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Full text of "The Warren cook book, comp. and arranged by the Second auxiliary missionary society, formerly the Young ladies' missionary society of the Presbyterian church"

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Minutes 
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1 to 3 



Coffee 

Mutton, leg . . . 
Ham, weight 12 
Turkey, weight 
Corned Beef or 
Fowl, weight 4 
Chicken, weight 

Lobster 20 to 30 

Cod and Haddock, weight 3 to h pounds 20 to 30 

Halibut, thick piece, weight 2 to 3 pounds 30 

Bluefish and Bass, weight 4 to 5 pounds 40 to 45 

Salmon, weight 2 to 3 pounds 30 to 35 

Small Fish 6 to 10 

I'otatoes, white 20 to 30 

Potatoes, sweet 15 to 25 

Asparagus 20 to 30 

Peas 20 to 60 

String Beans 1 to 2V2 

Beets, young 45 

Beets, old 3 to 4 

Cabbage 35 to fiO 

Turnips 30 to 45 

Onions 45 to 60 

Parsnips 30 to 45 

Spinach 25 to 30 

Green Corn 1 2 to 20 

Cauliflower 20 to 25 

Tomatoes, stewed 15 to 20 

Rice 20 to 25 

IVIacaroni 20 to 30 



BROILING. 

Hours Minutes 

Steak, one inch tliiek 4 to 6 

Steak, one and one-half inches thick 8 to 10 

Lamb or IMutton chops 6 to 8 

Quail or Squabs 8 

Chickens 20 

Small tliin fish 5 to 8 

BAKING. 

Bread (white loaf) 45 to 60 

Bread (graham) 35 to 45 

Biscuits or rolls (raised) 12 to 20 

Biscuits, baking powder 12 to 15 

Gems 25 to30 

Cake (layer) .'. 20 to 30 

Cake (loaf) 40 to 60 

Custards 30 to 45 

Baked Beans 6 to 8 

Beef, sirloin or rib, rare, weight 5 pounds ... 1 5 

Beef, Sirloin or rib, Avell done, weight 5 pounds ] 20 

Mutton, (saddle) IVi to 11/2 

Lamb, (leg) l^A to 13^ 

Lamb (i'orequarter) 1 to IVi 

Veal (leg) 'SV2 to 4 

Veal (loin) 2 to 3 

Pork, young, (chime or spare rib) S to 3^4 

Chicken, young, (weight 3 to 4 pounds) 1 to li^ 

Turkey, (weight 9 pounds) 2\'[^ to 3 

Goose, (weight 9 pounds) 2 

Duck (domestic) 1 to I14 

Duck (wild) 20 to 30 

Grouse 25 to 30 

Partridge 45 to 50 

Fish (thick) weight 3 to 4 pounds 45 to 60 

Fish (small) 20 to 30 

NOTP] — Length of time for cooking fish and meat does not de- 
pend so much on the number of pounds to be cooked as the extent of 
surface exposed to tlie heat. Boston Cooking School. 



mmm 



mmmmm m m mmmmmmmmmmm 



Warren 
Savings Bank 

Capital and Surplus $700,000.00 
BANKING BY MAIL 






A cook book is a very necessary article; 
so is a 

BANK BOOK 

A checking account with a bank is a 
convenience no housekeeper should 
be without. By paying your bills by 
checks you are enabled not only to 
keep your accounts straight, but you 
have receipts for all disbursements — in 
the cancelled checks which are re- 
turned to you. 

In our Savings Department interest at 
4 percent., (compounded and credited 
semi-annually) is allowed, and small 
deposits receive the same careful at- 
tention that is given to large ones. An 
invitation is extended to all to open an 
account with the 



"Old, Strong and Reliable' 



@ [i]i[^' (!][£] |[eI@|[^ if£( [@! |@! [[DJilBlild} |[i]i|@ [El i@' (s] Idl' (£l 



M i 



The 



Warren Cook Book m 



m 



m ' 



M 






Compiled and Arranged by the 

Second Auxiliary Missionary Society 

Formerly the 

Young Ladies' Missionary Society 
Of the Presbyterian Church 



m 



M 
M 



THIRD EDITION 



Carefully Graded and Adapted to Every Day 
Use in Any Household 



Wan 



WARREN, PA., DECEMBER 1908 



m 



MMMQMMMBMQMM U ^O^M^MMMMMMM. 



THE WARREN MIRROR. PRINT. 



i of CONGRESS 

Qpies RtK'O'ved 

10 1908 

yi,<nt tjixrv _ 

0^ XXc. fio. 
t)pi - O.I J 



Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1908 by the Second Auxiliary Missionary 

Society of tlie Presbyterian Church of Warren, Pa., in the office of Librarian of 

Congress at Washington. 



PREFACE, ^^r 



The Second Auxiliary Missionary Society, formerly the Young 
Ladies' Missionary Society, of the Presbyterian Church of Warren, 
Pa., takes great pleasure in offering the third edition of '' The 
Warren Cook Book " to the public. 

For twenty years The Warren Cook Book has been a guide 
in many homes, receiving the highest commendation from those 
who have followed its directions. 

The demand for the book increases with each edition. The 
last edition, (less than five years old), has been carefully revised 
and enlarged and made up-to-date in every particular. 

The new book has behind it the experience of one hundred 
practical housekeepers. Each department has been compiled in a 
most careful manner by the person whose name appears at the head 
of the department. 

It is believed the new edition of The Warren Cook Book will 
meet the dem.inds of the average housekeeper better than many 
books which sell for double the price. 

The Society takes this opportunity to thank all its patrons 
of the past and to bespeak for the new book the generous support 
which has been accorded The Warren Cook Book in the years 
that have gone by. 

Mrs. J. W. Kitchen, 
Mrs. W. J. Richards, 
Mrs. W. S. Peirce, 
Mrs. C. H. Smith, 
Mrs. a. R. Blood, 
I\Iiss Mary Kopf, 

Cook Book Committee. 



Wyman & Conarro 

The Only Reliable 

Jewelers and Opticians 
In Warren County 



406 Pcnn'a Ave., W. 



Warren, Pa. 



WE DON'T PREACH LOW PRICES. THAT IS 
WHAT WE PRACTICE 



N. GREEMIND & SON 

Indertakers and dealers in 
furniture & Stone Vaults 



EXCHANGE 


BLOCK 


Rour doors Hast of Sus= 


pension 


Bridge 



J. B. MULLEN 

DRUGGIST 

Retail dealer in Drugs, 
Chemicals and Toilet Articles 



332 Penn'a Ave., W. Warren, Pa. 



Washington Dye- 
ing and Cleaning 
^^=Works^== 

218 Pennsylvania Ave. 

BELL TELEPHONE 445-B 



l^umpbrey ^ De Lm 

— Dealers in — 

f resb, Salt and Smoked meats 
Poultry, Card, €tc. 



434 Penn'a Hoe., Ul. l)onhart Block 



T. W. McNETT 

Funeral Director 
and Embalmer 



OFF. HOTEL STRUTHERS 



Phone 72-K Residence, 110 Penn'a Ave.. W 



T. O. SLATER & CO. 



HARDWARE SHORS 



Household Rurnishings and General 

Hardware 



A. R. BLACK 

INTERIOR 
DECORATIONS 



Wall Paper and Fabrics of Every 
Description 

Tapestries, Laces, Draperies, 
Interior Decorations 

Designs and Estimates 
Furnished 

Contracts Promptly 
Executed 



223 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., W. 
Both Phones Folkman Store 
WARREN, PENN'A 



Warren Table 
Works 



Manufaclurers o( 



" The Warren Line " 
of Bedroom Furniture 

Dressers, Empress 
Dressers, Chiffoniers, 
Dressing Tables and 
Beds -:- -:- -:- 

In Oak, Mahogany 
and Bird's Eye Maple 

ALWAYS IN 

''Warren Quality" 
WARREN, PA. 



^ v)/ li/ \t< Uy i)/ vt/ vih(' tl< vi/ \^t \ti\b\ki\k \ii iii\it\ki\ii^ vtn \^ \i/ \ti \ii \t/ it/ vi; «)/ vt< \ii «t/ li/ \ t/ \t/ xf/ \ki vl/ vt/ \ii vt/ v(/ Ktt Kii\b\ki\ti \l» \ii \ti <& 




Good Bread 

Is an Essential in Every Home 

You can not accomplish this 
unless you have a 

Universal Bread Mixer 

Saves Time — Saves Flour 



REGULAR FAMILY SIZE WHICH 

MIXES 4 LARGE LOAVES ONLY 

COSTS $2.00 



Pickett Hard^vare 
Company 






XXXXJWXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
X X 

X X 

X 
X 
X 
X 



I Warren Trust Company 



Acts as Administrator, Executor, Guardian x 

X 

and Trustee x 



Also acts as a trusted agent, collecting income from 



real estate or personal property, and x 

invests same as directed x 

irV 

4 Per Cent on Interest ^ 

Accounts V 



X X 

I WOULD LIKE TO DO YOUR BANKING I 



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

X X 



First National Bank I 

WARREN, PA. 



Capital $100,000 Surplus $100,000 5c 

X 



X 

^ Profit and Loss $34,000 

X X 

X X 

x X 

X X 

X X 

g Oldest Bank in Warren County g 

X X 

X X 

X X 

X X 

X 4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits Compounded x 

U Twice a Year I 

X X 

X X 
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX '. 



al(B]i®lfMlfHlp]f^[l]|B](l](s][ll M M [ll[B](l][sl[al[B](l:fll(B|fBllB|^ 



II 
Zl}t f ualitg mmh I 



Better then other 
kinds no matter 
at ^^hat price 



Sold only at 

FEHLMAN'S 



^ 



A. A. Davis & Company 



Booksellers & Stationers 



Wall Paper, Window Shades, Blank Books, Pocket 
Books, a fine line of Holiday Goods, Picture Frames, 
Etc., our Candy is Delicious. 



b^^. 



jd 



The Green Photo Co. 



Especially Attractive Pictures 
at Popular Prices -:- -:- 
Cameras and Photographic 
Supplies -:- -:- -:- 

Picture Frames and Mouldings 



OVER CITIZENS NAT. BANK 



Warren 



Penn'a 



C. W. BECKLEY 

AT 

Mills Bldg. Opp. Struthers Hotel 
FOR 

Chafing Dishes -- Toasters 

Flat Irons - - Warming Pads 

Renovators 

OR 

Anything Electrical 



^ «t< tt/ \i/ vt> «!/ vt/ \ti \ii \tt Ui \ii v(/ vt< «t« \ii \li it/ vt> \t/ \t/ 1(/ \ii «t/ vl/ vt/ \t/ \</ 1(/ \l/ \ti\ii \ti \i/ vi/ it< \ti Ui i(/ v(/ <t( tkr\t« \l/ ><< tt/ Ui \ti it/ it< vt/ \tt ^ 

I Siegfried's Pharmacy | 



The Up-to-date Drug Store 
The Rexall Store 

We have the exclusive sale of 

"BERI" BEST FRENCH OLIVE OIL. 
Olive Oil is better for Summer Cooking than lard or other 
animal fats, because it is not heating nor does it cause 
indigestion. WARREN, PA. 



■^ ifv <<\ «|x /(V «ft ^ it^ <f« i\ if« ^ 1f< ifx «t« )^ <(^ ift if( iV« 1^ f)\ (f \ «(\ (|« /|t iV> IV /|\ «(\ >|t /f \ /|x (f /|v «|\ If \ if|« «(\ (f \ If \ (f ) ii(\ «(t ii(\ If « /f « m n< 1^^ 



Drip! Drip! Drip! 


TRY 

BAYER 

for Furniture 

"Nuff Ced" 

SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO UNDERTAKING 


What is more annoying 
than a dripping faucet 

If you will use the Bashlin Fau- 
cet there will be no "drip". You 
can place a new seat in it with- 
out shutting the water off in the 
cellar, etc. It always closes with 
water pressure. Service guaran- 
teed. :: :: :: :: :: 

For sale by all Plumbers 


Manufactured by 

The Bashline Co. 

WARREN, PENNSYLVANIA 










Agents for All of the lead- 
Allegrettis j^g ^^d most 
Famous Choco- i . i 
lates and Bon popular kmds 
Bons of Perfume 

The 
Central Pharmacy 

Newell & Gaughn 

Proprietors 
316 Second St. Opp. Savings Bank 

Fine Prescrip- The best and 
tion work our strongest Fla- 

. ,^ . voring Extracts 
specialty— two , c • 
'^ and opices 

Graduate Jry our Baking 
Pharmacists Powder 


M. &b G. Cousins 


Millinery 


Full line of ex- 
clusive models :: 


215 Liberty St. Warren, Pa. 



Every household should be 
supplied with 

Sabine's Curatine 


Rheumatic Sufferers 

who have not used 

Crocker's Rheu- 
matic Remedy 

SHOULD DO SO 

It is a most infallible remedy, 
and we guarantee good results 
or money refunded. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS 


Uil 

an infallible remedy 
and cure for 

Cuts, Burns, liarache, /Yost 
Bites, Scalds, C/iappcd Hands, 
Sun Burn and all Inflamation 

For sale by all druggists 


Prepared and guaranteed by 

PHILLIPS DRUG CO. 

Warren, Pa. 


Prepared by 

Phillips Drug Co. 

WARREN. PA. 








C. E. Metzger Co., Ltd. 

WARREN, PENNSYLVANIA 



HIS store and the people in it are for service; your 
/ service; not what we want, but what you want. 

Filled with goods of the best quality we can 
place before you, in a good, clear daylight store, 
where you see what you are buying. These 
prices are fair to both of us — your saving is as 
important as our profits. We try to make you sure of it 
by saying, "At any time if you are not satisfied with what 
you get here, get your money back. When we've pleased 
you, tell your friends; when you are displeased, tell us." 



C. E. Metzger Co., Ltd. 

WARREN, PENNSYLVANIA 



The City Market 

No. 216 Hickory Street 

High Grade 

Fresh and 

Salt Meats 

A. M. ROGERS 

Manufacturer of 

ICE CREAM, SHERBETS 
AND CANDIES 

Sales Room, Lunch Room 

and Ice Cream Parlor 
No. 234 Penn'a Avenue West 

ALLEN'S SHOE STORE 

—SOLE AGENTvS FOR- 

PATRICIAN 

— AND— 

RALSTON HEALTH SHOES 

No. 103 Liberty Street 
Warren, Pa. 



J. G. Johnson B. R. Rrickson 

The Banner 
Grocery 

Try Our Sunshine Flour 

No. 301 Penn'a Avenue East 

Both Phones 



KOPF &. 

HENRY 

— Dealers in— 

GROCERIES 
AND PROVISIONS 

Canned and 

Pickled Goods 

No. 334 Water Street 

WARREN, PA. 



IS FRESH MADE 

IS HOME MADE 

OUR LARD 

SHORTENS 

TASTES RIGHT 

AND SAVES MONEY 



R. H. & D. L. LEWIS 

No. 304 Penn'a Av. W. 



WARREN 
NATIONAL BANK 

BANKING SERVICE 

IJanks are becomin^^ more and more the custodians of the 
funds of the people of both larjre and small means. This 
is due to a wider appreciation of the value of bankino: ser- 
vice as its usefulness is extended and its methods become 
better known. In the case of 

"The Warren National Bank" 

the "BEST" service is assured. Its officers aim in everj^ 
wa3' to protect the interests of its patrons, making- use of 
ever}- means of precaution. Its up-to-date svstem of ac- 
curacy and promptness is combined with the same careful 
attention to large or small depositors. 

PAYS 4 PER CENT 



C. H. SMITH CO., Ltd. 

WARREN, PENN'A 

Importers and Retailers 

Everything that is Good, Nothing that is Inferior 

WOMEN'S APPAREL— SECOND ELOOR 

Suits, Cloaks, Furs, Dresses, Undergarments, Corsets, Waists, Etc. Misses, 
Children's and Infants' Wear, Millinery and Boys' Clothing. 

MAIN FLOOR 
Dress Goods, Silks, Trimmings, Gloves, Neckwear, Laces, Embroideries, No- 
tions, Ribbons, Hosiery, Umbrellas, Linens, Etc. 

THIRD FLOOR 

Carpets, Rugs, Mattings, Lace Curtains, Linoleums, Etc. 

BASEMENT 

China, Cut Glass, Trunks and Bags, Etc. 

WE INVITE YOUR PATRONAGE 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



INDEX 



Almond, Bread, 21S 

Cake, 162-176 

Cream Candy, 259 

lee Cream, 200 'i07 

Prune Filling, 170 

Pudding, 133 
Almonds, to Blancii, 26o 

Salted, 258 
Ambrosia, 229 
Apple, Baked, 133 

Crab Jelly, 225 

Dessert, 144 

Dumplings, 132 

Fried, 65 

Fritters, 95 

Jelly, 227 

John, 132 

Kuchen, 154 

Pie, 153-154 

Pie, Dried, 156 

Pudding. 132 

Salad, 86-87 

Sauce, 46 

Sauce Cake, 174 ~ 

Snow, 222 

Tapioca, 144 

Water, 221 
Apricot, Saiice, 144 
Apricots, Jellied, 144 
Artichokes, 64 
Asparagus. J^oiled, ti4 

BakecL 65 

Canned, 237 

Creamed. 64 

On Toast, 65 
Aspic, Jelly, 100 

Mushrooms in 9!.i 

Tongue in 99 
Bacon Cri>ips, 113 

And Liver, 41 
Banana, Fritters, 95 

Ice Cream, 206 

Pudding. 145 

Sherbet. 211 

Whip, 145 
Barlcv. Cruel. 220 

Water, 217-221 
Bean, Pickles. 259 

Salad. 86-S7 

Soup, ]S 



Beans, P.aked, 65-66 
Canned, 237-23S 
l>ima, 66 
String, 66 
Beef. Braised, 35-36 
Boiled Corn, 37 
Cannelo7i, 37 
Creamed. 3'i 
Cottage Pie, 39 
Essence. 218 
Friz/.iod, 3'i 
Hash. o9 
Loaf, 38 
Omelet. 38 
Pie, 39 

Pot Roast, 37 
Roast, 37 
Roll, 38 
Sansaae. 3S 
Steak.' ]}roiled, .35 
Steak, Fried, 35 
Steak, Pann(>d, 36 
Steak. Scalloped, 3; 
Steak. Smothered, 3'. 
Steak, Stufl'ed, :'8 
Tea, 218 
Tongue, 38 
Beet. Greens. 67 
Pickles, 240 
Relish, 67 
Salad, 86-S7 
Sandwich, 125 
Beets, 6G 

Canned, 237 
Belgian Hare, 57 
Biscuit, Baking Pud, li7 
Graham, 117 
Mapie Sugar, 117 
Twin, 117 
Sour Cream, 11"^ 
Bisque, Fig. 225 
Glace,' 145 
Ice Cream, 207 
Lemon, 208 
Ovster, 20 
Blackberrv, Cake, 163- 
174-175" 

Jelly. 224-225 
Pickles, 239 
Blanc Mange. 21^ l-U' 
Bluefish, Baked, 25 



Boiled Water, 204 
Boiled Dinner, 65 
Boquet Delicious, 145 
Bouillon, Tomato, 23 
BREAD, 103-105 
Bread, Almond, 21S 
Bran, 105-218 
Brown, 106-107 
Brown Boston, 107 
Brown Oat Flake, 

108 
Brown Steamed, 106 
Buns, Cinnamon, 1 10 
Cake. Coffee, HI 
Cake, Ourrantj 111 
Dutch, 108 
Entire Wheat, J 09 
Ginger, 136-179-182 
Graham, 107-lOS 
Jars, 2(;5 
Pudding, 133-134 
Rolls, 111 
Rusk, 112 
Rye, 110 
Salt Rising, 110 
Sponge, 104 
Sticks, 110 
Yeast, 104 
Boston Cream, 145 
BREAKFAST DISHES, 

113 
Broth, Oucken, 219 

Mutton, 218 
Buckwheat, Batter, 122 

Cakes, 122 
Buns, 110 183 
Cabbage, Bculed, 67 
Cooked, 63 
Cold Slaw, 67-63 
(Ireamed, 67 
Fried, 68 
Ladies, 68 
Pickled, 241 
Salad, 87 
Scalloped, 68 
AVilted, 67 
CAKE, LAYER, 762 
Cake. General Direc- 
tions, 162 
Almond, 163 



INDEX 



CAKE, Cont. 

r.altimorc Lady, 163 
Blackben y Jam, 165 
Black and Whito, 103 
Chocolate, 163- lOl 
Cheap. 164 
Coffee, 111 
Common. 163 
Corn. 118 
Cream, 164 
L>andy, 16.5 
Delicate. 164 -165 
Devils Food, 165 
Ice Cream, 165-166 
Isabel 1. 166 
Johniiv, 118 
Jell\ KcUod, 107 
Layer, 166 167 
Lemen Jelly, 166 
Lemon Sponge, J 'JO 
Maple Supar, J07 
Orange, 167 
Prune Almond, 167 
Ribbon. 16S 
Filden, 168 
White, 16S 
Yellow. 168 

CAKE LOAF, 174 

Cake. Anirel Food, 

174 
Angel CocoanuE, 174 
Apple Sause, 174 
Arciiangol, 174 
Blackberry Jam, 175- 

176 
Black Cap, 175 
Chocolate, 175176 
Clove. 175 
Coffee, 111 
Corn, lis 
Currant, 111 
Cream Almond, 176 
Cream Sour. 17G 
Delicate. 177 
Devils. il7f-177 
Fruit. 177-17S 
Ginger Bread, 179 
Gold, 178 
Hickorv Nut, 179 
Lily. 170 
Molasses, i7!( 
MaliogHnv, ISO 
Nut. ISO" 
Pound. ISO 
Tumbler. 180 



CAKE, Cont. 
Turk, ISO 
Quick, 180 
Sunshine, 180181 
Sponge, LSI -223 
Si)onge, Boded, 1S2 
Sponge, Chocolate, 

181 
Spice, 182 
Spanish. 183 
Spaisnh Buns, 183 
Virginia. 183 
Walnut. 183 
White. 183184 

CANDY COOKED, 253 

Butter Scotch, 253 
Caramel. 2.53 
Caramels, Chocolate, 

253 
Caramels. Cocoanut, 

254 
Caramels, Mapb. 256 
Cocoanut Bar. 2.14 
Cracker Jack. 254 
Cream, 254 
Directicms for I'ull- 

ing. 257 
Fill l;isque. 255 
Fi'idiiP. 12S-25r,-25fi 
Glace Nuts, 2.".6 
Orapcfruit Peel, 254 
Hops. 256 
Lemon Clear, 256 
Maple Sugar, 256 
Mint Paste, 261 
Mississippi Pecan, 

256 
Orange Peel, 254. 
Penoche, 257 
Peanut, 257-258 
Popcorn Balls. 257 
Pralines. 258 
Puffed l^ice. 2.58 
Sea Foam, 258 
Taffy, Vanilla, 258 
Taflv, Vinegar, 250 
Tafl'5\ White, 250 
Texas Chips, 2."»S 
White,. Old F.ash- 

ioned, 250 

CANDY UNCOOKED, 
250 

Almond Creams, 2.)0 
Chocolate, 2.59 



CANDY, Cont. 

Chocolate Cream, ?60 
Chocohite Pepper- 
mints. 260 
Cocoanut CVeam. 260 
Creams. 261 
Cream Clierries. 260 
Date t;reams. 260 
English Walnut. 260 
French Cream. 259 
Fondant. 261 
Frnils Glaced. 261 
Hickory nut, 260 
Neapolitan, 260 
Orange, 260 
Walnut. 261 

CANNED FRl'IT, 229 

Cantaloupe, Si.iced, 240 
Carrots, Fried, 69 
Stewed. 69 

CATSUPS, 250 

Catsup. Cold, 250 

Cucumber. 252 

Currant, 252 

Crape, 251 

Tomato, 2.50 
Cauliflower. Breaded, 60 

Cieamed. 60 

Pickled. 241 

Steamed, 60 

Stewed. 60 
Celerv, Sauce. 48 

Salad. 86-87 

Soup, 10-2-23 

CHAFING DISH, 128 

Eggs Curried, 128 
Eu2s with Cheese, 

i'28 
Fruit with Sauce, 

128 
Fiogs Lees, 129 
Fudge, 128 
^Macaroons with 

Sauce. 120 
]\iushrooms Creamet!, 

129 
]\lusliro':>ms A-la-Sa- 

bine. 129 
l\hishrooms & Sweet- 
breads. 130 
Ovsters, Creamed, 

120 
Oysters Fricasee, 120 
Ovsters Panned, 1.30" 



TIIE WAREEN COOK BOOK 



CHAFING DISHES, Cont. 

Sweetbreads Cream - 
ed, 130 

Welsh Rarebit, 130 

Woodcock, Scotch. 
130 
Charlotte Husse. 147 
Cheese, Balls, 95 

Cream of, 97 

Croquettes, 97 

With Eggs, GO-128 

Fondue, 96 

With Macaroni, 72-73 

Ramakins, 96 

Salad, S7 

Straws, 96 

Sandwiclies, 96-1-25- 
126 

SoulUe, 95 
Cherry., Candy, 260 

Conserves, 230 

Ice, 211 

Pie, 155 

Salad, 87 

Soup, 19 
Chestnut Stuffing, 58 
Chicken. Boiled, 51 

Broiled. 51 

Broth, 219 

Capons, 52 

Creamed, 53 

Croquettes, 97 

En Casserole, 54 

Fricasee, 54 

Fried. 54 

Maryland, 51 

Patties, 100 

Pie, 53 

Pressed, 52 

A-la Providence, 52 

Roast. 51 

Salad, 88 

Sandwich, 125 

Scalloped, 54 

Smothered, 52 

Terrapin. 52 

CHILI SAUCE, 250-251 

Chocolate, Cake. 163-164- 
175-176481 
Candy, 25;;-259-?.60 
Cookies, 187 
Cream, 144 
Cream Filling, 169 
Custard. 147 
frosting, 171 



CHOCOLATE, Cont. 

Ice Cream, 207 

Vie, 155 

Pudding. 134-135-147 

ilaisins, 90 

toauce. 141-210 

To Drink, 200 
Chops, Ivarab, 40 

Mutton, 40 

Pork, 41 
Charlotte llnsse. 147 
Chow Chow, 242 
Chowder, Cabbage, 240 

Clam, 27 

Corn, 241 
Clam Chowder, 27 ' 
Clams. Deviled, 29 

IMinced, 31 
Chaniug Fluid, 2(12 
Cocoa, Muffins, 121 

To Drink. 200 

Balls. 192 

Cake, 174 
Cocoanut, Balls, 102 

Cake. 174 

Candy. 25I-2G0 

Cookies. 187 

Cream, 147 

To Drink, 200 

Filling. 16!) 

Pie, J 55 
Codfish, Balls, 28 

Boiled. 2(- 

Creamed, 34 
Coffee, After Dinner, 1'j8 

Boiled. 19S 

Bread, 111 

Bran. 199 

Cafe Glace, 199 

Filtered, 198 

For One. 198 

Jelly, i47 

COLD DESSERTS, i-;^, 

Cold Slaw, 67-f.8 

CONFECTIONf.RY Sec 

Candy, 255 

COOKIES, 187 

Cookies, Bi'own Sugar, 
187 

Buttermilk. 187 
Childrens, 188 
Chocolate, 187 
Cocoanut, 187 190 



COOKIES, Cont. 

Cream. 187 

Drop. 192 

Fig, 188 

Fruit. 192 

Ginger, 188 

Ginger Snaps, 190 

Hermits. 191 

Jellv. 190 

Jumbles, 190-191 

Lemon Snaps, 191 

^lacaroons, 193-194 

Peanut, 18S 

Pepper NTuts. 191 

Raisin. 189 

Sand Tarts, 191-192 

Scotch. 189 

Sour Cieam. 190 

S.)ur Milk, 191. 

Spice, 189 

Sugar, 189 

Tavlor, 194 

White, 190 
Corn. Baked, 70 

Boiled (ireen. 70 

Cake. 118 

Canned, 23S 

Chowder, 241 

Fritters, 71-119 

Gems, 12r. 

Griddle Cakes. 122- 
12." 

Meal Gruol 220 

INleal l\his]i. 115 

Meal Pudding, 137 

Mntbns, 120 

Oysters, 70 

Pudding. "0 

Salad. 241 

Smothered. 70 

Soup. 18-19 
Cranberry. Dumpling, 134 

Frappe. 211 

Jelly. 226 

I'uddinj?. 134 

Poll, 134 

Sauce, 46 
Cream, Candv. 261 

Cake. 104-176 

Cookies, 187-190 

Filling. 168-169 

Puffs. 196 

P.iffs. Fried. 118 

Pie, 155 

Sauce, 141-150 

Toast, 222 



INDEX 



Croquettes, Cheese, 97 

Chicken. 97 

Ham, 43 

Macaroni, '98 

Parsnip. 74 

Potato, 76 

Potato Sweet. 79 

Rice. 98 

Salmon. 98 

Veal. 98 
Cvontons. 19 
Crullers 194-195 
Cucumber. Catsup. 2.12 

Cooked. 71 

Fried, 71 

Pickle*. 241-2-1:2 

Salad. 243-88-02 

St u lied, 71 
Currant, Bread. Ill 

Catsup, 257 

Conserve. 230 

Jelly. 225-227 

Pie, 154-155 

No Cooking. 230 

Marmalade. 230 

Punch, 202 

Sherbet, 211 

Water, 222 
Custard, Baked, 148 

(varameb 145 

Cliocolate. 147 

Junket, 219 

Maple, 149 

Orance. 15C 

Pie, '] 55-157 

Rennet, 219 

Soft, 219 
Cutlets. i:<;g 99 

Pish, ol! 

Lobster, 99 

Veal, 4r-9s 

Veal in Cheese, 98 
Dandelions. 71 
Date. Pie, 71 

Creams, 2t'0 

DESSERTS COLD, 144 
Apricots Jellied. 144 
Apricot Sauce. 144 
Apple, 144 
Apple Tapioca, 144 
Banana Pudding, 14-5 
Banana Whip, 145 
Bisque (ilace. 145 
Boquet Delicious, 145 
Boston Cream. 145 
Caramel Custard, 145 



DESSERTS, COLD, Cont. 

Cream le'lv. 22(' 
Cream de Kus?e, 146 
Cliarlotte Russe, 147 
Chocolate Cream, 1 17 
Chocolate CustanLl 47 
Cliocolate Pudding. 

147 
Cocoanut Cream. 147 
Corn Starch P)id 

diuir. 146 
Custard Baked, 148 
Delicious Pudding, 14S 
Floating Island, 14S 
Ginger Cream, 148 
Fruit, 148 
Italian Cream, 1-19 
Junket, 219 
Lemon Cream, 149 
Maple Custard. 14!> 
ilaple Pudlino. 150 
Marshmaliow Crean, 

Marshmaliow Pud- 
ding, 149 
Orange Custard. 150 

151 
Orange Snow, 150 
Prune Pudding, 150- 

151 
Prune Whin, 150 
Snow Pudding Iced. 

208 
Snow Puddin;/. 151 
Spanish Cream, 151 
Sponge Cream Mox, 
151 

DOUGHNUTvS, 194-195 

DRINKS, 198 

Chocolale, 200 
Cocoa, 200 
Coffee. 198- 190 
Eiig Nog, 203 
Cider Eizg Nog. 203 
(4rape Juice, 203 .''il 
Lemonade, 200-201 
Orangeade, 201 
Punch, 201-202-204 
Raspberry Mint 203 
Raspberry Vinegar, 

203 
Water, Polled, 204 

Duck, Roasted. 54 

Roasted. Wild, 55 
Roasted, Red Head, 
55 



Dumpling. Apple, 132 
Craiil)erry, 134 
Strawberry, 140 

EGGS, 5o 

Egg. Balls, 60 

Cutlels. 99 

Nog. 203 

I'udding. 135 

Sa^ad. "8S-b9 

Sauce. 4 7 

Soup, 19 
Eggs, Baked, 60 

Eoile.l, 00 

Breaded. 113 

With Cheese, 60 

Cmiied. 128 

Di-viied. 61 

Fondue, (il 

Kentucky, 61 

And Lemon, 219 

For Luncheon, 6.t 

Omelet. 01 

Omelet, Ham 61 

Omelet, Tomato, 62 

Pickled, 62 

Poached, 62 

Sandwich, 126-127 

Scrambled, 63 

Spanish. 62 

Stull'cd in Nest, 62 

With Tomato. 60 

And Toast. 63 

ENTREES, 95 

Egg Nog, 203 

Egg Plant. Fried, 71 

With Cheese, 72 

Stuffed, 72 
Fig, Bisque, 255 

Cookies, 188 

Filling, 169 

Green Tomato, 234 

Pudding. 135-136 

Sandwich, 126 
FiiHngs, Cream, 168 169 

Cream, Sour, 167 

Cream. Nut, 169 

Chocolate, 169 

Cocoanut, 169 

Iml'. 169 

French. 169 

Lemon, Cocoanut, 170 

Marshmaliow. 170 

Nut or Fruit. 170 

Orange, 170 



10 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



FILLINGS, Cont. 

Pistachio, 170 
Prune AJnioiu!, i70 
Stravvborry, 170 

FISH, 2 5 

Fish, Blue Baked, 25 
Boiled, 26 
Breaded. 27 
Broiled, 27 
Cod Balls, ifi 
Cod, Creamed, 34 
Cod, Fresh, 26 
Creajued, 28 
Courbillion. 28 
Cutlets, 30 
Filling for, 26 
Fried.' 29 
Mackeral, Salt, 27- 

114 
Salmon, Baked, 2G 
Salmon Croquettes, 

33-98 
Salmon Loaf, 32 
Salmon, Steamed, 3:1 
Sardines, Fried, 27 

170 
Shad, Baked, 26 
Shad. I'lanked, 32 
Shad Roe, 26 
Smelts Fried, 29 
Trout. 27 
On Toast, 29 
Tuj-bot, 33 

Flaxseed Lemonade, 221 

Flour Uruel, 220 

I'ondant, 261 

FOOD FOR TilF SICK, 

Frappe, Cranberry, 211 
Ginger Ale;, 203 
Lemon, 212 

FRIED CAKES, 19/1-195 

Fritters. Apple. 95 

Banana, 95 

Baloort, IP; 

Corn. 71.-1.19 

Ham. 113 

Jolly Bovs. 119 

Oyster Plant, 74 

Parsnip. 119 
Frogs Le;i;s l'"'ried. 129 
Frozen Pud ling, 207 



FROSTINGS, 171 

Frosting, Boiled, 171 
Caramel, 171 
Choe.date, 171 
Maple Sugar, 17l 

Fruit, Cake, 177 178 
Canned, 229 
Cookies. It2 
With Sauce, 128 
Gla.-eu. 261 
Drinks, 200 
rilling, 170 
Lemonaile, 201 
Pudding, 136-148 
Punch, 202 

Fudge, 128-255-256 

GAME, 51 
GEM.S, 117 

Gems. Corn Meal, 120 

'.Graham, 119 

Kornlet, 120 

Wiieat. 120 
Giblet Gravy, 58 

Ginger, Bread, 136-179- 
182 

Cookies, 188 
Cream, 148 
Drops, 192 
ice, 211 
Ice Cream. 2(>S 

Snaps. 190 
Ginger Ale Frappe. 203 
Goose. B(jast, .^).'? 

With Saner ]<j-aut, 
56 

Graham, Biscuit, 117 
Bread, 107-108 
Gems. 119 
Mush. 115 
Pudding, 137 
AVaffles, 124 

Grapes. 230 

Grape. Juice, 221 -20:; 
Catsup. 2.-.1 
Conserve, 230 
Jam. 231 
Jelly, 226 
Spiced, 231 

Grape Fruit. F'eel 254 
Salad. 89 



Griddle Cakes, Buck- 
wheat, 122 
Corn, 122-123 
No Ecgs, 122-123 
Flannef, 123 
Mince. 114 
Potato. 12r^ 
Kice, 123 
Sweet Milk, 123 
Grouse, Jiroiled. 56 

Chestnut Stuffing, 

56 
Larded, 56 
Gruel, Arrowroot, 2:10 
Barl(!y, 220 
Corn)neal. 220 
Flour. 220 
Oatmeal, 2;:0 
Haju, Baked, 42 
Balls. 43 
Boiled. 42 
Broiled, 42 
Croquettes. 43 
Fritters. 113 
Omelet, 61 
Sandwich. 126 
Hash. Bake<|, '^.9 
Hermits, 191 
Hints. Helpfid, 261 
Hominy, 72 
Hqp Yeast, 104 
Horseradi'sih iSauce, 18 
Huckleberry. Pie, 156 

•lellv. 226 
ICES, 205-21 1 
Ice. Cherry, 211 

Cianherry. 211 
Currant, '211 
Ginger, 211 
Lemon. 21 1 
Mint. 212 
Orange, 212 
Basiiberrv. 213 
Strawlieiry, 2\i 

ICE CREAM, 20: 

lee Cream, Directions tor 
Freezing, 205 
Almond. 20n 
Angel, 206 
Banana. 200 
P.iR((ue, 207 
Caramel. 2-')7 
Chocolate, 207 
CoflTee. 207 
I'rench, 207 



INDEX 



11 



ICE CREAM, Cont. 

Frozen I'luldiris;, 20.' 

Lemon Hisque. :i''lS 

Miuaroon, 208 

Waj.lo, 209 

Molina t, 20& 

Pcael;, 200 

Pineapple. 209 

Kaspherrv, 20!) 

Eic<; Pudding, 208 

Snow. 210 

Strawborrv, 2 JO 

\'ani!ia, 210 
Ice Civani rJake, IG.'i 1«)6 
Ice Croam Sawe, Choco- 
late, 2L0 

Colleo, 210 

Maple, 210 
Indian Pudding. 137 
Jam, «5rape, 2;{1 

Jim, 2Vil 

StrawlviTV, 2'j4 
Javelle Water" 26.5 
Jell ice. 222 
JELLIES, 224 
Directrons loi- Mak'np, 

224 
Jelly, Aspic, CO 

Bar-!c-;)nc. 224 

Blackix'iry. 224 

r.laek Paspberrv, 2?.5 

Coffee, 147 

Cranberry, 226 

Ciabupplo, 225 

Cream. 220 

Curnint, 2'>5-227 

Dam.5on. 220 

Four FruiK 226 

Grape, 220 

Grap;- Jt duince. 221 

Huckleberry, 220 

Mint & Apple, 227 

Orange, 227 

Peaeli. 227 

Quince, 227 

Red Raspberry, 227 

Tomato. 92 

^ enison. 223 
Jelly Cakr. 167 
Johnnv Cake, US 
Jumbles, 190 I'H 
Junket. 21V 
Junket Custard 219 
Kidney, .Oeviled, 113 

Stewed, 41 



Kouniis, 221 

Lamb, Barbacued, 40 

Broiled, 40 

Chops, 40 

Pvoast, 39 

Koast Quarter, 40 

Sandwich, 120 
Lemon, !3isque. 20S 

Cake. 106 

Candy. 250 
Cream, 149 

And Egir. 219 

Filling, 170 

Frapi)e, 2i;3-212 

Ice, 211 

Pie, 150-157 

Queens, 192 
Sauce, 141 

Sherbet. 212 

Snaps. 191 

Syrup, 201 
Lemonade, 200 201 
Lemonade. Flaxseed, 221 

Fruit, 201 

Irish Moss. 221 

Pin(!apple. 2)1 
Lettuce, 72 

Sandwich. 12(i 
Liv(!r & Onions, 40 
Liver & Bacon, 41 

LITTLE CAKES, 192 

Lobster, to Open, 30 

Cutlets, 30-99 

Salad, 90 

Sauce, 48 

Stewed, 33 
Macaroni, Boiled, 72 

Croquettes. 9b 

And Ch.H'se. 72 /3 

With Tomato, 7 2 
Macaroon Ice Cj'cam, 20S 
Macaroons, Oatmeal, 19" 

Peanut. 19-: 

With Sauce, 129 
Mackerel. Salt, 27 

Creamed. 114 
Maple. Biscuit. 117 

Candv. 25'? 

Cake. 1()7 

Custard Px;. 2 57 

Caramels, 2.56 

Frosting, 171 

Ice Cream. 201) 

Parfait, 214 

Sauce. T42-21(' 
Marmalade, 2?.l-2.« 



Marguerites, l!'3 
ilarshmalknv, Filling, 170 
Cream. 119 

Pudding, 149 
Mayonnaijie. 85 
MEATS & SAUCES, 35 
Meat Cakes. 39 
Meat Pie, 39 
Milk to Scald, 264 
Minoe Meat, 157-L58 

Mock. 158 

Griddle Cakes. 114 
Mint Ice. 212 

Jelly, 227 

Paste, 261 

Punch, 202 

Sauces, 46 

MISCELLANEOUS, 262 

Molass^^s, Cake, 179 

Candy, 257 
MoinsBie, Coffee, 214 

Neapolitan, 214 

Peach, 214 

Pineapple, 215 

Red Raspberry. 215 

Sultana Roll,' 215 

Walnut, 215 

MUFFINS, GEMS, ETC. 
117 

Muffins, Bran, 105-218 
Breakfast, 120 
Cocoa. 121 
Com, 120 
No Fug, 121 
Rice, "121 
Sally Lunn, 122 
Wheat, 120 
Mush. Corn, 115 
Gratham,, 115 
Oatmeal, 115 
Mushrooms, in. Aspic, 99 
A-lia-Sabine. 129 
Baked, 115 
Creamed. 73 
Sauce, 48-49. 
Stewed, 73 

And Sweetbreads, 130 
And Tongue, 99 
Mushroom Onudet. 115 

Patties. 100 
Mustard. Dutch, 252 
:Made. 252 
Pickles, 244 
Tomato, 252 



12 



THE WARREN' COOK BOOK 



MiittoiT, Broth, 218 
Chops, Broiled, 40 
Chops, Fried, 40 
Chops, Panned, ±0 
Leg, Boiled, 4U 
Roast, 29 
Never Fail Cakes, 193 
Nuts and Peaches, 99 

Glace, 256 
Nut, Cake, 179-180 
Ca,kes, 193 
Candy, 256 
Filing), 170 
Salad, 90 
Sandwich, 127 
Noodles. 20 
Noodle Soup, 20 
Oat Flake, 115 
Patmeal, Gruel, 220 
Muish, 115 
Macaroons, 193 
iSoup, 221 
Water, 222 
Olive Sandwicth, 126 
Omielet, Beef, 61 
Ham, 61 
MoisihiPoom, 115 
Plain, 62-61 
Tomato, 62 
Onions, au grartin, 73 
Boiled, 73 
lE'S call oped, 73 
Fried, 73 
And Liver, 40 
Pickles, 245 
Stuflfed. 73 
Orangeade, 201 
Orange. Cake. 167 
Candy, 260 
Compote, 208 
Custard, 150 
FiUling. 170 
Ice. 212 
Jdly, 227 
Marmalade, 231 
Peel, Candied, 254 
Pie, 158 
'Sauce, \\-2 
.Sherb?t. 212 
Snow, 150 
Tart, 161 
Oyster, Bisoive, 20 
Cakes, 114 
Cocktail. 31 
Fritters, 74 
Patties, 100 



OYSTER, Cont. 

Plant, 74 

Sauce, 48 

Soup, 20 

Stuffing, 58 
Oysters, a-la-Thoriidik:e, 
32 

Cora, 70 

Creamed, 129 

Frilcaseed 129 

Fried, 29 

Panned, 32-130 

Scalloped, 33 

(Stewed, 33 
Oxalic Solution, 263 
PamiCiakies, see Griddle 
Cakes, 122 

PARFAIT, 213-223 

Parfait, Angel, 213 

Cafe, 214 

Maple, 214 
Parsnips, Boiled, 74 

Creamed, 75 

Fried, 74 

Stewed, 74 
Parsnip Cakes, 74 

Croqueittes, 74 

Fritters, 119 

Oysters, 74 
Paste, Pie, 153 

Plain, 153 

Puff, 153 



PASTRY, 153 

Pattic Cas.'s 100 

Potato Ca=ies, 77 
Patties, Chicken, 100 
Mushroom. 100 
Ovster. 100 
Sweetbread, 100 
Pea Soil].. 21 
Peas. Boiled. 7-'^ 
Canned. 2;^S 
Peanut, Candy. 257-258. 
Cookies, 188. 
Macaroons, 194. 
Sandwich, 126. 
Soup, 21. 
Peaches, Canned, 231-232 
Peach, Ice Cream, 203. 
Jelly, 227. 
Kuchen, 158. 
Mangoes, 244. 
Marmalade, 232. 



PEACH, Cont. 

Mousse, 214. 

Pickles 244-245. 

Pie, 158. 

Sherbet, 213. 
Pear, Chip, 233. 

Marmalade, 233. 

Salad, 90. 
Pears, Baked, 232. 

Canned, 232. 

Spiced, 232. 
Pepper, Fillings, 7b. 

Pickled, 246. 

Stuffed, 75. 
Pimentos, Stuffed, 75. 

PICKLES, 239. 

Pickles, Directions for, 
239 

Bean, 239 
Beet, 1240 
Blackberry, 239 
Cantaloupe, 240 
Chowder, 240 
Chowder, Cabbage, 

240 
Chowder, Corn, 241 
Cliow Ohow, 242 
Corn Salad, 241 
Cucumber, 241-242-24.'? 
Cucumber Salad, 243 
Erie, 242 
French 242 
German Sauce, 243 
India, 243 
Mango, 243 
Mango, Peach, 244 
Mfxed, 244 
Mustard, 244 
Onion 245 
Picallilli, 245 
Spioed, 245 
Peach, 245 
Plum, 246 
Pepper, 246 
Raisin, 246 
Sandwich, 125 
Spaniiish Sauce, 246 
Sweet, 247 
Tomato, 247 
Tomato, Ripe, 247 
Tomato, Sweet, 247 
Turnip, 247 
Vinesrar for Cucum- 
ber, 248 
Watermelon, 248 



INDEX 



15 



Pie, Apple, 153 

Apple, Cue tar d, 154 

Apple, Dried. 156 

Apple Kuch«n, 154 

Chess, 154 

Chicken, 53 

ClKO'Cokite, 155 

Cherry, Mock, 155 

Cocoainut, 155 

Coitta'ge, 39 

Crust, 153 

Cream, 155 

Currantt, 154-155 

Custard, 155 

Custard, Maple, 157 

Date, i56 

Hu(»k>leberry, 136 

Kuahen, Apple, 154 

Kuclien, Peach, 158 

Lemon, 156 

Lemon, Cream, 157 

Meat, 39 

Minoe, 157-158 

Mince, Mock, 158 

Orange, 158 

Paste, Plain, 153 

Paste, Puflf, 153 

Peach, 158 

Pieplant, 159 

Pieplant, Cream, 159 

Pigeon, 56 

Piiaeapple, 160 

Pot. Veal. 44 

Potato, 159 

Prune. 160 

Pumpkin. 159 

Raisin, 160 

Raspberry, 160 

Rice, 160 

Snow, 160 

Squash, 161 

Strawberry, 160 

Washington, Cream, 161 
Pieplant, Canned, 234 

Pie, 159 
Pigeon, Broiled, 56 

Pie, 56 
Pigs in Blanket, 114 
Pigs Feet Broiled, 42 
Pineapple, Canned, 233 

Ice Cream, 209 

Lemon ade. 201 

Mousse. 215 

Pie. 160 

Salad. 87 

Sherbet, 213 

Spiced, 234 



Plum Pudding, 137 
Plums, Spioed, 246 
Popcorn Balls, ■ 257 
Potato, Cakes. 76, 114 

Oases, 77 

Chips, 76 

Croquietttt5, 76 

Painoaki's, 123 

Pie, 159 

Puff, 78 

Puree, 20 » 

(Salad, 91 

Soup, 20 

Stuti'ing, 55 
Potatoes, Baked, 75 

Boiled, 76 

Browned, 76 

Creamed, 76 

Disked, 77 

Escalloped, 77 

Fried, 77 

Fried French, 77 

Mashed, 77 

Lyonnaise, 78 

Oak Hill, 78 

Rioed, 77 

Sacked, 78 

Sour, 78 

Stuffed, 78 

A-'la-Creole, 79 
Potato. Sweet, Balls, 79 

Cakes, 79 

Croquettes, 79 

Puree, 21 
Potatoes, Sweet, Ba'ked, 
78 

Candied, 79 

Glazed, 79 
Pork. 41 
Pork and Beans, 65 

Cake, 180 

Chops, 41 

Chops. Broiled, 41 

With Fried Apples, 41 

Pvoaet, 41 
POULTRY & GAME, 51 

PRESERVES, 229 
Puff-^. Cream, 196 

Creaim, Fried. 118 

Potato, 78 

Raisin, 139 
Prune, Almond FilliMg. 170 

Cake, 167 

Pie. 160 

Pudding, 150-151 

Whip, 150 



Pumpkin IMc, 159 
Punch, Can I on, 202 

Currant, 202 

Kruit, 201-202 

Crape, 204 

Mint, 202 

liasp berry, 203 

Tea, 200 

Tutti Frutti, 202 

PUDDINGS, HOT, 132 

Pudding, Almond. 133 
Apple, 132 

Apple Dumpling, 132 
Apple, Haked, 132 
Apples, Boiled, 132 
Birds Nest. 133 
Bread, 133-134 
Brown Betty, 133 
Buckeye, 133 
Caa^amel, 134 
Chocolate, 134-135 
Christmjas, 135 
Cottage, 134 
Cornmeal, 70-137 
Cranben-y, 134 
CranbeiTy Diimpling, 

134. 
Egg, 135 
Fig, 135-136 
Fruit, 126 
Ginger, 136 
Ginger Bread, 136 
Graham. 137 
Indian, 137 
Mountain Dew, 137 
Peach Kuchen, 158 
Plum, 137 
Queen, 138 
Raisin Puffs, 139 
Rice, 223 

Rice & Peach, 138 
Rice Meringue, 138 
Rice, Old Fkshioned 

138. 
Rice, Without Eggs. 138 
Steamed, 132-139 
Strawberry Short 

Cake 139 
Strawberry, 140 
Suet, 140 
Tapioca, 141 

PUDDINGS, COLD, see 

Cold Desserts. 144 

PUDDING SAUCES, 140- 
141 



14 



THE WAKREN COOK BOOK 



Pudding Sauce, Aprioot, 
144 
Cream, 141-150 
iQ'iooolate, 141-210 
Coffee, 210 
Cornstarch, 14tj 
Hard, 141 
Lemon, 141 
Maryland, 142 
Maipie, 210 
Orange, 142 
Sour, U2 

Strawiberry, 140-142 
[For Suet, 140 
Vanilla, 142 
YeLlow, 142 
Quince, Honey, 234 

Jelly, 226-227 
Quail, Broiled, 57 

iRoast, 57 
Rabbit, Belg-ian Hare. 67 
Fricassee, 57 
Panned, 57 
Radishes, 79 
Raisin, Cooikies, 189 
Pie, 160 
Pickles. 246 
Puffs, 139 
Raisins, Cliocolate, 96 
Raspberry, Ice, 213 
Ice Cream. 209 
Jelly, 225-227 
Momsise. 214 
Pie, 160 
Punch, 203 
Sherbet, 213 
Vinegar, 203 
No cooking, 230 
Reed" Birds, 59 
Rennet. Custard, 219 
Rice, Boiled, 79 
Croquettes. 98 
C riddle Cakes, 123 
Merinoriie. 138 
nVlnffins. 121 
Pie. 160 
Puff'Pd. 258 
Pudding. 138-223 
'Water, 222 
Rflck Biscuit, 194 
Rolls, Parker House. Ill 

Sausage, 114 
Ru^k, 112 

SALADS, 86 



Salad, General Directions, Sally Lunn, 122 



Apple & Celery, 86 

Bean, 86 

Beet, 86-87 

Cabbage, 87 

Cabbage & Apple, 87 

CantaJouipe, 87 

Celery & Pineapple, 
87 

Celery & String 

Beans, 87 

Cheese, 87 
Cherry, 87 

Chicken, 88 
Cold Slaw, 68 

Com, 241 

CueximbeT, 88-243 

Cucumber & Swieet 
bread, 92 
lEgg. 88-89 

Endive & Bacon, 89 
Fruit, 89 

Crape & Pecan, 90 
Qrapefruit, 89 
Craipefruit & Celery, 
89 

Lettuce & Onion, 90 
Lettuce & Pepper, 90 
Lobster, 90 
Pea, 90 

Pecan & Grapes, 90 
Potato, 91 
Russian, 91 
Salmon, 91 
Shrimp', 91 
Spinach, 92 
iSweetbread & Cu- 
cumber, 92 
Tomato, 92 
Tomato' & Chives. 92 
Tomato Jelly, 92 
Vegetable, 92 
Watercress. 93 
Waldorf, 93 

SALAD DRESSINGS, 83 

Salad Dressings, Boiled, 83 
Cream. 84 
Frencth. 85 
Fruit. 85 
Lobster. 85 
Mayonnaise, 85 
Sovir iCream, 86 
For Salmon, 86 
Sauce Tartare. 86 



SANDWICHES, 125 

Sandwiches, Beet, Cheese, 
125 

Cheese, Hot, 95-125 

Cheese & Pickle, 125 

Chicken, 125-127 

Club, 125 

Egg, 126-127 

Fig, 126 

Ham, 126 

Lamb, 126 

Lettuce, 126 

Olives, 126 

Peanut, 126 

Russian, 126 

iNeufchatel, 126 

uSardine, 127 

Tongue & Chicken, 
127. 

Xut & Egg, 127 
Salmon, Baked, 26 

C.noquetteis, 33-98 

Loaf, 32 

Salad, 91 

Steamed, 33 
Salsify, Creamed, 74 

Fritters, 74 

Siioup, 21 
Sardines, Fri/ed, 27 
Sardine Sandwiches, 127 

SAUCES, MEAT. 46-47- 
48 

Sauce, Apple, 46 
Bechamel, 48 
Brown, 47 
Brown Flour, 47 
Caper, 46 
Celery, 48 
Cranberry, 46 
dream, 70-99 
Drawn Butter, 47 
Egg, 47 
Cibfet, 58 
HollamJ,, 48 
HorseradisQii, 48 
Lobster. 48 
Mint, 46 

Mushroom, 48-49 
Ovster, 48 
Stock, ' 45 
Tartare, 48-86 
Tomato, 47 
White. 47-54 
Worces'tershiire. 48 



INDEX 



15 



SAUCES, PUDDING, 141 SOUPS, Cont. 



Sauer Kraut, 80 
Sausage, Beef, 38 

Pork, 42 

Rolls, 114 
Scrapple, 43 
Shad. P,ake<i. 26 

Planked, 32 

Roe, 2G 

SHERBET, 211 

Sherbet, Banana, 211 

Currant, 211 

Lemon, 212 

Orange, 212 

Peach, 213 

Pineapple, 213 

StrawberrA\ 213 
Shrimp Salad," 91 

SICK, FOOD FOR, 217 

Slaw, Gold, 67-68 
Smelts, Fried, 29 
Souffle, 95 

SOUPS, 17 

Soup. General Directiofne, 
17 
Bean. Black, IS 
Bouillon. 18 
Bouillon, Tomato, 23 
Celerv. 19-223 
Corn," 19 

Coirn, Cream of. 18 
iCherrj', 19 
Croutons, 19 
Egg, 19 
Oatmeal, 221 
Oyster, 20 
Oyster Bisque, 20 
Noodle. 20 
Noodle. German, 19 
Pea, Cream, 21 
Pea, Dried, 31 
Peanut. 21 
Poitato. 20 
Puree. Pod;a.to. 20 
Puree, Sweet Potato. 

21 
Puree. Tomato. 22 
Salsify. 21 
Rpanikh. 22 
Soring. 22 
Stock. 17 



Stock, to Clarify, 18 

Tomato, Cream, 22-23 

Tomatci I'uree. 22 

Tomato with Sago, 22 

VeaJ, 23 

Vegetable, 23 
Spinach. Boiled, 80 

Salad, 92 
Squabs, 56 

Squasb, Summer, Boiled, 
SO. 

Fried, 80 

Steamed, 80 
Squas'h, Winter, Baked, 
80 

Pie, IGl 

Steamed. 80 
Squirrel, 57 
Stains, to Remove, 262- 

263-266 
Stock, W.hite. 17 

To Oarify, 18 

For Sauces, 45 
Strawberries, Canned. 234 
Strawberry Ehimplimgs, 
140 

Filling, 170 

Joe, 213 

loe Cream, 210 

Jam, 234 

Pie, 160 

Preserveis, 234 

Pudding. 140 

Sauce, 140-142 

Short Cake, 139 

Syrup, 201 
Stuffing, Chestnut, 58 

Oyster, 58 

Potato, 55 
Succotash, 80-81 
Sultama RoU, 215 
Sweetbread Patties, 100 

Salad, 92 
Swt^'dtbrtads. Ore-amied, 
100-130 

Larded. 43 

AVith :\Iushrooms. 130 

Tapioca. Apple. 144 

Pudding. 141 
Tart*. Banbury. 161 

ilociha. 193 

Orange. 161 

Sand. 191-192 



Tea, How to Make, 199 

Beef, 218 

Iced, 200 

Punch, 200 

Russian. 199 
Timbals, 99 
Timbale, Tomato. 99 
Toast, Cream, 222 

And Eggs, 63 

Fish on. 29 

French, 114 

Veal on, 44 

Water, 222 
Tomato Bouillon, 23 

Catsup, 250 

Conseirve, 235 

Green, Figs, 234 

Jelly, 92 

Mustard, 252 

Omelet, 62 

Pickles, 247 

Puree, 22 

Salad, 92 

Sauoe, 47 

Soup, 22-23 

Timbale, 99 
Tomatoes. Baked. 81 

For Breakfast, 116 

Canned, 238 

Witb Eggs, 60 

Escalloped, 82 

Figs, Gireen, 234 

Fried, 81 

Fried, Green, 82 

Pickled, 247 

Roasted, 82 

Stewed, 81 

Stewed, Green, 82 

Sliced, 81 

Stuffed, 82 
Tongue, in Aspic, 99 

Baked. 44 

Beef, l?oiled, 38 

And Mushrooms, 99 

Sandwiches. 127 

Tripe. 38-39 
Trout, Brook. 27 
Turbot. 33 
Turkey Dreissing, 58 

Hen, 57 

Roast. 57 

With Cli^s.tnu1;s. 58 

With Ovsters. 58 

Wild. 58 
Turnip Pickles, 247 



16 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



Veal, Croquettes, 98 
Cutlets, 45-98 
.Loaf, 4-4-45 
Pot Pie, 44 
Roast, 44 
Sandwich, 127 
Soup, 23 
Stew, 45 
On Toast, 44 

VEGETABLES, 64 

VEGETABLES, CAN- 
NED, i2;!T 

As'paraous, 237 
Beets, 237 



Vegetables Canned, Cont. 

r.oans. Lima, 238 
Beans String, 237-238 
Corn, 238 
Tomatoes, 238 
Vegetable Soup, 23 

Venision, J«jlliy, 22S 
Saddle, 59 
Steak, 59 

Vin'egaT, Cbld Storagie, 
248 

For Pickles, 248 
Easpberrv. 203 
Taffy, 259 



Waffles, 123-124 
Water, Apple, 221 

Barley, 217-221-222 

Boiled, 204 

Currant, 222 

Javelle, 263 

Oatmeal, 222 

Rice, 217-222 

Toast, 222 
Welsh Rarebit, 130-131 
Wood Dock, Broiled, 59 

Roast. 59 

Scotch, 130 
Yeast, 101 



SOUPS. xz 

SOUPS 

Mrs. H. A. Booth 

Nothing furnishes a bettrr foutidatioii t'of soup than a shank 
of beef; if veal is added the fiavor will be more delicate; the bones 
^broken in small pieces), are a valuable addition. Always put the 
meat to cook in cold water, for all the juices are required for the 
soup, and if the meat is put into boiling water the pores will be 
closed and the juices retained. Do not allow it to boii rapidly, but 
irt the kettle stand on the back part of the range and simmer slow- 
ly; remove the scum that rises to the top and add a little cold watei 
occasionally to keep it from boiling until it has been thoroughly 
skimmed and your soup will then be clear. A skillful cook will be 
careful that no pungent flavor predominates, but all are so blendea 
;is not to suggest any one in particular, except in cases where only 
the flavor of one vegetable is desired. When you can make a good 
stock you have the foundation of all soups and can have a new soup 
(•very day by adding different flavorings or vegetables. Be careful 
pbout the quantity of salt; remember it is easier to add than to take 
away that seasoning. 

SOUP STOCK. 

1 shin of beef. 5 quarts of cold water. 1 onion, 1 carrot. 1 tur- 
ni]). 2 bay leaves. 1 sprig of j^arsley. 12 cloves. 1 stalk celery, ] 
tal)lespoon salt. Lean, uncookc<l. juicy beef should t'onu the basis 
of your soup; wipe the meat well with a damp towel; now cut all 
the meat from the bones; place the bones in the bottom of a large 
kettle; lay the meat on top of them; add the water and stand the 
kettle on the back part of the range for an hour; then place it over 
-1 good fire; after about 80 minutes the scum of the meat will gather 
on the surface, and the Avater will begin to steam ; now place it over 
a more moderate fire; add 1 cup of cold water aiul skim off the 
scum; now cover the kettle closely and let it siiuiiu'i- (not boil) for 
•1 hours; then add the vegetables and simuici" one hour longer; then 
strain the stock through a fine sieve; add the salt and stand at 
once in a cold place. If you keep it in a warm i)lace it will not nuike 
a nice jelly. When cold take all the grease from the surface and it 
is ready for use. Mi-s. Rorer. 

WHITE SOUP STOCK. 

Select meat that is much fresher tiiaii for roasting. Cut tlie 
meat, about 4 poiuids of veal, Vi of which is Ijone, into several 
pieces; ])ut the whole into the soup kettle, and then add 2 (|1s. cold 
water, and heat, gradually, to the boiling iioint . LiM siiinncr tbre.^ 



18 THE WARKEN COOK BOOK 

or four hours; then add 1% teaspoons of salt, 8 or 10 peppercorns 
or a part of a sweet red-pepper pod, a sprig of parslej^ 3 or 4 cloves. 
V-2 l^^ay leaf, li/o teaspoons sweet herbs, and 2 tablespoons, each of 
chopped celery and onion. Continue the cooking until the meat is 
tender. Remove the meat for use in hash or other made dishes, 
and strain off the broth. There should be three pints or a little 
loss of broth. If there be more, let simmer until reduced to that 
quantity. A fowl cooked in the broth will make the broth mucli 
richer. It will be no detriment to the fowl to be thus cooked. 

Boston Cook Book, 

TO CLARIFY SOUP STOCK. 

To 1 quart of stock add white of 1 egg, beaten slightly. Heat 
stock to boiling point, boil 2 minutes ; then cook gently 10 minutes ; 
remove scum and strain through cheese-cloth. F. B. S. 

BOUILLON. 

4 pounds of .juicy beef, 1 knuckle of veal, 2 small turnips, 2 
carrots, 1 soup bunch, 1 small pod of red pepper, 2 small white 
onions, salt, 6 quarts of water. Boil six hours; then strain through 
a sieve ; let stand over night and congeal ; skim off the grease ; jnit 
into a kettle and heat. Mrs. H. Biddle. 

BOUILLON NO. 2. 

1 pint of water to 1 pound of meat. Season with salt, pepper, 
spices, herbs and vegetables as you please. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP. 

1 pint of black beans; soak over night in 3 quarts cold water; 
in the morning pour off this water and add 3 quarts of fresh water ; 
boil gently 3 hours; when done there should be over a quart. Add 
1 quart of stock, 2 whole cloves, 2 whole allspice, small onion, piece 
of mace, small piece of cinnamon, stalk of celery and a bay leaf. 
Into a frying pan put 3 tablespoons butter ; and when it bubbles add 
1 tablespoon of flour; cook till brown. Add to soup and simmer all 
together nearly an hour ; season with salt and pepper ; strain through 
a fine sieve; serve with slices of lemon and hard boiled eggs. 

Mrs. Salyer. 

CREAM OF CORN SOUP. 

Score each row of grains on 6 ears of corn ; then, w ith the back 
of a knife, press out carefully, and throw the cobs into a kettle. 
Cover with a quart of water, bring to boiling point, and strain . 
Add to this the scraped corn. Rub together 2 tablespoons of butter 
and 1 of flour; stir into the mixture, and bring to boiling poin1 . 
Add 1 pt. of hot milk, 1 rounding teaspoon of salt and 1 salt- 



SOUPS. 19 

spoon of pepper. If canned corn is used allow 1 can to 1 quart of 
milk, 1 tablespoon of flour and 2 of butter, with the prescribed 
Sf^asoning. Mrs. Rorer. 

CORN SOUP. 

12 ears of corn, or 1 can of corn boiled twenty minutes; add 1 
small onion before boiling; add 2 qts. of rich milk; season with 
pepper, salt and butter; thicken with 2 tablespoons of flour. Boil 
the whole ten minutes ; then put through a sieve ; turn into a tureen 
in which the volks of 2 eggs have been well beaten. 

Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

Put 1 pt. of cooked celery through the second knife of a meat 
chopper, 1 pt. chicken broth, 1 qt. milk, 2 tablespoons butter, made 
smooth with 2 tablespoons flour. Boil the celery and stock togeth- 
er; heat the milk and stir through it the butter and flour, until 
smooth; then add stock and season highly with salt and paprika. 

Mrs. George P. Orr. 

CHERRY SOUP. 

Wash 1 qt. cherries and cover with water; cook until tender; 
rub through a sieve and sweeten to taste ; return to the fire and 
thicken with a tablespoon corn starch wet with a little water. In 
the meantime have some rice flour cooked in milk until consistency 
of mush; season with salt and piece of butter; serve with the soup 
in a side dish. Any kind of fruit can be used in place of cherries. 

Miss Bertha AVulff. 

CROUTONS. 

Butter slices of stale bread, cut into inch squares and brown 
lightly in a quick oven. Serve with soup. Mrs. J. Gleave. 

QUICK EGG SOUP. 

Stir a teaspoon of beef extract into 1 qt. boiling water; add 
a grated onion, i/s teaspoon of celery seed or a little celery chopped, 
1/2 teaspoon of salt, and a saltspoon of pepper; stir constantly until 
it reaches the boiling point ; strain through a fine sieve, and pour 
it while hot into the well-beaten yolks of 2 eggs; add 4 tablespoons 
rf carefully boiled rice, and serve very hot. Mrs. Rorer. 

(GERMAN) NOODLE SOUP. 

Take a nice soup bone and put on with a gallon of cold water; 
let it come to a boil and skim: then let it boil slowly for 2 hours. 
1 hour before serving add small pieces of carrot, onion, celery and 
parsley. Half an hour before serving add a few whole peppers, 



^u THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



fillspice, cinnamon and grated nutmeg to taste. This soup is im- 
proved by using a small chicken with the bone. Strain soup 
through a colander and cook noodles in it and serve hot. 

Mrs. D. S. 

NOODLE SOUP. 

Take 2 eggs, mix with tiour enough to make a very stiff dough, 
add 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder to the flour before mixing; roll 
thin and dry for an hour; then cut very fine and boil in 2 qts. beei" 
stock for twent}^ minutes; season to taste. Mrs. D. D. Reed. 

NOODLES FOR SOUP. 

Beat 1 egg light, add a pinch of salt and flour enough to make 
a stiff dough; roll out very thin; dredge with flour to keep from 
sticking; roll up tightly; begin at one end and shave down fine like 
cabbage for slaw; strain soup and add noodles ten minutes before 
serving. Mrs. M. Strelitz. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

1 qt. milk to 50 oysters, 1 large tablespoon of flour; 2 table- 
spoons butter rubbed together, pepper and salt ; drain the liquor 
from the oysters ; put it on the stove with the butter, flour and 
seasoning. Let it come to a boil and skim; then add milk; let this 
boil before adding oysters, which should only boil up for a moment. 

]\Irs. Ada Partridge. 

DELICIOUS OYSTER BISQUE. 

Cover i/> pt. of finely chopped celery with 1 pt. of water ; stevr 
slowly for i/> hour; drain and wash 25 oysters; throw them into a 
sauce pan and shake over the fire until they have boiled for at 
least five minutes; drain, this time saving the liquor; now mix the 
t-elery and oysters together; add to them 1 qt. of milk; rub to- 
gether 2 tablespoons of butter and 2 of flour; add this to the mix- 
ture and cook for 10 minutes longer; strain through a sieve; add 
a rounding teaspoon of white pepper. JMrs. H. A. Booth. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Cut potatoes fine into cold water; cook down in salted water 
until tender; add a little onion, cream and milk,- — half cream; sea- 
son with salt and pepper, and beat one egg slightly ; pour in slowly 
v.hile cooking; do not stir; then add a small piece of butter and 
serve. Mrs. AV. D. Hinckley. 

PUREE OF POTATOES. 

Boil and mash in 2 qts. of water 4 large potatoes, a small onion. 
2 stalks of celery, 2 s]irigs of parsley. When done pass through a 



SOUPS. 21 

sieve ; return to the fire ; season with salt and pepper, and 2 gener- 
ous tablespoons of butter, rubbed into a dessertspoon of flour; boil 
up once and pour into a tureen over a cupful of whipped cream. 

Mrs. James Roy. 

PUREE OF SWEET POTATOES. 

4 medium sized sweet potatoes, 1 pt. milk, 1 tablespoon butter, 
1 tablespoon Hour, salt and pepper to season ; boil the potatoes un- 
til very tender and then remove the jackets, and press through a 
colander or a potato ricer; put milk on to boil in double boiler; 
rub butter and flour together until smooth; add to the milk; then 
add potatoes; stir until thoroughly mixed; add salt and pepper as 
needed; serve with toasted crackers or croutons. 

Miss Flora McNett. 

PEANUT SOUP. 

1 qt. peanuts shelled and cooked in water until tender, (about 
1 hour); add 1 qt. water, 1 slice onion, 1 stalk of celery; rub 
through a sieve, and if on hand add I pt. of chicken stock, if not, 
] qt. of milk ; thicken with 1 tablespoon of flour and 1 tablespoon 
of butter rubbed together; season with salt and pepper. 

Mrs. H. A. Booth. 

CREAM OF PEA SOUP. 

1 can of peas. 1 pt. milk or cup each of cream and milk, 1 
tablespoon flour, 1 teaspoon salt. Vi teaspoon pepper, 1 tablespoon 
of butter; drain peas from liquor; cook until tender and rub 
through a sieve; scald and thicken milk with flour; add seasoning 
and combine puree with milk, and lastly add butter; serve at 
once. MES. F. E. SILL. 

DRIED PEA OR BEAN SOUP. 

Soak the peas or beans over night in cold water; next morn- 
ing drain and cook in stock water until tender; then take 1 onion 
and 2 carrots, and cook with the peas. AVhen tender slice the 
carrots in thin slices ; take peas from fire and rub through a sieve ; 
put in a piece of butter, a little chopped parsley, season with pep- 
per and salt ; boil up ; pour over carrots and serve at once with 
croutons. Miss Wulff. 

TWO SALSIFY SOUPS. 

Scrape 10 or 12 roots of salsify, throwing each one at once 
into cold water. Then cut into very thin slices, and cover with a 
quart of cold water, add 1 bay leaf and 1 slice of onion, cover and 
cook for thirty minutes. Add 1 pt. of milk and 1 tablespoon of 
butter rubbed with 1 of flour; stir carefully until boiling; add 



22 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



] level teaspoon of salt and 1 saltspoon of white pepper. 

To change the character of this soup press the salsify through 
a sieve, or grate it before cooking. The yolks of 1 or 2 eggs may 
be beaten with V^ of a cup of cream and add at the last moment. It 
then makes a nice soup for invalids or children. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

SPRING SOUP. 

Cut up 4 or 5 bunches of small onions; simmer in 1 qt. of 
water until very tender; then rub through a sieve; season well 
with salt and paprika ; thicken with 3 tablespoons of flour and 3 
tablespoons of butter rubbed together ; then add 1 pt. of hot milk ; 
serve at once with toasted bread. 

SPANISH SOUP. 

Fry in a little fat, a clove of garlic, 1 slice of onion. i/4 tea- 
spoon thyme, 1 qt. brown stock, or beef extract ; then add 1 can 
French kidney beans, or 1 pt. of dry beans, soaked over night; 
then cook slowly 1 hour; rub through a sieve; add salt and pep- 
per to taste, and 1 pimento cut in small pieces. Wlien using beef 
extract, use 1 teaspoon to a cup of water. Boston Cook Book. 

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP. 

Add to 1 pt. of water 10 medium-sized, or 1 qt. of canned tom- 
atoes, 1 teaspoon of sugar, 8 whole cloves, Yo onion, a little parsley, 
and boil fifteen or twenty minutes ; add a small teaspoon of soda 
and in a few minutes strain ; thicken 1 qt . of milk with a large 
tablespoon of corn starch, stirring and boiling for ten minutes ; 
add to this a little salt, a sprinkling of cayenne, a heaping table- 
spoon of butter, and the mixture of tomatoes, allowing the whole 
to become thoroughly heated through, but not to boil. 

Mrs. J. Roy. 

TOMATO PUREE 

1 qt. tomatoes, 1 qt. water, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 small onion, 
1 tablespoon corn starch, 1 tablespoon sugar; melt butter in spider 
or frying pan, and frv the onion until tender; dissolve sugar and 
corn starch in a little of the tomat(», ad<!. a few cloves aud cook 
1/2 hour and strain. Mrs. C. E. Bell. 

TOMATO SOUP WITH SAGO. 

Put 1 qt. !)f stewed or 1 can oi' tomatoes into a saucepan; add 
1 slice of onion, 1 bay leaf, 1 sprig of parsley, simmer gently for 10 
minutes. II.') ve ready 4 t.ibb spoons of pearl s;i«io that has been 
soaked in a pint of water for 2 hours, stand it oii the back part 
of the srove, and cook slowly until sago is clear; press the tomatoes 



SOUPS. 23 

through a fine sieve; add the sago and lA pt. water or stock; 
stir in 1 tablespoon of butter; add salt and pepper, and serve at 
once. Mrs. Rorer. 

CREAM TOMATO SOUP. 

1 can tomatoes, ^4 teaspoon soda, 1/3 cup butter, 14 cup flour, 
salt, 1/2 teaspoon white pepper, 1 qt. milk ; stew tomatoes slow- 
ly 1/2 hour; strain and add soda while hot; make a white sauce 
of remaining ingredients, and add tomato juice. Serve immed- 
iately. Mrs. J. AV. Crawford. 

TOMATO BOUILLON WITH BREAD FINGERS. 

Put 12 tomatoes cut into slices into a saucepan, or use 1 can 
of tomatoes ; add 1 pt. water, 1 onion sliced, 1 bay leaf, 1 round- 
ing teaspoon salt, a saltspoon of white pepper; boil rapidly for 
ten minutes; press through a colander, using as much of the flesh 
as possible; add 1 pt. boiling water and, if you like, i/> teaspoon 
beef extract and the whites of 2 eggs, slightly beaten; stand this 
over the fire, and boil rapidly for five minutes ; strain through two 
thicknesses of cheesecloth. The tomato that remains in the cloth 
niay be put aside for sauces or the flavoring of other soups. You 
will have 1 qt. of beautiful, clear, strong soup. Serve with thi» 
toasted bread fingers. Mrs. Rorer. 

VEAL SOUP. 

To 3 pounds of a well broken joint of veal add 4 qts. water 
and set to boil; prepare I/4 pound of macaroni by boiling it in a 
dish, by itself, with enough water to cover it; when the macaroni 
is tender add a little butter and season to taste with pepper and 
salt, then add the macaroni and the water in which it was cooked 
to the stock; onions or celery may be added for flavoring. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Boil a beef bone in 3 qts. water 3 hours ; remove the meat 
and add to the soup a very little cabbage, 1 onion, 1 carrot, 1 
turnip, some celery all chopped fine, and 1 tablespoonful of rice or 
barley; season with salt and pepper and boil an hour; serve as it 
is or strain if preferred; season the meat with pepper and salt, 
a small piece of batter and cook broAvn in a little of the broth 
until tender and serve after the soup. Mrs. B. 



24 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



PISH. 25 

FISH 

Mrs. J. O. Parmlee 

Fish are easier of digestion but less nutritious than meats. To 
be eatable they should be perfectly fresh, those being most perfect 
which go straight from their native element into the hands of the 
cook. 

HOW TO TELL WHEN PERFECTLY FRESH. 

The eye should be clear, the gills red, the scales bright, the 
f.esh firm. After fish are dressed and cleaned, rinse thoroughly in 
cold water, using only what is necessary for perfect cleanliness, 
drain, wipe dry and place on ice until ready to cook. 

To remove the earthy taste from fresh water fish, especially 
bass, sprinkle with salt and let stand over night or a few hours be- 
fore cooking, rinse off and wipe dry. Fresh water fisb should never 
be soaked in water, except when frozen, when they may be placed 
in ice-cold water to thaw and then immediately cooked. 

Salt fish may be soaked over night in cold water (skin side up), 
changing water once or twice if very salt. Fish should always be 
well cooked, being both unpalatable and unwholesome when under- 
done. 

One of the most essential things in serving fish is to have 
everything hot and quickly dished, so that all may go to the table 
at once. 

The method of cooking which retains most nourishment is broil- 
ing, baking next and boiling poorest of all. Steaming is better than 
boiling. 

BAKED BLUEFISH. 

To bake a bluefish lay some slices of larding pork in the bottom 
of a baking pan ; over this sprinkle a large onion chopped fine ; put 
about 4 slices of bread on top of the chopped onion ; then lay the 
fish in, having had it dressed at the market for baking; slice the 
fish across the backbone in four or five places, and insert in each 
gash a piece of the larding pork; lay some strips of the pork over 
the surface of the fish; season well with salt and pepper; dredge 
with flour; cover the fish with another pan; stand it in a quick oven 
and bake till the flakes of the fish separate from the backbone ; then 
serve in the pan in which it is baked. Have a dish of quarters 
of lemon served with the fish. New boiled potatoes are the proper 
accompaniments to baked blue-fish. This baked fish with potatoes, 
followed by a salad of lettuce, green peppers and Spanish onions, 
makes an excellent dinner without anything else. 



26 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



BAKED SALMON. 

Drain the liquor from one can salmon ; pick to pieces ; work in 
1 tablespoon melted butter, salt, pepper, 2 eggs, 1 cup bread crumbs, 
a little milk ; put in a buttered bowl or baking powder can ; set in 
pan of boiling water; cook in a hot oven 1 hour. 

SAUCE. 

Make a cup drawn butter; add liquor from can, 1 beaten egg, 
pepper, salt, 1 chopped pickle and minced parsley ; boil up and pour 
over fish or serve as gravy. Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

BAKED SHAD. 

Clean and wash thoroughly inside and out ; wipe with clean 
towel; rub it well with salt; make a dressing of 1 cap stale bread 
crumbs, 1 tablespoon chopped parsle\, salt, pepper arnl melted but- 
ter; stuff fish and sew it up with soft yarn. Now score one side of 
the fish about two inches apart, and put a strip of salt pork in each 
gash; place slices of pork on bottom of dripper and rest the fish on 
these; dredge thickly with salt, pepper and flour; bake in warm- 
oven fifteen minutes to every pound of fish ; garnish with lemon 
slices, potato balls and parsley. Mrs. Parmlee. 

SHAD ROE. 

Cover the roe with boiling salted water to which a teaspoon of 
■vinegar has been added and boil gently from eight to ten minutes. 
Remove from fire; drop into cold water and cool slightly; roll in a 
mixture of milk and egg and then in cracker crumbs ; fry in butter, 
seasoning with salt and pepper. Serve with a fish sauce or lemon 
points. Mr. John Schmutz. 

FILLING FOR FISH. 

1 cup bread crumbs. Vo cup chopped olives, ^4 cup melted but- 
ter, cinnamon to make it pink, salt and pepper. 

Mrs. E. S. Lindsey. 

BOILED FISH. 

To boil a fish, fill with a rich dressing same as for poultry, wrap 
in a well floured cloth, tie closely with twine and place in boiling 
water; simmer from ten to twelve minutes to the pound, according 
to the size. 

BOILED FRESH COD. 

Sew up the piece of fish in thin cloth, boil in salted water, al- 
low fifteen minutes to the pound; carefully unwrap, and pour over 
it Hollandaise or cream sauce. 



FISH. 21 

BOILED SALT MACKEREL. 

After freshening, wrap in a cloth ; simmer for fifteen minutes ; 
remove ; slice over it two hard boiled eggs ; pour over drawn but- 
ter or a dressing made with a little milk and flour; garnish with 
parsley leaves. Mrs. T. W. McNett. 

BROILED FISH. 

This is one of the nicest ways qf cooking bluefish, mackerel, 
large trout, shad and white fish. Rub your broiler with a piece of 
suet before putting the flsh in . A fish weighing four pounds will 
take a half hour to cook over a moderate fire. When the fish is 
done, separate it carefully from the broiler with a knife, sprinkle 
with salt and pepper and spread with butter. It is now ready to 
serve. For broiling, the fish should be split down the back. 

FRIED SARDINES. 

Select fine large sardines; take them from the box with care; 
wipe the oil from them ; dip first in egg and then in rolled cracker ; 
fry in spider in hot butter. Serve on toast. AdaPartridge. 

BROOK TROUT. 

"Wash and drain a few minutes ; split nearly to the tail ; flour 
nicely; salt and pepper; fry in a little butter, or with slices of salt 
pork . 

BREADED FISH. 

Use any kind of fish that has been freed from skin and bones. 
Cut it into small pieces about four inches long and three wide ; sea- 
son well with salt and pepper; then dip it in beaten egg and roll in 
dried bread crumbs ; arrange in the frying basket, but do not place 
one piece top of another; cook for three minutes and a half in cot- 
tolene properly tested; serve with tartar sauce or black butter. 
Smelts are also cooked in this manner. Mrs. Parker. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

4 dozen clams, G ears corn, 6 tomatoes, f- onions, (i i)()tatoes, V2 
pound salt pork, salt and pepper to taste : run all through a meat 
chopper (the clams very fine, the vegetables coars-.;; ; cook three 
hours; add water as necessary to make 2 gallons of chowder. 

Mrs. AV. J. Richards. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

25 clams, Vt pound salt fat pork. 4 good-sized onions, 6 medium- 
sized potatoes, 1 qt. milk, ] can corn, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 table- 
spoons flour; clean shells thoroughly with a brush; put them in a 
kettle; pour over them 2 qts. boiling water; cover tightly; when 



28 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

the shells open, remove clams from them; lay on a plate and cut 
into small pieces ; chop pork and fry in a spider till light brown ; 
add onions chopped fine ; stir till cooked ; then turn into the kettle 
of water; then add the potatoes diced. When potatoes are half 
done add clams; cook till potatoes are done; then add milk. When 
it boils add corn ; simmer few minutes ; then add butter and flour 
(browned in spider) ; season with salt and cayenne. 

Mrs. Salyer. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

100 clams chopped fine ; place with the liquor o^ er the fire ; 
add two or three times the amount of clam juice or water; chop 4 
onions, 2 carrots, 6 potatoes, 6 tomatoes and a little parsley ; chop 
fine and try out 6 ounces of fat salt pork ; pour fat and scraps into 
Ihe clams; roll fine i/2 pound of crackers and stir in e^radually, add- 
ing also 1 qt. milk two minutes before chowder is done ; season 
with black pepper. Mrs. W. M. Hoffer, Jamestown. N. Y. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

1 coffee cup raw shredded codfish, 1 bowl raw potatoes ; boil 
together; mash together and beat vigorously. 1 egg, butter Vo the 
size of an egg, pepper ; thoroughly mix and roll into balls ; drop 
into hot fat and fry three minutes. Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

COURBILLION. 

A firm fish, (red fish or sheep's head), cut the fish up; salt, 
pepper and roll in corn meal; fry plain; put away and let get cold; 
1 heaping tablespoon of butter; put that in frying pan and let get 
brown; add 1 onion, cut very fine; let the onion get brown. To 
butter and onion add 1 can tomatoes ; let this cook until all cooked 
together; then add !/> teaspoon of salt, red pepper to taste, 1 table- 
spoon Worcestershire sauce ; then pour 1/2 teacup of boiling water ; 
]nit in the pieces of fried fish; cover and put to back of stove; al- 
low to slowly simmer for one hour. Mrs. J. P. Jefi'erson. 

CREAMED FISH. 

2 cups of cooked fish, 2 tablespoons of flour, 1 tablespoon but- 
ter, 1 tablespoon chopped parsley, 1 cup cream or milk, 1 teaspoon 
salt, yolks of 4 hard-boiled eggs, cayenne pepper to taste ; scald the 
cream ; rub the butter and flour together until smooth ; add to 
cream and stir until it thickens ; take from fire ; add yolks of eggs 
mashed fine; the parsley, salt and pepper; mix well; add fish care- 
fully; for if it is stirred it makes the mixture stringy and pasty; 
put in ramekins, shells or baking dish; cover top with buttered 
crumbs and bake in hot oven fifteen minutes. Double this recipe 
(4 pounds fish uncooked fills 17 ramekins.) Carrie J. Allen. 



FISH. 29 

DEVILED CLAMS. 

Chop 1 can clams until fine; chop 1 onion, size of large hickory 
nut, and 5 leaves of parsley ; add 1 coffee cup of milk to onion and 
parsley; stir; mix butter size of egg, and a teaspoon flour; then add 
onions, parsley and milk; stir and mix; add this to clams and stir 
in an egg; add pepper, salt, Worcester sauce, scant teaspoon cay- 
enne pepper; stir; bake in shells with cracker crumbs and butter 
over them. Mrs. J. P. Jefferson. 

FRIED FISH. 

For a large fish cut out the backbone, and cut the body in 4 or 
r> pieces; sprinkle with salt and pepper; roll in flour and fry in hot 
iard or drippings until brown. ^Irs. Hawke. 

(PHILADELPHIA) FRIED OYSTERS. 

Have 1 pt. large oysters Avell drained; roll very fine some crack- 
er crumbs mixed with a handful browned bread crumbs; season with 
salt and pepper and a little nutmeg; have ready a beaten egg to 
which has been added 2 tablespoons milk ; dip each oyster separ- 
ately in the crumbs ; then in the egg, and back in the crumbs : pat 
in shape and lay on platter until ready to fry in deep fat, which 
must be boiling hot and over a very hot fire ; put in carefully 5 or 6 
oysters at a time ; turn quickly and lift out on hot platter the mo- 
ment they are a light brown. If these are properly fried the oys- 
ters will be tender and moist, in a crisp brown jacket, and not at 
all greasy. ]\Irs. Copeland. 

FRIED SMELTS. 

A person who has once fried smelts in cottolene will never un- 
der any circumstances use lard; make a slight opening at the gills; 
then draw them between the thumb and finger, beginning at the 
tail, this will press out all the inside. Now dip them first in beaten 
egg; then in bread crumbs and fry in very hot cottolene: drain, dust 
Vv'ith salt, and serve smoking hot with tartar sauce. 

Mrs. Parker. 

FISH ON TOAST. 

Take the remnanls of any fresh fish, whether fried or boiled; 
pick into flakes and cover in a sauce pan with milk or cream; if 
milk is used, to 1 cup of milk use 1 teasi)oon flour stirred with butter 
enough to cream it; salt and pepper to taste; if cream is used, omit 
the butter, but thicken with the flour stirred with a little cream; 
v.hen it comes to a boil remove instantly nnd pour over toast; gar- 
nish with hard boiled eggs. Ada Pai-fridg**. 



50 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



FISH CUTLETS. 

% pt. milk, 3 teaspoons cottolene, 3 even tablespoons flour, 1 
egg yolk, 1 tablespoon parsley, chopped, Y^ grated nutmeg, 10 drops 
onion juice, 2 cups of cold boiled fish, seasoning. Put the milk on 
to boil; rub together the cottolene and flour; then stir them into 
the boiling milk; stir and cook until a thick paste is formed; add 
the yolk of egg, parsley, onion juice; mix and add the boiled fish; 
mix again and add a palatable seasoning of salt and cayenne; turn 
out to cool; when cold, form into cutlets or croquettes; dip first in 
beaten egg; then in bread crumbs; fry in very hot cottolene; drain 
on brown paper and serve very hot with Cream Sauce. 

Mrs. Parker. 

LOBSTER. 

Never buy a dead lobster. The male is preferred; the female 
for sauces and soups. The female has a broader tail and less claws 
Ihan the male. If possible, always boil the lobster at home; but 
in some localities, where it is necessary to buy them boiled, see that 
the tail is stitf and elastic ; so that when you bend it out, it springs 
back immediately; otherwise they were dead before boiling. Lob- 
sters boiled when dead are watery and soft; they are very unwhole- 
some, even to a dangerous degree. 

TO OPEN A LOBSTER. 

Separate the tail from the body and twist off all the claws ; 
shake out carefully the tom-alley (this is the liver and may be known 
by its greenish color) ; also the coral. Then draw the body from 
the shell, remove the stomach, which is found immediately under 
the head and throw this away, now split the body through the cen- 
ter and pick the meat from the cells; cut the underside of the tail 
shell; loosen the meat and take it out in one solid piece; now split 
the meat of the tail open and you will uncover a little vein running 
its entire length; this remove. The vein is not always the same 
color; sometimes it is red; sometimes black and sometimes white; 
but in all cases it must be taken out and thrown away. The stom- 
ach or lady, the vein and the spongy fingers between the body and 
sliell, are the only parts not eatable. Crack the claws and take out 
the meat. Philadelphia Cook Book. 

LOBSTER CUTLETS. 

A 4 pound boiled lobster, chopped fine, % cup cream, 1 table- 
spoon cottolene, 1 tablespoon flour, 3 egg yolks, mace, salt and 
cayenne to taste, 1 teaspoon parsley, chopped fine ; mix the flour ; cot- 
tolene, cream and egg yolks together and let come to a boiling point, 
but on no account let it boil ; add this and seasoning to the lobster 



FISH. 51 

meat ; then place all on a dish to cool ; when cool mold with the hands 
into cutlets and dip first in egg and then in bread crumbs and fry 
in hot cottolene a light brown ; place a small claw in the end of each 
cutlet and serve the instant they come from the skillet. 

Mrs. F. T. Parker. 

LOBSTER CUTLETS. 

1 pt. chopped lobster meat, ^/j teaspoon salt, cayenne, 14 tea- 
spoon mustard, 1 cup cream sauce ; mix the salt, mustard and cay- 
enne together and add them to the lobster meat, which has been 
chopped fine ; add the cream sauce : 1 cup cream and milk, 2 table- 
spoons butter, i/t teaspoon salt. 14 cup flour, white pepper Make 
a white sauce and cook until thick; add the lobster mixture; spread 
the mixture I/2 inch thick on a platter; when cool shape into cut- 
lets and dip in seasoned bread crumbs ; then in egg, and again in 
crumbs; cook in deep fat until brown; put a lobster claw or paper 
frill in the end of each cutlet. Serve with a sauce. 

Mrs. W. A. Talbott. 

MINCED CLAMS. 

Open 25 clams, taking care to keep entire the same number of 
half shells; wash the clams; cut off the heads; split and scrape the 
necks and mince the entire clams very fine ; put them over the fire 
to stew in the strained .iuice which they yield while being opened. 
Meantime peel an onion, slice it thin; put it over the fire in 2 ounces 
of butter ; let it begin to turn yellow ; then stir smoothly into it 2 
ounces of flour, the minced clams and their broth : 1/2 pt. cream 
or milk ; 1 saltspoon of salt, V4 of a saltspoon each of grated nutmeg 
nnd white pepper, and a dash of cayenne; the mixture should be as 
thick as for ordinary croquettes, and if the clams do not yield suffic- 
ient juice, substitute milk for it ; let the mixture simmer where it 
will not burn for twenty minutes ; remove it from the fire ; stir into 
it the yolks of 8 raw eggs; put it into the clam shells; arrange them 
on a baking pan; dust them with bread crumbs; put a small piece 
of butter on each one. Mrs. Parker. 

OYSTER COCKTAIL NO. I. 

1 tablespoon lemon .juice, 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, 3 
tablespoons tomato catsup, 1 saltspoon salt, Y2 saltspoon cayenne, 5 
drops tobasco sauce; put from 4 to 6 raw oysters in sinall glass for 
each person; pour over oysters 1 large tablespoon of above mixture; 
serve with oyster forks. Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

OYSTER COCKTAIL, NO. II. 

8 oysters, 1 tablespoon tonuito catsup. 1 tablespoon Worcester- 
shire sauce, 1 teaspoon horseradish, 1 teaspoon taragon vinegar, 1 



52 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



teaspoon lemon juice, 4 drops pepper sauce, pinch of salt; mix well, 
add the oysters ; fill the glasses and let the mixture stand until 
thoroughly chilled and blended before serving. Chili sauce and 
some of the oyster or clam liquor, for this recipe and the same foi" 
clam cocktails, may be used. 

Mrs. W. M. Hoffer, Jamestown, N. Y. 

OYSTERS A LA THORNDIKE. 

Drain a pt. oysters and add them to 2 tablespoons of melted but- 
ter; cook in this until they grow plump; then add i/o teaspoon salt; 
a dash of caj'enne and nutmeg; 4 tablespoons of cream and the well- 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs; serve on squares of toast. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Put 1 pt. oysters in colander; pour cold water over them; let 
drain for 10 minutes; put frying pan over fire, and when very hot 
toss in oysters; shake over fire until oysters are plump- season Avith 
salt, pepper and 1 tablespoon butter; serve on platter with tomato 
catsup. Mrs. Gruninger. 

PLANKED SHAD. 

This is the very best way of cooking shad : — The plank should 
be 3 inches thick, 2 feet long, li/o feet wide, and of well seasoned hick- 
ory or oak. Pine or soft wood gives the fish a woody taste. Take 
a fine shad just from the water; scale; split it down the back; clean 
it; wash well and wipe dry; dredge it with salt and pepper; place 
(he plank before a clear fire to get very hot; then spread the shad 
open and nail it skin next the hot plank with tacks; put it before 
the fire with the large end down. In a few minutes turn the board 
so that the other end will be down. To tell Avhen it is done pierce 
it with a fork; if the flesh be flakey. it is done. Spread with butter; 
serve on the plank or draw the tacks carefully, and slide the shad 
onto a hot dish. The white fish caught in the lakes when cooked in 
this manner are excellent. "Sirs,. Parker. 

SALMON LOAF. 

1 pound can salmon. 1 cup grated bread crumbs, 3 eggs, V2 cii]) 
milk. 1 tablespoon melted butter, salt and pepper; pick salmon with 
fork: add the beaten yolks and other ingredients; then the beaten 
v.'hites last; mixing it lightly: steam 1 hour. Mrs. Roy. 

SALMON LOAF. 

1 small can salmon; 4 eggs beaten light; 4 tablespoons melted 
hutter ; 1/2 cup fi"e bread crumbs ; season with salt, pepper and ]Dars- 
ley; chop the fish fine; mix together; put in buttered pan; steam one 
hour . 



FISH. 33 

SAUCE FOR SAME. 

1 cup milk heated to boiling point, thickened with 1 tablespoon 
corn starch. 1 tablespoon butter, liquor of salmon, 1 raw egg, put in 
last; carefully pour over loaf and serve hot. 

Mrs. C. E. Bell and Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

STEAMED SALMON. 

1 can salmon, 2 tablespoons melted butter, 3 eggs, (save yolks 
for dressing;. Vj enp bread crumbs; season with salt, pepper, mus- 
tard, cayenne and parsley, if liked; mix thoroughly and steam one 
hour. 

DRESSING. 

. Cream 1 tablespoon liutter. 1 teaspoon corn starch, 1/2 cup milk; 
cook until clear; add lirpior from salmon with yolks of eggs well- 
beaten. Mrs. F. H. Gruninger. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

Take equal parts of canned salmon, (after drawing off the oil), 
and mashed potatoes; season with salt and pepper; dip in egg; roll 
in cracker crumbs and fry like oysters ; making them in any shape 
preferred. Ada Partridge. 

STEWED OYSTERS. 

Juice of oysters ; boil and strain ; i)ut on again ; add butter, 
cream, pepper and salt; wash the oysters; add them to juice and 
let them just boil. For pint of oysters, add 6 allspice. 

Mrs. J. P. Jefferson. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

1 pt. oysters, 2 cups of crumbs, salt, a little cayenne. 2 table- 
'■'poons of butter, 14 cup oyster juice; place oysters in 2 layers using 
Yi amount of crumbs on bottom of baking dish, Vi more in the mid- 
dle, and 1'2 f^^i top; bake in moderate oven thirty to forty minutes. 

STEWED LOBSTER. 

Cut the lobster fine; ])ut it in a stew-pan with a little milk oi- 
cream; boil up once; add 1 tablespoon butter, a little pepper, and 
serve plain or on toasted crackers; cook lobster only long enough to 
heat it. as a longer cooking renders it tougli . Mrs. Parker. 

TURBOT. 

4 pounds white fish, steam until done ; bone it ; take 1 qt. milk, 
y^ pound flour, a little thyme or sage, salt and pepper. 3 slices of a 
large onion; cook over a kettle of water until it comes to a thick 
cream ; then add Vi pound of butter and 2 eggs ; put in a large bak- 



54 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

ing dish a layer of fish, salt and pepper; then the tilling, until the 
dish is full, putting filling on top ; sprinkle with bread crumbs, and 
cheese if preferred ; bake in a moderate oven Y_> hour. One large 
dish will serve 15 or 20. (this has been tried and found very nice.) 

Ada Partridge. 

CREAMED CODFISH. 

1 pt. of salt codfish picked up fine ; cover in cold water and bOil 
up once ; turn off water and add 1 pt. of cream thickened slightly 
or a cream sauce. (See index. ) 



MEATS AND SAUCES. 35 



MEATS AND SAUCES 

Mrs. F. P. Hue 

BEEF. 

The qviality of beef depends on the age of the creature, and man- 
ner of feeding". Good beef should be firm and of fine grained tex- 
ture, bright red in color, and well mottled and coated with fat. 
The fat should be firm, and of a yellowish color. Suet should be dry 
and crumble easily. Meat should be removed from paper as soon 
as it comes from the market, otherwise the paper absorbs some of the 
juice. 

Keep meat in a cool i)laee. Always wipe beef before cooking, 
with a cheesecloth wrung out of cold water, but never allow it to 
stand in cold water. Inattention to the temperature of the water 
and too early application of salt causes great waste in boiling meats. 
To make fresh meat rich and nutritious it should be placed in a ket- 
tle of boiling water, skimmed well as soon as it begins to boil again, 
and placed where it will slowly boil. Turn meat occasionally and 
keep well under water and fresh hot water supplied as it evapor- 
ates in boiling. Boil gently, as rapid boiling hardens the fiber and 
renders the meat hard and tasteless. No salt should be added until 
the meat is nearly done, as it extracts the juices if added too soon. 
Salt meats should be put on in cold water, so that it may freshen in 
cooking; as soon as water boils (if meat is very salt), replace by 
fresh cold water, the water being changed until it remains fresh 
enough to give meat a palatable flavor when done. Allow twenty 
minutes to the pound for fresh meats, and twenty-five for salt and 
smoked meats; the time to be modified, of course, by the quantity of 
meat. The broth of boiled meats should always be saved to use in 
soups, stews and gravies. A pod of red pepper in the water will 
prevent the unpleasant odor from filling the house. 

BEEFSTEAK BROILED. 

To cook a good, juicy steak never pound it, but slash it several 
times across each way ; lay upon a gridiron well greased : have a nice 
bright fire and broil quickly without burning; if the coals blaze from 
tlie drippings, sprinkle on a little salt, which will instantly extinguish 
the flames. Steak should be turned constantly while broiling, and to 
be rare should not cook over three minutes; butter, pepper and salt 
well after taking up. Serve on a hot platter. Mrs. W. W. 

BEEFSTEAK FRIED. 

Put the steak into a very hot frying pan; after it has remained 
a very few moments ; turn quickly several times. When done, put 
on a hot platter, salt, pepper and butter. 



56 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

BEEFSTEAK SCALLOPED. 

Chop very fine, raw steak ; Initter a tin ; place in it a layer of 
the chopped meat ; then a layer of bread crumbs ; on this bits of but- 
ter, pepper and salt ; then another layer of meat, bread, pepper and 
salt; beat 1 egg thoroughly; add 1/2 teacup of milk, V- cup water; 
pour carefully over the top ; stick bits of butter thickly over it ; bake 
V2 to % of an hour; cover the dish until steamed through; then 
remove and brown . Mrs . S . D . Smalley . 

BEEFSTEAK SMOTHERED. 

Pound very thoroughly a slice of steak cut % inch thick from 
the round, (1% pounds) ; sprinkle with flour and pound again: keep 
adding flour and working it into the steak (both sides) until 1 cup 
of flour has been used ; put into a very hot iron pan and sear well 
(m both sides; season with salt and pepper cover with boiling water; 
let simmer gently for one hour; slip a knife under it frequently to 
prevent burning. Mrs. S. W. Tait. 

TO PAN A BEEFSTEAK. 

When there are no conveniences for broiling, heat an iron pan 
very hot. put in the steak and turn it from side to side over a hot 
fire for about fifteen minutes ; serve on a hot platter ; season the same 
as broiled steak . Mrs . Hue . 

BRAISED BEEF. 

Take 6 or 8 pounds of the round or the face of the rump, and 
lord with i/4 pound of salt pork; put 6 slices of pork in Ihe bottom of 
braising pan and as soon as it begins to fry add 2 onions, i/o of small 
carrot and % small turnip all cut fine ; cook them until they begin 
to brown ; then draw them to one side of the pan and put in the beef, 
which has been well dredged with salt, pepper and flour; brown on 
all sides; then add 1 qt. of boiling water and a boquet of small 
herbs ; cover and cook slowly in the oven for four hours basting every 
lAventy minutes ; take up ; thicken gravy ; pour over meat and serve. 
Or, add to the gravy, 1/0 can of tomatoes ; cook ten minutes ; strain ; 
pour around meat and serve. 

CREAMED BEEF. 

Shave y^ pound of beef into thin slices ; put 3 tablespoons of but- 
ter into a frying pan, and as soon as it is melted add the meat ; stir 
until the slices begin to curl ; then add 1 cup of milk and when the 
milk boils, stir in 1 teaspoonful of flour, mixed smooth with 3 table- 
spoonfuls of milk; season with pepper: boil up once and serve. 

Miss Parloa. 



MEATS AND SAUCES. j^i 



CANNELON. 

Mix 1 pound uncooked beef, chopped fine ; yolk of 1 egg, 1 table- 
spoon chopped parsley, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 tablespoon bread 
crumbs, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, salt and pepper together; then form 
into a roll about 6 inches long and 4 in diameter; wrap in greased 
})aper; put in a pan and bake in a quick oven 30 minutes. When 
done remove the paper, place the roll in the center of a hot dish and 
serve -with mushroom or brown sauce poured over it or slice and serve 
cold. Mrs. P. P. Leehe. 

FRIZZLED BEEF. 

Cat y-^ pound of dried beef thin as shavings; beat together 6 
eggs, and % cup of milk; season lightly with salt and pepper; put 
2 tablespoons of butter into a frying pan, and when it has become 
melted put in the shaved beef; stir over a hot fire until the meat 
1-egins to curl; then draw the pan back where there is less heat; 
{idd the mixture of eggs and milk; stir until the eggs begin to thick- 
en: then pour into a warm dish and serve at once. 

Miss Parloa. 

ROAST BEEF. 

Place spider on top of stove, and when smoking hot put in your 
roast which has been thoroughly rubbed with a moist cloth ; sear 
and turn over ; salt, pepper and dredge with flour the seared side. 
B}^ this time it will be ready to turn again; treat this side in the 
san;e way ; put in oven. Cook a 3 pound roast % of an hour. 

Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

POT ROAST. 

Select a 4 pound piece of the shoulder, rump, or round of beef, 
liaving suet with it for the fat in browning; place in kettle with 
l^oiling water, enough to nearly cover; remove scum as it comes 
to a boil ; boil rapidly for three minutes to harden the outer fibre 
and retain juices; then simmer for 3V2 hours; when the water will 
have evaporated, leaving only fat in the kettle ; season at this point 
with salt and pepper; cook in the fat % hour, turning often to 
brown on all sides; remove the meat to a hot platter; \)lend into the 
^at J.^ Clip di'v flour: then add 1 pt. boiling water; stirring constant- 
ly; season the gravy; strain and serve. 

BOILED CORNED BEEF. 

Wipe the meat and tie securely in shape; put in kettle; cover 
with cold water, and bring slowly to boiling point; boil 5 minutes; 
remove scum, and cook at a lower temperature until tender; cool 
slightly in water in which it was cooked; remove to a dish; cover, 
jind place on cover a weight that meat may be well pressed. 



53 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

BOILED BEEF TONGUE. 

Put on a kettle of boiling water; add 1 pt. salt, 1 pod of red 
pepper, or a pinch of cayenne ; if water boils away, add more so as 
to keep the tongue well under water until done ; boil until it can 
be easily pierced with a fork; take out; remove skin; take 1 cup 
water, V-] cup vinegar, y-_. tablespoon sugar; scald and pour over; 
let stand two days before using. This amount of salt is enough for 
2 tongues if the kettle is large enough to hold them. 

BEEF LOAF. 

3% pounds of round steak chopped fine, 1 cup cracker.-^ rolled 
fine, 1 cup sweet milk, i/o cup butter, 1 teaspoon of pepper, 1 tea- 
spoon salt, 2 eggs; bake 3 hours, basting with hot water and but- 
ter. Mrs. E. E. Allen. 

BEEF ROLL. 

3 pounds of beefsteak chopped fine (buy already chopped), l^A 
cup oyster crackers rolled fine, 2 eggs well-beaten, almost 1 cup 
boiling water, butter the size of an egg, 1 teaspoon salt and l'^ tea- 
spoon pepper to 1 pound of meat ; make into two rolls and cover 
with boiling water; bake three hours. Mrs. G. B. Nesmith. 

BEEF OMELET. 

1 pound tender beef chopped, 2 soda crackers rolled fine, 2 
eggs, a small lump butter, and pepper and salt and sage to suit 
taste; mix well and make into a roll; place in a tin with a little 
butter and water; bake 1 hour basting it frequently. 

Mrs". J. Gleave. 

BEEF SAUSAGE. 

Use 3 pounds uncooked round of beef, 1 pound of beef suet, 1 
pt. cold water, 1/2 tablespoon of salt, l^ tablespoon white pepper, 1. 
generous teaspoon sage ; chop beef and suet very fine ; add the sea- 
soning and water and mix thoroughly ; make into small cakes and 
dredge with flour; fry for six minutes and serve very hot. 

Miss Parloa. 

STUFFED STEAK. 

] slice of round steak cut thin; fill it with turkey dressing; 
then tie the steak together or roll it; steam two hours. Fifteen or 
tAventy minutes before serving put it in a pan; sprinkle with flour 
and pieces of butter; put in a baking or broiling oven until broAvn. 

BROILED TRIPE, 

Fresh honeycomb tripe is best for broiling; wipe tripe as dry 
as possible ; dip in fine cracker crumbs and olive oil or melted but- 



MEATS AND SAUCES. 



39 



ter, draining-off all fat; again dip in cracker dust; place in a greased 
broiler and cook 10 minutes, cooking smooth side of tripe the first 
three ininutes; place on hot platter, honeycomb side up; spread with 
laittcr and sprinkle with salt and pepper. 

FRIED TRIPE. 

Dip trii)e in flour in whidi is mixed salt and i)e])pei'; fry in 
small quantity of hot fat until brown; drain and serve on hot plat- 
ter. 

COTTAGE PIE. 

Cover bottom of a snmll greased baking dish witli hot mashed 
potato; add a thick layer of chopped roast beef seasoned Avith salt 
and pep[)er, and a low dreps of onion juice if desired; moisten 
with gravy: cover with a layer of maslied potato; bake in hot oven 
long enough to heat through. 

BAKED HASH. 

1 cup of any !<ind .»i' v'.*Kl meat ehoj^ped rather ''oar^e remove 
■'at ami gristle, ;idd to tlu- meat V- cup of cold water. 1 cui') cold 
mashed potatoes, 2 tablespoons butter and 2 tablespoons bread 
crumbs; season with pepper and salt and ])ake one hour. 

MEAT PIE. 

Cut the meat into small bits and stew until tender in just enough 
water to cover it; line the sides of a pudding dish with rich crust; 
put in a layer of meat, seasoned well with salt, pepper and a very 
little onion; then a layer of sliced boiled potatoes and bits of but- 
ler, and so on until the dish is full; pour over all the gravy in which 
lhe meat was stewed, thickened with a little flour; cover with a 
Ihick crust leaving a slit in the middle. If the pie gets dry add 
more gravy or a little hot water. 

MEAT CAKES. 

1 cup of cooked meat chopped fine, (different kinds may be 
used together), 1 egg, 1 tablespoon melted butter, little salt and 
])epper, 1 slice of bread over which boiling water has been quickly 
l)uured and thoroughly drained; make into cakes and fry. 

^lary E. Kopf. 

ROAST OF LAMB OR MUTTON. 

Parl)'>!! a leg of lamb oi' iniitto'i in sailed water; brown Vj, 
])ouml (if luitter in a skillet; tliicken -witii 1 cup of rlour; add 1^,4 
pts. of milk; season with pepper and salt; cover the nu^at with a 
layer of this dressing; put in a very hot oven; as it browns and 
crisps add more of the dressing so that wheti the meat is done it is 
enclosed in a thick broAvn crust. !Mrs. R. O. Wilson. 



40 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



BOILED LEG OF MUTTON. 

Put into a kettle of boiling water; add 1 enp of well washed 
riee ; when water boils skim it carefully; let boil rapidly for fifteen 
minutes; then set kettle back where it will only simmer for two 
I'.ours. If you prefer to have the mutton better done, cook fifteen 
minutes longer. The rice makes it whiter and more tender; serve 
v;ith caper sauce. Miss Parloa. 

FRIED MUTTON CHOPS. 

Select mutton not too fat ; put 1 tablespoon of butter into fry- 
ing pan ; when melted lay in chops well seasoned with salt and pep- 
per; let fry five minutes, turning over once; then dip each chop in 
beaten egg then in bread or cracker crumbs and fry until browned 
on both sides. 

BROILED MUTTON CHOP 

Place chops on gridiron over a clear fire ; turn frequently, tak- 
ing care that the fork does not penetrate the lean part of the choijs; 
season with pepper and salt ; when done put a piece of butter on 
each chop and send to table on a hot dish ; broil lamb chops same 
way; serve with tomato sauce. 

PAN-BROILED LAMB CHOPS. 

Chops for pan-broiling should have Hank and most of the fat 
removed ; wipe chops ; put in hissing hot pan ; turn at once and sear 
the other side ; turn often, using knife and fork that the surface may 
not be pierced ; cook from six to ten minutes ; when half cooked 
sprinkle Avith salt ; drain and serve on hot platter ; spread with but- 
ter or serve with tomato sauce. 

BARBECUED LAMB. 

Cut cold roast lamb in thin slices and re-heat in sauce nuide by 
melting 2 tablespoons of butter; add % tablespoon vii'.egar, ^.4 <iiip 
currant jelly, Vit teaspoon French mustard, salt and pepper to taste. 

ROAST QUARTER OF LAMB. 

After trimming joint, skewer 3 slices of bacon to the outside; 
spread the inner side with butter and* cover with fine bread crumbs 
seasoned with salt and pepper and minced parsley to taste ; bake in 
moderate oven, and when nearly done, remove bacon and cover with 
bread crumbs ; let bake long enough to make a nice brown ; serve 
with sauce or lemon juice, as preferred. 

LIVER AND ONIONS. 

Cut liver in small pieces, l^ i^idi square; pour boiling water 
over ; drain and dredge with flour ; have ready four or five onioiLS 



MEATS AND SAUCES. 41 



sliced; place in a hot frying-pan Avith a good sized piece of butter 
v.ith liver on top of onions ; season with salt and pepper ; cover ami 
cook slowly until onions are tender; remove cover and brown; add 
at the lastl tablespoon of hot catsup. Florence S. Wood. 

LIVER AND BACON. 

Cut thin slices of liver; pour boiling water over it and immed- 
iately pour off; take an equal number of slices of bacon and fry, 
turning often until they are crisp; when done remove from fat; 
place on a hot dish; dredge liver with flour; season with pepper; 
fry slowly in the hot fat, turning frequently; dish liver and bacon, 
a slice of each alternateh^. 

STEWED KIDNEY. 

Cut a kidney in small pieces; put 14 pound butter in a sauce 
pan on the fire, and when very hot put in the kidney, stirring with 
a wooden spoon 3 minutes over a brisk fire ; add for each pound of 
kidne^' V2 tablespoon of flour; I/2 teaspoon of salt, 1/0 the quantity 
of pepper and a little sugar; moisten with 2 gills of water; simmer 
gently for five minutes. Florence S. Wood. 

PORK. 

Pork contains the largest percentage of fat of any meat. Al- 
though found in market through the entire year, it should be sel- 
dom served and only during the winter months ; cook slowly and 
thoroughly . 

CHOPS. 

Wipe chops; sprinkle with salt and pepper; place in hot frying 
pan and cook slowly until tender and well broAvned on each side. 

CHOPS WITH FRIED APPLES. 

Arrange chops on a platter and surround with slices of apples, 
fi'ied in the fat remaining in pan. 

ROAST PORK. 

AVipe pork; sprinkle with salt and pepper; place on a rack in a 
dripping pan; dredge meat and bottom of pan with flour; bake in a 
moderate oven three or four hour, basting every fifteen minutes with 
fat in pan; make gravy as for other roasts. 

BROILED PORK CHOPS. 

Have the chops cut thin; put them in a stew pan; cover with 
boiling water; simmer for i/o hour; then remove from water and 
dredge lightly with salt, pepper and flour; broil over a clear fire 
for ten minutes ; prepared in this way the pork will be well cooked 
and tender. Miss Parloa. 



42 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



BROILED PIGS' FEET. 

When pigs' feet are wanted for a breakfast dish they must be 
boiled the previous day. 1 foot is enough for each person; scrape 
the feet and wash them thoroughly ; then tie each one in a seperate 
piece of cheesecloth and put all into a stew pan with 2 tablespoons 
of salt to eight feet, and boiling water enough to cover them; let 
the water boil up once ; then set the pan back where the feet will 
simmer for six hours ; at the end of that time take the pan from 
the fire and set it where its contents will become cool ; when cold, 
remove the feet to a platter and drain them, but do not take off the 
cloth. In the morning remove the cloth and split the feet; dredge 
with salt, pepper and Hour, and broil over clear coals for ten min- 
utes ; place on a warm platter ; season with salt, pepper and but- 
ter. Miss Parloa. 

SAUSAGE. 

7^0 pounds lean pork, 2Yi pounds fat pork, 3 oz. salt, ^/^ oz. 
summer savory powdered, % oz. sage leaves powdered, 1 oz. ground 
pepper ; put the meat with the fat and lean mixed together through 
a coarse meat chopper ; add the seasonings, rubbing them in with 
the hands ; finally grind the seasoned meat as fine as possible ; pack 
the sausage in a jar, pouring % an inch or more oi melted lard 
over it. " Mrs.W. M. Hoffer. 

BAKED HAM. 

Soak ham over night in water enough to cover it- add 2 table- 
spoons of soda previously dissolved in the water ; make a batter 
of flour and water and put all over the ham ; if a large one bake 
three hours ; if small, two hours ; lay sticks in the pan to keep it out 
of the fat; when done scrape off the batter and dress. 

Mrs . Scherinerhorn . 

BROILED HAM. 

Cut slices of ham very thin; put on broiler and cook over clear 
coals for five minutes. The broiler must be turned constantly, as 
the fat from the drippings blaze up; serve the meat very hot. 

BROILED HAM. 

Soak thin slices of ham for one hour in lukewarm water; drain, 
wipe and broil five minutes. 

BOILED HAM. 

Brush thoroughly to remove dust and mould ; soak in cold water 
one hour; cut hardened surface and butt of ham off; put ovet fire 
in cold water; let come to a boil and keep steadily at this point for 
one hour; change water and boil until done. A ham weighing 12 



MEATS AND SAUCES. 43 



pounds will require four hours boiling; remove skin and leave ham 
in water until cold, then it is ready for use. When ham is ready 
to put in kettle for boiling, stick full of whole cloves and bits of 
cinnamon. ^Irs. AY. A. Hall. 

HAM CROQUETTES. 

Chop the choice bits of liam fine and season with pepper or 
mustard; with a little flour in hands make into small balls and dip 
in beaten egg; roll in bread or cracker crumbs; fry to a light hrown 
in hot lard. Mrs. AV. A. Hall. 

HAM BALLS. 

Chop fine cold cooked ham ; add 1 egg for each person and a 
little flour; beat together; make into balls and fry brown in hot but- 
ter. Airs. Dwight Cowan. 

SCRAPPLE. 

Take pigs' feet or hogs' head and liver or gelatinous parts; 
boil till meat falls from the bones (four or five hours); take out; 
mince fine ; take out bones ; put back in liquor ; season with black 
and red i)epper, salt, sweet marjoram, sweet basil and summer sav- 
ory; then add 2 parts of Indian meal and 1 part of buckwheat; stir 
in meal slowly while boiling until the mixture is thick and ropy; 
then put in earthen pans to cool. Mrs. A. D. AVood. 

SWEETBREADS. 

A sweetbread is the thymus gland of lamb or calf, but in cook- 
ery, veal sweetbreads only are considered. 

A sweetbread consists of 2 parts. The round, compact part is 
called the heart sweetbread, and is the most desirable. Sweetbreads 
spoil quickly. They should be removed from paper as soon as re- 
ceived, and plunged into cold water and allowed to stand one hour, 
drained and put into acidulated, salted, boiling water; cook slowly 
twenty minutes ; drain ; plunge into cold water that they may be 
firm and white. Sweetbreads are always parboiled in this way for 
further cooking. Mrs. Farmer. 

Sweetbreads are quite as. frequently employed as ingredients in 
sundry made dishes, as served alone and as they do not possess a 
very decided natural flavor they need to be accompanied by a high- 
ly seasoned sauce or they will taste rather insipid. They are in 
full season from May to August. 

SWEETBREADS LARDED. 

Boil twenty minutes; draw through each one thin slices of pork, 
dredge with salt, pepper and flour; bake twenty minutes in a quick 
oven • serve with green peas seasoned with salt and butter and 
cover with cream sauce. Airs. L. G. Noyes. 



44 THE WAEREN COOK BOOK 



CREAMED SWEETBREADS. 

Parboil a sweetbread ; cut it in lA inch cubes or seperate in 
small pieces; re-heat in 1 cup white sauce. Creamed sweetbreads 
may be served on toast, with croquettes or for filling patty cases. 

BAKED TONGUE. 

Boil a fresh tongue in salted water until tender; add to the 
water 2 or 3 cloves, a bay leaf and a small onion if liked ; take from 
the water; remove the skin and return to water. About an hour 
before serving place in a deep pan and pour over the following 
sauce; cover closely and bake in a moderate oven basting often. 

SAUCE. 

Melt y^ cup of butter; add Vi cup flour and gradually 2 cups of 
the strained water in which the tongue was cooked, IV2 cups stewed 
and strained tomatoes, % teaspoon Worcestershire sauce or any gravy 
sauce. A can of mushrooms may be added if desired . 

Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

VEAL POT PIE. 

1 pound of veal cut in small pieces and stewed ; for dumpling ; 
'] pt. flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, butter the ?ize of hickor;/ 
nut rubbed into flour, in which baking powder has been mixed ; % 
cup milk, cut with biscuit cutter and drop into stew after meat has 
boiled i-o hour; season to taste. Mrs. Blood. 

VEAL ON T0A?5T. 

Chop veal rather coarse ; salt, pepper and boil under tender in 
a little water; add a piece of butter; thicken Avith a little flour made 
into a thin paste with a little cold water; put toast on a warm plat- 
ter; pour this over and serve. Miss S. H. 

VEAL LOAF. 

11/2 pounds of uncooked veal, IV., pounds of beefsteak ch()p])ed 
flne, 1 cup rolled crackers, 2 eggs, butter size of an egg, 1 talDle- 
spoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper and a little grain of clove; thorough- 
ly niix and make into a loaf; bake two hours in a slow oven in a 
closely covered bread pan; when cold cut in thin slices. 

Mrs. M. J. Danforth. 

ROAST BREAST OF VEAL. 

A breast of veal well seasoned, a force meat made of bread 
crumbs, 1 egg, 1 small onion parboiled ; then chop fine : season with 
pepper and salt; moisten with milk; put this on ribs and press i]i 
shape ; roast till done and nicely browned ; serve with brown gravy . 

Mrs. S. P. S. 



MEATS AND SAUCES. 45 



VEAL LOAF. 

2 pounds lean veal. 1 pound lean fresh pork. 1 4 pourd salt pork, 3 
eggs, 1 cup pulverized crackers. 1 teaspoon pepper, 2 teaspoons salt, 
1/4 teaspoon allspice; cook meats together until tender; put through 
i'ood chopper and mix with cracker crumbs, beaten eggs and season- 
ing; moisten with stock in which meat was cooked; pack in a 
greased baking pan and bake one hour. Elizabeth J. Clough. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 

Wipe and remove the bone, skin and tough membrane; cut into 
pieces for serving; cover the bone and tough pieces of meat with 
cold water, and cook at a low temperature. This stock is to be used 
in the sauce. Small pieces may be put together by using wooden 
toothpicks for skewers; season the veal with salt and pepper; roll 
in fine bread crumbs ; dip in beaten egg ; then in crumbs again ; melt 
2 tablespoons of dripping, or butter, in a French pan, and brown the 
cutlets in the hot fat; when broAvned. put the cutlets into a stew pan, 

SAUCE FOR CUTLETS. 

2 tablespoons dripping. V; <*^ip flour. 1 pt. stock or water and 
stock. 1 teaspoonful or more AVorcestershire sauce. 2 tablespoons 
chopped parsley, % teaspoon salt and % teaspoonful pepper; pre- 
pare as a brown sauce ; pour over the cutlets and cook at a low 
temperature for one hour, or until tender. 

Drexel Institute. Mrs. AV. A. Talbott. 

VEAL CUTLET. 

Simmer veal in small quantity of water till tender; then dip in 
Avhite of egg and rolled cracker crumbs, seasoned with salt and 
pepper; fry in butter to a rich brown. Airs. J. W. Kitchen. 

VEAL STEW. 

3 pounds of veal cut into strips :] inches long and 1 inch thick. 
peel 8 large potatoes and cut into slices Vo inch thick • put layer of 
veal in bottom of pot; sprinkle with pepper and salt; then layer of 
potatoes ; then layer of veal seasoned as before ; use up veal thus ; 
over last layer of veal put slices of salt pork; and over the whole, 
layer of potatoes; pour water enough to cover; heat 15 or 20 min- 
utes and simmer one hour. 

SAUCES 

STOCK. 

Stock is the basis of all meat sauces, soups and purees. It if 
really the juice of meat extracted by long and gentle simmering, and 
in making it, it should be remembered that the object to be aimed 
at is to draw the goodness of the material out into the liquor. It 



46 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



may be prepared in various ways, richly and expensively or econ- 
omically. All general stocks, or stock which is to be used for mis- 
cellaneous purposes, should be simply made, that is, all flavoring in- 
gredients should be omitted entirely until its use is decided upon. 
The stock will keep longer than it would do if vegetables, herbs 
and spices were boiled in it, besides which the flavoring can be 
adapted to its special purpose. To ensure its keeping, stocks should 
be boiled and skimmed every day in summer and every other day in 
winter. The pan and lid used in iiaiking it should be scrupulously 
clean. Excellent stock is made constantly with the bones and 
trimmings of meat and poultry, with the addition, or not, of a little 
fresh meat, or a portion of extract of meat. A good cook will 
never be without stock as broken remnants of all kinds will find 
their way to the stock-pot, and will not be thrown away until, by 
gentle stewing they have been made to yield to the utmost what- 
ever of flavor and goodness they possessed. The liquor in which 
fresh meat has been boiled should always be used as stock. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

Heat 1 tablespoon butter; add'l tablespoon floui and stir un- 
til perfectly smooth; then add gradually 1 cup of cold milk; let boil 
up once; season to taste with salt and pepper and serve. This is 
nice for vegetables, omelets, fish or sweetbreads. P. H. 

APPLE SAUCE. 

Pare, core and slice tart apples ; stew in water enough to cover 
them until they break to pieces ; beat to a pulp with a good lump of 
butter and plenty of sugar; serve cold. B. R. and P. C. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

Place in sauce pan, littk^ more thnn cover with water; cover 
and stew until skins are tender adding more water if necessary ; 
strain through sieve; add % pound sugar to every pound of berries; 
let simmer ten minutes; then remove from fire; do not strain unless 
you prefer it that way; serve with roast turkey or game. 

MINT SAUCE. 

2 tablespoons of mint chopped fine. i/4 cup vinegar, 1 tablespoon 
sugar; the addition of 8 tablespoons of the liquor from boiling lamb 
is an improvement. 

CAPER SAUCE. 

Beat to a cream 2 tablespoons of flour and i/o cup butter, and 
pour upon it 1 pt. of boiling water ; set the mixture over the fire and 
stir constantly until it becomes heated to the boiling point; season 
with a little white pepper and grain of cayenne ; add 1 tablespoon 
of lemon juice and 3 tablespoons of capers. Miss Parloa. 



MEATS AND SAUCES. 4? 



DRAWN BUTTER. 

Piece of butter size of an egg, 1 heaping tablespoon of tiour, % 
pt. boiling water, a trifle salt, a few leaves of chopped parsley; blend 
tioni- and butter; then add the boiling water, stirring constantly to 
make it smooth ; boil one minute, salt to taste, and just before serv- 
ing add parsley cut fine; serve in gravy boat. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

1 large cup stewed tomato or the same quantity of the fresh fruit 
cut up fine, 1 tablespoon flour. 1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon 
sugar. 3 whole cloves, 3 whole allspice, salt and pepper to taste ; 
stew the tomato if fresh, twent}^ minutes, with the spices ; if al- 
ready cooked, thoroughly heat ; rub through a wire sieve (the sieve 
sliould be fine enough to hold the seeds) ; add sugar, salt, pepper, 
and lastly the flour and butter rubbed to a cream together; boil up 
liard for a moment, stirring all the time, and serve. 

BROWN SAUCE. 

Cook 3 tablespoons buttei- until slightly browned; add 2 table- 
spoons flour mixed with Vi teaspoon salt, % teaspoon pepper; brown 
the butter and flour; then add 1 cup stock or water. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

2 tablespoons liutter. 2 taldespoons flour, 1 cup milk, i/t tea- 
spoon salt, few grains pepper; put butter in sauce pan; stir until 
melted and bubbling; add flour with seasonings and stir until thor- 
oughly blended; pour on gradually the milk, adding about i/-? at a 
time ; beat till smooth . 

BROWN FLOUR. 

Put a thick layer of flour into a baking pan and place in hot 
oven ; watch and stir till flour is well browned all through ; when cold 
])ut in jar and cover closely, it is then ready to use in making grav- 
ies and sauces. 

EGG SAUCE NO. I. 

To Drawn Butter Sauce add beaten yolks of 2 eggs and 1 tea- 
spoon lemon juice. 

EGG SAUCE NO. II. 

1/4 pound butter mixed with 3 tablespoons flour; stir into it 1 pt. 
of boiling water; add 3 hard-boiled eggs chopped fine; season with 
salt, pepper and minced parsley; l)oil until thick as cream. A good 
snuce for meat, fish or fowl. Mrs. Richards. 



48 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



OYSTER SAUCE. 

Heat and strain the liquor from 1 pt. oysters ; add the oysters 
and cook until plump ; remove oysters and make a sauce by adding 
butter, flour, oyster liquor and milk; add oysters and season with 
salt and pepper. Boston Cooking School. 

CELERY SAUCE. 

Cook 3 cups celery cut in small pieces in boiling salted water un- 
til soft; drain, rub through a sieve and add to sauce. 

TARTAR SAUCE. 

1 tablespoon vinegar. 1 teaspoon lemon juice, 14 teaspoon salt, 
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, % cup butter. 

Boston Cook Book. 

LOBSTER SAUCE. 

To Hollandaise sauce add % cup lobster, meat cut in small dice. 

HORSERADISH SAUCE. 

3 tablespoons grated horse radish root, 1 tablespoon vinegar, 14 
teaspoon salt, few grains cayenne, 4 tablespoons heavy cream ; mix 
first 4 ingredients and add cream beaten stiff. 

Boston Cooking School. 

HOLLAND SAUCE. 

4 tablespoons vinegar, 4 peppercorns, % teaspoon salt ; let boil 
until reduced % ; let cool ; then add the well-beaten yolks of 4 eggs, 
4 ounces butter and a little nutmeg; cook until thick tis cream; take 
from fire ; put it in another kettle of boiling water at back of stove 
and whip with egg beater until frothy, adding by degrees 3 table- 
spoons butter; when sauce is light and smooth it is readv to serve. 

E. Detlefs. 

WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE. 

A patent preparation sold by grocers. 

BECHAMEL SAUCE. 

Cook 2 slices onion and 4 slices carrot in 2 tablespoons butter 
for five minutes; then add 1 tablespoon flour, 1 cup water or stock; 
stir well for two minutes ; add ^/^ teaspoon salt, I/4 teaspoon pepper 
and unbeaten yolks of 2 eggs. E. Detlefs. 

BROWN MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

Mix well 3 tablespoons flour, VI teaspoon salt, Ys teaspoon pep- 
per; add these to 2 tablespoons butter, previously browned in pan; 
stir till well browned ; then add gradually 1 cup brown stock ; boil 



MEATS AND SAUCES. 49 



until smooth; then add V^ can mnshrooms; bring to a boil and 
serve . 

WHITE MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

Mix 1 tablespoon butter and 2 tablespoons flour in sauce pan 
over the fire : salt and pepper to taste ; add liquor from 1 can mush- 
rooms and cook until smooth: add Vj cup cream; let come to a boil 
and then add the mushi'ooms : simmer fjentlv for five minutes. 

Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

To make a pt. of sauce use 2 tablespoons of butter, 1 tablespoon 
flour; put over the fire and stir until brown; then put in 1/0 pt. of 
Abater or chicken broth; i/^> pt. of essence of mushrooms; stir until 
tiie sauce is smooth; season with saltspoon salt, % saltspoon pepper; 
put in the mushrooms and boil 3 minutes. 



THE AVARREN COOK BOOK 



POULTRY AND GAME. 51 



POULTRY AND GAME 

Mrs. L. G. Noyes 

Poultry includes all domestic birds suitable for food, except 
pigeon and squab, examples: — Chicken, fowl, turkey, duck, goose, 
etc. Game includes such birds and animals suitable for food as are 
pursued and taken in field and forest ; examples : — quail, partridge, 
Avild duck, plover, deer, etc. The flesh of game, with the exception 
of wild duck and wild geese is tender and contains less fat than 
poultry and is of fine flavor. Game meat is of dark color, partridge 
and quail being exceptions, and is usually cooked rare. 

The great secret of cooking game is constant basting, it should 
be under done, red in the middle full of gravy, but not raw. 

BOILED FOWL. 

Dress, clean and truss a fowl ; tie in a piece of cheesecloth, 
otherwise scum will settle on skin and discolor it; place in kettJe 
half surrounded with boiling water; cover; cook slowly until ten- 
der, turning occasionally; add salt the last hour of cooking; serve 
with egg, oyster, or celery sauce. 

ROAST CHICKEN. 

AVhen the chicken is nicely dressed fill it with a dressing made 
as follows : Take enough stale bread to fill the chicken and cut in 
very fine pieces; then i)ut in a spider with 2 tablespoons of butter 
and brown slightly ; when cool enough not to cook the egg, mix 3 
eggs and enovigh milk to moisten nicely; pepper and salt to taste, 
and for those Avho desire it, sage is an improvement ; put in the oven 
and roast until tender; baste often. Mrs. D. D. Reed. 

BROILED CHICKEN. 

Dress for broiling; sprinkle Avith salt and pepper and place in 
a well greased broiler; broil twenty minutes on a clear fire, turning 
so that all parts may be equally browned. The flesh side must be 
exposed to the fire the greater part of the time, as the skin side will 
brown quickly. Chickens are so apt to burn while broiling that 
many prefer to partially cook in oven ; place chicken in dripping- 
Xmn, skin side down; sprinkle with salt and pepper; dot over with 
butter; bake fifteen minutes in hot oven; then broil to finish cook- 
ing. 

MARYLAND CHICKEN. 

Dress, clean and cut up chicken; sprinkle with salt and pepper: 
dip in flour, egg and crumbs ; place in a well greased dripping-pan 



52 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



and bake twenty minutes in a hot oven ; basting often after first five 
minutes of cooking with % cup of nielte'd butter; serve with ereara 
and mushroom sauce. Miss Farmer 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

An old chicken may be used for this. Place over a moderate 
fire and simmer gently until the meat falls from the bones; add 1 
teaspoonful of salt when about half done. When done take the 
meat from the bones and cut into small pieces ; put the skin and 
bones back into kettle and boil until the liquor is reduced to IV2 pts. ; 
then strain and season to taste with salt and pepper ; mix this with the 
chicken; pour the whole into a mould and stand in a cold place 
over night. A light weight may be placed on top to press it to- 
gether. Mrs. Rorer. 

CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 

Melt 3 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour, i/t teaspoon salt, 
a little pepper; add gradually 1 cup sweet milk; stir until it thick- 
ens ; then add II/2 cups of cooked chicken, cut fine, the yolks of 2 
hard-boiled eggs also cut fine, the whites cut in Yi inch pieces; cook 
two minutes longer and serve on toast. E. Detlefs. 

CHICKEN SMUTHERED IN MUSHROOMS. ^ 

Split 2 well grown, tender fowls down the back ; place them 
breast upwards in a dripping pan; pour over them a large cupful 
of boiling water in which has been melted 2 tablespoons of butter; 
cover closely and roast in a steady oven until they are tender all 
Ihrough and a light, even brown, about one hour is required : baste 
at least every ten minutes ; the two last times with clear butter ; dish ; 
keep hot while you make the gravy; use browned flour to thicken 
it and add 1 small can of mushrooms, cut up, each in three pieces; 
pour over the fowls and serve. Mrs. Mark Jamieson. 

CHICKEN a la PROVIDENCE. 

Prepare and boil a chicken following receipt for boiled fowl. 
The liquor should be reduced to 2 cups and used for making sauce 
with 2 tablespoons each butter and flour, cooked together; add to 
sauce 1/2 cup each of cooked carrots (cut in small pieces) and green 
peas; 1 teaspoon lemon juice, 2 eggs, salt and pepper; place chicken 
on hot platter, surround with sauce. Mrs. L. G. Xoyes. 

CAPONS. 

A caponed chicken is drawn, cleaned and singed in the sam(i 
way as a common chicken. It may be roasted or boiled or stuffed 
with truffles, according to the receipts given for turkey. A capon 
thus prepared makes a very recherche dish. 



POULTRY AND GAME. 55 



CREAMED CHICKEN. 

If year-old fowls, steam until temler, using the liquid for bast- 
ing:; flit up the chicken, using only choice pieces, or if used, bone 
and fill the backs with the bits of meat ; bone the first joint, if used ; 
lay all into a drip])ing pan and cover enough to keep it from brown- 
ing; make an uncooked sauce of flour, water and butter, seasoned 
liighly. the thickness of cream, and baste the chicken until tender; 
then sprinkle thickly with flour and let it brown, turning the pieces 
over in the sauce so that both sides Avill be nicely browned. Ten 
minutes before serving, pour in as much cream as will make the 
gravy the right thickness and keep turning the chicken in the gravy 
until ready to serve; after taking up the chicken, if the gravy is 
thick, thin with cream or water and strain, after cooking it up well, 
.^erve the gravy separately. Mrs. B. W. Rogers. 

CREAMED CHICKEN. 

Two 3-pound chickens or 1 4-pound, 1 can of mushrooms ; boil 
chicken and pick up as for salad ; blend 4 large tablespoons of but- 
ter with 5 even tablespoons of flour; heat 1 qt. of cream; add hot 
cream to butter and flour; stir until thickened; season with salt and 
pepper to taste ; cook sauce and add to chicken and mushrooms ; put 
into dish to bake and cover the top Avith bread crumbs and bits of 
butter; bake 30 minutes; serve in timbales, with a teaspoon of 
Avhipped cream on top when served. Mrs. C. E. Bell. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Cook chicken, having 4 cups of broth ; to broth add 3 table- 
spoons butter. 3 tablespoons flour and a little pepper; reserve some 
of gravy for gravy dish, putting remainder over chicken. 

CRUST. 

214 enps flour. !/> teaspoonful salt. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
2 tablespoons butter; ruli butter lightly into the flour; 1 egg well 
beaten, in which you add 1 cup milk; then add to the flour, either 
drop in or roll out and put in pan. Will bake in about i/o hour. 

Mrs. James Roy. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Boil 2 medium sized chickens; season well with butter, pepper 
and salt; cut in small pieces and place in a four-quart pan; then add 
1 qt. sweet cream ; cover with a crust made the same as for baking 
powder biscuit, only mixed with cream, instead of milk; if sour 
cream is taken use 1 teaspoon of soda instead of baking powder; 
salt crust a little; bake % of an hour. Mrs. F. H. Rockwell. 



54 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



CHICKEN en CASSEROLE. 

1 chicken, 1 carrot, 1 qt. boiling water or stock, 1 teaspoon salt, 
1 small onion, 1 saltspoon of pepper; cut vegetables and place in 
casserole with chicken on top ; add water or stock and bake un- 
covered in a hot oven for I/2 hour; when chicken is nicely browned, 
add salt; cover the dish and bake slowly for one hour longer. 

Rabbits, hares and all so-called inferior pieces of meat, may be 
cooked en casserole the same as chicken. 

FRICASSEED CHICKEN. 

Joint the chicken and put in a steamer ; place over a kettle 
containing 3 qts. of boiling water; steam until tender; then put it 
in the kettle, in which leave 1 cupful of the drippings from the 
chicken ; season with salt, pepper and a liberal piece of butter ; then 
pour in 1 pt. of rich milk ; when at boiling point, stir in V_> table- 
spoon of flour mixed Avith a little cold milk, and when it begins to 
thicken remove from the fire ; have ready baking powder biscuits 
freshly made; split in two and lay crust side down on a platter; 
pour chicken over and serve. Mrs. Fred Darling. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 

Cut chicken as for a fricassee ; dredge each piece with salt, i)ep- 
per and flour; fry slowly in bacon drippings or butter. If young, it 
will fry in % of an hour. Mrs. Rorer. 

SCALLOPED CHICKEN. 

1 chicken, 1 can mushrooms, 3 or 4 sweetbreads cut into small 
pieces ; mix until quite soft with Avhite sauce ; season with salt and 
pepper, AVorcestershire sauce and a little onion ; cover with bread 
crumbs; drop bits of butter over the top and brown in the oven. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

1 pt. milk, 3 tablespoons flour, 1 tablespoon butter ; when the 
sauce is thick enough break an egg into it and mix thoroughly. 

Mrs. J. B. Morgan. ' 

DUCKS. 

Ducks to be good must be young and fat, the lower part of the 
legs and webbing of the feet soft, the under bill, if the duck is 
young, will break easily. 

ROAST^DUCK. 

Prepare the same as roast chicken and make a stuffing from 1 
cup bread crumbs, 1 teaspoon of sage, 1 small onion cut fine, 1 large 
tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon salt, i/i teaspoon pepper; serve with 
green peas and apple sauce. Ducks may also be stuffed with potato 
stuffing. 



POULTRY AND GAME. 55 



ROAST WILD DUCK. 

Place on a rack in dripping pan; sprinkle with salt and pepper 
and cover breast with 2 very thin slices of fat salt pork: bake twenty 
to thirty minutes with fat in pan. Wild duck should be stuffed with 
apples pared and cut in pieces, and 3 small onions to improve flavor 
ol" duck; neither apples nor onions are to be served. If a stuffing 
to be eaten is desired, cover ])ieees of dry bread with boiling Avater, 
as soon as bread has absorbed water; press out water: season bread 
with salt and pepper, melted butter and finely eh()])pe(l onion. 

RED HEAD DUCK ROASTED. 

In drawing the bii'ds, cut a lengthwise slit over vl)e croj) : after 
tlie windpipe and appendages have been removed and the duck care- 
fully washed and wiped with salt water, pass the head through this 
opening into the duck and pull it through the opening made in draw- 
ing between the drumsticks; skewer the head in place, salt, if de- 
sired, set in a very hot oven and let cook from eighteen minutes, for 
very rare, to forty minutes for well done ; baste two or more times 
Avith butter melted in hot watei-. R. C. S. M. 

ROAST GOOSE. 

The goose should not be more than 8 months old; the fatter the 
r;iore tender and .juicy the meat. A goose -1 months old is the choic- 
est; kill at least 24: hours before cooking; cut the neck close to the 
back; bea^t the breastbone flat with the rolling pin; tie the Avings and 
legs' securely and stuff with the folloAving mixture: 3 pts. bread 
crumbs, 6 ounces butter or part butter and part salt pork, 2 chopped 
onions, 1 teaspoon each of sage, black pepper and salt. Do not stuff' 
very full, and stick openings firmly together to keep HaA'or in and 
lat out. If the goose is not fat, lard it with salt pork, or tie a slic« 
on the breast; place in a baking-pan Avith a little Avater and baste 
frequently Avith salt and water some add onion and vinegar) ; turn 
often so that the sides and back may all be nicely broAvned ; Avhen 
nearly done baste with butter and a little flour; bake two hours, or 
more, if old; Avhen done take from the pan, pour off the fat, and 
to the broAvn gravy left add the chopped giblets Avhich have pre- 
viously been steAved till tender, together Avith the Avater they ha^'e 
l)een boiled in; thicken Avith a little flour and butter rubbed to- 
gether; bring to a boil and serve Avith currant .jelly; apple sauce is 
a proper accompaniment to roast goose. 

Mrs. J. 11. S. 
POTATO STUFFING. 

2 cups hot mashed potatoes, 1 14 cups soft stale bread crumbs, 
V4 cup finely chopped salt pork, 1 finely chopped onion, 1/3 cup but- 
ter, 1 egg, IV2 teaspoons salt, 1 teaspoon sage; add pork and onion 
last. Miss Farmer. 



56 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



GOOSE STUFFED WITH SAUERKRAUT. 

Fill goose with sauerkraut; sew it up: place in a large kettle; 
cover with about 2 qts. of sauerkraut ; cover the whole with l)oiling 
water and eook three hours ; at the end of this time take out the 
goose ; place in baking pan ; baste with melted butter ; dredge the 
breast thickly Avith flour; put it in a quick oven until a nice brown 
(about one hour) ; serve in a bed of the boiled sauerkraut. 

BROILED GROUSE. 

Split doAvn the back and lard the breast; season inside and out 
with salt and pepper; place in a pan and cover closely with an- 
other pan inverted; place in oven and allow to remain twenty 
minutes, after Avhieh place on broiler and brown; allow a good sized 
piece of butter for each bird; melt in pan which came from oven, 
and pour over ])irds. Mrs. A. D. AVood. 

GROU.SE LARDED. 

Lard breast and insert 2 lardoons in each leg; truss and place 
on trivet in shallow pan; rub with salt; brush over with melted but- 
ter ; dredge wnth flour and surround with trimmings of fat salt pork ; 
bake 1 2 hour in a hot oven, basting 3 or 4 times ; serve on hot but- 
tered toast. Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 

GROUSE AND CHESTNUT STUFFING. 

Stuff with a chestnut stuffing ; lard the breast and legs; cover 
with pieces of salt pork and bake % of an hour in hot oven. 

Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 

SQUABS. 

Squabs are at their best when the flesh is pinkish and the lurds 
short and fat, with soft legs and feet. A¥hen the flesh turns dark, 
they are squabs no longer. Young pigeons are good eating; broil- 
ing is the most popular method of cooking squabs. 

HOT PIGEON PIE. 

Bone the pigeons and brown them in hot butter; mal^e i\ stew of 
tlieni. When the birds are tender, pour the stew into a deep ])aii lined 
with pie paste ; cover with a sheet of pie paste in which a few holes 
have been cut in the center; bake thirty minutes. 

BROILED PIGEONS. 

Split the birds dow^n the back; lard with small strips of fat 
pork ; place on a broiler and broil over a moderate fire for % of an 
hour; serve on hot buttered toast. 



I'OII/PKY AND GxV.AlE. ^z 

ROAST QUAIL. 

Dress and truss each l)ird: dust with salt, pepper and Hour and 
place on a slice of bread in a roasting pan ; cover each one with a 
thin slice of salt pork and cook in a hot oven about twenty min- 
utes; garnish with toast points and serve with Brown Sweetbread 
Sauce. To l^^ cups of rich, brown sauce, add Y2 sweetbread cut 
in pieces. 

BROILED QUAIL. 

Split down the back: l;u-('l the bretist and broil the same as wood- 
cock. 

PANNED RABBIT. 

Clean and cut into halves .is in Fricassee of Rabbit; place in 
a baking pan; spread lavishly with butter; dust with salt and pep- 
per: and bake in a quick oven one hour; basting every ten minutes. 

Mrs. Rorer. 
SQUIRRELS. 
Squirrels may be fricasseed, broiled and panned precisely the 
same as rabbits. 

BELGIAN HARE a la MARYLAND. 

Separate at joints; sprinkle with salt and pepper; roll in flour, 
egg and bread crumbs ; clispose in a well oiled dripping pan ; bake 
in hot oven about i/o hour; baste frequently after the first five min- 
utes with bacon fat. 

FRICASSEE OF RABBIT. 

Dress the rabbit; wipe well inside and out with a wet cloth; 
then dry; cut down, splitting it into halves; then cut each into -1 
pieces; finish the same as Fricassee of Chicken. 

YOUNG HEN TURKEY. 

Young hen turkeys are best for roasting; the legs should be 
black, the skin white, the breast broad and fat. and the shorter the 
neck the better. In the legs of fowls are ten oi- more tough ten- 
dons, which in cooking, particularly in roasting, become hard and 
bony. In turkeys these tendons are especially large and objection- 
al)le. but if these be drawn and the leg skewered close to the body, 
to avoid drying, the drumstick becomes almost equal in tenderness 
and delicacy to the second joint, a thing greatly to be desired by 
all those who enjoy the rich, dark meat of the fowl. 

ROAST TURKEY WITH GIBLET SAUCE. 

Clean and prepare exactly the same as Roast Chicken, using 
double the amount of stuffing and roasting fifteen minutes to every 
pound. 



58 THE AVARREN COOK BOOK 



GIBLET SAUCE. 

Ponr off liquid in pan in which turkey has been roasted; from 
liquid skim off' 6 tablespoons ; return fat to pan and brown with 6 
tablespoons flour; ])our on gradually 3 cups stock in which giblets 
have been cooked; add giblets finely chopped; cook five minutes. 

ROAST TURKEY WITH OYSTER STUFFING. 

For a turkey weighing from 8 to 10 pounds, allow one loaf of 
stale bakers' bread. 1 (\t. of oysters, 1 Jeraon. 2 roots of celery and 
^ pound of butter. It is taken for granted that the turkey is thor- 
oughly cleaned and wiped dry before putting the stuffing in ; crumble 
bread until very fine; season with pepper and salt; drain oysters, 
setting the liquor aside ; now take a very sharp knife and peel off 
the outer rind of the lemon, being careful not to have any of the bit- 
ter and tough white skin left on ; out the peel in very small bits : 
chop the Avhito part of the celery very fine, adding butter and juice 
of lemon ; stir until thoroughly mixed ; then proceed to stuff' body 
and crop. A turkey of the size spoken of requires at least two 
hours baking, and should be basted frequently; the liquor of the 
oysters should be put in the pan when the pan is first set in the 
oven and this is to be used in liasting. The <:ible-'s should 
be chopped fine and cooked in a basin on the top of the stove and 
when the gravy is made, add them to it. Mrs. Fred Sill. 

CHESTNUT STUFFING. 

3 cups French chestnuts. i/> cuj) butter, 1 teaspoon salt. Vs tea- 
spoon pepper, i/4 t'^^P cream, 1 cup cracker crumbs ; shell and blanch 
chestnuts; cook in boiling salted water until soft; drain and masb. 
using a potato ricer; add liutter, salt, pepper, creau;' and cracker 
crumbs. 

TURKEY DRESSING. 

2 loaves stale bakers' bread; cut in slices and toasted and but- 
tered well; then moisten slightly with boiling water; then chop fine; 
add pepper, salt and poultry seasoning, and 2 teaspoons baking 
powder and 2 eggs last. Mrs. C. H. Meacham. 

WILD TURKEY. 

Make a stuffing from 2 cups stale bread, V^ pound of salt pork, 
chopped fine, 1 teaspoon salt, i/4 teaspoon pepper; mix well together; 
stuff the body of the bird ; truss ; place in baking pan ; cover the 
breast Avith thin slices of fat pork; put i/o cup of water in pan and 
bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes to every pound ; after one 
liour, cool the oven slightly; put 1 teaspoon of salt in the pan, and 
baste with melted butter every ten minutes at first, afterwards with 
its own gravy. Mrs Rorer, 



POULTRY AND GAME. 59 



SADDLE OF VENISON 

AVipe the venison well with a towel dipped in Avai'm water: lai-d 
thickly with salt pork; place on a rack in dripi)ing pan and roast 
in hot oven fifteen minutes to every pound, basting every ten min- 
utes at first with melted butter and afterwards with its own drip- 
lyings ; when half done, season with ] teasi)oon salt and a few dashes 
of black pepper; add 2 tablespoons of tioui lo the fat in the pan in 
which it was roasted; stir until brown: add 1 pt. good stock; stir 
constantly until it boils : take from fire : add salt and pepper to 
taste, and 1 tablespoon of currant jelly and water cress; cover with 
I'Uttered paper while roasting to prevent juice drying out. The 
shoulder may be roasted the same way. 

VENISON STEAKS. 

May be broiled and .st'i'\('d the same as l)eefsteak with a simple 
dressing of salt, })e[)per and butter. Venison should always be 
cooked rare. 

BROILED WOODCOCK. 

Split down the back: lai'd the breast with fat salt pork and 
Itroil; have ready small pieces of buttered toast; lay each bird on 
a piece of toast, breast side down, and season with salt, pepper and 
bits of butter, just breaking the bone a little so seasoning Avill pene- 
trate; then turn over and season top with salt, pepper and butter; 
set in oven a moment before serving; serve currant jelly with wood- 
cock. Mrs. A. D". AVood. 

ROAST WOODCOCK. 

Split down the back; lard the breast with fat, salt pork; place 
liirds in baking pan with a square of toasted bread under each bird; 
]iut them in hot oven; roast thirty-five minutes, basting every five 
minutes, the first time with melted butter and afterwards with the 
gravy in the pan. Airs. L. G. Noyes. 

REED BIRDS. 

May be prepared same as wood cock, broiled or i-oasted fifteen 
minutes. 



60 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

EGGS 

Mrs. Ralph Stone 

"There is a best way of doing everything, even if it be to boil 
an egg. " — Emerson. 

BAKED EGGS. 

Butter a baking dish and line v^ntli bread crumbs ; break in the 
required number of eggs ; cover with grated cheese or not as pre- 
ferred ; season with butter, pepper and salt ; cover with bread crumbs 
and place in hot oven until whites are "set." 

Mrs. John Siegfried. 

BAKED EGGS. 

Butter a deep plate thoroughly ; add a little salt and pepper ; 
break in the eggs and immerse them with sweet cream: put into the 
oven and bake five minutes or till the egg is "set. " Ready for the 
table. Mrs. W. V. Hazeltine. 

BOILED EGGS. 

Put them in cold water and when it has boiled the eggs will be 
done, the whites being soft and digestible, as they are not when put 
on in boiling water. Jennie Halliday. 

SOFT BOILED EGGS NO. II. 

Place the eggs in boiling water, 1 qt. for 3 eggs ; remove from 
the stove and let stand covered from 8 to 10 minutes. 

Mrs. Richards. 

EGG BALLS. 

Boil any number of eggs you wish ten minutes ; drop in cold 
water; when cold, peel and cut egg in two, lengthwise; remove yolks 
and stir to a paste; stir in thoroughly the white of 1 egg; season 
with pepper and salt: stir again, foru' into balls the size and shape 
of a walnut; roll in Hour and fr.v lirown in hot l)utter: then place 1 
ball in each half of white. 

EGGS WITH CHEESE 

For 5 eggs use 2 tablespoons gratcHl clieese. ^ ta 1)1 (-spoon butter, 
s;iit and pepper to taste: melt the nutter : add the efrcrs ; tlien the 
clieese. stirring until thick and smooth in a chafing dish. 

EGGS BAKED WITH TOMATOES. 

Select round tomatoes of uniform size: cut off the stem ends 
i\n(\ take out enough of the pulp to leave a space as large as an 



EGGS. 61 

egi?; sprinkle the insido -\vitli salt and i)('i)per; drop into each an 
egg: plaee the filled tomatoes in a baiN'ing dish with a little hot 
■water and bake about fifteen minutes or until the eggs are set, a,nd 
the tomato is a little softened; serve on rounds of bread, browned 
in butter. 

DEVILED EGGS. 

Boil as many eggs as are needed for twenty minutes; when coo) 
enough to handle cut in halves lengthwise; extract the yolks and 
rub these to a paste with a little melted butter, some cayenne pep- 
per (or white pepper if preferred), a little salt, and jnst a dash of 
vinegar; fill the whites with this and serve on a platter garnished 
with parsley. ]\rrs. D. L. Gerould. 

DEVILED EGGS. 

Boil 6 eggs 20 minutes; put into cold water- peel, cut in halves, 
slicing a little off one end so that the ego; will stand up : remove the 
yolks; rub them to a smooth paste with a little melted butter, cay- 
enne pepper, mustard and vinegar, with which fill the hollow in 
the whites; serve in bed of white cabbage, sliced, or use as gar7?.ish 
for meats. Jennie Halliday. 

EGG FONDUE. 

6 eggs, 2 heaping tablespoons of parmesan cheese, I/4 teaspoon 
salt, 1 dash cayenne; beat the eggs with a fork until light; add the 
salt, pepper and cheese ; put a tablespoon of butter in a frying pan, 
when hot turn in eggs and stir until thoroughly cooked and smooth ; 
serve on squares of buttered toast. 

KENTUCKY EGGS. 

Bring 1/2 pt. of new milk to a boil and stir into it 6 rggs, not 
beaten; cook slowly two minutes, stirring occasionally, salt to taste, 
dot with butter and serve on dry toast. HouseLold. 

EGGS FOR LUNCHEON. 

Boil some eggs twenty minutes: cut in halves and lay on a plat- 
ter; prepare a drawn butter gravy and pour over the eggs. 

Mrs. D. L. Gerould. 

OMELET. 

6 eggs. ] tablespoon tloui-. 1 cu]) milk, a pinch of salt, beat the 
v.hites and yolks separately; mix the flour, milk and salt; add the 
yolks; add beaten whites; liave buffered spider very hot; put in; 
bake in a quick oven five minutes. ]\Irs. Hoffman. 

HAM OMELET. 

]\rakc the same as plain omelet and as soon as it begins to 
thicken, sprinkle over it three tablespoons of finely chopped ham; 
roll and serve. 



62 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



PLAIN OMELET. 

3 eggs well beaten; stir into eggs about 11/2 teaspoons flour, 
beating it smooth; then add a little salt and a large tumbler of milk; 
heat a spider or frying pan; melt in it a little butter to grease it 
well; pour in the omelet and bake in oven to a nice brown. 

Mrs. J. Gleave. ' 

TOMATO OMELET. 

Have ready as much tomato as would be required for the meal; 
cook well and rub through a colander; season with butter, salt and 
pepper, a tablespoon of white sugar; make a nice omelet of 5 eggs. 
l_cup milk ; make in two rolls ; lay on a platter and pour the tomato 
over it; send to the table hot. Mrs. E. Rogers. 

POACHED EGGS. 

Nearly fill frying pan with boiling water; add a little salt and 
vinegar; break eggs, 1 at a time, into wet saucer; slip from this up- 
on surface of water ; cook slowly three minutes ; take up with j)er- 
f orated skimmer; lay carefully upon buttered toast and serve im- 
mediately. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Boil the eggs very hard ; when cool cut in halves, lengthwise ; 
s'prinkle them plentifully with vinegar, to which has been added a 
little melted butter, jtepper and salt. Jennie Halliday. 

POACHED EGGS WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Take 1 can of mushrooms ; place in a sauce pan with a table- 
spoon butter; season with teaspoon salt and pinch of white pepper; 
add 2 drops of lemon juice ; cook for ten minvites ; then thicken the 
sauce and prepare 10 poached eggs ; pour the sauce on a platter ; ar- 
range the eggs around the dish; put the mushrooms in center and 
serve hot with toast. 

SPANISH EGGS. 

Cover the liottom of an earthen baking dish with well seasoned 
tomato puree ; arrange on it poached eggs, leaving space to show red 
color; lay between the eggs whole small sausages already cooked, 
or sausages cut in inch lengths ; place a bit of butter on each egg 
and set dish in the oven to heat it only. 

STUFFED EGGS IN A NEST. 

Cut hard-boiled eggs in halves, lengthwise ; remove yolks and 
put whites aside ; mash yolks and add half the amount of chopped 
ham and enough melted butter or cream sauce to make of consist- 



EGGS. 63 

ency to shape; make in balls size of original yolks and re-fill whites. 
Jb'orm remainder of mixture into a nest and pour 1 cup of white 
sauce (see index.) Sprinkle with crumbs and bake until crumbs 
are brown. Miss Kopf. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Beat 5 eggs slightly with silver fork; add 1/2 teaspoon salt, % 
teaspoon pepper, 1/2 cup milk ; heat omelet pan ; put in 2 tablespoons 
butter, and when melted turn in mixture; cook until of creamy con- 
sistency, stirring and scraping from l)ottom of pan. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH TOMATO. 

Peel a large, firm tomato and chop it up small, with a bit of 
onion; put into a hot sauce pan with plenty of fresh butter; season 
to taste; stir until onion and tomato are thoroughly cooked; then 
]iour in 4 well beaten eggs and stir quickly until the eggs are nearly 
set ; serve on hot dish . 

EGGS AND TOAST. 

jNIake slices of milk toast and arrange on platter; use receipt 
for scrambled eggs, having eggs slightly underdone; rour eggs over 
toast; sprinkle with 4 tablespoons grated cheese; put in oven to 
melt cheese and finish cooking eggs. 

EGGS ON TOAST. 

Toast several slices of bread ; poach the number of eggs requir- 
ed; butter the toast; lay eggs nicely over the top; moisten the toast 
Avith salted water in which the eggs are poached; serve hot. 



64 THE WAKREN COOK BOOK 



VEGETABLES 

Mrs. J. W. Kitchen 

Many green vegetables contain materials physiologically suited 
to our needs ; better by far take iron as contained in vegetable 
foods than from a bottle. People who cut from their diet the suc- 
culent vegetables are continually taking drugs to bring about the 
necessary natural conditions which might always be produced by 
the judicious and regular use of green vegetables. 

Mrs. Rorer says: "All vegetables should be put over the tiro 
to cook in actually boiling water. Green or top ground vegetables 
should have a teaspoonful of salt to each quart of water. Under- 
ground vegetables should be salted after they are tender. "' 

Mrs. Farmer of the Boston Cooking School says all vegetables 
should be cooked in boiling salted water, except peas and beans, 
which should be salted the last half hour. When noted teachers 
thus disagree the modern cook may decide for herself and use salted 
or unsalted boiling water for cooking vegetables as "experience, the 
dear teacher," may dictate. 

ARTICHOKES. 

After washing well, soak in cold water V-i hour; boil in plenty 
of water with a little salt l^A hours ; drain and serve with melted 
butter or slice into a dish and pour over Annegar. 

Mrs. A. Ruhlman. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Boil five minutes; pour off water; add more, boiling hot; boil 
ten or fifteen minutes, letting the water nearly all l-oil out; then 
season Avith salt, pepper and butter; make a thickening of 1 tea- 
spoon of flour mixed with a little milk and stir in; have toasted a 
few slices of bread ; spread with butter and put in a dish and over 
them turn asparagus and gravy. ]\Irs. T. AV. McNett. 

CREAMED ASPARAGUS. 

TTse only the brittle part of the stalks; wash and remove scales; 
cook in boiling salted water twenty minutes or until tender, the 
heads will cook first so pierce the stalk to see if tender; drain and 
place in a hot dish and pour over cream or a sauce made as follows: 

CREAM SAUCE. 

Place in granite stcAV pan 1 tablespoon buttei-. 1 talilespoon 
flour; rub together over the fire; when blended add 1 cup milk, 
stir over the fire until thick and smooth; season with salt and p<m)- 
per. i\Irs. -T. AY. Kitchen. 



VEGETABLES. 65 



ASPARAGUS ON TOAST I. 

Serve creamed aspar;i<i-us on buttered oi- milk toast. 

ASPARAGUS ON TOAST II. 

Boil the stalks in salted Avater twenty minutes; remove stalks 
to a warm plaee and let water boil doAvn to about a teaeiip ; add 2 
tablespoons butter, and 2 tablespoons lenu)n juice; season with pep- 
per; add salt if necessary; plaee slices of hot toast on a platter; 
add the asparagus stalks and pour over the dressing. 

Berta T. Kitchen. 

BAKED ASPARAGUS. 

Prepare as for creamed asparagus; when boiled tender, place 
stalks in buttered baking dish; pour over the creamed dressing; 
sprinkle lightly with bread crumbs and ]uit in oven for twenty 
minutes. 

FRIED APPLES. 

AVipe and halve 4 tart red apples: remove core; place in a hot 
skillet 1 tablespoon Initter. lA cup boiling water and i/o cup sugar; 
cover and let simmer for ten minutes; remove cover and brown on 
both sides. Mrs. W. A. Mitchell. 

FRIED APPLES. 

Pare, core and cut in halves good, tart apples ; lay in spider with 
a piece of butter the size of a walnut ; sprinkle over them 14. cup 
sugar; place in oven and fry until tender and nicely browned. 
AVhen dishing, slip a knife under each one and slide onto platter; 
serve hot. Mrs. G. P. Orr. 

A GOOD BOILED DINNER. 

4 hours before serving put meat in kettle of boiling water, 
enough to little more than cover; when it boils skim carefully; then 
let boil slowly. One hour before serving, add cabbage cut in 
quarters, turnips in slices, V-i hour later whole potatoes. If corned 
beef is used no salt will be required; if fresh meat is preferred salt 
when adding potatoes. 

BAKED PORK AND BEANS. 

1 pt. beans soaked over night; put over fii-e and boil until soft- 
ened; pour off water and add fresh from the teakettle; take 2 or 3 
tablespoons molasses and a small piece of pork which has been stand- 
ing in boiling water; bake in same kettle without cover until done, 
(about five hours); always add boiling Avater as needed Avhile. cook- 
ing. I\Irs. J. 0. Parmlee. 



66 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



BOSTON BAKED BEANS I. 

Allow to every qt. of small white soup beans 1 pound of pickled 
pork; soak beans over night in cold water; in morning wash them 
well in a colander ; put them on to boil in cold water ; at the first 
boil drain the water off and cover them with fresh boiling water; 
score the rind of the pork and put it in with the beans ; simmer the 
beans gently until the skin cracks ; take out the pork and drain ; put 
beans into a bean pot (an earthen pot or pipkin with a cover,) al- 
most bury the pork in the center of the beans; add 1 teaspoon salt to 
1 pt. of the water in which the beans were boiled; pour this into 
the pot and sprinkle with pepper; pour over the top of the beans 1 
large spoon of molasses; put on the lid; then bake in a very moder- 
ate oven for six or eight hours. Mrs. Rorer. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS II. 

Same as above except the addition of 1 teaspoon of mustard to 
3 tablespoons of molasses poured over the top. Claimed by somo 
to be more digestible. Mrs. Kitchen. 

STRING BEANS. 

Remove strings and cut in pieces 1 inch long; cook in boiling 
water until tender ; drain and pour over cream or a cream sauce ; 
season with butter, pepper and salt. 

STRING BEANS, (GERMAN STYLE.) 

"Wash and string beans; put in bottom of kettle 3 tablespoons 
butter; cut into the butter 1 small onion or i/;. of a large one and let 
cook a few minutes, stirring constantly; add beans and pour over 
boiling water ; cook slowly until nearly dry ; season with salt and 
pepper to taste ; diced bacon is sometimes used in place of butter, 
when preferred . Mrs . R . Reese . 

LIMA BEANS. 

Soak 1 pound of lima beans one liour; cook slowly two hours, 
adding more water if necessary; season with salt, pepper and table- 
spoon of butter. Mrs. R. H. Hall. 

BEETS. 

Growing beets will cook in one hour but in the winter beets 
should boil steadily two or three hours; when thoroughly done, 
peel and -hop fine (or slice) ; put in hot dish and add 1 teaspoon of 
sugar, 8 tablespoons viiies-ar a lumj) .f l)utter, salt and pepper lo 
taste. ^ Mrs. 0. T. S. 



VEGETABLES. ez 



BEET RELISH. 

2 cups boiled beets cut in cubes, while hot mix with 2 table- 
spoons butter; season and pour over i/^ cup vinegar and i^ cup 
cream; s* rve warm on a lettuce If^af. Lizzie Anna. 

BEET GREENS. 

Do not separate the tops from the ro'ls; wash carefully, exam- 
inius: every leaf; cook in boiling salted water until tender; drain 
in colander; remove skin from roots; cut coarsely; place in hot dish 
with butter size of a walnut; garnish with hard boiled eggs; serve 
with vinegar. B. T. K. 

BOILED CABBAGE. 

Cut off outside leaves; cut in quarters and remove stalk; let 
stand in cold water for one hour; cook in boiling salted water from 
thirty minutes to one hour; a scant ^/4 teaspoon soda will hasten 
the cooking and destroy the odor; drain and serve or chop and sea- 
son with salt, pepper and butter. 

BOILED CABBAGE, (GERMAN STYLE.) 

Same as above with addition of small piece of salt pork to the 
kettle when boiling. Mrs. R. S. 0. 

CREAMED CABBAGE. 

Chop cabbage; boil in salted water until tender; add cream, 
butter, pepper and salt. 

CREAM CABBAGE, (WILTED). 

1 cup sour cream, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 eggs, a little vinegar; 
scald the cream and eggs together and add vinegar to taste; chop 
or slice the cabbage ;. sprinkle with salt and pepper and wilt in the 
oven; then squeeze ovit the liquor from the cabbage and cover with 
the dressing. Mrs. D. L. Gerould. 

CREAM CABBAGE. 

Beat the yolks of 2 eggs, i/o cup sugar, VL- cup vinegar, butter 
the size t)f an q^^, salt and pepper, 1 teaspoonful mustard; put the 
mixture into a saucepan and stir until it boils; then stir in 1 cup 
sweet cream; let it boil and pour over the cabbage hot; or reserve 
che cream; whip, and pom- over the cabbage last; mix in a few 
celery seeds. Mrs. Whitcomb. 

COLD SLAW I. 

Select solid head of cabl)age; slice very thin and place in cold 
water till cri.sp ; dry in a towel and sprinkle sugar, (salt and pepper 
if desired) and pour over 14 cup vinegar; toss with a fork and serve. 



68 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



COLD SLAW II. 

Cut cabbage very fine; season with pepper, salt and sugar; add 
vinegar enough to moisten all the cabbage and pour off any which 
may settle in the bottom of the dish; add enough whipped cream 
to dress it nicely; toss with a fork and serve. Mrs. J. Roy. 

COLD SLAW. 

Cut the cabbage very fine, salt and pepper to taste ; take 1 cup 
of vinegar, scant cup of sugar and butter size of a walnut ; boil a 
minute and add yolk of 1 large egg or 2 small ones beaten with Y2 
cup cream; boil up once and pour over the cabbage while hot. 

Mrs. M. E. Richards. 

FRIED CABBAGE. 

Slice the cabbage fine ; put in spider with enough water to cover 
and 2 tablespoons pork grease ; salt and pepper to taste ; let the 
water all boil out and fry in the grease until a nice brown. Just 
before serving add vinegar to taste. Mrs. Jane Allen. 

A NICE WAY TO COOK CABBAGE . 

After cooking the cabbage in salt water until tender, make a 
dressing as follows : Take a piece of butter the size of an egg, % 
cup vinegar, a teaspoon mustard, a teaspoon sugar; wlien 1)oiled stir 
in 3 well beaten eggs and pour over cabbage. 

Mrs. Will Watson. 

COOKED CABBAGE. 

Shred the cabbage fine, put into an earthen kettle to cook ; 
make a dressing with i/o cup vinegar, 1 tablespoon butter, salt and 
pepper to taste and dredge with a little flour and 1 egg; stir all 
v^ell together ; set on the back of stove to cook slowly ; add 3 good 
spoons of cream before taking from the ^re. Serve hot. 

Mrs. E. Rogers. 

SCALLOPED CABBAGE. 

1 qt. chopped cabbage ; boil 20 minutes ; butter a baking pan 
and alternate layers of bread crumbs and cabbage ; season with pep- 
per and salt and pour over cream sauce; bake twenty minutes. 

Belle Braunan, Fostoria, 0. 

LADIES' CABBAGE. 

Boil a firm, white cabbage fifteen minutes ; change the water for 
more from the teakettle ; when tender drain and set aside until 
cold; chop fine and add two beaten eggs, a teaspoon of butter, 3 
tablespoons of rich milk or cream ; stir all well together and bake 
in a buttered pudding dish until brown; serve hot. 

Mrs. Willis Cowan. 



VEGETABLES. 69 



STEWED CARROTS. 

Boil whole until perfectlj tender; then ehop up fine; season 
with salt, pepper and bvitter; just before taking up pour over 1 cup 
of cream or milk. Mrs. McNett. 

FRIED CARROTS. 

Boil until tender and chop; take 1/2 pound cold meat (ham is 
best) and 1 onion; chop up together fine; mix with the carrots; 
roll into balls; dip in eggs and fry in butter until a nice brown. 

Mrs. A. Ruhlman. 

FRIED CARROTS II. 

Slice lengthwise and boil until tender in salted water; drain 
and fry in butter until brown . 

STEAMED CAULIFLOWER. 

Choose nice, white head; trim off outsi.le leaves; open in places 
to remove insects which are found about the stalk and let lie wnth 
heads downward in salt and water for one hour, Avhich will draw 
out the vermin; then put in steamer; cover tightly and steam until 
tender; serve whole with cream dressing turned over it. 

Mrs. AV. A. Mitchell. 

STEWED CAULIFLOWER. 

Cut into small clusters; lay in cold salt water \(> hour; then 
drop them into boiling water and boil fifteen minutes; turn of¥ 
laost all the water and add 1 pt. of milk or cream, a lump of but- 
ter, pepper, salt and a little flour; let this come to a boil taking care 
not to scorch; arrange in a dish and pour the dressing over it. 

Mrs. M. E. Rogers. 

CREAMED CAULIFLOWER. 

Remove leaves; cut off stalk; separate flowerets and soak thirty 
minutes in cold salted water; cook thirty minutes in salted water; 
drain and dress with cream; let come to a boil and serve. 

]\frs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

BREADED CAULIFLOWER. 

Trim leaves and wash well a good sized cauliflower; put 1 tea 
spoon salt in 4 qts. boiling water and add Y2 cup flour. This will 
take away nearly all the odor and leave the cauliflower white; boil 
cauliflower in this V^ hpur; drain so that no water is left in it; 
pass through a colander; soak 1 pt. white bread crumbs in warm 
milk; squeeze it well and pass through the colander; put in chop- 
ping bowl with the (^uilitiowcr ; add Ihe yokes of 3 raw eggs, 1 



ZO THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

tablespoon butter, % teaspoon salt and 1 saltspoon pepper; mix well 
together and finish by adding the whites of 3 eggs beaten very 
stiff; mix again lightly; butter a quart mould; pour the puree into 
it; have a sauce pan of boiling water so as to come within % inch 
of top of mould ; cook for forty minutes ; remove from water ; 
place a warm plate over top of mould and turn it over. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

Put y-2 tablespoon butter and Y2, tablespoon flour in a sauce 
pan ; stir continually for three minutes over fire ; then pour in 
slowly stirring meanwhile i/o pt. boiled milk; season with a salt- 
spoon of salt and % saltspoon pepper and cook very slowly for a 
minute or until smooth ; add 1/2 pt. rich cream and cook four min- 
utes ; remove from fire ; add % tablespoon butter ; cut in pieces ; 
when the butter is melted pour the sauce over the cauliflower. 

Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

BOILED GREEN CORN. 

Remove husks and silk ; cook ten or twenty minutes in boiling 
\\'ater and serve or cut from the cob and season with butter and 
salt. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

To 1 cup grated raw corn add one well beaten egg, Y^ cup flour 
and salt and pepper to taste ; drop by spoonfuls and try in hot fat 
or drop on a well greased griddle. Mrs. D. D. Reed. 

CORN PUDDING NO. I. 

To 1 can of chopped corn or same quantity of scored and 
scraped raw corn ; add 2 eggs slightly beaten, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 
teaspoon salt, % teaspoon pepper, li/> tablespoons butter and 1 pt. 
of scalded milk ; turn into buttered pudding dish and bake slowly 
one hour; cover for the first half hour. J\Irs. J. AV. Kitchen. 

BAKED CORN WITH CHEESE. 

Same as corn pudding; cover with grated cheese and fine bread 
crumbs dotted with bits of butter ; bake until brown . 

OLD SOUTHERN CORN PUDDING. 

11/2 dozen ears corn, scored, then scraped from cob; add salt 
and red pepper to taste, butter size of a small egg and 1 cup thick 
sweet cream ; butter a baking dish and add above mixture ; bake in 
a quick oven. Mrs. W. M. Lindsey. 

SMOTHERED CORN. 

Cut corn from the cob, put in frying pan with large piece of 
butter, add salt and pepper; cook twenty minutes, but adding no 



VEGETABLES. ^i 



water, stirring occasionally. The steam will cook it if well cover- 
ed; when done add a few tablespoons of cream if at hand. 

]\Irs. Thomas. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

12 ears of corn scored, 3 eg'gs, 2 tablespoons flour, i/o teaspoon 
soda, 3 tablespoons milk, 1 tablespoon butter, pinch of salt, drop 
on greased pan or griddle and fry. Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

CUCUMBERS. 

Do not slice cueumbci-s into saltetl water as it hardens them 
and makes them indigestible. Just before serving peel and slice 
and send to the table with ice or season with pepper, salt and vine- 
gar, (a few dro])s of onion juice may be added to the vinegar or 
onions may be sliced with the cucumber. 

COOKED CUCUMBER. 

Remove the peel and cook in boiling water until tender; slice 
and simmer in good brown gravy to which a very little chili vine- 
gar has been added; allow them to remain seven or eight minutes; 
then serve. j\Irs. Malissa Thomas, Fostoria, 0. 

FRIED CUCUMBERS. 

Dip slices of cucumbers into egg and bread crund)s and fry in 
butter or in hot fat until a nice brown. Mrs. Schermerhorn. 

STUFFED CUCUMBERS. 

Pare cucumbers; cut in halves; hollow the centers and let stand 
in cold water for thirty minutes ; to the part scooped out add bread 
crumbs, pepper, salt and a grating of nutmeg; put back in the 
shell and put small pieces of butter on top ; place in a dish with 
a very little water or stock and simmer about forty nunutes or un- 
til brown. Another stuffing: — i/o cup cucumber, y^ cup nuts, beat- 
en white of one egg, salt and pepper. 

DANDELIONS. 

Carefully look over and wash thoroughly ; remove roots , 
plunge into boiling salted water, (allowing 2 qts. water to a peck 
of dandelions); cook nearly an hour or until tender; season with 
salt, pepper and butter ; garnish with hard-boiled eggs ; serve with 
vinegar. 

FRIED EGG PLANT. 

Pare and cut in slices y^ inch thick; season sifted bread crumbs 
with salt and pepper; dip each slice in beaten egg; roll in crumbs 
and frv brown. Sarah E. Thomas. 



2-2 THE AVAFREN COOK BOOK 

STUFFED EGG PLANT. 

Cook egg plant in boiling salted water for fifteen minutes ; 
cut off one end and remove the pulp with a spoon ; put 2 table- 
spoons butter in a pan; add 1 cup of bread crumbs, 1/2 tablespoon 
chopped onion and the pulp (chopped); cook five minutes; season 
with salt and pepper, and if necessary moisten with a little stock 
or water; cool slightly and add a beaten egg; re-fill egg plant; 
cover with buttered bread crumbs and bake thirty minutes in a 
hot oven. As Taught in Boston Cooking School. 

Chopx^ed walnuts or hickory nuts may be added to the stuffing. 

EGG PLANT WITH CHEESE. 

Alternate layers of sliced egg plants (l)oiled till tender) ; cream 
sauce and grated cheese, having crumbs and cheese on top ; bake 
until brown. 

HOMINY AS A VEGETABLE. 

The large hominy requires soaking over night and cooking all 
day and is best when served the following day. When nicely sea- 
soned with salt, pepper and butter it makes a most delicious winter 
vegetable and the oftener it is warmed over the better it is. 

Mrs. Eorer. 

LETTUCE. 

Wash and arrange in a dish with 1 onion sliced, and sprinkle 
with salt, pepper and a little sugar; then take 1 cup vinegar and 
•J tablespoons sweet cream and pour over. Mrs. A. Ruhlman. 

LETTUCE. 

Very nice when prepared as Cold Slaw II. 
BOILED MACARONI. 

Plunge % cup macaroni broken in inch pieces into 2 qts. boil- 
ing water with 1 tablespoon salt ; boil twenty minutes ; drain in col- 
ander and pour over cold water to whiten it as well as keep the sec- 
tions from adhering; re-heat in cream and add salt. 

MACARONI AND CHEESE. 

Boil macaroni as above; then place layer in buttered pudding 
dish; sprinkle with grated cheese; repeat; pour over white sauce; 
cover with buttered crumbs and brown. 

MACARONI WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

Same as macaroni and cheese, except in place of white sauct 
use a tomato sauce. 



VEGETABLES. ^3 



THE SHELL OF AN EDAM OR PINEAPPLE CHEESE. 

After all the cheese has been used fill the shell with boiled mac- 
aroni or spaghetti, in cream sauce; stand on a piece of oiled paper; 
bake a few minutes in the oven and serve in the shell. There is 
just enough cheese imparted by the toasting of the shell to give the 
most agreeable flavor to the macaroni. If care is taken one shell 
will answer for three or four bakings. j\Irs. Rorer. 

STEWED MUSHROOMS. 

Wash 1/2 pound mushrooms ; scrape stems and cut in slices ; peel 
caps and break in pieces; plunge all into 3 tablespoons melted but- 
ter ; cook for two minutes ; sprinkle with salt and pepper and dredge 
with flour, add I/2 cup of hot water or stock ; simmer for five min- 
utes and serve. 

CREAMED MUSHROOMS. 

Cook same as stewed mushrooms ;' instead of adding hot water 
or stock add cream or cream sauce; serve on toast. 

ONIONS BOILED. 

Pare and boil whole about fifteen minutes and turn off water; 
add more hot water, enough to cover and boil down to about four 
or five tablespoons ; salt, pepper and butter size of an egg and serve 
hot; add milk or cream, if desired. Mrs. D. Cowan. 

ESCALLOPED ONIONS. 

Take 8 or 10 good sized onions; slice and boil tender; lay them 
in a baking dish, putting bread crumbs, butter in small bits, pepper 
and salt between each laj^er until dish it nearly full ; cover top with 
bread crumbs and add milk or cream until dish is full ; bake I/2 hour 
or until onions are tender. 

ONIONS au GRATIN. 

Same as above. When baked cover the top with a thick layer 
of grated cheese and return to the oven until melted and brown. 

FRIED ONIONS. 

Reirove skins and slice ; heat skillet very hot ; melt 2 tablespoons 
butter or drippings ; add the sliced onions and fry until tender, being 
careful not to burn; season with salt and pepper and serve. 

B. T. K. 

STUFFED ONIONS. 

Parboil large onions in enough salted boiling water to cover 
for ten minutes; cool and remove centers; mash the centers and 



Z\ THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

mix with them finely chopped cold meat, stale soft bread crumbs 
and cream or melted butter enough to moisten ; season with salt 
and pepper. Fill the onion shells and place in buttered shallow 
baking pan and bake in a moderate oven until onions are tender. 

Mrs. M. A. Bliss. 

OYSTER PLANT (SALSIFY.) 

"Wash, scrape and plunge in cold water to present discolor- 
ation; cut in inch sections and boil until tender in salted water; 
drain; season and add cream or cream sauce. 

OYSTER PLANT FRITTERS. 

Boil as above until tender; mash; season with salt and pepper; 
shape into little cakes and fry in butter till brown. 

Mrs . D Cowan . 

BOILED PARSNIPS (MASHED.) 

Wash and scrape parsnips; boil until tender; pour off water, 
salt, pepper and mash fine ; put in a piece of butter size of an egg 
and serve in covered dish. Mrs. A. Ruhlman. 

PARSNIP CAKES. 

Cook same as above; shape in little cakes and fry brown in 
butter. 

FRIED PARSNIPS. 

Wash and scrape ; cut in slices lengthwise ; boil in salted water 
fifteen minutes; drain and brown in a frying pan in butter. (Dip in 
egg and crumbs if desired.) 

PARSNIP CROQUETTES. 

Wash and scrape as many parsnips as required; boil in water 
till tender; drain; mash fine; season with salt, pepper and butter; 
add a well-beaten egg and 1 tablespoon flour; roll into little cakes 
nnd dip in ^^^ and cracker dust and fry in butter. 

Mrs. T. W. McNett. 

PARSNIP OYSTERS. 

Grate 3 large raw parsnips ; add 2 beaten eggs, i/^ cup sweet 
milk, salt, pepper, a little butter and flour enough for a thin batter; 
fry on griddle in butter as pancakes. Mrs. Ollie McClelland. 

PARSNIP STEW. 

Cut about half a pound of pork in small pieces ; put in a kettle 
and boil 1 hour; then add ]>otatoes and parsnips cut in little pieces. 
% more potatoes than parsnips ; boil another hour ; keep plenty of 



VEGETABLES. ^^ 



water in so that it will not stick to the kettle. A very good disn 
in the spring when parsnips are fresh. ]Mrs. G. C. James. 

CREAMED PARSNIPS. 

Wash, scrape and cnt in small sections, discarding the woody 
centers ; boil until tender in salted water ; drain and pour over 
cream or cream sauce; season with salt and pepper and serve. 

PEAS. 

Shell, wash and let stand in cold water for an hour; cook in 
boiling water until tender and very little water should remain at 
this point; season with salt, pepper and butter; add cream or cream 
sauce if desired. 

STUFFED PEPPERS. 

Cut a slice from the stem end of nice sweet peppers ; remove 
the seeds and parboil fifteen minutes ; fill Avith equal parts of cold 
chicken or veal and softened bread crumbs ; season with onion juice, 
salt and pepper; cover with buttered bread crumbs and bake thirty 
minutes; serve on toast with a brown gravy. 

As Taught in Boston Cooking School. 

STUFFED PIMENTOS. 

Fill pimentos with mashed potatoes, seasoned as for the table; 
I'lace in a hot oven for twenty minutes; handle carefully; serve hot. 

OTHER FILLINGS FOR PEPPERS. 

Kice and chicken, bread as for turkey stuffing, tomatoes and 
bread crumbs, creamed cauliflower with cheese, corn pudding, any 
(old chopped meat with bread crumbs; macaroni and cheese. 

POTATOES. 

Never buy potatoes of a farmer without being assured they 
were raised on high ground. Low ground potatoes will not cook 
u]^ meal}' nor will they become crisp when fried in deep fat. 

BAKED POTATOES. 

Select potatoes of uniform size ; wash with a vegetable brush 
and remove any bad spots; place in pan of cold water for an hour 
or two; bake in a moderate oven about forty minutes or until ten- 
der. If the oven is too hot the skin will harden so that the steam 
from the center cannot escape making the potato soggj^ If the 
oven is not hot enough the effect will be the same. "When done roll 
the potatoes one by one in a napkin to make inside soft and flakey; 
serve in an uncovered dish. 



Xe THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



POTATOES BOILED. 

Clean thoroughly or peel very thin, potatoes of uniform size; 
let stand in cold water an hour or two ; place in boiling salted 
water, (a tablesi)oon of salt to a quart of water) and boil until ten- 
der ; drain ; place on stove uncovered until dry and serve in uncov- 
ered dish. 

BROWNED POTATOES. 

Prepare as for boiled potatoes ; boil or steam fifteen minutes ; 
then place in dripper where meat is roasting; baste each potato and 
bake until tender and brown, basting if necessary. 

POTATO CAKES. 

"When sufficient mashed potatoes are left over, before putting 
them away to cool, make them into little flat cakes and when Avanted 
fry in butter until brown. M. J. D. 

CREAMED POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes in little dice ; add them to a white 
sauce; keep at boiling point for ten minutes and serve. 

Mrs. D. Cowan. 

POTATO CHIPS. 

Pare long potatoes; slice on vegetable slicer into cold water; 
let stand two hours, changing once ; take from water and dry be- 
tween towels; fry in deep fat, keeping in motion with a skimmer; 
drain on brown paper and sprinkle with salt. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

2 cups riced potatoes, 2 tablespoons butter, i/o teaspoon salt, 
% teaspoon pepper, y^ teaspoon celery salt, few grains of cayeene, 
few drops of onion juice, yolk of 1 '^%^, 1 teaspoon finely chopped 
I>arsley ; mix ingre iients in order given and heat thoroughly ; shape 
and dip in crumbs; egg and crumbs again; ixy 1 minute in deep fat, 
and drain on brow^n paper. 

As Taught in the Boston Cooking School. 

POTATO CROQUETTES EN SURPRISE. 

Make potato croquette mixture, omitting parsley ; shape in 
femall nests and fill with creamed chicken, shrimps or peas; cover 
nests with croquette mixture ; then roll in form of croquettes ; dip 
in crumbs; o.^^ and crumbs again; fry in deep fat and drain on 
brown paper. 

As Taught in the Boston Cooking School. 



VEGETABLES. 



IX 



DISKED POTATOES (FRENCH FRIED.) 

Pare raw jiotatoes and cut in i)i('ces Icngtinvise ; soak in salt 
water 1 hour; fry in hot lard until tender and brown turning often; 
drain on brown paper; sprinkle with salt and serve. 

Mrs. G. P. Orr. 

ESCALLOPED (KENTUCKY POTATOES.) 

Pare several raw potatoes and slice thin; lay in a <lish in layers, 
sprinkling salt, pepper, a little tlour and dots of butter between 
each layer; add hot milk unt^l it may be seen through top laj'er; 
bake l^^ hours or until potatoes are soft. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES II. 

Cut enough cold l)oile(.l or baked potatoes into tiny squares to 
fill a quart baking dish ; butter the dish and put in a layer of the 
potatoes; sprinkle with salt, pepper, bits of parsley, dot with but- 
ter and cover with white sauce; repeat until dish is full, omitting 
white sauce from top layer; dot the top liberally with butter; 
sprinkle with salt, pepper and crumbs, and pour over a cup of 
cream; bake thirty or forty minutes or until a nice brown. 

Mrs. J. W. Kitchen. 

FRIED POTATOES. 

Slice cold-boiled potatoes into hot butter; season with salt and 
pepper and fry until browned, turning often. 

FRIED (RAW) POTATOES. 

Put raw potatoes through a meat chopper; put in a skillet 2 
tablespoons butter to 2 cups of the potato; Avhen very hot add the 
potatoes ; season with pepper and salt ; turn often and cook tw^enty 
or thirty minutes until browned through. IMrs. M. K. Bliss. 

MASHED POTATOES. 

Put i)otatoes through a ricer or mash them well . add butter, 
salt ami pepper and hot milk or cream enough to beat Avell. 

RICED POTATOES. 

Same as above; after beating well ])ut through ]-ieer again into 
hot tureen and send to the table. 

POTATO CASES. 

To ] pt. of mashed potatoes prepared as above, add 2 eggs and 
heat well; line small molds with the mixture; brush well with but- 
ter; then with fine bread crumbs; bake till brown; fill wilh any fill- 
ing for patties. 



^8 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

LYONNAISE POTATOES. 

Melt 2 tablespoons butter; season with salt and pepper; add 2 
Clips of sliced cold potatoes and cook until the potatoes have ab- 
sorbed the butter, turning often, but do not allov^^ them to brown: 
then add 1 tablespoon of butter in which 1 tablespoon of sliced 
onion has cooked for five minutes and when well mixed add i/o table- 
spoon finely chopped parsley. J3. T. K. 

OAK HILL POTATOES. 

Four cold boiled potatoes, five hard-boiled eggs; put layer of 
potatoes cut thin in a buttered baking dish ; sprinkle with salt and 
pepper; add a layer of eggs; repeat and pour over the whole IV2 
cups white sauce and cover with buttered cracker crumbs; bake till 
crumbs are brown, about twenty minutes. Sauce: 3 tablespoons 
butter, 3 tablespoons flour, ll\> cups milk. Vt teaspoon salt and a 
dash of pepper; serve hot. Mrs. H. A. Booth. 

POTATO PUFF. 

2 cups mashed potatoes; stir in 2 tablespoons melted butter; 
beat with an egg beater to a white cream before adding anything 
else : then put in 2 eggs whipped very light and a cup of cream or 
milk, salt to taste. Beat all together and pour into a baking dish 
and bake in a quick oven till nicely browned. 

Mrs. W. V. Hazeltine. 

SACKED POTATOES. 

Bake 6 potatoes as directed under baked potatoes ; remove 
from oven ; cut off an end and scoop out the inside with a teaspoon ; 
mash; add 2 tablespoons butter, salt, pepper and 3 tablespoons of 
hot milk ; then add whites of 2 eggs well beaten : beat till very 
light; re-fill skins and bake six or eight minutes in very hot oven. 
These are very good without the eggs, if enough hot milk is added 
to beat well. " B. T. K. 

SOUR POTATOES. 

Boil potatoes with skins on; pare and slice -while hot; take V3 
as many onions and slice very thin; then fry some pork and leave 
about 1 tablespoon of the grease in spider and turn a teacup of 
vinegar in with it ; salt and pepper tl\e potatoes and onions, well 
mixed together and turn into the grease and let heat through ; serve 
hot. Mrs. Thompson. 

BAKED SWEET POTATOES. 

Prepare and bake as white potatoes. 



VEGETABLES. e'g 



SWEET POTATO BALLS. 

To a pt. of hot rieed or mashed sweet potatoes add 3 tablespoons 
of butter, V2 teaspoon salt, a little pepper and 1 beaten egg. If 
too dry to'shape into balls add a little hot milk; roll the balls in 
Hour and fry in deep fat and drain on brown paper. 

As Tanglit in the Boston Cooking School. 

SWEET POTATO CAKES. 

Prepare as for mashed sweet i)otatoes; sha])e into flattened balls 
and brown in butter: see white potato cakes. B. T. K. 

GLAZED SWEET POTATOES. 

Wash and pare H mediniu sized sweet potatoes; cook ten min- 
utes in boiling salted water; drain and cut in halves lengthAvise; 
])ut in buttered pan and baste with syrup made of 1/0 cup sugar, 4 
tablespoons water and 1 tablespoon butter; bake about twenty-five 
minutes basting twice with remaining syrup. 

■ Mrs. E. E. Allen. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Follow recipe for Sweet Potato Balls, except to shape in cro- 
quettes . 

CANDIED SWEET POTATOES. 

Into a syrup of sugar and water, dip slices of cold boiled sweet 
potatoes; place on buttered tin and brown in oven. 

SWEET POTATOES A LA CREOLE. 

Peel five large sw^eet potatoes and cut in halves the long w^ay; 
put in a deep baking dish ; cover with milk ; add I/2 teaspoon of salt 
and a tablespoon each of butter and brown sugar; wet 1/0 cup of 
bread crumbs wnth a beaten egg; cover the potatoes wnth this and 
bake in a moderate oven about an hour. Mrs. Richards. 

RADISHES. 

Round radishes maj' be made atti-active when cut to resemble 
tulips. After soaking in cold water, begin at the point and cut 
the skin % the length of the radish until 6 incisions have been 
made ; slip a pointed knife under the point of each section and re- 
turn the radish to cold water where the sections of sk'in will cui'l 
back as far as cut, resembling the tulip. 

BOILED RICE. 

AVash 1 cup rice thoroughly and put in a double boiler contain- 
ing ] (|t. boiling water and a level tablespoon salt; let water in un- 



80 THE AVARREN COOK BOOK 

der kettle boil rapidly fifteen minutes; ponr off any water not ab- 
sorbed by the rice return to the kettle and cook twenty minutes 
longer. Rice cooked in this way will have every grain separate. 

SAUER KRAUT. 

Boil a piece of fresh beef or pork one hour ; then put in the 
kraut and boil together two hours; add salt if necessary. 

SPINACH. 

Remove roots; look over carefully and discard all wilted 
leaves; wash in several waters. If very young and tender, put in 
a kettle or stew pan and heat gradually and cook slowly for thirty 
minutes in its own juices. Old spinach better be cooked in boiling 
salted water uncovered to retain green color; drain, chop, re-heat 
and season with salt, pepper and butter; garnish with slices of hard 
boiled eggs. 

SUMMER SQUASH (STEAMED.) 

If very young and tender cut in large pieces and steam thirty 
minutes. If older the skin has hardened, pare thinly; remove cen- 
ter and steam till tender; mash; season with butter, salt and 
pepper. 

SUMMER SQUASH (BOILED.) 

Cut in thick slices; boil in salted water until tender: drain in 
cheese cloth over colander and mash ; season with butter, pepper 
and salt. 

FRIED SUMMER SQUASH. 

Follow recipe for Fried Egg Plant. 

STEAMED WINTER SQUASH. 

Quarter; renmve center; place in steamer with the skin side up; 
steam one hour or until tender; scrape out the center: mash; sea- 
son with salt, pepper and butter; if lacking in sweetness add less 
than a teaspoon of sugar. 

BAKED WINTER SQUASH. 

Cut squash in quarters or less, remove seeds and stringy por- 
tion; place in a dripping pan; bake two hours or until soft; remove 
from shell; mash and season with butter, salt, sugar and pepper. 

Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

SUCCOTASH (STRING BEANS.) 

String, wash and cut the beans in y^ inch pieces: place in stcAv 
pan of boiling water and boil until nearly tender, thirty or forty 



VEGETABLES. 6i 



minutes ; then add corn cut from the cob, % more corn than beans, 
and continue boiling slowly until both are tender at which time 
very little water should remain in the pan; season with butter 
salt and pepper, five minutes before serving. 

Mrs. D wight Cowan. 

SUCCOTASH (LIMA BEANS.) 

14 pound dried lima beans; soak one hour in water; boil two 
hours (slowlv) ; add 1 can corn; season with salt, pepper and but- 
ter. " Mrs. R. S. Hall. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Prepare as for stuffed tomatoes ; add to the pulp an equal quan- 
tity of cracker crumbs; season with butter, pepper and salt and a 
little chopped onion; fill the shells; re-place the top slice and bake 
lAventy minutes in hot oven. ^I- J- D- 

FRIED TOMATOES I. 

Cut ripe tomatoes with the skins on into slices 1 inch thick, 
salt and sprinkle sugar on both sides; dredge with cracker crumbs; 
lay in hot fat of equal parts of butter and lard ; fry on both sides till 
brown; remove carefully to hot platter; pour sweet cream into the 
fat from which the tomatoes have been removed and boil two 
minutes, stirring all the time and pour over the tomatoes on the 
platter. Mrs. L. D. Wetmore. 

FRIED TOMATOES II. 

Same as above without dressing. 

STEWED TOMATOES I. 

Boil two large tomatoes in 1 coffee cup of water; season with 
salt and pepper to taste; when cooked add 1/2 cup cream and let 
come to a boil ; crumb two slices of bread in a deep dish and add 
a piece of butter the size of a walnut ; pour over the cooked toma- 
toes and serve when hot. Mrs. M. S. Ensworth. 

STEWED TOMATOES II. 

Wipe; pare; cut in pieces and cook slowly in stew pan for 
twenty minutes stirring occasionally; season with butter, pepper 
and salt. 

SLICED TOMATOES. 

AVipe ; cover with boiling water; let stand one minute; remove 
skins and chill thoroughly; cut in I/3 inch slices and serve. When 
ice is not at hand remove skins without the use of boiling water. 



62 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Cover bottom of a buttered baking dish with buttered cracker 
crumbs; add a layer of tomatoes peeled and sliced (or the solid 
part of a can of tomatoes) ; season with butter, pepper and salt, 
and cover with buttered crumbs; bake in a hot oven until crumbs 
are brown. Berta T. Kitchen. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Wipe and remove thin slices from stem end of 6 medium sized 
tomatoes ; take out seeds and pulp ; sprinkle inside of tomato witli 
salt; invert; and let stand i/o hour; cook five minutes two table- 
spoons butter with Vo tablespoon finely chopped onion; add 1/2 cup 
finely chopped cold cooked chicken or veal, i/o cup stale bread 
crumbs, tomato pulp and salt and pepper to taste ; cook five min- 
utes ; then add 1 egg slightly beaten and cook one minute, and 
re-fill tomatoes with mixture; place in buttered pan; sprinkle with 
buttered cracker crumbs and bake twenty minutes in a hot oven. 
As Taught in the Boston Cooking School. 

ROAST TOMATOES. 

Cut a slice off the top of fine large ones; take out most of the 
inside ; fill with a rich dressing as for chicken ; replace the top and 
place in a pan without water; roast in oven % of an hour or until 
done; sprinkle sugar over and serve. Mrs. H. G. Eddy. 

STEWED GREEN TOMATOES. 

Peel and slice 5 or 6 green tomatoes; also 3 onions; put in 
spider with onions at the bottom with enough water to cook ; when 
done turn off water, if any remains; season with salt, pepper and 
butter the size of an egg and a little milk or cream. 

Mrs. T. W. McNett. 

FRIED GREEN TOMATOES. 

Slice tomatoes thin and cover with salt ; let stand ^/o hour ; then 
dip in flour and fry in butter. Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 65 



SALADS AND DRESSING 

Mrs. E. E. Allen 

Salads made of greens slioiild always be served crisp and cold. 
The vegetables should be thoroughly washed, allowed to stand in 
cold or ice water until crisp, then drained and spread on a towel and 
set aside in a cold place until serving time. Dressings may be 
added at table or just before sending to table. If greens are allowed 
to stand in dressing they will soon wilt. It should be remembered 
that winter greens are raised under glass and should be treated as 
any other hot house plant. Lettuce will be affected by a change 
of temperature and wilt just as quickly as delicate flowers. 

Canned or cold cooked left over vegetables are well utilized in 
salads, but are best mixed wnth French dressing and allowed to 
stand in a cold place one hour before serving. Where several vege- 
tables are used in the same salad they should be marinated separ- 
ately, and arranged for serving just before sending to the table. 

Meat for salads should be freed from skin and gristle, cut in 
small cubes, and allowed to stand mixed with French Dressing be- 
fore combining with vegetables. Fish should be flaked or cut in 
cubes. 

Where salads are dressed at the table, first sprinkle with salt 
and pepper, add oil. and lastly, vinegar. If vinegar is added before 
oil, the greens will become wet. and oil will not cling, but settle to 
bottom of bowl. 

To Marinate : — The word marinate used in cookery, means to 
add salt, pepper, oil and vinegar to a salad ingredient or mixture 
and let stand until well seasoned. 

SALAD DRESSINGS 

BOILED DRESSING I. 

1 teaspoon mustard, % cup sweet milk, 1 teaspoon salt, 
y2 cup vinegar, 3 teaspoons sugar, butter size of an egg. yolks 
of 3 eggs; cook in double boiler; when cold add i/o cuj) cream whip- 
ped. Mrs. James O. Parmlee. 

BOILED DRESSING II, 

4 tablespoons butter, 1 tablespoon flour, i/. teaspoon salt, 2 tea- 
spoons sugar, 1 teaspoon mustard, (heaping). 3 eggs, 1 cup milk, 
1/2 cup vinegar; let butter get hot in pan; add flour; stir until 
smooth; add the milk and let boil; beat all other ingredients togeth- 
er and add to boil. If too thick add juice of lemon, or a little cream 
when cold. Mrs. W. H. Hegerty. 



64 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



BOILED DRESSING III. 

1 teasoon dry mustard in 1 tablespoon boiling water, 1 table- 
spoon sugar, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 saltspoon salt, 1 table- 
spoon tiour, yolks of 3 eggs, ^2. cup vinegar, cayenne pepper; beat 
the eggs; add the rest of the ingredients except the vinegar and beat 
thoroughly; add the vinegar which has been heated, and cook all 
together in a double boiler until thick; add to taste whipped cream, 
when used. Mrs. C. T. Conarro, Mrs. W. J. Richards. 

BOILED DRESSING IV. 

4 tablespoons butter, 3 tablespoons flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 
tablespoon salt, 1 heaping tablespoon mustard, a pinch of cayenne 
pepper, 1 cup milk, 1/2 cup of vinegar, 3 eggs; let butter get hot in 
a sauce pan; add flour and stir until smooth, being careful not to 
brown; add the milk and boil up; place the sauce pan in another 
of hot water ; beat eggs, salt, pepper, sugar and mustard together 
and add vinegar; stir this into the boiling mixture and stir to the 
consistency of soft custard. 

Mrs. S. P. Schermerhorn, Mrs. E. E. Allen. 

CREAM DRESSING. 

1 tablespoon sugar. I/2 cuj) vinegar, 1 tablespoon flour, 2 eggs. 
1/4 teaspoon mustard, Vi cup butter, 14 teaspoon salt, 1 cup cream, 
whipped; mix dry ingredients; add beaten eggs, vinegar and but- 
ter; cook in double boiler until thick, and when cold add whipped 
cream. Miss Mary White, Mrs. Hilda Wood Jacobs. 

CREAM DRESSING II. 

Yolks of 4 eggs, very thorougly beaten, i/> cup vinegar, y^ tea- 
spoon mustard. 1 tablespoon sugar, 1/0 cup melted butter or salad 
oil; set the mixture in a vessel of hot water and let simmer until it 
is thick and smooth ; then salt to taste ; let cool and bottle for use. 

Mrs. Scofield. 

CREAM DRESSING III. 

Will keep for weeks. Yolks of 8 eggs or 4 whole ones. 1 tea- 
spoon salt.^l teaspoon mustard, i/o cup sugar, 1 teaspoon black pep- 
per, 2 tablespoons flour, iy> pts. vinegar, 1 cup butter, cayenne pep- 
per ; mix thoroughly adding vinegar and butter last ; let come to a 
boil and when cold, thin as you use, with a little cream. 

Mrs. William Bashline. 

FRENCH DRESSING I. 

I/2 teaspoon salt, I/4 teaspoon paprica, 2 tablespoons vinegar, 4 
tablespoons olive oil; mix in covered can and shake till foamy. 

Mrs. James 0. Parmlee.* 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 85 



FRENCH DRESSING II. 

Yolk of 1 egg, 2 tablespoons vinegar, ;3 tablespoons of olive oil, 
1/2 teaspoon salt, Yi ot pepper; beat the jolk very light; put salt 
and pepper in a bowl ; add gradually the oil ; rub and mix until the 
salt is thoroughly dissolved; then add by degrees the vinegar; stir 
continually for one minute and it is ready for use; use the white 
wine vinegar. Mrs. Trunkey. 

FRUIT SALAD DRESSING. 

Slightly beat 2 eggs in a bowl (richer if yolks of 4 eggs are 
used) ; add a little salt, cayenne pepper, dry mustard, 1 teaspoon 
sugar and 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch; mix until very smooth; heat 4 
tablespoons mild vinegar; when hot drop little by little into the mix- 
ture in the bowl, beating all the time ; return to stove and stir until 
thick ; remove from stove and add, while hot, 1 large tablespoon but- 
ter and beat until very light, and cool; when ready for use, add V2 
pt. cream whipped very stiff, and stir into dressing. 

Mrs. (Jopeland. 

OIL MAYONNAISE. 

Have all ingredients and dishes cold. 14 teaspoon mustard, J 
teaspoon salt, cayenne, yolks of 2 eggs, 3 teaspoons lemon juice, I 
cup olive oil ; mix dry ingredients ; add to beaten yolks : then add a 
few drops of oil, beating with an egg beater or wooden spoon ; then 
add alternately the lemon juice and remainder of oil, beating stead- 
ily until all has been added. (Lemon thins the mixture, oil thick- 
ens it.) Do not allow it to get too thin as it is apt to curdle. If 
the dressing should curdle start with a fresh yolk, adding the curdled 
dressing to it slowly, and alternating it with some of the acid. Be- 
Tore using thin mayonnaise wnth thick whipped cream. 

Mrs. Hilda Wood Jacobs. 

OIL MAYONNAISE II. 

2 cups best olive oil, yolk of 1 egg. juice of 1 lemon, I/2 teaspoon 
salt. 1/4 teaspoon mustard, % teaspoon red pepper place a bowl in 
pan of ice water; put egg, seasoning and strained lemon juice in 
bowl and beat together, (using Dover beater) ; then add oil slowly 
and beat rapidly. The result is a bowl of stiff ^Mayonnaise in ten 
minutes. Flora B. Smith. 

LOBSTER SALAD DRESSING. 

4 eggs. 1 tablespoon sugar, 2 tablespooTis butter, 1 of salt, 2 of 
vinegar, 1 of mustard ; beat the whites of the eggs separately and 
add last; cook in a bowl set in a kettle of water. ^Irs. Parker. 



66 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



SAUCE TARTARE. 

To 14 cup oil dressing, add 1 teaspoon each of chopped olives, 
pickles, capers, parsley; may use tarragon instead of lemon in 
dressing. Mrs. Hilda Wood Jacobs. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Beat yolks of 8 eggs until thick and lemon colored ; drop 3 
tablespoons olive oil in slowly, beating continually ; add 1/0 cup melt- 
ed butter, % cup vinegar and juice of 1 lemon slowly ; cook in dou- 
ble boiler until it coats a spoon; remove from range and sift in th«? 
following which have been thoroughly blended, 4 level teaspoons 
salt, lyo tablespoons mustard, 1/0 teaspoon white pepper, i/g teaspoon 
red pepper, 3 tablespoons powdered sugar. This dressing should be 
thinned with whipped cream. Mrs. C. L. Clough. 

SOUR CREAM DRESSING. 

1/2 cup thick cream, 3 tablespoons vinegar, i/4 teaspoon salt, few 
grains of pepper; beat cream until stiff; add other ingredients slow- 
ly beating all the time. C. L. A. 

SALAD DRESSING FOR SALMON. 

1 teaspoon mustard, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, a little 
pepper, % cup melted butter, 3 eggs, 1 cup rich milk or cream, V2 
cup vinegar; put dry ingredients in bowl and moisten with hot 
water; then add melted butter, eggs beaten light and milk; lastly 
the vinegar ; set bowl in pan of boiling water and cook until thick as 
custard, stirring all the time. Mrs. Edward Lindsey. 

SALADS 

APPLE AND CELERY SALAD. 

Take equal parts of crisp celery cut into lengths, and tart ap- 
ples scooped' from the skin and chopped rather fine. Both should 
be chilled thoroughly before mixing. At serving time sprinkle 
lightly with salt and toss them together. Use either French Dress- 
ing, or Mayonnaise. Mrs. Siegfried. 

BEAN SALAD, GERMAN. 

1 qt. of string beans, 1 onion, 3 tablespoons of ham or pork 
fryings, i^ cup of vinegar; boil the beans in salted water until ten- 
der; pou^off the water; slice the onion fine and add to the beans; 
pour over this a dressing made of the vinegar and ham fat; add 
salt and pepper to taste and mix thoroughly. 

BEET SALAD. 

Dice cold boiled beets and an equal quantity of celery; mix with 
either oil or cooked mayonnaise, and serve on lettuce. 

Mrs. Florence S. Wood. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. a? 



BEET SALAD. 

To 1 can of Strawberry Beets, cut in Vii inch cubes ; add 1 pound 
shelled pecans, broken in pieces; serve with boiled salad dressing; 
garnish with finely shredded red cal)l)age. Beets should he marin- 
ated and seasoned with French Dressing before mixing with nuts. 

Elizabeth J. Clough. 

CABBAGE SALAD . 

Shred finely a small white cabbage and let stand in ice water 
one hour; drain and dry as much as possible in a cloth; then add a 
small quantity of shredded sweet pepper or onion and celery; use 
sour cream dressing or mayonnaise. ]\[rs. E. E. Allen. 

CABBAGE AND APPLE SALAD. 

2 cups chopped cabbage, 1 cup chopped tart apples, 1 cup wal- 
nut meats broken in pieces; mix with cream dressing and serve im- 
mediately. MaryE. Kopf. 

CANTALOUPE SALAD. 

Cut the meaty inside of a ripe cantaloupe in cubes; dust slight- 
ly Avith salt, paprika and cinnamon; put this in a jar next the ice 
for several hours ; when ready to serve, put a little cream cheese 
through the ricer over the cantalonpe. which is already on lettuce, 
and serve with Oil Mayonnaise and Whipped Cream. 

Mrs . McCullough . 

CELERY AND PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

Cut pieces of canned pineapple into small dice; chop fine an 
equal amount of crisp celery; mix thoroughly with a cream dress- 
ing; serve on lettuce and garnish with pecan meats. C. A. 

CELERY AND STRING BEANS. 

Boil string beans if very yoimg whole, if not, in halves; when 
cold add diced celery, using more beans than celery; serve with Oil 
Mayonnaise or French Dressing. ]\rrs. James 0. Parmlee. 

CHEESE SALAD. 

Make small balls of Neufchatel cheese seasoned with cayenne or 
paprica and served with French or Cream dressing in the hearts of 
lettuce leaves. Mrs. Allen. 

CHERRY SALAD. 

Remove pits from C'alifornia cherries, both red and white if 
preferred and fill cavities with blanched hazel nuts ; arrange on 
heart leaves of head lettuce and serve with French dressing to which 
has been added some of the cherry juice. Mrs. C. L. Clough. 



88 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



CHICKEN SALAD. 

To 2 qts. of cut chicken add 3 pts. celery. After the chicken 
is boiled and perfectly cold, remove skin and cut into dice ; use 
shears for cutting as it is more uniformly and quickly done, using 
only the white meat if you want it very nice; after you have cut 
it, stand in a cold place until wanted ; wash and cut the white parts 
of celery into pieces about % inch long, throw them into a bowl ot 
cold water, and also stand away until wanted. When ready to serve, 
dry the celery and mix with the chicken; dust lightly with salt, 
white or cayenne pepper, and mix with oil mayonnaise ; cooked dress- 
ing; or equal quantities of both with whipped cream. 

niv« ,\]lpn. 

i CHICKEN SALAD. 

1 qt. chicken meat, 3 tablespoons vinegar, 1 tablespoon oil, i 
generous teaspoon salt, lA teaspoon pepper, 1 pt. celery, ^layon- 
naise dressing; free the cold cooked chicken of skin, fat and bones, 
and cut it in cubes; put 1 qt. of the meat in a bowl with a marinade 
made by mixing \'inegar, oil, salt and pepper; stii well and place in 
the refrigerator for one hour or longer ; cut in thin slices enough 
of the white, tender part of celery to make a generous pint ; M^asli 
this in cold water, and put it in the refrigerator with pieces of ice 
on top. At serving time remove the ice and drain all the water 
from the celery; mix the. celery with the chicken, and add 1 pt. uf 
mayonnaise dressing. C. L. A. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

fi cucumbers sliced very thin; add a large tablespoon salt; mi.s: 
well; let it stand two hours; drain and rinse in ice water; add 3 
onions sliced very thin ; then 6 tablespoons sour cream beaten a lit- 
tle, 6 tablespoons vinegar, pinch white pepper; serve at once very 
cold. Mrs. Hoffman. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

6 cold boiled potatoes, 2 large onions ; slice j)otatoes and onions ; 
throw salt and pepper over them, just enough to season them; let 
stand a few hours; about % hour before serving; slice 6 medium size 
cucumbers with the above; serve with boiled dressing. 

Mrs. Booth. 

EGG SALAD. 

Take as many eggs as needed; boil them until perfectly hard, 
almost i/o hour; take out the yolks carefully; chop the white very 
fine; arrange lettuce leaves or cress on a dish, making nests of the 
whites of eggs, and put 1 yolk in each nest; sprinkle French dress- 
ing over the whole. Mrs. Fletcher Parker. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 89 



EGG SALAD. 

Cut 4 hard boiled eggs in halves crosswise in such a way that 
tops of halves may be cut in small points; remove yolks; mash, and 
add an equal amount of finely chopped cooked chicken ; moisten with 
oil dressing; shape in balls, size of original yolks, and refill whites; 
arrange on lettuce leaves and serve with oil dressing. 

ENDIVE WITH BACON. 

Make a bed of endive with onion sliced fine over it ; cut bacon 
in dif'e; place in frying jmn and fry sIoavIv. AVhen rca<ly to serve, scat- 
ter bacon over onion and endive and use either French dressing or 
from frying pan pour off part of fat ; add some vinegar ; let boil up 
and use as dressing. Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

3 oranges cut up and drained well in a sieve, 1 pt. pineapple, 
canned or fresh, drained. 1 pound Malaga grapes cut in halves and 
seeds removed. 1 pound English walnuts, (in shell.") Use Fruit 
Salad dressing. Mrs. P. P. Leclie. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Partly fill glass with bananas and oranges cut in slices ; garnish 
with a little cocoanut, 2 or 3 cherries and a nut or two, and pour 
over them a dressing made of the juice of 2 lemons, 4 tablespoons 
sugar, 2 teaspoons almond extract, 4 tablespoons water; stir these 
over the fire until sugar dissolves; when cold, pour over the salad. 

Mrs. David H. Siggins. 

GRAPE FRUIT SALAD. 

Pare two grape fruit; divide sections and separate membrane 
and pulp : break into large pieces ; place in colander and let drain 
into earthen dish, take 1 package of lemon Jellycon and pour on 
small cup boiling water; when cool add juice from grape fruit; 
pour into shallow pan and when firm cut in inch pieces; serve Avith 
sections of fruit, either in shell or on bed of head lettuce with ono 
spoon of oil mayonnaise. Mrs. James 0. Parmlee. 

GRAPE FRUIT SALAD. 

Separate the grape fruit into sections ; with scissors snip th<b 
membrane encasing the sections, and carefully peel it from the 
pulp ; arrange 3 or 4 of these sections in a circle on lettuce leaves, 
in center put teaspoon or more of maj'^onnaise dressing. 

Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

GRAPE FRUIT AND CELERY SALAD. 

Cut the grape fruit into quarters ; remove the pulp rejecting all 
skin and pith, and mix with an equal quantity of diced, white eel- 



90 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



ery; fill each boat-shaped section of the shell with this mixture, cov- 
ering with a light mayonnaise, and garnishing with ripe and green 
olives, stoned and halved. Mrs. J. P. Jefferson. 

LETTUCE AND ONION. 

Lettuce cut fine with the shears ; put in a plate and add a little 
onion cut up fine ; cover with a French dressing, 2 tablespoons olive 
oil and a little salt and red pepper to 1 tablespoon vinegar is the 
proportion; 2 tablespoons of this mixture is enough for one plate 
and one can plan accordingly. F. B. S. 

LETTUCE AND SWEET PEPPER. 

Cut lettuce with shears ; remove seeds and top from red sweet 
peppers and cut in same way ; serve pepper on lettuce with French 
dressing. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Select heavy small lobster, rather than large ones ; put them in 
warm water and let boil about i/o hour; take from the shells and 
claws all the meat that is eatable ; cut it in blocks and let it cool 
thoroughly; use lobster dressing, also thoroughly cold; when ready 
to serve, make a nest of lettuce on the dish ; mix a part of the 
dressing with the cut lobster; place it in the dish; cover it with the 
remaining dressing; garnish with small tufts of lettuce and with the 
smaller claws. Mrs. F. Parker. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Remove lobster meat from shell ; cut in I/2 i"ch cubes, and mar- 
inate with a French dressing; add an equal quantit}^ of celery cut 
in small pieces, kept one hour in cold or ice water; then drained and 
dried in a towel; moisten with any cream or oil dressing: arrange 
on a salad dish; pile slightly in center; cover with dressing; sprinkle 
with lobster coral forced through a fiijie sieve, and garnish with a 
border of curled celery. Mrs. Allen. 

PEAR SALAD. 

Remove the blossom end, and core as many pears as there are 
persons to serve; slice cross ways, and keep together as a whole 
pear with stem in top ; place each pear on lettuce and serve with 
French dressing. Mrs. Hilda Wood Jacobs. 

PECAN AND MALAGA GRAPES. 

Seed Malaga grapes without separating the hnlves and put n 
pecan nut meat into each grape ; serve on lettuce with French dress- 
ing or cooked if preferred. C. L.- A. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 



9J 



POTATO SALAD. 

Steam I/2 dozen large potatoes ; cut in slices and prepare a dress- 
ing of vinegar, oil, mustard, hard boiled eggs and minced onion ; 
season with pepper and salt and pour "over the potatoes . 

Mrs. Parker. 

POTATO SALAD. 

1 qt. cold boiled potatoes cut in small pieces, nearly the same 
amount of celery; 4 hard boiled eggs cut fine, and 8 medium sized 
onions chopped fine ; mix all together ; season with salt and pepper ; 
use Oil Mayonnaise ; garnish with hard boiled eggs and bleached 
celery tops; lettuce can be substituted for celery if preferred. 

Mrs. A. D. Wood. 

RUSSIAN SALAD. 

Take equal quantities of cold i)otatoes cut in Vl' inch cubes, 
celery, whites of hard boiled eggs, and pecans ; mix with a cream 
dressing; serve on lettuce with some of the yolks of the eggs, which 
have been put through a ricer, as garnish for the top. 

Mrs. Hammond. 

SALMON SALAD. 

Flake 1 can steak salmon; dice 1 cucumber and cut 1 bunch of 
celery very fine; mix together and serve w^th salmon salad dressing. 

Mrs. Edward Lindsey. 

SALMON SALAD. 

Set a can of salmon in a kettle of hot water; let it boil twenty 
minutes ; take from the can and put in a dish ; pour off the juice 
or oil ; put a few cloves in and around it ; sprinkle salt and pepper 
over ; cover with cold vinegar, and let it stand one day ; prepare 
dressing as follows : Beat the yolks of 2 raw eggs with the yolks of 
*1 eggs boiled hard, mashed fine as possible ; add gradually 3 table- 
spoons of melted butter, or the best salad oil, 1 tablespoon of mus- 
tard, a little salt and pepper, (black or cayenne), and vinegar to 
taste ; beat the mixture a long time ; (some persons like the addition 
of lemon juice and a little brown sugar,) cover the salmon thickly 
with a part of the dressing; tear up very small the crisp inside 
leaves of lettuce : add to the remainder of the mixture, and pour 
over; garnish with crisp lettuce leaves. Mrs. Fred Darling. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

Use fresh or canned shrimp, if in can cover with ice water 
twenty minutes; drain thoroughly; remove intestinal veins and 
break in pieces ; moisten with cream dressing and arrange on lettuce 



92 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

leaves ; put a spoon of dressing on each and garnish with whole 
shrimp, olives and capers. Mrs. Allen. 

SPINACH SALAD. 

Pick over ; wash and cook i/^ peck spinach ; drain and chop 
finely; season with salt, pepper and lemon juice, and add 1 table- 
spoon melted butter; butter slightly small tin moulds and pack 
solidly with mixture ; chill ; remove from moulds, and arrange on 
thin slices of cold boiled tongue cut in circular pieces ; garnish base 
of each with a wreath of parsley, and serve on top of each sauce tar- 
tare. Mrs. Hilda Wood Jacobs. 

SWEETBREAD AND CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Parboil a pair of sweetbreads, with bay leaf, twenty minutes; 
drain, and when quite cold cut in i/o inch dice ; mix with an equal 
quantity of cucumber cut in i/o cubes, after removing seeds and 
pulp ; mix with cream dressing, and serve on lettuce or in cucumber 
cups. Mrs. Rose Hammond. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Peel and chill tomatoes ; cut in halves crosswise ; arrange each 
half on a lettuce leaf; garnish with Mayonnaise and minced onion. 

TOMATO AND CHIVES. 

Select small firm tomatc^es; peel and eliill ; cut chives in half inch 
lengths; sprinkle over tomatoes and let stand ^/^ hour with French 
dressing poured over them. Mrs. E. D. Wetmore. 

TOMATO JELLY. 

y-2 box or 2 tablespoons granulated gelatine, i/o cup cold water, 
2 teaspoons salt, 2 pieces of bay leaf, 6 peppercorns, 1 teaspoon sugar, 
1 slice onion, 6 cloves and 1 can tomatoes ; soak the gelatine in the 
cold water until soft; cook the tomatoes and seasoning (except salt) 
for twenty minutes, strain and add salt; pour the hot liquid over the 
softened gelatine ; stir until it is dissolved ; then pour into custard 
cups which have been wet with cold water; serve very cold on let- 
tuce leaves with Mayonnaise dressing. Miss DeForest. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 

Cut up some small cooked string beans ; add an equal amount 
of cooked peas, beets cut in dice and carrots ; serve on lettuce, keep- 
ing each vegetable separate, with a spoon of mayonnaise. 

Mrs. James 0. Parmlee. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 95 

WATERCRESS. 

AVash ; remove roots ; drain and chill watercress ; arrange in sal- 
ad dish, with minced onion or sliced cucumber, and serve with 
French dressing. C. L. A. 

WALDORF SALAD. 

2 medium sized apples cut in dice shaped pieces, twice that 
amount of celery cut the same, I/2 pound of walnuts broken in small 
pieces ; mix all together with an oil mayonnaise diluted with 
whipped cream. Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

WALDORF SALAD. 

Use equal parts of good tart apples cut in 14 inch cubes, walnuts 
and celery; mix with a cream dressing and arrange in nests of let- 
tuce leaves. Mrs. Hammond. 



94 THE W A KREN COOK BOOK 



ENTREES. 95 



ENTREES 

Mrs. F. E. Sill 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Make a batter with 1 cup sweet milk. 1 teaspoon sugar. 2 eggs, 
whites and yolks beaten separately, 2 cups Hour, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder, mixed with flour ; chip some good tart apples ; mix in the 
batter and fry in hot lard; serve with maple syrup. 

Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Sour apples, lemon juice, powdered sugar, 1 cup flour, U/^ tea- 
spoon baking powder, 3 tablespoons powdered sugar, i/4 teaspoon 
salt, 1/3 cup milk and 1 egg; core; pare and cut apples in % inch 
slices; sprinkle with powdered sugar and few drops of lemon juice; 
let stand one hour; then drop pieces in batter; fry in deep fat; 
serve Avith hard sauce, 

BANANA FRITTERS. 

3 bananas, 1 cup flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 table- 
spoon powdered sugar, i/4 teaspoon salt, Vi cup milk, 1 egg, 1 table- 
spoon lemon juice ; mix and sift dry ingredients ; beat egg until 
light ; add milk and combine mixtures ; add lemon juice and banana 
forced through a sieve ; drop by spoonfuls and fry in deep fat ; 
drain on paper and serve with a lemon sauce. 

CHEESE BALLS. 

Grate common cheese of an excellent quality and flavor and 
stand it in a cool place, while an equal amount of mixed nuts are 
chopped fine ; season the cheese highly with red pepper and a little 
more salt; add the nuts to the cheese, and stir well together .with 
sweet cream. Enough cream should be used to make the mixture 
soft, but still have it in a condition to handle; roll the mixture into 
balls and roll the balls in chopped parsley. Mayonnaise dressing 
iiuiy be used instead of cream and seasoning; serve these linlls with 
pie or Avith a salad course. Clara B. Schofield. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

1 cup soft bread crumbs, i/^ cup sweet milk. 4 tablespoons 
grated cheese, yolks of 3 eggs, whites of 4, 1 tablespoon butter, 
scant teaspoon of salt, little pepper: put bread crumbs and milk to- 
gether and cook, stirring until smooth; add yolks of eggs, cheese 



96 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



and butter and just before baking add the beaten whites ; place in 
pan of boiling water and bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Haslet. Franklin. 

CHEESE FONDUE. 

1 cup scalded milk, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 cup soft bread 
crumbs, I/2 teaspoon salt, i/4 pound mild cheese ; cut in small pieces, 
yolks 3 eggs, whites 3 eggs; mix first five ingredients; add yolks of 
eggs, beaten until lemon colored; cut and fold in whites of eggs, 
beaten stiff; pour in a buttered dish and bake twenty minutes in a 
moderate oven. Approved. 

CHEESE RAMAKINS. 

4 tablespoons grated cheese, 1 gill milk, yolks of 2 eggs, 2 
tablespoons butter, 2 ounces bread, !/•{ teaspoon mustard, whites of 
3 eggs, cayenne and salt to taste ; put the bread and milk to boil ; 
stir over the fire one minute ; take off ; add seasoning, yolks of eggs ; 
beat the whites to a stiff froth; stir them in carefully; pour into a 
greased dish and bake about fifteen minutes. Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

1 cup grated cheese, 1/2 cup butter, % cup sifted flour, 1 tea- 
spoon dry mustard, a large pinch of red pepper, 4 teaspoons of cold 
water or enough to form a soft dough; mix and roll like pie crust 
and cut into strips 6 by Y^ inch; bake a light brown. 

Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

3 tablespoons grated cheese, 3 tablespoons flour, 1 tablespoon 
melted butter, 1 tablespoon cold water, yolk of 1 egg, salt ; mix and 
roll; cut in strips and bake fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. David H. Siggins. 

FRIED CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Slice bread very thin; butter lightly; remove the crusts and lay 
a slice of cheese with a little sprinkle of cayenne between each slice ; 
press the slices firmly tosrether that they may hold the cheese be- 
tween them; fry to a golden brown in melted butter; serve at once. 

Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

CHOCOLATE RAISINS. 

Buy the large meaty raisins on the stem and cut them into small- 
er bunches and place at one side of a small serving plate and a gener- 
ous spoonful of grated chocolate at the other side; 'pull a raisin from 
the stem and dip it into the chocolate as you dip fresh berries into 



ENTREES. gr 



sugar. This is an excellent dainty to serve with hot tea and a 
■wafer between courses in the place of salted nuts. 

Clara B. Schofield. 

CREAM OF CHEESE. 

1 cup whipped cream, 1 tablespoon granulated gelatine dissolv- 
ed, 4 tablespoons grated cheese; mould and serve. 

Mrs. Haslet, Franklin. 

CROQUETTES. 

The secret of making croquettes firm lies in their being mixed 
for a long time. The meat should be chopped or ground very fine 
after being freed from all gristle and bone and fat. Allow V2 pt- 
of milk to every pint of meat. The milk should be put over the fire, 
while a tablespoon of butter and 2 tablespoons of flour are rubbed to- 
gether; the hot milk is then added, and the whole cooked to a thick 
smooth paste ; add to your chopped meat a tablespoon of chopped 
jjarsley, salt and pepper to taste ; a little grated rind of lemon and 
a teaspoon of onion juice; then stir the seasoned meat into the 
paste and let stand at least two hours before it is moulded into cro- 
quettes . Dip first in eggs ; then in bread crumbs ; then fry in smok- 
ing hot lard or AVesson's cooking oil. Sweet potatoes make a nice 
croquette with only the parsley, salt and pepper, w^ith a pinch of pa- 
prica for seasoning. Mrs. S. E. AValker. 

CHEESE CROQUETTES. 

2 cups grated cheese ; 1 cup fine bread crumbs ; salt and cay- 
enne to taste; form into small balls; dip into beaten eggs and fine 
cracker crumbs; fry in boiling fat; serve with salads. 

Mrs. Salyer. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

1% cup chopped cold, cooked fowl, I/2 teaspoon salt, i/4 teaspoon 
ce lery salt, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, a few drops onion juice, 1 tea- 
spoon chopped parslej^ few grains of red pepper, 1 cup thick white 
sauce ; mix ingredients in order given, cool, shape, crumb and fry 
same as other croquettes. F. M. Farmer. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Make a Bechamel sauce of 1 cup of chicken liquor, y^ a cup of 
cream, 1/4 a cup, each, of butter and flour, salt and pepper, and a 
scant teaspoon of kitchen bouquet ; add a beaten egg and 1 pt. of 
chopped chicken ; a few chopped mushrooms or almonds are an im- 
provement ; when the mixture is cool form into pear shape ; dip in egg 
and bread crumbs, and fry in deep fat ; serve on a folded napkin or 
dish paper, inserting a sprig of parsley into the stem of The croquettes. 

Mrs. Janet M. Hill. 



96 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



MACARONI CROQUETTES. 

Put macaroni in boiling hot salt water; boil twenty minutes; cut 
in very small pieces ; 1 cup milk, 2 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons 
flour made into a white sauce ; add macaroni, 2 tablespoons grated 
cheese, 1 teaspoon salt; cool ; shape and dip in egg and 1)read crumbs; 
fry in deep fat. Mrs. C. E. Bell. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

1 cup rice, i/^, teaspoon salt, Yj cup boiling water, yolks of 2 eggs. 

1 cup scalded milk, 1 tablespoon butter ; wash rice ; add the water 
with salt ; cover and steam until rice has absorbed water ; then add 
milk ; stir lightly with a fork ; cover and steam until rice is soft ; re- 
move from fire ; add egg yolk and butter ; spread on a plate to cool : 
shape and roll in crumbs; dip in egg; again in crumbs; fry in deejj 
fat. Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

1% cup cold salmon, 1 cup thick white sauce, a few grains of 
cayenne, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, salt ; mix all together ; cool and 
shape; roll in egg and crumbs and fry in deep fat. Approved. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

2 cups chopped, cold, cooked veal, i/o teaspoon salt, Va teaspoon 
pepper, few grains cayenne, few drops onion juice, yolk of 1 egg, 1 
cup thick sauce ; mix ingredients in order given . In making the 
sauce use rich, white stock in place of milk ; cool, shape, crumb and 
fry same as other croquettes. F. M. Farmer. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

To every pint of veal chopped fine add this sauce: i/> pt. of 
milk or cream, 1 large tablespoon butter, 2 large tablespoons flour. 1 
large tablespoon onion juice, 1 teaspoon salt, Y^ teaspoon nutmeg 
grated, cayenne to taste ; put the milk on to boil in a farina boiler ; 
rub the butter and flour to a smooth paste ; then stir into the boiling 
milk and stir continually until thick ; take from the fire and add the 
meat; beat thoroughly; add seasoning; then turn on a large plate to 
cool ; when cold and hard form into cone-shaped croquettes ; dip first 
in egg and then in bread crumbs and fry in boiling oil or fat. Serve 
at once. Mrs. Blood. 

VEAL CUTLET IN CHEESE. 

Beat together yolks of 2 eggs, I/2 cup of water, % cup flour, 1 
tablespoon melted butter and V2 cup grated cheese; whip whites of 
eggs to a stiff froth; stir gently in batter and set aside for two or 
three hours ; cut 2 pounds veal cutlet into pieces the size of the palm 
of the hand ; dip into batter and drop into smoking hot fat ; cook but 

2 or 8 pieces at a time unless kettle is large. 

Mrs. David Alexander. 



ENTREES. 99 



LOBSTER CUTLETS. 

2 cups chopped lobster, VL' teaspoon salt, few grains cayenne and 
nutmeg, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, yolk 1 egg, 1 teaspoon finely chop- 
ped parsley, 1 cup thick white sauce; mix together and shape when 
cool in form of cutlets; dip in egg and crumbs; fry same as cro- 
quettes. Approved. 

EGG CUTLETS. 

1 can mushrooms, 6 hard l)oiled eggs ; cut both quite fine ; make 
a thick white sauce; season with salt and pepper; form into cro- 
quettes and fry in deep fat. Lillian Lemmon. 

PEACHES AND NUTS. 

Take whole firm peaches; pare them; remove the stone and fill 
the cavity formed with finely mashed English walnuts; put the 
]/eaches together again, keeping them in position by piercing them 
with fine toothpicks; place them in steamer for ten minutes and then 
remove and cool: serve with sugar and whipped cream. 

Clara B. Schofield. 

TIMBALS . 

Three-fourths cup flour, V2cup milk, i/o teaspoon salt, 1 egg, 1 
teaspoon sugar, ] teaspoon olive oil; mix dry ingredients; add milk 
gradually and beaten egg; then add olive oil; dip a hot timbale iron 
into batter; then in deep fat; fry until crisp and brown; take from 
iron and invert on brown paper to drain. Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 

TOMATO TIMBALE. 

Beat 3 eggs and 4 yolks and add 14 "ieaspoon salt, a teaspoon 
sugar. 1/4 teaspoon soda. V^ teaspoon onion juice. i-.> cup cream and % 
cup of tomato puree (canned tomatoes passed through a sieve to 
remove the seeds) ; turn into buttered timbale molds and bake until 
firm ; let the molds stand on several folds of paper and be surrounded 
by water at the boiling point. The water should not boil after the 
molds are set into the oven ; serve turned from the molds witli 
"ream sauce. INIrs. Janet M . Tlill. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

Cook together Vl of a cup. each, of butter and fiour. and add 
gradually 1 pt. milk; let simmer ten minutes after all the liquid 
has been added ; season with salt and pepper and add Kitchen Bou 
quet to taste. Mrs. Janet M. Hill. 

TONGUE AND MUSHROOMS IN ASPIC. 

Make the aspic by taking 3^^ pts. water, 2 teaspoons beef ex- 
tract, or use more if you prefer it stronger, juice of 1 lemon strained. 



lOO THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

salt, few drops of tabasco sauce or a little black pepper, % box of 
Chalmer's gelatine dissolved in cold water; let stand one hour; then 
stir all over the fire until smooth; cool and put into moulds; slice the 
mushrooms; chop fine some tongue; make into balls and drop inti> 
the aspic ; when set then pour the remainder of the aspic into the 
m.oulds ; when hard turn out on lettuce leaves and serve with may- 
onnaise. Mrs. B. W. Rogers. 

QUICK ASPIC JELLY. 

Let an ounce of lean, raw ham, chopped fine, an onion sliced, 
1/2 carrot, sliced, a stalk of celery, 2 sprigs of parsley, a bay leaf, 1 
or 2 mushrooms, if at hand, and a piece of red pepper pod; simmer 
in 3 cups of cold water about an hour; then add salt to taste, a tea- 
spoon of beef extract, a teaspoon of Kitchen Bouquet, and i/o a box 
of gelatine, softened in % a cup of cold water; stir thoroughly; then 
strain through a double cheese-cloth; mould in shallo"s^ pan; cut in 
squares or diamonds, large or small, and use as a garnish for a 
dish of cold meat or a salad. Mrs. Janet M. Hill. 

PATTIES. 

For Patty Cases use recipe for Pufl' Paste, found under Pastry: 
cut in strips, wind about forms made for the purpose and bake. 

CHICKEN PATTIES. 

Two 3 pound chickens or one 4 pound. 1 can of mushrooms ; boil 
chicken and pick up as for a salad ; blend 4 large tablespoons of but- 
ter with 5 even tablespoons of fiour ; heat 1 qt. of cream ; add hot 
cream to butter and flour; stir until thickened; season with salt and 
pepper to taste ; cook sauce and add to chicken and mushrooms ; put 
into dish to bake and cover the top with breadcrumbs and bits of 
butter; bake thirty minutes, serve in patties with a teaspoon of 
whipped cream on top. Mrs. C. E. Bell. 

CREAMED SWEETBREADS. 

Parboil a sweetbread ; cut into % inch cubes, or separate into 
small pieces; reheat in 1 cup white sauce; serve in patty cases. 

Approved. 
CREAMED MUSHROOMS. 

Prepare % pound of mushrooms and cook in 2 tablespoons of 
butter eight minutes ; add II/2 tablespoons flour and when well mixed 
add % cup of cream; season with salt and pepper; when thickened 
serve in patty cases. Mrs. H. C. Jacobs. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Clean 1 pt. oysters and cook until plump ; drain ; strain the 
liquor and add enough milk to make li/o cups ; melt 3 tablespoons of 



ENTREES. 101 



butter and add 5 tablespoons flour; pour in gradually the liquid; sea- 
son with i/li teaspoon of salt, % teaspoon, each of pepper and cel- 
ery salt; add the oysters and as soon as heated; serve in patty cases. 

Mrs. Wood. 

TO SALT ALMONDS. 

Shell, blanch and spread them out on a bright tin pie dish; add 
a piece of butter the size of a hickory nut ; stir well and stand them 
in a moderately warm oven until a golden brown; take from the 
oven; stir them around; dredge them quickly with salt and turn 
out to cool. 



,02 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



BREAD. 103 

BREAD 

Mrs. D. Cowan 



The old saying. "Broad is the staff of life" has sound reason in 
it. Good bread makes the homeliest me^l aeceptable, and the coars- 
est fare a])i)etizing, while the most luxurious table is not even tol- 
erable without it. Opinions as to what constitutes good bread 
diflFer. perhaps as much as tastes and opinions concerning anything 
else, but all will agree that bread to be good ought to be light and 
sweet — that is, free from any perceptible acid or yeasty taste — 
flaky, granular, or not liable to become a doughy mass and as white 
as the grade of flour used will allow. 

To obtain these qualities in bread, use the best flour. The 
best is cheapest. The Minnesota hard si)ring wheat is the equal of 
the best and is so much superior in strength that i/s less is used in 
all receipts for bread. No rule can be given bv which an inexper- 
ienced person can determine the grade of flour with accuracy, but 
a few hints will enable anyone to know what not to buy. Good 
flour adheres to the hand, and. when pressed, shows the imprint of 
the lines of the skin. Its tint is cream white. Never buy that 
which has a blue-white tinge. Poor flour is not adhesive, may be 
blown about easily, and sometimes has a dingy look. In no event 
should flour be used without being sifted. It seems like a simple 
process to make bread, but it requires a delicate care and watchful- 
ness. The process which raises bread successfully in winter, will 
often make it sour in the summer. One may have valuable recipes 
and well defined methods in detail, but nothing but experience will 
secure the name merited by so few although coveted by every prac- 
tical houskeeper, an excellent bread maker. Three things are indis- 
pensable to success, good flour, good yeast and watchful care. As a 
general rule one small teacup of yeast and 3 pts of "wetting will 
make sponge enough for 4 ordinary loaves of bread; or. if you pre- 
fer, a little more than 3 pts. of "wetting" and 1 compressed yeast 
cake will make the same amount. In all cases add the yeast last, 
making sure that the sponge is not hot enough to scald it. When 
]>laced to rise, cover closely. A temperature of eighty or ninety 
degrees is right. It is an improvement to beat the sponge thorough- 
ly for fifteen minutes. 

To make good bread always be up in morning early to prevent 
the sponge becoming sour by too long standing, and in winter to be 
getting materials warmed and in readiness for use. 



104 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



THE SPONGE. 

This is made from warm water or milk, yeast and flour, (some 
add mashed potatoes), mixed together in the proportion of 1 pt. 
wetting, (water or milk), to 2 pts. sifted flour; when milk is used 
it must be first scalded and then cooled to blood heat. The scald- 
ing tends to prevent souring. If the wetting is too hot the bread 
will be coarse ; when water is used a tablespoon of lard or butter 
makes the bread more tender. Bread made from milk is of course 
more tender and nutritious and requires less flour and less knead- 
ing. "The Buckeye." 

YEAST. 

3 large, old potatoes pared, soaked and boiled until broken in 
small pieces ; % cup of loose hops boiled in 1 qt. of water ; drain and 
mash potatoes ; add the hop water and enough more hot water to make 
2 qts. ; strain, rubbing all the potato through ; put it on to boil, and 
when boiling add % of a cup of flour which has been wet to a 
smooth paste in cold water, and % of a cup of sugar ; boil five min- 
utes, stirring well ; let cool ; add % of a cup of yeast and when 
well risen add Y^ cup of salt; keep in a covered jar in a cool cellar. 
Bread made of this yeast will not sour even in hot weather. 

Mrs. "W. J. Alexander. 

YEAST. 

Take 12 large potatoes and boil in 2 qts. of water; when donii 
pour the water over 2 cups of flour; mash the potatoes and put in 
with the water and flour ; take 1 small handful of hops ; add boiling 
water ; boil a few minutes ; then strain into the mixture, and add 1 
cup of sugar and %, cup of salt ; when cool add 2 good yeast cakes. 
This will keep for weeks in a cool place. Mrs. M. I. Mead. 

YEAST. 

2 qts. of water, 3 handfuls of hops ; boil twenty minutes ; boil 6 
large potatoes in the hop water and when done mash them fine ; then 
add 1 cup of sugar, 2 tablespoons of ginger and 2 of salt ; when cool 
stir in 14 cup of good yeast ; keep it warm until it foams . 

Mrs. A. J. Collins. 

LIGHTNING YEAST. 

Mash fine 6 medium-sized boiled potatoes and mix with them 
1% tablespoons each of flour, salt and sugar; beat well together; then 
add 1/2 pt. boiling water; beat again and follow with a whole pint 
of boiling water; stir again and cool by adding 1 pt. of cold water; 
then add a cake of Yeast Foam which has been dissolved in 14 ^^^> 
of tepid water; let stand m a warm place about ten hours, after 



BREAD. 105 

which it is ready for use. Never set bread at night with this yeast, 
but in the morning take i/o yeast and V^ water (a pint of each makes 
2 loaves), add a pinch of salt, a tablespoon of sugar and a tablespoon 
of lard to each loaf: mix into ?. large loaf, moulding until it does not 
stick to the board ; keep in a warm place till light ; then mould into 
loaves; keep warm again until light enough for the oven; bake fifty 
or sixty minutes. The above amount of yeast is sufficient for three 
bakings of 2 loaves each, and should be kept in a cool place until 
used. If directions are followed this bread may be out of the oveu 
before 11 o'clock a.m. Mrs. F. M. Knapp. 

BREAD. 
Take 1 pt. milk; scald, and add a piece of lard or butter the 
size of a butternut, 1 tablespoon of sugar, and a pt. of water; when 
lukewarm add a small cup of potato yeast and flour enough to make 
a moderately stiff batter: beat thoroughly, when light add PxOur 
enough to stiffen and knead on the board for twenty minutes or 1/2 
hour; cover closely, and set to rise. Tf the sponge is made about 7 
o'clock p m. it will ])e ready to knead before going to bed. In 
the morning put into pans the first thing and it will be ready for the 
oven by 8.30, or sooner. Mrs. "W. J. Alexander. 

BREAD . 

Soak 1 compressed yeast cake in a little cold water for one hour ; 
then take 1 pt. new milk, 1 pt. warm water, 1 teaspoon of salt, 2 
teaspoons brown sugar. 2 teaspoons lard or butter ; add the yeast 
cake ; mix stiff in a bread bowl ; then mould well on the board ; re- 
turn it to bowl and set to rise ; next morning mould into loaves with- 
out any more flour and set to rise before baking. Follow directions 
closely and you will have elegant bread. Mrs. Fred Darling. 

BREAD . 

]\rash 2 small potatoes into 1 qt. potato water. 1 pt. milk (scald- 
ed), when hike wann stir in flonr enough to make a stiff batter; 
then add 1 compressed yeast cake previously soaked in wpter. and 
beat all thoroughly; set in warm place all night; in the morning ad<l 
a good pinch of salt. 1 iron spoon sugar. 1 iron spoon lard, (not 
melted) ; stir in enough flour to make it the right consistency to 
mould on board; mould twenty minutes; place back in mixing bowl 
to rise; when very light shape into loaves; place in tins and let rise 
once more: when light enough; put in hot oven; bake from % to 1 
hour. This quantity Avill make 4 small loaves. 

^Irs. Dwight Cowan. 

BRAN BREAD OR MUFFINS. 

1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon soda, pinch of salt, 2 cups wheat bran. 
iV4 cups sweet milk. 1/0 cup molasses; mix and sift flour, soda and 



106 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

salt ; add bran ; mix well ; add milk and molasses, and beat thor- 
oughly ; bake at once in gem pans about ^A. hour or until cooked 
through. They do not require a quick oven. Use plenty of butter 
when eating them. Mrs. Gleave. 

BROWN BREAD. 

1 pt. boiling water made into mush with corn meal ; when this 
is done, take about 1 qt. of flour in a pan ; add the mush, to it, and 
Yo cup Porto Rico molasses and a little salt; when cool enough add 

1 cup of sponge, and make into a loaf with the flour; put into bak- 
ing tins and let it raise to the top ; bake one hour and ten minutes 
in a slow oven. This recipe makes enough for one loaf. 

Mrs. G. C. James. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

1 cup molasses, 21/^ cups sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda in 1 teaspoon 
hot water, 2 large cups graham flour, li/o teacups corn meal, 1 tea- 
spoon salt; steam three hours; put in oven a few minutes after. 
This will make 6-1 pound baking powder cans full. Fill the cans 
i/o full with dough. Mrs. S. E. Walker. 

BROWN BREAD STEAMED. 

3 cups graham flour, 1 cup corn meal, 2 cups sour milk, y^ cup 
molasses, i/o cup sugar, 2 level teaspoons soda dissolved in hot 
water, 1 cup raisins, if desired; fill into 1 pound baking powder 
cans about % full, and steam 2i/o hours. If moist over the top when 
done, put in oven long enough to dry off. Hold cans bottom side up 
while hot and it will gradually slide out. Mrs. J. Gleave. 

BROWN BREAD WITH COMPRESSED YEAST CAKE. 

Stir into 1 qt. of boiling water enough corn meal to make a 
mush ; let it cook a few minutes, stirring all the time to prevent 
burning; remove from the stove and add 1 cup Porto Rico molasses, 

2 tablespoons sugar, a piece of lard the size of a large walnut, a lit- 
tle salt ; let it get cool, and add 1 compressed yeast cake, previously 
soaked in 1/4 cup tepid water; it is now ready to sift in the wheat 
flour; keep sifting in the flour until stiff enough to mould on the 
board without sticking, (do not add flour after your bread is on 
the board, as that will spoil any bread) ; mould twenty minutes and 
then place in bread bowl and let rise until morning, in a warm room. 
In the morning mould down and shape into loaves, (do not mould 
only long enough to shape the loaves nicely), put into baking tins; 
let rise and then bake in moderate oven one hour. This quantity 
Avill make 2 large loaves. Peoria A. Cowan. 



BREAD. 102- 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

1 cup corn meal flour, or granulated corn meal. A cups graham 
flour, 2 cups sour milk, 2 teaspoons (scant) saleratus, 1 cup molasses, 
1 coffee cup raisins, y^ cup sugar: steam 2iA hours in pound baking 
powder cans. This recipe will make 6 loaves. 

Mrs. W. D. McLaren. 

BROWN BREAD . 

1 f|t. Ixiiliiig water: thicken wilh corn meal like niiisli: put into 
mixing boAvl and add 1 large cuj) New Orleans molasses; when cool, 
add 1 cake of compressed yeast dissolved in V+ cup tepid water; mix 
Avith wheat flour and knead thoroughly as wheat bread ; let it rise 
over night and in the morning shape into loaves, handling as little 
as possible; let it get very light and bake as wheat bread. 

Mrs. I G. Lacy. 

BOSTON CORN BREAD. 

1 cup sweet milk. 2 cups sour milk, 2 teaspoons soda. 1 Vo cup 
molasses, a cup flour, 4 cups corn meal; steam three hours and brown 
a few minutes in the oven. ^Mrs. C. P^. Cobb. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

2 cups corn meal, ly^ cup flour, 2 cups sour milk, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 1/2 cup molasses, 1 tablespoon soda, 1 teaspoon salt ; steam three 
hours ; then set in oven and brown . Mrs . Keegan . 

BROWN BREAD . 

Stir into 1 scant pt. boiling water enough corn meal to make a 
good mush: let cook a few minutes; remove from stove and add ^ 
cup Porto Rico molasses. 1 tablespoon sugar, a pinch of salt ; let it 
cool ; add 1 cup bread sponge, and stir in flour enough to allow it to 
be moulded on board ; mould fifteen minutes ; put in baking pans 
to rise; when light place in oven and bake slowly one hour. 

Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Soak 2 fjts. old bread in H cups warm water and put through 
colander; add 1 cup dark molasses. 1 teaspoon salt and i/l> yeast cake 
dissolved in i/4 cup tepid water; sift in enough wheat flour until 
stiff enough to mould on board ; knead thirty minutes ; return to 
bowl ; let rise very light again ; shape into two loaves ; place in tins ; 
let rise once more and then bake one hour in a moderate oven. 

Dora Engstrom. 
GRAHAM BREAD. 
1 pt. sour milk. lA cuj) New Orleans molasses, 3 cups graham 
flour, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon salt; bake slowly one hour. 

Mrs. Smiley. 



108 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

li/o cups sour milk, 1/2 cup molasses, 2 cups graham flour, 1 
(heaping) teaspoon soda, pinch of salt; bake II/4. hours in very slow 
oven in baking powder cans. Mrs. D, Cowan. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

In making graham bread, use hop yeast, setting sponge at night, 
mixing stiff as can be stirred with iron spoon ; in the morning take 
3 large cups of sponge, 1 large cup New Orleans molasses, 1 large 
cup warm water, butter or lard size of small egg, and stir thoroughly 
with spoon; then add 1 pt. graham flour and wheat flour elTough to 
make a very stiff batter. This makes two loaves; let rise slowly 
until very light. Mrs. M. J. Danforth. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

2% cups sour milk, 21/0 teaspoons soda ; dissolve soda in a lit- 
tle water; then add to milk, 1/2 cup brown sugar, % cup molasses, 
pinch of salt, 4 cups graham flour; add I/2 cup of seeded raisins; put 
in tins, raise one hour and bake one hour. 

Mrs. AV. M. Robertson. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

2 cups graham flour, 1 cup white flour ; scald % of this mixture ; 
mix with water like stiff cake; add i/^ yeast cake; let raise over 
night; in the morning add 1/2 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, a very lit- 
tle soda, if it seems sticky add more flour; put in tins and when light 
bake. Mary H. James. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

1 cup molasses, 1 teaspoon soda ; put in a pan and warm until it 
foams; add 1 pt. sweet milk; stir in 3 cups of graham flour and I 
small teaspoon salt ; take another cup of graham flour and stir in 2 
teaspoons baking powder ; stir all together and bake li/o hours in a 
moderate oven. ]\Irs. W. D. McLaren. 

OAT FLAKE BROWN BREAD. 

1 pt. white bread sponge, 1 tablespoon salt, 2 cups oat flake, over 
which pour 2 cups boiling water, and allow to cool before putting 
into the sponge ; add 1/4 cup molasses, and white flour until it is too 
stiff to stir with a spoon ; let rise in a bowl ; when light enough put 
into bread pans and rise again; bake a full hour. This will make 
three loaves. Mrs. David Alexander. 

DUTCH BREAD. 

1 pt. bread sponge, % cup sugar, 2 eggs, i/o cup milk, 2 table- 
spoons shortening, (i/o butter and lard), add flour enough to make 



BREAD. 



1C9 



it stiff enough to stir with a spoon; let rise until lifrht , put in pans; 
wash over with cream and sprinkle Avith sng'ar and cinnamon, put- 
ting a little butter over all; let stand until li<>:]it and bake V2 hour. 

Mrs. James Roy. 

ENTIRE WHEAT BREAD . 

1 qt. water, (a little more than tepid), 2 qts. entire wheat Hour, 
4 tablespoons New Orleans molasses. 8 tablespoons sugar, 1 even tea- 
spoon soda, 1/2 teaspoon salt, butter size of an egg, 1 compressed 
yeast cake ; stir well the water, molasses, butter, salt, sugar and soda, 
and 1 qt. of the flour; then add yeast cake, previously dissolved in 
a little water ; add the rest of the flour ; stir until it drops from the 
spoon; let stand over night. In the morning stir down and ])n1 in 
tins; let it rise and then bake li/4 hcmrs. 

]Mrs. S. P. Schemerliorn. 

ENTIRE WHEAT BREAD . 

2 generous qts. of unsifted flour, IVU pts. Avarm water, 1 table- 
spoon butter, 1 tablespoon sugar. Vo tablespoon salt, H cake com- 
pressed yeast or 1/0 cup home-made yeast. 

This will make 2 loaves of bread and a pan of rolls. Many peo- 
ple confound entire wheat flour with graham, but it is very differ- 
ent. Graham is a coarse-ground wheat meal; entire wheat flour is 
the whole wheat-^with the coarse husk discarded, of course — ground 
to a fine flour. It gives a brown loaf or roll, but a delicious one^ 
smooth and fine. 

After sifting the flour into a bread bowl, put aside a cupful for 
use in kneading the bread later, and put the sugar and salt with the 
remainder. If the yeast be compressed, dissolve it in a small quan- 
tity of water ; pour the remaining water and the yeast into the bowl, 
and finally add the butter, somewhat softened by standing in a warm 
place for a while ; beat the dough vigorously with a strong spoon, 
and when it gets smooth and light, sprinkle a moulding board with 
a part of the flour that was reserved, and turn the dough out upon 
the board ; knead until smooth and elastic, say from twenty minutes 
to 1/2 an hour ; then return to the bowl, and after covering first with 
a clean towel and then with a tin or wooden cover; let it rise for 
about eight hours in a temperature of about 70 degrees. If the tem- 
perature be lower than 70 degrees, more time will be required for the 
rising, and, of course, if it will be higher, less time will be needed. 

If the dough be mixed in the morning and kept for four or five 
hours in a temperature of 80 or 90 degrees, it will be in a condition 
for baking in the afternoon. When it has risen, butter lightly 2 
bread pans and 1 roll pan. Make enough rolls to fill the pan. shap- 
ing them with the hands: then put the remainder of the dough on a 



1 10 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



board and divide it into two loaves. Let the rolls and loaves rise 
till they are double their original size; then bake in a moderate oven 
— the rolls for % hour and the bread for one hour. 

Miss Parloa. 
RYE BREAD. 
Make the same as my graham bread, except use rye flour instead 
of graham. Mrs. M. J. Danforth. 

SALT RISING BREAD. 

A pinch of salt and soda in a l)owl ; pour in a cup of boiling 
Mater ; when cool enough not to scald ; stir in shorts enough for a 
thick batter; keep in a warm place over night; in the morning put 
about 2 qts. of flour in bread Dowl ; pour in a cup of boiling water 
and cool with a cup of new milk; then stir in the emptyings and let 
rise; when light, knead into loaves and let rise to bake. 

Mrs. Nelson Ens worth. 

SALT RISING BREAD. 

1 teacup shorts, a pinch of soda; mix a ])attcr with warm 
water or milk; set in a warm place over night; in the morning mix 
a batter with salt, milk and flour; stir in the emptyings; let rise; 
pour in a pan of flour and add 1 pt. more water or millv; knead into 
loaves and let rise to bake. Take some of the light dough and kiiead 
in shortening for light biscuit. ]\Irs. S. E. Orr. 

CINNAMON BUNS. 

To 1 cup of bread sponge, add 1 small egg, 1 tablespoon sugar, 
1 tablespoon lard (not melted), a pinch of soda dissolved in a tea- 
spoon of water, I/2 teaspoon of salt ; mix all thoroughly together 
with the hand; add flour to make the dough like a soft loaf, by 
kneading in the bowl, (but not on the board) ; when thoroughly 
mixed set aside to get very light ; then roll out to about "^^ inch in 
thickness ; spread abundantly with sugar and butter previously mixed 
together; then sprinkle lightly with cinnamon; roll up like a jelly 
roll and cut off from either end with a sharp knife about 1 inch for 
each bun; place in biscuit tin (close together) and spread with but- 
ter and sugar; sprinkle with cinnamon; let rise until very light, and 
bake in a quick oven from ten to fifteen minutes. In doubling this 
recipe 1 large egg is sufficient. Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

BREAD STICKS. 

2 cups bread dough, 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon sugar; 
mould well on the board; return to bowl and let rise; then mould 
down again and shape to sticks 4 inches long and 2 inches around. 
Place in bread stick tins; let rise again, and bake in hot oven. 

Dora Engstrom. 



BREAD. 1 1 1 

ROLLS. 

2 qts. flour. 4 tablespoons butter, (5 or 6 may be used), li/o tea- 
spoons salt, 1 beaten egg. ^5 t'up sugar, 1 qt. milk, 1 compressed 
yeasfcake; set sponge, when sufficiently light knead and return to 
bowl to rise again ; when light knead and mould into rolls, using just 
as little flour as possible. The dough should be very soft. Let 
rise again and when very light, bake. If the temperature of the 
kitchen is held at 75 degrees, the dough will be ready for its first 
kneading in three hours, and for the second kneading an liour later. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

With 2 qts. sifted Hour, 2 tablespoons melted butter. 2 table- 
spoons sugar, a little salt, well worked together; make a sponge 
with warm milk and add 1 dissolved yeast cake; when it is light, add 
flour and mould for twenty minutes; let rise again; roll it out; cut 
into thin cakes; butter the top and fold them half over and set to 
rise again; bake. Mrs. CD. Crandall. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

1 pt. sweet milk, 1 tablespoon melted lard, 1 tablespoon melted 
butter. 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 small teaspoon salt, 1 compressed yeast 
cake. 2 qts. flour; scald milk; then add sugar, butter, lard and salt. 
AVhen lukewarm, add yeast cake previously soaked in V4 cup water: 
stir in enough of the measured flour; (after sifting a few times) to 
iiiake a soft sponge; set aside to get quite light and spongy; then 
add the remainder of the flour and knead twenty minutes on the 
board or ten minutes if a bread mixer is used; let rise very light; 
roll out ; spread with butter ; cut with biscuit cutter ■ fold over, 
bringing edges even; place in tin (not too close together) and let 
rise ; bake in a quick hot oven ; butter over the top after placing them 
in the tin and also after baking. Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

ENGLISH CURRANT CAKE. 

3 pounds sifted flour, lyo pound butter and lard. Y^ pound of 
soft Avhite sugar. ^2 pound cleaned currants. 2 ounces candied lemon 
peel. 1 yeast cake, sweet milk to mix; rub butter and sugar into 
flour until fine like meal ; chip lemon peel ; wash currants and add 
while the mixture is dry; scald milk and mix into a stiff batter 
like biscuit dough; dissolve yeast cake and work well in; put in 
warmed greased pans in shape of buns, and set to rise over night; 
l-ake in slow oven. Mrs. W. P. ^Fitehell. 

GERMAN COFFEE CAKE. 

i/; pound butter, ] cup sugar, 1 qt. warm milk, 1 cake of com- 
pressed yeast dissolved in warm milk, 3 eggs and about 2 pounds of 
flour: mix thoroughly and let stand in a warm place over night and 



1 12 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



\n the morning, pour into pans to rise; guard against using too much 
fiour. Have batter the same consistency as that of layer cake; 
fiavor with Royce's vanilla or lemon. Before placing in oven spread 
with butter and sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. 

Mrs. Leon Ball. 

RUSK. 

1 pt. milk, 1 cup yeast or 1 yeast cake dissolved in i/. cup luke- 
warm water, 4 eggs ; add as much flour as can be stirred in with a 
spoon ; let rise until very light ; then add 2 cups sugar, 1 large cup 
butter. If too soft to handle, add a little more flour, hut the dough 
should be very soft ; let rise again until very light ; mould gently 
with the hands; let rise again and bake; then wa^h with cream and 
sugar; set rusk at 3 p. m. ; add sugar and batter at 9 p. m. ; and 
let rise until morning. Jamestown Cook Book. 



■ BREAKFAST DISHES. H5 

BREAKFAST DISHES 

Mrs. C. A. Bettis 

BREAKFAST HINTS. 

Serve all cold things absolutely cokl, and hot things hot. 

If toast IS served have it made at the last minute, or, better still, 
three or four times during the meal, and send it to the table iu m 
I'oldr^l naplxin. hot and crisp. 

First, fruit of all kinds daintily prepared, followed by cereals 
uncooked or the cooked ones following receipts on the package foi- 
cooking, toast, cakes, waffles or muff'ins, eggs, hash, potatoes baked, 
creamed or the potato chips, cookies, doughnuts, and above all a 
good cup of coffee or cocoa. 

Any of the folloAving receipts which have been tested Avill 
lielp to make a delicious breakfast. 

For all sorts of muffins, gems, waffles, pancakes and similar 
dishes suitable for breakfasts, look in the department headed "Muf- 
fins, Gems, etc." 

BREADED EGGS. 

Boil the eggs hard; cut in round, thick slices; pepper and salt; 
dip each in beaten raw egg; then fine bread crumbs or powdered 
cracker, and fry in butter hissing hot; drain off every drop of grease 
and serve on a hot dish for breakfast. Mrs. R. T. A. 

BACON CRISPS. 

. Take thin slices of nice bacon; remove the rind; dip in beaten 
egg and rolled cracker cnunbs, and fry a delicate brown. 

HAM FRITTERS. 

To 2 cups boiled ham chopped fine, add 2 well beaten eggs, V-j, 
cup milk, a few cracker or bread crumbs; season with pepper and 
salt, and drop by the spoonful into hot fat; fry a nice brown. 

DEVILED KIDNEY.S. 

Cut 4 lamb's or 2 veal's kidneys into small jjieces; cover with 
cold water and let come to the boil; drain; put in a sauce pan. 1 
mediiun-sized onion, chopped fini?. 1 tablespoon butter and simmer 
till onion turns yellow; add 1 cup broth. 1 teaspoon curry powder, 
^. pinch cayenne, salt, and let the kidneys simmer about ^/^ hour or 
until tender; thicken a little and serve on hot buttered toast. 

Mrs. R. T. A. 



1 14 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



CREAMED SALT MACKEREL. 

Take a salt mackerel ; wash ; remove all the black skin from 
the inside, and soak over night in a large pan of water : place in hot 
water and let simmer for a minute or two; drain and place on a 
platter; have ready a rich cream dressing; pour over, and send to 
the table hot. 

OYSTER CAKES. 

To 1/2 pt- oyster liquor and 1/2 pt. sweet milk, add 1 pt. wheat 
flour, a few chopped oysters, 2 eggs and a little salt ; drop by spoon- 
fuls into hot lard, and fry a nice brown. 

PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Take nice thin slices of bacon ; remove the rind and parboil ; 
take fine, plump, fresh oysters; drain; dip in beaten egg, and roll in 
cracker crumbs ; wrap each oyster in a slice of bacon, pinning to- 
gether with a wooden toothpick; place the pigs in a wire basket, and 
merse in hot fat until a delicate brown ; remove the picks, and send 
to the table hot. 

SAUSAGE ROLLS. 

Boil small sausages ; cut in half lengthwise and remove the 
skin; make a rich baking powder biscuit dough; roll to the thinness 
of lA inch; cut in strips somewhat larger than the sausages; fold in 
the sausages; roll and pinch until well covered; brush with milk and 
bake in a quick oven. Mrs. R. T. A. 

MINCE GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Chop all the cold bits of meat you may have, of whatever kind, 
cooked of course ; season with salt and pepper ; make a batter as 
for pancakes ; lay a spoonful on the well-buttered griddle ; then a 
spoonful of the choppeci meat and part of a spoonful of the batter 
over the meat ; when cooked on one side, turn, and when done, serve 
hot as possible. 

FRENCH TOAST. 

Put 6 slices of bread in a dish ; beat 2 eggs well, and put in 1 
pt. sweet milk; stir well; pour over the bread and let stand ten min- 
utes; bake on a hot buttered griddle, same as pancakes, and ent with 
butter and sugar or syrup. 

POTATO CAKES. 

Take 1 qt. cold mashed potatoes and work 2 eggs well through : 
make into cakes and fry in butter and lard, or drippings. You can 
mix in codfish that has been previously prepared for the table, and 
make codfish balls. 



BREAKFAST DISHES. 115 

CORN MEAL MUSK. 

Salted water 4 cups, corn meal 1 cup. Into the salted water, 
stir corn meal .till it begins to thicken, and finish cooking in a double 
boiler; cook three or four hours. May be re-heated over steam for 
breakfast, and served with sugar and cream. 

FRIED CORN MEAL MUSH 

Sprinkle fresh corn meal into salted boiling water; stir until 
very smooth, adding meal until of the right consistency. Let it boil 
slowly for 1/2 hour; then add a little wheat flour; put in a wet mold, 
V2 pound baking powder can or pudding dish to cool, or dip muffin 
rings in cold water; set on a plate and fill with mush; remove the 
stiffened forms ; cut in slices I/2 inch in thickness ; roll in flour and 
fry slowly in hot lard or drippings; serve with molasses or maple 
syrup. 

GRAHAM MUSH. 

Stir fresh graham flour into salted, boiling water, beating out 
the lumps as much as possible ; boil briskly for several minutes, and 
serve hot with sugar and cream. 

OAT FLAKE. 

To 1 qt. boiling water add 2 cups oat flake and a teaspoon of salt ; 
let boil in the upper kettle of a double boiler over the fire until thick- 
ened ; then cook over steam from forty minutes to an hour, or until 
ready to serve. 

OATMEAL MUSH. 

Put 4 tablespoons oat flake into 1 qt. cold water; add 1 teaspoon 
salt ; let it cook slowly from one to two hours, adding hot water when 
needed; just before serving add 1 teaspoon butter; serve with sugar 
and cream. 

BAKED MUSHROOMS. 

Peel 12 large fresh mushrooms; simmer in butter; add 1 cup of 
chicken or veal broth, or a cup cream ; salt and pepper to taste ; sim- 
mer fifteen minutes; place on rounds of bread on a buttered platter; 
cover and cook in oven about ten minutes, basting once with melted 
butter. A small pinch of mace will give the mushrooms a more pro- 
nounced flavor. Mrs. M. M. W. 

MUSHROOM OMELET. 

Clean 1 cupful small button mushrooms, canned ones may be 
used ; cut them into bits ; put into a stew-pan an ounce of butter and 
let it melt ; add the mushrooms, a teaspoon salt, Vo teaspoon pepper 



1 16 THEWABREN COQK BOOK 

and % cup cream or milk; -stir in. a littl-e floiir, dissolved in milk to 
thicken, if needed; boil ten minutes, and set aside until the omelet 
is ready ; make a plain omelet the usual way, and just before doubl- 
ing it, turn the mushrooms over the centre, and serve hot. 

Mrs. R. T. A. 

TOMATOES FOR BREAKFAST. 

Cut in half nice, firm tomatoes; place in pan skin side down, with 
piece of butter on each ; sprinkle with pepper and salt, and bake till 
tomatoes are tender; remove with a cake turner onto a hot serving 
dish ; add a cup cream to the juice in the pan ; let it come to the boil ; 
thicken with a little flour and pour over the tomatoes ; serve with 
hot toast. Mrs. R. T. A. 



MUFFINS, GEMS, ETC. li? 

MUFFINS, GEMS, ETC. 

Mrs. S. E. Walker 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT, NO. 1. 

2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt ; 1 table- 
spoon butter, 1 tablespoon lard, % cup milk and water, in equal 
parts; mix the flour, baking powder and salt and sift twice; work 
in the butter and lard with the tips of the fingers; add gradually the 
liquid, (more or less as required according to quality of the flour), 
mixing with a knife until of the consistency of a soft dough; toss on 
a floured board; pat and roll lightly until 1/2 inch in thickness; cut 
into shape and bake in a hot oven fifteen i.<inutes. 

Mrs. S. J. D. 

TWIN BISCUIT. 

Use recipe for Baking Powder Biscuit No. 1; roll a little less 
than 14 inch in thickness ; brush over with melter butter and put 
together in pairs ; bake in a quick oven from twelve to fifteen min- 
utes. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT NO. 2. 

One qt. of sifted flour, 2 tablespoons of lard or butter, % tea- 
spoon of salt, 3 teaspoons baking powder ; mix together ; add suffic- 
ient milk to form a very soft dough; knead little as possible; roll 
out quickly and bake in hot oven. Mrs. W. 

MAPLE SUGAR BISCUIT. 

Same as above; when rolled out sprinkle with maple sugar; roll 
ap in small rolls and cut slices from the ends and bake on buttered 
tins. 

MAPLE SUGAR BISCUIT. 

1 cup maple sugar, broken in pieces the size of hickory nuts, V2 
cup of white sugar, % cup of butter, 1 cup of milk, 1 egg, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, flour enough to roll moderately stiff; press a 
lump of sugar firmly on each biscuit just before putting in oven. 

GRAHAM BISCUIT. 

IVs cups flour, % cup graham flour, 2 teaspoons baking powdei;, 
^^ teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons butter, -"^ cup milk ; mix the flour, 
baking powder and salt and sift twice; work in the butter with the 
tips of the fingers; add the milk gradually; toss on a floured board; 
pat and roll to Y2 inch in thickness; cut into shape and bake in hot 
oven twelve to fifteen minutes. ■ 



1 18 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



SOUR CREAM BISCUIT. 

1 qt. flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 2 tablespoons butter; 
work' into dry flour, y^ teaspoon soda added to 1 cup sour cream, 
salt and sufficient sweet milk to make right to roll. 

Mrs. S. E. Walker. 

JOHNNY CAKE, NO. I. 

2 eggs, pinch of salt, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons melted 
butter, 1 cup milk, 1 cup corn meal, 1 cup flour, 2 teaspoons bakin« 
powder; bake twenty minutes in a quick oven. 

Mrs. JohnM. Siegfried. 

JOHNNY CAKE, NO. II. 

2 cups corn meal, 1 cup flour, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of sour 
milk, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 teaspoon baking powder 
in flour, i/2 teaspoon soda in sour milk, 1 tablespoon sugar. 

Mrs. Gemmill. 

CORN CAKE. 

6 tablespoons melted butter, 6 small tablespoons sugar, 1 cup 
of sweet milk, 3 eggs. 1 cup of corn meal, 2 cups of wheat flour, 3 
teaspoons baking powder, a little salt. C. W. 

FRIED CREAM PUFFS. 

1/2 pt. milk (heat) ; add i/^ cup sugar, 2 tablespoons flour, 2 
tablespoons corn starch, 2 eggs, i/4 teaspoon salt; wet with i/4 pt. 
milk; when thick take from stove; add butter size of a walnut, 2 
tablespoons broken walnut meats, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; bake 
in a square c^ike pan; when cold cut in 16 squares; wrap in egg and 
cracker crumbs and fry in deep lard or oil (delicious and easily 
made.) Mrs. Bashline and Mrs. Walker. 

BALLOON FRITTERS. 

Boil in 1 pt. water a dessert spoon of fresh butter; pour scald- 
ing hot over a light pt. flour, and beat until cold ; add the well beaten 
yolks of 6 eggs, and just before cooking the perfectly light w^hites ; 
fill a skillet with lard and when boiling hot drop in the batter, a 
tablespoon at a time. It only takes a few minutes to cook them; 
put them in a warm oven in a dry towel for a short time to remove 
superfluous grease; serve hot. Mrs. W. K. Jacobs. 

FRITTERS. 

2 eggs, i/o pt. sweet milk, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 cups flour, 1 small 
teaspoon of baking powder; drop from teaspoon in hot lard and fry; 
serve hot. Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 



MUFFINS, GEMS, ETC. 1 19 



PARSNIP FRITTERS. 

Scrape, and if large cut them; put in well salted boiling water 
and boil until tender; then mash, adding to 4 or 5 parsnips a heaping 
teaspoon of flour, and 1 or 2 eggs well beaten, pepper and salt to 
taste ; form the mixture into eakes % of an inch thick ; fry on both 
sides in a little butter a light brown; serve hot. 

Mrs. Will Watson. 
CORN FRITTERS. 

1 cup corn, 1 egg beaten, i/4 teaspoon salt, a pinch of pepper, 
2 tablespoons flour, 1 tablespoon sweet milk, y^ teaspoon baking pow- 
der ; mix all together and drop by spoonsfuls on a well greased grid- 
dle of part butter and part lard; fry a delicate brown on both sides. 
Mrs. I. G. Lacy and Mrs. S. E. Walker. 

JOLLY BOYS FRITTERS. 

21/^ heaping tablespoons of sifted yellow corn meal, 2 heaping 
tablespoons flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 saltspoon of salt, 1 table- 
spoon of baking powder; beat 1 large egg and add to the dry mix- 
ture ; add milk enough to make a stiff drop batter ; beat well and 
drop by teaspoon into hot lard. Eat with maple syrup. 

Mrs. B. T. K. 
GEMS. 

In baking gems, remember to have a hot oven, and heated, well 
greased pans. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

Butter the gem pans thoroughly and put where they will get 
very hot. 1 cup graham flour, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 egg beaten light, 

1 tablespoon sugar, butter the size of large walnut, 1 teaspoon cream 
of tartar, i/{. teaspoon soda, pinch of salt; beat up quick and hard; 
do not stir. ]Mrs. Mark Jamieson. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

1 pt. buttermilk, 1 teaspoon of soda, a little salt, 1 egg, I/2 cup 
sugar, 1 tablespoon of lard ; thicken with graham flour and bake in 
gem tins. Mrs. Hoffman. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

1 scant qt. graham flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 3 teaspoons 
of sugar, i/> teaspoon of salt ; mix well together and wet with 1 pt. 
of milk; bake in gem pans in a hot oven. Mrs. Hiram G. Eddy. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

^ f'-SS, V'l cup sugar, 1 large tablespoon butter, scant cup of milk, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, 1/2 cup of flour, 1 cup of graham flour; 
makes 10 or 12 gems. Mrs. W. J. Richards. 



120 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



KORNLET GEMS. 

1 can Kornlet, 1 pt. tiour, 1 teasiiooii salt, same of sugar, 2 large 
teaspoons Baking Powder, 1 pt. milk; mix into a firm, batter; fill 
well-greased gem pans %, and bake in a hot oven. 

WHEAT GEMS. 

1 egg, 11/2 cups sweet milk, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons of baking 
powder, 1 tablespoon melted butter: bake in very hot oven in very 
hot gem pans. Mrs. I. G. Lacy. 

CORN GEMS. 

Same as Johnny Cake No. T. Bake in gem pans. 

BREAKFAST MUFFINS. 

Take 1 qt. flour and stir in 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 pt. 
of milk, 3 eggs, 3 tablespoons sugar, butter size of an egg; bake in 
gem tins or muffin rings. Mrs. David H. Siggins. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

1 large cup sweet milk, 2 eggs. 4 talilespoons sweet cream, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 cui) of flour, 1 cup corn meal, a little 
salt. For wheat muffins use this recipe substituting wheat flour 
for the corn meal. Very reliable. Mrs. "Weston Beaty. 

DAINTY CORNMEAL MUFFIN.S. 

2 eggs, 2 tablespoons of A\liite sugar, ly^ cups of sweet milk, Vj 
teaspoon salt, 1 cap of white Indian meal, 2 cups flour, a tablespoon 
of melted butter, and 2 heaping teaspoons of baking powder; sift 
the baking powder into the flour. Begin with the eggs and add 
all the other ingredients in the order above given and bake in gem 
pans in a hot oven for twenty minutes. They are delicious. 

Mrs. S. E. "Walker. 

WHEAT MUFFINS. 

1/2 cup of sn.gar, 2 teaspoons melted butter', 1 egg, % cup of sweet 
milk, 1 cup of flour, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder, a little salt. 

Mrs. J. W. Crawford. 

WHEAT MUFFINS. 

Beat 1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon melted butter and 1 egg thor- 
oughly; add 1/2 cup sweet milk, 1% cups flour and 3 teaspoons bak- 
ing powder. Makes 8 or 9 muffins. Mrs. D. D. Reed. 

MUFFINS. 

2 cups flour, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 
cup sweet milk, 4 teaspoons baking powder. 1 egg and a little salt. 

Mrs. Haslet, Franklin. 



MUFFINS, GEMS, ETC. . 12 1 

MUFFINS. 

1 pt. flour, 1 cup milk, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons Ijaking powder, but- 
ter the size of an egg; beat the yolks of the eggs with the butter; 
then add the whites well beaten; sift baking powder with the flour 
and mix all together in a batter; bake in muffin rings. 

Mrs. L. B. Hoffman. 

MUFFINS. 

2 cups flour, salt, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 tablespoon but- 
ter, 1 tablespoon sugar; beat 1 egg in a teacup and fill with sweet 
milk; beat into a batter and bake in muffin rings. 

Mrs. J. C. Thomas. 

MUFFINS. 

1 tablespoon butter, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 eggs, 2% cups milk, 
6 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, a little salt; leave out 
sugar if you prefer. Mrs. W. V. Ilazeltine. 

MUFFINS WITHOUT EGGS. 

1 qt. of buttermilk, a teaspoon soda dissolved in the milk, a little 
salt, and flour enough to make a stiff batter; drop into gem tins, 
and bake fifteen or twenty minutes. Two or three tablespoons of 
sour cream will make them a little richer. Mrs. C. A. Bettis. 

MUFFINS WITH COCOA. 

^/4 cup of butter, I/4 cup of sugar, 1 egg, % cup of milk, IV2 cups 
of flour, 1/2 cup cocoa, 2 rounded teaspoons baking powder. Cream 
the butter and sugar; add the yolk of the egg; sift the flour and 
baking powder together three times; add the mixture alternately 
with the milk; beat the white of an egg to a stiff froth and fold in 
carefully ; fill hot gem pans half full ; bake in a quick oven fifteen or 
twenty minutes. Clara B. Scofield. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

1 cup boiled rice, 1 pt. flour, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon lard or butter 
1 teaspoon of salt and enough milk to make a thin batter ; beat hard ; 
bake quick in small tins. Lucy Marie Cowan. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

1 cup boiled rice, 1 cup sweet milk, 114 cups flour, 2 eggs, well 
beaten, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1/0 teaspoon 
salt, 5 tablespoons melted butter; stir lightly; bake in hot muffin 
pans. Mrs. S. E. AValker. 



,22 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

SALLY LUNN. 

3 tablespoons melted butter, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 
2 cups flour, 1 egg, 3 teaspoons of baking powder; bake in muffin 
rings or small patty pans. Nice for tea, warm. 

Mrs. CD. Crandall. 

GRIDDLE CAKES. 

In cooking pancakes and waffles, be sure to use only enough 
grease to keep them from sticking to the griddle or waffle iron. 
Have the griddle hot ; cook the cakes until the edges are full of bub- 
bles ; then turn. If doughey inside, the griddle is too hot; if 
leathery and heavy, not hot enough. A teaspoon of brown sugar 
will make cakes brown nicely. The addition of some soaked bread 
crumbs, mashed fine, or a little cold rice soaked in milk until soft, 
makes them very tender and delicious. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

1 qt. warm water, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 cake yeast foam dissolved 
m warm water, buckwheat flour enough to make a stiff batter ; when 
ready to bake pour out some of the stiff batter and set in a cool 
place to start batter for next morning and thin the rest with sour 
milk to the right consistency and add 1 teaspoon soda ; bake on a 
hot griddle. Mrs. Bettis. 

Buckwheat batter can be kept perfectly sweet by pouring cold 
water over that left from one morning, and which is intended to be 
used for raising the next morning's cakes. Fill the \'essel entirely 
full of water and put in a cool place; when ready to use, pour off 
the water, which absorbs the acidity. 

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES. 

2 cups flour, V_. cup corn meal. IV2 tablespoon (Ic'cl) boking- 
powder. li/o teaspoons salt, % cup sugar, li/> cups boiling wat(n% 
VA cups milk, 1 egg, 2 tablespoons melted butter; add meal to tha 
boding v.'Hter and boil five, minutes; turn into boM'l ; add milk and 
remaining dry ingredients, mixed and sifted ; then add the egg well 
beatc-n and then the butter; bake at once ou hot griddle. 

Jamestown Cook Bouk. 

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES. 

2 cups soar milk. 1 cup corn meal, Y2 ci^P ^vlieat flour, 1 egg 
i>eaten light, y^ teaspoon soda, pinch of salt. 

Mrs. M. W. Jamieson. 

GRIDDLE CAKES WITHOUT EGGS 

2 cups graham flour, 1 cup white, 2 cups buttermilk, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 heaping teaspoon soda, 1 pt. of bread crumbs soaked until 
soft; add water if necessary to thin batter. Mrs. E. R. Pierce. 



MUFFINS, GEMS, ETC. 125 



GRIDDLE CAKES WITHOUT EGGS. 

] pt. sour milk; add a pinch of salt, flour enough to make a 
stiff batter; beat perfectly smooth, tke last thing before baking add 
a level teaspoon of soda dissolved in hot water; add enough sweet 
}nilk to make thin enough for baking on a hot griddle. 

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES WITHOUT EGGS. 

Same as above recipe except in place of all flour use 14 cup corn 
meal. M. J. D. 

SWEET MILK GRIDDLE CAKES. 

1 pt. of sweet milk in which dissolve i/^ teaspoon soda, 1 cup of 
flour in which mix 1 rounded teaspoon baking powder; put together 
and add a pinch of salt and enough flour to make the right consist- 
ency for baking on a hot griddle. ]\Irs. Lizzie Garfield. 

GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Enough flour is added to a qt. sour milk to make a rather thick 
batter. The secret is, that it is left to stand over night instead of 
being finished at once. It may stand to advantage 24 hours. Next 
morning add 2 well beaten eggs, and salt, also I/2 teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in warm water. Bake at once. Mrs. Boyce. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

1 qt. milk, 3 tablespoons yeast, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 2 
eggs well beaten, 1 teaspoon salt, flour to make good batter; set 
sponge over night. In morning add butter and eggs. 

Mrs. George Xoj-es. 

POTATO PANCAKE. 

Take raw potatoes and grate them ; let them drain through col- 
ander to dry out juice ; add egg, salt, nutmeg and onion to season ; 
fry in butter and lard, but not enough to make them greasy. One 
egg sufficient for six potatoes. 

Conewango Fishing Club . 

RICE GRIDDLE CAKES. 

1 pt. milk, 2 cups boiled rice, 2 cups flour, 8 eggs, 2 heaping tea- 
spoons baking powder; press the rice through a sieve; add to it the 
eggs Avell beaten; then 1 tablespoon melted butter; then the flour 
and milk; beat until smooth; add the baking powder; mix thorough- 
ly and bake at once on a hot griddle. 

Jamestown Cook Book. 

WAFFLES. 

1 qt. flour, 1 large pt. sweet milk, 2 eggs, 3 tablespoons butter, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, a little salt ; rub the butter through the 



124 ■ THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

flour tlioronghly; add salt audi bkldng-; powder ; when ready to bake 
beat the eggs and add to the milk and then to the other ingredients. 

Ellen W. Beaty. 

WAFFLES . 

1 pt. sweet milk, % cup melted butter, sifted flour to make soft 
batter; add the -Well beaten yolks -of 3 eggs!; then the beaten whites, 
lastly 2 teasoons baking powder. Mrs. Lucy Noyes. 

WAFFLES. 

3 eggs, % pt. milk, 2 ounces of butter, 2 ounces of powdered 
white sugar, % of a pound flour sifted, i/^ teaspoon cinnamon; warm 
the butter and milk together; beat the eggs well and pour them in 
the milk ; sprinkle in the flour, sugar and spice gradually until it 
becomes a thick batter; heat waffle irons; grease well and pour in 
some of the batter; shut the irons tight and bake on both sides by 
turning the irons. Mrs. W. A. Greaves. 

NICE WAFFLES . 

1 pt. sour milk. 1 teaspoon salt, tal>lespoou melted I'utter, 3 egge 
beaten separately, flour to make thick batter, and 1 teaspoon of soda 
dissolved. Sweet milk may be used, in which ease substitute 2 tea- 
spoons of baking powder for the soda. C. J. W. 

GRAHAM WAFFLES. 

1 pt. sweet milk, 3 well beaten eggs, 1 tablespoon sugar, butter 
the size of a walnut (melted), salt. 1 pt. graham and 1 cup wheat 
flour, mixed with 2 heaping teaspoons of baking powder. 



SANDWICHES. 125 



SANDWICHES 

Miss Nettie Talbott 



The term sandwich Avas first used by John Montagu, fourtli 
Earl of Sandwich (1792), who used to have slices of bread with hain 
between brought to him at the gaming-table, to enable him to go on 
playing without intermission. The term is now applied to thin slices 
of bread, cake or crackers, plain or buttered with some article of food 
placed between. 

Bread for sandwiches should be a day old before using. The 
butter should be creamed with a spoon or knife before spreading, 
not melted. 

BEET AND CREAM CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Spread one piece of bread with cream cheese, the other with 
beets that have been chopped very fine and seasoned with French 
Dressing. 

HOT CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Slice bread thin ; remove crusts and place a slice of cheese with 
a sprinkle of cayenne between two slices of the bread; put sand- 
wiehs in drippers and place in oven until a light brown; serve hot. 

Miss Bemis. 

CLUB SANDWICHES. 

Have ready 4 triangular pieces of' toasted bread spread with 
Mayonnaise Dressing; cover two of these with lettuce; lay thin slices 
of cold chicken (white meat) upon the lettuce, over this arrange 
slices of broiled breakfast bacon, then lettuce, and cover with other 
slices of toast spread with IMayonnaise. Garnish with lettuce dipped 
in ^Mayonnaise. 

CHEESE AND PICKLE SANDWICHES. 

Mix Neufehatel cheese with chopped sweet pickles and enough 
cream to make soft paste. Spread bread in the usual way. 

CHICKEN .SALAD SANDWICHES. 

Chop cooked chicken; season with salt, pepper and paprica ; 
mix with salad dressing and cream; spread on bread and press cor- 
responding slices together. 



126 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



EGG SANDWICHES. 

Hard boil the eggs, when cold peel and chop rather fine ; add suf- 
ficient amount of both oil and vinegar to make it moist enough to 
spread on thin buttered slices of bread ; season well with salt and 
paprika. Miss Siegfried. 

FIG SANDWICHES. 

Chop V4 pound figs very fine; add I/4 cup water and cook to a 
smooth paste : add also, 1/^ cup almonds, blanched, chopped very fine 
and jiounded to a paste with a little rose-water, also juice of ¥2 
lemon. "When cold spread mixture on thin slices of cake or brown 
bread. -Raisins or dates may be used in place of figs. 

HAM SANDWICHES. 

Chop cold boiled ham (^4 ^s much fat as lean) ; season with salt 
and paprien : mix with salad dressing and enough cream to spread; 
prepare sandwiches in usual way. 

LAMB SANDWICHES. 

Mix cold chopped lamb with fresh mint sauce and a little salad 
dressing if desired; spread on thin slices of buttered bread. 

LETTUCE SANDWICHES. 

Lay lettuce leaf on buttered bread ; cover with Mayonnaise 
which has been mixed with a little finely chopped onion. 

OLIVE SANDWICHES. 

Chop olives and mix with either cream or oil mayonnaise as pre- 
ferred and spread between thin slices of buttered bread. 

PEANUT SANDWICHES. 

Chop freshly roasted peanuts very fine ; then pound in a mor- 
tar until smooth ; season with salt and thick cream. Salad dressing 
may be used with cream if desired. 

Peanuts and red raspberry jam mixed make a delicious filling 
for sandwiches. 

RUSSIAN SANDWICHES. 

Slightly butter thin slices of bread ; moisten fine chopped olives 
with Mayonnaise Dressing and spread on bread; spread other side 
with Neufchatel and press together. 

NEUFCHATEL SANDWICHES. 

Neufchatel cheese is excellent in sandwiches mixed with an 
equal quantity of chopped nuts and seasoned with paprika. They ar«3 



SANDWICHES. 12? 



better if made of rye or bran bread and should be served at any 
informal or Dntoh lunch with coflFoo. Alice Siegfried. 

SARDINE SANDWICHES. 

Use in l)ulk, ecjual ])arts of yolks of well-cooked eggs. rubl)ed to 
a S!nooth paste, and the flesh of sardines, freed from skin and bones 
and pounded in a mortar; season to taste with a few drops of tobasco 
sauce and lemon juice, and spread as usual. Crackers may be useil 
in the place of bread if prepared just before using. 

TONGUE AND VEAL (OR CHICKEN) SANDWICHES. 

Use a little less of the chopped tongue than of the otlier kind of 
meat, and M> as much chopped celery as meat; mix with salad dress- 
ing; spread one piece of bread with butter, the other with the mix- 
ture and press together. 

NUT AND EGG SANDWICHES. 

]\Iix ly^ cups of pecan and walnut meats, (equal parts) ground 
line with 2 hard-boiled eggs and 8 medium-sized olives chopped fine ; 
moisten with dressing made as for my salmon salad and spread be- 
tween buttered slices of bread. Mrs. Edward Lindsev. 



126 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



CHAFING DISH 

Miss Mary White 

The chafing dish, wliieh, within the last few years has gained so 
much favor, is by no means a utensil of modern invention, as its his- 
tory may be traced to the time of Louis XIV. 

The simple tin chafing dishes may be bought for as small a 
sum as 90 cents, while tJie elaborate silver ones command as high a 
price as $100. Very attractive ones are made of granite ware, nickel 
or copper. The latest patterns have a screw adjustment to regulate 
the flame and a metal tray on which to set the dish. 

A chafing dish has 2 pans, the under one for holding hot water, 
the upper one with long handle for holding food to be cooked. A 
blazer differs from a chafing dish, inasmuch as it has no hot w^ater 
pan. Wood alcohol is often used instead of the high proof spirits. 

List of dishes previously given that may be prepared in the 
chafing dish : Eggs and Cheese, Egg Fondue, Scrambled Eggs with 
Tomato, Creamed Fish, Creamed Chicken, Fish on Toast, Barbecued 
Ijamb, Frizzled Beef, Creamed Beef. Creamed Sweetbreads. Veal on 
Toast. 

» CURRIED EGGS. 

Melt 2 tablespoons butter; add 2 tablespoons flour mixed with 
1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/2, teaspoon curry powder and % teaspoon paprika ; 
stir until well mixed; then pour in gradually 1 cup milk; add 3 
hard-boiled eggs cut into eights lengthwise, and re-heat in sauce. 

Mary L. White. 

EGGS WITH CHEESE. 

For 5 eggs use 2 tablespoons grated cheese, 1 tablespoon butter, 
salt ancl pepper to taste; melt the butter; add the eggs; then the 
cheese, stirring until thick and smooth in a chafing dish. 

FRUIT WITH ORANGE SAUCE. 

Put into the chafing dish 1 cup of orange juice and ""^ cup sugar ; 
moisten 1 level teaspoon of arrowroot in a little cold water; when 
the juice is hot add to it the arrowroot and cook until thick ; then 
add 1/4 cup candied cherries, and 3 oranges peeled and separated into 
small pieces ; cook for three minutes and serve. Mrs. Roy. 

FUDGE. 

Melt 1 tablespoon butter; add %, cup milk and l^/o cups sugar; 
stir until sugar is dissolved; then add 5 tablespoons prepared cocoa 



CHAFING DISHES. 129 



or 2 squares chocolate; heat to boiling point and boil twelve minutes, 
stirring occasionally to prevent barning; extini/uish flaine- add 1 
teaspoon Royce's vanilla, and beat until creamy; pour into buttered 
pan; cool and cut into scpuu-es. 

FRIED FROGS' LEGS. 

Clean and trim 1 dozen frogs' hind legs; season with salt and 
pepper; roll in crumbs, e^g and crumbs, and sauti in a hot blazer, 
using enough butter to prevent burning. Do not attempt to cook 
too many at a time. 

CREAMED MUSHROOMS. 

Prepare V:] pound of mushrooms and cook in 2 tablespoons of 
butter eight minutes ; add iy2 tablespoons Hour and when well 
mixed add % cup cream ; season with salt and pepper. When thick- 
ened serve on toast. IMrs. H. C. Jacobs. 

MUSHROOMS A LA SABINE. 

Wash 1/2 pound of nuishrooms ; remove stems and peel caps; 
sprinkle with salt and pepper; dredge with flour and cook three 
minutes in a hot pan wnth 2 tablespoons butter; add V/^ cups brown 
sauce and cook slowly five minutes; sprinkle with 8 tablespoons 
grated cheese; as soon as cheese is melted arrange mushrooms on 
toast and pour over them the sauce. 

MACAROONS WITH CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 

Put 1 cup rich cream in the chafing dish ; beat together Vt cup 
cocoa, the yolks of 3 eggs, and 6 tablespoons sugar; add this to the 
hot cream; stir continuously until thick; flavor with 1 teaspoon of 
Koyce's vanilla, and pour at once over the macaroons. 

]\rrs. Koy. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Clean 1 pt. oysters; cook until plump; drain; strain the liquor 
and add enough milk to make IV2 cups; melt -S tablespoons butter; 
add 5 tablespoons flour and pour in gradually the liquid; season 
with 1/. teaspoon salt, i/s teaspoon each of pepper and celery salt ; 
add the oysters and as soon as heated, pour over slices of toast. 

Mrs. Wood. 

FRICASSEED OYSTERS. 

2 teaspoons butter, 1 teaspoon salt, VL- teaspoon pepper, (cay- 
enne). 1 pt. oj'sters ; place all ingredients, except oysters in blazer, 
when hot add oysters; cover and shake pan occasionally. When the 
oysters are plump, drain them and place them wliere they will 



150 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



keep hot; add enough cream, to liquid drained from oysters, to make 
1 cup. Make a white sauce, using this for liquid : 2 tablespoons of 
butter, 1 teaspoon of lemon juice, 2 tablespoons of flour, salt and 
pepper to taste ; beat 1 egg until light, pour sauce over it, add oys- 
ters, and when hot, serve on toast or in patty cases. 

Mrs. H. C. Jacobs. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Heat i/ii cup of butter in blazer; add 1 qt. cleaned oysters; sea- 
son to taste with salt and pepper; cook until oysters curl and serve 
on hot toast. ^Irs. AV. J. Richards. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

i\Ielt 2^2 tablespoons butter ; add 2 tablespoons flour, Vi teaspoon 
salt, i/s teaspoon paprika, i/o tablespoon Chili sauce ; clean 1 pt. oys- 
ters and add; cook until edges curl, then add 1 tablespoon finely 
chopped parsley and 2 tablespoons chopped celery; serve with toast. 

Miss Mary White. 

SWEETBREADS WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Parboil 1 pair sweetbreads and cut in dice; cook 2 tablespoons 
chopped mushrooms in 3 tablespoons butter, five minutes; add 2% 
tablespoons flour, mixed with i/. teaspoon salt and % teaspoon pa- 
l)rika. and pour on gradually 1 cup milk and Vi cup mushroom liquor; 
add the sweetbread dice and 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Just before 
serving, add the yolks of 2 eggs and 1 teaspoon finely chopped pars- 
ley. :Miss Mary White. 

CREAMED SWEETBREADS. 

Remove tubes and membrane from 1 ]mir of sweetbreads; clean 
and parboil in boiling salted water twenty minutes: drain and plunge 
into cold water; as soon as cool, remove from the water nnd cut into V^ 
inch cubes; melt 2 tablespoons butter and add 2^^ tablespoons flour 
mixed with ^/i teaspoon of salt and a few grains of pepper : pour on 
gradually 1 cup of milk ; then reheat sweetbreads in sauce. 

Alice Siegfried. 

SCOTCH WOODCOCK. 

Melt 3 tablespoons butter; add II/2, tablespoons flour and pour 
on gradually 1 cup of milk ; add Vi teaspoon salt, a few grains of 
cayenne and anchovy essence ; add 4 hard boiled eggs finely chopped 
void serve on toast. Mrs. H. C. Jacobs. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

% pound cheese. 1 tablespoon butter. 1 egg, Vj cup cream, V^ 
teaspoon salt, 1 dash of cayenne pepper, % teaspoon dry mustard ; 



CHAFING DISHES. 151 



mince the cheese and put all the ingredients into the chafer and stir 
continually until it is smooth and of the consistency of thick cream; 
serve immediately on hot butter crackers. Mrs. Richards. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

1 pound cheese, 2 eggs, i/^ cup milk or cream, 2 teaspoons butter, 
'y4 teaspoon mustard, i/i> teaspoon Worcestershire sauce ; put cheese 
and milk or cream, into upper part of chafing dish ; mix mustard, 
salt, cayenne and Worcestershire ; add eggs and beat well. When 
cheese is melted stir in mixture of dry ingredients and egg; then the 
butter, and stir until it thickens ; stir constantly ; pour over toast or 
wafers ; brown toast on one side only. Mrs. H. C. Jacobs. 



132 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

PUDDINGS 

Mrs. C. D. Crandall 

BOILED PUDDINGS. 

Be sure there is suffieienl water in the kettle tc boil tiie length 
<>i time the pudding requires. Scald a good bag; sprinkle with 
flour; turn inside out and put in the batter; tie tightly leaving 
room for pudding to swell ; plunge in the kettle of boiling water ; 
cover and do not disturb until done. 

STEAMED PUDDINGS. 

Place a cloth under the cups or pudding dish, and one over the 
pudding to absorb moisture. Have a steady fire and be sure there is 
sufficient water beneath to furnish steam the required time. 

BAKED PUDDINGS. 

Earthen ware is preferable for a pudding dish, though tin or 
granite ware may be used Butter dish carefully before putting in 
the pudding and bake in an even temperature. Do not cook cus- 
tards too long or they become watery. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

1 qt. flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 1 heaping teaspoon salt, 
] tablespoon lard. Either milk or water (milk is best) to make 
dough as for biscuits, work as little as possible; roll out and cut in 
squares; have apples pared and cored; if small put one whole apple 
in each square ; if large, V2 with a little sugar ; bring the corners up 
well around the apples and pinch together inclosing the apple in the 
dough; steam V2 hour; place a napkin in the steamer so when the 
dumplings are done they can be lifted out without breaking. Have 
the w^ater boiling when steamer is set on. This is enough for 8 or 
9 dumplings. Mrs. W. A. M. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

4 large or 5 small apples grated, 1 good cup sugar, yolks of 2 
eggs, pinch of salt, pinch of cinnamon; mix with a fork all together; 
beat the whites of the eggs stiff and put into the pudding still beat- 
ing with the fork. Have the pudding dish hot with a lump of but- 
ter in it, and bake in a pan of hot water for 14 hour. Eat with hard 
sauce or sugar and cream. Mrs. Hoffer, Jamestown. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

1 qt. stewed apples, y^ pound butter, 4 eggs, 1 cup grated bread, 
a little nutmeg; sweeten to taste; bake in a pudding dish. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 133 



BIRDS' NEST. 

Into a deep buttered pie tin, slice tart apples and cover with 
sugar (about % cup) ; sprinkle with cinnamon and dot with buttter 
as for pie ; cover with a batter made as follows : Into 1 14 cups flour, 
mix a heaping teaspoon of butter, a pinch of salt and IV2 leaspoons 
of baking powder; add gradually % cups of milk; bake thirty min- 
utes or until the apples are tender; serve hot with sugar and 
cream. A beaten egg added last to the batter improves it. 

Mrs. Kitchen. 
BAKED APPLES. 

Core apples with an apple corer; bake with plenty of sugar; 
when done fill center with broken walnuts and pecans ; serve with 
whipped cream. S. S. R. 

ALMOND PUDDING. 

Blanch % pound sweet almonds and pound fine: add 1 large 
si)oon rose water, or other ilavoring, if desired : beat 6 eggs to a stiff 
froth, adding 3 tablespoons sugar, 3 tablespoons cracker crumbs, 4 
ounces melted butter and 4 ounces citron cut in small bits. To this 
add the pounded almonds and 1 qt. milk ; bake % hour in a pudding 
dish with linuig and rim of paste. Delicious. INIrs. M. D. Hull. 

BROWN BETTY. 

Butter a pudding dish; put in a layer of bread crumbs; next a 
layer of apples, pared and sliced thin, a little sugar, butter and nut- 
meg to taste : next a layer of bread crumbs, and so on until the dish 
is filled, having a layer of bread crumbs at top; pour in a little 
water and cover dish; set in oven. When nearly done remove the 
cover and brown on top. Eat with cream or sauce of any kind. 

Mrs. C. D. Crandall. 

BUCKEYE PUDDING. 

1 egg, % cup P. R. molasses, ^/^ cup cold water, 1 cup flour, 1 cup 
seeded raisins mixed with the flour, 1 scant teaspoon soda, little 
cinnamon and salt; steam IY2 hours. No shortening, l)ut good. 

Mrs. Gokey. Jamestown. 

COLD SAUCE FOR BUCKEYE PUDDING. 

1 egg, piece of butter size of egg, % cup granulated sugar, V2 
teaspoon Royce's vanilla; cream butter and sugar; add beaten yolk; 
then last the beaten white. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

Yolks of 2 eggs, beaten, add 1/0 cup sugar; beat again; then add 
% qt. milk, % cup bread crumbs and a teaspoon of butter; add either 
cocoanut, raisins, nutmeg or Royce's flavoring extract and bake 



.134 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

thirty minutes or until brown on top; spread with a fruit jelly or 
conserve and cover w^ith the whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff and slight- 
ly sweetened and flavored; place in a slow oven until brown. The 
jelly may be omitted. Mrs. Kitchen. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

3 cups bread crumbs soaked in 1 cup hot milk, 1 cup molasses, 
T cup fruit (currants, raisins, citron and nuts), 1 teaspoon soda, .1 
egg, 1 large cup flour, 1 tablespoon butter, salt and spice to taste. 
Don't use any butter if you use nuts. Steam three hours and serve 
with any good sauce. Mrs. E. R. Allen. 

CARAMEL PUDDING. 

2 cups brown sugar, 4 eggs, 1 qt. milk, Royce's vanilla to taste, 
melt sugar in spider; when thoroughly melted add milk and stir until 
sugar is all dissolved ; cool and add to the well beaten eggs ; flavor 
and bake in oven in pan of water; add a pinch of salt to eggs when 
beating. Mrs. Daniel A. Sullivan, Jamestown. 

HOT CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Melt li/> oz. chocolate over water; beat yolks of 4 eggs with 1 
cup sugar until light; add to chocolate stirring constantly; flavor 
with % teaspoon Royce's vanilla and i/o teaspoon cinnamon; fold 
into the mixture the well beaten whites of the 4 eggs and beat all 
together very lightly ; turn into a greased pudding mold and bake in 
a pan of hot water i/i hour; serve at once in individual glasses with 
v; hipped cream over the top. Mrs. 0. F. Hoffman. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

1 cup sugar, 1 egg, 3 teaspoons Home baking powder, 3 cui)3 
flour, 1 teaspoon Royce's extract vanilla, V2 cup butter, 1 cup sweet 
milk or water; sprinkle a little sugar over top before putting in 
oven ; bake in a square tin, when done cut in squares ; serve with 
sour sauce. Mrs. J. G. Smith. 

CRANBERRY ROLL. 

Stew 1 qt. cranberries in enough water to keep them from 
burning ; make very sweet ; strain and let cool ; make a paste and 
when the cranberry is cool, spread it on the paste about an inch 
thick ; roll it and tie in a flannel cloth ; boil two hours and serve 
with a sweet sauce. 

CRANBERRY DUMPLINGS. 

1 qt. cranberries, 1 pt. sugar, 1 pt. water. "When berries come 
to a boil add the dumplings and boil twenty minutes without uncov- 
ering. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 135 



DUMPLINGS. 

1 pt. flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, i/o teaspoon salt, 1 cup 
milk; drop 1 tablespoon in a place on top of berries. 

Mrs. G. B. Nesmith. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

1 qt. milk, 1 pt. bread crumbs, yolks of 3 eggs, 5 tablespoons 
<xrated chocolate; scald the milk; add bread crumbs and chocolate; 
take from fire and add Vo cup sugar and beaten yolks; bake fifteen 
minutes; beat whites to a stiff froth; add 3 tablespoons sugar; 
sprinkle on top and brown; serve with cream. Mrs.Salyer. 

STEAMED CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

% cup sugar, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 egg, 1 cup sweet 
milk, li/o cups flour, 11/2, teaspoons baking poAyder, 2 squares melted 
chocolate ; put chocolate in last and beat thoroughly ; steam % of an 
}^()^^j. Mrs. Conarro. 

CHRISTMAS PUDDING. 

11/.'. cups each of suet cut fine, raisins, sugar, flour, bread crumbs, 
milk, 2" eggs, spices of all kinds. If sweet milk is used 2 teaspoons 
of baking powder and if sour, 1 teaspoon of soda; mix well and 
steam three hours and serve with a sauce. Mrs. Drum. 

EGG PUDDING. 

To 9 eggs well beaten add 9 tablespoons of flour and 1 qt. of 
milk; excellent. Mrs. W. V. Hazeltine. 

FIG PUDDING. 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup chopped suet, 1 cup buttermilk or sou? 
milk, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 3 cups flour, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, a 
little nutmeg, 1 pound figs cut fine and floured ; mix together molas- 
ses, suet and spices ; dissolve soda in teaspoon of hot water and mix 
with other ingredients; beat eggs light and stir into mixture; add 
figs <ind flour and beat thoroughly. It should be the consistency of 
cake; steam 21/2 hours. This pudding will keep several weeks. 
When ready to use steam 1/2 hour; serve with a sauce. 

Mrs. C. IT. Smith. 

FIG PUDDING, NO. II. 

1 cup suet chopped fine, 1 cup molasses. 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 
teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon salt. 1 cup milk. 4 scant cups flour, 
1 teaspoon soda dissolved in boiling water, 1 cup raisins, 1/2 cup 
tigs chopped fine; steam three hours. This will make three small 
puddings. To be eaten with hard sauce. Lora E. Aklen. 



156 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



FIG PUDDING, NO. Ill 

1 qt. bread crumbs. 1 pound l)rown sugar, 1 jtound figs, % 
pound suet, 3 nutmegs, 1 tablepsoon baking powder, 4 eggs ; steam 
4^2 hours: serve with sauee. Mrs. Hue. 

STEAMED FIG PUDDING. 

% cup of molasses, (New Orleans), i/. cup of chopped suet, ^2 
cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of chopped figs, li/o cups of flour, i/o tea- 
spoon cinnamon, a little grated nutmeg, a pinch ofsalt, i/o teaspoon 
of soda, dissolved in a little hot water; mix all together and steam 
three hours. Louise Stuart. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

1 pt. flour, 4 level teaspoons baking powder, 14 teaspoon salt, V2 
cup beef suet chopped fine, i/4 cup molasses, 14 teaspoon each of nut- 
meg and cinnamon, i/o cup currants, i/o cup raisins, i/> cup milk ; 
sift the dry ingredients; add fruit and suet; stir in milk and molas- 
ses slowly and beat well; steam li/o hours if in small moulds, 2i/2 
hours if in large moulds. Mrs. J. W. Crawford. 

GINGERBREAD PUDDING. 

ly^ cups molasses, % cup boiling water, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 
teaspoon cinnamon, 2 teaspoons soda dissolved in hot water, % cup 
melted butter, 3 cups flour; stir the molasses, butter and water to- 
gether; add the cinnamon and ginger, and lastly the flour; bake in 
two bread tins. 

SAUCE. 

1 cup of sugar, 1 cup water, 1 tablespoon butter, 3 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoon Royce's vanilla; put the sugar and water in a sauce pan; boil 
fifteen minutes ; beat the yolks of the eggs and stir into the boiling 
syrup ; put the basin into another of hot water until it begins to 
thicken ; then add butter, the whites of the eggs beaten to a stifl: 
froth; then the vanilla; stir one minute longer and serve. 

Mrs. Ida M. Brown." 

GINGER PUDDING. 

■V2 cup molasses, fill up with boiling water, % cup butter, yolks 
of 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 tablespoon ginger, 2 tablespoons sugar, 
2 cups flour; steam one hour. 

SAUCE. 

Whites of 3 eggs beaten stiff; add 1 cup sugar and the juice 
and grated rind of 1 lemon. Mrs. F. K. Russell. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. ix,z 



GRAHAM PUDDING. 

1 egg, i/o cup molasses, I/2 cup sweet milk, l^ cup melted butter, 
1 cup chopped raisins, l^/o cups graham flour, 1/2 teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in warm water, a little nutmeg; steam two hours. 

SAUCE. 

2 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, juice of 1 lemon. 

Mrs. D. D. Reed. 

INDIAN CORN MEAL PUDDING. 

IV2 pts. of hot water, 1 teacup corn meal, !/•> teaspoon salt; cook 
thoroughly ; add 1 qt. rich sweet milk, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 scant 
cup sugar and 3 eggs well beaten together with the sugar, ^2 cup 
seeded raisins ; mix all together ; bake in moderate oven three hours, 
keeping covered two hours and stirring three or four times the first 
hour to keep raisins from settling; serve with cream flavored to 
taste. Mrs. J. A. Culbertson. 

PLAIN INDIAN PUDDING. 

1 qt. of new milk, 5 large tablespoons of Indian meal, 4 eggs, 
coffee cup of sugar, nutmeg or spice to taste, and 1 tablespoon but- 
ter ; boil the milk ; scald the meal in it ; then let cool before the eggs 
are added; bake % of an hour in a moderate oven. 

Mrs . Richards . 

MOUNTAIN DEW PUDDING. 

] pt. of milk, yolks of 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons of cocoanut, I/2 cup 
rolled cracker crumbs, 1 teaspoon Royce's extract lemon; bake V2 
hour; make a frosting of whites of 2 eggs, 1 cup sugar and put in 
oven to brown. Jennie Halliday. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

V'2 pound sugar, 1 cup Porto Rico molasses, 1 pound snet chopped 
line. 6 eggs, 2 pounds currants, 2 pounds raisins, Vt pound citron, 14 
pound lemon and orange (candied), a little salt, small teaspoon of 
soda, spice to taste, enough flour to make very thick; work in with 
the hands when can no longer be stirred with a spoon ; boil in a bag 
five hours. The pudding is better if not used until a few weeks old ; 
leave in bag; hang away in cool place. When wishing to serve place 
in kettle of boiling water until thoroughly warmed through. 

Mrs. F. P. Hue. 

SIMPLE PLUM PUDDING. 

An inexpensive and simple plum pudding is made with rice as 
its foundation. A cup each of ground rice, flour, chopped suet, 
sugar, seeded raisins and milk are mixed together thoroughly, a 



158 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



tablespoon of vinegar, and a teaspoon of soda added. The mixture 
is then boiled three hours and served v\^ith a lemon sauce. 

Mrs. S. E. Walker. 

RICE AND PEACH PUDDING. 

Cook 1/2 cup rice previously soaked one hour in plenty of cold 
water and salt. When barely tender, drain; put in a double boiler; 
add milk enough to cover, and cook slowly until the milk is absorb- 
ed ; take from fire ; add 1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 well 
beaten eggs ; put a layer of this in a buttered dish, and then a layer 
of halved peaches ; continue until the dish is full ; bake twenty min- 
utes in a hot oven if the peaches are canned, forty minutes if they 
are fresh; serve with "Maryland sauce." 

Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

QUEEN PUDDING. 

1/2 pt. bread crumbs, 1 qt. milk, 1 teacup white sugar, yolks of -1 
eggs, rind of 1 lemon; beat yolks and sugar together; stir into tlv, 
milk and crumbs; bake until a light brown; then cover with jelly 
or jam, or canned strawberries, and beat the whites of the eggs stiff 
with 4 tablespoons sugar and spread over jam; put in the oven and 
let brown; put some of the juice of the lemon in the frosting, i/o of 
the recipe is enough for four or five persons. 

Mrs. D. W. Ames. 

RICE MERINGUE. 

1 cup boiled rice, 1 large pt. new milk, 3 eggs, 1 large cup sugar, 
1 lemon ; beat yolks with i/<} sugar ; add to milk and rice ; cook until 
thick as soft custard ; remove from fire and add grated lemon rind ; 
pour into buttered pudding dish ; spread on top the well beaten 
whites mixed with balance of sugar and the lemon juice and brown. 

Mrs. Copeland. 

OLD FASHIONED RICE PUDDING. 

1 small Yz cup rice washed in several waters ; put rice when 
thoroughly washed in a baking dish and cover with 2 qts. milk; 
sweeten and flavor with nutmeg to taste ; put in slow oven and turn 
down when brown on top every fifteen minutes for two hours. 

Mrs. Siegfried. 

RICE PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS. 

1 qt. milk, 4 tablespoons rice, i/o cup sugar, butter the size of a 
large walnut, 1 teaspoon Royce's lemon or almond extract, pinch of 
salt; wash rice carefully; then add other ingredients; place in bak- 
ing dish and bake in a very slow oven 2% hours, just allowing it to 
simmer; do not stir it. Mrs. F. P. Hue. 



PUDDINGS AND SA.UCES. 139 



RAISIN PUFFS. 

1 cup milk, V2 c^^P butter, 2 cups tiour, 1 cup raisins, chopped 
fine, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder, 2 tablespoons sugar, 3 eggs; 
steam in cups one hour; serve with sugar and cream or w.ith a sauce 
made of 2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 eggs rubbed together. When 
ready for table, pour over 1 cup of boiling water. 

Miss Alden, Mrs. George Orr and Mrs. Smiley. 

QUICK STEAMED PUDDING. 

1 heaping teaspoon butter, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 
IV3 cups flour, Iteaspoon baking powder; half fill 4 cups with any 
FteAved fruit; fill up the cups with the batter; steam twenty min- 
utes; invert when taking out of cups to serve. Mrs. Fred Sill, 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE I. 

1 cup sugar, 1 egg. 4 tablespoons melted butter, rubbed together 
until light ; add 1 cup sweet milk, with level teaspoon soda in it, 
lastly add 2% cups flour with 2 teaspoons cream tartar ; bake in two 
layers in a quick oven ; crush 1 qt. of strawberries or red raspberries 
and sweeten to. taste with powdered sugar; put between layers of 
cake ; take another qt. of berries and put on top ; sprinkle with pow- 
dered sugar. Do not put together until serving time. 

Clara C. Orr. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE NO. II. 

1 egg beaten and put in cup ; fill cup with milk ; work butter 
size of walnut into li/o cups flour; add 1 teaspoon sugar, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder and a pinch of salt; add the milk and egg; bake in 
one cake ; split and fill with the berries and cover top with same ; 
serves six people. Mrs. Charles Conarro, 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE NO. III. 

Into 3 cups of flour mix 3 teaspoons baking powder and 1/4 tea- 
spoon salt ; add 3 tablespoons butter and work in with hands ; add 
milk slowly, wetting small divisions at a time to the "sticky" point. 
Divide in two sections and roll one out on a floured board until it 
will fit a round layer cake tin; brush with melted butter; then roll 
out the other section and place on top ; brush with sweet milk and 
bake twenty minutes in fast oven. While baking, crush slightly 2 
qts. of strawberries to w^hich add a cup of sugar. When baked 
split the cake through the center and butter the inner surfaces ; 
spread lower layer with crushed berries ; invert the other layer hav- 
ing soft part up ; heap on the balance of the berries and serve immed- 
iately. A short cake should not be spread until time to serve. In- 



140 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

dividual cakes may be made in the same way by using large biscuit 
cutter when rolled out for the tin. 

Mrs. M. A. Bliss, Jamestown, N. Y. 

STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 

Take enough stale bread to fill an earthen pudding dish and 
cut or break into very fine pieces, first cutting off the crusts; then 
mash a qt. of fresh strawberries with a coffee cup of sugar; set on 
stove just long enough to heat through ; pour over bread until thor- 
oughly moistened; set away on ice or in a cool place, when cold serve 
Avith whipped cream. This is quickly made and a delicious dessert. 
Canned berries may be used. Mrs. L. D. Cornelius. 

STRAWBERRY DUMPLINGS. 

Put 1 pt. of sifted flour into a bowl ; rub into it a piece of but- 
ter the size of an egg; add 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 heaping teaspoon of 
baking powder and sufficient milk to moisten — about i/o cup ; mix 
quickly; take out; roll into a sheet 14 of an inch thick; cut into cakes 
with a' round biscuit cutter; put about 3 strawberries into each cake; 
fold them over neatly and steam twenty minutes: serve Avith straw- 
berry sauce. 

STRAWBERRY SAUCE. 

Beat butter the size of an egg to a cream, adding gradually ¥>, 
cup granulated sugar; then add 12 berries (1 at a time) mashing and 
beating until the whole is perfectly light. If it has a curdled ap- 
pearance add more sugar and stand in a cool place until wanted. 

Mrs. Salyer. 

SUET PUDDING. 

1 cup suet, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup molasses, 4 cups flour, 1 tea- 
spoon soda, 1 large coffee cup raisins; steam three hours. 

Mrs. C. A. Bettes. 

SUET PUDDING. 

1 cup seeded and chopped raisins, 1 cup figs, 1 cup sweet milk, 
1 cup syrup, 1 cup suet, 3 cups sifted flour, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 tea- 
spoon cinnamon, l/^ teaspoon cloves and nutmeg; steam three hours. 

SAUCE. 

2 cups pulverized sugar into which rub 2 teaspoons butter; 
flavor with Royce's vanilla and just before serving add the well beat- 
en whites of three eggs. Mrs. G. B. Nesmith. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. ui 



TAPIOCA CREAM PUDDING. 

1 cup tapioca soaked in water until soft, 1 cup sugar, 1 qt. milk, 
yolks of 3 eggs ; bring milk to a boil ; then add the beaten yolks and 
sugar together; then the tapioca, stirring well until it thickens; 
flavor to taste ; take off fire and stir in the whites of eggs beaten to 
a stiff froth; meringue the top and brown in the oven. 

Mrs. J. W. Kitchen. 



SAUCES 



CREAM SAUCE. 

1 Clip cream beaten stiff; add % cup powdered sugar and Y? tea- 
spoon Royce's vanilla. Mrs. Farmer. 

HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 

Melt 1/4 cake unsweetened chocolate with % cup powdered sugar 
and i/ti cup boiling water, stirring: cook m double boiler to the con- 
sistency of molasses and serve hot; poured over vanilla ice cream 
makes a delicious dessert. Mrs. Robertson. 

HARD SAUCE. 

Cream % cup butter and 1 cup powdered sugar; flavor with 
Royce's lemon or vanilla. 

LEMON SAUCE NO. I. 

2 cups boiling water, 1 cup sugar, 5 level tablespoons flour, 
grated rind and juice of 1 lemon, 2 tablespoons butter; mix sugar 
and flour thoroughly; then add boiling water; cook eight or ten min- 
utes, stirring constantly; add the lemon juice and rind; then the 
butter; stir until butter has melted and serve at once. 

Mrs. J. W. Crawford. 

LEMON SAUCE NO. II. 

2 cups sugar, 2 eggs, juice and rind of 2 lemons ; beat all to- 
gether, and just before using add 1 pt. boiling water. Never boil 
sauce after adding lemon, as it makes it bitter. 

LEMON SAUCE FOR FRUIT CAKE RECIPE. 

2 cups boiling water, 1 cup sugar, 3 heaping teaspoons corn 
starch, 1 tablespoon butter, juice of 1 lemon. If hard sauce is used 
put a little hard sauce in the center of your pudding and around it 
the above sauce made without the butter. Mrs. W. D. McLaren. 



142 THE WAKREN COOK BOOK 

MARYLAND SAUCE 

Cream well 2 tablespoons butter, 4 tablespoons brown sugar and 
yolks of 2 eggs ; add Yo cup peach syrup and a small piece of cinna- 
mon bark; stir over hot water until it thickens. 

MAPLE SAUCE. 

To 1 pound powdered maple sugar add 1 cup water and boil un- 
til it will thread from a fork; pour this slowly on the stiffly beaten 
whites of 2 eggs, stirring all the time; lastly add 1 cup of cream. 

ORANGE SAUCE. 

Beat the whites of 3 eggs until stiff; add gradually 1 cup pow- 
dered sugar. When well beaten add juice and grated rind of 2 
oranges and juice of 1 lemon. 

SOUR SAUCE. 

1 pt. sugar, (light brown), 2 tablespoons ""'negar, butter the size 
of an egg, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 pt. water; cook until thickened. 

STRAWBERRY SAUCE. 

To hard sauce add % cup crushed strawberries. 

VANILLA SAUCE. 

Mix 1/2 cup sugar with II/2 teaspoons flour, 2 tablespoons butter 
and blend over the fire ; add gradually 1 cup boiling water stirring 
constantly ; boil five minutes ; remove from fire and add 14 teaspoon 
Royce's vanilla. 

YELLOW SAUCE. 

Beat 2 eggs until light ;add gradually 1 cup powdered sugar; 
beat thoroughly; flavor to taste with Royce's extract. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. _^^h 



144 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

COLD DESSERTS 

Mrs. Jas. Roy 

APRICOTS JELLIED. 

1 can apricots (use all the juice, but not quite all the fruit), 2 
cups sugar, i/2 cup gelatine in pt. of water; a little lemon juice or 
extract may be added to gelatine if liked ; strain juice, being sure to 
have 1 qt. ; then turn juice over gelatine and strain ; put into a mould 
or moulds and add apricots. S. S. Roy. 

APRICOTS JELLIED NO. II. 

Drain canned, peeled apricots from their liquor; soak ^/o box 
gelatine in I/2 cup cold water; dissolve in 1% cups boiling water; 
add 1 cup sugar, % cup of orange juice, % cup of lemon juice and 
% cup of liquor from apricots ; strain and pour mixture into a mould 
to the depth of 1/0 inch ; let harden in a pan of ice water ; then add 
halves of apricots, placing a blanched and delicately toasted almond 
in the stone cavity of each, cut side down ; cover with mixture ; let 
stand to harden ; add another layer of apricots and remainder of 
mixture ; chill thoroughly ; turn on serving platter and serve with 
apricot sauce. 

APRICOT SAUCE. 

Drain canned apricots from syrup and rub through a sieve ; 
there should be % cup of pulp ; add 3 cups whipped cream and 
sweeten to taste. Elizabeth J. Clough. 

APPLE TAPIOCA. 

Pare and core 6 ripe apples ; put in buttered baking dish ; fill 
each hollow with sugar and moisten with a little lemon juice ; 
sprinkle around the fruit 6 tablespoons large pearl tapioca; pour 2 
cups cold water into the dish ; cook gently li/o hours, when a deli- 
cate jelly will have formed about the apples; serve with cream. 

Clarion Cook Book. 

APPLE DESSERT. 

Take as many good sour apples as required ; pare ; remove the 
core without breaking apples ; make a thick syrup of sugar and 
water; add a little fruit coloring; put in tthe apples; just one layer 
and cook until clear or done; then remove the dish (which should 
be granite) from the fire. When cold serve in separate dishes, an 
apple in a bed of whipped cream sweetened and flavored ; fill the 
centers with the cream and place a candied cherry on top. Red 



COLD DESSERTS. 145 



fruit jelly can be used as a coloring by adding to the syrup if pre- 
ferred to other coloring. Mrs. S. E. Walker. 

BANANA WHIP. 

Press pulp of 3 bananas through a sieve; cook with i/? (''iP o^' 
sugar and a tablespoon of lemon juice until scalded ; cool and tiavor 
with a few drops of Royce's vanilla; add a few grains of salt; then 
beat gradually into a cup of thick cream beaten solid; chill. 

G. D. Peirce. 

BOQUET DELICIOUS. 

A loaf of angels food, the center of which lias l)een removed with 
a sharp knife and the space filled with whipped cream sweetened 
and flavored, chopped nuts or a small box of marshmallows added 
to cream. Just before serving cover outside of loaf with mara- 
chino cherries and glace nuts. V. B. S. 

BANANA PUDDING. 

Set a pt. of milk to boil; then stir into it the beaten yolks oL" 
three eggs; boil until it thickens a little; flavor with Royce's extract, 
and sweeten to taste; slice three or four bananas in a pudding disli 
and pour over them the custard; whip the whites of the eggs stiff 
and heap on top; set in oven for just a moment; serve cold. 

^Irs. D. L. Gerould. 

BOSTON CREAM. 

VL' box shredded or granulated gelatine, I/2 cup cold water, juice 
and rind of 1 lemon, li/> pts. milk, lyo cups sugar; soak gelatine in 
V2 cup cold water until soft ; put the milk in double boiler ; set on 
fire and boil; take from fire and add gelatine; stir until dissolved, 
and set away to cool; now add the sugar and lemon; mix thorough- 
ly; turn into mould and set away to harden; serve with cream. 

]\Irs. Fletcher Parker. 

BISQUE GLACE. 

1 |)t. whipped cream, IVii dozen macaroons, 3 eggs, V^ cup water, 
-/:i cup sugar. 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla, Vi box gelatine (if not 
frozen) ; boil sugar and water together for I/2 hour; heat eggs well 
and stir into boiling syrup; put in double boiler over boiling water 
and beat eight minutes ; take from fire and put pan in cold water 
and beat till cold ; then add flavor and whipped cream and the rolled 
macaroons; stir well and put in moulds and let stand for two hours. 

Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 

% cup hot milk. 1 egg. 4 tal)lespo()ns sugar. 2 cups cold milk; 
place 2 tablespoons sugar in sauce pan directly over fire; when melt- 



146 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

ed and brown add the hot milk and the rest of the sugar; beat the 
egg and add to cold milk and add to hot milk slowly; fill custard 
cups and bake in moderate oven in a pan of water, which is even with 
the custard, until custard is firm. Mrs. Richards. 

CREAM DE RUSSE. 

1/2 box gelatine, 1 qt. cream, whites of 3 eggs, Vo cup of pow- 
dered sugar, 1 small box marshmallows, % pound shelled almonds; 
soak y- box gelatine in y^ pt. of cream until soft ; set dish in a 
pan of hot water and stir until smooth; whip lyo pts. cream; beat 
whites of 3 eggs very stiif, stir in lightly y2 cup powdered sugar 
(a little more if desired) and then the gelatine mixture which should 
be lukewarm; put in a little at a time and beat rapidly so it will 
not lump ; add flavoring ; then add gradually to the whipped cream ; 
add last the marshmallow^s which have been cut in small pieces, 
also the almonds which have been blanched, and cut or chopped; 
line a mould with lady fingers or sponge cake ; turn in the mixture 
and let stand at least one hour; keep very cool. 

Mrs. L. B. Tetens. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

1 qt. fresh milk, a pinch of salt, 4 tablespoons corn starch, 4 
tablespoons sugar ; dissolve the corn starch in a little milk ; stir in 
the sugar; put remainder of the milk on the stove and let it come 
to a boil ; then stir in the corn starch ; let it boil until it thickens ; 
remove from stove; flavor with Royce's vanilla and pour into wet 
moulds . This makes ten teacups ; serve with cream and maple 
sugar. Mrs. Crandall. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

1 pt. sweet milk, 2 tablespoons corn starch, a little salt ; let come 
to the boiling point in a double boiler and add the whites of 3 eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth ; pour into molds to cool ; serve Avith cream or 
sauce given below. 

To make a Chocolate pudding remove % of the above mixture 
and add to it a square of chocolate dissolved in 2 tablespoons milk 
over the fire and 2 tablespoons sugar; alternate layers of the white 
and dark parts in a mold and set away to cool; serve in slices with 
whipped cream or the following. 

SAUCE. 

To 1 pt. boiling milk add 3 beaten yolks of eggs with 3 table- 
spoons sugar thinned by adding 1 tablespoon milk; stir over steam 
until thickened and flavor with lA teaspoon Ro.yce's vanilla. 

Kate Messner. 



COLD DESSERTS. u? 



CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

1/2 package granulated gelatine; soak in 1/2 pt- cream a few mo* 
ments; set dish in a pan of hot water and stir until smooth; whip 
11/2 pts. of cream; beat whites of 3 eggs very stiff; stir in lightly I/2 
cup powdered sugar and then the gelatine mixture, which should be 
lukewarm; put in a little at a time and beat rapidly so it will not 
lump; add flavoring and add all to cream gradually; line a mould 
with lady fingers or sponge cake and let stand at least one hour and 
keep very cold. Clara C. Orr. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

11/2 qts. of milk, 1/4 teaspoon salt, % cup sugar, 2 oz. Baker's 
chocolate, 1/2 cup corn starch, whites of 4 eggs, 1 teaspoon Royce's 
vanilla; scald the milk; melt chocolate and thin with heated milk; 
mix corn starch, sugar and salt, and add scalded milk slowly; cook 
in double boiler, stirring constantly till thick ; remove from fire and 
when slightly cool add beaten whites of eggs and vanilla; pour into 
moulds; chill and serve plain or with whipped cream. 

Evelyn Crandall . 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

1 generous pt. milk, 3 eggs, beaten light, 5 tablespoons sugar, 1 
large tablespoon corn starch, 2 squares chocolate, a few drops 
Royce's vanilla; cook in double boiler; when cold cover with whip- 
ped cream. Elta R. Matthews. 

CHOCOLATE BAVARIAN CREAM. 

1/^ box shredded or granulated gelatine, 1/2 c^P cold water, 1 pt. 
milk, 1 pt. cream, 2 ounces chocolate, Y2 cup powdered sugar, ] tea- 
spoon vanilla ; soak gelatine in 1/0 cup cold water until soft ; whip 
the cream; grate the chocolate; put milk on to boil; when boiling add 
the chocolate and gelatine ; stir until dissolved ; take from the fire ; 
add the sugar and vanilla; then turn into a basin to cool; stir con- 
tinuously until it begins to thicken; then add the whipped cream; 
stir carefully until thoroughly mixed; now turn into moulds and set 
away to harden; serve with whipped cream placed around the base. 

COFFEE JELLY. 

1 coffee cup gelatine soaked 1/2 hour in i/o teacup cold water, 1. 
qt. strong coffee made as if for table use, sweetened to taste ; add the 
dissolved gelatine to the hot coffee; pour into wet cups and set in 
cool place for few hours; serve with whipped cream. 

COCOANUT CREAM. 

% box shredded or granulated gelatine. 1 cup milk. 1 cup pow- 
dered sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 pt. cream, 2 cups freshly grated 



148 THE WARKEN COOK BOOK 

cocoanut ; soak gelatine in 1 cup milk until soft ; add 1 cup sugar ; 
set in basin of boiling water and stir until gelatine and sugar is dis- 
solved; set away to cool; when quite thick add 1 teaspoon vanilla, 
2 cups freshly grated cocoanut and 1 pt. cream whipped to a solid 
froth ; stir gently until very thick ; turn into moulds and set away 
to harden. 

BAKED CUSTARD. 

4 eggs, 1 cup sugar. V-2 teaspoon salt, 1 qt. milk; put in cups; 
place in pan of water and halve until firm in center. Take care that 
heat is moderate or a whey will form. Kate Messner. 

DELICIOUS PUDDING. 

3 pts, milk, yolks of 4 eggs, i/o box of gelatine, sweeten to 
taste, and boil as custard ; when taken from the fire stir in thorough- 
ly the beaten whites; use Royce's extract vanilla; pour into moulds, 
and when cold, serve with cream. It is better made the day be- 
fore you want to use it. Mrs. James Roy. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

1/. package of gelatine soaked in i/^ cup cold water. 1 pt. boiling 
water; when cold add the juice of 2 small lemons or 1 large one; 
strain through a fine sieve ; then add 1 coffee cup of sugar, 2 
oranges cut in small pieces. 2 bananas sliced, Vi pound ■'igs, lA pound 
walnuts, cut fine; any kird of fresh fruit may be added to this; mix 
thoroughly; pour into wet mohU and set in a cool place; serve with 
whij)ped cream . 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

Sauce : 1 pt. milk, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon sugar ; put milk 
in doable boiler; beat yolks and sugar light; stir into the hot milk; 
stir gently until thick as cream; flavor with Royce's vanilla; cool. 

Island: Whites of 2 eggs, 1 small glass of jelly or sauce, (cur- 
rant or raspberry), beat the whites until partly stiff; add the jelly 
or sauce and beat luitil very stiff; serve the island on lady fingers or 
sponge cake and pour over the sauce which is served in a bowl or 
pitcher, E. S. Hunter. 

GINGER CREAM. 

Cover 1 tablespoon gelatine with y^ cup milk; soak Y_> hour; 
then dissolve over hot water and add 4 tablespoons powdered sugar; 
whip 1 pt. cream; add I teaspoon ginger sugar or a 10 cent box of 
preserved ginger cut up fine, 3 chopped figs and 3 dates; strain 
the jelly and stir into the cream mixture ; beat all together until it 
begins to harden; turn into a mould or sherbet glasses and cover 
the top when ready to serve with chopped almonds. 

Mrs. C. n. Smith. 



COLD DESSERTS. 



149 



ITALIAN CREAM. 

% box gelatine, 1 qt. milk, 8 eggs, li/l> cups sugar; soak gela- 
tine 1^ hour in cold milk; put milk on to boil and when boiling stir 
in yolks of eggs well beaten; add sugar and gelatine; Avhen the 
custard begins to thicken take jt off and pour into a deep dish in 
which the whites have been beaten to a stiff froth; mix well to- 
gether and flavor to taste ; put in moulds and allow 4 hours to cool . 
This cream is much more easily made in winter than in summer. 

Mrs. E. R. Pierce. 
LEMON CREAM. 

Beat the yolks of 4 eggs with 4 tablespoons of sugar; add the 
juice and grated rind of 1 large lemon and 4 tablespoons hot water; 
cook, stirring constantly to prevent the least boiling, until it thick- 
ens ; then remove from fire and stir in the whites of 4 eggs, beaten 
very stiff, with 2 tablespoons sugar; serve very cold with lady fin- 
gers or any sweet wafer. Mrs. A. R. Taylor. 

MARSHMALLOW CREAM. 

Take 1 pound fresh marshmallows, \U shelled English walnuts, 
1 pt. rich sweet cream, a few^ candied cherries; cut your marshmal- 
lows in pieces ; break up the walnuts ; mix together in a dish hold- 
ing more than 1 qt; whip the cream until thick; flavor with Royce's 
vanilla or any preferred flavor and pour over and mix with the 
marshmallows and nuts ; serve in sherbet glasses with a candied 
cherry. AVill be ready to serve in li/o or 2 hours after mixing. Will 
serve a dozen or more. ]\rrs. S. E. AValker. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING. 

Dissolve 1 tablesoon granulated gelatine in V. en]) cold water, 
stirring over the fire. When dissolved add Vo cup cold water and set 
away to cool ; beat the wliites of 4 eggs very stiff using a wire spoon 
beater and add the gelatine slowly, l)eating car-^fuily until well 
mixed ; add the juice of 1 lemon and gradually sprinkle in 1 cup 
granulated sugar, beating all the Time; divide the mixture inlo three 
parts and flavor with Royce's extract using a different flavor and col- 
oring for oacli ]('a\iiig 0110 part while riio})pe(i luit.s ana candied 
cherr.'es may be added as desired; ])iace in a bread tin one biyer above 
the other and stand in a cool place until firm; slice as brick ice cream 
and serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. E. A. Plnllips and :\rfs. J. M. .\ndrews. 

MAPLE CUSTARD. 

For 4 people, 3 eggs well beaten, a good generous I'o ^'^P '^a- 
ple syrup, 1 pt. milk ; rub cups with butter ; place in pan of hot 
water and bake; cool and serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. C. E. Bell. 



150 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

MAPLE PUDDING. 

1 cup maple syrup, 2 cups cream, 2 tablespoons gelatine, yolks 
of 5 eggs ; heat syrup until it just boils up ; pour slowly over beaten 
eggs and stir well together; cook again, stirring all the time until 
it thickens nicely ; let cool ; then add cream whipped and gelatine, 
having been soaked in a little cold water; put in a mould and set 
away in cool place till firm. Mrs. Kitchen. 

ORANGE CUSTARD. 

1 pt. milk, 1 tablespoon corn starch, a little butter, yolks of 2 
eggs; cut up oranges and cover with a cup of sugar. When cus- 
tard is cold pour over oranges and stir all together; make frosting 
for top of whites of eggs beaten with a little sugar ; brown if de- 
sired. Mrs. James Roy. 

ORANGE SNOW. 

% box shredded gelatine, 70 cup cold water, juice of 6 oranges, 
J pt. boiling water, juice of 1 lemon, whites of 3 eggs. 2 cups pow- 
dered sugar: soak gelatine in V2 e^P ^^^^ water until soft; add 1 
pt. boiling water ; stir until gelatine is dissolved ; set in a cool place 
until it begins to thicken; then beat into it the strained jnice of 
oranges and juice of 1 lemon and 2 cups sugar; beat the whites of 
3 eggs stiff; add them and beat the whole together until it looks 
white and sponge-like ; put into a inould and set on ice to harden ; 
serve with whipped cream. Mrs. Fletcher Parker. 

PRUNE PUDDING NORWEGIAN. 

Vi2 pound prunes. 1 inch stick cinnamon, '2 cups cold water, I'/.'s 
cups boiling water, 1 cup sugar, I/3 cup corn starch; pick over and 
wash prunes ; then soak 1 hour in cold water and boil until soft ; 
remove stones ; obtain meat from stones and add to prunes ; then 
add sugar, cinnamon, boiling water and simmer ten minutes ; dilute 
corn starch with enough cold water to pour easily; add to prune 
mixture and cook five minutes; remove cinnamon; chill and serve 
with cream or custard. Mrs. Salyer. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

% cup thick cream, % cup powdered sugar, % cup milk, I/2 
teaspoon Royce 's vanilla ; mix cream and milk and beat till stifii, 
using egg beater; add sugar and vanilla. 

PRUNE WHIP. 

1 pound prunes, stewed; soak well before cooking; pit them; 
stew them down rich with sugar. The skins should be soft; if not, 
strain through a colander; then whip whites of 3 eggs and stir in. 
The prunes should be cold before the eggs are stirred in. This is to 
be eaten with whipped cream, and makes an elegant dessert. 



COLD DESSERTS. 151 



PRUNE PUDDING. 

22 prunes boiled, stoned and chopped very fine, whites of 5 
eggs and a pinch of salt; beat; then add l^ cup sugar and i/4 tea- 
spoon cream tartar; set pudding dish in basin of hot water and 
bake 22 minutes; serve with whipped cream. S. S. R. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

1/2 box gelatine, % cup cold water, 2 cups powdered sugar, 1 pt. 
boiling water, whites of 4 eggs, juice of 3 lemons ; souk gelatine in 
Yo cup of cold water until soft ; add juice of 3 lemons and 2 cups 
powdered sugar; add 1 pt. boiling water; stir until dissolved; strain 
and stand aside until cold and partly stiff; now stand in a basin of 
crushed ice or ice water and beat continually until the whole mass 
is? as white as snow; beat the w^hites of 4 eggs to a stiff froth and 
add to the mixture ; beat continuously for five minutes ; turn into 
fancy moulds and set away to harden. Mrs. Fletcher Parker. 

SPONGE CREAM BOX. 

This is made from freshly baked sponge cake whicli should be 
cold before preparing for dessert; cut a square 2 in thick and suf- 
ficient in size to serve the number required ; hollow out the center, 
leaving a shell thick enough to keep its shape nicely; crumble the 
parts removed and mix it with walnut meats broken fine. Add 
enough whipped cream to make moist and put back into the shell ; 
cover top and sides with whipped cream and send to the table. Very 
simple and delicious. Individual cakes may be pre|)ared in same 
way if preferred. Mrs. J. AV. Kitchen. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

1 qt. milk, % box gelatine, 4 eggs beaten separately. 1 large cup 
sugar ; put gelatine in cold milk and let it dissolve on stove ; beat 
yolks and sugar together and add to milk; let it come to a boil; re- 
move from stove and add beaten whites; flavor with Royce's vanil 
ia ; pour into moulds and set in a cool place. 

Mrs. J. W. Greenland. 



152 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



PASTRY. 153 

PASTRY 

Mrs. C. J. Reese 

The first essential for making good pastry is to have all uten- 
sils as cold as possible. 

PUFF PASTE. 

5 cups flour even full (sifted), I14 cups cold water, 1 cup lard, 

1 heaping cup butter; mix riour and lard thoroughly with hands, 
then add water and mix wnth spoon ; roll out ; add bits of butter, us- 
ing half of it ; sprinkle with flour and roll up ; then roll out ; add 
rest of butter ; sprinkle with flour and roll up , then roll out thin ; 
sprinkle with flour and roll up ; put aside for about thirty minutes 
in a cool place: roll out thin; fold once and roll other way. 

JVIrs. G. P. Brockway. 

PLAIN PASTE. 

IM: cups pastry flour, % cup butter and lard, % lard to i/{{ but- 
ter, 1/4 teaspoon salt, ice w^ater; cut fat into flour and salt until it 
is the size of small peas ; add water to make a stiff dough ; roll in 
one direction only and on one side. Mabel Reese. 

PIE CRUST NO. 2. 

1 cup flour, y-2 cup butter or lard ; mix with a knife ; add ^/^ cup 
of water, very cold; then beat it with a knife 

Mrs. H. G. Eddy. 

PIE CRUST NO. 3. 

1 cofi'ee cup sifted flour, % cofl^ee cup lard, % teaspoon baking 
powder, suft'icient water (ice cold) to mix. Mrs. E. E. Allen. 

PIE CRUST NO. 4. 

2 coffee cups sifted flour, % cup of lard, sufficient ice cold water 
to make soft dough; roll thiu ; cover with small pieces of butter; 
fold over three times and roll ; repeat this twice for lower crust, and 
lour times for upper crust; do this quickly and in a cool place; just 
before putting in oven spread top of pie lightly with lard. Enough 
for two pies. Mrs. S. P. Schemmerhorn. 

APPLE PIE. 

Fill pie crust with nice tart apples, sliced very thin ; cover with 
sugar and small pieces of butter; season with cinnamon and nutmeg, 

2 tablespoons of cold water. Just before covering with crust, 
sprinkle lightly with flour. Mrs. S. 



154- 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



APPLE KUCHEN, 

Peel and quarter 6 good sized apples ; then steam until tender ; 
line a deep pie plate with paste and put in 1 layer of apples; pour 
over custard and bake. Mrs. C. J. Reese. 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE NO. 1. 

Line a pie plate with plain paste and bake it. Into a double 
boiler put 1 cup of milk ; mix together the yolks of 2 eggs, 2 table- 
spoons of sugar and i/o tablespoon of corn starch, and add them to 
the milk when boiling; stir over a fire until it thickens. When the 
paste is baked put into it 4 apples which have been cut in quarters 
and cooked until tender ; pour over these the custard ; make a me- 
ringue with the whites of 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons of granulated sugar; 
jilace this in spoonfuls on the pie and brown in the oven. 

Mrs. W. D. Todd. 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE 2. 

1 cup ground or grated sour apples, 3 eggs, 1 cup sweet milk, Vj 
cup sugar, butter the size of a hickory nut, nutmeg or cinnamon to 
taste; beat the sugar and eggs, (sa\e out the v/lntes oF l^/o eggs for 
the meringue); then add the milk and the butter in small pieces; 
then the cup of apple ; bake in one crust ; beat II/2 whites to a stiff 
froth ; add 1 teaspoon sugar and put over pie when baked ; then 
brown in the oven. Mrs. Z. T. Weaver. 

CHESS PIE. 

3 eggs, % cup of sugar, % cup of butter ; beat butter to a cream ; 
then add yolks and sugar beaten to a froth, with the flavoring; stir 
all together rapidly, and bake in nice crust ; when done spread witii 
Ihe beaten whites and 3 tablespoons of sugar and a little flavoring; 
return to oven and broAvn slightly; flavor custard with Royce's va- 
nilla, and frosting with lemon. This makes one pie. which should 
be served immediately. If not Avanted so rich add i/> cup of milk. 

Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

RIPE CURRANT PIE. 

Stir to a smooth paste 2 tablespoons water and 1 tablespoon 
flour; add yolks of 2 eggs and 1 cup sugar; mix well and add to 1 
cup of ripe currants mashed fine ; line an inch deep pie tin with 
any good crust ; pour in the mixture and bake slowly until the crust 
is well done and will slide around in tin ; then cover with the two 
stiffly beaten whites to which 2 tablespoons of sugar have been add- 
ed and return to oven until browned nicely. A very excellent pie. 

Mrs. Green. 



PASTRY. 



155 



COCOANUT PIE. 

1 pt. milk, 1/^ cocoanut, 1 tea(;up sugar, 3 eggs ; grate coeoanut ; 
mix with the yolks of the eggs and sugar; stir in the milk, filling the 
pan even full and bake; beat whites of eggs to a froth, stirring in 3 
tablespoons of pulverized sugar; pour over pie and bake to a light 
brown. If prepared cocoanut is used, 1 heaping teacup is required. 

Mrs. Joseph Hand. 
CUSTARD PIE. 
3 eggs beaten very light, 1 pt. boiling milk, 1 tablespoon melted 
butter, 2 heaping tablespoons of sugar: season with nutmeg to taste. 

Mrs. S. 
CREAM PIE. 

1 pi. milk. 3 eggs, small teacup of sugar, 2 tablespoons corn 
starch; beat yolks, sugar and starch together: let the milk come to 
a boil, and stir in the mixtiu-e, adding a teaspoon ol' butter and pinch 
of salt; bake crust; fill with the custard: bake; spread on whites 
(prex'iously beaten to a stiff froth with 2 tablespoons sugar) and 
brown in a quick oven. Mrs. Joseph Hand. 

CREAM PIE. 

3 tablespoons of flour mixed with 1 cup of sugar; add yolks of 
2 eggs ; milk to moisten and stir till smooth ; boil nearly 1 pt. of 
milk; set dish in hot water to prevent burning; stir in the eggs 
and flour and boil ; add a pinch of salt, and butter size of a hickory 
nut; flavor with Royce's lemon or vanilla; bake your crust and then 
fill with the cream ; beat the whites of 2 eggs to a stiff froth ; add a 
teaspoon of sugar; spread over the pie and brown in the oven. 

Mrs. A. E. Walker. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

% cup sugar, yolks of 3 eggs, small piece of butter, 1 teaspoon 
flour; wet with a little cold water, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 large table- 
spoons chocolate grated ; beat all together and cook until done ; flav- 
or with Royce's vanilla; bake crust and fill with the mixture; beat 
the whites of 3 eggs to a stiff froth ; add 1 tablespoon sugar ; spread 
over pie and brown in oven. Mrs. J. W. Crawford. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE . 

1 cup split cranberries, i/. cup seeded raisins, 1 cup sugar, 1 
cup hot water, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 teaspoon Roj'ce's vanilla; mix 
together and bake very slowly. . Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

RIPE CURRANT PIE. 

1 cup mashed currants, 1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons water, yolk 
of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon of flour; beat well together and bake in one 
crust; frost with whites of the eggs and sugar. Mrs. I. G. Lacy. 



156 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

DATE PIE. 

1 pound of datfis (molasses euT-ed) : cover with water and cook 
till read.y to sift: then add 3 esjes. 1 qt. milk and a pinch of cinna- 
mon and salt; bake with bottom crust. Household. 

DRIED APPLE PIE. 

Cook the apples very soft ; mash up very smooth ; beat in the 
yolks of 2 eggs ; sweeten and season to taste ; bake with one crust 
and frost with the beaten whites and 2 tablespoons of sugar. 

Household . 

HUCKLEBERRY PIE. 

To 1 pt. huckleberries, add 2 tablespoons of vinegar and % cup 
of sugar; sprinkle with flour; bake between 2 crusts. 

Mrs. J. W. Kitchen. 

LEMON PIE. 

1 coffee cup sugar beaten with the yolks of 2 eggs, a pinch of 
salt, 1 tablespoon butter, one cotfee cup boiling water; put on the 
stove in a pan ; add the grated rind of 1 lemon to the M^ater, and V/z 
tablespoons corn starch dissolved in a little water; let come to a 
boil ; then remove from stove ; add sugar, eggs and butter, previous- 
ly beaten together, and juice of 1 lemon. Have pie paste ready; 
pour this in and bake ; when done, remove from stove ; add the beat- 
en whites of 2 eggs, a little sugar ; spread over pie ; return to oven 
and slightly brown. Mrs.F. C. Darling. 

LEMON PIE. 

The juice and grated rind of 1 lemon. 1 cup of white sugar, th'j 
yolks of 3 eggs, 1 cup of milk. 3 tablespoons of sifted flour; bake till 
nearly done and then add a frosting made of the beaten whites of 
3 eggs, and 3 tablespoons of powdered sugar; return to oven an-l 
slightly brown. Mrs. Nesmith. 

LEMON PIE. 

1 cup sugar, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon butter, l^ cups 
water, pinch of salt, 1 lemon, 2 tablespoons corn starch dissolved in 
a little water; grate the rind of the lemon into water 
find Iv'-'t .••(■me 1(1 ti l^oil . juM Ihe cnni--;!;) veh and let it 
thicken; remove from the stove; beat yolks of eggs, sugar, butter, 
jniee of lemon and salt together and add to the first mixture; let 
all come to a boil together; have large pie crust baked previously 
and fill M'ith the above; spread over this the whites of eggs beaten 
with 2 tablespoons sugar; brown slightly in oven. 

IMrs. J. Gleave. 



PASTRY. 15^" 

LEMON PIE. 

1 lemon, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup water, 2 eggs, reserving one of the 
whites, 1 tablespoon flour; grate the lemon; beat the eggs, sugar 
and flour together; add the lemon and water; put the mixture over 
boiling water until sufficiently cooked; bake the crust of the pie 
and then fill in the mixture; beat the remaining white to a froth; 
add 2 tablespoons of sugar; spread over the pie and brown slightly. 

Mrs. C. A. Bettes. 

LEMON PIE. 

1 lemon, 2 or 3 eggs separated, 1 cup boiling water, ] cup 
(scant) sugar. 1 tablespoon butter, and 2 large tablespoons flour; 
beat yolks and grated rind and juice of lemon together; mix sugar, 
butter and flour thoroughly; pour on the boiling water and dissolve; 
add eggs and lemon ; beat whites of eggs to stiff froth and stir into 
mixture; line deep pan with rich crust; pour all into it and bake 
in a moderately hot oven. Mrs. J. AV. Dunkle. 

LEMON CREAM PIE. 

1 cup sugar. ] tablespoon butter, 2 eggs, juice and grated rind 
of 1 lemon. 1 cup boiling water. 1 tablespoon corn starch, dissolved 
in cold water; stir corn starch into boiling water; add butter and 
sugar well beaten together; when cool add lemon and the beaten 
yolks of the eggs ; bake in an open crust and when done spread over 
the top the beaten Avhites of 2 eggs sweetened ; then brown in oven. 
, Lora E. Alden. 

LEMON PIE WITH TWO CRUSTS. 

1 lemon : grate the whole lemon, 1 cup sugar, butter size of 
walnut. 1 egg. 1 tablespoon flour, 14 cup raisins chopped ; beat all 
together thoroughly; pour over it 1 cup boiling water just before it 
is put in crust; bake immediately. Mrs. E. R. Pierce. 

MAPLE CUSTARD PIE. 

1 pt. cream or milk. ] cup new maple sugar, yolks of 8 eggs, 
pinch of salt; beat sugar and eggs together; add cream or milk; 
line pie plate with good rich paste ; fill Avith mixture and bake in 
quick oven. Fredonia C. B. 

POOR MAN'S MINCE MEAT. 

1 peck green tomatoes, (peeled and chopped), 4 ]u)unds granu- 
lated sugar, 2 pounds raisins chopped, 2 tablespoons cinnamon. 1 
tablespoon cloves, 1 cup vinegar; cook two hours before adding 
sugar, spices and raisins; then cook two hours more. 

JamestoAvn C. B. 



158 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

MINCE MEAT, 

For a gallon of mince meat use % chopped meat, (salted when 
boiling), and % chopped apples, 1 pt. molasses, 2 cups good vine- 
gar, 1/2 cup of butter or 1 cup chopped suet, 1 tablespoon allspice, 
1% tablespoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves and a teaspoon salt. 
To make a mince pie, line a tin with rich crust and fill with above 
adding raisins, sugar and dots of butter in quantities to suit the 
taste; cover with crust and bake in slow oven about ^/^ hour. 

Mrs. A. Cook. 

MINCE MEAT NO. II. 

2 pounds lean beef boiled ; when cold chop fine ; 1 pound of suet 
minced to a powder; 5 pounds juicy apples, pared and chopped, 4 
pounds seeded raisins, 2 pounds currants, washed and dried, i/o pound 
citron, chopped, 3 tablespoons cinnamon, 1 tablespoon cloves, 1 table- 
spoon cloves, 1 tablespoon allspice, 2 tablespoons mace, 1 grated nut- 
meg, 1 tablespoon fine salt, 3 pounds brown sugar, I/2 gallon boiled 
cider ; mix and heat through ; then seal in jars. Jelly, juice from 
spiced fruits, preserves, or plain fruit juices may be added and will 
add to flavor. Kate Winger. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

1 cup crackers rolled fine, 1 cup hot water, i/o cup vinegar, 1 
cup molasses, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup currants, 1 cup raisins, spice to 
taste; measure with a teacup. Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

ORANGE CREAM PIE. 

Beat thoroughly the yolks of 2 eggs with I/2 cup of sugar; add 
1 large tablespoon flour, 1 small tablespoon corn starch, dissolved in 
milk; pour into 1 pt. boiling milk and let cook about three minutes; 
flavor with Royce's extract of orange and pour into a baked crust; 
beat the whites to a stiff froth; add I/4 cup of sugar; flavor with 
orange extract; s])read on top; put in oven and slightl;/ brown. 

Mrs. John Thomas. 

PEACH KUCHEN. 

Make the crust the same as for bisenit, and line the bottom of 
a deep pie tin about i/o inch thick; quarter the peaches and cover 
bottom of tin ; then sweeten and put in several pieces of butter ; 
sprinkle with cinnamon and bake without upper crust ; serve with 
cream. Mrs. D. D. Reed. 

PEACH PIE. 

Rub, but do not pare the peaches ; put them into a stew pan 
with sugar to the taste and water enough to cover them; boil till 



PASTRY. 159 

they are soft ; lay them in a pudding dish ; pour over the water in 
which they were boiled; cover with a rich pie crust an inch thick 
and bake. Mrs. L. D. Wetrnore. 

PIEPLANT PIE. 

Mix Yo teacup of sugar and 1 heaping teaspoon of flour togeth- 
er; sprinkle over the bottom crust; then add the pieplant cut up 
fine; sprinkle over this another half teacup of sugar and 1 heaping 
teaspoon of flour; bake fully % of an hour in a slow oven. 

Mrs. T. W. McNett. 

CREAM PIEPLANT PIE . 

1 cup cream, 1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon flour and enough pie- 
plant to cover bottom of dish ; cut up pieplant and add Yi teaspoon 
of soda and pour on boiling water; let stand on range a few min- 
utes; then drain and put in the bottom of a well lined pie plate; 
then add cream ; then sugar and last the flour ; cut top crust a little 
larger than bottom of pie plate and place over top without pinching 
down. F. C. B. 

POTATO PIE. 

% cup of grated raw potato, 1 pt. sweet milk ; let milk boil and 
stir in potato; when cool add 2 well beaten eggs, K2 cu]) sugar, a 
pinch of salt and tablespoon of butter; flavor to taste; bake with- 
out upper crust. Mrs. T. W. McNett. 

PUMPKIN PIE NO. 1. 

1 egg. 1 tablespoon flour; beat thoroughly together, 1 cup sugar, 
2 large tablespoons pumpkin, 1 small teaspoon ginger, ^/o teaspooa 
cinanmon. 1 tablespoon melted butter, pinch of salt and new milk 
to fill a quart bowl with the other ingredients ; put in a common size 
pan; bake very slowly. Mrs. J. E. Wheeler. 

PUMPKIN PIE NO. 2. 

1 well beaten egg, y^ cup sugar, 2 heaping tablespoons pumpkin, 
V2 pt. rich milk, (a little cream will improve it), a little salt, butter 
the size of a hickory nut and season with cinnamon or nutmeg and 
ginger; bake with under crust in hot oven. 

Mrs. Dwighi Cowan. 

PUMPKIN PIE NO. 3. 

1 cup pumpkin, 1 cup sugar, 1 pt. milk, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon flour, 
1 teaspoon ginger, pinch of salt and nutmeg; mix flour, spices and 
sugar; then pumpkin and egg; bake with one crust. 

Aresta Beaty. 



160 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

PRUNE PIE. 

Soak 1 pound of prunes over night ; cook and remove pits ; then 
beat fine and sw^eeten to taste ; beat the whites of three eggs stiff 
and then beat all together: line a pie plate with a rich crust and 
fill with mixture ; strap with pastry and bake ; when cool serve with 
whipped cream. Mrs. J. Bourquin, .Mrs. Sill. 

PINEAPPLE PIE. 

Pastry : — 1 cup flour and Vi t-iip butter ; chop together until but- 
ter is in pieces size of peas ; use enough ice water to make dough 
hang together in crumbs ; handle with a fork ; place mixture on 
board and press together with rolling pin; fold in three and press 
out again ; repeat this and then roll to the size of your pan. Tins 
will be enough for two small pies ; cover your pan ; prick well with 
SI fork and bake ; fill with fresh or canned pineapple . If too juicy 
thicken with cornstarch and add a spoon butter before putting in 
crust "When cold, whip y^ cup of cream stiff; sweeten and cover 
the pie. i\Irs. J. R. Drum. 

RED RASPBERRY PIE 

1 pt. berries, 1 cup sugar, 2 tnliles])ooiis Hour and 1 teaspoon 
butter; use any rich crust; line your pie plate; sprinkle half th.^ 
sugar and flour in bottom ; put in berries and the other half on top, 
dotting on butter last thing; put on top crust and bake. All berry 
pies can be made in the same way. Mrs. C J. Reese. 

RICE PIE. 

2 eggs, 1 cup cooked rice, 5 tablespoons sugar. 1 pt. milk ; flavor 
Avith lemon; put in crust and bake. Mrs. E. R. Pierce. 

RAISIN PIE. 

1 cup chopped raisins. 1 large lemon grated, 1 cup of sugar, Vl* 
cup molasses, i/j cup water; stir in 1 large tablespoon flour, 1 soda 
cracker rolled : boil until it thickens ; then add Y^ cup of nuts : bake 
with 2 crusts like mince pie. Mrs. L. T. Parmlee. 

STRAWBERRY PIE . 

1 qt. berries, 2 small stalks of rhubarb, IVo cups sugar. 3 table- 
spoons flour; mix dry ingredients in a bowl; fill pie crust; put bits 
of butter on top; cover and bake. Miss L. Alden. 

.QNOW VIV. 

Make a smooth paste of 2 tablespoons of cornstarch and 3 
tablespoons of cold water; then pour in this paste 1 pt. of boiling 
water and 1 cup sugar; boil well; add the white of 1 egg, beaten to 



PASTRY. I6i 

a froth, and a pinch of salt; add whipped white of 1 egg, into 
which has been stirred 1 tablespoon of sugar; spread on top, and put 
in oven to brown; flavor to taste. F. C. B. 

SQUASH PIE. 

Wash and dry the squash ; cut in slices and steam until tender 
all through; rub through colander. For 1 pie take 3 large table- 
spoons of squash; season to taste with sugar, ginger, cinnamon, aU 
spice, nutmeg and salt, and 1 egg which is to be beaten to a cream 
with the sugar, butter size of a walnut; add enough hot milk to fill 
the pie plate and keep the mixture hot over boiling water until 
ready to bake; bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. M. W. Jamieson. 

WASHINGTON CREAM PIE. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk. 1 tablespoon butter. 1 egg, 2V2 
cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder; flavor with Royce's vanilla; 
bake in two layers or in one layer and split. 

CREAM FOR FILLING 

1 pt. milk ; let come to a boil ; add i/j cup sugar, 2 eggs and but- 
ter the size of a walnut; flavor with Royce's vanilla and servo wnth 
whipped cream. Mrs. A. B. Kehr. 

BANBURY TARTS. 

1 pound raisins, 1/4 pound citron. 4 figs chopped fine, juice and 
grated rind of 1 lemon, 1 cup sugar, 3 rolled crackers, 3 tablespoons 
water : just heat through but do not cook ; makes about 3 dozen ; 
cut good pastT^A' Avith round cutter and add 1 tablespoon filling. 

Boston Cooking School. 

BANBURY TARTS. 

1 cup raisins, 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, 1 cracker, juice and grated 
rind 1 lemon; stone and chop raisins; add sugar, egg slightly beat- 
en ; cracker finely rolled, and lemon juice and rind ; roll pastry % 
inch thick, and cut pieces 3y2 inches long by 3 inches wide ; put 2 
teaspoons of the mixture on each piece ; moisten edge with cold 
Avater half way round; fold over; press edges together wnth three- 
tined tork, first dipped in flour; bake twenty minutes in slow oven. 

Mrs. W. A. Talbott. 

ORANGE TARTS. 

Line gem pans with good pastry; bake and fill with a spoon of 
orange marmalade or conserve; cover with meringue, made of 
whites of eorcrs and 1 tablespoon powdered sugar to each egg; put in 
oven until light brown. Raspberry or other jams can be substituted 
for marmalade. F. C. B. 



162 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



Layer Cakes, Fillings and Frostings 

Mrs. William Hammond 

To insure success in the making of any kind of cake, use none 
but the best ingredients; then exercise great care and judgment in 
the mixing and baking. 

The essentials for good cake are fresh eggs, fine granulated 
sugar, pastry flour and best butter. 

To mix butter cakes, measure dry ingredients and mix and sift 
baking powder and spices, if used, with the flour. Break each egg 
separately, thus avoiding loss should a stale egg chance to be found 
among the number, separating the whites from yolks, if the rule so 
specifies. 

Measure butter, then liquid. Place the butter which should be 
soft, but not melted, together with the sugar in an earthen bowl; 
rub together until creamy, add yolks of eggs or whole eggs, beaten 
until light, liquid, and flour mixed and sifted with baking powder. 
When whites alone are used fold into the batter the last thing be- 
fore baking. 

Cake can be made fine grained only by long beating. Do not 
stir, but beat thoroughly, bringing the batter up from the bottom 
of the dish at every stroke, thus driving the air into the cells of 
the batter. Unskilled mixing, too rapid or unequal baking, or a 
sudden decrease in heat before it is quite done, will cause streaks 
in the cake. Fruit, when added to a cake, is usually floured to pre- 
vent settling to the bottom. Raisins should be seeded, then cut with 
scissors, rather than chopped. 

Grease the pans with melted butter, lining the bottom with thin 
paper, taking care that it does not project over the sides. In 
filling^ the pans, have the mixture come well to the corners and sides 
of the pans, so that when the cake is baked it will be perfectly flat 
on top. The baking of cake is quite as important a feature as mix- 
ing. • Many a well mixed cake has been spoiled in the baking. Ex- 
perience alone can teach one what the temperature of the oven 
should be for the different cakes. Cake should be watched closely 
while in the oven, opening and shutting the door carefully. Do not 
move the cake in the oven unless positively necessary, then do it 
gently. When done cake shrinks from the pan, and in most cases 
this is sufficient test, but if in doubt try with a broom splint and 
if the dough does not adhere, it is done. When removed from the 
oven, allow it to stand five minutes; then invert the pan on a board 
covered with fibre paper, and the cake will fall out. If the cake is 
inclined to stick to the sides, loosen with a knife before inverting. 
Allow the cake to cool before icing. Mrs. Hammond. 



LAYER CAKES, FILLINGS AND FROSTINGS. 165 



ALMOND CAKE AND LADY BALTIMORE. 

2 cups granulated sugar, % cup butter, 1 cup ?nilk, 2% cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla, whites 
oi' 8 eggs; bake in two layers. For filling, pour over the beaten 
whites of 2 eggs a syrup made of 2 cups granulated sugar, 1 cup 
water, cooked until it threads; beat this until nearly cold when add 
% pound blanched almonds, chopped fine; flavor with Rovce's al- 
mond extract. Mrs. Wm. Hammond. 

If used with the following filling would make an excellent 
Lady Baltimore Cake. Filling— Boil 3 cups of granulated sugar 
with a gill of water until a drop hanging from the tip of a spoon 
threads in the air ; pour while hot over the whites of 3 eggs whipped 
to a standing froth; Avhip until yon have a thick cream and stir 
in gradually a cup each of seeded and minced raisins and chopped 
pecans, with 5 figs that have been soaked soft in lukewarm water, 
then wiped dry and minced. : 

A GOOD COMMON LAYER CAKE. 

3 eggs, 1 tablespoon butter, ly^ cups sugar, 2 cups flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder sifted with the flour. 1/2 cup rich milk; flavor 
to taste with Royce's extracts and bake in jelly tins. 

Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar, % cup butter, 3 tablespoons sour milk or 
cream, 3 tablespoons strong coffee (liquid), yolks of 3 eggs and 
whites of 2, 1 teacup of blackberry jam, 2 teacups flour, 1 teaspoon 
soda, sifted in flour, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves, V-J 
nutmeg grated, 1 teaspoon Royce's lemon extract; stir all together; 
bake in 8 layers ; put together with boiled frosting. Mrs. Salver. 

BLACK AND WHITE CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, Vo cup butter, i/^ cup sweet milk, whites of 3 eggs. 
1 cup flour, 1/2 cup cornstarch, Iteaspoon baking powder. Black 
Part — 1 cup of brown sugar, Vo cup butter, 1/2 cuj) sour milk, 1 
teaspoon soda, l^^ cups flour, Vo cup raisins, y^ cup nuts, yolks of 
3 eggs, 1 teaspoon molasses, all kinds spices; either nut or fig filling 
is nice between black and white cake. Mrs. C. H. Meacham. 

OHOnOT.ATF. CAKF. NQ 1 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cap sour milk, i/^ teaspoon soda 
dissolved in the milk, 4 eggs, S^/o cups flour, 3 teaspoons of baking 
powder; dissolve 1/4 cake chocolate (or less) and add to middle 
layer. For frosting — ^Whites of 3 eggs, 2 cups of confectioner's 
sugar, Yj cake grnted chocolate and Royces' vanilla t^ taste. 

Mrs. I. G. Lacy. 



164 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



CHOCOLATE CAKE NO. II. 

1 cup brown sugar, % cake grated chocolate, i/^ cup sweet 
milk ; put all together and boil until as thick as custard. When cold, 
add 1 teaspoon of Royce's vanilla, 1 cup brown sugar, 14 cup but- 
ter, 1/2 cup sweet milk, 3 eggs, 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon soda; bake 
in 2 layers with chocolate filling; put 3 ounces of chocolate into a 
double boiler; sink it down into the hot water. When the choco- 
late melts, add % cup of milk, 1/0, cup sugar. AVhen smooth, add 
yolk of 1 egg, and a teaspoon of vanilla; cool and put between lay- 
ers. Agnes Robertson. 

CREAM CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, butter size of an egg, 2 eggs, 1 heaping cup flour, 

1 teaspoon cream tartar, i/o teaspoon soda, Y^ cup milk ; bake in 2 
layers . 

Cream for Filling — y^ pt. milk, ^/^ cup sugar, ^4 cup flour, I 
egg; beat sugar, egg and flour together; heat milk over steam or 
water. When scalding hot, stir in other ingredients; flavor with 
Royce's vanilla or lemon and spread between cake when cold. 

Mrs. J. B. Allen. 

CREAM CAKE SIMPLE. 

3 eggs, 11/2 cups flour, 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 

2 tablespoons water; bake in 2 cakes and split while warm. 

Cream — 1 egg, 1 pt. milk, Vo cup sugar, 2 teaspoons corn 
starch, butter size of an egg, 14 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; let cool 
and put between cakes. Miss Jennie Halliday. 

A GOOD CHEAP LAYER CAKE. 

1 egg and yolk of another, 1 cup sugar, butter size of an egg, 1 
cup sweet milk, 2y2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking po-^A'der, flavor to 
taste; bake in layers. Apple cream for above. Pare and grate 2 
medium sized sour apples ; beat white of egg and 1 small cup gran- 
ulated sugar together; add grated apple and beat until frothy and 
light — will not run if beaten long enough; flavor with Royce's ex- 
tract of vanilla; put between layers and cover top of cake. Very 
nice if eaten while fresh. Mrs. J. Gleave. 

DELICATE CAKE NO. 1. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 4 cups sifted 
flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, whites of 8 eggs ; bake either in 
solid or layer cake; flavor with Royce's vanilla, if in layers slice 
candied pineapple fine and mix in the frosting for between the 
layers. Mrs. AV. D. McLaren. 



LAYER CAKES, FILLINGS AND FROSTINGS. 165 

DELICATE CAKE NO. 2. 

2 cups pulverized sugar creamed with a good i/^ cup butter, % 
cup sweet milk, 3 scant cups flour measured after sifting, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder. !/■ teaspoon Royce's almond flavor, and lastly 
the whites of 6 eggs well beaten. Mrs. F. K. Russell. 

DEVIL'S FOOD. 

2 cups sugar and 1 cup butter creamed, yolks of 5 eggs well 
beaten, 1 cup sour milk, 1 scant teaspoon soda in 1 ta])lespoon boil- 
ing water, i/o cake of grated chocolate, 2^/2 scant cups flour, 1 heap- 
ing teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla, whites of 
f) eggs beaten stiff. 

Icing — % cake grated chocolate, 1 cup granulated sugar, I/2 
cup milk, butter size of hickory nut, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; 
boil until it thickens. Mrs, W. J. Richards. 

DEVIL'S FOOD. 

Part 1. — 1 cup sugar, 1 cup grated chocolate, 1/0 cup sweet milk, 
let come to a boil. Part 2. — 1 cup sugar, i/o cup butter, 3 eggs, I/2 
(.up sweet milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 cups flour; measure ingredients 
with a coffee cup ; mix the two parts together ; bake in layers and 
put together with icing. Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 

CHEAP DEVIL'S FOOD. 

3 squares of chocolate, melted, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 
granulated, 1 tablespoon^ butter ; mix the above well together ; then 
add 1 cup sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla, 1 
rounded cup of flour; bake in 2 layers or as a solid cake. Use any 
icing preferred . Mrs . S . E . Walker . 

DANDY CAKE. 

Vj oup batter, 2 cups sugar (scant), % cup milk. 2 cups flour, 
whites of 6 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder; sift flour four times; 
sift sugar three times. 

Icing — 8 ounces chocolate, l^/^ cups powdered sugar. 4 table- 
spoons corn starch, 2 cups milk. When done cooking add table- 
spoon boiling water. Mrs. Parmlee. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

Beat to a cream % cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup rich milk; 
sift 2 large teaspoons baking powder twice with 2 cups pastry flour, 
and 1 small cup corn starch; add to first mixture, and slowly fold 
in the whites of 7 eggs, beaten stiff; bake in 2 layers. 

For Filling — 1 pt. cream whipped stiff, to which has been added 
1 tablespoon Chalmer's gelatine soaked 2 hours in a tablespoon cold 



166 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



water and dissolved in a tablespoon boiling water; sweeten and 
flavor with Royce's extract; spread between layers and frost the 
top of the cake. . Mrs. M. Mead. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

2 cups granulated sugar, % cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, whites 
of 8 eggs, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder; bake in layers. 

Frosting — 2 cups white sugar, % cup water, whites of 3 eggs 
beaten stiff; let sugar and water boil until it forms a string when 
dropped from the spoon; pour very slowly into the whites of the 
eggs, beating constantly; flavor with Royce's vanilla. 

Mrs. W. A. Rankin. 

ISABELL CAKE. 

3 eggs, whites only, 2 scant cups granulated sugar, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 3 cups flour, 2 large tablespoons butter, 2 heaping teaspoons 
baking powder. When cake is mixed divide into 3 parts; bake 1 
part white ; add 1 square melted chocolate to second part, and color 
the third with a few drops of red fruit coloring to make it pink; 
cover dark layer with white icing ; then use white layer and icing ; 
then the pink one and cover the whole with icing. 

Mrs. F. M. Downing. 

LEMON SPONGE. 

1 pound granulated sugar, Vi: pound flour, 8 eggs, juice and 
grated rind of 1 lemon, 2 teaspoons baking powder; bake in 2 thick, 
oblong layers, frosting each one with lemon juice thickened with 
l>ulverized sugar. After frosting under layer, spread with a cus- 
tard made as follows : % cup milk, 1 egg, i^ teaspoon corn starch or 
flour; sweeten, and flavor with Royce's vanilla. 

Mrs. C. N. Payne, Titusville. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, I/2 cup sweet milk, 21/2 cups flour, 5 
eggs, 2 teaspoons of baking powder. 

Jelly for Cake : — 1 egg, 3 tablespoons melted butter, 1 coffee cup 
sugar, the grated rind and juice of 2 lemons ; cook in a dish over 
water until of the right consistency. Mrs. W. V. Hazeltine. 

LAYER CAKE. 

11/0 cups sugar, % cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 4 eggs, (the 
whites only), 21/0 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder sifted with 
flour, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla, and bake in layers. 

Mrs. J. W. Kitchen. 



LAYER CAKES, FILLINGS AND FROSTINGS. \6l 



LIGHT LAYER CAKE. 

Cream 1/5 cup butter; add 1 cup sugar gradually; then the well 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs, and alternately V- euj) milk and \Yi cups 
iiour sifted with 2 level teaspoons baking powder, whites of 2 eggs 
beaten dry, Mrs. Honor Tarndee. 

LAYER CAKE WITH SOUR CREAM FILLING. 

1 eup sugar, 2 eggs, -1 tablespoons melted butter, big Vii cup 
milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder sifted in 2 cups flour, ] teaspoon 
lioyee's vanilla. 

Filling: — 1 small cup gour cream whipped and sweetened, % cup 
chopped raisins, % cup chopped nuts. The cream can be quite sour 
if it is nol bitter. This recipe makes two lavers. 

Mrs. E. R. Allen. 

MAPLE SUGAR CAKE. 

IV-i cups of granulated sugar. I/2 cup butter, whites of 6 eggs 
or 3 whole ones, % cup of sweet milk, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 2 
heaping cups flour; bake in 3 layers; put together with boiled frost- 
ing, using maple sugar in place of granulated. Take the same 
cpiantity of maple sugar . ]\Irs . D . L . Gerould . 

ORANGE CAKE. 

I/4 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, i/o cup milk, 1% cups flour, 
21/4 teaspoons baking powder; cream the butter; add sugar gradual- 
ly; eggs well beaten and milk; then add flour mixed and sifted with 
baking opwder ; bake in a dripping pan ; cut in halves ; spread I/2 
with orange filling and cover top layer with frosting flavored with 
Royce's orange. 

Filling: — 1/2 cup sugar. 2^/2 tablespoons flour, grated rind Vj 
orange, 1^4 cup orange juice, 14 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 e^^ slight- 
ly beaten, 1 teaspoon butter; mix ingredients in order given; cook 
ten minutes in double boiler, stirring constantly ; cool before spread- 
ing. Boston Cooking School. 

PRUNE ALMOND CAKE. 

Y2 cuj) l)utter. 1 cup sugar, I'o cup milk, ^L' cup corn starch, 1 
cup flour. 21/4 teaspoons baking powder, whites of 3 eggs. 14 tea- 
spoon Royce's almond extract; bake in dripping pan, and cut in 
Iwo crosswise; make enough boiled frosting for two layers; to ^/-^ of 
it add 8 soft prunes stoned and cut in pieces, and I/4. cup aliponds 
blanched and cut in pieces. Boston Cooking School. 

ROLLED JELLY CAKE. 

3 eggs, j'-olks and whites beaten sei)arately, '1 cup sugar, 1 cup 
iiour, pinch of salt, 1 teaspoon baking powder sifted in flour, 14 cup 



168 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

boiling water, added last ; spread thin on greased di-ipper ; when 
baked spread thick with jelly and roll while hot. 

Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

11/2 cups sugar, I/2 cup butter, 21/0 cups of flour, i/o cup sweet 
milk, whites 4 eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder; take 2 tablespoons 
of the above mixture and add a little soda, i/o cup of chopped rais- 
ins, a few currants, % cup flour, l^ cup molasses ; bake in three lay- 
ers. Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

TILDEN CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 of pulverized sugar, 1 of sweet milk, 3 of flour, 
% cup of corn starch, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 of 
Royce's lemon extract. Mrs. Wm. Hammond. 

WHITE CAKE 1. 

Cream 1 cup sugar, I/4 cup butter ; add 1/2, cup sweet milk ; then 
well beaten whites of 3 eggs, li/o cups flour, li/o teaspoons baking 
powder. Mrs. Honor S. Parmlee. 

WHITE CAKE 2. 

lYz cups sugar, i/^ cup butter, % cup milk, 3 teaspoons baking 
powder, 2 cups flour, whites of 5 eggs beaten and put in last. 

Mrs. Conarro. 

WHITE CAKE 3. 

1 cup sugar, i/o cup butter, i/o cup milk, li/o cups flour, after 
sifting once, 2 small teaspoons baking powder, whites of 4 eggs, 
whipped to a stiff froth and put in last, Royce's vanilla. 

Mrs. D. W. Ames. 

YELLOW CAKE. 

Yolks of 8 eggs, 1 cup sugar, i/> cup butter, 1/0 cup sweet milk, 
11/2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder; to be flavored with eith- 
er Royce's lemon or orange, baked in layers, and lemon filling or 
orange icing placed between them and on top . 

Lemon Filling — 1 cup sugar, whites of 2 eggs well beaten, iuiee 
and grated rind of a lemon; mix and boil until it thickens. 

Mrs. D. L. Gerould. 

FILLINGS 

CREAM FILLING. 

% cup sugar, % cup flour, i/s teaspoon salt, 2 eggs, 2 cups scald- 
ed milk, ] teaspoon Royce's vanilla or % teaspoon lemon extract; 



LAYER CAKES, FILLINGS AND FROSTINGS. 169 

mix dry ingredients ; add eggs slightly beaten and pour on gradual- 
ly scalded milk; cook fifteen minutes in double boiler, stirring .con- 
stantly until thickened, afterwards occasionally; cool slightly and 
flavor. Boston Cooking School. 

FRENCH CREAM FILLING. 

% cup thick cream, i/4 cup milk. % cup powdered sugar, white 
of 1 egg, V2 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; dilute cream with milk and 
beat until stitT, using Dover qs:^ beater; add sugar, white of egg 
beaten until stiff and vanilla. Boston Cooking School. 

CREAM FILLING. 

1 cup powdered or granulated sugar, Y^ cup hot water; let sim- 
mer; beat white of 1 egg and mix with the above. AVhen cold add 
V2 Pup chopped raisins, ^ cup chopped walnuts, 1 tablespoon grated 
cocoanut. Mrs. Lees. 

CREAM NUT FILLING. 

1 cup rich milk or cream, 3 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon corn 
starch ; let come to a boil ; stir in the yolks of 3 eggs ; cook in a 
double boiler; when cool add 1 cup nuts and flavoring. 

Mrs. W. R. Kopf. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

21/4, squares chocolate, 1 cup powdered sugar, 3 tablespoons 
milk, yolk of 1 egg, I/2 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; melt chocolate 
over hot water; add I/2 the sugar and milk; add remaining sugar 
and yolk of egg; cook in double boiler until it thickens, stirring 
constantly at first so that mixture may be smooth; cool slightly; 
flavor and spread. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM FILLING. 

Make cream filling, using a full cup of sugar instead of % cup; 
add 11/4 squares Baker's chocolate, which has been melted over hot 
water. Boston Cooking School. 

COCOANUT FILLING. 

Beat whites of 2 eggs on a platter until very stiff; add enough 
powdered sugar to spread; spread over cake; sprinkle thickly with 
fresh grated cocoanut ; use for layer cake, having filling between 
51 nd on top. 

FIG FILLING. 

V2 pound figs, finely chopped, % cup sugar. V;; t-up boiling 
water, 1 tablespoon lemon juice; mix ingredients in the order given 
c.nd cook in double boiler until thick enough to spread. 



l^-o THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



LEMON COCOANUT CREAM. 

Juice and grated rind 1 lemon, 1 cup powdered sugar, yolks 2 
eggs, 1 cup shredded cocoanut ; mix lemon juice and rind witli 
sugar and yolks of eggs slightly beaten ; cook ten minutes in double 
boiler, stirring constantly; add cocoanut; use when cool. 

MARSHM ALLOW FILLING 1. 

Put % cup sugar and i/4 cup milk in a sauce pan; heat slowlj' 
to boiling point without stirring and boil six minutes ; break i/4 
pound marshmallows in pieces and melt in double boiler; add 2 
tablespoons hot water and cook until mixture is smooth ; add hot 
syrup gradually, stirring constantly; beat until cool enough to 
spread. This may be used for both filling and frosting. 

Boston Cooking School. 

MARSHMALLOW FILLING 2. 

2 tablespoons of gelatine dissolved in 7 tablespoons of boiling 
water; stir in gradually 1 pound of confectioner's sugar and beat 
with a spoon i^, hour; flavor with Royce's vanilla; pour in a tin, 
size of your cake, and set away until the gelatine thickens ; put be- 
tAveen the two layers of cake. ]\Irs. A. W. Niekle. 

ORANGE FILLING 

1/^ cup sugar, 2i/2 tablespoons flour, grated rind \i] orange, 14 
cup orange juice, % tablespoon lemon juice. 1 egg, slightly beaten, 
1 teaspoon butter; mix ingredients in order given; cook ten min- 
utes in double boiler, stirring constantly; cool before spreading. 

PRUNE ALMOND FILLING 1 . 

To boiled frosting add Yj cup selected prunes, stoned and cut 
in pieces, and % cup almonds blanched and chopped. 

PISTACHIO PASTE. 

To Marshmallow Filling No. 1 add a few drops Royce's extract 
of almond, % cup pistachio nuts blanched and chopped and leaf 
green to color. B. C. S. 

NUT OR FRUIT FILLING. 

To Boiled Frosting No. 1 add chopped walnuts, almonds, hick- 
ory nuts, Brazil nuts, figs, dates, or raisins, separately or in any com- 
bination desired. 

STRAWBERRY FILLING. 

1 cup thick cream, % cup sugar, white of 1 egg, y^ cup of 
strawberries, Vi teaspoon Royce's vanilla; beat cream until stiff, 
using Dover beater ; add sugar, white of egg beaten until stift". 
strawberries mashed and vanilla. Boston Cooking School. 



LAYER CAKES, FILLINGS AND FROSTINGS. i^-i 



FROSTINGS 

BOILED FROSTING 1. 

1 flip g:ranulated sugar, white 1 egg, about i/o cup water; beat 
the egg to a stiff froth; boil the sugar and water until it "hairs" 
when the spoon is lifted, or if tested in cold water until it forms 
a soft ball in the water; pour slowly over the beaten egg, beating 
all the time; flavor; beat until eold. Miss Kopf. 

BOILED FROSTING NO. 2 

11/2 cups sugar to i^ cup water; boil until a small ball forms 
between the fingers when dropped in water, whites of 2 eggs beaten, 
stiff; add 14 teaspoon cream of tartar; pour the sugar over the eggs 
and beat until it does not run. Mrs. A. W. Nickle, 

BOILED FROSTING 3. 

21/2 cups sugar, whites of 3 eggs ; wet the sugar with water ; 
boil until it hairs when the spoon is lifted; have the eggs beaten 
very light; stir in the boiling sugar; beat until cold. If too stiff, 
put in a little milk; if too thin, a little powdered sugar. 

Mrs. S. P. Hall. 

CARAMEL FROSTING. 

2 cups light brown sugar, % cup sweet milk, butter the size of 
a walnut, 2 teaspoons Royce's vanilla; cook sugar, milk and but- 
ter until it grains and add vanilla before taking from the stove ; stir 
until creamy when it is ready to spread . K . W . 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING 1. 

8 ounces or 1 cake of chocolate, li/o cups pulverized sugar, 2 
tablespoons corn starch, 2 cups sweet milk; cook all together until 
thick: then add a little boiling w'ater to make it glossy. 

Mrs. Salyer, 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING 2. 

To boiled frosting No. 1 add 4 tablespoons grated chocolate, 
melted over steam. Mrs. Lees. 

MAPLE SUGAR FROSTING. 

2 pounds maple sugar, 1 cup water, whites of 2 eggs ; boil sugar 
and water until it forms a soft ball when dropped in cold water; 
pour into the beaten whites of the eggs and proceed as for boiled 
frosting. Mrs. Orr. 



1 2-2 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



LAYER CAKES, FILLINGS AND FROSTLXGS. i?5 



\14 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

LOAF CAKES 

Miss Mame Kopf 

ANGEL FOOD. 

Whites of 11 eggs, II/2 measures of granulated sugar, 1 rounded 
measure oi flour, 1 rounded teaspoon cream of tartar, 1 teaspoon 
Royee's vanilla; sift flour four times; measure; add cream of tar- 
tar; sift again and put back in sieve ready to put into cake: put a 
pinch of salt in the eggs and beat to a stiff froth ; add the sugar 
lightly; next the vanilla, and last the flour, very lightly; bake in an 
an^'el food pan aliout 70 minutes in a slow oven. When baked turn 
the pan upside down to cool. A small tin measuring cup that can 
be obtained with the pan is used. Miss Kopf. 

ANGEL COCOANUT CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der, 1/2 cup milk, whites 8 eggs ; spread the top with icing then with 
the grated cocoanut . Mrs . S . H . Davis . 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

1 whole egg and yolk of another, iy2 cups brown sugar, i/o cup 
butter, 1 cup apple sauce as sweetened for table, 1 teaspoon cinna- 
mon, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon soda, II/2 to 2 cups flour; cream 
butter: add sugar gradually and eggs beaten very light; mix thor- 
oughly ; then add apple sauce, cinnamon, cloves and soda sifted with 
the flour ; beat all together and bake as a loaf cake . Ice with 
boiled icing to which chopped raisins may be added as desired. 

Mrs. Hue, Miss Lucile Partridge. 

ARCHANGEL CAKE. 

Beat well together 1 cup sugar and 1 cup butter. When sugar 
and butter are creamed sufficiently, beat in 2 cups of flour sifted six 
times. The last time sift with one teaspoon of baking powder. 
Lastly stir in the well beaten whites of 8 eggs ; flavor. 

Mrs. S. T. Neill. 

BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. 

3 eggs, 2 whites saved for frosting, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup black- 
berry jam, Y2 cup butter, 3 tablespoons sour cream, 1 teaspoon each 
of soda, cinnamon and cloves, 2 cups flour. Mrs. W. M. Bashline. 



LOAF CAKES. \^^ 



BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE . 

T cup sugar (brown), 14 cup butter, y^^, cup sour milk, 1 cup 
blackberry jam, 3 eggs, leaving out the whites of 2 for frosting, 2i/j. 
cups of flour, 1 teaspoon soda ; spices to suit the taste . 

Miss Aresta Beatty. 

BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup jam, 1 cup raisins, 1/2 
cup currants, 3 tablespoons of sour milk, i/o teaspoon soda in milk, 
a little cinnamon and nutmeg, 2i/> cups flour. F. B. S. 

BLACK CAP CAKE. 

1 cup butter creamed, with II/2 cups sugar, 2 tablespoons molas- 
ses, 2 eggs, 14 cup sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2^ cups flour, I/2 tea- 
spoon of cinnamon and cloves together, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup 
walnuts broken or chopped; bake in a loaf. Mrs. C. JI. Smith. 

CLOVE CAKE . 

1 good cup brown sugar, 1 cup butter, i/^ cup milk, 1 cup chopped 
raisins, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon baking soda dissolved 
in hot water; put the raisins in the last thing before Ihe flour; then 
add 2 cups flour with 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Mrs. W. C. Watson. 

CLOVE CAKE . 

1 cup sugar, 1/0 c^^P butter, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup sour milk, 3 
cups flour, 1 cup chopped raisins, 2 teaspoons cloves, 1 teaspoon 
soda, 2 eggs; add any kind of fruit. 

Mrs. M. Hazeltine. 

CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE . 

1/2 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 2 eggs, 1/0 cup coffee, 14 cup milk, 
21/. cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 2 squares of melted choc- 
olate, 2 teaspoons Royce's vanilla; cream butter with fork; add 
sugar and cream again ; then the yolks of the eggs. cofPee, milk and 
Boyce's vanilla; sift flour with baking powder, and add to other in- 
gredients; then melted chocolate; then whites of egg^ beaten stif?; 
bake in moderate oven. Mrs. E. E. Allen. 

SPICED CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

4 eggs; save the whites of two Por frosting; 2 cups sugar. 1/; cup 
butter, 1 cup sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 cups flour, V> teaspoon 
cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon cloves. 14 cake melted chocolate. 

Mrs. B., Mrs. Sill. 



\Z6 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



SCOTCH CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

11/2 cups sugar, % cup butter. 2 eggs, i/o cup sour milk, l^ cup 
boiling water, 2 cups flour, sifted five or six times, 1 teaspoon Royce's 
vanilla, 2 squares chocolate, 1 teaspoon soda; dissolve chocolate in 
the boiling water and stir in last. Mrs. D. H. Siggins. 

CREAM ALMOND CAKE . 

y^ cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1% cups flour, 4 level teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, i/o cup milk, whites of 4 eggs, i/o teaspoon Royce's al- 
mond extract ; cream the butter ; add the sugar gradually ; sift flour 
and baking powder and add to the mixture, alternating it with the 
milk; fold in beaten eggs and flavoring; bake in a loaf 45 minutes 
in a moderate oven. 

SOUR CREAM CAKE . 

2 cups sugar, % cup butter, 3 eggs, 1 cup sour cream, 3 cups 
sifted flour, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in hot w^ater, 1 teaspoon bak- 
ing powder; cream butter and sugar; beat eggs light and add a lit- 
tle salt and flavor to taste; then the cream to which has been added 
the soda dissolved in 1 tablespoon of hot water; then the flour and 
baking powder beaten well into the cake. This can be baked in a 
loaf or two layers, using any kind of filling or icing. 

Mrs. Rosamond D. Rogers. 

SOUR CREAM CAKE . 

1 cup sour cream, li/o cups brown sugar, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 eg^, 
21/2 cups flour, spices to taste. Fruit may be added if liked, i/o, cup 
raisins, i/> cup shredded citron. Mrs. Salyer. 

DEVIL'S FOOD. 

% cake Baker's chocolate dissolved in 1 cup boiling water put in 
last thing before putting in oven. 2 cups sugar, i/o cup butter, i/o cup 
sour milk, 2 large cups flour, 2 eggs, 1 rounded teaspoon baking pow- 
der added to flour, 1 level teaspoon soda added to milk ; beat whites 
of eggs and put in just before chocolate; flavor with Royce's vanilla. 

J. Mabel Siggins. 
DEVIL'S FOOD. 

2 cups granulated sugar, ^4 cup butter, h eggs, 1 cup sour milk, 
1 teaspoon soda, 3 cups flour, i^ cake chocolate, grated, 1 teaspoon 
Royce's e>'tract vanilla. Mrs. Rose Messncr. 

DEVIL'S FOOD. 

First part — 1 cup brown sugar^ '/{_ cup butter, I/2 cup sweet milk, 
2% cup flour, 1 teasp(>on soda. Second Part. — 1 cup brown sugar, 
1 cup grated chocolate, % cup sweet milk, yolk of 1 egg; cook un- 
til thick ; mix with first part and bake in loaf. 



LOAF CAKES. \xi 



DEVIL'S FOOD. 

2 Clips sugar, V- cup butter, y^ cup sour milk, 2 ei^ps ; mix to- 
gether; 1/4 cake chocolate grated, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup boiling 
water; mix together; add 2 cups tiour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 
teaspoon Royce's vanilla. Mrs. F. II. Gruninger. 

DELICATE CAKE (WHITE ) 

3 cups sifted Mt*ur, 1 ' ^ cups sugar, 7 eggs, whites only. 1 teacup 
sweet milk, 2 tablespoons butter. 2 teaspoons baking poAvder. 1 tea- 
spoon Royce's \anilia; beat ])utter and sugar to a cream; add milk 
and eggs Avell beaten: then flavoring; mix with this veiy shnvly. the 
flour in wliicli leaking powder has been sifted; bake in quick oven. 

Mrs. W. A. Hall, I\Irs. W. Watson. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 21A cui)s flour, whites of 7 eggs, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 pound raisins, 1 jiound figs, 1 pound 
dates, 1 pound almonds, 14 pound citron. Nora B. Davis. 

PLAIN FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar, i/> cuf) butter, 1 cup of raisins, seeded and 
chopped, V2 ^'^V sour milk, 2 cups flour, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, Vi 
cup molasses, spices to taste. Mrs. Henry Cogswell. 

To this recipe mav be added i/> cup of walnuts broken. 

M. C. K. 
FRUIT CAKE NO. 1. 

1 pound butter, 11/4 pound brown sugar, i^ cuj) molasses (large), 
9 eggs, li/i pounds flour (sift before weighing), 8 pounds currants, 
i/o pound citron, sliced thin, 2i/2 pounds seeded raisins, ^4 pound can- 
died lemon peel, sliced thin, 14 pound candied orange peel, sliced thin, 
1/; pound figs, 1/2 pound blanched almonds, 14 })ound candied pineap- 
ple. ] cup strawberry preserves, 1 teaspoon saleratus. 1/2 teasi)Oon 
cloves, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 2 or 3 nutmegs; cream the butter and 
sugar; add molasses, saleratus. spices and well beaten eggs; take 
part of the flour and thoroughly flour all the fruit before adding 
slowly to the mixture. After all ingredients are put together, beat 
Avith tlie hands 15 or 20 minutes; steam fon^' hours, bake one. This 
will make a large milk pan loaf or can be divided into several small 
ones as desired. Mrs. F. P. Hue. 

FRUIT CAKE NO. 2. 

1 pound each of butter, sugai- and flour. 4 pounds seeded raisins. 
1 pound citron sliced, 1 pound each of dates and figs chopped fin*^. 
12 eggs. 1 large orange, 1 lemon peel chopped fine and the juice, 1 
tablespoon each of cinnamon and allspice, 1 heaping leaspoon each 



irs THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



of cloves and mace, 1 nutmeg, 1 cup molasses, i/o, teaspoon soda, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 wine glass strong coffee ; chop the orange 
rind and pulp fine and mix as much sugar with it as can be stirred 
in (this is in addition to the pound;) beat the butter and sugar to 
a. cream; add the yolks and spices; then the molasses and soda, and 
the fruit well floured, the stiffly beaten whites last ; steam four hours 
and bake one ; makes a large cake . Mrs . Drum . 

FRUIT CAKE NO. 3. 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup sour milk. 1 teaspoon 
soda. 2 eggs, % cup butter, 4 cups flour, 2 pounds raisins, ly^ pound 
currants, I/4 pound candied orange peel, 14 pound candied lemon 
peel, I/2 pound citron, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 
teaspoon mace, 1 teaspoon nutmeg; seed the raisins; wash currants 
well; put the fruit all together and chop fine in chopping bowl; rub 
the fruit into a part of the flour. Mrs. W. D. McLaren. 

FRUIT CAKE NO. 4. 

1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup butter and lard mixed, 1 cup strong 
coffee, 1 cup molasses, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon of cinnamon and cloves 
together, a little salt, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in hot water, 1 pound 
raisins, 1 cup walnuts, 3 cups flour; bake one hour; makes two cakes. 
If desired one of these calces may be used for pudding by steaming, 
and serving with Lemon Sauce found under Puddings and Sauces. 

Mrs. AV. D. McLaren. 

FRUIT CAKE NO. 5. 

1 pound brown sugar, 1 pound butter, 8 eggs, li/. pound flour, 
.1 pound citron, 1 pound candied cherries, 1 pound nuts, Vj pound 
pine apple, y>. pound orange peel, 2 pounds raisins, 1 pound figs, 
1 cup molasses, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon allspice, 1 teaspoon 
nutmeg, same in liquid spices, 1 tablespoon Royce's orange extract, 
] teaspoon soda. 1 teaspoon baking powder; steam four hours and 
then put in oven ten minutes to drv. This will make four cakes. 

Mrs. A. W. Nickle. 
GOLD CAKE. 

11/2 cups sugar, 1/0 cup butter, 3 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2 or 21/2 cups 
flour, 1 teaspoon cream of tartar, y> teaspoon soda in milk. 

Mrs. J. P. Johnson. 
GOLD CAKE. 

1 cup granulated sugar, 1/0 cup butter, yolks of 8 eggs. Yo cup 
sweet milk, I14 cups flour, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder, 1 
teaspoon Royce's orange extract; cream butter and sugar; add 
yolks and beat thoroughly before adding milk, flour and extract. 

Mrs. M. Kopf. 



LOAF CAKES. 1^9 



GINGER BREAD. 

Cream V^ cup of butter aud V- eui) of sugar, 1 egg, Y2 cup sour 
milk, Vo cup molasses, 1% cups flour, 1/0 teaspoon ginger, 1/2 teasp<)<ni 
cinnamon, 1/0 teaspoon soda, 1/2 teaspoon salt ; sift flour, spices, salt 
and soda tog*etlier; bake thirty minutes. Mary L. White. 

GINGER BREAD. 

1/2 cup shortening, 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup sour milk, % cup mo- 
lasses" 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 teaspoon soda, 14 teaspoon salt, IV:? 
cups flour, 1 egg. Mrs. W. M. Bashline. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. 

11/2 cups sugar. 1/2 cup butter (scant), whites 4 eggs, 1 small cup 
milk, 2 cups flour, 1 'cup nuts, 2 large teaspoons baking powder; 
flour the nuts and fold the nuts and whites in last. 

Mrs. W. H. Hegerty. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. 

1/2 cup butter, 11/2 cups sugar, % cup water, 2 cups flour, 
whites 4 eggs, 1 cup hickory nut meats broken, 1 teaspoon baking 
powder; beat butter and sugar to a cream; add w^ater and flour; 
stir until smooth; add half the whites well beaten; then the nuts; 
then the remainder of the whites and the baking powder; bake in 
loaf cake or in 2 layers. Mrs. A. K. Blood. 

LILY CAKE. 

1/2, cup butter, 1 cup sugar, creamed; add 1/2 cup milk, V^ cup 
corn starch, 1 rounded cup flour, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla, whites 
of 4 eggs well beaten, 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Mrs. W. J. Richards. 

MOLASSES CAKE. 

1/2 cup liglit brow^n sugar, 14 cup butter, % cup sour milk, V2 
cup molasses, 1 egg, 1 full cup sifted flour. 1/2 teaspoon ginger, IV2 
teaspoons soda. Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee, Miss Alden. 

MOLASSES CAKE. 

% cup molasses ; fill cup up wath sugar ; % cup butter ; fill 
cup with boiling water; 1 cup raisins, seeded and chopped, 1 egg 
well beaten, 2 cups sifted flour, 1 teaspoon soda, % teaspoon cinna- 
mon, V4 teaspoon cloves, a little nutmeg. ]Miss K. Ilorton. 

MOLASSES CAKE WITHOUT EGGS. 

1 cup molasses. .3 tablespoons melted butter, V2 cup buttermilk, 
1 teaspoon soda. 2 teacups sifted flour; bake in loaf or layers; frost. 

]\[rs. W. M. Bashline. 



1 60 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



MAHOGANY CAKE. 

% cup butter, li/'o cups sugar, 3 eggs, not separated, 2 cups 
fiour, 1 teaspoon soda, sifted in flour, 1 teaspoon Royee's vanilJn, 
1 cup sweet milk, % large cake chocolate cooked in half of the 
milk. Mrs. P. P. Leehe. 

NUT CAKE. 

1/2 cup butter, II/2 cups sugar, V:.., cup sour milk, 1/2 cup raisins, 
seeded and chopped, 1/2 cup butternut meats rolled, 2 cups flour, 3 
eggs i/> teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon nutmeg. 

Mrs. W. H. Pickett. 

POUND CAKE. 

1 tumbler eggs, % tumbler butter, 11/2 tumblers sugar, IVo 
tumblers flour, i/4 teaspoon baking powder; beat butter and flour 
together to a cream; sugar and eggs together; bake in slow oven. 

Mrs. Eliza Vosberg. 

TUMBLER CAKE. 

1 tumbler butter, 1 tumbler eggs (broken), 11/2 tumblers of 
sugar, 114 tumblers sifted flour, 2 even teaspoons baking powder; 
beat butter and flour together; beat sugar and eggs together; then 
mix all together. Mrs. A. J. Davis. 

PORK CAKE. 

1 pound pork, fat, chopped fine; pour over it 1 pt. boiling 
water, 1 pound raisins, i/4 pound citron, 2 cups sugar, ] cup molas- 
ses, 1 teaspoon soda ; flour tp thicken ; season with nutmeg, cloves 
and cinnamon. Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

QUICK CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, ly^ teaspoons baking powder, sifted in I14 cuj^s 
flour, 14 cup melted butter; break whites of 2 eggs on top of but- 
ter and fill cup with sweet milk; turn this into the sugar and flour, 
and beat all together quickly and lightly; turn into a greased tin 
and bake at once. Mrs. A. D Wood. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites 7 fresh eggs, yolks 5 eggs, ] cup granulated sugar, Y-l 
cup flour, 1/2 teaspoon cream tartar, pinch of salt ; sift and measure 
as for angel food cake; beat yolks thoroughly; then beat whites 
about half; add cream tartar; beat until very stiff; stir in sugar 
lightly; stir beaten yolks thoroughly; then add flour and 1 teaspoon 
Royee's vanilla: put in a tube tin and bake 45 or 50 minutes. 

Mrs. S. H. Davis. 



LOAF CAKES. isi 



SUNSHINE CAKE. 

AVhites of 11 eggs, lVi> t-'iips gi-uiiulated sugar, 1 cup flour, 1 
teaspoon cream of tartar, little salt, 1/9 teaspoon Royce's vanilla, 
yolks of 5 eggs. The secret in this cake is to have the eggs fresh 
and cold: measure flour after sifting once; sift flour, sugar and 
cream of tartar together four or five times, so they will be light 
and well mixed; break the eggs, whites only, onto a large platter 
or bowl ; beat thorn with the salt to a stiff dry froth ; add the va- 
nilla ; then sift the flour in a little at a time, and stir but do not 
beat. AVe call it folding; beat the yolks of 5 eggs very light and 
fold into the cake; use a tin with removable bottom, and legs, and 
never grease such a tin for cake of any kind; bake about one hour 
in a moderate oven. If the oven bakes fast on the top put paper 
over it and put a couple of tin cans in the oven to hold the paper 
up, so the cake, as it rises, wnll not touch the paper. Do not open 
the oven door the first fifteen minutes, then if it has not raised any. 
turn on a little more gas. AVhen you take it out of the oven turn 
bottom side up until cold ; then run a knife around and it will drop 
out. Mrs. Rosamond D. Rogers. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

5 eggs, juice of 1 lemon, 1 cup granulated sugar, 1 cup flour, 
y-2 teaspoon baking powder ; beat yolks and sugar to a cream ; add 
lemon juice ; then stiffly beaten whites of eggs ; then the flour and 
baking powder; grease tins and bake in hot oven. Mrs. Salyer. 

WHITE SPONGE CAKE. 

8 eggs, whites only, 1 cup powdered sugar, Vj cuj) flour, Vii 
cup corn starch, 1 teaspoon cream of tartar, i/o teaspoon soda, 1 
teaspoon Royce's vanilla; beat whites to a stiff froth; add sugar 
and beat well ; then soda dissolved in a little milk, the corn starch and 
flavoring; stir cream of tartar in flour and add the last. 

Mrs. Rose Messner. 

SPONGE CAKE WITH MILK. 

4 eggs, beaten thoroughly, 2 cu])s granulated sugar. 2 cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder; sift baking powder in flour; af- 
ter all is stirred well together, add 1 cup boiling milk ; flavor with 
Royce's extract. Mrs. J. Danforth. 

CHOCOLATE SPONGE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, I/2 ^'i^P butter, I/2 cup or cake of chocolate melted 
in butter, 2 eggs, i/o cup sour milk, lA teaspoon soda, V2 teaspoon 
salt, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons bakiiig 
powder; add cup boiling water last thing; bake in slow oven. This 
makes a large slab cake. Less chocolate if so desired. 



152 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



SPONGE CAKE WITH HOT WATER. 

1 cup sugar. 2 eggs, 1 teaspoou baking powder. 1 cup flour, y^ 
cup boiliug water ; beat sugar and eggs together ; sift baking pow- 
der in flour; beat all together; then stir in the boiling water; bake 
quickly. Mrs. D. D. Reed, Mrs. J. Gleave, 

Mrs. Dwight Cowan, Miss C. Pickett. 

BOILED SPONGE CAKE 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, 5 eggs and a few drops of 
Royce's lemon extract; boil sugar same as for frosting; beat whites 
of eggs stiff in a bowl, and pour the syrup over, beating until cold, 
then add the beaten yolks, 1 teaspoon cream of tartar added to flour 
and sifted five times; then beat all together and pour into an un- 
buttered tin; bake slowly 50 or 60 minutes. Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

BOILED SPONGE CAKE. 

6 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup water, 1 level teaspoon cream of tar- 
tar, 1 cup flour; separate the eggs, and beat whites to a stiff' froth 
with cream of tartar; boil sugar and water till it hairs and beat 
into whites of eggs until cold ; have yolks beaten light and stir 
lightly into the frosting; sift flour once before measuring; then sift 
3 or 4 times as for angel cake ; fold in as carefully as you can ; 
flavor; bake in angel food pan one hour in slow oven. 

Mrs. "W. D. McLaren, Mrs. Schlosser. 

SPICE CAKE. 

2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup butter, 3 eggs, 2% cups flour, 1 cup 
sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in milk, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup 
nuts, chopped or broken, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves ; 
bake in loaf or little cakes. Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

SPICE CAKE. 

2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup sour milk, 1/2 cup butter, 2% cups 
flour, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup almonds chopped, 1/0 cup currants, 2 eggs, 
1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon allspice, 2 teaspoons 
cinnamon, a little nutmeg, citron if you like. 

Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

MRS. ROOSEVELT'S SPICE CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 4 eggs, 4 cups flour, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1^^ teaspoons nut- 
meg. 

SPICED MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, ^ cup butter, i/> cup sweet milk, yolks of 5 eggs, 
and whites of 2, 1 teaspoon each of ground cloves and cinnamon, V2 



LOAF CAKES. I85 

nutmeg, grated, l^/o cups flour, 1 heaping teaspoon baking powder; 
cream butter and sugar ; add the well beaten yolks of the eggs ; 
then the milk, spices, flour and baking powder, and lastly the whites 
of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. The above recipe may be used 
with the yolks of 7 eggs, leaving out the whites ; bake in moderate 
oven. When the cake has been in the oven a minute or two sprin 
kle over top a little soft sugar and cinnamon; bake in a long shal- 
low pan. Mrs. M. Kopf. 

SPANISH CAKE. 

1 pt. sugar, 4 eggs, reserving whites of 2 for icing, % cup but- 
ter, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 scant qt. flour; 
bake in a large dripping pan ; when done, cut in squares with a hot 
knife and ice. ^Irs. Dwight Cowan. 

SPANISH BUNS. 

1^2 cups brown sugar, i/> cup butter, % cup sour milk, l/^ tea- 
spoon soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon 
cloves, 2 cups flour, 2 eggs, reserving 1 white for icing; bake in a 
shallow pan; cover with boiled icing flavored with Royce's orange; 
cut in squares when ready to serve. Mrs. W. B. Hammond. 

SPANISH BUNS. 

1 pt. brown sugar, 4 eggs, reserving 2 whites for icing, 1 cup 
sweet milk, 1 cup melted butter, 1 qt. flour, 3 teaspoons Home bak- 
ing powder, cinnamon, allspice and cloves to taste ; bake in a drip- 
per; ice, and cut in squares. Mrs. L. A. Goodrich. 

VIRGINIA LOAF CAKE. 

1% cups sugar, % cup butter, 1 cup chopped raisins, 2 eggs, 1 
cup buttermilk, 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon each of soda, cinnamon 
and cloves. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, ^2 cup butter, I/2 cup milk, IX^ cups flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, 1 cup nut meats chopped fine, 2 eggs ; ice, and 
put whole English walnut meats on the top and sides. 

Mrs. W. A. Hall. 

WHITE CAKE. 

2 cups granulated sugar, scant cup butter. 8 large cups flour, 1 
large cup milk, whites 8 eggs, 2 rounded teaspoons baking powder. 
This makes 2 large cakes. Mrs. W. R. Kopf. 

WHITE CAKE. 

2 measures sugar, i/^ measure butter, 3 measures flour, 1 meas- 
ure milk, whites 4 eggs (5 if small), 3 level teaspoons baking pow- 



164 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



der; flavor to suit taste; keep out !/:> measure of sugar to stir with 
eggs ; sift flour four times and then keep one measure to sift with 
baking powder; cream butter and sugar; then add milk and 2 meas- 
ures of flour, and beat thoroughly; then add the other measure of 
flour and baking powder, and lastly, fold in the well beaten whites of 
eggs into which the Yo measure of sugar has been stirred ; flavor with 
Royce's extract. Miss Winger. 

GOOD RECIPE FOR WHITE CAKE OR CAN BE USED FOR 

LAYER CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups fine granulated sugar, 3 heaping cups of 
pastry flour, whites of 6 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der, 2 teaspoons Royce's extract; cream the butter and sugar; add 
the milk ; add % of the flour ; then i/o the beaten whites ; then i/o the 
flour that is left ; then the remainder of the eggs, and the rest of the 
flour and the extract ; stir until perfectly smooth, each time after 
adding each part. Any white cake is improved by using this for- 
mula for putting together. Mrs. S. E. AValker. 

AUNT HATTIE'S WHITE CAKE. 

1 cup white sugar, % cup butter, whites of 4 eggs, % cup sweet 
milk, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon Royce's 
vanilla. 



LOAF CAKES. 185 



186 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



COOKIES, DOTGIINrTS. LITTLE CAKES, ETC. \&z 



Cookies, Doughnuts, Little 
Cakes, Etc. 

Mrs. Charles T. Conarro 



BROWN SUGAR COOKIES. 

3 cups brown sugar, 4 eggs (not beaten separately), % cup but- 
ter, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in water, flour sufficient to roll out; 
bake in quick oven. Mrs. IT. E. Brown. 

BUTTERMILK COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar, 1 full cuj) butter, 1 cup butter milk, 1 teaspoon 
soda. 3 eggs and a little nutmeg, 3 drops of lemon, flonr enough to 
make a batter that will drop from the spoon and not spread; drop 
on greased pans and put a raisin in center of each. 

Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

1 cup granulated sugar, 1 cup cocoanut, lA cup butter, 2 eggs, 
•1 tablespoons sweet milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder, flour to roll 
without sticking. Mrs. M. Kopf. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, 1 egg, i/o tablespoon 
ginger, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 14 teaspoon soda, !/> cake 
chocolate dissolved in % cup boiling water; mix quite stiff; sprinkle 
with sugar before baking. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES NO. 2. 

1/2 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, I/4 teaspoon salt, 2 ounces 
Baker's chocolate, 2i/^ cups flour (scant), 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der, 14 cup milk; cream the butter; add sugar gradually, egg well 
beaten, salt and chocolate melted ; beat well and add flour mixed 
and sifted with baking powder alternately with milk ; chill ; roll 
very thin then shape with small cutter, first dipped in flour and 
bake in hot oven. Mrs. Edward Allen. 

CREAM COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar. 2 eggs, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sour cream, 1 teaspoon 
soda, 1 teaspoon Royce's lemon extract, or i^ nutmeg, grated, flour 
enough to make a dough as soft as it can be rolled. 

Mrs. W. A. Hall. 



188 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



CHILDREN'S COOKIES. 

3 eggs, 2 large cups brown sugar, ^ cup butter, % cup lard, 1 
qt. flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder; roll thin and place a raisiu 
on each cookie before baking. Mrs. Burfoot. 

FIG COOKIES. 

1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, i/^ cup butter, 1 dozen figs chopped fine, 1 
heaping teaspoon baking powder, flour to roll nicely. 

Mrs. S. J. Franklin. 

GINGER COOKIES NO. 1. 

1 cup N. 0. molasses, 1 cup lard, 1 cup sugar, 3 tablespoons 
vinegar, 1 teaspoon salt ; let come to a boil ; cool and add 2 beaten 
eggs, a level tablespoon soda and scant tablespoon of ginger mixed 
dry with the first cup of flour; beat well and add flour enough to 
make a soft dough. Hattie Golnicke. 

GINGER COOKIES NO. 2. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, 1 tablespoon vine- 
gar, 1 tablespoon soda. 1 tablespoon ginger, a little (?innamon and 
cloves ; stir and boil this mixture ; when cold add 2 eggs, well beat- 
en, and flour enough to mal^e quite stiff; roll very thin and cut. 
These cookies will be either crisp or soft according to the time the 
mixture is cooked. Mrs. Copeland. 

GINGER COOKIES NO. 3. 

11/2 cups molasses, i/o cup brown sugar, i/4 cup strong coffee, 1 
cup lard and butter mixed, 2 teaspoons soda, 1 teaspoon ginger; 
mix and set on the stove until it foams ; let cool and mix soft and 
roll thin. Mrs. R. A. Love. 

GINGER COOKIES NO. 4. 

2 qts. flour. 2 heaping teaspoons soda sifted together, 1 cup 
shortening worked into flour, 2 eggs, 1 cup sour milk or cold cof- 
fee, 2 cups New Orleans molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 teaspoon 
ginger, % teaspoon cloves, 1 heaping teaspoon cinnamon, I/2 teaspoon 
salt; stir up over night and set in cellar to get thoroughly cold- 
will need very little flour to roll out for 'baking next morning. 

Mrs. Gleave. 

PEANUT COOKIES. 

2 tablespoons butter, I/4 cup sugar, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon baking 
powder, 14 teaspoon salt, % cup flour, 2 tablespoons milk, i/o cup 
chopped peanuts, 1/3 teaspoon lemon juice ; cream butter ; add sugar 
and egg, well beaten; mix and sift dry ingredients; add to first 



COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS, LITTLE CAKES, ETC. leg 



mixture ; then add milk, peanuts and lemon juice ; drop from tea- 
spoon on an unbiittered sheet 1 inch apart and place half peanut on 
lop of each; bake fifteen to twenty minutes in slow oven. 

Mrs. Edward Allen. 

RAISIN COOKIES. 

1 cui) butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 eggs, 1 small nutmeg, 1 cup chop- 
ped raisins, small Y2 teaspoon cinnamon, 3 tablespoons milk 1 tea- 
spoon soda' dissolved in milk, flour enough to roll thin. 

Bessie Richards. 

SPICE COOKIES. 

1/ii pound brown sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, Vo pound almonds, 

1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/0 pound citron, 1/0 teaspoon cloves, 4 eggs, 
1/0 teaspoon allspice, Vo cake chocolate, IV2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der; mix Avith enough flour to make a very stiff (lough. 

Mrs. M. Strelitz. 

SCOTCH COOKIES. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 5 tablespoons milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 

2 teaspoons cream tartaV, 2 eggs, flour to make soft dough; flavor 
v\'ith Royce's vanilla; roll thin and bake in hot oven. 

]Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

1 cup sugar. 3 tablespoons water, 1 cup butter. I/2 teaspoon soda, 
2 eggs, nutmeg and salt to taste; roll in sugar before baking. 

Mrs. M. E. Pickett. 

SUGAR COOKIES NO. 2. 

2 eggs well beaten, li/o cups coffee A sugar. % cup l)utter. i;. 
cup sweet milk, l/o teaspoon soda; mix soft and roll thin. 

Mrs. R. A. Love. 

SUGAR COOKIES NO. 3. 

2 cups sugar. 1 cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, yolks of 3 eggs, 
1 teaspoon soda, flour enough to make a dough as soft as can 
be rolled; sprinkle sugar over the top and bake in a quick oven. 

IMrs. AVhitcomb. 

SUGAR COOKIES NO . 4 . 

2 cups sugar and 1 cup butter mixed well together; then add 1 
e^g, well beaten, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 teaspoon soda in a teaspoon 
of hot water, just a little nutmeg; flour to roll nicelv, with n little, 
sugar on lop. Mrs. F. K. RiL<;sell. 



190 THE WARKEN COOK BOOK 



SOUR MILK COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar (1 gi-anulated and 1 coffee A), 1 cnp butter, 1 
egg, 1 cup sour milk, even teaspoon soda, lA teaspoon l)aking pow- 
der, flour enough to roll; flavor with nutmeg or Royce"s almond ex- 
tract. Mrs. M. Kopf. 

SOUR CREAM COOKIES. 

1 cup sugar, i/o cup lard and butter mixed, Vi; ("iiP *^'^^ii" cream, 
1 egg, 1/2 teaspoon soda, nutmeg to taste, flour to make .stiff enough 
to roll and cut; bake in quick oven. Mrs. S. E. AValker. 

WHITE COOKIES. 

1 cup lard, 1 cup sour milk, 2 cups white sugar, VA cups flour, 
even teaspoon soda; beat the lard to a cream; then add a teaspoon 
of salt; stir in the sugar; then the sour milk and flour: flavor with 
nutmeg if desired. Mrs. Turner. 

BRUNSWICK JELLY CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, yolks 8 eggs, 2 large tablespoons rose 
water; flour to mix as soft as you can; roll and cut out like cookies; 
after they are baked spread with apple jelly and put frosting on 
lop made of the whites of eggs. IMrs. I. G. Lacy. 

COCOANUT JUMBLES. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 eggs, 1/0 grated cocoanut ; nuike 
just stiff enough to roll thin. J. M. D. 

GINGER SNAPS NO. 1. 

1 cup lard, 2 cups New Orleans molasses, 1 teaspoon soda in 'j 
of boiling water, 1 tablespoon ginger; mix rather stiff; roll thin and 
bake quickly. Mrs. M. E. P^'ckett. 

GINGER SNAPS NO. 2. 

2 cups molasses, 1 cup sugar, % cup butter; put these in a pan 
and bring to a boil ; take 1 qt. flour, 1 tablespoon ginger, 1 teaspoon 
cloves, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon nutmeg; put 1 teaspoon soda 
in first part while hot ; turn it onto the flour and spices previously 
mixed together; then add flour enough to make a stiff dough; roll 
very thin and bake. Mrs. Fred Darling. 

GINGER SNAPS NO. 3. 

1 cup granulated sugar, 1 cup black molasses, 1 cup butter, 1 
tablespoon ginger, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 14 teaspoon powdered alum, 
1 teaspoon soda; let come to a boil ; when cold add 1 beaten egg and 
flour enough to roll thin ; bake in quick oven . 

Mrs. C. H. Smith. 



COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS, LITTLE CAKES, ETC. 191 



HERMITS NO. 1. 

1 cup raisins stoned and chopped, 1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 
tablespoon cinnamon, V5 teaspoon soda dissolved in .1 little milk, S 
eggs, tiour enough to roll out ; cut with a tumbler and bake in a quick 
oven. Mrs. C. E. Bell. 

HERMITS NO. 2. 

Cream 1 cup butter; stir in 1 cup sugar gradually, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon. 1 teaspoon cloves, a little nutmeg, 1 low teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in a little warm water, 3 eggs, yolks and whites beaten to- 
gether, 1 cup seeded and chopped raisins, flour enough to roll easily 
but do not roll as thin as cookies, and use as little flour as possible 
to handle: sprinkle with sugar before cutting; keep in a tight box. 

Mrs. John Clark. 

JUMBLES NO. 1. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 4 eggs. 1 teaspoon baking poAvder. 1 
teaspoon Koyce's vanilla, flour enough to roll. 

Mrs. Ada Partridge. 

JUMBLES NO. 2. 

21/2, cups sugar, 1 cup butter. 4 eggs. 3 tablespoons vinegar, ^A 
teaspoon soda, flavoring, flour enough to roll. C. E. J. 

JUMBLES NO. 3. 

21/2 cups pulverized sugar. % cup butter. 4 eggs, 1 tablespoon 
vinegar, 1 small teaspoon soda, a little nutmeg, flour enough to roll ; 
sprinkle sugar over them and bake. Mrs. Lucy Hall. 

LEMON SNAPS. 

1 cup sugar, % cup butter, 1/2 teaspoon soda dissolved in 2 tea- 
spoons hot water, flour enough to roll thin; flavor with Royce's ex- 
tract of lemon. IMrs. E. Tj. C. 

PEPPER NUTS.. 

1 pound sugar, ^'U pound butt(^r, 5 eggs, l/o teacu]; milk, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder; flour enough to roll. E. G. R. 

SAND TARTS. 

Rub 2 pounds granulated sugar and 2 pounds flour well togeth- 
er; then rub in ly^ pounds butter; wet the whole with '" eggs well 
beaten; form into a loaf and let stand in a cool place over night to 
harden ; roll very thin ; cut out and wash the top of (nich cake with 
)nilk and the yolk of an egrt^ mixed together; sprinkle with sugar 
find cinnamon and chopped almonds or peanuts. These tarts will 
keep a long time if kept in a tight tin box. Mrs. P. P. Leche. 



192 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

SAND TARTS, NO. II. 

2 well beaten eggs, 11^ cups sugar, % cup butter, then fill cup 
with sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda ; flavor with Royce 's nutmeg or 
orange. Aresta Beatty. 

LITTLE CAKES 

COCOANUT BALLS. 

Use Mrs. Connaro's recipe for White Cake; bake in one layer; 
cut into small squares ; cut off the corners ; roll in icing and then in 
shredded cocoanut. Mrs. Richards. 

DROP CAKES. 

lyo cups sugar, l^ cup sour milk, 1 cup currants, y^ cup butter, 

3 cups flour, 2 eggs and a level teaspoon soda. Mrs. J. W. Kitchen. 

DROP COOKIES. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, % cup shortening, 2 eggs. 2 heaping 
teaspoons soda, 2 teaspoons ginger, spices to taste, 14 cup cold water, 

4 cups flour, a little salt, raisins if liked; drop from a teaspoon on 
buttered dish. Miss Winger. 

DROP FRUIT COOKIES . 

1 pound powdered sugar, 4 large eggs, beat the whites ; Y^ pound 
citron, rind of 1 lemon grated, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, 
] teaspoon cinnamon, 1 scant teaspoon soda dissolved in boiling 
water, 1 pound flour, 1 qt. fruit, (figs, nuts and raisins), 2 tablespoons 
coffee. (No shortening.) Drop with teaspoon on buttered tin. These 
cookies will keep for weeks. ]\Irs. Volbrecht. 

GINGER CAKES NO. I. 

1/2 cup brown sugar, 1 cup molasses. 1 cup butter, 1 teaspoon 
each of cinnamon and ginger, 1/0 teaspoon cloves, % teaspoon soda 
dissolved in a cup of boiling water, 2iA cups flour; add 2 well beaten 
eggs the last thing before baking; bake in gem pans or in a loaf. 

Mrs . Trunkev . 
GINGER CAKES NO. II. 

1 cup molasses, % cup brown sugar, l^ cup butter, 2V2 cups 
flour. 1 beaping teaspoon soda, 1 cup boiling water, i/o, teaspoon cin- 
namon. Yi teaspoon each of nutmeg, cloves and allspice, 2 eggs light 
ly beaten and added last. Mrs. G. B. Nesmith. 

LEMON QUEENS. 

V2 cup butter, 1 cuj^ sugar, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, grated 
rind of 1 lemon, scant teaspoon soda, 1 saltspoon salt, 4 eggs, IV2 
cups flour; makes 18 cakes. Mrs. W. J. Richards. 



COOKIES, DOUGIIXFTS. LITTLE CAKES, ETC. 193 



MOCHA TARTS. 

Use any good white cake recipe; bake in thin layers and cut into 
small cakes and put 2 or 3 together, (according to thickness) witii 
TJiis filling: 

% cup sugar, i/j cup flour, Vs teaspoon salt, 2 eggs. 2 cups 
scalded milk, 1 teaspoon Royce's lemon extract; mix dry ingred- 
ients; add eggs slightly beaten and then j^our on the scalded millc;. 
cook fifteen minutes in double boiler or until thick; cool and flavor. 

Cover the little cakes with this frosting: To 1/. cup butter, add 
l\'-2 cups powdered sugar gradually and beat until creamy; add 1 
cup of the cream filling which has been cooled, li/o squares of Bak- 
er's chocolate melted and y^ teaspoon Royce's vanilla. 

Mrs. N. A. Watson, Erie. 

MARGUERITES. 

lA cup sugar, enough water to moisten; let boil until ropej'; 
stir syrup into the white of 1 i^gg whipped to a stiff froth ; add a 
pinch of cream of tartar and beat same as for frosting; stir in 1 cup 
chopped English walnuts; spread on any kind of crackers (not 
salted) and place in oven to brown. These are nice and will often 
take the place of cake. iMrs. D. AY. Ames. 

NEVER FAIL CAKES. 

1 cup sugar, !/> cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder, Y^ 
cup butter, 2 eggs, ly^ cups flour; cream butter and sugar; add milk; 
then beaten yolks; then the flour; stir thoroughly and add the well 
beaten whites; flavor with Royce's extract; stir evenly and bake in 
gem tins in a moderate oven. ]\Irs. Whitcomb. 

NUT CAKES. 

2 cups sugar. 2 eggs. 1/0 cup butter. 1 cup milk. 1 cup chopped 
raisins, 1 cup chopped Avalnuts, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der; beat butter and sugar to a cream; add eggs well lieaten : then 
.iiilk. flour and baking powder, and last the raisins and nuts; bake 
in tins in moderate oven; when cold put on chocolate icing and add 
half a walnut. IMrs. Af. Strelitz. 

OATMEAL MACAROONS. 

1 level tablespoon butter. 1 cup sugar. 2 eggs well beaten, 2 cups 
oatflakes, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla or 
any flavor desired; cream the butter and sugar; add the baking 
powder to the oatflakes; mix all well together; add the flavoring- 
add eggs last; beat all together; drop on warm tins and bake. 

Mrs. F. P. Hue. 



194 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



PEANUT MACAROONS. 

1 cup sugar. 1 eiip eliopped peanuts, 2 tablespoons tlour, Avhites 
of 2 eggs, pinch of salt ; bake in very slow oven. 

]\rrs. Hoffer, Jamestown. 

ROCK BISCUIT. 

lyo cups sugar. % cup buttca-, :\ eggs, 1 eup raisins. 1 eup 
chopped nuts, i/i; cup currants. 4 tablespoons sweet milk. 1 small tea- 
hpuon baking powder, Vi teaspoon cinnamon, a little nutmeg and a 
few drops each (»f Roj^ce's extract of lemon. ,;range, Naniila and al- 
mond, 2 cups of flour or a little more if necessary to make stiff 
enough for sinall drop cakes, 1 teaspoon batter dr-opped on a greasetl 
l)an . Mrs. C. 11. Smith. 

TAYLOR COOKIES. 

1 pt. molasses. ] pt. brown sugMi'. 1 ])t. butter; boil tou'ether five 
minut(^s. v.hen cold add Vj pt- sweet milK'. 1 tablespoon soda, 1 table- 
spoon cinnamon. 3 eggs, 4 scant cups fl(uir; bake in gem pans or 
drop by spoonfuls on a large pan. AVill keep for any length of time. 

Mrs. W. M. Robertson. 

DOUGHNUTS 

DOUGHNUTS. 

1 cup sugar, i/o cup butter. 3 eggs well beaten, 1 cup sweet milk, 
8 teaspoons baking powder, a little nutmeg, flour enough to roll eas- 
ily; fry in hot lard. ' ATrs. J. AV. Crawford. 

COMMON DOUGHNUTS. 

1 large cuj) sugar, 5 or 6 tablespoons melted lard 2 eggs well 
beaten, fi/. cups sour milk. 1 teaspoon soda, a little nutmeg, and Hour 
enough to roll easily; fry in boiling lard. jMrs. W. J. Richards. 

CRULLERS NO. 1. 

1 cup sugar, i/. cup sweet milk. 2 tablespoons butt(>r, 3 eggs, ^z- 
teaspoon soda, nutmeg and salt; mix quite stiff: roll thin; cut in 
strips about 3 inches long and !•/- inch wide; cut those up in 4 
strips; fold the ends together and frv as fried cakes. 

Mrs. M. E. Pickett. 

CRULLERS NO. 2. 

3 eggs, 4 tablespoons melted lard, 1 cup sugar, (i tal)lespoons 
milk, flavoring, 2 teaspoons baking powder, flour to roll iiieelv and 
fry- Mrs. Wilbur. 



COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS. LITTLE CAKES, ETC. 195 



CRULLERS NO. 3. 

1 egg. 1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon sugar, flour to roll niee- 
]v: fry in Very hot lard and sprinkle with sugar. 

Mrs. S. J.Franklin. 

DELICIOUS DOUGHNUTS. 

'[I/2 cups pulverized sugar, butter the size of large walnut. 1 eup 
sweet milk, 2 eggs; cream the butter and sugar; beat the eggs in a 
bowl and add to them the milk ; then pour slowly onto the creamed 
sugar, beating in a little at a time ; add II4 cups sifted 
flour and beat smooth; into I/2 eup flour mix 2 teaspoons 
baking powder and a little grated nutmeg, and add to the mixture, 
following with flour enough to stiffen for rolling out. These dough- 
nuts have a ''melt in your mouth" quality if directions are carefully 
followed. " Mrs. S. W. Tait, Montpelier, Ind. 

FRIED CAKES. 

1 qt. flour, 2 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 1 teaspoon baking powder, nutmeg and salt to taste ; mix soft 
as can be handled ; roll and fry. Mrs. M. E. Pickett. 

FRIED CAKES NO. 2. 

1 cup granulated sugar, 1 cup confectionary sugar, i/o cup lard 
and butter mixed scant), II/2 cup sweet milk, 3 eggs, 3 teaspoons 
baking powder in 2 cups flour, little nutmeg; add sufficient flour to 
roll out ; not too hard ; when fried roll in confectionary sugar. 

Mrs. Tees. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS NO. 1. 

1 pt. milk, scalded, 1 eup sugar, 1 egg, a little salt, 2 
tablespoons melted butter, 1 yeast cake, or i/o cup of home made 
yeast; mix egg, sugar and butter together; when milk is cool stir 
into it; put in yeast and flour to make stiff sponge; let get very 
light; mould and roll out; cut in squares; put them on buttered 
plates; let get very light; then fry. Mrs. J. 0. Parndee. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS NO. 2. 

2 eggs, 11/0 cups sugar, 1 small cup butter, 2 pts. potato yeast, 
14 teaspoon soda, a little salt, flour to stiffen enough to stir with 
spoon; stir at night and let raise until morning; roll and cut out 
and let raise again until very light ; makes 4 dozen . 

Mrs. P. E. Sonne. 



196 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



CREAM PUFFS. 

Let 1 Clip liot water and i/. cup butter eonie to a boil and stir 
in ] cnp flour; when cool add 3 eggs without beating; drop in a 
dripping pan and bake twenty or twenty-five minutes ; cut and (ill. 

Cream for Puffs — Let 1 pt. milk come to a boil and stir in 2 
eggs, 1 cup sugar, i/o cup flour beaten together with a little cold 
milk; boil until thick and flavor with Royce's vanilla. 

Mrs. W. J. Richards. 



COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS. LITTLE CAKES, ETC. ig^ 



198 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



DRINKS 

Miss Lora Alden 

COFFEE . 

Coffee for family use should be bought in small quantities, 
freshly roasted and if one has a coffee mill, ground at home as need- 
ed, because after being ground unless kept air tight, it quickly de- 
teriorates. If not bought in air tight cans with tight fitting cover, 
it should be emptied into canister as soon as brought from the gro- 
cer's. 

Coffee may be served as filtered coffee, infusion of coffee, or de- 
coction of coffee. Commonly speaking, boiled coffee is preferred, 
and is more economical for the consumer. According to the way in 
which it is to be made, coft'ee is ground fine, medium and coarse. In 
making filtered coffee it should be ground fine, for boiled, coarse or 
medium . 

FILTERED COFFEE. 

I cup finely ground coft'ee, 6 cups boiling water; place coffee 
in strainer, strainer in coffeepot, and pot on the range ; add gradual- 
ly^ boiling water and allow it to filter; cover between additions of 
water. If desired stronger, re-filter ; serve at 02ice with cut sugar 
and cream ; put sugar and cream in cup before hot coffee. If creairi 
is not obtainable, scalded milk may be substituted. 

Mrs. Farmer in Boston Cook Book. 

BOILED COFFEE. 

II tablespoons coffee, 1 egg, 10 cups water (boiling) ; beat the 
egg; add a. little cold water and mix with the coffee; turn into coffee 
pot; pour on boiling water and stir thoroughly; boil for three min- 
utes ; place on back of the stove for ten minutes, where it will keep 
hot but not boil ; serve at once. Mrs. Rankin. 

TO MAKE COFFEE FOR ONE. 

Allow 2 tablespoons ground coffee to 1 cup of cold water; add 
coffee to cold water; cover closely and let stand over night. In the 
niorning bring to boiling point. 

AFTER DINNER COFFEE. 

For after dinner coffee use twice the quantity of coffee, or half 
the amount of liquid given in other recipes ; serve in after dinner 
coffee cups, with or without cream and sugar. 



DRINKS. 199 

CAFE' GLACE'. 

1 qt. black coffee, 1 qt. inilk (heated but not boiled) ; sweeten 
with 3 tablespoons powdered sugar; turn mixture in ice cream 
freezer as for sherbet, only long enough to mix; chill thoroughly; 
about 5 or 6 minutes; serve in high glasses, adding to t-acli. if liked, 
a tablespoon of sweetened whipi^ed cream. 

Jamestown Cook Book. 

BRAN COFFEE. 

8 cups clean wheat bran (get at a mill), 2 cups oat flake, 1 cup 
corn meal; mix together; then stir in % cup Porto Rico molasses; 
mix with hands like pie crust to aovid having it lumpy; put in drip- 
per and place in a hot oven; stir every five or ten miinites for IV2 
or 2 hours, when it will be a nice brown. Be careful to avoid burn- 
ing. 

BRAN COFFEE. 

Use a tablespoon of the above mixture to a person, and put in 
a tarleton bag in either hot or cold vv^ater. A bit of butter size of 
bean will prevent boiling over. Let boil at least i/> hour. This coffee 
warmed over is even better than at fii'st. ]\[rs. J\I. J. Danfnrth. 

TEA. 

Black Tea is made from leaves which have been allowed to fer- 
ment before curing. Green Tea is made from unfermented leaves 
artificially colored. Freshly boiled water should be used for nuiking 
tea. Boiled, because below the boiling point the stimnlating prop- 
.-i'ty, theine, would not be e;ctraeted. Freshly boiled, because lon^ 
cooking renders it flat and insipid to taste on accpunt of escape of 
its atmospheHc gases. Tea should always be infused, never boiled. 
Long steeping destroys the delicate flavor by developing a larger 
amount of tannic acid. 

HOW TO MAKE TEA. 

3 teaspoons tea, 2 cups boiling water; scald an earthen or china 
tea pot: put in tea, and pour on l)oiling water; let it stand in a 
^varm place for five minutes. 

i\rrs. Farmer in Boston Cook Book. 

RUSSIAN TEA. 

Follow recipe for making tea. Russian tea may he served hot 
or cold, but always without milk. A thin slice of lemon, from which 
seeds have been removed, or a few drops of lemon jnice is allowed 
for each cup; sugar is added according to taste. Each cup can also 
be garnished with a preserved strawberry or a candied cherry. 

Lora E. Alden. 



200 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



ICED TEA, 

After making the tea, strain into glasses i/j full of craeked ice; 
sweeten to taste. Mrs. Clough. 

TEA PUNCH. 

]\Iake as much tea as you think you will need, using Oolong; pour 
this in punch bowl over large cake of ice ; then add lemon and 
orange juice and small frait in season as for any punch. 

Mrs. C. B. Salyer. 

COCOA AND CHOCOLATE. 

Many people who cannot drink tea or coffee, find cocoa indis- 
pensible. Invalids and those of weak digestion can take cocoa where 
chocolate would prove too rich. 

COCOA. 

11/2 tablespoons prepared cocoa, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 cups 
boiling water, 2 cups milk, few grains salt; scald milk; mix cocoa, 
sugar and salt ; dilute with i/o cup boiling water to make smooth 
paste ; add remaining water and boil one minute ; turn into scalded 
milk and beat two minutes, using Dover egg beater. 

CHOCOLATE. 

1 qt. milk, 3 ounces Baker's Chocolate; cut in small pieces, -3 
tablespoons sugar, pinch of salt ; boil all together for ten minutes . 
then take from fire; add 4 or 5 dfops Royce's vanilla and beat with 
Dover egg beater until smooth ; serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

CHOCOLATE OR COCOA. 

Mix together 1,2 t-up of sifted flour, 1/. cup granulated sugar and 
% teaspoon salt ; put into a sauce pan I/2 cup chocolate, finely shav- 
ed (or cocoa) ; add 1 qt. boiling water; stir until dissolved; add the 
flour, sugar and salt, and boil gently, stirring constantly five min- 
utes ; then stir in 1 qt. boiling milk, and serve with or without 
whipped cream. This will make 12 cups. Mrs. Friday. 

FRUIT DRINKS 

LEMONADE. 

1 cup sugar, i/-- cup lemon juice. ] pt. water; make syrup by 
boiling sugar and water twelve minutes ; add fruit juice ; cool and 
dilute with ice water to suit taste. Lemon syrup may be bottled and 
kept on hand to use as needed. 



DRINKS. 201 

LEMON SYRUP. 

5 pounds white sugar, 2 ounces citric acid. 1 ounce of tartaric 
acid, Vo ounce epsoiu salts, the juice and grated rind of -4 lemons, 
3 pts. boiling water; put the sugar in a })reserving kettle; add the 
acid dry to the sugar; pour the boiling water on and add the juice 
and rind of the 4 lemons. When all is dissolved and quite cold, stir 
tlie well beaten whites of 2 eggs, and the juice of 2 more lemons; 
strain through muslin and bottle. ^Mrs. K. ~\V . Stuart. 

LEMONADE WITH EGG. 

Squeeze the juice of V- lemon m a glass; add sugar. 1 raw egg, 
ice and water; shake vigorously, using a "shaker." This beverage 
is largely used by boating men, runners and athletes generally. 

PINEAPPLE LEMONADE. 

1 pt. water, 1 cup sugar, 1 qt. ice water, 1 can grated pineapple, 
jnice 8 lemons; make syrup by boiling water and sugar ten minutes; 
add pineapple and lemon juice; cool; strain and add ice Avater. 

ORANGEADE. 

Make syrup as for lemonade; sweeten orange juice with syrup, 
and dilute by pouring over crushed ice. 

ORANGEADE NO. II. 

Put in a large tumbler the juice of IVo oranges, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, 1 teaspoon lemon juice; fill the glass with ice water. 

FRUIT LEMONADE. 

This is made by adding fresh fruits of all kinds to strong lemon- 
ade, and if boiling water is used, letting it stand till cold before add- 
ing the ice, it will be found much more delicious. 

STRAWBERRY SYRUP. 

Take fine ripe straw])erries and press the juice through a clotli. 
To each pint of juice add 1 pt. simple syrup and boil gently for an 
liour; remove from the fire, and when cool, bottle the mixture, seal- 
ing the cork; serve mixed with water to taste in glasses half filled 
with cracked ice. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

1 cup water, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup tea infusion, 1 qt. Apollinaris, 
2 cups strawberry syrup juice. 5 lemons, juice of -5 oranges, 1 can 
grated pineapple, 1 cup candied cherries; nuike syrup by boiling 
water and sugar ten minutes ; add tea, strawberry syrup, lemon 



202 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



juice, orange juice and pineapple ; let stand thirty minutes : strain 
and add ice water to make IY2 gallons of liquid ; add cherries and 
apollinaris ; serve in punch bowl with large piece of ice. This quan- 
tity will serve 50. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

While fresh fruits are always preferable, canned berries and 
pineapple may be substituted ; steep 2 generous teaspoons of tea 
in 2 qts. boiling water for five minutes; strain and add 1 pound of 
lump sugar, stirring until thoroughly dissolved; grate 8 lemons and 
extract all the juice ; cut 3 oranges into slices ; shred 1 pineapple ; 
slice 5 bananas very thin and hull 1 pt. strawberries. When the 
tea is cold add all of the fruit, and let stand in the refrigerator for 
several hours. Place a cube of ice in the punch bowl; pour the 
mixture around it and when well chilled serve in punch glasses. 
To get the best results from the pineapple, peel and remove the eyes ; 
tear apart with a silver fork ; reject the cores ; sprinkle with sugar 
?.nd let stand on ice for twelve hours. 

TUTTI FRUTTI PUNCH. 

Boil together for five minutes 1 qt. water and 1 pound sugar; 
add the grated rind of 2 lemons and 4 oranges and continue boiling 
for ten minutes longer ; strain the syrup through cheese cloth and 
add 1 qt. cold water ; extract the juice from the lemons and oranges ; 
strain and mix with 2 dozen malaga grapes cut in half and seeded, 
2 slices tangerine oranges, 4 slices of pineapple, and 1 banana cut 
into slices. 

CANTON PUNCH. 

Boil 4 cups water, 1 cup sugar and V2 cup Canton ginger cat fine 
for twenty minutes; strain and a'hi i/i cup lemon juice and Vi cup 
orange juice. Wheii ready to serve, pour over a block of ice and 
add 1 qt. charged water. 

CURRANT PUNCH. 

Wash thoroghly 1 ([t. red currants adding Vo the quantity of red 
raspberries and pour over 1 pt. l^oiling water; cover the trait closely 
and M'hen cold press through a sieve, stirring in IY2 "ups sugar, 1 
tablespoon white wine vinegar and the juice of 1 orange. Thorough- 
ly chill and serve in slender glasses Y^ filled with shaved ice; add to 
( ach glass a small sprig of fresh mint. 

MINT PUNCH. 

Cho]) fine 1 dozen stalks of mint ; add i/o cup sugar and the 
juice of 2 lemons; jam thoroughly and let stand one hour, stirring oc- 
casionall}^; then strain and add the juice of 4 more lemons, I/2 cup 



DRINKS. 205 

sugar and 1 pi. water (reduced to a syrup), the yellow rind of 2 
lemons sliced, and some freshly cut mint; stir well and just before 
serving, add 1 qt. shaved ice and 2 qts. ginger ale. 

Elizabeth AV. Marvin, in Jamestown Cook liook. 

RASPBERRY PUNCH. 

Juice fnnn 1 qt. can of red raspberries, juice of 5 lemons, pulp 
of 2 oranges and 2 bananas diced. To these add enough water to 
make a good drink; sweeten to taste and serve ice cold. 

Mrs. Downing. 

RASPBERRY MINT. 

To 1 qt. lemonade add V2 t;up of raspberries and the leaves front 
a sprig of mint ; chill for two hours and serve in tall glasses, each of 
which is garnished with a floating sprig of mint. 

"Good Housekeeping."' 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. - 

To 6 qts. red raspberries allow 1 scant qt. white wine vinegar; 
pour the vinegar over thef ruit in a stone jar; cover and stir the 
fruit once every day for four or five days ; then strain through a jelly 
bag ; boil allowing 1 pt. sugar to every pint of juice ; skim off the 
scum that rises; cook until the consistency of syrup. When cold, 
bottle, cork and seal. Mrs. D. Shear. 

GINGER ALE FRAPPE. 

Cut into odd little spiral twists the skin from A lemons, adding 
a pinch each of cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and whole cloves, 1 large 
cup granulated sugar, a cup of flaked pineapple and 2 sliced oranges. 
alloAving the fruit puree to stand in a cold place for at least three 
hours : then turn into a large stone pitcher, pouring in slowly 3 pts. 
ginger ale and 14 glass blackberry juice from cooked berries; serve 
while it effervesces in small chilled mugs. 

' ' Good Ilousekeei ) i n g. ' ' 

CIDER EGG NOG. 

To each qt. sweet cider allow 4 eggs; beat the yolks until they 
assume the consistency of cream ; beat the whites to a stiff froth ; 
stir together the cider and beaten yolks and sweeten to taste ; stir in 
half the beaten whites and season lightly with grated nutmeg; stand 
in ice until very cold; serve in punch glasses with a teaspoon of me- 
ringue on top of each glass. 

GRAPE JUICE. 

Pick Concord grapes from the stem; wash the grapes and heat 
them, stirring them all the time. When broken pour into a jelly bag 



204 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



and allow the juice to drip from the grapes ; measure and add ^4 the 
amount sugar; cook juice and sugar until they reach the boiling 
point; pour into hot bottles; cork and seal immediately. Less sugar 
may be used . Miss L . DeForest . 

WELCH'S GRAPE PUNCH. 

Take the juice of 2 lemons, the juice of 1 orange, (pineapple 
juice will improve it), 1 pt. Welch's grape juice, 1 small cup sugar 
and 1 pt. water. " Mrs. W. M. Hoffer. 

HOW BOILED WATER MAY BE MADE PALATABLE. 

FIRST, Take exactly 2 gallons of water. If the water is not 
clear, beat up the white of 1 egg and add to the water before boil 
uig. This will gather up every particle of foreign matter in the 
water and carry it to the bottom of the vessel. The water should he 
1)rought to a brisk boil and then stood aside to cool and settle. 

SPjCOND, Pour off the clear water and stir into it a level tea- 
spoon of bicarbonate of soda ; then stir in % teaspoon of hydrochloric 
acid. This will make the water perfectly safe, sparkling and re- 
freshing without any flat taste. Cassius Gillette. 
Chief of the Bureau of Filtration of Philadelphia. 



ICE CREAM, ICES, ETC. 205 



ICE CREAM, ICES, ETC. 

Mrs. A. R. Blood 

Under frozen dishes we include : 

Ice Cream — Thin cream or custard foundation, sweetened, flavor- 
ed and frozen. 

Water-ice — Any fruit juice, diluted with water, sweetened and 
frozen . 

Sherbet — AYater Ice to which has been added gelatine or whites 
of eggs. 

Frappe — Water Ice frozen only to the consistency of mush. 

JNIousse or Parfait — Cream, whipped, flavored and sweetened, 
placed in moulds, packed in ice and salt and allowed to stand three 
or four hours. 

DIRECTIONS FOR FREEZING DESSERTS. 

Frozen dishes are perhaps the easiest desserts to be prepared if 
one is provided with a good freezer, ice shave, or burlap bag and axe, 
sufficient ice and coarse salt. Snow may be used instead of ice, but 
as it is not easily acted upon by the salt, pour water upon the snow 
and salt until it is slushy. Never draw off the salt water until the 
mixture is frozen unless there is danger of its getting into the can, 
for this salt water is what effects freezing. 

Shave ice, or if you haven't an ice shave, put the ice in a burlap 
bag and pound it fine with the broad side of an axe. Adjust can con- 
taining mixture to be frozen in the wooden tub, fasten the crank, 
and give it a turn to see that the can fits in the socket. Allow three 
measures of ice to one of salt for ice cream, sherbet or water ice, 
while equal parts of ice and salt should be used for freezing frappe, 
and packing mousse or parfait. If only a small quantity is to be 
frozen, the ice and salt need come but little higher in the tub than 
the mixture in the can, otherwise fill tub to top of can. As the mix- 
lure increases in bulk when freezing, the can should never be more 
than 34 filled. Turn the crank slowly and steadily until it goes pret- 
ty hard. After mixture is partly frozen the crank may be turned 
more rapidly. Add more ice and salt as needed. In freezing water 
ices turn the crank slowly for a few minutes, then rest for about five 
minutes, turn slowly again and again rest. Continue this until the 
water ice is frozen quite hard. It requires a much longer time to 
freeze water ice than ice cream. If you are making a sherbet in- 
stead of a water ice turn dasher rapidly until the mixture is frozen 
pretty hard. After mixture is frozen, draw off water; remove 



206 THE "WARKEN COOK BOOK 

dasher ; with a large wooden spatula scrape the cream from the sides 
of the can, then beat and work it for a number of minntes ; put lid 
on the can, with a cork in the opening; repack with icf and salt, us- 
ing now four measures of ice to one of salt; cover the tub with a 
piece of carpet or with newspapers and set away for one or two hours 
to ripen. Water ices and sherbets should be given three or four 
hours for this ripening process, by which we mean the blending of 
the different ingredients. When ready to serve, dip can in cold 
water, wipe, then turn cream out on a dish. If you wish to mould 
the frozen mixture, do not freeze too hard. Fill the mould or form 
with the mixture, being careful to fill every part of the mould. Cover 
with buttered paper, buttered side up. Put on cover and press down. 
Kepack in salt and ice. 

ICE CREAM 

• ALMOND ICE CREAM. 

1 qt. cream, 1 qt. milk, 2 cups sugar; scald sugar and milk witli 
2 tablespoons Chalmer's gelatine which has been soaked in cold milk, 
let cool ; add cream and 1 cup chopped almonds and freeze. 

Mrs. W. W. Rankin. 

ANGEL ICE CREAM. 

Whip the whites of three eggs to a stiff froth, and put % cup 
each of sugar and water into a saucepan over the fire ; stir until the 
sugar is dissolved; then cook slowly without touching until a little 
dropped into cold water will form a ball when rolled between the 
fingers; pour the hot syrup slowly on the egg white"?, beating con- 
55tantly. When cold add 1 pt. whipped cream, and any desired 
flavoring; freeze. Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 

BANANA ICE CREAM. 

4 eggs, 1 qt. cream, 1 qt. milk, 6 bananas, 1 pound sugar; peel; 
Tnash and then beat the bananas until they become a paste. Allow the 
milk to come to a boil; add the beaten eggs- and sugar; then add 
cream and when cold freeze ; add the bananas when the cream is par- 
tially frozen. Pineapples, strawberries or any other fruit inay be 
used instead. Mrs. S. E. Walker. 

BANANA ICE CREAM II. 

1 qt. cream, % pound sugar, 3 good sized bananas ; put 1 pt. 
of the cream into a farina boiler. When hot, add the sugar, stir un- 
til dissolved, and stand aside to cool. When cool add the remaining 
pt. of cream ; turn into freezer and begin to freeze ; pare the ban- 
anas and cut out the centers with their seeds ; mash the remainder 
to a smooth paste, and turn into the cream when latter is nearly 
frozen; flavor the cream with a little Royce's vanilla. 

Mrs. W. IT. Filler. 



ICE CREAAr, ICES, ETC. 20? 

BISQUE ICE CREAM. 

Make custard as for Vanilla Ice Cream II.; add 1 qt. cream, I 
teaspoon Royce's vanilla, and 1 cup chopped hickory nuts or Eng- 
lish walnut meats; then freeze. Miss Farmer. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM WITH ALMONDS. 

1 ^-enerous pt. milk, 1 scant cup sugar, 1/5 cup Hour. f)inch of 
s;alt, 2 eggs, I qt. cream, 1 cup sugar (caramelized), 1 tablespoon flav- 
oring; put the milk in a double boiler and let come to a boil; beat 
the first cup of sugar, the flouu, salt and eggs together and stir into 
the boiling milk; cook twenty minutes, stirring most of the time. 
"When this has been cooking about fifteen minutes, earamalize the 
second cup of sugar by putting the sugar in an iron or granite sauce- 
pan over the fire and letting it melt and brown; turn this while still 
smoking hot into the custard, which by this time will have cooked 
twenty minutes; mix thoroughly and remove from the fire. "Whe.u 
cool, strain; add the qt. cream and the flavoring and freeze. 

Mrs. W. H. Filler. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

1 qt. cream, 2 cups milk, ^y^ cups sugar, 1 tablespoon Hour, Ys 
tablespoon salt. 1 egg; mix flour, half of sugar, salt and egg: add milk 
gradually. AYhen thick add remaining part of sugar which has been 
caramelized; cook twenty minutes. When custard is cool add cream 
and 1 cup chopped almonds. Miss Charlotte Young. 

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 

1 qt. thin cream, 1 cup sugar, ly^ squares Baker's chocolate, 1 
(ablespoon Royce's vanilla; melt chocolate and dilute M-ith hot water 
lo pour easily; add to cream; then add sugar, salt and flavoring, and 
i'reeze. Mrs. L. II. Ensworth. 

COFFEE ICE CREAM. 

1 qt. cream, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup strong coffee ; mix and freeze. 

Mrs. D. AV. Beaty. 

FRENCH ICE CREAM. 

In a double boiler scald 1 pt. milk; beat together 4 eggs and 1 
cup sugar; stir slowly into scalded milk. When it thicke"is, strain 
and set away to cool ; beat 1 pt. of cream to a froth ; add to the chilled 
custard with 2 tablespoons of Royce's vanilla and freeze. 

Mrs. W. D. Hinckley. 

FROZEN PUDDING. 

1 generous pt. milk, 2 cups granulated sugar, 1/. cud flour (scant 
measure), 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons Chalmer's gelatine, 1 qt. cream, 1 



206 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



pound candied fruit, 1 tablespoon Royce's vanilla; let the milk come 
to a boil ; beat the flour, 1 cup of sugar, and the eggs together, and 
stir into the hot milk; cook twenty minutes; then add the gelatine 
which has been soaked in cold water for one hour. When cool add 
sugar, cream and vanilla; freeze ten minutes; then add fruit; fin- 
ish freezing and pack for about two hours before using. 

Mrs. F. P. Hue. 

GINGER ICE CREAM. 

To recipe for Vanilla Ice Cream, add i/o cup Canton ginger cut 
in small pieces ; then freeze. Approved. 

ICED RICE PUDDING WITH A COMPOTE OF ORANGES. 

Rub y-2 cup rice well in a towel; put it on to boil in 1 pt. cold 
water; boif 1/2 hour; drain; cover with 1 pt. milk, and boil V2 l^our 
longer. Whife this is boiling, whip 1 pt. cream; add what drains 
from the whipped cream to the rice and milk; press the rice througli 
a wire sieve and return it to the farina boiler ; beat together the yolks 
of 6 eggs and li/o cups sugar; then pour over the boiling rice; stir 
well; return again to the fire and cook two minutes, or until it be- 
pns to thicken; take from the fire; add 1 tablespoon Royce's ex- 
tract of vanilla, and turn out to cool. AVhen cool, put into freezer 
and freeze. When frozen, stir in the whipped cre.am; smootli down. 
and let stand for two hours packed in salt and ice. 

FOR THE COMPOTE . 

Boil together for ten minutes 1 pound sugar and i^ cup water; 
skim and add the juice (»f quarter of a lemon: peel 1 dozen sweet 
oranges ; cut them in halves crosswise : cut out the cores with a sharp 
knife; put a few pieces at a time in the hot syrup and lay them 
out singly on a flat dish; pour over them the remaining syrup and 
place on the ice to cool. To dish, lift the can from the ice and salt; 
wipe carefully ; then wipe the bottom with a towel dipped in boiling 
water, and turn pudding out on round dish ; heap the oranges on 
top and around the base of the pudding, and pour the syrup over 
them; serve immediately. Mrs. Blood. 

LEMON BISQUE. 

2 lemons, juice and grated rind, 1 qt. cream, 1 cup sugar; scald 
cream with ^/o the sugar and cool ; dissolve rest of sugar in lemon 
juice ; mix and freeze ; will serve about 12. Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

MACAROON ICE CREAM. 

To recipe for Vanilla Ice Cream, add 1 cup macaroons dried and 
I)ounded; then freeze. Miss Farmer. 



ICE CREAM, ICES, ETC. 209 



MAPLE ICE CREAM NO. I. 

1 qt. cream, 1 largo cup thiclv iiiai)le syru[) ; mix and freeze. 

Mrs. W. W. Rankin. 

MAPLE ICE CREAM II. 

5 eggs, 1 cup maple syrup, % pt. cream ; put syrup on stove ; let 
come to boil ; then stir in beaten yolks ; stir until it thickens ; let 
cool ; whip cream and whites ; add to custard and freeze. 

Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 

NOUGAT ICE CREAM. 

3 cups milk. 1 cup sugar, yolks 5 eggs, 1 teaspoon salt. P/o cups 
lieavy cream, whites 5 eggs, V;{ cup each pistachio, filbert, English 
walnuts and almond meats, 1 teaspoon almond extract, 1 tablespoon 
Royce's vanilla; make a custard of first 4 ingredients; strain and 
cool ; add heavy cream beaten until stiff, whites of eggs beaten un- 
til stiff, nut meats finely chopped, and flavoring; then freeze. 

Mrs. Hiram C Jacobs. 

PINEAPPLE ICE CREAM. 

1 qt. cream, 1 pound sugar, 1 large ripe pineapple or 1 pt. can, 
juice of 1 lemon; put 1 pt. of cream in a farina boiler with 1/4 the 
KUgar; stir until the sugar is dissolved; take from the lire, and stand 
aside to cool; pare the pineapple; take out the eyes; cut open and 
take out the core; then grate the flesh; mix it Avith the rest of the 
KUgar; stir unt'l the sugar is dissolved: a'ld the remaining pt. of 
cream to the sweetened cream and freeze ; add the lemon juice to the 
pineaijple and stir into the frozen cream; beat thoroughly; tiirn the 
crank rapidly for five minutes; then remove the dasher; re-pack the 
tub; cover and stand away for two hours to ripen. Tf canned pine- 
apple is used, add the lemon juice to it, and simi)ly stir the whole in- 
to the cream when cold, and freeze. Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

PEACH ICE CREAM. 

1 dozen best ripe peaches; peel and stone; ])lace in l)owl and 
crush with 6 ounces pulverized sugar. Now take ] qt. rich cream ; 
sweeten to taste and flavor with 1 teaspoon Royce's almond; when 
the sugar is all dissolved put in freezer and when nearly frozen, add 
the peaches. Give a few more turns to the freezer to harden. 

:\Irs. F. C. Darling. 

RASPBERRY ICE CREAM. 

Prepare same as Strawberry Ice Cream, only using raspberries 
instead of strawberries. Approved. 



210 THE WAREEN COOK BOOK 



SNOW CREAM. 

_ 1 cup cream, 1 cup sugar, 1 or 2 eggs beaten well together; then 
stir in light snow until it is frozen as stiff as you wish. This is quick- 
ly made and good. Mrs . C . A . Bettis . 

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 

Put 3 pts. strawberries in a dish with 1 cup sugar and crush, 
season 3 pts. cream with lyo cups sugar and freeze; wlien about froz- 
en open the freezer and put in berries ; then freeze for about five min- 
utes and pack for a few hours before serving. Miss Winger. 

Many people prefer to use only the juice of berries. 

VANILLA ICE CREAM NO. I. 

1 qt. cieam, 1 cup sugar, 1 small teaspoon Royce's vanilla; mix 
ingredients and freeze. Many people think the cream is smoother 
and more velvety if half the cream is scalded with the sugar; then 
allowed to cool, added to the remaining cream and frozen. 

Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

VANILLA ICE CREAM NO. II. 

1 pt. milk, 1 cup sugar, y2 cup flour, scant, 2 eggs, 1 qt. cream, 
.1 tablespoon Royce's vanilla. When the cream is added, add an- 
other cup sugar ; let milk come to boil ; stir in the boiling milk the 
first cup of sugar, the eggs and flour ; cook twenty minutes ; set 
away to cool ; then add sugar, cream and the flavoring : freeze. 

Mrs. Robert Sheldon. 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 

(To be served with Vanilla Ice Cream.) 
1 square Baker's chocolate, 1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, Vi; 
cup water, I/2 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; melt chocolate in double 
boiler ; add the other ingredients excepting the vanilla and boil fif- 
teen minutes. When ready to serve add vanilla. Serve hot. 

Mrs. A. R. Blood. 
COFFEE SAUCE. 
(To be served with Vanilla Ice Cream.) 
11/2 cups milk. 1/2 cup ground coffee, 1/. cup sugar, % table- 
spoon arrowroot, few grains salt; scald milk with coffee, and let 
stand twent.y minutes ; mix remaining ingredients and pour on grad- 
ually the hot infusion which has been strained : cook five minutes 
and serve hot. Mrs. Hiram Jacobs. 

MAPLE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

Maple syrup boiled down and thickened with a little corn 
starch; serve hot. IVIrs. D. W. Beaty. 



ICE CREAM, ICES, ETC. 2 1 1 



WATER ICES AND SHERBETS. 

Any \vater-ice can be made into a sherbet by ad(]ing whites of 
eggs, say 2 or 3 whites to every quart of the mixture to be frozen, 
or 1 tablespoon of Chalmer's gelatine (1 teaspoon it' you use the 
granulated gelatine) to a quart of the mixture. Some use a little 
gelatine even with the eggs, thinking it gives smoothness and body. 
On the other hand any sherbet can be made as a water-ice by omit- 
ting eggs and gelatine. 

BANANA SHERBET. 

1 pt. milk, 1 pt. cream, 2 eggs, VL' dozen bananas sliced thin. 
When ready to freeze add the juice of 4 lemons and 2 tablespoons of 
lemon Jello dissolved in a little hot water. Mrs. E. R. Allen. 

CHERRY ICE. 

1 qt. water, 1 pound sugar, 1 pt. canned cherries, 1 tablespoon 
Chalmer's gelatine; boil sugar and water together for five minutes; 
add gelatine previously soaked in a little cold water to hot syrup; 
let cool ; add juice of 2 lemons ; press cherries through the coarsest 
meat chopper; then add them, juice and all to syrup and freeze. 

Mrs. George Orr. 
CRANBERRY FRAPPE. 

1 qt. cranberries, 2 cups water, 2 cups sugar, juice of 2 lemons ; 
cook cranberries and water 8 minutes; then force through a strain- 
er ; add sugar and lemon juice ; freeze to a mush, using equal parts 
of ice and salt. Mrs. Hiram Jacobs. 

CURRANT SHERBET. 

1 pt. currant juice, IY2 pts. water, 1 pt. sugar, 1 tablespoon 
Chalmer's gelatine, juice of 1 lemon, pinch of salt; soak the gelatine 
for % hour in cold water sufficient to cover it; then dissolve in Y2 
pt. boiling water; mix it with the pt. of cold water, the sugar, salt, 
lemon and currant juice, and freeze. Mrs. Filler. 

GINGER WATER ICE. 

4 cups water, 1 cup sugar, I4 pound Canton ginger, l/o cup 
orange juice. % cup lemon juice; boil water and sugar fifteen min- 
utes: add ginger cut in small pieces, and the fruit juice; cool and 
freeze. If you wish only the ginger flavor, without the pieces of 
ginger, boil the ginger with the sugar and water; add fruit juice; 
when cool strain and freeze. Mrs. Blood. 

LEMON ICE . 

3 pts. water, V/o pts. sugar, rinds of 1 lemon and 1 orange, 
juice of 4 lemons and 1 orange; boil sugar, rinds and water together 



2 1 2 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



twenty minutes ; strain and when cold, add the juices and whites 
of 4 eggs; freeze. Mrs. L. G. Noyes. 

LEMON SHERBET NO. I. 

Boil in 1 qt. milk rind of 1 lemon and 1 pound suu^ar ; when cool 
put in freezer and half freeze. Have ready the juice of 5 lemons 
mixed with a little sugar and the whites of 3 eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth ; add this mixture to the frozen milk in the freezer and freeze 
solid. Mrs. A. D. Wood. 

LEMON SHERBET NO. II. 

1% pts. sugar, 3 pts. water, juice of 10 lemons, 2 tablespoons 
gelatine ; boil the sugar, water and gelatine together twenty-five 
minutes ; add the lemon juice ; strain and freeze. 

Miss Valentine. 

LEMON FRAPPE. 

1 qt. milk, 4 lemons, 1 pt. cream, l^/o cups sugar, whites of 5 
eggs ; heat milk with rind of 1 lemon and sugar ; cool and partially 
freeze ; add juice of 4 lemons ; freeze ; add the eggs well beaten and 
the cream whipped stiff. Mrs. Gruninger. 

MINT ICE. 

Boil together 1 qt. water and 1 cup sugar for five minutes ; re- 
laove the leaves from 10 good-sized stalks of mint; wash carefully; 
chop fine ; then pound them to a pulp ; work gradually into the hot 
syrup ; cool ; strain ; add the juice of 2 lemons and freeze. If fresh 
mint is not available use enough of Royces' extract of spearmint to 
produce desired flavor. Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

ORANGE ICE NO. I. 

1 qt. water, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups orange juice, ^,4 cup lemon 
juice ; boil water, sugar and grated rind of 1 orange for five min- 
utes ; cool ; add orange and lemon juice ; strain through cheese cloth 
and freeze. Mrs. Hiram Jacobs. 

ORANGE ICE NO. II. 

6 oranges, the grated rind of 3, juice of 2 lemons, 1 pt. sugar 
dissolved in 1 pt. cold water; mix and freeze same as ice cream. 

Mrs. C. A. Bettis. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 

Juice of 12 oranges, 1 pound sugar, 2 level tablespoons Chalmer's 
gelatine, 1 qt. boiling water, juice of 1 lemon ; cover gelatine with 
cold water and soak two minutes ; then add boiling water and 



ICE CREAM, ICES, ETC. 213 



sugar ; stir over fire until it boils. When cold add orange and lemon 
juice; strain into freezer. When frozen add 1 egg, better with 1 
tablespoon powdered sugar; beat thoroughly; let stand to ripen. 

Mrs. Richardson. 

PEACH SHERBET. 

1 qt. sweet milk, 2 cups granulated sugar, whites of 3 eggs, 12 
ripe peaches ; put milk, sugar and 1 peach stone in farina kettle and 
boil; cool, strain and half freeze; have ready the peaches pared, 
mashed and rubbed through a wire sieve and the eggs beaten to a 
stiff froth ; add to mixture in freezer and freeze solid. 

Mrs. M. W. Jamieson. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 

Put milk and sugar on stove same as for lemon sherbet; cool 
and partly freeze; 3 eggs beaten to a stiff froth and 1 grated pine- 
apple rubbed through wire sieve; mix, beat light and add to frozen 
mixture and freeze solid. Mrs. A. D. Wood. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 

Boil together 1 ([t. water. 1 pound sugar and 1 pineapple grated; 
add 1 tablespoon granulated gelatine soaked in a little cold water 

Mrs. George Noyes. 

RASPBERRY SHERBET. 

Boil 1 qt. milk and 1 pound sugar; when cool put in freezer 
nnd half freeze; have ready 1 pt. raspberry juice, juice of 1 lemon,' 
and whites of 3 eggs beaten to a stiff froth; add this mixture to the 
frozen milk in the freezer and freeze solid. 

Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

RASPBERRY WATER ICE. 

1 qt. red raspberries, 1 qt. water, juice of 2 lemons, 1 pound 
sugar; add sugar and lemon juice to berries; mash and let stand one 
hour ; then press through a sieve ; add the water and freeze. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

STRAWBERRY WATER ICE. 

Prepare precisely as Raspberry Ice, using strawberries instead 
of raspberries. IMrs. Rorer. 

MOUSSE AND PARFAIT 

ANGEL PARFAIT. 

^Make same as Ancre] Tee Cream; put in mould and pack in cfpial 
l-arts of salt and ice for four hours. Mrs. C. TI. Noyes. 



214 THE WAREEN COOK BOOK. 



CAFE PARFAIT. 

^ box Chalmer's gelatine, i/4 cup cold water, 1 cup clear, strong 
coffee, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup cream, 1 pt. cream, y^ cup powdered sugar, 
J teaspoon Royce's vanilla; soak i/4 box gelatine in Vt cup of cold 
water for % hour ; pour over it 1 cup of clear, strong coffee ; add ] 
cup sugar and stir until it is dissolved ; strain and «tand aside to 
cool ; whip 1 cup cream ; add it to the coffee and stir until it begins 
to thicken ; turn into a freezer and stir until quite hard ; whip 1 pt. 
cream very stiff, adding % cup powdered sugar and 1 teaspooji 
Royce's vanilla; pack in a mould, putting a layer of the coffee mix- 
ture an inch thick as the outside and filling with the whipped cream. 
When the center is filled, cover with the coffee mixture ; then put on 
the cover of the mould, having first bound the edge of the mould 
with a piece of letter paper; dip a piece of muslin in melted butter 
and cover the joint; pack in salt and ice and let stand at least two 
hours. Mrs. W. H. Filler. 

MAPLE PARFAIT. 

Yolks of 3 eggs well beaten, and stirred into % cup of maple 
syrup ; boil until it coats the spoon, when remove from fire and beat 
with beater until cool; add 1 pt. of thoroughly whipped cream; mix 
well; pack in ice and salt, and let stand four hours. 

Lena Waterbrandt. 

COFFEE MOUSSE. 

1 pt. whipped cream, i/o cup granulated sugar, yoiks of 3 eggf^ 
beaten, 5 stale lady fingers rolled into poAvder, 1 teaspoon Royce's 
coffee extract ; pour into buttered mold ; cover tightly and pack in 
ice and salt for three or four hours. Mrs. Leon G. Ball. 

NEAPOLITAN MOUSSE. 

Whip 1 qt. cream stiff; cover ^4 box Chalmer's gelatine with Vi 
cup cold water and let stand % hour; cut ^^ pound candied cherries' 
in pieces; cover with the juice of an orange; let stand until the cher- 
ries are soft ; turn the cream into a basin and add 1 cup powdered 
sugar and the gelatine dissolved over hot water, the fruit and 
orange juice and 1 teaspoon of Royce's vanilla; stir gently from the 
bottom towards the top till it begins to thicken ; turn into a mould 
wet with cold water; pack in ice and salt and let stand two or three 
hours. Mrs. C. E. Bell. 

PEACH MOUSSE. 

V-j: ounce Chalmer's gelatine dissolved in % cup cold water. Af- 
ter it is melted add it to the pulp of 12 peaches also juice of 1 lemon 



ICE CREAM, ICES, ETC. 215 

and 1/2 pound sugar; stir until the mixture begins to congeal; then 
add 1 pt. cream whipped ; mould and chill for three or four hours. 

Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

PINEAPPLE MOUSSE. 

Dissolve 1 ounce Chalmer's gelatine in '% cup cold water. Af- 
ter one hour add 1 cup boiling water, % pound sugar, the juice of 1 
lemon, and 1 can shredded pineapple; stir until it begins to thicken; 
then add 1 cup of cream, whipped; put in mould and bury in ice 
and salt for three hours. Mrs. Parmlee. 

PINEAPPLE WALNUT MOUSSE. 

] pt. cream whipped stiff, 1 cup sugar. 1 cup shredded pineap- 
ple, 1 cup chopped English walnuts, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; pack 
in freezer and let stand three or four hours. Mrs. Chas. Conarro. 

RED RASPBERRY MOUSSE. 

Mash 1 cup berries, add 1 cup powdered sugar and 1 tablespoon 
granulated gelatine soaked in cold water and dissolved in Vi cup 
hot water; stir until mixture begins to thicken; then add 1 cup 
cream whipped until very stiff, and fold in 1 banana cut in thin 
slices; turn into mould and set on ice for three hours. 

Mrs. A. R. Blood. 

SULTANA ROLL. 

Scald 1 qt. milk ; add 1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon flour rubbed 
smooth in a little water, and 1 beaten egg; stir and cook, for twenty 
minutes ; add pinch of salt ; strain and cool ; flavor with 1 teaspoon 
Royce's vanilla and 1 teaspoon Royce's almond extract; add 1 qt. 
whipped cream; color green with Burnett's leaf green, and freeze. 
"When frozen turn into a mould and sprinkle with candied cherries ; 
fill center of mould wnth 1 pt. whipped cream, whipped to stiff froth, 
adding 1/0 cup pow^dered sugar and 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla: pack 
in ice and salt and let stand two hours. Mrs. F. E. Sill. 



2 1 6 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 



FOOD FOR THE SICK. 2 1 1 



FOOD FOR THE SICK 

Mrs. W. S. Pierce 

i\Iany persons think that the more they eat the more strength 
they will have, forgetting that they are only able to assimilate the 
amount of necessary nourishment and all over this is worse than 
-wasted, for it clogs the system in its removal. It was Balzac who 
said, "if there is anything sadder than unrecognized genius, it Is 
a misunderstood stomach."' 

Statistics jirov.e that % of all disease is brought about by er- 
ror in diet. The correct proportions of food-principles have n(jt 
been maintained, or the food has been improperly cooked. Physic- 
ians agree, with but few exceptions, that the proper preparation of 
food for the sick is of as great importance in the restoration to 
health as administration of drugs. Time and manner of serving are 
of ecpial importance. Take especial care in setting an invalid's tray 
Cover with a spotless tray-cloth or napkin. Avoid having too mam 
things on the tray at one time. Salt may appear, but pepper never 
Foods which are intended to be served hot should be placed in heat 
ed dishes and kept covered during transit from kitchen. Equal care 
i-hould be taken to have cold foods served cold. Serve in small quan- 
tities. The sight of too much food often destroys the appetite. 

If patient is restricted to milk diet and milk is somewhat objec- 
tionable, it may be tolerated by serving in different ways, such as 
koumiss, albumenized milk, or by adding Apollinaris, seltzer water 
or rennet. 

BARLEY WATER AND RICE WATER. 

Are generally used to reduce a laxative condition. Toast water 
is often useful in cases of extreme nausea. Fruit waters are princi- 
])ally used for fever patients. They are cooling, refreshincr ai>d mdd- 
I> stiDinlating and vahi;ible fur the salts and acids they (Contain. 
Beef essence, which is the expressed juices of beef, being nutritious, 
is given when a condensed form of food is necessary. Beef tea con- 
tains the juices 01 beef diluted Avith water, and is given as a stim- 
ulant, rather than a nutrient, as is generally supposed. 

Egg-nogs are recommended where it is necessary to take a 
large amount of nutriment daily, as is often the case after a severe 
illness. 

Corn and oatmeal gruels are heat producing and should never 
be given when inflammatory syii^ptoms are present. 

ArroAvroot makes a delicate gruel and is more easily digested 
than anv other form of starch. Tt should never be given to infants. 



2 1 8 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 

Foods should be nutritious, easy of assimilation, in small quan- 
tities, at regular intervals. After the completion of a meal, the tray 
should be removed at once, from the sick room, milk should be cov- 
ered while in the room and if any is left in the glass it must be 
thrown away. 

ALMOND BREAD. 

2 pounds blanched almonds, dried and ground through meat 
chopper, 3 eggs beaten separately, i/4 teaspoon baking powder, a lit- 
tle salt; mix together; then add stiflly beaten whites; stir lightly; 
put in greased pans ; when double in size, bake. Mrs. Geo. Sill. 

BRAN BREAD OR MUFFINS. 

See page 105. One at a meal. Will generally produce a laxative 
condition if eaten with plenty of butter. 

BEEF ESSENCE. 

1 pound steak from top of round. Wipe steak, remove all fat, 
and cut in small pieces ; place in canning jar ; cover ; place on trivet 
in kettle and surround with cold water; allow water to heat slowly, 
care being taken not to have it reach a higher temperature than 130 
degrees Fahrenheit ; let stand two hours ; strain and press the meat 
to obtain all the juices ; salt to taste. 

BLANC MANGE. 

Mix 2 tablespoons powdered arrowroot and 2 tablespoons malted 
milk with a little water into a paste ; add gradually 2 scant cups of 
water ; bring to a boil and stir until it thickens ; add 14 teaspoon 
Royce's vanilla, and, if liked, 1 teaspoon cocoa; put in mould until 
quite cold. G. D. P 

BEEF TEA. 

Beef tea is the juice of the beef diluted with water. Care should 
be exercised in the selection of the beef as it should be juicy and of 
good flavor. The back and middle of the rump and the top of th-; 
round is the best for this purpose. Tenderloin steak sliould never 
be used. 1 pound of lean steak ; remove all fat, skin and membrane ; 
cut fine; add 1 pt. cold water; put into earthen dish and keep at 120 
degrees Fahrenheit for two hours; strain or not. Mrs. Clough. 

BROTH, MUTTON. 

3 pounds mutton (from the neck), 2 qts. cold water, 1 teaspoon 
salt; wipe meat; remove skin and fat, and cut in small pieces; put 
into kettle with bones; cover with cold water; heat gradually to 



FOOD FOR THE SICK. 219 



boiling point; skim; then add salt; cook slowly till meat is tender; 
strain ; cool ; remove fat ; re-heat to boiling point, and, if desired 
add, 3 tablespoons rice or barley and cook until tender. If barley 
is used, soak over night in cold water. 

BROTH, CHICKEN. 

Dress and clean a chicken ; remove skin and fat, disjoint and 
wipe with a wet cloth ; put in stewpan ; cover with cold water ; heat 
slowly to boiling point ; skim and cook until meat is tender. When 
half done season with II/2 teaspoons salt. There should be about 3 
pts. stock ; strain, cool and remove fat ; re-heat to boiling point and 
add 2 tablespoons well washed rice, if desired ; cook until rice is 
soft. 

JUNKET CUSTARD. 

1 cup milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, 14 junket tablet, ] teaspoon 
cold water, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; heat milk until lukewarm; 
add sugar and vanilla; when sugar is dissolved, add tablet dissolved 
in cold water; turn into small moulds and let stand in a cool place 
until firm. 

RENNET CUSTARD. 

1 cup milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 teaspoon liquid rennet, 1 
tablespoon cherry juice ; heat milk until lukewarm ; add sugar and 
cherry juice. When sugar is dissolved, add rennet; turn into small 
moulds and let stand in a cool place until firm. Cinnamon or nut- 
meg may be used in place of cherry juice. 

SOFT CUSTARD. 

Heat iy2. cups of milk in double boiler; beat 3 egg yolks; add 
V2 cup cold milk, 14 cup sugar; add these to hot milk and cook un- 
til custard coats the spoon; strain, flavor with Royce's vanilla and 
serve cold. Mrs. Richards. 

EGG AND LEMON. 

% cup cold water. 1 egg, juice of 1 lemon; shake together in 
shaker or large mouthed bottle for four or five minutes, 

JUNKET. 

Heat 1 qt. milk until lukewarm (98) ; add 3 tablespoons sugar, 1 
teaspoon orange juice or any flavor desired; dissolve 1 junket tab- 
let in 1 tablespoon cold water and add to milk; turn into glasses and 
stand in warm place until thoroughly set; then put in refrigerator 
until needed. Aresta Beattv. 



220 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 

CREAM JELLY. 

1/2 box Chalmer's gelatine, i/i pt. cold water, i/o pt. boiling water, 
] pt. cream ; soak gelatine in cold water. In one hour pour on boil- 
ing water; strain, sweeten and flavor with Royce's vanilla; stir un- 
til it begins to congeal ; then stir into it the cream, well whipped, re- 
serving a little for the top. Serve very cold. Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

GRUEL, ARROWROOT. 

1 cup boiling water, 2 teaspoons Bermuda arrowroot, cold water, 
salt ; mix arrowroot with cold water to form a thin paste ; add to 
boiling water and cook ten minutes ; season and add cream if de- 
sired. Arrowroot is the purest form of starch. 

GRUEL, BARLEY. 

1 cup boiling water, 3 teaspoons barley flour, i/o cup milk, 1^4 tea- 
spoon salt, cold water : mix barley flour with cold water to form a 
thin paste ; add to boiling w^ater and boil fifteen minutes ; then add 
iiiilk, season and strain. 

GRUEL, BARLEY. 

Barley flour, 2 tablespoons blended with a little cold milk and 
stir into 1 qt. scalding milk ; cook in a double boiler two hours ; 
salt to taste and add sugar if desired ; strain. 

INDIAN MEAL GRUEL. 

Blend 1 tablespoon Indian meal, %, tablespoon flour, 1/4 teaspoon 
salt with 2 tablespoons cold water to make a smooth paste and stir 
into boiling water ; boil slowly I14 hours ; dilute with liiilk or cream, 
and strain. 

OATMEAL GRUEL. 

Add 14 ^up oatmeal and % teaspoon salt to IV2 cups boiling 
water; cook four or five hours in a double boiler, adding more water 
if necessary; strain and dilute with hot milk to make it of right 
consistency; re-heat and serve. Sugar and flavoring may be added. 

GRUEL FLOUR. 

Sf-Mld 1 cu]) mill':; mix 1 -j tablespoon flour and a littl(> siilt with 
a little cold milk and stir into the scalding milk; cook in a double 
boiler for i/> hour ; stone and quarter 1 dozen raisins ; add enough 
water to cover; cook slowly until the water has all bojled away: add 
to grnel just l^efcre serviiag. If tbere is luueh diarrhoea, the raisins 
should be left out. 



FOOD FOR TIIE SICK. 221 



GRAPE JUICE. 

l\j cups Coiu'onl grapes, 1 cup cold water, 1/2 cup sugar; wash 
and pick over and remove stems from grapes; add water; cook II/2, 
hours in double boiler ; add sugar and cook twenty minutes^ straiii 
and cool. 

KOUMIS. 

1 qt. milk, 11/2, tablespoons sugar, I/3 yeast cake, dissolved in 1 
tablespoon lukew^arm water; heat milk until lukewarm; add sugar 
and dissolved yeast cake; fill beer bottles within II/2 inches of the 
top and let stand for six hours at a temperature of 80 degrees Fahr- 
enheit ; chill and serve fourth or fifth day. Mrs. Richards. 

LEMONADE. 

1 tablespoon lemon juice, 2 tablespoons syrup, water; make a 
syrup by boiling eight minutes 1 cup water and 1/2 cup sugar. To 2 
tablespoons syrup add lemon juice and % cup water. Soda water, 
Apollinaris or Seltzer w^ater may be used instead. 

LEMONADE, IRISH MOSS. 

14 cup Irish moss, 2 cups cold water, juice 1 lemon, sugar; pick 
over and soak Irish moss in cold water to cover; remove moss; add 
cold water and cook twenty minutes in double boiler; strain. To 1/2 
cup of liquid add lemon juice and sugar to taste. 

LEMONADE, FLAXSEED. 

1 tablespoon whole flaxseed, 1 pt. boiling water, lemon juice, 
sugar; pick over and wash flaxseed; add water and cook two hours, 
keeping just b^low boiling point ; strain : add lemon juice and sugar 
to taste. 

SOUP OATMEAL. 

Add 1/2 pt- cold cooked oatmeal to 1 pt. water; add 14 cup chop- 
ped celery, a bay leaf, a rounding teaspoon salt, unless the oatmeal 
was salted; cover and boil slowly for fifteen minutes; add, if you 
have it. a teaspoon beef extract or use stock in place of water ; press 
through sieve: return to fire; add lA pt. good milk; re-heat; serve. 

WATER APPLE. 

1 large sour apple. 2 teaspoons sugar, 1 cup boiling water: wnpe. 
core and pare apple; put sugar in the cavity: bake until tender; 
mash; pour over water; let stand i^ hour and strain. 

WATER BARLEY. 

1 or 11/2 tablespoons ])arley boiled in I qt. water three hours; add 
boiling water to keep it to 1 quart; strain and add a ])inch of salt. 

]\[rs. I^ieliards. 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 



WATER BARLEY. 

3 tablespoons barley, 4 cups cold water, salt, lemon juice, sugar: 
pick over barley and soak in water over night or for several hours ; 
boil gently 1^ hours; strain; season with salt, lemon juice and sugar; 
re-heat and serve. 

WATER CURRANT. 

2 tablespoons currant juice or jelly, % cup cold w^ater, sugar ; 
mix juice and water; then sweeten to taste, or beat jelly with fork 
and dissolve in water; sweeten if necessary. 

JELLICE. 

% teaspoon of currant, lemon or cranberry jelly; put into gob- 
let ; beat well with 2 tablespoons water ; fill up the goblet with ice 
M'ater, and you have a refreshing drink for a fever patient. 

WATER OATMEAL. 

1 cup fine oatmeal, 2 qts. water, which has been boiled and 
cooled ; add oatmeal to water and keep in a warm place, (at 80 
degrees Fahrenheit), lA/o hours; strain and cool. 

WATER RICE. 

2 tablespoons of rice washed well in two or three waters; take 
stew pan with 1 qt. warm water and put on fire to boil ; when water 
boils put in rice with one inch of the stick of cinnamon and let boil 
one hour until the rice has become a pulp ; strain the rice water into 
a basin and sweeten to taste. When cold it is ready for use. Cin- 
namon cooked with rice helps reduce a laxative condition. 

WATER TOAST. 

Take 2 slices of stale bread ; toast (juite brown and pour on them 
1 qt. boiling water, and let stand ten minutes ; strain through cheese- 
cloth ; season with salt. 

APPLE SNOW. 

1 baked apple ftiashed through a fine sieve to remove skin and 
shreds; beat the white of 1 egg until quite stiff; then fold in 2 table- 
spoons sugar and apple; add last 1 teaspoon lemon juice; serve at 
once with whipped cream. Warren Emergency Hospital. 

CREAM TOAST. 

Heat 1 tablespoon butter. AA^hen it is melted and hot add V^ 
tablespoon flour and i/s teaspoon salt ; stir until smooth : add I/2 cup 
hot milk gradually ijntil it makes a cream mixture ; pour over toast 
and serve hot. Warren Emergency Hospital. 



FOOD FOR THE SICK. 223 



CELERY SOUP. 

Cook 1/4 cup celery in V-: ^'^P boiling water until very soft; 
strain and add I/4 cup hot milk and Vi cup hot cream ; make a creara 
sauce of '/•> tablespoon batter, V2 tablespoon flour, % tesispoon salt, 
white pepper, % teaspoon onion juice; cook until thick and add to 
liquid. Warren Emergency Hospital. 

PARFAIT. 

AVhip 1/2 pt. thick cream until stiff; then add 3 teaspoons sugar, 
1/4 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; pack in freezer and allow to stand three 
hours without turning. "Warren Emergency Hospital. 

POOR MAN'S RICE PUDDING. 

Wash 1/^ cup rice thoroughly and place in a baking dish with 
cups milk ; bake in moderate oven ly^ hours ; then add Ys cup raisins 
and 3 tablespoons sugar and bake 14 hour longer; serve either warm 
or chilled with cream. AA^arren Emergency Hospital. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat yolks of 6 eggs until thick and lemon colored ; add 1 cu]i 
sugar gradually and continue beating; add 2 teaspoons lemon juice 
«nd grated rind and whites of eggs beaten dry. AVhen whites are 
partly mixed with yolks cut carefully and fold in 1 cup flour, mixed 
and sifted with pinch of salt; bake in an unbuttered tin in a slow 
oven for thirty minutes. Warren Emergency Hospital. 



224 THE WAEREN COOK BOOK. 



JELLIES 

Mrs. C. H. Smith 

Jellies are made from fruit juice and sugar in nearly all cases 
proportions being equal. When failures occur, they may usually 
be traced to the use of too ripe fruit ; or a damp atmosphere. If a 
possible thing, try and make it on a clear day. 

To Prepare Glasses — AVash and put on back of range to get 
hot, or wipe them from hot water when jelly is almost finished. 

To Cover Jelly Glasses — Melt parafine wax; put one large 
tablespoon over each top after jelly is perfectly cold — cover with the 
regular top or paper and plainly mark each glass and set in cold, 
but dry place. 

Always heat your sugar before adding it to the hot juice ; put 
it in a granite dish, or a dripper; put in the oven lea\ing the door 
open and stir occasionally. 

To Make Jelly Bag — Fold two opposite corners of cheese cloth 
or cotton and wool flannel 44 yards long: sew up in form of a corn- 
ucopia, rouuding at the end: fell or French seam to make strong; 
bind the top with tape and finish with two or three loops. 

BAR-le-DUC JELLY. 

This jelly requires time and patience, but amply repays the 
maker for her trouble, if made in small quantities, and is much less 
expensive than the imported article. Either white or red currants 
may be used, not over-ripe. Stem and wash the currants ; spread 
on a soft towel ; cover with another towel, and pat gently to remove 
all moisture. Now take an ordinary unused steel pen ; open each 
currant and scoop out the seeds and juice into a bowl; save the 
skins in another bowl. To % bowl of juice and seeds, add H bowl 
(.f currants unseeded ; mash and put on to boil. When hot. add one 
bowl and a quarter of granulated sugar ; boil ten minutes and strain 
through a fine wire sieve. Now add a good half bowl of currant 
skins to the syrup thus formed and boil slowly about fifteen min- 
utes. A few seeds will adhere to the skins, but do not attempt to 
remove them all, as it would crush the skins too much ; pour into 
jelly glasses. When set, cover with parafine. This makes five or 
six glasses. Mrs. W. D. Hinckley. 

BLACKBERRY JELLY NO. I. 

Blackberries are best for jelly when partly red ; cook them to 
a pulp with a little water; then strain; use pound of sugar to a pt 
of juice. 



.IKLLIES. 225 

BLACKBERRY JELLY NO. II. 

To your blackberries atkl a few apples in about the proportion 
of 6 apples to 8 or 10 qts. ; cook in a little water; strain through a 
jelly bag; use pint for pint of juiee and sugar; eook antil it jellies; 
try by putting a teaspoon of the liquid in a cool place and when 
it jellies pour into glasses. 

BLACK RASPBERRIES AND CURRANT JELLY. 

l"^se black raspberi'ies and currants in about efpial parts, a few 
more berries than currants if desired ; cook and proceed as for 
blackberry jelly. 

CURRANT JELLY NO. I. 

Currants are usually in best condition between June 28 and July 
3. Cherry currants make the best jelly, equal portions red and 
white currants are desirable and make a lighter colored jelly; pick 
over currants, need not remove stems; wash and put in kettle with 
a little water; cook slowly until currants look white; put in bag. and 
drain; measure; bring to boiling point; boil eight minutes; add hot 
sugar, (pt. of sugar to a pt. of juice); boil three minutes; pour in 
glasses. 

CURRANT JELLY NO. II. 

Put fruit in a stone jar and set in a kettle of tepid w^ater; boil 
until the fruit is well softened, stirring frequently; put in a jelly bag 
and let drip a few hours; boil juice just tw^enty minutes; add hot 
sugar; let boil five more; pour into glasses. Mrs. Ella Darling. 

CURRANT JELLY NO. III. 

Squeeze juice from currants without cooking; boil juice twenty 
minutes; then add 1 pound of hot sugar for each pint of juice; stir 
well together and boil five minutes. 

Mrs. A. K. Blood and Mrs. J. AV. Lees. 

CRAB APPLE JELLY. 

Wash ap])les; remove stems and blossoms and cut in (piai'tcT's; 
put in kettle and add cold w^ater to come nearly to top of apples: 
cook slowly until apples are soft; mash and drain through a coarse 
sieve; avoid squeezing apples which makes jelly cloudy; then allow 
juice to drip through the bag; boil twenty miinites; add equal quan- 
tity of hot sugar; boil five minutes; skim and turn into glasses; fol- 
low same directions for apple jelly, the juice of one or two lemons 
improves either kind. 



226 THE AVARKEN COOK BOOK. 



CRANBERRY JELLY NO. I. 

Pick over and wash 1 qt. cranberries; put in a (l()nl)le l)uiler. 
filling outer vessel with lukewarm water; cover closely; bring to a 
boil ; keep this up until berries are broken to pieces ; strain and then 
heat quickly to boiling ; add one cup hot sugar ; take from fire soon 
as sugar is melted and turn into mould. Mrs. Schlosser. 

CRANBERRY JELLY NO. II. 

Pick over and wash 4 cups cranberries ; put in a stew pan with 
1 cup boiling water and boil twenty minutes ; rub through a sieve ; 
add 2 cups sugar and cook five minutes; turn into a mould or glasses. 

Mrs. F. E. Sill. 

DAMSON JELLY. 

Wipe and prick with a pin ; make same as currani jelly, using 
% as much sugar as juice. 

FOUR FRUIT JELLY. 

1 pound cherries stoned. 1 pound currants, 1 pound strawberries, 
] pound raspberries ; put all the fruit into a pot with 4 pounds of loaf 
sugar and put over a quick fire ; boil steadily ; when the sugar is 
melted, the fruits dissolved and the preserve begins to rise to the 
surface, remove the pot from the fire; strain through a s'ieve ; put in 
glasses and cover when cold or put in i/^ pt. cans and seal while hot. 

Mrs . James . Parmlee . 

GRAPE JELLY. 

Take grapes just beginning to turn ; boil ; put in jelly bag and 
let drain; boil the juice twenty minutes; add 1 pt. sugar to each pt. 
of juice and boil about ten minutes longer. Mrs. McNett. 

GRAPE AND QUINCE JELLY. 

To 15 pounds of grapes add 10 quinces; cut quinces up, remov- 
ing every seed and cook twenty minutes; strain all together and 
place juice on stove to boil ; let boil fifteen minutes, lieing near to 
remove scum as it appears. Have sugar hot in oven, allowing a 
pound of sugar to a pt. of juice ; add sugar and boil ten minutes when 
it is ready for the glasses. Mrs. John Clark. 

HUCKLEBERRY JELLY. 

When canning huckleberries, take some of the superfluous juice 
and make jelly of it in the same manner as other fruit jellies ex- 
cept that not more than % cup of sugar for a cup of juice is neces- 
sary. It makes a delicious jelly. Mrs. Kichards. 



JELLIES. 221 

ORANGE AND CURRANT JELLY. 

21/2 qts. currant juice, 1 pound raisins seeded, 7 pounds white 
sugar ; boil raisins in currant juice five minutes ; then add sugar and 
6 oranges cut in squares, including skins, (removing seeds.) Boil 
twenty minutes or until it will jelly. Agnes Kobertson. 

MINT AND APPLE JELLY. 

1/2 peck green apples, green skin, 1 large bunch fresh mint; 
wash and quarter apples ; cover with cold water and put on to boil ; 
add i/> of mint. "When apples are soft strain through sieve on to the 
rest of the mint bruised. When cool strain through jelly bag; add 
nearly as much sugar as juice and 1 drop of green coloring; proceed 
as with any jelly. Mrs. W. D. Hinckley. 

PEACH JELLY. 

Pare, stone and slice the peaches and put into a stone jar w^ith 
% of the kernels ; heat in a pot of boiling w^ater, stirring from time 
to time until the fruit is well broken ; strain, and to every pint of 
peach juice add the juice of 1 lemon; measure again, allowing a 
pound of sugar to each pt. of juice ; heat the sugar very hot and add 
when the juice has boiled twenty minutes; let it come to a boil and 
take instantly from the fire. 

QUINCE JELLY. 

Cut up and core ripe quinces ; put them in sufficient water to 
cover and stir gently till soft ;. strain without pressure, and to every 
pound of juice allow 1 pound of crushed sugar ; boil the juice twenty 
minutes; add the sugar and boil again till it jellies, about fifteen 
minutes; stir and skim well all the time; strain through thin cloth 
into glasses and when cold cover. 

RED RASPBERRY AND CURRANT JELLY. 

5 qts. currants, 4 cups water, 5 qts. raspberries, 2 cups water; 
cook separately; drain; then measure juice and put together; boil 
twenty minutes; add equal quantity of hot sugar and boil five min- 
utes or longer; try it and see if it jellies by cooling a spoonful quick- 
ly. If not, cook a few minutes longer ; skim and pour into glasses. 

Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

When currants are best and cheapest get enough to make all the 
juice you wish for jelly ; cook and drain ; then heat juice and can 
hot (no sugar..) The juice will keep until other fruits are cheaper 
and when one wishes to make raspberry, blackberry or peach ielly, 
add part currant juice which insures making it jell. 



228 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 



VENISON JELLY. 

1 peck wild grapes, 1 qt. vinegar, 14 cup each whole cloves, 
stick cinuamon; 6 pounds sugar; put first ingredients in preserving 
kettle ; heat slowly to boiling point ; cook until grapes are soft ; 
strain and boil twenty minutes ; then add hot sugar and boil five 
minutes. Boston Cook Book. 



CANNED FRUITS AND PRESERVES 229 

Canned Fruits and Preserves 

Mrs. C. L. Clough 

Fruit for canning should be fresh, firm, of good quality, and not 
over-ripe. If over-ripe, some of the spores may survive the boiling, 
then fermentation will take place in a short time. 

For canning fruit, use % as much sugar as fruit and 2I/2. to 3 
cups water to each pound of sugar; make a syrup of the sugar and 
water cooking ten minutes ; add a small quantity of the fruit at a 
time ; by so doing, fruit may be kept in perfect shape. Fill sterile 
jars with fruit, and enough syrup added to overflow jars. If there 
is not sufficient syrup, add boiling water, as jars must be filled to 
overflow. Introduce a spoon between fruit and jar, that air bubbles 
may rise to the top, quickly put on rubber and screw on sterilized 
covers, being sure that the jars are air tight. 

PRESERVING, — Use % or equal amount of sugar with fruit. 
Large fruit may be left whole or cut in halves. 

TO STERILIZE JARS. 

"Wash jars and fill with cold water: place in a large kettle and 
surround with cold water ; heat gradually to boiling point ; remove 
from water, empty, and fill while hot with fruit ; place tops in water 
to sterilize; dip rubbers in hot water, but do not allow them to stand. 
New rubbers should be used each season, and care must be taken that 
rims of covers are not bent, as jars cannot then be hermetically 
sealed. 

SMALL FRUITS. 

Be careful in selection of fruits; remove stones or hulls, if any; 
put in porcelain kettle with granulated sugar on top in the propor- 
tion of ] cup of sugar to 1 qt. of fruit ; let stand for an hour or sn 
as this keeps fruits whole ; set on stove with a little water in the bot- 
tom, to prevent burning stir up from bottom once or twice; boil five 
or six minutes. Mrs. W. D. Hinckley. 

AMBROSIA. 

1 bowl of grated pineapple, 2 bowls of mashed strawberries. 3 
bowls of granulated sugar; mix together and boil slowly till thick; 
then pour into jelly glasses and seal with parafine. If pineapple 
flavor is liked best use two bowls of pineapple and 1 of berries. 

Mrs. C. B. Salver. 



230 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 

CHERRY CONSERVE. 

6 pounds pitted sour cherries, 3i/^, pounds sugar, IV2 pounds rais- 
ins, rind, pulp and juice of 3 oranges, 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 
1 teaspoon nutmeg ; boil cherries and sugar ten minutes ; chop the 
raisins, oranges and spices together; add to the cherries and sugar; 
boil all together until thick ; put in glasses. Mrs. James Roy. 

CURRANT CONSERVE. 

This is something new and so delicious that it may well be con- 
sidered one's choicest preserve; take five pounds of washed and 
stemmed currants, 5 pounds of sugar, and 5 oranges peeled, and 
seeded, and cut into bits ; add 2I/2 pounds seedless raisins ; mix the 
whole together and boil for twentv minutes; seal while hot. 

Mrs. C. E. Bell. 

CURRANT MARMALADE. 

5 pts. currant juice, 5 pounds sugar, 1 pound of raisins seeded, 
4 oranges ; put the juice in preserving kettle ; add th'3 orange peel 
chopped fine, and raisins slightly chopped ; boil this ten minutes ; 
then add the juice of oranges and the sugar; put into glasses same 
as jelly. Mrs. C. B. Salyer. 

CURRANTS AND RASPBERRIES PRESERVED WITHOUT COOK- 
ING. 

1 bowl currants, 2 bowls red raspberries, 3 bowls sugar; mash 
fruit thoroughly, a little at a time, using wooden spoon. When all 
is done add sugar; let stand 24 hours, stirring often. Then put in 
cans and seal. Unless every particle of fruit is mashed it will not 
keep. Mrs. C. B. Salyer. 

GRAPES. 

Squeeze the pulp of the grapes from the skins ; cook pulp till 
you can press it all through a sieve ; free from seeds ; add a little 
water to skins and cook till tender ; then put skins and pulp together. 
To each pint add a pound of sugar ; boil fifteen minutes. 

GRAPE CONSERVE. 

Put skins in one dish and pulp in another : boil pulp and strain 
to remove seeds ; then add skins and cook till tender ; then strain 
again. To 3 pts. juice add 3 pounds of brown sugar. 2 pounds of 
chopped and seeded raisins ; boil till thick ; remove from fire and add 
1 pound of blanched and chopped almonds; put in glasses and seal. 
A 10 pound basket will make 3 pts. juice. This quantity will make 
14 glasses. Mrs. C. B. Salyer. 



CANNED FRUITS AND PRESERVES. 251 



GREEN GRAPE CONSERVE. 

1 pound seeded grapes xnd 1 pound sugar; seleet the largest 
grapes on the bunch; cut in halves; remove seeds; then weigh them- 
make a rich syrup of ihe sugar and a little water; then put lii the 
grapes a.nd cook till clear and thi.-k. Mrs. C. B. Salyer. 

GRAPE JAM. 

Remove the ji,rapes from the stems; wash them and i)ress the 
jjiilp from the skins; boil the pulp until it will separate from the 
seeds; rub through a sieve; add the skins to the pulp and boil with 
an equal weight of sugar for fifteen minutes; put into jars or 
tiunblers and when cool cover wWh paper wet in brandy or melted 
])arafine. Miss Deforest. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

3V-J pounds of Catawba grapes (weigh after removing stems), 
2Vii pounds of brown sugar. 1 pt. vinegar, cloves and cinnamon to 
taste ; squeeze grapes from skins ; scald pulp till it will pass through 
a sieve; then put into a porcelain kettle; add vinegar; let boil up 
once ; then add skins and sugar and boil one hour or longer. 

Mrs. C. B. Salver. 

JIM JAM. 

6 pounds crab apples, quartered and cored, but not peeled, 1 pt. 
vinegar, 2 pounds seeded raisins, 2 oranges, pulp and all cut quite 
fine, 6 pounds sugar, l^/o tablespoons each of cinnamon and cloves ; 
put spices in a bag; add 1 cup of water and the vinegar; boil a few 
minutes; add sugar and boil twenty minutes; add crabapples, oranges 
and raisins and cook i/^> hour; remove spices and seal. 

IMrs. F. H. Gruninger. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

12 sweet oranges, (Valencia), 6 bitter oranges, (Seville), 4 lem- 
ons, 8 pounds sugar, 4 qts. water. After cutting oranges and lemons 
in very thin slices, cover them with the Avater and let the whole stand 
36 hours; then boil three hours; add sugar and boil two hours nuire. 
So much depends on size and sweetness of oranges that one must 
judge of the amount of sugar. Also too nuich ])()ilinsr makes the 
marmalade dark. 

PEACHES. 

]\rake a syrup in the proportions of '■] cups of su^ar to a qt. of 
water, in (juaiitity according to the amount of fruit to can; let it 
simmer en back of stove, and begin peeling fruit; plaee in glass jars 
crowding in as much as possible; godly po\ir in the l^oiling syrup. 



252 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 

nearly filling the can; put on cover without rubber; proceed Avith 
next can the same way until you have filled enough cans to fill your 
steamer. Most iruit requires 1/2 hour to cook but very ripe fruit 
better be tried with fork in twenty minutes ; remove ; till up the can 
Avith syrup , adjust new rubber and seal. Four stones to each can 
add color and flavor to the syrup. Mrs. J. Kitchen. 

PEACHES. 

Select fruit not over ripe and of good flavor: pare and put in 
cold water to keep from the air, as soon as all are prepared, put in 
porcelain kettles, (2) 1 containing hot water, 1/0 full, the other gran- 
ulated sugar with about % water; take from cold water and plunge 
immediately into the kettle of hot water; try with a silver fork to 
see when tender ; should not boil more than two or three minutes ; 
as fast as the pieces are tender put them into hot cans and cover with 
boiling syrup from the other kettle; seal can and proceed in the same 
manner with rest. It is not best to cook more than enough to fill 2 
or 3 cans at a time. Always run a silver fork handle down inside 
the can two or three times to let out air bubbles. Plums and cherries 
may be put up in the same way, allowing them to cook until skins 
begin to break. Mrs. W. D. Hinckley. 

PEACH MARMALADE. 

10 poiTnds peaches, ly^ pounds sugar, 1 pineapi)le. juice of 3 
lemons, pits of 14 of the peaches; cook peaches and i)iu<>apples. with- 
out adding water, for an hour; then add peach pits which have been 
blanched, boiled until tender and chopped fine ; add lemon and sugar 
and cook twenty minutes. Will keep in jelly glasses. 

Mrs. 0. S. Brown and Mrs. Robert Hall. 

PEARS. 

Pare with silver fruit knife ; plunge immediately into cold water 
to keep from discoloring; make syrup of 1 pt. sugar to qt. of water: 
place on stove in porcelain kettle ; have another with boiling water ; 
take from cold water and plunge quickly into boiling water. When 
tender put into hot cans and cover with boiling syrup : seal immed- 
iately. Mrs. Fred Darling. 

PEARS BAKED AND CANNED. 

Select good winter pears (Duchess preferred) ; wipe clean and 
prick each with silver fork ; set in baking pan with little Avater in 
the bottom; bake slowly till tender. If very large cut lengthwise in 
halves; make a syrup of brown sugar, in the proportion of 1 cup ol 
sugar to 1 pt. water. When pears are done place as many in the 
cans as possible and fill Avith hot syrup; seal immediately. Quinces 
may be canned in the same Avav. Mrs. C. B. Salver. 



CANNED FRUITS AND PRESERVES. 255 



PEAR CHIP. 

8 pounds of sugar, 8 pounds of fruit sliced thin, 4 lemons, I/4 
pound preserved ginger; boil lemon peel till tender (cut fine),; then 
add ginger sliced, and boil all together till clear and thick. 

Mrs. W. J. Richards. 

PEAR MARMALADE. 

8 pounds chopped Bartlett pears, 6 pounds sugar, 4 lemons, juice 
and grated rind, ly^ green ginger scraped and chopped very fine, 1 
cup water; boil slowly % of hour or untiV pears are clear. 

Mrs. James Roy. 

SPICED PEARS. 

7 pounds pears, 3 pounds sugar, 1 pt. vinegar, I/2, o/.. ginger root, 
Yj lemon (rind), I/2 oz. whole cloves, Y2 oz. whole allspice, ^/^ oz. 
stick cinnamon ; cut the pears in half ; remove the seeds and pare ; 
put the vinegar and sugar on to boil. Into each piece of the pear 
stick three or four cloves ; divide the cinnamon, allspice and ginger 
into tAvo parts ; put into small pieces of cheese cloth ; tie tightly, 
and then throw them into the sugar and vinegar. When this mixture 
begins to simmer, add the pears and the lemon rind ; bring all to 
boiling point; take from the fire, and turn carefully into a stone jar; 
stand in a cool place over night. Next day drain all the syrup 
from the pears into a porcelain lined or agate kettle ; cook over a 
moderate fire, and when boiling hot pour it back in the jar over the 
pears. Next day drain and heat again as before ; do this for five 
consecutive days. The last day boil the syrup down until there is 
just enough to cover the fruit; add the fruit to the hot syrup, bring 
the whole to a boil, and put in stone or glass jars or tumblers. The 
pears may be finished in one day, by taking out the fruit and cooking 
the syrup slowly down to the right amount, then the fruit is added 
to it. re-heat and finish as above. Miss DeForest. 

PINEAPPLE. 

Pare fruit and take out all eyes; cut in small slices; weigh fruit 
and with half as many pounds sugar as fruit put in a crock aiul let 
stand over night; in the morning put it over the fire and let boil 
for a minute only. 

PINEAPPLE (CANNED COLD.) 

Cut up fruit into dice or shred it. To 1 pound of fruit. 1 pountl 
of sugar; place in layers in a crock; leave over night; put in glass 
cans and fill to top; seal airtight, dipping covers and rubbers in -warm 
water; place in a dark place. ]\Irs. C. B. Salver. 



254 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 



SPICED PINEAPPLE. 

7 pounds fruit, 4 pounds sugar, 1 pt. vinegar, Vj ounce cassia- 
buds, Vi ouncje whole cloves, Vt ounce ginger root; pare pineapples: 
take out llie eyes and slice; cook in the syrup over a moderate Hre 
ten minutes; cook tlie syrup with sjiices ten minutes before adding 
fruit; remove ginger root before canning. 

Mrs . L G . Noyes . 

QUINCE HONEY. 

2 quinces, grated, 1 pt. sugar, i/. pt. water; boil t^* entv minutes. 

Mrs. F. E.' Sill. 

RHUBARB (PIE PLANT.) 

Wash the stalks and cut into inch pieces ; fill cans lightly and 
then fill up with cold water; put on the rubbers and tops all under 
cold water, to exclude the air ; screw tops very tight. 

Miss Marae Kopf. 

STRAWBERRIES. 

For 10 qts. of berries use 9 qts. sugar; add enough Avater to lit- 
tle more than cover sugar and place on stove. When it boils put 
in the berries and let all boil briskly for three or four minutes. 

xMrs. S. M. Hall. 

DELICIOUS STRAWBERRY JAM. 

Crush the berries and put in preserving kettle to cook without 
any water; let them bubble all over before adding the sugar, which 
should be in the proportion of 3 cups sugar to 2 of berries ; let boil 
just ten minutes and seal in i/o pt. cans. This is fine to serve with 
ice cream, as it has the real strawberry flavor. 

Mrs. C. H. Noyes. 

STRAWBERRY PRESERVE. 

Select large solid berries and use a pound of sugar to a pound 
(>f fruit ; place alternately a layer of berries and sugar in preserving 
kettle and let stand over night. In the morning place over fire and 
boil fifteen or twenty minutes ; pour on platters and let remain three 
or four days ; then put into jelly glasses and seal. 

IMrs. C. T. Conarro. 

GREEN TOMATO FIGS. 

4 pounds small green tomatoes, 4 pounds sugar, juice of 2 lem- 
ons, 1/2 ounce of ginger and mace mixed, small stick cinnamon; 
pierce each tomato with a fork; then put all together in a porcelain 
kettle to boil ; add 1 lemon sliced as thin as possible ; boil all together 



CANNED FRUITS AND PRESERVES. 255 



till fruit is clear; take from kettle with a skimmer; lay on platters 
to cool ; boil syrup till thick, adding lemon juice ten minutes before 
syrup is done ; put fruit into iars ; pour hot syrup over it. 

Mrs. C. B. Salyer. 

TOMATO CONSERVE. 

Slice Ys pk. of green tomatoes, 2 lemons and 1 orange, removing 
seeds of lemons and orange; let all come to a boil; add 2 pounds 
white sugar; season to taste with crystallized ginger cut fine, (4 or 
5 pieces) ; boil until transparent and syrup thickens. 

Mrs. W. D. Hinckley. 



256 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



CANNED VEGETABLES. 23? 

CANNED VEGETABLES 

Mrs. W. E. Rice 



Fruits and vegetables to be sterile must be thoroughly heated. 
All jars and covers must be sterile and the housewife must observe 
surgical cleanliness. 

If the housewife understands the real definition of sterilization, 
the canning of vegetables becomes an easy process. Peas, corn and 
beets contain sugar which furnish nourishment and food for yeast 
plants and bacteria, which make them more difficult to keep than 
fruits rich in acids. 

Young lima beans, young green peas and sweet corn are easily 
dried and are much more palatable than those canned, if properly 
soaked and carefully cooked. 

Dried cabbage, spinach, cauliflower and beets are sold by lirst- 
class grocers. 

Eggs are dried to use in winter when eggs are scarce and ex- 
pensive. Mrs. Rorer. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Wash, trim, cover Avith boiling water; boil rapidly for fifteen 
minutes ; then drain and arrange, heads up, in wide-mouthed jars. 
Adjust rubbers, fill the jars to overflowing with water (that has been 
boiled and cooled) ; add a teaspoon salt and lay on rubbers and lids 
loosely. Stand the jars in the boiler on top of rack, surround half 
way with cold water; cover the boiler; bring quickly to boiling 
point and boil for liA hours; lift out 1 jar at a time; ouickly fasten 
or screw down top without lifting it from the jar; keep protected 
from draught until cool. 

BEETS. 

AVash young beets; throw into boiling water and cook for Vo 
hour; remove skins; pack the beets in jars; add i/^ pt. vinegar to a 
qt. water (that has been boiled and cooled) : fill the jars and cook % 
(if an hour; follow directions for Asparagus. 

STRING BEANS NO. I. 

String and cut the beans; put them into the cans and fill cans 
full of cold water ; steam three hours ; remove cover and put on rub- 
ber; steam one hour and seal without removing cover. 

Mrs. W. D. Hinckley. 



256 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



STRING BEANS NO. II. 

Wash and cut beans in inch pieces; fill jars with beans and 
place under faucet ; let cold water flow freely on them until jars are 
full ; put rubbers and covers on jars ; fasten loosely ; use boiler or 
steamer and steam 3i/o hours ; seal without removing cover. If boil- 
er is used, put shingles or board in bottom of boiler, on which place 
jars and fill boiler with cold water until jars are % covered. 

LIMA BEANS. 

Wash, shell and fill jars and place under running water and 
steam like string beans. 

TO CAN CORN. 

Cut corn from cob ; pack cans full, pressing down hard ; steam 
three hours ; put on rubber ; steam one hour ; seal without removing 
cover. Mrs. W. D. Hinckley. 

PEAS. 

W^ash, shell and fill jars ; then place jars under running water 
and steam as string beans. 

TOMATOES. 

Scald and pare tomatoes; cut large ones in quarters and 
small ones in halves ; add salt to suit taste ; cook only from three to 
five minutes, after they come to a boil ; can and seal while hot. Tin 
cans are best, and if care is taken to empty, wash and dry thorough- 
ly as soon as opened for use, the cans may be used with safety for 
4 or 5 years. Mrs. J. Gleave. 

TOMATOES. 

Follow above directions, omitting the salt, place in sterilized 
glass jars, using new rubbers, seal quickly. Keep in a cool dark place. 

Mrs. Kitchen. 



PICKLES. 239 

PIC LKES 

Mrs. T. S. McNett 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

In making pickles use none but the best cider vinegar, and boil 
in a porcelain kettle — never in metal. A small lump of alum dis- 
solved and added when scalding pickles the first time, renders them 
crisp and tender, but too much is injurious. Keep in glass or stone- 
ware; look at them frequently and remove all soft ones; if white 
specks appear in the vinegar; drain off and scald, adding a liberal 
iiandful of sugar to each gallon, and pour again over the pickles ; 
liits of horserdish and a few cloves assist in preserving the life of the 
vinegar. If put away in large stone jars, invert a saucer over the 
top of the pickles, so as to keep well under the vinegar. The nicest 
way to put up pickles is bottling, sealing while hot, and keeping in 
a cool, dark place. Many think that mustard (the large white or 
mellow) improves pickles, especially those chopped and bottled, and 
mangoes. Never put up pickles m any thinir that has held any kind 
of Grrease. and ne\'f'r let them freeze. T'se an oaken tub or cask for 
pickles in brine, keep them well under, and have more salt thaji will 
<lissolv(\ so that there will always be plenty at the bottom of the 
cask. All pickles should be kept from the air as much as possible. 
In making sweet pickles, use best brown sugar, "Coffee C," or good 
maple sugar. 

BEAN PICKLES. 

Pick green beans when young and tender; string and place in a 
kettle to boil with salt to taste, until they can be pierced witli a 
fork; drain well through a colander; put in a stone jar; sprinkle 
Avith ground black and cayenne pepper, and cover with strong cider 
\ megar, sugar may be added if desirable. Approved. 

PICKLED BLACKBERRIES 

Take 4 pounds sugar to 7 pounds fruit. 1 pt. vinegar. 2 ounces 
cinnamon. 2 ounces cloves; put all together; tie spices in bags; let 
all scald but not boil, just to let the juice run out; soon as berries 
look red, skim out into a crock; let the juice cook down until 
(juite rich ; then pour over berries. Perhaps in a week or tvro you 
Avill need to repeat cooking. ]\Irs. Dwiglit CoAvan. 



240 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



SWEET PICKLED BEETS. 

Boil them in a porcelain kettle till quite soft, when cool cut 
lengthwise or any desired shape ; boil equal parts vinegar and 
sugar with 1/2 tablespoon of ground cloves tied in a bag, to each 
gallon ; pour boiling hot over the beets. Mrs. T. W. McNett. 

SPICED CANTALOUPE. 

7 pounds cantaloupe ; pare and cut in sections ; 4 pounds sugar, 
1 pt. vinegar, 1/0 oz. ginger root, 1 teaspoon ground cloves, 2 tea- 
spoons allspice, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1/0 teaspoon ground mace; 
put the vinegar and sugar on to boil ; mix spices and divide into 4 
parts ; put each part into a square of muslin and tie tightly and 
throw into the sugar and vinegar. When this mixture is hot add 
the cantaloupe and bring all to boiling point; take from fire and 
turn carefvTlly into a stone jar; stand in a cool place over night. 
Next day drain off all the liquor and boil up again and pour over 
ihe fruit; do this seven times. The last time boil juice until the 
consistency of syrup ; add fruit and bring all to boil . All fruits 
are fine done this way, cherries, pears, plums, quinces, watermelon 
rind and peaches. Mrs. McCullough, liaworth. 

CABBAGE CHOWDER. 

2 heads cabbage, 1 dozen 'good sized sweet peppers, all colors, 
4 ounces mustard seed, 1 tablespoon salt, 1 cup sugar; chop cabbage 
and peppers together; add other ingredients and let stand four 
hours; drain; cover with vinegar; place in cans and seal. Can be 
used to fill mangoes. IVfi-s. J. T. I'.rennen. 

CHOWDER. 

1 peck green tomatoes. 8 large onions ; chop all fine and mix 
with them 1 teacup salt and let stand over night. In the morning 
drain in colander and put into kettle containing 1 qt. water and 1 
qt. vinegar; let boil twenty minutes; then skim out; now place chow- 
der in kettle with 1 pound brown sugar. 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper, 
1 tablespoon each of whole cloves and allspice, and 1 of ground cin- 
namon and 4 tablesj)oons mustai'd seed ; co^-er with good vinegar and 
let boil up once. Rose E. Hammond. 

CHOWDER. 

I/O, pk. green tomatoes, same of cabbage, 4 peppers, 6 onions, IM.* 
ounces white mustard seeds, l^ ounce celery seed, 4 cups sugar; chop 
the tomatoes, cabbage, peppers and onions fine ; cover with salt and 
let stand over night; then drain; add the sugar and seeds; cover 
with vinegar and cook i/o hour and can while hot. 

Mrs. Richards. 



PICKLES. • 241 

CORN SALAD. 

12 good sized ears of tender corn, 1 cup sugar, 1 good sized 
iicad of cabbage. 2 tablespoons salt. 2 small pejipers, V^. pound ground 
nnistard, Vi* gal. good vinegar; eho}) cabbage; add salt and let stand 
lo drain; chop peppers; cut corn off cobs; stir mustard in a little of 
the vinegar; mix all ingredients together, and let come to a good 
boil; seal in cans or bottles. If vinegar is very sour dilute it with 
a little Avater. Mrs". J. 0. Gleave. 

GREEN CORN SALAD. 

15 ears green sweet corn. 1 head cabbage medium size, 3 green 
[icjipers, ]!/> cups white sugar, 2 tablespoons salt, 4 ounces ground 
mustard, 2 qts. cider vinegar; cut corn from the cob; chop cabbage 
and peppers fine; heat vinegar; then add other ingredients except 
coi-n. which add after it is boiling hot, and cook over steam thirty 
;iiimites. it must not boil after corn is added; put into glass jars. 
Tliis is delicious \v\U\ meat and Mill keep all winter. 

Mrs. J. P. Johnson. 

CORN CHOWDER. 

Chop 1 large head of cabbage ; put 2 tablespoons of salt in it ; 
]ilace under a weight to drain two or three hours or over night; chop 
4 large green peppers; cut the corn from 12 large ears; add 1 cup 
sugar, either white or brown, V-i box mustard stirred smooth in 
some of the vinegar, i/o gallon vinegar; mix all together; let boil up 
good; seal in cans. IMrs. I. G. Lacy. 

PICKLED CAULILOWER OR RED CABBAGE. 

Put in strong salt and water 4 days; take out and drain; boil 
vincgai'. whole black pepper and celery seed to taste; pour on hot 
ever pickles. Good for use in 6 Aveeks. better in 3 months. 

]\rrs. A. Gerould. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES NO. 1. 

5 (jts. water. 1 pt. salt; scald and ])<)ur over cucuiubers. and let 
stand tb.ree days; then pour (if[; make a fresh brine as before and 
repeat once more. On the ninth day take y^ water a/id ^^ vinegar- 
to this add ^4 ounce alum; scald and pour over; let stand six days; 
then pour off; prepare vinegar, spices, red or green peppers to make 
hot, and sugar to taste; be sure that your vinegar is the best, and 
tlicy will keep in an open crock two years. ^frs. Fred Darling. 

PICKLED CUCUMBERS NO. 2. 

Take small cucumbers; place in jar; pour (iver vhem lioiling 
water; add ejumgh salt to season nicely; repeat boili)ig this water 



242 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 



for four mornirsgs in succession, the fourth mornini? add a pinch of 
alum; the lifth morning take vinegar enough to cover pii^kles; put 
in porcelain kettle with a little sugar and spices tied m bag; let 
come to a boil; drain cucumbers out of salt water and place in stone 
jar and pour over them boiling vinegar; prepare cucumbers as above 
till jar is filled; these will keep all winter. Good idea to put horse- 
radish in vinegar. Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

CUCUMBER OIL PICKLE. 

Slice (IS for the table 24 cucumbers; peel 1 qt. small onions: salt 
well; stand over night, in the morning drain thoroughlj^; take 3 
tablespoons of ground white pepper, 1 quarter pound Coleman's mus- 
tard, 14 pt. best olive oil; mix this smooth; then add slowly 3 pts. 
best cider vinegar cold; add cucumbers and onions: stir for a few 
moments ; put into cans and seal. Good in 3 months. 

Mrs. Salyer. 
ERIE PICKLE,S. 

Boil 14 pound salt and 2 qts. vinegar together and pour over 1 
ounce black pepper, 1 ounce yellow mustard seed, 1 ounce allspice. 
1 saltspoon cayenne. When cold pour over cucumbers and small 
silver onions which have been washed and pared; put in fruit cans 
with a small piece of alum. If the vinegar is too strong the pickles 
will wither. 700 small cucumbers in quart jars will take about a 
gallon and a half of vinegar after it is prepared. Mrs. Osborn. 

FRENCH CHOW CHOW. 

1 qt. large green cucumbers cut in pieces, 1 qt. very small ones, 

1 qt. button onions, 1 qt. green tomatoes cut in pieces, 1 large cauli- 
flower cut small, 4 large green peppers cut in coarse bits ; put all in 
weak brine, and let stand for 24 hours ; scald in same brine and 
drain through cheese cloth; make a paste of 6 tablespoons Coleman's 
mustard, 1 of tumeric,! cup flour, 1 cup })rown sugar, about 2 qts. 
cider vinegar; first moisten dry materials with a little ^•inegar; then 
add the remainder; put on stove, stirring continually till smooth and 
thick ; then add all of the pickles I used double the above amount 
and had over 6 quarts. L. Smith. 

FRENCH PICKLES. 
1 peck green tomatoes sliced, 6 large onions, sliced. 1 teacup 
salt sprinkled through them over night; drain thoroughly, in morn- 
ing boil in 2 cjts. water and 1 qt. vinegar fifteen or twenty minutes 
and drain; then take 4 qts. vingear, 2 pounds brown sugar. V2 pound 
white mustard seeds, 2 tablespoons cloves. 2 tablespoons cinnamon. 

2 of ginger, 2 of ground mustard and 1 of cayenne pepper; put all 
together and cook fifteen minutes. This is excellent and will keep 
a long time. IMrs. jM. T. Mead. 



PICKLES. 243 

GERMAN SAUCE. 

4 qts. green tomatoes, 4 qts. (•al)i)age, 1 qt. onions, 1 pt. celery, 
measured after they are chopped, 1 pound sugar, 3 pts. vinegar, 1 
gill salt, 1 large green pepper, 1 tablespoon each of allspice, cloves 
and white mustard seed ; drain the tomatoes through a colander and 
hoil the whole, twenty miiuites. 'Mrn. AV. K. Jacobs. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Chop 11' cucumbers and 12 white onions, 2^/^ red peppers: 
sprinkle over this a very small cup salt, and drain well ; add ^4 tea- 
cup each of white mustard and celery seed; sweeten enough vinegar 
to cover the whole; scald vinegar and let it cool before pouring 
over the mixture. It is then ready to eat. Can in glass. 

Mrs. I. G. Lacy. 

INDIA PICKLES. 

1 dozen green tomatoes, 1 dozen onions, 1 dozen cucumbers, 1 
tablespoon salad oil, 1 tablespoon curry powder, 1 tablespoon mus- 
tard, 1 tablespoon tumeric, 1 teaspoon black pepper, 1 teaspoon 
cayenne, 3 pts. vinegar; boil all together and put in iar; (slice all the 
l)ickles and let stand in salt over night) ; get medium sized cucum- 
bers and onions ; pare cucumbers. Mrs. AYill Keegan. 

MANGOES. 

Take large green peppers: cut open the tops and take out the 
seeds ; soak peppers in water twenty-four hours ; (and change the 
water in that time if necessary) ; break up a head of cauliflower, 
green beans, small cucumbers, radish seeds, small green tomatoes, 
and little onions ; let them stand in strong brine for i/o hour ; then 
drain and stuff the peppers almost full; then slice cabbage fine and 
fill the top ; fasten the top down with a cucumber or bean or sew 
with thread ; pack them in a stone jar, and pour over them cold 
vinegar; add mixed spices and horseradish root. 

Mrs. E. E. Allen. 

SWEET MANGO PICKLES 

^Melons not quite half ripe; pare them and take out seeds; soak 
in brine three days; make the brine of 1 teacup of salt to a pail ot 
Avater; piece of alum size of walnut; wash in cold water before till- 
ing. Use for filling. — Cauliflower, cucumbers, small onions, nastur- 
tiums, beans, pears, celery, raisins, small tomatoes and peppers; spice 
Avith cinnamon buds, black and Avhite mustard seeds, black pepper 
corns, ginger root and cIoa'cs; 1 gallon of vinegar. 3 pounds sugar; 
boil and put on cold; scald caulilloAver in salt Avater to make tender. 

F. S. Wood. 



244 THE AVARREN COOK BOOK. 



PICKLED PEACH MANGOES. 

Take large free-stone peaches, ripe enough to allow the pit to 
come out easily; put in brine for two days; mix to your taste, chop- 
ped garlic, race ginger soaked in water over night and then sliced 
thin, grated horseradish, white and black mustard seed, and celery 
seed. After taking out of the brine cut open and remove the pits ; 
fill with this mixture, and tie up ; pour over cold vinegar, and let 
it remain a few weeks; then pour over the mangoes spiced vinegar 
well sweetened containing a bag of turmeric. M. I. Mead. 

MIXED PICKLES, 

Take a peck each of small euenmbers, caidifower and small 
OJiions ; mix and place in layers in jar, sprinkling y2 pt. salt between 
layers; coA'cr with boiling water and let stand over night. In the 
morning di-ain in colander and wipe dry; add to 8 qts. of cider 
vinegar, i/o^ pound of mus-tard, 1 tablespoon turmeric, 2 talDlespoons of 
ginger, 21/0 of curry powder, and 1 teaspoon of cayenne ; mix all 
the seasoning in a little cold vinegar until smooth, 
and then stir into the vinegar and continue stirring until it 
heats to a boiling point ; pour over the pickles and set away ; stir two 
or three times for a day or tW'O and then put them into quart jars. 

Mrs. T. W. McNe'tt. 

MUSTARD PICKLES NO. I. 

1 qt. small pickles, 1 qt. small onions, 1 qt. sliced tomatoes, 1 qt. 
musk and watermelon. 2 green peppers chopped fine, 2 heads cauli- 
Hower cut in pieces; cover with salt water over night; in morning 
scald in vinegar till tender. 

Paste — 2 qts. best cider vinegar, 4 ounces mustard, 4 ounces 
fiour. ] tablespoon cinnamon. 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper, 1 table- 
spoon turmeric ; boil till it becomes a smooth paste ; then mix all to- 
gether; pickle and paste. Mrs. Will Keegan. 

MUSTARD PICKLES NO. II. 

1 qt. small cucumbers, 1 large cucumber sliced, 1 qt. small 
onions, 2 pounds cauliflower broken up, 6 small green peppers seeded 
and sliced; cover with scalding brine and let stand over night; 
drain. Mix 6 tablespoons mustard, 1 tablespoon turmeric, 1 table- 
soon celery seed, 21/2 cups sugar and 1 cup fiour with a little cold 
vinegar and add to 3 qts. vinegar; let boil two minutes; add the 
pickles and let boil five to eight minutes. 

Mrs. Hammond. Buffalo. 



PICKLES. 245 

PICKLED ONIONS. 

Make a brine by boiling 1 pound of salt in 3 ([ts. of water; use 
the small silver skinned onions; rub off the skins and throw into 
the brine; let them remain in the brine twenty-four hours; then 
wipe dry and put into wide mouthed bottles. To 1 qt. white vinegar 
allow ] teaspoon of pepper corns, 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, and 
^/o teaspoon coriander seeds: boil tiiis five minutes; when cold pour 
over onions and cork tightly. "Will be ready for use in 2 weeks. 

Mrs. T. W. McNett. 
PICCALILLI. 

Take green tomatoes chopped very fine; sprinkle well with salt; 
let stand twenty-four hours; drain off and put in a stone jar; take 
about I/O. the quantity of cucumbers and the same of cabbage; after 
they are chopped put separately in jars and cover with cold vine- 
gar; take about I/4 as much white onions as cucumbers and chop 
them: salt and pour boiling water on them; let stand a few hours; 
drain off and cover with vinegar as above ; let all remain in a cold 
place twenty-four hours; then press very dry and mix together; add 
some yellow and black mustard seed, celery seed and a bountiful 
supply of grated horseradish with a few green peppers chopped fine ; 
take the best vinegar and about 2 pounds brown sugar to the gal- 
lon; boil it in part of the vinegar; skim well and pour over the 
whole; add as much cold vinegar as is required. 

PICCALILLI. 

1 large white cabbage, 50 small cucumbers, 5 qts. small string 
beans. 8 small carrots, 1 dozen sticks celery, 5 red peppers, 2 heads 
cauliflower; chop fine; soak over night in salt water; wash well; 
drain through a colander, and pour over them hot vinegar spiced 
with mace, cinnamon, and allspice; turn off vinegar and scald sev- 
eral times and seal. F. G. M. 

SPICED PICKLES. 

Let 200 small cucumbers stand in salt water three days ; boil 
fifteen minutes, i/> gallon vinegar, 1 ounce white mustard seed, 1 
ounce black mustard seed, 1 ounce juniper berries, 1 ounce celery 
seed, 1 handful small green peppers, 2 pounds sugar, a few small 
cnions and a piece of alum i/o size of nutmeg; pour over the cucum- 
bers while hot and let stand a day; repeat three or four times, and 
1he last time mix V^ pound of prepared mustard with the vinegar; 
]'our over the cucumbers and seal in liottles. ^Trs. AY. J. Richards. 

PICKLED PEACHES. 

Rub off with a cloth or pare them (\h\s, is just a mallei- of 
choice), and prick each with a fork; heat in just enough Mater to 



246 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 



cover them until they almost boil ; take out and add to the water, 
sugar in the following proportions : To 7 pounds of fruit take 8 
pounds sugar ; boil fifteen minutes ; skim and add 3 pts. vinegar, 1 
tablespoon each of allspice, mace and cinnamon, 1 teaspoon 
of celery seeds, 1 teaspoon of cloves; put the spices in thin 
muslin bags ; boil all together ten minutes ; then add the fruit and 
cook until they can be pierced with a straw ; take out the fruit with 
a skimmer and put into jars or cans ; boil the syrup down until 
thick; pack the peaches in glass jars and pour syrup over them 
scalding hot. You may pickle pears in the same way with or with- 
out peeling. 

SPICED PLUMS. 

10 pounds plums, 7 pounds sugar, 1 pt. vinegar ; put in a bag i/4 
cup of cinnamon, 1 large spoon of cloves and 1 large spoon of all- 
spice; let all boil a few minutes (excepting plums;) then take off 
and cool ; pick the plums with a fork and put into a jar ; then pour 
over them the syrup; after heating the juice three inornings, each 
time allowing it to cool, then pouring over the fruit; pat the fruit in 
glass cans and boil the juice down quite rich and cool, after which 
pour over all and put away. Mrs. E. E. Allen. 

PICKLED PEPPERS. 

Take large green ones ; make a small incision at side ; take out 
all seeds, being careful not to mangle the pepper ; soak in salt water 
one or two days, changing water twice ; stuff with chopped cabbage 
or tomatoes seasoned with spices as for mangoes (omitting the cay- 
enne pepper), or a mixture of nasturtiums, chopped onions, red 
cabbage, grapes and cucumbers, seasoned with mustard seed and a 
little mace; sew up incision; place in jar and cover with cold spiced 
vinegar. Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

PICKLED RAISINS. 

Leave 2 pounds raisins on stem ; add 1 pt. vinegar and i/o pound 
sugar; simmer over a slow fire I/2 hour. Mrs. TI. C. H. 

SPANISH SAUCE. 

1 peck green tomatoes, 1 dozen large onions, 1 dozen sweet pep- 
I)ers, 2 bunches celery, 4 qts. ripe tomatoes, 2 tablespoons cinnamon, 
2 tablespoons cloves, 2 tablespoons mace, 1 teaspoon cayenne, 1 tea- 
spoon allspice, 2 pounds sugar, 1 gallon vinegar, salt to taste ; peel 
and chop first three; let stand in salt water over night. In the morn- 
ing drain in a muslin bag; scald ripe tomatoes; peel and chop fine; 
drain in colander; chop celery; add rest of recipe and cook one hour. 

Lillian Lemmon. 



PICKLES. 



24^- 



SWEET PICKLES. 

Take 8 poimds of green tomatoes and chop fine; add a qt. vine- 
gar, 2 cups sugar, a teaspoon each of mace, cinnamon and cloves, and 
boil about fifteen minutes ; let cool and put into jars. E. P. M. 

PICKLED TURNIPS. 

Cold boiled turnips make very good pickles ; scald vinegar suf- 
ficient to cover them ; add spices ; sweeten to taste ; let them cool be- 
fore using them. C. H. W. 

PICKLE FOR TOMATOES. 

3 pts. vinegar, 2 pounds brown sugar, 14 pound mustard seed, 2 
tablespoons ground cinnamon, 2 tablespoons ground cloves, 1 table- 
spoon allspice, 1 tablespoon yellow mustard, 1 tablespoon red pep- 
per, a little salt ; boil tomatoes in the above a few minutes. 

M. L. Johnson. 

SWEET TOMATO PICKLES. 

!{; pk. green tomatoes sliced i^ in thick ; boil in water and vine- 
gar with a little salt until easily pierced with a fork ; drain through 
a sieve; scald together 1 qt. vinegar, 3 pounds sugar, 3 tablespoons 
cinnamon, 1 tablespoon cloves, 1 tablespoon allspice ; put spices into 
a bag and boil in the vinegar; place in a jar a layer of the sliced to- 
matoes ; then a thin layer of sliced onions and alternate until all arc 
placed ; then pour over the spiced vinegar boiling hot, throwing in 2 
tablespoons whole mustard seed ; cover lightly. 

Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

RIPE TOMATO PICKLES NO. I. 

Pare and weigh ripe tomatoes and put into jars and just cover 
with vinegar; after standing three days pour off the vinegar and 
add 5 pounds coft'ee sugar to every 7 of fruit ; spice to taste and pour 
over tomatoes and cook slowly all day on the back of the stove; 
use cinnamon, mace and a little cloves, or not any as preferred. 

Jennie Halliday. 

RIPE TOMATO PICKLES NO. II. 

Pare ripe, sound tomatoes, (do not scald); put in a pan: scald 
spices (tied in a bag) in vinegar and pour while hot over them. This 
receipt is best for persons who prefer raw tomatoes. 

Jennie Halliday. 

RIPE TOMATO PICKLES NO. III. 

I/O peck small tomatoes, i^ dozcMi good sized onions sliced, 3 
ounces mustard seed, black and vellow mixed, 5 cents worth of horse- 



246 THE WARRExN COOK BOOK. 

ardish, cut in chips, 1 ounce each of whole cloves and allspice, sev- 
eral small red peppers cut up ; put in fruit jars in layers ; boil the 
vinegar. (1 cup of salt to a gallon of vinegar) ; let it stand until 
cool before pouring over the tomatoes. Do not have the vinegar 
too strong. jMrs. Leche. 

COLD STORAGE VINEGAR. 

1 gallon vinegar, 2 cups sugar (white), i/o cup mastard, I/2 cup 
chopped horse radish, 1 handful mixed spices, 11/2, cap salt; put in 
a gallon jar; wash cucumbers, any size you prefer, and place in the 
above mixture without first soaking in brine. Mrs. Booth. 

PICKLED WATERMELON. 

1 pound sugar to 1 pound rind, 2 cups vinegar to every pound 
(.C sugar. For a gallon of pickles take 1/0 ounce white ginger, I 
tablespoon turmeric, mace, cloves and cinnamon to taste. The thick- 
er the rind used the better. Prepare the same by remijving the thiti 
hard outside rind also the soft substance inside, ('ut in narrow 
strips a}id plnce in lirine strong encuigh to float an egg, for ten dnys; 
then take out and put in preserving kettle with enough cold water 
to cover; let come to a boil slowly and boil live minutes; skim into 
ice water and let stand twenty-four hours ; next let come to a boil 
slowly and boil again five minutes, tliis time in alum water. Be 
sure to see that they boil slowly, as rapid boiling softens them; 
plunge into ice water once more and let stand five hours ; for the 
third time let boil five minutes and set away in the same water till 
morning. Next day simmer the rinds in enough sweetened water 
to cover them, for ten minutes ; take out of water and spread on 
dishes to cool ; meanwhile, prepare the last syrup, allowing a pound 
of sugar to a pound of rind, and 1/2 ounce sliced white ginger to a 
gallon of pickles and a cup of water to every quart of sugar. Place 
on stove and when sugar is dissolved add the rinds and simmer till 
clear; take out once more and add to the syrup 2 cups vinegar to 
a pound sugar already in, 1 talilespoon turmeric to a ga]h:)n of pick- 
les, mace, cloves an,d cinnamon to taste; let come to a boil and re- 
turn the rind to simmer fifteen minutes ; put up in fruit jars when 
boiling hot. These pickles are delicious. 

Mrs. M. I. Mead and Mrs. L. S. Clough. 

WATERMELON PICKLES. 

(^ Short process.) 
S poi"<nds melon rind, 1 qt. cider vinegar, G pounds sugar, 1 tea- 
spoon ground mace. 1 teaspoon allspice, 1 teaspoon ginger. 1 tea- 
spoon cloves, 1 large teaspoon cinnamon; tie sj^ices in a bag and 



PICKLP]S. 



249 



boil in vinegar and sugar. "While lioilijig pour over the melon rind 
which has been prepared as follows : Peel rind and cut in inch 
lengths; put over fire in cold water and cook slowly until tender, 
drain; put in crock and cover with the boiling syrup. Pen* three 
days drain the rind; let tlK- syrup come to a boil and pour back on 
rind. The third day lieat syrup and rind to the boiling point and 
place in glass jars and seal. Cora D. Danforlh, Kane, Pa. 



250 THE WARREN COOK BOOK. 



CATSUP, CHILI SAUCE, ETC. 

Mrs. Sara O. Mitchell 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

1/2 bushel ripe tomatoes, 1 qi. vinegar, y^ cup salt. I/4 pound 
whole black pepper, Yo teaspoon cayenne pepper or eai)sicum, 1 
ounce whole cloves, i/4 pound allspice, 1 cup ground mustard, (^,4 
pound can) wet in part of the vinegar, 6 large onions, 2 pounds 
brown sugar, a handful of peach leaves: boil three hours stirring to 
keep from burning ; when cool strain through a sieve ; bottle and 
seal. Mrs. G. C. James. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

1 basket (V2 bushel) ripe tomatoes; slice and cook until soft; 
then run through a sieve; place again on sto^'e and when partly 
boiled dov/n add 1 pt. vinegar, when thick enough add 1 cup brown 
sugar, 3 tablespoons salt, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves and 
black pepper, 1/0 teaspoon red pepper, and 1 of mustard mixed with 
a little vinegar ; boil two or three minutes and bottle. 

Mrs. James Roy. 

COLD CATSUP. 

Chop fine 1 peck ripe tomatoes; drain; then run through a 
sieve; 2 roots horsehadish grated. 1 10c bunch celery chopped fine, 
1 cup chopped onions, 1 cup brown sugar, ^/^ cup salt, 1 cup white 
mustard seed, 1 teaspoon black pepper, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon. 2 red peppers, 1 qt. vinegar; mix all together; seal with- 
out cooking. Mrs. J. P. Johnson. 

COLD CATSUP. 

I/2 peek ripe tomatoes, -/.> cup grated horseradish, 1 cup black 
and white mustard seeds mixed. 1 cup sugar, 1/0 cup salt. 2 table- 
spoons black pepper. 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 tea- 
spoon mace. 2 red pepper pods chopped, 1 onion chopped, 1 ounce 
celery seed. 1 qt. good vinegar; chop tomatoes fine and drain; then 
mix and bottle. Mrs. T. (I. Lacy. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

3/2 bushel ripe tomatoes, 4 onions, 2 small red peppers; boil to- 
gether until soft enough to put through a sieve ; strain ; add 12 
tablespoons sugar, 4 tablespoons salt, 1 tablespoon mustard, 2 



CATSUP, CHILI SAUCE, ETC. 251 

heaped tablespoons cinnamon, and 1 of cloves tied up together in a 
piece of thin cloth ; cook all together until thick enough ; then add 2 
cups good cider vinegar; cook five minutes; seal while hot. 

Mrs. J. Gleave. 
CHILI SAUCE. 

30 large tomatoes, 10 small onions, 1 green or red pepper, 3 
tablespoons sugar, 3 tablespoons salt, 1 pt. vinegar; peel and slice 
tomatoes and cook till done; then add chopped onions, sugar, salt 
and pepper, and 1 teaspoon black pepper, and lastly vinegar; cook 
down quite thick and seal hot. Mrs. Dwight Cowan. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

^2 bushel ripe tomatoes peeled, 6 large onions chopped, 4 red 
peppers chopped, ^ pt. fine salt, 4 teaspoons brown sugar ; strain the 
tomatoes through a colander and add 1^/^ qts. vinegar and boil all 
together four or five hours Tintil thick ; bottle while hot. 

Mrs. I. G. Lacy. 

BRIGHT RED CHILI SAUCE. 

18 ripe tomatoes, 6 large onions. 4 red pei)pers, 5 cups vinegar, 
3 tablespoons salt, 10 tablespoons sugar, no spices ; chop onions and 
peppers fine ; boil tomatoes ; put through a colander ; mix all togeth- 
er; boil one hour. Aresta Beattv. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

30 large ripe tomatoes, 7 onions, 3 green peppers, 14 tablespoons 
sugar, 2^2 tablespoons salt, 2i/^ cups vinegar; peel and slice tomatoes; 
cook until done ; add chopped onions and peppers, sugar, salt and 
vinegar; cook until thick; seal while hot. Mrs. J. W. Crawford. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

6 large ripe tomatoes peeled and sliced, 1 large onion, 2 small 
peppers chopped fine, 2 cups vinegar. ] tablespoon each brown sugar 
and salt; put all together; stew gently until thick enough; seal. 

Mrs. James Roy. 
CHILI SAUCE . 

24 ripe tomatoes peeled, 4 green pepi)ei-s (•]i()i)pe(l fine, 4 table- 
spoons salt, 8 tablespoons sugar, 8 cups vinegar, 8 large onions 
chopped, 1 tablespoon allspice. 2 tablespoons cinnamon ; boil two 
hours. ]\Irs. ]\I. Ilazeltine. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 

4 pounds grapes boiled in 1 qt. vinegar; rub through, a sieve; add 
2 pounds brown sugar, 1 tablespoon each of cloves, allspice, cinnamon 
and pepper, I/2 tablespoon salt ; boil until thick. 

Aresta Beatty. 



252 



THE WARKEN COOK BOOK. 



CURRANT CATSUP. 

5 pounds currants, 3 pounds sugar, 1 pt. vinegar, a little salt, 1 
teaspoon pepper, 8 dessertspoons cinnamon, 1 dessertspoon cloves, 1 
dessertspoon allspice ; mash and boil one hour. 

Mrs. J. 0. Parmlee. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

3 dozen large cucumbers, peeled and grated, Y^ dozen onions 
chopped fine; add i/> cup salt; put in colander and drain over night; 
then cover with vinegar; add V2 ounce white mustard, white pepper 
to taste ; seal cold, for meats and sandwiches. Mrs. E. N. Smith. 

DUTCH MUSTARD. 

1 tablespoon dry mustard, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon corn- 
starch, 1 teaspoon salt, yolk of 1 egg. 1/0 cup vinegar, 14 cup milk; 
ujix mustard, cornstarch, sugar and salt together ; wet gradually 
with egg and milk; put in double boiler, when heated add vinegar; 
cook until thick and smooth, stirring constantly. 

Mrs. W. J. •Richards. 

TOMATO MUSTARD. 

] peck ripe tomatoes, 4 onions, 2 red peppers, 1 tablespoon whole 
cloves. 1 tablespoon whole black pepper, 1 tablespoon ginger, 2 table- 
spoo'is salt: boil two hours: strnin ; tlien add 1 small cup brown 
sugar, y^ cup mustard stirred into 1 pt. cider vinegi-ir; boil two 
hours and bottle. Mrs. Kopf. 

MADE MUSTARD. 

1 tablespoon mustard, 1 tai:)lespoon sugar. 1 teaspoon salt, % 
cup vinegar, 1 egg; let come to a boil stirring constantly. 

Mrs. D wight Cowan. 



CONFECTIONERY. 255 

CONFECTIONERY 

Miss Frances Allen 

BUTTER SCOTCH NO. I. 

1 cup brown sugar, Y2 cup water, 1 dessert spoon vinegar, piece 
of butter size of a walnut ; boil about twenty minutes ; iiavor ii" de- 
sired. Mrs. E. E. Allen. 
BUTTER SCOTCH NO. II. 

1 cup molasses (golden syrup is best,) V^ cup sugar, butter size 
of hickorynut, 2 tablespoons vinegar put in when nearly done; add 
nuts to suit, % cup or more. 

CARAMEL CANDY. 

. 3 cups sugar, % cup milk, 1 cup chopped walnuts, 1 tablespoon 
butter, caramalize 1 cup sugar; then add milk; let all the sugar dis- 
solve, and add the other 2 cups sugar, and butter; cook until it har- 
dens in water; remove from the fire, and add nuts; pour on buttered 
pan and mark in squares. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS NO. I. 

2 cups granulated sugar, 2 tablespoons vinegar, 2 tablespoons 
butter, enough water to moisten the sugar; when nearlj^ done, which 
can be told by testing in cold water; add 1 cup grated chocolate and 
2 teaspoons Royce's vanilla; put into buttered pans. Avhen half cold 
mark off with back of knife into squares. Mrs. W. J. Richards. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS NO. II. 

2% tablespoons butter, 1 cup molasses, 2 cups brown sugar, % 
cup milk, 3 squares chocolate. 1 teaspoon RoycQ's vanilla; put ingred- 
ients into kettle and boil until when tried in cold water, a firm ball 
may be formed in the fingers; add Royce's vanilla just after taking 
from fire ; turn into a buttered pan ; cool and mark in small squares. 

Mildred J. Allen. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS NO. III. 

1 cup of molasses, 1 cup sugar, Vi cuji butter, 1 cup grated choc- 
olate ; boil until mixture drops hard in water. 

Marie Schermerhorn. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS NO. IV. 

3 cups sugar, 1 1: <'"P molasses, V2 cup milk, % cake chocolate, I/4 
cup butter; flavor with Royce's vanilla. 



254 THE AVARREN COOK BOOK. 

COCOANUT CARAMELS. 

1 pt. inilk. l)utter size of an egg, 1 fresh eocoanut grated fine, or 
an equal quantity of the dessicated eocoanut; 8 pounds granulated 
sugar, 2 teaspoons lemon juice (strained); boil slowly until stiff; 
then beat to a cream ; pour into shallow pans ; when partly cool mark 
off in squares. Hattie Sherman. 

COCOANUT BAR NO. I. 

4 cups sugar, 1 cup water, i/. teaspoon cream of tartar, 14 pound 
eocoanut ; cook sugar and water and cream tartar until it makes a 
soft ball when dropped in cold water; remove from fire; beat until 
it thickens; then add eocoanut; turn into buttered pans; cool and 
cut into bars. Ernestine Cowan, Mrs. J. W. Crawford. 

COCOANUT BAR NO. 2. 

4 cups granulated sugar, % cup milk ; boil three minutes ; stir 
until it begins to thicken and add 1 grated eocoanut, or an eqlial 
quantity of the dessicated eocoanut ; spread on buttered pans, and 
cut into bars. 

CRACKER JACK. 

1 qt. unshelled peanuts, 3 qts. popcorn, 2 cups molasses, 1 cup 
granulated sugar ; boil sugar and molasses until it threads ; add a 
pinch of soda before removing from stove ; mix popcorn and pea- 
nuts ; pour the candy over it. 

CANDIED ORANGE PEEL. 

Cut skins in strips ; put on in cold water. "When it boils up, 
turn off; cover in hot water and turn off twice, (three waters in all) ; 
put them in a thick white syrup ; let them lie in that over night, in 
the morning take strips out and lay on plates to drain. Just before 
dry, sprinkle with granulated sugar. Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

CREAM CANDY (GENUINE). 

2 cups sweet cream. 2 cups light brown sugar, small piece of 
butter, pinch of salt; place altogether in a sauce pan and boil gentlj 
without stirring about twenty minutes : cool and mark off into 
squares. The consistency of the candy should be when cohl morQ 
that of wax thnii anything else, not in the least brittle nor sticky. 

IMrs. Mark Jamieson. 

CANDIED GRAPE FRUIT PEEL. 

Cut; peel into strips; soak 48 hours in salt water, using 1 table- 
spoon salt to ] qt. water; drain off salt water: put in granite kettle 
with clear, cold water imd boil six to eight hours, changing water 



CONFECTIONERY. 2^5 



four times during the boiling: add cold water while cooking. AVhen 
tender, drain; take equal weight of sugar and fruit and to each 
pound of peel, 1 cup cold water; cook one hour or until syrup has 
nearly boiled away; take out carefully; drain; lay on platter over 
night: then roll in sifted powdered sugar. Mrs. Sara i\Iitchell. 

FUDGE NO. I. 

3 cups light brown sugar, % cup cream or milk, batter the size 
of an egg, 1 tablespoon grated chocolate, 1 cup nuts chopped fine, i/^ 
cocoanut chopped fine, 1 teaspoon Royce's vanilla; put sugar, milk, 
butter and chocolate in pan and boil about ten minutes, or until it 
strings, stirring all the time; take from stove; add nuts and cocoa- 
nut, stir utilil tliick; then pour on buttered platter. 

Mrs. Davis, Tionesta, Pa. 

FUDGE NO. II. 

2 cups sugar, ^-o cup milk. 1 square chocolate, butter the size of 
a walnut ; cook until it will form a soft ball in water, stirring all the 
time; poai into buttered pans, and when cool cut in squares. 

Aresta Beatty. 

FUDGE NO III. 

2 cups granulated sugar, 1 cup milk or 1/2 cream and milk, 1/4 
cake of chocolate, butter size of a walnut ; mix the ingredients and 
boil, stirring constantly until it forms a soft ball when tried in cold 
Avater. Before removing from fire add i^ teaspoon Royce's vanilla ; 
when done beat rapidly until creamy; add chopped nuts or cocoa- 
nut, if desired; pour on buttered plates and cut into squares. 

Gertrude Greaves. 

FUDGE NO. IV. 

2 cups granulated sugar, 1 cup cream or milk. 1 tablespoon but- 
ter, 1 teasoon Royce's vanilla, 2 squares chocoUite, 1 cup nuts if de- 
sired: boil ingredients until mixture forms soft ball in cold water: 
then pour on marble slab and stir with a wooden spoon; then take 
up with flat knife and cut in pieces. Frances Allen. 

Georgia Christie, Butler, Pa. 

FIG BISQUE. 

1 cup light brown sugar, 1 cup granulated sugar, white of 1 egg, 
i/> cup water, 1 cup chopped figs ; boil sugar and Avater until it makes 
soft ball in water: then stir this syrup into beaten white of egg and 
Veat until nearly thick: stir in figs quickly and dip out with teaspoon 
on waxed paper. Lillian Brock way. 



256 THE AVARRP::N cook l^OOK. 



GLACE NUTS. 

2 cups sugar, ] cup boiling water, l^ teaspoon cream of tartar ; 
boil ingredients together until syrup begins to discolor (310 degrees 
Fahrenheit) ; remove from fire and place sauce-pan in cold water to 
instantly stop boiling; remove from cold into hot water while dip- 
ping ; take nuts and dip separately ; place on oiled papers. 

Frances Allen. 
HOPS. 

2 cups white sugar, 1 cup cream or milk, 2 squares chocolate ; 
boil until it forms soft ball when tried in cold water; place in pan of 
cold water and let stand till cold; then stir till creamy and pour into 
buttered pan. M. S. Wood. 

ITALIAN CREAM FUDGE. 

2 cups light brown sugar, 1 cup granulated sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 
kitchen spoon butter; cook until it forms soft ball in water; then 
remove from fire and beat until it becomes creamy; add Vii ^i^P luits. 

LEMON CANDY (CLEAR.) 

Dissolve IVii pounds of loaf sugar in V2 pt- water; add the white 
of 1 egg; when it is boiled sufficiently to snap in cold water; add 1 
teacup strained lemon juice ; boil quickly again until it snaps in cold 
water ; pour on buttered plates and cut in even squares. 

Bessie ]\I. Crary. 

MAPLE CARAMELS. 

1 pound maple sugar, 1 cup rich cream. la the absence of cream 
1 cup milk in which has been melted 1 tablespoon butter may be 
used ; cook until it will stiffen if tried on a cold plate ; pour in sheets 
and bar oft', or in odd shaped patty-pans. Bessie "SI . Crary. 

MAPLE SUGAR CANDY. 

1 pound soft maple sugar, % cup thin cream. ^4 ciip boiling 
water, % cup walnuts or pecan meats ; break sugar in pieces ; put in- 
to sauce pan with cream and water; bring to boiling point; boil un- 
til soft ball is formed when tried in cold water; remove from fire; 
beat until creamy ; add nuts : pour into buttered tins. 

MISSISSIPPI PECAN CANDY. 

2 cups pulverized sugar, 1/0 cup cream, butter size of walnut, 1 
tablespoon cocoa, small teaspoon Royces' vanilla, 1 cup pecan meats; 
mix sugar, cream, butter and cocoa in kettle; put over quick fire, 
stirring constantly. AVhen it has boiled two or three minutes, try it 
in water: then remove at once from fire; flavor with Royce's vanilla: 
beat until creamy; stir in nuts and pour on buttered tins. 



CONFP]CTIONERY. 25? 



DIRECTIONS FOR PULLING CANDY. 

('andy to be pulled must l)e eooked until it is brittle wlien cool, 
therefore, the i)ulling must bejrin with the first hardening of the 
edges of the candy in the buttered pans ; work steadily, adding a lit- 
tle at a time as it cools sufficiently until it is all taken up. If the 
warmth of the hands is not sufficient work over a stove, as keeping 
the candy warm facilitates the process. Faithful work for V^ hour, 
never less time, makes the candy light, smooth, brittle, yet with that 
melting quality so desirable. Mrs. Jane Orr. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

1 cup best N. 0. molasses. 1 cup white sugar, 1 tablespoon vine- 
gar. 2 tal)lespoons butter, 14 c^ip h^^t Avater. Elizabeth Clough. 

PENOCHE. 

2 cups light broMu sugar, 1 cup milk, piece of l)utter size of an 
eirg, 1 teaspoon Royce's "Manilla. 1 cup walnut meats; put ingredients 
into kettle: boil until when tried in cold water a very firm ball is 
I'oT-med ; stir until creamy; add nuts and pour into buttered pan. 
AMien cool, cut in squares. Frances Allen. 

PEANUT CANDY NO. I. 

2 cups sugar, ly^, cups water, i^ f "ip nu)lasses, a small bit of but- 
ter, 2 cups peanut meats added when boiled till done. 

Mrs. J. W. Kitchen. 

PEANUT CANDY NO. II. 

To 1 large cup New Orleans inolasses add i/> cun l)rowu sugar 
and a lump of butter- boil until it will harden in cold water; shell 
and chop, not very fine, 1 qt. freshly roasted peanuts. AVIien the candy 
is done, stir in the nuts and mix thoroughly; pour into buttered 
plat(^s: cut in small pieces or squares. ]\Irs. James Hand. 

PEANUT CANDY NO. III. 

3 cups brown sugar. 1/. cup Avaler: 1)oil until it strings from the 
spoon; add butter and nuts to taste. Hattie Sherman. 

POPCORN BALLS. 

2 cups molasses. 1 cuj) l)rown sugai'. 1 tables])oon vinegar, piece 
of butter size of small egg: cook this mixture in large kettle-, pop the 
corn (enough to make 4 qts. when popped.) salt it and sift it 
through the fingers, taking care to remuve all hard kernels and 
loose salt: then stir into the kettle all the corn the candy will take 
up: heap on butlei'cd ])la1es and cut into block's or mould into balls. 



258 



THE WARREN COOK BOOK 



PRALINES. 

1% Clips powdered sugar, 1 cup maple syrup, 1/4 cup cream, 2 
cups liickory nuts or pecans ; boil first 3 ingredients until, when tried 
in water, a soft ball is formed; remove from fire and beat until 
creamy; add nuts and drop from tip of spoon in small piles on but- 
tered paper. 

PUFFED RICE. 

Boil togerlicr 1 cup granulated sugar, i/. cup water, 1 teaspooji 
vinegar for i\ve miruies ; then add 2 tablespoons molasses, butter size 
of a walnut, V- ti^Hsp(H)n salt; boil until a few drops in cold water 
becomes hard and brilile; take from fire; stir in i/o package Quaker 
pufl'ed rice prp\'i()us]y warmed and si>read on dish to cool. 

PEANUT BAR. 

Melt 2 cups granulated sugar and pour over 1 cup nut meats. 
This makes a delicious brittle candy. Frances M. Allen. 

SEA FOAM. 

1 cup light brown sugar, 1 cup granulated sugar, 1 cup water, 
white of 1 egg, Royce's vanilla, \[> cup walnut meats; cook sugar 
and water until the syrup forms a waxy ball in cold water; remove 
from fire and let stand while beating white of egg with whisk. When 
light, pour syrup in slowl^^ beating until stiff enough to hold its 
shape ; then add nuts and ]nit (|uickly on buttered platter, using two 
spoons. Hilda AV. Jacobs. 

SALTED ALMONDS. 

Blanch almonds and dry on a towel; place in pie-tin and pour 
over them 1 or 2 teaspoons melted butter ; salt weU and place in 
oven until a golden brown. Frances M. Allen. 

TEXAS CHIPS. 

3 large iron spoons of molasses, 2 large iron spoons of water, 1 
large iron spoon of melted butter, 1 large iron spoon of sugar; boil 
until brittle if dropped in water ; pour into buttered plates and as it 
cools pull from the edges, out from dish as thin as possible and 
snap off. This will make a large quantity. 

iNIaria Schermerhorn. 

VANILLA TAFFY. 

1 pound of sugar, 1 tablespoon Royce's vanilla, 1 ounce gum 
arable, 1 cup of cream; boil sugar and cream together; when half 
done add the dissolved gum-arabic; when done add the Royce's ex- 
tract vanilla. This filled with nuts is very nice. 

Maria Schermerhorn. 



CONFp]CTIONERY. ^.5^ 

VINEGAR TAFFY. 

IV2 pound light l)r()\vn sugar, % cup butter, 34 cup vinegar, (if 
very strong dilute with water) ; boil very sloAvly until it makes soft 
ball in water; {)()ur out into buttered platter and set to cool and pull 
when cool enough to handle. Lillian Brockway. 

WHITE TAFFY. 

3 eups sugar. 1 cup water, 1 tablespoon vinegar; boil very slowly 
without stirring; try in cold water and when hard pour into greased 
dripping pan; cool and pull. Mrs. C. II. Smith. 

OLD-FASHIONED WHITE CANDY. 

1 cup cold water. 2 cups granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon (leveled 
off) cream of tartar ; flavor to taste ; wdien brittle in cold water it 
is done ; pull at least 1 o ho ir. ]\Irs. Jane Orr. 

FRENCH CREAM OR UNCOOKED CANDIES 

FRENCH CREAM NO. I. 

To the white of 1 egg beaten to a stiff froth, add 1 tablespoon 
of cold water and a small quantity of Royce's vanilla extract; sift 
carefully XXX confectioner's sugar; stir into mixture gradually 
keeping the mixture smooth, until you can no longer use the spoon ; 
turn out then upon kneading board, dusted wnth sugar and knead, 
adding sugar all the time, until you have a paste smooth, firm and 
perfectly manageable ^Irs. H. E. BroAvn. 

FRENCH CREAM NO. II. 

"White of 1 egg, 1 tablespoon sweet milk, confectioner's sugar 
to stiffen ; knead like bread ; make in any shape desired. 

Mrs. Hiram G. Eddy. 

FRENCH CREAM NO. III. 

To the white of 1 egg add 1 t,ablespoon water: stir in confec- 
tioner's sugar until able to knead ; dust kneading board with sugar 
and proceed as directed in No. 1. Mrs. 0. P. Northrup. 

ALMOND CREAMS. 

Shell and blanch the almonds and roll each nut in a layer of the 
french cream candy. 

CHOCOLATE CANDY. 

Use French Cream mixture flavored with grated confectioner's 
chocolate ; shape in cubes or bars. 



260 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

Use French Cream mixture; roll in pear shapes; let them stand 
on a marble slab or on waxed paper about twelve hours ; then melt 
confectioner's chocolate over steam or boiling water. With a fork 
roll the creams in the melted chocolate and let them dry off. 

CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINTS. 

Use French Cream mixture flavored with the essence of pepper- 
mint (or wintergreen) ; mould into disks and cover with chocolate 
as directed above. 

CREAM CHERRIES. 

Make a small round ball of French Cream ; cut a strip of citron 
the size of a cherry stem; put the ball of cream on one end; take a 
cherry glace and cutting it in two put % each side of the stem of 
the cream ball. Lucy Bostwick. 

COCOANUT CREAM. 

Use French cream mixture ; add freshly grated cocoanut and 
also melted chocolate if desired; then mould into cubes. This is also 
very nice when the cubes are placed on buttered tins leaving quite 
a space between them, and set in the oven for a few minutes. 

DATE CREAMS. 

Select perfect dates ; with a sharp knife remove the seeds ; shape 
Uie French cream into oblong pieces ; fill the cavity with it. 

ENGLISH WALNUT CREAMS. 

Use a French cream mixture ; have ready the unbroken half 
meats of English walnuts ; roll candy in balls and stick a nut on both 
sides. 

HICKORYNUT CREAM. 

Add to a French Cream candy chopped hickorynut meats; 
shape in cubes or bars two inches long. 

NEAPOLITAN CREAM. 

Take 3 equal parts of French Cream mixture ; make 1 orange as 
given below, another chocolate, the third cocoanut ; pack one on top 
of the other, each layer to be V^ of an inch thick ; cut in cubes. 

ORANGE CREAM. 

Use a French Cream mixture ; flaA'or with the strained juice and 
grated rind of 1 orange (squeeze the grated rind through cloth to 
procure a clear liquid; shape as desired. 



CONFECTIONERY. 261 



WALNUT LOAF. 

The white of 1 egg aud un equal amount of water, well beaten ; 
stiffen with confectioner's sugar, adding 1 teaspoon of Eoyce's va- 
nilla and 1 large cup of walnuts chopped fine; mould into a loaf and 
Clip in melted Baker's chocolate into which has been put 1 teaspoon 
of grated paraffine. Mrs. S. "W. Tait. 

WHITE FONDANT. 

2Y2 pounds sugar, ll^ cups hot water, V4 teaspoon cream tartar; 
put ingredients into a smooth granite pan; place on range and heat 
gradually to boiling point; boil without stirring until when tried in 
cold water a sor'r, ball nuiy be cormed that will jiist keep its sliape; 
pour slowly ^w slij.'-htly oiled platter, or slab; 1:1 stand n few min- 
utes to, cool, but not long enough to become hard around the edges; 
■work with wooden spoon till white and creamy; then it should bf^ 
kneaded until smooth ; put into bowl ; cover with oiled paper that a 
crust may not form on top and let stand twenty-four hours. Always 
make on a clear day. Frances Allen. 

CREAMS. 

Place part of the fondant in a double boiler and stir constantly 
until it melts ; add Roj'^ce 's peppermint, wintergreen, chocolate or any 
flavor desired, and drop by small teaspoons on marble slab or para- 
fine paper. This must be done rapidly as the fondant hardens rap- 
idly. L. C. K. 

GLACED FRUITS. 

AVhite grapes, raisins, sections of orange, fancy cakes, berries 
and nuts may be glaced by dipping in the melted fondant. 

jMrs. AY. J. Richards. 

TURKISH MINT PASTE. 

Pour 1/2 cup cold water over 3 tal)lespoons granulated gelatine ; 
let stand until water is absorbed; pour V, cup cold water over 2 cups 
granulated sugar and when dissolved heat to boiling point; add thf 
gelatine and cook twenty minutes after boiling begins; remove from 
lire; add 2 tablespoons lemon .juice, 4 tablespoons mint syrup 
and green color paste to tint a delicate green ; turn into unbutter- 
ed pan to stand over night; pull from pan to a ii;ipcr .spread with 
sifted confectioners sugar; cut and roll each piece in the sifted sugar. 

Mrs. E. E. Allen. 



262 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Miss Kate Winger 

CLEANING FLUID. 

2 ounces aqua ammonia, I ounce eastile soap, Vy ounce saltpetre, 
y2 ounce ether, 1/2 ounce glycerine, 1 qt. rain or filtered water. Ex- 
cellent for men's and boys' clothing. Can be used on any woolen 
goods or any dark silk, (if diluted half and half with water,) for 
dust stains, or grease spots. ^Irs. M. W. Jamieson. 

CLEANING FLUID. 

1 pt. deoderized benzine. lA dram sulphuric ether, i/j dram 
chloroform, % dram oil of wintergreen, 1 dram alcohol. 

Mrs. W. J. Richards. 

CLEANING FLUID. 

1/4 ounce glycerine. 1/. ounce alcohol, Y^ ounce sulphuric ether, 
2 ounces ammonia, V2 ounce powdered eastile soap ; add enough 
water to make 1 qt. of the mixture. For woolen goods and to be 
used with brush or sponge aijd rinsed with pure water. 

I;ora Alden 

FOR MOTHS. 

1 ounce alum, 1 ounce sul.phurate of zinc, 3 omices salt; mix with 
2 qts. water and let stand over night ni a covered vessel. In tlie 
morning pour it carefully into another vessel so that all sediment 
may be left behind. .Dilute this with 2 qts. water, and apply by 
sprinkling the edges of the carpet with a wh'sk broom. 

Mrs. P'riday. 

TO REMOVE STAINS FROM LINEN. 

BERRY STAINS. — Place garment over pan and slowly pour 
on boiling water until the stain disappears. 

TEA, COFFEE AND CHOCOLATE STAINS.— If cold water 
fails to remove, dip in diluted javelle water, which like oxalic acid 
solution, should always be kept on hand. See recipes below. 

PEACH, PEAR AND GRAPE STAINS require acid. Use Oxalic 
Acid Solution on stains, being careful to rinse well in water as soon 
as stain disappears, as the acid will eat linen if not well rinsed out. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 263 



MILDEW will disappear if persistently wet in buttermilk and 
laid in the sun, but it is easier to use chloride of lime. Put a little 
lime in cold water and stir until dissolved; then strain through cheese 
cloth and pour over stained spots; watch carefully and as soon as 
bleached out, rins(> in 8 oi- 4 waters to remove every particle of lime. 

INK STAINS shouUl l)e soaked in fresh milk or washed in salt 
and water and then sponged with lemon juice. Vinegar will take ink 
out of carpets. Peroxide Hydrogen is used successfully in cciiioving 
ink from colored goods. 

IRON RUST. — Dissolve a teaspoon of salt in a tablespoon or 
more of lemon juice and apply to stain, then hang in the sun. Sev- 
eral applications may bo necessary 'before the stain is entirely re- 
moved. 

GRASS STAIN. — Either alcohol or molasses will remove grass 
stain. Lard is also used successfully. 

]\IACHINE OIL OR VASELINE.— Rub with soap and cold 
water. Hot water sets the stain. 

TAR. — Vse kerosene oil. or rub lard well into the tar; tlien i-iil) 
with soap and hot water. 

STAINS OF LONG STANDING.— Wet in cold water; dip in 
javelle water for a minute or two ; then rinse in several waters ; dry 
in the sun. If this fails the oxalic solution given below is infallil)le. 

PAINT STAINS that are dry and old may bo romovcd from cot- 
ton or woolen goods Avith chloroform. 

BLOOD STAINS may in most cases be removed b,v soaking in 
cold water with a little salt in it. 

JAVELLE WATER. — Put 2 pounds of salsoda in a large granite 
pan or stone jar; pour 4 qts. boiling water over it and stir ujitil well 
dissolved ; add 1 pound chloride of lime and let stand a day or two, 
stirring occasionally; let settle; then drain off clear portion and 
strain into fruit jars. 

TO WHITEN CLOTHES when Avashing, add a small teacup of 
javelle water to a boiler of water; pour over well rubbed clothes; let 
stand fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally that everj^ part may be 
thoroughly scalded ; rinse well and dry. 

OXALIC SOLUTION.— Put i^ ounce oxalic acid (crystalized) 
in a T>t. bottle of water; when dissolved it is ready for use; plain- 
ly label the bottle as it is very poisonaus. AftiM- an application of 
this, the fabric should be quickly and well rinsed. 



264 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

HELPFUL HINTS. 

TO SCALD jMILK. — Put in double boiler, having water boiling; 
cover, and let stand on range until milk around edge has a bead-like 
appearance. 

TO EXTRACT JUICE FROM ONION.— Cut a slice from root 
end of onion ; draw back the skin and press onion on a coarse gratei", 
working with a rotary motion. 

TO CARAMELIZE SUGAR.— Put in a granite saucepan; place 
over range and stir constantly until melted and of the color of maple 
syrup. Care must be taken to prevent sugar from adhering to the 
sides of the pan or spoon. 

TO PREVENT SALT FROM LU:MPING — Mix with corn starch, 
allowing 1 teaspoon cornstarch to 6 teaspoons salt. 

TO "WASH CARAFES — Use handful of shot or rice in strong so- 
lution of soda and shake well; or half fill with hot soapsuds, to which 
is added 1 teaspoon washing soda. Put in new^spaper, torn in small 
pieces. Let stand 1/2 hour, shaking occasionally. Empty, rinse witli 
hot water, drain, wipe outside and let stand to dry inside. 

TO CLEAN GRANITEWARE where mixtures have been burned 
on. Fill wnth cold w^ater, add washing soda, pearline, or any soap 
powder; heat gradually to boiling point, then empty when dish may 
be easily washed. 

TO KEEP A SINK DRAIN FREE FROM GREASE.— Pour down 
once a week at night: i/o can Babbitt's potash dissolved in 1 quart 
water. 

A small piece of window glass will be useful for holding the 
leaves apart on a cook book, and one can read the recii)e and not 
soil the book by too much handling. 

IF POTATOES HAVE BOILED DRY, setting the kettle in\- 
mediately into cold water prevents a burned flavor. Boil a strong 
solution of soda in the bui'ned kettle. 

WHEN SINK DRAIN IS CHOKED pour into sink \\ pound cop- 
peras, dissolved in 2 quarts boiling water. If this does not clear it. 
repeat before sending for plumber. 

TIE STRANDS OF A NEW BROOIM closely together; put into 
a pail of boiling water, and soak 2 hours. Dry thorougiily before us- 
ing. 

BOTTLE CONTAINING OXALIC ACID should be marked poi- 
son, and kept on a high shelf. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 265 



TO KEEP ICE CHEST in a good condition ; wash thoroughly 
once a week with cold or lukewarm water in which washing soda has 
been dissolved. If anything is spilled in an ice chest, it should be 
wiped off at once. 

TO CLEAN PIANO KEYS, rub over witli alc.liol. 

FOR DISINFECTANT use Piatt's Chloride^. Chloride of lime is 
a valuable disinfectant, and cheaper than Platts' Chloride. 

TO REIMOVE RUST FROM STEEL, rub wc^ll with sweet oil and 
then with pulverized lime. 

TO REI\rOVE PAINT FROM GLASS, dip a damp doth in l)ak- 
ing soda and rub it over the spots. 

FOR A BRUISE apply hot water innnediately and all discolor- 
ation will be removed. 

FOR BURNS. Lime w^ater and sweet oil in equal quantities is 
one of the best remedies for a burn. 

TO CLEAN WILLOW FURNITURE use salt and water; apply 
with a nail brush. Scrub well and dry thoroughly. 

TO BRIGHTEN BRASS scour with salt and vinegar. 

FOR CLEANING BRASS OR COPPER, 4 oz. oxalic acid, 1 oz. 
powdered rotten stone, 1 paper Mount Eagle Tripoli, 1 qt. water. 

TO EXTERMINATE ROACHES or waterbugs ; sprinkle powder- 
ed borax and sugar in places where they are found. 

TO KEEP JELLY in ordinary glasses ; cover with melted par- 
affine. 

FISH may be scaled much easier by first dipping them into 
boiling water for a minute. 

SALT WILL CURDLE NEW MILK, hence, in preparing por- 
ridge, gravies, etc., salt should not be added mil 11 the dish is pre- 
pared. 

^ TO BLANCH ALMONDS— Cover with boiling water and let 
stand two minutes; drain; put into cold water and rub off skins; 
dry between towels. 

TO WHITEN CLOTHES add a teaspoon of powdered borax to 
last water in which clothes are rinsed. This is especially good to 
remove yellow that time gives to white garments that have beeti 
laid aside for two or three years. 

BREAD JARS AND CAKE BOXES should be scalded twice a 

week in summer, sunning, if possible, to keep mold from gathei-ing 



266 THE WARREN COOK BOOK 

WASH BOILERS WHEN RUSTY may be cleaned with sweet 
milk. 

TO CLEAR HOT FAT throw in a few slices of raw potato. 

IN PICKLING, alum helps to make the pickles crisp, while 
liorseradish and nasturtium seeds prevent vinegar from becoming 
muddy. 

To beat the whites of eggs quickly, put in a pinch of salt. 

To brighten tin that has not been burned, scour with soda. 

If those who make their own yeast would boil the hops in an old 
teapot much labor would be saved. 

Pour boiling water over raisins and the stones can be renw v'cd 
easily. 

JAMS AND JELLIES should be kept in a cool, dark, dry place. 
Keep a slate in the kitchen once and you will never do without 
it, as many trips to the grocery will be saved. 

TO WASH BLACK CALICO, scald in salt and water to set the 
color. 

TO RESTORE FROZEN PLANTS, as soon as discovered pour 
cold water over them, wetting every leaf thoroughly. In a few min- 
utes it will become crystalized with a thick coating of ice. In this 
state place them in the dark, carefully covered with a newspaper; 
the ice will slowly melt, leaving the plants in their original state. 

TO ]\IAKE FLAT IRONS SMOOTH rub them on fine salt. iv.>ep 
a little beeswax in a cloth in the ironing blanket for the same pur-- 
pose. 

TO CLEAN POLISHED FURNITURE, dip a chamois skin in 
warm water and wipe carefully. 

TO CLEAN OI^T STOVE PIPE, place a piece of zinc on live 
coals in stove. The vapors produced carry off soot by chemical de- 
composition. 

STAINS ON HANDS may be removed by rubbing with salt 
moistened with lemon juice. Then wash the hands in clear water. 

Glaze the bottom crust of fruit pies with white of an egg and 
they will not be soggy. 

Place anything cooked in fat upon blotting paper and it will 
not taste greasy. 

Salt fish are soonest freshened in sour milk. 

A dish of cold water placed in the oven will prevent a delicate 
cake from burning. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 261 

1/2 yd. of cheese cloth makes a good dish cloth, if folded and 
stitched. 

A strip of muslin one inch wide, wet and placed to enclose the 
edge of a pie, will keep the juice from boiling out. 

FOR CHAPPED HANDS. One tablespoon lemon juice, 1 table- 
spoon glycerine, 2 tablespoons alcohol and a few drops of i)erfume. 
Shake the bottle well and rub a little on the hands after washing, be- 
fore drying. 

LISTERINE is an excellent disinfectant for the mouth and 
throat and is one of the best preservatives of the teeth known. 



The O'Dell Clothing Co. 



You can't help admiring our 
Clothes. 

They Fit Right 

They Wear Right 

and at the price we ask, no better 
value, if so good, can be secured 
outside of this store. 

In Choosing, you have the most 
complete line in this end of the 
state at your disposal. 



The O'Dell Clothing Co. 

Western Pennsylvania's Greatest 
Clothiers, Hatters and Furnishers 

WARREN :: :: PENN'A 



31 



F you dress as well as you can, 
you'll wear Printz's Clothing. 
Nobody dresses any better. 
Your money spent for clothing 
here is merely on deposit until 
you re sure you re satisfied. 




Phillip's 

Ice 
Company 



The Standard Grocery 
I I Company I I 



Dealers in Provisions, Foreign 
Fruits and Confectionery 

106 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, EAST 
Union Phone 202-1 Bell Phone 42-B 



PIANOS 



The Bennett, 

Hartzell and 

Widdifield Excel 

Manufactured by 

The Bennett Piano 
Company 

224 Hickory St., Warren, Pa. 



BAD COLDS 

are the forerunners of dangerous diseases of the throat and lungs. H 
you have a cough, you can stop it with Pise's Cure. If you sufter trom 
hoarseness, sore throat, bronchitis or pains in the lungs. Piso s Cure will 
soon restore the irritated throat and lungs to normal, healthy condition. 
An ideal remedy for children. Free from opiates and dangerous m- 
gredients. For half a century the sovereign remedy m thousands ot 
homes. Even chronic forms of lung diseases 

RESPOND TO PISO'S CURE 



H. J. SCHINDLER 



Blank Book Manufacturer 

Printer and Book 
Binder 



107 Penn'a Ave., W. 



Warren, Pa. 



J/ie ^i 



K^nt/c/e 



isses Kjnuaer 

•^rt anrl .^aLiisIc Ketone 

zlrictures framed to order >^rt 

&oods of all /iinds 

(classical and popular music 



22r5 Ciberfy St. 



Warren News Co. 

Stationers 
Newsdealers 



Choice Post Cards 
SAVINGS BANK BLOCK 



The Newell Press 

JOHN T. NEWELL 

Particular Printing for 
Particular People 

Opp. Hotel Struthers Warren, Pa. 



Dennison Bros. 



Men's Boys' and Children's 

Clothing, Suits and 

Furnishings 



Dennison Bros. 

WARREN, PA. 



m. 



m 



m^mmmmmmmM&mWmWmmmm 



Laurel flour 
Excelsior Coffee 

TWO Of THE BEST 
THINGS IN WARREN 



To be had only at 

BERGER'S PLRE EOOD 
STORE 

TH« Home of Quality 



"The Proof of the 
Pudding 

is in the eating" 



And a shoe is kno^vn 
by the service it gives. 
Our shoes have a 
reputation for Good 
Service and unusual 
Style Qualities, and 
they fit in such a way 
that great comfort is 
enjoyed. 

$2.50 to $4.00 

Eberhart & Miller 

Opp. Suspension Bridge 
WARREN -:- PENN'A 



3 i- 

« . f. 

Try Chafing Dish Recipes on an Electric | 

Chafing Dish — No smoke or fire — I 

A turn of the button does | 

all the work. 



Electricity lights your home 
Lightens your labor 



Let us serve you 



Warren Electrical Light Company 



:^ ^\ Ifl 1^ If) If \ (^ «f \ Dp «|« llf ) ^\ ^« «|t ^ «|\ ^ «|\ lf\ ^ «P If V /|\ <f \ «|\ l|\ «r> Ifl «|\ 1^ ^\ >fV ^ ^ f« ^\ ^\ ^1 ^« If « ^\ ^ IfX tX lf\ ^ <(\ «|\ «|\ «|t ^\ «f \ ^ 




"I have lived in Southern California and Florida 
winters, in the Adirondaclcs summers, and in the 
mountains of North Carolina between times, and 
I have found White House Coffee just the 
same, — always good, — always better than 
other brands called 'best' and 'just as 
good,' and I want the White House 
Brand, and I won't take any other ! " 

The wise merchant will always have the White 

House Coffee in stock. 1, 2 and 3-lb, 

cans only. Never sold in Bulk. 

DWINELL-WRIGHT COMPANY, 

Principal Coffee Roasters. Boston and Chicago. 



Sold by the best Grocers generally and at wholesale by 

Smith & Horton Co., Ltd 

WARREN, PENN'A 



The best results from the recipes in this book 
can be obtained by using Conew^ango Brand of flour, 
butter and spices. Ask your Grocer for the Conewan- 
go Brand. Smith & Horton Co., Ltd. are the exclus- 
ive Avholesale distributers. 



Walker's Celebrated 

I X L Ice Cream 

Sold Everywhere 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Walker Ice Cream Co. 

LIMITED 

309-311 Union St. Warren, Pa. 



THE MIRROR 

Artistic Printing 
of Every Kind 



Publishers of the Daily and 
Semi-Weekly Warren Mirror 

227 Penn'a Ave., W. Warren, Pa. 



Ig 111 

I TO"DAY^S I 



a 





AGAZIN 



For the Women and Children of 
the Family 



I AND 

I TO-DAY'S PATTERNS 

11 

i FIFTY CENTS A YEAR 



HI 

m 
1) 
m 
m 
m 



i STORIES 1 

I HOUSEHOLD HINTS | 

I RECIPES i 

1 CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT i 



FANCY WORK d 

FASHION NOTES 1 



m 
m 



44 



Ease is the Beautiful 

Result of Forgotten Toil" 

As the dollar is "bent" 

the fortune's "incHned" 



We pay you four per cent on your savings, and 

ANY AMOUNT STARTS AN ACCOUNT 




Established ■RJLU'^P^TlQ Warren, 

1870 IkliUV^F^H Pennsylvania 



I SENSE TALK— CENT S SAVINGS ! 

^ In the purchase of Flavoring Extracts, you buy flavor and Cologne Spirits. f' 

rj The proportion of Cologne Spirits in Flavoring Extracts seldom varies except in ^ 

J very cheap goods, where Alcohol and Water are largely used. t 

■^ The proportion of Flavoring Material added to the Spirits varies greatly, t: 

■i therefore, what you buy in addition to Flavoring Material is Alcohol or Alcohol Z^ 

i^ and Water. fe 

■^ You can buy Cologne Spirits at $2.50 per gallon, or less than 2c an ounce. f' 

■» You can buy Flavoring Extracts one-quarter, one-third, three-fourths or t 

^ full strength according to price. t 

.g You will readily recognize that full strength Flavoring Extracts are the best f- 

■J to buy. A less amonnt is required and a better flavor is obtained. They are ^ 

^ cheaper in the end. t 

I ROYCE'S HIGH GRADE FLAVORING EXTRACTS are full strength | 

■■» — are made from the best of selected materials — require only one-half teaspoonful f-^ 

i^ to give a delicious fruit flavor to one quart of material. t 

J Is not the reasoning clear and sound ? A trial will convince you. % 

■5 Our representative will be pleased to submit samples. f: 

I f 

I Represented in Warren by ThC AbnCr RoyCC Co. | 

I MRS. MARY GILL Manufacturers and I 

I 316 East Street Perfumers f 



Mott-Phillips Hardware 
Company 

Plumbing, Tin and Sheet 
Iron Work — Hardware, 
Stoves, Tinware, Sewer 
Pipe, Etc. -:- -:- -:- 



213 PENN'A AVE. 



WARREN, PA. 



E. U. STEIN 

The Woman's Shop 

Votaries of fashion will have an oppor- 
tunity to select from the very choicest gar- 
ments and wraps for day and evening wear, 
for the street, theatre, for walking or autoing. 
Each piece thoroughly stylish with every 
fashionable feature delineated. Coats, Suits, 
Fur Coats, Furs, Belts, Bags, Waists, Etc. 



209 Liberty St. Warren, Pa. 



Pictorial Review 
Patterns 



Acorn 
Shirt Waists 



Green & Blair 



Distributors of 



Up-to-date Dry Goods 



WARREN, PENN'A 



Thomson's Glove 

Fitting and Royal Queen's Own 

Worcester Corsets Hosiery 




-^2^ 



Burt Shoe 



The Burt Shoe for women has 
stood pre-eminent in the shoe 
world for half a century, for 
which there must be a reason. 
Experts have always given the 
Burt Shoe the highest awards 
at the great expositions. They 
saw the reason. Ladies who 
have worn the Burt, know the 
reason. On examination you 
can see the reason. In origi- 
nality of design, beauty of style 
and perfection of fit. The Burt 
Shoe is unequaled at $4.00. 



Gregory, Brown & 
Company 

Special Agents Warren, Pa. 



4 



F. S. RICHARDSON 

Successor to Kennett & Richardson 

Ladies and Children's 
FURNISHINGS 

Holiday Goods 

Toys and Novelties 

Rog-ers Block 

WARREN, PA. 



MISS SILL 

FASHIONABLE 

MILLINERY 

No. 426 Penn'a Avenue West 



FOUKMAIN 

Does All Kinds of 

Upholstering 

Rurniture Repairing 
=:anci:- 
Hurniture Packing 
No. 223 Penn'a Avenue West 



THE MISSES LESSER 

Invite the public to 
visit their store 
w^hen in search of 

HIGH GRADE 
GOODS 



BAKER & JOHNSON 

DRY GOODS 
Notions and 

Ladies' Furnishings 

.•at? 
AGENTS FOR 

McCALL PATTERNS 



THE BOSS GROCERY 

Chase & Sanborn's High Grade 
COFFEE 

MAGNOLIA riOlR 

J. P. McANERNEY - - PropT 



IT'S WORTH a Trip Down Town 
to see 

REYNOLDS' 

DRUG STOCK 

if 

Everything know^n in Medicine and 

Pharmacy is there in abundance 

and inviting freshness 

THE REYNOLDS DRUG CO. 

TWO STORES 



HAVE 

JiCOB KELLER & CO. 

Make Your INext Suit and 

it will 136 made 

RiOMT 

JACOB KELLER CHAS. R. BECK 
The Tailors 



Ul{i lom'd 



Weights and Measures 

4 cups flour 1 pound 

2 cups butter (packed solidly) 1 pound 

2 cups granulated sugar 1 pound 

Sy2 cups confectioner's sugar 1 pound 

2% cups brown sugar 1 pound 

2% cups granulated corn meal 1 pound 

2 cups finely chopped meat 1 pound 

9 large eggs 1 pound 

1 square Baker's chocolate 1 ounce 

2 tablespoons butter 1 ounce 

Vs cup almonds blanched and chopped 1 ounce 

4 level tablespoons flour 1 ounce 

1 tablespoon (well heaped) granulated sugar or 2 of flour or 

powdered sugar 1 ounce 

Soft butter size of an egg 2 ounces 

1 6 tablespoons 1 cup 

2 cups 1 pint 

PROPORTIONS. 

3 heaping teaspoons Baking Powder to 1 quart of flour. 
1 even teaspoon Baking Powder to 1 cup of flour. 

] tablespoon cornstarch to every half pint of liquid. 

1 tablespoon sugar to every half pint of liquid. 

1 teaspoon soda to 1 pint of sour milk. 

1 teaspoon soda to I/2 pint of molasses, 

1 teaspoon vanilla to 1 quart milk for custards. 

5 to 8 eggs to 1 quart of milk for custards. 












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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 






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