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Full text of "The Wallkill Valley in art and story"

974.701 '^'- •— 

W15w 

1899 

1417553 



GENtALCGY COLLECTIOR 



(/ 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRAR' 



3 1833 02209 4228 



^yO^^-1^^^ ^'^"'^ ^^i^'^^^ I 




MONEY PAID IS 
MONEY SAVED.. 



...when it is paid for a 



Sharpies Dairy 
Separator — - 




branches: 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Omaha, Neb. 



Do you make butter? If you do, you need a Cream 
Separator. Not only will a Separator save the women 
of the house the work of setting the milk, skimming it, 
and washing the pans, but ;/ will make money for you. 

How ? By increasing the quantity of cream from 20 
per cent, to 30 per cent. ; by the butter commanding at 
least 2 cents per pound more than butter made without 
a separator; by having the warm skimmilk to feed the 
stock, pigs, and chickens. 

We make our Dairy Cream Separators in four styles 
and sizes. 

If you have a feed cooker you should have the Little 
Giant Dairy Cream Separator. It can be attached 
to the boiler and is made in two sizes. If. however, 
you do not want a steam power machine, the Safety 
Hand Cream Separator is the one you are looking 
for. It is furnished with a pulley attachment for dog or 
pony power, or with a crank handle for man power. 

The Little Giant and the Safety Hand Separators are 
the only safe Dairy Separators made. 

They are the least complicated. 

The repair bills are absolutely nothing. 

For ease of running they cannot be beaten. 

In appearance they are by far the neatest. 

They do the cleanest skimming and produce the 
smoothest cream. 

They are the easiest to clean and their bowls are not 
filled with delicate parts. 
Full information on application. 



P. Mm Sharpies, 

West Chester, Pa,, 
U. S. A. 




M4 XM *>M M4 M4 M^ 



Its People 
Its River 
Its Environs 

and 
Its History 



M<* w* w* f^ r^ P^ 



JOHNSTON .V I'KCIi. 



In Art 
and Story . 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Wallkill 

Valley Farmers' 
Association, 
Walden, N. Y. 



UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF THE SECRETARY. 



^§^^§^§^^^§g2^^eg2§g2^^eg2^ 




EMBLEM OF THE WALLKILL VAlIeY FARMERS- 



ASSOCIATION, 






/Innouncement 




1417553 



1889 
1899 



DECADES PASS in rapid succession and the panorama 
of life yields little of its detail if even its outline, to 
the generation that follows. It is but a brief interval 
since the aboriginal denizens of the forests held unrestricted 
sway over the mountain fastnesses and intervening valleys of 
Southeastern New York. 

It has been said that, in America, our local history has 
not vet received its full development. We have been careless 
of our traditions, monuments and relics, which, "if of a dif- 
ferent sort from those of Europe, are no less interesting and 
important to preserve." 

The following pages are too few to make any pretence 
to being a history of the Wallkill Valley. They may serve, 
however, to record much that might otherwise pass with the 
forgotten and unknown, and hence are merely offered as a 
contribution to the growth of local song and story "to cling 
like green vines about the broken fragments of the past." 

The response to former publications of this character 
has met with such complimentary reception at home and 
abroad that we are encouraged to add the present volume 
to those of former years. 

I desire to acknowledge the invaluable CQ-operation and 
assistance of the many individuals who have contributed in 
many ways to give this soiivenir much of whatever value 
it may have. 



)^6^ajJ- 



SECRETARY. 



THE HOMESTEAD. 

"Welcome, ye pleasant dales and hills, 

Where dreamlike passed my early days. 
Ye cliffs and glens and laughing rills 

That sing unconscious hymns of praise; 
Welcome, ye woods with tranquil bowers 

Embalmed in autumn's mellow sheen. 
Where careless childhood gathered flowers, 

And slept on mossy carpets green. 

"The same bright sunlight gently plays 

About the porch and orchard trees ; 
The garden sleeps in noontide haze. 

Lulled by the murmuring of the bees; 
The sloping meadows stretch away 

To upland field and wooded hill; 
The soft blue sky of peaceful day 

Looks doivn upon the homestead still. 

"Unchanged it greets the changeful years — 

Its life is one unending dream ; 
No record here of grief or tears ; 

But, like the limpid meadow stream. 
It seems to sympathize with youth, 

Just as the river does with age. 
And ever whispers — Sweetest truth 

Is written on life's title page." 



Beacon Lights of the Wallkill Valley, 



CORNELIA F. GILLESPIE. 

©UR grand old Wallkill Valley furnishes us an almost inexhaustable supply of sub- 
ject matter upon various topics, but of all topics the one most dear to our hearts 
is the "Beacon Lights" — the churches. These lights mean civilization and progress. 

Note the rapid advancement of the people in foreign lands after the introduction of 
the Christian Church, then what mighty power must be ours, who are continually within 
its light. At almost any point along the Wallkill upon a quiet Sabbath morning one can 
hear some Beacon bell calling. the people to the house of God. In faith our forefathers 
reared these blessed shrines throughout this beautiful valley to be the lights to guide 
our souls to the Heavenly land. 

Many of those who were instrumental in rearing these houses of worship have long 
since passed to their final resting places. They did their work faithfully and well and 
are now only sleeping after a life of toil waiting for the resurrection morn, when they, 
with the noble ones of to-day, who would for Christ's dear sake lay down their lives, if 
duty demanded, will be united in that Kingdom not made with hands. 

We will attempt to name and locate, as nearly as possible, the Churches in the imme- 
diate river valley. Lack of space prevents us from entering into details. 

Beginning at the most northern part of the Valley near Morris Lake, Sussex Co., N. J., the source of the 
Wallkill, in Sparta township, in the Village of Sparta stands the First Presbyterian Church, erected in 1786. It 
is very prosperous, free from debt, and has a large surplus in its treasury. Present pastor is Rev. Wm. Hollin- 
shed. The M. E. Church of Sparta was erected in 1837 and rebuilt in 186,S. Present pastor is Rev. H. Bice. 

About five miles northward are three churches in the Village of Ogdensburg, a Presbyterian under the pas- 
toral care of Rev. Wm. Hollinshed of Sparta, a BapMSt, and a Catholic. 

Four miles to the north, on the bank of the Wallkill is the Village of Franklin Furnace. In this village a 
Baptist Church was built in 1832 and abandoned in 18?3, but is now used by the Presbyterian congregation. 
Present pastor is Rev. J. K. Freed. There is also a Catholic Church here, erected in 1863, of which Father 
Boylan is Pastor. 

Next in order is the North Church, located about two miles southwest of Hamburg, of the Presbyterian de- 
nomination, was organized from the Sparta Church (1819) and is supplied from Hamburg. 

Hamburg, the next village on the Wallkill, contains four Churches— Presbyterian, organized and built in 
1814, the Rev. Mr. Barnes, pastor, recently resigned; Baptist, organized in 1811, the present pastor is Rev. A. 




FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, GOSHEN, N. Y. 



S. thompson; the Church of the Good Shepherd, Rev. J. H. Smith, pastor. The first service held on June 3, 
1S74. It is a stone structure consisting of nave and chancel; with engaged tower, surmounted by a cross and 
containing a tine toned bell; and the Episcopal, completed in 1S74. the Rev. J. H. Smith is present rector. 

Saint Thomas' Church, Vernon, N. J., is a plain wooden building. It has a small congregation of devout 
people who are strongly attached to their little Church. It has a bell, pipe organ and altar hangings for the 
different ecclesiastical seasons. Rev. J. H. Smith, Rector. 

Four miles to the north is Deckertown. This village has three churches— the First Baptist, organized in 
1759, rebuilt recently, and the Rev. Bristow is its pastor; the Second Presbyterian, organized in 1834, Rev. E. A. 
Hamilton is present paster; and the Methodist, organized and built in 1858, the present pastor Rev. L. F. Bow- 
man. 

The Wantage M. E. Church, located three miles northeast of Deckertown and one mile west of the Wall- 
kill is supplied from Deck- 
ertown. 

Crossing the line into 

Orange County, eight miles 

1^^^ , northeast of Deckertown, 

■f^^^j^^ N. J., and about two west 

of the Wallkill is located 
•■5 t'lfi pleasant village of 
„^^^ Unionville containing three 
.■^^^^ Churches — the Orange 
Baptist, organized in 1822, 
the Rev. J. King, present 
pastor; First Presbyterian, 
organized in 1803, present 
pastor. Rev. J. S. London; 
and the Methodist, organ- 
ized in 1868, edifice com- 
pleted in 1870, present 
pastor. Rev. W. S. New- 
some of Westtown. 

The ancient Village of 
Amity, a mile from Pochuck 
River, a tributary of the 
Wallkill. It rests in the 
center of beautiful scenery, 
and the Presbyterian 
church, which is the most 
conspicuous object in a 
wide compass, stands on 
an elevated site of sur- 
passing loveliness. In 
the year 1797 the first 
church building was erected and opened for public worship, the ministerial labors of Rev. R. H. Craig, pastor 
since May, 1892, has grown more and more devoted as the years pass. Important improvements have been 
made, a pipe organ placed in the Church, and a centennial celebration was held on December 10, 1896. 

Westtown, two miles west of the Wallkill in the town of Minisink, has two Churches — the Presbyterian, 
organized March 10, 1803, the people incorporated "The First Presbyterian Church of Westtown." Subscrip- 
tions to July, 1805, amounted to $11,733.50. September 4, 1806. the Society was taken under care of Presby- 
tery. Rev. Thomas Grier, the hrst pastor, was installed February 9, 1809. One hundred and three persons 
were received into the communion of the church in 1815, fifty-seven in 1816, and one hundred and ninety-four in 




PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, RIDGEBERRY 



1820, all on confession of faith. The present pastor, the Rev.iR. H. Taylor, was installed May 9, 1889. The 

church was rebuilt near the close of the first pastorate, and remodeled under the pastorate of the Rev. D. 

C. Niven (1872) and again within the present pastorate (1898-9). The Methodist, organized in 1863, and the 

present pastor is Rev. W. S. Newsome. 

The Presbyterian Church. Florida. N. Y., was organized probably in 1750. The Church has a comfortable 

and commodious sanctuary, beautifully situated in 
the center of the village. The Church is thorough- 
ly organized. Its present membership is about 
160, and its pastor the Rev. David F Bonner, D. 
D. The M. E. Church is supplied by Rev. F. 
Russell. 

Ridgeberry, two and one-half miles west of 
the Wallkill, contains two Churches— Presbyter- 
ian, organized in 1805, present pastor. Rev. T. 
Brittain: and a Methodist Church, pastor, Rev. 
R. M. Roberts. 

Four miles to the north, upon the banks of 
the Wallkill, is the Village of Denton. This vill- 
age contains a Presbyterian Church, organized in 
1839. 

Following the River northward from Den- 
ton, a short distance from the Wallkill, we ap- 
proach the beautiful city of Middletown, which, 
owing to its number of Beacon Lights, ought to be 
very righteous, it contains fourteen Churches of 
which the following are the names of the organ- 
izations, each accompanied by the present pastor's 
name: First Presbyterian, Rev. David Winters. 
Second Presbyterian, Rev. Charles Beattie, D. D. 
The First Congregational Church. Middletown, N. 
Y., 1785, Rev. Charles Seeley began his pastor- 
ate. The Church had been established previous 
to Dec. 12, 1784. In 1786 a lot was purchased and 
in part is occupied by the present Church edifice: 
It was for forty (40) years the only Church in 
Middletown. 1798 Rev. W. H. Smith began effi- 
cient pastoral work; 1807 Rev. Allen Blair was 
chosen pastor; 1810 the ground around the 
Church was used for burial purposes, as it con- 
tinued to be for many years. 1812 Rev. Abel 
Jackson was called to the pastorate, at an annual 
salary of |500 and 20 cords of good firewood. 
1814-15 a precious revival. 125 persons uniting 
with the Church; 1820 Rev. Wm. Blair entered 
upon the pastorate of the Church; 1824 Rev. 
George Stebhins was called; 1825-1834 harmony 
did not prevail, but all disputes were finally set- 
tled; 1836 the new Church was dedicated, about 

the same time the first bell in Middletown was placed in the belfry of the Church. Rev. John Fishpool 

commenced pulpit work as a supply. 1837 Rev. M. LaCost; 1838 Rev. Chas. Machin; 1842 Rev. H. 

Righter; 1845 Rev. J. C. Territt: 1846 Rev. L. C. Lockwood. A very precious revival gave great strength to 




FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. AMDDLETOWN. 



the Church; 1851 Rev. S. T. Lum. a very earnest pastor. Interior of Church greatly improved; 1854 Rev. G. 
T. Timlow; 1855 Rev. D. Lancaster; 1860 Rev. Jonathan Crane; 1868 pastorate of Rev. Dr. C. A. Harvey, to 
his indefatigable efforts was largely due the planing and erection of the present Church edifice; 1871 former 
house removed; 1872 corner stone of the new laid with impressive services; Oct. 22d. 1873 Church dedicated, 
sermon hy Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, of Brooklyn Tabernacle; 1875 second pastorate of Rev. J. Crane, who died 
Dec. 25, 1877. A floating debt of J16.000 was cancelled; 1876 a new bell with fixtures weighing 4000 pounds, 

presented by Deacon W. C. McNash. An 
elaborate organ of great volume was pur- 
chased; 1878 Rev. F. R. Marvin, M. D. in- 
stalled. 1879 entire funded and accruded debt 
of S21.500 paid; 1881 a large tower clock 
placed in the belfry of the Church ; 1882 Rev. 
H. C. OIney called to the pastorate; 1885 
Centennial of Church. $5,000 was provided 
to meet unpaid pledges of 1879; 1887 resign- 
ation of Rev. E. C. Olney, on account of 
impaired health; 1888 Rev. A. F. Pierce. 
Union Evangelistic services held by the 
Churches of the town. 106 entered into fellow- 
ship with this Church; 1S89 interior of the 
Church was beautified and enlarged; 1892 
Rev. William A. Robinson began his services 
as pastor. Dec. 22d. Rev. Dr. Lyman Abbott 
"1 Brooklyn, preached the sermon; 1893 re- 
sulted in placing the Church on encouraging 
financial basis; 1894 great spiritual results 
and conversions recorded; 1895 revision of 
Ciuirch Manual; 1896 payment of all debts 
resting upon the Society. During the Euro- 
pean trip of the pastor during June and July, 
tlie pulpit was supplied by Mr. Charles P. 
Pierce of Yale Seminary. Grace Episcopal, 
Re\ . Da\ id J. E\ans. B. A., Rector, was in- 
corporated Feb. 18. 1845. The present struct- 
ure was begun in 1846, finished in 1847, and 
consecrated hy Bishop Delancy, on Sept. 12, 
1848. In 1866 the south transept was built 
by E. P. Wheeler, to whom, more than any 
other man, the parish is indebted for its foundation, and in the following year the north transept was added by 
the pious munificence of the same benefactor. The beautiful spire dates back from 1868. St. Paul's M. E.. 
Rev. Frank L. Wilson, D. D. ; First Baptist, Rev. Frank A. Heath; North St. Congregational, Rev. W. H. Mor- 
ton; Prim. Old School Baptist, Elder H. C. Ker; St. Joseph's (Catholic), Rev. J. P. McClancy; Free Christian. 
Rev. C. M. Winchester; Christ Church (Universalist) , Rev. J. Newton Emery; A. M E. Zion, Rev. J. W. Mc- 
Coy; A. M. E. Bethel, Rev. T. J. Jackson; Faith Mission, Elder D. L. Conkling. 

From this city we will pass on to Goshen — our own county seat, not the land of Biblical name. Herein 
we find five strong churches and a Presbyterian Mission (colored), of which Re\'. W. C. Brown is pastor. 
The Presbyterian, now under the pastoral care of Rev. Robert Bruce Clark, is the oldest church in the Southern 
half of the valley. It was organized and had a settled pastor as early as 1721. and at present is in a very 
flourishing condition. The remaining four are the Methodist, Rev. W. F. Brush, pastor; Episcopal, St. James, 
with Rev. G. C. Betts, rector; St. John the Evangelist (Catholic), with the Rev. P. McCorry, pastor; and A. 
M. E. Zion. with Rev. King, pastor. 




FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, MIDDLETOWN, N. Y. 



A Presbyterian Church was organized and built at Scotchtown about 1796. Rev. J. K. Mann is present pastor. 

At Campbell Hall is located the First Presbyterian Church of Hampfonburg. a new edifice. This is the 
original Church of Herds. The pastor is Rev. Alex. Gilmore. 

Next in order is the Village of Montgomery, located on the east bank of the WallUill. For the number of 
inhabitants she has more light than her sister villages. Within the corporation are three churches. The Pres- 
byterian, organized and 



T 



.t 






T. D. Elder, present pas- 
tor. The Methodist, Rev. 
Newton Way, pastor. The 
first services were held in 
this village about eighty 
years ago. Church ereect- 
ed in 1S29, enlarged in 
1853. and thoroughly re 
paired and cupola built in 
1S60; the bell was placed 
in its position in 1861. 
The lecture room was add- 
ed and colored glass win- 
dows put in in 1884. Seat- 
ing capacity nearly 300. 
No indebtedness on the 
church property. And the 
Holy Name of Mary (Cath- 
olic I , Rev. PatricU Morris, 
pastor. 

Then across the river, 
one mile to the West, on 
a high elevation, stands 
the historic Brick Church. 
Space compels the omission 
of details, but suffice it to 
say that no church can 
claim any nobler souls 
than those who have been 
members of this fold. The 
original organization( 1732) 
was composed of German 
emigrants. The first 
structure was built of logs, 
the second (1760), a frame 
building on the present 
site, and the third (1S03), 
a brick edifice, which was remodeled in 1834. This year (1899) the burden of debt is once more lifted from 
her fair brow. She is now in a prosperous condition under the pastoral care of Rev. J. F. Berg. 

About two miles to the east from Montgomery village is located a Presbyterian Church, known as Good- 
will. This congregation was originally comprised of emigrants from Ireland, organized about 1729. She is a 
prosperous Church and is now under the present care of Rev. J. H. Thompson, Montgomery, N. Y From this 
Church two miles to the north-east is the Berea ( Ref Dutch) Church, originally it was an off-shoot from Good- 
' Searle, Walden. N. Y. 




CHURCH, GOSHEN, N. Y. 



will, organized 1819, present pastor. Rev. E. V. 



10 



9 



Four miles to the north of Montgomery is the beautiful village of Walden. situated on either bank of the 
Wallkill. There are four Churches within the Corporation limits, viz: — The First Reformed Church, Rev. 
William Wyckoff Schomp. Pastor. As early as 1830 a definite effort toward establishing a Church was made, 
building operations began in 1835, the house was not completed till 1838. The dedication took place in August. 
The first pastor. Rev. John M. Scribner. was installed August 20, 1839. In 1842 Rev. Charles Whitehead be- 
came pastor, continuing till 1849. The same year Rev. Martin V. Schoonmaker became pastor, faithfully dis- 
charging his duties till 
1888, almost forty years. 
In 1888. Rev. W. H. S. 
Demarest, was installed. 
Under his care and wise 
guidance, the Church was 
enlarged and beautified, 
e.xternally and internally, 
as it appears to-day. 
During hisadministrations, 
stained glass windows 
were added, and electric 
lights and steam heat in- 
troduced. In 1897, Rev. 
William Wyckoff Schomp, 
the present incumbent, be- 
came its pastor. On ac- 
count of the commanding 
position it occupies, it has 
long and favorably been 
known as the Hill Church. 
From its site the landscape, 
north, south, east and west 
is magnificent. The High- 
lands of the Hudson, the 
Shawangunk Mountains 
and portions of the Cats- 
k.lls all appear. The Wall- 
kill River at the foot of the 
hill on the west flows 
north-ward, at times a 
gentle stream, and at times 
a raging torrent. 

The Methodist, organ- 
ized about 1820, in 1850 
purchased the Covenanter 
Church building on Main 
St., present site, for their 

meetinghouse; remodeled recently, and is now a handsome edifice with a large and generous congregation, 
present pastor. Rev. O. Haviland. The Episcopal. (St. Andrews) organized in 1732, at St. Andrews— removed 
to Walden 1827, present rector, Rev. Anketell. The Catholic edifice erected in 1894, Rev. Patrick Morris, Pastor. 
From Walden three miles to the north, in the village of Wallkill. county of Ulster, near the east bank of 
the River is the Wallkill Valley (Ref.) Church, edifice erected in 1869, destroyed by fire about 1889, replaced by 
present brick structure, present pastor, Rev. M. T. Conklin. 

The old Shawangunk Church, located about three miles west of Wallkill Village, was erected in 1737, and 





CATHOLIC CHURCH. GOSHEN. N. Y. 




THE HISTORIC BRICK CHURCH. MONTGOMHRY. N. Y. 




METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, MONTGOMERY, N. Y. 



is at present without a shepherd owing to the 
recent resignation of the Rev. Joseph Dixon. 
New Prospect Reformed Church, a daughter of 
the Reformed Church of Shawangunk. Feb., 
1S14 the Church was incorporated. The Rev. 
H. Polhemus was then pastor of the Church of 
Shawangunl<. and it was the intention of both 
congregations that he should have the pastor- 
al charge also of New Prospect, but before the 
consumation of said expectation, he was re- 
leased from his earthly labors. The Rev. E. 
O. Moffett is the present pastor, who has re- 
ceived over two hundred (200) in the member- 
ship of the Church during his pastorate. 

A few miles to the north from Wallkill vil- 
lage is the Reformed Church, New Hurley, 
N. Y. The first formal application for organi- 
zation was Sept. 29. 1767. A second signed 
by fifty-two persons March 7th, 1770 — formally 
organized Nov. 8th, 1770. During the winter 
of 1773-74 the first building was erected 30 x 40 
ft., 1811, 20 ft. added to the rear. For 
forty years they were without any means of 
warming the building except the little foot 
stoves brought by these mothers of Israel. 
1835 the old church was burned to the ground 
to give place to the present large edifice. 

As a church its historical data is replete in 
memorable incident. Its record is of a very 

high order. Generations of its departed people are entombed beside the church so dear by all the hallowed 

associations associated with these lives. The present pastor. Rev. John A. Thurston, is deeply interested 

in its spiritual life, and is 

progressive and faithful in the 

development of its social and 

financial life. 

An M. E. Church is located 

at Galeville on the west side 

of the River nearly opposite 

New Hurley, the pulpit sup- 
plied, having no settled pastor. 
Guilford Church, a short 

distance west of Gardiner was 

erected in 1833, the present 

pastor is Rev. C. E. Lasher, 

Libertyville, Ulster Co., N. Y. 
A Ref . Church of recent con- 
struction is in Gardiner village, 

Rev. Theodore F. Bayles is its 

pastor, and also the St. Charles 

(Catholic), with Rev. John B. 

McGrath as present pastor. 




REV. M. V. SCHOONMAKER. D. D., 
Forty years pastor of the Reformed Church, Walden, N. 




WALLKILL VALLEY REFORMED CHURCH. 




PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, CAMPBELL HALL. N. Y. 




PRFSP.vri l<'l,AN illl'Pi II. (.!)( )|)WI1.L, N. Y. 




REFORMED CHL'RCH. NEW HLRLHV. N. V. 



In the village of New Paltz are three churches, viz.: Methodist, with Rev. R. L. Ross, pastor, and the 
Reformed. The latter originally French Ref., was organized 1683; the French language was used until 1733; 
then the Dutch until 1800. The audience room of the present edifice is very spacious. The church numbers 
272 families and has 576 communicants, and is the largest church in the Classis of Kingston. The Rev. E. C. 
Oggel, D. D.. is the pastor. 

African M. E. Zion, Rev. C. H. Williams, pastor, organized Oct. 1858, at Clintondale; 1860 removed to 
New Paltz; rebuilt 1873. Membership 150; 40th anniversary, Oct. 16 and 17, 1898. 

At Rosendale are three churches — the Reformed, organized and erected in 1843, with Rev. Wm. Coombs 
as present pastor; an Episcopal, with Rev. Henry Barker, rector, and the St. Peters' (Catholic) with Rev. P. F. 
Mangham, pastor. 

Rosendale Plains Reformed Church is under the pastoral care of Rev. Wm. Coombs. 

Bloomingdale Ref.. organized in 1796, er.-cted 1797, and St. Remy, erected in 1864, are both under the 
pastoral care of Rev. J. Millet, Whiteport, N. y. 

The St. Patrick's Church (Catholic) of Whiteport, has Rev. F. M. Fagan for pastor. 



i6 



Dashville Falls or Rifton Glen Ref. Church, was erected in 1831. and is at present without a pastor. 
We now arrive at the north end of our Valley, with Kingston as the terminating point. This beautiful 
city contains twenty-eight organized churches, of which the following are the names, each accompanied by the 
name of the pastor, viz: First Baptist, Rev. Philip B. Strong: First Baptist (Rondout), Rev, H. W, Sherwood; 

Bethany Chapel, Rev, : Jewish Congregation, Rev, Benuet Grad, Rabbi: Jewish Congregation, Rev, 

David Goldberg, Rabbi: English Lutheran Church of Redeemer. Kingston, N. Y., organized January 24th. 1S97, 
with 184 charter members; present membership. 298; Sunday School organized June, 1897, enrollment, 2,^2: 
Luther League (Young People's Society), membership 46; Ladies' Aid Society, membership 103. Wm. F. 
Bacher, pastor. Value of property, |8,000. German Lutheran, Rev, A, Schinidtkonz; German Lutheran, 

Rev. G. A. HenUee: Methodist Episcopal, 

Rev. E. L. Hoffecker; Methodist Episcopal 
(St. James), Rev, B, C. Warren; Methodist 
Episcopal. Rev. Arthur Thompson; Methodist 
Episcopal (African) Rev. C. C. Ringgold; Meth- 
odist Episcopal (Colored), Rev. Edw. Scarboro; 
Presbyterian. Rev. C. S. Stowitts; Presby- 
terian, Rev, J, F, Williamson; Protestant 
Episcopal, Rev. Thos. Burrows; Protestant 
Episcopal (Supply), Rev, Alden Bennett: 
Church of the Holy Cross, Rev. C. M. Hall; 

First Church of Christ (Scientist 1 , Rev. 

22 Franklin St ; First Reformed ( Dutch ) , ( 1661 ) , 
Rev, J, G, Van Slyke; Second Reformed 
(Dutch), (1848). Rev. T. B. Seeley; Re- 
formed Church of the Comforter (1770), Rev. 
S. E. Winnie; Roman Catholic. Rev, Francis 
Fabian; Roman Catholic, Rev, D, P, Ward; 
Roman Catholic, Rev. R. L. Burtsell; Roman 
Catholic. Rev. E. M. Sweeney: Roman Catho- 
lid. Rev. M. Kueken; Union Children'sChurch, 

Rev. . 

The First Reformed Church of Kingston is 
undoubtedly the oldest organization in the 
Valley, around which cluster many historic 
memories. The early settlers with the daunt- 
less spirit and Holland courage, settling as 
early as 1665, near Kingston, at the mouth of 
the Wallkill, were earnest and devoted in their 
religion. Their names have become a syn- 
onym for stern morality on ardent church lines. 
The ruling passion seemed the love of Church 
and God. Faith to them was more than the homeland, and their sturdy religion became rich heritage of their 
new country. These factors, touched and entwined together making and transmitting still each its element of 
blood and virture close together in this very valley of the Wallkill, to this day betray their lineage. The first 
edifice was erected in 1661, at the corner of what is now known as Main and Wall Sts. It was built of logs and 
regularly dedicated; in 1679 a stone building was erected, and the church was incorporated in 1719. The in- 
terior of the building was consumed by tire, when Kingston was burned in 1777; the building remained stand- 
ing until 1S32. A stone building was again erected: this has been supplanted hv the present modern structure 
erected in 1851. 

NOTE— We are indebted to Mr. Charles E. Stickney of Deckertown, N. J., for data and information relat- 
ing to the Churches south of Goshen, 




REV, JOHN A. THURSTON, NEW HURLEY, N, Y. 



Our Valley contains many religious denominations, but only those who accept 
Christ as their chief corner stone, may expect a Union of Creeds in Heaven as there are 
no Sects in that Holy place. What a grand life it would be if we could all 




THE OLD KINOMUN DL FCII kirORMED CHURCH. 

' So live, that when our summons comes to join 
The innumerable caravan which moves 
To that mysterious realm where each shall take 
His chamber in the silent halls of death. 
Go not like the quarry slave at night. 
Scourged to his dungeon ; but, sustained and soothed 
By an unfaltering trust, approach the grave 
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 
Aboiit him, and lies down to pleasant dreams." 



19 



The Huguenot Memorial House, New Paltz, N, Y, 

ALFRED HARCOURT. 

THE old colonial building, widely known as the Hasbrouck house, has recently been purchased by the 
Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, Monumental Society of New Paltz, for the purpose of preserving it, both on 
account of its historic interest, and because of its suitability as a place for the storing of historic documents and 
ancestral relics. 

The old, steeped roofed homestead, which is full of interest to any one who takes pride in a Huguenot an- 
cestry, was erected in 1712, and with the exception of the DuBois house, which has lost much of its historic 
interest through being remodeled, it was and is the finest of the seven homesteads erected by the patentees and 
their children. 

The first point of interest about the Hasbrouck house is that it is entirely hand made. The nails were 

hammered out by the vil- 
lage blacksmith, and the 
boards were planed by the 
home carpenter. The wide 
chimneys, made to receive 
the large sticks of fire- 
wood without splitting, 
were built of bricks brought 
from Holland to Kingston, 
and drawn from there to 
New Paltz over the primi- 
tive roads of two centuries 
ago. 

The rooms of the lower 
floor on the north side 
were originally used as a 
store. Here were kept the 
few necessities of the 
early settlers, and here 
also from time to time 
liquor was sold. The bar, 
a large slab of wood, 
was placed across one cor- 
ner of the room from the chimney to the window sills. On it is s till "chalked up" a genuine account of a 
sale of rum. Near the chimney is a closet which might easily escape notice and which, itis said, was 
used as a money drawer. There are two other rooms on the lower floor which were used as living 
rooms by the family, and which were large and commodious for a house of that time. The family rooms on the 
second floor are of good size; and the heavy beams and slanting ceilings give them a truly colonial appearance. 
The beginning of the movement which resulted in the purchase of the house this winter, was made in 
April, 1894. Until his recent death, the late Edmund Elting was an earnest and prominent worker in the matter, 
serving the society in the capacity of secretary. 

The present oflicers of the society are: President, Ralph LeFevre; First Vice-President. Jesse Elting; 
Secretary, Jesse M. Elting; Treasurer, Jacob M. Hasbrouck. The trustees of the society are Louis Bevier, A. 
T. Clearwater, G. M. Sharpe, Irving Elting, Frank Hasbrouck, Joseph E. Hasbrouck, Jesse Elting, Jacob LeFevre. 
Jonathan Deyo, Solomon DuBois, Abram D. Broadhead and Jacob M. Hasbrouck. 




THE HUGUENOT MEMORIAL HOUSE NEW PALTZ. N. Y. 



Joseph Brant^ the Chief of the Mohawks^ who command- 
ed at the Battle of Minisink, 

BY HARRISON W. NANNY. 

JOSEPH BRANT — TAYENDANEGEA is a household name in Orange county, and he who bore it looms a dark 
lurid figure against the background of our Revolutionary history. A pure blooded Mohawk, his education and 
training was had in the schools of the white man. In the fierce warfare which England waged to coerce her re- 
bellious colonies into obedience, his part has been much misunderstood. He was never, in any sense of the 
word, a border ruffian, nor is he to be reckoned of the ilk of those who, within the memory of men hardly beyond 
middle age, made the term a reproach in the Kansas-Missouri trouble, just prior to the Civil War. 

On the contrary Brant was a Christian and a member of the Episcopal Church and aided in the transla- 
tion of the Prayer Book, the Acts of the Apostles and Catechism into the Mohawk tongue. One of the earliest 
recorded incidents concerning him is by Rev. Dr. Wheelock. a clergyman in the Mohawk valley, in which he 
says "that in the French War Brant went out with a company against the Indians, (these were allies of the 
French) in which he behaved so much like the christian and the soldier, that he gained great esteem." 

He was presented at the court of the king in London, and was the friend of Boswell. His portrait, painted 
in 1776, has been preserved at Warwick, and a copy of same accompanies this sketch. 

When the trouble between England and the Colonies began, he was urged to remain neutral, but refused. 
He asserted that his race was bound by the faith pledged in ancient treaties to their great father, the king, who 
had defended them against the French, in the struggle for the dominion over this continent, to aid him against 
his enemies, and he loyally kept that pledge. But the hand on the dial was not to be turned backward. In the 
providence of God a new nation was to have birth, in which crowns, scepters and royalty were to have no place, 
and Joseph Brant was to be put down on the record by the troubled colonists as the most blood-thirsty and cruel 
of those who sought to compel their obedience to law and an established government. To this belief the disaster 
at Minisink, which brought death to many a Goshen family, in a no small degree contributed. But it is not so. 
War is not humane, "war is hell," and the part acted by Joseph Brant as a commander of men in armed hostil- 
ity to other men acting from a different point of view, can in no wise be considered as more culpable than that of 
Grant or Sherman. To him, as well as to them, is laid no charge of personal cruelty or rapine. Some of the 
followers of each, we know, left behind them a trail dishonorable to human instincts, and to whom either of the 
three commanders would have meted death as the penalty, if the offender were known. 

The massacre at Wyoming was mainly at the hands of white men, yet the same has been laid at the door 
of Brant, and Campbell, in his "Gertrude of Wyoming," sings: 

"The Mammoth comes — the foe — the Monster Brant — 
With all his howling desolating band." 

A cherished tradition of one of the oldest families in Orange county — the FuUerton— relates of an ances- 
tress, Mary Whittaker, who at the age of twelve years escaped the slaughter at Wyoming, thus: (Eager is 
quoted page 414) "Brant took her by the hair of the head and held her up by one hand and painted her face 
with red paint with the other and then let her go, telling her that was the mark of safety." On the same oc- 
casion, (Eager is again quoted, page 415)"A little boy, John Finch, also an Orange county ancestor, was saved 
without being painted. This little boy laughed at the odd and grotesque appearance of the Indians, and one 
raised his tomahawk to strike him down. Brant saw the motion of the Indian, seized and ordered him not to in- 

21 



jure the boy." While in both these incidents is found the kernel of that which the after-time has conceded |to 
Brant, his gentleness and humane disposition, it is necessary to dispel this romance of these two old families. 
If any one fact has been established in history, it is that Brant was not at Wyoming, and the poet Campbell, in 
the notes to the second edition of "Gertrude of Wyoming." remarks that "since writing the poem 1 have had 
access to documents which completely satisfy me that Brant was not at that scene of desolation." And adds, 
"I also ascertained that Brant strove to mitigate the cruelty of Indian warfare, and his name remains in the poem 

a pure and declared character of fiction." 

An incident, not unlike those above noted, is 
preserved in the tradition of the Van Auken 
school-house. During the raid of 1779, at 
Minisink, the girls stood lamenting around the 
dead body of their teacher, and bemoaning 
their own coming doom, when a strong muscu- 
lar Indian suddenly came along and with a 
brush dashed some black paint across their 
aprons, as the symbol of safety. "This 
(Eager is being quoted, page 3S9) was Brant, 
and the little daughters of the settlers were 
saved." These girls impressed the paint up- 
on the boys and they too were passed un- 
harmed. 

In the official report made of the battle of 
Minisink, among other absurdities, it is grave- 
ly asserted that Brant carried off a number of 
children as prisoners. Happily, for the truth 
of history as well as humanity's sake, a pris- 
oner, the only one captured, Capt. John Wood, 
of the Goshen company of Col. Tusten's reg- 
iment, left behind him a journal of the events 
following the battle, and his journey while a 
captive with Capt. Brant, as he terms him, 
and those under him, to the Indian country, 
which disposes of the question to the contrary. 
And this journal well sustains Brant's official 
report of the Minisink raid and battle, in which 
he says, "we in no wise injured women or 
children." 

It is the desire of the author of this mono- 
graph to refrain from any discussion of the 
Minisink battle, as that properly belongs to a 
work now in course of preparation for the 
publisher. 

Yet it may be remarked that, since Goshen's 
first commemoration of that event, which was 
the subject of an article in the Souvenir of 1898. 
much has been brought out which reveals a 
tale of the cowardice and flight of a portion 
of the forces which marched to oppose Brant, and which in numbers e.\ceeded those of the latter, and thus left 
the Goshen regiment to annihilation. 

Another incident, no less characteristic of Brant, is preserved in a letter written by him to Gen. Van Ren- 
selaer, which accompanied a returned captive girl, in which he says: "I send you by one of my runners, the 




JOSEPH BRANT— TAYENDANEGEA. 
The Great Chieftan of the Si.t Nations, from the original painting i 
i77g, by G. Romney, in the collection of the Earl of Warwick, Ene 




VALLEY AND STREAM, ESSEX COUNTY, N. J. 

child, which he will deliver that you may know that whatever others may do, I do not make war on women and 
children. I am sorry to say that I have those engaged with me in the service who are more savage than the 
savages themselves." A sad commentary of the red man upon the Tory. 

"Historical accuracy is a plant of slow growth," says a historical writer. The same might be observed 
concerning biography. Washington is asserted to have been a Christian, a man of prayer. That Howe, Clinton, 
Burgoyne and Cornwallis were followers of the Divine Master, no American historian has yet put upon the record. 
Praying Generals always belong to the same side as their biographers. Brant has had no biographer of his race 
or blood, yet a white historian has written that Brant, prominent among those of his day, was devoted to 
christianizing, civilizing and uplifting his race, and declared himself as having always striven to avoid the un- 
necessary shedding of blood, and to avert the cruelties incident to war. 

Three generations have been upon the stage since Joseph Brant ceased to be a factor among the affairs of 
the living. The fury of political passion which marked his era is dead; the bitterness engendered by the loss 
through war, of the results of years of labor to the border settlers, has been obliterated by the county which 
years of peace has brought to their descendants, and to these there lingers only the tradition 

"Of far off unhappy things. 
And battles long ago." 

Prejudice has been yielding to the results of calm and cold historical research and investigation, and an 
impartial judgment can now be rendered by the tribunal sitting at the dawn of the twentieth century, a decision 
which for fairness, was impossible to be accorded during the years so closely allied with the events, of which the 
bitter memories had not passed away. 



23 



St* Andrews, 



MISS MAY HUNT. 

THIS quiet peaceful hamlet is located in the northwest corner of the Town of Montgomery on a patent of 
3,000 acres, granted to Henry Wileman in the year 1709, within the then County of Ulster. The hamlet 
is rich in tradition and interest, being one of the oldest within the present borders of Orange. 

Mr. Wileman was the first settler and divided the patent into lots in 1712. The settlement adopted his 
name and was l<nown as Wilemantown. His nationality was Irish. He was a Free Mason and a lawyer, the 
first admitted to practice (1727) in Orange Co. It was upon his land in 1774 that Log Church was erected and 
a plot of land adjoining set aside as a burial place. The property is now owned by Mr. George Dunn, and the 
location was in the corner of the field on the fork of the roads leading from St. Andrews to Walden and Wallkill. 
He was a benefactor of the church, and it is here in the old yard that his dust reposes with that of many other 
early settlers. 

It is a much to be lamented fact that all vestige of this ancient, burial place should have been destroyed 
over half a century ago. 

Under the pastoral care of the Rev. John Sayre in the year 1770, Log Church became incorporated under 
the name of St. Andrews, and a new edifice erected in the southeast of St. Andrews Cemetery. The hamlet 
then assumed the church name, and it was here that the family of Lieutenant Governor Colden attended worship. 
A visit to the cemetery which adjoined the church reveals the fact that it has served as a burial place for over a 
century and a quarter. 

Here rest the remains of the Dorcases'. Galation's. Banks', Gee's and Graham's. Capt. George Graham 
being interred 1774 — families all connected with the early history of the church. Here also we find the graves 
of heroes of the Revolutionary and the Civil War. Peace to their ashes, and let us hope that this (God's Acre) 
may never share the fate of the old Episcopal yard. 

Previous to the location of the new church, a number of buildings had been erected. The principal ones 
being a school house built of mud and logs, located on the old road leading to King's Hill, opposite the present 
residence of Mr. Chauncey Radiker, a tavern on the brink of the brook and a store. Here also was established 
one of the first Post Offices of the county. 

St. Andrews is not lacking in bloody historical events. It was here that an Indian massacre took place 
at the beginning of the French and Indian war. Gen. Clinton as Captain was engaged in the attack, and seven- 
teen Indians were killed. Again at the beginning of the Revolution. Lieutenant Governor Colden came very 
near being shot by the indignant Whigs as he attempted to read the King's decree. South of the hamlet in 
front of the residence of Mr. Corsey, is the site of an Indian fort, and to the west of the village during the 
winter of 1782, a company of Revolutionary soldiers laid encamped. It was while acting as a special messen- 
ger from this encampment to the Commander-in-chief at Newburgh, that John McLean afterward Commissary 
General of this State, was attacked, taken from his horse, gagged, tied to a tree and the papers referring to his 
errand taken. He was rescued the following morning. 

We still find many of the descendants of the old colonial families here. Arthur McKinney located here in 
1745, and a portion of his original tract is still owned and occupied by his great-great-grand-son. Soon after 
came the Beattie's, Snyder's, Kidd's, McKissock's, Coe's and Crowell's— descendants of which are still num- 
erous about the village. Robert Crowell purchased the King's Hill farm, then a wilderness, about 1771, from 
the St. Andrews Church. 

Approximate to the village is the old stone house built previous to the Revolution, occupied by Mr. Charles 
Thorne. Four generations of the Thorne family family have been born in this house. 

I leave many other points of interest to be gleaned by the local historian, of which space here is to 
limited to mention. 




'THE SUNSHINE OF THE VALLEY. 




w^ 



RESIDENCE OF REV. ROBERT H. MCCREADY, CHESTER, N. Y., A FORMER PASTOR OF THE HISTORIC 
BRICK CHURCH, MONTGOMERY, N. Y. 



26 




Rev. Robert Houston I^lcGready, Ph. D. 



DeV. ROBERT HOUSTON MCCREADY. PH. D., was born at Pittsburgh, Pa., July 12, 1853. At the age 
* »^ of fourteen his father died, and in that same year he began life for himself as a store boy. At sixteen 
he made a public confession of faith, and became a member of the church. He received the average English 
education at the public schools, later he studied under Prof. Love. He graduated from the Western University 
of Pennsylvania, June, 1870. One preparatory and three college years were spent in West Geneva College, 
Ohio. Previous to his University course, he spent the required four years in the Alleghany Seminary, and 
graduated in the summer of 1883. He received calls from New Castle, Pa., New Concord, O., Oil City, Pa., 
Barnesville, N. B., and Coldenham, N. Y., accepting the latter, March 6, 1884. Later he filled pastorates at 
Prospect Hill, Eighty Second St. near Park Ave., N. Y. In 1890 he accepted the pastorate of the Old Brick 
Church at Montgomery. 

He was married to Miss Bell H. Beattie, daughter of Rev. David Beattie of Scotchtown, N. Y., June 
21, 1S88. 

The writer of this sketch is fully acquainted with his earnest zeal in his ministry at Coldenham and 
Montgomery — of the good fellowship existing between pastor and people, and his watchful care over the interests 
of the community at large. His name is honored and revered among the citizens of the Valley of the Wallkill. 
Mr. McCready is the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, at Chester, N. Y. 



27 




Rev. Robert Bruce Glark. 



THE REV. ROBERT BRUCE CLARK has been pastor of the historic Goshen Church since January 1st, 1886, 
and is the successor of the Rev. Dr. Snodgrass, who in his day was amongst the famous Presbyterian 
divines, and was settled at Goshen durng the last thirty-six years of his venerable life. Mr. Clark is a grad- 
uate of Amherst College, Union Seminary, and is identified with various interests of the beautilul village in 
which he lives. The Presbyterian Church of Goshen was organized in the year 1720. Three edifices have been 
used by the congregation since that time. The first was built sometime between 1720 and 1730; the second was 
built in 1812, and the present commanding structure was dedicated 1871. It is massive, commodious, beautiful 
for situation; of solid, rough stone to the top of its spire of 186 feet, comfortably seating 1,200 people, and in 
the midst of a large and beautiful park in the centre of the village. The 175th anniversary of the church was 
celebrated in the Spring of 1895. 




(iharles Edward I^lillspau^h. 

CHARLES EDWARD MILLSPAUGH was horn on the homesteaJ. in the town of Goshen. Educated at the 
Farmers' Hall Academy. Goshen, graduating from that institution. Six years were spent in the employ of 
W. L. Vail, a merchant of Florida. N. Y. A partnership was formed under the firm name of Merriam & Mills- 
paugh. in the village of Goshen, in 1860, engaging in the general dry goods business, which continued until 1872, 
being then dissolved by mutual consent. Mr. Millspaugh immediately entered into partnership with D. Redtield, 
under the firm name of Redfield & Millspaugh. continuing until the death of Mr. Redfield. since which time the 
business h^s been conducted by Mr. Millspaugh. 

Few men are more useful or prominent in church work. For many years he has filled the position of trus- 
tee of the Goshen Presbyterian Church, with the office of Clerk and Treasurer, and Chairman of several import- 
ant committees of the Church. For more than twenty years he has been the honored Superintendent of the 
Sunday School, and is the best known and most prominent Sunday School worker in the county, frequently serv- 
ing as President of the Orange County Sunday School Association, organized May" 22, 1861. 

The writer of this sketch was intimately associated with Mr. Millspaugh in this work for a period of ten 
years, and can attest to the great services rendered, which resulted in the general revival of Sunday School in- 
terest throughout the county. 

When the limitations of this life is reached, when the tabernacle of the body is broken, like the jar that 
holds the roses, though broken in fragments, the perfume of the roses lingers, so the memory of a good and use- 
ful life will cling like green vines about the broken fragments of the past. 



29 




Rev. J. H. Thompson. 



REV. J. H. THOMPSON was horn at Bemis Heights, New York, April 28, 1862. He prepared for college at 
The Hudson River Institute, at Claverack, New York, from which he graduated in 1883. In the fall of the 
same year he entered Hamilton College, at Clinton, New York, and graduated in the class of '87. He entered 
Princeton Theological Seminary in the fall of 1887, and graduated in 1890. He was ordained to the Gospel Min- 
istry by the Presbytery of Troy, New York, in May 1890; and entered temporarily in home mission work in 
Northern Idaho. On September 4, 1890, he was married to Miss S. Cornelia Lansing, daughter of the Rev. A. 
G. Lansing, of the Reformed Church. In the spring of 1891, he was called to the pastorate of the Goodwill 
Presbyterian Church of Montgomery, New York, where he still remains. 



3° 




John G. Howell. 



THE father of the subject this sketch was a native of the old town of Goshen, where he was born inl797. His 
father, Silas Howell, was one of the many early emigrants from Long Island, who, in themselves 
and their descendants, have so largely contributed to the substantial elements of our country's population 
and worth. He removed from Goshen to Newburgh with his father, and located on the Newburgh and Cochecton 
Turnpike, and in that vicinity he spent nearly the whole of his long and worthy life of 85 years among the 
notable sons of Orange County, which to enumerate them would be legion. The subject of our sketch is the 
younger son of R. and O. Belknap Howell, born July 23d, 1S29, on the farm where he now resides, being a man 
of sterling character, keeping abreast of the times by strictly attending to the business of agriculture, with a 
desire to make two blades of grass grow where one grew before. He is eminently successful in his business, 
and is one of the well-to-do men of the town. He has been a member of the Goodwill Church for 30 years, and 
trustee for about 15 years. His family consist of two children, David B. Howell and Sarah Francis Howell. 
Both are married and have homes of their own. 



31 




Rev. William Wyckoff 8chonip. 

REV. WILLIAM WYCKOFF SCHOMP, the youngest son of David G. and Phtebe A. (Todd) Schomp, was 
born on his father's farm, near Bedminster, Somerset County, N. J. He is of Holland descent— the first 
of his name coming to this country in 1672 and settling in Bushwick, Long Island; he is thus entitled to be and 
is a member of the Holland Society of New York. 

He prepared for college at Rev. William Cornell's Classical Institute, Somerville, N. J. After passing the 
June examinations, he entered Rutger's College at New Brunswick, N. J., in the fall of 1872, graduating in June, 
1876. Having had the ministry in view before entering college, he became a student in the Theological Seminary 
and graduated from that institution in May, 1879. After a summer's rest, he accepted a call to become the 
pastor of the Reformed Church of Glenham. Dutchess County, N. Y., and began his work there November 16, 
1879. His pastorate at Glenham was noted, like each succeeding one, for harmonious, quiet work, and the 
forming of most delightful friendships. The first pastorate closed November 8, 1885, under conditions similar to 
those with which each succeeding pastorate has ended, viz., with an urgent call to another field and earnest 
solicitations to remain in his present charge. Having received and accepted a call to become the pastor of the 
Reformed Churches of Marbletown, (Stone Ridge, N. Y.), and North Marhletown, ULsterCo., N. Y., he began his 
labors in his new charge November 15, 1885. After a successful and laborious term of seven years' service 
with these churches, he resigned to accept a call to the First Reformed Church of Athens, Greene Co., N. Y., 
and commenced his service with that church January 8, 1893. He was installed as pastor of the Reformed 
Church, at Walden, September 1, 1897, preaching his first sermon on the following Sunday (5th j. 



32 




Henry 8uydani. 



LJENRY SUYDAM was born on Long Island in 1S26, son of Moses and Mary Schoonmaker Suydam, whose 
* * early ancestors all came from Holland. He was educated in Brooklyn, graduated under Doctor Campbell, 
who later, became Professor of the Theological Seminary of New Brunswick, N. J. The occupation of his 
early life, was raising produce for New York markets. In 1852 he married Lemma Anna, daughter of Henry 
Bergen of Long Island, later, of Orange County. In 1854, while visiting with his uncle, the late Rev. M. V. 
Schoonmaker of Walden, he decided to locate in the Wallkill Valley, and bought the farm of the late Joseph 
Hasbrouck Decker, two miles south of Walden, where he continued farming for thirty-five years, bringing his 
farm to a high state of cultivation — after which time, his four children being married, he retired from farming, 
coming to the village of Walden where he and his wife reside with their youngest daughter, Mary Ella, wife of 
T. D. Barker. After coming to Orange County he became an active member of the Reformed Church at Walden, 
serving for many successive years as an Elder. In 1860. the Wallkill Valley Cemetery Association was formed, 
he being one of the trustees, and continued a trustee until 1888, when he was elected its President, and has 
since then devoted much of his time personally, overseeing and helping to beautify the city of the dead. In 
1888, about twenty-five additional acres were bought, and have since been paid for by the Cemetery Association, 
and at the present time, are undergoing extensive improvements, it being the aim of the Association to make 
it one of the finest cemeteries in Orange County. 



33 




James T. Ir>vin. 



JAMES T. IRWIN was horn in the town of Montgomery. January 14th, 1S30, the youngest son of the late 
Edward Erwin and Rachael Traphagen, and grandson of John Irwin of Revolutionary fame, his father being a 
farmer. He acquired some l<nowledge of farm life until 1845, when he removed to Newburgh, and learned the 
trade of a carriage trimmer, in which business he is engaged at No. 7 South Water Street. Newburgh, N. Y. In 
June, 1S52. Mr. Irwin married Miss Catharine La Tour of Newburgh. Mrs. irwin died April 3. 1863. He was 
again married to Miss Prudence McMinn, of Newburgh, October 19, 1865. Mr. Irwin has been a member of 
Trinity M. E. Church for the past fifty years, and for many years a member of the official board of the church. 
He is a member of Highland Lodge of Odd Fellows, and is a past Noble Grand, and past District Deputy Grand 
Master of Orange District, No. 1. Mr. Irwin is an active and earnest worker in the Order, in which he takes 
much pride. He is frenuently called upon to deliver addresses at public meetings of the order in Newburgh, as 
well as in other places, and is well and favorably known to the past and present Grand Officers of the State. 



34 




James W. Barnes. 



1417553 



Tames W. BARNES was horn at Middle Hope, Orange Co., N. Y., April 15th, 1859, and passed his boyhood 
*-* days on the farm of his parents, Nathaniel and Martha Waring Barnes. He obtafned his early education 
at the district school at that place, afterward attending the Newburgh Academy, finishing with a special course 
at W. L. Chapman's private school. He began his business life by accepting the employment of Gillies & 
Needam. afterwards Gillies, Needam & Sands, February 1st, 1876, continuing with them until September 1st, 
1880, when the firm was dissolved. Mr. Sands withdrew to form a partnership with Mr. Barnes, under the 
firm name of Sands & Barnes, which started in the general dry goods business at the present location No. 99 
Water Street, and continued five years. Mr. Barnes succeeding to the business, formed a partnership with his 
brother-in-law, Mr. W. N. Owen, which continued for one year, since which time he has conducted the business 
alone. He married Miss Sarah F. Owen, March 29th. 1S82. They have one son, N. Waring Barnes, who has 
just taken his e.xaminations for admission to Columbia University, New York City. Mr. Barnes has been prom- 
inently identified with Trinity M. E. Church for a long time. He has been assistant superintendent of the 
Sunday School, Steward, and for the last eight years a member of the Board of Trustees. Mr. Barnes is a man 
of uncommon common sense, of dignified and polite demeanor. He vs kindly in spirit, is true as steel to his 
friends. He is tireless in his integrity — he is incompatible in his integrity. He has business ability, has good 
business habits, commanding the esteem of his fellows, and deser\'es the success with which he has been 
favored. 



35 




Geori^e B. Harris. 



GEORGE B. HARRIS, the youngest son of George F. Harris and Eveline Youngblood, was born near Pine 
Bush, N. Y. After graduating at the public school, he attended the Albany Business College, and entered 
his brother's store at BuUville, N. Y., and conducted the same for several years. April. 1898. he succeeded 
James S. Eaton in an old established business at Walden, N. Y., where Mr. Harris now conducts an e.xtensive 
grocery store. September, 1894, at Circleville, N. Y.. he married Miss Minnie W. Shaw, daughter of Robert 
W. Shaw. Mr. Harris is a member of the Reformed Church at Bloomingburgh, N. Y., and of the Masonic 
Lodge of Walden. 



36 




/Ilex. Goldberg. 



A LEX. GOLDBERG, of whom the above is a strikingly good Mkeness, was bom In Kingston, N. Y., in 1861, 
■'»■ and at the age of four years removed with his parents to Poughkeepsle. He was educated in the public 
schools at the latter place, and entered the clothing business at the age of 15 years, and removed to Newburgh 
in 1882, where he was engaged in the same line as partner, and finally sole owner of the recognized leading 
establishment of the city. In the winter of 1897-'98, he removed his business to the store No. 83-85 Water 
Street — a much larger and more modern building, where he now conducts an establishment without a peer 
between New York and Albany, and prides himself as an Outfitter for man or boy, and greatly enlarged the 
scope of his business. The mammoth show windows of Mr. Goldberg's store are one of the attractions of the 
city. He has always been accredited as one of the city's most substantial and enterprising business men, with 
the interests of his adopted city uppermost in all his efforts. He is prominently identified with social and 
fraternal interests in the city, and his intelligence and good fellowship make him a popular citizen with many 
warm, personal friends. 



37 




John Schwartz. 

A MONG the prominent citizens of German birth in the city of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., none holds a higher 
■**• place in the estimation of the community than the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch. He is 
extensively engaged in the tobacco business, and has an enviable reputation for integrity and fair dealing as 
well as for thrift and enterprise. 

Mr. Schwartz was born in Bavaria, Germany, September 9th, 1S39. His father, John Schwartz, died 
when our subject was a child; when ten years of age he came with his mother to New York City. In January, 
1850, they came to Poughkeepsie, and after attending school for a short time, he entered the cigar business' 
which he has made his life work. 

On May 6th, 1S60, Mr. Schwartz married Miss Bayer, a native of Trov, N. Y. They have four children 
all sons. On May 1st, 1S64, he succeeded Mr Joseph Bayer, his father-in-law, in the business of manufac- 
turing cigars and tobaccos. This business is now carried on, in greatly enlarged proportions by Mr Schwartz 
and three sons, constituting the firm of John Schwartz & Sons, they having become partners February 1st 1889 



38 




/Idam Wiley. 

THE subject of this sketch, Mr. Adam Wiley, was born at Croton Falls, Westchester County, New York, on 
the 9th day of May, 1849, his father being James Wiley and his mother Rebecca Ritchie. 

Several years of Mr. Wiley's early life were spent at school at Croton Falls, N. Y., and Mill Plains, 
Ct., but, his father dying when he was fourteen years of age, without leaving any means of support for a large 
family, young Adam found it necessary to discontinue his school career and seek remunerative employment. 

The first few years of his new venture were spent at farming, but learning of a position open in one of 
the livery stables in Brewster, and as his mind possessed a natural bent for horses, he made application and 
procured the situation. His employment here lasted five years, and during that time he had an opportunity to 
study veterinary under Dr. Amos Smith, a then well known veterinarian. The instruction thus received has 
proved of such value to Mr. Wiley, that he has won a meritorious record as a highly competent doctor of horses 
and cattle, and for which proficiency he was recently awarded a Diploma by the N. Y. State Board of Regents. 

For the past twenty-two years Mr. Wiley has worked for the Borden interests, and for the last fourteen 
years he has been employed directly by the Borden family, the latter five years of which, as superintendent at 
" Home Farm." 

On November 8th, 1873, he was joined in marriage with Rebecca Sweetman, of Brewster, Putnam County, 
New York, and as a result of such union, there were four sons and two daughters, three sons and one daughter 
still living. 



39 




James L. (>ra>vford. 



JAMES L. CRAWFORD, the subject of this sketch, was born at Searsville, Orange County, N. Y. He 
developed much mechanical sl<ill early in life, and when his school days were passed, naturally chose the 
carpenter's trade, at which he made very rapid progress, and soon had the reputation of being a very skillful 
and proficient workman, which naturally led to his rapid advancement in his chosen work, now extending over 
four decades. In 1870 Mr. Crawford became a resident of Walden, since which date he has been largely identi- 
fied with its building interests. He built the Episcopal Church at Walden, constructed the tall spire on the 
Brick Church at Montgomery, and at different periods made many extensive repairs and additions to the New 
York and Walden Knife Works. He has erected a great many of the residences of Walden and its environs. 
Mr. Crawford has always been a loyal Republican and an earnest and effective worker in behalf of his party. 
He served as town Assessor for a term of years, and filled the position in a fair and impartial manner. For 
about thirty years he has been a member of the Odd Fellows, and has passed the chairs, is prominent in the 
order of the K. of P., and a representative citizen of the Valley of the Wallkill. 



40 




James R. I^lciiullou^h. 

Tames R. MCCULLOUGH, whose portrait is given above, is a native of the Wallkill Valley, being born near 
*J Walden, April 25th, 1839, and contiuued to live there (with brief intervals; until September, 1887, when he 
removed with his family to Newburgh where he still resides. Mr. McCullough spent many years of his life in 
the grocery business in or near Walden. In 1870 he was appointed U. S. Census Enumerator for the towns of 
Montgomery and Crawford, and for the five years following was employed by J. S. Taylor & Co., lumber and 
coal dealers. He is and always has been an ardent Republican, was twice elected Collector of the Town of 
Montgomery, and for many years was elected Clerk of the Board of Trustees of the village, also Inspector of 
Election for the town. He was active in the Fire Department, being a member since 1860; he was a charter 
member of Enterprise Steamer Co., when it was organized in 1872, and his name still appears on their roll of 
honorary members. He joined Freeman's Lodge, No. 170, 1. O. O. F. in 1863, filled all the different chairs in 
the Lodge, and was chosen in 1876, D. D. G. M. for the District then comprising the counties of Orange and 
Sullivan, containing seventeen Lodges. He was a charter member of Orange Lodge. No. 2470. Knights of 
Honor, and the first Dictator of the Lodge, and being a veteran of the Civil War, was a charter member of Fair- 
child Post, No. 564, G. A. R., and is at present a member of Newburgh Lodge, No. 309, F. & A. M. 
Mr. McCullough is now, and has been for some years employed by the Board of Public Works of the City of 
Newburgh, as Assistant Superintendent of Streets. In his leisure moments he still takes great interest in the 
fraternal, religious and political organizations of his adopted home. 



41 




Philip /lyers. 



THE subject of this sketch was horn at Libertyville, Ulster County, New York, November 3rd, 1857. His 
parents were Phillip and Sarah A. Ayers, who were direct descendants of the French Huguenbts, the 
sturdy pioneers who planted a christian civilization in the Hudson River and Wallkill Valleys. Early in life Mr. 
Ayers chose the millers trade, and under the instruction of H. Weed, of the Royal Mills, Loyd, N. Y., soon be- 
came proficient in his business, remaining for a period of seventeen years. In 1893 Mr. Ayers, with his family, 
moved to the Borden Home Farm, and has charge of one of the largest and best equiped mills in the state; hav- 
ing the latest and most improved machinery. The products of the St. Elmo Mills are noted for their purity and 
great excellence. 



42 




Wesley Wait, I). ». 8. 



WESLEY WAIT, D. D. S., was born near Montgomery, N. Y., May 15th, 1861, son of Thomas and Mary 
Mould Wait. He received his education at the district school and Montgomery Academy. In 1881 he 
entered New York College of Denistry, and eight months after was appointed first assistant to Professor J. B. 
Littig. In 1883 he graduated one year ahead of his class, his degree not being conferred until 1884, and began 
the practice of his profession at Newburgh in 1885. He is the proprietor of the Consumers Ice Company, now 
leased to the Muchattoes Lake Ice Company, also of the Newburgh Floral Company, having store on Second 
Street and greenhouses at West Newburgh, which contain thirty thousand feet of glass. He still practices the 
profession of denistry. From 1890 to 1893 he represented New York State in the American Association of Invent- 
ors and Manufacturers, and in 1S91 represented this Congressional District at the Patent Centennial at Wash- 
ington, D. C being the inventor and owner of several valuable inventions. In 1885 Mr. Wait was married to 
Emily S. Rawlins, youngest daughter of General John H. Rawlins, chief of staff to General U. S. Grant, and ex- 
Secretary of War. Mrs. Wait died March 25, 1897, leaving one child, a daughter, Lucille R. His residence is 
on Grand Avenue, Balmville, N. Y. 



43 




Harrison Wheeler >!anny. 

HARRISON WHEELER NANNY, whose monograph of Brant appears in this annual of the Souvenir, is a well- 
known Goshen lawyer. Beside his reputation as such, he is reckoned by the "canny kin" as their con- 
gener in classical and literary scholarship, also being conceded a foremost place among the younger historians of 
Orange county. His many addresses before historical and literary societies and on occasions of public cere- 
monies, have won high encomiums from critical scholars and historians. Mr. Nanny was born in the town of 
Warwick where his family settled long prior to the Revolution. He received the baccalaureate degree at Union 
College where he graduated in the class of 1868, and immediately began the study of the law. He is of direct 
Welsh descent and of family devoted for generations to the profession of arms. His ancestor Capt. John Nanny 
raised a company, in the year 1645. for service against King Charles 1, which was captured at Dolgelly, North 
Wales, and had presented to him the alternative of a political trial or an embarkation to America. Each suc- 
ceeding generation in this country has been engaged in its wars, and to Mr. Nanny is due the organization of 
the Orange County Chapter, of the Sons of the Revolution. His father Capt. Abram L. Nanny was well known 
during the days of the Civil War, as the Provost Marshal of the then 11th District, composed of the counties of 
Orange and Sullivan, under whose direction an enrollment of those liable to military duty, and a draft of 2,000 
men therefrom, was made at Goshen, during a period of tierce political excitement, in 1863, at which time he was 
sustained by the 5th Regiment of Wisconsin and the 2d Connecticut Battery. 

It was Mr. Nanny's desire to enter the Military Academy at West Point, but an affliction which resulted 
in permanent infirmity intervened on the eve of his appointment, and the would-be soldier was sent to College 
and reluctantly turned to another pursuit. 



44 




James 1^1. Walker. 

Tames M., son of Jacob Walker and Mary C. Durkee, was born at Walker Valley, Ulster Co.. February 
•J 2.S, 1S45. He was educated in the public schools and completed a course of training in the Newburgh 
Business College. He assisted his father in all his business interests, in the store, on the farm, at the saw- 
mill and in all kinds of lumbering. In 1H65 he took charge of the market wagon route from Walker Valley to 
Newburgh, selling farm produce and shipping butter to New York by way of Wm. K. Mailler's barge. 
In 1S68 and '69, he tilled the same position for Mr. C. Barnhart, to whom his father had sold the store and 
business in Walker Valley. In LS/O his father built the three-story brick building on Montgomery Street, 
Walden, and on May 9th of that year it was opened for business under the firm name of Jacob Walker &. Son. 
In 1877 they enlarged the building, and in 1880, Jacob Walker, the senior member of the firm retired and James 
S. Eaton took his place, and the firm of Walker & Eaton was formed. Again the building was enlarged and the 
drug department added. They bought the grocery stock from A. S. Tears and from Hiram B. Wooster in 1885. 
and conducted two stores until February 1st, 1894, when the firm was dissolved by mutual consent, J. M. 
Walker remaining at the old stand on Montgomery Street. The same year he adopted the cash system and now 
finds it necessary to enlarge his space. 

He was a member of the board of village trustees for a period of about five years. He has been an oflRceJ 
in the Walden M. E. Church twenty-five years, was president of the board of trustees and superintendent of 
the Sabbath School for about five years. He has also been a trustee of the Wallkill Valley Church for the past 
ten years. He has never engaged to any e.xtent in matters pertaining to politics, but his influence has always 
been thrown in the temperance side of the question at issue. 



45 





^R^^^w- ' ^^^^H 




ff ^^^1 




1.., -^.u^^ ^ ' "^^ 




^^^iiiiM 


^^^^B 


1 



Whitfield (iibbs. 



WHITFIELD GIBBS was born at Hope, N. J., January 28, 1851. He is a son of Levi B. and the late Ellen 
Vanatta Gibbs. He was given a common school education in his native village. The first four years of 
his business career was spent clerking in a store. He then went to Newton, N. J., where he learned the print- 
ing business in the office of the Sussex Register, and later worked at his trade in Newark and New York. In 1878, 
with J. J. Stanton, he purchased the Deckertown Independent, and after conducting that for four years, he disposed 
of his interest to his partner. He afterwards held the position of city editor of the Jerser City Deiilr Argus, and 
also editor of the Passaie Daily Times. Previous to purchasing The IValdeii Citizen, he was Purchasing Agent of 
the Pennsylvania, Poughkeepsie and Boston R. R. In July, 1898, he purchased The IValden Citizen, which was 
then a folio, but he at once converted it into a quarto, which is a live local weekly newspaper. 



46 



f 


IV 




-y M 


1^ 


^^^^^^j^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 



/llexander Kidd. 



A LEXANDER KIDD was born at St. Andrews, a beautiful hamlet In the town of Montgomery, N. Y. (The 
•**■ historical events of Its past have been graphically described by one of its residents on page twenty-four 
of this volume). Mr. KIdd's parents were Lotan KIdd and Eliza Woodruff, honored citizens of their day and 
generation. Early In life he Inclined to an active life, and during years spent at Newburgh, N. Y., he served as 
a member of the old Cataract Engine Company, No. 3, and was also a member of the Washington Continental 
Guards under Captain Isaac Wood, receiving an honorable discharge; he served full time In the Nineteenth Regi- 
ment of Orange County under Captain Peter Latourette. Later Mr. Kidd enlisted In the Fifty-si.xth N. Y. S. V. 
under Colodel C. H. Van Wyck. At the e.xpiratlon of two years, on account of Illness contracted, he was honor- 
ably discharged at Seabrook, S. C. In 1.S66 he began a general grocery business at Newburgh, N. Y., under the 
firm name of A. & T. Kidd. In 1875 he removed to Orange Lake, Orange County. N. Y.,and conducted a hotel, and 
in 1,S80, at the same place, opened the Lake Side House, at that time a noted resort for summi^r tourists. During his 
management of seven years a very large and prosperous business was established. In 1887 Mr. Kidd removed 
to Walden, N. Y., and has since conducted a large and modern betel. At St. Andrew's Is a large tract of fertile 
land known as the " Old Kidd Homestead," which has been in possession of the Kidd family since early in the 
seventeenth century; recently it passed to the ownership of the subject of this sketch, who bears the name of 
his honored grandfather. In 1865 Mr. Kidd was married to Miss C. B. Smith, of Montgomery, N. Y. Their 
only child, Lewis W., resides at Walden, N. Y. 



47 



In jVIemoriam, 



RECOGNITION OF FRIENDS BEYOND THE LIMITATIONS 
OF THIS LIFE. 



' We are quite sure 
That He will give them hack. 
Bright, pure and beautiful. 
We know He will but keep 
Our own and His, until we fall asleep. 
We know He does not mean 
To break the strands reaching between 

Me here and there. 
He does not mean though Heaven be fair 
To change spirits entering there. 
That they forget the eyes upraised and wet, 
The lips too still for prayer, 

The mute despair. 
He will not take 

The spirits which He gave, and make 
The glorified so new. 
That they are lost to me and you, 

I do believe 

They will receive 
Us — you and me — and be so glad 
To meet us, that when most 1 would grow sad. 
I just begin to think about the gladness 

And the day. 
When they shall tell us all about the way 

That they had learned to go. 

Heaven's pathway shore. 
My lost, my own and 1, 

Shall have so much to see together by and by, 
1 do believe that just the same sweet face 
But glorified, is waiting in the place 
Where we shall meet if only 1 
Am counted worthy in that by and by. 
I do believe that God will give a sweet surprise 
To tear-stained, saddened eyes. 
And that His heaven will be 
Most glad, with joy for you and me. 
As we have suffered most. 

God never made 
Spirit for spirit answering shade for shade, 
And placed them side by side. 
So wrought in one, though separate, mystified 

And meant to break. 
The quivering threads between. 

When we shall wake 
I am quite sure we shall be very glad 
That for a little while we were so sad." 



48 



In Memoriam. 




John Gail Borden. 

JOHN GAIL BORDEN was born in Galveston, Texas, January 4. 1844. He was the youngest son of that 
great public benefactor, Gail Borden. Coming north with his father when hut a lad of thirteen he attended 
one of the public schools of Brooklyn for a time, and from there went to Winchester Center, Conn., where he 
entered the Winchester Academy. From Winchester a business college was the next step in his educational 
course, but this was interrupted by the Civil war; for, like many of " Our Boys" in the recent Spanish-Ameri- 
can war, he left the school room in response to his country's call for volunteers. He enlisted in the 150th New 
York Volunteers and served under Colonel (later General) John Henry Ketcham for two years and a half, during 



49 



which time he worked his way to the rank of SecondLieutenant. The long, continued active service and exposure 
brought on an illness, compelling retirement from the army for several months, when he recovered sufficiently to 
again resume his duties, and was transferred to the Forty-seventh New York Volunteers, with which regiment 
he remained until the close of the war, participating with it in the Florida campaign. Returning to his home in 
Brewster, N. Y., when mustered out of service, Mr. Borden became identified with the New York Condensed Milk 
Company, where his inventive genius and energy played a conspicuous part in the perfecting of his father's 
inventions. Later he was elected president of the company and filled this position most successfully until 1S85. 
In 1881 Mr. Borden moved from Brewster to Wallkill, Ulster County, where he built the condensery for the N. Y. 
C. M. Co., at the same time beginning on an extensive scale the farming operations which have made the 
Borden's Home Farm one of the model practical farms of this State. Failing health in 1885 compelled retirement 
from an active business life, when he turned his whole attention toward improving and beautifying his farm, trying, 
as he often expressed it, " to make two blades of grass grow where but one grew before." How well he suc- 
ceeded has been demonstrated by the bountiful crops gathered from year to year on the " Home Farm." Mr. 
Borden's intense patriotism led him to become one, if not the first, of the pioneers in the work of inculcating a 
love of country and the " Stars and Stripes " in the hearts of the children, and to this end made a practice on 
Decoration Days of presenting each child in the public schools in his vicinity, both North and South, a small 
American flag, as he felt the future of our country rested with the rising generation. Devotion to home and 
country were among Mr. Borden's strong characteristics. The good he accomplished in his forty-seven years of 
life cannot be recorded here. He left an enviable record — that of an energetic. Christian gentleman who devoted 
his time, talents, and means to the uplifting of humanity. Mr. Borden died in October, 1891, at his winter home in 
Ormond, Fla. We close this brief sketch with a quotation from an obituary taken from The Coast Gazette, an 
Ormond paper: — 

" Thus have we lost a good friend in common with all the State: a man of kindly heart, intelligent and far 
seeing, he used his wealth to benefit others far more than himself individually, and wherever he tarried, whether 
amongst the green hills of the North, by the waters of the St. Johns, on the shores of the Halifax, or amid the 
sand dunes of the beach, his hand and genius were ever busy to beautify and improve as well as to stimulate 
and help others. More capable hands will write his biography, which, when done as it deserves to be, will show 
forth a noble example, to be esteemed and followed by others upon whom Providence has showered wealth." 

History of "Home Farm." 

The Wallkill is the western boundary of the ■■ Home Farm:" its southern limit is the land owned by the 
New York CondensedMilk Company, while on the east and north lie the various farms once forming the northeastern 
tract deeded by good Queen Anne. In the year 1750 a part of this royal grant passed into the possession of a 
Hasbrouck, and was inherited and held by the Hasbrouck heirs until the years 1866 and 1872, at which dates 
certain portions of said parcel of land, called " Lot No. 6," passed into the possession of Mr. John P. Andrews. 
This gentleman maintained the property as a farm and summer residence, carefully preserving the old stone house 
built by the Hasbroucks in 1771. During Mr. Andrews' ownership many improvements were made and an 
addition built to the old homestead. In the year 1881 the "Andrews' Farm " passed into the possession of John 
G. Borden, who began immediately to acquire the smaller farms adjoining him, until 'they came to form a part of 
the present " Home Farm," the name given it by Mr. Borden. The natural attractions of " Home Farm " are 
too familiar to the readers of the Souvenir to need description here. It was not our design, in this brief sketch, 
to describe its many attractions or to sound the praises of the one who devoted the last ten years Of his life to its 
development, and who now sleeps amidst the daily routine of its busy life. 



5° 



In Memoriam. 




Robert Youii^. 

DoBERT YOUNG was born in the town of Montgomery, N. Y.. November 28, 1818, being tlie eldest son of 
■^ *■ Jotinston and Margaret Bartcley Young. He received his education at the Montgomery Academy, where he 
was preparing to enter college, but owing to the death of his father it became necessary for him to devote his 
time to agricultural pursuits. He was a man intellectually far above the average of his fellows, was well read, 
possessed an excellent memory, independent in his thought and action, always doing his own thinking and giv- 
ing out his opinion without fear or favor. Mr. Young was fond of controversy and debate and many years ago 
when debating societies were in vogue he was always present at the Goodwill schoolhouse and was the life of 
the society. In 1879 he was elected supervisor of the town of Montgomery, which office he held eight consecu- 
tive years, from 1879 to 1.S.86, and again for one year in 1890, which was his last public service, being an 
efficient member of the board, and looked well after the interests of the town. At the time of his death, in Sep- 
tember, 1895, he held the office of district clerk, having filled that office for fifty-four years. In May, 1862, he 
married Miss Emily Crawford Arnott, who, with four children, survive him, their son Robert Jr.'s death pre- 
ceding his father's by two years, and a daughter, Eliza Crawford, who died in infancy. 



51 



In Memoriam. 




rioyd li. Keevs. 

FLOYD H. REEVS was born in Westtown, Orange County, New York, December 29, 1837. He was a son of 
Charles W. and Azubah (Lee) Reevs. At the age of ten years he moved with his father's family to 
Goshen. Received his education at Charlottsville, N. Y. At an early age he became a partner with his father 
in the mercantile business under the firm C. W. Reevs & Son; his father died September 2, 1865. March 1, 
1866, the partnership of Reevs & Kelsey was formed, which relation continued until his death, March 4, 1898. 
He was a man of independent thought and action, possessed a natural inquiring mind and always completed 
whatever he undertook, when he had once in his mind the object worthy of his support. He was an honest, 
upright business man. He was vice-president of the Goshen Savings Bank, and in all matters which have 
tended in the direction of Goshen's prosperity he was progressive. In religious matters he has been prominent 
all his life. Had he not been a successful man of business he would have been a successful preacher, for he was 
an eloquent and effective speaker in religious gatherings, and in the great revival in Goshen Methodist Church 
in the early seventies his earnest and powerful addresses will long be remembered. In 1863 he married Christine, 
daughter of John and Hannah (DeKay) Cowdsey. To them was born two daughters, Mrs. Wilmot Makuen and 
Miss Clara. He was buried from his late residence; interment. Slate Hill Cemetery, Goshen, New York. 



52 



In Meiuoriam. 




Ghancy llulse. 

/"^HANCY HULSE was burn in Blooming Grove, this county. May 2, 1S27. He was a son of Meads T. and 
^^-^ Dollie (Stewart) Huise. He was reared on liis father's farm, and after securing a fair education began to 
clerk in a store at Burnside. At the age of seventeen he was apprenticed to learn the trade of a watch case 
manufacturer with Charles Hulse,at which he served four years and a half, then secured a position in New York 
City, where he remained for ten years. He then settled in Washingtonville, Orange County, where he manufac- 
tured watch cases until 1866. The following year he came to Goshen, where he purchased a jewelry business, 
and from that time forward success crowned his efforts. During the last fifteen years of his life the business 
was conducted under the firm name of C. Hulse & Son. In 1884. together with his son, L. W., they began deal- 
ing in wagons and carriages under the style of the Hulse Wagon Company. Politically he was a staunch 
Republican, and for several terms he served as Trustee of the Village Board. He was enterprising and public 
spirited, and it was due to his influence and progressive spirit, in a great measure, that Goshen attained its 
present prosperity. His hrst wife was Susan Jane, daughter of George and Susan (Cooley) McKinney, natives 
of Orange County. To them were born two children, a son, Lewis W., and a daughter, Susie. The mother of 
these children died in 1865, and for his second wife he married Frances C daughter of Hudson Webb, of 
Hamptonburgh. He died May 20, 1895. and was buried from the Presbyterian Church, of Goshen; interment at 
Slate Hill Cemetery. 



In Memoriam. 




JoBin 8. Taylor. 

MR. TAYLOR was born in Warwick, N. Y., December 6, 1S32, was a son of Isaac and Margaret (Smith) 
Taylor, the former a native of Sussex County. N. J., and the latter of Warwick, N. Y. John S. Taylor 
remained with his parents until the age of twenty-five when he was married and for ten years operated the old 
farm of two hundred and forty acres which he then owned. At the end of that period he came to Walden and 
started the coal, feed and lumber business. He never took active part in political matters and was not 
bound by party ties prefering to vote for the man best qualified to till the office, regardless of the party to which 
he belonged. He was ever interested in the welfare of the community. He served as President of the 
Walden Knife Co., fifteen years, President and Trustee of the village ten years, President and Trustee of the 
village school twelve years, and President of the water works three years. Mr. Taylor was twice married, 
his first union being with Miss Mary W. Brook of Warwick, who died April 30, 1886, leaving two sons, Newton 
L. of Norfolk, Neb., and Isaac B., of Walden. On the 16th of November, 1887, Mr. Taylor was married to Mrs. 
F. A. Rowland, a sister of Edward Whitehead, President of the Walden Knife Company. On the morning of 
Jan. 31, 1899, he passed beyond the limitations of this present life, and on Feb. 3rd his interment was made 
at the Wallkill Valley Cemetery, Walden, N. Y. 



54 



In Memoriam. 




IM. Gedney 8nyder. 

l\/l GEDNEY SNYDER was bom on the ancestral homestead near Orange Lake in the town of Newburgh, N. Y. , 
•'■'*• August 7, 1833. Mr. Snyder's early life inclined to agriculture and he became one of the representative 
farmers of Orange county. In 1861 he married Mrs. C. Louise Gedney of New York city. Mr. and Mrs. Sny- 
der selected for their home a large and pleasantly located farm at St. Andrews, N. Y. As the years passed ex- 
tensive improvements were made, the land brought to a high state of cultivation, the buildings modernized and 
enlarged, making a beautiful suburban home. Mr. Snyder was known as a thrifty and successful farmer, whose 
well cultivated domain and attractive surroundings were evidence of his enterprise and prosperity. For a long 
series of years he was trustee of the public school and at the time of his death in 1895 was a director of the 
Walden National hank, which position he had tilled for many years, greatly to the financial interests of that in- 
stitution. He was laid at rest in the family plot in the Wallkill Valley cemetery at Walden. 



55 



In Memoriam. 




Nicholas I. Quackenbos. 

NICHOLAS I. QUACKENBOS, the subject of this sketch, descended from an old and honored New York family. 
He was born in the city of New York, April 14. 183S. His parents were Mangle Minthorne and Julia 
(Clark) Quackenbos. When about twenty-one years of age Mr. Quackenbos selected Montgomery, N. Y., as 
his future place of residence, where he purchased a tract of land very pleasanth situated, which he brought to a 
high state of cultivation and later erected thereon one of the most modern homes in the valley of the Wallkill. 
Mr. Quackenbos had strong characteristics, blended with many graces. Throughout his life his family and 
home were objects of his deepest regard, his highest ambition. He gave liberally of his wealth to the support of 
his Church and public benevolence. He had the happy faculty of forming close, true friendships, with a magnetic 
power that drew to him without conscious effort the hearts of those with whom he came in touch. He died at his 
residence in Montgomery, Wednesday, November 23, 189S; interment was at Brick Church Cemetery, Mont- 
gomery, N. Y, 



56 



In Memoriam. 




Daniel I^illspau^h Wade. 

TNaNIEL MILLSPAUGH WADE was horn at Montgomery. N. Y., December 16, 1832. The boyhood days of 
•*— ' Mr. Wade were passed in Montgomery. Early in life he learned the tinsmith's trade and soon established 
a business of his own, continuing it until August, 1S91, making thirty-nine years of continuous business in the 
same locality. On the 26th of March, 1856, a wedding ceremony was performed which united the destines of 
Mr. Wade and Miss Charlotte C. David, a daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Constable) David. Mr. Wade was 
always an active worker in the Presbyterian Church, in which he served as elder for fifteen years. He was 
most earnest in his support of all work tending to improve and elevate the kindred interests of his town and 
county. In early life he was a Democrat; later he gave his allegiance to the Prohibition party. For three years 
he represented his town as supervisor, also served as a member of the School Board, of which he was president 
for some years. Mr. Wade was also a trustee of his native village. His genial manners and sturdy integrity 
won him hosts of friends, who held him in high esteem. Mr. Wade accumulated a competency, retiring from 
business several years before his death, which occurred at Montgomery in January, 1899. His interment was at 
the Presbyterian Cemetery, Montgomery, N. Y. 



57 



In Memoriam. 




Rev. i^lartin V. 8choonmaker, D. D. 



N. J.. June 16. 1S99, aged 82 years. 



REV. MARTIN V. SCHOONMAKER, D. D.. died at Allenhurst, 
Interment at the Wallkill Valley Cemetery. Walden, N. Y. 
Dr. Schoonmaker's biographical sketch, with his contributed articles. " Recollections of a Pastorate," and 
"The Life Beyond Immortality." in the annual Souvenirs for 1895 and 1896, respectively, are remembered by 
the readers of these volumes. 



S8 



In Memoriam. 




John I^lould. 

HThe subject of this sketch was born in 1813. He came from a family whose representatives were numbered 
•*• among the earliest settlers of the Valley of the Wallkill. the remote ancestors being natives of Holland. 
Mr. Mould was born in the town of Montgomery, N. Y., and spent his entire life of nearly seventy-six years 
upon the farm on which he was born. He was well known as one of the energetic and successful citizens of the 
locality. Mr. Mould was a strong Republican, an earnest and active member of the old Brick (Reformed) 
Church. For a long series of years he served as elder, and at his death was the senior elder of his Church. 
Mr. Mould married Miss Emily Douglas, who was almost a life-long member of the Brick Church. The inter- 
ment of John and Emily Mould was at the Brick Church Cemetery, Montgomery, N. Y. 



59 



In Memoriam. 




J. Cdward Baker. 

J EDWARD BAKER, who, for a number of years prior to his death was one of the influential business men 
• of Newburgh, was born near Buffalo, N. Y., being a son of Michael H. and Amelia (Shay) Baker, the 
former being a native of Germany and the latter of Erie County, N. Y. In Newburgh, where his boyhood 
days were passed, he was educated in Professor Brown's private school. He had a natural talent for stone 
lettering and cutting, and worked at that business for several years. At the suggestion of his father a partner- 
ship was formed between the two and they embarked in the manufacture of mineral waters. This connection 
continued until the death of his father in 1885, when the son succeeded to the business and continued until his 
death, November 23, 1893. He was liberal to all churches and charitable enterprises, and it may with truth be 
said of him that his was an honest, upright and moral life. The lady who was Mr. Baker's faithful helpmate in 
life bore the maiden name of Rosa Viola Ramsperger. On the death of her husband she succeeded to the man- 
agement of the business, which she has since carried on. 




MONUMtNT tRECTHD IN OLD lOVVN BUKVINU (jKUUND, 

of Liberty and Suuth Streets, N'ewburijh, New York, by Quassaick Chapter, Daughters of the American 
Revolution, to Mark the .Site of the First Church in Xewburgh, Unveiled May 30, 1899. 



61 



.^' 



,i«eH 



/ 



Is the Best Market 

in which to Buy 




And the Largest 

Dry Goods 
Store in 
Newburgh is 



% 



ON THE HUDSON RIVER. 



Scboonmahcr ^ . 



94 and 96 Cdatcr Street, 



Sunshine and Shadow of a Farmer^s Life, 

CHARLES RIVENBURG. 

NEVER having been a farmer, it may seem to you like presumption on my part to speak on the subject 
assigned me, "Sunshine and Shadow of a Farmer's Life:" and yet, may it not he possible from the 

vantage ground of a non-personally interested observer, to see some things more clearly than can be realized hy 

those hampered by familiarity of occupation. 

This is the age when we are delighted to boast of antiquity in architecture, in furniture, in family, in 

jewels and ornaments, in art. in sculpture, in occupation. How proud we are to point to the age of our business 

houses; how for generations in 
the past our ancestors have 
followed the same line. How- 
ever, we must all give the palm 
for antiquity to the agriculturist. 
Your ancestral estate was the 
garden of Eden. Adam was the 
first husbandman as well as 
the first husband; Eve, the first 
milkmaid. Think of the delic- 
ious richness of that snowy 
fluid in those days. No mi- 
crobes, no chalk, no salt, no 
water needed, no leaky or 
stolen cans, no inspectors. In 
the course of time as year fol- 
lowed year, cycle after cycle, 
century after century, the only 
records with which both profane 
and sacred history have to do 
were with the tillers of the soil, 
and the raisers of flocks and 
herds. You farmers may there- 
fore boast of your antiquity, for 
vou reach back even to the ISy- 
iiin of the corner-stone of the 
Inundation of the world. You 
may boast of men in your occu- 
pation whose history after the 
lapse of thousands of years is 

common to every household wherever the sacred scriptures are read, and will so continue until the end of time. 

Men noted for character, probity, steadfastness of purpose, honored by God as well as man in all generations. 

How responsible, then, your occupation to sustain the dignity of manhood set by your progenitors. In this 

vou will be sustained by the sunshine of worthy example. 

Men engaged in the pursuits of learned professions and business life have cares, worries, trials and crosses 

of which the farmer by his genial fireside does not even dream. How frequently we hear sympathy expressed 




SPRING BROOK, EAST WALDEN, N. Y. 




^o. 



WANTED 

"'«» /» the Wallla" ^' 



,iey 



To ship all their fruit this season via the Pou^hkeepsie Bridge Road. 

We offer you the best service in reaching all markets — New York, Jersey City, 
Paterson, Newark, Philadelphia, Hartford, Springfield, Providence, Worcester, 

Boston, etc. We :guarantee the continuance of rates and time and 

the prompt adiustment of any claims. Get started right this year by 

shipping with us, thereby obtaining the lowest rates and early markets, also 

the best prices. 

L. JOHNSTON, Agent, Highland, N. Y. 

W. P. BISHOP, Agent, Loyd, N. Y. 

W. T. REID, Agent, Clintondale, N. Y. 

N. H. YEAGER, Agent, Modena, N. Y. 

W. J. MARTIN, Gen'l Freight Agent, Hartford, Conn. 



64 




A PARTIAL VIp;\V OF THU AKTIFICrAL LAKE IX THE RURAL GROUN'DS, N'KW JERSEY. ILLU.STR ATIVH OF 
WHAT MAY BE ACCOMPLISHED TO ADORN AND BEAUTIFY SUBURBAN HOMES. 

for the physician, who, when the thermometer reaches zero, in the face of a blinding storm of sleet, 'has to travel 
miles alone through the darkness of the night to visit the sick, while the farmer is peacefully sleeping. How 
often the lawyer who holds in his hands the keys of destiny for the prisoner on trial, whose offense is punisha- 
ble with death, spends days and even weeks in the preparation and trial of the cause without rest or recreation, 
troubled with the demon of insomnia from nervousness, of exhaustion and grave responsibility. The statesman 
with the multitudinous cares of a nation dependent upon his skill and judgment in the formation of domestic 
measures, and in the comity of international affairs; the business man with notes coming due. with a small 
bank account and a large list of debtors who can not hnd it convenient to settle, suffer agonies with which the 
farmer is not on speaking acquaintance. Sunshine for the farmer is freedom from solicitude; shadows for 
all others. 

All occupations and avocations other than that of husbandry, depend more or less upon public opinion. 
Even those who stand most high in the professional world must submit and cater to a great degree to the sen- 
timent of the people. Their position in life, the financial success of men of affairs depends largely upon the 
impress they create upon the masses with whom they come in contact. The success of a salesman, and his 
promotions are determined by his apparent sweetness of disposition under any and all circumstances of annoy- 
ances. The farmer in the enjoyment of his broad acres, feels a kingly power. In these possessions he feels 



65 



Central-Hudson Steamboat Co.'s 

DAIUV UIINES 



i-l vv- 




NEWBURGH LINE. 

steamers Homer Ramsdell and Newburgh be- 
tween New York and Newburgh, 

Cranstons, West Point, Cold Spring and Cornwall. 



Leave 


Newburgh daily, except Sun 


days 


, at 7:00 


P- 


m.; Su 


ndavs at 6::)o p. m. Leave Ne\ 


V York, foot 


ot 


Frank 


in S't., except Sundavs. 5:00 p 


m.; 


Sunda 


"S, 




m. From June ist to October 


ist. 


Saturr 


IV 


boat 1 


aves New York, 3 p. m. 










Rates of Pare. 








Betv 


•een Newburgh, Cornwall, 


Cold Sprii 


IS, 


West 


Point, Cranstons, and New \ 


ork. 


one w 




5ocen 


s ; Excursion, 75 cents. 









POUGHKEEPSIE LINE. 

Steamers D. S. Miller and J. L. Hasbrouck, be- 
tween New York and Poughkeepsie, 

New Hamburgh, Marlborough, Milton, Highland. 

Leave Poughkeepsie daily, except Saturdays, 6:00 
p. m., landinc^ at Highland and Marlborough on 
down trip. Leave New York daily, except Sun- 
days, at 6:00 p. m. 

Rates of P'are. 

Between Poughkeepsie, Highland, Milton, Marl- 
borough, New Hamburgh, and New York, one way 



> 






KINGSTON LINE. 

Steamers Wm. F. Romer and Jas. W. Baldwin, 
between New York and Kingston, 



^Vest Point. Newburgh. New Hamburgh. Marl- 
borough, Milton, Poughkeepsie, Esopus. 

Kingston daily, except Saturdays, 6:00 p. 
Leave New York foot West loth St., week 
. except Saturdays, 4:00 p. m.; Saturdays 1:00 
Down Boat does not land at West Point. 

Rates of fare. 

Kin^st'Ti (Iviindout), Esopus, and New 
u-k, ..n.- wav, 75 ..■.-nts ; excursion. $1.25. Pough- 
'psie, Miltun, Marlborough. New Hamburgh 
d New York, one way, 60 cents ; excursion, $i.cx}. 



NEWBURGH & ALBANY LINE. 



Between Newburgh and Albany, Stopping at In- 
termediate Landings. 



vburgh daily, except Sundays, at 
,ve Albany daily, except Sundays, 



These Steamers extend their trips to Troy Mon- 
days, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. 




The n)ost Economical and Plcasanl lUay for Passenger Travel. Prompt ?reigbl Service and Loip Rales. 

66 



that none may chide, criticise, reprimand or deny, for of what avail would be any criticism. His products 
supply the human race. All things that make our world the paradise it is, must emanate from the soil; and the 
producer of wares for public necessity, is in a position of independence sweet to the human soul. Should 

business or pleasure call him away, he need not feel 

that clients or customers will seek other offices or 

- ' stores in his absence. His fields will patiently await 

his return. Should illness or indisposition be his lot, 
his convalesence is materially aided by a quiet and 
submissive mind, whereas the man of business is 
laboring under a mighty strain for a quick recovery, 
and to that extent is handicapped by this anxiety to 
return to his office or behind his counter. Delightful 
then is the sunshine of the farmer's life. 

As we look over the 
toilers of this work-a- 
day world of ours, how 
many thousands of them 
we find shut up in hives 
of industry from early 
morn till darkness again 
spreads her mantle over 
the land, deprived of 
light and the sweet air 
of God's creation ; num- 
bers with pale and 
haggard countenances 
thirsting for the sun- 
shine of healthfulness, 
imprisoned in musty 
offices or dingy count- 
ing rooms, and then 
that numerous class 
delving in the bowels 
of the earth so deep 
that there, light may 
not send her faintest 
pencil, thus living on 
a mere existence year 
after year, until the fell 
destroyer consigns them 
to mother earth, with 
whom from earliest 
childhood the\ were lit- 
erally familiar. We now 
again direct our atten- 
tion to the tiller of the 
PICTURESQUE DRIVES, LAKE MOHONK. soil. Do we see there 

the discontented expression, the slavish demeanor, the cadaverous face, the pale brow, the sunken eye, the 
emaciated form. No: sunshine, literally and figuratively, gives us a race well preserved and robust in appear- 
ance, with ruddy cheeks, happy and contented. Verily, the farmer's wife, and sons and daughters, all bespeak 
a life of sunshine, healthfulness and good appetites. 




67 



..St. Elmo Mills.. 



WALLKILL, N. Y. 







Card to the Public, 



Although confident from business success of past years, 
that our reputation as Leading Dealers in Feeds, Grains 
and General Mill Produce in the Wallkill Valley, is well 
established, still in view of our desire to enroll among 
the already extensive list of customers, parties, who, al- 
though having heard of the Superior Quality of our 
goods, Low Prices, and the promptness with which orders 
are attended to, have not availed themselves of our ser- 
vices, we take this means of bringing to their attention 
the fact, that in addition to our regular retail business 
in such articles as are found only in a fully equipped 
mill, we are enabled, through an arrangement with one 
of the large western mills, to offer all kinds of Wheat 
Feeds at the lowest market prices. Farmers will find 
it to their advantage to procure our prices before look- 
ing elsewhere. 

BORDEN'S ST. ELMO MILLS, 

WALLKILL, N. Y. 



..Manufacturers of 



"St. Elmo Rye Flour," " Perfect Graham " and 
Extra Fine Bolted White and Yellow Corn Meals. 
Agents for the Celebrated "America" Wheat Flour. 



M 

m 



S^p53pf3 intended To. ^Sl^SliS 



There seems seme inherent quality indigenous to the soil for the creation of great men. Statistics and 
biographies teach us that the men who have moved the world as statesmen, inventors, promoters of the weal of 
the human race, were propogated on the farm. There were planted the strong physique, the personal force the 
indomitable will that later make the world richer, purer and better, for the grand achievements made possible 
by drinking in through early years the sunshine and health giving ozone of a free country life. 

'Tis true that a farmer's 
life will not produce for him 
great wealth. Should he con- 
tinue this occupation during 
the term of his natural e.xist- 
ence, his name will not de- 
scend to posterity as a great 
capitalist, the employer of 
thousands of men, the orga- 
nizer of trusts, that giant 
octopus, sapping the life's 
blood of more honorable, yet, 
from the world's standpoint, 
less fortunate men; millions 
will not be his, but what will 
millions avail Dives as he 
stands before the great white 
throne. There we shall be 
known for our true worth, 
and stocks and bonds will not 
be at a premium on the judg- 
ment morn. Nevertheless, 
the occupation of farming 
should and does provide a 
competence for you in your 
old age, so that you may 
continue the journey of life 
to the final harbor with smooth 
seas. Life is not all the 
amassing of colossal fortunes, 
but it is so living that we may 
obtain from it the greatest 
good tor ourselves and for 
our neighbors; the greatest 
joy and pleasure, with the 
least amount of care and an- 
noyance. This is life as it 
should be lived. 

What a perfect condition 
of joy to commune with nature 
under her most favorable con- 
ditions. To arise on a June 




MOUNTAIN ROADS, LAKE MOHONK. 



morning to meet a greeting from an orchestra mighty in numbers, caroling music so sweet that angels might 
envy, refreshing one's eyes with the earth clothed in her magnificent beauty, the sparkling dew drops kissing 
one another, and anon scintillating like diamonds in a back ground of velvety green. Every where our gaze 
strays, new beauties burst upon us. The sun appearing over the eastern horizon, paints the fleecy clouds in 



69 



*^*#^^990»g##&»^*a*##*^9###:###*&^i^**#^^^^^^^^^^*»^*^**^*^****% 




^ 



S5.00 
ReiDard 



Bookkeeper, Sten- 
ographer, Clerk or 
Teacher,\vhich we 
successfully fill.^ 
We supply compe- 
tent assistants to 
business houses, 
without charge. 



Situations. 



for all graduates 
ofourBusinessand 
Short hand courses 
an invaluable feat- 



chants and other 
prominent patrons 
in every part of 
the world. 



as above. 



^ 



Clement C. Gaines, Prcs'i. Pouijhkecpsic. n. v. 



xJypetoriting 
xJelegraphing 



Renography.... 



"^^ Law, Lurrespondence, Arith- 
metic, etc, taught praoticallv 
by MAIL, or personally, at Eastman College, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., the model business school. 

Il!iivsUm_oMiachiiig|re?fe^^^^^^ 

ing the business of Merchandising, Banking, Trans- 
portation, insurance. Real Estate, Commission, etc. 



Wanted, 



UNEMPLOYED YOUNG MEN 

'lose education has been 
lished in public schools, 
academies and colleges to write for our plan of 
HoMK Study. We teach (ry Mail and personallv) 
in a short time, some useful vocation, and, what is 
better, get employment for our students. 

By the old wav. training for business cost vears 
of apprenticeship, but the successful business man 
of to-dav is the one who is thoroughly prepared for 
shorter methods of EASTMAN COUEOE. 



rk bv 



Youn^ fDcn 
Crajncd 

to be all round 
business men— or 
they may take a 
special branch of 
business and be 
thorough in that. 
Nobetterillustra- 
tion of the value 
of a business edu- 
cation can be of- 
fered than the suc- 
cess of those who 
have graduated 
from 

Eastman 
Business 
College, 

Pougbhccpsic. n. Y. 



ugh 



In- 
thor- 
short. 
loder- 
In writing 
ntion this paper 



70 




PICTURESQUE LAKE MOHONK. 

brilliant colors and sends his beams across a sky of azure blue, thence shortly to steal down to fragrant flowers 
waiting in all their pristine purity for this morning salutation. What invigorating influences for the day of 
toil, with nature to cheer us with all her loveliness, and nature's God in our hearts creating a love for the 
beautiful; toil under these circumstances becomes a blessing, and when the evening comes with her restfulness, 
sweet contentment still reigns. Another picture of delight opens before us as the beautiful twilight colors light 
up the western sky. The gentle lowing of the cattle creates a soothing influence that lulls to slumber the 
weary yet happy husbandman. 

Thus pass the days through seed time and harvest, each bringing sweetened toil and recreation, until barns, 
granaries and storehouses are bursting with the accumulations of golden grains supplied by a bountiful provi- 
dence. Autumn soon appears with her artist brush and palette, decking hill and dale with a harmony of color 
never rivaled in the artificial landscape. 

No pen, or brush can portray, no poet, be he ever so divine, can measure the depths of emotion aroused with- 
in our souls by the consciousness of the beautiful, by the realization that the Creator of this marvelous blending 
of lights and shades, of the combination of effects of orange and yellow, of blue and vermilion, is our God, edu- 
cating us so that the home beyond the skies on our arrival there, shall not overwhelm us with its effulgence. 

To the dwellers in city or town, flats or apartments, the home life of a farmer would be a revelation. 
Hemmed in by brick walls and stone pavements, human nature demands excitement. Interests aside from the 



71 



Johnston & Peck 



PRINTED THIS BOOK 



47 49 and 51 Third Street 

NEWBURGH NEW YORK 



Consult Them 



Do Y^u Uqc paper Boxes? 



We are Manufacturers of all 
Kinds of Plain and Fancy 



'<^*<i>*<£' 



WE ARE WHOLESALE AND 
RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 




We are General Agents for The 
National Gum and Mica Co.. Manu- 
facturers of Pastes, Sizings and 
Lining Glue. 



WRITE US 



Wrapping Paper, 



Paper Bags 
and Ty\fine 



Newburgh Paper Box Factory^ 



F. WM. WENZEli, PROPRIETOR. 



87 WATER STREET, NEWBURGH, N. Y. 



72 




WESLEY GROVE— THE OLD NEELEYTOWN CAMP MEETING GROUNDS, PHOTOGRAPHED SEPT. 1868. 

family circle fill the mind. Children, almost, need introductions to fathers who are never seen at the family 
table during the day. Evenings are spent at the club or opera. Around the farmer's board the family life is 
made prominent. Community of interests makes the members thereof one kin, as strong as that of blood rela- 
tionship. Here home life is at its acme of perfection. Love holds sway, each striving in the little family circle 
to center the delights of the whole world. Books, papers, periodicals and magazines read aloud by the father, 
while the mother with her work basket and her children gathered about her, form a picture of perfect content- 
ment unknown to town life. Truly sunshine mellows the farmer's life. 

As to the second part of my subject — the shadows, the corollary — I fail to find them. Sunshine pre- 
supposes shadows, as a natural sequence they should follow. Before 1 began to write, I wondered if my 
thoughts would not stray almost entirely amongst the shadows, but after some meditation, I found my fears 
groundless. As I traveled along 1 looked for the darkness— looked to the north, sunshine and pleasant warmth 
met me there; looked to the east, no shadow, nothing but brightness there; looking to the south, sunshine with 
gentle zephyrs, greet me there; looking to the west, still we bask in pleasant beams, not even fearing the 
coming night. 



73 



What the 

People 
Say: 

THE LUDWIG PIANO CO. Here we rj 

keep Pianos and Organs at prices chea J^ 

Leading instruments they supply T 

that cannot be surpassed say I 

Unequalled for tone and touch, 'tis clear * 

to give satisfaction is their idei\ 

D 



urahility and quality in them we gain 



and utmost sweetness we obtain 



N 

instrumental and vocal whene'er we gV^ 

In Brass and String goods all agree y'^ 

a fine selection here we V_> 

Guaranteeing our tuning, repairing and /^^ 

prices low, all favor the Ludwig Piano CV^ 



ell selected sheet music they will show 



57 Broadway and 
16 Colden St., 

NEWBURGH, NEW YORK. 



W. F. CONKLING 

MANAGER. 




The Greatest 
Charm 



of any Piano is a sympathetic 
tone. tS* Volumes of sound may 
be appreciated by some players, 
but the true music-lover has an 
ear only for the quality of tone. 
Our Pianos are constructed to 
give forth melody rather than to 
make noise, j* The music that 
is in them is identical in each 
instrument, the varied prices be- 
ing graded according to cost of 

v^^SCS* *^ «5* «i^ t^ «^ (,?• t3^ tS^ uf* 

Over four 

r)undred of these 



pianos 



Sold in this vicinity. The only Piano 
sold that the maker has confidence 
enough in to 

GUARANTEE 
FOR A 
LIFETIME. 



74 



Sunshine and Shadows of a Farmcr^s Life. 



(CONCLUSION ) 

Love, peace and repose — the tenderest trio 

Of musical words ever blended in one. 
That one word is home — near the brook by the meadow 

Dear home of my childhood in years that are gone. 

In fancy I wander on a sweet summer morning, 
Away to the wheat field just over the hill. 

'Tis harvest time now, and the reapers are coming 
To gather the waiting grain, yellow and still. 

Many harvests have passed, many summers have ended. 
Since here I oft toiled with glad reapers before. 

And felt the great bounty of heaven extended 

Giving joy to the worker and bread to the poor. 

Long ago I remember when thirsty and tiring 
The harvesters came to the old maple shade. 

How they quaffed the pure water so cool and inspiring. 
That gushed from the fountain that nature had made. 

And I think of the orchard, the apples that yellowed, 
Half hidden by leaves in the big early tree; 

Ah, those apples how lucious, when ripened and mellowed. 
Then dropped in the clover for sister and me. 

Old home of my youth, so humble and cherished. 
The hallow-ed memory cheers me to-day, 

When all other thoughts of the past shall have perished, 
Remembrance of thee shall illumine the way. 

Sweet home by the woodland, now farewell forever; 

I've wandered afar from thy dear cottage door. 
I love thee, my farm home but never, no never. 

Thy sunshine and shadow shall cover me more. 



75 



Charles D. Wait 



DEAL BR IN 



Coal. Lumber, 



Champion and | ^"«"''. Feed. 
Dcering Mowers I Grain, Salt, 
and Binders | Cement, 



• • • 

YARD: 
Railroad Avenue 

and 

Clinlon Sired 

Monlgomery, 

N. V. 



^ Lime, Fertilizers, 

% Bremerv Grains, 

% Sprout, Clover 

^ and Cimothv Seeds. 

^ general £ine J'arming 
j Smplemonts. 



ID B. JOHNSTON, 

DEALER IN 

Dry Goods 

GROCERIES AND CROCKERY. 

MONTGOMERY. N. Y. 

T. W. STRATTON 

-•^MILLER 

and dealer in 

Grain, 
Flour- 

and Feed, 

MOINXaOIVIERY, INEW VORK. 



jOittie Fulton SKarket 

67 5ronl St.. Dlewburgh. Dl. 'I). 

fjHIS MARKET -u-as started tii 1896 
^ hv the fishermen of Long Branch, 
'aho are inteiested in the large fisheries of 
the New Jersey coast. For years thev 
eonsigned their fish to the markets of Nev: 
York City and in return got Utile for 
their labor. Thev organised themselves 
and shipped their goods by boat to this 
and other large towns, thus giving the 
coisttmer Ireslier and better fi'sli at less cost 
than by anr other way — being handled di- 
rect and only one commission paid. 





^ 



This market is equipped with a large Cooler, capa- 
ble of taking two tons of fish, where the temperature 
is kept at 40 degrees in the hottest weather. By 
calling on us you are sure at all times of getting 
Fresh Fish direct from the nets of old ocean, at half 
the cost of any other first-class market. 

GEO. EILLEN, 

MANAGER. 



DANIEL IRWIN, 

jt.-*.*SHIP 

CHANDLER, 

Sail and Awning Maimer. Dealer in Ship Chandlery 
Goods, Rope and Tackle. Blocks of all sizes ; Ash and 
Spoon Oars, Cotton Cordage, Flags and Bunting; Cano- 
pies, Dancing Crash. Horse Covers. Wagon Tops, Canvas 
Signs, Rosin, Pitch, Tar. Okum. Hooks and Thimbles, 
Large and Small Tents for sale and to let. Martin Spun 



Deale 



Cotton Waste. 



, Ha 



Cotton, Macrame 
and Oils, Straight : 



cks, Ci 



Splicing 
.mp Cots. 
;. Gilling Nets 



ery descriptK 

Iking Cotton, Spun 

"nd Twines, Paints 



62 S. Water St., 
Newburgh, Nm Ym 



76 




AN OLD ELM, ULSTER COUNTY, N. Y. 



77 




SLATE 



It W ill Pay You to Look at Our Stock 

Shannon 
& Co., 

The Larg:est Mantle 

Fire-Place and Tile House 

Along the Hudson River. 




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78 



Historical—Orange County Sunday School Association* 

WILLIAM C. HART. 

'T'HE mission of this publication would be remiss in its duty, if in connection with 
A the churches of the Wallkill Valley, some mention were not made of the great 
work of the Sabbath Schools associated therewith. In city and village, in every sequest- 
ered hamlet, are men and women of the highest type of God's creation, whose hearts go 
out in sympathy with the salvation of child life; whose best efforts, whose influence, 
whose earnest prayers are for turning such lives to a realization of the life eternal. 
In one of God's acres, " Berea Cemetery," Montgomery, N. Y., may be found the grave 
of Joseph B. Lawson, a man of blessed memory, an earnest prayerful member of a 
Union Sunday School, at St. Andrews, N. Y., who taught a large class of boys through 
a series of years, and lived to see each one become a communicant of the church 
on earth. 

It was the privilege of the writer to be numbered with this particular class, and 
now in humble gratitude records this tribute to his memory. While John R. Wiltsie of 
Newburgh had large business interests to engross his mind, at least, he was an earnest 
Christian man. Mr. Wiltsie long felt that the interests of Sunday Schools would receive 
a great impetus if those working on the same lines could meet together in convention. 
Consequently, notices were sent out, and a large number of those friendly to the cause 
assembled at the First Congregational Church, Middletown, N. Y., on May 2 2d, 1861, 
at 10 A. M., when the first Orange County Sunday School Association was organized, 
embracing all the towns of the county. The attendance was large, and the sessions 
inspiring. Among these early members we note Rev. J. Forsyth, Rev. G. H. Mande- 
ville, John R. Wiltsie, Charles Estabrook, Rev. John Crane, Rev. D. N. Freeland ; Rev. 
L. Littell, Mt. Hope; Rev. M. V. Schoonmaker, Walden; Rev. D. C. Niven, W^esttown; 
Rev. R. H. Wallace, Little Britain; Rev. S. S. Mills, Deerpark; Rev. D. Maclise, Mont- 
gomery; Rev. J. B. Ten Eyck, Montgomery; Rev. J. Erskin, Montgomery; A. Dennis- 
ton, Washingtonville ; Richard Coldwell, Blooming Grove; H. Barnes, Crawford; W. E. 
Mapes, Howells; C. E. Millspaugh, Goshen; Wm. L. Fairchild, Walden; John Verity, 
Walden; Wm. E. Gowdy, Walden; A. W. Cook, Walden, Sidney Kidd, Walden; W. C. 
Hart, Walden; Dr. Crane, Goshen; Isaac Swift, Minisink; Charles Young, Hampton- 
burgh; G. B. Mapes, Greenville; C. Mills, Florida; David Coleman, Wallkill; Charles 
Knapp, Little Britain; Conard Laskamp, Coldenham ; Joel T. Headley, New Windsor; 
James Mills, Hampton; Lewis M. Smith, James H. Phillips, H. S. Banks, John Martin, 
Newburgh. 

79 



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THE OLD KIDD HOMESTEAD, ALEX. KIDD, OWNER, WALDEN, N. Y. 

On October 8, the .Society met at the Reformed Church, Newbnrgh, nearly every 
-school in the county being represented. It was decided that the Society hold quarterly 
sessions. Our limited space will only permit of brief mention as we trace the work of 
the organization. 

Reformed Church, Walden, April 29; Presbyterian Church, Middletown, July 15; 
October 4, 1862, Presbyterian Church, Cornwall. The county report gave 18 towns. 
Officers and teachers, 1,118; scholars, 6,808; average attendance, 4,973; conversions, 144, 
April 14, 1863, Presbyterian Church, Monroe; July 14, Baptist Church, Newburgh. 
The first collection $20, was here taken, for incidental expenses. Mr. Charles Esta- 
brook was elected secretary, and as the years passed by was very active and useful in 
the Society's life. Mr. Estabrook was in great demand to address the children, and had 
the happy faculty of holding their closest attention, as well as all who came in touch 
with his impressive manner, when he addressed an audience. Mr. Estabrook now holds 
the position of City Librarian at Newburgh, which place he has filled fornearly 30 years. 
October 13, at Warwick Reformed Church, the president. Rev. L. P. Ledoux, exhibited 
a head of wheat grown from a grain of wheat found in the head of a mummy that had 
been entombed three thousand years ago. July 20, 1864, Presbyterian Church, Goshen, 
Rev. G. H. Mandeville, of Newburgh, elected president; October 25, M. E. Church, 
Middletown; April 25, 1865, M. E. Church, Port Jervis; July 25, Calvary Presbyterian 
Church, Newburgh, elected Thomas B. Scott, president, J. H. Phillips, secretary; 



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84 



October 24, Presbyterian Church, Atontgomery; April 24, 1866, M. E. Church, Wash- 
ingtonville, special collection $115; July 24, Reformed Associate Church, Little Britain, 
Rev. R. Howard, elected president; vice presidents, T. B. Scott, Rev. J. M. McNulty; 
corresponding secretary, Hon. H. B. Bull, Montgomery; recording secretary, T. J.' 
Bonnell, Port Jervis; October 30, M. E. Church, Portjervis; April 30, Pre.sbyterian 
Church, Middletown; August 6, 1S67, rst Presbyterian Church, Chester; October 29, 
1867, Presbyterian Church, Canterbury; July, 1868, Presbyterian Church, Mont- 
gomery; April 28, Presbyterian Church, Cornwall Landing; April 28, First Presby- 
terian Church, Washingtonville, C. E. Millspaugh, of Goshen, was elected correspond- 
ing secretary. The reports from towns gave 102 schools; 1,496 teachers and officers; 
8,879 scholars; 417 conversions— three towns not reporting. The brothers J. S. C. 
Abbott and Lyman Abbott were present, and gave great interest to the sessions. An 
incident was related of a teacher who taught a Bible Class of seventy (70), had been 
wonderfully blest by seeing sixty-nine (69) become communicants of Christian churches. 
October 4, First Presbyterian Church, Monroe. This session was memorable from the 
death record of active members of the Association. We note in full: 

"The committee appointed at the last meeting of this Association to present a 
minute concerning the decease of Hon. Robert Denniston, Rev. Daniel Higbie, Rev. 
Jos. H. Robinson, Mr. John Jaques and Rev. Robt. H. Wallace, D. D., would most 
respectfully report the following for the adoption of this Association: 

"Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God in the dispensation of His Providence to 
remove from us Hon. Robert Denniston, elder in the Presbyterian Church at Washing- 
tonville, who for almost half a century had been identified with the Sabbath School 
cause in this county. Rev. Daniel Higbie the pastor, and Mr. John Jaques, the efficient 
superintendent of the Sabbath School attached to the same church, thus taking from it 
pastor, elder and superintendent in the space of a few months to enter upon, as we 
believe, the realization of their hopes; and whereas, our young brother. Rev. Joseph H. 
Robinson, pastor of the church at Cornwall Landing, has also been taken from our band 
of vSabbath School workers, at the very commencement of the Christian warfare, and 
whereas, also Rev. Robert H. Wallace, D. D., who in years gone by in the church of 
his fathers stood up for, and defended the rights of the children, to the blessings of the 
Gospel, against the prejudices and opinions of many of that day, has also fallen at a 
ripe old age, ' full of years and full of honor. ' 

"Therefore, we desire to enter upon record this, our humble tribute, to the faith- 
fulness and labors of love of our departed brethren, and to express our gratitude to the 
great head of the church for permitting them to labor so faithfully and well in the 
Master's vineyard — setting us a precious example, and when at last, when their work was 
over, enabling them to triumph through the riches of divine grace. Whilst we sympa- 
thize with the relatives of our departed friends in their sad and severe bereavements, 
we rejoice that they sorrow not as those who have no hope, for we know that those who 
sleep in Jesus, will God bring with him to the enjoyment of a better life. " 

April 13, 1869, M. E. Church, Walden; August 10, morning session, M. E. Church, 

85 



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Headquarters for the Orange County 
Agricultural Society. 



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86 




A MILL OF THE OLDEN TIMES, ULSTER COUNTY, N. Y. 
87 



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WALDEN, N. Y. 

Ctiauncey A. Reed, Editor and Proprietor. 



OFFICIAL VILLAGE PAPER— PUBLISHED EVERY SAT- 
URDAY MORNING. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION, fl.OO 
PER ANNUM. THE WALDEN HERALD WAS ESTAB- 
LISHED IN 1870. ITS CIRCULATION IS AMONG A 
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OFFICE, CORNER MAIN AND OAK STREETS, EN- 
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afternoon session, Reformed Church, evening. Baptist Church, Port jervis ; the death 
of Hon. H. B. Bull, of Montgomery, was announced, and suitable resolutions passed. 
The following officers were elected: President, Rev. R. Howard Wallace, Little Britain ; 
vice president, Charles Estabrook, Newburgh; secretary and treasurer, William C. 
Hart, Walden; May i8, 1870, Presbyterian Church, Florida; November 9, Union 
Church, Newburgh— large attendance; August 10, 1870, Congregational Church, Mid- 
dletown, the birthplace of the Society, also witnessed the disbanding of the Association, 
and the re-organization of the present Society, under the same name. It was a grave 
error, and the only cause that led to the action, was to dispense with a cumbersome 
Constitution and By-laws, and adopt one brief in wording, yet amply covering all 
requisite conditions. 

A special committee had labored long and earnestly to prepare a statistical report 
of the condition of the schools of the county, which was very ably presented by C. E. 
Millspaugh; 3,000 copies of this paper were printed and distributed. The afternoon 
session was so largely attended, that adjournment was made to a larger audience room, 
the Presbyterian Church edifice. The report of the treasurer for the year, showed 
receipts $207.64. 

November 8 and 9, 1870, the first semi-annual convention convened at St. John's 
Chtirch, Newburgh; May 31, 1871, at Warwick; June 5, 1872, Presbyterian Church, 
Goshen. Officers elected : President, Rev. Wendell Prime, Newburgh ; vice president. 
Rev. C. A. Harvey, Middletown; secretary and treasurer, W. C. Hart, Walden. The 
latter tendered his resignation, and W. E. Mapes was elected to fill the vacancy; 
November 2, 1872, First Presbyterian Church, Middletown; May 13, 1879, Union Pres- 
byterian Church, Newburgh. Officers elected : President, Rev. Jas. M. Dickson, Mont- 
gomery; secretary. Rev. A. H. Saxe, Walden; treasurer, James H. Phillips, Newburgh ; 
June 16, 1880, Presbyterian Church, Goshen; 131 Sunday Schools; 2,011 officers and 
teachers; 10, 175 children and youth; 2,648 adults; 16,598 total enrollment; conversions 
396; contributions $5,714. 24; May 31, 1881, 2d Presbyterian Church, Washingtonville; 
May 22, 1882, M. E. Church, Warwick; June 14, 1883, Presbyterian Church, Middle- 
town: President, Arthur Jones, Newburgh; secretary, Floyd H. Crane, Goshen; treas- 
urer, I. H. Jackson, Montgomery; May 13, 1884, 2d Presbyterian Church, Florida; 
May 12, 1885, Presbyterian Church, Chester; May 18, 1886, Presbyterian Church, Corn- 
wall; May 10, 1887, Reformed Church, Port Jervis; May 15, 1888, Presbyterian Church, 
Goshen, Rev. W. S. Winans, Jr., Goshen, president; May 21, 1889, Moffatt Library, 
Washingtonville; May 20, 1890, Walden; May 20, 1891, Warwick, Richard Caldwell, 
Salisbury Mills, president; F. A. Crane, secretary; May 18, 1892, M. E. Church, Corn- 
wall; president, Emmett A. Browne, Port Jervis; May 17, 1893, Presbyterian Church, 
Highland Falls, president, R. S. Talbot, Cornwall: secretary, A. B. Hurtin, Middletown; 
May 16, 1894, Montgomery, president, H. N. Greene, Washingtonville; May 15, 1895, 
Presbyterian Church, Port Jervis, president, C. E. Millspaugh, Goshen ; secretary, O. B. 
Hurtin, Middletown; treasurer, C. A. Brown, Port Jervis; May 15, 1896, Presbyterian 
Church, Chester; May 12, 1897, Trinity Church, Newburgh; May 25, 1898, Reformed 
Church, Walden, president, E. C. Barnes, Newburgh; corresponding secretary, W. F. 



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entitled to tt, and we promise you it will do for you. The old stencil and postal cards can be used as formerly. 

Refer to W. D. Barns, Middlehope, and Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association, 

i filtrate of Soda 

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% stimulating f ^' ^►•.^•.^Vl* 

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Nitrate of Soda as a hig^hly stimulating fertilizer for the pro- 
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especially of ensilage crops. Owing to the drowth this year it 
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Hawkes, Newburgh; recording secretary, A. B. Hurtin, Middletown; vice president at 
large, Jas. S. Eaton, Walden; executive committee, H. N. Greene, Washingtonville; 
M. C. Sears, Blooming Grove ; R. H. Wood, Goshen; H. E. Williams, Walden. 

At Goshen, May 1899, the attendance from all sections of the county was large, and 
the sessions of great interest. The address of welcome by Rev. Robert Bruce Clark 
most cordial. The response from Mr. James S. Eaton, of Walden, voicing the good will 
of the assembled delegates ; all lines of the county work indicated a healthy and grow- 
ing interest. A new departure was made in ordering the publication of the record of 
the years work and the minutes of the convention, for distribution in the schools of the 
county. Entertainment of visiting delegates, by the ladies of Goshen, in one of the 
Halls of the village, was most ample and elaborate. 

We have traced the historical record of the Society from 1872, from the Recording 
Secretary's book, kindly loaned by the efficient Secretary, Mr. A. B. Hurtin, of Middle- 
town ; the preceding eleven years the writer was 
familiar with the life and growth of the organiz- 
ation, and from our records are enabled to place 
on file much interesting data that otherwise would 
pass with the forgotten past. 

We most earnestly recommend to the consid- 
eration of the present management of the Orange 
County Sunday School Association, that some 
plan may be devised tending to unite the Old and 
New Associations, that the birth of the Society 

may date from 1861. 

In consideration of the fact that the same 
members; the identical officers that represented 
the first, were retained in their respective posit- 
ions in the formation of the re-organized Society, 
we close this hastely written sketch, congratulat- 
ing' the members of the Sabbath Schools of Orange 
County, in having at their head the efficient and 
earnest President, Mr. Edgar C. Barnes, who was 
elected at Walden i8g8, and re-elected at Goshen 
1899. 

Mr. Barnes, a native of Orange County, was 
born July i6th, 1834. His parents removed from the Valley of the Wallkill near Wal- 
den, to New York City when he was seven years of age, at which place he received a 
common school education. 

During the cholera epidemic of 1849, his parents returned to Orange County, and at 
the age of seventeen he entered the employ of A. R. & O. Taylor as clerk in their store 
at Pine Bush N Y. Many of the business principals instilled into him by Archibald R. 
Taylor during the three years he was there employed have been with him throughout his 
business life. 




eu(;ar c. b.^rnes. 

nt of the Orange County Sunday 
.School Association. 



Orders Called for and Delivered. 






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GROCERS. 



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^^ ^.^^ %^^F *^^^ *^^^ M^^^ \^^^ *^^W \.^^F %^^^ \^^^ %^^^ ^9 

Funeral Direciofm 

Representing- the leading establishments in his line. 
Every requisite for the burial of the dead. He is thor- 
oughly competent to properly embalm and pre- 
pare for interment. The same painstaking 
care will be given to calls from remote and 
distant localities without additional 
charges. ■. ■. ■. ■. ■. ■. ■. ■. ■. ■. •. '. '. *. •. '. *. *. *. •. -. •. ■. 

Tine Carriage Painting a Spccialtv. 



Charles Johnson, 

ST. ANDREWS, N. Y. 

DEALER IN 

Beef, VeaL mutton. 
Pork and Poultry... 

My stock is always selected with the greatest care, and is 
offered with the assurance that for quality- 
it is unexcelled. 

VILLAGE AND COUNTRY HOMES REGULARLY SUPPLIED. 



96 




WALLKILL VALLEY CEMETERY. 

HENRY SUYDAM, PRESIDENT. DANIEL T. TEAKS, SUPERINTENDENT. 



97 



Orange County AfiRicuLTURAi Society. 



FAIR 



Fifty-Ninlh 
Annual 



Mittitletown 
N. Y. 



:i!©###i^####^©^:##»S^^^^^^^&&^^^#&9^©#*9##9©&^#^&&##©###&0^^#SS#^^;##a 



September 
12th, 
13th, 
14th, 

and 

f 

15th, 

1899. 
An Address by 



^ -for Cattle, Borscs, Sbccp, ^ 

S( Swine, poultry, Dogs, Xmple- ^ 

V »w i - ^ - fn 

\J merits. Machines, -Furniture, A 

HJ Grain, Tcgctables, -flowers, ^ 

^ -fruit. Bread, Cahc, Canned ^ 

W fruit, etc., paintings. Draw- /^ 

^ ings. Decorative Hlorks, fancy Jj} 

^ Hrticles, |Veedlework — plain ^ 

W and ornamental ; Domestic A 

>y J^anufacturcs, School Cdorh, % 

X etc. H number of valuable t 



Vl/ Special premiums arc also /^ 



/^ 



M/ offered. ,>$ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



i^W 



Governor Roosevelt 

on the First Day, Tuesday, Sept. 12th. 

Trotting Races during the Second and Third 
Days for purses amounting to §1,600.00. 

Children's Day. Friday, Sept. 15th \yhen Children 
attending school will be admitted FREE. 

A Grand Calyalade of Horses each day of the 
Fair, and other Special Attractions may be ex- 
pected. 

Excursion Rates on all Railroads. Exhibits re- 
turned Free. Electric Care Rut! to the grounds. 

Stock, including Poultry, close 
all other classes close Sept. 



Entries of Liyi 
Sept. 5th. Entries 
6th. 



Premiums 

AMOUNTING 
TO NEARLY 

$7,000 

ARE 
OFFERED. 

Premium Lists 

and regulations, ■\yith entry blanks, furnished on 
application to either of the following officers: 

Hon Augustus Dennitson, -Washingtonyille, 
President; Benjamin C. Sears, Blooming Groye, 
E. A. Brown, Middletown, Vice-Presidents ; D. A. 
Morrison, Newburgh, Secretary ; William Eager, 
Montgomery, William F. Royce, Middletown, As- 
sistant Secretaries; H. M. Howell, Middletown, 
Treasurer. 

DIRECTORS: 

William H. Hallock, Washingtonyille ; George 
A. Swayze, Middletown ; William H. Clark, West- 
town ; 'v. Edgar Hill, Stony Ford ; J. Edvyard 
Wells, Chester; Henry M. Howell, Middletown, 
Sidney H. Sanford, Warwick ; Horace D. Thomp- 
son, Middletown ; S. D. Roberson. Bullyille ; C. 
W. Shaw, Mountainyille ; W. S. Laurence, Ches- 
ter ; Charles Mapes, Middletown. 



ADMISSION—Member's or Exhibitor's Ticket, $1 ; Single Admission Ticket, 3Sc.: Carriage Tickets, 3Sc. 




99 



IF YOU LOVE 

Good Horses 



BUV A. 




DEERING MOWER 




.Deering Pony Binder 



To do your mowing and harvest 
your grain, and you will save 
them a great deal of labor. Ac- 
knowledged to be the lightest 
draft and best cutting harvesting 
machinery on the market. Call 
and examine them for yourselves 
before buving elsewhere. Everv 
MACHINE FULLY WARRANTED. 

FOR SALE BY 

Joseph M. Shafer, 

WALDEN, N. Y. 




Theodore D. Barker 



WALDEN. N. Y. 



Harness Maker and 
Carriage Trimmer. 

BUSINESS ESTABLISHED IN 1856. 



Harness of all Kinds and a 
General Line of Horse-Fur- 
nishing; Goods, a Fine Line of 
Gloves for all Purposes.J*^.^* 
Quality and Price Reasonable. 



.Horses Bought and Sold. 

Main Street, 
WALDEIM, N. Y. 



Walden Steam Laundry, 

BESSLEY FREAR. Prop. 

OAK STREET, WALDEN, N. Y. 
«^ fe^ «^ 

As Good Work As Is To Be 
Had Anywhere. 

Sustain 

Home Industry I 

Patronize People Who Live and Spend 
Their Money With You. 



Local Agency at Jotn Cox, Montgomery ; John 
White, Wallkill; J. N. Crist, Pine Bush. Laundry 
Collected and Delivered Free of Charge. 



Casper Knlffin, 

WEST SIDE MARKET, WAEDEN, N. Y. 




Dealer in Choice Dressed Steer Beef, Mutton. Pork, 
Veal and Lamb. Poultry in its season. Kettle Rendered 
Lard of the Finest Quality. I exercise great care in the 
selection and purchase of my meats. Our patrons can rest 
assured that it will be my highest ambition to furnish at 
all seasons the best the market affords, and on the most 
liberal terms. Meats delivered. We ask the people of 
Walden and surrounding country one favor : "As we 
journey through life let us live by the way." 



Cbc Uldlden Citizen and Che iUdllkill Enterprise 



ISSUED EVERY FRIDAY. 



WHITFIELD GIBBS, Editor and Publisher. 



All Forms of Job Printing I 



OFFICE, MAIN STREET, 



WALDEN, N. Y. 




THE THREE (ELMS) SISTERS. PLAINS ROAD, ULSTER CO., N. Y. 



,\ Srover Sraliam 
Lompany. 



Manufacturers of the 



S. GROVER GRAHAM 



rosrnvEcuRE 



THE GREAT for dyspepsia, heartburn, cas- 

FOOD DIGESTER. 0^^^..,^^ «9^,»C.,».m'» tritis, threatened cancer and 



Grover Graham's 



ALL STOMACH TROUBLES. 



Dyspepsia Rcmcdv. 



RELIEF IN 
FIVE MINUTES. 



Write for Pamphlet, etc., to GROVER GRAHAM CO., Newburgh, N. Y. 



JSrpS 



I UP-TO-DATE i 

i DRY GOODS STORE | 

^ SHUART & EMBLER 

SIjKS 66 Water Street, Newburgh, N. Y. ^ 

....DO YOU use Tea and coffee ? 

Sftices, Extracts and Baking Powder ? 

Handle the BEST in the MARKET. 

ROAST our own COFFEE. 

GRIND our own SPICES. 

^Manufacture our own EXTRACTS and BAKING POWDER. 

ARE THE LARGEST IMPORTERS AND RETAIL DEALERS 

IN THE UNITED STATES, 
Buy for cash and sell for cash. Hence can give you better 

value for your money than any other house in the business. 

Solicit a Trial Order. 




YOU SEE OUR WAGONS EVERYWHERE. 



HEADQUARTERS : 

156, 158, 160, 162 and 164 Water Street, and 59, 61, 63, 65 and 67 

Pearl Street. 
NEW YOEK CITY, BEOOZLYN BOEOUGH. 

AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY CITY, 

104 



BRANCH : 

GRAND UNION TEA CO., 

J. VAN BUSKIRK, M'g'r. 
54 Water St., Newburgh. N. Y. 




< < 

X o 



105 



I^staurant 

132 Water St., 

Newburgh, N. Y. 

WE DESIRE TO ANNOUNCE TO OUR FORMER 
PATRONS THAT WE CAN FUR- 
NISH THE BEST 

25c. Dinner 



IN THE CITY. 



HOME-MADE PIES AND PUDDINGS A SPECIALTY. 




F 
R 
A 

IN 
K 

W 

IW 

I 

L 
E 
R 



Matter d' J-uniisher, 
32 Water St., cor. Carpenter St., Newburgh, N. Y. 

. . . I89Q . . . 



Mill Agents for 

Christian's Superlative 
and " White Sponge " 
Brands of Flour.cSt,^*^,^ 



Price Lists and 
Samples Mailed 
on Application. 




REYNOLDS & CPAMER 

Wholesale Grocers. 



DEALERS IN CHOICE 
FOOD PRODUCTS. 



Warehouses and Elevators, 
Opposite N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R. Depot 



SHIPPERS OF FLOUR, 
FEED AND GRAIN. 




io6 



Ulest Shore Railroad 



NIAGARA 

FALLS 



ROUTE. 



X-i"l"t"t»I"t"l-'f4"l-t"t"t"("t"t»(»t-X 

* + 

* Passing:, as it does, t 

5 along- the west shore t 
i of the t 



Hudson 
River 

And through the 

Piciuresi/ue 

Mohawk 

Valley. 



THE FAMOUS 
TRUNK LINE 

ROUTE. 



x+'H"f++'f++-H"H-++^-++K 



lliu Only line Itnnnin^ Wii^ner Kuffet Palace JSIeepin^ (iars 
between New Vorh anti Toronto, Without Ghan^e, is the Popular 
West 8hore Kailroad. 



^ The only All-Rail Route and Through Drawing Room ^ 



W 



Car Line to and from the Catskill Mountains. Special 
^ Trains, Drawing Room Cars Attached, Are Run During 
^ the Summer Season between New^ York and New Paltz, 



for Lakes Mohonk and Minnewaska, via Wallkill Valley ^ 
5 Railroad. Drawing Room Cars without change, bet-ween ^ 



A 



\^ New^ York, Philadelphia and Bloomville, and between /jy 
$ Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Long Branch, /^ 
^ Point Pleasant, New York, Saratoga and Lake George. /^ 



fast express Crains with eiepfant palace and Sleeping Cars 

BETWEEN NEW YORK, BOSTON, NEWBURGH, KINGSTON, CATSKILL, ALBANY, SARATOGA, MON- 
TREAL, UTICA, SYRACUSE, ROCHESTER. BUFFALO, NIAGARA FALLS, HAMILTON, LONDON, TORONTO, 
DETROIT, CLEVELAND, CHICAGO AND ST. LOUIS, WITHOUT CHANGE FOR TICKETS, TIME TABLES, 
AND FULL INFORMATION, APPLY TO ANY TICKET AGENT OF WEST SHORE RAILROAD, OR ADDRESS, 



C. EI. 

GENERAL PASSENGER AGENT. 



LAMBEIRT, 

5 VANDERBILT AVE., NEW YORK. 



107 



E. S. SAYER, 



DEALER IN 



LUMBER, COAL, FEED, 
SEWER PIPE and SALT. 



WALDEN, N. Y. 



•y^^ 



l^ C. DOMINICK, 



SUCCESSOR TO TAVLOR & EATEMAN. 



Dealer in 



Lumber, Coal. Teed. Lime, Cement 
and Building n?ateriaisof all kinds 



LONGMAN & MARTINEZ PAINTS 

SOLD AT 20 PER CENT DISCOUNT 
TO CLOSE OUT STOCK. 



Go to Mamminis', Walden, 
N. Y., cheapest place in 
town to buy Fruit, Confec- 
tionery, Nuts, Cigars, Mor- 
ton's and Home - made 
Cream. Also Ice Cream 
Soda 5 Cents per Glass. 
Best in Town 




JOHN AHRENS, 



EAST WALDEN, N Y. 



J'armers' 
Supplies, 



CONSISTING OF 

Mill Feeds, Corn, Oats, Hay and Straw, 
Poultry Foods, High-Grade Fertilizers, 
Land Plaster, Salt, etc. An excep- 
tionally FINE GRADE OF 



Coal 



Screened and Delivered at Reasonable 

Prices. Mowing Machines, Hay 

Rakes, Hay Tedders, Syracuse 

Plows and Their Extras. 



io8 



A. H. WADE 






Main Street, 

WALDEN N Y 



HNDREW K. WADE, Walden, 
N. Y., offers the largest assort- 
ment of Stoves and Improved 
Gas Stoves. The Happy Home Range 
and Howe Ventilator are the best 
Base Burners in the market, requiring 
one-third less coal for heating on account 
of their superior construction. Highly 
recommended by our patrons. Large and 
varied assortment of House Furnishing 
Goods, Granite Ware, Clothes Wringers. 
Milk (^ans of best quality and workman- 
ship. Tin Roofing and Plumbing in all 
its branches. Tinware in every line, of 
our own make, made from the best ma- 
terials. When in Walden call and see 
the advantages I can offer at my store. 
Country orders attended to with prompt- 
ness and despatch, and work done in a 
satisfactory manner. 



/ 



POLILTPY MONTH L\ 

Although Reduced in Price to FIFTY CENTS A YEAR, is still the same "OLD 
RELIABLE" of the Poultry Press. No shrinkage in Reading Matter, nor loss in 
Quality, Interest and Helpfulness. Its reputation for honest and fair dealing, 
independent and reliable management will not be sacrificed. At the ne'w price 
every one who keeps poultry, whether farmer or fancier, should read it; in fact, 
cannot afford to be without it. TWELVE NUMBERS FOR FIFTY CENTS, is al- 
most like buying gold dollars for half price. SEND REMITTANCE TO-DAY— AT 
ONCE— BEFORE IT IS FORGOTTEN. 

POULTRY MONTHLY, Albany, N, Y. 



109 



W.J. 
CAMPBELL 

ST. ANDREWS, N. Y. 

Best floods 
Lowest 
Prices 



FLOUR 

...Patent Process Only. 

FISH 

....Sweet, Fat, White.. 



TEAS 



Young Hyson, Oolong, 
Japan, English Break- 
fast, Gunpowder 



COFFEES 

la\a. .Wara^aibo, .Woclia. 



Delaware Connty Butter 
a Specialty. 



CANNED GOODS 



Goods Delivered and Orders Solicited. 



Do You 

Realize ? 

That the Heat WASTED IN YOUR 
CHIMNEY from Stoves, Ranges, or Fur- 
naces, WOULD KEEP 
YOUR UP - STAIRS 
ROOMS WARM ALL 
WINTER ? .-t The Ross 
Radiator SAVES THIS 
HEAT and SAVES ITS 
COST IN FUEL. .•* If 
your dealer don't keep 
the ROSS RADIATOR 
WRITE FOR FULL 
AND PRICES. 

Ross Radiator Co,^ 

Newburgh, N. Y. 

Guaranteed Satisfactory or Your Money 
back. 




PARTICULARS 



,jt Eilectric Light Plants, Bur- 
glar Alarm Systems, House Call- 
Bell Systems, and Telephone 
Systems installed, and the best 
of results guaranteed. ^ Manu- 
facturers of Special Reactance 
Governing Board for Series Alter- 
nating Current Circuits. ^* Gen- 
eral Sales Agents for Packard «^ 
Lamps and Transformers..^^^ 
When in need of anything in 
the ELECTRIC LINE, Write 
to or Call on J-^J-^J-S-J-J-S- 

Hewitt & Warden, f 

14 S. Water St., 
Newburgh, N. Y. 




5: %D. 3)evoe S: Co/s I 

A 

pure Lead and S 



SI 

V . 



Zinc paints. S 

X ._., .. . A 



R e: A D V Fo R u s e: ! % 

« : s 

^ The Dark Colors, many of which are used for trimming purposes, are solid A 

V colors made from the most permanent pigments, and therefore do not contain /s. 

5J either lead or zinc. ^ 

^ None of these paints contain any Water, Alkalis, Benzine, Petroleum, Kero- * 

fi, sene, Fish Oil, Barytes, Whiting, or other adulterants. They are not "Patent," * 

» '' Chemical," or " Fireproof. " 5 

mThey are all Made with Pure Linseed Oil Only. 

They are strictly pure and FREE FROM ALL FORMS OF ADULTERATION. They are sold subject to 
Chemical Analysis. The Whites and Light colors contain only: Pure White Lead, Pure White Zinc. Pure Lin- 
seed Oil, Pure Turpentine Dryer, Pure Tinting Colors. THE PAINTS ARE MADE FOR PAINTING HOUSES. 

NOTE ALSO — These paints are all put up full measure according to the United States Standard Gallon of 
231 cubic inches. 

rOanufaclurcd by T. Ul. Dcvoc S Co., Dcip York, ibc Oldcsl and Largcsl Paint Concern in Ihc United Stales. 

ESTABLISHED 1754. 

roR SALE BY FOWLER HARDWARE CO., walden, n. y. 



Fowler Hardware Co,, 

WALDEN, N. Y. 

Real Estate and 
Insurance^ 

We Make a Specialty of Renting and Selling 
Village and Farm Property in this Section. 




The 

New York 

Furniture 

Gompany... 



THE LARGEST HOUSE FURNISH- 
ERS IN ORANGE COUNTY. 



Hiinsf fuiiiisliers come and go, but the Old Reliable 
New York Fiiruiture Co. cau always be found at 

No. 102 Water St., 
Newburgh, N. Y. 

With Reliable Goods at the Most Popu- 
lar Prices. 



Furniture, Carpets and Crockery 



In fact, ever_vthing- to furnish your homes. Here you will find an 
assortment of goods not found in any (>ther house in Newburgh. 
If Middletown is more convenient, we carry the same stock at the 
same prices, at ......... . 

a. EMMET CRAWFORD'S 



44 and 46 North St., 



Middletown, N. Y. 




STATE NORMAL and 
TRAINING SCHOOL "^T.^l'ci™ '' 



The School Year be- 
gins the second Wed- 
nesday in September. 



The purpose of this School is to 
furnish competent teachers for the 
Pubhc Schools of the State of New 
York. ^ ^ ,^ ^ ^ 

For cuxular giviiii^ fuU injortnatiou. a^idrt's^ 

FRANK S. CAPEN, A. M. Ph., D. 

PRINCIPAL. 



KM 



Tuition and use of 
Text Books Free, 



HUDSON RIVEIR BY DAVLIGHT. 



THE 

PALACE IRON 

STEAMERS. 



New York and Albanv 



OF THE 

HUDSON RIVER 



...DAV LINE... 



i^ Direct Connection at 
I Newburgh HJth the 

# Nevvburgti Electric Rail- 
way. The attractive 
route lor SIMMER 
TRAVEL to and from 

^ the Catskill Maun- 
j^ tains, Hotel Champlain 

# and the North; Niagara 

# Tails and the West; 
the Thousand Islands 
and the St. Lawrence 
River.'.'. ■.■.•.•.•. •.■.'.■ 




x■^+■^*■^■■t■■^■■^■■^■^■i■■i■■^+x 

+ ♦ 

+ TIME TABLE. + 

+ Daily, txcept Sundays. + 

+ " + 

+ GOING NORTH, A. M. + 

+ * 

2 Brooklyn, Annex.. 8.ck> T 

5 DesbrossesSt... 8.40 j" 

T 22d St., N. R 5.00 T 

T Yonkers 9.4^ T 

T West Point 11. 5.; T 

+ P-" + 

J^ Newburgh 12,-- ^ 

^ Poughkeepsie i.i^ ^ 

i Kingst.m Point... 2.1 -i- 

^ Catskill 3.-", .;. 

41 Hudson 3.41 i{- 

^ Albany 6.1. ^ 

* -f 

F. B. HIBBAHD. 

BEN. PASS. ACT. 



H trip on one of these famous Steam- 
ers, on the noblest stream in the coun- 
try, offers rare attractions. Cbcy are 
fitted up in the most elegant stvlc, ex- 
clusirelv for passengers. Cbcir great 
speed, fine orchestra, spacious saloons, 
private parlors and luxurious accom- 
modations in every respect, render 
tbcm unexcelled. Send 6 cents in 
Stamps for " Summer excursion 
Booh." fSfS;SfSfe;SfBfSfS;eff 



GENERAL OFFICE : 
DESBROSSES STREET PIER. 

NEW YORK CITY. 



+ 
+ 

* 

+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 

+ 

+ 
+ 

+ 



TIME TABLE. 

Daily, Except Sundays. 



GOING SOUTH, A M. 



Albany.. 
Hudson.. 
Catskill., 



Kingston Poi 
Poughkeepsii 
Newburgh ... 
West Point.. 

Yonkers 

New York: 



+ Brooklyn, Annex 



st-H"H"H'++++++++x 

E. E. OLCOTT. 

GEN. MANAGER. 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip on the American Continent. 




DAY LINE STEAMER "NEW YORK,' I'ASSIXC U. S, CRUISER -XEW YORK.' 




ON THE DAY LINE. THE PARK AT KINGSTON POINT. 

"5 



Avoid danger 

and the terrors of indigestion by hav- 
ing your teeth put in good repair 
before too late. We have the latest 
appliances for painless filling and ex- 
.tracting of teeth. 



Painless extracting of teeth 
by the Hale Method. 

Nitrous oxide gas. The making of 
artificial dentures, and crown and 
bridge work are among our specialties. 
AH work guaranteed to be the best 
in workmanship and quality. 



Dr. C. A. 



53 Water Street, 
NEWBURGH, N. Y. 



CONOVER, 

DENTIST, 



Snits Pros ecuted and 

Defended in all Courts, 



Practice in Surroe-ates' 
Conrts a Specialty. 



James G. Graham, 

Counsellor-at-J^aio. 

BREWSTER BUILDING, 

44 Smith Street, Newburgh, If. Y. 



YUKANSAVEGOLD 

and get the Best Brands of ROOFING 
and HOUSE PAINTS, Etc., at 

= THE NEWBURGH LUMBER CO. - 




BROADWAV. 

Special agents for Harrison Bros. & Co. Town and 

Country Ready Mixed Paint. Pure Rubber 
Paint for Leaky Roofs. 

Neponset Red Rope Roofing. 

Sheathing and Deafing Papers. 

Sash, Blinds, Doors, Glass. Trim. 
Builders' Hardware. Extension Ladders, Etc. 

TELEPHONE, 1 10 2 x 110 3 
116 




Ir) i\)e. §>lia(ia of tlie Willev^s 



"INTERPINES." 



Dr. SEWARD'S HOME for 
INVALIDS. 



GOSHEIN, IS. Y. 

DUIV lllENStO BV IHE STAIE tdlHIfllSSION IN lUNACV, 



NEW YORK 
OFFICE 

113 West 85th 
Street 

Monday and Thursday 

of each week, 

1 to 3 P. M. 



Information and circulars of 
Dr. J. SEWARD PERRY at 
any time at above address. 



A BEAUTIFUL quiet, resting "HOME," 
devoted to the care and medical treatment 
of the Nervous and Mental Invalid. Mansion 
ample; situated in a park of grand old forest 
trees, the PINE predominating-. Pure air and 
water; abundant sunshine; elegant drives and 
every possible arrangement made to insure the 
comfort and welfare of inmates. Rooms large and 
airy; all modem conveniences with perfect san- 
itation. These conditions, combined with the most 
advanced and successful methods of treatment 
under the immediate supervision of the resident 
physician, assisted by carefully selected, refined 
nurses, render it an institution where physicians 
may send such of their cases as require special 
and thorough treatment, under environment, with 
the full assurance they will receive conscientious 
and continuous care. 

A'oluntarv and committed cases received. 



FREDERICK W. SEWARD, M. D. 



OPERATING PHYSICIAN. 



ii8 




PARLOR AND OFFICE OF DR. F. \V. SEWARD. 




Frank M, Coll ins, 

WALDEN, N. Y. 

THE MAIN STREET 

PLUMBER 




tmplovs none bul liislUdss Workmen, dnd 
is thus enabled lo do Hrst-lldss 

PlumDIng, Steam and Gas Filting. 

ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN AND WORK GUARANTEED. 

.MAIN ST.. C)|'I'. THE B.ANK. 



MRS. M. J. SHAW, 

Hrt Gmporium 

Hl.MAN HAIR GOODS 119 Water St., 

A SPECIALTY. NEWBURGH, N.Y. 

Sladiker & Siays, 

WALDEN. N. Y. 




GENERAL BLACKSMITHING. 

III/. ,1,1 lilt; diiJ Liiiw /lorsi'i. jin/ l/iosi- 7ui//l quarter cracks, 

^Inni ill I he most scientijic maimer ami oil improved prin- 

eiples. Horse shoeing and repairing receive his 

PROMPT ATTENTION! .' I I .' ! ! 




*** furniture 

Carpets, 
Shades, etc. 



Our Prices are Like Our Advertisement, Dif- 
ferent from Others; and it would pay you to 
write us when thinking of Purchasing. 

T. L MILLSPAUGH, 



136 MAIN STREET, 
WALDEN, N. Y. 



3llex. Soldberg 



NewDurgh's Leading Clothier, 



J^atter and furnisher 

Sor 3Can, 5^oy or Child. 



83-85 Water Street, 



NEWBURGH, N. Y. 



^ /Orri^ 




MOISY ALAPM CLOCK, 



63c 



...Nickel 
Watch 

98c 

R. H. GORRIE, Jeweler, 



(Hi ^ 

ISi Leave your Good Watch Home while ^ 

^ Fishing. Bicycling, and Working the ^ 

I Farm. Every One WARRANTED. ^ 



79 Water St., cor. Third St. 



NEWBURCH, N. Y. 



Just one word 




and that word is reliability. It 
is the foundation of success. 



Our remedies ARE reliable. Twenty years 



CractS; 
Brittle Hoof, 
Contract'd 
and Coronet. 



Quarter 
Cracks, 
■^fl Foot Ail, 
Garget, 

Caked Bags, of increasing demand is the BEST recommend 

Cracked Teata 

in Cows. \ve have. 



Scott's Arabian Paste, 

The best all-ardund veterinary 
remedy known 

25c, 50c and $1rOO, 



Scott's Gall Paste, 

Cures and work the horse 
every day 



25c. 




We guarantee our goods if directions are followed. NO CURE NO PAY, 
Send for price list to the trade. Single boxes on receipt of price. 

ARABIAN PASTE is a positive cure for caked udder. Preventative better 
than cure. One application at the first appearance of inflammation will save 
the udder. Keep it in the stable. Do not lose the use of a valuable cow by 
unnecessary delay. Always have a reliable remedy on hand when needed. 

SCOTT'S FAMILY PASTE is unequaled as a gen- 
eral household remedy — cures cuts, bruises, burns, 
scalds, corns, chafing, abcesses, boils, pimples, salt 
rheum, eczema, cold sores, chapped hands, sore nipples, 
inflamed breasts, old sores, etc. Sure cure for piles. 
For bicycle bumps and bruises, there is nothing that 
will remove soreness and inflammation as quickly. 
Ask your druggist or dealer for it. If they have not 
got it they will send for it. 

Insist on having the genuine. Take no other. Do not 
take something that you are told is as good as SCOTT'S, 
for there are no remedies made that equal Scott's. 

SCOTT HOOF PASTE CO., Rochester, N. Y. 





9^ 0^ M^ *^ M^ M^ #M #M 

EDWIN KNAPP 



COLDENHAM, N. Y. 

•CARRIAGE WORKS. Blacksmith- 
^^ ing' and Repairing. Carriage Paint- 
ing a vSpecialty, using only the Best 
Materials, combined with a thorough 
knowledge of the work. 

Thankful for past patronage of citi- 
zens of Wallkill Valley, I invite a con- 
tinuance of the same, and will give 
attention to all who may address or 
call upon me at my business stand. 

M^ k^ ^* ^* ^0 ^* ^* ^* 



I D. MABIE 



^ STOVES, HEATERS, ® 
^ RANGES, ETC. 



Plumbing, 
Tinning, Etc* 



46 WATER ST., NEWBURGH,N. Y. -^^^^.p 




Iflyi 



3 1 



it 




^ PYRAMIDS 

we built for all time. 

OUR BUSINESS 

ivas established on a like foundation 

of GOODS thoroughly 

constructed 

to withstand all inferior competition. 



No risk in trading at our stores — your money 
back for the asking. 



Easy Terms to People of Moderate Means. 



We want your trade and are willing to meet 
you more than half way every time. 

M. HERRICK 



The Largest House Furnisher on the River. 
Everything for Housekeeping. 



Po'heepsie, iNewDurgh, 

epp. Morgan House. u Warer St. 



P. S. In order to see if this advestisement pays, I will allow 10 per cent 
off of all customers who see this. C. M. Northrip, Manager of the New- 
burgh Store. 



125 



+ 



Tf you need a Fi\R^ or business W/IGON, a SURREY, RLNilBOlIT or 

-^ TOP BLIGGY, with either 8teel, Rubber or Pneumatic Tires, a 
Morse or Team for Farm or Business; a fine Carriage Pair, 

8peedy Roadster, or gentle driver for your Family, your can find all 
of the above at 314 to 318 Broadway. The only place where you 
can find a full and complete stock of all the above goods under one roof, 
and sold at one profit, between New York and Albany. 

Remember a $ saved is a $ earned. Call and examine my immense 
stock and you will find I can save you many a $. 

Chas. W. %Oeed, 

Dlewburgh, Dl y. 



st4.^4.^4.4.^+4.++^++4..f.4■4■^■l•.^^■l■■)■■t•■(■+■l■■{■■f+■)-■)-^■f■^■l■'f+4■'f■f■l■•l■■f•^•^•^'f'f■•f■+•l•'f■(•■(■•l■•(■•^■^'f■l■•l■■l•■t•'fx 



Handy Wagon 



It is no longer necessary 
to offer arguments in favor 
of ■ ^— . 



Low-Wheeled, 
Wide-Tire, 
Short-Turning, 
Broad- Platforn 
Wagons. 



Every farmer knows he 
ought to have one ; it Is 
only a question "Where 
can I buy a good one 
with the least money." 



The Fa 



Handi 



Wa^on Co., of Sagii 
llichis^an, were the first to 
build such a wagon, and the 
only ones who give the 
farmer a choice ^between 
steel and wood wheels. 

They suDplied the U.S. 
Government with all the 
Trucks they used in the 
Cuban war. They build 
more Farm Trucks than 
all other builders com- 
bined. 



f P W 1¥ Tl'^W'Pr^ T ^ I 'F^ P ^ ^ li 



The Farmers HANDY WAGON 
Company, 

SAGINAW 

are makers 
Low-Down 
Wide-Tire 

FARM 
TRUCKS. 

METAL 
WHEE 

Old Farm Wag 

All-Steel 

Clnulart Frtt. 




sv sell a good steel 
wheel wagon AS LOW AS 



= $18.00 = 



The wagon with movable 
platform shown in this pic- 
ture is the one recommend- 
ed by the Agricultural 
Colleges and Experiment 
Farms, and is the only- 
truck ever adopted bv the 
U. S. Government. ' The 
platform is easily removed 
and stakes placed on bol- 
sters, then it is ready for 
an ordinarv wagon box. 
The wheels 'turn under the 
load. Send for catalogue 
and prices. 



FARMER'S HANDY WAGON CO., Saginaw, Mich, 



126 




JOHN SCHWARTZ^ sons: 



VHMP WMM 



J ^.. 





JOHN SCHWARTZ 

& SONS 'MANUFACTURERS 



Tine 
Cigars 

and WHOLESALE 
and RETAIL .... 

Tobacconists 



313 MAIN STREET 
POUGHKEEPSIE . . 

We carry a large and com- 
plete line of everything re- 
quired by Tobacco users . . 

Ask for our New Cigar 

The iUallkill Valley Special' 

5 CENT CIGAR 



Retail Dealers will consult the 
interests by calling on us . . 



JOHN SCHWARTZ 

&Cr^lVTC 313 MAIN STREET 
Owi>0 PO'KEEPSIE, N. Y. 



127 




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ADRIAINCE 3^ BICHEYE 

MOWERS, BINDERS, 
REAPERS, HARROWS. 



You have known the Adriance Buckeye Goods a long time and have always 
known them Favorably. 

^ Thcu arc 

M Now Belter 

Than Ever 
Before 




JouGHKEEPS'^ 



Modern Machines 
embodying the Best 
of the original, every 
later feature that is 
good, new features 
of Great Value to 
the Farmer and pe- 
culiar to the Adri- 
ance Buckeye. 



Because they are the Best they are used on such Model Farms as the Borden Home Farm, 
the Arden Dairy Farm and by the Best Farmers in the Wallkill Valley and elsewhere. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

AdHance, Piatt A Com, PoughkeepsicN.r, 



SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
129 



I r jc*^ A REAL TONIC, gj:^ I 

I <» I : !3 I 

t + ♦ S * 

4> ^J I The Imperial Wine Co., of Newburgh, N. Y., haS J ^ J 

* S J placed on the market a Wine, Iron and Beef that is + Jh t 
+ ^ + endorsed by every reputable physician. The Wine J S + 
+ ^ * employed in its composition is the Famous Imperial + ^ J 
+ S + Wine. The Beef and Iron, the purest and best that + JN t 
+ ^^ + money can buy. The average Beef, Iron and Wine sold J |^ + 
+ I J is made from the poorest wine that can be procured. + "W * 

* ^1 + You know Imperial Wine, Iron and Beef is superior to + ^J it 

* ^T + all others. It will cost you a trifle more than some J ^^ + 
+ ^5 J others, but after trying it you will be glad you paid it. + * 

* QP + Ask your grocer for it. If he hasn't got it, apply to the + ^ t 
J ^ + IMPERIAL WINE COMPANY, NEWBURGH, N. Y. J J5 + 

+ ft. 1 ft 



Imperial Iron, Wine anil Beefm * I 



dhe jteason 



We have gone to the 
Front as the Leading 
CARRIAGE 
DEALERS 

IN THE COUNTY IS THAT OUR 



'Why 



CARRIAGES, SURREYS, BUGGIES, RUNABOUTS 
AND HARNESS ARE UP-TO-DATE IN QUALITY, 
STYLE AND FINISH. •.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.'. '.•.■. •.•.•.•.•/. 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 
AS OUR INCREASING 
BUSINESS SHOWS. 



DCewburgh Carnage Co., 

DCewburgh, DC. %. 



131 



A. R Shaffer 



Photographic 
Artist 



275 Main Street 
Po'keepsie, N.Y. 

We specially invite you to call and see our work. Our Studio is on the ground 
floor, no stairs to climb. Picture framing a specialty. We carry a large line of all 
the styles of picture moulding. Cameras and amateur photo supplies. Artists' 
materials, engravings, water colors, and all the newest productions in pictures. 

MENTION THIS AD. AND GET A SPECIAL DISCOUNT, 

















C H. DORR 




MANUFACTURER OF 


Pine Cigars 


/ u 

"^^-'^ ''III 1 


1 

1 


From an experience of over half a century 1 have failed to find a 
brand of cigars equal to Dorr's. Truly they are superior to any with 
which 1 am acquainted. 1 invite you to profit by my experience. 
















No. 7 WATER STREET 

WHOLESALE 

and RETAIL. NEWBURGH, N. Y. 



132 



F. J. Bradley's 



/s the place to buy 




CARRIAGES, SLEIGHS, 
HARNESS, &c. 



86^to 90 Front Street, 
NEWBURGH, N, Y. 





Wholesale and 
Eetail Dealers in 



carriages, wagons. »•» Sleighs 

WEST MAIN STREET, GOSHEN, N. Y. 

133 



FINE HARNESS, BLANKETS, 

and all Goods for the Horse, Car- 
riage and Stable. 



-M 



JostPH H. ROSE, Pres'l. 

F. B. Savage, fice-Pres't. 

R. C. Whitehii.l, Sec. 

John B. Rose, Treas. &= Gen. .Matt. 

E. \V. CoKwis, AisV Gfii. .M.iii. 



3£. 51. 5". Co.'s Celebrated 

SPlumbago Stoof and 

Slack S^aint. 




W^iMTW,. WWrMMW IM ©11^. 



NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

Manufacturers of 
all kinds of . 

PAINTS IN OILS •• •• 
GREASES, VARNISHES 
ETC. 



Plumbago Roof Paints 
are the Best 



If your dealer does not keep our goods 
in stock, write us for samples, prices. 



#M 



M^ 



134 





COMMERCIAL MEN'S HEADQUARTERS. 

First-Class Accommodations for Permanent or Tran- 
sient Guests. This house has recently been refitted and 
refurnished. Large, airy rooms, electric lights, steam 
heat, and improved sanitary conveniences. Electric cars 

pass the door. Free 'Bus to and from W. V. R. R. Depot. 

TABLE UNEXCELLED. LIVERY ATTACHED. 

Main and Walnui Sis., Walden, N. Y. 



135 



Dclson House 




LARGEST AND BEST 
EQUIPPED HOTEL in 
THE CITY : : : : : 



MARKET STREET 
POUGHKEEPSIE:: 
NEW YORK : : : : : 



H. N. BAIN 

Proprietor 



136 




The Palatine Hotel 




H. N. BAIN & CO., Proprietors. 



INEVVBURGH, IN. V, 

The Model Hotel of 
the Hudson River- 



MODHRX fX COXSTRUCTIOX AXn 
UP-TO-DATE IX EVERY DETAIL. 

The Summer Vacationist makes a mistake if he fails to place this popular Hostelry upon his itinerary 



Many Popular Trips out of New York and other 
places make this hotel their objective point. 



The Historical Points of world-wide interest sur- 
rounding THE PALATIINE make it very 
popular among tourists. 






m 
m 



CHILTON PAINT 

THE STANDARD 
FOR QUALITY IN 
THE EAST 

The Atherton Pharmacy, 

WALDEN, N. Y. 



m 

m 
m 
m 






I The Newburgh 

I Horse Exchange 




A. M. COOK & SON, 

I Successors lo W. C- Trimble. ) 



HORSES 

Of All Kinds Constantly on Hand. Car- 
loads Arrive Weekly. Fancy Matched 
Teams. J* J* .* <^ ct: J- ^ ^ .^ ^ ^ 

TROTTERS AND 
SPEEDY HORSES 
A SPECIALTY..*^ 

f Cor. First and Chambers Sts. , Newburgh, N. Y. 



i3« 



ARTHUR BARNES J. W. MONELL ^ 

Barnes & MoneU^ | 

(,Sl-CCKSSORS in F. r. HARNFS) f)> 



.COMMISSION 
MERCHANTS. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN BUTTER, EGGS, f 
I LARD, ALL THE BEST BRANDS OF PORK, | 
I ETC. J- SPECIALTIES — FINE DELAWARE | 

BUTTER and HERKIMER COUNTY CHEESE. I 

Cold Storage I 

Warehouse. f 

We have ample space and facilities for the ™ 
care of all kinds of goods usually placed in such # 
warehouses above the freezing point, and at |^ 
reasonable rates. Special Rates on car lots. ^ 

42 SOUTH WATER ST., 
NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

NEARLY OPPOSITE WEST SHORE DEPOT. 



'39 



#x^ 



OFFICERS OF THE 



Ulallkill Valley ^^-^^ 
Tarmers' ilssociatJon 



1899 



JOSEPH B. HADDEN 

President 



HARVEY N. SMITH 

Vice-President 



WILLIAM C. HART 



NICHOLAS J. FOWLER 



^ 



One Yea""; '899 



Cwo Y^srs 



DIRECTORS 

I JOSEPH B. HADDEN, Walden, 
GEORGE B. ANDREWS, Walden, 
WILLIAiM C. HART, Walden, 

I JOHN D. MOULD, Montgomery 

■| JOHN P. COVERT, Montgomery, 
ADAM WILEY, Wallkill, 
LEWIS WOOLSKY, New Paltz, 

L W. H. HALLOCK, Washingtonville. 

f WILLIAM DUNN, St, Andrew's, 

EDWIN KNAPP, Coldenham, 

ISAIAH W. DECKER, Walden, 

I ARTHUR McKINNEY, Walden, 

1 CHARLES D. WAIT, Montgomery, 

1899-1900 lESSE BOOTH. Campbell Hall, 



f HORACE D. THOMPSON, Goshen, 
JONAS DUBOIS. Walden, 
WILLIAM C. WELLER, Walden, 
I CYRUS W. BOWNE, Walden, 
CbrCC Years 1 HARVEY N smith, Montgomery, 

'• .a«fi . . ROBERT B. CROWELL, Wallkill', 

IO9S-190I S. HARTSHORN, Plattekill, 

I SAMUEL H. KNAPP, Walden. 



In a Beautiful Countrv 
Through a Camera ^ 



1894, '95, '96, '97 
■98, '99 



FOR ONE 
DOLLAR... 



Jirt 



rj Representing over THREE HUN- 

^niil'iPnir'i ^"^^^ '^^D fifty Picturesque- 
^i^iyMfyt. #((f t7 Historical or Otherwise interesting 
scenes, together with pen pictures describing the beauty and 
the utihty, the glory and grandeur of the locality— oH/y a 
fi"^- copies lemaiii. The six issues will be forwarded to your 
address on receipt of fl.OO. 

Uhe Wallkill Valley 
J-armers ' Jlssoeiation 
Walden. Di. ^. 



Newburgh Planing 
• Mill Company •• 











i-r^j:,;. _ ^-?>- .^.. 




Successor to 
THOMAS SHAW'S SONS 



Planing, Turning, Carving, Scroll Sawing 
Mantles, Cabinets, Screens, Grills, Etc. 



Doors, Sash, Blinds and Window Frames to order. 
Mouldings, Stair Rails, Newels and Balusters on 
hand and to order. Ash, Walnut and Pine Ceil- 
ing and Wainscoting. Yellow Pine, N. C. Pine, 
Maple, Cypress, Sycamore and Quartered Oak 
Casings. Corner and Base Blocks in any desired form. 



Church Work a Specialty. 



Al l Work Kiln Drie d £'-New^uS'^N?''Yf^ 



LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE. 




It IS a streng:thenm8: food and tonic, 
remarkable in its flesh-forming prop- 
erties. It contains Cod-Liver Oil emul- 
sified or partially digested, combined 
with the well-known and highly 
prized Hypophosphites of Lime and 
Soda, so that their potency is materi- 
ally increased. 

What Will It Do? 

It will arrest loss of flesh and restore 
to a-J^otmal condition the infant, the 
child and the adult. It will enrich the 
blood of the anemic; will stop the 
cough, heal the irritation of the throat 
and lungs, and cure incipient consump- 
tion. We make this statement because 
the experience of twenty-five years has 
proven it in tens of thousands of cases. 

Bz sure you get SCOTT'S Emulsion. 



■COrr & EOWXE, chemists, New York. 



^^^