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Full text of "The war history of the 1st/4th Battalion, the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, now the Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire), 1914-1918"

H' 



UCiiB LIBRARY 



THE WAR HISTORY OF 
THE IST/4TH BATTALION 
THE LOYAL NORTH 
LANCASHIRE REGIMENT 





THE COLOURS 



THE 



WAR HISTORY 



iJl- Tllli 



ist/4th Battalion The Loyal North 
Lancashire Regiment, 

uoiv The Loyal Regiment 

(North hancashire). 

I 9 I 4- I 9 I S 



" The Lancashire ftwl were as itotil men «5 were in Ihc wr/d and as brave 
firemen. I have often told them they were as good fighters and as great 
plunderers as ever ucnt to a field .... 

" It was to admiration tn see what a sfjirit of courage and resolution 
there was amongst us, and how God hid us from the fsars and dangers 
we were exposed to." 

CaPTAI.N HoDCSO.V, writing I.N' 1648, ON THE I3ATTLE OF TrESTON. 



[copyright] 



mil 
Prinlcd Ijy Geo. Toii.MIN & Sons, Ltd.. ( '■uardiaii Work-., rrL-ston. 

Published l)v the liATTALluN lllsroRV CoMMIIlKK. 




Photo : .1. IV inter, I'tiston, 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL RALPH HINDLE, D S 0. 

He commanded the Battalion from I'cbruary, 1915, till wounded 
in action at Fcstubert, and afjain from August, 1915, till killed 
in action at Vaucellette l-"arm, on 30th November, 1917. 



" What do these fellows mean by saying, ' I've done »iy 
bit' ? What is titeir ' bit' ? I don't consider I've done mine 
yf/."— Lieutenant-Colonel Hindlc in 1917. 



l^ebicatioiL 

Co 

Cfje JftDaiii 2^obp of our Comrabeg, 

U3t)o ijabe gone fortoarb in tnuuiplj to 

tfje ilnknolun Haitb, 

Clje aear Partp, 

left befjinb to clean up anb Ijanb ober, 

©ebicate tfjis^ book. 



PREFACE 



The purpose of this book is to supply to the people of Preston and district, 
for the first time, a complete and authentic record of the adventures of their 
original local Territorial Infantry Battalion during the Great War, such a 
record being a chapter of local history which must sooner or later be written ; 
to put into the hands of the relatives and friends of those who have gloriously 
fallen the story of the unit with which they served faithful \into death, with 
its accompanying tribute from their surviving comrades ; to supply to the 
latter- maimed or whole a book which they may hand down to posterity 
to speak of their service ; and last, but not least, to speak to those who shall 
succeed to our traditions, of Comradeship, Cheerfulness, Endurance, Devotion 
to Duly, and all the virtues which go to make up " the Spirit of the Regiment." 

The delay in publication has been unavoidable, and even now the book 
IS not as complete as its ccmpilers would wish ; in particular, it is not possible 
to give the names of casualties as they occurred, except in the case of Officers ; 
both Company and Battalion records have had to be destroyed again and 
again, and there is little material left to work on except the War Diary and 
individual diaries. 

The book is a live product. Every line of it is either written by those who 
were actually with the Battalion during the period of which they write, or 
is condensed from the War Diary. It would have been far easier, and, from 
a literary point of view, more satisfactory, to have handed over the documents 
to a professional Historian to write up, but it was felt that the vivid descrip- 
tions of eye-witnesses, even though lacking in style, were preferable to any 
such compilation. 



CONTENTS 



Dedication 
Preface 

Chapter I. — Early History and Training in England 
II. — Early Days and the Battle of Festubert 
III. — Trench Warfare 
IV. — The Somme Battles 
V. — ^Trench Warfare in the Salient 
VI.— The Third Battle of Ypres 
VII. — Reorganisation and the Battle of the Menin Road 
VIII.— Cambrai 
IX. — Givenchy Period 
X. — The Advance . 
XI. — After the Armistice 
Appendix A. — The Honours List 
B. — The Casualty List 



Page 

I 

5 

22 

31 

40 

61 

79 

95 

106 

126 

131 

1.37 

141 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



Frontispiece : The Colours 

Portrait of Lieutenant-Colonel Ralph Hindle, D.S.O. 

Reduced Facsimile of the Roll of Volunteers for Service 

Abroad ...... 

Group of Officers -Bedford, 1915 . 
Photograph -Meteren, 1915 .... 

Battalion about to Parade for Trenches, 1916 
Christmas Card, 1916 ..... 

Aeroplane Photograph of Trench Lines in Salient 
Aeroplane Oblique Photograph of Trenches in Salient 
Aeroplane Oblique Photograph, showing Objectives for Third 

Battle of Ypres 

Panorama Photograph from Pond Farm 

Aeroplane Photograph of D.13.C. ..... 

Aeroplane Oblique Photograph of Objectives -Menin Road Battle 

Group of W.O.'s and N.C.O.'s — Delettes, 191S 

Remnant of Givenchy Keep, 1920 

The Colours Marching Past —Brussels 

Site of the Battalion Memorial 

Divisional Cocarde ..... 



Facing Dedication 

Facing Chapter 1. 
Facing Page 4 
7 
31 
50 
57 
58 



61 
81 

82 
85 
106 
116 
131 
132 
133 



Page 
Facing Page 
Page 



MAPS 



Map No. 1 — Festubert ... 

Map of Battle of Festubert (Sketch Map 

Map of Battle of Festubert (7 p.m 

Map of Battle of Guillemont 

Map of Battle of Delville Wood 

Map of Battle of Guedecourt 

Map No. 2 — Ypres Salient 

Map of the Third Battle of Ypres, showing Objectives 

Map No. ;$ -Menin Road Battle .... 

Map No. 4--Gillemont Farm Sector 
Map No. 5 Vaucellette Farm Area 
Map No. 6 Givenchy ...... 

Facsimile of German Map, showing Plan of Attack, Captured 
April 9th, 1918 





Facing Page 12 




15 




Page 16 




34 




37 




38 




Facing Page 40 




Page 63 




Facing Page S3 




96 




„ 100 




„ 108 



110 



A Reduced Facsimile of the Roll of 
\'olunteers tor Service Abroad signed in 
tlie Public Hall, on Sth August, 1914 



A Reduced Facsimile of the Roll of Volunteers for Service Abroad signed in the 
Public Hall, on 8th August, 19IJ. 



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CHAPTER I. 
Early History and Training in England. 

The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment has a peculiar history, being descended 
from the old 47th, the Lanarkshire* Regiment, and the 81st, the Loyal 
Lincoln Volunteers. 

In 1881, when these two Regiments were at their Depot at Preston, it was found 
convenient to amalgamate them, and they became the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the 
North Lancashire Regiment. The Lincolnshire men were not pleased at having 
to drop the epithet " Loyal " (conferred on them")" in memory of an occasion during 
the Peninsular War when, on volunteers being told to step one pace forward, the 
entire Battalion moved forward one pace), and they placed their views before the 
War Office, with the result that the new formation was allowed to retain the epithet, 
and it became the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. This little outline of its history 
explains why the 1st Battalion's March-past is " My love is like a red. red rose," 
generally known as the "Red Rose," and the 2nd Battalion's "The Lincolnshire 
Poacher." 

A Volunteer Rifle Corps was formed in Preston in 1839 as a consequence of 
the talked-of possibilities of a French invasion. This Corps continued in existence 
as a Volunteer Corps until the territorialisation of Regiments about the year 
1878, when it became a Volunteer Battalion of the Loyal North Lancashire 
Regiment ; later, on the formation of the Territorial Force it became the 4th (T.) 
Battalion of the same Regiment. 

This Territorial Battalion succeeded to the traditions of the amalgamated units, 
and strove as best it might to emulate its Regular Battalions, but the Territorial 
scheme did not produce the full complement of officers and men, and it should be 
realised that those who served in it prior to the war did so in the face of a certain 
amount of ridicule, gave up nearly the whole of their spare time to camps and drills, 
and in most cases were seriously out of pocket over the whole business. 

With the exception of a Company which was sent to South Africa to reinforce 
the Regular Battalion, the unit had not seen active service prior to August, 1914, 
but those who then belonged to it were keen, and had, in the face of discouragements, 
done their level best to master their job. 

The beginning of August, 191(, found the Battalion, under strength in officers 
and men, in camp at Kirkby Lonsdale. When war was declared on the 4th of 
August, and the Territorial Force was embodied, the 4th were hurriedly recalled, 
and took up their quarters in the Public Hall, Preston. Within two or three 
days they had recruited to strength in all ranks, and had volunteered, practically 

'Changed lo " Lancashire in I7.SI when thi-y were sent to thai Countv to recruit. 
tAccordinc to tradition 



to a man, for service abroad. Photographs of the original roll signed on that 
occasion will be found immediately preceding Chapter I. 

That first fortnight in the Public Hall will never be forgotten by any of those 
who went through it. The Companies lived, ate, and slept on the floor, or on the 
benches in the gallery ; the officers slept on the floor of one of the crush-rooms, 
and the whole business was a bit of a nightmare, but we were firmly under the im- 
pression at that time that any day might bring orders to go abroad, and we were 
kept fully equipped and issued with ammunition according to the mobilisation scale 
then in force. 

On the 8th August, the Battalion paraded in the Market Square, Preston, 
and the colours were handed over to the Mayor for safe custody, no one at that time 
foreseeing that they would remain there for just on five years. A photograph of 
the colours appears as a frontispiece to this book : in the fulness of time, no doubt, 
the battle honours earned by the Battalion in the Great War will be embroidered 
upon them. 

On the 22nd August, we moved down to Swindon, where the Battalion 
remained for nearly three months, billeted in schools, training, and generally im- 
proving discipline, but it was very difficult to get much real work done, as detach- 
ments were sent off to guard the main line of the Great Western Railway. These 
detachments, on the whole, had a pretty good time, as they were stationed at various 
places along the Thames Valley and the local people took a great interest in them, 
and were most hospitable. They learnt a good deal, especially in getting used to 
night sentry work, but no one was sorry when in November they were recalled and 
the Battalion moved as a whole to Sevenoaks. 

Here we were allotted good training grounds and serious training was possible. 
Though the nature of the billets, mostly empty houses, threw us much on our own 
resources, it had the advantage that we began to learn to make ourselves comfort- 
able under any circumstances. 

We spent Christmas here, and had a very elaborate Christmas dinner, followed 
by a really good concert, in a large marquee provided by the generosity of one of the 
inhabitants. We found many hospitable folk at Sevenoaks, and made many friends. 
The two King's Own Battalions and the .5th Battalion of the Loyal North Lanca- 
shire Regiment were also billeted at the same place, and there was a good deal of 
unavoidable overcrowding. Up to this time we had been the only 4th Battalion, 
but in November, 1914, an order was issued that 2nd Line Territorial Battalions 
should be formed, for Home Service only, to find drafts for the 1st Line Battalions, 
and we took the title 1 '4th, to distinguish ourselves from the 2/4th, then in process 
of formation at Blackpool. The latter was later on — early in I91fi- sent overseas, 
and served in France and Belgium in the SJth Division. 

About February, 1915, the 1 /4th, which had previously been worked on the 
eight-company organisation, with a Captain, two Subalterns, and a Colour-Sergeant 
to each Company, was reorganised in accordance with a War Office Order on the 
four company system. This system had been in operation in the Regular Army 



for some time prior to the war ; why it had not previously been applied to the 
Territorial Force we never knew, and only surmised that it had been on its trial 
until the change was actually made. 

February, 1915, will always be regarded as the turning point in our history. 
Major Hindle, then Junior Major, was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel and given com- 
mand of the unit. A severe process of weeding out started, coupled with vigorous inocu- 
lation and vaccination, and we commenced to train in accordance with the new War 
Office syllabus of training. We trained very hard, but everybody was becoming 
restive. It is not too much to say that we had daily been expecting to be sent abroad 
ever since the previous August, and by this time we were beginning to think that 
we should never go. In consequence there was much muttering, which was not 
allayed when we saw the 1,5th Loyal North Lancashires hand in their blankets one 
morning, and parade for France. 

In March, 1915, we were suddenly moved to Oxted, where we were billeted in 
empty houses. There we began to dig, and completed, to the satisfaction 
of those who were in charge, a section of the London Defences running over 
the Downs. This was excellent experience, as there was every kind of soil to be 
contended with — clay, chalk, sand, and a sort of conglomerate, composed of what 
seemed to be melted flints, which blunted any pick in about five minutes. Here 
we first came into contact with elements of Kitchener's Army, which were engaged 
on similar work. 

In April, 1915, it was suddenly made known that at last we really were going 
to France, and we were moved to Bedford, where we joined the 51st Highland 
Division. The ten days at Bedford were spent in completely re-equipping the 
Battalion and transport, and in bayonet fighting and route marching, our last 
route march before crossing to France being one of 18 miles in full pack. 

The Lancashire men and the Highlanders fought like anything when they first 
met, and a keen rivalry sprang up between them, which only became friendly when 
one evening a fight took place between one of our fellows and one of the Highlanders. 
It was reported amongst us that our man had won. Probably a similar report was 
current amongst the Highlanders with regard to their champion ! Whatever the 
truth was, from that day we settled down together and became the best of friends. 

It has been impossible to devote very much space to these early days in England. 
Everyone was as keen as mustard, and we had the advantage of having, besides our 
Regular Adjutant Captain Norman (Royal Welsh Fusiliers), and Sergeant-Major 
Farnworth (of the 1st Battalion), a number of senior Officers who had made soldiering 
their hobby for years and passed the examinations necessary to attain their rank. 
The Warrant Officers and many of the Non-Commissioned Officers were also thoroughly 
trained. The disadvantages under which we laboured were that, being a Territorial 
unit, our equipment had not been up to date, and we were not, at first at any rate, 
taken in hand and pushed on as the newly-formed Kitchener's Army were ; but 
there is no doubt that at Bedford, when at last we were under orders for overseas, 
we held our heads high, and in all the glory of a new issue of equipment and clothes 



were on the whole a pretty smart and likely looking lot. It is most unfortunate 
that the only photographs taken of Companies at Bedford are not now available, 
the films having been destroyed by fire. Two Officers and a number of men had 
been left at Oxted, and one can never forget the pitiful disappointment shown on 
their faces as we marched away, leaving them behind. Some of them afterwards 
came to us as reinforcements. 




IX 
D 
O '2 

o - 

K o 

W ^ 

o 



CHAPTER II. 
Early Days and the Battle of Festubert. 

On the 2nd of May, 1915, Major Foley, Second-Lieutenant Harris (Transport 
Officer), the Machine Gun Officer, and 104 other ranks and the whole of the Regi- 
mental Transport, entrained at BALLAST PIT SIDING, BEDFORD, at one o'clock 
in the morning, arriving at SOUTHAMPTON at 6 40 a.m., where they embarked 
on s.s. ' ' ROSSETTI ' ' and sailed at 4 30 p.m., arriving at HAVRE at 3 a.m. on the 3rd. 

On the evening of that day, the rest of the Battalion entrained at BALLAST PIT 
SIDING in two trains, and travelled down to FOLKESTONE, where they arrived about 
midnight, and marched straight down on to the boat, s.s. " ONWARD," which cast 
off at 1 30 a.m. 

At last we were really on our way, after all the delays and waitings we were 
going overseas like the rest ! And it had all been done so quickly that only now, 
as we stood on the darkened boat and watched the lights of England receding, did 
we begin to realise what it meant — this stealthy journey of nearly a thousand souls 
across the Channel, which many of us had never seen before, and which many were 
never to see again. 

The Adjutant's diary gives our strength (apart from the Advance Party) as 
follows : — 

Lieut. -Colonel R. Hindle. 

Captain and Adjutant C. C. Norman (R. Welsh Fusiliers.) 

Captains Nickson, Booth, Hibbert, Peak, Whitfield, Crump, H. Parker, Widdows. 

Lieutenants Ord (Signalling Officer;, Smith, Rennard, Brindle, Moore, Gregson, 
Duckworth. 

Second-Lieutenants Houghton, Davies, Lindsay, Rogerson, P. Parker, Bryce- 
Smith, Craven. 

Lieutenant and Quartermaster F. W. Baker. 

Captain Derham (R.A.M.C ). 

Rev. Powell, C. of E. Chaplain. 

And 895 W.O.'s, N.C.O.'s, and Men. 

The total strength of the Battalion on this date was (including attached) 31 
Officers and 1,003 other Ranks. 

No smoking or talking was allowed on deck during the passage, which was calm 
and without incident, and the boat drew alongside at BOULOGNE about 3 a.m , 
where we at once disembarked and marched about two miles to a canvas rest camp 
at OSTROHOVE. How strange everything looked in the early morning light, as 



we swung along against our instincts on the riaht-hand side of the pavi road, the 
French signs with which we grew so familiar later on, the grilles in the front doors, 
the smells ! 

On arrival at the camp we were soon told off to our tents, where we slept till 
eight, when we had breakfast. After breakfast most of us sent off our first Field 
Postcards to the folks at home, and cleaned up. We stayed in camp all day, resting 
and sunning ourselves, parading again at (i .'{0 p.m., when we marched to PONT 
DE BRIQUES Station, where we formed up in groups of 40 and waited for the train, 
which soon arrived from HAVRE with the Transport. Cattle trucks ! However, we 
entrained, about 40 to a truck, and presently jolted off ; we spent a very uncom- 
fortable night ! 

On Sth May, about 2 30 a.m., we arrived at BERGUETTE, where we detrained 
and at 4 a.m. started to march to LILETTE, led by a "guide" who took us about two 
miles out of our way a serious matter, on empty stomachs, to us who were still fresh 
from " the fieshpots of Egypt " ; however, we got there, and went into billets of 
sorts, many preferring to sleep in the open, so villainously d:rty were some of the 
outhouses. Here we found the 1 /Sth King's Liverpools, the 1 '4th King's Own 
and Brigade Headquarters being at neighbouring places. All day and all night an 
almost continuous stream of motor vehicles went through, mostlv laden with French 
troops in their picturesque blue and red. Battalion Headquarters was " chez M. 
Rousseau,'' and the Officers' Mess in a small estaminet. As we rested that day, we 
heard the distant guns for the first time, booming intermittently the whole day through. 

On the fith, about 7 15 p.m., we received orders to move, and marched out at 
iS p.m. to LILLERS, where we joined the rear of the Brigade at 2 47 p.m. Here 
began the worst march that any of us remember, over strange uneven roads, in pitch 
darkness. To us, marching in rear of the whole Brigade, it seemed interminable ; halts 
were irregular, and by the time " ten minutes' halt " came along to us it was time 
to move again, and it was impossible to maintain a steady pace. Added to this 
someone had seen fit to billet from the front of the column instead of the rear, which 
held us up at each billeting village and prolonged the march considerably. The last 
mile nearly finished us, but we stumbled into CALONNE-SUR-LE-LYS at 1 a.m. — 
dead beat — and slept it off. 

We had a pretty easy time for the next few days, as, beyond being required 
to be ready to move at an hour's notice, we were left alone. The weather was 
fine, and many of us bivouacked ; we did a little training, and tried to teach the local 
people a little sanitation, a word which apparently did not exist in their language. 
We, on the other hand, learnt that faggots and soil had a market value ; one Com- 
pany, taking soil from a heap in a field, were pounced on by the owner for taking 
" ma bonne terre " to cover someone else's smelly midden, and he was quite rude 
about it. The Officers' Mess was in a private house on the main street ; one 
night when an al fresco concert was in progress to the great delight of the troops, 
a man passing on the road enquired what was going on, and received the laconic 
reply, "Officers' rum issue I " 




2 
W 

a; 

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On the 8th we were visited by Sir Douglas Haig and the Divisional Comnnander. 

The gunfire about eight or nine miles away increased on the 9th to what must 
have been a very heavy bombardment- no doubt the second Battle of LA BASSEE. 

On the 11th blankets and Officers' kits were allowed to be removed from 
the waggons on which they had hitherto been loaded, and the state of readiness was 
relaxed. Respirators for poisonous gas (the old gauze and wadding affairs) were 
issued. On the 13th there was a thunderstorm, accompanied by torrential rain, 
which did not add to the comfort of the campers. 

Just after midnight on the 14th, orders to move arrived, and after breakfast 
we fell in and moved to the starting point by CALONNE CHURCH, whence we marched 
as a Brigade to METEREN. We arrived there at 2 p.m., and got into billets about 3, 
mostly on the east and north-east sides of the town, the Mess as usual in an estaminet, 
whose landlord thought fit to start emptying his midden soon after we arrived, causing 
one man to say to another, who seemed in low spirits, " What's up. Tommy ? Avez 
vous mal de midden ? " 

The country was different from CALONNE, where the ground was flat 
and intersected by ditches full of frogs which croaked all night ; here it was un- 
dulating, and windmills and hop fields became features. On the south side of the 
town were a number of graves of Officers and Men who had fallen in the fighting 
there on 13th October, mostly Royal Warwicks and King's Own — it was said that 
the Huns had mounted machine guns on the tower of the church, which commands 
the country to the south and west, and had simply mown them down. How 
difficult we found it then to realise the story, and how peaceful the little town 
seemed to us. The Adjutant took the opportunity of teaching the Officers a 
little field sketching — a branch of our training which had hitherto been crowded 
out. Courses in those days were few and far betv/een, and though we had 
learnt in the Regiment many things of which some of the systematically 
trained Officers of later days were conspicuously ignorant, there were gaps in 
our knowledge. 

Sunday was fine and hot, and all denominations had Church Parades. On Monday 
the Ninth Division marched through— what a fine lot they looked, and how we envied 
them "their cookers." Why hadn't u r got cookers? And the old galling com- 
parisons between the treatment of the Territorial Force and Kitchener's Army were 
rubbed in once more. It is all dead now, but we had something to grouse at. 
On Tuesday, the 18th, we paraded at S p.m. for a night march, through VIEUX 
BERQUIN and NEUF BERQUIN to LA GORGUE, a suburb of ESTAIRES, where 
we arrived about 4 a.m. Not for months afterwards did most of us learn that we, 
the 31st Division, had been moved up by General French to be in reserve for the 
Second Battle of LA BASSEE. 

The town was full of troops. Our men were billeted in breweries and factories; 
B and A Companies were in a shell-riddled Girls' School ; the Officers had difficulty 
in finding even a floor to sleep on, but at last most of them gravitated to one estaminet, 
where they fed on what they could get, and slept. An unforgettable incident rises 



to the mind. Lieutenant — , having disposed himself for slumber on three chairs 
and fallen asleep, tried to turn over and so rolled off in one piece on to the floor, 
where he lay immovable, only remarking, in injured tones : " I'm fed up with this 

- War !'• 

On the 19th, the 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers left us and went to ST. OMER, 
and 18 of our men were sent to the Tunnelling Company R.E. ; this is mentioned 
because it was our first separation we had been together, in the same sections even, 
with practically no change for months. 

On the 20th we marched to billets in farms on the east side of LOGON ; when 
we got there we found them occupied by a Battalion of the Grenadier Guards, 
who had been in action the night before and lost their Colonel, Sergt. -Major, and 
(57 other Ranks, so we formed up in a field opposite a large 18th century farm with 
a moat round it and stayed there all day ; in the evening the Guards moved out and 
marched off with that inimitable swing of theirs, and we took over their billets — 
untouched farms within three miles of the line. Here we were close to the lair of 
a J)in. Howitzer the only one on that front, it was said which had been shelling 
the Hun all day. 

The next day we set to work with zeal to clean up and put the sanitation right 
covering middens to prevent flies breeding, building incinerators, and fixing up a 
water supply ; we rather specialised in sanitation even in those days, when most 
people seemed rather to scoff at it. Late at night the 5th Gordons arrived and 
bivouacked in the field opposite. 

On the 2.'kd, a very hot day, sanitary work continued, and surveys of the billeting 
area were carried out by Officers, and afterwards combined into a composite map; the 
next day Second Lieutenant Sutherland, of the 2nd Leicesters, two N.C.O. 's, and 1 1 men 
reported, to instruct us in trench work needless to say we were keen for anything 
they could teach us, as we were eagerly looking forward to our first tour in the line. 
Yes, Reader, you may think this is a figure of speech, but it is not— we really were, 
and we sharpened our bayonets with zest on the old lady's grindstone, and thought 
she must be a German spy because she tried to stop us ! 

All the same, we expected to stay where we were for a few weeks, and were 
a bit surprised to learn, after a lecture on trench work by Captain Burton, 3i)th 
Gharwalis (we were in the Indian Corps), that we were to go into the line on the 
25th. We assembled on the road by Battalion Headquarters at 7 p.m. and marched 
to a Cemetery, where we were met by an Officer of the 1 '7th Black Watch. He 
reported that the trenches we were to occupy were being shelled by the enemy, so 
we halted till 10 p.m., when we moved forward by platoons at 100 yards' distance. 

It is quite impossible to try to convey in print the impression of one's first march 
up to the line : one remembers the dark, strange road, broken trees, loose telephone 
wires, a long halt in a battered village, then on through interminable miles of breast- 
works manned by Canadians, crawling cautiously along in single file and breathless 
silence then a halt, and platoons are sent off down various alleys, to find at the 
end a trench full of Scotsmen anxiously awaiting relief. The right of the Battalion 



9 

rested on the QUINQUE RUE, the left on the road from RUE DE L'EPINETTE to 
FERME COUR D'AVOUE ; A and D Companies and Machine Gun Section occupied 
the front hne, No. 2 platoon having an advanced post about 200 yards in front of 
the main line ; C was in support and B in reserve. The fire trench had only recently 
been built, and the forward bit had 18in. of water in it ; no wire had been put up. 
The support trench was an old German trench about .'500 yards to the left rear of 
the fire trench, while the reserve trench was again 200 yards behind the latter. The 
parapets were revetted with, and in some cases entirely built of, sandbags ; dug- 
outs — very sketchy- were built in the parados ! The trenches were nowhere 
more than two feet deep, the rest of the cover being above ground ; there were narrow 
communication trenches. Every house in the neighbourhood was in utter ruin, 
and the ground was a mass of shell holes. Equipment, rifles, ammunition, clothing, 
tins, both our own and enemy, were strewn everywhere, and dozens of bodies — 
chiefly of Scots Guards and Germans — lay about as they had fallen in the May 
Battle of Festubert ; the stench was awful. Some old German trenches, not occupied 
by us, were interesting as showing the elaborate way they had dug themselves in. 
One dugout was a room about 15ft. square, with doors and a window, lined throughout 
with wood planking covered with cloth, and furnished with leather-covered chairs 
and a table ; in one a quantity of feminine underclothing was found — what it was 
doing there could only be guessed. 

Most of the above description is taken from the Adjutant's journal, written 
at the time ; all we saw that night was mud and sandbags. The Platoon which took 
over the forward trench had to wait for the Scots to climb out at the back, and then 
stepped down about two feet and found themselves in a good foot of muddy water. 
There was nothing for it but to wait till dawn ; when it came we found ourselves 
in a shallow ditch, with only two rows of sandbags in front. Immediately to our 
front was a huge pile of black, red, and yellow sandbags, where the Germans had 
blocked and strengthened an old communication trench leading into our lines ; 
their main line was further off — from 200 to 400 yards ; behind us and in front were 
the dead bodies, also in our own parapet and under the duckboards of the communica- 
tion trench, which was soon dubbed " Bluebottle Alley," for as soon as the sun rose 
clouds of the loathsome insects filled the air and buzzed round our heads. To our 
front we could see in the distance the spire of VIOLAINES Church, and on our right 
was a new parapet, very high and thick, surrounding CANADIAN ORCHARD. We 
were puzzled and annoyed for some days by sniping from that direction, till one early 
morning we saw a Hun crawling from under that same parapet towards his own lines, 
but a rifle shot fired from a rifle which had belonged to one of the Scots Guards 
settled his hash and avenged the late owner of the rifle. 

On the 26th we were shelled intermittently all day, and two men were wounded, 
our first casualties ; in the evening two platoons were sent out and extended from 
the right of No. 2 Platoon at P 1 1 and started a trench to connect up with the Canadians. 
On the 27th we were again shelled intermittently, but no appreciable damage was 
done and we improved our positions greatly. We did not realise then that we had 



10 

been put in to finish the consolidation of newly-taken ground — a pretty stiff beginning 
for raw troops. The night was exceptionally quiet — there was less shelling than 
usual and very little sniping ; during the morning our fire trenches were shelled 
somewhat severely with shrapnel, and again in the afternoon, six men being 
wounded. As soon as it got dark, working parties went out to get on with the new 
trench to the right of P 11 ; the existing forward trench was strengthened and the 
R.E. put a footbridge across the ditch on our right front ; it was very dark and 
there were no interruptions. 

The next day we lost two men wounded by shell fire, which was pretty heavy. 
A working party of 200, with a covering party under Lieutenant Brindle, started 
a new trench from the new bridge towards the Canadians, and did good work in spite 
of bursts of shrapnel at intervals ; during the night bearings were taken on gun 
flashes, and we located the enemy battery which was troubling us. 

On the 30th the enemy fire — both shrapnel and H.E. (known in those days as 
"Jack Johnsons" or " Coalboxes " — was heavier than usual ; two years later 
such activity would have provoked a perfect hurricane of retaliation from our own 
guns, but in 1915 our gunners had nothing to throw away and no retaliation could 
be had. That night the working parties continued their work, and our guns at 
12 15 a.m. and 2 15 a.m. fired a few shells. The enemy retorted with vigour, wound- 
ing Second Lieutenant Bryce Smith and five men and killing one. The working 
parties were brought in at 1 a.m. The enemy fire died down about .'{ 30 a.m., but 
burst out afresh at 1 1 a.m., being directed chiefly on our fire trenches, which were 
damaged in several places. 

On 1st June we carried out the usual programme, and were shelled fairly heavily 
during the afternoon ; in these early days we had three or six men in every bay 
of the trench, and the wonder is that our casualties were not much greater than they 
were. On the 2nd we were relieved by 5Sth Vaughan's Rifles, and marched 
back to billets at CORNET MALO, half a mile north-west of LOCON CHURCH. We 
went out by companies, and the leading men set off at about four miles an hour, 
with the result that those at the back of the long single file were running and 
stumbling and out of breath, and it was great good luck that we all reached the rendez- 
vous ; but we did, and after a short rest, tramped off by Companies to our billets, 
which we reached about 4 a.m. As each Company wheeled into its own farm- 
yard a wild cheer went up, for there were our C.Q.M.S. and cooks, a brand new 
field cooker, like the ones we had seen and envied with the 9th Division, and, best 
of all, a meal — piping hot and ready. It took about one minute to get the Com- 
pany formed in close column, arms piled, packs off and neatly dressed, and coffee 
served out. 

We rested all day, but in the evening moved to fresh billets between CALONNE 
and ROBECQ via the LA BASSEE CANAL. Lieutenant Gregson and 30 other ranks 
went to the new Grenadier Company, and Lieutenant Smith and four to the Trench 
Morta-- class. Two days later, back we went to our old billets at CORNET MALO ! 
That was a horrid march. Starting at 7 p.m., we marched 12 miles as ordered, but 



11 

On arrival no one knew anything about us, and on enquiring at Brigade Headquarters 

it was discovered that a counter-order had been issued but had never reached us, 
so we had to turn about and retrace our steps to CORNET MALO, arriving at mid- 
night. It was during this counter-march that we passed a Battalion of Highlanders, 
and one of them shouted : " What Battalion's that ? " Quick as thought came 
the answer in a tone of pitying contempt : " Battalion ! This isn't a Battalion ; 

it's a walking club ! " Another Scots wit asked : " What are you chaps 

doing? Marching ? " and got prompt answer : " Marching ! No ; we're rest- 
ing ! " — as indeed we were, technically. 

On the 7th Second Lieutenant Lindsay went to hospital with flu' ; it was a sultry 
day and bathing was fashionable, both in the Canal and the clear streams, also the 
following day, till a thunderstorm with torrents of rain put a stop to it. Captain 
Parker also went to hospital about this time. 

On 9th June we moved up to the trenches along the RUE DE BOIS, RUE DE 
L'EPINETTE, through FESTUBERT VILLAGE and down LE QUINQUE RUE. for 
about 800 yards, and relieved the 1,7th Black Watch. FESTUBERT was" the 
most badly-smashed village we had yet seen — there were remnants of barricades 
still standing in the streets most of the houses were heavily sandbagged, and some 
had barbed wire round them. There was a house at the entrance to the village with 
all the front blown in and the furniture of the upper bedrooms hanging shakily — 
half in, half out. Where the Church had been, now only recognisable by the Crucifix 
which still stood unharmed, we turned to the left. (This description and the pages 
which follow were written by the late Captain Lindsay at the time, and have been 
inserted practically as he wrote them.) 

THURSDAY, June 10th, 1915. 

The day passed away very quietly ; but there were two or three very heavy 
thunderstorms with torrential rains which rapidly converted the trenches — the com- 
munication trenches in particular — into quagmires. These communication trenches 
became very dirtj-, in no place being less than boot-deep and in many places thigh-deep 
in a pestilent liquid mud. The boards placed at the bottom of the trench were quite 
covered over, and, being extremely slippery, were mainly useful in leading the way 
to the deeper, wetter part of the trenches ! Working parties at night in heavy rain 
had very great difficulty in making progress. The night was very dark, and the men 
were loaded with spades and hurdles and sandbags. Only a section of the working 
party under the command of Captain Crump managed to get through to the fire trench, 
and took three hours to do it — until midnight— distance not quite a mile ! Working 
parties were under control of Engineers. 

Lieutenant Holt was admitted to hospital suffering from rheumatism. Second 
Lieutenant Rawsthorn, Reserve Machine Gun Officer, took over the Machine Guns. 

FRIDAY, June 11th, 1915. 

Second Lieutenant Lindsay rejoined the Battalion. 



12 

The morning was finer, but the trenches were still very muddy. Three working 
parties were sent out in the morning to work in the open between the reserve and the 
support lines in the making of bridges across the ditches and of tracks through the 
long grass, of ramps in the trenches to facilitate climbing the parapet, and in 
clearing up the old German trench which lay in that area. The Germans shelled 
this old trench of theirs regularly, though it was not occupied. 

The Battalion was relieved unexpectedly by the 1 7th Black Watch. Relief 
was completed by 10 15 p.m., and the Battalion marched back along the Canal to 
billets near LE CORNET MALO, in the wood to the south of that place. The march 
was a tiring one, but the men lasted out well, and billets were reached about 5 a.m. 

SATURDAY, June 12th, 191.5. 

The day was passed in resting and cleaning up. 

SUNDAY, June K^th, 1915. 

Orders were received to return to the trenches we had left on Friday night, and 
relieve the Battalions which had relieved the 1 8th K.L. Irish and ourselves then. 
Though no order had been issued, we all knew that the Battalion was going up for 
an attack, and in anticipation of this the Officers, or as many as cared to do so, 
drew men's uniforms from the Quartermaster's Stores. Lieutenant Moore, hearing 
in hospital word of this impending attack, rejoined us. The Battalion marched 
off at 6 p.m., and relief was completed in the trenches about I a.m. This time we 
took over the fire and support trenches from the 1 6th Black Watch. We found 
the trenches very much drier than when we left them. There was some shelling 
at the time of relief. The dispositions of the Battalion ((i4() strong) were : B and 
C Companies in fire trenches, D Company in support, A Company in reserve. 

Second Lieutenant Houghton and one man were wounded going up. 

It is a queer sensation going up to one's first battle. The bracing of the nerves 
to face the unknown — it is the essence of religion, voluntary self-sacrifice for 
a cause, made possible only by faith, and calling for the strongest effort of will to 
control the nerves. Happy the man who is not gifted with a vivid imagination— 
who, like Kipling's oxen, can plod steadily along, living in the present — blind to 
the future. Those who fall do so at the moment of their highest endeavour ; had 
they lived they had probably never risen so high again. Surely to them, if to anyone, 
is granted the peace which passeth understanding. 

MONDAY, June 14th, 1915. 

The Battalion had been warned for an attack, and operation orders issued 
from the Brigade in the morning made this clear. With the object of gaining 
ground in the direction of RUE D'OUVERT, the Fourth Corps was to attack the 
German positions in the north. The 51 st Division, the 7th Division, and the 
Canadian Division were to attack simultaneously. 



Map No. 1 

FESTUBERT 



Map No. 1 

FESTUBERT 




r 



13 

The 5 1st Division detailed the 154th Infantry Brigade, and the 15'lth Infantry 
Brigade the 1 -Ith Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (with 10 bombers) on the right, 
and the l/6th Scottish Rifles (with 10 bombers), on the left, as assaulting troops. 
Besides these there were : — 

I. 2 Officers, 7 N.C.O.'s, and 'Mi men from Grenadier Company. 

II. 12 bayonet men from I /4th North Lancashires. 

16 bayonet men from 1 /6th Scottish Rifles. 

III. 2 N.C.O.'s, 12 men of 1 /4th North Lancashires, Blocking parties. 
1 N.C.O., 6 men of l/(jth Scottish Rifles. 

IV. 1 N.C.O., (} men of 1 /4th North Lancashires, Carrying parties. 
1 N.C.O., 6 men of l/6th Scottish Rifles. 

V. 1 Sections as escort from the 1 /4th North Lancashires. 
(These North Lancashire details were found by D Company.) 

The supporting Battalion was the 1 /4th Royal Lancaster Regiment, less two 
platoons, whilst the 1 /8th Liverpool Regiment was held in Brigade Reserve. 

There was also a Trench Mortar detachment with two guns of the old 
" Archibald " type, under the command of Lieutenant Smith. 

A working party of two platoons from the 1 /4th Royal Lancaster Regiment 
was detailed to accompany one Section of the 2 2nd Highland Field Company R.E. 

The attack by the Brigade was towards the houses on the road behind the Ger- 
man salient. At these houses a junction would be effected, if the iittack was 
successful, with the 7th Division. The two attacks converged on this point. We 
were to obtain flanking fire from the rifles and machine guns of the 152nd Brigade 
in the trenches to our left. They in turn were to advance on the flank when we 
had consolidated our position. 

The whole attack was timed for 6 p.m. on the 15th June, and was to be pre- 
ceded by a 48 hours' bombardment. 

These, in brief, were the operation orders. We had been warned to show no 
signs of activity during this preliminary bombardment, which began about 
dawn, and was devoted chiefly to cutting the enemy's barbed wire. Field 
guns bombarded this, whilst the heavier guns played on the enemy's trenches, and 
the heaviest on the houses behind. The bombardment was not confined to our 
front, but extended all along the ridge to the south towards VIOLAINES. This 
village lay over the ridge, and only the church spire could be seen. 

From the support trench, the view was of the usual kind, a flat Flanders 
plain, with ditches bordered by rows of pollard willows, and wrecked farm- 
houses with a few scattered trees. The plain very gradually rose to a sky-line, 
the Aubers ridge being especially marked on the right. The British bombard- 
ment was persistent and, from what we could see, effective, whereas the 
Germans only replied sporadically with some sharp bursts of shrapnel and some 
high explosive shell on the communication trenches, from which B and C 



14 

Companies lost a few men. The bombardment continued all along the front, on 
both sides of us, all night with only two slight stoppages. 

In reply to an enquiry from the artillery as to the amount of damage done to 
the wire by the artillery fire in our line of advance, Major Nickson replied that most 
of the wire had been destroyed. This was at 11 a.m. on the 15th June, 1915, and 
shrapnel was still bursting over it. Captain Norman reported to the same effect, 
and said that all stakes were gone, and such strips of wire as remained did not 
appear to be an obstacle to an advance. He added that the wire opposite the enemy's 
main trench could not be observed clearly from our fire trench. 

TUESDAY, l.Sth June, 1915. 

The British bombardment continued as on the previous day, with the Germans 
still only occasionally replying. Very heavy artillery (9.2) was brought to bear 
upon the houses on the road to our immediate left front, some being set on fire. It 
was particularly interesting to watch this shelling, and to note the regularity and 
precision with which it was shifted from house to house. The wire and the German 
sap and the fire trenches were also kept under continual fire. An advanced mountain 
battery played on the enemy's parapets. 

B Company was withdrawn to the support trench to the right of D Company, 
whilst C Company moved to the right of the fire trench, making room for the charging 
company of the 1 fith Cameronians on their left. A Company was still in reserve. 

Orders were received in the afternoon that the British bombardment would 
increase greatly in intensity at 5 ;{() p.m., and would continue so until 6 p.m. For 
this first half-hour, the guns would be concentrated on the enemy's barbed wire. 
At 6 p.m. they would " lift," i.e., increase their range on to the enemy's fire tiench 
and shell this solely for three minutes. At 6 3 the communication trenches would 
be bombarded for a minute, and the enemy's main trench from 6 4 to 6 15. At 
fi 15 the guns would lift into the road, and would shell this intensely for half-an- 
hour, until (i 45. At 6 45 the artillery would form a barrage beyond the road. 

At 5 'M) promptly the bombardment became terrific. Shells whistled and 
shrieked overliead in enormous numbers. All the British artillery which was massed 
behind the line concentrated on the assaulting positions with rapid fire. There 
were also some French 75 batteries to help. Under this rain of shells B and 
D Companies moved up the communication trenches towards the fire trench from 
the supports, and A Company to the supports from the reserve line. 

But while the British bombardment increased greatly in intensity; the German 
shelling, from being merely desultory, also became intense. High explosive shells, 
in salvoes of four, dropped upon the communication trenches, filling them, in many 
places, with earth and mud, and in some cases obliterating them. It became a task 
of extreme difficulty to move up to the firing line under this heavy fire. There were 
some dead and wounded in the trenches. 

At () p.m. precisely C Company charged from the fire trench. The leading 
platoon was a composite one, made up from Nos. 9 and 12 for strength, and under 



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Ditches marked 
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Scale about 100 yards 
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15 

the command of Second Lieutenant Parker ; No. 10 Platoon under Second Lieutenant 
Craven followed at 100 yards' distance, and No. 11 under Second Lieutenant Davies 
followed this. They had to climb the parapet, and, under a withering fire, form 
to the left flank slightly and then charge. They did this almost perfectly in line, 
and were in possession of the trench inside three minutes. Their losses were 
chiefly from rifle and machine gun fire. This must have been principally from 
the main trench, and not the advanced trench of the salient, since they found most 
of the Germans there sheltering in dugouts ; these were dealt with by bombing 
parties. The bombers worked in two groups : (a) (right) 1 5th Royal Lancaster 
Regiment under Lieutenant Taylor, and (b) l/6th Scottish Rifles under Lieutenant 
Hay (left group). These bombing parties, supported by the various parties told off 
to them, did magnificent work, and penetrated right through the road to a much 
greater distance than ever the assaulting battalions reached. 

Roughly it may be said that the centre of the attack was L 8 as marked on the 
map. The two leading platoons of C Company, with their left directing the whole 
attack, charged the German T-head sap directly in front, and taking that in the 
rush, swept to the German fire trench. On their left were the 1 6th Scottish Rifles 
aiso charging 

When the trench was won, comparatively easily, the Germans holding up their 
hands and pleading for mercy, the bombing parties extended outwards, down 
past Z 1, K (), and Z 4. Their orders were to push ahead as far as possible, since 
the 7th Division, as detailed, would be attacking at the same time. Another party 
was to break off up towards the German main trench at X 7. The other main 
party of bombers went towards L 10 up the communication trench which was also 
a firing trench facing M 4 — at L 10 they split off, one towards L 9 and the other down 
the main German trench. These bombers actually went beyond the road so fast 
that their bayonet men could not keep up with them. They mostly ran along the 
top of the trench, with the German and British Artillery both bombarding the 
lines all this time very heavily indeed. 

Red screens were used to show the furthermost points reached by the infantry, 
to enable the artillery to support. The bombing parties carried red flags, and a 
red rocket was to be fired when the infantry reached the houses on the road at L 11. 
(The artillery had set these houses on fire, and they afforded a good landmark, i 
But the artillery observers could see nothing because of the tremendous smoke and 
dust cloud, which hid the whole area from their view. All telephone communica- 
tion was very soon smashed up, and messages had to be sent by relays of orderlies. 
Lieutenant Ord at L H was in charge of this. 

The course of the battle becomes a little obscure. The next supporting Com- 
pany was B, but Captain Peak, for some time reported missing, has lately been 
reported dead, and there is no connected account of what actually happened 
to this Company. At this period the German artillery redoubled in intensity on 
the deploying Companies, and whereas C Company had suffered chiefly from rifle 
and machine gun fire, B and D and A Companies suffered from shrapnel and high 



16 



explosive. B Company seems to have reinforced C Company on the right. B 
Company men say they had to cross a deep ditch with barbed wire entanglements at 
the bottom. (This must have been the ditch marked in front of the German fire 
trench at Z 1 ). Here, they say, Captain Peak was killed on the barbed wire in 
front of the trench. 

D Company, coming up the now very badly damaged communication and fire 
trench, was sent to reinforce the line in the left of the centre of the attacking line 
across the sap and the fire trench, and then along the edge of the communication 
trench towards L 10. Both B and D Companies moved to support in lines of 
platoons, through a gap in the trench, under extremely heavy artillery fire. 

Meanwhile the attack had swept on, past the German trench, up along the 
German communication trenches. There were a great number of casualties from 
rifle fire from the German main trench and enfilading machine gun fire from some- 
where about X 7 or Z 2. But the attack swept on and must have carried the 
main trench, already bombed, but for being pulled up suddenly by uncut barbed 
wire, which lay concealed in the long grass on the German (east) side of the ditch 
which runs parallel to the German main trench, south-east from L 10. The 
attacking line was then within ,'iO yards of the trench. More enfilade fire came 
from one of the houses at L 1 1 on the road. This house must have had a good 
number of machine guns in it. 

The position therefore about 7 p.m. was this: — ■ 




J 



n 



r 



;f 



Barbed wire marked in red wavy 

line. 
Red line marks approximate centre 

of attack. 



17 

The Scottish Rifles were attacking on our left with their right resting on the 
British sap head at L 8. Their advance was checked by uncut barbed wire which 
ran along the northern edge of the communication trench, very early on, and they 
lay in the open under galling and very heavy fire, losing heavily in attempting to 
cut it, but were compelled to advance along the communication trench. At 7 p.m. 
when the advance was checked, they were in this communication trench, which 
they were holding. Once a part of the German salient, it faced obliquely the 
British trench at M 4 ; it was also a fire trench, being very narrow, with numerous 
traverses and some dugouts about Z. The uncut wire here in front of this trench 
prevented any further advance by them. All their officers except one were 
casualties. The result of this forced change of front by them was the formation 
of an angle at L 10 in the line of attack, they themselves facing north, whilst the 
Loyal North Lancashires faced east or perhaps north-east. 

The ditch in which C Company lay, now reinforced by D on the left and B on 
the right, with A coming up from reserve, was bordered by a row of pollard willows. 
On the left it was comparatively dry, with a slight protecting bank on the east 
(German) side ; but the further it went to the right the more of a quagmire it 
became. In some places on the right it was thigh-deep in water. It ran parallel 
to the German trench along the road, at about 30 yards' distance from it. It 
afforded comparative security after the advance because of the slight cover to be 
obtained in it, and because it was too near the German trench to allow 
artillery fire to be brought to bear. C Company had brought up one sandbag per 
man and one shovel to every three men, with 20 wirecutters to the Company, and 
B and A Companies had brought up three sandbags per man and a pick or a shovel 
carried slung with spun yarn, per man, but some of these were lost in the advance, 
and only a few men came up with them all. 

The Battalion entrenched itself in this ditch line as best it could. It was rapidly 
going dark. A Company, as it came up, was sent to the right of the line to 
strengthen and extend it and to get into touch v/ith the 7th Division, and several 
parties were sent out to the right to find them, but fruitlessly. Entrenching in a 
water-logged ditch with the entrenching tool was slow work. At dusk the l/Jth 
King's Own sent up a Company to reinforce, under the command of Captain 
Barrow ; Major Nickson was in command of the front line. The Colonel had 
been wounded earlier in the evening, and Major Foley took over command and 
established his headquarters in the German fire trench opposite L 8. 

About 1 1 p.m. there was a slackening of the German fire, both artillery 
and rifle. The German artillery fire had been directed chiefly against our 
supports and reserves, and was particularly violent at L 8. Some of our wounded 
had been collected there, and were looked after there all night by Sergeant-Major 
Farnworth. 

By this time, in the front line, a machine gun had been placed in position about 
L 10. The trench junction there had been blocked by sandbags. It was at this 
point (L 10) that the Scottish Rifles were in touch with us. It was found impossible, 



f 



18 

because of lack of material, to block the further trench (X 7), and accordingly the 
line we held in the ditch was bent back to the right to protect that flank. The line 
was a bad one. There was a conference of Officers held by Major Nickson. Both 
flanks were in the air. We were not in touch with the 7th Division, and enfilade 
rifle fire was coming from the right flank, though fairly weak. The ditch was water- 
logged, and too wide in places and clearly marked by the row of pollard willows. 
Spades and picks and sandbags were lacking. There were no bombs left, and no 
bombers. (There were two advanced bomb reserves of 1,()0() bombs each near L 8, 
but no one knew where these were. The bombers sent to reinforce the original party 
were shelled heavily on the road to the reserve trenches, and out of 33 only five were 
unwounded.) Impossible to entrench ditch. Therefore proposed line about 20 
yards back in the open. This meant beginning afresh without tools. Men too 
crowded in line. There were no Veriy lights. Artillery support had ceased about 
8 45 because of uncertainty as to the actual position of the attacking Battalions. 
Major Nickson sent back word to Major Foley explaining this and asking for 
instructions. In the meantime the German counter-attack began, and prevented 
instructions arriving. 

It was about midnight when the Germans began to throw up flares in great 
numbers. They had been shelling L 10 and the (German) captured salient for 
some time before. Their counter-attack proper began by bombing at L 10 so 
severely that the machine gun there was damaged and put out of action, and 
the connection with the Cameronians broken. Almost at the same time, the 
Germans began to bomb down the right communication trench (X 7), and followed 
this by throwing bombs across the open. There was no means of replying, and no 
cover to be had anywhere in the ditch. To stay there would have meant the wiping 
out of those in the line ; enfilade fire came from both flanks- on the right from 
the German main trench at K 7, and on the left from L 9 ; the Scottish Rifles in 
the German communication trench were enfiladed down the whole length by 
artillery and rifle fire. Orders were given, therefore, to retire from the position. 

At the point Z (see map) a mixed body of men lined the shell craters and held 
up the Germans for about two hours, losing heavily. This point Z, which lay on 
the German side of their fire trench, was an absolute mass of wrecked dugouts. 
These men finally retired, in the mist of the morning, towards the sap south-west 
of L 8. In the retirement all the attacking Battalions were mixed up. The sap 
at L 8 was held by a composite company : 1 /4th Loyal North Lancashires, 1 6th 
Scottish Rifles, 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment, Grenadier Guards, 1 8th Liverpool 
Irish, but the Germans, probably because of their check at Z, did not push their 
counter-attack on to the British lines. 

The attacking Battalions were withdrawn to the support trenches about 4 a.m. 
on the 16th, the men in the sap about 6 a.m., and the lines were taken over 
by the l/8th K.L. Regiment (Irish), 



19 

Motor machine guns under Captain Hammond, D.S.O., to left of L 8, stayed 
up through the attack and for four days afterwards. 

The casualties were heavy. 

The Colonel was wounded at the beginning of the attack, when near L 8. 
Almost at the same time the Adjutant, Captain Norman, was severely wounded. 
He advanced with the leading platoon and was on the parapet of the German trench 
when he was wounded by, it is said, an officer hiding in a dugout. 

In C Company, Second Lieutenant P. Parker, who was in command of the 
charging platoon was seriously wounded, Second Lieutenant Craven was wounded 
in the leg, and Second Lieutenant Davies, who, wounded slightly twice, would 
go on, was fatally wounded and died on the field. 

In B Company, Captain Peak was reported killed, as previously mentioned, but 
was posted missing, as there was no definite news of what actually happened to 
him. Lieutenant Moore was wounded in the wrist, and Captain Crump blown up 
and injured by a shell. 

In D Company, Captain Hibbert was last seen directing the platoons through 
the gap in the fire trench. After that no news can be obtained of what happened 
to him, and he was posted missing. Captain Whitfield was seriously wounded 
in the thighs by shrapnel and died in hospital at Boulogne. Second Lieutenant 
Rawsthorn, in charge of the machine guns, was killed by shell when leading his 
team across the open to the German trenches. Lieutenant Brindle was hit on 
the head and in the arm. 

In A Company, Lieutenant Smith* was in charge of the trench mortar team 
during the bombardment, firing from the fire trench. When the order to charge 
was given. Lieutenant Smith rushed forward with his gun, and was seriously 
wounded when carrying it across the open. He died in hospital at Lillers two days 
later, and was buried there. 

The Officers who came through the fight unhurt were Major Foley, Major 
Nickson, Captain Booth, Captain Widdows, Lieutenant Rennard, Lieutenant Ord, 
Lieutenant Duckworth, Second Lieutenant Lindsay. 

Second Lieutenant Rogerson was away at General Headquarters attending a 
Machine Gun Course, and Lieutenant Gregson was attached to the Grenadier 
Company at the time. 

The casualties among the men were heavy, especially among the N.C.O.'s.t 
They were : — 

Killed ... ... ... ... 26 

Wounded ... ... ... ... 266 

Missing ... ... ... ... 110 

Total ... ... ... 402 

*C.Q.M.S. Lester and Private Cowburn (S. B.) brought him in to L 8. 

tCaptain Caldwell. M.O., was specially mentioned for attending to 2'13 wounded and getting 
them clear. 



20 

It must be assumed that most of the missing are killed. The list therefore 
stands with a high ratio of killed to wounded. 

The respective strengths of the Companies on June 30th, according to 
Orderly Room returns, were : — 

A Company ... ... ... ... 146 

B Company ... ... ... ... 99 

C Company ... ... ... ... 149 

D Company ... ... ... ... 126 



Total ... ... ... 520 

15 Officers on strength. The effective rifle strength was 358. 

The German trenches after the two days' bombardment were in a bad state. 
In many places they had been completely destroyed, and when we took them we found 
them piled deep with German dead. The dugouts, which had been made in the 
parados, seemed whole, but were full of dead and wounded, probably the work of 
the bombers. The communication trench was also partially destroyed, and littered 
with German dead. The whole series of trenches were full of German equipment 
in great confusion. Like our trenches, they were built of sandbags, but their 
communication trench was very deep and well traversed, and was probably intended 
to serve as a fire trench against M 4. There was an abandoned German machine 
gun in the fire trench in a stretcher carriage, which could not be moved. There 
was a good amount of German equipment outside the trench about the point Z. 
This place was the wildest spot, a mass of shell holes and fragments of works. 
The German barbed wire was very strong, of abnormal thickness in closeness and 
strength of spikes and in the wire itself. The ditch in front of the sap was heavily 
wired under the water. The German casualties must have been very heavy. The 
artillery Officers said they caught the reinforcements coming up on the road first 
with the 4.5 howitzers, and later with the 9in guns. Bombers say something of what 
they saw there, but not all of them agree on the point. The trenches were occupied 
at the time of the attack by Bavarians, it is said. The counter-attack was made 
by the reserve Division of the Prussian Guards. 

The British trenches suffered severely too. In the morning L 8 was a wreck, 
most of the trench battered down, and the communication trench, which was 
revetted with hurdles, also badly damaged. The trench was saved in many cases, 
though, by the hurdles bending and not collapsing as sandbag revetting would have 
done. It was at L 8 that the brunt of the firing was. In some places there the 
trench lines were completely obliterated, and in very many places s6 badly damaged 
as to need extensive repair before being of much use again. 

The British report of June 16th, as issued by the Press Bureau, read : — 

" Yesterday evening, we captured the German front line of trenches east 

of Festubert, on a mile of front, but failed to hold them during the night 

against the strong counter-attacks delivered by the enemy." 



21 

The communique issued at the German Main Headquarters says, according to 
the "Daily Telegraph":- "Wednesday. 

" Again influenced by Russian defeats, the French and English yesterday 
attacked with strong forces of men at many points on the Western front. 

" On the other hand, two attacks of four English Divisions betweens the 
roads of Estaires — La Basses and La Basses Canal completely collapsed. Our 
brave Westphalian regiments and reinforcements, consisting of portions of our 
Guard, repulsed the attacks after desperate hand-to-hand fighting. The enemy 
suffered heavy losses. We captured several machine guns and one mine- 
throwing howitzer." 
JUNE 16th, 1915— JUNE 21st, 1915. 

The Battalion regathered at LE TOURET and was given breakfast there from 
the cookers which had been brought up, with a rum issue. The roll was called, 
and only 243 men answered it.* We moved off about 10 a.m. In spite of their 
exhausted condition and their heavy losses, the men marched well and in good 
spirits, singing for the first half-hour of the journey, but a halt was made just 
before reaching billets for the purposes of a rest. The day was very hot and 
close. The march was resumed about 4 30 p.m., and billets at LE CORNET 
MALO were reached about 5 30 p.m. Billets were of the usual type — barns with 
adjacent orchards. 

Lieutenant Ord was admitted to hospital on June 17th. The men were very 
exhausted, and the days passed in resting and cleaning-up and reorganising. All 
the Companies needed reorganising. B Company was without an Officer until 
Lieutenant Gregson came back from the Bomb School on June 19th. There was 
a great shortage of N.C.O.'s, since most of them were casualties. B, C, and D Com- 
panies had an average of five or six each, and A Company was not much better. 
Platoons were very weak in strength. A few odd men rolled up during the first 
few days. One, Corporal Smalley, of D Company, came in from the German lines 
wounded, with German field dressings on his wounds. 

The system of Officers messing by Companies had to be abandoned, and a 
Battalion mess was reinstituted. This system was abandoned on the 9th July, when 
three messes were constituted : Headquarters, A and B, and C and D, when out of 
the trenches. 

Brigadier-General Hibbert inspected the Battalion, together with the 1 8th 
Liverpool Regiment, on June 18th, and conveyed to Officers and Men the apprecia- 
tion of himself and of the Corps Commander for the services they had rendered. He 
said that though the attack had failed in its immediate object, yet it had been 
instrumental in attracting to itself reinforcements which might otherwise have been 
directed against the French, attacking further south. The G.O.C. Division held 
an inspection on June 19th, and conveyed to us a message from Field-Marshal Sir 
John French, congratulating the Brigade on the fight it had made. 

•Fifty-one men actually answered the roll, the rest being accounted for. 



CHAPTER III. 
TRENCH WARFARE. 

Major Foley took over the command of the Battalion on June 16th, 1915, vice 
Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle, wounded ; Major Nickson became senior Major, vice 
Major Foley, from the same date ; Lieutenant Duckworth became Adjutant, vice 
Captain Norman, wounded ; Captain Widdows took over command of C Company, 
vice Major Nickson ; Lieutenant Rennard of D Company, vice Captain Hibbert, 
missing ; Lieutenant Gregson B Company, vice Captain Peak, missing ; Second 
Lieutenant Rogerson became Machine Gun Officer, vice Second Lieutenant 
Rawsthorn, killed. 

The weather was good and sunny, and we bathed in the LA BASSEE Canal. 
Most of us were exhausted by the attack and in need of rest. Indents for clothing 
and necessaries were rendered. 

Orders were received on the 21st for the Battalion to proceed to billets near 
LE TOURET. A working party of 200, under Captain Booth, was detailed for 
work under the R.E. building a light railway. 

JUNE 22nd— JUNE 24th. 

The Battalion arrived in billets about 7 p.m., and took over the billets of the 
1 7th Royal Highlanders. 

There was no working party to be furnished for the night, the 22nd/23rd June, 
but one of 100 men under the command of Captain Widdows for the night following. 
This working party was detailed for work in the firing trench. The trench, which 
needed extra traverses and wider parapets, was protected from the German view 
by an old ruined communication trench which was to be demolished as soon as the 
new low fire trench was ready for use, and in neither working party were there any 
casualties. 

This stay at LA COUTURE was quiet, and was devoted to resting and 
reorganising. There was a little shelling of the village to our right, but none near 
to us. Second Lieutenant Rogerson rejoined the Battalion after a fortnight's 
machine gun training. 

JUNE 25th. 

The Battalion moved off about 7 p.m. on the night of the 24th June, and 
marched to ESTAIRES, where it arrived about II p.m., and was billeted, the men 



23 

being in factories or breweries. These billets were very similar to the ones 
we occupied on May 18th. ESTAIRES is a fair-sized town, a market town in many 
ways, with some industries. It was interesting to us, because it was the first town 
we had been quartered in since landing in France. 

In the afternoon of June 25th, orders were received to move to the trenches 
the same night. The Battalion marched to the trenches via LAVENTIE, which 
had been heavily shelled by the enemy, but most of the damage centred on 
the church, as in other villages where we had been. Here the church, and the 
two roads which crossed near the church, as well as the adjoining streets for a length of 
about 200 yards, were in ruins ; the nearer you got to the church centre the more 
intensive was the damage. The inhabitants, however, were living in the village 
and carrying on their business outside this shelled ring. 

The trenches were reached at 8 30, and relief was completed by 9 p.m. The 
Battalion we relieved was the 1 Ist London Regiment (T.F.). 

JUNE 26th— JULY 4th. 

We spent eight days in these new trenches. They are known as " E2 Lines, 
FAUQUISSART," and were of the breastwork type, a shallow trench first being 
dug to a little above the water level and a high parapet of sandbags placed in front 
of this. The line we occupied was practically, when allowances are made for the 
fact that it was a fire trench, the equivalent of the reserve trenches which we held 
about June 10th. It was the same line. The British here had been able to make 
no headway. The parapet was very good and very thick as a rule, but much of the 
parados was shaky and had to be rebuilt. The long grass in front had already been 
partly cut by the previous trench holders, and there was a fair amount of wire in 
front, but not too much. The enemy was about 300 yards off, but the lines were 
not exactly parallel, and at one point the enemy must have been nearly five 
hundred yards away. There was very much less shell fire than in the previous 
trenches we had held, and very much more rifle shooting. There was a number 
of fixed rifle batteries with which the enemy tried to break the sandbags. There 
were also snipers normally to be found firing from a flank. The telescopic-sighted 
rifle, which had been issued to the Battalion just before entering the trenches, 
proved very useful for sniping in return. These rifles were the short rifles, fitted 
with telescopic sights, with a crossed hair-line on the object lens and a range dial. 
One ran to 600 yards and the other 1,200 yards in range. 

A, B, and D Companies were in the trench line, with C Company in reserve 
holding an entrenched post. These " forts " took the place of the support line in 
the trenches we had been in before and were intended as defensive and rallying 
points in case of an attack. Battalion Headquarters was in the open. 

Second Lieutenant Evans, who had been left behind with Second Lieutenant 
Norwood at Oxted when the Battalion moved to Bedford preparatory to sailing for 
France, rejoined the Battalion from the 2/4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 
on the night of June 26th. 



24 

On June 27th, Second Lieutenant R. A. Ostrehan and Second Lieutenant 
E. G. Baker, from the 2 4th Battahon, joined the Battahon, and Second Lieutenant 
D. H. Ostrehan joined on the night of the 28th. 

To the left of our positions, the opposing lines narrowed down until in one 
place, known as Red Lamp Corner, they were no more than fifty yards apart. A 
mine was sprung here by us one morning at dawn, and shook the earth around. 
There was a short bombardment by our artillery of the mine crater and of the 
enemy line, and a slight reply from the German artillery, which bombarded the 
position much more heavily two days later, but these bombardments did not 
affect us. 

JULY 4th— JULY 9th. 

The Battalion was relieved in the night of the 3rd '4th July about 10 p.m. by 
the I 7th Gordon Highlanders, and marched off to billets in the ESTAIRES — 
LA BASSEE road, near LA GORGUE, taking over billets from the 1 /5th Seaforth 
Highlanders. The billets were of the usual type, orchards and farm buildings. The 
Officers' Mess was established in the local schoolroom. 

The six days' rest from the trenches was interrupted by a series of working 
parties, which swallowed the whole available strength of the Battalion, Officers' 
servants, signallers, stretcher-bearers, transport, and machine gunners all having 
to be impanelled in order to provide the number required. The work done was 
miscellaneous — digging in communication trenches, improving communication 
trench parapets, laying a level bed for a light trench railway, &c. This resulted 
in most of the men sleeping all day. New clothing was issued on the 4th July, and a 
day was set apart for bathing the Battalion in the brewery-bathhouse. This bath- 
house had been made by taking vats from the brewery and tubs, and filling these 
with hot water. Men filed in at one door and gave up their dirty underclothing, 
and tied their clothes into a bundle, fastened with their identity disc. Each man 
was issued there with clean shirt and underclothing, whilst his old garments were 
washed and cleaned. Facilities were provided for bathing a Company at a time. 
Six baths for Officers were laid down also. This hot bath was greatly appreciated 
by the men ; it was the first one they had had since landing. 

The G.O.C. Indian Corps, to which the Division had been attached, inspected 
the Brigade on Wednesday, July 7th. The Battalion paraded as strong as possible, 
and put 293 rifles into the field. The General, Sir James Wilcox, expressed himself 
as well satisfied with the Brigade and welcomed them back to the Indian Corps, 
which they had temporarily left, expressing a hope that they were back for good. 

JULY 10th- JULY 15th. 

in these six days the Battalion was on trench duty in F lines, a little to the 
right of our previous position. The trenches were of the same type as those of E 2 
Lines, consisting of a strong breastwork sandbagged trench, only a little sunk below 
the level of the ground, with several supporting points in rear. The whole 



25 

Battalion was in the line, with the exception of Battalion Headquarters, which were 
situated about 1,000 yards back from the firing line in a farmhouse. Captain Booth 
was sent to hospital from here. 

Nothing of much moment happened to us in these lines. There was one very 
wet night, which left the trenches in a very bad condition for the following day. 
What shelling there was was directed upon the house behind us ; very few shells 
fell on the trench. 

Our casualties amounted to one killed and three wounded in this period, mainly 
from sniping, which was fairly active. We had a sniping post, heavily sandbagged, 
in an orchard to the rear of the line, and a sniping party with telescopic-sighted 
rifles to garrison it. 

There was an order that equipment must never be removed for any purpose. 
One day a man emerging from his billet with equipment on but the shoulder straps 
of his jacket unbuttoned cannoned into the R.S.M., who accused him of having had 
his equipment off. This he denied, and muttered that he had just been having 
breakfast. ' ' Do you need to unbutton your shoulder straps to have breakfast, 
then ? " enquired the R.S.M. in his silkiest tones. The man stood glowering for a 
moment, and then in desperation burst out, " Well 1 Ah've got to saay summat, 
'evn't I ?" 

We were relieved on the night of the 16th/17th July by the 1,4th Royal 
Lancaster Regiment, about 10 p.m., and moved off to reserve billets near Head- 
quarters. Detachments from A Company, under Second Lieutenant Evans, and 
C Company, under Second Lieutenant R. A. Ostrehan, garrisoned " fort " supporting 
points behind the line. There was a heavy trench mortar bombardment of the 
trenches held by the 2,5th Lancashire Fusiliers on the night of the 19th 20th July, 
which caused a Brigade " stand-to," but nothing happened. The 2/5th Lancashire 
Fusiliers had rejoined the Brigade the week before. 

The Brigade was relieved on the night of the 23rd;2'lth July by the 13th Brigade, 
the Battalion by the 1st Middlesex Regiment. 

On the 27th we left for LA GORGUE Station, where we entrained, and arrived 
at CALAIS at 8 p.m., then on via ABBEVILLE and AMIENS to CORBIE, where 
we detrained and marched to billets at RIBEMONT. On the 31st we went to 
MARTINSART, being then in Divisional Reserve. Here we remained for a week 
training. 

This SOMME country was a great change from the plains of Flanders, and the 
air was better. 

We relieved the 25th Lancashire Fusiliers on the 6th August in Sector B. 
A, B, and C Companies were in the fire trench ; D Company in support at POSTE 
LESDOS ; Battalion Headquarters in AVELUY WOOD south of AUTHUILLE. The 
trenches were cut in the solid chalk — hardly any sandbags — and the French had 
made the dugouts very comfortable. The barbed wire was thick. On the 4th 
Second Lieutenant W. R. Haggas had reported from the 2/4th Loyal North 
Lancashires, bringing five N.C.O.'s and men, who had been wounded, from the base, 



26 

and a week later Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle returned from England and again took 
over the command of the Battalion. On the 9th a thunderstorm broke and turned 
the trenches into mud. On the llth the first party went on leave. Two men were 
wounded the same day. The sector was quiet, and so was LA BOISELLE sector, 
where we went on the 14th, relieving the 1 5th Irish. C and D Companies were in 
the fire trench ; A and B in support at POSTE DONNEZ. The opposing lines were 
so close that high bomb nets were found necessary. 

On the 21st we were relieved by the I /5th King's Liverpool Regiment, and went 
into billets at AVELUY. It is chronicled in the War Diary that at this time the men 
began to have hot tea and soup served about midnight and that one-third were 
allowed to sleep at night. On the 22nd a draft was received from the 2,4th Loyal 
North Lancashire Regiment of 101 Other Ranks, and the following day four Officers, 
Second Lieutenants A. B. Bratton and H. M. Strong, from the 3rd Loyal North 
Lancashires, and Second Lieutenants J. S. Walker and M. W. Nolan, from the llth 
Loyal North Lancashires, joined. 

On the morning of September 4th the enemy shelled the trenches at POSTE 
LESDOS fairly heavily, and one shell burst in the midst of a working party, killing 
one and wounding five Other Ranks of D Company, whilst a week later one Other 
Rank was killed. On the 17th Lieutenant-Colonel Foley left the Battalion and 
crossed to England to take over command of a third-line unit. The succeeding 
day, just before being relieved by the 1 ''8th Liverpool Irish, the trenches were again 
heavily shelled, and one Company Sergeant-Major, one Sergeant, and one Corporal 
were killed by a single shell, whilst three Other Ranks were wounded. Captain 
H. Parker, Captain J. A. Crump, and Lieutenants K. H. Moore, R. Ord, and J. L. 
Brindle rejoined the Battalion from the 3/4th Loyal North Lancashires, and the 
first-named three Officers took over the command of A, B, and C Companies 
respectively. 

At this time Companies of one of the Service Battalions of the Highland Light 
Infantry were attached to us for instruction. 

On October 1st Brigadier-General J. L. Hibbert was wounded in the shoulder, 
and Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle took over the temporary command of the Brigade, 
while Major Nickson took over the Battalion with Captain Crump as second. Captain 
Rennard and Second Lieutenant Norwood went into hospital the same day, and 
Captain Gregson on the 3rd, and on the 4th Captain Green, R.A.M.C, reported for 
duty, vice Lieutenant Sugars transferred to the 3rd Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel 
Hindle returned to the Battalion on the 7th, and Brigadier-General G. T . G. 
Edwards, C.B., took over command of the Brigade. 

On the whole the month was quiet. On the 3rd we went into the line, 
A, C, and D in front and B in support at POSTE LESDOS — being relieved on 
the 15th by the 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers, when B and C Companies relieved 
the 1 8th Irish on the right of F 1 sector, A and D being in support at 
POSTE DONNEZ ; here we stayed till the 21st, going back to AVELUY, 
whence nightly working parties went up the line. 



27 

On the 27th, " fur " coats were issued, and we went back to POSTE 
LESDOS sector. 

On the 28th, the enemy bombarded the wire and front line from 7 10 a.m. 
to 9 30 a.m., doing considerable damage and blowing in ICO yards of trench 
between AINTREE STREET and MERSEY STREET, held by C Ccmpany, 
and 30 yards in A Company's sector. C.S.M. Edwards earned the D.C.M. for 
manoeuvring his Company about during the shelling in such a way as to escape 
with very few casualties. 

The whole of the month was quiet and uneventful, but there was some desultory 
shelling of the working parties ; salvos of H.E. and H.V. shells were sent over 
hourly, and in one of these bursts on the 30th Major Nickson was killed, whilst 
Second Lieutenant Bratton and six Other Ranks were wounded. 

On the 31st Captain J. O. Widdows went sick and Second Lieutenant Nolan 
and 20 Other Ranks were wounded, the total casualties for the month being : — 
Officers : killed one, wounded two, sick four ; Other Ranks : killed one, wounded 
35, missing one. 

Early in November Second Lieutenant R. S. De Blaby reported for duty from 
the base. On the 2nd an enemy shell burst in the trench held by A Ccmpany, killing 
two men and wounding one, whilst five others were admitted to hospital suffering 
from shock. Two mornings later two shells landed at the junction of Aintree Street 
and the fire trench, killing three men and wounding three others who were waiting 
as sentry reliefs. About this time, owing to the number of sick and wounded (the 
trenches were in a very bad state and knee-deep in water through the torrential 
rains and the men were very wet), it became extremely difficult to find the requisite 
number of men for the different duties each day. 

On the 5th Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle went on leave for nine days, Captain 
Crump taking over command, and during that period the weather was so bad, snow 
falling on several of the days, that the programme of training could not be carried 
out. On the 18th Second Lieutenants T. A. Burnside, F. R. Best, and M. Wilson 
joined, and on the 20th one man was killed during an enemy burst of 30 small shells 
in reply to our artillery's work on the German trenches. 

On the 25th Bomber Gent did very good work. Taking nine bombs with 
him, he went out alone, and, encountering an enemy patrol coming from a 
sap-head, bombed them with good effect. The following day Lieutenant 
K. H. Moore was killed by a sniper. The month's casualties consisted of 
one Officer killed, and of Other Ranks eight killed, three wounded, and 95 sick. 

On December 2nd, at BOUZINCOURT, C.Q.M.S. E. E. Lester was presented 
with the Croix de Guerre for conspicuous bravery at Festubert on June 15th. This 
ceremony took place on Battalion parade. Second Lieutenant A. Hague arrived 
from the 3 4th Loyal North Lancashires, and later in the month Second Lieutenants 
A. Parker and Fairclough joined for duty, whilst Second Lieutenant Bryce Smith 
rejoined from the base. As Christmas approached the weather was very bad, and 
the sides of the trenches were continually falling in. There were pumps in plenty. 



28 

but the water ran in as fast as it could be pumped out. On Christmas Day we were 
relieved by the I 4th King's Own, and managed to get a good dinner, thanks to our 
excellent Quartermaster, Lieutenant Baker. The casualties during December 
consisted of 2 Other Ranks wounded and 82 sick, and for the whole year 
2',i Officers (4 killed, 10 wounded, 2 missing, 2 died of wounds, and 5 sick), and 
624 Other Ranks (30 killed, 271 wounded, 14G missing, and 177 sick). 

New Year's Day, 191(i, dawned wet and dismal in the trenches at 
AUTHUILLE, and though the general situation was quiet our trench mortar 
batteries were in action for a time. It was during the evening's retaliation 
that a shell blew in a dugout, killing Second Lieutenant F. R. Best and 
wounding Second Lieutenants H. Rogerson and R. A. Ostrehan and three 
Other Ranks. The following day the Battalion was relieved by the 16th 
Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, and moved to billets at LAVIEVILLE, six miles 
away. The following day the Brigade left the 51st Division, and, moving 
off from HENENCOURT, we marched via BEHENCOURT to ST. GRATIEN and 
a day later to RAINNEVILLE. The Brigade stayed at RAINNEVILLE a day 
and a-half, the time being spent in a much-needed clean-up, and at this point 
on January 5th we became the 164th Infantry Brigade of the 55th Division. 

On the ()th we left the 13th Corps to move to the new Divisional area, the 55th 
Division being then part of the Nth Corps. The march was via BERTANGLES, 
VAUX-EN-AMIENS to ARGOEUVES, the Battalion subsequently moving 
independently to AIRAINES, via ST. SAUVNEUR, PICQUIGNY, and SOUES, 
reinforcements arriving from the base the day after the Battalion had been 
billeted. Company training was carried out, and we had the task of finding 
control posts for all entrances to the village to prevent British Army horses 
from entering on account of the number of diseased horses there. On the 14th 
Second Lieutenants Silveira, Agostini, and Matthews arrived from the 3/4th 
Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. The Brigadier should have inspected the 
Brigade the following day at COURCHON, but the event was cancelled owing 
to rain, and Battalion drill took place instead. In the afternoon the A.S.C.'s 
Picture Palace was booked and the men given a free show. During the week 
a bombing school, bayonet course, and rifle range were fixed up, and excellent 
progress was made with the training. On the 20th of January Major Parker 
took over the Battalion on Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle's departure on leave. 
During the remainder of the stay there the training was rounded off by an attack 
over open country, a gas test in the presence of the G.O.C. of the Division, and 
instruction in grenade throwing for all the Officers and N.C.O.'s, before, 
ultimately. General Allenby inspected the Division near HALLENCOURT, on 
the 29th. 

On February 2nd the Earl of Derby inspected the Battalion at VIEULAINE, 
and the following day we proceeded to billets at LONGPRE, whence the 
Brigade, less two Battalions, marched to new billets. Brigade Headquarters 
proceeding to RIBEACOURT, 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers to BEAUMETZ, and 



29 

the 1 '4th Loyal North Lancashires to PROUVILLE. At AUTHEUX, a few days 
later, the Battahon and Platoon bombers were inspected in their work by the 
G.O.C. of the 53th Division, Major-General Jeudwine. "Old Judy," as he was 
called, soon found a place in our hearts — he had the gift of inspiring those 
under him— and we all loved him. 

About this time the Brigade experienced the French winter at its worst in so 
far as rain was concerned, conditions being so bad that no training was possible for 
two days. The men found welcome relief when the downpour ceased by partici- 
pating in a five miles cross-country run. On the 15th the Brigade marched from 
HEM, via DOULLENS, to HALLOY and on to BELLEVUE, where units broke off 
to their respective villages, the 1 4th continuing the march via BAVINCOURT and 
GOUY-EN-ARTOIS to MONCHIET. Three nights afterwards hostile aircraft flew 
over the village and dropped two bombs not far from our lines. There were no 
casualties. Shortly before noon the following day an enemy 'plane again flew over 
the village, dropping a bomb about 150 yards from the huts, once more without 
effecting any damage. On the 2;kd orders were received for the Battalion to go 
into the trenches to take over from the I 5th King's Liverpool Regiment. There 
was a heavy fall of snow that afternoon, followed by a frost at night, and we moved 
into the line the following night. The enemy was very quiet on this front and apt 
to show himself a good deal. Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle took over the command 
the day following the Battalion's arrival. About this time the trenches became 
very wet owing to the thaw, and the discomforts familiar at these times recurred. 
Meanwhile the enemy indulged in rather more sniping than usual, while a visit by 
a dozen hostile aeroplanes one morning was accompanied by activity on the part 
of his artillery. There were no casualties or cases of sickness during the month — 
a record. 

March also was quite uneventful. A German deserter surrendered to us, and 
there was only a single casualty during the month, one man being wounded. But 
on April 1st, while A, B, and C Companies were billeted at BRETENCOURT, 
the enemy fired about three salvoes to the west of the village, and one shell 
burst in a barn occupied by No. 15 Platoon (D Company), killed six men, and 
wounded eight others. On the 9th Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle went to the 
3rd Army School, and Major Crump took command of the Battalion during 
his week's absence. On the 2.'{rd, while rifle grenades were being fired, one 
exploded in our lines and would have caused serious loss of life, but Private 
Carter threw himself upon it and received the full force of the burst. He was 
killed, and Second Lieutenant Wilson, trying at the same time to grasp the 
grenade and throw it away, lost his hand. Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle went on 
leave on the 27th, Major Crump taking over the command. During the month, 
in addition to the casualties referred to, there were seven men killed and a like 
number wounded. 

On 1st April, while the Battalion was at GROSVILLE, four cavalry N.C.O.'s 
were attached, two from the 1st Dragoon Guards and two from the Inniskilling 



30 

Dragoons. On the 4th the Battalion took over shghtly to the right of the former 
frontage, the left Company frontage being taken over by the KiSth Brigade. Owing 
to shortage of Officers, A and C Companies worked as one in respect of Officers' duties. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle resumed his command two days before the Battalion was 
relieved. As soon as duty again lay in the shape of trench life, it was discovered 
that though the enemy was very quiet there appeared to be a great amount of work 
in progress in his lines. One day the enemy shelled the front line with 
" Five-nines," but there was no material damage. Obviously the object of the shoot 
was to discover trench mortar emplacements. During the next two days there was 
again some shelling, and on the ^JOth, during a "strafe " of the right Company, 
Second Lieutenant Eccles was killed, the only other casualties during the whole 
of the month being two Other Ranks killed and two wounded. 

Shortly after midday, June 4th, our artillery and trench mortars opened an 
intense bombardment on the enemy wire, and this was replied to by heavy fire for 
half-an-hour, mainly on our support lines and communication trenches, but no 
severe damage was done, and, although the dressing station behind the support line 
was blown in, there were no casualties. The following day Second Lieutenant 
Ducksbury reported for duty from the base. The time was mainly occupied in 
training bombing parties, scouting, wire cutting and crawling, and cutting new 
pattern fire steps under R.E. supervision. 

A special raiding party was practising and was increased to four Officers 
(Captain Gregson, and Second Lieutenants Martin, Roscce, and Walker) and 15 
N.C.O.'s and men per company, who were billeted separately in the village and trained. 
Short rifles and long bayonets were issued to the Battalion on the afternoon 
of the 19th, and long rifles and short bayonets withdrawn. The same day the 
Battalion moved up to AGNY to relieve the South Lancashires, the raiding party 
remaining at BRETENCOURT. Although the enemy shelled and sent over rifle 
grenades within the next few days, little damage was done and there were no 
casualties. Here we first met a large trench mortar called " Crashing Christopher " 
— the " Heavy Minnie " of later days. 



CHAPTER IV. 
THE SOMME FIGHTING. 

On the 27th of June we were bombarded by all calibres, but sustained no 
casualties. 

On the 2.Sth the raiding party of three Officers and 56 Other Ranks mentioned 
in the last chapter left our lines at the junction of GAMBLER STREET with 
the fire trench at 5 35 p.m. The raid was preceded by the discharge of cloud 
gas and artillery fire. 

This party was working in conjunction with raiding parties from all Battalions 
in the Division. They advanced by two rushes to within a few yards of the enemy 
trenches, where they came under heavy fire and were held up. At 5 50 p.m. they 
established communication with our lines and reported that they could get no 
further and were suffering heavy casualties. A Sergeant returning and reporting 
that the enemy were in strong force and further progress was impossible, Major 
Crump ordered them to retire, which they did in good order in spite of losses which 
included the whole of the leaders. 

The wind seemed to be uncertain and blew back the smoke curtain diagonally 
across the front so as to disclose our party, which was on the right flank of 
the Division, to the enemy. 

The enemy wire had been well cut and presented no obstacle, but the enemy 
were seen in force in the trenches to the north of BLAIRVILLE WOOD, some of 
them wearing box respirators. The gas, however, apparently did not reach the 
wood, but near our lines a number of enemy dead were observed who had 
obviously been killed by the gas. Corporal Thompson did admirable work in 
maintaining telephonic communication between the advanced portions and the 
Headquarters of the Brigade raiding parties in our own front line. Private 
Clarke and Corporal Thompson remained in a shell hole not far from the 
enemy wire until after nightfall and saw them come out of their trenches and 
carry some of our men who were either dead or wounded across the bridge 
into their trenches. The ten killed of the raiding party included Captain 
E. M. Gregson and Second Lieutenant A. Martin, whilst Second Lieutenant 
A. S. Walker was amongst the IS wounded. 

The Lancashire Fusiliers' party (who also came under command of Major 
Crump) advanced quickly and rushed the last few yards before effecting an entrance 
into the enemy trenches. They divided into three parties, which bombed along 



:<2 

the fire trench before being attacked by enemy bombers coming across the open. 
They were then ordered to retire, which they did after suffering casualties. 
A private of the left party did good work with his bayonet, keeping the enemy at 
bay until the last of his party had left the trench ; for this he was awarded the 
Victoria Cross. All the parties came under machine gun and rifle fire, but they 
inflicted a large number of casualties before returning. There were no trench 
boards in the enemy line where our men entered them, and the trenches had 
obviously suffered considerably from our artillery fire. The enemy threw " stink " 
bombs into their own wire, but most of the wounded were brought in by our men, 
who, however, brought back no prisoners and no material, except a cap taken from 
a German soldier for identification purposes. 

Captain G. C. Hutchinson, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, though severely wounded 
in the German wire, did capital work in this raid, as he continued to direct 
operations after being hit. Lance-Sergeant Russ and Private Bennett, of the 
same Battalion, assisted several wounded men back to our lines and later brought 
in Captain Hutchinson. Sergeant Entwistle, who brought back reports on the 
progress of the raid, returned to assist in carrying out the retirement, whilst 
Private Ward and another collected five wounded in a shell hole and brought 
them in one at a time under heavy machine gun and shell fire. 

A Private who was with the party writes : — "Captain Gregson was there ; 

1 never saw him look better- he was always one of the smartest Officers in the 
Battalion, but he seemed to have been got up for the show with greater care than 
usual. The smoke lifted like a curtain. We were in full view of the Boche trench. 
We went on till within .SO yards of it and then he opened out with machine guns, 
rifles, and trench mortars. It was Hell let loose, but someone shouted ' On the- 
Kellys,' and on we went, but were cut down like corn. The ' Jerrys ' were two-deep 
in their trench, and we realised we were done." Sixteen men answered the roll-call 
out of 76. " The worst part of a stunt is always after, when they have a roll-call. 
To stand there and listen to names being called and try to answer ' He's killed ' — 
no one can picture it who hasn't seen one." 

The total casualties for the month were two Other Ranks killed, six wounded, 
and 2() sick, including four Officers. 

On the afternoon of July 1st, the enemy shelled our reserve and support 
trenches and also the village of AGNY with 4.2's, whilst late at night he 
opened fire on the front line with "whizz-bangs " and 4.2's, trench mortars, rifle 
grenades, and machine guns. He also sent up a large number of flares, but our 
artillery replied and activities ceased within an hour. 

The following day Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle went to hospital, and Major 
Crump again assumed command of the Battalion. There was considerable enemy 
activity with artillery and trench mortars, whilst our aeroplanes were active. The 
trenches were damaged by enemy gunfire the following day, when Second Lieutenant 
Jump and three Other Ranks were wounded. The Battalion was relieved by the 

2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers on the 4th, and went to billets at DAINEVILLE ; 



33 

Colonel Hindle returned the same day, but on the 7th he again had to go to hospital. 
On the 10th we practised over trenches similar to those we expected to attack. The 
attack was practised several times, and on the night of the llth the Battalion 
relieved the l/6th King's Liverpools. Two nights later the Brigade made a 
demonstration, Second Lieutenant Saunders being in charge of a party which went 
over at midnight to bomb an enemy sap. Though they were unable to enter the 
sap, owing to wire being uncut, a number of bombs were thrown into it, and it was 
not until the party returned that the enemy replied with light machine gun and 
rifle fire. 

On the 16th, 76 reinforcements joined the unit, which was relieved by the 
l/4th King's Own and marched to BARLY, where we rehearsed trench attacks and 
signalling in conjunction with aeroplanes. Later the Battalion marched by stages 
to CANDAS, where it entrained for MERICOURT. Arriving there on the llth', 
we marched to billets in MEAULTE and on the following day to HAPPY VALLEY, 
where we bivouacked. 

The weather was fine and the billets good at this time, and training was carried 
out on an extensive scale, the work including practising digging-in with entrenching 
tools. One afternoon men marched to BRAY and bathed in the Somme, where, 
unfortunately, one man was drowned. 

On the 30th July, Church Parade was held, at which Brigadier-General G. T. G. 
Edwards presented Sergeants Entwistle and Lancaster with Military Medal Ribbons 
won by them in the raids at BLAIRVILLE. Late that afternoon orders were 
received to be ready to move at very short notice, and the same night the Battalion 
left for the trenches at GUILLEMONT, occupying some old German 
communication trenches (Dublin and Casement trenches), which contained no 
dugouts. Within a few hours of the Battalion's arrival the enemy opened out 
on the trenches and battery positions in the vicinity with 5.9 's and heavier shell. 
Second Lieutenants Orrell and Crone were wounded, as also were 15 Other Ranks. 
The total casualties for the month were three Officers and 34 Other Ranks. 

August was a trying month. The line held extended from MALTZHORN 
FARM, where we linked up with the French on the right, to a point near ARROW 
HEAD COPSE. The trenches were incomplete, as they were newly dug, and 
besides being narrow and shallow, they had not been joined up in several 
places. The enemy bombardment was more or less severe every day, and on 
the 3rd Second Lieutenants C. S. Munro and J. Hunt were wounded, along with 
16 Other Ranks, whilst three men were killed. About this time enemy snipers 
were very active along a ridge about 150 yards ahead, where they appeared to have 
established themselves. This ridge was on the south side of and abutted on the 
sunken road which ran from our line to GUILLEMONT. Part of this sunken road 
was held as a trench by the 2 /5th Lancashire Fusiliers, who were thus enfiladed by 
the enemy snipers on the ridge and consequently had a considerable number of 
casualties daily, the losses among the Officers being especially heavy. 



34 

It was decided, therefore, to attack this ridge and establish a strong point there 
which would deny that ground to the enemy. This minor operation was considered 
important in view of the casualties mentioned and also because it would afford 
facilities for reconnoitring GUILLEMONT and the lines of approach, this being 
most essential in view of the contemplated general attack on the GUILLEMONT — 
MAUREPAS line. 

At a conference held by the Brigadier with Major Crump and Major H. Parker, 
it was decided that Major Parker should carry out the operation with two strong 
platoons of D Company on the evening of the 5th of August ; that under Brigade 
arrangements communication trenches (which were exceedingly narrow) should 
be kept clear to facilitate the movement of the troops taking part in the attack up 
to the front line ; and that a barrage would be put down by the Divisional artillery 
who would also do counter-battery work. 




3c \LC i/co 3- 



When the attacking party commenced to move up to the starting-off place, 
it was found that the communication trenches had not been cleared as arranged, 
and it would have been impossible to get up in time by using them. The party 



35 

therefore moved up over the open and managed to arrive in time, but, unfortunately, 
not till after dark. 

Second Lieutenant A. Hague and his platoon attacked. The second platoon 
with consolidating material was kept in reserve in our front line, but the enemy was 
found to be in considerable force on the ridge, occupying a strong point, and a 
switch line running back towards Wedge Wood. 

The attacking platoon encountered heavy rifle and machine gun fire, and our 
barrage brought down enemy artillery fire, which caused considerable loss to 
working parties in communication trenches. Three attacks in all were made, but 
finally the attempt had to be abandoned for that night. Second Lieutenant 
Hague was reported missing, two men were killed, and 25 wounded. 

Major Parker subsequently reported to the Brigadier that he thought that he 
could attain his objective on the evening of the (ith August, provided he was allowed 
to attack at dusk without barrage but with only five minutes' preparation with two 
Stokes' Mortars, and this plan was assented to. The same troops were employed, 
having been brought up to strength. The attacking platoon, led by Lieutenant 
R. S. De Blaby, attacked at 20.30 hours. The attack was successful, the position 
was consolidated, and our troops were relieved by the 1 /5th Liverpool Regiment 
just before dawn. During consolidation Major Parker went out with a patrol and 
located the enemy switch line, finding it heavily wired and strongly held. 

The troops engaged in this operation rejoined the Battalion (which had been 
withdrawn to reserve i on the morning of the 7th August. 

After a night in bivouacs, preparations were made to go over the ground prior 
to an attack on GUILLEMONT on the 8th. The Battalion returned to the line 
that night and assembled in trenches east and west of the road which ran 
south from the east corner of TRONES WOOD, C Company being detailed to 
consolidate the right of the enemy line and D Company the left on the west 
side of GUILLEMONT. A and B Companies acted in conjunction with the 1,4th 
Royal Lancasters and the 1 8th Liverpool Regiments respectively. The attack 
was not a success. The right was held up from the start by the switch line 
which had been reported by our patrol on the 6th, such report having been 
either overlooked or ignored, and the men had to fall back to the original line, 
though the 1 8th Liverpools went through the village on the left, and 
D Company of our Battalion commenced to consolidate, but were driven off by 
the enemy coming behind them and cutting them off from the Liverpools. 

Considerable confusion was caused owing to the mist and the employment by 
the enemy of smoke bombs, the four platoons in reserve not being called upon for 
this reason, though all their officers were killed and they suffered many other 
casualties. The operation was a costly one. Nine Other Ranks were killed, 97 
wounded, and 107 reported missing ; whilst of the Officers, Captain E. M. Rennard 
and Captain H. Lindsay were killed. Second Lieutenants 0. H. Ducksbury and 
J. H. Holden missing (afterwards found to be prisoners of war), and Lieutenants 



36 

De Blaby and A. T. D. Evans and Second Lieutenants E. L. Fairclough and 
T. A. Bigger wounded. Lieutenant De Blaby died the following day. 

On the 9th of August the remnant of the Battalion was relieved by one 
Company of the 1 5th South Lancashires and marched to bivouacs, where 
Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle again took over command. 

Three days after coming out of the line a large permanent working party of 
150 men, under Major Parker, proceeded to the trenches to the 2 '5th Lancashire 
Fusiliers, who were also detailed for the same work, and on the 14th August Major 
Parker was wounded. The Brigade subsequently left the area. The Battalion 
which had been strengthened by drafts of 100 men from the Manchesters and one 
Officer and 110 Other Ranks from the East Lancashire Regiment, entraining at 
MERICOURT and detraining at ABBEVILLE, marched to billets in SAIGNEVILLE, 
via CAMBRON and GOUY. Here training proceeded on the usual lines, whilst a 
lecture was given to the Officers and N.C.O.'s of the Brigade by Major-General 
H. S. Jeudwine. The General used the tail of a cart as a platform without 
warning it tipped up and sent him sprawling in the road. This was too much 
for the gravity of the troops and of the General himself. No one laughed 
more heartily than he did as he picked himself up and resumed the thread of 
the lecture this time from the ground level. 

Battalion sports were held whilst the unit was at rest, and in the closing 
days of the month the Battalion returned by train to MERICOURT, marching 
to a camping ground at MILLENCOURT, whence Captain L. Duckworth went 
to hospital, whilst the Battalion again moved a short distance to another area, 
where all ranks were accommodated in tents. The total casualties for the 
month were I'A Officers and 289 Other Ranks. After a couple of days' " rest " 
at MILLENCOURT, the Battalion was sent for instructional purposes to take over 
the left of an old Corps line trench running between the ALBERT- AMIENS road 
and the ALBERT -MILLENCOURT road. On relieving the 8th King's Liverpool 
Regiment in the Corps line, the Battalion spent the night rehearsing the numerous 
phases of trench warfare, one Company building a " strong point." The following 
day this was repeated, and some of the time was spent in wiring and patrolling. 
The Battalion was relieved by the 1 8th (Irish) King's Liverpool Regiment on 
the night of September .'ird. Three days later the Battalion moved from 
MILLENCOURT to a camping ground near FRICOURT, where it was joined by 
Captain S. B. Donald, of the 5th East Kents (Buffs), and Captain C. B. Bolingbroke, 
of the 1 (ith Norfolks. Orders to go into the trenches were received the following 
day, and the Battalion marched to MONTAUBAN where it was met by guides of 
the 8th Devons. The sector taken over by the Brigade extended from the eastern 
edge of DELVILLE WOOD in the direction of GINCHY, the 1 4th Loyal North 
Lancashires being in the front line alongside the 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers, and 
the remainder of the Brigade in support. Captain C. H. Cockrill reported for duty 
from the 1 '(ith Norfolks on the 8th, on which day we had four killed and 
19 wounded. 



37 

The DELVILLE WOOD battle started on the 9th September. The British 
artillery were in action all day, and at 4 p.m. the barrage started ; at 4 45 the 
Division on our left attacked. Our objective was to capture HOP ALLEY with B 
and C Companies, whilst the Lancashire Fusiliers were to go over with us and 
take ALE ALLEY. At 5 25 the Battalion went over and the first objective — 
HOP ALLEY — was gained, but the second wave did not succeed in reaching ALE 
ALLEY, and as HOP ALLEY had become untenable under intense machine gun 
barrage and gunfire, the remnant of B and C Companies withdrew and fell 
back to their original line. Supporting Companies from the l/8th King's 
Liverpool Regiment and 1 /4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment were sent up 
to strengthen the lines, whilst working parties consolidated the position. Sergeant 
H. Farnworth was awarded the D.C.M. for work in this attack. 




The casualties were heavy ; amongst the 24 killed were Second Lieutenants 
W. E. Pyke and E. F. Falby. whilst, in addition to 125 men, Captains Donald and 
Bolingbroke, Lieutenant H. W. Strong, and Second Lieutenants W . V. Gray, 
P. Pollard, F. R. Vipond, C. H. Forshaw, and W. H. Berry were wounded. Under 
the heading of missing wre the names of 79 of the rank and file. As the result 
of these heavy losses the Battalion was withdrawn from the front line to the supports 
and rested for the dav. In the afternoon we stood-to in view of a possible attack 



38 

by the enemy. Though remaining in support, the Battalion was moved 1,000 yards 
nearer the front line (or the remainder of its stay until the 41st Brigade came up 
as relief on September 12th, when we marched to bivouacs near FRICOURT. 

The customary routine was followed during the " rest," during which a move 
was made to BUIRE. Brigadier-General Edwards handed over the Brigade to 
Brigadier-General C. I. Stockwell, who was quickly dubbed " Strafing Jimmy." 
He was a good soldier, and his methods, though often resented by individuals, were 
effective. He continued to command the l()4th Brigade till the Armistice. 




5cALC 1 230.30_ 



On the 19th, after being ordered to go into the line at FRICOURT, where 
were the 1 /8th King's Liverpool Regiment, we were suddenly ordered to vacate 
the trenches and proceed to bivouacs at MAMETZ, where six days were spent 
in Company training, during which specially large working parties were employed 
in digging a communication trench through LONGUEVAL. 

On the 21th a Battalion of the Ki.'ith Infantry Brigade was relieved by us in 
front of DELVILLE WOOD close to FLERS. On the 25th and 26th one Other 
Rank was killed and 22 wounded. On the latter day we relieved the l/7th King's 



39 

Liverpool Regiment in GIRD TRENCH, close to GUEDECOURT. That day we had 
17 wounded and 3 missing. 

Following great activity by our artillery, the 164th Brigade attacked in the 
afternoon of the 27th, the Battalion being in support. The Sth Irish captured 
the part of GIRD SUPPORT still occupied by the enemy, and in the course of 
the evening we relieved the Irish in the captured trench, one Company occupying 
a sunken road running into GUEDECOURT. The casualties were very slight, 
but Second Lieutenant R. Forrest was killed and Second Lieutenant G. Duerden 
and 4 Other Ranks were wounded. 

The following morning mist hung low over the battlefield, and when it cleared 
a large enemy party was observed to be digging-in along a line rather more than 
half a mile away. Rifle and machine gun fire was directed at them, and they ceased 
work abruptly after suffering a number of casualties. During the afternoon the 
enemy artillery retaliated, killing 6 men and wounding 30. 

The 10th Royal West Kents relieved us on the 29th, and we went into billets 
at DERNANCOURT. Thus ended an eventful month, in which the Battalion had 
suffered somewhat heavily, the total casualties being 3 Officers and 33 Other 
Ranks killed, 9 Officers and 211 Other Ranks wounded, 82 Other Ranks missing, 
and 2 Officers and 54 Other Ranks sick. 



CHAPTER V. 
TRENCH WARFARE IN THE SALIENT : October 1st, HUCi, to July 14th, I!)I7. 

On the 1st October we left MANANCOURT and entrained at EDGE HILL, 
arriving in billets at L'ETOILE at II p.m. The following day we marched to 
LONGPRE, where we entrained for POPERINGHE, where we were billeted for 
the night. The next day we marched to BRANDHOEK, where we were in huts 
for the next few days, furnishing a daily working party to dig a cable trench near 
RIGERSBERG CHATEAU. During this period Second Lieutenant G. Duerdcn 
joined us again, and the following Officers as reinforcements :— Captain A. Walsh, 
Second Lieutenants G. Tong, F. C. Jenkinson, V. Mather, A. O. Knight, I. Haworth, 
F. L. Vernon, E. G. Faber, A. Bardsley, A. Ashton, E. E. Tweedale, H. Holden, 
H. Swaine, R. V. Reed, B. H. Williams, J. E. Ordish, R. Bissett, J. H. Ogden, and 
H. K. Vipond. 

During these days we did Company training, in preparation for our debut in 
the SALIENT. 

THE SALIENT ! How can one hope to describe it so as to bring home its 
realities to those who have never seen it ? Yet without some such description the 
history of the next few months would be about as informative as the stereotyped 
official bulletin, " On the rest of the Front there was nothing to report." 

Picture then POPERINGHE, a typical Belgian town, with here and there 
a house partly demolished by shell fire, crawling with troops of all kinds, with shops, 
restaurants, and estaminets, sprinkled with English notices, such as " Divisional 
Headquarters," "Wind Dangerous," "Officers' Club," "Divisional Canteen," 
and so on. This was our centre of civilisation. Beyond it stretched eastwards the 
YPRES road, fringed at first with tall trees and a sprinkling of houses, and peopled 
with troops, lurries, guns, limbers — coming and going, twelve kilometres of it, 
with deep ditches on either side, and beyond them fields which had once been 
cultivated but were now given over to " dumps," camps, battery positions, and so 
on, a few fields being still under cultivation by women and old men. 

After six kilometres we come to VLAMERTINGHE, badly knocked about, but 
with a certain number of houses still standing and used by our troops ; a thin slice 
of the tower of the church remaining to give the Hun a range mark ; from this 
point the road is under enemy observation, and one begins to notice shell holes and 
broken trees becoming more frequent as we near YPRES railway station, to which 
trains still run, but only at night with all lights out, drawn very slowly and silently 
by a mysterious engine which shuts o?f steam and proceeds by electricity or 
something of the kind as it nears YPRES. 



Map No. 2 



THE YPRES SALIENT 



To ELVERDINOnE 




xi 




41 

Standing on the " platform " at YPRES station at night, you see the enemy 
flares going up all round you except on the west, and you realise that you are indeed 
in " The Salient." 

The city of YPRES itself, which at first sight seems like a jumble of ruins, you 
find presently to contain hiding-places for dozens of guns and hundreds of troops ; 
whole streets of houses remain standing, mostly minus windows or doors. By day, 
the streets are almost deserted ; by night, though no lights are shown, the city is 
alive with parties of troops, mule-drawn limbers, waggons, and motor lurries, 
bringing up rations and ammunition and the baggage of incoming Battalions. 

All these come along the road from VLAM after dusk, and when things are 
in full swing the road is a wonderful sight— mile after mile of mixed Army vehicles 
tightly packed along both sides, the middle full of marching troops. Sometimes 
motionless, sometimes crawling cautiously on in the dark, sometimes disturbed 
by a shell falling and killing a few men or a mule or smashing up a lurry in 
its crashing burst, hour by hour the stream goes on, the very life-blood of the 
Infantry in the Salient. 

From YPRES to the front line was at this time about two miles, first by road, 
then tracks, then trenches or breastworks, through wrecked and ruined country, 
weedgrown and desolate. 

Each Battalion held a " sub-sector " of the line. Battalion Headquarters being 
in some group of dugouts or ruined chateau about a mile behind the front line 
with the reserve and support Companies somewhat nearer, and two front line 
Companies. In addition to the Infantry Battalions, there were posts held by 
machine guns, this weapon having been taken out of the hands of the infantry, 
trench mortar sections, and other details doing various jobs. 

The country in general is rather like HUNDRED END, the soil being like the 
Lancashire clay, but wetter and stickier. 

On the 15th we moved up to YPRES, where we were billeted in the RAMPARTS. 
These RAMPARTS billets merit a special description. The city is guarded on the 
east and south by a rampart and moat, the rampart being about 50 feet high, and 
of equal thickness and formed of earth taken out when the moat was dug, faced 
with brick on the outside and crowned with trees. 

Under this mines had been made, stuffy, cramped places full of frames and 
props and dimly lit with electric light, generally overcrowded and always damp and 
rat-infested, but still places where the Battalion in Brigade reserve could lie down 
and sleep in comparative safety, except for the danger of gas. To the south of the 
MENIN GATE, an ugly gap in the ramparts through which the MENIN ROAD 
issued from the city and where it was never safe to linger, was one of such mines 
usually occupied by two Companies, to the north a similar one and the Officers' 
dugouts. Battalion Headquarters being further back in the city. On the night of 
a relief, men would arrive in small parties in the pitch dark and stumble along the 
street, which was always a foot deep in mud, till they found the gas sentry, when 
they would disappear within the dark entry with a grunt of relief. 



42 

During the next few days working parties went up the line every night, and 
on the evening of the 19th we relieved the l/4th King's Own in'fthe RAILWAY 
WOOD sector. 

RAILWAY WOOD had once been, as the name implies, a wood beside the 
MENIN railway ; when we made its acquaintance it was just a churned-up, slimy 
bit of rising ground, approached by a decent communication trench called WEST 
LANE crossing the muddy BELLEWARDEBEEK, beyond which were the breast- 
works and dugouts and cookhouses forming BEEK Trench, a mass of slime and 
rotten sandbags which it was part of our job to drain, duckboard, and rivet with 
corrugated iron. As nearly every trench in the Salient was in a like state, and 
repairs were soon spotted and strafed by the Hun, and as every available man 
was daily employed in repairs, et cetera, it will be seen that " Old Bill's " opinion, 
that the war would only end "when the whole of Belgium had been put into 
sandbags," had much to justify it. 

Going up to the front line from BEEK Trench on a dark night was no picnic. 
You started along a narrow alley winding uphill, your hands feeling the slimy 
sandbag walls, your feet wary for broken duckboards ; now and again a hot, stuffy 
smell, a void space in the wall, and the swish of pumped-up water under foot 
proclaimed the entrance to a mine. Gradually the sandbag walls got higher and 
the alley narrower, and in places you stumbled into daylight where the trench had 
been blown in and got covered with blue slime wallowing across the block ; round 
corners you dived under narrow tunnels two or three feet high, finally emerging into 
the comparative open of the front line trench. 

When we were in Brigade reserve in YPRES, the working parties sent out at 
night often had this journey to do, after a two mile tramp and heavily laden with 
shovels, duckboards, barbed wire, and so on, but there was no falling-out, and little 
grousing. 

A feature of this sector was the craters and shell-hole posts out in the open in 
front, garrisoned by small parties of men ; there they lay — cold, wet, and sleepy — 
for hours on end, visited at intervals by an Officer or N.C.O. 

On the 20th Captain Ord was appointed Commandant of the l(»-lth Brigade 
Officers' School, and Major A. H. Haslam joined us. On the 22nd 1(> " Minnies " 
fell on our front line, wounding Second Lieutenant J. F. Walmsley and J. H. Ogden ; 
the following night we were relieved by the 1 .Sth King's Liverpool Regiment and 
went back to YPRES to the PRISON and MAGAZINE billets. These two buildings 
had not been greatly damaged, and the MAGAZINE was fairly shell-proof. We 
sent the usual nightly working parties up the line till the 27th, when we relieved 
the 1,4th King's Own in WEILTJE sector, to the north of RAILWAY WOOD ; 
here the Hun was further off and things were a bit more comfortable.* Second 

*0n the 26th, R.S.M. Farnworth, who for a long time had been suffering great pain in his 
limbs, was sent to hospital. He was eventually discharged unfit (or further service. A man of 
arresting personality, steeped in Army tradition, and the possessor of a biting tongue, his influence 
in the Battalion was great and lasting. 



43 

Lieutenants Reed, long, Vipond, and Vernon were posted to other Battalions on 
the 29th. The tour was quiet on the whole, and on the 31st a piece of the enemy's 
parapet fell in, giving our snipers a splendid chance— they claimed three certain hits. 
That night we were relieved by the 1 5th King's Own and marched back to C Camp, 
a collection of wooden huts distributed in a roadside copse near BRANDHOEK, a 
little bit of Heaven to weary and sodden men coming out of the line. Here we could 
sleep and feed in peace, do refitting, physical jerks and parades, and play football. 

During the month no less than three Officers and 55 men had gone sick and 
been sent to Field Ambulance (also known as "Fanny Adams ") — for which the 
change to the Flanders clay was no doubt largely responsible. 

We remained at C Camp till the 8th November, when we moved up to YPRES 
again and were billeted in the RAMPARTS and the SCHOOL ; the latter was a large 
building on the MENIN ROAD outside the city and made a decent billet till the 
gunners put a large gun in it, with the usual sequel. 

During the next three days we sent a working party of 250 up the line every 
night. Major Crump rejoined the Battalion on the 11th. 

On the 12th we relieved the 1 -Ith King's Own in the RAILWAY WOOD 
sector, B and C Companies being in the front line, A and D in support in BEEK 
Trench. Captain Houghton rejoined the Battalion. 

On the night of the loth the moon shone beautifully and disclosed our wiring 
party to the Hun about 100 yards off. Second Lieutenant Higson was hit ; the 
next night our Lewis guns retorted on Hun working parties. 

Every day brought its ration of "Minnies," shells and bullets, and someone 
got hit ; Second Lieutenant Walton was killed by a sniper's bullet on the 16th. 
The sniper was promptly shot by one of ours. 

On the 17th, at 11 p.m., for half an hour, we strafed the Boche with guns, heavy 
and Stokes' trench mortars and rifle grenades, to stir him up — the usual tactics of 
the 55th Division ; he retaliated feebly and wounded only one man ; a fighting 
patrol then went out, but found no Hun about. 

On the ISth, at 8 45 a.m., 18 heavy " Minnies " fell on B Company, wounding 
two men ; our guns retaliated— they always did for "Minnies"- to discourage 
them. I think we all hated and feared the " Minnie " more than anything, chiefly 
on account of the deafening, nerve-shattering effect of the explosion ; if you 
watched you could see them coming over like an oil-drum describing slowly a 
parabola in the air and could dodge them and watch the fall from a safe distance, 
then a pause, then CRRRAAASH ! and up went sandbags, earth, wood, iron, 
and sometimes men, leaving a crater of raw crumbly earth to be dealt with as soon 
as might be. 

In the evening we were relieved by the 1 5th King's Liverpool Regiment, and 
straggled systematically back to YPRES— billeted this time in the Prison and 
Magazine. 



44 

The Officers now with the Battalion were as follows : — 
Lieutenant-Colonel R. Hindle, Corpmanding. 
Major Crump, Second in Command. 
Second Lieutenant R. N. Buckmaster, Adjutant. 
Second Lieutenant Burnside, Transport. 
Lieutenant Bardsley, Quartermaster. 
Second Lieutenant Lowe, Lewis Guns. 
Second Lieutenant Mather, Bombs. 
Second Lieutenant Williams, Sniping and Intelligence. 

Captain A. T. Houghton ) 

Captain A. Walsh | 

Second Lieutenant Tyldesley } A Company. 
Second Lieutenant Bissett 
Second Lieutenant Cooper J 
*Captain F. S. Baker 
Second Lieutenant Agostini 
Second Lieutenant Robinson I 
Second Lieutenant H. Holden i 
Captain Hore ) 

Lieutenant Tautz 
Second Lieutenant R. Hall 
Second Lieutenant Ashcroft ; 
Captain Matthew 
Lieutenant Howarth 
Second Lieutenant Holmes 
Second Lieutenant Brown j 

The next five days were spent in cleaning up and bathing — a ceremony in which 
a whole Company filed into an old building labelled " Divisional Baths," handed 
in their underclothing, stood in tubs under a trickle of warm water and washed as 
best they might, receiving " clean " clothes in return, and came away cleaner and 
fresher men. The inverted commas in the last sentence are a tribute to the 
longevity and indestructibility of the louse, or " chat ," and her eggs ; no process 
was ever discovered by which they could be extirpated, except " handpicking." 
(Some people may think this reference a little indelicate, but this is a truthful record 

The usual nightly working parties went up the line, until, on the 24th, we 
relieved the 1 4th King's Own in the WIELTJE Sector. A and D Companies were 
in the front line, C Company in support in "New X Line," and B in reserve, 
Battalion Headquarters being at POTIJZE CHATEAU. 

•Captain Baker formerly Quartermaster had volunteered for a combatant Commission 
when we were short of Officers after the Somme Battles — and was given command of B 
Company which he held until killed in September, 1917. The high qualities which had 
made him an ideal Quartermaster, made him equally successful as a Company Commander. 



B Company. 



C Company 



D Company. 



45 

The relief started badly, a " Minnie " strafe during the morning having blown 
in the front line in several places, incidentally blowing a Company Ccmmander cut 
of his dugout ; the strafing went on all afternoon, but luckily ceased at dusk, and 
the relief passed off without incident. 

This sector was a distinct improvement on RAILWAY WOOD. The Hun was 
about 'lOO yards away, and there was consequently hardly any trench mortar 
activity and no mining, but the wire was thin, the drainage bad, and the Company 
Headquarters mere shanties, while most of the sentry posts had to make shift with 
a ground-sheet for sleeping accommodation, the old traverses and dugouts having 
been knocked in and never repaired. The reserve Company in CONGREVE WALK 
was more comfortable, being well hidden in dead ground, and their trench was clean 
and dry - a nice change after their tour in the worst bit of RAILWAY WOOD. 

That night was quiet, and our patrols and wirers were busy in No Man's Land ; 
rain fell during the night, and breakfasts were very late in the morning. 

The following description of a typical day in the front line is for the edification 
of those who have never been there ; how we longed to bring s( me of our stay- 
at-home acquaintances out there and rub their noses in Flanders mud — the real 
stay-at-homes, the profiteer, CO., agitator, striker — the folk who, in accordance 
with what Lewis Carroll called " the glorious British Principle of Political 
Dichotomy," were doing their best to nullify our efforts in the fighting line ! 

The day begins at "Stand to," about an hour before dawn, when the 
Officer and N.C.O. on duty go round rousing every one with a hoarsely-whispered, 
"Wake up, there— Stand to !" reinforced by a shake as each man comes slowly 
up out of the wells of sleep and stumbles to his feet, rubs his eyes, grabs his rifle, 
and mounts the fire step. The Company Commander rouses the signaller, or vice 
versa, and every one sniffs the cold night air and hopes that " Jerry " won't come 
over this morning. 

Slowly the darkness thins; faces become visible, then sandbags, then duck- 
boards, then the screwposts supporting the wire in front ; suddenly a lark stirs, 
mounts up and bursts into his fervent song- the dawn has come, and the Company 
Commander gives the word "Stand down," which is passed along and acted 
on promptly, so that in a minute only the sentry on each post is left on duty. For 
we no longer hold the line continuously — our numbers are too small — but with a 
certain number of sentry posts, each consisting of an N.C.O. and, when possible, 
six men more often four — some posts being Lewis gun posts, others bombing posts, 
others riflemen only. This line of posts, weak as it is, is strung out between and 
in front of a series of " strong points " containing machine guns and an infantry 
garrison lodged in deep mines, while behind us is the support Company ready to 
come up in case of need, and reserve troops further back ; in addition we have the 
guns, which we can always switch on in a few seconds by telephone or sending up 
a rocket ; all these things give us confidence, weak though we feel ourselves to be. 

About this time there appears in the trench an Officer from the reserve 
Company, followed by sweating men carrying knapsack food- containers and dixies. 



46 

The word " Breakfast up " is hardly needed, as already a man from each post is 
waiting with both hands full of mess tins to draw the bacon and tea for his post — 
bread and dry stuff was issued by the Company Quartermaster-Sergeant the night 
before. The sentries are excluded from the ensuing munching until such time as 
a chum, his meal swallowed, is available for relief ; never for an instant, by day 
or night, must that vigilant watch over No Man's Land cease. 

The Officers crowd into the Company Headquarters or crawl into their own 
" caboosh " and eat their food in privacy, the same food as the rest but on a 
plate, sometimes with porridge and eggs, privately purchased, in addition — the 
Army issues the same ration to all ranks, but extras can be bought at canteens 
in YPRES. 

After breakfast comes cleaning and inspecting rifles, while the Company 
Commander, who has already had a look round and detailed the day's work to the 
Company Sergeant-Major, completes and sends down by runner to Battalion Head- 
quarters his Trench State and account of ammunition expended ; then adjusting 
his tube helmet and box respirator and tightening his belt carrying his revolver 
and glasses (it is a standing order that everyone must wear his equipment all the 
time in the front line), he sets out to inspect his lines, finding, if he knows his job, 
a cheery word for all and sundry, and receiving often better than he gives, taking 
stock of everything, strafing slackers, and generally tuning up for the day, well 
knowing that, if he misses anything, the Commanding Officer or, worse still, the 
Brigadier, will spot it and strafe him ! 

Each sentry post has its standing orders pinned up on a board, with a duty 
roster showing each man's work through the 24 hours, and ensuring that each 
gets eight hours in which he may try to sleep, and a sheet for intelligence, which 
is collected by the Intelligence Officer every morning when he visits the sniping 
posts. 

" Dinners up " is the signal for a general break and a repetition of the breakfast 
scene, but the food is stew or roast meat and potatoes or rissoles. At I .'{0 p.m. 
casualty returns and special indents have to be at Battalion Headquarters, and at 
MW p.m. a report on the situation and direction of wind (this latter with reference to 
possible gas activities). Having to render this report in the middle of a strafe, some 
sorely-tried Officer is said to have written, " Situation , Wind vertical ! 

Long before this we have all washed (or dabbed) our hands and faces in shell- 
hole water and shaved as best we can, and an inspection of box respirators has been 
carried out by the Officer on duty ; feet are also inspected and rubbed with whale 
oil to guard against trench-feet, then work is resumed till tea, after which it is time 
to stand-to again for another hour. 

Then the night routine begins ; the men who have worked all day " get down 
to it," while the wirers begin to slide over the parapet with their rolls of barbed 
wire and posts ; the patrol puts on boiler-suits and cap-comforters — each man 
leaving behind any possible identification, and slides off into the waste, fitfully 
lit by enemy flares, in front of us. 



47 

The Officer and N.C.O. on duty start their tour of the line, candles are lit in Com- 
pany Headquarters and correspondence is dealt with, while the Company Commander 
has another good look round while waiting for the patrol to return ; when they 
come in the leader's report has to be reduced to writing — often no easy matter when 
an unfortunate reference to " enemy seen " raises a perfect hail of questions from 
higher authority, truculently asking why they were not instantly gone for and 
spitted ! Picture Second Lieutenant Snooks, on patrol for the first or second time 
with three men, sent out to examine enemy wire, shivering and squirming his way 
across NO MAN'S LAND, all eyes and ears, suddenly hearing guttural voices and 
seeing six or more figures looming big in the haze. Of course, he ought to bluff 
them and bring them in — that is what you would do. Reader, wouldn't you ?— but 
he doesn't ; he remembers that he was told to examine wire, not to make trouble, 
so he crouches motionless in the mud till they pass, and thinks he has done the right 
thing — till he sends in his report. Then, all at once, the Brigadier, the Colonel, 
the Company Commander send for him, and ask him abruptly, and with degrees 

of rudeness befitting their respective ranks, what the he meant by letting those 

Boches escape ! Needless to say, he never repeats the mistake ! And in time he 
learns that in the Division and the Battalion it is a criminal offence to let slip any 
opportunity of killing, capturing, or annoying Boche ! 

About 10 p.m. is " tea up," and the rum issue is mixed with this or with the 
breakfast tea at the discretion of the Company Commander. The patrol and other 
men coming in cold and wet need theirs at once, followed by a walk down to the 
Brigade drying room, where they can sleep in blankets before a brazier while their 
clothes are dried. 

With the patrol's return operations usually close for the night, and about 
midnight, having dealt with the last batch of chits which a thoughtful and zealous 
runner has seen fit to pick off the Adjutant's table and deliver, asking searching 
questions about the " number of sandbags laid " or "the number of screw posts, 
long, salved " the day before, or the name of a man used to operating an electric 
light plant or minding pigeons or mixing cocktails (" nil returns to be rendered !" 
which means " If none, say so "), the Company Commander, who alone has no 
allotted sleeping time, takes off his tin hat, loosens his belt, and sleeps. At 
3 a.m. the Officer on duty, who does a four-hour spell, sends in another " situation 
and wind report," and waits for the hour when he can stir up everyone else for 
" stand-to," strolling from one post to another and keeping an eye on things in 
general and the Boche in particular. 

It is very quiet, probably raining a little ; nothing on the move, except rats. 
What brutes they were, those rats of the Salient ! huge mangy brutes the size of 
a cat, a few patches of fur on their otherwise bare pink bodies ; getting under your 
feet, running over your face as you lay trying to sleep, eating through haversacks 
to get the biscuits within, scurrying, scratching, gnawing all night long ! 

To resume the thread of the story : — The following extracts from a Company 



48 

Commander's diary, given under the dates on which they were written, help to 
give hfe to an otherwise bald narrative : 

2.Sth. •' This dugout is very poor and the roof is leaky — my canvas bucket 
catches most of the drip, however. . . . Have just been entering up Logbook 
sitting in the dugout with a candle for company — caked in mud, sandbags over my 
boots — feet cold, raining outside, but quite cheerful, as I am expecting some hot 
stew before long. The old skin-lined coats are no longer issued ; instead we have 
leather jerkins lined with fleece, very warm and comfy." 

'i()th. " To-day is apparently Sunday, but out here one can't tell it except 
by the calendar ; the daily hate goes on much as usual in fact to-day we have 
been hating the Boche rather extra much. Our guns have been slowly and 
deliberately knocking his front line to blazes all day, but if I know anything of him 
he will be about half a mile behind down a hole of some sort— we all go to ground 
in these days : ' They shall go into the caves and dens of the rocks, they shall say 
unto the mountains, " Fall on us " and to the hills " Cover us," men's hearts failing 
them for fear and for looking for those things which are coming on the earth ' 
a wonderful book, the Bible ! . . . One of the men said to-dav, ' The Boche 
isn't here. Sir ; he's gone to the Somme and left his missus to look after 
this place !' . . . How nice a change of boots will be !" 

27th. " A fighting patrol under Second Lieutenant Agostini went out but 
encountered no enemy. At 7 .'{0 p.m. we were relieved by the I 5th South 
Lancashires ; they were very strong and all arrived together instead of post by post 
and the narrow trench was jammed with men so that our fellows had a struggle 
to get out. However, we got out without a casualty, assembled at YPRES station, 
and trained to BRANDHOEK, whence we marched to C Camp for a rest." 

'IHth. " 'Cleaning and inspection of kit,' says the War Diary. We always 
lay long on the morning after relief, no one worried anyone else till noon at least. 
"To-day I had a bath ! Oooooooh ! Nothing can describe the utter luxury of it 
when for several days you haven't even had your revolver off ! A real one and 
lie down in it ! I feel another man already ! Nothing of special interest, very 
busy inspecting, cleaning up, repairing, and generally getting ready for the 
trenches. ... It's still very cold and difficult to keep warm ; these huts have 
no glass in the windows, but horn, sacking or linen, so one always writes by 
candle-light. We have a gramophone in the Mess which plays all day and cheers 
us much. ' O, Cecilia ! Don't make those eyes at me !' is a great favourite, 
especially with the Padre, who says the sentiment is exceedingly proper !" 

The following days were devoted to Company training, and on Sunday 
December 3rd, 191fi, there was a Church Parade. Our Diarist writes: " We are still 
in rest, and it's still freezing — coke is bad to get in quantity to-day we are very 
short ; food is plentiful, there are Y.M.C.A. huts and canteens and places about 
where one can buy baccy, biscuits, fruit, etc. the important thing is that all 
eatables must be in tins, otherwise the rats get the lot. ... In spite of cold, 
dirt, and discomfort, it's a good life on the whole, and one's conscience is at rest ; 



49 

we're part of an Army — and a fine Army- and the Army is abundantly cheerful.' 

Our numbers at this time were very low, three more Officers and ^{7 Other 
Ranks having gone sick during the month. 

On 6th December, we were inspected in mass by the Corps Commander, 
an amusing inspection which rather showed up the lack of horsemanship of some 
Company Commanders. As a result a Battalion riding school was started, and 
carried on whenever we were in " rest." The following day we moved up to 
YPRES (RAMPARTS and SCHOOL), and on the 8th relieved the 1 0th King's 
Liverpool Regiment in RAILWAY WOOD. The following day our artillery was 
active, strafing the enemy front line ; we received some " Minnies " in exchange. 
During the night our field guns and machine guns fired on enemy communications ; 
he retaliated with shells and "Minnies." 

In the support trench :BEEK) were many home-made weather vanes, 
somewhat out of adjustment, and one day, in directing a stranger to Company 
Headquarters, someone said, " Keep along the trench and you'll see several 
weather-cocks." "Yes," broke in a humorist, "to show the various Norths I" 

On the nth the activity on both sides was renewed, but without serious 
damage. Of course trenches were blown in and there were many narrow escapes, 
but only two men were wounded in the three days. It was always a standing 
wonder that so much metal could fly about in horrid, jagged bits, knocking trenches 
about, missing men by inches, demolishing dugouts, and yet cause so few casualties. 
For example, three men were lying in a low dugout with an iron roof ; a shell 
struck the front edge, burying the men and at the same time saving them from its 
own explosion, which took place simultaneously ! Men are sometimes literally 
struck dumb at these times, as witness the following true story : — Scene— a slight 
shelter ; Officer inside. Private at entrance ; three shells fall in quick succession, 
the first and second miss the shelter by a foot or two and make the usual noise and 
mess, the third hurtles down and buries itself at the very entrance - a long pause, 
then a small, unnatural voice, "That's a dud, sir!" Another pause, another 
voice of like quality, " Yes, I see it is !" 

The 12th was very quiet. A drizzling rain fell all morning, mixed with snow 
later. The following day we were told to prepare for relief, and had the 
satisfaction of seeing, during the afternoon, our heavies putting some really big 
stuff on the Hun lines ; in the evening we returned to our YPRES billets. 

14th. YPRES was shelled fairly heavily and we had one casualty ; our guns 
were also very active. "What an awful row these big guns make when they go 
off ; if you're anywhere near them the noise seems to box your ears and make you 
deaf for some seconds." 

15th. " Our guns were making a fair old row last night and this morning, 
celebrating the Kaiser's peace proposals, I suppose- what a difference from the 
old RICHEBURG days ! To-night, about 1 30, the Hun suddenly started shelling 
this place to some tune and kept it up for half an hour ; quite a lot burst near our 
dugout and there was a good bit of stuff flying about, but no one was hit." During 



50 

these days the usual nightly working parties filed through tlie MENIN GATE and 
went up the line to shovel slime for a few hours. 

On 17th Derember, liM(), we moved to PRISON billets and into the line again — 
WIELTJE^on the 18th. 

On the 19th a dozen " Minnies " fell on our front line— again no one was hurt ; 
on 2()tli December, HdJi, the Hun shelled us all day; no casualties, bitter wind and 
snow, aeroplanes active, a Hun machine being brought down over their lines at 1 15. 

21st December, IWKi. Great artillery activity. Our front line trenches were 
cleared with tlie exception of a few Lewis guns from S a.m. to 4 p.m. Our heavies 
bombarded the enemy trenches from S a.m. to 10 a.m. The field guns cut wire 
opposite our front line from 10 a.m. to I p.m., after which the heavies resumed 
operations. In the evening a patrol located an enemy sentry post in the Long Sap. 
On the 22nd the artillery programme was repeated ; tlie enemy retaliated and 
caused one casuality. On the 23rd the I 'Itli King's Own raided over our heads, 
entering the enemy trenches and finding them deserted ; the enemy retaliated 
heavily, causing three casualties, one man (Duerden) being killed in the front line 
by a bit of shell. As the front line was simply plastered with shells, we were lucky 
not to have more. 

" There was a pretty heavy strafe this morning early," writes the Diarist ; 
" it went on for about an hour and left one kind of dazed and sleepy." 

Christmas Eve was very quiet ; the great question was, "Were we to stay 
in the line over Christmas or not ?" Our joy on hearing that we were to go out 
was tempered by pity for the King's Own, who relieved us. 

Christmas Day. "Out of trenches ! Came out last night and forthwith had 
a shave and partial wash. We sent an Officer on, and when we landed here (YPRES) 
the men found candles lit and fires going in their billets, and we had ditto in ours. 
To-day we gave the men a decent Christmas dinner, and are now about to have 
one ourselves — a roaring fire, plenty of candles, turkey stuffed with Ihc stuffing, 
beer, vin ordinaire, pudding, and sundries have the promise of a very pleasant 
evening in them, if the Boche will refrain from throwing stuff over- -he peppered 
this place some to-day ! To-morrow, work— pulling things together— refitting, 
cleaning, reorganising ; to-night, Christmas Day, home thoughts, comfort and 
God bless everyone, especially those at home, who are always with us in thought 
— what we owe to their prayers no man knows." 

Second Lieutenant Tyldesley was largely responsible for the success of the 
dinner referred to. The Battalion dined in the MAGAZINE, two Companies at a 
time, on hastily-made tables and waited on by the Officers ; there was pork and 
goose mixed (Tyldesley's tunic bore the marks of goose-grease for long after), and 
trimmings, plum pudding and dessert and fruit and beaucoup beer, and we drank 
"The King" and everyone enjoyed themselves. 

'i()th. " Everyone in splendid form after a day's rest and a good feed, a sort 
of cheery, alert look on everyone's face that I haven't seen for a long time." 
220 men were on working parties that day, and on the 27th we were relieved by 



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51 

the I '5th South Lancashires and went back to C Camp, this time by train —' the 
Midnight Choo-choo ' as some wit dubbed it. The silent assembly of troops at 
YPRES Station, the entraining, and the gradual withdrawal of the train from that 
stricken area into cultivated country, are some of the things we shall never cease 
to recall v/ith complete vividness. The following days were devoted to the usual 
cleaning and inspections, etc. 

" To-day I have had all my men inspected for deficiencies and paid them ; 
I find an excellent plan is to require a man to produce a chit from his Platoon 
Commander stating that he has been fully inspected before he is paid ; by adopting 
this plan I get all sorts of people up for inspection who would otherwise probably 
have been missed. To-morrow I get my Company on parade for a whole morning 
— a most unusual occurrence and one to be made the most of." 

The 31st December found us still at C Camp— clean, fresh, and ready for 
another year of war, though fervently hoping for peace. 

Our total casualties for the year were as follows : — 





Officers. 


Other Ranks 


Killed 


9 


69 


Wounded 


23 


434 


Missing 


1 


190 


Do. believed killed ... 


2 





Drowned 





1 


Sick to F.A. 


16 


204 



Totals 



51 



898 



The New Year started with a Brigade holiday, and in the Church Army hut 
the men were given a dinner followed by a cinema performance ; the Sergeants 
and Officers also had dinners in their respective messes. "A dinner of stew, 
mixed pork, and goose, and plum pudding, and beer in a mess tin, means more to 
the men to-day than all the elaborate spread we had at SEVENOAKS, which 
cost £150." 

During this period reinforcements of Officers and men kept turning up, and 
were rapidly assimilated ; on the other hand, almost every day some Officer or man 
went sick, the weather on the whole being mild and damp. 

On 3rd January, 1917, we were inspected by the Brigade Commander, and were 
complimented on the turnout, also on the camp ; in fact at this time Brigade were 
rather fond of us and let us alone quite a lot. 

On the 5th the Lewis gun detachments with their handcarts were inspected 
by the Divisional Commander ; he caused great mirth by wheeling a handcart 
violently at a ditch, to demonstrate how easily the shafts broke ! At this time the 
Lewis gun was in a transition stage and the favourite toy of the staff ; it was finding 
its feet as a Company weapon, and masses of orders about it were coming in every 
day, to the joy(?) of all concerned. 



52 

On the fith we returned to YPRES, and on the 7th reheved the l/6th King's 
Liverpool Regiment in RAILWAY WOOD, where we were badly shelled the 
following day, six men being wounded. This relief was accomplished without 
a casualty, although Platoons had some narrow escapes. We were singularly 
lucky that way ; we were always hearing that such and such a Battalion had had 
a Platoon blown to bits in the Square, but it never happened to us ; if an Officer 
lost men by taking a known dangerous road when a safer was available, it was 
not counted unto him for righteousness ! 

On the 8th the enemy shelled us all day, especially BEEK TRENCH and 
BATTALION HEADQUARTERS, and six men were wounded ; the 9th was quieter 
— one man wounded. 

On the 10th, after a quiet morning, our artillery bombarded enemy lines 
opposite B Company, who had their Company Headquarters blown in in the 
retaliation which followed - no casualty. 

After a quiet day on the 1 1th, the Battalion was relieved on the 12th, except 
A Company, by the i;4th KING'S OWN, A Company being left behind to do a 
special job — wiring in close support and support lines — the rest going back to 
yPRES, whence they provided the usual nightly working parties till the Kith, when 
they were relieved by the 12th ROYAL SUSSEX REGIMENT and marched to 
P Camp north of POPERINGHE. The next day we marched to ROUSSEL FARM, 
about a mile east of ELVERDINGHE, the Drums, recently re-formed, playing on 
the march for the first time. A Company turned up, dead beat, at 5 a.m. Second 
Lieutenant Faber went sick from sheer overwork ; as Lewis gun Officer he had 
tried to do everything himself and broke down. We were sorry to lose such an 
excellent Officer. 

During the next few days, except when snowed off, a party of nine Officers 
and 300 Other Ranks, under Captain Houghton, was employed daily in making the 
formation for doubling a railway track, supervised by an R.E. Officer. As our party 
included a Civil Engineer, a Railway Engineer, and a Municipal Engineer, there 
was enough technical skill to have laid the whole railway ! During this period 
another party, D Company under Captain Matthew, were repairing dugouts in 
CANAL BANK, YPRES, and after the first day were billeted there to save marching. 

On the 22nd Captain Harris returned to the Battalion and took over the 
Bombing Company, an experimental organisation which did valuable work during 
its short existence. We were glad to leave this place with its thin huts (the weather 
was bitter) and march to D Camp on the 2.1rd, where, on the 24th, we were 
inspected by the Army Commander, General Sir Herbert Plumer. 

On the 1st February our shooting team were winners in the inter-Battalion 
competition and were chosen to represent the Brigade. On the 3rd we were relieved 
in D Camp by the 1,5th NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT, marched to 
POPERINGHE, and trained to BOLLEZEELE. 

The train was a sort of miniature affair, and the railway ran, mostly by the 
roadside, at about three miles an hour. What a treat it was to get out of the sound 



53 

of the guns for a bit, and to be in a pleasant little Flemish town, outwardly 
untouched by war! It consisted of a cheerful-looking market square lined with 
small shops, with a Church in the middle — quite a treat to see a Church untouched 
by shells — with a sort of openwork spire, to let out the sound of the carillons which 
played every hour and half-hour ; how sweetly and peacefully it floated out over 
the open country on a still, frosty night ! There was also a good inn, the " Lion 
d'Or, " known as the " Brass Cat! " The men were mostly billeted in enormous 
barns ; the Officers in houses round the square. Here, it was rumoured, we were 
to have a month's rest, but no one believed it ; we actually pol 16 days. 

On the 4th, being Sunday, of course orders for an immediate move were 
received at 1 1 30 a.m., and the Battalion packed up and concentrated at 2 15 p.m. 
and marched to ESQUELBECQ, a distance of five miles ; this march will long be 
remembered by the Lewis gunners, who had to carry their guns there and back 
again — for this turned out to be a "camouflage" march ; much hostile aerial 
activity had recently been displayed in the back areas, so large columns of troops 
were made to march eastwards during the day and back at dusk. 

It was bitterly cold, snow on the ground and freezing hard — this weather 
continued all the time we were there. The time was devoted to training — 
Company, Battalion, and Brigade schemes, and in the intervals we smartened up 
and overhauled our interior economy. 

On the 16th we moved back to C Camp, where we relieved the 14th Hampshires. 

On 17th February, 1917, we sent an Officer and 20 men to attend an 
investiture of French soldiers by the Army Commander, as representatives of the 
55th Division — rather a compliment. 

On the 18th the Brigadier presented Military Medal ribbons to Company 
Sergeant-Major Heywood, Corporal Bamber, and 1147 Private Ainscough, T. On 
the 24th we moved into billets in CANAL BANK, YPRES. These were large 
elephant dugouts on the bank of the canal north of YPRES, comfortable and fairly 
safe, but we were only there for a night, relieving the 1 5th South Lancashires in 
the LA BRIQUE sector the next night. This was a rotten sector, badly neglected 
by previous Divisions; even the main communication trench was about two feet deep 
in water when we first saw it, and BILGE TRENCH well deserved its unsavoury 
name. It is only fair to say that when we left it it was fairly comfortable. On 
the 26th the line was rearranged, and we returned to CANAL BANK, whence we 
sent up the usual nightly working parties. 

On the 4th March YPRES was heavily shelled during the day, but we relieved 
the 1 /4th King's Own in the line in the evening without casualties ; at 7 5 p.m. 
the enemy sprung a mine on our right Brigade front and our artillery opened 
a heavy bombardment ; one man was wounded in YPRES. 

The 5th was a quiet day ; at night a patrol went to examine CANADIAN 
DUGOUTS in the middle of NO MAN'S LAND and found them occupied. 

On the 8th we were relieved by the 1 4th KING'S OWN and went back to 



54 

CANAL BANK, where some artist did the Regimental Crest in bits of tile in front 
of a dugout. One wonders if it is still there ! 

On the ISth we sent a strong fighting patrol up the line to raid two of the 
CANADIAN DUGOUTS. The party consisted of one Officer, one N.C.O., and 12 
men, who constituted the dugout party, and two complete Lewis gun teams. 

Presumably the Hun got wind of the enterprise- he always did for Nos. I, 
2, and ;{ dugouts were empty and the wire round them destroyed. That evening 
we relieved the King's Own again. On the 15th YPRES was shelled throughout 
the day, and again the following day ; a patrol of our& had a scrap with a Hun 
patrol in NO MAN'S LAND, but suffered no casualties. 

The 17th was a quiet day ; the Battalion was relieved by the 1 /5th KING'S 
OWN and went back to C Camp, where we remained till the 28th. During this 
period important reorganisation was carried out, the bombing sections rejoining 
their Companies, thus " washing out " the Bombing Company, the Lewis guns being 
placed finally under Company Commanders ; Companies reorganised their 
Platoons into four sections — one of bombers, one of riflemen, one of Lewis gunners, 
and one of rifle grenadiers. As a matter of fact we had ourselves suggested and 
partially adopted this about a month before, but it was now officially sanctioned. 
Second Lieutenant H. Lonsdale joined us during this period. 

On the 28th we moved back to CANAL BANK, YPRES ; on that day we made 
272 barbed wire concertinas and carried 100 up the line. We remained here 
a few days, supplying nightly working parties — chiefly carrying wire up to the 
front line ; two men were wounded on the 1st April. 

During February and March we lost 98 men through sickness alone— our 
monthly average being between 40 and fiO during the following months also. 

On the 2nd April we relieved the I 4th KING'S OWN in the LA BRIQUE 
sector without casualties ; Second Lieutenant Fullerton joined us. The next 
day was quiet, with slight shelling on the front line, but on the following night a 
patrol of ours ran into a strong enemy party, who tried to cut them off, but a Lewis 
gun team being sent for, they thought better of it and retired, covered by two 
machine guns ; we had three killed and one wounded that day. 

On the 6th we had a man wounded, and again on the 7th ; on the latter day 
the IHSth Brigade on our right carried out a hurricane bombardment on the enemy's 
front line with Stokes' mortars. The enemy sent up red flares, which, being our 
S.O.S. signal, brought our artillery into action, and fiOO shells were fired on the 
enemy front line opposite us. Our relief that night by the I 4th KING'S OWN 
was carried out, with one casualty, in bright moonlight, and we went back to 
CANAL BANK. 

The 8th, Easter Sunday, was a lovely day, and very quiet. The Padre held 
four Communion services in one of the dugouts, and a large number of us went. 

The next few days we spent in doing a certain amount of training on the 
Canal Bank, with nightly working parties ; on the 12th Second Lieutenant R. A. 



55 

Hall was accidentally wounded in the arm during bombing practice ; the same 
evening we relieved the 1 4th KING'S OWN in LA BRIQUE sub-sector. 

On the 13th, during some slight shelling, a Lewis gun post on our right 
Company front had the misfortune to get hit, one man being killed and three 
others wounded, and on the following day, though' "quiet," two more men were 
wounded. On the 17th we sent out a large fighting patrol, with Bangalore 
torpedoes, to capture an enemy sentry post in a sap head, but, as usual, "when 
they got there the cupboard was bare," and they came away empty. 

On the 17th we were relieved by the 12th ROYAL SUSSEX f39th Division)— 
the relief was not complete till 1 30 a.m. — and we entrained at YPRES at 2 30 a.m. 
and arrived at POPERINGHE station at 3 25 a.m. and marched to Z Camp, 
where we snatched a few hours' sleep. At 2 30 p.m. we marched via 
WATOU to HOUTKERQUE, where Companies were billeted in scattered farms ; 
here our Medical Officer, Captain A. W. Uloth, R.A.M.C, went sick, and 
Captain R. W. Shegog, R.A.M.C, came in his place. Here we remained 
for three days, cleaning up and training, till on the 22nd the whole Brigade 
concentrated at 9 a.m. one mile south of HERZEELE and marched, with first 
line transport, to billets in ARNEKE, where we arrived at I 45 p.m., leaving 
again early next morning to concentrate at 9 a.m. four and a half miles west of 
ARNEKE, and march via WATTEN (locally known as "WAT") to HOULLE, 
where we arrived at 2 p.m. These marches, though a stiff trial to men fresh 
from the trenches, with slack muscles and tender feet, were interesting ; we were 
seeing new country : HOUTKERQUE and HERZEELE were nice little towns, 
though the latter had more troops than it could properly hold ; ARNEKE was still 
better — the people, who seemed delighted to see us, had a curiously English look, 
probably due to the fact that Marlborough's troops were once billeted all round this 
part ; just as the Scotch blood in Lancashire is traced to the presence of the 
Pretender's following. HOULLE is in the midst of the hilly country near ST. OMER 
^strongly reminding one of parts of Kent — an ideal country to train in. Here 
were large ranges, like the Aldershot Ranges, for musketry, and every day we 
marched out of billets and up on to the hills for training of some kind, taking our 
cookers with us and having dinners up there, every day getting fitter and improving 
in morale — shaking off the trench staleness and thinking more of open fighting- — 
getting more of the " oifensive spirit." Second Lieutenant Hall rejoined us on 
the 26th. The Diarist writes at this time : " Still in the same place " — that in 
itself, you see, is sufficiently remarkable to be chronicled. " There are real 
hedgerows here, just bursting into leaf, and the fritillaries are out all along the lanes, 
in fact I am in the middle of real Spring. A lilac in front of my window shows half 
out, covered with bloom, and the currants are quite green. All this makes one 
long more than ever for England. The people round here are much better farmers 
and gardeners than we are — nothing is wasted, and everything done thoroughly 
and carefully. As I look out of the window a thrush is singing and the view is an 
English view. Oh, to be in England now that April's here !" 



56 

30th. '• The cuckoo is at it and the nightingale, in fact it is Spring, cloudless 
day, glorious sun, everything as it should be, only one thing wrong, I'm not where 
I ought to be, in England — Spring in a foreign land is a painful pleasure to 
an Englishman." The point of these extracts is that they express what each of 
us felt at that time and many other times — an intense longing, carefully smothered, 
for Home and Peace ; few individuals, if any, went abroad, or stayed there, because 
they liked it. 

Until the (ith we remained at HOULLE training ; it would serve no useful 
purpose and would bore the general reader to set down the programme of 
training carried out ; enough to say that it was a freslj and merry column that 
marched back to ARNEKE on the (ith of May, leaving again by train at 1 1 45 a.m. 
for POPERINGHE. Here we were met by the Divisional Band, which played 
us to L Camp, where we spent the night, returning to POPERINGHE the next 
morning and up by train to the PRISON billets at YPRES. 

During the next five days bathing was carried out, and the usual nightly 
working parties went up the line. YPRES was distinctly livelier than before, but 
only one man was wounded during the period. 

On the 14th we relieved the l/4th KING'S OWN in the right sub-sector, 
POTIJZE. The sectors had been rearranged . D Company had two Platocns in 
the front line and two in close support ; A Company was in reserve and held MILL 
COTTS, GARDEN OF EDEN, PROWSE TRENCH, and ST. JAMES' TRENCH. 
B and C Companies, in Brigade Reserve, were billeted in houses on the POTIJZE 
ROAD. 

On the ISth the enemy was very active with his artillery, the front line 
Company, D, calling for retaliation five times during the morning ; we had one man 
killed and one wounded. A fighting patrol had gone out the previous night to try 
to capture an enemy party, and were supported by an artillery barrage — as usual, 
the enemy had withdrawn. 

At 9 15 that evening the enemy placed a shrapnel, trench mortar, and howitzer 
barrage on our front line first, then on our support line, and an S.O.S. being sent 
up by the Battalion on our left was repeated by us ; as soon as the barrage started 
our front Company stood to and fired rapid over the parapet. No one in the front 
line saw the enemy leave his trenches, but two snipers, who had been out in 
NO MAN'S LAND all day and were waiting for it to get dark to come in, saw the 
enemy place a machine gun on his parapet, the team of which they proceeded to 
knock out ; they also saw Huns entering the trenches of the Battalion on our left. 
Our trenches were badly damaged in places, one man was killed, one missing, and 
Second Lieutenant Francis and four men wounded ; B Company relieved D that 
evening. 

"It is curious to notice the different effects intermittent and concentrated 
shelling have on one — intermittent shelling takes people different ways— on the 
whole it makes you angry ; concentrated shelling, such as a barrage, you rise above 
altogether by some curious effort of will. I think it is that in the first case one 




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57 

hears each one coming hissing along in a descending scale, and speculates where 
it will fall, while in the second there is simply a terrific medley of bangs and crashes 
which you can only accept as a perfect inferno of noise, and leave it at that." 

The following night we hit back ; Major Crump, who was in command in the 
absence of Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle, who was commanding the Brigade, 
organised a raid, carried out under an artillery barrage by Second Lieutenant Tautz, 
three N.C.O. 's, and 20 men, who entered the enemy's lines and bombed dugouts. 
The party had great difficulty in getting through the wire, and our casualties were 
two men wounded of the party and one in the trench ; three of the raiders were 
at first reported missing, but Private Metcalfe turned up at dawn, having got entangled 
in the wire and badly wounded, and in the evening another. Private Cooper, came 
in, having spent the day in a shell hole. 

That day, the 20th, leave reopened, having been closed since January, and 
everyone began to calculate their chances. 

About this time we were encouraged to use our Lewis guns against hostile 
aircraft, and special mountings and fittings were issued to us for that purpose • 
it was impossible for people behind to deal with machines flying low over our front 
line. This aeroplane shooting was rather good sport, and though very few were 
actually brought down by Lewis gun fire, they soon learned to keep out of range. 
At this time the aeroplane activity in the SALIENT was great on both sides — on 
a fine day machines swarmed like midges in the sky. 

On the night of the 20th we were relieved by the 1 4th KING'S OWN, and on 
relief we marched to A Camp, just behind VLAMERTINGHE, leaving Captain Harris 
and 200 men of B and D Companies in YPRES as a working party. They had 
rather a lively time, as YPRES was being heavily shelled daily — a shell actually 
entered a cellar where several men were sleeping, ricochetted and buried itself in 
one of the walls without exploding or touching anyone. During the next few days 
five men were wounded. 

On the night of the 26th we relieved the 1 Alth KING'S OWN in the POTIJZE 
sector, C and A Companies in front, B in support, and D in reserve, and began at 
once a series of works designed to mislead the enemy and make him think an 
attack was intended on our front. How much he was deceived appeared from the 
amount of attention we received from this time onward until the battle of 
MESSINES. 

The opposing sides gained much of their knowledge of the other's intentions 
from aeroplane photographs, which show up with great clearness any newly-dug 
earth. It was our task then to open up all the disused trenches on our sector, 
placing along the top a row of new sandbags, and to dig saps out into NO MAN'S 
LAND, at the same time annoying the Hun by every means in our power. Two 
were killed and three wounded during the next four days, during which we kept 
throwing things at the Hun — trench mortars, grenades, bullets, etc. — and we really 
did stir him up. Then came the news that we were not to be relieved, so 
Companies changed over. 



58 

On 1st June the gas strafe started ; our people started it with a discharge of 
500 gas drums on enemy reserves. We heard afterwards that so sudden and 
concentrated was the attack that a whole Company were poisoned where they 
stood. The enemy retaliated on us, killing one man and wounding three, using 
everything he had; then he began to bring up gas shells and use them, chiefly at 
night on lines of communication. The sighing of gas shells going over never 
ceased during three successive nights before the show, yet the damage done was 
very slight. But the Companies in the trenches kept getting odd ones, and the 
veering breeze kept clouds of various gases drifting about for quite a long time, 
and we had a few anxious vigils. The Hun was very angry and horribly afraid 
and therefore shelled everything he could think of, and we appeared to occupy some 
of his thoughts, for we certainly got our full share and he took his toll of us. 

On the 2nd we sent over more gas drums, and again the Hun retaliated, 
doing a lot of damage to trenches and killing two men and wounding five others. 

On the ;kd we treated him to a combined smoke, artillery, and machine gun 
barrage, and he replied, but more feebly, killing one man and wounding two ; but 
during the night, from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m., he drenched YPRES with gas shells, our 
transport suffering slightly. He also, on the following day, put ()7 " Minnies " on 
to B Company, killing one man and wounding Second Lieutenants Hall and Johnson 
and 1 1 others. We were glad to learn that Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle had been 
awarded the D.S.O. in the Birthday Honours List. 

That night a minor enterprise by the 1 ;5th NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT 
on our right caused some shelling on our right front Company, and a party digging 
saps in front escaped by a miracle ; he also sent. a few Granatenwerfer over into the 
middle of another party engaged in sap digging, causing several casualties, the total 
being 14 wounded for the two days. On the 14th both sides were active. We were 
preparing an elaborate programme of smoke and other bombs, to be discharged at 
the same hour as the MESSINES battle was timed to start, also putting scaling 
ladders against the parapet- this work was under Captain Harris. The Hun 
shelled YPRES pretty heavily in the evening, and set two large dumps on fire. 

At 3 10 a.m. on the 7th the Messines battle started with a literal earthquake- 
19 mines being blown up at once, the barrage starting at the same time en our front 
among others. The enemy shelled us for about half an hour, by which time he 
found out that we were bluffing him and stopped. Our casualties were five 
killed, Second Lieutenant Agostini and 10 others wounded. 

On the 8th the enemy shelled the roads with 5.9 's and gas shells in the early 
morning, our guns doing wire cutting with the 106 fuse, a very sensitive fuse which 
bursts on graze without burying itself ; a good many " shorts " fell on our trenches 
due to defective ammunition, which was just as dangerous to the gunners as to us, 
as muzzle-bursts were not infrequent. A gunner Officer going round the line was 
at a loss for words when he saw a shell case, which had fallen short, stuck up over 
a dugout with the inscription, "A present from the R.F.A. !" Sergeant 



59 

Thompson was killed by a nosecap from one of these " shorts," and during the 
day four men were wounded. 

In the afternoon A and C Companies relieved B and D in the front line. 

At 1 1 9 p.m. the ;59th Division on our left sent over gas from Projectors ; we 
caught some of the retaliation on POTIJZE ROAD- 5.9's and gas shells. 

On the 9th we had a fairly quiet morning, but the artillery livened up in the 
afternoon ; the 1 4th KING'S OWN carried out a successful raid on our front, 
bagging six unwounded prisoners, who seemed glad to be taken. The enemy was 
taken by surprise in mid-relief. We had six men wounded during the day. 

Things remained lively during the next two days, five men being wounded, 
but on the 11th the blessed word " Relief " was whispered. Imagine the joy of men 
who had never had their clothes off for nearly three weeks — more, in some cases. 
The relieving Battalion, the 1 9th King's Liverpool Regiment, did not arrive till 
after ',i a.m., so relief had to be carried out in daylight in very small parties, but 
it went off without a casualty, and we marched to a canvas camp behind YPRES, 
where we rested till noon on the 12th, when we marched by Companies to 
POPERINGHE, leaving by train at 2 45 p.m. and reaching ESQUELBECQ at 
4 45 p.m.; here we were joined by part of the transport, and after dinner had been 
eaten we marched on to BOLLEZEELE, where we occupied our old billets. 

The next three days were spent in cleaning up, bathing, and a little training. 

On the 16th the Brigade marched via Watten to BOISDINGHEM ; it was a 
broiling day and the sky was like brass, and as the march started at 9 a.m., when 
the sun was high up, and was mostly uphill, a large number of men were affected 
with sunstroke and fell out, but the 9th Wing R.F.C. were very good to us and lent 
us lurries to bring in the stragglers. Here we found the acccommodation poor and 
totally inadequate, but we crowded in somehow, many preferring to bivouac in the 
open fields rather than occupy the buildings allotted to them : the village lay on the 
top of the downs not many miles from our old area HOULLE, almost out of the 
sound of the guns. About this time the Diarist, reviewing recent events, writes :^- 

" To be within two or three yards of a big shell when it bursts sounds like 
sudden death, but it isn't — necessarily ; it happens daily to lots of people who 
survive ; I have been several times as close as that, closer in one case ; the shock 
and noise absolutely deafen one for some minutes afterwards, but it seems to pass 
off ; but there must be a good solid bulwark of earth between you and the shell ! 
if there isn't, well shell-shock is the best you can hope for !" 

On Sunday, the 17th, we had a Church of England parade out of doors, the 
cornet player of the Drums leading the hymns. Second Lieutenants Easterby and 
Rigby joined us. The following day we were inspected in mass by the Brigadier, 
who gave us a good rating about Saturday's march. We thought this a little 
unkind, as it might have occurred to the Staff to make a start early in the morning 
and get it over in the cool of the day, instead of expecting men who were weak fiom 
a long spell of trenches to march 15 miles heavily laden in the middle of a hot June 
day ; however, we had no doubt that those responsible would be duly ticked off, 



so we swallowed the rating with outward calm ; after all, the men who fell out had 
in some cases done so without asking leave, being long past caring what happened, 
and this was a breach of march discipline. 

The remaining days of the month were spent in training ; we received a large 
number of reinforcements, including Second Lieutenant Brooke. Captain Houghton, 
who had picked up trench fever during the last tour, was sent to Field Ambulance, 
Captain Harris taking over A Company. 

On the 2nd July we marched to LUMBRES, thence we went by rail to 
BRANDHOEK, and marched from there to DERBY CAMP. At dusk D Company 
moved forward to a post called L 4 on the YPRES Road, A and C Companies to a 
strong point called P 1, and two Officers and 50 Other Ranks to YPRES for water 
duties. Second Lieutenant H. Whitehurst joined us as a reinforcement. Two 
men were wounded on the 3rd and one on the 5th, on which day Captain Ord 
rejoined us from the Divisional School, Major Crump leaving the following day for 
a three months' course at the Senior Officers' School, Aldershot. 

On the 9th we relieved the l/4th KING'S OWN in the line ; there was 
considerable enemy activity during the night, and we had one killed and one 
wounded. 

On the 10th, although considered "quiet," we had three men wounded, while 
on the I'ith, though he put two of our Lewis guns out of action with Minenwerfers 
and shelled our trenches intensely, we had no casualty. At 1 1 p.m. he began to shell 
Battalion Headquarters steadily and went on till 8 30 a.m. ; a wiring party from 
our left front Company had three men wounded by " Minnies," and had to come in. 

One man was killed and eight wounded during the day, one of the wiring 
party being missing. On the 13th two men were wounded during desultory shelling 
of our lines, and five on the next day, which started quiet, but things on both sides 
woke up at dusk, our guns bombarding enemy batteries, the Hun sending gas shells 
on to us, and barraging the front line, stopping all work, wounding three men and 
gassing two others that day. In the early morning 20 yards of the front line parapet 
was knocked in, one man killed and five wounded. Things were getting very 
hot indeed, and our strength was daily being whittled down, but relief was not yet. 

The casualties at this time would have been far heavier than they actually 
were but for the fact that the N.C.O.'s in the front line had learnt that NO MAN'S 
LAND was the safest place in a bombardment and used to take their posts out in 
front of our wire as soon as the Hun opened out. 




Oblique Aeroplane Photograph Showing Objectives in the .ird Battle of YPRES. 



CHAPTER VI. 
THE THIRD BATTLE OF YPRES. 
15th July, 1917, to 1st August, 1917. 

On the 17th July, 1917, the preliminary bombardment of the enemy lines by 
our guns commenced. In the early morning ten shells from a Hun high velocity gun 
landed on Battalion Headquarters, one actually entering the Colonel's dugout and 
exploding there without injuring him ! 

On the night following, a fighting patrol of ours had a brush with a Hun patrol 
in NO MAN'S LAND, and did good work, bringing back a dead German, who turned 
out to belong to the 449th Infantry Regiment, who were expected to be opposite to 
us. On the 20th Second Lieutenant Vincent took a raiding party of 20 in to the 
enemy lines and found a post of four men ; two fled, one was bayonetted, and one 
taken prisoner. During these days artillery had been active, and our casualties 
were 6 killed, 13 wounded, 2 gassed. 

On the 21st we suffered rather heavily from enemy artillery, a single shell 
hitting 9 men, our total casualties on that day being 1 1 killed and 14 wounded, 
of whom 2 afterwards died— our worst day since the SOMME. The Quarter- 
master, Lieutenant March, was wounded but remained on duty. In the evening 
we were relieved by the 1 5th King's Liverpool Regiment, and went back to a 
canvas camp near POPERINGHE, where all had a bath, and then marched on to 
WATOU, resting there for three days and returning to the canvas camp on the 25th. 
Captain L. Duckworth rejoined us here, and Second Lieutenant Holmes reported 
for duty. 

During the night of the 27th enemy aeroplanes dropped bombs near our camp. 

The following Operation Order and the details of the attack are taken verbatim 
from the War Diary, the official record, and are very complete, but a fev.- prefatory 
words are necessary to make them intelligible to the genera! reader. 

The 55th Division was at this time in the 19th Corps of the 5th Army, which, 
vAth the 2nd Army and the 1st French Army, were to attack the enemy's 
GHELUVELT— LANGEMARCK line ; the task allotted to our Brigade (161), was 
to pass through the other two Brigades of the Division when they had taken their 
objectives and capture the third-line system, mostly consisting of concrete 
blockhouses, which we were to meet for the first time. 

The barrage is officially stated to have been the most intense which had ever 
been put down up to that time, and largely contributed to the success of the attack. 



62 



Another novelty for us was " B team," a nucleus of Officers, Warrant Officers, 
N.C.O. 's and men who were kept out of the attack so that the Battalion could be 
reorganised as quickly as possible afterwards ; the Order had teen issued by the 
Higher Command some months before, and to it was largely due the wonderful 
speed with which units recovered from battles which in earlier years would have 
taken nearly all their leaders and specialists and rendered them unfit for action 
for at least six months. 

The following Officers actually went up with the Battalion for the battle, 
the remainder being on B team. Of those that went up, only the Commanding 
Officer, Adjutant, Transport Officer, and Second Lieutenant Higson came through 
unwounded. 

Lieutenant-Colonel R. Hindle 

Captain Ord 

Captain Shegog, R.A.M.C. 

Captain Caley 

Lieutenant Buckmaster 

Second Lieutenant Ashcroft 

Second Lieutenant Williams 

Second Lieutenant Bardsley 



Commanding. 
Second in Command. 
Medical Officer. 
Chaplain. 
Adjutant. 
Signalling Officer. 
Intelligence Officer. 
Transport Officer. 



Captain A. L. Harris 
Second Lieutenant Ordish 
Second Lieutenant Tyldesley 
Second Lieutenant Macsweeny 

Lieutenant Ogden 
Second Lieutenant Vincent 
Second Lieutenant Easterby 
Second Lieutenant Rigby 

Captain Hore 

Second Lieutenant Higson 

Second Lieutenant Mather 

Lieutenant Ostrehan 
Second Lieutenant Fullerton 
Second Lieutenant Holden 



A Company. 



- B Company. 



C Company. 



D Company. 



The aeroplane photograph read in conjunction with the map will help to give 
the reader some idea of the country as it actually was, for though July as a whole 
had been fine, there was a heavy thunderstorm on the 29th, which turned the tracks 
and roads into morasses and filled the shell holes with water. "The succeeding 
days were dull and heavy, making the completion of the artillery preparation 
peculiarly difficult, and typical Flanders weather prevailed on the morning of the 
31st— the moment chosen for the attack. 



63 

" Low-lying clouds which made aerial observation and co-operation as 
difficult as could be imagined ; a dampness of atmosphere, threatening rain at any 
moment ; a half-sodden ground, greasy and depressing — such was the luck of the 
weather when the barrage opened." * 

The Operation Order for the attack is set out below practically in full. It is 
impossible to summarize it without losing some detail which may be of interest to 
readers. 



So a too oyda 

SOuh 




THE OPERATION ORDER. 

1. On Z Day, the 55th Division will take part in a general attack. 
Battalion on the right — <)th Cameron Highlanders. 
Battalion on the left — 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers. 
I65th Brigade will capture the FREZENBERG line before the advance 

of the lfi4th Brigade begins. 
Brigade support — 1, 8th Liverpool Regiment, who will, after the capture 

of final objectives, consolidate the general line K of KEIR FARM — 

SCHULER FARM. 
Brigade reserve — 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment, who will, after the 

capture of final objectives, consolidate the general line GALLIPOLI — 

SOMME— HINDU COT. 



From " The Story of the 55th Division," by the Rev. J. 0. COOP. " Liverpool Daily Post. 



M 

2. At ZERO plus 4hrs. 4()mins. the Battalion will advance in artillery formation 
from the position of assembly and deploy as necessary, at the discretion of the Platoon 
Commanders, before crossing the Black Line. 

The attack will then be made behind a creeping barrage, in four waves. 

The BLACK DOTTED LINE will be captured and held as an outpost line, the 
GREEN LINE being consolidated. 

;$. Distribution and Formation for Attack. 

Right Front Company ... ... ... D. 

Left Front Company ... ... ... A. 

Right Support Company ... ... ... C. 

Left Support Company ... ... ... B. 

Between Assembly Line and Black Line, the formation will be four lines of 
Platoons in file or fours, at 50 yards' distance. 

After crossing the Black Line the formation will be four waves at 50 yards' 
distance. 

The second wave will close up to the first, and the third wave to the second, 
before the first and second waves reach their respective objectives. 

'1. Machine Guns. 

One sub-section will move in rear of each supporting Company. They will 
occupy the outpost line, one gun being placed in each of the four strong points that 
will be constructed, upon receiving orders from the O.C. Battalion. 

5. Objectives of Waves and Commanders. 

The first wave will capture the line of trenches D 20 a XI 90 D 14 a 10 20 
and all buildings north-west of KANSAS CROSS within the Battalion boundary 
and on the south-west side of the ZONNEBEKE WINNIPEG road. A special 
party will be told off to bomb forward along the trench leading towards the Green 
Line from D 14 c. SO 70. This line will be under command of O.C. D Company. 

The second wave will capture the Green Line ; this line will be under the 
command of O.C. A Company. 

Third wave will pass through first and second waves, and will capture BLACK 
DOTTED LINE and will be under command of O.C. C Company. 

Fourth wave will collect Nos. 4, 5, and (5 mopping-up parties and will help in 
the consolidation of the Green Line. This wave will be prepared to assist the third 
wave in the capture of its objectives. 

(i. Consolidation. 

The consolidation, which will commence at once, will be carried out in depth 
and will take the form of three lines of strong points, namely, those held by Nos. 1, 
2, and ',i waves. 

These strong points will ultimately be joined up to form trenches. 

One Company of the 1 8th Liverpool Regiment will be available to assist in 
digging. 

It is essential that artillery shelters for the Garrison should be constructed 
before dawn on Z plus 1 day. 

Strong points will be constructed at the following places : 

D 14 d 05 30. By the second wave, where touch will be gained with 
Battalion on right. 



65 



Also at- 

D 14 *) S '^ third wave, and touch gained with the Battahon 

D8c^7l'' I °" °"' '^f*- 

One machine gun will move up into each of these strong points as soon as the 
ground has been gained and consolidation begins. 

7. Battalion Headquarters. 

Prior to advance will be in the mined dugout in CONGREVE WALK. 
During advance Battalion Headquarters will move between the two rear 
Companies. 

A temporary headquarters will be established about POMMERN CASTLE. 

8. Assembly. 

The Battalion, with machine guns, trench mortars, and mopping-up parties, 
will occupy CONGREVE WALK between POTIJZE road and LONE street. Order 
from right to left : — • 



15 Platoon. 
Mopping-up party No. 1. 

9 Platoon. 

16 Platoon. 

Right sub-section machine guns. 
i;{ Platoon. 
12 Platoon. 

Mopping-up party No. 5. 

Mopping-up party No. 4. 
14 Platoon. 

Trench mortars. 

Battalion Headquarters. 



a Platoon. 

Mopping-up party No. '1. 

6 Platoon. 

1 Platoon. 

Left subsection machine guns. 

7 Platoon. 

2 Platoon. 
5 Platoon. 

Mopping-up party No. 6. 
Mopping-up party No. 3. 
4 Platoon. 



Mopping-up Parties. 
For during the attack will follow : 

1. Trenches north-west of IBERIA and dugouts 

atD19bl065 ... 

2. 'Gallipoli dugouts and trenches as far west as 

Somme exclusive 



15 Pla'.oon. 



3 Platoon. 



H. Somme and trenches north-west as far as 

Battalion boundary ... ... ... 4 Platoon. 

4. Works at D 14c 1 2 ... ... ... 14 Platoon. 

5. Keir Farm ... ... ... ... 14 Platoon. 

6. Buildings 100 yards west of Kansas Cross ... 4 Platoon. 
Parties 1, 2, and 3 will be furnished by 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment. 
Parties 4 and 5 by C Company 1 4th North Lancashire Regiment. 

Party 6 by B Company 1 '4th North Lancashire Regiment. 

These parties will merge into the waves immediately in front of them before 
reaching their objectives. 

Parties found by the 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment will be absorbed by their 
own unit as soon as it reaches them. 

Parties found by the 1 4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment will be furnished 
from fourth wave, and upon completion of their task will be absorbed by that wave 
as it passes over them. 

Each mopping-up party will consist of one Platoon. 



(Mi 

10. Trench Mortars. 

One sub-section of trench mortars will assemble in CONGREVE WALK, close 
to the mined dugouts, and will move near Battalion Headquarters in the attack, 
ready to deal with any points of resistance that may hold out. They will take up 
position on the line D 1( Central -Toronto Farm, after all objectives have been 
taken. 

11. Medical. 

Aid post orior to advance I 4 a (i 4. 

During the advance, the Medical Officer will move in rear of the centre of the 
Battalion and will establish an aid post in the vicinity of POMMERN CASTLE. 

\2. Communications. 

During the advance, communications will be by runner visual being established 
whenever halted. Second Lieutenant ASHCROFT will establish : 

1. A Battalion command post, about D 19 a 4 4, and will arrange telephonic 
communication with l(}4th Brigade office near Rat Farm. 

2. An advance command post about Hill ,'{5, and connect up by telephone 
with Brigade forward station, near Somme Farm. 

.'{. Runner relay post about D If) a 2 8. 

i;}. Dress and Equipment. 

Dress : -Fighting order with packs. 

Ammunition : 120 rounds S.A.A on every man except — 

(1) Signallers. 

(2) Scouts. 

(3) Runners. 

(4) Lewis Gunners. 

(5) Bombers. 

(6) Rifle Grenadiers, carrying No. 20 grenades. 

All of whom will carry 50 rounds S.A.A. 

In addition, every N.C.O. and man will carry : 

(1) In the pack. -Towel and soap, spare oil tin, holdall, rations (see para. 1 4), 
extra water bottle (containing cold tea without sugar or milk), groundsheet, 
and mess tin. 

(2) In each top pocket of the jacket. — One No. 23 rifle grenade complete 
with rod and cartridge (except Rifle Grenadiers carrying No. 20 grenades). 

(3) In each bottom pocket of the jacket. One aeroplane flare. 

(4) Under the braces of the pack. — Three sandbags. 

In addition to the above — 

(a) Each bomber will carry eight No. 23 grenades in bomb buckets. 

|b) Sixteen extra pairs wirecutters will be issued to each Company and 
will be equally distributed amongst Platoons. 

(c) S.O.S. signals will be issued at the rate of five per Company. 



67 

(d) All Rifle Grenadiers wearing grenade carriers will carry six No. 20 
grenades. These will not be detonated until the Battalion arrives at 
CONGREVE WALK. 

Rifle Grenadiers will carry their 50 rounds of ammunition in a bandolier 
and will discard their S.A.A. pouches. 
Orders re carrying of heavy tools will be issued later. 
Men carrying heavy tools will not carry entrenching tool. 
All the stores mentioned above will be issued in the concentration area on 
X/Y night. 

14. Supply. 

(a) Rations. 

(1) Rations for consumption on Z day will be delivered to Companies from 
Quartermaster's Stores on X day. 

(2) Rations for Z plus 1 day will be drawn at the concentration area on 
the night X Y. 

(3) Rations for Z plus 2 day will be at the Brigade Dump, near junction 
of Milner Trench and Congreve Walk, and will ultimately be brought forward 
by pack transport. 

Scale of rations for Z, Z plus 1 and Z plus 2 day will be as follows : — 



Preserved Meat 

Biscuits 

Sugar 

Tea 

Jam 

Solidified Alcohol 



lib. 

lib. 

2oz. 

5-8oz. 

3oz. 

One 8oz. tin for eight men. 



(b) Water. 

800 gallons of water will be held in reservoirs for 164 Brigade on the line 
Liverpool Trench — Congreve Walk, and water bottles will be filled from this 
source on Y;Z night. 

On Z day, 800 gallons of water for the Brigade will be sent forward in 
petrol tins for use on Z plus 1 day. 

15. Dumps. 

Brigade dumps will be formed as follows : — 
Advanced dump on road at about D 13 c 1 8. 
Right Forward dump— GALLIPOLL 

The advanced dump will be formed and maintained by transport with the 
following stores : — • 

S.A.A. Flares. 

Lewis gun drums. Blank Cartridges. 

No. 23 grenades. Verey lights. 

No. 20 grenades. 

l/4th Royal Lancaster Regiment will be responsible for carrying from the 
advanced dump to the forward dump and will provide one Platoon for carrying 
from the forward dump to Companies. 



(iS 

EXTRACTED FROM WAR DIARY. 

POPERINGHE. 

28th July. Announced to be W day in connection with forthcoming 
operations. Bombs again dropped during night fairly near our camp. 

Second Lieutenant W. Young and three Other Ranks to Field Ambulance sick. 

2f>th July. X day in connection with forthcoming operations. Preparations 
made for moving into concentration area. At 9 p.m. the Battalion (less 
party of KM) Other Ranks and seven Officers who were being left out of the 
attack) marched off from camp by Platoons at .'{(M) yards" distance. There was 
comparatively little shelling, and the concentration area was reached (HlOc' 
without casualties. It consisted of camouflaged trenches and bivouac sheets 
erected under hedges. Battalion Headquarters was established in a ruined farm 
with a siege battery of R.G.A. at 2 'M) a.m. The Battalion was fitted out with rations 
for Y, Z, and Z plus I days, bombs, wirecutters, aeroplane flares, S.O.S. signals, 
sandbags, etc. 

VLAMERTINGHE. 

30th July. Y day. Strict order<; had been issued with regard to 
restricting movement, so as to preclude the possibility of the concentration being 
made known to the enemy. As a matter of fact, it was a very dull day, and visibility 
was never even fair. During the late afternoon, the Brigadier and Divisional 
Commander visited the Battalion and wished us good luck. At 9 23 p.m., in drizzling 
rain, the first Platoon moved off towards the trenches, followed by the remaining 
Platoons at intervals of 200 yards. The mopping-up parties (three in number) 
provided for our Battalion by 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment moved with us into 
such positions as to arrive in their correct position of assembly. 

;{Oth July. The route taken was the main VLAMERTINGHE YPRES 

road to the WATER TOWER I 7 c 83 }>3, thence by tramline to where it joined 

No. 3 track, running parallel and in between the YPRES POTIJZE road and YPRES 

-ST. JEAN road, joining CONGREVE WALK, our assembly trench, at about 

I 4 a 43 90. On arrival here, Battalion Headquarters was established in the mined 
dugout at the VINERY I 4 a 03 SO. CONGREVE WALK was reached without a 
casualty, not a shell being fired during the whole time the Battalion was on the 
roads and tracks. Our artillery was very active, raining gas shells on the enemy 
continuously for four hours from about 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. At one time about 

I I ;{() p.m. the enemy sent a few mustard-gas shells, in the vicinity of CONGREVE 
WALK, causing momentary sneezing and a temporary cessation of the work of 
drawing tools. After tools had been drawn there was nothing further to do except 
have hot tea two cookers being concealed near ST. JEAN with this end in view. 

Two Other Ranks wounded. 

31st July. Z day. At ZERO hour (3 50 a.m.) the 53th Division assaulted, 
taking part in a general attack of the 5th Army, part of the 2nd Army, and the 
1st French Army. 

At ZERO the 1 03th and lOlith Infantry Brigades attacked and captured the 
Blue Line. The artillery barrage commenced at ZERO. It did not provoke any 
reply in the neighbourhood of CONGREVE WALK until about 4 15 a.m., when a 
few 4.2 's and 5.9 's fell in the trench and caused a few casualties. From 4 30 a.m. 



69 

onwards, German prisoners came past in continuous streams, in many cases being 
utilised to carry down our wounded. From the Blue Line the KJSth and Ififith 
Brigades moved on to the Black Line ; the artillery provided a protective barrage 
to cover consolidation. At ZERO plus 4 hours 4(i minutes, the l()4th Infantry 
Brigade moved off in artillery formation from CONGREVE WALK, 1 4th Loyal 
North Lancashires on the right, with I 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment in support 
and 2,5th Lancashire Fusiliers on the left with 1 8th (Irish) Liverpools in support. 

Second Lieutenant Ashcroft (Signalling Officer) was killed by a nosecap 
as we started off, otherwise everything went off satisfactorily. The enemy were 
dropping shells, both high-explosive and shrapnel, promiscuously between 
CONGREVE WALK and our original front line, but there was no difficulty in eluding 
the areas to which attention was being paid. It was a dull misty morning, and so 
there were neither aeroplanes nor balloons in the air to detect the advancing troops. 
As we passed over NO MAN'S LAND, Companies were well shaken out into their 
various squares and the direction was being well kept. The enemy wire in front 
of his first line system was practically non-existent and provided no obstacle. 
The trenches appeared very badly smashed in and in places obliterated, though here 
and there appeared small concrete dugouts apparently still intact. 

The advance continued to go well, and the Platoon Commanders with the help 
of their compasses maintained their direction. The enemy were apparently pre- 
occupied finding out exactly where their own infantry were and also in moving 
back some of their guns. Consequently, we were very little troubled by shells, but 
machine gun fire caused us considerable annoyance. It was mostly coming 
apparently from our right flank, perhaps frcm some strong point which had not been 
sufficiently mopped-up. However, although bullets were flying everywhere, the 
range had not been correctly estimated, and so we suffered very few casualties in 
this way before reaching the Black Line. 

At ZERO plus 6hrs. 20mins. (10 10 a.m.) the 164th Infantry Brigade formed 
up under the protective barrage, which stood about 200 yards on the enemy's side 
of the Black Line, and moved forward to attack and consolidate the Green Line. 
Just before forming up under the barrage, we were caused a little trouble by some 
snipers who had apparently been swept over by the barrage and were lying out in 
shell holes. From now onwards the artillery barrage was rather thin, owing to the 
fact that it was out of range for some of the guns which had fired during the initial 
assault and because it was being provided by batteries who had moved forward 
since ZERO to positions in the vicinity of the original NO MAN'S LAND. When 
the 1 4th Loyal North Lancashires moved off from the Black Line, touch had been 
obtained with the 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers on the left and the (ith Cameron 
Highlanders (45th Infantry Brigade, 15th Division) on the right. During the 
subsequent advance from the Black Line to the Green Line the casualties, which 
were particularly heavy amongst Officers, were again principally caused by 
machine gun fire. Reports were received from several Officers giving their location, 
and those machine guns immediately in our line of advance were effectively dealt 
with, but we were still troubled by guns firing from high ground beyond the Green 
Line and also by guns enfilading us from our right flank. 

Several strong points had to be dealt with in the course of the advance, 
particular mention being made of SOMME FARM, GALLIPOLI, and KEIR FARM. 
SOMME FARM provided us with (JO prisoners ; it consisted of several concrete 
dugouts, one being an aid post, and had evidently been used as a Battalion Head- 



70 

quarters. There were also concrete dugouts at KEIR FARM and GALLIPOLl, 
each of which provided us with prisoners. 

The Green Line was reported captured at 1 1 40 a.m., and consohdation was 
at once put in hand. While this was in progress, hostile machine guns again proved 
troublesome, especially from NILE FARM. During the advance to the Green Line 
six batteries 77mm. -were encountered. The gunners continued to fire them 
until our advancing waves were within about 2(K) 250 yards, and then withdrew. 
On arrival at the Green Line difficulty was experienced in liusbanding the available 
resources of ammunition until a further supply could be brought up. Demands 
were received from all parts of the line, but they were unable to be met for some 
considerable time, owing to the fact that the pack animals, which were bringing 
up supplies, were experiencing difficulties owing to the unexpected quantity of uncut 
wire. 

Meanwhile, while the GREEN LINE was being energetically consolidated, 
the third wave moved on to take the BLACK DOTTED or OUTPOST LINE. This 
was established along a line running about '2(M) yards in front of the GREEN LINE. 
Our own barrage appeared to fall a trifle short at this point, and consequently our 
line was held up slightly and could not be established on the intended line. Fifty 
prisoners were captured and sent back by the Platoons comprising the outpost line. 
A message timed 11 41 a.m. stated " enemy in full flight." 

At 12 10 p.m. our protective barrage ceased. Meanwhile the outpost line was 
being put into a state of defence by the construction of a series of strong points, 
though considerable difficulty was being experienced in maintaining touch on the 
left. On the right we appeared to be in touch, but it was obvious that the right flank 
Company of the (Jth Camerons was not up to its alignment, and, consequently, their 
line was swung back. 

The difficulties about ammunition continued to mcrease. Many Lewis guns 
were used until every round had been expended, but there was still none available 
for issue at Battalion Headquarters. Things went well until 2 'M) p.m., when a 
report was received that the enemy were forming up for counter-attack in the 
vicinity of BOETLEER. At 2 35 p.m. a strong counter-attack developed on the 
right, and the Oth Camerons on our right were seen to be withdrawing. This 
attempt on the part of the enemy was immediately followed by an attack on our 
left. With the enemy advancing on both flanks and closing together in the centre, 
our outpost line, seriously weakened, particularly on the left, withdrew, and was 
absorbed into the GREEN LINE. This line in turn then had to withdraw as there 
was no touch on the right, and the 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers had had to fall back 
well behind the GREEN LINE owing to the GREEN LINE not having been taken 
by the Divisions on their left. 

The withdrawal was carried out in perfect order, the troops fighting as they 
moved back. By this time our supporting Battalion, the I 4th Royal Lancaster 
Regiment, had merged itself into our line, and the combined forces of the two 
Battalions formed a line of resistance just in front of the BLACK LINE. Posts 
of Lewis and machine guns were thrown out as soon as it was dark, and our 
protective barrage and S.O.S. line was withdrawn to conform with our new line. 

In the evening, about 10 p.m., a warning order was received to the effect that 
the Brigade would be relieved by units of the l()5th Brigade. 

Further general observations will be made under date August 1st. 



1\ 

Casualties during operations on the 31st July.: — 

Officers : — Killed — Captain A. L. Harris (commanding A Company), Second 
Lieutenant G. Ashcroft (Signals), Second Lieutenant 
B. H. Williams (Intelligence Officer), Second Lieutenant 
V. Mather, Second Lieutenant F. Fullerton, and Second 
Lieutenant J. H. Ogden (Commanding B Company). 
Died of Wounds— Captain R. W. Shegog, R.A.M.C. 
Wounded and Missing — Lieutenant D. H. Ostrehan (Commanding 

D Company), and Second Lieutenant C. Rigby. 
Missing — Second Lieutenant D. H. McSweeney and Second Lieutenant 

H. S. Holden. 
Wounded — Second Lieutenant H. Tyldesley, Second Lieutenant 
H. C. Vincent, Second Lieutenant F. C. Jenkinson, Second 
Lieutenant E. M. Easterby, Captain R. Ord, Captain 
W. L. B. Caley, Second Lieutenant L. Howarth (with 
164th T.M.B.), and Second Lieutenant J. E. Ordish. 
Other Ranks :— Killed 44, Wounded 179, Missing 77. 
Total Casualties :— Officers 19, Other Ranks 300. 
1st August, 1917. Following message has been received : — 

"Well done, one-six-four. I am very proud of what you did to-day. It 
was a fine performance, and no fault of yours you could not stay." 

GENERAL JEUDWINE. 

" I congratulate all units on having earned this praise, which I know to 
be well deserved." 

C. I. STOCKWELL, 
Brigadier- General, 
Commanding 164th Infantry Brigade. 



The above account may now be amplified and illuminated by a short summary 
of the adventures of each Company and Platoon— taken from the original 
narratives of the Battalion, which, written in most cases from the account 
of surviving private soldiers, are now in the custody of Colonel C. F. Coop, D.S.O., 
at Liverpool. 

A Company lost its Commander, Captain Harris, soon after passing the Black 
Line — he was shot by a sniper ; C.S.M. Dudley was later on wounded and taken 
prisoner ; No. 1 Platoon had its Commander (Sergeant Entwistle) and the Lewis 
Gun Corporal wounded when leaving CONGREVE WALK. It came under machine 
gun fire just before reaching the BLACK LINE, and by the time it reached 
KANSAS CROSS only eleven were left. 

"About 12 45 p.m. a heavy machine gun barrage started on our line, and 
about 2 pm. the enemy were seen counter-attacking over ridge on our right, and 
I saw the Highlanders withdrawing. This was immediately followed by an attack 
on our left. We held on for fully half an hour, when the order came down from the 
right, ' Go back, one by one.' Only six of our Platoon were left. We withdrew 
to shell holes 50 yards back, though the people on our left and right had 



72 

fallen farther back. The enemy were then very close to us, and I think he captured 
one or two prisoners. 

"At this point we lost touch on both flanks, because we were in advance of 
the rest of the line ; we therefore withdrew as well as we could, fighting and firing 
as we went. We managed to rejoin our own line just before dusk, and found a 
few more of our Platoon who had become separated." 

No. 2 was held up in front of SOMME FARM, a machine gun playing on it from 
there ; a tank came up and reported to Second Lieutenant McSweeny and 
moved to attack. 

No. 2 rushed the machine gun and took fiO prisoners. The position consisted 
of about six very strong concrete dugouts, one of which was a Regimental Aid Post 
and contained several wounded enemy. 

At the GREEN LINE they came under heavy shell fire. The enemy could be 
seen in full flight, and our Lewis gunners fired on them. There were 15 or 16 of 
the Platoon left, and they began to dig in ; they were in touch on both flanks. 

Later they saw the enemy advancing to counter-attack over the ridge in front, 
in several waves, extending to about one and a half yards between each man, and 
Second Lieutenant McSweeny was taken prisoner. 

Second Lieutenant Tyldsley, commanding No. .t, was wounded just after 
passing the BLACK LINE, when it came under very heavy machine gun fire but 
advanced to the GREEN LINE without ever being held up. 

No. 4 Platoon had ten killed and three wounded by one shell before leaving 
Congreve Walk, and Second Lieutenant Ordish was wounded during the advance. 

They were held up by SOMME and by a further line of strong points 150 yards 
beyond, from which they got about 20 prisoners. 

Lieutenant Ogden, Commanding B Company, was killed. 

No. 5 went through SOMME, and most of the garrison gave themselves up. 
A few tried to run away, and were fired on. 

They went through to the outpost line and began to dig in. Second Lieutenant 
Mather was siting the trench when he was killed by a sniper's bullet, and 
Sergeant Nabb took over the Platoon. 

No. 6, after A Company had dealt with SOMME, moved on to a line of posts 
about 500 or (>(M) yards farther on, which they passed on the flank and moved on 
to the outpost line. 

No. 7 Platoon, except Lewis gunners, were detached to carry trench mortar 
ammunition for the 164th Trench Mortar Battery. Eighteen men were detached 
for this purpose. Ten became casualties before leaving CONGREVE WALK, one 
shell hitting the lot. The remaining eight carried up their loads, but quickly became 
casualties ; only two arrived at the GREEN LINE, carying four rounds each. 

Sergeant Ward was killed. 

No. 8 Platoon was detached to mop up Kansas Cross, and was formed up in 
rear of No. 4 Platoon, A Company. It suffered ten casualties from shell fire before 
leaving CONGREVE WALK, all the bombers being knocked out, and had a few 



73 

more casualties before reaching the BLACK LINE, and when it got to KANSAS 
CROSS it was only about eight or nine strong. " There were a few concrete dugouts 
and a trench just on our side of KANSAS CROSS, also a few ruined buildings. We 
captured 50 prisoners here, all of whom gave themselves up without a fight — slightly 
wounded men taking them back. After completing the mopping-up, we moved 
on to assist in consolidation. Here Second Lieutenant Rigby was wounded." 

No. 9 Platoon suffered many casualties from machine gun traversing fire, but 
went on to the OUTPOST LINE. Second Lieutenant Jenkinson was badly 
wounded just before getting to the GREEN LINE, and four Germans, who gave 
themselves up, carried him down. Prisoners were coming in in 20's and 30's. 

No. 10, under Second Lieutenant Higson, mopped up KEIR FARM, where two 
concrete dugouts were found and a number of prisoners taken, also documents, 
some of which were taken from an enemy Liaison Officer. They advanced to the 
GREEN LINE, and commenced to consolidate. "No British contact 'planes fiew 
over ; we only saw three enemy 'planes, who flew so low that they fired at us ; also 
an observation balloon ascended from ABRAHAM HEIGHTS. 

"About two hours after reaching the GREEN LINE the enemy were observed 
to be forming up on the heights in front of us, and eventually counter-attacked on 
our right against the 15th Division, who commenced to retire. We formed a 
defensive flank on our right to get enfilade fire on the enemy and so cover the retreat 
of the 15th Division, but they retired behind us and could give us no assistance 
when we were compelled to retire. By this time the enemy had got a machine gun 
barrage on our front, also enfilading us on our left, and caused a number of 
casualties ; we fought a rearguard action along with the rest of the Battalion until 
we reached the BLACK LINE. 

" S.O.S. signals were sent up from the GREEN LINE, but they all failed to 
burst." 

No. 11, under Lieutenant Lonsdale, got held up by the belt of wire running 
down the left of Hill 35. This wire had hardly been touched, but they cut a way 
through after some time and managed to catch up the barrage. 

" From SOMME FARM came a lot of machine gun fire, so we hung back a bit 
and waited for our left flank to come up ; we trained our Lewis gun on to the farm 
to assist the people on our left. When they approached fairly close about a dozen 
of the enemy attempted to make off, but were either caught by our fire or gave 
themselves up. From the trenches running through D 13 central, the enemy began 
to retire. We opened fire on them and caused some casualties ; some got away 
and seemed to have left their equipment and rifles. Gallipoli held out for some time, 
but we engaged it with the Lewis gun while the remainder worked round it. The 
garrison surrendered — about 25 in number. Men went in the rear side and 
reported strong machine gun emplacements. From KEIR FARM I saw about 
six men run without tunics, but a lot held out until we got round them ; about 20 
men gave themselves up from here. The point D 14 c 1 2 was searched and found 
to be a battery position — as far as I could make out, three guns. A Corporal and 



74 

two men were told off to search for papers, documents, etc. I pressed on with the 
Platoon, and at a line in front and to the left of MARTHA HOUSE we came under 
point-blank artillery fire from near KANSAS CROSS, but did not stop our advance ; 
it only seemed to be from one or two guns. At D 14 c 38 we found a battery 
position, two guns untouched but several damaged, and an Officer gave himself up 
with several men. We then pushed on to the GREEN LINE and got in touch with 
the people on our right and sent out patrols to the left, but could not get in touch. 
Some of the King's Own then came up and were sent on to the left. Having 
pushed Lewis guns forward with patrols, we commenced to consolidate, and put in 
a good two and a half hours. At 2 '.W p.m. the patrols reported a counter-attack 
on the right and left. We stood to and opened a heavy rifle and Lewis gun fire on 
them, sending up two S.O.S.'s, but neither of them worked. 

" In the meantime three enemy aeroplanes flew over our lines, dropping flares 
and opening machine gun fire on us. The machine gun fire from the left began 
to account for a lot of our men. The enemy appeared in strength, being in open 
order. I counted six lines, and yet there were more following. The sections on 
our right began to retire across our rear, and the enemy was beginning to get well 
behind us. The left were also pressing, so we decided to retire from the left, 
covering the retirement with rifle and Lewis gun fire. We then took up a line 
running from Approx. D 20 a 89 to D 14 c 72 in shell holes. We formed a defensive 
flank of three Lewis guns along a small ridge to our right. The enemy pressed on, 
although we were accounting for a large number with our rifle fire and the enfilade 
Lewis gun fire on the right. The Lewis guns ran short of S.A.A. After we had 
made a stand for about an hour, the S.A.A for the rifles ran short ; we collected 
as much as we could from the dead and wounded, but it was only about ten rounds 
per man. The enemy again succeeded in working round our right, so we had to 
retire, fighting a rearguard action on to the old FREZENBERG LINE." 

No. 12 ran into two strong points, and in each case the garrison gave themselves 
up. Fifty prisoners came out of one. Both consisted of concrete dugouts, with 
trenches in front, and behind one of them there was a concrete gun emplacement. 
Sergeant Whiteside, the Platoon Commander, was wounded. "When the enemy 
counter-at'acked on our right the Scots retired, and Lieutenant Hore sent some 
of our party to form a defensive line on the right flank. We held on for about 
three-quarters of an hour, and then we withdrew, dropping in shell holes and firing 
as we went back. They fired machine guns on us as we withdrew. A good number 
of our wounded were captured, but no unwounded prisoners, as far as I know." 

No. i;5 got to the GREEN LINE and consolidated this, but got mixed up with 
other Platoons. "None of us know what happened to Sergeant Yates. We saw 
him just before the withdrawal, and he was then unwounded. Nobody saw him 
again." 

Second Lieutenant Easterby, Commanding No. 14, was wounded twice, 
the second time being just beyond the BLACK LINE. " Two snipers who caused 
trouble near GALLIPOLI were captured. The Platoon consolidated the GREEN 



75 

LINE until 2 30 p.m., when the enemy counter-attacked on the right. The Scots 
on the right were seen to withdraw, and Second Lieutenant Fullerton, who 
had taken over command of the whole line, shouted to us to hang on. He himself 
established a defensive flank on our right, but was shortly afterwards killed." 

No. 15, after going 500 or 600 yards, ran into a strong point. " The barrage 
had knocked out a machine gun which had been playing on us, but rifle fire 
continued to come from this place. We went straight on, and when we neared 
the place they gave themselves up. There were about three dugouts — connected — 
and about 20 prisoners were taken." 

" On reaching our objective we dug in under machine gun fire from our left. 
About 1 15 p.m. we saw the smoke of an engine on the other side of the ridge. 
About half an hour after this the enemy appeared over the ridge, and advanced 
towards us. We opened on him with Lewis guns. He was covering his advance 
with machine guns on the left. The (jth CAMERONS were seen retiring, and took 
up a position in a strong point about 15(1 yards behind our trench. We hung on 
to our trench for 20 minutes or half an hour. Second Lieutenant Fullerton 
acted with great gallantry during this trying period. He persuaded the whole of 
our line to hang on- he was the only Officer left in the GREEN LINE — and it was 
a great loss when he was killed, just before we withdrew." 

Only seven of this Platoon survived. 

No. l(i was first held up at GALLIPOLI, but continued] the advance, 
and 150 yards further on found another strong point, consisting of a trench and a 
few dugouts. The garrison of the post -about 25 in all— gave themselves up 
immediately. They then moved on to the GREEN LINE, and commenced to dig in. 
They had been digging for over an hour when the enemy counter-attacked on the 
right. " Twenty minutes previous we had seen the smoke of a train. For a time 
he was disorganised by our machine guns and Lewis gun fire ; then he advanced 
on the front of the Battalion on our right, which withdrew immediately, and the 
enemy followed. Second Lieutenant Fullerton ordered us to line the hedge on our 
right, and we held on there for half an hour. Meanwhile the enemy tried to get 
round behind us, and to a certain extent succeeded. 

" Our position was then so bad and our ammunition supply so small that we 
had to withdraw, moving back step by step in small parties. Gradually we worked 
back to the BLACK LINE, though some of our men — including Lieutenant Holden 
— were captured. ' ' 

EXTRACT FROM WAR DIARY^ontinued. 

At 12 midnight, July Slst August 1st, the Battalion held a line of resistance 
just in front of the Black Line. At 1 15 a.m. completion of relief by the 165th 
Infantry Brigade was reported, and the remnant of the Battalion were ordered to 
concentrate in our original front line between Warwick Farm and Lone Street. 
This was done, and Battalion Headquarters was established at the mined dugouts 
in Oxford Trench. At 10 a.m. Headquarters was transferred to the mined 
dugout at WIELTJE. 



70 

Meanwhile an effort was being made to collect our stragglers. During the 
withdrawal a great many men had become separated from their Platoons, and by 
2 p.m. on the 1st of August only 90 of our men had assembled in the old front 
line. In ones and twos they were eventually brought in, though some remained 
behind with the KiSth and IWith Brigades in the Black Line till 24 hours or more 
after the Battalion had been relieved. 

The weather was desperate ; rain was pouring down all day, and the trenches 
were in a terrible state. Four or five derelict tanks could be counted, stuck deep 
in the mud, either in our old front line or in the German original front line. The 
day was fairly quiet, and there was only a little shelling in the vicinity of WIELTJE. 

About mid-day the enemy counter-attacked on the front of the Division on 
our right, and succeeded in making a small breach in the Black Line. In the 
evening of this day a cooker was brought up with hot tea, etc., for the men. 

Lieutenant G. J. Fismer, R.A.M.C, reported for duty vice Captain R. W. Shegog, 
R.A.M.C, died of wounds. 

Casualties : Officers : Lieutenant C. L. Hore, M.C., to Field Ambulance sick ; 
Other Ranks : Nil. 

With reference to the attack in which the Battalion took part, the following 
points are of interest : — 

1. Ammunition ran short in every Company, a proof of the fact that the rifle 
has again come to its own as the chief weapon of the infantryman. 

2. It is estimated that quite 90 per cent, of the casualties were caused by 
machine gun fire and snipers. 

3. Casualties amongst Officers were exceedingly heavy, and great responsibility 
devolved upon N.C.O.'s. This fact emphasised the necessity for careful preparation, 
by means of daily lectures and demonstrations to all Platoon Sergeants and Section 
Commanders. 

4. It is generally agreed that on this occasion the men were far too heavily 
laden. It is thought that in an attack of this kind, when a distance of several 
thousand yards has to be traversed, it is far better to go lightly equipped, and to 
trust to the probability of being able to get additional supplies of water and rations 
from the rear as soon as darkness falls. 

5. All systems of communication, except runners, broke down. Visual was 
impossible owing to the dull mist which prevailed, and wires, when once laid, were 
soon broken. 

6. Tanks were a failure (except possibly in one case), the ground being far too 
wet and heavy. One tank is said to have done useful work in co-operation with 
the infantry in reducing Somme Farm. 

7. Aeroplanes for some reason failed us, the R.F.C. evidently considering the 
bad visibility sufficient reason to cancel flying. This was particularly unfortunate, 
as the enemy were not slow to take advantage accordingly, and three hostile 
machines are reported to have been flying over our positions practically all the time 
that consolidation was in progress. In one case a machine gun was fired at our 
troops. 

8. Lastly, many acts of extreme gallantry and devotion to duty were reported 
after the fighting of the 31st July, on the part of all ranks of the Battalion. 

In fact the 55th Division as a whole, and particularly the I(>4th Brigade, will 
ever be remembered for its share in the attack which started the third battle of 
YPRES. The l(>4th Infantry Brigade in particular can ever be proud of the advance 
from the Black Line to the Green Line. 



77 

Copies of the following messages and letters are attached : — 

(1) From Major-General H. S. JEUDWINE, C.B., G.O.C. 55th Division, to 

Brigadier-General C. I. STOCKWELL, D.S.O., Commanding IMth 
Brigade. 

(2) 55th Division Special Order of the Day. 

(3) Letter from 5th Army Headquarters to XIX. Corps. 

(4) 5th Army Commander's Congratulations. 

Fifth Army. 

2nd August, 1917. 
Appendix to D.R.O.'s of 7th August, 1917. 
Army Commander's Congratulations. 

1. The Army Commander wishes to offer his heartiest congratulations to the 
troops under his command on the success gained by them on July 31st. 

2. For a fortnight prior to the attack the enemy has maintained a heavy and 
continuous artillery fire, including an unprecedented use of H.V. guns against 
back areas and a new form of gas shell, all of which caused severe casualties. 
Despite this and the fact that the forward area was dominated by the enemy at all 
points, the necessary preparations for the battle were completed and the difficult 
forward march and assembly of nine Divisions successfully carried out and the 
assault launched. This alone constitutes a performance of which the Army may 
well be proud. 

3. As a result of the battle, the enemy has once again been driven by the 
1st French Army and ourselves from the whole of his front system on a front of 
about eight miles, and we are now firmly established in or beyond his second line 
on a front of seven miles. 

4. We have already captured 5,448 prisoners, including 125 Officers. Up to 
date the capture of eight guns, 10 trench mortars, and 36 machine guns has been 
reported. 

5. In addition we have inflicted extremely heavy casualties on the enemy. 
Owing to losses during our preliminary bombardment, he was forced to bring up 
six fresh Divisions. Since then three more Divisions have been withdrawn shattered. 
Thus, in a fortnight, we have disposed of seven or eight Divisions and severely 
handled 10 more, several of which must be shortly withdrawn. 

6. The 2nd Army on our right and the 1st French Army on our left have been 
as successful as ourselves. The French captures to date number 157 prisoners and 
three guns. The 2nd Army have also taken 390 prisoners and several machine guns. 

7. Despite the weather on the day of the battle, we shot down five enemy 
machines and one balloon, losing only one machine ourselves. 

(Signed) R. T. COLLINS, 
Lieutenant-Colonel, 

For Major-General, G.S. 



55th (West Lancashire] Division. 
Special Order of the Day. 

3rd August, 1917. 
To All Ranks of the 55th (West Lancashire) Division. 

Before you went into action on the 31 st July, I told you how confident I was 
that the Division would do its duty and maintain its reputation and the reputation 
of the grand Regiments to which you belong. 
You have done more than that. 



78 

The attack you made on the 31st is worthy to rank with the great deeds of the 
British Army in the past, and has added fresh glory to the record of that Army. 

The courage, determination, and self-sacrifice shown by Officers, Warrant 
Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers, and men is beyond praise. It is a fine 
exhibition of true discipline, which comes from the mutual confidence of all ranks 
in themselves, their comrades, their leaders, and those under them. This in its 
turn is the product of hard training. Your doings on the .'{1st show how well you 
have turned this training to account. 

You captured every inch of the objectives allotted to you. It was not your 
fault that you could not hold all you took. You have broken and now hold, in spite 
of weather and counter-attacks, a line that the enemy has strengthened and 
consolidated at his leisure for more than two years. 

This will, I believe, be the beginning of the end. When your turn comes to 
go forward again you will know your own strength and the enemy will know it too. 

I am proud of what you have done and am confident that with such troops 
ultimate victory is certain. 

H. S. JEUDWINE, 

Major-General, 
Commanding 55th (West Lancashire) Division. 



Fifth Army. 

;jrd August, 1917. 
XIX. Corps. 

The Army Commander wishes to convey his thanks and congratulations to 
the G.O.C. and all ranks of the 164th Brigade on their fine performance on July 
3 1st. They carried out their task in a most gallant manner and fought splendidly 
to retain their hold on the ground won. All Officers showed energy, courage, and 
initiative in dealing with the situation, and the men under their command, in spite 
of heavy losses, did their utmost, by carrying out their orders, to ensure our success 
and the enemy's defeat. 

Great credit and praise is due to the G.O.C. Ki-lth Brigade for the magnificent 
behaviour of the troops under his command. 

(Signed) N. MALCOLM, 

Major-General, G.S. 



The Brigadier-General commanding has much pleasure in forwarding the 
above remarks of the Army Commander and directs that these be communicated 
to all ranks. 

He considers that all the credit and praise is due to the Officers and men of the 
Brigade. 

Captain, 
Acting Brigade Major, 
6th August, 1917. 16.1th Infantry Brigade. 



CHAPTER VII. 

REORGANISATION, AND THE BATTLE OF THE MENIN ROAD. 

On the 2nd August, 1917, the remnant of the Battalion was relieved by the 
9th Royal Irish Rifles (36th— Ulster— Division), and assembled at a camp near 
VLAMERTINGHE, where they found the members of B team and food, and had 
a good sleep. At 10 p.m. that night we moved in motor 'buses to the WATOU 
area, where we took over our old camp. Lieutenant G. M. Fismer, R.A.M.C, 
and one Other Rank had been wounded in coming out of the line, and Lieutenant 
J. E. Ratcliffe reported as Medical Officer ; on the following day Lieutenant 
W. L. Price and Second Lieutenants R. Grisdale and A. P. Smith and lOS Other 
Ranks reported as reinforcements. 

On the 5th we marched to ABEELE, where we entrained and travelled via 
ST. OMER and WATTEN to AUDRUICQ, arriving there about 5 p.m. Here we 
found lurries waiting to take us to our new billeting area, AUDREHEM, a pleasant 
village just big enough to hold us. 

On the 7th, Second Lieutenant Holden came back from attachment to the 
R.E.'s with 23 Other Ranks, and Captain C. M. Denton and 34 Other Ranks reported 
as reinforcements. During the next few days Captain Houghton, Second Lieutenant 
Vincent and Second Lieutenant Swaine rejoined us and Major de Wend Fenton. 
Second Lieutenant F. Shippobottom and Second Lieutenant A. B. Fergie reported 
for duty along with nine Other Ranks, while on the 18th Second Lieutenant 
J. Hailwood and A. Martin, and on the 21st Second Lieutenants A. H. Doleman, 
S. A. H. Pruden, and Iners joined us, followed by Second Lieutenants H. W. C. 
Griffiths, H. Dance, and J. Oldham on the 22nd. 

The following honours were announced for gallantry in action in the recent 
battle : — 

BAR TO D.S.O. Lieutenant-Colonel R. Hindle, D.S.O. 

MILITARY CROSS Second Lieutenant H. C. Vincent, B Company. 

Second Lieutenant H. Lonsdale, C Company. 
D.C.M. 24908 Lance-Corporal E. Ashton, A Company. 

201260 Lance-Corporal T. Butcher, A Company. 
MILITARY MEDAL 200057 Sergeant J. Heaps, Headqrs. 

201530 Lance-Corporal P. Norris, B Company. 
200<)43 Sergeant J. E. Cookson, D Company. 
34879 Sergeant J. Cosgrove, C Company. 



80 

MILITARY MEDAL imsm Corporal F. Pitcher, B Company. 

'JOOlll Lance-Corporal W. H. Clarkson, Headqrs. 
2(t27(>l Private J. Spencer, D Company. 
20()l)(» Private J. Bates, Transport. 
'HHYA^l Private J. H. Parkinson, Transport. 
12}H(> Private D. Rathbone, C Company. 
;iI987 Lance-Corporal J. Walmsley, A Company. 
It is fashionable among fighting men to belittle the honours which they 
themselves have earned, knowing as they do that many individuals employed at 
bases have received decorations which were never meant to be conferred for 
anything except gallantry in action, while others who have abundantly deserved 
them have either died before they were granted or have had no witness surviving 
to report their conduct ; it is therefore only fair to mention that when " immediate 
awards," such as the above, are made to fighting men, it is as a result of reports 
sent in by eyewitnesses, which, in our Battalion at any rate, were tested by 
cross-examining those mentioned in them as to the deeds of others, the resulting 
list of recommendations being further checked and often cut down by Brigade. 

We enjoyed our stay at AUDREHEM, knowing that our last battle had raised 
us to the status of Storm Troops, and that when we moved up again it would be for 
another attack and not back to the demoralising influences of trench life. With 
this in view we carefully reorganised and trained, all ranks working together keenly 
with one end in view efficiency, with the result that in six weeks a tired, straggling, 
muddy, shaken remnant was transformed once more into a smart Battalion, well 
organised and equipped, and trained with special reference to attacking concrete 
blockhouses. Officers daily attended lectures by one of their number on some phase 
of the attack, and Company Commanders held daily conferences of their N.C.O.'s 
and senior Privates, so that however heavy might be the casualties among leaders, 
someone might remain with the neces.sary knowledge to carry on. Every fine day 
Companies marched with their cookers to the training area at GUEMY, and remained 
there all day doing progressive field training ; there was football, boxing, a Divisional 
horse show, and other delights, as well as Brigade days, and the Commander-in- 
Chief himself came one day to see us at work ; so the days slipped by until the 
14th September. Captain Duckworth went as Second in Command to the 
1 Sth King's Liverpool Regiment, and various other Officers left us sick or to other 
units, so that when B team had been detailed the following Officers inoved up to 
take part in the attack : 

Lieutenant-Colonel R. Hindle, D.S.O. Commanding. 
Captain A. T. Houghton Second in Command. 

Captain R. N. Buckmaster Adjutant. 

Lieutenant Bardsley Transport Officer. 

Second Lieutenant Brooke Intelligence Officer. 

Second Lieutenant Whitehouse Signalling Officer. 

Lieutenant Radcliffe, R.A.M.C. Medical Officer, 




e 
o 
a, 

a 

c 



l A Company. 



B Company. 



81 



Lieutenant E. G. Baker 

Second Lieutenant A. P. Smith 

Second Lieutenant H. Dance 

Second Lieutenant J. Oldham J 

Captain F. W. S. Baker 

Major Fenton • 

Second Lieutenant Holmes 

Second Lieutenant Fergie 

Captain R. H. Tautz 

Second Lieutenant Pruden j> C Company. 

Second Lieutenant Grisdale 

Lieutenant Holden 

Lieutenant Price 

Second Lieutenant Martin 

Second Lieutenant Myers 



■ D Company. 



On the 14th the Battalion, including B team, marched to AUBRUICQ, 
proceeding thence by train to a point near YPRES, where we took over a bivouac 
camp near GOLDFISH CHATEAU— a muddy field with pits dug all over it, each 
just big enough to shelter two or three men, and covered with sheets of corrugated 
iron. 

Since 31st July, 1917, the ground along the STEENBEEK captured by us on 
that day had been the scene of bloody fighting, two attempts by other Divisions to 
advance beyond the Black Line of the previous attack having, been made and having 
failed, so that with small variations the front taken over by us on 15th September 
was identical with that held when we had come out six weeks before. 

The ground over which we had to pass was commanded by two spurs — the 
GRAFENSTAFEL SPUR half a mile to the north, and the GALLIPOLI SPUR, 
part of which was within our frontage, to the south; and apart from the concrete 
blockhouses on our own front, every yard of our advance was raked by machine 
gun bullets from innumerable others on our flanks, so that until these were put out 
of action no advance was possible without appalling losses. Add to this the total 
absence of landmarks in that amorphous wilderness, where no trees, no blade of grass 
remained, every square yard of ground having been churned up by our shell fire 
— the extreme difficulty of distinguishing one blockhouse from another— the fact 
that Companies had been reduced to three Platoons and Platoons to only 20 men 
owing to lack of sufficient reinforcements — and when you have studied the maps and 
photographs and tried to visualise the ground, you may form some idea of what the 
Battalion had to do on the 20th September, 1917. The GRAFENSTAFEL ROAD 
was our one hope of keeping direction— the road which, as the photographs clearly 
show, became utterly indistinguishable from the surrounding mire within 2G0 yards 
of our starting point ; when this failed, general direction was only kept by use of 
the compass. 



82 

The material paragraphs of the Operation Order and the official account of 
the battle are as follows : — 

THE OPERATION ORDER. 

1. (a) The 55th Division will attack on Z day. The 9th Division will be on 

the right, and the 58th Division on the left. 

(b) The l()5th Infantry Brigade will be on the right, the l(>4th Infantry 

Brigade on the left, tlie KUith Brigade less two Battalions will be 
in reserve. 

(c) The 1 /4th Royal Lancaster Regiment and the I '4th Loyal North 

Lancashire Regiment will be in the right or KEIR sector. 
The 2 /'5th Lancashire Fusiliers in the centre or COTTS sector. 
The l;8th Liverpool Regiment in the left or SCHULER sector. 
The 1 5th Royal Lancaster Regiment will be attached to the 164th 

Infantry Brigade and be available for the countering of enemy 

counter-attacks. 

2. On the night KJth 14th the (German) 2nd Guards Reserve Division came 
into the line opposite to the 55th Divisional front and is reported to be holding the 
line with all three regiments up, one Battalion of each Regiment being in the 
line, one in support, and one in immediate reserve. 

Those in reserve are located west of the PASSCHENDALE RIDGE. 

S. (a) First pause of the barraf:e ... ... RED DOTTED LINE. 

First objective in ... ... ... YELLOW LINE. 

Final objective in ... ... ... GREEN LINE. 

4. It is the intention to capture and occupy as a line of resistance the GREEN 
LINE. 

The attack will be made in stages under cover of a creeping barrage. 
There will be a pause of at least half an hour on the RED DOTTED LINE 
and again on the YELLOW LINE. 

5. The plan of attack and objectives will be as follows : — 
In the KEIR sector : 

The I 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment will attack at ZERO in four waves, the 
first two waves extended and the second two in columns. 

Objectives : — First two waves ... Red Dotted Line. 

Second two waves ... Yellow Line, 

after which they will support the capture of the Green Line. 

In the COTTS sector :- 

The 2/5th Lancashire Fusiliers will attack at ZERO, in four waves. 
Objectives : First wave ... Red Dotted Line. 

Second wave ... Yellow Line. 

Third wave ... Green Line, an advanced strong point 

established at Green House. 
In the SCHULER sector :— 

Two Companies 1 /'8th Liverpool Regiment will attack at ZERO in two waves. 
Objectives : — First wave ... Red Dotted Line. 

Second wave ... Yellow Line. 
Two Companies will be in the hands of the Officer Commanding 1 '8th Liverpool 
Regiment. 

(i. The Battalion will assemble in three lines at 20 yards' distance, the leading 




Map No. 3 

OBJECTIVES in the 
BATTLE of the MENIN ROAD 

Sept. 20th. 1917 



b 



83 

line being about 150 yards west of the assembly line of the 1 -Ith Royal Lancaster 
Regiment in the following order : — 

First wave, from right to left — 14 Platoon, 13 Platoon, 1 Platoon, 2 Platoon. 
Second wave, from right to left — 9 Platoon, 10 Platoon, 11 Platoon, 5 Platoon, 

6 Platoon, 7 Platoon. 
Third wave, from right to left — 1,S Platoon, machine guns, 3 Platoon. 
Captain Houghton will be responsible for the taping of these lines and supplying 
two guides to each Company to lead them to their position of assembly. 

7. Distribution of Companies during the advance : — 

First wave, from right to left — Two Platoons D Company, two Platoons 
A Company. 

Second wave, from right to left — C Company, B Company. 

Third wave, from right to left — One Platoon D Company, one Platoon 
A Company. 

The first wave will form two lines of extended order before crossing the 
Yellow Line. 

The objective of the first wave will be an outpost line passing through 
FOKKER FARM D14c9 9 and D 14 d 1 5. 

Garrisons will be detailed in advance : — For FOKKER FARM by A Company, 
and dugouts D14dl6 by D Company. 

Strong points will be constructed at these points and others in between should 
it be found necessary, the principle being that the whole front should be : — 

(a) Covered by enfilade machine gun or Lewis gun fire. 

(b) Under observation. 

The objective of the second wave will be approximately the Green Line. 

The garrison will be detailed beforehand for the dugouts D 14 c 4 9 bj' 
B Company. 

The objectives of the third wave will be to ensure that the first and second 
waves reach their objectives. 

Garrisons will be detailed beforehand for dugouts D 14 c 44 and MARTHA 
HOUSE by D Company. 

Dugouts at D 14 a 2 and KANSAS HOUSE by A Company. 

8. Unexpected concrete defences encountered during the advance will be 
garrisoned and consolidated, as soon as the final objective is taken, on the following 
principle : Each wave will be responsible for all ground between itself and the 
leading line of the wave in its rear. Should any pockets of the enemy still remain, 
they will be mopped up as this is taking place. 

12. The reserve Battalion (1 '5th Royal Lancaster Regiment) will arrive in the area 
AISNE- HINDU COT-POND FARM about the time that the Green Line is taken. 

The role of this Battalion will be to deliver an immediate counter-stroke against 
any hostile counter-attack. 

13. Prisoners' escorts, messengers, etc., when returning to their Companies 
from the rear, will take back six bandoliers of S.A.A. from the forward dumps. 

14. Dress : — Fighting order, with packs instead of haversacks. Every N.C.O. 
and man will carry : — 

1 No. 23 rifle grenade. 

2 Aeroplane flares. 
4 Sandbags. 

1 Bandolier extra S.A.A. — Carried in the pack. 
1 Lewis gun magazine 



84 

Parties of men specially selected to deal with dugouts will carry two No. 23 
rifle grenades. 

Every rifle grenadier will carry six Hales No. 24 rifle grenades. 

Shovels will be carried by every man, less runners, signallers, stretcher bearers, 
and Nos. I and 2 of Lewis gun teams. 

Men carrying shovels will not carry the entrenching tool. 

Bayonets will not be fixed until immediately before leaving the assembly hne, 

15. The Battalion will be fitted out on the early morning of Y day. Bombs 
and S.A.A. will be drawn from the St. Jean dump by small parties from each 
Company. At the same time parties will draw shovels and sandbags from the 
Divisional R.E. dump, St. Jean Wieltje Road, ()(K) yards west of Wieltje. These 
carrying parties must have returned to Congreve Walk-Liverpool Line by 5 'M) a.m. 
on Y day. After that hour there must be no movement over the open. 

16. The Brigade main dump is at C 23 c 3 I (old German front line). Advanced 
Brigade dumps are established at Spree Farm (C 18 d 5 3) and at dugouts C IS d 7 5. 

17. All ranks will carry during the attack the iron ration and the unexpended 
portion of Z day's rations. 

Rations for Z plus 1 day will be dumped as far forward as possible. Water 
bottles will be filled from the water-carts on the evening of Y day. 

18. Barrage map will be issued later. 

19. Points for Liaison : - 

With 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers ... KANSAS HOUSE. 

D 14 a 2. 
With 1 (ith Liverpool Regiment ... D 14 c 5 4. 

D 14 c 95 40. 

20. Headquarters 164th and 165th Infantry Brigades will be the Wieltje 
dugout. Battalion Headquarters will be at the commencement Capricorn Keep 
and dugouts C lSd.S() ; subsequent moves will be notified. 

21. Aid Post: -Pond Farm, CISbSO. 

22. ZERO HOUR will be 5 40 a.m. 
Watches will be synchronised. 

23. Communication between Companies and Battalion Headquarters will be 
by runner and visual. 

All messages will be duplicated by a second means of transmission. 
Two pigeons will be carried by D Company and two by A Company, moving 
in the leading wave. 

Second Lieutenant Whitehurst will be responsible for : — 

(a) Laying a wire from Battalion Headquarters to Brigade forward station 

at Pond Farm, and from Battalion Headquarters to Battalion 
forward command post. 

(b) Establishing visual between Battalion Headquarters and Battalion 

forward command post about D 13 central, if practicable. 

(c) Establishing relay runner posts about D 13 c 2 6, D 13 d 1 6, and 

Keir Farm. 
Contact 'plane can be recognised by a rectangular attachment on both lower 
planes and a white dumb-bell on either side of the body. 



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85 

Whenever the 'plane calls for signals by sounding the klaxon horn or firing 
a white Verey light, the most advanced lines of infantry will : — 

(a) Light flares in the bottom of a shell hole. 

(b) Show Watson fans- white and coloured sides alternately .'{() seconds. 

The 'plane will call for signals at ZERO plus 1 hour. 

ZERO plus 2 hours. 
ZERO plus 2'. hours, 
and at such other times as may be necessary. 

S.O.S. signal is a rifle grenade bursting into two red and two green lights. 

24. Second Lieutenant Brooke will be responsible for : — 

(a) Keeping liaison with 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment during their 

advance to the Yellow Line. 

(b) Establishing a Battalion forward command post about D 13 central 

and keeping the whole front under close observation. 

25. Acknowledge in writing. 

(Signed) R. N. L. BUCKMASTER, 
18th September, 1917. Captain and Adjutant, 

Issued at 8 a.m. l/4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. 



EXTRACTED FROM WAR DIARY. 
YPRES. 

15th September. Fairly quiet day. 

One Other Rank reinforcement. One Other Rank to Field Ambulance sick. 

16th September. About 10 45 a.m. 10 enemy aeroplanes dropped bombs in 
the vicinity of the camp, causing one casualty. Road near camp heavily shelled 
at dusk. 

Two Other Ranks wounded. 

17th September. Situation normal. Reconnaissance of forward area carried 
out. W day in connection with forthcoming operations. 
One Other Rank killed in VLAMERTINGHE. 

18th September |X day). Day spent in fitting out, etc. On the evening of this 
day the Battalion moved forward to the Congreve Walk — Liverpool Trench line, 
running through the village of St. Jean. Our artillery were very active throughout 
the night. 

Two Other Ranks wounded. One Other Rank died of wounds. 

ST. JEAN (TRENCHES!. 

HHh September. Commencing at dawn, our artillery opened the 24 hours' 
bombardment preparatory to the attack. The enemy's reply during the day was 
exceedingly feeble. 



86 

Commencing 9 .'M) p.m., the Battalion moved off from ST. JEAN by Platoons at 
20() yards' distance, via the WIELTJE GRAVENSTAFEL road. The night was 
quiet, and there was practically no hostile shelling. 

Battalion Headquarters were established at CAPRICORN KEEP (C 18 d 55 65) 
at 11 p.m. The KEEP consisted of six very strong dugouts of reinforced concrete. 
Three were taken over as headquarters by this unit and three by the 1 -Ith Royal 
Lancaster Regiment. 

Casualties : - Two Other Ranks killed ; three Other Ranks wounded. 

20th September. The Battalion was reported in position of assembly at I a.m. 
The lines to be taken up by the various waves were marked by tape, which had been 
laid as soon as darkness permitted. When once in position the assaulting troops 
lay in shell holes until ZERO hour. A continuous drizzling rain made the ground 
sticky and the going bad. The line of assembly was a north south line running 
through SOMME (D 1,'J c 30 25). During the night things were fairly quiet, 
though lively artillery fire developed on our right soon after 3 a.m. 

ZERO hour was at 5 40 a.m., at which time the artillery barrage opened. 

The 1 'tth Loyal North Lancashire Regiment moved forward from the assembly 
position in rear of the 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment. The 1 4th Royal Lancaster 
Regiment had for its objective (1) the RED DOTTED LINE and (2) the YELLOW 
LINE, and it was intended that the 1 4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment should 
" leap-frog " at the YELLOW LINE and capture and consolidate the GREEN LINE. 

The enemy barrage was promptly opened on the approximate line of our 
assembly position a proof that the enemy were fully prepared for the attack. 
This caused the three rear waves, i.e., the four Companies of the 1 4th Loyal North 
Lancashire Regiment, to close well up on to the 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment, 
and it appears that in a good many cases this was overdone, causing the two units 
to be intermingled and considerably undermining the principles of organisation. 

The creeping barrage was being governed by two new principles, tried for the 
first time and designed to combat and counteract the enemy's new system of defence : 
— (1) there were two definite pauses in the barrage, during which it was intended 
that Companies should replace casualties from the rear and generally reorganise ; 
(2) the barrage started to move forward at the rate of six minutes every hundred 
yards and later at the rate of eight minutes every hundred yards. 

The attack to commence with went well, though a great many casualties were 
inflicted by enemy machine gun fire, which from the start was very well directed. 
AISNE FARM was reported taken at 6 5 a.m., though a Platoon of the 1 '4th Loyal 
North Lancashires had to give assistance in the attack on this strong point. A 
message timed S 17 a.m. stated, " Attack appears to be going well." 

The first pause was made on the RED DOTTED LINE, though apparently very 
little re-organisation was found practicable. Soon after moving forward aeain 
considerable trouble was caused by hostile machine guns on the flanks bringing 
enfilade fire to bear on our advancing troops. According to reports received, this 
was particularly the case on the right, where the left Battalion of the l()5th Infantry 
Brigade was held up before GALLIPOLI, as a result of which an enemy machine 
gun on Hill 37 was playing havoc with the waves in the valley through which we 
were advancing. 

The result of these obstructions on either flank was that the men of this 
Battalion in many cases inclined outwards, leaving an exceedingly thin line facing 
the original objective. In some cases whole Platoons found themselves attacking 
strong points on the frontage of other Battalions. Particularly was this so in the 



81 

case of GALLIPOLI, in the ultimate capture of which men of this Battalion very 
materially assisted. 

Very few of our men reached the YELLOW LINE, though a message from the 
Battalion O.P., timed 8 45 a.m., stated that it appeared to be taken and 
consolidation commenced. Finally, therefore, a line of resistance was sited and 
consolidated about mid-day between the RED DOTTED and YELLOW LINE, with 
posts of Lewis gun teams thrown out 50 to 100 yards to the front. 

The enemy was not finally dislodged from the vicinity of GALLIPOLI and the 
adjoining SUVLA until after 10 a.m., by which time the barrage was of no further 
assistance. 

20th September. At 10 50 a.m. the enemy was reported massing for a counter- 
attack in the vicinity of NILE and FOKKER FARMS, but nothing except heavy 
shelling materialised on our front. Soon after 1 p.m. various S.O.S.'s were sent 
up, and apparently local counter-attacks, without any success, were launched on 
both our flanks. 

In the afternoon an effort was made to reorganise the Battalion, which was 
now reported to consist of only four Officers and 60 rifles in the firing line. The 
right Battalion frontage was now being held by a mixed line of the 1 4th Royal 
Lancaster Regiment and the 1 4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, stiffened by 
two Companies of the 1 /5th Royal Lancaster Regiment, who, as Battalion in Brigade 
reserve, and detailed to assist in the capture of the objective and to deal with any 
hostile counter-attack, had dug themselves in on a line in rear of our consolidated 
positions. 

About 7 p.m. an Officers' patrol went forward to reconnoitre KEIR FARM 
and discover whether it was held by the enemy. This patrol, however, did not 
succeed in its objective and lost its way, and the project had to be postponed till the 
following morning. 

As soon as darkness allowed, an effort was made to examine our positions and 
to find out whether measures for defence were complete. They were found to be 
held by at least six Lewis guns, while there were in all four machine guns, two of 
which were German, and proved very useful against the enemy. 

During the night patrols were sent out, and a further effort made to find the 
defences of KEIR FARM. KEIR FARM was not identified, and it was therefore 
assumed that it no longer existed as a concrete defence. No signs' of the enemy 
were seen. The night passed without incident, though shelling on both sides was 
maintained fairly consistently. 

Casualties : — 

Officers : — Killed — Captain F. W. S. Baker (Commanding B Company), 
Second Lieutenant A. B. Fergie. 

Wounded — Captain R. H. Tautz, M.C. (Commanding C Company), 
Second Lieutenant E. G. Baker (Commanding A Company), 
Second Lieutenant A. P. Smith, Second Lieutenant 
H. Dance, Second Lieutenant J. Oldham, Second Lieutenant 
R. Grisedale, Second Lieutenant A. Martin, Second 
Lieutenant B. Myers, Second Lieutenant C. B. Holmes 
(died of wounds, 28th September, 1917). 

Other Ranks .-—Killed 23, Wounded 161, Missing 11 ; Total 195. 

Four Other Ranks reinforcements from base. 



ss 

The following notes by an Officer who was present are added to complete the 
account : 

At about 10 p.m. the Battalion began to arrive by Platoons, each Platoon 
coming up in silence, knowing we were close up to the enemy outposts, winding 
in single file over the uneven ground, being shown its tape, filing along it and lying 
down to wait for the dawn ; the assembly was completed by i a.m. the hour fixed, 
and apparently unknown to the enemy. 

At this hour, to add to the discomfort, a steady drizzle set in, but a tot of rum 
was served out and most of the men were soon asleep, to be waked at dawn by the 
crash of our opening barrage. 

Battalion Headquarters retired to CAPRICORN KEEP, while the Medical 
Officer and his men settled in POND GALLERIES. Both these blockhouses had 
been built of concrete by the Boche to shelter his reserves from our shelling in 
earlier days - during the days that followed they were severely tested, but never 
failed us. 

At ZERO, 5 40 a.m., while it was still dark, down came our creeping barrage, 
and the King's Own began to advance. Our men had been told to give them a good 
start and, full of eagerness as they were, would have done so had the answering 
enemy barrage not come down on their tails ; this had been foreseen and its 
position judged from previous registration, and the assembly position was just in 
front but only just and the " shorts " got some of our men, causing the rest to 
hurry and close up on the King's Own, who were already passing AISNE FARM. 
We had to complete the capture of this, and lost heavily in the process. 

Under terrific machine gun fire from the front and both flanks, causing 
casualties at every step, the two Battalions struggled forward to get to grips with 
their unseen enemies, and soon arrived at the two groups of blockhouses, LOOS 
and GALLIPOLI, with four others lying between them. 

These two groups, though the latter was of^ the allotted front, at once became 
the immediate objectives the left hand Companies took the LOOS blockhouses 
one by one, nine in all, with bomb and bayonet ; the Companies on the right swung 
round and joined the King's Liverpool Regiment in storming GALLIPOLI ; in the 
centre small parties of men, their Officers having been hit, took the other four and 
so reached the RED LINE. 

Lieutenant Brooke went forward, and, with a few signallers, established a 
forward comrjiand post near LOOS ; our machine gunners came up and turned 
five of the newly-taken Hun machine guns round on the enemy, and things seemed 
to be going well, but the hour-long pause of the barrage was too long, the hail of 
cross-fire from more distant machine guns still continued, and the men, who had 
sought cover in shell holes, were out of sight and scattered, though strenuous efforts 
to reorganise were made by the few leaders who remained, and with a certain amount 
of success. But the line had lost its cohesion, and when the barrage went on only 
a portion of the line saw it and attempted to follow. 

Lieutenant Brooke had notified the capture of the Red Line to Battalion 
Headquarters, but no further message coming through, the Second in Command 
went forward to clear up the situation ; on reaching the Red Line he could at first 
see no one, but soon stumbled into a shell hole full of men, and was able, running 
from one hole to another, to locate the whole line up to the flanks of the adjoining 
Battalions, and to estimate the casualties. 

The barrage had already passed the Green Line and the machine guns in the 
blockhouses were active. Their crews could see every movement, and the troops 
on both flanks were stationary, so that at the moment no further advance was 



80 

likely to succeed — moreover, everyone had had time to feel the reaction. So the 
order was given to dig in and to send out small patrols to try to occupy the ground 
immediately in front, and by this means the line was advanced still further. 

Lieutenant Holden took charge of one of these, while Second Lieutenant 
Pruden supervised consolidation. 

About this time the Hun seems to have realised the position, for he opened out 
with every gun he had, shelling the captured pillboxes and putting a very heavy 
barrage all round the aid post and Battalion Headquarters, but his attempt at 
counter-attack was beaten off by machine gun, Lewis gun, and rifle fire. 

We afterwards found out that SUVLA and THE CAPITOL had not been taken, 
nor had CROSS COTS — had they been the cross-machine gun fire on us would have 
been much less intense. 

No praise is too high for our stretcher bearers, who - all through that day and 
the succeeding days toiled without intermission bringing in wounded ; the aid 
post was in the line of the Hun barrage, a concrete structure, with a passage two 
feet wide on the enemy side with chambers opening off it ; the stretcher cases had 
to be dressed out in the open, while the passage was crowded with walking wounded, 
some of them Huns — the look of utter weariness and dejection on the faces of the 
latter was a thing not easily forgotten. 

The runners did splendid work ; a few were killed as they made their way over 
the shell-tossed ground- -the wonder is that any escaped. 

For five days the Battalion remained in those shell holes, beating off one 
counter-attack after another with the help of our gunners, who were truly 
magnificent. At first it was impossible to reorganise properly owing to the mixing 
of Battalions, but ultimately a definite frontage was allotted to us by Brigade, and 
that night we sorted ourselves out from the King's Own and Companies were picked 
out and given a definite bit of line— A and B in front, C and D in close support. 
At the same time the line was advanced considerably, especially on the right, the 
posts on HILL 37 having been taken by the right Brigade. 

Getting rations up to the line was a terrible business — runners and guides kept 
losing their way, and more than one party nearly entered Hun territory ; but guide 
wires were laid to Companies, the C.Q.M.S.'s did their work splendidly, and the men 
were fed and kept going. 

About 25th September we were relieved by the 59th Division, a genial 
lot — full strength -who seemed to expect to find trenches and dugouts ! Thanks 
to the tapes and wires which had been laid, relief was quick, and we all dribbled 
back to ST. JEAN, where Companies assembled by the cookers and had hot tea and 
rum served out. They were actually singing- the revulsion, I suppose. 

After a lot of delay we got into trucks on the DECAUVILLE railway (a metre 
gauge affair). The Commanding Officer was balanced on the back of the little 
engine, and as we started, some wit shouted out, " Don't move, sir ! You might 
upset her I" 

Additional light is thrown on the course of the battle by the Platoon 
narratives : — 

Lieutenant E. G. Baker, Commanding A Company, was hit in the head during 
the advance. No. 1 Platoon Commander, Lieutenant Smith, was badly wounded 
in the thigh before the first strong point was reached. Private Wyre fired some 
rifle grenades into it, after which the Platoon rushed it with men of other units, 
and bombed and bayonetted the enemy out. Sergeant Beaumont then led them 
towards SCHULER GALLERIES, when he was shot through the head about 



90 

50 yards behind the Red Line. About IG men under Private Wyre found tlieir way 
to the Red Line ; others, with an Officer of the King's Own, went forward on the 
left. He said he would take them tolthe Yellow Line, but was killed by a sniper. 
They were willing to go on, but had no leader till Sergeant Knowles of No. li came 
up and took a small party out under heavy cross machine gun fire to the domed 
strong point on the road. 

No. 2 got on all right till Lieutenant Dance was hit in the arm. They took 
a small strong point on the right with others helping, and also helped to take 
AISNE FARM, where one Hun Officer and eight men were taken. 

Sergeant Knowles took eight men to the left to take the strong point in the 
road, but there were about 30 enemy in a trench in front of it, and he was 
compelled to fall back again for lack of support. Two sections helped to take the 
strong point in front of LOOS. 

Captain Baker, Commanding B Company, was wounded at 6 30 a.m., but 
continued to advance ; he was killed at 7 a.m. at a strong point about 
150 yards to the right of LOOS. At this same point five out of the Lewis gun team 
of seven were put out of action (one killed and four wounded). Sergeant-Major 
Roberts bombed the strong point. 

Sergeant Pitcher, of No. 6, with five men, assisted in the attack on the strong 
points at LOOS and was severely wounded. Second Lieutenant Fazackerley, during 
the pause in the barrage, advanced with Lance-Corporal Clayton and four men to 
a point on a ridge to find a possible position for Lewis gun. Here they were subject 
to intense enfilade machine gun fire from the right flank in the direction of 
GALLIPOLI, which made it impossible to advance further until the right flank had 
advanced. 

Second Lieutenant Martin, Commanding No. 1 1 , was badly wounded 
immediately after zero, and Sergeant Murphy assumed command. This Platoon 
assisted in the capture of AISNE HOUSE ; at least 20 Germans were taken there. 

In No. 10 Lance-Corporal Charnley was wounded immediately after zero, and 
during the pause Mr. Myers and one or two others were sniped, and when they 
moved forward again only one bomber remained. 

In No. 0, at nightfall, Mr. Fergie, Mr. Holmes, and two Sergeants went forward 
to reconnoitre a forward position. The two Officers were struck by a shell and 
were both very badly wounded. Lance-Corporal Anderton took over command. 
Private Pendlebury was wounded on the afternoon of the 23rd for the third time. 
C Company Commander (Captain Tautz) was wounded at the first pause. 

No. 13, owing to the darkness, got mixed up with the 1 4th King's Own on 
the left flank, and helped the Lancashire Fusiliers to carry SCHULER GALLERIES. 

D Company Headquarters Lewis gun team, when near GALLIPOLI, was shot 
down by machine gun fire, but Corporal Prescott retrieved the gun. Visual 
communication with the Battalion forward signalling post was opened from behind 
a dugout at D 13 b 1 by Private Roocroft, Company Signaller, and Private 
Parkinson, of B Company, and was maintained by shutter and lamp until the night 
of the 21st. On the morning of the 2Ist, Corporal Prescott and Private Goodwin, 
Company Runner, went forward of the line and shot some enemy snipers who had 
been annoying the troops in the line. On the evening of the 23rd, during an 
intensely heavy bombardment. Corporal Prescott volunteered and kept observation 
all the time, though wounded in the shoulder by shrapnel, and refused to go to the 
aid post until the troops were relieved. 

No. 14 attacked the strong point at D 13d2(i in conjunction with a party of 
the l/4th King's Own, then Second Lieutenant Holden and the remaining men of 



91 

his party moved to attack GALLIPOLI, which was holding up the advance. This 
fight lasted about an hour. 

On the 21st September, Second Lieutenant Holden, who was patrolling to 
KEIR FARM, was writing a message to send by pigeon when he was killed. There 
were four other casualties, and the pigeons were killed. 

No. 15. At 10 a.m. on 21st September, Second Lieutenant Pruden took a small 
patrol to KEIR FARM. During the night an advanced post held by Lance-Corporal 
Gorton and five men with two Lewis guns was buried. One gun was in action again 
immediately, and the other after six hours. 



EXTRACTED FROM WAR DIARY. 
TRENCHES. 

21st September. There was fairly lively shelling at dawn, but the situation 
was reported quiet at 7 30 a.m. The front was continually patrolled before daylight 
and no signs of the enemy found. During the morning a further Officers' patrol 
worked forward to KEIR FARM and confirmed the previous report that it was 
practically non-existent. On the afternoon of this day the strength of the 
Companies in the line was reported at 90, though it was known there were still many 
more men of this unit who had become merged in the Battalions on either flank. 

At about 4 40 p.m. the 1 8th King's Liverpool Regiment, on the left of the 
2/5th Lancashire Fusiliers, attacked and occupied SCHULER FARM. Owing to 
the small amount of resistance encountered it was decided that the 2 5th Lancashire 
Fusiliers should take CROSS COTTS and that then the I 4th Loyal North Lancashire 
Regiment should conform by moving forward to the new alignment. The attack on 
CROSS COTTS, however, never materialised, as at 6 30 p.m. heavy enemy counter- 
attacks were launched on Hill 37 on our right, and on the London Division on our 
left, the front held by this unit simply being subjected to an intense bombardment. 
Our artillery promptly replied to the S.O.S., and no enemy succeeded in reaching 
our lines. 

During the ensuing night a further effort was made to complete the 
reorganisation by separating the I 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment and the I 4th 
Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. This unit took over the south, viz., 2(M) yards 
of the KEIR sector, extending approximately from D 13 d 23 32 to D 13 d 23 75. 
By this means a few more men were collected together. The Battalion was then 
organised on a two-Company frontage with two Companies in support, and the 
whole line was straightened and pushed' forward an average depth of 50 yards. It 
was found that the only practicable wayjof doing this was by arranging a system 
of guide wires of a fixed length, which were taken out' by| posts in advance and, after 
their direction, etc., had been checked, the rear wave advanced along them by 
Platoons and took up the new alignment. It was intended that this process should 
be repeated by leap-frogging the two waves until the YELLOW LINE was reached, 
but owing to the still imperfect state of organisation, it was decided to postpone 
this movement until the following night. 

During this night, however, guide wires were laid from the main line to the 
isolated Lewis gun posts 100 yards in front. This ensured cohesion and gave the 
most forward men confidence. Guide wires were also made from the main line of 
resistance to Battalion Headquarters to facilitate the work during the night of 
carrying parties bringing up S.A.A and food. 



i>2 

The enemy's artillery was quiet during the night, but our own was very busy, 
apparently with gas shells, upon the enemy's batteries. 

Killed : Second Lieutenant H. Holden and two Other Ranks. 
Wounded : — Two Other Ranks. 

22nd September. There was a certain amount of shelling about dawn, other- 
wise the day was quiet. 

As soon as it was dark, the right of the Battalion was advanced 150 yards and 
connected with a machine gun in a shell hole near KEIR FARM about D i;{ d (iO 55. 
This movement, which was successfully carried out with the help of guide wires, 
brought our line round in such a way as to face the enemy, whose position now ran 
approximately north-west south-east. Connection was also maintained with the 
l()5th Brigade on our right, but in view of the fact that the latter were being relieved, 
it was not considered advisable to carry out any further advance, so as to avoid any 
possibility of bringing down an enemy S.O.S. barrage. 

The usual posts were pushed out in advance of the new line. 

Owing to the exhaustion of several Officers in the line, two were brought down 
for a rest to Battalion Headquarters, and the Signalling and Intelligence Officers 
took over control of the Companies. The night was quiet. Two Companies of the 
2 ()th North Staffordshires came into support to our Brigade. 

Casualties : Two Other Ranks wounded. 

2;{rd September. The day passed without incident. Patrols before dawn 

saw nothing of the enemy. An S.O.S. was sent up on our right at 3 50 p.m., but 
nothing materialised. 

At 5 p.m. the enemy heavily bombarded our positions, and on front line 
system and the vicinity of Battalion Headquarters were heavily bombarded for three 
hours. By S 15 p.m. all was quiet again and the relief was begun. The relieving 
unit was the 2 (>th North Staffordshires (59th Division, who took over our frontage 
with one Company. Relief was completed without casualties about 1 1 p.m. 

A special effort was made to secure identifications before being relieved, and 
a patrol that went out with this object in view returned with two prisoners, who 
were encountered in NO MAN'S LAND. The capture of these prisoners proved 
the presence of the third German Division opposite this part of the line since the 
attack was launched on the 20th. 

Upon relief. Companies concentrated at St. Jean, where, after hot tea had been 
supplied from the cookers, a train was provided to take the Battalion to 
VLAMERTINGHE. 

24th September. The Battalion arrived at camp south of VLAMERTINGHE 
at 4 ;{0 a.m. Morning was spent in resting, etc. At ;{ p.m. the Brigade entrained 
and travelled from VLAMERTINGHE to POPERINGHE, detrained at 
POPERINGHE, and boarded 'buses at a point about one mile south-west of the 
town. By this means we went to WATOU area, and were accommodated in tents 
at Hill Camp iK 12d7S). 

14i{ Other Ranks from reinforcement camp 

1 1 Other Ranks from base. 



TELEGRAMS : 

" Please convey to all ranks 55th Division the Army Commander's 
congratulations on the fine record of the Division during the hard fighting of the 



93 

past two months. The Army Commander wishes specially to thank all ranks for 
their splendid efforts, which have contributed greatly to the success of the last attack 
and to wish them all good luck and success in the future. Despite their long period 
in the line prior to commencement of operations they have well maintained and 
increased their high reputation. 

" FIFTH ARMY." 

' ' Brigadier-General Stuart and all ranks West Lancashire Reserve Brigade 
send heartiest congratulations to West Lancashire Division on their splendid 
success." 

" Well done, 35th West Lancashire Division! Accept my most hearty 
congratulations. I sincerely trust your losses are not heavy. 

•' DERBY." 



To All Ranks of the 55th (West Lancashire) Division. 

I regret that owing to the move of the Division I have not been able to see all 
units since the fight on 2()th September. I hope to do so later as opportunity offers. 

The messages received from higher Commanders and others since the battle 
have been published from time to time as received and have no doubt been read by 
all ranks, who will see from these messages how well the higher Commanders have 
appreciated the work of the Division. 

In addition, I have recently been allowed to see the reports on the Division 
rendered to General Headquarters by the Army and the Corps in which we served. 
In these reports the Division is spoken of as "a good fighting Division possessing 
the right spirit " and as " a first-rate Division." I know that all ranks throughout 
the Division will share the pride that I feel myself in reading those opinions of the 
Commanders under whom we have served. 

I have also had the advantage of reading scores of stories of individual courage, 
determination, endurance, and self-sacrifice, narrated by Commanding Officers in 
bringing the services of individuals of all ranks to notice for recognition. These 
stories increase my pride in the Division and my confidence in it. 

The West Lancashire Division had a good reputation before the recent fighting 
in front of Ypres. You have now won for it a reputation second to none in the 
Expeditionary Force, and every soldier in the Division may well be proud of belonging 
to it. That reputation I feel confident you will cherish and maintain. We are now 
in an easy part of the line, but ordinary trench duties demand constant alertness, 
endurance, and conscientious observance of orders ; besides it is up to us at all 
times to take advantage of any opportunities for aggressive action which will cause 
loss or damage to the enemy. It is by such action, as well as by smartness and 
good discipline when out of the line, that the great reputation of the West Lancashire 
Division can, and I am sure will, be kept up by each soldier in it, of every rank. 

H. S. JEUDWINE, 
55th Division Headquarters, Major-General, 

lOth October, 1917- Commanding 55th Division. 



The following decorations were awarded in respect of the battle and announced 
11th November : — 

MILITARY CROSS Captain A. T. Houghton. 

Second Lieutenant S. A. H. Pruden. 

Second Lieutenant L. Brooke. 



94 



D.C.M. 



MILITARY MEDAL 



2()()()51 C.S.M. Roberts, H. 

20(1077 Corporal Prescott, S. 

2(1()7S2 Private Parks, T. 

20ll!(7 Corporal Thompson, J. 

20(MiS2 Private Coupe, F. 

2(I0S}>.'> Lance-Sergeant Knowles, R. 

I21.il Lance-Corporal Cayton, R. 

2«l(lti().S Private Pendlebury, T. 

2()2})()7 Private Yates, W. 

291 17S Private Goodwin, H. 

201350 Corporal Robinson, J. 

2}»()79 Private Parkinson, T. 

:UM)i Private Jones, T. 

1()9'10 Private Cunningham, D. 

202(H»9 Private Wyre, F. 

2(107.S() Lance-Corporal Gorton, F. 

201.S42 Sergeant Bell, H. 



2(l(«52 



Lance-Sergeant Murphey, J. 
Private Thistleton, T. 



238002 Private Roocroft, W. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

CAMBRAI, 25th September, 1917 to fith December, 1917. 

At WATOU we began once more to pull the Battalion together and bring it up 
to strength, and reinforcements began to come in. Captain Duggan, M.C., from 
the 10th Battalion, joined us here, also Second Lieutenants J.O. Firth, J. H. Livesey, 
H. Ramsbottom, and P. Adamson, and 18 Other Ranks. 

On the 26th we marched to HOPOUTRE, where we entrained and moved out 
at 9 30 a.m., travelling in cattle trucks via ARRAS to BAPAUME, where we arrived 
about 7 p.m. Thence we marched through desolate and ruined country to a pile 
of ruins labelled YTRES, where we shared a canvas camp with a Battalion of the 
Buffs for the night ; they left the following morning. 

Major Crump rejoined us from England on the 30th. 

We stayed at YTRES resting, bathing, reorganising, and training, till 
3rd October, when we left the 4th Corps area and marched to a canvas camp at 
AIZECOURT-LE-BAS in the 3rd Corps area ; the camp was on a hill top, and it 
was bitterly cold. From here reconnaissances of the new forward area were carried 
out, the 164th Brigade being in Divisional Reserve. 

Second Lieutenant Easterby came back on the 5th, and on the 10th Second 
Lieutenants J. L., W. H. F., and F. C. Smith, D. Carmichael, J. E. F. Nicholson, 
R. B. Wilkinson, and C. Taylor joined us as Officer reinforcements, followed by 
Second Lieutenants L. Frost, F. G. Green, and C. Milne on the 13th. 

On the 12th we marched to VILLERS FAUCON into billets ; the following day 
Companies moved forward to LEMPIRE, where we became support Battalion to 
the right Brigade. 

The country in which we now found ourselves was a pleasant change from 
FLANDERS ; the soil was chalk like the south-east of England, and the scenery 
was, or had been, similar ; but the Germans in their retirement had systematically 
destroyed everything — cut down every tree, blown up every house and structure 
down to the very telegraph poles, and poisoned the wells — it was a desolate and 
dead country. Curiously enough, he had left the cellars intact, and as these, even 
under wattle-and-daub houses, were solidly built of brick, with arched brick roofs, 
they made excellent, if rather dark, hiding-places and billets. 

We never quite understood these cellars, so much better than the houses to 
which they belonged ; some said they were specially built as wine cellars, that being 
once a wine country ; others favoured the theory that they were specially designed 
as refuges in war time. 



m 

From LEMPIRE, wliich corresponded to YPRES in this sector, we sent working 
parties up the line every night. A Company had four posts, known as LEMPIRE 
CENTRAL, LEMPIRE EAST, YAK and ZEBRA POSTS, which were manned day 
and night, the garrisons showing no movement during the daytime. 

On the ISth we relieved the I 4th KING'S OWN in the right Battalion 
subsector of the Brigade front. The line was in truth no line, but a string of posts 
connected by trenches apparently freshly dug in the stiff clay which here overlay 
the chalk ; each post provided with a mined dugout for the garrison rather a 
pleasant place, we thought, on first acquaintance, as we were told that horses could 
be ridden (and were, just at first) right up to the front line ! 

On this occasion Companies were disposed as follows : 

GILLEMONT POST, the only place which showed signs of wear, was held by 
D Company, with one Platoon of A, as Left Front Company ; CAT POST by C as 
Right Front Company : DUNCAN and DOLEFUL POSTS by A as Support Company ; 
and KEN LANE, a sunken road lined with dugouts, by B, the Reserve Company, 
and Battalion Headquarters. 

Of course, previous to our taking over the sector, the Divisional artillery 
had begun to wake up the Hun by concentration shoots, which were continued 
at intervals —the retaliation was mostly in the shape of Minenwerfer on GILLE- 
MONT POST, which reminded us. on that account, of RAILWAY WOOD. 

During the five days we had plenty to do in becoming acclimatised and 
establishing the old trench routine again with a new set of Officers and men ; very 
few were left now of the June lot, and many of the N.C.O.'s had never seen a trench 
before. Here Second Lieutenants W. G. E. Taylor, C. A. Rush, Hornby, and 
12 Other Ranks reinforced us. A perpetual source of joy to the old ones these 
drafts were ; first they had to be taken down and " put through it," and then taught 
how to behave, if they didn't know, but somehow or other at the end of a fortnight, 
they seemed to have settled down and become part of us. 

The I 4th KING'S OWN relieved us on the 2.'{rd, and we went back to 
ST. EMILIE, whence, during the next few days, we provided working parties for 
the front line, going into the line again on the 29th, when we relieved the 1 5th 
South Lancashires in the BIRDCAGE sector the relief was completed without 
casualties by 8 30 p.m. The Medical Officer, who had had a pretty stiff time on 
20th September, went sick that night, and Captain E. Watson Williams, R.A.M.C, 
took over his duties. 

On the 30th October the enemy trench-mortared our front line, killing three 
and wounding nine men otherwise the tour was quiet, and on 1st December we 
were relieved by the 1 9th King's Liverpool Regiment and went by light railway 
to HAMEL or TINCOURT it was a double village, and usually known by this latter 
name. It was stated above that every village in the area had been destroyed — 
this place was an exception, as some of the civil population had been left there by 
the Hun, so that we found it almost intact. The Companies' billets had wire beds 
in them, and we added to these while we were there. Our total strength at this 



Map No. 4- 

GILLEMONT FARM SECTOR 
November, 1917 



o 



Map No. -4 

GILLEMONT FARM SECTOR 
November, I9t7 




• 



97 

time was '.i9 Officers and 777 Other Ranks the fighting strength being 24 Officers 
and 546 Other Ranks, so that in numbers, at any rate, we had partly recovered from 
our losses in the SALIENT. 

We had a very pleasant time at HAMEL till the 16th, when we returned to 
ST. EMILIE ; during the period Captain Buckmaster assumed command of 
B Company and Second Lieutenant Pruden became Adjutant of the Battalion, 
a position he retained till the Armistice. Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle had been' at 
Brigade since the 13th, commanding the 164th Brigade during the absence of 
Brigadier-General Stockwell on leave, afterwards going on leave himself, and 
Major Crump had been in command of the Battalion. 

On the 16th we moved back to ST. EMILIE, and on the 17th we relieved the 
1 5th King's Liverpool Regiment in the GILLEMONT sector. 

On the morning of the 18th November, the Battalion was disposed as follows 
(see map) : — 

Front line--D Company, under Lieutenant Shippobottom, in CAT POST. 

C Company, under Lieutenant Lonsdale, in GILLEMONT FARM 
sector. 

Supports B Company, under Captain Buckmaster, in DUNCAN and 
DOLEFUL POSTS. 

Reserve A Company, under Captain Houghton, in KEN LANE with 
Battalion Headquarters. 

Major Crump was in command of the Battalion, and attached to A Company was 
a raiding party of 19 in training for a raid, under Lieutenant Adamson. At 
5 30 a.m. the Boche opened a hurricane bombardment on the GILLEMONT FARM 
sector with trench mortars, including SO heavy minenwerfer brought up the night 
before, and reduced the front trench to a shapeless mass of craters : out of 12 posts* 
only Sergeants Hartley and Hogg and half-a-dozen men were left alive ; all the rest, 
with the Officer (Lieutenant Firth) and Sergeant on duty, who were found at the 
head of the communication trench under two feet of earth, were killed and buried. 

About 200 Huns entered our line in three places, equipped with spades and 
rations, and worked forward bombing, and things looked serious ; but Lieutenant 
Lonsdale, though badly shaken, kept his head, organised his Headquarters details 
into a firing line who held up the enemy advance, and managed to telephone to 
Battalion Headquarters, and A Company was ordered to counter-attack. 

The barrage which had been put down on KEN LANE was by this time falling 
off, and, as the men were standing to, Lieutenant Adamson was able to push off 
at once with his raiders and one Platoon of A, followed by the rest of A under 
Captain Houghton, with very few casualties. As soon as the enemy saw the 
first wave come over the hill he began to retreat rapidly, but not before the 
counter-attackers and the gallant remnant of C had bayonetted a score or so. Some 
of the Huns had entered D Company's line and caused a few casualties there, among 

*A post normally consisted of an N.C.O. and 6 men. 



98 

others Lieutenant Shippobottom, a very promising young Officer, who was caught 
by a bomb as he came out of Company Headquarters. 

This affair was reported in "THE TIMES" as follows : — 

9 30 p.m. — At dawn this morning a strong hostile raiding party attacked 

our trenches in the neighbourhood of GUILLEMONT FARM, south-east of 

Epehy [north-west of St. Quentin^, and effected an entry at certain points. Our 
• troops counter-attacked across the open, and after sharp fighting, in which we 

captured a few prisoners, ejected the enemy. 

Lieutenant Adamson received the M.C. for his excellent leadership — the way 
he worked round the flanks of the hill was pretty to watch, and Sergeants Hartley 
and Hogg also received the M.M. for their stout fight with a few men against over- 
whelming odds. 

It fell to A Company to clear up the mess, and they took over the sector that 
night ; the men were dead beat, the front line blown to bits, and lateral 
communication interrupted to such an extent that four Officers were on duty 
simultaneously the whole night through. 

The following day was spent in making further clearance, and special parties 
from Battalion Headquarters and Pioneers carried on through the night. 

The raiders who went to CAT POST did not enter our trenches, but bombed 
them from the parapet, doing some damage and causing a few casualties. They 
then returned to their own lines. 

The enemy left two unwounded prisoners in our hands, two wounded prisoners, 
and about ten dead were left in our trenches. 

Our casualties were : Second Lieutenant J. A. Firth, killed ; Second 
Lieutenant F. Shippobottom, wounded, died of wounds in hospital ; Second 
Lieutenant R. Hornby, slightly wounded, remained at duty ; 1 1 Other Ranks killed, 
21 Other Ranks wounded, 48 Other Ranks missing— many of these being buried 
in the destruction of the trench. 

The following extracts from the War Diary refer to our share in the CAMBRAI 
attack : — 

19th November. The work of reorganisation was completed, and the repairing 
of the trenches went on. At 1 p.m. orders were received that it was Y day, and the 
preparation for the attack to be made on Z day started at once. Our artillery and 
trench mortars completed their wire cutting programme. Enemy shelled our 
supports with 5.9 's and 4.2 's during the day. 

D Company, who were holding CAT POST sector, were ordered to remain there 
and to push posts into the GILLEMONT sector when the assaulting troops moved 
forward. 

At 2 30 p.m. A Company sent 50 Other Ranks to the 164th Trench Mortar Battery 
as carrying parties for guns moving forward, and 20 Other Ranks to the 
n>4th Machine Gun Company as carriers to their guns moving forward. Between 
11 p.m. and 12 midnight the remainder of A and C Companies, who were holding 
the GILLEMONT sector, were relieved by the l/4th Royal Lancaster Regiment, 



99 

who were to assault the GILLEMONT defences of the enemy in the morning. On 
rehef these Companies proceeded to KEN LANE and were held in Battalion reserve. 

B Company, who were in support at DUNCAN and DOLEFUL posts, took up 
dispositions as follows during the night : — 

One Platoon as permanent garrison FLEECEALL POST. 
One Platoon as permanent garrison GRAFTON POST. 
One Platoon as permanent garrison ISLAND TRAVERSE. 

Owing to our losses in Lewis gun personnel, sustained in the raid on the 18th, 
we were unable to carry out a programme of Lewis gun fire for barrage purposes 
that had been allotted to us. This was taken over by the l/5th King's Liverpool 
Regiment, with the assistance of two Lewis gunners from the Platoon of B Company 
in FLEECEALL POST. 

The evening and night was very quiet ; there was no enemy activity whatever. 

Two Other Ranks to Field Ambulance sick. 

20th November. Z day. At 2 a.m. the Battalion was disposed as follows : — 

Headquarters KEN LANE. 

D Company CAT POST SECTOR. 

B Company ... ... Headquarters and one Platoon, FLEECEALL 

POST ; one Platoon, GRAFTON POST ; 
one Platoon, ISLAND TRAVERSE. 

A and C Companies ... 70 Other Ranks detached as carrying parties ; 

remainder at KEN LANE, with one Platoon 
organised to occupy DOLEFUL POST if 
required. 

Aid Post DUNCAN POST. 

ZERO hour was at 6 20 a.m. 

The duty allotted to us was permanently to hold the Brigade front and on no 
account to move forward in support of the assaulting Battalions. 

The attack on GILLEMONT was at first successful, but by 1 p.m. all our troops 
were driven back to our original front line. The attack on the KNOLL was 
unsuccessful owing to the wire not having been cut. 

Our garrison in the original line stood fast all through. 

The enemy heavily shelled our front and support lines, especially DUNCAN 
POST, throughout the day and succeeding night. 

Our casualties were : — One Other Rank killed, eight Other Ranks wounded, 
three Other Ranks missing. 

At 8 p.m. the posts at FLEECEALL, GRAFTON, and ISLAND TRAVERSE 
were relieved by the 1 8th King's Liverpool Regiment and 2 '5th Lancashire Fusiliers, 
and on relief proceeded to DUNCAN POST. At midnight the entire Company (B) 
was organised into a wiring party, and commenced wiring in front of the 
GILLEMONT sector. 

The carrying parties attached to the Trench Mortars and Machine Guns were 
returned to A Company at KEN LANE by 10 p.m., except one party of 20 Other 

H 



100 

Ranks which did not arrive till the 'iZnd. At 10 p.m. A and C Companies 
commenced to relieve the I 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment in the GILLEMONT 
sector. 

Two Other Ranks to Field Ambulance sick. 

21st November. At I p.m. the relief of the 1 Ith Royal Lancaster Regiment 
was completed. The 1 4th Royal Lancaster Regiment proceeded to KEN LANE 
and SART FARM. The day was quiet ; the work of clearing the trenches and 
reorganising was continued. At 2 p.m. one Platoon B Company relieved a Company 
of the 1 5th King's Liverpool Regiment in DOLEFUL POST. 

22nd November. The day was abnormally quiet. Three daylight patrols 
were sent out to discover any signs of an enemy retirement. Enemy front line was 
found to be held in force. At 8 p.m. the Battalion was relieved by the I 7th King's 
Liverpool Regiment, and on relief proceeded to VAUCELLETTE Camp X l.'ic, and 
came under command of the B.G.C. KMith Infantry Brigade. C Company did not 
go to VAUCELLETTE, but proceeded to billets in ST. EMILIE. 

The Battalion was present in billets at VAUCELLETTE Camp by II p.m. 

Three Other Ranks to Field Ambulance sick. 

The next few days were spent in repairing billets and replacing equipment lost 
in the recent battle, and on the 28th we marched back to billets at VILLERS 
FAUCON ; Major Crump left the Battalion to take over command of the I 10th 
King's Liverpool Regiment. 

On the 29th, after a Warning Order, which was afterwa ds cancelled, we 
marched to VAUCELLETTE Camp, just behind the ruins of a farm of that name. 
Apparently the Divisional Commander had noticed, while making a tour of the 
forward area on the 28th, that the enemy was reconnoitring with low-flying aircraft 
as well as registering targets with his artillery, and knowing that movement behind 
the enemy's lines was above normal, he suspected an attack on our front, hence 
our move. 

In order to make clear the events that followed, which were by no means clear 
to us at the time, it is necessary to quote in extenso from the " History of the 55th 
Division ": — 

" The Division was at this time holding a front of 13,000 yards, supported only 
by two Brigades of Field artillery ! 

" This wide frontage could not of course be continuously held ; it consisted 
of Platoon posts, connected by travel trenches, and distributed in depth so far as 
circumstances allowed. But with such a wide front an effective distribution in 
depth was impossible with the troops available. On the morning of the attack, 
the portion of the line extending from BANTEAUX RAVINE to WOOD ROAD was 
held by the 1,5th South Lancashires. South of them in the HONNECOURT sector 
were the l/5th North Lancashire Regiment, and in the OSSUS sector the 1 lOth 



Map No. S 

The 

VAUCELLETTE FARM AREA 

Nov. 30th. 1917 



Map No. 5 

The 

VAUCELLETTE FARM AREA 

Nov. 30th, 1917 




"^ 



c 



101 

King's Liverpool Regiment. The 1 5th King's Own were in support. The 
Ifi5th Infantry Brigade on the right was disposed as follows: — 1 /6th King's 
Liverpool Regiment from OSSUS WOOD to HEYTHROP POST ; 1 5th King's 
Liverpool Regiment from GRAFTON POST to EGO POST; and 17th King's 
Liverpool Regiment southwards from this point to CAT POST and NEW POST. 
The 1 9th King's Liverpool Regiment were in support. The 164th Infantry Brigade 
were in Divisional reserve. 

"At seven o'clock on the morning of the 30th, in thick fog, a very heavy 
bombardment broke out upon the whole Divisional front, and all tracks and roads 
were heavily shelled. Almost simultaneously a message was received at the 
Headquarters of the 166th Brigade in EPEHY, from the 35th Brigade, which was 
on our immediate left, stating that the l/5th South Lancashires were being heavily 
trench mortared and that the S.O.S. had gone up. Communication with this 
Battalion was at once attempted, but without result, and save for a visual signal 
message received at 7 43 a.m. stating, ' We know nothing yet, O.K.,' nothing 
further was heard from the 1 /5th SOUTH LANCASHIRES, nor did a man of that 
Battalion return. 

" It was presently, however, to be made clear that the enemy had broken 
through somewhere on the left of the l/5th South Lancashires, and was pushing 
forward in large numbers and with great rapidity on VILLERS GUISLAIN. Between 
7 38 a.m. and 7 45 a.m., Germans in considerable force were seen on VILLERS 
RIDGE, and a few moments later large numbers of British troops, not of our 
Division, were seen to be falling back from the direction of GONNELIEU .... 
just north-west of VILLERS GUISLAIN. Very shortly after eight o'clock enemy 
machine guns were firing on our batteries from the high ground south of GAUCHE 
WOOD, and enemy aeroplanes, flying as low as 100 feet, were subjecting VILLERS 
GUISLAIN and the ground in its vicinity to heavy machine gun fire. 

" At 8 15 a.m. the enemy were seen to be advancing in strong force southwards 
from the north of the cemetery — i.e., on the western side of VILLERS GUISLAIN. 
The position of the village was precarious. 

"Meantime, as late as 7 57 a.m., the 1 /5th North Lancashire Regiment 
had reported : ' No Infantry action,' but at 8 15 a.m. a message was received from 
the Liverpool Scottish on their right, stating that the enemy was advancing from 
his trenches at OSSUS 'L. A quarter of an hour later an indistinct message from 
the 1 /5th North Lancashire Regiment was received at the Headquarters of the 
166th Brigade, to the effect that the enemy was through on the left — the line was 
then cut. 

"By 8 20 a.m. the enemy were reported to have penetrated our lines at 
HOLT'S BANK, and a few moments after large bodies of the enemy were seen in 
PIGEON QUARRY- north of the Liverpool Scottish and between them and the 
1 5th North Lancashire Regiment. Almost simultaneously the enemy were 
reported to be coming over in extended order and in large numbers, wave after 
wave, to EAGLE QUARRY, on the 165th Brigade front, and also to be advancing 



102 

on FLEECEALL POST on the south. By 9 15 a.m. the enemy had penetrated the 
Divisional front from the BIRDCAGE northwards for about .S(M) yards, and were 
even reported to have been seen in GLOUCESTER ROAD. VILLERS GUISLAIN, 
turned from the north and eventually surrounded, was reported at 9 30 a.m. to be 
in enemy hands, and a little over half in-hour later the enemy had succeeded in 
progressing to within a few hundred yards of VAUCELLETTE FARM. He got 
no further, for there he met the 1 ;4th Loyal North Lancashires." 

All Press accounts are strangely silent about the work the Battalion did at 
VAUCELLETTE FARM on the 30th November, 1917. 

The scene of the action was the col or ridge at the head of the valley which 
runs along the northern edge of VILLERS GUISLAIN and up towards the south-east 
(see map) ; this ridge commanded the railway for a considerable distance, and by 
holding on to it we were able to keep the Hun off CHAPEL HILL ; had he occupied 
this feature and mounted machine guns there, most of the area of open grass land 
between HEUDECOURT and PEIZIERE would have been under direct fire, with 
obvious consequences, whereas its retention by us kept this covered, and also covered 
the flank of the Guards when they counter-attacked and drove the Boche back out 
of GOUZEAUCOURT. 

The front had been very quiet and the possibility of trouble seemed to most of 
us very remote, but all precautions were taken, and before we turned in on the night 
of the 29th, Colonel Hindle's orders as to the issue of bombs, extra bandoliers, 
haversack rations, and filling of water-bottles were carried out to the letter. At 
the same time Company boxes, gramophones, etc., were with us, and we spent a 
cheery evening, with little thought for the morrow. 

At dawn the next day heavy firing was heard to the north, but at first we put 
this down to the aftermath of the CAMBRAI push and paid little attention to it ; 
by degrees it increased in violence, and the Commanding Officer gave the order to 
stand-to, but carry on with breakfasts, which were just ready — this was at 7 50 a.m. 
Soon after he sent Lieutenant Fazackerley (Intelligence Officer) forward to find out 
what was going on, and Lieutenant Johnson to KiGth Brigade for orders, our own 
Brigade Headquarters and three Battalions being still back at HAMEL resting. 

About 8 30 a.m. information was brought by Lieutenant Fazackerley that 
the enemy was advancing all along our immediate front, and the Commanding 
Officer at once sent for Company Commanders at the double ; one of us, who knew 
him well, afterwards said it was the first time the Commanding Officer had ever 
been in a hurry. In a few words he made his dispositions : A Company to hold 
the left under Captain Houghton ; B Company, under Captain Buckmaster, 
the centre in front of the farm ; and D Company, under Captain Matthew, to the 
right at the head of the LINNET VALLEY. By this time straggling remnants of 
the Division on our left were to be seen crossing the railway ; a few were collected 
and taken forward by A Company. 

The Companies standing in readiness were at once led forward by their 
Commanders, and took up positions as shown on the map, gaining the crest at the 



103 

moment when a party of Huns was in the act of crossing the railway just south 
of CHAPEL CROSSING ; A Company caught them before they reached dead ground 
and wiped them out, while a Lewis gun mounted on the railway and a Platoon 
beyond it secured the approach up the valley. It is difficult to estimate the number 
of Huns shot down by this Company alone in the first five minutes— the countryside 
was alive with them, advancing in small patrols with light machine guns. 

The enemy had also stationed heavy machine guns in various buildings, 
especially a Beet Factory to our front, and during the whole action our troops 
were subjected to continuous and accurate traversing fire from these, and to a 
certain amount of shelling. 

From this point our War Diary will speak for itself : — 

30th November, 7 40 a.m. " Stand-to " order received from 166th Infantry 
Brigade. Intelligence Officer and scouts sent forward to reconnoitre. 

9 a.m. Our infantry and artillery observed retiring on our left in the direction of 
HEUDECOURT. Artillery reported they had abandoned guns in VILLERS GUISLAIN. 
Battalion Headquarters, under R.S.M., sent forward to form line on north-east 
side of VAUCELLETTE FARM, where they immediately came under machine gun 
fire from the enemy advancing from VILLERS GUISLAIN. 

A Company were ordered up on their left, and had to fight hard to reach their 
position ; the enemy had already seized Chapel Crossing, All the Officers of this 
Company eventually became casualties. 

B and D Companies were ordered to continue the line on the right of 
Headquarters on the east side of VAUCELLETTE FARM. All Companies were 
quickly in position ; fire was opened, and the enemy ceased to advance and took 
up a position on a line running from the BEET FACTORY to CHAPEL CROSSING. 
At the time there were no troops in position on our right or left flanks. This state 
of things prevailed until dusk, when the Canadian Mounted Brigade arrived. 

11 a.m. Orders were received from the I66th Infantry Brigade to clear enemy 
from VILLERS GUISLAIN. Battalion ordered to advance in extended order to 
clear enemy from VILLERS HILL. This they proceeded to do, led by Lieutenant- 
Colonel R. Hindle, D.S.O. 

The men were firing from the hip as they advanced, and the foremost line of the 
enemy began to retire. The advance was successful until the centre of the line 
reached a point about 200 yards from the crest of the hill, when ammunition ran 
short. At this time fresh enemy troops advanced over the hill in considerable 
strength. 

The Colonel was killed, and all three Company Commanders became casualties. 
The Adjutant took command of the Battalion and ordered a withdrawal to 
VAUCELLETTE FARM. This was carried out slowly, under covering fire from the 
left flank. 

A defensive line was established on the east side of VAUCELLETTE FARM, 
and the men commenced to dig themselves in with their entrenching tools, under 



104 

cover of Lewis gun fire. A supply of ammunition was brought up by stretcher 
bearers returning from the Aid Post. 

11 ;{() a.m. At this time Major Crump, who was reconnoitring under orders 
from the G.O.C. (Kifith Infantry Brigade) estabhshed a post on the EPEHV — 
VILLERS GUISLAIN ROAD, consisting of one Vickers gun and team, one Officer 
and .'50 Other Ranks of various units. The gun in this post did great execution 
amongst the enemy in LEITH WALK, and effectually prevented him from advancing 
further. 

12 15 p.m. A composite Battalion of the 12th Division arrived as 
reinforcements, one Company being sent to strengthen our garrison in front of the 
farm, two Companies continued our line northwards, and one Company was kept 
in the camp as local reserve. Touch was obtained on the left with the 9th Essex 
Regiment. 

12 55 p.m. Major Crump having completed reconnaissance and reported 
to Ififith Infantry Brigade, was ordered by the G.O.C. to assume command of the 
Battalion and to take with him two Vickers guns and teams and supply of 
ammunition for LONE TREE POST (EPEHY^ VILLERS GUISLAIN ROAD). 
One gun was sent to right flank of the post to command the LINNET VALLEY, the 
other to VAUCELLETTE FARM. Soon afterwards touch was obtained with 
l/4th Royal Lancaster Regiment on our right. 

I ,'{0 p.m. C Company arrived as reinforcements and were sent into the trench 
south of the farm, in front of the railway. After this the consolidation of the line 
was carried on by the men with the entrenching tool, only a few picks and shovels 
being available. This was eventually remedied by the arrival of the Battalion 
mobile reserve of S.A.A. and tools, so that, with the help of the composite Battalion 
(12th Division), a fire trench was dug across the whole front of the farm, and 
a considerable amount of wire put out soon after dark. 

5 p.m. The Canadian Cavalry Brigade, under Brigadier-General Seeley, 
arrived at rear line of VAUCELLETTE Camp. One regiment dismounted and 
reinforced our line. One Regiment dug a support line west of the farm. C Company 
were relieved at 11 p.m. by the 1 8th King's Liverpool Regiment, and went into the 
line east of the farm to assist in the consolidation of the position. 

Our casualties were : Killed : Lieutenant-Colonel R. Hindle, D.S.O. ; 

Second Lieutenant J. H. Livesey. 
V^Aounded and Missing (afterwards reported killod) : 

Captain R. N. L. Buckmaster. 
Wounded : Captain A. T. Houghton, M.C. ; Captain 
F. K. Matthew, Second Lieutenant E. M. Easterby, 
Second Lieutenant R. B. Wilkinson, Second 
Lieutenant P. Adamson, Second Lieutenant F. G. 
Green, Second Lieutenant J. E. P. Nicholson. 
Other Ranks : Killed 11, Wounded 84, Missing 15. 



105 

Writing to express his sympathy with Alderman R. Hindle, Chorley, on the 
loss of his son, the late Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle, D.S.O., Major-General H. S. 
Jeudwine said : - - 

" Lieutenant-Colonel Hindle 's death was a great blow to all of us. To his 
Battalion it seemed irreparable. His never-failing keenness, his courage and 
determination, were of inestimable value, and had made his Battalion one of the 
finest, if not the finest, in the Division. His cheerfulness and modesty endeared 
him to everybody. His Battalion did splendid work under his leadership in the 
attack in front of Ypres. There he came safely through great dangers, though he 
never spared himself. 

" The last action was quite unforeseen," the letter continues. " When the 
German attack appeared probable it fell to him and his Battalion to occupy a position 
of great importance. I saw him on the day preceding the attack and gave him 
orders which he carried out most loyally, as I had the utmost confidence he would. 
He was killed almost instantaneously at the head of his men, where he always was 
when there was danger. ... It will, I am sure, be some consolation to you 
to know that the fine fight he made with his Battalion was the means of definitely 
checking the German advance in that part of the field, and of preventing their 
reaching a position which would have endangered large forces." 

VAUCELLETTE CAMP. 

1st December. At 1 a.m. the Battalion was relieved by the composite 
Battalion of the 12th Division, and on relief went into Brigade reserve at the railway 
dugouts (W 23 b) 57 c S E. The day was spent in reorganising the Battalion. At 
11 p.m. the Battalion was relieved by the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, 
and proceeded by route march to billets at HAMEL, arriving at 3 a.m. 

Second Lieutenant J. Johnson wounded. One Other Rank to Field Ambulance 
sick. 

Extract from a letter received by the G.O.C. 164th Infantry Brigade from the 
G.O.C. 55th Division : — " I saw the Corps Commander to-day, and he said that they 
(i.e., the 1 /4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) had saved the situation. He had 
seen the Commander-in-Chief, and he had agreed." 



CHAPTER IX. 
THE GIVENCHY PERIOD, 7th DECEMBER, 1917, to 3rd SEPTEMBER, 1918. 

On the 6th December, 1917, the remnant of the Battalion marched back from 
TINCOURT to Canvas Camp, FLANICOURT, arriving there at 12 30 p.m. 

The next day we spent in putting up more tents and cleaning up. Captain 
Duggan, M.C., and Captain Hore, M.C., rejoined us from England and 22 Other 
Ranks from the reinforcement camp. 

On the 8th we entrained at 10 a.m. and were taken to MAROEUIL, and 
marched in pouring rain to billets at LATTRE ST. QUENTIN, arriving there 
at 2 30 a.m., where we rested all the following day. 

On the 10th we marched to TINCQUES, and the following day to BRYAS. 

On the 11th we marched to HENCHIN, and the following day to DELETTE, 
where 1 1 Other Ranks reported as reinforcements. Here we entered on a long 
course of training. 

On the 22nd news came that Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Crump had been 
mentioned in despatches. 

On Christmas Day, after Church Parade, we had a splendid Battalion Dinner 
in the local hall and a concert in the evening. 

Snow fell on the 26th and interfered with training. 

Our total casualties for the year 1917 are recorded in the War Diary as 
follows : - 

Wounded & Died of Sick to 

Killed Wounded Missing Missing Gassed Wounds F.A. 

Officers 14 31 2 2 1 19 

Other Ranj^s 137 627 159 11 1 520 

Totals 151 658 161 2 II 2 539 

JANUARY, 1918. 

On New Year's Day we found ourselves still at DELETTE, where we had an 
excellent dinner. Congratulations were received from the King, the Commander- 
in-Chief, the Army Commander, and the Divisional Commander. The following 
days were spent in Company training and bathing. There was a snowstorm on 
the 8th. There were good ranges here, and one of the Companies was on the range 
every day. 




U 
H 
H 

Q 



O 
2 



107 

On the 14th the New Year's Honours List came out. The Military Cross for 
Captain Matthew ; Captain Buckmaster, Corporal J. Collier, Lance-Corporal 
J. Baker, and Private J. Maher being mentioned in despatches. Second Lieutenant 
Ramsbottom joined us as a reinforcement. 

On the 19th the Brigade was inspected at COYAQUE by the Army Commander, 
General Home, who took the opportunity of welcoming the Brigade to his Army. 
The following Officers joined for duty : — Captain T. D. Collett, Second Lieutenants 
H. A. Latham, J. Dawson, W. Hughes, N. Smith, and T. Stanley. 

On the 20th the award of a Bar to the Military Cross to Captain Pruden and 
the Military Cross itself to Second Lieutenant H. Fazackerley were announced. 

There were regular lectures during the period on a variety of subjects, and many 
keen football matches were played. 

On the 25th another batch of Officers-Lieutenant G. B. Wardle and Second 
Lieutenants O. R. Cooper, R. Hodgson, G. H. Frost, E. H. Studdard, and L. O. 
Halliwell- joined us, followed, on the 30th, by a draft from the 1,5th North 
Lancashires, consisting of : — Captains R. W. B. Sparkes, M.C., and B. J. Phillips, 
Second Lieutenants J. S. Hampson, T. H. Scott, W. E. Pasley, J. H. Friar, F. Greaves, 
A. James, T. McLachlan, M.C., J. T. Taylor, and 163 Other Ranks. 

On the 31st the total strength of the Battalion was 56 Officers (including the 
Medical Officer and the Padre) and 942 Other Ranks, there being actually 43 Officers 
and 631 Other Ranks serving with the Battalion. 

Two more Officers, Second Lieutenants Beresford and Horsfall, and two Other 
Ranks arrived on the 2nd February, and Second Lieutenants Symes and G. Haworth 
came on the 3rd, Second Lieutenant R. Smith on the 4th, and Second Lieutenants 
G. Kirkby and H. Bailey on the 6th. 

We had never been so strong in numbers since the battle of FESTUBERT, 
and the rest and daily training had improved our morale, so that when we 
moved away from DELETTE on the 7th February we presented a very different 
spectacle to the handful of survivors who had mustered after the VAUCELLETTE 
FARM affair at the end of November, 1917. 

Esprit-de-corps is a wonderful thing, and has been noticed by many people 
during the war. Officers and men rejoining their Companies after perhaps two 
years' absence would find awaiting them the same Company they had left, although 
perhaps no Officer and only half-a-dozen men remained of it, and though on 
this date the Commanding Officer was the only Officer still present who had left 
England with the Battalion, and there were probably not more than 20 of the 
originals with him, yet in some indefinable way the Battalion was the same one. 
Not perhaps so thoroughly grounded in some ways as it originally had been, but 
with all the cumulative experience of three years of war governing its every move. 

On the 7th February, escorted by the Divisional Band (which was generally 
considered an ominous sign), we marched to ESTREE-BLANCHE, and arrived 
there very wet about 12 noon. Six men were sent to Field Ambulance sick. 

The following day we marched on to CANTRAINNE, arriving there at 3 p.m., 



108 

again very wet, and on the itth on to FONGUIERES, where all were present 
and billeted by 1 p.m. 

Sunday was devoted to Church Parade and cleaning up, the strength of the 
Battalion being recorded as 51 Officers and 7(KS Other Ranks. Second Lieutenant 
P. Adamson, M.C., rejoined us here. 

The next three days were spent in training and preparations for the trenches 
and reconnaissance of the forward area, in this case the LA BASSEE CANAL 
sector. 

On the 14th we relieved the 1 8th Lancashire Fusiliers by daylight. 
Companies marching via BETHUNE and the canal bank. Relief was completed 
by 4 30 p.m. 

Here we found civilians living in the "village line," and small shops ! Our 
dispositions were on a different principle to those which obtained at YPRES, all 
Companies being in the front line, in the order, from right to left — C, B, A, and D, 
each Company being disposed in depth. C Company was on the south of the canal, 
the remainder on the north. Battalion Headquarters was at KINGSCLEARE. 

Here we took up again the old trench routine, nightly patrols, working on 
the trenches, and so forth. 

The position itself was a curious one. GIVENCHY, the scene of so much 
desperate fighting in 1914, was a village completely destroyed, some few remnants 
of walls and a mass of bricks, the remains of a large church, being all that 
remained of a fair-sized village ; it lay on the western slopes of a small knoll, 
which formed the southern and western extremity of the FROMELLES AUBERS 
ridge. The opposing trenches had been dug in 1914, so that the actual crest of 
the knoll was in No Man's Land, and the opposing trench lines were out of 
sight of one another. 

In the intervening years of warfare, GIVENCHY had been one of the most 
active mining centres on the British front, with the result that by the time the 
55th Division took over, the front line on the crest of the knoll consisted of a 
continuous line of craters 800 yards long. 

Both sides occupied the high tops of the craters, but the view was practically 
limited by the top of the crater opposite. The position was one of great importance 
— if the Germans gained possession of the whole of GIVENCHY HILL they would 
command the whole of LA BASSEE CANAL from where it passed through our 
lines to BETHUNE, as well as a large area in close proximity to what remained 
to France of its great northern coalfield. 

The country to the north of the spur was dead i^at for miles, and the roads were 
all overlooked from the crest of the hill. Every effort had been made to strengthen 
the position by the construction of a series of tunnels for shelter during 
bombardments, but the exits from these were not of the best. A certain amount 
of cementing had also been done. By April 9th the GIVENCHY— FESTUBERT 
area was a mass of apron fencing stretching back in depth for several thousand 
yards. 



Map No. 6 



GIVENCHY AREA 
April, 1918 



Map No. 6 



GIVENCHY AREA 
April. 1918 




^ 



o 



10?) 

The dangers of this tunnel system and the difficulties of negotiating the mass 
of wire in this area necessitated careful practice in the action of the troops holding 
it. Posts were manned daily from the tunnel system, this action being timed 
and every Officer, N.C.O., and man thus learnt his way about the whole system of 
defence. 

The action of the Battalion in support was definitely laid down. No counter- 
attack across the open was to be made on account of the number of apron fences ; 
in the event of the enemy penetrating at any point into the line, further penetration 
was to be stopped by the supports, and when the enemy was pocketed he was to be 
cut oft by movement along the trench system against his flanks and rear. All 
posts and strong points were wired in all round, and had orders to fight to the last 
even if surrounded. All this careful preparation bore fruit later, on April 9th, 
which was, as a battle, a most remarkable example of the value of taking the British 
soldier into your confidence and making him understand ~ahy he was ordered to 
do something. 

On the 15th, seven Other Ranks joined us as reinforcements. 

On the 17th, at 3 15 a.m., a silent raiding party of enemy rushed the crater 
post of D Company, under cover of smoke bombs. The enemy were quickly ejected, 
and left two dead in our lines. Our casualties were :— Second Lieutenant 
Westwood and two Other Ranks wounded, three Other Ranks missing. 

The next day we hit back, sending a patrol into the enemy's front line, who 
searched it for 200 yards without finding anybody. The attempt was repeated on 
the following day, and an enemy wiring party was rushed. 

On the 20th the 1 /4th King's Own relieved us by daylight, and we moved into 
support. Headquarters and A, B, and C Companies being in the village line and 
D Company in LE PREOL. The following days were quiet, and we were busy 
repairing the defences. Seven men went sick. 

On the 25th we relieved the 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers in the right sector, by 
daylight, the dispositions being similar but Companies from right to left being — 
D, B, C, and A. Our patrols found enemy machine gun fire very active. Second 
Lieutenant W. H. F. Smith went to Field Ambulance sick. 

The following day was quiet, and at night our patrols were very active trying 
to get into the enemy's lines to secure a prisoner. Ultimately the enemy got 
so "windy" that they sent up their S.O.S., and their barrage came down on 
our support lines. After 40 minutes' retaliation by our guns everything became 
normal. Second Lieutenant James-Alfred was wounded. Thirty-two Other Ranks 
reinforcements joined us. 

The next day was quiet, but the night was lively, four patrols being in No Man's 
Land searching for enemy all night. From enemy machine gun fire we had the 
misfortune to lose Second Lieutenant Adamson, M.C.. who was killed. Second 
Lieutenant Hulme was sent to Field Ambulance sick. 

On the 28th there was the usual amount of artillery activity during the day. 
At 7 30 p.m. a raiding party, consisting of Second Lieutenants Taylor and Cooper 



no 

and 28 Other Ranks, raided an enemy machine gun post but found it empty, and 
could not penetrate further owing to machine gun fire. 

On March 21st the long-expected attack against the Allied front commenced. 
The 5th Army, on the right of the 3rd Army, were driven back, and the enemy 
almost reached AMIENS. In order to fill the hole thus made, the 1st and 
2nd Armies were denuded of reserves, and as a direct result of this the 
l()4th Brigade, which was in Divisional reserve, was constantly being rushed up 
to points of concentration at night in case the Boche attacked, and all ranks 
learnt thoroughly to dislike the code word " Bustle." On about April 1st, at 
the Corps Headquarters, it was decided that the Division must risk all on the 
line GIVENCHY--FESTUBERT, supporting Battalions of Brigades being close up 
behind their battle line. The establishment of the main line of defence on the 
line of FESTUBERT VILLAGE made the position of GIVENCHY difficult, as the 
line of defence of the right Brigade holding the position was 800 yards in front 
of the left Brigade. 
THE BATTLE OF GIVENCHY. 

At about 7 a.m. on the 9th April, in thick fog which made observation 
impossible, the enemy appears to have attacked the left brigade of the 2nd 
Portuguese Division in strength and to have broken into their trenches. 

Shortly after 7 a.m. an attack had developed on the right Brigade of the 40th 
Division, and soon afterwards the attack opened on our front. Map No. 7 is 
a copy of the German map which was captured by us in the course of the 
battle, from which the German plan can be clearly gathered. 

The Ki'lth Infantry Brigade was holding GIVENCHY, with the 1 4th Royal 
Lancaster Regiment on the right and the 1 4th North Lancashire Regiment on the 
left, 2/5th Lancashire Fusiliers in support with three Companies in the Village line 
(a continuation of the FESTUBERT line) and one Company and Headquarters at 
GORRE, some distance back. On the left of the 164th Infantry Brigade, the 
l«).5th Infantry Brigade held the Village line (FESTUBERT) in strength ; north 
of the 55th Division were the Portuguese ; the l()<)th Infantry Brigade was in 
Divisional reserve ; south of the canal the 1st Division held the line. The 
l(J4th Infantry Brigade and the I()5th Infantry Brigade were covered by the 
27(Jth and the 275th Artillery Brigades, or rather groups. 

The amount of artillery available was not great for the frontage to be covered. 
At 4 15 a.m. the enemy opened a heavy bombardment, reaching as far back as 
GORRE ; this was largely a gas bombardment, but all reports showed that no 
mustard gas was being used, which was suspicious, as previous experiences 
further south had shown that, when the enemy really intended to attack, he 
did not use mustard gas for fear of getting into it himself. 

At this time the front line Companies reported by wire that the situation was 
normal, but that all ranks were standing to. The morning was extremely foggy, 
the limit of vision being about 30 yards at the best. About 5 a.m. the code word 
" Bustle " was received from Brigade, and at 6 a.m. a very heavy bombardment 




, _ Cltf5*E— ^' ii»— -. oi^ ■ '*' ""21 



lan Map showing plan oi attack Captured April Wlh, 191. 



"> 



Ill 

of our front line system commenced — some of the heaviest shelling ever 
experienced by the Battalion. 

The enemy's procedure so far had been exactly the same as that used against 
the 5th Army on March 21st. The shelling of the front line system increased 
in intensity, many trench mortars being in action. 

At 8 45 a.m. the front line Companies reported that the enemy was advancing, and 
the S.O.S. went up from the Companies and Battalion Headquarters (SCUTHMOOR 
VILLA), though doubts were freely expressed as to the rockets being seen on account 
of the thick fog, which was accentuated by the smoke and dust of the bombardment ; 
they were seen, however, and the artillery and machine gun barrages opened 
promptly. From this time onwards till midnight savage fighting went on in the 
front line system. 

The German Divisional orders, captured during the course of the day, showed 
that the 4th Ersatz Division, which had been made up to strength and re-equipped, 
had been brought into the line for the purpose of making this attack. This 
Division had been specially selected for this attack, as it had for many months 
held the GIVENCHY FESTUBERT front and was supposed to know the ground 
well. It was strengthened with storm-troops and heavy machine guns. The 
general plan was to attack the GIVENCHY salient on the flanks, striking towards 
WINDY CORNER on the north, and forwards and through SPOIL BANK to 
PONT FIXE on the south ; each of these attacks was to be carried out by 
one Regiment of three Battalions, strengthened with storm-troops and heavy 
machine guns. 

On reaching the objectives WINDY CORNER and PONT FIXE, these two 
attacks were to join hands, and thus cut off the main GIVENCHY position. 

No direct frontal attack was to be made across the craters, but machine guns 
were to be mounted on the commanding crests which were to engage the garrison 
while the encircling attacks were in progress. 

One Battalion of the northern attack had orders on gaining the position 
WINDY CORNER—LE PLANTIN SOUTH to turn north along the FESTUBERT 
VILLAGE line and clean up in co-operation with an attack by one Battalion 
of the Reserve Regiment. 

As soon as these actions had been successful, a general advance was to be 
made on GORRE. 

The attacking Boche had been carefully instructed that "the 55th Division 
is a tired Division, only fit to hold a quiet section of the line." Before nightfall 
he found out his mistake. Owing to the thick fog and the amount of wire, the 
fighting from the commencement of the Boche attack until the afternoon 
consisted of isolated fights carried on all over the area by small parties of Officers 
and men, but all acting on a preconceived plan. 

The garrisons of the strong points located the enemy by means of patrols, so 
that when the fog lifted at about 11 a.m. they instantly opened heavy fire with 
rifles and machine guns. 



l\Z 

The enemy succeeded in getting into one half of the concrete pill box in 
CAVAN LANE, but the crew fought him through the gas curtain while the 
machine gun continued its fire northwards with excellent results, until a counter- 
attack, led by Captain Lonsdale, M.C., from BUNNY HUTCH tunnel entrance, 
freed the crew. 

The enemy actually entered our lines at several places, notably GIVENCHY 
KEEP, PICCADILLY TRENCH, WARE ROAD, MOAT FARM, BATTALION 
HEADQUARTERS, KITCHEN ROAD, and WINDY CORNER, but he was very 
quickly driven out, except at GIVENCHY KEEP, BATTALION HEADQUARTERS, 
and WINDY CORNER ; the situation at these three points was not really 
satisfactory until after mid-day. 

The enemy's northern attack failed to take any strong points covering the 
north flank of the GIVENCHY salient ; it did succeed in taking LE PLANTIN 
SOUTH and in penetrating into WINDY CORNER, but was then held up by the 
garrison and Battalion Headquarters details in HERTS REDOUBT and 
SOUTHMOOR VILLA. 

The enemy looted the Divisional Canteen and established his Battalion 
Headquarters there, thus being immediately in rear of the Battalion sector. A 
counter-attack by the 165th Infantry Brigade re-took LE PLANTIN SOUTH, and 
a local counter-attack organised by Battalion Headquarters, restored the situation 
at WINDY CORNER, but not before the enemy had captured our Aid Post and some 
50 prisoners, including the Padre, and had sent small patrols forward toward 
LONE FARM, who, however, were destroyed by our advanced 18-pounders, which 
blew them to pieces at close range, bits of Boche being scattered on the trees and 
hedges in the vicinity. 

Ultimately the German Battalion Commander and 120 Boches were captured 
in KITCHEN ROAD. These men were all found to be loaded with the contents 
of our Divisional Canteen ; needless to say, they were quickly relieved of their loot. 

The Boche continued to press his troops forward into the angle between 
GIVENCHY KILL and the LE PLANTIN FESTUBERT LINE, suffering very 
severe losses from our heavy and continuous fire on his flanks ; in many instances 
his own machine guns, manned by our Lewis gunners, were turned against him 
with excellent results. He could get no further and was completely disorganised by 
the fog and wire, and the situation on this fiank became stabilised for the moment. 
The l/4th King's Own, who were holding the right sector of the Brigade front, had 
suffered very heavy losses from the preliminary bombardment, owing to the lack 
of shell-proof cover, the trench system having been practically destroyed. 

The enemy^ advancing over the flat between the southern crater and the canal, 
overran the main line of defence, but failed to take the most advanced sap, 
" Death or Glory," situated on the bank of the canal. The garrison of this 
sap, consisting of one Platoon, about 18 strong (of the l;4th King's Own), 
maintained a heavy enfilade fire on the advancing enemy, causing him very 
heavy casualties. Though cut off for five hours, this garrison most gallantly 



113 

held its position, and later in the day sallying forth, captured a machine gun 
and crew. 

Despite the losses incurred from " Death or Glory " sap, the Boche pushed on 
and captured ORCHARD KEEP, the garrison of which had been destroyed by 
shell fire, and penetrated into GUNNERS' SIDING, at its junction with the main 
. communication trench, ORCHARD ROAD. He, however, failed to take either 
MARIE KEEP to the north or SPOIL BANK KEEP to the south. His further 
progress beyond GUNNERS' SIDING was checked by supports pushed up by the 
2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers. His endeavours to push north of GUNNERS' SIDING 
were checked by the few men of the garrison and the anti-tank 18-pounder gun in 
the trench. This gun, though damaged by shell fire to such an extent that the 
breach had to be opened with a pick, fired no fewer than 150 rounds at a range of 
200 yards at the enemy. Time after time the enemy tried to rush it across the 
open or along the trench, but were beaten off by the infantry covering the gun. 

At about 10 45 a.m. the situation had stabilised on the front of our Brigade, 
and was as follows : — 

A large number of the enemy were in the low ground in the angle between 
the north face of the GIVENCHY salient and the LE PLANTIN SOUTH— 
FESTUBERT line. Another large force were on the flat plateau between MARIE 
KEEP, GUNNERS' SIDING, SPOIL BANK KEEP, and DEATH AND GLORY SAP. 
In other words, the enemy were divided into two, and contained in two deep 
pockets. At 1 1 a.m. the fog cleared, and there was a very marked increase in the 
rifle and machine gun fire, as all along the front small parties of troops, acting on 
their own initiative, began at once to attack the nearest Boche in flank and rear, 
forcing him to maintain his position in the pockets. 

Orders were then issued to push every available man up to close the mouths 
of the two pockets. The forces available were divided into two parties, the 
northern of which was to seize GRENADIER ROAD, thereby closing the mouth 
of the northern pocket and cutting off all the enemy in it. 

This force acted with great vigour, and not only gained GRENADIER ROAD, but 
also re-took the commanding saps on the northern craters, giving valuable observation 
over the flat ground to the north and the approaches to the Portuguese front. 

The southern force i" King's Own" and Lancashire Fusiliers) was ordered 
to move up CHEYNE WALK, regain the front line, and then move northwards, 
closing the mouth of the southern pocket. 

This force succeeded in freeing DEATH AND GLORY SAP and regaining the 
main line of defence, but could not regain its crater posts owing to the complete 
destruction of the trenches leading to them. 

These movements commenced at 11 30 a.m., and were covered by a 
concentrated barrage fire by our artillery on CANAL RESERVE, in which the 
enemy were believed to have their reserves massed. During the progress of the 
operations no enemy supports came up, and direct evidence is now available that 
this was due to the artillery barrage. 



114 

It will be remembered that early in the morning about 50 Officers and men 
were captured by the enemy round the First Aid Post at WINDY CORNER, among 
them being the Rev. L. N. Forse, Chaplain to the 4th Loyal North Lancashire 
Regiment. This Officer was many weeks in Germany, and on his return to the 
Brigade on release stated that he and ten other prisoners were taken off by the 
Boche to one of the trenches north of the craters. The ground in this area was 
covered with enemy dead, and our rifle and machine gun fire was very heavy. 
Later the party were moved southwards behind the craters, making for CANAL 
RESERVE trench. At about 1 1 30 a.m. the party were thirty yards or so from the 
trench, which was packed with about 500 enemy massed three deep. Our barrage 
opened and fell right in the trench, doing tremendous execution, unfortunately 
knocking out 23 of the Chaplain's party. After half an hour the barrage ceased, 
and the remnants of the party made for the trench, but found it quite impossible 
to move along it owing to the Boche dead in it. The massed enemy reserves 
appeared to have been completely destroyed by our artillery fire. 

The mouths of the pockets being closed and the enemy surrounded, it was only 
a matter of time before he was forced to surrender in groups. 

There were many acts of bravery on the part of individual Officers and men, 
and many honours were won. 

The outstanding features of the action were : {a) absolute preparedness for 
action, (/;) the sending out of scouts to locate the enemy, (r) the prompt initiative 
shown by all ranks, which was responsible for the breaking up of the enemy's 
attack and his complete defeat. 

By 3 45 p.m. we had regained the whole of our defensive system, with the 
exception of the saps on the southern craters. As soon as darkness came on, an 
attack was organised by the Royal Lancaster Regiment to recover the crater saps 
in their area. This was very successful, a large number of prisoners being taken 

At 2 45 a.m. on April 10th, the Brigadier was able to inform the Division that 
the Brigade held its line intact, including the forward saps, as it had been held on 
April 8th. 

During the afternoon of April {)th two Companies of the South Lancashire 
Regiment came up, one being allotted to each Battalion in the line. The Company 
allotted to the 4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment was posted in GRENADIER 
ROAD, with one Platoon at LE PLANTIN SOUTH, and they did yeoman service 
in relieving our tired men. 

Throughout April 9th the action of our artillery had been admirable. Two 
18-pounder batteries of the 11th Division which could fire on our front were handed 
over to the Brigade, and two heavy batteries belonging to the Corps placed 
themselves under the orders of the Brigade. 

As soon as darkness permitted, all guns north of the canal were withdrawn 
south of the canal, and the guns came out of their emplacements and took up 
positions in the open. 

The 165th Infantry Brigade had maintained its main line intact, but had 



115 

given up its advanced posts. No touch could be obtained with the Portuguese 
on the left, and early in the morning of April 10th the enemy were pushing 
through clear of and north of the lfi5th Infantry Brigade. 

The 165th threw back its left flank at right angles, the defensive flank being 
continued by all units of the Division. 

After 4 p.m. the rest of the day was spent in reorganising the posts and 
mopping up the few remaining enemy left in the sector. Our communication 
trenches were continuously shelled. At about 4 p.m. B Company, 1 , 5th South 
Lancashires, came up as reinforcements and manned our left flank from NEW 
CUT to WINDY CORNER. 

Our casualties were : — 

OFFICERS -Killed : Second Lieutenant L. Brooke, M.C. 

Wounded : Second Lieutenant R. E. Horsfall, G. C. Horner, 

C. Haworth, and P. B. Beresford. 
Missing : Chaplain L. N. Forse (prisoner of war) and Lieutenant 
W. H. Jenkins, Medical Officer. 

OTHER RANKS— Killed 43, Wounded 100, Missing 50. 

No further attacks were made on our front. 

On the 10th, although enemy guns and aeroplanes were very active, an attempt 
was made to clear out the trenches and bury the dead. 

Captain A. A. Turner, R.A.M.C, reported for duty as Medical Officer. 

Captain Collett was wounded on the 11th by enemy shelling, which was heavy, 
especially on Headquarters in the afternoon and a barrage on our lines at 6 p.m. 

Second Lieutenant Vincent, M.C, was wounded by artillery fire on the 12th. 

During the 10th and subsequent days, the artillery with the l()4th Infantry 
Brigade played a big role in breaking up many enemy concentrations against the 
thrown-back flank. The enemy was unable to move his men forward without 
coming under the observation, and very often the close fire of, our northern posts 
and flanks. 

Thus ended a highly-successful action, in which the Battalion played an 
important part. Had the day gone against the Division, the Allies might have had 
to abandon the Pas de Calais. A glance at the map will show the seriousness of 
such a step. 

The Brigade continued, despite heavy artillery bombardment, to hold the line 
until the Division was relieved by the 1st Division. 

During the action of the 9th of April, and the night of the 9th and 10th, the 
following casualties were incurred by the Brigade : — Killed, wounded, and missing : 
35 Officers, 659 Other Ranks. 

The enemy lost about 600 killed in our lines and NO MAN'S LAND. No 
estimate can, however, be made of his casualties in his own lines, but, judging 
from the reports of returned prisoners of war, these were exceptionally heavy. 

The following captures were made :-- Prisoners: 641, including many Officers and 
two Battalion Commanders ; 100 light and heavy machine guns, and one Regimental 



116 

Band. In addition, on April llth, an Austrian artillery Officer was killed on the 
Red Dragon Crater, and the identifications obtained from him were the first direct 
evidence of the presence of Austrians on the Western Front. A very fine range- 
finding instrument was captured at the same time. This instrument was presented 
by the Battalion to the West Lancashire Field Artillery. 




The Remnant of GIVENCHY KEEP, I920. 

On the 13th the communication trenches were practically cleared of blocks. 
The keeps were heavily shelled in the afternoon. Fourteen men arrived from the 
reinforcement camp. 

On the 14th enemy artillery was still very active, and all preparations were 
made to meet further attacks. 

On the 15th the enemy annoyed us by persistent harassing fire throughout 
the day. 

Second Lieutenant Westwood was killed and one Other Rank wounded. 
The new Padre, Captain R. R. Schofield, arrived. 



117 

On the 16th, amidst active enemy artillery fire, the 1st Black Watch relieved us, 
the relief being completed with three casualties. We marched back to BEUVRY, 
where we em- 'bussed and were taken to LOZINGHAM. 

Captain Hore, M.C., went to England sick, and Second Lieutenant E. M. 
Studdart to Field Ambulance. 

127 Other Ranks arrived from reinforcement camp. 

The Battalion was not billeted until 4 a.m. 

The next few days were spent in reorganising and training. Captain 
Carmichael and Second Lieutenants Greaves and Taylor and five Other Ranks 
going sick. 

On the 22nd we went en masse to the Divisional Theatre. 

On the 23rd we em- 'bussed at 7 a.m. for VAUDRICOURT, where we 
arrived at 9 30 a.m. 

An advance party was sent to take over the Support Battalion area of the 
GIVENCHY sector. A "B team" of seven Officers and 110 Other Ranks went to 
VURBURE. We em- 'bussed again at 8 p.m. and went to ARMEGUIN, whence 
we marched to relieve the 1st Northamptons in support. 

C Company were at WINDY CORNER and D Company at PONT FIXE, 
A, B, and Headquarters being on the canal bank. We had one man killed and 
one man wounded. 

The next day on the whole was quiet. There was some shelling at WINDY 
CORNER with 4.2 's One Other Rank was killed. 

The 25th was quiet up to 9 p.m., when a heavy barrage was placed on our 
support lines. The whole Battalion was on working parties by night. Our 
support lines were again bombarded at 2 20 p.m. on the 26th. 

Platoons were detached and sent to the Lancashire Fusiliers and the King's 
Own in case of need, and A Company remained in the VILLAGE LINE all night. 

Eight Other Ranks were wounded on this and the following day. 

The following are extracts from various telegrams, letters, and Press cuttings 
referring to the Battle of GIVENCHY :— 

(SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTARY DESPATCH.) 

THE 55th DIVISION AT GIVENCHY. 

Headquarters, France, Monday, 1 15 p.m. 
On the morning of the German attack on April 9th, I9I8, the 55th (West 
Lancashire) Division (Territorial) was holding a front of about 6, (MM) yards, 
extending from the LA BASSEE CANAL to just south of RICHEBOURG L'AVOUE, 
where its line joined that held by the Portuguese. The enemy's attack on the 
southern portion of this front was delivered by all three Regiments of the 
4th Ersatz Division, which was well up to strength. A captured Divisional Order 
issued by the General Staff of this German Division, and dated April 6th, 1918, 
shows that its objectives were " the ground and the British position in the triangle 



118 

formed by GIVENCHY— FESTUBERT GORRE." The following passages troiii 

this captured order are of special interest : — 

In our attack our three Regiments will be opposed by at most six 
Companies in front and at most two Reserve Battalions in FESTUBERT 
and GIVENCHY. One Battalion in Divisional Reserve is south of the 
LA BASSEE CANAL in LE PREOL. It will be prevented by our powerful 
artillery fire from taking part in the fight for FESTUBERT and GIVENCHY. 
The troops are elements of the English 55th Division, which, after being 
engaged on the SOMME, has suffered heavy losses in FLANDERS and at 
CAMBRAI, and was described by prisoners in March, 1918, as a Division 
fit to hold a quiet sector, that is below the average quality. 

The order containing the passages quoted above was distributed among all 
Officers and Under-Officers of the 4th Ersatz Division down to Platoon 
Commanders, presumably with a view to encouraging the troops prior to their 
attack, and in the belief that the opposition met with would not be very serious. 
If this was his expectation the enemy was most signally disappointed. 

Throughout the early part of the morning of April 9th, the 55th Division 
beat off all attacks on its forward zone, and maintained its line intact. Later, 
when the German infantry had broken through the Portuguese positions on its 
left, the Division formed a defensive flank facing north-east on the line 
GIVENCHY -FESTUBERT to the neighbourhood of LE TOURET. This line it 
maintained practically unchanged until relief, through six days of almost 
continual fighting, in the course of which it beat off repeated German attacks 
with the heaviest losses to the enemy, and took nearly 1,(KK) prisoners. 

At one time, on the first day of his attack, the enemy's troops forced their 
way into GIVENCHY and FESTUBERT. Both villages were shortly afterwards 
regained by the 55th Division as the result of a highly-successful counter-attack, 
in which several hundred Germans were captured. All further attempts on the 
part of the enemy to carry these positions broke down before the resolute 
defence of the 55th Division. Though he succeeded on April 1 1th in entering 
a post north of FESTUBERT, he was thrown out again by a counter-attack, 
and on the night of April I'ith the 55th Division improved its position in this 
neighbourhood, capturing a German post and taking several prisoners. 

Next day, during the afternoon, the enemy heavily bombarded the whole 
front held by the Division between GORRE and the LAWE CANAL, and 
subsequently attacked in strength. He was once more repulsed with heavy loss 
by the most gallant and successful defence of a Division which he had been 
pleased to describe as consisting of second-class troops. 



TELEGRAMS RECEIVED. 

From Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig, K.T., G.C.B., G.C.V.O., K.C.I.E., 
April 10th, 1918 : — 
" Please convey to General Jeudwine and to all Officers and men of the 
55th Division my congratulations on their splendid fighting yesterday, especially 
at FESTUBERT and GIVENCHY." 

From General Sir H. Plumer, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., Commanding 2nd Army, 
April 9th, 1918 : 

" Many congratulations on your success at GIVENCHY from the 2nd Army." 



119 

From Lieutenant-General Sir H. S. Home, K.C.B., K.C.M.G., Commanding 1st Army, 
April })th, 1918 :- 
" Sincere congratulations to you and all ranks of the 55th Division on your 
splendid defence to-day." 

From Lieutenant-General Sir R. Haking, K.C.B., K.C.M.G., Commanding 
XI. Corps, April 10th, 1918 : — 

" I wish to thank you, your Brigade, Battalion, and Company Commanders, 
for the splendid manner in which you have repelled the enemy's attack along 
your whole front and formed a very wide flank on your left when the Division 
there was driven back. 

" The fine offensive spirit displayed by Officers and men on this occasion 
reflects the highest credit upon the whole Division. Although heavily attacked 
along your whole front and your left flank turned, you have been successful in 
maintaining your original line and even gaining some ground and capturing over 
700 prisoners. 

" The co-operation of the Artillery, Engineers, and Pioneer Battalion was 
excellent throughout, and it will be a great pleasure to me to report the matter to 
the Army Commander." 

From the Earl of Derby, K.G., Secretary of State for War, April 10th, 1918 :— 
"Well done, 55th ! You have done splendidly, as you always do." 

From the XI. Corps, April Ilth, 1918:— 

' ' The Corps Commander wishes his congratulations conveyed to all ranks of 
the 55th Division on again beating off German attacks." 

From G.O.C. 1st Division, April 11th, 1918 : — 

" On behalf of the 1st Division I wish to convey to you and all ranks of the 
55th Division our admiration of your stout fight at GIVENCHY and FESTUBERT." 

From the 42nd Division, April 20th, 1918 :— 

"All ranks of the 42nd East Lancashire Division most heartily congratulate 
the 55th West Lancashire Division on their magnificent defence of GIVENCHY. 
They are glad to be able to think that the work and plans commenced by them stood 
their Lancashire brothers in good stead." 

From the 51st Division, April 10th, 1918 :— 

"Heartiest congratulations from all ranks 51st (Highland) Division on the 
fine victory won by you yesterday." 

From the 57th Division : — 

"All ranks 57th Division congratulate 55th Division on their fine fight." 

From the Mayor of Preston, April 13th, 1918 : — 

" I have heard with greatest admiration of the splendid work of the Officers 
and men of your Division. We are very proud of them." 

EXTRACTS FROM NEWSPAPERS. 
"The Times," April 11th, 1918;— 

55th DIVISION'S FINE FIGHTING. 

(From our Special Correspondent.) 

" The breach made by the Portuguese retirement threw an enormous strain 

on the British 55th Division on the extreme right, which held the positions about 

GIVENCHY. The Lancashire men threw back their left to make a flank on that 



120 

side, and then began the defence of GIVENCHY, which will be remembered as one 
of the brilliant incidents of this war. The ground here was of some importance, 
as being almost the only exception to the general flatness of the bat le area. Three 
times, it is said, at least, the German masses succeeded in breaking a way into 
GIVENCHY, once during the course of the day, and twice during the evening and 
night, only to be thrown out again by the most dashing counter-attacks. This 
morning GIVENCHY and all our original line remained in our hands, and I believe 
it still remains, and, out of the prisoners taken, over 700 were captured by the 
Lancashire men." 

[Note. Of these, 560 were taken by the 1 4th North Lancashire Regiment. 

"The Times," April 12th, 1918: — 

" The section of attack was delivered in great strength, some eleven or twelve 
Divisions being used on not more than 17,000 yards, and the weight of the impact 
drove back the Portuguese front at the centre. It was the magnificent stand of the 
55th Lancashire Division at GIVENCHY which prevented what might have been 
a rather serious disaster. Of the behaviour of our men in this fighting round 
GIVENCHY nothing could be said in too high praise. This morning the Germans 
were still attacking here, and in vain." 

"Daily Mail," April 15th, 1918: — 

" For the work of such Divisions as the 9th, 51st, and 55th no praise can be 
too high, no words of laudation extravagant. With their backs to the wall they 
have shown that they are capable of reaching new heights of heroism, as great as 
any the glorious past has known." 

"Daily Mail," April Kith, 1918:- 

" They have fought with a gallantry and endurance worthy of their race, and 
the heroism of the 55th (Lancashire Territorial) Division is worthily celebrated by 
Sir Douglas Haig in a special despatch. Their country may indeed be proud of 
these men who are so lavishly giving their blood on her behalf, and she will follow 
their efforts with her love and prayers." 

" Le Petit Parisien," April 12th, 1918 :— 

" At the beginning of the attack, after the Portuguese had been forced back, 
the plan of the German High Command was checked thanks to the indomitable 
resistance which was offered by the British right flank. There the enemy found 
established a Lancashire Division the 55th which will certainly be mentioned 
in the communique. It is the least that can be done for this Division. For ten 
hours three German Divisions tried in vain to dislodge it." 

" Le Matin," April 13th, 1918:— 

" It was there that the 55th Division as I have already told you- held on 
and triumphed. I wanted to see with my own eyes some of these bravest of the 
brave. But before seeing them I had already seen their prisoners. . . . 

" 'One should be almost proud to have been beaten by such men,' said 

one prisoner who belonged to the German nobility. 

" An Officer of the highest rank said to them (the 5.5th) : 

" ' You have accomplished one of the finest feats-of-arms — perhaps the 

finest of the whole war.' 

"It is true. They had fought to the limit of the impossible." 



12i 

On the 28th we moved into the right sector and relieved the I 4th King's 
Own A Company to MAIRIE REDOUBT, B Company to DEATH OR GLORY 
SAP, C and D to GUNNERS' SIDING. The sap had been heavily trench-mortared 
before we took over, and parts of it were blown in. One Other Rank was killed 
and four wounded. The award of the French Croix de Guerre to Sergeant 
J. Cookson was announced. 

On the 29th, DEATH OR GLORY SAP was heavily " minnied." Two Other 
Ranks were killed and three wounded. On the 30th, there was some heavy 
shelling, though only one man was wounded, but we lost one man killed and one 
wounded from minenwerfer the following day. On the 2nd we were relieved by 
the 1 5th King's Liverpool Regiment, 12 men being wounded in the course of the 
day, and went back to rest. 

This rest was thoroughly enjoyed by the whole Battalion, being the first real 
rest since the battle of GIVENCHY. The billets were good, and the canteen well 
stocked. 

On the 8th, we moved back to the line, Major Duggan, M.C., being in command, 
and relieved the l/7th King's Liverpool Regiment in the right sector. 

Wiring and working under difficult conditions continued until the 12th, three 
men being killed and eight wounded, two missing, and seven sick during the tour. 
We were relieved on the night of the 12th by the 2/5th Lancashire Fusiliers, and 
moved back to support. 

On the 14th, A Company carried out an operation against the enemy's front 
line post in WILLOW DRAIN, penetrating his line at one point and establishing 
a block which they held till about 10 30 p.m., being then obliged to withdraw 
by strong counter-attack. The front and support lines were heavily bombarded 
from () 15 p.m. till about 11 p.m., harassing fire being kept up until 2 a.m. 

The raiding party sustained heavy casualties. Going across No Man's Land — a 
mass of shell holes — Second Lieutenant Ibbotson was wounded and then killed by 
a shell ; Second Lieutenant Milne was killed by a bomb while passing through the 
enemy wire ; and Second Lieutenant Cooper was wounded by a bullet in the throat, 
causing the loss of his voice, but gallantly went on writing his orders in his pocket 
book and carrying on until killed by a second bullet*. There is no record of the 
other casualties, but they numbered about 50. 

This raid was supported by a creeping barrage, the ground in the neighbourhood 
being blanketed throughout by artillery and Stokes' mortars. 

On the 1 7th we relieved the 1,4th King's Own in the left GIVENCHY 
sector, A Company at PLANTAIN SOUTH, B Company left front Company, 

*Two years afterwards his parents received this pocket book. The last entries are as follow : — 
" Remainder of section to follow L C. Price Tel! Sergeant. ' 
" You have done damn well, but you aren't finished yet ! Read this to him." 
" Bomb the Boche out. See that gap in the parapet ? I want to get the whole section 
there. " 

" Can we get a message back to Capt. Swaine ? I suggest let one man take Farnworth 

back and also message. Tell C. A Co " 

So it ends. 



122 

C Company right front Company, D Company holding the KEEPS. Four Other 
Ranks were killed and Second Lieutenant Chapman and 19 Other Ranks 
wounded during the tour, whicli came to an end on the 20th, when the 
l/6th King's Liverpool Regiment relieved us at 2 10 a.m. 

The Battalion then moved back to rest billets. 

The period now under review was known as the " bustle " period, as that was 
the code word on receipt of which all kinds of moves were to take place which 
cannot here be detailed. 

In our rest billets at VAUDRICOURT we went through the usual training and 
bathing routine until the 2Gth, when we relieved the 1,7th King's Liverpool 
Regiment in the GIVENCHY left sector. During the rest Second Lieutenant 
Hampson was killed and four men wounded. 

At this time a stringent order was issued that anyone damaging crops was to 
be court-martialled (rather a contrast to the same period in the previous year, when 
the fields which formed our training grounds being covered with young corn, we 
had been ordered to disregard the crops entirely. Obeying this order went literally 
against the grain!). 

On the 23th May the following honours were announced : — 

Bar to Military Medal :— Corporal Pendlebury, M.M., and Lance-Corporal 
P. Wyre, M.M. 

Military Medal : — Sergeants R. Parkinson and A. Lowe, Corporal J. Gradwell, 
Privates A. Hommans, G. Rotherham, T. Marsh, W. Goodram, J. Meadows, 
R. Williams, F. Lloyd, J. Read, L. Cunliffe, and T. Farnworth. 

We had five men wounded on the 27th. 

On the 28th, described in the War Diary as " a quiet day," a small party of the 
enemy entered one of our posts in PICCADILLY at 12 30 a.m. It was 
immediately bombed out without casualties to us. The attempt was repeated 
the following day, but frustrated by our Lewis gunners and rifle grenadiers. 
Thirteen men were wounded in the next three days. 

On the 1st June, the enemy bombarded us heavily with mustard gas shells and 
shrapnel for two hours, killing Second Lieutenant Greaves and wounding Captain 
Lonsdale and 10 Other Ranks. 

On the 2nd, also described as " a quiet day," six Other Ranks were killed and 
Second Lieutenant Dawson and 23 Other Ranks were wounded, and on the following 
day two killed and 15 wounded. The Battalion was relieved in the evening by 
the 1 4th King's Own, when we went back to support. Working parties occupied 
us for the next few days, three men being killed, one missing, and five wounded 
during the period. 

On the 8th, on relief by the 1 6th King's Liverpool Regiment, we moved back 
to rert billets at VAUDRICOURT. 

The following appeared in the King's Birthday Honour List : — 

Mentioned in Despatches : — Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Crump, Privates 
R. Worden and J. Bates. 



123 

Distinguished Service Order : — Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Crump. 

Bars to Military Cross -.— Major Duggan, M.C., Captain Lonsdale, M.C., 
Second Lieutenant H. Fazackerley, M.C. 

Military Cross : — Captain D. Carmichael, Lieutenant A. Bardsley, Second 
Lieutenants H. Bailey and C. Milne. 

Distinguished Conduct Medal : — Company Sergeant-Major Ireland, Sergeants 
J. Miller, M.M., and A. Atkinson, Privates F. Reddish, J. Livesey, and 
T. Parkes, M.M. 

Companies were thoroughly reorganised. Training was carried out and sports 
were held. 

On the 14th June, Major T. G. Williams, M.C, 1 7th King's Liverpool 
Regiment, took over command of the Battalion. On the same day the 
Battalion relieved the 1 /7th King's Liverpool Regiment in the right GIVENCHY 
sector. The usual routine was carried out during the tour. The enemy 
bombarded the sector on the 19th and again on the 20th at 3 a.m., when he put 
down a severe barrage of 4.2 's and some mustard gas. We were relieved on the 
night of the 23rd by the 1 4th King's Own. During the tour our casualties were : — 
Second Lieutenant Pasley and eight Other Ranks killed, and 17 Other Ranks 
wounded, Lieutenants Hyndson and Pierce, Second Lieutenant Boddington, and 
16 Other Ranks going sick to hospital. 

Our bombing post in HALF-MOON TRENCH was not more than 20 yards 
distant from a bombing post in the enemy's sector, and after a careful 
reconnaissance had been made under the supervision of the Officer Commanding 
B Company (Captain R. H. Smith, M.C), Second Lieutenant Weatherhill 
volunteered to take out a patrol the following night and raid the enemy's 
trenches. The night was a particularly dark one, but, unfortunately, the enemy 
discovered the patrol getting out of the trenches, and the attacking party was 
subjected to a heavy fire from machine guns and bombs. The patrol remained 
out for about an hour, but finally they returned to the trenches, and it was 
found that Second Lieutenant Weatherhill was missing and two Other Ranks 
wounded. Another patrol was immediately sent out by the Officer Comrrianding 
B Company to find out what had happened to Second Lieutenant Weatherhill, 
but this and other subsequent patrols met with no success. 

On the 27th, on relief, we went back into support, and at 5 a.m. on the 
following day to rest billets at VAUDRICOURT. Here the G.O.C presented 
medals and ribbons to Officers and men of the Battalion on the 30th. 

On the 1st July, at the Brigade Horse Show, the Battalion did very well, 
carrying off the Championship Cup and six first prizes, which in itself was 
sufficient reward to the Officer Commanding Transport (Lieutenant A. Bardsley, 
M.C.) and all Other Ranks. It might here be mentioned that, under the 
supervision of Lieutenant A. Bardsley, the Battalion Transport did very well 
in the Division Show and later on obtained first prize at the Corps Transport 
Show. 



124 

On the 3rd we moved up in position to the line and relieved the 1 /7th King's 
Liverpool Regiment in support in the GIVENCHY sector, one man being killed 
and four wounded, and two more wounded the following day. 

On the evening of the 7th we relieved the 2 5th Lancashire Fusiliers on the 
left sector a very difficult relief, Companies having to move up their sectors 
through a heavy bombardment of 4.2's, 5.9's, whizzbangs, and minenwerfers. This 
was the enemy's retaliation for our bombardment in connection with a raid carried 
out on our flank by the 1st Cameronians. One Other Rank was killed and six 
wounded. The next few days were spent in the usual routine and working and 
wiring parties, and were fairly quiet, our casualties for the tour being : Seven 
Other Ranks killed and eight wounded. 

On the Kith we were relieved by the I 6th King's Liverpool Regiment, and 
moved back to LE PREOL, where we stood-to for the night, moving back to 
VAUDRICOURT the following morning. 

On the 20th a dance for Officers and men took place in the Recreation Hut. 

On the 22nd we relieved the 1 5th King's Liverpool Regiment in the right 
GIVENCHY sector. 

No prisoners having been captured by the Corps for about a fortnight, 
the Divisional Commander was very anxious that prisoners should be obtained 
for the purpose of identification, and with this end in view, on the 27th, two 
reconnaissances by Second Lieutenant Archibald on the old British Line opposite 
ORCHARD ROAD during the morning, and by Second Lieutenant Dawson 
opposite FINCHLEY ROAD SAP in the afternoon, found both enemy posts 
unoccupied. It was therefore decided that these two Officers should take part 
in a silent daylight raid, and on the following day both Officers took over 
patrols. Second Lieutenant Dawson's patrol met with no success, but Second 
Lieutenant Archibald's patrol succeeded in capturing three of the enemy and 
one machine gun and returned to our trenches with no casualties and without 
a single shot having been fired by either side. 

Congratulatory telegrams were received by the Officer Commanding and 
Second Lieutenant Archibald was awarded for his gallantry the Military Cross 
and the Non-Commissioned Officer who accompanied him was awarded the 
Military Medal. 

On the 29th, at his own request. Second Lieutenant Dawson again tried to 
effect an entry into the enemy's line, and was successful in finding three men 
and a strong working party, which the patrol promptly bombed. Our casualties 
were nil, and from documents subsequently captured from the enemy it would 
appear that these raids had a depressing effect on the enemy's morale. 

On the 30th, Second Lieutenant Archibald and two Other Ranks again entered 
the post and reconnoitred the trench, finding quantities of bombs. Later in the 
day they returned to the enemy's trench, collected all explosives in a dugout, and 
blew it up. We were relieved that night by the l/4th King's Own, and went back 
into support. The casualties during the tour were eight Other Ranks wounded. 



125 

On the 1st August we found ourselves in the GIVENCHY VILLAGE Lines. 

On the ,'<rd we tried to select a shooting team for the Army competition, but 
had to give it up owing to hostile shelling. That night we moved back to rest billets 
at VAUDRICOURT. Boxing, cricket, dances, and Divisional Horse Shows were 
the chief events of the next few days. 

The Battalion relieved the 1 /6th King's Liverpool Regiment in the left 
GIVENCHY sector on the 9th. All ranks of the Battalion, with the exception of 
those actually on sentry posts, were employed during the day on wire carrying and 
making " concertinas " with a view to strengthening the defences, and during this 
tour the Battalion accomplished a great improvement in the wire defences. 

Things were quiet, except for wire-cutting by our artillery, up till the 15th, 
when we had two hours' shelling by yellow cross gas shells, projected from trench 
mortars. We moved back to support in the evening, being relieved by the 
2/5th Lancashire Fusiliers. During the tour. Second Lieutenants Archibald, 
Cowan, and Shell were wounded, and four Other Ranks were wounded and 
14 Other Ranks were gassed. The next few days in support were occupied 
by bathing, working and carrying parties, the casualties being : Three Other 
Ranks killed, 18 wounded, and Second Lieutenants Dixon, Dawson, and (il Other 
Ranks gassed. 

On the 23rd, we moved in to hold the right and left sub-sectors during 
the capture of the craters by the 1,4th King's Own and the 2 5th Lancashire 
Fusiliers, which operation was successfully accomplished. 

There was a good deal of shelling during these days, Second Lieutenant 
Fazackerley, M.C., and one Other Rank being killed, one Other Rank gassed, and 
Second Lieutenant Pride and 10 Other Ranks wounded. The loss of Second 
Lieutenant Fazackerley, M.C., was keenly felt by all ranks of the Battalion. 

On the 27th we went back to rest billets at VAUDRICOURT. 

On the 3rd September we relieved the 1 /6th King's Liverpool Regiment in the 
GIVENCHY left sub-sector. The craters were heavily shelled between 4 and 6 p.m. 
with 5.9 's and blue and yellow cross gas. Reconnoitring patrols pushed out at 
daylight and established posts on the west edge of CHAPPELLE ST. ROCHE. 
Second Lieutenants Tennant, Kershaw, and Scott, and 21 Other Ranks were 
gassed, 1 killed, and 1 wounded. 

The change of mental attitude in this chapter and in the next is very 
noticeable. No longer do we take part in costly attacks on a wide front or 
beat off similar attacks by the enemy, nor do we sit still and merely harass 
him. We feel ourselves winning at last — the game becomes more exciting as 
we begin to press, and then to follow, a beaten enemy. 



CHAPTER X. 

THE ADVANCE. 

On the 1st September, 1918, orders were received that Infantry Brigades 
in the line must be prepared to follow up the enemy rapidly should he 
commence to withdraw on the Divisional front, fighting patrols to make good 
what ground they could ; this was consequent upon reports of fires and 
explosions behind the enemy's line and information from enemy prisoners. 

On the 4th, patrols having reported the evacuation of the enemy's front 
line trenches. Battalion Headquarters moved up from WINDY CORNER to 
GIVENCHY KEEP TUNNEL. D Company secured a prisoner. One of our night 
patrols encountered enemy at ROCHE ALLEY, and a sharp fight ensued ; we left 
one man severely wounded, who was brought in by a daylight patrol. Lieutenant 
King and 3H Other Ranks were gassed, one Other Rank killed, and Second 
Lieutenant Davies and two Other Ranks wounded. 

The following day, daylight patrols continued to push up ROCHE ALLEY and 
CUPOLA ALLEY, and established outposts, our own line being in advance of the 
right Battalion. The enthusiasm of all ranks to push forward was much marked, 
and the respective Companies vied with each other in their endeavour to establish 
posts farthest east of any in the Battalion or in the Division. Four Other Ranks 
were wounded and 12 Other Ranks gassed. 

On the (ith there was a little scattered shelling ; we were relieved in daylight 
by the 1 4th King's Own, and went into support. The next two days were occupied 
with carrying parties, which involved hard and continuous work owing to the state 
of the trenches and the increasing distance between the front line posts and the 
reserves. We had one Other Rank killed, seven wounded, and three gassed. 

On the 9th we relieved the King's Own again, and patrols located the enemy 
at APSE HOUSE. The following night a patrol attacked him, but without success. 

The 11th was very wet, and on the 12th we were relieved by the 
2/5th Lancashire Fusiliers and moved back to support. The casualties during 
the tour were : ,S Other Ranks killed, Second Lieutenants Jones, Daniels, 
Marsden and Thomas and 18 Other Ranks wounded, 1 Other Rank gassed. 

The weather began to improve. The enemy carried out as usual the daily 
strafe on the craters on the 13th. Two Other Ranks were killed, one wounded, 
and two gassed. 

On the 14th, four Platoons from A and C Companies were detailed for 
carrying parties to the 2 /5th Lancashire Fusiliers, who were attacking 



127 

CANTELEUX TRENCH at 1 30 p.m. The operation was classed as unsuccessful 
owing to strong counter-attack and heavy shelling, but they secured 10 prisoners. 
Second Lieutenant L. B. Smith was killed whilst assisting the attack of the 
Fusiliers, and six Other Ranks were wounded. The 1 7th King's Liverpool 
Regiment relieved us, and we were taken back by 'buses to VAUDRICOURT, 
where we rested, trained, and carried out the usual recreational programme. 

On the 20th, Lieutenant-Colonel T. G. Williams, M.C., went on leave, and the 
Battalion was then under the command of Major A. E. Entwistle. 

On the 21st, the Divisional boundaries having been altered, we relieved the 
ISth Gloucesters on the CANAL, A Company taking over the outpost line north 
of the CANAL, B Company the outpost line south of the CANAL. The relief passed 
off without incident. 

On the 22nd, B Company pushed their forward posts out about 400 yards. 
Much enemy harassing fire on this and the following days. The weather broke 
on the 23rd. On the 25th, Companies changed over. 

On the 2Sth, we were relieved by the 1 4th King's Own, and went into support 
at BARGE HOUSE. The casualties during the tour were : 5 Other Ranks 
killed. Second Lieutenant Kirkby and 10 Other Ranks wounded. 

On the 30th, B and D Companies attacked the DISTILLERY, capturing 
58 prisoners, but were forced back to their original line later in the day. Second 
Lieutenant Bryne and three Other Ranks were killed. Second Lieutenant Cairns 
and 4() Other Ranks were wounded, and two Other Ranks missing. 

On the 1st October, Major H. J. G. Duggan returned from the Senior 
Officers' Course, Aldershot, and took over command from Major Entwistle. 
On the same day, at 6 15 a.m., B and D Companies, each reinforced by two 
Platoons of C Company, attacked and captured the DISTILLERY and machine gun 
posts on the right and left of it ; 23 prisoners and four machine guns were taken ; 
Second Lieutenant Griffiths, Parkinson, Haworth, and Bowler and six Other 
Ranks were wounded and 13 Other Ranks killed. At night we were relieved 
by six Platoons of the King's Ov/n, and moved back into support. 

On the 2nd, early morning patrols having reported that the enemy was 
retiring along his whole front, we moved forward, Headquarters being in MARIE 
KEEP. The movement was continued on the following day, 2 Other Ranks 
being killed and 5 Other Ranks wounded and missing. 

On the 4th, we went back to positions of assembly in LA BASSEE, going into 
reserve billets on the 5th. 

On the 5th, Lieutenant-Colonel T. G. Williams returned from leave and 
resumed his command. 

On the 8th, we marched to billets at BETHUNE, and were comfortably billeted 
by 4 p.m. Here Second Lieutenant W. E. Crossley, M.C., M.M., Captain 
R. J. Cross (Chaplain), and Second Lieutenants Blount, Towers, and Kennett joined 
for duty. 



\2H 

On the 12th, we went up in lurries and relieved the 1 Sth King's Own as 
outpost Battahon on the left Brigade front, Battalion Headquarters being at 
LATTRE. 

On the l.'Uh, our patrols at dawn found the enemy very alert, and located 
several machine gun posts west of the HAUTE DEULE CANAL. Some harassing 
fire on our forward posts during the day. Two Other Ranks were killed. Second 
Lieutenant Taylor and nine Other Ranks missing, and Second Lieutenant Crossley 
and one Other Rank wounded. 

On the I'fth, the enemy artillery became more active, and our patrols were 
heavily engaged by machine guns. The marshes were found almost impassable, 
the water being eight feet deep in places. Our sentry posts located in the marshes 
were unremitting in their attempts to push forward, and the spirit of all ranks, 
despite the conditions, was excellent. Seven Other Ranks were killed and 

11 Other Ranks wounded. Second Lieutenant R. G. Latham joined for duty. 

On the 15th the harassing fire continued. Our patrols were very active, but 
did not advance. Captain W. L. Price and five Other Ranks were wounded. 
Second Lieutenant H. C. Saville joined for duty. 

On the 16th, patrols reported some of the enemy posts unoccupied. At 

12 noon D Company and two Platoons of B Company crossed the HAUTE DEULE 
CANAL at LES ANSCRUILLES, and proceeded to attack from the flank the 
strongly-held bridgehead at BAC DE WAVRIN, A and C Companies attacking 
frontally at the same time. The attack was under the personal supervision of 
Major H. J. G. Duggan, M.C. The bridgehead was taken at 9 p.m., and patrols 
pushed on to the SECLIN CANAL. Pontoon bridges were thrown acrcjs the 
Canals. Lieutenant Bury and Second Lieutenant Taylor and one Other Rank were 
wounded. 

On the 17th, the 2 Sth Lancashire Fusiliers and the 1 4th King's Own passed 
through our outposts at 5 a.m. The Battalion reorganised and assembled at 
WAVRIN. At 4 p.m. we moved to NOYELLES, and were billeted by 11 p.m. 
Second Lieutenant Taylor died of wounds. Second Lieutenant Hailwood and 
two Other Ranks were killed and seven Other Ranks were wounded. 

On the ISth, at 3 a.m., we moved into the main outpost line of resistance east 
of D'ENCHEMONT. 

On the 19th, at 7 a.m., the Battalion passed through the outpost line held by 
the King's Own on the LAMARQ RIVER, and advanced- A and C Companies 
in front and B and D in support. The enemy resistance was practically nil, and 
the villages of CYSOING, BOURGHELLES and WANNEHAIN and ESPLECHIN 
were captured. At night we took up outpost positions, with B and D Companies 
along the line of resistance, on the high ground east of WANNEHAIN ; 
A Company found the outposts to the east. One Other Rank was wounded. 

On the 20th, the 2 Sth Lancashire Fusiliers marched through our outpost lines 
and we moved into Brigade reserve. One Other Rank was wounded. 



129 

On the 21st, in the afternoon, we moved into billets at FROIDMONT. 
At 2 a.m. on the 22nd, we relieved the 1 4th King's Own in the outpost line — 
C Company on the right, D on the left, A and B Companies in support. 
We attempted to advance, but were unable to do so owing to heavy machine gun 
and artillery fire, five Other Ranks being killed, 14 wounded, and one missing. 
Our daylight patrols found the enemy was holding a strong line with many 
machine guns. At the time of relief it was understood that the enemy had been 
cleared out of the wood in O 33 b and d, but when the Officer Commanding 
D Company (Captain Montague Smith) attempted to enter the wood he was met 
by strong machine gun fire. 

The Officer Commanding D Company planned two attacks on the wood, but 
the enemy were so strong as to make these unsuccessful. Artillery assistance was 
asked for, and at 4 30 p.m., under an artillery barrage, D Company attacked 
and was completely successful in capturing the wood, taking 18 prisoners and four 
machine guns. Outposts were pushed up in front of the wood, and at dusk the 
Company was relieved by B Company (Captain R. H. Smith, M.C.]. 

At 2 a.m. on the 23rd, we drove off an enemy counter-attack, but at 4 30 a.m. 
a strong counter-attack delivered from the flank with the strength of about two 
Companies forced our posts to withdraw from the wood. There was a thick fog 
at the time of the attack, and, communications having broken down, no assistance 
was forthcoming from our artillery. The Officer Commanding B Company, 
however, immediately organised Company Headquarters and a Platoon of 
A Company and delivered a quick counter-attack, which, whilst it was not 
successful in regaining the wood, effectually managed to establish us some 
little distance our side of the wood. We were relieved by the 2 3th Lancashire 
Fusiliers about midnight. Second Lieutenants Chambers and Blount and 
33 Other Ranks were missing, one Other Rank killed, and 25 Other Ranks 
wounded. We moved into billets at FROIDMONT, where Battalion Headquarters 
had to change their location, being shelled with mustard gas. Seven Other Ranks 
were wounded. 

On the 25th, we relieved the 1,4th King's Own in the main line of resistance, 
Battalion Headquarters being at FERME DU BARON, C Company on the right, 
D Company in the centre, A Company on the left, and B Company in support. 
Lieutenant King rejoined us here. The next two days were occupied in working parties. 

On the 28th, we were relieved by the l/7th King's Liverpool Regiment, and 
moved to billets at WANNEHAIN, where we bathed and rested. Two Officers and 
59 Other Ranks had gone sick during the month. A Divisional Paper Chase was 
attended by the mounted Officers on the 1st November. 

On the 9th, the enemy having retired further, we moved on to ESPLECHIN, 
and on the 10th to BARRY, marching to VILLIERS ST. AMAND on the 11th. 

The Armistice at 11 o'clock on that day put a stop to further operations. 
Whilst nobody could be sorry that the War had come to an end, it was annoying 
to be stopped when we had at last really got going and the fox was in sight. 



Many of us thought at the time, and still think, that we might have gone 
on a little further, and that it was a mistake not to push the advance and 
really rout the enemy. 

At eight o'clock on Armistice night the Battalion Band attended a dance 
given by the Brigadier, General C. B. Stockwell, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., and the 
first social function after the Armistice at which the Officers of the Battalion 
were represented was a great success. 

Captain M. Smith was awarded the Military Cross for his gallantry and 
initiative displayed in the successful attack on the wood O Xi b and d. Captain 
R. H. Smith was awarded a Bar to his Military Cross for his personal bravery 
and initiative in organising a prompt counter-attack after we had lost the 
wood O Mi b and d. Major H. J. G. Duggan, M.C., was awarded the D.S.O. for 
personal bravery and leadership displayed at BAC DE WAVRIN and the attack 
on the wood 33 b and d. 




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CHAPTER XI. 
AFTER THE ARMISTICE. 

Although fighting was now over, the "War" was not. Working parties 
and training still continued at LEUZE, whither we marched on the 14th, and on 
the 25th the "Education Period" commenced. We moved to WATTINE 
(Chappelle) on the 26th, and on the 2nd December sent an escort, consisting of 
Captain S. H. Pruden, M.C., and Lieutenant Bulling, Company Sergeant-Major 
Roberts, and two Sergeants, to England to bring out the Colours, which were 
handed to them on the 7th in Preston by the Mayor. The same day the 
Battalion lined the main road on the occasion of the King's visit to LEUZE. 

The Colour Party rejoined us on the 10th, and the Colours paraded with the 
Battalion for the first time on the 13th. On the 15th we moved to ATH. On the 
following days we moved to EUGHEHEIM, LEMBECQ, and UCCLE, where we 
prepared for a long stay in good billets. Second Lieutenant A. Livesey was 
awarded the Military Cross. 

The total casualties for the year 1918 were as follows : — 

Killed Wounded Missing Gassed D. of W. W. & M. 
Officers 10 31 6 4 1 25 

Other Ranks 140 514 101 154 595 

Totals 150 545 107 158 1 620 

Officers 77. Other Ranks 1,504. 

The Battalion marched past the King of the Belgians in BRUSSELS. 
The total casualties of the Battalion for the whole of the War are set out 
in the War Diary as follows : — 

M. believpd Died of Sick 

Killed Wounded Missing. W. & M. Killed Gassed Wounds Dwnd. to FA. 

Officers 37 95 1 1 2 2 4 4 65 

Other Ranks 376 1846 596 10 165 1 1 1496 



Totals 413 1941 607 12 2 169 5 1561 

Officers 220. Other Ranks 4,301. 

Most of those entered as "Missing" were afterwards reported "Killed in 
Action ;" many were reported "Prisoners of War," and it is a matter of history 
now these were kept alive by the weekly parcels which reached them from the 
Prisoners of War Committee in Preston, to which our grateful thanks are due. 



132 

The process of demobilisation and disintegration of the Battalion now set in, 
and our numbers steadily dwindled until nothing but the Cadre was left. 

The Cadre returned to Preston on the 12th June, 1919. Only short notice 
was received, but there was a good turnout of Officers and men who had 
served with the Battalion, and an entertainment was given by the Corporation. 

With this function the War History of the unit comes to an end. 
Practically all of us are now back in civil life, a few not much the worse for 
wear, others maimed or with impaired faculties, but 870 Officers and Other Ranks 
rest in France and Belgium, and to their memory it is hoped to erect a 
memorial over there. 




The telegraph post at which the Padre is standing 

marks the site of the Battalion Memorial, with the 

broken trees surrounding Vaucellette Farm about 

200 yards behind 



As the Siith Division Memorial is to be put on GIVENCHY HILL, the scene 
of the Battalion's best-known exploit, another site has had to be fixed upon. 
This has been found on the crest of the ridge on which VAUCELLETTE FARM 



133 

stood, where the Battalion on 30th November, standing alone, stemmed the 
advancing tide of Huns. To the Maire of VILLERS GUISLAIN and to 
M.M Henri and Leon Nolin, the owners of the ground, we owe the gift of a 
small square plot by the roadside there, on which to erect a memorial to 
our comrades. 

" These gave up the years to be 
Of joy and work, and that unhoped serene 
That men call age ; and those who would have been 
Their sons, they gave, their immortality." 

Although many graves have been marked and identified, there are countless 
others which never can be ; hence the necessity of a single monument to include 
all. 

Those graves which can be identified have been marked with the Divisional 
Cocarde, a representation (about six inches in diameter) in colour, on enamelled iron. 
of the 55th Division badge. 




APPENDIXES 

A. — .List of Honours and Distinctions earned by the Battalion. 
B. — Casualties. 



APPENDIX A. 



l/4th LOYAL NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT. 
A LIST OF HONOURS AND DISTINCTIONS EARNED BY THE BATTALION. 

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER. 

Lieutenant-Colonel R. Hindle, D.S.O., June, 1917. Bar to D.S.O., September, 1917. 

Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Crump, D.S.O., June, 1918. 

Major H. J. G. Duggan, D.S.O., January, 1919. 

Lieutenant-Colonel T. G. Williams, D.S.O., June, 1919. 

Major H. Parker, D.S.O., June, 1919 (Brigade Major, 42nd Division]. 



2nd Lieut. P. Parker 
Capt. J. O. Widdows 
2nd Lieut. H. Lindsay 
2nd Lieut. H. Lonsdale 
2nd Lieut. S. A. H. Pruden 
Capt. A. T. Houghton 
Capt. D. Carmichael 
2nd Lieut. J. Adamson 
2nd Lieut. H. Vincent 
2nd Lieut. L. Brooke 
2nd Lieut. R. H. Tautz . 
Capt. F. K. Matthew 
Lieut. A. Bardsley 
2nd Lieut. H. Fazackerley 
2nd Lieut. C. Milne 



MILITARY CROSS 

1915 
1915 
1915 
1917 
1917 
1917 
1918 
1917 
1917 
1917 
1917 
1917 
1918 
1917 
1918 



2nd Lieut. 


S. B. Westwood 


1918 


2nd Lieut. 


H. Bailey 


1918 


2nd Lieut. 


C. L. Hore 


1916 


2nd Lieut. 


E. Fairclough 


1916 


2nd Lieut. 


D. Archibald ... 


1918 


Capt. J. A 


. Burnside 


1918 


2nd Lieut. 


H. Brown 


1918 


2nd Lieut. 


J. M. Caie 


1918 


2nd Lieut. 


J. Cairns 


1918 


2nd Lieut. 


J. Levesley 


1918 


2nd Lieut. 


J. Dawson 


1918 


2nd Lieut. 


R. S. Hulme ... 


1918 


Capt. H. H. Smith 


1918 


Capt. H. S. 


P. Walmsley (R.F.C. 


1917 



BAR TO MILITARY CROSS. 



Capt. D. Carmichael ... 1918 

Capt. S. A. H. Pruden ... 1917 

2nd Lieut. H. Fazackerley 1918 



Capt. H. Lonsdale ... 1918 

Major H. J. G. Duggan ... 1918 



MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES OFFICERS. 



Lieut.-Col. R. Hindle (twice) 
Major J. A. Crump (3 times) 
Major H. Parker 
Capt. R. N. L. Buckmaster 
Lieut. F. W. S. Baker 
2nd Lieut. F. K. Matthew 



Capt. L, Duckworth 
Lieut. W. March 
Capt. E. M. Rennard 
Lieut. H. Whitehurst 
Lieut. H. Lindsay 



lAH 



MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES OTHER RANKS. 



IMKi 


Pte. Clarkson, W. A. ... 




January, l!M7 


2411 


Pte. Foley. T 




January, 1917 


2(M>ISK 


Pte. Cookson, J. 




January, 1917 


M)S» 


Lance-CpL Parkinson, T. 




January, 1917 


2(M)1S2 


R.Q.M.S. Corns, R. 




June, 1917 


2(K)12H 


C.S.M. Dudley, J. 




June, 1917 


202,S2() 


Pte. Tyldesley, W. 




June, 1917 


2(Mt;{7!» 


Pte. Maher, J 




November 7th, 1917 


2(10048 


Pte. Worden, R. 




April 7th, 191H 


20107X 


Cpi. Collier, J 




November 7th, 1917 


2()(10SS 


Pte. Yates, J 




November 7th, 19 IS 


2()0;{(i7 


Sgt. Dunn, R 




June, 1919 




Lance-Cpl. Baker, J. ... 




1917 




DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL. 


2(Ki7l(i 


Pte. Cowburn, W. 




January 14th, 1910 


2(MM)I2 


Sgt. Lester, E 




January 14th, 19 Hi 


2(M)204 


Pte. Moore, W. 




January 14th, 19l(i 


i;«() 


Sgt. Pye, J. R. 




January Nth, 19l(i 


■mHHYl 


C.S.M. Lindsay, C. 




January 14th, I91(i 


;W75 


R.S.M. Farnworth, J. E. 




January 14th, 19 Mi 


S04 


C.S.M. Edwards, T. J. 




January 14th, 19 Mi 


2(M»;W8 


Sgt. Fletcher, J. 




January 14th, 1910 


200450 


Pte. Ward, T 




July :50th, 1910 


2(K);W2 


Sgt. Hogg, J 




July ;M)th, I91(i 


201();»7 


Sgt. Farnworth, H. 




January 19th, 1917 


249.S0 


Sgt. Ashton, E. 




September 17th, 1917 


20(MISI 


C.S.M. Roberts, H. 




October ;{rd, 1917 


200077 


Sgt. Prescott, S. 




October, 1917 


20270;i 


Sgt. Atkinson, A. 




September .{rd, 1918 


280«4 


Pte. Reddish, F. 




September .'kd, 1918 


20i:«(i 


Pte. Livesey, J. 




September .'{rd, 1918 


2(M)2«);{ 


Sgt. Miller, J 




September .'{rd, 1918 


2(M)575 


C.S.M. Ireland, J. 




October .'{rd, 1918 


24I5S4 


Pte. Harris, W. 




November 2nd, 1918 


201200 


Lance-Cpl. Butcher, T. 




July .list, 1917 




Pte. Parkes, T. 




1918 


MILITARY MEDAL AND MERITORIC 


)US 


SERVICE MEDAL. 


H Sgt. 


Entwistle, T. 


VI.M. 


August 2;{rd, 1910 


lflK4 Sg . 


Lancaster, J. 


M.M. 


August 2;{rd, 1910 


:m Cpi 


Bettley, B 1 


VI.M. 


September, 1910 


2S.S9 CpL 


Osbaddeston, J. 


VI.M. 


November 10th, 19 


:{4;i25 Sgt. 


Goodridge, D. ... 


VI.M. 


January, 1917 


2(M(29;{ Pte 


Miller, J. I 


VI.M. 


November, 19 Mi 


2(MIS7.i Pte 


Seed, T. 1 


VI.M. 


November, If) Mi 


2(MMH)0 Sgt. 


Yates, R. T 1 


VI.M. 


July, 1917 


;i4}>79 Sgt. 


Cosgrove, J. 


VI.M. 


September, 1917 


2027(il Pte. 


Spencer, J I 


VI.M. 


September, 1917 



\M) 



MILITARY MEDAL AND MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL Continued. 



2()()4S9 CpL Homer, A. 

;{19S7 Cpl. Walmsley, J. ... 

20i;W() Lance-Sgt. Robinson, J. 

200BS2 Pte. Coupe, F. 

2(M);i52 Pte. Thistleton, T. ... 

2(H197 CpL Thompson, J. ... 

2(H)75(i Lance-CpL Gorton, F. 

20()S9S Sgt. Knowles, R. ... 

291 17S Pte. Goodwin, C. J. H. 

I(i94(> Pte. Cunningham, J. 

;{4;«»4 Pte. Jones, T. E. 

Zmm Pte. Roocroft, W. 

()H9;{ Sgt. Murphy, J. 

2()2{)99 Pte. Wyre, P. 

20168;} CpL Dring, A. 

200541 Sgt. Turner, F. 

2409WJ Lance-CpL Davenport, T. 

2024(i7 Lance-Sgt. Holt, A. 

.■{0479 Lance-CpL Bamford, W. 

408;i4 Pte. Lee, S. N. 

30471 Lance-CpL Davies, G. J. 

202(i40 Pte. Cunliffe, L. 

29405 Pte. Goldstraw, J. ... 

20000 CpL Summers, E. M. 

200050 R.Q.M.S. Aspden, J. 

2OO50K Sgt. Ryan, T. 

20540 Sgt. Birch, R. 

290177 C.S.M. Porter, R. 

200804 CpL Bell, W. 

240412 Pte. Farnworth, T. 

2040 Sgt. Leach, J. 

184 Pte. Gent, C. 

2(M)081 C.Q.M.S. Roberts, H. 

200222 C.Q.M.S. Heywood, J. W. 

2553 Pte. Latham, E. 

200174 Lance-CpL Bamber, J. 

274 Sgt. Bates, A. 

105 Sgt. Board, J. H. .. 

4948 Pte. Gent, F. 

2(H)240 Pte. Ainscough, T. .. 

29079 Pte. Parkinson, T. .. 

200057 Sgt. Heaps, J. 

2(M)357 Pte. Parkinson, J. H. 

200143 Cpl. Finnerty, T. 

2(H)782 Pte. Park, T. 

201350 Lance-CpL Norris, P. 

12154 Lance-Sgt. Cayton, T. 

201542 Sgt. Bell, H. 

202907 Pte. Yates, W. 

2(M)541 Sgt. Turner, F. 



M.S.M. September, 1917 

M.M. September, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. August 11th, 191S 

M.S.M. August 29th, 1918 

M.M. September 9th, 191S 

M.M. October 20th, 1918 

M.M. October 20th, 1918 

M.M. October 20th, 1918 

M.M. October 20th, 1918 

M.M. October 20th, 1918 

M.M. October 2(ith, 1918 

M.M. November 29th, 1918 

M.S.M. December, 1918 

M.S.M. 1918 

M.S.M. 1918 

M.S.M. 1918 
M.M. 

M.M. October, 1918 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. July, 1910 

M.M. January, 1917 

M.M. September, 1917 

M.M. September, 1917 

M.M. September, 1917 

M.M. September, 1917 

M.M. September, 1917 

M.M. September, 1917 

M.M. September, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. October, 1917 

M.M. January, 1918 



110 



MILITARY MEDAL AND MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL Continued. 

2(M»2IS Sgt. Parkinson, T. R. 
2(MMi.|3 Sgt. Cookson, J. E. 

;j()20l Pte. Read, J. 
202072 Pte. Meadows, J. ... 
202SI4 Pte. Rotherham, G. 
2()0<i(il Cpl. Gradwell, J. 

;52211 Pte. Williams, R. ... 

2-102:<9 Sgt. Lowe, J. 
2(10S0f» Cpl. Pitcher, F. 
2(l()2;57 Lance-Sgt. Sharpies, W. 

24;W7S Sgt. Threadgold, W. 

;i()729 Pte. Goodram, W. 
202702 Sgt. Kelly, H. 
202SS1 Sgt. Aspden, J. 

WM2 Sgt. Payne, W. 

.'il07S Lance-Cpl. Norris, H. 

29(Mi(i5 Pte. Pendlebury, T. 

12«M0 Pte. Rathbone 
2(KHHi Pte. Bates, J. 
2(MM1J Pte. Clarkson, W. H. 
Pte. Hornmans, A. 
Pte. Marsh, T. 
Pte. Lloyd, F. 
Sgt. Hartley ... 
Sgt. Hogg 



M.M. 


September .'{rd, liHH 


M.M. 


September, 1*117 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


August, 


1917 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


October 


7th, 1918 


M.M. 


October, 


1918 


M.M. 


October, 


1918 


M.M. 


October, 


1918 


M.M. 


October, 


1918 


M.M. 


October, 


1917 


M.M. 


August, 


1917 


M.M. 


August, 


1917 


M.M. 


August, 


1917 


M.M. 


1918 




M.M. 


191K 




M.M. 


1918 




M.M. 


1917 




M.M. 


1917 





12154 
29<Mi<>5 
202099 
201()8:{ 
202()J0 
2(M)29;< 
202«47 



BAR TO MILITARY MEDAL. 

January, 1918 

T June, 1918 

October 7th, 1918 
October 2()th, 1918 



Sgt. Cayton, T. 

Cpl. Pendlebury 

Cpl. Wyre, P. 

Cpl. Dring, A. 

Pte. Cunliffe, L 

Sgt. Miller, J. 

Sgt. Holt, A. 



October 2()th, 1918 
October 2«th, 1918 
October, 1918 



CROIX DE GUERRE 

2:{0 Sgt. Lester, E 

2(K)158 Sgt. Cookson, J. 
201(i8;« Cpl. Wilkinson, J. S. ... 



(FRENCH). 

June, 1915 
August 17th. 1918 
January, 1919 



MEDAILLE MILITAIRE (FRENCH). 

.{01 Cpl. Bettley, B. September, 19n! 

2027.52 Cpl. Wilkinson, J 



August 29th, 191 S 



MEDAILLE MILITAIRE (BELGIAN i. 
20(1077 Sgt. Prescott, S. January, 1!M9 



APPENDIX B. 



THE CASUALTY LISTS. 

These lists, originally compiled in Battalion Orderly Room as the casualties were 
reported, have now been checked with Records. It is too much to hope that they are 
absolutely correct, but the compilers have done all they can to correct mistakes. 

The following signs and abbreviations have been used : — 
^K. in A. — Killed in Action. 

►fiD. of W. - Died of wounds received in action— the first date that of the 
wounds ; the second the death. 
R.P. of W. — Prisoner of war (returned) — the date being that of capture. 
W. — Wounded. 

N.T. — An entry in the Battalion Roll which the Record Office cannot 

trace - probably owing to the number being that by which 
a man was known in another Battalion. 

I 4th LOYAL NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT. 
A list of all casualties sustained by the Battalion between April, I91.S, and November, l!(I.S 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty 


Date. 


Pte. 


Abraham, T. 


28206 


A 


W. 


18 II 17 

and 2 6 18 


Pte. 


Abram, P. 


3636 


D 


W. 


N.T. 8 8; 16 


2nd 


Lieut. Absolom, W. 


— 


— 


W. 


22 6 16 


Pte. 


Acult 


27904 


B 


R.P. of W. . 


9 4 18 


Pte. 


Adams, E. 


2S13 


A 


W. 


15 8 15 


Pte. 


Adams, F. 


30915 


B 


W. 


9 9/18 


^2nd 


Lieut. Adamson, J. 


— 


— 


W. 

K. in A. . 


30/11/17 
27/2/18 


Pte. 


Addison, A 


194,S 


A 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Addison, E. 


1465 


D 


W. 


15/6 15 


Pte. 


Affleck, G. H 


203598 


A 


W. 


31 4,17 


2nd 


Lieut. Agostini, H. F. S 





— 


W. 


7 6,17 


Pte. 


Ainscough, G. 


290044 


C 


W. 


20 9 17 


Pte. 


Ainscough, J. R. 


25789 


B 


W. 


16 7 17 


Pte. 


Ainsworth. A. ... 


203142 


B 


W. 


. N.T. 9 4 18 


^Pte. 


Ainsworth, J. 


2055 


D 


K. in A. 


15 6 15 


Pte. 


Ainsworth, T. 


4554 


B 


W. 


N.T. 9 9 16 


►{.Lance-Cpl. Alcock, T 


28201 


A 


D. of W. 14 


5 18 ; 24 5 18 


Lance-Cpl. Alcock, T. 


,{0477 


B 


W. 


1,6 18 


Lance-Cpl. Aldridge, T. F. . 


3444 


C 


W. 


N.T 8 8 16 


^.Pte. 


Alexander. J 


17912 


B 


K. in A. . 


3 7 18 


Pte. 


Alker, T. 


4328 


B 


W. 


9 9/16 


Pte. 


Allan, W 


3356 


C 


W. 


15 6 15 


^.Pte. 


Allen, J 


202880 


D 


D. of W. 15 


7 17 ; 15 9 17 


Cpl. 


Allen, M. 


2501 


B 


W. 


28,6 16 


Pte. 


Allen, P 


34829 


C 


R.P. of W . 


20/9 17 


Pte. 


Allen, R. 


.T(J40 


B 


W. 


31/7/17 


^Lance-Cpl. Allen, R. 


202611 


B 


K. in A 


31/7 17 


4«Lance-CpI. Allen, S 


202890 


D 


K. in A. 


. N.T. 16/9,17 


Lance-Cpl. Allen, T 


202829 


B 


W. 1 


) 4 18 ; 3 7 18 


Pte. 


Allcock, U. F 


27895 


B 


W. 


3 8 18 


Sgt. 


Allen, W. 


5694 


A 


W. 


30 7 17 


Sgt. 


Allen, W. 


202665 


A 


W. 


31/7/17 



I r_' 



Rank and Name. 

^Pte. Allison, G. 

Pte. Allison, H. 
^Pte. Almond, E. 

Pte. Almond, J. 

Lance-Cpl. Almond, R. 
>J.Pte. Almond, T. 

Pte. Alker, T. 

Pte. Alsopp, A. 
4«Pte. Alty, T 

Pte. Amatt, J. 

Pte. Amers, J. 
^<Sgt. Anderson, A. 

Sgt. Anderson, J. T. 
»}<Lance-Cpl. Anderton, J. 

Pte. Anderton, J. H. 

Pte. Anderton, W. ... 

Pte. Andrew, J. 

Sgt. Anglezarke, J. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Anyon, T. 

«i«Pte. Anyon, W. 
i|<Pte. Annes, W. 
»I«Pt?. Archer, E. H. ... 
►I<Pte. Archer, J. 

Pte. Archer, W. 

■Jnd Lieut. Archibald, D. 
>fiPte. Arkwright, F. ... 
>J<Lance-Cpl. Armer, E. 
i^Pte. Armitage, E. 

Pte. Armitstead, J. ... 

Pte. Armstrong, H. ... 
»I<Pte. Armstrong, W. F. 
•{■Lance-Cpl. Arnold, F. G 
^.Pte. Arstall, J. H. ... 
•{•^nd Lieut. Ashcoft, G. 
^Pte. Ashes, H. 

Sgt. Ashton, A. 

Pte. Ashton, E. 

Cpl. Ashton, J. 

Lance-Cpl. Ashton, T. J. 

Pte. Ashton, W. 

Pte. Ashton, W. 
^.Cpl. Ashton, W. 

Lance-Cpl. Ashworth, A. 

Pte. Ashworth, A. 

Pte. Ashworth, A. 
»i«Pte. Ashworth, J. 
>i«Pte. Ashworth, J. 
4«Pte. Ashworth, J. R. 

Pte. Ashworth, R. ... 

Pte. Ashworth, T. 

Pte. Ashworth, W. ... 
4"Cpl. Askew, A. 

Pte. Aspden, J. 

Pte. Aspden, J. 

Pte. Aspinall, A. 

Lance-Cpl. Aspinall, J. 

Pte. Aspinall, J. 

Pte. Astin, J 

Lance-Cpl. Astley, F. 

Pte. Astley, H. 

Lance-Cpl. Astley, J. 

Pte. Astwood, G. W. 



No. 


Coy. 


*Jature of Casualty. 


Date. 


2NI!) 


B 


K. in A. 


15 6 I.S 


.{72.57 


A 


W. 


27 9 18 


4l()lfi 


D 


K. in A. .. 


8 7/18 


;joi6 


B 


W. 


31 10 15 


27ft9.S 


C 


W. 


N.T. 9,7/18 


2012(H) 


C 


K. in A. 


18/11 17 


4S;{2 


B 


W. 


N.T. 9 9 16 


4N.iN 


A 


W. 


8 8 16 


202i;t.S 


B 


K. in A. ... 


31 7 17 


... 2.<.';0.S2 


A 


W. 


31 7 17 


;to7.';i 


B 


W. 


.30. 9/1 8 


is;{S7 


A 


K. in A. .. 


1 10/18 


41(i9.i 


A 


W. 


15/8; 18 


23i,se 


C 


K. in A. ... 


18,11/17 


:<0K():< 


C 


W. 


6 9,18 


l(>9S« 


B 


W. 


3I;7/I7 


.•t(Mi07 


B 


W. 


19,8 18 


i;j:t4 


D 


W. 


15/8 15 


306 


C 


W. 


28 10/15 
and 9,9(16 


.■{9.S9 


C 


D. of W. ... 


17 11/15 


28202 


--- 


D. of W. ... 


19 11,17 


... 241234 


B 


D. of W. ... 


17,6/18 


4I6I4 


D 


K. in A. ... 


8/7/17 


28203 


A 


W. 


30 10/18 


— 


.. 


W. 


5,8 18 


24074 


C 


K. in A. ... 


20 9 1 7 


... 201750 


— 


K. in A. ... 


31 7 17 


... 202831 


B 


K. in A. 


18 11 17 


... 201371 


D 


R.P. of W. ... 


9,4/18 


24.SI 


D 


R.P. of W. ... 


9/4/18 


.3232 


C 


K. inA. .. 


15 6,15 


... 23800.5 


A 


K. in A. ... 


9,4 18 


202.575 


A 


K. in A. ... 


19 9 17 






K. in A. 


31/7/17 


20505 


B 


K. in A. 


9 4/18 


24980 


B 


W. 


9 4/18 


29.37 


B 


W. 


6/11/15 


.. 2.38011 


C 


W. 


16/4/19 


36384 


D 


W. 


24/8/18 


4569 


B 


W. 


31,7,17 


20237 


B 


W. 


31/7 17 


... 202704 


., 


D. of W. ... 


20,4 17 


41696 


C 


W. 


5 9 18 


41696 


C 


W. 


3 9 18 


... 200.5.52 


A 


W. 


24/iO/18 


2622 


C 


K. in A. 


15/6 15 


4035 




K. inA. ... 


29,5/16 


28205 


B 


K. in A. ... 


29/5/18 


6210 


B 


W. 


9/9/16 


2.5.56 


A 


W. 


15/6/15 


202792 


A 


W. 


20/9 17 


2244 


C 


K. in A. ... 


9 9 16 


20288 1 


D 


W. 


31 7/17 


6267 


D 


W. 


31/7/17 


6.322 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


... 202681 


B 


W. 


11/6/17 


5710 


B 


W. 


11/6/17 


6265 


D 


W. 


15/7/17 


... 242524 


A 


W. 


14/5/18 


7627 


C 


W. 


8/8 16 


146 


B 


W. 


8 8/16 


6231 


D 


W. 


9/9/16 



1 1:5 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


►J-Pte. 


Atherton, W. ... 


... 2(1I7-1.1 


B 


D. ofW. ... 


3 12 17 


Pte. 


Atherton, W. 


2(iS.i 


A 


W. 




31 7 17 


Pte. 


Atherton, W. 


44S;{ 


B 


W. 




9 9 16 


Sgt. 


Atkinson, A. 


... 20270.-i 


A 


W. 




10 4 18 
and 23 10 18 


4.Pte. 


Atkinson, F. 


2HI.'; 


C 


K. in 


A. 


15,6 15 


Pte. 


Atkinson, G. W. 


MM) 


B 


W. 




9/9/16 


Pte. 


Atkinson, H. 


4449 


D 


W. 




9,9 16 


Pte. 


Atkinson, J. 


206.5 


D 


W. 




15/6 l.i 


Pte. 


Atkinson, L. 


2S204 


A 


W 




30 / 1 1 1 7 


Pte. 


Atkinson, T. 


10701 


B 


W. 




19/7 17 


Pte. 


Baxendale, W. ... 


2032 


C 


W. 




15 6 15 


Pte. 


Battersby, A. 


2273 


B 


W. 




15 6 15 


Pte. 


Baker, A. 


2407 


B 


W. 




30 5 15 


4«Pte. 


Ball, S. J 


2312 


— 


K. in 


A. 


15 6 15 


^-Pte 


Baldwin, J. 


1731 


— 


K. in 


A. 


21 11 15 


4iPte. 


Bamber, A. J. ... 


2806 


— 


K. in 


A. .. 


15 6 15 


4iPte. 


Banister, R. 


202637 


. 


K. in 


A. .. 


31 7 17 


Pte. 


Bamber, J. 


3 


B 


W. 




15 6 15 


Pte. 


Banks S. E. 


xmn 


C 


R.P. 


of W. .. 


18,11 17 


«J.Lance-Cpl. Baker, J. T 


2.3493 


D 


K. in 


A. .. 


22 10 IS 


if<Lance-Cpl. Baron, J. E. 


13520 


B 


K. in 


A. .. 


1 10 18 


Pte. 


Barrett, J. R. ... 


29087 


A 


W. 




.30 9 IS 


Pte. 


Bassett, C. 


.35677 


. 


W. 




1 10 18 


Pte. 


Barry, J. 


... 242209 


D 


W. 




1,10 18 


Sgt. 


Bamford, M. S. ... 


... 203018 


B 


W. 




N.T.I3 10 18 


^Pte. 


Barnes, F. 


30608 


D 


D. of W. .. 


10 II IS 


Lan 


ce-Cpl. Bates, F. W. 


... 202793 


A 


W. 




23 10 IS 


Pte. 


Bailey, H. 


24818 


B 


W. 




23,10 IS 


Pte. 


Ball, H 


1412 


D 


W. 




15 6 15 
and 1 4 16 


^.Lance-Cpl. Bamber, E. H. 


1648 


B 


K. in 


A. .. 


15 6 15 


Pte. 


Bamber, R. H. ... 


16.53 


A 


W 




15 6 15 


Lance-Cpl. Ball, F. ... 


1775 


A 


W. 




15 6 15 


Pte. 


Baines, J. G. 


2250 


B 


W. 




30 5 15 


Pte. 


Bamford, J. 


3503 


C 


W. 




2U 5 16 


Pte. 


Barlow, F. 


4860 


B 


W. 




.30 7 IH 


Sgt. 


Bates, A. E. 


274 


A 


W. 




3 8,16 


Pte. 


Bamford, T. 


3074 


A 


W. 




5,816 


Cpl. 


Batty, F. 


2.38 


B 


W. 




8,8 16 


Pte. 


Banks, J. 


3938 


C 


W. 




S 8 10 


Pte. 


Barton, A. 


3971 


D 


W. 




N.T. 8 8 16 


^Pte 


Baxendale, G. 


3914 


D 


K. in 


A. 


8 S 16 


Pte 


Barnes, J. 


4.523 


B 


W. 




N.T. S 9 16 


^.Pte. 


Baines, L. 


4000 


B 


K. in 


A. .. 


9 9 Hi 


4. Pte. 


Ball, E 


4439 


C 


K. in 


A. .. 


9 9 16 


4-Pte 


Baines, T. 


4029 


A 


K. in 


A. .. 


9 9 16 


Pte. 


Barnes, J. 


4828 


B 


W. 




N.T. 8 9 16 


Pte. 


Barlow, W. H. ... 


2267 


D 


W. 




28 9 16 


i^Pte. 


Barnish, W. 


4002 


C 


K. in 


A. 


S S 16 


.^Pte. 


Barlow, F. 


1055 


— 


K. in 


A. 


15 6 15 


^Pte. 


Barnett, H. L. ... 


.3.321 


- - 


K. in 


A. 


15 6 15 


4.Pte. 


Bateson, W. 


2621 




K. in 


A. .. 


15 6 15 


^.Pte. 


Bath, F 


16896 


— 


K. in 


A. 


20 9 17 


^Pte. 


Baxendale, J. 


141 


— 


K. in 


A. .. 


15 6 15 


Pte. 


Barton, A. 


3231 


B 


W. 




29 9 16 


Pte. 


Baxendale, R. ... 


... 201726 


C 


W. 




13 5 17 


Pte. 


Bamber, W. 


... 200.5.36 


A 


W. 




23 5 17 


Pte. 


Battersby, W. ... 


... 2026.5S 


D 


W. 




12 7 17 


Pte. 


Bamber, W. 


... 201251 


D 


W. 




14 7 17 


Pte 


Barron, H. 


36907 


C 


W. 




18,7 17 


Pte. 


Barton, A. 


... 200995 


B 


W. 




31y7;17 



Ill 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. N 


ature of Casualty 


Date. 


Pte. Bancroft, L. 


202H8.( 


D 


W. 


31 7 17 


Lance-Sgt. Batty, F. ... 


... 200116 


B 


R.P. of W. 


31 7 17 


Lance-Cpl. Barnes, A. 


202 1 1 .5 


B 


W. 


31 7 17 


Ptc. Backhouse, L. ... 


2(I2!>70 


C 


W. 


31 7 17 


Pte. Bates, G. W. 


.((i 1 r>!) 


B 


W. 


27 5,17 


Pte. Barrow, J. 


201121 


B 


W. 


3 6/18 


Pte. Barrett, W. 


,(N()7S 


A 


W. 


7 7/18 


Pte. Barnes F. 


.fOOOS 


D 


W. 


16 8 18 


Pte. Baliner, R. W. ... 


2S220 


B 


W. 


5 9 18 


Pte. Baron, H. 


;tO!l2 1 


A 


W. 


S 9 IN 


Ptc. Baron, J. W. 


2I7(>!» 




W. 


13 9 IN 


>fcPte. Barlow, A. 


.{(•.SON 


A 


W. 

K. in A. . 


2 6 IN 
23 9 IN 


Pte. Barker, W 


;«ii.ss 


D 


W. 


29 7 17 


2nd Lieut. Baker, E. G 






W. 


20 9 17 


4<Capt. Baker, F. S. ... 






K. in A. . 


20 9 17 


Pte. Barton, R. 


'.'.'. 290 liM 


B 


W. 


20 9 17 


^.Pte. Baines A. 


290200 


D 


W. 

K. in A. . 


20 9 17 
4 4 IN 


4«Lance-Cpl. Ball, R. ... 


l.iO.S7 


B 


K. in A. . 


20 9 17 


Pte Barker, W. 


... 202971 


C 


W. 


20 9 17 


4<Pte. Baxendale, J. ... 


202607 


A 


K. in A. . 


.30; 10 18 


Pte. Balding, B. J. ... 


. . . 2906;{0 


C 


R.P of W.. . 


18 1117 


►J.Pte. Baxter, C. E. 


;t4907 


C 


K. in A. 


20 11 17 


Pte. Bamber, W. 


201209 


B 


W. 


20/11/17 


Pte. Burscough, A. ... 


... 201646 


D 


W. 


30/11/17 


Pte. Battersby, J. W. 


... 2026,S8 


D 


W. 


.30/11/17 


^Pte. Ball, J 


201.'>06 


B 


K. in A. . 


9/4/18 


^Cpl. Bamber, J. 


200171 


A 


K. in A. . 


11/4/18 


Pte. Barlow, S. 


|;S6I8 


D 


W. 


9/4/18 


Pte. Barnish, J. 


... 201447 


D 


W. 


9 4 IS 


«f<Pte. Baines, A. 


... 290200 


D 


K. in A . 


12 4 IS 


Pte. Bailey, J. 


27910 


D 


R.P. of W. . 


12 4 IS 


Pte. Balmforth, C. ... 


2906;{| 


C 


W. 


15 4 IS 


.{.Cpl. Bailey, J. 


;f0459 


A 


K. in A. . 


14 5 18 


«i.Pte. Bamford, H. 


24675 


D 


K. in A. . 


15 5 18 


Pte. Bates, J 


200146 


C 


W. 


19,5 18 


Lance-Cpl. Bates, J. ... 


;i0472 


C 


w. 


19 5/18 


Cpl. Bateson, F. 


19622 


B 


w. 


. N.T. 27 5 /IS 


Pte. Bennett, R. 


2004. I.? 


A 


w. 


15,6/15 


Cpl. Bennett, J. 


261 


C 


w. 


15 6/15 


►J.Pte. Bentham, J. 


27S 


C 


Died 


27 10/18 


Ptf. Bennett, J. 


.US 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


4<Pte. Beaver, D. 


2299 


A 


D. of W. . 


8/8 Ifi 


Cpl. Bennett, E. 


... 202620 


B 


W. 


.30 9/18 


Pte. Beardsworth, A. 


1439 


D 


W. 


15 615 
and 9 9/16 


Sgt. Bell, T. B. 


1003 


C 


W. 


,30/5/15 

and 7/9 16 


^<Lieut. Best, F. R. ... 


— ■ 




K. in A. . 


1 1,16 


^.Pte. Benson, H. 


2130 


B 


K. in A. . 


4/6/16 


Pte. Berry, E. 


4864 


B 


W. 


2/8/16 


Pte. Bell, R 


4853 


B 


W. 


4/8/16 


Pte. Bennott. J. 


2006 


B 


W. 


8,8,16 


■fiCpl. Beesley, R. H. ... 


200189 


— . 


K. in A. . 


31 7 17 


«J«Pte. Berry, W. 


2904 





D. of W. . 


19 9 15 


^.Sgt. Bent, A 


3033 


— 


Died 


27 1,15 


Cpl. Be'field, J. 


264 


B 


W. 


9/9/16 


^.Sgt. Bettley, W B. ... 


.301 


B 


D. of W. 26 


9 16 ; 12 10/16 


Pte. Beetham, A. 


3221 


B 


W. 


26/9/16 


Lance-Sgt. Bell, T. ... 


5601 


C 


W. 


3/11/16 


Pte. Bevins, G. S. 


202.506 


C 


W. 


16/17 


Pte. Bennett, C. H. ... 


... 202623 


B 


W. 


4,6/17 



145 



Rank and Name. No. Coy. 

Pte. Berry, B. 20288.') 

Pte. Beck, W. 29401 ... C 

>i<Pte. Beardwell, W. H. ... ;{02I5 ... D 

Pte. Berrington, J 2(>'1!)2 ... B 

Pte. Beardsworth, A. ... 20027(> ... D 

^.Pte. Berry, W. E .■i2(>Nl ... A 

Pte. Berry, E. 202040 ... B 

^Pte. Bennett, W 2 1. '{42 ... B 

Pte. Bennett, J. T R. ... 290692 ... C 

Pte. Berrington, E 24919 ... B 

4<Lance-Sgt. Beaumont, W. ... 265280 ... A 

Pte. Beardwood, H 200011 ... C 

Pte. Bean, H. 202614 ... C 

Pte. Belgin, F. 28217 ... D 

^.Pte Best, J .■57744 ... B 

Pte. Bennett, H .i^MO ... D 

^Sgt. Beechey, T. J. D. ... 2029.3;{ ... C 
2nd Lieut. Beresford, G. G. 

Pte. Beaman, G. E 34332 ... B 

Pte. Billington, S 2029 ... A 

Pte. Birch, R. 2235 ... A 

Sgt. Birtwistle, H 238023 ... A 

^Pte. Billington, R 3169 ... B 

Pte Bibby, J 784 ... B 

^Pte. Bilsborough, R 4400 ... A 

Pte. Billington, W 3190 ... A 

Sgt. Bibby, J. 208 ... C 

Pte. Billington, E 3.351 ... B 

2nd Lieut. Bigger, T. A. ... ... — 

>J<Pte. Bingham, H 200600 ... A 

Pte. Binks, W 235019 ... C 

Lance-Cpl. BiUingtDn, T. ... 201622 ... B 

Pte. Birmingham, J. ... 202466 ... D 

Pte. Bickerstaffe, R 200695 ... B 

^Pte. Bishop, A 202794 ... A 

<i>Pte. Bibby, R. 202705 ... B 

4.Pte. Bibby, T. 200271 ... D 

Pte Birch, L. 201814 ... D 

.{.Pte. Bibby, J. W 23691 ... A 

Pte. Birchenough, H. E. . . 202904 ... C 

Sgt. Bishop — ... A 

Pte. Bibby, J. 200190 ... B 

Pte. Bibby, C. 28065 ... B 

Lance-Sgt. Bingham, J. ... 200606 ... D 

Pte. Bibby, J. 238012 ... B 

^Pte. Billington, R. G. ... 29078 ... B 

Pte. Birch, A. 28212 ... D 

^Pte. Birch, F. 37572 ... B 

Pte. Birmingham, J. ... 244766 ... D 

Pte. Bleasdale, C 200576 . . A 

. Pte. Blackshaw, J 262 ... C 

2nd Lieut. Blount, G. A. ... — 

►J-Cpl. Blackledge, H 1469 ... D 

►fiPte. Bland, R. 1453 ... C 

Pte. Blundell, J 13434 ... C 

Pte. Blakeley, W 4558 ... C 

Lance-Cpl. Bloom, H. ... 202.574 ... B 

>J(Lance-Cpl. Blackledge, A. ... 1393 

Pte. Blaylock, G. F 202883 ... D 

Lance-Cpl. Bland, W. ... 21051 ... C 

4.Pte. Blackledge, M 22904 ... C 

Pte. Blackhurst, J 203012 ... D 



Nature of Casualty. 



Da'c. 



w. 


31 7 17 


w. 


1 6 18 


K. in A. ... 


16 6 18 


W. 


N.T. 5 9 IS 


W. 


7 9 18 


K. in A. ... 


II 9 IS 


W. 


23 9 18 


D. of W. ... 


17 9 17 


W. 


21 9 17 


W. 


20 9 17 


K. in A. ... 


20 9 17 


W. 


20 9 17 


R.P. of W. ... 


18 II 17 


W. 


18 II 17 


K. in A. ... 


9 4 IS 


W. 


II 4 IS 


D. of W. 14 


4 IS ; 17 4 IS 


W. 


9 4 IS 


W. 


9 4 18 


w. 


15 6 15 


w. 


15 6 15 


R.P. of W. . . 


13 10 18 


K. in A. 


15 6 15 


W. 


.(0 10 15 


K. in A. ... 


2 8 16 


W. 


8 8 16 


W. 


8 8 16 


W. 


8 8 16 


W. 


8 8M6 


D. of W. ... 


8 4 17 


W. 


13 4 17 


W. 


12 7 17 


W. 


N.T. 14 4 17 


W. 


31 7 17 


K. in A. ... 


31 7 17 


K. inA. ... 


31 7 17 


K in A. 


31 7 17 


W. 


3 6 18 


K. in A. ... 


20 9 17 


W. 


18 II 17 


W. 


20 II 17 


W. 


.30 II 17 


W. 


30 II 17 


W. 


30 II 17 


W. 


N.T. 21 3 18 


K. inA. .. 


13 4 IS 


W. 


12 4 IS 


W. 


20 9 17 


D. of W. . 


10 5 IS 


W. 


25 5 IS 


W. 


15 6 15 


W. 


15 6 15 


Missing 


23 10 18 


K. in A. .. 


■15 6/15 


K. in A. 


15 6 15 


W. 


. N.T. 3 7 16 


W. 


13 8 16 


W. 


31 7 17 


K. in A. .. 


15 6 15 


W. 


17 8,18 


W. 


4 9 IS 


K. in A. .. 


31 7 17 


W. 


20,9 17 



I.l(i 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Blackburn, R 

»i«Pte. Bleasdale, J 

Pte. Blackborough, W. 

•fiPte. Bloy, A 

»fiPte. Blakelev, W 

Pte. Blackborough, W. H. S. 

Pte. Bowling, J 

Pte. Bond, F 

Pte. Bolan, J. 

Pte. Boardman, J. 

Capt. Bolingbroke, C. B. 

Pte. Bolton, C. A 

Sgt. Bolton, W. 

Cpl. Booth, R. 

Lance-Cpl. Boardman, G. 

Sgt. Boardman, G. 
>J<Pte. Bonny, J. C 

Pte. Bowker, T 

Pte. Bolton, J. 

Sgt. Board, A. 

Pte. Booth, J. 

Pte. Bootle, S. 

Pte. Bowes, T. 

Lance-Cpl. Boyle, W. 

Pte. Bond, G. 

►I<Sgt. Boothroyd, F. 

^.Pte. Booth, W. 

4«Pte. Boast, W. R 

►fiPte. Bolton, C. 

^Pte. Bond, H. 

4«Pte. Bone, W 

>J.Pte. Braithwaite, F. J. 

■^.Pte. Briggs, J. 

•{.Pte. Booth, W. H 

Pte. Bond, R. 

Pte. Bottoms, F 

Pte. Booth, H. 

Pte. Bourne, W 

:jnd Lieut. Bowler, F. C. 

Pte. Booth, S. G 

►fiPte. Bolton, J. T 

►J<Pte. Boyle, J 

4iPte. Bond, J 



Pte. 


Bostock, E. 


Pte. 


Bott, A. J. 


Pte. 


Bond, A. 


4iPte. 


Bolan, J. 


Pte. 


Boon. T. . . 


Pte. 


Bounds, J. H. . 


4«Pte. 


Booth, F. 


Pte. 


Bolton, J. 


Pte. 


Brindle, G. 


Pte. 


Br-ooks, E. 


Pte. 


Brierley, T. 


Pte. 


Bretherton, E. . 


2nd 


Lieut. Brindle, J 


►I.Capt 


. Brindle, J. L. . 


Pte. 


Brandwood, G. . 


^.Pte. 


Brooks, C. 


Pte. 


Brindle, W. 


^Pte. 


Bradshaw, E. 


Pte. 


Bromilow, J. 



No. 

20;t«(),> 

2.J.S00I 

.J.'i.Sfi.'i 

201 7«4 

2S2I« 

2076 

2.i.{| 

2711 

2;».504« 

2i)402 

;»92 

I.W2 

1427 

1427 

2012 

2784 

1760 

I6.S 

1498 

.{867 

4586 

240.5 

2;t,505l 

2027.J0 

20.J794 

19 

I.tSI 

201644 

1616 

2.i.i7 

222.5 

20.(564 

2;«5i;t9 

20:<6I0 
.«I947 

.•(4878 

202577 
;(I907 
a.5575 
;{7i>99 

282 1 ;( 

1 2 1 75 

28208 

2007 1 2 

.(4868 

28214 

.(6387 

240906 

1906 

2821 

48 

89 



201626 
28215 

. 1.(294 
;[092.( 
3091 ;( 



Coy. 

A 
D 
D 
B 
C 
D 
D 
B 
C 
C 

D 
A 
D 
D 
D 
C 
B 
A 
D 
A 
C 
C 
B 
D 
D 
A 



Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



A 
A 
C 
B 
A 

D 

A 
C 
A 

B 
D 
D 
C 
C 
B 
C 
C 
A 
C 
B 
B 



A 
A 

A 
B 



w. 




N.T. 20 9 17 


K. ir 


lA. 


;»0 M 17 


W. 




N.T.;(0 II 17 


K. in 


1 A. 


9 4 18 


K. ir 


1 A. 


9 4 18 


W. 




l.S 5 18 


W. 




15 6 15 


\\. 




IS 6 15 


W. 




15 6 16 


W. 




N.T. 2.{ 7 18 


W. 




N.T. 9 9 16 


W. 




.'(0 9 18 


W. 




15 6 15 


W. 




15 6 15 


W. 




15 6 15 


W. 




26 9 16 


K. in 


A. 


.(1 5 15 


W. 




9 9 15 


W. 




21 10 15 


W. 




5 8 16 


W. 




4 8 16 


W. 




8,8,16 


R.P. 


of W. '.'.'. 


8 8 16 


W. 




9 9 16 


w. 




17 5 17 


K. in 


A. 


18 5 17 


K. in 


A. ... 


.(I 7 17 


K. in 


A. ... 


15 6 15 


K, in 


A. ... 


15 6 15 


K. in 


A. ... 


.(1 7 17 


Died 




25 1 16 


K. in 


A. 


15 6 15 


K. in 


A. ... 


18 8 16 


K. in 


A. ... 


.(1 7 17 


W. 




.(1 7 17 


W. 




.( 6 18 


W. 




N.T. 16 6 18 


W. 




14 9 18 


W. 




:{0 9 18 


W. 




20 9 17 


K. in 


A. 


20 9 17 


K. in 


A. 


20 9 17 


W. 




20 9 17 


K. in 


A. 


.'(0 II 17 


W. 




:{0 II 17 


W. 




:{0 II 17 


R.P. . 


3f W. '.'. 


17 2 18 


K. in 


A. ... 


9 4 18 


W. 




9 4 18 


W. 




l.( 4 18 


K. in 


A. 


10 5 18 


W. 




II 5 18 


W. 




29 5 15 


W. 




.11 5 15 


W. 




15 6 15 


W. 




15 6 15 


w. 




15 6 15 


Died 


at Home 


l.{ .•» 18 


W. 




2,8 17 


K. in 


A. 


.(0 II 17 


W. 




.(0 9 18 


K. in 
W. 


A. 


l.( 10 18 
i:( 10 18 



147 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy 


Pte. Brown, A. 


2;{.'>4!)N 


B 


^Pte. Bury, R 


2857 




Pte. Bretherton, E. .. 


1675 


B 


Pte. Brindle, G. 


1906 


A 


Pte. Brooks, E. 


2821 


C 


2nd Lieut. Bryce Smit 


h, H. — 


— 


Lance-Cpl. Brennan, J 


1 292 


C 


Pte. Brown, J. 


4852 


C 


^Pte. Brierley, W. 


1946 


B 


Pte. Bradley, A. 


.•{436 


C 


>fiPte. Brierley. H. 


,i9I.i 


A 


^iCpl. Bridge, H. 


1449 


C 


Pte. Bradshaw, H. .. 


164 


B 


Sgt. Brown, B. 


2292 


C 


Pte. Brooks, F. 


48.59 


B 


Pte. Briggs, F. 


4862 


A 


Lance-Sgt. Brown, A. 


5600 


B 


Pte. Briggs, J. 


... 202071 


B 


Pte. Brierley, J. H. .. 


31937 


D 


Pte. Briggs, E. 


. . . 202834 


B 


Pte. Brooks, F. 


. 202035 


B 


Cpl. Brooks, B. 


... 202650 


C 


«{.Pte. Brown, G. 


202601 


A 


Pte. Brewin, M. 


... 202849 


B 


Pte. Bradbury, J. 


... 203770 


B 


Pte. Broad, J. 


... 201576 


A 


^.Pte. Bradley, J. 


... 235031 


A 


Lance-Cpl. Bradley, C. 


... 201218 


B 


Cpl. Brennand, F. 


... 200740 


B 


^.Pte. Breakell, R. 


... 203145 


B 


»I«Pte. Breckon, G. 


... 242983 


D 


Pte. Bradnum, H. 


41621 


D 


Pte. Bridge, J. 


.32993 


D 


Pte. Bradley, J. 


41622 


B 


Pte. Breakell, S. 


201271 


D 


2nd Lieut. Bratton 


— 


— 


Pie. Brown, C. 


30693 


C 


Pte. Brown, J. 


30957 


B 


Pte. Bromley. C. 


27110 


C 


Cpl. Briggs, F. 


... 202038 


A 


^«Cpl. Brooks, B. 


... 202650 


C 


Pte. Bramall, J. 


... 244993 


C 


Pte. Brown, L. 


28222 


C 


^Pte. Bramwell, T. 


37632 


B 


Pte. Brierley, H. 


25538 


A 


»I«Pte. Brown, R 


15103 


D 


>J«Pte. Bradley. E. 


.. 201241 


D 


Pte. Briggs, W. 


31589 


D 


^Pte. Brown, H. 


.37313 


D 


Pte. Brown, H. 


28224 


A 


>J«2nd Lieut. Brooke, L. 


... 


.. 


Pte. Bradburn, B. 


10712 


B 


Cpl. Brindle, A. 


... 202037 


B 


^Pte. Brown, E. 


28155 


C 


Pte. Brown, T. 


25173 


C 


Sgt. Brough, R. 


. . 247009 


D 


Pte. Burgh, H. 


20.57 


D 


Pte. Burns, W. 


2617 


C 


>J<Pte. Bushles, J. 


. . 200920 


D 


4«Capt. Buckmaster, R. 


N. L. — 




Pte. Butler, L. 0. 


10604 


B 


Lieut. Bury, W. H. . 


— 


-- 



Nature of Casualty 

W. 

K. in A. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

K. in A. 

W. 

K. in A. 

K. in A. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

K. in A. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

K. in A. 

W. 

W. 

K. in A. 

K. in A. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

w. 
w. 
w. 
w. 

K. in A. 

W. 

R.P. of W. 

K. in A. 

W. 

K. in A. 

K. in A. 

W. 

K. in A. 

W. 

K. in A. 

R.P. of W. 

W. 

K. in A. 

W. 

Missing 

W. 

W. 

K. in A. 

K. in A. 

W. 

W. 



Date. 

N.T.17 10/18 
15/6/15 
15 '6 '15 

29 5,15 
.50 5 15 

30 5 15 
8 11/15 
28/6 16 
28/6 16 

6,8/16 

8/8/16 

8/8/16 

8/8/16 

9/9/16 

9/9/16 

6 11/16 

24 II 16 

N.T. 2,6/17 

N.T. 31 5 17 

4 6 17 
7 6 17 

18 7/17 

18 7/17 

31/7/17 

31/7/17 

31/7/17 

31/7/17 

31,7/17 

31/7/17 

31/7/17 

2 6 '18 

16 8/18 

16 8 18 

N.T. 19 8/18 

N.T. 4 9 18 

.30 10 15 

5 9/18 

14 9/18 
20 9 17 
20 9 17 
20 9 17 

20 9 17 
18 II 17 
18 II 17 
30 II 17 
;») II 17 
30 11 17 
30,11 17 

26 3 18 
28 3 17 
8/4/18 
9/4/18 
9/4/18 
9/4/18 
9/4/18 
9 4 18 

15 6 15 
15 6 15 

21 7 18 
30 II 17 

30 9 IS 
- 9 9 16 
and 16 10 18 



N.T. 



N.T. 



148 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Burke, T. 

C.S.M. Burke, J. 

Pte. Butcher, R. 
^Pte. Burns, F. 
^Pte. Ball, R 

Pte. Ball, H 

Pte. Butler, S. 

Pte. Burt, H 

Pte. Burt, J 

Pte. Burscough, A. ... 

Pte. Bunting, W. 

Pte. Burke, W. 

Pte. Buttry, R. 

2nd Lieut. Bury, W. H. 

Pte. Burrows, E 

Pte. Buckell, H. 

Pte. Buckingham, F. 

Pte. Baker, J. 

Pte. Butterworth, H. 

Pte. Bustin, E. 

Lance-Cpl. Butcher, T. 

Pte. Buckley, A. 

Lance-Cpl. Buckley, F. 

Pte. Bulgar, P. 

Lance-Cpl. Buck, J. ... 

Pte. Burke, S. 

Pte. Butterworth, J. ... 

Lieut. Bulling, A. E. 

Pte. Buth, F 

4<Pte. Bullough, C. 

Pte. Burke, E. 

Pte. Burrows, H. 
^Pte. Butler, F. 
4<Pte. Budd, W. 

Pte. Buckley, L. 

Lance-Col. Buck, J. ... 

Pte. Burns, J. H. 

Pte. Butler, A. 

Pte. Burns, H. 
^Pte. Butler, S. 

Pte. Bythell, C. T. ... 

Pte. Byrom, L. 
4<2nd Lieut. Byrne, W. 

Pte. Byrom, S. 



Pte. Cardwell, T. 
Pte. Cartmell, E. G. . 

Pte. Cartmell, W. 

Sgt. Cash, S. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Caffery, J. 

Pte. Caine, F. 

Rev. Caley, W. L. B. 

Pte. Cawham, H. 

Pte. Callon, W. 
^Pte. Castle, J. 

Pte. Calligan, R. 

Sgt. Carter, T. 

Pte. Cavies, T. 

Pte. Caddich, J. 
^Pte. Carter. G. T 



No. 



Coy. 



Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



2!)4,{| 


B 


W. 




23 10/18 


■'■mt 


B 


W. 




15 6 15 


77.5 


B 


w. 




15 6 15 


2N8G 


B 


K. in 


A. 


15/6/15 


;J520 


D 


K. in 


A. .. 


3/11/15 


NI2 


D 


W. 




1/4/16 


250:{ 


A 


W. 




31/7/16 


2iai8S 


D 


W. 




S/8/I6 


.{081 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


4293 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


3919 


c 


W. 




8/8/16 


246 


c 


W. 




8/8/16 


1790 


B 


w. 




8/8/16 


— 


. 


w. 




9/9/16 


4425 


B 


w. 




9/9/16 


2048 


B 


w. 




9/9/16 


(•213 


B 


Missing 


9/9/16 


19738 


C 


W. 




19/5/17 


200821 


B 


W. 




13/7/17 


2027.58 


— 


W. 




31/7/17 


20I2G0 


B 


W. 




31/7/17 


29718 




W. 




317,17 


238013 


D 


w. 




. N.T. 317,17 


20390(i 


B 


R.P. 


of W. '.'. 


31,7/17 


I82S7 


D 


W. 




17/8/18 


31,500 


B 


W. 




24/8/18 


2SS58 


C 


W. 
W. 




3/9/18 
1/10/18 


ir>89r> 


'. D 


W. 




20/9/17 


202108 


C 


K. in 


A. 


31,7/17 


.321.5,5 


c 


W. 




18 II 17 


202010 


c 


W. 




IS 11 17 


24.530 


A 


K. in 


A. 


20 II 17 


28209 


C 


K. in 


A. .. 


IS II 17 


28223 


A 


W. 




3011 ,17 


18287 


D 


W. 




21/3/18 


34925 


D 


Missing 


. N.T. 12/4/18 


2.5219 


D 


W. 




12 4/18 


217.57 


B 


W. 




. N.T. 28/4/18 


200597 


A 


D. of W. 14 


5 IS ; 19/5/18 


243870 


A 


W. 




24 3/18 


202781 


B 


W. 




31/7/17 


— 




K. in 


A. 


30/9/18 


41623 


A 


W. 




14/5/18 


4612 


B 


W. 




9/9/16 


305 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 
and 26 '9 16 


336 


A 


W. 




15 6 15 
and 20/9/16 


6174 


A 


W. 




28/9/16 


2106 


C 


W. 




28/9/16 


2684 1 


D 


W. 




4/6/17 




Chaplain 


W. 




31/7/17 


3395 


A 


W. 




31/7/17 


3902 


D 


W. 




5/8/16 


45.39 


A 


K. in 


A. 


8/8/16 


4614 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


322 


C 


W. 




13/8/16 


3250 


C 


W. 




9/9/16 


4308 


C 


w. 




. N.T. 9/9/16 


29.53 


B 


K. in 


A. '.'. 


14 15 



149 



Rank and Name. 
Pte. Catterall, J. 

.{«Pte. Catterall, P. 
>f<Pte. Carter, W. 

Pte. Cain, E 

Lance-Cpl. Caton, J. C. 
.fPte. Calder, J. H. ... 

Pte. Caffery, T. J. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Calderbank, H. 

Lance-Cpl. Caffery, J. 

Lance-Cpl. Cartmell, W. 

Pte. Carrington, G. 
►fiSgt. Calvert, W. 
4.Pte. Catterall, M. 
►J<Pte. Cavanagh, J. W. 

Pte. Calvert, W. H. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Caton, R. 

Pte. Catterall, G. 

Pte. Calvert, J. 
^Pte. Cashmore, H. W. 
«|«Pte. Catterall, L. 
4<Pte. Calder, J. H. 
►I«Pte. Carney, F. R. J 

Pte. Cadd, W. 

Pte. Cass, T 

2nd Lieut. Cairns, J. 
^Pte. Carter, H. 

Sgt. Cayton, T. 

Pte. Carroll, E. S. ... 
^.Pte. Carlill, A. 

Pte. Cartwright, G. ... 

^Pte. Carr, S 

Pte. Cartwright, J. 

Pte. Carrodus, R. 

Pte. Cardwell, A. 

Pte. Carroll, J. 

Pte. Cartmell, J. 

^Sgt. Calvert, W. 

Pte. Cardwell, A. 

Pte. Carr, C 

Lance-Cpl. Cavies, T. 

Cpl. Cavies, T. 

►pPte. Capley, C. 

Capt. Collett, C. G. ... 

^Cpl. Carson, W. 

Pte. Carroll, J. 

Pte. Catterall, J. 

Capt. Carmichael, D. 

Pte. Carpenter, G. 

Pte. Casson, J. 

Pte. Chapman, J. 

Pte. Churm, F. L. ... 

Pte. Chapman, R. 

(fcPte. Charnley, T. A. 

>J<Pte. Chapman, C. 

Pte. Chapman, J. 

^Pte. Chadwick, J. 

Pte. Charnley, J. 

>I<Pte. Charnley, F. C. ... 

Pte. Chipperfield, A. F. 

Pte. Chadderton, J. ... 



No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


4304 


A 


W. 


26/3/16 
and 8/8/16 


1442 


D 


K. in A. ... 


1/4/16 


1909 


C 


K. in A. 


23/4/16 


;«» 


B 


W. 


26/5/16 


42 


B 


W. 


28/6/16 


299.1 


C 


K. in A. 


28/6/16 


109.5 


C 


W. 


26/6/16 


HM.S 


A 


W. 


3/8,16 


2106 


C 


W. 


5/8,16 


200173 


A 


W. 


2/8,17 


202157 


C 


W. 


31/7 17 


235007 


C 


D. of W. ... 


26/8,18 


9244 


D 


K. in A. 


20 11 /I7 


204880 


— 


Died 


10 7 17 


28229 


B 


W. 


20 11 17 


200545 


A 


W. 


20/11/17 


28233 


A 


W. 


20/11/17 


2654 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


2917 


D 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


2665 


A 


K. inA. ... 


15/6/15 


2995 


D 


K. in A 


28/6/18 


28246 


A 


K. in A. ... 


30/11/17 


29263 


A 


R.P. of W. ... 


23 10 18 


38883 


A 


W. 


N.T. 11/9/18 


— 


— 


w. 


30/9/18 


38666 


B 


K. in A. ... 


1/10/18 


12154 


B 


W. 


30/9/18 


30959 


C 


W. 


1/10/18 


31006 


B 


K. in A. ... 


4/11/18 


10274 


A 


W. 


N.T. 23/5/18 
and 29/10/18 


201436 


C 


D. of W. ... 


24/5/18 


2320 


B 


W. 


16/6/18 


31874 


B 


W. 


3/7/18 


28225 


D 


W. 


9/7/18 


29405 


D 


W. 


16/8/18 


27998 


D 


W. 


17/8/18 


235007 


B 


D. ofW. ... 


25/8/18 


28225 


D 


W. 


21/8/18 


3685 


B 


w. 


N.T. 4/9/18 


201009 


B 


w. 


31/7/17 


201009 


B 


w. 


4/9/18 


9024 


B 


K. inA. ... 


15/4/18 


— 


— 


W. 


15/4/18 


240177 


A 


K. inA. ... 


9/4/18 


29405 


D 


W. 


25,4/18 


201653 


A 


W. 


26/4/18 


— 


- - 


W. 


20 ,'4/ 18 


34323 


D 


W. 


30/11/17 


28227 


A 


W. 


2/5/18 


6149 


C 


W. 


26/9/16 


200232 


C 


W. 


N.T. 21,7/17 


3844 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


4017 


D 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


3842 


D 


K. in A. ... 


9/9.16 


4746 


C 


W. 


N.T. 9,9/16 


2052 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 






D. ofW. ... 


31/7/16 


1931 


C 


W. 


5/8/16 


11186 


B 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


34942 


C 


R.P. of W.... 


18/11/17 


202578 


B 


W. 


21/11/17 



150 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Mature of Casualty. 




Date. 


^.Pte. 


Child, J. J. 


;i(i() 1 


A 


K. in A. ... 




15/6/15 


*Pte. 


Chappie, G. 


Xtfill 


D 


K. in A. ... 




16/6/15 


Pte. 


Christian, J. 


4202 


A 


W. 




9/9/16 


Pte. 


Charnley, J. 


200422 


B 


W. 




12/7/17 


Pte. 


Chettleburgh, J. W. 


29725 


C 


W. 




31/7/17 


Pte. 


Chambers, E. E. 


417NO 


C 


W. 




S/9/18 


Pte. 


Charlton, J. 


;tl009 


C 


W. 




I/I0/I8 


2nd 


Lieut. Chambers, J. 


— 


— 


Missing 




23/10/18 


2nd 


Lietu. Chapman, B. 


R. W. 


. . 


W. 




17/5/18 


Cpl. 


Charlesworth, J. 


25487 


C 


W. 




19/5/18 


4<Pte. 


Carishem, T. 


41086 


D 


K. in A. ... 




2/6/18 


Pte. 


Charnley, C. 


;{67;« 


D 


K. in A. .. 




9/4/18 


Pte. 


Chorley, J. 


... 2.i5l6;J 


B 


Missing 


N.T. 


13/4/18 


Pte. 


Chorlton,' T. A. ... 


29097 


B 


W. 




9/4/18 


Pte. 


Clayton, G. 


1424 


C 


W. 




27/9/16 


Pte. 


Clayton, G. 


... 200270 


C 


w. 


an 


13/7/17 
d 2/9/18 


Pie. 


Clayton, H. 


4068 


D 


w. 




8/8/16 


Pte. 


Clarke, E. 


4680 


B 


w. 


N.T. 


9/9/16 


Lance-Cpl. Clarke, G. 


2240 


A 


w. 




9/9/16 


»i«Pte. 


Clough, J. 


2575 


C 


K. in A. 




9/9/16 


Pte. 


Clement, H. 


4319 


C 


W. 


N.T. 


9 9/16 


Sgt. 


Clayton, S. T. ... 


1284 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. 


Clarkson, T. 


2657 


C 


W. 




26/4/16 


^Pte. 


Clarke, J. 


35 


A 


K. m A 




28/6/16 


*Sgt. 


Clarke, J. B. 


2I00N 


A 


K. in A. .. 


N.T. 


28 6 / 1 6 


Lan 


ce-Cpl. Clough, J. 


2573 


C 


W. 




1/8/16 


Pte. 


Clarkson, J. R. ... 


3080 


C 


W. 




5/8/16 


Pte. 


Clark, W. 


3297 


A 


Missing 


N.T. 


2/8/17 


Pte. 


Clarkson, R. 


... 200571 


C 


W. 




31/7/17 


Pte. 


Clay, J 


... 200660 


A 


W. 




20 9/17 


^Pte. 


Clayton, S. 


20.59 


D 


K. in A. ... 




15 6/15 


4<Pte. 


Clark, W. 


41709 


— • 


K. inA. ... 




30/9/18 


^.Cpl. 


Clarkson, L. 


MI!) 


D 


W. 

K. in A. 




15 6/15 
28,6/16 


Pte. 


Clarkson, W. H. 


1916 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. 


Clarke, J. 


28158 


C 


W. 




4 9 18 


^Pte. 


Clarke, L. G. ... 


28232 


B 


Presumed Killed 


9/4/18 


Pte. 


Clarke, J. 


... 240241 


B 


R.P. ofW. ... 




9/4/18 


Pte. 


Clarke, J. 


... 201441 


D 


W. 




13/4/18 


^Pte. 


Clarke, R. T. ... 


28231 


B 


K. in A. ... 




14/9/18 


Pte. 


Clayton, E. H. ... 


28228 


C 


W. 




9/4/18 


Pte. 


Clare, P 


20549 


C 


W. 




27/4/18 


>I.Pte. 


Clarkson, H. 


120 


A 


K. inA. ... 




15/6/15 


«|«Cpl. 


Collier, J. 


... 201078 


• - 


K. in A. ... 




1/12/17 


4.Pte. 


Collier, S. 


... 202740 


— 


K. in A. ... 




9,9/16 


»I«Pte. 


Commons, E. 


140 


— 


K. in A. 




16/6/15 


Pte. 


Cottom, W. 


3912 


C 


Missing 




9/9/16 


^Pte. 


Corless, H. 


3398 


C 


D. of W. ... 




2/I0/I6 


Pte. 


Cooper, G. 


3046 


D 


W. 




26/9/16 


Pte. 


Corcorn, T. 


202043 


A 


W. 




2/6/17 


Pte. 


Collins, A. 


... 202621 


.. 


W. 




5/6/17 


Pte. 


Counsel!, J. 


18740 


B 


W. 




10/7/17 


Pte. 


Cooper, G. 


... 200875 


A 


w. 




15/7/17 


Pte. 


Coley, T. 


34336 


B 


w. 




15/7/17 


Pte. 


Coote, W. 


... 200595 


A 


w. 


N.T. 


18/7/17 


R.S.M. Corns, R 


. 200182 


D 


w. 




18/7/17 


^•Pte. 


Coe, S. C 


26005 


C 


K. in A. ... 




21/7/17 


Sgt. 


Cookson, J. 


... 200158 


C 


W. 




21/7/17 


Pte. 


Coulton, L. 


20096(i 




W. 


N.T. 


31/7/17 


Lance-Sgt. Collins, W. 


223!) 


A 


W. 




8/8/16 


Pte. 


Cox, T 


4871 


C 


W 




8/8/16 



151 



Rank and Name. 



No. 



Coy. Nature of Casualty 



Pte. 


Cocker, T. 


4()2i) 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


Pte. 


Collier, T 


55.58 


C 


w. 




.. N.T. 8/8/16 


Lan 


ce-Cpl. Corner, H. 


447!) 


D 


w. 




8/8/lfi 


Pte. 


Comber, T. 


.•t6fi4 


C 


w. 




8y8/16 


Pte. 


Cookson, J. 


.{903 


C 


w. 




8/8/16 


Pte 


Coxhead, R 


3530 


c 


w. 




8/8/16 


Pte. 


Cowley, C. 


,5011 


B 


w. 




8/9/16 


Pte. 


Corless, H. 


3398 


C 


w. 




9/9/16 


Pte. 


Cocker, W 


.3774 


C 


w. 




9/9/16 


^Pte. 


Costello, E. G 


4873 


A 


K. in 


A. 


9/9/16 


Pte. 


Collins. W 


3790 


B 


W. 




. N.T 9/9/16 


Pte. 


Cowell, C 


1487 


D 


w. 




9 9/16 


Pte. 


Cowell, R. 


3056 


B 


w. 




14/6/15 


Pte. 


Collinson, W. E. 


1373 


D 


w. 




14/6/15 


Pte. 


Cookson, J 


314 


C 


w. 




15/6/15 
and 30/5/18 


Pte. 


Compton, T. 


129 


D 


w. 




. N.T. 20/4/16 


^-Pte. 


Connolly, W. 


1462 


- 


K. in 


A. 


15/6/15 


4<Pte. 


Connor, C. J. 


32142 


. 


D. of W. 


26/3/18 


^Cpl. 


Coupe, R. 


2525 




K. in 


A. 


14/7/16 


4<Pte. 


Coupe, T. 


6 


— 


K. in 


A. 


11/9/15 


APte. 


Croston, A. 


28 


— 


K. in 


A. 


16/10/14 


Pte. 


Coxhead, R 


3530 


C 


W. 




.. N.T. 3,7/16 


Pte. 


Corless, H 


3398 


c 


W. 




4/7/16 


Pte. 


Cox, T 


4871 


c 


W. 




5 7/16 


Cpl. 


Cowburn, W. 


783 


D 


W. 




.. N.T. 5 8/16 


Pte, 


Cottom, R. 


200751 


c 


W. 




.. N.T. 31/7/17 
and 20/9/17 


Pte. 


Coulton, L. 


202966 


A 


W. 




31 7/17 
and 20/9/17 


Lance-Cpl. Cooper, J. C. 


202104 


D 


W. 




20 9/17 


Lance-Cpl. Conway, J. 


26812 


A 


W. 




30,10/17 


►fiPte. 


Coupe, T. 


4119 


c 


K. in 


A. 


11 9/15 


Pte. 


Collins, R. 


28045 


C 


W. 




.. N.T.I8 11/17 


Pte. 


Cornwell, J. A. ... 


202631 


A 


W. 




20/11/17 


Pte. 


Conlon, R. 


28226 


A 


W. 




30/11/17 


Pte. 


Corrie, T. 


3061 


B 


W. 




.. N.T.30/11/17 


Pte. 


Colvin, J. 


2400 


C 


W. 




15/6,15 


Pte. 


Coupe, F. 


2678 


A 


w. 




15/6/15 


Pte. 


Corry, J 


144 


B 


w. 




15,6/15 


^Pte. 


Cortman, F. 


1429 


D 


K. in 


A. 


15/6 15 


APte. 


Cocker, E. 


2088 


D 


K. in 


A. 


15/6/15 


Pte. 


Cookson, J. 


3038 


C 


Missing 


15/6/15 


Pte. 


Corfield, J. E 


29403 


D 


K. in 


A. 


17/6/18 


Pte. 


Cocking, E. 


3967 


A 


W. 




9/9/16 


Pte. 


Cockran, A. 


.{0612 


B 


W. 




5,9/18 


Lance-Cpl. Coleman, R. 


26009 


A 


W. 




30,9/18 


Pte. 


Connolly, J. 


41711 


B 


W. 




30/9 18 


Pte. 


Commins, A. S. G. 


30362 


A 


R.P. 


of W. 


23/10/18 


Pte. 


Cones, G. E. 


21455 


A 


W. 




23/10/18 


4«Pte. 


Cookson, T. 


20254 1 


A 


D. of W.24 


10 18; 27/10/18 


Sgt. 


Corns, E. 


1435 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. 


Cowell, C. 


1487 


D 


W. 




15,6/15 


Lan 


ce-Cpl. Collins. W. 


2239 


A 


W. 




15,6/15 


Pte. 


Connors, J. 


28238 


A 


W. 




14/5/18 


^.2nd 


Lieut. Cooper, W. R. . 


— 


— 


K. in 


A. 


14/5 18 


Pte. 


Corry, J. ... 


202061 


D 


W. 




.. N.T. 14/5/18 


C.Q.M.S. Cosgrove. J. 


34979 


B 


W. 




14/5/18 


Pte. 


Coop, F. ... 


61215 


A 


W. 




.. N.T. 29/5/18 


Sgt. 


Cookson, J. 


200158 


C 


W. 




30/5/18 


Pte. 


Coleman, E. A. ... 


29912 


A 


W. 




1/6/18 


Cpl. 


Collier, F. W 


. 202905 


C 


W. 




2/6/18 


Pte. 


Coleman, W 


238027 


D 


W. 




2/6 '18 



Date. 



152 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Coyle, W. 

'ind Lieut. Cowan, C. B 

Pte. Cox, E. ... 

Pte. Coley, T. 

Pte. Cook, H. J. 

>J«Pte. Colleney, T. 

Pte Cooper, G. 

Pte. Colquhoun, C. W, 

Pte. Cox, J. ... 

Pte. Cox, J. ... 

Pte. Crook, G. 

Pte. Crompton, B 

Pte. Crompton, S. 

Pte. Crook, W. 

Pte. Craig, J. ... 

>i.Pte. Crook, R. 

Pte. Crook, P. 

Pte. Cross, W. 

Pte Crane, J. 

Pte. Croasdale, A. 

Pte. Cross, H. 

Pte. Crabtree, J. 



2nd 

Pte. 

Pte. 
•fiPte. 
4<Pte. 

Pte. 
>|«Pte. 
^iPte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
*Sgt. 

2nd 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
4«Pte. 

Pte. 

2nd 
^Pte. 



Lieut. Crone, J. 
Cross, T. ... 
Critchley, J. 
Cross, J. ... 
Crook, R. 
Cross, E. S. 
Croft, J. ... 
Crook, P. 
Crane, J. 
Craven, E. 
Cross, E. ... 
Lieut. Craven, N 
Cross, S. . . 
Crank, R. A. 
Crowther, R. 
Crerar, J. 
Croasdale, W. 
Lieut Crossley, W 
Crook, G. 



Pte. Cryer, H. 

4«Pte. Cross, T. ... 

Pte. Crossen, J. 

Pte. Croft, J. A. 

Pte. Crossley, A. 

Pte Crook, S. 

Sgt. Crabtree, H. 
Lance-Sgt. Crougham, J 



Pte. Croasdale, E. 

Lance-Cpl. Crompton, J 

4«Pte. Crossley, A. 

Pte. Crossley, W. 

4«Pte. Crowe, A. J. 

►pPte. Crabtree, E. 

Pte. Cumming, J. 

Pte. Cunliffe, J. 

Pte. Curwen, C. 

Pte. Curly, J. ... 



No. 
41630 

26224 

34336 

28230 

14568 

290769 

35673 

240515 

29404 

3859 

4672 

31605 

25634 

235032 

202530 

4874 

3890 

2829 

586 

4854 

15 



171(i 

20266(i 

202628 

202.530 

261 1H(; 

36901 

201014 

2829 

2872 

735 

26161 
30611 
30691 
29092 

28886 

201495 

202563 
200384 
1625 
290282 
201635 
203045 
243874 
201146 

2002 1 1 
265149 
2823.S 
20491.1 
20.SI0.i 
24.5857 

4980 
14318 

4429 
243651 



Coy. 
D 

C 
B 
B 
B 
C 
D 
B 
C 
A 
B 
C 
D 
A 
A 
C 
D 

B 
D 
B 
B 



A 
A 
A 
A 
C 
B 
C 
B 
B 
A 

C 
B 

C 
D 



C 
A 
C 
A 
A 
B 
D 
B 

D 
D 
C 
A 
B 
A 
B 
D 
B 
D 



Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



w. 


2/6/18 


w. 


5/8/16 


w. 


3,9/18 


w. 


Mill, 17 


w. 


30 11 17 


D. of W. .. 


5/12 17 


W. 


13 4/18 


W. 


11/4/18 


W. 


I6/4/I8 


W. 


1/5/18 


W. 


29/9/16 


W. 


10/1,17 


W. 


19/5/17 


W. 


21 IS in 


w. 


615117 


K. in A. .. 


31 Pin 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


1/8/16 




and 9/9/16 


W 


9/9 16 


W. 


28/5,16 


W. 


3/7/16 


w. 


31/7/16 


K. inA. .. 


21/8/16 


Shock 


31/7/16 


W. 


3/8/16 


K. in A. .. 


31/7/17 


D. of W. .. 


4/8/17 


K. in A. .. 


31/7/17 


W. 


20/9/17 


K. in A. .. 


20/9,17 


D. of W. .. 


.30 11/17 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


15/6/15 


K. in A. .. 


15/6/15 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


3/9/18 


W. 


4/9/18 


W. 


9 9/18 


K. in A. .. 


9,9 18 


W. 


.to 9 18 


W. 


13 10 18 


W 


16 8 18 


K. in A. 


14/10/18 


W. 


24/10/18 


Killed in Bru 


ssels 25/4/19 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


14/5,18 


W 


23,5,18 


W. 


N.T. 15 8 18 


W. 


16 8 16 


W. 


25 3 18 




and 9 4,18 


Missing 


N.T. 9 4 18 


W. 


13/4/18 


K. in A. .. 


9/4/18 


W. 


9/4/18 


K. in A. .. 


25/4/18 


K. inA. .. 


14/5/18 


W. 


9,9,16 


W. 


1/6/17 


W. 


2/8/16 


W. 


31/7/17 



153 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Nature of 


Casualty. 




Date. 


Pte. Curry, J. 


202903 


C 


W. 




and 


31 7 17 
18/11/17 


Pte. Cunningham, D. 


16940 


D 


W. 






30/10/17 


.{.Pte. Cuthbert, H 


202579 


D 


K. 


in A. 




18/11/17 


^Pte. Culshaw, J. H 


2807. •{ 


D 


D. 


ofW. .., 




10/12/17 


^Pte. Curl, A. J 


2428.30 


D 


K. 


inA. 




1/10/18 


Pte. Cunningham, W. 


1615 


C 


W. 






15/6/15 


Pte. Cunhffe, S 


28243 


A 


W. 






25/5/18 


Pte. Culshaw, J. H 


3284 


A 


W. 




' N.T 


. 9/4/18 


Pte. Curtis, T. S 


41632 


B 


W. 






11/5/18 


Pte. Cutler, J. 


23207 


B 


w. 






9/5/18 


Sgt. Cyr, D 


— 


B 


w. 




N.T 30/11/17 


Capt. Crump, J A. ... 


— 


— 


Shock 




15/6/15 


Pte. Dainty, G. 


1386 


D 


W. 






15/6/15 


Sgt. Davenport, J. E. 


1545 


B 


W. 






26/5/15 


Pte. Darwen, J. 


2956 


B 


W. 






15/6/15 


Pte. Davidson, C 


3896 


D 


W. 




N.T 


. 28/6/16 


Pte. Daisy, T. 


7042 


C 


W. 




N.T 


. 7,8/16 


Pte. Davies, W 


1905 


A 


W. 






8/8/16 


Pte. Davies, C. 


3981 


C 


W. 




N.T 


. 8/8/16 


Pte. Daley, J. B 


3927 


C 


W. 






8/8/16 


Pte. Dalton, A. 


1726 


c 


w. 






9/9/16 


Pte. Daggers. R 


1518 


B 


w. 




N.T. 


9/9/16 


Pte. Dale, W. 


202507 


B 


w. 






6/6/17 


Pte. Davies, G. A 


34317 


A 


w. 






5/6/17 


Pte. Davies, H. 


. 202567 


D 


w. 






30/7/17 


Pte. Davenport, S. R. 


235010 


C 


w. 






31/7/17 


Pte. Dawson, R 


202483 


B 


w. 






31/7/17 


Lance-Cpl. Davies, W. J. 


34301 


— 


w. 






31/7/17 


2nd Lieut. Dance, H. 


— 


— 


w. 






20/9/17 


Pte. Dandy, J. 


18235 


B 


w. 






29/9/19 


Pte. Davies, S. 


24465 


A 


w. 






20/9/17 


Pte. Davies, A. E 


290644 


B 


w. 






20,9/17 


Pte. Davies, S. 


202048 


A 


w. 






20/9/17 


Pte. Daggers, G. 


200210 


C 


w. 






20/9/17 


Pte. Davies, W 


28248 


B 


w. 






30/11/17 


Lance-Cpl. Davey F. 


201380 


B 


w. 






9/4/18 










26 6 18 and 


17/10,18 


^Pte. Davies, 0. 


39878 


— 


D. ofW. ... 




23/4/18 


►J<Pte. Davies, R. 


24124 


— 


K. i 


in A. 




20/9/17 


►J«Pte. Davies, T. 


202513 


— 


K. i 


in A. 




31/7/17 


»|<Pte. Davenport, S 


29105 


A 


K. i 


inA. ... 




20/5/18 


2nd Lieut. Dawson, J. 


— 


— 


W. 






2/6/18 


Pte. Davies, D. M 


41170 


D 


W. 






18/8/18 


Pte. Dawson, R 


. 202483 


B 


W. 






3/7/18 


Pte Davenport, H. C. 


37837 


C 


W. 




N.T. 


11/7/18 


2nd Lieut. Davies, H. 






W. 






5/9/18 


2nd Lieut. Daniels, H. 


— 




W. 






11,9 18 


Pte. Davies, E. 


41075 


A 


W. 






14 9 18 


Cpl. Dandy, J. 


18235 


D 


W. 






27,9,18 


Pte. Davies, E. C 


28420 


D 


W. 






30 9 19 


Pte. Davies, W. J 


34301 


B 


W. 






14 10 18 


Pte. Dand, M. 


41634 


D 


W. 






16/8,18 


^2nd Lieut. Davies, W. A. .. 




. 


K. inA. ... 




15/6/15 


Sgt. Daggers, H 


16440 


C 


W. 






9/4/18 


Pte. Davies, G. 


29108 


A 


W. 






14/5 18 


Pte. Davies, E. G 


29388 


B 


W. 






14/10.18 


>J<Lieut. De Blaby, R 


- — 


— 


D. of W. ... 




8,8 16 


►J«Sgt. Devey, F. 


1592 


B 


K. inA. ... 




9 8 16 


Pte. Dennison, R. 


1058 


C 


W. 






15 6 15 


4«Pte. Dewhurst, J 


2554 


A 


K. inA. ... 




16/5 15 


Pte. Dewhurst, F 


4567 


B 


W. 






8/10/16 



154 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Dewhurst, F. 

Pte. Dempsey, J. 
>J<Pte. Dempsey, J. 

Pte. Dean, C. H. 

Pte. Delaney, J. 

Pte. Dewhurst, F. 

Pte. Dean, J. W. 
^Pte. Derbyshire, S. 
<i>Pte. Dewhurst, H. 
>I«Pte. Dinwoodie, D. 

Cpl. Dearden, W. 
4<Pte. Dench, G. 

Pte. Demain, E. H. 

Sgt. Dean, J. ... 
(fiPte. Dexter, F. G. 

Pte. Deardon, W. 

Lance-Cpl. Dewhurst, J 

Cpl. Dewhurst, J. 

Lance-Cpl. Dickenson 

Pte. Dixon, R. 

Pte. Dixon, T. 

Pte. Dixon, R. 

Pte. Diggle, W. 

Pte. Dingsdale, T. 
^Lance-Cpl Dickinson, D. 

Pte. Dickenson, R. M. 

Pte. Dilworth, A. 

Pte. Digby, H. L. 
►J.Pte. Dixon, W. 
^Pte. Dickenson, T. 

Pte. Dickenson, T. 

2nd Lieut. Dixon, J G. H 
4«Pte. Downing, J. 

Pte. Dowding, H. 

Pte. Dobson. H. G. 

Pte. Doble, E. 

Pte. Dodgson, J. 

Capt. Donald, S. B. 
4«Pte. Doyne, W. 
^Pte. Dobson, S. B. 
►fiSgt. Donnellv, J. 
4.Cpl. Doran, J. 
►J<Pte. Duncan, A G. 

Pte. Dodgson, J. 

Pte. Doult, H. 
^.Pte. Donkin, A. 

Pte. Dobson, G. 
^Pte. Draper, F. 

Pte. Draper, G. 
4«Pte. Drew, W. 

Pte. Dring, A. 

Pte. Durham, R. 

Pte. Duckworth, A. 
«I.Pte. Dunn, S. 

Pte. Duijdale, W. 
>f<Pte. Dunderdale, E. 

2nd Lieut. Ducksbury, O. H 

Pte. Dudley, J. 

Pte. Duerdon, J 
>J.Pte. Duckworth, H. 

Pte. Duckworth, S. 

Pte. Duckworth, E. 

2nd Lieut. Duerden, W. 



No. 

(i2IK 

(>2I!> 

202S;f« 

201S99 

200050 

2n28.'J7 

242.(.S2 

20;«i.5.S 

20.'ilU(i 

28074 

202419 

2S5009 

28251 

201694 

1 1 4().'< 

202049 

25799 

25799 

2,5(i7 

2(i58 

:J982 

4.541 

.{027 

202605 

200026 

2026.J4 

22552 

282407 

.576537 

290599 

23741 

2981 
45.59 
4535 
243237 
2851 

6125 

202122 

202900 

240607 

235033 

200773 

203334 

30999 

.30961 

6273 

28148 

204911 

201683 

2618 

3403 

.302 

2922 

200546 

333S 
4673 
6276 
6235 
6217 



Coy. 

B 
B 
B 
B 
B 

D 



C 
A 
B 
B 
D 
D 
B 
D 
A 
B 
B 
D 
D 
C 
B 



B 
C 
B 
C 
D 

A 
C 
B 
B 
C 

C 
A 
D 



A 
B 
C 
B 
D 
A 
D 
D 
A 
D 
A 
B 
B 

C 
A 
D 
C 
B 



Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



w. 


9,9/16 


w. 


9/9/16 


K. in A. 


7/6/17 


W. 


6/5/17 


W. 


16 7/17 


W. 


31 7,17 


W. 


20,9/17 


Died 


6/4/17 


K. in A. 


7,6/17 


K. in A. 


18 11 17 


W. 


.. N.T.30/II ,17 


D. of W. 


17/12,17 


W. 


9 '4/18 


W 


N.T. 13/4 18 


K. in A. 


16,8 18 


W. 


16,8,18 


W. 


13,7/17 


W. 


12/4/18 


K. in A. 


3/8/16 


W. 


IS/6/15 


W. 


31/7/16 


W. 


9/9/16 


W. 


26/9/16 


W. 


31/7/17 


D. of W. 


7/4/17 


W. 


31/7/17 


W. 


20/9/17 


Missing 


... N.T.18/11/17 


K. in A. 


8/11/17 


D. of W. 


19/2/18 


W. 


16/8/18 


W. 


17/8/18 


K. in A. 


16/6/15 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


w. 


9/9/16 


w. 


9/9/16 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


K. in A. 


19/5/17 


K. in A. 


7/3/18 


K. in A. 


20/9/17 


W. 


9/8/18 


W. 


7/9/18 


K. in A. 


24/9/18 


W. 


17 10,18 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


W. 


30,11/17 


K. in A. 


12/4/18 


W. 


30 '9/18 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


12/7/15 


K. in A. 


20 8/15 


W. 


28/6/16 


K. in A. 


8 8/16 


W., P.P. 


ofW. 8 8/16 


W. 


.. N.T. 9/9/16 


W. 


. N.T. 9/9/16 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


W. 


26/9/16 


W. 


26/6/16 


W. 


26/9/16 



155 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


feature of C 


asualty 


Date. 


Pte. 


Duggan, J. 


(il7.S 


A 


W. 




29 9,16 


►fiPte. 


Duerden, T. 


(>I7(! 


A 


K. in 


A. 


23 12 16 


C.Q 


M.S. Dudley, J. ... 


200I2N 


B 


W. 




24/5 17 


C.S.M. Dudley, J. 


200128 


A 


R.P. 


of W. . 


31/7/17 


►I-Pte. 


Duckworth, A, ... 


20IIII 


D 


D. of W. 


8/6 16 


4<Pte. 


Duggan, J. 


2027!>(i 


D 


D. of W. . 


8 6/17 


Pte, 


Dunne, G. 


2.i502.S 


- 


W. 




31 1/17 


Pte. 


Dunn, J. 


282.'>2 


C 


w. 




18 11,17 


Pte. 


Dunnigan, J 


. 20242.< 


B 


w. 




.iO 7,17 


Pte. 


Duckworth, H. . 


2X24!) 


D 


w. 




17 2 18 


>{.Pte. 


Duckworth, A. ... 


24.'{50l 


A 


K. in 


A. 


20/5/18 


4-Cpl. 


Dutton, T. 


;{046,S 


D 


K. in 


A. . 


2/6/18 


Pte. 


Duxbury, B. 


... 201781 


B 


W. 




3/6/18 
and 10 9 18 


Cpl. 


Durose, F. 


;f9.S7(! 


C 


W. 




. N.T. 27/7/18 


Pte. 


Dunn, J. 


.•{228,S 


D 


W. 




17/8/18 


►I-Pte. 


Duddle, T. 


;{03;to 


B 


K. in 


A. 


2/10/18 


^<Cpl. 


Duxbury, W. T. 


202699 


A 


K. in 


A. 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Duckworth, A. ... 


. 24X50 1 


A 


W. 




30 11 '17 


Pte. 


Dyson, J. 


202580 




W. 




5/6/18 


Pte. 


Eaves, J. 


1 098 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. 


Eastham, J. 


3912 


D 


W. 




8/8/16 


Pte. 


Eastham, T. 


3118 


B 


W. 




8/8/16 


Pte. 


Eastham, R. 


3I.J9 


C 


W. 




9/9/16 


^Pte. 


Eaves, T. 


200698 


B 


K. in 


A. 


31/7/17 


^Pte. 


Eaves, R. 


... 200225 


C 


K. in 


A. 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Eastham, R. 


... 200937 


C 


W. 




31/7/17 


^Pte. 


Eastwood, J. A. 


416,37 


A 


K. in 


A. 


14/5/18 


Pte. 


Easton, G. H. ... 


282,55 


B 


W. 




3/7/18 


^Pte. 


Easthorpe, C. A. 


35186 


B 


K. in 


A. '. 


14/10/18 


Pte. 


Eales, J 


416.fS 


D 


W. 




4/9/18 


^2nd 


Lieut. Eccles, W. 


... 




K. in 


A. 


30/5/16 


Pte. 


Eckton, J. 


2302 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. 


Eckersley, A. 


243224 


A 


W. 




8 '8/16 


►{.Pte. 


Eccles, F. 


4546 


B 


K. in 


A. 


9/9/16 


4<Pte. 


Eckersley, J. 


6170 


D 


W. 
K. in 


A. 


21 12/16 
10 1 17 


Pte. 


Eckersley, J. H. 


... 202389 


D 


W. 




31 7 17 


Pte. 


Eccles, T. 


... 201288 


A 


W. 




20 9 17 


Pte. 


Eccleston, I. 


341.506 fR.A 


M.C. 


W. 




. N.T.30 11 17 


Pte. 


Ecceston, J. 


. . 201102 


B 


W. 




M) II 17 


Pte. 


Eckersley, J 


... 202389 


D 


W. 




10 4 18 

and 16 8 12 


C.S.M. Edwards, T. J. 


804 


C 


W. 




15 6 15 


Pte. 


Edwards, C. 


1617 


C 


W. 




15 6 15 


Pte. 


Edwards, F. D. ... 


4946 


C 


W. 




23 12 16 


Pte. 


Edge, J 


202622 


A 


W. 




31 7,17 


Cpl. 


Edgar, K. V. ... 


201616 


B 


W. 




31 '7/17 


Pte. 


Edwards, F. D. ... 


... 202107 


A 


w. 




23 12/16 
and 20 10/17 


Pte. 


Edge, F 


28275 


B 


w. 




9/4/18 


Pte. 


Edwards. J. W. 


... 235496 


B 


w. 




5/9 18 


Pte. 


Edwards. T. 


14541 


B 


w. 




.30 9/18 


►I-Pta. 


Egan, J. 


4397 


B 


D. of W. . 


26 9 16 


^Pte. 


Egan, L. 


. . 242917 


B 


K. in 


A. . 


25/4/18 


Pte. 


Ellison, E. 


2991 


C 


W. 




5/8/16 


Pte. 


Elliott, R. 


3508 


B 


W. 




8/8/16 


Pte. 


Ellis, F. C. 


26574 


— 


W. 




10/4/18 


►I-Pte. 


EUemont, E. S. ... 


28453 


C 


D. ofW. 


16/6/18 


Pte. 


Ellis, B 


96018 


B 


W. 




N.T. 4,9 18 


Pte. 


Ellison, R. 


30962 


B 


W. 




17/10 18 


Pte. 


Elgar, H. 


260108 


B 


w. 




23/10 18 



15(i 



Rank and Name. 

>i.Pte. Ellerby, W. 
Pte. Emmet, J. 
Pte. Entwistle, J. 
Sgt. Entwistle, T. 

>JiPte. Enderby, W. 

Pte. Entwistle, T. 

Pte. Entwistle, R. 

Pte. Evans, A. 

Pte Evans, A. 

Lieut. Evans, A. J. D. 

Pie. Evans, C. 
^Sgt. Evans, R. 

Pte. Evans, R. 

Pte. Evans, G. F. 

Pte. Evans, A. 

2nd Lieut. Easterby, E. M. 



Pte. Farmer, J. 

Pte. Fairclough, C. ... 

2nd Lieut. Fairclough, E. 1 
^Pte. Farrell, T. 

Pte. Fallown, W. 
4.Cpl. Farrell, W. A. ... 
►{<2nd Lieut. Falby, E. F. 

Pte. Fazackerley, W. 
►J«Pte. Fairclough, W. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Farnworth, H. 

Pte. Fairbrother, W. 
^Pte. Farrer, L. 

Pte. Farrer, G. 

Cpl. Faraday, W. 

Pte. Faulkner, W. 

Pte. Fazackerley, T. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Fazackerley, T. 

Pte. Farnell, D. 

Pte. Fairbrother, A. ... 

Pte. Farnworth, T. ... 

Pte. Faragher, W. 

>fc2nd Lieut. Fazackerley, H. 

Pte. Fayen, W. 

Pte. Fenton, J. 

Lance-Cpl. Fenton, T. 

Pte. Fearnley, E. 

>ti2nd Lieut. Fergie, A. B. 

Cpl. Fenton, T. 

^Pte. Folown, J. 

4<Pte Ferrey, J 

Pte. Fell, H 

►{.Pte. Fell, W 

Pte. Fielding, R. 

Pte. Fishwick, W. 

2nd Lieut. Firth, E. S. 

4.Pte. Finch, R. J. 

Pte. Fishwick, H. 

Pte. Finney, J. 

Pte. Finch, F. 

Lieut. Fismer, G. J. ... 

Pte. Finney, H. 

Pte. Fisher, W. 



No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


'ii:m\7 


C 


K. in A. .. 


30 9 18 


;«».54 


B 


W. 


. N.T .9/9/16 


;{.»;{s 


C 


W. 


9;9/l6 


2(HI02,S 


A 


w. 


9/9,16 
and 31,7 17 


20 KM 2 


C 


K. in A. .. 


18 II 17 


2MS2.S 


D 


W. 


11 9; 18 


2i;{;{.i(t 


B 


W. 


. NT. 30 9 18 


2079 


D 


W. 


15,6,15 


•l(>07 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 




.. 


w. 


8/8/16 


2020.SI 


C 


w. 


9/6/17 


201700 


C 


K. in A. .. 


31/7/17 


;{620l 


A 


W. 


31/7/17 


29389 


B 


W. 


3/6/18 


4879 


C 


W. 


9 9/16 


~^" 





W. 


31/7/17 
and 30/11/17 


844 


c 


W. 


15/6/15 


IO(k< 


C 


W. 


15/6/15 




... 


W. 


8/8/16 


2(iS(i 


B 


K. in A. ... 


15/6/15 


1994 


B 


W. 


28/6,16 


202030 


- 


K. in A. ... 


8/8/16 


— 


— 


K. inA. ... 


9/9/16 


3484 


B 


W. 


9, '9/ 16 


4420 


B 


K. in A. ... 


9,9,16 


201697 


C 


W. 


24/5/17 


203550 


C 


W. 


31/7/17 


19005 


B 


W. 


18/11/17 






D. of W. ... 


13/1/ 18 


202798 


A 


W. 


30/11/17 


202889 


D 


W 


30/11/17 


3S2.S9 


D 


W. 


N.T. 23/3/18 


201. ((it 


D 


W. 


9/4/18 


20l3<il 


D 


W. 


15,8,18 


ll(i4.l 


A 


W. 


25 4/18 


20091 


B 


W. 


.(0,4/18 


240112 


A 


W. 


14/5/18 


41012 


D 


w. 


2/6/18 
and 17/8/18 




— 


K. inA. ... 


25 8 18 


32080 


C 


W. 


N.T. 20,7/18 


2580 


A 


W. 


15/6 15 


24 


B 


W. 


1 /I 16 


202(i54 


D 


W. 


15/5/17 






K. in A. ... 


20,9,17 


200012 


B 


W. 


14/4/18 


200458 




K. in A. ... 


28/6 16 


41044 


D 


D of W 11/! 


1/18 ; 12 9 18 


30613 


D 


W. 


24 9/18 


265331 


C 


K. in A. ... 


13/4/17 


3341 


C 


W. 


15/6/15 


186 


D 


W. 


14/9/15 


— . 


— 


W. 


8/8/16 


2303 


A 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


3555 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


4299 


D 


W. 


N.T. 9/9/16 


200098 


D 


W. 


31/7/17 


— 


... (R.A.M.C.) 


W. 


2/8/17 


235167 


C 


R.P. ofW. ... 


31/7/17 


13386 


C 


R.P. of W. ... 


18,11/17 



157 



Rank and Name. 

^2nd Lieut. Firth, J. 0. 

Pte. Finney, J. 

Pte. Fitzgerald, T. ... 

^Pte. Fielding, J. B. ... 

Pte. Fiddler, J. N. ... 

Pte. Fitzgerald, E. 

Lance-Cpl. Fisher, W. 

Sgt. Fisher, W. 

Pte. Fiori, G 

^Sgt. Fisher, J. Y. 

Pte. Fitzgerald, A. ... 

Pte. Finney, F. 

Pte. Finch, T. 

Lance-Cpl. Fisher, E. E 

►fiCpl. Fletcher, J. 

Lance-Cpl. Fletcher, J. 
►J.C.Q.M.S. Fletcher, J. 

Pte. Flowers, T. 

^Pte. Fletcher, W. 

►J<Pte. Forrest, J. 

Pte. Flannery, L. 

>frPte. Fletcher, J. 

^Pte. Flockhart, D. 

Pte. Fletcher, U. 

>I<Pte. Fletcher, H. 

Pte. Flanagan, L. E. 

Pte. Flaherty, T. 

>J<2nd Lieut. Fullerton, F. 

Pte. Fleming, J. W. ... 

Sgt. Fowler, E. 

Pte. Fowler, E. 

Pte. Fowler, H. 

Pte. Forrest, J. F. ... 

^Pte. Foster, E. 

►|<Pte. Forshaw, R. 

^Pte. Fowler, J. 

2nd Lieut. Forshaw, C. H. 

>J«2nd Lieut, Forrest, R. 

Pte. Forrest, J. 

Pte. Foreman, R. 

►fiPte. Forsyth J. 

►I<Sgt. Foley, W. 

Pte. Forrest, 

Pte. Fox, W. H. 
^Pte. Ford, W. 
>J<Pte. Fowler, J. 

Cpl. Foy, J. 

Cpl. Foulkes, C. 

Pte. Foster, G. 

Sgt. Fryer, W. 

Rev. Forse, L. N. 
^Lance-Cpl. Frazer, A. 

Pte. Freebury, A. 

2nd Lieut. Francis, J. E. 

Pte. Frame, A. 

Pte. Frame, J. 

Pte. France, A. 

2nd Lieut. Frost, L. ... 

2nd Lieut. Fryer, T. H. 

Lance-Cpl. Fryer, G. 



No. 



Coy. 



Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



— 


- - 


K. in A. 


18 11 17 


... 2027'M 


D 


W. 


30 11,17 


37649 


B 


W. 


10/4/18 


41302 


D 


K. in A. 


29/4/18 


38985 


C 


W. 


811 


81015 


C 


W. 


.. N.T. 6/6/18 


28454 


B 


W. 


16/8/18 


28454 


B 


W. 


30 9/18 


40688 


B 


W. 


4 9/18 


22768 


D 


K. in A. 


22 10/18 


40185 


A 


W. 


23 10/18 


29275 


A 


W. 


7 7/18 


30645 


C 


W. 


8 8/18 


13881 


C 


W. 


4 9/18 


1987 


B 


K. in A. . 


10 4/16 


1755 


D 


W. 


15 6/15 


1755 


D 


K. in A. 


31 7 17 


84 


A 


W. 


30/5/15 


2691 


C 


K. in A. . 


15/6/15 


37598 


. 


K. in A. . 


15/6/15 


3165 


C 


W. 


15/6/15 


... 200419 


A 


K. in A. . 


31/7/17 


... 202566 


C 


K in A. . 


31/7/17 


37668 


B 


.. W. 


20/9/17 


... 290499 


A 


K. in A. 


20/9/17 


28264 


B 


W. 


25/4/18 


29117 


D 


.. W. 


26/4/18 

and 25/8/18 


— 


. 


K. in A. . 


31/7/17 


28075 


A 


W. 


9/9/18 


1349 


D 


.. W. 


IS/6/15 


1374 


D 


W. 


15 6/15 

and 8/8/16 


155 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


3185 


D 


.. W. 


5/9/15 


1445 


D 


D. of w. : 


5/8/16 


2574 


B 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


2773 


C 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


— 


— . 


W. 


9/9/16 


— 


— 


K. in A. . 


27/9/16 


20096N 


D 


W. 


4/6/17 


. . 200743 


B 


W. 


7/6/17 


. . 20103S 


D 


K in A. . 


31/7/17 


200097 


D 


.. W. 


20 9/17 






D. of W. . 


23 9 17 


... 202839 


B 


R.P. of W. . 


9 4 18 


28258 


B 


Missing 


8 4 18 


... 2.35141 


C 


K. in A. . 


. N.T. 13 4/17 


31681 


D 


K. of A. . 


18 5/17 


200058 


B 


W. 


4,6/17 


18989 


A 


W. 


26 5 18 


28758 


D 


W. 


3 6 18 


6074 


D 


W. 


. N.T. 28 6/16 






R.P. of W. . 


9,4 18 


2690 


A 


K. in A. 


15 6/15 


2875 


C 


Missing 


15 6/15 


- 


- 


W. 


18/5/17 


... 202584 


D 


W. 


. N.T.18/11/17 


... 2034.53 


B 


W. 


9 4 18 


... 202.54 S 


D 


Missing 


13 4/18 


- 


— 


W. 


2 5 18 


— 


— 


W. 


• 2,5,18 


... 200618 


A 


W. 


27/5/18 



15S 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Francis, W. H. 

Ptc. French, T. W. 

Pte. Frost, F. H. 

Pte. Francombe, W. 

Pte. Frodsham, J. 

Ptc. Fyles, E. 



►JtPte. Gardner, J. 

Pte. Galloway, T. 
«J«Pte. Garlinge, C. J. 

Pte. Gartshore, R. 

Pte. Garrett, F. 

Pte. Gaskin, S. 
^.Pte. Gale, A. G. 

Pte. Gaunt, R. 

Pte. Gardner, R. 

Pte. Gallagher, J. 

Pte. Gaskell, J. 

Pte. Garside, R. C. ... 
►frPte Geldeard, R. 

Pte. German, A. 
^Pte. Gent, D. A. 

Pte. Gent, F 

Pte. Gerber, C. 
4<Pte. Gerrard, L. 

^Pte. Gent, F 

4<Pte. Gerrish, J. 

Lance-Sgt. German, G. H. 

Lance-Sgt. Gerrard, W. 
>J»Lance-Sgt. George, T. 
^<Pte. Gill, H 

Lance-Sgt. Giddens, H. 

Cpl. Gibson, J. 
►j4Pte. Gisby, S 

Pte. Gibson, D. 
»I<Pte. Gilbertson, R. ... 
.{.Pte. Gidlow, A. 

Pte. Gibson, T. 

Pte. Gillibrand, J 

Pte. Gilmaur, W. H. 
►fiPte. Ginger, F. 
>|<Lance-Cpl. Gillett, N. 

Pte. Gillett, C. 

Sgt. Gillett, T. E. 

pte. Gill, G. A. 
^.Pte. Gillibrand, 

Pte. Gill, I 

4<Pte. Gilbertson, R. ... 
>J<Lance-Cpl. Gillabrand 

Pte. Gillett, J. 
>f<Pte. Gidman, A. 

Pte. Gledhill, W. 
>JiLance-Cpl. Glover, T. 

Lance-Cpl. Gorton, F. 

Pte. Goddard, E. 

Pte. Gore, T. H. 

Pte. Gore, T. W. 

Pte. Godfrey, R. 

Pte. Gorton, H. V. ... 
>J<Pte. Gordon, A. 



No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


211 70S 


D 


W. 


22 8 IS 


2N2(i(» 


A 


W. 


9 9 IS 


;i.SO.{(i 


D 


W. 


22 10 IS 


■-'S'.'d.s 


B 


W. 


23 7 IS 


:i7(iSl 


D 


W. 


14 5 IS 


2(17 


D 


W. 


3 8 16 


lO'll 




K. in A. 


15 6,15 


:<(>2U() 


D 


W. 


20/11/17 


Ni)l2 


B 


K. in A. 


23/11/17 


MMiA 


A 


W. 


28 3 /IS 


28271 


B 


R.P. of W. 


9 4 IS 


2s;(()(i 


D 


W. 


29/4; IS 


lUOlM) 


D 


K. in A. ... 


8 6; 18 


2S2(i:iil 


B 


W. 


N.T. 21 6/18 


2219 


B 


W. 


28 9,16 


17l(i 


B 


.W. 


15,6/15 


740(i 


B 


W. 


3 S 16 


48.S1 


A 


W. 


8/8/16 


2061 




K. in A. ... 


15/6/15 


29 1 1 1 


A 


W. 


29/5/18 


1408 




K. in A. ... 


15/6/15 


.■i(i888 


A 


W. 


2,6/18 


4I30;{ 


B 


W. 


8/6/16 


201739 


B 


K. inA. 


31/7/17 


4849 


B 


K. in A. ... 


28/6/16 


29282 


D 


K. in A. ... 


3/9/18 


1 Xi9:i 


D 


W. 


4/9 18 


;f8()8i 


D 


W. 


13/4 18 


42040 


B 


K. in A. 


14/10/18 


28271 


C 


K. in A. 


29/10;i8 


202772 


D 


W. 


.30/11/17 


16200 


B 


w. 


9/4/18 


30368 


C 


K. in A. 


I0/4/I8 


202800 


B 


W. 


13/5/18 


29127 


A. 


K. in A. .. 


8/7/18 


2246 


A 


K. in A. .. 


9/9/16 


202773 


D 


W. 


9 9/16 


4278 


D 


W. 


29 5/16 
and 9,9/16 


5284 


B 


w. 


29 9/16 


35972 


A 


K. inA. .. 


31/7/17 


210 


D 


K. in A. . 


28/6/16 


330 


B 


W. 


28/6/15 


175 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


290 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


152 


.. 


K. in A. 


3/5/15 


4686 


A 


W. , 


3 8/16 


29127 


A 


K. in A. 


8/7/18 


2960 


B 


W. 


9,9/16 






K. in A. .. 


25 9/17 


2.5301 


A 


W. 


9 6/17 


29123 


B 


K. in A. 


9 4/18 


242.322 


C 


W. 


20 9/17 


779 


D 


K. in A. .. 


28/5/15 


200756 


D 


W. 


30/11/17 


27761 




W. 


9 4/18 


23677 


C 


. W. 


. N.T. 3/6/18 


4 loss 


D 


W. 


8/7/18 


3289 


D 


W. 


9, '9/16 


122.35 


A 


W. 


18/5/17 


202731 


C 


K. inA. .. 


18 7/17 



159 



Rank and Name. 
Pte. Goodram, G. 

Pte. Gore, J. A. 

Pte. Gorton, J. 
^Pte. Gorton, J. 

Pte. Gough, R. 
^.Pte. Gorst, T. H. 
^Pte. Gorse, W. 

Pte. Goodier, L. 

Pte. Gough, G. 
>I<Pte. Goodram, W. 

Pte. Gornall, E. 

Pte. Goodier, R. 
•JiPte. Greenhalgh, J. . 

2nd Lieut. Green, A. 

Pte. Griffiths, J. 

Col. Grant, W. 

Pte. Graham, E. 

Pte. Gregson. J. 

Pte. Gray, J 

^Pte. Greenwood, H. ... 

Pte. Greenwood, R. ... 
>J<Pte. Gresty, 0. F. 

Pte. Grimshaw, H. 
^2nd Lieut. Greaves. F. 
»J«Pte. Grinter, W. 

Pte. Grayson, W. 

2nd Lieut. Gray, W. 

Pte. Green, F. 

Pte. Greenwood, G. . 

Pte. Gradwell, J. 

Pte. Greenwood. W. R. 

Pte. Grey, W. H. 

Pte. Gregory, G. 

Pte. Grey, I. W. 
»i«Pte. Green, J. 

Pte. Green, H. 

Pte. Gregson, E. 

Pte. Gregory, G. 
>JiPte. Gregson, W. 

2nd Lieut. Gresdale. R. 
^Lance-Cpl. Greenhalgh, G. 

Pte. Grimshaw, A. ... 

Pte. Griffiths, J. 

Pte. Grinse, T. 
»J<Pte. Gregson, H. 
►fiCapt. Gregson, E. M. 

Cpl. Green, J. 

Pte. Grungy, T. 

Pte. Greenwood, R. ... 

Pte. Gregory, W. 

CpL Green, W. 

Pte. Gregson, G. 

Pte. Greenwood, C. ... 

Pte. Grime, J. 

Pte. Greenwood, J. ... 

Pte. Green, H. 

Pte. Gregson, E. 

^Pte. Griffin, W. 

Pte. Green, H. 

Pte. Green, J. 

Pte. Grimes, F. 



No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


2;{80o;{ 


C 


W. 




21 7,17 
and 20 9/17 


277.S 


A 


W. 




15 6 15 


195 


D 


W. 




5/9/15 


2028,5:t 


.. 


K. in 


A. 


31/7/17 


lO.S 


B 


W. 




31/7/16 


1941 


A 


K. in 


A. '.'.'. 


15/6/15 


443,i 


A 


K. in 


A. ... 


30/7/16 


2S270 


D 


W. 




9/4/18 


41647 


A 


W. 


... 


14/5/18 


,iH729 


B 


K. in 


A. ... 


1/10/18 


.{6877 


B 


P.R. ( 


af W. ... 


23/10/18 


201280 


B 


Missing 


23/10/18 


:i7290 


B 


K. in 


A. 


18/11/17 


— 


— 


W. 




30/11/17 


37259 


A 


W. 




9/4/18 


36559 


C 


w. 




N.T. 9/4/18 


29118 


A 


w. 




9/4/18 


29124 


— 


w. 




9/4/18 


23501 1 


A 


R.P. . 


of W. '.'.'. 


9/4/18 


201568 


D 


K. in 


A. ... 


N.T. 9/4/18 


29409 


D 


W. 




29/4/18 


39617 


B 


K. in 


A. '.'.'. 


28/4; 18 


29410 


C 


W. 




16/5/18 


— 


— 


K. in 


A. '..'. 


1/618 


27177 


D 


K. in 


A. 


2/6/18 


25592 


B 


W. 




19/9/16 


— 


— 


W. 




9/9/16 


2420 


D 


W. 




N.T. 9 '9/16 


4650 


D 


W. 




N.T. 9 9/16 


200661 


A 


W. 




6/5/17 


202640 


B 


W. 




N.T. 11/6/17 


202642 


B 


W. 




12/7/17 


26662 


B 


W. 




31/7/17 


23,501 1 


A 


W. 




31/7/17 


244966 


A 


K. in 


A. '.'.'. 


31/7/17 


200841 


A 


W. 




2/8/17 


200412 


A 


W. 




31/7/17 


26662 


A 


W. 




2, '8 /1 7 


2955 


— 


Died 




25/7/15 


— 


— 


W. 




20,9/17 


202475 


C 


K. in 


A. ... 


20 9,17 


10721 


D 


W. 




20/9,17 


7259 


A 


W. 




N.T. 20/9/17 


25503 


C 


W. 




20/9/17 


200715 


C 


Died 




12/4/15 


— 


— 


K. in 


A. .'.'.' 


28/6/16 


56 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


70 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


1009 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 


1345 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


1593 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


1943 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


3265 


B 


W. 




15(6/15 


3342 


D 


W. 




15'6/15 
and 8/8/16 


2585 


B 


W. 


... 


15/6/15 


2990 


A 


W. 


>.. 


15/6/16 


1914 


A 


w. 




1/8/16 


200953 


.. 


K. in 


A. 


15/6/15 


2990 


A 


W. 




2/8/16 


4996 


C 


W. 




5 8/16 


3604 


C 


w. 




8,8/16 



KiO 



Rank and Name. 



No. 



Coy. Nature of Casualty 



Pte. 


Gregson, A. 


.•{■I()2 


D 


W. 




8 8 16 


Pte. 


Grime, T. 


777.S 


B 


W. 




8 8 16 


Pte. 


Greenwood, C. ... 


22G.i 


B 


W. 




13 7 16 


Pte. 


Greenhalgh, J. ... 


20295.J 


C 


W. 




9 7 18 


Pte. 


Greenwood, J. W. 


2827.S 


B 


W. 




!) 9 18 


Pte. 


Green, C. 


. 21072i> 


D 


W. 




15 8 18 


Pte. 


Green, C. 


.•{00 II 


D 


W. 




16 8 18 


Cpl. 


Graham, E 


2(>(),{Sr> 


A 


W. 




31,7 17 


APte. 


Green, J. 


2ll!)<i(J 


A 


K. in 


A. ... 


2 8 17 


Cpl. 


Grimshaw, T 


1 2!»2I 


D 


W. 




5,9 18 


Pte. 


Griffiths, T 


2<>l 1 2 


A 


W. 




9/9 18 


2nd 


Lieut. Griffiths, H. W. ( 






W. 




1 10 IN 


Pte. 


Graham, R 


■Il72;f 


B 


W. 




30 9 18 


Pte. 


Grei;ory, H 


. 2(0549 


B 


W. 




23,10/18 


4-Pte. 


Grimshaw, J. 


3375 




K. in 


A. 


15,6 15 


*Sgt. 


Gunn, A. 


202498 


B 


K. in 


A. ... 


21,4,18 


Pte. 


Gulloway, E 


28272 


D 


W. 




4 9 18 


Pte. 


Gunn, F. 


3«(i<i7 


C 


W. 




17 10 18 


Pte. 


Guffogg, J 


241216 




w. 




9 4 18 


Pte. 


Gynes, W. 


201404 


D 


w. 




8/6 17 


Pte. 


Hankinson, W 


10150 


B 


w. 




9/4 18 

and 7/7 18 


APte. 


Haworth, W 


29140 


C 


K. in 


A. ... 


9/4/18 


Pte. 


Harris, H. L 


2(i(;;is 


D 


W. 




9/4/18 


Pte. 


Hamer, T. 


202002 


B 


W. 


9 4 


18/11/17 

18 and 17/8/8 


Pte. 


Harold, T. R 


28293 


A 


W. 




10/4/18 


APte. 


Haslam, L 


203757 


A 


K. in 


A. 


9/4/18 


Cpl. 


Hanley, T. 


241169 




W. 




9/4,18 


Cpl. 


Hawkins, T. H. 


245083 




W. 




9/4/18 


Cpl. 


Harvey, M. 


. 241723 




W. 




9 4/18 


+Cpl 


Haslam, H 


242279 


A 


Died 




18/10 18 


Cpl. 


Haworth, D. 


41654 


D 


W. 




2/5/18 


.{.Cpl. 


Hampson. W. 


294IS 


A 


K. in 


A. 


14/5/18 


Lance-Cpl. Hancox, W. 


201562 


A 


W. & Missing 


14/5/18 


Pte. 


Hampson, F. 


202061 


D 


W. 




14'5/18 


Lance-Cpl. Hankinson, J. 


202166 


A 


W. 




15/5,18 


^2nd 


Lieut. Hampson, J. 


— 




K. in 


A. 


21 '5/18 


Pte. 


Hacking, J. 


23655 


A 


W. 




1/6/18 


Cpl. 


Harwell, E. J 


33839 


D 


W. 




3/6/18 


Pte. 


Hartley, H 


205006 


B 


W. 




18/6/18 


Pte. 


Hayes, J. 


202561 


A 


W. 




20/6/18 


Pte. 


Hall, J 


29729 


D 


W. 




15/8/18 


Pte. 


Haighton, F. 


413676 


D 


W. 




I5/8/I8 


Pte. 


Hayes, F. 


235,500 


D 


W. 




15/8/18 


4iPte. 


Hargreaves, F 


202803 


A 


K. in 


A. 


9/9/16 


^.Cpl. 


Hartley, A 


1135 


A 


K. in 


A. ... 


9/9,16 


Pte. 


Hardy, J. R 


3799 


A 


W. 




9/9/16 


Pte. 


Harrison, J. 


5054 


A 


W. 




9/9/16 


Pte. 


Hartley, J. W 


4678 


D 


W. 




N.T. 9/9/16 


Pte. 


Haslam, R 


202059 


D 


W. 




9/9/16 


Pte. 


Hacking, T 


4259 


D 


W. 




N.T. 9/9/16 


Pte. 


Halley, H 


6105 


D 


W. 




9 9,16 


Pte. 


Hankinson, J. ... 


3175 


B 


W. 




9 9 16 


Pte. 


Hamer, J. 


4802 


B 


W. 




9 9 16 


Pte. 


Hargreaves, J. H. 


4895 


B 


W. 




N.T. 9 9,16 


^Pte. 


Harvey, A. 


6301 


C 


K. in 


A. 


25,9/16 


Pte. 


Hamer, J. 


14592 


B 


W. 




N.T. 26/9/16 


Pte. 


Harrison, J. 


202,564 


A 


W. 




6 4/17 


Pte. 


Hargreaves, H. ... 


. 202939 


C 


W. 




24/6/17 


2nd 


Lieut. Hall. R. A. 


— 


— 


W. 




4/5/17 


Pte. 


Halliwell, W 


202725 


D 


W. 




12/7/17 



Date. 



101 



Rank and Name. 

►fiPte. Harrison, T. C. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Haworth, H 

Lance-Cpl. Haworth, J 

Pte. Hardacre, J. 
»J<Capt. Harris, A. L. 

Sgt. Hall, A. ... 

Pte. Hall, C. ... 

Pte. Harrison, W. 

Pte. Hardman, T. 

Pte. Hargreaves, G. 

.fiPte. Hatton, R. 

^Pte. Haworth, J. H. 

4<Pte. Halsall, P. 

^Sgt. Hurley, J. 

Pte. Hall 

^Cpl. Hall, H. ... 

Pte. Harrison, W. A 

Pte. Hart, F. ... 

.J.Sgt. Harling, W. 

«J<Pte. Harrison, P. 

Pte. Hart, E. ... 

Pte. Hague, A. E. 

Pte. Hayes, W. 

Pte. Hargreaves, P. 

►J.Pte. Hall, G. H. 

^Pte. Hart, G. F. 

Pte. Hannah, J. 

Pte. Harvey, W. 

>J<Pte. Hardacre, J. 

Pte. Harrison, G. S. 

Pte. Hankinson, W. 

Pte. Hart, J. ... 

Pte. Harrop, W. 

Pte. Hardman, F. 

Pte. Halliwell, W. 

Lance-Cpl. Halsall, W 

Pte. Hampson, J. P. 

Pte. Haslam, L. 

►fiPte. Hammond, L. 

Pte. Hawkland, H. 

Pte. Hatch, W. 

Pte. Hargreaves, A. 

Pte. Hardman, E. 

Pte. Hamer, W. 

Pte. Hardman, W. 

Pte. Hackett, F. 

Pte. Hankinson, W. 

Pte. Harrobin, W. 

Pte. Haighton, J. 

Pte. Hartley, T. 

Pte. Hayhurst, J. T. 

C.S.M. Harwood, J. 

>I<Cpl. Hawkhurst, C. 

Cpl. Hartley, J. 

Pte. Halliwell, H. 

Sgt. Hall, A. ... 

i{<Pte. Harrison, G. 

Pte. Hall, T. V. 

Pte. Harrison, W. 

>i<Pte. Hardacre, J. 

Pte. Hamer, H. 



No. 


Coy. Nature of Casualty 




Date. 


24464.5 


A 


K. in A. . 




21 7 17 


2xs<j;fi 


C 


W. 


' N.T 


. 20,7/17 


15384 


C 


W. 




tin in 


20I79H 


C 


W. 




21/7/17 


— 


• — 


K. in A. . 




iinin 


200587 


c 


W. 




uniM 


202627 


D 


W. 




3\nm 


201588 


B 


W. 




31/7,17 


201349 


— 


w. 




31/7 17 


36822 


c 


w. 




31 7/17 


202525 


B 


K. in A. 




31/7,17 


202610 


B 


K. in A. 




31/7/17 


202734 


D 


K. in A. . 




31/7/17 


147 


D 


Died 




8/8/16 


138 


D 


W. 




8 8/16 


200604 


D 


K. in A. . 




8,8,16 


4055 


D 


W. 




8,8/16 


4885 


C 


W. 




8,8 16 


161 


B 


K. in A. . 




15 6/15 


2198 (R.A 


.M.C.I 


K. in A. . 


. N.T 


. 8,8,16 


1404 


D 


W. 




15 6/15 


2123 


B 


W. 




15,6/15 


2279 


B 


W. 




15 6/15 


2677 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


28092 


C 


K. in A. . 




18/11/17 


28292 


B 


K. inA. . 




18/11/17 


28291 


B 


R.P. of W. . 




18,11/17 


28067 


A 


W 




20/11/17 


202140 


A 


D. of W.9 1 


I 17 ; 


30 11/17 


28282 


A 


W. 




30 11/17 


161.50 


B 


w. 




30,11/17 


201250 


D 


R.P. of W. . 




30/11/17 


16258 


D 


W. 




30/11/17 


28289 


D 


W. 




30/11/17 


202725 


D 


W. 




30/11/17 


241351 


C 


W. 




9;'4/18 


28281 


B 


W. 




9,4 /18 


19372 


B 


W. 




9,4/18 


202979 


B 


K. in A. . 




31/7/17 


202168 


B 


W. 




31/7/17 


18600 


B 


Missing 




31/7/17 


13411 


D 


Missing 




31/7/17 


200280 


D 


W. 




20/9/17 


37637 


D 


W. 




20/9/17 


32015 


D 


W. 




21/9/17 








and 30/8/18 


14785 


D 


W. 




20/9/17 


6150 


B 


W. 


'. N.T 


20/9/17 


202989 


C 


W. 


. N.T.18 11/17 


238017 


C 


W. 




28/5/17 




C 




and 


18/11/17 


3029 


C 


W. 




8 8/16 


1463 


B 


w. 


'. N.T 


8/8/16 


81 


D 


w. 




9,9/16 


1618 


C 


K. in A. . 




9/9 16 


1664 


C 


W. 




9/9/16 


3986 


A 


W. 




9 9 16 


2402 


C 


W. 




13 9 16 


1289 


C 


K. in A. . 




6/6/15 


2083 


D 


W. 




15/6/15 


4195 


A 


W. 




8/7/16 


5004 


A 


D. of W. 3! 


7 17 


9 12/17 


8883 


B 


W. 


.. N.T 


31 7/16 



I(>'J 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


■Mature of Casualty. Dat 


Pte. 


Hamer, A. 


20018!) 


A 


W. 


2 8 


2nd 


Lieut. Hague, A. E. 






Missing 


5 8 


Pte. 


Harrison, F. 


29(il 


C 


W. 


15 6 


Pte. 


Hankinson, J. 


.117.1 


B 


W. 


15 6 


Pte. 


Harrison, J. 


2!)l!l 


D 


W. 


15 6 


Pte. 


Hartley, T. 


.•i02!t 


C 


w. 


21 10 


Pte. 


Hartley. H. 


■la^n 


B 


w. 


29 10 


Pte. 


Hargreaves, A. ... 


;)«!(; 


A 


w. 


29 10 


Pte. 


Hall, H 


138 


D 


w. 


.30 10 


Pte. 


Hart, J 


143 


D 


w. 


26/4 


Pte. 


Hartley, H. 


2.5,58 


B 


w. 


26/5 


Cpl. 


Harrison, F. 


29r>l 


C 


w. 


28/6 


+Pte. 


Haslam, G. 


2.5.iS 


B 


K. in A. 


14/6 


+Pte. 


Hayes, J 


2771 


A 


K. in A. . 


15/6 


^Pte. 


Hardickey, M. ... 


2842 


B 


W. 
Died 


15 6 
23 6 


4<Pte. 


Haley, ]. W. ... 


2.53 




D. of W. 


II 9 


4-Cpl. 


Hall, H 


200604 




K. in A. 


8 8 


^.Pte. 


Hall, H 


2000.58 




K. in A. 


8 8 


Pte. 


Hartley, H. 


20.(30 


D 


W. 


N.T. 16 8 


Pte. 


Heyes. J. B. 


30<I48 


D 


W. 


1 1 /9 


Pte. 


Hazeldinc, J. 


.. 202760 


D 


W. 


12/9 


4-Pte. 


Horrobin, W. 


29.574 


C 


D. of W. 


24 /9 


4<I-ance-Cpl. Hawilt. W. 


2941 3 




K. in A. . 


.30/9 


Pte. 


Hardacre. A. N. 


30492 


A 


W. 


.30/9 


Pte. 


Hall, H 


.•(0678 


B 


R.P. of W. 


2 10 


Pte. 


Hargreaves. G. ... 


36822 


C 


W. 


15 10 


^2nd 


Lieut. Halliwood, J 


.. 




K. inA. . 


17/10 


Pte. 


Hawkins, F. 


260111 


B 


W. 


7/10 


Pte. 


Haworth, J. 


2026,51 


D 


W. 


. N.T.22/10 


Pte. 


Hall, A. A. W. ... 


41650 


D 


W. 


22/10 


Pte. 


Harmer, W. 


30966 


B 


R.P. of W. . 


23/10 


Pte. 


Hardman, W. 


22628 


A 


W. 


23/10 


Pte. 


Hadwin, W. B. ... 


244863 


A 


W. 


24/10 


Pte. 


Harrison, F. 


291.30 


D 


R.P. of W. 


22/10 


Pte. 


Hamer, W. 


28766 


A 


W. 


29/10 


Pte. 


Hall, A. W. W. 


416.50 


D 


W. 


8/6 


Pte. 


Hancox, J. 


30497 


A 


W. 


16 8 


Sgt. 


Hall, A 


2402 


C 


w. 


8/8 


Pte. 


Hayes, A. 


2026.59 


A 


w. 


31/7 


4"Pte. 


Hartley, J. F. ... 


28062 


B • 


K. in A. 


30/11 


ALance-Cp!. Hackett, T. K. 


202528 


A 


K. in A. . 


9/4 


Lance-Cpl. Halton, A. 


1709 


- - 


R.P. of W. . 


8 8 


Pte. 


Hayes, J. 


.. 202561 


A 


W. 


16 ;6 


Pte. 


Harvey, I. G. 


.. 3096.5 


B 


w. 


14/10 


^Pte. 


Heap, E." 


2.SI71 


D 


K. m A. . 


9,4 


Pte. 


Henthorrie, S. 


210906 


A 


W. 


N.T. 10/4 


4<Pte. 


Heeney, W. 


28276 




K. in A. 


9/4 


4«Pte. 


Herd, J 


9609 


B 


K. in A. 


25/4 


*Pte. 


Hallows, E. 


2026.56 




K. in A. . 


31/7 


►fiPte. 


Hanson, E. 


. 202687 


. 


D. of W. . 


31/7 


+Pte. 


Hargreavcs, J. H. 


6222 


- - 


D. of W. . 


3/10 


4.Pte 


Harrison, J. 


16.5.38 




D. of W. 


2 8 


4<Lance-Cpl. Harwocd, J. 


200558 




K. inA. 


31 7 


Pte. 


Heaps, E. 


240270 


A 


W. 


14/5 


Pte. 


Heaps, J. 


201465 


A 


W. 


2,6 


Pte. 


Hey wood, T. 


30496 


D 


W. 


2 '6 


^.Pte. 


Heath, E. W. ... 


27487 


B 


KinA. 


16,8 


Pte. 


Heather, B. 


235047 


D 


W. 


16/8 


Pte. 


Heap. L. H. 


3554 


B 


W. 


. N.T. 9/9 


Pte. 


Hesmondhalgh. H. 


4143 


B 


W. 


9/9 


Pte. 


Hewarth, W. A. 


2319 


A 


w. 


27,6 



163 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty 


Date. 


Sgt. 


Heaney, C. 


1704 


D 


W. 


156,15 

and 8/1/17 


Pte. 


Heiiitt, F. 


... 200146 


C 


W. 


5,8/17 


Pte. 


Heaps, R. 


... 202527 


A 


R.P. ofW. . 


31 ,'7/17 


4,CpI. 


Heaps, R. 


200.S67 


— 


K. inA. . 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Heald, D. 


.i.539 


D 


W. 


8 '8/16 


Lan 


ce-CpI. Henderson, J. H. A. 2789 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Horn, W. 


3968 


C 


W. 

22 9 


9 ,9 '16 

17 and 7 10 18 


Pte. 


Heskith, H. 


2606 


C 


W. 


9'9/l6 


^Pte. 


Hey, S 


... 202856 


C 


K. in A. . 


9 9/16 


Pte. 


Heeley, J. 


2.5.S 


C 


W. 


11 9 16 


Cpl. 


Heywood, E. 


199 


A 


W. 


9/9/16 


4<Pte. 


Heaps, J. 


1788 


B 


K. in A. . 


15/6/15 


4<Pte. 


Helm, F. 


2768 


C 


K. in A. . 


16 6 15 


4-Pte. 


Hewitt, H. 


286.'{ 


C 


K. in A. . 


15 6/15 


►{.Pte. 


Helm, H. 


2927 


B 


K. in A. 


16 6/15 


Pte. 


Hewitt, A. E. ... 


2049 


A 


W. 


31 7/16 


Pte. 


Helme, T. 


104 


B 


w. 


15 6/15 


Pte. 


Hesketh, J. 


;}287 


D 


w. 


15/6/15 


Pte. 


Hesketh, P. 


2007 


C 


w. 


I5/6/I5 


Pte. 


Heaton, A. E. ... 


2074 


D 


w. 


31/7/16 


Pte. 


Hewitt, J. 


4141 


A 


w. 


8 8/16 


^Pte. 


Heyes, V. 


2743 


C 


K. in A. .. 


I '7/16 


Sgt. 


Heaney, C. 


1704 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


^.Pte. 


Henderson, T. 0. 


... 202554 


— 


Died 


20/2,17 


^Pte. 


Henley, W. 


289 


— 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


4,Lance-Cpl. Hesketh, H. 


22717 


— 


K. inA. .. 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Hewitt, A. E. ... 


2049 


A 


W. 


15 6 15 


Pte. 


Hendy, W. 


... 200488 


D 


W. 


8 8/16 


Pte. 


Heaton, C. 


20294 


B 


W. 


N.T.18/11/17 


*Pte. 


Heaps, J. 


... 200057 


D 


K. in A. 


30 11/17 


Pte. 


Heywood, W. H. 


... 290554 


A 


W. 


20/9/17 


Pte. 


Heywood, J. W. 


... 255501 


D 


W. 


16/8/18 


Pte. 


Higginbotham, F. 


.(0097 


B 


W. 


14/10/18 


Pte. 


Heron, S. C. 


244871 


D 


W. 


22/10/18 


Pte. 


Helm, E. 


29128 


B 


R.P. of W. .. 


23/10/18 


A R.S.M. Heywood. H. 


. . 200222 


D 


W. 


24/10/18 


Pte. 


Heald, A. 


201313 


A 


W. 


9/7/18 


Pte. 


Helme, J. E. ... 


29137 


D 


W. 


4/9/18 


►fiPte. 


Heath, L. 


40395 


B 


D. ofW. .. 


9/9/18 


^Capt 


. Hibbert, C. G. R. 


— 


— 


Presumed Killed 15,6/15 


^Pte. 


Higgins, R. 


29132 


B 


K. in A. . 


9 4/18 


Sgt. 


Hindley, F. 


240268 


A 


W. 


25 '4/18 


Pte. 


Higgins, L. 


4787 


B 


W. 


. N.T. 9,4/18 


^Lance-Cpl. Higham, E. 


2611 


B 


K. inA. .. 


9 4/18 


4<Pte. 


Hill, H 


28288 


— 


K. in A. . 


11 3 18 


►pLance-Cpl. Higgins, J. 


240083 


B 


K. in A. 


8/7/18 


Pte. 


Hibbert, W. 


24 1 553 


A 


W. 


7/7/18 


Pte. 


Hickson, T. 


30491 


A 


W. 


7/7/18 


Pte. 


Hilton, W. 


28295 


D 


W. 


16/8/18 


*Sgt. 


Hills, H. L. 


3785 


B 


K. in A. 


N.T. 9 9/16 


^Pte. 


Hitchon, H. 


6223 


B 


D. ofW. 9 


9 16 : 13 9 16 


2nd 


Lieut. Higson, F. 




— 


W. 


13 11 16 


Pte. 


Higham, W. 


200877 


B 


W. 


31 7/17 


Pte. 


Hilton, J. R. ... 


17102 


— 


w. 


15/5 17 


^Pte. 


Highfield, J. 


... 200457 


B 


D. ofW. .. 


7,6,17 


Pte. 


Higham, H. 


201022 


C 


w. 


9/7/17 


Pte. 


Hill, H 


II5I3 


A 


w. 


16/7/17 


4<Pte. 


Hinsley, A. 


202S9I 


. 


K. in A. . 


9 9/16 


^Pte. 


Hirst, E 


.{0493 


— 


D. of W. 


30,5/18 


4-Pte. 


Hodson, G. A. ... 


238041 


— 


K. in A. 


2 6/18 


>i<Pte. 


Holden, S. 


4886 


— 


D. of W. .. 


29 6 16 



164 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. Nature of Casualty 


Date. 


4.Pte. Horam, C. 


4382 




Died 


23 2 1 


Pte. Higham, A. 


20372S 


A 


W. 


31 7 1 


Pte. Hilton, T. 


242ISI 


C 


.. W. 


5,8,1 


Pte. Higham, F. 


.. 202l,f(i 


C 


.. W. 


9 9 1 


Pte. Highfield, J. 


1 <)!»:< 


B 


W. 


8 8 1 


Pte. Higham, H. 


;<27.{ 


C 


.. W. 


5 8 1 


Lance-Cpl. Hill, J. ... 


;to4 


C 


. W. 


15 6 1 


^.Lance-Cpl. Hill, E. ... 


7SII 


C 


D. ofW. . 


25 8 1 


>J«Pte. Higgenson, F. ... 


2'J.«i 


B 


K. inA. . 


146 1 


Pte. Hicks, F. 


1291 


C 


,. W. 


15/6 1 


Pte. Highfield, J. 


lO'J.t 


B 


. W. 


15 6 1 


Pte. Hindmarch, W. H. 


28297 


D 


R.P. of W. . 


18,11,1 


Pte. Higham, J. 


200451 


A 


W. 


30 II /I 


>J<Lieut. -Colonel Hindle, R. 


- — 


.. 


W. 

K. in A. . 


15 6 1 
30 11 1 


H[.Unce-Cpl. Hill, J. ... 


.. 200186 


A 


D. OfW. . 


21,9 1 


Pte. Hilton, R. 


4378 


B 


W. 


20 9,1 


^Pte. Higham, B. 


2l24(i 


A 


K. in A. . 


23 10 1 


Pte. Hicks, W. T. ... 


30(>94 


D 


W. 


16 8/1 


Pte. Hinslev, A. 


fi28l 


D 


.. W. 


9 9 1 


.frCapt. Hibbert, C. G. R. 





_ 


Presumed K 


illed 15 6 1 


Sgt. Hogg. J 


200092 


C 


W. 


. N.T. 9,4 1 


Cpl. Hodson, R. 


20103.! 


D 


Missing 


9 ;'4 1 


Pte. Howard, C. . . 


240240 


A 


.. W. . 


9/4,1 


Pte. Holden, W. 


25383 


A 


W. 


. N.T. 14/5,1 


Pte. Hopwood, T. 


30480 


A 


W. 


14/5/1 


Pte. Holwill, R. H. ... 


27963 


D 


W. 


23/5/1 


>i«Pte. Howard, W. 


36702 


A 


K. in A. . 


20/5/1 


>i<Lance-Cpl. Horribin, W. 


29,S74 


— 


D. ofW. . 


24 9 1 


4<Pte. Hough, J. W. ... 


2.3246 


— 


K. in A. . 


31/7/1 


4<Pte. Howarth, H. 


,5247 





K. in A. . 


27/8/1 


4<Pte. Howarth, W. J. 


29)40 


— 


K in A. . 


9/4/1 


Pte. Howson, L. 


202057 


D 


W. 


31/7,1 


Pte. Hobbs, W. A. E. 


33840 


C 


W. 


20/5/1 


Pte. Houijhton, W. J. 


238030 


A 


W. 


29,5 1 


Pte. Hodson, J. A. ... 


30495 


D 


Missing 


. N.T. 2 6 1 


>I«Pte. Holland, L. 


28284 


D 


K. inA. . 


3 6 1 


4<Pte. Holmes, J. 


240065 


B 


K. inA. . 


5/6/1 


Pte. Holt, H 


.. 201786 


D 


W. 


25 6 1 


Pte. Howard, W. 


238031 


C 


W. 


27 6/1 


Pte. Hopwood, F. 


.30489 


A 


W. 


77 1 


Pte. Hope, F 


243548 


D 


W. 


16 8 1 


^Pte. Howarth, J. R. ... 


6279 


D 


K. in A. . 


9 9 1 


Pte. Howson, R. 


6101 


D 


W. 


9 9 1 


Lance-Cpl. Holland, W. 


1584 


B 


W. 


9 9 1 


4«Lance-Cpl. Hope, J. H. 


4890 


B 


K. inA. . 


9,9, 1 


^.Lance-Sgt. Horsefield, T. 


339(> 


C 


K. inA. . 


30/6 1 


Lance-Cpl. Harwood, J. 


200558 


C 


Missing 


31/7/1 


4<Pte. Hollingworth, P. 


2.3.5013 


C 


K. inA. . 


29,5/1 


Pte. Hopkins, E. 


3283 


B 


W. 


. N.T. 3/5/1 


2nd Lieut. Holden, H. S. 


— 


— 


R.P. of W.. 


31/7/1 


Pte. Hodgkiss, H. ... 


3I98I 


A 


W. 


9,6/1 


^Pte. Horner, A. E. ... 


200646 


A 


K. in A. . 


9 7/1 


Pte. Holt, A 


202698 


B 


K. in A. . 


12 7/1 


Pte. Hodson, E. 


203265 


B 


W. 


13/7 /I 


►f-Pte. Horsefield, R. A. 


20280 


A 


K. in A. . 


21/7/1 


Pte. Homans, A. 


.36178 


D 


W. 


31 7,1 


Pte. Hornby, W. 


202060 


B 


W. 


31 7,1 


Pte. Houghton, J. 


2(K)777 




W. 


. N.T. 31,7/1 


Pte. Holden. W. A. ... 


31834 


A 


W. 


31/7/1 


Pte. Howarth, W. L. 


202491 


B 


W. 


31,7/1 


^.Pte. Howlding, W. ... 


203812 


A 


K. in A. . 


31/7/1 


4>Pte. Hoyle, R. 


1681 


A 


K. in A. 


8 8/1 



165 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. Date. 


Cpl. Houghton, F. 


54 


B 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Hodgson, F 


1691 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Hodgson, J 


4427 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Hornby, E. R 


4454 


C 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Hogg, J 


4027 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Holcroft, G 


6430 


B 


W. 


8,8 16 


2nd Lieut. Holden, J. A. . 


— 


— 


W. & R.P. 


3f W. 8 8,16 


^Pte. Howe, W. D 


4635 


A 


W 


9/8/16 


Pte. Homer, A. 


2044 


A 


W. 


9/9/16 


Lance-Cpl. Holland, W. 


1584 


B 


W. 


9 '9/16 


^Pte. Holden, W 


3450 


C 


K. in A. 


9 9 16 


Pte. Holgate, H 


4460 


C 


W. 


.. N.T. 9,9/16 


Pte. Hodgson, J 


1418 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Hosker, T. 


2962 


B 


W. 


8/8/16 


^Pte. Hollinghurst, J. 


1646 


B 


K. in A. 


16/6; 15 


Pte. Hodgkinson, D. R. 


1789 


B 


W. 


16 6 15 


Hf«Pte. Hogg, J 


2219 


B 


K. inA. 


15/6 15 


►fiPte. Howard, J. 


2513 


B 


K. inA. 


16/6,15 


>I.Pte. Howarth, J 


2597 


B 


K. inA. 


16/6 15 


^Pte. Holker, J. 


2753 


B 


K. inA. 


16/6;i5 


>I.Pte. Holt, W. 


300 


C 


K. inA. 


16/6,15 


>I.Pte. Henley, W 


289 


D 


K. inA. 


16/6/15 


Pte. Hoggorth, M 


4888 


C 


W. 


14/7/16 


Pte. Howson, L. 


4887 


A 


W. 


16/7/16 


Pte. Holt, T 


4524 


D 


W. 


3/8/16 


Pte. Holden, C 


53 


B 


W. 


29/5/15 


Pte. Hodgson, J 


204 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte.. Howarth, F 


2093 


D 


W. 


16,616 


Pte. Horsfield, T 


3396 


D 


W. 


15,6,15 


^Pte. Houlding, J. C 


78 


B 


K. inA. 


15/6/15 


>J.Pte. Holmes, T 


2843 


B 


K. inA. 


6/11/15 


^Pte. Hoyle, R. 


1681 


A 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Hood, D. 


200253 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. Hodson, W 


1567 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. Holland, R 


1579 


A 


W. 


15 6/15 


Pte. Holland, W 


1584 


B 


W. 


15 6 15 


Pte. Hoyle, R. 


1681 


A 


W. 


15,6/15 


Pte. Hodgson, F 


1691 


D 


W. 


15 6/15 


Lance-Cpl. Holden, R. 


1740 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. Howarth, R 


2653 


C 


W. 


15,6/15 


Pte. Hodson, E 


2825 


B 


W. 


15,6/15 


2nd Lieut. Houghton, A. T. 





— 


W. 


13,6/15 


Capt. Houghton, A. T. 


■ — 


— 


W. 


30/11/17 


Pte. Houghton, W. H. 


202435 


B 


R.P. of W. 


18/11/17 


.J<Pte. Houghton, A. F. 


28285 


B 


K. in A. 


18/11 17 


2nd Lieut. Hornby, R. 


— 


— 


W. 


18 11 17 


Pte. Holland, H 


13644 


B 


W. 


30 11/17 


.{.Pte. Horarth, W 


36077 


D 


K. inA. 


30 11/17 


Pte. Holland, W. H. 


28286 


D 


W. 


9/4/18 


2nd Lieut. Horsfall, R. E. . 


— 


— 


W. 


9, '4/ 18 


2nd Lieut. Howarth, J. 





— 


W. 


9/4/18 


2nd Lieut. Horner, G. S. 


— 


— 


W. 


9/4/18 


Pte. Hopkins, E 


'. 32183 '.'. 


B 


Missing 


31 7 17 


Pte. Holgate, H 


200288 


D 


Missing 


31 7,17 


Pte. Holland, H 


17484 


D 


W. 


.. N.T. IS 9 17 


Pte. Holden. G. B 


37656 


D 


W. 


20 9 17 


Pte. Holland, H 


13644 


B 


W. 


20 9 17 


4.2nd Lieut. Holden, H. 





— 


K. inA. 


21 9 17 


^2nd Lieut. Holmes, C. 


— 


— . 


D. ofW. 


20 9/17 


Lance-Cpl. Hough, R. 


202930 


B 


W. 


20,9/17 


Lance-Cpl. Hoggett, A. 


201272 


B 


W. 


20,9/17 


^Pte. Hodson, R 


36086 


D 


K. in A. 


20 9 17 


Pte. Horan, J. „. 


201740 


D 


W. 


20,9/17 



166 



Rank and Name. 
»J«Pte. Howarth, A. 
4<Pte. Howarth, T. 

Pte. Holt, A 

Lance-Sgt. Holt, A. ... 

Sgt. Holt. A 

Pte. Holmes, T. 
Cpl. Hoole, R. 
Pte. Horrocks, J. 
Pte. Howard, T. 
2nd Lieut. Howarth, G. 
^Pte. Honey, C. 

Pte. Holt, H 

Pte. Horsley, J. 
Pte. Howarth, R. 
2nd Lieut. Howarth, L. 
i^«Pte. Hockey, F. 
Pte. Hoodless, L. 
Lance-Cpl. Hough, R. 

Sgt. Hogg, J 

Pte. Hodgson, H. O. 
«J«Cpl. Hutchinson, J. ... 

Pte. Hughes, F. 
^<Cpl. Hunt, G. N. 
►J<Pte. Hutchinson, T. ... 
Cpl. Huddart, W. P. 
Pte. Hunt, J. W. 
^.Pte. Hubbard, H. 
4<Pte. Hunt, W. 

Lance-Cpl. Hutchinson, J. 
Pte. Hulme, W. E. ... 
Pte. Hurst, C. 
Pte. Hutchinson, W. 
Pte. Hubbersty, T. ... 
Pte. Hudson, G. 
Cpl. Hubbersty, J. 
Pte. Humphries, H. ... 
Pte. Hunter, J. 
Cpl. Hunter, J. 
Pte. Hudson, E. 
4iPte. Hutton, A. H. ... 

Cpl. Hall, H 

Pte. Hurley, J. 
Pte. Hudson, J. 

Pte. Hall, H 

Pte. Hurley, J. 
2nd Lieut. Hunt, J. ... 
4<Pte. Hunt, R. 
.{.Pte. Hunt, D. 

Pte. Hubbersty, J. ... 
Pte. Hughes, J. G. ... 
Pte. Hulme, S. 
^<Pte. Humphries, H. ... 

Pte. Hulme, W. 

Pte. Hunter, T. D. J. L. 
►i<Pte. Huddleston, E. ... 

Pte. Hurst, 0. H. 

Pte. Hubbick, A. 
4«Pte. Hudson, F. 

Pte. Hull, F 

>J<Pte. Harrison, J. 
>|.Pte. Hunter, W. 
4<Sgt. Hurley, J. 



No. 


Coy. 


Nature of 


Casualty. 


Date. 


;(2o.«i 


A 


K. inA. ... 


20 9 17 


202N04 


A 


K. in A. . 


20 9 17 


2026-I7 


D 


W. 




30 10 17 


202647 


D 


W. 




18 5 18 


202647 


D 


W. 




15 10 18 


.(0620 


D 


W. 




4 9 18 


2029S2 


C 


W. 




10,9 18 


201986 


B 


W. 




14/9 18 


28296 


B 


W. 




23 9 18 


- 




W. 




1 10 18 


36017 




K. i 


n A. 


1 10 18 


20176 


D 


W. 




N.T. .30,9/18 


.10964 


B 


W. 




14 10/18 


33924 


D 


W. 




22 10/18 


— 





W. 




31 7 17 


202626 


D 


K. 1 


in A. 


17 10/18 


28277 


A 


W. 




.30 11 17 


202430 


B 


W. 




N.T. 30 11 17 


200092 


C 


W. 




N.T. 9 4/ 18 


240348 


B 


W. 




13 5/18 


240067 


D 


K. 


in A. 


9 4/18 


28280 


D 


W, 




9 4/18 


202608 


A 


K. 


in A. 


10,4/18 


28299 


B 


K. 


in A. 


9 4/18 


290794 


A 


W. 




11 4 18 


23.';026 


A 


R.P. of W. ... 


9/4/18 


39,{9() 


D 


D. . 


of W. 2 


5 18 ; 5/5/18 


29414 


C 


K. 


in A. 


10 5/18 


202,5,13 


A 


W. 




14 5 18 


240092 


A 


W. 




14 5 18 


.•J4173 


A 


W. 




N.T. .30/5 18 


446.i 


B 


W. 




9/9/16 


457.S 


B 


W. 




9/9/16 


6241 


C 


W. 




25 9 16 


200544 


A 


W. 




21 7 17 


4891 


C 


W. 




9 9 16 


171 


D 


W. 




15 6 15 


171 


D 


W. 




8 8/16 


1963 


B 


W. 




8 8/16 


1083 


C 


K. 


in A. 


16 5/15 


2522 


D 


W. 




14 7 16 


20054 


D 


W. 




2 8/16 


234 


C 


W. 




15 6/15 


3983 


D 


W. 




1 4/16 


2084 


D 


W. 




2 8/16 


— 


— 


W. 




3 8 16 


2.300 


A 


K. 


in A. 


4 6/15 


4273 




K. 


in A. 


29 5 '16 


2241 


B 


W. 




IS 6 15 


28287 


C 


R.P. of W. ... 


18 11/17 


202500 


B 


W. 




30 1117 


4891 


C 


W. 




31 7 17 






D. 


of W. ... 


28 9/17 


235134 


D 


W. 




N.T. 20 9/17 


244867 


A 


W. 




N.T. 20 9/17 


2<)072» 


C 


K. 


in A. 


20/9/17 


2431 1 1 


D 


W. 




16 '8/18 


26691 


C 


W. 




1 10/18 


34112 


D 


K. 


in A. 


22/10/18 


240113 


B 


R.P. of W..., 


23 10/18 


I6.5.S8 


— 


D. 


of W. ... 


2 8/17 


201472 





K. 


in A. 


22 4 17 


200063 


— 


K. 


in A. 


,S 8 Hi 



167 



Rank and Name. 
"JiPte. lanson, R. 

Pte. Ibbotson, J. 
>J<2nd Lieut. Ibbotson, G. S. 

Pte. Ikin, J 

>}«Dr. Inglis, W. 

Pte. Ince, R 

►J<Pte. Ingram, J. 
«J«Lance-Cpl. Ingle, H. ... 

Sgt. Innes, A. 

Pte. Ince, W 

Pte. Ince, J 

Pte. Ince, J 

>J<Pte. Irving, G. 

Pte. Irving, A. 

Lance-Cpl. Isherwood, J. 

Sgt. Isles, R 

4.C.S.M. Isles, R. 

Pte. Isherwood, A. 
"fiPte. Isherwood, R. 

^Pte. Jackson, S. 
^Pte. Jackman, J. 

Pte. Jackson, T. 

Pte. Jackson, W. 
«JiLance-Cpl. Jameson, A. 
>J<Pte. Jackson, J. 

Pte. Jackson, W. 

Pte. Jackson, J. 

Pte. Jackson, W. 

Pte. James, W. J. ... 
•J<Pte. Jagger, A. 
«J<Cpl. Jackson, W. 
>J<Cpl. Jackson, H. 

Pte. Jackson, J. J. ... 

Pte. Jamieson, H. 

Pte. Jackson, R. S. ... 
i^«Cpl. Jackson, W. 
^Pte. Jackson, J. 
>J«Pte. Jackson ... 

Pte. James, L. M. 

Pte. Johnson, L. 

Pte. Jackson, H. 

Pte. Jones, A. 

Pte. Jacobs, M. 

Pte. Jameson, T. 

Pte. Jackson, W. 

2nd Lieut. Jenkinson, T. C. 

Sgt. Jeffries, W 

Pte. Jeffrey, E. H 

4<Pte. Johnson, R. L 

2nd Lieut. James-Alfred 

Lieut. Jenkins, W. H. 

Pte. Jolly, J 

Pte. Jones, E. J 

Pte. Jolly, J 

Pte. Joyce, V. 

Pte. Jones, M. 
^Lance-CpI. Johnson, W. 

Pte. Johnson, W. 

Pte. Jones, J. 

Pte. Jordan, J. 
^Pte. Johnston, W 



No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


201678 


D 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


235162 


... 


W. 


. N.T. 5/7/17 




... 


K. inA. .. 


14/5/18 


2.S270 


C 


W. 


3/6/18 


1555 


B 


K. inA. ... 


15/6/15 


132 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


3275 


C 


K. in A. .. 


8/8/16 


202762 


C 


K. in A. ... 


9,9/16 


202937 


B 


W. 


31/7/17 


203633 


D 


W. 


N.T. 9/4/18 


3695 


D 


W. 


4 8/16 


39955 


D 


W. 


16/8/18 


219 


D 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


4573 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


6263 


D 


W. 


9/9/16 


993 


C 


W. 


15 6/15 


200195 


C 


K. in A. 


21/7,17 


202858 


C 


W. 


30/11/17 


290916 


B 


K. inA. ... 


25/4/18 


1622 


B 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


217 


B 


K. inA. ... 


15/6/15 


1464 


D 


W. 


15/'6/15 


1694 


A 


W. 


15/6,15 


1069 


C 


K. in A. 


16 6,15 


3419 


B 


K. in A. 


8,8/16 


6226 


B 


W. 


9/9/16 


202582 


B 


W. 


12/7/17 


3183 


D 


W. 


N.T. 21/7/17 


202147 


. . 


W. 


31/7/17 


202449 


B 


K. inA. ... 


31/7/17 


202651 


C 


K. in A. ... 


31/7/17 


202701 


C 


K. in A. ... 


31/7/17 


2713 


B 


R.P. of W. ... 


9/4/18 


28076 


D 


W. 


25/4/18 


41534 


D 


W. 


14/5/18 


27792 


C 


K. in A. .. 


8/6/18 


41738 


B 


K. in A. 


22/6/18 


30696 


— 


K. in A. 


11, '8/18 


42001 


A 


W. 


16/8/18 


30920 


D 


W. 


4/9/18 


.30919 


D 


W. 


4/9/18 


214364 


C 


W. 


N.T. 3/9/18 


245144 


C 


W. 


3/9/18 


30967 


B 


W. 


30 9/18 


3183 


D 


W. 


28/2/18 


— 


— 


W. 


31/7/17 


34300 


A 


W. 


14/5/18 


5280 


B 


W. 


N.T. 14/5 18 


2406 


B 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


— 


— 


W. 


26/2,18 


— 


Medical Officer 


W. 


9/4/18 


1035 


A 


W. 


15,6/15 
and 8/1/17 


1288 


C 


W. 


15,'6/15 


1969 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


2547 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


107 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


2264 


A 


K. in A. ... 


1/8/16 


3568 


B 


W. 


8/8/16 


4189 


A 


W. 


9,9/16 


5342 


C 


W. 


14/11/16 


202583 


B 


K. inA. ... 


2/6,17 



168 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Jones, W. 

■2nd Lieut. Johnston, W. H 



Pte. 


Jordan. J. 




Pte. 


Jones, J. 0. 




Pte. 


Jones, W. 




Pte. 


Johnson, J. 




Pte. 


Jones, C. 




Pte. 


Jolly, J. ... 




Pte. 


Johnson, F 




^Pte. 


Jones, W. 




Pte. 


Jones, G. H. 




Lan 


:e-Cpl. Johnson, 


Pte. 


Jones, P. 




4.Pte. 


Johnson, J. 




Pte. 


Jones, J. 




•J<Lance-CpI. Jones, 


W 


^.Pte. 


Jones, T. E 




Pte. 


Jones, A. 




Pte. 


John, D. T. 




Pte. 


Jones, C. M. 




Pte. 


Jones, H. 




2nd 


Lieut. Jones, 


H. 


Lan 


:e-Cpl. Jones, 


F. 


Pte. 


Jones, J. 




Pte. 


Jones, A. 




*CpL 


Johnson, H. 


C. 


Lance-Cpl. Jones, 


F. 


Pte. 


Jump, J. 




Pte. 


Jump, R. W 




Pte. 


Kay, C. ... 




^.Pte. 


Kay. E. ... 




Pte. 


Kay, F. ... 




Pte. 


Kay, G. ... 





J. E. 



E. 



^Pte. Kay, G 

Pte. Kay, J 

4«Lance-Cpl. Kay, J. 
►hPte. Kellett, W. 

Pte. Kellett, W. 

Pte. Kempster, J. 

Pte. Kellett, F. 
4«Lance-Cp!. Kerfoot, J. 

HhPte. Kell, T. W. 

Pte. Kelly. J 

Pte. Kelly. P. 

Pte. Kellett, A. J. ... 

Pte. Kent, G 

Pte. Kelly, W. 

Pte. Kenyon, F. 

Pte. Kenyon, T. W. ... 
^Lance-Cpl. Kellgariff. J. 

Pte. Kenyon, W. R. ... 

Pte. Kershaw, W. 

Pte. Kenyon, F. H. ... 

Sgt. Kelly, A. 

Pte. Kellaway, A. A. 

Pte. Kershaw, W. 

Pte. Kelton, A. G. ... 

Pte. Kershaw, F. 



No. 
2()2.S09 

202;t!ll 

205.5ti I 

202.i()<J 

2:{2.'>;< 

290797 

20100:{ 
37.575 
19744 
27571 

2037X0 
3til91 
23253 

202.5H I 
29057 
34301 
3GI9I 
41200 
30049 
29417 

6765 
30655 

242N75 

30329 

675li 

202975 
36848 

2221 

3040 

4916 

202064 

8311 

37664 

240325 

3438 

1476 
1297 
2N0S 
1201 
2659 
2040 
5356 
3929 
233 
4897 
6116 

202972 

2068 

6185 

4619 

36192 

202202 
26185 

202893 

244920 

202788 



Coy. Nalure of Casualty 




Date. 


B 


W. 
W. 






2 6 17 
4 (i 17 


C 


w. 






18 7 17 


B 


w. 




N.T.3I 7 17 


B 


w. 






31 7 17 


A 


w. 




and 


31 7 17 
.30 II 17 


A 


w. 






20 9 17 


D 


w. 






20 9 17 


B 


w. 






20 9 17 


B 


K. in 


A. 




20 9 17 


B 


W. 






20 9 17 


C 


W. 




. N.T.18 II 17 


A 


W. 






30 11 17 


A 


K. in 


A. 




30 II 17 


C 


W. 






30 II 17 


A 


K. in 


A. ; 




28 2 18 


B 


K. in 


A. . 




9 4 18 


A 


W. 






14 5,18 


D 


W. 






3 6 18 


C 


W. 






28 7 18 


C 


W. 






4 '9; 18 


_ 


W. 






II 9 18 


D 


W. 




'. N.T 


.30 9 18 


A 


Missing 




13 10 18 


D 


W. 






16 lU 18 


B 


K. in 


A. 




22 10 IS 


D 


W. 




'. N.T 


1 6 18 


. _ 


W. 






18 7 17 


C 


W. 






3I/7/I7 


D 


W. 






15 6 15 


C 


K. in 


A. 




15/6,15 


D 


Missing 




8 8 16 


A 


W. 






9 9 16 








and 18 7 17 


B 


K. in 


A. . 


. N.T 


20 9 17 


B 


W. 






20 9 17 


C 


K. in 


A. 




14,5,15 


A 


W. 
Died 






15,6,15 
30 6, 16 


D 


W. 




'. N.T 


15 6 15 


C 


W. 






15 6,15 


A 


W. 






15,6/15 


D 


K. in 


A. 




15,615 


C 


K. in 


A. 




15 6 IS 


B 


W. 






2 8, 16 


D 


W. 






8,8,16 


D 


W. 






8 8 16 


C 


W. 






9 9 16 


D 


W. 






9 9 16 


D 


W. 






9 9 16 


— 


K. in 


A. 




3I/7/I7 


D 


W. 






9 9/16 


A 


W. 






29/9/16 


D 


W. 




'. N.T. 


29,9/16 


C 


W. 






9/6/17 


D 


W. 






9/6/17 


A 


w. 






31/7/17 


D 


w. 






20 9,17 


B 


w. 






7 '7/ 17 


A 


w. 






30 1117 


D 


w. 






30,11,17 



169 



Sgt 

Lane 

Pte. 

Pte, 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Sgt. 

Pte. 

Cpl. 

2nd 

Cpl. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
4<Pte. 

Pte. 

Lane 
4.Pte. 
•fiPte. 



A. E 



D. 



Rank and Name. 

Kelly, A. 
e-Cpl. Kent, 
Kelsall, A. 
Kennedy, N 
Kettley, C. 
Kerridge, A 
Kerfoct, W. 
Kelly, W. 
Kendrick, C. G. 
Keith, D. 
Lieut. Kershaw, 
Kent, G. ... 
Killgarriffe, J. 
Kirkham, M. 
Kirby, R. 
Kippax, J. 
e-Cpl. Killgarriffe 
Kirk, J. 
Kippax, J 



^Lance-Cpl. Kippax, R 



Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Cpl 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Lieu 

Pte. 
«{.Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

2nd 
.{.Pte. 
>|<Pte. 

Pte. 
*Sgt. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
4«Pte. 

Pte. 
^Pte. 

>}«Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
»JiPte. 
4«Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Cpl. 



Kilby, I 

King, T 

Kilshaw, W. 
Kilby, W. 
Kirkham, A. 
Kirkman, J. 
KiUick, E. V. 

King, C 

Kirkham, C. 
Kimberley, A. . 
t. King, E. 
Kirkman, J. W. 
Kirkman, J. W. 

King, T 

Kirkham, A. 
King, J. A. 
Lieut. Kirkby, { 
Knott, A. 
Knight, J. 
Knox, A. 
Knowles, R. 
Knapper, J. 
Knight, W. 
Knight, C. 
Knowles, A. 
Knight, W. 
Knowles, F. G. 

Large, H. 
Lapping, G. 
Lawrenson, J. 
Lawrenson, W. 
Lawson, F. 
Latimer, E. M. 
Lawson, T. S. 
Laithwaits, W. 
Lawson, M. 
Lawson, T. 
Larmour, T. 
Larkin, F. 
Lancaster, J. 



No. 

202702 
29144 

202661 
29;}91 
18841 
29390 
37248 

202702 
30992 
30460 

200113 
2068 
3089 
3962 
4949 
2007 
202859 
202108 

202108 

16878 

200534 

32037 

203063 

200559 

242976 

42004 

30946 

30681 

32092 

2274 

7721 

2213 

200599 

205083 

202757 

203594 

5632 

200895 

30622 
235502 

20599 
201454 
235502 

35176 

265663 

28090 

37682 

201213 

27232 

244818 

51638 

6106 

4061 

4091 

201760 

1348 

1984 



Coy. 

D 
A 
A 
B 
A 
C 
D 
D 
B 
A 

B 
D 
A 
D 
C 
D 
C 
B 



C 
A 
A 
D 
A 
A 
D 
D 
A 
A 

C 
D 
A 
A 
B 

C 
A 
A 
A 
C 
B 
B 
A 
B 



C 
D 
A 
B 
D 
C 
D 
B 
B 
B 
D 
B 



Nature of Casualty 



Date. 



w. 


9 4,18 


w. 


10/4/18 


w. 


10/4/18 


w. 


25/4/18 


w. 


2/6 '18 


w. 


16 8/18 


w. 


17,8/18 


w. 


16 8 18 


w. 


23,9 18 


w. 


26 5/18 


w. 


3 9 18 


w. 


27 7 19 


w. 


15 6/15 


w. 


15 6/15 


K. in A. 


3/8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


.. N.T. 8 9 16 


K in A. 


9 9/16 


W. 


9/9/16 


K. in A. 


4/6/17 


W. 


4 6/17 


D. of W. 


5 6/17 


W. 


31/7/17 


W. 


31/7/17 


W. 


31/7/17 


W. 


.. N.T. 20,9/17 


W. 


13/4/18 


W. 


22 8/18 


W. 


30 9 18 


w. 


30 9 18 


w. 


20 10/18 


w. 


8(7/18 


w. 


3/9/18 


w. 


8/8/17 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


W. 


8/9/16 


W. 


31 '7 17 


Missing 


23 4/18 


W. 


25 9 18 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


K. in A. 


31 7 17 


W. 


30 11 17 


K in A. 


9/4 18 


W. 


16 8,18 


W. 


30 9 18 


W. 


14 10 18 


K. in A. 


31 7 17 


W. 


23 10/18 


K. in A. 


31/7,17 


Died 


9/7 17 


W. 


18/1117 


W. 


20 11/17 


K. in A. 


30 11/17 


K. in A. 


30 11/17 


W. 


l(> 8 18 


W. 


.. N.T. 25 9/18 


W. 


9 916 


W. 


.. N.T. 9 9 16 


W. 


9 9/16 


W. 


31 7/16 


W. 


26 6 15 


W. 


15 6 15 



170 



Rank and Name. 



No. 



Coy. Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



Sgt. Lancaster, J. 




liW) 


B 


W. 


1 8 16 


Pte. Lambert, S. 




2.5NN 


B 


w. 


15 6 15 


Pte. Larmour, J. 




231 


B 


w. 


28 7/16 


Lance-CpL Latham, 1 


1. 


2553 


B 


w. 


3 8,16 


Pte. Larkin, C. 




•1865 


D 


w. 


88,16 


Pte. Latham, T. 




4301 


D 


w. 


8 8 16 


Pte. Lambert, H. 




43()<l 


B 


w. 


8,8 16 


Pte. Latimer, J. 




33S!) 


C 


w. 


9/9,16 


Pte. Landston, F. 




I!»232 


D 


w. 


30,9 18 


Pte. Lake, R. C 




200129 


C 


w. 


28,6; 18 


Pte. Law, A. ... 




3252 


C 


w. 


8 8,16 


^.Pte. Latham, C. W. 




30(i24 


B 


K. in A. 


1,10,18 


Pte. Leyland, P. 




37254 


B 


W. 


20 9 17 


Pte. Lees, R. E. 




2i)0«75 


C 


R.P. ofW. 


18/11 17 


Pte. Lewis, P. 




2()274!» 


C 


Missing 


. 18,11 17 


^Pte. Leach, H. J. 




279(i7 


A 


K. in A. 


30,11 17 


Pte. Lennon, J. 




243771 


D 


W. 


11,4 18 


^Pte. Leary, A. 




17549 


— ■ 


K. in A. 


9 4 18 


4«Pte. Lewtas, J. 


.. 


4900 


— 


K. in A. 


29 9 16 


Pte. Lee, J. T. 




30969 


B 


W. 


.to 9 18 


Pte. Lewis, W. T. 




30625 


D 


R.P. of W. 


.{0,9 18 


Pte. Levitt, F. J. 




35647 


D 


W. 


15 8 18 


Pte. Leach, F. 




2401 


B 


W. 


9/9,16 


Pte. Linness, E. 




41669 


C 


W. 


2,5,18 


^Sgt. Lightbowne, J. 




24061 


B 


K. inA. 


18/1117 


►fi'ind Lieut. Livesey, J 


."a. 




— 


K. in A. 


30/11,17 


Pte. Lilburn, W. J. 




33725 


B 


W. 


9/4/18 


Pte. Lipman, S. 




291.52 


C 


W. 


9/4/18 


4iPte. Lightfoot, H. 




29154 


C 


K. in A. 


23,9/18 


Pte. Lingard, S. 




4.500 


C 


W. 


. N.T. 9,9 16 


Pte. Livingstone, J. 




245 


D 


W. 


9 9,16 


Pte. Livesey, R. 




2029(iS 


C 


W. 


14.4 17 


Pte. Lightfoot, W. B 




36194 


B 


R.P. 01 W 


31,7,17 


Pte. Livesey, J. 




5439 


C 


W. 


20,9/17 


Pte. Liddell, W. 




243.541 


A 


W. 


20,9 17 


^Pte. Livesey, J. 




20293X 


B 


K. in A. 


20,9/17 


Pte. Lister, F. 




2N05 


A 


W. 


15/6,15 


Lance-Cpl. Lister, A. 




1 3S5 


D 


W. 


31/8/15 


i^Capt. Lindsay, H. 








K. in A. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Liptrot, J. 




202421 


D 


W. 


9/4/18 


Pte. Lloyd, F. 




202973 


B 


W. 


14,6/18 


^.Pte. Lloyd, L. 




18.335 




K. in A. 


9/4/18 


Pte. Lloyd, J. G. 




41216 


D 


W. 


4/9/18 


Pte. Lloyd, W. S. 




203832 


A 


W. 


23,10/18 


^Pte. Longworth, W. 




17838 


B 


K. in A. 


30/11/17 


Sgt. Lowe, A. 




240239 


B 


W. 


9 4,18 


Capt. Lonsdale, H. 




— 


.. 


W. 


1,8/18 


Pte. Loud, J. ... 




13866 


C 


W. 


16 5 18 


Pte. Lomas, S. W. 




29392 


B 


W. 


4 9/18 


Pte. Loud, A. 




204976 


C 


W. 


5/9/18 


►I<Pte. Lowe, B. 




23,5049 


.. 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Lofthouse, J. 




23 IS 


A 


W. 


15/6/15 


«i.Cpl. Lofthouse, J. 




200583 


A 


K. in A. 


29/5/17 


^.Pte. Lord, T. E. 




20.{0I4 


C 


K. in A. 


1/6/17 


4<Cpl. Lomax, J. 




— 


R.A.M. 


C. K. in A. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Lowe, W. 




. 203599 


A 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Loftus, J. 




43.56 


C 


W. 


9/9/16 


Pte. Lowe, J. H. 




.•50623 


D 


W. 


30/9/18 


Pte. Legan, S. ... 




27.552 


C 


R.P. of W. 


22/10/18 


HE<Pte. Lowndes, T. 




201.532 


B 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Lowe, H. 




30925 


D 


W. 


22/10/18 


Pte. Lund, J. ... 




200688 


C 


W. 


9/4/18 


^Pte. Lupton, S. 




201788 


C 


K. in A. 


9/4/18 



171 



Rank and Name. 
►I<Sgt. Lucas, E.... 
>J<Pte. Lund, J 

Pte. Lund, H. 
^Pte. Lewtas, J. 

Pte. Lund, J 

►fiPte. Lucas, W. 

Pte. Lupton, W. 

Pte. Lund, J 

Pte. Lucas, E. 
>{<Pte. Lyons, C 

Lance-CpL Lythgoe, R. 

Pte. Lyth?oe, S. 

Pte. Lyon, G. E. 
>I.Pte. Lvnch, H. 
4«Pte. Leitch, D. C. 

Pte. Lee, B 

Pte. Lewis, W. P. 

Lance-CpL Leigh, W. 

Pte. Lewis, C. 

Pte. Lees, C. J. 

Lance-CpL Lewty, F.... 

Pte. Lee, G 

Pte. Lever, E. 

Pte. Leighton, E. 

Pte. Leonard, J. 

Pte. Lewis, J. 

Pte. Lee, H 

Pte. Levingstone, R. ... 
>fiPte. Leach, F. 

Lance-CpL Leeming, W. 
>J<Pte. Lewis, W. 
i^Pte. Leadbetter, J. ... 

Pte. Lee, H. J. 

Pte. Lees, C. J. 

Sgt. Lester, E. 

Pte. Legard, E. R. ... 
>JiLance-Cpl. Leigh, J. ... 
«I«Pte. Leach, T. E. 
4<Pte. Lee, G 

Pte. Lee, J 

Pte. Leeming, W. 

Pte. Leach, J. 

Pte. Lee, J 

Pte. Lees, C. J. 

Pte. Lewis, J. 

Pte. Lee, S. N. 

>f<Pte. Makinson, T. E. 
Pte. Madhill, T. 
Pte. Marsh, T. 
Pte. Malley, J. 
Pte. Martin, C. J. 
Pte. Marsden, J. 

Pte. May, A 

Pte. Mather, T. 

Pte. Magnall, E. 
^2nd Lieut. Mather, V. 
Pte. Makinson, J. 
Pte. Massey, L. 
Pte. Marchant, J. 



No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty 




Date. 


201091 


A 


Died while P 


of W. 


9/4/18 


2693 


C 


Missing 




9 9 16 


4373 


D 


W. 




9/9/16 


4900 


B 


K. in A. . 




29/9/16 


285 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 


2051 


D 


K. in A. . 




16/6/15 


4090 


B 


W. 




8/8/16 


4333 


B 


W. 




8/8/16 


3374 


D 


W. 




9/9 16 


29060 


C 


K. in A. . 




9,4 18 


18346 


D 


W. 




7/6/17 


161 1 


C 


W. 




27/6/15 


2281 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 


2236 


A 


K. in A. . 




16/6/15 


36041 


A 


K. in A. 




14/5/18 


27603 


A 


W. 


'. N.T. 


14/5/18 


30690 


C 


W. 




9/9/18 


13306 


B 


W. 




30/9/18 


4286 


C 


Missing 


'. N.T. 


9/9/16 


3132 


C 


W. 




9/9 16 


3259 


D 


W. 




9/9/16 


4939 


B 


W. 




9/9/16 


4186 


A 


w. 




28/9/16 


6187 


A 


w. 




29/9/16 


4606 


A 


w. 

D. of W. . 




23/12/16 
30/12/16 


202065 


— 


w. 


ant 


15/4/17 

31/7/17 


202437 


B 


w. 


. M. 


31/7/17 


202066 


C 


w. 




31/7/17 


202806 


A 


K. in A. . 




31/7/16 


260428 


A 


W. 


'. N.T. 


31/7/16 


203940 


A 


K. inA. . 




31/7/16 


32722 


A 


K. inA. . 




31/7/17 


2322 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


3132 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 


230 


B 


W. 




29/6/15 


2112 


C 


W. 




30/8/15 


1387 


D 


K. in A. . 




16/'6/15 


1633 


C 


K. inA. . 




16/6/15 


2641 


B 


K. in A. 




16/6/15 


1295 


C 


W. 


'. N.T. 


1/8/16 


1941 


A 


W. 




2/8/16 


4415 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


4903 


B 


W. 




8/8/16 


3132 


C 


W. 




5/8/16 


4899 


C 


W. 




9/9/16 


40834 


B 


W. 




30/9/18 


5260 





Died 




25/11/16 


4408 


A 


W. 


'. N.T 


9/'9/16 


4403 


D 


W. 




9/9/16 


2612 


C 


W. 




9/9/16 


3412 


C 


W. 




0/9/16 


4008 


A 


W. 




9/9/16 


4662 


D 


W. 


'. N.T 


9/9/16 


319533 


C 


W. 


and 


24/5 17 
23 10,18 


202862 


C 


W. 




4,6/17 


— 


— 


K. in A. . 




31/7/17 


31989 


B 


W. 




31/7/17 


201735 


C 


W. 




31/7/17 


12292 


B 


W. 




31/7/17 



172 



Rank and Name. 



Pte. 

Pte. 
>fiPte. 
4<Pte. 

2nd 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Cpl. 
^<Pte. 
►fiPte. 
4<2nd 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
►fiPte. 
4<Pte. 
4'Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
►I<Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

2nd 
^Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
>J<Pte. 

Pte. 



Marsh, S. 
Marsden, F. 
Mannion, D. E. .. 
Mair, J. ... 
Lieut. Martin, A. 
Marsden, R. 
Marsh, P. 
Mather, T. 
Makin, R. 
Maher, J. 
Matthews, T. 
Mawsdiey, T. 
Lieut. Martin, A. 
Marden, F. 
Marshall, H. 
Maymon, J. W. 
Macheter, J. 
Mather, W. H. .. 
Mansel, A. E. .. 
Marsden, J. 
Matsell, J. H. .. 
Maden, S. 
McGinnerty, W. 
McHugh, J. 
McNamara, P. .. 
McCartney, H. .. 
McGreal, J. 
McKerney, H. .. 
McDougall, T. .. 
Lieut. McSweeny, 
McGerr, J. 
McMahon, J. J. 
McDerby, J. 
McEwen, R. 
McDonald, R. .. 
McKeown, J. 



Pte. McGunnigle, P. .. 

Pte. McDougall, F. .. 

Pte. McCarthy, J. 

Pte. McGovern, J. 

Pte. McWiUiams, H. 
.{.Cpl. McCullough, R. .. 

Pte. McMahon, J. 

Pte. McGaughrey, O. 

Pte. McLacklan, A. .. 

Pte. McCIure, W. 

Pte. McDonald, J. E. 
►fiPte. McCann, J. 

Lance-Cpl. McNulty, J 

Pte. McCormack, j. .. 

Lance-Cpl. McDonald, 

Pte. McConnell, J. .. 

»I<Pte. May, G 

•fiPte. Martin, T. 

Pte. Marsden, H. 

Pte. Makinson, N. 

Pte. Marris, H. 

Pte. Martin, J. T. 
Pte. Mayman, J. 
Pte. Martin, R. 
Pte. Marsh, J. 



D. A 



No. 

20253(i 

•I2;»70 

264 1 <J 

202071 

.■»,';254 

2!M)N22 

2(12 1 U(i 

200,(79 

104:i 

I486 

761 

787 

2.576 

26.J9 

2969 

35247 

201473 

235012 

3069 

4124 

21482 

235410 

202584 

201829 

201758 

200354 

17525 
202494 
241755 

34318 

200205 

2736 

2269 

1682 

4909 

2634 

4148 

1985 

1999 

29162 

29420 

8731 

29421 

242713 

31,50 

203948 

1053 

365952 

202679 

202846 

I5J 

176 

218 

1129 

25761 

181 

3860 



Coy. 


Mature of Casualtj 


/. Date. 


A 


R.P. ofW. 


31/7 17 


C 


Missing 


.. N.T. 31 '7 17 


C 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


D 


K. in A. 


31 7/17 


— 


W. 


20 9 17 


C 


R.P. of W. 


18/11/17 


c 


W. 


18/11/17 


A 


W. 


30/11,17 


B 


W. 


30/11/17 


D 


Missing 


9/4/18 


C 


K. inA. 


15/6/15 


D 


K. in A. 


2/4/16 


— 


K. inA. 


28/6/16 


B 


W. 


14/6/15 


C 


W. 


25/5/16 


B 


w. 


15/6/15 


C 


w. 


15/6/15 


C 


w. 


15/6/15 


. - 


Died 


21/5/18 


-- 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 




K. in A. 


31/7/17 


C 


W. 


18/11/17 


D 


W. 


9/9/16 


D 


W. 


12/7/17 


A 


W. 


.. N.T. 13/7/17 


C 


K. in A. 


217/17 


C 


W. 


21/7/17 


B 


W. 


31/7/17 


A 


W. 


31/7/17 


. 


R.P. of W. 


31/7,17 


B 


K. inA. 


31/7/17 


B 


W. 


31/7/17 


B 


W. 


31/7/17 


A 


w. 


20/11/17 


C 


Pres. K. 


5/6/15 


B 


W. 


19/4/18 




D. of W. 


9/7/15 


A 


W. 


IS/6/15 


A 


W. 


19/9/15 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


C 


W. 


8/8/16 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


D 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


B 


W. 


8/8/16 


A 


w. 


10/4/18 


C 


w. 


26/4/18 


D 


w. 


.. N.T. 2/6/18 


A 


w. 


30/9/18 


B 


K. in A. 


2/10/18 


B 


W. 


23/10/18 


D 


W. 


4/9/18 


C 


W. 


8/8/16 


C 


R.P. of W. 


18/11/17 





K. inA. 


31/7/17 




K. inA. 


8/9/16 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


D 


w. 


1/6/15 


D 


w. 


1/6/15 

and 8/8/16 


A 


w. 


15/10/15 


B 


w. 


19/10/15 


D 


w. 


1/4/16 


D 


w. 


1/4/16 



173 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. Nature of Casualt] 


Date. 


►{.Pte. 


Marris, L. 


I47(i 


D 


K. in A. 


15,6/15 


^.Pte. 


Martin, W 


.iOO.i 


A 


K. in A. 


16 6,15 


►I«Pte. 


Marginson, A. . 


:<;tGs 


C 


K. in A. 


16/6 15 


4<Pte. 


Maguire, J. 


24-J 


C 


K. in A. 


16/6/15 


Pte. 


Maries, J. 


:{ii 


C 


W. 


16/6/15 


^P'.e. 


Marsden, F 


7(il 


B 


K. in A. 


30/10/15 


Pte. 


Madders, I 


240.5 


C 


W. 


1/8/16 


.{.Pte. 


Mayor, J. 


42().5 


C 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Marsh, S. 


4428 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Marshall, J 


194 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Mayor, R. 


;{i7- 


B 


W. 


8 8,16 


Pte. 


Mather, G 


.{7752 


D 


Missing 


.. N.T. 8/4/18 


Pte. 


Mayoh, I. P 


25369 


A 


W. 


10/4/18 


Pte. 


Marland, J 


1972.5 


A 


W. 


2/5/18 


Pte. 


Malpas, J. H 


41230 


C 


W. 


2 5 18 


Pte. 


Marsh, T. 


24.(192 


A 


W. 


• 145 18 
and 24/9 18 


Pte. 


Maude, A. 


.{22.54 


C 


W. 


2,6 18 


Pte. 


Massey, F. 


;«m27 


C 


W. 


20/7,18 


Pte. 


Massey, E. 


.•«l(i28 


D 


W. 


15/8 16 


Pte. 


Malie, A. 


.•«)(i2(i 


B 


W. 


4/9/18 


Pte. 


Mansley, J 


2246;{ 


B 


W. 


4/9/18 


.}.2nd 


Lieut. Marsden ... 






Killed 


11/9/18 


Sgt. 


Matthews, A. E. 


41068 


D 


W. 


22/10/18 


^Cpl. 


Manson, T. M 


.36014 


A 


K. in A. 


22/10,18 


4<Pte. 


McHale, E 


202790 


D 


K in A. 


30/11/17 


Pte. 


Mellis, J. 


4242 


C 


W. 


9,9,16 


Pte. 


Metcalf, C. B 


20289.5 


D 


W. 


19/5/17 


Pte. 


Mellars, C. H 


2;{.5028 


C 


W. 


31/7/17 


.{.Sgt. 


Mercer, A. 


1665 


B 


K. in A. 


15 6/15 


Sgt. 


Meredith, R 


4402 


C 


Missing 


.. N.T. 4 8,16 


Sgt. 


Melling, J 


1448 


B 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Meadows, J. 


202072 


A 


W. 


27/5/18 


Pte. 


Metcalfe, R 


30996 


C 


W. 


2/10/18 


Pte. 


Mellor, A. 


34086 


D 


W. 


14/5/18 


Pte. 


Miller, J. 


1484 


D 


W. 


29/9/16 


Pte. 


Miller, W 


241745 


C 


W. 


5,6/17 


^Lance-Cpl. Middlehurst, A. . 


. 265750 


B 


K. in A. 


31 7/16 


Pte. 


Minion, A. 


200071 


D 


W. 


9 8/16 
and 20/9/17 


Pte. 


Miller, G. 


200815 


B 


W. 


20 9/17 


Pte. 


Mitchinson, D. ... 


2073 


D 


W. 


156/15 


Pte. 


Miller, W. E 


2536 


D 


W. 


15,6,15 


Pte. 


Mills, J 


2569 


B 


W. 


156/15 


Pte. 


Minnion, A 


159 


D 


W. 


15/6,15 


APte. 


Middlehurst, W. 


202663 


— 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Milward, A. 


42008 


A 


R.P. of W. 


14/5 18 


4-2nd 


Lieut. Milne, C. ... 


— 


— 


K. in A. 


14 5 18 


Sgt. 


Miller, J. 


. 200293 


D 


W. 


1 10 18 


Pte. 


Midgley, A. C 


29486 


D 


W. 


30,9,18 


Pte. 


Minors, S. 


30927 


B 


R.P. of W. 


23/10/18 


Pte. 


Mitchell, R 


25152 


A 


W. 


14/5/18 


Pte. 


Morgan, J 


1797 


B 


W. 


9/9/16 


•{.Pte. 


Moncur, J. 


2320 


A 


W. 

K. in A. 


15 6 15 
9 9 16 


Pte. 


Molyneaux, J. ... 


4267 


A 


W. 


9,'9/16 


^»Pte. 


Moore, E. 


6286 


D 


Died 


2 10/18 


Pte. 


Moulding, F. N. 


1466 


B 


W. 


29,9/16 


.}.Pte. 


Morris, H. 


218 


D 


K. in A. 


8 8 16 


Capt. Matthew, F. K. 


— 


.. 


W. 


30 11,17 


.{.Pte. 


Moore, J. 


3486 


— 


K. in A. 


1 6 16 


4<Pte. 


Morris, L. 


1476 


B 


K. in A. 


15 6 15 


.{.Pte. 


Mort, N 


203801 


— 


Died 


19/2/17 



171 



Rank and Name. 

•J<Pte. Moscrop, S. 

^'Pte. Morgan, E. J. 

Pte. Moss, R 

Pte. Molyneaux, A. E. 

Pte. Monks, W 

Pte. Moulding, F. 

«J«Pte. Morley, W. 

Pte. Monen, M. 

Pte. Moscrop, S. 

Pte. Molloy, J. 

Pte. Moss, O. . . 

Pte. Morgan, E. H. 

2nd Lieut. Moore, K. 
4«Lieut. Moore, K. 

«fiPte. Monks, E. 

^iPte. IVJorris, R P. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Moore, T. 

Pte. Morley, T. 

Cpl. Moss, J. A. 

Pte. Moriey, S. 

Lance-Cpl. Monks, J. 

Pte. Montague, E. 

Pte. Morris, F. 

4<Pte. Morris, J. 

^Pte. Moss, J 

►J.Pte. Morley, S. 

^.Pte. Moss, R 

^Pte. Mounsey, J. 

Pte. Morgan, C. 

Pte. Morris, T. 

Pte. Moreton, R. H. A 

Pte. Morton, T. 

Pte. Molloy, J. 

Pte. Morgan, L. 

Pte. Morris, H. 

.frPte. Moss, B 

Pte. Moss, J 

Cpl. Mooney, J. 
Cpl. Murphy, J. 
Pte. Muin, R. A. B. 
Pte. Murray, P. 

Sgt. Murray, A. P. . . 

Pte. Mulliner, E. A. ... 
Pte. Murray, W. 
Pte. Murray, J. 
Lance-Cpl. Muncaster, I 

Pte. Muse, J 

Pte. Murphy, J. 
2nd Lieut Myers, B. 
2nd Lieut. Munroe, C. I 

4.Pte. Naylor, A. 

4.Sgt. Nabb, F 

Pte. Nelson, A. 

Pte. Nelson, T. 

Pte. Nelson, G. A. ... 

Pte. Neville, J. 

Pte. Nelson, T. 

>J<Pte. Newman, J. E. ... 



No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. Date. 


202ti2l 


C 


D. of W. 14 


7 17 I'J II 17 


24.SO»() 


C 


K. in A. 


18 7 17 


20i;»sr> 


B 


W. 


31 7 17 


20i7;ti 


C 


W. 


31 7 17 


ii72;t 


A 


W. 


31 7 17 


20028ti 


B 


W. 


31 7 17 


2i»249.i 


B 


K. in A. 


31 7 17 


2S07N 


A 


W. 


19 9 17 


2((2(i54 


C 


W. 


18 II 17 


2(H)ti.i4 


C 


W. 


18,11,17 


202(i;{N 


A 


R.P. ofW. 


9 '4 18 


2451 1;{ 


B 


W. 


9 4 18 






W. 


15 6 15 






K. in A. 


26 II 15 


1421 


D 


K. m A. 


1,4,16 


•SIH.i 


D 


Drowned in 


Somme 28,7 16 


1 ;{.iO 


D 


W. 


15,6,15 


174.1 


A 


W. 


15 6/15 


1 7.V2 


B 


W. 


.30,5 15 


1 7S4 


B 


W. 


15/6 15 


2oo;i 


D 


W. 


15/6,15 


■IKi.i 


B 


w. 


15/6,15 


44.5(> 


A 


w. 


20/4/16 


1294 


C 


K. inA. 


15(6/15 


2H.S2 


B 


K. in A. 


16/6/15 


42;«7 


C 


K. in A. 


4/8 16 


2972 


B 


K. in A. 


5 8 111 


4525 


D 


Died 


8 8/16 


4374 


B 


W. 


8,8/16 


49fi2 


B 


W. 


8/8 16 


28H4 




W. 


. N.T. 10,4/18 


21344 


C 


W. 


6,7/18 


30926 


D 


W. 


4 9/18 


4727 


B 


W. 


. N.T. 4/9/18 






Missing 


23/10/18 


30668 


A 


W. 


8/9/18 


30679 


A 


K. in A. 


23 10 18 


25243 


B 


W. 


4 9 18 


25580 


C 


W. 


23 10 18 


6692 


C 


W. 


24 5 17 


.36182 


B 


R.P. of W. 


31,7/17 


2864 


D 


W. 


209/17 






Missing 


9/4/18 


283018 


B 


W. 


25/3/18 
and 4/9/18 


1G02 


C 


W. 


15/6/15 


2285 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


2730 


A 


W. 


31 ;7/l6 


200837 


A 


W. 


!l 4/18 


41508 


A 


W. 


14 5/18 


6693 


C 


W. 


4/9/18 


— 


— 


W. 


20,9/17 


— 


— 


W. 


3/8/16 


2078 


D 


K. inA 


15/6/15 


202934 


B 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


2703 


A 


W. 


I5/6/I5 






D. of W. 


20 7,17 


4496 


C 


W.— 


8 8 16 


2909 


B 


w. 


8 8,16 


202778 


D 


w. 


9/6 17 


201.321 


B 


R.P. of W. 


31 7 17 


35311 


B 


K. in A. 


31 7,17 



175 



Rank and Name. 



Pte. 


Newsham, J. 


^Pte. 


Nelson, J. 


Pte. 


Needham, A. 


^Pte. 


Nelscn, J. 


Cpl. 


Nelson, G. H. . . 


Pte. 


Netherwood, W. 


>J<Pte. 


Neilson, R. R. 


^Pte. 


Nere, L 


.{.Pte. 


Newbery, H. 


^Pte. 


Nickson, R. 


Pte. 


Nixon, R. 


4<Sgt. 


Nixon, R. 


Pte. 


Nicholson, J. 


Pte. 


Neild, W. 


^Pte. 


Nightingale, J. ... 


Pte. 


Nicolls, J. W. ... 


Pte. 


Nicholson, S. T. 


^Maj 


31- Nickson 


Pte. 


Nightingale, T. ... 


^Pte. 


Nichols, J. W. ... 


2nd 


Lieut. Nicholson, J. 


Pte. 


Nowell, M. 


Pte. 


Norwood, K. 


Pte. 


Norris, J. H. ... 


2nd 


Lieut. Nolan, M. W. 


Pte. 


Norcross, J. 


Pte. 


Nowell, M. 


Pte. 


Norris, L. 


Lance-Cpl. Norris, P.... 


Pte. 


Norris, T. 


Cpl. 


Norris, J. 


Pte. 


Norris, A. 


Pte. 


Nolan, T 


Capl 


. and Adjt. Norman, 




(R.W.F) 


Pte. 


Nutter, W. 


«I«Sgt. 


Nuttall, J. 


Lance-Cpl. Nutter, H. 


Pte 


Nuttall, H. 


Pte. 


Nuttall, J. 


Lan 


ce-Cpl. Nugent, J. E. 


Pte. 


Nutter, W. 


Pte. 


Nuttall, J. H. ... 


4«Pte. 


Nuttall, T. 


Pte. 


Oakley, C. 


^.Pte. 


Gates, P. 


Pte. 


O'Brien, P. 


^Pte. 


O'Brian, W. 0. ... 


Pte. 


O'Brian, S. 


Pte 


O'Connor, J. 


^Pte. 


'Conner, J. 


4<Pte. 


Oddie, G. 


•I-Pte. 


O'Flynn, C. E ... 


Pte. 


'Grady, C. 


Pte 


Ogden, J. 


Pte 


Ogden, B. 


Pte 


O'Grady, C. 


Pte 


Ogden, W. 


►I<Pte 


O'Heary, A. 


Pte. 


O'Keife, J. 



E. P. 



C. C. 



No. 

2n.{.t2l 

41liHN 

;i0632 

149;i9 

2108.56 

.{9954 

41080 

29.593 

29164 

2,560 

1467 

1467 

2934 

.■f4,562 

203389 

37806 

35721 

203884 
37806 

1417 
2229 
1552 

4036 

200267 

2361 

2013.56 

28165 

240026 

34075 

41.532 



4361 
1666 
20809 
29166 
30631 
29900 
2.5397 
204997 

202690 

34333 

32251 

5630 

4318 

202810 

4817 

.32142 

202826 

■203518 

1970 

•202774 

202585 

200045 

42011 

17.548 

4912 



Coy. Nature of C 


asua 


Ity. Date. 


C 


W. 




31 7 17 


D 


K. in 


A. 


29 4 18 


B 


W. 




16;8 18 


— . 


K. in 


A. 


31 '7,17 


D 


W 




4/9/IS 


A 


W. 




9 9 18 


C 


K. in 


A. 


1 10 18 


B 


K. in 


A. 


23 10 18 


C 


K. in 


A. 


17/6 18 


A 


K. in 


A. 


11/7/15 


D 


W. 




15/6/15 


B 


D. ofW. 


23 8 16 


B 


W. 




. N.T. 28 6 16 


C 


W. 




... N.T. 27 2 18 


A 


K. in 


A. 


9 4/18 


C 


W. 




2 5 18 




K. in 


A. 


l/iO/18 


C 


W. 




3/9/18 


— 


K. in 


A. 


30 10 16 


C 


W. 




3/9/18 


C 


K. in 


A. 


1 10/18 


— 


W. 




30 11/17 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


B 


W. 




15 '6 .15 


C 


W. 




29/8,15 


— 


W. 




30/10 15 


A 


W. 




9 9/16 


D 


W. 




6 '5 17 


C 


W. 




20 9/17 


B 


W. 




20/9/17 


B 


W. 




. N.T. 25 '4 ,'18 


B 


W. 




2 6/18 


B 


W. 




23 10 18 


B 


Missing 


23 10/18 





W. 




15 6/15 


C 


W. 




NT. 9 9 16 


A 


D. ofW. 


9 9 16 ; II 9 16 


A 


W. 




30/11 17 


C 


W. 




9 4 18 


C 


W. 




18 18 


C 


W. 




3 9 18 


B 


W. 




4 9 18 


B 


W. 




30 11 17 
and 9 4 18 


— 


K. in 


A. 


31/7/17 





W. 




31 7 17 


A 


D. ofW. 


20 9 17 ; 24 9 17 


C 


W. 




5 8 16 


A 


K. in 


A. 


8 8 16 


A 


W. 




29 9 16 


C 


W. 




9 9 16 


D 


D. ofW. 


26 3 18 


B 


K. in 


A. 


9 4 18 


B 


D. ofW. 


31 7 17 ; 1 8 17 


B 


W. 




15 6 15 


C 


W. 




9 9 16 


D 


W. 




31717 


B 


W. 




. N.T. 16 8 18 


A 


W. 




7 9 18 


D 


K. in 


A. 


... N.T 9 4 IS 


B 


W. 




8 8 16 



176 



Rank and Name. 

Pte Oliver, C... 
Pte. Oldnall, H. 

2nd Lieut. Oldham 

Pte. Oldtield, A. E. 
^Pte. Oldfield, J. T. 

Pte. O'Melia, W. 
►I-Pte. O'Neill, T. 
4«Pte. O'Neal, C. F. 

Pte. O'Neil, G. 

Pte. Ormerod, G. 

2nd Lieut. Orrell, J. 

Pte. Ormerod, T. 
►tPte. Ormerod, 0. 
►{.Pte. Ormerod, J. R. 

Major Ord, R. 

2nd Lieut. Ordish, J 

Pte. Ormerod, H. 

Pte. Orrell, F. 

Pte. Orr, C. ... 

Pte. Orrell, R. J. 

2nd Lieut. Ostrehan, 

Pte. Osbalderston, H 
»J<Lieut. Ostrehan, D. 

Lance-Cpl. Osgerby 

Sgt. Ouldcott, E. 

Pte. Ousey, S. 
^Lance-Cpl. Owen, I 

Pte. Owen, A. ... 

Sgt. Owen, C. F. 

►{.Pte. Owen, H. R. 

Pte. Owen, W. 

Pte. Oxford, G. 

>I«Pte Oxford, N 

4.Pte. ONeil, P. 

»fi2nd Lieut. Ogden, 



R. A. 

H. 
H. 



J. H. 



►fiPte. Parkinson, R. ... 

Pte. Parkinson, J. A. 

Pte. Parkinson, C. 

Pte. Park, L 

Pte. Park, T 

Pte. Parkinson, T. 

Pte. Park, F 

Cpl. Parkinson, J. 

Pte. Parkinson, R. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Parkinson, R. 

Pte. Parkinson, H. 

^Pte. Parr, E 

>fiPte. Parkinson, J. 
^.Pte. Palmer, J. 

C.S.M. Parkinson, E. 

Pte. Parkinson, H. 

Lance-Sgt. Parkinson, A. 
^.Pte. Park, W. 

Pte. Partington, J. 

Pte. Parkinson, F. 
>}<Pte. Parkinson, W. ... 

C.Q.M.S. Parkinson, W. 

Pte. Parkinson, T. H. 

Pte. Parkinson, W. ... 



No. 

28;{8 
2718 



395 1 (i 
6261 
:»870 
:<I22 

(i:<i'J 

■20107;< 
2558 

4913 

202739 

6248 



2()(Ki34 

240710 

30(;72 

242868 

201766 

235003 
251 

29394 

1900 

3444 

200I<I9 

238034 

40770 

6355 

27722 

3019 



I0K5 

KiilO 

1926 

2663 

2877 

2876 

86 

33.f 

1079 

1079 

2839 

2584 

70 

4101 

332 

2839 

226 

1 580 

4915 

2515 

2021.32 

200178 

202425 

200818 



Coy. 

B 
C 



C 

c 
c 

c 

B 

c 
c 
c 



B 
B 
B 
B 



B 
D 

B 
A 
A 
C 
A 
A 
D 
D 



A 
D 
B 
D 
B 
B 
B 
C 
B 
B 
A 
D 
B 
D 
B 
C 
A 
B 
B 
D 
A 
A 
B 



Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



w. 


15 6 15 


w. 


15 6 15 




and 3 8 16 


w. 


20,9 17 


w. 


5,9,18 


D. of W. ... 


20/9/16 


W. 


8/8; 16 


K. in A. ... 


15/6/15 


K. in A. ... 


28 9/16 


W. 


21 7 17 


W. 


N.T. 29 10 15 


W. 


31/7 17 


W. 


8/8/16 


K. in A. ... 


9/9/16 


K. inA. ... 


25,9/16 


W. 


31 7/17 


W. 


31 7/17 


R.P. of W. ... 


31 7 17 


R.P. of W. ... 


9 4 18 


W. 


4 9 18 


W. 


119 18 


W. 


1 1/16 


W. 


12 7/17 


Presumed K. 


31/7/17 


W. 


31/7/17 


W. 


14/9/15 


K. in A. ... 


8/8/16 


W. 


23/6/18 


K. in A. ... 


15/6/15 


W. 


3 8/16 


W. 


27,4/18 


K. in A. ... 


20 5/18 


W. 


23/10/18 


W. 


8/8/16 


D. ofW. 12 


4 18 ; 9/5/18 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


W. 


22 10/16 


K. in A. . 


31,7/17 


Died at Home 


^ 2,11/14 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


15 6/15 


W. 


15 6 15 


W. 


IS 6 IS 


W. 


15 6 15 


W. 


15/6 15 


W. 


IS 6 15 


W. 


9/10 15 


W. 


31/7 17 


W. 


6/11/15 


K. inA. .. 


15/6/15 


K. in A. ... 


15/6,15 


D. of W. 3 


8,16 ; 7/8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


8 8/16 


W. 


8 9/16 


K. in A 


9 9/16 


W. 


9/9 16 


W. 


22 11 16 


K. in A. ... 


4 4 17 


W. 


31 7 17 


W. 


31 7/17 


W. 


31/7/17 



177 



Rank and Name. 

Lance-Cpl. Parkinson, W. 

Lance-Cpl. Parkinson, T. 

Pte. Park, T. ... 

Cpl. Parkinson, W. 
>{«Pte. Parker, R. 

Pte. Parkinson, J. 

Major Parker, H. 
>i<Pte. Parker, G. 

Pte. Parkinson, T. 
►fiPte. Parkinson, C. 

Cpl. Partington, J. 

Cpl. Parkinson, A. 

Pte. Paisley, D. 

Pte. Payne, C. J. 

Pte. Parkinson, J. S. 
HE<Pte. Parker, J. 

Pte. Patterson, H. C. 
>i«Pte. Palmer, E. 

Pte. Parry, R. 

>{«2nd Lieut. Pasley, W, 

Pte. Parkinson, T. 

Sgt. Parkinson, W. 
►J<Sgt. Parkinson, R. 

2nd Lieut. Parkinson, H. 

Pte. Parker, R. 

Lance-Cpl. Park, T. 
^Sgt. Parkinson, R. 
^Pte. Parker, T. 
>J«Lance-Cpl. Parkinson, J. 
4<Pte. Passy, J. 

Pte. Parry, E. 

Pte. Palmer, A. 
»I«Lance-Cpl. Perry, A. J 

Pte. Pennington, A. E 

Pte. Perry, R. 

Pte. Pearson, J. 

Pte. Pelzer, W. 

Pte. Peel, W. E. M. .. 

Pte. Pendlebury, J. .. 

Pte. Pendlebury, T. .. 

Pte. Perry, A. 

Pte. Pearsley, A. 

Cpl. Pendlebury, F. .. 

Pte. Pemberton, C. 

Pte. Perry, R. 

^Pte. Pearce, J. 

Pte. Perry, R. 

Pte. Pendlebury, W. .. 
>I<Capt. Peak, J. A. 

Pte. Pendlebury, W. .. 

Pte. Phillips, H. 

Sgt. Pilkington, W. .. 

Pte. Pickup, J. 

Pte. Pickering, G. N. 

4<Pte. Pilkington, G. .. 

C.S.M. Pilkington, W. 

Pte. Pickup, J. 

►pPte. Pinner, E. 

Pte. Pimley, R. 

Pte. Pincock, J. 



No. 
200818 
2002.'59 
200782 
200167 
202000 
245161 

31774 

200931 

2S343 

20207!) 

200111 

2013,S7 

36600 

19100 

38661 

244807 

39677 

13356 



29679 
200167 
200218 

41252 

200782 

200218 

37647 

240117 

28091 

290815 

241827 

275 

2737 

5029 

3163 

6127 

62,50 
202602 
290665 

16836 
201369 
290665 

19993 
2021.50 

14299 
200760 

19894 

19894 

12068 

200291 

2788 

3239 

145 

1481 

2458 

202759 

1925 

202969 



Coy. 

B 
B 
D 
C 
D 
D 
A 
A 
C 
C 
B 
C 
D 
D 
D 
C 
C 
A 
B 



B 
C 
C 

A 
D 
C 
B 
B 
A 
C 
C 
A 
B 
A 
C 
C 

C 
A 
C 
A 
B 
C 
C 
A 
C 
B 
B 

B 
B 
D 
A 
C 
D 
B 
A 
C 
B 
C 



Nature of Casualty 



Date. 



w. 


16/8/18 


w. 


20 9/17 


w. 


20/9,17 


w. 


20/9 17 


K. in A. . 


20/9/17 


W. 


20 9 17 


W. 


20 9 16 


K. in A. . 


20 9 17 


W. 


M) 10 17 


K. in A. . 


18 11 17 


W. 


20 11 17 


W. 


30,11/17 


W. 


9/4/18 


W. 


9/4/18 


R.P. of W. . 


12/4/18 


K. in A. . 


9,4/18 


W. 


29/4/18 


K. in A. . 


14/5/18 


W. 


27 '5/18 




and 30 9/18 


K. in A. 


17/6 18 


W. 


4/9/18 


W. 


4 9/18 


K. in A. . 


7 9/18 


W. 


1/10/18 


W. 


30 9/18 


W. 


30 9/18 


K. in A. . 


13/10/18 


K. in A. . 


23/10/18 


K. in A. . 


16/8/18 


K. in A. . 


30 11,17 


W. 


9/4yl8 


W. 


9/4/18 


K. in A. , 


15/6/15 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


8/9/16 


R.P. of W. . 


9 '9/16 


W. 


27/9/16 




and 15 11 16 


W. 


18 11 16 


W. 


20/9,17 


W. 


20/9 17 


W. 


20/11 17 


W. 


24/4 IS 


W. 


28 7/18 


W. 


4 9 18 


W. 


15 9,18 


K. in A. . 


23/10 18 


R.P. of W. . 


23 10 18 


W. 


19 8/18 


Presumed K 


lied 15/6/15 


W. 


9, '4/ 18 


W. 


20 9 17 


W. 


15 6 15 


W. 


15 6 15 


W. 


15 6,15 


K. in A. . 


15 6 15 


W. 


8 8 16 


W. 


. N.T. 8 9 16 


K. in A. . 


9 9 16 


W 


9 9 16 


W. 


31 7 17 



178 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. Nature of C 


asualty 


Date. 


^.Pte. Pilkington, J 


;{(ii(ii) 


B 


W. 




31 7 17 
and 20 9 17 








K. in 


A. . 


9 4 18 


4<Si»t. Pitcher, F. 


20(IN()<I 


B 


D. of W. 20 


9 17 ; 22 9/17 


Pte. Pickles, F. S 


2(12(11!) 


D 


W. 




20 9 17 


Sgt. Piper, F 


IN(IO.t 


A 


W. 




l( 9 IS 


Cpl. Plummer, J. 


l(>.|!» 


A 


W. 




9 9 16 


Pte. Pollitt, J. 


242((87 


C 


W. 




8 8; 16 


Pte. Potter, R. 


4319 


B 


W. 




8 8/16 


2nd Lieut. Pollard, P. 




. 


W. 




9 9/16 


Lance-Cpl. Porter, T. 


2,S;{7 


C 


w. 




9 9/16 


Pte. Porter, W. G 


.{(i90(> 


A 


w. 




17/7/17 
and 20,9 17 


^.Pte. Potter, T. 


:*2«27 


C 


K. in 


A. . 


21 7 17 


Sgt. Porter, J. 


2(>(iO»7 


C 


W. 




20 9 17 


.{.Pte. Poole, H. 


2()()(iK(; 


D 


W. 




.(0 II 17 








D. of W. 


3 12/17 


«i<Pte. Pomfret J 


202t)9(i 




K. in 


A. . 


26 4/18 


C.S.M. Porter, R. 


290177 


A 


W. 




20 5/18 


Lance-Cpl. Porter W. 


■.i29M 


B 


W. 




2 6/18 


»I«Pte. Porteous, G 


2;t5511 


C 


D. of W. . 


14 10 18 


4«Pte. Power, C. 


2112129 


D 


K. in 


A. . 


21/7/17 


Pte. Price, H. 


1690 


C 


W. 




N.T. 15/6/15 


Pte. Procter, H 


2540 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. Preston, W 


4515 


C 


Missi 


ng 


N.T. 9/9/16 


Pte. Preston, A 


1914 


C 


W. 




9/9/16 


4iPte. Preston, J. 


12760 


. 


K. in 


A. 


9 '4/18 


4<Lance-Cpl. Procter, J. 


4067 


B 


K. in 


A. 


9,9/16 


Lance-Cpl. Procter, A. 


2(I16(>.{ 


A 


W. 




317/17 


4.Sgt. Price, T. R 


,t;{176 


A 


K. in 


A. 


N.T. 31 7/17 


Pte. Priebe, W. 


.{5;{99 


B 


W. 




31,7 17 


Lance-Cpl. Procter, A 


202811 


A 


W. 




31/7/17 


^Lance-Cpl. Preston, T 


20062 1 


D 


K. in 


A. 


20/9/17 


Cpl. Prescott, S 


200077 


D 


W. 




23/9/17 


Sgt. Prescott, S 


200077 


D 


W. 




2/6/18 


Lance-Cpl Prince, F. 


29172 


A 


Missing 


14/5/18 


Pte. Procter, C. 


205071 


B 


W. 




4/9/18 


Pte. Price, J 


;»0973 


B 


W. 




. N.T. 30/9/18 


Capt. Price, W. L 


— 


— . 


w. 




15 10/18 


Pte. Pringle, R. J 


31007 


D 


w. 




22/10/18 


2nd Lieut. Pride, R 


— 


— 


w. 




27/8/18 


►{.Pte. Preston, J. 


12760 


C 


K. in 


A. 


9/4/18 


Pte. Prestwich, D 


29423 


B 


W. 




23/10/18 


Pte. Purcell, R. 


35788 


C 


W. 




4/9/18 


^Pte. Pye, A 


2577 


A 


K. in 


A. 


16/6/15 


Pte. Pye, P 


2202 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. Pye, F 


2571 


B 


W. 




15 6 15 


^.2nd Lieut. Pyke, W. E. 


— 


— 


K. in 


A. 


9/9/16 


>|.Pte. Pate, R 


27624 


— 


K. in 


A. 


26 10/17 


Pte. Quinn, J. 


4349 


C 


W. 




. N.T. 9/9/16 


Pte. Quirk, W 


203426 


B 


W. 




31/7/17 


^Lance-Cpl. Ramsbottom, R. 


37694 


, 


K. in 


A. . 


9/4/18 


>|<Pte. Rathbone, S. J. 


2108 


C '. 


K. in 


A. . 


15/6/15 


Cpl. Ranee, F. 


1610 


c 


W. 




15 '6/15 


Pte. Ranson, J. G 


2648 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. Rankin, H 


2790 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. Rathbone, J. T. 


3474 


D 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. Rankin, H 


2790 


A 


W. 




31/7/16 


•fiPte. Ranson, H. 


2651 


B 


K. in 


A. 


16/6/15 


>}<2nd Lieut. Rawsthorn, A. E 






K. in 


A. . 


15/6/15 


Pte. Ramsden, B 


4918 


B 


W. 




8/8/16 



179 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


Pte. 


Rayton, H. 


.{129 


D 


W. 


88 16 


Pte. 


Rapson, S. 


GI95 


A 


w. 


9 9 16 


Pte. 


Rawcliffe, A. E. 


3370 


B 


w. 


9 9 16 


Pte. 


Rainford, C. 


4997 


B 


w. 


9 9 16 


Pte. 


Ralphs, H. 


4919 


D 


w. 


14 12 16 


Pte. 


Rapson, V. 


... 20281.'; 


A 


w. 


1 4 17 


^Pte. 


Ratcliffe, J. 


. . . 202692 


A 


K. in A. ... 


31,7 17 


4«Pte. 


Ramsden, C. 


202695 


B 


W. 

K. in A. ... 


31,7 -17 
26,9 18 


Pte. 


Race, A. F. 


... 2.5,5117 


A 


W. 


20 9 17 


4<Pte. 


Rathbone, D. 


12910 


C 


K. in A. ... 


19 9 17 


^Pte. 


Raby, G. A. 


25872 


C 


K. in A. 


18 11 17 


Pte. 


Ratcliffe, G. 


... 265997 


A 


W. 


14/5,18 


4<Pte. 


Ray, F 


... 202080 


. . 


K. in A. 


8,8/16 


Pte. 


Ranson, A. E. ... 


260119 


D 


W. 


22/10/18 


Pte. 


Rafferty, G. 


.•i0935 


A 


W. 


23/10 18 


.I«Lance-Cpl. Reid, J. ... 


52 


A 


K. in A. ... 


15 6 15 


Pte. 


Rees, J 


... 243123 


C 


W. 


4 8 16 


>}«Capt. Rennard, E. M. 


— 


-- 


K. in A. ... 


8,8 16 


Pte. 


Renwick, W. 


4544 


C 


Missing 


N.T. 9 9,16 


►JiPte. 


Read, J. R. 


... 202433 


B 


K. in A. 


1,3/17 


Pte. 


Read, J 


36204 


A 


Missing 


30/10/17 


Pte. 


Rees, T 


35633 


C 


R.P. of W. ... 


15,11/17 


Pte. 


Read, R. ... 


31785 


B 


Missine 


9/4/18 


Pte. 


Reddish, F. 


28064 


D 


W. 


12/4/18 


Pte. 


Reeves, J. W. ... 


42012 


A 


W. 


N.T 14/5/18 


Pte. 


Reid, J. R. 


290490 


D 


W. 


N.T. 16/8/18 


Pte. 


Reid, A 


30635 


D 


W. 


168/16 


Pte. 


Relph, H. 


23265 


B 


W. 


30,9/18 


Pte 


Reid, A 


30635 


D 


W. 


16,8/18 


^Pte. 


Redman, J. C. ... 


29178 


D 


K. in A. ... 


4/9/18 


^Pte. 


Riding, H. 


2544 


. . 


Died at Home 6/4/15 


.J«Pte. 


Riley, J 


1440 


D 


W. 

D. ofW. ... 


15/6/15 
9/8/16 


Pte. 


Rigby, J. 


1608 


C 


W. 


15/6/15 


^Pte. 


Richardson, H. ... 


1952 


A 


W. 

K. inA. ... 


15/6/15 

8/8,/ 16 


Pte. 


Rigby, J. T. 


2854 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. 


Rigby, H. 


3156 


D 


w. 


28/6/15 


Pte. 


Richardson, J. ... 


4174 


C 


w. 


14/7/16 


>I«Pte. 


Rigby, T. 


1024 


C 


K. inA. ... 


16/6/15 


►I«Pte. 


Riding, W. 


2062 


D 


K. inA. ... 


16/6/15 


4<Lance-Cpl. Rigby, J. T. 


2854 


D 


K. inA. ... 


5/8/16 


Pte. 


Riley, H. 


... 200436 


C 


W. 


8/8/16 


>I<Pte. 


Rigby, T. 


241616 


C 


W. 

Died at Sea 


8/8/16 

4/5/17 


Pte. 


Riley, R. S. 


1614 


C 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte 


Richardson, J. ... 


1951 


A 


W. 


9/9/16 


^Pte. 


Riley, H. 


1440 


D 


D. ofW. ... 


9/8/16 


Pte. 


Rimmer, D. 


2696 


C 


W. 


9/9/16 


Pte. 


Richardson, G. ... 


27435 


C 


W. 


14/4/17 


Pte. 


Riley, J. E. 


23269 


A 


W. 


5/6/17 


Pte. 


Ridehalgh, F. ... 


... 202813 


A 


W. 


16/7/17 


^Pte. 


Rigby, J. 


... 202726 


D 


K. in A. ... 


21/7,18 


2nd 


Lieut. Rigby, C. 


— 


— 


Missing 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Richmond, J. 


... 201410 


D 


W. 


20/9/17 


Pte. 


Richardson, J. J. 


23208 


D 


W. 


20,9/17 


Pte. 


Ridehough, G. ... 


... 202689 


A 


W. 


20,9,17 
and 30/11/17 


Pte. 


Rigby, C. 


... 208089 


C 


Missing 


N.T.18/11/17 


Pte. 


Rigby, R. 


202409 


B 


R.P. of W. ... 


9/4/18 


Pte. 


Ridsdell, J. 


... 260131 


D 


W. 


N.T. 9/4/18 


Pte. 


Rigby, R. 


24010 


C 


W. 


12/4/18 



180 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Rigby, J. E. 
»i.Pte. Ridgard, J. 

Lance-Sgt. Ridgway, L 

Pte. Richardson, E. R. 

Pte. Riley, J. ... 

Pte. Rickard, H. 

Pte. Rigby, J. E. 
»i«Pte. Rigby, M. 
^<Pte. Riding, G. 

Pte. Richardson, J. 

Cpl. Richie, D. 

Cpl. Riding, C. 

Pte. Ripley, J. 

Cpl. Robinson, R. 

Pte. Round, W. 

Pte. Robinson, T. E. W. 

Pte. Robinson, H. 



H. 



W. 



Pte. Robinson, A. 

Pte. Roughsedge, G. 

2nd Lieut. Rogerson, 

Pte. Robinson, W. 
>I<Pte. Rogerson, G. 
^<Pte. Robinson, J. 
4<Pte. Robinson, G. S. 

Pte. Round, S. 
►I<Pte. Robinson, H. 

Pte. Roberts, H. 

Pte. Robinson, J. 

Lance-Cpl. Rollins, F 
^Pte. Robinson, P. 
^Lance-Cpl. Robinson, 

Pte. Roberts, A. 
4<Pte. Roberts, J. 

Pte. Roughsedge, H. 
«i«Pte. Rossall, J. 

Pte. Rogers, W. B. 

Pte. Robbins, E. H.. 

Pte. Robinson, G. 

Pte. Rollins, J. 

Pte. Roscoe, J. 
^Pte. Rowett, C. 

Pte. Rooney, W. 
«J«Pte. Robinson, C. W 
^Pte. Robinson, F. 

Pte. Rossall, W. 

Pte. Roberts, J. W. 

Pte. Roberts, A. T. 

Pte. Roberts, O. 

Pte. Roach, F. 

Sgt. Robinson, H. 

Lance-Sgt. Robinson, 

Pte. Rourke, J. 
>i<Pte. Roughly, A. 

Pte. Robinson, A. 

C.S.M. Roberts, H. 

Pte. Robbins, C. H. 
>I<Lance-Cpl. Rooney, W. 



Pte. Roberts, J. 

Pte. Rose, B 

Sgt. Roberts. G. 
Lance-Cpl. Rogerson, R. 



J. 



No. 

2,'>.'>;»;j 

29INI 

■-'402 Hi 

2!) 175 

202N6S 

:{!I2()5 

255;{.{ 

29395 

41904 

20.J587 

200705 

29180 

.l(Mi.50 

1109 

2SIG 

2.582 

2S50 

I.5G9 
128 

2000 
2414 

4.«)7 

2;t5023 

2539 

202037 

1483 

243208 

1447 

0252 

.3819 

4488 

4477 

5578 

201554 

202504 

33874 

200315 

200088 

290273 

201027 

201208 

235043 

200637 

203010 

37249 

290669 

.36177 

290214 

200577 

201390 

25201 

27663 

243762 

200081 

33874 

201208 

34038 

.39681 

243767 

200822 



Coy. Nature of Casualty 

C 
A 
A 
C 
C 
D 
C 
B 
B 
D 
A 
A 
D 
C 
C 
B 
C 



A 
D 

B 
C 
A 

C 
C 
D 
D 
D 
C 
C 
C 
D 
A 
B 
B 
B 
A 
D 
B 
B 
B 
B 

C 
C 
C 
A 
D 
B 
B 
D 
B 

B 
B 
B 

A 
A 
C 
A 



Date. 



w. 


10/5/18 


K. in A. . 


14/5/18 


W. 


18(5/18 


W. 


2/6/18 


W. 


18/6/18 


W. 


27/8/18 


w. 


8/9/18 


K. in A. . 


I4/9/I8 


K. in A. . 


28/9/18 


W. 


30/9/18 


W. and R.P. 


of W. 23 10/18 


W. 


23 10/18 


W. 


16/8/18 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


15/6/15 




and 8/8/16 


W. 


3/11/15 


W. 


1/11/15 


W. 


1/1/16 


W. 


27/3/16 


K. in A. . 


16/6/15 


D. of W. . 


2/8/16 


K. in A. 


20/9/17 


W. 


8/8/16 


K. in A. . 


28/8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


D. of W. . 


12/9/16 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


W. 


9/9/16 


K. in A. . 


24/12/16 


W. 


9/1/17 


K. in A. . 


19/5/17 


W. 


3/6/17 


W. 


2/7/17 


w. 


15/7/17 


w. 


30/7/17 


w. 


31/7/17 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


W. 


31/7/17 


K. in A. . 


31/7/17 


K. in A. . 


15/6/15 


W. 


31/7/17 


W. 


20/9/17 


W. 


20/9/17 


w. 


21/0/17 


R.P. of W. . 


18/11/17 


W. 


30/11/17 


W. 


30/11/17 


W. 


9/4/18 


K. in A. . 


9/4/18 


W. 


9/4/18 


W. 


7/6/17 


W. 


9/4/18 


W. 


25/4/18 


K. in A. . 


11/5/18 


W. 


14/5/18 


W. 


14/5/18 


W. 


14/5/18 


W. 


8/9/18 



181 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


.J<PtP. Roberts, J 


2(>;52;}9 


D 


K. in 


1 A. ... 


11 9,18 


►JiPte. Robinson, J. 


245202 


A 


K. in 


1 A. ... 


1/10/18 


Cpl. Robinson, J 


24:5767 


D 


W. 




N.T. :J0/9/18 


Pte. Rose, J. E 


40469 


D 


W. 




22 10/18 


Pte. Robinson, A. 


265288 


D 


W. 




N.T. 11/4/18 


Pte. Rukin, J. 


1051 


C 


W. 




15/6/15 


»I.Pte. Rutter, W 


1367 


D 


W. 




15 6/15 








K. in 


lA. '.'.'. 


1/4/16 


Pte. Rushton, J 


2578 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


Pte. Rushton, W 


202551 


B 


R.P. 


of W. '.'.'. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Rudge, E. A 


3065:5 


D 


R.P. 


of W. ... 


16 8/18 


Pte. Ryan, T. W 


200568 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 

and 18/7/17 


Pte. Ryan, J 


200409 


B 


w. 




12/12/16 


Pte. Ryan, S 


202747 


D 


w. 




13/6/17 


Sgt. Sanderson, F. 


197 


D 


w. 




15 6/15 


Pte. Sanderson, R. 


201006 


C 


w. 




8/8/16 


Pte. Samson, D 


5005 


B 


w. 




9 9/16 

and 7/6/17 


Pte. Saul, T 


5298 


B 


w. 




26/9/16 


Pte. Sandham, W 


201462 


A 


w. 




29/5/17 


Pte. Savage, E. 


. 202683 


D 


w. 




10/7/17 


^.Pte. Savery, F. 


245109 


C 


K. in 


A. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Sandham, J 


200398 


C 


W. 




20 9/18 


Sgt. Saltmarsh, A 


29396 


C 


W. 




29/9/18 


Pte. Sandford, H 


26647 


D 


W. 




18/11/17 


Pte. Sandham, J 


200398 


D 


W. 




13/4/18 


Pte. Salmon, H 


202639 


A 


W. 




14/5/18 


Pte. Sahsbury, S 


202441 


D 


W. 


... 


31/7/17 


►fiPte. Savage, G. F 


31909 


A 


K. in 


A. ... 


20/9/17 


Pte. Salisbury, G 


241107 


A 


W. 




20/9/17 


Pte. Scudamore, R 


21168 


A 


W. 




14/5/17 

and 31/7/17 


Pte. Scott, J 


202784 


D 


W. 




10/7/17 


>}<Pte. Scriven, A. H 


235039 


A 


K. in 


A. 


31/7/17 


2nd Lieut. Scott T. H. H. .. 


— 


— 


W. 




8/7/18 


^Pte. Scattergood, J 


30651 


A 


K. in 


A. '.'.'. 


8/9/18 


►fPte. Scowfcroft, W 


37227 


D 


W. 




20/9/17 








K. in 


A. 


9/4/18 


Pte. Scowcroft, R 


. 202649 


C 


W. 




21/9/17 


Cpl. Scott, F 


201253 


A 


W. 




20/9/17 
and 23 10/18 


^Pte. Scott, J. H 


202388 


D 


K. in 


A. ... 


1811 17 


Sgt. Scholes, H 


12176 


B 


W. 




I4,10;IS 


4«Cpl. Scott, F 


201253 


A 


K. in 


A. 


23/10 18 


2nd Lieut. Scott, T. H. H. 


— 


— 


W. 




3/9,18 


Pte. Scholl, A. V 


35393 


B 


W. 




9/4/18 


Sgt. Seed, J 


473 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


Lance-Cpl. Seed, Wm. 


1137 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


Cpl. Seed, A 


1663 


A 


W. 




IS/6/15 


>i<Sgt. Seed, A 


1 663 


A 


K. in 


A. '.'.'. 


9 9/16 


Pte. Seddon, W 


2089 


D 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. Sergeant, E 


23 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


Lance-Cpl. Seddon, J. W. ... 


71 


B 


W. 




IS/6/15 


Pte. Sewell, W. S 


4424 


A 


W. 




21/6/16 


4«Pte. Seed, J 


2722 


B 


K. in 


A. 


15/6/15 


^Pte. Sellars, G. 


.3281 


D 


K. in 


A. ... 


15/6/15 


C.Q.M.S. Seed, W 


1660 


A 


W. 




2/8/16 


Pte. Selfe, H 


;i9l8 


D 


W. 




5/8/16 


^Cpl. Seed, H 


200344 


A 


K. in 


A. '.'.'. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Senior, B. 


4557 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


Pte. Settle, J 


7564 


C 


W. 




8/8/10 



182 



Rank and Name. 

>}<Sgt. Seddon, G. 

Pte. Seddon, J. 

Sgt. Seel, W. ... 
>}iSgt. Sedgwick, T. 
>J<Lance-Cpl. Sephton, H. V. 

Pte. Sergeant, J. 

Lance-Cpl. Seddon, 

Pte. Sellar, W. L. 

Pte. Seddon, H. 
4.Pte. Seddon, H. 

Pte. Sewell, E. 
»J<Lance-Cpl. Seed, T. 

Cpl. Searle, W. C. 

Lance-Cpl. Seddon, R 
>J<Sgt. Seed, A. ... 
^Sgt. Skingsley, W. 
4<Pte. Sharpies, M. 

Lance-Cpl. Sharpies, W. 

Cpl. Sharpies, J. 
4«Sgt. Sharpies, J. 

Pte. Shipcott, W. 

Pte. Shipcott, J. 

Pte. Shipcott, W. J 

Lance-Cpl. Sherrington, B. 

Lance-Cpl. Shuttleworth, F. 

Pte. Sharpies, P. 

Pte. Shorrock, J. 

Pte. Shorrock, A. 

Pte. Sharpies, W. 

Pte. Sharpies, T. 

^.Pte. Sharpies, W. H. 

►fiPte. Shuttleworth, T. 

Pte. Shepherd, A. 

Pte. Shaw, R. 

Pte. Shuttleworth, W 

Pte. Sharrocks, J. 

Pte. Shenty, J. 

>i«Pte. Sharpies, W. 

Pte. Shepherd, J. 

Pte. Shepherd, F. 

Pte. Sharpies, W. 
►fiCapt Shegog, R. W. 

>ftPte. Shepherd, F. 

Pte. Sharpies, H. 

Lieut. Sholl, A. E. 

Pte. Shaw, D. 

Pte. Sharpies, H. 

Pte. Shepherd, R. 

Sgt. Sharpies, W. 

Pte. Sharpe, R. 

«i«Pte. Shutler, F. 

Pte. Shipsides, W. 

C. S.-M. Sharpies, H 

Pte. Shuker, A. 

Pte. Shevlen, J. 

4«Pte. Shackleton, H. 

Pte. Shillabeer, E. J 

ii«Pte. Sharp, J. 

Pte. Shuttleworth, W 



No. 



Coy. Nature of Casualty 



1434 


D 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


2010 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


278l> 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


93 


A 


K. in A. 


9/9'16 


202662 


A 


D. of W 


7/7/17 


4I2S4 


D 


W. 


8/7/18 


290066 


D 


W. 


16/8/18 


29190 


C 


W. 


3/9/18 


242031 


B 


W. 


5/9/18 


201830 


D 


K. in A. 


12/4/18 


290466 


B 


W. 


25/4/18 


200579 


A 


K. in A. 


31 7/17 


41058 


D 


W. 


15 10 18 


290066 


D 


W. 


22,10/18 


1663 


B 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


39« 


A 


K. in A. 


15,6/15 


1408 


D 


K. in A. 


15 6/15 


1103 


A 


W. 


15/6/15 


1140 


B 


W 


I4/6/I5 


1140 


B 


K. in A. 


2/8/16 


1793 


A 


W. 


15 6/15 


1903 


B 


W. 


15,6 15 


1930 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


2004 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


14 


B 


w. 


29/5/16 


334 


A 


w. 


15/6/15 


3248 


C 


w. 


15/6/15 


3120 


C 


w. 


26 3/16 


34.% 


A 


w. 


28 6 16 


3785 


A 


w. 


27,6 16 
and 8 8 16 


2619 


C 


K. in A. 


15,6/15 


IO(i 


B 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


182 


D 


W. 


3/8/16 
and 9 9 16 


4530 


B 


W. 


8 8 16 


4468 


C 


w. 


8;8/16 


201633 


D 


w. 


8 8/16 


3071 


C 


w. 


9,9/16 


1103 


A 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


,5046 


B 


W. 


29,9/16 


5629 


A 


W. 


8/1/17 


200237 


A 


W. 


21/7/17 


— 


R.A.M.C 


K. in A. 


31 7 17 


202600 


A 


K. in A. 


31,7/17 


28129 


C 


W. 


.. N.T 6/7 18 


— 


- - 


W. 


15 8/18 


200497 


D 


W. 


15 8 18 


40871 


B 


W. 


24 8,18 


30638 


D 


W. 


4 9 18 


200423 


D 


W. 


13 9 18 


29492 


A 


W. 


13 9 18 


30639 


B 


K. in A. 


14,9 18 


28081 


D 


W. 


6 12 17 


200043 


D 


W. 


30 II 17 


33158 


C 


W. 


94,18 


201147 


D 


W. 


13 4 18 


41679 


B 


K. in A 


25 4 18 


41680 


A 


W. 


14/5/18 


203718 


B 


Missing 


31/7/17 






Died 


1/1/19 


368615 


D 


W. 


31 7 17 




C 


W. 


20 9 17 



Date. 



183 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


^Pte. 


Shaw, G. 


21770 


^2nd 


Lieut. Shippobotto 


m, F. — 


^Pte. 


Sharman, F. 


:W936 


►|«Pte. 


Sharpies, R. N. .. 


1144 


Lance-Cpl. Simpson, V, 


r. ... 1026 


Pte. 


Silviera, C. 


2113 


Pte. 


Singleton, R. 


2314 


Pte. 


Simpson, J. 


2887 


Pte. 


Simpson, A. 


3228 


Pte. 


Silcock, T. 


3911 


Pte. 


Silcock, L. 


2796 


Pte. 


Simpson, J. J. .. 


3147 


Pte. 


Singleton, J. 


2824 


Pte. 


Simpson, J. E. .. 


6255 


Pte. 


Simpson, J. 


200941 


Pte. 


Silcock, W. 


... 212669 


Pte. 


Simpson, A. 


... 202643 


Cpl, 


Simpson, R. 


... 201081 


Pte. 


Simpson, T. 


34309 


Pte. 


Sidebottam, H. .. 


32685 


Pte. 


Simpson, J. 


240843 


►I«Pte. 


Singleton, W. 


241473 


Lan 


ce-Cpl. Simpson, J. 


... 202870 


Pte. 


Simmonite, W. E 


... 235005 


Pte. 


Silvester, J. 


27812 


Pte. 


Simm, H. 


25667 


Pte. 


Silcock, T. 


... 201414 


►i<Pte. 


Simm, W. 


17261 


Pte. 


Simpkin, J. 


30937 


Pte. 


Slater, T. 


... 200957 


^Pte. 


Slater, J. 


1422 


Pte. 


Slater, |. 


3323 


►pPte. 


Slater, J. 


1578 


^.Pte. 


Slater, F. 


1783 


Pte. 


Slater, G 


... 200732 


Pte. 


Slater, A. 


3612 


Pte. 


Slack, R. 


42018 


Pte. 


Slater, W. 


23752 


►f-Cpl. 


Sleath, G. F. .. 


36929 


Pte. 


Slater, D. 


... 202673 


Pte. 


Slater, T. 


... 201631 


►JcSgt. 


Smith, J. J. 


1075 


Pte. 


Smith, J. 


... 200290 


Set. 


Smart, J. E. 


... 200333 


Pte. 


Smalley, C. 


221 


^Lieut. Smith, W. 


— 


Pte. 


Smith, J. 


... 200290 


Pte. 


Smith, H. 


... 201713 


Pte. 


Smith, R. 


200873 


Pte. 


Smith, W. 


... 242271 


Pte. 


Smith, J. 


1474 


*Cpl. 


Smith, J. 


... 200072 


Pte. 


Smith, W. 


4925 


Pte. 


Smith, E. 


201780 


Pte. 


Smith, G. 


202629 


Pte. 


Smethurst, J. R. 


3.5868 


Pte. 


Smith, G. F. 


30361 


Pte. 


Smethurst, R. 


2020.54 


Cpl. 


Smith, H. 


... 235036 



Coy. Nature of Casualty, 

A ... K. in A. 

— ... D. ofW.18 
D ... K. in A. 

A ... W. 

D. of W. 

B ... W. 

B ... W. 

A ... W. 

D ... W. 

B ... W. 

A ... W. 

C ... W. 

C ... W. 

B ... W. 

C ... W. 

C ... W. 

A ... W. 

B ... W. 

Died 

C ... W. 

C ... W. 

C ... W. 

C ... W. 

D ... Missing {Pres 

C ... W. 

c ... w. 

B ... W. 

B ... W. 

A ... W. 

B ... K. in A. 

A ... W. 

B ... W. 

— ... K. in A. 
D ... W. 
A ... K. in A. 
B ... K. in A. 
B ... W. 
A ... W. 
B ... W. 
A ... W. 
C K. in A. 
A ... W. 
D ... W. 
C ... K. in A. 
D ... W. 
B ... W. 
D ... W. 

— ... K. in A. 
D ... W. 
B ... W. 
C ... W. 
D ... W. 
D ... W. 
D ... W. 

K. in A. 

B ... W. 

B ... W. 

C ... W. 

A ... W. 

A ... W. 

A ... W. 

B ... W. 



Date. 
20/9/17 



17; 20/11 


17 


30/9 


18 


9/9 


16 


11/9 


18 


15/6 


IS 


N.T. 30/5 


15 


15/6 


15 


15/6 


15 


I5;6 


15 


and 8/8 


16 


31 /7 


17 


16/6 


IS 


9/9 


16 


9/9 


16 


26/9 


16 


27/9 


16 


1/4 


17 


3/5 


17 


4/6 


17 


10/6 


17 


23/6 


17 


3/6 


18 


8/7 


18 


K.) .30/11 


17 


26/4 


18 


28/4 


18 


28/4 


18 


31 /7 


17 


20/9 


17 


30/10 


17 


24/10 


18 


15/6 


15 


15/9 


IS 


15/6 


15 


9/9 


16 


15/6 


15 


8/8 


16 


31/7 


17 


27/5 


18 


7/6 


18 


9/4 


18 


31/7 


17 


9/9 


16 


15/6 


lis 


15/6 


15 


15/6 


IS 


N.T. 15/6 


15 


15/6 


15 


22/12 


15 


8/8 


ae 


8/8 


IW 


8/8 


116 


8/8 


116 


15/6 


IS 


8/8 


16 


26/9 


16 


7/6 


/17 


31/7 


17 


N.T. 31/7 


17 


2/6 


18 


N.T. 9/7 


18 


16/8 


18 



184 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


►I-Pte. Smith, J. 


42019 


4«2nd Lieut. Smith, W. B. 


... 


Pte. Smith, A. 


30977 


Lance-Sgt. Smith, W. 


... 202724 


Pte. Smith, H. 


31577 


Pte. Smith, J. 


205998 


Pte. Smith, A. 


... 243755 


^.Ptc. Smith, D. H. ... 


38097 


Pte. Smith, W. 


29195 


^Lance-Cpl. Smith, S. 


... 242836 


Pte. Smith, A. 


... 235017 


■^.Pte. Smith, W 


201048 


■2nd Lieut. Smith, A. P. 


... 


Pte. Smith, H. 


37243 


^Pte. Smith, E. 


201780 


Pte. Smith, S. F. 


31951 


4.Pte. Smart, T. 


31980 


Lance-Cpl. Smith, T. 


8584 


4.Pte. Smith, R. 


. . 200917 


Lance-CpL Smith, A... 


... 243755 


Pte. Smith, A. 


... 235017 


Pte. Snape, W. 


2965 


Pte. Snelgrove, J. C. 


248 


Pte. Smithson, E. W. 


5019 


4«Pte. Snowhng, G. 


9934 


Pte. Southworth, J. ... 


2270 


Pte. Southworth, J. ... 


100 


Pte. Sowerby, W. C. 


... 200329 


>i.Pte. Southworth, J. ... 


2874 


Pte. Southworth, D. ... 


4920 


Pte. Southworth, A. M. 


4499 


Pte. Southworth, D. ... 


202653 


Lance-Cpl. Southworth, D. 


202653 


4«Pte. Southworth, W. 


202542 


Pte. Southam, J. 


29182 


Pte. Southworth, C. ... 


... 201420 


Pte. Somers, J. 


37589 


Lance-Cpl. Springate, H. 


131 


4<Pte. Spencer, R. 


2902 


Pte. Spivey, F. 


1402 


Pte. Speakman, W. J. 


30664 


Pte. Speet, J. W. 


30637 


Cpl. Spensen, R. 


... 202899 


Pte. Spencer, J. 


... 202761 


Pte. Squires, B. D. ... 


1978 


Pte. Squires, A. 


1492 


^Pte. Street, R. 


2672 


Pte. Stanton, J. 


2979 


Pte. Stephenson, V. ... 


119 


Pte. Stanton, P. 


2924 


►{.Lance-Cpl. Stones, R. 


1643 


Pte. Stark, A. M. 


3100 


Pte. Starling, T. 


... 240625 


>J.Pte. Stevenson, R. ... 


2554 


.{.Cpl. Stephenson, L. ... 


3151 


Pte. Stott, E 


... 202086 


^Pte. Shanley, H. 


,5007 


Lieut. Strong, H. W. 




Lance-Cpl. Strettle, W. 


2570 


Pte. Stubbs, F. 


... 202775 



Coy. 
D 

B 
B 
B 
B 
D 
A 
D 
A 
C 
C 

C 
B 
A 
C 
C 
A 
D 
A 
C 
C 
B 
C 
B 
D 

C 
B 
B 
B 
B 
A 
A 
C 
B 
A 
D 
D 
B 
D 
D 
B 
D 
D 
B 
D 
B 
A 
B 
A 
B 
B 
C 



D 
B 



Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



A 
D 



K. in A. 


11 9 18 


K. in A. . 


14 9 18 


W. 


.{0 9 18 


W. 


30 II 17 


w. 


9,4;i8 


w. 


9/4/18 


w. 


9/4/IK 


K. in A. .. 


9/4/18 


W. 


2/5/18 


Missing (Pres'd D.) 14/5 ,18 


W. 


31/7/17 


K. in A. 


31 7/17 


W. 


20 9,17 


W. 


20 9 17 


K. in A. .. 


20 9 17 


W. 


20 9 17 


K. in A. 


30 10 17 


W. 


18 11 17 


K. in A. .. 


13 10 18 


W. 


20 6 18 


W. 


30 II 17 


W. 


15 6 15 


W. 


15 6,15 


w. 


99 16 


K. in A. .. 


18/11 17 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


15/6/15 




and 1/4/16 


R.P. of W . 


15 6/15 


K. in A. .. 


15/6/15 


W. 


8/8/16 


W. 


9/9/16 


W. 


31 7/17 


W. 


18/11/17 


K. in A. ... 


5/8/17 


W. 


13/4/18 


W. 


16/8/18 


W. 


31/7/17 


w. 


18 11 17 


w. 


15 6/15 


K. m A. 


15/6/15 


W. 


9/9/16 


W. 


4/9/18 


W. 


5 9/18 


w. 


30/11/17 


w. 


31/7/17 


w. 


27/3/16 


w. 


8/8/16 


K. in A. ... 


15/6/15 


W. 


15/6/15 


w. 


15/6/15 


w. 


15/6/15 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


R.P. of W. ... 


16/6/15 


W. 


1/8/16 


Died 


25/10/16 


K. in A. ... 


28/6/16 


W. 


3/8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


D. of W. ... 


13/8/16 


W. 


9/9/16 


W. 


9/9/16 


W. 


9/9/16 



IS5 



Rank and Name. 

^.Pte. Strickland, T. A. 

Pte. Steam, D. 

Pte. Stringer, A. 
>J<Sgt. Stephenson, V. ... 
^Pte. Stephan, W. H. 

Pte. Stambridge, A. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Stafford, J. 

Lance-Cpl Stewart, T 
«J«Lance-Cpl. Stanford, H. 

Lance-Cpl. Stamper, J 

Lance-Cpl. Stubbs, F. 

Lance-Cpl. Stewart, T. 

^Sgt. Stansfield, A. 
>|<Pte. Stearne, D. 

Pte. Stoddart, T. 
4<Cpl. Stratton, S. 

Pte. Stroud, W. G. ... 

Lance-Cpl. Stafford, J. 

Pte. Sumner, J. 

Pte. Sumner, R. 
>I<Pte. Sutcliffe, J. 

Pte. Sumner, W. 
►I<Pte. Sutton, R. 

Pte. Sumner, J. 

Pte. Sumner, W. 

Pte. Sumner, T. 
»J«Pte. Swindlehurst, J. 

Pte. Swindells, J. 
^Pte. Swift, G. T. 

Lance-Cpl. Swingler, E. 

Pte. Swift, J 

Pte. Swaine, A. 

Pte. Swann, D. 

Pte. Syddal, A. 

Pte. Sykes, T. 
>I<Pte. Singleton, R. 
»J»Pte. Swindlehurst, H. 

>J<Lance-Cpl. Tattersall, W. 
>|<Pte. Taylor, J. 

Pte. Taylor, A. 
►fiPte. Taylor, J. W. ... 
4<Pte. Tattersall, W. ... 

Pte. Taylor, R. A. ... 

Pte. Taylor, J. 

Pte. Taylor, J. W 

Pte. Taylor, J. 

Pte. Tarbett, J. W. ... 

Pte. Taylor, J. 
>i«Pte. Taylor, W. 

Pte. Taylor, T. 

Pte. Tatler, W. 

Pte. Taylor, W. 
►I<Pte. Taylor, T. 

Lance-Cpl. Taylor, T. 

2nd Lieut. TauU, R. H. 
^Pte. Taylor, T. 
4«Pte. Taylor, J. E. 

Pte. Taysom, J. 

Pte. Taylor, T. 



No. 



Coy. Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



3053 


B 


K. in A. . 




9/9/16 


235015 


A 


W. 




29/5/17 


202088 


B 


W. 




8,6/17 


200052 


C 


K. in A. . 




18/7/17 


.{6893 


A 


K. in A. 




18/7 17 


10631 


D 


W. 




16/8,18 


19564 


A 


W. 




16/8/18 


203840 


D 


W. 




15/8/18 


25775 


A 


K. in A 




30/11/17 


28083 


A 


.. W. 




30/11/17 


202775 


D 


W. 




3011/17 


283040 


D 


W. 


' N.T 


25/4/18 








and 15/8/15 


202767 


D 


K. in A. . 




31/7/17 


235015 


A 


K in A. . 




20/9/17 


30978 


B 


W. 




30/9/18 


6333 


— 


K. in A. . 




20/9/17 


40552 


A 


W. 




19/10/18 


19.i64 


A 


W. 




26/5/18 


26,50 


B 


W. 


'. N.T 


31/7/16 


2600 


B 


.. W. 


. N.T 


1/8/16 


6148 


C 


D. of W. 9 


9 16 


16/9/16 


32001 


A 


W. 




3/5/17 


200718 


A 


K. in A. . 




31/7/17 


200848 


A 


.. W. 




9(8/18 


203638 


C 


W. 


; N.T 


1/5/18 


201017 


B 


R.P. of W. . 




31/7,17 


4643 


A 


K. in A. 




28 9/16 


235041 


B 


.. W. 




31)7/17 


202667 


A 


K. in A. 




31/7/17 


243201 


B 


.. W. 




3 6/ 18 


32870 


D 


R.P. of W. . 




17/2/18 


9014 


B 


.. W. 




18/11/17 


244630 


D 


w. 




30/9/18 


235165 


B 


.. w. 




16/7/17 








and 30/11/17 


37600 


B 


. w. 




30/11,17 


32832 


— 


K. in A. . 




31/7/17 


202534 


— 


K. in A. . 




20,9/17 


776 


D 


K. in A. 




1/4,16 


2056 


D 


.. W. 

K. in A. . 




15/6/15 

8/7/18 


283 


C 


W. 




15, '6 15 


2230 


A 


K. inA. . 




15,6/15 


3490 


C 


K. inA. . 




28/6/16 


4513 


A 


W. 




31,7/16 


4564 


C 


.. W. 




8/8/16 


3306 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


3541 


D 


w. 




8,8/16 


4452 


C 


. w. 


'. N.T 


. 9/9/16 


200972 


C 


.. w. 




9/9/16 


4600 


C 


K. inA. . 




9/9/16 


3538 


D 


. W. 




9/9/16 


4991 


B 


.. W. 




9 9 16 


15055 


B 


.. W. 




14/7/17 


31905 


A 


K. in A. . 




31/7/17 


202597 


B 


. W. 




31/7,17 


— 





W. 




20/9 '17 


201710 


D 


K. in A. 




20 9 17 


235016 


A 


K. in A. . 




17 9 17 


291086 


C 


W. 




18/11/17 


203544 


C 


R.P. of W. . 




18/11,17 



18G 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. Nature of Casualty. 


Date 


^.Pte. 


Taylor, J. E 


20049.5 


D 


K. inA. ... 


12/4/18 


Pte. 


Taylor, G. C. 


2!)li)7 


D 


W. 


9,4 18 


2nd 


Lieut. Taylor, W. G. E. 


— 




W. 


1,6 18 


Pte. 


Tabor, J. H 


202501 


B 


W. 


2,6,18 


Pte 


Taylor, H. W 


32290 


C 


W. 


3,6/18 


^.Cpl. 


Tancock, E. J 


13601 


D 


D. of W. 18/6, 


18 ; 22 6 18 


>|.Pte. 


Taylor, J 


20019.5 


D 


K. inA. ... 


7,7,18 


Pte. 


Tarte, W 


;i(ilS0 


D 


W. 


16/8 18 


Pte. 


Tabor, J. 


202.501 


B 


W. 


4/9,18 


Pte. 


Talbot, R. 


30938 


D 


W. 


4,9,18 


Sgt. 


Taylor, J. W 


201044 


C 


W. 


4/9/18 


2nd 


Lieut. Taylor, W. G. E. 


- - 


. 


Missing 


13 10 18 


2nd 


Lieut. Taylor, J. T. 


— 


. 


W. 


16 10 18 


Pte. 


Taylor, J. 


30940 


C 


W. 


23 10 18 


Pte. 


Taylor, H 


37626 


C 


W. 


9 4 18 


4.Pte. 


Tennant, W. 


6204 


B 


Missing (Pres'd 


K.) 26,9 16 


4.Pte. 


Tebay. T. 


16062 


A 


W. 

K. inA. ... 


10,4 18 
14 5 18 


2nd 


Lieut. Tennant, J. 


- - 


— 


W. 


3 9 18 


Pte. 


Tew, A. ... 


29398 


B 


W. 


23 10 18 


Pte. 


Thompson, A. 


1637 


C 


W. 


15 6 15 


Pte. 


Thorpe, A. 


254.'; 


A 


W. 


15 6 15 


.{.Pte. 


Thorpe, A. 


200614 


A 


K. inA. ... 


9 4 IS 


Pte. 


Thomason, J. S. 


260 


C 


W. 


15 6,15 


Pte. 


Thistleton, G. 


338 


A 


W. 


15,6,15 


Pte. 


Thornley, H. 


4926 


B 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Threlfall, W 


3846 


D 


W. 


8,8 16 


Sgt. 


Thornber, A 


2316 


D 


W. 


9/9/16 


4-Pte. 


Thexton, S. 


201041 


D 


K. in A. ... 


9 9/16 


Pte. 


Thomason, J. E. 


21798 


C 


W. 


24 5 17 


*Sgt. 


Thompson, J 


201350 


A 


K. in A. 


3 6 17 


Pte. 


Thistleton, T 


200352 


B 


W. 


10 6 17 


Pte. 


Thompson, A. ... 


290739 


C 


R.P. ofW. ... 


18 II 17 


4.Pte. 


Threlfall, E 


32961 


C 


K. inA. ... 


18 11,17 


4<Pte. 


Thomas, J. 


202697 


D 


D. ofW. 9,4 


18 ; 25/4 18 


*Sgt. 


Thompson, J. 


201197 


D 


W. 


9,4/18 


Sgt. 


Threadgould, W. 


243878 


A 


w. 


14,5,18 


Pte. 


Thornton, F. J. 


38221 


A 


w. 


21,5 18 
and 7,7,18 


Lance-Cpl. Thompson, W. .. 


201.3.53 


D 


w. 


23/5 18 


Pte. 


Thomas, E 


29425 


A 


w. 


29 5 18 


Pte. 


Thompson, C. H. 


29424 


D 


w. 


16 6 IN 


2nd 


Lieut. Thomas, F. 


— 


_ 


w. 


11,9 18 


Pte. 


Thornycroft, A 


30640 


B 


w. 


1/10,18 


Pte 


Thornley, E. 


23223 


A 


w. 


17 10 18 


4-Cpl. 


Thomas, A. S. ... 


29202 


C 


K. inA. ... 


9,4 18 


Pte 


Timbrell, H 


2.W4 


A 


W. 


30/5/15 
and 9 9 16 


Pte. 


Tipping, E 


2884 


B 


W. 


15 6 15 


Lance-Sgt. Tickle, H. 


139 


B 


W. 


1 1,16 


Pte. 


Titterington, J. ... 


3873 


A 


W. 


8/8 '16 


Pte. 


Tinsley, T. 


3057 


C 


W. 


88/16 


Pte. 


Timbrell, H 


2304 


A 


W. 


9,9 16 


Pte. 


Tilsley, W 


202926 


C 


W. 


20 9; 17 


Pte. 


Tipping, F. 


29203 


A 


W. 


9/4,18 


Pte. 


Tinsley, J. A 


30661 


C 


W. 


17/8/18 


Lance-Cpl. Tootle, E. 


1 185 


D 


W. 


15 6/15 


Cpl. 


Tomlinson, J. W. 


1997 


B 


W. 


15 6,15 
and 18 9 15 


Pte. 


Towers. W. 


267.! 


A 


w. 


16 6 15 


Pte. 


Tootell, J 


14U 


D 


w. 


5 9 15 


^.Pte. 


Tomlinson, A. ... 


76 


B 


K. inA. ... 


15,6,15 


•|<Pte. 


Tootell, J 


2011 


D 


K. in A. ... 


8/8/16 



187 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Tootell, J. 
►pPte. Todd, R 

Pte. Tomlinson, F. J. 

Pte. Tonge, H. 

Pte. Todd, F 

Lance-Cpl. Tootell, J. 

Pte. Todhunter, J. L. 

Pte. Todd, P. E. 

Pte. Todd, W. 

Pte. Todd, G. E. 
>J<Pte. Tomlinson, A. ... 

Cpl. Travis, J. 

Pte. Tracey, J. 
.{.Pte. Trafford, H. B. ... 
^Pte. Turner, F. 

Pte. Turner, V. 

Pte. Turner, W. 
>{<Pte. Turner, W. 

Pte. Turner, J. 

Pte. Turner, F. 

Pte. Turner, E. 

Pte. Turner, J. 
H^Pte. Turnbull, T. 

Lance-Cpl. Tucker, A. C. 
>I<Pte. Turvey, T. 
>i"Pte. Turner, G. 
>f«Pte. Turnbull, F. M. 

Pte. Tyldsley, P. 

Pte. Tyson, H. 

Lance-Cpl. Tyrer, F. ... 

2nd Lieut. Tynell, R. F. L. 
^Pte. Tyldsley, T. 

Pte. Tyers, W. 

Pte. Tyler, H. 

2nd Lieut. Tyldesley, H. 

Pte. Underwood, J. P. 

Pte. Unsworth, J. 

Pte. Unsworth, W. ... 

<i>Pte. Unsworth, J. 

Pte. Unsworth, H. ... 

^Pte. Unsworth, T. 

Pte. Underwood, T. W. 

Pte. Urwin, H. 

Pte. Urwin, H. 

Pte. Utting, W 

Pte. Utting, W. 

Pte. Vass, J 

Pte. Vaughan, D. W. 

Pte. Vass, J 

Pte. Vause, J. 
Lance-Cpl. Valentine, G. 
Pte. Vause, J. 
Pte. Varey, W. 

Pte. Vasey, J. W 

Pte. Valentine, G 

Pte. Vause, J. 

Pte. Vickers, W 

Pte. Vickerman, J. ... 



No. 



Coy. Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



.1240 


D 


W. 




8/8 16 


4!l(i5 


B 


K. in 


A. 


9 9,16 


31771 


A 


W. 




6 5 17 


2029'JS 


B 


R.P. 


of W. .. 


31,7 17 


20106!) 


D 


W. 




20/9,17 


200469 


D 


W. 




20/9 17 


244867 


A 


W. 




20/9,17 


26117 


C 


W. 




18 11 17 


203248 


A 


W. 




14 5/18 


30979 


B 


W. 




13 10 18 


235044 


A 


K. in 


A. 


31 7,17 


1366 


D 


W. 




15 6 15 


201564 


C 


R.P. 


of W. '.'. 


31 7/17 


203067 


C 


K. in 


A. .. 


31,7/17 


2311 


A 


K. in 


A. .. 


156,15 


1919 


A 


W. 




15 6 15 


4943 


B 


W. 




8/8 16 


4,563 


C 


K. in 


A. 


9 9 16 


6207 


B 


W. 




9 9 16 


4330 


D 


W. 




29/9 16 


235042 


B 


R.P. 


of W. '.'. 


31/7 17 


290171 


C 


W. 




18/11/17 


202648 


A 


K. in 


A. 


30/11,17 


34261 


A 


W. 




29/5,18 


42023 


D 


K. in 


A. 


3/6/18 


38808 


B 


K. in 


A. .. 


14/10,18 


42113 


B 


K. in 


A. .. 


14/10,18 


5032 


C 


W. 




8/8/16 


3387 


D 


W. 




. N.T. 8/8/16 


4540 


D 


W. 




8/8;l6 


— 




W. 




30/3/18 


29200 


D 


K. in 


A. 


19/4/18 


41297 


D 


W. 




16/6/18 


35474 


B 


W. 




31/7/17 


— 


— 


W. 




31/7/17 


2315 


A 


W. 




15/6 15 
and 30 10 15 


1721 


B 


W. 




9 9 16 


5078 


C 


W. 




. N.T. 9 9 16 


200375 


B 


K. in 


A. 


4 6,17 


24378 


D 


W. 


20 9 , 


13/7/17 
(17 and 9 4,18 


29426 


C 


K. in 


A. .. 


1/5/18 


30942 


B 


W. 




14 8/18 


2866 


A 


W. 




9 9 16 


200779 


A 


W. 




10 4 18 


2831 


B 


W. 




15 6 15 


2880 


B 


W. 




15 6 15 


4288 


A 


W. 




31 7,16 


4655 


C 


W. 




9 9 16 


4298 


A 


W. 




9 9 16 


297 


B 


W. 




9 9 16 


202513 


C 


W. 




10 12,16 


31937 


D 


W. 




31/7 17 


37652 


D 


W. 




12 4/18 


26511 


B 


W. 




16,8,18 


202573 


B 


W. 




31 7 17 


31937 


D 


W. 




9 4 18 


148 


B 


W. 




9,7 15 


1296 


C 


W. 




15,6 15 
and 9/9/16 



188 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. Nature of Casualty. Date. 


2nd Lieut. Vipond, T. R. . 






W. 


9,9,16 


Pte. Vickers, A 


202922 


C 


W. 


9/9 16 


Pte. Vickers, A 


202922 


C 


w. 


8/6,17 


2nd Lieut. Vincent, H. C. . 







w. 


31 7 17 
and 9,4 18 


^.Pte. Waterworth, S 


4110 


C 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Walkden, F 


1621 


C 


W. 


8/8,16 


Pte. Waring, T 


202S 


D 


W. 


8/8/16 


^C.S.M. Waring, T 


1720 


C 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


Pte. Walker, J 


20209-1 


C 


W. 


9/9/16 


^.Pte. Walkden, J. H. 


20275,1 


C 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


Pte. Wallbank, J 


:<021 


A 


W. 


. NT. 9,9 16 


Pte. Watkinson, H 


4045 


A 


W. 


.. N.T. 9, '9, 16 


Pte. Ward, C. 


2912 


B 


W. 


9/9/16 


Pte. Walton, J. W 


282K 


B 


w. 


15/5,15 

and 9,9 16 


4.Pte. Waddicar, A 


202097 


D 


K. in A. 


4 4 17 


Lance-Cpl. Walton, J. W. . 


200761 


C 


W. 


13,4,17 


Pte. Ward, A. 


:ilX91 


D 


R.P. of W. 


18/5/17 


Pte. Wainwright, W. 


202,590 


B 


W. 


14/7/17 


Pte. Wall, J 


.•{2166 


A 


W. 


18/7/17 


Pte. Watkinson, H 


. 20i;{66 


D 


W. 


20/9/17 


Pte. Walker, L 


29944 


C 


W. 


20/9 17 


2nd Lieut. Walmsley, J. F. 




. 


W. 


22/10/16 


^Lance-Cpl. Walmsley, J. 


201.521 


A 


K. in A. 


20/9/17 


Pte. Watts, E. J 


.{1.544 


C 


Missing 


.. N.T.18/11,17 


Pte. Waring, J. 


200175 


A 


W. 


.. N.T. 9/4/18 


Pte. Walsh. J. 


;{2964 


C 


W. 


14/4/18 


Pte. Walker, F 


29217 


A 


W. 


9/4/18 


4-Sgt. Ward, R. H 


200984 


B 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


Cpl. Walmsley, J 


4992 


C 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Walsh, W 


.{2085 


B 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Welsh, S. 


202921 


B 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Ward, A. 


202920 


— 


w. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Walmsley, H 


;{|987 


A 


R.P. of W 


31/7/17 


HhPte. Walker, J 


1687 


— 


Died 


6/11/16 


4.Pte. Webb, S. G 


9226 


— • 


K. in A. 


31/7/17 


HE-Pte. Wilbraham, T. E. 


. 244686 


— 


D. of W. 


22/9/17 


•fiPte. Wilkinson, R 


1149 


— 


D. of W. 


23/8/16 


>J«Pte. Wilkinson, S 


2922:{ 


— 


D. of W. 


22/5/18 


Pte. Warnes, P 


2.{5040 


A 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Watson, L W 


202962 


A 


W. 


31/7/17 


Lance-Cpl. Walker, J. E. L. 


.{4330 


D 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Waite, E. 


25576 


D 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. Waite, J. 


37570 


A 


W. 


20/9/17 


Pte. Warren, R 


27561 


C 


W. 


20/9/17 


Pte. Wade, L. 


1023 


C 


W. 


15/6/15 


.{.Sgt. Waring, T. 


1720 


B 


W. 

K. in A. 


15/6/15 
9/9/16 


Pte. Waring, J. 


2053 


D 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. Waters, E. 


2978 


A 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. Walker, A 


3014 


A 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. Wainman, A. 


3401 


D 


W. 


30/9/15 






B 


W. 


8/8/16 


Pte. Walton, T 


4108 


D 


W. 


1/7/16 


Pte. Walsh, A. 


4938 


D 


W. 


25/4/16 


2nd Lieut. Walker, A. S. . 





— 


W. 


28/6/16 


P-.e. Wardley, J 


4932 


C 


W. 


30,6/16 


Lance-Cpl. Wade, R. W. . 


4069 


A 


W. 


28/6/16 


Pte. Ward, T. 


1975 


A 


W. 


29/6/16 


Pte. Ward, A. 


2787 


A 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. Walker, J 


49.30 


B 


W. 


31/7/16 



18!) 



Rank and Name. 



No. 



Pte. Walsh, J. 


439S 


Pte. Walmsley, C 


41«7 


Pte. Watson, A. 


376021 


Pte. Walsh, J. 


.{249.1 


^Sgt. Walne, W 


2003.57 


Pte. Walmsley, T 


376t)9 


Pte. Warrington, J. S. 


41668 


^Pte. Wallis, F. C 


241358 


Pte. Watkinson, H 


36794 


^Pte. Watson, M 


29427 


Pte. Walker, A 


30476 


Pte. Wadd, H 


40433 


Cpl. Warwick, W. A. 


15554 


Lance-Cpl. Wainwright, W. 


202590 


Pte. Walmsley, F 


41097 


Pte. Wandless, G. E. 


30981 


Pte. Watts, J. A 


235513 


Pte. Ward, T. 


343016 


Pte. Warnes, H 


30980 


«I<2nd Lieut. Walton 


— 


^Pte. Walton, J 


30983 


Pte. Watkinson, A 


25462 


Pte. Wafer, P 


22306 


Pte. Welley, L 


7526 


Pte. Webster, P. J 


6297 


Pte. Welsh, S. 


6313 


^Pte. West, J 


2021,55 


4<Pte. Webster, P 


202907 


i^Pte. Webster, W 


.36175 


2nd Lieut. Westwood, SB. 


— 


Pte. Webb, W 


35539 


Pte. Westhead, F 


203879 


.}<Pte. Weatherstone, J. 


4470 


Pte. Waston, W. A 


29429 


2nd Lieut. Wetherill, W. B. 


— 


Pte. West, H. 


24664 


>}«Pte. Webster, S 


36175 


^<Pte. Weaver, A 


24328 


^.Cpl. West, G 


28195 


Lance-Cpl. Whittle. R. H. ... 


3939 


Pte. Whyte, J. 


2870 


>i<Pte. Wharton, J 


3985 


Pte. Whyte, P. 


3762 


Pte. Whelan, G 


202924 


Pte. Whinney, C. T 


202785 


Pte. Whittaker, H 


202819 


Pte. Whitelegg, E 


202552 


^Lance-Cpl. Whalley, W. 


3211 


4<Pte. Whiteside, J 


200674 


Pte. Whittingham, H. 


202657 


Pte. Whalley, R 


202170 


Pte. Wharton, R 


37147 


Pte. Whittle, W 


201835 


Pte. Whalen, E 


201812 


.{.Pte. Whalley, J 


24140 


Pte. Whittaker. G 


203529 


Sgt. Whiteside, T 


200001 


Pte. Whalley, C 


200619 


Pte. Whittle, J 


237,59 


Pte. Whittle, W 


235168 


Pte. Whelan, G. E 


36676 



Coy. 

A 
B 
A 
A 
A 
A 
D 

D 
D 
C 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
C 
A 



B 
A 
A 
C 
C 
C 
B 
C 
A 



Nature of Casualty. 



Date. 



A 
B 
D 



D 
A 
B 
A 
C 
C 
B 
C 
C 
C 
A 
A 
D 
C 
D 
A 
A 
D 
D 
D 
C 
C 
A 
B 
B 
C 



w. 


3 8/16 


w. 


8 8,16 


w. 


.. N.T. 26 4,18 


w. 


14/5/18 


K. in A. . 


7/5,18 


W. 


2,6/18 


W. 


. N.T. 2 6,18 


K. in A. 


6/5 18 


W. 


27 6 18 


K. in A. . 


8,7/18 


W. 


16/8/18 


W. 


16 8,16 


W. 


4,9 18 


W. 


4,9/18 


W. 


14,9,18 


W. 


14/9/18 


W. 


24/9/18 


W. 


.. N.T. 30/9/18 


W. 


30/9/18 


K. in A. . 


16,11,16 


K. in A. . 


2/10/18 


W. 


23/10/18 


W. 


14/5/18 


W. 


.. NT. 8,9/16 


W. 


9/9/16 


W. 


25,9/16 


K. in A. 


15/7/17 


K. in A. . 


21/7/17 


W. 


22 7/17 


K. in A. 


119/18 


W. 


17/2/18 


K. in A. . 


18/4/18 


W. 


31 7/17 


R.P. of W. . 


31 7,17 


K. in A. 


3,8;16 


W. 


20/5/18 


Missing 


17 6/18 


W. 


16,8 16 


K. in A. . 


11,9/18 


D. of W. . 


2/10/18 


K. in A. 


8/7/18 


W. 


8,8/16 


W. 


8/8/16 


D. of W. « 


; 8 16 ; 25,9/16 


W. 


9,9; 16 


W. 


9/9,16 


W. 


9/9/16 


W. 


6/5/17 


W. 


6/5/17 


K. in A. 


7/6/17 


K. in A. 


18/7/17 


W. 


30 7 17 


R.P. of W. . 


31 7 17 


W. 


20 9 17 


W. 


30,1117 


W. 


30/11,17 


K. in A. 


9 4 18 


W. 


317 17 


W. 


31,7/17 


W. 


31,7 17 


R.P. of W. 


31,7,17 


Missing 


... N.T. 31 7 17 


R.P. of W. 


317, 17 



190 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. Nature of Casualty 


Date. 


Pte. Whitley, B 


2()2(i77 


D 


W. 




20 9 17 


Lance-Sgt. Whiteside, J. 


!»()(i 


C 


W. 




15,6 15 


Pte. Whittle, A 


I4'.)() 


D 


W. 




15/6il5 


Pte. Whiteside, J 


2135 


B 


W. 




30/5/15 


Pte. Whalley, C 


2552 


A 


W. 




15/6/15 


Lance-Cpl. Whiteside, T. 


2 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 
and 8,8/16 


Pte. Whittaker, W 


7 


B 


W. 




11/8/15 


Pte. Whewill, H 


SO 


B 


W. 




15/6/15 


Pte. Whitehead, C 


;t827 


A 


W. 




9/7/16 


^.Pte. Whittle, W 


415 


A 


K. in 


A. . 


15/6/15 


>I.Pte. Wharton, A 


2024 


A 


K. in 


A. . 


15/6 15 


>J.Pte. Whiteside, W 


2G:{2 


C 


K. in 


A. . 


15/6/15 


.{.Pte. Whalley, G. C 


3192 


C 


K. in 


A. . 


15 6/15 


Pte. Whittaker, F. 


242738 


C 


W. 




4/8/16 


Pte. Whiteside, J 


2138 


B 


W. 




5/8/16 


Pte. Whiteside, T 


242 


C 


W. 




5/8/16 


Pte. Whitehead, W. T. 


29428 


A 


W. 




14/5/18 


Pte. Whittaker, R 


29220 


B 


W. 




2I/5/I7 


Pte. Whiteside, J 


15180 


B 


W. 




18/6/18 


Pte. Whitehead, C 


3151(> 


A 


W. 




20/6/18 


>i.Pte. White, F. H 


42030 


C 


D. of W. 25 


6,18 ; 13/9/18 


Pte. White, F. 


10200 


B 


W. 




. N.T. 25/6/ 18 


Pte. Whittaker, J 


25399 


D 


W. 




4/9/18 


Pte. Whitehead, W 


235.50C 


B 


W. 




5/9/18 


Lance-Cpl. Wharton, S. 


201743 


D 


W. 




9/9 18 


Pte. Whittaker, J 


253i)il 


B 


W. 




22,10/18 


Pte. Whitfield, H 


.(0987 


B 


W. 




23/10/18 


^.Capt. Whitfield, J. L. 






K. in 


A. '. 


15/6/15 


Lance-Cpl. Wharton, S. 


201743 


D 


W. 




9/4/18 


Pte. White, T. H. ... 


2713G 


C 


W. 




4/9/18 


Pte. Wilson, J. 


1621 


C 


W. 




. N.T. 8/8/16 


^«Pte. Winrow, R 


7583 


D 


K. in 


A. 


8,8/16 


Pte. Wilson, J. H 


5442 


D 


W. 




8/8/16 


Capt. Widdows, J. 0. 


— 


— 


Shock 


10/8/16 


Pte. Wilkin, J. 


1002 


C 


W. 




9,9/16 


Pte. Wilson, H 


4453 


C 


W. 




9/9/16 


^.Pte. Wilson, J 


4381 


C 


K. in 


A. 


9/9/16 


Pte. Wilson, A. 


201877 


c 


W. 




9/9/16 


4<Pte. Williams, D. H. 


2(i29IN 


c 


K in 


A. 


9/9/16 


►I.Pte. Wilcock, F. N 


I3I4I 




K. in 


A. . 


23/7/16 


4«Pte. Williams, J. B 


204811 


. 


Died at Horn 


e 30/12/17 


.{.Pte. Worden, H 


202424 




K. in 


A. . 


4/4/17 


Pte. Winterbourne, W. 


4997 


'. c '. 


W. 




. N.T. 9/9/16 


Pte. Wilkinson, H 


4447 


c 


W. 




. N.T. 9/9/16 


4.Sgt. Williamson, M 


200236 


A 


K. in 


A. '. 


9/9 16 


Pte. Wignall, W 


3771 


A 


W. 




9/9; 16 


»i<Pte. Wilkinson, R 


3249 


c 


W. 




15/6/15 








D. of W. . 


11 9/16 


►{.Pte. Winstanley, J 


6113 


D 


K. in 


A. . 


28 9/16 


^"Ptc. Williams. F 


2963 


B 


K. in 


A. . 


29 9,16 


Lance-Cpl. Wilson, C. H. . 


6.307 


c 


W. 




18/11/16 


Pte. Widdup, J 


202655 


D 


W. 




4/4/17 


Pte. Wilson, H. G 


36177 


A 


W. 




2/6/17 


Pte. WiUett, W 


18618 


B 


W. 




4/6/17 


Pte. Wilson, R. 


202993 


B 


W. 




5/5/17 


^.Pte. Wignall, A 


201752 


B 


K. in 


A. 


7 6 17 


Pte. Willacy, H. P 


201439 


C 


W. 




15 7/17 








R.P. 


of W. '. 


31/7/17 


^.Pte. Wilson, R 


201225 


C 


K. in 


A. . 


21/7/17 


Lance-Cpl. Wilson, C. H. . 


202916 


C 


W. 




21/7/17 


Pte. Willett, T. H 


202093 


D 


W. 




21/9/17 


Pte. Wills, G. J 


25041 


D 


W. 




20/9/17 



191 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. 


Nature of Casualty 


r. Date. 


Pte. 


Williams, C. P. ... 


28261 


A 


W. 


18/11 17 


Pte. 


Wilson H. 


24217 


A 


W. 


18 11 17 


^2nd 


Lieut. Wilkinson, R. 


B. — 


— 


K. in A. 


.50 11 17 


►fiPte. 


Willacy, E. 


... 200;{62 


A 


K. in A. . 


30/11/17 


Pte. 


Winstanley, W. ... 


27807 


A 


W. 


.30 11/17 


Pte. 


Wickham. G. T. W. 


2924 


A 


W. 


19 3/18 


Pte. 


Williams, J. 


34314 


B 


W. 


9/4/18 


^Pte. 


Wilmore, H. 


27666 


B 


K. in A. . 


25/4/18 


4.2nd 


Lieut. Williams, B. 


■I. — 


. 


K. in A. . 


3ly7,17 


Pte. 


Winstanley, E. ... 


... 200299 


D 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Wilson, T. 


... 201753 


B 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Wilcock, J. 


... 203629 


D 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Wilkinson, J. 


... 202688 


D 


W. 


31/7/17 


Pte. 


Winnow, J. 


27591 


A 


W. 


17/9/17 


4-Pte. 


Wignall, E. 


3155 


. 


K. in A. 


215,16 


*Cpl. 


Williamson, M. ... 


1138 


A 


W. 

K. in A. 


15/6/15 
9/9/16 


Pte. 


Wilson, T. 


1600 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. 


Williamson, P. .. 


1699 


A 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. 


Wilding, A. 


2740 


B 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. 


Wignall, E. 


3155 


A 


W. 


15/6/15 


Pte. 


Wilder, F. 


33 


B 


W. 


15,6/15 


Pte. 


Wilson, R. 


2.55 


C 


W. 


16/6/15 


Pte. 


Wilkinson, J. 


200863 


C 


W. 


29/10/15 


2nd 


Lieut. Wilson, M. 


— 


— 


W. 


23/4/16 


►I-Pte. 


Wilson, H. 


1965 


B 


K. in A. . 


15/6/15 


^.Cpl. 


Windebank, T. ... 


2499 


C 


K. in A. . 


15/6 15 


Pte. 


Wilson, H. S. ... 


4631 


C 


W. 


14/7/16 


Pte. 


Winrow, G. 


4138 


A 


W. 


5/8/16 


i^Pte. 


WiUan, G. 


4501 


A 


K. in A. . 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Wilcock, J. 


3935 


B 


W. 


8/8/16 


^Pte. 


Williamson, H. ... 


42024 


A 


W. 
Died 


20/5/18 
15 11 18 


Pte. 


Williams, J. D. ... 


... 242028 


A 


W. 


. N.T. 8/6/18 


>i<Pte. 


Wilding, J. 


23501 


D 


W. 

K. in A. 


16/8,16 
14/10/18 


Pte. 


Wilson, H. 


24217 


A 


W. 


16 8/16 


Pte. 


Williams E. B. 


30646 


D 


W. 


16/8/16 


Pte. 


Winterbotton, J. A. 


27111 


D 


W. 


4/9/18 


Pte. 


Williams, F. 


26826 


D 


W. 


4,9/18 


Pte. 


Williamson, W. 


.30658 


A 


W. 


30/9/18 


Pte. 


Wilson, H. W. ... 


... 240713 


— 


W. 


30/9/18 


Pte. 


Wiles, G. 


30988 


B 


W. 


2/10 18 


Pte. 


Wiles, J. 


30643 


B 


W. 


13/10 18 


Pte. 


Williamson, J. ... 


30985 


B 


W. 


17/10/18 


Pte. 


Winstanley, R. ... 


23592 


B 


W. 


23/10/18 


Pte. 


Wilby, G. H. ... 


29069 


B 


W. 


23/10/18 


Pte. 


Williams, G. 


41530 


B 


W. 


23/10/18 


Pte. 


Williams, R. 


.32211 


A 


W. 


23/10/18 


^Pte. 


Wilkinson, A. ... 


2.5945 


A 


K. in A. . 


23 10/18 


Pte. 


Wiles, J. 


30643 


D 


W. 


16 8 18 


«fiPte. 


Wilson, J. 


202098 


B 


K. in A. 


8,8 16 


^.Pte. 


Williams, H. 


31977 


A 


K. in A. . 


2 6 17 


Cpl. 


Wilkinson, J. S. 


... 2027,52 


D 


W. 


9 4/18 


Pte. 


Williams, C. P. ... 


28261 


D 


W. 


9/4/18 


^.Pte. 


Wilkinson, A. 


25945 


A 


K. in A. . 


23/10/18 


^.Pte. 


Woodruff, W. ... 


3309 


D 


K. in A. . 


8, '8/16 


^Pte. 


Woodhouse, E. ... 


3978 


D 


K. in A. 


8 8/16 


►I<Pte. 


Worthington, A. 


2074 


D 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


Pte. 


Wood, E. L. 


,5095 


C 


W. 


. N.T. 8 9 16 


4-Pte. 


Wootton, A. 


6312 


C 


K. in A. . 


9 9,16 


Pte. 


Wood, J. 


4309 


C 


Missing 


. N.T. 9/9/16 


Pte. 


Woodward, G. ... 


5197 


B 


W. 


. N.T. 9/9/16 



192 



Rank and Name. 

Pte. Worthington, G. 

Pte. Woods, J. 

4.Pte. Wood, F. 

•frPte. Worthington, J. S 

Pte. Worthington, G. 

Pte. Worthington I. 

Pte. Woodward, G. 

Pte. Woods, J. 

4<Pte. Worsley, R. 

4.Pte. Wood, W. 

4<Pte. Woodcock, J. 

^.Pte. Wood. F. 

Pte. Woods, J. 

>J<Pte. Woodward, C. 

C.S.M. Woods, J. 

Pte. Worthington, A. 

Pte. Woods, J. 

>JiPte. Woodburn, A. 

Pte. Worswick, J. 

Pte. Worthington, F. 

Pte. Wood, H. 

^.Pte. Worsley, R. 



Pte. 

Pte. 

Lane 
4<Pte 
>!«Sgt, 

Pte 

Pte 
»fiPte 

Pte 

Pte 

Pte 

Lane 

Pte. 
>fiPte. 
>f"Pte. 
^.Sgt. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 

Pte. 
►t-Pte. 

Pte. 
»I.Pte. 

Pte. 
•f<Pte. 

Cpl. 
^Pte. 



Woods, W. H 
Woods, J. 
e-Cpl. Woodward 
Woodburn, A. 
Woods, R. 
Worswick, J. 
Woods, T. 
Worsley, F. 
Wood, H. 
Wood, E. C. 
Woodruff, F. 
e-Cpl. Woods, D 
Woodward, G. 
Wood, H. E. 
Woodburn, W. 
Wrigley, W. H. 
Wragg, W. H. 
Wrench, J. 
Wright, T. H. 
Wragg, W. H. 
Wright, T. 
Wright, M. C. 
Worden, H. 
Wright, J. 
Wright, W. 
Wright, J. 
Winn, M. 
Wyre, P. 
Winrow, J. 



Pte. Yates, H. 

Pte. Yates, J. . 

ii<Pte. Yates, J. . 

Pte. Yates, G. 

►fiPte. Yates, E. 

Pte. Yates, F. 

Pte. Yates, H. 

Sgt. Yates, R. 

Pte. Yates, W. 



No. 
•-'()2.SS!» 

■.Vim 

27078 
2(l2(il» 
2(»2.=i88 

.i7(i(>3 
202S2:{ 
201,S<K{ 
2(10();{2 

:u .s I N 

17101 

27078 

;t2l77 

250 

501 

2072 

2580 

2669 

2830 

2903 

.3082 

73 

235 

241 

250 

2669 

58 

4933 

4578 

.SOOl 

;i8ii7 1 

41682 

29204 

290208 

28250 

41085 

232037 

6201 

4912 

11.577 

290588 

202915 

202588 

2643 

202424 

20638 

4393 

9216 

3551 

202099 

27.591 

201202 

241,577 

200888 

2092 

1774 

4774 

3.56 1 

200090 

24583 



Coy. Nature o( Casualty. 

C 
B 

C 

c 
c 

B 

D 
B 
B 
B 
D 
C 
B 
B 
D 
B 
A 
A 



B 
B 
C 
B 

C 
C 
B 
A 
B 
A 
C 
B 
C 
C 
B 
A 
B 
D 
A 
A 
C 
D 
D 
C 
D 
A 

B 

A 
B 

D 

A 



D 
D 

D 
B 
C 
D 
D 
D 



Date. 



w. 


18 7/17 


w. 


20 9/17 


K in A. 


209/17 


K. in A. 


18 11/17 


W. 


IS II 17 


W. 


30 11/17 


W. 


9 4/18 


W. 


31 7 17 


D. of W. , 


U 7 17 ; 8 8/17 


K. in A. 


31 7/17 


K. in A. 


31 7/17 


K. in A. 


19/9 17 


W. 


20 9 17 


K. in A. 


29/6/16 


W. 


15 '6/15 


W. 


.30 5/15 


W. 


15 6/15 


W. 


15,6/15 


D. of W. 


3 11/15 


W. 


15 6 15 


W. 


15 6 15 


W. 


15 6/15 


W. 


15/6/15 


D. of W. 


8/8/17 


W. 


15/6/15 


W. 


15 '6/15 


W. 


14/6/15 


D. of W. 


8 11/15 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


W. 


31/7 16 


W. 


3,8/16 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


W. 


.. N.T. 28/7/18 


W. 


12/5/18 


W. 


11/5/18 


W. 


14/5/18 


W. 


2/6/18 


K. in A. 


2/6 18 


K. in A. 


N.T.23/10/18 


K. in A. 


9/9/16 


W. 


.. N.T. 9/9/16 


w. 


2/7/17 


w. 


.30/11/17 


w. 


17/2/18 


w. 


I3/4/I8 


w. 


15/6/15 


K. in A. 


4/4/17 


W. 


25/3/16 


K. in A. 


8/8/16 


W. 


18/6/18 


Died 


4 10/16 


W. 


16 8/18 


D. of W. 


18 9/17 


W. 


16/8/16 


W. 


15/8/18 


K. in A. 


9/4/18 


W. 


15/6/15 


K. in A. 


15/6/15 


W. 


.. N.T. 9/9/16 


W. 


28/9/16 


R.P. of W. 


31/7/16 


W. 


30/11/17 



19;{ 



Rank and Name. 


No. 


Coy. Nature of Casualty. 


Date. 


Pte. Yates, J. R. 


29224 




W. 


9 4 18 


Pte. Yates, F. 


... 2029i;{ 


C '. 


W. 


21 7 17 


4.Pte. Yates, J 


...- 201543 


D 


K. m A. .. 


21 7 IS 


Pte. Young, W. A. ... 


29399 


B 


W. 


30 9 IN 


Pte. Young, W. 


... 202676 


B 


W. 


31/7/16 


►fcPte. Younger, W. 


30986 


B 


K. in A. .. 


23/10/18 


4.Pte. Yull, G. A. 


3572 


B 


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