorious vic- 
tories of the war. William Andrews died at his home in Seattle in 1871, 
at the age of sixty-nine years, the family residence standing on the present 
site of the Lincoln apartment building, corner Fourth and Aladison streets, 
His wife survived him about seven years, passing aAvay in 1878. 

In the public schools of his native state and later in an academy in Mich- 
igan, Lyman B. Andrews pursued his studies, the family having remo\'ed to 
the latter state in 1832, but in 1841 returned to New York in order to care for 
the maternal grandfather of our subject. The year 1844, however, again 
witnessed their arrival in ]Michigan. ^Ir. Andrews, of tiiis review, was 
reared upon the home farm in the usual manner of lads of the period and 
afterward entered a machine shop where he learned the trade, being for a 
number of years thereafter employed as a machinist and railroad engineer 
on what is now the Lake Shore Railroad. He spent four or five years in 
Minnesota and in 1859 the entire family came to the Pacific cosat, journeying 
by way of New York and thence by steamer via the Isthmus of Panama to 
California. 

In i860 ;Mr. Andrews decided to go to a newer country and made his 
way to Seattle where, in connection with another man. he took contracts from 
the government for the surveys of public lands. He did considerable Vv'ork 
of this character at a time when it was verv hard to do survevins^ because of 
the dense timber growth. In 1863 he made the discovery of the coal prop- 
erty, now in possesion of the Pacific Coal & Iron Company, near Oilman. 
"He homesteaded and secured four hundred acres of land which he owned and 
operated for several years and then sold the property for forty thousand dol- 
lars. His work in this direction led to investigations as to the richness of the 
coal deposits in this section of the countn' and subsequently to the discovery 
.of other coal mines near Oilman and Newcastle. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 283 

With the exception of the time spent upon the homestead at Gihnan, Mr. 
Andrews has maintained his residence in Seattle and has seen it grow from a 
smah place of one hundred and fifty white persons to its present extensive 
metropolitan proportions. He has also been a prominent factor in its indus- 
trial and commercial life and has contributed in no small degree to its im- 
provement and upbuilding. In early years he conducted a repair shop, his 
mechanical ability enabling him to do any kind of repair work, from that 
needed to repair the mechanism of a clock, up to that in demand in placing in 
order the most intricate and enlarged machinery. He had brought with him 
many tools which he used in the conduct of his shop here. Mr. Andrews also 
built two residences in the city, but he spent twenty years at the corner of 
Fourth avenue and Madison street, the present site of the Lincoln apartment 
building. In 1890-91 he erected a fine residence on Queen Ann Hill, the 
grounds and house together costing about eighteen. thousand dollars; which 
after four or five years he sold. He has purchased and sold considerable 
vacant and also improved property, both for himself and other parties, and 
in his real estate dealings he has met with creditable success. 

Mr. Andrews has been prominent in public affairs and is a strong sup- 
]3orter of the principles of the Repu1)lican party. He advocated such prin- 
ciples even before the formation of this old political organization. He has 
always been active in party work and his services have been recognized in 
various ways. His first vote for president was cast in behalf of General 
Winfield Scott, the Whig candidate in 1852. He was elected the first county 
clerk of Brooklyn township, Hennepin county, Minnesota, • after the admis- 
sion of that state to the Union. After coming to the territory of W^ashing- 
ton he was continuouly connected with public aft'airs and was sent as a dele- 
gate to the national convention at Philadelphia when General Grant received 
the nomination for his second term. He also attended the national conven- 
tion in Cincinnati, in 1876, as a national committeeman, having been ap- 
pointed to the position in 1872. In 1878, at a constitutional convention at 
Walla Walla, he represented the county of King, and when the constitution 
was framed by this body, it was submitted to the people and ratified by a two- 
thirds vote, but congress did not act upon it and the work had to be gone over 
again. In 1864 Mr. Andrews received the appointment of clerk of the United 
States District Court and held the office for ten and one half years, acting 
under five different judges. In the territorial legislature he served as chief 
clerk for one term and he has been a member of the city council of Seattle for 
a number of terms, exercising his official prerogatives in support of every 
measure for the general good. For two years he was police judge. After 



284 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the formation of the state he was elected to represent his district in the state 
legislature in 189 1-3. In 1898 he was elected to the state senate, represent- 
ing the twenty-eighth district comprising the sixth and eighth wards of the 
city. He proved an active working member of the senate, leaving the impress 
of his individuality upon the legislation enacted during the session of 1899. 
He secured the passage of an appropriation of twenty-five thousand dollars 
b}^ the state for an exhibit at the Pan-American Exposition, at Buffalo, New 
York. He was then appointed by Governor Rodgers one 01 the members of 
the state commission and elected by the other members to attend the exhibi- 
tion and throughout nearly the entire period of the operation of the fair he gave 
the state his time and services without charge. He was much interested in 
the success of the state exhibit, labored earnestly to get it together and in 
seeing that it was properly shown. He also was able to give general informa- 
tion to visitors concerning the state and his work was of great benefit to the 
state. In 1896 he was on the Republican ticket as one of the presidential 
electors, and although it was the year of the Populist success, he led his ticket 
by several hundred votes. On the 29th of April, 1902, his name was sent to 
the senate as that of a nominee for the responsible position of receiver of 
public moneys in Seattle and on the 8th of May following the appointment 
was confirmed by the senate. He took charge of the post on the ist of July. 
In addition to the duties which devolved upon him as receiver in the land oftke, 
he is also special disbursing agent of the government, having been nominated 
to this office bv the secretarv of the interior. He furnished suretv bonds for 
both positions. Having had large experience in local departments both in 
Minnesota and Washington, he is specially well fitted to act as receiver of 
the land office and is thoroughly experienced in the routine of the work. 

Of the four children of Mr. Andrews, all are yet living and are mar- 
ried. William R., is an attorney of southern California; Mrs Eva Pat- 
terson resides with her husband, near Oilman upon a ranch which was given 
jier by Mr. Andrews. Judge R., a printer by trade, is largely interested in 
Seattle and is engaged in erecting buildings upon his property on Seventh 
avenue. Lyman Ralph also has extensive real estate interests in this city. 

Such in brief is the life history of Mr. Andrews. He has taken an 
active part in the business that he has transacted, in the council chambers 
of his state, and his course has ever been above suspicion. The good of 
the public he places before partisanship and the welfare of his constituents 
before personal aggrandizement. He commands the respect of the mem- 
bers of the legislature, and at home, in the city of his adoption where he is 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 285 

best known, he inspires personal friendships of unusual strength and all who 
know him have the highest admiration for his good qualifications of heart 
and mind. 

FRED A. GASCH. 

A man who has served the public long and well and been a highly re- 
spected citizen during his residence in Seattle is Mr. Fred A. Gasch, now 
retired from an active business life. 

Mr. Gasch comes of a noted German family of musicians. His grand- 
father and his father, August Gasch, were both well known musicians, 
though the younger member of the family has not elected to follow in their 
footsteps. He was born in Hermstedt, dukedom of Brunswick, Germany, 
February 20th, 1843. He was reared and received his education in Ger- 
many until the age of eighteen, when he started out to make his own way 
in the world. He chose America as a future home, and having some rela- 
tives in San Francisco went directly to that place, where he immediately 
went to work in a machine shop, which trade he had learned in Germany. 
He enlisted in the Sixth California Infantry and served from August, 1864, 
until the close of the war. During this time he was detailed for special 
work on boats from San Francisco to Panama, guarding mail and treasure. 

In 1870 he settled in Seattle, which was then a small village of six 
or seven hundred people. For a number of years he was employed in dif- 
ferent mills and shops, until 1875, when he had enough capital to engage 
in business for himself, in which he continued until 1886. Foreseeing the 
future of Seattle he made some investments in real estate which have since 
proved very profitable. He believed in improving his property, and thereby 
showed his faith in its value. In 1889 he was elected county commissioner 
on the Republican ticket, which office he held for eight years, two years 
under territorial and six under state administration. He had previously 
held the office of city councilman in 1883, and refused to be re-elected. 
One of the most important things which came under his administration 
was the building of the county court house, which was started in 1889 and 
completed in 1901. When it came to deciding the location he was in favor 
of the best possible location, and used his efforts toward purchasing land 
where it would be convenient for the general public. His efforts in this 
direction met with no response, and it was finally built on ground owned 
by the county. He then turned his attention to conducting the county affairs, 
which he has always done to the entire satisfaction of every one, and has 
now retired from office-holding. The next important work which came 



286 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

under his supervision was the reorganization of the poor farm. There 
was but a small building, insufficient to accommodate the patients, and the 
board set to work to put up a good alms house, which hai.l rooms for one 
hundred and twenty-three patients with proper accommodations for both sexes.- 
The poor farm had been run at a great expense to the county, as they were 
buying produce, etc., which should have been made on the place. Mr. Gasch 
set to work to inculcate some thrifty German principles into the economic 
methods of the farm, and very soon made a good farm of it, planting an 
orchard and improving it in many ways. There was some dissatisfaction 
on the part of tax payers, as every one did not consider such extensive im- 
provements were necessary. Air. Gasch invited an inspection of the build- 
ing and the working methods. A thorough examination was made by men 
of standing in the building line, and it was pronounced to be in accordance 
with the plans and specifications, and later the movement was upheld by 
everyone. He earned the respect of every citizen of the county, and it was 
with deep regret that he could not be induced to continue in the administra- 
tion of its affairs. King county owes a great debt to Mr. Gasch. 

In 1890 he erected the double building, 608-10 Terry avenue, in half 
of which he makes his home. He fraternizes with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and is. an honored member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

In 1869 he was united in marriage to Anna Landgrabe, and to this 
couple have been born two children : Haibee, wife of Henry Sheabe, of 
Los Angeles, California ; Fred, who has spent the last six years in the Klon- 
dike. 

GEORGE W. WARD. 

The life of George W. Ward is closely identified wilh the history of 
Seattle, which has been his home for many years. He began his career here 
when the population of the city did not exceed twelve hundred inhabitants, 
and throughout the years which have since come and gone he has been closely 
allied with its interests and upbuilding. His life has been one of untiring- 
activity and has been crowned with a degree of success which numbers him 
among the substantial residents of his adopted city. 

Mr. Ward is a native son of the Empire state, his birth there occurring 
in Cattaraugus. Cattaraugus county, March 23, 1838, and he is of English 
and Irish descent, his ancestors having settled in Nev.^ England prior to the 
Revolutionary war, in which his paternal grandfather was a participant. The 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 2^7 

latter was born in Massachusetts, as was also his son, C. H. Ward, the father 
of our subject. The family subsequently removed to Cattaraugus county, 
New York, where the latter was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hustetter, 
and in 1854 they removed to Illinois. He was a mechanic, and both he and 
nis wife were members of the Baptist church. His death occurred in Chi- 
cago when he had reached his seventy-seventh year, and his wife was called to 
j:er final rest at the comparatively early age of forty-five years. They were 
the parents of four children, two sons and two daughters, three of whom are 
residents of Washington. William H. is a resident of Snohomish and Mary 
J''. is the wife of C. E. Brown, of Seattle. 

George W. Ward recei\ed his education principally in the schools of 
Illinois, and in early life he began business career as an insurance agent. In 
the Prairie state he was united in marriage to Miss Louise Van Doren, a 
daughter of C. M. Van Doren, who was descended from an old American 
family. Two children were born to ]\Ir. and Mrs. Ward in the Prairie state, 
Arthur C. and Susan E., both of Seattle, and the daughter is the wife of 
Henry D. Temple. With his family Mr. Ward came to Seattle in 1871. 
locating on a farm sixteen miles south of the city, where they resided for tvro 
and a half years, and on the expiration of that period, in order to give their 
children better educational advantages, they removed to the city. He had 
learned the carpenter's trade in Illinois, and he then engaged in contracting 
and building in this city and also in the manufacture of sash and doors, thus 
continuing for about five years. Since that time he has been engaged in the 
veal-estate, insurance and loan business in company with Mr. Llewellyn. Mr. 
Ward is a man of splendid business and executive ability, and carries forward 
to successful completion whatever he undertakes. Through the channels of 
trade he has greatly promoted the interests of Seattle, and at all times he is 
alert in his efforts to improve the conditions of all lines of business that the 
country may thereby become more prosperous and that all people may enjoy 
more of the comforts of life. 

One child has been added to the family circle in Seattle, Mabel V., now 
the wife of W. M. Olney, of this city. The family are valued members of 
the Baptist church, in which 'Sir. Ward has served as deacon for forty years. 
In political matters he is a Republican and is a zealous advocate of the policy 
and principles of his part}-. Since his removal to the Pacific coast he served 
as a justice of the peace for a number of years. lie is emphatically a man 
of enterprise, indomitable energy and liberal views, and is thoroughly iden- 
tified in feeling with the growth and prosperity of the county which has so 
long been his home. 



288 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

THOMAS SANDERS. 

Thomas Sanders, president of the Bryant Lumber & Shingle Company, 
owning a mill at Bryant and one at Fremont, has attained to an enviable 
position in industrial circles and is now the owner of an extensive business 
which has been built up through the enterprise and ability of the partners. 
Mr. Sanders is a native of England, his birth having there occurred in 1856. 
His parents, John and Mary (Clements) Sanders, were both natives of the 
same country and in 1870 they emigrated to Petersburg, Canada, bringing 
with them their eight children, all of whom are yet living in Canada with 
the exception of the subject of this review. The father was a farmer. He 
belonged to the Methodist church and the family is one of the highest re- 
spectability. 

Thomas Sanders attended school in England and through observation, 
experience and reading has constantly broadened his knowledge, keeping 
well informed on all matters of general interest. In 1875 he went to Sagi- 
naw, Michigan, where he engaged in lumbering, and in October, 1879, 
he arrived on the Sound. Here he was first employed for wages and later 
engaged in contracting. In 1889 he entered into partnership with Mr. Verd, 
under the firm name of Verd & Sanders, and in 1891 they incorporated the 
Bryant Lumber & Shingle company. They own the entire stock and in the 
business they have met with gratifying success. They first established a 
shingle mill at Bryant and in the new enterprise prospered, their output 
continually increasing to meet the growing demand of the trade. In 1894 
they bought their large plant in Fremont and placed it at once in successful 
operation, at the same time retaining their mills at Bryant. After their 
arrival in Fremont they continued to increase their facilities until the mill 
now has a capacity of one hundred thousand feet of lumber in ten hours. 
They also have a door and sash factory and do all kinds of work in that 
line, employing one hundred and ten men in Fremont and one hundred men 
in Bryant, when running to their full capacit^^ The plant at the former place 
is worth seventy-five thousand dollars and at the latter place fifty thousand 
dollars. They also have a large body of timber land, which will supply 
their mill for many years. This is worth fifty thousand dollars. The mem- 
bers of the firm are men of the highest honor in their methods of busi- 
ness and in that way have gained their splendid success. They have a 
large local demand for their manufacture and also ship to outside markets. 

On the I St of May, 1883, Mr. Sanders was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Woodin, who was born in the city of Seattle, a daughter of Ira 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 289 

Woodin, a resident of Woodinville, Washington, which place was named 
in his honor. He came to the Sound in 1852, soon after the arrival 
of the Dennys and is one of the honored and valued pioneers of this sec- 
tion of the country. He married Susan Campbell, who was born in Port- 
land, Oregon, one of the first white people born in that district. Mr. and 
Mrs. • Sanders have seven children : Guy T., William, Howard W., Ellen, 
Allen McKinley, Ruth and Esther. They have a pleasant home in Seattle 
and the family attend the Congregational church. Mr. Sanders is a Re- 
publican in his political affiliations and has served as road supervisor and 
postmaster, but has never been an active politician in the sense of office 
seeking. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica. A self-made man in the best sense of the term, he has worked his way 
steadily upward in the business world, maintaining a reputation for honor 
.and reliability that no man can question. 

ERNEST B. HUSSEY. 

Ernest Bertrand Hussey has had an eventful career, in which he has 
visited many sections of the globe, viewing many nations in their own lands 
and gaining broad knowledge of their ways of living. He has sailed twice 
around Cape Horn, once around the Cape of Good Hope, has twice crossed the 
Isthmus of Panama, four times crossed the United States and has been 
a resident of every continent, excepting Europe and Australia. In busi- 
ness, too, he has had a noteworthy career, and has attained to a position of 
distinction as a civil engineer. His labors in this direction have been of 
great benefit and value to Seattle and to-day he is accounted one of the 
prominent men of the city. He is now the general purchasing agent of 
the White Pass & Yukon route and is also engaged in private enterprises 
as a civil engineer. 

Mr. Hussey was born January 10, 1865, at sea off the coast of south 
China at the mouth of the Saigon river, on the ship Lyemoon, of which his 
father, Peter Hussey, was commander. The family is of Scotch-Irish an- 
cestry, and w?.s founded in Nantucket, Massachusetts, in 1650, William 
Hussey being the progenitor of the family in America. Benjamin Franklin 
also came of the same line. Another William Hussey, the grandfather of 
our subject, married Phoebe Folger, of Nantucket, a member of the family 
to which the distinguished Judge Folger belonged. Mr. and Mrs. Hussey 
were members of the Society of Friends or Quakers and he served as one of 



290 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the selectmen of Nantucket. He went to California at an early day and 
died there at the age of fifty years. 

Peter Hussey, the father of our subject, was born in Nantucket and 
early in life went to sea, where he was rapidly advanced until he became com- 
mander of a ship and in that capacity he was in the merchant marine ser- 
vice during the greater part of his life. He married Miss Lavina Doane, 
a native of West Dennis, Cape Cod, ^Massachusetts, also descended from an 
old New England family, of English ancestry. Wlien our subject was but 
two years of age his mother died at sea, while the vessel was on a trip around 
Cape Horn. Both parents were members of the Episcopal church. Captain 
Peter Hussey died in Japan during the fall of 1894 at the age of sixty-six 
years. 

Ernest B. Hussey was only three years of age when on a voyage with 
his father on the barque "Nellie Fogerty" the vessel burned at sea when- 
three hundred miles off the South American coast, but they took to the 
boats and landed in Pernambuco, Brazil, where they were compelled to re- 
main for six months before they could get means of returning. At length, 
how^ever, thev reached New York, and the father afterward went to Cali- 
fornia, taking his son Ernest with him. He had become tired of the sea 
and they settled on a farm in the San Joaquin valley, l)ut after a year the 
father again entered the merchant marine service, going to China and then 
to Japan, continuing in command of a vessel until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1894. 

Ernest B. Hussey returned from California to New Bedford, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, and there began his school life, crossing the continent by the newly 
completed E'nion Pacific Railroad. After a year at school he returned to 
San Francisco by the way of the Isthmus of Panama and thence went to 
Japan, joining his father. He attended school for a time in Yokohama, 
Kobe and Nagasaki, after which he made various extended trips to Corea, 
Siberia, China, the Philippine islands and India with his father. He was 
also with him during the campaign of the Satsuma rebellion in Japan. In 
1879 he left Yokohama for New York, going by way of the Cape of Good 
Hope. He then spent four years in acquiring an education in New Bedford, 
Massachusetts, and later took up the study of civil engineering in Boston, in the 
office of E. S. Philbrick, the engineer who built the Hoosac tunnel. After this 
Mr. Hussey entered the employ of Charles A. Putnam, a civil engineer of 
Salem, Massachusetts, with whom he remained for six years. Here he ad- 
vanced to the position of chief associate, acquiring wide experience in water 
works and sewerage construction, and in municipal and railroad work 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 291 

throughout New England and also in various extensive harbor improve- 
ments along the Massachusetts coast. 

In the Spring of 1889 Mr. Hussey started for the Pacific coast with 
Tacoma, Washington, as his objective point, and devoted several months to 
visiting all of the Puget Sound ports, finally giving his preference to 
Seattle as the city destined to become the greatest on the Pacific coast. 
He had just become a resident of this place when the great fire of 1889 
swept over the city. In the fall of that year he lentered upon the practice 
of his profession and for five months was engaged on various surveys, 
including the entire harbor frontage of Seattle and Elliott Bay. He was 
also engaged in various land surveys throughout the western part of the 
state, and in the spring of 1890 he opened an office as a civil engineer, con- 
tinuing until the spring of 1892, at which time he accepted the office of 
general superintendent of the Union Trunk Line, constructing several of 
its extensions. He resigned that position in the spring of 1895 to again 
resume the private practice of his profession, opening his office in the Dexter 
Horton office building, where he has since remained. In the spring of 1898 
the White Pass & Yukon route, with E. C. Hawkins as chief engineer, es- 
tablished headquarters in Mr. Hussey's office, and he immediately became 
actively connected with the purchase of supplies and the equipment for the 
entire system, and has since remained with the company in his present ca- 
pacity. To him can credit be justly given for being instrumental in the 
establishment of Seattle as the base of supplies for that Company in the 
construction of its railroad in the far north, and the locating of their Pacific 
coast offices here. Mr. Hussey is also engaged in various other enterprises, 
in all of which it is his design to make Seattle headquarters, thus promot- 
ing the business prosperity of the city. 

Mr. Hussey has taken a very deep interest in Freemasonry. He was 
made a Master Mason in Star King Lodge, of Salem, Massachusetts, in 
1886, and was senior deacon of his lodge at the time of his removal from 
Salem. He attained to the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in 
Massachusetts Consistory of Boston, in 1887, and has held office in all 
of the branches of the order. He affiliated with the Scottish Rite branches 
in Seattle in 1894 and was elected to the thirty-third degree in the fall of 
1897, but could not take the degree until he was thirty-three years of age, 
so that it was conferred upon him in 1898. He was one of the youngest 
Masons that has ever received this degree, it being conferred upon him by 
special dispensation of the supreme council. He received the decoration 
of the Grand Cross at the hands of the Supreme Council in 1895, there 



292 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

being only three elected every two years. He is head of the order in this 
section and is deputy inspector general of the state of Washington and 
territory of Alaska. In politics Mr. Hussey has been a life-long Democrat, 
but is not an office-seeker or office-holder. 

In December, 1890, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hussey and 
Miss Carrie Louise Brokaw, a native of Romulus, New York. She is of 
English and French Huguenot stock, and by her marriage she has become 
the mother of three sons : Bertrand Brokaw, Kenneth Peter and Wilfred 
Ernest. Mrs. Hussey is a valued member of St. Mark's Episcopal church, 
and is also a member of the Society of Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion. Mr. Hussey received Episcopalian baptism in Japan and with his 
family attends that church. His record in all his undertakings is one of 
high honor and of successful accomplishment. He has become widely known 
as a reliable business man. 

* JOHN P. HOWE. 

Probably no name is more widely known in connection with the the- 
atrical business of the Pacific coast than that of John P. Howe, for through 
thirty-one years it has appeared upon the programs of different theaters of 
which he has served as manager. Mr. Howe was born in Wayne county, 
Ohio, on the 22d of August, 1849, ^-^^ is of English ancestry. The family 
was founded in .Vmerica during the colonial epoch in its history and repre- 
sentatives of the name loyally aided in the long war which brought independ- 
ence to the nation. His grandfather, Samuel Howe, was born in Virginia, 
possessed splendid musical talent and was a very prominent and successful 
teacher of music. In 181 8 he left the south, removing to Ohio. He was a 
cousin of General Robert E. Lee, and he attained the age of seventy years, 
while his wife lived to be about the same age. Their son, John Hiram Howe, 
the father of our subject, was born in Wayne county, Ohio, in 1826, and was 
for many years a prominent dry-goods merchant, his careful conduct of his 
business bringing to him splendid success. He married Miss Matilda Shel- 
ing. of Pennsylvania, who was of German lineage, her ancestors having been 
early settlers of Pennsylvania. Both Mr. and Mrs. Howe A'cre members of 
the Presbyterian church and shaped their lives by its teaching. His death 
occurred when he was fifty-two years of age, while his wife, long surviving 
him, reached the advanced age of seventy-two years. They were the parents 
of three children: R. N., a resident of Portland, Oregon; Noble P. and 
John P. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 293 

' The last named was educated in the pubhc schools of Minneapolis and 
in Seabury College, and has been continuously connected with theatrical busi- 
ness since 1869. He is one of the oldest theater managers west of the Rocky 
Mountains, having given his entire attention to the business through the past 
thirty-one years. He has probably controlled more theaters than any other 
jTian on the Pacific coast. Between the years 1884 and 1891 he had control 
of the Northern Pacific Theatrical situation, besides all the first-class the- 
atrical business of Portland, Oregon, Seattle, Tacoma and Walla Walla, 
Washington, and Victoria, British Columbia, tog'ether with that of a number 
of smaller cities. He was lessee and proprietor of the Columbia and Alcazar 
theaters of San Francisco during the years 1894-5. He has also owned and 
controlled M. Quad's funny play, Yoke, which Mr. Howe brought to the 
Pacific coast in 1880. He afterward was manager of W. E. Sheridan, the 
great tragedian, in King Lear, Louis VH and a repertoire of Shakespearean 
plays, and since then he has assumed the management of the Seattle theater. 
His efforts have met with phenomenal success. The theacer was built in 
1892, at the northwest corner of Cherry street and Third avenue, at a cost of 
Si 50,000, and is a beautiful structure. It is strictly a Seattle institution, 
being a product of the city's enterprise and capital. Fire-proof and sub- 
stantially built, as well as being of a pleasing style of architecture, it is the 
equal of any first-class theater on the coast in both design and interior finish- 
ing and decorating. Mr. Howe assumed the management in 1898, since 
which time the citizens of Seattle have taken pride as well as pleasure in this 
excellent place of amusement and the play-loving, people are to be congrat- 
ulated that a manager of such ability as Mr. Howe is in charge of this 
attractive house. 

In 1882 occurred the marriage of Mr. Howe and Miss Mary Ella Shef- 
field, who was born in Vancouver, Washington, and is a daughter of A. H. 
Sheffield, a pioneer who went to Vancouver with Captain U. S. Grant and 
was also well acquainted with General Sheridan, who was then lieutenant, 
while the future president was only commander of a company, both he and 
General Sheridan being stationed at Vancouver. Mr. Sheffield served as 
sheriff for some years and was one of the well known and leading pioneers of 
the state. Unto our subject and his wife have been born two children : 
John Pardee, Jr., now a student in the Washington Military College, and 
Oueenie Bessie, at school. They have a nice home on Oueen Ann Hill, and 
their circle of friends in the city is extensive. Mr. Howe is popular in busi- 
ness circles and is widely and favorably known all over the Pacific coast. 



294 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

COLONEL ALDEN J. BLETHEN. 

In this age of colossal enterprise and marked intellectual energy, the 
prominent and successful men are those whose abilities, persistence and 
courage lead them into large undertakings and assume responsibilities and 
labors of leaders in their respective vocations. Success is methodical and 
consecutive, and however much we may indulge in fantastic theorizing as 
to its elements and causation in any isolated instance, yet in the light of 
sober nivestigation we will find it to be but a result of the determined appli- 
cation of one's abilities and powers along the rigidly defined line of labor. 
America owes much of her progress and ad\'ancement to a position 
foremost among the nations of the world to her newspapers, and in no line 
has the incidental broadening out of the sphere of usefulness been more 
marked than in this same line of journalism. Seattle, the city marveious, 
lias enlisted in its newspaper field some of the strongest intellects in the 
nation — men of broad mental grasp, cosmopolitan ideas and notable busi- 
ness sagacity. 

Prcjminent among the men who have gi\'en the city prestige in this 
direction must be placed Colonel Alden J. Blethen, the subject of this re- 
view. His identification with the "art preservative of all arts" is one of 
personal predilection, and though he has intermittently turned his attention 
to enterprises' of a different nature, still, true to the instincc said to charac- 
terize every newspaper man, he inevitably returned to the work, strengthened 
and re-enforced by the experiences which were gained outside. 

Colonel Blethen is the editor-in-chief of The Seattle Daily and Sunday 
Times and comes of one of the oldest families of this country, his ancestry 
tracing back to 1680, when representatives of the name located at Ipswich, 
Massachusetts. 

As a rule the men of the family have devoted their energies to either 
agricultural or sea-faring pursuits. The paternal grandmother was a sec- 
ond cousin of Ethan Allen, the gallant Vermont general, who led the Green 
Mountain boys to victory in the capture of Fort Ticonderoga. 

Again the family was represented by loyal service in the Civil 'war, 
three brothers of our subject joining the Union army. Allen served for 
three years in the Army of the Cumberland and participated in the notable 
battles of Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and Frank- 
lin. 

Charles Edward died from the result of injuries sustained at the battle 
of Cedar Creek where Early surprised Sheridan "twenty miles away." 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 295 

James L. was wounded at Gettysburg and served his country till the close. 

Colonel Blethen is a native of Maine, having been born at Knox, Waldo 
county, on December 27, 1846, his parents being Alden and Abbie L. Blethen. 
After acquiring a common-school education he entered Wesleyan Seminary 
and College, where he was graduated in 1868, and in 1872 he won the de- 
gree of Master of Arts, at Bowdoin College. He then took up the profes- 
sion of teaching and was lessee and principal of the Abbott Familv School 
from 1869 until 1873. 

At the same time he carried on the study of law and was admitted to 
the bar of the state of Maine in the latter year, establishing an office in Port- 
land. He there engaged in practice until 1880, when on account of ill 
health he removed to Kansas City, Missouri, where he entered upon the 
vocation for which he is so admirably fitted. For four years he was editor 
and manager of the well known Kansas City Journal, at the conclusion of 
which time he removed to Minneapolis, where his field was enlarged by pur- 
chasing an interest in two prominent papers there — The Tribune and llie 
Journal. He served as editor of the Tribune and manager of the Journal 
until 1888, when he sold his interest in those papers for two hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars spot cash. 

Having a decided liking as well as a special ability for newspaper work, 
Colonel Blethen repurchased the Tribune the following year, but fire de- 
stroyed the building in November of the same year and he thus suft'ered a 
loss of one hundred thousand dollars. Nothing daunted, he set to work to 
build in 1890, erecting the new Tribune building at a cost of one hundred 
thousand dollars, but the great financial panic of 1893 followed so closely 
after the fire that it brought disaster to him as it did to so many others and 
he lost all that he had saved. 

While there he took an active interest in military affairs and served as 
colonel on the staffs of both Governor Nelson and Governor Clough. He 
had enlisted at the time of the Civil war, but as he was the youngest of 
the family and there were three other brothers at the front, his mother — 
a widow — induced him to remain at home. 

After his financial failure, "desiring to begin anew in the newspaper 
field. Colonel Blethen came to Seattle and in 1896 he purchased tlie plant of 
a bankrupt paper. It was housed on Yesler Way, in a room not adapted 
or adequate for the publication of a newspaper, and he soon removed the 
plant to more conspicuous quarters in the Boston block, with a circulation of 
thirty-five hundred of a four-page paper. He increased this over fifty-six 
per cent in the first vear and The Times has since steadily grown until its 



296 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

circulation is about thirty thousand of a twenty-paged paper. This rapid 
and steady increase again demanded more commodious C[uarters and in 
1 901 arrangements were made for the construction of a building erected 
specially for The Times. Realizing the trend of business northward, Col- 
onel Blethen decided upon the corner of Second avenue and Union street. 

Many of his friends laughed at him for going so far away from what 
Avas then considered the business center, but even the brief space of time 
which has since elapsed has proven the wisdom of his step. Here a building 
was erected four stories in height, including the basement, which is eigh- 
teen feet in the clear. The building is sixty by one hundred feet. 

The business offices and mailing' room are on the main floor. There 
are twenty offices on the second floor and the entire top floor is occupied 
by the editorial, news and reportorial department and the type-setting room. 

In the last named are ten type-setting machines and in addition many 
men are engaged in compiling what is known as other than "straight mat- 
ter." The large "Quad" Hoe press in the basement turns out a folded 
paper of thirty-two pages in a single run, and the supplenientary press of 
twenty-four pages supply the additional pages of the great Sunday and 
magazine paper which it had long been Colonel Blethen's dream to produce. 

The first copy was issued February 9, 1902, and thus he put into work- 
ing force the idea which he had long entertained and which is the crowning 
glory of his other successes in building up such a splendid paper as he has 
made of The Times. Taking the month of j\Iay, 1902, for example, some 
idea of the magnitude of the business may be had from the fact that the ex- 
penses were twenty-four thousand eight hundred and sixty dollars and over 
two hundred and sixty thousand pounds of paper were used. 

Employment is given to one hundred and fourteen persons, beside the 
services of eighty-three carriers which are recjuired. 

It would be a work of supererogation to attempt in this connection to 
enter into details concerning the history of The Times or to note the specific 
points which have marked the growth of the enterprise and the brilliant ac- 
complishment of the man who directed its destinies. These matters stand 
forth in their own exemplification and further comment in that direction is 
unnecessary. A local publication said : 

"With matchless energy and foresight Colonel Blethen has made it the 
greatest CA-ening daily on the Pacific coast and has devoted it as a mighty 
instrument for the upbuilding of Seattle. There is not at this time a better 
or more elegantly equipped newspaper plant west of Chicago than that from 



298 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

ceptable members until called to his final home in 1897. Prior to coming to 
America he married Miss Jane Bruce, a lady of Scotch lineage, who was born 
in the north of Ireland. She too was a most earnest and consistent Christian 
and by her marriage she became the mother of seven sons and three daughters. 
Her death occurred in 1875 ^vl^en she was sixty-four years of age. Three of 
the children have been called to the home beyond and three are living on the 
Pacific coast, while four are in Canada. One of the sons, Alexander B. 
Stewart, is prominently engaged in the drug business in Seattle. A. M. 
Stewart is a druggist in Tacoma, and our subject is interested in the under- 
taking business in Seattle, as a member of the firm of Bonne\" & Stewart. 

In the public schools, George M. Stewart obtained his education and 
when fourteen years of age came to tlie Pacific coast, making his way to Cali- 
fornia, in order that a chang^e of climate might benefit his health. He was 
small and rather delicate at that time and the change did prove advantageous. 
He developed a strong and robust manhood that has proved an excellent 
foundation for his business activity in recent years. He attended school in 
San Francisco and subsequently engaged in clerking in a store there. Later 
he removed to Virginia City, Nevada, wdiere he was engaged in general mer- 
chandising for eight years, meeting with gratifying success. He was married 
there in 1880 to Miss Mary Klupfer, but the wife of his choice and of his 
youth was only spared to him se\enteen months and he was left with a little 
daughter, Mary Veronica, who is now in school at San Mateo, California. 
Two years after the death of his first wife, Mr. Stewart wedded Miss Katie 
Parkinson, a native of San Francisco. Her father, R. R. Parkinson, was a 
California pioneer of 1849, ^"^ ^o^" thirty-six years was the editor of a 
newspaper in Carson City. He was a native of England and in religious 
faith was an Episcopalian, while his political support was given the Repub- 
lican party. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart now have two daughters, Helen Mar- 
garet, and Gladys Mae. 

For some time Mr. Stewart was a traveling salesman, representing Hall, 
Luhrs & Company, proprietors of a wholesale house of Sacremento, for 
which he traveled six years throughout the states of California, Nevada, 
Utah and Oregon, having a very large patronage which brought to the house 
an extensive business. In 1889 he came to Seattle and purchased the interest 
of Mr. Shorey in the firm of Shorey & Company, undertakers, at which time 
the name was changed to Bonney & Stewart. They were burned out in the 
great fire in 1889, since which time they have erected a large brick building, 
planned especially for their business at the corner of Third avenue and Colum- 
bia street. They have managed their business with great r.uccess and now 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 299 

stand at the head in this Hne in Seattle. They have the best planned and 
most attractively furnished undertaking parlors in the west, or perhaps in 
the United States. They are men of much public enterprise, taking- an 
interest in every laudable movement or measure in the city. It has been wise- 
ly said that "the liberal man deviseth liberal things and by liberal things he 
shall stand" and this has been verified in the case of Mr. Stewart and his 
partner. He is a man of resourceful business ability and his efforts have not 
been limited to one line, for he is interested in various other business enter- 
prises. He is now the president of the Queen Oil Company of Kern county, 
California, and with the firm owns considerable stock in a gold mine in 
Sonora, w^iich his partner, Mr. Bonney, is operating successfully. 

Mr. Stewart is a valued member of several fraternal organizations, in- 
cluding the Knights of Pythias Lodge of Seattle, of which he is past chan- 
cellor. He has filled all of the chairs in both the subordinate lodge and en- 
campment of the Odd Fellows society and is treasurer of the Grand Court 
of Foresters of the state of Washington. He also holds membership rela- 
tions with the Fraternal Brotherhood, the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men, and the Royal Arcanum. He owns one of the nice homes of the city, 
located at the corner of Seventeenth and Madison streets and he and his fami- 
ly are highly respected here, enjoying the hospitality of many of the best 
residents of Seattle. Every movement, measure or interest which elicits the 
approval of Mr. Stewart also receives from him earnest support and it is 
therefore that he is known as an active member of the Republican party, his 
labors making him a leader in the organization in the state. He was treas- 
urer of the Republican state central committee for four years and for a num- 
ber of years served on the central committee of the city, doing all in his power 
to promote the growth and secure the success of Republican principles. In 
consideration of his efforts for the party and his effective labors in its behalf, 
r;s w^ell as his fitness for the office. President McKinley appointed him to the 
position of postmaster of .Seattle, and the nomination being confirmed by the 
senate he took charge of the office on the ist of Jantiary, 1900. The post- 
ofiice is well arranged, and the service is highly satisfactory to the citizens of 
Seattle. The business is growing rapidly; in the year previous to his in- 
cumbency the receipts were ninety-three thousand dollars, and in the year 
1901, amounted to two hundred and four thousand dollars, making an in- 
crease of more than double in two years, wdiich is an excellent showing for the 
growth of the city, and also indicates that the duties of the postmaster are 
onerous. In his official course, however, Mr. Stewart is indicating that the 
eonfidence reposed in him and in his ability was not misplaced, for no more 



300 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

capable official has ever been in charge of the postoffice at Seattle. As a 
citizen he is public spirited and progressive and in private life he commands 
that confidence and esteem which is always accorded to true worth. 

ELBERT F. BLAINE. 

With many of the leading measures resulting in the rapid development 
of the city of Seattle Mr. Blaine has been identified, and his efforts have 
been such that they have not only won him a place among the prominent 
people of the city, but have also contributed in a large measure to the gen- 
eral improvement and development of the city along lines of substantial 
advancement. 

At the bar and in the handling of business interests, Mr. Blaine has 
become a factor in the life of Seattle, where he has made his home since 
1885 ^i^d where he is now a member of the Denny-Blaine Land Company. 

A native of Romulus, Seneca county. New York, Elbert F. Blaine was 
born on the 26th day of June, 1857, and is of Scotch-Irish lineage, his an- 
cestors on his father's side having emigrated from the old world to the 
state of Pennsylvania long prior to the Revolutionary war. Flis great- 
grandfather lived at Milton, Pennsylvania, and at this place his grandfather 
and father were born. His grandfather emigrated to the state of New York 
when James Blaine, the father of this subject, was four years old. James 
Blaine was a farmer by occupation and a man of the highest respectability. 
He filled various offices of honor and trust, and while not a member of any 
church he was always an active worker therein. He married Amanda De- 
Pue, a native of New York, and they became the parents of eleven children, 
eight of whom are yet living. The father reached the venerable age of 
eighty-three years, passing away in 1893, and the good wife lately died in 
her eighty-third year. 

Mr. Blaine, of Seattle, is the only member of the family residing on 
the Sound. He completed his literary education in the Valparaiso (Indiana) 
Normal School, and afterwards took up the study of law in the Union Law 
School, at Albany, New York, in which institution he was graduated with 
the class of 1882. He was then admitted to the bar in New York, and 
removed to Huron, Dakota, and subsequently to Minnesota. He arrived 
in Washmgton in 1884, settling in Tacoma; the following year he moved 
to Seattle and took charge of the old Michigan sawmill a' Belltown. On 
the first day of January, 1886, he took up the practice of law, entering into 
partnership with the Hon. John J. McGilvra, of Seattle, which relationship 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 301 

was maintained for several years, during which time the firm enjoyed a 
large and important business. Lee DeVries became a member of the firm 
and some time afterwards Mr. McGalvra retired and the firm name was 
then changed to Blaine & DeVries, this continuing until 1899. During Mr. 
Blaine's early practice of law no case was too small or unimportant for his 
consideration. However small the case he never neglected it, his motto 
being that whatever one undertakes to do, do well. When he liad determ- 
ined that his client was on the side of right, he would never give up until 
he had employed every honorable means in his power to establish his posi- 
tion. He thus won a ■ reputation as a painstaking, thorough and capable 
lawyer, and by degrees the practice of the firm increased until the time 
and energy of its members were taxed to the utmost. Through the influence 
of the late Arthur A. Denny, a very large clientage was secured from the 
old settlers of the city of Seattle and it fell to their lot to administer many 
of their estates. In the practice of his profession, Mr. Blame says he was 
successful in a degree greater than he ever dreamed he would be, and his 
ability as a lawyer is indicated by the fact of the few cases lost to the many 
won for his clients, and the legal business entrusted to his care, for many 
years, has been of the most important character. 

Owing to press of business, Mr. Blaine has given very little time to 
political work. In national and state politics he is a Democrat, but in munici- 
pal affairs he believes that there should not be too much partisanism. In 
the upbuilding of Seattle he has ever taken an active part, believing from 
the very beginning of his acquaintance with the town that it was destined 
to have a great future. In 1899 the Denny-Blaine Land Company was 
formed, composed of Charles L. Denny and Elbert F. Blaine. At this 
time the health of the Hon. Arthur A. Denny was very much impaired and 
the new firm practically took charge of his large estate and since his death 
Mr. Blaine has been the attorney for the estate, which is being managed in 
the office of the Denny-Blaine Land Company. Through, the efforts of 
our subject the Yakima Investment Company was reorganized, the property 
being acquired by the Washington Irrigation Company, and since that time 
Mr. Blaine has given much of his attention and energy to the control of its 
affairs. For a number of years the firm operated the Grant street car line. 
The Denny-Blaine Land Company has purchased and improved a number 
of tracts of land, notably one which is now the Denny-Blaine Lake Park, 
one of the very finest additions to the city of Seattle, and they are inter- 
ested in various other enterprises. 

Mr. Blaine was married in 1882, to Miss Minerva Stone, a native of 



302 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Seneca, New York, a daughter of John R. Stone, of that county, and a 
representative of one of tlie old American famihes. They now have one 
son, James Arthur. Theirs is one of Seattle's beautiful and attractive res- 
idences, located in tlie Denny-Blaine Lake Park. Mr. Blaine is a member 
of several secret orders and his wife is a member of the Trinity Episcopal 
church. For a number of years Mr. Blaine has taken a great interest in 
the upbuilding of the University of the state of Washington. Lately he has 
become president of the board of park commissioners of the city of Seattle 
and he and his associates have succeeded in creating such a public senti- 
ment in favor of parks that a large sum of money has been appropriated 
by the city council for the establishment of a magnificent park and boule\ard 
system in Seattle and the commencement of work thereon. His life has 
been one of untiring' activity and has been crowned with a high measure of 
success. He is possessed of great energy, is quick of perception and forms 
his plans readily. He has the will power and the courage to carry them 
forward to successful completion and to-day he ranks among the leading 
business men of the northwest and capable of controlling interests of great 
magnitude. 

J. W. GODWIN. 

In past ages the history of a country was the record of wars and con- 
quests; to-day it is the record of commercial activity, and those whose names 
are foremost in its annals are the leaders in business circles. The conquests 
now made are those of mind over matter, not man over man, and the victor 
is he who can successfully establish, contrgl and operate extensive commer- 
cial interests. J. W. Godwin is one of the strong and influential men whose 
lives have become an essential part of the history of Seattle and the west. 
Tireless energy, keen perception, honesty of purpose, genius for devising 
and executing the right thing at the right time, joined to every-day 
common sense, guided by great will power, are the chief character- 
istics of the man. Connected with one of the wholesale commission 
liouses of Seattle, the place that he occupies in business circles is in the 
front rank. He is president and manager of the J. W. Godwin Company, 
controlling one of the largest commission houses of this city, and is also 
president of the Fisher's Union of Alaska, largely engaged in the canning 
of salmon. 

Mr. Godwin is a native of the Old Dominion, his birth having occurred 
in Bloxom, Accomack county, Virginia, on the 23d of August, i860. He 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 303 

i£ descended from one of the old families of that state of English lineage. 
Several generations of the family, however, have resided in this country 
and were well known as planters in Virginia. O. W. Godwin, the father of 
our subject, was there reared and educated and after attaining to man's estate 
married Miss Elizabeth Bloxom, a lady of Irish descent, also belonging to 
one of the old Virginian families. Both Mr. and Mrs. Godwin were mem- 
bers of the Baptist church. In his political faith he was a Democrat and 
a gentleman of sterling worth, reliable in all of life's relations. He was 
called to his final rest in his seventy-fourth year and his wife passed awav in 
her sixty-fifth year. They were the parents of thirteen children, of whom 
seven are yet living. 

J. W. Godwin, who is the only member of the family in Washington, 
was educated in the public schools of his native city. He remained with his 
father until his twentieth year, after which he engaged in clerking in a store 
for two years and then went to the city of Philadelphia, where he became 
connected with the commission business, familiarizing himself with the meth- 
ods of carrying on operations along that line. He had been associated with 
trade in the city for four years prior to his arrival in Seattle. Believing that 
there were good business possibilities in the northwest he resolved to become 
an active factor in trade circles in this state and removing to Washington he 
established a wholesale commission business, which has grown in volume 
and importance until it exceeds that of any other house in the city. Mr. God- 
win is the president and manager of the company and its splendid success is 
attributable in a large measure to his efforts. He is likewise the president of 
the fisher's union of Alaska, extensively engaged in the canning of salmon. 
He has made large investments in city property and has been one of the build- 
ers of this attractive municipality of the northwest. He was alone in the 
commission business from the time of his arrival in 1890 until 1894, at which 
time the present company was incorporated and since that time he has been at 
its head. The firm has acquired extended popularity as well as a large busi- 
ness and its trade covers much of British Columbia and Alaska, as well as 
the state of Washington. The company largely imports bananas from cen- 
ral America, distributing them over the districts mentioned. His realty in- 
vestments have been judiciously placed and he has bought and sold consider- 
able city property. His block on First avenue is a brick one, sixty by one 
hundred and twenty feet, which was built for stores and is thus occupied on 
the first floor, while the remainder is used for hotel purposes. Mr. Godwin 
has also built and sold a number of residences in the city and is credited with 



304 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

having done his share toward the improvement and substantial progress of 
Seattle. 

In 1892 occurred the mariage of our subject and Miss Ella Dickinson, 
the wedding being celebrated in Philadelphia, of which city the lady is a 
native. Her father, Lea L. Dickinson, belongs to the celebrated Dickinson 
family of the Keystone state. Mr. and Mrs. Godwin have a nice residence 
in Seattle and the circle of their friends is a larg"e one. He is a Royal Arch 
Mason, having been a valued member of the craft since t88i and at the 
present time he is a past master. In politics he is Democrat and sands 
high in the ranks of his party, but has never been an office seeker, as the 
claims which his business makes upon his time are too extensive to admit of 
much outside work. The character and position of Mr. Godwin illustrates 
most happily for the purpose of this work the fact that if a young man be 
possessed of the proper attributes of mind and heart he can unaided attain to 
a point of unmistakable precedence in the business world. His career proves 
that the only true success in life is that which is accomplished by personal 
effort and constant industry. 

JOHN ARTHUR. 

For a number of years a distinguished member of the legal profession, 
Mr. Arthur is a leader in thought and action in the public life of the state. 
His name is a familiar one in political and professional circles throughout 
Washington. By reason of his marked intellectual activity he is well fitted 
to aid in moulding the policy of a new state and forming its public opinion. 

Mr. Arthur is a native of the Green Isle of Erin, his birth having oc- 
curred there near the town of Ennis, county Clare, on the 20th of June, 
1849. He is of English and Irish ancestry. His father, Thomas Arthur, 
was also born in Ireland, and was descended from a prominent old English 
family, which, with the ancestors of the famous General Wolfe, the hero of 
Quebec, the Whites, Melvilles, Stackpooles, Martins, and others, formed a 
strong colony of landholders in the counties of Limerick and Clare. Presi- 
dent Arthur was a member of this family. Thomas Arthur, the father of 
him whose name introduces this review, removed in i860 to England, and 
in 1863 to the United States. With his wife and seven children he settled 
in McKean county, Pennsylvania, where he died at the age of eighty-five 
years ; his widow is still living, aged eighty-seven years. 

John Arthur received his education in Ireland, England and the United 
States. He l^egan his legal studies in Erie, Pennsylvania, under the pre- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 305 

ceptorship of Hon. John P. Vincent, ex-Judge of the Erie judicial district. 
Later he became a student in the Columbian University, at Washington, D. C, 
where he completed both the regular and post-graduate courses, of two years 
each. At the close of his second year he received the degree of Master of 
Laws, and was awarded the first prize for producing the best essay upon 
a legal subject. The prize was delivered to him in the presence of the presi- 
dent of the United States and his cabinet and the judges of the supreme 
court; the presentation being made by the solicitor-general, in behalf of the 
attorney-general, who complimented Mr. Arthur on his able and schol- 
arly production, and soon thereafter moved his admission to practice before 
the supreme court of the United States. Mr. Arthur resigned a legal posi- 
tion under the government and opened a law office in Washington, D. C, 
where he continued to practice until March, 1883, when he lemoved to 
Puget Sound to accept the attorneyship for the Tacoma Land Company, 
with headquarters at Tacoma, but passing a large part of the timeJn Seattle, 
where he. has resided continuously since April 18, 1887. He has been for 
over fourteen years the secretary of the King County Bar Association, and 
has been president of the Washington State Bar Association. In Erie he was 
president of the city board of license commissioners. In Seattle, in 1891, 
he was elected president of the state board of University land and building 
commissioners. In politics he is a Republican, and has served his party as 
chairman of the King county central committee. 

In the year 1880 Mr. Arthur was happily married to Miss Amy A. 
Lane, a native of Erie county, Pennsylvania, but at that time a resident of 
Philadelphia. Their only child, Chester W., died in the city of Washington. 

In Masonic circles Mr. Arthur has borne an active part. He was made 
a Master Mason in St. John's Lodge, No. 9, of Seattle, and soon became its 
master. He has taken all the degrees in the York and Scottish Rite, and 
has served as potentate of Afifi Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Tacoma. 
He is Grand Master of Masons in the state of Washington. 

WILLIAM JAMES. 

Practical industry, wisely and vigorously applied, never fails ni secur- 
ing a due measure of success, and the well known and able business man of 
M'hom this sketch is written has given in his career an exemplification of the 
truth of the statement, and he is now incumbent of the responsible position of 
assistant superintendent of the Renton coal mines, representing one of the 
important industrial enterprises of King county. To Mr. James 1)elongs 



3o6 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the distinction of being one of the sterHng pioneers of the Pacific coast, and 
in this section of the Union he has passed practically his entire life, growing" 
np under the invigorating environments and scenes of the pioneer epoch and 
developing that sturdy self-reliance and self-respect which have made for the 
attainment of success and which have gained to him unequivocal respect and 
esteem in an objective way. 

Mr. James is a native of the island of Scilly, where he was born on the 
i8th of August, 1845, liJs parents dying while he was a mere child, having 
been of stanch old Welsh stock. He was taken into the home of relatives 
and with them, when but nine years of age, in 1854, he came to California, 
the trip being made by way" of the Isthmus of Panama, and they settled at 
Marysville, where he received limited educationaj advantages, ,the school 
system in that locality at the time having been very crude and primitive. 
Thus he may be said to be self-educated, even as he has been distinctively the 
architect of his own fortunes, having been dependent upon his own resources 
from his boyhood. He became identified with the mining industry in Marys- 
ville and vicinity and there remained until 1862, when he went to Nevada, 
where he was engaged in a similar line of work for the ensuing six years, thus 
becoming thoroughly familiar with the wild life of the minmg camps of the 
frontier during the early clays when civilization maintained a precarious foot- 
hold in this isolated section of the Union. During the greater portion of his 
residence in Nevada he was identified with quartz mining, but he later passed 
two years in the coal mines of Mount Diablo, California. At the expiration 
of this period Mr. James went to Illinois and was for a time identified with 
coal mining in La Salle county, after which he returned to the west and was 
engaged in mining in different sections of Wyoming until 1876, when he 
came to the Newcastle coal mines, in King county, Washington. Here he 
opened the Franklin mine and was also employed as suprintendent at the 
Gilman mine for about two years, and since that time has had charge of the 
operation of the Renton mine, which is now a very large producer, and he has 
also had charge of the development of other important coal mines in this 
locality. In fact it may be said without fear of contradiction that no man 
in the state of Washington has been more prominently and intimately con- 
cerned in the developing of the coal mining industry than has Mr. James, 
while his long experience and thorough technical knowledge have gained him 
a high reputation as one of the best mine operators in this section, and his 
able and faithful services have won for him the respect and confidence of 
those in whose service he has been enlisted and also of those over whom he 
has been placed in charge. The mine which he opened at Adaville, Wyom- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 307 

ing. had a vein of coal eighty-three feet thick, and this was one of the import- 
ant coal propositions which owed its development to his effective labors. 

In politics Mr. James is a stalwart Republican, and fraternally he is 
identified with the Masonic order, holding membership in St. John's Lodge 
No. 9, which w^as one of the first organized in the city of Seattle. In 1868, 
Mr. James was united in marriage to Miss Mary James, the two families not 
being related. She was born in the state of Michigan, and of this union 
two children have been born, Richard H. and James W., both of whom are 
able and popular young tradesmen of Reiiton, where the family have a 
pleasant home and where Mr. James is the owner of several other residence 
properties, taking a due interest in all that makes for the advancement and ma- 
terial prosperity of his home town, where he has lived for so many years and 
where he is accorded the highest confidence and esteem. Mrs. James is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church and she has prov^ed to her hus- 
band a true and devoted helpmeet and companion during the happy married 
life of nearly thirty-five years. 

CHARLES A. KOEPFLI. 

Charles A. Koepfli, now acceptably serving as county clerk of King 
county and ex-ofiicio' clerk of the superior court of the state of Washington 
for the county of King, is one of the leaders of the Republican party in his 
section, his large acquaintance and unbounded popularity giving him an in- 
fluential following, while his shrewd judgment of men and affairs makes his 
counsel of value in all important movements. In business circles he also 
takes a foremost rank. 

A native of Iowa, Mr. . Koepfli was born in Dubuque, on the loth of 
June, 1854, his parents being Theodore F. and Mina (Benson) Koepfli, who 
were born in Germany of Swiss ancestry. On his emigration to America 
the father located in Dubuque, Iowa, where he engaged in merchandising 
for several years. He departed this life in the sixty-third year of his age, 
but his wife still survives him and is now in her sixty-sixth year. Unto 
them were born two sons, the older being Adolph H., a resident of Dubuque. 

Charles A. Koepfli, the younger son, was reared and educated in his 
native town, and there engaged in the grocery business with his father for 
some years. Coming west in December, 1889, he located in Seattle, Wash- 
ington, and embarked in the undertaking business under the name of the 
Seattle Undertaking Company, of which he is still a stockholder, president 
and manager. His place of business is at 1012 and 1014 Third avenue, and 



3o8 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

he is meeting; with good success in that venture, being- thoroughly rehable 
and honorable in all things. 

The Republican party has always found in Mr. Koepfli a stanch sup- 
porter of its principles, and he has taken a very active part in promoting its 
interests. In 1900 his name was placed on the ticket as candidate for coun- 
ty clerk and ex-officio clerk of the superior court of the state of Washington 
for King county, and when the votes were counted it was found that he had 
been elected by a large majority, receiving the support of his many friends 
in both political parties. He is now filling the office with credit to himself 
and to the entire satisfaction of his fellow citizens. 

Socially Mr. Koepfli is a valued member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, the Independent Order of Foresters, the Iowa Legion of Honor, 
the Modern Woodmen of America, the Bankers Association of Des Moines, 
Iowa, the Sons of Herman, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the 
Washington Fraternal Congress, of which he is treasurer, but the order in 
which he takes the most active part is the Woodmen of the World, being one 
of the head managers of the organization for the nine states of the Pacific 
jurisdiction. This order is one of the best and most successful fraternal 
insurance societies and is receiving very large accessions to its membership 
every year, its management and methods being highly approved by all who 
iiave investigated the subject. 

In 1876 Mr. Koepfli was united in marriage to Miss Maria Reynoldson 
©f Dubuque, Iowa, and to them have been born three sons, namely : Albert 
E., T. Frank and Thomas R. The family are quite prominent socially and 
are held in the highest esteem by a host of friends in the city where they now 
make their home. In business, social and political circles Mr. Koepfli stands 
deservedly high, and is entitled to honorable mention in the history of his 
adopted state. 

VITUS SCHMID. 

Vitus Schmid is now living a retired life on Mercer island, where he was 
one of the first settlers, dating his residence from 1887. He has lived in the 
state of Washington, however, since 1870 and has therefore been a witness 
of much of its growth and development from early pioneer times when this 
section of the country was separated from the older east by almost impass- 
able mountains and the limitless sand stretches of the plains. There was 
iittle or no railroad communication to bridge over time and space and the 
task that awaited the pioneers was a severe and hard one. In the work of 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 309 

development and improvement in Seattle and the surrounding district jNIr. 
Schmid has borne an active and helpful part. 

A native of Hohenzollern, Germany, Mr. Schmid was born December 
18, 1848, and is a son of Conrad and Theresa Schmid, the former a farmer 
by occupation. In the public schools of his native country our subject pur- 
sued his education until he was fifteen years of age, when he bade adieu to 
friends in his native land and sailed for America in company with his brother. 
He landed in New York and shortly afterward made his way to Philadelphia, 
where he served an apprenticeship to the wagon-making trade. He after- 
ward followed that trade, gradually making his way westward. He crossed 
the plains as the railroad was built and assisted in constructing the snow 
sheds near Cheyenne, Wyoming. Eventually he reached California, but re- 
mained in that state for only two months, after which he came up the coast to 
Portland in 1869. There he was employed until April, 1870, but business 
was dull there, and he determined to continue his northward journey, sending 
his baggage on by stage. He then walked to Olympia and at that place took 
a boat for Seattle, where he arrived with only five dollars in his pocket. He 
aided in building the Alida, the first new boat built here. In August of the 
same year, 1870, he opened a wagon shop at the corner of Second and Wash- 
ington streets and there built the first express wagon and also the first lumber 
v,'agon ever constructed here. For three years he conducted the shop and 
then returned to the east in order to marry the lady to whom he had previous- 
ly become affianced. After spending four years in the east he again came to 
Seattle. Finding that another wagon shop had been established in the mean- 
time, he worked at the carpenter's trade and also dealt to some extent in real 
estate, purchasing some farm land on Mercer island. He has erected a house 
at the corner of Ninth and Marion streets in the city, also his shop here. He 
is very active and enterprising in his real estate operations, and his efforts 
in this direction have led to the substantial improvement of this portion of 
the comity. From his home on the island he has a fine view of Lake Wash- 
ington and Seattle. 

In i^olitics Mr. Schmid is a Republican where questions of national im- 
portance are involved, but at local elections he casts his ballot independently 
of party ties. He has served as road supervisor and also as a member of the 
school board. Socially he is connected with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In pioneer 
days he belonged to the German Singing Society, but since he removed to 
the island he has not been associated with that organization. 

Mr. Schmid has been twice married. On the 6th of April, 1874, he 







lo REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 



wedded Sarah A. Chase, and they have had four children : Conrad G. ; Victor 
].; Theresa, who became the wife of Edward McMahon; and Carohne, the 
wife of Frederick Remich, who is proprietor of a newspaper at Wood- 
stock, Ihinois. Both Mr. and Mrs. McMahon are graduates of the State 
University and are now successful teachers ; the two sons were also students 
of the State University, and in the summer of 1897 they went north in 
company with Professor Ingraham and made the ascent of Mount St. Elias 
with Count Luigi ; the following year they were lost with the Jane Grey while 
on their second trip to Alaska. The mother died July 15, 1883, and on the 
6th of August, 1888, Mr. Schmid was agani married, his second union being 
Avith Ida Dryen. Their son, George Mercer Schmid, died m the spring of 
1899, at the age of six years. Such in brief is the life history of our subject. 
He has never had occasion to regret his determination to make America his 
home, for in the opportunities of this land he has found the business open- 
ings he desired, and with appreciation for possibilities and with unflagging 
enterprise he has steadily worked his way upward. 

JOHN STEWART BRACE. 

John Stewart Brace is the president of the Brace & Hergert Mill Com- 
pany of Seattle, extensively engaged in the manufacture of lumber and 
shingles. Canada has furnished to the United States many bright, enter- 
prising young men, who have left the Dominion and entered the business 
circles of this country, with its more progressive methods, livelier competi- 
tion and advancement more quickly secured. Among this number is John 
Stewart Brace. He has some of the strong, rugged and persevering charac- 
teristics developed by his earlier environments, which, coupled with the im- 
pulses of the Celtic blood of his ancestors, made him at an early day seek 
wider fields in which to give full scope to his ambition and industry. He 
found the opportunity he sought in the freedom and appreciation of the 
growing western portion of the country. Though born across the border he 
is thoroughly American in thought and feeling and is devoted and sincere in 
his love for the stars and stripes. His career is identified with the history 
of Seattle, where he has acquired a competence and where he is an honored 
and respected citizen. 

Mr Brace was born in Canada on the 19th of August, 1861, being of 
English ancestry. Harvey Brace lived in Vermont when the Revolutionary 
war broke out, and he was a captain on General Washington's staff during the 
war. His son Bannister, born in 1764, moved to Auburn, New York, where 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 311 

Jiarvey Brace, the grandfather of John Stewart, was born in 1808. This 
grandfather Brace moved to Toronto, Canada, in 1829, where lie established 
an edged tool factory, later removing his industry to Goodrich, Canada. He 
married a Miss Fischer, a lady of German ancestry, and in his later life went 
with his son Lewis John Brace to Spokane, Washington, where he spent his 
remaining days, passing away at the ripe old age of eighty-one years. By 
his marriage he had a large family, and the children were reared in the faith 
of the Episcopal church, and as there was no church of that denomination in 
Ihe neighborhood in which they lived the grandfather of our subject joined 
the Presbyterian church and remained identified therewith until his death. 
He was a man of sterling worth and unquestioned honesty. 

Lewis John Brace, the father of our subject, was born in Goodrich, 
Ontario county, in 1838, and after arriving at years of maturity wedded 
Miss Mary Gibson, a native of Ireland, who w^ent with her parents to Canada 
when only five years of age. Lewis John Brace became an extensive man- 
ufacturer of lumber and was also engaged in contracting for and construct- 
ing public buildings, bridges and roads. During a large portion of his resi- 
dence in Canada he held the office of Queen's magistrate in the town of Wing- 
ham, this being an office very similar to that of justice of the peace in the 
United States. Removing westward to Spokane, Washington, he was there 
largely engaged in stock-raising and later turned his attention to the manu- 
facture of lumber, but now he is retired from active business and with his 
estimable wife resides in the city of Seattle. During the whole of his busi- 
ness career he has been a prominent and reliable man, honored for his upright 
business methods as well as for his public spirited citizenship. He and his 
wife have had seven children, four of whom are yet living. 

Of this number John Stewart Brace is the eldest. He ] pursued his early 
education in the public schools of Ontario and afterward completed a course 
in a collegiate institute in Gault. When seventeen years of age he joined 
his father in the lumber business and came with him to Spokane, Washington, 
when twenty-two years of age, in 1883, and since that time lias given his un- 
divided attention to the lumber business in the state of his adoption. For 
five years he was connected with the Spokane Mill Company and in company 
with his father was associated in conducting a mill outside of the city. In 
October. 1888. he came to Seattle and has since been associated closely with 
the city and her interests. Here he at first accepted the position of superin- 
tendent of the old Western Mills Company, with which he remained until it 
was absorbed by the Rainier Power & Railway Company, of which D. T. 
Denny was the largest stockholder. Later this l)usiness went into the hands 



312 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

of a receiver and was closed out by him. In 1895 ^^- Brace and his partner, 
Mr. Hergert, leased the property and met with such excellent success in the 
c:onduct of their business that in 1899 they purchased the property and have 
refitted the plant with the latest improved machinery. The capacity of the 
plant is now sixty-five thousand feet of lumber in ten hours. They employ 
eighty men and have a large local demand for their product. Under their 
able management the business has steadily increased and the building is now 
worth seventy-five thousand dollars. Mr. Brace is a man of superior busi- 
ness ability and has not limited his efforts to one line. He is interested in 
several business enterprises and he has large logging interests, and has ac- 
quired considerable city property. 

Mr. Brace was elected alderman of Seattle in 1892 and served for two 
years. In 1890 he was united in marriage to Miss Kate Frankland, a native 
of Providence, Rhode Island, and a daughter of James Frankland, who was 
of English ancestry. They now have five children : Sarah Maude, Mary 
Eveline, Harry Dominick, John Benjamin and Alice Mildred. The parents 
hold membership in the Episcopal church and Mr. Brace is a valued member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. They have a fine residence in 
Seattle and are very highly respected citizens, while Mr. Brace is known as 
a successful business man. His life has been one of continuous activity, in 
which he has been accorded his due share of labor, and to-day he is numbered 
among the substantial residents of Seattle. His interests are thoroughly 
identified with those of the northwest, and at all times he is ready to lend his 
aid and co-operation to any movement calculated to benefit this section of 
the country or advance its wonderful development. 

ALBERT BUHTZ. 

A reprensentative of the industrial interests of Seattle, Albert Buhtz is 
the president of the Fremont Barrel Company and the manager of the busi- 
ness. A native of Germany, he was born on the 25th of September, 1846, 
his parents being William and Christiana (Pretzer) Buhtz, both of whom 
were natives of the same country. The father was sea captain and owned 
Ihe ship on which he sailed. In religious faith he was a Protestant and was 
n man of sterling integrity who made many friends in his own land and in 
the ports to which he sailed. He died at the age of sixty-four years, and his 
wife passed away at the age of fifty-eight years. They were the parents of 
six children, of whom only two are living, a younger brother of our subject 
being still a resident of Prussia. 





(yj^i>t.-'^i>^7'^ 



THE NEW yore: i' 

fICLIBRARYS 



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i ntaeN '^uwo/itiopso. 

'i 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 313 

Albert Buhtz was educated and learned his trade in his native land and 
^vhen fourteen years of age he went to sea, following "a life on the ocean 
wave" for eight years, during which he sailed over all parts of the Atlantic 
ocean and the North sea. In 1868, when twenty-two years of age, he came 
to the United States and made his way inland to Cleveland, Ohio, intending 
to make this country his home. At the time of his arrival in the Ohio city he 
had but little knowledge of the English language, but he was determined and 
resolute and his self-reliance and energy have enabled him to steadily advance 
in the business world. He learned the cooper's trade in Cleveland and en- 
gaged in the manufacture of oil barrels, securing a good market for his pro- 
duct. He remained in that business in Cleveland until 1888 when he deter- 
mined to come to Seattle, hoping thereby to benefit the health of his wife. 

In 1 87 1, in Cleveland, Mr. Buhtz had been married to Miss Susie Gram- 
]ich, who was bom in Germany but was brought by her parents to the United 
States when she was but two years of age, her father being Jacob Gramlich. 
Eight children were born unto our subject and his wife in Cleveland and an- 
other child was added to the family in Seattle. All are yet living and are 
respected members of society in the city in which they have so long resided. 

After arriving in this city Mr. Buhtz began work at his trade and being 
expert and capable he soon found that his services were in constant demand. 
In 1896 he established his present business and is now at the head of the 
Fremont Barrel Factory. He has a lot two hundred by two hundred feet, on 
which he has erected a building eighty by sixty feet and two stories in height. 
He has also built another building, twenty by thirty-six feet and a story and a 
half in height. In connection with the plant there is also a dry kiln forty by 
sixty feet. He has the facilities, tools and knowledge to enable him to manu- 
facture the best cooperage of all descriptions. He- makes a specialty of fish, 
vinegar and meat barrels, and the fish barrels are largely sent to Alaska. A 
large business is successfully conducted and the factory is so arranged that if 
exceptionally large orders are received an extra number of workmen can be 
employed to hasten the filling of the order. In the conduct and ownership of 
the factory Mr. Buhtz is now associated with his son, Albert J., who is the 
secretary and treasurer of the company. He is a well informed and capable 
young business man. 

Albert J. Buhtz is now married and has one son. The other members 
of the father's family are William F., Emil R., Carl F., Minnie, Susan, 
Amelia, Matilda and Gertrude. Susan is now the wife of William Wagner. 
The family have a good home which Mr. Buhtz built on the hillside, over- 
looking his factory and the surrounding country and the beautiful lake near 
20 



'314 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

by. In his political affiliations he is a Republican, having supported the 
party since casting his first presidential vote for James A. Garfield. He and 
his family are members of the German Congregational church. The hope 
'that led them to seek a home on the coast has been realized, for here the mother 
^regained her health and still lives to bless the home by her cheerful presence. 
Ivlr. Buhtz is a man of strong force of character, purposeful and resolute. 
He is still active in business affairs and his career has been remarkably suc- 
cessful chiefly by reason of his natural ability and his thorough insight into 
the business in which as a young tradesman he embarked. His word is as 
good as his bond and the better one knows him the greater the respect he 
entertains for him. 

EDWIN R. BISSELL. 

Edwin R. Bissell is engaged in the drug business at Auburn, his mer- 
cantile affairs being a prominent factor in the commercial activity and pros- 
perity of the town. He was born near Erie, Erie county, Pennsylvania, on 
the 2ist of February, 1855, and is a son of Gaylord G. Bissell, whose birth 
occurred in Litchfield county, Connecticut, on the 13th of February, 1825. 
When a young man the father left the Charter Oak state and removed to 
jirie county, Pennsylvania, and subsequently became a resident of Fort 
l^odge, Iowa, where he remained for about five years. In 1860 he removed 
to Virginia City, Montana, being one of the pioneers of that celebrated min- 
ing camp. He was chosen the first mayor of Virginia City and was after- 
v/ard the first police judge of that place, filling those positions at a tinie when 
that section of Montana was overrun with outlaws. It required considerable 
personal courage and determination to occupy those offices, but he discharged 
his duties without fear or favor, and his son Edwin now has in his pos- 
session a star which was presented to his father while he was acceptably serv- 
ing as police judge, and which the son prizes very highly. Gaylord G. Bissell 
was a practicing physician and had also been admitted to the bar in his 
younger days, but never followed the law as a profession. In Montana, 
when he was not engaged with his official duties, he devoted his energies to 
■mining. In 1869 he returned to the east, locating at Lovilia, Iowa, where 
he engaged in the practice of medicine until his life's labors were ended in 
•death, on the 8th of July, 1879. In Litchfield county, Connecticut, he had 
v/edded Emily Talmadge, who was born in Connecticut, April 20, 1828, and 
they were married in that state on the 7th of November, 1849. Mrs. Bissell 
survived her husband for a number of years, passing away in Lovilia, Iowa, 
on the 20th of April, 1898. Both the parents of our subject were of French 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 315 

Huguenot extraction and their respective families were founded in America 
by those who belonged to the original Plymouth colony of New England. 

In the schools of Torringford, Connecticut, and Lovilia, Iowa, Edwin 
i^. Bissell pursued his education, becoming a resident of the latter place when 
thirteen years old. He continued his studies until he reached the age of eight- 
een, after which he engaged in teaching for two or three years, near Avoca, 
Iowa. He followed that profession through the winter months and during 
the summer season worked as a farm hand. During the mining excitement 
in Colorado he went to Lead vi He and entered the employ of the Little Pitts- 
burg Mining Company, with which he was connected for a year. He then 
turned his attention to the cattle business in San Luis valley, in Colorado, 
raising cattle on the range for about four years. He went through all the 
experiences of a cowboy on the plains. He then returned to Iowa and after 
his marriage took his bride to Colorado, where he continued to make his 
liome until 1884, when he sold his interests there and became a resident of 
Lovilia, Iowa, where he conducted a restaurant for a year. He next re- 
moved to Vining in Clay county, Kansas, where he accepted a position as 
clerk in a general store, acting in that capacit}^ for four years. 

In 1889 Mr. Bissell came to Washington, locating at Auburn, where in 
connection with his uncle, V. R. Bissell, he opened a drug store under the 
firm name of V. R. Bissell & Company. The uncle died in 1893, since which 
time the store has been owned and conducted by Edwin R. Bissell. He car- 
ries a large and well selected stock of drugs and other commodities usually 
found in first-class drug stores, and his patronage is extensive anad brings to 
him a good profit. 

In 1 88 1 occurred the marriage of Mr. Bissel to Miss Alice Roberts, the 
wedding taking place in Lovilia, Iowa, where the lady was born in i860. 
She died in Auburn in January, 1902, leaving one son, Gaylord Nathan, who 
:'s now thirteen years of age. Mr. Bissell belongs to King Solomon Lodge, 
E. & A. M., Douglas Lodge, K. P., Valley Lodge, I. O. O. E., the Independ- 
ent Order of Eoresters and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, also to 
the National Union and Oriental Princes. He is a popular representative of 
those fraternal organizations and has many friends among the brethren in 
the ranks. His political support is given with unfaltering purpose to the 
Republican party, and upon that ticket he was elected treasurer of Auburn in 
] 898, and has since been continuously in the office, proving loyal and faithful 
to the trust reposed in him. He is a man of enterprising and progressive 
spirit and has found in the business opportunities of the west the advantages 
which he sought for the purpose of acquiring a comfort-ible competence. 



3i6 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

PERRY POLSON. 

"Through struggles to success/' has been the Hfe record of Perry Pol- 
son. Difficulties and obstacles have barred his path to the goal of prosperity, 
but by determined and honorable effort he has worked his way steadily up- 
ward and to-day he stands in an enviable position on the plane of affluence, 
with a record of diligence, perseverance and business integrity that any man 
might envy. A native of Sweden, he was born in Halmstad on the 8th of 
July, 1854. His parents, Olof and Gunilla (Matson) Poison, were bom, 
reared and married in Sweden and in 1868 came to the United States, bring- 
ing with them their seven children, three sons and four daughters. They 
settled in Iowa, and one more son was added to the family there, while one 
son was born in Washington territory. With the exception of two, all of the 
children are yet living and both parents survive at the age of sixty-eight 
years. They are respected and industrious farming people and are faithful 
and devout members of the Lutheran church. 

Perry Poison is the only member of the family residing in Seattle. He 
received a common school education in his native land and was a lad of four- 
teen years when in 1868 he arrived with his father and the family in Iowa 
and began to earn his own living there as a farm boy. After three years 
spent in the Hawkeye state he came to Washington territory, being then a 
youth of seventeen years. Here he continued to .work as a farm hand, being 
paid from thirty to forty dollars per month, which was the usual wages paid 
at that time. During the Cariboo excitement in British Columbia he went 
there and was employed by the firm of Meacham & Nason at Barkerville in 
the lumbering and mining business at seventy-five dollars per month and 
board. He had charge of one of the lumber yards and the accounts in con- 
nection with the business. On his return to Washington he puchased a farm 
of one hundred and ninety acres in Skagit county, for which he was to pay 
five thousand dollars. He paid one thousand dollars down, the remainder to 
be afterward paid, leaving a debt of four thousand, and at the end of the first 
year he found that he was five thousand dollars in debt and was paying fifteen 
per cent, interest on the same. That interest he continued to pay for six 
years. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Poison was united in marriage to Miss Kate H. Hinckley, 
who was born in the old town of Shasta, California, a daughter of J. C. 
Hinckley, the publisher of the first newspaper in the then flourishing town 
and mining camp of Shasta. For three years after his marriage Mr. Poison 
continued on the farm and reduced his indebtedness, but the worry and anx- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 317 

iety were too much for him. His health failed and he was told by the physi- 
cians that he could not live unless he made a change. He then rented the farm, 
reserving a small piece of land, on which he intended to build and make his 
home, but in the meantime a party in the implement business induced him to 
engage in that line of commercial activity as a partner in Laconner, Skagit 
county, under the firm name of Pool & Poison. They did business together 
tor a little more than a year and then Mr. Poison purchased his partner's in- 
terest and continued the business alone for a year. On the expiration of that 
period he admitted his brother Nels Poison to a partnership and after two 
years of successful business a third brother, John Poison, became a partner, 
and the Poison Hardware Company was organized. The business grew to 
large proportions. They were buying their goods from Portland and San 
Francisco jobbers, but in 1889 Perry Poison went east and purchased goods, 
rifter which the Portland jobbers refused to sell them goods and also put their 
traveling men in Mr. Poison's territory to canvass his patrons and take from 
him his customers. This caused our subject to conclude that he would either 
have to go out of business or go to Seattle and open business there in com- 
petition with the Portland people. The firm incorporated under the name of 
the Poison, Wilton Hardware Company, Mr. A. Wilton joming the com- 
pany, and a branch house in Seattle was opened with Mr. Wilton in charge. 
They were then in direct competition with their old friends and by careful 
management and honorable business methods they secured the business to 
such an extent that one of the Portland branches at Seattle was sold to them, 
and they were in control of the whole business. They became large whole- 
sale dealers in this line and have the credit of being the pioneer jobbers of 
agricultural implements and vehicles from Seattle. They also have a store 
at Wenatchee, Chelan county, besides their store at Laconner which is now 
a branch store, their Seattle store now being their head office. After the last 
incorporation of the firm, Mr. Poison's brother, Nels, withdrew, and in Feb- 
ruary, 1 90 1, his brother John died. He had been vice-president and secre- 
tary of the company. In 1897 Mr. Wilton withdrew and the following year 
Mr. Poison changed the name of the business to its present .^orm, the Poison 
Implement & Hardware Company, of which he is the president and manager. 
Through all the years he has been the active moving spirit in the enterprise 
and to his business talent and honorable methods ma,y be attributed the 
splendid success he has achieved. He has the good will and confidence of 
all with whom he has had business relations. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Poison have been born four children : Minnie, who 
is now a stenographer in her father's office; Helen, Olof Hinckley, and 



3i8 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Harold. Mr. Poison is a member of the Masonic fraternity and was secre- 
tary of his lodge in Laconner. He is also a representative of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and in politics is a Republican. While on his 
farm he served as road supervisor and school director, but has never been 
desirous for official positions. Such is the life record of Mr. Poison, and 
his success has been most creditable. Like other business men he has "not 
found all of the days equally bright. Indeed in his commercial experience, 
he has seen the gathering of clouds that threatened storms and disaster, but 
his rich inheritance of energy and pluck has enabled him to turn defeat into 
victories and promised failures into brilliant successes. Whether as a busi- 
man or in private life, he has always been the same genial, courteous gentle- 
man, whose ways are those of refinement, and whose word no one can 
question. 

ALVER ROBINSON. 

Alver Robinson, who for the past ten years has been president of thQ 
Seattle Land Company and is now engaged on his own account in buying 
and selling real estate and loaning money, has been a very active factor in the 
improvement and upbuilding of the city in which he makes his home. He 
has been interested in a number of additions which have been made to Seattle, 
including Harrison Heights north of Lake Union, and Latone which is now 
well improved. He has also been interested in the Brooklyn addition, com- 
prising one hundred and seven acres adjoining the State University, and in 
the Coffman addition, between Jackson street and Yesler Way, comprising 
twenty-three acres. 

Mr. Robinson is a native of Tennessee, his birth having occurred near 
Knoxville, on the 4th of August, 1857. The family is of Scotch lineage and 
was early founded in Virginia by ancestors who located there in pioneer days. 
Walter Robinson, the grandfather of our subject, was born in the old Domin- 
ion, and became a planter and slave-owner there, but did not believe in the 
system of holding people in bondage and at the time of the Civil war became 
a staunch Union man and a Republican. When a young man he left Vir- 
ginia, removing to Tennessee, where he was married and in that state, in 
1832, his son John C. Robinson, was born. After arriving at years of matur- 
ity the latter was united in marriage to Elizabeth B. Chisholm, a lady of 
Scotch lineage, who was born in Tennessee. He inherited his father's slaves, 
but he, too, was not in favor of the system of slavery as it existed in the 
south. Removing to Arkansas and afterward to Kansas, he has devoted 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 3^9 

the greater part of his attention throughout his business career to agri- 
cuhural pursuits and is now hving in the Sunflower state at the age of 
sixty-nine years. He and his wife have long been acceptable and faithful- 
members of the Christian church and are worthy and esteemed citizens of 
the community in which they make their home. Mr. Robinson served as 
assessor of his county and was a candidate of his party for the state legis- 
lature, but as his county has a Democratic majority he was defeated by 
a small vote, as he endorsed the Republican party and its principles. Mr. 
and Mrs. Robinson became the parents of eleven children, of whom nine 
are yet living and three of the sons are respected and worthy citizens of 
the state of Washington; namely, A. J., of Seattle; C. D., of Snohomish; 
and Alver. 

In taking up the personal history of Alver Robinson we present to 
our readers the life record of one who is widely and favorably known in 
connection with business interests in Seattle. He pursued his education in 
Missouri and in Kansas, for during the period of the Civil war his family 
resided in the former state. Early in his business career he was engaged 
in farming and later turned his attention to the manufacture of carriages 
as a member of the firm of Cole & Robinson, in which industry he was in- 
terested from 1883 until 1887, meeting with a high degree of success in 
his undertakings. He was also to some extent engaged in real estate deal- 
ing and his experience in that direction proved a benefit to him when he 
began his real estate operations on the Pacific coast. In the year 1887 Mr. 
Robinson made his way to California and in the fall of that year arrived 
in Seattle, where he became one of the organizers of the Seattle Land Com- 
pany, of which he was president for ten years. He has been very prominent 
and influential in promoting the growth and improvement of the city, doing 
all in his power to advance its interests. He is a business man of high 
integrity, of marked enterprise and keen discernment, and his well directed 
efforts have been the foundation of the success which has attended him. 
He is now a member of the Chamber of Commerce, a body composed of the 
most prominent and enterprising business men of Seattle. 

In 1889, Mr. Robinson was happily married to Miss May Randolph, 
a native of Oregon and a daughter of S. P. Randolph, one of the honored 
pioneer settlers of the Sunset state, who later came to Washington, taking 
up his abode in Seattle in 1873. To our subject and his wife was born one 
son, Walter Randolph Robinson, who is now in school. In 1893 Mr. Robin- 
son was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 12th 
of March. She was a lady of amiable disposition, of culture and refinement. 



320 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

and a devoted Christian woman. In the. church she was an active and 
earnest worker, and her loss was deeply felt there as well as in her home 
and in the social circles in which she moved. On October 7, 1902, Mr. 
Robinson was married to Aliss Anna Campbell. 

Soon after coming to Seattle Air. Robinson placed his membership in 
the First Presbyterian church and later he became one of the organizers of 
Westminster Presbyterian church, with which he has since been identified. He 
is now one of its most active and influential representatives, is serving as one 
of its deacons and is a trustee, and in his contributions for its support he is 
most liberal and generous. His life has been honorable, and viewed in a 
personal light he is a strong man, strong in his good name and in the 
high reputation which has come to him through upright dealing in business 
and through fidelity to duty in every relation in which he has been placed. 

CHARLES R. COLLINS. 

Charles R. Collins was born in the city of Philadelphia on the 3d of 
January, 1863, and the blood of English and Welsh ancestry flows in his 
veins. The family of which he is a representative was founded in Virginia in 
colonial days and among its numbers were those who were active particip- 
ants in events which shaped the early history of the Old Dominion and also 
of New Jersey. In religious faith they adhered to the Society of Friends. 
On the maternal side ]\Ir. Collins is connected with the Harrisons of Vir- 
ginia. Joseph Harrison Collins. Uie father of our subject, was born in 
Haddonfield, New Jersey, in 181 3, and married Martha Ann Judkins, a re- 
presentative of an old family of Virginia, but later established in Ohio. Mr. 
Collins removed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in 
the lumber trade and in the building business. Under the old city govern- 
ment he served as a city commissioner and was a man prominent in public 
as well as business affairs. He adhered to the faith of the Presbyterian 
church and after an honorable and upright career departed this life in 1888, 
at the age of seventy-four years. His wife survives him and is now in the 
seventy-sixth year of her age, and she still resides in Philadelphia. In the 
family were six children, and with one exception all are yet living. 

Charles R. Collins attended the public schools of his native city and 

received his instruction and training as a mechanical engineer in Stevens In- 

. stitute of Technolog}'. After completing the course he was for some years 

connected with the engineer department of the United Gas Improvement 

Company of Philadelphia, where he remained until 1896, a period of ten 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 321 

years. He then came to Seattle to accept the position of general manager 
of the Seattle Gas & Electric Light Company, in which capacity he served 
most acceptably until the 31st of December, 1900, when he resigned his po- 
sition to engage in business for himself. He is now connected with con- 
struction w^ork on the Pacific coast, his labors covering the territory of Cali- 
fornia, Oregon and Washington. He assisted in laying out the work for 
the new gas plant of Claus Spreckles of San Francisco, and is also building 
the gas works at Everett, Washington. He likewise has charge of the con- 
struction of the plant of the Citizens' Gas Light & Power Company of Seat- 
tle. He is an expert mechanical engineer, thoroughly famiiliar with the 
great scientific principles which underlie his work, having acquired a practical 
knowledge of the duties which devolve upon him in connection with the exe- 
cution of contracts in this department of industrial activity. 

Mr. Collins was happily married in 1891 to Miss Anna Chapin, a 
daughter of William Castner Chapin, of Philadelphia. They have three 
children, Elma C, Charles R., and William Chapin. The parents hold mem- 
bership in St. Mark's Episcopal church, in which Mr. Collins is one of the 
vestrymen. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the Republican party and is well informed on the issues of the 
day, yet has never been an aspirant for office. He has become interested in 
property of the city, owning some valuable real estate, and is also a trustee 
of the Chamber of Commerce of Seattle. This is a utilitarian age, in which 
liusiness interests are predominant, and when business affairs are assuming 
extensive proportions, and marked progress is being made along all lines of 
industrial work. Realizing that there is ever room at the top and that op- 
portunity for advancement is never lacking, Mr. Collins has so qualified him- 
self for his w^ork that his skill and ability have continuously enabled him to 
progress in the line of his chosen vocation, and he stands to-day among the 
leading representatives in the department of mechanical engineering on the 

Pacific coast. 

RALPH W. EMMONS. 

Twelve years have passed since Ralph W. Emmons became identified 
with the interests of Seattle, and during all this period he has been recog- 
nized as one of its leading law practitioners. Time has but brightened his 
reputation in professional circles and among the leading men of the city has 
given him a prestige that is indeed enviable. His birth occurred in Orion, 
Oakland county, Michigan, on the nth of December. 1854. and he is of 
English descent. The progenitor of the family on American soil was Rev. 



322 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

\Villiam Emmons, an Episcopal minister, who came to this country in an 
early day took up his abode in Xew Hampshire. The great-grandfather, 
William Emmons, served in a Xew York regiment during the Revolutionary 
war. Elias R. Emmons, the father of him whose name introduces this re- 
view, was born near Sandy Hill, Xew York, and he was married to Miss 
Sarah Carpenter, whose ancestors were among the early settlers of Ro- 
chester, Xew York, and were prominently engaged in milling pursuits there. 
yir. and Mrs. Emmons became the parents of four children, of whom three 
are still living. 

Ralph W. Emmons received his literary training in the schools of Mi- 
chigan, while his professional studies were pursued in ^Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin, and he was admitted to the bar of Oregon in 1882. Forming a partner- 
ship with his brother, A. C. Emmons, he then embarked in the practice of his 
chosen calling in Portland, Oregon, where they have maintained an office for 
the past twenty years, and for the past twelve years they have also practiced 
in Seattle, in both places meeting with a well merited degree of success. 

The marriage of Ralph W. Emmons and Cornelia Harris was cele- 
brated in 1890. The lady is of English descent, and her ancestors were 
among the early American settlers. Her father, Joseph Harris, was a Union 
soldier during the great Civil war. Tjo yir. and Mrs. Emmons were born 
three sons, Ralph, born in Portland, Oregon, and Harris and Arthur, born in 
Seattle. The family reside in a beautiful home on Beacon Hill, and ]Mrs. Em- 
mons is a valued member of St. Mark's Episcopal church. On attaining ma- 
ture years ]\Ir. Emmons became identified with the Masonic fraternity, and he 
has ever since retained his membership therein, and he is also a member of 
the Sons of the Revolution. He has always been an ardent and active Re- 
publican, maintaining a high standing both in political and professional circ- 
les, and Seattle numbers him among her leading and influential citizens. 

JOHX W. IMcCOXXAUGHEY. 

King county is fortunate in that it has a class of men in its public offices 
who are faithful to duty and have the best interests of the community at 
heart, placing the public welfare before personal aggrandizement and the 
good of the community before partisanship. On the list of public officials 
appears the name of John W. McConnaughey who is occupying the position of 
county treasurer. He is also well known in commercial circles, being en- 
gaged in the manufacture and sale of paint in Seattle. A native of Ohio, he 
was born in the city of Dayton in April, i860, and is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. 




^^r^i/T?^. 



tTT^T."^?^ 




SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 323 

In the Keystone state David McConnaughey, the grandfather of our subject, 
was born and removing westward became one of the pioneer settlers of Day- 
ton, Ohio, where he secured a farm from the government and placed the 
land under a high state of cultivation. To its development and improvement 
he devoted his energies up to the time of his death which occurred in his 
sixty-eighth year. John C. McConnaughey, the father of our subject, was 
born on the homestead farm near Dayton, on 1824, and after arriving at 
years of maturity married Miss Elizabeth A. Keplinger. Her father also 
was a pioneer of Ohio and for many years an owner of a flouring mill there. 
Mr. McConnaughey was a farmer and stock raiser who spent his entire life 
in his native town and died at the age of seventy-two years. His wife still 
survives him and is now sixty-nine years of age, her home being in Dayton, 
Ohio. This worthy couple were the parents of eleven children, all of whom 
are still living. Three of the sons are on the Pacific coast, C. K. McCon- 
naughey, being the cashier in the treasurer's ofifice of King county, while D. 
F. is manager of the Seattle Paint and Varnish Company, the stock of which 
is owned by John W., D. F. and C. K. McConnaughey. 

To the public school system of Dayton, Ohio, John McConnaughey is 
indebted for the educational privileges he received. In 1885 he left home in 
order to enter upon an independent business career and making his way to the 
west was engaged in the brokerage business in Wichita, Kansas. He traveled 
all over the western part of that state and at length sought a home on the 
Pacific coast, removing to Portland, Oregon, in the fall of 1889. The month 
of July, 1892, witnessed his arrival in Seattle, where he continued in the 
brokerage and real estate business until April, 1898, when he organized the 
Seattle Paint and Varnish Company, under which name he and his brother, 
D. F. McConnaughey, are conducting a wholesale business, manufacturing 
all of the goods which they handle. They make everything in the paint line 
and their business is proving a very satisfactory one, bringing to them a good 
income annually. The product of their factory finds a ready sale upon the 
market owing to the excellence of quality as well as reasonable price and the 
reliability of the house. Our subject is also largely interested in city real 
estate, including both business and residence property, his investments having 
been so judiciously made that they have greatly augmented h.is capital. 

Mr. McConnaughey is identified with all of the interests of Seattle and 
is well known not only because of his real estate dealings and his industrial 
and commercial interests, but also because of the active part which he takes 
in promoting movements and measures calculated to advance the general 
good. He is a valued meinber of the Rainier Club, the Athletic Club and of 



324 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the Chamber of Commerce. In poHtics he has been a Hfelong Republican 
and in the fall of 1900 was elected to his present office by a good majority 
and is filling the position with much ability. He has thirty employes in his 
office under him and has given a surety bond of $233,000. He sustains an 
unassailable reputation for integrity and honesty in all business transactions 
and the choice of the public in calling Mr. McConnaughey to office was cer- 
tainly a wise one. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He is a thorough representative business man. 
his standing being high in the community and he is both widely and favorably 
known in the city of his adoption, 

CHARLES B. FORD, M. D. 

Each calling or business, if honorable, has its place in the scheme of 
human existence, constituting a part of the plan whereb}' life's methods are 
pursued and man reaches his ultimate destiny. "All are needed by each 
one," wrote Emerson. The importance of a business, however, is largely 
determined by its usefulness. So dependent is man upon his fellow men 
that the worth of the indi\-idual is largely reckoned by what he has done for 
humanity. There is no class to whom greater gratitude is due than to those 
self-sacrificing, noble minded men whose life work has been the alleviation 
of the burden of suffering that rests upon the world, thus lengthening the 
span of human existence. Their influence cannot be measured by any known 
standard, their helpfulness is as broad as the universe and their power goes 
hand in hand with the beneficent laws of nature that come from the source of 
life itself. Some one has said, "he serves God best who serves humanity 
most." The skillful physician then, by the exercise of his native talents and 
acquired ability, is not only performing a service for humaniU-. but is follow- 
ing in the footsteps of the Teacher who said, "Inasmuch as ye have done it 
unto one of the least of these, ye have done it unto me." 

A name that stands conspicuously forth in connection with the medical 
profession of Seattle is that of Dr. Charles Bickham Ford, one of the young- 
er members of the profession. He is a native of Shreveport, Louisiana, born 
August 17, 1873, and on the paternal side is of Scotch and English ancestry, 
while on the maternal side he is of German and English ancestry. The 
Doctor's paternal great-grandfather removed to North Carolina in a very 
early day, and his son moved from that state to Mississippi, where he was a 
planter for a number of years, and was also a member of the Mississippi state 
senate. His son. \\^illiam Pendleton Ford, was born in iMississippi. in 1847. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 325 

He was there married to Miss Clara B. Kline, a native of Shreveport, Louisi- 
ana, and a daughter of John Jackson, also of that state. They were of Ger- 
man ancestry, the progenitor of the family in this country having been among 
the early settlers of Pennsylvania, and the Doctor's ancestry on both sides 
were active participants in the Revolutionary war. William Pendelton Ford 
joined the Confederate forces when but fourteen years of age, and was a 
brave and valiant soldier until the close of the great sanguinary struggle. 
He was wounded in battle, and his death occurred at the age of forty-six 
years. He removed from Mississippi to Louisiana, and served as cashier of 
the Merchants & Farmers Bank of Shreveport. To Mr. and Mrs. Ford 
were born three children, two sons and a daughter, and of these Edward G. 
now resides in Baltimore, Maryland, The daughter died in infancy. The 
mother still survives, and now makes her home with her son, the subject of 
this review, in Seattle. The family are members of the Episcopal church. 
Dr. Charles B. Ford received his literary education in the University of 
South Sewanee, Tennessee, and his professional training was accjuired in the 
Bellevue Medical College, in which he was graduated with the class of 1895. 
In order to still further perfect himself in his chosen calling he spent a year 
and a half in the Brooklyn Hospital, and upon the expiration of that period 
he came to Seattle and entered upon his professional career. He soon se- 
cured a liberal and remunerative practice and won recognition as one of the 
leading physicians of the city. He has given special attention to the prac- 
tice of surgery, in which he is considered an expert, and in addition to his 
large private practice he is also serving as assistant surgeon to the Marine 
Hospital. He is a valued member of the King County Medical Society and 
of the Washington State Medical Society, and his skill and experience along 
the line of his chosen calling far outreach his years. He is a genial gentle- 
man, always courteous and considerate, of broad humanity, sympathy and 
tolerance, and possessed of that sincere love for his fellow men without which 
there can never be the highest success in the medical profession. His friends 
are legion, and the history of Seattle would be incomplete without the record 
of his life and work. 

MRS. JOSEPHINE P. McDERMOTT. 

This is an age in which woman's ability in many departments of busi- 
ness life has been widely recognized, because she has successtully entered the 
ranks of commercial and professional life and proved that her skill is equal 
to that of man. Mrs. McDermott is the efficient president of The Bon 



326 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Marche, Nordhoff & Company incorporated department store, which is one 
of the largest and most popular department stores in the northwest. It is 
located at 1419-35 Second avenue and 1 15-123 Pike street, and an office is 
maintained in New York city for the purchase of the goods. Four hundred 
employes are found in the Seattle establishment and there are twenty-five 
departments in the store, handling all such goods as are sold in the large de- 
partment stores of New York and Chicago. Edward Nordhoff, now de- 
ceased, and his wife, who is now Mrs. McDermott, came from Chicago, 
where they had been employed as salespeople, to Seattle in 1890, and started a 
little store in North Seattle with quite limited means, but they w'orked to- 
gether and their straightforward business methods and liberal policy, to- 
gether with courteous treatment of their customers, brought them a large 
patronage, and their success from the beginning was almost phenomenal. 
The business increased rapidly each year, and in 1897 still larger quarters 
w^ere required for the enterprise and they removed to the present store on 
Second avenue. But when ]\Ir. Nordhoff was about to realize his highest 
dreams of success death claimed him. The business was then incorporated. 
R. G. H. Nordhoff, the brother-in-law of Mrs. McDermott, became her part- 
ner. He is a gentleman of exceptionally fine business ability and became the 
vice-president of the new company, while Mrs. Nordhoff was made president. 
They are conducting the business along the lines first planned, buying goods 
for cash, selling at a small profit and therby making large sales. Absolute 
<:ourtesy to all patrons is demanded from their employes, and the business has 
grown each year until it has assumed very extensive proportions. Each 
Saturday night they give concerts to which the customers are welcome, and 
the generosity and liberality with wdiich they conduct the business has 
brought them hosts of friends. 

Edward L. Nordoff, who was the founder of this business, was born in 
Germany, pursued his education there and in that country became familiar 
with business methods. Emigrating to the new world he took up his abode 
in Chicago, where he secured a clerkship in one of the large stores of that 
city. His capability, keen insight and untiring energy^ continually brought 
him promotion until he became the manager of a large mercantile establish- 
ment there. After his marriage he removed from Chicago to the northwest 
to engage in business on his own account and met with the highest success 
in his undertaking. He was devoted to his business, was continually watch- 
ing for opportunity to extend its scope, and yet he was ever found as a genial, 
generous, public-spirited and enterprising citizen and was highly esteemed by 
all with whom he came in contact through business or social relations. Shortly 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 327 

before his death he induced his brother, R. G. H. Nordhoff of Buffalo, New 
York, who had been a successful business man of that place, to become identi- 
fied with the commercial interests of Seattle, thereby adding a valued addi- 
tion to its mercantile circles. 

Mrs. McDermott was born and educated in Chicago and there gave her 
hand in marriage to Edward Nordhoff. Since their removal to Seattle she 
has given her entire attention to the business and has deservedly earned her 
position as the most popular and prominent business woman of the city. The 
policy maintained in the store has ever been a most liberal one, reflecting 
credit upon the owners. Mrs. McDermott has an individual interest in those 
who are in her service, and all know that fidelity will lead to promotion as" 
opportunity offers. 

On the 4th of June, 1901, Mrs. Nordhoff became the wife of Frank ]\I. 
McDermott, a popular and prominent business man of Seattle, numbered 
among the extensive and successful merchants ; both are widely and favor- 
ably known in this city, and their efforts have contributed to the business 
prosperity of Seattle. The success of the enterprise of which Mrs. McDer- 
mott is the head has been gained along the old time maxims such as, "Hon- 
esty is the best Policy," and that, "There is no excellence without labor." 
The large department store of Nordoft" & Company is to-day one of the lead- 
ing commercial enterprises of the city and its representatives have been a 
valued addition to Seattle. 

JOHN G. GRAY. 

The ancestry of this Seattle lawyer is English, and his father emigrated 
to this country at an early age and became a Congregational minister. While 
ni the service of the church he was pastor of churches in New York, Illinois, 
Iowa and Nebraska. His family consisted of five sons and three daughters, 
all of whom are now living. 

John G. Gray was born in 1861. He was educated in the public schools 
of Whiteside county, Illinois, and at the age of sixteen years began teach- 
mg in Nebraska. His legal education was acquired in the law office of 
Abner W. Askwith. Esq.. now a leading lawyer of Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
In 1887 Mr. Gray was admitted to the supreme court of Iowa, and in 
1888 he moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, and in 1890 became a member of 
the firm of Booth, Lee & Gray, which firm enjoyed a good practice. In 
1898 he removed to Mountain Home. Idaho, and was engaged in business 
ventures outside of his profession. In September, 1899, he removed to 
Seattle and resumed the practice of the law. 



328 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

July I, 1901, he formed a partnership with Mr. Hugh A. Tait, form- 
erly of Ogden, Utah, under the firm name of Gray & Tait, and the firm 
continued until January i, 1903, when Mr. Tait accepted the appointment 
of assistant corporation counsel for the city of Seattle. The appointment 
was unsolicited upon the part of Mr. Tait, and came to him on account of 
his reputation as a careful lawyer acquired in the trial of cases confided 
to the firm of Gray & Tait. Mr. Gray retains the business of the firm, has 
a number of clients, and they have confidence in his ability. In 1893 Mr. 
Gray married Miss Nellie Strickley, and two daughters and a son have been 
born to them. In politics Mr. Gray has ever been a Republican. 

GENERAL J. D. McINTYRE. 

There is no man in King county whose life, if it were written in full 
here, would make so thrilling a romance as' that of Brigadier General J. D. 
Mclntyre, of Seattle. He is fifty-one years old, by profession a mining 
engineer, and until 1890 had lived almost continuously on the outskirts of 
civilization. His life has been a part of the history of many of our western 
mining camps. He is a crack shot, and has had more sanguinary encoun- 
ters with white men, Indians and wild beasts than could be recounted in 
a volume. It may be said of him that he does not know the sense of fear. 
For the past eleven years he has settled down to a quite home life, has ac- 
quired a large fortune and lives in his own l^eautiful home overlooking Lake 
Union, in Seattle. A visit to his home on Lake Union is well worth anvone's 
while. The originality of the architecture of the house and grounds is a 
reflex of the character of the man. 

Gen. Mclntyre was born at Point Fortune, Canada, on December 4, 1851, 
of Scotch parents. His great-great-grandmother was a daughter of a brother 
of the Duke of Arg^de, and his great-great-grandfather was a real admiral 
in the British navy. His great-grandfather was a lieutenant in the British 
army, and distinguished himself at the battle of Quebec, and was with Gen. 
Wolff when he fell. The family, consisting of father, mother and three 
children, of which the General was the oldest, emigrated to the United States 
in 1858, and in 1859 the General's father (since dead) went to Pike's Peak, 
afterwards Denver, Colorado, but then a part of Kansas. He engaged in 
mining and took out a great deal of gold in Georgia Gulch. He built the 
first toll road in Colorado. The family followed in i860, taking four months 
to make the journey by team. It was on this trip that first began the series 
of exciting adventures that has followed this boy's career ever since. The 



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SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 329 

whole route was infested with Indians. Their travels were often impeded 
by great herds of buffalo. Flocks of graceful antelope glided by them con- 
tinually. This boy, naturally of a martial spirit, here got his first lessons in 
fighting Indians and hunting. The train consisted of one hundred wagons, 
and young Mclntyre was rated as good a shot as any man in the train. 
When the train reached Loup's Fork, of the Platte river, it ran into five thous- 
and Crow Indians on the war path, but how they escaped being all massacred 
is too long a tale to recount here. In crossing Loup's Fork a great cloud- 
burst occurred, breaking the cable on which the ferry boat crossed the river, 
and some forty on board, including the boy Mclntyre, were carried down the 
mighty flood at a violent speed, but, strange as it may seem, all were saved 
from this danger also. 

Denver, at this time, contained only seventy-five houses and was sur- 
rounded by apparently a great desert. For about seven years young Mc- 
lntyre never knew what it was to be free from the danger of an attack by 
Indians. Gen. Mclntyre says his growth was stunted by the strain on his 
nervous system. 

A public school was started in 1863 at Denver and one of the first boys 
to appear at this school was young Mclntyre. In 1864 the negroes Vvere 
admitted to the school, where many southern children attended, which caused 
a great riot. At a meeting young Mclntyre was chosen captain, not because 
he was opposed to the colored children's attendance, but because he had the 
coolest head and seemed the best qualified for leadership, 3lthougli he was 
scarcely fourteen years old, and many boys in the school were much older. 
Within an hour he had organized the whole school into three companies, ap- 
pointed officers, secured a drum and fife, a flag and was marching down La- 
ramie street, Denver, to the school board, which was in session. He told no 
one his plan, but marshaled the three noisy companies close around the ofinces 
cf the school board. He selected two other boys as a committee to see the 
school board and went in, when he made the following speech : 

"Mr. Chairman, we come to you as a committee of the Denver public 
school children, to say that owing to the prejudice growing out of the war 
many of our school boys and girls are opposed to occupying the same seats. 
W'ith the colored children, and, while we recognize the right of colored chil- 
dren to attend our school, we believe it would be wiser to put the colored chil- 
dren in a room by themselves, and give them a separate teacher for a while. 
When the prejudices, growing out of the war, have had time to die out, no 
doubt we will all look on this thing differently." 

A hurried consultation was held by the school board, in which all agreed 
21 



330 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

that the boy was right. They then and there announced that they would 
give the colored children a separate teacher, until further notice. 

In 1870 young Mclntyre, then nineteen years old, was elected enrolling 
clerk of the eighth session of the Colorado legislature. During the session a 
concurrent resolution was passed almost unanimously through both Senate 
:and House, asking the delegates in congress to give young Mclntyre the first 
vacancy at West Point. This was done because of his special fitness and 
.ability, and for certain achievements which were known only to a few. He 
"went immediately to the Militar}- Academy at West Point, but soon saw that 
ihe wild frontier life, hunting and fighting Indians, had not given him the 
requisite education to enable him to pass the examinations, and he must re- 
turn home, greatly to his disappointment. About this time was the period 
of the worst hazing at West Point. They made a bronco of plebe Mclntyre, 
and had another cadet ride him, greatly to the amusement of the first and 
second classes. He stood this hazing like a stoic, until one man asked to see 
his sweetheart's picture. This infuriated young Mclntyre, and he whipped 
two men, a second and third class man dreadfully, before he could be over- 
powered and taken off. A number engaged in the melee, and pressed him 
back to the wall. He told them they were a lot of cowards, for a dozen to 
jump on one, and that he could whip the whole academy one at a time. 
They were very glad to let the young bronco go, and the word was passed 
around the academy that no man should haze him again, and they never did. 
It is a custom at West Point that a good fighter shall not be hazed. He then 
went back to Denver and studied for several years with civil and mining en- 
gineers. 

In 1877 he went to the Black Hills, locating at Dead wood. This was 
a year or more before law and order had been established in the Black Hills 
and young Mclntyre soon became a leader in the vigilance committee which 
ruled during all these wild times. Deadwood was crowded with des- 
perate men and the vigilance committee dealt summary justice to all offend- 
ers. It was the rule of the committee to hang the offender and try him after- 
wards, and Mclntyre says no mistake was ever made in hanging the right 
man. 

He bought the Minnesota mine, near the Great Homestead, at Lead 
City. While away on a surveying expedition three desperadoes, led by Jim 
Levy, jumped his mine. When he returned, being informed of the situation, 
lie immediately started for the mine alone, with nothing but his trusty re- 
volver. He walked into the tunnel where the three desperadoes were at 
Avork, picked up all their guns and ammunition, threw them over his should- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. '331 

er and drawing his own revolver ordered them to come out. They were 
completely cowed by the boldness of this move, and as he had the "dead sure 
drop" on them, and knowing that he was a dead shot and a bad man to fool 
with, they came meekly out. He ordered them to "hit the trail" for Lead 
City, which they did. The whole town got wind of the trouble, turned out 
to see the sight and young McLityre became the hero of the camp. Many 
tales of this kind could be told of him if space would permit. 

In many of the early mining camps he is known as Lucky Jack, because 
of his wonderful luck in mining ventures. He was for many years the lead- 
ing mining engineer of the Black Hills. He was chief engineer of the Great 
Homestead mines, before he was twenty-seven years old He examined 
mines in company with the greatest mining engineers of the nation at that 
time. There is no doubt that the knowledge acquired in such times was one 
of the sources of his success in mining ventures in Washington, Alaska and 
British Columbia. He is the owner of or interested in many paying mines, 
and will in all human probability become one of the bonanza miners of the 
Pacific coast at no distant day. He is the owner or part owner of several 
gold mines that had been wrecked by bad management, and has with those as- 
sociated with him made them pay well. 

In 1890, together with some Tacoma gentlemen, he formed the Mont- 
^uma Mining Company which owns the coking coal mines at Montzuma, 
now paying dividends. He, with Henry Hewitt, Henry H. Sweeney and 
Col. C. W. Thompson, of Tacoma, formed also the Pacific Coast Steel Com- 
|/any, wdiich was a consolidation of the Tacoma Steel Company and the Pa- 
cific Steel Company, combining virtually all the steel and iron industries on 
the Pacific coast. He, with E. M. Shelton, of Seattle, and Charles Richard- 
son, of Tacoma, formed the Bessie Gold Company, wdiose gold mines are 
near Juneau, Alaska, which company is now paying dividends. He formed 
the La Rica Consolidated and bought the Peshastin Gold Mine at Blewett. a 
rich property. He has raised more money from eastern investors than any 
man in the northwest. There are over six thousand stockholders in liis 
enterprises. He has not only the ability to conceive great enterprises, like 
those mentioned above, but can organize them, raise money, build the enter- 
prises and run them economically afterwards. This is a rare gift and one 
that finds a wide field in the development of the vast resources of the Pacific 
Northwest. He makes very strong friends and bitter enemies. No one ever 
accused him of going back on a friend. He is generous to a fault, and many 
a man will tell you how he helped him in times of trouble. He ne\er drinks, 



332 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

smokes or swears; a cultured gentleman and a good friend as well as a 
bitter enemy. 

In 1882 he went from the Black Hills to Montana, and within eight 
years he had organized five different irrigation companies, raised the money 
and built over four hundred miles of irrigating canals. He built the great 
Gallatin canal, the big Muddy Storage reservoirs, the Chestnut Valley canal, 
the vSun river canal, the Florence canal and others, making a large amount of 
money out of them. He came to Washington at the request of the Northern 
Pacific railroad officials and organized the great Sunnyside Canal Company 
at North Yakima, and sold out to the Northern Pacific. He came to Seattle 
in 1 89 1, and the following year surveyed the Okanogan Indian reservation 
for the United States government. 

Gen. Mclntyre has always taken a prominent part in politics. He is 
one of the immortal thirteen who organized the People's party of this state, 
in 1894, and stumped the state in that election. The People's party carried 
the state by a tremendous majority, electing nearly every man on the ticket. 
He was formerly prominent in the Prohibition party, and stumped the state 
for that party. He is a reformer in politics and, w'hile he is socialistic in his 
views, can scarcely be termed a socialist. 

General Mclntyre was appointed brigadier-general commanding the 
National Guards of Washington, in 1896. The state force consisted of the 
first and second Washington regiments, two troops of cavalry and one bat- 
tery of artillery. He served all during the Spanish war. The splendid 
record made by the first regiment in the Philippines was largely due to his 
training. 

Gen. Mclntyre is a born leader of men and is possessed of rare executive 
ability in the organization, financiering and development of great business 
enterprises, especially in mining. He is considered one of our ablest political 
organizers, but as he is a reformer in politics he usually starts with the 
minority. 

General Mclntyre's domestic life has always been of the most delightful 
and inspiring character, as he was possessed of those greatest of earthly 
blessings, a good wife and a good mother. In 1883 he married Miss Lizzie, 
daughter of Professor A. Hull, one of the most learned men in Iowa. To 
the wisdom and foresight of this brave and accomplished woman her husband 
admits his great obligations, and never wearies of saying how much he owes 
to her encouragement for all the successes of his life. Her father was a. 
great-grandson of Commodore Isaac Hull, who commanded the frigate 
"Constitution" in her famous battle with the British ship "Guerriere" during 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 333 

tiie war of 1812. She is also a lineal descendant of General Hull who com- 
manded the military forces of the United States in the same war. During 
their early married life Mrs. Mclntyre often accompanied her adventurous 
husband on his dangerous mountain trips, and looks back with pleasure to 
niuch of the camp life and other outdoor experiences. They have six chil- 
dren, all at home: Lucile, an accomplished musician; Marie, Cedric, Ralph, 
Marguerite and Phillis Yvonne. Of her to whom he owes his being General 
Mclntyre always speaks as "my beautiful mother." She is living at Spo- 
kane with his two younger brothers. Laura S. Murphy, the portrait artist, 
is his sister. General Mclntyre joined the Masonic order while living in 
Montana, and is also a member of the Royal Arcanum. He and his wife 
are members of the Christian church. 

GEORGE M. HORTON, M. D. 

Dr. George M. Horton, a prominent member of the medical profession 
of Seattle, whose marked ability and careful preparation have gained him 
distinction in tlie line of his chosen life work, has spent almost his entire life 
in this city, for he was only five years of age when his parents removed to 
Seattle. He is a son of Julius Horton and a nephew of Dexter Horton, who 
are mentioned elsewhere in this volume, and in whose sketch appears the an- 
cestral history of the family. Julius Horton was born in New York and 
after arriving at man's estate he married Miss Annie E. Big"elow, a native 
of Michigan. They had a family of four children, three of whom are yet 
living. The father now resides in Georgetown, Washington, at the age of 
sixty-seven years. He is a member of the Protestant Methodist church and 
in his political affiliations is a Republican. At one time he served as assessor 
of King county. Both he and his wife are among the well known and high- 
ly esteemed early settlers of Washington, having located here at an early 
period in territorial days. 

The Doctor was bom in Shabbona Grove, De Kalb county, Illinois, on 
the 17th of March, 1865. He was only five years old when brought by his 
parents to the west and has since been a resident of Seattle. His literary 
education was begun in the public schools here and after he had completed 
his high school course he entered the territorial university, where he com- 
pleted his general studies. He then began preparations for professional 
duties as a student in the Bellevue Hospital and Medical College in New 
York city, where he was graduated in 1890. He then returned to Seattle 
and at once began the practice of the profession for which he had received 



334 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

excellent training in one of the best schools of the land. He entered into 
partnership with Dr. J. S. M. Smart, who had been his preceptor before he 
Avent east to college, but soon Dr. Smart died and Dr. Horton has since been 
alone, gradually acquiring an extensive and important practice among Seat- 
tle's best citizens. As a physician and surgeon he ranks among the most 
skilled in this part of the state and is constantly broadening his knowledge 
and promoting his efficiency as a practitioner by reading, investigation and 
experiment. By his marked skill he has attained celebrity and is now meet- 
ing with excellent financial success as well. 

During his practice here Dr. Horton served for four years as county 
coroner. Fraternally he is a Master Mason, belonging to St. John's Lodge 
No. 9, F. & A. M., of Seattle. He is also a Knight Templar and has taken 
the degree of the Scottish Rite up to and including the thirty-second. He is 
also a member of Afifi Temple of the Mystic Shrine of Tacoma, and he holds 
membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, the Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen of the 
World. In the line of his profession he is a member of the King county 
Medical Society, in which he has been honored with the presidency, the 
Washington State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, 
in all of which he is an active and valued representative. 

In 1 89 1 Dr. Horton was united in marriage to Miss Ethel G. Benson, a 
daughter of H. A. Benson, of Portland, Oregon. They now have two sons 
and a daughter, George M., Kenneth and Gertrude. The Doctor has a 
very wide and favorable acquaintance throughout Seattle, both profession- 
ally and socially, and he and his wife enjoy the high esteem of a host of 
warm friends. 

WASHINGTON C. RUTTER. 

The history of King county would be incomplete without the record of 
this representative citizen, whose career has ever been one in which business 
activity has been blended with unbending honor and unflirxhing integrity, 
and his course is well worthy of emulation by him who would justly com- 
mand the respect of his fellow men. Mr. Rutter was born in Tarentum, 
Pennsylvania, on the i8th of May, 1854, and is of Puritan ancestry. His 
ancestors landed at Plymouth Rock from the Mayflower, and later his 
branch of the Rutter family settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and 
were active participants in the subsequent history and wars of the country. 
Our subject's grandfather, William Rutter, w^as born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, but wdien a young man removed to LawTence county, that 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 335 

state, where he was married. As a Hfe occupation he followed the tilling of 
the soil, and he lived to the good old age of ninety-three years. 

John Rutter, the father of him whose name introduces this review, was 
born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, in 1826, and at Tarentum, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1850, he was united in marriage to Eliza Jane Llorton, who was 
born in Tarentum, Pennsylvania, in 1824. He, too, followed farming as 
a life occupation, and became a prominent and influential citizen of his locali- 
ty. During the dark period of the Civil war he volunteered as a one hun- 
dred day man in the Union army, and his brother, who was killed at Spotts- 
sylvania, Virginia, in May 1864, and cousins were also soldiers in that 
memorable struggle, all loyally aiding in the preserv^ation of the Union. 
One family sent five sons to fight for the starry banner, and three of the num- 
ber laid down their lives on the altar of their country. John Rutter passed 
to his final reward in 1895, at the age of sixty-nine years. He had been a 
staunch Republican since the formation of the party, and was an upright, 
loyal and worthy citizen. His wife was called to her final rest on the 3d of 
March, 1898, at the age of seventy- four years. In their family were three 
sons and a daughter, all of whom are still living. One son, Jesse W., is a 
mine owner and resides at Nome, Alaska, while the son James A. is en- 
gaged in the lumber business in West Virginia. The daughter, Mrs. Tillie 
J. Stoops, makes her home near Dayton, Pennsylvania. 

Washington C. Rutter enjoyed the advantages afforded by the common 
schools of Pennsylvania and Ohio, the family having located in the latter 
state in 1856, where they resided for ten years, and then returned to Kittann- 
ing, Pennsylvania. His boyhood days were spent on his father's farm, and 
after attaining to mature years he was engaged in coal mining in western 
Pennsylvania for twelve years. Since the spring of 1888 he has made his 
home in Seattle, and during his first year in this state he w^orked in the coal 
mines at Oilman, and while thus engaged, in 1889, he was nominated on the 
Republican ticket to the first house of representatives in the state of Wash- 
ington. He was successful in the following election, and while thus serving 
he was made chairman of the committee on mines and mining, was a member 
of the committee on labor and labor statistics, and also served on the 
military committee. In 1890 Mr. Rutter was elected to represent the 
twenty-ninth district in the state senate, in which he served for two sessions, 
and in the first session he was again made chairman of the committee on 
mines and mining, was a member of the committee on labor and labor statis- 
tics, and also on the committee of public buildings and grounds. In 1893 
he was appointed by the executive committee of the Washington World's 



336 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Fair Commission to make a collection of the different minerals of the state, 
which exhibit was shipped to the World's Fair at Chicago and exhibited in 
the Washing-ton state building under his immediate supervision. In this col- 
lection was a mammoth piece of bituminous coal weighing twenty-five tons, 
from Roslyn, Kittitas county, from which he gave away ten thousand 
small pieces, properly labeled, and these were taken all over the world and 
thus they proved a great advertisement for the coal deposits of the state. 
Thus ]\Ir. Rutter rendered a most valuable service to this commonwealth, 
and his efforts were highly commended in the final report of the executitve 
commissioner from this state. In 1897 he was appointed clerk of the 
probate court of King county, in which office he served for three years, and 
he then became interested in mining and organized the Kittanning Mining 
Company, of which he is the president. Their property is located in the 
Red Boy mining district of eastern Oregon, and the mines of this company 
are proving very valuable because of their rich deposits. 

The marriage of Mr. Rutter was celebrated on the 3d of September, 
1891, when Miss Emma Clow became his wife. She is a native of Buft'alo, 
New York, and by her marriage she has become the mother of two sons, 
Fred C. and George J. The family occupy a beautiful home at South Park, 
Seattle, which ]\Ir. Rutter erected in 1892. In his social relations he is a 
member of the ^Masonic order, having been made a Master Mason in Olive 
Branch Lodge No. 114, at Leesburg, Virginia, in 1882. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of 
United ^Vorkmen, and the Seattle Aerie No. i, of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles. On attaining to years of maturity he became allied with Republi- 
can principles, and he was an active worker in the ranks of that party until 
the time the Republican national convention convened at St. Louis, of which 
he was made a member. He left the party with Senator Teller and thou- 
sands of others and has since been independent in his political views. Since 
the year 1888 Mr. Rutter has been a resident of the Pacific coast, and he has 
nobly performed his part in bringing alx)ut the changes which have contri- 
buted to its present properous condition. As one of the public spirited and 
leading citizens he is held in high esteem. 

AMOS O. BENJAMIN. 

The day of small undertakings, especially in cities, seems to have passed 
and the era of gigantic enterprises is upon us. In control of mammoth cour 
cerns are men of master minds, of almost limitless ability to guide, of sound 






yc^ /^u-i>'i^-v<^0(__^ 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 337 

judgment and keen discrimination. Their progressiveness must not only 
reach the bounds that others have gained, but must even pass beyond into 
new and broader, untried fields of operation; but an unerring foresight 
and sagacity must make no mistake by venturing upon uncertain ground. 
Thus continually growing, a business takes leadership in its special line 
and the men who are at its head are deservedly eminent in the industrial 
world, occupying a position that commands the respect while it excites the 
admiration of all. There is no one in Seattle who has done a larger business 
in the line of raising sunken vessels and in the buying and selling of steam- 
boats than Amos Oscar Benjamin, who is president of the Alaska Com- 
pany. He has been the owner of not less than thirty steamers, buying many 
disabled ones, putting them in repair, then sailing them for a time and after- 
ward disposing of them at a profit. He, too, has been a successful and 
practical diver for many years and the splendid degree of prosperity which 
has attended his efforts is well merited. 

Captain Benjamin w-as born in Rome, Oneida county. New York, on 
the 22d of June, 1843, and is descended from an old New England family 
that was early established in the colonies. His paternal grandfather was 
born in Vermont and emigrated to New York, rearing his family in Her- 
kimer county, nine miles from Little Falls. There his son, Oscar Benjamin, 
was born in 1819. Later he married Emaline Cleveland, of Westerville, 
Oneida county. New York, and followed the business of a contractor and 
builder, meeting with creditable success. In religious faith he was a Method- 
ist and in politics a Whig. He died at the early age of twenty-seven years, 
leaving two little children to the care of his widow\ Mrs. Benjamin after- 
ward became the wife of Francis P. Graves and three daughters were born 
of that union, of whom two are yet living. The mother died in North 
Dakota in 1888 at the age of sixty-six years. 

In the public schools Captain Benjamin pursued his education. He 
was in his seventeenth year when the great Civil war burst upon the coun- 
try. At once he endeavored to enlist but his mother objected to his entering 
the service at that early age and he was therefore rejected. In the follow- 
ing year, however, on the 4th of January, 1862, he succeeded in becoming 
an enlisted member of Company I, Eighty-first New York Infantry, serving 
in the Peninsular campaign under General McClellan in Virginia. He was 
in the seven days battle under that leader at Fair Oaks and at a later period 
was in the engagements at Cold Harbor, Fort Harrison and in front of 
Petersburg. The troops then proceeded down the south side road after the 
army of General Lee, and when tJie surrender came;, Captain Benjamin 



338 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

was acting as orderly under General Gibbons and prepared the room in which 
the articles of surrender were drawn up. He arranged the table and brought 
the pen and ink with which the terms of agreement were written and signed 
and he now has in his possession the table spread which was then used. 
His command was the first to enter Richmond and set at liberty the pris- 
oners who were incarcerated in Libby. At one occasion in the battle of 
White Oak Swamp he was wounded in the ankle. He had re-enlisted in 
his old regiment in January, 1864, and was honorably discharged on the 
226. of June, 1865. Efficiently and well had he served his country and to 
the north he returned as a veteran and victor. 

The year following the close of the war, Mr. Benjamin was happily 
married to Misss Ann Wood, of Oswego, New York. For a short time 
he was engaged in the shipping and commission business in the east and on 
the 6th of April, 1867, he followed the advice of Horace Greeley and started 
westward, going by way of the Lakes and the railroad to Cedar Falls, Iowa, 
and on to South Dakota. He finally settled at Fremont, Nebraska, 
where he became engaged in the business of removing buildings. Fie was 
also prominent in public affairs there and served as constable and deputy 
sheriff for three years. Removing to Dixon county, that state, he secured 
a homestead claim upon which he resided for four years, becoming the 
owner of six hundred acres of land in that locality, but the grass hoppers 
destroyed all of his crops and he abandoned his property. After two years 
passed in Nevada he came by team to Seattle, bringing with him his wife 
and three children. They started on the 3d of July, and arrived on the 3d of 
September, 1878. 

Here Captain Benjamin engaged in teaming for a year and later turned 
his attention to the work of moving buildings. In 1881 he began the wreck- 
ing business which he has followed continuously for the past twenty years. 
He succeeded in raising a locomotive for the Northern Pacific Railroad 
from the bay at Tacoma. It was under thirteen feet of sand and several 
parties had attempted the work without success. He took it out and for his 
work received a clear profit of ten hundred and fifty dollars. In 1897 the 
present Alaska Company was incorporated for the purpose of raising sunken 
vessels. Captain Benjamin became president and in the enterprise he is 
associated with his sons and his sons-in-law. They have taken a locomotive 
out of forty-eight feet of water and have raised many wrecked steamers. 
For the past eighteen years Captain Benjamin has also engaged in steam- 
boat traffic and is now the owner of the Nellie Jenson and a brig which 
he is overhauling. Few men are more familiar with the waters of the Sound 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 339 

than he. He had sailed on the Atlantic before coming west and since his ar- 
rival on the Pacific coast he has been master of the Evangel and the Fern- 
dale, together with other vessels. He has owned as many as thirty steam- 
ers and several sailing vessels and his business has been an important one, 
proving of value to the public and at the same time bringing to him a good 
profit. He has become especially prominent as a diver and wrecker. 

In his business Captain Benjamin is associated with his sons William 
vS., Charles A. and Paul S. His daughter Bertha is the wife of D. Van 
Dyke, a master mechanic, and Annie Gertrude is the wife of A. H. Goes- 
well, of Seattle, while Martha Emeline resides at home. The sons-in-law 
are trustees in the corporation and Mr. Cogswell is now its secretary. 

Captain Benjamin entered the war as a believer in ihe doctrines of 
Democracy, but before its close he became a Republican and has since 
stanchly adhered to the party. He is a prominent member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic and the Ancient Order of United Workmen and he 
and his wife are connected in membership relations with the Seattle Taber- 
nacle church. Captain Benjamin is a man of pleasing address, courteous 
manner, unflinching principle and unquestioned integrity, and yet with all 
that practical common sense which never runs to extremes; and it is no 
wonder that wherever he goes he wins friends. His life has been well spent 
and his honorable and useful career is worthy of emulation. 

RALPH COOK. 

Ralph Cook, chief of the fire department of Seattle, with headquarters 
at station No. i, on the corner of Seventh avenue and Columbia street, was 
born in Sufifolkshire, England, on the i6th of October, 1865, and is a son of 
Edward and Jemima (Grif^th) Cook, both natives of that county. Ralph 
is the eldest of their nine children, the others being: Daniel A., lieutenant 
of engine company No. 9; Edward, a member of engine company No. 4, 
both brothers being employed as plumbers ; Joseph and Charles, who are en- 
gaged in mercantile pursuits in Seattle; Jemima, the wife of George Over- 
ton, a brick layer of this city; Susanna, the wife of A. Edwards, also of Seat- 
tle; Martha, the wife of John Prichards, of this city; one son, Edward, died 
in England when only two years of age. 

Ralph Cook was brought by his parents to this country when only five 
years of age, the family locating in Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania, where the 
father was employed as inspector of mines. There the son Ralph spent the 
days of his boyhood and youth, and to the public school system of the city he 



340 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

is indebted for the early educational ad\antages which he received. At an 
early age he engaged in carpenter work, and was associated with his father 
in the work of the mines. In 1888 he accompanied the family on their re- 
moval to Seattle, Washington, where the father engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness at the corner of Fifteenth and Spruce streets, and the son received con- 
tract work for grading and excavating. In November, 1890, the season 
subsequent to the disastrous fire which swept over this city, the Seattle fire 
department was organized into a paid company, and our subject was made 
deck hand on the fire boat. Previous to his coming to Seattle he had spent 
five years in the volunteer fire department of ^Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania, 
two years of the time being president of the company, and after fifteen days of 
service on the fire boat his efficiency caused him to be transferred to company 
No. I, where for a time he served as a pipeman. From October, 1892, until 
February, 1895, ^^^ ^'^^^^ the position of lieutenant, was then promoted to the 
captaincy, and in July, 1895, was made the chief of the department. On 
the nth of June, 1896, however, he resigned that position to engage in busi- 
ness for himself, and on the 31st of September of the same year he was ten- 
dered the office of assistant chief, which he accepted and filled until February 
26, 1 90 1, when he was again made chief of the department. 

Chief Cook is without exception the most capable and efficient fireman 
on the western coast, and for a man of his years he has probably seen more 
active service than falls to the lot of those who engage in fighting this des- 
troying element. He has been engaged in almost continuous service since 
his eighteenth year, and the efficiency of the fire department of Seattle re- 
flects great credit on the worthy chief as well as to the brave fire laddies 
under his command. The headquarters of the department are at station No. 
I, on the corner of Columbia street and Seventh avenue, where three com- 
panies and eighteen men are located; engine company No. 2 is stationed at 
Pine and Third avenue, where nine men are employed; company No. 3 is 
stationed between Seventh and Eighth avenue, south; company No. 4 is 
located at Battery and Fourth avenue, with eight men; company No. 5 is 
the fire boat, Snoqualmie, at the foot of Madison street, with eight men; 
company No. 6 is stationed at Twenty-sixth avenue, south, and Yesler 
Way with six men; company No. 7 is at Fifteenth avenue and Harrison 
street, with six men ; chemical engine company No. i is stationed at Fremont 
street, with three men; chemical engine company No. 2 is stationed at Ter- 
race and Broadw^ay, with three men; and chemical engine company No. 3 is 
at Lee and First avenue, west. The company have seven steam fire engines ; 
two of the most approved modern chemical engines; seven hose wagons, 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 341 

equipped with chemical engines; two combination chemical engines and hose 
wagons; one fire boat, with necessary equipments; three hook and ladder 
wagons, of the Arial turn-table patterns and a sixty-five foot extension 
ladder; seventeen thousand two hundred feet of hose in good condition and 
four thousand and five hundred and fifty feet in an inferior condition, kept 
for extra service. In the year 1901 they made three hundred and eighty 
runs, eighty-eight in excess of the previous year and one more than in any 
year since the company was organized. The department was organized with 
paid service in October, 1889, immediately after the great fire. It has ever 
been the aim and effort of Chief Cook to increase the working efficiency of 
the department by the adoption of the best methods and appliances, and 
through his exertions many improvements have been made and other im- 
portant ones are under way. With the exception of San Francisco the com- 
pany has not a superior on the Pacific coast. 

On the 24th of January, 1893, in Seattle, Chief Cook was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Nellie Meade, a daughter of Thomas and Julia Meade. She 
was born in the city of London, but when a child was brought by her parents 
to Toronto, Canada, where her life was spent until 1890, and in that year she 
came with the family to Seattle; her father is a contract plasterer of this 
city, and Mrs. Cook is the youngest of his three children, the others being: 
Thomas, Jr.. a brickmason of Seattle; and Mary, the wife of Richard Hays, 
also of this city. Four children have been born to the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Cook, but two have passed away, Ralph, the first born, and Grace, 
both dying in infancy. The two surviving children are Mary and Elline. 
In his fraternal relations Mr. Cook is a charter member and for several 
years was treasurer of Evergreen Lodge, No. 33, A. O. U. W., and is also 
a member of Seattle Lodge, No. 92, B. P. O. E. He attended the Fire 
Chiefs' convention in New York, and visited the fire departments of all the 
eastern cities. He is one of the most honored and highly esteemed citizens 
of his community, and it is safe to say that no man in Seattle has a wider 
circle of friends and acquaintances than Ralph Cook. 

WILLIAM M. RUSSELL. 

William M. Russell is the popular manager of the Third Avenue The- 
ater of Seattle. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on the 22d of February, 
1849. His grandfather, Peter Russell, came from France with Marquis 
De Lafayette and fought in the Revolutionary war. After its close he de- 
termined to make his home on the American continent, and subsequently re- 



342 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF. 

moved to Montreal, Canada, where his son, Peter Russell, was born in 1819. 
Throughout his business career the latter was engaged in contracting and 
building. In 1827 he left his native place, removing to Wayne county, 
Michigan, and settling near Detroit, and as the city grew his place was 
finally included within the corporation limits. There he built the Russell saw- 
mill on Grand River avenue. He married Miss Ellen Quigley, a native of 
Inverness, Scotland. Her father was a native of the Emerald Isle, born in 
Belfast, and her mother was born in the land of hills and heather. Mr. and 
Mrs. Russell continued to reside in Michigan, and he died in Detroit in 1878, 
at the age of seventy years, while his wife had passed away ten years before, 
and both were laid to rest in Mount Elliott cemetery of that city. They were 
members of the Catholic church. In their family were thirteen children 
and five of the sons and three of the daughters are yet living. One of the 
sons, Charles Russell, is an engineer in the Third Avenue Theater of Seattle. 
William M. Russell attended school in Detroit until his eighth year, 
after which he had only three month's mental training wilhin the school- 
room. In the school of experience, however, he has learned many valuable 
lessons and has continually obtained knowledge by reading, experience and 
observation. He entered upon his business career in connection with the 
lumber trade in Birmingham, Michigan, and later was an officer in the De- 
troit House of Correction, having charge of fifty- of the convicts in the paint- 
ing department. He was just in his twentieth year and he displayed such 
good judgment and efficiency in the discharge of his duties that after three 
years he was promoted to the position of deputy warden, which office he 
filled until 1871, when he resigned in order to go upon the road as collector 
for the firm of D. Appleton & Company of New York. He continued in 
that business for seven years, or until 187S, when he entered the theater 
business as a manager in New York city. He first was manager for the 
scout, Texas Jack (J B. Omohundro), and Daniel McKay, the famous Ore- 
gon scout. Later he took out his own company and toured through Mich- 
igan until 1886. He not only managed his own company, but also spec-, 
ulated in various other theatrical enterprises. In 1887 and 1888 he man- 
aged Dan Morris Sullivan, "Mirror of Ireland," and in 1889 he organized 
a dramatic company under the firm name of the Russell and Jewell Dramatic 
Company. This company he brought to Seattle, it being the first popular 
attraction of any note ever in the city. It occupied the old Turner Hall and 
proved a valued addition to the amusement circles of the west. In 1890 he 
returned to Seattle with the same company and later toured Oregon, Califor- 
nia, Montana, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas and Arizona. He closed 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 343 

out his business on the 22d of February, 1893, and spent some months in 
southern Cahfornia. On the 15th of May, 1893 he again arrived in Seattle 
and took charge of the Third Avenue Theater. 

Not long after this the Merchants National Bank acquired the owner- 
ship of the theater, and in 1894 Mr. Russell became manager for the owners, 
and when the bank failed a receiver was appointed, Mr. Russell continuing 
in his position. In 1897 he formed a partnership with E. L. Drew and 
purchased the bank's interest in the theater. Since then they have been 
the lessors of the theater, which for a time played a stock company, 
but in 1896 Mr. Russell began placing traveling attractions and has 
brought to this house the leading popular attractions of the United States. 
The patronage for the last three years has been six times greater than that 
when he took charge. Attractions are all booked at least a year in advance. 
The house is represented by Stair & Havlin of New York, where it has be- 
come as well known to theatrical men as it has to the people of Seattle. Mr. 
Russell devotes his entire time to the management of the opera house and 
has made a marked success in this business. 

CHRISTIAN N. SANDAHL. 

Denmark has furnished her quota of good citizens to this country, 
and not the least enterprising among these is the subject of this review. 
Descended from a line of successful florists and seedgrowers, it is not won- 
derful that C. N. Sandahl's greenhouses and nursery are known through- 
out Seattle and even the county. He was born in Denmark on the loth of 
May, 1857. His father was an extensive land proprietor and successful 
agriculturist, using his lands for the raising of flowers and seeds. Being 
bred in this atmosphere, our subject could do nothing else than engage 
in the business he now follows so profitably. He remained in his native 
country until he reached manhood, receiving a good education in the com- 
mon schools, which he supplemented by a course at college. When he 
was twenty-one years of age he engaged in the floral business in Denmark, 
which he continued with profit until he came to America in 1881. He 
located in Grand Forks county. North Dakota, where he entered some 
government land, and remained there for some eight years. During this 
time he was not idle, and at the end of this period found himself proprietor 
of four hundred acres of land, which he cultivated in an agricultural way 
imtil 1890, when he disposed of his land interests in North Dakota and 
came to Seattle. 



344 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Here he rented land along the Columbia car line, and for a time was 
successfully engaged in market gardening. The inherent instincts of his 
race cropped out, however, and this business was gradually merged into 
floriculture. In 1897 he enlarged this business considerably, adding the 
nursery and seeds. This has grown and enlarged from year to year, until 
it has finally reached its present extensive dimensions. Mr. Sandahl gives 
especial attention to the quality of his flowers, and imports bulbs and seeds 
from France, Holland, Germany and Japan. He makes a specialty of im- 
ported ornamental shrubs from France and Japan, and one gains a knowl- 
edge of almost every kind of plant, bulb or seed, in going through his 
extensive greenhouses. He is proprietor and founder of the Puget Sound 
Nursery and Seed Company, whose store and distributing depot is at 1109 
Second avenue. Their nursery and greenhouses are on loii Taylor avenue, 
while their main and largest nursery is at Renton. They have also a branch 
store at Tacoma, and supply many smaller houses, shipping as far east as 
New York. In politics Mr. Sandahl is a Democrat, and belongs to the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, and the Danish Brotherhood. He is an 
industrious, energetic and intelligent citizen, and upholds all that stands 
for honesty and fair dealing. He is highly respected by his many acquaint- 
ances, and greatly admired and loved by his countless friends, 

M. FRANK TERRY, M. D. 

Seattle, the city wonderful, has enlisted in her professional ranks the 
services of many men of distinguished ability and sterling character, and 
among the representative physicians and surgeons of the metropolis of the 
great northwest stands the gentleman whose name initiates this review, and 
it is with marked satisfaction that we here incorporate a brief review of 
his career. Dr. Terry claims the old Keystone state of the Union as the place 
of his nativity, having been born in Terry township, Bradford county, Penn- 
sylvania, on the loth of August, 1840, and being a son of Mynor and Susan 
(Lacy) Terry, both of whom were likewise natives of Pennsylvania, as 
was also the paternal grandfather who bore the name of Nathaniel Terry, 
while his father was born in the state of New York, thus bearing to us 
the assurance that the family has been identified with the annals of Ameri- 
can history from the early colonial epoch. The last mentioned was one 
of the pioneers of Bradford county, Pennsylvania, where he figured as the 
founder of Terrytown. Mynor Terry, was a tanner by vocation, and he 
passed his entire life in his native town. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 345 

M. Frank Terry was reared to the invigorating- discipline of the farm, 
and his early educational privileges were such as were afforded in the public 
schools, including a high school course.. At the age of twenty years he 
began his technical study of medicine and surger)^ under most effective 
preceptorship, and after fully qualifying himself he entered into practice 
in his native town, in 1864, and there remained for a quarter of a century, 
securmg a representative support and attaining marked success in his pro- 
fessional work. The Doctor may well be considered also as one of the 
pioneer physicians of Seattle, since he took up his abode here in the year 
1889 and has ever since carried on a successful general practice in medicine 
and surgery, gaining marked prestige and having a supporting patronage 
of representative character. He has thus been in the active practice of his 
profession for nearly two score years, and that these ha^■c been years of 
devotion and much self-abnegation none can doubt. 

In 1897 Dr. Teriy was appointed a member of the state board of health 
of Washington and he served in this capacity for a period of four years. 
For more than thirty years he has been prominently identified with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he is past noble grand and 
has been a representative in the grand lodge of this fraternity m the state. 
In politics he has ever been indq^endent. He has not been denied a due 
measure of temporal success during the years of his residence in Seattle, 
where he has accumulated valua1)le real estate, while he is also the owner of 
mining interests in the state. On the 8th of June, 1865, Dr. Terry was 
united in marriage to Miss Maria Sweeney, w ho was born in Vermont, the 
daughter of Dr. Daniel Sweeney, and they are the parents of one daugh- 
ter, Mary, who is the wife of S. J. Stewart, of Seattle. 

EDWARD M. RATCLIFFE, M. D. 

There is no field of endeavor in connection with the countless activities 
of life that places so exacting demands upon those who nerve in its con- 
fines as does the profession of medicine. There is demanded a most 
careful and discriminating preliminary training and unremitting and consecu- 
tive study and application through all the succeeding days, and, over and 
above this, the true physician, who in a sense holds life in his hands, must 
be imbued with that deep sympathy and true humanitarian sentiment which 
will bear his professional labors outside the mere commercial sphere. He 
whose name introduces this review is known and honored as one of the 
representative medical practititioners of Seattle, having gained distinctive 
22 



346 . REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

professional prestige and the confidence and respect of those to whom he 
has ministered, as well as of the community at large. 

Dr. Ratcliffe, who has his office at 115 Yesler Way, is a native of the 
fair old state of Kentuck)-. having been born in Verona, Boone county, on 
the loth of June, 185 1, and being the second in a family of nine children. 
He was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm and continued to devote 
his attention to agricultural pursuits in his native state until he had at- 
tained the age of twenty-six years, his early educational training having 
been received in the public schools. At the age noted he began reading 
medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. Findley at Crittenden, Kentucky, 
making very satisfactory progress in his technical study and finally being 
matriculated in the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, in 1878. He was 
graduated as a member of the class of 188 1, passing the intervals between 
the college terms in study and practice with his old preceptor. Shortly 
after his graduation the Doctor located in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, where 
he continued in the active practice of his profession until 1884, when he 
came westward as far as Kansas and located in Cimarron, which was then 
in Finney county, now Gray county, and there he accepted a position as land 
agent for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company, retaining 
his incumbency until 1887, when he was appointed to the office of sheriff of 
Gray county by Governor Martin, but resigned the office at the end of one 
•year. During his regime the county seat contest was at its height, and so 
bitter was the feeling engendered in the connection that his duties proved 
not only insistent and onerous, but also extremely dangerous at times. The 
Doctor made a record as a brave and discriminating officer, performing his 
duties with that distinctive courage and self-reliance which were so nec- 
essary in that new and wild section of the state at that time. 

In 1888 Dr. Ratcliffe came to Pierce county, Washington, where he 
was engaged in the general practice of his profession untd July 10, 1893, 
when he removed to Seattle, where he has ever since maintained his home 
and where he has attained an enviable reputation as a skilled physician and 
surgeon, retaining a practice of representative character. During his resi- 
dence in the state he has been identified with many business enterprises of 
importance, both in the city of Seattle and in connection with mining in- 
terests through the northwest, and he is known as an able and progressive 
business man as well as a leading member of the medical fraternity. In 
politics the Doctor gives his allegiance to the Democratic party, and he 
ever gives his aid and influence in the promotion of those undertakings 
which make for the general goorl of his home citv and state. In the citv 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 347 

of Tacoma on the 29th of October, 1890, Dr. Ratcliffe was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Maude Garlough, who was born in the state of Iowa, and 
they are the parents of two sons, Robert G. and Charles E. 

ISAAC WARING. 

One of the substantial and representative business men of Seattle is 
Isaac Waring, the agent and manager of the Great Northern Express Com- 
pany m Seattle. For a number of years he has been identified with the 
industrial development and public life of this section, and is widely and 
favorably known. A native son of England, he was born m Yorkshire on 
the 1 6th of August, 1867, and is a son of Isaac and Mary (Russell) War- 
ing, both natives of Yorkshire. The father, who was a prominent farmer 
and land owner in his native land, came with his family to America in 
1881. a location being made at Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where he entered 
government land and engaged in general farming and stock-raising. He 
still makes his home at that place, and is an industrious and highly es- 
teemed citizen. 

Isaac Waring is one of eight children born to Isaac and Mary (Russell) 
Waring, and is the only one of the family residing in the coast country. His 
primary education was recci\-ed in a private boarding school in England, where 
he remained until his fourteenth year, at which time he was apprenticed 
to a grocer, but shortly afterward accompanied the family on their removal 
to America. His first occupation in this country was in a clerical capacity 
with a wood and coal company at Sioux Falls, and in 1885 he entered the 
employ of the American Express Company. During his seven years" con- 
nection therewith he passed through the various grades of promotion, and 
for one year was the company's agent at Grand Forks, North Dakota. 
^^'hile stationed there, in 1892, the Great Northern Railroad Company or- 
gani.'jed their own express company, and Mr. Waring then came to Spokane 
to cissume charge of it, his territory extending from Havre, Montana, to 
the roast, and since 1896 he has had charge of the local office in Seattle. 
Throughout the period of his residence in this city he has taken an actise 
interest in local affairs, and in his political affiliations is a stalwart Re- 
publican. Since 1900 he has been a trustee of the Seattle General Hospital, 
and is a trustee of the Co-operative Mining Syndicate, having been in- 
terested in mining operations for the past five years. 

On the 1 2th of October, 1892, at Kasota, Minnesota, Mr. Waring was 
united in marriage to Miss Martha F. Moses, a daughter of Thomas and 



348 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

Louise (O'Dellj Moses, and to this union two sons ha\e been lx)rn, Thomas 
G. and Earl Russell. The family reside in a pleasant and comfortable home 
at 970 Twentieth avenue, and in addition Mr. Waring also owns property 
in Minnesota and Wisconsin. He is a prominent member and active worker 
in the First Methodist Episcopal church of Seattle, in which he is holding- 
the office of treasurer, and for the past five years has been a member of its 
official board. His excellent business ability, tog'ether with his affable man- 
ner, strict integrity and courteous treatment of his patrons, have advanced 
him step by step to the high position which he now occupies in the busi- 
ness world, and in every relation of life he has lived up to his high ideals. 

WILLARD W. DE LONG. 

The man of wealth is not the man whom the American citizens hold in 
highest regard. Ijut he who can plan his own advancement and accomplish it 
in the face of competition and obstacles that are always to be met in the busi- 
ness world. The "captains of industry" are those whose business foresight 
can recognize opportunity and whose executive force can utilize advantages 
which are not given to one alone, but perhaps encompass the w"hole race. 
The life histor}^ of Willard W. De Long is simply that of a successful busi- 
ness man who owes his advancement to close application, energy, strong de- 
termination and executive ability. He has never allowed outside pursuits 
to interfere with the performance of business duties or the meeting of any 
business obligations and thus he stands to-day, one of the prosperous resi- 
d.ents of King county, strong in his honor and his good name. He is to-day 
president of the Bank of Ballard, with which he has been .connected since its 
organization. For thirteen years he has been a resident of King county and 
for more than eleven years has made his home in this town, his labors prov- 
ing of the greatest benefit in the up-building of the place. 

yir. De Long was born in Lake City, Wabasha county, ^Minnesota, 
July 25, 1861, four days after the battle of Bull Run occurred. His paternal 
grandfather was a French refugee at the time of the Re\'olution. In his 
native country he attained great w-ealth but his estates were confiscated. At 
that time the name was spelled Da Longe. Fleeing to America the grand- 
lather located in eastern New York and became connected with woolen man- 
ufacturing there. • 

James W. DeLong, the father of our subject, was a native of Ohio, but 
when only eleven years of age went to sea. He worked his way steadily up- 
ward in a seafaring life until he became the owner of a sailing packet, the 



->1^. 



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*«TWt, U3HOK A.vn 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 349 

Eagle Wing, which he operated between Cahfornia and Panama, during 
the years 1848, 1849 and 1850. The boat was lost in the spring of 1858, 
having been engaged in the coasting trade with the Sandwich Islands. It 
met destruction while rounding Cape Horn, after which Captain De Long 
retired from the sea and went overland to Minnesota. He had previously 
served in the United States navy as a machinist and he took up the same line 
of work in Minnesota and aftenvard was engaged in the same capacity in 
Chicago. In the early seventies, however, he returned to Minnesota, but 
later went to the east and was in business at different places; coming to Se- 
attle on a visit, he died here on the 31st of July, 1893. While in Minnesota, 
Captain James De Long had married Miss Matilda A. Phillips, whose father 
belonged to an old Vermont family. After serving for four years in the 
United States navy, in Pacific waters and also engaging in chasing slave ves- 
sels in the Atlantic, Captain De Long entered the army and was wounded at 
San Francisco, while engaged in quelling a riot. In the spring of 1861 he 
enlisted in Company I, Thirteenth Minnesota Infantry, and was afterward 
captain of a Wisconsin company. With the Minnesota regiment he 
served in the army of the Tennessee and was captured but xvas later paroled. 
Subsequently he was again in military service under the command of General 
Sibley, at the time of the Indian outbreak. 

In the public schools of Chicago and of St. Paul, Minnesota, Willard 
W. De Long ])ursued his early education and after completing a high school 
course in the latter city he entered the business college in St. Paul. In the 
meantime he had learned the machinist's trade but after completing the course 
in the commercial school he took up teaching as a profession and for twelve 
years taught in the public schools. Later he was employed as an instructor 
in special branches in different schools and institutions. In 1889 he came to 
Seattle and was engaged in lecturing on educational subjects, just prior to 
the great fire. Later he taught school and then became president of the Ac- 
me Collegiate Institute of Seattle, which at that time was the largest school 
of the kind north of San Francisco. There were fourteen teachers and six 
hundred pupils in the institution. With the school Prof. De Long was con- 
nected until 1898, although he had given up teaching personally in 1896. In 
the year first mentioned he sold his interest in the institution. Trof. De 
Long left the office of county clerk in February, 1901, in order to establish 
the Bank of Ballard. He bought the lot where the bank is located, had the 
building erected and opened the institution for business on the TOth of June, 
1901. It was capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars. By the 30th the 
bank had deposits of thirty-two hundred dollars. This sum was nearly 



350 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

doubled by the end of the next month and has steadily increased every month 
since until on the loth of April, 1902, the deposits were over fifty thousand 
dollars. Owing to the rapid increase of business it was found necessan^ to 
increase the capital stock, which was doubled just four months after the es- 
tablishment of the bank. Mr. De Long's early training as an expert account- 
ant and bookkeeper has proved of great service to him in his banking connec- 
tions and his extensive accjuaintance with bankers and business men through- 
out the west has been an important feature in building up the extensive busi- 
ness which is now enjoyed by the institution of wdiich he is at the head. He 
has served as cashier of the bank and in ]March, 1901, he purchased the con- 
trolling interest in the stock and has since been president of the institution. 
The bank building is twenty-five by ninety feet, a brick structure, two stories 
in height, and of this twenty-five by forty feet is occupied for banking pur- 
poses. Mr. De Long is also agent and member of the board of directors of 
the Equitable Building-, Loan and Investment Association, his identification 
therewith dating form its organization. 

In 1882 occurred the marriage of Mr. De Long and M'ss Belle Dakota 
Bridges, the wedding being celebrated in Minnesota. The lady is a daughter 
of Mark M. and Eliza Bridges, and was the first white girl born in the ter- 
ritory of Dakota that lived to mature years, and therefore she was appro- 
priately named. Her father was engaged in fighting- Indians there under 
the command of General Abercrombie and was at the head of the commissary 
department at the time of her birth. ]\Tr. and Mrs. De Long are the parents 
of six girls, the two eldest being now employed in the bank, one as a book- 
keeper and the other as a stenographer. His children are named as follovvs : 
Cleo, Alice, Maude, Beulah, Goldie and Frances Willard. The last named 
was so called in honor of her father and also of Frances Willard, who was 
for so long the national president of the Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union, and the union of this state adopted this daughter as an honoray mem- 
ber of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, in which her mother is 
an active worker, having- served as treasurer of local union since the society 
was established here. Mrs. De Long has also served as ijresident of the 
Women of Woodraft for a number of years, and is a loyal and devoted 
member. 

In his political views Mr. De Long is a Republican and labors earnestly 
and actively for the growth and up-building of his party. He has served as 
a delegate to countv and state conventions, but since taking" charsre of the 
bank he has found little time to devote to active political work. He served 
as deputy clerk for four years and three months, continuing in the office 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 351 

through the changes of two administrations. He had charge of clerical 
work in connection with canal construction, in the purchasing of property for 
the government, and in keeping the record of the legal work. His course 
was extremely noticeable in this respect and when the report was truned over 
to the government the work was all checked over and no errors found. This 
required a vast amount of labor, as it demanded over ten thousand entries 
in the records and a direct expenditure by Mr. De Long of Uvo hundred and 
twenty-live thousand dollars. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern 
Woodmen, with the Fraternal Brotherhood and with the Knights of the 
Golden Eagle. He has erected two residences in Ballard, and his own home, 
which was built in 1896, is a fine place surrounded by an acre of ground 
which is all set out to fruit and flowers and is an ornament to the city. 
Splendid success has attended the efforts of Mr. De Long, whose business 
interests have been of a character to benefit his community as well as to pro- 
mote individual prosperity: He has left the impress of his individuality 
upon intellectual development in various communities and is now a represent- 
active of the financial interests of Ballard. He began his career under ad- 
verse circumstances, being compelled to make his own way and his success in 
life illustrates most forcibly the power of patient and persistent effort and 
self reliance. He has so conducted all affairs, whether of private interests 
or of public trusts, as to merit the esteem of all classes of citizens ; and no 
word of reproach is ever uttered against him. As a man and citizen he en- 
joys the prosperity which comes to those genial spirits who have a hearty 
shake of the hand for all those with whom they come in contact from day to 
day, and who seem to throw around them in consequence so much of the 
sunshine of life. 

CHRISTIAN MILLER. 

Few men are more prominent or widely known in this section of Wash- 
ington than Christian Miller, where for many years he has been an active 
factor in the building- interests. Through his diligence, 1 perseverance and 
business ability he has acquired a handsome competence and has also con- 
tributed to the general prosperity through the conduct of enterprises which 
have furnished employment to many. He is now serving as president of 
the Miller & Geske Construction Company, one of the substantial firms of 
King county. A native of Linfield, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, Mr. 
Miller was born on the 14th of July, 1850. His maternal grandparents 
came to America as early as 1750, and his paternal ancestors were resi- 



352 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

dents of this country prior to that time, although no records have been 
k-ept. On the maternal side two of his ancestors fought in the Revolution- 
ary war, and two of his uncles gallantly defended their country in the war 
of the Rebellion. James Miller, his father's brother, who was imprisoned 
at Belle Isle, is still living, while his mother's brother, John Hause, laid 
down his life on the altar of his country. Jacob Miller, the father of our 
subject, offered his ser^'ices to his countr}^ in her time of need, but was re- 
fused on account of a defect in his hearing. For over fifty years he served 
as a trackmaster for the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company. In 
the Keystone state he was united in marriage to Catherine Hause. by whom 
he had five children, three now living, namely: Charles F.. who is employed 
by the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company as superintendent of 
the coal docks at Salem, Massachusetts ; Christian, whose name introduces 
this review; and J. W., who resides on the old home farm. The father of this 
iamily was called to his final rest when he had reached the age of seventy- 
four years, while the mother still lives in excellent health at seventy-nine 
years of age. 

Christian Miller began the active battle of life for himself at the early 
age of thirteen years, at which time he learned the carpenter's trade, ^vhile later 
he took up the study of heavy building. When but twenty-four years of 
age he was given charge of the heavy work for the Philadelphia & Reading 
Railroad when the company began buying coal lands, and he assisted in 
establishing their coal depots on the Atlantic coast, while later he held a 
very responsible position for the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Com- 
pany, ten years having been spent in charge of such work. Coming to 
the Pacific coast in 1881, Mr. Miller entered the employ of the Oregon 
Improvement Company, now known as the Pacific Coast Company, having 
charge of the establishment of their coal bunkers in San Francisco and 
later in Portland. He was next employed by the Columbia & Puget Sound 
Railroad Company, which he represented for many years, and after the 
great fire of this city he had charge of the rebuilding of all their works 
here, including coal bunkers, warehouses, docks, shops, roundhouses. On 
the completion of this work, however, he resigned his position in order to 
spend some time in travel, and after his return four months later resumed 
his former connections and took charge of the construction of the company's 
buildings at Port Townsend, Anacortes and Olympia. Severing his con- 
nection with the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad' Company, Mr. Miller 
then began the arduous task of clearing a tract of land which he had pm*- 
chased near Seattle, and as time passed by he succeeded in removing its 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 353 

dense growth of native timber, also placed the land under an excellent state 
of cultivation, planted an orchard and in many ways improved the farm. 
In 1897, however, he returned to his former occupation, and in 1901 or- 
ganized the Miller & Geske Construction Company, of which he was made 
the president. Among the many important works which this company have 
constructed may be mentioned the power house at Leshi Park, the rebuild- 
ing of the Schwabacker dock and warehouse, the Broad street dock and the 
dock for the Chlopeck Fish Company, the J. B. Agen dock, the New Col- 
man dock, the fire-boat slip and many foundations for bridges and other 
pile driving work in and around Seattle. They also erected the two large 
coal bunkers in this city, and had charge of all bridge work on the water 
front when the Seattle & International Railroad was being builded. In 
1886 Mr. Miller had suffered the loss of an arm and he then purchased the 
old stand of John Sullivan, carrying on that business for several years, 
when he was induced by the Seattle & International Railroad Company 
to return and resume his former relations. 

The marriage of Mr. Miller was celebrated in Chester county, Penn- 
sylvania, on the 9th of October, 1873, when Rebecca Savage became his 
wife. She is a daughter of Davis Savage, who for many years served as 
a squire, as did also her grandfather. Seven children have blessed the 
union of our subject and his wife, as follows: Davis A., a merchant of 
Seattle; Chanceford, a painter by occupation; Edna M., the wife of A. T. 
Schmidt, of Louisville, Kentucky; Ina C. and Marguerette, both attending 
school; two of the children have passed away, Charles Leroy, the first born, 
and J. Harley, both of whom died in early childhood. The political sup- 
port of Mr. Miller is given to the Democratic party, and he is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce of Seattle. 

EDWARD OTTO SCHWAGERL. 

No foreign born citizen can become the president of the United States, 
but this is almost the only limit placed upon the ambitions and efforts of 
America's adopted sons. The field of business is limitless, and to-day many 
of the leaders of commerce, of manufacture and in professional and military 
life are those who have had their nativity in foreign lands and have crossed 
the Atlantic to ally their interests with this great and growing republic, 
where the path to public honor is the road of public usefulness and ability. 
One of the most distinguished landscape gardeners of all America is Ed- 
ward O. Schwagerl. The beauty of the new world, especially in the cities, 



354 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

has been largely enhanced and augmented by his efforts, as he has exer- 
cised his art, not in supplanting nature, but in supplementing it by the knowl- 
edge of a hig-her civilization and by directing the natural forces in a way 
that will present the most pleasing results of form, color, symmetry and 
entire harmony. 

Mr. Schwagerl. after having been an important factor in the develop- 
ment of park and boulevard systems of the east and middle states, is now 
devoting his energies to a similar work of a very important character in 
the northwest, and Seattle is fortunate to have secured his residence and 
services in outlining a system of parks and driveways which, if completed, 
will be unsurpassed for scenic effects and natural beauties. A native of 
Wurtzburg, Bavaria, Mr. Schwagerl was born January 14, 1842. his parents be- 
ing Leonard and Madaline Schwagerl. During his infancy his parents removed 
across the border to Paris, and at an early age his love of the beautiful in 
nature and art was strongly manifest and was gratified in many of the 
art palaces of France. It has been the dominant influence in his life, and 
through his development of his latent powers he has risen to a position 
hardly second to any in the United States. His early education was ob- 
tained from private tutors, and his leisure time not demanded by his text 
books was mostly spent in visiting the art halls and palaces and the parks 
and squares of the cities. At the age of twelve years he came alone to 
New York city to join his brother, with the purpose of accompanying" him 
to Costa Rica, but his brother failed to meet him in the eastern metropolis 
and thus he found himself alone and penniless in the great city, unable to 
speak a word of English and with no friend to whom he could go for as- 
sistance. Making his way through the streets of the city he chanced upon 
a French restaurant at the corner of Fulton and Broadway, where he se- 
cured employment at nine dollars a month. While there he met Mr. Clapp, 
proprietor of the Everett Flouse, who was impressed by the foreign boy 
and gave him employment, making him a member of the family. There 
he remained for a year, when he became the protege of George Dow, with 
whom he made his home until nineteen years of age, meanwhile being em- 
ployed as salesman for several years in the stores of A. T. Stewart and 
vSchwechard & Kessel. 

At the age of nineteen Mr. Schwagerl entered a school at Tilton. New 
Hampshire, where he spent several years in pursuing a select course of study. 
His teachers believed he had a decided calling for the ministrv, and used 
their influence to induce him to enter that calling, but after mature and 
conscientious deliberation he gave up that idea. Soon after leaving school 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 355 

in 1865 he went to Paris with Messrs. Dows & Guild, of Boston, and while 
there was tendered a position by the French architect, Mons Mulat, who 
was laying out extensive public grounds in the Paris Universal Exposition. 
He remained with Mulat lor a year and then returned to America, locating 
in Hartford, Connecticut, where he accepted a position with Jacob Weiden- 
mann, a noted landscape architect, who had charge of the city parks of 
Hartford. He also prepared a treatise on landscape gardening, but received 
no credit for this work, as it was published under his employer's name. 
After remaining in Hartford for eighteen months he concluded to try the 
western country and located at Omaha, Nebraska, where he established him- 
self in business and remained for a year. He was then called to St. Louis 
to take charge of the work of laying out and improving the parks and boule- 
vards of that city. Pie laid out most of the parks there and was the or- 
ganizer of the board of park commissioners. Included in his work there 
are the noted Lindell boulevard, Van Deventer Place and many other public and 
private parks and grounds, and in connection with Mr. Leffingwell he selected 
the grounds for Forest Park. In 1872 his services were solicited by H(-in. 
William J. Gordon, of Cleveland, who wished him to assume charge of his 
private grounds which afterward became the public parks. He did all the 
engineering and artistic work for the Gordon park, since given to the city; 
also has since formulated the plan for a regular system of parks and boule- 
vards in that city, and laid out the Wayne, Payne and Eels parks and 
Rockefeller grounds, all being evidences of his superior skill. He was like- 
wise solicited to go to Chicago to assume charge of the park system there, 
but, unwilling to supplant its incumbent, he remained in Ohio until about 
1888 or 1889, when he was chosen by Mr. Henry Failing, of Portland, 
Oregon, who has been searching the east for a competent and skilled archi- 
tect to survey and make complete plans for the Riverview cemetery of Port- 
land. He spent some six months in making plans and doing topographical 
work and then returned to the east, but after a brief period he again came 
to the Pacific coast, arriving in Seattle in September, 1889, stopping in 
the meantime in Lincoln, Nebraska, to take charge of some city work, which 
claimed his attention for four months. 

After coming to the coast he decided to establish a high class horticul- 
tural business, and procured land at Kingston for that purpose, making a 
fine collection of foreign and domestic plants, trees and shrubs. He was 
called to Tacoma to take charge of pul)lic parks and make the i)lans for 
Point Defiance Park of six hundred acres; Wright Park of thirty acres; 
University Place, residence park of twelve hundred acres; and Olympic 



356 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

boulevard. His public work so interfered with his private operations that 
he gave up his horticultural business, and many of his choice and rare plants 
and shrubs mav now be found in Kinnear Park, which is one of the choicest 
gems in Seattle's crown. Removing to the city of Seattle, Mr. Schwagerl 
accepted the position of superintendent and engineer of the park and laid 
out Kinnear Park, made the plans for Denny Park and laid out the city 
park. All this has been done in addition to much landscape gardening at 
the homes of many of the most prominent and wealthy citizens of Seattle. 
Indeed the city owes much of its adornment to the efforts of Mr. Schwagerl, 
who has devoted his entire life to this work, until it seems that he has almost 
reached perfection. Not only has he a most comprehensive and thorough 
knowledge of the great principles of mechanical science, as embodied in 
civil engineering and kindred subjects, but has a love of beauty and apprecia- 
tion of color, form and harmony without which no one can hope to attain 
success as a landscape artist. His reputation extends throughout the entire 
country, placing hmi among the most prominent and original representa- 
tives in America. 

On the 1 8th of July, 1894, Mr. Schwagerl w^as united in marriage to 
Miss Frances McKay, of Tacoma. In his political views he is a Republi- 
can, but as may be inferred he has no time or inclination to take an active 
part in political affairs. In addition to his work as a civil engineer, archi- 
tect and landscape gardener, he is a painter of landscape plans and views 
and has a fine studio in his home. He is now interested in a work which for 
magnitude, scope and beauty will eclipse everything that he has already 
accomplished — the construction of a park and boulevard system for Seattle 
that will not only connect various parks of the city but will also embrace 
drives along the shore of Lake Washington and through some of the most 
scenic and beautiful scenery of which America can boast, the whole boule- 
vard system to cover thirty-five miles. Already many of Seattle's most 
prominent and public spirited citizens are deeply interested in the plan, and 
Mr. Schwagerl seems in a fair way to realize what but a few years ago was 
deemed the dream of an idealist. However, there is nothing of the dreamer 
about him. He is intensely practical as well as a lover of beauty and art, 
and his work in the world in the establishment of parks has benefited thou- 
sands in the cities and will be a monument to him through coming ages, 
more enduring than any monument of marble or stone. Mr. Schwagerl 
claimed H. P. Blavatsky as his most esteemed and honored teacher in mat- 
ters of ethics and philosophy, closely studying for sixteen vears her inval- 
uable works, such as "The Key to Theosophy" and her "Secret Doctrines," 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 357 

linked with her personal papers and teachings. He insists that pure the- 
osophy is the proper bond between ethics and philosophy, the only solid 
basis for religion. 

ELLIS DeBRULER. 

Ellis DeBruler, who is filling the office of city attorney of Seattle and 
has long been an active member of the bar at this place, was born in DuBois 
county, Indiana, on the 25th of August. 1863. He comes of an old Ameri- 
can family of French ancestO"- His grandfather, Wesley DeBruler, re- 
jnoved from North Carolina to Indiana in the year 1816, and became one 
of the pioneer settlers of DuBois county, identified with agricultural work. 
There he cleared and developed a farm and became a leading citizen in 
his community. His son, John H. DeBruler, also carried on agricultural 
pursuits. He was a Republican in his political affiliations and had firm 
faith in the party principles, but never sought office. He married Eliza- 
beth Downey, a daughter of the Rev. L. D. Downey, one of the first settlers 
of DuBois county, Indiana, and of this union five children were born, but 
the subject of this review is the only one now living west of the Mississippi 
river. The father died in the year 1891, at the age of sixty-eight years 
but the mother, Elizabeth A. DeBruler, is still living. 

In the public schools of his native county Ellis DeBruler began his 
education, which he afterward continued in the Cumberland University at 
Lebanon, Tennessee, his mother's father being a minister of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian church. He pursued his literary education vith the idea of 
entering the law, and won the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He began prac- 
tice in Rockport, Indiana, in 1889, remaining a member of the bar at that 
place for four years, but the reports he had heard of the Puget Sound 
country attracted him to the northwest, and making a trip here he was 
so pleased with the country and its future outlook that he decided to re- 
main and formed a partnership. He has been a resident of Seattle since 
1893 and for five years has served as city attorney. His practice is of a general 
character. The zeal with which he has de\-oted his energies to his pro- 
fession, the careful regard evinced fur the interests of his clients, and an 
assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all tiie details of his cases, have brought 
him a large business and made him very successful in its conduct. His 
arguments have elicited warm commendation, not only from his associates 
at the bar, but also from the bench. He is a veiw able writer; his briefs 
always show wide research, careful thought, and the best and strongest 



358 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

reasons which can be urged for his contention, presented in cogent and 
logical form, and illustrated by a style usually lucid and clear. 

To some extent Mr. DeBruler is interested in property in. the west, 
believing it a good investment, owing to the growing condition of this 
section of the country. He owns two residences in the city, one on Twen- 
tieth avenue and one at Green lake. He is a Republican in politics, active 
and diligent in support of the party and he has attended many conventions. 
While in Indiana he served as deputy prosecuting attorney. His long ex- 
perience in connection with the city offices has made him invaluable in the 
position during the wonderful growth of the past five years. A large 
amount of legal business has been brought to the office and one not well 
informed concerning such duties could not capably attend to the exten- 
sive legal interests of which Mr. DeBruler has oversight. His ability and 
skill are widely acknowledged, and the public and the press accord to him a 
leading place in the ranks of the legal fraternity of Seattle. Socially he 
is connected with the Knights of Pythias and with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He is a man of g'enial and pleasing disposition 
and wherever he s:oes he wins friends. 



&^ 



HANS J. CLAUSSEN. 

It will assuredly be not uninteresting to observe in the series of biog- 
raphical sketches appearing in this volume the varying national origin and 
early environment of the men who have made their way to positions of 
prominence and success in connection with the professional and industrial 
activities of life. In no 1:)etter way can we gain a conception of the diverse 
elements which have entered into our social, professional and commercial 
fabric, and which will impart to the future American type features which 
cannot be conjectured at the present time. We have had an American type 
in the past; we shall have a distinctively national character in the future, 
but for the present, amalgamation of the varied elements is proceeding and 
ihe final result is yet remote. From the great empire of Germany have come 
to the American republic a class of citizens from which our nation has had 
much to gain and nothing to lose, and the extraction of the subject of this 
sketch may be sought for among the vigorous and intellectual natures which 
have made Germany what it is to-day, and he may well take pride in his 
ancestral record, for it has been one bespeaking strong and worthy man- 
hood and gentle and earnest womanhood, as one generation has followed 
another. Mr. Claussen holds prestige as one of the essentially represents- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 559 

tive business men of the city of Seattle, being prominent! 3- concerned in 
industrial enterprises of marked scope and importance and Ivdvmg shown 
that inflexible integrity and honorable business policy which invariably be- 
get objective confidence and esteem. Progressive, wide-awake and discrim- 
inating in his methods, he has achieved a notable success through normal 
channels of industry, and to-day is president, treasurer and manager of the 
Claussen Brewing Association at Interbay, a suburban district of Seattle, 
and also vice-president of the Diamond Ice & Storage Comp;..ny, whose busi- 
ness has likewise extensive ramifications. 

Mr. Claussen is a native of the province of Holstein, Germany, where 
he was born on the 13th of November, 1861, being a son of Csecilia M. and 
Peter Jacob Claussen, representative of stanch old German stock. Our 
subject prosecuted his studies in the schools of his native province until he 
had attained the age of ten years, when he accompanied his parents on their 
emigration to America, the family locating in the city of San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, where he continued his educational work, as did he later in Dixon, 
that state, the family home having been on a farm for the gi eater portion of 
his youth. After completing the curriculum of the high school he entered a 
business college, where he finished a thorough commercial course and thus 
amply fortified himself for taking up the active duties of life. \n 1882 Mr. 
Claussen took a position as bookkeeper for the Fredericksburg Brewing- 
Company in San Jose, California. In 1884 he began learning the details of 
the brewing business, and later he passed about two years in the employ of 
the National Brewing Company of San Francisco, gaining a thorough ex- 
perience in all branches of the industry and thus equipping himself in an ad- 
mirable way for the management of the important enterprise in which he is 
now an interested principal. In 1888, in company with E. F. Sw^eeney, Mr. 
Claussen effected the organization of the Claussen, Sweeney Brewing Com- 
pany in Seattle, and business was conducted under that title until 1893, when 
the company disposed of the plant and business. In 1892 Mr. Claussen 
associated himself with Messrs. Charles E. Crane and Georee E. Sackett in 
the organization of the Diamond Ice & Storage Company, of which our sul)- 
ject became vice-president at the time of its inception and in (hat office he has 
since served, the enterprise having grown to be one of inijX)rtance and ex- 
tensive operations. In March, 1901, was formed a stock company which 
was incorporated under the title of the Claussen Brewing Association, with 
a capital of fifty thousand dollars, which was later increased to two hundred 
and fift}' thousand, and the company erected a fine brewing plant at Interbay 
and ha^'e liere engaged in the manufacture of a very superior lager beer, the 



36o REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

excellence of the product and the effective methods of introduction having" 
gained to the concern high reputation and a most gratifying supporting pat- 
lonage; which extends throughout Washington and contiguous states. The 
equipment of the plant is of the most modern and approved type and in every 
process and detail of manufacture the most scrupulous care is given, insur- 
ing absolute purity, requisite age and proper flavor, so that the popularity 
of the brands of beer manufactured is certain to increase. The annual ca- 
pacity of the brewery is sixty thousand barrels, and the plant is one of the 
best in the northwest, the enterprise being a credit to the executive ability 
and progressive ideas of the gentleman who inaugurated the same. 

Mr. Claussen has been a resident of Seattle since 1888, and from the 
start he has maintained a lively interest in all that concerns the progress and 
material prosperity of the city, being known as an alert and public spirited 
citizen and able business man, and holding unqualified confidence and esteem 
in the community. He has been an active factor in the councils of the Demo- 
cratic party, but in local affairs maintains a somewhat independent attitude, 
rather than manifesting a pronounced partisan spirit. In 1901 he was the 
Democratic nominee for member of the lower house of the state legistlature, 
but as the district in which he was thus placed in nomination is overwhelm- 
ingly Republican in its political complexion he met defeat, together with the 
other candidates on the ticket. Fratenally he is prominently identified with 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Seattle Turn\erein society and the Ger- 
man Benevolent society, in each of which he has held office. He was also 
one of the organizers of the Mutual Heat & Light Company in 1902, and 
has ever stood ready to lend his influence and definite co-operation in support 
of legitimate business undertakings and worthy projects for the general good. 
In 1892 he erected his fine residence on Boren a^•enue. and this he still owns, 
though he now makes his home at Interbay, in order that he may be more 
accessible to the brewery, over which he maintains a general supervision. 
He is a young man of forceful individuality and the success which has been 
his indicates most clearly his facility in the practical application of the talents 
and powers which are his. In the city of Seattle, on October 10. 1891, Mr. 
Claussen was united in marriage to Miss Emma Meyer, who was born in 
Hamburg. Germany. 

REV. FRANCIS X. PREFONTAINE. 

The tales of romance and adventure do not contain any more remark- 
able facts than does the history of the men who. in behalf of religious prin- 
ciples, carried their work into the wild districts of the west to reclaim it for 



k. 









frnr NFW rnRK] 
FU^!CLIBRARY[ 






SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 361 

purposes of Christianity. Rev. Francis X. Prefontaine established the 
CathoHc rehgion in Seattle and has been untiring in his work in behalf of the 
church. He is now the pastor of Our Lady of Good Hope, at Third avenue 
south and Washington street, which church was established by him and has 
been developed to its splendid proportions through his earnest and conse- 
crated efiforts. 

Father Prefontaine was born in Montreal, Canada, in 1838, and his 
parents were natives of that country. He pursued his literary education in 
Nicolett College, which is located midv^ay between Quebec and AIontreaL 
He finished his studies there in 1859 and then matriculated in the LeGrand 
Seminary, of Montreal, pursuing a theological course, and was one of three 
hundred students. On the 20th of November, 1863, he was ordained at the 
seminary and afterward started immediately for the Pacific coast by way of 
the Isthmus of Panama, six weeks being consumed in making the trip, 
iiowever, he arrived safely on Puget Sound and was the first priest ap- 
pointed to labor for the white people of this northwestern district, a few mis- 
sionaries having previously begun their labors among the Indians. Father 
Prefontaine resided first in Steilac(X)m, where a military i30st had been es- 
tablished. After ten months spent at that point he removed his head-quarters 
to Port Townsend, and visited the entire Sound country from that place, 
traveling in canoes with the Indians and sleeping on the shores of the streams 
^vherever night overtook them. A trip of this kind covered three of four 
months. In 1867 he decided that there was no brig-ht future for Port Town- 
send and, although Seattle comprised only about five hundred inhabitants, he 
lielieved that there was a spirit nf Christian development here that was bound 
to conquer in the end and he decided to locate at this place. He therefore 
rented a residence on Third a\'enue between Jefferson and James streets, a 
building containing three rooms, and he converted two of them into a cha])el. 
.At his first meeting there were Ijut three peo])le in attendance, but through 
personal effort he soon secured the attendance of many others and the church 
graduallv grew ix)th in numerical and spiritual strength. 

In the winter of 1868-9 Father Prefontaine began clearing the ground 
upon which his church now stands. It was all covered with timber and it 
required the combined labors of three men for three months to clear the lour 
lots. One tree which Father Prefontaine cut down himself towered to the 
height of two hundred and twenty feet and he used it in the foundation of 
the church. It required him two days, however, to fell this tree. There was. 
a creek crossing the place and this fact had been recognized by the sailors of 
the Decatur, when, in 1856, that sloop of war came to the relief of the settlers 
23 



362 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

who were in sore straits because of the Indian attacks. The sailors set a 
barrel to catch some fresh water here, and when clearing the land Father 
Prefontaine found relics of their visit; not only the barrel, but a couple of 
rusty bayonets and a large key ten inches in length which he holds as a relic 
of these troublesome times. It had probably been the key to the storehouse 
aboard the boat. Bullets and shells were also found on the land showdng 
that this had been the ground where serious work had l^een done in pioneer 
times. In March, 1869, Father Prefontaine secured the material here from 
which to build the first house of worship, which extended thirty-six feet on 
Third a\^enue at the corner of Washington and extended back a distance of 
sixty feet. When completed the house had a seating capacity for one hun- 
dred people and had been erected at a cost of three thousand dollars. The 
building is now the center of the present church of Our Lady of Good Hope. 
This building was a large one for the time and was entirely finished inside 
with stucco work. In the erection of the building Father Prefontaine took 
a very active part as a carpenter, as a painter and even in carving the stucco 
work. There is some carving still in the building that he did many years 
ago. The building completed cost four thousand dollars, which sum was 
raised by fairs up and down the Sound. Father Prefontaine held a fair in 
Seattle at which he raised eight hundred dollars and other fairs were held 
at Port Gamble, Port Ludlow and Utsaladdy, and within about four months 
the entire sum of money needed was raised with the exception of about one 
thousand dollars. In 1882 it became necessary to enlarge the edifice and 
Father Prefontaine remodeled and rebuilt it as it now appears, executing this 
work at an outlay of sixteen thousand dollars. He retained Lhe former build- 
mg and steeple, however, in the construction of the new house of w'orship. 
The building w^as completed in 1883. A pipe organ was acquired for it at 
a cost of twenty-five hundred dollars. This was the only parish in Seattle 
until 1889, when a new parish was formed and the church of the Sacred 
Heart was established and the building erected. In 1876 a contract to take 
care of the sick w^as secured from King county and Father Prefontaine called 
the Sisters of Providence to carry on the w^ork. He then purchased a house 
and lot for the sisters and aided in transforming it into the first hospital, do- 
ing considerable work on the building himself. 

In 1880 he persuaded the sisters of the Holy Name to come and take up 
the work of education, having in the meantime purchased a half block of land 
on Second avenue for sixty-eight hundred dollars. He then put up a build- 
ing between Seneca and University streets, erecting this for the use of the 
teacl'.ers, at a cost of three thousand dollars. In 1883. owing to the en- 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 363 

croachment of the business district upon the site of the school, it was sold 
for thirty-five thousand dollars and a block was purchased at Seventh and 
Jackson streets. Parochial schools were held in the basement of the church 
until 1890, when Father Prefontaine built the brick building on Sixth and 
Spring streets and then discontinued the holding of the school in the church 
basement. Along the lines of church work he has labored earnestly and his 
efforts have been of benefit in extending Catholic influence and work. He 
built the first church in La Connor, of which he was both the architect and 
the carpenter. 

Father Prefontaine has a fine library, possessing liten.ry tastes which 
have been met by extensive reading, making him a well niformed man. In 
the early days he delighted to take a tramp through the woods with his gun 
and had not a little reputation as a successful hunter. It has been through 
this means and through reading that he has sought recreation from the stren- 
uous duties of his pastorate, but his energies have been given in an almost un- 
divided manner to his church work and the parish of Our Lady of Good 
Hope, now one of the strongest in the northwest, is the result of his energy 
and devotion to the cause of Christianity. He was a pioneer in introducing 
Catholicism into this city and this portion of the state, and the growth of the 
church here is largely due to liis efforts. 

MILO A. ROOT. 

The ancestors of this gentleman were Englishmen and were among the 
early settlers of the Massachusetts Bay colony. His great-grandfather, 
Israel Root, was a Revolutionary soldier; he was a member of the Baptist 
church and lived to a good old age. His son Henry was a soldier in the 
second war with Great Britain, and one of the incidents of the war is fam- 
ily history. He had crossed the Niagara river with twenty companions to 
procure some fruit, but they were surprised by British cavalry and forced 
to a hasty retreat, tearing up the bridge to prevent pursuit ; the enemy opened 
fire, and one of their bullets came so close to Mr. Root as to cut off a por- 
tion of his beard, but the Americans with the aid of their artillery finally 
obliged the British to retire. After the war Mr. Root resided in Allegany 
county, New York, for the remainder of his life. It was in this last named 
county that William H. Root was born, but he later became a prominent 
farmer and stock-raiser of Barre Center, Orleans county, New York. He 
still resides there in his sixty-ninth year, and has passed a life of consider- 
able influence in his communitv. His wife was Miss Cordelia Halroyd. a 



364 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

native of Cortland county, New York, and daughter of Rew William Hal- 
royd, a minister of the Baptist church ; this gentleman wat- a fine scholar,, 
especially well versed in the ancient languages, and of English descent. 
His wife was Amelia Knickerbocker, who was descended from one of the 
oldest Knickerbocker families of New York. There were seven children 
bom of this union, and five are now living. 

The only member of the family residing on the Pacific coast is Milo 
A. Root, who was born to the above mentioned parents while the}- were 
residing in Bureau county, Illinois, on January 22, 1863. He accompanied 
the family on their removal to Orleans county, New York, in 1876, and it 
was there that he finished his literary education, being a graduate of the. 
Albion high school in 1882. He at once took up the study of the law with 
the Hon. John H. White, a prominent jurist of western New York and 
also of high standing in the grand lodge of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows in that state. Young Root also graduated from the Albany Law 
School, and also read law in the ofiice of the present attorney general of 
New York, and in the fall of 1883 came to Olympia. Washington, and so 
thoroughly had he mastered his studies that in the following year, upon 
the report of the committee of examination, of which Judge Hanford was 
chairman, he was admitted to practice ])y Judge Hoyt. During the thir- 
teen years of his residence as a practicing attorney in Olympia he served, 
two years as probate judge of Thurston county, and was prosecuting at- 
torney for a similar period. Judge Root came to Seattle in 1897. and 
during the following year was in partnership with Judge Hoyt. but from 
then till January. 1900, he practiced alone: at the latter date the firm of 
Root, Palmer and Brown was organized, of which Judge Root is th.e senior 
member. He has been very successful in his law practice and is the attorney 
for many large corporations. As a Rq^ublican he has taken an active part 
in the campaigns, has been a member of the state conventions and of the 
Republican state central committees. He is a Royal Arch Mason, a mem- 
ber of the Elks, the Woodmen of the World, the Knights of Pythias and 
ihe Royal Arcanum. 

In 1890 Judge Root was married to Miss E. Lansdale of Olympia; 
her father was Dr. R. H. Lansdale. a prominent physician and one of the 
pioneer settlers of Whidbey Island, \Yashington ; he was a warm friend 
and associate of General Isaac Stevens, the first governor of the territory,, 
and assisted in negotiating many of the Indian treaties. Mr. and Mrs. 
Root are the parents of four children. Bernice C, Hortense M., Milouise 
and An.na E. Judge Root is the owner of considerable city property, and 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 365 

IS interested in several companies, and has invested money i'or eastern capi- 
talists. He is a member of the Sons of the Revolution, and both he and his 
wife are members of the Cong-regational church. He is an enthusiastic 
Sunday-school worker, having- for some years taught an interesting class 
numbering over one hundred young ladies and gentlemen. 

HARALD BLEKUM. 

The rough and precipitous land of Norway has ever been productive of 
the world's best seamen, the earliest records of history recounting the daring- 
adventures of the hardy Norsemen in their viking ships; and some of this 
blood still flows in the veins of Captain Blekum, all his life a sailor and now 
manager of the firm, Stevenson & Blekum Tug Company, proprietors of the 
tugs Mystic, Harry S.. Doctor. Oscar B. and Magda, and doing a general 
towing and jobbing business, furnishing ballots, renting skows and barges, 
of which they have a large number. W. H. Stevenson is the secretars^ and 
treasurer of the company. 

Captain Blekum was born at Horten, Norway, November 30, 1865; the 
blood of his ancestors asserted itself early in life, and at the age of fourteen 
he went to sea as a deck boy on a deep sea voyage lasting about thirty-five 
2nonths, in the course of which he visited Scotland, England, Russia, the 
West Indies and Panama, and returned rated as a seaman before the mast. 
After his return he entered the school of navigation at Mandal, Norway, 
Avhere he completed a thorough technical training and received first class 
papers. He then became mate of a vessel on a \ oyage to France and then re- 
turned to his home in Norway. His father, Olaus Blekum. had meanwhile 
removed to Lindesnaes, to take charge of the government lighthouse there. 
And here it may be well to speak a few words of the father of our worthy 
subject. He had started in the navy of Norway as a lad, and passing through 
all the various degrees he became an officer when King Oscar was yet a boy ; 
he was afterwards promoted to the lighthouse department and until 1878 
was traveling inspector of the lighthouses; he was then placed in charge 
of the lighthouse at Lindesnaes, one of the largest in the world, which posi- 
tion he still retains. Our subject, after the event last mentioned, served as 
second mate of three different vessels, cruising to France and Spain and in 
the Baltic; he was soon promoted to first mate and engaged in navigation 
in the North Sea until 1884, in which year he came to America. From here 
he made three voyages in the Brittanic from New York to Liverpool. In 
the fall of 1884 he came to the Pacific coast and engaged in navigation on 



366 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

the Pacific until 1889. In that year Mr. Blekum took out his full naturaHzation 
papers, since which time he has been on the Sound; in 1890 he became mas- 
ter and commander of various vessels in the Sound coasting trade, among 
them the Michigan, Vulga, Chinook and the Mystic; and lor the last three 
years he has been harbor pilot for all the large naval and merchant vessels. 
The present company was organized in 1890 as the Stevenson Tug & Barge 
Company, and Captain Blekum became a partner in 1893. 

Mr. Blekum is one of the most thorough business men and highly re- 
spected citizens of Seattle; he bears an enviable reputation as an expert navi- 
gator, and his long and successful experience as a seaman makes him abso- 
lutely reliable. His marriage occurred on the 8th of August, 1891, Minnie 
Thomson becoming his wife, and she was the mother of four children : Os- 
car, Clara, Edna and Karen Petrea. In the same year he erected his com- 
fortable and sightly residence at 161 1 Tenth avenue, west, where he lives 
in the happy enjoyment of all the domestic comforts. Mr. Blekum was con- 
firmed and reared in. the Lutheran church; in politics he has maintained an 
independent position. He is now candidate for Norwegian vice-consul in 
Seattle. 

DAVID W. BOWEN. 

The honored subject of this memoir is closely identified with the busi- 
ness interests of Seattle, and is now holding the important position of secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Puget Sound Sheet Metal Works. He is a native 
of the state of Ohio, born on the 8th of December, 1867, and is a son of John 
and Elizabeth (James) Bowen, also natives of the Buckeye state. Of their 
three children our subject is the only one who grew to years of maturity, and 
the days of his boyhood and youth were spent in the state of his nativity, 
where he received a liberal education in its public schools. He also became 
a student in Mount Union College, in which institution he graduated in 1887. 
During the two years succeeding his graduation he found employment with 
the Lacock Mill Company as manager of their sales department. The year 
1889 witnessed his arrival in Seattle, and during his first eight months in this 
city he occupied the position of bookkeeper. Returning thence to Cleveland, 
Ohio, he was there engaged in a similar capacity for seven months, and since 
that time he has made his home continuously in Seattle, the first year after 
his return being spent with the MacDougall & Sons Company. After filling 
various other positions he was made deputy collector of internal revenues for 
the district of Oregon, and after three years of ser\ace therein he resigned 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 367 

his position to establish the Puget Sound Sheet Metal Works, which was or- 
ganized on the 3d of March, 1901. This concern sustains an unassailable 
reputation in business circles and is one of the leading establishments of its 
kind in the city. Their large and well arranged factory is located on the 
water front at 1318-22 Western avenue, and their offices are at the same 
place. Mr. Bowen is a young man of exceptional business ability, and in 
trade circles he enjoys an enviable reputation. 

The marriage of Mr. Bowen was celebrated in Seattle on the 25th of 
December, 1890, Miss Nettie V. Stevenson becoming his wife. She is a 
native of Pennsylvania. One son, Harry S., has come to brighten and bless 
their home. In his fraternal relations Mr. Bowen is a member of the Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of. the Modem Woodmen of the 
World and is past regent of the Royal Arcanum. His political support is given 
to the Republican party, and although since attaining to mature years he has 
been an active worker in the ranks of his party he has never been an aspirant 
for political honors. He has been many times a delegate to the central 
committee. His life thus far has been a busy and useful one, characterized 
by generosity and kindness, by honor and integrity. 

CHARLES H. ALLMOND. 

Throughout life Charles H. Allmond has been prominently identified 
with the interests of the Pacific coast country, and is to-day one of the lead- 
insf business men of Seattle. A native son of the Golden state, his birth 00- 
curred in the city of Sacramento on the 15th of August, 1857, and he is a 
son of John G. and Lydia (Douglas) Allmond, natives respectively of Mich- 
igan and New York. The father remained in his native state until his 
twenty-third year and then made his way to California, sailing on the first 
screw-steamer which rounded the Horn, the Sarah Sands. In June, 1850, 
he engaged in mining and prospecting, which he carried on in connection 
with mercantile pursuits until 1852. In that year he returned to the east 
and w^as there married, returning thence with his bride to Ihe Golden state, 
where he followed agricultural pursuits until his life's labors were ended in 
death, in 1867. To Mr. and Mrs. Allmond were bom five children, namely: 
George D., a prominent rancher in California; Mar>' H., the deceased wife 
of A. C. Snyder; Charles H., the subject of this review; Katherine D., the 
wife of Mr. D. Hurlburt, of Ne^v York ; and Douglas, editor and proprietor 
of the Anacortes American at Anacortes, Washington. 

Charles H. Allmond remained with his parents on their ranch until 



368 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

1S67, when he accompanied the family on its removal to Sacramento, 
there making his home until 1880. His early educational training- was re- 
ceived in the city schools of Sacramento, and when fourteen years of age he 
entered the old Sacramento Union office, in the capacity of a clerk, thus con- 
tinuing, for the following three years. When seventeen years of age he was 
given employment in the shops of the Central Pacific Railroad at Sacramento, 
Avhere he remained for five years, and during that time mastered the various 
branches of the pattern maker's trade and became a proficient workman. 
The year 1880 witnessed his arrival in Seattle, his first work in this city be- 
ing in the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad shops, under J. M. Coleman, 
from whence he entered the Washington Iron Works. In 1882. in com- 
pany with W. R. Philips, he established a foundry and machine shop on Sec- 
ond and Jackson streets, but in 1889 Mr. Allmond disposed of his interest 
there, and the concern afterward became known as the Vulcan Iron Works. 
Returning thence to his native state, he was for one year engaged in pros- 
pecting and mining in the Cascades, and in 1897 ^^^ went to Alaska, where 
for three years he resumed his mining operations. Prior to his removal to 
Alaska Mr. Allmond had served as foreman of the Moran Brothers pattern 
department for about five years, and after returing from the north again 
entered the same occupation, thus continuing until March. 1901. At that 
time he established his present business at 519 First avenue, south, but in 
January, 1902. removed to his present location. i\s a draughtsman and 
pattern-maker Mr. Allmond has built up a large and lucrative business, and 
has furnished most of the patterns for the various shops and foundries of 
the city. By his ballot he supports the men and measures of the Republican 
party, and has ever taken an active interest in all measures and movements 
pertaining to the advancement and upbuilding" of the city of his choice, while 
on many occasions he has served as a delegate to conventions. He is widely 
and favorably known and is recognized as one of the rq^resentative men of his 
community. ♦ 

RICHARD S. JONES. 

Richard S. Jones is actively connected with a profession which has im- 
portant bearing upon the progress and stable prosperity of any section or 
community, and one which has long been considered as conserving the public 
welfare by furthering the ends of justice and maintaining individual rights. 
His reputation as a lawyer has been w^on through earnest, honest labor and 
his standing at the bar is a merited tribute to his ability. He now has a 
very large i^ractice, and his careful preparation of cases is supplementerl by 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 369 

R power of argument and forceful presentation of his points in the court 
room, so that he never fails to impress court or juiy and seldom fails to gain 
the verdict desired. 

Mr. Jones is a native of the state of Minnesota, born February j. 1861, 
and is of Welsh ancestry, the family having been founded in Virginia in 1652. 
The grandfather. Rev. S. Jones, was a leading bishop of the Methodist I'ro- 
testant church and was born in Virginia in 1803. At an early date he went 
to Minnesota as a missionary bishop there and was a prominent and active 
factor in establishing the churches of his faith m that new coimtrv. He mar- 
ried Miss Isabel Robinson, a member of the noted Robinson family of VVis- 
consn, and they became the parents of five children, of whom one, Mrs. Sam- 
uel Foress, of Minnesota, is still living. Richard Asbury Jones,, the father 
of our subject, was born in La Fayette, Indiana, on the 226. of October. 1831. 
He married Miss Sarah McClellan. the great-granddaughter of John Har- 
ris, the founder of the city of Harrisburg. Pennslyvania, who received the 
property there as a grant from the croxNu and was a pioneer settler of that 
state. At one time he was captured by the Indians, tied to a tree and a fire 
was kindled around him but fortunately he was rescued by another band of 
Indians. Mr. Jones, the father of our subject, was educated in Wisconsin, 
and in 1850 crossed the plains to California, settling in San Jose, where he 
studied law and was admitted to practice in 1853. He practiced his profes- 
sion there until 1858, when he returned to the east, locating in Rochester, 
Minnesota. He became an eminent member of the profession in that state, 
taking an active part also in political work. He served his district in the 
state legislature of Minnesota and in 1884 he was a delegare to the Demo- 
cratic National convention and seconded the nomination of Grover Cleveland 
for the presidency of the United States. The following year he was ap- 
pointed by President Cleveland to the position of chief justice of the territoiy 
of Washington. He had acquired the reputation of being one of the ablest 
lawyers in the state of Minnesota and in the discharg'e of his official duties 
in Washington lie evinced a profound knowledge of the law. taking to the 
bench the very highest qualifications for the most responsible office of the 
state government. His last opinion, given just before his death, was to the 
effect that the Woman's Rights Bill which had been j^assed by the legislature 
was in conflict with the United States Constitution. Washington then being 
a territory. His record as a judge was in harmony with his record as a man. 
the same being distinguished by unswer\ing integrity and a masterful grasp 
of every problem which presented itself for solution. Judge Jones departed 
this life Augtist i i, 1888, dying of heart (Hsease at the age of fifty-six years. 



370 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

His good wife passed away in 1879. They lived and died in the faith of tiie 
Methodist church and their influence was ever on the side of progress, cul- 
ture and intellectual and moral advancement. They left four children, of 
whom three are yet living. M. K. Jones is the superintendent of the Great 
Northern Road at Seattle. Isabel is residing in Rochester, Minnesota. The 
other daughter, Mrs. Edith H. Wheeler, died in Yakima, Washington, in 
1898. 

Richard Saxe Jones, the subject of this review, pursued his literary ed- 
ucation in the public schools and in the University of Minnesota, after which 
he read law in his father's office for four years and in 1883 was admitted to 
practice. He then entered upon the profession in South Dakota and was 
elected prosecuting attorney of his county in 1884, but the following year he 
resigned and returned to his old home in Rochester, where the son took up 
the father's practice and remained there until 1892. In that year he came to 
Seattle and opened a law office here, practicing alone until 1894, at which 
time the Brinker, Jones & Richards law firm was formed. The senior part- 
ner was the United States attorney at that time. This business relationship 
was maintained until 1900 when Mr. Brinker and Mr. Richards went to Alas- 
ka, Mr. Jones remaining in Seattle in the enjoyment of a large practice. This 
has been his life work and he has attained a distinguished position in connec- 
tion with his chosen calling. He is now the attorney of numerous corpora- 
tions and makes a specialty of admiralty law. 

In 1885 Mr. Jones was happily married to Miss Helen Maude Taylor, 
of Bethel, Connecticut, a descendant of an old American family. This union 
was blessed with one son, Richard S., who is now a student in the high school 
of Seattle. Mrs. Jones departed this life in 1889 and nine years later, in 
1898. Mr Jones was again married, his second union being with Miss Mar- 
garet Barr, who was born in Indiana and was reared in Minnesota. Her 
father was John Barr, a banker of the latter state and one of her brothers is 
professor of mechanical engineering in Cornell University, while another 
brother is state senator in Minnesota and a member of the board of regents 
of the state normal school. He is also engaged in the banking business. 
Mrs. Jones was a successful teacher in the kindergarten department of the 
state normal school prior to her marriage. She has becom.e the mother of 
one daughter, Margaret Isabel. 

Mr. Jones has been a life-long Democrat and a prominent worker in the 
ranks of his party. He is also a leading Mason of the state of Washington 
having been made a member of the craft in Rochester Lodge, No. 21, F. & 
A. IvL, in 1885. Since then he has received all of the degrees in both the 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 371 

York and Scottish Rites, the thirty-third degree having been conferred upon 
him in Seattle in 1898. He has filled nearly all of the subordinate offices in 
all the branches of the order and is a past deputy grand chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias. He is also an honorary life member and is past exalted 
mler of the Elks. Both have a large circle of friends in the city and in his 
profession Mr. Jones has attained high honor. His legal learning, his ana- 
lytical mind, the readiness with which he grasps the points in an argument, 
all combine to make him a very successful advocate and his comprehensive 
knowledge of the law makes him a wise counselor. 

CHRISTIAN HOFMEISTER. 

Throughout the history of our country the German element in its popu- 
lation has been one of its best factors, and among those best known in Seattle 
is Christian Hofmeister, who for a number of years has occupied a very con- 
spicuous place among the leading business men. He is the founder and 
proprietor of the Washington Floral Company, whose extensive green- 
houses are located at Fortieth avenue and east Madison street. In Wurteni- 
berg, Germany, on July 10. 1848, Christian Hofmeister was born to Mat- 
thew and Frederica (Kamerer) Hofmeister, both also natives of that place. 
When fourteen years of age the son Christian was apprenticed to a florist at 
Stuttgart, with whom he remained for three years, there laying the founda- 
tion upon which he has built the superstructure of his life work. In 1868, 
when he had reached the age of twenty years, he bade adieu to the home and 
friends of his youth and sailed for the United States, and after his arri\al mi 
American soil he made his way to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he secured 
employment with the large seed and floral company of J. R. & A. Murdock. 
So well did he discharge his duties which devolved upon him in this capacity 
that on the expiration of three years' serxice he was appointed to the position 
of foreman, which he continued to fill for the following eight years. In the 
A^ear 1889 he made his way to Seattle, where he soon secured a tract of land 
and established his present business which has grown from a small beginning 
to its present large proportions, and the Washington Floral Company now 
occupies an enviable position in the luisiness circles of the city. They make 
a specialty of the raising of choice flowers and plants, the furnishing of cut 
flowers being one of the principal features of the business. Their various 
greenhouses require a covering of fifty thousand square feet of glass and in 
addition to their large local trade they also ship extensively to the neighbor- 
ing states. Mr. Hofmeister produces only the choicest varieties of plants. 



172 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF 

carefully selected from the most reliable sources, and as a result of his years 
of experience and his conscientious dealings with his patrons he has estab- 
lished a satisfactory and constantly increasing trade both at home and in the 
surrounding towns. 

The marriage of our subject was celebrated in Seattle on the 28th of 
July, 1 89 1, when Miss Anna A. Peterson became his wife. Three children 
have been born to brighten and bless their home. Annie Marie. Lillie Mar- 
guerite and Florence Catherine. The family reside in a comfortable and 
commodious residence in this city, which was completed in 1901. Mr. Hof- 
meister gives his political preference to the Republican party, but he excer- 
cises his right of franchise in the support of the men whom he regards as best 
qualified to fill positions of trust and responsibility. In his fraternal rela- 
tions he is a member of the Ind<;pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Knights of Pythias, while religiously he is identified with tlie English Luth- 
eran church. He iias a wide acquaintance in this section of the state, and his 
honesty in all trade transactions, his reliability in discharging his duties of 
citizenship and his fidelity to the interests of private life have won him marked 
esteem. 

FRANK E. PELLS. 

Frank E. Pells is the efticient postmaster at Ballard, and he has been a 
factor in the upbuilding, advancement and improvement of the town almost 
from the establishment of the place. He was born in Rockford, Illinois, in 
.'869. The ancestral history can be traced back through three generations, 
the first representative of the family in America coming from Germany. 
The grandmother on the paternal side bore the maiden name of Johnson and 
^v•as a direct descendant of Commodore Johnson, who won distinction in the 
war of 181 2, a man of remarkable size, as well as a brilliant naval officer. 
Samuel E. Pells was born in Rockford, Illinois, and became superintendent 
of the tack factory of that place. In 1888 he removed to the west and en- 
gaged in ranching until his death, which occurred in November, 1900. His 
wife bore the maiden name of Jennie Hart, and was a daughter of Charles 
Hart, who was born in Carlisle, Scotland, in 1818, and came to America 
when about twenty years of age. \Mien passing through Chicago he w^as 
urged to locate there, but the town was so unprepossessing" that he said he 
would not accept the location as a gift; instead, he took up his abode in 
Tanesville, Wisconsm, and had a sheep pasture where the principal hotel and 
the park of that city are now found. He took a claim from the government. 



SEATTLE AND KING COUNTY. 373 

and his patents are signed by James K. Poik, then president of the United 
States. Mr. Hart was one of the founders of both Janesville and Monroe, 
Wisconsin, and an honored pioneer settler of that portion of the state, and 
he died in 1897. % the marriage of the parents of our subject they had 
four children : Charles H., who is now manager of the Pioneer L.aundrv 
Company ; Frank E. ; Mrs. Cooper, of Ballard ; and Fred, who is acting as 
bookkeeper for the Cedar Lumber Company of Seattle. 

In the public schools of his native city Frank E. Pells pursued his liter- 
ary education and afterward took a course in a business college. For four 
years he was connected with a tea company in Illinois and in Iowa and in the 
fall of 1889 he came to Ballard, the town having been founded in that year. 
He decided that the new hamlet was favorably located and that a good future 
was before it and he turned his attention t(i the real estate business. Later 
he became proprietor of a mill, which was afterward burned. Just prior to 
the great Klondike rush Mr. Pells took a trip to that region of Alaska, in 
1898, and ran pack trains from Skagway to Lake Bennett. In 1898, how- 
ever, he returned to Ballard and established a laundry and also purchased the 
store adjoining the postoffice. He conducted the latter enterprise until 1901. 
when he sold his store and organized the Pioneer Laundry Company and 
built the present building in which to conduct his business. He gives em- 
ployment to fifteen people there and his patronage is large and profita!)le. 

On the 1st oi July. 1901, Mr. Pells was appointetd postmaster of Bal- 
lard by President McKinley, and received a regular appointement on the 
i6tli of January, 1902, the latter being signed by President Roosevelt, so that 
he holds commissions bearing the signature of our late martyred [)resident and 
of the present chief executive of the nation. During his incuml)ency tlie 
business of the office has increased fully one third, and the capacity of the 
office has been doubled. Mr. Pells is a very efficient. poj)ular and active 
postmaster, having systematized the work of the office, which he conducts 
nlong practical business lines. He is an active wc^rker in the Republican 
ranks and was one of the nine men of the ])lace who claimed to be a Re])ublican 
when the Populist excitement of 1896 was at its height. He has served as a 
delegate to citv and countv conventions and takes much interest in city and 
county affairs. He belongs to the ccwnty central committee and has labored 
earnestly for the growth and success of his party, although v,p to the time of 
his appointment as postmaster he never sought or desired office for himsoll. 

Mr