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Full text of "The Washington ELM"

KEFEHENCE BOOK 

TO BE TAKEN 

PHim THE LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/washingtonelm193437wash 



GREETINGS TO 
NEW INSTRUCTORS 




Elm 



HAIL TO THE 
153RD CLASS 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 1. 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 22, 1934 



PRICE .IN CENTS 



FIRST ASSEMBLY 
OF YEAR HELD 



President Mead Addresses 
Students 

Dr. Gilbert W. Mead stated thi 
future policy of the college briefly ii 
address at Thursday's opening 



fOLLES APPOINTED 
VGLISH ASSISTANT 



W 



llso Head Public Speak- 
ling Department 



his 

convocation exercises. Dr. Mead 
pointed out that the purpose and duty 
of any college is to endow its stu- 
dents with knowledge and vision 
which with honesty, courage, and 
God-given common sense go to make 
up the ideal citizen. This, he said 
should be the first and final aim of 
our institution. 

College Judged By Alumni 
A college is invariably judged by 
the finished men and women it sends 
into the world. Obviously it is vital 
to the well-being of a college to keep 
these up to standard. Moreover, the, 
governmental future of our natiorj 
is almost entirely dependent upon thtf 
intelligent effort made in this direci 
tion by the various centers of erudif 
tion through out the country. QuotJ 
ing again from Dr. Mead: "the ana? 
lytical mind, laboratory technique, 
the conclusions of the logician, the r — 



DEAN OF WOMEN 



his youthful appearance ; 
Pr>sBr Tolles, who has accepted 
thposlion recently made vacant by 
thresiPnation of Professor Makosky 
hafil r l*ady secured for himself ai 
enable .reputation in his chosen field 
oJtudy. 

i 1928 he was graduated from 
H^iilton College, of Clinton, N. Y., 
w ji honors in English and Public 
Spaking. After a year of High 
Sc >oI teaching, he returned to Ham- 
ilt i for two years as an instructor 
in English and Public Speaking, at 
th same time completing the re- 
qu thnents for his Master's degree. 

mowing this achievement, Pro- 
fe ol Tolles was successively engag- 
ed n»t as a graduate student at Col- 
"if ■ '-^University, where he complet- 
residence requirement for the 




MRS. TUTA SUCCEEDED 
BY DR. ROBINSON 



Will 



Assist In Mathematics 
And Chemistry 



FROSH CLASS 
NUMBERS 95 



iow: 



hot""' of Doctor of Philosophy, and 
s a member of the faculty of 

ber COml Brook High School, N. J., 

• he entered as an instructor in 

\r*\, and left as the head of the 

nent — all in the space of 
iagni 



uld not be assumed from this 



AMANO-ft T- SRfiTJLBi 



DEAN BRADLEY ALSO 
ENGLISH INSTRUCTOR 

Succeeds Miss M. G. Brewer 
As Member Of Department 



friendliness and sportsmanship of the , 5 .aaa 10u 

" of educational achievement 



athletic field or of fraternities, if and 
when applied to governmental affairs. 
Will revolutionize them completely." 
Changes In Curriculum 
President Mead announced a fur! 
ther matter of policy in that changes — ' 
will be made in the curriculum from 1 
year to year as conditions seem 



professor Tolles is of the dry, 
Ed type so frequently caricatur- 
fel the typical college professor, 
Bto the contrary, his is a frank 
rtgaging personality, and he con- 
; I a most undignified enthusiasm 
t0 H<^Xlf, tennis, and sand-lot baseball. 



make them advisable. SeveraV-M ng educational lines Professor 

expresses a great liking tor 



changes were made during the pas^ 
summer. 

Welcomes New Students 

Dr. Mead expressed his pleasure a^ 
being back in the harness, renewing 
old and pleasant associations. He ofi 
fered a hearty welcome to the neiy 
students, impressing upon them thai 
they can feel a just pride in the tra- 
dition-invested past of this venerabl 
institution. He mentioned that this 
year opened the college's one-hun- 
dred and fifty-third year of contin- 
ous life. The past year, he said, wa: 
a successful one in terms of progress 
achieved. He remarked upon thd 
various crisis in our nation's history 
during this period, concluding that 
conditions at present are consider 
ably improved. He showed that the 
advent of vision and intelligence in- 
to public life has made change into 
progress. The increasing promin- 
ence given to college-trained men 
should serve as a stimulus to others 
who may reach prominence them-; 
selves. 

Values Of Education 

In a discourse on the values of ed 
ucation Dr. Mead demonstrated that 
college is valuable only if it teaches 
how to think. He condemned imi- 
tative philosophies, classroom par 
rots, and showed that these may re 
suit from modern mass education. In 
this respect he said, the small college 
with its individuality, personal rela- 
tions, and friendly spirit, if it haq 
the modern point of view, has a di 
tinct advantage over the large uni- 
versity. 

Opening Procession 

The convocation exercises were 
opened with an academic procession 
of the members of the faculty. The 
Washington College Orchestra fur- 
nished the music for this and for the 
recessional nt the close of the exer- 
cises. 



/*♦< 



terature of the 19th century, 
particularly for dramatics and 
[filiate subject, Public Speaking, 
also intensely interested in 
ing, which, he declares, is "the 
est educational factor in the life 
e young boy." 

j aduate of a small college, Pro- 
[• Tolles fully appreciates the ad-, 
ges to be found in such an in- 
ion. "I am interested," he says, 

teaching students as a group, 
ather in dealing with them as 
iduals. This is possible only in 

11 college." 
lally, Professor Tolles is mar- 

a member of Alpha Delta Phi 
rnity, had a terrible time find- 
place to live in Chestertown : 
fell in love with the college when 

it for the first time only a few 
i ago. 



Miss Amanda Bradley, the little 
Southern lady who is now Dean of 
Women at Washington College re- 
ceived her Bachelor's degree at 
Birmingham Southern College as an 
English major. Winning a scholar- 
ship, she continued work at Radcliffe 
College, where she was awarded her 
master's degree. Her most recent 
work was done at Harvard in prepar- 
ing for her doctor's degree. The 
poetry of the Romantic period is the 
subject of her thesis. Before com- 
ing to Washington College Miss Brad- 
ley taught at St. Catherine's Episco- 
pal School for Girls in Richmond, 
Virginia. 

Miss Bradley has met all types of 
deans in her life as dean of women 
in several institutions. In finishing 
a discussion of one whose methods 
had displeased her she said earnestly, 
"My hobby is to be a human dean" 
and added as an illustration lines 
from a poem by Dr. Mead in which he 
refers to Dante, 

"Bearing through mystic, insub- 
stantial glory. 

Love and the gentle heart." 



Dr. Wilbur J. Robinson, who for 
the past three years held the position 
of graduate assistant in mathematics 
at Ohio Stae University, has been ap- 
pointed to the office of assistant pro- 
fessor of mathematics and chemistry 
recently made vacant by the resigna- 
tion of Mrs. Lorene Hartley Tuta. 
He will also be head of Middle Hall, 
in which dormitory he is now situat- 
ed. 

Dr. Robinson received the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts at Ohio Wesleyan 
University in 1931, doing major work 
in mathematics with his minor in the 
field of chemistry. While there he 
became a member of Pi Mu Epsilon, 
honorary mathematical fraternity, 
and Sigma Pi Sigma, an honorary 
physics fraternal order. Upon grad- 
uation he was presented with the key 
of Phi Beta Kappa, nationally known 
honorary scholastic society. 

During his three years at Ohio 
State University he prepared for his 
doctorate in the field of mathematics 
and recently had the degree of Doc- 
tor of Philosophy conferred upon him 
He is also a recent member of the 
American Mathematical Society. 

In undergraduate school Dr. Rob- 
inson took several courses under Dr. 
Arthur L. Davis, now head of the 
modern language department of 
Washington College. There also he 
went out for the distance positions in 
track. His home is in Depauville, 



Tests Prove Class Of Superior 
Rank 



N. Y. 



FRESHMAN WEEK OPENS 
YEARS ACTIVITY 



1ENDLINESS IS NOTED AS TRAIT 

STUDENTS AT COLLEGE SHOULD CULTIVATE 



' Welcomes of all sorts have been, 
' | no\v. extended to all new students 

I the College, and to all older ones 

turning from the summer holiday. 

nee I am asked to add here another 
bid, let me say simply that you are 
'1 welcomed here, new students and 
Ed, to a constant adventure of 
tiendllness. Living together in a 
(1-oup is likely to be a difficult mat- 
:r, under any circumstance. On a 
tallege campus, where nearly every- 
|ody seems to know nearly every- 
hing about everybody else, this is 
articularly true. 
"A friend," said the little boy, "is 

fellow who knows all about you and 
till likes you." The maturei- mind 
eeognizes that true friendliness, 
ventilating in lifelong friendship 



and companionship, gets its vivify- 
ing vigor from the impact of the best 
of one nature upon the best of anoth- 
er, not the worse side. 

Know your neighbors on the cam- 
pus. Broaden yourself by knowing 
many. Do not make the common 
mistake of limiting yourself too ob 
viously to the intimacy of one or s 
few, excluding yourself from the rest 
of the world. The world can get 
along better without you than you 
can without it. 

Make this year one of adventure 
in friendships, remembering that if 
you do not give widely, you cannot 
receive deeply. Your college will be 
n better place if you do. 

— Gilbert W. Mead. 



The Ninth Annual Freshman Week 
activities began oh Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 9th with Dr. Gilbert W. Mead 
delivering the address of welcome to 
some ninety freshman gathered 
William Smith Hall. Dr. Mead's talk 
was immediately followed by an ex- 
planation of the Washington College 
honor pledge by the President of the 
Student Council, Mr. Wesley L. Sad- 
ler. Jr. The same afternoon regis- 
tration was held for the freshmen 
and at seven-thirty that evening a 
very successful reception by the fac- 
ulty was given in Reid Hall for the 
entertainment of the newcomers. 

Thursday morning was given over 
to various background tests and the 
afternoon was devoted to addresses 
by Dean Jones explaining the college 
curriculum, by Miss Ella Barkley and 
Mr. W. L. Sadler of the Women's and 
Men's Student Councils respectively, 
discussing the systems of student 
government at Washington College. 
Through the kindness of Mr. Emer- 
son Russell, a movie party was giv- 
en at The New Lyceum Theatre, 
which was followed by refreshments 
donated by Gill Brothers. 

Certain background examinations 
were given again on Friday morning 
while the afternoon was spent listen- 
ing to talks by Miss Doris Bell, Mr. 
J. T. Kibler, and Mr. Frank Goodwin. 
A new function appeared Friday ev- 
ening, in the form of introductions 
to the various societies and orgsniia- 
tions which meet on the campus. On 
Saturday in William Smith Hall. Dr. 
Mead presented the Anal address o 
Freshman Week. "Your Future at 
Washington College." 



Ninety-five students are includ- 
ed in the present Freshman Class at 
Washington -College. Psychological 
tests have shown the class of '38 to 
have better chances of scholastic 
success than the class of '37. Good 
football material has given the coach- 
es hopes of a fighting team. Social 
activities will not be neglected and 
the orchestra and glee club are re- 
cruiting new members from the first 
year students. 

Psychological Tests Given 
Numerous tests were given the in- 
coming students. These same tests 
are given in about 300 colleges 
throughout the country. Next spring 
a comparative table showing the 
standing of the various ones v/ill be 
published. At present, the results of 
the Freshmen at Washington are not 
known. However, the American 
Council Psychological Test rated the 
Freshman Class twenty points higher 
than the present Sophomores. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Livingood the class of 
38 is an older and more select group 
than last year's freshman class, thus 
accounting for the higher showing 
made by the new group. 

Athletic And Musical Talent 

The football squad was increased 
by 19 husky freshmen about evenly 
divided between the backfield and 
line. Practice has already revealed 
several good punters among the new 
men. The coaches say the additional 
material makes the future look bright. 
With more plunging backs and fight- 
ing linemen a winning Washington 
team should be waiting for Hopkins. 

Musical talent, too, is found in 
this versatile class. There are sev- 
eral new songsters for Mr. Moffett to 
train for his Glee Club. Nine fresh- 
men joined the orchestra at the first 
practice of this year. As only two 
men left that organization, the Or- 
chestra is assured of a successful 
season. 

A number of Freshmen are anxi- 
ously awaiting the formation of the 
Cotillion Club. The pretty girls will 
find willing escorts among the eager 
boys. 

The Y. M. C. A. is expecting many 
new members from the Freshmen 
who have expressed a desire to join 
the College T. 



PROF. JOHN D. MAKOSKY 
CALLED TO ALMA MATER 

Former English Instructor Ap- 
pointed To Western Md. 

Professor John Donald Makosky. 
who for years served Washington 
College in the capacity of Assistant 
Professor of English, recently 
ed a similar position at Western 
Maryland College. 

Although the college is sorry to 
lose so able a faculty member, it 
cannot but congratulate Frofessor 
Makosky upon bis radiation . 
veins to be every college pro 
dream— to teach in his Alma Mater. 
Furthermore, it is not unlikely that 
Makosky may eventually 
become bead of that department 

when the present incmnbonl 

. ed. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 22, 1934 



The Washington Elm 

Published by and for the interests of the student body of Washington 
College, the eleventh oldest institution of higher learning in the United 
States. 



Founded at Chestertown, Md., 1782 



Editor 

Assistant Editor 



William Oliver Baker 
Carroll Casteel 



Art and Drama 

Society 

Sports 

Exchanges 

Music 

Copy 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Frances Silcox 

Dorothy Clarke 

Phillip Skipp, Jean Harshaw 

Alfred Taylor 

Vincent Brandolini 

Anne Whyte 



REPORTERS 

Allan Brougham, Howard Clark, Robert Fink, Miriam Ford, Arthur Greims, 

Kola Hill, William Eight, William McCulIough, Doris Metcalfe, 

Joseph Mooney, Robert Shaull, Edward Weer, Lawrence 

Williams, Lawrence Yourtee 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager Louis Goldstein 

Assistant Business Manager Emerson Slacum 

Circulation Manager Joseph McLain 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., Postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription Price, ?1.50 a year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

Address all business communications to the business man- 
ager, and all other correspondence to the Editor-in-Chief. 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 22, 1934 



NEW YEAR — NEW PEOPLE 

A characteristic of Washington 
College is its staid persistence. In 
one hundred and fifty three years the 
direction of the North Pole from 
Chestertown has varied by many de- 
grees, but the third week in Sep- 
tember has seen, with but few gaps, 
the beginning of activity on College 
Hill. Washington College has grown 
so fundamental to its environment 



stance to the fine and great deeds 
of man. 

The freshman will soon be aware 
to many things incidental to the col- 
lege community. Most of these 
things will form fine new experiences 
in his spiritual and mental growth. 
Still, he will meet a bitter sort of 
cynicsm that is as infantile as it i: 
loud. He may be disillusioned in ■< 
few instances, if there remains any 



AVE 

The three new members of Wash- 
ington College's most valuable asset 
the faculty, have been made welcome 
a dozen times, already. They de- 
serve these formal welcomes as be- 
fits entrants into a new society. How- 
ever, the most significant greetings 
they will receive are_from the stu- 
dents who have the pleasure of study- 
ing under them. Appreciation for 
mastery of his field, cooperation, hard 
work and unfeigned interest — these 
things are the least a student can 
give his professor. The fine teachers 
at Washington College, as President 
Mead has well said many times, are 
investing their lives in this institu- 
tion. Several of them have display- 
ed, over a long period of years, a de- 
votion for Washington College strong- 
er than the heaviest masonry of Wil- 
liam Smith Hall, which must some- 
day crumble. The traditions and 
ideals built into the College by these 
generous educators are everlasting. 
Such a faculty, with its able addi- 
tions, promises a happily successful 
year, "ab ovo usque ad mala." 



Orchestra Facf 
Successful J 

Talent Is Promised Fri 
New Class 



VALUES 



By Vincent Brandol" 

On the wave of a glorious? 
do, the Washington College^ 
Ira swept into its first off'' 
hearsal Tuesday night, Septe 
The practice was one of spA 
portance because try-outs fc 
coming freshmen musiciav 
held. The candidates were" 
lows: i( 

Violins — Lawrence Kaleshkl 
Bride, Franklin Bolth, and By 
Smith. I 

Saxophones — William Thorl, 
Winston Blevins, and Frank F(j 
Drums — Harold Kosowsky. 
The ranks of the orchestra e 
not left depleted by the last gr> 
tion, and the incoming class asjs 
the college its first little sympy 
orchestra. 

Instead of reviewing simplifie'- 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-lv Heard 



Reading time The office boy re- 
fused to read this, so we were unable 
to time him. 



For one year now we have been 
living under the "laws of the Meads 
and the Persians," and many, notice- 
able currents — social, educational, 
and air, may be seen eddying on the 
once placid face of Washington Col- 
lege. Reforms have been promised 
and we are looking forward to chang- 
es — some great and some short. 



vangements of well-known com 
tions as formerly, an entirely 
repertoire will be offered, one t 
will deal exclusively with the 
library of overtures. Emphap-, 1 
not only be placed on the tec< 
ties of music alone, but on the e 
of presentation. a 

This year the orchestra, nd 
ing, complete, twenty-two i 
hopes to make many trips, wHs 
be the chief concern of Mt 
Henry G. Davis and Librarian 
K. Fears. 



that there is nothing strange about] thing which has escaped the expert 



this regular phenomenon. It proves, 
however, always interesting. The 
variable equations of human rela- 



A small tollege hails as its prime 
advantage over larger institutions 
the chance for intimate friendship it 
affords its students. Its small body 
allows a close connection between 
the stuflent and professor. The stu- 
dent can thus avail himself of inval- 
uable advice — advice from the ex- 
perience of mature and intelligent 
people. Perhaps the most important 
thing a student, senior or freshman, 
can acquire from knowing one or sev- 
eral of his professors well is a sense 
of values of things. Choices and de- 
cisions are, perhaps, abstractly, the 
only problems of life. Critical in- 
sight offers, usually, satisfactory so- 
lution to these difficulties. Acquaint- 
ance with a learned scholar provides j ganization. If this fact were 
critical insight. The conclusion of! Uue > there would be very little H 



ed into the established system. These "Snap" judgments, conclusions with 



symbols, freshmen forming the class 
of 1938, have already been introduc 
ed to some of that unique existence 
undergraduate life. Within the year, 
most of them will have acquired an 
individuality in the college family. 
Washington will be thus richer for 
the absorption of new personalities 
into its body. 

Hence, the freshman class is im- 
portant to the College intellectually, 
athletically, and socially. It is im- 
portant to the sophomores so that 
they may develop a needed sense of 
superiority. It is important to itself 
because it is learning to think and 
live, in many cases, for the first time 
away from parental supervision. 



out thought, are usually worthless. 

If the average freshman is careful 
in drawing conclusions and possesse a 
passion for excellence, he will be 
graduated a superior man. A re- 
spectfully intimate connection with 
the faculty of scholars under whom 
he is to have the privilege of study 
ing will imbue him with caution ir 
choices and a desire to be always "ir 
the presence of the best." 

Athletics and other activities must 
and will fill much of the new stu- 
dent's time, and attract his interest. 
He should sincerely support the col- 
lege teams, even though he has nev- 
r kicked a pigskin ellipsoid, or 



analysis of the high school senior. He 
will hear virtuoso in verbosity "un- 
muzzle" their "great heaps of wis- 
tions, on which colleges are builded, j dom," often about the lesser things 

are brought into new play. A fresh j of life. To all of these influences lis i the Iine <* reasoning is obvious, 
set of symbols, properly, as yet. un- j will be critically aloof if he forms! The ^udent must often decide one 
to be integrat-|the habit of discreet judgment. P* e:,t range of values for himself. It 

is, what is he to count above all else 
in his college life and interests? The 
upper-classman quite as often as the 
first-year man tussles with this point 
of view. Should athletics, or debat- 
ing, or the Cotillion Club absorb his 
chief energies? He doesn't know, 
but he is often completely overlook- 
ing his only sane reason for a col- 
lege residence. He is here to learn 
to work and concentrate with a pre- 
cision that would require years to de- 
velop without the college influence. 
His studies, then, no matter how use- 
less they seem to him, should be his 
first consideration, should supercede 
all else. Adherence to this obvious 
truth will solve many mental con 
filets. Students, or rather, those 
people matriculated in college cours- 
es, who go about saying that ".social 
contactr," etc., are the most import- 
ant things in college experience are 
weak rationalizers to apathy 
guilty conscience. True, extra-cur- 
ricular activities have a large recog- 
nized value, but it is a certain sec- 
ond to the importance of academic 
work. 

Professors, who have been through 
tho mill, will corroborate these state- 
ments to tho doubter. They are 
very pleasant, in fact, about being 
consulted. Although some of them 
appear to have a demeanor so grave 
that from its gravity, as Cliarles 
Lamb said, "Newton might have de- 
duced hi,-i law of j; ravioli on," they 
are truly a fine, human faculty. 



Rehearsals have been set foi 
day nights at 6:30, and all -inir 
musicians are requested to sp^ 
Dr. Livingood. 



INTERCEPT 
PHRASES' 

By Frederick Taylor 



Every change of leadership 
essarily leads to some change i 



dropped a basketball through the 

To attempt to plot a course by; hoop. Coaches say that often ath- 

which new men and women may steer jletic contests are as much of spirir 

.* .nvariably futile and foolish, be- as of brawn and muscle. The spirit 

'.» beyond the capabilities of must be school-wide 

educator. Theirl No worth-while person can be dis- 
appointed with college. Here, if no- 



consciences, and the standards and 
ideals which they accept as peculiarly 
suitable to themselves will guide 
them. It murt be remernbn 
ever, that ideal- cannot be made to 
. but must be theiie 
imperb-hable things whir-h, being 
form without substance, yet Jend «ub- 



where else, he can rise above what 
Mr. H. G. Well* called "the encrus- 
tation of mediocrity," which covers 
the earth. It is the freshman today 
I make the graduate four 
years hence, and "of nothing, noth- 
ing is made"— 'do nihilo, nihil fit." 



Sunday night all the traditions of 
this venerable institution were shat- 
tered when the "Rat party" was held 
before the witching hour of mid- 
night. This was considerately done 
to allow the younger sophs their eight 
hours sleep. The only people we saw 
very excited over the event were a 
few sophs who worked themselves 
into a frenzy by hurling over-done 
tomatoes at all within range. It was 
a mild affair; next year we expect to 
see a tea-party held for the rats over 
Reid Hall. "Little Giant*' Dunton, 
Reddish, McLain, Greims and Class 
awed the unfortunate youths by their 
grimaces while the townspeople 
shouted encouragement. It was re- 
ported that one of the new instructors 
was accidently included among the 
"Rats" but this has not been veri- 
fied. No injuries were reported, save 
various blisters, on the soph's hands, 
of course. After a few traditional 
exercises, "President" Greims kissed 
the freshmen goodnight, and a few 
soph volunteers tucked the tired but 
happy Rats in their wee beds. 



For many of us, this is our last 
year. It is with a sigh that we real- 
ize that time passes by at school even 
faster than it does in Italy. (Where 
every time you look you see a Dago 
by.) 



gress. This column is no excepl ij 
Undpr our new editor we shall 
deavor to make this an exchangi 
umn wilh strictly exchange mat 

We know that there will be 
unfavorable comment at the 
audacity of trying to write exc' 
es in an exchange column, bu 
fact remains that such a colu/a 
generally considered an asset P 
college paper. Otherwise we f 
not find them in the hundred • 
some odd papers that we read in 
er to prepare this column. 

Not only shall we profit by obf 
ing affairs and new ideas of other! 
leges but also we shall gain a' 
prestige through the exchange of, 
licity with the various other psj 
which will be in contact with 
Through these channels it is pony 
to make Washington College l 
known on at least a hundred ot 
campuses. Anyone who ha 
trouble telling a student of some o 
er college where Washington Coll 
i:;, should know that this would b 
desirable state of affairs. 



Now that "Dusty" Rhodes is head- 
waiter over the Cafeteria, we are 
looking forward to a year that will go 
down in history as "the year of the 
Great Famine." 



Our readers needn't be alarmed — 
the present writer of this column is 
not going to continue his job. He 
has other fish to fry, literally speak- 
ing, than college students. He is 
considered as a sort of journalistic 
purgative to rid the editorial intes- 
tines of all the poisons accumulated 
during the summer, and so clear the 
way for his successor and allow for 
an easier issue in the future. 



Having expounded upon the 
ues of an exchange column we wl 
to warn you that we haven't any a 
changes for you to read. There c 
be any until this edition gets out ai 
gives other colleges something 
which to exchange. 

Only one paper has come in so fa 
the "Farthest-North Collegian," pu 
lished in Alaska College. Howcve 
we thought that would make rathi 
chilly reading for these cool i 
ing:: >:u put it away until atmospher; 

conditions were more conducive, 



Glee Chib Holds 
First Meeting 

Joseph Mooney Is President 
Of Body 



By Lawrence Williams 

The first weekly meeting of the 
Washington College Glee Club was 
held Wednesday evening, Sept. 1 !), 
in William Smith Hall. A large num- 
ber of freshmen were present, and, 
with most of the old members re- 
turning! the Glee Club is anticipat- 
ing a successful year. 

The Glee Club, under the direction 
of Mr. Raymond R. Moffett, will in- 
augurate a series of fall concerts, tho 
first of which will be given at Wil- 
mington, Del., in October, 

Officers for the ensuing year are 
ns follows: President, Joseph A. 
Mooney; Manager, to be elected due 
to absence of Charles Wells, who fail- 

fd to return; Treasurer, Carroll W. 
asteel; Librarian, Clifton Hope. 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 22, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Football Team 
Prospects Fine 



New 



Men Lend 
Brawn 



Needed 



By Phillip Skipp 

College has been open a week now, 
and no doubt many students have 
begun to wonder about prospects in 
all branches of sports. Before go- 
ing any further let us get this fact 
straightened out; this year there is 
to be a New Deal in athletics. 

Tho immediate interest is football. 
Though the squad is much larger 
than in previous years, the number of 
veterans returning is not so large. 
Coach Ekaitis has but seven letter 
men around which to mould his new 
team. Last year's strong line was 
heavily hit by graduation, and then 
Nowak, an outstanding performer en- 
tered law school. The task of bol- 
stering up the line rests with Dwyer, 
Ward, and Lord. Still there is much 
promising material among the fresh 
men. The backfield situation is 
somewhat improved due to the return 
of Evans and Huffman, two heavy 
backs. The one factor that leads 
many to be slightly optimistic is that 
the schedule is brief and not too 
heavy. 

Basketball is a few months away, 
and not much can be said at this 
time. Three letter men will be back. 
But it is expected that some of last 
year's reserves and a few freshmen 
will make up the squad. 

Track has been substituted for la- 
crosse. The results of the inter- 
class track meet last spring were 
very encouraging. 

Baseball, the other spring sport, 

will be in for a great cleaning. Many 

new faces are expected to be seen on 

c ' "i the diamond next spring. 



FOOTBALL 

By GEORGE EKAITIS 



In the majority of colleges the men 
tion of September brings to mind 
football. Another September has 
irrived, bringing with it the thud of 
'ootballs being punished by ambitious 
toes and the grunts and groans of 
aching bodies and minds going 
through the very necessary rituals 
that are essential to the molding of 
p. successful machine. In many of 
the colleges the football campaign 
opened very close to the first of the 
month. Ours has been running for 
a little over one week. At present 
the season is too young for predic- 
tions as to what we shall have, but 
not too early to state that prospects 
are exceedingly bright for a suc- 
cessful campaign. 

There have been changes in the 
rules, the only ones of major im- 
portance has to do with forward 
passing. The rules makers are en- 
deavoring! to encourage forward 
passing and have retracted the 
rlause regarding a five yard penalty 
for each incomplete pass in one ser 
ies of downs, after one incomplete 
pass has been thrown. This year 
there is no penalty for incomplete 
forward passes, except on fourth 
down. Also last year any pass 
thrown over opponent's goal line be 
coming incomplete automatically be 
came a touchback. This year the 
attacking team is allowed one incom- 
plete pass over the goal line in the 
same series of downs, except on 



I fourth down, thus if a pass is throv 



on the first down and becomes incom- 
plete over the goal line, it is classed 
only as a down, but if another pass is 
thrown on second down and is also in- 
complete, it is ruled as a touchback. 
If thrown on fourth down and being 
the only pass in that series, it is rul- 
ed as a touchback, if it becomes in- 
complete over the goal line. 

The ball this year has also been 
made smaller and supposedly stream- 
lined. This has been done to en-lffa m es. 






-Advertise in The Elm. 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



Six Contests 

Listed For Fall 



Schedule Shorter Than Last 
Year 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 

at home. The athletic department ^MWX^irtWX&X^^ 
made every effort to get a game for 
October 27 but met with little suc- 
cess, so there will be no additional 



For the first time in recent years 
the Washington College eleven faces 
a schedule that is short and made up 
of teams in its own class. Of the six 
games carded only two will be played 



courage more forward passing. Thus 
far we have found it to be a little 
harder to control both for passing 
and punting. Coaches are of differ- 
ent opinions, some are high in their 
praises as to its merits, while others 
say nothing good of it. Time and 
games will test out its true merit. 

Regardless of all changes, foot- 
ball goes on, and there will be a lot 
of exciting Saturdays before the cur- 
tain is rung down on this present 
campaign and I honestly believe 
Washington College is going to fur- 
nish a few of them for you. A little 
more deep-rooted and honestly meant 
confidence and feeling towards the 
present squad on the part of the stu- 
dent body would be very instrumen- 
tal in the making of the present 
bright prospects into a successful 
season. 



Here is the official schedule for the 

season: 

Oct. 13 — Gallaudet Home 

Oct. 19 — Hopkins Away 

Oct. 27 — Open 

Nov. 3 — Susquehanna Home 

10 — Mt. St. Mary's Away 

17 — Haverford Away 

24 — Delaware Away 



LeCATES BROS. | 
BARBER SHOP f 

Where the college man £ 

can get his style of X 

hair cut X 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



I Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



—00- 



-Advertise in The Elm. 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



H. D. OREM & SON 

Case Farm Machinery, J'WW«W«W««««W« 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 - Chestertown 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 

«v*v*«v*v-fr»*»v-*v*v-»v*v-»v-»v- 
COMPLIMENTS | 
SMITH'S KUT RATE X 

DRUG STORE 



For Sport and Gym Shoes X 
Buy at the X 

Oriole Shoe Store X 

Men's and Ladies' 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP $ 1 «<^«XH>v<-c-x-><-x««-c«M-x-e«>** 
Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Chestertown, Md. 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



pmuipj 

QELieiO0 s " 



/, CONDENSED L 

VEGETABLE 

isoupr 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and | 

Smoking Tobacco. x 

STAM DRUG COMPANY | 

j The Prescription Store t 



T— 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 



Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And AH Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



\ 



COOPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students, offers 
line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. Pennants, Pil- 
lows, Stickers, Stationery and School Supplies. 

. Every 



Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M 

{ Day but Saturday and Sunday. 
\ 



s\\\\\\s\\\\\\\\^\^\^^-^^^^^'^^'^^^ s ^ s ^ y ' % 



I 



Margaret E. Jefferson 

A Smart Shop For Women 



I 



Chestertown, Md. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 22, 1934 



DOIN'S 



The Hill has certainly been in one 
continuous hubbub since the students 
arrived. Even Ma Nature's rainy re- 
ception failed to wet-blanket our re- 
turn and most of the sore throats got 
that way from talking, and not from 
the weather. The only thing that is 
missing, is the class of '34. but since 
a mimb.gr- of them have procured 
jobs, we can wish them the best of 
luck and hope that they will be com- 
ing back to see us soon. When Col- 
lege broke up last Spring, the good 
old Eastern Sho' still held her own 
because several of the students work- 
ed down at Betterton and others 
were there for the season. Mim 
Ford showed the world that she was 
going to make someone a good house- 
wife and began by waiting on tables. 
Dobbie, Gamber, Russ Baker, Your- 
tee, Pratt, and Reinhold practically 
ran the town, while Estelle Wesley, 



Caroline Helms, and Joe Mooney did 
things up right, too. The call of 
those famous Betterton dances 
brought Scotty and Dick Johnson 
down from Cumberland. Dr. and 
Mrs. Meade spent the greater part of 
the summer at home, entertaining 
various guests. The President's sis- 
ter, Mrs. Edith Osborn, of Pennsyl- 
vania spent several days here with 
her daughter. Miss Elizabeth Osborn. 
Mr. James Saxon Childers, a recog- 
nized author, and Dr. and Mrs. An- 
thony Constans from Birmingham- 
Southern, were also guests. Mrs. 
Frank Goodwin deserted Chester- 
town and visited her home in Ala., 
while our Chief Campaigner was 
rounding up some more ambitious 
young things. By the way, the next 
time you see a cleaner's wagon going 
by, look carefully at the driver, for 
it will probably be Al Hodgson. Al 
is only one of the seniors of '34 who 
is doing the college credit. Charlie 
Clark, Sarah Ellen Byrn, "Curley" 
Koeber, and Paul Pippin are teaching 
at secondary schools. W T e guess that 



now that Burdette Nuttle is putting 
tomatoes in cans, that he often 
thinks of the ones he used to put in 
freshmen. Joe O'Farrel has started 
a new gag; this time it's selling in- 
surance. Wilson Cohee is at busi- 
ness school, as is Hattie Ragan. In- 
cidently. Hattie and Dave were in 
town a few days ago, visiting with 
Thelma Smith. It was amusing to 
see Dave casting his eye about Gills 
giving the Freshman girls the once 
over. Well, we can't blame him, 
they look like a good bunch, and the 
upper class girls are going to have 
to keep both eyes and thumbs on their 
Cadets. Oh, say! Marie Poole has 
taken the first step toward that fatal 
leap, since it is said that Marie has 
just announced her engagement. 
Here's happiness to you, Marie! 
Judging from the number of people 
who have decided to make the cours- 
es given by Dr. Howell, and Mr. 
Goodwin, their life's work, we had 
better take the first seat we find, or 
we'll be forced to stand. Ann 
Brown and Marian Emmord are 



working for their Master's Degree at 
William and Mary in Richmond. And 
Ellen Flick is doing Social Service 
work in Baltimore. Looks like that 
inclination is handed down from one 
President to another, since Leah 
Frederick did volunteer work along 
the same line. Other people are do- 
ing things too, and this could go on 
for hours, but honestly, space is run- 
ning out, so if some one has been 
neglected just drop a line to the 
"Elm" and we'll fix it up. 

— D. Clarke. 



Assembly Programs 

Are Announced 



A. H. Brown Speaks On Thurs- 
day, September 27 

The list of speakers for the next 
several weeks, who are procured 
through the efforts of Dr. F. G. Liv- 
ingood, Chairman of the Faculty 
Committee, is unusually varied and 
promises interest. 

The first guest speaker will be Mr 



A. H. Brown, prominent Centreville 
attorney, who will address the week- 
ly assembly of students and faculty 
at 11:00 A. M., on Thursday, Sep- 
tember 27th. 

The second will be Mr. T. Gordon 
Bennett, Educational Advisor, Third 
Corps Area, C. C. C, who will speak 
one week later, Thursday, October 
4th. 

Following these two gentlemen 
will be Mr. Harold Donnell, Superin- 
tendent of Maryland Prisons, on 
Thursday, October 11th. 

The speaker for October 18, Found- 
er's Day, is as yet unannounced. Dr. 
A. C. Goddard, of Wilmington, Del., 
is scheduled for October 25th, the 
last Thursday in October. 



A Maine owner of a small outfit of 
foxes reports that of 896 persons 
who snapped pictures of them and 
promised that if good they would 
send him a print, not one has ever 
turned a photograph in. 



Geologists have found that Cape 
Cod, Massachusetts, is sandy to a 
depth of 300 feet in some places. 




From the choicest Turkish and Domestic 
tobaccos— only the clean center leaves are 
used in Luckies— these are the mildest 
leaves— they cost more— they taste better. 



7w^ pet&k 

"It's toasted" 

V Your throat firotection—at'ainst irritation— against cough 



Saturday Night 
Informal Tonight 

In Gymnasium 



The" lS ^^EIm 



Movie Program 

For Week Appears 

In Each Elm 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 2. 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 29, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



E. H. Brown Speaks 
At Assembly 

Centreville Antiquarian 
Speaks On Local History 

Edward H. Brown, of Centreville, 
was the speaker at the weekly assem- 
bly held in William Smith Hall on 
September 27th. An interesting de- 
scription of Eastern Shore history, 
which is his hobby, was given. Dr. 
Gilbert W. Mead made the introduc- 
tion and in concluding linked the 
past of Washington College with the 
local history. Members of the stu- 
dent council were officially installed 
by President Mead. 

Was Newspaper Publisher 

Mr. Brown at present an attorney 
in Centreville is a former newspaper 
publisher. The need of using leisure 
time to an advantage was stressed 
and a hobby was pointed out as ad- 
visable in his address. In part Mr. 
Brown said "today the acquisition of 
wealth is first, but in the future mon- 
ey will be reduced to minor import- 
ance and abundant leisure time will 
be at our disposal." 

In his hobby, the study of local his- 
tory, a grandfathers clock proved to 
be the clue that showed the rise and 
fall of a family thru a period of 200 
years. The scanning of old records 
and the reading of old estate inven- 
tories on file have given a complete 
record of the lives of early Mary- 
landers. 
Says Peale Born in Queen Annei 

Mr. Brown unearthed proof that 
Queen Annes County is the birthplace 
of Charles Wilson Peale, famous ear- 
ly American painter. He found that 
Luther Martin, revolutionary lawyer 
and defender of Aaron Burr, taught 
in the free school of that county. 
Further that Kent Island was repre- 
sented in the Virginia House of Bur- 
gesses before Lord Baltimore sailed 
up the Chesapeake Bay. 

Because of this hobby he has en- 
joyed many hours of leisure spent 
away from the routine of daily af- 
fairs. The value of acquiring a hob- 
by can not be overestimated to college 
students. It should be a part of then- 
education. 

Student Council Sworn In 

President Mead administered the 
oath of office to Wesley L. Sadler, 
the new president of the student 
council. Sadler, in turn, gave the 
oath to the other council members. 
Senior representatives: Lord, Saylor, 
Shaull. Junior representatives: Ber- 
ry, Bilancioni, Fink. Sophomore re- 
presentatives: Abbott and Yourtee. 
These men will have complete con- 
trol of the student government for 
the coming year. 



Pegasus Staff Begins 

Work On Annual 



Pegasus has been brought in from 
his summer pastures and is already 
being groomed for the coming year 
under the able direction of Mr. Rob- 
ert Shaull, editor, and Mr. Louis 
Goldstein, manager. 

The staff has not yet been chosen 
but a contract was signed with 
Zhamsky Studios of Philadelphia, to 
take core of the photography and 
with cooperation of Mr. Deady, the 
photogrnpher, the book has been 
planned and the photography begun. 



Professors And Their Families Spend 
Summer Seeking Fish And Facts 

President Mead Made Short Trips ; Others Journeyed To 
The Cool Latitudes Of Canada And The North 



by Nola Hill 

The vacation activities of the mem- 
bers of the Washington College 
Faculty varied considerably, but it is 
found that they all spent an interest- 
ing and delightful vacation. 

Dr. Gilbert W. Mead, President of 
the college, spent most of his vaca- 
tion in his office, only taking time off 
for official visits and for short trips 
out of town. 

Quite a number of other faculty 
members remained in Chestertown 
for their vacations, later taking short 
trips before returning to the class- 
room. Dr. J. S. W. Jones was among 
this contingent, so were Dr. and Mrs. 
Wm. R. Howell, Dr. and Mrs. K. S. 
Buxton, Prof, and Mrs. J. J. Coop, 
Miss Doris T. Bell, Mr. Paul A. 
Solandt, and his mother Mrs. Sol- 
andt. 

Water Attracts Many 

To those who remained here, the 
waters of the Chesapeake Bay and 
the Chester River provided amuse- 
ments in the form of fishing, swim- 
ming, and boating. Fishing seemed 
to be especially popular, numbering 
among its devotees Dr. Frederick G. 
Livingood who enjoyed most of his 
vacation with his family in Myers- 
town, Pa., which is also the home of 
his alma mater — Albright College. 

Canada and the Northern part of 
the United States seemed inviting af- 
ter the hot weather of the Eastern 
Shore, hence Miss Florence Snod- 
grass visited relatives in Canada 
and motored with friends through 
New Brunswick Province where she 
attended the Sesqui-Centennial cele- 



bration of the Province. Professor 
and Mrs. Lawrence Ford also visited 
relatives in Brantford, Ontario. Lat- 
er in the summer Dr. and Mrs. Howell 
motored through still another sec- 
tion of Canada. While there, they 
visited Dr. Locke's Sanatorium. 
Dr. IngalU At West Haven 

Dr. Gertrude Van A. Ingalls vaca- 
tioned quietly at West Haven, Conn., 
where she did quite a bit of reading 
of Roman History. She also at- 
tended performances of the Jitney 
Players, who have visited several 
times at Washington College. 

Dr. Livingood visited New York 
several times and Mr. Solandt made 
two trips north. 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Davis found 
Lake Canandaique, N. Y., a delight- 
ful place to spend the first part of 
their vacation. They found the 
water sports here as delightful as 
others found them on the Eastern 
Shore. The next lap of their jour- 
ney took them to Chicago, where they 
visited the University of Chicago and 
attended the World's Fair. The main 
portion of the summer, however, they 
remained in Madison, Wisconsin; 
where they have many friends. While 
there, Dr. Davis did some research 
work in the Library of the University 
of Wisconsin. Before returning to 
Washington College, they again spent 
some time at Lake Canandaiqua. 
Dr. Dole Attends University 

Some members of the faculty sub' 
stituted Summer School work for 
their usual vacation. These includ^ 
ed Dr. Esther M. Dole, Mrs. Ethel 
S. Fox, and Professor Fred W. Dum- 
schott, all of whom attended George 
(Continued On Page 5) 



Mt. Vernon Offers 
October Program 

Curators Propose Varied 
Series Of Meetings 



At a meeting held Tuesday even- 
ing in William Smith Hall, the offi- 
cers and board of curators of the 
Mount Vernon Literary Society of 
Washington College outlined the pro- 
gram of that organization 'for the 
month of October. 

The first meeting, at which time a 
musical program is to be presented, 
is scheduled for October 4. The fol- 
lowing week a debate will be staged 
with the question. Resolved: That 
"ratting" is beneficial to the students 
of Washington College. These first 
two meetings will be open to fresh- 
men and applications for member- 
ship will be received at this time 
from freshmen and upper classmen 
showing their desires and intentions 
to become members. 

The meeting of October 18 will be 
a program made up entirely of first 
year talent and the freshmen will 
have a chance to show the older mem- 
bers of the society their entertaining 
capacities. At the last session of 
the month the three new faculty 
members will also have a chance to 
show their merits as entertainers 
outside of the classroom. 



ATTENTION CALLED 
TO FRATERNITY RULES 



Midyear Pledging Must Follow 
Neutral Period 

The entrance of a new class into 
Washington College makes it exped 
ient that the rules governing the 
rushing and pledging of first year 
men by social fraternities be called 
to the attention of the student body, 
Particular emphasis is laid on the 
points restricting the visits of fresh- 
men to fraternity houses, and of fra 
ternity members to West Hall. 

In addition to the following gen- 
eral rules, at a special meeting the 
Faculty Committee on Fraternities 
included in its minutes the following 
statement: 

It was moved, seconded and passed 
that no first year men, freshmen, or 
OTHERS may be pledged or accept- 
ed for membership until after next 
October (October 1, 1934). 



Silver Pentagon Society 

Discusses Year's Policies 



President John M. Lord opened the 
first regular meeting of the Silver 
Pentagon Honor Society for campus 
leadership with a speech outlining the 
activities proposed for the year, at 
the Society's session held at 7:45 
o'clock in the evening of Wednesday, 
September 26, in William Smith Hal!. 



CURRICULUM CHANGE 
PRODUCES NEW COURSES 



Number Of Electives Is Greatly 
Increased 



Several new courses are being of- 
fered beginning this semester for the 
convenience of Washington students. 
General Biology, a less technical sur- 
vey of the field, is being introduced 
in order to allow education require- 
ments of six hours of biology to be 
taken more conveniently. The course 
will give a general idea of the prin- 
ciples of biology as required for 
high school teaching. It is a three- 
hour course both semesters. 

A one-hour course in journalism 
is being offered by the English de- 
partment for sophomores, juniors and 
seniors. The course is distinctly not 
a preparatory course for newspaper 
work, although it would be an aid. 
The course cooperates with the Elm 
and many of the assignments are 
copy for the school paper. 

In addition to the new courses sev- 
eral other changes have been made. 
One change has been made in the 
freshman schedule. History 1-2 no 
longer being required, although one 
year of history is still necessary. 

The sophomore is given a choice in 
requirements, being allowed to choose 
two of the following courses: Psychol- 
ogy, Economics, Sociology, Govern- 
ment. English Literature (3-4) is 
now an elective course and may be 
superseded by another English 
course. 

The most important change is the 
greater freedom allowed the upper- 
classes. Juniors and Seniors must 
carry fifteen hours as a minimum, 
The courses are entirely elective ex- 
cepting the major and first minor. 
The second minor has been abandon- 
ed. Public speaking is no longer a 
requirement for graduation. 

These changes are effective begin 
ning with the Class of 1937. 



Activity Committee 
Announces Ruling 

Will Be Two Dances Allowed 
Each Month 



The Student's Activities Committee 
under the leadership of Dr. Livingood 
made it's first official decision of the 
year pertaining to the ever vital ques- 
tion of Saturday Night Dances. Two 
Saturday Night Dances will be held 
every month which will include both 
informal and formal dances. 

The committee stressed the 
portance of all organizations, who 
wish to sponsor dances during the 
year, arranging their dates as early 
as possible in order to avoid any con- 
flicts. 

The Activities Committee will hold 
it's regular meetings on the first 
and third Tuesdays of every month 
at 1:45 P. M., in the Dean's office 
except where sufficient cause may 
nrise as to necesssitate a special 
meeting. All petitions, in order to 
bo considered, must be in by noon, 
one day previous to the regular meet- 
ing. 

Members of the Activities Com- 
mittee include, Dr. Livingood, chair- 
man ; Dr. Buxton, secretary ; Dr. 
Dole, Dean Bradley and Dean Jones. 



Dr. Mead Counsels 
Activity Leaders 

Cites Importance Of Campus 
Interests 



Years ago, when Woodrow Wilson 
was President of Princeton, he coin- 
ed a phrase much used since. Speak- 
ing of the complexity of college life, 
he remarked that it was like a circus, 
and the great temptation was to pay 
so much attention to the side-shows 
that one lost sight of what was going 
on in the main tent. By the side- 
shows he meant the multifarious ac- 
tivities which run along as supplemen- 
tal to the principal purposes of life 
on a college campus. 

Student Never Spectator 

Dean McConn of Lehigh has recent- 
ly pointed out that the student is not 
a spectator, and nevar can be. He 
must be a performer, and, unfor- 
tunately, is expected somehow to per- 
form in all the rings at once. 

College activities outside the class- 
room — the so-called "extra-curricu- 
lar" part of campus life, — have their 
best defense in the opportunity they 
provide for the development of qual- 
ities of leadership. Participation in 
them should be, for each of you as in- 
dividual students, a real opportunity 
for such development. It is a mis- 
take to enter them with the intention 
of 'seeing how much you can advance 
your selfish personal interests, social 
or political. Campus folks are quick 
to see the shoddiness of "activity 
hounds" and "honcrs — grabbers." 
Should Choose One Field 

Participation in activities from the 
beginning of the Freshman's exper- 
ience can best be advanced if you 
choose at once to center your atten- 
tion on the one you feel yourself best 
fitted for, whether it be campus 
journalism, athletics, dramatics, the 
departmental clubs, the musical or de- 
bating societies, or what-not. Yoor 
chance of success is largely increased 
if you restrain your impulse to 
spread yourself around. The con- 
sequent thinness of too much spread- 
ing will prejudice your chances of 
attainment. 

College Is Always First 

Activities involve responsibilities. 
Proper responsibility to the activity 
means responsibility to the College 
— which after all, is the main tent. 
Of course the activities cannot sur- 
vive without the college to which 
they are attached. Good activities 
help make a good college better. 
There must be cooperation between 
the administration and the activities, 
not because the activity feels that 
the administration holds over them 
the whip-hand, but because the ad- 
ministration, with its wider connec- 
tions and longer experience, is in a 
position, in a hundred ways the stu- 
dent scarcely recognizes, to aid the 
group and the individual toward mak- 
ing their work a real success. 

Properly handled, these "shows" 
do not remain "side-shows"; they be- 
come integral parts of what is goinjj 
on in the main tent. And the cen- 
tral business of the main tent is 
builded around the curriculum itself; 
for, if you can't keep up in tho pro- 
cession of performers there, you tind 
yourself suddenly projected outward 
by some strange centrifugal 

and you arv on the outside looking 
in, sadder, certainly, if not wiser. 

Gilbert W. Mead. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 29, 1934 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown. Md., 1S72 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum . Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, SI. 50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 29, 1934 



captain and his staff officers, and ex- 
traordinary success in admitting 
hands before the mast, as shown by 
nearly a hundred new students, are 
these things alone grounds for the 
confident cheerfulness that may now 
be added to a hundred others of 
Washington College's virtues? In- 
directly, they are these grounds, and 
the silver-spangled prospects for this 
new year have sprung from the high 
points of last year's activity. 

President Mead had been in resi- 
dence but a few days, and was not to 
be officially inaugurated for three 
months, when he received in the name 
of the College the generous Charles 
Harley Bequest, amounting to approx- 
imately $150,000. The College op- 
ened with a speech of cordial friend- 
liness and lofty exhortation to ideal- 
ism by the new President. The be- 
ginning of classes saw a valuable and 
soon appreciated addition to the fac- 
ulty in the recently appointed head 
of the modern language department. 

The mellow, golden days of early 
Fall were surpassed for color by the 
of scores of 



SEEN FROM THE MAST HEAD 
Examination of the masthead of \ rainbow-hued hoods 
the ELM this week reveals its lopping academic delegates attending the in- 
off to a mere stump of its former i auguration of Washington's nine- 
self. The masthead of a newspaper teenth president, and Mr. Roosevelt 



is the space on the editorial page 



himself came from his Potomac-bord- 



wherein is recorded data about the ' ered city across the "Big Bay", 



staff and publication of the sheet 
Previous mastheads in this paper 



wish the old College Godspeed in the 
work of the coming centuries. The 



have been unprofessional in makeup, | football season had some defeats, but 
and ridiculously large in proportion ' it also had hard-fought, cleanly-won 



to the rest of the page. 
been cut to the essentials of a proper 
masthead, and the reporters have as- 
sumed the dignified position of staff 



Thus it has I victories. The Inaugural ceremony 
gave the College increased national 
recognition. 

Eminent personages of science and 



membership without glaring print ! art came to speak before the assem- 
blaring the fact in every issue. The ' bly in William Smith Hall, as Dr. 
staff this year is too fine, and sincere ' Carver, and Mr. Max Montour. A 
and enthusiastic a group to care for widespread revision of the curricu- 
la e cheap publicity of listed names, lum, with a mature and modern point 
and the far more effective method of ' of view, was gotten well under way. 
signed articles from time to time will CWA assistance was made available 
reflect greater credit on the writer, to students, and the half-year mark- 
The masthead, which would seem | ed the entrance of many new mem- 



to be burdened with more fittings . bers into the student body. Two de- 
than the Rainbow's, also announces ' partmental societies were organized; 
that the ELM is a weekly. This has \ the Classical and Chemical societies, 
been the aim of the staff since last I for the pursuit of intellectual gain, 
summer, and is now the fact through , Efforts which will someday be cul- 
the phenomenally successful efforts ' minated in success were made to es- 
of the business staff, whose import- ; tablish one of the best of the nation 



ance in the publication of a newspap- 
er is about that of the horse to the 
cart, or the wheels to the wagon. This 



honor fraternities on the campus. 
The season in dramatics was bril- 
liantly capped by the Shakespeare 



cooperation is greatly appreciated by Players "'As You Like It," after the 
the ones directly responsible for the i dramatic club had done good work 
ELM, and the Business Manager in with "Daley," and some one act 
particular is given deserved credit j plays, one of which was written by a 



flowing in the life-veins of the indi- 
vidual and the organization. Those 
who do not catch the spirit are likely 
to be left in the lurch. Few people 
will want to be left behind at this 
fine old College, which is going up 
and on, to halt "ad Calendas 
Graecas." 



MARK THIS DOWN 
There may be seen, without the ef- 
fort of careful inspection, strange 
markings on the wall at the top of 
each set of stairs leading from the 
first to the second floor of William 
Smith Hall. On the wall at the top 
of the stairs in the end nearest the 
gymnasium, these markings progress 
along the painted surface in long 
waves. This set, in particular, have 
given archeologists and anthropolo- 
gists many hours of perplexed 
thought. It is known, scientifically, 
that those who frequent the building 
are largely college students. No one 
of this intelligent class of people 
could ever, of course, be guilty of ig- 
norantly and wantonly defacing an 
area in a public place, kept clean and 
painted with an eye to beauty, for 
the public good. Hence, scientists 
re concluding that the marks are 
those made eons ago by a primitive 
race, and that they are just now crop- 
ping out through the wall with all the 
wisdom they will shed on the past 
ages, in time to be discovered in Mr. 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



A murky haze hovers over the col- 
legir.te front, from the obscure dis- 
tance we hear a multitude of con- 
flicting sounds. Scraping of furni- 
ture in new rooms being furnished, 
old friends being greeted, shouts and 
groans from the football fields that 
are soon to become fields of glory, 
and — shh — could it be a rustling of 
leaves of new books being opened? 

Although we have been in opera- 
tion over two weeks, the general col- 
lege season has just opened. The 
first college papers are full of plans, 
innovations, and hopes for the com- 
ing season. They are also proud of 
their football team as now is usually 
the best time, (note exception — 
Washington!) 

Speaking of sounds we notice that 
a one reel of movie of student activ- 
ities of the Colorado Woman's Col- 
lege campus is now being filmed. It 
will be synchronized with sound and 
music by a Hollywood studio. A 
musical comedy no doubt. 

Princeton University men in a re- 
cent poll on what living man they 
would like to be if given a choice 
chose President Roosevelt, Mussolini 
and Hitler. We pick Bing Crosby to 
win a similar poll here. 

From "The Maryland Diamond- 
back" we learn that the "Lonesome 
Cowboy" of radio fame is a former 



Roosevelt's Administration. The only j editor of the "Diamondback." Who 
other known markings of this general i knows to what heights our crooners 



type were made on cave walls by Cro- 
Magnon man, the first post-glacial 
type. Perhaps the glacial Mouster- 
ian man also made such signs, for 
those of the Cro-Magnon nature pos- 
sess considerable artistry, which can- 



may rise? At least some of them 
will be qualified to sell papers or 
watermelons when they graduate. 

Dean Matthew T. McClure of the 
University of Illinois suggests the 
teaching of social usage to be one of 



not be said of the scratches, looking] the functions of the University R. O. 



for his part in assuring a more fre- 
quent publication. News may now 



member of the Class of '34 

The debating team experienced 



be published instead of history, and [ short but undefeated season, and 
the paper can play a more effective , marked the revival of this acitivity 
part in College life. The burden of ( at the College. The Honor Society 

<. gain- 



the editors and staff has been dou-j f or excellence in scholastic 



bled, but so has the value and pleas- j e( j prestige and heard learned dis 



ure of the work. 



A SPIRIT IN THE AIR 
Many people, professors, students 
and janitors, alike, have felt and ex- 
pressed the spirit of new hope and 
enthusiastic optimism at Washington ! 
College this year. The educational exterior manifestations of successful 



institution, like other more commer- 
cial businesses, has felt the stresses 
of a disproportionate economic bal- 
ance. College students have declar- 
ed that the world is empty of oppor- 
tunity of gaining a livelihood, for! optimism which greets the new year 



them. This sort of academic unrest and which dignified presidents of so- 
harmful to the cloister-like aloof- cieties have already been heard to 



not unlike those of a modern lead 
pencil, on the walls of the hall of 
William Smith. 

These pre-historic men were of an 
extremely low order of intelligence, 
for while they had cranial cavities of 
considerable spaciousness, the con- 
tents of their heads was of inferior 
quality, -and the simple convolutions 
of the cortex permitted of fewer 
thoughts and memories than those of 
later humans. They were stupid 
about everything, and poorly adapted 
to their environment. They grunted 
with only fair success, for the 
larygnx was badly formed. None of 
these characteristics can, of course, 
be applied to Washington College 
students (no, not even the first state- 
ment in the paragraph, in toto), so 
the mystery of the marks is becom- 
ing cloudier and less marked every 
day. , 

The exact nature of the marks has 
piqued the scientists curiosity. Those 
on the gymnasium end of the hall may 
be (1) a graphical representation of 
a manometric flame, (2) the physical 
contours of the latest sea-serpent, or 
(3) a good reproduction of the sine 
curve. The most striking mark on 
the south, or campus-end wall re- 
sembles with considerable verisimili- 

., the feeling of gladness and tude the modern si ^" im the ^e 
root of a number. Now, probably 

the only association of the Cro-Mag- 
non man with squares was that he 



T. C, adding "not that University 
students are not gentlemen . . . . " And 
why the three dots? 

Love, dumbness and faculty Intel- 
igence are the reasons for flunking 
out of school, according to a dean 
at the University of Nebraska. Per 
haps the eighteenth amendment 
hasn't been repealed out there yet. 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



We are a little late in extending 
our welcome to the entering Fresh- 
men class, and now we find we must 
temper our greetings with a bit of 
sage advice. 

1. — Just because it's called the 

ushin' season" is no reason to think 
it is connected with the Soviet Gov- 
ernment. The Soviets have some 
plan to their government. 

2. — (Advice to girls). Education 
can bo awfully broadening. Ask 
some of the soph girls, then cut down 
on your calories. 

3. — Don't confuse the Dean's Cab- 
inet with some sort of filing system. 
A filing system has some practical 
use. 

Seen here and there: "Stokoski" 
Brandolini, as conductor of the school 
orchestra, has a fine "baton" aver- 
age. His gestures speak for them- 
selves. 

Word of advice: The next time 
Mooney and Baker go for a boat ride 
down Betterton after a dance they 
better make sure the boat is cast off 
before they start. 

Comments: Price says Rhodes's 
big moment is hardly bigger than a 
second. 

"Archimedes" Brown succeeded in 
dis-em-boweling the radio down Mid- 
dle Hall Lounge Room, and then re- 
assembling it with only three parts 
left over. He says he can't get any 
music, but the static sounds a lot bet- 
ter. 

The Pegasus Staff has decided to 
"buy American" this year. They 
have Zhamsky for photography, and 
a Mr. Schultz for their printing. 

Herman Benton, our old Janitor, 
is back again this year. He's as live- 
ly as ever, and will sing "Hen Anna 
Rooster" for you any old time. Last 
year Herman was seen sporting the 
pledge pin of a well-known Frat for 
some time. 



I courses by such people as the ister- 
nationally famous Dr. McCollum, of 

' Johns Hopkins. The Honor System, 

; under the careful guidance of Dean 
Jones, and a strong student council, 

i proved, in general, effective. 

In addition to all these somewhat 



growth, the College was raising its 
standards scholastically, and ex- 
panding healthfully its internal strue 
ture, 



Academic Dress Is Colorful Result Of Age-Old 
Traditions Of The Church And The Medieval University 



ness which ought to characterize the declaim on as "something in the air' 
graduate, in his search for pure has resulted from the combined 
knowledge. Thus, the buoyancy and 1 stimuli of a ten-year period of growth 
rareness of the college community «"* a new lease on life under the ad- 
that the year will be a happy one are '/liniatrative genius of the late Dr. 
fine things to observe. It is interest- j Titsworth, and a year period of all the 

and 
the 



ing to speculate upon the cause 
the-e auspicious circumstances, 



f, important things listed before, 
a,, many others, occurring under 



Afferent from the voiced feeling* of wl" an ' J •MUM present Administra- 

a year ago, when the College began tl '' n - 

It would seem expedient to snatch 
this thing "from out of the air" when- 
ever it la possible, and integrate it 



under a new administration. This Ad- 
ministration has met every ! 
ported by it* executive lieutenants, 
ot financial depression and internal , with whatever activity one is engaged 



was a blockhead, so this hieroglyph 
points toward a later origin. 

One theory has yet to be expound- 
ed. Perhaps the marks were made 
by a .student after all, by one who has 
reverted in a sort of Hydeian v/ay to 
the habits of his forbears, who were 
not bears at all, but more like mon 
keys, a million years ago. He has be 
come an atavism, poor fellow, and 
should serve as an example of what 
might happen to many more people, 
for it should be recalled — "facilis 
descensus Avernu." This regression 



tout flinching and i in at the time. Such has already been to type may be coming, for one can The 



Whenever a college faculty walks 
out in academic procession, the var- 
iegated and vivid colors and the 
seemingly endless variety of hoods 
in their decoration and design baf- 
fle the average onlooker. To a stu- 
dent who has never before observed 
?uch a procession, it looks unintelli- 
gible. It is in fact easy to read the 
signs if one only knows how. 

Academic costume, descended from 
the same common source as the robes 
of the judicial bench and of the pul- 
pit, namely, the medieval university 
and church, tells its own story to him 
who can read. By the cut of the 
robe, the color of the hood, and its 
lining, are noted the degree, the de- 
partment, and the university. 

The Bachelor's degree, the lowest 
academic distinction, is marked by 
the simple robe with a wide flowing 
open sleeve. The Master wears i 
robe with a long closed sleeve reach- 
ing well below the knee, the arm pro- 
truding from a slit in the upper part. 
In old days this closed baglike sleeve 
was used to carry small objects. The 
robe or gown of the Doctor's degree 
is the more voluminous open robe 
with closed "Bishop" sleeves and with 
a velvet band adorning the front of 
the robe and velvet bars or chevrons 
on the sleeve. 

The hoods with their brilliant edg- 
ings and linings give color to the pro- 
cession; they also speak a language, 
velvet neckbands of the hoods 



without flaws. This firmness of the 'done in many cases and new vigor in | see the handwriting on the wall 



tell the branch of learning in which 



the wearer received the degree. Blue 
ndicates philosophy (the Ph. D.- 
nost common among college faculty 
doctors. White denotes the arts 
(A. M., Litt. D.'. Red is for Divini- 
ty (the D. D.', as in the portrait of 
Dr. William Smith, hanging over our 
assembly hall platform. So also 
green denotes medicine (the M. D.) ; 
and the royal purple is reserved for 
the highest honorary degree the Doc- 
tor of Laws. 

It is in the hood linings that the 
greatest variety is seen, as these are 
the college or university colors of the 
institution conferring the degree, as 
maroon and black for Washington; 
the Harvard crimson (Dr. Livin- 
good), the Yale blue (Dr. Ingalls), 
etc. 

The chevrons or bars on the 
sleeves, like the facings of the gown 
and hood designate the branch of 
learning, as blue for philosophy and 
purple for laws. So in the Convoca- 
tion procession this year, the blue 
of many of the faculty indicated 
their Ph. D. degrees; the purple bars 
and gown facings of President Mead 
marked the degree of Doctor of 
Laws (LL. D.) while the white neck 
piece of his hood showed also the 
degree of Doctor of Letters (Litt. 
D.) 

Even the cap tassles tell a story; 
the black being for Bachelor and 
Master, while gold is permissible for 
the Doctor and is expected for tho 
administrative head, the President or 
Dean of the faculty. 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 29, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Strenuous Practice 
Order In Football 



Backfield Shows Strength; 
Huffman Best Punter 

by Phillip Skipp 

The past two weeks have been the 
hardest opening weeks of training in 
recent years for a Washington foot- 
ball squad. Lengthy practice ses- 
sions have been in order every after- 
noon, but the spirit that is shown 
even during the toughest spots is one 
of the most encouraging signs of the 
season. It isn't the old "college 
try" spirit, but each and every fel- 
low gives all he has because he re- 
alizes that he has to show something 
in order to make the team this year, 
Even Manager Rhodes finds it hard to 
have time to spend with his fresh- 
man friend. 

The backfield material is excep- 
tionally good. Huffman, Evans, and 
Nicholson are three, big, fast backs 
who will give the opposition plenty 
to worry about. Berry, Young, and 
Wilmot are other outstanding back' 
field candidates. Coach Ekaitis is 
still experimenting to find a group of 
punters. To date Huffman is the 
only outstanding kicker on the 
squad. 

An aerial attack has been stressed 
this year. The line has been thor- 
oughly drilled in the art of protect- 
ing the passers. The line under the 
guidance of Coach Kibler has made 
tremendous progress. The tackle de- 
partment led by Capt. Dwyer is very 
strongly fortified. So strongly in 
fact, that some of the candidates may 
have to be used as guards. As ends, 
Bilancioni, Salters, Baker and An- 
derson compare favorably with any 
in Lhe state. The guard positions are 
being held down by two hard charg- 
ing "Mountaineers," Ward and 
Brandt. The veteran Johnny Lord 
is at center with Davis as a capable 
understudy. 

The first team has not not been 
selected as yet, and a merry battle 
will be on for all positions in the re- 
maining two weeks before the first 
game. 



Football Coach 




George Ekaitis 
Ekaitis, who is head coach of foot- 
ball, is training a squad which is 
shaping better than any in many 
years. 



Varsity Club Makes 

Bow For New Season 



The Varsity Club held its first 
meeting of the new school year Tues- 
day, September 24. Maybe it is well 
to elucidate slightly on the import- 
ance of the Varsity Club as an or- 
ganization. First, it is the only or- 
ganization on the Hill for athletes 
alone. It is an old club that has 
listed as members the names of all 



former "greats" in Washington Col- 
lege sports. Its honorary members 
are men known all over the state. 
Any man who has won a letter in 
any sport is eligible for membership. 
There is one thing that keeps a few 
from joining, and that is the initia- 
tion. This initiation is by far the 
severest given on the Hill at any time 
during the year. Any one who goes 
through it without whimpering is en- 
titled to membership in such a ven- 
erable club. 

The Varsity Club has a great deal 
to say concerning athletics on the 
Hill. Last year it brought about an 
amendment to the constitution of the 
Athletic Association giving the coach- 
es the power to appoint captains for 
each game in each sport. The Club 
also takes charge of all pep meetings. 
As a result of the first meeting Pres r 
ident Ward has met the freshman 
class three times this week for the 
purpose of 'instructing them in the 
school's cheers and songs. He re- 
ports there are ten candidates out 
for the position of freshman cheer- 
leader. The freshmen have respond- 
ed nobly; it is for the other classes 
to follow their example. 



FOOT BALL 

by George Ekaitis 




It looks as though Dr. Mead's alma 
mater, Birmingham-Southern, started 
oft' on the right foot by creating some- 
what of an upset in defeating Au- 
burn by the score of 7-0. Auburn 
usually ranks high in big league foot- 
ball and their defeat was considered 
an upset; being the only one of major 
importance last Saturday. The op- 
enings of last week may be likened 
to a very little "pop", but to-day 
there will really be a "bang" (with 
emphasis) on the gridirons with such 
games as Clemson versus Georgia 
Tech; Colorado versus Kansas; V. M. 
I. versus Duke; W. & L. versus Ken- 
tucky; Northwestern versus Mar- 
quetta; Pitt versus W. & J.; Stanford 
versus Santa Clara; V. P. I. versus 
Temple; and in our own state, the U. 
of Maryland versus St. Johns and 
Navy versus William & Mary. These 
games should furnish the main fire- 
works although there will be plenty 
of action on other gridirons. 

Here in our own backyard, Kibler 
Field, I have had the pleasure of 
watching and working with the finest 
squad I have seen on that field. With 
our opening game two weeks away, 
the boys are moving along slowly but 
surely into a well rounded machine. 
A real battle for all positions is being 
waged with strength in the backfield 



After a Studious Day- 
Visit 
JIM AND HICK'S 
BILLARD PARLOR 



#.ct|mxbts |&cer 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chester-town, Md. 



and a weakness in reserves at the 
guards being brought out in the early 
practices. At present the backfield 
appears decidedly strong with Berry, 
Evans, Tignor, Nicholson, Greims, 
Huffman, Wilmot and Young making 
the choice of a starting backfield dif- 
ficult. Baker, Bilancioni, Salter and 
Anderson are striving for the end 
positions. At the tackles there are 
Jones, Kilby, Benham and Skipp try- 
ing to earn the position alongside 
Captain Ellis Dwyer. The guard 
battle has narrowed down to Ward 
Brandt, and Mygatt, this position be 
ing very weak in reserves. At cen- 
ter, is Lord, with Davis and Saylor 
battling merrily for the position in 
case Lord is of a necessity shifted to 
guard. Others on the squad being 
carefully watched for signs of im- 
provement and possible "dark hors- 
es" are: Pratt, C. Vandervoort and 
Biggs in the backfield; Shorb and 
Wingate at the ends; Van Newkirk 
at tackle; B. Vandervoort and Tow- 
ner at guard; and McDorman at cen- 
ter. The results of the scrimmages 
started last Wednesday and running 
for about two weeks will have much 
to do with the selection of the start- 
ing lineup for the opening game with 
Gallaudet on October 13. Barring the 
injury "bugaboo," indications are 
for a banner year on the gridiron. 



Girls' Hockey 

In Progress 

Several Honor Positions To 
Be Filled 



The girls' hockey season has start- 
ed. Every Monday, Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday, Friday at three-thirty, prac- 
tice starts. As in previous years the 
contests will be intra-mural, with two 
sister classes pulling together against 
the other two. Everyone recognizes 
the skillful playing of Caroline Helms, 
Dickie Metcalfe, and several others, 
but the greatest interest lies with the 
Freshmen. Will they surpass the 
previous classes in athletic ability? 
Miss Bell says that already a few of 
them have shown a great adaptation 
to this game. 

Several places on the varsity team 
are vacant due to the graduation of 
Sarah Ellen Byrn, Patience Pyle, 
and Lucille Rasin, so there will 
probably be plenty of competition 
among the classes for the honor pos- 
itions to be filled at the end of the 
season. 

It is hoped that this year proves as 
much fun as last. Rivalry between 
the Freshman-Junior team and the 
Sophomore-Senior one was close and 
enjoyed by both participators and 
spectators. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



After An Evening of Hard 




Study Refresh Yourself at the 




CAFETERIA CANTEEN 




All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 




dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 




Ice Cream 





HOLDEN'S 


SERVICE STATION 


Cross St. and Maple Ave. 


Sunoco Products 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety First 

F. G. Usiiton, Pres. 

L. B. Russell. Vice-Pres. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 305 



Men's and Ladies' 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MARYLAND 

PROGRAM WEEK OF OCTOBER 1 - 6 

MONDAY - TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1 - 2 
JANET GAYNOR - LEW AYRES in 

"SERVANTS' ENTRANCE" 

The sweethearts of "State Fair" are in love again. 
You'll LAUGH at their troubles and THRILL at 
THRILL at their romance. 

Also: Comedy, Cartoon and Sportreel. 



WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, OCT. 3 - 4 

SHIRLEY TEMPLE 

GARY COOPER - CAROLE LOMBARD in 

"NOW AND FOREVER" 

The tiny star of "Little Miss Marker" brings you 
another fine picture for the whole family. 
Also: Comedy, Snapshot and Cartoon. 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 - 6 
W. C. FIELDS in 

"THE OLD FASHIONED WAY" 

with BABY LeROY - JOE MORRISON 

One of tho year's funniest pictures with a great 
cast. 

Also: Novelty Reel, Cartoon, Comedy. 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 
C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



Bennetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITHS KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 29, 1934 



JUNE GRADUATES 

BECOME TEACHERS 



By Lawrence Yourtee 

According to the most recent re- 
port received from Dr. Frederick G. 
Livingood. head of the Washington 
College Department of Education, 
six of the graduates of the Class of 
1934 have received appointments to 
fill teaching positions in various high 
schools in this and adjoining states. 
The list of appointees also includes 
the names of several graduates of 
previous years, who are filling posi- 
tions for the first time, as well as 
some who have been transfered this 
year to other schools. 

Graduates of the Class of '34 who 
are now teaching are: 

Sarah Ellen Byrn, teaching Eng- 
lish and Physical Education at Cam- 
bridge High School. 

William E. Burkhardt, teaching 
English and Social Studies at Reho- 
both High School, Rehoboth, Del. 

Charles B. Clark, teaching French, 
Social Studies, and Physical Educa- 
tion at Preston High School. 

Richard W. Hall, teaching Science 
and Physical Education at Chester- 
town High School. 

Erwin L. Koerber, teaching Social 
Studies at Greensboro High School. 

John R. Smithson, teaching Phy- 
sics and Chemistry at Annapolis High 
School. 

Graduates of previous classes 
teaching for the first school year: 

Mary Fair, Class of '33, teaching 



Commercial Subjects at Millsboro 
High School, Millsboro, Del., follow- 
ing a year of Commercial training. 

Ann M. Kreeger, Class of '33, 
teaching at Georgetown High School, 
Georgetown, Del., following a year 
of Commercial training. 

Helen Norris, Class of '32, teach- 
ing French at Greensboro High 
School. 

Frederick G. Usilton, Jr., Class of 
'33 (A. M. University of Pennsyl- 
vania. '34) teaching English at Cris- 
field High School. 

Graduates who have been trans- 
fered this year include: 

Nelson F. Hurley, '31, formerly at 
Greensboro High School, now teach- 
ing at Towson High School. 

Earl T. Willis, '31, formerly at 
Oakland High School, now teaching 
at Catonsville High School. 



Elm Appointments 

Are Announced 



Recent changes in and additions to 
the ELM staff, in both news writing 
and business departments, include the 
appointment of John Mead as Cir- 
culation Manager, and Jay Spry as a 
regular news reporter. Other af 
filiates of the week are Clarke Fon 
taine and Marvin Smith. First year 
students who are being considered 
for membership on the Staff, after 
filling their apprentice requirements 
are Howard Ayres, Allen Biggs, Carl 
Coch, William Doering and Eugene 
Zoldy. 



SORORITIES BEGIN 

YEARS ACTIVITY 



KAPPA GAMMA 

We sincerely regret to state that 
Betty Childs and Olga Shortess will 
not be back this year. Betty is tak- 
ing a course at a Dramatic School in 
New York and Olga is working. The 
majority of our new alumnae have 
taken up new studies. Lucille Rasin 
is studying dancing at the Estelle 
Dennis school in Baltimore, and later 
on will take part in the Tercentenary 
Pageant at the Statium. Hattie Ra- 
gan is taking a business course at 
Goldie in Wilmington. Anne Kreeg- 
er is teaching at Georgetown, Del. 
As to our older Alumnae, Louise 
Simpers Chapman recently visited 
with her mother, Mrs. Frank Simpers, 
who is also a hostess of the sorority. 
Jerry Harwood is now in Philadel- 
phia. Anne Bonwill Danneburg has 
bought a house in Mt. Washington. 
Baltimore. During the summer. 
Margaret Wanderer took several 
courses at the University of Mary- 
land. 

The sorority plus the other old 
girls were delighted to see Betty 
Childs ease into Reid Hall last night. 
Betty arrived at Godlington Manor 
yesterday for a stay of two weeks 
with her grandmother, Mrs. H. S. 
Brown. Pet Mace has announced 
her engagement to Buck Farber, and 
Louise Crouse has announced her 
marriage which took place in 1931. 



cill and Elizabeth Walbcrt, visited 
the campus over the past week-end. 
Ann Brown is attending William and 
Mary in Richmond, Babs Boynton is 
taking two courses here, and is also 
a substitute teacher of Kent county. 



Reid Hall Records 

For Speed Broken 

The boys may kick about the Reid 
Hall girl keeping them waiting, but 
that's just a pose, lads! When the 
Dean of Women, Miss Bradley offer- 
ed a prize to the floor which first col- 
lected the House Dues, five minutes 
after the offer was made, the first 
floor paid up, and then stood around 
to give the others the Bronx cheer. 
Miss Bradley almost fainted with sur- 
prise when three minutes later, the 
third floor practically fell down the 
steps with its dues. And last but 
most, the second floor, arrived with 
its pay. It may have been the offer, 



but we prefer to think that it is a 
first demonstration of cooperation 
within the Hall. 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 
Men's Wear 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gal 
Range!, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



GAMMA SIGMA 

Two of our Alumnae, Gladys Cou 



=ril 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 



GILL BROS 



PHILUPJ 



Tomato 

i JUICE V 




. . . just about every cigarette smoker knows 

that but here are some other facts to keep in mind . . . 

For a cigarette to be milder and taste better it must be 
made of mild, ripe Turkish and home-grown tobaccos. 
We wish you could go into the factories and see 
Chesterfield made. The mild ripe tobacco is cut in 
long even threads — then packed into the cigarette so 
as to make Chesterfield draw right and burn evenly. 
A good cigarette can give you a lot of pleasure, and we 
■would like for you to try Chesterfield. 





the cigarette that's MILDER 
the cigarette that 

TASTES BETTER 



alJiJlLO Ulj J 1LI\ 
esterfield 



■S^**", 




% J5M, LiKAtn & Mnu Tobacco Co. 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 29, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Varsity Club Asks 
For Cheer Leaders 

President Ward Seeks Fresh- 
men Candidates 



by Carl Cochran 

At a meeting of the freshmen men, 
called by the Varsity Club, on Mon- 
day evening, September 24, Mr. El- 
lery Ward, President of the club, ex- 
tended an earnest request for volun- 
teers as candidates for the two avail- 
able positions of cheer leaders. 

After telling of the general lack of 
spirit on the part of the entire stu- 
dent body, and stressing the import- 
ance of cheering as an aid to victory 
in athletic contests, Mr. Ward point- 
ed out the fact that after four years 
of service a leader is eligible for a 
school letter. With such an attrac- 
tion as this it is anticipated that sev- 
eral men will place themselves as 
candidates to be tried out at cheer 
practices. 

Two will be elected by the entire 
class of freshmen and those two will 
represent the entering class in the 
cheering section at the coming games. 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



College Y. M. C. A. Opens 

New Year Officially 



Senior Fund Created For Use 
Of Senior Members 



On Tuesday evening, Sept. 18, the 
Y. M. C. A. held its first regular 
meeting of the year in the Y Room, 
at which time old members renewed 
their membership and plans were dis- 
cussed regarding the admittance of 
new members. 

It was decided to have a "Senior 
Fund" set aside each year in order 
that the Y might express its appreci- 
ation to those who have served the 
Y loyally for four years. 

This year the Y expects to carry 
on an extensive and varied program 
of activities including Vesper Ser- 
vices, Church Services, and the usual 
participation in Tri-State Conferenc- 
es. The Y will also inaugurate an 
Employment Agency to aid its mem- 
bers in securing work during the 
scholastic year. 



NOTICE 

"The Faculty Committee on Stu 
dent Activities will meet on the first 
and third Tuesdays of each month. 
All communications to the committee 
must be in the hands of the secretary 
not later than noon of the Monday of 
the week of the meeting. 

K. S. Buxton, Secretary, 
The Student Activities Committee. 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 - Chestertown 



Faculty Spends 
Varied Summers 



Chemical Society 
Drafts 



Many 



Catch Fish; Others 
See Mountains 



Up Tc 
Co 



The Minute 

if f ures 



PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Washington University. Dr. Dole 
also taught at Alfred University, Al- 
fred, N. Y. 

The Adirondack Mountains seemed 
invitingly cool to Dr. Kathleen E. 
Carpenter, who spent her entire va- 
cation there. 

Dr. Jones vacationed at Atlantic 
City for the latter part of the sum- 
mer. 

While the North called some va- 
cationists, to others the South seem- 
ed equally inviting, so we find Mr. 
and Mrs. Coop motoring to Kentucky 
and finding it cool there as compared 
to the hot weather in Maryland. 

Miss Amanda T. Bradley, Dean of 
Women, had planned a trip with 
friends, but while visiting relatives 
in Birmingham, Alabama, she decid- 
ed to teach at Birmingham-Southern 
College for the summer session. Her 
trip, however, was only postponed and 
after the session she motored to Hot 
Sulphur Springs, White Sulphur 
Springs, then to New York. While 
there she attended the premiere of 
Grace Moore in "One Night of Love. 
She ended her vacation by arriving in 
Chestertown on the Bullet to take 
over her new duties as Dean of Wom- 
en at Washington College. 

Pi'ofessor Frank Goodwin probably 
spent the most active vacation, since 
he was on his usual field campaign. 
The results of his vacation are easily 
discernible about the campus, in the 
many new faces. 

Prof. Tolles acted as counsellor at 
Camp Dudley for boys, near Lake 
Champiain, New York. He also 
worked on his thesis, which dealt with 
the drama. Dr. Robinson also work- 
ed on his thesis when the heat per- 
mitted. 



PI, 



President Ingersoll Opens Ser- 
ies Of Scientific Programs 



by Charles Dudley 

The Washington Chemical Society 

held its first meeting Tuesday night. 
The meeting was opened by President 
Gilbert Ingersoll and there were a 
series of short talks by various mem- 
bers, concerning the program for this 
year. All present agreed to put forth 
their best efforts to make this a most 
successful year. 

This society was organized last 
year by a group of students interest- 
ed in chemistry, with the purpose of 
creating a greater interest in chem- 
istry and the allied sciences to give 
students a chance to express their 
opinions on scientific matters, which 
is sometimes awkward in the class 
room, and to create a more informal 
relation between the instructor and 
the student. This year the program 
is to be even more varied and inter- 
esting, consisting of moving pic- 
tures, talks by various student mem- 
bers, demonstrations and probably a 
chemical exhibition. 

All Freshmen are cordially invit- 
ed to attend the next meeting, which 
is to be held Tuesday, October 2, at 
7 :00 P. M. Last year members are 
expected to continue their interest. 



Biology Dept. Has 
Record Enrollment 

Additions To Museum Col- 
lection Requested 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERGER'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



LeCATES 


BROS. 


BARBER 


SHOP 


Where the college man 


can get his 


style of 


hair cut 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



STUDENTS 

Wc carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lcntheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
ST AM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Walson. P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis. Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink. Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



STERLING 

"The Rexall Store" 

Clip this ad out and get a 
free Coca Cola at my drug 
store. 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



by Emerson Slacum 

The Department of Biology is op- 
ening its session with record numbers 
in all classes and with the institution 
of a new course open to Freshmen. 
Even if students are not taking class- 
es in Biology, they are welcome to 
come up to the top floor of William 
Smith Hall and see the Department's 
Museum and display cases, and it is 
hoped that an interest will be taken in 
these and perhaps contributions made 
to them. It is the department's es- 
pecial aim just now to collect and 
preserve specimens of local insects 
and other animals and plants: every- 
one can help and find interest in this 
work. The latest contributions are 
as follows: A live Praying Mantis, 
Elliott Brown; Marine Shells, Fred- 
erick Peyser; Collection of dried But- 
terflies, E. P. Slacum. 

A home can always be found (tem- 
porary or permanent) for living an- 
imals of reasonable size (no cats or 
dogs desired). Contributions should 
be made to Emerson Slacum (Labor- 
atory Assistant). Do not leave them 
without an introduction. 

It is gratifying to learn that Mr. 
Robert Shaull's poem "To An Amoe- 
ba*' which occurred in one of the is- 
sues of "The Elm" last year, has gain- 
ed such fame for himself that he is 
being sought out as a columnist for 
one of the local newspapers during 
the coming year. 

Additional contributions received 
by the Biology Department during the 
past week include a fine collection of 
sea urchins, corals, sea-shells and 
sponges by Robert Swain, '37, who 
spent his summer vacation in the 
British Honduras and other Central 
and South American countries. A 
large collection of shark teeth and 
fossils was also contributed by How- 
ard E. Clark, "37. 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 11 1J 



Margaret L Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And AH Soft Drinks Waiting For You 



Chestertown Restaurant 




THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students, offers 
line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. Pennants. Pil- 
lows. Stickers. Stationery and School Supplies, 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:S0 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, SEPT. 29, 1934 



DOIN'S 



On Thursday 20th. the First Lady 
of the Campus went for hev usual 
canter and then to visit with Mrs. H. 
S. Brown at Godlington Manor. She 
arrived at home just in time to be 
rushed upstairs in order to get dress- 
ed for dinner, for, you must under- 
stand, 'twas the Lady's birthday. Up- 
on entering the living room a few- 
minutes later, she saw seated there 
Miss Amanda Bradley. Mrs. Bell, 
Miss Doris Bell, and the Mead fam- 
ily. "Happy Birthday!" quoth they. 
"We've invited ourselves to dinner." 
"Oh dear — what's in the ice box!" 
wailed the Lady. En route to the 
quisine she bumped into the dining 
room table, and what do you suppose 
she saw. A whole dinner laid, with 
presents an' everything! And then 
they all trouped in and ate it all up. 
And young Jawn complained about 
i; lor three hours afterwards. Now 



please don't get excited, for though 
a little late, this prologue is merely 
to say Happy Birthday to Mrs. Gil- 
bert W. Mead. 

Nor is that all of the parties going 
on. Last Friday the Gamma Sigma 
Sorority gave a tea at Dr. Gertrude 
Ingalls for Miss Amanda Bradley 
and that Sunday the Alpha Kappa 
Fraternity had a house warming in 
the form of a tea, and then the Kap- 
pa Gamma Sorority came forth with 
another tea for Miss Bradley and the 
ladies connected with the college. 
By the time it's over, Miss Bradley 
can add T to her three R's. 

— D. Clarke 

New Feature 
Beginning in the next week's issue 
of the ELM, some member of the 
Varsity Club will write an article on 
a phase of athletics at Washington 
College. The same person will not 
write successive articles, and the ser- 
ies will reflect the points of view of 
the society as a whole. 



Daughter Born To Mr. And 
Mrs. F. W. Damschott 



On Tuesday, September 25th, a 
new Co-ed put in her first appearance. 
Her name will be Miss Pricilla Anne 
Dumschott. We are sure she will be 
2gainst 8.00 o'clocks, since she seems 
to prefer afternoon. Both Miss 
Pricilla Anne and Mrs. Frederick 
Dumschott are now enjoying life in a 
big way. 



Editor's Note 
The cut of a football player ap- 
pearing at the head of Mr. Ekaitis' 
column on football was made avail- 
able through the courtesy of the 
Queen Anne Print Shop. 



Notice 
The editors of the Student Hand- 
book wish to correct the error in an- 
nouncing Miss Alice Cruickshank as 
President of the Kappa Gamma Sor- 
ority. Miss Lucy Cruickshank is the 
President. 



Baltimore Scene Oi 

Pageant Oct 5 And 6 

Maryland's Tercentenary year will 
be climaxed with fanfare and pagean- 
try on October 5th and Gth. 

The Maryland Tercentenary Com- 
mission of Baltimore will present an 
historical pageant in the Baltimore 
Stadium on the nights of October 5 
and 6 in which over 3,000 persons will 
participate. The entire state will be 
represented in the prelude to the 
pageant, when a "Duchess" and her 
attendants from each county in Mary- 
land will be presented to "Lady Bal- 
timore." 

"The Soul of Maiyland" is the title 
of the pageant, a work just complet- 
ed by Doctor Matthew Page Andrews, 
Chairman of the Baltimore Commis- 
sion. It will be directed by Percy 
J. Burrell, of Boston, who has staged 
more than thirty successful pageants. 
The city will contribute $5,000 to 
help meet the expenses of the affair, 



and various individuals and firms will 
underwrite it. There will be a small 
charge for admission, and it is ex- 
pected that the affair will be self- 
sustaining, and underwriting sub- 
scriptions refunded. 

Only the founding of the colony 
and the events leading up to it will 
form the subject of the pageant, a 
unique feature of historical works of 
this kind. Invariably, great stretch- 
es of history have been included in 
such writings. A heightened effect 
will be produced, it is believed, by 
concentration upon the single main 
event, the planting of the settlement 
in Maryland. 



-no- 



Notice 
W. Frank Jarrell wishes to an- 
nounce to all organizations of Wash- 
ington College that he is acting as 
boolcing agent for Ruffina lula's Or- 
chestra, of Baltimore, Maryland. 
Any size combination is available at 
reasonable rates. 



/~s 



[\ow fx efresKin g J 




Thecl 
these are: 





slaves— 
rest leaves 
Store 



lim'TaJA pd&k 



Naturally, they taste better —because 
Luckies use "The Cream of the Crop"— only 
the clean center leaves — these are the mild- 
est leaves — they cost more— they taste better. 



On to Hopkins! 

Lend Your Support to Charter 

a Boat 



ifie 




Elm 



S*f" 



President Mead"» Article 
Appears Today 
On Tate Two 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 3. 



SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



LIBRARY LOSS 
IS 500 BOOKS 



Not More Than 50 Believed 
Found 



In the last inventry conducted by 
the library depai*tment, five hundred 
books were found to be missing. This 
was the original estimate. It is be- 
lieved that when a careful examina- 
tion is made perhaps fifty of those 
lost will be located. To hope for the 
recovery of more than fifty is to be 
very optimistic. 

Approximately $1000 Loss 

The exact value of these books is 
not known at the present, but if each 
missing volume were valued at two 
dollars as a conservative estimate, 
the aggregate loss to the college 
would be nine hundred dollars. Mrs. 
Fox, the college librarian, states that 
it is impossible to replace many of the 
books at this average cost. 

Broken Sets Hard To Replace 

One of the most regrettable cir- 
cumstances concerning these thefts 
— no milder trem can describe the 
majority of the losses — is that valu- 
able sets are broken. These cannot 
be replaced by ordering one book. In 
fact the cost of replacement will be 
prohibitive in many cases. The lib- 
rary department believes that at least 
fifteen sets have been broken in this 
manner. 

History Losses Greatest 

The students of Washington Col- 
lege have a marked preference for 
the books of the History Department. 
In explanation and in all fairness to 
the other departments it must be said 
that the History Department has 
many more books in the stacks than 
any other. Those students who are 
not historically inclined borrow books 
from the shelves of the English De- 
partment and a surprisingly large 
number appropriate for their own 
use volumes from the Sociology 
shelves. 

Stack Privileges Discontinued 

Naturally, this state of affairs can- 
not continue, pointed out the Librae 
ian. Valuable stack priveleges are 
and must continue to be denied the 
students while books vanish. It is 
the duty of the individual members 
of the college to prevent the re-oc 
curence of such unfortunate happen 
ings, continued the Library Admin 
istrctor. It reflects little credit 
upon the student body of a school 
that such "depradations" do occur 



SILVER PENTAGON 
TO ELECT SENIORS 



Society Will Choose Two From 
Among Eligible Men 



Professor Goodwin Suffers 
Painful Injury To Hand 



Professor Frank Goodwin, Associ- 
ate Professor in Sociology and Econ- 
omics, was injured while docking his 
boat at Rock Hall, Md„ last Satur- 
day evening. The boat was sudden- 
ly lifted and driven against the pil- 
ings by an unusually large wave. Be- 
fore Professor Goodwin could escape 
his right hand was severely crushed 
between the side of the yacht and a 
piling. He was taken to Easton 
Emergency Hospital where he was 
treated by Doctor Palmer. Fortun- 
ately no bones were broken or main 
arteries severed. Eleven stitches 
were taken and he was thou permit- 
ted to return to his home in Chester- 
town. He returned to classes on 
Wednesday. 



At a special meeting called by 
President John Lord, and held at 7 
P. M. on Thursday, October 4, in Wil- 
liam Smith Hall, the Silver Pentagon 
Honor Society, of Washington Col- 
lege, virtually completed its reor- 
ganization, which was first under- 
taken nearly a year ago, in prepara- 
tion for affiliation with a national 
honor fraternity. 

The two most decisive points of 
the whole revision program were un- 
animously adopted. They are, first, 
that the membership of the Society 
shall be composed of five seniors and 
three juniors, a total of eight; and 
second, that actual election to the 
Society be held within the Society, 
instead of election by classes, wh ; ih 
was the method in the past. By this 
change the undesirable factors of 
popularity and politics will be elimi- 
nated, it was pointed out by an officer 
of the Silver Pentagon. Election 
shall require a unanimous vote of 
the members, but since it is strictly 
on the point system, this will be little 
but a formality. Two seniors will be 
chosen in a short time, and all sen- 
ors who find themselves eligible are 
being asked to submit their points to 
John M. Lord for auditing. An 
activity must have been actually en 
:aged in before it may be counted. 

The Silver Pentagon Society was 
once a chapter of Blue Key, a 
tional campus leadership honor fra- 
ternity, from which it withdrew be- 
cause of dissatisfaction -with the na- 
tional administration. Since this 
withdrawal, the Silver Pentagon has 
adopted in effect the constitution and 
by-laws of the Omicron Delta Honor 
Fraternity, which it is now petition- 
ing. 



PRESIDENT SPEAKS 



Dramatic Tryoats 

The Washington Players showed 
signs of a lively fall season by hold- 
ing the first try-outs at 3:15 P. M., 
October 5, in William Smith Hall. 
Some play will be given before the 
Christmas holidays. Harry Rhodes 
is president of the club; Robert Fink- 
is manager, and Professor Tolles is 
assisting in play direction. 




C/*J3E*zr W.Mead Ll.H, 



Addresses Gathering 

In Spaniard's Neck 



President Mead was the principal 
speaker last Sunday at the annual an- 
niversary services at the old Span- 
iard's Neck meeting house in Queen 
Anne's County. This was the home 
neighborhood of John Emory, who 
was the outstanding figure in the es- 
tablishment of the Methodist colleges 
a century ago, and who abandoned 
the practice of law in Centreville to 
become a Methodist minister. He 
was the tenth Methodist bishop 
America, and was the greatest figure 
in the church at the time of his death 
in a runaway accident in 1836. Bishop 
Emory was a graduate of Washing- 
ton College in the class of 1805, and 
President Mead's address dealt with 
his life and character. 

Incidentally, a classmate of Em- 
ory's was the famous Ezekiel Cham- 
bers, United States Senator from 
Maryland, and Chief Judge of the 
Second Judicial District, who was 
Chairman of the Board of Visitors 
and Governors of Washington Col- 
lege for a quarter of a century. Sen- 
ator Chamber's home was the beau- 
tiful river-front house in Chester- 
town now owned by Mr. W. W. Hub- 
bard. Judge Chambers received the 
honorary Doctor of Laws degree from 
Yale University. Bishop Emory re- 
ceived an honorary A. M. from St. 
John's, Annapolis, and an honorary 
D. D. from Washington College, his 
Alma Mater. 



Y. M. C. A. PLANS WORK 
AGENCY FOR STUDENTS 



Meeting Held October 1 To 
Discuss Project 



Plans were laid for a Student Em- 
ployment Bureau by the YMCA at 
its meeting held Monday, October 1 
in William Smith Hall. Marion Tay- 
lor brought to the attention of the 
"Y" the fact that there are many men 
in school who are capable of doing 
certain types of work in Chester- 
town but cannot obtain work be- 
cause the business men of the town 
do not know their qualifications and 
whether or not they are reliable. 

It was decided that members of 
the "Y" desiring the benefits of the 
employment service should submit 
their qualifications to some member 
of the "Y" who will be appointed to 
take charge of the project. Anyone 
in town who wants work done will 
communicate with the head of this 
service. He, in turn, will select 
some one from his list who is capable 
of doing the work desired. It is 
thought that with the "Y" acting as 
an intermediary between the stu- 
dents and the people in Chestertown 
and guaranteeing the capabilities 
and integrity of the students listed, 
those students who need work will 
get it. 

The YMCA is going to conduct 
an active campaign to make this plan 
a success.. An advertisement is ap- 
pearing in this issue of the ELM. 
Other advertisements will appear in 
two of the leading county papers in 
addition to letters to the leading bus- 
iness men of the community. 

The meeting of the "Y" held Mon- 
day evening was originally planned 
for the Freshmen but plans had to be 
altered when Professor Goodwin was 
unable to lead the discussion. The 
discussion intended for this week will 
in all probability be held next week. 
The YMCA officers are well pleased 
by the interest the freshmen have 
shown. All factors seem to point to 
a highly successful year. 



Articles Omitted 



Limited space caused by an unusu- 
ally large amount of necessary ad- 
vertising matter has made it impossi- 
ble to include several articles. Notable 
among these was the first of the ser- 
ies of Varsity Club write-ups. The 
first of these will appear next week. 
In the future, an eight-page issue will 
usually be offered. 



INVESTIGATION OF SUMMER ACTIVITIES OF INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS 

REVEALS VARIED PURSUITS OF WORK AND PLAY, ON LAND AND SEA 



by Allen Brougham 

It is always interesting to note 
just how the various members of the 
student body spent their summer va- 
cation, and a random and rather hap 
hazard survey recently conducted re 
veals many varied and amusing oc 
cupations and diversions. 

Of course, it was found that a cer- 
tain percentage disported themselves 
at nearby beach resorts, and includ- 
ed among these were: Jean Young, 
Ella Barkley, "Caekie" Kirwan, 
"Mimi" Skinner, Isabel North, Bill 
Long, Bob Mitchel, the redoubtable 
"Pogio" Reddish, Chunk Wells, und 
Mary Jane Nield, who all spent some 
time at Ocean City, Md. At Reho- 
beth might hove been seen "Lib" 
Morgan, Clarke Fontaine, Barbara 
Sparklin, Nancy Post, Jimmy Johns, 
Lucille Legg, Alice Cruikshank, and 
Boh Garrett. So far as can be as- 



certained, Mr. and Mrs. "Skip" Boyn- 
ton and Jane Youse were the only 
representatives of the college 
Ocean City, New Jersey. 

Geography captivated several of 
the men students. Norris Duffy went 
to Sweden and Russia as a bell-boy on 
an American-Scantic liner; Allen 
Brougham sailed to Venezuela and 
California on a Standard Oil tanker 
as an Able Seaman; Bob Shaull went 
to Corpus Christi and Houston as an 
ordinary seaman aboard a Bull Line 
freighter, and Sammy Lintbicum 
made a trip to Havre and Hamburg 
ns a wiper on the "City of Balti- 
more." 

Bill Reinhart was an ice man in 
Chestertown; John Lord officiated at 
the Voshell House as clerk, bartend- 
janitor, charwoman, and room 
moid. Wes Sadler worked for the 



Western Union; Harold McCrone 
spent the summer on a construction 
gang at the Aberdeen Proving 
grounds dodging shells and poison 
gas; Dick Saylor drove a sand truck; 
Joe McLain worked at the Bethlehem 
steel plant in Baltimore; Art Greims 
and Bill Grieb carefully murtured 
young corn fields on a farm, and Earl 
Price made dough in a bakery. 

Ellis Dwyer worked in a Ford 
plant in Pennsylvania; Ed Evans, Ho- 
bart Tignor, and Charley Berry play- 
ed baseball with Mi's. Raskob's "Ori- 
oles"; Bob Fears was maintenance 
man at Port Herman Beach; Leah 
Frederick did social service work in 
Baltimore; Snyder was head greens- 
keeper at Rogers Forge golf club, and 
last — but best of all, Fred Peyser 
taught old ladies how to ride bicycles 
at a New York beach resort 



PLANS MADE TO 
SEE GRID GAME 

Announced At Assembly Ad- 
dressed By T. G. Bennett 

Dr. Mead announced in the assem- 
bly on October 4th that there was a 
possibility of the student body going 
to Baltimore on October 20th for the 
game with Hopkins University. Fol- 
lowing the announcements an infor- 
mative address on the Civilian Con- 
servation Corps was given by Dr. F. 
Gordon Bennett educational advisor 
for the Third Corps Area. Dr. Ben- 
nett, well known educator and for- 
mer superintendent of Queen Annes 
county schools, is now heading "the 
university of the woods." 

Game At Hopkins October 20 
Plans are being made for students 
of Washington College to go to the 
Hopkins game on October 20th. The 
trip will be made by boat from Tol- 
chester to Baltimore; using busses 
from the college to Tolchester, or dir- 
ect from Chestertown to the field by 
bus. Students interested in attend- " 
ing the game sign the sheets placed on 
the bulletin board for the purpose. 
Definite plans will be announced 
when the details are known. 

Education In University Of Woods 

360,000 men are distributed over 
the country in 1800 C C C camps. 
Men without gainful employment are 
enabled to maintain their self respect 
by working for wages in the health- 
ful out of doors. Valuable service is 
rendered the country through forest 
preservation. A five point educa- 
tional program insures well rounded 
physical and mental growth. Ad- 
vantageous use of leisure time is 
stressed and opportunities to study 
along academic and vocaTional lines 
are offered. 

The men spend seven hours a day 
in the field engaged in vigorous phy- 
sical work. It is the remaining free 
time that is used for the optional ed- 
ucational program. Since the school 
began in April many men have taken 
advantage of the courses offered. 
Training in human relationship is 
fitting these temporary woodsmen to 
assume the responsibilities of citizen- 
ship. 

Dr. Bennett said, "Our purpose is 
to give to every boy according to his 
merits, abilities, and needs practical 
opportunity for development so that 
when he is returned to his communi- 
ty he may be a better citizen for hav- 
ing attended a C C C camp." 



Duffy And Mooney 

In Fireman's Show 



The Chestertown Volunteer Fire 
Company gives its annual musical re- 
view "Mixed Pickles," under the able 
direction of Mrs. H. J. Wheeler, of 
the Wheeler Producing Company, 
next Wednesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day evenings in the old Lyceum The- 
atre. 

It is interesting to observe that 
several talented Washington College 
actors, such as Joe Mooney and Nor- 
ris Duffy are offering their services to 
Mi-s. Wheeler and the local show. 

You will see Mr. Duffy ns "Jona- 
than Stout" ami Mr. HoO&Qj 
"Robert Russell." Also. Rob Clif- 
ford, Dorothy Clarke. Calvin Rogers, 
Mary Jo Wheatley. Harriot L. Rog- 
ers, Carolyn Jewell* Kitty Anthony. 
George de Socio, and last but not 
least, Mr. Peyser, will appear in the 
chorus. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 1934 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College. 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 1S72 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum - . Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox. Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, $1.50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 1934 



ON WITH THE DANCE 

The College people are showing 
themselves happier this year not only 
in their -work, but also in their play. 
There is a vast difference between 
carefree fun and forced gaiety. The 
latter, often resulting from plainly 
liquid spirits, has half-heartedly an- 
imated many dances of the past two 
or three years. Dances are the chief 
form of the college's social activity, 
and hence are accurate indices 
student morale 
tagon Society's reception dance 



Plans are not automatic. They re 
quire conception, organization and ex- 
ecution. Conception sprang from 
scattered individuals; organization 
was effected by that group of activi- 
ty leaders called together periodical- 
ly for conference by Dean Jones, and 
known as the Dean's Cabinet; execu- 
tion depends upon the unity of wish 
and purpose of the student body. 

It will be a fine thing for the big 
Chesapeake to have upon it again a 
shipload of students from the old 
college of the Eastern Shore. A cen- 
tury or more ago, doubtless this was 
a common enough occurrence. Par- 
ties of meticulous young colonial 
gentlemen often were seen debarking 
from a swift buceye of skipjack »t 
the ports of Baltimore, or, more fash- 
ionable still, Annapolis, then the 
'little Paris' of America. Here they 
sought the cosmopolitan atmosphere 
foreign to the pastoral Eastern Shore. 

It should easily become an annual 
voyage if this first one in several 
years is successful. It will be strong 
support for Washington's fighting 
team and coaches to have all of the 
students there. Therefore, for this 
alone, let all the students be there. 

The British have a proper word to 
describe the event; it will be "jolly." 



See Students Today 
As More Mature 



President Mead Hails Grow- 
ing Up In Colleges 



A wise friend of mine, the Dean of 
the undergraduate college in a great 
university, under whom I began my 
college teaching, used to complain 
rather humorously that when college 
students want added privileges, they 
insist they are "college men"; but 
that whenever they get into a scrape, 
they plead for leniency on the ground 
that they are only "college boys." 

I suppose that what he was saying 
amounts to this: that the privileges 
of maturity should be asked for only 
by those who are sufficiently grown- 
up to recognize the responsibilities 
involved, and mature enough to fore- 
see the results and bear them with- 



TOLD TO 

ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



(Reading Time). Unable to time 
this, as the installment collector fore- 
closed on the office clock. 

And now "it's a little Dutch girl"! 
Congratulations, Professor. Hope its 
not too hard on you getting heir- 
conditioned . A petition has been 
presented by the leading men in Mid- 
dle Hall to the Dean, asking to have 
all flies found down the washroom 
muzzled. - . Who is it that causes 
"Casanova" Fink's little heart to go 
"potato potato "... "Cowboy" Clif- 
ford is seen over at Reid Hall in his 
riding boots — just so he doesn't get 
in the habit. .. Rhodes seems to 
have tried out the advice of "pick 



out whining. 

In college, just as in life as a whole, I U P th y bed and walk", and is camp 
one of the most serious questions is 
that of social relationships — the 



-00- 



A NEW MT. VERNON 



This year the Mt. Vernon Literary 
Society, most venerable of campus 
organizations, is making a concerted 
effort to regain some of its former 
dominant prestige at Washington. It 
f is a great tribute to this society that 
At the Silver Pen- ft alone survives the dim past of 
f i Washington's early life. There 
Freshman Week, and more particul- j must have been other attempts, 
arly at the Saturday Night Informal though probably they were few, to 
of last week, everyone had a thor- form extracurricular activities in the 
oughly pleasant time. Not only did ! first half-century of the college's 
he say so, but. far more important, he life. No vestige of them remains, 



acted so. There was a feeling of 
geniality, of good fellowship, over 
the -svhole affair. The music sound- 
ed better, the floor seemed a ball- 
room floor. 



Only the Mt. Vernon, born in 1847, 

under the leadership of no one knows 

whom, lives on. 

As Dean Jones, President of Mt. 

Vernon in 1899, was saying the oth- 
The Silver Pentagon will continue i « day, for many years this literary 
to snonsor these informal at least! society was the strongest cultural, 
once a month, and often twice a < political and social extra-curricular 
month, for the entire college year, activity on the Hill. One year 
Such things exist only through the' organized sway threatened to abolish 
interest and attendance of the stu- athletics! New students were select- 



what 



ed and rushed for the Mt. Vernon 
much as they are by fraternities to- 
day. The programs consisted of 
learned sessions of debate, declama- 
tion and presentation of scholarly 
papers. Members seriously worked 
and studied in preparation for the 
worthwhile information they were to 
disseminate. 

Recent years have wrought sad 
changes in the Mt. Vernon Literary 
Society. True, papers have been 
read — on such subjects as the Liter- 
ary Aspects of Pickled Pigs Feet; 
talks have been given — on the 

■ theroesis modern novels. Songs 
There is reallv no reason why the i , , » . . 

I have been sung of one sort or other 

if the singer did not forget to come 

to the meeting. However, these 

things are all of the past 



dents for whom they are held. It 
should be traditional for him who 
wishes to dance on Saturday night to 
go where his friendly fellows are, in- 
to the big, old gym. There he can 
experience, in the properly done 
dance, a harmony and a blended 
rhythm. Then can he feeL though 
not metaphysically, perhaps, 
Dryden meant when he said: 

"From harmony, from heavenly 
harmony, 

This universal frame began: 1 
<m 
CROSSING THE BAY 



problem of how we may all live to 
gether in our common world with the 
least friction; how the younger learn 
to judge the actions of the older and 
follow only those which are the 
sound ideals; and how the older 
learn to choose carefully their own 
actions so as not to appear absurd in 
the eyes of their younger compan- 
ions. In all human relationships, 
the man who keeps his mind open and 
his mouth shut is superior to the one 
who keeps his mind shut and his 
mouth open. 

The closed mind tends to a blind 
traditionalism, an imitative habit 
which repeats each year the habits 
of the past without questioning 
whether they constitute the best and 
most rational methods of getting 
things done. The "boy" is imitative; 
the "man" is, or should be, independ- 
ent, rational, mature, unprejudiced, 
and dispassionate in his desire to find 
the proper thing to do. 

The college generation and their 
habits have long furnished material 
for movies,* plays, magazine articles 
and movies — most of which are in- 
correct or unjust in one way or anoth' 
er. The funnypaper collegian and 
the movie-show campus never exist- 
ed. They were made up from the 
rare and outstanding examples of 
foolish juvenilty which the public 
occasionally saw, or thought they 
saw, when the college was on public 



plans now in the process of consum 
mation should not result in Wash- 
ington College going steamboating on 
the 20th of October. The expendi- 
ture necessary for the trip ie certain- 
ly small; the journey is neither long 
nor tiresome when one is surrounded 
by two hundred of one's congenial 
comrades, it will be most pleasant for 
the whole student body to see Wash- 
ington beat Hopkins, instead of hav- 
ing that privilege solely for the team, 
doubtless everyone will study all of 
Saturday night upon his return 
order to compensate academically for 
the lack of classes on Saturday — in 
fact the whole plan seems flawless. 
The plan, however, is not flawless. 



Cotillion Club Has 
Fine Program 

First Dance Of Series Set For 
October 26 



I do believe there are more "men 
and less "boys" in college today than 
formerly; more "women" and less 
girls," in the same sense of meas- 
uring maturity. Of course, becom- 
ng a man and putting away childish 
things is not accomplished over night, 
in the individual, or the single col- 
lege, or in the college generation as 
a whole. How well American col- 
legians are progressing in their grow- 
ing up is discussed in an article I 
have just read in the October number 
of the "Esquire" magazine, and 
which I recommend to you. It is 
called "The Vanishing Collegian," 
and if you don't know the meaning 
of the word "bucolic" in the connec- 
tion in which it is used in the last 
column, be sure to look it up. 

Gilbert W. Mead. 



Mr. Sadler, the new president, and 
his admin istrative assistants, the 
Board of Curators, have determined 
that the Mt. Vernon shall regain its 
dignity, and it is certain that it will 
regain its strength and value to the 
college. 

Despite how clever it seems to be 
foolish, and trivial, sometimes even 
witty, it is really much harder to be 
serious, about one's pleasure. The 
Mt. Vernon Literary Society will not 
be a dry-ax-dust collection of pedant*. 
Its programs, however, it is felt, will 
offer opportunity for informal 



ing over at Reid Hall "Dusty 

suggests the Frosh and Sophs, instead 
of holding a football game this year, 
play "Drop the handkerchief" in- 
stead. .. .Huffman and Tignor win 
the Y. W. C. A. popularity contest 
"Tony" is still looking for his 
hat. . We hear the Phi house is get- 
ting a new paint job. They bought so 
much paint they are looking for new 
members to finish the job. . . . 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
'Freddie" Peyser spent hours up 

the Biology Lab. trying to locate an 
Ameoba under his microscope. Fin- 
lly, he called Doctor Carpenter in 
great excitement saying he saw one 
at last. Upon investigation, it was 
found Freddie had been gazing into 
the little reflecting mirror under the 
slide. 

♦ -> -> 
We wonder why the "Bachelor's 

Club" recently formed, has adopted 
as its symbol a safety pin? Perhaps 
it denotes the extreme youthfulness 
of the members — or does it mean 
they are going to save their pin mon- 
ey or are they using the pin to re- 
mind them of the motto "safety 
first?" Write to President Dudley for 
particulars. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
The photographer for the year 

book has written in asking how come 
he has a picture of a tuxedo shirt 
photographed by itself? It is our 
opinion that Gardiner had just slip 
ped through somebody else's collai 
when the snap was shot. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
The business manager of the year 

book, who must collect money for 
the Senior photographs, send: 
appeal through this column. "Will 
the party or parties who paid me a 
Confederate dollar bill please write 
m and identify themselves; there is 
such a thing as carrying a joke too 
far." Signed, Louis Lazarus Gold- 
stein. We investigated and found 
Louie couldn't tell the difference be- 
tween a Confederate dollar bill, and 
a United Cigar Store coupon, which 
redeems Louie. He tells us, by the 
way, that the photographer insulted 
one rather "pleasing plump" person 
by demanding, when said person was 
posing for a portrait, "Shall I take 
this view in sections, or all at once"? 



The Washington College Cotillion 
Club has planned a program for this 
year which in extent should surpass 
any of the efforts of this organiza- 
tion in previous years. In the expec- 
tation that there will be a larger mem- 
bership this year, members of the 
committee are carefully investigat- 
ing the higher class orchestras in an 
attempt to secure the best music fin- 
ancially possible. 

The first of the series of five danc- 
es will be held on October 26th, and 
the gymnasium will be decorated in 
the conventional Hallowe'en attire. 
Among the innovations to be intro- 
duced this year will be the serving of 
refreshments to the chaperones dur- 
ing intermission, and there is the 
possibility that this first dance will 
be presented as a Masked Ball. 

Coach Ekaitis is cooperating with 
the club, and will allow his football 
men to attend the first dance. In view 
of the greater responsibilities to be 
shouldered this year, and in the be- 
lief that with the proper advice these 
formal dances can be greatly improv- 
ed, the Cotillion Club has asked Miss 
Doris Bell and Professor Tolles to 
act as Faculty Advisors. 

The dates of the remaining four 
dances have been tentatively approv- 
ed by the Student Activities Commit- 
tee pending the completion of the 
athletic schedule: December 14, 1934, 
February 8, 1935, March 15, 1935, 
April 26, 1935. 

Membership in the Cotillion Club 
is open to any student, and the fee 
for the four dances is ten dollars, re- 
sulting in a saving of five dollars to 
members, since non-members must 
pay three dollars for each dance, or 
fifteen dollars for the five. 

Officers are elected yearly: a pres- 
ident, secretary-treasurer, and repre- 
sentatives from each class. These 
officers compose the standing com- 
mittee, and each dance is chairman- 
ned by one of them. 



Large Improvement Noted 
In Reid Hall Morale 



FIVE SOPHS PLEDGED BY FRATERNITIES 



Three Cast Lot With Phi Sigma Phi While Two Pledge To 
Alpha Kappa 



Five sophomore men became asso- 
ciated with two of the throe social 
fraternities on the College Hill dur- 
ing the past week. 

The- three bids issued by the Phi 
Sigma Phi were accepted by Francis 
Bratton, of Elkton, Md., Clifton H >pe 
of St. Michaels, Md., and Howard 
Clarke, of Baltimore. These men 
quaintance with truly literary things,] are active participants in various cam- 



pus aflaiih, including the Y. M. C. A 
the orchestra and the Elm staff. 

To the Alpha Kappa order, Robert 
L. Snyder, of Baltimore, and Marion 
Towner, of Chestertown, pledged 
themselven fraternally. Towner ib d 
member of the football squad while 
Snyder is well known in the activi- 
ties circle. 



Reid Hall has caught step with the 
new spirit of enthusiasm prevailing 
on the campus. Within the Hall 
there is apparent an attitude of co- 
operation, of studiousness, and a de- 
sire for purposeful living. Dean 
Bradley's wise and friendly sugges- 
tions are met with frankness and 
willing cooperation by the co-eds. 
There is less noise; footsteps are 
quieter; voices are lowered; there 
seems to be a spirit of thoughtfulness 
for others. Although the rules have 
not been changed to any extent, they 
have been clearly set forth and dis- 
cussed; each individual is doing her 
utmost to follow them. The spirit of 
noblesse oblige has taken root. 

Girls student government has be- 
come effective. The Womens' Coun- 
cil, resuming its responsibilities, 
is winning respect among the coeds. 
In guiding the council and restrain- 
ing a little the boisterousness, Miss 
Bradley is endeavoring to make Reid 
Hall a pleasant place in which to live, 
to work, and to play. 

Entertainment and recreation have 
not been neglected. Amateur dra- 
matics! — plays in which all the girls 
can take part, readings, and teas are 
planned for week ends during 
winter. 



the 



SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



Squad Offensive 

Working Smoothly 

Young, Berry, And Evans Work 
To Support Backfield 



by Phillip Skipp 

Judging from results of the hard 
scrimmages of past weeks Washing- 
ton College's football team will have 
a fine running and plunging attack 
This new offense will feature four 
different formations. The Warner 
double wing back and the single wing 
back formations will be used more 
than the others. Both of these sys- 
tems require speed, power, and exact 
blocking by all the backfield and the 
line. The blocking in all the scrim- 
mages has not been any too impres- 
sive, and the backs have been run- 
ning too slowly. 

Young, Berry, and Evans have 
proven themselves to be the main- 
stays of the backfield. Young has 
sp^ed and deception; once he gets 
into an open field he will be very 
hard to stop. Berry is the best pass- 
er on the squad. He can be counted 
on to get the pass off fast and, what 
is more important, accurately. Evans 
has improved a great deal; at the 
rate he is going now he should be 
sure to start against Gallaudet. Ev- 
ans is a hard plunger and blocker; he 
gains extra yards just by continually 
plugging. Nicholson has been ham- 
pered by a side injury, but he should 
soon be ready for heavy duty. 

The line play at first showed a 
great lack of coordination, but this 
fault is slowly being ironed out under 
the capable supervision of Coach Kib- 
jler. Ward is the outstanding line- 
man. 

Lord and . Dwyer are doing 
very good work, but the four other 
positions are. weak both on the de- 
fense and offense. 



Athletic Director 




J. Thomas Kibler 
Coach Kibler is assisting with bis 
experienced advice in perfecting the 
line play. 



Freshmen Girls Offer 

Fine Hockey Material 

Enthusiasm for hockey has increas- 
ed a great deal this week, with a 
large number of freshmen appearing 
on the field to start in for practice. 
There seem to be a great many possi- 
bilities among them. Doris Unruh 
with a bit more practice will prove a 
speedy wing. "Beppy" Westcott is 
another fast little wing player. Mar- 
garet Bell plays inner and has as 
plucky and fighting a spirit as any 
girl on the field. Polly Taylor 
should also be mentioned for her evi- 
dent determination to "get that ball." 
These freshmen will be big assets on 
whichever team they play. 



PAGE THREE 



FOOT BALL 

by George Ekaitis 




Last Saturday's results brought on- 
ly two surprises to the football world 
in general, and they were Temple's 
overwhelming defeat of V. P. I. and 
Santa Clara tieing Stanford's sup- 
posed "wonder team." The defeat 
of Duquesne by West Virginia was 
not unexpected, although some con- 
sidered it in the nature of an upset. 
In general, the results were as ex- 
pected by the majority of experts 
with the exception of the above 
games. There will be some real bat- 
tles today, try and pick the winners 
of these: California vs. St. Mary's, 
Southern California vs. Washington 
State and Stanford vs. Oregon State; 
in the West: Louisiana State vs. Sou- 
thern Methodist, Centenary vs. Okla- 
homo, and Arkansas vs. Texas Chris- 
tian in the Southwest; Minnesoto vs. 
Nebraska, Iowa vs. Northwestern, and 
Ohio State vs. Indiana in the Middle 
West; Georgia Tech vs. Vanderbilt, 
Tennessee vs. North Carolina, and 
Tulane vs. Auburn in the South; Col- 
umbia vs. Yale, Maryland vs. Wash- 
ington and Lee, Virginia vs. Navy, 
Pitt vs. West Virginia, and Western 
Maryland vs. Villanova in the East. 
Pick ten out of these seventeen and 
you may score yourself a B plus. 

We are faced with no opponent due 
to the dropping of football by Loyola, 
but a practice game, under game con- 
ditions, will be in order for today. 
One was held last Saturday with fre- 



quent stoppages for corrections. The 
blocking and tackling was found to 
be very poor as was the timing of 
plays, due mainly to the backfields 
not running as hard as they are able 
to run. 

Injuries have cut down the effici- 
ency of the squad somewhat with the 
loss of Shorb, a promising end, for 
the remainder of the season, and les- 
ser injuries to Tignor, Nicholson, 
Greims, and Davis. The last four are 
expected to be in shape for the prac- 
tice game today. 

The scrimmages, as expected, nar- 
rowed down the fight for positions. 
In some cases, decided improvement 
was in evidence, while in others, very 
deep disappointment. As yet, with 
the possible exception of Captain 
Dwyer, Ellery Ward, and John Lord, 
there have been no outstanding in- 
dividual for any of the eleven posi- 
tions, leaving the starting line-up 
for the opening game with Gallaudet 
still in doubt. 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 



Bride And Zoldy Are 

Frosh Cheer Leaders 

Tony Civet Close Runner-Up In 
Race 



by William Doering 

In an election held last Monday 
evening in William Smith Hall, John- 
ny Bride and Gene Zoldy were chosen 
as cheer leaders by the Freshmen. 
The election was conducted by re- 
presentatives of the Varsity Club. 
The successful candidates are now 
in line for the letter W, which they 
will receive several years from now, 
provided their work is satisfactory 
and inspiring. The unsuccessful can- 
didates were Tony Civet, Jack Dunn, 
and Lawrence Koleshko. 

During the week preceding the 
election, a red-hot campaign was con- 
ducted by the candidates and their 
cohorts. Bride and Tony Civet were 
the favorites, while Zoldy was class- 
ed as a "dark horse." Reid Hall, it 
was generally understood, was solid- 
ly behind Tony. The failure of the 
girls to present themselves at the 
time of the election is believed to be 
the main cause of his defeat. A last- 
minute swing to Zoldy by supporters 
of other candidates was evident dur- 
ing the hour before the election. The 
vote for the leading three men was 
close, and the presence of a half-doz- 
en more of the class would have 
changed the entire result. 

The final tabulation of the vote is: 

Johnny Bride 25. 

Gene Zoldy 22. 

Tony Civet 18. 

Lawrence Koleshko 6. 

Jack Dunn 1. 




WhiteBurley 

the best tobacco 

forsmoking 
in a pipe 



Rough Cut 

__ cut the right way 
to smoke cool 
and last longer 




'ettmans rrocess 

_ adds to the fragrance 

and makes it act 

right in the pipe 



Common -sense 
package 

—keeps tobaccojresh 
handy to carry -10 f 



the pipe tobacco that s MILD 
the pipe tobacco thafs COOL 



© 1954. Liggcit 4 Myiu Toa-uxo Ct. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 1934 





lesterfields are milder 

Chesterfields taste be 



i\$ 



Ripe home-grown tobaccos 

We begin with the right 
kinds of mild ripe Domestic 
tobaccos. Then we age and 
mellow them like rare wines 
for flavor and taste. 



iroinatic Turkish tobaccos 



Next we add just the right 
kinds and the right amounts 
of Turkish tobaccos to give 
Chesterfield the "seasoning" 
that helps to make them taste 
better. 






Blended and cross-blended 

Finally we "weld" these 
% tobaccos together the Chest- 
1 erfield way — different from 
I any other — to make Chester- 
| field a milder better- tasting i 
1 cigarette. 



MONDAT WEDNESDAY 8ATURDAY 



B08A NINO CRETE 

PON8ELIE MARTINI STUECKCOLD 

KOSTELANKTZ ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS 

9 P. M. (E. 8. T.) -COLUMBIA NETWORK 



M takes good things to 
make good things . ..there is no 
substitute for mild ripe tobacco 



SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Assistants Named 

In Various Sabjectsl 



Honor Society Meets 



In the various fields of study the 
following students have been ap- 
pointed as reading or laboratory as- 
sistants: 

Chemistry: H. W. McCrone, Earl 
W. Price, Edwin Lowe. 

Biology : David Wallace, Leland 
Stevens, Emerson Slacum. 

French: Mary Jane Neild. 

Spanish: Antonio Civit. 

German: Gilbert Ingersoll. 

Physics: Ellis Dwyer. 

History: Ann Whyte. 



The Scholastic Honor Society of 
Washington College, will begin its 
official year with a meeting at the 
home of the Faculty President Dr. K. 
S. Buxton, in the evening of Oct. 9. 
Mr. Tolles will be the guest speaker. 



Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chester town, Md, 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radio*, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111 J 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



Phillips 



TSOUPJ 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety First 

F. G. Usilton, Pie... 

L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 

On Sunday afternoon, from four 
to five, STD entertained at tea in 
the sorority room in honor of Dean 
Bradley. 

Ellen Flick, last year's president, 
is doing welfare work in Baltimore. 

We regret that Mrs. Tuta, a pa- 
troness of tl e sorority, did not re- 



turn to college this fall. 

Alexina Robinson, Ellen Flick, 
"Flivver" Cooper, and Dot Kimble 
visited on the campus recently. 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

EILLARD PARLOR 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



Where The College Boys 

Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF OCTOBER 8-13 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8 - 9 
CARY GRANT -- FRANCES DRAKE in 

"LADIES SHOULD LISTEN" 

Comedy "Love On A Ladder," Cartoon, Novelty 
Reel. SPECIAL ADDED PICTURES OF THE 
DIONNE QUINTUPLETS. 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, OCT. 10-11 
MARLENE DIETRICH in 

"THE SCARLET EMPRESS" 

Added — Oswald Cartoon "Dizzie Dwarf," Musi- 
cal Comedy "Fads And Fancies." 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 - 13 
. WARNER OLAND in 

"CHARLIE CHAN IN LONDON" 

4dded — POP EYE, The Sailor in "A DREAM 
WALKING," Musical Comedy and Novelty Reel 
"Society Notes." 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 305 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



LeCATES BROS. 
BARBER SHOP 

Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERGER'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students, offers 
line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. Pennants, Pil- 
lows, Stickers, Stationery and School Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 

HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And All Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 1934 



Lang. Requirement Changed 

Modern Language Requirement: A 
reading knowledge of one modern 
foreign language. This will be ad- 
ministered as follows: 

1. A proficiency test will be giv- 
en in May shortly before the end of 
the college year. This test will be 
prepared by the instructor concerned 
under the direct supervision of the 
Head of the Modern Language De- 
partment. 

2. Normally only those students 



FOR BETTER 


COAL SERVICE 


PHONE 149 


C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



who have completed the equivalent 
of two years study of a language in 
college will be admitted to such a 
test. It presupposes the ability to 
interpret, satisfactorily, modern 
prose of average difficulty. 



Men's and Ladies' 

SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



Poetry By Anthony 

The following verse was written 
by James Anthony, '34. Additional 
bits of Mr. Anthony's, and others 
works will be published from time to 
time. 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITH'S KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



Time is a little bird 
That wings forever 
On its weary flight to nowhere. 



The river is a cat, 

Lazy, smooth, stretched out. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



HOLDEN'S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross Sfc. and Maple Ave 

Sunoco Products 



The breezes brush her; 
She licks her feet, purrs softly. 
But when the wind rubs her wrong 
She humps her back with bristled tail 
And spits in snarling fury. 



MAKE YOUR CAR 




A COLLEGIATE ONE! 




A complete accessory line 




Goodrich Tires 




STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 




COMPANY 




331 Hish St. 





Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 

Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 




GRAY BEAUTY SOLON 



K ^ 



Reasonable New Fall Prices. 

Watch announcements of 

Specials each month. Starting 
October SiU for the month of 
October on Monday, Tuesday, 
WednrsH^v and Thursday, Sham- 
id Finger Wave 75c. 

;egu1ar prices on Friday and 

rday. 



liow jKefreshing / 




<z? 



7 m 




OvrtUbl ISM. Tbe AmeHe*& Totuxo Comfrur. 



Luckies use the finest tobaccos— only the 
clean center leaves— these are the mildest 
leaves— they cost more— they taste better. 

"It's toasted" 

T Your throat protection — against irritation— against cough 




Use Scoresheet 
On Page Three 




Elm 



See Washington 
Beat Hopkins Today 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 5. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, OCT. 20, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



A. C. GODDARD 
TALKS ON PEACE 



Discusses Futility Of War At 
Thursday Assembly 



The Reverend Alvin C. Goddard, 
pastor of McCabe Memorial M. E. 
Church, Wilmington, Delaware, took 
"World Peace" as the subject of his 
address at the regular Washington 
College Assembly on October 18th. 

Mr. Goddard based his speech up- 
on the facts unearthed in investiga- 
tions of the war situation by people 
all over the country. 

War To Save Investments 

It was pointed out that economical- 
ly war was for the purpose of saving 
the investments of some few people 
and of increasing the income of oth- 
ers, especially those who owned mu- 
nition factories. The recent inves- 
tigation by Federal authorities gives 
one an idea of the part war has been 
made to play in the economic world. 

Propaganda Greatest Cause 

Mr. Goddard continued that 
propaganda has probably been the 
greatest cause of all wars. People 
are told what to believe about the 
countries with whom they are fight- 
ing and are educated to the point 
where they will believe anything 
their government tells them. An ex- 
ample of how war propaganda is 
handled is found in the secret files of 
the Intelligence Department of the 
United States Government. In this 
department there are accounts of all 
things done by all nations of the 
world. One file contains all the 
good things that a nation has ever 
done, the other contains all the bad 
things it has done. In case of war, 
if the country is on the side of the 
United States, the good deeds of the 
nation are fed out to the people — to 
work them up to a pitch where their 
patriotism will force them to aid the 
country in war. If the country is 
against the United States the un- 
pleasant things will be published and 
a spirit of antagonism will be brought 
to bear against the nation in ques- 
tion. Evidence is placed in these 
files written an hour after an event 
has taken place so that they are al- 
ways up to date and ready for im- 
mediate use. 

File Contains Evidence 

Mr. Goddard discovered that there 
was a file which contained everything 
he had ever written or said concern- 
ing World Peace and that, in case of 
war, this evidence would be used 
against him. 




STRONG WASHINGTON ELEVEN 
| FACES HOPKINS AT H0MEW00D 



C. E. DUFFY TO SPEAK 
ON FOUNDER'S DAY 



153rd Birthday Of College 
Celebrated Oct. 25 



Portraits 

Are Shifted 

Founder's Picture Hangs In 
President's Office 



The former Presidents of Wash- 
ington College and chairmen of the 
Board of Visitors and Governors will 
no longer gaze down on our assembly 
speakers. These pictures have been 
removed from the space they have so 
long occupied on the walls around 
the platform. 

The majority of the pictures are 
to be found in Dr. Mead's offices. In 
his private office are those of the 
Rev. Smith, founder of the college, 
the Rev. Walters, Dr. Cain and Dr. 
Titsworth, former presidents of the 
college. In the outer office are the 
pictures of Dr. Reid, a former presi- 
dent, and Judges Chambers and 
Pearce former chairmen of the Board 
of Visitors and Governors. The other 
two pictures of Dr. Micau, Vice Pres- 
ident Emeritus, and Judge Wickes of 
the Board of Visitors and Governors 
are in Dean Jones' office. 



DRAMATIC CLUB BEGINS REHEARSALS FOR 
"JONESY" IN PREPARATION FOR FALL STAGING 



by Frances Silcox 

The Washington Players have 
started rehearsals of "Jonesy", their 
first play of the year which will be 
given November 21, 1934. This three 
act comedy has as its cast — Dorothy 
Clark playing the leading role of 
Diana Deveraux, who desires to be 
a great actress respite the protests 
of those about her. Playing oppo- 
site Miss Clarke in the title role is 
Robert Fink as Wilbur Jones, a typi- 
cal college boy, quite grown up and 
resentful of the attention bestowed 
upon him by his doting mother. With 
him from college he brings his weal- 
thy fraternity brother, Billy Morgan, 
played by Robert Clifford. 

Lelia Anthony is Mrs. Henry 
Jones, Wilbur's mother. She is an 
ineffectual, unavailing sort of per- 
son who derives much pleasure and 
enjoyment from sobbing and wiing- 
ing her hands. Carolyn Jewell plays 
her conscientious, studious daughter, 
Anne. Her henpecked husband who 
has sown a few wild oats in his time 
— a fact of which he is proud — is por- 



trayed by William Hall. Elsie Whar- 
ton is their inquisitive unaffected 
maid, Katie, 

Mildred Ellis, the poor, rejected 
financee of William and friend of 
the family is Jean Harshaw. 

George Spence takes the role of a 
big hard-boiled business man while 
Lawrence Koleshko plays the kind 
friend to everyone. 

To add to the wisecracks, wit and 
humor of the play are the plumbers, 
Harry Rhodes and Norris Duffy, and 
the policeman, George Rasin. 

This cast was selected after sever- 
al tryouts and it is the aim of the 
club this year to bring before the 
spotlight new talent as well as the 
more experienced performers. 

Professor Tolles is directing the 
play assisted by the President of the 
club, Harry Rhodes. Many of the 
details of scenery planning, stage 
managing, and other various arrange- 
ments have not been completed. If 
as much interest and enthusiasm is 
shown in this as in the tryouts there 
is no doubt but that a splrndid per- 
formance will be presented. 



SILVER PENTAGON 
ELECTS SENIORS 



Shaull And Rhodes Named By- 
Society 



The Silver Pentagon Society met 
last Tuesday noon, October 16th, for 
the election of two of four senior 
classmen eligible for membership. 
Messrs. Shaull, Goldstein, Sadler and 
Rhodes. 

Of the four, Shaull and Rhodes 
were elected by a unanimous vote of 
the society — the former having twen> 
ty activity points and the latter sev- 
enteen. Both Shaull and Rhodes 
have been versatile in their extra cur- 
riculum activities. 

Shaull is the editor of the Pegasus, 
and is a member of the Student 
Council, the Honor Society, a colum- 
nist of the Elm, and holds member- 
ship in the Phi Sigma Phi Fraternity. 

Rhodes is president of the Drama- 
tic Club — he will be seen this fall in 
"Jonesy," the current presentation of 
the Dramatic Club, — is football man 
ager, and a member of the Alpha 
Kappa Fraternity. 

The induction of the new members 
will take place in the near future, 



College History 
Being Compiled 

by Lawrence Yourtee 
A collection and compilation of his- 
torical information pertaining to the 
one hundred fifty-two year existence 
of Washington College is being con- 
ducted by the Alumni Association, 
and is to be edited in book form un- 
der its direction. Stanley G. Rob- 
ins, President of the Washington 
College Alumni Association, has nam- 
ed Mrs. Frederick S. Albee to act as 
chairman of a committee of three to 
collect material which will shed some 
light upon the early history of the 
college. The remainder of the com- 
mittee consists of Gilbert T. Rude, 
and Colin Ferguson Stam, a descend- 
ent of Colin Ferguson, the second 
principal of the college. 

This committee, in its effort to 

write the story of the college from 

its infancy, has not only to search 

through widely scattered records 

(Continued On Page Two) 



Thursday, October 26th, will be ob- 
served as Founders Dny by Wash- 
ington College. Mr. C. Edward Duf- 
fy will speak at an assembly in Wil- 
liam Smith Hall. Washington began 
its official existence in October 1782 
and thousands are expected to send 
in greetings on her 153rd birthday. 

The speaker at the Founders' Day 
program, C. Edward Duffy, class of 
'24, is at present a resident of Wil- 
mington, Del. He is a law partner of 
United States Senator Hastings and 
Assistant States Attorney of Dela- 
ware. 

Alumni, former students, and 
friends of the college have been ask- 
ed to join the celebration by mail. 
Thousands of return post cars have 
been mailed and President Mead will 
announce the number of signed cards 
that come back. 

The original charter for the college 
was granted by the Maryland legis- 
lature in May, 1782. However, it was 
required that not less than 5000 
pounds be raised before the colleg' 
would be permitted to open. 

The organization meeting of the 
first Board of Visitors and Governors 
was held October 15, 1782. The 
charter was signed between OcLobe.' 
1 5th and November 10th. The date 
October 25th is an arbitrary date 
chosen as the official beginning of 
Washington College, and celebrated 
as such annually. 



Many Spectator Students Will 
Cheer Maroon And Black 



Literary Society Hears 
Debate On Ratting 



The main feature of the Thursday 
night session of the Mount Vernon 
Literary Society, which was held in 
the auditorium of William Smith 
Hall, was a debate, "Resolved: That 
ratting be abolished at Washington 
College." The affirmative was up- 
held by Robert Shaull and Ernest 
Holland; the negative by Alfred 
Gardiner and Robert Fink. Richard- 
son Saylor was the chairman of de- 
bate. The final decision was render- 
ed in favor of the affirmative by pop- 
ular vote of the members of the group 
present. 



Washington College's 1934 foot- 
ball team makes its first journey a- 
way from the home gridiron when the 
Eastern Sho' men engage John Hop- 
kins in Baltimore this afternoon. 
The series between the Maroon and 
Black and the Blue Jays is one of 
Washington's oldest. But to date the 
invaders have yet to score a win over 
a Hopkins aggregation. The Blue 
Jays scored a 21 to victory last 
year, but it was Washington's first 
game of the year, and numerous 
fumbles led directly to all three 
touchdowns. The result would prob- 
ably have been decidedly different 
later on in the season. 

Hard Fought Battle Predicted 
Coach Ekaitis hopes to have his 
strongest lineup on the field against 
the Baltimore eleven. With this 
hope it mind he used his regulars on- 
ly for a short time in last Saturday's 
game against Gallaudet. Little can be 
said about the Hopkins team. In their 
opener with N". Y. U. Lhey looked very 
ragged being defeated 34 to 0. But 
just when all the sports critics were 
painting a dismal future for the 
Homewood team, they stopped for- 
ward and held a strong Lehigh team 
to a 7 to 6 score. The surprising 
outcome of this game put them into 
the running again. As a result all 
indications point towards a bitter and 
hard fought battle today. 

Blue Jays Boast Star* 

The Blue Jay backfield boasts of 
two stellar perfoimers in Galloway 
and McClean, a triple threat man 
who passes with either hand. Their 
line is heavy and experienced. The 
left side of their forward wall is es- 
pecially strong with Van Orman at 
end, Ellis at tackle, and Giardina at 
guard, 

Washington Backfield Strong 

The Washington backfield ciaima 
four exceptional backs and several in 
reserve. Huffman and Nicholson the 
"Big Berthas" of the backfield should 
really batter down all opposition while 
Berry's passing and Young's bril- 
liant running should also play havoc 
with the Blue Jay gridmen. The line 
on the other hand is not as experienc- 
ed as that of Hopkins, but it is ex- 
pected to do as all recent Washing- 
ton lines have done, and that is to 
out-play the Johnny forwards com- 
pletely. 



CANNIBALISM OBSERVED 
AS GALLAUDET IS 



STILL EXISTANT 
BURNED IN EFFIGY 



by Carl Cochran 

Cannibalism? 

Certainly not cannibalism too on 
the Sho'. 

Cannibals or South Sea Islanders 
or what have you, they surely act like 
pagans. Wiggling, prancing, run- 
ning, chanting, yelling, beating 
drums, and clashing cymbals in a 
blood-thirsty and terrifying war 
dance are decidedly actions of canni 
bals. Too, they are carrying their 
intended victim, with his legs al- 
ready crumpled and broken, to his de- 
struction. Around and around they 
go, with terri^e din and commotion, 
and with a pot of oil swinging 
hreateningly from the arm of one 
jf their number. They seem to have 
a set determination as they finally 
wing southward and go straight to- 
wards the stake which they soon sur- 
-ound. The intended victim, with his 
face frightfully distorted by fear and 
pain, is viciously bound to the stake, 
drenched with oil from the metal pot, 
and finally ignited. As he moans in 



agony and cries out in the unbearable 
pain they dance around him, taunt- 
ing and molesting him further, until 
at length he expires. When the fire 
burns low and is in danger of going 
out fuel is hastily supplied by the 
tribe, each member of which brings 
forth, with much ceremony, his of- 
fering — his noble and unselfish sac- 
rifice — in order that the fire may be 
kept alive. As the last bits of fuel 
float away skyward in the form of 
thick black smoke a resounding shout 
rends the peaceful atmosphere and 
immediately seventy-five necks be- 
longing to seventy-five men are rais- 
ed — free forever from their burdens. 
The rats have had a memoiable 
day, glorified by two events — the 
burning of Gallaudet (in effigy), and 
the complete and total destruction of 
the pretty green rat signs (furnished 
through the courtesy (?) of Gill 
Brothers) — all taking place on Kib- 
ler Field between the halves of the 
Gallaudet-Washington game. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 20, 1934 



The Washington Elm 



accident from the college body. A 

I suitable place for treatment of the 

h/ b>- pad for the ill and injured has always been not- 

,bly lacking at the college, especiai- 

., Co „ lymthemen s dornntones where 

, ' there are certain insurmountable dif- 

the eleTenth oidesi oI i ticuhies. The coHege has. however. 

™ ^ r:tK ^. Iways been solicitious of the medi- 

Foundcd a: Chest ertown, Md., IS72 ca j attention available to these need- 

. ■ ing it, ami, although the former of- 

Oliver Baker Editor j ficial physician has retired, Chester- 

, »„. F.tiT.iv ' town offers other doctoi-s of medical 

... d >r „. v ' und surgical abilities. One or twu 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manage* pr0R0UR * ements of .. Abracadabra - 

Emerson Slacum Asst. bu>. Mgr. , oes ^ however( pro a U ce them. A 

, word to the Administration does, es- 

Associate Editors i pecially when it is addressed to the 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, President or the Dean. 
Philip Skipp, Joan Harshaw, Alfred Ir seems not too presumptive reas- 



oning to believe that an arrange- 
ment with the hospital for admission 
of students will be made. Such a 
plan would obviate the very painful 
persona] effects, and, in circumstanc- 
es very conceivably different from 
those of actuality, the college-wide 
affects, of the recent illness of an ex- 
cellent football player. It is evi- 
dent that the most skillful of profes- 
sional treatment cannot be substitut- 
ed for proper nursing and physical 
facilities; it must merely complement 
ihese. Washington College is seek- 
ing to improve her rather neglected 
care for the sick, and complete stu- 



Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 
Whyte 

Entered at the Chestertown, Bid., 
postofnee as second class matter. 
Subscription price, S1.-50 a year. 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

SATURDAY, OCT. 20, 1934 

MEN, PLAYING FOOTBALL 
The excellent performance :: ih^ 
football team in the decisive victorj 
over Gallaadet shows that Washing- 
has thoroughly dent cc , operat j ori w ;n great lv aid pro- 
permeated htr athletic atmosphere. gres , in this direction. 

Coach Ekaitis' team chose a neat way , QO 

of exhibiting their ambition for fu- 
ture, more difficult contests by clip- 'TIS A HARD WORLD 
ping the opponents score to precisely When a majority of Washington 

noibing. Athletic Director Kibler College's students move over to Bal- 

should feci <ure that ids prediction . imore todaVj (hey are taking wUh 

of a change of the "old order , i. e., *• - .. * j j « 

. c i 4. „i.„ii i;t flM iir. them tneir hats and coats, and tue 

the oraer of last year, snail literally 

be realized in all branches of sports* reputation of the College body. Un- 

for Washington will be in the tra- dergraduates are famous for their 

ditional order of the victor-first. buoyant soirits, and jolly gaietv, and 

The college appreciates tins sei- , ove of fun and and 
louslv striving team of football play- 

ers- " The student section of the Hence - the > r become legitimate sub- 
bleachers W2s nearly filled last week, jeers for the critics and censure of 
despite the marrow-seeking OcLober the press and the public of a mun- 
gale. The newly-chosen freshmen dane world. This condition is dc- ' 
cheer leaders were lofty in purpose plorable but immutable. About the 
and perfect in effort if not quite so in only way, it seems, that students can 
technique. Still, their mechanics show their carefreeness for the re- 

surprisingly in accord, and what slrictions and impositions of every-' 
matters a bit of discord when every- day life is to deprive the livers of 
one wants to show vocally that he is the narrow life of the pleasuie of, 
proud of his team, that is forty criticizing, and even punishing, en-j 
-ihead? The thing to be ie- ing students. Hence, if Washing- 
raembered in a time like that, when ton's students do not carry off Hop- 
cheers and praises spring so easily to kins goal posts, or pick up loose ar- 
one's lips, is that the only time when tides in restaurants, there will be no , 
the cheering should be louder, and excuse for Chestertown's Associated 
harder, and done by everyone is Press correspondents report that' 
when the team is forty points behind. College students have dumped the 
Then, of course, it is superflons to Baltimore Trust Building into the 1 
suggest, the team will be playing Chesapeake Eay, while being shot at 
times harder 2nd if it isn't at with howitzers from Fort Melienry. 

Trying to, it doesn't deserve the If the students boarding the ship 

approbation of the student body. Express act with a measure of sani- 

Today, Captain Dwyer and his ty (one admits this is a cruel, cruel 

mates face the first really difneuit necessity) until they return to Wash-i 

match of their season. From the ington's storied walls, the Western' 

point of view of united Washington Shore can't call the Eastern Shore; 

College, who will cross the Bay to moronic, and all will be "right with| 
support the team, figuratively, in a . the world." 

body, the team will, of course, win. - oo 

Even if the score is mathematically ».•«-, — -.-. rtr , sts\* 

less than Johns Hopkins score, if the HISTORY OF COLLEGE 

r^lLrwer^encetat'Te « BEING COMPILED 

Gallaudet game are present, the play- . 

ers for the Eastern Shore shall have Active Research Seeks Records 

won by trying, and the fortunes of' Of 1804-1816 

the score will have been simply — dis 

:m, but such is unthinkable. (Continued From Page 1) 

The Gallandet victory has set the more than a century old, but has also 

college moving athletically just as t0 contend with certain periods in 

the opening of the year saw her mo*- w hich the history of the college is al- 

ing academically and in activities, most a blank. Such a period as this 

and nothing should stop hei. The was the one from 1804-1816. The 
victor:- has even: desirable effect, 1 lack of material concerning this 

and Will Wordsworth, who, no twelve year interim is due to the fire 

doubt, played some ancestral sort of of m6f which destr ed the admin . 

Sf *. A ^ ^a Gra t n ! mar istration building and many valuable 
School, and at Cambridge, must have , b J 

had a bit of advice about the disad- iec ° TCs w,th !t - 

vantages of victory m mind when he Extensive research is being carried 

" the warrior, on in tne 'arger libraries, and, in ad- 

"Who, not content that former dition, an appeal has been made to 

worth stand fast, Alumni who have valuable informa- 

Looks forward, persevering to the tion in their possession to submit it 

to the committee for their use, Since 

00 : all of the members AV this committee 

AN INFIRMARY ljve in or near Washington, D G 

ng of the Kent- Ehey hm acam Uj ^ b ^ rf 

Queen Anne* hoxpitai mark-, the end t . _ . . . . . , . 

■■■ To*, by a band „t ^ mat<!nal " ™ Ch "' " H ' "" 

i l will make i. 

Uta. . " : to "-' 

once V, Wuhinsrt', long period 

■t the proxin and ih.it a! 

almost on the earnpun, ai ^^t two yearn wilt have elai- i 

infirmary for ca«* of nitknen* an'j Rlliahed. 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



We're very sorry folks but there 
will be no band concert tonight — 
the piccolo player sprained his little 
finger! Also — there will be no in- 
ercepted phrases — the editor had an 
deal Consequently we have here a 
list of the papers, we have received 
and comments upon the same. 

We hope our distant readers will 
receive these comments in the same 
unpredjudiced spirit in which they 
are given. 

;. "Strayer Topics" — Strayer 
College — Your general layout is most 
businesslike. 

:\ "The Indiana Stateman"' — In- 
diana State Teacher's College — Well 
written and readable throughout. 

3. "The Diamondback" — Univer- 
sity of Maryland — Very creditable or- 
ganization of a carious mixture of by 
city, daily and county weekly copy. ' 

4. "Temple University News" — 
Temple University — Your "pentabu- 
lations of the Temple Bells" column 
is excellent. 

5. "The Antiochian" — Antioch 
College — We never miss reading your 
editorial page. 

G. "The Trinity Tripod" — Trini- 
ty College — Why all the filler mater- 
ial — no news? 

7. "Montana Exponent" — Mon- 
tana State College — Our idea of a 
"regular" newspaper. 

S. "The Gold Bug" — Western 
Maryland College^ — Not at all hard 
to read. 

9. "St. John's Collegian" — St. 
John's College — What's the secret of 
your columnist's success? 

10. "The Hawk" — St. Joseph's 
College — Pictures add much to your 
paper. 

11. "The Connecticut Campus" 
— Connecticut College — Among the 
best we read. 

12. "The Greyhound" — Loyola 
College — Surprising to find provin- 
cialism in the big city. 

13. "Swarthmore Phoenix" — j 
Swarthmore College — Scholarly to! 
say the least. 

14. "The Review" — University of 
Delaware^ — In our opinion your fea- 
tures don't add to your paper. 

15. "B. R. C. Reflector" — Blue 
Ridge College — Good in spots but lots 
of room for improvement. 

10. 'The Pasquina* — Potomac 
State College — Won't criticize you oni 
your trial issue but something might 
be done about the blurred printing. I 

17. "The Farthest North" — Col- 
lege of Alaska — Very interesting to 
read. 

13. "The Gold and Black"— 
Birmingham-Southern University — 
You must have an active sports edi- 
tor. 

19. "The Mountain Echo" — Mt. 
St. Mary's College — Your writers 
seem to be very spirited. 

20. "The Drexel Triangle" — 
Drexc-I University — A well rounded 
paper in all respects. 

21. "The Argus'' — Crosby High 
School — As long as it's straight news, 
you are as good as the majority of 
college papers but your features are 
juvenile. 

We wish that the staff of all the 
publications to whom we have sent 
copies of the "Elm" could se our long 
mailing list and then compare it with 
the short list above. Perhaps they 
might do something about balancing 
up the columns. We really would 
like to exchange with them but they 
don't seem to realize it. 

For the benefit of those who are 
interested in statistics and those of 
us who aren't sure why we are in 
college or of what value it will be, — 
we present the following table found 
in "The Connecticut Campus." 

"Less than one per cent of our 
Americans are college graduates, but 
this one per cent has furnished: 

55 percent of our Presidents. 

54 per cent of our Vice Presidents. 

47 per cent of our Speaker, of the 
i i 

per cent of our members of 
- 1 ess, 

61 per cent of our Secretarii - I 
State. 

i er cent of our Attorn* , Gen- 
erals. 



Dr. Mead Suggests 
Spirit Of The Day 

Notes That The College Is On 
Parade Across The Bay 



TOLD TO 

ME 

By I. Un-Iy Heard 



When the issue of the "Elm" con- 
taining this column appears, Wash- 
ington College will be embarked on 
an adventure, either afloat or on 
wheels, in which all of us — or nearly 
all — will be sharing. Of course the 
campus will be just where it has been 
ever since grass began to sprout oil 
the everlasting hills, and the build- 
ings will still be standing on their 
ancient foundations. Ent the Col- 
lege will be on a temporary migra- 
tion, just the same. 

Students, faculty, and local friends 
will be on their way to join with the 
alumni and friends on the other side 
of the Bay in attendance on a foot- 
ball game. Yet it is not simply the 
transference of a large portion of our 
personnel to Baltimore which causes 
me to say that, for the day, Wash- 
ington College is moved some miles 
to the westward. 

The great thing is that the spirit 
of Washington College is on the 
march. Of course it is on the march 
to an athletic contest. But that is 
not all — not by a great deal. The 
spirit and temper of Washington 
College, of which we are all properly I 
proud, is on parade. It is on show 
before a great many alumni and 
friends whom many of us cannot 
recognize when we meet them. They 
will know us, though we do not know 
them, and by our individual actions 
the present spirit of Washington 
College will be judged. 

Team work in the football squad is 
expected, and will be exhibited, I am 
sure. Team work in die cheering 
sections will certainly make itself 
felt. Naturally, no member oi the 
team will "let down" his College by 
poor sportsmanship, or risk his per- 
sonal reputation by doing less than 
the best expected of him. Just as 
naturally, no other member of our 
College body will, by his actions or 
attitude, exhibit his College to the 
inevitable onlooker in any way by 
which the College may be judged as 
mean or low or cheap, or devoid of 
gentility or a just pride in itself. 

"College Spirit" is not merely an 
enthusiastic individual spirit FOR 
the College. Its higher manifesta- 
tion is the sum total which is the ev- 
ident spirit OF the College. It is 
sometimes called by another name — 
"esprit de corps," the spirit which 
mirrors itself in the attitudes of the 
many individuals from whose united 
actions it arises. It is the devotion 
to a unified spirit which makes it im- 
possible for any individual to sacri- 
fice his own self-respect, as much for 
the effect it will have on the body to 
which he belongs as for the result on 
his own personal reputation. 

It is this peculiar and mysterious 
something which can make or break 
any institution in human society, just 
as easily as it can make or break the 
success of a football team. When 
every single individual, from least to 
greatest, recognizes that he bears a 
not inconsiderable portion of the 
College's fame and reputation as cer- 
tainly as does the backfield man who 
is entrusted with the ball, then we 
shall see an exhibition of Washing- 
ton College "esprit de corps" 
whose final effect will be to add much 
to the excellent reputation the Col- 
lege already bears among the wide 
public outside the boundaries of our 
campus. 

This is a responsibility we all bear 
equally. By one, many are judged. 
From the united actions and feel- 
ings of all comes the true and typical 
college spirit. One thoughtless or 
wilfully careless person can do more 
harm to this spirit than a dozen oth- 
ers can remedy. 

Washington College today is on 
parade, and every parade is ;■ test, 
'i he more each person contributes to 
■ i"' uei ■ of the test, the greater 
will be pin pride in his College, which, 
by his own actions he is making the 
bettt or hi pre enee in it. 

—Gilbert W. Mead. 



Reading time; For us students, the 
best time is after a meal, we can 
think best on an empty stomach. 

Mr. Donnell, Supt. of Maryland 
Prisons, speaking in assembly, mod- 
estly admitted the whole prison sys- 
tem was run through the genius of 
one man. He also helped answer the 
question what W. C. students do af- 
ter graduation. Dean Jones bristled 
at the fact that ex-convicts were em- 
ployed to teach at U. of C. Don't 
forget we have a Jesse James with 
us. 

The Gallaudet game was close — 
close to a hundred in our favor. We 
nominate Goldstein as cheer leader 
for the Gallaudet boys. 

DRIPPINGS . . Now Bob Clifford 
should write a column, so he can men- 
tion other people . Note to Red- 
dish — bald headed men in New York 
are renting out their heads as adver- 
tising space . . . All last summer, 
Gardiner went to a camp, and it was 
C. C. C. Gardiner, now he's out to 
get a high index, and it's B. B. B. 
Gardiner (Beat Bill Baker) .... 
Jean, Dickie, arid Flicker must have 
read somewhere about the good de- 
rived from "casting your bread," and 
so they tried it. They are suffering 
terribly from their punishment. . . . 
Looks like the chairman of the Co- 
tillion Club is going to be slightly in- 
disposed If it's not Elmer, it's 
Kilby, everybody wants to know 
"where's my Kilby?" We suggest 
"Oasis" Taylor, both have plenty of 
dates. . . . 

AS WE SEE THEM "Bud" 

Wilson — the funniest man at a barn 
dance "Zeke" Taylor — the dum- 
my on the ventriloquist's lap . . 
"Lee" Dolan — Santy Claus with his 
whiskers shaved off "Mimi" Skin- 
ner — Mrs. Skinner's little girl grown 
up "Joe" Freedman — a rabbi with 
the jitters . Mrs. Bontz — the hap- 
py ending to a cannibal's dream . . 

Now that Rhodes is manager at the 
cafe, the title "Horsethief" applies 
better than ever to hirn. Not for noth- 
ing did Dick Saylor get the Bell 
Haven waiting list changed around. 

The photographer wrote in to 
"Pots" Chambers asking him to give 
them permission to use his picture by 
renting it out* to farmers of the dis- 
trict the farmers claim it would 
keep the boll weevils out of their 
crops. 

The Reid Hallites are petitioning 
for more lights so they can raise 

their "scholastic standard." 



COTILLION CLUB HOLDS 
FIRST DANCE OCT. 2 6 



New Members Assure Success 
Of Autumnal German 



The Cotillion Club held its first foi- 
mal meeting of the year on Thursday, 
October 11, 1934, in Miss Bell's of- 
fice. Plans for the ensuing season 
were made and the chairman for the 
first dance selected. As in former 
years the first dance, which will be 
held on Friday, October 26, is called 
the "Autumnal German" and is spon- 
sored by the Cotillion Club itself. 
The following dances will each be 
sponsored by a class and the Christ- 
mas Cotillion may have such a name 
as the "Freshman Hop.'' 

The Club is at present seeking the 
entertainment of the "Haverfota- 
ians*\ who, as many remember, were 
popularly received when they played 
here last year and all indications 
point to their coming next Friday 
night. 

There has been a steady inflow "f 
members to the club thus far and the 
pro ipects for better orchestras, bet- 
ti i' decorations, and better all-around 
land ; -''in vary bright. 



SATURDAY, OCT. 20, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



PROBABLE LINE-UPS 

JOHNS HOPKINS 



IS 

VAN ORMAN 

R. E. 



S 

SALTERS 

L. E. 



CALLOWAY 
R. H. B. 

16 
ORTH 
R. T. 



15 
KILBY 
L. T. 

11 
BERRY 
L. H. B. 



15 

ZERiLLI 

F. B. 



12 

McCLEAN 

Q. B. 



PHILLIPS 
R. G. 



HALBERT 
C. 



GARDINIA 
L. G. 



WASHINGTON 



17 
WARD 
L. G. 



LORD 
C. 



TIGNOR 
R. G. 



14 

HUFFMAN 

F. B. 



3 

GREIMS 

Q. B. 



5 
KELLY 
L. H. B. 

19 
ELLIS 
L. T. 



25 

DWYER 

R. T. 

23 

NICHOLSON 

R. H. B. 



10 

PASSAREW 

L. E. 



21 

BILANCIONI 

R. E. 



SKIPPING OVER 
THE SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 





1st 


2nd 


3rd 


4th 


Total 


Washington 












Johns Hopkins 













JOHN HOPKINS: 13— CANNING; 6— VINCENT; 11— BISHOP; 12— MERSON; 8— McGUIRE; 22— NO- 
VAK; 36 — JENKINS; 7 — HOUCK; 9 — GALLOWAY; KAHL; HELLIJAS. 
WASHINGTON: 4 — BRANDT; 19— BAKER; 7 — WILMOT; 16 — JONES; 2 — BENHAM; 10 — MYGATT; 

12 — ANDERSON; 24— SKIPP; 6— McDORMAN; — SAYLOR; 8— YOUNG; 20— EVANS; 

PRATT; DAVIS. 



It surely must have been a grand 
and glorious feeling for alumni and 
friends of Washington College to 
look in the sport section of the Sun- 
day papers and see, Washington Col- 
lege 51, Gallaudet 0. Yes sir, to 
open the local football season with a 
win is a novelty. Until very recent- 
ly it was the Maroon and Black who 
served as a warm-up opponent for 
some large university. To express 
it mildly, football at Washington 
College has advanced tremendously 
under the guidance of Coach Ekaitis. 
Two seasons ago a Maroon and Black 
aggregation won its first game in 
many starts by defeating Gallaudet 
6 to 0. Last year a stronger Gallau- 
det team was beaten 48 to 0, and 
Haverford was also defeated. The 
scores in all the other games were 
very close. Now the present eleven 
is at the threshold of a banner sea- 
son. It has good coaching, weight, 
power in the field, and plenty of 
spirit. 

Last Saturday was a big day for 
most of our future opponents. Dela- 
ware scored a 14 to win over Juni- 
ata. Susquehanna trimmed Haver- 
ford 12 to 0. By the way, our team 
meets both of these teams later in 
the season. 

Judging from last Saturday's game, 
it looks as though Johns Hopkins has 
served notice to our Eastern Sho' 
gridmen that they aren't as bad off 
as Baltimore critics will have you be- 
lieve. Those Blue Jays done stepped 
right up and held a strong Lehigh 
team to a 7 to 6 score. And even 
then the engineers needed a gift pen- 
alty to come out on top. Today's 
game will be a hard struggle, but our 
boys have become victory minded, 
and it will take an exceptional John 
Hopkins team to change their present 
mood. 




apger Rough Cut 



... m a 
common - sense 
package — 10c 




T 

I'm glad 1 live in a country 

where a dime is money 

-and where I can get 
good pipe tobacco" 



THE tobacco which we 
believe is best suited 
for pipes is used in making 
Granger Rough Cut. 

It is made by the Wellman 

Process, and we believe that 

it will compare favorably 

with higher priced tobaccos. 

We wish, in some way, tie 

could get every man who smokes 

a pipe to just try Granger. 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



) 1934, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



the pipe tobacco that's MILD 
the pipe tobacco that's COOL 

—/<> /is seem to like H 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 20, 1934 



FOOT BALL 

by George Ekaitis 




Chemical Warfare Topic Of 
Chemistry Society Program 



Today is THE PAY!!-! Pitt may 
plav Minnesota, Navy may play Col- 
umbia, and Western Maryland may 
plav Boston College, but we play- 
Johns Hopkins! This same v>ill not 
be the picnic last Saturday turned out 
to be. It will be a football game 
worth going a long way to see. Hop- 
kins served notice as to the power 
thev have been concealing by hold- 
ing Lehigh to a 7 to 6 score. (And 
Lehigh was lucky to win.) Incidental- 
ly that Lehigh team happened to be 
rated as the best thai school has had 
since 1916. So contrary to early re- 
ports. Hopkins has plenty of what it 
rakes to make a football team. In 
McLean they have a real triple- 
threat man. Calloway is another tine 
back, especially adept on defense and 
receiving passes. A line that will 
match ours in weight and speed. This 
game Dromises to be as hard fought 
as any battle presented on the "big 
league" gridirons. 

A few words about last Saturday's 
game with Gallaudet. It was hardly 
a fair test as to the merit of those 
striving for various positions. But 
it did bring forth the excellent all- 
around work of Elton Wilmot, a 



freshman, in the backfield. The work 
of the entire squad was very pleas- 
ing, and the zest with which the boys 
tackled the correction of mistakes ap- 
parent in that game bodes no good 
for Hopkins. 

The victory over Gallaudet was 
costly, as Nicholson and Huffman 
suffered injuries to their shoulders. 
Whether these will have responded by 
| today is problematical, if not, their 
I loss will be heavy. It is also an op- 
! en question whether Skipp or Wil- 
mot will be in shape to play against 
Hopkins, as both had been ill the I 
early part of the week and as a result 
are a little weak. Regardless of who 
will start the game today, Washing- 
ton will have a hard charging line 
and hard running backfteld on the 
field. 

The interest shown by the admin- 
istration and the student body to the 
extent of closing school for today and 
going in a body to Baltimore is very 
gratifying to the football squad and 
to Mr. Kibler and myself. With 
this whole hearted support, the team 
will surely extend itself to enable the 
trip back on the boat to be a celebra- 
tion ride. 



The "Washington Chemical Socie- 
ty" began its program of the year, 
Tuesday evening, October 16th, in 
William Smith Hall, with the deliver- 
ing of several papers by 'members of 
the group. The mam topic was the 
important role which chemistry plays 
in the drama of modern warfare. 
Gilbert Ingersoll delivered a paper 
on "Chemical Warfare" in which he 
explained some of the synthetic pro- 
cesses for the manufacture of those 



poisonous gases. 



which were used dur- 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331 -M 



ing the World War. 

Harold McCrone presented a paper 
on "Military Explosions' in which he 
outlined the classes of explosions, 
their various uses, their basic the- 
ories, and their characteristics. 

Francis Bratton delivered a hum- 
orous and interesting talk on a little 



LeCATES 
BARBER 



BROS. 
SHOP 



Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



Up To The Minute 


Coif f 


u r e s 


PARK 
BEAUTY 


ROW 
SHOPPE 


Phone 334-306 Park Row 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Types of 
Contraction 

Phone Chestertown 305 




H O L D E N ' S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



GRAY BEAUTY SOLON 

Reasonable New Fall Prices. 

Watch announcement, of 
Special, each month. Starting 
October 6th for the month of 
October on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sham- 
poo and Finger Wave 75c. 



Regular 
Saturday. 






Friday and 



Over Jefferson's Store 
Phone: Chesterlown 106 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERGER'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



PHIUIPJ 



(TOMATO 

isoup-r 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



known phase of the life of the great 
German poet Goethe, namely, his 
many simple but important discover- 
ies in the field of chemistry. 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety First 

F. G. Usilton, Pres. 

L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 





RADIO SUPPLY CO. 




Rad 


os, Washing Machi 


les, 


Sew 


ing Machines. Repairs 


for 


all 


makes of radios. Records 


and 


Sheet Music. 




Lus 


by Moffett, F. W. Smith 
Phone 111J 


Jr. 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in. Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



MAKE YOUR CAR 

A COLLEGIATE ONE! 

A complete accessory line 

Goodrich Tires 

STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

331 High St. 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
23c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 
Town 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M„ 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And AH Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



SATURDAY, OCT. 20, 1934 



Washington Eleven 
Swamps Gallaudet 

by William Kight 

The Maroon and Black gndders 
proved to be quite a formidable ag- 
gregation when they swamped Gal- 
laudet by the score of 51 to 0, Sat- 
urday, October 13. Possessing a 
much heavier team, the locals quick- 
ly marched down the field and across 
the goal line; Huffman took the ball 
over with a hard smash off-tackle. 
Gallaudet elected to kick off and, af- 
ter a few plays, a beautiful pass, 
Berry to Salters, netted the second 
score of the game for Washington. 

Nicholson and Wilmot scored in the 
second and the team marched on 
with Greims and Nicholson scoring 
in the third quarter. 

By this time Coach' Ekaitis had 
one substitute after another going in, 
but even they could not be stopped. 
Long runs by Wilmot and Young, to- 
gether with the passes thrown by 
Berry accounted for two more touch 
downs. 

The visitors threatened only once, 
that coming late in the fourth quar- 
ter when an intercepted pass put the 





After An Evening of Hard 




Study Refresh Yourself at the 




CAFETERIA CANTEEN 




All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 




dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 




Ice Cream 



ball on Washington's fifteen yard 
line. However, they were unable to 
score. 

Altogether the team played well to- 
gether and the plays went off with 
clocklike precision. One of the most 
outstanding performers of the day 
was Wilmot, substitute back, whose 
hard running through the line gain- 
ed much ground during the second 
period. Berry was never better in 
throwing passes, two of which result- 
ed in scores. Huffman and Nichol- 
son acquited themselves creditably 
with their hard running through the 
line. 

The line proved to be equally ef- 
fective on both offense and defense. 
Ward played his usual game at 
guard while Kilby, a first year man, 
showed to advantage at tackle. Mc- 
Dorman, who relieved Johnny Lord 
at center, played a bang-up game and 



TH E WASHINGTON ELM 

will probably see more service this 
year. 

The lineup and summary: 
Gallaudet Washington 

N. Brown ... R.E Baker 

Miller R.T Skipp 

Gamblin R.G Ward 

J. Davis C Lord 

McCord L.G Tignor 

Ladner L.T Dwycr 

Drake L.E Bilancioni 

Kruglitsch . . . J.B Greims 

Akin L.H Berry 



PAGE FIVE 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 
C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidairc, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



Nicholson 
Huffman 



13 13 13—51 
0—0 



Hoffmeister . . R.H. 
C. Davis F.B. 

Score by periods: 

Washington 12 

Gallaudet 

Touchdowns — Huffman, Nicholson 
(2), Salter, Greims (2), Wilmot, 
Young. Points after touchdown — 
Berry (2, placekick), Huffman. Sub- 
stitutions — Gallaudet, Goodin, Talli- 
pon, Calligon, Collins, Tucker, Stan- 
fel; Washington: Kilby, Salter, Jones, 



Wilmot, Young, Pratt, Benham, Mc- 
Dorman, Towner, Mygatt, Brandt, 
Van New Kirk, Anderson, Davis. 
Refeiee — Bradley, Temple. Head 
linesman — Bowman, Syracuse. Um- 
pire — Hausm&n, Piinceton. 



£f c li m i fc t s ]& f t r 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chester-town, Md. 



"The Bank Where 

Yon Feel At Home' 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



±Wi 



air enou 




THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



FROM time to time we tell you facts 
about Chesterfield Cigarettes.- 
We say that Chesterfields are different 
from other cigarettes — that the tobaccos 
are different, the paper is different, and 
the way they are made is different. 
Everything that modern Science knows 



about or that money can buy is used in 
making Chesterfield a milder, better-tast- 
ing cigarette — a cigarette that Satisfies. 

You can prove what we 

tell you about Chesterfield. 

May we ask you to try them 
— that would seem to be fair enough. 




?>mmm:m:» 





i£fry*M& 



the cigarette that's MILDER 
the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



(9.Y&**- — 



MONDAY 

ROSA 

PONSELLE 



WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 
NINO CRETE 

MARTINI STUECKGOLD 



) 



© 19M. Licgbtt & Mybiis Tobacco Co. 



KOSTELANETZ ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS 
9 P. M. (E. S. T.) -COLUMBIA NETWORK 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 20, 1934 



DOIN'S 



The first football game of the sea- 
son brought a large number of alum- 
nae trouping. It was certainly nice 
to see old friends filling the stands. 
Dottie Kimble and Ruble Ryan. El- 
len Flick, Walter Rees. "Semi" Hol- 
linsworth, Elizabeth Brice, Dick 
Camber. Helen Harris, Burdette Nut- 
tie, Emory Burkhardt, Lucille Rasin, 
Bertha Folk. Bert Hastings, Pat 
Beasman and Patience Pyle did some 
healthy cheering. The old school 
marms and masters, Anne Kreeger 
and Charlie Clark, Jack Smithson, 
Joe OTarrell, and Fred Usilton left 
their respective children to be here. 

The Victory "W" Dance that night 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



After a Studious Day- 
Visit 
JIM AND HICK'S 
BILLARD PARLOR 



was a howling success due to the un- 
tiring efforts of President Ward. 
During intermission, the Chester- 
town Restaurant did a good business. 
The prospects of this week end 
have put everyone in such a good 
humor that it is doubtful if the old 
"Tub" will make the other shore. We 
feel sorry for Baltimore that night, 
when Washington College students 
will be wandering around, loose. We 
are having some trouble in finding a 
place big enough to hold the frolic- 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITH'S KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



Bennetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies* 
Ready - to - Wear 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



some, rocking, joyous students after 
the game. It is to be hoped that the 
team will be allowed to remain over 
for the fun. 

While the Western Sho' is getting 
an eye-ful of the Eastern Sho' Stomp, 
the Dean of Women will entertain at 
Reid Hall the Misses Ida M. Ander- 
son and Margaret Henry, who are as- 
sociated with St. Catherine's School. 

Mrs. Naomi Tawes Hall, mother of 
Elizabeth Hall spent the night at Reid 
Hall last Tuesday. Mrs. Hall made 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



Men's and Ladies' 

SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



favorable comments concerning the 
atmosphere in the Hall and expressed 
her intention to repeat her visit. It 



is most gratifying to the Dean and 
to the girls that such an impression 
has been created. 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF OCTOBER 22-27 

MONDAY - TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22-23 
MAE WEST in 

"BELLE OF THE NINETIES" 

with 

ROGER PRYOR -- JOHN MACK BROWN 

DUKE ELLINGTON and ORCHESTRA 

Also — Comedy, Cartoon, Novelty. 

WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY, OCT. 24-25 
HAROLD LLOYD in 

"THE CAT'S PAW" 

Also — Cab Calloway in "Hi De Ho," Scrappy 
Cartoon, Novelty Reel. 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26-27 
DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

TIM McCOY in 

"VOICE IN THE NIGHT" 



LEE TRACY - HELEN MORGAN 
in 

"YOU BELONG TO ME" 



Good Taste/ 




"It's toasted" 

▼ J*mr AbrMf pnUttt** — ageinit irritation — againit mmtk 



J_/uckies are round, Luckies are 
firm, Luckies are fully packed 
with only the clean center leaves — these are the 
mildest leaves — they cost more — they taste better. 



Keep the Record Clean; 
Beat Mt. St. Mary's 



The^'S^EIm 



Prepare For 
Gala Homecoming 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 6. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1934 



FALL COTILLION 
OPENS SEASON 



Paul Wilkinson's Orchestra 
Plays At First Formal 

From the originality and efforts of 
Mr. John Mead grew the first Cotil- 
lion of the year, held last night in the 
gymnasium. It was acclaimed as one 
of the most enjoyable and entertain- 
ing dances ever given on the Hill. The 
atmosphere and spirit was such that 
as soon as one stepped through the 
door, he was filled with expectation 
of a good time. 

A most life-like Scarecrow pointed 
the way to the dressing rooms. Be- 
yond him, at the far end of the floor 
loomed up a huge pumpkin with leer- 
ing eyes and rakish grin. The orches- 
tra stand at the side of the gym was 
decorated with a background of green 
drapes and a yellow and green base. 
Flying witches ascended toward a 
large yellow moon at the top and 
within the stand stood Mr. Paul Wil- 
kinson, leading his nine piece orches- 
tra straight into the hearts and feet 
of his listeners. The windows were 
artistically covered with orange and 
black paper, with pumpkins in the 
center of each of them. Orange paper- 
covered lights gave out a soft and 
mellow glow, intermittent with dark 
shadows cast by intriguing spider 
webs. The scene was one of beauty 
and gaiety. 

In the middle of the third dance, 
Mr. Wilkinson attracted the atten- 
tion of the dancers to the huge pump- 
kin at the end of the floor. The cur- 
ious audience formed a semi-circle a- 
round it, whispering expectantly. A 
gleam of a knife, a tearing of paper, 
and thru the center of the pumpkin 
stepped President Joseph Mooney and 
Miss Jean Harshaw. Mr. Wilkinson 
introduced Mr. Mooney and Miss 
Harshaw and one by one, the other 
officers of the Cotillion Club and their 
dates stepped through the opening. 
Mr. Sam Linthicum and Miss Vir- 
ginia Foley, Mr. William Long and 
Miss Isabel North, Mr. Allan Broug- 
ham and Miss Jane Youse, Mr. George 
DeSocio and Miss Doris Unruh, Mr. 
John Littell and Miss Willa New- 
nam, Mr. Robert Clifford and Miss 
Dorothy Clarke, and Mr. Lawrence 
Yourtee and Miss Doris Bell com- 
pleted the members. 

The original way of presentation 
was suggested and planned by Mr. 
John Mead. 

During intermission, the Phi Sigma 
Phi Fraternity was host to the Guests 
of Honor, Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert W. 
Mead, the chaperones, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Goodwin, Mr. and Mrs. Win- 
ton Tolles, Miss Amanda Bradley and 
the new officers of the Cotillion Club 
and their dates. 



Activities Committee 

Announces Dance Date 



PRESIDENT MEAD 
SPENDS BUSY WEEK 



The Student Activities Committee 
met Tuesday, October lGth to decide 
upon a date for the presentation of 
the Silver Pentagon Society's Infor- 
mal for November. 

Since Saturday, November 3rd is 
Homecoming Day, that evening was 
appointed. 

At the same time, the Activities 
Committee scheduled the production 
of the Dramatic Club's play "Jonesy" 
for Thursday evening, November 21. 

Dr. Fred G. Livingood, president of 
the Student Activities Committee, 
announced that that organization will 
continue its policy of previous years, 
i. e. each of the major activities will 
be permitted to present one dance 
every year. 

The Activities Committee will not 
meet again until the first Tuesday, in 
November. 



Sees Inaugurations At Berea, 
O., And Annapolis 



President Mead found the latter 
part of last week very full if not 
particularly exciting or interesting. It 
was not, however, entirely devoid of 
excitement. 

On Wednesday Dr. Mead travelled 
to Berea, Ohio, for Thursday's in- 
stallation of President Louis C. 
Wright of Baldwin-Wallace College. 
The feature of the day was a con- 
ference on Trends in Higher Educa- 
tion. The principal speakers were 
President G. H. Wilkins, of Oberlin, 
President W. P. Tolley, of Alle- 
gheny, and Dean W. W. Charters, of 
Ohio State University. 

On his return President Mead pre- 
pared to attend the installation of 
W. W. Woodcock as president of St. 
Johns College at Annapolis on Sat- 
urday. Mrs. Mead accompanied her 
husband at these exercises, at which 
President Woodcock, an honorary 
LL. D., of Washington College last 
June, wore the Washington College 
hood. Governor Ritchie officially in- 
stalled Mr. Woodcock in an impres- 
sive ceremony attended by many 
delegates from colleges of this and 
of neighboring states. 

From these exercises Dr. Mead pro- 
ceeded to the Washington College- 
Johns Hopkins football game at 
Homewood field in Baltimore and 
saw the gridmen of his college de- 
feat those of the large university. Dr. 
Mead is positive that nothing in his 
week's activities gave him more 
pleasure. 



GERMAN DEPARTMENT 
TO GIVE SCHURZ AWARD 



The famous Carl Schurz Memorial 
Foundation for the promotion of bet- 
ter German- American relations, has 
presented six volumes of Goethe's 
best works to Washington College to 
be used as a reward in a contest car- 
ried on by the German Department. 

It will be remembered that Candler 
Lazenby, traveling representative of 
the Foundation, who is directly re- 
sponsible for this offer, was the first 
speaker on last year's assembly pro- 
gram and that the renowned Max 
Montour, .under the auspices of the 
Foundation, gave several readings 
here later in the year. 

The prize will be awarded on 
competetive basis, the exact nature of 
which is still undecided. The possi- 
bilities that have been suggested are 
an essay on some phase of Goethe ; 
readings from German, or recitation 
of German poetry. 

The award will probably be made 
at Commencement. More complete 
details will be given later. 

It has also been announced that 
the German Department is arranging 
other contests to stimulate interest 
in the language. 



Large Audience Sees 
Freshman Program 

Approximately one hundred and 
fifty students attended one of the 
best freshmen entertainments ev>r 
sponsored by the Mount Vernon Lit- 
erary Society when the class of 1938 
presented its program Thursday even- 
ing in the auditorium of William 
Hall. The tonstmaster was William 
Doering. 

At the next meeting, which will be 
the last open session of the -'Kin.-, 
the program will be put on by the 
three new faculty menlbei'B. Also. at 
this time the society will vote on new 
members who have submitted their 
applications for membership. 



FOUNDER ' S DAY officers elected 
CELEBRATED]™* BI ^- GY CLUB 



New Organization Formed By 
Interested Students 



Dr. G. A. Bunting Presents 
'91 Memorial Plaque 

Washington College observed 
Founder's Day on October 25, 1934, 
by an assembly in William Smith 
Hall. The work of organization in 
1782 under the first president, Rev. 
William Smith, was reviewed by Dr. 
Gilbert W. Mead. Mr. C. Edward 
Duffy, '24, of Wilmington, Delaware, 
made the principal address. Dr. 
George A. Bunting, '91, of Baltimore, 
Md., introduced Dr. Robert L. Swain 
who presented a plaque commemor- 
ating the class of 1891. Birthday 
gifts from alumni and friends were 
acknowledged by the president. 

The plaque commemorating the 
class of 1891 was given to Washing- 
ton College by Dr. George A. Bunt- 
ing. Dr. Bunting, a graduate of for- 
ty-three years ago, and prominent 
manufacturer of Baltimore, renewed 
old associations at the college. The 
maples that he helped to plant are 
now shading the campus and his old 
room in Middle Hall was still vague- 
ly familiar. 

Dr. Bunting, modestly calling Judge 
Robert F. Duer "the most distinguish- 
ed member of the class of 1891," ar- ' eral people have submitted articles, I back last year, 
ranged for the Judge to dedicate the j to be used when the club is again call- ' However, with such a line in front of 
plaque. As court was in session, Dr. | ed together. An announcement of them, their backs should give our 
Bunting requested Dr. Robert S. j the time for the next meeting will be | team plenty to worry about. 
Swain to act for the Judge. Dr. posted on the bulletin-board, and thei 
Swain, friend of Dr. Bunting and his ! organization is open to everyone in-' 



On Tuesday afternoon, October 
23rd, a meeting was called for all 
persons interested in the formation 
of a Biology Club or Biological Socie- 
ty, at which approximately thirty- 
five students were present, and a dis- 
cussion was held concerning certain 
technical aspects of the organization. 

The meeting was called through 
the efforts of a small group of Biology 
students who have had in their mind 
for some time such a club, and who, 
because of Dr. Carpenter's approval 
and interest, were determined to test 
the reaction of the other students in- 
terested in the subject. 

The students present elected the 
following officers for the ensuing 
year: 

President, Ivon E. Culver; Vice- 
President, Leland B. Stevens; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Emerson P. Slacum. 

A program committee was also 
elected, consisting of representatives 
from each of the four classes. Al- 
ready, an interesting meeting is be- 
ing planned for Novembe: 



PRICE TEN CENTS 

GRIDMEN^iSIT 
MT.ST.MARY'S 

Maroon Backfield Has Edge 
On Mounts 



With an improved running attack 
and hard charging line the Washing- 
ton College eleven is out to avenge 
last year's defeat when it meets 
Mount St. Mary's this afternoon on 
the Mountaineers' field. The boys 
from Emmitsburg won a 19 to 6 vic- 
tory last fall, but today's encounter 
will find the Sho'men better prepar- 
ed, and Coach Ekaitis' charges are 
conndent of turning the tables. 

Mounts Made Good Showing 
On paper the Mounts 1 record is 
very misleading. They were beaten 
by Georgetown, Canisius, and Gettys- 
burg, but the showings they made in 
all these contests stamps them as one 
of the best teams in the state. Mount 
dt. Mary's has r.lways boasted of & 
strong line and this year's line is no 
exception. In Sullivan at end the 
Mountaineers have a smart, fast, vet- 
eran who is ably assisted by Farmer, 
McSride, and Gillespie. 

Hopkins Out Of Lineup 

Their backfield on the other hand 

does not come up to the standard of 

last year's. This is mostly due to 

and sev-lthe fact that Hopkins, an all state 



terested in the subject, 
■oo — 



Washington Line Ready 

No doubt the Washington line is in 
for a bruising battle today, but Cap- 
tain Dwyer, Ward, Lord, and the oth- 

HOMECOMING DAY TO Be'ZZ^V^L^^^ 

An academy exisited in Chester-| OBSERVED NEXT WEEK thin ^ eas >' a11 week s0 as '™ be able 

to give everything they have against 



Alma Mater, is president of the Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association. His 
son Robert is a sophomore at the col- 
lege. 



town for seventy-five years prior to 
the founding of Washington College 
although its beginning is shrowded in 
obscurity. Rev. William Smith came 
from Philadelphia College, now the 
University of Pennsylvania, as rector 
of the Chester Parish Church. Dif- 
ferences of opinion led him to leave 
Philadelphia College which be had 
helped to found and where he had 
served as the first Provost of that in- 
stitution. 

In May 1782 the Maryland legis- 
lature passed an act authorizing the 
establishment of a college at Ches- 
tertown. Sufficient endowment con- 
tributions were solicited during the 
summer by Dr. Smith to enable the 
first board of Visitors and Governors 
to meet on October 15, 1782. George 
Washington became a member of this 
first board, contributed to the endow- 
ment, attended the commencement of 
1784, and gave his name to the new 
institution. 

Mr. Duffy, a graduate of the class 
of 1924, is Assistant States Attorney 
of Delaware and a law partner of 
United States Senator Hastings. He 
pointed out the significance of Found- 
er's Day and the work of the College 
in the formation of permanent habits 
by the students. "The college, in 
four years gives the last period of 
training which determines the course 
of a man's life" said Mr. Duffy, "and 
he should be trained to serve the 
community as well as ad\anee him- 
self." 



Homecoming Day will be observed the Mounts - 
.„ c af ,,„i^„ xr . ^ . , J The Maroon and Black backfield 

on baturday, November o m honor of t, j *. , , ,_- , 

has an edge over the rival backfield, 
the returning "old grads." and this should really decide the is- 

For their entertainment a football 'sue today. It is up to the backs to 
game will be played with an old rival,] take advantage of most of the break 
Susquehanna. This game of course] 
will be held in the afternoon and ' 



because both lines will be evenly 
matched. Huffman, who has recov- 
ered from his injury in the Hopkins 
plans are now being made by Dean 1 game, with Billy Nicholson as a run- 



Charles Dole Undergoes 
Operation In Washington 



Jones, Alumni Secretary, for a very 
informal get-together dinner in the 
evening following the game. 

Celebrations for an expected vic- 
tory are being prepared by the Stu- 
dent Council and the Silver Pentagon 
Society. The Frosh will have ample 
opportunity to show their ability in 
woodcraft as a large bonfire will 
be ignited in one of the surrounding 
fields on Friday night. 

Saturday evening under the direc- 
tion of the Silver Pentagon Society 
a dance will be given in the gymnas- 
ium. This affair perhaps will serve 
a duel purpose inasmuch as a form of Olsewski 
entertainment for the alumni and as 
e. victory dance for the football team. 

Along with the visiting alumni, 
many high school students from the 
Eastern Shore will attend the game 
as guests of the athletic association. 
These young visitors will be seated 
with the college body and an effort 
will be made by the cheer leaders to 
include them in the cheers and songs. 
This will be a novel undertaking and 
naturally will be looked upon by the 
athletic association and the student 
body with a keen interest. 



ning mate, should be counted on for 
many needed gains, Charlie Berry 
and "Gib" Young are the key men 
in today's encounter. Berry wiil 
carry the brunt of the extensive pass 
attack that will be used, while 
Young's speed is counted on to get 
him into the clear on most of the 
plays especially used for today's 
game. 

The probable line-ups: 



Mt. St. Mary's 


Washington 


Sullivan .... 


L.E. . 


Salter 


McBride .... 


L.T. 


Skipp 


Gillespie ... 


L.G. 


Ward 


Farmer . . . 


C. . 


Lord 


Mendelis . . 


R.G. 


Tignor 


Olsewski 


. R.T. . 


Dwver 


Tosick . 


R.E. 


Bilancioni 


Reilly 


Q.B. . 


Young 


Lynch 


L.H. 


Berry 


Norris 


R.H. 


Xiiholson 


R. Leahy 


F.B. 


Huffman 



Dr. Dole, Head of History Depart | Qhemkal Society ShoWS 

nient, was called to the University 
Hospital at Washington, D. C, on 
Wednesday night. Her son, Charles 
Dole, formerly of Washington Col- 
ego ami now a student at. University 
if Maryland, was stricken with ap- 
pendicitis ainl was operated on Wed- 
nesday evening. 



Football Relations With 
St. Johns May Be Resumed 



uci i i mi and he is re< overing. 



The Athletic Administration al 
Washington College recently an- 
nounced that negotiations with m. 
John's College, Annapolis, Maryland) 
have been opened regarding a renew- 
ill of football relationships. 
The Washington athletic i 

ties are making an effort to ar 

cellar meeting of the Wash- things so that St. John's will 

Chemical Society al Chos tertOWn one ye;u and Delaware 

:■ giviitj ■ 

test Tor the annual Hon 
" ■ ion each year. 



Film " Romance 01 Rubber' 

The 
ington 

7 o'clock in the evening of Tuesday. 

Octobei 30, will feature the showing 

The operation was] of two reels of a scientific motion pic- 



ture, tlu- "Romance of Rubber.*' 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1934 



played. Spirit, and energy, and the 
joy of conquest ha? been instilled : " 
Published weekly by and for the to the team, and the coache 



The Washbgron Elm 



should 



.' , ■ ,. ilreadv «ee the tangible results of 
interests of .he student body, tacuh, *•* -^t ,£ m ^^ 

and alumni of Washington College. 



the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the I'nited States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md.. 1ST2 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Eniereon Sla«:m Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Frances Sileox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipr, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



like the "Farmers" (fanner may not 
be as euphonic a term as "blue jay," 
but at least it is applied to men who 
can properly play football), with the 
spirit of the Maroon and Black, and 
with the moral support of the College 
united, cannot be stopped. The de- 
fear of Hopkins was characterized by 
headword as well as handwork and 
footwork, and showed once more the 
superiority of the small college, 
whose unified spirit aided in the van- 
quishing athletically of a university 
six times its size. Despite the char- 
acteristic tendency of the press to 
emphasize the individual's part in the 
trsme. the contest was most happily 
notable for the excellent teamwork ! the U. of M.that the leading organ. 



TODAY 

Today climbs up the hill 

Like an old man 

Tired, content with work complete, 

Lonely under the cold, clear autumn 

moon. 
If you were here 

Today would run lightly up the slope 
Along a path of scar let-tinted trees 
To meet the first bright evening star. 

( — Kam. in The Antiochian, An- 
tioch College). 

We see by "The Diamondback" of 



Entered at the Chestertown. Md., Lf trie Eleven. It is this quality of 
matter, j unse lfish coordination, combined 
i year, vrith a strengthening of the offensive, 
■ that shall mean always greater vic- 
„.. tories in this season, for "the die is 

1934 oa5T — Jacta est alea ' 



postoffice as second class 
Subscription price. Si. 50 a 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 



TRADITIONS SHATTERED 
It is a hard and bitter thing to shat- 
ter traditions of ancient standing. 
An accepted custom of the land is 
that a college body far from home. 
in a city, unrestrained, and eye-wit- 
nesses of the greatest football vic- 
tory of its college in more than a de- 
cade should disgrace itself and its 
college by every ingenious means 
known to the fertile mind of youth. 
However, amirabile dictu, some 
one hundred and fifty Washington 
College students in these circum- 
stances did nothing of the sort. It 
was a fine thing to see how nearly 
like ladies and gentlemen they con- 
ducted themselves, especially those 
who returned on the ship Annapolis, 
■which was little more than a nutshell 
when it docked at Tolchester. A lit- 



for 
alumni. The I 
hich will be the ; , 
of the season, will 



attractive to many graduates Gi th m0 n sition: I love vou. I , their faces in. and the fun began.] t h e students can, and then they have 

... .< It 1 a i. •» "__ . ml_ 1 1 — ..« A tViIc- nvnu-rl \l'OC|ti i-i. _ j:_U_i: I ..1 „„,.,,,.« „-F rnnrlni, no 



THE ALUMNUS AND THE UNDER- 
GRADUATE 
A week from today marks the an 

nual Homecoming Week-end 
Washington College 
Susquehanna game 
last home gam> 
prove 

who wish to see the "unbeaten team' 
perform on its own gridiron. The 
event will be marked, also, by the 
usual dances, fraternity and sorority 
receptions and perhaps special enter- 
tainment from plans of the Student 
Council. — 

Such organized returns to the cam- 
pus by a considerable body of the 
alumni are to be valued and encourag- 
ed- Xot only is a large measure of 
the ultimate control of the College 
invested in them, but also they can do 
much to influence wisely the under- 



zations on the campus have joined 
in sponsoring a "Campus Conscious 
Day." as part of a campaign to stop 
cutting of the campus and promisc- 
ous throwing of trash. From the in- 
creasing amount of cowpaths (we use 
the term advisedly) and trails ap- 
pearing on our own campus, some- 
thing of the same idea might well be 
used here. It would at least save the 
erection of those unsightly chains. 



REMINISCENCES OF 
GALA HOPKINS TRIP 



Prof. Ford Does His Bit In Up- 
holding Honor Of College 



Here's a story a sophomore major- 

% in mathematics at the University 

of Minnesota told his girl friend 



Dazzled by the bright lights of the 
city, still panting from dodging traf- 
fic, and a little white as a result of 
their ride on the top of a Charles 
Street Bus, the better seven-eights of 
Washington College assembled at 
Homewood last Saturday to see their 
college win a glorious football game 
oyer Johns Hopkins. If any of the 
alumni were not present, it was be- 
cause they didn't happen to be on thi: 
continent at the time. 

We timed that 101 yard run of Gib 
Young's, and it is our firm belief he 
did it in four and a half seconds flat 
although our Ingersoll special may 
have stopped once or twice. Our 
team may be "farmers." but we sure 
showed them we could plough Hop 
kins under. We can only remember 
closing our mouth once during the 
game, and that was for the purpose 
of getting worked up to a running 
start on a cheer for Huffman 

After the game, a quiet, orderly 
mob of Washington College students 
began to tear down the goalposts, 
but a group of Medicos protested by 

ntly but firmly pushing 



some of 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



Scott Beck and Goldstein after the 
game stayed over at a hotel, but not 
for good An organization to com- 
bat the Bachelor's Club is being 
formed over at Reid Hall. . . .That 
"rat" forced to Carry his hat on a pole 
as a penalty imposed by the Vigilance 
Committee reminds us of the story of 
William Tell It's surprising what 

penalties the intellects of the Soph 
class can concoct . There will be a 
hot time in the old town the night of 
the homecoming game, with the big- 
gest bonfire ever staged.. "Grant, 
omnipotent potentate" John Littell 
heads the Cardinal Club, with Mooncy 
just "potent"; let's give this club a 
big hand — or shall we give them the 
"bird"? 

That Hopkins game will be talked 
about till some of us have graduated 
from here the boat looked a hang- 

over at a monkey's cage after Henry 
Gill gave out all his peanuts. 

The true aristocrats of this school 

are the waiters over at the cafeteria 

They get to the food first, they 

can buv twice as much ice cream as 



am to prove that you love me. Here's 
the proof: 

1. I love you. 

2. I am r a lover. 

3. All the world loves a lover. 

4. You are all the world to me. 

5. Therefore you love me. 
(Note weakness — when women are 

reduced to mathematical precision — 
heh heh — you should live so long). 



The goalposts around this crowd were, the diobolical pleasure of serving us 
brought crashing down {unfortunate- , wna t is left over. 

ly on Jack Smithson's head.) Profes-j it was noble of Ella Barkley to give 
sor Ford was seen to leap over the I herself room campus for two days, as 
fence as lightly as a gazelle, in spite . a point of justice. We wonder what 



Mrs. ; 
other 



tie blowing off of steam on the upper duate generations. Ai 

deck, the proper place for such action ^ i<rhl w Morr0 w said the 
according to marine engineering day ° in ber appea i to the alumnae of 
standards, was harmless and even de- w0men » s cu }i e&e s, proper advice and 



of his wife's pleas and her restrain- 
ing hold upon his coat tails, and mad-. 
ly precipitate himself into the fray, , 
screaming something about "the hon-j 
or of the college," and waving what 
appeared to be a half empty milk bot- 
tle over his head. A committee of 
the faculty, composed of Professor 
Dumschott, Professor Coop, Dr. Rob- 
inson and Dr. Livingood, and headed 
Racket by Dean Jones, was seen heading to- 
war 



she would do if she caught 
heating at solitaire. 

oo 



CAMPUS SENTIMENT 



sirable. The students showed their 
respect for the hard work of the : 
team, and did not blaspheme the 
memory of a great game by coarse or 
Towdyish behaviour, yet there was no ! 
lack of enthusiasm. The whole trip j 



encouragement from the 
who has had experience with the con- 
flicts of a troubled world may save 
"a whole generation from bitterness." 
For the alumni to feel the responsi- 
bility for such counsel would seem to 



The "St. John's Collegian" seems 
to have solved the question of who 
will write the gab column — by print- 
ing them all. It has four chatter eol 
umns — Heathen Chinee, Bull, 
and Hoi Polloi. 

{Our next door Wine-hell (?) had ' with a gleam of resolutions 
graduate better ]ook tQ Ms laiire is_ we G nce ; eyes, but we were unable to ascer 
; heard of a man who got into ail sorts 1 tain what became of this committee 
of trouble for writing things). 



A special voluntary reporter of 
THE ELM has made a number of ob- 
servations and interviews on the cam- 
pus since the Maroon's victory over 
Hopkins and found the following 



A certain young women's college 
is making much of the fact that re- 



^".rar ^ aW ^|^^^i^» to "™ -^c^— d' statisticTsW that 



would point most directly to Admin- 
istrative sanction of more such trips 
in the future. 

The particular appreciation of the 
students for arrangement of the de- 
tails of the trip, and assumption of 
much of the financial risk involved 
goes to Dean Jones, whose personal | 
influence was a large factor in ob*i 
taining the night boat. The Dean 



interest in their college. 



CHEER THE CHEER LEADERS 
The election of responsible cheer- 
leaders at Washington College was 
merited by the organization and per- 
sistence of the cheering section at 
the Hopkins game. It is interesting 
to observe the value laid in cheering 
in several quotations from players 
appearing in today's ELM. Bride | r€ « : '/ 
was heajrdjo f e ^k m J^meenng and Zoldy deserve praise for their 
conscientious efforts to assure the 
team that the College wants it to win. 
Authorities in the matter say that 
much of the success of a cheer lead- 
er rests in his distinction physically 
from the cheering section. This is i 



ds the other goal posts, each man sentiment expressed on the subject: 

' Dwyer — The louder the cheering 

the better we feel. The students in 

, the stands and the eleven men on the 

Finally the "Sho'men" decided thcy,| ield kept that ball from pass j n g the 

didn't want the darn posts anyhow, , g ya] . d line 

and rode away in busses; while the | Rhodes — Wasn't that a swell team 
Hopkins rooters rode away in a huff. ' Saturday? 

The boat ride home that night will Tony — I'm going to get up a peti- 
sixj live long in our memory. The "An- | tion to go to all the games. 

was truly a "floating pal- Prof. Goodwin — A fine exhibition 
ace" in more ways than one. Thei f sterling sportsmanship on the part 
students certainly kept up their spir- i f the Eastern Sho'men. 
its. The singing on the third deck Huffman — I came to in time to see 

A.dd definitions I could be heard all the way down iniy oun g tearing down the field for our 

Dromedarv: Sleeping quarters f or , the basement (or whatever they call hrsi tout-liuo..-.. After that, things 
the downstairs of a boat). Many ot , went black again. 
f ez 'this group were hoarse the next day Priscilla Grainger — 1 love it. 

Skipp — When you look up in the 
stands and realize that everybody is 



men get angry an average of 

times a week, and women only three.; napoli: 

(Yeah! But who makes the men an- 
gry?) 



students. 

Fez: Countenance 



"Is my 



of his Cabinet where the plan was 
first discussed that "With a hundred 
and fifty students, I believe we could 
beat Hopkins," and results again 
show that the Dean does not make 
rash statements. 



sixty 



accomplished usually by the use of! slu ^ ent| y- 



Minaret: A colonial dance 
seconds make it. 

Harem: A word of caution, as 
"She's all right, she doesn't mean 
any harem." 

Salaam: A meat used in making 
sandwiches; term used in bridge; to [ shelled out his wares to all and sua 



(especially Dickie Metcalfe who 
sounded like a champion hog caller 
the morning after the contest) but! 
what cared they, so long as we won.j 
Henry Gill, carrying a big bag of i 
peanuts over his shoulder, and Iook-| 
much like a simian Santa Claus, 



VICTORY AND HONOR light-colored clothes. There would! < From 'Jukes Arabian Nights 

The great athletic victory of last seem to be little doubt that a figure I Temple University News.) 



Saturday, when all the sky and shin 
ing water combined to make a per- 
fect day for the happy College 



clad wholly in white stands out more 

sharply against a dark section of stu- 

on 1 dents than one with white trousers 



[dry. What a night 
j Our school has adopted a new mot 
I to since the game — "ON TO 
ROSE BOWL!" 



grasses upon it. 

Time was spent all through the j 

summer in planning the evenly-cut ■ 

new bank, until it was gotten in a. 

tiew spirit' of old Washington. This game by contrasting the red sweaters! perfectly smooth and regular condi-l 

decisive and spectacular way of the Washington leaders to * 



migration, was the crowning justi- and a dark "upper layer." This fact 
r. in the field of sport for the was observed by many at the Hopkins 

iters 

the! 



Y. M. C. A. BANQUET SET 
FOR NOVEMBER 9T H 



of showing the college world, and the I snowy whiteness of the opponents' 
world in general, that Washington ; man. Doubtless the Varsity Club, or 
College is a vital institution at work ' some other interested organization, 



and at play. It was a fitting anni- 
versary of the first year of Dr. Gil 



! will see that in the future Washing 
ton's fine cheer leaders are 



bert Mead's formal inauguration as pristinely in the color of newly-fall- 
president of the College, when, just at en snow. 



year ago to a day, Mr. Roosevelt 
came over from Washington to don 
the brilliant hood of Washington's 
of Laws. That Washington 
remains in that lordly company of 
unbeaten teams of the East. 



ANOTHER BEAUTY SPOT 

When, this past summer, Chester- 
town decided that the "woods could 
not been seen for the trees" on 
and Washington Avenue's gentle foliated 
from all indications shall remain so, slope, the authorities of the city had 
vindicates the coaches' faith and the trees that had grown too beautiful 
persistence in the training of her men removed, and nice, smooth concr'-U: 
over a period of many defeats. It put in their place. The contstruetion 
must be emphasized that although! of this concrete shoulder along the 
cation* of the entering claas avenue necessitated the cutting back 
have been larg<; and valuable, the of the College campus bank on the 
experience of the veterans, many of right hand ride of the road approach- 
then m their third and fourth years*, ing the town between Bait Hall <or- 
ia of even greater importance, and to ner and the main gateway I he teep 
them belongs much of the glory, if ' bank here had always been 



rather 
on* mart name glory as th<- r* ..nr'i nondewript formation, with a half- 
Svr work well done, r.nd a garrif nard I hearted growth of mo 



The business administration 
of the College, under whose direction 
is care of the grounds, has carefully 
supervised the preparation of the 
slope for the laying of sod. Now, 
clad I for the past week, sod has been re- 
moved from an area north of the 
heating plant and expertly laid on 
the bare earth of the bank, until an 
unsightly part of the campus has been 
transformed to a grassy inclination of 
pastoral beauty combined with for- 
mal dignity. To establish a sod on a 
steep slope is always a difficult mat- 
ter, and it is most important that sod 
thus placed not be disturbed. A sin- 
gle thoughtlesK running up or down 
on th<? bank will mean disalignment 
of the whole »ystem, since the sod is 
compo ed of a large number of small 
rectangles. It is the request of the 
Administration, and, of course, the 
public opinion of the student 
body, that thi* <ixe<dk*nt improvement 
be protected from any sort of traffic 
or w*;ar, so that it may become one 
more "beauty spot" on College Hill. 



by Marvin H. Smith 
The Y. M. C. A. has set Novem- 
ber 9th as the date for its banquet to 
be held in the banquet room of the 
Chestertown Restaurant. The fact 
that November 10 is an open date on 
the football schedule made possible 
the holding of this banquet on a Fri- 
day night. President Sadler ap- 
pointed the following committee to 
take care of the details of this affair, 
Edwin Lowe, chairman; Howard 
Clark, and William Doering. 

This banquet is the outgrowth of 
a discussion held several weeks ago on 
how the Y. M. C. A. might improvi 
its program. It was suggested that 
a banquet of this sort be held at in 
tervals throughout the year, as ; 
means of presenting variety to the 

31'dinary program of events and at 

he ■ ■ i " ime having n good time, ) 
is predicted 'h.t. thi.-, will Ik- one of 
the largsst banquets ever held at 
Washington College with from thirtj 
1 o fori y members present. 



with you, it makes you tackle harder. 

George Ekaitis — Finest squad I've 
coached. The defensive stand in- 
side our 20 yard line was very good. 
The offensive needs brushmg up. 

Kiib> -ft's great to be a Fresh- 
man at Washington College. 

Dean Jones' — Washington played 
THE better today than I have ever seen 
her play before. Everybody had a 
good time. 

Doris Unruh — That second touch- 
down was the Berry's. 

Salter — The cheering helped lots. 

Prof. Ford — I was afraid 3ome of 

.■ boys would get hurt, so I tried to 
help out by doing my bit. 

Fred Taylor — The cheering makes 
the water bucket feel lighter. 

Ward — It was the greatest battle. 



GLEE CLUB BROADCAST 
OVER STATION WDEL 



by Lawrence Williams 
The Washington College Glee Club 
under (he direction of Raymond R. 
Moffett, will present its first conceal 
of the season, December 7, over Bta- 
tion WDEL for the benefit Of th"' 
Boy Scouts of Wilmington, Delaware. 
The college quartet, selected for 
llv, year, includes Joseph A, Mooney, 
firs! tonoi*, Larry Williams, second 
tenor, Frank Jarrell, in i bae . and 
Robert Fink, second bass. Donald 
MacDorman will be the accompani I. 
At the mooting of the Glee Club mi 
October 1 8, Lawrem o Williams waa 
elected l"' linesi manager of i he 6r- 
■ iini.'.iI Ion for this yea] . 



SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



SKIPPING OVER 
THE SPORTS 

by PhM Skipp 



No doubt most of the local students 
are familial' with the following inci- 
dent, but it seems to get better with 
repetition. A day or so before the 
game with Washington College, the 
John Hopkins coach was giving his 
squad some woi'ds of encouragement. 
"Fellows," he said, "just take advant- 
age of all the mistakes those dumb 
farmers make and we'll coast to a vic- 
tory." But alas, as a prophet that 
coach turned out to be a total loss. 
For the final score read Washington 
13, Johns Hopkins 0, and the irony 
of it all is that it was blunders by the 
Blue Jay captain that led directly to 
both scores. Which all goes to show 
that those city slickers must be slip- 
ping or else the "Hicks" are getting 
smarter. Anyway, it was a sweet 
victory and a hard battle to lose. The 
lines fought each other to a stand 
still, but quick thinking by Young 
and Berry provided the margin of 
victory. 

No doubt our victory over J. H. 
made history here, but it shouldn't 
blind us to the good work done by 
other state teams. A powerful Wes- 
tern Maryland team won national 
ranking for itself by decisively de- 
feating Boston College 40 to last 
Saturday. The Navy's 18 to 7 vic- 
tory over the Rose Bowl winners was 
very pleasing to all the followers of 
the Middies. Then Maryland and St. 
John's both defeated strong oppon- 
ents. There has been some talk a- 
bout a Washington College-St. Johns 
game. So let it be said here that the 
whole Eastern Shore is heartily in 
favor of such a game if it could be 
arranged. 

Mount St. Mary's, our opponent 
for today, had a tough time of it, 
against Gettysburg last Saturday. 
The Mounts lost 2 to but only af- 
ter repeated hard breaks against 



them helped the Pennsylvania team. 
Susquehanna, whom the Maroon 
and Black meets Nov. 3, still contin- 
ued its string of victories at the ex- 
ense of Hamilton. It was another 
of those base ball scores, the count 
being 2 to 0. Haverford, on the 
other hand, does not appear to be 
very strong this fall. They were de- 
feated 21 to' 7 by Weslyan last Sat- 
urday. 

All reports that find their way here 
to Chestertown seem to be filled with 
praise for that new football team up 
at Newark, Del. Last Saturday the 
Blue Hens held a favored Hampden- 
Sydney team to a to tie. Those 
Delaware boys have been going great 
guns since the beginning of the sea- 
son, and they have yet to be beaten. 
It will be some contest when the two 
Eastern Shore rivals tangle togethe 
up in Newark late in November. 



INTERCEPTED PASSES 
PAVE WAY TO VICTORY 



MARIAN BROWN TOPS 
OWN ARCHERY SCORE 

Marian Brown again broke her last 
record. Now the top-score in points 
in archery is one hundred and forty- 
six. Many efforts are now being 
made to break even that. 

At a meeting of the Girls Athletic 
Association, Miss Bell explained the 
purpose of the organization. It has 
a president, vice-president and a sec- 
retary-treasurer. These will be elec- 
ted at a meeting this week. Also a 
Board of Managers, including the of- 
ficers, and two seniors, two juniors, 
one sophomore and one freshman 
with three members at large, must 
be elected. These girls do not nee 
essarily have to be ci'ack athletes, but 
must be ones who can be counted on 
to give impartial consideration to all 
duties of the Board. This Board has 
the selection of class teams and at 
the end of each sport season selects 
by vote an honorary varsity. Honor- 
ary varsity members are awarded a 
black old-English W with a small let- 
ter attached of the sport in which it 
was won. 



Washington Line Strong As 
Jays Use Aerial Attack 



The game with Hopkins last Satur- 
day, October 20th, was more of a 
battle than the score indicates. 

It took an alert, scrappy Washing- 
ton team to down an equally scrappy 
Hopkins eleven. For more than 
three quarters each team hammered 
at the other vainly, the ball going 
first from one end of the field to the 
other. However in the last quarter, 
Hopkins succeeded in going down to 
Washington's eight yard line mainly 
on McClean's ability to throw pass- 
es. Here the Maroon and Black line 
rallied and held Hopkins for three 
downs. On the last down McClean 
elected to pass and shot one over the 
goal line into the waiting arms of 
Gibby Young, who took the ball and 
raced the length of the field for the 
first score of the game. Effective 
blocking by "Moon" Evans helped 
make the touchdown possible. The 
try for extra point by placement fail- 
ed, the ball going wide. 

Then Hopkins kicked off and Wash- 
ington marched to the Blue Jay's for- 
ty yard line from where they kicked. 
With the ball on his own twenty yard 
line and only a few seconds to play 
McClean made a last desperate bid 
for a score and tossed another pass 
which Charley Berry tucked under 
his arm and galloped forty yards to 
add six more points to the score. 
Young calmly kicked the extra point 
from placement, and the score stood 
13 to 0. 

The whole team played good ball, 
Kilby, Dwyer and Ward starred of- 
fensively and defensively and Bilan- 
cioni played a bang-up* game at end. 
"Doc" Huffman was injured dur- 
ing the third quarter and had to be 
removed from the game. However 
his injuries were slight and he will 
probably appear in the starting lineup 
against Mt. St Mary's this week. 



FOOT BALL 

by George Ekaitis 




There may have been more spec- 
tacular battles on other gridirons, but 
not one of them was more harder 
fought than our game with Hopkins. 
Both teams played themselves out. 
In my opinion the harder charging 
line marked the difference between 
the two teams. I can think of noth- 
ing but praise for our Maroons, each 
and every one of the boys giving ev- 
erything they had, playing alert, 
heads-up football for sixty hard min- 
utes, despite the hot sun and the very 
dusty field. Praise for the line; hard 
charging, opening holes for our back- 
field, stopping the Hopkin's running 
attack by making the tackles or clear 
iug their interference so that one of 
our backs had an open shot at the 
ball carrier, rushing the passer so 
hard that towards the latter part of 
the game he was throwing the ball 
just to get rid of it. Praise for the 
backfield; running hard, blocking 
hard, backing up the line well, knock- 
ing down passes, or the receiver when 
he did get one, keeping alert, taking 
advantage of every opening that 
came their way, Praise for the en- 
tire team, working as a unit and dig- 
ging in when Hopkins got within 
scoring distance, with a "they shall 
not pass" attitude. The team would 
not be beaten, and a team that won't 
be beaten cannot be beaten. The 
boys surely earned for themselves a 
glorious victory. 

Today we meet another old rival 
in Mt. St. Mary's. Last Saturday they 
lost to a good Gettysburg team by a 
score of 2 to 0, a blocked punt being 
converted into a safety for the mar- 



gin of victory. As usual, the Mounts 
have a strong team and this game 
promises to be a dog-fight from be- 
ginning to end. The squad came 
through the Hopkins game with only 
bruises and will be in shape for a- 
nother great game today . 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel, 318 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



A man who has been 

smoking Granger for a 

long time said this: 

"A package of Granger gives 
me and my old pipe about 9 hours 
of enjoyment, 

"My pipe is about average size, 
and smoking it leisurely as I like 
to do, a pipeload of Granger lasts 
me about 25 minutes, and that 
means that I get about 21 good 
pipeloads from every package. 

"Was there ever so much enjoy- 
ment for so small a cost?" 



£> I'll-I. I.tcch-itI* MybmTob.ccoCo. 




... ire a 
common -sense 
package — 10c 



the pipe tobacco that's MILD 
the pipe tobacco that's COOL 

<«_* —jolis seem to like it 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1934 



Poetry 



Mr. Anthony. '34, who is on a voy- 
age to Puerto Rico, produced the fol- 
lowing verses recently: 

LITTLE GOLDEN GIRL 
Up the road of memory from the 

night 
There conies a little girl, 
Her sunny hair and tender face so 

slight 
Kissed by the wind in pure delight. 
The sunny air 
Is part of her. 
And in her smiles 
The glow of never-ending Spring 
Blooms fair. 

All the livelong summer day 
She sings her baby songs in childish 

art, 
With eyes aglow 
And sweetness far away — 
And fills my world with rapture to 

the heart. 

TINKLE BELL 

In the forest's deepest dell 
Tinkle, tinkle, tinkle bell, 
Where the greenest mosses grow 
Under oak and mistletoe. 
Where the lovettes blossom blue 
Siiigs the woodbird, pec-whit-iu. 
And the fairies weave a spell 
Of gossamer round tinkle bell. 



RAT HALL SEEKS 

AMUSEMENT CROWN 



fey William Doering 

Woodvow Simmons, the one-man 
barn dance, entertains (?) all who 
care to hear him every night between 
7:00 and 10:00. It is rumored that 
he is going to be on the air soon. 

This week's tragedy: Harry Kauf- 
man isn't getting a single hour's cred- 
it for Cafeteria Public Speaking I. 

Ever since the pfopkins trip, they're 
calling Bill Doering the Ghost of Rat 
Hall. We thought he was weird 
enough before. 

Bud Wilson failed in his attempt 
to wrest the pillow-fighting crown 
from the mighty brow of Woodrow 
Simmons last Tuesday. Simmons, 



^rljmiots f&cer 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chestertown, Md. 



you know, is the undefeated cham- 
pion. 

Earle Wagner's weekly calendar: 
Sunday, the folks bring him up some 
home-made sausage; Monday, trying 
out the sausage; Tuesday, more 
sausage, Wednesday, sausage almost 
gone; Thursday, here goes the last 
link; Friday, only two more days till 
sausage time; Saturday, oh, boy! it 
won't be long now; Sunday, the folks 
bring up more sausage; and so on 
indefinitely. 



FOR BETTER 


COAL SERVICE 


PHONE 149 


C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



KENT 


COUNTY 
BANK 


SAVINGS 


Interest paid on 


Deposits 


Motto Safety 


First 


F. 


G. Usilton, 


Pres. 


L. B 


Russell, V 


ce-Pres. 


H. C 


• Coleman, 


Cashier 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



FOUNTAIN PENS 


25c to $10 


STERLING'S 


The Rexall Store 



H O LD E N ' S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



LeCATES 


BROS. 


BARBER 


SHOP 


Where the college man 


can get his 


style of 


hair cut 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Type, of 
Cons traction 

Pbone Chestertown 305 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



MAKE YOUR CAR 

A COLLEGIATE ONE! 

A complete accessory line 

Goodrich Tires 

STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

331 High St. 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 — Chestertown 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERGER'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 




KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 




Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 




Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 


;1 




GRAY BEAUTY SOLON 

Reasonable New Fall Prices. 

Watch announcements of 

Specials each month. Starting 
October 8th for the month of 
October on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sham- 
poo and Finger Wave 75c. 



Kegular pric 
Saturday. 



Frida 



and 



Ov< 
Pho 



Jefferson's Store 
s: Chestertown 1W 



Service really was good last Sat- 
urday while Ed Turner was head- 
waiter in the Cafeteria. There were 
never more than thirteen in line at 
one time. We nominate him for 
that office as soon as it becomes va- 
cant again. 

Since Kilby and Huffman have 



added their names to the fast-grow- 
ing list of radio-owners, it seems as 
if the third floor's motto is: "A rad- 
io in every stewpot." 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111J 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And All Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF OCT. 29-N0V. 3 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29-30 
The MUSICAL HIT 

"CARAVAN" 

with 
CHARLES BOYER - LORETTA YOUNG 
JEAN PARKER - PHILLIPS HOLMES 

Also — Betty Boop Cartoon, Comedy and Novelty. 



WEDNES. - THURS., OCT. 31 - NOV. 1 
Cecil B. DeMille's 

"CLEOPATRA" 

With CLAUDETTE COLBERT 

and WARREN WILLIAM 

The year's biggest picture — playing here as first- 
run day and date with KEITHS in Baltimore. 
Also — Comedy, Snapshot and Cartoon. 



FRIDAY - SATURDAY, NOV. 2 - : 

DE LUXE DOUBLE FEATURE 
GEORGE O'BRIEN in 

"THE DUDE RANGER" 



JACK HOLT in 

"I'LL FIX IT" 



SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



Building Program 
Planned For Future 



by Allan Brougham 
From time to time, through the 
medium of assembly talks and the 
College Bulletin, the student body 
has become more or less acquainted 
with the past history of the college, 
yet the aspirations for Washington's 
future have been sadly neglected. 

There has been a casual reference 
or two made to the possibility in the 
distant future of the erection of a 
library building south of William 
Smith Hall, but for the most part 
there is a lack of definite knowledge 
as to the extensive plans that have 
been drawn up for the ultimate ex- 
pansion of the college. 

For several years there hung in the 
library a large perspective of the 
campus as it will look when the hop- 
ed-for building fund materializes. On 
this plan there was depicted the new 
dormitory, which will stand along the 
southern edge of the campus, facing 
the three existing dormitories. The 
plans for this building were made by 
Henry Hopkins, the Baltimore archi- 
tect who drew the plans for the ren- 
ovation of Reid Hall. When com- 
pleted, this dormitory will contain 
living accomodations for approxi- 
mately one hundred and seventy-five 
students, with the probability of the 



PAGE FIVE 



location of the cafeteria in its base- 
ment. The estimated cost of the 
building, which will be constructed 
in the Georgian Colonial style, as is 
William Smith Hall, approaches two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 

The Board of Visitors and Gover- 
nors for some time considered build- 
ing connecting links between West, 
Middle, and East Halls in order to re- 
lieve the congested housing condi- 
tions, but this plan was finally held 
to be unfeasible. 

The library building mentioned a- 
bove will closely resemble the gym- 
nasium, and the estimated cost is 
seventy-five thousand dollars. The 
construction of this addition will 
greatly enhance the standing of the 
college scholastically, and it is a 
toss-up as to which would be the first 
constructed, the dormitory or the lib- 
rary. 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



There is also the plan to construct 
a field house at some point on the 
athletic field, at a cost of about sev- 
enty-five thousand dollars. Several 
years ago there seemed to be some 
chance of obtaining the money for 
this, enterprise from the state, and 
the Board considered transferring the 
library to the gymnasium in the event 
of such construction. 

At the present, although hope is by 
no means extinct, there is little im- 
mediate likelihood of the realization 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



of these plans. The estate of thel 
late Senator Garrett Foxwell, who ' 
died, some twenty years ago, is held 
for the use of his widow during her 
life, after which time it will revert 
to the college. The amount involved 
in this estate is not known definitely, 
as the greater part of it is in land. 
The Charles Harley estate was left in 
a like manner a year ago, and was 
evaluated at approximately one hun- 
dred thousand dollars. 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



PIP'S 



BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones : 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



"The Bank Where 

You Feel At Home' 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



Good Taste / 




<Vprrlitil IIRI, TIM Amptlrui Tobanoo Coibmiu. 



.Luckies are round, Luckies are 
firm, Luckies are fully packed 
with only the clean center leaves 
—these are the mildest leaves— 
they cost more— they taste better. 



"It's toasted" 

Y Ye-r throat pr+tectitn — *f*i*sl irrit'athm 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1934 



DOIN'S 



Poor Baltimore! The old town 
was certainly one sight after we left. 
Especially Homewood field. Will you 
ever forget that moment when Gibby 
Young took that little old pigskin 
ahustlirtg down the field. But. be- 
lieve it or not, there were two people 
who didn't see him score the touch- 
down! Jean Young and Dottie Wil- 
liams got so excited that they lost 
their footing and fell through the 
bleachers. Jane Youse was a close 
runner-up, and fell down two rows. 
However, one of the prize events 
was when several members of the 
faculty were standing up, slid some- 
one yelled, "Down in front. Pikers"; 
and they sat down. 

It seemed mighty gocd to see so 
many Alumni there. Wc heard Phil 
Wingate's melodious tone- before we 
could locate him. B.riette Nuttie 
and Walt Kees were doing their 
share too. Ellen Flick. Lucille Ras- 
in. Parks Rasin. Semi and Vick Hol- 
Knsworth, Doc Marry, Doc Wagnei 
Slivers Freeney. Joe OTaxrell, Ai- 
lene and Mac McLain. Kr.rtie Ragan, 
Dave Fisher. Mason Trupp, Brins- 
field. and oh. so many others, cheer- 
ed the old college on to victory. 

When the blood thirsty students 



Men's and Ladies* 

SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



leaped over the fence, led b.\ the old 
timer, Fritz Reinhold, ami several of 
the faculty followed, flu field was 
one howling mob of humanity. One 
professor was almost hung on the 
fence, while his better hall held on 
to his coat tails, and another one had 
to just watch because he was handi- 
capped. 

If you haven't heard about the trip 
back, it's your own fault. 

Those who stayed in Baltimore 1 
went to the Old Hangout, the Rcn- 
nert, and to the High Hat Students 
from the Western Maryland had the 
same idea so Mac's two Alma Mateis 
sat side by side. 

This week end won't be quite so 
exciting for those of us who can't get 
up to Mt. St. Mary's tor the game. 
However, the Cotillion last night was 
a good start. 

There will be a big time in East 
Hall on Sunday though. Mrs. 
"Dutch" is coming home with that 
prize package. MISS PRISCILLA [ 
ANN DUMSCHOTT. Watch ouL.j 
Taus! You had better watch your 
lingo, and wear soft -soled shoes from 
now on. you wouldn't want Mr. | 
Dumschott to have to walk the floor 
in the cold, would you? Or get flunk- 
ed in Government either-! 

— Dorothy Clarke. 



Ekaitis, Grid Mentor, To 
Speak Over WDEL Nov. 2 

George L. Ekaitis, Washington 
football coach, will talk over Station 
WDEL, Wilmington, at 7:15 P. M. on 
the evening of Friday, Novemuer 2. 
The first ten minutes of his fifteen- 
minute appearance on the ah will be 
devoted to some football iupic and 
the last five minutes to predictions on 
the outcome of the following day's 
games. 



Louisa Bowen, '31, Marries 



Louisa Bowen, '31, was married to 
William B. Matthews, Jr., of Balti- 
more, at St. Luke's Protestant Epis- 
copal Church, Church Hill, on Satur- 
day, October 27, at 7 o'clock in the 
evening. Mr. Matthews is a gradu- 
ate of St. John's. 



Col H. S Brown Named To 
High Position On NRA Board 

H. S. Brown, '00, chairman of the 
board of visitors and governors, as- 
sumed duties as a member of the 
NRA advisory board on Tuesday, 
October 23. He will be in Washing- 
ton, D .C., three days each week. 

Miriam E. Jones, '20, is teacher of 
Domestic Art, Western High School, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



J. Randolph Field, ex-'oO, has en- 
rolled at the Philadelphia Divinity 
School, where he will study for the 



Episcopal Church's priesthood. Since 
leaving Washington College in 1929 
Mr. Field has been engaged in news- 
paper work, being associated with 
the Cecil Whig at Elltton. 



W. 


H. PENNINGTON 


Representative of tn 


; Wash- 


ington 


National Life 
Company 


nsuranc.e 


Health and Accident 


Policies 




624 High St 





CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Managemen 
Cannon St. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



After a Studious Day- 
Visit 
JIM AND HICK'S 
BILLARD PARLOR 



COM PLIMENTS 


SMITH'S 


K.UT RATE 


DRUG 


STORE 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



After An Evening of Hard 




Study Refresh Yourself at the 




CAFETERIA CANTEEN 




All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 




dies, Tobacco*, Milk and 




Ice Cream 





BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 




I 



smoke a 
great many Chesterfields., 
morning, noon and ni^nt 
. . they are always the same 




MONDAY WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 

BO«A MNO CBETE 

B PONSELLE MARTINI STLECKXOLD 

KOSTELANETZ ORCHESTRA AND CHOBL'S 

9 P. iL (E. S. T.J— COLUMBIA NETWORK 



The Chesterfields you're 
smoking now are just like 
they were last year or any 
other year — because we al- 
ways buy the right tobaccos 
— uniformly ripe and mild. 



Chesterfields are milder . . they taste better 



© Mi. Licorrr as Mv»M Tobacco c-3, 



Beat, Lick, Vanquish 
Susquehanna 



The**^EIm 



Welcome, Alumni, To 
Game, Dance and Banquet 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 7. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



WASHI NGTON EN GAGES CRUSADERS 



MAROON AND BLACK IS 

DETERMINED TO KEEP 

UNBEATEN RECORD 



Captain Dwyer Leads Strong 
Team Against Susquehanna 



A vastly improved Washington 
College eleven seeks its fourth 
straight victory today when it en 
gages a heavy Susquehanna outfit on 
Kibler Field in a Home-coming bat- 
tle. 

The Pennsylvania gridders have a 
fine record to date. They were de- 
feated by Moravian 6 to in their 
opening game, but since then have 
gone on to beat Haverford, Hamilton 
and tie a strong St. Joseph team. Still, 
impressive as this record may be the 
Sho'men expect to extend their siring 
of victories. 

Both teams have many similar fea- 
tures. As"a matter of fact they have 
almost the same sort of plays. Both 
boast of strong defensive lines and 
very heavy backfields. The North- 
erners with Eisenhower, Goyne, and 
Alexander in the line present a for- 
midable forward wall. But on the 
other hand Dwyer, Ward, Lord and 
the rest of the Washington line have 
yet to be out-fought or out-charged. 
The rival backfields are very much 
alike. Each is composed of two 190 
pounders who supply the power while 
the other two men are smaller but 
faster and more shifty. 

Washington will have to go into the 
game minus the services of "Doc" 
Huffman, star fullback, who has a 
very bad knee and will be out of act- 
ion for two weeks at least. Then 
Brandt, a very promising guard, left 
school. As a result, Lord will have 
to shift from center to guard if the 
need for this change arises. 

From the way every thing shapes 
up, Kibler Field will be the scene of 
a "battle royal" this afternoon. But 
the record crowd of friends and old 
"Grads" back should inspire the 
Maroon and Black to play its best 
football game of the 




NOTES PART AS HOST 
COLLEGE PLAYS TODAY 

President Mead Welcomes Op- 
ponents, Alumni, Guests 



Tice > Susquehanna captain, is 
one of the mainstays of the visi- 
tors' line. He plays tackle on the 
offense and guard on the defense. 
He weighs in at 186 and is a sen- 
ior at the Selinsgrove University. 



DR. MEAD ATTENDS 
BALTO. ALUMNI PARTY 



Two weeks ago today the College 
moved tempararily across the Bay to 
Johns Hopkins. We were not hosts 
but visitors. In the good nature 
which accompanies such occasions, 
the visitors ran away with the hon- 
ors. 

We have been properly proud of 
the achievement by the College that 
day both as to the victory scored by 
the football team and the general im- 
pression the College body made 
mong our host of Baltimore alumni 
and friends. 

Today the situation is reversed. 
Instead of being company we are now 
the host. 

Today has been designated as 
"Home-Coming Day" and is, of course 
marked by the game with Susquehan- 
na University. 

As hosts to the visiting team, we 
are expected to give them a fair 
break, a strong battle, and, if possi- 
send them home defeated. They 



ble, 



Will Attend Inaugui-al In Penn 
Nov. 10 



On last Thursday, November 1 
President and Mrs. Gilbert W. Mead 
attended a dinner dance and - card 
party held by the Baltimore Eastern 
Shore Society at the Lord Baltimore 
Hotel. In connection with the din- 
ner, a meeting of the Baltimore Chap- 
ter of the Alumni Association was 
held, over which W. C. Baldwin, 
chairman, presided. Dean Jones and 
other faculty members were also in 
eason and come attendance. 



out of the fray with an impressive 
victory. 



Selinsgrove, Pa. — Although the 
.Susquehanna Crusaders are saturated 
with a winning spirit, the Selinsgrov- 
ers are far from being overconfident 
as they prepare for the remaining 
foes on their schedule. Washington 
College will be the next hurdle for 
the Crusaders at Chestertown, Mary- 
land. Games with Drexel and Pen- 
nsylvania Military College will fol- 
low in the Philadelphia district and 
the season will finally wind up at 
Selinsgrove on November 24 when 
the Crusaders battle Swarthmore. 

The Chestertown contingent is 
ranked with the undefeated teams of 
the East to date and a classy ball 
club characterises the Shoremen this 
season. Since this modern series of 
games between Washington and Sus- 
quehanna originated in 1929, the 
Maryland rival has failed to score on 
thy Crusaders although during the 
pant two years Coach Ullery's men 
failed to register more than one 
touchdown against them. 

With no major injuries developing 
Coach Ullery hopes to have a full 
strength team for the Marylnnders 
"m Saturday. Sullivan and Badger 
will be ready for starting positions 
and the return of Pete Shuty will 
Kive the Crusaders a reserve centoi. 
Hie varsity backfleld will remain in- 
tact. 



Dr. Mead spent last Friday, Octo- 
ber 26, in Baltimore at the quarter- 
ly meeting of the State Library Com- 
mission. He is serving as a member 
of that commission, having been ap- 
pointed to the position by the Gov- 
ernor last year. 

President Mead will represent 
Washington College at the inaugura- 
tion of Dr. Charles S. Miller as Pres- 
ident of State Teacher's College in 
Slippery -Ruck, Pa., on this coming 
Saturday, November 10. Dr. Miller 
and President Mead have been ciosely 
associated for some time, since they 
were room-mates and fraternity bro- 
thers at Allegheny College. Dr. Mil- 
ler was formerly the Superintendent 
of Schools at Lansdowne, Pa. 



may take back with them the small 
end of the score, but they must also 
carry away a remembrance of fair 
treatment and good sportsmanship. 

We are also hosts to our elder bro- 
thers, our alumni. The football game 
is only one part of the day for them. 
Since they are elder members of our 
college family, they have a proper 
pride in the institution and a strong 
feeling of possession. Everyone of 
us, acting as host, must make them 
welcome 

We are expecting, also, during the 
afternoon, to entertain a large num- 
ber of high school students and their 
principals from all the schools of the 
Eastern Shore. To these visitors, we 
shall give our interest and attention 
and a friendly treatment which will 
cause them to want to return. 

Parents, friends, and patrons a- 
mong the general public will be part 
of our visiting company. To them, 
also, we extend a hearty and friendly 
greeting. 

We must all share in extending 
hospitality to our visitors from the 
youngest freshman to the oldest fac- 
ulty member. Let them all be so 
treated that they go away convinced 
that Washington College is alive, 
progressive, intelligent, and well- 
mannered as befits a gentleman of the 
old school. After all, Washington 
College bears 152 years of history 
with which has come the gentility of 
long gocd breeding. To this is add- 
ed the abounding vigor of lusty and 
eternal youth. It is the vitality of a 
life eternally renewing itself through 
the constant enrichment of its blood 
stream from the unfailing supply of 
new friends and new students added 
each year. 

To all of our visitors, a welcome. 
Washington College is proud to en- 
tertain you today. 

—Gilbert W. Mead. 



HOMECOMING EVENTS 
OFFER VARIETY OF FUN 

The college has planned to make 
its Homecoming week-end the best 
ever. The social events promise to 
be especially fine. A dance tonight 
tops the list, while an Alumni dinner 
and fraternity and sorority "get-to- 
gethers" ought to help make the grads 
feel at home. 

The dance is sponsored by the Sil- 
ver Pentagon Society and should be 
very enjoyable, not only because of 
the crowd expected on the floor, but 
also because of the orchestra and 
decorations provided. Vinny Bran- 
dolini and his "Spaghetti Eaters" will 
be at hand to furnish those melodies 



FAGIN TALKS ON 
RUSSIAN DRAMA 

Johns Hopkins Man Reports 
On Russian Visit 



which 



are growing ever more popular 



on the campus. He will direct 
nine-piece outfit featuring several 
original special arrangements. The 
decorations promise to be very good. 
In general they will be those used at 
the first Cotillion held last Friday 
night. The admission will be 50c 
per couple, 35c stag. Dancing will 
be from 8 to 12. 

The dinner will be held at 6 P. M. 
at the Voshell House, this hotel hav- 
ing been designated as "Alumni 
Headquarters" for the week end. 
Tickets for the dinner will be 50 
cents each and may be secured at the 
game from officials of the Alumni As- 
sociation, from the ticket booth be- 



Dr. W. B. Fagin of the Johns Hop- 
kins University, spoke at an assem- 
bly in William Smith Hall on No- 
vember i, ijsi. His talk, drawn 
from a recent trip to Russia, was en- 
titled "The Russian Stage Under the 
Soviet llcgin.e." President Ifcad 
made the introduction. 

Dr. Fagin, a member of the Hop- 
kins Faculty, is widely known as the 
director of the successful Hopkins 
Playshop. "Though New York is con- 
sidered the center of the drama, 
Moscow offers the most stimulating 
dramatic presentation," said Dr. 
(■'agin. "The reactions againsi real- 
ism is found in the German school of 
expressionism while the Russian stage 
has developed naturalism," he con- 
tinued. 

The Russian theatre has been na- 
tionalized in the process to unify the 
education of the masses. According 
to Dr. Fagin, "there are three groups 
of licensed theatres presenting cen- 
sored plays. The first group presents 



tween halves or at the hotel prior to propaganda plays showing the strug- 
the dinner. The dinner will be a stag gle for complete industrialization and 
affair - various aspects of the Russian rcvo- 

The sororities and fraternities are lution." 
cooperating to try and make the week 



end more enjoyable for their gradu- 
ate members by arranging informal 
"feeds" or teas to take place either 
directly after the game or after the 
Silver Pentagon dance. 



WILMOT ELECTED TO 
HEAD FROSH CLASS 



Shorb Named To Council; Huff- 
man Is Vice-President 



The first Freshman Class meeting 
was held at William Smith Hall on 
Friday, November 2. The meeting 
was held under the direction of the 
Student Council for the purpose of 
electing officers for the class of 
Seventy-five members of the class 
were present. 

The nominations for president 
were Wilmot, McDorman, Huffman, 
Van Newkirk. and Bergdoll. In the 
first ballott Wilmot, Huffman and 
McDorman were the leaders. The 
second ballot left Wilmot and Huff- 
an and the final voting Wilmot was 
elected. 

For vice-president, Huffman and 
McDorman were nominated. Huffman 
received the majority vote. 

The candidates for Student Coun- 
cil member were Ford, Bergdoll, 
Shorb, Van Newkirk, and McDorman. 
In the first ballot Shorb, Van New- 
kirk, and McDorman were well in the 
lead. The final ballot gave the office 
to Shorb. 



A second group presents plays of 
a purely literary value to keep old 
traditions alive while the third group 
of theatres exists only as a source of 
amusement." Foreign plays aie 
carefully censored to eliminate ideas 
contrary to the established propa- 
ganda policy. 

Hamlet, in an improved version of 
Shakespeare, played a dual role tak- 
ing the part of the ghost as well as 
his own. The new Russian is not 
superstitious. Ophelia is made to 
get drunk and then accidentally to 
drown. Suicide, as well, has no place 
in the optimistic philosophy of new 
Russia, were concluding thoughts of 
Professor Fagin. 



BOOK COLLECTORS' 

SOCIETY FORMED 



Ra i 



Editions Will 
Studied 



Silver Pentagon To Hold 

Installation Banquet 

The Silver Pentagon Society, of 
Washington College, will formally in- 
stall two senior candidates, Mr. Harry 
Rhodes and Mr. Robert Shaull, at a 
imquet to be held in the Voshell 
House on November 7 at 7:30 P. M. 
ty A. M. 

A ritual program is being devised 
by Mr. Michael Wallace and Mr. Wil- 
liam Baker under the supervision of 
Dr. P, G. Livingood, faculty advisor 
of the organization. The installation 
will be formal in nature. 



P AJ AM A PARADE I S\ °° 

MEMORABLE AFFAIR Honor Society To Hear 



Pep meeting, bon fire, and rat par- 
ty were all combined last night in one 
great celebration for the potential 
victory over Susquehanna University. 
Nearly the entire student body par- 
ticipated in the proceedings which be- 
gan shortly after G :00 P. M. in West 
Hall, and lasted for more than four 
hours, ending at the lower end of Kib- 
ler Field. The Frosh pajnma parade 
and the giant bon fire were the high 
lights of one of the greatest demon- 
strations of real, red-blooded school 



Mrs. E. P. 



Mrs. E. Price Ewing will speak on 
the International Situation with ref- 
erence to Japan at the second month- 
ly meeting of the Washington College 
Scholastic Honor Society. The 

meeting will be held Tuesday night, 
November G, at eight o'clock, at the 
esidenee of Dr. Frederick G. Livin- 
good. 

Mrs. Ewing is an authority on her 
t in the history of Washington I subject, having lived in Japan during 
College. (recent years. 



A meeting was held at the home of 
Dr. Ingalls on Tuesday evening, Oc- 
tober 30, 1934. for the purpose of 
organizing a book club. The idea of 
such a club was started by Dr. In- 
galls after several students, interest- 
ed in collecting books and enlarging 
their own libraries, asked how to ob-, 
tain such books. Already innumer- 
able plans have sprung up as to what 
the club expects to accomplish dur- 
_ . ing the year. Speakers on how to 

L W I n g „ ei raM editions, how to tell the val- 
ue of books, and other topics con- 
cerning first editions are expected to 
speak to the club. It is also hoped 
that the chili will be able to make 
book plates for themselves and pos- 
sibly visit private and public libraries 
to inspect old books. Committees 
were appointed at the meeting to 
draw up a constitution and to select 
s name for the club. The next meet- 
ing will probably be held the latter 
part at the month, at which time any 
OHO interested is invited to be 
nt by the organization. 



3 AGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 1934 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by snd for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and .-ilunim of Was 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
hicrher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown. Md„ 1782. 

William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll O.steel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacuro Ass;. Bus. Mgv. 



dertaklng the hard work of depart- 

! mental club organizers. 

| It is understood on good authority 
that the next society at the College 
will be the Omcers-in-Canvnus-Soeie- 
ties Society, which will petitiin the 
Faculty Committee on Student Activi- 
ties for twice daily meetings, to be 
held in the heating plant, where a 
plentiful supply of heated air is al- 
ready available. 



SMASH THE INJINS TODAY 



EVER VICTORIOUS TEAM 

It is apparent that the College's 
acquired motto of "On to the Rose- 
howl" is no idle jest. The "Rose- 
bowl" is, after all, as far as Wash- 
Mfredlington College is concerned, merely 
\nne * figurative term. It can hardly be 
: otherwise at a College where football 
is played as a pure sport, by men who 
! participate "for the fun of it." The 
fine clean-cut, hard-played, fairly- 
won victories of the Maroon and 
i Black are not the semi-professional 
| matches of the Rosebowl variety. 
Rather they typify the ideal of the 
1 1 athletic contest. There is not the 
_ slightest doubt that the whole Gol- 

" ,lege is welded into a unit to support 

TEN DAYS A WEEK this greatest of all Washington's 

IN EXTRA-CURRICULARS -quads to an unbeaten finish. This 
great 'rallying 'round of loyal class- 



Associate Editors 
es Silcox, Dorothy 
Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, 
Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, 
Whyte, William McCullough 

Entered at the Chestertown. Md.. 
posiorfice as second class matter. | 
; - iption price, §1.50 
Single copy, 10 cents. 



Clarke, 



year. 



SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 1S34 



Perhaps Washington College's new 
. explains the souree of the 
many new societies which are spring- 
ing up on every side. The two new 
departmental organizations of the 
. sf week, founded basically for the 
purpose of the informal pursuit 



pure knowledge, were long restrained - - 

respective department heads. f e 
Kinallv. thev rooted and budded by "5 ° 
, . • ■. It . , ,, ;-+-,- their purposi 

their own vigour. It is both mtei- , „ r r 

esting and remarkable to note that 
Washington's students have time for I 



men" to urge on a striving and con- 
scientious team merely proves again 
that the critical undergraduate will 
lend his complete support only to a 
worth-while cause. Thus, the play- 
'*£ ers of this memorable year deserve 
not only for their admirable 
omiance, but also for their abil- 
ty to convince the student body of 
to play winning foot- 
ball, 




the Alumni, and their 
the College's joy. 



happiness is j 



Hence, the rigid training rules, and 



more and more extra-curricular ac- 1 their observance, this year, have nri 
tivit i es Occasionally it is under-: suited not only in national recogm- ; 
stood studies do interfere, but this tion as an unbeaten team, but they] 
inconvenience seems readily over- have also multiplied by many times | 
the athletic morale of the whole stu- 

„. ■ i j- *u — -™ dent bodv. President Mead's truth. 

There are now, including the new ""■ " * ... 

-udent session of la£t ■ Iune starfc ed the ball 



bodies, some twenty-seven 
societies on the Hill, excluding, 
course, athletic teams, which also, of 
course, are extra-curricular activi- 
ties. This makes each activity's 
share of students, as an aliquot part 
of the whole. 11.1111 members. Evi- 

. .. , , ., _ ■ „,__„_- popular on the Campus, for it is un- 

dentlv several of the groups manage,* * ■*" i„„„« 

* L, _^.v i. ™„nL „„ m i«, popular on this Campus for a player 



"'* rolling, and the coaches have kept it 
going — until the squad has repeated- 
ly taken it across the opponent's goal 
line. Football men are in bed by ten 
o'clock; football men do eat and 
drink properly; football men are 



to exist with a much smaller number 
than this modest total, for the size 
&i others is relatively enormous. 
However, when it is postulated that 
some students belong to many dif- 
ferent groups, the above reasoninj 
becomes fallacious; but when 



popular on this Campu 
to break training rules.' 



HAIL TO THE ALUMNI 

This is Homecoming season. Col 
l° lieges from Maine to Mexico are invit- 



arge number of students who attend ling their graduates back to talk, and 
no outside-the-lecture-room function dance and see a football game. Aside 
is reckoned with, the burden of the|f rom the tactically wise procedure of 



others is increased. Twenty of these 
activities hold meetings at least bi- , 
weekly, and more than fifteen hold co "ege 

them weekly. 



HOMECOMING AND THE 

UNDERGRADUATE 

If the alumni of Washington Col- 
lege act with a spirit and unanimity 
comparable to that of the undergrad- 
uate body, probably some two thous- 
I and of them will return to the Cam- 
pus today. Still, even if but a 
of a hundredth of this number con- 
I quel's the limitations of space and 
time, the College will still be de- 
; lighted to see them. In a college of 
j the happily small size of Washing- 
j ton. the alumnus never loses his 
denlity as an individual. You, the 
alumni who have indicated by your 
{ presence that your Alma Mater does 
maintaii parental lies on you, are 
still significant to the student body of 
today. The College remembers 
teams that you played on like that 
one you will cheer to victory today, 
it remembers debates you gave, and 
dances you held, and great pajama 
parades you had. You will be mis- 
taken if you assume that all these 
new faces at Washington are uninter- 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



Flash! The student council of the 
University of Delaware has just voted 
tenth ' t0 Ehow tneir appreciation for our 
past hospitality by reciprocating with 
a free dance for Washington College 
students after the W. C. and U. of 
D. football game. 

(Fun ahead for everyone folks but 
we Washingtonians will sure cheer up 
the disappointed dissipating Dela- 
warians that night for they are sure 
to be a sad crowd.) 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-1y Heard 



keeping the grads in touch with the 
Homecoming affords the 
If the seven who hold ! alumnus and alumna chances to shed 
the years and burdens of the business 
of living, and assume again for an 
ihour, a day or a week-end the unique 



less frequent meetings than the oth- 
ers are averaged with the fifteen 
weekly-session ers, it is safe to note 
twenty meetings per week. Also, as 
the experience of members attests, and carefree existence of the under 



Right now we indignantly rise to 
a point of order — a sports columnist 
in the Loyola "Greyhound"' says — 
"But the problem now facing us is 
in just what class does Gallaudet be- 
long after dropping a 51 to verdict 
to a weak Washington College out- 
fit." 

(This well informed young man 
etted in talking about the things that could probably give Webster a few 
you did when you were here. This pointers on the definition of "weak" 
friendly college, and who ever — in our opinion he is the fellow who 
tires of talking to one's Iriends? picked the Orioles to win Lhe pen- 



Editors Note: This ancient and 
honorable column is now composed 
by various people. Guesses as to the 
writers' identities will be in vain. 

This column gives us the jitters ev- 
ery time we dash one off. People only 
read it to see if their name is in it 
(not that they want it to be — oh, 
no!) If it's not theie, then it's a 
lousy column. The unly way we 
could satisfy every social light in this 
school is to print the names of every- 
one in school — then they could cut 
it out and send the clipping home, 
just to show the folks what a big-shot 
they are at W. C. 

DRIPPINGS — "Duke" Mitchell is 
leading a dog's life . The lucky 
dog! ..The Cardinal's Club has 
evolved the most complicated form of 
initiation ever seen on this campus 
. . . We can see that the strain of 
producing this masterpiece has crip- 
pled the" mentalities of some of the 
members. Peyser wants to know 
"who is this Don Juan?" . Rhodes 
is still going over big in a small way 
. . Now Ann's sighing over some 
freshman But he seems to be 

"sigh proof" ..And Mimi's got it 
the same way That's appropriate 

Louis Lazarus Goldstein — busi- 
ness manager of the Y. M. C. A. 

It takes a strong and experienced 
campaigner in the art of cafeteria 
eating to withstand the repeated as- 
saults of the clean-up squads with- 
out at least the loss of a salad or 
dessert. We've seen whole meals' 
snatched from unsuspecting students 
who have paused for the purpose of 
talking or bumming a cigarette. . . . . 
These men, chosen for their ruthless- 
ness, and total lack of scruples, have 
no hesitation about running down 
some of the more physically handi- 
capped students with their slop 
wagons A little discretion on the 

part of C. S. C. (the Cafeteria 
Scavenger Club- would go a long 
i way in making the meals a little more 
enjoyable. 

John Littell is going "strong" now 

and his old feud with Bill McCul- 
lough rages on. He wonders if she 
willa"? 



the average length of these meetings graduate. As the alumni are reju- 
venated, the undergraduate becomes 
aloofly mature, by contrast. He be- 



is, conservatively, an hour. Referring 
to the College-wide figure of 11 mem- 
bers per activity, the total time spent . 
in extra-curricular meetings each ^ns to observe the graduates of last 
week is more than 220 person-hours, -year, or the last decade or century, 



or, roughly, 10 twenty-four hour 
days, or twenty days a week in the 
College of the commoner twelve hour 
variety. 

This calculus of time spent in socie 



with a sort of abstract interest. Grad- 
uates do make interesting ease histor- 
ies from the student's point of view. 
Are they not, in general, projections 



lies of various sorts may indicate to into time of the freshman or senior, 
the first-year man or woman, at least, ' himself? 



that careful decisions must be made 
when one considers affiliation in ex- 
tra-curricular organizations. The 
value of each activity in the Amer- 
ican college is unquestioned. A wise- 
ly chosen activity field may conceiv- 
ably prove more valuable in later en- 



nant.) 



1 Some of them have been unsuccess- 
ful; perhaps handicapped by traits 
I they allowed to become fastened on 
I them in their college days. Here the 
(present student has no vague exhor- 
tation to ideals, but concrete evidence 
of what may result from unwise and 



deavor than forty semester hours of | often negligent habits during the 
a pedantic and stereotyped academic [ forroat j ve year8 of college life. Han- 
work, although such extreme >n-| p ji y , he has the much more general 



stances are rare. However, just as 
the Administration limits the number 
of hours of class-room work a stu- 
dent may carry, so may the wise stu- 
dent curb his outside interests, and 
round them into a finished whole. 

The Biology and Historical Socie- 
ties will doubtless furnish many hap- 
py tiroes of interesting program* and 
ftoeial diveraion to their founder- and 
adherent*. The student* who are 
thus stneereljr interested in informal 
rBTesttgations of their chosen fields 
are greatly to be commended for no- 



example of the successful graduate 
also before him. These characters 
are as though radiant lines from his 
own personality were projected on a 
screen two, or ten, or twenty years 
away, and yet made visible today. It 
is evident that a marvelous opportun- 
ity is given the student to profit by 
the experience of his predeca <n 
especially as he may meet them in 
their native haunts, on Homecoming 
Day. 

' <>f the under- 

graduate benefits, Homecoming in for 



Hence, welcome and glad greetings 
to you all. 

We are in a quandary with this 
P O € t Y V present zoological tendency of colleg- 

iate mascots — Hopkins has its Blue 
The verses below are the last of a j ay; Navy has its Goat; Temple has 
series of poems by Mr. James An- its Owl; Georgia has its Bulldog; 
thony, '34. New works will appear Loyola has just been presented two 
in the future. j Greyhounds; but the question still re- 

People, people, men and women, lit- mains, who can find a Pegasus" 

tie children, surging forward, j (The other evening a riotous young 
Ever forward, knowing but the one , gentleman claimed to have seen one, 
direction, forward, forward; | but his school spirit evidently came 
Stumbling, groaning, reaching out-! from a container.) 

ward, always onward; I (And then there was the student 

Eyes turned upward on horizons dim who thought school spirit was that 
1 which haunted the place.) 

Romeo and Juliet 
| T'was in a restaurant they met, 
Romeo and Juliet; 
He had no cash to pay the debt, 
So Romeo'd what Juli'et. 
Politics 
Nomination 

Agitation 

Accusation 

Congratulation 
(Klotxberger in "The Connecticut 
Campus," Conn. State.) 



and distant 

Old men limping, women weeping, 
little children coming after; 

Tens and hundreds, thousands, mil- 
lions, swarming surging, 

Pushing forward, leaving but the 
dead behind. 

BEYOND 

I have a fever in my heart 
That spurs me ever to depart 
From the old to something new, 
Something rich and golden too, 
.something gay and never blue. 
Let mc always seek perfection, 
Upward, onward in direction, 
Such as swells the heart the rounder. 
Makes the mind and body sounder, 
That is gladness' chief propounded 
And keeps the disposition true. 



SCORN 
Bear bt the North blinking at me out 

of the cold sky, 
Scoroer <>f man time Immemorial 
Blink away till I die. 



We tried for an alliteration above- 
but we doff our hats to "The Anti- 
oehian" whose headline reads — 
"Much Moronic Merriment Markf 
Mock Rally," the article then goes on 
to say that Perry Masonitchkavitch 
won the costume honor*. 



What's in a name? We find that 
Miss Somen) is that way about Mr. 
Winters down at Salisbury State Nor- 
mal. 



Gossip and everyday happenings 
on the campus — keyhole snoopings — 
eavesdropping — high pressure de- 
tectiving and speciality. 

Reading Time: For average stu- 
dents, six or five minutes, for three 
pointers, no minutes — their time 
should be taken up with the cosmolo- 
gy of the world, etc., and not read- 
ing juicy morsels Of "I Unly Heard." 

We predict: 

1. Overwhelming defeat of Sus- 
quehanna. 

2. An undefeated football team. 

3. A good Assembly speaker. 

4. A clean Tau house. 

5. More tables in the cafeteria. 

6. A pin for Greims to hold his 
clothes together for future parties. 

7. A large turkey for Thanksgiv- 
ing. 

Now for our overflowing cup of 
keyhole knowledge: We wonder if 
McCrone remembers anything he did 
Tuesday — an eventful day for our 
young iad Say, Bill Nick, what is 

the great attraction in Reid Hail — 
don't lead our young ladies astray 
pleeze ! Charley aid Dusty — 
don't you know the town girls get the 
nir enough without taking them rili- 
ng on these autumn nights What 
s the matter Kilby? Did a Reid Hall 
girl make you break your promi.te — 
don't cry we will pick up your d — 
dolls Come on Wilmot — out of 
your hermitage — there are dates to 
be made! I guess Lucille Legg 
passed her eampuatry, after all, last 
year — we saw her flying her "Kight" 
again Friday night These fresh- 
men arc hard to understand, aren't 
they, Ella?? . Why doesn't Minis 
Ford bring her ".summer love" on the 
campus — we would like to see him 
Dick Chambers should get a new 
car — maybe he will get to the ML St. 
Mary's football game by next year — 
providing no breakdowns. 



SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FOOT BALL 

by George Ekaitis 




And again sixty hard fought min- 
ues of football brought a well-earned 
victory over Mt. St. Mary's. Again 
praise must be heaped on our 
Maroons, playing as a unit for every 
minute of the ball game. Praise for 
the line holding its own against the 
hardest charging line we have met to 
date. Praise for the backfield, driv- 
ing for yardage on every play and 
backing up the line on defense de- 
spite linemen down field clipping at 
them on every play. Praise for the 
team as a defensive unit in not let- 
ting a good Mt. St. Mary's team get 
inside our thirty yard line once dur- 
ing the game, with the exception of] 
the 50 yard run, after receiving a j 
pass, by Lynch, for the Mount's 
touchdown and that was made possi- 
ble by our backs hesitating upon hear- 
ing the lineman's horn. 

I do want to mention one phase of 
the game that may have escaped the. 
attention of our supporters, of whom I 
I was pleased to see many at this 
game, and that was the work of our 
wing-backs on the opposing end: 
making it possible for our safety man 
to run back a couple of punts that 
put us in position to score. Without 
this excellent blocking it is doubtful 
if the safety man could have gotten 
off those very decisive run-backs, 

Today is the BIG DAY! Home- 
coming! Old grads from everywhere. 
And what could be more fitting than 



THIRD STRAIGHT WON 
AT EXPENSE OF MOUNTS 



Washington College's football team 
proved conclusively its right to be 
called a fighting eleven last Saturday, 
October 27 by edging out a 12 to 6 
victory over Mt. St. Mary's in Em- 
mitsburg. 

The entire first half was played in 
a heavy down-pour which made the 
footing precarious. As a result the 
Washington attack was slowed down 
considerably. A break came eaily in 
the second quarter when Berry quick- 
kicked and Dwyer downed the ball on 
the rival 2-yard stripe. "Gib" 
Young took Reilly's kick and ran it 
back to the six yard line. Three bucks 
gained but little so on the last down 
Young took the ball around left end 
for the score. Dwyer's kick for point 
was wide. 

With a six point lead and just a 
short time before the end of the half 
the Shoremen eased up a little. As a 
result Lynch was wide open on a flat 
pass to the left, and he continued to 
run through five or six players who 
should have had him. Mt. St. Mary 1 
tried to buck the ball over for the 
extra point but five black shirted 
linesmen downed the runner before 
he cuuld get started. Tfie half ended 
shortly after. 

The rain had ceased by time the 
second half began. The third quar- 
ter saw both teams keep the ball a- 
round mid-field though the Mounts 
did make a number of first downs by 
off tackle plays. In the fourth quar- 
ter the Washingtonians got started. 
A passing attack with Berry throwing 
and Salter and Bilancioni receiving 
carried the ball down into the Mount 
territory, but a fumble cost the 
locals a chance for a score. As a mat- 
ter of fact two more fumbles by 
Washington deep in the enemy terri- 
tory delayed a score. Another time 
Young tried for a field goal from 
placement but his boot was low. Fin- 
ally Young ran back a punt within 
scoring distance. On the next play 
Salter, on a reverse, took the ball to 
the two yard line. Huffman carried 
it over. The kick after touchdown 
was blocked. 

The Mountaineers tried desperate- 
ly to score by means of passes, but 
the alert Maroon and Black backfield 
knocked every one down. 



having as opponents the fine football 
team from Susquehanna University. 
Each year they are represented by a 
strong, alert football team and this 
promises to be another hard fought 
football game from beginning to end. 
Last Saturday they outplayed a 
strong St. Joseph's team, (winner 
over Ursinus, who in turn had de- 
feated the U. of Pennsylvania) to a 
scoreless deadlock. 

Our reserve strength suffered a se- 
vere blow in the loss of Brandt, a re- 
serve guard, who has leit college, and 
the loss of Davis, reserve center, be- 
cause of an injury that necessitated 
his turning in his uniform for the re- 
mainder of the season. These de- 
partures cut an already small squad 
to the total of twenty-seven. 

The squad came through the Mt. 
St. Marys game without any serious 
injuries and will be in charge for 
another great game. 



PAGE THREE 



CAROLYN HELMS CHOSEN 
TO HEAD GIRLS' A. A. 



A meeting of the Girls' Athietic 
Association was called by Miss Doris 
Bell, director of Women's sports, and 
the following officers were elected: 

Carolyn Helms, President. 

Jean Harshaw, Vice-President, 

Eleanor Stevens, See.-Treas. 

Members of the board representing 
the various classes were then chosen. 
This resulted in the selection of Alice 
Cruikshank and Ruth Cannon, sen- 
iors; Leah Frederick and Doris Met- 
calfe, juniors; Nancy Post, sopho- 
more; Elizabeth Westcott, freshman. 
Elizabeth Hall is the new honorary 
member on this year's staff. 

The newly elected board met on 
Wednesday and the principal matter 
of business was to decide on the corn- 
teams. 



SKIPPING OVER 
THE SPORTS 

by Phi! Skipp 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 

Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



Well, well, it has finally happened. 
Last Saturday a certain Baltimore 
sports writer described our up and 
coming football team as a smart, 
alert eleven. No doubt this sports 
writer will be fired for his audacity 
in bucking tradition, but never the 
less those words are down in black 
and white for future Washingtonians 
lo gaze at and wonder. As a matter 
of fact our boys were so touched by 
this most generous praise that they 
went out that afternoon and won a 
ball game wholly by capitalizing on 
Mt. St. Mary's errors. Which proves 
that the eminent Mr. C. T. can't be 
wrong. 

Last Saturday was a big day for 
the Free State. Every college in 
Maryland except the Mount come out 
on top. The two outstanding wins 
were those by Maryland and Navy. 
The Old Liners got sweet revenge on 
a good U. of Florida team to the tune 
of 21 to 0. Navy continued its string 
of victories defeating Pennsylvania's 
strong but inexperienced team by a 
17 to score. Dick Harlow's Wes- 
tern Maryland eleven turned in a 20 
to victory over St. Thomas in 
Scranton. St. John's had an easy 



time with American U. But both 
John Hopkins and Baltimore U. were 
extended to the limit to win close 
garner over Haverford and Bridge- 
water respectively. By the way 
Western Maryland is ranked ahead of 
Navy in the Maryland - Washington 
district. 

That Hopkins-Haverford score 
gives us something to think about. 
True we beat Hopkins 13 to 0, but 
Ha^ei-ford outplayed tht Blue Jays 
up until they weakened in the last, 
minutes and yielded a touchdown. 
The Pennsylvanias were off to a Dad 
start, but they have been improving 
with every game and should be at 
their best when the Sho'men meet 
them two weeks hence. 

Our rivals up Delaware way took 
it on the chin from Lebanon Valley 
over the week end. To some that is 
good new? because it shows that the 
trick can be accomplished, but others 
feel that defeat will detract color 
from the annual Washington College 
and Delaware game. 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 





..it makes the 
tobacco milder 



la the manufacture 
of Granger Rough Cut Pipe 
Tobacco the Wellman Process 
is used. 

The Wellman Process is dif- 
ferent from any other process or 
method and we believe it gives 
more enjoyment to pipe smokers. 
...it gives the tobacco an ex- 
tra flavor and aroma 
...it makes the tobacco act 
right in a pipe — burn 
slower and smoke cooler 
. . . it makes the tobacco milder 
...it leaves a clean dry ash 
— to soggy residue or heel 
in the pipe bowl 

LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO. 



V \e wish in sonic zeay iv<? could get 

•■■■■■■ ■ *■ '. \\-0%xV- x c^ 

• evety man who smokes 6 pipe 
to just try C*ran<Jer 




t A Mwtftt'Tfl*Mi^i> -Co-:- 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 1934 



GOLDSTEIN SCORES AS 
RED Ws DELUGE CAMPUS 

Cheer Leaders Will Be Garbed 
In White Uniforms 

Sueb a sensational football team 
deserves nothing but the best Cer- 

:he student body has given 
the™ nothing less than tins Cheer- 
leaders. Johnny Bride and Zoldy. 
have inspired and encouraged in 3 
backing with as much zest as the 
••earn lias played football. 

It toot Lou Goldstein, who nas 



been famous since his freshman year 
as the campus business man. to insti- 
gate a means of backing the football 
team and at the same time benefiting 
the worthy cheer leaders. The little 
red W's bearing the inscription 
BEAT SUSQUEHANNA were ti e 
means. The Varsity Club is the gen- 
eral sponsor of the plan. Every 
student in Washington College 



After 


An Evening 


of 


Hard 
at the 




Refresh "V ourself 


CAFETERIA CANTEEN 


All Ki 


ads of Sandw 


chc 




dies 


, Tobaccos, M 
Ice Cream 


ilk 


and 



HOLDEN' S 


SERVICE STATION 


Cross St. and Maple Ave. 


Sunoco Products 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

25c to S10 

STERLING'S 

The Recall Store 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTEHTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



"The Bank Where 

You Feel At Home" 

Tlie First 
National Bank 

Of Ch-.sstertovn 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidairc, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented 1 by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. V/yle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



bought for the sum of five cents the 
privilege to wear one. The money 
collected will be used to buy uniforms 
for the cheer leaders. At the same 
time, the team, constantly faced with 
the order BEAT SUSQUEHANNA, 
will have to do something about it. 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop- 



FOR BETTER 


COAL SERVICE 


PHONE 149 


C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



*»' c h m i o 1 5 


JSccr 


Distributed 


by 


THE CHESAPEAKE 


BEVERAGE 


CO. 


Chestertown 


MA 





KENT 


COUNTY 
BANK 


SAVINGS 


Interest paid on 


Deposits 


Mo 


to Safety 


First 


F. 


G. Usiiton, 


Pres. 


L. B 


Russell. Vice-Pres. 


H. C 


. Coleman, 


Cashier 



CHAS. C. SCHRIESER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Fall line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 




Reasonable New Fall Price*. 

Watch announcement.. of 

Special* each month. Starting 
Oc'-obcr 8th for the month of 
October on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sham- 
poo and Finger Wave 75c. 

Regular prices on Friday and 
Saturday. 

Over Jefferson' t Store 
Phone: Chestertown 106 




Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 305 



LeCATES 


BROS. 


BARBER 


SHOP 


Where the college man 


can get his 


style of 


hair cut 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



KREEGER 


S 


JEWELRY STORE 


Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 


Watches, Rings 
Novelty Jewelry. 


and 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants. Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And AH Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF NOV. 5 - 10 

MONDAY - TUESDAY, NOV. 5 - 6 
W. C. FIELDS - ZAZU PITTS in 

"MRS. WIGGS OF 

THE CABBAGE PATCH" 

Added — BINC CROSBY Musical, Cartoon, Nov- 
ell '. 

WEbTlESDAY-THURSDAY, NOV. 7 - 8 
RICHARD ARLEN - IDA LUPINO in 

"READY FOR LOVE" 

Added — Betty Boop Cartoon, Comedy. 



FRIDAY-SATURDAY, NOV. 9 - 10 
JACKIE COOPER in 

"PECK'S BAD BOY" 

Mdod — POP EYE Cartoon, Comedy, Sportreel. 

—COMING- 
NOVEMBER 14-15 

WILL ROGERS in 

"JUDGE PRIEST" 



SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



STUDENT COUNCIL 
PLANS MENU REVISION 

Attention Is Called To Smok- 
ing Rule In Wm. Smith 

At the regular meeting of the Coun- 
cil a petition was presented concern- 
ing the condition of food in the cafe- 
teria. The petition had been held 
over for several weeks and in the 
meantime the signers had noticed an 
improvement in the food. For this 
reason the petition is being held in 
reserve in case it should be necessary 
in the future. However, a commit- 
lL -e has been appointed to investigate 
the food situation along certain lines. 
There are certain meals which very 
few people are able to eat. The 
committee will make a report on these 
meals and the Council will act to 
have them removed from the menu. 
The committee, Mr. Lord, Mr. Shaull. 
and Mr. Abbott, would like to get a 
list of those foods which are unpalat- 
able to the majority of the students 
and announced that they will appre- 
ciate student cooperation. 

In the past two weeks the Council 
has shown by its action in a certain 
case, that noise will not be tolerated 
in the halls during the evening before 



any athletic contest. Team members 
should be free to study during the 
early evening and should have abso- 
lute silence after ten o'clock. 

Plans are progressing for l.ie "Pa- 
jama Parade" which will include a 
pep meeting and a bonfire. A tele- 
graph pole has been procured for the 
bonfire and advertisements hfve been 
put in the local papers concerning 
wood for the fire. Freshmen should 
see Miss Whitaker for addresses of 
persons who have old wood for the 
fire. 

There is a rule prohibiting smok- 
ing in William Smith Hall. Persons 
are likely to be careless or ignore this 
rule. It will be enforced strict.y 
from this time, insists the Council 



Y. W C. A. PRESIDENT 
STATES YEAR'S PLANS 



Will Entertain Mothers And 
Feminine Guests At College 



SORORITIES FETE 

HONORARY MEMBERS 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones : 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



A recent interview with Miss Doris 
E. Metcalfe, President of the Y. W. 
C. A. at Washington College, result- 
ed in the following statement con- 
cerning the aims and work of that 
organization for the year: 

"Until this year, the "Y's" social 
activity has been felt and realized 
i only by those coeds who have parti- 
cipated in its limited number of 
functions. However, this year we 
are planning to make for oursclve3 
a real place among the Washington 
organizations. The place which has 
been formulated will perhaps be of a 
gi eater help to boys than to gir 
We intend to take entire charge of 
female guests who are on the cam 
pus at any time. It will be seen to 
that they are entertained when nee 
essary, and we will do our part to 
make their visit as pleasant a one as 
possible." 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 

The sorority recently entertained 
at tea at the home of Mrs. Buxton, 
Guests included: Dean Bradley, Mrs 
Fox, Mrs. Dana, Mrs. Johns, Mrs, 
Tolles, Miss Russell, Mrs. Stam and 
Mrs. Mead. 

Mrs. Fox has been elected vice- 

esident of the Middle Atlantic Lib- 
rary Association. 

Charlotte Holloway and Maigaret 
Russell attended the State Teacher's 
meeting in Baltimore last week. 

Miss Louise Russell and Mrs. Law- 
rence Ford are now honorary mem- 
bers of the sorority and Mrs. Donald 
Stam, a patroness. 

Recent alumnae visitors to the 
campus have been: Mrs. Francis 
Fitch, Dorothy Kimble, and Ellen 
Flick. 

We are expecting a large number 
of alumnae back at college this week 
end. Plans have been made to en- 
tertain them while they are with us 

KAPPA GAMMA 

Miss Sarah Ellen Byrn, Miss Pet 
Mace, Miss Lucille Rasin, Miss Mary 
Parks, Mis-; Elizabeth Brice, and Miss 
"Bunny"' Bowen attended the wed- 
ding of Miss Louisa Bowen at Church 



Hill last Saturday. Miss Byrn spent 
the right with Miss Doris Metcalf at 
Reid Hall afterwards. 

On Sunday, November 4th, a Home- 
coming Breakfast is to be held in 
Reid Hall by the Kappa Gamma, for 
their Alumnae. 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



Good Taste/ 




The clean t^tewLeaves — 
these arexhe mildest leaves 




"It's toasted" 

V Your throat protection— asainst irritation-' -against couth 



7h£yTa£& pet&k 



lou'll find every Lucky 
firmly round and fully packed with long 
golden strands of fine tobacco — only the 
clean center leaves— these are the mildest 
leaves— they cost more— they taste better. 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 1934 



DOIN'S 



Welcome Alumiv 
coming week end! 



This is Home- 
That time of 
times when old friends meet; old 
songs are sung; and new jokes told 
which poor or good will get a laugh. 
Welcome Home! Our homes, hearts, 
bottles, everything, (excepting our 
pocketboofcs) are open to you. It's 
good to see you back. Remember 
last, year at this time* The main 
difference is that the football game 
will be a different story and the vic- 
tory dance tonight will be for Our 
Victory. After that wild bonfiie 
last night, with everyone still hoarse 
from celebrating your return and the 
prospective game, few of us were in 
fit condition to attend 8 o'clocks this 
morning. But sleeping through them 
and the rest of the morning's classes 
should put us in yelling spirit for this 
afternoon's battle. Only a few more 
hours and we'll be shaking wicked 
feet at the dance, too. 

Last week end was pretty quiet on 
Campus, but those who managed to 
get to Emmitsburg tell a different 
tale. Jean Young, Leah Frederick 
and Dickie Metcalfe came back late 
Saturday night, soaked and cold but 
happily hoarse and still able to shout 
when the bus finally rolled in. As 
the football heroes alighted, they 
noticed a suspicious red glow in the 
direction of the A. K. House, and 
fearing for their belongings, rushed 
madly over only to find that it was 
a railroad flare, lit in celebration of 
the score over Mt. St. Mary's. 

Those of us left behind, found the 
week end rather uneventful. However. 



[when we heard the score, our stored 
up energy came in handy. 

Clara Wyle spent the week end in 

[Bridgeton, visiting Mr. and Mrs. R. 

IB. Davis while Caroline Helms went 
home and Dottie Williams went to 
Philadelphia where she attended a 
fraternity dance. 

It looks as though part of Wash- 
ington College has already resumed 
relations with St. John's College, 
when Louisa Bowen '31, married W. 
B. Matthews, last Saturday. Pet 
Mace. Lucille Rasin. Sarah Ellen 
Byrn, Elizabeth Brice, and Mary 

■Parks weie present at the ceremony 
and reception. The bride wore white 
satin with a lovely train and veil. 
Henrietta Bowen, better known as 
"Bunny" was Maid of Honor and 
wore maroon velvet with hat to 
match. Two of the bridesmaids wore 
the same, while the other two brides- 
maids wore green velvet with hats 
to match. The bride carried gar- 

j dinias and lillies of the valley and her 

! attendants bronze chrysanthemums. I 
Mr. and Mrs. Matthews will wake, 
their home with the groom's parents, j 
The girls of Reid Hall have set the 
date for their first dance as Decern- 1 
ber 8th. So boys, don't start anyl 

'scraps around that time, because you i 

Will miss plenty of fun. 



Ed Keenan Returns 
To His Alma Mater 



Many Of Football Famous 
Will Attend Homecoming 



COACH EKA1TIS TALKS 
ON FOOT BALL SCOUTS 



ject lasted ten minutes and the final 
five minutes of the quarter hour pro- 
gram were devoted to forecasting 
winners in today's gridiron contests. 



History Department 

Organizes Society 

A meeting was held Friday after- 
noon. November 2, at 3:15 under the 
auspices of the History Department 
of Washington College for the pur- 
pose of forming a History Club. The 
society will be composed of History 
majo 
torical subjects. 



Among the "football famous" of 
Washington College who will return 
to the campus today for the Home- 
coming festivities is Eddie Keenan, 
of Waterbury, Conn. 

While playing on the Washington 
eleven, 1922-25, Keenan enjoyed the 
distinction of being the heaviest grid- 
rier in college ranks. He tipped the 
scales ;it 345 pounds and got much 
publicity for himself and the college 
because of his heft. 

Despite his weight Keenan was ex- 
ceptionally fast and once bested a- 
nother Washington gridder, Tom Lee, 
in a 100-yard dash for a sizable wag- 
er. 

Other former Washington athletic 
luminaries from Waterbury, who 
have signified their intentions of re- 
turning along with Keenan are: Jake 
Reiger, Henny Carrington, Bob Mel- 
el's and Dominic Jamelle and last 
year's big, little man, Al Dobkins. 



MAKE YOUR CAR 

A COLLEGIATE ONE! 

A complete accessory line 

Goodrich Tires 

STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

331 High St. 



The duties of a football scout was 
the topic discussed by Coach George 
Ekaitis over Station WDEL, Wil- 
mington, last night as he filled a 15- 
minute program, one of a series in 
which football coaches in this section 
of the country have participated. 

What the scout looks for and the 
tough job he has in finding it were 
outlinded by the Washington grid- 
iron mentor. His talk on that sub- 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111 J 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 - Chestertown 



PHIIUPJ 



■ I con'denseO '■ \ 

CELERY 




_l_jet's find out why 
Turkish tobacco is so important 
to a good cigarette 



On the sunny slopes of 
Smyrna . . . in the fertile 
fields of Macedonia. . . along 
the shores of the Black Sea 
. . . grows a kind of tobacco 
that is different from any 
other tobacco in the world. 

THESE Turkish tobaccos 
are the only tobaccos of 
foreign cultivation that are 
used to any great extent in 
making American cigarettes. 
Turkish tobaccos are famous 
for their spicy aroma, and a 
blend of the right kinds of 
Turkish tobacco with our own 
home-grown tobaccos is better 
than any one kind used alone. 
In Chesterfield we balance 
mild, ripe tobaccos grown 
in this country with just the 
right amounts of the right 
kinds of Turkish. 
It is by blending and cross- 
Naiitt ubaca grower blending these different tobac- 
idlmg Amman Umr- cos tnat we make Chesterfield 
tits how I urktib tobac- . .. . , 

a it cured. the cigarette thar s milder, the 

cigarette that tastes better. 




Turkish tobacco hung in 
the open air to be cured. 



MONDAY WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 

ROSA NINO CRETE 

PONSELLE MARTINI STUECKCOLD 

KOSTELANETZ ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS 
9 P. M. (E, S. T.)— COLUMR1A NETWORK 



Still Unbeaten; 
On To Haverford 




Frosh-Soph Tie-up 
Monday, 12th, at 3:30 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 8. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD„ SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



HOME GAMES TO 
BE IN ARMORY 

Sixteen Game Basketball 
Schedule Completed 



BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
HOLDS FIRST MEETING 



Simulteneously with the announce- 
ment Nov. 7th of the completed 
lG-game schedule for the Washing- 
ton College "Flying Pentagon," 
1934-35 edition, came the announce- 
ment that all of the home games of 
the Shoremen this year will be played 
on the court of the Chestertown 
Armory. 

Negotiations and arrangements for 
the use of the Armory were completed 
this week between Tom Kibler, ath- 
letic director at the local school, and 
Major Frank B. Hines, commanding 
officer of the Medical Detachment. 
Work on erecting the baskets and 
laying out the floor will be started 
within the next few days. The blea- 
chers used in the Washington gym 
will be transferred to the Armory. 

The Washington team, it was 
announced, will also practice on the 
Armory floor several days each week. 

The schedule as announced by 
Graduate Manager Fred W. Dum- 
schott contains 16 games, eight on 
the home floor and eight away. Ten 
of the games are with Maryland Col- 
legiate Basketball Association mem- 
bers, St. John's having been added 
to this loop since last season. 

The card opens with a game with 
Upsala on the local court on Decem- 
ber 14 and lists a tilt with West Ches- 
ter Teachers College also before the 
Christmas holidays. 

The schedule is as follows 
Dec. 14 — Upsala 
Dec. 18 — West Chester T. 
Jan. 11 — Hopkins .... 

Jan. 12 — Western Md. . . 

Jan. 16 — U. of Md. 

Jan. 19 — Mt. St. Mary's 

Jan. 26 — Loyola 

Feb. 2 — St. John's 

Feb. 6 — Swarthmore 

Feb. 9 — Hopkins 

Feb. 15 — Mt. St. Mary's . , 

Feb. 16 — Delaware Home 

Feb. 21 — St. John's Away 

Feb. 26 — Western Md Aw*y 

Mar. 1 — Loyola . Home 

Mar. 2 — Delaware Away 



Wallace Delivers Paper; Dunn 
Elected Committeeman 



The first regular meeting of the 
Biological Society was called to or- 
der by President Ivon Culver at 7:30 
P. M. Wednesday evening, November 
7th, in Room 25 of William Smith 
Hall. 

The first part of the meeting was 
devoted to business, during which 
time several sections of the consti- 
tution were voted on, and Mr. Dunn 
was elected freshman member of the 
program committee. 

It was decided that t>l e 
organization will be called the 
Biological Society and its meet- 
ings will be open to all those interest- 
ed in the subject. Active members 
were defined as those persons who 
feel that they should like to take 
an active part in the programs : 
etc., and who have turned their names 
in to the secretary. No dues are to 
be exacted from either active or vis- 
iting members, and meetings will be 
once or twice a month, the time and 
place being decided by the President 
and committee. 

The latter part of the meeting was 
taken up by the reading of a very in- 
teresting paper by Mr. David Wal 
lace entitled "How Living Beings 
Prepare for Winter." An open dis- 
cussion followed in which Dr. Car- 
penter amplified Mr. Wallace's infor- 
mation with some of her knowledge 
on the subject. Meetings in the fu- 
ture will be devoted almost entirely 
to the reading of papers on biologi- 
cal subjects followed by discussions 
of the articles presented. 



Home 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Home 
Home 
Away 



Gridders To Face 
Game Schedule Next 



Eight 
Year 



Hopkins. Mt. St. Mary's At 
Home— St. Johns Pending 



SOCIETY TO SEE LIQVW 
AMMONIA PREPARED 



An eight game football schedule is 
in the making for the Washington 
College eleven of 1935 and six of 
the tilts have already been definitely 
arranged. A game with St. John'; 
is pending for the local field and 
Graduate-Manager Fred W. Dura- 
schott has not yet booked the foe for 
the opening tilt. 
Oct. — Open 

Oct. 12 — Swarthmore Away 

Oct. 19 — Hopkins Hume 

Oct. 26 — St. John's, pending, Home 

Nov. 2 — Susquehanna Away 

Nov. 9 — Mt. St. Mary's Home 

Nov. 16 — Haverford Away 

Nov. 23 — Delaware Away 



LIBRARY ADDS 
MANY BOOKS 



HONOR SOCIETY HEARS 
ORIENTAL TRAVELLER 



Several Gifts Listed Among 
Acquisitions 



Many excellent new books are now 
on exhibition in the library ready to 
be listed in the Micou Memorial sec- 
tion, the Elisha Cullen Dick library 
in Reid Hall, and in the Washington 
College library proper. 

Cecil Rhodes" by Sarah Gertrude 
Millian, one of the best biographies 
of the past year, is there, bought for 
the Micou shelves. Another Micou 
biography is "Charles the First: King 
of England" by Hilaire Belloc. Bel 
loc has written biographies of half 
a score of famous French men and 
women. Reviewers praise this one 
highly. 

A little readers guide by Drury and 
Simnett will also be in the Micou sec- 
tion. This book criticizes all kinds 
of literature from fairy tales to 
scientific treatises. It tells what 
books one should read and directs 
very well the formation of a library 

Joseph Priestley's fine novel "Eng- 
lish Journey" and Stark Young's "So 
Red the Rose" are new Micou books, 
as are "I, Claudius" by Graves, "Soc- 
ial Gospel and the Christian Cultus" 
by Charles Morrison, "Ideals of the 
East and West" by Saunders, and 
"These Hurrying Years" by Gerald 
Heard. The two volume biography 
of Robert E. Lee by Douglas Free- 
man is one of the best-known and 
probably one of the best of all the 
new Micou books. 

The Reid Hall library has a new 
biography of Charles the First, writ 
ten by Charles Wheeler Coit. The 
girl's library also purchased "The 
End of the Chapter" by John Gals- 
worthy, "Story of My Life" by Marie, 
Queen of Roumania, and "A Gay 
Family" by Ethel Boilezu. 

The College library received as a 
gift from E. M. Noble translations 
of the works of Goethe and Schiller. 
Lives of both of these men are in- 
cluded, that of Goethe an autobio- 
graphy. The library has a copy of 
"Early Manor and Plantation Houses 
in Maryland" by Henry Chandler 
Forman, a book which is command- 
ing great interest throughout Mary- 
land. It is of local interest as sev- 
eral old Kent County homes are men- 
tioned and pictured. "The Revolu- 
tionary Poems of Philip Freneau" in 
three volumes and a reference book 
by Beers on "The Connecticut Wits" 
complete the more literary of the new 
books. 



Mrs. E. Price Ewing; Addresses 
Group On Asiatic Problems 



Japan's policy of militaristic ag- 
gression in the Orient is justified, ac- 
cording to Mrs. E. Price Ewing, 
Asiatic traveller and Internationalist, 
who spoke before the regular month- 
ly meeting of the Scholastic Honor 
Society of Washington College last 
Tuesday evening, at the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. Frederick G. Livingood. 
Mrs. Ewing also discussed the posi- 
tion of China and India in world af- 
fairs. 

The speaker described the condi- 
tions of Japan's recently acquired 
territories of Formosa, Korea and 
Manchuria as uncivilized and de- 
praved. The people, she said, were 
vulgar, primitive barbarians. Mrs. 
Ewing praised the excellent work that 
Japan is doing to establish better liv- 
ing conditions in these lands. 

China and India were discussed 
concerning manners, customs and 
philosophies of the people. The ef- 
fect of the Mongol invasion into China 
was reviewed. The independent In- 
dia provinces, free from British rule 
are modern states of advanced gov- 
ernment and social development, said 
Mrs. Ewing. Throughout, Mrs. Ew- 
ing laid the ills of the Orient to Eur 



HONOR GROUP 
INSTALLS TWO 

President Mead Speaks To 
Silver Pentagon Society 

Dr. Gilbert Wilcox Mead, president 
of Washington College, was the prin- 
cipal speaker at the annual installa- 
tion banquet of the Silver Pentagon 
Honor Fraternity, held last Wednes- 
day evening at the Voshell House, in 
Chestertown, Maryland. Harry C. 
Rhodes and Robert S. Shaull, '35, 
were formally inducted into the Fra- 
ternity by John M. Lord, its presi- 
dent, and William 0. Baker, the vice- 
president, acted as toastmaster for 
the occasion. Shaull also spoke in- 
formally on "Silver Pentagon as it 
Seems to the Student Body." 

President Mead's talk centered a- 
bout the function of an honorary 
leadership society on a college cam- 
pus. He drew comparisons between 
various paired xypes of national hon- 
or societies. The history of the 
founding and growth of the most 
op & ean interference and commercial \ famous of each class of such organi- 
explottation. Until the West is (ii-i zatlons was outlined by the speaker, 
vorced from Eastern interests, the Dr - Mead emphasized repeatedly the 
two can never approach an under- [ loyalty a society like the Silver Pen- 
standing, emphasized the speaker. I ta £ on must always show to the Col- 
Mrs. Ewing was introduced by Wil- le ^ t of which it is a part. He insist- 
liam Baker, vice-president of the | 



Chemical Students Als 
Distill Mercury 



To 



NO LACK OF SPIRITS MARKS RETURN OF ALUMNI, 
WHOSE BANQUET IS AFFAIR OF SMASHING JOLLITY 



The preparation of liquid am- 
monia at thirty degrees below zero 
and the distillation of a metal, mer- 
cury, at many hundreds above, will 
mark the program of technical dem- 
onstrations to be presented at the 
regular meeting of the Washington 
Chemical Society at 7 P. M. on Tues- 
day, November 13, in Room 35 of 
William Smith Hall. 

Charles Dudley will prepare liquid 
ammonia and show its peculiar prop- 
erties. An experiment with the 
distillation of mercury by means of 
reduced pressure is to be done by 
Ear] Price. Elliot Brown will dem- 
onstrate and explain a new Borax 
bead test. The Soxhlet cxtralion of 
fats is to be shown by Edward Lowe. 
Emerson Slacum is to demonstrate a 
method for the quantitative and 
qualitative analysis teats Cor arsenic, 
All interested will be welcome al this 
instructive and entertaining meetins 



by Carl Cochran 

With alumni massaging the calves 
of their legs with RUBBING alcohol 
and imbibing generous draughts of 
Bromo-Seltzer, Sunday morning, and 
the week following Homecoming cel- 
ebration, appeared on the autumnal 
(or is it winter?) stage. 

Sudden, unaccustomed, and stren- 
uous exercise on Saturday, between 
the halves of the football game was 
lOsponsible for that -'sore all ->ver" 
feeling. They were nil there—tall 
men, short men, big men, fat men, 
skinny men — in fact all kinu — from 
Keenan to Brimsfield. Here and 
there a familiar W shone out on a 
sweater which hinted strongly of 
moth bulls. While some of the alum- 
ni present regained their undcrgiad- 
uate spiriis once again and were 
demonstrating it by marching around 
the football field in a rollicking, hil- 
arious, pa nuli\ Ur- undergraduates 
kept company with more alumni and 
Cornier athlete! who, while casting 



longing glance.: toward the field, sh<-i! 
ed peanuts for little Jane and Bobby 
While students on the Hill were 
standing in line Saturday evening in 
the cafeteria, alumni — the male poi 
tion — were enjoying a stag dinner at 
the Voshell House, downtown, Che: 
tertown's most stately hostelry. With 
Page Young and Harry Russell act- 
ing as self-appointed, duel-toastmas- 
ters and trying to keep the affair 
from dragging, things went along 
very smoothly (???). The most 
prominent speech of the evening 
was. "To Hell with poverty — let's 
ha've a drink" Which came from the 
noble lips of none other than rotund 
Eddie Keenan. A very pleasant su 
prise came when Henry GUI appeared 
on the scene and proceeded to distri- 
bute his famous white pencils to the 
former school buys. Once, when the: 
party began to lag in its progress, 
some of those present who were mosl 
bored found diversion in tossing wat- 
(Gontinued On Page 4) 



ed that campus politics and personal 
prejudices must never enter the con- 
sideration of group action by socie- 
ties designed for service to the stu- 
dents and the college. 

Optimism for the eventual success 
Elects o:f: tne conversion of the Silver Penta- 

Rr>. • i « gon into a circle of the national hon- 

. L. jWaiJl i'ir t t resident , orary f ra ternity of Omicron Delta 
Kappa was expressed by Dr. Mead. 
Group Aims To Promote Deep- j He commended the body for its act 



Honor Society, after a short busi- 
ness meeting conducted by Dr. K. S. 
Euxton, tiie president. 



Historical Society 



er Interest In History 



Robert L. Swain, Jr., was elected 
President of the Washington College 
Historical Society at a meeting held 
Friday, November 2. Swain was un- 
animously elected. To him goes the 
credit for the organization of this 
ociety. 
The Historical Society announces j tne students. 



ion a year ago when it returned 
its Blue Key charter to National 
Headquarters and sailed again un- 
der "it's own colors." 

Shaull, the student speaker, and 
newly installed member, commented 
on the success of Silver Pentagon's 
dance program. He noted that many 
of Silver Pentagon's services and 
actions to benefit the College were 
not always called to the attention of 
Hence, occasional 



its aim to be that of promoting a questions of the value of the organi- 
deeper historical interest and culture. | sation outside of its honorary recog- 



It will sponsor speakers from time to 
time that should prove very interest- 
ing. It also wishes to create more 
interest in local history 



nition were heard, but not justified, 
! concluded the speaker. 



SHORE STUDENTS ARE 

Other officers elected by the more QUESTS OF COLLEGE 



than forty-five members present were: 
Vice-President, Michael Wallace; 
Secretary, Priscilla Grainger, Treas- 
urer, George Pratt. Doctor Dole 
and Professor Dumschott were named 
Honorary President and Faculty Ad- 
visor respectively. The Program 
Committee appointed was as follows: 
Ira Measell, Chairman; William Hall, 
Martha Harrison, Lawrence Wil- 
liams, and Joe Freedman. It was an- 
nounced that the society will meet 
monthly. 



Public Education Discussed 
By Dr, F. G. Livingood 

Thursday evening, November S, 
Dr. Frederick G. Livingood, head of 

the Department of Education at 
Washington College, spoke before the 
Centreville Rotary Club at their reg- 
ular meeting. In observance of Na- 
tional Education Week, Dr. Livingood 
Chose a phase of public education as 
the topic for his talk. 



Athletic Association Gives Boys 
Chance To See Game 



Five hundred and thirty-five boys 
representing twenty-eight Eastern 
Shore high schools and one Delaware 
high school were entertained as 
guests of the Athletic Association on 
Homecoming Day last Saturday. 

The registration and instruction of 
these sub-collegians was handled by 
Sadler, Shaull, and Yourtee, repre- 
sentatives of the Student Council. 
Copies of the Colleges' songs ami 
cheers and a large maroon "W" were 
distributed to the visitors in order 
to aid them in joining the singing and 
the cheering on the athletic field, and 
o distinguish their present 
eruesis of the college. 

I, was interesting to note that 
many of the principals and ■ ■■ 
>u charge of these visitors wove alum- 
ii of Washington College and ware 
returning tor the first tune in many 
years. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 1934 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the studejnt body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md„ 1782. 

William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus- Manager 

Emerson Slacum . . Asst, Bus. Mgr. 



Associate Editors 

Frances Silcos. Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte, William McCullough 

Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, Sl-50 a year. 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 1934 



SERVICE AND THE SILVER 
PENTAGON 

The Silver Pentagon Installation 
Banquet of last Wednesday called at- 
tention to one of the few functions 
of the Society that are not College- 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



the College at the Homecoming Ban- 
quet last Saturday night serves to 
differentiate again the war-time, and 
immediately post-war generation 
from the students of this later and 
not so commercially prosperous 
times. 

Several recent occasions have con- 
clusively shown that the college 
men, and women, too, of today do 
not act the part of senseless rowdies, 
but conduct themselves in the fashion 
of ladies and gentlemen, under cir- 
cumstances which give much more 
cause for hilarious rejoicing than a 
re-union banquet. They are. for the 
most part, serious and purposeful 
people, striving and learning in a 
hard, but not a mad, world. 

The graduates of one or two de- 
cades ago have often been called a 
'lost generation,' because they grew 
up in the hectic times of war and 
reconstruction. Then, values were 
warped, the shot nerves of the whole 
world were super-sensitive and wild; 
everyone sought bitter, new sensa- 
tions. The shell-torn, corpse-strewn, 
lice-infested fields of France have 
made their impression on these taut, 
tense people of E. Scott Fitzgerald's Hey-Ho! A columnist in "The Buff 
pen and time. anc i Blue" of Gallaudet College says 

Perhaps these poor people can, tnat „ tne B] ues were buried under an 
then, with the few weak ones of re 
cent graduation who have merely im- 



With nil the local interest about 
football, homecoming, monthly tests, 
etc., such things as regular columns 
for the W. E. (weekly effort — not 
Washington Elm as you thought) 
seem to take a back seat. Even the 
exchange papers that we read for 
ideas give us startling news items a- 
bout what their old grads have done 
"For Old Times Sake," but after last 
Saturday — the banquet at the Voshell 
House — etc., Etc. Etc. — comment on 
such items wouldn't stir up a ripple 
around here. 

(Here-Here: Can't prattle on like 
this — as the rider said to the runa- 
way horse, "Woe unto you.") 



itated their elders, with no reason of 



■wide. Usually the public attention j their own, be pardoned a bit for kick- 
bestowed upon this campus leadership | ing out windows in a frenzy of good- 
fratemitv is upon some one of the , fellowship. The point of the whoie 
scores of occasions that it is acting j matter is. besides bringing home ; the 
as a body for the public good. 



j greater soundness of a depression 



Perhaps too few students realize; bred generation, and the . effect; 

1 war, that it is very sad to have to ^ay 
"atnenV and "requiescat's" over so 



not 



the actual significance of the Silver 
Pentagon Society on the Hill. Per-, 

haps, too, thev accept the honor of much manhood that has 
membersnip in it as merely a token I -ached middle age. Yet such 
of personal popularity, as wa 
case often in the old days of 
Key, and open class elections. These 
concepts should, of course, be alter- 
ed with the vastly revised nature of 
the Society. 

Rhodes and Shaull, the two recent- 
ly-installed Senior members, repre- 
sent the first work of the new system 
of selection of affiiliates. Candf 
dates must qualify on the point sys- 
tem, which Is outlined in the Hand- 
book of the College. 



the be the stern necessity if this genera- 
Blue ticra doesn't make a better job of 
government, and society, and Home- 
coming Banquets. 

oo 

CHEWING GUM AND OTHER 

FUN 
The college student is theoretical- 
ly polite. In public, at least, he pre- 
;" | sumably follows the recognized forms 
of behaviour. The peculiar varia- 
The standards tions of these customary manners ob- 
here are high enough greatly to re- £erve d in recent student assemblies 



have caused much comment 



strict the field of eligibles, to diver- 
sifv the fields of leadership present- 
ed," and to insure candidates of recog- the faculty, and senou 

nized achievement. Further, elec- ' dents. The effect 

tion is completely removed from the i speakers must be more pronounced. 



avalanche to the tune of 51 to in 
favor of the Washington College ov- 
ergrown strongarin boys." 

(Even though such admiration for 
our team is a welcome change, we 
still maintain that we got the biggest 
kick out of the 6-0 victoiy back in 
'32. Remember that victory bomhe?) 



In a recent annual report by the 
President of one of our well-known 
New England Universities, I find a 
paragraph which sets me thinking a- 
bout Washington College, and its at- 
titude in respect to the problem he is 
discussing. 

Starting with the statement that 

'the depression has brought a new 
seriousness to students everywhere," 
he discusses that remark in relation 
to his own institution. This is the 
last part of his paragraph: 

It used to be the custom, at least 
in some colleges, for socially ambiti- 
ous students to affect an aroma of ig- 
norance, — evidently thinking that it 
ould make them more popular. But 
an aroma of ignorance receives no 

more approval in this University's 
best circles today than an aroma of 
gin would receive at a W. C. T. U. 
convention. I have never known 
honors for scholastic achievement to 
be more earnestly coveted than they 
are right now."" 

Washington College never was re- 
nowned as a "country club college." 
For many reasons, the jazzomania of 
prosperous days, I have been told, 
made less impression here than on 
many another campus. Still, I be- 



of campus politics, and the 
mequaliiies of personal popularity, 
by election from within the group, 



Unfortunately, they have no effec- 
tive means of telling the student body 



yet While we're on the subject of foot- 
will ball, we find that "Herb" in the 
"I\.mpk University News," has p. line 
of thought en tiic jnsuiig heroes — 
the linesmen, particularly the tackles. 
He says, "Many of the opposition 
plays are directed at the tackle posts. 
Two snd ocmecruos three men are 
pointed to take the tackle out of the 
play, iet these tackles on the de- 
fense are responsible for stopping 
those tackle thrusts even before they 
reach the line of scrimmage.. They 
outcharge and upset the opposing 
tackle, .smash tlirongb. the interfer- 
ing backs, and spill the ball carrier 
before lie makes a yard. A toufeh 
among j j b m an y man's league. And they 
it — GO smashing miuutes of it. 
the guest [Then they read in the morning's pap- 
ers how so-and-so won the ball game 
by a thrilling last-minute run for the 
only touchdown. 



where a unanimous vote is required i how surprised they are at the dis- 
for approval of a candidate. Tfle | conr tesv shown them at the "friend- 
total membership of the society has ; c0 \\^ se 
been limited to eight, in the ratio of j J __ _ 
five seniors to three juniors, plus. 
course, faculty members. 
present members qualif; 



It is, of course, true that all as- 
Alf of the I sembly speakers do not deliver mas- 
under the terpieces of phetorical composition, 



point system. Thus there is estab- ; jji tones of majesty and grace. Many 
lished for the representation of all ! f them are not even very entertain- 
tbe major activities as nearly an ideal | j ng . This latter variety, more than 
"steering body" as can be conceived. | any other, offer the greatest chal- 
Through the group, student trends j lenge to the student. Newton ^was 
and opinions may be submitted in 
proper form to the seats of authority 
concerning these trends and opin- 

ions. The Society, itself, often ob- both gave greatness to the world. 
tains student privileges or benefits by Greatness of this caliber is not likely 
expression of its own opinion, be- .to be found in the usual assembly 
cause it is composed of representa- speaker; still, every man must have, 
trves of the whole student body, and something to offer, and if the student 
thus its opinion is the public opinion is alert and intelligent enough he will 
College. ifind what, in the address, means most 



not an entertaining man, and there 
is no record that St. Peter ever told 
funny stories- It is undeniable that 



;\aterial services of Silver 
Pentagon to the College a& a whoie 
are Innumerable, as, for example, two 
years ago, the small activities fee 
which was added to the College bud- 
get solely through the efforts of Sil- 
ver Pentagon by its petition to the 
Board of Visitors and Governors. The 



to him. It seems reasonable to sug- 
gest that if one absorbes the very 
best from a large number of person- 
alities into himself, the result will be 
a composition of strength and char- 
acter. 

The point of the matter is, then, 
„_ that not only may profit be gained 
fee has made possible the existence | from attention in Assembly, but also 
of several important organizations on [that discourtesy by reading, gum- 
tbe Hill, which otherwise would have I chewing, sleeping, and such extiane- 



For those who would be Winchel's 
we recommend to them the offer of 
"The American Campus." This com- 
posite undergraduate puolication con< 
tains the news from colleges all over 
the country and will send you a car- 
ton of cigarettes, the brand of your 
own selection, for every "campus tid- 
bit" that you send in that is printed. 

The "Campus" says, "The best one 
to reach us last week was the one 
from a Syracuse student who tells us 
that when a professor fell asleep 
the beginning of a class period 
cently, the considerate students let 
him sleep until the end of the per- 
iod." 

(We feel sure that there is better 
news than that around here — to say 
nothing of escaping the editor's blue 
pencil. Send your contribution to — 
The American Campus Publishing 
Co., 15 West 38th St., New York 
City.) 



Students Seen As 
Serious- Minded 



"Aroma Of Ignorance" Once 
Affected Has Gone 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-Iy Heard 



Black and blue from blows and 
kicks, our tender feelings still quiv- 
ering from the sneers of a multitude, 
and with our hair graying around the 
temples, we still intend to continue 
writing the first half of this calumny. 

According to Mr. Fagm, who 
wasn't a viper after all but a very in- 
teresting assembly speaker, the Rus- 
sians often have to wait two years be- 
fore they can buy a ticket to the 
Soviet theatre, presumably waiting in 
line all this time. A Russian would 
feel right at home in our cafeteria 
line. 

Incidently, Manager Rhodes has 
hatched a diabolical scheme to pester 
us long suffering students. He has 
the knives heated so we can't spread 
too much butter on our bread. Next 
he'll have some machine to split a 
leaf of lettuce edgewise, to make the 
salads stretch. 

We missed one of our social lights 
of the school this week. Mr. Gold- 
stein was paid to come home to vote 
(most likely to cast a proxy vote for 
half the county. And all we could 
get out of this election was a cigar 
— which exploded in our face). Ev- 
erybody seems to be against us ... . 
when they pat us on the back, they 



lieve it true that the hard scramble are just looking for a soft spot to 



after the necessary financial backing 
achieve a college education has 
brought a new seriousness into the 
average college youth of America, 
and Washington College has not es- 
aped the effects. 
We know, especially from the ex- 
perience of recent graduating class- 
es, that a college degree is certainly 
not a passport to social exclusiveness, 



plunge a knife. . . Gardiner says he 
knows that unly God can make a 
tree, but he don't think a Fern is in- 
cluded ill the tree family , "Doc- 
tor" Rhodes is learning to play the 
mouth organ. 



Ye olde exams are coming around 
tht mountain, again and many of us 
will be lost in the rush per usual — 



nor a guarantee of financial success. I but no! Let us to arms and show 
We know that with the limited oppor- our profs that the super-civilized stu- 
tunities for young men and women i dents of Washington College are not 
today, the only way to get and to hold j deteriorating. For those who have 
a job is to be able to demonstrate a j not already found out how to make 
moral and an educational leadership, good grades, let me give you the "in- 
fo" on how it may be done. 

1. Answer, "what do you think?" 



faced financial failure. 

Perhaps this privilege of serving 
*.he whole College is what makes elec- 
Pentagon one of the 
highest honors the College can be- 
stvw. At least, student." all should 
feel that the ; exists for 

them, and its shield might well bear 

the words, **lu* popnli mprcma est 

fa*. 



A LOST GENERA I ION 

The cheap, bawdy and efal 
haviour of several of the Aiumni of 



ous activities reflects to the discredit 
of the whole College. Rhythmic 
mastication of tropical tree juice is 
never an artistic performance, One 
member of the faculty produced 
verse, founded on a quip of ancient 
standing, about the practice: 

"Gum-chewing girl and cud-chew- 
ing cow, 

There IS a difference, you'll allow. 

But WHAT is the difference; I 
know now, 

It'* th<- thi "■ ' oo'k on the face 

of the • 



As a closing thought we submit the 
following: 

A policeman covering his beat not- 
iced a small boy standing alone on a 
dark street corner. Since it was 
rather late the cop approached the 
boy and asked, "What are you doing 
out so late, sonny?" 

The little fellow replied, 'I'm a- 
fraid to go home." 

"Shur and why are you afraid to 
go home?' - the protector of tne pub- 
lie safety reiterated. 

"We have a new baby at our houKe" 
said the youngster. 

"What difference does that make," 
asked the cop. 

The little fellow grimaced. "We!) 
it's this way, my old man blamet> me 
f'-i veiylhiug" 

(From ' The Montana Exponent.") 



based on clear and correct thinking, 
and a proved ability at assimilating 
and analyzing facts. 

Opponents of formal collegiate ed- 
ucation used to glorify their own 
training in what they called "The 
University of Hard Knocks," largely 
because they considered college cam- 
pus life to be permeated by this 
"aroma of ignorance." Their claim 
is, largely, no longer true, as college 
men and women, country wide, are 
daily demonstrating. 

A sane, healthy, intelligent atti- 
tude toward college years as a period 
of intellectual broadening and deep- 
ening, has brought about a change. 
No longer is it necessary for an in- 
terested student to "bootleg" his in- 
terest in history, or philosophy, or 
literature, or art, for fear his fel- 
low students will laugh him into soc- 
ial unpopularity. On our own cam- 
pus, the organization or revival of de- 
partmental discussion groups, to ini- 
tiate or continue interest outside 
lassroom hours, is a definite sign- 
post in that direction. 

None of us are fools enough to ex- 
pect an immediate race of mental 
wizards to populate American college 
halls, or to look with disdain on any 
one less the intellectual aristocrale 
than those adorned with Phi Beta 
Kappa's golden key. But the plain 
and undisputed fact is, that business 
and government, and civic and soc- 
ial life in the outside world wants 
leaders — as near to A grade and B 
grade as it can get. 

My friend from New England is 
right. The "affected aroma of ig- 
norance" is no longer popular among 
the American undergraduates, 
Gilbert W. 



Mea 



Activities Committee 

Publishes Dance Date 



The Victory dance for the Frosh- 
Soph game will be held Wednesday, 
November 28, 

The Girls Dance is to be held Sat- 
urday, December H. 

These are the dates set by the Ac- 
tivities Committee at their first No- 
vember meeting. 



to the first question — that will give 
you a good start and will show the 
professor you are alert and on the 
job. 

2. Write so that the professor 
can't read your writing; he may give 
you the benefit of the doubt. 

3. Avoid answering the question 
— just ramble around the point. 

4. Be as disagreeable as you can 
to the professor to prove you are not 
handshaking him. 

5. Write in pencil and use scrap 
paper for your exams. 

G. Finally, and the surest way of 
making a good mark, is to tell the 
professor you know more about the 
Subject than he does — he just loves 
that — the fact is, he will think you 
are so "smart" he won't even mark 
your paper. 

Now, more power to you! On to 
your exams with those few points in 
mintl ! But with all our advice, which 
is just a side issue, we must not for- 
get our real job— NEWS, GOSSIP 
and DETECTING. 

We have detected this week: 

A few students of Washington 
College have found a new place to 
spend their intermissions — down at 
the jail — but need we go further — 
Jean Young, Phoebe Pyle, Al Wilmot, 
and Ray Kilby could tell you more 
about it, although I must add to?t 
Gibby Young must have thought he 
was dashing down a football field in- 
stead of driving a car, , . and then 
there was the party at Kirby's after 
the dance — s'nuff sed! Oh Jack, I 
won't tell anyone you were wrestling 
with a garden hose at 3 A. M. and 
of course as far as I'm concerned no 
one will know that our fair Priscilla 
was there in the midst of the gayety. 
Homecoming week brought back 
old memories or forgotten lovers — 
or are they forgotten, Estelle? I 
know Jean Young and Jean Harshaw 
were not pleased to see certain old 
grads gracing the campus. . . .Berry, 
the man of broken promises, wub up 
to his old tricks again by importing 
out-of-town ferns on the campus for 
the week end. 



SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SKIPPING OVER 
THE SPORTS 



by Phil Skipp 



Today finds the Sho'men with an 
open date. This affords somewhat of 
a break as many of the players man- 
aged to secure quite a few bumps and 
bruises during the game last week 
and a weeks lay off will considerably 
strengthen our chances for wins over 
Haverford and Delaware. 

Huffman, who was injured in the 
Mt. St. Mary's game, is steadily im- 
proving and will probably be ready 
for action when we play Haverford 
on the 17th. 

Maryland teams were generally 
successful last Saturday. Maryland 
turned in a 20-0 victory against Vir- 
ginia. Navy remains on the books 
as one of the undefeated, untied 
teams of the season as they easily de- 
feated Washington and Lee, a team 
Princeton was able to beat by only 
two points, 2 to 0. Western Mary- 
land was barely able to beat Catho- 
lic U. A blocked punt resulting in 
a safety and two points. Hopkins and 
Baltimore U. were unsuccessful, los- 
ing to Swarthmore and Shennandoah 
12-0 and 13-7. 

Our rivals from Delaware eked out 
a 7 to win over Dickinson last Sat- 
urday. From all indications the 
Blue Hens have a much stronger team 
than was generally thought at the be- 
ginning of the season and will be a 
tough team to bet. However, foot- 
ball games are won on the field and 
not on paper so only after sixty min- 
utes of hard fighting will the victor 
be declared. 



PAGE THREE 



FOOT BALL 

by George Ekaitis 




A fine day, excellent opponent and 
an interesting game. True, the game 
ended in a tie, but it was interesting 
from start to finsh. Both teams de- 
serve commendation for the brand of 
football exhibited. 

Today we are faced with an open 
date. But not so with the majority 
of schools. Some of them may be 
wishing before the day is over, that 
they could have had an open date, for 
they will have to take defeat with 
their bumps and bruises. In looking 
over the country's schedules, it is ap- 
parent there are some games on tap 
that promise plenty of action and 
doubt as to the victor until almost 
the closing whistle. There will be 
many spectacular plays and out- 
standing players and not a few dis- 
appointments. Many of the unde- 
feated are doomed to fall. Some of 
the outstanding games of the day are, 
the Notre Dame-Navy game in Cleve- 
land Ohio, the Syracuse-Michigan 
State game at Syracuse; incidentally 
both of these teams have yet to taste 
defeat and one is to fall by the way- 
side today. Ohio State against Chi- 
cago will furnish plenty of fireworks 
out there in the Mid-West, and with 
them there is the Northwestern-Illi- 
nois, and the Nebraska-Pittsburgh 
games, both of them promising plen- 
ty of what the spectator likes to look 
at. Some of the other big games are 
the Army-Harvard, Temple-Carnegie 
Tech, Colgate-Tulane, Yale-Georgia, 
Virginia-Washington and Lee, V. P. 



I.-North Carolina State, Minnesota 
Indiana, Iowa-Purdue, Wisconsin- 
Michigan, Arkansas-Rice, Baylor- 
Texas, California-Southern Califor- 
nia, and another pair of unbeaten 
teams out there on the Coast, Stan- 
ford versus Washington. 

And right close to home, if you 
like your football enough to travel a 
little, we have the U. of Pennsylvania 
against Penn State, at Philadelphia, 
which should be a good football game. 
Western Maryland versus West Ches- 
ter Teachers at Chester, Pa. George 
Washington versus Louisiana State 
in Washington and Delaware versus 
P. M. C. in Atlantic City, this last 
game being a night game and held in- 
side on a constructed gridiron in the 
Atlantic City Auditorium. 



RALLY FALLS SHORT 
AS MAROONS ARE TIED 



by William Kight 

A heavy Susquehanna eleven held 
the Maroon and Black gridders to a 
6-6 tie last Saturday, November 3, 
on Kibler Field, thus toppling Wash- 
ington from the list of undefeated, 
untied teams in the country. 

Playing before a large homecom- 
ing crowd, Washington scored in the 
middle of the second quarter when 
Nicholson crashed through the line for 
six points after a beautiful pass, 
Young to Salter, had placed the ball 
on the enemy five yard line. The 



try for extra point by placement 
failed; the ball went wide. 

Late in the third quarter Susque- 
hanna drove deeply into Washington's 
territory and scored shortly after the 
fourth quarter opened. Hanna mak- 
ing the touchdown. The try for ex- 
tra point failed. 

Washington staged a late rally in 
the closing stages of the game but to 
no avail, the final whistle found the 
ball on Susquehanna's two yard line. 



M. Ford; L. H., L. Frederick; C. H. t 
D. Metcalfe; R. H., V. Carter; L. F., 
M. Smith; R. F., M. Sutton; G., M. 
Tryzno. 

Sophomores: L. W., K. Anthony; 
I. L., E. Stevens; C. F., J. Harshaw; 
I. R., L. Stevens; R. W., P. Pyle; L. 
H., A. M. Sterling; C. H., N. Post; R. 
H., M. Brown; L. F., E. Wesley; R. 
F., M. Regester; G., L. Nicholson. 



JUNIORS DEFEATED BY 
SOPHS IN GIRLS' HOCKEY 



The Sophomores sprung a surprise 
on the Juniors at the first hockey 
game of the season when they won 
1 to 0. The front line of the Sophs 
was functioning like veterans. New 
halfback, Nancy Post, was always 
behind the line, ready to assist it. 
Louise Nicholson, goal-keeper, played 
a splendid game, always ready to en- 
courage and see openings for her for- 
wards to drive out. 

The lineup; 

Juniors; L. W., C. Jewell; I. L., 
L. Cruikshank; C. F., C. Helms; I. R., 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones : 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

EILLARD PARLOR 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 




ran^erJxou 




gh Cut 



In the manufacture 
of Granger Rough Cut Pipe 
Tobacco the Wellman Process 
is used. 

The Wellman Process is dif- 
ferent from any other process or 
method and we believe it gives 
more enjoyment to pipe smokers. 
. . . it gives the tobacco an ex- 
tra flavor and aroma 
. . . it makes the tobacco act 
right in a pipe — burn 
shaver and smoke cooler 
. . . it makes the tobacco milder 
. ..it leaves a clean dry ash 
— no soggy residue or heel 
in the pipe bowl 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 

the pipe tobacco that's MILD 
the pipe tobacco that's COOL 

—Jo fix seem fo like it 



\yhy-I don't heh'eve I 
have used a pipe cleaner 
in three or four weeks 



Granger leaves no gum 
in the bowl of my pipe 
— or moisture in the stem. 
It burns down to a clean 
dry ash." 




... in a 

common - sense 
package — 10c 



1934. Liggett & Mviits To».cvt> Co. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 1934 



ALUMNI RETURNS FOR 
BIG HOMECOMING DAY 



Stag Dinner At Voshell 

House Proves High Point 

(Continued from Page 1) 
er pitches througrh window panes, 
juggling plates and squashing piano 
stools and setees (bet Keenan had 
something to do with that). 

\ -est. around the corner of the 
telephone booth disclosed: A recently 
acquired, and vtry dignified member 
of the faculty getting an undisturbed 
audition of the regurgitations of two 
old grads. from his vantage point be- 
tween them. 

\ very distinguished graduate 01 
some thirty or forty years back cau- 



tiously inquiring for a place which 
served high balls. 

A waiter slicing the thick blue 
smoke with a silver knife. 

Tables set in the corridors in order 
to accommodate the over-flow of the 
food-slaying mob. 

Several broken seals and uncorked 
bottles. 

A clear view of the upper molars 
of the four members of the impromp- 
tu quartet. 



After An Evening of Hard 
Stodv Refresh Yourself at the 

CAFETERIA CANTEEN 
AH Kind, of Sandwiches, Can- 
dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 
Ice Cr«am 



HOLDEN'S 


SERVICE STATION 


Cross St. and Maple Ave. 


Sunoco Products 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



'The Bank Where 

You Feel At Home" 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



Bennetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protcne Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 
C. W. KiBLER & SONS 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



Dr. Jones graciously thankinp Gill 
for his pretty new pencil. 

After a mad scramble to the coat 
rack, and half an hour's argument ov- 
er hats and coats, the group adjourn- 
ed to the gym — the dance — and a per- 
fect ending for homecoming day. 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



pHiLLIPj 



VIGE^TAuLE 

SOUPj 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 


PARK 
BEAUTY 


ROW 
SHOPPE 


Phone 334-306 Park Row 





RADIO SUPPLY CO. 




Rad 


os, Washing Machines, 


Sew 


ing Machines. Repairs 


for 


all 


makes of radios. Rec 


>rds 


and 


Sheet Music. 




Lus 


by Moffett, F. W. Smith 


Jr. 




Phone 111J 





HUNGRY or 


THIRSTY? 


Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 


Beer And AH Soft Drinks Waiting For You 


Chestertown 


Restaurant 



;*tl. miMs Peer 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chestertown, Md. 



MAKE YOUR CAR 

A COLLEGIATE ONE I 

A complete accessory line 

Goodrich Tires 

STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

331 High St. 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



Visit 


ALBERT L. WHEAT 


For Anything 


in 


Men's Wear 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



Margaret E. Jefferson 


A Smart Shop For Women 


Cnestertown, Md. 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



GRAY BEAUTY SOLON 

Reasonable New Fall Prices. 

Watch announcements of 

Specials each month. Starting 
November 1 for the month of 
November on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sham- 
poo and Finger Wave 75c. Mani- 
cure 35c. 

Regular prices on Friday and 
Saturday. 

Over Jefferson's Store 
PIiodc: Chestertown 106 




NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF NOV. 12-17 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12-13 
DAMON RUNYAN'S 

"THE LEMON DROP KID" 

with LEE TRACY - HELEN MACK 

Also — BING CROSBY Musical, Cartoon and 
Novelty. 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, NOV. 14-15 
WILL ROGERS in 

"JUDGE PRIEST" 

Also — Comedy "Men In Black,'' Cartoon and 
Musical. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, NOV. 16-17 
DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

JOHN WAYNE in 

"MAN FROM UTAH" 



EDDIE QUILLAN in 

"THE GRIDIRON FLASH" 



SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



College Fee No 
Longer Itemized 

Total Determined By Cost Of 
Operation 

Editor's Note: 

Many inquiries have been receiv- 
ed concerning the allottment of the 
general college fee. The following 
information was obtained by a staff 
writer, from an interview with the 
Business Manager of the College. 



Heat, light, water, janitor service, 
Reid Hall matron and meals, re- 
pairs and teachers' salaries are in- 
cluded in the general college fee. No 
definite allottment is made to any 
item, but from previous years it is 
known that the total average of these 
expenses is the same. The general 
college fee is determined by dividing 
the amount necessary to cover these 
costs by the average number of stu- 
dents. 

There was a time when a definite 
percentage of the fee was set aside 
for each item. That was unsatisfac- 
tory as the individual items would 
vary considerably at times while the 
total remained the same. By lump- 
ing the necessary expenses sufficient 
funds are always on hand to cover 
varying costs. 



RAT HALL ACTIVE IS 
VARIETY OF WAYS 



'Success Story" To "Music And 
Art" Occupy Frosh 



Success Story 
Ever since Hallowe'en, Johnny 
Mygatt has been the most popular 
man in the tiass. "I attribute my 
popularity to eating plenty of Dusty 
Rhodes' scrapple," says Johnny. 



his shoes at night, the boys use them 
for a refrigerator. Leon's feet are 
responsible for the icy chill that per- 
vades Rat Hall at times. 



Advertisement 

Attention, Reid Hall: WANTED, a 
date. Apply Woodrow Simmons, Rat 
Hall. Give references and past ex- 
perience. 



Fall Fashions 

Don McDorman has introduced a 
new mode in flashy shorts. Iggie 
Benham is the Beau Brummel of the 
bathrobe wearers. Doering an J 
Bergdoll continue to lead the fashion 
parade when it comes to vivid paja- 
mas. 



Weather Conditions 

Leon Horwitz claims to have the 
coldest feet in the dormitory. They 
are so frigid, that, after he takes off 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety Fir«t 

F. G. Usilton, Pre*. 

L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



Crime Wave 

Latest mystery baffles police! 
Strange discovery of shoes, books, 
straws, tacks, hammers, and what- 
have-you in Kosowsky's bed. Located 
between the sheets. Inspector Bride 
on the case. Looks bad for the cul- 
prit. Revelation next week. 



his toothpick, 
his soap-case. 



Doering still wants 



Music and Art 

Fred Micari is taking private danc- 
ing lessons (the one-foot kind) from 
Dr. Beachley. Rumors have it that 
Hill Billy Simmons and his boys are 
going on the air soon. 



LeCATES BROS. 
BARBER SHOP 

Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



Lost and Found 

Leon Horwitz is still looking for 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 



Bid. Given on All Type, of 

Construction 



Chestertown 305 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Wat.on, P. S. T. and Eait 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and We.t 

Hall.. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



Good Taste / 




IdfolBd&i 



The cl^r^||i%t: 

these irMho rpiMest leaves 

we/cfem<r 




It's good to smoke Luckies for Luckies are round, 
Luckies are firm, Luckies are fully packed with 
only the clean center leaves -these are the mild- 
est leaves -they cost more -they taste bet^, v " 



"It's toasted" 

^Yoar threat pnttttion — against irritation — against nrngk 



have the big- 
.on the college has 
probability a well- 

.. from Philadelphia 

for the ihuK-e. 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 1934 



DOIN'S 



: iand thtr Maid of Honor will be Miss 
: Pricilla Grainger. 

i On Friday night, the Freshmen 
| class put on an excellent show. The 

: Pajama Parade was a howling suc- 

Friday was certainly a day full of | cess and the various contributions to 
events. One young lady especially '■ the bonfire were certainly a credit to 
really believed in starting the week ' the college and to that class. Johnnie 
end off right- Enroute to Centre- Bride did more than his part in lead- 
viile. with a car full of friends. Miss ' ing the cheers and songs around the 
Marian Brown hit the side of a truck. : blazing fire. With Susquehanna in. 
Her car swerved off toward a ditch, \ flames, and the scores of our prev- j 
but righted itself. For a moment icjious combats with that college going 
looked like a very serious accident! up in smoke, the merry crowd of on- 
and according to "the driver of the j lookers yelled their throats hoarse. ! 
truck, danger was avoided only by ; Several members of the Faculty were ! 
Miss Brown's skillful handling of the ; present and when the usual edition; 
car. Little hair.: was done to the; was hauled upon the fire, one mem- 1 
truck but the left fenders of Bliss ber was heard to say, "My word, it 
Brown's car were torn off and the [ looks like a great big wardrobe." j 
> (Maybe they don't have them in Eng- ' 
land). Remember the buckshot ep- 
isode of last year? 

Didn't the old grandstand rock at 
! the game. Especially when Bill 
Nick carrieJ the ball over for a 
i touchdown. And didn't Al Bilanci- 
j oni do himself up proud, and poor 
.Huffman fight a hard battle from the 
bench? The team sure missed you 
running board bent upward. The Huffy. As for the Alumni, with 
right hand d-.or was severely damag-j^ x e eii::n out in front, supported by 
ed. Fortunately no one was injured. | the _ wn ole school, that snake dance 
That same day, the engagement of j during the halves was lively enough 
Miss Barbee Humphries, class oi "34, | to go down in history. We must 
to Mr. Dudley Brown Rowe, a gradu- strive for bigger and better men. 
ate of the University of Virginia, was The gym had a full house at the 
announced. The wedding ictory dance, in spite of the sore I 

place in January. Mrs. Frank j throats and banged-up team. Those | 
Goodwin will be Matron of Honor! v.-ha were near enough to hear the 




music said it was splendid. During the 
intermission, the Greek's did plenty 
of business, although a number were 
entertained royally at Mr. Vernon 
Kirby's and the Foley mansion. 

A number of Alumnae spent the 
night at Reid Hall. Among them 
were Miss Wilma Dahn, Miss Mary 
Farr, Miss Anne Peck, Miss Dorothy 
Kimble, Miss Ann Brown, Miss Mar- 
ian Emmord, Miss Helen Morris, Miss 
Gladys Coucil, Miss Gertrude Chan- 
ney, Miss Isabel North, and Miss 
Sarah Ellen Byrn. Good old bull . 
sessions took place and we under- 
graduates listened to the words of 
wisdom which fell from the lips of 
those who were out in the hard, cruel 
business world. Most of us agreed 
later that we're darned glad to be in 
college. 

The following morning the Kap- 
pa Gamma Sorority gave a breakfast 
for its Alumnae at which Mrs. Win- 
ton Tolles made her first informal 
appearance as sn Honorary Member 
of the Sorority. 

Next week end will be a lazy one 



and we hope to recover sufficiently to 
get up to Haverford to cheer out 
team on to ANOTHER VICTORY. 



DATES OF FROSH-SOPH 
ACTIVITIES DECIDED 



The cafeteria committee of the 
Student Council after a survey of the 
conditions have listed the foods that 
are generally objectionable and have 
taken steps for the elimination or 
improvement of these foods. It has 
also been provided that the employees 
in the kitchen shall wear white caps. 

The date for the annual tie-up has 



been set for Monday, 12th, at 3:30. 

The Frosh-Soph football game wiH 
be held Friday, November 23. 

A committee is functioning to pro- 
vide activities for the Thanksgiving 
holiday. 



Men's and Ladies' 

SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



WILLIAMS 


FLOWER AND 


GIFT SHOP 




We Specialize in Ha 


ad-Made 


Gifis, Cu 


t Flowers 


and 


Corsages 




332 Hi s h Sr. 


Phone 81SF4 orh 


332 


High St. 




Telephone 


818F4 or 


362M 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



COM PLIMENTS 




SMITH'S KUT RATE 




DRUG STORE 
< 





— and the boys smoked them 
I in the nickels and the dimes 
— and they sang ff a hot time in the old town" 



—and the girls raked in the nickels and the dimes 




i ij. 

Smoking 
STAMDR 
The Presc, 



cigarette thats MILDER 
the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



© 19)4, Ijcaarr u Mvim Toiiatoj Co. 



Now Haverford; Next Dela- 
ware, And An Undefeted 
Sen.on 




f&ttjg&ftoi 





See Duffy and Rhodes Plumb- 
ing with the Joneses 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 9. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



GUEST ARTISTS 
GIVE PROGRAM 



Students Hear Selections By 
Peabody Musicians 



by Vincent Brandolini 

At the regular Thursday morning 
assembly, Nov. IB, a concert was 
presented by a trio of Baltimoreans, 
including Mr. Elwood Hawkins, bari- 
tone, Miss Miriam Amer, pianist, and 
Mr. Arnold Kvam, celloist. For Mr. 
Hawkins and Miss Amer, it was their 
first appearance at Washington Col- 
lege, and the second for Mr. Kvam. 

Mr. Hawkins, at present a student 
under John Charles Thomas, the fam- 
ous baritone, pleased the audience 
with his rich, solid and clear voice, 
having excellent range, and power. 
His last group of songs, when an- 
nounced, elicited many "ahs" and 
"ohs" of satisfaction from the audi- 
ence. Approbation by the students 
was shown in their applause. The 
spirit and fire, and interpretation of 
"I Love Life" were well done. 

Miss Amer added to the concert by 
playing her first two compositions in 
a solid and firm style, characteristic 
of these pieces. Ease and dexterity 
of execution and a contrasting light- 
ness of touch was shown in her ren- 
dition of Stravinsky's Etude. 

The majority of Mr. Kvam's re- 
pertoire was well-adapted to the 
tonal qualities of the cello. Flain- 
tiveness and entrancing mellowness 
were the key-notes of the selections, 
especially of the ever-popular "Old 
Refrain" by Kreisler, and Colter's 
"Hymnus." Antithesis of simplici- 
ty and mellowness was supplied in 
Perpetual Motion and Concerto in G 
Minor, in which skill in bowing, in- 
tricate fingering and use of har- 
monics were the outstanding featur- 
es. 

The program was exceptionally 
well received, indicating that the ap- 
preciation of music is still prevalent 
among the student body. The gen- 
eral consensus of opinion of the 
campus is decidedly in favor of these 
musicales. 

The program was as follows: 
Thanks to Thee Handel 

Quandero paggio (Falstaff) 

Verdi 
French Dring Song 

Soit Bourguignon 

Mr. Hawkins 

Air Bach 

Old Refrain arr. by Kreisler 

Hymnus Colter 

Mr. Kvam 
Prelude in C Minor Chopin 

Sonnet Liszt 

Etude Stravinsky 

Miss Amer 
Largo Eccles 

1st movement of 

Concerto in G Minor, Saint-Saens 
Perpetual Motion Van Goens 

Mr. Kvam 
I Love Life Mannezuke 

O Dry Those Tears Del Riego 

Green-eyed Dragon, Woolsey Charles 
Home on the Range 

Mr. Hawkins 



Dr. Buxton Attends 

A.C. S. Meeting 

Hears Talk By Midgely On 
Synthetic Rubber 



Dr. K. S. Buxton, Professor of 
Chemistry at Washington College, at- 
tended a meeting of the Maryland 
Section of the American Chemical 
Society, of which he is a member, on 
the evening of Friday, November 9, 
at the Johns Hopkins University, in 
Baltimore. An address on "Natural 
and Synthetic Rubber" was given by 
Dr. Midgely, President of the Ethy- 
lene Corporation of America, and 
Assistant Director of Research for 
tho General Motors Corporation, 



STUDENT TRW PLANNED 
BY SILVER PENTAGON 

Plans Are Still Tentative And 
Arrangements Not Complete 



A student trip by bus to the foot- 
ball game at the University of Del- 
aware is being sponsored by the Sil- 
ver Pentagon Society on November 
24th. 

Arrangements are being negotiat- 
ed with the Red Star Bus Line to 
supply the transportation and Grad- 
uate Manager Dumschott has arrang- 
ed for a student price of 5oc for ad- 
mittance to the game. The cost of 
the trip will not exceed the nominal 
sum of 75c and there is a possibility 
of a still cheaper rate. There is the 
chance that the busses will remain at 
Newark until 10:30 P. M-, in order 
to accomodate those students who 
wish to take advantage of the dance 
which is being given by the Delaware 
host, following the game for the en- 
tertainment of the Washington Col- 
lege students. 

The plans are still tentative and ar- 
rangements are not complete but at 
this writing over forty persons have 
indicated their desire to make such 
a trip. The future of this trip lays 
in the co-operation of the students 
with the initiative taken by the Sil- 
ver Pentagon Society. 




PLAYERS GIVE 
"JONESY" NOVEMBER 21 



Dramatic Club's Initial Produc- 
tion A Comedy 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
HEARS I.E. HANCOCK 



Noted Antiquarian And Patriot 
Here Monday 



James E. Hancock, Secretary of 
the Maryland and Historical Society, 
and a leading manufacturer of Bal- 
timore, will be the guest speaker of 
the first meeting of the Washington 
College Historical Society on Mon- 
day, November 26. He is the Pres- 
ident of the Maryland Society of the 
War of 1812 and of the Society of 
the Sons of the Revolution, and is al- 
so affiliated with a score of other his- 
torical and patriotic societies. The 
Secretary of War appointed Mr. Han- 
cock as custodian of Fort McHenry, 
a national shrine. He is an author 
of numerous publications and pam- 
phlets on historical subjects. In the 
civic and cultural affairs of his city, 
Mr. Hancock is regarded as a leader. 
All students are welcome to hear 
him. 

The address will be delivered at 
3:15 on the afternoon of Monday, 
November 19, in tht Dick Memorial 
Library in Reid Hall. The Presi- 
dent of the College, and various 
faculty members are. expected to be 
present. 



Dr. James R. Micou, Vice-Presi- 
dent Emeritus, and former head of 
the Department of Classical Langu- 
ages, of Washington College, will be- 
gin a series of anecdotes connected 
with life at the College, in next 
week's ELM. Dr. Micou has been as- 
sociated with Washington College 
for more than forty years. 



Y. M. C. A. HOLDS FIRST 
ANNUAL BANQUET 



Varied Program Presented By 
Members Of Organization 



The first banquet of the Washing- 
ton College YMCA was held in the 
club room of the Chestertown Res- 
taurant on Friday, November 9, 
1934. Joseph Mooney was toast- 
master and the speakers were Pro- 
fessor Frank Goodwin and Wesley 
Sadler. A program of mirth and 
melody was enjoyed by the thirty-six 
present. 

In his speech Prof. Goodwin out- 
lined what was expected of each Y 
member and Sadler visualized the 
future of the Y at Washington Col- 
lege. It was decided to make the 
Y banquet an annual affair. 

Selections rendered by the "Hill 
Billies" were enjoyed as they had 
foresight enough to announce the 
titles of their pieces. Ernest Hol- 
land in the best one minute speech 
gave a daring expose of his thwarted 
love life. William Van Newkirk was 
awarded the prize for the best joke. 

A quartet composed of Fears, 
Taylor, Williams and Doering sang 
and the new college hymn was sung 
by Lawrence Williams. Group sing- 
ing was continued throughout the 
dinner and the affair was concluded 
by singing the Alma Mater. 



SOPHOMORES WIN OVER 
SOPHOMORES IN ANNUAL 



FRESHMEN WIN OVER 
TUG OF WAR AND TIE-UP 



by Carl 

Under a sky threatening of snow 
and in a penetrating North wind 
freshmen and sophomore men, alike, 
experienced both defeat and victory 
in a double contest on Kibler Field, 
Monday, November 12, at 3:30 in the 
afternoon. 

In the first event — a tug-of-wnr 
between teams of approximately 
equal weight and consisting of fifteen 
men each, the rats were dragged mer- 
cilessly through a stream of cold 
water, played upon the center of the 
rope. They went down gracefully to 
n defeat due mostly to a lack of co- 
operation and a fnilure to time their 
efforts effectively. 



Cochran 

From the second contest, the tie- 
up, the freshmen emerged dusty, dir- 
ty, and tired, but at the same time 
victorious. In the short space of five 
minutes and forty-five seconds they 
had tied up every sophomore and had 
lost only five of their -own number. 
While it is true that the sophs were 
outnumbered the fact that the rats 
had a carefully predetermined plan 
of attack is probably the primary 
reason for their success. 

The whole nffair was sponsored by 
the Student Council, the members of 
which, along with Conches Kibler and 
Ekaitis, acted us judges. 



by Frances Silcox 

The Washington Players will pre- 
sent "Jonesy", their first production 
of the year, in the college auditorium 
on Wednesday evening, November 21, 
1934. 

The cast of the play, which has 
been rehearsing for the past month, is 
as follows^ 

Anne Jones — Carolyn Jewell. 

Mildred Ellis — Jean Harshaw. 

Mrs. Jones — Lelia Anthony. 

A Plumber — Norris Duffy. 

Another Plumber — Harry Rhodes. 

Henry Jones — William Hall. 

Wilbur Jones — Robert Fink. 

Billy Morgan — Robert Clifford. 

Eliza — Elsie Wharton. 

Diana Devereaux — Dorothy Clarke. 

Stanley Jackson — Lee Dolan. 

Mr. Silverberg — Lawrence Kolesh- 

Policeman — George Rasin. 

Diana Devereaux, touring with a 
stock company in the role of a South 
African native girl, comes to a med- 
ium-sized American city where dwells 
her uncle, Stanley Jackson, a prom- 
inent business man. In the town, al- 
so, live the Jones'. They consist of 
Mr. Henry Jones, a lawyer, his wife ; 
Grace, and their two children, Wil- 
bur and Anne. 

When the play opens, we find the 
Jones household in a state of turmoil 
and confusion. Wilbur, just home 
from college, has cast aside Mildred 
Ellis, his fond and affectionate fian- 
cee, and has fallen madly in love with 
Diana. To add further to the corrup- 
tion of the morale and tradition of 
the Jones family, he has, through the 
influence of his wealthy college 
friend, Bill Morgan, who is visiting 
him, lost heavily at gambling. From 
these, many complicated and amus 
ing situations arise that have to be 
straightened out in three acts. 

Bill Hall, overcome by Miss Devere 
aux's beauty, quite forgets his role 
of an angry commanding father and 
does a little dance to the tune of 
"Lou, Lou, Lou, you are my Lou" — 
the hit song of his own flame of 
Weber and Fields back in the "good 
ole days." 

Then Bob Fink, looking just too 
sweet for words in pajamas, proves he 
is a real college man who can appre- 
ciate honor between men and a wom- 
an of the world by putting on a real 
cave-man performance which just 
about takes the poor heroine's breath, 

Even Carolyn Jewell forgets her 
studious self once or twice and utters 
words we are unable to find in a dic- 
tionary. And, if you have ever 
wondered just how Dot Clarke could 
educate a prospective mother-in-law 
— come and see her give Mrs. Jones 
a piece of her mind. 

These are only a few of the unus- 
ual occurrences that happen in the 
play. We see plenty of fun, plenty 
of wisecracks — and there may be 
plenty of breaks if Bob Fink forgets 
to use the correct personal pronoun 
— so you had better be present on 
Wednesday evening. 



Jitney Players Here 

After Thanksgiving 



The Jitney Players, noted road 
company of the stage, will present 
Goldsmith's "She Stoops to Con- 
quer" at Washington College some- 
time near the end of November, ac- 
cording to word received from them 
by Dr. Gertrude Ingalls. Hope that 
this fine company would come to the 
College this Fall was expressed last 
summer by Dr. Ingalls, who com- 
municated with the Jitneys then. The 
visit will be sponsored by the Shakes- 
peare Plnyers and the Dramatic 
Club. 



GRIDMEN ARE 
ON ROAD TODAY 



Face Strong Haverford Team 
On Pennsylvanians' Field 

The Washington College football 
team takes to the road today when 
it travels to Philadelphia to take on 
a vastly improved Haverford eleven 
this afternoon on the Pennsylvanians* 
home field. 

Haverford will prove to be a hard 
nut to crack for the undefeated 
Maroon and Black team. The Pen- 
nsylvanians got off to a bad start this 
fall. They were defeated by Le- 
high, Susquehanna, Wesleyan and 
Johns Hopkins, but they improved 
each game. Johns Hopkins was very 
lucky to beat them a couple of weeks 
ago, and Haverford seemed to have 
gotten its stride last week, defeating 
a strong Hamilton team, 13-12. 

Holzer and Conn are the two back- 
field aces of the northerners. These 
two men have starred in all of their 
contests and can be be expected to 
Rive a good account of themselves 
this afternoon. Kane, an end, is no 
doubt the most outstanding lineman 
in the opposing forward wall. A lit- 
tle extra-hard blocking will be re- 
quired to get him out of the plays a- 
round his end. On the whole, the 
Haverford team has gotten new life 
and is anxious to avenge last year's 
9-0 defeat at our hands. 

Washington College will go into 
the fray with its strongest line-up. 
It has been two weeks since the Sus- 
quehanna game and ail of the v et- 
erans on the injured list have recov- 
ered completely. Huffman will be 
available for backfield work. Lord 
has finally gotten rid of his cold. 
Dwyer's shoulder and Ward's knee 
have both responded well to Trainer 
iaylor's massageing. During the 
past two weeks much time has been 
devoted to fundamentals, and it is 
expected that the followers of Wash- 
ington College will see a hard tackl- 
ing and smooth-blocking team take 
the field against Haverford this af- 
ternoon. 

Coach Ekaitis is undecided about 
his starting line-up, but it will prob- 
ably shape up as the line-up for the 
Susequehanna game, except that 
Huffman and Evans might start in 
the backfield. 

Probable line-ups: 
Washington Haverford 

Salter L.E Kane 

Kilby L.T Gamer 

Ward L.G Duff 

Lord C Boyle 

Tignor R.G Fraser 

Dwyer R-T Sinkler 

Bilancioni . . . R.E Morgan 

Greims Q.B Taylor 

Berry L.H Tierman 

Evans R-H Holzer 

Nicholson F.B Conn 



Cotillion Club 
Later Hours For 



Petitions 
Dance 



Conflict With Basketball Sche- 
dule Causes Action 



The scheduling of the basketball 
game with Upsala College, December 
fourteenth, makes it necessary for 
the Cotillion to start at a later hour. 
The originally planned time was to 
have been nine P. M., and the peti- 
tion now going the rounds of the 
activities committee applies for nine- 
thirty to one-thirty. 

This change will by no means set 
a precedent, but it is merely to be 
used when such an emergency as a 
conflict between two activities arises. 

Plans are afoot to have the big- 
gest and best Cotillion tin* coUeg« has 
ever aeon. In all probability a wall- 
known orchestra from Philadelphia 
will be obtained for the dance. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 1934 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 1782. 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel . Asst Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



day when the teai3°idds another vic- 
tory to its long and admirable string. 

The interim between the first three 
and the last quarter of the football 
season has not fostered a decline in 
the spirit of the whole College for 
the team's victories. A large cheer- 
ing section at Haverford today shows 
continued and increasing spirit. How- 
ever, next week, with, perhaps, the 
most crucial game of the season, and, 
incidently, the final one, even more 
enthusiasm than at the historic Hop- 
kins contest should be evident. 

The Silver Pentagon Society is ar- 
ranging for the trip to be made by 
the student body en masse. The 
proximity of Delaware should result 
in many more students present than 
at the Hopkins game. 

The thing to be remembered and 

demonstrated for the last games is 

, no different from that for the first 
Entered at the Chestertown, Md., Qnes Jt simply . g that the fine team 

postoffice as second class matter. of fhis J . ear has near ] y finished an un- 
beaten season by virtue of its own 
and its coaches conscientious efforts, 
AND with unwavering college sup- 
port. The mental attitude of success 
and adequacy for any situation is 
recognized as a strong factor in the 
realization of success. The team and 
ihe College body are still inseparably 
Dela- 



Associate Editors 
Frances Silcox, Dorothy 
Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, 
Taylor. Vincent Brandolini, 



Clarke, 
Alfred 
Anne 



Whyte. William McCullough 



Subscription price, $1.50 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 1934 



or the uninitiated to see how the mat- 
ter of the world acts and is acted on 
than at the six open meetings of the 
Washington College Chemical Socie- 
ty. 



THE IVY VINE 
Several related types of architec- 
ture are to be seen on the campus of together, and Haverford and 
Washington College. All tend to- ware may be written on the record as 
ward the Southern Colonial period, ' already vanquished. 

as illustrated in the Mt. Vernon- °° 

like treatment of Reid Hall, and the ADMISSION AND "CHISELERS" 
even more dignified Georgian ("Col- y ne season f or dramatics will open, 
onial Georgian", it should be noted) at Washington College, when the cur- 
William Smith Hall. This general tain yjggg nex ^ Wednesday evening on 
type of building has never been not- tne Washington Players initial pro- 
ed for its feeling of intimacy or of auction, "Jonesy." A large student \ 
informality. One cannot put window representation at such presentations I 
boxes with geraniums, or trellis' with ; Sj naturally, as important as a large 
clematis, on such structures. They st U{ j e nt section at an important foot- 
are invariably remote and bare. ball gam e. If one must reduce his I 
However, several examples are on every action to mere cause and ef- 
the Campus of the College to prove | fect< he can rightly say that attend- 
that much can be done with these ance at a dramatic production shows 
buildings to make them adaptable a5 much " sen ool spirit" as cheering 
parts of a whole effect. The gallant at a th!etic contests. 
"fan" of ivy which has mounted the Besides these "idealistic" attitudes 
caked face of William Smith, and the toward play attendance at College, 
equally courageous ivy vine on the tnere ^ ye t one much more significant 
Sc-jth comer of East Hall give beauty prac tical point. The scorn of the 
and dignity, and at once decrease the world is Q j re cted today toward a 
similarity of their respective build- ''chiseler." A politer name for one 
ings to sides of the Great Wall of of tnis con temptible species of human 
China. Ivy vines and ivy-covered : kjnd jSi in this usagei " ga te-c rasher." 
towers have apparently interested Tne same conventions of legitimate 
many people. Probably few plants | admission to an entertainment of any 
have found as much poetic use as ivy, , £ort appy to aI i tne ru ] es f organiz- 
not excepting such pastoral growths ed soc ; ety . A person dishonestly 
as gallingale. Always has ivy grown f orc j ng \^ way j n to a theatre where 
on the sides and up the spires of admission is charged is the same sort 
great halls of learning. "Storied of person wno would heretically in- 
walls" of antique castles must be ivy- vade the sanct uary of a cathedral. A 
matted. . cleric who condoned this latter act- 
It is not haphazard chance that ivy i(m wou ] d De condemned by all. Like- 
is a universal covering given by a. vr ^ SB sno ald an organization that os- 
thoughtful nature to mask man's tens jbiy requires a fee for admission 
crude efforts. Ivy has a thousand, to it£ activities be condemned by the 
virtues. Ivy is a plant of urban -^hde College if it encourages non- 
light and pastoral shade. It is stern, pay ing spectators. It is not to be 
severe, yet always green and alive, .^med that such was ever the case 
Milton referred to it among other f at Washington College, but the un- 
ways as "ivy never sere." Hence, fairness f the practice should at 
civilization has come to build four|j east De considered, 
walls and a roof, plant ivy on them, 
and call the whole a building. 



SEEING AND HEARING 

A number of students from the 
College attended Walter Hampden's 
interpretation of Hamlet, a tragedy 
written several years ago by a play- 
wright named William Shakespeare, 
in Baltimore last Friday night. Such 
visitations to the artistic offerings of 
the city are greatly to be praised. 
Also, in recent years a small number 
of students, in company of a profes- 
sor especially fond of fine music, have 
been accustomed to attend some per- 
formances of the opera during the 
season, in Philadelphia. 

It is odd, that more evidence of 
enthusiasm for the arts in the form 
of frequent trips to the theatre, the 
dance, the opera, the gallery or the 
lecture is not observed at the Col- 
lege. In many instances, students 
first learn at least partially to appre- 
ciate these things in their under- 
graduate days. It seems too bad 
that when they are learning about all 
these beautiful forms of expression 
with which man has for ages tried to 
make his lot pleasanter that they do 
not see a Russian Ballet, a Wagner- 
ian opera, or a Shakespeare play. 

The reason most frequently heard 
for this apparent apathy for the best 
in music and drama is, naturally, fin- 
ancial. Yet no undergraduate pre- 
tends that he doesn't spend a perfect- 
ly amazing annual sum on the frivol- 
ous pleasures of the movies and that 
peculiar American concoction called 
the ice cream sodo. Washington Col- 
lege students are not, of course, ad- 
vised to forgo these pleasures to hear 
Tannhaeuser. It is merely strange 
that more of them do not hear Tann- 
haeuser. 



Perhaps man's love and respect for 
ivy-blankets on bare walls is because 



CHEMISTRY 

There is no doubt that advertising, 



by it his buildings are clothed with a and especially that species of adver- 
bit of Nature's grace and harmony. ^ tisin £ called "ballyhoo" is a strange 
His efforts become a little more na-| and powerful phenemeon. If a re- 
turaU and thus a little more divine. downed chemical demonstrator was 
Ivy would not go well on the I engaged by the College at a high fee 
mosaics of St. Sophia or on the Par-I** perform certain experiments some 
tbenon. It would, however, fit beau- ! evening, no doubt the whole student 
tifully the brick expanses of the three j body would attend. When a series of 
men's dormitories and all about the. demonstrations spectacular enough to 
base of William Smith HalL Some- , interest the most ignorant scientific 



thing green and creeping would pull 
these buildings down where they be- 
long. Colonial Georgian architecture 
should not be applied to skyscrapers. 

Doubtless the Administration which 
cares for the grounds will someday 
plant some ivy somewhere. It is not 
hard to grow, and rooted plants may 
be obtained from costless slips. Wash- 
ington College would benefit from an 
"iry day" on a wholesale scale. Who 
knows but that the present classes 
may return to gaze at the cupola of 
Middle Hall and speak with Gray of 
"yonder ivy-mantled tower." 



MORE VICTORIES 
The past open week has given the 
Maroon and Black eleven respite 
from the labours of their vrinning, un 
defeated season. Doubtless the 
coaches have not allowed the period 
to be idle. This will probably be 
graphically xbown at Haverford to- 



jf 1Q — 

kfferJ)p% 



New Castle, Delaware. 
November 13, 1934. 
Editor: 

Washington Elm, 
Washington College, 
Chestertown, Md. 
Dear Sir: 

While reading through the Wil- 
mington evening paper one nite last 
eek I chanced to scan the happen- 
ings of "25 years ago today." In 
that column ran a statement to this 
effect: "The University of Delaware 
football team was defeated by Wash- 
ington College by the score of 34-0." 
With this game coming up soon as a 
main event on the two schedules, I 
thought the student body might be 
interested to read this statement 
through your paper. Maybe a slo- 
gan could be gotten from this bit of 
news so old, such as: "History repeats 
itself — let's prove it on the 24th at 
Delaware." 

Here's wishing your football team 
and student body the greatest day of 
the football season when they meet 
Delaware on the 24th. 

See you then. 

Sincerely, 
Charles E. Smith. 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



It has often been said that "hope 
springeth eternal." We are well a- 
ware of the strength of this state- 
ment because we still hope to some- 
day turn out a column that suits us, 
— so far there has always been some- 
thing that isn't what we want. Still, 
as the crafty wolverine used to say 
last year, "If you jest keep a'pluggin', 
sompin' is bound to happen, — cer- 
tain!" 



We Washingtonians should be 
proud of our new found pep and en- 
thusiasm this season. Such genuine 
school spirit as was exhibited the 
night before the Susquehanna game 
isn't generally found in other col- 
leges, by any means. 

"The Diamondback" prints a front 
page story telling of a pep rally and 
bonfire held on the drill field at which 
250 students were present, — and this 
from the University of Maryland with 
2000 students enrolled. 

'The University of Delaware Re- 
view" says — "We wonder why our 
cheer-leaders look apologetic and 
ashamed to lead a cheer when Dela- 
are is not doing so well and needs 
the cheering most?" 

There certainly can be no com- 
plaint about our cheering as the con- 
ensus of the team shows tha# it is a 
great asset. 



Herb Allison, a columnist in "The 
Diamondback," got magnanimous a 
few days ago and printed an ad free 
of charge: 

WANTED 
A DATE by the editor of last year's 
Reveille, who hasn't been out on a 
date for several months and feels 
very lonely. Rare line, good ap- 
pearance not particular, t*nd \i-*'y 
lonesome. Address P. O. box. 

(Attention business manager Gold- 
stein — there's a new line to take up.) 



layman is offered by a departmental 
club of the College, few over a score 
come to see and to learn, 

The low-temperature experiments 
done in the general chemistry labor- 
atory, and the low temperature meas- 
urements done in the physics labora- 
tory, were of the quality of profes- 
sional demonstrations. It is doubt- 
ful if more than twenty per cent of 
the student body has seen work with 
a temperature of less than — 180 de- 
grees F. The solidification of mer- 
cury is fully as interesting as a squab 
dinner at the Commons. Liquid am- 
monia behaves analogously to water, 
and opens a whole new philosophical 
concept of man's system of solvents, 
by which he measures many of his 
physical influences. "What a world 
of profit and delight" awaits the per- 
son who has never met chemical re- 
actions face to face. 

No better place has been discover- 
ed in many a week for the initiated 



Assembly Program 
Plans Completed 

Hon. T. Alan Goldsborough 
Speaks Next Week 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



We thought the tug of war and 
mud fight was a fine example of stu- 
dents striving towards the higher 
things. It was as peaceful as a naval 
conference — we never had so much 
fun since Aunt Eppie mistook the 
sulfuric acid for Listerine. 

It was colder out there than 
Ghandi in a rumble seat. 

A delegation of the Phi boys were 
loosed on the metropolis of Maryland 
Wednesday, stay away from the 300 
block Baltimore St., boys. ... Baker 
is writing to the states road commis- 
sion . Congratulations to Flicker 
as chief scavenger. . . . Pogie claims it 
took forty men to put him out of the 
ring in the tie up, but we think, from 
what we saw of the affair, that John- 
ny Bride did a pretty good job of it 
all by himself Brooks put up a 
good fight We saw a beggar ap- 
proach Rhodes and ask him for "sum- 
pin for a cuppacawfee", and Dusty 
handed him a lump of sugar. . .Ov- 
erheard on the campus — Let's or- 
ganize a new society — I feel like be- 
ing a President Coach Kibler 
should charge admission to his gym 
lasses — they are as funny as most 
of assembly speakers, and he could 
use the money to buy our cheer lead- 
ers a new pair of shoes (and what he 
had left over he could build a new 
gym with) — although "with" is a 
heck of a thing to end a sentence 
with — . 

We feel that with conscientious ef- 
fort and hard work we have a chance 
of graduating as a moron, after tak- 
ng those I. Q. tests . fractions al- 
ways did worry us, and when they 
give two of them in the same prob- 
em, it's just too much for our intel- 
lect ..We didn't study up on the 
thing. 



We notice that students at Antioch 
College are enthusiastic over their 
new cooperative bookstore while 
The Mountain Echo" of Mt. St. 
Mary's College is all hepped up about 
the college cafeteria which is about 
to open. 

(We wish them luck but feel that 
they don't know what they are get- 
ting into). 



Our friend Hascist X. Jukes of the 
"Temple University News," comes 
through with some more definitions, 
this time on elections. 

BALLOT: a lead missle used in 
guns; a toe dance. ' 

TAXES: a large state whose cap- 
ital is Dallas; plural term for cabs. 

RIVAL: a shotgun. 

CAMPAIGN : a bubbling liquor 
costing $8 a quart. 

NIRA: to be closer as "Come Nira." 

PACT: to be crowded. 

STATE: I like sirloin best. 

DEFEAT: they stick out when the 
blanket is too short. 

VOTES: food eaten by horses. 

FUND: to recover when lost; en- 
joyment. 



The assembly program for the next 
four weeks promises unusual inter- 
est. Congressman T. Alan Golds- 
borough will address the assembly of 
November 22. Since November 29 
is Thanksgiving Day there will be no 
speaker at that time. On Thursday, 
December 6, Mr. Harry C. (Curly) 
Byrd, Vice-President of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, will speak before 
the weekly assembly. For Thurs- 
day, December 13, the last assembly 
before the Christmas vacation be- 
gins, there will be a musical combina- 
tion from the Peabody Institute of 
Baltimore, Md. 



BUSKSHOT — Authorities at Sim. 
mons College for Women prohibits 
students from tickling each other for 
fear they will go into hysterica. . 
Singing in the showers is taboo at 
Newcome College . Then there was 
the Scotch tenor who was asked to 
sing as he never sang before — for 
charity The names and telephone 
numbers of all frosh women at Pitt 
can be bought for ten cents — read 
the wall in Middle Hall— Ches. 263 
Dumb Dora says that Ping Pong 
is a hairy ape The chaperons at 

St. Lawrence have threatened to 
strike unless more attention (a paid 
to them — see NIRA for a code 
Who said a saxaphone is an ill wind 
that nobody blows good? 



Now that tests are all over we 
can settle back in our arm chairs and 
rest until the next batch comes a- 
long next month. Tsk — Tsk, it's a 
shame we have to waste our valuable 
time with such outside activities as 
lessons when there are so MANY 
social engagements to fill. Just to 
think of it makes me so desperate I 
could go out and pluck a thistle or 
even climb a tree. But as I said to 
old F. D. that is not here nor there — 
it's just six of one and a half a dozen 
of another, all told. 

Speaking of social engagements, do 
you know there was a scavenger par- 
ty down at Mary Jo's Monday night. 
Six couples went tearing through the 
streets of Chestertown in search of 
plunder — wedding rings were taken 
from frightened wives — milk bottles 
snatched from babies and even little 
barnacles were not safe from the all- 
seeing eyes of the plunderers and 
orst of all someone asked Professor 
Ford if he had a W. C. T. U. pin — my 
only comment is "heroes are made, 
not born" . Skipp had quite a time 
the other night getting a young 
blonde Freshman our of Reid Hall 
without her boy-friend seeing him — ■ 
what to do, says, Lorraine. . Earn- 
ing of Peyser must be "Owen" some 
money over at the girl's Dorm — by 
the way he is traversing the grounds 
Leah Frederick and Gladys Rig- 
gins started out the year right by ov- 
erstaying their first "late" permis- 
sion Saturday night — from what they 
say it takes over an hour to drive up 
from Centreville — well, believe what 
you may, but I have my doubts. . - 
Libby Morgan's affection for V. Foley 
is steadily growing so 'tis said — eh, 
Clarke? What lies hidden in 

Flicker's diary is the burning ques- 
tion!!! 



With The Alumni 

Marion Clough is attending the 
Wharton School, University of Pen- 
nsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. He is> 
majoring in economics. 

Thump- <>n Kjowii is a Standard 
Oil tank salesman. 

Delbtrt Proudfoot is in the sales 
department of the Swift Packing 
Company. 



SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



SKIPPING OVER 
THE SPORTS 

by Phil SIcipp 



SOPHS TRIM FROSH 

IN GIRLS' HOCKEY 



Little to write this week. I say, I 
see that open date kinda takes the 
wind out of the sails. Can't use half 
a column bragging about our victory 
last Saturday because there wasn't 
any. Nevertheless the "Free State" 
was well represented in the win col- 
umn. The most notable victory was 
that of Navy over Notre Dame. The 
Middies won 10 to 6 and proved to 
the skeptical public that they really 
have a good football team. Then 
John Hopkins passed to a 17 to 14 
victory over Mt. St. Mary's in the bat- 
tle for last place in the state stand- 
ing. 

Squad gossip — Sure is good to see 
"Doc" Huffman in a suit again. Kil- 
by, Bilancioni, and Wilmot should be 
really inspired in today's game. They 
travelled over 600 miles to spend a 
few hours with their one and only. 
Tignor wants a suit of armor to 
scrimmage in. They call it the "Hell 
Wagon" and nobody disagrees. Young 
and Lord are the two extremes when 
it comes to speed. "Gib" always 
leads the boys in during the sprints 
while Lord brings up the rear. Beg 
your pardon, Johnny, you do beat 
Dwyer once in a while. Tackling 
Nick is like tackling a locomotive. 
Yep it's the same difference. The 
tackling dummy has decided to give 
as well as take. You can expect it 
to kick or hang up on you anytime. 
Evans will go places if he gets half 
a chance. Salter swears he is a punt- 
er only the coaches are afraid he'll 
lose all the balls. Ward is the best 
line man out there. Jones is the 
crooner of the squad, and he "will 
demonstrate the latest dance steps if 
you want to see them. A decoration 
for the fellow who succeeds in con- 
verting a point after touchdown. 
Nuff said. 



Anthony, Jewell And Bell 
Named To Board 



Friday afternoon was the scene of 
a hockey game between the Sopho- 
mores and Freshmen. It was an ex- 
citing game for all onlookers. The 
score was 2-0 in favor of the Sophs. 
The Freshmen have a united team 
with lots of courage and pluck. Most 
of the fouls they made were from in- 
experience alone, and in another year 
they should have one of the best 
working hockey line-ups ever seen at 
Washington College. 

The Frosh line-up was: 
Right Wing — Bell. 
Right Inner — Taylor. 
Center Forward — Unruh. 
Left Inner — Crawford. 
Left Wing — Westcott. 
Right Halfback — Pink. 
Center Halfback — Williams. 
Left Halfback — Lynch. 
Right Fullback — McCoole. 
Left Fullback — Wharton. 
Goalie — Clough. 

The three members at large elected 
for the Board of Managers are Kitty 
Anthony, Caroline Jewell, and Mar- 
garet Bell. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 

The Rexall Store 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Range*, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 
C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

lnterett paid on Deposit* 

Motto — Safety Firat 

F. G. Usilton, Prei. 

L. B. Ru.jell, Vicc-Pr.a. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Ring* and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



FOOT BALL 

by George Ekaitis 




The Navy football team is a fine 
example of what thinking, alertness 
and the will to win can accomplish 
in any line of endeavor. This Navy 
team has been outweighed and out- 
powered in almost every game, but 
has played hard, alert football which 
has discounted whatever difference in 
weight and man-power they have en- 
countered thus far this season, as 
their record of seven victories and no 
ties or defeats will attest, Last 
week they defeated a powerful Notre 
Dame team by taking their two 
chances to score and making some- 
thing of them, by scoring a field goal 
an'd a touchdown, winning the game 
10-6, although outweighed nineteen 
pounds to a man. Today they play a 
more powerful club in the University 
of Pittsburgh, and almost all uf the 
experts are picking the Navy to lose 
by at least two touchdowns. But 
you cannot tell what that Navy team 
will do, for they have proven to be a 
team that is wide s awake, making 



difficult problem on our Maroons' 
hands. It will take the notable six- 
ty minute football the team played 
against both Mount Saint Mary's and 
Johns Hopkins to bring this one home 
for the students and alumni to ad- 
mire. With a two weeks rest the 
squad appears to be in excellent 
shape for the sort of game they will 
find necessary. 



breaks, and then taking advantage of 
these breaks. They appear to be a 
team with the attitude, they won't be 
beaten. And a team that won't be 
beaten, can't be beaten! 

There are some other excellent 
games today. Some with high na- 
tional standing at stake, such as the 
aforesaid Navy-Pitt game; the Col- 
gate-Syracuse game; Bucknell-Wes- 
tern Maryland, and the Illinois-Wis- 
consin game. All of these teams are 
striving for national honors and a de- 
feat or tie, will throw them by the 
wayside. 

Some others of lesser importance 
as to national ranking, but not the 
least important to their rabid fans, 
Yale-Princeton, Fordham-Purdue, 

Carnegie Tech-Duquesne, Pennsyl- 
vania-Columbia, Southern California' 
Oregon, Detroit-Michigan State, and 
our own game with Haverford. 

Haverford has come a long way 
since the beginning of the present 
season. They appear to be a very 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies* 
Ready - to - Wear 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on AH Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 30S 




like ifi&t 
fragrtint Granger 




..,:.... ........ ...>-.,^.-..... 



... in a 
eotnruon -s&msij 
pachage~ We- 




lti the manufacture 
of Granger Rough Cut Pipe 
Tobacco the Wellman Process 
is used. 

The "Wellman Process is dif- 
ferent from any other process or 
method and we believe it gives 
more enjoyment to pipe smokers. 
...it gives the tobacco an ex- 
tra flavor and aroma 
...it makes the tobacco act 
right in a pipe — burn 
slower and smoke cooler 
...it makes the tobacco milder 
...it leaves a clean dry ash 
— no soggy residue or heel 
in the pipe bowl 

LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO. 



; ($1 J9M, tdfiOSTT A Myf.«s,1 



,s^^» 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 1934 



Freshmen Migrate 
As Winter Comes 



Travel Up And Down 
Down And Up 



And 



Dunn charged that Tony has four dif- 
ferent kinds of hair oil that he 
brought from Cuba. Probably Mr. 
Dunn doesn't know that there is a 
duty on petroleum that adds to the 
income of our fair country. In bring- 
ing in the oil, Tony puts himself in 
the front rank of patriots. 



by William Doering 
Transportation 
Bill Van Newkirk has transported 
himself from the third floor to the 
first. Six moving vans were employ- 
ed by Mr. Van Newkirk to move his 
lamps, unabridged dictionaries, pri- 
vate library, etc. 



Unemployment 

Unemployment in local circles has 
been lightened to a considerable de- 
gree. Philip Hickman has been re- 
moved from its ranks to the position 
(?) of a janitor for Kat Hall. Mr. 
Hickman was formerly in the bread 
line every day. His service so far 
has been very efficient. 



Import! 

At the "Y" dinner last week. Jack 



The Flight of Time 

Here is the story of Room 73: 
Sept. 12 — Kauffmnn and Dolan. 
Sept. 20 — Kauffman and Micari. 
Oct. 15 — Kauffman and Panowict. 
Oct. 20 — Kauffman and Brant. 
Oct. 31 — Kauffman 

Dec. i — mm 



High Society 
Johnny Mygatt continues to get in- 
vitations from Reid Hall. What a 



Doings in the Scientific World 

Jack Dunn is exhibiting a couple of 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



MAKE YOUR CAR 

A COLLEGIATE ONE! 

A complete accessory line 

Goodrich Tires 

STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

331 High St. 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



/irthmiots tttt 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Cncstertosrn, Md. 



LeCATES BROS. 
BARBER SHOP 

Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



H. D. OREM & SON 

Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 — Chestertown 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 

Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radio*, Wuhing Machine*, 
Sewing Machine*. Repairs for 
all makes of radio*. Record* 
and Sheet Music 
Lusby Moffett. F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111 J 



skulls in his room. Not only are they 
displayed, but also utilized as ash- 
trays. Come one, come all, and see 
the marvels of the science laid before 
your eyes! This shows what can be 
done by using the head. 



Athletics 

The hero of the Freshman victory 
in the tie-up: Harold M. Kosowsky, 
of Waterbury, Conn. He tied up 
yahmsteen Sophs single-handed, and 
came back for more. "I discriminated 
against no one," says "Battling" Har- 
old, "I hopped the first one that came 
along." Three cheers! and a rah- 
rah that there are still men like 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. W>1„, Reid Halt. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halts. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 boor service. Tel. 316 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



Kosowsky to bolster us up. 



back and a one-legged Senator among 
their number. 



Back to Normal 

Shorb and Huffman have discarded 
their crutches, and are doing their 
stuff again. No longer can the Frosh 
boast of having a four-legged full- 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

'Herb's Restaurant 

AH American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 




Pmiupj 






'The Bank Where 
Yoa Feel At Home' 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And All Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 




GRAY BEAUTY SOLON 

Reasonable New Fall Prices. 
Watch announcements of 

Specials each month. Starting 
November 1 for the month of 
November on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sham- 
poo and Finger Wave 7Bc. Mam- 

Regular prices on Friday and 
Saturday. 

Over Jefferson's Store 
Phone: Chestertown 106 



SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Chem. Club Gives 
Unusual Exhibits 



Liquid Ammonia Experiment 
Is Main Feature Of Program 



The Chemistry Club devoted its 
November 13 meeting to a series of 
technical demonstrations. 

The feature of the exhibit was the 
liquidation of ammonia obtained by 
cooling with dry ice, alcohol and 
ether to a temperature of negative 
180 degrees centegrade. Another 
part of this experiment was the man- 
ufacture of a hammer of frozen mer- 
cury. This unusual exhibit was un- 
der the direction of Charles Dudley 
and Harold McCrone. 

Earl Price was in charge of an ap- 
paratus for the distillation of mer- 
cury with aid of a vacuum pump. 

Removal of the caffein content in 
tea by the Soxhlet extractor was ex- 
hibited by Edwin Lowe while Em- 
merson Slacum directed the qualita- 
tive tests for arsenic. 

The borax lead tests for cobalt 
and nickel were demonstrated by 
Eliot Brown. 

Professor Coop froze rubber and 
flowers at a temperature of 127 de- 
grees below zero centegrade. 

The experiments were well con- 
ducted and the meeting was an out- 
standing success. 

oo 

International Society 

Recently Organized 



Attends Dinner 




Young People Hold 
Discussion Group 

Professor Goodwin Leads 
Organization's Discussion 



J. S. W. Jones 



ANNUAL BANQUET HELD 
BY PHILA. ALUMNI 



On November 8, at 12:45 in Room 
11, the International Society was 
formed under the direction of Wesley 
Sadler. As the name suggests this 
society was formed for the purpose of 
studying contemporary international 
problems. With every problem dis- 
cussed an attempt will be made to 
find a parallel in history in order that 
the potentialities of present day 
problems might be undeistood. 

The society elected the following 
officers: Prof. Dumschott, Faculty 
Advisor; Alfred Gardiner, President; 
Richard Chambers, Vice-President; 
Margaret Salisbury, Secretary ; 
Mary Jane Neild, Librarian. 



The Philadelphia Chapter of the 
Washington College Alumni Associa- 
tion is holding its annual Fall Ban- 
quet on the evening of Satuday, 
November 17, in Philadelphia, fol- 
lowing the football game with Ha\- 
erford College. President and Mrs. 
Gilbert W. Mead will attend as 
guests of honor, and Dean Jones and 
other faculty representatives expect 
to be present. 

The Philadelphia Chapter is one 
of the more active of the alumni 
groups, and according to their annual 
custom, they will entertain a mem- 1 
ber of this year's Senior Class, select- j 
ed by Dean Jones. 



On Sunday, November 11th, the 
third meeting of the Young People's 
Society was held in the Farish House 
of Emmanuel Episcopal Church. 

This organization, which holds its 
meetings every other Sunday after- 
noon from four to five-fifteen in the 
afternoon, has been in existence for 
several years, and is composed large- 
ly of college students. The meet- 
ings consist of the serving of light 
refreshments, following which an in- 
formal discussion is held on some 
topic of interest to the members. 



The membership is by no means re- 
stricted to members of the Episcopal 
Church, and any others who may be 
interested are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 

This discussion, which was led by 
Professor Goodwin, consisted of a 
consideration of the various reasons 
why people originally attended 
church, and whether these motives 
still exist or not. The next meeting 
of the society will be held on De- 
cember 2nd, instead of the 25th of 
November, owing to the fact that 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



Modem Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL S1PALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 

GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

332 High St. Phone 818F4 orh 

332 High St. 

Telephone 8I8F4 or 362M 



many of the students will spend the 
latter week-end away from the col- 
lege because of the Delaware game. 



After An Evening of Hard 
Study Refresh Yourself at the 

CAFETERIA CANTEEN 
All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 
dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 
Ice Cream 



HOLDEN'S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



Men's and Ladies' 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF NOV. 19 - 24 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19-20 
ALICE FAYE - JAMES DUNN in 

"365 NIGHTS IN HOLLYWOOD" 

Also — POP EYE in "Two Alarm Fire," Comedy 
and Cartoon. 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, TYOV. 21-22 

FRED ASTAIRE - GINGER ROGERS in 

"THE GAY DIVORCEE" 

The finest musical comedy ever brought to the 
screen. 

Also — Sportreel, Comedy, Cartoon. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24 
DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

RICHARD CROMWELL in 

"AMONG THE MISSING" 



TIM McCOY in 

"THE PRESCOTT KID" 



THE 
WASHINGTON PLAYERS 

PRESENT 

ONES 

A 3 ACT COMEDY 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21st 1934 
IN WILLIAM SMITH HALL 

STUDENT ADMISSION 25c OTHERS 35c 





PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 1934 



DOIN'S 



Last week end was exceedingly 
quiet after the previous Home Com- 
ing. A large number of us went 
home or to Baltimore. Those of us 
left behind had to content ourselves 
with whatever excitement we could 
stir up. The rainy Saturday after- 
noon prevented any outside doin's. 
However, Miss Dorothy Clarke and 
Mr. Bob Clifford had a rollicking cut- 
throat game of bridge with Mr. and 
Mrs. Tolles and nearly ate them out 
of house and home. 

That night Miss Leah Frederick 
and Mr. Jack Perry, Miss Gladys Rig- 
gins and Mr. Louis Goldstein attend- 
ed the Centreville dance, and the 
movies kept the rest of the students 
quiet. 



WHAT 


9 

• 


WHEN 


WHERE 




WHOSE 



On Sunday Mrs. William R. Howell 
entertained the Kappa Gamma Sor- 
ority with a tea at which Miss Aman- 
da Bradley poured and the sorority's 
hostesses, Mrs. Frank Simpers, Mrs. 
Winton Tolles, Mrs. Thomas Kibler, 
and Mrs. Frank Goodwin were guests. 

On Monday night, Miss Mary Jo 
Wheatley gave a birthday Scavenger 
Party. Miss Flicker Wanderer, Mr. 



Bill Kight, Miss Jean Young, Mr. 
Wilbert Huffman, Miss Dickie Met- 
calfe, Mr. Jimmy Salter, and Mr. Ray 
Kilby were guests. In the desperate 
search for "three hairs from a 
horse's tail," Miss Wheatley and Mr. 
Kilby invaded Harlem, roused an in- 
habitant who under threats and prom- 
ises was driven to shear most of the 
hairs from his old Dobbin's tail. Miss 
Young and Mr. Huffman ate most of 
the cabbage they had to get and 
didn't have much room left for re- 
freshments. Miss Metcalfe and Mr. 
Salter nearly took a dip in the river 
when trying to get a barnacle. Every- 
time anyone caught sight of Miss 
Wanderer and Mr. Kight, they were 
going so fast that only the black 
shopping bag dangling from that 
lady's arm could be seen. Needless 
to say, these two took the honors. 

On Friday members of the Shakes- 
peare Class and of the Shakespeare 
Club went to Baltimore to see Walter 
Hampden in "Hamlet." Mrs. Ethel 
Fox, Mr. Winton Tolles and Miss 
Mary Jo Wheatley loaned their cars 
for the occasion. 

Those who attended Walter Hamp- 
den's performance of Hamlet include 
Carolyn Jewell, Wesley Sadler, 
Gladys Coucill, Emily Jewell, Mary 
Jo Wheatley, Margaret Thornton, 
Caroline Helms, Robert Shaull, Mil- 
dred Lee Skinner, Nola Hill, Mrs. 
Ethel Fox, Bill McCullough, Willa 
Newnam, Bill Baker, Carroll Casteel, 
Prof. Tolles and Mildred Tryzno. 

Today a number of us will beg, 
borrow or steal a ride to see the game 
at Haverfovd. Yes, Team, we'll be 
there to help you bring home the 
bacon! 



HAMLET PLANNED AS 
MARCH PRODUCTION 



Shakespeare's Hamlet will be pre- 
sented early in March by the Shakes- 
peare Players of Washington Col- 
lege, according to plans released by 
Dr. G. Van A. Ingalls, Ditector of the 
Players, and Professor of English at 
the College. 

A tentative cast has been selected, 
and definite work on the stage tech- 
nique and on rehearsals has been be- 
gun. 



BUY 

CHRISTMAS 
SEA LS 




HELP 



FICMT 
TUBERCULOSIS 



A victory won from Delaware 

Means cheering hundreds mast be there; 

The Silver Pentagon will have the basses 
To help transport the student masses. 

Let all urge on the football men 
To vanquish e'er the Cackling Hen. 



SOME ALUMNI 
ARE EMPLOYED 



Others Follow Trends Of 
Higher Education 

John Wagner is studying medicine 
at the University of Maryland. 

James Davis is at Beacom's Busi- 
ness College, in Wilmington, Del. 

Fred "Fritz" Reinhold is teaching 
in the night school of the Baltimore 
City College. 

Emily Jewell is doing social i.elicf 
work in Baltimore. 

Joe O'Farrell is selling insurance. 

Dick Gamber is working with the 
Retail Credit Company of Baltimore, 
as a claim investigator. 

Burdette Nuttle has entered part- 
nership with his father in the can- 
ning industry at Denton, Md. 

Albert Dobkins is playing semi-pro 
football in Waterbury, Connecticut. 



The Mount Vernon Literary Socie- 
ty's International Program which 
was scheduled for the evening of No- 
vember 15, was postponed until next 
Thursday because of' the use of the 
auditorium of William Smith Hall for 
the presentation of a musical pro- 
gram by the Women's Club of Kent 
County. 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITH'S KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



E 



air enou, 




WE tell you that Chesterfield 
Cigarettes are made of mild, 
ripe tobaccos. We've told you about 
the paper — that it's pure and burns 
right, without taste or odor. 

We have said that Chesterfields are 
made right. The tobaccos are aged, 
then blended and cross-blended, and 



cut into shreds the right width and 
length to smoke right. 

These things are done to make 
what people want — a cigarette that's 
milder, a cigarette that tastes better 
— a cigarette that satisfies. 

You can prove what we 
tell you about Chesterfield. 
May we ask you to try them 
— that would seem to be fair enough. 




9^i 



ajjttojiytnfc 



the cigarette that's MILDER 
the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



%> 1954, LiGGirr It Myem Tomcco Co. 



/' 



Bring Back The 
Hastings' Trophy 



lite 




Elm 



Thanksgiving Celebrations 
Next Week 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 10. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, NOV. 24, li)Z, 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



WASHINGTON GRIDDERS END 
SEASON AT DELAWARE TODAY 

Determined To Remain In* 



Undefeated Column 



For the first time since 1922 
Washington College football team 
will disturb the nest of the Delaware 
Blue Hens when the Maroon and 
Black eleven invade Frazer Field in 
Newark this afternoon in an attempt 
to win its initial victory since re- 
sumption of an old rivalry in 1932. 

The Delaware game is without 
Important Games For Both 
doubt the most important on the lo- 
cal schedule. Both teams boast of 
unusually good records, and the game 
takes on the added significance of be- 
ing solely an Eastern Shore event. 
Each club has so far had a success- 
ful season, and each has pointed to 
today's tilt. 

The Blue Hens have two blemishes 
on their record. The figures show 
that they have won four games, tied 
one, and lost two. Victories have 
been scored over: St. Joseph, Juni- 
ata, Dickinson and Drexel. A tie 
game was played with Hampton 
Sidney while the Delaware aggrega- 
tion bowed to Lebanon Valley and 
P. M. C. Still Drexel beat Lebanon 
Valley which goes to show that Del- 
aware has come along a long ways in 
recent games. 

The Washington College record 
shows four victories and one tie. 
Gallaudet, John Hopkins, and Mt. St. 
Mary's were defeated in short order. 
Then came a 6 to 6 tie with Susque 
hanna. But last Saturday the Sho'- 
men flashed a great deal of offensive 
power in a 39 to 14 victory over Hav- 
erford. 

Delaware Strength In Line 

Delaware has a very good back 
field consisting of Rober-ts, a little 
speed merchant, Glover, an honest 
to goodness bucker, O'Connell, and 
Zavata, exceptional blockers and 
defensive men. The wall will indeed 
be the strongest Washington has en- 
countered this year. Capt. Thomp- 
son, a big 200 pounder, holds down 
one end With Scannell on the other 
wing. The tackles are heavy and 
rangey. The guards, who weigh 
more than 200 pounds apiece, have 
a reputation for hard charging and 
smearing play after play. Hodgson 
will be in at center. 

Washington Backfield Has Edge 

The "Washington liackfield has a 
slight edge on its rival. It boasts 
of three backs weighing over 190 
pounds each, and in Young the lo- 
cals have one of the fastest men in 
football. The forward line com- 
pares very favorable with that of 
Delaware. Dwyer, Ward, and Lord 
will be playing their last game, and 
they can be counted on to give all 
they have. 

Each team is favored in its own 
section, but this means very little, 
because when these two rivals get to- 
gether in the "Eastern Shore Clas- 
sic" all previous records are forgot- 
ten, and, the success or failure of a 
1 season hinges on the result. 



DR. MICOU RECALLS 
EARLY EXPERIENCES 



Has Been Associated With 
College For 47 Years 



WHAT EACH HAS DONE 
WASHINGTON 

52 Gallaudet 

13 John Hopkins 

12 Mt. St. Mary-s 6 

6 Susquehanna 6 

39 Haverf ord 14 



DELAWARE 

16 St. Joseph 

14 Juniata 

Hampton-Sidney 

Lebanon Valley 24 

7 Dickinson 

P. M. C 12 

7 Drexel 6 



by Dr. J. R. Micou 

When Voltaire on his death-bed 
exclaimed "Je vais chercher un 
grand peut-etre" he knew as much 
about his destination as I did of 
Washington College when I arrived 
here as an instructor on February 
12, 1887. 

I did not even know the name of 
its President, much less the number 
of students or teachers. I had not 
inquired, nor had I been informed 
what subject or subjects I would be 
expected to teach. As I had been re- 
commended to the college by the 
board of the school in which I had 
been teaching nothing but mathema- 
tics for six years, I assumed that I 
was to be professor of mathematics. 

Since I had never heard of the col- 
lege, though living within less than 
two hundred miles of it, I felt sure 
that it was small, probably on a par 
with such colleges of my native Vir 
ginia, as Hampden-Sidney, Randolph- 
Macon, William and Mary, and oth- 
ers. I was, therefore, greatly sur- 
prised, not to say shocked, when I 
found that there were only about 
thirty students, three buildings, and 
three tecchers. The buildings were 
Middle Hall (1844) ; East Hall 
(1854), and West Hall (1854). 

All the resident students lived in 
West Hall, the first floor of which 
was used as the auditorium. Middle 
Hall had four rooms on each of its 
three floors, these rooms being about 
twenty-one feet square. All of Mid- 
dle Hall, however, except three 
rooms, was allotted to the steward- 
ess. Two of these exceptions were 
the rooms on the first floor to the 
right of the central hallway, and were 
used as the Physics and Chemistry 
laboratories. The other exception 
was the northwest room on the sec- 
ond floor, ityhich served as a library, 
t he stewardess served the meals in 
the southwest basement room of Mid- 
dle Hall, now a lavatory. 

The south half of East Hall was 
the home of President Rivers and my 
family occupied the northern half. A 
fence ran along the north side of the 
driveway back of East, Middle, and 
West Halls, and the land between 
that fence and the apex of the trian- 
gle bounded by Washington and Col- 
lege Avenues was a cornfield. When 
I sat on my porch I looked north over 
the decaying cornstalks of the prev- 
ious year. Fences ran along Wash- 
ington and College Avenues, and a- 
long the road south of the campus, 
enclosing about twelve acres. In 
the southwest corner or the campus 
were two small frame houses, occu- 
pied respectively by "Rat" Taylor 
and "Pretty" White, two characters 
about whom we shall hear more later. 
(Continued on Page 5) 



GUEST SPEAKER 




Silver Pentagon 

Sends Bus To Newark 



Hon. T. A. Golds- 
borough Speaks 

Redistribution Of Wealth 
Subject Of Talk 



The Hon. T. Alan Goldsborough, 
Congressman representing the first 
congressional district was the assem- 
ly speaker at Washington College on 
Thursday, November 22nd. The 
keynote of Congressman Goldsbor- 
ough's address was the imperative 
need for the solution of our greatest 
national problem — the distribution of 
wealth. He illustrated the inequal 
ities of our distributing forces by re- 
ferring to the abundance of food- 
stuffs in certain communities and the 
presence of starvation also in these 
same communities. Congressman 
Goldsborough stated that the prob- 
lem of distribution was solvable; that 
if bankers, mathematicians, and 
conomists would get together and 
really work on the problem, it could 
be solved in a short time. The op- 
position of a few banking interests 
of New York and London who con- 
trol the press hinder a complete 
lution, Mr. Goldsborough said, and 
the solution of this great problem 
is necessary to prevent revolution 
and National destruction. "The ex- 
pression of public sentiment by the 
process of education is the only 
thing that can be done to solve the 
problem, and prevent the destruction 
of our nation, said Mr. Goldsborough 
He predicted that, in the near future 
there would be legislation of tre- 
mendous importance. He mentioned 
the lack of employment for college 
graduates as a result of this break- 
down in distribution. He, however, 
stated that the difficulties which grad- 
uates encounter now would help 
them build up their backgrounds and 
increase their perspective, in order to 
fortify themselves against future 
life. He concluded his address by 
emphasizing the duty of the repre- 
sentatives of the people toward the 
futherance of any good program, pr- 
ospective of party affiliations. 



"JONESY" HAILED AS 
SUCCESSFUL PLAY 



Dramatic Club's Initial Produc- 
tion Well Staged 



COUNCIL MAKES 
HOLIDAY PLANS 

Football And Hockey Gaines 
Feature Program 

The Student Council has arranged 
an extensive program of events for 
the Thanksgiving holidays. Begin- 
ning at 3:30 P. M. on Wednesday 
and continuing until 10:30 P. M. on 
Thursday, five varied events have 
been scheduled. 

Wednesday, November 28 

3:30 — Freshman-Sophomore fool- 
gall game. 

8:00 — Victory dance. 

Presentation of Alumni Cup by 
President of Junior Class. 

Thursday, November 29 

10:00 — Hockey game between girls 
and football letter men. 

4:00 — Tea Dance in Reid Hall. 

7:00 — Treasure Hunt starting 
from Reid Hall. 

The Victory dance will be financed 
by the Freshman and Sophomore 
Classes, the winning class paying one 
third and the losing class two third; 
of the cost. If the Freshman class 
is victorious the "rat" rules will be 
lifted until Monday morning. 

The Council will provide cars for 
I anyone wishing to enter the Treasure 
j Hunt. The "treasure" will be dis- 
j played in the case in William Smith 



by Prances Silcox 
Dramatic Critic of the Elm 

"Jonesy", the three-act comedy 
given by the Washington Players on 
Wednesday evening, should be award- 
ed the honors of the week. It was a 
splendid performance and the cast, 
stage manager^, and coaches are to 
be congratulated. 

Players Show Confidence 

The thing an audience probably ad- 
mires most in any play is the natur- 
alness, assurance,, and confidence 
with which the performers act. On 
Wednesday evening, the cast of 
"Jonesy" were at home on the Wash- 
ington stage. Whatever fits of stage 
fright any of them went through be- 
hind scenes were shaken off us they 
stepped upon the stage. 

As The Audience Saw Them 

Bob Clifford strolled leisurely a- 
cross the stage with the typical col- 
lege boy air of nonchalance. Bill 
Hall, followed by his poor weeping 
wife, Lelia Anthony, stamped and 
tore his hair in true masculine fash- 
ion while his young rascal of a son, 
Bob Fink, quite naturally played a- 
round with that overwhelming per- 
sonage, Dot Clarke. 

Norris Duffy and Harry Rhodes! Hall. After the hunt from 10:00 
acted as though they had spent their I until 10:30 the contestants will 
life sitting down for a smoke while j gather in Reid Hall where refresh- 



they got paid by the hour 

Jean Harshaw, who made her de- 
but before the limelights of the stage 
in this play, proved to be a striking 
addition. Her side remarks and un 



-oo- 



The Silver Pentagon Society will 
send one bus to the Delaware game- 
at Newark today. The bus will leave 
in front of Reid Hall shortly after 
12 o'clock noon today. It is possi- 
ble that a few seats may be available 
immediately before the bus leaves. 



NOTICE 

The Elm will probably appear next 
week as a four-page edition because 
of the Thanksgiving holiday. The 
printing office closes on Thanksgiving 
Day, and hence it is impossible to 
print the full-sized paper. 



Paul Harris Speaks 
At Peace Conference 



A peace conference was held on 
November 18, at 4 P. M. at the home 
of Mrs. Jessie Snow, 4 Longwood 
Road, Baltimore, Md., who is secre- 
tary of the League of Nations Asso- 
ciation (Maryland Branch). 

The guest speaker was Paul Harris, 
Jr., a prominent Socialist who 
"stumped" for Norman Thomas in 
his past campaign for election. Mr. 
Harris is also President of the "In- 
(Continued On Page Six) 



frankness afforded many ending Thursday at noon. 



usual 
laugh: 

It seemed almost impossible to 
think that Carolyn Jewell does not 
actually wear tortoise shell rimmed 
glasses nor walk with her head bur 
ied in a book after seeing her in the 
play. 

One could just see Lee Dolan giv- 
ing sentences in a courtroom after 
the way he ordered Dot Clarke around 
and wasn't that just like Elsie Whar- 
ton to forget to order grape-nuts? 

By the expression on Lawrence 
Koleshko's face, it is probable that 
Bill Hall might have gotten a whack 
later in the evening when the Hon 
orable Policeman, George Rasin, wa: 
not intervening. 

Public Sentiment 

Just to show how public sentiment 
ran, here are a few criticisms — con- 
structive and destructive — heard a- 
bout the campus. — Lee Dolan's gray 
hair was very becoming. — It is not 
often one gets to hear both sides of 
a telephone conversation. — It is un- 
fortunate the College can not pro- 
duce some good terse collegiate slang 
to take the place of the ordinary vul- 
garities of speech used to get a laugh 
and express emotions. — Sorry we 
didn't see more of the Duffy-Rhodes 
twosome. — It was too emotional. — 
Koleshko's Jewish accent was splen- 
did. — The acting made the play. — 
Carolyn Jewell "took the cake" when 
she invited Dot Clarke to join the 
family battleground. — At the rata 
Bill Hall was stirring his five lumps 
of sugar, he might soon have had 
soup, even though there wasn't any 
tea in his cup. — Did Lelia Anthony 
her wedding ring out wring- 
ing her hands (she didn't wear 
one). — We wondered whether George 
Rasin acquired that police training 
while acting as Mayor of Worton. — 
We believe the drenching Bob Clif- 
ford and Jean Harshaw got came 
from a cloudburst rather than from 
a mere street sprinkling hose. — After 
the first scene I sat on the edge of my 
seat and held my breath for fear of 
what could happen to further compli- 
cate matters. Isn't that enough said 
about any play? It was a great play, 
may there be many more. 



ments will be served. 

The Council has taken steps to re- 
arrange the Christmas vacation by 
pushing it forward half a day, thus 
having it begin Wednesday night and 



German Department Invited 
To Participate In Program 

German Presentation To Take 
Place At Newark In Spring 



The German Department of Wash- 
ington College has been invited by 
the University of Delaware Modern 
Language Department to participate 
in the presentation of a program of 
German plays and singing at New- 
ark, Delaware in April, it has been 
announced by Dr. Arthur L. Davis. 

It is expected that the German 
Classes of Johns Hopkins, University 
of Delaware, and Washington Col- 
lege, will present three one-act plays, 
entirely in German. Between plays 
the noted soprano of New York, 
Frau Else Loerser will sing a group 
of songs said Dr. Davis. It is also 
probable that there will be some 
group singing by the classes of the 
.hiee colleges. 

Not only will this project be ma- 
terially profitable to those who par- 
ticipate in and attend it, said Dr. 
Davis, but it will also create an air 
of cooperation among these colleges 
in literary lines as well as athletic. 

The exact time of the presentation 
is as yet unknown, but will probably 
be in early Spring. 



-oo- 



Classical Society Enter- 
tains At Reid Hall Tea 



The Classical Society gave a tea 
Friday, November 23, at four 
o'clock in the drawing room of Reid 
Hall. Mrs. Solandt and Miss Ponta 
officiated as pourevs. Among the 
guests were Dr. and Mrs. Livingood, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ford. Dr. and Mrs. 
Davis, Dr. and Mrs. Howell, and Miss 
Russell, who played several piano 
selections. Also present were the 
honorary members. Dr. Ingalls, Dr. 
Dole, and Dr. and Mrs. Mead. Law- 
rence Williams was present, and gave 
a program of semi-classical songs, ac- 
companied by Miss Russell. 



PAGE TWO 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertovrn, Md„ 17S2. 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 1934 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein . . Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



certainly be no objection to saying 
"Boorah" in an unassuming sort of 
way, or even to congratulating the 
players, who, after all, won the game. 
At the dance which Delaware has 
so hospitably arranged, no doubt a 
spirit of congeniality and amiable 
good-fellowship will prevail. If this 
is not translated into stealing the 
gymnasium, or playfully setting fire 
to the administration building, this 
spirit will be excellent- There is no 
reason why today should not show 
a double victory; in football and in 
good manners. 



Associate Editors 

Prances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp, Jean Harsbaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte, William McCuUough 

Howard Clark 



PERFECTION MAKES HISTORY 

If the Maroon and Black eleven 
maintains its average today, it will 
have scored the first 3.00 athletic in- 
dex known at Washington College in 
many years. This will be truly a de- 
cisive battle with Delaware, for if 
Eniered at the Chestertown, Md., i Washington draws victory from it, a 
postomce as second class matter. I species of athletic perfection more 
Subscription price. S1.50 a year, ) rare than the great-fabled dodo Jill 
• i , in,. T,t^ ihave been attained. An undefeated 

Sing le copy, 10 cents- \ setlS on, a certain consequence of the 

~ line spirit and serious effort of the 

SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 1934 squad impel i e d by the determination 

- I of the coaches, amounts to a sort of 

-.„,«,,- ^nnn standard performance. It is a bit 
KNOWING AND HEARING GOOD ^ ^ syInmetrkal motion „f a 



beautiful piece of precision machin- 
ery. 

A philosophical question may 



de- 



al- 
ways be applied to contests. Did the 
victor win or the vanquished lose? 
In all but perhaps the first of the 



h I games of this memorable season, 

1 hlgn, ' ^ofiTiitplv won. 



MUSIC 

Dryden beautifully appreciated 
the eternal power of music when he 
wrote: 

•'So when the last and dreadful hour 
"This crumbling pageant shall 

vonr, 
••The trumpet shall be heard on mgn, j Washmgton definitely won. By her 
•■The dead shall live, the living die, r and trained power she 0Ter . 

•'And Music shall untune the sky. ^^ her opponents . This j s true 

There is no more widely-known ^ }f r can be sQ earned . Hap . 

nor widely-hailed art than music. . Tne 1 a - thes6 v i ct „ r j e s, which, after to- 
popular acclaim which greets things ^ ft seems very ^^ onf , can 
musical at Washington College be " itiTelv ^y have been unmarred, 
speaks a fine feeling for the rhyth-,^ ^ atcompIished in tne prop - 

y ' er sporting manner. With no ex- Oldest 
! ceptions, the players have done their 
jobs thoroughly, quietly, efficiently 




SlVMti 



OLD ALUMNI 
SEE CONTRAST 



The trio of Baltimore musicians 
heard at a recent assembly served as 

a reminder of Washington's own mus- 1 ^^un'o'sten'tltiouslyr Play's have been 
; directed toward the opponent's goal 



Not only the performance of the 



guided by the experience and inspir- 
ed by the enthusiasm of Dr. Freder- 
ick Liringood, and often under the 'team, but the spirit m which the Col- 
£d£Td£SSon of Mr. Vincent lege body has haded the successive 
i immeasurably victories has also been 



Alumnus Observes 
College Continuity 



A week ago it was my fortune to be 
in close proximity to a situation 
which gave me a curious thought. 
Here is the situation — and here is the 
thought, repeated somewhat as i 
struck me. 

The occasion was 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



Brandolini, contributes immeasurably : victories nas a»o u« u exemplary. 

much to Co?* -™- es T of — " S Sri3EK£5: Washington College people. There 
V™*? ZfLTL ISsl alTo give To make popular heroes out of foot-! were alumni, principally, and some 
M^RnsseUand^ M^erta^ogive ^ ^ ^ ^.^ , facuhy and friend! , and a smaU mIx . 

^^"the"' Cmt of the dignity it deserves, and heaps ture of undergraduates, 
will =how a bit of its ability to the ridicule where credit should be. As| chief among the aiumm was a 
whole College in a future assembly, any player will agree, there is noth- , stat ely gentleman, hearty and cheer- 
as it has been a vearly custom re- ing heroic about playing football; it f„i, courtly and gracious, looking ev- 
, ■ lis simply a fine and thrilling game. er y bit of a dozen years less than the 

C£ To r know and love good music, one Even Milton, writing Paradise Lost, , calelldar gives him, active and heal- 
mnst hear good music It would 'and Michelangelo, painting the Cis-jthy despite his almost eighty years, 
seem very pleasant to hear in the al-i'ine Chapel ceiling, were not of he- and as keenly alive to today's devel- 

ternat* assembly periods in which ■ roic-fame. Upments at Washington College as 

the orchestra does not play, a selec- '- I he was to his Alma Mater when he 

Hon by the skilled Miss Russell, or a BUS Y ALUMNI AND EDITORIALS grdauated here fifty-eight years ago. 



Hark! Look! What is that cloud of 
dust we see? What is that scurrying 
hurrying noise we hear? What can 
that long moving line be? It might 
be Frank Buck trecking through 
Africa — but it isn't, — it's Washing- 
ton College crossing to Delaware! 
And who is going to miss that game 
— "Not I," says little Rollo, (who has 
tin cans tied on to each foot and a 
gathering of cov -_belI in each hand) but he wist- 
fully murmurs, "I wish we had a mas- 
cot — "cause I really would parade 
it." 

Yowsah folks, we wish we had a 
.ascot to lend to little Rollo because 
we agree with him — therefore we 
pledge ourselves to continue our un- 
relenting search for a Pegasus. 

(Our chase is being breathlessly 
watched all over the country — we had 
two letters last month about it). 



song by the versatile Mr. Moffett, j T( . js exceedmg ] y gratifying to the 



who is considered at Peabody a Oner ; £LM tQ nQte thg ^ xtent and detai i f 
artist than Earle Lippe, wno has be- ^ pfcrusal bv readers besides under- 
come so popular here. Dryden paid 
; tribute to vocal and instru' 



Close to him at the table sat 
undergraduate, who will, if the aca- 
demic gods prove kind, receive his de 
gree here in 1938. So this is the 



graduates. The attention _busy alum- -^ ht that flashed through my 
|ni give to editonals, which are tne!^.^ j *_ „.i. : „i. T _ 



mental music in his Alexander's ]east . read of any newspaper depart- 



jmind, and to which I gave expression 



Feast, when the feats of Timotheus 

the flute-player and St. Cecilia are 

judged: 

Let old Timotheus yield the prize, 

Or both divide the crown; 

He raised a mortal to the skies, 

She brought an angel down. 



ments, in the ELM is clearly shown 
by comments appearing in the local 
i press and elsewhere concerning a re- 
cent editorial on the Homecoming 
! Alumni Dinner. Such attention is at 
I once flattering and provocative of 
j praise to the select class of people 
[ who read editorials anywhere. If 
VICTORY AND GOOD MANNERS they keep up the habit, they will 

The football season which, as ev-jP™ op to be good citizens. 
ery student at Washington College ie 
confident, will be perfect, will then 
show not the only Fall perfection of 
the College. The excellent behaviour 
of the student body at home and a- 

war also constitutes an undefeated: , ~_ , 

season. Such respect for the good! ■* M *™ n H " Smith 

name of the College on many occa- The Washington College Debating 
sions when ft would be easier to eel- ■ Society held its first meeting of the 
ebrate good fortune in a material year Tuesday evening, November 20, 
rather than an idealistic way height- in Room 20. President William 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By 1. Un-ly Heard 



(The last writer of this calumny is 
spending a vacation "up the river," 
as he expresses it. This trip was 
sponsored by the Department of Jus- 
tice and he was escorted by several 
obliging Federal officers. His good 
man Friedegg is responsible for this 
effort) . 

Up at Newark today some of our 
boys will be thinking of a similar oc- 
casion two years ago. They will be 
looking forward to the dance tonight 
and when the Lime comes the young 
hopefuls will proceed to trip (of 
course we'll have to pick 'em up and 
drag 'em out) the light fantastic. 
Many of us are figuring on a hard 
winter and can see no reason why 
such friendly rivals as the Delawares 
shoud object if we borrow back some 
of the top and overcoats that we lent 
two years ago. Maybe we won't get 
the same ones but as long as we keep 
warm we'll be satisfied. 

And now there's a big cry by the 
Phis to initiate Mrs. Boynton — the 
Skipper" is just another hen-pecked 
husband and the horn-tooting at 
meeting time is becoming very irk- 
some to quite a few. To others it is 
a cause for joy since as long as nee 
Babcock is beating at the portals the 
meeting can't go on — and goodness 
knows there has to be something done 
to stop them. 

Now that Jean has had her fun 
last week-end with the Philly B. F. 
we wonder what's going to happen 
at Newark today with all the old 
alumni viewing proceedings Seen 
together (as Gertrude Stein would 
say) More often than oftener — 
Rhodes and "Sand in My Shoes" Ha- 
zel, Charlie and, oh well, its Doris 
right now, the two Bobs and Jean 
(remember Barnum's wise words, 
Bob and Bob), Doc R. and George 
Leo.. We've been asked to an- 
nounce that the A. K. Glee Club will 
render its first concert Monday af- 
ternoon. 



DEBATING SOCIETY 
MEETS FIRST TIME 



ens the effect of victory. 

By its courtesy and good manners, 
the present undergraduate body has 
earned an enviable name for itself 
among the alumni and associates of 
the College. This is a thing to be 
guarded more jealously than richen 
of silver and gold. Tempests of 
mass action under the impetus of e- 
aotional force result in later futile 
regrets. Harm to property, rowdy- 
ism in action, and such expressions 
of ha ppines s are memorable only for 
their destruction. After the team wins 
over at Newark today, there could 



Baker outlined plans for the coming 
debating season. 

It was made known that the De 
bating Society hopes to put ceveral 
teams in the field of intercollegiate 
debate thus year. Actual work will 
begin when the schedule is near 
enough to being completed for the 
Society to know what the larger 
*chools consider the more important 
questions this year. Wesley Sadler, 
Manager of Intercollegiate Debate, 
reports that the schedule this year 
■■ill in all probability be a reasonably 
long one. 



that if this particular undergraduate 
should some day succeed to the hon- 
ored titie of Washington's Oldest Liv- 
ing Alumnus, and be pesented at a 
college dinner as many years from 
his graduation as this affair was from 
the graduation of the class of 1876, 
I the dinner would be held at the dis- 
tant date of 1996! A long academic 
generation, indeed! 

Similarly, if we eount as far back 
before the day when this alumnus 
was himself beginning his work here, 
we land in the generation which saw 
the invasion of this county by Brit- 
ish troops, and was marked locally 
by the exploits of Mistress Kitty 
Knight, and the Battle of Caulk's 
Field, and the inspiration which 
caused the composition of 
Spangled Banner"! 

Out of this thought comes more 
than the curious results of the sud- 
den mental arithmetic to which I 
subjected myself with the horrid 
feeling that I somehow must be 
counting wrong. There arose the 
feeling, stronger than ever, of the 
eternal overlapping of college gener- 
ations which makes college history 
rich a ceaseless thing. Old trees on 
the campus, and old buildings, and 
historical and memorial markers be- 
come objects of parsing interest on- 
ly, as we see them daily. But a liv- 
ing example of how united college 
(Continued In Next Column) 



While musing about the above we 
came across this headline in "The 
Connecticut Campus" — "Rhode Is- 
land State College Ram Treks In 
Early Dawn To Conn. State." It 
seems that several C. S. C. men ab- 
ducted the Rhody ram and held said 
male sheep (value $25 in cash and a 
million dollars in sentiment) two days 
until the R. I. vs. Conn, game when 
he was returned as Connecticut 
changed R. I.'s worry from sheep to 
football. 

(Let's kidnap Delaware's Blue Hen 
and leave them a goose egg on the 
scoreboard in return). 



Think of all the fun we could have 
enticing someone down here to swipe 
our Pegasus only to have them find 
out that there ain't no such thing. 



Skipping around a bit we find that 
a recent survey of the Harvard stu- 
dent body showed that the average 
college student carries approximately 
ar twenly-two cents with him. 

(The bloomin' capitalists!) 



Kight: "I think I've got a flat tire." 
Peg: "I think that makes us even.'" 
(Annapolis Log). 



interest leaps at one bound beyond 
tho usual span of a man's life, gives 
us sober thought of the extended 
continuity and indefinite eternity of 
a noble and historic institution like 
Washington College, of which we all 
are today an integral part, as were 
our many predecessors, and as will be 
our uncounted generations of acad- 
emic descendants, 

—Gilbert W. Mead. 



A well known writer of a love-for- 
lorn column recently forwarded me 
a letter received by her from a girl 
at Reid Hall instructing me to an- 
er it since I would probably know 
personally the difficulties of the young 
lady. 
Dear Miss — 

I am a freshman in college and 
very much in love with a football he- 
Every night after dinner he 
walks home with me but oh, Miss — 
heTe is where the trouble starts. He 
acts so very indifferent toward me. 
I have tried everything that is known 
to "get your man" but still he is dis- 
tant to me. Do you think he loves 
me? Please, please Miss — heip me. 
I AM DESPERATE!! 

Signed D. W. 
Yes, I do think he loves you D. W. 
In a recent editorial it was staled 
that "hate is akin to love" and this is 
surely the case. As I am acquaint- 
ed with the young man in question 
I think that you may be using the 
wrong tactics. My advice to you, 
D. W., is to lure him coyly to the 
drawing room and after getting him 
comfortably situated immediately 
burst forth with wild phrases of flat- 
tery — praise him to the nth degree. 
Be sure to droop your eyelids shyly 
when he looks at you, that is always 
a guod method. If these things 
fail, start to work on his sympathy, 
tell him you are homesick, blue, or 
that you have lost your last friend. 
Now, best of luck to you, D. W., and 
may your future and his be united 
into one! 

BITS — Miss Young is getting into 
shape for the football team — she has 
started limbering up her toes by 
kicking rocks around Any old 

picks that are not used will be glad- 
ly appreciated by Johnny Lord — or 
mr.ybe a shovel would be better 
Grticie is still sweeping away her 
troubles with her "broom" very sue- 
ceEsfully . Have you noticed the 
crowds around the bulletin board ut 
Bill Smith — they gaze for hours up- 
on their handsome faces,... I ask 
you, must G. W. Jon k *8 walk home 
with EVEHY girl he meets? 



SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SKIPPING OVER 
THE SPORTS 

by Phi) Skipp 



This afternoon almost all of the 
nation's football teams join together 
in one grand finale. True, there re- 
main many more games to be played, 
but the cloud of dust raised over the 
country's gridirons will assume its 
greatest proportions today. Each 
Saturday thereafter activities will 
greatly decrease until the 1934 is 
ended. 

Washington College approaches 
the finish line this afternoon. It has 
been running a very fine race 
throughout. Yes, that Susquehanna 
game slowed her pace a little, but last 
week the Maroon and Black regained 
its stride — added a little speed and is 
thundering down the home stretch. 
Delaware is the last obstacle to over- 
come in order to speed by the judge's 
stand a winner. 

This will be one of the last articles 
about our football team, so let's have 
a little fun with the squad. 

First, let's take our hats off every- 
body to those four stalwarts of the 
Senior class, Ward, Lord, Dwycr and 
Baker. Yes sir, a job well done, 
Uncle Ekaitis took nil his boys walk- 
ing Sunday afternoon. Yep, and 
Berry had a date too. Did he gripe. 
Evans not being a walking man got 
sore feet. Secret practice all week. 
Makes you feel like big time. Ben- 
hum had a deuce of a time getting in, 
lie didn't know the pass word 0. 
K. for "Nick" to go gunning Satur- 
day morning but not Friday night. 
The two assistant managers ate twice 
as much as any player up at Haver- 
ford last" Saturday. Practicing In 
llie moon light is great fun. Hard to 
keep your mind on football though. 
Kilby and Salter are rivals for a 
"she." Jean has been adopted as 
the sweetheart of the squad. Who 
is next "HufF"? Evans, Berry, and 
Salter are "raring" to show up their 
home state University. Tignor has 
all the boys running from him in the 
showers. Don't blame them either. 
Bilancioni never takes all his tackles. 
Oh yeh, before I forget. "Little" 
Arthur Griems knocked out Tignor 
last Saturday. Most of the squad re- 
turns next year. Nick has another 
year. And P. J. S. will probably 
have this column again next year. 
Lets finish with some advice from 
Coach Ekaitis. "A hard charging 
line and a fast running backficld 
can't be beat." Also "Beware of the 
'Scavengers', Hi Boys." 




Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



College Hill Lunch Room 

AH kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. WaLon, P. S. T. and Ea.l 

Hall. 
H. Davit, Middle and We>l 

H.lli. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour aervice. Tel. 318 



Junior Girls Win 
From Frosh ■ Sophs 

Play Sophomores Monday For 
Lead In Girls' Hockey 

Caroline Helms got back into form 
last Friday, when in a game between 
the Juniors and Freshmen, she scored 
six goals, Metcalfe making the other 
one. The Junior team began to func- 
tion with their old form, keeping 
their line formation, while their de- 
fense was everywhere at once, shoot- 
ing out the ball from the goal. The | 
Freshman team was completely ov- ; 
erwhelmed, although they put up a 
brave fight. 

Monday afternoon Caroline Jewell 
made the only goal scored that after- 
noon. Though the Juniors kept the 
ball in the Sophomore territory, the j 
Sophomore defense made them un- 
able to score more than one goal. 
Nancy Post and Alice Marian Sterl- 
ing were outstanding in their de- 
fense work. Phoebe Pyle continues 
to improve in her quick-witted steal- 
ing of the ball from her opponent. 

The play-off should be the most in- 
teresting game ever played here. It 
will take place next Monday. 



FOOT BALL 

by George Ekaitis 




Today — Delaware ! What else 
should bo said? Delaware to date 
has a very impressive record despite 
their two defeats. They have play- 
ed through a harder schedule than 
ours, and their two defeats have been 
by the strong Lebanon Valley eleven 
24 to 0, and by the undefeated and 
unscored upon P. M. C. team. The 
Cadets won a game played in the 
Atlantic City Auditorium by a 12 to 
score. Four games have been 
won, the same number as we have 
won, St. Joseph's falling 16 to 0; 
Dickinson, 7 to 0; Juniata, 14 to 0; 
and last Saturday Drexel was defeat- 
ed in a hard fought game 7 to 6, the 
alertness and hard charging of the 
Delaware forward wail swinging the 
issue in favor of Delaware. A tie 
game with Hampden-Sidney was also 
played. They have proven to be a 
big alert team taking advantage of 
the other team's mistakes, as Drexel 



will testify. It will take all the foot- 
ball our Maroons are able to play to 
win this game and finish out a high- 
ly successful season. We are on the 
spot, as it were, for there is nothing 
move pleasing to a college team than 
to be the first to defeat a team that 
has as yet to lose a game. This 
game will be decidedly tougher than 
both the Johns Hopkins and Mt. St. 
Mary's games, and the boys will have 
to condense the two totals of sixty 
minute football of each of these two 
games into this one game of sixty 
minutes to win, a second's let-down 
will be costly. The Haverford game 
resulted in some painful bruises and 
"charley-horses," but those ailing are 
expected to be in shape for the hard 
game that will be necessary. 

The most pleasing feature of the 
Kaverford game was the improve- 
ment in the entire team's blocking. 
There is a decided thrill to the coach 



to see some linenl 

of the opponents 

block. There ne\ 

offense without go 

gardless of how goo.. ,iu_... 

may be. Qualified observers at the 

Navy-Pitt game made no mention of 

any particular back, but never tired 

3f writing about Pitt's blocking and 

how their linemen and backs spilled 

the Navy players. 

Today there are some other im- 
portant games too, such as California- 
Stanford, Yale-Harvard, Maryland- 
Georgetown, Minnesota-Wisconsin, 
Temple-Villanova, Rice-Texas Chris- 
tian, Chicago-Illinois, Army-Notre 
! Dame, and Columbia-Syracuse. 
I Last Saturday was a bad day for 
| undefeated teams, Navy, Princeton, 
Illinois and Syracuse falling by the 
wayside. The Yale-Princeton game 
was a proof, oddly enough, of the 
saying that was originated by a fam- 
ous Princeton football coach, "Bill" 
Roper, "A team that won't be beaten, 
can't be beaten!" 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 




%e€eos 



...it gives 

tobacco an extra 

flavor and aroma 




. . . in a 
common -sense 
package ~ 10c 



fere °tfro^ ZD P ^ss is .. f 
***' >» a e ' 0bacc ° act 

slower «»* L fie r b '< r » 

~~~"° s °g<tvL"Z d ' y asl > 



eseish in some zo&y zee con fa pet 
every titan who smokes a pipe 
iofust in f GranPer .; , , 



\\9\<, iftwm* : *$>rfM ToiMw» £».■ . 




THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 1934 



^^-^^_ 



tors 
rm society 



Adopt Name THE CAXTON- 
IANS At Organization Meeting 

The. first hook collectors' society 
ever known to exist at Washington 
College formally ratified its consti- 
tution, elected its officers, and adopt- 
ed the name The Caxtonians, at a 
meeting of the charter members held 
at the home of Miss Gertrude Van A. 
Ingalls. at S P. M. on Tuesday, No- 
vember 20. Miss Ingalls, Professor 
of English at the College, was chosen 
Faculty Sponsor, and Jay Spry, '37, 
■was elected president on the second 
ballot. Other officers named were 
Marjsret Thorn«on, vice-president, 
and Clifton Hope, - 37, Secretary- 
treasurer. The fourteen charter 
members present unanimously rati- 
fied the Constitution, which provides 
for ter-weekly, Tuesday-evening 
meetings. 

The constitution of The Caxtonians 
was drawn up by a committee ap- 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



pointed at an informal meeting of in- 
terested people held three weeks ago, 
and notes the purpose of the group 
to "study and collect rare and inter- 
esting editions." 

This purpose will be accomplished 
by subscription to rare book cata- 
logues, journals, the systematic study 
of bibliography, and the building up 
of the private libraries of the mem- 
bers with rare as well as ordinary 
editions, according to plans of the 
society. It is proposed that each 
member acquire at least one collec- 
tor's item in the year. This is re- 
commended to be, according to dis- 
cussion at the meeting, a book in 
some special field selected by the col- 
lector. A collector's item is gener- 
ally a first edition of an old or fam- 
ous work. 

The ratified constitution provided 
for others than the charter members 
by election by two-thirds vote, after 
the candidate has submitted his ap- 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 
C. W. K1BLER & SONS 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 



Watches, Rings 
Novelty Jewelry. 



and 



■The Bank Where 
Yon Feel At Home" 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
ST AM DRUG COMPANY 
The Pretcription Store 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 



Given on All Types of 
Construction 



Bid: 

Phone Chestertown 30S 



plication in writing to the secretary- 
treasurer. He must convince the 
society of his "sincere and serious 
interest" in its object- 
Meetings will be held every third 
Tuesday, at 8 P. M„ at a place pre- 
viously to be announced. Programs 
are to be planned by special commit- 
tees appointed to meetings in ad- 
vance, following provisions made at 
the meeting. 

Already The Caxtonians have an- 
nounced a series of studies concern- 
ing books. These include book-bind- 
ing, printing, type-setting, kinds of 
paper used, kinds of type of letter- 
ing, book plates, and allied subjects. 
Visits to famous collections, as The 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety First 

F. G. Usiiton, Pres. 

L. B. Russell. Vice-Pres. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



Rosenbach Collection in Philadelphia, 
will be made, it was said. 

Co-operation with the Washington 
College library, especially in the mat- 
ter of obtaining rare books for the 
College, is part of the program of the 
new organization. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

AH American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 
Town 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



LeCATES 
BARBER 



BROS. 
SHOP 



Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 




THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 





GRAY BEAUTY SOLON 

Reasonable New Fall Prices. 

Watch announcements of 

Specials each month. Starting 
November 1 for the month of 
November on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sham- 
poo and Finger Wave 75c. Mani- 
cure 35c. 

Regular prices on Friday and 
Saturday. 

Over Jefferson's Store 
Phone: Chestertown 106 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And All Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF NOV. 26-DEC. 1 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26-27 
BERT WHEELER - ROBERT WOOLSEY 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



Als 



"KENTUCKY KERNELS" 

—Comedy, Cartoon and Snapshots. 



WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, NOV. 28-29 

"LIME HOUSE BLUES" 

— with — 

GEORGE RAFT 

ANNA MAY WONG - JEAN PARKER 

Also — Color Cartoon, Musical Act, Comedy and 
Sportreel. 

FRIDAY^SATURDAY, NOv7~3d^DEC. 1 
DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

"BACHELOR OF ARTS" 

with 

TOM BROWN - ANITA LOUISE 
STEPIN FETCHIT 



BOB STEELE 
— in — 

"TRAILING NORTH" 



SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



KAUFMAN VINDICATED 
BY HUMBLED WRITER 



Threatened Columnist Makes 
Statement Of Policy 

Public Sentiment 

A regular feature of this column 
seems to be the receiving of a choice 
assortment of brickbats every Satur- 
day when the Elm makes it appear- 
ance. It is indeed a calamity of no 
small magnitude that the spirit in 
which this is written is not under- 
stood. It is not the purpose of this 
Rat Hall Merry-Go-Round to stir up 
ill feeling, but to lighten in its hum- 
ble way monotonous round of tests, 
cauliflower, studies, pork, tests, and 
so on. Nonconstructive criticism is 
inevitable, however; it will ho doubt 
be on hand in remarkable bulk next 
Saturday. Meanwhile, bear in mind 
that the Reporter has his moments of 
lunacy, too. 



Wall Street News 
There are a few words to be added 
about Harry Kaufman who was un- 
consciously put in perhaps the wrong 
light last week. We hasten to state 
that this is hardly the case; Mr. 
Kaufman is a scholar and a gentle- 
man, and the scion of a long line of 
merchants. And also, says Mr. 
Kaufman, a first-class business man. 



OR. MICOU RECALLS 
BOARDWALK ON CAMPUS 



Were No Saturday Classes In 
Late 19th Century 



Psychology Applied 

Alfred Gardiner, the dignified Sen- 
ior who philosphizes to the insigni- 
ficant rats, outwitted the scoundrel 
who stole his clothes last Tuesday 
morning with the intention of mak- 
ing him miss his eight o'clock. Like 
the psychologist that he is, he mas- 
terfully produced a brand new pair 
of white flannels, and went his way 
nonchalantly. "Merely the triumph 
of mind over matter," says Mr. Gard- 
iner. 



Believe It Or Not 

Ben Vandervoort claims the dis- 
tinction of being the only man on 
the campus who has ever startled a 
codfish. 



Danger Ahead 

Upon receiving his degree. Wood- 
row Simmons intends to enter the 
service of the Maryland State Police 
Department chasing hit-runners, driv- 
ing-drunks, etc. "Am also going to 
be especially strict on parked cars 
in shady lanes," says Officer Sim- 
mons. This is just a tip to file away 
for future use. 



Reference* 

The History I class is now study- 
ing Greece. For rancid information 
on the subject, visit the cafeteria. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
by Dr. J. R. Micou 

The balance of the campus below 
the terraces was occupied by the 
baseball and football field, now the 
hockey field of the Co-eds. A board- 
walk extended from the foot of the 
campus to the top of the hill, close 
to the eastern 'fence. When the 
northwest winter winds swept across 
the campus they piled the snow up 
against this fence, and there it often 
lay until Easter or later. 

There were only three - , possibly 
four, houses on the west side -of 
Washington Avenue, and one on the 
east side, between College Hill and 
the town. At that time there were 
no pavements on either side of the 
avenue. 

As I have stated, there were but 
three teachers at the college, and 
the limited curriculum did not re- 
quire a very great number. Greeki 
Latin, and Mathematics were the on- 
ly four-year subjects. No modern 
languages were taught except Ger- 
man and French, each for two years. 
The only sciences taught were Phy- 
sics and Chemistry, each being con- 
fined to one year — one in the Jun- 
ior year, and the other in the Sen- 
ior. 

The President taught Greek, La- 
tin, and Moral Philosophy. I taught 
French, German, Physics, Chemistry, 
and Caloculus. The third member o"f 
the faculty taught the other mathe- 
matical subjects, and perhaps a little 
History and English. The elective 
system was unknown. The library 
was open only twice a week, for two 
hours each time. 

There were no Seniors in the 
Spring of 1887, and so no Com- 
mencement was held that year. One 
of the first things the President told 
me when I arrived in February was 
that one of the two Seniors had left 
at the end of the Fall term to go into 
business, and that the other was at 
home in a dying condition! 

No catalogue was published until 
after the accession of Dr. Reid to the 
presidency in 1889. Under this 
president the enrollment increased to 
about one hundred and twenty. Re- 
citations began at nine in the morn- 
ing and ended at two in the after- 
noon. There were no Saturday 
classes. There was a holiday of one 
week at Christmas, and one day at 
Easter. 



Brain Trust 

The only way Lee Dolan (Jr.) can 
get into Reid Hall is be night watch- 
man. He bribed Oscar "Buttercup" 
Davis Sunday, and tried his luck, No 
report of Mr. Dolan has yet been re- 
ceived. 



Popularity 
Speaking of Reid Hall, all that An- 
drew Anderson has to do is to step 
inside and say "AnderBon down- 
stairs" and they all come with a rush 
— to order sandwiches and ice cream 
from the Canteen. 



Five Seniors, Veteran And Valuable 
Players, Finish Collegiate Football 



Comment On Their Feelings 

Today As Season 

Ends 



AUTHORITIES SANCTION 
THANKSGIVING PLANS 



by Howard Clark 

Today, Ellis Dwyer, Russ Baker, 
Ellery Ward, Dick Saylor, and John- 
ny Lord, play their last football 
game for Washington College. For 
four years they have given all they 
had, many times taking it on the 
chin, fighting though often losing. 
Win or lose they were real sports- 
men and this season of victories is 
not entirely due to good coaching or 
new material but to the unconquer- 
able spirit of these veterans. A Bpir- 
it that was able to keep a losing team 
fighting until the final whistle. 

■ Capt. Dwyer — 

We'll be fighting hard this after- 
noon and if Delaware wins it won't 
be because the team hasn't given it's 
best. 

Russ Baker — 

It's been great to have played foot- 
ball for Washington and I'll always 
remember the fellows that played a- 
long side of me. The best feeling is 
to have a winning team as good as 
this year's team that goes into the 
Delaware game. My best wishes for 
the teams of Washington College in 
the years to come. 

Ellery Ward — 

It's great ending your football 
career on a winning Washington Col- 
lege team, but I wish to add that it 
wasn't a disgrace to play on any of 
the Washington teams, for win or 
lose they fought for sixty minutes. 
Washington College has proved itself 
a good winner or loser and I'm proud 
to have played for her. 

Dick Saylor — - 

It certainly is gratifying to all of 
us who have been here four years 
to see our aims and hopes of a suc- 
cessful football season realized. My 
congratulations to Coaches Kibler 
and Ekaitis and every man on the 
squad. A great spirit, an eagerness 
and desire to win, has brought us the 
taste of victory which is mighty 
sweet. To the fellows of the team 
next year — keep it going. We'll be 
here to see you win! 

Johnny Lord — 

Four years ago it looked like a, 
long, long time in which to play foot- 
ball ahead of me. Today comes the 
realization that it is all over for me. 
I shall always be proud and glad that 
I have played for Washington in good 
years and bad. Playing for the 




PLANS COMPLETL 
FROSH-SOPt 



With each team holding 
almost daily, and with inte___ run- 
ning high, plans are being perfected 
for the annual freshman-sophomore 
football game to be played next Wed- 
nesday, November 28, on Kibler 
field. 

Dwyer, captain of the varsity team, 
is acting as coach for the sophs while 
Evans and Huffman are serving for 
the freshmen. 

It is anticipated that the combat 
will be hard-fought and lively because 
of the intense rivalry between the 
two classes, the award of a silver cup 
to the winners, and because of the 
fact that the game will settle the tie 
resulting from the tie-up and the 
tug-of-war in which each class wa3 
once victorious. 



NOTICE 

The absence of one of the national 
advertisements for the past two weeks 
in the ELM does not mean that the 
ad has been withdrawn. The series is 
merely being changed from the fall 
to the winter season. 



maroon and black has strengthened 
my love for my alma-mater and 
makes me look forward to the day 
when, perhaps, a son of mine shall 
grub his nose in the ground and grin 
because that ball has crossed one 
more chalk line. 

To those men who read this and 
have more football years ahead of 
them I should like to convey one 
thought. Football is a game for fun, 
it is only work when you make it so ; 
play the game hard, clean, and you 
too will enjoy scraping the skin off 
your nose on the ground. To Coach- 
es Ekaitis and Kibler, under whom 
I am proud to have played, I wish a 
continuance of the glorious record 
they have made possible this year. 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 

GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

332 High St. Phone 818F4 orh 

332 High St. 

Telephone 818F4 or 362M 



Transportation 

Six of the boys went back to cleat 
old Connecticut last week to see the 
homefolks and heartbeats. The par- 
ty consisted of Bride, Micari, Kauf- 
man, Mike Wallace, Kosowsky, and 
Labasauckas. "Well" says Johnny, 
"they're getting along pretty well 
without us, considering. . ." 



Approve Dates For Dances, 
Hockey Games And Play 

The Thanksgiving activities, the 
Hockey game and the Tea Dance, 
have been approved by the Activities 
Committee. 

Approval that "She Stoops to Con- 
quer" by Goldsmith, be presented by 
the Jitney Players on December 7, 
was also granted by the Committee. 

The moving up of the basketball 
game, previously scheduled for De- 
cember 14 in order to relieve the 
conflict between the game and the 
Cotillion has also been approved, 
However, the Activities Committee 
has set no definite date for the game. 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331 -M 



MAKE YOUR CAR 

A COLLEGIATE ONE! 

A complete accessory line 

Goodrich Tires 

STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

331 High St. 



Society Corner 
The above mentioned boys report 
that Kaufman had a date with Ace 
Wilmot's girl. Says Harry; "All she 
would say was, 'My Hero', and she 
didn't mean me, either." 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITH'S KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 

Complete line of Hard- 

ware. Paints and Farm 

Machinery 



HOLDEN'S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



LIQUORS and WINES 
Come and see me 
HERZBERG'S 
GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 
Phone 190 



After An Evening of Hard 
Study Refresh Yourself at the 

CAFETERIA CANTEEN 
All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 
dles, Tobaccos, Milk and 
Ice Cream 



£r |i m iii ts 


jBttt 


Distributed 


»T 


THE CHESAPEAKE 


BEVERAGE 


CO. 


Cheil.rtown 


Md. 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111 J 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 



Men s and Ladies 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 

Store 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



GEO. T. COOPER 


Fancy Meats 


and Groceries 


Phone 400 and 401 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Repre.ent.tive of the Wash- 
ington National Life In.ur.nce 
Company 
Health end Accident Policies 
624 Hifh St. 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 




THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 1934 



JIN'S 



It was tough on us Suckers last 
Saturday at the Haverford game 
when we saw some of our illustrious 
students climbing over fences, walk- 
ing across corn fields and calmly tak- 
ing seats in the bleacheis. while ihe 
rest of us sat holding our §1.10 tick- 
ets awaiting the collector who never 
appeared. Well, anyway, the game 
made up for it- The college owes a 
lot to the enterprising cheerleaders 
that day too. Mr. Peyser did his 
part until Mr. Slacum shouted him 
down, and took his place. But Fred- 
die got his word in first. Then our 
Supersalesman, Mr . Goldstein exer- 
cised his vocal cords to great advant- 
age, and finally ended up with a very 
red countenance and thankful words 
when Mr. Boynton, our H — i — p. 
H — i — p, cheerleader took his place. 



\PH1LA. ALUMNI HOLD 

ANNUAL BANQUET 



1 L. L. Goldstein, *35, Speaks For 
Undergraduate Body 



DECEMBER 



-HALL DARN GOOD 



On Wednesday, the Washington 
Players gave their first performance. 
"Jonesy." The members of the cast 
deserve credit for their work, and Mr. 
Tolles certainly did his best to make 
the play a success. 



The Philadelphia Chapter of the 
Washington College Alumni Associ- 
ation held its annual banquet last 
Saturday, November 17, at the Meri- 
dian Club in Philadelphia. Louis 
Goldstein '35 was student repre- 
sentative from Washington College. 
Several members of the faculty at- 
tended, among them President Mead, 
Dr. Howell, and Dr. Robinson. 

Goldstein spoke at the banquet, 
mentioning the new spirit evident on 
the campus this year, and giving as 
examples the college's undefeated 
football team, the many new organ- 
izations that are being formed, and 
various other manifestations of a- 
wakened interest. He also outlined 
a plan for a ten-year club, initiated 
by this year's senior class. This club 
would have for its purpose that each 
class return in a body to its Alma 
Mater at some date as yet undeter- 
mined ten years after graduation. 

Harry Pringle Ford, the oldest liv- 
ing alumnus of Washington College, 
addressed the group. He told of the 
activities of the Association and paid 
tribute to Dr. Titsworth, the College's 
late president. Mr. Ford was grad- 
uated from Washington College fifty- 
eight years ago. His daughter, Miss 
Mary E. Ford, was elected the new 
president, of the Chapter replacing 
William C. Johnston '27. Miss 



Historical Society 
Hears J. E.Hancock 



The guest speak- 
er of the Wash- 
ington College 
Historical Society, 
James E. Hancock. 
LL. L., the Secre- 
tary of the Mary- 
land Historical So- 
ciety, the Presi- 
dent of the Maty- 
land Society of 
the War of 1812 
and of the Socie- 
ty of the Sons of the Revolution, will 
give the address in William Smith 
Hall. Room No. 21, Monday after- 
noon at 3:15. President Gilbert 
Mead will also give a brief opening 
talk. Dr. E. M. Dole, the head of 
the History Department, will intro- 
duce the distinguished antiquarian. 
All are invited and urged to avail 
themselves of the opportunity to 
hear Mr. Hancock. 




Maude 0. Hickman was reelected sec- 
retary-treasurer of the organization. 
Dr. Mead spoke at some length, 
stressing, as did Goldstein, the re- 
newal of spirit on the campus. The 
other principal speaker was a Phil- 
adelphia lawyer, a friend of Mr. 
Ford. He spoke on present-day gov- 
ernment and tried to explain some 
phases of the new deal. 

Dr. Howell, the registrar, and Dr. 
Robinson, the college's new professor 

1 of mathematics and chemistry, also 

: made brief remarks. 




Above are seen two of the Jitney Players' cast, 
Theodora Peck as Constance and Pendleton Harri- 
son as Marlowe from Goldsmith's, "She Stoops To 
Conquer." 



JITNEY PLAYERS LIKELY 
TO APPEAR DECEMBER 7 



Goldsmith's "She Stoops T< 
Conquer" Will Be Presented 



The appearance of the Jitney Play- 
ers, who were scheduled to play Gold- 
smith's "She Stoops to Conquer 1 ' 
here November 30, has been post- 
poned. Dr. Ingalls, who is responsi- 
ble for the college's securing them, 
has set Friday, December 7, as 
the new date. It has not yet been 
accepted by the company but will 
probably be suitable. 



Washington Represented 
At Balto. Peace Conference 



(Continued from Page 1) 
ternational Youth Movement" and a 
member of the "Research Staff of 
National League For Prevention of 
War." 

Those present included delegates 
from Hopkins University, Hood Col- 
lege, State Normal School, University 
of Maryland, Western Maryland, and 
Washington, which was represented 
by R.chard P. Chambers and Law- 
rence E. Williams. 








you might say 

there are few things 
that cost so little 
d give so much 



• IW, Lmm * IM> TMat Co. 



Congratulations to 
Team and Coaches 




f&ttjg&ftojt 





See the Jitneys and 
Goldsmith on Monday 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 11. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, DEC. 1, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



BLUE HEMS ARE 
DEFEATED 29-7 



Gridmen Close Season With- 
out Defeat — Tied Once 



by Phillip Skipp 

As a result of the 29-7 victory ov- 
er Delaware last Saturday up in 
Newark, Delaware, this year's foot- 
ball team became the first in Wash- 
ington College history to go through 
an entire season undefeated. The 
rather one-sided score does not indi- 
cate in the least what a hard-fought 
and close contest it was. Up until 
the beginning of the fourth quarter 
the Shoremen were only 3 points a- 
head 10 to 7. The Maroon and 
Black scores came in the second 
quarter when "Gib" Young reeled 
off a sixty yard run to the Delaware 
eleven yard line. On the next play 
Berry went off his left side for the 
first score of the game. Nicholson 
converted the extra point. A few 
minutes later Washington recovered 
a fumble deep in Delaware's terri- 
tory. Three plays gained but little, 
so on the last down Nicholson step- 
ped back and place-kicked a field 
goal from the 30 yard line. The 
half ended soon after. 

The third quarter opened with 
Washington receiving the kick off. 
Young ran it back to the IB yard 
line. On the first play a lateral 
evaded the arms of the receiving 
back, and rolled over the goal line 
where Worrell fell on it giving Dela- 
ware six points. Thompson kicked 
the extra point. The rest of the 
quarter found the ball moving around 
the center of the field. Thompson's 
fine kicking kept the Sho'men in 
check. However soon after the op- 
ening of the last quarter the Maroon 
and Black recovered a Delaware fum- 
ble on the opponents 45-yard line. A 
few plays took the ball to the seven- 
yard Hue where Nicholson went over 
standing up. 

Delaware resorted to a desperate 
passing attack. But this proved to 
be a boomerang because the Wash- 
ington backfield inteicepted or 
Knocked down all of them. Ward 
got his hands on one of those wild 
heaves and scampered across the goal 
line. A Berry to Salter pass ac- 
counted for the last score. 



Dr. Mead Attends College 
Association Meeting 



Invited As Guest Of O. D. K- 
Anniversary In Washington 



Dr. Mead spent Friday and Satur- 
day at Atlantic City attending the 
annual meeting of the Association of 
Colleges of the Middle States, of 
which Washington College is a mem- 
ber. He was accompanied by Dr. 
Livingood and Dr. Howell. Dr. Davis 
joined them later, to attend the As- 
sociation of Teachers of Modern 
Languages, held in connection with 
the College Association meeting. 

Dr. Mead has been invited as an 
honor guest at the anniversary din- 
ner of the Omicron Delta Kappa hon- 
oi' society, of which he is a member, 
celebrating the twentieth aninvrr- 
sary of the founding of the society. 
The dinner is to be held at the Hotel 
Willard, Washington, on the evening 
of Dec. 15. The principal speaker 
Will be U. S. Attorney-General Homer 
S. Cummings, also a member of the 
organization. 



NOTICE 

Becnuse of the reduced issue size 
of the ELM this week, Dr. J. R. 
Mieou's articles will be continued in 
next week's paper. The ELM takes 
this opportunity to thank Dr. Micou 
for this very popular series. 




Theodore Peck as Constance and Robert 
Caldwell as Hastings in "Goldsmith's "She 
Stoops To Conquer." 



JITNEY PLAYERS PRESENT GOLDSMITH'S "SHE 
STOOPS TO CONQUER" MONDAY, DECEMBER 3 



Noted Road Company To Be Guests Of Shakespeare Players 
And Dramatic Club At Reid Hall Tea 



The Jitney Tlayers make their 
third visit to Washington College 
next Mondav, this time in Goldsmith s 
comedy, SHE STOOPS TO CON- 
QUER. 

These talented young people need 
no introduction to W. C. students. 
They have kept two previous engage- 
ments here; playing Sheridan': 
TRIP TO SCARBOROUGH in 1928, 
and the 19th century melodrama 
CASTE two years ago; but they are 
vividly remembered by all who saw 
them, as well for their own charming 
personalities as for their finished act- 
ing. 

Their history is so romantic that it 
is impossible to resist reviewing it. 
The company was organized twelve 
years ago, by Bushnell Cheny, then 
just graduated from Yale, and his 
bride, Alice Keating Cheney. 

Miss Keating, born in Buffalo, and 
as a child associated with Katherine 
Cornell in church plays and town 
dramatics, had spent her girlhood in 
Europe, studying not only dramatic 
art, but music, dancing, fencing, 
languages, — the myriad things a good 
actress must know, — all under the 
best teachers Europe boasted. She 
had returned to this country to play 
as John Barrymore's leading lady, in 
HAMLET and other of his produc- 
tions; and from there she had gone 
to the Theatre Guild, because she be- 
lieved that the fuiure of the theatre 
lay in Little Theatres rather than in 
commercial drama. 

It was ihrough his interest in the 
theatre, and in the Little Theatre 
movement that Mr. Cheney met Miss 
Keating, while he was still an un- 
dergraduate. Upon graduation he 



joined the Theatre Guild; soon after 
he and Miss Keating were married, 
and with the capital afforded by the 
cheques they requested of their re- 
spective families in lieu of wedding 
gifts they founded the Jitney Play- 



The idea was to approximate ihe 
strolling companies of Elizabethan 
times, in order to take drama to the 
people, — the people no longer being 
able to go to the drama, since it was 
no longer to be seen in their towns, 
but only in New York. Therefore, 
on an old chassis of what had once 
been a Jitney bus Bushnell Cheney 
designed a body which, travelling a- 
long the road by dav, appeared an 
innocent truck; but which, opened up 
and unfolded at night, became a 
compact, thoroughly equipped thea- 
tre. 

In this quaint and ingenious con- 
trivance Mr. and Mrs. Cheney and 
their little company — only six at first 
— toured the country. Because from 
the first Mrs. Cheney insisted on only 
the finest of actoi* 
a success at once, 
were all recruited from John Barry- 
more's HAMLET cast, and from the \ sprained 



FROSH WIN IN 

ANNUAL EVENT 



Mygatt Scores Touchdown In 
8-0 Victory Over Sophs 

by William Doering 

Led by fullback Johnny Mygatt, 
the Freshman football team romped 
to victory over the Sophomores by 
the score of 8 to last Wednesday 
on Kibler Field. Johnny's sensational 
52 yard run in the third quarter was 
the feature of the game, while Mc- 
Dorman and Ben Vandervoort star- 
red on the Frosh defense. Nides 
shone brilliantly for the iosers, and 
Abbott's shifty running gave the 
Frosh a great deal of trouble. A ban- 
quet and victory dance followed the 
game. 

Freshmen Kick Off 

The Freshmen opened the game by 
kicking off, and holding the Sophs 
near their own line. During the 
first minute they almost forced the 
Sophs back of their own line, but the 
upper-classmen kicked out of danger. 
Several minutes later, the Rat line 
blocked Reddish's kick and scored a 
safety back of the Soph goal line. 
After the kickoff, time was taken out 
for refreshment. Waterboys Fink and 
Clark got mixed up in the melee and 
served the wrong teams. After the 
play resumed, Nides intercepted a 
pass and made a dash down the field, 
being stopped only by Ben Vander- 
voort's well-timed tackle. The strug- 
gle raged in the center of the field 
for some minutes until action was 
momentarily stopped to allow Char- 
lie Vandervoort to rearrange the 
clothes which had been nearly sep- 
arated from him. He got back at the 
Sophs by kicking a beautiful 50-yard 
punt that rolled back of the opposing 
goal line. Play was resumed on the 
twenty-yard line, and Referee Rus- 
sell's whistle blew for the end of the 
half. 

Mygatt Scores Touchdown 
McDorman kicked off at the start 
of the half. Abbott fumbled a mom- 
ent later, but the ball was recovered 
by Nides. Abbott got off a beauti- 
ful 60-yard punt, but was cheated 
out of it, as the Freshmen were guil- 
ty of holding. They were penalized 
ten yards, and the play resumed, Ab- 
bott's kick being invalid. A fumble 
by Abbott gave the ball to the Frosh; 
on the next play Johnny Mygatt 
crashed through the Soph defense to 
dash 52 yards for the first and only 
the venture was ' touchdown of the game. The quar- 
The first troupe Iter ended with no further score. 

During the last quarter Compton 
his leg, but recovered 



PANEGYRIC 
An Editorial 



Great victories of previous lands 
and times have had noble poets to in- 
dite encomiums in their memory. 
There lives no more a divinely-in- 
spired Homer to celebrate again the 
Fall of Troy and the athletic, stone- 
hurling triumph of Odysseus over the 
Phaeacian Euryalus, in one lofty 
manner. Yet the world of sport af- 
fords chance for such ennobled rec- 
ords, as it did in classic times. One 
of them is the football season of 
Washington College for 1934. The 
victories, the efforts, the sportsman- 
ship, and the personnel of this team, 
unique in Washington's history, are 
all suggestive of classic proportions. 

This memorable, historic, unde- 
feated season marks another of those 
successes, those outbursts of vitality, 
for which Washington College is not- 
The splendid performance of 



ed. 



Theatre Guild in New York. Five of 
the original six are now well known 
actors, and their successors have been 
worthy of them. 

In order that as many as possible 
may have an opportunity to know at 
first hand what charming people these 
guests of ours are, their sponsors, the 
Dramatic and the Shakespeare Clubs, 
are giving a tea in their honor at Reid 
Hall Monday afternoon, from four 
to five. For students no formal in- 
vitations will be issued, but all will 
be welcome. 



Coaches Kibler And E kai ti s Agree That 
Determined Spirit Compelled Victories 



When asked the question, both 
coaches of the undefeated football 
teams gave similar answers as to the 
success of the post season. They ac- 
t edited this unprecedented success 
to a new air of enthusiasm which ap- 
peared for the first time in many 
years on both the football field and 
on the campus. 

In the words of Mr. George Ekaitis, 
head couch, is found the basis excel- 
lent spirit " 'displayed by the giid- 
ders this season when he stated. 

"1 attribute (he success of our club 



to a new mental attitude and a hard 
charging line and a hard running 
backfield." 

Coach J. Thomas Kibler even made 
his statement more specific when he 
said: 

"A new deal in spirit existed a- 
mong our boys this year as revealed 
by the fine spirit of determination of 
the seniors of our outfit." 

Mr. Kibler also made remaiks to 
the effect that he is quite confident 
that this spirit will be carried over to 
the other athletic teams of this year. 



enough to continue the game. In the 
waning minutes of the game, the up- 
perclassmen threatened by -a steady 
march down the field. Bruehl got off 
a long pass to Reddish which netted 
the Sophs much gain. Ford and 
Wagner went in to bolster up the 
battered Frosh defense, and the whis- 
tle blew several minutes later. 
Coaches Lauded 
Bright lights on the defense weie 
Ben Vandervoort, McDorman, Horo- 
witz and Benham for the Freshers; 
Nides, Abbott, Wingate and Comp- 
ton for the Sophs. Much credit is due 
to Coaches Evans and Huffman, who 
are responsible for the excellent 
teamwork of the Rats. Capt. Dwyer 
of the varsity coached the Sophs. 



Young People's Society 
Postpones Meeting To Dec. 9 



The meeting of the Young People's 
Society of Emmanuel Church, which 
was to take place on Sunday after- 
noon, December 2, has been postpon- 
ed until the following Sunday be- 
cause a number of the members have 
evidenced their inten ion to spend the 
week end away from 1 the college. 



the team, which has brought it na- 
tional recognition; the tireless, skill- 
ed, enthusiastic training of the coach- 
es; and perhaps, to a lesser degree, 
the spirited support of the student 
body, — all have effected the victor- 
ious achievements of the year. But, 
when these factors are added to- 
gether, they result in one term, 
Washington College. There lies the 
true triumph, in the football sons of 
this old College, in her coaches and 
her students — not in these factors in- 
dividually. 

Probably only a football player or 
a football coach knows what an un- 
defeated season really means. To 
the spectator, however informed or 
interested, it means thrilling mom- 
ents, precise and deceptive plays, bat- 
tering advances or retreats, finally, 
the highest score for the College 
team. To the player and the coach, 
it must represent all of these things 
magnified a hundred diameters, plus 
a score of far more significant facts. 
Among them, it shows honor, fair- 
ness, honesty, loyalty to the game 
and the team rather than to the 
grandstand, ability to think quickly 
and effectively in action, accuracy of 
movement and design, coordinated 
teamwork, absence of internal jeal- 
ousies and animosities, coolness and 
nervous control in tense momenta, 
ability to follow orders explicitly, 
physical stamina, and many other 
qualities of the man. It is at once 
evident that to the skilled observer 
and player the consistently winning 
teams, as Washington's, reveals in 
its players singly in games and in 
practice not merely the traits of a 
good football player, but the quali- 
ties of a MAN. This, then, in its full- 
est import, is what the supremely 
victorious football team of 1934 
means. Little more in eulogy can be 
said. 

What the mathecal consequences 
to the college of the fine season will 
be is relatively unimportant. Doubt- 
less the added publicity and local 
athletic prestige thus expended will 
help somewhat in keeping the Col- 
lege before the public eye. The im- 
portant thing that the team and the 
coaches can feel they have accom- 
plished is a job well done. The 
tandard of performance" has been 
attained. They have contributed to 
the welfare of iheir Alma Mater, and 
who could ask more? 

The victory over Delaware was a 
glorious and fotrfFht-foi climax; pos- 
session of the Hastings' trophy is the 
attainment of an ideal. The College 
and the town congratulates the team, 
the coaches and Captain Dwyer. Es- 
pecially praised arc the Seniors who 
finish their four years of service to- 
ward the achievement of this glor- 
ious season, and the second team, the 
"scrubs" who make the winnings ^i 

the Varsity sure. 

All Hail] and Hail to All. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, DEC. 1, 1934 



The Washington Elm !*:* *™£ ™ ong lhe colIege men of 



Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 17S2. 

William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Ass:. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Prances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor. Vincent Brandolini. Anne 

Whyte, William McCullough 

Howard Clark 



this country." 
j The fraternities at Washington 
! College are having a chnnce now to 
|show their own imperfections as well 
as good in the matter of honor and 
the i ui:.irg rules. All of these lit- 
tle indications go far toward estab- 
lishing the individual worth of a fra- 
ternity. The general value of them 
seems undoubted. 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price. $1.50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 



SATURDAY, DEC. 1, 1934 



A VICTORY IN CONDUCT 
Despite the gala aspect of the day. 
public opinion nas expressed itself 
■ - [y oi Ehe College 

behaved with proper Moi.ncis last 
Saturday. The orderly enthusiasm 
and controlled good will toward lhe 
world was everywhere manifest dur- 
ing :he game. Extraordinary" self- 
constraint left the goal-posts huact; 
. oi] ire j were mobbed; streaming 
hundreds did not leave the field from 
the Washington s:anus (n^r b*ve 
they erc-r done so. in previous ic- 
toryiess seasons ) before the game 
was pvei; ::o fictional alibis were g»v 
en for the opponent's single score. 
The whole attitude and conduct, thee, 
of the College body at Newark was 
thoroughly exemplary. What one did 
in the dusky hours after -.he *:amt- 
and an undefeated season is strictly 
one's own Effair, when ii 
miles from the College, and dees cox 
represent the official College. 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



Little Rollo (whom we have com- 
missioned Head Scout of the Quest 
of the Pegasus) has just informed us 
of a terrible tragedy that has hap- 
pened on the University of Maryland 
campus. It seems that the Universi- 
ty was to formally install their new 
object of affection — a large hundred 
year old turtle, at the Georgetown 
?ame. but, — the turtle, gaily painted 
in the symbolical colors of black and 
gold, was discovered dead on Satur- 
day morning! Most inconvenient! 

"And that," exclaims little Rollo, 
"is the beauty of the Pegasus — if we 
can ever find one, 'cause they jay the 
bloomm' things are immortal-" 



the Terp has a fairly good action 
shot — the kind we would like to see 
in our own "Told to Me" column. 

"Clyde Dubose frantically phoning 
Officer Lewis in the dead of night a- 
bout an 'evil smelling poisonous gas' 
in Silvester Hall Officer Lewis 
asking "Does it smell like a skunk?' 
Bro. Dubose replying 'Yes!' and 
then the doughty watchman shouting 
back, 'Well it IS a skunk! Matter 

of fact it was several of them 
but they went unharmed, Lewis hav- 
ing found from bitter experience 
that their potency increases after 
sudden death." 



Continuing on in the "Diamond- 
back", a column written by Testudo 



The "Kaverford News" says a col- 
lege professor is a man who knows a 
great deal about a little, and goes a- 
long knowing more and more about 
less and less until finally he knows 
practically everything about noth- 
ing; whereas, a student who knows a 
very little about a great deal, and 
keeps knowing less and less about 
more and more until finally he knows 
practically nothing about everything. 
(We now presume you know what 
you don't, don't what you know, do 
that you know that you know that 
you didn't — hey, slow down — only 
Gertrude Stein can write stuff like 
that.) 



TOLD TO 

ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



The old micestro is back from his | 
trip "up the river," all sunburned (in I 
stripes), with his hair shaved, and I 
rarin' to go to work. 

When this went to press, we hadn't i 
seen the Cafeteria Carbaret Club put , 
on its first floor show on Thanksgiv- j 
ing day, but we expect a lot from the 
boys. "Dime a Dance" Rhodes is, 
headman, and we hear he's going to 
put on a barn dance that will crack 
the roof. THE SCAVENGER SEX- 
TETTE will murder some of our fav-i 
orite compositions (or decomposi- 
tions) as "Ragtime Blues" ard "You 
Go Over Big With Me" — dedicated 
to Mrs, Bontz. Kilby, Huffman, 
loung, Salter, Wilmot and Londcs 
are the songbirds. Freeman will sing 
"My Wild Irish Rose" and Mike Wal- 
lace will croon "OI. YOI, OI Finkle- 
stein" Ward, Berry, and Evans 
will juggle some of the platters 
(Strike up a tune in a jugular vein, 
boys!) Skip will render that old fav- 
orite "To Bring Your Coffee In The 
Morning." 

Again we go to press before we 
found out whether McCrone got the 
part of the turkey that sits down first. 



like he did his first three years up 
here — he says if he gets it this time 
he's going to stuff it down the head 
waiter's throat. 

Drippings — "D. W." is looking o- 
round for a certain columnist. . . . 
Doss is cutting out Freddie on his 
Owen home grounds. . . . Goldie says 
that wasn't his best girl he was out 
with — just necks best. ...We refuse 
to make a pun with Ann and Long in 
it. Ann it'll be a long time before we 
do. 

rhilbert Phineas Phidilzter. 



Extra! Extra! Read all about the 
queer "doings" of our "prominents" 
at the Delaware Game last week-end 
— (ah, what a week for I-Unly- 
Heard). First, let us congratulate the 
team for plucking the feathers out 
of the Blue Hens — poor things — they 
were really a sorry sight after the 
game minus their brilliant plumage 
. .A bouquet to Wardie for his 
touchdown — I'm only sorry Johnny 
didn't have a chance to intercept one 
of those passes. I'm sure he could 
have done justice to the ball. A hear- 
ty cheer to our linesmen! 

Among those Black Catting: — 
McMahon was offered a contract af- 
ter his solo on the platform — "The 
find of. the year," remarked Mr. 
Black Cat . . Those interested in the 
lump on Dusty's nose — please see 
Mimi for full information — Scott 
was thrown for a loss Saturday night 
1 — -his S. A. just didn't seem to click 
I with the gal from Northeast 



-oc— 



PLAY-GOING AND PLAY-GOERS 

Hex! -uor.caT &oid=mi:h"s '.--;qu:£- 
ite comedy "She Stoops io Cc-nquer" '. 
will be presented on the boards of j 
William Smith HalL Opportunities j 
to see such a reputable snd t^ieme'i 
company as the Jitney I'layers are 
few, hi Chestertown. The jitneys are 
one of the few remaining skilled road 
companies. Their performance will 
interpret a play of unsurpassed wit 
and delicacy of thrust. Peihays 
there has never been anothe 
comedy so nice as "She Sto — 
It wHl be a pleasure, a privilege, and 
a valuable experience to see it uone 
by ihis line company. 

Xo doubt the movies Monday night 
will be largely devoid of College stn- 
-. Jitneys will play to a 
ftsll honse. At any raie, the attend- 
ance w02 serve as 2n indication of the 
Jitisric End dramatic appreciation Oi 
Washington College. Such enter- 
r.:= forms an integral 
student life, and an invalu- 
able part of student experience, a<. 
coimt-polrtan «eats cf learning, es- 
pecially abroad. There, the inquir- 
tU often forego proper 
food to hear a famous opera, or see 
a great play. There will be no nec- 
essity for personal deprivation to see 
"She Stoops to Conquer" on Monday 
evening. To be present will be «*> 
evidence one's good taste. 



"MAGNIFICENT FRIENDSHIP" 

That "fraternities promote a high- 
er standard of undergraduate activi- 
ties" was the considered decision of 
the College Fraternity Secretaries As- 
sociation, which is meeting in annual 
convention at the Hotel Roosevelt. 
These experienced administrators of 
many a big national fraternity con- 
cede that the fraternity is not flaw- 
less. Still, they were apparently un- 
• in their belief that the ad- 
vantages of the fraternity, and mo~- 
particolarty of the national frater- 
nity far outweighed it* irnperfacib.v 
Dean Heckel of Missouri noted the 
scholastic supremacy of the fraterni' 
ty man, and continued that '(■>■ 
** 'magniiicant friendship' (Jul cfcstl 
acUrizcs fraternity life » an 'mrprei 




"1 



J 



Pipe tobacco made 
by the Wellman Process 
and rough cut as Granger 
is, does not clog the pipe 
but stays lit, smokes 
longer, slower and cooler. 

We believe this process is 
the reason for Granger being 
milder. 

We know it adds something 
to the flavor and aroma of the 
good, ripe White Barley Tobac- 
co that cannot be obtained in 
any other way. 

We wish, in some way, we 
could get every man who smokes , 
a pipe to just try Granger. 



... in a 
common-sense 
package— 10c 

£ 193 i.TtGctrr ft Mrni Tobacco Co. 



doesn't clog a pipe 



SATURDAY, DEC. 1, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Men's and Ladies' 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



MAKE YOUR CAR 

A COLLEGIATE ONE! 

A complete accessory line 

Goodrich Tires 

STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

331 High St. 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 

GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

332 High St. Phone 818F4 orh 

332 High St. 

Telephone 818F4 or 362M 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



Srhmints ^ctc 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chestertown, Md. 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL S1PALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



After An Evening of Hard 
Study Refresh Yourself at the 

CAFETERIA CANTEEN 
All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 
dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 
Ice Cream 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

EILLARD PARLOR 



LeCATES BROS. 
BARBER SHOP 

Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



H O LD E N ' S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITH'S KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



Phillip5 



&EANS 

mm. 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Wnt.on, P. 3. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davit, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 




GRAY BEAUTY SOLON 

Reasonable New Fall Prices. 
Watch announcements of 

Specials each month. Starting 
November 1 for the month of 
November on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sham- 
poo and Finger Wave 75c, Mani- 
cure 35c. 

Regular prices on Friday and 
Saturday. 

Over Jefferson's Store 
Phone: Chestertown 106 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto Safety First 

F. G. Usilton, Pres. 
L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 
H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



"The Bank Where 

You Feel At Home' 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 305 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And All Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, DEC. 1, 1934 



DOIN'S 



Besides this week end when the 
majority of students expect to go 
home to repeat the good dinner, we 
are looking forward to the presenta- 
tion of the Jitney Players. This ver- 
satile and charming company will 
again be with us on Monday night. 
December 3rd. It is being sponsored 
by the Dramatic Club and the Shakes- 
pearean Club, both prominent socie- 
ties on the Hill. From 4 o'clock to 5 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 
C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



o'clock on Monday afternoon these 
clubs will entertain the Jitney Play- 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 - Chester-town 



THE ? MARK SOLVED: 

Thanks for your inteiest. 
We want your company. 
We need your money. 
We hope you enjoy 
The Girl's Dance, 
December 8, 1934, 
The Gymnasium. 
1.00 per couple, 
75c stag. 



ers and the students at Reid Hall with 
a tea. It is the purpose of this tea 
to allow the students and friends of 
the college to have the privilege of 
meeting the Players. 

The wedding of the sister of Miss 
Leah Frederick took that young lady 
to Baltimore, although she was suf- 



fering from a strained side which re- 
sulted from the championship Hockey 
game held Tuesday afternoon. The 
college wishes to congratulate the 
Sophomore team as the victors and 
also the Junior team for their fine 
playing. 



Announcement of the marriage of 
Miss Nola Hill, '35, to Mr. Samuel 
Crow, on November 3, has been re- 
cently made. 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111 J 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chester-town, Md. 



CHARLIE'S SMOKE 
SHOP 

Complete line of Tobac- 
cos, Candies, Magazines 
and School Supplies. 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

WEEK OF DECEMBER 3 -- 8 

MONDAY - TUESDAY, DEC. 3 - 4 
FRANCIS LEDERER in 

"THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS" 

— with — 

CHARLES RUGGLES, MARY BOLAND 

JOAN BENNETT 

Also — Sportreel, Musical, Cartoon. 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, DEC. 5 -- 6 
WARNER BAXTER in 

"HELL IN THE HEAVENS" 

• and 

"LA CUCARACHA" 

The biggest little feature ever produced. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, DEC. 7-8 
DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

REX BELL in 

"THE FIGHTING TEXAN" 

and 

"MENACE" 

All-Star Mystery Thriller. 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 







CO. . there are just as many 
kinds as there are kinds of folks 



: W$W" ' -"' '-'■< ~ 




long • short • thick 
heavy • dark • light 
all kinds and styles 

. . . but it takes mild ripe 
tobacco — Turkish and 
home-grown — to make a 
milder better-tasting ciga- 
rette. 

. . . and that's the kind 
you get in every Chester- 
field package. 



Down South in the tobacco 
country, where they grow and 
know tobacco — in most placet 
Chesterfield is the largest-sell- 
ing cigarette. 



A bale of aromatic Cbnt- 
trfttld Turkish tobacco. 



>.'.- a MvwTpMtfoCo. 



Mild ripe home-grown tobacco 
used in Clietterficld Cigarettes. 










Eleven Days Until 

Christmas Vacation 




jlmuOI 



Attend The Concert 

Tomorrow Afternoon 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 12. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



DR. MICOU TELLS 
OF EARLY DAYS 

He Hails Coming Of Co-eds 
And Dancing 



by Allen Brougham 

When Dr. Micou first came to the 
college in 1887 there were practical- 
ly no social activities of any import- 
ance on the Hill. The Mount Ver- 
non Literary Society had been or- 
ganized for some forty years, and 
shortly following his arrival the Adel- 
phia Society came into being, but ex- 
cept for these organizations there 
were no other extra-curricular activ- 
ities along that line. During this 
period, however, the literary socie- 
ties held a far greater importance to 
the students than they seem to to- 
day, and to a large extent made up 
for the lack of other social affairs, 
The meetings of these societies were 
taken up with extensive programs, 
which included debating, declama- 
tions, and the reading of essays. For 
a student not to take any interest in 
one or the other of these societies was 
practically unheard of, and one who 
did not was considered as being more 
or less of a social outcast. 

The Normal School was establish- 
ed in 1896 with an enrollment of be- 
tween eighteen and twenty young 
ladies, and from then on the social 
life of the campus received a new 
impetus. Dances became quite pop- 
ular, both of the Virginia Reel type 
and the modern round dancing. 

Football and baseball were among 
the sports included in the athletic 
program, and while the college did 
not excell to any great extent in 
football, it was quite remarkable, 
taking into consideration the size of 
the .student body, the fine baseball 
teams the college put on the diamond. 
At one time, he recalls, tne college 
even went so far as to play Harvard 
University, who won by only a small 
margin. On one of our baseball 
teams during this period Washington 
had a most phenomenal battery. The 
pitcher was excellent, and besides 
serving as a member of the team, he| 
coached the squad. The catcher was 
a mechanically perfect player, ana 
probably established an all-time rec- 
ord in his department of the game 
through his never dropping the ball! 
After leaving college he was tried 
out in the National League, but his 
eyes went back on him, and he never 
became a success in professional base- 
ball. 

The students of today live in s 
condition of comparative luxury to 
that endured by those of Dr. Micou's 
first few years at Washington Col- 
lege. Each room in the dormitory 
was heated by a small iron stove, and 
the students were required to fur- 
nish their own fuel. This was a per- 
iod of porcelain wash-basins, and 
each student washed in water ear- 
ned by himself from the old pump 
that stood behind East Hall. The 
cupola on Middle Hall at that time 
housed a bell, with which the stu- 
dents were called to classes. The 
building behind West Hall was built 
about 1900, and served as the gym- 
nasium for many years. Those who 
are sufficiently interested may stiil 
see the running track around what is 
now the ceiling of the garage. 

Public Speaking for many years 
consisted of a most trying procedure 
'or those who were inclned to timid- 
■ty. Each student was required to 
apeak from the platform during the 
chapel period, and at times the ob- 
v '°us distress of the unfortunate 
speaker was surpassed only by the 
|>«ge delight of the audience. At one 
lme t Dr. Micou recalls, there was one 
student enrolled who persistently re- 
fused to make his required speech, 
*|id finally it was necessary to inform 
h,I » that he could not be graduated 
(Continued On Puge 5) 



GLEE CLUB BROADCASTS 
OVER STATION WDEL 



Group Presents Varied Pro 
gram Of Songs 



by Lawrence E. Williams 

The Washington College Glee Club 
under the direction of Haymond R. 
Moffett will broadcast a short pro- 
gram over Station WDEL, Wilming- 
ton, Delaware, a member of the N. 
B, C. network, at 7 P. M., December 
7. Immediately following the broad- 
cast the Glee Club will give a con- 
cert at the St. Paul's M. E. Church, 
10th and Jackson streets, sponsored 
by Troop No. 4G, B. S. A., Wilming- 
ton, Delaware. 

The Washington College Glee 
Club was founded in 1927 by the 
late R. A. Kilpatrick, a former mem- 
ber of the "Bach Choir," Bethlehem, 
Penna. In that year the Club tour- 
ed the Eastern Shore of Maryland, 
and during the following year made 
an extensive tour of the Western 
Shore of Maryland. During 1930, 
in addition to the regular concert 
season, the Club broadcasted from W. 
F. B. R. in Baltimore, a member of 
the N. B. C. network, and also from 
W. D. E. L., Wilmington, Delaware. 

Since the death of Professor Kil- 
patrick the organization has been un- 
der the direction of Raymond Mof- 
fett, an alumnus of the College and 
at present an artist student at the 
Peabody Conservatory of Music, Bal- 
timore, Maryland. 

It has been the custom of the Club 
in the past to present a program of 
both sacred and secular music. The 
numbers on the program have rang- 
ed from hymns to choruses from well- 
known operas. 

The programs this year will be 
made up of groups of hymns, spirit- 
uals, art songs, and various well- 
known secular songs. The Glee 
Club has a quartet which will render 
various numbers, and Mr. Moffett will 
also sing a group of selections. 



CONDUCTS ORCHESTRA 




F. G. Livingood 



Dr. Livingood will conduct the 
Little Symphony Orchestra of Wash- 
ington College in its first concert of 
the season, tomorrow. Mr. "Vincent 
Brandolini, student leader, will also 
conduct several numbers. Dr. Liv- 
ingood is Professor of Education at 
the College. 



CURLY BYRD SPEAKS 
TO ASSEMBLY GROUP 



Recalls Washington College's 
Defeat Of U. Of Md. 



ORCHESTRA PRESENTS 
SUNDAY CONCERT 



HARRY T.PORTER '05 ONE 
OF MISSING HUNTERS 



Donor Of Character Medal 
Disappeared December 1 



Harry T. Porter, one of Washing- 
ton's best known alumni, has been 
missing since Saturday, December 1, 
when he started on a duck hunting 
trip accompanied by A. Ross Gary, 
seventeen year old student of Oak- 
ington, Md. Mr. Porter graduated 
from Washington College in 1905. 
He later received his master degree 
from Columbia University, and has 
also studied at Oxford University, 
England, Johns Hopkins University 
and Cornell. 



He married Miss Ethel Grace Bag- 
ley. They have four children 
Charles Bagley Porter, 20, a senior 
at Johns Hopkins University; Miss 
Jean Poiter, 19, in her second year 
at Goucher College; Harry P. Por- 
ter, Jr., 17, a fourth year student at 
Baltimore City College; and Rosalia 
Porter, 10. Mr. Poiter is best known 
at Washington College as the donor 
of the H. P. Porter Character Medal 
which is given each year to the most 
worthy college man. 

He was principal of Belair High 
school for several years. Al the 
Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, 
where he has been instructor in Eng- 
lish since 1912, he is greatly admir- 
ed and respected. 

Search parties, made up of volun- 
teers, the Navy, the Coast Guard, 
and Baltimore Police Department 
have been at work since Sunday. 
Airplanes from Aberdeen Proving 
Ground have been out making obser- 
vations. A small row boat in which 
the men left Saturday morning was 
found floating upside down near the 
head of the bay. 



St. 



Clair Martinet Is Guest 
Soloist At Public Affair 



The first of the Sunday afternoon 
musical programs will be presented 
by the college orchestra in the audi- 
torium of William Smith Hall al 
3:30 P. M., Sunday afternoon, De- 
cember 9th. The soloist for the 
program will be St. Clair Martinet, 
well-known violinist frem Baltimore. 
Mr. Martinet maintains a studio in 
Baltimore, spending week-ends at his 
summer home near Rock Hall. The 
public is invited to this program. 

The program to be presented Sun- 
day afternoon follows: 

1. <a) Grand March, "The Pilgrims" 

Wellesley 
(b) Voluntary, "Thy Glory" 

Reynard 
Orchestra 

2. (a) "Chanson sans Paroles" 

Tschaikowsky 
(b) "Minuet" from "The Mili- 



Mr. H. C. (Curly) Byrd, Vice-pres- 
ident and Director of Athletics at the 
University of Maryland, was the As- 
sembly speaker at Washington Col- 
lege, Thursday, December 6, at 11 
o'clock. Mr. Byrd was introduced 
by Doctor Mead, who was pleased to 
present such a well-known personage 
to the Assembly. 

Mr. Byrd began his address by a 
reminescience of a former visit hi 
had made to Washington College 
when he was a player on the Univer- 
sity of Maryland's football team. 

His address was concerned with 
the aims of the College and students 
of today. 

The chief aim of the College of to- 
day should be that of creating lead- 
ership, i. e., to fit young men and 
women for leadership in their own 
communities. 

Mr. Byrd stressed the importance 
of judging achievements not by tne 
fame or wealth one has acquired, but 
rather, by the amount of service he 
has rendered mankind. 

Mr. Byrd discussed the part cour- 
age had played in the past. "Cour- 
age,'" he said, "is the greatest virtue 
of mankind, because it was thiough 
courage that most of our desirable 
contributions to the society of 
day have been attained." 



tary Symphony" 


Haydn 


Orchestra 




"Dance-Musette" 


Gluck 


String Quartette 




Overture, "King Rose" 


Barnard 


Orchestra 




(a) "Chapel Bells" 


Havilian 


(b) "In Thy Name" 


Reynard 


Orchestra 




Violin Solo 


Selected 


St. Clair Maitinet 




(a) "Liebestraum" 


Liszt 


(b) "Unfinished Symphony" 




Schubert 


Orchestra 




(a) "Sonata" Beethoven 


(b) "March Militaire" 


Schubert 



Secretary Of Carnegie 
Foundation Visits Campus 

Dr. And Mrs. R. M. Lester Are 
Guests Of President Mead 



Dr. and Mrs. Robert M. Lester, of 
New York City are being entertain- 
ed this week end as guests at the 
home of President and Mrs. Mead. 
Dr. Lester holds the position of Sec- 
retary of the Carnegie Corporation 
of New York. 

On Wednesday, December 5, Dr. 
Gilbert W. Mead attended a meeting 
of Governor Nice's Committee on the 
Budget held in Baltimore. At the 
meeting Dr. Mead represented Wash- 
ington College, and presented the 
College's claims to that committee, 

On Friday, December 7, Dr. Mead 
addressed a gathering in connection 
with the regular meeting of the Lions 
Club at Salisbury, Maryland. 



Nat'l Secretary Of Theta 

Kappa Nu Visits College 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Musick, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, visited the College 
last week as guests of Dr. and Mrs. 
K. S. Buxton. Mr. Musick is the 
National Executive Secretary of the 
Theta Kappa Nu Fraternity. He 
came to Chestertown on an inspec- 
tion of the Phi Sigma Phi Fraternity 
and was entertained by that group. 



SILVER PENTAGON SOCIETY PLANS CHARITY 

DANCE BEFORE CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS 



PLAYERS PLAN 
LARGER GROUP 

Obtain Membership In Mary- 
land Dramatic Group 

The Washington Players have just 
completed plans for becoming a mem- 
ber of the Maryland Conference of 
Dramatic Organizations. This con- 
ference of little theatre groups and 
college dramatic clubs of Maryland 
was established for the purpose of 
raising the standard of dramatics in 
this part of the country. 

Among the clubs already belonging 
to this conference, of which Dr. W. 
Bryllion Fagin, director of the Hop- 
kins Playshop, is president, are The 
College Players, Western Maryland; 
The Footlight Club, University of 
Maryland; The Maryland College for 
Women; Masks and Faces, Goucher; 
The Playshop, Johns Hopkins; and 
several little theatre groups in the 
state. 

The culmination of its year's work 
is a convention held every spring. 
Each club sends two delegates to the 
meeting. The program consists of 
talks by prominent people of the dra- 
matic world and also a play is given 
by one of the clubs. 

The Washington Players, in addi- 
tion to joining this conlerence, are 
changing some of their policies this 
year. The new plan, under the dir- 
ection of Professor Winton Tolles, is 
to have more productions. The big 
public performance will not be the 
only aim of this club. 

Each month a group of two or 
more one-act plays will be presented 
to the student body at a small fee. 
These plays will be staged and dir- 
ected by members of the club. 

The first of these performances 
will be Monday evening, December 
17, 1934. At this time "A Night at 
an Inn" by Lord Dunsany, directed 
by Robert Fink, and "The Ghost 
Story" by Booth Tarkington, direct- 
ed by Lelia Anthony will be given. 
The cost of admission will be ten 
cents. 

All persons interested in acting, 
tage managing, or play writing are 
invited to become members of the 
Club. It is hoped that these plays 
will arouse student interest and that 
before the year is over the College 
will have the opportunity to see a 
play, written by some member of the 
Club, produced. 

At a meeting held last Tuesday the 
Club drew up a constitution and 
elected the following officers: Vice- 
President, Robert Fink; temporary 
executives, Dot Clarke, Wesley Sad- 
ler. Bill Hall. 



A Commodity Dance for December 
15 is being planned by the Silver 
Pentagon Honor Society of Washing- 
ton College in cooperation with the 
Kent County Welfare Board. If 
plans materialize, it will probably be 
the first affair of this type to be pre- 
sented at the College. 

Eajch person attending the dance 
ill be assessed a minimum of 25 
cents worth of consumable goods. It 
is provided that none of these con- 
sumables shall be perishable, but 
shall include such items as canned 
goods, nuts, potatoes, etc. After the 



dance the commodities will be placed 
in a large box and turned over to the 
Welfare Board of Chestertown for 
distribution to relief families for 
Christmas. If the students do noi 
wish to seek entrance at this fee the 
assessment will be 75 cents per couple 
and 50 cents stag. 

It is expected that the music will 
be furnished gratis, or for a small 
fee, by the Washingtoninns* The 
plan is now going the rounds of the 
Student Activities Committee for 
consideration. 



VICTORIOUS TEAM HAS 
FIRST OF BANQUETS 

To Be Guests Of Rotary Club 
And Voshell House 

The first of the three banquets 
planned for Washington College's 
undefeated football team was held 
Thursday evening in the college com- 
mons. The principal speaker includ- 
ed George Hoban, former All-Amer- 
ican football player and now noted 
gridiron official, John Ogden, Mana- 
ger of the Baltimore Orioles Base- 
ball Club, and Dr. Gilbert W. Mead, 
President of the College. The 
toastmaster was Harry S. Russeh, 
local newspaper man and former 
Washington College athlete. 

The second fete for the Shore 
gridders is scheduled for next Mon- 
day night when they will be the 
guests of the Chestertown Rotary 
Club at a special banquet to be serv- 
ed in the parish house of Enmuuuiel 
P. E. Church. An effort is being 
made to secure Di«k Harlow, famed 
mentor at Wastern Maryland Col- 
lege who tutored George Ekaitis. 
(Continued on Pag* 3) 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1934 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 1782. 

William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum - Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte, William McCullough 

Howard Clark 

Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, $1-50 & year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1934 



of the virtues of helpfulness which, 
if well developed, the graduate will 
take with him and *pply in the rela- 
tions of the larger life outside. 

"The fraternity is not a mere 
mutual benefit society, but a train- 
ing school in the technique of bene- 
fit, a training school in finest citi- 
zenship. As part of its work it is a 
training school in manners, in urban- 
ity, the dramatization of good will. 
I have no fear of national standardi- 
zation in manners if the standardiza- 
tion is upward. 

"If, out of competitive pride, a 
house seeks to be distinguished for 
good manners it is wholly fortunate 
for the college." 

These things are worth considera- 
tion by the fraternities at Washing- 
ton College. The message both in- 
spires the fraternity to uphold its 
trust, and calls the freshman to con- 
sider and realize the part of the fra- 
ternity on the College campus. 



NONSENSICAL LONG 

Mr. Huey Long is undoubtedly a 
very brilliant man. It requires, for 
instance, a considerable amount of 
ingenuity for him to make such a 
j consistent fool out of himself. It is 
all very well for him to insult all of 
the capitalists in Wall street, a Ger- 
man Admiral, the Congress, and „he 
Constitution of the United States. 
When he causes the removal of a stu- 
dent editor, and threatens to stifle 
the expression of the student press at 
Louisiana State University, he is at- 
tacking a powerful front. College 
editors all over the country are in 



Speaking of lack of advantages due 
to isolation — we just heard an inter- 
esting story about a Richmond deb 
who readily agreed to attend a foot- 
ball game with a young Princetonian, 
but when he wanted to take her to his 
Great Neck (N. Y.) estate after the 
game she refused. 

(Which goes to show that geo- 
graphy is a fine study — just think of 
the good hunting she missed — or do 
they hunt out there?) 



THE JITNEYS CONQUER 

The Jitney Players have come and 
gone. Their play was enthusiastical- 
ly hailed by that fortunate and quite 
large part of the College who saw it. 
Dr. Gertrude Ingalls is largely re- 
sponsible for the coming of this 
troupe of artists of the stage. She, 
and the nominal sponsors of the af- 
fair, the Shakespeare and Dramatic J censed at Louisiana's Toadfish, and 
clubs, plus several students who work- I sympathize with Jesse H. 
ed particularly hard in the sale of I Editor of the The Reveille 
tickets, deserve praise for contribut- !for publishing a letter of criticism of 
ing to the cultural life of the College. | Dictator Long's actions in running 

There is no doubt that expert act- ] the State Legislature. Long was 
ing of a famous vehicle, like "She supported in his demand that Cutrer 

Stoops " intensifies a literary 8p-,and several other members of the 

preciation. Perhaps more than that, | staff be removed, by Dr. James M. 
it introduces one properly to the fine ; Smith, President of L. S. U. Cutrer 



Carter, 
fired" 



art of laughing and 
Life, 



playing with 



says that President Smith admitted 
that Long was "virtually dictator of 
o the well-trod stage,; the University. Long is reputed to 
j^" :have shouted in the State Senate: 

oo "I'll fire any student that dares to 

A NOBLE SPIRIT PASSES f? * word against me I'll fire a 
t% w ! tnuusamj. We\e goc ten thousanl 

The search for Mr. n , enry ^ ort ^ !to take their places. That's my uni- 
versity, I built it, and I'm not going 
to stand for any students criticizing 



and a companion, believed drowned at 
the heat* of the Chesapeake Bay, 
while on a duck hunt, last Saturday, I g uey Long 



appears futile. Washington College 
has lost a fine friend, a loyal Alum- i 
nus, and a graduate important in the 
educational affaire of the ballimore 
Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Porter 
has, for many years, stimulated 
idealism and virtue among the under 



The only comment that can be 
made on this Ciceronian oration 
that it would probably fail to receive 
a passing mark in a fifth grade com- 
position course. To be sure, BIr. 
Long probably never took a fifth 
grade composition course. Mr. Long 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



We're very sorry folks but we have 
no further reports on .the quest of 
the Pegasus, little Rollo (our chief 
scout) hasn't been heard from for 
over a week. By this time he must 
be far in the backwoods with no com- 
munication back to civilization — 
when last seen he was headed down 
the shore. 



Careless Smoking Is 
Seen As Dangerous 

Students' Carelessness Cre- 
ates Fire Hazard 



Going further away in our geo- 
graphical meanderings we find that 
the students at the College of Alas- 
ka have solved their own housing 
problems by constructing "yerches." 
When the dormitories became over- 
crowded the extra students were not 
to be daunted, they went out in the 
nearby fields and put up their yer- 
ches — which is the Russian name forj tne pr i nc ipi e f smoking in the build^ 



"The burning of William Smith 
Hall would strike a severe blow at 
the physical resources of Washington 
College. The library, laboratories 
and offices of this building are essen- 
tial to the operation of the College." 
These were the opinions of a promin- 
ent member of the Administration of 
the College, when he distuned with 
a representative of the ELM, recent- 
ly, the greatly increased fixe-hazard 
engendered by careless smoking in 
the class-rooms and assembly hall of 
William Smith. He noted that the 
wash-rooms of the building provided 
reasonably safe opportunity for 
Mucking between classes. However, 
even in these concreted rooms, sever- 
al blazes have occured from cigar- 
ettes carelessly tossed into inflam- 
mable waste-bat>kets. To minimize 
this chance for serious fire, the Ad- 
ministration has replaced the inflam- 
mable paper containers with metal 
ones. 

However, cigarette stubs found on 
class-room floors give evidence of a- 
buse of the concession, and easily re- 
movable privelege of smoking in the 
administration building. It k; not 



sod house, and which are very com- 
fortable in spite of the cold weather. 
The houses are of Russian design but 
the College "yerches" have been im- 
proved by the installation of radios 
and phonographs. 

(If Tignor keeps objecting to the 
noise in Middle Hall one of these 
days we're likely to see him camped 
in a nice quiet little yerch out on the 
athletic field.) 



graduates at the College by donating advocates a redistribution of wealth 
the Porter Character Medal. This gift gj s f ew admirers are reported to be 
has always suggested the lovely na- i w j 3 hing that there be a redistribution 
ture and beautiful character of the f sensei an d that the Senator will 
man who gave it. He must have had [ emerge from his poverty-stricken 
a deep and full belief in the inher- 1 condition in this regard, 
ent goodness of youth, and thought 
it worthwhile to encourage a quality 
too often forgotten in a mundane 
world — idealism. 

Mr. Porter wts an educated man. 
He studied after his graduation from 
Washington College, at the Univer- 
sity of Oxford, in England, and did 
much graduate work at the Johns 
Hopkins University. He was in- 
structor in English at Poly at the 
time of his hunting trip. At the In- 
stitute, he was admired and loved as 
a humanitarian as well as a teachei 
It is particularly significant that his 
companion in death was a young stu- 
dent just beginning what promise- 
to be a brilliant career. 



The New York University Fourth 
Estate Club noted in the resolution 
it telegraphed to Long condemning 
his action, the following: 

"Such action is thoroughly 
American in ideal, repugnant to the 
spirit of the Constitution, and con- 
trary to the basic ideal of a sound 
democracy." 

Louisiana can never say, "Hail, 
Hitler," but it can cry "Lollypop, 
Long." 



Up in Connecticut there seems to 
be the same trouble around meal- 
time that keeps us in suspense a- 
round here. The editor of "The 
Connecticut Campus" says, "Why not 
have a couple of cheer leaders during 
the supper hour at the Beanery to 
lead the patiently waiting multitudes 
in the college songs and cheers? It 
would use the wasted hours to good 
advantage and make the time pass a 
little more pleasantly." 

(Once we suggested that it would 
be a good thing if Cafe could open 
about ten of twelve so those who 
didn't have eleven o'clock classes 
could be served and those just get- 
ting out of class would be free to go 
right through the line, — BUT one of 
the aristocratic waiters chastized us 
with the remark — "You're sure to get 
your lunch in about twenty minutes 
if you can find a seat at a table that 
has been cleared off, so why worry 
At which we see his point, — it's hard 
to be concerned with other people's 
misfortunes.) 



ing or in classes that the interviewed 
executive objects. Rather it is the 
very likely possibility that if the prac- 
tice continues in paper-littered as- 
sembly and recitation rooms, a fire 
will result that will cripple the whole 
College, and cause the student body 
and Faculty to suffer through gross 
carcle.^ne»s of an individual. "In 
other words," summed up the mem- 
ber of the Administration, "the Col- 
lege simply CANNOT afford to take 
the chance." 

If the cooperation of the entire 
student body to restrict smoking in 
William Smith Hall to the wash- 
rooms is not obtained, steps will be 
taken to lock all class rooms and the 
assembly at six o'clock in the even 
ing, intimated the gentleman inter 

iewed. Play practices would thus 
be practically prohibited, and society 
meetings would have to seek other 
places. However, he added, these 
measures would be taken only as a 
last resort. It is felt that complete 
student cooperation for the common 
good will be at once obtained. 

The ELM, it was learned from ed- 
itorial headquarters, is adopting a 
policy on the matter. People who 
are not enough interested in the wel- 
fare of the College to observe the re- 
quested precautions of smoking oniy 
in the appointed rooms will be giv>n 
undesirable notice. Attention is also 
called to rulings of the Student 

Council. 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By 1. Un-Iy Heard 



Since this column is under the dir- 
ection of a new Winchell I will start 
things off right by telling you: 

When the cat is away the mice will 
play — and we are wondering when 
Wavdy will go Maul — ing again. 

Nick is trying to find out when 
Glad — Riggins will be as happy as she 
was Friday night. 

We hope by now that Jiggle Duffy 
has given an ample explanation to 
Bud's girl for not accepting her in- 
vitation to the girl's dance. 

Evidently Shaull and Mooney have 
been pushed out in the cold again by 
Jean — Wilmot is the new one — this 
cuts Shaull down to 24. 

Rhodes broke the ice Saturday 
night and went to Centreville (?) 
and he certainly Pegged his way 
home. 

Goldie's latest theme song is carry 
me back to Virginia's West Virginia. 

Latest New Flash — Gardiner-Bvan- 
dolini case. Fern has decided to spend 
this week end in Baltimore — (Ask 
Gardiner why). 

Sadler is wondering why Kilby 
likes a certain Jewel so much. 

Following the advice of Berry, 
Huffman is now going strong for the 
Ford. 

They say Helms has two Wards but 
there was only one Ward Saturday 
because the Washington Ward was 
busily entertaining a married foot- 
ball fan of the fair sex. 

How are John Lord and Jimmy 
Johns going to explain their doings 
over in Queen Anne's. 

Scott Beck says judging from last 
Thursday night, Rock Hall has the 
best girls on the Eastern Shore. 



ACTIVE FRATERNITY MEMBERS LISTED 

AS INFORMATION TO BENEFIT NEW MEN 



Y. M. C. A. Debates Inviting 
Negroes To Peace Conference 

"Resolved, that the Negro Colleges 
of Maryland should be invited to par- 
ticipate in the coming YMCA Con- 
ference on World Peace" was the sub- 
ject of the debate held by the "Y" 
its meeting Wednesday evening, 
December 12. The negative team 
composed of Dick Sayler, Joe Moon- 
ey, and Wesley Sadler were the win- 
ners. The affirmative team was 
composed of Arthur Greims, Dick 
Chambers, and Jack Dunn. The sub- 
ject naturally provoked much discus- 
sion among the members of the aud- 
ience. 

Through the courtesy of the man- 
agement of the New Lyceum Theatre 
the members of the YMCA have se- 
cured reduced prices for down stairs 
seats that they may attend the show- 
ing of "College Rhythm" next Wed- 
nesday evening, December 12. The 
members of the "Y" will meet in the 
"Y" Room and then attend the mov- 
ies in a body. 



Society To Plant 
Memorial Tree On Campos 

( The campus of Washington College 
Always did Mr. Porter love Youth has ocen selected by the National So- 



and Life, and much did he give 
them. Such gifts are immortal. 



to 



FRATERNITIES AT 

UNION COLLEGE 
Dr. Dijon Pyan Fox, Presi- 
dent of Union College, issued a state- 
ment a week ago provoked by the 
withdrawal of two national fraterni- 
ties from Yale University. Union is 
the birth-place of several of the old- 
est national fraternities, includin, 
the oldest Kappa Alpha. Doubtless 
she feels called upon to make some 
comment in the matter. President 
Pox pays an honest tribute to fra- 
ternities when he says: 

"The wise executive esteems the 
fraternities as giving their members 
wholesome values that they could 
not get otherwise. The well con- 
ducted chapter is a moral gymnasium 
where is prevented the daily exercise 



ciety of the Daughters of the Cincin- 
nati as the location for the memorial 
tree which the Society will place 
Maryland as one of the memorials, 
now being located in each of the 
states in which the Society is repre- 
sented. 

The Society which is composed of 
direct descendants of officers in forc- 
f General Washington, who or- 
ganized the Society of the Cincinnati 
in 1784, will erect on the Washing- 
tot College campus a marker to mem- 
orialize the gift, and the presenta- 
tion will be made at an appropriate 
later date. Mrs. Clara de Ru*sy 
Tucker, of New York City, is Na 
tional President of the organization 
and Mr«. J. Harper Skillin, of Kzt>- 
ton, represents the Society in Mary- 
land. The presentation of the mem- 
orial is being accomplished through 
the efforts of these two ladies. 



Since the fraternity pledging sea- 
son begins only a month after the re- 
turn from the Christmas holiday, the 
following list of affiliates of the fra- 
ternities on the Hill is published for 
the information of first-year men. 
The fraternities are listed in the or- 
der of their founding date. 
ALPHA KAPPA 
Seniors 
Earl Price, Norris Duffy, Harry 
Rhodes, Dick Saylor, Walsh Barcus, 
Scott Beck, Clarke Fontaine, Dale 
Rees, John Lord. 

Juniors 
Charles Berry, William Reinhart, 
William Nicholson. 

Sophomores 
Arthur Greims, James White, Wil- 
son Sutton, Marion Towner, Robert 
Snyder. 

Faculty and Honorary 
Dr. J. S. W. Jonea, Dr. A. L. Davis, 
Prof. F. G. Dumschott, Prof. R. L, 
Ford, Dr. H. G. Simpers, M. D., Mr. 
J. Purnell Johnson. 

PHI SIGMA PHI 

Seniors 

Richard P. Chambers, William O 



K. Boynton, Robert S. Shaull, J. Cal- 
vin Rogers, Allen R. Brougham, 
George de Socio. 

Juniors 
Carroll W. Casteel, George T. 
Pratt, Robert T. Garrett, S. Dawson 
Linthicum, John M. Littell. 
Sophomores 
Alger H. Abbott, Joseph W. Mc- 
Lain, Howard E. Clark, Francis Brat- 
ton, Clifton Hope, Robert L. Swain, 
Jr. 

Faculty Members 
Frank Goodwin, Kenneth S. Bux- 
ton, William R. Howell, James W. 
Johns. 

Honorary Members 
Col. Hiram S. Brown, Hon. T. 
Alan Goldsborough, John I. Col' 
burn, Dr. Joseph K. Shriver, The 
Late Paul E. Titsworth, Albert D. 
Mackey. 

PHI SIGMA TAU 
Seniors 
Harold W. McCrone, Michael F. 
Wallace, Robert W, Mitchell, H. Gil- 
bert Ingersoll, William J. Watson. 

Juniors 
Philip J. Skipp, Albert Bilancioni, 



SUNKEN TREASURE 



Baker, RuBsell A. Baker, J. William Edwin S. Lowe, Emerson P. Slacum, 



Long, Joseph A. Mooney, Jr., Delano I 



(Continued On Page Six) 



by Joseph McLain 

Washing with the torrer.tous 
currents, shifting as the sands of the 
Sahara, oscillating with every minute 
pulsation of the water, this sunken 
treasure gloried in its marine envir- 
onment. It was lost in and hidden 
hy the twirling depths, for what 
seemed to be centuries to the ardent 
seekers above the surface. 

"What is that queer machine of 
five long uneven cylinders joined to 
a truncated oblong base, approach- 
ing me. Surely it can't be the end 
of my subterranean sojourn. Of 
course not it has slipped by as have 
its predecessors. Those searching 
for me must have infinite patience, 
and intelligence for these are un- 
charted waters. Here it comes a- 
gain, this time nearer, one of the 
claws are around me, but it fails Lo 
hold, and I have glided to another 
part of the sea. After a alight in- 
terim I see the same machine coin- 
ing toward me, blindly groping. In 
vain do I try to escape from its grasp, 
and as I am hauled to the surface, I 
hear this unintellible utterance, 
'Next time I'll buy Ivory.' " 



SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Miss Bell Reviews Success 
Of Girls' Hockey Season 



Athletic Board Experiences 
Difficulty Choosing Varsity 



Miss Doris Bell in a recent inter- 
view in her office made the following 
statement: 

"With the last hockey stick turned 
in we have come to the end of the 
most successful season to date with 
the three class teams handing in their 
shin guards with regret' that there 
will be many months before going on 
the field again. 

"The Sophomores had the best for- 
mation, and their complete coopera- 
tion and dependence on each other 
were noticeable. Their fleet-footed 
wings, backed by their halves fed the 
ball to the forward line with the ac- 
curacy of veterans, the backfield mak- 
ing such a sterling defense that the 
ball came rarely to the goalkeeper. 
By the end of the season perfect 
sportsmanship was shown on the field, 
the players playing for the joy of it, 
and even when beaten, feeling that 
it was a good game, and they had 
done their best. 

"Caroline Helms as usual, stood out 
as high scorer. The goal-keeping of 
Lucy Cruickshank was well worth 
watching. 

"The choosing of the honorary var- 
sity will this year be a harder task 
than the Board has ever had before, 
as there are more outstanding and 
capable players on the teams. It is 
hoped that each year we can end the 
season with a game as we had Thanks- 
giving day, the players drawing for 
the teams, and thoroughly enjoying 
playing against their own teammates. 
I sincerely hope that with the next 
year's Freshman team, we will be 
able to have four separate teams." 

The results of the games played 
are: 

Jr. -Sophs, November 5 — Sophs 



SOPHS SCORE SURPRISE 
VICTORY OVER JUNIORS 



November £t> was the decisive 
game between the Juniors and Soph- 
omores for the hockey championship 
of the year. Last year the Juniors 
were the victors, but this time the 
Sophs scored a surprise when they 
won. The score was one to nothing, 
the only goal being made by Louise 
Stevens. 

It was an exciting game to all, the 
participators agreeing thai they en- 
joyed it more than any other game 
in which they had ever played here. 
Each team played both defensively 
and offensively, doing its utmost to 



TEAM GIVEN BANQUET 

BY ROTARY CLUB 



SKIPPING OVE \ HE SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Washington coach, in his undergTad- 
uate days, as the speaker, Mr. Har- 
low is prominent in Rotary affairs in 
Westminster. 

The banquet to be tendered the 
Shoremen by Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
E. Eshman at the Voshell House on 
Thursday, December 13, is the third 
of the affairs to be arranged in honor 
of the Washington gridders who have 
just completed thf ; best season in the 
school's history. 



1-0. 

Soph-Frosh, November 9 — Sophs 
2.-0. 

Jr.-Frosh, November 14 — Jrs. 7-0. 
Jr.-Sophs, November 19 — Jrs. 1-0. 

Sophs-Frosh, November 21 — 
Sophs, 2-0. 

Jr.-Frosh, November 22 — Jrs. 5-0. 

Play-off, November 26 — Sophs 
1-0. 

Red and Blue Teams, November 
29 — Blue, 1-0. 

The basketball season opening this 
week shows as usual the popularity 
of this indoor sport. 



It was only three weeks ago that we 
beat Delaware to close the first unde- 
feated season in Washington College 
history. But now we must pay the 
penalty for such a successful season 
by having to completely revise our 
1935 football schedule. In the first 
place Gallaudet will not be seen on 
the local gridiron next fall. Still 
one can't blame them for refusing to 
be a "trial horse" for a much heavier 
opponent. The- big surprise came 
when Havei-ford, who was already 
scheduled for next year, cancelled its 
game. It seems in that 39 to 14 loss 
they suffered our boys were a little 
too tough for them. It was alright 
a couple of years ago when Haver 
ford used to beat us, but they find it 
difficult now. As a result they won't 
play us. We recommend the light 
but fighting Gallaudet team to fill 
their open date next fall. Or are 
they too strong? Here is something 
to make you wonder. St. John's re- 
fuses to play us because we are too 
strong for them, and just a few years 
back they refused to play on the 
grounds that we were too weak. "Go 
out and get a reputation," they said. 
We got the reputation, and they got 
cold feet. Oh well, here is an all op- 
ponent team selected by the letter 
men: 

L. E. — Kane, Haverford. 

L. T. — Eisenhower, Susquehanna, 

L. G. — Gardini, John Hopkins. 

C. — Farmer, Mt. St. Mary's. 

R. G. — Olscewski, Mt. St. Mary* 

R. T.— Orth, John Hopkins. 

R. E. — Scannel, Delaware. 

Q. B. — Wasilowski, Susquehanna. 

R. H. — Zavada, Delaware. 

L. H. — Glover, Delaware. 

F. B. — Hanna, Susquehanna. 



A very large basketball squad is 
working out each afternoon under 
Coaches Kibler and Dumschott. Only 
four letter men, Ward, Nicholson, 
Bilancioni, and Skipp are back, but 
the wealth of material on hand has 
the coaches working because there 
are two or more outstanding men for 
each position. Huffman, Salter, Wil 
mot, and Horowitz, all freshmen, are 
crowding the regulars, and it is cer- 
tain that two or three of them will 
be on the first five before long. Ber- 
ry, Evans and McLain from last 
year's squad have shown a great deal 
of improvement and should prove 
very valuable. 

Here and there: — Dwyer will be 
the last football captain unless the 
present ruling is changed. Taylor is 
the new football manager in spite of 
the fact that Tignor wanted the job. 
Billy Nicholson is 3rd high scorer in 
the state and 11th in the East. 
Washington's football team scored 
151 points against opponents 33. The 
Hastings trophy sure looks nice. So 
do the little gold footballs. Reddish 
came through for the freshmen last 
week so they say. Kilby is playing 
havoc on the court. ''Gib" Young is 
quite a track star and this fellow 
Fountain is really a first class pitch- 
er. Coach Ekaitis is planning a very 
extensive course this winter for his 
boxing class. First basketball game is 
only 6 days away. Opponent is Up- 
sala from up Jersey way. Reminds 
me, plenty of excitement about in- 
tramural basketball teams. "Rough-; 
house" Baker is training to keep up 
his reputation. Perry and Peyser wi! 
make up the whole Junior team. 




IIEDJ-TYPE 
HOSIERY 



KIIEkSTRAin 




EE-L 

-uriiK luvii-in LflSTEX'onAteii 

$1.00 

© Tests show this new wonder stocking 
can save you 25 to 50% on your hosiery 
costs! Three pairs outwear four to five of 
ths ordinary kind. Because Knee-High 
ends all knee-strain and stretch. Gently 
but trimly self-supporting . . . knee- 
length . . . gives far more comfort— and 
better style. Newest shades in shadow- 
less chiffon . . 

MARGARET E. JEFFERSON 

"A Smart Shop for Women" 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



"^ 



to 



yes, and 

here's why— 



&Uit 



We know that smoking a pipe 
is different from smoking a cigar or 
cigarette . . . and in trying to find 
the tobacco best suited for pipes . . . 

We found out that the best tobacco 
for use in a pipe grows down in the 
Blue Grass Section of Kentucky, and it 
is called White Burley. 

There is a certain kind of this tobacco 
that is between the tobacco used for ciga- 
rettes and the kind that is used for chew- 
ing tobacco. 

This is the kind of tobacco that we use, 
year after year, for Granger Rough Cut. 

We got the right pipe tobacco, made 
it by the right process . . . Wellman's I 
Process . . . we cut it right . . . rough cut. v 

The big Granger flakes have to 
burn cool and they certainly last 
longer, and never gum the pipe. 




© 1934, Ligcbtt & Mvm\ Tobacco Co. 



the pipe tobacco that's MILD 
the pipe tobacco that's COOL 

—folks scent to Jiie it 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1934 



Rat Hall Engages 
In Gossiping 

New Correspondent Writes 
Toward Life And Love 



by Harry Kmufmann 

Ed. Note. — Each week this column 
will feature a guest writer. 

Rat Hall Idio»yncra*ies 

Dusty Claggett takes at least three 
showers a day, wears no socks, and 
roust shimmy himself at least thirty 
times before the shower. 

What — No Soup? 
Ever since the recent contest 
Johnnv Mygatt holds his head high. 
We are surprised that he has not 
received an imitation for tonite's 
dance. 

Crime Wave 
Luther Bergdall, the scoura^e of 



the third floor, may be seen sriy ev 
ening upsetting the beds of his room- 
mates. 



Sports 

Stanley, our idea of the answer to 
a maiden's dream, should be a can- 
didate for Miss Bell's hockey team. 



Cupid At Work 

We wonder what will be the out- 
come of the Dunn-Kosowsky affair. 



Roommates And Comrades 

Wilmot and McDorman don't trust 



locates bros. 
barber shop 

Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



H OLD E N ' S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



After An Evening of Hard 
Study Refresh Yourself at the 

CAFETERIA CANTEEN 
All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 
dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 
Ice Cream 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



Men's and Ladies' 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidairc, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



each other on the mail. They hoth 
go to Reid Hall for fear that one may 
deceive the other. 



New Myttery 
We wonder what brings Leon Hor- 
owitz, the promising young basket- 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 
GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

Phone 109 or 818F4 

332 High St. 



^rtjmid ts f&eer 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chestertown, Md. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 305 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 

Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



ball flash, to the lower end of High 
Street. 



Time Brings Changes 

The promising young editor, W. 
P. Doering, Esq., has changed some- 



what from a young innocent Fresher 
of three months ago. However, you 
still have to break his door down to 
gain admittance to his sanctum. 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety First 

F. G. Usilton, Pres. 

L. B. Russell, Vice-Pros. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



"The Bank Where 
You Feel At Home' 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



PARK CLEANERS AND 




DYERS 






Telephone Building 






Represented by 




D. 


B. Ford, A. K. and P. 


S. P. 


c. 


Wyle, Reid Hall. 




W 


Watson, P. S. T.. and 
Hall. 


East 


H. 


Davis, Middle and 
Halls. 


West 


Try our cleaning, you'll lib 


e the 




difference 




24 


hour service. Tel 


318 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



FOX'S 


Anything the College 


Student or his family 


wants at the Right Price. 


5c to $1.00 Store 




Phillips 



MATO 

oupJ 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And All Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Pilgrimage For 
Society Planned 

Dr. James E. Hancock Speaks 
To Historical Body 

Next Tuesday, Decemebr 11th, the 
members and friends of the Wash- 
ington College Historical Society are 
going on a pilgrimage of Chester- 
town, where several historic edifices 
will be visited such as: "Wide Hall," 
built in 1762, the "Abbey" or the 
Catlin House, erected in 1735, the 
Custom House, built in 1694, which 
is the oldest structure in the town, 
and the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
erected in 1772. The pilgrimage will 
start at 3:15 from William Smith 
Hall and will be under the leader- 
ship of the Society officers and Dr. 
Dole. Papers will be delivered 
stressing the historiacl significance 
of each building before they are en- 
tered in order to give the Society 
members a deeper appreciation of 
them. This affair was made possible 
by the courtesy and co-operation of 
Mr. Wilbur W. Hubbard and other 
people. In the Spring, a similar one 
of Kent county will be undertaken by 
the Historical Society, 

The first organized meeting of 
the soeiety took place in the as- 
sembly of William Smith Hall, Mon- 
day afternoon, November 26. 

The meeting was opened by Vice- 
president Wallace who introduced 
Doctor Mead; Doctor Mead gave a 
short talk in which he congratulated 
the Historical Society upon its found- 
ing and stated that he hoped that in- 
terest in the wealth of historical ma- 
terial that the college and the Eas- 
tern Shore offered might be aroused 
through the efforts of that body. 
Doctor Mead closed his brief talk by 
introducing Doctor Dole, head of the 
History Department of Washington 
College, who presented the guest 
speaker of the afternoon, Doctcr 
James E. Hancock, the Secretary of 
the Maryland Historical Society, 
President of the Maryland Society 
of the War of 1812, and the Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion. 

The subject of Doctor Hancock's 
address was the. "Clipper Ships of 
Maryland and the Eastern Shore." 
Doctor Hancock, first of all, gave a 
definition of history which is as fol- 
lows: History is the study of the ad- 
vancement of mankind, including all 
happy things as well as those that 
are not so happy. He next stated 
that the Revolutionary War 
American national unity and the 
War of 1812 completed it. He said 
that the chief cause of the Revolu- 
tionary War was commercial. * The 
aggression on the part of the British, 
just before the Revolution, he said, 
"was caused by the great growth of 
Colonial trade. After the Revolu- 
tionary War American trade increas- 
ed to an even greater extent." 

Upon the motion of Lawrence Wil- 
liams, seconded by Joseph Freedman, 
Doctor Hancock was voted an hon- 
orary member of the Historical So- 
ciety. The meeting was then ad- 
journed by Vice-president Wallace. 



DR. MICOU RECALLS OLD 
DORMITORY HEATERS 



Students Supplied, Own Fuel 
And Heated Own Water 



(Continued From Page 1) 
until he fulfilled the requirement. 
So, greatly against his will, he event- 
ually got up enough courage to 
mount to the platform and begin. He 
had chosen to declaim Mark Twain's 
"Dedication of a Monument to 
Adam," and it was painfully appar- 
ent that he was in no fit mental con- 
dition to dedicate a monument to any- 
one — with the exception, possibly, of 
himself! He manifested his neiv- 
ousness by hopping about the plat- 
form in a manner somewhat akin to 
that of a ballet dancer. He finally 
managed to get out the lines "What 
have we done for Adam?. . .Noth- 
ing! And what has Adam done for 
us. . . .Everything — he gave us Hea- 
ven, he gave us Hell!" And at this 
point his agitation increased to such 
an extent that it was difficult for the 
eye to follow his gyrations from one 
end of the platform to the other. In 
the resulting confusion he forgot the 
rest of the declamation entirely and 
rushed from the stage panic-stricken. 
The members of the faculty handed 
folded slips to Dr. Reid after the as- 
sembly was over, containing the 
marks that they judged the speaker 
should receive. When he opened Dr. 
Micou's slip a puzzled look ciosseJ 
his face, for Dr. Micou had marked 
on his slip the figures 10 and 90. He 
asked Dr. Micou for an explanation 
of this extraordinary procedure, and 
the latter replied that the speaker, in 
his estimation, should receive only 10 
for bis speaking ability, whereas he 
merited no less than 90 for dancing. 



NEW BROTHERHOOD HAS 
MYSTERIOUS CONTENT 



With the opening days of Decern 
ber has come a new and different so 
cial organization to the Hill. 

The eight charter members of this 
group have decided to assume THE 
GORDIANS as the name of their 
brotherhood which is to be exclusive 
and secret, and they have stated their 
purpose as being: "To promote more 
intimate and sincere friendship a- 
mong the various members, and to 
contribute to the social activities on 
the campus of Washington College." 

Reports of the planned activities 
of the Brotherhood indicate that 
more will be heard from them in the 
near future. 



Chemical Club 
Hears Prof. Ford 



"French Chemists" Subject 
Of Lecture Nov. 27 



CHRISTMAS COTILLION 
TO BE AT REGULAR TIME 



Jack Mohr Of New Jersey To 
Furnish Music For Dance 



"French Chemists" was the subject 
of a lecture by Professor Lawrence 
Ford, who spoke at the last meeting 
of the Washington College Chemical 
Society, Tuesday, November 27. 
Professor Ford, head of the French 
depaitment at' Washington College, 
pointed out that American scholars 
are for the most part ignorant of 
French scientists and their contribu- 
tions. 11° explained that American 
universities and graduate schools 
have always copied from German, 
not French, models, giving the fact 
that most countries emphasize the ar- 
tistic and literary qualities of the 
French people as another reason for 
overlouking its sciertitic acniev 
ments. 

Professor Ford remarked that the 
average well-informed individual 
knows of only a few great French 
scientists and is inclined to consider 
them as exceptions. To destroy such 
a belief he mentioned many compar- 
atively unknown men and showed 
that their work was of vast import- 
ance in their respective scientific 
fields. He specified Lamarck's early 
investigations in evolution and Nau- 
din's discovery of the laws of heredi- 
ty as examples in the field of Biology. 
He discussed several other French 
contributions to Biology. 

Professor Ford named the French 
recipients of Nobel awards in scien- 
tific fields. He told briefly of the 
varied activities of Louis Pasteur in 
practical and theoretical chemistry 
and Medicine. A rough list of im- 
portant inventions by Frenchmen 
concluded the address. 

oo 



As a result of the petition present- 
ed to the Activities Committee for 
the moving up of the hour of the 
Christmas Cotillion, it was decided to 
schedule the basketball game with 
Upsala, which falls on the same ev- 
ening, a half hour earlier, so that the 
dance may be begun at the usual 
time — nine o'clock. By doing this, 
there has been eliminated any possi- 
bility of confusion. 

The chairman for the decorations 
for this dance will be Johnny Littell, 
the Junior representative of the club, 
who will choose the same decorative 
effect as that presented last year. 
There will be a ceiling of pine bran- 
ches, the sides of the gymnasium be- 
ing colorfully attired in shades of 
green and red. 

The Cotillion Club is exceedingly 
fortunate in obtaining Jack Mohr and 
his orchestra to supply the evening's 
entertainment. Mr. Mohr comes to 
us from Newark, New Jersey, and 
brings with him a type of orchestra- 
tion that has received acclaim 
throughout the East. He also car- 
ries with him another "Harriet Hil- 
liard." 

In view of this unusual presenta- 
tion, and because of the traditional 
popularity of the Christmas Cotil- 
lions, the Cotillion Club expects to 
entertain a record social gathering 
on the evening of Friday, December 
14th. 



There will be a meeting of the 
Young People's Society on Sunday 
at Emmanuel Church at 5 o'clock P. 
M. Supper will be served. 



College Mill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



OPENING OF 

New Drug Store 

THIS WEEK 
Under The Voshell House 

Complete Line of Drugs, Stationary, Candies, 

Tobaccos 

T0ULS0N DRUG STORE 

EARL A. STAFFORD, Phg. 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 

C W. KIBLER & SONS 



New Eugene De Luxe 

PERMANENTS 

With Croquinole Ends 
$5.00 

Shampoo, Hot Oil 

Mondny, Tuesday, Wednesday, 

Thursday $1.00 

For December 

GRAY BEAUTY SALON 




Barnhart And 

Gardiner Talk 



R. P. Chambers To Speak At 
Next Meeting Of Body 

The International Society held its 
third meeting in Room 11 last Tues- 
day night. After the business had 
been transacted, the members and 
visitors were addressed ly Frank 
Barnhart and President Alfred W. 
Gardiner on "The Coming Saar 
Plebiscite." Mr. Barnhart traced 
the history of the Saar Basin since 
the World War, and Mr. Gardiner ex- 
plained the present situation and its 
effect on the coming election there. 
In the discussion that followed, the 
speakers answered questions on their 
subject. 

The next meeting will be held 
shortly before the Christmas holi- 
days. Dick Chambers will be the 
principal speaker, and his subject and 
colleague will be announced in the 
next issue of the ELM. 



A British scientist says that as 
many as 50,000 living species of mol- 
lusks are known. 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITH'S KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111 J 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 
HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



L C. Treherne W. G. Smyth 

TREHERNE ASSOCIATES 

REALTY 

Salt Water Homes, Colonial 

Estates, Inland Farms and 

Ducking Shores 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 
331 High St. 



High Quality Accessories 
At Low Prices 



ch Tires, 
Batteri 



Tubes and 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF DEC. 10 - 15 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10-11 
GEORGE M. COHAN in 

"GAMBLING" 

Added — Color Novelty "Baby Blue," Comedy 
"Domestic Blisters" and Cartoon. 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, DEC. 12-13 

"COLLEGE RHYTHM" 

— with — 
JOE PENNER -- LANNY ROSS 
JACK OAKIE -- MARY BRIAN 

and 
THE ALL-AMERICAN CO-EDS 
Added— Musical "COLLEGE SONGS," Cartoon 
and Novelty. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14-15 
DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

"WOMAN IN THE DARK" 

FAY WRAY « RALPH BELLAMY 
and 

WESTERN FEATURE 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1934 



Student Atheism 
Noted As Passing 

Parallel To Classic Times 
Drawn 



The increasing prevalence of athe- 
ism and agnosticism among college 
Student is out the mark of an age of 
transition, writes Louise Fleming 
Robertson of Florida State College 
for Women, in the current (No. 3) 
issue of The Literary Workshop, the 
national organ for student expres- 
sion. Her article is titled "Relig- 
ion Comes of Age." 

Subject to delusions, contends Miss 
Robertson, are the legion of Ameri- 
can writers who in the last decade 
have pronounced that it is all over 
for religion, presenting, among other 
causes, the increasing atheistic atti- 
tude in our colleges. 

"I am convinced," she writes, 
"that the characteristics of the re- 
cent religious period had their natur- 
al termination in agnosticism and 
that the time is right for the emer- 
gence of a neo-Christicn movement, 
.ally and dynamically adapted 
to this age. 

"At ihe present time the college 
student often finds himself empty- 
handed and not a little bewildered 
where spiritual matters are concern- 
ed. Religion is too often presented 
to him in illusions that shrivel when 
brought in the sunlight of modern 
knowledge and criticism. ■ 

"The new liberal movements are too 
far on the religious frontier to have 
reached him yet — to have reached 
even his church leaders who for the 
most part as blithely unconscious 



that a religious revolution is in pro- 
cess. His old rebellion has given way 
to the need for a positive philosophy 
which he has not yet found. 

"Of religion he sees only wreck- 
age; and as long as his leaders con- 
tinue to point to that wreckage as 
the way of salvation, there will be no 
dealing away of debris for recon- 
struction. 

"Atheism, agnosticism and cynic- 
ism were the transitional character- 
istics of the period between the best 
of Greco-Roman thought and the ad- 
vent of Christianity, and they ap- 
pear to be the penalty this genera- 
tion is paying for living in a like per- 
iod." 

Other points discussed in the arti- 
cle are: the decline amongst the ed- 
ucated populace of all forms of 
churchly practices; the complete 
obeisance of religion to science after 
an historic tradition of contradiction 
and conflict; and the transference of 
emphasis from theological to sociolo- 
gical dogma in the more active and 
liberal Christian groups. 



BIOLOGICAL GROUP 

DISCUSSES FISH 



Stevens, Slacum, And Culver 
Read Papers 



PHI SIGMA TAU ENTER- 
TAINED AT DINNER 



Twelve leading members of the Phi 
Sigma Tau Fraternity, of Washing- 
ton College, were entertained on 
Thanksgiving Day, at evening dinner, 
by William McCullough, '37. 

The dinner was held at the home 
of McCullough's mother, Mrs. Ethel 
S. Fox. Members of Mrs. Fox's sor- 
ority, the Sigma Tau Delta served at 
the affair. 



The second meeting of the recently 
formed Biological Society was called 
to order by President Culver on No- 
vember 27 at 7:00 P. M., in Room 25 
William Smith Hall. 

After the reading of the minutes 
and the roll call there followed a 
brief discussion in regard to the ad- 
visability of having a page in the 
year book. It was finally decided to 
leave the matter over until the next 
meeting. 

The remainder of the meeting con- 
sisted of the reading of thx-ee papers 
entitled : 

"The Hen-pecked Male," by Le- 
land Stevens. 

"A Maternal Sacrifice," by Emer- 
son Slacum. 

"Piscine Panorama," by Ivon Cul- 



Fraternity Members Listed 
As Information To New Men 



(Continued From Page Two) 
Lawrence E. Williams, Hobart H. 
Tignor, William E. Kight, S. Charles 
Dudley. 

Sophomore* 
Jay J. Spry, Lawrence K. Yourtee, 
William M. McCullough, E. William 
Hall. 

Faculty Members 
Dr. Frederick G. Livingood, Prof. 
Jesse James Coop. 



"I Unly Heard" Is 
Goal Of Authors 



Hundreds Of Columns Sub- 
mitted; Worst Printed 



They say Reid Hall is over-run with 
mice but we think that there are 
enough "cats" there to take care of 
them! 

Bits after looking things over: — 
How about a square deal for D. W. 
from the Freshmen girls in Reid Hall 
Two-timer Lynch seems to be 
trying to cut out Polly. Velma 
celebrates her 20th bh-thday by tak- 
ing Wardie to the Girls' Dance. 
Watch her, Caroline! . . .Caci seems 
to believe in that old adage, "The 
best way to a man's heart is through 
his stomach." Hows about it, Larry? 
. . Don't ask Ruthie or Mimi what 
happened Wednesday night — they 
probably wouldn't remember . .Our 
heart felt sympathy for Nancy who 
is wondering if Mac will forget their 
date for the Girls' Dance, as he has 
been known to do before . Can't 
Betty Johns have dates week-nights 
since then you take out Gladys, Duf- 
fy?...^. B. certainly should ap- 
preciate a sweet young thing's car 
and radio which are at his command 
most of the time In case any- 

thing happens to the A. K. mascot 
they should enlarge the blanket and 
give it to Penny, although she is an- 
noying to most of us, they should ap- 
preciate her Nave Ann, Jean, 
Dodo, or Vilma told you about Mike 
Wallace's tea party? Why do they 
go over there, anyway? . . . .Poor 
Dottie, we wonder if she's eating off 
the mantel these days. .. Don Me- 



Dorman is certainly standing up for 
his "sterling" qualities — swearing we 
couldn't get anything on him — you 
watch!. . . Jane swears she's not in 
love and Allan can study without 
thinking about her, but — what would 
you call it . How come Jimmie 
and Dickie turned the sofa around in 
the Drawing Room? .... With Bill's 
sickness and Joe's Glee Club the 
quartet seems somewhat broken up 
— incidentally, why "May-flower?" 
. . . Miow!! 

Latest romances on the campus: — 
Coach Ekaitis and Dr. Robinson ... 
Al Wilmot and Don McDorman . . . . 
Norris Duffy and Larry Yourtee 
George Pratt and Sammie Linthi- 
cum ...Bob Fink and Hobble Tig- 
nor. 

It will be fun to watch the antics 
of these odd couples at the Coed 
Hop: — Velma and Wardie . .Mimi 
and Bill Doering (perhaps) .... 
Jeanie and Eddie. . . Flicker and Joe 
Mooney. . . Caci and Bob Shaull 
Mary Jo and Al . . Harriet Lou- 
ise and George Pratt. . Ruthie and 
Calvin .... Alma and John Meade 
. . . . Elsie and Dunk ... Leggs and 
Ben. . . .Sutton and Andy. . . Sue 
and A. W. Jones . Jean and Ace 
Wilmot . Miss Doris and George 
Ekaitis . . Phoebe and J. Salter 
. . . .Barbie and George! 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 

Mrs. Fox entertained members of 
the sorority and patronesses at her 
home a few weeks ago. 

Eleanor Stevens was recently 
pledged to the sorority. 

The sorority was delightfully en- 
tertained at tea at Miss Russell's 
home last Sunday afternoon. 

Betty Titibodeau aUended the 
Army-Navy football game last Satur- 
day. 




•%£ 



if 



M. 



Harvesting to- 
bacco and packing 
it in tJie barn for 
curing — and (be- 
low) a scene at a 
Southern tobacco 
auction. 



ANY men of the South have 
been "in tobacco" for years— growing tobacco 
and curing it— buying it and selling it— until 
they know tobacco from A to Izzard. 

Now folks who have been in tobacco all 
their lives, folks who grow it, know there is 
no substitute for mild ripe tobacco. 

And down in the South where they grow tobacco 
and where they ought to know something about it — in 
most places Chesterfield is the largest-selling cigarette. 



the cigarette that's MILDER 



the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



C 1**4. Lts^rr r * Mrm T'/iMW Co. 



Merry Christinas 



lit© 




Elm 



Happy New Year 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 13. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, DEC. 15, 1934 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



DR. JONES WAS 
GRID FULLBACK 

Played On First College Team 
Forty-Five Years Ago 

by Allen Brougham 

The recent successful football sea- 
son has given rise to a greater amount 
of enthusiasm regarding this sport 
than the college has known for many 
years. Although some of the upper- 
classmen and a great number of the 
townspeople can remember the day 
when Washington College could 
boast of neither an undefeated foot- 
ball team nor even a fairly credit- 
able one, at the same time there 
were some teams during those years 
that are worthy of mention. 

Football was introduced into the 
athletic program of the college in a 
most disastrous, albeit interesting 
manner. In the year 1888 the aver- 
age boy on the Eastern Shore knew 
little, if anything, about the game of 
football, and the Washington Col- 
lege students were no exceptions. 
Dr. Jones states that up until that 
time he had never seen the game 
played. However, some of the col- 
lege students and a few young men 
from the town played together oc- 
casionally on the lower campus, and 
worked up quite an interest in the 
game. This interest culminated in a 
challenge to the St. John's second 
team, which was accepted. The lat- 
ter college had been playing football 
for three years under the tutelage of 
Dr. Cain, who later became President 
of Washington College. 

There being no eligibility rules in 
those days, the Washington team was 
composed partly of college students 
and partly of boys from the town. 
When the day for the game arrived 
it was discovered that the St. John's 
first team had arrived instead of the 
second ! The Washington players 
held a hasty conference to decide 
whether or not to play in the face of 
certain defeat, and finally concluded 
that even if they lost it would give 
them a good chance to see how the 
game was played. The lineup for 
Washington was as follows: 

Linesmen — 

Horris Beck 

Fred Porter 

Charles Twilley 

W. B. Usilton 

laird Goldsborough 

John Todd 

Backfield — . 

ti.B. — Clarence Ferkiii3 

U.B.— Fred Gherker 

H.B. — Lewin Wickes 

F.B.^J. S. W. Jones 

Dr. Jones states that he played 
fullback because it gave him the op- 
portunity to get as far away from the 
scrimmage as possible, and consider- 
ing the way in which football was 
played then, he showed exceeding 
prudence. Rules were usually of a 
local nature, and were resorted to in 
a casual way unless the home team 
happened to be on the losing end. 
There is the story told about the ear- 
ly rivalry between Rutgers and 
Princeton that illustrates this cus- 
tom very well. When Princeton 
played at Rutgers, the game was 
played under the Rutgers rules, and 
when the game was played at Prince- 
ton, the rules were of a Princetonian 
nature. Needless to say, the games 
were always won by the home team! 

Aside from this, however, the game 
itself was most unscientific. It was 
common practice at that time for the 
offensive team to get behind the ball- 
carrier and push him as far as possi- 
ble toward the opponent's goal, cer- 
tainly a harrowing experience for the 
unfortunate object of their hercu- 
lean labor! The ball-carrier was not 
down until he called out "Held" with 
whatever amount of breath remained 
In him. Even in the face of this it 
Was quite common to see the man 
(Continued On Page 5) 



PEABODY MUSICIANS ARE 
ASSEMBLY GUESTS 



Students Hear Violin. Vocal, 
And Piano Selections 



by Vincent Brandolini 

On December 12, at the regular 
Thursday morning assembly in Wil- 
liam Smith Hall, a group of Peabody 
Conservatory artists, including Miss 
Rita Taft, soprano, Miss Dorothy 
Cross, violinist, and Miss Miriam 
Hamer, pianist, presented a concert 
to the Washington College students. 
Miss Hamer made her first appearance 
before the student body several weeks 
ago. 

Miss Taft's choice of selections 
showed to excellent advantage the 
fine qualities of her voice and excel- 
lent range. Of especial interest was 
the well done interpretation of 
Minn's Oria from Puccini's "La Bo- 
heme." One could visualize the poor 
little flower girl, whose only joy and 
consolation was to see the sun's rays 
at dawning. Miss Taft's last group 
of numbers of a light vein brought 
forth much applause from the stu- 
dents. 

Miss Hamer played with the same 
grace and dexterity as before. Her 
firm touch made Medtnei's serenade 
very effective. Her last selection, 
Caprice, consisting of light airy, and 
lilting passages bespoke the musi- 
cian. Her technique in changing and 
shifting the position of her hands re- 
ceived for her the well deserved ap- 
plause of the students. 

Miss Cross, charming violinist, de- 
lighted the students with her fine 
playing. The rich, appealing tones 
which she drew from her violin evok- 
ed the admiration of the students. 
The use of harmonics, octaves, and 
double notes, occurred frequently 
and especially in De Beriot's First 
Movement. 

The Assembly Committee is to be 
commended for obtaining musical 
concerts which are enthusiastically 
received by the students. 



Schurz Award 
For Best Essay 

Contestants From German 
Classes To Participate 



The interest of German students 
was aroused a few weeks ago when 
President Mead announced that the 
Carl Schurz Memorial Foundation had 
donated a six-volume set of Goethe's 
works and to be presented to the win- 
ner of a contest, the nature of which 
was to be determined by Dr. Mead 
and the Head of the German Depart- 
ment. This committee has announc- 
ed an Essay Contest as the basis of 
the award, which will be made at the 
Commencement Exercises next June. 

The essay, to be written in either 
German or English, is to deal with 
some important phase of Nineteenth 
Century German Culture. 

The logical contestants would be 
the members of the German 8 Class, 
but so much interest has been evinced 
by students other than these, that 
the committee has widened the field 
to include these people: members of 
German 8 ; students who have main- 
tained an average grade of "B" in 
German for four semesters; students 
enrolled in German 4 who received 
a grade of "A" in German 3. 

Students interested in entering 
this contest should consult Dr. Davis 
for further information. 



Recalls Early Football 




Dean J. S. W. J 



interview. 



ed concerning early football expert' 



encei at Washington College. The 
interview appears in today's ELM 



WASHINGTON PLAYERS 
PRESENT TWO WORKS 



Tragedy And Melodrama Giv- 
en Next Monday 



by Frances Silcox 

The Washington Players will pre- 
sent on Monday evening, December 
17, 1934, the first two of a series of 
one-act plays directed by members of 
the Club. 

As stated before, these perform- 
ances are given for the purpose of 
allowing people who are interested in 
staging, directing, writing, or taking 
part in plays to do so; and they are 
presented to the student body mere- 
ly for its entertainment and enjoy- 
ment. 

One of the plays to be given, "A 
Night at an Inn" by Lord Dunsany 
is probably the most famous of all 
one-act plays and is included at some 
time or another among the produc- 
tions of almost all amateur players. 

It is the story of a robbery, an 
idol's revenge, and many deaths. A 
group of robbers, headed by Robert 
Clifford and including Lee Dolan, 
William Hall, and Wesley Sadler, 
steal and idol. They soon discover, 
however, that the idol intends to seek 
revenve. As a result of this re- 
venge, seven deaths occur. The play 
is full of mystery and it is gruesome 
in parts but it grips one's interest. 

The staging, which is of particular 
importance in this play, is being done 
by William McCullough and the play 
is being directed by Robert Fink. 

Quite in contrast to this is the oth- 
er play, "The Ghost Story" a melo- 
drama, by Booth Tarkington. In this 
play, George, played by Charles Ben- 
ham, finds that he has but little more 
than an hour of his Christmas vaca- 
tion left in which to "pop the ques- 
tion" to Anna, played by Alice Mar- 
ian Sterling. 

He is busily engaged in gathering 
up courage when a crowd of Anna's 
friends also drop in to ask questions. 
With one last hope, George begins to 
tell the famous ghost story which took 
place outside of Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, and ended with — oh, but you 
must come to hear about that for 
yourself. 

Carl Cochran is staging the play 
and Lelia Anthony is directing it. 

Included in the cast of these two 
plays are several persons who have 
never befoi'e appeared on the Wash- 
ington College stage. It is also new 
business for the directors but despite 
these factors the prospects are for a 
good performance. 

Remembering that our President 
once was a robber for a night, and 
remembering also?, that Christmas is 
so close at hand, it seems that this 
is an excellent time for everyce to 
become enlightened in the matters of 
robbery and Christinas proposals. 
All this information you get for the 
price of one ice-cream soda next Mon- 
day night. Do not miss the chance 

of receiving it! 



CHARLES ESHMAN HOST 
TO UNDEFEATED TEAM 



Banquet At Voshell House 
Caps Season's Victories 



Gifts of golden footballs climaxed 
a golden season for the members of 
Washington College's undefeated 
team at the lavish and brilliant ban- 
quet given the team and" the coaches 
by Mr. Charles Eshman at his hotel, 
the Voshell House, on Thursday ev- 
ening, December 13. 

Every member of the team receiv- 
ed a fine little golden pebbled, foot- 
ball, containing a maroon W, the 
words "Undefeated Team," the year, 
and the player's name. In addition. 
Coach George Ekaitis was presented 
with a football, and Captain Ellis 
Dwyer with a scarlet jacket, as tok- 
ens of the team's appreciation. 

The players were loud in their 
gratitude and praise for Mr. Esh- 
man's cordiality and generosity as a 
host. The story behind the banquet 
was as interesting as the novel dec- 
orations for the affair. Mrs. Esh- 
man, who entertained the players in 
conjunction with her husband, is a 
native of Newark, Delaware, and the 
victory over the University there 
prompted the long-promised banquet 
reward to the winning team. Mr. 
and Mrs. Eshman spared no pains in 
either menu or decorative-effects. 
The center-piece of the long table 
was a turf-covered area with white 
candle goal posts at the end, repre- 
senting accurately a gridiron. A floral 
mound in the field's center was 
shaped like a football and the frozen 
dessert was in the form of a football 
player. 

Although there were no long, for- 
mal speakers, a number of the com- 
pany were introduced by Toastmas- 
ter Billy Usilton, and gave short 
talks. These included Dean Jones, 
who told of the first College football 
game, Coaches Kibler and Ekaitis, 
Harry Russell and William Collins. 

The function rang down the final 
curtain on the greatest football sea- 
son in the history of Washington 
College. 



Dr. A. L Davis 
To Read Paper 

Theodor Fontane Subject Of 
Address 



The subject of the paper that Dr. 
Arthur L. Davis, head of the Depart- 
ment of Modern Languages at Wash- 
ington College, will present at the 
annual meeting of the Modern Lang- 
uage Association to be held at 
Swarthmore, December 27, 28, 29, is 
"Theodor Fontane, as a Critic of the 
German Empire," according to a 
statement made by him in a recent 
interview. 

The meeting will be attended by 
modern language teachers from all 
sections of the country and research 
papers representing the German, 
French, Spanish, and English lang- 
uages will be submitted. These pap- 
ers, according to Dr. Davis, are re- 
search projects prepared along lines 
that will hold the interest of the 
greatest numbers of the members 
present. 

Theodore Fontane, the subject of 
Dr. Davis' paper, has been acclaimed 
as one of the greatest German novel- 
ists of the Nineteenth Century. This 
particular project, Dr. Davis said, re- 
quired a study of Fontane's novels 
and diary in order to rend and to see 
his criticisms of the German Em- 
pire, which existed from 1S70 until 
the World War. 



X M A S GERMAN 
IS A SUCCESS 

Fir Trees Vie For Favor With 
Jack Mohr's Orchestra 



by Dorothy Clarke 

The Christmas Cotillion held last 
nigiit in the Gymnasium was an out- 
standing success. Mr. Allan Brough- 
man and Mr. John Littell were the 
Co-directors for the evening. As 
usual the efforts of Miss Doris Bell 
and Mr. John Mead were of great 
value. 

The holiday spirit was in full 
swing. A delicious odor of fresh 
pine filled the air, and everywhere 
there was gayety and color. A huge 
tree, arrayed with glittering lights 
and shimmering tinsel stood in the 
center of the floor. On and beneath 
the spreading branches of this sym- 
bol of holiday were gayly wrapped 
gifts. Each person present was 
agreeably surprised to find that San- 
ta Claus had arrived ahead of time. 

Behind the great tree, at the far 
end of the floor, a green enclosure 
separated the orchestra from the dan- 
cers. On either side of this, was a 
gay small tree, among whose boughs 
more lights glissened. The windows 
were covered with red and white pap- 
er in the center of which was a pap- 
er tree. 

To the pleasant strains of Jack 
Mohr's orchestra, the dancers swayed 
with light hearts and lighter feet. 
The combination of colorful dresses 
made a most picturesque scene. Dr. 
and Mrs. Mead, Dr. and Mrs. Davis, 
Professor and Mrs. Ford, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Goodwin, filling the role 
of chaperones, watched from the side. 
The Harriet Hillard of the evening 
made the dance more enjoyable with 
her attractive personality and songs. 

Those who were at the dance owe 
the Cotillion Club a vote of thanks 
for starting them off for the Christ- 
mas Holidays with a note of cheer 
and a spirit of good times. 



FOOTBALL TEAM HEARS 
NOTED W. MD. COACH 



Dick Harlow Praises Washing- 
ton's Record 



by Arthur Greimi 

Dick Harlow, coach of football at 
Western Maryland College paid high 
tribute to both Coach Ekaitis and 
Coach Kibler in his talk before the 
members of the Washington College 
undefeated football team, which was 
being feted by the Chestertown Ro- 
tary Club at a banquet held in the 
P. E. Church, Monday evening, De- 
cember 9. Mr. Ekaitis was praised 
as one of the finest backs Harlow had 
ever coached and Coach Kibler is to 
Mr. Harlow the best basketball coach 
in Maryland. 

In the introduction of his talk, Mr. 
Harlow stated that this was one of 
the proudest moments of his life be- 
cause his personal interest in Wash- 
ington College and because of one of 
his own students was making good as 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Holiday Length 

Remains Unchanged 

No effort to change the length of 
the Christmas holiday will be made 
was the decision of the Student 
Council at its last meeting. The 
council considers that, in view of the 
number of authorities who would 
have to sanction such a step, it will 
not be possible to take it this year. 
The holidays will begin at S:lo 
o'clock P. M., Vfadnftsdty, Decem- 
ber IS und will end al S O'clock, Tues- 
day morning, January 3. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, DEC. 15, 1934 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 17S2. 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel . Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus, Manager 

Emerson Slacuni Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



Associate Editors 

Frances SUcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte 



William McCullough 
Howard Clark 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md. 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, S1.50 a year, 
Single copy. 1 cents. 



SATURDAY, DEC. 15, 1934 



A MERRY CHRISTMAS 

The time for the rejoicing and 
gladness at the birthday of the Sav- 
iour of man always makes a hurrying 
humanity stop and think awhile. 
Christmas is losing its mad, material, 
cocktails aspects of the Twenties. It 
is assuming more its proper position 
as a time for the expression of beau- 
tiful sentiments and ideals. There- 
fore, it is not odd that youth may 
think more seriously of the Noel than 
its immediate elders. 

Vacation time is traditionally gay 
and carefree for the student home 
from the Autumn season of restraint 
and discipline at college or school. 
He does all of the accepted, jolly hab- 
its of the Season. He doubtless 
drops many pennies into a beggar's 
cup: perhaps he will arrange a cheer- 
ful basket of good things for the 
poor. Yet, the college student, that 
person who should be most aware of 
the miseries and pathos of Man, of 
great Vergil's 'lacrimae rerum', 
through his acquaintance with litera- 
ture, history and art, too often lets 
the Yuletide pass away without try- 
ing to discover what he may do to 
lighten the load of his fellows. 

Christmas is the time when Chris- 
tianity should feel integrated, and 
when every Christian should take 
stock of his own ideals and virtues. 
Then, too, the New Year approaches, 
with opportunity for a sort of chron- 
ological revision of one's manner of 
life. 

May the students of Washington 
College, as the students all over the 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



EXTRA! EXTRA! 

MYSTERY BAFFLES BEST M1ND3 

Whereabout* of Miss Scout Puzzles 

Spry and Peyser 

Folks, our lovable little Rollo is 
still lost! According to supposition 
he is either in London or in some 
Eastern Shore Glee Club, — an uncon- 
firmed report says his latest and best 
composition is entitled, "I'm Lost In 
a Fugue." 

(Dear Editor, Please disarm all 
suspicious looking anti-punsters de 
siring to see the Exchange colum- 
nist). 



We found a couple of good letters 
in the mail, these are from "The Tern 
pie News" — 
Dear Editor: 

I go with a co-ed and she says I 
have terrible manners. As I like her 
very much and want to keep on the 
good side of her, will you please tell 
me when it is proper for a man 
lift or remove his hat? 

Blushingly, 

Carrot-top. 
Dear Carrot-top: 

A man should remove his hat 
when buying a new one, when taking 
a bath, when eating, when going to 
bed, during snowballing time, when 



Told To 
Me 






By I. Un-ly 
Heard 



A YEAR HAS PASSED 

A year ago last Monday President 
Paul Emerson Titsirorth passed from 
earthly life. His world was made 
poor by his loss, and ricn by his mem- 
ory. Although at the time of his 
death, his active connection with 
"Washington College had ceased, his 

ene~r^ Tnd vis ion are enshrined for- ; wor!( f, nnd a new, and true, and deep- getting a hair cut, when taking up 
!ve77n the academic monuments of , er meil ning in this Christmas than collection, when washing the hair, 
thfcold College. Dr. Titsworth rais- | they have ever found before. Per- when swimming, when standmg on his 
ed the enrollment of the College to haps on Christmas Day, as they kneel head, 
the highest number in its history; he .uefore the altar in their churches or 
planted a myrtle bush back of Wil- : j,, their hearts, the b ~eat vision of 
liam Smith Hall. He willed a gener- j Power, and Glory and Goodness that 
ous endowment to the Washington can ie to the Angels nearly two thous- 
College library; he drove all night arid 1 years ago will pomt the way for 
after his own inaugural at Alfred Un- t ; iem to live more fully, lest for them- 
iversrry to wish success and happi- ; selves ana more for iii3:.kind 
ness to President Mead, as the latter All of them, every one ™ 



■ — Jingo. 

P. s. — If she's only a co-ed, why 
worry? 



01 a Sierry Christmas. 



became Nineteenth President 
Washington College. 

President Titsworth, despite the 
short time of his absence from the 
CnUeee he served so faithfully for 

S. yfars hls^-eady become a leg- ington Players takes the form of an 
endiy figure there. Students speak experiment in he drama Grand 
oThuI noTm the commonplace lang- opera has been .'popularized m New 
uage of everyday affairs, but in the York for many years. 



This one's from "The Montana Ex- 
: ponent" — draw your own conclusions. 
Dear Editor: 
wished ' Why can't people find out what 



After reading last week's calumny, 
we begin to question the wisdom of 
leasing out this column to other writ- 
ers. It unly serves to allow them to 
vent their half-digested, unpalatable 
literary excretions upon the unpro- 
tected public so they may "even up" 
some old scores against certain of 
their colleagues. Wardie just 
couldn't see the point in some of the 
remarks made about him — and he 
said so in no uncertain terms (un- 
less you call throwing a fellow down 
the stairs uncertain terms). Ward 
is a bad man to fool with — as he is 
the man that serves us the food. 
Rhodes didn't appreciate the honor- 
able mention he got last week — and 
he's taking it out on this writer, whom 
he suspects, by serving Rhode's no- 
torious "vacuum-packed" dips of 
ice-cream to him. 

Incidently, the only way to prop- 
erly enjoy your meals over the cafe 
is to eat them in the dark — by court- 
esy of the local Power Company. 
That way you can't see what you're 
eating. 

Silver Pentagon officers please 
note — if this charity dance is to get 
food for the starving, don't forget — 
"charity begins at home." 

The A. K. basketball team certain- 
ly looked domestic, if nothing else, 
in their new sweat suits. For a time 
we thought Duffy was going to drop 
through the seat of his costume, but 
it came out all right in the end. 

It's so cold over in the Boy's Hall 
they have the windows open to let the 
cold out, and we take a cold shower 
to get warmed up. 

— Fat Burns. 



out on fouls. Dirty player I 



New Sweat Suits 

Covered from neck to toes in white 
flannel, the A. K. basketball squad 
caused quite a sensation when they 
came on the floor with only their bare 
faces hanging out. 



A DRAMATIC EXPERIMENT 

The renewed activity of the Wash- 



Too, the hum- 



the 



Historical Note 
It's too cold- for puritans to come 
ore is before they start talk- 1 across in the Mayflower. Ask the 



Question 

Andy, how does it feel to spend the 
day in the auditorium waiting for the 
girl of your dreams? Is it worth it? 



Advice 

Leggs should make up her mind 
and give one of them a break. Its a 
big problem to wrestle with though, 
isn't it "Peg"? 



Sour Grapes 

Ask Hope why he is through with 
women after making such a fine start 
with a little brunette from town. 



-oo- 



lst Floor — 

1. It looks as though "Caroline ' 
isn't losing any weight with "War- 
dy," because we saw him bring her 
four cakes from the cafe. 

2. The "Salt — er "didn't work on 
the "Dickie"-bird. Have you all ever 
heard of a "Johnny"-bird? 



'■Harshaw's" going 
Can it be the 



2nd Floor — 

1. We hear 
"Mooney" again, 
stars? 

2. "Ann" seems to have a "Long" 
"Whyte" way ahead of her. 

3. We hear rumors to the extent 
that "McMahon" is going back to his 
old "Post" again. 

4. Don't we all wonder wheie 
Mimi" was from 12:00 to 12:30 

o'clock Saturday night? 



ingY This year several stories have 
been started that have been detri- 
mental to the character of several in- 
nocent people on the campus. Why 
can't some of these illbred, uncouth, 
llmannered, ignorant, gossips 



man who owns one. 



>rs of a man blest stone mason may see a Raphael I dusty, pull in their ears and look at 
who loved his feUowmen.' His ener- or a Rembrandt in the galler.es of , themselves just once! 



Secret of Success 
The early success of the Phi basket- 
ball team was due to careful obser- 
whoivance of rigid training rules. Other 
talk about other people's affairs and|teams note rule one: "The members 
look for dirt where the slate is only ; of the squad shall not, absolutely and 



positively, drink too much whiskey.' 



the stu- 



— I Only Heard. 

(The secret's out — whoever has 

the reddest face after reading this, is 

the one who writes our "Told to Me" 

column). 



gv, hk achievements, his scholarly na- the Metropolitan^ >.ow 
tSe and his courtesy were but evi- dents of Washington College are be- 
dent traits and results of his chai- ing given the opportunity to see good 
acter I' is true that to the outside plays at prices far below those of the 
he was a cold man, yet his aloofness humblest enema. „. . , 

accentuated his sincerity. He saw This new policy of the Thespians 
as his duty as a Christian, and per- points clearly to an often unseen 
blpstoo, he saw it as the only basic ' fact. Hard-working and long-suf- 
reason for the existence of the inui-;fenng dramatic organizations usual- 

vidual, contributions to the better- ly are regarded as pre-ordained ser- 

menttf his fellows. That is how he vants of the institution at which they 

lived his tragically shortened life-, play. Their vehicles are frequently 

as a man tired but ever dynamic in too long and too difficult to be either 

doing and striving in a world harsh complete artistic successes or draw- 

and ungrateful to any man of un- ] ers 01 huge and enthusiastic houses. j Students at the U. of Delaware 
Huh rirtue and ideals. So w ben ' Actually, none of these functions | must be developing an inferiority 

the monuments of flesh and blood he should be the motives of an amateur ; complex, we find among their "Cur- 
left behind him at Washington Col- ! dramatic club. The purpose of such ' re nt Quotes," in The Review— 

lege generations of students, speak a group should be primarily selfish "Thinking has never been a popu 

of him, they talk in tones of appreci- to produce and present modest plays 

ation. and admiration, and sorrow at for the experience and pleasure of 

Ki -aaspme tne memDers - Of course, such a plan 

15 P ^„ ™«n 'will inevitably result in improvement 

The College goes on apparently > presentation. Large 

unchanged after a year, and one ul^ vo]untary ^J imce wi „ the „ ap . 

But the intelligent and not too 



The following is intercepted from 
"The Sun Dial" of Randolph-Macon 
Woman's College — 

"Are you in the German play as a 
shepherd or an angel?" 

"I'm no angel." 

t Address, Lynchburg, Virginia). 



often told that it goes on far past 

the lifespan of any one of the teach- P - j ^ 

m ana rfmnrntatoxs who build ^ wm do ^ ^^ their 
parts of their hv« into it otU 1. ^ se of a gemi _ an _ 

"™ J*" thiS ° ne h b " n r g ™r nual audience. 
a -harp rebel tne mea whose po^er production of many gnort 

and courage and devotion to their wnith students may attend at 

task keep -the institution a living, * ^.^ ^ should sfcimulate tne 
trowing thing. Washington Players to a new high 

The College pays homage in mem- of ac hj e vement. They will be doing 
ory on the hrst of these satl yearly \ a j ob of their own cn oosing, and up 
cycles to him whose pure soui may to their own standards, well. 

zander in the mystical iand ol 
the .-suntiuwer'B aim and tne Poet's 



Chief Red Face 

Student Council President, Sadler, 
has ceased to be a model of honor and 
personal integrity. In the first bas- 
ketball game of the season he was put 



3rd Floor — 

1. Say, "D. W.'s " getting a 
square deal now — after last week's 
suggestion. 

2. Why does M. Breeding like 
the Greensboro route to Denton, 
NOW, better than the Ridgely route? 

3. What's happened to the "Tay- 
lor" Club? Looks like there's been 
some "lynching" business! 

4. We wonder what has caused 
Hilda to loose her interest in Bal- 
timore? 

6. Is Jean giving Peyser the cold 
shoulder? Why, Jean? 



Biologists Hear 
Mr. Neal Truslow 



Tells Society Of Parasites 
And Their Extermination 



Classical Society 
Elects Historian 



lar sport at Delaware." 

A good many students at Dela- 
ware have quite good heads — as good 
as new — they've never been used." 

"The Tower" 



Along the same line ; 
of Catholic U. says — 

"Some people boast of an 'open 
mind' — probably mistaking vacancy 
for an opening." 



*trange vision: 

"Ah, Sunflower, weary of time, 

,untest the steps of the tun, 
"Setkm* alter that sweet tfoiden 

clllfie, 

"Where the travellers journey is 
done; 



John £. French Married 

On Thanksgiving Day 



Rev. John E. French, of Cordova, 
Maryland, who is a special student at 
the college was married on Thanks- 
" Where the youth pined away with I giving day, at Rumbley, Maryland, 
desire, to Kim Lillian Price who lives at 

,.....', . „ j j ,_ I Hatthewstown. Mrs. French is a 

"And the pale virgin shrouded in ,0-1 

■member uf the teaching corps of Tal- 
bot County while Mr. French is pas- 



"Arise from their graves, and aspire, 
"Where my Sunflower wtxhes to go." 



U,r at the M. E. Churche* at Coidova 
and Matthewfltown 



Copper Refining Is 

Subject Of Film 

The mining, refining and commer 
cial production of copper is the sub- 
ject of a 2-reel moving picture which 
the Chemical Society of Washington 
College will show at 4:15 on Tues- 
day afternoon, December 18. 

The movie has been obtained by 
Dr. Buxton, Professor of Chemistry, 
from the Y. M. C. A. library of edu- 
cational films. It treats in pictorial 
detail the whole process of obtaining 
copper. Copper's importance in mod- 
ern industry, and especially in elec- 
trical developments makes the pic^ 
ture especially significant. 

The movie will be given in Room 
36, and all interested students are 
cordially invited to attend. 



by Clarke Fontaine 

The third meeting of the Biology 
Society was held last Wednesday ev- 
ening in Room 25 William Smith Hall. 
The meeting was called to order at 
7:45 by President Culver, and fol- 
lowing the reading of the minutes 
there was a discussion regarding a 
page for the society in the Pegasus. 
It was decided by majority vote that 
the club would sponsor a page and it 
was announced that each member 
would be taxed 25c to cover the ex- 
pense. 

The soeiety was then honored by 
hearing a talk entitled "The Micro- 
scope That Makes A Million" by Mr, 
Neal Truslow of the Truslow Poul- 
try Farm. His talk included a dis- 
cussion with blackboard diagrams of 
the life-cycle of the parasite causing 
Coccidiosis and also an explanation 
of his research resulting finally in the 
perfection of "Toxite" the disinfect- 
ant used for its extermination. Mr. 
Truslow demonstrated how with the 
assistance of a microscope and sev- 
eral scientists his establishment dis- 
covered and put on the market a pro- 
duct which was powerful enough to 
kill the parasite by penetrating its 
"egg" on the poultry-house floor be 
fore it can reach the fowl. 

After the speech was over un open 
discussion was held in which Mi 
Truslow answered many questions 
asked by members of the society, 



Plans For Second Annual 
Banquet Discussed 



On Monday, December 10, the 
Classical Society elected Donald Me- 
Dorman as first Historian of the so- 
ciety. The office was recently cre- 
ated, due to stress of circumstances. 
After a round-table discussion. Miss 
Silcox, the President, appointed a 
committee headed by Miss Eloise 
Hepbron to arrange programs for the 
year. An ambitious schedule was 
discussed, including several talks by 
eminent classicists, pilgrimages to 
points of interest, and, of course, the 
Society's usual social functions. 
Plans were discussed concerning the 
second annual banquet, to be held 
next month. It will be remembered 
that the members and friends of the 
organization were the guests last 
I year of Professor Solandt, and with 
,n enlarged roster, an even greater 
ucccss is expected this year. 

On Monday, December 17, Profes- 
lOr Solandt will give an illustrated 
lecture on ancient Rome. Due to 
the popularity of this subject, the 
meeting will be open. 

The new members recently induct- 
ed into the society are: Alice Mc- 
Cool, Donald McDorman, Helen 
Shallcross, Clifton Hope, Mildred 
Skinner, Murvin Smith, Jny Spry, 
Mary Emma Taylor, and Margaret 
Walters. 



SATURDAY, DEC. 15, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Speaks Here 




DICX. HAR.L.O\A/ 



The smiling gentleman above it 
Dick Harlow, football coach at West- 
ern Maryland College and former 
tutor of George Ekaitis, Washing, 
ton Coach. 



FOOTBALL TEAM HEARS 
NOTED W. MD. COACH 



Dick Harlow Praises Washing- 
ton's Record 



(Continued from Page 1) 
a coach. 

The theme of Coach Harlow's talk 
was upon the firm foundation which 
the institutions of America were 
standing. Mr. Harlow emphatically 
stated that he would accept any chal- 
lenge offered by any one in attacking 
the game of football. He eondemed 
the man who attacked national ath- 
letic heroes long since dead and he 
paid great tribute to the late Knute 
Rockne of Notre Dame fame. 

Mr. Harlow stated that a football 
man was never found leading a com- 
munistic parade or preaching athe- 
ism. He also referred to the use of 
the code of sportsmanship in business 
and industry. 

His closing remarks were in the 
praise of the scrubs who in the ulti- 
mate gain as much, if not more than 
the varsity star. In his own words 
he said: "Time will come when you 
will be needed and you will not be 
wanting." 



Varsity Hockey 
Team Selected 



Two Teams Chosen ; 
Team Gets W 



First 



The Board of Managers of the 
Girls' Athletic Association held a 
meeting Monday at twelve forty-five 
to select the honorary varsity hockey 
team. It was quite difficult to make 
even the first eliminations, as many 
of the players were so evenly match- 
ed. Two teams were chosen, al- 
though only the first will get black 
"W's." 

This was the final result: 

Honorary Varsity — 1st team: 

Right Wing — Priscilla Grainger. 

Right Inner — Jean Harshaw. 

Center Forward — Caroline Helms. 

Left Inner — Eleanor Stevens, 

Left Wing— Kitty Anthony. 

Right Halfback — Velma Carter. 

Center Halfback — Dickie Metcalfe. 

Left Halfback — Leah Frederick. 

Right Fullback— Miriam Ford. 

Left Fullback — Nancy Post. 

Goalie — Lucy Cruickshank. 

2nd team — means honorable men- 
linn for 1st team: 

Right Wing — Caroline Jewell. 

Right Inner — Louise Stevens. 

Center Forward — Doris Unruh. 

Left Inner — Beppy Westcott. 

Left Wing — Phoebe Pyle. 

Right Halfback — Margaret Bell. 

Center Halfback — Marian Brown. 

Left Hnlfback-Alice Marian Sterl- 
ing. 

Right Fullback— Hazel Lynch. 

Left Fullback — Estelle Wesley. 

Goalie — Louise Nicholson. 



SKIPPING ove \h E SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



The past week has offered little of 
interest in the realm of inter-colleg- 
iate sports. As a matter of fact it 
has proven to be one of the dullest 
weeks of the new athletic year. Yet 
this is only natural because there is 
always a lull between the last foot- 
ball game and the ushering in of the 
new basetball season. Still this 
seemingly inactive period is truly full 
of action. If you don't believe it 
just drop in to any college gym and 
see the air filled with flying basket- 
balls and fellows in flashy jerseys 
streaking all over the floor. They 
are all working hard because the op- 
ening game is only a few days away 
and they want to start the season 
with a win. 

The Maryland basketball season 
has just barely started. But pre- 
season dope leads one to believe that 
this will be a banner season for most 
of the Free State institutions. The 
still young Maryland Intercollegiate 
League provides the major interest 
for most of the local fans. St. Johns 
has been admitted to the league 
swelling the membership to six. Wes- 
tern Maryland, last year's winner, 
was hard hit by graduation. As a re- 
sult, they will probably not be as 



otrong as before. Little is known 
about Mt. St. Mary's, but it will be 
hard to replace Hopkins at center 
and two or three other regulars. 
Lynch will have to be watched by 
opposing teams. In Baltimore we 
find two league members namely, 
Loyola and Hopkins. Both of these 
teams have shown great strength in 
their opening games against weak 
opposition. But Hopkins will be at 
a great disadvantage by the lack of a 
tall center. St. Johns will have a 
good team with Donahue leading 
them. But they will find the going 
much harder since Butterworth, one 
of the best centers in the east last 
year, got his sheep skin last June. 

Right no wit would be hard to pre- 
dict our chances on the court this 
winter because the fellows haven't 
played anyone as yet. To be sure we 
played Upsala last night, but this col- 
umn was written two days before the 
game. West Chester Teachtrs 
brings down its best squad in years 
for a merry battle next Tuesday. Our 
boys need a few games under their 
belt, and when the first league game 
rolls around after the holidays, Hop- 
kins will find us in mid-season shape. 

Observations: — Football team sure 



is being feted. Three banquets in 
one week. Made a mistake about 
gold footballs last week. But hold 
on, they will be here soon. Harry 
Russell makes our all-American 
Toastmaster's team. Dick Harlow 
probably knows a lot of football, but 
he can talk talk. Enjoyed him very 
much. Nick is the first Washington 
player to make "all state" in years. 
"Huff" just found out that Evans 
was left handed. Bilancioni and 
"Smith" Greims work harder than 
ane one on the basket ball floor. And 
"AI" still has a bum leg from foot- 
ball. It is 28 laps to the mile on the 
indoor track. "Nick" is doing a Tig- 
nor in the shower rooms. Perry and 
Peyser — what a combination. They 
beat the freshmen single handed. 
"Rough-house" Baker is running true 
to form. They won't let him play 
enough he claims. 



When Julius Caesar conquered 
Egypt, he made the Egyptian calen- 
dar the basis of hsi famous reform 
calendar. 



STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 
331 High St. 



High Quality Accessories 
At Low Prices 



Goodrich Tires, Tubes and 
Batteries 



In time of drought, muskrats mi- 
grate from drying swamps to new 
locations which are better watered. 



A survey shows that the average 
heighth of buildings on Manhattan 
island is only five stories. 



L C. Treherne W. G. Smyth 

TREHERNE ASSOCIATES 

REALTY 

Salt Water Homes, Colonial 

Estates, Inland Farms and 

Ducking Shores 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITH'S KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



E9KB 



T wo Pla ys 

A Night At An Inn 
A Ghost Story 



WASHINGTON PLAYERS 



MONDAY, DECEMBER 17th 

7:30 P. M. 

10c At The Door 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1934 



West Hall Has 

Gossip Also 

New Columnist Gets Abund- 
ance Of News 



Heat on the third floor again. Two 
days in a row. Hot stuff. I never 
would have believed it. I'll have to 
speak to Mr. Goldsborough about a 
congressional medal for "Chief". . . 
There goes the lights again. Must 
be the Vandervoorts . I'll have to 
send Bergdall down to calm the bro- 
thers Which reminds me that the 

boys have resolved to take Luke out 
on a "party" after his next bit of | 
mischief. Beware. Mr. Bergdall,] 
you'd better not put anymore shoes, 
walls, hammers, buildings or the like | 
in Kosowsky's or Koleshko's bed;) 
or lower mice into Wagner's and t 
Bigg's windows; and perhaps you'd 
better leave Iggy's doorknob on his i 
door — for a few nights, anyway 
Wonder if those three girls invited j 
Johnny Mygatt to sit with them at . 
dinner the other day or vice versa; I 
mean Flicker, Dickie, and Jean 



I think Iggy has fallen in love with 
one of the Hollywood actresses 
(again?). He saw her in the New 
(?) Lyceum the other night and still 
raves about her. Don't worry, Mr. 
Benham its probably nothing per- 
manent, just puppy love, I'd say. . . . 
(Are you jealous Carl?) . That 
New Secret Society, the Gordians, 
has a few freshmen in it, I under- 
stand. Seems to be creating an at- 
mosphere of mystery around "rat 
hall." We're waiting for something 
to happen Kauffman, I wonder if 

it's Chick or her younger sister that 
you've been losing sleep over. Bet- 
ter lay off the downtown girls, Har- 
ry, why not give Reid Hall a break? 
Then again, perhaps a little dieting 
will make the "Reidites" storm over 
to West Hall after you . . Vernon 
Bowen gives warning to a certain 
young upperclassman that has been 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 
Men's Wear 



hanging around Louise Morris. Fight 
fairly, Vernon, a duel will give you 
both an- equal chance . . Johnny 
Bride claims the record for catching 
mice. The mice just storm around 
the room and Johnny just nonchal- 
antly asks you what color you'd like 
this one to be, and presto! change! 
here is a green one. Perhaps its the 
food that Bergdall hides in his trunk 
that brings the rodents on My 

selection for the college romance of 
the week, Kauffman and Friedman 
An ideal couple I'd say Don't 
worry Fred, you might still take Har- 
ry out once in a while Seems as 
if some of the boys changed the mark 
on Bill Doering's college problem 
paper to tenth tenth. Was Bill's 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



face red? And poor innocent Ko- 
sowsky got the blame for it, when the 
truth finally dawned on Doering. . . . 
Bud Wilson, shall you permit Betty 
Johns to be snatched from your 
clutches by those designing upper- 
classmen. No, no, Bud, a thousand 
times no. - Gee, I wonder what has 
got into Dusty Claggatt, wearing 
stockings two days in a row. . . .Per- 
haps it is because he thought knick- 
ers wouldn't look so well without 
them I think I'll stir up a revolu- 

tion among the boys to get Wes ship- 
ped from our dormitory. Think of 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid H»1L 

W. WaUon. P. S. T. and Ea.t 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try oar cleaning, yon'U like the 

difference 
24 nonr service. Tel. 318 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



?HIILIPJ 



/.cboriE ; V, 

maim 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 
Town 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And AH Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or hit family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF DEC. 17-22 

MONDAY - TUESDAY, DECEMEER 17-18 
ANNE SHIRLEY in 

"ANNE OF GREEN GABLES" 

A picture for the millions who loved LITTLE 
WOMEN. 

Added — Comedy, Cartoon and Novelty. 

SPECIAL BENEFIT MATINEE 
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18th AT 3:30 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, DEC. 19-20 

"THE WHITE PARADE" 

with 
JOHN BOLES -- LORETTA YOUNG 

Added — Comedy, Betty Boop Cartoon, and Mad- 
house Movies. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22 

DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

TIM McCOY in 

"THE WESTERNER" 



TITLE OF 2ND FEATURE WILL BE 
ANNOUNCED LATER 



"The Bank Where 
You Feel At Home" 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lcntheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



having such a dirty player setting an 
example for the boys. . . -My heart 
really went out to Gardiner, last Sat- 
urday. Imagine dragging a female 
all the way to the armory only to be 
embarrassed by the coach when 
Gardiner was asked to remove the 
Jewell from the set-up? 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 

C. W. KIBLER & SONS 





flik 

HP-type 

HOSIERY 

knEE sfRflin 




EE-HIG. 

-uriiri luut-in"tflSTEX"aoAi£liA 

$1.00 

® Tests show this new wonder stocking 
can save you 25 to 50% on your hosiery 
coslsl Three poirs outwear Four lo five of 
!he ordinary kind. Because Knee-High 
ends all knee-slroin and stretch. Gently 
but trimly self-supporling . . . knee- 
lenglh . . . gives far more comfort — ond 
belter style. Newest shades in shadow- 
less chiffon . . . 

MARGARET E. JEFFERSON 

"A Smart Shop for Women" 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



OPENING OF 


New Drug Store 


THIS WEEK 


Under The Voshell House 


Complete Line of Drugs, Stationary, Candies, 


Tobaccos 


TOULSON DRUG STORE 


EARL A. STAFFORD, Phg. 



New Eugene De Luxe 

PERMANENTS 

With Croquinole EncU 
$5.00 

Shampoo, Hot Oil 

Monday, Tueiday, Wednesday, 

Thursday $1.00 

For December 

GRAY BEAUTY SALON 




SATURDAY, DEC. IS, 1934 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



Dr. Jones Recalls 
First Grid Defeat 



St. John's Swamped College 
Team 126-0 

(Continued From Page 1) 
with the ball crawling along the 
ground toward the goal line beneath 
a wriggling mass composed of his ten 
teammates and the opposing eleven. 

Of the final score in the game with 
St. John's, little should be said. The 
Chestertown papers were kind enough 
in their writeup of the fracas, not to 
mention that the local college had 
been defeated by the more or less de- 
cisive score of 126 to 0! 

This game with St. John's was of 
importance to the history of the col- 
lege not only because it was the first 
game ever to be played here, and, in- 
cidentally, the most disastrous, but 
for a reason that holds a greater sig- 
nificance to the present students than 
does any other — because this first 
game was played on November 24, 
1888, just 46 years to a day prior to 
the late victory over Delaware. 

Of the eleven members of the orig- 
inal team, eight are living at this 
time. Three of the team became 
prominent in their various lines of 
endeavor. Lineman Goldsborough be- 
came a Federal Judge, Halfback Lew- 
in Wickes became a Circuit Judge on 
the Shore, and served in that capa' 
city until his death a year and a half 
ago, and Fullback Jones became Dean 
of Washington College, which office 
he holds at the present time. 

There have been other history- 
making football teams at Washington 
College, Dr. Jones recalls; in 1907 
Washington defeated Maryland Agri 
cultural College — the present Mary- 
land University; Rutgers was defeat- 
ed sometime between 1907 and 1911 
in which latter year the local eleven 
succeeded in triumphing over St. 
John's. In 1917 Washington again 
defeated St. John's, 27 to 7. 

In all, the college has played for- 
ty-five years of intercollegiate foot- 
ball, no games having been played in 
1918 because of the Great War, 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY VISITS EMMANUEL 

CHURCH AND "WIDE HALL" IN PILGRIMAGE 



PAGE FIVE 



Papers Are Read At The Old Church And Colonial Residence 
On Water Street 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety First 

F. G. Usilton, Pres. 

L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



LeCATES 


BROS. 


BARBER 


SHOP 


Where the college man 


can get his 


style of 


hair cut 



HOLDEN'S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



by Lawrence Williams 

Tuesday afternoon, December 11, 
the members of the Washington Col- 
lege Historical Society, under the 
supervision of Dr. Dole, made two 
brief but enlightening pilgrimages, 
first to the Protestant Episcopal 
Church on High Street, then to "Wide 
Hall" on Water Street. 

Harriet Louisa Rogers delivered an 
interesting paper on the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. She mentioned 
the fact that at a convention held in 
tile old Emmanuel Church, Novem- 
ber 9, 1780, a resolution was intro- 
duced and adopted, providing that 
"the church of England heretofore 
so known in the Province of Mary- 
land now be called the Protestant 
Episcopal Church." This was the 
first representative body of the de- 
nomination in America to apply this 
designation to itself, and by that 
action to officially and finally sever 
all connections from the mother 
church in England. Thus it may be 
said that the Protestant Episcopal 
Church of America first took form in 
this Chestertown church. 

The Society then journeyed to 
"Wide Hall" where, through the 
courtesy of Mr. Wilbur Hubbard, the 



members were conducted through 
this beautiful old colonial mansion. 
Mr. Hubbard gave a brief history of 
the house and its contents. Investi- 
gations conducted by Mr. Hubbard 
and other interested authorities indi- 
cates that "Wide Hall" was built be- 
tween 1732 and 1762. The proper- 
ty on which the house stands was sold 
for a song in 1732 and in 1762 it 
changed hands at a price of 2800 
pounds. This house was first the 
home of a Chief Justice of the Kent 
County Court. At the occasion of 
the founding of Washington College, 
General George Washington was a 
guest at "Wide Hall." It is gener- 
ally believed that the architect of 
Independence Hall, Philadelphia, was 
also the designer of "Wide Hall." The 
house is furnished with antiques of 
the colonial period which the Hub- 
bards have collected. Six Duncan 
Phyfe chairs of the colonial period 
are in the living room, and in the 
dining room stands a Hepplewhite 
sideboard. Perhaps the outstanding 
feature of the house is the beautiful 
overhanging stairway, without any 
visible means of support, which 
has baffled modern architects as to 
its construction. Most of the rooms 



are panelled and wainscoated, decor- 
ated with rich woodwork. The din- 
ing room shows the best workman- 
ship in the house. It is decorated 
with a fine wooden cornice depicting 
early days before the Revolution. 
"Wide Hall" was the center of a gay 
social life which was so characteristic 
of Tidewater Maryland. Antiquarians 
and history lovers are indebted to 
the Hifbbards for the restoration of 
their home to its former splendor and 
glory. 

The pilgrimage was brought to a 
delightful close with an invitation to 
tea at the home of Dr. Ester M. Dole. 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331 -M 



GORDIANS DORMANT 

DURING HOLIDAYS 



Strange, New Group Will Be- 
come Active In 1935 



THE GORDIANS, the new broth- 
erhood on the campus as mentioned 
in last week's ELM, is moving for- 
ward as was prophesied. At their 
meeting Tuesday night two men 
were taken in as prospective mem- 
bers and it was decided that the or- 
ganization should launch their active 
program after the holidays. 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 — Chestertown 



BUY 

CHRISTMAS 
SEA LS 




HELP 



F1CHT 
TUBERCULOSIS 




ash- 
heel 



t leaves a clean chy 
no soggy residue or 

in the pipe bowl 




. . .hi « 

package — 10c 



In the manufacture 
of Granger Rough Cut Pipe 
Tobacco the Wellman Process 
is used. 

The Wellman Process is dif- 
ferent from any other process or 
method and we believe it gives 
more enjoyment to pipe smokers. 
.../'/ gives the tobacco an ex- 
tra flavor and aroma 
...it makes the tobacco act 
right in a pipe — burn 
slower and smoke cooler 
. . . it makes the tobacco milder 
...it leaves a clean dry ash 
— no soggy residue or heel 
in the pipe bowl 
Liggett & Myers tobacco C«l 



We'wis/i in some way we could pet 

every man who smokes a pipe 

to Just try Cffrmper 



)»•). liiwm « Mvi*» T»»x<,i Co. 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, DEC. 15, 1934 



DOIN'S 



Unfortunately we have some very 
unpleasant nev.-s. The ball started 
rolling last Monday when Mrs. Bell, 
mother of Miss Doris Bell, slipped 
down some stairs and broke her an- 
kle in three places. Due to various 
causes, the ankle had to be set 
five times. We sincerely hope that 
Mrs. Bell will soon recover from her 
accident. Last Tuesday. Miss Eliza- 
beth Dill was operated on for 
appendicitis. Betty is now on tie 
road to recovery. Mr. Lawrence 
Yoortee is in for a se-gre at the hos- 
pital where he will be for two weeks. 
lough luck Larry. The fourth on 
our list of cssualities is Dr. Carpen- 
ter who is being treated at a hospi- 
tal in Baltimore. Dr. Carpenter is 
expected to he released shortly. 

Now to the more pleasant side of 
Doin's, The Girls' Dance was cer- 
tainly a good one. Those who miss- 
ed it were quite out of luck. George 
Kelly's orchestra was fine, and the 
decoration? were very colorful and 
attractive. Whoever put the wax on 
the Boor did some- job though. In 
fact, it was so slippery that to keep 
one's balance was a work out in it- 
self. After the dance several of the 
students were guests of Mr. an i Mrs, 
S. Seott Beck. The dance at the 
Country Club was in celebration of 



the twenty-fifth wedding anniversary, 
of Mr. and Mrs. Beck. 

This week began the annual after- 
dinner amusements of inter-closs and j 
i i nter-fraternity basketball. Half of 
the fun is in listening to the choice j 
remarks one hears from the side lines, j 
It won't be long now before we are j 
all at home preparing for the usual : 
round of social functions. Before we t 
'go Reid Hall is going to do its pari I 
\ toward the holiday. For the past 
I week the girls have been singing; 
carols, so don't be surprised to see i 
[them most anywhere lending their 
; voices to the spirit of Christmastide. 
The annual Chrislmas party will 
■take place at 10:30 on Tuesday night. 1 
This is always an hilarious affair and , 
Iwe are looking forward to it with j 
[pleasure. The Hall will be lit up^ 
with glowing candles in every win- j 
dow and the sputtering fire in the 
grate will present a scene of ieal 
homey beauty. 

I Only four more days and away we 
!go. Doin's wishes you the best of 
Santas and a very Merry Christmas. 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



£ c 1 1 m i M s peer 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chestertown, Md. 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



^Hait a minute— 

here's what she smokes 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 
GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

Phone 109 or 81SF4 

332 High St. 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



CHAS. C. SCHR1EBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett. F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 11IJ 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 




' Mrnj Tot«y» Co. 



Beat Western Maryland 
Tonight 



Ihe 




Exam Schedule On 
Page 4 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 14. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., 



SATURDAY, JAN. 12, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



Orchestra Presents 
Assembly Concert 

Music Enthusiastically Re- 
ceived By Students 

At the regular Thursday morning 
assembly in William Smith Hall, 
January 10, the Washington College 
orchestra presented its second con- 
cert of the season. The orchestra, 
which is the finest that has been 
heard in years, presented a program 
that won the complete approval of 
the students. The compositions 
which aroused the admiration of the 
students were two well known selec- 
tions, Liszt's "Liebestraum," and 
Jerome Kern's "Old Man River," 
from "The Show Boat." 

Expression and fullness of tones 
combined with well-executed caden- 
zas and aspeggios of "Liebestraum" 
exemplified the beauties of classical 
music. 

"Old Man River," rendered first 
with a smooth liquid, and undulating 
rhythm, and then in the bright, cheer- 
fl syncopated, staccato style of the 
more modern music pleased the fan- 
cy of the students. The orchestra 
was conducted by faculty director, 
Dr. Livingood and student director 
Vincent Brandolini. Mr. Moffett, 
director of the Washington College 
Glee Club, made the students feel 
sympathetic for the thirsting negro 
laborers when he rendered Jerome 
Taylor's "Water Boy." 



PORTER MEDAL CONTIN- 
UED BY CHARLES CLARK 



Former ELM Editor Was Re- 
cipient Last Year 



Historical Society Receives 
Oil Pointing 01 Washington 

At the business meeting of the 
Washington College Historical Socie- 
ty in December, Dr. Gilbert W. Mead 
was elected an honorary member. 

The total membership of the 
organization is now nearing fif- 
ty. For the next formal meet- 
ing, a former Chief-Justice of Dela- 
ware is expected to be the guest 
speaker. In a previous meeting, Dr. 
Mead announced that a friend of the 
College is donating twenty dollars in 
prizes to be awarded to the member 
who writes the best paper on the 
Eastern Shore. The Society is be- 
ing given an old oil painting of 
George Washington and a large 
steel engraving of Washington and 
his generals by an interested lady in 
New Jersey. In the spring, they 
will be formally presented to the 
College by the Society. 



The Porter Character Medal, pre- 
sented annually for the last ten years 
by the late Harry P. Porter, '05, will 
be continued in memory of Mr. Por- 
ter by Charles B. Clark, '34, the re- 
cipient of the last award made dur- 
ing Mr. Porter's lifetime. 

Mr. Porter, an outstanding alum- 
nus of the College, who lost his life 
by drowning while duck hunting last 
December, awarded the medal each 
year to the person designated by the 
Faculty as having contributed the 
most on the campus during the year 
to the maintenance of high moral 
ideals. The first recipient, in 1924, 
was Ellas W. Nuttle, now a well- 
known lumber merchant in Denton. 
In 1925 it went to Charles M. Jar- 
man, now engaged in the practice of 
law in Baltimore, and in ,1926 to 
Frederick W. Dumschott, whose later 
career is well known to all Washing- 
ton College people. 

Olher awards were: 1927, titorgc 
Francis Carrington; 1928, Joseph 
Stanley Long; 1929, Joseph Jerome 
Frampton, Jr.; 1930, Oliver E. Rob- 
inson, Jr.; 1931, Elizabeth A. Mace; 
1932 and 1933, Richard Monroe Gam- 
ber; 19o4, Charles iiranch Clark, who 
is at present teaching in the High 
School at Preston, Md. 

It is the wish of Mr. Clark, in mak- 
ing the award, that the medal shall 
continue to be known as the Porter 
Medal, in remembrance of Mr. Por- 
ter's life and service to the College. 



The Elm To Appear As Foar 
Page Edition During January 

The ELM will appear, during the 
slack month of January, and part of 
February, as a four-page paper. This 
is the result in part of a necessity to 
economize sometime in a publication 
schedule including more than twice 
the number of issues ever before at- 
tempted, for which the student fee 
is exceedingly small, and is not in- 
creased from the fee for a semi-mon- 
thly ELM. However, although they 
have not seriously affected the ELM 
plans, thanks to the excellent coop- 
eration of the Business Staff, nation- 
al advertising withdrawals have caus- 
ed a disturbance in the whole college 
newspaper world. Two of the 
ELM's chief advertisements have 
been withdrawn from all college news- 
papers, as the result of litigation in- 
volving contracts between two of the 
national advertising agencies. 

The ELM will resume its normal 
size when the busy Spring season of 
the second semester comes. No re- 
duction in the number of cuts, car- 
toons, etc., will be made. The ELM 
continues to endeavor to fulfill its 
function as an integrating medium 
°n the campus of Washington Col- 
'fige, and pledges its loyalty for 1935 
to the welfare of the institution. 



Washington Players Plan 
One-Act Plays For February 

Robert Clifford And William 
Hall To Be Coaches 



The second program in the series 
of one-act plays to be given by the 
Washington Players will be presented 
early in February. No definite plan 
as to the plays to be given or char- 
acters have been decided upon but 
Robert Clifford and William Hall will 
be the coaches. 

The first of these programs was 
held December 19, 1934 at which 
time "A Night at an Inn" and "The 
Ghost Story" were presented before 
a large audience of students. They 
were coached entirely by members of 
the Club and the coaches are to be 
complimented for their splendid per- 
formance. 

The Club, at a recent meeting, 
took in more than twenty new mem- 
bers. 



Mount Vernon Hears 

Musical Program 



Vocal Solos And Instrumental 
Numbers Featured 



An entirely musical program was 
presented by members of the Mt. 
Vernon Literary Society at an open 
meeting Thursday evening, January 
10, in the auditorium of William 
Smith Hall. An instrumental trio 
composed of Brandolini, Jurreli and 
Kosowsky gave several novelty se- 
lections which featured the program. 
Vocal solos by Miss Mary Jane Nicld 
and Lawrence Williams drew a large 
hand from their audience. Mr. 
Brandolini also gave several selec- 
tions on the piano. 



INTERNATIONAL GROUP 
TO HEAR R. P. CHAMBERS 



The International Society of Wash- 
ington College will meet nt 0:45 on 
Tuesday evening, January 15, in 
William Smith Hall, lo hear Richard 
P. Chumbers on The League of Na- 
tions. All members are urged to at- 
tend. 



President Mead 
Speaks In South 

Will Spend Week At Meeting 
And Conferences 



On Sunday President Mead begins 
a week of speech making and confer- 
ences which will carry him from Tow- 
son, in our own state, to Birmingham, 
in Alabama, the state of his former 
residence, and to Atlanta, Georgia. 

Sunday, January 13, he will be a 
speaker, along with Governor Nice 
of Maryland, and President Amos 
Woodcock, of St. John's College at 
Annapolis, on the program in cele- 
bration of the sixty-ninth anniver- 
sary of Founder's Day at the Mary- 
land State Normal School at Towson, 
Maryland. 

By train, on Sunday night, he will 
leave for the South, where, on Tues- 
day, he will address the Kiwanis Club 
of Birmingham, Alabama. On Wed- 
nesday, January 16, he will return to 
Birmingham-Southern College, where 
formerly he was dean, and will there 
deliver an address. The annual 
meeting of the Association of Amer- 
ican Colleges will call him to Atlan- 
ta, Thursday, where he will stay over 
Friday attending the sessions of that 
body. 

It is probable that President Mead 
will return to the campus on either 
Saturday or Sunday, after having 
spent a very busy week. 



"WAR IN 1940" FEAR 
OF PAUL HARRIS 



Peace Speaker Criticizes 
Roosevelt And Policies 



GROUP DISCUSSES THE 
PREVENTION OF WARS 



Paul Harris Leads Discussion 
On World Peace 



"Stop war or be damned," was the 
statement of Paul Harris of the Na- 
tional Council for the Prevention of 
War to a discussion group of Wash- 
ington College students and faculty 
held Thursday afternoon, January 3. 

"The young voter has the most to 
loose by war. All relations between 
nations are endangered and peace 
ruined by another major war. War 
must be prevented by a new attitude 
in America,'.' he continued. 

He stated that this, organization 
considered World Peace to be the 
paramount issue of the day. He add- 
ed that the leaders of the Prohibi- 
tion, Socialist, or any other move- 
ment, if asked, would say that anoth- 
er war would kill the movement for 
years to come. 

Mr. Harris put forth the following 
program for peace: (1) world wide 
education for peace, building up skill 
of living peaceably, standing up a- 
gainst wrongs and learning skill in 
obtaining redress; (2) world wide or- 
ganization for peace; (3) world wide 
limitation of armaments by interna- 
tional agreements; and (4) political 
action. 

"We can prevent war by stopping 
to act as students — act as voters. 
Nations declare war. The only force 
that moves nations is voters unless 
it be violent revolution. Our 632 de- 
terminers of policy are not often 
bribed, but often pushed by voters. 
We must find a way to get voters to 
change votes. Youth is the un- 
predictable." 

He outlined the results obtained in 
Massachusetts where peace advocates 
succeeded in holding a referendum 
on the question of the United States 
entering the J-ieague of Nations at 
the last election. Only 4 out of 115 
districts voted against entrance into 
the League. 

"In the event of another war, I 
will not enlist, be drafted, or buy 
bonds. I will make speeches against 
war. I cannot have part in mass 
murder. I realize that 1 am a party 
lo a government that rests on vio- 
lence. When it employs new or 
more violent type of murder, I can- 
not have a part in that, ' he stated^ 



by Marvin H. Smith 

Fear of a war involving the United 
States before 1940 leading to the de- 
struction of democratic government 
and ushering a post-war depression 
that will make the present one look 
sick in comparison if the present for- 
eign policy of the United States is 
pursued, was expressed by Paul Har- 
ris of the National Council for the 
Prevention of War at the Washing- 
ton College weekly assembly held 
Thursday, January 3. 

Mr. Harris censured the Roosevelt 
Administration for many of its pol- 
icies in relation to foreign affairs. He 
heartily disapproved of the maneuv- 
ers of the American Fleet to be held 
in the near future. He stated that 
this fleet will be the largest ever as- 
sembled under one command.' He 
added that Japan could hardly inter- 
pret this as a friendly gesture. He 
expressed grave concern and great 
dismay at the collapse of naval limi- 
i tation negotiations, especially since 
' Japan and the United Stales are ap- 
parently headed for a naval race. 

Mr. Harris showed that there are 
some bright spots in the sea of world 
affairs. He cited the successful ar- 
bitration by the League of Nations 
of the differences arising between 
Jugoslavia and Hungary after the as- 
sail ii.alior. of the former's king at 
Marseilles on October 9 as proof that 
the international outlook is far from 
hopeless. 

The conclusion that pacifists have 
fought for their ideal in the wrong 
way, was voiced by Mr. Harris. He 
said that if the United States is to be 
kept out of another war, the Presi- 
dent and Congress must be made to 
understand that advocates of World 
Peace in the United States represent 
votes, votes being the only langu- 
age that the politician understands. 
He added that all future campaigns 
must be fought not with education 
but with votes. 



MRS. BRICKER ASSUMES 
DUTIES IN CAFETERIA 



Dietitian Requests Students 
Opinion On Menu Changes 



Mrs. Adele G. Bricker, who re- 
cently accepted the position of die- 
titian in the Commons, comes to 
Washington College with an enviable 
record in her field. A natice of 
Pennsylvania, Mrs. Bricker for the 
last seven years was dietitian in one 
of the largest department stores in 
Youugstown, Ohio, having two res 
taurants under her management. 

Dr. Mead expresses himself as very 
well pleased at having obtained the 
services of Mrs. Bricker, and feels 
that with the proper cooperation 
from the student body she will be 
able to remove the recent causes for 
complaint. 

Mrs. Bricker earnestly requests 
student opinion as to the conduct of 
the cafeteria, yet at the same time 
sounds the note of warning that "no 
set menu can possibly please all of 
the individual tastes of one hundred 
ind fifty students; the problem is to 
arrange some method to ple&ae the 
largest majority possible." 

For the time being Mrs. Bricker 
has been examining the existing sit- 
uation closely, and with the aid of 
student criticism will endeavor . iom 
time to time to make such changes as 
seem necessary. 



Cagers To Meet 
W.Md. Tonight 

Team Ends Second Week-End 
Game In Armory 

Washington College's basketball 
team plays its second league game in 
two days when it acts as host tonight 
to a big rangy Western Maryland 
quintet at the Chestertown Armory. 

The invading team from the wes- 
tern section of the state will be in- 
augurating its campaign in the de- 
fense of the Maryland Intercollegiate 
title it won last winter. This year's 
Terror five has developed rapidly. 
Paced by Mergo, Rascavage, and 
Shepherd, three high scorers, the 
Westminister quintet is feared by all 
the other loop members. They look 
on Western Maryland as the team 
to beat. To date the visitors have 
played but two games. The first 
was lost to Georgetown by a very 
close score, and the second game was 
with Catholic University. 

Coach Kibler realizes the strength 
of last years champs and is taking 
no chances. He will put his strong- 
est line up on the floor tonight, with 
high hopes that his charges will par- 
tially atone for the two defeats suf- 
fered at the hands of Western Mary- 
land last season, from all indica- 
tions the local mentor will start the 
same team that faced Upsala. The 
two freshmen, Salters and Wilmot, 
will cavort in the forward positions. 
Skipp will be in at center while Huff- 
man and Ward will hold down the 
guard posts. This lineup is not too 
certain however because it is possi- 
ble that Nicholson will start at guard. 
And no doubt Bilancioni, Horowitz, 
MacLain, Evans and Berry will see 
some action before the evening is 
over. 



DR. G. £. ZOOK NAMED 
CONVOCATION SPEAKER 



Was Recently Made Director 
Of Education Council 



The mid-winter Convocation at 
Washington College, which will be 
held on February 21, will be featur- 
ed by an address by Dr. George F. 
Zook, of Washington, D. C, who re- 
cently resigned as United States 
Commissioner of Education to be- 
come Director of the American Coun- 
cil on Education, according to an- 
nouncement made by President Gil- 
bert W. Mead. 

Dr. Zook is noted as a speaker on 
educational subjects and has been for 
years en acknowledged authority on 
matters pertaining to higher educa- 
tion in the United States. He was 
for some years Chief of the Division 
of Higher Education in the United 
States Bureau of Education previous 
to his election as President of the 
University of Akron, where he serv- 
ed from 1925 to 1933, leaving that 
position to become United States 
Commissioner of Education last year. 

The February Convocation of 
Washington College is traditionally 
held at a time coinciding with the 
celebration of Washington's Birth- 
day in commemoration of his Inti- 
mate connection and services in the 
founding of the College. 



The ELM extends the sympathy 
and condolences of the College to H. 
Gilbert Ingersoll, '35, in the death of 
his father yesterday morning. 



S. E. Shannahan Is Assembly 
Speaker January 17 

Samuel E. Shannahan, Chairman 

.>t the Maryland State Board of Aid 

and Charities, will address tin- wtck 
l> assembly on Thursday, January 
17, Mr. Shnnnahan's commit U-o is 
one of the most important in thr 
State, and governs the nniwuvs of »H 

state-aided institutions, as hospital! 
and colleges, 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, JAN. 12, 1935 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 17S2. 

William Oliver Baker - Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte, William McCullough 

Howard Clark 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, S1.50 a year. 
Single copy, 10 cents. 



SATURDAY, JAN. 12, 1935 

FOOD,— PERHAPS FOR 
THOUGHT 

"I sine the sofa. I, who lately sang 



cence, when students, most of all, re- 
mote as they are from the hard strife 
of a troubled world, should reaffirm 
their loyalty to the ideals of truth, 
and honor, uprightness and Christian 
devotion to things great and good. 
They are the things most stable and 
most lasting today, as ever, — these 
ideals. The man exalted by right- 
eousness need fear no material con- 
tingencies, for material needs will be 
met by the strong fabric of his "im- 
mortal soul." This selfsame devo- 
tion to ideals is no martyr's clock, to 
be worn by the few and venerated 
holy saints. It is a thing that every 
mortal can and ought to own. A pure 
nature has the beauty to its holder of 
a poetic vision springing from the 
soul, and the students of this fine, old 
College are challenged to prove their 
idealism in 1935, and if their faith in 
it is strong enough, they will, for 

crede quod habes, et habes. 



ALUMNI ENTERTAIN 
A letter from the president of the 
Baltimore Chapter of the Alumni As- 
sociation inviting students of Wash- 
ington College to a dance in Balti- 
more on the evening of January 26, 
appears in today's ELM. As an Alum- 
ni letter it contains several fine 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

Bj Frederick Taylor 



Greetings of the season folks, even 
though the ominous cloud of exams 
is hovering in the distance it's still 
possible to have a happy new year. 
Speaking of threatening clouds, one 
misguided student claims that a col- 
lege faculty reminds him of the sol- 
diers on the Marne — their cry is the 
same, "They shall not pass," is was 
\>n misguided Semester reports 
will tell. (Too much). 

Upon our return from the holidays 
we found the Elm mailbox just bulg- 
ing with pre-Xmas papers; since then 
the mail man has passed us by with- 
out so much as looking askance. 
Thinking it not necessary to list the 
rest of the seasons, we herewith 
guarantee every item to be at least 
three weeks old. Oh well, some peo- 
ple pay real money for antiques. 

Here's one that certainly improves 



Phrases, and expresses an admirable with age— according to an official 
loyalty and love of the graduates for announcement of Susquehanna Urn- 



"Truth, Hope, and 
tonched with awe, 

"The solemn chords, 
trembling hand, 



Charity, 
and. 



their Alma Mater. It is understood versify all members of the class of 
1 1SS4 are living and accounted for. 
(Speaks well for something or oth- 
— perhaps it's dated coffee}. 



BALTIMORE ALUMNI 

TO SPONSOR DANCE 



President Greenlee Offers Stu- 
dent Tickets At $1.00 



and that the Alumni desire to learn 

know the undergraduates more in-j 
with a timately than ever before. The ] eT 
I present students should realize and | 



"Escaped with pain from that ad- j appreciate this. The welding togeth- j At a recent dance at Massachusetts 

venturous flight, er of friendships through attendance j r n?t itute of Technology the girls paid 

-v 0w £ee k repose upon an humbler ^ at the same College, although the 
"theme; friends may be a generation apart, 

"The theme, though humble, yet is always a lasting bond. 

august and proud j The Baltimore Chapter has shown 

"The occasion — for the fair com- ■ its wish to form this bond by mak- 

Trand-; the =one " I i"g special provision for undergrad- j than ninetv cents 

manas tne -ong. i «s ±* ... *_,. j n. j ninety ^"w- 'lng, or buy vour tickets from a mem 

Thus wrote William Cower in his : uates who wish to attend the dance I (Unless thev have gold teeth "Lit- * ' the committee 

lovelv verse on the Sofa. He might on the twenty-sixth. It indeed be- : tle Mne Morgan" or "Knee-Hi Lynch" De Cordially" vours 

have" also well chosen the theme of hooves all students who can arrange i oug h t to get at least a nickle for go- 

potstoes. Beefsteak, too, properly the Balumore trip to join the BEAU ; ingf un d e r such a system) 

grilled and seasoned, should compel MONDE after the game on the even- 



Editor, WASHINGTON ELM: 

The annual meeting and party of 
the Baltimore Chapter of The Wash- 
ington College Alumni Association 
will be held in the Chesapeake Room 
of the Emerson Hotel on the evening 
of January 26 after the Washington- 
Loyola basketball game. 

The election of officers for the com- 
ing year is the chief item of business 
to be transacted. The party will be 
a dance-cabaret style. Al Mason 
will furnish the music. There will 
be no speeches. 

Arrangements for the party have 
been made by a committee of the 
younger alumni representatives of a 
large group of very interested Wash- 
ington graduates of the past ten years 
living in and around Baltimore. The 
date of January 26 has been chosen 
for the party because it will give us 
an opportunity to have as our guests 
the large number of Washington stu- 
dents and other alumni who will be 
in Baltimore for the Loyola game. 

Among the guests of honor to be 
invited are Dr. and Mrs. Meade, Dr. 
Jones, Coach Kibler and his assist- 
ants, and the basketball team. 

To show our interest and enthusi- 
asm for. Washington College and its j 
ever growing prestige, we should 
have a large attendance from the 
. i young crowd, and it behooves the 
admission according to their metallic , o]dei , alumni to give them our SU p por t | 
value. A mechanical robot accom | &t tMg annual meeting and nance . i 
plished the measurement of the me ^" , Tickets are $1.50 a couple. Make 
allic content of each young lady Innervations now with Preston P.: 
said that they all got in for lessjj Secre t a rv, 333 Munsey Build- 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



It was Owen to Peyser that he was 
Dunn out of Jean. Though the lady 
says its her Owen fault. Example of 
the inconstancy of feminine affec- 
tions. 

"Woman-Hater" Rogers of the 
Shaull-Rogers team has been seen in 
town with a very pretty blonde wait- 
ress. Better be careful Calvin. 

Joe McLain complains that he 
hasn't enough competition to make 
it worthwhile. Make it it interest- 
ing for Joe and take "On to Water 
Street" for a slogan. 

Flicker, University of Maryland 
may be far away but that's no excuse 
for taking it out on a freshman. She 
may be your big moment, Lee, but 
she'll break your heart. 

What member of the faculty spent 
three days of the Christmas vacation 
working math problems. 

The monkey cage in the library is 
a great improvement. The lovely 
librarians will now be safe from any 
advances. True some were made 
"safe" by nature, but the others that 
are built — that's another story and 
limited space due to Goldstein's ad- 
vertisements causes its omission from 
the column. 



* Graves Taylor, '29 
s Interviewed 



an even higher lyric flight than the ing of January 26, 
sedentary sofa. Yet it is on just| 
such things that the spectacular feats 
of the world are builded. Nelson 
had undoubtedly, despite his gouL. 
had a good meal before Trafalgar. J - j _ f 
and there is evidence that Leonardo ild 1 U I 
did not paint the ceiling of the Sis- 
tine Chapel on an empty stomach. I 
Thus should Mrs. Bricker realize, 
completely how important her posi-l 
tion'at Washington College may be- 1 
Doubtless she is aware of the aca- j 
demic vigour and capacity of a well- , 
fed student body. The student body, > 
from all reports, also appreciates 
this gastronomical justice apparent- 
ly rarely done it in the past. 

Little friendships and kindnesses 
are so important in stabilizing the 



W. Jones also. 

(We'll admit that there is some 

I similarity but every invitation that 

AnUOUncer Over WGAR WaS we ever saw to one of the Dean's 

monthly tea partys was signed J. S. 

W. J.) 



R. EARLE GREENLEE, 

President. 
p. s. — If you would like to play 
The "Indiana Statesman" claims bridge, notify the secretary before- 
to have one thing in common with hand and bring your own cards. 
Washington College, that is in thei Student tickets (blue) for the 
names of the deans. It seems that j dance will go on sale at the College 
the dean out there is named Dr. J. at ONE DOLLAR ($1.00) each, ad- 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 

Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



Outstanding Student 



From the Publicity Bureau of Sta- 
tion WGAR, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Graves Taylor smiled. 

"Have a drink, fella," he invited. 

"Sure thing," your correspondent 
replied, eager to accept. 

Graves Taylor reached for the low- 
er drawer in his desk and brought 



friendly eqoilibrium of a not very J<jrth a fcott]e ft was nQt a , arge 
rational society that they often ie- lbottli _ but there vas som ethmg a- 
^ ^il^i" ?, e r°^l n f;i»oat it, thought your correspondent. 



or failure at task. Mrs. Bricker 



"Hey, where's the chicken I order- 
ed an hour ago?" 

"It'll be along soon sir — she 
hasn't killed it yet but she's getting 
in some nasty blows." 



mitting one couple to the Chesapeake 
Room, Emerson Hotel, after the 
game. 

The committee in charge of the af- 
fair includes Preston P. Heck, '24 : 
chairman; Mrs. Louisa Bowen Mat 
thews, '31; Miss Ellen E. Flick, '34 
and W. Kennon Perrin, '31. 



LeCATES BROS. 
BARBER SHOP 

Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



that made it appear 



move. Every move made by Mr. 

Taylor was transcribed into your 

"airialto" reporters notebook. This 

different. It ' certainly beat all other methods of 



is, already a friend to the students at wag nQt ]ike tfce m Qther Qjies he interviewing. 
Washington College. Petty anta- , ^ sw ^ What more , it was empty, 
gonisms seem no part of her; evper- , ^ c(mtcnts had been drained . Was 
ieneed professional capability is °H tbat discourafrm|r . 
viously hers. "Already," say the^ „^ 
students, "the food tastes better." _ m ', 
and ei1 
How- 



Mrs- Pricker's task is large. 



Beats them all by 
long shot! 

Here are some interesting excerpts 
from your correspondent's notebook: 

Graves Taylor. born in 1907 on 
Smith's Island which is located 



Mr. Taylor, that bottle is 
I remarked. 
"1 was just kidding you, my friend. ] Chesapeake Bay about 20 miles from 
cannot be done m many ■ days. 1 How- ^ & ^^ ^.^ tQ my m I ainland _ y son of a mjnister 

ever her diners know that she has , u ti r coIIee tor of whis- 

their-s and the College we fare at nd ch ampagne bottlea .» 

heart, and express the wish that her ; had en)0tions col . 

days as part of the Washington Col- . ^ foj . a minute TeH me what 
lege personnel may be long and hap- " do you gather up besides bottiea 

"' m and emotions of unsuspecting pencil 

t pusher: 



A MATTER OF IDEALS 
Despite the sickness which marred 
the holiday for many, and the nsnal 
New Year's admonitions and exhor- 
tations which have become "popu- 
larized" until they are trite, the be- 
ginning of another year calls every- 
one to higher aims. Perhaps the have to see me after the program, 
ruminations of the Christmas time ; "But, Mr. Taylor, this is the only 
did not make all students feel like I chance thai I have had to gel 



attended Wesley Collegiate In- 
stitute at Dover, Delaware was 
graduated in 1925 . played 
baseball team. basketball quintet 

runner on the track squad 
entered Washington College at Ches^ 
tertown, Maryland . majored 



Duke University 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Four terms of eleven weeks are given 
each year. These may be taken con- 
secutively (graduation in three years) 
or three terms may be taken each 
year (graduation in four years). 
The entrance requirements are intel- 
ligence, character and at least two 
year* of college work, including the 
subjects specified for Grade A Med- 
ical Schools. Catalogues and applica- 
tion forms may be obtained from 
the Dean 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 



"Rare books and antique decant- h aw . a t college was a member of 



"Tell me more about it, Mr. Tay- 
lor," I asked, 

"Graves Taylor glanced at the 
clock on the wall. "I'm due on the 
ah- in a few moments, Dan. You'll 



Dante after he drank from the foun- 
tain of the Lethe and Eunoe: 
"1 returned 

"From the most holy wave, regener- 
ate, 
"E'en an new plants renew'd with 

foliage new, 
"Pure and made apt for mounting to 
the start.' 



touch with you personally." I pro- 
tested. 

"Follow me," directed Mr. Taylor 
as he led me to the control room. 

"Now what," I ventured to ask, 
still wondering what he had in mind. 

"We'll talk sign language through 
the control room window," explained 



Mr. Taylor hurriedly. So that was 

as the Poet fcublimely expr esses It in ' his plan. Great, I thought. 

the Divine Comedy. I took out my notebook and began 

Still, thm itiurt be fresh aspira-| watching through the control room 

tions and renewed ideal* in every hu- ' window. Craves Taylor smiled. That 

man breast. N'ow can the insuffici-' was the signal to begin. Hi:-, fingers I and a ) ia if years hatt been with 

eneies and slights and faulu; rcien- . moved in the most grotesque manner. WGAR since. always smiling 
failure* and errmgi of mankind bl espondent followed each an j always glad to extend a helping 

laid behind. It is a time of renas-I (Continued In Next Column) hand a real man indeed. 



the football team baseball team 

on the track squad . first 
President of the Phi Sigma Phi Fra- 
ternity played in the college or- 
chestra . . .editor of the Pegasus, 
college annual also editor of his 

prep school paper, the Collegian .... 
at college he wrote for the Washing- 
tonian has written stories for 

College Humor, Radio Art, Radio 
Stars, and Broadcasting at pres- 

ent announcer and public relations 
director of WGAR has a hobby 

of collecting whiskey bottles col- 
tectfon dates back to 1870 has 

first piece of glaws blown in America 
in his collection . he now has more 
than 200 bottles has written 

stories for the Baltimore Sun and 
also the Wilmington Evening News 
Prior to his coming to WGAR he 
was publicity man for RICO for one 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 

C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sertment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



'The Bank Where 
You Feel At Home" 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



SATURDAY, JAN. 12, 1935 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



INTRA ■ MURALS 

Coach Ekaitis has been pushing the 
intra-mural games through at a rapid 
rate. It is possible to play four or 
five games a day now that the Var- 
sity uses the armory. There is a 
great deal of interest shown in these 
games as can be judged from the at- 
tendance. But the calibre of play- 
ing is far below that of recent years. 
In the Fraternity-Dormitory League 
the Phi Sigma Tau team is leading 
the rest. But this lead has been ac- 
quired by virtue of some very lucky 
breaks. They will have to improve 
if they want to win the Intramural 
Cup again this year for the A. K. and 
Middle Hall teams are really crowd- 
ing them. 

The brand of basketball shown in 
the Class League is funny, but outside 
of that it is terrible. The Juniors 
are leading the circuit, but this is not 
due to the fact that Juniors are good, 
but it can be accounted for by the 
fact that the other teams are a ilttle 
worse. 

Reinhart of the A. K., Kight and 
Watson of the Taus, Tignor of the 
Juniors and Goldstein of Middle Hall 
are the stars for their respective 
teams. 

The standing: 
Frat. and Dorm. 

W. 

P. S. T ( 

A. K c 

Middle Hall i 

P. S. P J 

East Hall 5 

West Hall : 



SKIPPING DVE \ HE SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



By tonight, followers of Washing- 
ton College will have a very gooj 
idea as to how the latest edition of 
the Flying Pentagon will finish in the 
Maryland Intercollegiate League. A 
double victory over Hopkins and Wes- 
tern Maryland will send our boys to 
the top of the league. And, let me 
tell you once at the top our boys 
would be hard to dislodge from the 
lead. It is my opinion that a twin vic- 
tory would be just the incentive the 
team needs to carry them to the lea- 
gue championship. 

In the past two years, the Sho' 
quintet was eliminated in its first two 
or three contests. It was the custom 
to start the League season with Hop- 
kins one night and Mt. St. Mary's 
the next night. Both of these games 
were away, and as a result our boys 
did not show up as well as they were 
capable of doing. Consequently 
these early defeats broke down the 
morale of the team. They lost con- 
fidence in themselves and thereafter 
played mediocre ball. With the re- 
sult that we finished near the cel- 
lar each time. 

This year we again started off our 
league season with Hopkins, but our 
second game is at home with Wes- 
tern Maryland. I think this a break 
because I have every respect for the 



I Mount five. They always put out a 
good team, and on their own small 
floor they are very hard to beat, es- 
j pecially by a team that has not hit 
its stride as yet. Now don't for a 
1 minute think that Western Maryland 
j is easy. As a matter of fact they 
I have a better team than the Mounts. 
But a jinx is a jinx, and that is what 
Mt. St. Mary's has been to us in early 
season games. 

But it is as I said before, two vic- 
tories right off the bat, and we will 
be in an excellent position to come 
out on top. As it appears now there 
isn't any one team in the circuit that 
appears head and shoulders over the 
others. But then even at this early 
date it is not too difficult to say that 
Loyola and Western Maryland both 
have classy teams. St. John's is prob- 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



ably not as strong as last year but 
nevertheless will be a strong con- 
tender for the title. Hopkins and 
the Mounts do not appear to be as 
strong as in previous years. 

Glad to hear Hopkins, a darn good 
athlete and a good sport, is back at 

Mt. St. Mary's N. Y. U. has the 

best team in the N. Y. district and 
one of the best in the country. . . . 
Indiana has a six-foot-nine center 
.... Navy seems to be headed for a- 
nother banner basket ball season 
. . . Still think we should have play- 
ed in the Orange Bowl game with 
Miami . . Yes sir, just in their class 
and undefeated too ...There isn't 
any justice or else it is evenly di- 

vided . . Thanks to Prof. Coop an J 
Bob Shaull we have a new electric 
board for the score and number of 
minutes to play. . . See you all at 
the game tonight. 



^rlfmiots Jieer 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chestertown, Md. 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watton, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 



Class League 



Juniors 
Soph . . 
Fiosh 
Senior . 



W. 
5 
3 
2 




Pt. 
714 
600 
500 
000 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 305 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



Bennetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



L C 


Treherno W. G. Smyth 


TREHERNE ASSOCIATES 




REALTY 


Salt 


Water Homes, Colonial 


E 


tatcs. Inland Farms and 




Ducking Shores 




CHESTERTOWN. MD. 





After 


An Evening of 


Hard 


Study 


Refresh Yourself 


at the 


CAFETERIA CANTEEN 


Alt Ki 


rids of Sandwiche 


j, Can- 


dies 


, Tobaccos, Milk 
Ice Cream 


and 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



PHILLIP* 

Q Eiicious~ 



'/'-CONDENSED . V 

celiryI 
isoupr 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



Men's and Ladies' 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 


Next to 


Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



H O L D E N ' S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 



AND BILLIARD PARLOR 



Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And All Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 
331 High St. 

High Quality Accessories 
At Low Prices 

Goodrich Tire&t Tubes and 
Batteries 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety First 

F. G. Usilton, Pres. 

L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 
A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:16 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



New Eugene De Luxe 
PERMANENTS 

With Croquinolo Ends 
$5.00 

Shampoo. Hoi Oil 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 

Thursday $1.00 

For December 
CRAY BEAUTY SALON 




PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, JAN. 12, 1935 



DOIN'S 



The Christmas vacation, according 
to numerous students, was a rare old 
time. One round of parlies after 
another. Trips here and there, re- 
newing old acquaintances and having 
a good time in general. It is impos- 
sible to relate the various activities 
which were enjoyed. However, 
judging from the new clothes, new 
ties, pins, jewelry and the like, Santa 
must have never heard of She depres- 
sion. And it is hard to got into that 
studious atmosphere. Not that we 
were ever very familiar with it, 

We are very glad to see Dr. Car- 
penter back again, following a pro- 
longed seige of illness. Miss Brad- 
ley is ;ilso back on duty with her 
i lassi and "girls." La Grippe caught 
up with that lady during her vaca- 
tion and sent her to bed for several 
days. Dr. Livingood and Mr. Coop 
fought off these vicious germs for 
Nome time, but it was a losing race. 
However, these gentlemen are again 
back on their feet. 

Several of the students were late 
in returning due to the same epidem- 
ic, but at present, only Velma Carter 
is feeling real effects. We are glad 
that Betty Dill has recovered from 
her appendix operation and is with 
us once again, "Hi, Betty!" 



Mid-Year Examination Schedule For 1935 



MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 1935 
1:15 P. M. — 2:15 P. M. 

Music 3 Auditorium 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1935 

jl us i c i Auditorium 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 
9 A. M. — 12 M. 

Chemistry 7 
Education S ........ . 

French 1 . 

German 1 

Government 26 

Sociology 33 

Spanish 1 

1:30 P. M. — 4:30 P. 
Economics 3 

English 3 (Prof. Bradley) 
English 3 (Prof. Tolles) 
English 9 
English 13 

Government 29 

Mathematics 3 

Physics 3 



23, 1935 

Room 26 
Room 35 
Room 10 
Room 21 
Room 11 
Room 20 
Room 25 
M. 

Room 20 
Room 25 
Room 21 
Room 24 
Room 21 
Room 1 1 
Room 26 
Room 22 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1935 
9 A. M. — 12 M. 



Biology 3 
English 11a 
French 5 
German 7 
Latin 



Room 26 

Room 11 

Room 35 

Room 10 

Room 24 



Mathematics 1 (Dr. Jones) Room 25 
Moth. 1 (Dr. Robinson) Room 21 
Physics 9 Room 22 



1:30 P. M. 4:30 P. M. 

Biology A Rooms 25 and 26 

Economics 1 . - Rooms 20 and 21 

Education 25 Room 24 

History 17 Room 11 

Psychology 8 .... . Room 22 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1935 
9 A. M. — 12 M. 

Chemistry 11 Room 22 

English 5 . Room 26 

History 1 Rooms 21 and 25 

History 3 Room 35 

1:30 P. M. — 4:30 P. M. 

Economics 13 Room 20 

History of Art 1 Room 11 

Latin A Room 24 

Mathematics 5 Room 25 

Mathematics 9 Room 26 

Unified Mathematics . . Room 21 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26. 1935 
9 A. M. — 12 M. 

Biology 9 - Room 22 

Chemistry 5 Room 20 

English 1 (Dr.Mngalls) Room 35 
English 1 (Prof. Bradley) Room 25 
English 1 (Prof. Tolles) Room 21 
Sociology 31 Room 26 

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 1935 
9 A. M.— 12 M. 

Economics 9 Room 20 

French 3 Room 21 

French 9 Room 10 

History 7 Room 25 



Mathematics 7 Room 26 

1:30 P. M. 4:30 P. M. 

Chemistry 1 Room 21 

Chemistry 9 Room 35 

German 3 Room 10 

Spanish 3 Room 25 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1935 
9 A. M. — 12 M. 

Biology 1 Room 35 

College Problems Rooms 21 and 25 

Education 1 Room 26 

English 23 Room 24 

Mathematics 11 - Room 22 

Physics 1 Room 10 

Sociology 21 . Room 20 

1:30 P. M. 4:30 P. M. 

Government 21 . Rooms 21 and 25 



Report all conflicts to the Regis- 
trar. 

No changes in this schedule will be 
permitted without the consent of the 
Registrar. 

January 12, 1935. 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 
GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

Phone 109 or 818F4 

332 High St. 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 




f Land oakesf 

I do believe 
Til try 



— met/ a// &eeft saying., they're milder 

—anc//AearfAemsay. . they taste BETTER 



) IMS. liccm & Myeks Tobacco Co, 



Here's lo Bigger and Better 
Indices 



Ine 




Kim 



The ELM not to appear 
next week 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 15. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD, SATURDAY, JAN. 19, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



Washington Quint 
Meets Mt. St. Marys 



Game Important In Determin- 
ing League Lead 

Washington College, leaders of 
the Maryland Intercollegiate Basket- 
ball League, will defend its position 
tonight against a strong invading 
Mount St. Mary's team in the Ches- 
tertown Armory, 

The Mount has won but one game 
this season, but this has been due to 
unfoitunace breaks. Tonight thj 
EmmithDurg team will be at full 
strength for the second time this win- 
ter did they will pivbauly use the 
same lineup that elipl ^ vne highly 
touted Loyola team a few nights ago. 

In Sagadelli the visitors have one 
of the strut's high scorers. Two of 
his teammates, Hopkins and Lynch 
have been F.ldr performers in prev- 
ious games but have been handicap- 
ped so fai by injuries due to foot- 
ball and automobile accidents. Both 
of these men played against Loyola 
and turned in a creditable perform- 
ance. 

Coach Kibler anticipates a hard 
battle and has drilled his squad ac- 
cordingly but the team is confident 
that they will trip the Malloy-coach- 
ed Mountaineers. 

The lineup: 
Mt. St. Mary's Washington 

Sagadelli ... F Salter 

Leahy F Wilmot 

Hopkins C Skipp 

Lynch G Huffman 

Neilly G Ward 



HOMER'S WORKS SUBJECT 
OF TALK BY DR. INGALLS 



Misses Smith And Williams Al- 
so Take Part In Program 

by Donald McDorman 

Friday night, at 8 o'clock, the Clas- 
cal Society held a special meeting in 
the Reid Hall Library. The commit- 
tee had an instructive and entertain- 
ing program prepared, with Dr. In- 
galls, Miss Betty Smith, and Miss 
Addie Williams as guests. 

After a short business discussion, 
Dr. Ingalls presented a talk on the 
Greek Classicist, Homer. She gave 
a brief survey of Homer's works, with 
special emphasis on his Iliad and 
Odyssey. She discussed his style and 
purpose, the value of his work to 
Greek religion and culture, and the 
influence and effect of Homer on both 
Greek and Latin, and modern writers. 

Miss Smith played several delight- 
ful selections on the violin, accom- 
panied by Miss Williams, who also 
played a piano solo. Refreshments 
were served, and plans for future 
activities of the Society were dis- 
cussed. No date has been set for 
the next meeting, it will probabiy 
take place soon after the examina- 
tions. 



Wi Sigma Phi Entertained By 
Faculty Members And Wives 

The Phi Sigma Phi fraternity was 
cordially and delightfully entertain- 
ed last evening at cards, by Dr. and 
Mrs. William Rabon Howell, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Goodwin. Dr. 
Howell and Mr. Goodwin are faculty 
members of the fraternity. The 
party was held at the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. Howell. 



GROUP HEARS CHAMBERS 
ON LEAGUE OF NATIONS 



DIRECTS TEAM TONIGHT 



Advocates Entry Of United 
States Into League 



The League of Nations was the 
subject of a talk by Richard Cham- 
bers at the last meeting of the Inter- 
national Society held Tuesday, Jan- 
uary 15. 

Chambers, in explaining the Lea- 
gue and its functions, emphasized the 
fact that the world is in nearly the 
same condition that it das in 
1914. He stated that, contrary to 
popular belief, the League can do 
nothing that its members do not want 
done. 

He expressed his opinion that, 
"The United States would gain se- 
curity from war by entering the Lea- 
gue. It is silly to say the United 
States is not concerned with events 
in Europe. We were drawn into the 
World War because of our interests. 
Our interests are greater now than 
before." 

It was announced that the society 
has received a number of books from 
the Carnegie Endowment for Inter- 
national Peace. These books will be 
placed on a special shelf in the libr- 
ary. 




Coach Kibler 

Coach Thomas Kibler is the men- 
tor responsible for the Maroon and 
Black team heading the Maryland 
Intercollegiate Basketball League. 



CAMPAIGN FOR STACK PRIVILEGES BEGUN WITH 
CONSENSUS OF STUDENT AND FACULTY OPINION 



by Jay Spry 

Can a vigorous campaign for stack 
privileges be conducted in Washing- 
ton College? Student opinion is 
united in favor of this innovation, 
and the faculty as a whole agrees 
with the students, though tempering 
its remarks on the question with a 
conservatism bom of a knowledge of 
recent book losses. Several profes- 
sors say frankly that, in theory, open 
stacks are the only kind worthwhile, 
but that for Washington College, un- 
der the present conditions, they are 
not practical. Other faculty mem- 
bers demonstrate that the library 
force is insufficient to keep the books 
in order if there were open stacks, 
or even LIMITED stack privileges. 
Books misplaced in the stacks, these 
professors explain, are of as little use 
as books lost or stolen. 

The administration, however, 
strongly favors open stacks, though 
it realizes the factors which exist to 
prevent them. Student leaders al- 
most all favor the plan. Some of 
them, like some members of the fac- 
ulty, believe that prevailing condi- 
tions do not admit open stacks, but 
even these believe that consciousness 
of student responsibility should be 
developed which would make the pro- 
ject feasible in the near future. 

Dr. Davis, head of the Modern 
Language Department, thinks that 
stack privileges should be granted on- 
ly to seniors recommended by their 
major instructors. Mr. Richard 
Chambers rather aptly pointed out 
that if a student does not learn more 
about the library before his senior 
year than it is possible to learn now 
it is unlikely that he would show 
much interest then. Chambers be- 
lieves, as do several others, that the 
new arrangement in the library would 
lend itself readily to a system of op- 
en stack?. Men or women could eas- 
ily be checked by the assistant librar- 
ians as they entered the stacks and 
as they left them, the only defect in 
this plan is that books could easily 
be misplaced IN THE STACKS. It 
is necessary to create a sense of re- 
sponsibility, which would make bor- 
rowers replace books carefully. 

Wesley Sadler, President of Wash- 
ington College Student Government, 
says. "It is a fine plan, a good thing, 
if it can be worked out, and it should 
be." 

John Lord, Alpha Kappa and Sil- 
ver Pentagon president takes more 
definite stand: "Library books should 
be for the good of the students," 



says Lord, "and to that end the stu- 
dents should be allowed to use them, 
It is the library's business to prevent 
loss." 

Professor Goodwin repeats Mr. 
Lord's argument more forcibly: "One 
book being SEEN and read and ap- 
preciated is worth a library lying idle 
in the stacks." Professor Goodwin 
thinks that the loss of books, if it 
could be reduced to a minimum 
would be more than compensated for 
by the good that open stacks would 
do. 

Professor Ford maintains that the 
library must expect some slight loss 
of books, but that the number lost 
must be reduced substantially. Nev- 
ertheless he is in favor of regulated 
privileges. He feels _ that student 
opinion should be aroused to mak» 
the danger of losing books negligible. 
This would make any plan advanced 
not only practicable but advisable. 
Professor Ford also feeis that the 
students are not entirely responsible 
for the large number of books gone. 

Professor Dumschott, a former 
President of the Student Government 
Association at Washington College, 
r.nd present assistant professor of 
history and government favors the 
THEORY of open stacks, but says 
that "as long as Washington. College 
students have no more regard for the 
value of books or respect for library 
rules, they should not have and do 
not deserve stack privileges." He al- 
so fears that books would be misplac- 
ed. 

Dr. Ingalls believes that stack priv- 
ileges should be limited to upper 
classmen and that those having priv- 
ileges should be closely supervised. 
Eventually, advanced students might 
work alone. A few planned English 
courses will need some system of op- 
en stacks if they are to succeed, she 
finished. 

The general consensus of opinion 
is that open stacks have two definite 
advantages. First, they make it pos- 
sible to hunt for references and in- 
formation which may not be cata- 
logued definitely. Second, open 
stacks would encourage a wide 
browsing among books. It would de- 
velop the real appreciation of books 
that comes from knowing them in- 
timately, and without which no one is 
well-educated. For these two pur- 
poses a library like the one at Reid 
Hall is infinitely to be preferred to 
the College library, with its system 
of closed stacks. 



PEACE CONFERENCE 
PLANNED FOR MARCH 7, 8 



Y. M. C. A. To Sponsor Discus- 
sion Led By Notables 



The Washington College Peace 
Conference will be held March 7 and 
8 according to plans now being drawn 
up by the YMCA. 

Dr. A. C. Goddard, Pastor of Mc- 
Cabe Memorial M. E. Church, of Wil- 
mington; Dr. J. H. Bishop, Director 
of Religious Education of the Wil- 
mington M. E. Church, of Dover; and 
Professor Frank Goodwin will be the 
discussion leaders, Dr. Goddard will 
be remembered as a recent assem- 
bly speaker and Dr. Bishop as the 
leader of the YMCA Peace Confer- 
ence last spring. They will prob- 
ably make a few brief remarks in the 
assembly before the opening of the 
Conference. 

The "Y" considers this project the 
most important that it has sponsored. 
The subject of World Peace has been 
brought to the attention of every one 
by recent developments in Europe, by 
the announcement that Japan intends 
to renounce the Washington Naval 
Treaty in the next few days, and by 
facts brought to light by the commit- 
tee of the United States Senate that 
is investigating munition makers. 
These unsettled conditions make 
World Peace a subject for much 
thought and consideration. 

This Conference has been consid- 
ered so important and the amount of 
work to be done so great that a 
Steering Committee composed of 
Wesley Sadler, Chairman; William 
Doering, Arthur Greims, Larry Wil 
Hams, Marvin Smith, Secretary; and 
Richard Chambers has been appoint- 
ed to formulate plans for the Confer- 
ence and to submit the plans to the 
society. It will have general super 
vision over all other committees ap- 
pointed in connection with the af- 
fair. 



HILL BILLIES PRESENT 
MT. VERNON PROGRAM 



Mountain Music Features Var- 
ied Program 



"Good ol' mountain music", and 
barn dancing featured the Thursday 
evening program of the Mt. Vernon 
Literary Society in the auditorium, 
of William Smith Hall. The even- 
ing's entertainment, which was "to 
get the members in good humor for 
exams," was offered by William 
"Zeke" Doering and his Hill Billies. 

The program was opened with a 
group interpretation of "She'll Be 
Coming 'Round The Mountain." Oth- 
er features of the program included 
Bill Doering's parody of "I Like 
Mountain Music," barn dancing, tap 
dancing by Paul Biggs, and "Wreck 
Of The Old '97," with Simmons do- 
ing the vocal. Vincent Brandolini 
also gave several selections on the 
piano. Members of the Hill Billy 
Band were William Doering, Wood- 
row Simmons, Frank Jarre!!, Harold 
Kosowsky, Jack Dunn, Paul Biggs, 
Earl Wagner, John Panowicz, and 
Don McDorman. 



Professors Return To Duties 
After Periods Of Illness 



Dr. Carpenter Spent Several 
Weeks In Hospital 



Doctor Kathleen Carpenter, who 
has been away from the campus for 
several weeks, part of which time was 
spent in the hospital, returned Sat- 
urday of last week to take up her 
duties as professor of biology. Mi. 
Jesse Coop who has been ill for 
several days, has returned to resume 
his duties teaching physics and math- 
ematics. 



Samuel Shannahan 
Talks To Assembly 

Roads To Success Subject Of 
Visitor's Address 

Samuel E. Shannahan, Chairman 
of the Maryland State Board of Aid 
and Charities, and also a member of 
the Bou.'d of Visitors and Governors 
at Washington College, addressed the 
weekly assembly on Thursday, Janu- 
ary 17. 

Mr. Shannahan began his address 
with a quotation from Dana's "Two 
\ears Before The Mast." 

He then stated the theme of his 
address, which was "The Roads to 
Success." 

Some of the most outstanding of 
these were the following: first, read- 
ing, because one may learn much of 
the past through contacts with 
books; secondly, nature; third, suffer- 
ing and trouble, important because 
they make our spirits stronger; four- 
th, religion; fifth, friendship, which 
goes far into the road-ways of life; 
and sixth, disappointments. 

Mr. Shannahan said that "in fol- 
lowing these 'roads,' one must be 
brave and put forth real effort, for 
the reward is great; these roads to 
success may be confusing, but they 
will not be hard to follow if one pur- 
pose — success — be kept in mind." 



GRADING SYSTEM 
EXPLAINED FOR FROSH 



Method Of Determining 3.00 
Indices Noted 



by Allen Brougham 

The system of numerical grading 
used at Washington College in com- 
puting student grade averages has 
been a source of much bewilderment 
to the incoming freshmen. 

However, the mathematical prin- 
ciple involved is fairly simple, and 
when the average has been found it 
gives the student and the administra- 
tion a much better idea of the stu- 
dent's standing than does the con- 
ventional grading system of the high 
schools. 

For the sake of clarity, let us take 
a3 an example young Willie Green, 
who has struggled manfully through 
the semester and has been allowed to 
take all of his examinations. After a 
rather breathless, not to say prayer- 
ful, interval of time, he has received 
a letter from home enclosing his re- 
port card and a few pointed remarks 
concerning late hours and studying. 
Below we see the marks that greet 
his anxious gaze: 

Recitation Exam Average 
History 1 C C C 

U. Math D C D 

College Prob. B C B 

French D C D 

Biology IB B B 

English IB C B 

Young Willie's hours total 1G a 
week, and upon the basis of this evi- 
dence, he begins to figure out his in- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



William Smith Hall Burned 
Nineteen Years Ago 



by Robert White 

January 16 marked the nineteenth 
anniversary of the burning of the 
original William Smith Hall, a build- 
ing very similar to the present one. , 
It is unusual and interesting that on 
that night nineteen years ago there 
was also a snow such as fell Wednes- 
day night. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, JAN. 19, 1935 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown. Md., 17S2. 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel ...... Asst Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum . Asst Bus. Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Philip Skipp. Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte. William McCullough 

Howard Clark 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, Si. 50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

SATURDAY, JAN. 19, 1935 

ALGEBRA ALL DAY 

President William M. Lewis, of} 
Lafayette College, suggested a plan a 
few weeks ago which may result in j 
radical changes in the American sys- 
tem of recitations in colleges. lie 
proposes that a whole day per week be 
given to each subject of the student's 
course. Dr. Lewis adequately ex- , 
plained the proposal when he first, 
presented it to his own faculty: 

"The purpose is to get beneath the 
superficiality of the present college j 
system. This business of the geology 
professors being forced daily to i 
knock the French or history out of J 
the student's mind before he can be- 
gin on his own subject must come to 
an end. 

"There has been mnch criticism of 
the average American college man 
because of his superficiality. It isn't 
the fault of the boy. Ifs the fault 
of the system. We are living in an 
age of superficiality in college af- 
fairs." 

In Dr. Lewis* plan, only one hour 
■would be given to class or lecture 
work, and the remainder of the day : 
to laboratory or library work. 

Hot successful the system might j 
be, only time and trial can tell. Still, t 
at Washington College, as at every j 
American college, Dr. Lewis* remarks \ 
or. the superficiality of the system are 
pertinent and worthwhile. Without 
Qualification they would seem to be 
true. 

In certain English schools, but one 
or two snbjects are taught in a half, 
and the same subjects are not taught 
over the successive years. Such a 
plan seems to produce an admirable 
:" academic thoroughness. 



Council will operate as effectively as 
ever. But it is really a pity and a 
shame that the Council has to in- 
crease its vigilance when critical ex- 
amination occur. Cheating and crib- 
bing are personal crimes, like drunk- 
enness. They injure the individual 
and break down his morale. But 
they land him in no material gain. 
The cheater blasphemes his moral 
sensibilities and cribs on a paper. 
And what is that? Why this, he an- 
swers, the instructor marks the pap- 
er, and records a grade. Quite so, 
what's that? The grade goes into 
the Registrar's office where it meets 
a lot of other grades by agency of a 
mathematical formula whose solu- 
tion is the semester grade of the in- 
dividual considered. What next? 
The student may, in the course of 
time and crime, be graduated from 
the institution where he learned to 
work at theft of another's informa- 
tion. He seeks employment, and his 
mavfis, dicing superficial, ar.d there- 
fore the most convenient signs of his 
ability available (even though all 
marks are travesties of truth), land 
him a job. The job, he finds, re- 
quires, as jobs are, strangely enough, 
coming more and more to do, know- 
ledge. He nas gotten thiough col- 
lege on his cheating, and hasn't both- 
ered to acquire a bit of knowledge 
from time to lime. Inevitably he 
"can't deliver the goods," and thus 
loses his position. Thus ends the sad 
story of the bright man who wouldn't 
eat his oatmeal at home, or be hon- 
est- at college. It has, like ail such 
taies, a moral. The obvious moral is 
not, kind reader, Don't Cheat. That 
is too obvious to need a story to point 
it out. The real moral of the thing 
is dial the cheater, who fancies him- 
self so clever, is getting the worst end 
of a very bad bargain with, shall 
one say to be very positive, the 
Devil. The potential cheater will do 
well to examine Hamlet's observa- 
tion: 
"Th^re a:e move things in heaven 

and earth. Horatio, 
"Then are dreamt of in your philoso- 
phy." 




I INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



AN ESCAPADE 
Abont 4.1 percent of the student] 
body of Washington College are i 
home meditating (a.) upon their sins, t 
(b.) upon the injustice of the world, i 
January, with its wintry blasts, and 
od ice, is a pleasant month for ! 
meditation, especially before an open . 
fire. 

Mat in recent years has there been I 
such an opportunity for the spout- ! 
ides. Such things as, 
"Eales once made must be kept," and j 
"The innocent must suffer with the ' 
and "Wine is a mocker, and j 
strong drink is raging" spring biitbly 
to the knowing lips. 

The mainspring of action at any 

college is obviously the Faculty and 

ation, and this was one 

□ where the mainspring ticked 

with rapid and, it is whispered, not 

Tery happy, results. 



STACK PRIVILEGES 

A survey of some casual and en- 
tirely unofficial opinions concerning 
the possibility of stack privileges for 
a restricted number of students, in 
the general College Library appears 
in the ELM today. 

The article is intended primarily 
to show the feeling on this matter by 
both faculty and students, and to pre- 
sent a considerable argument for the 
serious purposes to which the privil- 
ege would be put. There is an ap- 
palling lack of real feeling for a 
library and its beautiful contents — 
bookj. among the students at Wash- 
ington College. Perhaps this lack of 
appreciation and reverence for a 
house of art whose masterpeiw are 
fine books, is a cause, in part, of the 
persistent difficulties with discipline 
which unfortunately require so much 
of the library administration's atten- 
tion. It is possible that a feeling of 
intimacy with hooks could be built 
up by discreet development of the 
stack-oiivilege system which w^uld 
instill a feeling of responsibility in 
the student for the welfare of his 
friends, the books. The opportunity j 
for creating such an attitude should 
not be overlooked. It is evident by 
the deplorable behaviour in the lib- 
rary of a large portion of the student 
body that the privilege cannot at 
once be extended to all. But neither 
can investigation of the matter be 
readily discontinued. 



To head the column we have a very 
appropriate item, — the "Temple 
News" has been running a song writ- 
ers contest based on the recent hit 
"You're The Top." We admit that 
the version that they published 
wasn't bad — all about "You're a 
champagne bubble, and you're Jean 
Harlow's double" et al, but here's 
one of local interest that was brought 
to our attention by its author — she 
was too modest to sign it so we give 
her our thanks publicly and she can 
receive 'em privately (from the pap- 
er naturally.) 

You're the top 

You're a Coach Ekaitis 

You're the top, 

Like a perfect night is, 

You're the Chester Bridge 

On a Sunday afternoon. 

You're a Nicholson run, 

The games we've won, 

A Gershwin tune. 

You're the Gill's, 

You're the best of your sex. 

You're the thrills, 

Of a three point index. 

I'm a fumbled ball, 

A heel that's all — a flop 

But if — baby, — I'm the bottom 

You're the top. 



DISHONESTY AND AESOP'S 

FABLES 
An article by the President of the 
mment Association at 
■-■-..■ rj&ars in today's ELM. 
naturally, the Honor 
SytUm, and the approaching exami- 
nations. The Council has been hon- 
estly stem with cheaterx t>. 
and baa taught, it i« hoped, first of- 
fender* a lemon, and old offenders 
the aselesmess of their d 
The Council this year, under th<; lead- 
ership of Mr. Sadler, 
more efficiently than ever recorded 

Of 
teat come* at the time i 
There is no question that then the 



WHY PROFESSORS GET GRAY 
These are some of the reasons: 
The bluffer. The boy with the 
loud voice and empty head. The fel- 
low who took the course before 
The sweet littie co-ed who doesn't 
know what it's all about, but who 
at least a B in the course. The 
ilent bird who might have something 
worth while to say but who keeps this 
something hidden. The collegian 
who hasn't read that far in the text 
z.:.u all^iapta to «tage a filibuster and 
the track. The 
deadly serious young radical who 
knows only tnat he's radical. The 
equally serious young conservative 
who believes only what his grand* 
Eatbez believed. And the bo oho 
is taking ih<; coune just for the cred- 
it. The sleepers don't count 
they sno/e. Ohio Stat* Lantern. 



The University of Maryland has 
been having the same sort of trouble 
with their dining hall as we "used" to 
have. The "Diamondback" carried 
on a bitter attack of the system but 
according to Herb Allison, the editor 
was effectively curtailed; he says, — 

'As a punishment for his recent 
editorial bombardment of the dining 
hall. Marshal] Mathias was sentenced 
to eat in the renowned refectory for 
<}X days by tiie Administration — 
which is what we call gagging the 
press." 



SADLER GIVES REVIEW 
OF SEMESTER'S WORK 



Asks Students To Cooperate 
With Council In Exams 



by Wesley Sadler 

Ad the Student Council reaches the 
half-way mark in its 1934-35 year it 
wishes to thank the student body for 
the cooperation it has shown. It is a 
known fact that the students are be- 
coming more and more honor con- 
scious and with this development we 
find it easier and more encouraging 
to do our best to uphold and perpetu- 
ate the principles laid down in the 
constitution of our otudent Govern- 
ment Association. The spirit of 
concurrence of the students with the 
Student Council has helped streng- 
then the position of student govern- 
ment on the Hill. 

Soon we will be in the throes of ex- 
aminations. With their coming we 
look to the students for a continua- 
tion of the fine support they have 
shown so far. And we of the Stu- 
dent Council feel that the students 
look to us to forward their interests 
to the utmost by upholding the hon- 
or system of Washington College. 

We pledge our support anew to 
this as we finish the first half of our 
college year and enter the second. 



Duke University 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM, N. C. 
i Four terms of eleven week* are given 
j each year. These may be taken con- 
| secutively (graduation in three year*) 
or three terms may be taken each 
year (graduation in four years). 
The entrance requirements are intel- 
ligence, character and at least two 
years of college work, including the 
subjects specified for Grade A Med- 
ical Schools. Catalogues and applica- 
tion forms may be obtained from 
the Dean 



The following incident happened at 
the U. of Minnesota so perhaps the 
■•.bove prof had grounds for his state- 
ment. 

It happened that one day Professor 
Linn couldn't meet his classes, so he 
wrote on the blackboard, "Professor 
Linn will be unable to meet his class- 
es today." One of the brighter un- 
dergraduates calmly walked up and 
erased the "C" in classes. The old 
'•r turned, after noticing the 
gal) of laughter, sneered at the of- 
fending student and, with equal 
eclat, erased the "L" in Jawes and 
strode from the room. 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



Cabbages to the local enchantress 
who turned informer and caused the 
suspension of twelve students as the 
result of a thoughtless escapade. 
Girls who would make men by brag- 
ging about their daring adventures 
can learn something from this serious 
experience. The true story would 
be very drab compared to her colored 
narrative, but sometimes truth makes 
poor conversation. 

"Sour Pan" Salters, exponent of 
the cafeteria slouch, is very conde- 
cending to three coeds that some- 
times share their table with him. 

Ask Bill Hall how to impress a 
girl. The Hall System begins with 
taking the lady to church. The col- 
lection plate presents a problem; but 
by skillful manipulation Bill can de- 
posit a copper and make it look like 
he parts with a nickel. It isn't oniy 
the facial expression that fools "em. 

The famous Washington trio that 
is never seen together: Tignor, An- 
dersen, and the fair Lucille. Ho- 
bart should maice her rearrange her 
schedule and divide her time more 
evenly. Andy has been getting the 
breaks. 

Brandolini is a lover of art. His 
gallery of fine pictures ranks second 
to none. The first work tnat catches 
the eye is an enlarged snapshot of 
"Vin;iie and Fern." To the right are 
a group of pictures of Fern and to 
the left are more pictures — of Fern. 
Brandoiini is a lover. 

What lass values her stock too 
high for her would-be admirers? 
Keep it up "sister" you have the 
right idea! 

Dr. Robinson is buying a radio. It 
is a wonderful invention that can sil- 
ence a piercing harmonica. 

Young Snyder had his hands full 
last nite. Don't talk about it Bob. 
An v thing you say wili be used against 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



FOR 


BETTER 


COAL 


SERVICE 


PHONE 149 


C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



/ 



SATURDAY, JAN. 19, 1935 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



Team Wins Over Hopkins In 
First lalra-League Game 

Washington College's basketball 
five opened its Maryland Intra-Lea- 
eue season with a 26 to 16 victory 
over Hopkins in Baltimore last Fri- 
day night, January 11th. 

The first half proved very slow with 
both teams fumbling often and miss- 
ing easy shots. The half ended with 
the score standing 7 to 7. But in the 
second half the Sho'men's attack got 
going and rolled up 19 points while 
holding the Blue Jays to 9 markers. 



Pentagon Defeats W. Md. In 
Hard Fought Game Here 



Washington College scored its sec- 
ond Maryland Intercollegiate League 
victory Saturday, January 12, at the 
local Armory defeating Western 
Maryland 38 to 26. This game was 
one of the best and roughest seen in 
Chestertown in recent years. In the 
first half the score see-sawed back 
and forth. The end of the first per- 
iod found the maroon and black lead- 
ing 16-15. 

But in the second half this lead 
was slowly increased as Coach Kib- 
ler kept sending in fresh reserves 
who made easy scores on the oppos- 
ing team. 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 
GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

Phone 109 or 818F4 

332 High St. 



L C. Treherne W. G. Smyth 

TREHERNE ASSOCIATES 

REALTY 

Salt Water Homes, Colonial 

Estates, Inland Farms and 

Ducking Shores 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



SKIPPING DVE \ HE SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



From all appearances it looks as if 
there is going to be a merry scram- 
ble for the championship of the Mary- 
land Intercollegiate Basketball Lea- 
gue. At present Washington leads 
the pack with two victories, but St. 
Johns is close behind with a victory 
over Hopkins in the first Johnnie's 
league debut. The Annapolis lads 
have a smooth team that is getting 
better with each game. The Mount 
surprised many league followers by 
defeating the fast stepping Loyola 
team up in Emmitsburg. True this 
is the Mountaineers first victory, but 
it shouldn't come as such a big upset 
because this was the first game the 
Emmitsburg team played at it's full 
strength, and anyone will tell you 
their floor is a great handicap to any 
visiting team. The Hopkins crew 
got off to a good start defeating Bit. 
St. Mary's, but they slowed down and 
lost then last two games. Western 
Maryland trails the rest with a sin- 
gle defeat and no victories. 

The Mount quintet appears here 
tonight at the local armory. This 
should prove to be a good battle. 
But I don't think that the visitors 
have yet hit their stride, and our 
boys should come out on top. 

My last cracks at some of the 
boys. 

The whole basketball squad spends 



its spare time in Baltimore down a- 
round the theatre section — especially 
the Clover and the Gaity. Horowitz 
had a whole cheering section out for 
him at the Hopkins game. 

Evans is the minute man of the 
squad. You don't want to give Mac 
even a half chance because it will be 
too bad. Thumbs down on any more 
rides like the other night . . took us 
eight hours to go 120 miles. The 
prize goes to Wilmot who stood for 
five minutes before a big show win- 
dow in Baltimore, clapping his hands 
and shouting "take it off." But then 
some kind of a prize must be given 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 
HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



H O LD E N * S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bids Given on All Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 305 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 
331 High St. 

High Quality Accessories 
At Low Prices 

Goodrich Tires, Tubes and 
Batteries 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



to the fellow that couldn't tell Lo- 
cust Grove from Kennedyville — and 
all the times that he has been there. 
"Hi" Huffman. You can all give 
a sigh of relief now because this is 
the last time that I will write this 
article. And it has been a lot of 
fun. 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

SEASON OPENS SOON 



Girls' basketball is scheduled to 
begin immediately following exami- 
nations. There will be several prac- 
tices, after which the Board of Man- 



Men 
SHOE 

Pa 

Next to 


's and Ladies' 
REPAIR SHOP 

u I Coco 

Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



KENT 


COUNTY 
BANK 


SAVINGS 


Interest paid on 


Deposits 


Mo 


tto Safety 


First 


F. 


C. Usilton, 


Pres. 


L. B 


Russell, V 


ce-Pres. 


H. C 


. Coleman, 


Cashier 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Managemen 
Cannon St. 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



After An Evening of Hard 
Study Refresh Yourself at the 

CAFETERIA CANTEEN 
AH Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 
dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 
Ice Cream 



PAGE THREE 



agers will schedule the games. The 
method of play will doubtlessly be 
quite similar to that of last year, 
each team playing the other twice, 
then the final playoff. 

For the past two years the pres- 
ent Juniors have carried off the 
laurels, but all of the games have 
been interesting, some being very 
close. 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



LeCATES 


BROS. 


BARBER 


SHOP 


Where the cc 


liege man 


can get his 


style of 


hair cut 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



New Eugene De Luxe 

PERMANENTS 

With Croquinole Ends 
$5.00 

Shampoo, Hot Oil 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 

Thursday $1.00 

For December 
GRAY BEAUTY SALON 



jSchmtbts Peer 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 
BEVERAGE CO. 
Chestertown, Md. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios. Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111 J 



After 


a Studious Day 




Visit 


JIM 


AND HICK'S 


BILLARD PARLOR 



"The Bank Where 

You Feel At Home" 

The First 
National Bank 

0i Chestertown 



PHILLIPJ 

v r^- __ ■ ■■ ^-1 y 



//"".OMOENSEO A 

VEGETABLE 

isoopr 




PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, JAN. 19, 1935 



GRADING SYSTEM 
EXPLAINED FOR FROSH 



Method Of Determining 3.00 
Indices Noted 



(Continued From Page 1) 
dex. He knows that A counts 3, 
B is 2. C is 1, and that D is 0. From 
there down the scale, E counts 1, and 
■ - ." 

Luckily, however, he has kept out 
of the lower scale, and can count on 
a positive index. First he looks at 
his final average in history. History 
is a three-hour course, and so 1, 
which is the equivalent of his C, mul- 
tiplied by 3, gives him 3. He goes on 
down the line in this manner, thus re- 



ceiving 
History 

Ma:h 



Coll. Prob 2 

French 

Biology 6 

English 6 

So far he is right in his figuring: 
he got D in math, and his 3 hours 
times gives him 0: he got B in col- 
lege problems, and the 1 hour times 
2 gives him 2, and so on. Now he 
adds the total number of points and 
discovers that he has managed to ac- 
cumulate 17 points, which he now 
proceeds to divide by the number of 
hours represented by those courses, 
which as we have said before, total 
16. 

Since Willie has graduated from 
! high school and managed to wiggle 
' through Mr. Coop's unified mathe- 
matics, it should not take him long- 
er than five or ten minutes to get his 



answer and check it over to make 
sure of its accuracy — 1.06. 

This, then, is his index — a little 
better than a C average, and had he 
perhaps slackened down in some sub- 
ject so as to receive an E or an F, 
the result would be just as easily 
reached, merely subtracting instead 
of adding the points, and then divid- 
ing as before. 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 

Town 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



COM PLIMENTS 

SMITH'S KUT RATE 

DRUG STORE 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF JANUARY 21-26 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, JANUARY 21-22 

"FATHER BROWN, DETECTIVE" 

with 

WALTER CONNOLLY - PAUL LUKAS 
GERTRUDE MICHAEL 

Added — Comedy, Cartoon and Snapshot. 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, JAN. 23-24 

"HELLD0RAD0" 

— with — 
RICHARD ARLEN -- MADGE EVANS 
RALPH BELLAMY - STEPIN FETCHIT 

Added — Clark and McCullough in "Everythings 
Ducky," Cartoon and Novelty. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JANUARY 25-26 
SHIRLEY TEMPLE in 

"BRIGHT EYES" 



BUCK JONES in 

"THE RED RIDER" 

Cartoon and Sportreel. 

SPECIAL MATINEE 

Friday, January 25th, at 3:30 — under Auspices of 

Woman's Club as a benefit for Public Library 

(OVER) 



JDid you ever notice . . in a roomful of people . . the 
difference between one cigarette and another.. and 
wonder why Chesterfields have such a pleasing aroma 




Many things have to do with the arotna 
of a cigarette . . . the kind of tobaccos 
they are made of. . . the way the to- 
baccos are blended ' . . . the quality of 
the cigarette paper. 



IT takes good things to 
make good things. 
Someone said that to get 
the right aroma in a cigarette, 
you must have the right 
quantity of Turkish tobacco 
— and that's right. 

But it is also true that you 
get a pleasing aroma from the 
home-grown tobaccos . . . 
tobaccos filled with Southern 
Sunshine, sweet and. ripe. 
When these tobaccos are 
all blended and cross-blended 
the Chesterfield way, balanced 
one against the other, you get 
a flavor and fragrance that's 
different from other cigarettes. 



i f m. I innvrr * Myers TodaC£o Co. 



Beat St. John's 
Tonight 




Attend The 
Cotillion Next Friday 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 16. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, FEB. 2, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



Dr. Mead Discusses 
Political Training 

Delivers Assembly Address 
Before Student Body 



by Howard Clark 

College Training for Public Life, 
a subject now widely discussed 
in college educational circles, was the 
theme of President Gilbert Wilcox 
Mead's address before the first as- 
sembly of the new semester, on Jan- 
uary 31, in William Smith Hall. The 
regularly scheduled speaker was un- 
able to travel over the snowy roads, 
and the college was honored by a 
speech from its president. 

Some colleges are just realizing 
the important part they hold in train- 
ing citizens. Dr. William Smith 
founded Washington in 1782 with the 
idea of fitting young men for intelli- 
gent citizenship, began the address. 
Dr. Mead emphasized that it is the 
duty of the college man to accept 
public office. The Governor of Con- 
necticut is a retired dean, and the 
President's unofficial cabinet is com 
posed of college professors, noted 
President Mead. 

Regardless of his vocation, a man 
can be a leader in his community 
group and, by his influence, aid in the 
selection of capable public servants. 
Changing social conditions present 
the masses with more leisure time, 
some of which could be profitably 
spent following the moves of legisla- 
tors, the speaker remarked. 

President Mead spoke of "the su- 
perstition of American individual- 
ism." "In a social human life com- 
plete individualism is impossible. In- 
dividual ownership does not erase the 
social obligation to serve the com- 
munity." 



NEW COURSES ADDED TO 
COLLEGE CURRICULUM 



Seminars In Chemistry And 
History Offered 



Hamlet Rehearsals 
Occupy Stage 

Players Prepare For Produc- 
tion On March 8 



At 8 o'clock on the evening of Fri- 
day, March 8, the aged and experi- 
enced boards of William Smith Hall 
Will be trod by Dr. G. Van A. Ingalls' 
Shakespeare Company in Mr. Wil- 
liam Shakespeare's well-known Ham- 
let. 

A large and enthusiastic, for it is 
a bit early to say brilliant, cast, many 
of whom are veterans of the notable 
Midsummer Nights' Dream, and As 
You Like It, has been selected to play 
the great tragedy. So magnificent is 
the vehicle that every hack company 
sometimes does Hamlet, and even an 
amateur cast feels brave enough to 
attempt the work. 

The always pressing matters of 
costumes, makeup, lights, and the 
meager Elizabethan properties will be 
managed in the usual expert manner 
°f the Shakespeare Players. Ticket 
sales is under the direction of Miss 
Elizabeth Short, and other commit- 
tees will soon be announced. 

The cast is complete except for a 
minor walking character or two, and 
't will be treated in these columns in 
detail next week. It is enough to say 
in brief that William Oliver Baker is 
Playing Hamlet, Miss Nola Hill will 
b e the lovely Ophelia, Robert S. 
Shaull will stalk about as the senile 
p olonius, Wesley Sadler is the vil- 
lainous Claudius, to say nothing of 
many newcomers to the Elizabethan 
Washington College stage. 

Rehearsals are the complete order 
of the dny at, present, and future an- 
nouncements will forthcome fast and 
"'riously. 



Beginning February 1, a group of 
seminar courses open to certain qual- 
ified students are available at Wash- 
ington College. They are offered 
primarily to those students who wish 
to go deeper into the study of the in- 
dicated fields: Chemistry 14, History 
18, Criminology, and Sociology 28, 
Psychology 4. 

Chemistry 14, which will consist of 
reading abstracts, source material, 
reference works and periodicals, and 
writing papers on selected subjects, 
will be open to senior, majors in this 
field. Its purpose is to train the stu- 
dent in the use of chemical literature. 

History 18 will aid the students in 
making a survey of all the history 
courses in college and familiarize 
them with the ones they have pre- 
viously had. It will be offered only 
to the history majors. 

Criminology is to be taught by lec- 
tures and discussions without the use 
of a text book, and the class will be 
required to investigate topics and re- 
port on them. 

Sociology 28 is made up of investi- 
gations of the family and reports will 
be required of the students; their 
subject matter will not be prescribed 
by the professor, who notes that it is 
primarily for the students to do as 
they desire as long as they do the re- 
quired amount of work. 

Psychology 4 is a continuation of 
the advanced course Psychology 3, 
and will include case studies in ap- 
plied psychology. 



SPEAKS AT ASSEMBLY 




Glt-BEiZT- W.M£#D £/.,&, 



President Mead, who recently 
returned from an extensive South- 
ern speaking tour, addressed the 
Washington College Assembly last 
Thursday. A high point of his jour- 
ney was his undisputed statement, 
before a large audience at the 
Towson State Normal School, ver- 
ifying Washington College as the 
oldest in Maryland. 



ESSAY CONTEST OFFER- 
ED BY PANHELLEMSTS 



HONOR SOCIETY ELECTS 
JUNIOR MEMBERS SOON 

Candidates Must Have 2.25 
Index To Be Eligible 



Outline Of A New York Itiner- 
ary Is Subject 



Editor's note: The following is a 
recent release of interest to Wash- 
ington College students. Some entry 
from the College mi^ht weil he made: 

The Panhellenic House Associatior- 
of New York extends an i>i '.'Ration to 
participate in a nationwide essay con- 
test on the subject "What 1 Would 
Like To See When I Visit New 
York" which it is sponsoring among 
members of National Fraternities and 
college students. 

The Panhellenic House Association 
believes that such a contest will fur- 
ther student relationships and will 
serve the purpose of obtaining a com- 
posite point of view of the attraction 
New York City has for the college 
student. 

The contest should also provide 
much interesting information about 
New York City for those who have 
never visited New York. 

(Continued On Page 4) 



Juniors whose indices average a- 
bove 2.25, and who rank in the upper 
tenth of their classes, will be formal- 
ly received into the Washington Col- 
lege Scholastic Honor Society at s 
special Honor Society Assembly on 
Thursday, February 14. 

A special speaker, whose name will 
be announced later, has been secured 
for the occasion through the efforts 
of Dr. F. G. Livingood, secretary, 
and former president, of the Honor 
Society. Probably the senior mem- 
bers of the Society will have a part 
in the program. The officers, who are 
arranging also for the regular Feb- 
ruary meeting, are Dr. K. S. Buxton, 
president; W. O. Baker, vice-presi- 
dent; Dr. F. G. Livingood, secretary; 
and Dr. G. Van A. Ingalls, treasurer. 



FRATERNITY RULES ON 
PLEDGING CHANGED 

Interfraternity Group Makes 
Three Resolutions 



by a Staff Writer 

The Interfraternity Council of 
Washington College recently passed 
three resolutions, all of which are 
calculated to regulate fraternity 
pledging. 

The first of these states in effect 
that no fraternity shall make a prac- 
tice of pledging men who have for- 
merly been affiliated with another 
fraternity at Washington College, 
The proviso is added that any fra- 
ternity desiring to pledge a former 
member or affiliate of another frater- 
nity must first have the matter dis 
cussed by the Inter-fraternity Coun 
cil. 

The second is designed to allow the 
fraternities to pledge a larger num- 
ber from this year's Freshman class 
than would have been possible under 
the old plan, which permitted each 
fraternity to have only twenty-five 
members. The new ruling allows 
pledging up to the twenty-five mem- 
ber limit, plus the number of seniors 
in the fraternity. 

The third resolution provides for 
the issuance of a letter of informa- 
tion from the three fraternities joint- 
ly to each first year man. This letter 
will explain to the potential fraterni- 
ty man the benefits of joining some 
fraternity, as well as the average cost 
of admittance to the three fraterni- 
ties on the campus This letter is at 
present being prepared by the pres- 
idents of the three bodies, and should 
be sent to the first year men shortly. 



ACTIVITIES BUDGET 
UNDERGOES CHANGES 



Interested Organizations 
Should Present Needs 



A revision of the Student Activi- 
ties Budget, which contributes vari- 
ous sums to the maintenance of val- 
uable Washington College organiza- 
tions, is being effected by the Silver 
Pentagon Society, which administers 
the use of the money. 

A committee from the Society will 
entertain suggestions by affected or- 
ganizations concerning their appro- 
priations. Such suggestions should 
be either presented in writing to the 
chairman of the committee, W. O. 
Baker, or a representative from the 
organization may present the case be- 
fore the committee at a time to be 
posted next week. 



Intra-Marals Progress 

As Second Half Begins 

The beginning of the second half 
of the Intra-mural Basketball League 
finds the Tau's at the head of the list, 
with eight victories and two defeats. 
Although they have a good chance of 
repeating they will find the going a 
little harder. 

West Hall has improved consider- 
ably in the past few weeks and, al- 
though they may not win the pen- 
nant, will cause the league leaders 
plenty of trouble. Middle Hall, play- 
ed most of its games minus Davis, 
center. His return will greatly aid 
that team and they should win a lot 
of games. 

The A. K.'s still seem to be a one 
man team with Reinhart doing most 
of the scoring and playing a good 
floor game as well. 

The Phi's and East Hall have also 
improved and a cleaner, faster, and 
much better brand of basketball wdl 
be witnessed from now until the end 
of the season. ' 

In the class league the first half 
ended in a three way tie; the Juniors, 
Sophs, and Freshmen enjoying that 
distinction, each team having won 
live and lost three games. 

This league has apparently degen- 
erated into a three team league, the 
Seniors having lost nearly every 
game by default. 



ASSEMBLY PROGRAMS 

ANNOUNCED FOR MONTH 



Anna D. Ward Speaks Next 
Week 



Dr. Frederick G. Livingood, Chair- 
man of the Assembly Program Com- 
mittee, has recently released a list of 
assembly speakers engaged for the 
next month. The assembly of Feb- 
ruary 21 is to be the annual convoca- 
tion, and the program of March 7 is 
to be sponsored by rhe Y. M. C. A. 
The list of speakers for this month 
includes: 

February 7 — Miss Anna D. Ward, 
General Secretary, Family Welfare 
Association, Baltimore, Md. 

February 14 — Dr. Samuel E. Burr, 
Superintendent of Schools, New Cas- 
tle, Delaware. This is the annual 
Honor Society Assembly. 

February 21 — Dr. George F. Zook, 
Director of the American Council on 
Education, Washington, D. C., at a 
formal convocation. 



Cageis To Meet 
St. John's Tonight 

Kiblerites Out To Avenge De- 
feat By Loyola 



Tonight "Dutch" Lentz and his St. 
John's cagers invade Chestertown in 
an attempt to displace Washington 
as an immediate contender for the 
league championship. 

Although the outcome of the game 
tonight will not decide the winner of 
the league it will have a very import- 
ant effect upon the standings. Each 
of the three leading teams, Washing- 
ton, Loyola and St. John's have lost 
one game and a loss tonight by either 
team will greatly hurt that team's 
chances for a pennant. 

St. John's, despite the loss of sev- 
eral star performers this year, has 
placed a strong team on the court. In 
the only two league games played 
this year it has made a remarkable 
showing, losing and winning one 
game, losing at Western Maryland 
and winning at Loyola. In each case 
one point provided the margin of vic- 
tory. 

In Lambros, St. John's has one of 
the best forwards in the state and he 
will be the man to watch along with 
DeLisio who has been playing a bang- 
up game at guard. 

The fact that Washington won 
from Western Maryland and lost to 
Loyola proves nothing except that 
both teams appear to be about evenly 
matched and it will be anybody's 
game from the first until the final 
whistle. Coach Kibler has his team 
in. good condition and is confident 
that they will turn in an impressive 
victory. 

The probable starting lineups: 
Washington St. John's 

Salter F Lambros 

Wilmot F E. DeLisio 

Skipp C Evans 

Ward G Donohue 

Nicholson G L. DeLisio 



League Game Lost 
To Loyola Quintet 

Each Team Scores Fourteen 
Field Goals 



A game lost on foul shots alone, 
was the report brought back from 
the Washington-Loyola game played 
at Evergreen Thursday night, with 
the Kiblerites on the short end of a 
32-28 score. 



The game was close from the startr 
ing whistle to the final gun, and the 
February 2S— Dr. John C. Krantz, score at half-time stood 15 to 12 in 
favor of Loyola. Salter and Wilmot 
stood out for Washington, accounting 
for ten points apiece, while Price 
Colvin was outstanding for the home 
team in scoring and in general play. 
The teams each made twelve dou- 
ble-decker scores, but the Grey- 
hounds made good eight out of ten 
tries from the foul line, while the 
scarlet-clad Washingtonians only 
made four of their ten free throws 
good. teon Horowitz, freshman 
flash, accounted for two field goals in 
quick succession in the closing min- 
utes of play, but the Greyhounds re- 
taliated with two of their baskets. 
Passing and floor work was good on 
both sides and the green and gray 
cagers were particularly strong in 
taking shots from the backboard. 



Jr., Chief of Bureau of Chemistr 
State Department of Health, Balti- 
more, Md. 

March 7 — Peace Conference spon- 
sored by the YMCA of Washir.yton 
College — Dr. A. C. Goddard, Wil- 
mington, Delaware; Dr. J. H. Bishop 
Dover, Delaware. 

oo 

Dramatic Society Offers 
Seven Plays For Semester 



Wil! 



Begin ELM Publicity 
Campaign 



At the request of Harry Rhodes, 
president of the Dramatic Society at 
Washington College, a regular space 
in the ELM has been apportioned to 
write-ups of this organization's activ- 
ities. Beginning next week, tit? 
ELM'S play critic, Miss Frances Sil- 
cox, will discuss various phases of 
the club's proposed production of 
seven one-act plays between Febru- 
ary 1 and May 16. 



The most c-\pcnsi\e road ever 
built by the federal bureau of roads 

is along tin 1 Oregon COASl htghwm^ 
smith at Mnrshfield, Oregon. A hifch 
bridge, tunnel and a cut ih 

solid rack boosted the cost i* 1 mtin 

than $500,000, or $100 a foot. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, FEB. 2, 1935 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 1782. 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein . Bus. Manager 
Emerson Slacum . . Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

William Kight, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte, William McCullough 

Howard Clark 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, $1.50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 



SATURDAY, FEB. 2, 1935 



comfortable expectation for the is- 
suance of the first semester's grades. 
When the student discovers his 
marks, there is an hour or two of 
pleasure at the high index, a day or 
two of disappointment, usually ac- 
companied by bitter rationalization, 
with the low index, and the accom- 
plishment or losses of the first semes- 
ter are thus counted and forgotten. 
This performance multiplied by eight 
gives the history of the average stu- 
dent's college experience in taking 
stock of his work. 

The reasons for this inaccurate, 
and rather absurd, phenomena are 
difficult to trace completely. First, 
perhaps the student is discouraged 
from any analysis other than his 
marks because of the popular accept- 
ance that marks do indicate work ac- 
complished. His fellows will call him 
an alibi hunter, if he feels that a 
course which has yielded him a D 
was more valuable to him than one 
in which he received an A. Also, 
marks are such tangible, mathemati- 
cal evidence they are one of the ex- 
ceptions to the popular fallacy that 
figures do not He, that they save the 
not too ambitious student the labori- 
ous task of self-evaluation. If he has 
skidded along for several semesters, 
taking courses for which he is pe- 
culiarly adapted, with an average of 
B, he calls himself a good student, 
and a good fellow, and labels his col- 
lege years successful. Actually, he 
has learned enough, and acquired the 
practice of clear thinking to the ex- 
tent that his four years spent in a re- 
fined boiler factory would have been 
much more productive to himself and 



Before the summer is over, he will 
have forgot it all, especially if he 
seeks, at once, employment. What a 
modest and a noble structure (but 
this is quite, quite impossible) would 
be a senior unedified. 



NEW STAFF APPOINTMENT 

Because of the press of other du- 
ties, and the considerable demands of 
the Sports Department, Mr. Phillip 
Skipp has resigned from the position 
of Sports Editor of the ELM. The 
Staff and Administration of the ELM 
indeed regret the loss of Mr. Skipp, 
and take this opportunity of thank- 
ing him for his excellent work on the 
Staff. At the same time, the ELM 
takes great pleasure in announcing 
the appointment of Mr. William 
Kight as Sports Editor. Mr. Kight, 
a member of the Class of '36, has 
done sports writing for the ELM 
since his freshman year. His home 
is in Cumberland, Maryland. 



Literary Digest 
Takes Peace 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



In these trying times of choosing 
new courses and settling down to the 
routine of the new schedule the 
"Yellow Jacket" comes through with 
some suggestions of possible theme 
songs for courses offered on the cam- 
pus. 

ASTRONOMY: Stars Fell On Ala- 
bama. 

BIOLOGY: Sweet Mystery Of 
Life. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING : Pahdon Mali 
Suthun Accent. 

ECONOMICS: We're In The Mon- 



Pre- 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-Iy Heard 



ey. 



LOOKING FORWARD 

Washington College, as an institu- 
tion of students, faculty, and admin- 
istration, should greet the new sem- 
ester with renewed vigor, and with 
energetic hope for further accom- 
plishment. Last Thursday marked 
more of a new year for the College 
than did January 1. During the last 
semester, Washington College tri- 
umphed, in her own circle, athletical- 
ly, and bids fair to repeat in her tra- 
ditional sport of basketball. Cer- 
tain necessary and pressing reforms 
in the organization of the dormitor- 
ies, notably Eeid Kail, the girls' 
dormitory, were effected. Certain 
much more rigid and stringent regu- 
lations must and will be effected un- 
der the direction of the skilled and 
wise Dean of those quarters, if the 
College is to advance a few centimet- 
ers toward that "glorious destiny" 
which proves so convenient a phrase 
for orators on the platform of Wil- 
liam Smith Hall. 

It is highly possible, and, it is in- > 
discreetly whispered, probable, that ; 
Washington will gain considerable I 

national recognition in the second | that ; although marks remain as ithe 
semester, thus continuing the policy I fundamental and most important 
of the nresident, Dr. Gilbert W. guage of the American college sys- 
Mead. Dr. George Zook, high in the ! tern, they should not be regarded as 
ranks of educators in the United ™^™ of ° est!Q y or admit cards to 
States, will deliver the Washington's 
Birthday Address. Of course, no 
Commencement speaker has been an- 
nounced, but those fa mi l i a r with 
President Mead's talents in this mat- 
ter would be unsurprised to greet 
Adolph Hitler or the King of Siam 
on that mild, even warm, morning 
next June, Too, a national honor- 
. : smity. which in not a few un- 
lesis given campus precedence 
the famous Phi Beta Kappa, 
may come to Washington and her Sil- 



Colleges Vote On Entry Of U. 
S. Into League Of Nations 

Second returns in the 325,000-bal- 
lot Peace Poll of undergraduates in 
119 colleges and universities give a 
scant majority of 50.07 per cent, for 
United States entry in the League of 



to humanity. Washington Coiicge j j^ 2t ; ons> according to the tabulations 
has graduated, and will graduate in 'published in today's issue of The Lit- 
succeeding years, a small number of erarv Digest. 

just such students. Many college in- j j^e favorable vote for U. S. Lea- 
structors, unfortunately, subscribe to ' g. ue en try -was concentrated in East- 
this fetishism of the infallibility of | rn institutions, fourteen voting 
grades. They place the emphasis on "Yes" and eight "No" while the oth- 
the meters connected with the ma- er sections of the country voted 26 
chine rather than on the mechanism 
itself. 

A score more reasons for not tak- 
ing grades as complete indicators of 
a student's worth and achievement 
might be cited. Marks tend to break 
down the Honor System, to cause un- 
fair competition, etc. 

The point of the whole matter is, 



CHAPEL: Tie between Blue 
lude and Mood Indigo. 

PSYCHOLOGY. Did You Ever See 
A Dream Walking? or Lost In A 
Fog. . 

GLEE CLUB: Learn To Croon. 

PHYSICAL ED.: You're A Builder 
Upper. 

EXAMINATIONS: The Last Round 
Up. 

ENGLISH: Use in Love I Is. 

PHYSIOLOGY: Pop Goes Your 
Heart. 

MATHEMATICS: She Done 'Em 
Wrong. 

DIETICS: I'm Bigger Than The 
Moon. 

MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY: 
They'll Call It Yours and Mine. 

(By the way, wonder what kind of 
home work they'll have in the last 
course?) 



against and 12 for. 

A total of 65.000 ballots are shown 
as received to date from sixty col- 
leges. 

The students were asked to express 
their opinion in this "College Peace 
Poll" on seven issues relating to war 
and peace. On the first question as 
to whether the United States could 
stay out of another great war, the 
vote was 68.31 per cent. "Yes" and 
31.69 per cent. "No." 

Asked if the individual student 

would bear arms in defense of the 

Et is certainly true United States in case the country 

that marks indicate a trend, and that *™« »™ded, 83.50 per cent, indi- 

many marks do show accurately both j " ted the >' woul <* ^ while 16.50 

the individual and relative ability of {P er cent - ™ ted that the y woula not 



At the U. of Pitt, the students are 
holding a "Penny-a-pounu dau;-p in 
place of the usual set price dances. 
Each girl is weighed at the door and 
her escort forks over one cent for 
each pound the dial registers. The es 
cort of the lightest and heaviest girls 
will be admitted free of charge just 
to make things interesting. There is 
also a $.25 exemption for red heads. 

(My, my, but wouldn't flicker fat 
popular at a dance like that?) 



Why is it that the Cafeteria din- 
ers are so ready to go to the fine din- 
ners prepared by the local church so- 
cieties. Maybe it's because they are 
afraid of forgetting how good food 
tastes, or is that too uncomplimen- 
tary to our new dietitian. 

Bob Fink, the "tohellwiththewom- 
en" Fink, is a changed man. No long- 
er does he scorn the fair sex. Those 
in his confidence say "Willa did it." 
McCullough isn't much competition; 
it's his car. 

After several reverses "Ear-muff" 
Peyser has at last experienced true 
love. He studied chemistry on sev- 
eral dates. Anything else Fred? 

Was Tuesday night the end of a 
short romance with Long, or is the 
fair Anne true? Ask the basketballer 
who took her to the movies. 

McCrone, after breaking a sweet 
little freshman's heai't, isn't content 
with her love, but must be seen at 
the movies playing with dynamite. 

Unrequited love doesn't appeal to 
Bob White. He dropped hi3 Balti- 
more flame for a local high school 
girl. Why not sit in the balcony, 
Bob, it's cheaper. 

Archimedes Brown has established 
a thriving business. Anyone wanting 
a term paper quick see the mad gen- 
ius and be guaranteed an A. 

Postponement of the Loyola game 
broke a lot of dates, and among the 
disappointed femm.es were the sweet 
young things that expected Horowitz, 
McDorman, McLain and others. 

Dr. Robinson was the only man in 
Middle Hall that didn't celebrate the 
ending of exams in a Bacchanalian 
orgy. But he doesn't count — beyond 
the largest positive integers. 



the student. The student with con- 
sistently low marks who is a loud ex- 
ponent of the insignificance of marks 
should beware of his rationalizing. 

A partial solution to the whole 
matter would be to issue no marks 
until the end of the senior year, but 
this has some obvious disadvantages. 
Several departments in Washington 
ver* Pentagon Society this year. Also, j College decrease the bloated import- 
a famous and powerful national so- I ance of grades by placing no marks 
cial fraternity is far on the wa> to- ■ on the paper, by using the ranking 
ward replacing a local on the Hill I system, or by the use of letters when 
■with one of its own national chapters, j actual numbers might have been em- | 

=re are other rumors of na- ployed. 
tionalization. I At least it is hoped that, when the ' 

Within the College itself, much | marks for the last semester are 
business is under way. The Debat- known, there will be no swelled heads 
ing Society, undefeated in its short ; or broken heart3 on Coiiege Hill. 

r, is opening shop to] oo 

attempt to repeat the process- Tne , THE HOME STRETCH 

:,ss.re Players are attempting The f ort y_odd members of the 

the most difficult production in the ' Clas _ of .35 are on the home stretch. 

history of the organization, which Ac such it gn0 , 1 ] ( j i f course, be the 

in the history of the presenta- ' y lax $ eelti tne most profitably and the 

: classic drama at the College. most energet ; e f tne jr college cours- 

The Dramatic Club will continue its ss By noW( the adaptable senior 

new-found policy of a varied and fre- : snould hsve learned how to get the 

v-produced program of plays. most frr#m everv co u ege hour, and 

campus organizations will find ghouH be eager t0 fini ,h his fleeting 

the spotlight in the calendar, ana the wUege fa va ; n glorious strife and am- 

departmental clubs will not be inact- L Eut - ft0W un hee-3ed fall such 

., 1 fiery words on eai*3 made acoustical- 

Thus the College should find itself , y inaenriWe by a cer tain noticeable 

busy and ha^py Uft the first half Of Bwe )ij ng of the conjoined cereoral 

1935. lit ztudenU will learn and be ^ete. This strange malady, which, 

taught M d m perfecting „.., , ra ,, rt ] inari ] v enough, seems 



fight. 

On the question of whether or not 
they would bear arms for the United 
States in its invasion of the borders 
of another country, 81.63 per cent, 
marked their ballot negatively, while 
1 18.37 per cent, showed they would 
j fight even in the case of an aggressive 
I war. 

I On the fourth question of "Do you 
believe that a national policy of an 
I American Navy and Air-Force second 
I to none is a sound method of insuring 
i us against being drawn into another 
'great war" the vote was C2.98 per 
cent, against such a policy and 37.02 
per cent, for it. 

An overwhelming majority of DO. 25 
per cent, showed advocacy of govern 
mental control of armament and mu 
nitions industries, while 9.7b par 
cent, of the student voters registered 
opposition on this issue. 

Voting on the question "In alint- 
ment with our historic procedure in 
drafting man-power in time of war, 
would you advocate the principle of 
universal conscription of all resources 
of capital and labor in order to con- 
trol all profits in time of war?" the 
balloting showed 81.5 per cent, mark- 
ed in favor of such universal con- 
scription to 18:50 per cent, voting 
against it. 



A Minnesota professor was telling 
a colleague about his former days at 
another institution. 

"I had the chair of social sciences," 
he said, "including sociology, eco- 
nomics, and political science." 

"That," remarks the other, "was 
not a chair, it was a settee." 



Then there is the yarn about the 
clever Dartmouth student who wish- 
ed to get home a few days early for 
vacation. The boy sent a telegram 
asking whether he should come 
straight home or home by way of To- 
ronto. "Come straight home" the 
family tersely wired. Wiuh this in 
his possession the student obtained 
the dean's agreement that he should 
no longer linger in the college. 

(Dear Editor, please scratch out 
the above item in Dr. Jones' copy so 
the idea will have a reasonable chance 
to work here.) 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 
GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

Phone 109 or 818F4 

332 High St. 



e great art of living. Perhaps, too, 
they will find time to study a bit in a 
pure and strictly academic way, for 
Ifat, after all, is the purpose of the 



stimulate the organs of speech, comes 
at a time v/hen the senior should be 
most alive to grasp a previously un- 
seen pies ■ '■■■' ■■■' ■■'■'■ bn pro- 
fitable lessons of undergraduate life. 
The senior, since yesterday, by 
: ange, and, it might bi 
ed, catalytic, (for it ia certainly the 
resuh of no effort by » 

. hai learned it all. 



An old woman at the circus was 
trolling through the menagerie, when 
she stopped dead still before the 
kangaroo cage and read the sign 
there, "Native of Australia." 

'Sakes alive," she exclaimed in 
horror, "did John marry one of 
them?" 

— Randolph-Macon "Sun Dial." 

Then there was the absent minded 
professor who didn't know where he 
got his limp. He was walking with 
one foot on the side walk and the oth- 
er in the gutter. 



Activities Committee 

Sanctions Dance Date 



MARKS, MARKS, MARKS 

This is one of the rare zeasons of 
oflege year wh*n studies and 
scholar-hip seem to hold th*- 
attention of the student. There is ' '.n this sei g nerfc term. The ! landing, 

r,h*re of strained an-- her words, kno ■•■'• of the year 



The Activities Committee has sanc- 
tioned the date of March twenty-see- 
the annual Inter-Sorority 
This is a Friday night, and 

the dance will be able to progress 

from nine until one. Plans have 

already been started for it, and it is 

1 expei ted to be one of the most out- 

f not the greatest, social 



Somebody told us that P. Wee 
Fink thinks that rigid economy is a 
dead Scotchman. 

(Is there any connection with that 
and his jewelry shop visit ) 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College HU1 

Telephone 331-M 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



L C. Treherne W. G. Smyth 

TREHERNE ASSOCIATES 

REALTY 

Salt Water Homoi, Colonial 

Estates, Inland Farms and 

Ducking Shores 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



SATURDAY, FEB. 2, 1935 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



Gardner Cavorts 
Kaufman Howls 



Rat Hall Reporter Reviews 

! Weil-Known Personalities 



All's Fair In War And 



Philosopher Gardner, adviser to all 
the little Rats, was found to be the 
brain behind a scheme that left Vin- 
ny Brandolini temporarily out in the 
cold. It seems that Al bribed anoth- 
er Senior (he is paying us not to 
mention his name) to trip Vinny on 
Middle Hall steps, thus hurting his 
arm and making it impracticable for 
him to visit Fern. His dastardly 
scheme successful, Gardiner, the cul- 
prit, dons his spare shirt and Sad- 
ler's best necktie, and jauntily trips 
down to Fern's house, where he so- 
licitously inquires after Vinny's 
health. 

An American Tragedy 

General Harry Kaufman had (by 
his own request) the assignment to 
write this colyum this week, but he 
walked out on the editor and staff in 
a fit of temperament. It seems that 
his brain-child was read to Messrs. 
Kilby, Koleshko, and Sadler, as sort. 
of a trial-balloon. Somehow or oth- 
er, the boys didn't appreciate his ef- 
forts, and, instead of breaking out in- 
to convulsions or mirth, they gave him 
the sour pan, thus hurting his tender 
feelings. 

Crazed by artistic rage, Harry tore 
up his precious creation, and stomped 



away in an embroiled mood. It'll 
take Freedman three weeks to nurse 
him back to robust health again. 
The American Home 

West Hall, says one wit, is just one 
big happy family. We have: 

Papa Sadler, Mama Gardner, Big 
Brudder Huffman, The Twins, Harold 
and Jack, Grandpop Bill Van, Poor- 
Relation Lee Dolan, Baby Boy Sim- 
mons, and all the other little kiddies. 

Mamma and Papa have trouble 
keeping the kiddies at their lessons, 
but with the help of big Brudder, 



HOLDEN'S 

SERVICE STATION 

Cross St. and Maple Ave. 

Sunoco Products 



STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 
331 High St. 



High Quality Accessories 
At Low Prices 



Goodrich Tires, Tubes and 
Batteries 



PAGE THREE 



they manager to preserve an aura of 
dignity, for which Rat Hall is fam- 
ous. 

Winter Sports 

We haven't been able to find out 
just who was the instructor in charge 
of the gym class held in the snow 
drift the other night. That's an ex- 
ample of what poor management will 
do. The event wasn't properly ad- 
vertised ahead of time, and specta- 
tors were few in number. Suppose 
EVERYBODY had known what was 
coming off- 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



Men's and Ladies' 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



LeCATES 


BROS. 


BARBER 


SHOP 


Where the college man 


can get his 


style of 


hair cut 





KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 






BANK 






Interest paid on Deposits 






Motto — Safety First 






F. G. Usilton, Pres. 






L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 






H. C. Coleman, Cashier 





W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And AH Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 

A store run for the benefit of t he students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs (or 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111J 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



After An Evening of Hard 
Study Refresh Yourself at the 

CAFETERIA CANTEEN 
All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 
dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 
Ice Cream 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



GEO. T. COOPER 

Fancy Meats 

and Groceries 

Phone 400 and 401 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Best Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 
Town 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones: 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



FOR 


BETTER 


COAL 


SERVICE 


PHONE 149 


C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



"The Bank Where 
Yoa Feel At Home" 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



PIP'S 



BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 
The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 
Everything Clean and 
Sanitary 





SHSS 






PHILUPJ 




.7. £onde^se" X. 









CRAY BEAUTY SALON 

New Eugene Permanents 
with ringlet ends 

$5.00 

We have another Per- 
manent with ringlet 
ends for $3.50 




PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, FEB. 2, 1935 



Balto. Alumni 
Keep Dance Date 

Despite Storm, Party Hailed 
As Success 



The party and dance planned by 
the Baltimore Alumni Association to 
be held following the basket bail 
game with Loyola on January 26th, 
was held in spite of the fact that the 
game had been canceled. The affair 
was staged in the Chesapeake Koom 
of the Hotel Emerson, in Baldmoie, 
and was well attended by alumni of 
Baltimore and the vicinity. The del- 
egation from the College, however, 
■was prevented from attending by the 
heavy snowfall, which made travel- 
ling practically impossible. 



HISTORICAL SURVEY 

COMMISSION PLANNED 



Historical Society Will Publish 
Findings 



The Washington College Historical 
Society is sponsoring a commission to 
survey Kent County and Washington 
College. The purpose of this body 
is not only to learn more about the 
history of both the county and col- 
lege, but also to bring unknown and 
forgotten material to light. The per- 
sonnel of the commission is to be 
composed of twelve historically-mind- 
ed citizens of Kent County and mem- 
bers of the society. Already a num- 
ber have expressed their willingness 
to serve. In the near future the 
names will be made public. As oc- 
casion permits, the findings of the 
commission will be published in the 



"Elm" and in the county papers. At 
the end of the year they will be in- 
corporated into pamphlet form to be 
printed and distributed under the aus- 
pices of the Washington College His- 
torical Society. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 

DEBATE TOPIC CHOSEN 



Candidates for the Washington 
College Intercollegiate Debating 
Team should report to Mr. Wesley 
Sadler, the manager, or to W. 0. 
Baker, president of the Debating 
Society. The question of interna- 
tional transportation of munitions 
has been selected. 



The seeds of some weeds may re- 
main alive in the soil for thirty years 
or even longer, and spring up after 
that time. 



P an hell enic House Association 

Sponors Essay Contest On New York 

(Continued From Page 1) 



The following rules will govern the 
contest : 

Select and arrange a tour of one 
week's duration from the list of sug- 
gestions from the ELM office. Select 
not more than fifty suggestions and 
arrange these in a comprehensive 
program. The committee recognizes 
that such institutions as the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art and the Amer- 
ican Museum of Natural History 
could occupy more than the entire 
week's visit, but the purpose of the 
contest is to see as many places and 
things as possible. After selecting 
your itinerary, submit a 500 to 1,000 
word commentary giving your rea- 
sons for your selections. Papers 



will be judged on the integrity and 
individuality of the point of view 
rather than on their value as a mere 
travelogue. Use plain white paper, 
size 8%xll, write on one side only 
in neat and legible hand-writing or 
the typewriter. Write your name, 
address, and fraternity, if any, in the 
upper left hand corner of each page. 

Prizes will be awarded as follows: 

First Prize: — a cash award of $50 
and one week's stay at Beckman 
Tower (Panhellenic). 

Second Prize: — ?35 and a week' 
end's stay at Beckman Tower vPan- 
hellenic). 

Third Prize: — S16 and a week- 
end's stay at Beckman Tower (Pan- 
hellenic). 



-so far as we know tobacco was 
first used about 400 years ago 



—throughout the years what one thing has 
given so much pleasure.. so much satisfaction 




Early Colonial planters 
shipped hundreds of 
pounds of tobacco to 
England in return for 
goods and supplies. 



. . .and tobacco has been like gold ever since! 
The tobacco raised in Virginia and exchanged 
for goods helped the struggling colonists to get a 
foothold when they came to America. 

Later on, it was tobacco that helped to clothe 
and feed Washington's brave army at Valley 
Forge. 

Today it is tobacco that helps — more than any 
other commodity raised in this country — to pay 
the expense of running our Government. 
In the fiscal year 1933-34 the Federal 
Government collected $425,000,000 from 
tax on tobacco. Most of this came 
from cigarettes — six cents tax on every 
package of twenty. 
Yes, the cigarette helps a lot — and it certainly 
gives men and women a lot of pleasure. 
Smokers have several reasons for liking 
Chesterfields. For one thing, Cliesterfields 
are milder. For another thing, they taste 
better. Tliey Satisfy. 



$ m*. tM/jcrx * MmtT'.iv/'-'/;. 



Don't Abuse 
Stack Privilege* 




Elm 



Beat 

Johns Hopkins 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 17. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



St. Valentine Dance 
Proves Popular 

Cotillion Club Presents Third 
Formal Of Year 



by Lawrence Yourtee 

Marked by a novel guessing con- 
test, the third Cotillion of the year 
was presented last night in the gym- 
nasium by the Cotillion Club. Soft 
lights, sweet music, and a good at- 
tendance combined to label the dance 
a successful one. 

The gym was cleverly decorated in 
an appropriate Valentine theme, us- 
ing red, white and green as the color 
scheme. Blood-red paper hearts of 
all sizes were everywhere in evidence, 
and on many of them were written 
verses that made many a true heart 
pound and throb. . At each window 
there was a "heart tree," gratefully 
bearing its heart-shaped fruit, as well 
as at each side of the cave of green 
from which the orchestra played. 
Simplicity characterized the whole 
decorative scheme, and was, on the 
whole, especially pleasing. 

On the wall behind the orchestra 
platform were the silhouettes of two 
college students, selected by the 
chairman of the dance from the stu- 
dent body at large. Those who at- 
tended the dance were invited to 
guess the names of the two whom the 
profiles resembled, and a prize was a- 
warded for the correct answer. The 
silhouettes were of Miss Nancy Post 
and Mr. Wesley Sadler. 

Music was furnished by Louis 
Stark's Orchestra, and dancing was 
enjoyed from 9 until 1. 

The chaperones of the dance were: 
Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Mead, Dr. and 
Mrs. K. S. Buxton, Dr. and Mrs. 
Dana, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Johns, Mr, 
and Mrs. Frank Goodwin, and Miss 
Doris Bell and Mr. John Wagner. 

The Dance Committee consisted of 
Allen Brougham, Chairman; G. De- 
Socio, C. Casteel, S. Linthicum, R, 
Swain, and Derringer. 



MEMBERS OF STUDENT 
BODY PRESENT PROGRAM 



Miss Anna D. Ward Unable To 
Keep Engagement 



the 



Variety was introduced into 
Washington College assembly pro- 
grams when a musical program was 
presented by members of the studenL 
body. Icy roads prevented the at- 
tendance of the speaker originally 
scheduled for Thursday, Miss Anna 
D. Ward, General Secretary of the 
Family Welfare Association, Balti- 
more. 

Lawrence Williams sang four 
songs. They were: "Rose in the 
Bud" by Dorothy Forrster; "Let the 
Rest of the World Go By" by Ernest 
Ball, "Just A-wearyin' For You" ry 
Carrie Jacobs Bond, and "When 
Irish Eyes Are Smiling" also by Ern- 
est Ball. Williams was accompanied 
at the piano by Miss Catherine Kir- 
win. 

Vincent Brandolini played a Chop 
in waltz, opus sixty four, number 
two. Brandolini, Frank Jarreil, and 
Harold Kosowsky comprised a novel 
instrumental trio of piano, bass viol, 
and traps. They presented unique 
intrepatations of popular songs. Af- 
ter this Mr. Moffett led the student 
body in the singing of some songs. 



LEADS TEAM 



VARSITY CLUB TO 

INITIATE SOON 



Twelve Letter Men To Be Tak- 
en Into Organization 



COLLEGE BEATS BETTER 
TON IN HOCKEY MATCH 



Capt. Chambers Scores Two Of 
Four Goals To Win 4-3 



by Arthur Greima 

The flash of steel, speed, the clash 
of bodies, skill and competitive spirit 
held sway last Saturday when the 
rival teams of Betterton and Wash- 
ington College met in an ice hockey 
game on the frozen Chester River. 

Led by Capt. Dick Chambers, cen- 
ter and main cog of the locals attack, 
the collegians won the close score of 
4 to 3. "Pots" Chambers, erstwhile 
lacrosse star, emulated the famed 
"Ching" Johnson as he garnered two 
goals for the Maroons. Mr. George 
Ekaitis, football coach displayed his 
versatile ability by playing a bang up 
game at defense for the Washington 
icemen. Mr. Ekaitis, however had 
difficulty maintaining his footing and 
several times neatly handled the puck 
w 'th his body instead of his stick. 

Other luminaries for the collegians 
were: Wes Sadler, Vin Brandolini, 
•in Jack Perry, and Pudge Kilby, 



Cous: 



while Owens of the visitors stood 

The game was held up many times 
while a player left the rink and skat- 
C( l in pursuit of the elusive puck 
which, not having the usual side 
boards to keep it in play, slid many 
vards away. 

This novel contest was witnessed 
by some hundred spectators from 
J"wn, College and Betterton, and if 
the cold snap ensues, several other 
S1 mular engagements will follow. 



by Russell Baker 

The "W" club of Washington Col- 
lege held its first meeting of the new 
semester, on Monday, February 4. 
The work of the meeting was devoted 
to the preparations for the annual 
initiation of new members. Accord- 
ing to the eligibility rules, candidates 
for membership are those men who 
have earned a varsity letter during 
the past year. The names of the fol- 
lowing have been proposed for the 
ceremony, to take place on Wednes- 
day night, February 13: 

Harry Rhodes, football. 

Ellis Dwyer, football. 

Bill Nicholson, football. 

Arthur Griems, football. 

Alger Abbott, baseball. 

William Rhinehard, baseball. 

Elton Wilmot, football. 

Wilbert Huffman, football. 

Raymond Kilby, football. 

James Salter, football. 

Alfred Anderson, football. 

Gibbons Young, football. 

Any men whose names might have 
been omitted for consideration, and 
who are desirous of becoming mem 
bers may do so by notifying Ellery 
Ward or any member of the "W" 
club, before Wednesday, Februarv 
15. 

The Varsity Club, according to the 
custom of previous years, has decid- 
ed again to present to the winning 
team of the intra-mural basketball 
games a trophy that will make a per- 
manent record for the college. 




Ski f»t* 



Phil Skipp is maintaining his con- 
sistent playing record of two previous 
years. Under the new system of 
appointments, he has been captain 
of the victorious Flying Pentagon 
several times, and lead the squad in 
the Swarthmore victory last Wednes- 
day. He plays at center. His home 
is in Bristol, Conn. 



HAMLET PRODUCTION 
ATTRACTS INTEREST 

Follows Three Successful Per- 
formances Of Players 



KIBLERITES PLAY 

HOPKINS IN ARMORY 



Blue Jays Out To Revenge De- 
feat Early In Season 



Senior Class Presents Foot- 
ball Photograph To College 

Picture Of First Undefeated 
Team In Dean's Office 

The Senior Class at Washington 
College recently presented to the 
College an enlarged photograph of 
the undefeated football squad of the 
1934 season. The picture, which is 

product Of Zhamsky Studios of 
Philadelphia, has been placed on the 
wall of the Dean's office. This act 
on the part of the senior class repre- 
sents a fitting tribute to the most suc- 
cessful football team Washington 
College has ever produced. 



Hopkins and Washington meet to- 
night, on the Armory court, for the 
second and final game of the year. 

The Blue Jays have not shown 
much improvement since the game of 
January 11, when they were defeat- 
ed by the locals. Washington has 
improved by leaps and bounds since 
then and the question is not whether 
they will win or not but who will 
make the most points, Salter or Hor- 
owitz. 

Up to now, little or nothing has 
been said about the Junior Varsity 
team. The fact that chey have been 
omitted in writeups does not detract 
from their ability. They have dis- 
played a good brand of basketball 
this year and have come out the vic- 
tor in nearly every contest. 

Probable starting lineups: 

Washington Johns Hopkins 

Salter F Siverd 

Horowitz F Siegel 

Skipp C ... Chancellor 

Wilmot . G Woodrow 

Huffman .... . G Rasin 



The Shakespeare Club of the Col- 
lege will once again step into the 
limelight on Friday evening, March 
8, when it will present "Hamlet" in 
William Smith Hall. The club fol- 
lowing the tradition of all Shakes- 
peare companies has decided to give 
"Hamlet" after three successful per- 
formances under the direction of Dr. 
Gertrude Ingalls. 

No play has ever been acted more, 
either in Europe or America, There 
is an interesting account of its being 
given aboard Captain William Reel- 
ing's ship, The Dragon, at Sierra 
Leone in 1608 as an entertainment 
for the Captain's Portuguese and 
English friends and as a beneficial 
occupation for the crew. 

Since the play's first performance 
in the Globe Theatre, London, in 
1601, there have been many actors 
who have reached their peak of fame 
playing "Hamlet." Richard Burbage 
of Shakespeare's own company heads 
this list. He was followed by such 
actors as Betterton, Ryan, Mil'a, 
Garrick, Barry, Kean and the well- 
known, Forbes Robertson. 

Forbes Robertson, probably the 
greatest of all these, made his last 
tour of this country some twenty 
years ago and has now retired from 
the stage. 

America has never produced a 
Hamlet equal to that of the English, 
but such actors as Booth, Mantell, 
John Barrymore, and Walter Hamp- 
den have made a name for themselves 
on the American stage. 

However, there is still time. If 
a new curtain, an enthusiastic act, 
hard working publicity agents and 
loyal patrons can be of any value to 
our "Hamlet", Washington College 
may give a new name to the Ameri- 
can list. Who knows? 



CAXTONIANS ARE ENTER- 
TAINED BY PRES. MEAD 



See 



Old Editions From 
Private Library 



regular 
Gilbert 



Marvin H. Smith Elected By 
Sophs To Student Council 



Marvin Hugh Smith was elected to 
the Student Council at Washington 
College as the representative fiom 
the sophomore class, at a meeting 
held at 12:30 F. M-, Friday, Febru- 
ary b. Smith fills the vacancy caus- 
ed by the resignation of Alger Ab- 
bott from the Council, because 
Council membership interfered with 
his other campus activities, Mr. Ab- 
bott stated that he could conscien- 
tiously no longer continue as a mem- 
ber. 



William Doering Will Speak 
To International Society 



William Doering, '38, will address 
the International Society of Wash- 
ington College on the subject "Re- 
action vs. Democracy, The Battle Of 
The Century," at a regular meeting 
next Wednesday evening, February 
lo. 



by Jay Spry 

The Caxtonians held its 
meeting at the home of Dr 
W. Mead Tuesday evening, February 
5th. 

After a short business meeting, 
Dr. Mead took charge of an informal 
program, showing the group several 
books which illustrate periods of type 
and binding from the sixteenth cen- 
tury to the nineteenth. He named 
the factors which make for associa- 
tion items and gave books from his 
own library as examples. Two books 
intimately connected with the history 
of the College, a first edition of 
Gustavus Vasa and an early history 
of Washington College, were seen by 
the members. Many fine books in 
fine editions were pulled from shelves 
and thumbed through during the 
course of the evening. 

Four new members were voted in- 
to the society. These were: Law- 
rence Yourtee, Marvin Smith, Rob- 
ert Fink, and Howard Clark. Mem- 
bers of the society reported the last 
month's issues of the Saturday Re 
view of Literature. Interesting 
items were read from a late book cat- 
alogue. Plans were informally made 
for attending a Gilbert and Sullivan 
opera in Washington February 23. 

Mrs. Mead served sandwiches and 
coffee after the meeting had adjourn- 
ed. 



Students Granted 
Stack Privileges 

Comes As Climax* To Cam- 
paign Begun By Students 

by Marvin Smith 

Stack privileges have been granted 
to Washington College students. This 
announcement was made in the as- 
sembly Thursday by Wesley L. Sad- 
ler, President of the Student Coun- 
cil. 

The granting of stack privileges 
comes as the climax to a campaign 
begun several weeks ago by an in- 
vestigation conducted by Jay Spry. 
The results of which appeared in the 
Washington ELM. A published in- 
vestigation showed faculty and stu- 
dent opinions to be definitely in fa- 
vor of the plan. The Student Coun- 
cil at its meeting Monday night am- 
plified suggestions appearing in the 
ELM, and adopted plans for rules 
and regulations of stack privileges. 
The plans were approved by Presi- 
dent Mead and by Mrs. Fox, the li- 
brarian. 

The rules as drawn up by the 
Council are as follows: 

1. The stacks will be open from 
3 p. m. until 5 p. m. every day except 
Saturday and Sunday. 

2. There will be a FERA worker 
just inside the door of the stacks to 
see that the books are properly re- 
corded. The regular librarian * will 
have nothing to do with the stack 
books at this time other than to help 
the students find the books they are 
seeking. 

3. There will be one or two tab- 
les within the stacks for the use of 
those students who desire to use 
these books only for an hour or two. 

4. If the student uses the stack 
books at one of the tables within the 
stacks, he will leave the books on the 
table there and the FERA worker 
will see that they are put away after 
the stacks are closed. 

5. Only a reasonable number of 
students will be allowed in the stacks 
at one time. 

t>. Positively no books can be 
taken from the stacks without being 
properly recorded Dy the FERA 
worker stationed there. 

7. The order of the books on the 
shelves is not to be disturbed. 

8. The first two weeks this plan 
is in operation a member of the Stu- 
dent Council will be in the stacks to 
give any aid that is necessary. 

9. Violation of these rules will 
result in the suspension of this priv- 
ilege. 



MISS ELIZABETH STUART 
ADDRESSES HISTORIANS 



The semi-annual nominations of 
the Mount Vernon Liteiary Society 
wore held in room 21 of William 
Smith Hall. Thursday, February 7. 
The elections will take place Thurs- 
day, February 14, at 12:30 in the 
siime room. 



Is D. A. R. Member And Well- 
Known Genealogist 

Miss Elizabeth Stuart, former re- 
gent of the Old Kent Chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion and at present historian of the 
London Bridge Chapter of that or- 
ganization, will address the Wash- 
ington College Historical Society 
Wednesday evening, February 13. at 
7:30 in room 11. William Smith 
Hall. 

Miss Stuart has been for years en- 
gaged in historical research work in 
this county and has done interesting 
work in the field of genealogical re- 
search. All are invited to attend 
this meeting and enjoy an interest- 
ing evening. A number of Kent 
County citizens who arc niton- 
the history of the ootinty will be in- 
vited to attend the meeting and plana 
will he made tor the collection and 

publication oJ historical material by 
the Historical Society] 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 1935 



stances, expunged from the ultimate 
membership roll of the body. Thus 
the freshman's choice must be wise 
and well-considered. 

Just at this point, another very im- 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College,! 

i «- >j * - *-* «.- _ „•* portant problem evidently comes to 
the eleventh oldest institution of r * , _ V* , . 

_, . , _ , hand. How is the freshman to be 
higher learning m the United States, guided m his decision? Of course. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 17S2. ! tnere are many external signs of a 

_^__ j fraternity which may seem signifi- 

WLUiam Oliver Baker Editor j cant to him. Under the system of 

Carroll Cs^teel Asst. Editor j ™5hing now in effect at the College, 

Lonis Goldstein Bus. Manager I ^e freshman, theoretically knows 

~~ „ . . _, ... the fraternity man but slightly. This 

Emerson Slacum Asst. Bus. Mgr.|. g required by the rnfe that no in _ 

. j fluence concerning fraternities be 

Associate Editors J brought to bear on the first-year 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, man. Also, if the fraternity man 
William Kight. Jean Harshaw, Alfred makes any pretense at abiding by the 



Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 
Whyte, Howard Clark 

Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, SI. 50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 



SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 1935 

CHOOSING FRATERNITIES 

Soon, it is even possible that be- 
fore this article is read, the excite- 
ment cf Pledge Day for the fratern- 
ities on College Hill will be over. It 
is the unfortunate, and really very 
serious fault of fraternities that on . 
Pledge Day someone must be disap- qmrements to be admitted to a col 
poinfed. Bids, it seems, cannot be ; |ege of^ Harvard's ; excellent repute 
sent to all. Already, under the sys 



] College rules, which were, incidental- 
, ly, of the fraternities* own choosing, 
I the freshman can know him not at all 
I as a fraternity man. Thus the prob- 
i lem becomes complex indeed, but, at 

least for some members of the class 
I of '3S, it will soon be, or has been, 

settled forever. 

EXITS IN FEBRUARY 
i The recent semester grades issued 
I at Harvard University illustrates the 
inaccuracy of college boards exami- 
nations, which vre often held up as 
; all of the good and beautiful by ed- 
. ucators in states operating under the 
regents system. There is no doubt 
; fhet a student must entirely satis- 
! lactorily meet all college board re- 



It was found without exception that 
such executives as Miss Tompkins of 
the Vassar Miscellany, Miss Royon 
of the Smith College Weekly and 
Miss Jump of the Mount Holyoke 
College News are superior in scholar 
ship, and have well-rounded interests 
carrying them beyond the campus 
publications field. 



Students Vote 2 - 1 
Can Avoid War 



tem Washington maintains to govern 
the scholarship standards of fratern- 
ities, several admirable and certain- 
ly intelligent members of the fresh- 
man class will, by a quirk of unkind 
fate, be forced to postpone their fra- 
ternity affiliation until they have be- 
come more completely accustomed to 
the technique of study in college; 



They, and other members of the class j n ™ m college. 



tion. Yet 16.9 percent of the enroll- 
ed first year men failed to meet mid- 
year examination requirements to re- 
main in the College. 

Naturally, the Administration up 
at Cambridge has been a bit disturb- 
ed over the whole matter. Delniat 
Leighton, Dean of freshmen, thinks 
that sometimes "elements of charact- 
er and temperment . lead to fail- 



who are not, or were not, summoned 
to the Dean's office on Pledge Day, 
should fully realize that Washington 
College is too intimate, too informal, 
and too closely knit together to feel 
that they are on the "outside," while 
some of their own classmates have 
gone "in." 

The spirit of a fraternity and fra- 
ternal life is a wonderful, inspiring 
experience. It makes an indelible 
imprint on the least impressionable, 
and creates a bond which passes over 
generations, and, in the cast of a 
national, passes over continents, and 
the very face of the globe. But this 
true fraternal union is not a selfish 
thing. It incorporates itself into the 
body of the college. The fraternity 



Further comments by Dean Leigh- 
ton are significant not only to teach- 
ers who are being prepared at Wash- 
ington College, but also to alumni 
and future alumni of the institution 
who may sometime have to face the 
contingency of Maryland's adoption 
of the college board system, and gov- 
ern the method of entrance into their 
institution accordingly. 

He notes: 

"College board examinations pro- 
vide a valuable test of a boy's com- 
mand of certain subjects at the com- 
pletion of preparatory school educa- 
tion; they present a picture which is 
extremely useful to a college which 
must select expeditiously among 
many candidates for admission, but 
the picture does not portray the 



becomes an organized group for the ; methods used bv the painter , a nd on- 
furtherance of the college s interests, ■ , y indirectlv amd imne rfectly does it 
and hence the interests of every stu- J TCTcal thoE ; traits of character, and 
dent in the college. Thus, though ^at ability to respond to a mature 
not m lorm, it , is very evident that in | inte ,iectual environment which aie 
spirit, fraternities at such a compact so jraportant for £uccess in coIlege .» 
unit as Washington College should 1 



have no barrier between themselves 
and the rest of the student body. All 
are basically the same, and there 
should be no diminition of friend- 
ship or of love because one finds him- 
self a fraternity man, and one's 
chum is not. 

Also, anywhere, but most particu- 
larly at a small college like our be- 



Literary Digest Poll 50-50 
For Entry Into League 



A FLYING PENTAGON 

The vigorous second-term business 
of other activities should not remove 
the student's attention from the ex- 
cellent work Coach Kibler and his 
basketball squad are consistently do- 
ing. Washington's Dean cf Mary- 
land basketball coaches has seeming- 
ly produced a team this vear that will, 
loved Washington, petty partisanship : ]Ske the g i or j oug football season, pro- 
and politics, and afiiliations springing , duce ^ de and commendable notice 
from fraternity actions are mean,| for the College. It is true that the 
contemptible things. They invan- littJe Loy ia affair was annoying, but 
ably result in being "flat, stale, and , Lhe trouncing of St. Johns last Sat- 
unprofitable. They are usually : ardaV| a team which was beaten by 

wea* tricks, too shallow and trans- , Loyola by a very narrow margin, 
parent to stand the scrutiny of an . pr0V es that the Maroon and Black 
honest eye, and often they dismte- 1 cagers have not yet shown by any 
grate under stress of their own pet- 1 means their full power and speed. 
tineas, but sometimes not before per- j Tne larger floor, and the jammed- 
manent harm is done. I jllf enthusiastic spectators not only 

One cannot think of fraternities {stimulate the fine game itself, but al- 
without thinking of permanence. In | so gladden the Graduate Manager's 
this regard, one means not only the , heart. 

assured perpetual continuity of a oo — » ■ 

great national, which ramifies itself j EDITORIAL ACTIVITY 

into every occupation in life, (and The activities of college editors 
takes care, often, that its members ' over all of the nation in the current 
are well placed in those occupations). Literary Digest Peace Poll, and in 
Also, is meant the long life of fra- other public discussions ;-ponsored by 
t*rnity membership. Fraternity the newly formed Association of Col- 
membership is often likened to the lege Editors have done much to break 
institution of marriage, in ernphasiz- \ down the often correct opinion of the 



Nearly one-sixth of American un- 
iversity undergraduates states they 
would not bear arms in case the Unit- 
ed States was invaded, according to 
the semifinal returns of The Literary 
Digest College Peace Poll conducted 
among the students of 115 leading 
universities, as published in to-mor- 
row's issue of the magazine. 

Of the 91,055 students voting on 
this issue S3. 60 per cent, marked 
their ballots that they would fight in 
case an enemy invaded the United 
States, while 16.40 per cent, voted 
negatively. 

On the policy of "should the Unit- 
ed States enter the League of Na- 
tions?" the balloting was almost a 
tie — 50.17 per cent, voting for entry 
and 49.83 per cent, signifying they 
were opposed. 

Ask if they believed the United 
States could stay out of another great 
war, the student bodies responded 
with a more than 2 to 1 vote that the 
nation could avoid another major 
conflict. 

The undergraduates balloted over- 
whelmingly negative on the question 
of bearing arms "for the United 
States in the invasion of the borders 
of another country." Of the 90,281 
votes recorded on this section of 1 the 
referendum, 17.83 per cent, were 
marked "Yes" while 82.17 per cent, 
were tallied in the "No" column. 

The students balloted 90.78 per 
cent, advocating "Government con- 
trol of armament and munitions in- 
dustries." 

By a vote of 33,870 to 58,025. they 
voiced opposition to the national pol- 
icy that "An American navy and air 
force second to none is a sound meth- 
od of insuring us against being drawn 
into another great war." 

On the seventh question of "In 
alinement with our historic proced- 
ure in drafting man-power in time of 
war, would you advocate the prin- 
ciple of universal conscription of all 
resources of capital and labor in ord- 
er to control all profits in time of 
war?" the vote showed 81.98 per 
cent, of the balloting for such uni- 
versal conscription to 18.02 per cent. 
opposed. 

The Literary Digest announces that 
this College Peace Poll is being con- 
ducted in cooperation with the Asso- 
ciation of College Editors who have 
been stimulating a response to the 
balloting through the medium of 
their own undergraduate publica- 
tions. 



mg the importance of a wijie choice. 
Still, so far there has been establish- 
ed m device for divorce from a fra- 
ternity. For one reason or another, 
a fraternity man may ren'ign from the 
active chapter roll, but he is never, 
except under the most trying* circum- 



late twenties that college editors 
were grafters, and senseless activity 
chasers. Another confirmation 
the increasing seriousness of purpose 
of the college press is an individual 
analysis of the ten leading women ed< 
itors in the Eastern United States. 



Student Council Notes To 
Be Published In Future 



Plan For Stack Privileges In 
Library Submitted 



Editor's Note: 

The following was received from 
the Secretary of the Student Coun- 
cil: 

Through neglect in the past, the 
Student Council minutes have not 
been published, and due to a rising 
demand for these minutes, all import- 
ant business v/ill be submitted for 
publication in the future. 

At the Council's last meeting, Feb, 
4, 1935, the following business was 
discussed: 

A plan for stack privileges in the 
library is being formulated by the 
Council. The plan consists of em- 
ploying a F. E. R. A. worker to help 
students procure books in the regu- 
lated manner. Freedom of the stacks 
v/ill be from the hours 3 to 5 P. M. 
A member of the Council will be on 
hand during the first few days to sec 

(Continued in next column) 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



As a certain well known philoso- 
pher says, "All we know is what we 
read in the papers," soo — , the 
"Swarthmore Phoenix" says, "and 
that reminds us, William D. {daunt- 
less) Hood raises a weak right hand 
in favor of bigger and better basket- 
ball trips anywhere at any time. He 
is, however, Swarthmore's most eco- 
nomical manager." 

(He must have saved plenty of 
pencil point keeping uack of Swarth- 
more's score last Wednesday night j. 



POME 



A school girl complexion 
May make men rave. 



A peach bloom neck 
May temper a knave. 



A gold glint marcel 
A love path may pave. 



But a man would go far 
For a permanent shave. 



-Indiana Daily Student. 



"In a certain math class last week 
Professor Higgins was calling the 
roll. He came to a name that re- 
mained unanswered. 'Miss Use] 
once' he said. 'Miss Usel twice. Miss 
Usel three times.' " 

"Sold," said a sleepy freshman 
voice on the back row. 

— The Indiana Statesman. 



Here's a rather clever rhetorical 
courtship which comes from the 
"Tower" of Catholic University: 

'You see a beautiful girl walking 
down the street. She is singular, 
feminine and nominative. You walk 
across the street, changing to verbal, 
and then become dative. You walk 
home together. Her brother is an 
indefinite article, and her mother is 
accusative and becomes imperative. 
You talk about the future and she 
changes the subject. Her father be- 
comes present and you become past 
tense." 



And then, in the Temple News, we 
have our old friend Prof. Mongoose 
who defines grammar as he sees her. 

COLON: A perfume. 

COMMA: A box that snaps 
tuxes. 

WORD: Harrassed, fearful. 

CLAUSE: To shut, covering 
the body. 

BOOK: Slang term for dollar. 

QUOTE: Usually worn with pants. 

PAPER: One of the condiments. 

ECLIPSES: What you like to kiss. 

PHRASE: To be chilled. 



pic- 



for 



Girl Friend: "Where did you get 
the A?" 

Bilger: "I played basketball at 
Navy." 

Girl Friend : "But Navy begins with 
N." 

Bilger: "Yes, I know, but I played 
on the second team." 

— Annapolis Log. 



Soph, (to frosh coed) : Have you 
matriculated at this college?" 
Coed: "Sir." 

— Arizona Kitty-Kat. 



that the work is carried on in the 
correct manner. 

A report submitted by the Cafeter- 
ia Committee resulted in the selec- 
tion of Mr. Sadler, Mi. Lord, and Mr. 
Fink to work in collaberation with 
Dr. Mead in obtaining better condi- 
tions in the cafeteria. Table service, 
if desired by the student body in gen- 
eral, will be sought. 

There being no further business, 
the meeting was adjourned. 



Visit 


ALBERT L. WHEAT 


For Anything 


in 


Men's Wear 



TOLD TO 

ME 

By 1. Un-ly Heard 



After reading the drivel in this 
column, scandal mongers are inspired 
to write their own observations of 
each others indiscretions. The follow- 
ing are some of the anonymous con- 
tributions received during the week 
which make it unnecessary to desig- 
nate a regular staff member for Lhe 
work. This policy will be continued 
in the future. 



Wild Bill Hall is nominated to act 
as president of "The Library Lovers 
Club." A year of training with 
Alice Marion fitted him to take on 
Elsie. 

Jeff and Jean must have found 
something to their mutual satisfac- 
tion. They are seen everywhere to- 
gether. 

If "Doc" were still here young 
Clark wouldn't spend so many even- 
ings down town. Between the "Doc" 
and the Navy, Howdy isn't very suc- 
cessful, but after his attempted dou- 
ble-crossing he dc e;:n't deserva a 
break. 

Middle Hall debates whether Dr. 
Robinson likes Snappy or Eieczy 
stories better than War Aces. Some 
say he prefers the Harmonica. 

Are two Campus big-shots to Dt- 
come rivals? While Dick was ciuset- 
ed in solemn conclave Mary Jane 
went sledding with Mike of the 
Tau's. 

Why the clatter of heels when the 
fair librarians sally forth from the 
sacred cage? Do they want all eyes 
to feast on the passing feminine 
pulchritude? Sometimes students go 
into the library to work. 

In the preliminary games Harry 
Russell calls technical fouls like a 
big time referee. Wonder if he is 
trying to fool the public. 

Before a recent game Salter was 
watching McDorman with an eagle 
eye. It wasn't hero worship. Don 
was sitting with Jim's Betty. 

The carefree assistant editor of 
the ELM has a weakness for Kent 
County girls. Intensity of interest 
radiates in lessening degrees from a 
center somewhere around Galena. 

Whenever Washington College is 
mentioned before a Baltimore babe 
she catches her breath. Alice always 
asks week-enders about George de- 
Socio. Somehow she can't forget 
how the Phi romeo made love after 
he loosened his tongue. 

Herman Benton, former sponsor of 
a clean-up Washington campaign, 
was nominated for president of the 
Y. M. C. A. Marvin Smith was his 
alleged backer. 

One of -Perry's old flames, Pete 
Tull, left her date and kept Dolan on 
his toes in Baltimore last week end. 



LeCATES 
BARBER 



BROS. 
SHOP 



Where the college man 

can get his style of 

hair cut 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 



SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 1935 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



KITING OVER 
SPORTS 

by William Right 



THE 



"Dutch" Lentz, St. John's coach, 
certainly received a big surprise the 
other day when notified that his bas- 
ketball squad would be reduced by 
nineteen men. It seems that the 
boys refused to take their lessons sei- 
jously so the dean decided to give 
them the afternoons as well as the 
evenings for study. 

Among those suspended were Lam- 
bros, who has been St. John's out- 
standing player to date, Evans, cen- 
ter, and several other men who had 
seen a good deal of service this year. 

This practically eliminates the 
Johnnies as a championship contend- 
er and they will be very fortunate if 
they finish better than last in the 
State League. 

Western Maryland has improved 
greatly since playing here, having- de- 
feated St. Johns and Mt. St. Mary's, 



RADIO SUPPLY CO. 
Radios, Washing Machines, 
Sewing Machines. Repairs for 
all makes of radios. Records 
and Sheet Music. 
Lusby Moffett, F. W. Smith, Jr. 
Phone 111J 



After An Evening of Hard 
Study Refresh Yourself at the 

CAFETERIA CANTEEN 
All Kinds of Sandwiches, Can- 
dies, Tobaccos, Milk and 
Ice Cream 



Up To The Minute 
Coiffures 

PARK ROW 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Phone 334-306 Park Row 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 

The Rexall Store 



L C. Treherne W. G. Smyth 

TREHERNE ASSOCIATES 

REALTY 

Salt Water Homes, Colonial 

Estates, Inland Farms and 

Ducking Shores 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



After the Show follow 
the Crowd to the Most 
Modern Ice Cream Par- 
lor in Town. 

GILL BROS. 



the latter by a close score. 

Washington now leads the pack in 
the pennant chase with four victories 
and one defeat while Loyola follows 
closely with three wins and one de- 
feat. These two teams appear to be 
the cream of the crop in the state 
loop and the title will probably be a- 
warded to the winning team when the 
Greyhounds play here for the final 
league game of the season. 



KIBLERITES DEFEAT 

SWARTHMORE 40-17 



Swarthmore came to town Wednes- 
day night but was no match for the 
Maroon and Black courtmen wno took 
the opportunity to show the visitors 
how good basketball should be play- 



ed. The first team soon rolled up 
a sizeable score and shortly after the 
second period opened Coach Kibler 
sent in the second team which car- 
ried on where the first left off. 

Final score : Washington 40, 
Swarthmore 17. 

The game last Saturday night prov- 
ed that as a championship team St. 
John's is out. Although fighting val- 
iantly this plucky little team was no 
match for a vastly improved Wash- 
ington team. 

At no time during the game were 
the locals headed. They took the 
ball at the opening whistle and quick- 
ly ran up eleven points before the 



Compliments 
of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331 -M 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



§f cl| m i i> t s 


fleet 


Distributed 


by 


THE CHESAPEAKE 


BEVERAGE 


CO. 


Chestertown 


Md. 



Where The College Boys 
Meet 

Herb's Restaurant 

All American 

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Beat Food 

Prompt Service 

Our Beer Is The Best In 
Town 



PAGE THREE 



Johnnies could get a score. Even 
though the score was fairly close at 
the beginning of the second half, the 
Sho'men put on the power and won 
40 to 21. 

Horowitz, Salter and Skipp turned 
in fine performances for the locals 
while Lambros was St. John's best 
bet. 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Bid. Given on AH Types of 
Construction 

Phone Chestertown 305 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 
GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

Phone 109 or 8ISF4 

332 High St. 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 

Watches, Rings and 
Novelty Jewelry. 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P. 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 318 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 
Salisbury, Md. 

Phones : 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



"The Bank Where 
You Feel At Home" 

The First 
National Bank 



Of Chestertown 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 

C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



PHILLIPS 

"E L1CIO" 5 



STUDENTS 
,-We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 
A store run for the benefit of t he students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



Margaret £. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, Md. 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And AH Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



GRAY BEAUTY SALON 

New Eugene Permanents 
with ringlet ends 

$5.00 

We have another Per- 
manent with ringlet 
ends for $3.50 




V77J 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 1935 



Social Functions 
Mark New Half 



Mr. And Mrs. D. K. Boynton 
And Others Entertain 



Mr. and Mrs. Delano K. Boynton 
entertained a group of college stu- 
dents at their home on Water Street 
several days ago, with a bridge-tea. 
The guests were: the Misses Jane 
Ytrase, Mary Jane Nield, Margaret 
Wanderer, Dorothy Williams and 
Dorothy Clarke, and the Messrs. Alan 
Brougham, Dick Chambers, George 
DeSocIo, Dick Sayler and Robert 
Clifford. 



Dr. Frederick livingood entertain- 
ed the Phi Sigma Tau Fraternity with 
a party at his home on Washington 
Avenue last Friday night a week. 



Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert W. Meade en- 
tertained the Caxtonian Society on 
Tuesday night at their home on 
Washington College. The Society 
•was privileged to examine several old 
volumes belonging to the President. 



FROSH FLASH 

HITHER AND YON 



The Washington College Cotillion 
Club gave its third dance at the gym- 
nasium last night. The ebnee was 
most successful, and the decorations 
as effective as ever. 



Icicles sixty feet long, three feet 
thick, and visible nine miles away, 
were deposited on the side of Moro 
Rock, Sequoia National Park in a 
winter snowstorm. The huge col- 
umns of ice were the largest ever 
seen in the park. 



by L. J. Koleshko, Guest Artist 

Can you imagine Bowen, scouting 
all week to find a girl to take to the 
Cotillion? It seems that Vernon 
can't make up his mind, on, perhaps, 
Vernon, they can't. 



Harry Kaufman, who until last 
week, held the honors in this column, 
still goes around with the look in his 
eyes that the world in general has 
done him wrong. Poor Harry, im- 
agine anybody doing him wrong! 

A genius is budding in our class. 
"Iggie" Benhara, who tries to impress 
Kolsliko and Kosowsky with his act- 
ing, picked out the wrong play to do 
it in. He gave them an impression 
of Romeo and Juliet, and played the 
two parts. Everything was going 
alright when the balcony broke, and 
buried Iggie. I guess the double- 
deck bed wouldn't do for a balcony. 



Biological Society 
Announces Lecture 



Attention Called Also 
Clipping Magazine 



To 



by William McCulIough 
"Health Work Among The Negroes 
Of Kent County" is the title of the 
film that is to accompany Dr. Beach- 
ley's lecture to be delivered before 
the Biological Society on February 
1-1. 

This meeting will be the first one 
of the second semester. The execu- 
tive committee announces that they 
expect to resume activities with re- 
newed vigor. They wish to remind 
students of the Biology Clipping 
Magazine. This magazine has re- 
ceived many contributions during the 
past semester and is well worth in- 
spection by the students. 



And while rambling, let us alight 
for a moment on our flash — Leon | 
Horowitz. Where, oh where, has he 
been spending his Sundays? And 
who, oh who, is he thinking of when 
he does his best playing on the ball- 
courts? Can it be — but no! Not she 
of High or Low street — Passe, Leon. 



Our dear friend Bergdoll seems to 
be lonely, or somebody thought he 
was. The other day, Luke received 
an application to join the "Lonely 
Hearts Club." When Luke was asked 
what he thought about it, he said 
"Oh, some guy trying to be funny." 
But, when no one was looking he sat 
down and wrote for further informa- 
tion. 



Kappa Gamma Sorority 

Entertained At Initiation 



Mrs, Florence Wilmer was form- 
ally initiated into the sorority last 
Monday night. Mrs. Frank Simpers 
entertained the sorority at a party 
afterwards. Mrs. Gilbert W. Meade, 
and Miss Amanda Bradley were 
guests of honor. Mrs. Thomas Kib- 
ler, Mrs. Frank Goodwin, Mrs. Fred- 
erick Dumschott, and Miss Florence, 
honorary members of the sorority, 
were present. 



CHEMISTRY CLUB 

SEES MOVIE 



The Chemistry Club resumed activ- 
ity with its regular meeting on Feb- 
ruary 5. A film showing Anaconda 
Copper was the main feature of the 
meeting. 

The next meeting will take place 
on February 19 at which time sev- 
eral members of the club will have 
topics to discuss. 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto — Safety First 

F. G. Usilton, Pres. 

L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 

H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



An oxy-electric torch, invented by 
Americans, is capable of cutting steel 
under water, operating much liks 
torches above the surface. 



STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 
331 High St. 

High Quality Accessories 
At Low Prices 

Goodrich Tires, Tubes and 
Batteries 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 -- Chestertown 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 

Machinery 



Men's and Ladies' 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



HOLDEN'S 


SERVICE STATION 


Cross St. and Maple Ave. 


Sunoco Products 



College Mil! Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drinks, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 




you're telling me 
they satisfy/? 




©«*& 



a**.— 




1 <* x"^ .ilvYt-t > 




MONDAY WEDNESDAY 
LOCBEZLA LILY 



8ATTJBDAY 

ma 

BOBI PONS 40nEf,tOKHWIIA 

XOSTELANETZ OICHESYBA *"» CHOBMB 

9 P. M. (e. 8. T.) — COLUMBIA NETWOBX 



© 1935, LfflOBTl It M" I 



Wear And Tear 
On Delaware 




JILMli!. 



Attend Play* 
Monday Night 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 18. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, FEB. 16, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



Dramatic Club Give 
Two Productions 

One Act Plays To Be Present- 
ed Monday Evening 



by Frances Silcox 

"Where the Cross was Made" a 
nielo-drama by Eugene O'Neil and 
"A Girl to Order" a comedy by Bes- 
sie Wreford Springer are the two 
one-act plays to be given under the 
directorship of Robert Clifford and 
William Hall of the Dramatic Club 
on Monday evening, February 18th 
in Willim Smith Hall. 

In the first of these plays, William 
VanNewkirk plays the part of an old 
worn-out sea captain, Captain Bart- 
lett, who spends his time in a tower 
scanning the sea for a ship to come 
jn loaded down with treasure. Doro- 
thy Clarke and Robert Fink, well 
known dramatic club players, will be 
seen in the roles of his daughter and 
son. 

Lee Dolan, donning his middle-ag- 
ed character once more, is the doc- 
tor who does his part in making the 
play weird and very dramatic, Wes- 
ley Sadler, Charles Benham, and 
David Wallace make up a trio of 
rough and ready sailors who will 
probably look more like pirates under 
dim lights. 

"A Girl to Order" is quite in con- 
trast, a typical college story of a love 
fight, a spendthrift son, several help- 
ing college friends, and an unexpect- 
ed father. 

Donald McDorman as "Dud" El- 
liot writes his father, at the sugges- 
tion of "Puck" Evans, Ernest Hol- 
land, "Biscuits" Nelson, David Wal- 
lace, and "Lady" Clayton, Frederick 
Taylor, that presents to a girl caus- 
ed him to incur such heavy debts at 
the well-known "Mac's". The cli- 
max is reached when Benjamin Van- 
dervoort, the father, arrives on the 
scene to meet his future daughter- 
in-law, and Frederick Taylor imper- 
sonates the lovely fiancee. 

When Elsie Jordan, played by 
Fern Blackway, the real and only 
girl in the play, comes to make apol- 
ogies, there are several misunder- 
standings to be "ironed* out, as you 
might expect. 

The contrast of the two plays 
promises to make the program very 
enjoyable and the directors and casts 
are working hard to put on a good 
performance. And remember jour 
admission is as always — your loyalty 
to the Dramatic Club plus your ten 
pennies! 



DR. G. F. ZOOK HONOR 
GUEST AT CONVOCATION 



Elaborate Program Planned 
For Washington's Birthday 



Group 



Dr. George F. Zook, of Washing- 
ton, D. C, will be the principal 
speaker at the mid-winter convoca- 
tion exercise to be held, according to 
the annual custom, on the twenty- 
first of February in William Smith 
Hall. At this time all the formali- 
ties of convocation will be observed, 
in celebration of Washington's birth- 
day and in commemoration of his in- 
timate connection and services in the 
founding of the college. 

Dr. Zook is a noted authority and 
speaker on educational subjects, and 
has had wide experience in his field. 
He was for some years Chief of the 
Division of Higher Education in the 
United States, and following this he 
was elected to serve as President of 
the University of Akron from 1925 
to 1933. He left that position last 
year to become United States Com- 
missioner of Education, and has re- 
cently resigned in order to accept 
the position of Director of the A- 
merican Council on Education. 

County and city school superin- 
tendants of Delaware and the Eas- 
tern Shore of Maryland have been 
invited to attend the Convocation, 
following which they will be enter- 
tained by President Mead at a lun- 
cheon to meet Dr. Zook. 



STUDENTS APPRECIATE 
STACK PRIVILEGES 



Discusses Role Of 
Chemistry In Medicine 



The role of chemistry in medicine 
will feature the next Tuesday even-! 
ing meeting of the Washington Col- 
lege Chemical Society. "Man 
Against Microbe" is the title of a 
film which opens the program. Wil- 
jiam Kight will discuss "Drugs Used 
m the Fight Against Disease." 

At this meeting, too, the Society 
Will attempt to present in summary 
a review of developments in chemis- 
try during the past year. This is 
cognate with its policy to discuss cur- 
rent chemical advances. 



Baltimore Alumni Entertain 
0>". Mead Monday Evening 



On the evening of Monday, Feb- 
ruary Hth, Dr. Gilbert W. Mead was 
entertained by the Baltimore Chap- 
ter of the Alumni Association at the 
Hotel Rcnnert in Baltimore. Later 
j^at same evening ho addressed the 
Men'a Club of the Episcopal Church 
of St. Michael and the Angola, of 
which R. Earle Greenlee is president. 



The student body of Washington 
College seems well pleased with the 
first week of stack privileges. 

Wesley Sadler, President of the 
Student Council, reported himself 
greatly pleased with the way this 
new plan has worked out. He stated 
that it was his opinion that great 
value would be derived from this in 
novation. 

Robert Snyder, the FERA worker 
stationed in the stacks, said that 
there were as many books checked 
out Wednesday as there were Mon- 
day and Tuesday together, it being 
his belief that the students were just 
waking up to the fact that there 
were open stacks. He added that 
there had been no mishaps and that 
he thought everyone to be thoroughly 
enjoying as well as deriving much 
good from these privileges. 

Lawrence Williams believed the 
open stacks to be one of the biggest 
improvements in Washington College 
in his three years here. In his mind, 
it makes the student feel at home. 

Jay Spry said that the plan, in his 
opinion, has gotten off to a good 
start. "The success of the plan is now 
up to the student body; the Admin- 
istration has done all it can do," he 
added. 



SPEAKS THURSDAY 




2)R. Qbogqe R -zook 

Dr. Zook will be the guest of hon- 
or and speaker at the Washington's 
Birthday Convocation next Thursday. 
He will also attend a luncheon given 
by President Mead after the morn- 
ing celebration. 



ML Vernon Elections Show 
Few Changes In Offices 



FACULTY GROUP TALKS 
BEFORE HONOR SOCIETY 



A discussion of the recent Euro- 
pean Arms Agreement will be led by 
Dr. Arthur Davis representing Gei- 
many, Dr. Kathleen Carpenter re- 
presenting England, Mr. Lawrence 
Ford representing France, and Mr. 
Frederick Dumschott representing 
the United States, at the regular 
meeting of the Scholastic Honor So- 
ciety of Washington College to be 
held in Reid Hall at 8 o'clock in the 
evening, February 19. All are mem- 
bers of the Washington College fac- 
ulty. 

The new members of the Society 
will attend the meeting, and partici- 
pate in the student discussion which 
will follow the talks. 



Wesley L. Sadler was re-elected 
President of the Mount Vernon Lit- 
erary Society at that organization's 
semi-annual election held Thursday, 
February 14, in Room 21. 

The other officers for the second 
semester are as follows: Vice-Presi- 
dent, Calvin Rogers; Secretary, Car- 
roll Casteel; Treasurer, Louis Gold- 
stein; and Board of Curators, Caro- 
lyn Jewell, Jean Harshaw, and Law- 
rence Wiiliams. 

It was announced that meetings 
would be resumed next Thursday, 
February 22. 



MISS ELIZABETH STUART 
TELLS OF RESEARCHES 



Describes Customs Of Colonial 
Maryland 



"Historical research is a most 
charming detective work, without the 
necessity of being a criminal," Miss 
Elizabeth Stuart told members of the 
Historical Society at the February 
meeting of the club Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 13th in William Smith Hall. 
She described the court house, into 
which her duties led her — small, 
close, dirty vaults piled haphazardly 
with dusty ancient manuscripts, some 
dating from 200 years ago. She finds 
material in wills, marriage records, 
old court records as well as the 
Standard American and Maryland 
Archives. Miss Stuart's research is 
chock full of thrills. Fascinating de- 
tails are to be found in connection 
with it. For example, she noted: 
Every man who settled in the colony 
Maryland was given fifty acres of 
land for himself and fifty for any 
other persons he brought or persuad- 
ed to come. Women had small 
standing; one was an old maid if not 
married between 16 and 18. A dau- 
ghter's portion consisted, if she was 
lucky, of a feather bed, a cow and 
perhaps fifty acres. 

Miss Stuart's talk was followed by 
an open discussion in which Mr. 
Frederick G. Usilton, Mr. Simon 
Westcott, Miss Stuart and Mr. Mor- 
ris Barroll participated. 

Dr. Dole, as chairman of the re- 
search committee of the Historical 
Society, discussed with the visitors 
three projects for research for inter- 
ested students. 

The first of these is a survey of 
source material to be found in pri- 
vate families. 

Secondly to investigate possibili- 
ties of providing glass cases in which 
to keep the old books and documents 
in Kent County Court Houses. Third, 
to get copies of records in old fam- 
ily Bibles; many of these records are 
lacking and needed by historians. 



'HAMLET", SHAKESPEARE. PLAYERS' PRODUCTION 
SEEN AS "BEST -LOVED" ENGLISH DRAMA 



"Hamlet," this year's vehicle for 
the Shakespeare Club, is the most 
discussed, the most written about, the 
most difficult, and the best-loved 
play, not only of the Shakespeare 
canon, but of the whole corpus of 
dramatic literature. 

The story goes back to legendary 
history, dealing with a Danish king 
comparable to our King Arthur. It 
reached England by way of transla- 
tions of Danish histories, and was al- 
ready cast in dramatic form bcfoie 
Shakespeare touched it. 

The older play was one to delight 
the Elizabethan heart, involving as it 
did in all the machinei-y cf the 
Senecan "tragedy of blood": ghosts, 
revenge, murder, incest, spies stab- 
bed behind the tapestry, skulls, cor- 
pses, madness, with a grand finale 
including poisoned wine, poisoned 
swords, treachery, plots, villainy 
caught in its own trap, virtue trium- 
phant in the moment of death, and 
"curtain" on a stage absolutely 
strewn with corpses. 

This plot Shakespeare took over 
unchanged. His hero is under oath 
to his father's ghost to avenge that 
father by taking the life of the false 
brother, murderer And now usurping 
king. But, — vengeance must be de- 
layed until the last act, else no play. 
How manage the delay, was Shakes- 
peare's problem. He solved it in true 
Shakespearian fashion, — psychologi- 
cally. Thus was born the "prob- 
lem" of Hamlet. Every reader since 
has sought to "pluck out the heart of 
his mystery," but never is the ques- 
tion settled. What kind of person is 
Hamlet? Why did he delay? Why 



Quint Meets Strong 
Delaware Five Here 

Blue Hens Out To Avenge 
Grid Defeat On Court 



Delaware and Washington renew 
relationships on the court for the 
first time this year at the Armory 
tonight. 

Neil Stahley, since coming to Del- 
aware last year from Western Mary- 
land has turned out one of the best 
teams in years. Although their rec- 
ord seems to belie this, nevertheless 
the visitors have played some crack 
teams this year and have made some 
good showings. O'Connel, forward, 
has been a consistent point getter for 
the Hens while Thompson has proven 
himself to be a first class guard. 

The fact that there has always 
been a keen rivalry between these 
two teams will be much in evidence 
tonight. The memory of that never 
to be forgotten football game at 
Newark last fall still lingers in the 
minds of the Delawarians and a vic- 
tory for them will help atone for 
that defeat. However, the locals are 
determined to show the visitors that 
the basketball team is on a par with 
the football team and will be out for 
a win from first to final whistle. 

Probable lineup: 
Delaware Washington 

O'Connel F Salter 

Pie F Horowitz 

Minner C Skipp 

Thompson G Wilmot 

Pettyman G Huffman 



INTERNATIONAL GROUP 
BEGINS LECTURE SERIES 



Doering First Of Two Sched- 
uled Speakers 



by Lawrence Williams 

The International Society, with 
William Doering as the main speaker, 
presented the first of a series of two 
lectures on "Hitler's Reaction vs. 
Democracy," February 13, in Wil- 
liam Smith Hall. The second lecture, 
which will be a continuation of the 
first, is to be held next week, the 



did he treat Ophelia so roughly? Was 
he mad? What of his future if he 
had lived? As though he were a time and speaker to be announced at 



real person, not a character in a pla>, 
we ask ourselves these questions. 
Each actor who plays the part must 
find suinc answer tu them. Quiet, 
.ueditative, shrinking from action? 
Bold, pass.ic.nate, determined, even 
cruel? The lines permit either in- 
terpretation. 

The latest scholar to pronounce on 
the matter, Mr. Dover Wilson, sees 
in the character more than imagina- 
tion. "Hamlet" was written in 
1601. In February of that year the 
Earl of Essex was executed for high 
treason, — executed, as England 
thought, without due cause being 
shown. Popular feeling ran high at 
this act of "tyranny" on the part of 
the aging Elizabeth. The evening 
before the event Shakespeare's "Jul- 
ius Caesar" was played in the streets 
of London, as a hint that there were 
ways to punish tyrants. 

Essex was the closest friend of 
Shakespeare's patron, the Earl of 
Southampton, Shakespeare evidently 
admired him. He was a strange per- 
te nip era mental, wavering be- 
tween fits of depressed inactivity and 
moments of violent action; clever, 
courteous, popular, his own worst 
enemy. His death cast a cloud over 
Shakespeare's outlook, for some time. 
Would it be strange, then, if, in a 
tragedy written at the very time of 
his death, the hero should be model- 
led at least in part upon the beloved, 
wronged, even martyred soldier and 
scholar? 

It is one of the answers to the 
"probleifl" of "Hamlet." 



a later date. 

Doering traced the shifting powers 
of the parties in the German Reich- 
stag and presented an interesting 
chart to illustrate the gradual down- 
fall of the Nationalist and other par- 
ties representing the democratic 
force of republican government, and 
the tremendous rise of reaction forc- 
es led by Hitler and the National 
Socialist party. 

Mr. Doering also emphasized the 
idea that Hitler's rise and subse- 
quent control of the German govern- 
ment was due largely to support giv- 
en him by the so-called "financial in- 
terests." 



FRATERNITIES PLEDGE 
THIRTEEN NEW MEN 



Pledge Day for the fraternities on 
the Hill came to a close at 5 o'clock 
Tuesday afternoon with the result 
that thirteen first year men have be- 
come affiliated with the Greek letter 
societies. The Silence Period began 
Monday at noon and the preferential 
bids were issued to the prospective 
fraternity men at noon Tuesday. 

Alpha Kappa announces the pledg- 
ing of Vernon Bowen, Raymond Kil- 
by, Donald McDorman, James Salter, 
and Elton Wilmot. 

Phi Sigma Phi lists benjiinin 
Beckham. Charles Benham, Lee Do- 
Ian, and fViliiam thompson. 

Phi Sigma Tau pledged Calvin 
ComptOD, William IK-tring, Woodrow 
Simmons, and William Van New kirk. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, FEB. 16, 1935 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 17S2. 

William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus, Manager 

Emerson Slacum . . Asst Bus. Mgr. 



Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

William Kight. Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor. Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Wbyte, Howard Clark 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md.. 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, 51.50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 



SATURDAY, FEB. 16, 1935 



THE BIRTHDAY OF THE PATRON 

The College body, and many invit- 
ed guests, will have the honor and study at W 
privilege of hearing one of the coun- 
try's foremost educators next Thurs- 
day- This is fine tradition, born but 
s few years back, of a formal convo- 
ction to honor the Birthday of the 
great Washington, our Washington's 
patron 2nd she, his namesake. The 
Founder, William Smith would have 
approved of such an occasion. His 
keen, active mind would certainly 
have assimilated, with critical reser- 
vations, the educational theories of 
such a renowned authority as Mr. 
Zook. Dr. William Snath and 
colleagues would have enjoyed the 
stern academic procession in honor 
of the Birthday, and the students of 
those early days would doubtless 



ADMINISTRATIVE EFFICIENCY 

In less than four weeks after the 
students* desire for stack privileges 
had been expressed editorially and 
by news story in the ELM, the Ad- 
ministration of the College and the 
Librarian had granted the privileges 
under supervision of the Student 
Council. Two of these weeks, at 
least, were occupied with the busi- 
ness of closing one term and begin- 
ning another, thus the actual time 
between the official inception of the 
idea and its execution was about a 
fortnight. 

Yet, with such cooperation, and 
rapid action for student good, on the 
part of the College authorities, there 
are students who maintain with pes- 
simistic enthusiasm that the Admin- 
istration as a whole is slow in con- 
sidering student's requests, restnts 
student iniative, and that "no one 
ever does anything around here." 
The admirably rapid arrangement 
for an aid to study like stack priv- 
ileges is only one of the many deeds 
which give the lie to the foolish 
words quoted above. This is only 
one more of the countless number of 
cases when the reasonable requests 
have been happily nd iuccessfull.* 
considered. 

Studeuts interested in serious 
hington College, and, 
mirabile dictu, there are not a few 
of them, are already showing 
their appreciation of the trust the 
Librarian and the Administration has 
put in them. Doubtless they will 
continue to show it by never abus- 
ing the stack privileges. 



English Ballad 
Out-Herods Herod 



HAMLET 

(A popular variety or vaudeville 
ballad from the music-halls of Lon- 
don about a century ago. From a col- 
lection of rare old "broadside" ballad 
sheets in the private library of Pres- 
ident Mead.) 

A hero's life I sing: his story shall my 

pen mark. 
He W3s not a king, but Hamlet Prince 

of Denmark. 
His mamma was young; the crown 

she had her eyes on; 
Her husband stopped her tongue; she 

stopped his ears with pizen. 

When she had killed the king; she 

ogled much his brother; 
And having slain one spouse, she 

quickly got another. 
And this so soon did she, and was so 

gre3t a sinner, 
The funeral baked meats served for 

the wedding dinner. 

Now Hamlet sweet, her son, no bully 
j or bravado, 
1 Of love felt not the flame, so went he 

to Bernardo. 
"0 sir- says he, "We've seen a sight 

with monstrous sad eye," 
And this was nothing but — the ghost 
of Hamiet's daddy. 



BLUEBOOKS ARE 

BECOMING OBSOLETE 

The ubiquitious and frequently 
time-wasting tests which the Amer- 
ican College system must have for- 
eotten to remove when it grew up 
from the high school system, have 
been done away with at Yale. Fac- 
olty, students, and alumni are unan- 
imous in praise of the move. Such 
have welcomed a ehance to broaden 3 unanimity among these three 
their knowledge of education and j groups itself marks the plan as some- 
pedagogy, thing phenomenal. Of such moment ■ 

although the tradition is | was the change considered that the j .< T ' m now coc k sure of going 
= is article in the Yale Alumni Weekly, serve you from all evil; 



Just at that time it rose, and sighing 
said, "uist, ilammy! 

Your mother is the snake that poison- 
ed me — Oh, damme! 

And now I'm down below, ail over 
sulphurous flame, boy; 

That your dad should be on fire, 
you'll own a burning shame, boy." 

Just at the time he spoke, the dawn 
was breaking through dell; 

Up jumped a cock and cried, "Cock- 
a-doodle-doodle !" 



Thus, 



young in execuuen. 



customs 



known, it fits into College 
■with the facility of old u;3ge. 

The day should, then, be one of 

students 



entitled "Yale Crosses the Eubi 
con." 

For the netty repetition of month- 
ly tests, Yale has substituted what 



especial dignity- The -~™ ce rtain departments at WashingtL- 
"2 College advocate, and partially fol- 

low. The English department here 



"splendid oast and glorious future" 
of Washington College. Tradition 
and the weight of centuries shouid 
have imbued the day with a whole- 
some reverence. 

Too. the student body will want to 
honor the eminent speaker himself. 
It will wish to show its appreciation 
on to President Mead for his care in 
arranging for the celebration. It is 
inconceivable under such circum- 
stances that anyone should attend the 
chapel exercises without the proper 
attire, or ".he proper decorum. The 
courtesy for which Washington is 
noted should be evident next Thuis- 
day. 



never gives tests once the student 
has embarked upon his major course 
of study in literature, and both the 
English and History departments re- 
quire comprehensive examinations of 
all majors, at the end of the four 
years of study. This plan, plus thel No matter now for that = a P la ^ they 



You to your mother walk, and I'll 
walk to the devil." 

Hamlet loved a maid; calumny had 

passed iier, 
She never had played tricks, 'cause 

nobody had asked her; 
Madness seized her wits, poor Lord 

Chamberlain's daughter! 
She jumped into a ditch, and went to 

heaven by water. 



SCHOLARSHIP AND 

RECOGNITION 



usual course examinations, corres- 
ponding to Washington College sem- 
ester-ended examinations, to test pro- 
ficiency in the particular course, is 
Yale's system of the future. 

The reform at New Ha"ien is un- 
doubtedly the signal for the reform 
elsewhere. The importance that the 
University places on the change is 
evident from the following dispatch: 

"The Yale News prediction that the 
step will bring one of the greatest 
educational advances Yale has ever 
made, is approved by both alumni 
and students." 



The Scholastic Honor Society be- 
came the center of public interest 
last Thursday for the first and, aa is 
customary, only time, in the year. 
But the very unobstrusive dignity of \ HISTORY OF ART CLASS 
the organization should give it pre;- ftpf AhJUPC IMTfi PI lift 
tfee, and thereby help to accomplish v/lO/iJYi£CO lit J U LLUB 
the fundamental aim of the Society. 
This aim is, of course, the advance- 
ment of scholarship on Washington's 
earn pus. 

The exclusive nature of Honor So- 
ciety membership has occasionally 
been criticized. Honor Society mem- 
bership is never the result of favorit- 
ism or popularity. It is a worthwhile 
and quite impersonal, reward for 
honest study, and consistent work. 

Although the standards for admit- 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



Gritinks dear readers (? — the 
punctuation is to see who reads, 
we're not doubting the state of your 
affection). We hope this finds ycu 
well and sufficiently recovered from 
that comic valentine, or do they still 
send those things? You guessed it, 
nary a comic came our way but we 
did hear it rumored that the strug- 
gling author of our irksome dirt col- 
umn was simply deluged with appro- 
priate verses. Such popularity must 
be observed. 

Somewhere among our browsings 
we came across the startling fact that 
Vassar College was founded by a 
spendthrift brewer who wanted to see 
if girls really could be educated. 
(We wonder if he satisfied himself? 
As we understand it there is still a 
great difference of opinions on the 
subject. For further details see the 
parents of any coed.) 

While on the subject of women's 
colleges, we discover that that ice- 
bound, female stronghold, Wellesley 
College has one (single) male student 
enrolled. (We predict a certain a- 
mount of embarrassment for him if 
he should ever receive a bachelor's 
degree from said institution.) 



Over at the University of Mary- 
land, Herb Allison (author of a chat- 
ter column from which we derive 
many a quipish choice item) is all 
agog over their recent Junior Prom. 
According to his somewhat incohei- 
ent babblings the brawl must have 
been very fair, at least he says that 
Red Nichols and his boys were no 
mere bunch of penny whistles. 

(Several local studes attended yon 
Terpsichorean festivities; one coo-ed 
of the species claiming that the house 
parties over there have our attempts 
outclassed — the severest consequence 
there being the ensuing headache. 
Guess who — she doesn't require much 
prompting to tell you all about it.) 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



After listening to the entertaining 
speaker in assembly Thursday, it is 
easy to understand the moods and 
idiosyncrasies of the New Castle del- 
egation which condescendingly a- 
dorns the Washington College Cam- 
pus. 

We wonder if Dolan and Adkins 
will reach the same state of instabil- 
ity this afternoon that was attained 
last Saturday. It was rumored that 
one Bawb Clifford had a helping 
hand. 

Freedman was very much perturb- 
ed over Cousin Harry last Wednes- 
day night. It seemed that the blow- 
er wanted to indulge in the untouch- 
able oyster. 

It is rumored that Tony Civit had 
in his possession a pack of cigar- 
ettes. For a man who comes from 
the tobacco country he certainly has 
used a lot of sugar in obtaining 
snipes. 

What daring young fellow is it 
who imports a date for a recent 
dance and goes walking with the lo- 
cal flame while the other sleeps? 

Who was the fortunate young man 
the college enchantress was seen with 
Wednesday night, after she had suc- 
cessfully gotten John Mead home. 

It is the future policy of this col- 
umn to avoid burning Peyser, be- 
cause he revels in the limelight. 

Tomcat Goldstein is sticking fair- 
ly close to home nowadays. Did the 
blond give him the frigid stare? 

Snyder has been charmed away 
from his books by the local lass who 
for two years has practiced on the 
Freshman 



Out west at Whitman College 
courses will be offered next year in 
the "Use of Leisure Time." 

(Which may be all right out west 
but we would like to see a few cours- 
es offered around here in "How to 
Find Leisure Time".) 



The class of History of Art has 
been organized into the Washington 
College Art Club and is a chapter of 
the American Federation of Art. 

Through this federation the club 
can obtain lectures and illustrations 
T.-hich are of interest and which can- 
not be obtained elsewhere. Officers 
have been elected and are as fol- 
lows: President, Betty Thibodeau; 
Secretary, Harriet Louisa Rogers; 
tance have been, for the first few and Librarian, Ira D. Measell. The 
years of the Society's existence, com- j dub ext «nds a welcome to anyone 
paratrveiy low (2.25 average being j aesirmg to become a member. 
the requirement), no doubt the qual< 



made and shammed it; 
The audience Claudius was, and he 

got up and dam't it; 
Ho vowed he'd see no more, he felt 

a wondrous dizziness, 
And he for candles called, to make 

light of the business. 

A fencing match have they; the 
Queen drinks as they try to; 

Says she "O King, I'm killed!" Laer- 
tes says, "So, 'm I, too!" 

"And so am I "cries Ham. "What, 
can all these things true be? ,: 

"What, are you dead?" says the 
King. "Yes sir, and so shall you 
be." 

So then he stabbed his liege, and fell 

on Ophy's brother; 
And so the Danish court all tumbled 

one on t'other. 
To celebrate these deeds, which are 
j from no mean sham let, 
Every village small, was henceforth 

called a hamlet. 



Which leads us to an offering of 
the Randolph Macon "Sun Dial ' 
(Ya better take it — they don't give 
away many things down there.) 

Teacher to little disturber in back 
of the room who is pulling Marys 
hair. "Johnny stop killing time that 



L C. Treherne W. G. Smyth 

TREHERNE ASSOCIATES 

REALTY 

Salt Water Homes, Colonial 

Estates, Inland Farms and 

Ducking Shores 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



ifying index will soon be raised. It 
is hoped that a tradition of excellent 
and hard work from the freshman 
year on will stand as the prerequisite 
for admission to a company which 
stands unique among Washington's 
organizations, stands unique because 
H must be composed of those who 
realize that college is a place for con- 
scientious application, and for ser- 
ious interests. 



Activities Committee 

Approves Dance Date 

The Student Activities Committee 
of Washington College approved at 
its last meeting the new rushing 
functions of the Sororities, and the 
Silver Pentagon Society received per- 
mission to hold an "informal" on the 
evening of February 22. 



-00- 



Jolmny: "I ain't killing 
Ma'am, I'm making time." 



t^ine, 



Prof: ''You can't sleep in class." 
Stude: "I know it. I've been trying 
to for the last half an hour." 

— Dirge 



Ai.d then there was the Scotchman 
who bought only one spur. He figured 
that if one side of the horse went 
the other side of the horse would go 
also, 

— Log 



Warning! Don't talk about the but- 
ter knives, you know how those thing: 
spread. 



Compliments 

of 

CHESTERTOWN 

ELECTRIC LIGHT and 

POWER CO. 



CHESTERTOWN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

AND BILLIARD PARLOR 

Open Under New Management 
Cannon St. 



THE BELLHAVEN 

Home of Good Food 

College Hill 

Telephone 331-M 



E. P. SLACUM ELECTED TO 
7. M. C. A. PRESIDENCY 



by Carl Cochran 

Results of the annual Y. M. C. A. 
elections held Tuesday, February 5, 
in William Smith Hall, show Emer- 
son P. Slacum, of Cambridge, elected 
as president of that organization for 
the ensuing year. 

Chosen to serve with Slacum weie 
Lawrence Williams as vice-president, 
and Marvin Smith as secretary. Be- 
eauHe of lack of time the election of 
treasurer was postponed until the 
following Monday, February 11, at 
which time William Doering v. as 
placed in that office, 



CHAS. C. SCHRIEBER 

Wholesale and Retail 
Candy 

Newspapers, Magazines 
Chestertown, Md. 



THE TIRE SHOP 

General Automobile 

Repairing 

Tires, Tubes, Gas and Oils 

Chestertown, Md. 



Visit 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 

For Anything 

in 

Men's Wear 



PENNINGTON 




CONSTRUCTION CO. 




Bids Given on All Types of 




Construction 




Phone Chestertown 305 





SATURDAY, FEB. 16, 193S 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



KIBLER1TES LOSE TO 
HOPKINS IN 35-23 UPSET 

Defeat Leaves Washington 
Tied For League Lead 



An aggressive Hopkins quintet ser- 
iously affected Washington's pen- 
nant chances when it handed the lo- 
cals a 36-23 setback last Saturday 
night at the Chestertown Armory. 

The Blue Jays took advantage of 
every opportunity and jumped into 
the lead which they held throughout 
the game. 

Rasin, Hopkins guard, was high 
scorer with ten points while Salter 
garnered eight for the Sho' men. 
oo 

Girl* Play Basketball 
Two Nights A Week 

Board Of Managers To Pick 
Teams Next Week 



Basketball season has started. Ev- 
ery Tuesday and Thursday nights at 
six-thirty the girls have their "work- 
out." Freshmen, Sophomores, Jun- 
iors and Seniors all play, usually on 
mixed teams. The first few practic- 
es have been, as in former years, 
rather rough with little real skill 
shown anywhere. Practice makes for 
perfection however, and before long, 
maybe at the next practice, they will 
be back in their old form. 

The Board of Managers will have 
a meeting next week to select the 
class teams and the dates for the dif- 
ferent games. Then play will begin 
in earnest. 



LeCATES 


BROS. 


BARBER 


SHOP 


Where the college man 


can get his 


style of 


hair cut 



W. H. PENNINGTON 
Representative of the Wash- 
ington National Life Insurance 
Company 
Health and Accident Policies 
624 High St. 



After a Studious Day 

Visit 

JIM AND HICK'S 

BILLARD PARLOR 



H OLD E N 'S 


SERVICE STATION 


Cross St. and Maple Ave. 


Sunoco Products 



College Hill Lunch Room 

All kinds of Candies, 
Cake, Drink3, Beer and 
Sandwiches. 
W. M. Crowding, Prop. 



j>cl|miiitB JScer 

Distributed by 

THE CHESAPEAKE 

BEVERAGE CO. 

Chestertown, Ma*. 



Bonnetts Quality Shop 

Men's and Ladies' 
Ready - to - Wear 



SKIPPING DVE \ HE SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



Yep, just like the proverbial bad 
penny, I've turned up again. The 
reasons? Well they are many. May 
be I have more time ofF this semester, 
and then again maybe I like to see 
my name in print. Vanity you 
know. However the basic reason is 
that writing this article affords me 
a great deal of pleasure and fun. I 
look forward each week to writing it. 
Then there is my public (all three of 
them). You know I am so egotisti- 
cal as to believe that a number, 
though a limited number, of readers 
follow my column each week. 

An all Eastern ShV affair is on ! 
deck tonight at the local armory 
when our traditional rivals, the U. of ; 
Del., pay us a visit. The Blue Hens j 
haven't fared so well this season, and ! 
about all they will bring down with j 
them is their good intentions. The 
Kibler men should come out on top. i 

Here is the part the boys like. . . . 
Dudley batted for Harry Russell the 
other night and scored a hit with the 
fans . If Kight predicts the result [ 



of any game don't believe him. . . . 
According to one critic the first five 
would have been better off in bed for 
all the good they did against Hop- 
kins . . Dwyer and Lord fitted in 
very well with boiler makers team 
Wilmot can make them all night 
if "Carrie" sits under the basket. . . . 
Coach Ekaitis has his trackaters 
pounding the boards every day in the 
gym. Simmons looks as though he 
should be a good middle distance 



KENT COUNTY SAVINGS 
BANK 

Interest paid on Deposits 

Motto Safety First 

F. G. Usilton, Pres. 
L. B. Russell, Vice-Pres. 
H. C. Coleman, Cashier 



H. D. OREM & SON 
Case Farm Machinery, 
Hardware, Glass, China- 
ware, Yarnall Paints and 
Varnishes. 
Phone 217 - Chestertown 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 
Complete line of Hard- 
ware, Paints and Farm 
Machinery 



Men's and Ladies* 
SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

Paul Coco 

Next to Fox's 5c to $1.00 
Store 



FRED T. ROBINSON 

Gas, Oil, Washing, Oiling, 
Greasing 

Maple Ave. near Queen 
Street — Phone 271 



THE PEOPLES BANK 
Chestertown, Md. 

Commercial and Savings 
Deposits Solicited 



STANDARD AUTO SUPPLY 
331 High St. 

High Quality Accessories 
At Low Price* 

Goodrich Tires, Tubes and 
Batteries 



man. Chaff ey is training under the 
guidance of Coach Ekaitis for a box- 
ing bout down in Centreville in the 
near future .... Good year to make 
a clean sweep of all contests with 
Delaware. Evans, Berry and Salter 
want to play the Blue Hens alone. 



WILLIAMS FLOWER AND 
GIFT SHOP 

We Specialize in Hand-Made 

Gifts, Cut Flowers and 

Corsages 

Phone 109 or 818F4 

332 High St. 



FOR BETTER 
COAL SERVICE 

PHONE 149 
C. W. KIBLER & SONS 



KREEGER'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

Eyes examined and 
glasses fitted by a grad- 
uate Optician. Fountain 
Pens, Ink, Kodaks, Films 
and Developing. 



Watches, Rings 
Novelty Jewelry. 



and 



STUDENTS 

We carry a large as- 
sortment of School Sup- 
plies. 

Whitman's Candy. 

Full line of Toilet Pre- 
parations including new 
Lentheric Line from Par- 
is. 

Abbott's DeLuxe Ice 
Cream. 

Pipes, Cigarettes and 
Smoking Tobacco. 
STAM DRUG COMPANY 
The Prescription Store 



PIP'S 

BARBER SHOP 

Located Under The 
Voshell House 

The Barber Shop for the 
Washington College 
Students 
We Specialize in Collegi- 
ate Haircuts 



PARK CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

Telephone Building 

Represented by 

D. B. Ford, A. K. and P. S. P- 

C. Wyle, Reid Hall. 

W. Watson, P. S. T. and East 

Hall. 
H. Davis, Middle and West 

Halls. 
Try our cleaning, you'll like the 

difference 
24 hour service. Tel. 316 



RED STAR LINES, INC. 
De Luxe Motor Coach 

Transportation 
Passenger 

Special Charter 

Express 

Salisbury, Md. 

Phones : 
Salisbury 1480 
Hurlock 67 



FOX'S 

Anything the College 
Student or his family 
wants at the Right Price. 

5c to $1.00 Store 



Diske University j 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Four terms of eleven weeks are given | 
each year. These may he taken con-! 
secutively (graduation in three years); 
or three terms may be taken each 
year ( graduation in four years) . 
The entrance requirements are intel- 
ligence, character and at least two 
years of college work, including the 
subjects specified for Grade A Med- 
ical Schools. Catalogues and applica- 
tion forms may be obtained from 
the Dean 



"The Bank Where 
You Feel At Home" 

The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 




THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 
A store run for the benefit of the students 

We offer a line of Wahl Dollar Pens and Pencils. 
Pennants, Pillows, Stickers, Stationery and School 
Supplies. 

Hours: 9 to 12 A. M., 1:15 to 4:30 P. M. Every 
Day but Saturday and Sunday. 



Margaret E. Jefferson 
A Smart Shop For Women 
Chestertown, 



HUNGRY or THIRSTY? 

Try Our Incomparable Seven-Course 50c Dinner 
Beer And All Soft Drinks Waiting For You 

Chestertown Restaurant 



GRAY BEAUTY SALON 

New Eugene Permanents 
with ringlet ends 

$5.00 

We have another Per- 
manent with ringlet 
ends for $3.50 




PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, FEB. 16, 1935 



FRATERNITY AND SORORITY FUNCTIONS 

DOMINATE WEEK'S SOCIAL PROGRAM 



Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert W. Mead en- 
tertained the officers of the Cotillion 
Club with an Intermission Party on 
February 8, at their home on Wash- 
ington Avenue. 



Dr. J. S. W. Jones pave a bridge 
party for members of the Alpha Kap- 
pa Fraternity and their dates at his 
home last Friday. 



Several Alumni were back for the 
Hopkins game last Saturday. Among 
them were Miss Dorothy Kimble, Mr. 
Hubie Ryan, Miss Sarah Ellen Byrn, 
Mr. Alan Bonwill, Mr. James D. 
Davis, and Miss Helen Norris. 



A .surprise Birthday Dinner was 
given for Mr. Robert Clifford, Jr.. at 
Belle Haven la:>t Sunday night. Miss 
Jean Young, Mr. Jeff Atkins, Miss 
Margaret Wanderer, Mr. Lee Dolan, 
Miss Dorothy Williams, Mr. Richard 
Sayli i, Mr. and Mrs. Delano Boyn- 
ton, Mist; Pricilla Grainger, Mr. John 
Mason Lnid, ami Miss Dorothy Clarke 
attended. 



'Hie Sitjina Tau Delta Sorority 
gave a dinner at Belle Haven on 
Tuesday night, followed by a movie 
party. Besides members of t.he 
Sorori y, Miss Elsie Wharton, Mis.s 
Hazel Lynch, Miss Doris Unruh, Miss | 



Willa Newnam and Miss Polly Tay.- 
lor were preaent. 



On Friday night, the Gamma Sig- 
ma Sorority had a Progressive Din- 
ner. Miss Beppy Westcott, Miss 
Doris Unruh, Miss Hazel Lynch, and 
Miss Elsie Wharlon, members of the 
Freshman class were guests. 



Biological Society 

Hears Talk On Koch 



Dr. R. G. Beachley Speaks At 
February Meeting 



This afternoon, the Kappa Gamma 
Sorority will give a luncheon party at 
the Country Club. The guests of 
the party will be the Misses Doris 
Unruh, Hazel Lynch, Elsie Wharton, 
Pegs Saulsbury, Beppy Westcott, 
Dorothy Williams, Betty Smith and 
Polly Taylor. 

D. C. 



Note: The hosts of the Phi Sigma 
Tau party reported last week in this 
column were Dr. F. G. Livingood and 
Mr. J. J. Coop. 



LIQUORS and WINES 

Come and see me 

HERZBERG'S 

GROCERIES 

High and College Sts. 

Phone 190 



PRESTON HECK HEADS 
BALTO. ALUMNI CHAPTER 



The first meeting of the Biological 
Society for the new semester was 
called to order by President Culver 
last, Thursday evening, February 14, 
at 7:20 P. M., in Room 11, William 
Smith Hall. 

The Society was fortunate in hav- 
ing as its guest speaker Dr. R. G. 
Beachley, Health Officer for Kent 
County, who gave a very interesting 
and instructive talk on Robert Koch, j 
the eminent German scientist who 
discovered the tuberculosis baccilus ! 
and did much valuable research work ' 
in medical science. 

At the conclusion of Dr. Beach- 
ley's talk, moving pictures of the i 
activities of the Negro health work in 
Kent county were shown by D. S. < 
King, supervisor of colored schools i 
of Kent county and Marjorie Forte, 
public health nurse. 



At the annual meeting of the Bal- 
timore Chapter of the Washington 
College Aiumni Association, held at 
the Emerson Hotel on the evening of 
Saturday, January 2Cth, the follow- 
ing officers were elected for the com- 
ing year. 

Preston P. Heck, President. 

Mrs. Ethel G. Dorsey, Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Ear] Cullen, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Executive Committee: , Dr. George 



BALDWIN ELECTRIC 
CORP. 

Electrical Wiring and Appli- 
ances. Frigidaire, Protene Gas 
Ranges, Maytag Washing Ma- 
chines. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
25c to $10 

STERLING'S 
The Rexall Store 



Barnett's Barber Shop 

Maximum Service with 
Minimum Cost. Experience 
of long standing. 



A. Bunting, John McLain, Miss Grace 
Culley, Kennon Perrin, R. Earle 
Greenlee and Dr. W. Houston Toul- 
ST>n. 



Pan-American Airways owns val- 
uable concessions and operating a- 
greements on a northei n route to 
Europe. 



Modern Shoe Repairing 

Store 

PAUL SIPALA 

Next to Sterling Drug 



GEO. T. COOPER 




Fancy Meats 




and Groceries 




Phone 400 and 401 





For Sport and Gym Shoes 
Buy at the 

Oriole Shoe Store 



0^ 





J ust what is meant 
by cross-blending tobaccos . . . and 
how does it make a cigarette milder 
and taste better . . . 

W^ell, in blending you take two or more tobaccos 
and mix them together — a rather simple process. 
But cross-blending goes a step further . . . 



Qnihc&u — 



MONDAY WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 

LUCREZIA LILY RICHARD 

BORI PONS BONELLI 

KOSTELANETZ ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS 

9 P. M. (E. S. T.) -COLUMBIA NETWORK 



IN making Chesterfields we take 
Bright tobacco from Virginia, the 
Carolinas, Georgia and Florida. We 
take Burley tobacco from Kentucky 
and Tennessee, and tobacco from 
Southern Maryland. 

Then in addition to these home- 
grown tobaccos we take tobacco 
grown in Turkey and Greece. 

We balance these mild, ripe home- 
grown tobaccos with the right 
amounts and the right kinds of 



aromatic Turkish. 

Then, instead of just mixing the 
tobaccos together, we blend and 
cross-blend them so that all the dif- 
ferent flavors go together into one 
full flavor — the Chesterfield taste 
that so many smokers like. 

Cross-blending tobaccos as it 
is done in Chesterfields gives 
the cigarette a pleasing taste 
and aroma — they're mild and 
yet They Satisfy. 



O 19S). Liggett 4 Myers Tobacco Co. 



Win State 
Cage Title 




Elm 



Attend The YMCA 
Peace Conference 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 19. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, FEB. 23, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



DR. ZOOK OFFERS SOLUTION 
FOR THE YOUTH PROBLEM 



SUGGESTS EDUCATION FOR SERVICE FORM OF LA- 
BOR AT MIDYEAR CONVOCATION 



by Marvin Smith 

"What we have in the form of ed- 
ucation today and what we ought to 
have tomorrow cost nothing, but the 
lack of it costs everything," was the 
statement of Dr. George F. Zook, 
former United States Commissioner 
of Education and at present Direc- 
tor of the American Council on Ed- 
ucation, when he spoke at the Third 
Annual Washington's Birthday Con- 
vocation at Washington College. 
"Our Youth Problem" was the title 
of his speech. 

"We can well afford to follow the 
example of our forefathers in laying 
great emphasis on education not on- 
ly to solve the youth problem but all 
problems with which we are faced to- 
day," he continued. 

Notes Real Youth Problem 

Dr. Zook brought to the attention 
of his audience that there really is a 
youth problem facing the country. 
He quoted figures to show that, out 
of approximately nine and a half 
million children of high school age, 
six and a half million are in school, 
the rest being unemployed. Out of 
approximately eight and a half mil- 
lion people of college agj, about one 
and a half million are enrolled. One 
half of those in neither school or col- 
lege are unemployed. 

Cites Great Unemployment 

Dr. Zook stated that because of 
present economic conditions, the NRA 
codes, child labor amendments in the 
various states, and because of cus- 
tom, the young people are not given 
a chance, it being increasingly diffi- 
cult to get jobs. 

"What will they do?" he asked. 
"In the month of January last year 
there were a little over 100,000 tran- 
sients. Ten per cent of these were 
boys and girls under fifteen; forty- 
seven per cent were under twenty- 
five; eighteen per cent of these were 
women and girls. That is what hap- 
pens to young people when they have 
no chance," he continued. 

Suggests Placement Boards 

Dr. Zook stated that although 
Washington is already doing too 
much, it is quite natural to look there 
for the answer to this youth problem. 
He asserted that Washington was 
trying to solve the problem through 
the CCC and its educational program, 
and through the recently establish- 
ed Federal Apprenticeship Board 
which is co-operating with similar 
boards that have been established in 
three-fourths of the states for the 
purpose of attempting to place young 
people in industry. 

Dr. Zook declared that there is one 
field open to youth as they grow old- 
er — the service form of labor. It is 
social in character and semi-educa- 
tional in form. 

"After watching the black shirts in 
Italy and the brown shirts in Berlin, 
I thought, 'Here is the form of ex- 
pression, the kind of citizenship 
training, which the young men and 
young women are getting in foreign 
countries.' " 
Education Cannot Be Democratic 

Dr. Zook said that when he said to 
l he Minister of Education in Berlin 
that we were becoming concerned 
w ith the character and quality of our 
secondary schools, that maybe those 
schools were not getting what was 
necessary, he was told that we ought 
to know by this time that democracy 
doesn't work, that democracy is try- 
ln g to raise the level of the average 
to the level of the best. 

Quoting George Washington, Dr. 
z <>ok said, "In a country like this 
where equal liberty is enjoyed, there 



is an ample field for mercantile and 
mechanical education. If money 
can't be found for education, there 
is something amiss with the ruling 
political power." 

Smith And George Washington Per- 
sonal Friends 
The mid-winter convocation began 
with the colorful procession of the 
faculty and Dr. Zook into the as- 
sembly hall in academic toga. The 
Rev. Dr. W. H. Litsinger, Pastor of 
Christ Methodist Protestant Church, 
delivered the invocation. President 
"Gilbert W. Mead spoke briefly on 
"George Washington and Washing- 
ton College," bringing out that it was 
no accident or gesture that George 
Washington allowed the college to 
use his name, that he served on the 
Board of Visitors and Governors, 
and that he received an honorary de- 
gree here. Dr. Mead showed that 
Washington and Dr. William Smith, 
the founder of Washington College, 
were thrown in contact with each 
other a number of times both before 
and after the founding of the col- 
lege. 



PRES. MEAD ATTENDS 
N. E. A. CONFERENCE 

Dean Bradley Also At Nation- 
al Meeting 



SHORE EDUCATORS 
ATTEND LUNCHEON 



School Officials Meet Dr. Zook 
At Function 



After the formal convocation 
Thursday, February 21, Dr. George 
F. Zook was the guest of Dr. Mead 
at a reception and luncheon in hon- 
or of the visitor. The reception was 
held in Reid Hall. The luncheon 
was at 1:16, in the college dining 
hall. 

County superintendants and city 
school principals of Delaware and 
the Eastern Shore were invited to 
meet Dr. Zook. 

Among those present at the lun- 
cheon were Dr. George F. Zook, and 
his assistant, Mr, Shank, 

Supt. L. C. Robinson, 

Supt. Howard C. Ruhl, 

Prin. W. J. Stenger, 

Supt. Samuel E. Burr, 

Supt. C. E. Douglass, 

Supt. H. E. Stahl, 

Supt. W. B. Thomburgh, 

Dr. W. H. Litsinger, 

Dr. J. S. William Jones. 

Dr. W. R. Howell, 

Dr. F. G. Livingood, 

Dr. R. G. Beachley, 

Prof. J. J. Coop, 

Dr. E. Clarke Fontaine. 



Dr. Gilbert W. Mead and Dr. F. G 
Livingood will leave Sunday, Febru- 
ary 24, to attend the winter confer- 
ence of the National Education As- 
sociation at Atlantic City. 

Various meetings and conferences 
will be in session from the 24th to 
the 28th. Among them are the De- 
partment of Superintendents of the 
W. E. A. and the College Teachers of 
Education. 

Dean Bradley attended the Con- 
ference of College Deans held in the 
same place Wednesday, February 20 
to Friday, February 22. 



DEBATING SOCIETY 
TRAINS FOR SCHEDULE 



Mr. Tolles Directs Preparation 
On Current Question 



Hoping to put intercollegiate de- 
bating on a basis somewhat similar to 
that of intercollegiate athletics, in 
far as the awarding of recognition 
the awarding of recognition to parti- 
cipants, the debate squad under Pro- 
fessor Winton Tolles is daily prepar- 
ing for the present season which op- 
ens March 1, with Blue Ridge Col- 
lege. 

The question: "Resolved, That the 
Nations Should Agree to Prevent the 
International Shipment of Arms and 
Munitions," is the one suggested by 
Pi Kappa Delta, the national debat- 
ing fraternity, for this year's topic. 
The following men are candidates for 
the two teams — one affirmative and 
one negative: 

Van Newkirk, B. Vandervoort, 
Williams, F. Taylor, Rankin, Gardi- 
ner, Bergdall, H. Clark, Snyder. 

Practice debates have been held 
between various candidates during 
the past week, in preparation for the 
rather strenuous schedule which in- 
cludes five colleges as opponents. It 
follows: 

Blue Ridge College, March 1, 1935. 

Western Maryland, March 2, 1935. 

Johns Hopkins U., March 9, 1935. 

U. of Maryland, March 12, 1935. 

Haverford, March 15, 1935. 



Birthday Events 
Recall History 

Review Emphasizes Signifi- 
cance Of Day 

by Jay Spry 

In the early years of the eighteen- 
th century, the Kent County School 
flourished. By 1723, when the 
Maryland Assembly passed the land 
grant, it was well established, and 
the grant was the foundation of its 
prosperity. By 1780 the enrollment 
had reached one hundred and forty. 
There were prospects of an enroll- 
ment of more than two hundred. Two 
years later, Yale had only two hun- 
dred students; Harvard had one hun- 
dred and forty-one; Princeton forty. 
Then Dr. William Smith came to 
Chester, as rector of Chester Parish 
and Master of the Kent School. 

There was felt a need for higli 
education in Maryland. Before the 
Revolution students had studied ii 
England. After it, this was impos 
sible. The expense of repairing to 
some other state was often prohibi- 
tive. The Board of Visitors of the 
Kent School decided that the plan 
of the school must be changed Lo in- 
clude a liberal education in the arts 
and sciences. 

In 1782 the Maryland Assembly 
agreed to charter the Kent School as 
a college provided that 10,000 
pounds be raised within five years. 
The name of the institution was to 
be Washington College, "in honour- 
able and perpetual memory of His 
Excellency General Washington, the 
illustrious and virtuous commander- 
in-chief of the armies of the United 
States." Dr. Smith collected the 
monies within five months. His ac- 
quaintance with William Paca, Gov- 
ernor of Maryland, Robert G. Golds- 
borough and John Page, as well as 
General Washington himself, helped 
immeasureably. These same meii 
later became Visitors and Governors 
of Washington College. 

General Washington expressed his 
appreciation "for the honor confer- 
red on me, by giving my name to the 
college at Chester." it affected him 
deeply and the pleasure derived 
therefrom, he said, was only surpas- 
sed "by the flattering assurance of 
the lasting and extensive usefulness 
of the seminary." He subscribed fifty 
guineas out of his own purse, as 
proof of his best wishes. 



FLYING PENTAGON ENDS 
SEASON THIS WEEK 

Have Fine Chance For State 
Cage Laurels 

The Maroon and Black courtmen 
have an open Saturday night date to- 
night for the first time this season. 
This will afford them some rest after 
the game with St. John's last Thurs- 
day night and they will be all set to 
end I he season next week by playing 
games with Western Maryland, Loy- 
ola and Delaware. 

On Tuesday the Kiblerites journey 
to Westminster to meet the Green 
Terrors of Western Maryland. This 
team has improved greatly since 
playing here early this year. The 
return of Bill Shephard to the line- 
up and the shifting of Kaplan to for- 
ward with Benjimnn taking the cen- 
ter position has yielded good results 
and the locals will have a battle on 
their hands from start to finish. 

Friday night finds the league-load- 
ing Loyola Greyhounds invading 
Chestertown in an attempt to decide 
the state championship once and for 
all by defeating the locals; but with 
the memory of that 32-28 defeat still 
lingering in their minds the members 
of the team will be out for revenge. 

Saturday night the cngers end the 
1934-35 season by playing Delaware 
at Newark. Delaware did not make 
a very impressive appearance here 
last week and, while we must not be 
too optimistic, we feel sure that the 
Kibler coached aggregation will close 
its most successful season in recent 
years by defeating the Blue Hens. 

Probable lineup: 

Fowable ... . F Salter 

Kaplan F Horowitz 

Benjaman C ....*... . Skipp 

Mergo G Wilmot 

Shepard G Huffman 



Complete "Hamlet" 
Cast Announced 



Shakespeare Players 
Rehearsals 



Push 



SCIENTIST ADDRESSES 
COLLEGE ASSEMBLY 



Krantz, Pharmacologist 
Speaks At Assembly 



Dr. John C. Krantz, professor and 
head of the Department of Pharma- 
cology of the University of Maryland 
Medical School, and chief of the Bur- 
eau of Chemistry of the Maryland 
^tate Health Department,, will be the 
speaker at the regular Thursday as- 
sembly, February 28. Dr, Krantz is 
also a special lecturer at the Johns 
Hopkins School of Medicine and 
member of the Graduate Council of 
the University of Maryland. 

Despite his youthful age of thirty- 
five, Dr. Krantz has won many laur- 
els in the Scientific field. He has 
books on science. He has advanced 
steadily until he is'the holder of 
eight degrees. He is the chairman of 
the scientific committee of the United 
States Pharmacopoeia, has served 
many times as a councilor to the 
American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science and was last 
year's vice-president of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association. Dr. 
Krantz is affiliated with numerous 
scientific bodies, fraternities, and the 
University and Torch Clubs of Bal- 
tiomre. 



CLASSICAL SOCIETY 
PLANS SOCIAL MEETING 



The Classical Society has an- 
nounced that its jiext meeting will 
take place on Wednesday evening, 
February 27, at 8:00 o'clock. It will 
be of a social nature, and will be held 
in the lounge room of Reid Hall. The 
program committee has arranged a 
<ery interesting evening, and has an- 
nounced as its main speaker Dean 
Bradley. There are to be refresh- 
ments, and a round-table discussion 
of plans for the Society's annual ban- 
quet, which is to be held in March. | 



"HanVlet," the play to be given by 
the Shakespeare Club in William 
Smith Hall on Friday evening, March 
8th, will have as its cast the follow- 
ing: 

Hamlet — William Baker. 

Claudius — Wesley Sadler. 

Gertrude — Marian Brown. 

Ghost — Carroll Casteel. 

Polonius — Robert Schaull. 

Laertes— William McCullough. 

Ophelia — Nola Hill Crow. 

Horatio — Arthur Greims. 

Rosencrantz — Laurence Yourtee. 

Cuildenstern — Ernest Holland. 

Osric — Robert Schaull. 

Marcellus — George Pratt. 

Bernardo — Clifton Hope. 

Francisco — Joseph McLain. 

Reynalda — Elizabeth Hall. 

First Gravc-Digger— Mildred Skin- 
ner. 

Player King — George Pratt. 

Player Queen— Dorothy Clarke. 

Lucianus — Frederic Peyser. 

Court Ladies and Gentlemen are 
to be selected later. 

The Club will follow in many de- 
tails the Gurrick performance of the 
last century, one of the best known 
of all times. 

Old Troupers In Cast 

William Baker, having for the 
past two years sent roars of laugh- 
ter through the audience in his role 
of a country carpenter in "Midsum- 
mer Night's Dream" and as Touch- 
stone, the clown, in "As You Like 
It," will again prove himself a true 
Shakespearean actor as Hamlet, the 
Prince of Denmark. 

Claudius, the uncle of Hamlet and 
usurper of the throne of Denmark, 
will be Wesley Sadler, who, last year 
as William, was content to wrestle 
with a duke. This year he lets not 
even a king stand in his way. 

Robert Schaull, another veteran of 
the Shakespeare Club, who played the 
part of the shepherd, Silvius and Le 
Beau in last year's performance, "As 
You Like It" will emerge from the 
green pastures to become the world- 
ly-wise Polonius. 

Ophelia, the lovely but much mis- 
understood daughter of Polonius and 
sweetheart of Hamlet, is to be played 
by Nola Hill Crow, who will be re- 
membered as Celia of "As You Like 
It." 

Mildred Skinner and Lawrence 
Yourtee will need no introduction to 
our Shakespearean audience, having 
both made their debut on our stage 
last year. 

Ghost Difficult To Present 

The ghost, the part designed by 
Shakespeare for himself, is always a 
problem to an amateur company. It 
takes skillful stage-acting and good 
lighting to present a real "honest-to- 
goodness" ghost for our modern, rath- 
er critical audience. Carroll Casteel 
is doing his best, however, to make 
the ghost a hair-raising creature. 

The other members of the cast, 
some of whom have been seen in oth- 
er performances show great promise 
in daily rehearsals. 

It will be a great play. And even 
if you do enjoy peeping in on re- 
hearsals, you have not seen anything. 
Remember those trunks of costumes 
that are bound to transform the most 
lowly attendant into an Elizabethan 
duke! 



Home economics experts are re- 
minding mothers that heavy outdoor 
lothing burdens a child, and is not 
necessarily as warm as lighter weight 
woolens. 



The United States treasury de- 
stroys several tons of wornout paper 
money every day- 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, FEB. 23, 1935 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for th* 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chester town, Md., 1782. 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel ...... Asst Editoi 

Louis Goldstein . Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum - . Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

William Eight, Jean Har-shaw, Alfred 

Taylor. Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte. William McCulIough 

Howard Clark 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, $1.50 a year. 
Single copy, 10 cents, 

SATURDAY, FEB. 23, 1935 



are acquired in a properly managed 
dining room, or alert, intelligent un- 
dergraduates. 

The essence of the change at Wash- 
ington, if such a change is effected, 
is the injection of discipline into the 
dining room. Dicipline is, in fact, 
the whole basis for an organized sys- 
tem of manners. Not the sort of dis- 
cipline, of course, that sends Johnny 
to bed because he did not refuse the 
second piece of cake. No, not this 
at all. Rather the sort of discipline 
that the undergraduate at Washing- 
con College lacks. 



"OUR COLLEGE IS 

FOREMOST EVER 

The New York Times unofficial in- 
vestigation into fraternity trends on | being formed there 
the American campus resulted in an ' - 
informing article in last week's Mag- 
azine supplement. One of the im- 

portant points of the discussion was | States Comm'^ioneF of 
that a chief competitor to fraterni- t from which position he resigned to 
ties was the new housing plan execu- \ become Director of the American 



DR. ZOOK 

"George Frederick Zook, educa- 
tor." That is the international au- 
thority who was the honored guest 
of Washington College last Thurs- 
day. The concise quotations speak 
much. 

The first of it tells of a man of im- 
portance, brillance, accomplishment. 
The second part crisply records a 
career distinguished in academic cir- 
cles for a score of years. Travelling 
fellow in European history from 
1911-1912; scholar in the same at 
Cornell University; professor in Eur- 
opean history at Pennsylvania State 
College from 1916-1920; thence call- 
ed to Washington as a member of 
important educational commissions, 
to investigate 
modern trends in the ancient art of 
learning; President of the University 
of Akron; from 1933-34 the United 
Education, 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



For those who have the question- 
able luxury of eight o'clock classes 
we have a very appropriate poem 
which was printed in the "Antioch- 
ian" from Antioch College. 

TO AURORA: GREETINGS 

At 8 o'clock the watchman's night is 

done, 

At 8 o'clock one sees a rim of sun; 
A pungent coffee-fragrance fills the 

air 
And mocks the hungry freshman who 

must square 
A minus x divided by a surd, 
Or hear the Periodic Laws averred. 

When Higher Learning weds with 

Rosy Dawn, 
We consecrate the union with a 
yawn ; 

The mind is very apt to hesitate 
When asked to grapple cosmic facts 

at S. 

— Dwight Boehm. 

(Which expresses our sediments 
exactly, — Prof. Ford has often said 
that one might stay up until 8 
o'clock but NEVER get up at that 
time.) 



CAMPAIGN FOR TABLE 
SERVICE STARTED 



Student Council Requests Stu- 
dent Opinion 



Our opinion of Swarthmore Col- 
lege and its paper has gone down the 
well known tobbogan slide since the 



by Wesley Sadler 

The first thing in the way of bus- 
iness was the installation of Marvin 
Smith as sophomore representative 
of the Student Council. After this 
it was reported that the door in the 
library had been fixed so as not to 
make so much noise on closing. The 
results of stack privileges were very 
gratifying, since it was reported that 
fifty-eight books had been borrowed 
from the stacks in five days and that 
the students were certainly living up 
to their part in making this privilege 
a success. 

The Council moved to take this 
opportunity to request students to 
stop cutting in line in the cafeteria. 

And now we come to the most im- 
portant business discussed at the 
meeting. There is a strong possibil- 
ity of obtaining table service in our 
college commons. It will take time 
and money, but if the students evi- 
dence a desire for this very definite 
improvement we believe that it can 
be done. The Administration feels 
that it is something the college should 
have and they are willing to do their 
part. 

However, the students will have to 
meet certain obligations, such as the 
following: 

1. Be on time for meals. There 
will not be a 25 or 30 minute leeway, 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



ted bv many large American umve: 

Yale is the current example j s , 



of the separate "college'' system, I Dr. Zook. 



Council of Education, — these repre- 
ent but a few of the achievements of 



last issue of ^he "Phoenix. ' After , as there is now. 

the Swarthmore game we had a very | 2. All students will be served at 

satisfied feeling of having at last j the same time. 

seen a team go down to defeat in a | 3. There will be an acting host 



where each of the divisions is a unit Washington College appreciates : ;-- t nt!enianlike manr-i AND THEN : or hostess at each table. 



including dining halls, recreation j. ne privilege f knowing, and hear- 
ing, and welcoming as part of her 
I very select inner circle a distinguish- 
1 ed modern of the age. 



rooms and the like. This "grazing 
out" of the commodious social fra- 
ternity mansion is. of course, caus- 
ing the leaders of national fraterni- 
ties much concern. Like all good 
Americans, however, these executives 
have an answer. 

Mr. Wilkinson, chairman of 
national Interfraternity Council, pro- 
po=es a =olunon. Rather, he says, tional significance of the event as a 
than junk the French chateaux and j reason for their observance. Such 
Tndor eounrrv seats of the fratemi- ; ™s the reason for Smith College's 
"Rally Day," for Johns Hopkins 
"Founder's Day." No such obscure 



OUR WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 

Colleges all over the land celebrat- 
the ed Washington's Birthday this week. 
Most of them had to choose the na- 



— their paper conies out the next | 
week and says, — "Believe it or not, ; 
that Washington College team had 



4. The men students will wear 
■oats and ties at the evening meal. 

5. This table service will be for 



four freshmen on their first team and ■ the noon and evening meals. 



every one of the 'boys' looked as if 



The main course of the dinner 



they had been shaving for almost a ! or supper will be served to all stu- 
decade." Which looks like the self I dents at the same time. The dessert 
npensation of just another college 1 will also be served at one time. 



that can't take it. 



ties, colleges wishing to integrate 
their dormitory system should pur- 
chase the fraternity houses, mort- 
gages and all. and allow the congen- 
Li groups to occupy them as college ' more intimately connected with the 



Boy, oh boy, but something is go- 
ing to happen up at the U. of Dela- 
ware soon; the friction between the ; a great benefit. And it can be done, 



7. Orderliness is to prevail at all 
times. 

There is no doubt but that the in- 
stallation of this new system will be 



faculty and students is getting 



if the students want it. If you have 
such a desire please make it known 



reason gives rise to our Washington | tense - The front P a £ e of th e latest 

College celebrations. This college is "Review" carries such head lines as, I to one of the ten men on the Coun 



property. This seems indeed an ex- 
cellent and workable plan. Like many 
things that cause much stir as inno- 



mmortal George Washington than 
any similar institution in the whole 



-"Students Call Faculty Assigners 
And Examiners Instead Of Teach- 



cil as soon as possible. We do not 
want to delay what we think is a wise 



ers, Helpers.' 



"Facts Crammed move for all concerned. 



ink- 



orld Thus it wa« wi^h a fpplin? Down Students' Throats And Th 
cause iiiut-ji sui <»= m..v- ■ oriu. j.nus, n was wu-n a reeling . 
thP ro'Wiate world this ' of more than patriotic pride, of more \ m S Discouraged; Should Quit Im 

* = ' _i i -r ii__ i il.! . fatinc T.aro-^r Rclinnl-s " TTvon thnn,- 



system has been used at Washington { -« 
College ever since the origin of fra 
temities here. It is true that Wash 



han mere honor of the great, that | *»**»»£ Larger Schools." Even though 



he Midyear Convocation assembled ' 
on Thursday, in William Smith Hall- ' 



s no sixty-room Greek letter ' Rather, it was with a feeling of per- 
dwellings. The fraternity houses at^anent intimacy with the past, with 



down in the sticks don't have a 
swimming team and a fencing team, 
etc., as have our neighbors, we can 
at least be proud of our faculty! 



ATTENTION CALLED TO 
VOCATIONAL BOOKS 



Washington College have, also, 
J 160,0 00 mortgages. 



the very founding of the country, 
that the Washington College of to- 



Broad Scope Of Subjects 
Treated 



Thus, again, is shown the forward- dav gathered to pay grateful respects 



to its forbears. 



ness of the small institution, and 

reiterated the complaint of the big- I " °° 

college, transfer student coming to r\nfun CTT> A /<n/cc 
Washington: "I thought I could show UtiLnLoi KA til V to 
them something, but I found that ev- 
erything I tried, someone had done 
there years ago." 



Now, says a columnist at the Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma, is apparently 
the meaning of the phrase, "Dear, 
you'll be the death of me!" The 
columnist points to the discovery by 
psychologists at Western State Col- 
lege, that a kiss, by causing extra 
LtNlRtVlLLt CU/VCCAJ palpitation of the heart, shortens the 
i average human life by three minutes. 



DINING AT DINNER 

The acquisition of social graces 
and social ease is much more import- 
ant in modern life than a mastery of 
Euclid or of the descent of the Ro- 



Soloists Featured In Sunday 
Program 

by Vincent Brandolini 



by Allen Brougham 

In an attempt to help the college 
student who knows neither what he 
wants to do after completing his col- 
lege career, nor what he is best fitted 
for, the Librarian has for some years 
been placing vocational references on 
an open shelf in the library. 

The average college student, it has 
(Hey ho for the short lived life of j been foumI| is attending college with 



a lover, — and Kight claims that he 
will die in about six more years). 

Attendance at morning chapel for 



man emperor. Education, says one Orchestra, making its first debut out- 
of the most widely recognized of 



Sunday. February 17, the Wash- students at Harvard University aver 
ington College "Little Symphony" ' 



platitudes, prepares for life. Educa- 
tion includes most certainly the teach- 
ing of social polish. This is an im- 
portant theme, but it is so obvious 
that only m its applications can ad- 
vance be made. 



?ide the College, presented a concert 
at the Opera House in Centreville, 
Md. 

The program was varied, and sel- 
ected to please any audience. The 
orchestra, playing in excellent mid- 



ch an advance is imminent if the I 8ea ' on , fa * ion ' sl,owed * at il ! a c °"- 
1 tinualiy improving and aspiring to 

greater heights. "Liebestraum" and 



Student Council's plan for dining ser- 
vice in the college commons mature:-. I 
The breakfast, luncheon, or dinner! 
table period are the most useful and i 
general forms of social intercourse. | 
The very physiological nature of eat- 
ing encourages light and pleasant 
talk, and a comfortable, proper man- 
ner in the presence of one's friends, 
classmates, family, superiors, teach- 
ers, or even in the presence of one's 
own contemplative self. 

The brilliant repartee' which char- 
acterizes the famous dining places of 
all history, or the polished social ele- 
gance of a Parisian opera-dinner, in 
not likely to be found in the com- 
mons of a small American college. 
But a fellowship, and a pocta! eon> 
seiousnes* valuable throughout life 



aged 63 daily during the past year. 

(We could easily increase that by 
lending them Dr. Howell and Miss 
Whitaker to take the roll for a few 
weeks). 



the novel arrangement of "Old Man 

River" elicited the' satisfaction of the 

audience. 

Mr. Lawrence Williams, popular 

college tenor, was featured as soloist. 

Mr. Williams' full, rich voice was 
enthusiastically received. Of especial 
interest was his rendition of Carrie 
Jacobs Bond's "Just Awearing for 
You." 

Miss Betty Smith, violinist in the 
orchestra, presented a solo, "Th(- Old 
Refrain" by Kreisler, in such a fine 
manner that nhe was encored to ren- 
der Nevin's immortal "Mighty Lak a 
Rose." Miss Smith's u«e of double 
notes and appealing, vibrant tone be- 
ftpoke her fine technique. 



This sign announced the chapel 
sermon at a small southern college, 
—"Do You Know What Hell Is?' and 
then a sign underneath invited stu- 
dents to, "Come and Hear Our Or- 
ganist." 



NOTICE 

Local advertisers will recall that 
because of uncertainty in publication 
plans at the beginning of the year, 
(he ELM was compelled to sell local 
advertising on the rate basis of last 
year's fourteen-issue schedule. That 
is, space was sold on the basis of 
fourteen insertions for the year. 
However, already this space has been 
given eighteen insertions, and will be 
given insertions from the middle of 
March until June. But the issues be 
'ween February 23, and March 23 
must be published with the omisi 
of certain local advertisements. 



little or no idea of what he is to pre- 
pare for, but merely because he was 
| put there by his parents. The fact 
1 that he must eventually awake to the 
! responsibility awaiting him is of lit- 
I tie consequence unless he is guided 
in some measure in the matter of his 
selection. And so the College, 
through the cooperation of the Lib- 
rary, is placing this information be- 
fore the student in the form of voca- 
tional guide-books. 

These books are to be found in the 
library in a small book-sehlf, above 
which appears the sign: "ARE YOU 
INTERESTED IN ", following 
which is the name of the particular 
vocation discussed. In the series 
there are nine major occupations re- 
viewed, each for a period of two 
weeks. These subjects include Ad- 
vertising, Aviation, Engineering, 
Journalism, Law, Medicine, Librar- 
ianship, Social Service, and Teach- 
ing. The books may be read in the 
library or taken out for a period of 
two weeks. 

This service to the students, al- 
though it has been discontinued for 
the pant few weeks, will be revived 
shortly, and Mrs. Fox, the Librarian 
expresses the desire that the refer 
ences be UHed more extensively thai 
in the past. 



As thousands jeer we again tickle 
the verbal keyboard of our Under- 
wood to try to sling a little gossip 
where it will cause the biggest com- 
ment combined with the lowest pric- 
ed damage suits. 

We saw and heard quite a few 
things which a lot of people wish we 
hadn't, listen closely everybody 
'cause we're telling you: — Saw a new 
combination the other night which 
might develop into something, Rein- 
hart and that lanky gal from Elkton, 
leaving Kight to stroll about in a 
daze dreaming of that Cumberland 
skirt that really loves him — so he 
says. Who started that rumor a- 
bout Mr. and Mrs. (?) Lord — how 
much truth is there, in it? ... . Fon- 
taine has a swell story about Libby 
and the gravy — ain't it Libby? . By 
the by we hear that back-seat Mor- 
gan has lifted the bars to all holds 
and is now often in a position to give 
Londos a few pointers — ask any one 
of a dozen who have seen her. . . . 
Why do Sadler and Jewell sit so far 
apart at basketball games — they in- 
variably find each other afterwards 
— anyway Rogers enjoys it during 
game time . . Perry has developed 
the cave man technique to a rowdy- 
dow on that blond — and how she likes 
it, or perhaps she can't get away 
Wonder how much rent Cham- 
bers pays for the use of Bill Smith 
after classes until supper time?. , . . 
Wilmot and MeDorman have been 
seen pricing comfortable two-family 
farms in the neighborhood — so, 
they're family men, huh?. . . A frat 
pin has been called a collegiate wed- 
ding ring — El Pink incidently. wears 
a blue and red diamond shaped pin 
which oddly enough resembles that 
of the Tau's . Some people said that 
the female impersonator in the dra- 
matic club farce had the same sort 
of cow boy legs as Dee Clark, — who 
is it that wore riding boots around 
here not so long back? If the five 

right people die suddenly J. F. Spry 
will go to the Naval Acadamy — all 
drug stores are hereby warned not 
to sell any rat poison to said Spry 
gentleman . . See Berry (whom the 
girls hate but would love to date) has 
an up and coming rival — Satchelfoot 
Pelensky admires from afar but gets 
closer every day . . The Y. M. C. A. 
Peace Conference programs are tak- 
ing up a lot of conspicious space late- 
ly — we noted A. W. Griems listed a- 
mong the peace leaders; some jump 
for him; he's usually listed as a dis- 
turber of the peace — we also noted 
E. S. Slacum, Pres., listed in larger 
letters — last fall he was the only 
secretary of an organization to be 
listed in the WHO'S WHO of the 
handbook. Well, now he really is a 
President so he won't have to edit the 
handbook to crash the WHO'S WHO 
If a raise in salary comes through 
coach, G. L, E. is seriously consider- 
ing middle-aisling it .Admiral 
Wotta Man Hope continues to be the 
dark horse in the Fi-Fi naval battle 
down on Water Street — -looks as if 
Mast Head McLain came out second 
best again by the stab in his hand al- 
though he swears it was an oyster 
knife We recommend that the 

library employ a trained nurse — to 
read off the prices and fines and then 
administer the smelling salts , , .Un- 
less some care is taken the stack priv- 
ileges will soon apply only to loving 
couples — as the solitude among the 
books supplies ideal conditions. . . . 
Ward is said to get booed for the 
track meet he puts on — running up 
and down the sofa — never quite cat- 
ching up . Peg Legg is now wear- 
ing the gold football of the undefeat- 
ed football team — Tig says he's no 
sucker, so double A. Andy must be 
it. . . . Shoe face Davis, of the Mid- 
dle Hall A. A. has his hands full 
these days What do you know a- 
bout Don and Lucy? And has her sor- 
ority sister captured the wily and 
elusive Wilmot. , , .Howdy says he 
has someone to take care of him. Con 
it be a sweet young CHS girlie?. . . 
Since when has Bill Rinehard ' been 
rushing Dolly? ... Why does little 
Barbie Hparklin get so many phono 
■alls, and calmly turn down all hope- 
.'til would-be-datoa? 



SATURDAY, FEB. 23, 1935 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



SKIPPING ° ve \h E SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



Craig Taylor rightfully calls the 
Maryland Inter-Collegiate Basketball 
League a funny circuit in which fun- 
ny things happen. Here it is with 
the finish line in sight and four teams 
s o hunched at the top that anyone's 
guess as to the winner is as good as 
the next person's. The Sho'men had 
but one game this week, with St. 
Johns, and will remain idle until the 
crucial game with the Western Mary- 
land Terrors a week hence. On the 
other hand, this week has been a very 
busy one for all the other league 
members. As a result the whole 



standing of the league may be chang- 
ed. At the time this article was 
written, Loyola had a small lead over 
the rest of the pack. But I feel that 
the Greyhounds are due to be tripped 
because you can't go on for ever win- 
ning ball games by 1 or 2 points. The 
ideal situation would be to have the 
Jesuits and the locals go into the com- 
ing fray all even. The victor would 
cop the championship. You can bet 
that the local drill shed would be fill- 
ed to capacity that night. 

I see where — Navy is to alternate 
with Army on the Yale football sche- 



dule. ..Harvard may follow the 
same plan . Athletic relations be- 
tween Columbia and the U. of Penn. 
may be severed due to fights in a re- 
cent basketball game. Basketball 
double headers at Madison Square 
Garden draw from 15 to 20 thousand 
people. . .The N. Y. U.-Duquesne 
game should be a thriller. . . There 
is some talk about raising the bas- 
kets from ten feet to 12 ft It 

would help such small fellows as Bil- 
ancioni and Berry . Widmeyer of 
Maryland defeated Metcalf recently 
To get back home. - the foot- 
ball team had it's sweetheart, now 
there is a girl who seems to be head- 
ed to go through the basketball 
squad . Little Audrey laughed and 
laughed and laughed because she 
knew that Delaware couldn't beat our 
basketball team. 



KIBLERITES SWAMP 

DELAWARE RIVALS 



First Period Score Proves Mar- 
gin Of Victory 



The Maroon and Black cagers de- 
feated the Blue Hens in the first of 
a two game series at the Chestertown 
Armory last Saturday night by the 
score 31-23. 

Washington started off in whirl- 
wind fashion and seemed able to 
score at will and led at the half by 
a substantial score. However the 
second half turned out to be a listless 
affair with each team playing equal. 

The visitors had a one man team 
in O'Connel who did most of the 
scoring and played a good floor game 
as well. 



Varsity Club Presents 

Plans At Banquet 

To make the Varsity Club a sphere 
of influence on the College campus 
was the resolution adopted by the 
members of that organization at an 
informal supper held at the Chester- 
town Restaurant last Tuesday even- 
ing in honor of the prospective mem- 
bers. 

Ellery J. Ward, president of the 
club, reviewed the aims of the organ- 
ization, and presented plans towards 
making the Varsity Club one of the 
prestige and one of service. The 
two immediate projects suggested 
and the ones to be followed are the 
securing of monogrammed sweaters, 
and definite steps to bind the alumni 
members of the club with the active 
members. 



WHEN ALL ELSE fails 




9 



am 



LUCKI 




jr* cfucL Sfcuia* 



I am a friend indeed. A better friend 
than others, because I am made only 
of mild, fragrant, expensive center 
leaves. I don't permit a single sharp 



top leaf nor a single coarse bottom 
leaf to mar my good taste or my 
uniform mildness. I am a sooth- 
ing companion, the best of friends. 



E CENTER LEAVES 



CENTER LEAVES GIVE YOU THE MILDEST SMOKE 



Coprrlfhl IBRD. The Arotrtcu Tobicw Coropin*, 



TfayTdtfi !$et&t, 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, FEB. 23, 1935 



Plans Complete For 
Y.M.C.A. Meet 

Discussion Leaders Repre- 
sent Many Fields 



"Y" REPRESENTATIVES 
ATTEND MEETING 



"Wage Peace? Wage "War?" will 
be the theme for discussion at the 
Annual Peace Conference sponsored 
bv the Washington College Y. M. C. 
A. to be held March 7 and S. 

High school students from the 
Eastern Shore, delegates from neigh- 
boring colleges, and ministers who 
may be interested are among those 
invited. Approximately 150 dele- 
gates are expected to attend. 

The discussion leaders are the best. 
They are Miss Pauline Albertson, of 
Salisbury, Eastern Shore Secretary j 
of the Maryland-Delaware Council of j 
Religious Education; Professor J. H. ' 
Bishop, of Dover, Director of Relig- 
ious Education of the Wilmington I 
Conference of the M. E. Church, Dr. 
A. C. Goddard, of Wilmington, Pas- \ 
tor of McCabe Memorial M. E. j 
Church; Professor Frank Goodwin, of | 
Chestertown, Faculty Adviser of the- | 
Washington College Y. M. C. A.; Mr. j 
A. W. Greims. Jr., of the college J 
"T"; Dr. W. E. Gunby of Newark. [ 
Delaware. Pastor of the Newark M. , 
E. Church; Mr. W. L. Sadler, Jr., of 
the college "Y"; Mr. E. A. School, \ 
of Baltimore, Executive Secretary of j 
the Johns Hopkins University Y. M. | 
C- A.: in addition to one more adult' 
leader and six visiting undergradu- ! 
ate college students whose names ; 
have not as yet been announced. The . 
topics for discussion will be "How 
War is Waged," "Outlining the Pres- i 
ent World Situation," and "How j 
Peace Is Waged." 

Registrations are coming in daily | 
and sre being taken care of by Car- 
roll W. Casteel, chairman of the In- 
vitation Committee. News dispatches 
concerning the conference have been 
sent to all the leading newspapers of 
the Eastern Shore of Maryland and 
Delaware by Marvin H. Smi:h, chair- 
man of the Publicity Committee. The 
"-t-timore papers are also carrying 
Tn* 01 ^ of the Conference. The 
Housing Committee, under the direc- 
tion of John C. Mead, has secured the 
cooperaiion of many residents of 
Chestertown in providing accommo- 
dations for the viators. Mr. Edwin 
S. Lowe has charge of the Welcome I 
and Registration Committee. 

Social activities for the Confer- 1 
ence are being planned by the Y. W. ! 
C. A., which will serve tea the first 
afternoon of the conference. A ban- ! 
qnet is being planned by a commit- [ 
tee under the direction of Lawrence ] 
Yourtee, and an armament play, un- j 
der the direction of Richard P. i 
Chambers, will be presented on the 1 
first afternoon of the Conference. ; 
That evening, two one-act plays will , 
be presented by the Washington \ 
Players. 

The Y. M. C. A. requests that the 
: cooperate with "Y" mem- 
bers in matmg the visitors feel at 
hiie they are on the campus. 
»o 

President Mead Guest 

At Johns Hopkins Fete 

Dr. Gilbert W. Mead ig being en- { 
tertained today in Baltimore, as a I 
President Ames, t& Johns; 
Hopkins. Washington's birthday is 
- ion of Hopkins' 59th An- 
nual Commemoration Day. A lunch- 
eon e. to follow the exercises. 



Delmarva Youth Group Hold 
Salisbury Session 

Robert Snyder, Lawrence Williams 
William Hall and Emerson Slactim 
are attending the Fifth Annual Con- 
ference of Delmarva Youth, at Salis- 
bury, Maryland, The conference 
opened yesterday, and will close to- 
morrow. These men are delegates of 
he Washington College Y. M. C. A. 
The Youth Conference will be direct- 
ed by Prof. James H. Bishop, of Dov- 
er, Delaware, who is to be the direc- 
tor of the forthcoming Peace Con- 
ference at this College. Over four 
hundred representatives of churches, 
young people's societies, and other 
organizations are expected to attend. 
Among the leaders of the Youth Con- 
"erence are Dr. Wade Barclay, of 
Chicago; Dr. Elbert M. Conover, of 
New York; Edward H. Brewster, of 
Philadelphia; and Dr. Alvin C- God- 
lard, of Wilmington. 



S. D. Burr Speaks 
At Honor Assembly 

Five Members Received Into 
Society At Exercises 

The necessity of having a well- 
rounded personality and knowledge 
in diversified fields, if one wishes to 
suceed, was emphasized by Samuel D. 
Burr, superintendent of the Special 
School District of New Castle, Dela- 
ware, in his address before the Wash- 
ington College Honor Society assem- 
bly Thursday, February 14. The Hon- 
or Society admitted five junior mem- 
bers. William Oliver Baker, its stu- 
dent president, explained the aims 
and purposes of the society. 

Mr. Burr attached great import- 
ance to the possession of a goal, eith- 
er permanent or temporary. He ad- 
vanced scholarship, moral courage, 
developed physique, and qualities of 
leadership as the factors which make 
for balance in an individual. "Do not 
overemphasize one aspect in life," he 



said, "and be willing to change goals, 
if it is necessary." 

The new members of the Honor 
Society are: Betty Dill, Charles Dud- 
ley, Robert Fink, Helen Jervis, and 
Betty Thibodeau. Mr. Baker gave as 
the basic aims of the Honor Society: 

1. The advancement of Washing- 
ton College in scholastic prestige. 

2. The stimulation of interest in 
scholarship by offering recognition of 
scholastic excellence. 

3. Revelation of the joy of work. 



International Society Hears 
Dr. Davis On Germany 



At the next meeting of the Inter- 
national Society to be held Wednes- 
day, February 27 at 6:40, the discus- 
sion on Germany, begun at the last 
meeting, will be continued with Dr. 
A. L. Davis as the speaker. Dr. Davis 
will talk on the present-day political 
situation in Germany, and, among 
other things, will discuss the program 
of the Nazis and the effect of their 
program on the other powers of the 
world. 

This is an open meeting, and visi- 
tors are invited. 



MAROONS DEFEAT ST. 
JOHNS 24 ■ 



19 



The high-flying Washington quintet 
advanced another step in the State 
League Championship race by defeat- 
ing St. John's last Thursday night 24 
-19. 

Although outscored in the first 
half 9-7, Washington came back 
with a final half spurt that netted 17 
points. Each team played equally well 
defensely and most of the scores 
came from outside shots and one- 
hand flips. 



Sororities Pledge 

Six Freshmen 



Tuesday, February nineteenth, 
was pledge day for the girls. Each 
sorority got two new members. The 
following are the results: 

Gamma Sigma — Beppy Westcott, 
Elsie Wharton. 

Kappa Gamma — Hazel Lynch, Dor- 
is Unruh. 

Sigma Tail Delta — Polly Taylor, 
Will a Newnam. 





D 



one movm 



Smokers of Chesterfield are funny that 
way, you can hardly move 'em. They 
evermore like 'em, and they evermore 
stick to 'em. Chesterfields are milder —they 
taste better. 



) !'/», Utwtt e* Mvt»s Tonnrat Co. 



Attend The YMCA 
Peace Conference 



lne 




Elm 



See Shakespeare's Best 
Loved Drama Friday 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 20. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



Last Arrangements 
Planned For Hamlet 

Record Audience Expected 
For Production 

Costumes, Posters, Tickets, Ra- 
hearsals, Curtain — the play is on — 
"Hamlet" will be presented by the 
Shakespeare Club next Friday even- 
ing, March 8th, in William Smith 
Hall. 

The play "Hamlet" is not new but 
the Shakespeare Club of Washington 
College's version may be in some 
parts original and in all parts unus- 
ual. For fancy having the cast 
"made to order." Well 'tis so. 

Since summer Bill Baker has been 
quoting blank verse on his daily jour- 
neys to and from Quaker Neck. He 
says his old "Chevie" fairly hums to 
the strains of those famous solilo- 
quies. 

We could think of Bill in a very 
philosophical mood but imagine get- 
ting a chance to see him in a mad 
scene or better still — at the feet of a 
lady. And, as for the accent — well, 
we have to rub our eyes twice to see 
if it is really William Oliver Baker 
but it isn't — it's "Hamlet" and so he 
will be until midnight, March 8. 

For four years we have heard it 
rumored about the campus that Bob 
Shaull keeps his dramatic ability un- 
der cover. Now we know it to be a 
fact. Today he acts as one Polonius, 
tomorrow another — never is he the 
same! Does he forget his part? No, 
it's just Bob putting himself into the 
part of a meddling old father, and 
enjoying every bit of it. 

After being on the stage for three 
acts before he is killed off, Bob re- 
turns as Osric, the master of cere- 
monies at the court in Act V. And 
does he feel at home? For some un- 
known reason the court seems to re- 
mind him of Pig Alley of bygone 
years and he makes himself once 
more the ringmaster of the show. 

Wes Sadler has lived for the day 
he would be called to present a ser- 
ious Claudius to the public. And we 
have inside information that he is a 
hundred times better than the Claud- 
ius of Walter Hampden's company, 
which toured the country this winter. 
There is no need to go to the city 
when we have such people at home. 

Nola Crow will never have a bet- 
ter chance to learn to be a sweet 
daughter, sister (and wife) than in 
her role of Ophelia. If the psycholo- 
gy classes are looking for a case in 
point they had better see Nola get 
from mad to "madder." Have you 
heard her reach high "G" in those 
little songs. Well, you better come 
she may never reach them again. 

Never has any company had a 
cleaner faced or more good natured 
ghost than Carroll Casteel, but when 
he trys to be serious and breath-tak- 
ing he continually sends Hamlet and 
all who see him into fits of laughter. 
We can not tell from whence he 
comes (above or below) but we are 
certain it's those staring eyes and 
that broad smile that cause the wrong 
emotion. 

Inquiries have been pouring in as 
to the school of dueling to be follow- 
e 'l' That is a secret the two Bills 
(Bill McCullough and Bill Baker) 
have not revealed. Maybe that's 
their originality cropping up, who 
«nows? 

Mimi Skinner is another of those 
Persons who just acts natural and it 
goes. As the second grave-digger, 
her life's ambition seems to be to just 
d, g graves and talk and talk. 

Courtiers, some in armor, some in 
court costume, ladies in waiting, 

n gs and queens, pages and 



COURTMEN TRAVEL 
TO DELAWARE TONIGHT 



Play Last Scheduled Game Of 
Season At Newark 



Tonight the cagers journey to New- 
ark to meet the Blue Hens in the sec- 
ond of a two game series and also to 
play the last scheduled game of the 
season. 

The Hens have not improved great- 
ly since playing here last February 
16th and should not give the locals 
much trouble. 

O'Connel has been the mainstay of 
the Delaware team all year and if he 
is held down the others will be able 
to do but little. Pie has demonstrat- 
ed his ability to find the basket in 
several games this year but his short 
stature is against him and he can do 
very little against a big man. 

Ellery Ward, who came back to 
flash his old time form at Western 
Maryland last Tuesday night when 
he replaced Horowitz at forward and 
proceded to ring up fifteen points, 
will probably start tonight at the for- 
ward position. 



vants, all come in for their bow. You 



can 



never recognize them in their 
^y garbs but they are all familiar 
laces about the campus. 



Student Opinion Shows 

Table Service Popular 

Representative Students Ex- 
press Sentiment 



Table service will be adopted in 
the commons provided the majority 
of the students express their desire 
for the improvement. The Student 
Council has received the administra- 
tion's approval and is now waiting 
for action by the student body. Fol- 
lowing are comments of representa- 
tive students on the proposed change 

Louis Goldstein. — "Table service 
would be one of the biggest improve- 
ments of the year. It would create 
a more home-like atmosphere and 
make the meals more enjoyable." 

Lucille Legg. — "We should have 
table service because the meals will 
be more appetizing. It will add a 
certain cultural advantage necessary 
to the college life." 

Richard Chambers. — "I'd like it 
'cause I'd get a chance to serve the 
steaks once in a while." 

Mary Jane Neild. — "I think it 
would be grand; it would be a social 
advantage for the students, especial- 
ly the boys." 

Michael Wallace. — "I think it 
would be a very great addition to 
the cultural life of our college; a 
splendid thing." 

Carolyn Helms. — "I think we 
should have table service just be- 
cause^ ." 

. Harold McCrone. — "Table service 
would create manners where they 
are practically non-existent, promote 
the student friendship, and most cer- 
tainly add to other enjoyment of the 
meals. 

Emerson Slacum. — "I believe that 
table service would increase the 
friendly spirit of Washington College 
and improve the etiquette of the stu- 
dent body. 

Ellery Ward. — "I am highly in fa- 
vor of table service if they increase 
the bulk and quality of food, which 
would be necessary to have efficient 
service." 

Norris Duffy. — "Table seivice 
would create a more sanitary condi- 
tion, and a much pleasanter atmos- 
phere. I'm for it 100 per cent." 



Dr. Krantz Tells Of 
Chemistry In Health 

"Purpose Of Chemistry To 
Make Medicine" Asserts 



ADDITIONAL PEACE 
LEADERS LISTED BY "Y" 



We heanl that a certain "Young" 
Freshman has nlready bought an or- 
chestra seat that he might get a bet- 
ter glimpse of his lady love as a court 
page. Shall we reseive the next 
seat for you? 



"This is a story of test tubes and 
of heroes in chemistry's fight against 
disease," said Dr. John C. Krantz, 
head of the Department of Pharmo- 
cology at the University of Mary- 
land Medical School, of his address 
to the Washington College assembly 
of February 28. The address was 
called "Chemistry in the Crises of 
Health." Dr. Krantz is also chief 
of the Bureau of Chemistry of the 
Maryland State Health Department. 

"The cardinal principle of Chemis- 
try is to preserve life," stated Dr. 
Krantz, "and its second principle to 
prevent pain." 

He told how the whole field of 
Chemistry was revolutionized when 
Paracelsus said: "The purpose of 
Chemistry is not to make gold, but 
medicine." 

"The purpose of Chemistry is the 
same today," he continued. 

Dr. Krantz reviewed Lavoisier's 
contributions to Chemistry, and those 
of Joseph Priestley. He spoke on 
the beginnings of anesthetic surgery 
and the advent of painless dentistry. 

He described the development of 
antiseptic surgery with Semmelweiss 
and Oliver Wendell Holmes as pio- 
neers in the field. 

"Chemistry is a crowded profes- 
sion," he said. "All professions are 
crowded. But there is still room in 
Chemistry for those who have a bent 
for research." 

Dr. Krantz gave this advice to 
budding chemists. He said: "The 
men who have made great discoveries 
have been those who have had the 
simplicity to wonder, the ability to 
question, and the capacity to apply." 



Classicists Hear Dean 

Bradley Talk On Horace 



Dean Bradley was the guest speak- 
er of the Classical Society in Reid 
Hall last Wednesday evening. She 
gave a short but delightful talk on 
the Latin poet, Horace. This golden 
age writer, she explained, was per 
haps the only Roman who wrote what 
the present age would call Romantic 
poetry, and yet his disposition was 
jovial and carefree, quite contrary to 
our conception of a romantic poet's 
personality. Horace did not attempt 
to write long epic poems, nor did 
subject matter concern him. His on- 
ly purpose was "to play with words," 
and create a beautiful effect, and he 
wrote so little that all his works can 
be bound into one thin volume. 

Miss Bradley's talk was followed 
by two musical selections by guesls 
of the Society. Miss Mary Jane 
Neild sang, "The End of a Perfect 
Day," accompanied by Miss Cather- 
ine Kirwan, which was followed by 
a piano solo, "Falling Waters," play- 
ed by Miss Kirwan. Refreshments 
were served, and the meeting broke 
up into small discussion groups. 



First Annual Conference To Be 
Largely Attended 



Miss Jessie L. Snow, of Baltimore, 
Executive Secretary of the League of 
Nations Association (Maryland 
Branch), has been added to the ex- 
cellent group of discussion leaders 
assembled for the Peace Conference 
being sponsored by the Washington 
College Y. M. C. A. Dr. A. C. God- 
dard, of Wilmington; Dr. W. E. Gun- 
by of Newark, Delaware; Miss Pau- 
line Albertson of Salisbury; Prof. 
James H. Bishop of Dover; and Mr. 
E. A. Schall of Baltimore are other 
outstanding leaders. 

Registrations indicate that from 
that point of view the conference 
should prove a success. High school 
students, college students, delegates 
from churches, ministers, and any 
others interested in World Peace are 
invited. 

This Conference will be the first in 
Maryland to combine high school stu- 
dents, college students, and minis- 
ters. It is the outgrowth of a con- 
ference held within the college on the 
subject of "Pacificism and War 
Propoganda" under the leadership of 
Prof. James H. Bishop of Dover last 
year. 

World Peace is considered by many 
to be the paramount issue of the day. 
Paul Harris of the National Council 
for the Prevention of War in a re- 
cent address expressed fear of a war 
involving the United States before 
1940 leading to the destruction of 
democratic government and usher- 
ing in a post-war depression making 
the present one look sick by compar- 
(Continued On Page Two) 



Food Poisoning No Fault Of 
Management, Analysis Shows 



The Bacteriological Department of 
the State Department of Health ana- 
lyzed the food that caused the poison- 
ng of sixty odd students. By bac- 
teriological analysis all reports were 
negative. Chemists analyzed the 
gravy and ice cream in their original 
receptacles — an important point ill 
bacteriological analysis — and ab- 
solved the cafeteria from negligence 
in both sterilezation of dishes and 
preparation of foods. The manage- 
ment of the commons is entirely 
blameless and should not be con- 
demned for the effect of outside fac- 
t?Ys beyond their control. 



DRAMATIC CLUB HAS 
EXTENSI VE PR OGRAM 

The Dramatic Club will entertain 
the guests of the Washington College 
Y. M. C. A. Peace Conference with 
two one^act plays, "A Girl to Order" 
by Bessie Wreford Springer and "A 
Ghost Story" by Booth Tarkington 
on Thursday evening, March 7 in the 
College gymnasium. 

The Club, which was reorganized 
earlier in the year, has a very active 
program planned for the^remainder 
of the school year. 

On Mai'ch 14 the members of the 
Club will give "The Valliants" in the 
weekly assembly. This play is said 
to be the best one-act play ever writ- 
ten. 

The next progTam of one-act plays 
will be presented on Monday evening, 
March 18. The directors and casts will 
be announced later. 

Plans are already being made for 
the Commencement week play. If 
these plans are fulfilled, it looks as 
if Washington College might have a- 
nother blue ribbon to add to its list 
of events for the year. Watch for 
more news concerning the Dramatic 
Club. 



Maroons Fight 
Losing Battle 

Hard-Pressed Game Gives 
Loyola 34-29 Win 

Loyola ended Washington's hopes 
for the State Championship title by 
defeating the locals in a thrilling 
game at the Armory last night. 

Loyola took the lead a few min- 
utes after the game opened when 
Carney netted a field goal. Al Wil- 
mot produced Washington's first 
score but Loyola stepped out and 
lead 15-10 at the half. Washington 
came back in the second half and 
rang up ten points to Loyola's two in 
the first few minutes of this period 
but the visitors stepped out to win 
34-29. 

Carney was the outstanding play- 
er for the Greyhounds, gathering 14 
points, while Horowitz turned in one 
of his best performances of the year 
for Washington. 

In the preliminary game the Junior 
Varsity defeated the Washington 
All-Stars, a long shot by Johns in the 
last two minutes of play providing 
the margin of victory. The final 
score was 24-22. 

•The lineup and summary: 
Loyola G 

Colvin, f 2 

Kelly, f 2 

Ferrarrini, f 2 

Taneyhill, c 2 

Wayson, g 



Carney, g 5 4-5 14 



Totals 13 8-10 34 



Washington 

Salter, f 

Ward, f 

Horowitz, f . 
Bilancioni, f . 
Skipp, c . - . . 
Nicholson, c . 
McLain, c . . . 
Huffman, g . 
Wilmot, g . . . 



F 
3-3 

0-3 
3-5 

0-0 
0-0 

1-1 

0-0 
0-0 

0-0 



Chemical Society To Present 
Movie Of Sugar Processes 

The growing, harvesting, and re- 
fining of raw cane sugar are the sub- 
jects graphically treated in a movie 
to be presented by the Chemical So- 
ciety at 7 P. M., Tuesday, March 5, 
in Room 35. 

The film consists of two reels. The 
first considers the production of raw 
sugar in various widely separated 
countries of the world. It shows life 
on a typical sugar plantation, and the 
peculiar industral organization which 
has been developed there. 

Much of the picture is laid in Cuba, 
where the cane thrives. Refining pro- 
cesses, packing, marketing and trans- 
portation are discussed and illustrat- 
ed. The large attendance at the re- 
cent ethyl-gasoline demonstration will 
be justifiably repeated at this meet- 
ing, officers of the Society stated. 



Totals 11 7-12 29 

Score by halves: 

Loyola 15 19 — 34 

Washington 10 19 — 29 



Dr. Davis Talks To Society 
On Hitler's Accomplishments 

Asserts Rise To Power Was By 
Constitutional Means 

The International Society at its 
regular meeting Wednesday, Febru- 
ary 27, was addressed by Dr. Davis 
who spoke on the present day political 
situation in Germany. Dr. Davis be- 
gan by stressing the fact that Hitler 
had risen to power by constitutional 
means and not by a "Coup D'etat." 

Dr. Davis then went on to explain 
the psychology and nature of the 
German people relating this as their 
present day attitude towards Hitler 
and to the rest of the world. The 
25 points of the Nazi Program were 
discussed by Dr. Davis and for the 
sake of classification were divided in- 
to 3 parts, the racial problems, the 
political problems, dealing most with 
uniting Germany and last the Foreign 
problem dealing mainly with secur- 
ing Germany's equality with the oth- 
er major powers of the world. 

Debaters Lose Decision 

To Blue Ridge 

The affirmative team oi th« Wash- 
ington College Debating Society lest 
a judged decision to the Blue Ridge 
Negative team yesterday afternoon, 
in William Smith Hall. Washington 's 
negative team went to Blue Ridge, 
where there was a no-decision de- 
bate. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 1935 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 17S2. 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein ... - Bus, Manager 
Emerson Slacum . . Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

Waiiam Eight, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandolini, Anne 

Whyte, William McCullough 

Howard Clark 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
postoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, 51-50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 



College students who wish to keep 
the College in the first rank. It is 
the statement by Mr. Walter Jessups, 
president of the Foundation, on the 
character of the undergraduate of to- 
day: 

"The student on the campus is no 
longer the blase, sophisticated stu- 
dent of the Twenties," Mr. Jessup 
says; "he is a hard-working, serious- 
minded person who demands more of 
the college library, the laboratory 
and the instructor than did his bro- 
ther of a decade ago. He is increas- 
ingly a patron of the seminar, the 
serious lecture, the art gallery, the 
symphony concert. This student is 
deflating the 'rah-rah boy' of yester- 
day. He has a different attitude to- 
ward scholarship, research, athletics, 
fraternities and student activities." 

Mr. Jessups makes further com- 
ment significant to the undergradu- 
ate everywhere. Particularly does 
he emphasize proper development of 
the 'personality': 

"That the world at large pays a 
premium for personality is every- 
where apparent. The mechanics of 



SATURDAY MARCH 2, 1935 curriculum or of equipment seem to 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Baltimore, Md., 

Feb. 27, 1935. 
To the Editor of "The Elm" 

Sir: 

It has greatly grieved me to not- 
ice in the newspapers lately, the num- 
ber of reports suggesting George 
Ekaitis as possible head coach of 
football at one institution or assist- 
ant at some other and the absence of 
any statement that he will return to 
Washington College next year. 

Of course, no Washington College 
supporter, who remembers the sad 
state of our football team back in 
19S1 and also proudly recalls its 
steady improvement under Ekaitis, 
up to the undefeated season of last 
fall, would be so ungrateful as to wish 
to deny Mr. Ekaitis the privilege of 
benefitting personally from his sig- 
nally effective work of the past few 
seasons. However, there is no ap- 
parent, good reason why Coach Ekai- 
tis can not secure his clearly earned 
advancement and still remain at 
Washington College. 

Friends and Alumni of Washing- 
have little to do with the develop- ton College do not have to read the 



I nient of this most precious of human 



Cooperation Suggested 
"In this situation. 



FRATERNITIES GAIN A DECISION qualities. 

National developments concerning 
fraternities vary week by week. This 
constant motion of opinions, dictums 
and investigations shows conclusive- 
lv that some new adjustment of fra- 
ternities is under way. During the 

pa*! week the fraternities have con- : Such an ana i ysjs wiU ca l] for a clear 
c!dsi\ely won the round. Kesponsi- definition of function; it may even 
ble authorities at Tale, whose Alpha j suggest; and pomt the way to wide _ 
Delta Phi closing seems to have ^set sprea( j cooperation among institu- 
te pot boiling, say that fraternities ' tionSj SQ that the students mav find 



need elaborate 'surveys' so much 
they need to analyze with sincerity 
their own resources in order to dis- 
cover their limitations and strengths. 



papers and the tributes paid Ekaitis 
to realize his worth, and certainly we 
can use the best in our athletics as 
j well as any other college, 
colleges do not | j f M , sur£ that a „ Washi]lgtor , 



Alumni would be delighted to have 
the college announce that Mr. Ekaitis 
has signed a suitable contract to re- 
turn next year. 

Sincerely yours, 
Phillip J. Wingate, 



'33. 



richer offerings by attendance at one 
institution for one year and at anoth- 
er for another. 

"The smaller colleges should take 
note of the fact that many of the 
1 older and larger institutions are 



there are quickly adjusting them- 
selves to the new 'college' system, 
At Union College, stronghold of fra- 
ternities, a much more emphatic ap- 
proval of the modern fraternity U 
voiced. President Fox says in £i 

article in the AJumni *™™* £j placing more emphasis upon student 
which, of course, he is referring to L^ ^^ devices ^ recreation 

national * rat *? mes ; . Ur 'and study. These have to do with 

-The well-conducted ™ a Pj e J. the acceptance of institutional re- 
C 'l sponsibility for student personality.'" 
Carnegie reports are invariably 
the result of careful investigation. 



Debating Team 
Begins Program 



is prescribed the daily exercise of 
the virtues of helpfulness which, well 
developed, the graduate will take 
with him and apply in the relations 
of the larger life outside. 

"Probably fraternities help schol- 
arship as much as they hinder it. 
Naturally, fraternity men take a 
large part in the public affairs of the 
college; they are more socially mind- 
ed. There is, however, nothing in 
fraternity life that prevents high dis- 
tinction in academic studies. 

"At Union College, for ex a m ple, 
we have just elected eight men to 
Phi Beta Kappa out of a class of 
163, and seven of the eight are fra- 
ternity men," 

It is probably too early in the dis- 
cussion to draw an accurate conclu- 
sion. One may say with reason to 
any one of the conflicting interests 
and marring parties what Samuel 
Butler counseled in his satire "Hudi- 
bras"; 

"This gambol thon advisest 
"Is, of all others, the unwisest; 
' li- but to hazard my pretence, 
"Where nothing's eertain but th' 

expense. 
"But is as bad to attempt, or worse. 
"He that complies against his will, 
"Is of his own opinion still, 
"Wnich*he may adhere to, yet dis- 
own, 
"For reasons to himself best 
known." 



Meets Western Maryland 
Here Tonight 



The Debating Society of Washing- 
ton College will formally begin its 
activities on Friday, March 1st, 
when there will be a debate with a 
They are not like Senate "committee I team from Blue Ridge CoIle E e - The 
eports. Their contents, one does well ', order of debate as released by Mr. 
Sadler, manager, is as follows: at 
3:15 P. M. in William Smith Hall, the 
affirmative of Washington College 
will contest with the negative of Blue 
Ridge College, and at Blue Ridge 
j College, on the same date, at 7 P. M., 



AN ALUMNUS HAS AN OPINION 

A letter appears today in the sel- 



dom used department of Letters to ; , 

., _,., ,, .. . , at „ however, the Washington College ne- 

the Editor. It is from an Alumnus i . . ... , ... , fe . . ,, 6 „. 

... . . .. ' gative will be pitted against the Blue 

who retams enough mterest in h'S | Ri afflrmat f ve . T £ , ic o£ de _ 

e to^snggest ceiUjn^d^aMel,,^ is: ,. Res0 , ved? The Natjons 

Should Argue To Prevent The Inter- 



actions. The position of the young- 
er Alumni, especially, is too often one i 
of unqualified and destructive crit 1 - 
icism of any College policy. Often 
they are silent, when a suggestion 
made from past experience might 
help in the progress of Washington 
College. 

The Alumni should realize that, in 
their positions of members-emeritus 
of the student body, they retain the 
privilege, and are cordially invited, 
to use the columns of the ELM when- 
ever they wish. If the ELM can 
play some part in the closer union of 
the whole College family of Adminis- 
tration, faculty, student body and 
Alumni, it will then be justifying its 
position as a coordinator of College 
affairs. It is even conceivable that 
certain notable Alumni who are now 
newspaper editors would use the wide 
collegiate circulation of the ELM's 
columns to express their College 
opinions, rather than in their own 
papers. This latter is, however, not 



A FEW OF SEVERAL THINGS 

The annual report of the Carnegie 
Foundation on Teaching, issued last ! jjfceiy 

Monday, is significant to the whole I . O0 

academic world for the trends it j 

point* out. Of course, it speaks | HIGH-FLYING GEOMETRY 
much of certain reforms in pedagogy. The heights to which the Flying 
These, however, are of slight interest Pentagon soared on Tuesday even- 
to the undergraduate. Probably I j ng n^y not nave been spectacu i ari 
they are of slight interest to the : but the performance was completely 
pedagogue. Pedagogy is notably meeeatiuL It was the sort of spirit- 
This, however, is entirely off ! e( j i determined success that wine 



national Shipment of Arms and Mu- 
nitions." The debate will last six- 
ty-five minutes and will be informal. 

The second debate, which is with 
Western Maryland, will take place 
on Saturday, March 2nd, at 7:30 P. 
M., and will be conducted in William 
Smith Hall. In this debate the nega- 
tive of Washington College will ar- 
gue against the affirmative of Wes- 
tern Maryland. All participants of 
this debate will wear formal attire. 
The Washington College Debating 
Society is handicapped by its mem- 
bers' lack of experience, with the ex- 
ceptions of Messrs. Baker and Sad- 
ler. The industry and hard working 
spirit of the members of the Debat- 
ing Society, however, compensates 
for the deficiency in experience. 

The Debating Society cordially in- 
vites everyone to attend the coming 
contests. 



ADDITIONAL PEACE 
LEADERS LISTED BY "Y" 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



One for the money. 
Two for the show, 
Three to get ready. 
Four, five. 

(Heh, heh, fooled ya, — but a be- 
ginning must be made some way). 



Up in one of the little New Eng- 
land seaports lays the good yacht 
"Psyche." It had come from one of 
the southern yacht clubs and was lay- 
ing in for supplies. One of the old- 
er natives of the region who was long 
on spelling, though short on mythol- 
ogy, was seen to return time after 
time to study the craft, and was also 
observed to shake his head. Finally 
he could bear it no longer; he swung 
on a bystander and in a disgusted 
voice said, "What a hell of a way to 
spell fish.'' 

— Cornell "Daily Sun." 



The more we read the more we are 
convinced that Wash Collish is not so 
far behind the times. Up at Trin- 
ty College at Hartford, Conn., we 
find that a columnist is clamoring for 
the immediate annihilation of the 
person who started the "Little Au- 
drey" menace. 

(Which would be rather hard to 
do around here as the menace seem- 
ed to come from a sort of spontane- 
ous combustion — cracking out at all 
sides.) 



CAMERA CLUB PLANS NOVEL- 
TY IN 'INTIMATE POSE' SES- 
SION. 

The Intimate Pose Society as the 
erstwhile prosaically labelled Camera 
Club now chooses to desigante itseU, 
is planning a novel session for next 
Monday night, open to the entire 
community as well as to members. 

No cost is involved. You bring 
your own living models and a cam- 
era, and you take home your own 
pictures. Except aid is promised by 
members of the society, l'crfect 
pictures are guaranteed. 

(Item from the "Antiochian" — 
what do you think?) 



A Columbia University correspond- 
ent reports that the statisticians 
claim that nine out of ten women are 
knock-kneed — and then he falls to 
wondering how in the world statis- 
tians find out such things. 

— Randolph-Macon "Sun Dial." 

(Quite a few would be cco'iomists 
are struggling along in a statistics 
course here but they all claim to have 
found no such divertisement as >et.) 



Names of writers are often so per- 
fect for the books they write — for in- 
stance, that one on "'Newspaper Ac- 
counting," by a man named Swindell. 

And when names come in combina- 
tion, they get even better. Dr. Lesh 
was startled the other day in class 
when he called the roll, and three 
students in succession answered to 
the somewhat unscholarly combina- 
tion, "Fuller, Gordon, Gin." 

— The "Temple News." 

How would this sound in class, 
"Berry, Pullensky, Long, Unruh," — 
off when warm weather come. 



TOLD TO 



By 



ME 

I. Un-ly Heard 



First Annual Conference To Be 
Largely Attended 



the subject. 

The subject is none other 
Washington College. It is a 



games and State Championships. The 



than j game was won in the spirit which 
habit Coach Kibler will develop in his team 
of the ELM always to point out that \ thu wee k, and will win the next game 
Wa*hmgV,n, the college of venerable j f the week. By the time this paper 
tradrtion, is always up to date. Many | b, circulated, the correct ten.se will 
of these instance* of modern pro- i be 'won' the week-end games. Then, 
Cress have been of administrative u, the Championship play-off, where 
policies, curriculum organization, and the fame sort of team and college- 
be like. Part of the Carnegie re- wide spirit that gained the football 
port, the mont recent authoritative team an undefeated season will put 
pronouncement on present day edu- Washington's Flying Pentagon in its 
cation, is a challenge to Washington | own, proper altitude. 



(Continued From Page 1) 
ison if the present foreign policy of 
the United States is pursued. He 
also said, "The young voter has the 
most to lose by war. All relations 
between nations are endangered and 
peace ruined by another major war. 
War must be prevented by a new at- 
titude in America." 

Since it is the young voter who has 
the most to lose by another war, the 
Washington College Y. M. C. A. is 
conducting its conference on World 
Peace for the voters of tomorrow and 
the more interested of the voters of 
today. 



Our well known University of 
Maryland takes a panning in the V 
M. I, "Cadet." "With the recent 
horror of mid-year exams leaving ev- 
eryone in barracks a little bit shaky 
and fed up on 'spots,' bridge, and the 
hay, we receive the envious news that 
at Maryland final examinations have 
been made optional." All of which 
adds to that institutions' growing re- 
putation as a collegiate country club 
and general fun-spot. 



Here's one wo imagine we'd inter- 
cept if the waiters dared to write. 
Dear Miss Pontz: 

Please come home, all is forgiv- 
en. 

Your loving boys in white. 



When last week's column went to 
press your correspondent was so en- 
thusiastic about his masterpiece that 
he was ready to acknowledge his au- 
thorship. The expected praise was 
smothered by the swarms looking for 
the fellow who dared to slander his 
best girl. Tough ain't it? 

Some campustry students don't 
seem to be able to keep out of the 
searching glare of publicity. A col- 
umnist with a conscience has no place 
on this paper, according to Editor 
Baker, so we'll have to submerge our 
sensitive feelings and give our wait- 
ing public all the news that's fit to 
print; and then more news. 

Caged librarians overheard "Slop- 
py Joe" Freedman admit his weak- 
nesses. It seems that our versatile 
scholar has only two — eating and 
women. Tsk tsk. . . Bob Fink as a 
new member of the Caxtonians at- 
tended his first meeting last Tuesday 
night; he seemed surprised that Willa 
wasn't there. Is that why you join- 
ed, Bob? . Fulton and Beppy make 
a very attractive couple. You're not 
trying to make an old flame jealous 
are you girlie? - Satchelfoot Po- 
lensky — we won't call you that any- 
more, Satchelfoot — is on the war- 
path. He didn't want his secret love- 
life bared to the world ... Coach 
Kibler and his cagers deserve all the 
praise that can be given by a grate- 
ful student body — no matter how the 
game comes out tonight . . The Al- 
len Broughams seem happily reunit- 
ed after Grade's illness . Pogie 
should stop getting in line with the 
pretty coeds. Such affectionate 
demonstrations embarrass the young 
ladies — in the daytime. . . According 
to reports from the administration: 
Balcony lovers will be out of luck if 
they don't stop smoking in their ren- 
dezvous . . Dr. Goodwin's collegiate 
pacifists will have a peaceful time 
with their guests next weekend. Pres- 
dent Roosevelt won't formulate any 
definite international policy until af- 
ter the Washington peace confer- 
ence. Good goin' boys. . . .Bob, is it 
necessary to walk over to Reid Hall 
after every meal? Lorraine won't get 
lost President Slacum lisped his 

way through his first public address 
last Thursday — very effective . . . 
Spectators booed the poor decision 
given Chick Chaffey, the two-fisted 
Washington Collegian, in Centreville 
the other week . Success of nearby 
boxing promoters has lead to demands 
to charge admission to wrestling mat- 
ches in Reid Hall — tough that the 
bouts are fixed McCullough is a for- 
midable competitor in the race for 
that pretty little blonde — she's O. K., 
what? . Wardie is- lucky to have 
such a sweet girl wishing him success. 
No wonder he was high scorer at 
Western Maryland.. 

A certain Greensboro lass 
has won many admirers with her 
charms. Jimmie seems most overcome 
by Betty's beauty — love is a wonder- 
ful thing Frederic Peeper is fea- 
tured in one of Bill Shakespeare's 
plays — buy a ticket and take a 
chance — it may be good anyhow. . . . 
Bill Thompson is falling in line with 
the Phi traditions. Ask Peg who went 
to the movies with the Rock Hall lov- 
er Carroll W. Casteel, understudy 
to the staid William O., can't make up 
his mind as to who the lucky girl will 
be for the rest of the semester — such 
popularity must be deserved, so don't 
be too hard on him Eleanor; Sparky 
is true enough. 

Duncan "what-a-man ' Derringer 
has been spending some time on 
Queen Street — almost as much as he 
would like to. What's a matter boy, 
slippin'?. . .Odds are two to one 
that Betty will be at the game with 
Ivon tonight. Bets piaced in Dean 
Jone's office after eight o'clock not 
accepted. . . Elsie seems to find Bill 
as interesting as ever. Lessons every 
night on How to hold your gal — take 
turns, at the keyhole watching a 
master at work 



SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 1935 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



SKIPPING OVER THE 
SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



The Loyola game is now history, 
aiu) the annual trek up to Delaware 
is on- Yes sir, the Maroon and Black 
basketeers will have an unusually 
large number of rooters up at New- 
ark tonight. But when the boys 
come out on the floor you can bet 
they will be listening for familiar 
greeting yells of the "Loyal ten." 
This spirited group includes: Mr. B. 
Fox, Scott Beck, Lee and Henry Gill, 
"Herb" Ward, S. Startt, Mr. Kauff- 
man, Mr. Van Sett, Tom Gale, and 
last but not least Lou "Lover" Gold- 
stein. This small delegation has be- 
come a permanent fixture at all 
times, and especially because of their 
steady support away from home they 
have found their way into the hearts 
of the players and the coach. Gen- 
tlemen, let me say, "Thank you" on 
behalf of the whole squad. 

And now while I am still in the 
mood for dealing out praise let me 
oiier my congratulations to Chaff ey, 
for the splendid performance he 
tinned in over at Centreville last 
Friday night. "Chick," as he is 
known to the fight fans, made his 
ring debut by holding the seasoned 



veteran Kid Ewing to a draw. The 
verdict was very unpopular with the 
crowd who thought the college lad 
had the better of the going. Yes 
sir, Chaffey sure did fool some of 
those "know it all" students who had 
predicted dire results. 

Believe it or not but Washington 
College got a big break when Charlie 
Havens was appointed coach at Wes- 
tern Maryland this past week. That 
means that George Ekaitis will again 
guide the destinies of the local foot- 
ball eleven next fall, and I am cer- 
tainly glad of that. George Kkaitis 
has established for himself the repu- 
tation of .being a top ranking coach. 
Without any doubt he would make 
good at any school and especially a 
large one. And all of his many 
Eastern Shore friends would be glad 
to see him get such a position because 
he deserves it. But even so they all 
know that they are much happier to 
have him here with us. His team 
was undefeated this past fall, and it 
isn't saying too much to add that 
with the material on hand George 
should make more football history 
here at Washington College. 

With the squad — Was great up at 
Western Maryland to see Wardie in 
old time form again. . Huffman has 
a new inspiration named "Sonny 
Day ..Address "Clover Theatre'' 
Shepherd is a fine basketball 
player The Hotel Emerson is 
getting to be a second home. . . .Sal- 



ter's mattress makes a good bus table 
. . . .Tell me a certain Reid Hall 
blonde is offering Wilmot a kiss for 
every basket he makes. . . .Why stop 
with one when there are 10 others on 
the squad who would be most willing 
to make the same bargain ... 0. K. 
boys, Manager Price will fix it up 
for you Greetings to my one 
reader over at St. Johns. 



Juniors And Sophs Win 
As Girls' Basketball Starts 

Tuesday night was the first girls' 
basketball game of the season. The 
Seniors played the Sophs, and the 
Juniors the Frosh. Both games were 
one-sided, the first for the Sophs, and 
the second for the Juniors. 

Lineups were: 
Seniors-8 Sophomores-42 

Cannon C Brown 

Hall SC Short 

Tryzno G ... Stevens, L. 

Pink G Post 

•Hall P Stevens, E. 

Wyle F Harshaw 

Juniors-44 Freshmen-13 

Metcalfe C Wharton 

Frederick ..... SC Lynch 

Carter G Williams 

Jewell . G Taylor 

Helms F Unruh 

Ford . F Westcott 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF MARCH 4 - 9 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, MARCH 4 - 5 

"CHARLIE CHAN IN PARIS" 

With WARNER OLAND 

Added — Grantland Rice SportHght, Comedy 
"2 Lame Ducks," and Cartoon. 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, MARCH 6-7 

GEORGE RAFT - CAROLE LOMBARD in 

"RUMBA" 

Added — Buster Keaton Comedy, Cartoon and 
Hollywood Snapshot. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MARCH 8 - 9 
JANET GAYNOR - WARNER BAXTER in 

"ONE MORE SPRING" 



BUCK JONES in 

"THE RED RIDER" 

Comedy and Cartoon. 

MATINEE — FRIDAY, MARCH 8th, at 3:30 

Benefit Showing for the KENT AND QUEEN 

ANNE'S HOSPITAL 



On your Ups and Downs 



Jm uo-m veo£-fy\Lmcl 




Maybe you wonder why I appeal 
more than others. Listen. Do you 
know that the top leaves of a to- 
bacco plant are unripe and biting? 
- Do you know that the bottom leaves, 
trailing the ground, are grimy and 
coarse? I know all that and for that 
reason I am made from the fra- 
grant, expensive center leaves. . .the 
leaves that give you the mildest, 
best-tasting smoke. Therefore, 
I sign myself "Your best friend." 



LUCKIES USE ONLY CM^tE$ LEAVES . . . CENTER LEAVES GIVE YOU THE MILDEST SMOKE 



■ \.|.w iri.i 103r>. Tin- \ n Ti'Uitu <.'oiii|>»ny. 




7*m '/Ssfe pef&/i, 



PAGE FOUR 

CHEMICAL 

GASOLINE 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 1935 



BODY SEES 
EXPERIMENTS 



Lead 



Telra-Ethyl Prevents 
Motor Knocks 

"Development of the Oil and Au- 
tomotive Industry" was the subject 
discussed bv Mr. Paige, of the Ethyl 
Gasoline Corporation, at the last 
Chemical Society meeting. 

Mr. Paige pointed out the interde- 
pendence of these two industries. He 
told of the discovering of large quan- 
tities of oil and the development of 
internal combustion engines that 
could use the oil and its products as 
fuel. According to Mr. Paige it was 
an engineer named Kettering who 
discovered the knock that appeared 
in motors after approximately one 
thousand miles of travel. Kettering, 
with the aid of a chemist, Midgely, 
ser to work to develop a fuel that 
would be anti-knock. It was acci- 
dentally discovered that iodine would 
prevent the knock but that iodine 
damaged the motor. Further inves- 
tigation led to the discovery of many 
agents that would procure the desir- 



ed effect but none of which was com- 
mercially practical. A new com- 
pound, a discovery of an obscure Ger- 
man chemist, known as tetra-ethyl of 
lead was the solution of the problem 
resulting in the present day ethyl 
gasoline. 

Mr. Paige demonstrated the differ- 
ences between regular gasoline, un- 
treated, and gasoline containing tetra 
ethyl of lead. A motor running on the 
first developed a knock but when 
switched to the second gasoline the 
knock disappeared and the motor ran 
smoothly. 



WASHINGTON CAGERS 
BEAT GREEN TERRORS 



The Maroon and Black courtmen 
gave the Green Terrors an unpleas- 
ant surprise when they handed them 
their first defeat of the season on 
their home floor last Tuesday night. 

The game was fairly close at all 
times but Washington jumped into 
the lead near the close of the first 
period and were never headed. The 
first half ended 22-18. The final 
score: 39-31. 

Ellery Ward, who was shifted from 



REGAINS STRIDE 




IV^^D 



guard to forward, was high scorer 
with, fifteen points, while Huffman 
gathered eleven. Fowble was Wes- 
tern Maryland's best performer. 



Activities Budget Revised 
By Silver Pentagon Society 

The following is the revised activi- 
ties budget as submitted by a com- 
mittee of the Silver Pentagon Socie- 
ty. The activities budget comes 
from a fund for which $.75 is allot- 
ted from each student's college fee. 

Total allotment 75c 

Apportionment: 

Silver Pentagon ? .15 

S. P. Special Fund 12 

Student Government ... -05 

Mt. Vernon Society 05 

Y. M. C. A OB 

Y. W. C. A 05 

Debating Society 10 

Five Departmental Societies .13 
Chemical Society 
Biological Society 
Historical Society 
Classical Society 
International Society 
Dramatic Club 05 

Total ■" ■ ■ ■ $ -78 

Special Grants for Pegasus Pages: 
Orchestra $5.00 



Glee Club 5-00 

W. S. G. A 7.00 

Total $17.00 

Also, provision was made for needs 
of Scholastic Honor Society. 

Submitted to, and unanimously a- 
dopted by, the Silver Pentagon So- 
ciety, February 7, 1935. 

W. O. Baker, Chairman. 



PHILLIPj 



Tomato 

1JUICEP 



T/ie selection, buying and preparation of 
the right kinds of Turkish tobaccos 
for making Chesterfield Cigarettes is 
a business in itself • • • 




Handling Turkish tobacco 
the Liggett & Myers modem 
factory at Smyrna, Turkey. 



WE have buyers in all the to- 
bacco markets of Turkey and 
Greece, including Xanthi, Cavalla, 
Smyrna and Samsoun. 

And at Smyrna Chesterfield 
has built the most modern to- 
bacco plant in the Near East. 
Here the spicy, aromatic Turkish 
leaf is sorted and graded under the 
eyes of our own tobacco men. 

Then it is put away to age in its 
own climate for two years or more 
to make it milder and better-tasting. 
When you blend and cross-blend 
the right kinds of aromatic Turkish 
tobacco with mild ripe home-grown 
tobaccos as we do in Chesterfield 
you have . . . 

the cigarette that's milder 
the cigarette that tastes better 



MONDAY WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 

LUCBEZIA LILY RICBARD 

BOM PONS BONELLI 

KOSTELANETZ ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS 

9 P. M. (E. S. T.) -COLUMBIA NETWORK 



& 193), LlGCirr It Myers Tobacco Co, 



Attend Poundage 
Dance Tonight 







Congratulations 
To Y. M. C. A. 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 21. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, MAR. 9, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



Peace Conference Is 
Great Success 



Elaborate Arrangements Wel- 
come 100 Guests 



Visitors and students of Washing- 
ton College enjoyed vaiied enter- 
tainment during_the first day of the 
Peace Conference. The high light 
of the festivities, which began im- 
mediately after the first discussion 
groups, was the conference banquet. 

Under the able direction of Mr. 
Richard P. Chambers, members of 
the Y. M. C. A. presented Paul Har- 
ris' arrangement of "Munitions Re- 
peat Hearing," every word of which 
was verbatim testimony of the re- 
cent investigation of armament 
firms conducted by the United States 
Senate. Brooks Reynolds, as Sena- 
tor Nye, Chairman of the Committee, 
with the aid of other Senators 
(George Rasin, Robert Snyder, and 
William Doering), skillfully steeted 
the munition makers (Peyser, Hope, 
Bamhart, Robert White and Hick- 
man) into the net of damning testi- 
mony. Lawrence Williams and Fred 
Taylor, as special investigators, re- 
enforced the Senate's line of offense. 

Immediately after the armament 
play, tea was served at Reid Hall by 
the Y. W. C. A. Delegates, visitors, 
and students became better acquaint- 
ed, and many new friendships were 
formed. This informal gathering 
afforded a pleasant respite from the 
more formal and serious activities of 
the afternoon. 

The conference banquet, held in 
the Washington College Commons, 
was a gala affair. Rev. Paul G. Wat- 
son, of Cambridge, Md., pronounced 
the invocation. Dinner was served 
by members of the regular Commons 
staff and the Banquet Committee. At 
the end of the meal, Dr. James Bis- 
hop, of Dover, Delaware, i ptned the 
program by leading the diners in 
group singing. Mips Catherine Kir- 
wan accompanied the songs. "Kam- 
enoi Ostrow" by Rubenstein was then 
interpreted on the piano by Miss 
Louise Russell. Raymond Moffett s 
rendition of the negro spiritual, 
"Nobody Knows the Trouble I've 
Seen," delighted his listeners, and 
then Dr. F. G. Livingood played 
Drdla's familiar "Souvenir," accom- 
panied by Mrs. Livingood. The mus- 
ical part of the program was con- 
cluded by Mary Jane Nield's solo, 
"Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life," by Vic- 
tor Herbert. 

E. William Hall, as toastmaster, 
rocked the house with his antecdotes 
and odd introductions. The peak of 
the merriment was reached when it 
was discovered that Brooks Reynolds 
bad disappeared witli Dr. Goddard's 
coat. 

Miss Jessie Snow's discussion of 
"The League of Nations Today," re- 
ported elsewhere in this issue, was 
the principal address of the evening. 

Through the cooperation of the 
Washington Players, the visitors were 
entertained with two plays from that 
company's repertoire, Springer'^ "A 
Girl to Order," and Tarkington's "A 
Ghost Story." Fred Taylor and 
Cha/les Benham, Washington Thes- 
pians, again demonstrated their flair 
for humor, while Alice Marion Sterl- 
">g and Fern Blnckway were once 
Wore the charming heroines. 



VARSITY CLUB PLANS 
ALL-WASHINGTON NIGHT 



Feature Athletics To Be Seen 
In Armory, March 16 



TAUS TAKE INTRA- 
MURAL CAGE TITLE 

by Markham Wingate 

The Phi Sigma Tau fraternity won 
the deciding game of the intramural 
Pbiyoff series by beating the fresh- 
men by the score of 30 to IB. "Gibby" 
rou»g was a constant threat for the 
freshmen and had to be kept under 
careful guarding, while Bill Right 
Played a stellar game at guard for the 
T, ui's, both as u scorer and director 
°* Play. 



An All-Washington Night is to be 
offered by the Varsity Club of the 
College for public approval on the ev- 
ening of March 16, in the Chester- 
town armory. The program will be 
made up of basketball, boxing, and 
wrestling contests, all the partici- 
pants being Washington College stu- 
dents. 

The Varsity Club hopes that this 
affair might be made an annual event 
and that the tradition of an All- 
Washington College Night will be es- 
tablished here. 

It is toward this end that the Club 
asks the cooperation of the student 
body in making this occurrence a suc- 
cess. Further notices of the details 
of this program shall be announced 
in the local papers and on the bulle- 
tin boards. 

The feature of the evening will be 
a basketball game between teams 
made up from the varsity squad of 
all-state players and out-of-the-state 
players. The boxing program will 
be featured by a bout between Coach 
Ekaitis and Ellis Dwyer, and shall 
include other noted fistic performers 
of the College, including "Chic" Chaf- 
fee, Russ Baker, Paul Bruehl, Henry 
Lewis, and others. The outstanding 
performance in the wrestling field 
should be turned in by Skippy Sad- 
ler' and Strangler McDorman, both 
boys having had some previous ex- 
perience before entering Washing- 
ton College. 



Cafeteria Problem 
Nearinff Solution 



Administration Discusses The 
Condition With Students 



SILVER PENTAGON PLANS 
NOVELTY DANCE SERIES 



First Is 



"Weight Of 
Affair 



Date' 



by Clarke Fontaine 

The dancing Dons of Washington 
College will be blessed with^a rather 
unique and pleasing dance (espec- 
ially pleasing to such persons as the 
writer) which will be sponsored by 
the Silver Pentagon Society this ev- 
ening in the gym. 

The admission will be figured on 
the pound basis; you know, just the 
same idea as if you were taking 
piece of weighed beef or so many 
pounds of cheese. Speaking of the 
pound basis, it might be well to men- 
tion that the official scales will weigh 
ounces or tons as well. The tax will 
be one penny for five pounds, which 
is cheap enough, even for guys -drag- 
ging Mae Wests, Wyles, or Unru 

It is probable that some fellows 
may think that the movies are clieap- 
per, but will put the wife's pleasure 
ahead of the healthy pocket-book and 
will be there "shelling out" from the 
old bill-fold. Can't you just see 
such spendthrifts as Adldns, Mit- 
chell and Dolan searching around for 
a Tryzno or a Pontz to cart over to 
the hop, so that they can really show 
the crowd what spending is? 

On the other hand, Rhodes, Gib 
Young and the humble writer will be 
there, and ashamed to take the 
change, 

Special warning to Rhodes — (bas- 
ed on latest statistics) As they of- 
ten weigh more than they look, or 
more than they like to admit, you'd 
better durn sight take at least a quar- 
ter. 

All joking aside, though, we urge 
you to come one and all, dragging 
your buxom dames, fence rails, or 
shrimps and we know you'll have a 
good time. 

Music will be furnished by Yin 
Brandolini and his 2000 Pound Band 
(weight including instruments, or 
should we say implements, of mus- 
ic). 



With the evidence of sincere stu- 
dent opinion before it, the Adminis- 
tration has taken definite steps to- 
wards effecting the change from the 
present cafeteria system to a plan of 
table service. 

In pursuance of this plan, a com- 
mittee composed of the dietitian, 
Mrs. Bricker, and of the four mem- 
bers of the Student Council Cafeteria 
Committee, Mr. Sadler, Mr. Lord, 
Mr. Fink, and Mr. Shaull, met with 
President Mead on Wednesday and 
discussed the situation for two hours 
and twenty minutes. This is the 
first time that the President, the Die- 
titian, and representatives of the stu- 
dent body have met together to 
smooth out difficulties in the Com- 
mons. 

"In this meeting, ' Dr. Mead 
states, "we have thrashed out many 
of the existing problems connected 
with feeding the students, and have 
laid definite plans for the change to 
the table-service system. This com- 
mittee meeting has been an undoubt- 
ed success, and future problems will 
be settled through the same agency." 

The Business Manager of the Col- 
lege, Mr. Johns, further expressed 
the hearty cooperation of the Admin- 
istration in bringing abouL this in- 
novation. 

"Table or group service in the 
Commons will be a definite move in 
the right direction. However, to se- 
cure the full benefits of this change, 
there must be cooperation between 
the students and the Administration, 
while details of the plan are being 
worked out. 

"The Administration has had in- 
dividual requests for such a change 
for some time, but because of a lack 
of general enthusiasm has taken no 
action. Since, however, the students 
clearly show themsehes of a unified 
opinion in the matter, the Admini- 
stration is only too glad to bring a- 
bout the desired reorganization — al- 
though the cost and labour will be 
increased appreciably. 

"The plan that has been suggest- 
ed will do much to better the social 
atmosphere in the Commons. Larger 
groups being thrown together during 
the meal hour should be advantage- 
ous to everyone in many ways." 



A. C. GODDARD TALKS ON 
"HOW PEACE IS WAGED" 



Asserts Wars Are Influenced 
By Investments 



"A lot of lies keep war going. The 
devil and all his cohorts couldn't wage 
a war unless there was a liar," was 
the statement of Dr. A. C. Goddard, 
Pastor of McCabe Memorial M. E. 
Church of Wilmington, in the open- 
ing address of the Annual Washing- 
I ton College Peace Conference spon- 
sored by the YMCA. He spoke on 
the topic "How Peace Is Waged." 

"In war time nobody tells the truth. 
Everybody in the war is guilty of 
falsehood. 'To make the world safe 
for democracy' was not a new slo- 
gan. 'A war to end war' was not a 
new slogan. Both were taken from 
the French Revolution. They were 
used to get people into war to pro- 
tect Wall Street investments," he 
stated. 

"The United States of America is 
in danger of becoming the greatest 
danger to world peace on earth. We 
are not now, but there is very much 
likelihood that we may be. America, 
while not the most hated, is the most 
feared nation," he asserted. 

Dr. Goddard brought out that wars 
are largely influenced by investments. 
He said, "Great Britain at one time 
had over 300 as fine publicity men 
as ever assembled working for the 
allied cause in the United States. We 
began to buy bonds. Wall Street in- 
vested in the allied cause. In 19X6 
when there was agitation for every- 
body to stop righting. Colonel House 
handed the Premier of England a 
statement initialed by Woodrow Wil- 
son stating we would be in the war in 
a little time if they could hold out. 
This was brought about by Wall 
Street." Dr. Goddard added that 
the day war was declared the Allies 
had overdrawn their account a half 
billion dollars at the Morgan banking 
house. 

oo 



Successful Seas on 
Of Team Reviewed 

Salter Leads Team In Scoring 
With 124 Points 



"Hamlet" Declared Saccess 
By Capacity Audience 



DEBATERS LOSE TO 
WESTERN MARYLAND 2-1 



Make Fine Showing Against 
Experienced Team 

A debate on the question, "Resolv- 
ed that the nations should agree to 
prevent the international shipment of 
arms and munitions," was held in 
William Smith Hall on March 2, 
1935. Western Maryland upheld the 
affirmative while Washington took 
the negative. Speakers for Western 
Maryland were Rutherford Daneker 
and William Bratton. Van Newkirk 
and Ben Vandevoort debated for 
Washington^ 

The debate was undecided until the 
last rebuttal by Bratton. The con- 
vincing arguments of this polished 
speaker decided the judges' vote; two 
to one in favor of the affirmative. 

Judges were: Mr. William Usilton, 
editor of the Kent News; Mr. Louis 
C. Robinson, superintendent of Kent 
County Schools; and Mr. William B. 
Copper, president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Chestertown. Alfred 
'Gardiner served as chairman. 



The Shakespeare Players of Wash- 
ington College, under the direction 
of Dr. Gertrude Ingalls, played 
"Hamlet" last night before a capacity 
house, in William Smith Hall. 

Dr. Ingalls' direction produced this 
year what was unanimously hailed 
by the audience as the most finished 
of all of her traditional Shakespeare 
plays. 

The sold-out house was a fine tri- 
bute to the ticket management, head- 
ed by Miss Elizabeth Short, who be- 
gan her campaign weeks ago. 

* "Romeo and Juliet" was the first; 
"Hamlet" is the most recent, and the 
best," said competent critics, as they 
praised the company's director. Dr. 
Ingalls. 

The stage and scenery were pre- 
pared and managed by Bryan New- 
ton, College superintendent of works. 
Mr. Jones, of Baltimore, was the cos- 
tumer and Miss Doris Bell did the 
make-up. The ushers were members 
of the Silver Pentagon Society. 



Torch Club Hears Dr. Mead 
On "Youth Problem" 



Dr. Gilbert W. Mead attended the 
regular monthly meeting of the 
Torch Club in Baltimore on March 7, 
1935. An address by President Men. I 
on "Youth and This New World ' was 
the feature of the evening. The 
meeting was at the University Club 
on Charles Street. 

Dr. John C. Krantz, known 
Washington undergraduates as 
entertaining chapel speaker, i: 
member of the organization. 



by WtlHam Kight 

With only four letter men held ov- 
er from last year's squad Coach Kib- 
ler was forced to rely upon the four 
Freshmen on the squad and they 
came through with flying colors to 
help win ten games while losing six. 

The majority of the games this 
year resulted in close scores and the 
team scored only 479 points to its op- 
ponents' 441. Salter was high scor- 
er with 124 points, scoring 43 fieid 
goals and shooting 38 out of 57 
fouls. Huffman was second with 77 
points. Skipp third with 74 while 
Horowitz gathered 60. 

Of the members of the team we 
might say a few words: 

Jim Salter, Freshman, whose abil- 
ity to get the ball at the tap off and 
whose spectacular long shots and one 
hand flips always brought praise from 
the spectators, will especially be re- 
membered for the part he played in 
defeating Mt. St. Mary's here early 
this season. 

Al Wilmot, freshman, proved to 
be a first class shot and a clever 
guard but it was his timely passing 
that enabled his team mates to score 
time and time again that stamped 
him as a real basketball player. 

Leon Horowitz, freshman, play?d 
a great game at forward. His un- 
canny ability to find the hoop while 
in the "bucket" netted many scores. 

Wilbert Huffman, freshman, play- 
ed an outstanding game at guard. As 
well as being a good guard he couid 
always be depended upon for a few 
points in e*ach game and in his fast 
breaks for the basket nearly always 
scored. 

Phil Skipp, junior, was acting cap- 
tain in the majority of games and 
had one of bis oest years since enter- 
ing school. Not only was his floor 
game improved but his ability to find 
the hoop was noteworthy. 

tilery Ward, senior, nniahes up his 
fourth year as a letter-man in ba3- 
ketball. Awalys a hard player 
Wardy could not get going al the be- 
ginning of the season but he finished 
up in brilliant fashion and was select- 
ed on the All-Maryland team. 

The other members of the squad, 
Berry, Evans, Bilancioni, Nicholson. 
McLain, and Greims while not play- 
ing regularly proved their worth 
when sent it to relieve the first team 
and they deserve a lot of credit for 
the success of the team this year. 

And so with these few comments 
we ring the curtain down on the 
1934-35 basketball season and turn 
our thoughts to the spring sports, 
baseball and track. 



Morris K. Borroll To 

Address Historians 



to 



Morris Keene Barroll, lawyer and 
prominent in local affairs, will be the 
guest speaker of the Washington 
College Historical Sociery, Wednes- 
day afternoon, March 13th. at 3:15, 
William Smith Hall, Room 11. 

It is fortunate to have Mr. Barroll 
speak, for his family constitutes for 
the most part the history of the col- 
lege. Three college presidents are 
numbered in the Barroll clan, also 
four members of Ihe family served .i< 
a chairman or director on the Board 
of Governors. Mr. Barralfa "tio s- 
tor. Rev. William «3nrroll, aided Dr. 
William Smith in the founding oJ the 

college and his son was a meffi.1 

the first graduating class in 1783. it 
is interesting '»< note that Or. Smith's 
daughter married into the Barroll 
family. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, MAR. 9, 1935 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 17S2. 



William Oliver Baker ... Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacam . . Asst, Bus, Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

William Kight, Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandelini, Anne 

Whyte, William McCullough 

Howard Clark 



Entered at the Chestertown, Md., 
pestoffice as second class matter. 
Subscription price, $1.50 a year, 
Single copy, 10 cents. 



SATURDAY, MAR. 9, 1935 



veloped in the calm, rational halls of 
a college. If this approach to the 
problem characterized the Confer- 
ence this week-end, much good was 
done. 

In any case, Washington College 
welcomed with all cordiality the 
guests at the Conference, and is 
proud to have had them, and parti- 
cularly the more experienced of the 
speakers, contribute to the education 
of Washington's youth. 

The Conference has given the stu- 
dents of the College another chance 
to see, on, of course, a much decreas- 
ed scale, how things are done in the 
world, not in the lecture-room. For 
the elaborate arrangements for the 
affair, the Y. M. C. A. deserves great 
credit. Particularly to Mr. Goodwin, 
the Faculty Advisor of the Tt *, to 
ex-president Sadler, and to President 
Stacum go congratulations for the 
successful management of the occa- 
sion. 

Only by these altruistic efforts can 
man progress, and that this conven- 
tion may have had its part in the as- 
surance of a peaceful world — "*Tis a 
consummation devoutly to be _ wish- 
ed." 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



SISYPHEAN SENIOR SIGHS SAD- 
LY, SAYING "SENSE SLIPS SOLV- 
ING SOCIAL STANDING" 
(Yeth thir thath what the William 
and Mary "Flat Hat" thayth in a 
front page article headline in talking 
about the lack of thenior privilegeth 
— you thee we aren't tho thure of 
our etheth.) 



VERBIAGE ABOUT VERDANT 

MATTERS 
Grass is a nopelessly involved or- 
ganism. It comes up in the Spring. 
Matters most pressing concerning it 
come np in the Spring. The matters 



IDEALISM 

The scholarship plan of President ( south jrf the ribs. 
James Bryant Conant, of Harvard, is 
completely successful, the scholastic 
records of the fellows appointed last 
year show. This particular plan ap- 



Somehow or other we always are 
partial to definitions whenever we 
come across them, they sort of give 
the reason why or somepin. Here 
are a few helter-skelter definitions 
from "The Buff and Blue" of Gallau- 
det College, — they're surprising to 
say the least. 

CLIMATE: caused by emotion of 
the earth around the sun. 

CIRCLE: a round straight line with 
a hole in the middle. 

GEOMETRY: teaches us how to 
bisect angels. 

BLIZZARD: the inside of a hen. 

STOMACH: human organ just 



are chiefly concerned with pressing Ue& fQ undergTa a U ates only, and 
it down, also in the Spring. All un- 



the past semester records offered the 
first opportunity for officials to dis- 
cover the exact standing of the ten 
Middle Western high school gradu- 
ates in their first term at Harvard 
College. The system of appointing 
( on full scholarships high school grad- 
uates of rare ability will be contin- 



VACUUM: a large empty space 
here the Pope lives. 



We received quite a shock the oth- 
er day when we discovered the fol- 
lowing item in "The Trinity Tripod," 
up in Hartford, Conn. 

"The gold shaving mug for the 
worst pun of the week goes to the 
author of the following found in the 
"Elm" of Wash. Col.: Warning! 
Don't talk about the butter knives, 
you know how those things spread." 

(Not to be outdone we'll award to 



dergraduates at Washington College 
are, of course, tremendously busy. 
Busy people have no time- Time is 
money. Busy people have no cents. 
The undergraduates at Wssbinjgiin 
College have no sense. Nay, that 
follows not. 

The grass does follow. It follows i 

xuc e>«« ue( j an( j ,g a g ne tribute to the ideal 

Winter. The undergraduate does not I 
follow — the walks- Thereupon (the . 
undergraduates being there upon the 

\ ffh ' un there some- 1 easi ' v maintain a pseudo-anstocrac, 

£ ^ ass .' c er t S ,, a P j j„„„ nnt I of intellectuals by admitting onlyl f our column and was dedicated to 

where), fine fallow ground does not , J . b ", ., . , -..,. c . 

; graduates of recognized preparatoiy Philip, you know — Philip Space.) 

I schools, after payment of normal tui- j 

tion fees. But Harvard prefers to 
contribute to society, and to the fut- 
ure welfare of the United States by 
developing leaders, men of talent in 
science, government, economics and 
art, who, without the aid of full 
scholarships, would be lost to future 
service. 



FRENCH STUDENTS STAY 
SOLID AGAINST WAR 



Express Sentiments When In- 
terviewed By A. C. E. 



ism of Harvard and of President them the fur lined cuspidor for per- 

This great university could serverence, "cause as we remember 

said crack was located at the end 



follow. 

Returned to the thin and tattered 
thread of this argument, one finds 
the harrying student (the declension 
goes: hurry, scurry, burly — , burly, 
birdie, girlie) although not yet quite 
in the clover, at least trampling 
heartlessly, a fair pasturage. Our 
gallant young blade, coming hither 
(or going thither) between the 
dormitories and Reid Hall crushes, in 



It was found that each of the men, 



a spirit of friendly rivalry, all other who are paid $1,000 in their first 
yonng blades to death. The ambi- \ year, and §1,200 a year thereafter, 
tious intellectual, dashing pugnaci-had done distinguished work in his 
onsly to a Peace Conference, makes studies, and had also branched out 
a right triangle ont of the "Sacred j into other activity; athletics, debat- 
L," immediately applies the Pytha- j ing and dramatics are representative, 
gorean theorem, chooses the shorter Again, the great resources of a great 
distance, and slays springing spears j university are doing good. Washing - 
of verdant herbs more surely than I ton College, although she cannot ex- 
Death, with his dread sickle, could tend such financial aid as Harvard, 
do it. Bricks and concrete to walk \ can, and does, "also serves" by recog- 
on are made. "Sticks and stones may ' nition and encouragement of honest 
break my bones," but no mention is worth and efforts. 

made of bricks. Many fine people | oo 

hold the persona] conviction that, to j __ # 

see a brick lying on the ground, in Drama League Of America 

an orderly way, and not to walk on ' 
it, is letting the brick get away with 
something. Bricks, undoubtedly, like 
some people, have a peculiar aversion 
to being stepped on- It is well to 
break bis sQly idea, nip it in the bud. 
Ah, there is the whole matter back 
again. End, Spring, grass. Tie 
Administration earnestly requests 
that all KEEP OFF THE GRASS. 



Last fall Bette Davis, noted 
screen star, visited her Alma Mater, 
Gushing Academy, to witness a loot- 
ball game. At the beginning of the 
game she promised a kiss to any one 
on her team who scored. Cushing 
won the game, 34-0, with five differ- 
ent men taking the ball over the goal 
line! 

(Now there's an idea, it really 
gives it a purpose. Loving or foot- 
ball? Dun't esk.) 



Announces Scholarships 



A student at Brown University ate 
20 doughnuts in 18 minutes, thereby 
establishing a record. 

(In the present state of affairs we 
just dare them to show us 30 dough- 
nuts, we'll show them a real record. 
Wonder what kind of course con- 
duets experiments like that? 'bno 
use wondering though — it's really 
just food for thought.) 



The Drama League of America an- 
nounces available scholarships for 
the study of the drama at a division 
of the University of London this 
summer. Students of dramatics at 
Washington College who wish to pur- 
sue serious study are urged to obtain 
more complete detaiU on the matter. 

The Drama League Travel Bur- 
eau, a non-commercial organization, 
has at its disposal scholarships cover- 
ing full tuition for the six weeks 
summer session at the Central School 
of Speech and Drama, affiliated with 
These 



ALTRUISM 

Sach an affair as this week's Peace 
Conference is an excellent testimon- 
ial to the vitality of an undergradu- 
ate body. It bespeaks interest in 
worldly affairs, and a desire to hear 

the opinions of others. The motive the University of London 
is certainly altruistic, and if the pur- ; scholarships are primarily intended 
poses do not become involved in a for students interested in literary 
Cretan maze of resolutions, no doubt and drama study, but are also given 
the cause of future generations will for the more important purpose of 
be aided. The nations acem much I promoting international underslar.u- 
dixturbed about this matter of peace. ! ing. The l?ague is eager that the 
It is doubtful whether the machinery j donors of these scholarships shall not 
of pat&amn has beam* effective | be disappointed in the response' lo 
ju actually to stop a wai, if j the unusual opportunity offered A- 
-■:.. md ananerefeJ and diplo-lmcricm students. 
matie caoses make that war immin- ; Students of the theatre and teach- 
ent. Bi.t. regardless of this aspect, | era of drama and its allied arts are 
peace eonferenc** and pacificists are eligible to come before the commit- 
acomph*rnng a splendid work if thc> tee on award*, and application blank* 
are teaching clear thinking and un- may be obtained from the League's 
derstanding rather than propaganda headquarters in Et-sex House, New 
and emotional appeals as the wea- York. A)] letters of inquiry con- 
pons with which to wage peace. These ■ cerning the panting f jtcholarships 
weapons should be roott highly de- 1 are welcomed. 



After a four year trial, "Painless 
Education" has proved to be a suc- 
cess at Chicago U. Under this plan 
the student is on his own and can go 
to class, study, etc., whenever he 
wants to. 

Their dean said, 'If five are ab- 
sent from my class of 30, I know 
word has gotten around that I haven't 
much to offer that week and my as- 
sumption has the value of making 
me teach better." 

We say, "Great stuff if our facul- 
ty will subscribe to it." 

Our faculty says, "Humph!" 



Olie: "Oh, there you are! Where've 
you been during the last three dan- 
ces?" 

Jean: "Elmer was showing me 
some new steps." 

Olie: "Were they very hard?" 
Jean: "Oh no. We took cushions 
long." 

— Connecticut Campus. 



Jack: "Well, babe, you lost your 
bet, and now I want the forfeit." 

Lea: "I don't know what you mean 

and besides someone might see us." 

— Log. 



Youh must be served — and then 
carried out, 

— Log. 

(No, no, ya dope, not "like a Iob" 
— that's where we got the crack) 



by Edward Price Bell 

(Ed. Note: This article was writ- 
ten for the Association of College 
Editors HORIZON by Mr. Bell, Eur- 
opean Correspondent for The Liter- 
ary Digest.) 

Paris : — 

Young academic France solid a- 
gainst war, fervidly national yet 
sanely international, overwhelmingly 
for the preservation in France of a 
civilization which is French and 
which is free. 

That would seem to be about the 
core of the case. 

Diversities of sentiment and 
thought in France are almost number- 
less. Feeling and conviction and ex- 
pression are strong from one end to 
the other of the political, social, and 
economic diameter. This is true not 
only of the academic youth; it is true 
of all elements of tne French popula- 
tion, in the cities and in the country. 
France is on the verge of great po- 
litico-economic changes. Nobody 
knows from day to day what will 
happen, and everyone talks of the 
possibility of "la guerre civile" 
(civil war). 

But no one wants either civil war 
or international war, least of all the 
youth, and especially the educated 
youth, of France. You stand before 
a great group of students, typical 
French students, stout-limbed, bright- 
eyed, ardent, brilliant, in a Paris 
class-room — say a class-room of 
l'Lcole Normale Superieure or PEcole 
Polytechnique — and ask: 

"Does any one of you believe in 
war?" 

"No!" with a roar that shatters all 
chance of question. 

"You have grave differences?" 
"Yes; differences many and grave." 
A towering, lanky, dark young 
man rises in the center of the group, 
and speaks in rapid-fire French: 

"Nous avons beaucoup d'idee.s 
differentes que nous soutenons avec 
passion, mais nous voulons penser et 
les etudier; nous avons besoin non 
nous se battre, mais nous s'entendie." 
(Freely, "We have many conllict- 
ing ideas which we hold passionately, 
but we do not want to FIGHT about 
them; we want to THINK about 
them, to STUDY them, to UNDER- 
STAND one another.") 

"You feel important governmental 
developments are imminent?" 
The towering young man replies 
"Oui, la treve actuelle n'est pas 
durable." ("The present truce of 
parties cannot last.") 

Such are the sentiments and the 
will of young academic France, so 
eager, so impetuous even, so rich in 
bodily and mental vigor, that one 
wonders whether its impatient ener 
gies can, or cannot, be confined to 
peaceful channels within its own 
borders. -Surely, Jules Romains i; 
not talking idly when he declares 
Nous pouvOns nous reveiller demain 
avec la guerre civile." ("We may 
awaKe tomorrow in civil war.'") How- 
ever, determined efforts are on foot 
for understanding and approxima- 
tion, lest France awake one morn- 
mg to find herself, not only in civil 
war, but under the threat, as the ioi- 
mer Premier Doumergue affirmed, of 
invasion. 

une of the gifted and convinced 
participants in this labor of appease- 
ment is M. Arinand Hoog, a student 
»n 1'Ecole Normale Superieure, a 
iNormalien. He is tall, spare, wiry, 
and energetic, with blaCK hair anu 
piercing, iriendly brown eyes, a 
young man of Dutch extraction, fur 
back, a thorough Freshman in ap- 
pearance and spiritual quality. He 
is a prominent member of JELNE 
REPUBLIQUE, an organization 
which stands about midway between 
the txtiemists of French politics, and 
an organization which is active in the 
pacificatory movement. M. Hoog be- 
longs to "le Groupe du 9 Juillet" 
("The Group of the Ninth of July"), 
composed of nineteen men, repre- 
senting a great diversity of opinion, 
who have agreed upon a "Minimum 
Plan" for the reform of conditions 
in the realm of French political econ- 
omy. 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-ly Heard 



The editor continually cuts por- 
tions of this column and has to be 
humored before he will allow doubt- 
ful items to be printed. Editorial 
vigilance coupled with threats from 
enraged students makes column writ- 
ing a hazardous occupation — at least 
at Washington College. So far no 
columnists have been lynched, but me 
and Henry L. have to be careful. 

Only this week an anoymous let- 
ter was found in the Elm box which 
was undoubtedly inspired by some 
gross mistatement of fact in last 
week's column. 

Dear Sir: 

After reading this week's Elm 
very carefully I was greatly surpris- 
ed to discover that the Elm would put 
in its paper, statements which are 
untreu. Trew dat jokes can be put 
in the paper, bot also vary true, 
jokes have der limits specialy wen 
specific direct names are used. 

Dis incident okured in da kolom 
listed "Told To Me." Maybe he 
herd someting like dat but wy should 
he put in de paper, ALL he hears 
specially since he herd it from a 
LIAR. 

I would appreciate it very much 
if lies and uncertain facts would not 
be published in the ELM lest this 
paper is to contain LIES and false 
tales. 

Student, 

Junior. 

"Such rigteous indignation is well 
founded and I. Un-ly Heard will be 
careful to see that definite proof ac- 
companies all tales of indiscretion 
and secret love. We do not care to 
fill our column with what we hear 
from LIARS. Other students wish- 
ing to complain, don't hesitate to 
write to the editor. Your feelings 
will be carefully considered." 

Dunk says Alvin is a lover. He 
wants the college to know about it. 
— Don't the fair coeds have a right 
to be warned against this young 
heartbreaker? - Alice has some- 
thing the freshmen boys like. Can't 
hide your charms can you girlie? 
Then there was the sign on the 
bulletin board that said Derringer 
was girl shy — There must have been 
some mistake ... Goldstein was a 
sparring partner for Harry Russcil 
in LeCates Barger Shop before the 
main bout in the armory last Friday. 

Possum Dunton has been keeping 
under cover but he would like to step 
out with Barbara — Sit with her of- 
tener Hartley. . . Hobart is a hard 
man to down. He still expresses 
hope in snaring the elusive Lucille 
There was more peace than 
quiet at the recent meeting of stu- 
dent pacifists — Very impressive... 
Dolly has a weakness for the Tau's. 
There are no secrets between broth- 
ers. 

Lemons to the sorehead "boys in 
white" who persist in making the 
dietitian's life miserable for her and 
who try to make her work more dif- 
ficult — all because she refuses to 
make pets of them as did her prede- 
cessor. 

Horowitz, is a tough hombre. He 
put Thompson out of the game at 
Delaware Expert mathematicians 

say there are many kinds of geome- 
tric figures. We know of several 
hopelessly involved triangles. Take 
f'rinstance the Bill-Bob-Willa T«- 
ange . . . The Hobart-Andy-Luciiie 

Triangle The Pogie-Cliff-Maiy 

Triangle The Calvin-Wes-Carolyn 
Triangle. . The Mac-Fulton-Beppy 
Triangle . And that bizarre affaii ; 
The Charlie-Satchelfoot-Doiin Trian- 
gle Frederic Peeper has been 
confined to his room with Athletes 
Brain — nothing to report, wait a - 
while, he'll come out of hiding..- 
Tony made the most of the peace 
conference — The five girls picked by 
Dean Jones appealed to the Cuba" 
flash . . John Mead made hiB dates 
in advance — more femenine dele- 
gates from Cambridge next year, . ■ ■ 
And thin reputable columnist was ac- 
cused of looking over the visiting 
femmes while covering the reginti'«' 
tionn for the Elm. 



SATURDAY, MAR. 9, 1935 



SKIPPING OVER THE 
SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



Even after a week's time it is dif- 
ficult to realize that the basketball 
season is over for another year. It 
is hard to get accustomed to the deep 
silence that greets one on entering 
the gymnasium which only a few 
short days before had been ringing 
with shouts and noise. The two iron 
baskets look lonely in their faded 
white background. The whole gym 
has a forlorn and forsaken appear- 
ance that makes 

You feel like one 

Who treads alone 

Some banquet hall deserted, 

Whose lights are fled 

Whose garlands dead, 

And all but he departed! 

Come on Skipp, snap out of it. 
Stop being sentimental. Every one 
is sorry the season is over, but there 
isn't any need of breaking down over 
it. 

The 32 to 26 victory over Dela- 
ware rang down the curtain on the 
most successful season a Washing- 
ton College basketball team has had 
in the past four years. True, the 
record of ten victories against five 
defeats is a far cry from the show- 



ing of the many former champion- 
ship teams produced here, but never- 
theless it indicates that basketball 
is on the up swing. Followers of the 
Maroon and Black are very optimis- 
tic about winning the state cham- 
pionship the next few winters. And 
indeed they have some basis for their 
optimism because all five of this 
year's starting line up will be back. 
Four of these veterans are only 
freshmen who with one year of col- 
legiate competition under cheir belts 
should be ready to clean up next sea- 
son. 

It has only been three years since 
Washington College resumed athletic 
relations with the U. of Delaware af- 
ter a lapse of ten years, but with 
leaps and bounds Delaware is grow- 
ing to be our biggest rival in the field 
of sport. Due to geographical con- 
ditions it seems only natural 
for these two institutions to become 
rivals, and the people in chaise at 
both of tiiese schools have succeeded 
in bringing about a spirit of fiiend- 
ly rivalry between them. 



Frosh And Janiors Win 
From Seniors And Sophs 

Another dual basketball game took 
place Tuesday night. The first game 
was that between the Seniors and 
Freshmen. It provided the excite- 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

ment for the evening, the score be- 
ing tied until the last minute, when 
Doris Unruh, switched from guard 
to forward, scored a basket for the 
Freshmen, thus putting them ahead 
by two points. Mabel Smith by her 
accurate shooting scored most of the 
points for the Seniors. Ruth Can- 
non's playing at center should also 
be commended. The combination of 
Bell and Westcott as forwards was 
outstanding by their excellent pass- 
ing and handling of the ball. 

The lineup: 
Seniors 22 Freshmen 24 

Smith F Westcott 

Hall, E F Bell 

Cannon . C Wharton 

Tryzno SC Lynch 

Wyll G Deen 

Hall G Unruh 

The second game, that between 
the Juniors and Sophomores, was 
extremely one-sided, Ford and 
Helms, rolling up a large number of 
points, forty-one in number, for the 
Juniors. These two players plus Met- 
calfe, Frederick, Carter and Jewell 
form an invinciple sextet. 
Juniors 41 Sophomore 12 

Helms F Stevens 

Ford F Harshaw 

Metcalfe C Brown 

Frederick .... SC Pyle 

Carter G Post 

Jewell G • Sutton 



PAGE THREE 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHEST ERTOWN, MD. 

PROGRAM WEEK OF MARCH 11 -16 

MONDA Y.TUESDAY, MARCH 11-12 

The Season's Newest Musical 

"ALL THE KING'S HORSES" 

— with — 
CARL BRISSON - MARY ELLIS 

Added — Comedy, Cartoon and Medbury Reel. 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, MAR. 13 - 14 
EDWARD G. ROBINSON in 

"THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING" 

Robinson's finest picture and the biggest screen 
sensation in years. 

Added — Comedy, Pictorial and Color Cartoon. 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MARCH 15-16 

DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

JOHN WAYNE in 

"THE TRAIL BEYOND" 



VICTOR McLAGLEN -EDMUND LOWE 
— in — 

"UNDER PRESSURE" 



BUCK JONES in 

'THE RED RIDER" 



TAKE ME ALONG 




m uoruA \rtt£ ffiie/rvd 







m % 



Choose me for your companion. I don't 
tolerate the bitterness, the acrid sting of un- 
developed top leaves. Why-should you? 
I don't tolerate the harshness of gritty, 
tough, bottom leaves. Neither should 
you. I give you exclusively the fragrant, 
expensive center leaves — the mildest, 
the best-tasting of all. They permit me 
to sign myself "Your Best Friend." 



Copjriitit 1D3!>, Tli« A 




IUCKIES USE ONLY CENTER LEAVES . . . CENTER LEAVES GIVE YOU THE MILDEST SMOKE 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, MAR. 9, 1935 



DRAMATIC CLUB PLANS 
PROPERTY COLLECTION 



Pres. Rhodes Announces Means 
For Cutting Expenses 



The Washington College Dramatic 
Club has commenced recently a pro- 
gram for acquiring new properties, 
according to Harry Rhodes, president 
of the organization. The plan is that 
the Dramatic Club will collect as 
much old clothing and antiques as it 
is able, thereby cutting down to some 
extent the expenses to which it has 
of late been subjected. The newly 
acquired properties will be placed m 
an old trunk, donated by Bob Clif- 
ford, and will be for the joint use of 
the Dramatic Club and the Shakes- 
peare Club. Mr. Rhodes requests 
that if any one has some old clothing 
or antiques that are just taking up 
room in his or her attic, should you 
wish to dispose of them, remember 
the Washington College Dramatic ; 
Ciub. 



Cagers End Season With 

Victory Over Delaware 

The Maroon and Black cagers end- 
ed a fairly successful season lost Sat- 
urday night when they defeated Del- 
aware bv the score of 32-26. 

Headed by Charlie Pie, small but 
fast forward, the Delawarians gave 
the Kiblerites a good game and it was 
only in the last few minutes of play 
that Washington was able to forge 
ahead and win. 



Peace Conference And Dance 
Mark Social Events Of Week 

Mrs. Frank Doyle, mother of Mis. 
Winton Tolles, is visiting with her 
daughter and Professor Tolles at 
their home on Mt. Vernon Ave. 



Terry Tolles Shares Spot- 
Light With Proud Parents 

Mr. and Mrs. Winton Tolles are re- 
ceiving congratulations upon the 
birth of a baby boy. The new Col- 
lege Junior arrived on Maich 4th. 
Mother and son are doing well and 
will return home shortly. The baby 
■will be named Terry. 



The Washington Players entertain- 
ed the delegates of the Peace Con- 
ference on Thursday night with two 
plays. 



The Y. M. C A. sponsored a ban- 
quet held in the College Cafeteria on 
Thursday at 7 P. M. The banquet 
was in honor of the Peace delegates 
who visited the College. 

The Silver Pentagon Society is 
holding a dance tonight at the gym- 
nasium. Admission lc per 5 pounds. 



WOMEN'S UNION OFFERS 
STUDENTS ESSAY PRIZE 

Subject To Be "Alcohol And 
Human Efficiency" 



A prize of five dollars, offered by 
the Kent County Women's Christian 
Temperance Union, will be given to 
the Washington College student who 
submits the best essay on the select- 
ed topic. 

Conditions of the contest are as 
follow: 

a. Title of the Essay: 
"Alcohol And Human Efficiency. ' 

b. Length of the essay: 

Not less than 1500 words nor more 
than 2000 words. 

c. Time: 

Essays submitted must be handed 
to Dr. Esther M. Dole, of Washington 
College, not later than April 1, 1935. 

d. Material for essays can be se- 
cured from recent periodicals, news- 
papers, books, and authentic statisti- 
cal records. 

e. Judges: The judges for this 
contest will be: 

Reverend Frank White. 
Reverend L. Charles Atwater. 
Dr. W. H. Litsinger. 



Scandal And Notoriety 

In West Hall Exposed 



Cork has been put to use by man 
for more than 2,300 years. 

The planet Uranus was discovered 
in 1781 by Sir William Herschel. 



by V. V. Bowen, Guest Editor 

Huffman has been asking about 
Martha S. Any information will be 
appreciated. . - Why not ask Fulton, 
Huff? ... Shorbie, why don't you 
give Mabel a break? Henry isn't 
looking all the time Buck is go- 
ing bankrupt calling up Freiua . . 
Why is Leonid Yaakalywitch Kulye- 
shaka so slow on the follow-up work 
after his flirtation walk in the grave 

yard with Pat? Hey! Woodrow, 

come here quick. There goes a 1335 
airplane — or is it a motorcycle?. . . . 
The pet aversion of the week — Van 
Newkirk's brief case .... It's a good 
thing Bergdall doesn't go to Wes- 
tern Maryland often, for a ball chain 
couldn't hold him down Friend 
Kosowsky, why are you laughing at 
your brother in the "Lonely Hearts 
Club?". . . I wonder what would be 
more amusing than to see Horowitz 
in a giggling mood in the wee small 
hours. . . Who said, "What's the 
matter, Vandervoort? Got bees in 
your bonnet? Look out, fellows, here 
come the soldier boys. . . I wonder 
if there is anything to Leon's threat 
to crash Reid Hall. Iggie's acting is 
in great demand, especially the Rom- 
eo and Juliet kind It's rumored 
that the Pharaoh's daughter found 
Moses Wilmot in the bull-rushes. . . - 
The Freshman Class challenges all 
comers to a basketball game, accord- 



ing to our varsity stars .... Bristol 
defeated Waterbury in two rounds 
the other day. The base drummer 
claims a foul. "Just wait till next 
time," says two round Harold, "I'll 
knock him for a row of alarm clocks." 
Harold is taking lessons from punch- 
drunk Horowitz, while Freddy is 
training with TNT Bride Who 
was it that poured water on Sleepy 
when he stuck his head out the win- 
dow last Sunday? Sleepy says it 
hurt his dignity. . . We wonder why 
Simmons painted SHUT on his door. 
See Woudrow for particulars. . . P. 
S.: Ray, are you a place behind the 
other "crushers," or a jump ahead 
of them? We think you can hold up, 
so don't fool us. 



Phillips 



/^cqwdensed \ 

CELERV 

isoupr 



Take a cigarette A like CHESTERFIELD 




You know I like that cigarette ... 

I like the way it tastes . . . there's 
plenty of taste there. 

Chesterfield is mild, not strong 
. . . and that's another thing I 
like in a cigarette. 

What's more, They Satisfy . . . 
and that's what I like a cigarette 
to do. 

I get a lot of pleasure out of 
Chesterfield . . . you know I like 
that cigarette. 



Q^iL a;*.— 



MONDAY WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 

LUCREZIA LILY RICHARD 

BORI PONS BONELLI 

KOSTELANETZ ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS 

9 P. M. (E. S. T.) —COLUMBIA NETWORK 

© 193}, LlCGBTT Bi Mynu Todacco Co. 



AlUnd All-Washington 
Ni B ht 



JL ilJi.ft>r 




ELMlli 



See Plays 
Monday 



VOL- XXXIV. NO. 22. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, MAR. 16, 1935 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



AllInReadiiiessFor 
Gymboree Tonight 

Basketball, Wrestling, And 
Boxing Featured 

Tonight the Varsity Club is spon- 
soring the first All-Washington Sport 
Carnival at the Chestertown Armory. 

The main event of the evening will 
be a basketball game between state 
and out-of-state performers. Each 
team has expressed confidence in its 
ability to down the other and it will 
be a good game from start to finish. 
Ward, Huffman, Horowitz, Nicholson 
and McMahon will probably start for 
the Marylanders with Wilmot, Salter, 
Skipp, Bilsncioni, and Evans heading 
the out-of-staters. 

There will be a total number of 
eight boxing matches with the Ekai- 
tis-Dwyer bout heading the list. Oth- 
er performers noted for their fistic 
abilities are "Chick" Chaffey, Russ 
Baker and Paul Bruehl. 

Four wrestling matches have been 
raided featuring Sadler, McDorman, 
Weinroth and others. 

The program as follows: 
Basketball 
Marylanders vs. Out-of-Staters 

Boxing 

G. Grieb vs. Perry 

Dolan VS. Lewis 

Griemt vs. W. Grieb 

Kight vs. Bruehl 

Panowicz vs. Ingersoll 

Baker vs. Davis 

Anderson vs. Benham 

Young vs. Chaffey 

Ekaitis vs. Dwyer 

Wrestling 



BASEBALL CANDIDATES 
REPORT FOR PRACTICE 



McDorman 


vs. 


Sadler 


Simmons 


vs. 


Weinroth 


Wallace 


vs. 


Stevens 


Compton 


vs. 


Tignor 



WALDEN PELL SPEAKS 
BEFORE STUDENT BODY 



Well Known Young Educator 
To Appear March 21 



The Reverend Walden Pell speaks 
in William Smith Hall on March 21, 
before the College Assembly. 

At present the Reverend Pell 
is headmaster of St. Andrew's School 
in Middletown, Delaware. Graduat- 
ing from Princeton in 1923, he ac- 
cepted a Rhodes scholarship to Ox- 
ford University where he received the 
degree of Master of Arts. The Rev- 
erend Pell was a member of the Ivy 
Club while at Princeton and later 
joined the Princeton Club of New 
York. He was ordained deacon in 
the Frotcstant Episcopal Church in 
1927, he became a priest in 1928. 

Mr. Pell is an old friend and col- 
league of Mr. Paul Solandt, of the 
College faculty. Both men hav. 
been masters at the Lenox School, in 
Massachusetts. 



Thirty-Five Men Make Up 
Prospective Squad 



The first call for candidates for the 
1935 baseball team netted Coach Kib- 
ler some thirty-five men, among 
whom were many veterans from last 
year's squad. Although wet grounds 
have prevented the team from going 
out-of-doors, daily practices are be- 
ing held in the gymnasium. 

Those included on the squad are: 

Outfielders — Goldstein, Hague, 
Lewis, Nicholson, Shorb, Tignor and 
Turner. 

Infielders — Berry, Howeth, Wilmot, 
Pratt, Salter, Abbott, Derringer, Lin- 
thicum, Kolesko, Reinhart and Win- 
gate. 

Pitchers — Anderson, Evans, Comp- 
ton, Weinroth, Nides, White, Ayres 
and Fountain. 

Catchers — Baker, Greims, Bruehl, 
Davis, Bilancioni, and Huffman. 

The addition of several prospective 
pitchers to the squad has greatly in- 
creased the locals' chances for an ex- 
cellent season. Heading the list is 
Fountain who is regarded as one of 
the best pitchers on the Shore. Other 
likely additions are Anderson and 
Compton. 

Huffman and Davis have been add- 
ed to the catching staff, and Turner, 
who played creditable ball for the 
Shore Orioles last summer, is a val- 
uable addition to the squad and will 
probably see much service in the out- 
field this year. • 



St. Patrick's Day 
Cotillion Is Success 



Color Scheme Carried Out In 
Green And White 



SENIORS DECIDE ON 
JUNE BALL PLANS 



Committees Appointed For 
June Week 



Gamma Sigma Holds Tea 

Dance At Country Club 

Function Held For Freshmen 
N Pledges Of Sorority 

The Gamma Sigma Sorority is giv- 
ing a tea dance this afternoon from 
two until five at the Country Club in 
honor of their new pledges, Beppy 
Westcott and Elsie Wharton. Vinny 
Brandolini and his orchestra will fur- 
ni'li the music. 

Gamma Sigma deeply regrets the 
death of Mr. Albert D. Mackey and 
<-'xtendB most sincere sympathies to 
Mrs. Mackey, a patroness of the sor- 
Pvity, 



At a meeting of the Senior Class 
on Monday, the eleventh, there were 
brought up for discussion several 
matters which should be of immedi- 
ate and future interest to the student 
body and the alumni. 

Tiie first of these topics had to do 
with the presentation to the college 
of a gift by the Seniors, a custom 
which has been followed for some 
years. After discussion by the class- 
es as to the amount to be spent and 
the form the gift would take, a com- 
ittee was appointed to consider the 
various ramifications of the subject 
and make its recommendations at the 
next meeting of the class. This com- 
mittee consisted of. John Lord, 
Chairman; Russell Baker, and Clare 
Wyle. 

The second matter of importance 
concerned a plan for the permanent 
organization of the class, with pro- 
visions for a reunion after a lapse 
of several years. In the past, pro- 
grams of this sort have been lacking 
from the last-year legislation of the 
classes, and it is felt that if such a 
plan can be efficiently worked out 
this year, an invaluable precedent will 
bo established for the guidance of 
future classes. The committee was 
composed of: Harry Rhodes, Chair- 
mo:.; Dick Chambers, and Allen 
Brougham. 

The June Ball, which is annually 
presented during June Week, was 
then discussed, and provisions were 
made for voluntary contributions by 
the members of the Senior Class to 
a fund to be used in furthering plans 
for this dance until such time as the 
tickets have been printed and sold 
to the student body and the alumni 
and friends of the college. The 
committee in charge of the June Ball 
this year will be selected by the Oom- 
mittee Chairmen, who were appoint- 
ed by President McCrone. 

Decorations — Margaret Wanderer. 

Music — Joe Mooney. 

Programs and tickets — Bill Long. 

Invitations — Ira Meosell. , 

Finances — Earl Price. ' 



The green and white of St. Pat- 
rick's Day prevailed last night in the 
college gym at the fourth of a ser- 
ies of five formal dances sponsored 
by the Cotillion Club. The music of 
Jimmy Adams' Peninsuleers blended 
smoothly into the refreshing tone of 
the decorative scheme to present an 
effect which was at once pleasing and 
satisfactory. This successful combi- 
nation is, in itself, a reflection of the 
general success of the dance. 

The decoration of the gym was 
centered about a combination of the 
St. Patrick's Day and Springtime 
themes. The lights were softened 
by white crepe paper coverings on 
which were green shamrocks. The 
windows were also covered with 
white, edged with a nile green bord- 
er, and in the center of each was a 
large green hat. The orchestra was 
enclosed in a bower of dogwood blos- 
soms, suggestive of the true atmos- 
phere of spring. Simplicity again 
characterized the decoration, with 
fully as much effectiveness as form- 
erly. 

The novel feature of the evening 
was an Elimination Dance in which 
the dancing couples were eliminated 
from the floor by the drawing of 
numbers which corresponded to the 
numbers on the programs. The last 
couple on the floor at the end of the 
drawing was given a ticket to the 
next Cotillion . 

The chaperons invited to the dance 
were Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert W. Mead, 
.Mrs. John E. Speicher, Dr. and Mrs. 
S. Buxton, Mr. and Mrs. 'Frink 
Goodwin, Miss Doris Bell and Mr. 
Walter Morris. George deSocio was 
chairman of the committee in charge 
of the dance. 



THETA KAPPA NU NATIONAL 
CHARTER GRANTED PSP 



A national fraternity has come to 
College Hill. 

A telegram brought the news here 
Thursday morning from national 
headquarters of Theta Kappa Nu in 
Cleveland, Ohio, that the local chap- 
ter of Phi Sigma Phi has been grant- 
ed a charter in the National, 

This event comes as a culmination 
of the efforts begun by the local 
group shortly after the inauguration 
of Gilbert Mead as nineteenth pres- 
ident of Washington College. Since 
that time, official visits to the cam- 



pus have been made by Dr. William 
A. Whiting, Grand Archon of Theta 
Kappa Nu; A. Bruce Musick, Execu- 
tive Secretary, and 0. B. Locklear, 
Traveling Secretary, which have 
marked the probationary period pre- 
vious to the granting of the charter. 
The coming of such an organiza- 
tion to the campus has marked anoch- 
er step forward in the progress of 
Washington College. It brings the 
College into national recognition by 
all the higher educational circles 
through its broad scope of inter-col- 
legiate contacts. 



Administration Supports Move 



DRAMATIC CLUB PUTS 
ON PLAY FOR ASSFJdBLY 

"The Valliant" Hailed As Out- 
standing Performance 



"The Valliant" by Halworthy Hall 
and Robert Middlemass, presented 
by the Dramatic Club in the Assem- 
bly on Thursday, was one of the most 
entertaining programs of the year. 

Charles Benham, as the convict 
doomed to die, was the star of the 
play. The other members of the 
cast, who assisted in setting the stage 
for him, were: 

Warden Holt — William Hall. 

Father Daly — William VanNew- 
Kirk. 

A Girl — Doris Unruh. 

Dan Wilson — George Rasin. 

The play was different from any- 
thing the Dramatic Club has attempt- 
ed this year but the praise it received 
from the entire student body and 
faculty showed that more such as- 
sembly programs would be welcomed 
by the college. 

On Monday evening, the third in 
the series of one-act plays will be giv- 
en in William Smith Hall and, as us- 
ual, the performance will be one you 
will not want to miss. 

One of the plays, "The Minuet" is 
unique in the Dramatic Club program. 
It is a one-act play of 18th century 
France,' by the famous author of 
"Voltaire' and "The Monkey's Paw," 
Louis N. Pnrker. 

Both of the two plays are student- 
directed. Miss Margaret Wanderer 
is doing "The Minuet," in costume. 
The lines are written in rhyming 
couplet, and the cast includes: 

Marquis — Robert Clifford. 

Marchioness — Dorothy Clarke. 

Goaler — Wesley Sadler. 

The other play offered is "Thank 
You, Doctor," directed by Miss Jean 
Harsh aw. 



Dr. Gilbert Wilcox Mead, Presi- 
dent of the College and who has been 
connected with national fraternities 
since 1907 has made the following 
statement concerning the advent of 
Theta Kappa Nu on College Hill: 

"I have known personally for some 
time several of the leading men of 
the national organization of Theta 
Kappa Nu, and have followed closely 
the development of the fraternity in 
She last several years. Many of its 
national leaders are college adminis- 
trators and faculty men in excellent 
institutions. 

"TKN is a member of the Na- 
tional Interfraternity Conference, 
and ranks well up in the scholarship 
rating which the National Infraterni- 
ty Conference makes the subject of 
an extensive study each year. Its 
ideals are sound, its leadership ex- 
cellent, and it will bring to the Wash- 
ington College Campus an intercolleg- 
iate contact which will be extremely 
valuable, not only to the members of 
the local chapter, but to all the men 
of the college. 

"The national administration of 
TKN recognizes fully the importance 
of the complete loyalty of the local 
chapters to the College in which they 
are located, and have demonstrated 
this in many ways. Washington 
College should welcome this fine or- 
ganization to our campus." 

Dr. William R. Howell, Registrar 
and head of the Economics Depart- 
ment of the College, believes that 
there will be a much more whole- 
some fraternal effect created on the 
campus. "A local group is of no 
great value to the college and the 
students," he said, "after the gradu- 
ate leaves the institution, because of 
the distance he is located from the 
college." 

National Fraternity Advantages 

Theta Kappa Nu, like any of the 
leading national fraternities, brings 
about a stimulation of scholarship 
standards on the Washington College 
Campus. A noteworthy award made 
by the body every year is a £2000 
graduate fellowship. As a special in- 
ducement to the individual chapter;; 
toward scholarship achievement, the 
fraternity also offers every jear 
scholarship and activity cups, scholar- 
ship and activity keys, and similar 
awards for scholastic accomplish- 
ment. 

A strong national stimulates a cor- 
rect campus social and fraternal life. 
It brings about the erection of a 
strong, unified group on the campus 
who are pledged, through the fratern- 
ity obligations, to a life of Loyalty 
:iml service to the College. The en- 
tire fraternity system will be greatly 
strengthened, and national cortacts 
of value to every member of the stu- 
dent body will be created. Although 
there can be no Immediate expansion, 
a national fraternity will cause an e- 
ventual extension of the housing pro- 
cram on this campus, when each fra- 
ternity will own its own chapter 
house, 

Washington College hails the for- 
mation of n chapter of a national or- 
ganization of the prestige, reputation 



and standards of Theta Kappa Nu- 
Officials of Phi Sigma Phi emphasized 
that the nationalization was in a 
large part the result of the cooper- 
ation of the Administration, notably 
President Mead, who early became 
actively interested. 

Dr. Winslow S. Anderson was elect- 
ed the first Grand Aichon of" the 
Theta Kappa Nu. Since the found- 
ing, it has been this fraternity's pol- 
icy carefully to inspect the character 
of its petitioners and to use common 
sense in rules governing petitioning. 
From the very start, the fraternity 
pursued a definite and sensible pol 
icy of growth. It aimed to be na- 
tional by placing chapters in all parts 
of the country, and to lend support 
to its established chapters by plac- 
ing others nearby, insofar as it was 
practical. Thus the fraternity grew 
with care and unity until today it 
lists well over forty active chapters 
on its rolls. Its exclusiveness and 
discrimination has been responsible 
for its abnormal rating in the Na- 
tional Interfraternity Conference. 

Local Chapter Notified Thursday 

Official confirmation of the accept- 
ing of Phi Sigma Phi's petition was 
in the following telegram received 
Thursday morning: 

PHI SIGMA PHI FRATERNITY 
WASHINGTON COLLEGE CHES- 
TERTOWN MD 

VOTE OF THETA KAPPA NU 
CHAPTERS AND NATIONAL OF- 
FICERS FAVORABLE TO THE 
PETITION OF PHI SIGMA PHI 
STOP CHARTER GRANTED SUB- 
JECT TO INSTALLATION AR- 
RANGEMENTS STOP IT AFFORDS 
ME GREAT PLEASURE TO CON- 
VEY THIS ANNOUNCEMENT TO 
YOU STOP A B MUSICK EXEC- 
UTIVE SECRETARY 

The local chapter of Phi Sigma Phi 
was formally recognized as a fratern- 
ity in May, 1929 by the Board of Vis- 
itors and Governors of Washington 
College. The original chapter roll 
bore the names of thirteen charter 
members. The local group also has 
steadily grown until the active mem- 
bers now number twenty-one, with 
five freshman pledges. Phi Sigma 
Fhi has an active Baltimore Alumni 
Chapter, composed of ten Washing- 
ton College graduates. The chapter 
roll also includes many distiziguished 
\ members who will now be 
installed, with the active members, 
into Theta Kappa Nu. The list of 
Honorary Members includes Co). 
Hiram S. Brown. Chairman of the 
Board of Visitors and Governors of 
the College. Dr, Joseph K. Shriver 
and John I. Colbourn, members of the 
Board, Representative T. Alan 
Goldsborottgh, Mr. Jr.mes M. Hep- 
bron, eminent Baltimore Welfare 
Executive, Dr. William R. Howell. 
Or. Kenneth S. Buxton, Frank Good- 
win, and James W. Johns, members 

of (he College faculty, and Mr. Hurry 

Russell, local newspaper man. 

The officials of Pin Sigma Phi 

w i-h especially to emphasl i 
dent's offii ing the nation* 

alisation of the group. Thej 
expressed 'he hope thai -''her n«< 
on the Washington C< 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, MAR. 16, 1935 



The Washington Elm 

Published weekly by and for the 
interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, 
the eleventh oldest institution of 
higher learning in the United States. 
Founded at Chestertown, Md., 1782. 



William Oliver Baker Editor 

Carroll Casteel Asst. Editor 

Louis Goldstein Bus. Manager 

Emerson Slacum . . Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Associate Editors 

Frances Silcox, Dorothy Clarke, 

William Kight. Jean Harshaw, Alfred 

Taylor, Vincent Brandelini, Anne 

Whyte. William McCullough 

Howard Clark 



to take courses in income tax evas- 
ion, at tins rate. Still, the glorious 
opportunity of earning what was for- 
merly pin money exists. For in- 
stance, the President of the United 
States must get easily §5,000 a year. 
The whole point of the matter is 
that no senior who starts al, say, 
S4,?00 should be hopelessly discour- 
aged. The outlook is promising. As 
far as the C. C. N. Y. prediction or 
opinion goes, the same senior class, 
at the same time, voted for Franklin 
Roosevelt as the "g'-eate^t lining A- 
nierican," and for Albert iiinstem as 
the greatest living man. 



ANOTHER FINE TEAM 

Washington's debating victory ov- 
er John's Hopkins attests to the work 



INTERCEPTED 
PHRASES 

By Frederick Taylor 



I shot an arrow into the air, 

It fell to earth, I know not where. 

I've lost a lot of arrows that way. 

(Yowsah folks, just throw out a 
few thoughts at random and soon 
you have a column, — here 'tis.) 



Trouble saver: Co-eds at North- 
western University have formed a 
Cloister Club, composed of girls 
whose boy friends are not on the 
campus. Insignia is a little yellow 



Y PEACE RESOLUTIONS 
ARE SENT TO NOTABLES 



Copies Sent To Executives And 
Congressmen 



TOLD TO 
ME 

By I. Un-Iy Heard 



of the winning team, Bergdall and \ ribbon pinned to the dress. Minimizes 



Vandervoort, and the skill of the 

Entered at the Chestertown, Md., ■ coach, Mr. Winton Tolles. Likewise, 

postoffice as second class matter. ; the noteworthy defeat of the Univer- 

Snbscription price, $1.50 a year, ; sity of Maryland is a tribute to Mr. 

Single copy, 10 cents. Tolles, Lawrence Williams and all of 



embarrasment, they claim. 

(Compensation?— And why do 
they have to advertise?) 



SATURDAY, MAR. 16, 



"TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME' 



Speaking of saving embarrasment 

— ' the various teams of the College have here ' s a better idea. Out at Antioch 

1935 made a creditable showing against ■ College two willing young girls have 

teams with much more experience, l established a Bureau to help would- ; 

■ t «. n i. m c • * a . j*v 'be lovers get located. With a par- 
for the Debasing Soc.ety adopted the | ^^ ^.^ ^^ & ^ negd on]y ; ^^ . q ^ ^^ of ^ Depart 

policy this yeai of building a strong telephone the date bureau to save j ment oi state, study of international 



Copies of the resolutions drawn up 
at the Peace Conference, sponsored 
by the Y. M. C. A., are to be sent to 
President Roosevelt, Senators Tyd- 
ings and Radcliffe, the Maryland del- 
egation in the House of Representa- 
tives, Governor Nice, the President 
of the State Senate, and the Presi- 
dent of the State Assembly. This act- 
ion was unanimously agreed upon at 
the last assembly of the Conference. 
The members of the Conference felt 
a need for immediate definite action, 
and so are joining in the national 
Peace movement. Conferences held 
at many other institutions have tak- 
en similar action, and it is believed 
that the Washington College Con- 
ference is adding to the rapidly glow- 
ing crystallization of student thought 
and to the nation-wide expression of 
that thought. 

The resolutions, in brief, deal with 
such matters as foreign policy, an 



■ l _.„ ... w — . itfiepjiuiit: tut: uore umi-"" ■"* — ■ incut ui . J '. a i < . aiuujr ui iiinniouuiiui 

Arnold Benne.t wrote aoooK onte , Qucleus for future years and f or that himself the trouble of asking a girl policy, membership in the League of 
■whose title was at once a tribute and I 



an autobiography. The book was reason did not send the more exper- 
called "Living on Twenty-four Hours ienced debaters into the field. The 
a Dav." The average undergraduate pronc j ency f Mr. Tolles as the train- 
at Washington College, and at many 1 nd the growing ability of the 

other places, lives on about seven 



i who is already dated or to get assur- 
ance that the girl he intends to ask 
is not already engaged for the even- 
ing. 

{With so many n. o. (nigh onto) 
a"day, anT* wastes the other y°ung, and especially the freshman married couples around here such an 
seventeen. ' ani1 sophomore, debaters should re- j organization is hardly necessary). 

Any graduate, from a day to a j su ]t in banner future seasons. 

score*of years after his graduation, I There ig much ^ nowadays of . 
will freely admit that his extrava- coI , students' increasing interest 

gance with time was the tragedy of - n serious matters ft -_ 0(M that EO 
Many a trite phrase ^^ a ect as ^ md munj 



The "Temple News" has a pen- 
chant for panning the University's 
other publication, "The Owl," a hum- 
or magazine. Says tin ">kws,'' 
"Owl Editor Sam Read, has outsmart- 



floats about ready to alight and tions - controli should attract a scant 

abrill that time is irretrievable These | half dozen listenerS| but such has 

platitudes flourish because they are faeen ca5e nearlv de 

universally true. There is nothing 

but agreement that the ordinary stu- l £parse audience Js nQ reflecti - n on Pomona "Sage Hen 

dent uses a tremendous amount oi | hl/ta ,,„,„+„ m +Ua A ^^ a ^ 



Nations and in the World Court, 
lernational labor organizations, mu- 
nitions and armaments, the report of 
the American Draft Convention, a- 
bolition of compulsory military train- 
ing in schools, the big navy program, 
trade agreements, and war debts. 
The total summary of the resolutions 
may be stated that disarmament and 
international cooperation are the 
chief objectives. 

90 >•■ — 



Morris Barroll Addresses 

_ ed himself. To a business letter which : ^i ii Historical SocietV 

■ ™ e « 1S DOth,ng bates held in William Smith Hall. The he penned to the co-ed editor of the ; Allege mStOTtCt U ZOCieiy 

" Read appended : 

mising question: : Loca i Historian Reviews Early 



the following 
time that produces no evident ad- ]y ^^ qujte dear]y (hat the peop]e , ,. what are yon doing Marcn 
vantage. He uses it in bull Ee /^ , wh o spend hour on hour arguing cur- I Wire c0 n ec t." Two days ago, came 
sions,,' in endless bridge games, in rent ti<ms in an unde rgraduate a telegram— yes, collect— "What's 

nth daily conversations with his lady „ bal] session „ are unwUling t0 hear up? Game for anything. Address 
love, in sitting and domg nothmg, in , an authoritative discussion on the H— Court, Claremont. Dot R."— 
standing and doing nothing, in walk- , sam( , matter put jnto logica , f orm . Sam paid ^ 

ing and doing nothing, in reading Probab! the reason tnese studeJlt s ] Then further on in same issue, 
worthless periodicals. A ... hours I Jo n<jt atten<J de()ates the fear 
of the day he uses in study A small ^ , eara son]( , thi 

part of the day he may devote to atn- ; nn ^_ 

letic exercise. The rest is gone, for- 



WASHINGTON OLYMPIAD 



ever. 

Some wantons with time will not 
admit it. They rationalize, and say 
that a fraternity house discussion on 
the state of man, nature and the uni- 
verse will give them a rounded back- 

ground, and impress the board of dir- j b fS nn . V*** 5 fS°; 
ectors when they come up for elec- j 
tion as president of the company. ; 
They point to the thousands of exam- 
ples of boys who were stupid and in' 
dolent in school who grew up to en- 



It is surprising that some annual 
entertainment by the athletic de- 
partment like the Varsity Club's 
ALL- WASHINGTON night was not 
Such amateur 
Olympics are considered indispen- 
sable at most colleges. 
■ boxing and wrestling performances 
' may be crude, they give a golden op- 
portunity for the would-be athlete 



"FACULTY PRODUCES 'OWL' "— 
in headlines, but their humor colum- 
nist who lets nothing escape him says, 
"Tsk, tsk, it's a biological improba- 
bility." 



dow a hospitaL Think of hew many 



to play to the glorious gallery. The 



more hospitals they might have en- | ^rs.ty Club and its officials should 
dowed had they acquired the habits'?' &*?** f * e contribution of 
of work and application when they ' he affair makes to college unity, 
were in school. For these ^Mu ! Once again the College has demon- 
tfaey must have before they pay an ■ strated that it is quite capable of en- 
=_.!_„*-_ tertaining itself in a clean, sports- 

income tax. ... 6 _, . ., ' _. r . 

Many students regret their waste manl,ke *<**■ Tlus self-sufficiency 
of time. They ask, rather imploring- j 1S F 1 ^* 311 *- . , .. 

ly, what there is to do. This ques- , President Ward and his assistants 
tion, of course, and the whole mat- ^ve gone to great pains to arrange 
ter, need no answer but the one Hor- ' ever V detai1 of the Program. Every 
ace gave, and Goethe gave, which student should feel constrained to at- 



The staid old Western Maryland 
"Gold Bug" went on a rampage the 
other week and published a tabloid 
, edition* Printed on yellow paper 
Although the | the issue conta ined such vital stories 
as this^ — 

"GRETA GARBO TO APPEAR IN 
PERSON AT COMMENCEMENT. 

We're very sorry, dear readers, but 
you will have to consider this story 
vacuum packed." 



read to us 

"Human art is long, and short is 
human life." 



tend this climax to the winter sea- 
son of athletics at the College. The 
Varsity Club deserves the laurels of 
the victor. 



Wingate: "Where you from?" 
Hickman: "Pocomoke, Md." 
Wingate: "One of those one-horse 
towns where the whole population 
goes down to meet the train?" 
Hickman: "V.'hat train: ' 

Johns Hopkins "News Letter 



History Of College 



Prizes Offered For Best Essay 



All Papers Are To Be In Be- 
fore May 23 



LITTLE MAN, WHAT NOW 
To every senior, the question of the 
day is what to do tomorrow? A re- 
cent poll (such things are usually u /) C_I V Hhfnrv Oi CnUeee 
iceurate as taking a vote on what th* U " Can > «"««'> ™ K.Olie 
weather should be next August.) a- 
mong the senior class at the School of 
Business and Civic Administration at 
the College of the City of New York 
reveals that the average senior ex- 
pects to be earning a salary of at 
least $5,000 a year five years after 
graduation. This is $1,000 a year 
more than at any time since the be- 
ginning of the depression. Doubtless 
this sanguine figure was arbitrarily 
hit upon because it is the amount the 
Honorable (although there is no hon- 
or among thieves), therefore, Mr. 
Hoey Long woold have every deserv- 
ing family start in the chicken bus- 
iness with (i. t., have as a nest egg). 
The poll shows that the rac*: 'J op- 
ticr.jiu is not e>.tinct. Seniors at 
Washington College woid do well 



Through the kindness of a friend, 
two prizes will be awarded at Com- 
mencement for the best essays or re- 
search papers dealing with some 
phase of the early history of Wash- 
ington College or Kent County. The 
event or person made the subject of 
the essay shall be limited in point of 
time to 1835 or earlier. 

First Pri2» — $10.00 

Second Prize^ — $5.00. 

Papers to be considered for the 
prize shall be in the hands of Dr. 
Dole, or President Mead, on or be- 
fore May 23rd. 



DRIPPINGS FROM THE OLD 
HOKUM BUCKET.— A kiss is noth- 
ing divided by two . Flattery is 
soft soap and soft soap is 90 per cent 
lye . Professor, "What kind of 
rock is this?" Student, "1 dunno, I 
just take it for granite . The Lis- 
terine song, "The Breeze That Blew 
My Girl Away . H. Clark, (to bar- 
ber) "Say, how Jong will I have to 
wait for a shave?" Barber, "About 
two years, sonny." . Faith is what 
enables you to eat an apple calmly 
in the dark . Madison Square Gar- 
den has the largest skating rink in 
the country, it can seat nearly two 
thousand people at one time . 
Some of the music depreciation class 
here think that a funeral march is a 
permanent lullaby . Last Saturday 
nite the gals got up on the scaler) and 
when they found out that they had 
fallen off they got up again 
What you don't know won't hurt you 
but it will pull your grades down ter- 
Iribly. K 



Before the monthly meeting of the 
Washington College Historical Socie- 
ty last Wednesday afternoon, a brief 
but interesting talk was given by 
Morris Keene Barroll, lawyer and 
historian, on his family's connection 
with Washington College during its 
struggling days, which was illusliat- 
ed with letters of Dr. Ferguson, pies- 
ident of the college from 1789 to 
1S04, and the original contract for 
the erection of Middle Hall in 1843. 

Dr. Gilbert W. Mead supplemented 
Mr. Ban-oil's remarks with a histor- 
ical sketch of the college and show- 
ed to the gathering several letters 
and documents of Dr. William Smith 
and those of other former presidents. 
A book published in 1784 on the in- 
corporation of the college and the 
original edition of "Gustavis Vasa,' r 
a play presented in honor of Wash- 
ington's visit here in 1789, were also 
shown together with a contemporary 
silhouette of Dr. Ferguson and a 
drawing by Ann Peale of Dr. Ring- 
gold, president of this institution 
from 1832 to 1854. Dr. Mead 
brought the meeting Lo a close by an- 
nouncing that a descendant was pre- 
senting the college with spoons made 
from the silver buckles of Dr. Fer- 
guson. Several ladies from the Old 
Kent Chapter participated in this 
open forum. 

In this meeting Mr. Barroll was 
unanimously elected an honorary 
member- 



Some college papers have four and 
five gossip columns. So what? Noth- 
ing much, only you have to begin 
writing with a punch-in-the-lead 
sentence, a punch like George is sav- 
ing for Ellis in their scrap tonight. 

(Simile — courtesy of Professor 
"Proud Papa" Tolles.) 

Why is it that this conglomeration 
of shady happenings is read by Dr. 
Mead and the intellectuals on down 
through the student body to Buck 
Howard. Maybe students like their 
names in the paper, but they won't 
admit it — exception Peyser — or else 
they want to check what they have 
done with the story that appears in 
print. Too bad there is a censor, 
n't it Mary Jo? 

There are definite restrictions im- 
posed on journalists and some are re- 
served for pseudo-Winchells. This 
column will be short (cheers) as . 

Can't write about — 

Dean Jones because he is a sacred 
institution Editor Baker be- 
cause he censors every crack about 
him before it gets to the linotyper 

Dr. Robinson because he has 
made a request to be omitted from 
the column and anyway he's a good 
guy when you get to know him. . . - 

.Wes Sadler because as student 
council president he must maintain 

the dignity of that office in the 

eyes of the students . - Sparky Cas- 
teel because he sends copies of the 
Elm to his distant sweethearts and 
hates to explain how it all happened. 

Questions — 

Was it Bob White that was asked 
for a date by the little lassie that 
keeps him away from his books? 

Who was Lord's date at the Better- 
ton binge after the Shakespeare 
play? . - What was Bob Fears do- 
ing when Dr. Livingood looked out 
of his window in the wee hours of 

last Friday morning? How 

many letters have come from Lowe's 
date of last week-end to other fam- 
ous campus lovers? . . . Who talk- 
ed to Carl's girl when she called from 
Blue Ridge and made such an im- 
pressioi. that a correspondence was 
started? Who are the latest ad- 
ditions to President Hall's Lovers 
Club? 



Dr. Beardsley Of Goacher 
College To Speak April 4 

Is Assistant Professor Of Clas- 
sics And History 



Dr. Grace H. Beardsley, Assistant 
Professor of Classics and History at 
Goucher College, addresses Wash- 
ington undergraduates in William 
Smith Hall on Thursday, April 4, 
1935. This feature of the regular 
assembly program will prove of inter- 
est to students of classics and his- 
tory. Dr. Beardsiey has done ex- 
tensive archaeological work and made 
a reputation as a brilliant speaker. 



It 



that — 



Skipp is making secret love to a 
local belle. Has this old romeo brok- 
en up a campus romance? We think 
so Pogie was very much in evi- 

dence at the Cotillion last night 

There is sufficient demand for 
Marvin's sister to come up to College 
next year — and be sponsored by 
Messrs. Young, Davis, Slacum, Red- 
dish, et al . - Emerson is now 
burning the candle in the middle as 
well. — Congratulations old man. . ■ 

A pretty little girl has somebody's 
heart and it doesn't make any differ- 
ence to her — Maybe she's particular 
Hermit Gillis is kindling a fire 
in his leaden heart. Surprise. ... 
It pays to be on the publicity end of 
the Shakespeare play. Bill was sand- 
wiched between four femmes in the 
Sunday Sun — Sudden popularity- 
what? 



Fan 



us Quotations — 



A sophomore went out with a g"' 1 
of seventeen and his roommate said, 
"Yeah, a grandmother for him" — K 

wasn't Bob, was it Carl a fair 

coed insists that "the stork that 
brought Frederic Peeper should have 
been shot for peddling dope." Tsk. 

Tsk "That's a load off niy 

chest," Bald Shaull after grapplinP 

with Weinroth Next week o* 

nother sucker will begin writing thin 
column. 



SATURDAY, MAR. 16, 1935 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



SKIPPING OVER THE 
SPORTS 

by Phil Skipp 



Folks, take a friendly tip and pie- 
sent your pasteboards early this ev- 
ening if you want a good seat for the 
most eollossal, gigantic, stupendous 
nthletic program ever attempted on 
the Eastern Shore. Yes sir, the Arm- 
ory should be packed to the rafters 
to-night for the first annual gymboree 
or All-Washington College Night to 
be held under the auspices of the 
Varsity Club. 

The program is divided into three 
parts each of which is so replete with 
features that is hard to pick out any 
one part as the most outstanding. 

The basketball game should be a 
thriller. An all-state team made up 
of such stellar performers as Ward, 
Huffman, Horowitz, Nicholson and 
McLain will be pitted against a gal- 
axy of out-of-state stars headed by 
Wilmot, Bilancioni, Salters, Berry 
and Evans. Rivalry between the^e 
two teams has reached a feverish 
stage with followers of both sides 
backing their favorites with big bets. 
I pick the out-of-staters to come 
through, but I'm not betting any mon- 
ey on the result. 

The boxing bouts are sure to keep 



the cash customers on edge. No doubt 
the Ekaitis-Dwyer fight will cop the 
spot light, but there will be 16 other 
pugs who will be in there giving the 
fans their money's worth. Here is 
a good chance to see how good I am 
in picking a winner just like Dan'l 
of the Sun, only I hope I do much 
better than he does because I don't 
think he is so hot. Well here goes. 

"Spark'' Grieb to beat "Streaky" 
Perry. 

"Kid" Lewis to shade "Boots'* Do- 
lan. 

"Smitty" Griems and "Sailor" 
Grieb to draw. It's fixed. 

"Spud" Bruehl to edge "Flappy" 
Kight. 

"Spike" Ingersoll to out-point 
"Tiger" Panowicz. 

"Powerhouse" Baker to outelug 
"Wildcat" Davis in the best fight of 
the evening. 

"Leggs" Anderson has too much 
for "Iggy" Benham. But I may be 
fooled. 

"Chick" Chaffey to lick "Gibby" 
Young. 

Here is my pick in the wrestling 
matches : 

"King" Sadler to spill "Luce" Mc- 
Dorman. 

"Dave" Wallace and "Biff" Stev- 
ens, a toss up with the odds on Biff. 

"Cream Puff" Tignor to out-love 
"Sonny" Compton. 

"Blimp" Weinroth too heavy for 



'Popeye" Shaull. 

Try your own predicting and see 
how you make out. I'll be looking 
for you all tonight. 

Time — 8 o'clock. 

Place — Armory. 

Price — 25 cents. 



JUNIOR GIRLS PROVE TO 
BE INVINCIBLE FOES 



Easily Defeat Seniors As Sophs 
Lose To Frosh 



Tuesday night the Juniors over- 
whelmed the Seniors with a surpris- 
ing number of points, considering the 
game which the Juniors played the 
Freshmen. Caroline Helms seemed 
to be unable to miss a shot. Miriam 
Ford was a good teammate. Leah 
Frederick, opposite Mildred Tryzno, 
played a good game. What she lack- 
ed in stature she made up for in 
speed. Dickie Metcalfe, although 
with more competition than usual, 
still is unsurpassed at center. 
Helms F Hall 

Ford F Smith 

Metcalfe C Cannon 

Frederick SC Tryzno 

Carter G Kail 

Jewell G Wyle 

Score: 61 to 17. 

The game between the sophomores 
and freshmen ended with a very close 



margin for the latter. The sopho- 
mores tried to regain in the sec- 
ond half what they had lost in the 
first. As then they did practically 
nothing. Nancy Post and Margaret 
Sutton played extremely well a3 
guards, keeping the freshmen from 
making a great many points. 

Dorothy Williams' defensive work 
as guard for the Freshmen was fine. 
Westcott and Bell also did some good 
shooting. 

Stevens F Bell 

Harshaw F Westcott 

Brown C Wharton 

Short SC Lynch 

Sutton G Williams 

I ost G Unruh 



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The entrance requirements are intel- 
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subjects specified for Grade A Med- 
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PAGE FOUR 



COACH KIBLER HOST AT 
BASKETBALL BANQUET 

College Residents Are Models 
In Fashion Show 

Jlr Thomns Kiblcr entertained 

bers of the basketball team with 

a banquet al his home on last Wed- 
nesday evening;. 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



SATURDAY, MAR. 16, 1935 



Mr. Vir.cent Brandolini's orchestra 
will furnish the music. 



The Washington Players gave their 
first Assembly play in the College 
auditorium on Thursday morning at 
the regular Assembly period. The 

piny was "The Valiant," a one-act 
play by Messrs. Hall and Middlomass. 
Miss Doris Unruh, a new-comer to 
the Washington singe, played one of 
the leads. Opposite her was Mr. 
Charles Benhnm, whose ability has 
been recognized in "The Ghosl 
Story." The supporting cast was 
comprised of Mr. William Hall, Mr. 
William Van Ncwkirk ami Mr. 

Chalks Rasin. 



The Kappa Gamma Sorority ex- 
pects to hold a tea in honor of Mrs. 
Morris Barroll and Mrs. Eben Per- 
kins in Reid Hall this afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Goodwin left 
Chestertown this morning to attenil 
a Conference in Delaware. Dr. Gil- 
bert W. Mead will be one of the prin- 
cipal spenkers. 



Friday night, the Cotillion Club 
gave its fourth dance in the gym- 
nasium. 



Several members of the student 
body and Faculty were models in the 
style show given at the Armory on 
Friday night Among these were: 
MIlB Mary Woodland Wcsli-ott. Miss 
Beppy Westcott, Miss Harriet Louisa 
Rogers, Miss Pricilla Grainger and 
Mrs. Florence Wilmer. 



The Gamma Sigma Sorority will 
give a ten-dance at the Country Club 
in honor of its pledges, the Misses 
Elsie Wharton and Beppy Westcott. 



Mrs. VVinton Tolles and young Mr. 
Theodore Tolles expect to return to 
their home on Mt. Vernon Ave., 
shortly, 



An Alumni card party is being 
planned. The date has been set for 
Monday night, nt 8 o'clock 
College gymnasium. 



DR. BUXTON SPEAKS 
TO BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY 



Will Discuss Role Of Synthetic 
Chemistry 



have Dr. Elisabeth Dichmann, Assist- 
ant Curator of lnverterbrates at the 
Agassiz, Harvard University, Mus- 
eum, as the speaker. 



Pigs, like human beings, prefer 
their food properly seasoned. Ex- 



periments in Nebraska have shown 
that swine fed two and one-half 
pounds of salt in every 100 pounds of 
ground feed showed a 36 per cent in- 
crease in weight gains over pigs not 
so favored. 



the 



Dr. K. S. Buxton will address the 
Biological Society of Washington 
College on Thursday, March 21. His 
subject will be "Contributions of 
Synthetic Chemistry to Medicine." 

Miss Francis Beck will be the 
speaker for the first April -meeting. 
Miss Beck is the daughter of Dr. Har- 
vey G. Beck, the well known endoc- 
rinologist, and she is at present en- 
gaged in biochemical research work 
with Dr. E. W. McCollum, of Johns 
Hopkins University. At the second 
April meeting, the executive commit- 
tee of the Biological Society plans to 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



The Dramatic Club will present 
two one-act plays Monday evening in 
the Auditorium. The admission will 
be 10c o person. 



DUDLEY ELECTED A S 
BASKETBALL MANAGER 

Charles Dudley, '36, was elected 
KUident manager of basketball for 
next Beason at the annual basketball 
banquet given this week by Coach J. 
Thomas Kibler. 

Dudley has been, with Robert Gar- 
rett, assistant manager during the 
past season and was sophomore as- 
sistant a year ago. Dudley is the 
second sports manager already elect- 
ed for the coming year, since Fred- 
erick Taylor was named manager of 
football last winter. 




PROGRAM WEEK OF MARCH 18-23 

MONDAY-TUESDAY, MARCH 18-19 
SHIRLEY TEMPLE in 

"THE LITTLE COLONEL" 

Added — Comedy, Cartoon Novelty. 
MATINEE TUESDAY, MARCH 19, at 3:30 



WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, MAR. 20-21 

"WEDNESDAY'S CHILD" 

— with — 

EDWARD ARNOLD - KAREN MORELY 

FRANKIE THOMAS 

Added — Sportreel, Cartoon and Comedy. 



FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MARCH 22-23 

DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

TIM McCOY in 

"REVENGE RIDER" 

ALL STAR CAST in 

"BEHIND THE EVIDENCE" 

BUCK JONES in 

"THE RED RIDER" 



lliey wont help you 

catch rivets 

thet/ won't cause any ilk 
or cure any ai/ments 

. . . when anything satisfies it's got to 
be right. . . no "ifs" or "buts" about it. 

Chesterfields satisfy because, first of all, 
they're made of the right kinds of mild ripe 
tobaccos. These tobaccos are thoroughly 
aged and then blended and cross-blended. 

It takes time and it takes money, but 
whatever it costs in time or money we do 
it in order to give you a cigarette that's 
milder, a cigarette that tastes better. 





© 1935. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



Write For ELM 
Tabloid Edition 



The ,li *^EIm 



Attend Barn Dance 
Tonight 



VOL. XXXIV. NO. 23. 



CHESTERTOWN, MD., SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 193S 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



'What Is A College' 
Asks Pres. Mead 

Suggests That Students Write 
Definition For Print 



Dramatic C I a b Presents 
Play By Mr. Tolles 



What is a college? 

Theory and practice seem to have 
partsd company at times in consttuct- 
ing *he proper definition, and these 
definitions have varied according to 
the collegiate generation in which 
tliey were made. 

A dozen years ago, in the days of 
abounding prosperity, when Ameri- 
can education went more than mildly 
mad on size, these attacks of colleg- 
iate elephantiasis developed some 
curious definitions. 

Definitions of a College 

"A college is a mass of people 
mainly between the ages of 18 and 24 
coming in contact with every possi- 
ble department of teaching from an- 
cient Sanskrit to modern night-club 
dancing. No subject studied has real 
relation with life (except possibly the 
latter). Size is the criterion; the 
greater the mass, the greater the col- 
lege." 

"A college is an athletic stadium 
sin-rounded by coon-skin coats and 
pocket flasks and inhabited by hired 
gladiators." 

"A college is an unusually respect- 
able country club where the member- 
ship fee must be supplemented by a 
secondary school education, and 
where a member will meet only the 
very best people." 

"A college is this — or that — or 
that — or what have you — with little 
relation to the serious problem of 
introducing young men and women 
to the best which has been thought 
and said in the world or of opening 
their eyes to the future." 

Present Trends of Colleges 

It would be stupid to defend any 
of these definitions today. The fet- 
ish of size is gone; the idol of over- 
emphasized athletics is smashed; the 
coon-skin coated collegiate mob ex- 
ists only in the pages of "Ballyhoo", 
or on the comic screen; the country 
club has given away to the classroom 
and library. 

This is only a reversion to the orig- 
inal type after a decade of collegiate 
jazz-mania. 

Big universities are sub-dividing 
into small residence colleges, where 
contacts between student and tutor, 
and student and student, may be clos- 
er. There are, increasingly, colleges 
where sports and games are indulged 
for the fun of play and not simply 
for the delectation of the grand- 
stands. 

What Is Washington College? 

I think Washington College is one 
of them. 

What is a college? Let me con- 
clude with just one idea; that the 
term is allied to the Latin word which 
indicates "gathering together." The 
heart of the definition will lie in each 
one's conception of the aim for which 
the group exists. 

I shall not today complete the de- 
finition. I give you this as a chal- 
lenge. Construct your own. If not 
too many definitions are submitted 
to the editor of the ELM, I am sure 
he would give space to printing some 
°f them in his next issue. But, 
whether you try to write it for print, 
oi" merely to crystalize your own 
thoughts, answer the question hon- 
estly, "What is a college?" 

—Gilbert W. Mead. 



Three one-act plays to be present- 
ed April 22 will conclude the scries 
of one-act plays given by the Dra- 
matic Club for this year. 

"Vane Effort," a remarkable com- 
edy written by Professor Winton 
Tolles, and directed by him, will be 
included in the program. It will 
feature an all-star cast, with plenty 
of laughter. 

The other two plays to be present- 
ed will be a comedy directed by Car- 
olyn Jewell and one of a more serious 
nature directed by Dorothy Clarke. 
The casts for these have not been 
decided upon at this time. 



WTERFRATERNITY HOP 
STILL UNCERTAIN 



Activities Committee Will 
Grant But One Petition 



COLLEGE NINE MEETS G. 
W. UNIVERSITY MONDAY 



Virginia peanut growers are rap- 
idly moving their profitable enter- 
prises to the larger peanut planta- 
tions that are being developed in 
Peru. 



Team Faces Hardest Schedule 
In Many Years 

The Washington College baseball 
team opens the 1935 season with 
George Washington University at 
Washington next Monday, April 8. 
At this time little is known about 
George Washington* but they have 
the habit of turning out good teams 
and will be hard to defeat. 

Closely following on the heels of 
this game is the one with George- 
town, also to be played in Washing- 
ton, on April 11. Then comes the 
first home game of the season when 
the University of Maryland invades 
Kibler Field April 13. 

Due to the exceptionally fine spring 
weather the squad has been practic- 
ing out of doors all week and sore 
arms are gradually being worked out 
while batting eyes are steadily be- 
ing sharpened. 

New comers to the squad this year 
who have been making favorable 
showings include Wilmot who is be- 
ing tried at third; Salter, at first; 
Huffman, behind the plate, and Foun- 
tain, pitcher, who has plenty of stuff 
on the old horsehide. 

Track, which succeeded lacrosse 
last spring when a suitable schedule 
could not be arranged for the latter, 
is rapidly coming into its own. 

Following several weeks of indoor 
running, Coach Ekaitis finally took 
his charges outside and has them en- 
gaging in light workouts. 

Although Ellery Ward is the only 
holdover from the last track squad, 
that of 1932, many newcomers give 
promise for a fairly successful sea- 
son. There are several good fresh- 
men prospects including "Gib" 
Young who is expected to cop a few 
of the dashes; Simmons, distance 
man, who has proven his ability to 
run by copping several long distance 
races down the Shore; and Bowen 
who looks well on the quarter mile. 
Other performers who will probably 
see action are Reddish, Jones, Kilby 
and Wright. 

The schedule is as follows: 
Baseball 
Apr. 8 — George Washington . Away 

Apr. 11 — Georgetown Away 

Apr. 13 — Maryland Home 

Apr. 16 — Long Island U Home 

Apr. 20 — Penn State Home 

Apr. 24 — George Washington Home 

Apr. 27 — Delaware Away 

May 1 — West Chester T Home 

May 4 — St. John's Home 

May 8 — St. John's Away 

May 9 — West Chester T Away 

May 11 — Washington-Lee . . . Home 

May 15 — Maryland Away 

May 16 — Loyola Away 

May 18 — Delaware Home 

May 25 — Mt. St. Mary's Away 

May 29 — Mt. St. Mary's .... Home 

May 30 — Loyola Home 

June 8 — Alumni Home 

Track 
April 20 — Delaware Away 

May 10 — Susquehanna Horn" 

May 25 — West Chester T. Away 



The possibility of a Spring For- 
mal to be sponsoi-ed by the three 
Greek-letter fraternities on the cam- 
pus has been a subject for lengthy 
discussion by the fraternity men dur- 
ing the past few weeks. 

Alpha Kappa and Phi Sigma Tan 
each petitioned the Activities Com- 
i mittee to be allowed to hold a sep- 
| erate dance, and the reply was that 
j there would be no petition granted 
for a separate dance unless only one 
J fraternity wished to hold such a func- 
tion. 

I Since this information was receiv- 
ed from the Activities Committee, 
Phi Sigma Tau has gone on record 
as favoring a dance jointly promoted 
by the three organizations. The 
subscription would not be limited to 
include only members of a fraterni- 
ty, but would be open to everyone. 

Alpha Kappa has not yet reached 
a decision, in the matter, and this is 
also the case with Phi Sigma Phi, 
which fraternity feel that the ex- 
penses involved in their incipient na- 
tionalization will be all that they can 
afford to spend at the present time. 
The school year is so far advanced 
that the dance, if it is to be held, will 
probably be scheduled by the Activi- 
ties Committee for the nineteenth of 
April. 



Silver Pentagon 
Gives Barn Dance 



Washington 
01 Yale 



Is Beneficiary 
Press Gift 



Washington College is one of sev- 
eral colleges and universities through- 
out the United States which will ben- 
afit by a donation made to the libr- 
ary of the college by an anonymous 
alumni of Yale University. This do- 
nation is in the form of an offer on 
the part of a Yale alumnus, whereby 
one half of the cost of any order of 
books for the library made through 
the Ynle University Press will be 
paid by him. Washington College 
Library is preparing to tnke advant- 
age of this otTcr, and the first order 
list is nearly complete. 



ELM TO APPEAR AS 
'PINK PAPER' TABLOID 



Sensationalism And Humour 
Mark Planned Edition 



Old Clothes To Figure In 
Hilarious Evening 

"The Barn Dance of this Saturday 
night will mark the highest point in 
entertainment yet reached in the 
Silver Pentagon program of novelty 
dances," said officials of the Silver 
Pentagon Society, campus honor or- 
ganization, in discussing the costume 
dance to be held in the gymnasium 
tonight. 

All students attending the dance 
are asked to wear old clothes of a 
rural cast. Several typical country 
or 'barn' dance figures will be ar- 
ranged during the evening, and the 
Silver Pentagon will award an at- 
tractive prize to the couple doing 
what the Society calls "the most pol- 
ished barn dance." 

The "Penny-a-Pound" dance which 
preceded the Spring recess was so 
successful that the Silver Pentagon 
Society, headed by John M. Lord, 
will continue to present special dan- 
ces for Saturday nights. The "Barn 
Dance" promises to be one of the 
most hilarious, but entirely well-man- 
nered social events of the current 
college season. 

The sponsors of the dance are em- 
phatic in their request that all at- 
tending carry out the spirit of the af- 
fair by coming in country clothes. 
The admission charges are 25c per 
couple, and 20c stag. 



President Mead Speaks 
To National Groups 



Dr. Gilbert W. Mead will speak to- 
night, Saturday, April 6, at a ban- 
quet to be held in the Wardman Park 
Hotel, in Washington. This ban- 
quet will conclude the National Con- 
vention of the American Alumni 
Council. 

On next Thursday, April 11, Dr. 
Mead will be a speaker at a dinner 
to be given in connection with the 
annual meeting of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association, which is 
being held this year in Chestertown. 



11 'FACULTY LEARNS TO READ 

student manuscript' 
may 6e a headline in the tabloid edi- 
tion of the Washington ELM which 
will appear early in April, as a hum 
ourous and instructive example of 
modern journalism," announced Wil- 
liam Baker, Editor of the ELM, in a 
recent interview. 

Screaming banner headlines, sen- 
sationally worded, will introduce ar- 
ticles satirizing people and events at 
Washington College, explained Bak 
ei\ The advertisements will be 
"super-puffed." The issue will be 
illustrated with antique cuts. The 
ELM will bo printed on pink paper a 
shade lighter than the famous New 
York DAILY MIRROR'S rosy pages. 

Elm officials are requesting na- 
tional advertisers to submit humour- 
ous advertising copy, in keeping with 
the issue. A classified ad depart- 
ment dealing with College 'Help 
Wanted', 'Business Opportunities,' 
and 'Sewing and Washing Machines' 
notices will supplement the regular 
advertising. 

In the interview, Mr. Baker em- 
phasized that the 'pink' edition is not 
to be primarily a humourous paper 
like the recent Western Maryland 
OWL, but is meant to parody accur- 
ately a metropolitan tabloid. 

The regular staff will prepare the 
paper, but free-lance writers of wit- 
ty or sensational style, with 'big- 
town' journalistic ambitions, are in- 
vited to contribute, the ELM editor 
ial board stated. 

"A hasty but careful study of yel- 
low journalism, led by the College 
class in journalism, will fit the ne 
writers to approach the assignments 
of that week from the city-tabloid 
reporter's point of view," noted Mi. 
Baker, in further discussing the plan. 

Snapper leads and sensational im- 
plications will receive special atten- 
tion in the stories. The heads will 
show a variety of type sizes, ranging 
from three inch "streamers" as main 
head-lines to truthful sub-heads a 
quarter of an inch high. Well- 
known College characters and mem- 
bers of the administration and facul- 
ty will be good-naturedly buffooned. 
Cartoons by Robert Swain will be 
drawn especially for the issue. 

ELM representatives were pleased 
with the variety of subjects a tabloid 
issue in April suggests,- The May 
elections will be treated in articles on 
College party platforms, probable 
candidates, and campaign activities 
of notorious wards like "Pig Alley." 
A Hood of seandal columns from 
vengeful students is likely to tax the 
censor's blue pencil, Baker suggested. 

In closing the interview, the ELM 
editor announced that no charge 
would be made for classified ad in- 
sertions, and that all students are at 
liberty to advertise in that depart- 
ment. The whole student body is 
urged to submit material for the 
issue. 



Classicist Speaks 
On Greek Islands 



Mrs. G. H. Beardsley Has 

Explored Many Lands 

"The Isles of Greece" — , history, 
poetry, art and language had famous 
beginnings there, was the theme of 
an enthusiastic discussion of the 
Greek islands by Dr. Grace H. 
Beardsley, noted archaeological schol- 
ar uf Goucher College, before the 
Washington College assembly last 
Thursday morning, in William Smith 
Hall. 

Dr. Beardsley spoke with intimate 
fondness of the gentle tribes who in- 
habit the numerous islands to the 
south anil east of Greece and the 
Balkans. For years she has explor- 
ed, with her husband, the romantic 
lands and seas where classic customs, 
as she pointed out, survive. She