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Full text of "War memories, 1861--the war for the Union--1865 : catalogue of original photographic war views, taken by ... M. B. Brady and Alex. Gardner ..."

Yorktown, 



Fredericksburg, 
Gettysburg, 



Antietam, Atlanta, 

Petersburg, Chattanooga, 

Richmond, Nashville. 



m 1861 Ofte Mar for the Itwm 1865 

Views made by Government Photographers during the Great War. 
CATALOGUE OF ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHIC WAR VIEWS. 

Taken by the U. S. Government Photographers, M. B. Brady and Alex. Gardner, during the great 
war of 1861, 1863, 1863, 1864 and 1865. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY. 

This series of pictures are ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS taken during the war of the Rebellion. It is more than a 
quarter of a century since the sun painted these real scenes of that great war, and the " negatives " have under- 
gone chemical changes which makes it slow and difficult work to get "prints" from. them. Of course no more 
" negatives " can be made, as the scenes represented by this series of war views have passed away forever. The 
great value of these pictures is apparent. Some " negatives" are entirely past printing from, and all of them are 
very slow printers. 

Just how things looked " at the front," during the great war, is, with most of us, now, after the lapse of more 
than twenty-five years, only a fading memory, cherished, it is true, and often called up from among the dim pict- 
ures of the past, but after all, only the vision of a dream. Artists have painted, and sketched, and engraved, with 
more or less fidelity to fact and detail those " scenes of trial and danger," but all of their pictures are, in a greater 
or less degree, imaginary conceptions of the artist. Happily our Government authorized, during the war, skillful 
photographers to catch with their cameras the reflection, as in a mirror, of very many of those thrilling and inter- 
esting scenes. 

Thes'e views vividly renew the memories of our war days. The camp, the march, the battlefields, the forts and 
trenches, the wounded, the prisoners, the dead, the hurriedly-made graves, and many other of those once familiar 
scenes are photographically portrayed and perpetuated. These are not sketches or imiginary scenes, but are the 
original photographs taken on the spot. None can be had anywhere except of us or our authorized agents. The 
supply is limited, and some numbers are already exhausted. Where a number is cancelled thus X it denotes that 
the negative is gone, and no more views of that subject can be had at any price. 

SIZE AND PRICE OF VIEWS. 

The views named on pages 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 are mounted double, for the stereoscope ; they are on hand- 
some cards 4x7 inches in size. We cannot furnish the views above specified in any other style or size. The title 
of the view is printed underneath each view, plainly, so that the person who is looking at the view, through a 
stereoscope, will have the title of the scene in plain sight at the same time that he is looking at the view. Having 
a printed description of each view adds very much to the pleasure of studying the scene. 

Price of the stereoscopic war views, 30 cents each ; $3 per dozen. 

The views named on pages 10, n, 12 and 13 are mounted singly on handsome, red-bordered " mounts " 9x11 
inches in size. Price, 75 cents each. We cannot furnish the views named on pages 10, n, 12 and 13 in any other 
size or style. 

TERMS, CASH. 

Money can be sent by Registered Letter, Post-office Order, Express Money-order, or Bank Draft, payable to us. 
Our references are : The Connecticut Trust and Safe Deposit Company, of Hartford ; The Commander of Post No. 50, 
G. A. R., Hartford ; the Commander of the Department of Connecticut, G. A. R. ; Agent of Adams Express Co., 
Hartford ; Agent of U. S. Express Co., Hartford. 

THE WAR PHOTOGRAPH & EXHIBITION COMPANY, 

Publishers and Sole Owners of the Original War Views, 

No. 2 State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1891, by THE WAR PHOTOGRAPH & EXHIBITION COMPANY, 
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



1861- <f> 




^PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY.* 



made "by Government ^pAotograjbAers during the Great 



The views named on pages 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, are mounted double for the stereoscope, on cards 4x7 inches. 
These (stereoscopic) views named on pages 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 cannot be furnished in any other style except 
stereoscopic, nor in any other size except on " mounts " measuring 4x7 inches. 
The title and description of the view is printed on the card. 
The price of these stereoscopic views is 30 cents each, or $3 per dozen. 



Catalogue of Original Photographic War Views. 

Taken by the U. S. Government Photographers, M. B. Brady and Alex. Gardner, during the great 
war of 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864 and 1865. 



1877. General W. S. Hancock. 
1879. General Nelson A. Miles. 

297. The 150th Penn. Infantry, March, 1863. Regiment 
in L.ine, Company Front. 

341. General Judson Killpatrick, September, 1863. 

342. General Alfred Fleasonton, September, 1863. 

382. Generals Franklin, Barry, Slocumb, Newton, and 
others, Yorktown. 1862. 



1 189. The Marshall House, Alexandria, Ta. 

Scene of the assassination of Colonel B. E. Ellsworth, Comman- 
der of the N. Y. Zouaves. He was shot and instantly killed by 
Jackson, the landlord, for pulling down a Rebel flag from the flag- 
staff on the roof. Colonel Ellsworth's death was immediately 
avenged by Sergeant Brownell of his Zouaves, who shot and bayo- 
netted Jackson almost at the same moment that Jackson shot 
Colonel Ellsworth ; their dead bodies fell within three feet of each 
other. This occurred on May 24, 1861. 

2296. Slave Pen, Alexandria, Va. 

Exterior view of the famous, or rather, the infamous slave pen. 
People of this generation can hardly make it seem possible that 
such an " institution " was ever tolerated under the stars and 
stripes, in this "land of the free." Read the inscription on that 
sign over the door : " Price, Birch & Co., Dealers in Slaves." 

363. The Siege of Yorktown, Ta. 

In the Spring of 1862. the Army of the Potomac laid siege to 
Yorktown, Va. Many heavy batteries were planted. This is 
Battery No. 1, on the Union right. It consists of five 100-pound, 
and two 200-pound Parrott guns. It was the heaviest battery of 
artillery ever mounted in the world, up to that time. It threw 
900 pounds of iron at one broadside. It was planted and manned 
hy Company " B," First Connecticut Heavy Artillery. 

375. The Siege of Yorktown, Va. 

In the early Spring of 1862, the Army of the Potomac laid a very 
heavy siege to Yorktown, Va. Immense batteries of enormous 
guns and mortars were planted all along the line by the First Con- 
necticut Heavy Artillery. This is a battery of 13-inch sea-coast 
mortars. 
455. Confederate Fortifications, Yorktown, Ya. 

When the Rebels evacuated Yorktown, they destroyed as many 
of their cannon as possible. This shows the remains of a heavy 
gun which was purposely bursted by them. Fragments of the 
gun strew the ground, together with shell and grape shot. The 
soldiers seen in the fort are Union Zouaves. 

1914. Encampment at Cumberland Landing, Ya. 

The camps of the Army of the Potomac covered thousands and 
thousands of acres. This is a picturesque view of a camp at 
Cumberland Landing, on the Pamunky River, Va., in May, 1862. 

383. A Group of ' Contrabands." 

One of the common and characteristic scenes in the Union 
army during the war was a group of "contrabands," happy and 
thankful if permitted to remain under the protection of " Massa 
Linkum's Soldiers." Here the photographer shows us such a 
group. 
468. Savage Station, Va., June 27, 1862. 

This was the Headquarters Army of the Potomac, just at the 
opening of the seven days' fight. At this station vast amounts of 
rations, forage, ammunition and hospital stores were distributed 
for the use of the troops. This station fell into the hands of the 
enemy together with many of our ick and wounded soldiers 
during the seven days' battles. 



435. Capt. J. C. Tidball and Officers, near Fair Oaks, 

June, 1862. 

436. Gen. George Stoneman and Staff, near Fair Oaks, 

June, 1862. 

61. " When Will the Army Move." Discussing the 
probabilities of an advance, March 28, 1864. 

131. Headquarters Army of the Potomac, Brandy 
Station, Va., April, 1864. 

216. Culpepper, Va., September, 1863. 

491. A Field Hospital Scene. 

During a battle " field hospitals " are established as near as 
possible to the line of battle. This view gives a glimpse of the 
field hospital at Savage Station, Va., during the battle of June 27, 
1862. The wounded are brought in by the hundreds and laid on 
the ground. The surgeons are busy dressing their wounds. 

471. Fair Oaks Station, Va. 

Here is where the battle raged hottest in June, 1862. In the 
rear of the battery of howitzers which is seen in the foreground, 
can be seen the left of Sickle's brigade in line of battle. Near 
the twin houses, seen still further in the rear, the bodies of over 
400 Union soldiers were buried after the battle. 

2348. Professor L,owe in his Balloon. 

During the Peninsula Campaign in 1862, the army balloon was 
a valuable aid in the signal service. This view shows Professor 
Lowe up in his balloon watching the battle of Fair Oaks. He can 
easily discern the movements of the enemy's troops, and give 
warning to our Generals how to head them off. The men at the 
ropes permit the balloon to rise to whatever elevation he desires 
and they then anchor it to a tree. 

431. 

" Flying Artillery," as it is sometimes called, isabattery of light 
artillery (usually 10-pounder rifle guns,) with all hands mounted. 
In ordinary light artillery the cannoneers either ride on the gun- 
arriage or go afoot. In "flying artillery" each cannoneer has a 
torse. This permits very rapid movements of the battery. "Fly- 
Qg artillery" usually serves with cavalry. This is Gibson's bat- 



A Battery of "Flying Artillery. 



horse. 

ing artillery' 

tery("C,"3dU. 

914. 



lally serves with cavalry. 

' ) near Fair Oaks, June, 1862. 



Unburied Dead on Battlefield. 

(Numbers 914 and 916 are entirely different scenes.) 
This photograph was made several months after the battle, on 
the field at Games' Mills, Va. At the time of the fight our troops 
were obliged to abandon the field and leave the dead unburied. 
The skulls and skeleton remains of some of our unknown heroes 
are here seen on the spot where they gave up their lives for our 
country. In the background can be seen the earthworks where, 
probably, was stationed the battery these soldiers were trying to 
capture when they were killed. 

916. Unburied Dead on Battlefield. 

This photograph was made several months after the battle, on 
the field at Games' Mills, Va. At the time of the fight our troops 
were obliged to abandon the field and leave the dead unburied. 
The skulls and skeleton remains of some of our unknown heroes 
are here seen on the spot where they gave up their lives for our 
country. 
2351. Field Telegraph Station. 

It was often necessary to establish a telegraph service between 
different points in our lines very hurriedly. This view shows 
one of the characteristic field telegraph stations. An old piece ol 
canvas stretched over some rails forms the telegrapher's office, 
and a " hard-tack " box is his telegraph table; but from such a 
rude station messages were often sent which involved the lives 
of hundreds and thousands of soldiers. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



756. Our Boys in the Trenches. 

This view will remind every soldier of the old times. Who 
has not been in the trenches? The earthwork, the pieces of 
shelter tent and boughs of trees stretched over to break the rays 
of the burning sun, the boys in the trench watching and waiting; 
the outlook across the little valley to the enemy's lines. It is like 
living the past over again to study this view. 

762. Destruction of a Bailroad Bridge. 

Both armies had a reckless habit of leaving the roads and 
bridges in a condition which ought not to have been permitted by the 
selectmen of the towns through which the army passed. This rail- 
road bridge is so badly used up that there is no reasonable expec- 
tation that the trains can make schedule time for some days. 

918. Collecting Bemains of the Dead. 

This is a ghastly view showing the process of collecting the re- 
mains of Union soldiers who were hastily buried at the time of 
the battle. This is a scene on the battlefield months after the 
battle, when the Government ordered the remains gathered for 
permanent burial. The grinning skulls, the boot still hanging on 
the fleshless bones, the old canteen on the skeleton, all testify to 
the hasty burial after the battle. Looking on this scene you can 
easily understand why, in all National Cemeteries, there are so 
great a number of graves marked " Unknown." These are the 
" unknown " heroes of the war, who " died that our Nation might 
live." 
1084. Interior of Fort Sedgwick. 

Fort Sedgwick on the Petersburg line was nicknamed by the 
troops " Fort Hell," because the Rebel shot and shell was rained 
into it so constantly and fiercely. This glimpse of the bomb-proof 

nrters of the garrison gives an idea of the unpleasantness of the 
as a place of residence during the early days of 1865. The 
boys, however, succeeded in extracting considerable comfort from 
life, even here. The rough chimney with the old pork barrel for 
a chimney pot, leads down underground to a Tittle fire-place 
around which many a song was sung or storjt told, even while 
Death was holding his carnival just outside. 

1O62. The Union Line Before Petersburg. 

From among a large number of views of the Petersburg hues, 
we select this as one which gives, perhaps, a better idea of our lines 
at Petersburg than any other view we have of them. First is seen 
the line of sharpened spikes or abbatis placed all along in front 
of the works to delay the enemy (in case of a charge) within short 
range of our guns. This moment of delay necessary to tear away 
this abbatis is deadly to the charging column. Then back of the 
abbatis the line of breastworks can be seen stretching away in 
the distance Behind the breastworks is seen the r^"<;h made 
huts of the troops who defend the line. 

831. The Thirteen-inch Mortar " Dictator." 

This large sea-coast mortar is mounted on a special flat-car 
made very strong for this purpose. This mortar-car is on General 
Grant's Military Railroad, at Petersburg. The car is readily 
moved along the line and the mortar is fired whenever required ; 
it is thus made very effective and annoying to the enemy, for it is 
something like the Irishman's flea, " when they put their hand on 
it, it aint there ; " in other words, when they turn the fire of their 
batteries on the " Dictator." our boys hitch on to the car and run 
it along out of the line of fire and commence pegging away again. 
By the time the "Johnnies" find out where the "Dictator" is 
and get the range to smash it, "it aint there" again; the boys run 
it along to a new stand for business. 

1171. Bailroad Battery Before Petersburg. 

This is another battery on General Grant's Military Railroad, 
operated the same as the mortar "Dictator" shown in view 
No. 831. The heavy cannon is mounted on a very strong, special- 
made car, protected with a roof of railroad iron. The car is 
readily moved along the line and the cannon is fired whenever 
required ; it is thus made very effective and annoying to the 
enemy, for it is something like the Irishman's flea. " when they 
put their hand on it, it aint there ; " in other words, when they 
turn the fire of their batteries on the Railroad Battery, our boys 
hitch on to the car and run it along out of the line of fire, and 
commence pegging away again. By the time the "Johnnies" 
find out where the Railroad Battery is, and get the range to 
smash it, " it aint there" again the boys run it along to a new 
stand for business. 

259. General Meade's Headquarters at Gettysburg. 

This little house was the Headquarters of the Union army dur- 
ing that terrible battle. On the third day of the battle this house 
was in direct range of the fearful artillery fire rained by the 
Rebels on the Union lines just previous to Pickett's great charge. 
The horses of General Meade's aides were hitched to the fence and 
trees near the house. Sixteen of these horses were killed during 
the artillery fire. Dead bodies of horses are seen in the road and 
field near the house and under the trees. 

1O47. "Winter Quarters of the Engineer Corps. 

The Engineer Corps were made up of skilled mechanics, bridge 
builders, etc., etc., and their winter quarters on the lines before 
Petersburg during the winter of 1864 1865, made by far the 
handsomest, most attractive camp in the Army of the Potomac. 
This is a View of Colonel Spaulding's quarters. Pine boughs have 
been interwoven into a handsome design for the front entrance. 
Over the entrance is the well-known Engineer Corps badge woven 
with the same material. Pieces of canvas are stretched over the 
ridge-pole, and this completes the Regimental Headquarters. 
Colonel Spaulding stands in the doorway. 



1O51. Bomb-proof Bestaurant on the Petersburg line. 

Who but a " Yank " would think of starting a " store " or restau 
rant on the line of battle where shot and shell are constantly fall- 
ing? This is a bomb-proof restaurant on the line at Petersburg. 
'The sign over the door "Fruit A Oyster House," looks as though 
it might have been "captured" by the proprietors from some 
regular eating house. 

6177. A Dead Confederate Soldier. 

This view was taken in the trenches at Petersburg, April 2, 1865* 
just after the Rebels were driven out of their works. It shows a 
dead Confederate soldier just as he fell. He was hit in the head with 
a piece of shell. His head is partly shot away and his brains are 
scattered about in the mud. His blanket was carried in the old 
familiar way, twisted together, tied at the ends, and slung across 
his shoulder. 

345. Church of the Engineer Corps Before Petersburg. 

The Engineer Corps were made up of skilled mechanics, bridge 
builders, etc.. etc., and their winter quarters on the lines before 
Petersburg during the winter of 18641865, made by far the 
handsomest, most attractive camp in the Army of the Potomac. 
This is a view of the beautiful little church built by them at their 
camp. The church and steeple are made of rough pine logs and 
branches, with the bark on, but it is artistic enough to make it 
worthy of a more permanent existance than a soldier's cam" 
warrants. 



2448. 



A Sutler's Tent. 



The Sutler or army storekeeper was the fellow who got the most 
of the soldier's pay. Sardines, canned peaches, ginger cakes, con- 
densed milk, plug tobacco, etc., etc.. at extremely high prices, 
found ready sale on pay day and for the few days thereafter that 
the money lasted, but with condensed milk at a dollar per can. 
and other-vthings in proportion, thirteen dollars per month did 
not prove sufficient to keep a fellow in cash more than one or two 
days per month. This is the tent of Johnson, the sutler of the 
2d Division, 9th Corps. 

783. Execution of a Colored Soldier. 

In the month of June, 1864, a colored soldier in the Union army 
in front of Petersburg, attempted to commit a rape on a white 
woman whose house chanced to be within our lines; the woman's 
husband was absent from home, serving in the Rebel army. This 
colored soldier, named Johnson, was caught, tried by Court- 
martial, lound guilty, and sentenced to be hanged. A request 
was made of the Rebels, under a flag of truce, that we might be 
permitted to hang Johnson in plain sight of both armies, between 
the lines. The request was granted, and this is a photograph of 
him hanging where both armies can plainly see him. 

961. First Wagon Train Entering Petersburg. 

As soon as the Rebels were forced to evacuate Petersburg, 
April 2, 1865, our troops took possession ; the inhabitants of the 
city were in a very destitute condition, almost starving in fact. 
The U. S. Government at once began issuing rations to these 
starving people, and great trains loaded with provisions soon 
rolled into the city. This is a view of the first wagon train that 
entered the city. The hated Yankees came to them with barrels 
of flour, pork, coffee, sugar, and other necessaries to relieve their 
suffering brought upon them by their friends (?) the Rebels. 

8514. Scene at City Point, Va. 

City Point, on the James River, was chosen by General Grant 
as his base of supplies. Docks and wharves were constructed, 
and here came the hundreds of supply vessels, bringing rations, 
forage, ammunition, clothing, hospital supplies, and all the vast 
amount of things needed for the great Army of the Potomac. 
General Grant also constructed a Military Railroad from City 
Point away out around to the left of Petersburg, and by means of 
this railroad he distributed these supplies to his vast army easily 
and rapidly. This is a view at City Point, General Grant's Head- 
quarters. 

6O35. Where one of Grant's Messengers Called. 

The City of Petersburg was under fire almost continuously 
from July 1864, till April 1865. Scarcely a building in the city but 
what was struck by shells from the Union batteries. This is a 
view of the parlor window of Dunlop's house, one of the finest in 
the city, showing where a shell came bursting into the house. 
It hardly seems possible that any one could escape such a long 
siege and bombardment, yet there were many women and children 
who remained in Petersburg during the entire siege. 

6705. 

This view gives a good idea of how the ammunition was pro- 
tected in the forts and batteries along the lines; first a room is 
built of h 
earth to i 

to the ma .. , 

earth and placed around the entrance to prevent the earth from 
caving in if a shell explodes on the magazine. Thus protected it- 
is rarely that a magazine is exploded. 

3346. One Beason why we did not go to Bichmond. 

There were many reasons why we did not go to Richmond as 
soon as we expected to. This is one of the reasons; there were 
lots of just such reasons as this all along up the James River. This 
is one of the many guns which the Rebels had in Fort Darling, 
which commanded the river approaches for a long distance. The 
Rebels used to shout across to our pickets, that before we could 
get to Richmond we had a LONQSTBEBT to travel, a big; HILL to cHib, 
and a STONEWALL to get over; but we " got there just the sarr-'R." 



Powder Magazine on the Lines. 



n te orts an aeres aong te nes; rs a room s 
heavy logs spiked together, then the logs are covered with 
a thickness sufficient to prevent a shell from penetrating 
agazine. The basket works, "gabions," are filled with 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



1210. McLean's House, Where Lee Surrendered. 

This is the scene of General Lee's Surrender to General Grant, 
April 9, 1865. It was within this house, owned by a Mr. McLean, 
and situated near Appomattox Court House, that the surrender 
was signed. This great historical event took place in the front 
room on the right of the door as you enter the house. 

2594. A Group of " Contrabands." 

The negroes who ran away from slavery and came into the 
Union lines, were employed by the Government as teamsters, 
laborers, Ac. They were happy, good-natured fellows, and made 
lots of fun for the soliders. This is a characteristic group of the 
"contrabands," as they were called, standing in front of their 
rough-built shanty to have their pictures taken. 

2538. A Pontoon Bridge on the James River. 

The boats and timbers forming this bridge are carried on wheels. 
When the army needs a bridge, the boats are quickly launched, 
and anchored parallel with the current, the timbers are soon laid; 
a bridge is thus formed, strong enough to permit the army to 
cross with the cannon and trains. The boats are then taken up, 
replaced on the wheels and are carried with the army. 

458. Confederate Fortifications, Yorktown, Va. 

"Battery Magrauder," named after the Rebel General Magrau- 
der, who was in command at Yorktown. When the Rebels evacu- 
ated this place they destroyed as many of their cannon as possible. 

560. On the Antietam Battlefield. 

This is a view on the west side of the Hagerstown Road. The 
bodies of the dead which are strewn thickly beside the fence, 
just as they fell, shows that the fighting was severe at this point 
on that bloody day, September 17, 1862. 

568. Where Sumner's Corps Charged at Antietam. 

This view shows where a battery of Rebel artillery was posted 
in the morning of Sept. 17, 1862. During the day Sumner's Corps 
charged over this portion of the field, and the dead bodies of men 
and horses, and the broken gun-carriages shows how the tide of 
battle carried destruction and death with it. 

553. The "Sunken Road" at Antietam. 

This ditch or " sunken road " was used by the Rebels as a rifle pit. 
A Union battery succeeded in getting an excellent range of tnis 
road, and slaughtered the enemy like sheep. This view of some 
of the dead just as they fell, is only a specimen of many groups 
of dead in that terrible trap, the " sunken road." 

552. Dunker Church, Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. 

The Rebels posted a battery of light artillery in front of a little 
one-and-a-half story building, used by the Dunkers as a church. 
This view shows where one gun of the battery stood. The dead 
artillerymen and horses, and the shell-holes through the little 
church, shows how terrible a fire was rained on this spot by the 
Union batteries. 

243. On the Battlefield at Gettysburg. 

A group of Union dead on the right of the Federal lines on the 
first days' fight, July 1, 1863. These soldiers were killed by one 
discharge of "cannister" from a Rebel . gun during a charge. 
"Cannister" is a tin can filled with small calls about the size of 
a marble. When the cannon is fired the force of the discharge 
bursts open the can, and the shower of cannister balls sweeps 
everything before it. 

245. Union Dead at Gettysburg. 

This group of dead was in " the wheat-field." The burial details 
found many such groups on that terrible field. The work of 
burying the thousands of dead was a Herculean task in itself. 
The hot July sun made it imperative that the dead should be 
placed underground as soon as possible. In some cases a little 
mound of earth was heaped over the bodies as they lay, and after 
the first rain storm the hands and feet of the dead could be seen 
sticking out from their covering of earth. 

253. The Slaughter Pen at Gettysburg. 

The woods at the foot of " Round Top," which was the " right " 
of the Union line, were named by the soldiers " the slaughter- 
pen." The enemy made a desperate attempt to gain a foot-hold 
on Roua4 Top, for it was virtually the " key" to the field. The 
woods en tt* slope were strewn with dead. This view gives a 



gli. 
266. 



Bg the trees, showing the harvest of death. 
In Trossel's Barnyard, Gettysburg. 



The 9th Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery were stationed 
in the yard and barnyard at Trossel's place. Some idea of the 
awful tide of battle which they met there can be inferred from the 
fact that of the 88 horses of their battery, 65 were killed. This 
view shrvrs where one of their guns stood. This battery did most 
valiant service here that day. They held the fearful charge in 
check Sbili our lines could be re-formed to successfully meet and 
repel tfee attack. 

73O. General Grant's Council of War. 

This view shows a "Council of War" in the field near Massa- 
ponax Church, Va., May 21, 1864. The pews or benches have been 
brought out under the trees, and the officers are gathered to dis- 
cuss the situation. It has been a disastrous day for the Union 
troops; the losses have been heavy, and nofhingapparently gained 
General Grant is bending over the bench looking over General 
Meade's shoulder at a map which is held in Meade's lap. The 
Staff Officers are grouped around under the trees; the orderlies 
are seen in the background ; the ambulances and baggage wagons 
can also be seen in the background. 



135. " Mounting Guard." 

Each day a new guard is detailed, and before they relieve the 
old guard of the previous day, they are paraded and inspected by 
the " Officer of the Day." This view shows a " guard mounting' 1 
of the 114th Pennsylvania Infantry at Headquarters Army of the 
Potomac, Brandy Station, Va., April 7, 1864. 

1O78. The Ambulance Corps. 

This view shows the method of removing the wounded from 
the field by the Ambulance Corps. In no previous war in the 
history of the world was so much done to alleviate suffering as 
in the war of 1861 1865. But notwithstanding all that was done, 
the wounded suffered horribly. After any great battle it required 
several days and nights of steady work ere all the wounded were 
gathered up, and no pen nor tongue can tell how they suffered 
while waiting for the Ambulance Corps. 

2508. Burial of the Dead. 

After the battle the dead are gathered and buried. Sometimes 
pine boxes were procured and single graves were made, with a 
head-board giving the name, company, and regiment, if it could be 
ascertained. This view was at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 15, 1862, 
and shows burial detail employed in burying the Union dead. This 
burial detail is under a flag of truce, as the Rebels hold this field. 

2512. Filling their Canteens. 

Comrades all remember how eagerly they made a rush for " the 
old well," when on a long and dusty march they came to a plan- 
tation with its cool "spring house," or its deep dark well. This 
view shows the familiar scene of filling the canteens; the well 
has been covered with canvas and a guard placed over it to pre- 
vent any waste of water, for a well, however deep and capacious, 
soon becomes dry when the army commence to draw water. 

715. Wagon Train Crossing the Rappahannock River. 

This is a view of the Sixth Corps wagon train crossing the 
Rappahannock River on a pontoon bridge, below Fredericksburg 
in May, 1864. 
721. Bringing in the Wounded. 

This is a view of Allsop's house near Spottsylvania Court House, 
May 12. 1864. The barn is used as a field hospital, and in the fore- 
ground is a wounded soldier on a stretcher, who is being brought 
in from the field of battle; his comrades have stopped a moment, 
and the stretcher is placed on the ground ; they are waiting 
orders from the surgeons to bring in the wounded man. The 
empty stretcher on the ground a little nearer the barn door tells 
the story of another wounded man on the operating table ; and so 
each one must take his turn under the surgeon's knife. 

723. Confederate Dead on the Battlefield. 

(Numbers 723, 725, and 726 are entirely different scenes.) 
This view was taken near Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 
1864, after Ewell's attack on the Federal right. The dead man 
is one of the Rebel General Ewell's soldiers, just as he fell. There 
is very little of the "romance of war" to be found in such scenes 
as this ; the fair face of nature is smeared and stained with the 
blood of the poor victims of war. Every rod of ground hereabouts 
has one or more dead soldiers lying on it. 

725. Confederate Dead on the Battlefield. 

This view was taken near Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 
1864, after Swell's attack on the Federal right. The dead man 
is one of the Rebel General Ewell's soldiers, just as he fell. There 
is very little of the " romance of war" to be found in such scenes 
as this; the fair face of nature is smeared and stained with the 
blood of the poor victims of war. Every rod of ground herea- 
bouts has one or more dead soldiers lying on it. 

726. Confederate Dead on the Battlefield. 

This view was taken near Spottsylvania Court House, May 19, 
1864, after Ewell's attack on the Federal right. The dead men 
are the Rebel General Ewell's soldiers, just as they fell. There 
is very little of the " romance of war " to be found in such scenes 
as this; the fair face of nature is smeared and stained with the 
blood of the poor victims of war. Every rod of ground hereabouts 
has one or more dead soldiers lying on it. 

274. The Horrors of War. 

A Union soldier killed by a shell at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. 
His arm was torn off, and can be seen on the ground near his 
musket, and entirely separated from his body. The shell also com- 
pletely disemboweled the poor fellow, and killed him so quick 
that he never knew what struck him. Think of a battlefield 
covering nearly twenty-five square miles, and covered with 
thousands of dead, many of them mangled even worse than this 
one aod you can have a faint idea of Gettysburg in the early days 
of July, 1863. 

2391. Wounded Trees at Gettysburg. 

Some idea of the fierceness of the battle can be had by observ- 
ing these trees near Gulp's Hill. The marks of bullets and shell 
can be counted by the hundreds. AH through the woods the trees 
were marred in this manner. Many trees were shot down as 
though cut with an axe. 

2288. 

burg. It is a very charac"teristVc"^iew,"an'd 'gives "a good idea' of 
how the "Johnnie Rebs" looked. They were nearly all clothed 
in a grey or butternut homespun cloth, and there were hardly 
two suits alike in a whole regiment; however, "a man is a man 
for a' that." These " Johnnies " were royal good fighters. 



Three " Johnnie Reb" Prisoners. 

shows three " Johnnies " who were captured at Gettys- 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



6718. Atlanta, Georgia, Just after its Capture. 

This is a view near the Railroad Depot in Atlanta, just after the 
city was captured by General Sherman. Uncle Sam's baggage 
trains and the " boys in blue " are a strange sight to the inhabi- 
tants of Atlanta. 
746. A Canvas Pontoon Bridge. 

This is the point on the North Anna River near Jericho Mills 
where the Fifth Corps crossed in May, 1864. On this side of the 
river is seen the pontoon wagons, and the stacked muskets of 
some of the troops. On the other side the troops are in bivouac 
under the trees, making coffee. The stacks of muskets, the 
soldiers lying on the ground, the smoke from the various little 
bivouac fires, combine to make the " past rise before us like a 
dream." 
1079. Engineer Corps Building a Road. 

This view shows a detachment of the 50th New York Engineers 
making a road on the north side of the North Anna River, near 
Jericho Mills. In the background is seen the ammunition train 
of the Fifth Corps crossing the river on the pontoon bridge built 
by this Engineer Corps. All old soldiers of the Army of the 
Potomac remember the valuable services rendered by the 60th 
New York Engineer Corps. 

755. A Confederate Redout. 

This is an exterior view of a Rebel redoubt on the south bank 
of the North Anna River. The guns of this redoubt commanded 
the Chesterfield bridge. The Second Corps crossed the river and 
captured this redoubt May 23, 1864. The artillery at the em- 
brasure, the shelter tents, the groups of soldiers are all as natural 
as life. 

6669. A Block House. 

This Block House was erected for the protection of the Knox- 
ville & Chattanooga Railroad. It is about four miles from Chatta- 
nooga. 

6175. Dead Confederate Soldier in the Trenches. 

(Nos. 6175, 6178, 6182, 6184, 6189 and 6190 are entirely different seenes.) 

This photograph was taken April 2, 18G5, in the Rebel trenches 
at Petersburg just after their capture by the Union troops. The 
trenches all along the lines were found to contain many dead Con- 
federates, and this view is but one of many that was made by the 
photographer showing the dead just as they fell. By looking at a 
number of these views you can get an idea of how a long stretch 
of the trenches looked that day. Of course the camera could not 
take but a small section within the scope of each view. You will 
notice that no two of the dead fell in the same position. 

6178. Dead Confederate Soldier in the Trenches. 



This photograph was taken April 2, 1865, in the Rebel trenches 
at Petersburg just after their capture by the Union troops. The 
trenches all along the lines were found to contain many dead Con- 



federates, and this view is but one of many that was made by thi 
photographer showing the dead just as they fell. By looking at a 
number of these views you can get an idea of how a long stretch 
of the trenches looked that day. Of course the camera could not 
take but a small section within the scope of each view. You will 
notice that no two of the dead fell in the same position. 

6182. Dead Confederate Soldier in the Trenches. 

This photograph was taken April 2, 1865, in the Rebel trenches 
at Petersburg just after their capture by the Union troops. The 
trenches all alonij the lines were found to contain many dead Con- 
federates, and this view is but one of many that was made by the 
photographer showing the dead just as they fell. By looking at a 
number of these views you can get an idea of how a long stretch 
of the trenches looked that day. Of course the camera could not 
take but a small section within the scope of each view. You will 
notice that no two of the dead fell in the same position. 

6184. Dead Confederate Soldier in the Trenches. 

This photograph was taken April 2, 1865, in the Rebel trencnes 
at Petersburg just after their capture by the Union troops. The 
trenches all along the lines were found to contain many dead Con- 
federates, and this view is but one of many that was made by the 
photographer showing the dead just as they fell. By looking at a 
number of these views you can get an idea of how a long stretch 
of the trenches looked that day. Of course the camera could not 
take but a small section within the scope of each view. You will 
notice that no two of the dead fell in the same position. 

6189. Dead Confederate Soldier in the Trenches. 

This photograph was taken April 2, 1865, in the Rebel trenches 
at Petersburg just after their capture by the Union troops. The 
trenches all along the lines were found to contain many dead Con- 
federates, and this view is but one of many that was made by the 
photographer showing the dead just as they fell. By looking at a 
number of these views you can get an idea of how a long stretch 
of the trenches looked that day. Of course the camera could not 
take but a small section within the scope of each view. You will 
notice that no two of the dead fell in the same position. 

6190. Dead Confederate Soldier in the Trenches. 

This photograph was taken April 2, 1865, in the Rebel trenches 
at Petersburg just after their capture by the Union troops. The 
trenches all along the lines were found to contain many dead Con- 
federates, and this view is but one of many that was made by the 
photographer showing the dead just as they fell. By looking at a 
number of these views you can get an idea of how a long stretch 
of the trenches looked that day. Of course the camera could not 
take but a small section within the scope of each view. You will 
notice that no two of the dead fell in the same position. 



173. How Sherman's Boys Fixed the Railroad. 

On the " march to the sea" Sherman's army burned the bridges 
and destroyed the railroads as they went. This view gives a 
scene of the destruction of the W. & A. R. R. The rails are first 
torn up, then the wooden ties are pried out and piled in heaps 
and burned; the iron rails are laid across the burning ties, and 
soon get hot enough in the middle so that the weight of the ends 
hend the rail up as here shown. Of course when they get cold 
they are simply good as " old iron." 

722. Confederate Soldiers laid out for Burial. 

Dead soldiers of the Rebel General Ewell's Corps killed at 
Spottsylvania, May 19, 1804. The dead of both armies were col- 
lected and buried by Union troops here. The Government Pho- 
tographer accompanied one of the burial details and obtained a 
number of views of burying the dead. 

24O1. " The Hero of Gettysburg." 

Old John Burns has been celebrated in song and history for tho 
brave part he voluntarily took in the great fight. He was an old 
citizen of the town of Gettysburg, who, when the battle began, 
took his old flint-lock musket and went into the Union ranks to 
fight for his Country. He was wounded three times ; this picture 
was taken after the battle as he sat in his old arm chair near his 
cottage door recovering from his wounds. 

2539. Pontoon Bridge Opened for Steamers. 

The pontoon bridges were readily opened for the passage of 
steamers. A few or the pontoon boats were slipped from their 
moorings and the floor timbers loosened, then the current of the 
river would sweep the few boats thus loosened around out of the 
way, and so made a draw-bridge. When the steamer passed 
through, the boats were quickly drawn back into place and 
fastened. 

2542. "Where Prisoners Were Exchanged. 

This is Aiken's Landing, where the flag-of-truce boat from 
Richmond came to discharge her cargo of poor, starved, and often 
dying Union prisoners, and receive in exchange the same num- 
ber of healthy, well-fed Rebels from our guards. Two or three 
rough old canal boats, and the grim old monitor there at anchor, 
but above all the glorious old stars and stripes, and on the shore the 
loving hearts and kindly hands of friends; so our poor starved boys 
called it "the gate into God's country." 

2557. A Pontoon Boat on "Wheels. 

This view shows two of the boats (of which the army bridge is 
made) on wheels ready for the march. Each pontoon wagon is 
drawn by six mules. These pontoons were always getting stuck 
in the mud, and the soldiers, struggling elong under their own 
burdens, were obliged to hnul on the drag ropes, and raise the 
blockade. Probably no soldier will see this view without being 
reminded of the time when lie helped to pull these pontoons out 
of the mud, and comforted himself by swearing at the mules. 

2529. Embalming Building near Fredericksburg, Va. 

This old barn near Fredericksburg, Va., was used as an em- 
balming building. Here the bodies of the dead soldiers that were 
to be sent North to their friends were embalmed. More than a 
hundred bodies were .sometimes brought here in one day. During 
the first battle of Fredericksburg, in December, 1802, several 
hundred bodies were here at one time to be embalmed. 

2531. 



Embalming Surgeon at Work. 



This view shows Dr. Burr, the embalming surgeon, engaged in 
the process of embalming a dead soldier. The veins are pumped 
full of some liquid, which possesses the power to arrest and pre- 



vent decay. Thus it was made possible to send to friends in the 
North the bodies of many hundreds of soldiers, which, but for 
the science of embalming, could not have been permitted a grave 
in their native soil. 

157. Building a Pontoon Bridge at Beaufort, S. C. 

This is a view of the troops engaged in building a pontoon 
bridge across Port Royal River, at Beaufort, S. C., in March, 1802. 
Each boat, with a certain number of timbers, is carried on a large 
wagon, and when needed, is brought up to the water's edge, 
slipped off from tlie wheels into the river, anchored parallel 
with the current, and followed by others in a like manner; the 
timbers are soon laid, and the army has a serviceable bridge, light 
and strong. 

161. A Battery of " Quaker Guns." 

Sometimes in order to give the enemy an idea that we had more 
cannon than we really possessed, our troops would make imita- 
tion cannon out of big logs, and mount them on such wheels as they 
could get hold of. At a distance these resembled a battery of 
artillery, and so served their purpose in deceiving tho enemy. 
This mock battery was made by the 7'.)th New York, at Seabrook 
Point, Port Royal Island, S. C., December, 1861. 

6661. I, ill ii Lake on Lookout Mountain. 

This beautiful little lake is on the celebrated Lookout Mountain. 
It is a charming spot. A story is told illustrating the wHI-known 
tendency of Southern people to tell how grand everything was in 
the South "befoh the wall." One evening since the war, a North- 
ern party were sitting on the bunks of this little lake, admiring 
the perfect loveliness of the scene. One of the Northern gentle- 
men said that the reflection of the moon's rays from the rnirror-like 
surface of the lake was simply perfect, that nothing could be more 
lovely. A Southern lady after listening to their many praises 
of the wonderful beauty of the moon reflected from the lake, 
sighed sadly as she replied, "ah! yes, it's very pretty, but you 
ought to have seen it 'before the war.'" 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



6051. Fort Sum tor after the Bombardment. 

(Numbers 6051 and 6052 are entirely different scenes.) 

This is a view of a portion of the exterior of the celebrated Fort 
Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, S. C. The heavy batteries on 
Morris Island aided by a fleet of Monitors, gave this fort a terrible 
bombardment. It was.at the commencement of this bombardment, 
a handsome, symetrical fort. Tnis photograph was made after the 
bombardment, and shows what a fearful pounding the fort has 
received : in fact it is scarcely more than a mass of ruins. Shot, 
shell, and dismounted and broken cannon are scattered about like 
leaves of the forest. 

6052. Fort Sumter after the Bombardment. 

This is a view of a portion of the exterior of the celebrated Fort 
Sumter. in Charleston Harbor. S. C. The heavy batteries on 
Morris Island aided by a fleet or Monitors, gave this fort a terrible 
bombardment. It was, at the commencement of this bombardment, 
a handsome, symetrical fort. This photograph was made after the 
bombardment, and shows what a fearful pounding the fort has 
received; in fact it is scarcely more than a mass of ruins. Shot, 
shell, and dismounted and broken cannon are scattered about like 
leaves of the forest. 

6140. Raising the Old Flag over Fort Sumter. 

April 14, 1865, (four years from the day the Rebels had com- 
pelled Major Anderson to haul down the stars and stripes from 
the flag-staff at Fort Sumter,) Major General Anderson raised the 
same nag over the ruins of the Fort, now again in possession 
of the United States. The ceremony was of most intense interest. 
Charleston Harbor was filled with Uncle Sam's vessels covered 
with holiday flags. Great crowds thronged Fort Sumter. Henry 
Ward Beecher delivered the oration. At a given signal, amid 
booming cannon, and with the bands playing the Star Spangled 
Banner, Major General Robert Anderson ran up the glorious old 
flag, and ran it up to stay ; a perpetual menace to treason from 
within, or foreign enemies from without. " Long shall it wave." 

6649. On the Battlefield at Stone River. 

This is a monument erected by the Veterans of Hazen's Brigade 
in memory of their comrades who fell here in the battle of Stone 
River. The inscription on this side of the monument reads: 
" The Veterans of Sniloh have left a deathless heritage of fame on 
the field of Stone River." Then follows the names of those who 
were killed, with dates, &c. This view will be much prized by the 
comrades or that army. 

1234. English Armstrong Gun in Fort Fisher, N. C. 

When the celebrated Fort Fisher (which was situated at the 
mouth of Cape Fear River and was the cover to the vast amount 
of blockade running into Wilmington) was captured by General 
Terry and Admiral Porter, among many other evidences of the 
friendship of England for the Rebels, there was found one of the 
noted Armstrong guns, made only for the English Government, 
and bearing the imprint of the " broad arrow," or Government 
brand of England. This is a view of the Armstrong gun furnished 
by the English haters of the United States to our enemies to help 
destroy us. But "John Bull "was not a "bigger man than old 
Grant,*' and the " Government at Washington still lives." 

6653. Chattanooga, Tenn. 

This view will be appreciated by many comrades. In the fore- 
ground is the Railroad Depot of Chattanooga ; a group of Rebel 
prisoners waiting for a train to make up to take them North. In 
the background the tent? scattered along at the base of Lookout, 
and looming up skyward is old Lookout Mountain, where Joe 
Hooker and nis boys fought " above the clouds." 

6672. Camp in Monument Garden, Chattanooga. 

This beautiful vie> is a scene looking up the Tennessee River. 
The charming camp in the foreground is in Monument Garden, 
near the Indian Mound ; the group of Soldiers seem as though 



they might be enjoying themsel 
3649. Where General McPhers 



i was Killed. 



This is the place on the battlefield of Atlanta, Ga., where the 
gallant General McPherson was killed, in July, 1864. During the 
fight General McPherson rode into this piece of woods alone. It 
so happened that there was a small gap at this point, betweeu the 
16th and 17th Corps, during the severe fighting. McPherson did 
not know of this fatal gap, and he rode through, directly into the 
enemy's line. The skirmishers of the Rebel General "Paddy 
Cleburne" were concealed in the underbrush; they fired and 
killed McPherson. He fell from his horse at this spot; the horse 
dashed back into our lines, and the General's aides seeing his 
horse riderless, charged into the woods and recovered the General's 
body, driving off the vandals who were robbing him of his watch 
and money. 
6619. Waiting for Exchanged Prisoners. 

This is the Federal flag-of-truce steamer " New York," waiting 
at Aiken's Landing, on the James River, for the Rebel flag-of- 
truce boat from Richmond, with a load of Union prisoners for ex- 
change. And what an exchange it was. The Union soldiers just 
from Rebel prison pens; starved and often too weak to walk, many 
of the poor victims had to be brought off on stretchers, some even 
were dead before they reached this place of exchange. What did 
the Rebels get in exchange; man for man, they received fat 
healthy, welPfed, and well-clothed Rebel soldiers. The starving 
Union soldiers we got from them went directly into hospitals 
or to their graves; the Rebel soldiers they got from us went 
directly into their army, the strongest and best men they had. 
This is the secret of the horrible treatment our soldiers received 
in Andersonville and other prison pens. It was to weaken us, and 
strengthen themselves that prompted them to starve our soldiers. 



3633. 



" Old Tecumseh " Himself. 



General William. T. Sherman was familiarly know as "Old 
Tecumseh," his full name being William Tecumseh Sherman. 
This photograph of him was taken in the Union lines before 
Atlanta, July 19, 1864. His boys will be glad to see him as he 
looked during the war. 



3626. 



General Sherman and Staff. 



is the camp, the troops drawn up in line. 
Outer Line at Nashville. 



This, photograph of General Sherman and his Staff, was taken 
on July 18, 1864, on the lines before Atlanta, Ga. 

367 1. Preparing for the " March to the Sea." 

This is the last train of cars that went out of Atlanta just before 
Sherman's troops destroyed the railroad. This train is loaded 
even on the roofs of the cars, with families fleeing from the city. 

3631. Sherman's Men Destroying Railroad. 

After the capture of Atlanta, and just before the "March to the 
Sea," General Sherman's men destroyed the railroads and all 
public property that could be of value to the enemy. This view 
shows the soldiers engaged in destroying the railroad and burn- 
ing the depots and store-houses. This photograph is a familiar 
picture, and no doubt suggests to your minds the words of the old 
and familiar song: 

"So ice made a thoroughfare for Freedom and her train, 
Sixty miles in latitude ; three hundred to the main, 
Treason fled before us for resistance was in vain, 
While we were marching through Georgia." 

6646. Federal Camp at Johnsonville, Tenn. 

This js a view taken at Johnsonville the day before its evacua- 
tion, in December. 1864. In the foreground is the depot platform 
and just back of that is the 1st Tennessee Colored Battery. In 
the background is the 

6639. 

This photograph was taken December 16, 1864, and shows a view 
on the outer Tine of the Union army at Nashville. The long line 
of shelter tents as far as the eye can see, the stacked arms, the 
groups of soldiers, all combine to make this a very interesting view. 

6652. Railroad Depot at Nashville, Tenn. 

This is probably as familiar a scene as any in Nashville to the 
comrades of that army. The long line of U. S. Locomotives give 
an idea of the vast amount of freighting necessary to supply the 
Army of Tennessee. 

1291. Confederate Dead at Fort Robinette, Corinth. 

This view shows dead Confederate soldiers in front of Fort 
Robinette, Corinth, just as "they fell, in their attack on the fort. 
The fort is seen in the background, on the left of the picture. 

391. The Levee at Ticksburg, Miss., February, 1864. 

This is a view of the famous Vicksburg Levee ; photographed 
in February, 1864. 

645. Pickett Station, Blackburn's Ford, BuU Run. 

This is a reserve picket station near Blackburn's Ford, at Bull 
Run. The advance picket is stationed a short distance beyond 
this reserve station. In case of an attack the advance pickets 
commence firing, and gradually fall back on the reserve ; then the 
reserve all along the Tine form and oppose the advance of the 
enemy as much as possible, and if crowded back, they retire 
slowly, fighting as they go ; this gives time for the army to form 
and be prepared to give battle. 

740. Hospital at Frederlcksburg, Ta., May, 1864. 

This is one of the hospitals established by the Sanitary Com- 
mission, in Fredericksburg, Va., during the Wilderness Campaign, 
in 1864. The wounded are from Kearney's Division, and are 
being cared for by the noble Sanitary Commission. 

1199. The Ever Welcome Sanitary Commission. 

In the history of all the world, there can be found no record of 
so grand and noble an organization, as the United States Sanitary 
Commission. It had its branches in nearly every town and village 
during the war. It sent its members (noble women and men) to 
every battlefield; it saved thousands of lives; it relieved untold 
misery and suffering. No old soldier can look at this picture with- 
out having awakened in him bright memories of the grand old 
Sanitary Commission, blessed of God and man. 

2318. The Sally-port and Draw-bridge. 

Around each fort is a line of " abbatis," and back of that a broad, 
deep ditch, or moat, partially filled with water. To enable the 
garrison to cross this ditch, to pass in and out of the fort, there is 
one narrow draw-bridge at the sally-port or entrance of the fort. 
When an attack is made, the bridge is lifted or drawn inside the 
fort, like a gang-plank; the sally-port is then closed and blocked, 
and the garrison are thus protected on all sides, both by the line 
of " abbatis," and the ditch or moat, making the fort like an island 
doubly surrounded, first by the moat, and then by the line of 
"abbatis." To advance on this fort under a heavy fire from these 
cannon, to stop directly before the muzzles of the guns and 
remove this line of "abbatis," while men were falling like leaves 
on every side, to struggle past the obstructions, cross the slippery 
moat, and attempt to scale the walls of the fort in the face of a 
deadly fire from the well-protected garrison, required brave men, 
indeed, for the attacking party were far more likely to find their 
graves in this treacherous, slippery ditch, than they were to scale 
the walls and capture the fort. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



We have over a hundred different views of the ruins in Richmond, in 
April, 18G5. We select from these a few to give some idea of the awful 
destruction caused by the Rebels when they evacuated the city. 

626O. Ruins of Richmond, April, 1865. 

When the Rebel army were forced to evacuate their Capitol at 
Richmond, they set fire to the city, exploded the powder in their 
magazines and did their worst to entirely destroy the city. The 
Union troops came in as eonquerers and immediately set to work 
with a will to extinguish the fires and save as much of the city as 
possible, but before the fires could be quenched, over 700 build- 
ings were in ruins. This is a view of the depot of the Richmond 
A Petersburg Railroad. The ruined building and the ruined 
locomotive shows what destruction war brings. 

6258. A Crippled Locomotive in Richmond. 

When the Rebel army were forced to evacuate their Capitol at 
Richmond, they set fire to the city, exploded the powder in their 
magazines and did their worst to entirely destroy the city. The 
Union troops came in as eonquerers and immediately set to work 
with a will to extinguish the fires and save as much of the city as 
possible, but before the fires could be quenched, over 700 build- 
ings were in ruins. This is a view of the depot of the Richmond 
& Petersburg Railroad. The ruined building and the ruined 
locomotive shows what destruction war brings. 

883. Panoramic View of Richmond. in Ruins. 

This view, taken in connection with number 884, form a very 
good Panoramic View of the "burnt district" in Richmond, in 
lHG. r >. These two views are from the old Arsenal looking down the 
James River. 

884. Panoramic View of Richmond in Ruins. 

This view, taken in connection with number 883, form a very 
good Panoramic View of the "burnt district" in Richmond in 
1805. These two views are from the old Arsenal looking down the 
James River. 

6161. Libby Prison, Richmond, Va. 

This is a view of the infamous Libby Prison, where so many of 
our Union soldiers suffered and starved during the war. It would 
take volumes to tell the story of Libby Prison. It was an old 
tobacco warehouse which the 'Rebels converted into a prison for 
Union soldiers. There is not a Grand Army Post through all our 
land but what has among its members some comrade who knows 
from experience just what a "hell hole" this place was. The 
building has now been torn down, and if the spot where it stood 
could be wiped off the face of the earth, it would be well. 



897. 



" Castle Thunder," Richmond, Va. 



This is a building which was used by the Rebels as a prison to 
confine Union soldiers. Its history is almost as damnable as that 
of Libby Prison. The horrors of both "Catle Thunder" and 
Libby Prison will be vividly remembered as long as any soldier 
who was therein confined shall li 




6277. Smoke-stack of the Rebel Ram " Virginia." 

This is the smoke-stack of the Rebel Ram Virginia, and shows 
how our batteries peppered the ram when it made its famous raid 
down the river and attempted to run by our batteries. When 
Richmond was taken, this smoke-stack was found at the 
"Rocketts." The Rebels had taken it out and was repairing the 
ram when they got orders to evacuate the city. The ram was 
blown up by them when they left. 



3618. 



Grave of General J. E. B. Stuart. 



The Rebel cavalry General, J. E. B. Stuart, is well remembered 
by all soldiers of the Army of the Potomac. This is his grave in 
Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va. 

3404. Place where President Lincoln was Assassinated. 

This is the private box in Ford's Theater, Washington, where 
President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, on the 
night of April 14, 1805. 

3405. The Chair Lincoln sat in when he was Shot. 

This easy chair was placed in the private box in Ford's Theater, 
Washington, specially for the use of President Lincoln, who, after 
the wearisome toil of the day liked to rest himself and for the 
time forget the cares of State by watching the play at the theater. 
It was while sitting in this chair on the evening of April 14, 18f>5, 
that the cowardly assassin sneaked into the private box and 
creeping up behind the noble Lincoln, fired the fatal shot. 

6719. Pickett Station near Atlanta, Ga. 

This is one of the picket posts on the Union lines before Atlanta, 
a few days before the battle of July 22, 18f>4. This is what is called 
the " reserve post." Slightly advanced from this position is the 
outside line of our pickets. 

827. 1st Massachusetts Cavalry Camp in the "Woods. 

This is a view of companies "C" and " D," 1st Massachusetts 
Cavalry. It will be or special interest to survivors of those 
companies. 



3591. General Grant's Horse, " Jeff Davis." 

This is one of General Grant's favorite horses ; the photograph 
was taken at City Point, Va., in March, 1865. 

306. Refugees Leaving the Old Homestead. 

This was one of the familiar scenes during the war. Union 
families were persecuted by the Rebels and '"bushwhackers," 
and to escape this persecution and probable death, they would, 
when pur troops came near enough to protect them, hastily gather 
up a little furniture, pile it on to an old wagon, and bidding good- 
by to their home, take up their march northward toward the land 
of freedom. 

657. A Negro Family coming into the Union Lines. 

A characteristic view of a big load of " contrabands " coming 
into our lines. 

619. A Cavalry " Orderly." 

One morning in October, 18(12, our photographer was approached 

by a cavalry " orderly," with the request : 
" Can you make a picture of my horse this morning ; " 
The photographer accommodated the soldier, and this is the 

view clone of those very useful soldiers, the Cavalry "orderly" 



A one of those very 
er of " dispatches." 



2321. Double-turrett Monitor " Onondaga," in the 
James River. 

488. Iron-clad Gun-boat " Galena," Showing the effect 
of Rebel Shot. 

This is a view of the United States Gun-boat "Galena" after her 
fight with Fort Darling, on Drewey's Bluff, James River, in July, 
1802. The "Galena" is an iron-clad, but the shot and shell from 
the Rebel guns have pierced her armor in various places. 

1O3. U. S. Frigate ' Pensacola," off Alexandria, Va. 

At the commencement of the war these great Frigates were the 
most powerful ships of war known, but the little Monitor came 
and revolutionized the navies of all the world. This is a view of 
Frigate "Pensacola," laying in the Potomac Itiver, off Alexandria, 
Va., in June, 1801. 

2541. Gunboat " Meiidota," in James River, near Deep 
Hot t., in, 1864. 

2547. U. S. Steamer " Massasoit," in James River, 1864. 



2467. 



The Rebel Ram " Atlanta.' 



482. Hundred-pounder Gun on Rebel Steamer. 

This view shows the hundred-pounder rifle-gun on the Rebel 
blockade-runner "Teazer" captured by the United States Gun-boat 
"Maritanza," July 4, 18G2. 



483. 



Effect of Yankee Shell on the " Teaser.' 



The Rebel blockade-runner "Teazer" was captured by the 
United States Gun-boat "Maritanza," July 4, 1802. This view 
shows a portion of the deck of the "Teazer," and how the shells 
from Uncle Sam's Gun-boat smashed things. 

3413. Admiral Dahlgren and Staff on the " Pawnee." 

The "Pawnee" was called the fighting ship of the navy. This 
is a view of Rear Admiral Dahlgren and Staff on the deck of the 
" Pawnee " off Charleston, S. C. 

1130. Magazine in Rattery Rodgers, on the Potomac. 

1140. Fifteen-inch Gun in Battery Rodgers on the 
Potomac. 

1151. Sling-Cart for Moving Heavy Cannon. 

These immense sling-carts are used for moving heavy cannon. 
The wheels have double spokes and very broad heavy tires. Some 
idea of the size of these immense wheels can be formed by com- 
paring their height with that of the officer who stands near. 
It will be noticed that although he is a tall man, yet his head 
only comes up to about the hub of the wheel. 

6717. On the Lines near Atlanta. 

This is the "Potter House" on the Rebel lines near Atlanta. 
The sharpshooters of the enemy posted themselves in the upper 
rooms and on the roof of this house overlooking the Union lines, 
and thus greatly annoying our troops and killing many of our 
men, during the battle of July 22, 1864. Finally a battery of light 
artillery was brought up, and quickly made the house untenable 
for sharpshooters or anyone else. 

259O. General Grant's Horse " Cincinnati." 

This is one of General Grant's favorite horses; the photograph 
was taken at City Point, Va., in March, 1865. 

6064. Water Battery of Fort Johnson, James Island, S.C. 

This view shows the Water Battery of Fort Johnson, looking 
towards the celebrated Fort Sumter. Fort Sumtcr can be seen in 
the distance. 

6077. Ruins of Secession Hall, Charleston, S. C. 

This Secession Hall (as it was called) in Charleston, S. C., was 
the birth-place of the Rebellion, for here it was the first ordinance 
of Secession was passed. This view shows the ruins of Secession 
Hall as it appeared when the Union troops took possession of the 
city. Adjoining the hall is shown the ruins of the Central Church, 
and in the background is seen St. Phillip's Church. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



577. Independent Pennsylvania Battery " E " 

(Knapp's Battery.) 

This is a view of the well-known Knapp's Battery, of the Army 
of the Potomac, at Antietam, Md., Sept., 1862. This view was taken 
shortly after the great battle of Antietam. 

587. Army Blacksmith and Forge, Antietam, Sept., 1862. 

Each battery of artillery and each squadron of cavalry were 
provided with a Forge, mounted on heavy wheels, similar to a 
piece of Artillery. This Forge travelled with the Army, and the 
Artificer in charge of the Forge attended to shoeing the horses, 
and repairing the iron-work of the gun-carriages and baggage- 
wagons. He always had plenty of business, and this view shows 
him engaged in shoeing the horses. 



602. President Lincoln and Gen. McClellan in 

McClellan's Tent. 

After the battle of Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862, President Lincoln 
visited the Army of the Potomac, and this view shows the Presi- 
dent and "Little Mac" in McClellan's tent at Headquarters Army 
of the Potomac, Antietam, October 4, 1862. 

787. Cowan's (First N. Y.) Battery before Petersburg, Va. 

This view shows Cowan's Battery, in position, in captured Rebel 
works on the Petersburg line. Although this view is not as 
clear as we wish it was, yet we publish it in response to numerous 
requests. 

2413. Near view of a " Sibley " Tent. 

Early in the war the soldiers were much more comfortably shel- 
tered than they were as the war progressed. This view shows a 
"Sibley" tent mess; these "Sibley" tents were nice large tents, 
and could comfortably hold from ten to fifteen men. When the 
Army moved up the Penninsula (from camp Winfield Scott, before 
Yorktown,) early in the Spring of 1862, we bade farewell to our 
comfortable large tents, and thereafter each soldier carried his 
house on his back. From the Spring of 1862 till the end of the 
war we lived in " dog tents " or shelter (?) tents as the government 
miscalled them. 



9 83. Troops dret 



. up In Hollow Square to Witness 
an Execution. 



This view was taken before Petersburg in 1864, and shows the 
troops formed in a hollow square to witness the execution of a 
negro soldier named Johnson, who was hanged on this scaffold, 
by order of a general Court-martial, having been convicted of an 
attempted rape of a white woman, whose house was within the 
Union lines near here, but whose husband was in the Rebel army. 

1045. Winter Quarters of the Rebel Army, at 

Manassas, Va., 1863. 

During the winter of 18611862 the Rebel army of Northern Vir- 
ginia were in winter quarters near Manassas, Va., and this is a 
view of their quarters, which, by the way, were much better than 
either army were accustomed to have during the later winters of 
the war. 

2568. Signal Tower on the Line before Peters- 
burg, Va., 1864. 

On our more permanent lines tall towers were erected on high 
and commanding positions. From the top of these towers our 
signal corps could transmit messages by means of waiving of flags 
by day and torches by night. These were in plain sight of the 
enemy, but were utterly unintelligible to them, as the messages 
were ail in cipher; the very men who were waving the flag did 
not know the tenor of the messages they transmitted; they of 
course knew how to wave their flags so as to make certain given 
figures, but they did not know what those figures meant. Only 
the Officers of the signal corps had the " key "to the cipher. The 
members of the signal corps were brave and cool as any soldiers 
who were doing the fighting, for when the lines of battle were 
shifting, the signal corps was pushed away out at the front where 
they could better observe the movements of the enemy, and trans- 
mit intelligence to the generals; they had to post themselves in 
tree-tops or on house-tops, in most exposed positions, and were 
constantly made the target for sharpshooters. When our troops 
were sorely pressed, sometimes a message from the little flags was 
like an inspiration, telling of reinforcements coming to our help. 

3679. Fort McAllister, on the Ogechee River, Ga. 

This was a very strong Rebel fort ; it was captured by Sherman's 
boys who made a splendid assault and charge, and carried it by 
storm. This view is on the river side of the fort, and shows a sig- 
nal man on the parapet, and a steamer approaching. 

2564. General Wright, Commander of the " Bloody 
Sixth Corps." 

The old Sixth corps were too well known to need an introduc- 
tion, but the survivors of that brave organization will be g-lad to 
take a look at their old commander, Gen. Wright, and the old 
headquarters flag, which could always be found where the fight 
was hottest. 



217. 



Non-commissioned Officers' Mess, Co. " D " 
93d New York Infantry. 



This view was taken at Bealton, Va., in August, 1863, and if any 
of the members of this Company are now living they will doubt- 
less appreciate the scene. 



Troops Crossing the Rappahann 
a Pontoon Bridge. 



nock River on 



This view shows the troops crossing the Rappahannock River 
at Germania Ford, May 4, 1864. 



486. The Original "Monitor" after her Fight with 
the "Merrimac." 

This view shows part of the deck and turret of the " Monitor ; " 
near the port-hole can be seen the dents made by the heavy steel- 
pointed shot from the guns of the "Merrimac." As the old war 
time ditty has it: 

"The Rebel shot flew hot, but our boys they answered not, 
Till they got within a distance they called handy ; 

Then says Worden to his crew, boys, let's see what we can do, 
And up spoke little Yankee Doodle Dandy." 

" The Rebels shook their head, and to one another said, 
The bottom of this river is quite sandy, 

We had better turn about, and for Norfolk quick set out, 
For we have found the very Devil, in this little Yankee Doodle 
Dandy." 

214. "Hard Tack." 

There is no necessity to tell the "boys" what this is; they all 
remember the old chorus of the old army song about " Hard Tack : " 

"Many days we have crunched you until our jaws are sore, 
Oh ! "Soft Bread" come again once more." 

2510. Fort Simmer, near Fair Oaks, Va., 1862. 

This is a view ol our light field-works on the Chickahominy, 
near Fair Oaks, in June, 1862. The men are at the guns ready to 
receive the attack and the infantry are hurrying into line on the 
right and left of the battery. 

804. Making Coffee. On the Lines before Peters- 
burg, Va., 1864. 

This view gives a glimpse of the bomb-proofs in which our sol- 
diers tried to live, during the long siege at Petersburg, 1864 1865; 
the camp-fire and the coffee-kettle look as familiar as in those 
days of yore. 

49O. Crew of the Original " Monitor " on her deck. 

This view shows the crew of the orginal " Monitor" on the deck 
of that world famous little " cheese box on a raft," as the Rebels 
contemptuously called her, until she showed them how easy she 
could lick their famous " Merrimac." The honest Jack Tars here 
seen can always congratula'te themselves that they took part in 
the famous fight which revolutionized the navies of all the world. 

6181. Dead Rebel Artillery Soldiers, Petersburg, Va., 
April 2. 1865. 

This is a view of some dead Rebel artillerymen, as the photog- 
rapher found them, in the works at Petersburg, the morning the 
place was carried by our- troops, by assault. The one in the fore- 
ground has on belt and cartridge box probably taken from some 
Union prisoner, as the letters U. S. are seen on the plate. 

6180. Dead Rebel Artillery Soldier, Petersburg, Va., 
April 2, 1865. 

This is a dead Rebel artilleryman in the works at Petersburg; 
his uniform is gray, trimmed with red, signifying that he belonged 
to the artillery. The blood is pouring out of a wound in his head, 
and his face is all covered with blood. 

1245. Railroad Battery before Petersburg. 

This is another battery on General Grant's Military Railroad, 
operated the same as the mortar "Dictator" shown in view 
No. 831. The heavy cannon is mounted on a very strong, special- 
made car, protected with a roof of railroad iron. The car is 
readily moved along the line and the cannon is fired whenever 
required ; it is thus made very effective and annoying to the 
enemy, for it is something like the Irishman's flea, "when they 
put their hand on it, it amt there ; " in other words, when they 
turn the fire of their batteries on the Railroad Battery, our boys 



hitch on to the car and run it along out of the line of fire, and 
commence pegging away again. By the time the " Johnnie 
find out where the Railroad Battery is, and get the range 



smash it, " it aint there " again ; the boys run it along to a new 
stand for business. 

799. The Execution of Mrs. Surratt and the Lincoln 

Assassination Conspirators. 

This view shows the interior of the Arsenal in the Navy Yard 
at Washington, with the scaffold arranged for the execution. On 
the scaffold are Mrs. Surratt and the three other condemned con- 
spirators listening to the reading of the death warrant. 

[These two views (This view and No. 800) comprise a scene of 
much historic interest. They were made by having two separate 
cameras set to photograph the scaffold. When the warrant was 
being read one camera was used and this view was taken ; then 
when the drop was sprung the second camera was used, and so 
the entire scene of such tragic interest was photographed.] 

800. The Execution of Mrs. Surratt and the Lincoln 

Assassination Conspirators. 

This view shows the drop sprang and Mrs. Surratt and the 
other three conspirators hanging. 

[These two views (This view and No. 799) comprise a scene of 
much historic interest. They were made by having two separate 
cameras set to photograph the scaffold. When the warrant was 
being read one camera was used and that view was taken ; then 
when the drop was sprung the second camera was used, and so 
the entire scene of such tragic interest was photographed.] 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



6O8. Burnside Bridge, Antietam, Sept., 1862. 

The assault and capture of this bridge, September 17, 1862, cost 
the Union array the lives of many of its gallant men. The history 
of the fight at this point is well worth reading. It will give some 
idea of what sacrifices were made that this "Government of the 
people, for the people, and by the people, should not perish from 
off the face of the earth." 

2597. " It is the Bean, that we mean, so white and clean." 

As the "boys" look at this view we think they will sniff the old 
familiar aroma of bean soup. 

4489. Gen. O. R. Paul, shot blind at Gettysburg. 

The bullet passed in at one eye and out of the other. 

4634. Commodore J. r,. Worden. 

He was in command of the "Monitor" when she whipped the 
" Merrimac." 

1494. Francis E. Brownell, ("Ellsworth's Avenger.") 

Brownell is the Zouave who was next to Col. Ellsworth when 
he was assassinated by the Rebel landlord of the Marshall House 
in Alexandria; as soon as Jackson fired the shot which killed 
Ellsworth, Brownell shot Jackson and followed up the shot with 
a bayonet thrust, sending his bayonet entirely through Jackson's 
body. The crape which Brownell wears on his left arm is the 
military badge of mourning for his Colonel, Ellsworth. 

1546. ,>n. John A. 1 >i v. 

Author of the famous order v "If any man pulls down the 
American Flag shoot him on the spot." 

947. General U. S. Grant. 

This photograph was taken just before the close of the war. It 
is the best photograph of General Grant ever taken. 

2209. Gen. 1'hil. Kearney. Photograph taken in 1862. 

General Kearney was shot dead during the Battle of Chantilly, 
Sept. 1st, 1862. This photograph was taken in July, 1862. 

1312. Abraham Lincoln, President. Photograph taken 
in 1864. 

1453. Jeff. Davis. Photograph taken soon after his 
capture. 

1613. Gen. G. A. Custer. Photograph taken in 1864. 

2612. Gen. J. B. McPherson, killed before Atlanta, Ga., 
July 22, 1864. 

1642. " Little Mac." Photograph taken in 1862. 

2177. "Uncle John Sedgwick," (Commander of the Sixth 
Corps. Killed at Spottsj 1 vania, Va.) 

2088. Gen. Robert E. Lee. Gen. G. W. Lee. Col. Wal- 
ter Taylor. 

2090. Gen. Robert E. Lee. 

2O77. Gen. Thos. J. Jackson, (" Stonewall.") 

5292. Admiral Farragut. 

2O22. Gen. G. H. Thomas, (" the Rock of Chickamauga.") 

2O02. Get*. W. T. Sherman, (" Old Tecumseh.") 

1864. Lieut. Commander \V. B. Cushing, who blew up 
the Rebel Ram " Albermarle." 

1757. Gen. G. K. Warren, Commander of the Fifth 
Corps. 

1321. Gen. N. P. Banks. 

2243. Gen. W. F. (Baldy) Smith, Commander of the 
Bloody Sixth Corps. 

3845. Gen. H. W. Halleck. 

2211. Gen. Lew Wallace. 

2208. Edwin S. Stanton, Lincoln's Secretary of War. 

132. Dinner Party at Headquarters Army of Potomac, 
April, 1864. 

137. Headquarters 3d Army Corps, (Capt. Bates' Quar- 
ters) April, 1864. 

163. General I. I. Stevens and Staff, Beaufort, S. C., 
March, 1862. 

223. Camp in the woods near Culpepper, Va., Nov., 1863. 
6056. Exterior view of Fort Sumter, S. C. 

This view shows how this famous fort was battered by the Union 
batteries, and also shows the method adopted by the Rebels to 
protect the walls against the shot and shell. 



248. Trossel's House, Gettysburg, July 4, 1863. 

The 9th Massachusetts battery of light artillery were stationed 
in the yard and barnyard at Trossel's place. Some idea of the 
awful tide of battle which they met there can be inferred from 
the fact that of the 88 horses of their battery, 65 were killed. 
This view shows where one of their guns stood. This battery did 
most valiant service here that day. They held the fearful charge 
in check until our lines could be re-formed to successfully meet 
and repel the attack. 

19OO. General John A. Logan. 

1922. "Fighting Joe Hooker." 

" Fighting Joe Hooker," as he was called, was appointed in com- 
mand of the Army of the Potomac, January 25, 1803, succeeding 
Burnside. He was himself succeeded by Gen. Meadc, June 27, 1863. 
This Photograph was taken just before he started with the Army 
of the Potomac after General Lee up into Pennsylvania. General 
Hooker was born in Hadley, Mass., November 13, 1814, and died 
in Garden City, N. Y., October 31, 1879. 

1955. Major General Francis C. Barlow. 

2358. Union Siege Artillery " In Park " at Yorktown. 

241O. Camp of the 31st Penn. at Queens Farms, Va. 
Fort Slocum in the distance. 

This view shows the style of camps in vogue in the early part 
of the war. The tents are what was known aa " Sibley's," large 
and comfortable ; later in the war the troops had what was called 
"shelter tents," or in the Western army called " dog tents." 

2419. Review of Col. Dwight's "Excelsior Brigade." 
2443. Headquarters lOth Army Corps, Hatchies Run, Va. 
2483. Belle Plain Landing, Va. A Picturesque Scene. 
2492. Evacuation of Port Royal, Va., May 3O, 1864. 

2551. Bomb-proof Quarters of Major Strong, at Dutch 
Gap, Va., July, 1864. 

3491. "Mounting Guard" in Fort Wagner, Morris 
Island, S. C. 

3494. Fort McAllister, Georgia. 

This view shows the ground over which Sherman's boys charged 
when the fort was captured. 

35O7. Stockade on Morris Island where Rebel Prisoners 
were confined. 

The Rebel authorities in Charleston placed the Union prisoners 
in confinement under fire of the Union batteries. When the 
Union authorities learned of this treatment of our prisoners, they 
notified the Rebels that unless our prisoners were removed to a 
place of safety, the Rebel prisoners in our hands would be con- 
fined in a stockade on Morris Island, where they would be under 
fire of the Rebel batteries in and about Charleston. As the Rebel 
authorities did not heed this warning, this stockade was built 
and the Rebel prisoners were confined here for a time, under 
fire of their own batteries. 

3763. " If any one attempts to haul down the American 
Flag, shoot him on the spot." 

This is a photograph of the famous letter written by Gen. Dix, 
which contains his celebrated order as above quoted. 

6006. Fort Saunders, Knoxville, Tenn. 

6221. Bomb-proof in the Rebel line at Petersburg, Va. 

6244. View of the James River, looking east from Libby 
Prison Hill. 

^8O. Gen. Ward, Gen. Mott, Col. Austin, Col. Brewster 
and Col. Farnham, 2d Division, 
3d Corps, Oct., 1863. 

6612. General Hospital at City Point, Va. 

6624. Picturesque view on the James River near Dutch 
Gap Canal. 

476. Waiting for the Attack. 

This view shows a battery of Union artillery in position, near 
Mrs. Clark's house, Fair Oaks, Va., June 27, 1SG2. 

653. Gen. Sedgwick, Colonel Sackett and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Colburn, Harrison's Landing, Va., 
August, i si;:;. 

1049. General Burnside and Staff, November, 1862. 

1467. Gen. George G. Meade, Commander of the Army 
of the Potomac. 

General Meade commanded the Army of the Potomac from 
June 27, 1803, till the close of the war. The celebrated battle of 
Gettysburg was fought under his command, and there, as else- 
where, he proved to be a sure and safe commander; he is well 
remembered by all of the old hoys of the Army of the Potomac 
who survive him; he was horn in Cadiz, Spain, December 31, Isl5, 
and died in Philadelphia, Penn., November G, 1872. 

1551. General Don Carlos Buel. 
17O2. General Daniel E. Sickles. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



List of Large Views. 

The following named views (on pages 10, 11, 12 and 13) are NOT stereoscopic, tut are mounted SINGLE on handsome, 
round-cornered, red-bordered " mounts " 9 s 11 inches in size. 

The Price of tie Views named on paps 10, 11, 12 and 13 is 75 cents each, or $8,00 per dozen, 



If you want STEREOSCOPIC views you must order them from the lists on pages 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, 

If you want views mounted SINGLE, 9x11 inches in size, you must order them 

from the lists on the following pages : (10, 11, 12 and 13.) 

In a few cases -we happen to have a view of the same subject in both sizes, for example : you will note on page 7 
among the stereoscopic list, that No. 6161 is a view of Libby Prison: you will also find in the 9 x 11 list on page 
13, No. 7557, is Libby Prison. 

It happens in this way: when the photographers were taking this picture they made two "negatives" of the 
same scene ; one of the "negatives " is a stereoscopic (4x7,) and the other " negative " is a single (9x11;) therefore 
we can supply that particular view either in stereoscopic (4 x 7) or single (9 x 11 ;) there are also a few other views 
on the lists which we can furnish in either size as desired ; but we cannot take a 9 x 11 " negative " and make a 
stereoscopic (4 x 7) view from it, nor vice versa ; we are thus explicit about this, because heretofore we have had 
much trouble caused by persons who order stereoscopic views from the list of large views, or large views from the 
list of stereoscopic. 



The following named views were photographed near Rappahannoch 
Station, Virginia, during the early part of the year 1864. 

7461. Camp of 50th New York Engineers. 

7290. Sutler's Hut, 5Oth New York Engineers. 

7293. Quarters of Field and Staff, 50th N. Y. Engineers. 



The following named views were photographed near Culpepper, 
Virginia, during the autumn of the year 1863. 

7334. Battery "A" 4th U. S. Artillery. 

7245. Battery "M" 2d U. S. Artillery. 

7501. General W. H. French and Staff. 

7071. Offlcersof 80th New York Infantry, (2Oth N.Y.S.M.) 



The following named views were photographed near Brandy Sta- 
tion, Virginia, where the Army of the Potomac had their win- 
ter quarters during the winter of 18631864. 

7495. Camp at Headquarters Army of the Potomac. 

7352. Colonel Wilson, Chief Commissary. 
7611. Band of 114th Penn. Infantry. 

7613. Guard Mounting of 114th Penn. Infantry. 

7308. Camp of the 114th Penn. Vols. Winter Quarters. 
7625. Camp of 18th Penn. Cavalry. 

7389. Company "D " 3d Penn. Cavalry, (dismounted.) 

7353. Camp of Military Telegraph Corps. 
74O2. Provost Marshals of 3d Army Corps. 
7129. Detachment of 1st U. S. Cavalry. 
7265. Camp of 6th New York Artillery. 
73O1. Field Hospital, 1st Division, 2d Corps. 
7306. Field Hospital, 2d Division, 2d Corps. 
7632. Field Hospital, of 3d Division, 2d Corps. 

7309. Winter Quarters in 3d Corps. 

7310. Camp of U. S. Engineer Battalion. 

70O5. Quarters of Company " D " U. S. Engineers. 

7068. Detachment of 3d Indiana Cavalry; Army Head- 
quarters. 

7637. Headquarters 1st Brigade of Horse Artillery (pop- 
ularly called "Flying Artillery.") 

7157. Winter Quarters, 1st Brigade, Horse Artillery, 

During the winter of 18631864 the Army of the Potomac was in 
winter quarters near Brandy Station, Va. This view is a charac- 
teristic scene. The log hut, with the crevices plastered up with 
Virginia mud, the log chimney and the pork barrel on top of it to 
help the draft, it is a vivid reminder of those days of the war. 



The following views were photographed on the lines before Peters- 
burg, Virginia, during the summer of 1864, and the winter 
of 18641866. 

7633. Fort Sedgwick. 

7534. Bomb-proofs in Fort Sedgwick. 

7487. MaJ. Eckert and Group of Military Telegrapher*. 

7497. General Bnfus Ingalls and Staff. 

7526. General O. B. Wilcox and Staff. 

7602. Officers of 114th Penn. Infantry. 

7447. Company "F" 114th Penn. Infantry. 

7348. Company "G" 114th Penn. Infantry. 

7263. Company "H" 114th Penn. Infantry. 

7384. Company "A" U. S. Engineers. 

7570. Company "B" U. S. Engineers. 

7568. Company " C " U. S. Engineers. 

7548. Company "D" U. S. Engineers. 

7295. Company "C" 1st Mass. Cavalry. 

7392. Company "D" 1st Mass. Cavalry. 

7391. Non-commissioned Officers, 1st Mass. Cavalry. 

7439. Essayons Dramatic Club, U. S. Engineers. 

7543. Camp of 2d Wisconsin Infantry. 

7575. Surgeons of the 2d Division, 9th Corps. 

7042. Surgeons of the 3d Division, 9th Corps. 

7046. Surgeons of the 4th Division, 9th Corps. 

7052. Field and Staff 39th U. S. Colored Infantry. 

7445. Non-commissioned Officers of General Grant's 
Escort. 

7298. Camp of 3d Penn. Cavalry, Headquarters Army 
of the Potomac. 

7059. Headquarters 5Oth New York Engineers. 

This is a view of Colonel Spaulding's quarters. Pine boughs 
have been interwoven into a handsome design for the front 
entrance. Over the entrance is the well-known engineer corps 
badge woven with the same material. Pieces of canvas are 
stretched over the ridge-pole, and this completes the regimental 
headquarters. Colonel Spaulding stands in the doorway. 

7463. Thirteen-inch Mortar "Dictator." 

This large sea-coast mortar is mounted on a special flat-car 
made very strong for this purpose. This mortar-car is on General 
Grant's military railroad at Petersburg. The car is readily moved 
along the line and the mortar is fired whenever required ; it is 
thus made very effective and annoying to the enemy, for it 
something like the Irishman's flea, "when they put their hand 
on it, it ain't there ; " in other words, when they turn the fire of 
their batteries on the " Dictator," our boys hitch on to the car and 
run it along out of the line of fire and commence pegging away 
again. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



74OO. Gen. Robert Nugent and Commanding Officers of 

Regiments in Irish Brigade, on the 

Petersburg Line. 

7339. "John Henry." Contraband at Headquarters, 
Army of Potomac. 

7123. Harper's Ferry, Maryland Heights, and London 
Heights. 

7222. Headquarters of Gen. O. II. Wllcox, In front of 
Petersburg, August, 1864. 

7934. Military Telegraph Wagon, for field Telegraphy. 

Shows the Telegraph operator sending a message from the 
wagon. 

8O88. On the Lines, near Atlanta. 

This is the "Potter House" on the Rebel lines near Atlanta. 
The sharpshooters of the enemy posted themselves in the upper 
rooms and on the roof of this house overlooking the Union lines, 
and thus greatly annoying our troops and killing many of our 
men during the battle of July 22. 1864. Finally a battery of light 
artillery was brought up, and quickly made the house untenable 
for sharpshooters or any one else. 

7303. Second Corps Mail Wagon. 

The sight of this wagon coming into the Camps of the old second 
corps always gladdened the hearts of the boys. It came loaded 
with letters from home, how welcome these were, none but the 
weary and heart-sick soldiers can ever know. Some letters had 
to be returned with a line or two written across the envelope, like 
this: "killed yesterday," or, "died in the hospital last week," 
or, " missing." 

7557. Libby Prison, Richmond, Va. 

This is a view of the infamous Libby Prison, where so many of 
our Union soldiers suffered and starved during the war. It would 
take volumes to tell the story of Libby Prison. It was an old to- 
bacco warehouse which the Rebels converted into a prison for 
Union soldiers. There is not a Grand Army Post through all our 
land but what has among its members some comrade who knows 
from experience just what a " hell hole " this place was. 

71 10. Ruins of Richmond, April 12, 1865. 

When the Rebel army was forced to evacuate their Capitol at 
Richmond, they set tire to the city, exploded the powder in their 
magazines, and did their worst to entirely destroy the city. The 
Union troops came in as conquerors and immediately set to work 
with a will to extinguish the fires, and save as much of the city as 
possible, but before the fire could be quenched, over 700 buildings 
were in the ruins. This is a view of a portion of the ruins. 



7258. 



Horrors of "War. 



A Union soldier killed by a shell at Gettysburg, July 3, 18G3. 
His arm was torn off, and can be seen on the ground near his mus- 
ket, and entirely separated from his body. The shell also com- 
pletely disemboweled the poor fellow, and killed him so quick that 
he never knew what struck him. Think of a battlefield covering 
nearly twenty-five square miles, and covered with thousands of 
dead, many of them mangled even worse than this one and you 
can have a faint idea of Gettysburg in the early days of July, 1863. 

7285. Ambulance Drill. 

This view shows the method of removing the wounded from the 
field by the ambulance corps. In no previous war in the history 
of the world was so much done to alleviate suffering as in the war 
of 18611865. But notwithstanding all that was done, the wound- 
ed suffered horribly. After any great battle it required several 
days and nights of steady work ere all the wounded were gathered 
up, and no pen or tongue can tell how they suffered while waiting 
for the ambulance corps. 

7055. In Trossel's Barnyard, Gettysburg. 

The 9th Massachusetts battery of light artillery were stationed 
in the yard and barnyard at Trossel's place. Some idea of the aw- 
ful tide of battle which they met there can be inferred from the 
fact that of the 88 horses of their battery, 05 were killed. This 
view shows where one of their guns stood. This battery did most 
valiant service here that day. They held the fearful charge in 
check until our lines could be re-formed to successfully meet and 
repel the attack. 

7946. Union Dead at Gettysburg ; killed by Cannister. 

A group of Union dead on the right of the Federal lines on the 
first day's fight, July 1, 1863. These soldiers were killed by one 
discharge of "cannister" from a Rebel gun during a charge. 
" Cannister" is a tin can filled with small balls about tne size or a 
marble. When the cannon is fired the force of the discharge 
bursts open the can, and the shower of cannister balls sweep every 
thing before it. "Cannister" is used at short range, and is fear- 
fully effective. 

7212. Rebel Winter Quarters at Centreville, Va., 1862. 

During the winter of 18611862 the Rebel army of Northern Vir- 
ginia were in winter quarters at Centrevijle, Va., and this is a view 
of their quarters, which, by the way, were much better than 
either army were accustomed to have during the later winters of 
the war. 



7948. President Lincoln and Gen. McClelhiu in Mc- 
Clellan's Tent, Antietam, Oct. 3, 1862. 

During the visit of President Lincoln to the Army of the Poto- 
mac in the early part of October, 1862, several views of the Presi- 
dent were obtained by the photographer. This view shows the 
President and " Little Mac " seated in General McClellan's tent 
with maps and plans on the table before them discussing the sit- 
uation, October 3, 1862. 



7191. 



McLean's House, where Lee Surrendered. 



This is the scene of General Lee's surrender to General Grant, 
April 9, 1865. It was within this house owned by a Mr. McLean, 
and situated near Appomattox Court House, that the surrender 
was signed. This great historic event took place in the front 
room on the left of the door as you enter the house. 

7926. CoUecting Remains of the Dead, Cold Harbor. 

This is a ghastly view showing the process of collecting the re- 
mains of Union soldiers who were hastily buried at the time of the 
battle. This is a scene on the battlefield months after the battle, 
when the Government ordered the remains gathered for perma- 
nent burial. The grinning skulls, the boot still hanging on the 
fleshiest! bones, the old canteen on the skeleton, all testify to the 
hasty burial after the battle. Looking on this scene you-can easi- 
ly understand why, in all National cemeteries, there are so great 
a number of graves marked " unknown." These are the " un- 
known" heroes of the war, who "died that our Nation might 
live." 

7942. Dead Rebel Sharpshooter at Gettysburg. 

In their attempt to silence Hazlett's Battery, which was posted 
on the summit of Little Round Top, the Rebels pushed their 
sharpshooters up among the rocks at the foot of Round Top. It 
was a shot from one of these sharpshooters that mortally wound- 
ed General Weed, who was directing the movement of his troops 
from the summit of Round Top. Lieut. Hazlett, commanding the 
battery which was posted there, was an old schoolmate of General 
Weed. He hastened to the side of the dying General to take his 
last message, when he, too, fell dead, pierced by a ball from the 
dreaded sharpshooter. Then the guns of the battery were turned 
on the " Devil's den," as it was aptly called, and many of the 
sharpshooters were killed. This view shows one of them. 

7491. Big Round Top, Gettysburg. 

Two hills called Big Round Top and little Round Top formed 
the left of the Union line during that great battle. This view 



gives a glimpse of Big Round Top. The stone wall in the fore- 
ground is a breastwork ha - ' 

July 2, 1863. 



lastily constructed by the Union troops, 



7916. Armory Square Hospital Chapel, Washington. 

Thousands of Army of the Potomac boys will remember 
Armory Square Hospital, in Washington. This scene with the 
beautiful dome of the Capitol in the background is a handsome 
souvenir of that great hospital, where so many of the " boys in 
blue " were carried from the battlefields of Virginia. 

7949. President Lincoln, Major Allen Pinkerton and 
Gen. McClernard, Antietam, October, 1862. 

The central figure in this scene is, of course, President Lincoln. 
Comparatively few of this generation have any clear idea how 
Mr. Lincoln really looked. This view is a valuable and rare 
picture ; it was photographed at headquarters Army of the Poto- 
mac, Antietam, Md., October 3, 1862. The officer in uniform is 
General McClernard, and the short, rather insignificant looking 
man on the other side of President Lincoln is Allen Pinkerton, 
chief of secret service, Army of the Potomac, and the father of 
the now famous Pinkerton Detectives. In the army he was 
known only as " Major Allen." 

7599. Scouts and Guides, Army of the Potomac. 

A large number of brave and shrewd men were employed as 
scouts and guides for the Army. This view shows a group of 
some of these scouts and guides. Photographed April 2, 1864, 
Brandy Station, Va. 

7512. Company "A" 93d N. Y. Infantry, August, 1863. 
7453. " "B" 

7591. " "D" 

7455. " "E" 

7594. "F" " " " 

7459. " "G" " 

7593. " "I" " " 

7009. " "K" " " 

7514. "Drum Corps" " " " 

The Company views of the old 93d New York, are so clear that 
any survivor of that well know regiment can pick out his com- 
rades almost as well as if they were in line before him. This 
view was taken at Bealton, Va., in August, 1863. At the 
request of the New York Tribune we publish these company 
views for the benefit of our New York comrades who will keenly 
appreciate this photographic muster of the old regiment, years 
after most of the veterans of the old 93d are dead ; those of the 
regiment who still survive will take great pleasure in " looking 
backwards " more than a quarter of a century into the laoes of 
their comrades of the war. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



The following named uiews were photographed near Falmouth, Vir- 
ginia, in the early part of the year 1863. 

7523. Ambulance Train of Engineer Brigade. 

752O. Drum Corps of Gist New York Infantry. 

7313. Company "I>" Gist New York Infantry. 

7554. Company "G" Gist New York Infantry. 

7556. Company " K " Gist New York Infantry. 

714O. Company "I" 6th Penn. Cavalry (Rush's Lancers.) 



7740. Non-commissioned Officers, 13th N. Y. Cavalry. 
775O. Commissioned Officers, 28th Mass. Infantry. 

7642. Officers of the 60th New York. ("Negative" is 
slightly damaged) 

4O46. General W. H. Slocum and Staff. 

4048. I'liil. Sheridan and his Generals. 

4O57. Old "Tecumseh" (Sherman) and his Generals. 

4054. General Frank I'. Ulair and Staff. 

8093. Keiiesaw Mountain. 

7657. Chain Bridge, Potomac Kiver. 

7951. President Lincoln, Oeii. McClellaii, and a large 
group of Officers at Headquarters Army of 
the Potomac, Aittietam, Oct. 4, 1862. 

7112. Camp of the "Om-ida" Cavalry, Headquarters 
Army of the Potomac, March, 1865. 

7744. Company "V" 3d Mass. Artillery, Fort Stevens. 

7874. Company " H " 3d Mass. Artillery, Fort Lincoln. 

7O47. Company "D v 149th Penn. Infantry, Nov. 6, 1864. 

768O. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis and Staff. 

8680. Group of Marines, Washington Navy Yard, April, 
1864. 

7715. Home of the Sanitary Commission. 

7711. The Welcome Visitor; Sanitary Commission 
Wagon. 

7750. Officers of the 26th Mass. Infantry. 

7758. Gen. John T. Hartraiift and Staff, (in charge of 
the Lincoln Assassination Conspirators' Exe- 
cution) July, 1865. 

789O. Company "K" 4th U. S. Colored Infantry, Fort 
Lincoln, Va. 

7927. Frederickslmrg, Va., December, 1862. 
7945. Admiral I). D. Porter, on deck of Flagship. 

7947. General IT. S. Grant. A very fine Photograph, 
May, 1865. 

7971. Slaughter Pen at foot of Little Round Top. 
Dead bodies of the slain among the rocks. 

7507. Head quarters Army of the Potomac near Fair- 
fax, Va., June, 1863. 

7516. General Kilpatrick and Staff, Stevensburg, Va., 
March, 1864. 



7563. Signal T< 



7374. Officers of the Signal Corps, Warrenton, Va., 
October, 1863. 

7468. " Major Allen." (This is tho old man Allen Pink- 
erton, Cbief of the Secret Service.) 

8085. Generals of the Cavalry Corps ; Sheridan, Wilson, 
Gregg, Davis, Torbert ami Merritt. 

7818. Battery "M" 9th New York Artillery. 

(This was formerly the Twenty-second New York Battery.) 

7419. The "Lincoln Gun" at Fortress Monroe, Va., De- 
cember 3, 1864. 

7938. 93d New York Infantry, at Autietam, Md. 

8112. Missionary Ridge. 

8118. Lookout Mountain. 

7672. JZdN.Y. Artillery, (Co. "F") at Fort C. F. Smith. 

7673. 2d N. Y. Artillery, (Co. L") at Fort C. F. Smith. 
7675. 2d N. Y. Artillery, (Co. "K") at Fort C. F. Smith. 
7722. Headquarters 13th N. Y. Cavalry, Prospect Hill. 

7735. 13th N. Y. Cavalry on Inspection, Prospect Hill. 

7736. Signal Station of 13th N. Y. Cavalry, Prospect Hill. 



7912. The Rebel Ram "Stonewall" after her capture. 

744O. A view in Fort Fisher, North Carolina, just after 
its capture, 1865. 

8000. FortSumter, August 13, 1863, showing effect of 

"trial shots." 

8001. Fort Sumter, August 23, 1863, showing effect of 

" bombardment." 

8018. The " Swamp Angel " on Morris Island, S. C. 

8O21. Headquarters of "Field Officer" in the Trenches, 
Morris Island. S. C. 

8023. A " full sap " in the Trenches, Morris Island, S. C. 

8053. General Grant and Staff at Cold Harbor. 

701O. 17th N. Y. Battery, near Washington, June, 1 863. 

7517. Company " C " 41st N. Y. Infantry, Manassas, Va. 

7252. Generals of the Army of the Potomac. 

7349. Major H. W. Sawyer and Staff, Commanding Camp 
Stoneman, D. C.. March, 1865. 

76O3. Gen. Pleasonton and Staff, Warrenton, Va., Oc- 
tober, 1863. 

7374. Officers of Signal Corps, Headquarters Army of 
the Potomac, Warrenton, Va., October, 1863. 

7388. Company "D" 149th Penn. Infantry, Nov., 1864. 

7401. Surgeon Hawks 50th New York Engineers, Nov- 
ember, 1864. 

7464. Officers of 4th Penn. Cavalry, Westover Landing, 
Va., August, 1862. 

7477. Officers of 50th Penn. Infantry, Fort Craig, July, 
1865. 

7479. Officers of Company " F " 2d New York Artillery. 

7486. Officers of 3d Penn. Artillery, Fortress Monroe, 
Va.. Dec., 1864. 

7503. 8th U. S. Infantry, Provost Guard, Fairfax Court 
House, Va., June, 1863. 

7531. Officers of 61st New York Infantry. 

7545. Headquarters 6th Corps, near Yellow Tavern, 
Va., February, 1865. 

7559. Officers of 17th New York Battery, June, 1863. 
7605. Captain Alexander, 80th New York Infantry. 

7403. Captain E. A. Flint, 1st Mass. Cavalry, Head- 
quarters Army of the Potomac, November, 1864. 

7182. "Hard Tack and Salt Hoss," Cedar Level, Va., 
August, 1864. 

7178. Officers of 4th New York Artillery. 
7185. Officers of 13th New York Cavalry. 
7253. Sergeants of 3d Mass. Artillery, Fort Totten, Va. 

7261. Commissioned Officers 3d Mass. Artillery, Fort 
Totten. Va. 

7267. Field and Staff 69th Penn. Infantry. 

7282. Officers of Companies "F" and "K" 3d Mass. 

Artillery, Fort Stevens, Va. 

7283. Company "F" 2d New York Artillery. 

7025. Dress Parade of the 50th Penn. Infantry, Gettys- 
burg, Pa., July, 1865. 

7035. Officers of 63d New York Infantry. 

7O58. Dress Parade of the 3d Penn. Artillery, Fortress 
Monroe, Va., Dec., 1864. 

7371. General Custer and General Pleasonton, 1862. 

These two Generals were well-known cavalry officers of the 
Army of the Potomac. 

7383. Grape-vine Bridge on the Chickahominy River, 
June 18, 1862. 

This well-remembered corduroy bridge was built by the sol- 
diers during the peninsula campaign. 

7886. Interior of an Army Hospital, 1864. 

This view shows the interior of one of the wards ("K ") of the 
well-known Armory Square Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

7382. General Burnside and Staff. 

This is a view of General A. E. Burnside and Staff taken in 
December, 1862, a short time after the disastrous battle of Fred- 
ericksburg. 

7426. Blockade Runner "Teazer" after her capture. 

The blockade runner " Teazer " was captured by the Union gun- 
boat "Maritanza" July 4, 1862. This is a view of the " Teazer " 
soon after her capture. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



This battery was (at the date above given) the heavies 
f artillery ever mounted in the world ; it consisted of 



7816. The Sutler's Tent. 

The "dearest spot" to the soldier was the sutler's tent. The 
sutler's goods were so dear that it took all of a soldier's pay to keep 
him in condensed milk and tobacco. 

7963. "Old Tecumseh" and Staff. 

The survivors of " the march to the sea" will find many familiar 
faces in this group. General William Tecumseh Sherman and 
his Staff, photographed in July, 1864. 

81OO. Alatoona Pass, Ga., where "Hold the Fort" orig- 
inated. 

This is a view of the famous Alatoona Pass, and the fort on top 
of the hill is where General Corse received the now famous mes- 
sage from Gen. Sherman to " Hold the Fort." 

7519. Camp Scene on the Famunky River, 1862. 

The camps of the Army of the Potomac covered many square 
miles. This is a picturesque view of a camp at Cumberland 
Landing, on the Pamunky River, Va., in May, 1862. 

80O6. Three-hundred pounder on Morris Island. 

This gun had its muzzle burst off, as here shown, by one of its 
own shells, which exploded just as it left the muzzle of the gun. 
As the gun was very useful it was roughly repaired by chisseling 
off the roughest parts of the fracture, and then it was used as 
though nothing had happened to it. 

8106. "Where General McPherson was Killed at Atlanta. 

This is the place on the battlefield of Atlanta. Ga., where the 
gallant Gen. McPherson was killed, July 22, 1864. There was a 
small gap at this point, between the 16th and 17th corps; McPher- 
son did not know of this fatal gap, and he rode through, directly 
into the enemy's line. 

7935. Battery No. 1, before Yorktown, Va., April, 1862. 

t battery 
of five 100- 

pounder and two 200-pounder Parrot rifled cannon; this battery 
was the wonder of the whole army, and was visited by thousands 
of persons to see the guns fired. The shots from these guns were 
effective in hurrying the evacuation of Yorktown by the Rebels. 
The battery was manned by company "B" First Connecticut 
Heavy Artillery. 

7950. General Joe Hooker and Staff, June, 1863. 

" Fighting Joe Hooker" as he was called, was appointed in com- 
mand of the Army of the Potomac. January 25, 1863, succeeding 
Burnside. He was himself succeeded by Gen. Meade, June 27, 18<>3. 
This Photograph was taken just before he started with the Army 
of the Potomac after General Lee up into Pennsylvania. General 
Hooker was born in Hadley, Mass., November 13, 1814, and died 
in Garden City, N. Y., October 31, 1879. 

7367. General Meade and Staff, October, 1863. 

General Meade commanded the Army of the Potomac from 
June 27, 1863, till the close of the war. The celebrated battle of 
Gettysburg was fought under his command, and there as else- 
where, he proved to be a sure and safe commander ; he is well re- 
membered by all of the old boys of the Army of the Potomac who 
survive him ; he was born in Cadiz, Spain, December 31, 1815, and 
died in Philadelphia, Penn., November 6, 1872. 

7969. Little Bound Top, Gettysburg, July, 1863. 

It has been said that if Little Round Top had not been there 
the Union army would have lost the great battle of Gettysburg; 
certain it is that it was a most important point, and it was seized 
by Vincent's Brigade of the Fifth corps, who, under the personal 
command of General Warren, gained the hill not a moment too 
soon, for a division of the Rebels were hurrying to take possession 
of it when Warren reached the summit. It made for the Union 
army an impregnable left wing, which the Rebels tried in vain to 
turn. 

7964. Union Dead on the Field of Gettysburg. 

This photograph was taken July 4, 1863, and it gives some idea 
of how the battlefield looked before the dead were gathered up 
and hurried. It is to be regretted that this "negative" has un- 
dergone such chemical changes that the picture is no longer as 
clear as could be desired, but as this is so realistic a scene we 
know that it will be appreciated as the only photograph of this 
part of the field now in existence, with the dead still on the field. 
It was near the extreme left of the Union lines. 

7824. Long Bridge, Washington, I>. C., 1864. 

All soldiers of the Army of the Potomac will remember Long 
Bridge. The sentinel on duty, and the sergeant of the -guard 
ready to examine the pass, are vivid reminders of those " days 
that tried men's souls" when we "boys" tried to get over to Wash- 
ington on a " French Pass" and got run into the guard house. 

7314. Post-offlce, Headquarters Army of the Potomac. 

Letters from the loved ones at home were most welcome to the 
soldiers, and the Government provided as good iacilities as possi- 
ble for the mails, but sometimes weeks and months would pass 
without our mail finding us; when it did come there would be a 
regular feast, for it would bring manv letters ; the only sad feature 
being the calling out of a letter for some comrade who had been 
killed. This Post-office is at Falmouth, Va., April, 1863. 



7268. Army "Wagon Train In Park. 

The supply trains of the great army numbered thousands of 
six mule teams and when on the march the trains would stretch 
out for miles. This is a photograph of the wagon train of simply 
one division of one corps. As there were three divisions in each 
corps, and there were many corps in the army, some idea can be 
had of the immense size of the crams by looking at this view. 
The wagons are "parked" in this way so they can be more readily 
guarded from a " raid " or dash by the enemy's cavalry. 

71 6O. Pontoon Boat on wheels, ready for the march. 

The army carried its bridges with it, ready to instantly replace 
such of the regular bridges as were destroyed by the enemy. 
The army bridges were made of pontoon boats, like this, which 
were anchored in the river in a line, parallel with the current, so 
as to form a foundation for the timbers and road-bed. 

7616. "Castle Thunder," Richmond, Va. 

This is a building which was used by the Rebels as a prison to 
confine Union soldiers. Its history is almost as damnable as that 



of Libby Prison. The horrors o 



ry is almc 
f both " 



Castle Thunder " and 



Libby Prison will be vividly remembered as long as any sole 
who was therein confined shall live. 

794O. Army Blacksmith and Forge, Antletam, Septem- 
ber, 1862. 

Each battery of artillery and each squadron of cavalry were 
provided with a forge, mounted on heavy wheels, similar to a 
piece of artillery. This forge travelled with the army, and tlie 
artificer in charge of the forge attended to shoeing the horses, and 
repairing the iron-work of the gun-carriages and baggage- wagons. 
He always had plenty of business, and this view shows him en- 
gaged shoeing the horses. 

7040. " Hard Tack'" Acquia Creek, February, 1863. 

There is no necessity to tell the "boys" what this is; they all 
remember the chorus of the old army song about " hard tack :" 

" Many days we have crunched you until our jaws are sore, 
Oh ! " soft bread " come again once more." 

7796. The Execution of Mrs. Surratt and the Lincoln 
Assassination Conspirators, (Heading the warrant.) 

This view shows the scaffold arranged for the execution. On 
the scaffold are Mrs. Surratt and the three other conspirators lis- 
tening to the reading of the death warrant. 

7797. The Execution of Mrs. Surratt and the Lincoln 
Assassination Conspirators, (Adjusting tin- noose.) 

This view shows the scene on the scaffold while the officers are 
adjusting the nooses around the necks of the condemned. 

7798. The Execution of Mrs. Surratt and the Lincoln 

Assassination Conspirators, (The drop.) 

This view shows the scaffold just as the drop was sprung; Mrs. 
Surratt and the other three conspirators are hanging. 

[These three views, Nos. 7790,7797, and 7708 comprise a scene of 
much historic interest. They were made by having three separate 
cameras set to photograph the scattbld. When the warrant was 
being read one camera was used and that view was taken; while 
the ropes were being placed around their necks another camera 
was used and that scene taken ; then when the drop was sprung 
the third camera was used, and so the entire scene of such tragic 
interest was photographed clear and distinct.] 

7752. Execution of Captain Wirtz, the Keeper of Ander- 

sonville Prison, (Reading the warrant.) 

The single life of Captain Wirtz (the notorious and brutal keep- 
er of that awful prison pen at Andersonville) could never atone 
for his many crimes against humanity. He was convicted of 
brutally murdering helpless Union prisioners at Andersonville. 
He was sentenced to death. Here he stands, on the scaffold in 
the yard of the Old Capitol prison in Washington, listening to the 
reading of his death warrant. 

7753. Execution of Captain Wirtz, the Keeper of Ander- 

sonville Prison, (Adjusting the noose.) 

This view shows the scene on the scaffold at the moment the 
noose is being adjusted around his neck. 

7 755. Execution of Captain Wirtz, the Keeper of Ander- 
sonville Prison, (The drop.) 

This view shows the scene on the scaffold in the yard of the 
Old Capitol prison in Washington, just after the drop fell, and 
while Wirtz is hanging. 

[These three views, 7752, 7753, and 7755 comprise a scene of 
much historic interest. They were made by having three separate 
cameras set to photograph the scaffold, when the warrant was 
being read one camera was used and that view wa.s taken; while 
the rope was being placed around his neck another camera was 
used and that scene was taken ; then when the drop was sprung 
the third camera was used, and so the entire scene of such tragic 
interest was photographed clear and distinct.] 

7930. Burnside Bridge, Antietam, September, 1862. 

The assultand capture of this bridge, September 17, 1862, cost 
the Union army the lives of many of its gallant men. The his- 
tory of the fight at this point is well worth reading. It will give 
some idea of what sacrifices were made that this "Government ol 
the people, for the people, and by the people, should not perish 
from off the face of the earth." 



14 PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



THE STEREOPTICON. 



Stcreopticons arc made double, and single. 

A double stereopticon produces the dissolving view effect on the canvas ; a single stereopticon will 
not produce the dissolving view etFect. 

A .sv'rt//^' Htereopticon makes just as clear and good and just as large a view on the canvas as the 
double stereopticon does, except that it does not produce the dissolving effect. 

The double stereopticon is arranged for oxy-hydrogen gas, and is calculated for an exhibitor who 
intends to show in large places only. Of course it can be used in small places if desired. 

The single stereopticon is arranged for both oxy-hydrogen gas and oil, so that if the exhibitor is to 
show in an opera-house or large hall he can use oil or gas, but if he is to show in a small hall, a school- 
house, or church, he can use oil, which is cheaper than gas. 

The Avar views (or "slides," as they are called,) which are used in the stereopticon are made on glass, 
either plain or colored, as desired. We refer to "slides" made from our real original, war negatives, 
taken during the war by the Government Photographer. There is also on the market what is known as 
"stock slides," which are views made from engravings or paintings, and are, of course, imaginary 
scenes; whereas the "slides" made from our real war photographs are accurate and realistic views of 
the Avar as it really looked. The real Avar A'ieAv " slides " are made only by us from the original photo- 
grapJiic negatives, and only for our exhibitors, and are not for sale by dealers. We do not keep a supply 
of the Avar " slides " on hand, but make them specially to order. 

In making up an assortment of "slides," it is well to have about one in five colored. A good outfit 
is made up as folloAvs : 

Single Stereopticon, fitted for both oil and gas, $ 55.OO 

54 Main" Slides" $1.5O each, ------ 81.OO 

3 Statuary Groups, war subjects, @ 75 cents each, - 2.25 

14 Colored "Slides " $2.5O each, 35.OO 

fifteen-foot Curtain, strongly made, _____ 7.50 

10OO Admission Tickets, 1.5O 

1OOO Reserved Seat Tickets, with coupon checks, - 1.75 

25O Window JIangcrs, in colors, ______ 4.OO 



Total cost of outfit, \cith SINGLE stereopticon fitted for oil and gas, - - $188.00 



fill tie outfit we furnisl a descriptive tali or lecture explaining tie war scenes, 



When you get well started Avith the single stereopticon outfit you will soon wish to have a double 
stereopticon, so, that you can giA^e the dissolving AUCAV exhibitions and extend your business to large 
toAvns and cities ; all that Avill be necessary for you to do will be to purchase another single stereopticon 
and connect it Avith the one you have, by a dissolving key, and you will have the complete dissolving 
vieAV double stereopticon. The other stereopticon Avill cost $55, the same as the first one, and you will 
also need a dissolving key, which costs 8 12 ; this added to the $ 188, Avhich you paid for the single stere- 
optieon outfit, makes the total cost of outfit, complete Avith double dissolving view stereopticon, $255. 
(The "slides" which you get with the single stereopticon outfit are used with the double stereopticon 
also, therefore no change of "slides" need be made Avhen you go to Avork with the double dissolving 
view stereoptieon.) 

There are several first-class opticians in this country Avho make good stereopticons. We have spent 
considerable time in examining and testing various makes of stereopticons, and we haA T e come to the 
conclusion that the " Charles Beseler" is the best. For this reason we use it ourselves in giving our 
exhibitions, and recommend it to any one who desires a first-class instrument at a fair price. 

Jf any one wishes to exhibit our views AVC Avill procure for him a " Beseler " stereopticon. We Avill 
furnish this stereopticon at the maker's price. It cannot be got one dollar cheaper if it is purchased 
direct of Mr. Beseler. We Avill procure the stereopticon more as an accommodation to our agent than 
as a matter of business, in order that Ave may forward the complete outfit all together and ready for 
exhibiting. "NVe do not make a business of dealing in stereopticons, but only get them for our own 
agents. Our business is solely the war view business. We do not keep stereopticons in stock, but will 
procure one if ordered. Our OAVJI stereopticon is a " Beseler," and Ave shall be pleased to show it to any 
one Avho Avill call on us. If you have a preference for any other make, get whatever style and make you 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



prefer, and we will supply the balance of outfit. We recommend the " Beseler," but we do not insist that 
our agents shall use this make if they prefer any other. All we ask is that you have an A No. 1 
instrument. 

We wish to have our war views brought before the people in the best possible style. 

It is not only for our interests that this is done, but for the interest of the exhibitor. If our agent 
gives an exhibition in a town, and shows the public a fine assortment of our war views with a, first-class 
apparatus, so that each view comes out on the canvas clear and startlingly realistic, he has advertised the 
exhibition so well and favorably that when he visits that town again he is of course assured of a full 
house. Our own experience in giving the exhibition is that the second visit to a town pays better than 
the first. We have given the exhibition in some places five times. Repeated invitations to- "come 
again " are the best evidences we can possibly offer as to the real merit of the war view entertainment. 

But if an exhibitor has a cheap lantern, it makes no difference how good his views are, he cannot 
show them well, and the result is that he not only does not make much money, but he disgusts the 
public with a poor show, and they do not wish to see him again. 

These are facts which are apparent and clear to everybody. 

One great advantage which a stereopticon exhibition has over a theatre company is this : a theatre 
company must have a large stage and fine scenery or they cannot give a real good show ; but the stere- 
opticon exhibitor can go into a school-house, if he has room enough to put up his canvas, and can give 
precisely the same exhibition that he would give in a magnificent opera-house, just as good, just the same 
exactly ; therefore the man who has a first-class stereopticon outfit can go to small towns where theatre 
companies never go, and consequently where the people are sure to come and see a good show if it is 
given, and as his expenses are light he can arrange to stay two nights in a place. The first night he will 
probably get only a small audience, but he shows them that he has a first-class exhibition ; during the 
next day those that were there the first night spread the news all over town that it is a show worth see- 
ing, and the second night he packs his house full. 

Our advice then is this : Commence at the bottom and go up by degrees, as you get the business 
learned in all its details. Don't start out with the idea of giving your first exhibitions in large cities. 

Get a first-class single stereopticon and the outfit described on page 14 ; exhibit in small towns, two 
nights in a place, until you get thoroughly posted in the business, then get another single stere- 
opticon and put the two together with a dissolving key, and you have a complete double dissolving 
view stereopticon, capable of giving the very best possible exhibition in any opera-house in the land. 

Occasionally you can add to your collection of views another set, and in this way you can arrange to 
visit the same place a number of times. Mr. Stoddard, Mr. French, and others of the most successful 
exhibitors, go to each place five times during the season ; that is, they have a " course " of five different 
exhibitions. It is pleasanter, cheaper, and more profitable to have a small circuit and go over and over 
it than to try and cover so much ground that your traveling expenses eat up half of your profits. 

The exhibition of the war views on canvas in such a vivid and realistic way creates a demand for the 
war photographs. Right here is where our profit comes in. Eacli exhibitor of our war scenes is appointed 
our agent for the sale of these war photographs. At each exhibition, anywhere from five to fifty 
dozen views ought to be sold, according to the size of the place you show in. As you make a good profit 
on these photographs it will pay you to employ one or two bright young men in each place to act as 
ushers and to sell the views. A complimentary ticket for his girl and a small sum of money in payment 
for his services will generally secure all the help you need. You will learn all these details of the busi- 
ness in a short time, and when you have become perfectly familiar with thorn, then is the time for you 
to get your second stereopticon and prepare for doing a larger business. We will furnish a printed 
descriptive talk about each view, so that the lecturer can have the scenes all arranged to come on the 
canvas just as he wants them, and can have something ready to say about each. One view may call for a 
pathetic little story, another view is best described by a funny incident of army life, another view brings 
out a ringing old army song, and so the evening slips uwtiy before your audience knows it. Every 
minute is occupied, and they go home feeling that they have been splendidly entertained. 

If you can come to Hartford and see the stereopticon and views, we would like to have you do so. 
If they are not exactly as represented, we will pay all your expenses in coming here and returning 
home. We invite you to consult our references and ascertain that we are a reliable company and that 
we do as we agree. 

Our references are the United States Express Agent, of Hartford ; The Adams Express Agent, of 
Hartford ; The Connecticut Trust and Safe Deposit Company of Hartford ; The Commander of the 
Department of Connecticut, G. A. R. 

NOTICE. There are many hinds of CHEAP Magic lanterns advertised. They are USELESS for public exhibi- 
tions, as they WILL NOT show a good view satisfactorily to an audience. They are mere toys, fit only to amuse 
children. Do not be induced to order a magic lantern for $1O, or iftlS; you will not get a satisfactory apparatus. 
No good, reliable instrument can be made for such a price. 



[For Illustrations of the Stereopticon, see pages 16 and 17.1 



i6 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



The Stereopticon Exhibition of War Views, 




This cut show's the interior of an Opera House, and illustrates how the Stereopticon is used. It is 
placed in the front row, center, of the " Dress Circle." From here the operator projects the scene upon 
the curtain or canvas at the back of the stage. The lecturer stands on the stage (at one side, so as not 
to interfere with the scene on the curtain), and as the views come out on the canvas he describes each 
scene to the audience. The cut shows the Dissolving View Stereopticon ; that is, two stereopticons 
"Beseler" make connected with a dissolving view key. The dissolving view effect is produced as 
follows : the cut shows that the scene now on the curtain comes from the lower or bottom lantern. In 
the upper or top lantern is another view ; the top lantern is now dark ; when the next scene is to appear 
on the curtain the operator simply turns the dissolving key and thus shuts the light off from the bottom 
lantern and turns it into the top one ; this of course causes the bottom lantern to become dark, and the 
view now seen dissolves out of sight, while the other view in the top lantern comes out gradually 
till it is strong and clear. Then the operator takes the view out of the bottom lantern and puts in 
another one, and turns the dissolving key, which sends the light into the bottom lantern again and cuts 
it off from the top one. So on from one to the other, causing each view to dissolve away and a new one 
to come in its place. This shows why it takes a Double Stereopticon or two lanterns to make the 
dissolving view effect. The Single Stereopticon will show the views here just as well as the Double 
Stereopticon does, except that the Single Stereopticon will not produce the dissolving view effect. The 
Single Stereopticon presents the views on the canvas just as clear, just as large, in fact exactly the 
same as this Double Stereopticon does. The Double Stereopticon is only two Single Stereopticons 
brought together and connected by means of the dissolving key, therefore anybody who has a Single 
Stereopticon outfit can add another Single Stereopticon to it and connect them with the dissolving key, 
and thus have a first-class Double Stereopticon, capable of giving the best exhibition possible. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OK THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



THE: "CHARTS 



" STROPTICON, 




THE SINGLE STEREOPTICON. 



THE DOUBLE STEREOPTICON. 



The above cuts give a fair representation of the "Beseler" Stereopticons, which we believe to be the 
best stereopticoiis made. They are handsome, strong, well made, and thoroughly serviceable. 

Perhaps the best recommendation tney could have is the fact that they are used by all the Normal 
Schools of the State of New York ; also by the Museum of Natural History, in Central Park, New York ; 
the College of Pharmacy, New York ; the School of Mines, New York ; the College of Pharmacy, San 
Francisco, Cal., and many others. The fact that these colleges and scientific schools use them is ample 
proof that they are A No. 1, and we recommend them to our agents as thoroughly satisfactory instru- 
ments in every respect, and perfectly calculated to show our war views in a clear and realistic manner. 



Selecting the Views for an Exhibition. 

The photographic "negatives" of the war scenes were made by the old-fashioned "wet-plate" 
process, which was the only process known at the time of the war (1861-1865). 

It is more than a quarter of a century since these " negatives " were made, and many of them have 
undergone chemical changes which make it impossible to get a good, clear " slide " from them. 

Others of the " negatives " are just as clear as though they were made yesterday. 

It is impossible, without making a careful examination of the " negatives," to decide which are in 
condition to make a clear view. 

Therefore we advise those who wish to exhibit the war scenes with the stereopticon, to leave the 
selection of the views mostly to our judgment. 

We can look over the " negatives " and pick out those that are in good condition to make a fine 
view on the curtain. 

It would be impossible for you to tell from the catalogue which views will make good, clear scenes 
on the curtain. 

We shall use our very best judgment in making the selection of views for any one who wishes to 
give the exhibition, for it is just as much for our interest to have you make a thorough success of the 
exhibition as it is for your interest, because your success means large sales of the photographs wherever 
you exhibit them ; therefore our interests become identical, and we shall naturally do our very best to 
fit you out so that you will make a thorough success of the business, for our main object is to work up a 
big sale for the AVar Photographs. 

Besides the views that are named on pages 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 in this catalogue, we 
have many not yet classified for the catalogue. From the entire collection we will select the best for an 
exhibition. 

If you will simply select (from the following list) the battles you are most interested in, or which 



1 8 PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 

T3 == == == = === ^=^^=r=r = = == = == ^ = =^z====rr=====zii=====^ 

rt v 

QJ ^ 

w r, will lake best in the section of the country where you wish to exhibit, and will leave the selection of 
* the rest of the views to our judgment, we will get out a set of war scenes that cannot be surpassed. 

BATTLES. 



EASTERN ARMY. WESTERN ARMY. 



Sheridan's Final Charge at Winchester. Battle of Chattanooga. 

Battle of Fredcricksburg. Battle of Kenesaiv Mountain. 

Sheridan's Ride. Alatoona, or " Hold the Fort." 

Rattle of Gettysburg. Siege of Atlanta. 

Battle of Antietain. Siege of ricksburg. 

Battle of Spottsylvania. Battle of Shiloh. 

"The March to the Sea." 

BATTLES. 



L> - Capture of ffetv Orleans. Battle of Mobile Bay. Battle of Port Huron. 

3 & Monitor and Mcrrimac. Kearsarge and Alabama. Capture of Fort Fislier. 

If the battles in which you are most interested are not in the above list, write and tell us what you 
~ := want, and if we have them we will include them in your outfit. 

So ~ 

If THE MUSEUM EXHIBITION CASE. 

I* .,,,r 

> C 

>-. 03 

Exhibition of War 



A PLEASANT AND PROFITABLE BUSINESS. 



flo Exhibition can lie given wllcl will interest tie Public so mncli as Real far Scenes, 



To enable our agents to exhibit the war views in a satisfactory and profitable manner, we have had 
made, by a skilled optician, a Museum Exhibition Case, so arranged that four people can be entertained 
at the same time. 

On each side'o{ the case there are two pairs of fine, strong, stereoscopic lenses, set at a proper distance 
apart, so that the exhibition can be given to four persons (two on each side of the case) at the same time. 

At a proper focus from the lenses an apparatus is arranged to hold the views at a right angle with 
the lenses ; strong reflectors are so placed as to catch the light and throw it directly upon the war scenes 
as they come into view of the people looking through the lenses. This extra light from the reflectors 
brings the scenes out splendidly. 

Under each view is printed its title, in plain sight of the person looking through the lenses. Having 
the full printed description of each scene adds greatly to the pleasure of studying the war views. 

The apparatus which holds the views is controlled and operated by the exhibitor from one end of 
the case. There are forty-eight views in the case, no two views alike. Of course four views are before 
the lenses at a time one view before each pair of lenses. By one simple turn of the apparatus the 
exhibitor brings up four other views ; as soon as the people at the lenses have had a fair opportunity to 
see these four, the exhibitor gives another turn to the apparatus and brings four more views up before 
their eyes, and so on until all the views have been shown. 

A brief lecture or descriptive talk about each scene makes the exhibition much more interesting, 
and at the same time draws a crowd around your case and keeps them there, and they are always 
anxious to get a chance to see the scenes which they hear you describing. 

We do not fix the price which our agents shall receive for exhibiting the forty-eight scenes, but we 
recommend that a uniform fee of ten cents be charged. This is a fair price, and no person man, 
woman, or child, rich or poor, intelligent or ignorant will begrudge the money for the privilege of 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR- THE UNION. 



looking back a quarter of a century to the very actual scenes of our war. From college president to 
boot-black, none are too high or too lowly to be interested in the scenes revealed by these lenses. It is 
thrilling history of our great war brought right before them ; it is no guess-work it is the real thing, 
just as the camera of the government photographer caught it ; as exact as a reflection in a mirror. 

As the case can be used in the evening as well as day-time, the agent can visit G. A. R. Posts and 
find ample business in the ante-rooms in the evening. When you get to work with the case and money 
begins to come in, you can send and get another outfit of views for the case, so as to give two different 
exhibitions. By this plan you can exhibit to the same persons to whom you first exhibited, for, having 
seen one exhibition of views, of course they will be eager to see the next. You will find everybody 
interested in looking at the views, whether soldiers or not. This Exhibition Case is calculated for use 
at Fairs, Reunions, Post Rooms, Hotel Offices, in stores, houses, or on the street. It can be used in the 
day-time as well as in the evening. It is entirely different from a stereopticon. It shows the war views 
through lenses. It will not throw the scenes on canvas. If you want a light, pleasant business, the 
Exhibition Case with four sets of lenses will furnish you the means of taking in dimes very easily. We 
had two cases of the war views on exhibition at our Post Fair. They were kept busy all the time, and 
earned a handsome sum for our Relief Fund. We also had the cases in use at the Fair given by Stanley 
Post No. 11, of New Britain. (See letter on next page of this catalogue, from the Commander and 
Committee of said Post.) 

The views are not yet fully catalogued. We have thousands of different views. They were photo- 
graphed during the war at Yorktown, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Atlanta, Chattanooga, Knoxville, 
Nashville, Mississippi River Campaign, Morris Island, on the Peninsula during the McClellan Cam- 
paign, Charleston, Fort Sumter, Lookout Mountain, Army of Tennessee, Petersburg, Richmond, etc. 

In selecting an assortment of views for exhibition in the case, it will not be possible to arrange it so 
as to show each soldier's company, regiment, or brigade. Of course each comrade would like to see his 
own regiment shown, but a moment's reflection will convince you that this is not possible ; the only 
practical way is to make a selection of views which will be likely to interest the public generally; there- 
fore the assortment should be made to include Battlefields, Batteries, Regiments, Forts, Picket Posts, 
Pontoon Bridges, Signal Towers, Rebel Prisoners, the Wounded, the Dead just as they fell, Burial of the 
Dead after the Battle, Libby Prison, the Monitor, etc., etc. In this way all are more likely to be inter- 
ested. As the views cannot be obtained anywhere except from us, our agents have a clear field. 

Price of the Museum Exhibition Case will four sets oflenses and forty-eight views, all complete, - $56.25 

EXTRA SETS OF VIEWS CAN BE ADDED FROM TIME TO TIME AS YOU REQUIRE THEM. 

The price quoted above is for the " Museum Case " and views carefully packed and delivered to the 
express or freight office in Hartford. We make no charge for boxing or packing, but freight or express 
charges must be paid by the agent. The main body of the Museum Exhibition Case is made of black 
walnut and cherry woods, handsomely finished. The weight of this outfit, packed for shipment, is 
about 100 pounds. 

If you can come to Hartford and see the outfit in use in our office, we would like to have you do so. 

If the Museum Exhibition Case and the war views are not exactly as represented, we will pay all of 
your expenses in coming here and returning home. We invite you to consult our references and ascer- 
tain that we are a reliable company, and that we do as we agree. 



(BEING TWO OR MORE "MUSEUM CASES" GEARED TOGETHER.) 



We have arranged the "Museum Case" so that two or more cases can be geared together and all 
work as one case. Therefore, as you progress in the business, you can add another case and thus be able 
to show to eight persons at a time. This is found necessary at Fairs, Encampments, or other places 
where there is a great crowd, and where the case for four persons at a time will not meet the demand. 

Committees of Fairs, etc., readily grant eligible space to the Museum Exhibition Cases, as they are 
an added attraction without expense, and are sure to bring in more money to the fund. 

We reserve the State of Connecticut as our own territory, and run the cases in the fairs, etc., here in 
this State. The sole right to a sufficient portion of any other State (not already taken) will be granted to 
an enterprising agent. Ample territory will be granted to each agent, so there will be no competition. 

When we place the "Museum Case" in Fairs, we allow the Committee one-half of all the money 
taken in. It costs us nothing to run the case, only the wages of the person we employ to tend it. Fre- 
quently the Committee will furnish some pretty young lady to tend the case and take in the dimes, but 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



even if we were obliged to employ some one to tend it, we can get a good competent young lady for $1.50 
to $2.00 per day. As we can show to forty or more persons an hour, at ten cents each, our share of one- 
half gives us a good profit, even after paying the wages of the person who tends the case. 

The advantage of having the Museum Cases geared together, instead of having one solid Case, is 
that if (as sometimes happens) two small Fairs are being held in adjacent towns at the same time, the 
two Cases can be separated, making two Museum Cases, each showing to four persons at a time, and thus 
get the benefit of both Fairs. The gearing is quite simple, so the Cases can be separated or connected in 
about one minute. When the Cases are shipped from one place to another they can be handled and 
moved much more easily separate than if it was one solid Case. 

Fairs, Camp-fires, etc., furnish a rich harvest which can be gathered with one or more of the 
Museum Exhibition Cases. 

The right sort of man can have an entire State and act as general agent, and by having a number of 
sub-agents at work in his State, can, by proper management, work up a splendid business and have a 
steady income. ^,^.__ 

The following is a sample of the letters we get from G. A. R. Posts who have our war views in their fairs', showing 
how the Exhibition Cases are liked Inj the Fair Committees. In every place where they are put on exhibition, 
they " take." The Comrades are all pleased ivith them, and the people patronize them in great numbers. They 
are a complete success, and are the most rapid " money getters " that any Fair can have. 




Heaflprters Stanley Post No. 11, G. A. R. 



NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 

THE WAR PHOTOGRAPH & EXHIBITION COMPANY, Hartford, Conn. 

Deqr Comrades: On behalf of Stanley Post No. 11, G. A. R., we wish to 
tender you our thanks for the very satisfactory attraction you placed in our Fair, 
just closed. 

The Exhibition Cases of your real war views pleased everybody ; not only the 
old soldiers, but the citizens and ladies and children appreciated the opportunity 

fiven them to see for themselves what war really was. Our well-known Comrade, 
ra E. Hicks, Past Department Commander, was much delighted when he discov- 
ered his own picture in a group of soldiers on the lines before Charleston. It was 
conclusive evidence of the genuineness of your war photographs ; indeed, they prove themselves to be 
all you claim for them, and any Fair Committee who secures them will find them an excellent source of 
pleasure and profit, without one penny of expense. 

Your ingenious arrangement of the lenses, so that a number of persons can be entertained at the 
same time, is admirable, as it enables the Fair to gather in the dimes rapidly. We wish you continued 
success. Yours in F., C., & L., 

GEORGE H. BECKETT, Chairman Fair Committee. FRANCIS H. SMITH, Post Commander. 

WM. H. GLADDEN, Secretary Fair Committee. 

TIE WIBLI EX1IB1T10I CASE. 

This is a handsome case made of black walnut and cherry, with tivo pairs of fine stereo lenses, and 
shows views to two persons at a time. It has two reflector tops, which can be closed when the Case is 
not in use. The forty-eight views in this Case are placed in an ingeniously arranged holder, the same 
as in the Museum Exhibition Case, and do not have to be handled at all while exhibiting them, con- 
sequently they can always be kept clean and bright. This Case weighs less than thirty pounds with 
the forty-eight views all complete. For a crippled comrade it is just the thing, being light and easily 
handled and worked. It is similar in its arrangement to the Museum Exhibition Case, except that this 
Double Case shows to but two persons at a time. 

Price of Double EiMMtion Case with two sets of lenses and forty-eiglt views, all complete, $27.75 

There are many comrades who would make admirable and successful agents and exhibitors of the 
war views, but who cannot afford to buy a first-class outfit to commence with. To all such we say, Do 
not give up the idea because you cannot commence at the top. It will be time well and profitably spent 
for you to begin at the bottom and work up. You will become familiar with the views and with the 
details of the business, and this knowledge will be of great value to you when you commence exhibiting 
with the stereopticon. Even if you commence with the Double Exhibition Case, you can work up 
rapidly, and within three or four months from the time you begin you can make money enough to pur- 
chase a Stereopticon outfit, if you will attend to business. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 



We want Good Agents to Exhibit these Views. 

"DOES IT PAY?" 

" Will it pay me to handle the war view exhibition f " is a question sometimes asked us by those who 
would like to exhibit the war scenes, but who are in doubt about their ability to make a success of it. 
In answer to the question, we print the following letter received from a comrade in California, who has 
been our agent in that section for nearly a year, and it shows that the Exhibition Case will earn good 
wages for an agent if it is properly attended to. Comrade Boulden writes us as follows : 

SELMA, FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 
THE WAR PHOTOGRAPH & EXHIBITION COMPANY, Hartford, Conn. 

COMRADES : I have rigged my Exhibition Case with lamps and now I show the war scenes both 
during the day and evening. I am glad to say that I have been for the last ten months making a good 
living for my family of seven persons, besides paying up some back debts, etc. I exhibit on the street, 
charging 15 cents for one side, and 25 cents for Doth sides. No one objects to this price, and I give uni- 
versal satisfaction. I want to get a larger outfit as soon as possible, and should have saved enough for it 
before this time if it had not been for doctor's bills and other debts which I am paying up. which accu- 
mulated while I was laid up with a broken arm and elbow before I got this Double Exhibition Case. As 
soon as I can get a " Museum Case " I can largely increase my business. Contrary to my expectations, 
I find that I am a success as a lecturer that is, in explaining the war scenes though I never had any 
practice before I got the Exhibition Case. 

Yours in F., C., & L., 

JOHN W. BOULDEN. 

The above letter came to us without any solicitation, and it can easily be verified either by writing 
to Comrade John W. Boulden, Selma, California, or to the commander of the G. A. R. Post in Fresno 
City. Mr. Boulden is a worthy comrade who took a Double Exhibition Case nearly a year ago, just as he 
was recovering from a compound fracture of his arm which had laid him up for several months, during 
which time he of course was earning nothing, and got considerably in debt. 

Some applicants think they ought to have the entire State to work in exclusively ; we will give an 
agent all the territory he can attend to, yet we cannot assign an entire State to one Exhibition Case. The 
way to make money with the case is not to run all over creation, but just work the territory thor- 
oughly. It is much the same with this as it is with picking berries : the boy who runs all over the fields 
to find the place where the berries are the thickest, don't get nearly as many as the one does who, when 
he finds a patch of berries, picks them. If agents will learn this lesson they will find no trouble in doing 
well with the Exhibition Case in a reasonable amount of territory, without trying to cover an entire State. 
It will be observed that Comrade Boulden charges 25 cents for showing 48 views. We do not object to 
this price being charged, but we do not recommend it. It may do in California or at some big fair, but 
for a regular thing, we recommend ten cents ; no one will find fault with that, and an agent can do well 
at that price. 

[Since the above letter was written to us Comrade Boulden has ordered a " Museum Case," and he is 
now doing much more business than when he had only the double case, which would show to only two 
persons at a time. Comrade Boulden is now working the " Museum Case," and says he is soon going 
to order a first-class Stereopticon outfit.] 



SPECIAL TO AGENTS. 



The following are some of the questions which are likely to be asked by agents 
or those who contemplate taking an agency for the exhibition and sale of our war 
views. We print them here, and append our replies to them, in order to save writing 
long letters to convey the same information. 

Question i. How much territory will you give me ? 

Answer. We will assign you all the territory you can work to advantage, and besides the terri- 
tory actually assigned to you, we will reserve for you additional territory, which we will assign to you as 
you may require it. In thickly settled States three or four counties furnish all the territory an agent 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOK THE UNION. 



can attend to, while in more thinly settled States an agent might require eight or ten counties, or even 
more. Therefore we fix no arbitrary rule, but will assign to each agent whatever amount of territory he 
may require. 

Question a. Do you give Agents sole right to territory assigned them? 

Answer. Yes. Each agent has the sole and exclusive right to the territory we assign to him. 
No charge is made for territory. We assign territory free with each outfit. 

Question 3. How do you protect an Agent in his territory? 

Answer. By legal injunction against any agent who disregards his assignment, and trespasses on 
the rights of territory of another. A test case has been tried and the Court has decided that one agent 
cannot legally trespass on the rights of territory of another, except by permission of the agent to whom 
the territory is assigned. In fact it very seldom happens that one agent will trespass on the territory of 
another. Each agent is dependent on us for the goods he sells. He can procure them nowhere else. 
Should we ascertain that he is trespassing on the territory of another, we warn him off, and if he fails 
to heed our warning, we refuse to fill his orders for goods, and this of course stops his business. Should 
he then ^emVtf, by exhibiting with the Museum Case or the Stereopticon on another's territory, we 
secure an injunction, and he must either obey that or settle with the Court. We never had but one case 
where it was necessary to secure an injunction from the Court. That settled it, the trespassing agent 
obeyed the injunction, and quit. 


Question 4. Do you grunt a Certificate of Agency? 

Answer. We do. Each agent is given a Certificate of Agency, sealed and signed by us and duly 
witnessed. This Certificate clearly defines the rights and privileges granted to our agents, and sets forth 
the territory assigned to the agent. 

In our office we have large atlases showing each State, County, City, Town, and Village, and we are 
thus enabled to mark off clearly the boundary line of each agent's territory. 

Question 5. Do you start Agents on credit or on the installment plan? 

Answer. We do not. Our business is strictly on a cash basis. There never was a credit business 
done yet but what there were losses due to it. Who pays for the losses or bad debts? Why, those who 
pay their bills. It is an old and true saying that "those who pay, pay for those who don't pay." In 
other words, if we have a hundred agents and we do a credit business, and ninety of them pay and ten 
of them fail to pay their bills, our prices must be made high enough to provide for the Josses we incur by 
the ten who do not pay ; therefore it is readily seen that the ninety who pay must pay enough to cover 
the losses incurred by the ten who do not pay. We prefer to do a cash business with the ninety who 
pay their bills, and have no losses to saddle upon them, rather than to do a little more business by the 
credit system, and saddle off a batch of losses upon the agents who pay. 

Our outfits for agents are made for various prices, so that any one who really wishes to become an 
agent can do so. An agent can commence with the smallest and cheapest outfit, and soon work along 
up until he can have the most expensive outfit and do a large and splendidly paying business. 

Question 6. Do you give more territory with a Stereopticon outfit than with an 

Exhibition Case outfit? 

Answer. Yes. An agent with a Stereopticon outfit needs considerably more territory than an 
agent with a Museum Case. An agent with a Stereopticon outfit needs a territory containing from 150 
to 200 places where he can profitably give the exhibition ; this would occupy him about a year to make 
the entire round of his territory ; then the second year he could take an entirely new set of views and 
go right over the same territory again, and do even better the second trip than he does the first. An 
agent with a Museum Exhibition Case does not need half as much territory, because he will average at 
least a week in each place, and if he has a territory which gives him 52 towns he will not probably make 
the entire round in a year. Long before he gets through with 52 towns he ought to have money enough 
to get the Stereopticon outfit and increase his territory and his business. 

Question 7. How soon can you ship an outfit after you receive the order? 

Answer. In about one week. We do not keep the outfits in stock, but make them to order for 
our agents ; the photographic views, which the agents sell, we keep in stock all the time ; therefore 
after an agent gets started with his exhibition outfit we are always enabled to fill his order for the pho- 
tographic war views the same day we receive it. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 23 

Question 8. Which is the best way to have outfits shipped ? 

Answer With regard to shipping goods, we wish to correct a mistaken idea that prevails to 
some extent. 

Some of our correspondents ask us to ship the outfit by Fast freight, C. O. D., as Freight is so much 
cheaper than Express. 

As a rule, Fast Freight costs only about one-sixth as much as Express ; that is, a case of goods that 
would cost you six dollars for Express charges would probably cost you only about one dollar if sent by 
Fast Freight. 

Sometimes the difference is even more than one-sixth ; for instance, we sent a box of goods to a com- 
rade out in Montana, and the Express charges on the box were $26.50 ; we made inquiries at the Fast 
Freight office as to what the same box would cost if it had been sent by Fast Freight, and found out 
that it could have been sent for $3.20. 

Of course we had to ship it by Express because the comrade ordered it to be sent by Express, but 
after he got it, and found out how much cheaper he could have got it by Fast Freight, he saw what an 
expensive mistake he had made in having it go by Express. Goods will go a little quicker by Express 
than by Freight, but not enough quicker to pay so much difference. Our goods are carefully packed 
and will go just as safely by Freight as by Express. 

If you wish goods shipped by Fast Freight you must remit the full amount of the bill with your 
order, as the Freight Companies do not do a C. O. D. business. If goods are sent C. O. D., they must go 
by Express. 

Question g. Does it require a. skilled operator to run the Stereopticon? 

Answer. It does not. We will warrant to take any boy of ordinary intelligence (15 years of 
age or more) and teach him in one hour how to operate the Stereopticon correctly. We send printed 
instructions with the outfit. 

Question 10. Is oxy-hydrogen gas safe for anybody to use? 

Answer. Our operator has used it hundreds of times, without the slightest trouble or accident of 
any kind. One day when our operator was sick, and we had an exhibition to give that evening, we 
took a boy about sixteen years old, and after one lesson of less than half an hour, this boy went with us 
and operated our double dissolving view Stereopticon, using the gas as well as our old operator could 
have done. 

Question n. Do you make your own gas, and use gas-bags in giving the exhi- 
bition ? 

Answer. No ; we do not. We never made a foot of gas nor used a gas-bag in all our experience. 
We do not know of a first-class exhibitor anywhere who uses such an old-fashioned thing as a gas-bag. 
The gas-bags hold the same relation to the gas-cylinders that an old lumbering stage-coach holds to the 
modern railroad express train. No one wants to be bothered with making gas, for it is a stinking, dirty 
business, and nine times out of ten the exhibitor has no time to waste in making gas ; moreover, no good 
exhibition can be given from a gas-bag, for the pressure can never be made equal, and consequently the 
light is never steady and equal, therefore your scenes never come out as good on the canvas. If any one 
advises you to use a gas-bag, just ask him to name one first-class exhibitor who uses gas-bags. He 
cannot do it, for no first-class exhibitor does use them. We assume that if you take hold of this busi- 
ness you want to give a first-class exhibition (and we want to have you give it first-class if you give 
it at all), therefore we say do not use gas-bags, but, on the contrary, use oxy-hydrogen gas from gas- 
cylinders, for the cylinders are neat, easily handled and managed, reliable, and always ready. 

Question is. How many exhibitions can be given with one pair of cylinders? 

Answer. One pair of cylinders will give from six to eight exhibitions. 

Question ij. Are the cylinders heavy and troublesome to carry? 

Answer. Cylinders weigh about one hundred pounds. We always take them on the cars with 
us and have them checked as our baggage. 

Question 14. Where can the cylinders of gas be procured? 

Answer. New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Kansas City, and 
many other places. We will send you the address of the Company nearest you that furnishes the gas. 



24 PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 

Question 15. Do I have to buy the gas-cylinders? 

Answer. No. The gas company own the cylinders, and you simply buy the gas, and they send 
it to you in these cylinders. When the cylinders are empty you send them back and take a fresh pair. 
You do not have to send them back and wait for them to be filled, but by ordering a fresh pair a day or 
two before those you have are empty, you will get the filled pair by the time you are ready to send 
back the empty pair. 

Question 16. What is the cost per night of the oxy-hydrogen gas used from the 

cylinders ? 

Answer. The average cost is, according to our experience of more than one hundred nights, 
about two dollars per night ; this is allowing for the cost of the gas and also the express charge 011 the 
cylinders to and from the gas company. 

We advise the use of the gas, because the gas makes a first-class exhibition, whereas the oil light 
makes not so clear and good a scene. There are some agents who use the oil light and who do a good, fair 
business, but we believe that by using the gas they could increase their receipts by more than enough to 
pay the difference in cost between the gas and the oil. Of course oil does not cost much, and some agents 
think that they might as well save the two dollars per night which the gas would cost them, but we 
think they are mistaken. Two dollars per night is equal to eight tickets at twenty-five cents each, 
and it is our opinion that an exhibitor will get more than eight tickets more each night if he uses gas, 
and is thus able to advertise on his bills that he uses the oxy-hydrogen lime light (the best light known 
to science), than if he used oil light, which everybody knows is not as good as the gas light ; for illustra- 
tion, suppose you average two hundred and fifty tickets per evening while usiug the oil light, and by 
using the gas light you averaged two hundred and fifty-eight tickets ; you will readily see that the gas 
has really paid for itself by getting you a larger audience. In point of fact, you would get a great many 
more than eight tickets per evening in excess of what you would get with oil light ; probably in most 
places your audience would be one-half larger if you used the oxy-hydrogen light than if you used oil 
light, for there are cheap, oil-light exhibitions of Bible scenes or of foreign scenes traveling through the 
country, and they do not give satisfaction to the public, but let a really first-class exhibition come to a 
town and let it be so advertised that the public will know that it really is first-class, and the public are 
always ready to respond liberally with their patronage to anything that is really first-class. This war 
view exhibition is, when properly presented, first-class, and capable of entertaining any audience, and it 
is our desire that our agents shall present it in a first-class manner, as it is really for our mutual interests 
that the exhibition be kept on the high plane of excellence where we have placed it and where it right- 
fully belongs. We therefore advise our exhibitors to use the oxy-hydrogen gas and thus give the highest 
satisfaction both to the public and to themselves, for there is a sense of satisfaction in the mind of the 
exhibitor when he knows and feels that he has given the public the very best exhibition possible, and 
one to which no exception can be taken ; it pays in every sense to do the best work; your reputation will 
go in advance of you, and you will find that it pays in dollars and cents, as well as in mental satisfac- 
tion, to have the reputation of having an "A No. 1" exhibition ; you will get lots of people to buy 
tickets who would not accept a free ticket to a cheap exhibition. The motto we adopt is, "There is 
nothing too good for the great American public," and we advise all our agents to adopt the same motto. 

Question 17. What admission do you charge, and what for reserved seats ? 

Answer. Our usual price of admission is 25 cents, and 10 cents extra for reserved seats. We are 
guided in our prices by the usual custom of the place where we give the exhibition. In some places we 
have charged 50 cents admission, and 25 cents extra for reserved seats. 

Question 18. What are your terms for giving the exhibition ? 

Answer. We give the exhibition either for a fixed sum or else for a share of the net profits, 
whichever way we agree on with the organization that we give the entertainment for. As before stated, 
we always give the exhibition under the auspices of some organization, either a G. A. R. Post, or a Sous 
of Veterans' Camp, or a Woman's Relief Corps, or a Church, or some other prominent organization. If 
they prefer to employ us to come and give the entertainment for a fixed sum, without any reference to 
how much they may take in, our terms are $75.00 for one night or $125.00 for two consecutive nights ; they 
pay us this sum and we come and give the exhibition for them, and they furnish the hall or opera-house, 
do the bill-posting and advertising, and all other incidental work connected with giving the entertain- 
ment. On our part, we pay our own railroad and hotel bills and give the exhibition. The best and most 
satisfactory terms, however, are an equal division of the net receipts; for illustration : we make an agree- 
ment to give the exhibition for a certain organization ; they see to engaging the hall or opera-house, 
doing the bill-posting and advertising, selling the tickets, and all other business necessary to the success 
of the entertainment, as far as the local work is concerned. On the day appointed we go to the town and 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 25 

attend to our part of the contract, viz.: getting our curtain set and our Stereopticon placed and tested, so 
that when evening conies arid the audience assembles we are in readiness to give the exhibition. The 
organization under whose auspices we are, provides ticket-seller, doorkeepers, ushers, etc., generally in 
the uniform of the organization. After the entertainment is over we go into the box-office with the 
committee and " settle up." First, we count the tickets and then balance the ticket sales with the cash ; 
the committee who have had charge of the local preparations present all the bills that they have con- 
tracted on account of the entertainment, such as rent of the hall, bill-posting, advertising, etc. ; on our 
part we present our bills for our expenses in coming there that is, our railroad fares and our hotel bills 
and $2.00 for the gas used in giving the exhibition. Thus we ascertain exactly what the expenses have 
been. Then there is taken out from the cash, enough money to pay all of these bills in full. The 
remaining cash is, of course, net profit; these net profits we divide equally, giving the Post or whatever 
organization it is that we are working for, one-half of the money remaining after all bills are paid, and 
taking the other half for our share. This we have found to be the most satisfactory way to arrange the 
terms. On these terms there is no chance for fault-finding in the settlement ; if it has been a good night 
and we have had a full house we are satisfied, and on the contrary, if it has been a poor night, when 
from stormy weather or from any other cause we have not had a full house, the Post or whatever organiza- 
tion it is does not feel as they would if they had to draw on their treasury to pay us a fixed sum agreed 
on beforehand. This business is like any other business in this respect, viz. : there are nights when we 
do a splendid business and "pack the house," and then there are nights when from bad weather 
or from some other cause we make a poor night and get in barely money enough to pay expenses. 
We have, up to this writing, given the exhibition just one hundred and seventeen different times ; we 
have got, in one single night, for our share of the net profits, $128.75, and, on the other hand, we 'have 
given the exhibition when we received less than $3.00 for our share, after all bills were paid. In figuring 
up our entire receipts for the one hundred and seventeen exhibitions that we have given, we find that 
we have averaged a profit of about $31.00 for each night ; that is, as above stated, we have had good 
nights and bad nights, but taking them all together we have averaged about $31.00 per night, net 
profit. The night above-mentioned, when we got $128.75 for our share of the profits, was an exception- 
ally good night. We never got so much in one night but once, but we have frequently received over 
$100.00 for our share in a single night ; and then, on the other hand, as before stated, we have gbne down 
to less than $3.00 for our share. If you would like to see the exhibition given, we shall be pleased to 
have you do so, and then you can judge for yourself just how the public like it, and you can see how the 
details of the business are attended to. Let us know about when you can visit us, and we will inform 
you by return mail when and where our next exhibition will be given, and will send you a compli- 
mentary ticket to attend the same. You can then arrange to come and visit us, look the business all 
over, and attend the exhibition, and so get well posted on the methods of carrying on the business, and 
can decide whether it is what we have represented it or not. We are perfectly willing to put this busi- 
ness on its merits, and let you be the judge of it. We think we make a reasonable and fair estimate 
when we state that, in our opinion, based on our own experience, two men can take this war view 
exhibition, and by attending to business and looking after the details properly, they can average better 
than ten dollars per night, each. As above noted, we have done better than this, but we will put the 
probable average at twenty dollars profit per night (ten dollars for each partner) as the reasonable and 
probable figure that can be realized. To do this, however, means a strict attention to business. It won't 
do to spend the most of your time in sitting around the hotel and drinking beer, or smoking, and spin- 
ning yarns. When you get to a town you will need to " hustle around " and see that the local details 
have all been properly attended to by the committee ; then go to the hall where the exhibition is to be 
given, and see that things are in good shape there. Get your curtain set in good style, and then get 
your Stereopticon placed and tested, so there will be no delay or hitch in the entertainment when the 
audience gets there. If the local committee have arranged for any army songs to be sung, you should 
make it a point to see the singers personally, before the audience assembles, and arrange with them just 
what you want sung, and just when to sing it. By having all these little matters clearly understood 
before the entertainment begins, you secure a good smooth evening, whereas a failure to attend to those 
little matters leaves it entirely to chance whether things go right or not. We cite all these things to 
show you that it requires work and careful attention to business in order to succeed in this enterprise, as 
well as in any other business. This war view exhibition is a good and profitable business when properly 
attended to, but it won't run itself, any more than a railroad or a steamboat will. Therefore, unless you 
" mean business," don't touch it at all. 

Question 19. Do you have to pay a license to give the exhibition? 

Answer. We have given the exhibition a great many times, but we have never hud to pay a 
cent for license yet. We usually give the exhibition under the auspices of some G. A. R. Post, or Kons of 
Veterans' Camp, of other organization, and they always make all the local arrangements and attend to 
all these local details. 



r 

26 PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 

Question so. Do you employ an "Advance Agent" to make your engagements 

for you ? 

Answer. We do not. We have found that we can make all the engagements \ve want by cor- 
respondence with the Post or whatever organization we desire to work with. It is better to give a 
G. A. R. Post the first offer, provided there is a Post in the place you are going to. After the first few 
exhibitions have been successfully given, you have something to refer to. It is easy enough to get 
engagements by offering the organization one-half the net receipts, as explained above. There is no 
risk to them in supl terms, because you are practically certain to take in enough to more than pay all 
expenses, and thus they have the opportunity offered them of making something for their treasury ; 
and on these terms you easily get all the engagements you want. After you get started and your reputa- 
tion is established, engagements will seek you, instead of you having to seek engagements. This has 
been our experience. 
A 

Question ai. What is the best season of the year for the Stereopticon Exhi- 
bition ? 

Answer. We begin early in September, and close our season on the evening of Memorial Day. 
The best month of the whole year is May ; the best week of the entire year is the last week in May ; and 
the best day in the year is Memorial Day. During the mouth of May the subject of the war is more 
especially before the minds of the whole people, and thus the war view exhibition is right in line with 
the thoughts of the people, and they will readily attend any real good entertainment pertaining to the 
war ; but during the week in which Memorial Day occurs (that is, the last week of May), every even- 
ing is a harvest-time with this exhibition. During that week, make your engagements only for large 
towns or cities. Do not waste a single evening in small towns. Properly managed, the exhibition can be 
made to earn you at least $100.00 each night of Memorial-day week. You need not be afraid of getting 
too large an opera-house or hall for the evenings of that \veek. Take the largest opera-house or hall in the 
place, and advertise liberally, so as to let all the people know what sort of an entertainment you have to 
offer them, and no fear but what you will have a full house. We know of nothing that interests the 
people generally so much as war and great battles and all pertaining thereto ; it makes no difference 
whether.it is a veteran soldier, or a citizen who did not go to the war, or the children, or the ladies ; they 
are nearly all interested in this subject. War seems to exercise a fascination over the minds of nearly all 
the people. This is true at any and all times in the year, but about Memorial-day season it is more 
especially so. For this reason it is the very best of the whole year's harvest for you, and your arrange- 
ments should be so made that you can reap richly. As above suggested, you should make your engage- 
ments only for larye places during that week. You will have lots of invitations to go to the smaller 
places, but such invitations must be put over, for you cannot afford to miss the best chance of the year 
just to accommodate some small Post located in a small town that has no hall which will seat over four 
or five hundred people. You are after larger game than that, and even at the risk of offending them, 
you had better decline their invitation. But most persons are reasonable, and when you tell them just 
how it is, they will not be offended at you for declining their invitation. Let them understand that 
this is a matter of business with you, and that to accept their invitation for that time would be like 
throwing away fifty or seventy-five dollars, and that you cannot afford to do it, and the chances are that 
you will maintain perfect good feeling and will make a " date " for some other time with them. 

Question 22. How did your Company get the original war photographs, if they 

were taken by the U. $. Government Photographers? 

Answer. During the war the United States Government authorized and employed Messrs. 
M. B. Brady and Alex Gardiner, two of the leading photographers of this country, to procure the most 
excellent cameras possible and to accompany the Union armies in the field, making photographs of all 
those wonderfully interesting and thrilling scenes. The object of this was to preserve in accurate 
form an illustrated historical record of the scenes of the war, to be treasured in the archives of the War 
Department in Washington. Messrs. Brady and Gardiner were permitted, by the terms of their con- 
tract with the Government, to make two negatives of each scene; they therefore prepared their cameras 
so that when they photographed any scene there were two separate negatives made, both exactly alike, 
of course. Both negatives were original and both made at the same moment by the same "exposure," 
as the photographers call it. So they went on, through the entire war, photographing thousands of 
scenes, Of each scene they had the two negatives, as above explained, making two complete sets all 
through. One set of these negatives was placed in the War Department at Washington, where they 
have since been treasured and where they now remain. The other set of negatives were stored away at 
the close of the war, and as years went by they were almost forgotten. We accidentally discovered 
them, packed away in a store-room and covered with the dust of almost a quarter of a century. We 
contracted to purchase the entire collection, and we paid the owners thousands and thousands of dollars 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 27 

on the contract, until we have finally paid up the entire amount, and we now own, absolutely, the 
whole of this most wonderful and interesting collection. The other set is, as above stated, in the archives 
of the War Department at Washington, where it will always be treasured. The Government set is not, 
and never will be, for sale, for the United States is not in business commercially, and of course never will 
undertake any business in opposition to any of its citizens. Consequently we say that no original war 
photographs can ever be obtained except of us. To say that these negatives are worth their weight in 
gold would be putting a cheap value on them. They are priceless, and should anything happen to 
destroy them they could never be replaced, for of course the scenes they represent are gone forever, and 
consequently no more photographs could ever be made. We carry a heavy line of insurance on the col- 
lection, but insurance money could not replace them if they should be destroyed. 

Question 93. How soon will you get the war photographs all catalogued? 

Answer. We cannot tell. We are now at work on the negatives, identifying, arranging, and 
preparing them for the catalogue ; but it is slow workj because there are so many of the views that we 
cannot identify or classify. In many cases the label which the photographer put on the negative when 
he made the photograph, almost thirty years ago, has been lost off, so that when the negatives came into 
our hands many of them had no label on, and we are working along carefully with them, getting them 
identified by comrades who sometimes see a view which they can recognize. We have large albums in 
our office, in which we have put a copy of each view, and when comrades visit us we set them down in 
a comfortable chair and request them to look over the albums, and when they see a view that they can 
positively recognize and identify, to give us the name and description of the view. In this way we are 
gradually getting the scenes identified and classified, and ready for the catalogue. We do not wish to be 
in too much of a hurry about publishing, because we prefer to take time and make sure that we get the 
names and descriptions right before we print them. 

Question 24. How large a scene do you show on the curtain? 

Answer. We usually make about a fourteen-foot view. This is large enough so that it can 
be seen clearly from all parts of the house. A fourteen-foot view covers about two hundred square 
feet of canvas, and brings out all the details of the scene nicely. Of course, as to the question of how 
large a scene to make, we can only say that the exhibitor must be guided by circumstances and by the 
size of the hall he is exhibiting in. You sometimes get into a hall where the ceiling is not high enough 
so that you can make a fourteen-foot picture. In that case you must of course make a smaller view. 
The Stereopticon will make any size view that you require, from a five-foot scene to a twenty-five foot 
scene. In a small hall it is not necessary to make so large a view as if you were in an opera-house or a 
large hall. In Music Hall, Providence, R. I., we ma.de a view almost thirty feet square. This was 
necessary, owing to the great size of the hall. Music Hall seats over five thousand people, and it is 
nearly ninety feet from the front of the balcony, or dress circle, to the stage. This is the only hall we 
ever found where we were obliged to make so large a view. The view is not as good when it is enlarged 
over twenty-five feet square. As above stated, a fourteen-foot scene is about the right thing, and you 
will very seldom find it necessary to make it any larger than that. 



NOTICE. 

In the seven foregoing pages we have answered some of the questions which will 
naturally arise in the mind of any person who is interested and disposed to engage in 
the business of the War View Exhibition. We have given you, in the answers to 
these questions, such information as we have gained in our own experience with the 
exhibition. After reading over these questions and answers carefully, if you desire any 
further information than is there given, we shall be pleased to correspond with you, or 
to have you come and make us a visit and look the business over. 

Yours in F., 0., & L. f 

THE WAR PHOTOGRAPH & EXHIBITION COMPANY, 

(Incorporated under the Laws of the State of Connecticut, December 27, A. D. 1890,) 

No. 2 State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 

WILLIAM HUNTINGTON, President. (First Sergeant Co. " D," 8th Conn. Infantry.) 
JOHN C. TAYLOR, Secretary and Treasurer. (Sergeant Co. " B," First Conn. Artillery.) 
CHARLES STARR, Assistant Secretary. 



I II II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ml I II I I I I I I I I I ! I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I M I I I I !_: 

! 1861 ~fliefaFfiFt|Ifiikt~ 1865 I 

-J^, v IL/ 

PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY. 

An Instructive and Entertaining Exhibition. 



*x LETTERS AND PRESS NOTICES. 

The following are a few of the many unsolicited letters and press notices we have received 



^ From the " WATERBURY AMERICAN." 

_ It was indeed an evening of rare enjoyment at Music 

_ Hall last night. The hall was full by 8 o'clock, and many 

_ were turned away. Before beginning there was some spec- 

^ ulation as to the merits of the novel entertainment, but 

_ the moment the pictures began to appear before the aud- 

-i ience all speculation was banished. From first to last, the 

_ whole audience was carried away with enthusiasm. Of 

_ course the old veterans were beyond restraint; their 

_ frequent responses to the lecturer, or spontaneous cheers 

_ over some familiar scene added a special charm to the 

^ entertainment. We may consider ourselves fortunate to 

^ live in a time when we can hear from a veteran's own lips 

^ the true stories of the war, and see these men recognize 

^ and enthuse over the spots where they endured so much 

^ for their country. They are not going to be with us many 

? jr*ir8 more, and then we shall regret every opportunity 

^ that we have lost of this kind, for it pertains to the most 

?s interesting period of American history. The views wer 



pronounced by the best judges strikingly life-like, and 

when the audience went away they felt as tho 

been taking a trip over those historic grounds. Every 



ough they 
ounds. Ev 



had 



one was astonished at the perfection of the wonderful 
photographs taken by Government Photographer Brady, 
and seemed to appreciate the fact that these were the only 
available copies of these pictures extant. Some of them 
were beautifully colored, and all true to life. The lectur- 
er, Commander John C. Taylor, of Post No. 60, G.A. R., 
Hartford, was a member of Major Bannon's Company, in 
the First Connecticut Heavies, and is a very pleasant 
speaker, interspersing his lecture with many amusing 
anecdotes. He apologized that it was^he first time he had 
used this manuscript, but the apology was unnecessary. 
It is probable that the Camp will yield to the popular de- 
mand, and bring the entertainment here again in the 
Spring, thua gratifying those who went last night, and 
those who are to-day expressing so universally their re- 
gret that they did not go. 



From the "HARTFORD COURANT." 

Mr. John C. Taylor of this city had a gratifying ova- 
tion at the Opera House last evening, where he gave bis 
entertainment entitled, "The War for the Union." The 
audience was very large, and the Woman's Relief Corps of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, will profit handsomely 
by it. This entertainment interests everybody, whether 
veterans or not, and it is sure to draw a liberal patronage 
wherever it is given. 



From the "NEW HAVEN JOURNAL AND 
COURIER." 

A large and attentive audience occupied the darkened 
Atheneum last evening when John C. Taylor, of Hartford, 
commenced the second lecture of the battle scenes ot 
" The War for the Union." Like the lecture of Wednes- 
day evening it was overflowing with interest and replete 
with instances of the great civil struggle. The illustrations 
were startlingiy realistic; the attention of the audience 
was held from beginning to end. To-night's lecture is 
the last of this pleasant and instructive course. 



From the "HARTFORD TIMES." 

In securing Mr. John C. Taylor to give his illustrated 
war lecture, the G. A. R. were instrumental in bringing out 
the best entertainment seen here for a long time. Indeed, 
in the line treated, it has never been equaled. The lec- 
turer carried his audience back to war days, by a few well- 
chosen words, and then by a series of interesting and soul- 
stirring scenes, thrown upon the canvas, transported his 
hearers to the front and gave the home-guard those stay 
at-home-patriots an idea of the horrors of war; and even 
the veterans, who were "at the front" for three years or 
more got ideas of the immensity of dread war which they 
did not pick up by actual experience. The lecturer had 
an attractive way of introducing the rapidly changing views 
which had a pleasing effect, and at times it was a question 
whether the audience was the most charmed at the words 
of the speaker, or by the excellence and variety of the 
scenes so distinctly thrown upon the canvas. If the ex- 
cellence of this entertainment was generally understood 
Mr. Taylor would be busy in answering calls for it. 



A Letter Irom A CRIPPLED COMRADE In the 
Far 'West. 

. What Old Soldiers think of the War Photographs. 

SARATOGA, Wyoming Territory 
THE WAE PHOTOGBAPH & EXHIBITION Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Dear Comrades: Tfie sample views I sent for came 
O. K., and to-day two more for which accept thanks. 

I thought at one time that I would try to do something 
toward exhibiting these war views, but the country is too 
thinly settled yet to make anything at it. If I were back 
in the States or located in some large town like Cheyenne 
or Laramie City I might do well. 

It would be difficult to tell how much I value these 
photographs and I get them down most every day and 
look them all over carefully. 

No one but an old soldier can form any idea how vividly 
these views bring back old times, and as I look into the 
past they represent, I can hear the singing of bullets, the 
boom of artillery, and the screaming of shells mingled 
with the shouts of the soldiers and the groans of the 
wounded and dying. 

I am dependent upon the pension I get for a living and 
I have anything but an easy luxurious life of it as you 
well know. Diseased in almost every tissue, I am unable 
to perform the slightest manual labor, still if I could afford 
it, I would have every war view you have even though 
they cost double what they do. 

My wife complains and says they make me moody and 
distressed. They do not. They only make me live over the 
past again. They carry my mind back to the time when I 
could endure any fatigue or exposure; when I could lie 
down upon a pile of rails or lean up against a tree and 
sleep Oh ! how I could sleep when I could eat raw bacon 
and drink water from a horse track and was glad to get it. 

Some of these days I hope to be better off than now. 
Then I want every view you have. Until then I wish you 
every success, and I'd like- to help you on in your good 
work, for it seems to me every old soldier owes you a debt 
of gratitude for your enterprise in preserving these me- 
morials of the past and placing them within reach of all. 
Yours in F. C. and L., 

JOHN F. CRAWFORD. 



A collection of views cannot be sent on approval, or to be selected from and part of them returned ; for the simple 
reason that there are not views enough to accommodate the thousands of comrades who would be defighted to take them 
and sit down and look them all over and pick out those they wish to buy. It is simply impossible to do the business in 
this way. We would like to accommodate every comrade who wishes to see all of these interesting war views, but the 
only way we can do it is to invite all who wish to see the collection to come to our office in Hartford, and we will take 
pleasure in having you spend as many hours as you like in looking over the scenes that were once so familiar to us all. 
We are glad to welcome any comrade or other person who is interested in the war scenes, and show him a collection of 
views of the great war, that will amply repay him for the time spent in visiting us. We have more than six thousand 
different views. 



_ 



These War Photographs are not in "the trade, 
of our authorized Agents. Reliable Agents wanted. 



They can be procured only of us, or T 



Comrade 



THE WAR PHOTOGRAPH & EXHIBITION COMPANY, 

No. 2 State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 
I I III II I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

-If you find nothing in this Catalogue which interests you, will you please hand it 
to some comrade or other person who might make us a good Agent.