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Full text of "Washington, west of the Cascades; historical and descriptive; the explorers, the Indians, the pioneers, the modern;"

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WASHINGTON 



West of the Cascades 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME III 



CHICAGO SEATTLE TACOMA 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1917 



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THE NEW YOEK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY | 

367661A 

ASTOR, LMNOX AND 

TtLDEN FOUNDATIONS 

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HE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRARY 



^.STOR, LENOX 
.'ii-DEN FOUNDATION 




SIDNEY A. PERKINS 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



SIDNEY ALBERT PERKINS. 

Sidney Albert Perkins, proprietor of the Tacoma Ledger, the Tacoma Daily 
News and other newspapers in the northwest, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
May 6, 1865. He is the son of George Goodwin and Emily (Cleveland) Perkins. 
His mother was a cousin of President Grover Cleveland. His father was a 
well known Congregational minister, who removed his family to Iowa, where the 
son had his first experience in newspaper work. But before that he had had 
many difficulties in his efforts to earn enough money for his schooling. A con- 
siderable part of that money came from the sale of tinware among the farmers 
of the surrounding country on Saturdays. Through one summer he worked as 
a brakeman on a railroad and for three seasons he herded cattle. For several 
months he worked for a farmer who paid him in young pigs which the energetic 
youth herded in the commons and fed on buttermilk hauled from a creamery, 
and he realized one thousand eleven dollars from the sale of them. These 
experiences were delightful as they gave him an outdoor life, which he always 
has desired. 

For seven years Mr. Perkins was a traveling salesman with headquarters 
in Chicago. It was this work that brought him to Tacoma, September 5, 1886, 
where he met William P. Bonney, then in the drug business on Pacific avenue, 
and they formed a partnership under the name of Bonney & Perkins. Mr. Per- 
kins gave up his Chicago position and remained here. The firm sold drugs and 
specialties at wholesale, covering a wide territory, and had a very prosperous 
business until the depression of the early '90s, when the firm lost everything. 
Mr. Perkins did not have a dollar, but he did not complain. He found employ- 
ment at one dollar and a half a day, hustling shingle bolts, and later he obtained 
a position in the city water department, turning water off and on, at seventy-five 
dollars a month. 

In 1896 Mr. Perkins formed the Young Men's Republican Club. He had 
been active in politics ever since coming to Tacoma. He had a considerable 
acquaintance in the east and that, with the attention which the activities of the 
club attracted, enabled him to obtain the assistant secretaryship of the republican 
national committee. As soon as he had assumed the duties he became one of 
the movers in the organization of the American Republican College League, 
which acquired a large membership and had a notable influence in the campaign. 
In the course of the campaign he established confidential relations with Hon. 
Marcus A. Hanna, chairman of the committee, and he became Mr. Hanna's 
private secretary. When Mr. Hanna was elected to the United States senate 

5 



6 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Mr. Perkins continued as his private secretary, a position in which he was in- 
trusted with a large part of the correspondence of the national committee, of 
which Senator Hanna still was chairman, as well as with much other political 
work requiring ability and fidelity. 

In 1898, while still in Senator Hanna's employ, he bought the Tacoma Daily 
News and a part of the stock of the Ledger Company. Later he acquired the 
complete ownership of the Ledger. After buying the News he sent Albert John- 
son, a well known Washington city newspaper man, out to become its editor. 
Mr. Johnson is now a member of congress from this state. In 1901 he left 
Senator Hanna's office and came west to take personal charge of his properties. 
Neither of the papers then was on a profitable basis. He at once converted them 
into metropolitan papers and by careful business and editorial management made 
them profitable and gave them a state-wide circulation. Early in 1900 he 
acquired the Everett Herald and quickly put that on a much stronger basis. 
Later he acquired the Bellingham Herald, and the Bellingham American and 
Reveille, the Morning Olympian of Olympia, and he established the Daily 
Recorder, of Olympia. He owns the Tacoma Engraving Company and is 
vice president of the Pacific-Alaska S. S. Company, one of the large and 
progressive steamship concerns of the west coast, is vice president of the Pacific 
Coast Gypsum Company and is interested in other enterprises of importance. 
In 1906 he built the six story Perkins building at A and Eleventh streets, as a 
home for his Tacoma papers, and a year later a structure of the same size and 
architectural style was added to it. 

Of the leading papers in Washington his alone have been steadfast in their 
allegiance to the principles of republicanism, and they never have ridden the 
waves of populism, free-silverism and other passing political notions. It has 
been said of him he is "a hard fighter but he holds no postmortems," and many 
of his adversaries have become his best friends. His Tacoma papers were the 
first in the state to declare for woman suffrage and they have led in many other 
movements for better political and economic conditions. 

In 1912 Mr. Perkins became a member of the republican national committee 
and he was reelected last spring. He now is a member of the executive com- 
mittee and of the campaign committee. He never has aspired to public office and 
four years ago refused to accept a high diplomatic post. Few men have a larger 
acquaintance among American political and financial leaders. 

He has taken an active interest in good roads work and in 1911-12 wa? 
president of the Washington Good Roads Association. He has been closely 
connected with the city's commercial bodies and is on the board of managers 
of the Associated Charities. His charitable interests have been centered largely 
upon the Children's Home, the curing of deformed children and the education 
of boys. He is serving' his third term as commodore of the Tacoma Yacht club, 
and in 1911-12 was president of the Pacific International Power Boat Associa- 
tion. His yacht El Primero is one of the largest and handsomest on the Sound 
and probably no boat on the coast has been honored by entertaining so many 
distinguished men. i\mong them have been President Roosevelt, President Taft, 
Vice President Fairbanks, and many cabinet members, senators, congressmen 
and others of note. Mr. Perkins has one of the finest collections of autographed 
photographs in the countr>'. It embraces the portraits of most of the prominent 
men of the nation for nearly two decades. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 7 

On November 17, 1896, Mr. Perkins married Miss Ottilie Walther, daughter 
of a prominent St. Paul physician, and they have three children, Virginia Thorne, 
Ottilie Walther and Elinore Cleveland. As a Mason Mr. Perkins is a Knight 
Templar and a hfe member of the Shrine. He also is a Hfe member of the Elks 
and a Hfe member of the Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the Union, 
Commercial and Country clubs. The family live at 501 North D street. 



WERNER ANDREW RUPP. 

Werner Andrew Rupp, who since June i, 1908, has been publisher and editor 
of the Aberdeen World, has devoted his life to newspaper work since completing 
his college course and his activities have in considerable measure furthered the 
interests of the section in which he lives. A native of Adrian, Michigan, he was 
born April 25, 1880, his parents being Bernard Heinrich and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Hinman) Rupp. Becoming a resident of Washington in his boyhood days, he 
supplemented his early education by study in Whitman College at Walla Walla, 
from which he was graduated in June, 1899, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. He first took up the profession of teaching, but after a brief period 
turned his attention to the newspaper field and for six years was editorial writer 
on the Tacoma News of Tacoma, W^ashington. He had broad experience to fit 
him for his present interests and activities and on the ist of June, 1908, he 
became owner of the Aberdeen World, which he has since edited and published, 
making it one of the best newspapers of the western coast. 

On the 27th of April, 1909, at Boise, Idaho, Mr. Rupp was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Lyda Cox, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Cox, of that city. 
For a quarter of a century her father has been the partner of ex-Governor John 
Haines of Idaho. Mr. Rupp is a member of the Aberdeen Lodge of Elks, of the 
Grays Harbor Country Club, the University Club of Tacoma and the X Society 
of Whitman College. In politics he is an independent republican and has taken 
a prominent and active part in political affairs, serving as chairman of the repub- 
lican state central committee of Washington from 1912 until 1914. His military 
record covers service as second lieutenant of the O. R. C. National Guard of 
Washington. 



JAMES D. LOWMAN. 



James D. Lowman is a capitalist of Seattle, whose steady progression in busi- 
ness has brought him to a foremost place in the ranks of enterprising and suc- 
cessful men of the northwest. His plans have always been carefully formulated 
and with unfaltering determination he has carried them forward to successful 
completion. He was born at Leitersburg, Maryland, on the 5th of October, 1856, 
and in early manhood came to the northwest, establishing his home in Seattle in 
1877. His parents were Daniel S. and Caroline (Lytle) Lowman, the former 
of German lineage, while the latter came of English ancestry. They maintained 
their residence in Leitersburg during the boyhood of their son James, who there 



8 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

attended the public schools until graduated from the high school. He afterward 
engaged in teaching for one year but the opportunities of the growing northwest 
attracted him and in 1877 ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ '^^^ home to identify his interests with those 
of Washington. He was but twenty years of age when he arrived at Seattle, and 
securing the position as assistant wharf master on Yesler's wharf, he occupied 
that position through four years. In the meantime he carefully saved his earn- 
ings, prompted by the hope of one day engaging in business on his own account 
and after four years had been passed in the northwest he had a sufficient capital 
to enable him to purchase a half interest in the book store of W. H. Pumphrey, 
thus forming the firm of Pumphrey & Lowman. That relation was maintained 
for two years and at the end of that time he purchased his partner's interest, 
becoming sole proprietor. He afterward organized a stock company, however, 
and took over the job printing plant of Clarence Hanford, at which time the 
Lowman & Hanford Stationery & Printing Company was formed. Mr. Lowman 
has since been the president and principal stockholder in that undertaking and 
the business has been developed through all the passing years until it has become 
one of extensive proportions, yielding a most gratifying profit. 

The life of Mr. Lowman has been a most active, busy and resultant one. In 
1886 recognition of his ability came to him in appointment to the position of 
trustee of all of Henry L. Yesler's property and he assumed entire control and 
management thereof. That was at a period when there was widespread business 
depression throughout the entire Sound countr}'. There was little demand for 
real estate and security values had decreased to an alarming extent. The Yesler 
property was largely encumbered and it required the utmost watchfulness, care 
and business ability to so direct aft'airs that prosperity would accrue. Seattle 
knows the history of Mr. Lowman's eft"orts in that direction. He recognized 
and utilized every available opportunity and in a comparatively short space of 
time placed the business interests of the Yesler estate upon a firm and substantial 
basis, the property being greatly increased in value. A disastrous fire occurred 
on the 6th of June, 1889, destroying much of the property of the Yesler estate, 
yet notwithstanding this the direction of Mr. Lowman led from apparent defeat 
to victory in business management. Moreover, the efforts of Mr. Lowman in this 
and other connections have been a most important element in the improvement 
and development of the city. For the Yesler holdings he erected three of the 
finest business blocks in the city and made various other improvements elsewhere 
in Seattle. He organized the Yesler Coal, Wood & Lumber Company, built and 
operated a sawmill on Lake Washington, reached by the Seattle, Lake Shore & 
Eastern Railroad, and platted and laid out the town site of Yesler. In addition 
to all of the onerous and extensive duties devolving upon him in connection with 
those enterprises, he became administrator of Mrs. Yesler's estate by appoint- 
ment in 1887. That Mr. Lowman is a most forceful and resourceful business 
man, the public fully acknowledges. In his vocabulary there seems no such word 
as fail. He carefully considers every question and every phase of a business 
proposition before he acts upon it, but when once his mind is made up he is 
determined in his course and neither obstacles nor difficulties can bar him from 
his path. He knows that if one avenue of advancement is closed he can mark 
out another that will enable him to reach the desired goal. 

Outside of the extensive Yesler interests, Mr. Lowman at the same time 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 9 

developed and expanded his own private business affairs. In addition to acting 
as president of the Lowman & Hanford Stationery & Printing Company he became 
a trustee and the secretary of the Denny Hotel Company, a trustee and the largest 
stockholder in the Steam Heat & Power Company, was a trustee in the Guarantee 
Loan & Trust Company, the James Street Electric & Cable Railway Company 
and the Washington National Bank. He was president of and a large stockholder 
in the Seattle Theater Company, which built the Seattle Theater immediately 
after the fire, when there was no theater in the city. With Mr. Furth he obtained 
a franchise for the Stone & Webster Company, which succeeded in consolidating 
all the street car lines of the city into one organization. He also built the Lowman 
building and he is one of the trustees and vice president of The Union Savings 
& Trust Company. 

In 1881 Mr. Lowman was united in marriage to Miss Mary R. Emery, of 
Seattle. He is a member of the Rainier, Arctic, Seattle Athletic and Seattle Golf 
Clubs. For three successive terms he was president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. He is widely known in the city where for thirty-eight years he has made 
his home, and any student of Seattle history must recognize how important has 
been the part which he has played in its upbuilding and progress. His labors 
have ever been of a nature that have contributed to public prosperity as well as 
individual success and he may justly be regarded as one of the foremost promoters 
of this metropolis of the Sound country. 



CHARLES H. PARK. 



Charles H. Park, who since November, 1908, has been supervisor in charge of 
the forestry service of the Bellingham district, has resided in the northwest from 
early boyhood although born in Fairmount Springs, Pennsylvania, June 13, 1872. 
He is a son of Charles N. and Elizabeth R. Park, the former a native of Luzerne 
county, Pennsylvania, where he was reared and educated and afterward engaged 
in farming, following that pursuit in his native locality until 1877, when he removed 
to Cottonwood, Kansas, where he engaged in farming for six months. On the 
expiration of that period he became a resident of Gunnison county, Colorado, 
where he was employed on a ranch until 1880. He next became a surveyor for 
the United States government in Colorado and afterward went to Whatcom, now 
Bellingham, Washington, where he continued in the same line of work and also 
carried on farming near the city. In 1894 he returned to Colorado, settling at Hot 
Springs, where soon afterward he passed away. He was married in Fairmount 
Springs, Pennsylvania, to Elizabeth R. Harrison on the 4th of July, 1871, and they 
became the parents of six children : Charles H. ; Daisy R. and Hattie, both de- 
ceased ; Eppyphras, a resident of Fort Benton, Montana ; Frances E., who is teach- 
ing in Montana ; and Mrs. Rosie A. Smoot, also of Fort Benton. 

Charles H. Park was a little lad of but five years when his parents removed 
with their family to Colorado, where he attended the district schools until he 
reached the age of twelve years. The family home was then established in Belling- 
ham, Washington, where he was again a public school pupil for a year. FTe after- 
ward worked upon his father's farm until he reached the age of seventeen years 



10 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

and still later, anxious to improve his education, he attended the normal school at 
Lynden, Washington, in which he pursued his studies to the age of nineteen years. 
He afterward took up the profession of teaching, which he followed in Whatcom 
county for four years, and at the end of that period he turned his attention to the 
shingle business, in which he was engaged until April i, 1907. He afterward 
entered the United States forestry service as assistant supervisor in that depart- 
ment and in November, 1908, he was appointed supervisor in charge of the Belling- 
ham district, which position he now occupies. He is making an excellent record 
by the prompt and able manner in which he discharges his duties, and he thoroughly 
understands and meets the demands of the position. 



NICHOLAS B. CHALLACOMBE. 

Nicholas B. Challacom.be, engaged in the undertaking business in Everett, 
was born in Challacombe, Macoupin county, Illinois, November 18, 1861. His 
father, Nicholas Challacombe, Sr., a native of Devonshire, England, was a son 
of John Challacombe, the founder of the American branch of the family. He 
came to the new world in 1833, settling first in New York, and after six months 
he removed to Macoupin county, Illinois, casting in his lot with the pioneer settlers 
there. He followed agricultural pursuits and Nicholas Challacombe, Sr., took up 
the same line of work, continuing his residence in Macoupin county until he 
passed away at the old home place November 3, 1896, when he was seventy-two 
years of age. He was very active in local afifairs and for twenty years served 
as supervisor in Chesterfield tov.-nship. His political allegiance was always given 
to the republican party. He was also a prominent member of the Presbyterian 
church and for more than forty years served as an elder. In early manhood he 
wedded Nancy G. Carson, a native of Tennessee and a daughter of William Har- 
vey Carson, a representative of an old family of that state, of Scotch-Irish descent. 
An uncle of Mrs. Challacombe, Gideon Blackburn, was the founder of Blackburn 
University of Carlinville, Illinois. Mrs. Challacombe is still living on the old 
homestead, to which she went as a bride sixty-eight years ago, and she is still a 
member of the same Sunday-school, which she joined eighty-three years ago. 
She was born August 26, 1829, and Mr. Challacombe was born June 19. 1824. 
The former has therefore reached the age of eighty-seven years. By her 
marriage she became the mother of eight children, seven of whom are yet liv- 
ing: Mary E., who is the widow of Arthur Hartwell and resides at Challacombe, 
Illinois; Dora J., the widow of J. K. Butler, of Wenatchee, Washington; J. W., 
living at Challacombe, Illinois ; Fannie, the wife of J. S. Searles, of Medora, Illi- 
nois; Nicholas B. ; IMabel, the wife of A. L. Birchard, secretary of the board 
of education of Everett, Washington ; and Professor Wesley A. Challacombe, 
who is professor of mathematics in Blackburn University at Carlinville, Illinois. 

After attending the country schools Nicholas B. Challacombe continued his 
education in Blackburn University at Carlinville, Illinois, and in Brown's Business 
College at Jacksonville, that state. His youthful days were spent upon the home 
farm and after he had attained his majority he took up the study of undertaking, 
being graduated from the Barnes College of Embalming in Chicago in 1898. He 




NICHOLAS B. CIL\LLAC0:MBE 



^THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRAFY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATIOK 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 13 

first entered the undertaking business at Greenfield, Illinois, where he remained 
for three years, and in 1901 he arrived in Everett, Washijigton, where he estab- 
lished business at No. 2812 Rockefeller avenue. He has since been active in that 
line and now has a well appointed undertaking establishment, containing a beau- 
tiful chapel in which services can be held, and private rooms for families. This 
is one of the finest chapels in Washington and his equipment is all first class. He 
has built up a business of gratifying proportions, meeting with well merited 
success. 

At Springfield, Illinois, June 18, 1889, ^^^- Challacombe wa-s united in mar- 
riage to Miss Anna Dannel, a native of Jersey county, Illinois, and a daughter of 
John and Mary (Palmer) Dannel, who were early settlers of that section and are 
now deceased. Two sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Challacombe. Stowell, 
born in Challacombe, Illinois, June 30, 1890, is now connected with the Ewart 
Lumber Company, of Cashmere, Washington. Arthur D., born June i, 1896, 
resides in Everett. He entered West Point July 14, 1916, but on account of not 
being able to distinguish colors well he returned home in October, 1916. The 
elder son married Emily Irvine, a native of Everett and a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin Irvine, early settlers of that city. There is one child of that mar- 
riage, Eileen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Challacombe occupy a pleasant home at No. 2601 Hoyt street, 
which property they own. He is a member of the Commercial Club and he 
exercises his right of franchise in support: Of the liien and measures of the repub- 
lican party. He is connected' with tlie Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Masons, the Red Men, the Woodmen of the World and the Modern Woodmen of 
America, all of Everett; is a member of the Washington State Undertakers Asso- 
ciation, and for the past fifteen years he has been an elder of the First Presby- 
terian church of Everett. His life has been guided by high and honorable prin- 
ciples and worthy motives and his many good qualities of heart and mind, com- 
bined with his business ability and his loyalty in citizenship, have established him 
in a notable position in public regard. 



FRANK DRAKE, Jr. 



Among the prominefit educators of Washington is Frank Drake, Jr., who is 
now so efficiently filling the position of superintendent of schools in Port Town- 
send. He was born on the 14th of February, 1881, in Welmore, Kansas, his 
parents being Irving Oliver and Katherine (Crowley) Drake, both natives of 
New York state, though they were married in Chicago, Illinois. During the 
Civil war the father was one of the mechanics in the employ of the government 
and as such assisted in building the Merrimac. In 1870 he removed to Kansas 
and continued to make his home there until called to his final rest in 1892 at the 
age of fifty-two years. His widow, who was born in 1843, is still living and 
makes her home in Emporia, that state. 

Frank Drake is the sixth in order of birth in a family of eight children, 
there being four sons and four daughters. He began his education in the public 
schools and later attended the Kansas State Normal School at Emporia, from 



U WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

which he was graduated in 1906. Later he was a student at the Kansas State 
University and was graduated from that institution in 1908. While still in school 
he served as a reporter for the Kansas City Times and later for the Denver Post 
and the Cheyenne Tribune, but after leaving the university turned his attention 
to educational work, teaching in the schools of Kansas for a time. He served 
as city superintendent of schools, both in Perry and Ellis, Kansas, and during 
the summer months devoted his time to newspaper work until 1912. In 1910 
he removed to Wyoming to become superintendent of the schools of Cody and 
while there he also served as deputy county assessor of Park county. On 
leaving there he came to Washington and accepted the principalship of the 
high school at Mossyrock, where he remained one term. Mr. Drake was then 
chosen principal of the high school at Centralia, where he spent two years. In 
191 5 he was made superintendent of the schools of Port Townsend and has 
since filled that position in a most creditable and acceptable manner. He is also 
a lawyer, having been admitted to the bar in Kansas in 1908 and in Wyoming 
in 1912. 

Mr. Drake was married in Lawrence, Kansas, June 8, 1909, to Miss Cora 
Viets, a native of that place .and a daughter of Clinton Viets, a well-known stock 
raiser of Lawrence. They have three children : Marguerite, born in Cody, 
Wyoming, in 191 1; Theodore, born in Centralia, Washington, in 1913; and 
Robert, born in Port Townsend, in 1916. 

Mr. and Mrs. Drake are members of the Presbyterian church and he also 
belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. In politics he is a republican. He has 
been identified with military afifairs, having served as second lieutenant in the 
Third Regiment, Wyoming National Guard, while a resident of Cody, and stood 
second in marksmanship in that state, his official score being ninety-six out of one 
hundred at three diflferent ranges — two hundred, six hundred and one thousand 
yards. He takes great pleasure in outdoor sports and is especially fond of big 
game hunting. He has devoted much time to the study of wild game and zoology, 
but these things have been only a recreation as his chief interest lies in his educa- 
tional work and he now occupies a prominent place" among the leading educators 
of his part of the state. 



HON. JOSEPH IRVING. 

Hon. Joseph Irving, president of the Sultan Railway & Timber Company, 
has not only figured prominently in connection with the utilization of the natural 
resources of the state, but also in framing its laws, having been a member of the 
state legislature. He was born in Liverpool, England, December 30, 1868, a 
son of Thomas Irving, a native of that country, where he successfully engaged 
in merchandising until his death, which occurred in Liverpool when he was forty- 
eight years of age. He married Frances G. Scott, who was also a native of that 
country and passed away at the old home in Liverpool in 191 2. when seventy- 
eight years of age. In their family were five sons and two daughters, of whom 
five are yet living. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 15 

Joseph Irving, who was the fifth in order of birth, acquired his education in 
the pubHc schools of Liverpool and in the Shaw Business College of that city, 
which he attended for a year. When a youth of nineteen he started out to earn 
his own living and, attracted by the opportunities of the new world, sailed for 
Canada in 1887, settling in Brome county. He first secured employment as a 
farm hand, receiving a wage of twenty-five dollars per month and board. After 
one year thus spent he became/ a clerk in the Lake View Hotel at Knowlton, Brome 
county, Canada, also holding that position for one year. Then he was married, 
after which he came to Washington on his wedding trip. So pleased was he 
with the country that he decided to remain and immediately sought employment 
in Tacoma, where his first work was that of driving a team for a grading company 
in the old town. He next secured the position of clerk in the Grand Pacific 
Hotel, with which he remained until February, 1892, when he resigned and became 
clerk in the Hotel Monte Cristo at Everett, which was owned by the Everett Land 
Company that had started the town. Soon afterward he took entire management 
of the hotel, which he ably conducted for four years and then leased the hotel, 
which was the first hostelry in Everett and he the pioneer hotel man. He con- 
ducted the hotel on his own account for three years and during the latter part 
of that period also entered upon the contracting business, supplying the Everett 
Pulp & Paper Company with materials for their factory. He also engaged in 
the general bolt and shingle business, following these various lines successfully 
for a number of years. He afterward turned his attention to logging and has 
been active in that field continuously since, developing his interests along sub- 
stantial lines until he is now controlling important interests as president of the 
Sultan Railway & Logging Company. He was also one of the organizers and 
is the president of the Puget Sound Log Scaling Bureau, remaining as its chief 
executive officer throughout the period of its existence. There is no feature of 
the logging trade in the northwest with which he is not familiar and his enter- 
prise and efiforts have placed him in a prominent position in his chosen field of 
business. He has recognized the natural advantages of the state and utilized its 
resources in the acquirement of a substantial competence for himself and family, 
while at the same time his activities have been of a character that have con- 
tributed to public enterprise and prosperity. 

In June, 1890, Mr. Irving was rnarried in Montreal, Canada, to Miss Julia 
Adele Prime, a native of Canada and a daughter of Dr. T. M. Prime, who died 
in 191 3. Her mother, who bore the maiden name of Amity R. Page, belongs 
to an old \"ermont family of English descent that removed from the Green 
Mountain state to Canada. Mrs. Prime is still living at the age of seventy-nine 
years and makes her home with her daughter in Everett. Mr. and Mrs. Irving 
have become the parents of the following named : Joseph, who is associated 
with his father in the logging business; Winifred F.. who is a graduate of the 
State University and is now a student in the Normal School ; Thomas R., Lillian 
Julia ; Peggy Marie ; and Robert Washington. 

A home at 2930 Hoyt street is owned and occupied by the family and in 
religious faith they are Episcopalians. Mr. Irving is also prominent in fraternal 
circles, belonging to the Masonic lodge at Everett and to the Elks lodge, of 
which he is a life member. Something of the nature of his recreation is indicated 
in his membership in the Cascade Club, of which he has been president, in the 



16 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Everett Country and Golf Club, of which he has been captain, and the Seattle 
Country and Golf Club. That he is interested in community affairs is indicated 
by his membership in the Commercial Club of Everett, with which he co- 
operates heartily in plans and projects for the city's upbuilding. His activity, 
however, has covered a much wider scope. He is recognized as one of the active 
republicans of Washington and has long been a member of the republican central 
committee of Everett, on which he has served on all of the committees. He was 
elected to the state legislature, serving during the administration of Governor 
Mead, and he was a member of the forest fire commission under appointment of 
Governor Mead and also under appointment of Governor Hay, having served for 
six years in that office. While a legislator he became the father of the forest 
iire bill, taking charge of and preparing the bill which became the first law 
of the kind in the state. He closely studied the questions which are of vital 
interest to the commonwealth and gave his aid and influence in support of many 
plans and measures that have resulted beneficially to the state. 



HARRY HENKE. 



Harry Henke, prominent in business circles as assistant manager of the Fleisch- 
mann Company at Sumner and active in civic connections as mayor of the city, 
found in the growing west scope for his industry and enterprise — his dominant 
traits of character. He has lived in Sumner since 191 1, having been transferred 
from the western division of The Fleischmann Company at Cincinnati to the coast 
division to fill the office of assistant manager at Sumner in 191 1. 

He was born in Cincinnati, December 25, 1881, and supplemented his high 
school education by study in the University of Cincinnati and by a civil engineering 
course in the Armour Institute of Technology in Chicago. He left that school in 
1901 and for six years followed the profession of civil engineer but in 1907 entered 
the employ of the Fleischmann corporation in his native city, there continuing until 
his transference to Sumner. The company has eleven different factories and began 
construction of its Sumner plant over five years ago, completing it in one year. 
The work was carried on ceaselessly day and night and almost all the machinery 
and equipment were made in Germany especially for this plant, which covers an 
area of eleven and nine-tenths acres. The plant represents an outlay of over five 
hundred thousand dollars and employs seventy-five people. The buildings are 
fireproof throughout. There is a famous well with a flow of one million five 
hundred thousand gallons of water daily, one hundred per cent pure. It was this 
well that induced the company to establish its plant at Sumner. The daily output 
of yeast is between four and five tons and the by-products are vinegar and dry 
feed, the daily output being three thousand gallons of one hundred grain vinegar 
and several tons of dry feed. F. E. Clarke is manager of the company's coast 
division, with H. Henke as assistant manager and W. B. Stephens superintendent 
of manufacture. The business is now one of the important productive industries 
of this section of the state and Mr. Henke's position is one of responsibility. 

In 1904 occurred the marriage of Mr. Henke and Miss Josie Thornbury, of 
Cincinnati, a representative of one of the oldest American families and a direct 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 17 

descendant of Sir Walter Thornbury. They have one son, Harry, Jr., ten years 
of age. Mr. Henke gives his political allegiance to the republican party. In 
Masonry he has taken the degrees of the York Rite, has attained the thirty-second 
degree of the Scottish Rite and is a member of xA.fifi Temple of the Mystic Shrine 
at Tacoma. He belongs to both the Sumner Commercial Club and the Tacoma 
Commercial Club and cooperates heartily in their efforts to upbuild the west and 
promote its development, which is already so great as to seem almost magical. 
His own business ability is demonstrated by his successive promotions in the 
employ of the Fleischmann Company, with which his position is now one of large 
responsibility. 



HUGH W. DIEHL. 



Hugh W. Diehl, president, treasurer and general manager of the Diehl & 
Simpson Ford agency for Whatcom county, has in this connection built up a 
business of mammoth proportions and his success is the merited reward of close 
application and indefatigable energy. He has lived in Bellingham from the age 
of ten years and in his life record has exemplified the typical spirit of enterprise 
in the northwest. He was born in Mattoon, Illinois, September 19, 1879, and in 
1882 was taken by his parents, J. H. and Minnie Diehl, to Willow Lake, South 
Dakota, where he attended the public schools until he reached the age of ten years. 
He then accompanied his parents to Bellingham and again became a public school 
pupil, passing through consecutive grades to the high school, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1899. He started out in the business world as an 
employe of the Bellingham Bay Improvement Mill Company, piling lumber, while 
later he was engaged at tallying lumber until he reached the age of twenty years, 
when he decided to attend Wilson's Business College, in which he spent three 
months. Later he secured a position with Charles Stanbra, with whom he learned 
the bicycle business, and subsequently became a partner of Mr. Stanbra, this 
association being maintained until 1909. Mr. Diehl then sold his interest and 
formed a partnership with C. R. Simpson under the name of the Diehl & Simpson 
Ford agency for Whatcom county. In February, 191 6, they incorporated the 
business, Mr. Diehl being elected president, treasurer and general manager, with 
Mr. Simpson as vice president and secretary. During the first year of the com- 
pany's existence they sold thirty cars and in the year 1915 two hundred and fifty 
cars. Since they have been in business they have sold altogether one thousand 
cars and their trade has now reached very extensive and gratifying proportions. 
They employ twenty-two people and have an annual pay roll of twenty-eight 
thousand dollars. They occupy a building which was erected especially for them, 
a two story structure, modern in every way. The first floor is devoted to the sales 
rooms and repair department, while the second floor is used as the assem.bling 
department. 

In Bellingham, on the 15th of June, 1910, Mr. Diehl was married to Miss Eliza- 
beth Sanders, and they have two children : Robert, three years of age ; and 
Dorothy, in her first year. Mr. Diehl votes with the republican party and is con- 
versant with the vital political problems of the country but does not seek nor desire 
office. His fraternal connection is with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 



18 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Success is his because he displays the qualities necessary to commercial progress — 
close application, indefatigable energy and thorough reliability. He is a successful 
salesman and also possesses the executive force necessary to manage and develop 
the business which he has built up. 



C. D. CUNNINGHAM. 



C. D. Cunningham, who is now successfully engaged in the practice of law 
at Centralia, Washington, was born in Auburn, Kansas, on the 29th of July, 1882, 
his parents being E. L. and Julia (Kendall) Cunningham, both natives of Ohio. 
He was reared on his father's farm and in early life became thoroughly familiar 
with agricultural pursuits. He attended the public schools of the Sunflower state 
and later entered Washburn College at Topeka, Kansas, from which he was 
graduated in 1905 with the degree of A. B. He then took up the study of law 
and was graduated from the law department of the University of Washington 
in 1908 with the degree of LL.B. 

Immediately after his graduation Mr. Cunningham located in Centralia, 
Washington, opening an office here in June, 1908. As time has passed he has 
built up a good practice that is constantly increasing, for his fellow citizens 
recognize his ability and he now ranks among the leading attorneys of Lewis 
county. He was elected for two terms as prosecuting attorney of the county, 
but resigned before the end of the second term in order to give his entire time 
to his general practice. 

Mr. Cunningham was married in Seattle in 191 2 to Miss ]\Iame Joack. and 
they have a little son, A. Byron, now two years of age. The family reside at 
218 Magnolia street, Centralia. Since attaining his majority Mr. Cunningham 
has always affiliated with the republican party and has taken a deep interest 
in public affairs. He is a prominent member of the Lewns County Bar Association 
and is also connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is a 
man of recognized ability and is justly numbered among the leading lawyers of 
the Community. 



EARLE L. FRANCE. 



Earle L. France, an enterprising citizen of Elma who is cashier of the Bank 
of Elma, was bom in Colorado in 1883 and in 1889 was brought to western 
Washington by his father, George W. France, who settled in Hoquiam and 
who is further mentioned in this work in connection with the sketch of his 
son, W. H. France, of Montesano. Earle L. France was at that time a little 
lad of six years. He at once began his education in the schools of Hoquiam 
and when his textbooks were put aside he entered the field of banking, believ- 
ing that he would find in it a congenial vocation. He was appointed assistant 
cashier of the Montesano State Bank, in which capacity he served for several 
years. In 1903 that bank opened a branch known as the Bank of Elma and 
Mr. France was placed in charge. In 1906 this was organized into a separate 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 19 

institution under the same name, with A. D. Devonshire, of Montesano, as 
president, George W. Ninemire as vice president and Earle L. France as 
cashier. In 191 1 George Simpson succeeded to the position of vice president 
and is now acting in that capacity. They erected a modern and substantial 
bank building in 1906 and an excellent business is now being carried on. Mr. 
France has had charge of the bank continuously since its organization, being 
the chief directing spirit in establishing its policy and promoting its develop- 
ment. 

In 1905, in Montesano, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. France and 
Miss Leo Fosnot and to them have been bom two daughters, Elizabeth and 
Lillian. Fraternally Mr. France is connected with the Masons and the Knights 
lof Pythias at Elma and with the Elks lodge at Aberdeen. In politics he is a 
republican and is active in all affairs of the town. He has served as a member 
of the city council and he cooperates in all plans and measures for the general 
good. Realizing the value of organized effort for the benefit of the com- 
munity, he became one of the founders of the Elma Commercial Club and was 
its president in 1910 and 191 1. His efforts in behalf of the city have been far- 
reaching and effective and he is justly accounted one of the representative busi- 
ness men and citizens of Elma. 



VIGGO KRIEGER. 



Viggo Krieger, president of the Krieger Laundry at Everett, is a native of 
Denmark. He was born March 4, 1888, a son of Adolph and Alexandria (Gats- 
feller) Krieger, who were also natives of that country, where they were reared 
and married. In 1892 the father crossed the Atlantic to the United States and the 
following year took up his abode in Everett, where soon afterward he established 
the Everett Laundry, the first business of the kind in the city. He remained an 
active factor in the management and control of the business to the time of his 
death, which occurred March 14, 1915, in Everett, when he was fifty-two years 
of age. A year after his arrival in the new world he was joined by his wife and 
the children, and she yet makes her home in Everett. Viggo Krieger was the 
eldest in a family of three children, the others being Ellen, the wife of Walter 
Pollock, residing in Saskatchewan, Canada ; and Lesso, living in Everett. 

Viggo Krieger was a little lad of but five years at the time he was brought 
by his mother to the new world and in the public schools of Everett he pursued 
his education, devoting his time largely to his studies until he reached the age 
of sixteen. He afterward served an apprenticeship at the painting and paper 
hanging trade, which he followed for six years, at the end of which time he 
became the active assistant of his father in the laundry business and has since 
been engaged in that field of labor. The business was incorporated in 19 12 under 
the name of the Krieger Laundry Company, of which he is now the president 
and treasurer, with his mother as vice-president and secretary. The plant is 
modern in every detail and theirs is one of the largest enterprises of the kind 
in the city, furnishing employment to twenty-five people. They maintain a high 
standard of excellence in the work and Mr. Krieger is thoroughly competent 



20 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

to direct the labors of those whom he employs, for he is himself a thorough and 
competent laundryman, having worked in all departments of the business from 
that of driver up. He also studies the needs of the trade and its opportunities 
and is gradually enlarging his interests. His plant is located at No. 2808 Hoyt 
street and covers a floor space forty by one hundred and twenty feet. For the 
collection and delivery of laundry three wagons are utilized. 

On the 1st of March, 1908, Mr. Krieger was married in Everett to Miss 
Anna Dolwet, who is of German descent, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Dolwet, who are now residents of Everett. The wedding was celebrated on the 
anniversary of Mrs. Krieger's birth and they have become the parents of two 
children: Walter, born in Everett, June i, 1910; and Albert, November 13, 1912. 
Mr. Krieger owns their home, which is situated at 2001 Broadway. 

In politics Mr. Krieger is a republican, but has never been a politician in the 
sense of office seeking. He belongs to the Danish Brotherhood of Everett and 
the Yeomen and to the Lutheran church and is interested in many forces which 
work for the uplift of the individual and the upbuilding of the community. He 
is leading a busy and useful life in the line of his chosen vocation and success in 
substantial measure is rewarding his labors. 



PETER F. CLARK. 



A popular and most capable official is Peter F. Clark, city clerk of Aberdeen. 
He was born in Canada, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter S. Clark. The former, 
a native of New York, removed to Canada, where he married Miss Ellen 
Fleming. In 1856 they removed to Lansing, Michigan, where the father engaged 
in the foundry business and where they made their home for many years. 
The father passed away at St. Louis, Missouri, and the mother died at Mason, 
Michigan. They had a family of eleven children, but three of whom are living, 
viz. : Peter F. ; Lewis, who is living in Detroit, Michigan ; and Mrs. Mary Fitch, 
of Lansing. 

Peter F. Clark attended the public schools in Lansing until he reached the 
age of fourteen. Like many another boy, he was desirous of escaping from what 
he regarded as the irksomeness and tedium of the schoolroom, so that his father 
put him to work on a ranch which he owned. Neither did he find ranch life 
congenial, so that his father took him into the foundry and he there learned the 
molder's trade. He spent about thirty-three years in the middle west at that busi- 
ness and in July, 1888, arrived in Aberdeen, where he assisted in building and 
placing in operation the first foundry of Grays Harbor, there working for some 
time in what was known as the William Minor foundry. He was called to public 
office in 1892, serving as a member of the city council in that and the succeeding 
year. For sixteen months he had charge of the city water works and he also 
served as city treasurer. During President Cleveland's administration he served 
for one term as postmaster of Aberdeen and then continued for three years 
and nine months as deputy postmaster under C. R. Bell, who succeeded him in 
Harrison's administration. In January, 1903, he became city clerk, which position 
he is still filling, having already been the incumbent in the office for thirteen 



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PETER F. CLARK 



■ THE NEW YORK 
PaBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LEN,OX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 23 

years. No higher testimonial could be given, for his long incumbency indicates 
unmistakably his capability, fidelity and the confidence reposed in him. 

In December, 1868, Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. 
Balcom, a native of Michigan. Their son, Charles N., is a resident of Aber- 
deen. Mrs. Clark, after a few months of illness, died October 6, 1916. 
Mr. Clark is a prominent Mason, having passed through all the chairs in the 
lodge, and his membership extends also to the commandery and the Mystic 
Shrine. He is likewise a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is a splendid type of American manhood and chivalry, is interested in educa- 
tional work, is public-spirited to a marked degree and counts no personal sacrifice 
or efl^ort on his part too great if it will promote the interests of his city. Moreover, 
he is ever courteous and genial — in a word, a likable man whose circle of friends 
is coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



JOHN E. CAMPBELL. 

John E. Campbell, president of the Port Angeles Daily Herald Company, has 
through his active life been identified first with the lumber industry and since 
with newspaper publication. He was born at Burnside, Lapeer county, Michigan, 
October 28, 1880. His father, John Campbell, a native of Scotland, came to 
America in 1870, settling first at Port Hiiron, Michigan, in which state he 
.remained until 1902, when he became a resident of Everett, Washington. He 
wedded Jane Twase, also a native of Scotland, and they became the parents of 
five children. '■ . .' ' 

John E. Campbell, the youngest of the three sons, was educated in the country 
schools of Michigan and at the age of fourteen years started out to provide for 
his own support, being first employed in the lumber camps of his native state. He 
followed lumbering and mill work until 1905. He came to Washington with his 
father in 1902, settling at Everett, and for three years there after was identified 
with the lumber industry in this state. After leaving the mills he purchased an 
interest in the Labor Journal, a publication devoted to the interests of organized 
labor in Everett. He became manager of the paper and so continued for six 
years. At length he sold his interest in the Everett paper and purchased the 
Port Angeles Daily Herald, formerly known as the Bee. It was then a weekly 
publication, but he has since converted it into a daily and has made it one of the 
attractive journals published in his section of the state, embodying all the ideas 
of most progressive journalism. He uses the Associated Press News Service 
and his paper is thoroughly up-to-date in every particular. His plant is equipped 
with the latest improved presses and other machinery such as is found in first 
class offices of the country, and the paper now has a large and satisfactory cir- 
culation, seventeen hundred copies being issued daily. Mr. Campbell devotes all 
of his time and attention to the paper and is president and manager of the 
company, with Arthur V. Watts as editor. The paper maintains a somewhat 
independent political course, with leaning toward the republican party. 

On the 30th of March, 1902, Mr. Campbell was married in Kalkaska, Michi- 
gan, to Miss Phoebe E. Collar, who was born at that place and is a daughter 

Vol. ni— 2 



24 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

of H. O. Collar, one of the pioneer settlers there. Air. Campbell has membership 
in Xaval Lodge, No. 353, B. P. O. E. He belongs to the Commercial Club and 
is deeply interested in matters of public import aftecting the welfare of his 
community and of the commonwealth. In 1908 he was elected on the republican 
ticket to represent his district in the state legislature and afterward served in the 
state senate as a representative of the progressive party from 1913 to 191 5. He 
was also nominated in Snohomish county for the United States congress, and 
although defeated in his district, he carried his home county, which indicated 
his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him by those who knew 
him best. He has ever taken an active interest in civic and political afifairs, his 
influence and aid always being given on the side of progress, reform and 
improvement. 



CHARLES EDWIN FLANERY. 

From the period of Everett's founding Charles Edwin Flanery has been 
identified with its development and upbuilding through his real estate opera- 
tions and is one of the well known business men of the city. A native of Iowa, 
he was born in Fremont county. December 16, i860, a son of James Flanery, 
whose birth occurred in Buchanan county, Missouri, although he spent the 
early part of his life in \^irginia. where the family had lived through several 
generations. They came of Irish and Scotch ancestry, the founder of the fam-^ 
ily in the new world having been the great-great-grandfather of Charles E. 
Flanery, who was one of the early settlers of the Old Dominion. Representa- 
tives of the family participated in the Revolutionary^ war and in the War of 
1812. 

James Flanerj' became a successful agriculturist and during the latter part 
of his life was a resident of Everett, Washington, having removed to this city 
on the 4th of July, 1900. He retired from active life and spent his last years 
in the home of his son, Charles E., passing away in Everett at the age of 
seventy-six years. The military spirit which actuated his forbears during those 
periods when the country needed the armed aid of her loyal sons was also 
manifest in him, for he serv'ed as a soldier of the Mexican war. He married 
Senah N. Simmons, a native of North Carolina and a representative of one of 
its old families of Scotch lineage. The Simmons were among the prominent 
people of that state, being well known as iron manufacturers and owners of 
large plantations and many slaves. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Flanery 
had over one hundred slaves, but becoming convinced that the practice of hold- 
ing people in bondage was utterly wrong, he espoused the abolition cause and 
freed all his slaves before the Civil war. His political allegiance was given to 
the democratic party and his religious faith was that of the ^^lethodist church. 
James Flanery became a member of the Baptist church and his ancestors were 
originally Calvinists. His wife, like her husband, spent her declining years in 
the home of her son, Charles E., and there passed away January 18, 1906, at the 
age of seventy-three years. 

Charles Edwin Flanery is the only survivor in their family of six children. 
He was educated in the common schools of Iowa and at the age of eleven years 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 25 

he entered mercantile circles, thus making a very early start in business life. 
Removing to the northwest in 1891, he spent five months in Lowell and on the 
1 6th of July of that year arrived in Everett. In the early days of his residence 
there he took up the real estate business, in which he has since been actively 
engaged, winning a substantial measure of success as the years have gone on. 
He promoted the Climax addition, also surveyed the first and second additions 
located north of Hewitt and west of Rucker streets respectively. His life has 
been one of intense and well directed activity. Not only has he conducted ex- 
tensive operations in the field of real estate but has also promoted various com- 
panies which have been factors in the utilization of the natural resources of 
the country and its continuous development. He promoted and organized the 
Martin Creek Copper Company at Silverton, Washington, and at the present 
time is organizing a gold mining company. His labors have constituted an 
effective and important element in advancing public progress. 

On the 31st of December, 1887, at Akron, Colorado, Mr. Flanery was mar- 
ried to Miss Elizabeth E. Shonefelt, a native of Michigan, who died in that 
state December 24, 1890, leaving a daughter, Yuna, who was born at Akron, 
Colorado, in November, 1888, and is now the wife of John Bale, a resident of 
South Bend, Indiana. 

In politics Mr. Flanery has always been a stalwart democrat, and while an 
active party worker, has never sought nor desired office. In fact he has always 
declined to serve in political positions, save that from 1884 until 1889, during 
the administration of President Cleveland, he was postmaster at Akron, Colo- 
rado. He was made a Mason there in 1887 and he now has membership in the 
Royal Arch chapter at Everett. He also belongs to the Methodist church and 
these associations indicate the high principles which govern him in all of life's 
relations. He is a member of the Commercial Club and is interested in all that 
pertains to the welfare and progress of his city and state. His is the record of 
a self-made man, for from the age of eleven years he has been dependent upon 
his own resources. He early came to recognize the force and value of indus- 
try and determination and throughout his entire business career has followed 
the old adage that honesty is the best policy. In early manhood he was the main 
support of his parents and he has always cheerfully and courageously borne 
the burdens which have developed upon him and through indefatigable and 
earnest efifort has worked his way steadily upward. 



HON. JOHN HARTE McGRAW. 

The name of John Harte McGraw is indelibly impressed upon the history 
of Seattle and the northwest, for he did much to shape public opinion at a most 
trying period in the history of the city and, more than that, he gave evidence 
of the fact that neither fear nor favor could swerve him from a course which he 
believed to be right. Throughout his entire career he was the exponent of that 
system of law and order which must ever constitute the basis of a growing, sub- 
stantial commonwealth; and in days when public afi'airs moved on calmly and 
quietly, with the serenity that grows out of an established order, he proved his 



26 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

ability in business ways by handling important financial interests. In a word, he 
seemed adequate to every occasion and to every demand made upon him and his 
ability placed him among the most distinguished representatives of Washington's 
citizenship. 

In that far-off American district known as the Pine Tree state, Mr. McGraw 
was born, his natal place being the Barker plantation in Penobscot county, Maine, 
while his natal day was October 4, 1850. He was descended from Irish ancestry, 
being a son of Daniel and Catherine (Harte) McGraw, both of whom were 
natives of Ireland. Coming to America in 1848, they landed at New York and 
thence made their way to Penobscot county, Maine, where the father conducted 
a lumber business until his death, which was occasioned by accidental drowning 
in the Penobscot river in 185 1. He was a man of industry and of marked probity 
of character and his wife and children thus sustained a great loss in his passing. 
His widow afterward married again and departed this Hfe in 1890. 

John H. McGraw was a lad of eight years at the time of his mother's second 
marriage. Disagreement with his stepfather led him to leave home when he 
was a youth of fourteen, his mother consenting to this step. He was thus early 
thrown upon his own resources and from that time forward he made his way 
in the world unaided. Up to that time he had had the opportunity to attend school 
a few months each year. It was with difficulty that he gained a start but he 
early recognized the eternal principle that industry wins and he relied upon that 
quality for advancement. He soon secured a clerkship in a general merchandise 
store and when but seventeen years of age was employed as manager of a busi- 
ness of that kind, acting in that capacity for four years. He then established 
business on his own account, embarking in merchandising in connection with a 
brother older than himself. 

His study of western conditions led him to determine to try his fortune upon 
the Pacific coast and in 1876 he made the long journey across the continent to 
San Francisco, where he arrived in July. After a brief period there passed 
he continued northward to Seattle, reaching his destination on the 28th of Decem- 
ber. It was not long afterward before he secured a clerkship in the Occidental 
Hotel and later he conducted a small hotel on his own account but subsequently 
suft"ered losses through fire, which swept away all of the earnings of his former 
years. At that date he sought a position on the police force, which then numbered 
only four members. The capability with which he discharged his duties in that 
connection led to his election to the office of city marshal. He was chosen to the 
position on the republican ticket and the city council also made him chief of 
police. In this connection a contemporary writer has said : "In these positions 
his popularity as a citizen and officer continued to grow, and a year later he was 
nominated by his party as its candidate for sheriff of the county of King to fill 
an unexpired term. He was elected and twice reelected to the same office, and 
it was during his third term that the anti-Chinese trouble began. A serious con- 
flict was threatened between the law-abiding and law-defying citizens, but it soon 
became known that Sheriff McGraw would uphold law and order, no matter 
what it might cost him personally, and by his tact and capable management the 
trouble and conflict were averted ; but notwithstanding the commendable course 
taken by him, it seriously detracted from his popularity, arousing the opposition 
of those who sympathized with the lawless element, and when he was nominated 
for reelection in 1886 he was defeated, together with the others on the ticket." 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 27 

During his connection with the administration of the law Mr. McGraw had 
gained considerable knowledge concerning legal principles and following his re- 
tirement from the office of sheriff he began studying and later passed the required 
examination that secured him admission to the bar. He then entered into partner- 
ship with Judge Roger S. Green and Judge C. H. Hanford, both eminent jurists, 
and a little later Joseph McNaught was added to the firm under the style of 
Green, Hanford, McNaught & McGraw. The professional career of Mr. McGraw 
proved both enviable and successful, but in political circles his ability was 
recognized and the public were loath to lose his service. He was again induced 
to become a candidate for the office of sheriff, his supporters urging that it would 
be well for him to accept the nomination in order that the people of the county 
might have the chance to show that in the opportunity for calm judgment which 
had come they approved his course in connection with the anti-Chinese riots which 
by his former defeat they had seemed to condemn. At the election of 1888 he 
was chosen for the office by an overwhelming majority and again he bent every 
energy toward the faithful discharge of the duties of that position and the main- 
tenance of law and order. He would have been again nominated had he not 
positively declined to once more become a candidate. He felt that he had given 
sufficient service to the public and he now wished to give his attention to private 
business affairs, for he had been elected president of the First National Bank and 
wished to become in truth as well as in name the chief executive of that insti- 
tution. He remained at its head for seven years and carefully directed its 
interests. 

Again the people demanded that he enter public life. Many of his fellow 
citizens urged him to accept the candidacy for governor and at length he con- 
sented. The election returns showed him to be the popular candidate and from 
January, 1893, until January, 1897, he directed the affairs of the commonwealth 
with the same capability that he displayed when sheriff and as a bank official. His 
entire administration was characterized by needed reforms and improvements. 
Progress was his watchword and at the close of his term papers of various 
political complexions spoke of him in terms of warm praise and regard, acknowl- 
edging the dignity and ability with which he had sustained the honors of the 
office. One paper said : "It is to the lasting credit of the ex-governor that general 
public sentiment approves his administration as honest, faithful, zealous and con- 
spicuously businesslike. He has been the tool of no combination, but has preserved 
clear-sighted mastery of his own convictions at all times. His state papers have 
been models of clearness and directness and show a mind well stocked and well 
balanced. American 'gumption' pervades these papers and no lover of the 
state will ever turn from their perusal with lessened respect for their distinguished 
author." A paper of the opposition party said: "He is a growing man; has 
studied and worked hard to make himself competent to discharge the duties 
devolving upon him, and his administration has been creditable to himself and 
party." When Governor McGraw laid aside the affairs of state he gave his 
attention largely to the management of his mining interests on the Yukon river 
in Alaska and to the control of his real-estate investments there. 

In 1874 was celebrated the marriage of Governor McGraw and Miss May L. 
Kelly, a native of Maine and a representative of an old New England family. 



28 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

They became the parents of a daughter and son : Kate Edna, now the wife of 
Fred H. Baxter, of Seattle; and Mark Thomas, who has important mining inter- 
ests in Alaska. 

Governor McGraw held membership in the Masonic fraternity, being identified 
with both the York and Scottish Rites and attaining the thirty-second degree in 
the latter. The death of Mr. McGraw occurred June 23, 1910, and in his passing 
the state lost one whom it had come to look upon with honor and whose record 
ever reflected credit upon the commonwealth. His constantly expanding powers 
took him from humble surroundings to the field of large enterprises and con- 
tinually broadening opportunities. His was the early struggle that must precede 
ascendency. The efforts required to live in ungenerous surroundings, the neces- 
sity to make every blow tell and to exercise every inventive faculty, developed 
powers of mind and habit which caused his name to become a distinguished one 
in the Sound country. Those who opposed him most strenuously came to recog- 
nize in him one who was always loyal to his honest beliefs and a large measure 
of admiration was entertained for him wherever he was known. His modest 
advantages he turned to excellent account and the wisdom, energy and success 
with which he pushed his way along is a study for American youths. The sim- 
plicity and beauty of his daily life as seen in his home and family relations 
constituted an even balance to his splendid business ability and his activity as 
a public official. 



LEWIS CROSBY PALMER. 

Lewis Crosby Palmer, cashier of the Citizens State Bank at Arlington, was 
born at Carmel, Putnam county. New York, April 25, 1881, a son of Bryant 
Scofield Palmer, who was a native of New York and a representative of an old 
Pennsylvania family of English lineage. In both the paternal and maternal lines 
were found ancestors who fought for American independence in the Revolu- 
tionary war. Bryant S. Palmer became a prosperous merchant at Carmel, New 
York, and also filled the position of postmaster there for more than twenty 
years. He was active in local political circles as a supporter of the republican 
party and did everything in his power to advance civic standards and promote 
the best interests of his community. He died at Carmel, New York, in 1908 at 
the age of sixty-eight years and his wife died in March, 1913. 

In the maternal line Lewis C. Palmer is descended from an ancestry honorable 
and distinguished. His mother, who bore the maiden name of Lydia A. Howes, 
was born in New York and was a representative of an old family of English 
descent, the ancestral line being traced back to Thomas Howes, who came to 
America in 1637 and settled at Yarmouth, ATassachusetts. He brought with him 
his three sons, Thomas, Joseph and Jeremiah, the last named having been born 
while the family were en route to New England. Thomas Howes was for one 
year treasurer of Yarmouth and was made a freeman there May 29, 1671. Jere- 
miah Howes, son of Thomas Howes, was born on the high seas in 1637 and died 
in 1706. For ten years he filled the position of deputy and for two years after 
the union of the colonies was representative to the colonial congress. He also 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 29 

served for twenty years as selectman in his town. He married Sarah Prence, 
a daughter of Governor Thomas Prence. Her death occurred March 3, 1704, 
while Jeremiah Howes passed away January 5, 1706. In the Crosby line it is 
found that David Crosby married Reliance Hopkins, a daughter of Samuel Hop- 
kins, who was a son of Stephen Hopkins and a grandson of Giles Hopkins, who 
came to America on the Mayflower. Abner Crosby, the great-great-grandfather 
of Lewis Crosby Palmer, was born in November, 1744, and participated in the 
Revolutionary war as a private in Captain Joseph Dykeman's Company of 
Colonel John Field's Regiment, a fact given in the state archives of New York. 
The Crosby line is traced back to Simon Crosby, who was born in England in 
1609 and at the age of twenty-six years with his wife Ann, then twenty-four 
years of age, and an infant son, Thomas, eight months old, started on the ship 
Susan and Ellen from London, England, on the i8th of April, 1637, and landed 
at Cambridge, Massachusetts. Thomas Crosby, born in 1635, married Sarah 
Brackett and among their children was John Crosby, who was born in 1670. 
Among the children of John and Hannah Crosby was David Crosby, who was 
born April 13, 17 19, and died at South East, Putnam county, New York, October 
21, 1793- He was married June 19, 1737, to Reliance Hopkins, who died at South 
East, February 25, 1788. Abner Crosby, who represented the family in the 
fifth generation, was born at Harwich, Massachusetts. December 25, 1744, and 
died at South East, New York, May 5, 1813. His wife, Ruth (Foster) Crosby, 
was born at South East in 1749 and there passed away October i, 181 6. They 
had three children, including Thomas Stephen Foster Crosby, who was born at 
South East in 1778 and there died April 10, 1851. He married Lydia Lears, who 
was born at South East in 1780 and passed away in her native city July 3, 1867. 
Their daughter Clara became the wife of Nathan Howes May 20, 1815, and they 
had a son, William Howes, who was married in May, 1842, to Lilla Cole. Among 
their children was Lydia Howes, who became the wife of Bryant S. Palmer. 

Lewis Crosby Palmer pursued his education in the public schools of Carmel, 
New York, and after his graduation from the high school attended Eastman's 
Business College. He afterward entered the Putnam County National Bank and 
in 1901 came to Washington, making his initial step in the business world in 
the northwest as an employe in the Seattle National Bank, in which he won pro- 
motion from time to time until he was made assistant cashier. His connection 
with that bank covered six years. He afterward served as cashier in the Bank 
of Savings in Seattle from 1907 until 191 2 and later was with the Northern 
Bank & Trust Company of Seattle as manager of the credit department. He 
resigned to become vice president and cashier of the Citizens State Bank of 
Arlington, in which connection he yet continues. His long experience in banking 
circles has made him familiar with every part of the business and he now bends 
his energies to administrative direction and executive control in his present con- 
nection with the result that the bank is on a substantial basis and its business 
is constantly increasing. 

On the 19th of November, 1903, Mr. Palmer was married in McLean. Tomp- 
kins county, New York, to Miss E. Claire Howard, a native of New York, born 
November 17, 1881, a daughter of Alvin and Eliza (Townley) Howard, repre- 
sentatives of an old New York family. Mr. and Mrs. Howard are both deceased. 
Mrs. Palmer is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and also 



30 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

of the Colonial Dames. By her marriage she has become the mother of two 
children: Howard, who was born in Seattle, February 14, 1908; and Robert 
Lewis, whose birth occurred in Seattle, June 20, 1910. 

Mr. Palmer has membership with the Knights of Pythias at Arlington and 
with the Arlington Commercial Club, of which he served as president in 1913. 
He likewise belongs to the Rainier Club of Seattle. In politics he is a republican 
but has never sought nor desired office. He was reared in the faith of the 
Universalist church. His aid and influence are always given on the side of 
improvement and progress and, coming from an ancestry honorable and dis- 
tinguished, he is fortunate in that his lines of life have been cast in harmony 
therewith. 



PROFESSOR ROBERT J. WHITE. 

Professor Robert J. White, superintendent of schools at Port Angeles and 
recognized as one of the able educators in the northern peninsula, was born in 
Haliburton county, Ontario, June 9, 1877. His father, William J. White, a 
native of England, was taken to Canada in 1850, when but three years of age. 
He was then an orphan, his parents having died in the East Indies, and he was 
reared by an aunt. He became a machinist by trade but has spent most of his 
life in agricultural pursuits. He wedded Mary Hull, a native of Ontario, Canada, 
and in 1881 they removed to Pembina county and later to Rolla, North Dakota, 
becoming pioneer settlers of that district, where the mother passed away in 
1907. The father, however, is still actively engaged in farming there and has 
contributed much to the agricultural development of the region. 

Professor White was the eldest son and fifth child in a family of eleven 
children, numbering three sons and eight daughters. His youthful experiences 
were those of the farmbred boy and he worked in the fields to the age of eighteen 
years, when he started out to earn his own living. He had attended the district 
schools, also the high school of Rolla and afterward became a student in the 
State Normal College, from which he was graduated in 1903, this being in con- 
nection with the University of North Dakota at Grand Forks. He afterward 
entered the University of Minnesota, in which he completed a classical course, 
winning the Bachelor of Arts degree in 191 1, while in 1917 the Master's degree 
was conferred upon him by the University of Washington. He began teaching 
in the rural schools of North Dakota and was thus engaged for five years. He 
afterward spent one year as principal of the schools at Rugby, North Dakota, 
and for two years was principal at Bottineau, that state. He then accepted the 
superintendency of the schools at Amboy, Minnesota, where he remained for 
four years, after which he was school superintendent at Elk River, Minnesota, 
for two years. In 1913 he arrived in Clallam county, Washington, and has since 
been superintendent of the schools at Port Angeles, during which period the edu- 
cational interests of the city have been greatly advanced, and he has inaugurated 
improvements in the system of instruction that have been of marked benefit. 
He holds up high ideals in his teaching service and is constantly studying to 
develop advanced methods that will make education the source of individual 




PROFESSOR ROBERT J. WHITE 



S^THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX " 
TILDSN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 33 

activity in each pupil after he leaves the schoolroom and enters upon the respon- 
sible duties of life. Professor White is also serving as a member of the county 
board of education and his colleagues and contemporaries speak of his work 
in terms of high endorsement. He has been elected to membership in two national 
honorary fraternities, in Phi Delta Kappa for research in education and in Delta 
Sigma Rho for excellence in debate and oratory. 

On the 20th of August, 1903, Professor White was married in Dewatto, Mason 
county, Washington, to Miss Addie Urie, a native of Ottawa, Ontario, descended 
from Scotch ancestry in the paternal line and of English in the maternal. Her 
parents have for the past sixteen years been residents of Seattle. Mr. and 
Mrs. White have become parents of four children : Miriam, born in Rugby, 
North Dakota, July 15, 1904; Wendell Hamilton, born in Mapleton, North 
Dakota, January 31, 1907; Vincent Lloyd, born in Amboy, Minnesota, May 11, 
191 1 ; and WilHam Gordon, born in Port Angeles, Washington, January 21, 1917. 

Professor White's military experience covers two years' service as sergeant 
of cadets during his university day^. He is. a prominent Mason, having joined 
the order in North Dakota, while he now has membership with the lodge, chapter, 
commandery and the Eastern Star of Port Angeles. His wife is also connected 
with the Eastern Star and she is secretarv of the Women's Reading Club and an 
active worker in the social, religious and charitable interests of the city. Professor 
White belongs to the Commercial Club and he gives his political allegiance to 
the republican party. Both are consistent members of the First Congregational 
church and he is chairman of its board of trustees and a teacher in the Sunday 
school. He studies closely questions afifecting not on-ly his professional interests 
but also those which have bearing upon the welfare and progress of the commu- 
nity or which tend to solve the problems connected with social service and indi- 
vidual uplift, and both he and his wife are numbered among the leaders in the 
intellectual and social life of Port Angeles. 



J. R. O'DONNELL. 



J. R. O'Donnell, manager and stockholder of the White Star Lumber Com- 
pany of Elma, which was incorporated in 1902, has been a most active factor 
in promoting the successful conduct of the extensive and important interests 
conducted by that corporation. A native of Washington county, Ohio, he was 
born in 1857 and became a resident of Washington in 1885. at which time he 
made his way to Hoquiam, where he was connected with a logging camp for a 
year. In t886 he removed to Elma and in 1887 and 1888 was employed as a 
timber cruiser by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. He then turned 
his attention to merchandising and for twenty years was thus connected with 
mercantile interests in Elma. He was appointed postmaster of Elma in 1889 
and some months later he joined Dr. Hill in the drug business and subsequently 
became active in the hardware trade. At length he sold out in that line and 
established a general store, which he carried on until he had completed a twenty- 
year cycle in commercial lines. 

In December, 1902, he became one of the organizers and incorporators of 



34 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

the White Star Lumber Company, which built and equipped a mill and at once 
began operations in the manufacture of lumber, the officers being Allen White, 
president; J. R. O'Donnell,- vice president; and E. L. Minard, secretary and 
treasurer. There occurred no change in the personnel until Mr. White with- 
drew, when he was succeeded by L. I. Wakefield as president, while J. H. Dailey 
became vice president, Will J. Langridge secretary and treasurer and J. R. 
O'Donnell manager. Their lumber mill has a capacity of seventy-five thousand 
feet and their shingle mill has a capacity of one hundred and twenty-five thou- 
sand shingles daily. They have their own logging camps and they employ one 
hundred and twenty-five men. The company built the town of Whites, where 
its plant is located, and it owns all of the houses and the store at that point. 
Air. O'Donnell devotes his entire attention to the business and as manager has 
promoted its development along substantial and constantly broadening lines 
until the business has now reached extensive proportions and the enterprise 
has become one of the profitable productive industries of the Grays Harbor dis- 
trict. 

Mr. O'Donnell was united in marriage in Elma to Miss Flora M. Wake- 
field and they have become parents of three children, Mrs. Mona Westover, John 
and Harry James. Appreciative of the social amenities of Hfe and recognizing 
his obligations to his fellowmen, Mr. O'Donnell has become a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, in which he has reached the Shrine, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He exercises 
his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican 
party and has been called to various political offices, serving as a member of the 
city council, also as mayor of Elma, while from 1903 until 1905 he was a mem- 
ber of the state senate. He has always given careful consideration to the vital 
and significant political problems of the day and his aid and influence have 
always sought the upbuilding of city and commonwealth. 



EDWARD L. NOYES, Jr. 

Edward L. Noyes, Jr., purchasing agent for the Puget Sound Traction, Light 
& Power Company at Bellingham, was born in Aladison, Wisconsin, September 
28, 1862, a son of Edward and Mehitable Louise Noyes. He attended the public 
and high schools until he reached the age of nineteen years and afterward spent a 
year as a student in a business college. Going to E\anston, Illinois, he was em- 
ployed at carpentering for a year, and afterward removed to Ashton. South 
Dakota, where he also engaged in carpentering. After two years he bought out a 
news stand, book and stationery store, which he conducted for five years and then 
sold. Removing to Sedalia, Alissouri, he entered the employ of the Sedalia Light 
& Power Company as a car inspector and thus continued until 1890. when he 
removed to Fairhaven, Washington, which is now a part of Bellingham, and 
secured the position of carpenter with the Fairhaven & New Whatcom Railroad 
Company. After a year spent in that connection he was given charge of the car 
construction department and from 1892 until 1893 was car inspector. In the latter 
year he resigned and went to Fowler, Indiana, where he again took up carpenter 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 35 

work, which he there followed until 1897. But the lure of the west was upon him 
and he returned to Bellingham, where he became motorman and conductor with 
the Fairhaven & New Whatcom Railroad Company, so continuing until 1906, when 
that company was taken over by the Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Com- 
pany. Mr. Noyes then became freight clerk and store-keeper and so continued for 
three years, when he was advanced to the position of purchasing agent, and since 
1 91 2 he has also served in that capacity for the Pacific Northwest Traction Com- 
pany, an allied corporation. His position as purchasing agent necessitates the han- 
dling of every branch of the business but Mr. Noyes has proven himself equal to 
the situation, making an excellent record as a representative of the company. 

In Ashton, South Dakota, on the nth of December, 1886, Mr. Noyes was mar- 
ried to Miss Hattie Belle Brier, and they have two children : Pearl Blanche, now 
Mrs. H. F. Randolph, of Bellingham; and Guy Edward, who is a student at the 
Dental College of Portland. 

Mr. Noyes is a stalwart advocate of Masonic principles, the craft finding in him 
an exemplary representative, and he is also connected with the Tribe of Ben Hur. 
He is likewise a member of the Chamber of Commerce, in which connection he 
manifests his deep interest in the welfare of the city and its upbuilding. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party, while his religious faith is that of 
the Presbyterian church. In all of life's relations he has displayed qualities which 
have gained for him the respect and regard of many with whom he has been 
associated. 



FRANK H. KNIGHT. 



Frank H. Knight, president and manager of the Northwest Hardware Com- 
pany at Bellingham, his business being located at No. 213 West Holly street, was 
born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, July 21, 1865, a son of M. H. and Sarah D. 
Knight. He attended the public schools of his native city to the age of eight years 
and then accompanied his parents on their removal to Taunton, Massachusetts, 
where he again studied in the public schools until he reached the age of ele\en 
years. The family home was then established at Rockford, Illinois, where he 
attended school until he reached the age of fifteen, when he entered the l)usiness 
world and has since been dependent upon his own resources. He then engaged 
with the Rockford Tack Company as an apprentice, spending four years in that 
way, after which he returned to his native state and for one year occupied a clerical 
position in the Pittsfield National Bank. He then accepted a clerkship in a hard- 
ware store, where he continued until 1888. when he removed lo the northwest and 
secured a position as clerk in the Macready hardware store at 'I'aconia. 1 lis al)ility 
won him advancement and he became buyer and confidential man, while later he 
was promoted to the position of manager and so continued until 1900. Hie busi- 
ness was then sold and at that time Mr. Knight went to Seattle, where he entered 
the employ of the Seattle Hardware Company, having charge of the retail depart- 
ment until 1501. 

He then located in Bellingham and became connected with the Northwest I l.ird- 
ware Company, of which he has since been president and manager. At that lime 



36 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

the business was occupying a two story brick building twenty-five by one hundred 
and twenty-five feet on the present site of their new three story and basement 
building, which was erected in 1912 and covers a lot fifty by one hundred and 
twenty-five feet. He also has in the rear of this building a two story T-shaped 
building which is used for warehouse purposes and also a two story warehouse on 
Bay street. The company deals in general mill and cannery supplies, shelf and 
heavy hardware, selling to both the wholesale and retail trades, and is represented 
on the road by two traveling salesmen, who cover all of Whatcom and part of 
Skagit counties and the San Juan islands. They also do considerable business in 
Alaska and something of the volume of their trade is indicated in the fact that they 
employ twenty-two people in their store. 

In Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on the 30th of September, 1890, Air. Knight was 
married to Miss Anna M. Bagg, and they have one child, Allen F., twenty-four 
years of age, who is a salesman with the Northwest Hardware Company. 

Mr. Knight belongs to the Bellingham Country Club and fraternally is con- 
nected with the Knights of Pythias. His political endorsement is given to the 
republican party, which he supports at the polls. His religious faith is that of the 
Congregational church.' He has based his conduct upon the rules which govern 
industry and strict and unswerving integrity and he has won the deserved confi- 
dence and respect of his fellowmen by reason of his capability and reliability in 
the conduct of his business. 



WILLIAM H. FRANCE. 

William H. France, cashier of the Montesano State Bank, has occupied that 
position continuously since 1897 and through the intervening period of nineteen 
years has contributed in substantial measure to its upbuilding and success. He 
came to the coast country from the middle west, being. a native of Guthrie county, 
Iowa , where his birth occurred in 1872. His father, George W. France, was born 
in Ohio and on removing westward settled at Guthrie Center. Later in 1877 
he became a resident of Leadville, Colorado, where for twelve years he engaged 
in mining, while in 1889 he removed to Spokane, W^ashington. The same year, 
however, he went to Hoquiam, where he engaged in the real estate and invest- 
ment business. When called to his final rest he was filling the position of post- 
master of Hoquiam, to which office he had been appointed under a republican 
administration, having long been a stalwart supporter of that party and an active 
worker in its ranks. He married Eva Harlan, a native of Pennsylvania, and they 
became the parents of five children : William H. ; Minnie E., the wife of AL L. 
Watson, of Hoquiam; Ollie E., the wife of John M. Dunning, of Hoquiam; 
Earle L., of Elma; and Georgia AL, a teacher of music in the schools of Renton. 
The death of the husband and father occurred in 1907, when he was sixty-six 
years of age, and in his passing the community lost a valued and prominent citi- 
zen whose worth in connection wnth local progress was widely acknowledged. 
The mother is still living. 

William H. France obtained the greater part of his education in his native 
city and in 1889 accompanied his parents on their removal from Colorado to 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 37 

Washington. He started out in the business world as a clerk in the First National 
Bank at Hoquiam, remaining in active connection with that institution until 1897, 
when he removed to Montesano and became cashier of the Montesano State Bank, 
which position he has since occupied. He has closely studied the banking busi- 
ness in every phase and has concentrated his energies upon the further develop- 
ment and upbuilding of that institution, of which he is now one of the large 
stockholders and which has become one of the strongest financial concerns of 
southwestern Washington. He is also a director of the Bank of Elma, which he 
aided in organizing. 

In 1897, in Hoquiam, Mr. France was married to Miss Adelaide Rowland, 
who arrived in Hoquiam in 1889. The children of this marriage are Alda, Rowland, 
Madgil, Muriel and William. 

Mr. France is well known in fraternal circles as a Scottish Rite Mason of 
high rank, as a Knight of Pythias and as an Odd Fellow. For several years he 
has been on the school board. He is always interested in affairs relating to the 
upbuilding and progress of his community, his cooperation ever counting as an 
element for public growth and miprovement. He and his family are well known 
socially in Montesano and the hospitality of their home is greatly enjoyed by their 
extensive circle of friends. 



HENRY A. SCHROEDER. 

Henry A. Schroeder, who is engaged in the real estate and insurance business 
and is an ex-president of the Seattle Real Estate Association, was born in the 
town of Le Claire, Iowa, August 22, 1861, and was four years of age when he was 
taken to Davenport, Iowa, by his parents, Henry and Elizabeth Schroeder, both 
of whom were natives of Germany, leaving the fatherland in young manhood 
and womanhood. They became acquainted and were married in the town of Le 
Claire, Iowa, and later removed to Davenport, where they established their 
permanent home. 

There Henry A. Schroeder pursued his education in the public schools and also 
attended a private German school from 1867 until 1874. He afterward con- 
tinued his studies in the public schools, from which ho was graduated in 1878 
and later he pursued a course in a commercial college. He then secured em- 
ployment as bookkeeper with a grain and warehouse firm and some years later 
was in the office of the wholesale grocery house of Beiderbecke & Miller, of 
Davenport, Iowa, with which firm he was connected for four years. In 1885 ^^ 
removed to Des Moines, Iowa, where he was engaged in the retail lumber busi- 
ness until February, 1888. In the spring of that year he came to Seattle, where 
he secured the position of bookkeeper with a real estate firm and subsequently 
entered the real estate and insurance business on his own account. His progress 
has been continuous as the result of his close application, untiring industry and 
perseverance. He has figured quite prominently in real estate circles. He acted 
as secretary of the Seattle Real Estate Association and in 191 3 was elected to 
the office of president, which position he filled for a year. He likewise filled the 
office of president of the Seattle Board of Fire Underwriters for three terms. 



38 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Mr. Schroeder was married in December, 1891, to Miss Grace La Rue 
House, who came with her parents from Fremont, Nebraska, to Seattle in 1888. 
Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder have one son, Frederick Karl. 

Mr. Schroeder holds membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks, with the Seattle Athletic Club and the Seattle Turn Verein. He is also a 
member of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce and is interested in its various pro- 
jects for the improvement and upbuilding of the city, giving hearty support to 
plans that relate to municipal welfare. 



MYRON J. COGSWELL. 

Myron J. Cogswell is now living retired but for a long period was identified 
with speculative building in Tacoma. At the outset of his career he realized the 
eternal principle that industry wins and industry became the beacon light of his 
life. He came to Tacoma from Goose Lake, Oregon, on the 31st of May, 1874, 
and is therefore among its oldest citizens in years of continuous connection. 

A native of New Hampshire, born December 7, 1843, Myron J. Cogswell 
came to the west in 1855 with his father, Ira Cogswell. The mother, who bore 
the maiden name of Eliza White, died when her son Myron was but six years 
of age. In 1868 the father made the trip to the Pacific coast by way of the 
Isthmus route and settled in Oregon, where he engaged in stock raising for a 
number of years. Coming to Tacoma, he here spent the summer of 1873, at which 
time a paramount question was whether Tacoma was to be chosen as the terminus 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad. In the fall of that year he took up his abode 
in Old Tacoma, where he spent the winter. He then made permanent location 
in what is now the present city and here resided until his demise, which occurred 
in June, 1896, when he was seventy-eight years of age. In the early days he and 
his son Myron were accorded mail contracts at a period which antedated the build- 
ing of railroads to carry the mail between Old Tacoma and Puyallup. He was 
afterward associated with his son in carrying the mails to the boats and also in the 
conduct of a livery business. They carried the mail from railroads and boats to 
the postoffice at Ninth and Pacific streets. As builders they were in partnership 
for a long period, during which time they erected many frame buildings in the 
city and also the two-story brick building first known as the Cogswell and later 
as the Brooklyn. The father retired about 1893 and enjoyed well earned rest 
up to the time of his demise. 

Following his father's retirement Myron J. Cogswell continued active in 
business, erecting many buildings and also handling much acreage property. In 
connection with the fimi of Smith & Fife he platted their addition to Tacoma 
',and he also helped improve a ten acre tract on Division street. He likewise 
erected a building on the site now occupied by the Paulson Company on Broad- 
way. He put up a two-story brick building at 1344 Broadway, built two livery 
stables and four business houses. Through his operations he did much to further 
Tacoma's growth and development, changing unsightly vacancies into well im- 
proved districts. Mr. Cogswell has now retired from the building business and 
for the past few years has given his attention principally to caring for his various 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 39 

properties. At one time he was a director of the Merchants Bank and also a 
stockholder in the Savings Bank. There has never been an important public 
project in Tacoma for the material improvement or municipal welfare of the city 
with which he has not been identified. 

Mr. Cogswejll was married a|t Norborne, Missouri, in May, 1876, to Miss 
Rebecca Brock, and they had a son, who died in infancy, and a daughter, Nellie, 
now the wife of Dr. Slayden, of Tacoma. Mrs. Cogswell is an active worker in 
the Episcopal church and a member of the Guild. The first home of the family 
was a small building which was later replaced by a larger residence erected at 
No. 705 Broadway, but in 1885 Mr. Cogswell built his present home at No. 252 
Broadway. 

At one time Mr. Cogswell was identified with the Masonic fraternity but has 
now left the order. He belonged to the old Chamber of Commerce, has member- 
ship in the present Chamber and was a member of the first Commercial Club. 
In politics he has always given his allegiance to the republican party, and has 
served as a member of the city council and for two terms as a member of the 
board of county commissioners. He has ever exercised his official prerogatives 
in support of the general good and has earnestly desired to improve and benefit 
Tacoma, where his interest has long centered. His life has been one of activity 
fruitful of important results and his business career was characterized by con- 
stantly broadening interests growing in importance as the years went on. 

The Cogswell family were quite prominent and active in the early history 
of Tacoma. The old reservoir was the first of the public improvements with 
which Ira Cogswell was connected, and in partnership with a Mr. Wilson from 
Seattle he laid the six-inch concrete foundation and also built the wooden flume 
reaching miles away to Spanaway lake, from which the first supply of water was 
brought to the city. In 1874 Myron J. Cogswell helped to fell the trees on what 
is now Pacific avenue from Commerce to the Bay and from Ninth to Puyallup. 
In 1875 ^"d 1876 the coal fields were unsurveyed lands and the railroad was 
slow in building into that section. Mr. Cogswell, with W. H. Fife, Harry PJ.ger 
and Robert Sprawl, filed on claims near where Carbonado novv stands and each 
invested about three hundred dollars in having the township surveyed. Their 
object was to stimulate the railroad so that they could open the coal fields and 
in this they were successful, the mines being first developed in 1877. Mr. Cogs- 
well feels that this was one of the most important enterprises with which he has 
been connected. 



JAY M. BRICKER. 



Jay M. Bricker, a resident of Hoquiam and secretary and treasurer of the 
Whiteside Undertaking Company of Hoquiam, Aberdeen, Montesano, Elma and 
Oakville, was born in Callao, Missouri, in 1882, a son of W. W. Bricker, who 
was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and was of German descent. His father 
went to California in the days of early mining excitement there and was killed 
on the coast, so that W. W. Bricker was early thrown upon his own resources. 
Removing westward to Callao, Missouri, he there established a furniture and 



40 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

undertaking business, in which he continued for thirty-eight years, being one of 
the oldest, best known and most highly respected merchants of that place. He 
was very successful and with a handsome competence retired from active 
business several years ago, since which time he has rested in the enjoyment 
of the fruits of his former toil. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Luella 
Harp, was born in Frankfort, Kentucky. 

Jay M. Bricker was a lad of fifteen years when he began working with his 
father and learned the undertaking business. He continued as his father's as- 
sistant for fourteen years and was also for a time with the undertaking firm of 
Alexander & Company of St. Louis. In 1913 he made his way to Aberdeen 
in company with his brother and there they joined William R. Whiteside in the 
undertaking business under the name of the Whiteside Undertaking Company. 
In April, 1915, they purchased property at Fifth and K streets in Hoquiam and 
remodeled the building, making it a thoroughly modern and up-to-date under- 
taking establishment with a well appointed chapel. They carry a large line of 
caskets and undertakers' supplies and Mr. Bricker is a licensed embalmer, while 
his wife acts as his assistant. He and his brother had the two highest grades 
made in the state examination and they are members of the State Undertakers' 
and Embalmers' Association. The company maintains five parlors as above 
stated and they have been very highly complimented on their business as having 
one of the four finest undertaking establishments in the state of Washington. 

On the 4th of May, 1905, in Callao, Missouri, Mr. Bricker was married to 
]\Iiss Bernice Henderson, who was born in Colorado but became a resident of 
Missouri. They have one daughter, Juanita, nine years of age. Mr. Bricker 
is connected with the Commercial Club and fraternally is identified with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. In his busi- 
ness career he has never been content to stop at a point short of the highest 
efficiency and it is this thoroughness and capability which he has displayed which 
have gained for him his present gratifying measure of success. 



JOHN H. DRISSLER. 

Business enterprise in South Bend finds a worthy and substantial representative 
in John H. Drissler, who is well known there as a merchant, handling hardware 
and ship chandlery. He was born in Germany, May 27, 1854, and was a young 
man of about twenty-six years when in 1880 he came to the United States. 
Crossing the continent, he made his way to Woodards, landing on the Willapa 
river ten miles above South Bend, where he opened a general store. At that 
time the town of South Bend had scarcely been started, having only a mill and 
a postoffice. Mr. Drissler laid out the town of Willapa, secured a postofiice and 
continued business at that point until 1897. when he entered into partnership 
with Freeman Albright under the firm style of Drissler «S: Albright. They came 
to South Bend, where they opened a store, handling general merchandise and 
hardware. The beginning of the business was small, but their trade has since 
steadily and constantly increased and today theirs is one of the important com- 
mercial enterprises of South Bend. In 191 5 they disposed of their dry goods 




JOHN H. DRISSLER 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TtLDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 43 

department and now concentrate their energies upon the handling of hardware 
and ship chandlery. They built the store where their hardware business is now 
located and with the passing years they have developed a business which is indeed 
gratifying. In addition to his other interests Mr. Drissler is connected with 
financial affairs as the vice president of the Pacific State Bank of South Bend. 
Mr. Drissler was the third of his father's family to come to the United States. 
His brother Jacob arrived in Pacific county in 1867 and there followed farming. 
His brother Philip came in 1874 and he, too, followed agricultural pursuits. It 
was the fact that these brothers were residing in Pacific county that caused Mr. 
Drissler to locate in this part of the state. 

From the establishment of his residence in the northwest Mr. Drissler has 
always been actively and helpfully interested in everything pertaining to the 
welfare and progress of his community. His efforts in behalf of public progress 
and improvement have been far-reaching and effective. He has done everything 
in his power to promote the development of South Bend and Willapa harbor and 
his fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth, ability and public spirit, have 
frequently called him to office. He has ser\^ed as a member of the city council and 
three times has been mayor of South Bend, his reelections indicating most clearly 
his fideHty to duty and his capability in office. He has given to the city a business- 
like and progressive administration, characterized by needed reforms and improve- 
ments, and his excellent service as South Bend chief executive indicated his 
fitness for still higher official service. In 191 1 he was elected to the state legis- 
lature and was made a member of the special committee on municipal corpora- 
tions other than cities of the first class. He was also a member of the committees 
on insurance, banks and banking and fisheries. His political allegiance has been 
given to the republican party since he became a naturalized American citizen. 
Aside from his political activity he has done much effective work for the benefit 
of his community in connection with the Commercial Club, of which he was the 
first president. 

Mr. Drissler was married in Portland, Oregon, in 1888, to Miss Ida V. Kling, 
a native of Hamburg, Germany, and they have become parents of three children : 
Valentine, who has an orchard at Oroville, east of the mountains ; Francesca ; 
and Walter, who is in the Pacific State Bank. The family is widely and prom- 
inently known in South Bend and for thirty-seven years Mr. Drissler has figured 
as one of the prominent, influential and honored citizens of Pacific county. 



THOMAS BURKE. 



Thomas Burke is a distinguished jurist who has written his name high on 
the keystone of the legal arch of Washington. He is, moreover, a business 
man of marked ability, as shown by his success, and throughout a most active 
life he has ever found time to devote to public service, contributing in large 
measure to the general welfare. A native of New York, he was bom in Clinton 
county, December 22, 1849. In writing of his family a contemporary biographer 
said: "Judge Burke is an Irish-American, having in his individuality the spirit 
and energy of an American patriot in combination with Celtic wit and intel- 



voi. in— 3 



44 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

lectual vigor. His parents immigrated to this comitry from Ireland, their 
native land. The father was of the honest farmer type, a kind hearted man, 
but a disciplinarian and an uncompromising foe to the vice of idleness. The 
mother was a woman of good judgment and of a kind, sympathetic nature." 

The usual environment of the farm was that of Judge Burke in his boyhood 
and youth. He worked in the fields from an early age and soon learned the 
best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He lost his mother 
before he was twelve years of age, after which the home farm was sold and 
the father removed with his children to Iowa. It was not long afterward 
before Judge Burke not only began to earn his own living but also contributed 
to the support of other members of the family. He was first employed to 
carry water to supply the needs of a gang of laborers engaged in constructing 
a railroad. In his early youth he sufifered an injury to one of his arms, which 
seemed to preclude the possibility of his learning a trade and he turned instead 
to a professional career. Because of his injury he was permitted to continue for 
a longer time in school and afterward to work in a store as errand boy and 
salesman. His course was marked by continuous, if not rapid, advance. He 
had to depend upon his own earnings for the opportunities secured along educa- 
tional and other lines and his youth was a period fraught with earnest and 
unremitting toil. While working in the store he carefully saved his earnings 
and devoted his leisure hours to study, thus preparing himself for entrance into 
the academy at Ypsilanti, Michigan, his wages being saved to meet the expenses 
of one term spent in that institution. He afterward worked as a farm hand 
and thus provided a sum necessary for the expense of a second term. Being 
now qualified for teaching he afterward divided his time between study in the 
academy and teaching in the district schools until after his graduation in the 
year 1870. In the meantime he had determined upon the law as his life work 
and in preparation therefor he entered the Michigan State University at Ann 
Arbor, although again his period of study was not a continuous one, as it was 
necessary for him to leave the university at times and continue teaching in 
order to meet the expense of his college course. He was also a student for a 
time in the office of a practicing lawyer at Marshall, Michigan, and following 
his admission to the bar he entered upon active practice in that city. Before a 
year had passed he was chosen to fill the position of city attorney, which office 
he continued to fill until his removal to the west in 1875. 

Again we quote from a contemporary biographer: "Teaching a country 
school and boarding around the district is very helpful to a young man as a 
means of perfecting a practical education. The teacher is usually received by 
the different families of the district as an honored guest, by a natural process 
he is trained in the art of being agreeable and his experiences afford opportuni- 
ties for the study of human nature and promote the development of his own 
character under the most favorable conditions. Judge Burke has always been 
fond of children, and while employed as a teacher it was his practice to entertain 
as well as instruct them by story telling. He is a charming conversationalist 
and has often been suspected of having kissed the blarney stone, but in fact 
has simply continued through life the habit of being genial and pleasant acquired 
while boarding around the district as a country school teacher. In height he is 
below medium and as a youth his physical appearance was not imposing. It 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CA:5CADES 45 

has been told concerning him that at the time of entering Ypsilanti Academy 
about all that was noticeable of his personality was a dozen freckles and a big 
mouth. He had read many books and having a retentive memory his mind was 
well stored with knowledge of history and general literature. He began the 
practice of his profession in partnership with John J. McGilvra, a pioneer lawyer 
who came to Washington territory in 1861, holding an appointment as United 
States district attorney, given to him by President Lincoln. This partnership 
did not continue very long, although the two men remained firm friends and 
Burke became permanently related to McGilvra by winning the heart and hand 
of his beautiful daughter." 

. Before leaving Marshall, Judge Burke had decided that Seattle was to be 
the place of his future residence. He had never seen the city but he had heard 
reports of the conditions here existing, and from the beginning of his residence 
in the northwest he has been a most loyal advocate of the city and a firm 
believer in its future prosperity and growth. He at once entered upon the 
active work of his profession and was not long in giving evidence of the fact 
that his ability as a lawyer was of high order and that he was most capable in 
coping with the intricate problems of the profession. Less than two years after 
reaching Seattle he was elected probate judge of King county and soon after- 
ward he severed his partnership relation with Mr. McGilvra and became a partner 
of U. M. Rasin. This firm accepted laboring men as their clients and were 
principally engaged during the first year in collecting wages for loggers, coal 
miners and sailors. The ability, enterprise and energy of the partners, however, 
soon led to their efforts being extended into other fields and their clientage 
constantly grew in volume and importance. At the expiration of his first 
term as probate judge Mr. Burke was reelected and would have been accorded 
a third election had he not declined to serve for a longer period. 

In the meantime, noting the trend of events and the demand for property 
advantageously located. Judge Burke had begun making investments in real 
estate and as his financial resources increased he continued to purchase property. 
The first that he owned was a lot with sixty feet frontage on Second avenue 
between Marion and Madison streets, and thereon he built a modern, reinforced 
concrete building, twelve stories in height, known as the Empire building, and 
recognized as one of the best office buildings west of Chicago. Many predicted 
failure for Judge Burke, believing that he paid an exorbitant price for the ground 
which he purchased, giving twenty-five thousand dollars, the lot being one 
hundred and twenty by one hundred and twenty feet, at the northwest corner 
of Marion street and Second avenue. Following the widespread conflagration 
that occurred in Seattle in 1889 he erected on that site a six-story office building 
called the Burke building. In order to do this he incurred an indebtedness 
almost equal to the value of the building, but his action showed his faith in the 
future of the city and time proved the wisdom of his judgment. All his 
investments have been judiciously made and success in considerable measure 
has attended his activity in the real estate field. He seems to readily grasp 
the opportunities of a situation and his energy and determination have enabled 
him to overcome difficulties and advance steadily toward success. 

His prominence has resulted not only from his ability as a lawyer and his 
sagacity as a real estate dealer, but also from his activity in political circles and 



46 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

in connection with those public affairs which have to do most with the welfare 
of the community at large. He has always voted with the democracy and has 
given to the party unfaltering and stalwart support. Because of his wide 
acquaintance and popularity the democratic party hoped with him as a candidate 
to win success in Washington, and without his solicitation made him nominee 
for the ofifice of delegate to congress. Having decided to accept the nomination 
he entered upon an earnest and persistent campaign, visiting every locality and 
making speeches in all the places where people were accustomed to assemble. 
However, he could not overcome the strong republican majority in the state, for 
the people of Washington at that time were largely in favor of a protective tariff 
and other principles which have constituted planks in the republican platform. 
In 1882 he was again his party's nominee but was once more defeated. In the 
campaign of 1884 he supported Charles S. Voorhees, the democratic candidate, 
and was a large contributor to the party's success in that election. One who 
knows Judge Burke well said of his political career and his successful effort in 
contributing to the election of Mr. Voorhees: "There had been no change in 
the sentiment of the people with respect to national issues, the success of 
V^oorhees being attributable to clamor for forfeiture of the unearned part of the 
Northern Pacific land grant. In the next campaign the democratic party by its 
platform continued to advocate radical legislation hostile to the Northern Pacific 
Railroad Company and also condemned the measures which had been adopted 
by President Cleveland and Governor Squire to protect Chinese inhabitants in 
the enjoyment of their rights under treaties and the laws of the United States. 
This was an attack on leading citizens, including Burke, for their resistance 
to lawless methods for the expulsion of the Chinese inhabitants. Therefore 
Burke did not support the party and he was never afterward en rapport with 
the men in control of the democratic organization. In the campaign of 1896, he 
canvassed the state of Washington in support of the candidacy of William 
McKinley for the presidency and the principles of the republican party. In this 
he was actuated to a large degree by his sincere belief that the business interests 
and welfare of the country were jeopardized by democratic advocacy of the 
doctrine of bimetallism applied to the monetary system. No speaker in that 
campaign, east or west, excelled him in ability as an advocate of a sound 
financial policy, and he has ever since continued to adhere to the republican 
party and to support republican candidates." 

There is no phase of life relative to the best interests of Seattle and of the 
state with which Mr. Burke has not been directly or indirectly connected since 
his arrival on the Pacific coast. He is naturally a leader of men and a molder 
of public opinion and many of his fellow townsmen have ever looked to him as a 
guiding spirit in matters vital to the community. With building operations 
there came a new era of prosperity to Washington, for, connecting the north- 
west with the outside world led to development of all lines of business and a 
rapid settlement of the state. Immigration has always followed railroad build- 
ing and this time proved no exception to the rule. With immigration there 
came a demand for real estate and in consequence there followed activity along 
various business lines, especially developing the lumber, coal mining, farming 
and salmon canning industries. This brought a demand for laborers and with 
other immigrants the Chinese flocked into Washington. Then with the fall 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 47 

of 1883 Mr. Villard lost his whole line of transportation interests of the north- 
west and there came a financial depression, together with an agitation of the 
question of the expulsion of the Chinese by unlawful and violent methods. 
This feeling spread throughout the northwest and perhaps reached its culmina- 
tion at Tacoma, when the people drove from that city every Chinese inhabitant, 
on the 3d of November, 1885, and a day or two later burned the buildings in 
which they had lived. Such a course would have been followed in Seattle 
had it not been for the vigorous measures and prompt actions of the sheriff of 
King county, the mayor and a large majority of the prominent citizens. The 
agitation, however, was persistently continued until in February, 1886, when 
an attempt was made to repeat the Tacoma occurrence in Seattle. Public 
meetings were held, in which the question of the hour was discussed and this 
naturally led to a growing animosity. When Judge Burke denounced in open 
meeting the lawless expulsion of the Chinese from Tacoma he became the object 
of hatred and revenge to the anti-Chinese agitators, and when the collision of 
forces occurred Judge Burke, armed with a double barreled shotgun, was in 
line with Captain Kinnear's Company of Home Guards. A few shots were 
fired and three of those on the side of the anti-Chinese were wounded, one of 
them fatally. These circumstances were used as a pretext for a charge of 
murder made against Judge Burke and the justice of the peace was called upon 
to issue a warrant for his arrest. The affidavit charging the crime was sworn 
to by a stranger whose identity never became known to Judge Burke or any of 
his friends. The murder charge was brought not only against Judge Burke 
but also against Frank Hanford, E. M. Carr, Rev. L. A. Banks and D. H. 
Webster, none of whom had fired a shot that day, although all of them were 
in the ranks of the Home Guards. They were simply selected as intended victims 
of the enraged rioters. Lawyers and other prominent citizens advised Governor 
Squires to place the city under martial law, and following this course, he 
appointed Major Alden as provost marshal, the latter immediately assuming 
command of the Home Guards and the two volunteer military companies then 
in Seattle. This force then governed the city until the arrival of General 
Gibbon with a force of United States regulars sent to preserve order, by com- 
mand of President Cleveland. The constable to whom the warrant against 
Judge Burke and others was issued was not permitted to make arrests while 
martial law prevailed, and immediately afterward the accused, except Rev. L. A. 
Banks, all went voluntarily before the justice of the peace, and, waiving a 
preliminary examination, were admitted to bail pending an inquiry concerning 
the accusation by the grand jury to be convened at the next ensuing term of the 
district court. In the following month of May that body made a report to the 
court to the effect that after a full examination of the witnesses cognizant of 
the occurrences of the day of the tragedy the accusation appeared to be entirely 
false and by that report the case was terminated. 

In the years of his law practice Judge Burke was associated with various 
partners in addition to those already named, including G. M. Ilallcr, Joseph 
A. Kuhn. Thomas R. Shepard, Andrew Woods, and his brother-in-law, Oliver 
C. McGilvra. His practice was largely devoted to civil law. his clients includ- 
ing many corporations and large business houses, though nuich of his time was 
given to the needy poor, whose cause he frequently plead without thought of 



48 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

remuneration. One of his brilliant efforts was in defense of a man indicted 
for crime, who by reason of his poverty was unable to engage a lawyer to plead 
for him. The court assigned the task of defending the man to Judge Burke and 
C. H. Hanford, then young lawyers, who worked together on the case most 
seriously, and Judge Burke's argument before the jury in behalf of the friendless 
man was one of the most eloquent and powerful pleas ever made in a Seattle 
court room. Many present, including some of the jurors, were affected to tears 
by his eloquence. Again we quote from a contemporary writer: "His record 
as a lawyer and business man is unstained by any dishonorable practice or 
trick or neglect of duty. Worthy members of the legal profession are 'the 
steadfast ministers of justice, the champions of honor and the knights who 
perpetually battle to redress wrongs and maintain the rights of men, taking 
fees for their services when they can get them, but never abating zeal in the 
cause of a client who is poor or weak or despised or wicked.' Judge Burke 
is a lawyer of that stamp." 

The many phases of his activity in its far-reaching scope have made the 
life of Judge Burke one of intense, practical value to the city. His labors have 
brought results beneficial to the community and the commonwealth. Where it 
seemed that his eff'ort was needed to advance the public welfare it has been 
given freely. For several years he served on the school board of Seattle and 
labored earnestly and eft'ectively to advance the interests of the schools and 
raise the standard of instruction. He was also alert to the subject of introduc- 
ing proper sanitary conditions into the schools and he was a member of the 
territorial board of education ere Washington's admission into the Union. 
His personal popularity has made him a favorite in the Rainier and Seattle 
Golf and Country-Clubs. Of the former he served as president for two terms 
and was the first president of the latter. In 1907 he went abroad, accompanied 
by his wife and Air. and Airs. M. F. Backus. They sailed on the steamship 
Alinnesota and traveled extensively through the orient, combining business and 
pleasure, for the two gentlemen were special commissioners of the Alaska-Yukon- 
Pacific Exposition. Their efforts in that connection were given without com- 
pensation and the participation of the Japanese and other oriental peoples in the 
exposition was brought about through their efforts. The Chamber of Com- 
merce of Seattle numbers Judge Burke among its organizers and his work in 
connection therewith has been far-reaching and resultant. He has served on 
some of its most important committees and has been a cooperant factor in all 
that has been accomplished through that agency for the benefit and upbuilding 
of Washington's metropolis. He was chairman of the committee which secured 
for Seattle a bronze statue of William H. Seward, one of the masterpieces of 
Richard E. Brooks, and especially interesting to the people of the northwest, 
as it was Seward who secured for this country the Alaskan territory. Whitman 
College conferred upon Judge Burke the honorary degree of LL. D. He has 
long been a stanch friend of that institution and a member of its board of 
overseers. He is a man of generous spirit and has given freely to many of its 
worthy objects. His contributions to charity and diplomacy have been real and 
creditable but his signal service has been in the vigor he lent to the pioneer 
era, in making this region habitable, in bringing its resources to light and in 
stamping his intensely practical ideas upon the educational system of the state. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 49 

Such careers are too near us now for their significance to be appraised at their 
true value but the future will be able to trace their tremendous effect upon the 
city and the institutions of their time. The possibilities of high position afforded 
in the United States to industry and fidelity have never been better illustrated 
than in the case of Judge Burke. With few advantages in boyhood he early 
started out to make his own living, dependent upon his own resources for what- 
ever the world was to bring to him of enjoyment or honors. He became 
possessed of wealth, political prominence, exalted social position and a mind 
enriched by foreign travel, by books and art, by constant mingling with men 
and women of the highest breeding, education and accomplishments. He started 
with nothing; he has now almost everything that men covet as of value and all 
has been won by his own unaided exertions. It is well that so successful a life 
should also have found time for the finer things our self-made men are prone 
to overlook — aid in money, personal attention to schools, the collection of rare 
objects of beauty from various parts of the country and the artistic adornment 
of his city and of his home. 



H. S. COOK. 



For more than a quarter of a century H. S. Cook has been identified with 
the business interests of Aberdeen as a member of the firm of H. L. Cook & 
Company, dealers in hardware and logging supplies and also conducting a cold 
storage business and manufacturing ice. Mr. Cook was born June 9, 1851, 
in Livingston county, Michigan, a son of Horace L. and Elizabeth (Ramsdell) 
Cook, both of whom were natives of New York. They were married in ]\Iich- 
igan in 1845 ^"d ^o them were born four children, of whom three are yet 
living, namely: H. S.; Ida M., the wife of J. S. Gunn, a member of the firm 
of H. L. Cook & Company; and Mrs. Sarah Richer, also living in Aberdeen. 
The other member of the family was H. L. Cook, Jr., who was likewise inter- 
ested in the business. He was born in March, 1865, and passed away in 1902, 
his death being deeply regretted by his business associates and by his many 
friends in every walk of life. He was married in December, 1895, to Miss 
Florence Stiles, a daughter of Judge Stiles, of Tacoma, and they had one child, 
H. L. Cook III, now living with his mother in Aberdeen. 

H. S. Cook acquired his education in tbe graded schools of his native 
county and throughout his entire life has been connected with the hardware 
trade, engaging in business along that line in Michigan until i8()8. He be- 
came familiar with every phase of the trade and continued actively in business 
as a hardware merchant in Michigan until 1890, when the company determined 
to become factors in the development of the west. The family then removed 
to Aberdeen, arriving in 1890, at which time they purchased a stock of hard- 
ware that constituted a department of the general store of J. A. Hood, who 
occupied the only business block of the town of Aberdeen. They perforce con- 
ducted business in the same building until they had an oi^portunity to move 
elsewhere. With the growth and development of this section of the state their 
trade has constantlv increased and they are now at the head of one of the chief 



50 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

commercial interests of the Grays Harbor country. There is no phase of the 
business with which Mr. Cook is not thoroughly familiar and his record has at 
all times measured up to the highest commercial standards. 



FRED A. MILHEIM. 



Important and extensive are the business interests of Fred A. Milheim, who 
is president of the Ideal Baking Company, conducting a wholesale business at 
Everett, with ramifying trade interests that cover a large territory in that section 
of the state. In fact, the Ideal Baking Company is one of the largest establish- 
ments of the kind in Washington and the development of the business is attrib- 
utable in" very substantial measure to the efforts of Mr. Milheim. A native of 
New York, he was born in Tonawanda, June 3, 1884, a son of Adolph and Eliza- 
beth (Mauer) Milheim. The father, a native of Switzerland, came to America 
in early boyhood with his parents, who settled in Michigan. He eventually took 
up the occupation of farming and stock raising in New York and remained a 
resident of Erie county, that state, to the time of his death. His wife was of 
German descent. 

Fred A. Milheim was the fourth in order of birth in a family of four sons 
and four daughters. He acquired his education in the public schools of Buffalo, 
New York, which he attended to the age of nineteen years and then started out 
in the business world on his own account. He was first employed as a clerk 
in a grocery store at Tonawanda and then established a grocery business which 
he conducted quite successfully for eight years. At length he disposed of his 
interests there with the intention of becoming a factor in the business life of 
the Pacific coast and removed to Everett. Prior to this time, however, he became 
a professional ball player on the Denver baseball team, but desiring to reenter 
commercial lines, he made his way to Everett in June, 1908, and immediately 
thereafter purchased an interest in the Ideal Baking Company, which at that 
time conducted only a retail trade. When Mr. Milheim entered the business it 
was converted into a wholesale establishment and from a small beginning the 
trade has developed to mammoth proportions. The first day's baking was but 
eight loaves of bread, and something of the continued growth of the business 
is indicated in the fact that the Ideal Baking Company today controls the largest 
trade north and outside of Seattle and the third largest in the state. The plant 
is modern in its equipment in every detail and its present output is five thousand 
loaves daily, with a capacity of fifteen thousand. The firm employs fifteen peo- 
ple, owns the building and grounds where the bakery is located at Twenty-fifth 
and Colby streets and is an incorporated concern, with Mr! Milheim as president 
and directing head. In addition to their large wholesale trade the company con- 
ducts retail stores and agencies in all the small towns north of Seattle and east of 
Everett. The following are all agents selling the company's bread : I. Botton. Sil- 
vana, Washington ; J. E. Montgomery, Alaxwelton ; F. L. Bartlett, Marysville ; H. 
Butikofer, Stillwater; A. H. Boyd, Duvall ; I. H. Berger & Sons, Bow; W. D. 
Cleveland, Meadowdale ; N. Carpenter, Machias ; E. Catching, North Bend ; Clin- 
ton Union, Clinton ; C. E. Ferrell, Edgecomb ; A. E. Frissell, Camano ; A. E. Dim- 




FRPJD A. .MILIIi;i.M 



:- Tttg NEW YORK 
PUELIC UBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 53 

mick, Stanwood ; Evenson & Dowse, Hartford ; Giles Lumber & Shingle Company, 
Darrington ; Galbraith Brothers, Darrington ; C. W. Glidden, Hamilton ; W. R. 
Harding, Langley ; Hilton & Witt, Marysville; Ives & Ives, Skykomish; J. A. 
Kennedy, Richmond Beach ; Lake Stevens Trading Company, Hartford ; And. 
Larson, Lake Stevens; H. A. Templeton, Sulton; A. E. Mitchell, Wellington; 
J. Melkind, Conway; John Maloney, Baring; Maylor Brothers, Oak Harbor; 
Milltown Trading Company, Milltown ; Stretch Grocery, Tolt ; E. Samzeleus, 
Novelty; Runkel Company, Arlington; N. J. Smith, Mukeltoe; Gold Bar Mer- 
cantile Company, Gold Bar ; Hall & Lund, Startup ; Peoples Grocery & Market, 
C. Buchart, Grotto; M. F. Smith, BerHn. Mr. Milheim is president of the 
Index; Peoples Union Store, Stanwood; A. L. Middleton, Seattle Heights; 
Master Bakers' Association of Everett. 

On the 3d of June, 1894, in Rochester, New York, Mr. Milheim was united in 
marriage to Miss Viola Matie Merry, a native of New York and a daughter of 
Ira and Mary Matie Merry. They have two children : Dorothy, who was born 
in Buffalo, New York, July 12, 1Q08; and Donald, whose natal day was July 
24, 191 1. The family residence, which Mr. Milheim owns, is at No. 2104 Colby 

street. 

In his political views Mr. ]\Iilheim follows an independent course. Frater- 
nally he is connected with the Masonic order, in which he has taken the degrees 
of lodge, chapter, commandery and consistory, and he is also a member of the 
Mystic Shrine. He belongs likewise to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and to the Commercial Club of Everett and he is a public-spirited citizen, inter- 
ested in all those forces which contribute to the progress and upbuilding of the 
district in which he lives. He cooperates heartily in all plans for the public good 
and is thoroughly satisfied with this section of the country, which he believes has 
a great future before it. His own career illustrates what may be accomplished 
when there is a will to dare and to do. He has persistently and energetically put 
forth his efiforts along well defined lines of labor and his success is the legitimate 
outcome thereof. 



AUSTIN CHARLES SMITH. 

Commercial enterprise in Sequim has a w^orthy representative in Austm C. 
Smith, a dealer in general merchandise and hardware, in which connection he is 
conducting one of the best stores of the town. He was born in Howell county, 
Missouri, March 27, 1883, and is a son of Edward Moore and Mary (Wilson) 
Smith, whose family numbered eighteen children, thirteen sons and five daughters, 
and theirs is the notable record of having not one death among the number. Tlie 
parents, too. are living. The father was born in North Carolina and belongs to one 
of the old families of that state of English descent, while the mother was born in 
Missouri. They are now living in Crawford county, Kansas, where Mr. Smith 
has long been known as a successful farmer, and he has also been active in political 

and civic matters. 

Austin C. Smith was educated in the public schools of Crawford county and 
his youthful experiences were those of the farm bred boy. He continued to assist 



54 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

his father until he reached the age of sixteen years, when he began earning his 
hving in another direction, taking up the painter's trade in Des Moines, Iowa. He 
followed that business as a journeyman for twelve years and in March, 1902, he 
came to Washington, establishing his home in Spokane, where he worked at his 
trade for two years. He then removed to Sequim, where he arrived an entire 
stranger. He began contracting in painting lines and so continued until 1912, 
when he established his present business by opening a grocery and hardware store, 
which he has since conducted under his own name as sole proprietor. The enter- 
prise has proven successful from the beginning. He originally had a cash capital 
of but four hundred dollars and today his business brings him annually seventeen 
thousand dollars, his trade having constantly and steadily increased. He has ever 
recognized the fact that satisfied patrons are the best advertisement and he has 
made every efifort to please his customers. Aside from being one of the prosperous 
merchants of the city he has erected and owns the Olympic Opera House, w^hich 
is the largest building in the city, having been erected at a cost of six thousand 
dollars. It covers an area forty by one hundred feet and is partially occupied on 
the ground floor by the Kof ord furniture store. 

At Sequim, on the 26th of November, 1908, Mr. Smith w^as married to Miss 
Nettie Miller, a native of Sequim and a daughter of Mr. and ^Irs. Chris Miller, 
who were pioneer settlers of this state. They have one child, Virl, born January 
14, 1912. 

Mr. Smith exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the republican party and was elected a member of the first city council of Sequim. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows, the Yeomen and the i\Iodern 
Woodmen of America. He belongs to the Commercial Club and takes active part 
in thus furthering the interests of the city. His religious faith is that of the 
Baptist church and his has been an honorable and upright life, winning for him 
the respect and goodwill of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



HENRY SCHUPP. 



Henry Schupp, secretary, treasurer and general manager of the Bellingham 
Bay Brewing Company and prominently known in connection with hotel interests 
in Bellingham, being secretary, treasurer and general manager of the company 
which built the Leopold Hotel, has demonstrated in his career the possibilities for 
successful attainment even when at the outset of one's career there is no chance 
to obtain assistance of a financial character or secure a desirable position through 
influence. 

Mr. Schupp was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, November 2, 1865, a 
son of Karl and Elizabeth Schupp. He attended the public and high schools of 
his native country to the age of sixteen years and then came to the United States, 
attracted by the opportunities which he believed might be secured on this side 
the Atlantic. He first worked as a farm hand near Parkersburg, West \'irginia. 
for three months and then went to Chillicothe, Ohio, where he engaged in farming 
and also attended night school for a year. He next went to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and there engaged as an apprentice with a pearl manufactory for two years. He 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 55 

afterward occupied the position of bookkeeper in a hotel for two years and later 
traveled for a year, looking for a favorable location. He finally settled at Basin, 
Jefl:erson county, Montana, where he was engaged in business until 1900, when he 
sold out and removed to Olympia, Washington, where he associated himself with 
an old friend, Leopold F. Schmidt, becoming secretary of the Olympia Brewing 
Company. In 1900 they and their business associates built a plant and organized 
the Bellingham Bay Brewing Company, of which Mr. Schupp has since been secre- 
tary, treasurer and general manager, and in this connection a large and profitable 
business has been developed. In 1902 Mr. Schupp became interested in the Byron 
Hotel Company, of which he has since been secretary, treasurer and general 
manager. In 1912 this company erected the present Leopold Hotel upon the site 
of the old Byron Hotel. It is a five story and basement structure, thoroughly 
modern in every appointment, and contains two hundred and one rooms, while 
forty-two people are employed in the conduct of the business. The hotel is con- 
sidered one of the finest on the coast in equipment and service and Mr. Schupp's 
previous experience along that line well qualifies him for executive control. 

In Cincinnati, in November, 1888, Mr. Schupp wedded Miss Katherine Sen- 
genberger, and they are the parents of three children, Katherine, Henry and Mar- 
garet, aged twelve, ten and eight years, all now public school pupils. 

Mr. Schupp is an Elk, has been a member of the United Commercial Travelers 
for twelve years and belongs to the Cougar Club and the Bellingham Country Club. 
In politics he is a republican and in religious faith is a Unitarian. The greater part 
of his time and attention is given to his business affairs, which have been of grow- 
ing extent and importance and have brought him substantial success. His residence 
at 6 Garden Terrace, which he built, is a beautiful home overlooking the bay. 



ALBERT L. JOHNSON. 

Albert L. Johnson, an active business man of Port Angeles, engaged in the 
coal and wood trade, was born in Cortland county. New York. October i, 1865. 
His father, Lyman B. Johnson, also a native of the Empire state, was a son of 
Charles Johnson, a native of Pennsylvania and a representative of one of the 
old families of that state of Dutch descent. Lyman B. Johnson was a stone 
mason by trade and thus provided for the support of his family. He wedded 
Mary Jane Crandall. a daughter of Lewis Crandall, who belonged to one of 
the old New York families of Irish descent. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have both 
passed away, the latter dying September 29, 1866, when but eighteen years of 
age. Mr. Johnson survived until 191 o and had reached the age of sixty-one 
years when he passed away in Cortland county. 

Albert L. Johnson, their only child, was educated in the public schools of 
his native county and when a youth of seventeen began working as a farm 
hand. He followed agricultural pursuits for a number of years and later 
worked along other lines, spending one year in a creamery in Cortland. New 
York. The opportunities of the growing west attracted him, however, and he 
crossed the continent to Auburn, Washington, where he arrived on the i6th of 
December, 1888. During the first winter he was employed as a clerk in the 



56 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Central Hotel there and on the 4th of March, 1889, he removed to Port Angeles, 
where he took up a preemption claim but owing to an accident was forced to 
sell his claim. After recovering from his injuries he worked in the shingle 
mills on Dry Creek in Clallam county and was thus engaged in mill work until 
April, i8go, when from the earnings which he had accumulated he purchased a 
team and began the teaming business. With that humble start he developed 
the largest teaming business on the peninsula and is still active along that line. 
He also deals in sand and gravel and builders' supplies of all kinds but gives 
the greater part of his attention to contracting for street "grading, paving and 
house moving. In June, 1907, he went to Seattle, where he remained for five 
years and where he did much work in those lines. He next removed to Aber- 
deen, where during 19 12 he engaged in the hotel business. Since locating in Port 
Angeles he has continued in the teaming business and as a grading and paving 
contractor and is also conducting a large wholesale and retail coal and wood busi- 
ness, his annual sales reaching a most gratifying figure. He is now supplying 
coal for the government coast guard vessels and he sells not a little to smaller 
dealers. 

On the 14th of February, 1892, in Victoria, British Columbia, Mr. Johnson 
was married to Miss Addie H. Hancock, a native of Clear Lake, Iowa, and 
a daughter of Henry and Jennie Hancock, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson have a son, Lyman Henry, who was born at Port Angeles, February 22, 
1893, and is now acting as bookkeeper in connection with his father's business. 

In politics Mr. Johnson is a republican, and while a firm believer in the prin- 
ciples of the party, has never been an aspirant for office — in fact has always 
declined to serve in public positions. He is a member of the Commercial Club 
and of the Merchants Association and individually and through those organ- 
izations is doing everything in his power to further the material development 
and extend the trade relations of the city. In his life he has always endeavored 
to follow the golden rule and his fellow townsmen speak of him in terms of high 
regard. 



ALFRED NEWMAN. 



Alfred Newman, proprietor of what is known as the Red Front Clothing 
Store and one of the leading business men of Port Townsend, has spent his 
entire life on the Pacific coast, being born in Marysville, California, October 
I, 1869. His parents, Abraham and Hannah (Schwartz) Newman, were both 
natives of Germany, and on coming to America in i860 located at Marysville, 
California, where the father was engaged in mercantile business for a number 
of years. On leaving there he removed to Nicholas, California, where he also 
spent several years, and later made his home in Williams, that state. On his 
retirement from business, however, he went to San Francisco, where he was 
residing at the time of his death which occurred in 1914 when he was eighty- 
nine years of age. His wife died in San 'Francisco in 1897 at the age of sixty- 
three years. 

In their family were eight children, four sons and four daughters, of whom 
Alfred Newman was the fifth in order of birth. During his boyhood he at- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 57 

tended the public schools of California and later pursued a commercial course 
in a business college of that state. He gained his early business experience 
while assisting his father in the store and he remained under the parental 
roof until twenty years of age. It was in 1889 that he arrived in Port Town- 
send, Washington, and established what was known as the Chicago Clothing 
Company. On selling out that business he became proprietor of the Red Front 
Clothing Store in 1891. His trade has steadily increased until it has now 
reached large proportions and he is at the head of one of the leading clothing 
stores in Jefferson county. 

Mr. Newman was married in Tacoma, Washington, January 28, 1890, to 
Miss Alma Packard, whose parents, George Franklin and Anna (Mathewson) 
Packard, were born respectively in New Bedford and Worcester, Massachu- 
setts. Both are now deceased. In politics he is independent, voting for men 
and measures that he believes will best promote the interests of his locality. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is 
a Royal Arch Mason. He stands high in business circles and has the respect 
and confidence of all who know him. 



FRANK HINES OSGOOD. 

There is probably no man who has taken a more active part in the growth 
and development of Seattle than Frank Hines Osgood, who now gives most of 
his time to looking after his extensive interests of various kinds. For many years 
he was connected with street railway construction and operation and from 1884 
to 1888 was the president and general manager of the Seattle Street Railway 
Company. Through his enterprise and capable direction the original electric 
system in Seattle was constructed. This was the first railway operated by elec- 
tricity west of the Mississippi and one of the first to be successfully operated in 
the United States. Mr. Osgood built similar systems in a number of other 
cities of the west but since 1907 has retired from railroading and is now devoting 
his attention to his various industrial, timber and mining properties. 

Mr. Osgood was born in Charlestown, New Hampshire, February 2, 1852, 
his parents being Solomon P. and Susan N. (Bailey) Osgood. Through both 
he is a descendant of early New England stock. The Osgoods were originally 
English, and the family was founded in this country in 1637. Through his 
paternal grandmother, Mr. Osgood is a great-grandson of John Bellows, the first 
settler at Walpole, New Hampshire, for whom the town of Bellows Falls, on 
the opposite side of the Connecticut river, was named. The Baileys were of 
Welsh extraction, and the family became residents of Massachusetts in the latter 
part of the seventeenth century. Salmon P. Chase was a member of the family 
of Mr. Osgood's maternal grandfather. 

Frank H. Osgood received his fundamental education in the village school 
of Charlestown, New Hampshire, and subsequently attended the New London 
University at New London, that state. The opportunities of the far west induced 
him to come to Seattle, Washington, in 1883, and soon afterward he became 
actively connected with street railway construction. The larger part of his labors 



58 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

for the next twenty-three years were devoted to railway building and operation. 
After a franchise had been granted for a street railway in Seattle, Mr. Osgood, 
without any previous experience, set himself to build the road, realizing the 
ultimate value of such a property. This was the first street railway in Washington 
territory. He was president and general manager thereof from its organization 
in 1884 until the Seattle Electric Railway was organized in 1888. It was alone 
through his enterprise and under his able direction that the original electric road 
in Seattle was constructed. It was the first electric railway west of the Missis- 
sippi and one of the first to be successfully operated within the United States 
and even in the world. In 1890 Mr. Osgood built an electric railway in Portland, 
Oregon, and during the years following carried to completion similar under- 
takings in Tacoma, Bellingham, Port Townsend, Spokane, Fidalgo Island and 
\^ictoria and Vancouver, British Columbia. He also made a contract for and 
built the West Street and North End Electric Railway from Seattle to Ballard, 
which is now a part of the Seattle Electric Railway. He also built the Rainier 
avenue line from Seattle to Rainier Beach. The latter line he purchased and 
extended it to Renton. He owned this line individually, finally disposing of it to 
its present owners. 

Since retiring from the street railway business in 1907, Mr. Osgood has given 
his attention to his various interests, which include important industrial enter- 
prises and timber and mining properties. His mining interests consist of gold, 
silver and lead mines, the latter situated in Oregon and California, and he has 
other property interests in Seattle and elsewhere. Among the industrial enter- 
prises with which he is associated is the Smith Cannery Machine Company of 
Seattle, with which he became connected at its inception, since which time he has 
been active in the successful management of its affairs. Mr. Osgood has become 
one of the leading capitalists of Seattle and such success as has attended his labors 
is highly merited, as it has come to him in return for unflagging enterprise and 
his superior judgment in business affairs. He has had confidence in the future 
of the west, and his faith has brought him golden returns. 

In the town of his birth — Charlestown, New Hampshire — Mr. Osgood was 
united in marriage to Miss Georgina B. Arquit, of Brooklyn, New York, who is a 
daughter of Joseph and Ellen (Douglas) Arquit. Mr. Osgood was one of the 
incorporators of the Rainier Club of Seattle and is a member of the Seattle Golf 
and Country Club and the Rocky Mountain Club of New York city. He has 
always been a lover of out-of-door life and a great admirer of nature. He has 
done eminently valuable work in western America as a builder of electric roads, 
and particularly in Seattle his constructive work could not be easily forgotten. 



H. C. BARKMAN, M. D. 

Dr. H. C. Barkman, who since October, 1908, has continuously engaged in 
the practice of medicine and surgery in Raymond, was born in Germany on 
.the nth of September, 1862, and in the schools of that country obtained his 
education. After mastering the usual branches of learning that are required 
as the foundation of success in life he entered upon preparation for the practice 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES b9 

of medicine and was graduated at Kiel in 1888. He received special training 
in obstetrical work and studied for some time at Leipzig. He practiced medi- 
cine for a brief period in Germany and in October,^ 1893, came to the United 
States, making his way to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he resided until June, 
1904. The favorable reports which reached him concerning the advantages 
and opportunities of the northwest led him to come to Washington and for two 
vears he resided at Stella, where he engaged in medical practice. He afterward 
lived for nineteen months in Camas and in October, 1908, arrived in Raymond, 
where he has since continued in active practice, discharging his duties with a 
marked sense of conscientious obligation. 

On the 31st of January, 1903, Dr. Barkman was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Helene Weigel, also a native of Germany, and in 19 13 they went back to 
their native country for a visit. Dr. Barkman, however, has become a loyal 
American citizen, having taken out his naturalization papers. In politics he main- 
tains an independent course. He also resided continuously on this side of the 
water since October, 1893, and in the intervening period of twenty-three years 
has utilized every opportunity to further his advancement along professional 
lines, continually adding to his knowledge through reading, observation and 
experience. His labors bring good results and he is now accorded a most lib- 
eral patronage. 



CHRIS CULMBACK. 



Chris Culmback, a wholesale dealer and jobber in cigars at Everett, was 
born at Jedsted, Denmark, June 3, 1867. His father, Jorgen Culmback, was 
also a native of that country, where he followed agricultural pursuits. He also 
took an active part in political affairs and served as a member of the city coun- 
cil. He likewise rendered military aid to his country in the war between Den- 
mark and Germany in 1864. He passed away in December, 1886, at Jedsted, 
when fifty-six years of age. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Kersten 
Hjerrild, died in Denmark in 1887, at the age of sixty-two years. In their 
family were five children, of whom four are yet living: Nels, who resided in 
the Schleswig-Holstein district of Germany and is now deceased; Knute. a 
farmer residing at Jedsted, Denmark; Klaus, who also follows farming in that 
country ; Mary, the wife of George Petersen, of Denmark, and Chris. 

The last named pursued his education in the schools of his native city to 
the age of fourteen years and spent his youth upon his father's farm, assisting 
in the work of the fields until he reached the age of seventeen, when he was 
apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, which he followed in Denmark for 
five years. When about twenty-two years of age he sailed for America, reach- 
ing this country in 1888. He first settled at Sidney, Nebraska, and secured em- 
ployment with the Union Pacific Railroad, working as a section hand for a 
year. He then removed to Portland, Oregon, where he was employed in 
various lines until 1892, when he became a resident of Everett, Washington, the 
city being platted about that time. He is therefore numbered among its earliest 
residents. He was employed in railroad work and in various other lines until 



60 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

1894, when he began deahng in cigars and tobacco and is today the oldest mer- 
chant in his hne in the city. From a small start, with a capital of but eighty- 
two dollars and a half, he. has developed his business to its present extensive 
proportions. He invested eighty dollars in the purchase of his original stock, 
which left him but two dollars and a half. He sold then to the retail trade, 
since which time he has developed his enterprise into the largest retail store of 
the city and also does an extensive jobbing and wholesale business, employing 
two traveling salesmen and selling largely over adjacent territory. His busi- 
ness today represents an investment of over thirty-five thousand dollars and 
Mr. Culmback is the sole owner. He is likewise a stockholder in the Everett 
Broadway Candy Company, manufacturers of fine confections, and is accounted 
one of the successful, well known and highly respected merchants of his adopted 
city. 

In Spokane, Washington, in 1908, Mr. Culmback was married to Miss 
Mathilda Larsen, a native of Denmark, where her mother still resides. Two 
children have been born of this marriage: Kersten, born in Everett, March 8, 
191 1 ; and Hans Christian, August 2, 1912. The family reside at No. 3214 
Grand street, in property owned by Mr. Culmback, and he also has other realty 
holdings in the city. In politics Mr. Culmback is a republican where national 
issues are involved but casts an independent local ballot. He is very prominent 
in Masonic circles, belonging to the lodge, chapter and commandery at Everett, 
and also has membership with the Mystic Shrine at Seattle. He is a life mem- 
ber of the Elks lodge of Everett and also belongs to the United Commercial 
Travelers, to the Danish Brotherhood, to the Cascade Club, to the Commercial 
Club and to the Lutheran church — associations which indicate much of the na- 
ture of his interests and the rules which govern his conduct. He is one of the 
valued and highly respected residents of Everett. The force of character 
which has enabled him to rise from a very humble position in financial circles 
to a place of prominence as a business man of Everett has also made him a sub- 
stantial citizen and one who recognizes not only the privileges but also the 
duties and obligations of citizenship. 



DONALD MAINLAND. 



Donald Mainland, a dealer in hay and grain at Port Townsend, belongs to that 
class of substantial citizens that Scotland has furnished to western Washington. 
He was born on the Orkney islands on the 22d of April, 1861, a son of Donald 
and Katherine (Garrock) Mainland, who were also natives of the land of hills 
and heather, where they spent their entire lives. They had a family of eight 
sons, of whom Donald, Jr., was the fourth in order of birth. The father owned 
a grist mill and also engaged in the manufacture of oatmeal and in his business 
met with a fair measure of prosperity. 

Donald Mainland of this review was educated in the common schools of his 
native country to the age of eleven years, when he started out to earn his own 
living. He was first employed at herding cattle and in the winter months he 
attended school. His time was thus passed until he attained his majority, when 




DUX ALU MAINJ>ANI) 



• THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRARY 

ASTO^, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 63 

he determined to try his fortune in the new world, and in the fall of 1882 he made 
his way direct to Washington, locating at Port Townsend, where he secured 
employment as engineer in one of the near-by sawmills. He was thus employed 
for nine years, at the end of which time he took up a homestead claim on section 
32, township 28, range i west, Jefferson county. He there secured one hundred 
and sixty acres, to which he afterward added eighty acres by purchase. He then 
successfully followed farming until May i, 1908, when he disposed of his land 
and took a trip abroad, visiting relatives in Scotland. Following his return to 
America he established his home in Port Townsend in August, 1908, and turned 
his attention to the grain business. In 1912 he estabhshed a hay and grain 
business, of which he is sole owner. In this connection he is conducting a whole- 
sale and retail business which is the largest of its kind in Port Townsend. He 
has built up a trade of extensive and gratifying proportions and his activities now 
constitute a source of substantial revenue. In addition to his business he owns 
considerable town property, having made judicious investment in real estate. 

In September, 1888, Mr. Mainland was married in Vancouver, British Colum- 
bia, to Miss Isabella Sinclair, a native of Scotland and a daughter of James 
Sinclair. They had three children but all have passed away. Mrs. Mainland holds 
membership in the First Presbyterian church and Mr. Mainland belongs to the 
Commercial Club of Port Townsend and the Good Roads Club. In politics he 
is a republican and has always taken an active interest in questions relating to the 
general welfare. He served for one four-year term as county commissioner of 
Jefferson county, but while never an offfce seeker, he has always cooperated 
heartily in plans and measures for the general good. In his business affairs he 
has displayed sound judgment as well as indefatigable energ)^ and through per- 
sistent effort, intelligently directed, has worked his way upward to success. 



ANDERS G. WICKMAN. 

Anders G. Wickman, engaged in the undertaking business in Bellingham, is a 
representative of that substantial class of citizens and business men that Sweden 
has furnished to the Pacific northwest. He was born at Toreboda, Sweden, Sep- 
tember I, i860, and while spending his youthful days in the home of his parents, 
Johannes and Anna C. (Swanson) Wickman, he attended the public schools. 
When a youth of sixteen he was apprenticed to the tailoring trade and after serv- 
ing for five years, a portion of the time in Norway, he went to Denmark in 1881 
and worked at his trade in that country until the fall of the same year. The op])or- 
tunities of the new world attracted him, however, and he bade adieu to friends 
in his native country and sailed for America. 

Mr. Wickman first established his home in Omaha, Nebraska, where lie was 

employed as a tailor until 1883, when he made his way to the Pacific coast, working 

at his trade with the firm of Bine & George, leading tailors of San Francisco, until 

1887. During this time Mr. Wickman also learned the cutting part of the work 

and in order to further his education he attended night school. His earnings were 

most carefully saved and he resolved to engage in business on his own account. 

To that end he made a tour over the northwest, looking for a favorable location, 
Vol. in— 4 



64: WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

and eventually entered into partnership in the merchant tailoring business in 
Tacoma with P. Holmeren. There he remained until 1889, when he removed to 
Bellingham, where for a long period heconducted one of the leading and profitable 
merchant tailoring establishments of the city. He built up a business of most 
gratifying proportions, which he continued to manage until 1906, when he sold out 
and afterward went abroad, spending six months in Europe. On the expiration 
of that period he returned to Bellingham, where he lived retired until March, 1909, 
but indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature and, not content with- 
out some occupation, he then formed a partnership with Ed Stokes for the conduct 
of an undertaking business under the firm style of Stokes & Wickman. In August, 
1910, he bought out his partner's interest in the business, which he has since 
conducted under his own name. 

In September, 1896, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Wickman and Miss 
Hulda Martenson, a native of Sweden. They are well known socially in Belling- 
ham and have a large circle of warm friends. Mr. Wickman holds membership 
with the Knights of Pythias Lodge, No. 1 1 ; Olalla Camp, No. 383, Woodmen of 
the World ; Sunset Lodge, No. 202, I. O. O. F. ; and the Elks Club, No. 194, at 
Bellingham; and from 1890 until 1897 he was a volunteer fireman of Bellingham. 
His political allegiance is given to the democratic party, and while he has never 
been an office seeker, he is never neglectful of the duties of citizenship but cooper- 
ates in many measures for the general good as a member of the Commercial Club. 
His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church and its teachings guide him in all 
of the relations of life. His sterling qualities are many and have gained for him 
confidence and regard in business circles and warm friendship in social circles. 



CHARLES D. BEAGLE. 

Charles D. Beagle has won gratifying success as an attorney and is con- 
sidered one of the leading residents of Mount Vernon. A native of St. Paul, 
Minnesota, he was born on the 23rd of December, 1881, and his parents were 
Alphonso P. and Emeretta (Rogers) Beagle, both natives of Michigan. The 
Beagle family was established in what was then Genesee county, in western 
New York, in colonial days, and is of Welsh descent. Luther B. Beagle, the 
grandfather of C. D. Beagle, emigrated from the Empire state to Michigan and 
was instrumental in naming the county in which he settled Genesee in honor of 
his home county in New York. He won gratifying success as an agriculturist and 
passed his remaining days in Michigan. His son, Alphonso P. Beagle, was at 
various times in the employ of several express companies but is now living retired 
in Flint, Michigan. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Beagle of this review was 
William Rogers, who was also a native of Genesee county, New York, where his 
ancestors settled in colonial times on removal to the new world from Wales. The 
mother is still living. There are only two children in the family, the daughter 
being Eunice i\nn, the wife of C. P. Johnson, a resident of Flint, Michigan. 

Charles D. Beagle attended the public schools of St. Paul, and after completing 
his course there entered the University of Minnesota and was graduated from the 
College of Law with the degree of LL.B. in 1904. For one year he engaged in 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 65 

the practice of his profession at St. Paul but at the end of that time removed to 
Anacortes, Washington, arriving there in July, 1905. He formed a partnership 
with H. C. Barney, formerly of Minneapolis, and they practiced at the bar under 
the firm name of Beagle & Barney. At the end of a year, however, this association 
was discontinued and about a year later Mr. Beagle became associated with Frank 
Quimby, an old attorney of Skagit county, under the firm name of Quimby & 
Beagle. He was city attorney of Anacortes for three years and in 1913 he was 
elected prosecuting attorney and moved to Mount Vernon. Benjamin Driftmier 
was taken into the firm as junior member, and the three men practiced in partner- 
ship until June, 191 5, when Mr. Quimby retired and the firm name became Beagle 
& Driftmier. This name is still continued and the firm is one of the best known in 
legal circles in this section of the state. Mr. Beagle has handled many important 
cases and the records show that he has won a large percentage of the trials in 
which he has appeared as counsel. His success is due to his thorough knowledge 
of statute and precedent, his habit of extensive preparation and his force in pre- 
senting arguments. 

Mr Beagle was united in marriage June 20, 1911, to Miss Maude Stewart 
Bliss, who was born in Alissouri but was reared in Minnesota. Her parents, 
H. D. and Ella Stewart Bliss, are well known residents of Minneapolis. She is a 
member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, is very active in club work 
and is now serving as president of the Mount Vernon Civic Improvement Club, 
an important factor in the uplift and upbuilding of the town. She also takes a 
prominent part in school and charitable work but allows nothing to interfere with 
her home duties. She has two children, John Stewart, who was born in Anacortes 
June 2, 1912, and Virginia Dare, born in Mount Vernon on the lOth of July, 19 15. 

Mr. Beagle is a stanch republican and has taken quite an active part in local 
politics. He is well known fraternally, belonging to the Masonic and Elks lodges 
at Anacortes and the Knights of Pythias. While a student in the University of 
Minnesota he became a member of two Greek letter fraternities, Kappa Sigma 
and Delta Chi. He is a communicant of the Episcopal church and is a member 
of the bishop's committee. He is very enthusiastic concerning the great future 
in store for the state of Washington, and does everything in his power to help 
realize its splendid possibilities. 



CHARLES R. FRAZIER. 

Charles R. Frazier, superintendent of the schools of Everett, has devoted 
the entire period of his manhood to educational work and his career has been 
characterized by steady progress in this field — a progress that has brought him 
to a position in the foremost ranks among the pu1)Hc educators of Washington. 
Professor Frazier is a native of Wisconsin, his birth having occurred at Viro- 
qua, Vernon county, on the 31st of January, 1869. The Fraziers came origin- 
ally from Scotland, a father and two sons crossing the Atlantic i)rior to the 
Revolutionary war. One of the sons settled in Pennsylvania and the other in 
Virginia, and it is from the Virginia branch of the family that Charles R. 
Frazier is descended. His father, William Frazier, was born in Ohio, to 



66 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

which state his parents had removed from Virginia in pioneer times. He 
married Pluma Powell, also a native of the Buckeye state and a daughter of 
Rev. Reuben Powell, who was a clergyman of the United Brethren church. 
The Powell family is of English, Dutch and Welsh descent. To Mr. and 
Mrs. William Frazier were born eleven children, ten of whom are yet living. 
The mother survives, but the father passed away at Sparta, Wisconsin, in 
1902, at the age of sixty-nine years. He had conducted a successful business 
as an agriculturist and manufacturer in that state and was prominent in the 
public life of the community, representing his district in the state legislature 
in 1876. His political allegiance was given to the republican party. While 
reared in the faith of the Quaker church, he afterward became a member of 
the Universalist church. 

The youthful experiences of Charles R. Frazier were those of the farm 
bred boy and after attending the country schools he entered the State Normal 
School at Platteville, Wisconsin, and completed the classical course by gradua- 
tion in 1891. In 1895 he was graduated from the University of Wisconsin 
and he has since studied in the University of |Chicago, while for one year he 
was a student at Yale. Before entering the Normal School he took up the 
profession of teaching in the country schools of his native county and follow- 
ing his graduation from the Normal he taught at Tower, Minnesota, and in 
the Nelson Newey high school at Superior, Wisconsin. His progress along 
professional lines has been continuous, his developing power and ability winning 
him wide recognition as a most able educator. He became superintendent of the 
schools at Waterville and of the schools at Little Falls, Minnesota, and at Winona, 
Minnesota, ranking with the ablest educators of that state. In 1909 he was made 
assistant state superintendent of schools in Minnesota and occupied the position 
for two years. In 1910 he removed to Everett and since that year has continu- 
ously occupied the position of city superintendent of schools, while under his 
guidance many improvements in the school system have been instituted. He 
provided for the expenses of his university training and his progress is the direct 
result of his effort and laudable ambition. He has compiled a spelling book known 
as the National Speller, which is used in many states, and he has always kept in 
touch with the most advanced ideas relative to educational work. His assistance 
has been sought in connection with the improvement of educational institutions 
and of educational methods on many occasions. He was vice president of the 
Inland Empire Educational Association in 191 5 and 1916 and was appointed by 
Governor Lister a member of the state board of education. In 19 12 he was hon- 
ored with the presidency of the Washington Education Association and in 191 5 
was made a member of the survey committee on the survey of the schools of 
Ashland, Oregon. He was a member of the board of directors of the National 
Education Association, 1913-1914, and gave courses in school administration in 
the University of Washington in 191 1 and in the University of Oregon in 1915, 
1916 and 191 7. Aside from his educational work Professor Frazier is the secre- 
tary of the Yakima Mazilla Orchard Company. 

On the 30th of June, 1897, in Washington, D. C, Professor Frazier was mar- 
ried to Miss Alice Bingham, a daughter of Lemuel R. and Martha (Tracy) 
Bingham, who were natives of Wisconsin. Their children are : Lewis Raymond, 
born in Superior. Wisconsin, January 14, 1899; Enid Adelaide, born in Water- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 67 

ville, Minnesota, June 30, 1901 ; and Jean Alice, born in Little Falls, Minnesota, 
May 5, 1903. 

Mrs. Frazier is descended through the Tracy line from a prominent EngHsh 
family. She is very active in club, charitable and church work and is custodian 
in the State Federation of Women's Clubs. She is also active in the Young 
Women's Christian Association and was formerly a director on the board. In 
politics Mr. Frazier is a progressive republican and at local elections casts an 
independent ballot. He was made a Mason at Superior, Wisconsin, and he belongs 
also to the Everett Commercial Club and the Everett Rotary Club, of both of 
which he is a director, and to the First Congregational church, of which he is a 
trustee. In a word, the influence of the family is always on the side of progress 
and uplift for the individual and for the community, and the effort of Professor 
and Mrs. Frazier is always toward the attainment of higher ideals and the advance- 
ment of civic standards. 



HENRY W. BALE. 



Well defined plans and purposes, manifest throughout his business career, 
have brought substantial success to Henry W. Bale, who is now president of the 
Bale Logging Company of Hoquiam. He was born near Bristol, England, in 
1866, and was a little lad of nine years when brought by his parents to the 
new world, the family home being established in Michigan, where his father and 
mother spent their remaining days. For almost a quarter of a century Henry W. 
Bale remained a resident of Michigan and in 1898 removed from that state to 
Hoquiam, where he entered commercial circles in partnership with Fred J- 
Wood, purchasing the stock of goods of Ash Brothers. Under the firm style of 
Bale & Wood they conducted a dry goods business on Eighth street for some time 
or until Mr. Bale disposed of his interests to engage in the lumber business as 
senior member of the firm of Bale & Parker. He has since been active along 
that line. 

Upon the death of Mr. Parker, the Bale Logging Company was incorporated 
in 1904 for the purpose of carrying on a general logging business on the Flump- 
tulips river in Chehalis, now Grays Harbor, county. In 191 1 W. L. Lick pur- 
chased an interest in the business and now looks after the logging end, while 
Mr. Bale has charge of the sales. Theirs is one of the chief industries of this 
character in Chehalis county. Mr. Bale also became interested with several 
others in establishing the Woodlawn Mill & Boom Company electrical mill, acting 
as vice president during Robert Lytle's lifetime and being made president of 
same upon the latter's death. At that time he also became vice president of the 
Hoquiam Lumber & Shingle Company and he is moreover the chief executive 
officer of the Lytle Logging & Mercantile Company. He is also president of the 
Panama-Eastern Lumber Company. It will thus be seen that he is very active 
in connection with the lumber industry, which has always been the chief source 
of wealth in Grays Harbor county. He became one of the organizers of the 
Lumbermen's Bank of Hoquiam in 1904 and from the beginning has served as one 



68 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

of its trustees. This bank is capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars and 
owns a fine bank building which was erected in 191 1. 

In 1900. at Hoquiam, ]\Ir. Bale was married to Miss Theodocia Parker, a 
daughter of James H. and Mary (Lytle) Parker, the former becoming one of the 
early pioneers of Tacoma and acting as city attorney of Hoquiam at the time of 
his demise in 1904. Mr. and Mrs. Bale have one child, William Warren. They 
hold membership in the Presbyterian church. ^Vlr. Bale now serving as one of 
the church trustees. Politically he gives his allegiance to the republican party 
and fraternally he was connected with the ^^^lasons in Alichigan and at the 
present time is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Since 
coming to the northwest he has made rapid and substantial progress in business 
and seems to have accomplished at any one point in his career the possibility 
for successful accomplishment at that point. Readily recognizing and utilizing 
opportunities which others have passed heedlessly by, he has worked his way 
steadily upward and the simple weight of his character and ability has carried 
him into important relations. 



ELLWOOD CLARKE HUGHES. 

Ellwood Clarke Hughes is engaged in the general practice of law in Seattle 
although largely specializing in the field of corporation law, his services being 
retained by many important business interests. He was born in Columbia county, 
Pennsylvania, August 25, 1855. His father, Ellwood Hughes, Sr., came from 
Quaker stock of Pennsylvania that was there in the time of William Penn. The 
mother, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Hill, represented a family 
established in America long prior to the Revolutionarv^ war and had a grandfather 
who served for seven years during the struggle for independence. 

In his early boyhood Ellwood Clarke Hughes became a resident of Illinois 
and attended Carthage College at Carthage, that state, until graduated with the 
Bachelor of Arts degree, winning valedictorian honors in 1878 with the remark- 
able percentage of ninety-nine and three-tenths. He afterward pursued a post- 
graduate course at Wittenberg College, in Springfield, Ohio, finishing in the spring 
of 1879, and for a brief period in his early manhood he devoted his attention Lo 
educational work. After pursuing his post-graduate work at Wittenberg he 
returned to that school, where he taught Latin and Greek one year, and he also 
was teacher of Latin and Greek in Mount IMorris (Illinois) College for one year. 

After preparing for the bar ]\Ir. Hughes practiced law in Iowa from the fall 
of 1881 until 1890 and became a leader of public thought and action in his sec- 
tion of the state, which is attested by the fact that he was during that time 
tendered the nomination for congress. He declined however, and afterward came 
to Seattle, where he entered upon the practice of law, associating himself with 
ludge Henry G. Struve, ex-United States Senator John B. Allen and Alaurice 
McMicken. Subsequent changes in the firm have led to the adoption of the 
present style of Hughes, Mc]\Iicken, Dovell & Ramsey. The law practice of ]\Tr. 
Hughes is general yet he has a large number of corporations among his clients. 
At one time he was attorney for the Seattle Electric Company and for the 
Northern Pacific Railroad Company but resigned from those connections. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 69 

When he first came to the northwest, Mr. Hughes took an active part in 
pontics as a supporter of the repubHcan party but never held nor desired office 
of any kind. He was president of the Post-Intelligencer Company from 1895 to 
1910, and during a large part of that time was a member of the Associated Press. 

In 1900 he took an active part in the reorganization of the Associated Press 
under the laws of the state of New York, at which time its base of operation 
was transferred from Chicago to New York City. He has also been 
president of the State Bar Association — a fact indicative of his high 
standing among the representatives of the profession here. He was 
tendered the office of United States judge for the third district by President Taft, 
in 1910, but declined to serve, preferring to concentrate his energies upon the 
private practice of law. He became a member of the Seattle school board in 1899 
and served until 1908, when he resigned, acting as president for a part of the time 
and taking a very helpful part in the reorganization of the schools and in freeing 
the school system from politics. He also did effective work in enlarging the 
scope of the schools and in securing the erection of new modern buildings. 

At Carthage, Illinois, on the 30th of December, 1880, was celebrated the 
marriage of Mr. Hughes and Miss Emma De Hart, daughter of William De Hart, 
of that place, and a member of one of the old families that was represented in the 
Revolutionary war. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes became parents of a son and daugh- 
ter. The former, Howard D., is a member of the law firm of Higgins & 
Hughes, the firm occupying a prominent position and winning success at the bar. 
He was for some time in the corporation counsel's office. The daughter, Helen, is 
the wife of William Marbury Somervell, mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

Mr. Hughes has for thirty years been connected with the Masonic fraternity, 
taking the degrees from the blue lodge to the commandery. He belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is a past master of his lodge in Iowa. 
He is a life member of the Elks lodge. No. 92, of Seattle and he belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce and to the Rainier, Arctic and the Seattle Golf Clubs. His 
interests and activities have never been self-centered. While he has concentrated 
his efforts upon his law practice and won success and distinction in that line he 
has also given his time and labors to the benefit of his communi^ty in his co- 
operation with the schools and in efforts along various other lines for the public 
good. 



WILLIAM F. ULRICH. 



One of the most beautiful homes of Index is the residence of William F. 
Ulrich, postmaster at that point. He was born at Hutchinson, Minnesota, De- 
cember 31, 1879, a son of Henry and Caroline (Ballinger) Ulrich, who were 
married in Minnesota. The father was a native of Germany but in his youth 
his parents removed with their family to Minnesota and later in life he engaged 
in farming in that state. He is still living at the age of sixty years. His wife 
has reached the same age. In their family were ten children. 

William F. Ulrich, the second in order of birth, attended the schools of 
Hutchinson, Minnesota, passing through consecutive grades to his graduation 
from the high school. In 1901 he came to Index and in connection with his 



70 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

uncle bought out the mercantile business which he conducted on an extensive 
scale for a number of years. After some time he purchased the interests of his 
uncle and conducted the business until December, 191 5, at which time he dis- 
posed of the store. He has never been afraid to venture where favoring op- 
portunity has led the way and his efforts have been put forth along well de- 
fined lines of labor where result is certain. 

On the i6th of May, 1906, Mr. Ulrich was married to Miss Persis E. Gunn, 
of Index, a daughter of A. D. and Persis (Graves) Gunn, who were among the 
first settlers upon the land where the town of Index now stands. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ulrich have become the parents of three children : Robert, bom in 1907 ; Donald, 
in 1913; and William, in 1915. All were born in Index and the eldest is now in 
school. 

Mr. Ulrich is connected with the Improved Order of Red Men and the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. He gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party and was a member of the first city council, thus serving when 
the town was incorporated. He occupied the position of city treasurer for five 
years and for the past ten years has been postmaster. He manifests a public- 
spirited devotion to everything relative to Index and his labors in her behalf 
have been so intelligently and wisely directed that most gratifying results have 
been accomplished. 



FRANZ PONISCHIL. 



Franz Ponischil is now living retired in Hoquiam but for a considerable 
period was identified with the tailoring business in that city. He is a native of 
Austria, born in Bautsch, province of Moravia, September 30, 1849, ^^'^^ "^ that 
country grew to manhood. There he was married August 23, 1870, to Miss 
Antonia Drescher, who was born April 25, 1845. 

For some time Mr. Ponischil was engaged in the tailoring business in Wig- 
stadtl, Austria, but, believing that he could better his financial condition in the 
new world, he and his family .mailed from Bremen on the 5th of July, 1884, and 
landed at Castle Garden, New York, on the 17th of that month. Three days 
later they sailed for Galveston, Texas, where they arrived July 25, and took 
the train for Burnett, Texas, whence they proceeded by wagon to Mason, Texas. 
Arriving at his destination, Mr. Ponischil at once opened a tailor shop though his 
capital consisted of but sixty dollars. The family found that there were very 
few in that locality who could understand their language but they made a favor- 
able impression upon their pioneer neighbors, who helped them by extending 
credit for flour, furniture and other necessities. They also helped in many other 
ways to Americanize the newcomers. Mrs. Ponischil was taken seriously ill and 
had to be sent to a hospital at San Antonio, Texas. The people built an ambu- 
lance for her conveyance and en route she found that they had left with her a 
purse containing money to pay her hospital fees and other expenses. In the 
meantime her family were well taken care of and the kindness of the people at 
that time eventually enabled Mr. Ponischil to gain a start in the new world. 
He commenced handling delicatessen goods but in that venture lost all that he 




ADOLPH PONISCHIL 



^- THE NEW York"! 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTO^, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 73 

had previously made. With his family he then started for San Antonio, Texas, 
but the first night out was overtaken by a party on horse back, who urged him to 
return, telling him that if he would return they would give him a lot and build 
him a house. The hospitality and democracy of the southwest made a lasting 
impression upon him and he will never forget the kindness shown him at that 
time. 

On the 9th of September, 1888, Mr. Ponischil and his family arrived in Stay- 
ton, Oregon, where they remained four years, and removed to Ocosta, Washing- 
ton, July 9, 1892. There he resumed work at his trade but the collapse of the 
boom at that place caused him to seek a new location and on the 28th of April, 
1895, he removed to Hoquiam, where he opened a tailoring establishment in a 
small room in the Heermans building on I street. He afterward removed to the 
Hoag block on Eighth street, occupying one-half of the store, and with the fur- 
ther development and growth of his business he secured quarters in the North- 
western building on Eighth street. Later he sold out and with his family returned 
to Austria. 

Adolph Ponischil, son of Franz, was born in Bautsch, Austria, on the 13th 
of June, 1871, and when thirteen years of age began learning the tailor's trade 
in Berlin, Germany, with his uncle, Oswald Ponischil. A year later his parents 
decided to come to the United States, leaving it optional with him whether he 
should come or not, but he heard that in this country they had cake three times 
daily and it was this that decided him to try his fortunes in the new world. He 
accompanied his parents on their various removals, finally becoming a resident of 
Hoquiam, Washington, where at one time he had charge of the old Hoquiam 
Hotel. He established a tailoring business on J street and later bought the old 
Watson bakery building, which he refitted, turning it into a tailoring establish- 
ment, where business was conducted for a number of years. He afterward pur- 
chased his present site, on which then stood a wooden building. With the return 
of his father and mother to Hoquiam, his father became associated with him in 
business under the firm style of Ponischil & Son. They afterward moved the 
wooden building away and erected the concrete building, which is one of the sub- 
stantial business structures of Hoquiam. It is splendidly fitted uj) for the conduct 
of the tailoring business of which Adolph Ponischil is now in charge and which 
constitutes one of the leading establishments of this character in southwestern 
Washington. 

At Aberdeen, Washington, February 26, 1894, Adolph Ponischil was united 
in marriage to Miss May Belle Flowers, a native of Spickard, Missouri, and they 
have become the parents of the following children : Pauline, who was born Sep- 
tember 12, 1896, in the old Hoquiam Hotel, the first on Grays Harbor, and who 
supplemented her public school education by a course in a business college ; 
Franz, who was born April 5, 1898, and attended the public schools and after- 
ward the Interlaken School at Rolling Prairie, Indiana ; Hilda, who was born Sep- 
tember 25, 1899, and is in her second year in high school; Agnes, who was born 
October 8, 1905, and is also attending school ; and Adolph Jack, born July 16, 1914. 

For four years Adolph Ponischil served as secretary of the county republican 
central committee but is now independent in politics. He is an active worker for 
good government and stands for high ideals in municipal afifairs. For two years 
he was a member of the National Guard in Oregon and for three years in Wash- 



74 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

ington, being the first to enlist in Hoquiam. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons, Elks, Eagles and Woodmen of the \\'orld. In ]\Iasonry he has taken 
the degrees of both the York and Scottish Rites and is also identified with the 
Mystic Shrine and the Order of the Eastern Star. His business ability, his fra- 
ternal connections and his loyalty in citizenship have all brought him prominently 
before the public and he is accounted one of the valued and representative citizens 
of Hoquiam. 



PETER ZOBRIST. 



Switzerland is famous throughout the world for its dairy products and a 
large percentage of its citizens are acquainted with the various phases of the 
dairy business and have won success along that line in other lands. Among this 
number is Peter Zobrist, for many years one of the prosperous dairymen of 
Bellingham, where he conducted an extensive business. He was born in Inter- 
laken, in the canton of Bern, Switzerland, in July, 1857, a son of Peter and 
Alagdalena Zobrist. There, within sight of the eternal snow-capped Jungfrau, 
his early days were passed and he pursued his education in the public schools 
of that beautiful city until he reached the age of sixteen years. It was then 
that he made his start in the business world, being employed in a cheese factory 
for two years, after which he took up the arduous task of acting as guide in the 
Alps, being thus engaged until he reached the age of twenty-three. Hoping to 
win success more readily in the new world, he then came to the United States 
and settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he accepted the position of foreman in 
a dairy. Later he was employed in the home of William Sticks for three years, 
after which he established a summer resort and dairy combined on what is known 
as Harrison Pike, near Cincinnati, there continuing until 1885. 

In the latter year !Mr. Zobrist came to Washington, making his way to Bell- 
ingham, and afterward he took up a homestead at Acme, Washington, to which 
town he gave his name — the English translation of the word Zobrist, meaning 
high up. While clearing this land of stumps he worked for a neighbor at a dol- 
lar and a half per day, and later he carried the mail from Bellingham to vari- 
ous points, being thus engaged until 1894, when he sold his land and removed 
to Bellingham, at which time he was the possessor of two cows and a cash 
capital of fifty dollars. He bought out a six cow dairy with one wagon and 
from that time he gradually acquired other dairy properties and consolidated 
them. In 1897, in addition to his Bellingham dairy property, he bought a ranch 
of one hundred and sixty acres near Van Wyck and took his twenty cows to 
that place, upon which he had seventy head of cows and six horses. In 191 5 
he erected a fine two story building at No. 1417 Dock street, using the first floor 
for his dairy, while he rents the second floor to the Woodmen of the A\'orld. 
His dairy is equipped with the most modern machinery for the conduct of a 
business of that character and he has a branch dairy at No. 1240 Elk street, 
which is operated under the name of the Van Wyck Dairy. He uses three cars 
for auto delivery and thus meets the demands of his trade. 

In May, 1884, Mr. Zobrist was married in Cincinnati, Ohio, to Miss Mary 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 75 

Koetter, and they have become the parents of eleven children : Peter R., thirty- 
one years of age, who is in charge of the Van Wyck Dairy Farm; ^Irs. Mamie 
Wilson, of Bellingham; William, twenty-eight years of age, who is ice cream 
maker for the Van Wyck Dairy; Mrs. Clara Aminton, of Bellingham; Emma, 
at home; Walter, twenty-four years of age, who is a driver for the Van Wyck 
Dairy; Arnold, twenty-three years of age, who works on the \^an Wyck farm; 
Emil, twenty-one years of age, also a driver for the Van Wyck Dairy ; Harry, 
nineteen years of age, working on the Van Wick farm ; and Charles and Albert, 
aged respectively seventeen and twelve years, now attending the public schools. 

Mr. Zobrist is a member of the Loyal Order of ]\Ioose and of the Wood- 
men of the World and in his political views is a socialist. His life has been 
an expression of characteristic Swiss thrift and enterprise — traits which have 
Avon for the people of the land of the Alps their creditable position among the 
nations of the world. These same characteristics manifested in the individual 
spell success and thus it is that Peter Zobrist has gained a position among the 
men of afifluence in Bellingham, where he is now conducting extensive and im- 
portant dairy interests. 

Since the above was written Mr. Zobrist has met with reverses on account of 
the war and has disposed of his real estate holdings but still retains the man- 
agement of the dairy business. 



HON. ROBERT R. WHITE. 

Hon. Robert R. White, ex-mayor of Sumner, is not only actively identified 
with the control of civic interests in his home town but also with its business 
development and has figured prominently in its financial circles. He was born 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 28th of December, 1876, a son of Wil- 
liam and Sarah (Reed) White, the former a native of Ireland, while the latter 
is of Scotch parentage. In 1878 they removed with their family, consisting of 
five daughters and two sons, Robert R. being the youngest, to Greenfield, Iowa, 
and settled upon a farm, where ex-Mayor White spent his youthful days and 
pursued his education, being graduated from the high school at Greenfield with 
the class of 1897. He afterward attended the. Capital City Commercial College 
at Des Moines, Iowa, and on completing his course there secured the position 
of bookkeeper with the Iowa Wholesale & Retail Seed Company of that city. 
He resigned in 1901 to remove to McKenzie, North Dakota, where he engaged 
in raising, buying and selling live stock, the undertaking being attended by a 
very substantial measure of success. In 1906, however, he heard and heeded 
the call of the west, arriving in Sumner in April of that year, lie entered its 
banking circles by purchasing the private bank of Frank Donnelly and, asso- 
ciated with other substantial business men of Sumner, he organized the State 
Bank of Sumner, which opened its doors for business on the 3d of May. T906, 
with Mr. White as president. He continued to act in that capacity until April 
10, 1916, or for a period of ten years, when he sold his interest in the bank to 
C.'m. Case, of Puyallup. He extended his connection with banking interests 
by organizing the Toledo State Bank in the fall of 1909. His business aft"airs 



76 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

have always been wisely managed and since his retirement from active connec- 
tion with the Sumner State Bank he has concentrated his efforts and interests 
upon the real estate business and has promoted various important realty deals. 
While a resident of McKenzie, North Dakota, Mr. White was married on 
the T4th of April, 1904, to Miss Edith Payne Thompson and to them have been 
born four children: Alfred W., WilHam R., Marguerite Edith and Robert 
David. Mr. White gives his political allegiance to the republican party, which 
he has supported since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. In April, 
1909, he was appointed a member of the state river commission by Governor 
M. E. Hay. When but twenty-nine years of age, he was elected mayor of Sum- 
ner and such was his progressive administration that in December, 1909, he was 
reelected for a second term and he was continued in office for four terms of 
two years each, giving to his city a very public-spirited and beneficial adminis- 
tration. In 1914 he was elected from the twenty-fifth district as a member of 
the State Senate and served until January, 1917. He was active in organizing 
the Sumner Commercial Club in March, 1907, and has been its secretary con- 
tinuously, his efforts in that connection proving of great worth in developing the 
city and extending its trade relations. A contemporary writer has said of him: 
"Mr. White is a man of energy and unusual business capacity, alert and awake 
to every opportunity. Keen, active and tactful, he is a citizen of great usefulness 
in his community." 



JOHN ANDERSON. 

John Anderson, president of the Quality Shingle Company at Edmonds, is a 
native of Ornskoldsvik, Sweden, born January 10, 1885, his parents being Hokan 
and Christina Anderson, who spent their entire lives in Sweden. The father 
was born in 1843 and passed away in February, 191 3, having for about three 
years survived his wife, who died in 1910, at the age of sixty-five years. In 
their family were five children who are still living: H. H., now living in 
Olympia. Washington ; Margaret, whose home is in Seattle ; Andrew, living at 
Pilchuck, Snohomish county ; and Christine, who is still in Sweden. 

John Anderson, the fourth of that family, attended school in Sweden and 
afterward started out in the business world as an employe in a sawmill there. 
After two or three years, however, he severed the ties that bound him to his 
native land and came to America at the age of eighteen years, prompted by the. 
laudable ambition of trying his fortune in the new world. In 1903 he arrived in 
western Washington, settling first at Monroe, where he remained for eleven 
years, working in the sawmills in that vicinity. In 191 5 he removed to Edmonds 
and purchased the interest of Mr. Gilbert in the Quality Shingle Company, of 
which he is now the president, with Gus Evanson as secretary and treasurer 
and Al Larson as manager. This is one of the important industrial enterprises 
of Edmonds, for the mill has a capacity of one hundred and forty thousand 
shingles and employs seventeen expert workmen. 

Mr. Anderson is a Master Mason and also has membership in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He maintains an independent political course 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 77 

but stands high in citizenship, for it is well known that his aid and influence 
are always given on the side of progress and improvement. He has never had 
occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for in the 
utilization of the opportunities here offered he has worked his way steadily 
upward and has now made for himself a creditable position in manufacturing 
circles. 



THEODORE D. YOUNG. 

When death called Theodore D. Young, of Olympia, time chronicled the 
passing of one of Washington's native sons, who represented an old and prominent 
pioneer family. He had himself for more than a half century been a witness of 
the upbuilding of the northwest and had taken a helpful part in the work of 
general development and improvement. His father, Austin E. Young, a native 
of Kentucky, born in 1830, came across the plains in 1853, driving one of the 
ox teams owned by the Biles family. In the same company traveled Martha J. 
Brooks, a daughter of General Brooks, a Confederate commander. The acquaint- 
ance then formed was consummated in their marriage of 1854. She, too, was a 
native of Kentucky. Mr. Young settled at Grand Mound and immediately 
became a member of the military organization that was necessary to suppress 
the Indian outbreaks. He was made an officer in his company and was stationed 
in the stockade at Grand Prairie, serving until the Indian troubles were settled. 
He began business as an employe in a tannery at Tumwater which was established 
by Mr. Biles and later he removed to Cosmopolis, being one of the four who laid 
out and owned the town site. He took a very active part in the upbuilding of 
the district and for many years held his business interests at that place. On the 
20th of May, 1872, he proved up on a homestead where Little Rock now stands 
and afterward platted a portion of it, which he called Viora but later it took the 
name of Little Rock. It was in 1862 that Mr. Young arrived in Thurston 
county, where he made his home throughout his remaining days, and with the 
progress and development of the community he was actively and helpfully inter- 
ested. He not only contributed to the material development but also to the 
political, social and moral progress of his district. He was reared in the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian church and ever lived an upright, honorable life. In 
politics he was a stanch democrat and at one time served as county commis- 
sioner of Thurston county. He was also well known in Masonic circles and 
became a charter member of Grand Mound Lodge, No. 3, F. & A. M. Later 
he was transferred and assisted in the organization of Olympia Lodge, Xo. i, 
F. & A. M. In 1889 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who 
passed away in January of that year at the age of fifty-one, whilr his death 
occurred in 1908, when he had reached the age of seventy-eight years. In their 
family were eight children : Medora, deceased ; Theodore D. ; Lcnson B., living 
at Little Rock; Charles H. and Roy E., also of Little Rock; Edith M.. who died 
in 1891, greatly beloved by all by reason of her beautiful character; Nettie B., who 
is the wife of William Pierce and is living on part of the estate at Mima ; and 
William H., of Portland. 

Theodore D. Young, who was born at Cosmopolis in i860, received a public 



78 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

school education in Thurston county and throughout his Hfe remained a reader 
and student, thus constantly broadening his knowledge. He was reared to farm 
life and assisted his father in clearing the land and making a home. For a 
number of years he taught school, thus contributing to the educational develop- 
ment of his section of the state, and later he entered upon the profession of civil 
engineering in connection with Mr. Lemon, of Olympia. He invested in property 
from time to time and became the owner of some valuable holdings, but during 
the widespread financial panic of 1893 lost all his real estate. He then resumed 
schoolteaching, which profession he followed until appointed deputy county engi- 
neer under Millard Lemon, and at the next election he was elected county 
engineer, continuing in the office until January, 191 1. At that date he turned 
his attention to the development of the estate that came to him from his father, 
consisting of farm and cranberry lands, but soon afterward death terminated 
his labors as he passed a^yay on the nth of May, 191 1. 

In 1889 Mr. Young was united in marriage to Miss Catherine L. Crawford, 
who was born in Illinois and in 1875 became a resident of California, whence 
she removed to Lewis county, Washington, in 1880. At the age of eighteen 
years she began teaching and for a number of years was a successful and 
thoroughly proficient teacher of Thurston county. To Mr. and Mrs. Young 
was born a daughter, Eltina M., who is now nine years of age. 

Fraternally Mr. Young was connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and for many years served as secretary of his lodge at Olympia. He 
was also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen at Olympia. He 
gave his political allegiance to the democratic party until 1896, when through his 
wife's influence he became a republican. Mrs. Young has taken a very active 
interest in political affairs and public activities and does everything in her power 
to promote republican successes because of her firm belief in the efficacy of the 
platform as a factor in good government. She became a charter member of the 
Education Club of Thurston county and is serving for the second term as its 
president. She also belongs to the Woman's Club of Olympia. She possesses, 
moreover, excellent business ability and executive force and has done much to 
promote and develop the property left to her by her husband, especially develop- 
ing the cranberry lands. 



BAILEY GATZERT HILTON. 

Bailey Gatzert Hilton, sales manager of the Everett Automobile Company, 
who is also successfully operating in real estate in Everett, was born May 31, 
1885, in Snohomish, Snohomish county, a son of the late John H. Hilton, one of 
the honored pioneer settlers of the county and one of the founders of the city 
of Everett. He is mentioned at length on another page of this work. In the 
family were five children, of whom but two are living, the daughter, Leila May, 
being now the wife of W. A. Loomis, of Seattle. 

The surviving son, Bailey G. Hilton, was educated in the public schools 
of Seattle and of Everett, in the Whitworth College of Tacoma and in the Uni- 
versity of Washington. At the age of seventeen years he entered the employ of 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 79 

his father and two years afterward took charge of the interests of the Hilton 
Land Company of Everett. He conducted that business successfully for a period 
of four years, or until the death of his father. During his father's illness and 
immediately following his death, covering a period of six weeks, Bailey G. Hilton 
made thirty-two thousand dollars through the purchase and sale of real estate 
in Everett. After settling up his father's estate he turned his attention to the 
automobile business in connection with L. R. Pittman under the name of the 
Riverside Carriage Company and for the past five years he has been sales 
manager of the Everett Automobile Company. He still retains large property 
holdings in Everett and in King county and his realty is constantly advancing 
in value. 

On the 19th of February, 1903, Mr. Hilton was married in Everett to Miss 
Amelia Uerkvitz, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. W. 
Uerkvitz, of an old family of that state but now residents of Everett. Politically 
Mr. Hilton follows an independent course, casting his ballot according to the 
dictates of his judgment. He belongs to the Commercial Club and cooperates 
in all its well defined plans and measures for the upbuilding of the city and 
the development of its interests. 



A. W. MIDDLETON. 



A. W. Middleton has since 1885 ^^^^ interested in the lumber industry at 
Aberdeen and vicinity, although he did not become a resident of the state until 
1897. He was born in Greenville, Michigan, in 1864, and spending his 
youth and early manhood there, became identified with the manufacture of 
lumber and thus brought to his business activity in the northwest the bene- 
fit of wide experience in that line. With his removal to this section of 
the country he purchased timber on Grays Harbor and from that period 
his business interests have steadily increased in volume and importance. For 
several years he has been the president of the Anderson & Middleton Lumber 
Company, one of the chief corporations operating in this section, and he is 
also the vice president of the Bay City Lumber Company, the Grays Har- 
bor Shingle Company and president of the Southern Humboldt Lum- 
ber Company of Cahfornia. There is no phase of the lumber in- 
dustry, from the selection of the standing timber to the sale of the finished 
product, with which Mr. Middleton is not familiar and the wise direction of his 
interests has brought him substantial success. Into other fields he luis carried 
his activities, various other projects profiting by his cooperation, keen discern- 
ment and sound judgment. He is connected with the Washington Portland 
Cement Company and the Metropolitan Building Company, is president of the 
Oregon Chair Company at Portland, Oregon, and is also identified with the 
United States Trust Company and the Playes & Hayes Bank. 

In 1888, in Michigan, Mr. Middleton was married to Miss Martha Anderson 
and to whom have been born four children: Edward A., Sarah, Martha and 
Charles. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Middleton is a Mason, having taken high 



80 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

degrees in both the York and the Scottish Rites. He is likewise connected with 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His colleagues and contemporaries 
speak of him in terms of high regard as a resourceful business man, thoroughly 
reliable, conducting his interests according to modern commercial standards and 
ethics. 



AUGUST SWANSON. 



August Swanson, a leading wagon maker and blacksmith of Port Angeles, 
was born May 21, 1867, i^i Christianstad, Sweden, his parents being Swan and 
Sesa (Anderson) Swanson, who are also natives of the same country, where they 
still reside. The father conducted business as a blacksmith and wagon maker 
but has retired from that field. For the past thirty years he has been engaged 
in the banking business and is vice president of one of the leading banks of his 
district but is now virtually living retired. He served as county commissioner 
for more than fifteen years and has long been active in political matters. In fact 
he is one of the prominent and influential residents of Christianstad. To him 
and his wife were born five children, two of whom are living, both in this coun- 
try, the daughter Bessie being mow the wife of Nels Olson, of Tacoma. 

August Swanson was educated in the schools of his native land to the age of 
fifteen years and when a youth of fourteen began working in vacation periods 
in his father's shop, learning the trade of blacksmithing and of wagon making 
under his father's direction. There he remained until he reached the age of 
seventeen, when he sailed for America, arriving in 1884. It was about the ist of 
September of that year that he became a resident of Carlton county, Minnesota, 
where he worked at his trade in the employ of the Shaw Lumber Company, a 
Davenport (la.) firm with which he remained for four years. In 1888 he arrived 
in Tacoma, where he joined his sister, remaining in that city until the spring of 
1891. He then became a resident of Port Angeles and for three years was em- 
ployed in the logging camps of Clallam county, working at his trade. In 1894 
he established a small shop on Laurel street in Port Angeles, between First and 
Front streets, and continued business there until 1910, when on account of the 
growth of his patronage he was compelled to seek more commodious quarters and 
removed to his present location at No. 131 First street. West. There he has a 
large shop modern in its equipment, his business now o'ertopping all others of the 
kind in his section. He employs six skilled workmen on an average and at times 
has had ten men in his employ, but with modern machinery it has been possible 
to dispense with the labors of some of them, although his business has increased. 
He has a complete service shop for autos, does repairing of all kinds and carries 
a complete line of supplies. His trade is now very extensive and gratifying, bring- 
ing to him a substantial annual income, and aside from his industrial interests he 
is a stockholder in the Port Angeles Trust & Savings Bank. 

Mr. Swanson is very pleasantly situated in his home life. He was married 
in Port Angeles, May 15, 1891, to Miss Nannie K. Bork, a native of Sweden, and 
they have become parents of five children : Alice, who passed away in Belling- 
ham; Herman T., who is employed in the bank; and Lillie, Mabel and Nancy, 
all at home. 




AUGUST SWANSON 



P^THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

I ASTO^, LENOX 

'•'i-DEN FOUNDATION 



• WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES , 83 

Politically Mr. Swanson has been a republican on national questions since 
becoming a naturalized American citizen, but at local elections he casts an inde- 
pendent ballot regardless of party ties. He served as a member of the city 
council in 1912 but has never been a seeker after office, preferring that his public 
service shall be done as a private citizen through his influence and his vote rather 
than as an office holder. He cooperates in all the movements for the benefit and 
welfare of his city as a member of the Commercial Club. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with Naval Lodge, No. 353, B. P. O. E., the Knights of Pythias, the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His has 
been an active and well spent life. Depending entirely upon his own resources 
from the time when he crossed the Atlantic at the age of seventeen, he is now one 
of the substantial and respected business men of Port Angeles, his life record 
proving what may be accomplislied when one has the will to dare and to do. 



ELMER E. SHERMAN. 



Nature's provision for Bellingham has enabled her citizens to become pros- 
perous through utilization of the kindred industries that spring up in connec- 
tion with navigation and marine interests and following this lead Elmer E. 
Sherman has become well known in business circles as superintendent of traps 
and all floating equipment for the Pacific American Fisheries and also of the 
shipyards at Eliza island. A native of Meigs county, Ohio, he was born in 
July, 1862, a son of Curtis and Mary Sherman, who in 1868 removed with their 
family to Point Pleasant, West Virginia, where Elmer E. Sherman attended 
the public schools to the age of thirteen years. He and his brother afterward 
went to Leadville, Colorado, where they worked on mule pack and freight trains 
and later became drivers of mule teams, being thus engaged until 1882. In that 
year Elmer E. Sherman went to Stockton, California, where he engaged in 
ranch work until 1890, the year of his removal to Washington. 

For three months Mr. Sherman was a resident of Mount Vernon, after 
which he came to Bellingham and for five years was employed as an engineer 
in logging camps in the vicinity of the city. He next went up the Eraser river 
and engaged in salmon fishing during the summer seasons, while for three win- 
ters he continued work in the logging camps. Returning to Bellingham on the 
expiration of that period, he then entered the employ of the Pacific American 
Fisheries, running pile drivers and working on their various salmon traps. His 
ability and faithfulness led to his advancement, and in 1913 he became superin- 
tendent of traps and all floating equipment and also of the company's ship- 
yards at Eliza island. In that ])osition of responsibility he has since continued 
and is today a prominent representative of the company at this point. 

On the 25th of December, 1888, Mr. Sherman was married to Miss Ella 
Parberry, of Jackson, California, and they have become the parents of two chil- 
dren • Clarence, eighteen years of age, who is captain on the steamer Spokane 
for the Pacific American Fisheries; and Kenneth, who is thirteen years of age 
and is attending the public schools. 

Fraternally Air. Sherman is connected with the Independent Order of Udd 



Vol. in— 5 



84 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES . 

Fellows, while politically he is a republican, giving stalwart support to the 
party, yet never seeking or desiring office. Attracted by the opportunities of the 
west, he has never had occasion to regret his determination to ally his interests 
with those of this section of the country, and he belongs to that class of enter- 
prising men who are contributing so much to the development of the northwest. 



DAVIS W. MORSE. 



Port Angeles owes much to the business enterprise and intelligently directed 
efforts of Davis W. Alorse, one of her native sons. He was born April 19, 
1863, and has the distinction of being the first white child born in Port Angeles. 
His father, the late David W. Morse, was a pioneer settler of Washington. He 
had previously resided for a time in California and in making his way to the 
Pacific coast journeyed across the Isthmus in 1858. He was a native of Nova 
Scotia and was of English lineage, his ancestors having settled in New England 
in 1621. Representatives of the family participated in the Revolutionary war 
and in the War of 1812. David W. Morse was an ambitious, energetic and suc- 
cessful man who followed mining and lumbering and was closely associated with 
the business development of Port Angeles, where he passed away in 1863, at the 
age of thirty-two years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Caroline 
Thompson, was born in Nova Scotia and was of Scotch and English lineage, 
belonging to one of the old Virginia families. She long survived her husband 
and died in Port Angeles, June 15, 1916, when almost eighty-one years of age, 
her birth having occurred on the 8th day of July, 1835. She became the mother 
of six children, four sons and two daughters, of whom five are yet living : Charles 
W., a resident of Port Angeles ; Sarah, the wife of Charles Agnew, of Port 
Angeles; and Davis W., of this review. The first three were children of the 
mother's first marriage. Having lost her first husband, she became the wife of 
Alfred Lee and the living children of that union are: Oscar Lee and Ida, the 
wife of Oscar Morse, of Port Angeles. 

Davis W. Morse obtained a public school education in his native city and 
afterward attended Barnard's Business College in San Francisco. When a youth 
of fourteen he started out to earn his own living, being first employed in the 
woods and later engaging in the lumber and logging business on his own ac- 
count. He followed that undertaking successfully for several years and in 
1883 he turned his attention to general merchandising, since which time he has 
successfully conducted a store, carrying a large and well selected line of goods. 
In 1913 he completed the large concrete block on the corner of Front and 
Laurel streets and purchased the Kirchberg interests in a clothing and dry 
goods store, of which he is now the sole proprietor and which he conducts under 
the name of tjae Port Angeles Mercantile Company. From 1900 to 1903 he was 
the owner of what is today the people's dock and he has had other business 
enterprises. He likewise has large property interests in Port Angeles and has 
erected a number of the business and office blocks of the city, thus contributing 
in substantial measure to its improvement and upbuilding. 

On the 8th of June, 1885, Mr. Morse was married in Victoria. British 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 85 

Columbia, to Miss Celia Morse, a native of California and a daughter of E. G. 
and Mary Morse, who were pioneer settlers of that state in 1851, having gone 
around the Horn in that year. Mr. Morse became an early prospector and 
miner of California and both he and his wife are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis W. Morse have four children : Mary, who is private secretary to Judge 
Thomas Burke, of Seattle; Warren, of Port Angeles; Hazel, a teacher in the 
public schools of Port Angeles; and Howard, who is now a pupil in the public 
schools. 

Mr. Morse is a republican and was the first city treasurer of Port Angeles. 
He belongs to the Commercial Club and is active in all affairs leading to the 
welfare and progress of his community. Fraternally he is a Mason and his 
religious faith is that of the First Congregational church, in which he is now 
serving as treasurer. He takes an active interest in all those forces which 
contribute to the material, intellectual, social and moral progress of his com- 
munity and his influence is always on the side of right and improvement. 



F. E. KNIGHT. 



F. E. Knight, conducting business at Dungeness, Washington, under the name 
of the Pacific Mercantile Company, was born at Elgin, Iowa, July 6, 1866, his 
parents being John Wesley and Alice (Red) Knight, the former a native of Ohio 
and the latter of Kentucky. They became pioneers of Illinois and Iowa, eventu- 
ally settling in the latter state. The maternal grandfather, Michael Red, was 
an early resident of Kentucky and emigrated to what is now the city of Rock- 
ford, Illinois, where he erected the first frame house, taught the first public 
school and was the first justice of the peace of that town. He afterwards became 
interested in mining and moved to Galena, Illinois, where he remained until his 
death. During the pioneer epoch in the history of Iowa ]\Ir. and Mrs. John 
W. Knight became residents of that state, where he took up carpentering and 
contracting, in which connection he developed an extensive business, remaining 
active in that line until about ten years prior to his death, which occurred in 
July, 19 1 5, when he had reached the age of eighty-six years. His wife died in 
August, 1913, at the age of seventy-three years, her demise occurring while they 
were on a visit to the home of one of their sons in Whitefish, Montana. They 
lacked but a few days of having been married fifty-one years. In their family 
were seven children, of whom six are yet living: A. W. Knight, of Tort Angeles. 
Washington; F. E. Knight, of Dungeness, Washington; Olive Kniel. of l"".lgin. 
Iowa; Everett Knight and Fred G. Knight, of Whitetlsli, Montana; and lulna 
E. Knight, of W^est Union, Iowa. During the Civil war he responded to the 
country's call for troops, enlisting as a private in the Thirty-eighth Iowa Infantry, 
in which he rose to the rank of corporal. He served for three years and though 
never wounded suffered from sunstroke at New Orleans. 

In early life F. E. Knight attended the public .schools of Iowa. l)ut when 
fourteen years of age put aside his textbooks and started out to make his own 
way in the world. He secured a clerkship in a store and was for several years 
connected with commercial lines. He worked in stores during the winter months 



86 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

and in the summer seasons was employed for a time at farm labor. At the age 
of twenty he became possessed with the idea that railroading was the only life, 
and consequently embarked in the train service, and was engaged for about four 
years in that line of work, when he met with an accident which incapacitated him 
for further work in that line, so it was necessary to turn his mind to other lines 
of work. After debating the matter he decided to get back into the commercial 
field, so went to Dixon, Illinois, where he took a commercial course in the Dixon 
University. After completing his course he went to Chicago, where he engaged 
in office work for eight years. In 1900 he came to Washington and after spend- 
ing a summer in Seattle he secured the position of stenographer and bookkeeper 
with the Roche Harbor Lime Company, with which he remained for two years. 
On the expiration of that period he came to Dungeness and organized the Pacific 
Mercantile Company, beginning business in a small way. Since then his patronage 
has grown to extensive proportions and today he has one of the leading general 
mercantile houses of his section, handling everything from a needle to a self- 
binder. He always carries a large reserve stock in the warehouse to supply the 
demands' of his many patrons and he has won his business through conservative 
yet progressive methods, honorable dealing and unfaltering enterprise. 

On the 28th day of October, 1908, in Seattle, Mr. Knight was married to 
Miss Lucretia Peddicord, a daughter of ^Ir. and Mrs. Evan Peddicord, early 
pioneers of eastern Washington. ]Mrs. Peddicord is a member of the Rufus 
Choate family of Baltimore. Maryland. ]Mr. Knight is connected with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and votes with the republican party, but 
the honors and emoluments of office have no attractions for him as he has always 
preferred to concentrate his energies and attention upon his business afifairs, and 
his close application has been one of the salient factors in his growing success. 



ALBERT MARSDON BROOKES. 

Albert Marsdon Brookes, well known banker and ex-postmaster of Seattle, 
was born in Galena, Illinois, on the 2d of September, 1843. He comes of English 
descent. His grandfather, Samuel Brookes, was one of England's most celebrated 
botanists and introduced the first chrysanthemums in that country from Japan. 
Joshua Brookes, a great-uncle of A. M. Brookes, was a celebrated surgeon of 
England and also a director of the Zoological Gardens. The father of A. M. 
Brookes, Samuel Marsdon Brookes, was born in England and became a famous 
artist — a depictor of still life whose canvases are to be found in every part of 
the art-loving world. He went to Chicago in 1834, when there were only six 
hundred inhabitants including the garrison. Thence he made his way to Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, and took up his abode among the pioneers of that place. In 
i860 he removed to San Francisco, there remaining until he passed away at the 
age of seventy-six years. To him and his wife, who died five years later, were 
born fourteen children, nine of whom reached maturity. The paintings of Samuel 
Brookes are among the /art treasures of San Francisco, and canvases he sold for 
two and three thousand dollars could not be purchased now for many times 
those prices, if at all. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 87 

Albert M. Brookes acquired his education in the public schools and academy 
of Milwaukee. He was too young to enlist when the first call came for volun- 
teers for service in the Union army in the Civil war but the following year in 
response to President Lincoln's call for three hundred thousand men, he enhsted 
in Company K, Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, joining that regi- 
ment on the 1st of August, 1862, and going to the front under command of 
Colonel Larrabee. The division was first under General Nelson and later under 
General Phil Sheridan, who remained in command until transferred to Virginia. 
The first engagement in which Mr. Brookes participated took place at Perry- 
ville and subsequently he took part in the battles of Murfreesboro, Stone River, 
Tullahoma, Chattanooga and Missionary Ridge, where the Union soldiers won 
such glorious victories against terrible opposition. Later he was in numerous 
minor engagements and also fought in the battles of Rocky Face Gap, Resaca, 
Dallas Courthouse, Kenesaw Mountain, the siege of Atlanta, etc., while subse- 
quently, under General Thomas, he participated in the battles of Nashville and 
Franklin. His regiment of eleven hundred and fifty men returned with only two 
hundred and fifty. Mr. Brookes miraculously escaped death and was mustered 
out after the cessation of hostilities with a most enviable record, having never 
been absent from the post of duty for even a day. He was only twenty-two 
when the war ended and a veteran victorious, having a record equalled by few 
and excelled by none of his age. 

While Mr. Brookes was fighting at the front, his father and mother removed 
to San Francisco and there he joined them in September, 1865. Through the 
instrumentality of one of his fathers friends, General Randall, the postmaster 
general, he was appointed a clerk in the San Francisco postoffice, where he 
remained for twelve years and was three times promoted. When he resigned, in 
1877, to remove to Seattle, he had risen to the position next in importance to 
that of assistant postmaster. Following his arrival in Seattle he joined a brother- 
in-law in the conduct of a wholesale liquor and cigar business, being thus engaged 
until 1885, when he purchased a general mercantile store at Black Diamond and 
there remained for two years. After returning to Seattle he purchased an interest 
in a cracker factory, of which he was made president and which has developed into 
a very profitable and extensive enterprise. He is still one of its largest stock- 
holders. 

In 1889 Mr. Brookes was appointed to the postmastcrship of Seattle by Presi- 
dent Harrison, a position he was eminently qualified to fill by reason of native 
ability and his long experience in the San Francisco postofifice. He had hardly 
undertaken the duties of his responsible position when Seattle sufifcred her great 
baptism of fire and through Herculean efforts the postoffice was saved, being 
the only brick building left standing. Mr. Brookes' record in the Seattle post- 
office stands second to none, for he so systematized the work and established such 
efficiency throughout that citizens of Seattle and the country at large could point 
to the institution with pride. At the end of two years he resigned to accept the 
position of cashier of the Boston National Bank, of which he was a director and 
stockholder. He is likewise a director and stockholder in the Diamond Ice Com- 
pany and owns much valuable real estate. 

In 1873 Mr. Brookes was united in marriage to Miss Laura Hannath, a native 
of Toronto, Canada. They have one daughter, Elise, who gave her hand in mar- 



88 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

riage to Rodney J. Arney, an Episcopal clergyman, and resides in Kent, Washing- 
ton. Mr. Brookes aided in building the first Episcopal church in Seattle and also 
assisted in the erection of St. Mark's church of that denomination. He is a 
prominent and highly honored member of the Grand Army of the Republic, being 
one of its first representatives on the Pacific coast, and in 1886 was elected 
department commander. Today he is regarded as one of the most valued citizens 
of Seattle, whose life of unsullied honor and rectitude is a credit to the city and 
an example to all. 



WILLIAM ROUSE. 



William Rouse, postmaster of Stanwood, was appointed to his present position 
on the ist of ^March, 191 5. He was born in Marion, Kansas, March 31. 1886, a 
son of Fred and Arvilla (Kellis) Rouse, both of whom were natives of the Sun- 
flower state. They afterward removed to Colorado and at various points the 
father served as railroad agent. He passed away in Marion, Kansas, in 1906, at 
the age of fiJty-eight years, and his widow is still living at the age of fifty-two 
years. 

In their family were four children, of whom William Rouse is the third in 
the order of birth. In his boyhood days he attended the common schools of his 
native city, after which he took up the study of telegraphy, which he followed 
in connection with railroad service. Coming to the northwest, he settled first at 
j\Iount A'ernon, where he remained for a year and a half and then removed to 
Stanwood, Washington, in 1909. He continued in telegraph work there until 
191 5, when on the ist of ^March he was appointed postmaster of Stanwood. He 
has proven a very efficient officer. 

On the /th of September, 1907. Mr. Rouse was married in Stanwood to Miss 
Sophie Willard, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Willard, of that place, and they 
have one child, Juanita. born in 1912. 'Mr. Rouse is one of the leading men of 
Stanwood and the high regard entertained for him is the just and merited recog- 
nition of his personal worth and his capa'bility in office. 



ROBERT PELTON McNULTA. 

Robert Pelton McNulta, a well known attorney of Olympia, Washington, is 
a native of Illinois, his birth occurring in Bloomington, ]\Iay 20, 1866, and is 
a son of John and Laura (Pelton) McNuha, the former born in New York city 
and the latter in Connecticut. Prior to the Civil war the father became a resident 
of the Prairie state and during that struggle he entered the service as a member 
of the First Illinois Cavalry, being commissioned captain of Company A. He 
was captured at Lexington, Missouri, in September, 1861, but was paroled in the 
following October. In 1862 he assisted in organizing the Ninety-fourth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, which was made up exclusively of McLean county citizens, 
and with that command he participated in the battles of \^icksburg and Mobile 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 89 

besides many other engagements, remaining in the service until after the sur- 
render of General Lee. He was mustered out at Brownsville, Texas, in August, 
1865, and returned to his home in Illinois. In 1868 he began the practice of law 
dt Bloomington and became a prominent attorney of that place. He was appointed 
receiver for the Wabash Railroad Company in 1887; was later made receiver 
for the Whiskey Trust; and also for the National Bank of Illinois at Chicago. 
After a useful and well spent life he passed away February 22, 1900, and his 
wife died in 1912. In the family of this worthy couple were eight children, of 
whom four are still living, Robert P. being the second of these. 

During his boyhood Robert P. McNulta attended the public schools of Bloom- 
ington, Illinois, and later pursued his studies in the State Normal University and 
the Wesleyan University at that place. He was graduated from the law depart- 
ment of the latter institution in 1888 with the Bachelor of Laws degree and was 
engaged in the practice of his chosen profession at Bloomington for six years. 
In 1894 he located in Chicago, where he practiced until 19 13, and then came to 
Everett, Washington, but in April of the following year removed to Centralia. 
In September, 1916, he moved to Olympia, where he has since engaged in general 
practice with most gratifying results. 

Mr. McNulta was married in Illinois in 1913 to Mrs. Jane C. Hoffman and 
they now reside at 161 7 Sylvester street, Olympia. During the two and a half 
years they lived in Centralia they made a host of warm friends and Mr. McNulta 
has gained an enviable position in his profession. He was a member of the Lewis 
County Bar Association and he has the confidence and respect of all with whom 
he has come in contact either in professional or social life. His political support 
has always been given the republican party since age conferred upon him the 
right of franchise. 



JACOB OTT. 



When civilization was just penetrating the northwest Jacob Ott became a 
resident of Tumwater, there arriving in 1852. He was a native of Switzerland, 
born on the 28th of February, 1825, and in 1850 he crossed the Atlantic to the 
new world. For two years thereafter he resided in New York and in St. Louis 
and then, leaving the latter city for the Pacific coast, traveled with ox teams over 
the plains, during which trip he endured many hardships and trials incident to 
such a journey. This was long before the building of railroads and the travelers 
had to proceed by slow and tedious stages over the hot stretches of sand and 
across the mountains. Reaching his destination, Mr. Ott first purchased land 
at Tumwater and commenced clearing it of the heavy timber with which it was 
covered. He built a log cabin and then took up work at the carpenter's trade, 
which he had previously learned. He followed that pursuit at various places in 
the country and was very active in promoting progress along building lines in his 
section of the state. 

After he had made a substantial start in business and had been a resident of 
America for about seventeen years Jacob Ott returned to his native land and 
was there married to Elizabeth Ott, who although of the same name was not a 



90 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

relative. The wedding trip of the couple consisted of a journey to the new world 
and across the American continent to Tumwater. As the years passed three 
children were born to the household : Henry, w^ho is now living in Los Angeles, 
California ; and Walter and Gertrude, both residents of Olympia. 

The children were all born in Tumwater, where Mr. Ott continued to work 
at the carpenter's trade and where he remained for fifteen years after his mar- 
riage, at the end of which time he took up his abode in Olympia, having already 
erected the residence of the family on Washington avenue. After becoming a 
resident of the city he devoted his attention to the management of his real estate 
holdings and erected store buildings on Fourth avenue and otherwise improved 
the property which he held, thus adding largely to the city's upbuilding. In the 
early days he had served in the Indian wars and assisted in subduing the red men 
and in all the years which had come and gone from that time until his death he 
had taken an active part in promoting the work of progress, civilization and 
improvement. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ott attended the Presbyterian church and he gave his political 
allegiance to the republican party. Death called him on the 27th of August, 
1899, while his widow survived until June 8, 191 5, passing away when sixty-four 
years qf age. All who kne\v them esteemed them and they won a very large 
circle of friends during the long years of their residence in Tumwater and in 
Olympia. 



willia:\i littlejohn. 

William Littlejohn is now living retired in Olympia but for many years was 
closely identified with the agricultural development of his section of the state. 
He dates his residence in Washington from pioneer times, having come from 
Miami county, Indiana, in 1852. He was born in Boone county, that state, 
September 14, 1837, so that he has now almost reached the eightieth milestone 
on life's journey. His parents, Morris and Matilda (Cavan) Littlejohn. lived 
for many years in Indiana and there the mother passed away, leaving two chil- 
dren. William and Rebecca Jane, the latter the wife of John S. French, of ]\lound 
Prairie, Washington. After losing his first wife the father wedded Betsy Eliza- 
beth McHenry and in the year 1852 he started with his family, numbering ten, 
and a considerable party, for the Pacific northwest. After six months spent upon 
the way he reached Oregon and later proceeded northward to Washington, set- 
tling in the spring of 1853 at Tumwater, where he worked in a mill for a time. 
In six weeks he and one Bolles purchased a place of six hundred and forty acres 
on Bush Prairie, which they divided and of which only ten acres had been fenced. 
He built a log cabin and at once began to develop and improve the property, which 
he converted into a valuable farm upon which he spent his remaining days. He 
was a public-spirited man and held a number of county offices. His political 
allegiance was given to the democratic party. 

William Littlejohn was a youth of about fifteen years at the time of the 
emigration to the northwest and in the schools of Indiana and of Washington he 
pursued his education, attending during the winter months, while the summer 




MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM LITTLEJOHN 



- THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRAHY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUND ATTON 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 93 

seasons were devoted to farm work. He lived with his father until he attained 
his majority and then started out in life independently, going first to the mines 
in Idaho. He afterward took up a homestead south of Bush Prairie, in Thurston 
county, improved it and there followed farming for some time. He afterward 
cultivated other lands and for eighteen years he lived on a well developed farm 
three miles from Olympia to which he added many modern improvements and 
accessories. However, when it came into his possession it was wild and before 
it could be cultivated it was necessary to clear it of brush. There he continued 
to carry on general agricultural pursuits until he had reached the age of seventy- 
six years, when he retired from active business life and in 1912 removed to the 
capital, where he now makes his home. 

Mr. Littlejohn was married on Grand Mound Prairie in 1863 to Miss Julia 
Ann Turner, who is a daughter of Richard and Eliza Ann Turner, and who came 
from Missouri to the west in 1852. Her father died when she was but six 
months old and the mother subsequently married Thomas J. Harper, a pioneer, 
who reached the advanced age of ninety-six years. His mother lived to be one 
hundred and four years old and a photograph taken when she was one hundred 
years of age is still in existence. Mr. and Mrs. Littlejohn have become the 
parents of thirteen children, of whom seven are yet living: Benjamin Franklin, 
a resident of Olympia ; Ella, the wife of Fred Goldsby, of Thurston county ; 
William T. and Robert M., who are living in Olympia; Charles W., who for ten 
years has resided in Alaska ; Fred N., of Olympia ; and Kate, the wife of Ed. F. 
Stringer, of Seattle. There are aJso -seventeen li.ving grandchildren and eleven 
great-grandchildren. Both Mr. and Mrs, Littlejohn are enjoying remarkably good 
health for their years. ; 

Mr. Littlejohn is a public-spirited citizen and has. long given active support 
to the democratic party, on which' ticket he has been elected to county and local 
offices. From pioneer times to the present he has been an interested witness of 
the changes which have occurred in this part of the country. There was no road 
to Olympia at the time of his arrival and the family had to cross the Tumwater 
on a plank or in a canoe paddled by an Indian. William Littlejohn took part in 
the Indian war, enlisting at Olympia and serving for ninety days. He wasi 
barely old enough to enlist but he proved a brave and loyal soldier and he has 
ever stood faithfully for what he has believed to be the right. 



WILL I. GRISWOLD. 



Will J. Griswold, member of the Bellingham bar and otherwise prominently 
identified with its business interests, was born in La Fayette, Indiana. October 
17, 1872, a son of Charles N. and Mary Griswold. He passed through consec- 
utive grades in the public schools to his graduation from the high school with 
the class of 1889, after which he went to Chicago to make his initial step in the 
business world as a clerk in the traffic department of the Chicago, Rock Island 
& Pacific Railroad Company. He was thus connected until 1903 and during 
that period he pursued a night course in Lake Forest University, during which 
time he studied law, completing the course in the year mentioned. 



94 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Attracted by the opportunities of the growing northwest, 3^Ir. Griswold 
arrived at Mount \'ernon, Washington, and for a year engaged in law practice 
at that place. He then removed to Bellingham, where he has since practiced, 
and in addition to his work as a member of the bar he has other interests, being 
secretary of The Abstract, Title & Insurance Company and also secretary of 
the Nestos Lumber Company. 

In Chicago on the 30th of June, 1897, occurred the marriage of Mr. Gris- 
wold to Miss Edith West. They now have one child, Francis, seventeen years 
of age, who is attending high school. Mr. Griswold is well known in fraternal 
circles as a Scottish Rite I\Iason and member of the Mystic Shrine, also as an 
Elk and a Knight of Pythias. His political allegiance is given to the repub- 
lican party, and in 1908 he was made president of the Whatcom County Taft- 
Meade Club. He belongs to the Cougar Club, of which he is now the president, 
and he is prominent in the social life of the city, enjoying the warm regard and 
goodwill of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



HER^IAX HILSE. 



Herman Hilse. of Everett, was born in Silesia, Germany, January 2, 1866, a 
son of August Hilse, a native of that country, who in 1892 came to America, 
settling in Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming, devoting his attention to 
that occupation to the time of his death, which occurred in Wisconsin in 1906, 
when he had reached the age of sixty-five. He married Christina Ludwig, also 
a native of Germany, and her death occurred in 1887, when she had reached the 
age of fifty years. She \vas the mother of six children. 

Herman Hilse, the youngest of the family, was educated in his native land 
to the age of sixteen years, when he came to the United States, arriving in 1882. 
For three years he was located in Wisconsin, being there employed in the timber 
w^oods, and in 1885 he removed to Washington, settling first at Tacoma. In 
that city he became connected with the lumber trade and in January, 1893, he 
removed to Everett, becoming one of the early residents there, the city containing 
at that time a population of about three thousand. For seven years he was 
employed in the liquor business and in 1900 he entered business on his own 
account, beginning on the Bayside and afterward removing to his present quarters 
at No. 31 15 Hewitt avenue, in Riverside. This location is the oldest place of 
business of its kind in the city and as soon as the prohibition law went into effect 
he engaged in the sale of soft drinks, refreshments and cigars, in which connec- 
tion he is accorded a liberal patronage. He has also won success in other fields, 
especially through judicious investment in real estate, and he now has large realty 
holdings. 

On the 15th of April, 1892. in Tacoma, Mr. Hilse was united in marriage 
to Mies Lena Simon, a native of Ohio and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Justinus 
Simon. Her father is now deceased but her mother still resides in Tacoma. In 
the family of Mr. and Airs. Hilse are four children: Alfred, who was born in 
Everett, May 6, 1895; Paul, born in Everett, June 6. 1896; Otto, who was born 
in Everett in April, 1899; and Herman, who was born in Everett, August 31, 1902. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 95 

The family reside at No. 2801 Chestnut street, where they own their home. 
Mr. Hilse has membership with the Eagles, the Moose, the Sons of Herman and 
the German Singing Society, all of Everett, and also with the Riverside Commer- 
cial Club. His political allegiance is given to the republican party but he has 
never sought nor filled office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his 
business afifairs, which, carefully directed, have brought to him the success that 
he now enjoys. 



HENRY J. OWENS. 

Henry J. Owens, manager of the Owens Logging Company at Raymond, is 
of Canadian birth although he has resided in the northwest for about three 
decades. He was born in Ontario, Canada, January 16, 1861, and obtained his 
early education in the schools here. When a youth of sixteen he removed to 
Manitoba, where he resided for five years, and then became a resident of North 
Dakota, where he spent a similar period. It was in the year 1887 that he arrived 
in the Big Bottom country of Washington, at which period the work of progress 
and development had scarcely been begun in that district. He took up a home- 
stead, on which he lived for seven years, carefully and systematically developing 
his land, and later he spent three years in California. On the expiration of that 
period he established his home at South Bend, Washington, where he began 
logging with an eight-horse team, but after a few months sold his outfit. He 
then turned his attention to the milling business at the Siler mill of South Bend, 
of which William O. Siler was the president and Jacob Siler vice president. He 
spent a year and a half in that connection, after which he sold his interests, the 
business being now owned by the Columbia Box & Lumber Company. He after- 
ward engaged in logging on the Palix river, at first purchasing an engine. He 
had seventy-five dollars with which to make his start in that connection but dur- 
ing the eight months there spent he paid for his entire outfit. Later he suf- 
fered from illness for several months, after which he engaged in logging on the 
South fork of the Nasel river with Ben Armstrong, with whom he remained 
for a year and a half. At the end of that time the business was divided and Mr. 
Owens was again in business independently. He bought two engines, equipped 
his plant and not only was able to pay for his entire equipment but also made 
. ten thousand dollars in two years. Since that time he has been at the head 
of the Owens Logging Company, which conducts a profitable and growing 
business. He is thoroughly familiar with every phase of the business in principle 
and detail and his efiforts have been so directed as to bring substantial returns. 
He is also interested in the Siler mill at Raymond, the Sunset Timber Company 
and the South Fork logging camp, and is running a logging camp on the North 
river. 

On the 8th of January, 1896, Mr. Owens was united in marriage to Miss 
Louisa Siler and they have became the parents of four children, Jacob Henry. 
Thomas Siler, William Osbourne and Elizabeth. Mrs. Owens was the first white 
woman in the Big Bottom countrv on the Cowlitz river. In 1886 she came to 



'& 



96 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

the northwest with her brother, Rufus T. Siler, and squatted on a homestead, 
where her brother still resides. 

In his political views Mr. Owens is a republican, thoroughly informed con- 
cerning the questions and issues of the day. His religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church and his has been an upright and honorable life, actuated by 
high principles and prompted by most commendable motives. 



MAURICE E. GARNER. 

Maurice E. Garner, president of the Garner Shingle Company of Everett, 
was born in Galena. Illinois, November 19, 1852, a son of Alphonso Garner, 
who was born in Illinois and belonged to one of the old families of that state 
of German descent, founded in America by John Garner, who came to the new 
world prior to the Revolutionary war. Alphonso Garner was a jeweler by trade, 
as was his father before him, and he became quite a successful business man. 
During the Civil war he aided in securing enlistments and trained several com- 
panies but could not take part" in military operations himself, having lost two 
fingers, which incapacitated him for duty at the front. In politics he was 
quite active as a republican. In 1882 he removed from Iowa to Buckley, Wash- 
ington, where he passed aM^ay in 1886, at the age of seventy-six years. In his 
native state he married Elizabeth Orn, who was also born in Illinois and was of 
German lineage. She survived her husband for two years, passing away in 
Buckley at the age of sixty-six. In their family were four children : Joseph A., 
now living in Tacoma ; Maurice E. ; Elizabeth, the wife of C. E. Hugg, of Seat- 
tle; and John C, who is engaged in the automobile business in Seattle. 

^laurice E. Garner was educated in the public schools of Mason City, Iowa, 
pursuing his studies until he reached the age of seventeen, when he started out 
in the world to provide for his own support. He entered upon an apprenticeship 
to the drug trade, which he followed for four years and then turned his attention 
to contracting and building, being especially active in railroad work. He was 
thus engaged until 1887, when he came with his family to Washington. During 
the early days of Tacoma he had a contract for clearing one hundred acres of 
land there, a part of which is included within the city limits, and he also took up 
contracting and building there, which he carried on in connection wnth the lum- 
ber trade. From Tacoma he removed to Buckley, where he engaged in the 
shingle business until 1910, when he disposed of his interests there and took up 
his abode in Everett. For five years he was engaged in the automobile business 
and in January, 191 5, in connection with his son, A. R. Garner, he established 
the Garner Shingle Company, Incorporated, of which he is the president, with 
his son as secretary, treasurer and manager. Their mill has a capacity of one 
hundred and fifty thousand shingles per day and employs on an average nine- 
teen people. ]\Ir. Garner also has other financial interests and he has large realty 
holdings in King and Snohomish counties. He was president and a director of 
the Enumclaw Cannery Company, operating in King county, Washington, and 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 97 

is interested in the Rockdale Cooperative Store and the Cooperative Creamery, 
both of which concerns are in a very prosperous condition. 

Mr. Garner has been married twice. In Howard, Kansas, he wedded Miss 
Amie Roberts, a native of lUinois, who died leaving a son, A. R. Gamer, now 
his father's associate in business. In Pueblo, Colorado, in 1882, Mr. Garner mar- 
ried Miss Anna Cain, a native of Denver, Colorado, and a daughter of James 
Cain, one of the first settlers of that city. There are three children of the second 
marriage: Violet M., now the wife of Tom Askell, a resident of Spokane; E. 
E., who is now in Seattle with his uncle, John C. Garner, as head machinist in an 
automobile business; and Elmer, who was born in Buckley in 1910 and is still 
under the parental roof. The family home is maintained at No. 4025 Rucker 
avenue, which property Mr. Garner owns. 

He is a republican of the progressive type. He is active in politics and is 
now chairman of the republican committee of precinct No. 4 but does not care 
to hold political office. However, while living in King county he was for six- 
teen years school director and school clerk. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Maccabees and is commander of Lodge No. 4 at Everett. He has worked 
his way upward and his success is due to the fact that he has wisely used his 
opportunities and made his efforts count for the utmost. In the management 
of the shingle mill he displays sound judgment and enterprise and he has never 
feared that laborious attention to details which is so necessary a factor in the 
attainment of success. 



ALVIN HEMRICK. 



Alvin Hemrick is a well known representative of brewing interests in Wash- 
ington, conducting business at various points. He makes his home in Seattle but 
is widely known throughout the state. He was born in Alma, Wisconsin, Feb- 
ruary 14, "1870, a son of John and Katherine (Koeppel) Hemrick, who were 
natives of Germany, the former born at Neffingen, Karlsruhe, Baden, and the 
latter at Schwarzenbach-am-Wald, Bavaria. Spending his youthful days under 
the parental roof, the son acquired his education in the public schools of Alma 
and in a night school, in which he pursued a commercial course. From early 
boyhood he has been connected with the brewing business. Flis father was 
owner of a brewery and Alvin Hemrick early became his active assistant. In 
this connection he has steadily worked his way upward until he now has im- 
portant interests of that character, being president of the Hemrick Brothers 
Brewing Company, the Aberdeen Brewing Company of Aberdeen, Washington. 
and the Claussen Brewing Association of Seattle. Fie likewise owns stock in the 
Seattle Brewing & Malting Company and in the Supply Laundry Company, of 
Seattle, of which he is president, and which is one of the largest on the coast. A 
contemporary writer has said of him: "He is a man of keen discrimination and 
sound judgment, and his executive ability and excellent management have 
brought to the concerns with which he is connected a large degree of success." 

Mr. Hemrick was married at Alma, Wisconsin, May 8, 1889, to Miss Wil- 
helmina Rutschow, a daughter of Charles and Wilhelmina Rutschow. Mrs. 



98 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Hemrick was born in Ganchendorf, Germany, and was a little maiden of ten sum- 
mers when the family home was established in Alma, Wisconsin, where she 
attended the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Hemrick have three children : Elmer 
E., a prominent business man of Aberdeen ; and Andrew L. and Walter A. 

The parents are members of the German Lutheran church, in which Mr. 
Hemrick has held office, and his political faith is that of the democratic party. 
He belongs to many fraternal organizations, including the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, of 
which he is a life member, the American Masonic Federation, the Sons of Her- 
man, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. He is also connected with the Seattle Liederkranz and the Seattle Arion, 
Ladies' Aid Society. All of these connections have brought him a wide ac- 
quaintance and he enjoys the goodwill and high regard of those whom he meets 
socially as well as those with whom he comes in contact in his business relations. 



PETER NORBY. 



Among the business men of prominence in Port Townsend, who through 
their own efforts have won success is Peter Norby, who was born in Trysil, 
Norway, on the 28th of August, 1874, and is a son of Halvor and Pernille 
(Skaaret) Norby, also natives of the land of the midnight sun. In 1886 the 
father brought his family to the new world and located at Blooming Prairie, 
Minnesota, where he worked at the carpenter's trade for three years. At the 
end of that time he came to Washington and turned his attention to farming in 
Hoodsport, where he continued to make his home until his death, although he 
died at Port Townsend in March, 1907, at the age of seventy-two years. His 
wife passed away the same year at the age of sixty-eight. In their family were 
eight children and with the exception of one all are still living. 

Peter Norby is the fifth in order of birth. He began his education in the 
schools of Norway, being twelve years of age at the time of the emigration of 
the family to the new world. In the schools of Alinnesota he gained a good 
knowledge of the English language, and he remained with his parents until after 
their removal to Washington. At the age of fifteen years he secured a position 
in a hardware store at Port Townsend, where he remained from 1889 to 1893. 
In the latter year he went to North Yakima in the interests of the same firm and 
he continued with them until 1897. That year he went to the far north, arriving 
at Dawson in the Yukon territory, November i, 1897, and while there he engaged 
in prospecting and also worked for wages. In 1902 he returned to Port Town- 
send, Washington, and established his present business in connection with Julius 
With. This partnership has since existed and they now have one of the leading 
tin manufacturing plants in this section of the state. Although they started in 
business on a small scale their trade has steadily increased until their establish- 
ment is one of the leading enterprises of Port Townsend. 

On the 8th of December, 1906, Mr. Norby was married in Seattle to Miss 
Anna Bendixen, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Karl Bendixen, well known citizens 
of Port Townsend. Mr. and Mrs. Norby have three children: Karl Halvor, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 99 

born in 1908; Hilda Pernille, born in 1910; and Inger Katharine, born in 1914. 
The family attend the Lutheran church of which Mr. and Mrs. Norby are mem- 
bers, and he is also connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
Encampment, the Rebekahs, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Wood- 
men of the World and the Yeomen. In politics he is an ardent republican. He 
was only about nine and one-half years old when he began earning his own 
livelihood, and the prosperity that has come to him is due entirely to his own 
well directed efforts. He has been industrious, enterprising and reliable, and to 
these characteristics may be attributed his success. He now occupies a promi- 
nent place among the foremost business men of Port Townsend, and wherever 
known is held in high regard. He is very fond of all outdoor sports, is an expert 
on the skis and has devoted considerable of his leisure time to the huntine" of 
big game. 



SAMUEL S. MORSE. 



Samuel S. Morse, president of the Montesano Creamery, is thus actively 
identified with an important business interest of the city and at the same time is 
actively connected with civic affairs as the present mayor. He was born in Lake 
county, Indiana, in 1869 and dates his residence upon the Pacific coast from 
1889, in which year he removed from Kansas to the northwest, establishing his 
home at Port Townsend, Jefferson county, where for several years he was local 
manager of one branch of the Glendale Creamery Company. There he remained 
until 1907, when he removed to Alontesano, where he has since made his home. 
His business interests are now of an important character. The Montesano 
Creamery, of which he is president, was established about twenty years ago. 
This is a close corporation, his wife being secretary and treasurer of the com- 
pany. On removing to Montesano ten years ago Mr. Morse assumed charge of 
the business and remodeled the entire plant, which now has a capacity of one 
thousand pounds of butter per day. He has also been engaged in making cheese 
since February, 1916, and he employs from four to six men throughout the 
entire year. About six years ago he installed the most modern machinery known 
to butter making and the entire plant is most sanitary in its arrangement and 
conditions. The company operates three automobile trucks, whicli arc used for 
the collection of milk throughout the country and which bring the milk direct to 
the creamery, where it is at once taken care of by the most scientific methods. 
For eighteen years Mr. Morse has been actively connected with the handling 
of milk and cream and there is no phase of the business witii which he is not 
familiar. 

In 1893, at Port Townsend, Mr. ^^lorse was united in marriage to Miss W'ilie 
Hunnacutt, who was born in Kansas and came to the northwest in 1888. I'.y her 
marriage she has become the mother of three children, Olga. Robert and Alice. 

Mr. Morse gives his political endorsement to the republican party and is one 
of its active workers. For eight years he was a member of the city council and 
for three terms served as mayor of Montesano, retiring from that office January 
I, 1917. The fact that he was thrice elected is indicative of the confidence and 



100 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen and of his capable service, which 
was characterized by marked devotion to the general good, finding manifestation 
in many tangible efforts for reform and improvement. He is connected with 
the Knights of Pythias and he has a circle of friends in his locality that is 
almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



WILLIA^I McCUSH. 



Opportunities tauntingly play before the dreamer, and slip away from the 
sluggard but surrender to the man of determined purpose and become valuable 
assets in his hands. Ambition, resolution and indefatigable energy are the quali- 
ties which have enabled William McCush to grasp every opportunity which has 
been presented and today he controls some of the most important business interests 
of Bellingham, being vice president of the Bellingham National Bank, president 
of the Whidby Island Sand & Gravel Company and an active representative of 
logging interests. He was born at Port Hope, Ontario, Canada, April 21, 1865, 
a son of Murdock and ]\[ary (Holmes) McCush, who removed to Michigan when 
he was but six weeks old. His early life was spent at Otsego Lake, Michigan, 
and at the usual age he entered the public schools, which he attended to the age 
of thirteen, after which he was employed in various sawmills and lumber camps 
until June, 1890. This gave him considerable practical knowledge of the busi- 
ness, Avith which he has since been more or less closely connected. 

In June, 1890, Mr. McCush came to \\'ashington, settling at Sehome, now 
Bellingham, where he engaged in carpentering until 1891, when he went into the 
b)uilding and contracting business on his own account. In the fall of 1892 he 
took charge of the McDaniel mill which he operated until 1895, when he turned 
his attention to the logging business, purchasing timber on Lake Whatcom. In 
1899 he branched out along the Bellingham Bay and British Columbia Railroad, 
now the Bellingham & Northern, operating the logging business along that line. 
In 191 5 he admitted George W. Christie, one of his old employes, to a partner- 
ship and they have since been operating in the logging business in the vicinity 
of Wickersham, Washington, as the Christie Timber Company. Their interests 
in that connection are large and growing and Air. McCush's early experience in 
the sawmills and timber camps of Michigan has contributed to his success in that 
connection. For many years he was the president of the Standard Alanufacturing 
Company, which operated two shingle mills in the vicinity of Bellingham but has 
recently gone out of business. He is the president of the Whidby Island Sand 
& Gravel Company, a most important concern of that character and vice presi- 
dent and treasurer of the Christie Timber Company, and he joined wnth twelve 
others in organizing the Bellingham National Bank in 1903, since which time he 
has been one of its directors and the vice president. This is one of the strong 
financial concerns of the district, capitalized for two hundred thousand dollars 
and having a surplus of two hundred and seventy-five thousand. The various 
lines of business to w^hich Mr. McCush has directed his attention have thus proven 
profitable and have constituted elements in the business development of the com- 
munity. 




WILLIAM .M(( rSii 



. THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 103 

On the 17th of July, 1900, in Bellingham, Mr. McCush was married to Miss 
Alwina Korthaur, and they now have two children: George W., bom July i, 
1902, now a junior in the' high school; and Lillian E., born April 9, 1904, a 
freshman. 

Mr. McCush is much interested in the cause of public education and has 
efficiently served on the school board. He is prominent in Masonic circles as a 
Scottish Rite Mason and Mystic Shriner and he also belongs to the Elks and 
Odd Fellows. He votes with the republican party, in the platform of which he 
believes the best elements of good government are embodied and as a member of 
the Chamber of Commerce he works for the local interests of Bellingham, doing 
everything in his power to promote the growth, upbuilding and progress of the 
community. He is also a member of the Whatcom County Council for Patriotic 
Service, a branch of the State Council of Defense. 



BERT FLOYD DANIELS. 

Bert Floyd Daniels, of Everett, successfully conducting a wholesale and 
retail bakery business which he has developed from a small beginning to ex- 
tensive and gratifying proportions, was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
September 10, 1870, a son of John Wesley Daniels, also a native of the Keystone 
state and a representative of one of its old families of Welsh lineage. The 
father, who was a millwright by trade, died when his son was but two years of 
age. The mother, who bore the maiden name of Mary Williams, was born in 
Pennsylvania and was of German 'descent. She died at Townville, Crawford 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1906, at the ag6 of severity-four years. 

Bert Ployd Daniels was the youngest, in a family of six children and after 
attending public schools. of Craw^ford county was graduated from Clarke's 
Business College at Erie, Pennsylvania. When a youth of fifteen he started 
out to earn his own livelihood, being first employed in connection with the lum- 
ber trade. When twenty-one years of age he joined his brother, Clinton E. 
Daniels, in the manufacture of lumber and shingles, carrying on business at 
Grand Valley, Pennsylvania. This partnership was maintained for several years, 
after which B. F. Daniels devoted fifteen years to the manufacture of shingles 
alone. He next entered the baking business at Johnsonburg, Elk county, Penn- 
sylvania, taking up that line without any knowledge of the trade. He made a 
marked success in the undertaking, however, and after a little time had more 
than doubled the business. Having heard of Washington and its wonderful 
opportunities, he sold his bakery business in Pennsylvania in 1910 and removed 
to the coast. It was his purpose to resume operations as a shingle manufacturer, 
but after investigating conditions he abandoned his original plan and again be- 
came connected with the baking business, purchasing what was then known as 
the Wetmore bakery. From a small beginning he has built up a trade of large 
proportion^ as one of the wholesale and retail bakers of Everett, his sales 
averaging about three thousand dollars per month. Fie has based his trade upon 
the excellence of his product and the reliability of his business dealings. 

On July 5, 1892, Mr. Daniels was married in Jamestown, New York, to Miss 
Nettie B. Preston, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 

Vol. Ill— 6 



104 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Ham Preston. They have two children, Reginald P. and Floyd L. The parents 
are members of the Alethodist church and Mr. Daniels belongs to the Odd Fel- 
lows lodge at Everett and to the Maccabees at Johnsonburg, Pennsylvania. He 
also has membership in the Everett Automobile Club and in the Everett Com- 
mercial Club. His political allegiance is given the republican party and his 
religious faith is that of the Methodist church. He is more than satisfied with 
the western country and would not return to the east, for he recognizes what 
the future holds in store for this great and growing district, settled as it is with 
a most progressive and enterprising class of men who, well trained in the busi- 
ness methods of the east, find here a needed scope for their activities, with 
boundless natural resources for the use of man. 



REGINALD HEBER THOMSON. 

Reginald Heber Thomson is a consulting engineer of Seattle and his ability 
is recognized by all who know aught of work of this character. He was previously 
city engineer and his scientific knowledge and practical skill enabled him to do 
excellent work for the city in promoting public improvements and utilities. 

A native of Indiana, Mr. Thomson was born in Hanover, March 20, 1856, 
and is of Scotch lineage, tracing his ancestry back to William C. Thomson, his 
great-great-grandfather, who, on leaving Glasgow, Scotland, became a resident of 
County Donegal, Ireland, about the year 1726. His son, James Thomson, was 
born in County Donegal in 1730 and in 1771 came to the new world, settling at 
Conocoheague, in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, thus establishing the family in 
the United States. Seven years later he took up his abode in Derry township, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and there on the 2d of April, of that year, 
James Henry Thomson, the grandfather of Reginald H. Thomson, was born. In 
1793 the great-grandfather and all his family removed from Pennsylvania to 
Nicholas county, Kentucky, and in that locality James Henry Thomson was mar- 
ried on the 1 2th of December, 1799, to Miss Sarah Henry. He engaged 
extensively and successfully in farming and became one of the influential resi- 
dents of his community, while for fourteen years he served as magistrate of 
Nicholas county and for two years filled the office of county sheriff. He was also 
prominent in promoting the moral progress of the community, acting as ruling 
elder in the Presbyterian church, in which he also led the singing for many 
years, possessing considerable musical talent and having great love for the art. 
In the year 1828 he was one of a colony that removed to Decatur county, Indi- 
ana, settlement being made at Greensburg, and there on the 7th of August, 1840, 
James Henry Thomson passed away at the age of sixty-two years. In 1852 
his widow went to Olympia, Washington, in company with her daughter Mary 
Elizabeth, who was the wife of Rev. George F. Whitworth, and there she passed 
away June 22, 1858, leaving behind the memory of a well spent and noble Christian 
life. 

Samuel Harrison Thomson was one of a family of two daughters and six 
sons and three of the sons became Presbyterian ministers, while the two daughters 
married preachers of the same denomination. The birth of Samuel H. Thomson 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 105 

occurred in Nicholas county, Kentucky, August 26, 1813, and in early manhood he 
wedded Magdeline Sophronia Clifton, who was born in Henry county, Kentucky, 
in 1820 and was of Huguenot ancestry, representatives of the family removing to 
America at a very early day. Her grandfather had a large estate in Washington 
county, Virginia. As scientist and educator Samuel H. Thomson was widely 
known. In 1844 he was given charge of mechanical philosophy and mathematics 
in Hanover College of Indiana and devoted thirty-two years to teaching those 
branches, retiring in 1876. In the meantime he had received the honorary degrees 
of Alaster of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Laws. 

In 1877, after resigning his position in Hanover College, Dr. Thomson went 
to Healdsburg, California, where for four years he conducted the Healdsburg 
Institute. He was not only a most able educator but was also a civil engineer 
of ability and was an ordained minister of the Presbyterian church. He removed 
to the Pacific coast for the benefit of his health but after a few years, passed 
away in Pasadena, California, September 2, 1882, at the age of sixty-nine years. 
There were nine children in the family, but only two survive: Henry Clifton 
Thomson, D. D., who has charge of the making of a translation of the New 
Testament from the original Greek into classic Spanish, working at Madrid, 
Spain ; and Reginald Heber. 

The last named was graduated from Hanover College with the class of 1877, 
at which time the Bachelor of Arts degree was conferred upon him. Ten years 
later he received the Master of Arts degree and in 1901 the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. Following his graduation he accompanied his parents to 
California and became teacher of mathematics in the Healdsburg Institute. Dur- 
ing his college days he had given special attention to civil engineering, which 
profession he followed for a time in California. Since 1881 he has been a resident 
of Seattle. Upon his removal here he became assistant city surveyor and aided 
in laying out and improving many of the city's streets. He filled the office of 
assistant city surveyor from 1881 to 1883 and in 1882 he became a partner of 
F. H. Whitworth, who was both city and county surveyor, the partnership being 
conducted under the firm name of Whitworth & Thomson, doing general railroad 
engineering, mining and city work. In 1884 Mr. Thomson became city surveyor 
and drew the plans for the construction of the first sewer built in Seattle on 
thoroughly modern principles. This was the Union street sewer, which has been 
used as a pattern for all subsequent work of a similar nature in the city. Mr. 
Thomson also drew plans and superintended the construction of the Grant street 
bridge, two miles long and twenty-six feet wide, built across an arm of the bay 
south of the city, connecting Seattle with the manufacturing districts. 

In December, 1886, the firm of Whitworth & Thomson was dissolved and tlie 
junior member also left the city employ to become the locating engineer of 
the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railway, now a portion of the Northern Pacific 
system. He made a location for the line from the head of Lake Washington 
through Snoqualmie valley and the Snoqualmie pass to Lake Kitchelos. In 
March, 1888, Mr. Thomson went to Spokane, where he acted as resident engineer 
for the road for a year, locating and constructing its terminals. He also located 
the two crossings of the Spokane river and planned and superintended the con- 
struction of the two bridges. He had a difficult task in locating the road through 
the wild mountainous district, but his line was adopted and has received the 



106 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

highest commendation. He left Spokane and the employ of the company in 
1889 and, returning to Seattle, became engaged in mining engineering and also 
served as consulting engineer until May, 1892, at which time he was appointed 
city engineer of Seattle. In that office he had charge of the design and construc- 
tion of the sewer system of the city, which has cost to date some eight or nine 
million dollars. He also perfected the plans and superintended the laying of all 
city pavements up to the time he retired from office and it was he who laid the 
first block of vitrified brick pavement on the Pacific coast. He has been the 
principal advocate of the gravity system of water for the city and pushed that 
project for seven years until the system was adopted, and the city is now supplied 
with an abundance of pure mountain water, sixty-five million gallons per day, at a 
co^t of three and one-half million dollars. The intake is twenty-six miles within 
the mountains, where the city has acquired the watershed of Cedar river and 
Cedar lake. Cedar lake itself is more than four miles long and a mile wide 
and its elevation is fifteen hundred and thirty feet above sea level. By the con- 
struction of a small dam, so as to impound the winter run off, the lake can be made 
to hold sufficient water to furnish the city three hundred million gallons every 
day in the year. This has been the great life work and aim of Mr. Thomson, and 
Seattle could not possibly have a better water system. It will prove one of the 
greatest blessings to the inhabitants for all time and will be one of the city's 
greatest attractions — an unfailing supply of pure, clear mountain water at the 
cheapest possible rate at which an abundant supply could be obtained. Certainly 
Seattle owes much to Mr. Thomson, whose labors have been of the greatest 
benefit. His work has been of a character that adds much to the healthfulness 
of the city and is, therefore, of direct good to every individual. A fall of six 
hundred feet is made by cascades in Cedar river a short distance below Cedar 
lake, and at the foot of these cascades Mr. Thomson has constructed for the 
city of Seattle the first section of a municipal electrical plant. This installation 
delivers in the city about fifteen thousand horse power, and the final installation 
will produce about three times that amount. 

To Mr. Thomson is due the credit for the magnificent boulevard system en- 
joyed in Seattle today, although he was materially assisted by George F. Cotterill 
and J. C. Jeftery, mention of whom is made elsewhere in this work, these two 
gentlemen doing much of the actual location work. Many years ago during the 
early stage of bicycle popularity the citizens complained they had no roads. 
The thought occurred to Mr. Thomson that here was the opportunity to drive in 
the opening wedge and to determine the outlines in what might later develop into 
a great driveway, accomplishing the project by degrees. He conceived a boulevard 
plan of magnificent proportions to traverse the city and also to follow the shore 
lines of Lake Washington. His dream was of a boulevard system to surpass 
anything of a like nature in the world and, although it is not yet wholly completed, 
his hopes have been glorious in their fruition, for the city of Seattle today 
possesses a system unmatchied in scenic beauty by any other city in the country. 
Using the bicycle path as the entering wedge, he put men in the field, constructing 
it along the grades and lines that would later become the boulevard. A cinder path 
was constructed and by degrees sections were worked out as a carriage drive. 
Afterward when the carriages were replaced by motors the system was turned 
over to the park department, which developed the motor drive of today, using the 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 107 

old bicycle path as its course and grade. If Mr. Thomson had undertaken to 
develop a boulevard in the first instance and had called it such it would have been 
killed, as the citizens would not have subscribed to it. It has developed step by 
step and has beeii gradually ornamented by the park board. While not yet com- 
pleted, it will not be many years before it encircles the lake and gives an eighty to 
one hundred mile driveway in and around the most beautiful city in the world. 

Mr. .Thomson has not only been responsible for many important projects in 
Seattle, but was also engaged in laying out and improving Strathcona Park on 
Vancouver Island when war stopped that work. 

The home life of Mr. Thomson exhibits as interesting phases as does his 
professional career. In 1883 he wedded Miss Adeline Laughlin, a native of Cali- 
fornia, who is of Scotch extraction. Her father, James Laughlin, was one of 
California's pioneer farmers. Four children have been born unto them : James 
Harrison, Marion Wing, Reginald Heber and Frances Clifton. The parents are 
members of the Presbyterian church, in which Mr. Thomson has acted as elder 
for more than a quarter of a century and as a teacher of the Bible class. He 
is a strong temperance man and believes in the abolition of the liquor traffic. He 
votes with the republican party. It would be tautological in this connection to 
enter into any series of statements showing him to be a man of broad public 
spirit, for this has been shadowed forth between the lines of this review. His 
work has ever been of the greatest public benefit and Seattle owes much to his 
efforts and should ever be proud to honor him among her builders and promoters. 



PAUL I. CARTER, M. D. 

Dr. Paul I. Carter, connected with the United States health service at Port 
Townsend, was born at Hamilton, Virginia, on the 28th of August. 1885, his 
ancestral line being traced back to the Revolutionary period. His grandparents 
were George W. and Orra (McElhenny) Carter, who were born in Virginia. 
His father, Dr. P. B. Carter, one of the leading physicians and surgeons of 
Tacoma, was born in Texas, but his people were all natives of Virginia. After liv- 
ing for some time in South Dakota he removed to Washington in 1886. He is still 
giving active attention to the duties of his chosen profession at the age of fifty-six 
vears. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Orra Lee Milbourne, was also 
of Virginian birth, and pursued her education in one of the noted Virginia 
academies for girls. Dr. and Mrs. P. B. Carter became the parents of two 
children, one of these being Lee J. Carter, now of Tacoma. 

The elder son. Paul I. Carter, attended public schools in Tacoma and also 
high school at San Luis Obispo, California. Later he entered the medical de- 
partment of George Washington University at Washington, D. C. from which 
he was graduated in 1907. 

It was in February, 191 1, in Port Townsend, that Dr. Carter was married 
to Miss Lota C. Tibbals, whose parents were pioneers of Port Townsend and are 
mentioned elsewhere in this work. Dr. and Mrs. Carter have two children: 
Mary Lee, born in Port Townsend in 1912; and Richard R.. born in February, 
1914. 



108 WASPIINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

The parents are members of the Episcopal church and Dr. Carter belongs to 
the Elks lodge at Port Townsend and is also a Royal Arch Mason. Along 
strictly professional lines he has connection with the Jefferson County, the Wash- 
ington State and the American Medical Associations. He is well known and 
popular and ranks high in medical circles throughout the state. His ability is 
widely acknowledged by his contemporaries and colleagues and he is well quali- 
fied for the responsibilities and duties which have devolved upon him in his 
present professional connection. 



LOUIS A. MERRICK. 



Louis A. Merrick, a leading attorney of Everett, well known and highly 
respected among his fellow members of the Washington Bar Association, was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, in September, 1859. His father, Ambrose 
N. Merrick, was also a native of Springfield, where the family had long been 
represented. The Merricks come of Welsh ancestry. There were four brothers 
who crossed the Atlantic in the early part of the seventeenth century, and two 
uncles of Antbrose N. Merrick participated in the Revolutionary war, while 
another was a soldier of the War of 1812, showing that the family. has been 
most loyal in its support of American interests. 

Ambrose N. Merrick became a member of the bar and in 1867 removed with 
his family to San Francisco, California, where he engaged in the general practice 
of law. He was also legal representative of the Indians in connection with one 
of the departments of the United States government. Later he established his 
home in Los Angeles, where he continued successfully in law practice for a 
time, and in 1870 he removed to Seattle, where he resided for two years. He 
afterward became a resident of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and was numbered 
among the prominent representatives of the bar in that city for thirty years or 
until his death, which occurred in 1901, when he was seventy-four years of age. 
For three terms he was corporation counsel of Minneapolis. Until 1872 he 
supported the republican party but during the candidacy of Horace Greeley for 
the presidency he became a democrat. He was the first chairman of the state 
central committee of the republican party when Fremont was its first presi- 
dential candidate and he took a very active part in state and national politics. 
While a resident of Seattle he was the right-hand man of Selucius Garfielde. 
He died April 28, 1901, at the age of seventy-four. His wife passed away April 
28, 191 6. She bore the maiden name of Sarah B. Warriner and was a representa- 
tive of an old Massachusetts family of English origin, her mother having been 
a Bates. Mrs. Merrick was born in Hartford, Connecticut, February 16, 1837, 
and following the death of her husband she came to Everett, where she lived for 
fifteen years ere death called her. She had a family of eight children, three of 
whom survive: Louis A.; Harry H., living in Chicago, Illinois; and Mrs. James 
B. Cutter, of Watsonville, California. Mrs. Merrick had many attractive social 
qualities which drew around her a large circle of warm friends. 

Louis A. Merrick pursued his education in Carleton College at Northfield, 
Minnesota, and in the Washington University at St. Louis, Missouri, where 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 109 

he pursued a preparatory course. He entered upon the practice of law in 1880 
in Minneapolis, in association with his father, there remaining until 1901, and on 
the 1st of July of that year he arrived in Everett, where he has since been 
engaged in active practice, ranking now with the leading attorneys of the bar of 
western Washington. He is a member of the Snohomish County Bar Associa- 
tion. His ability has gained him the respect of his professional colleagues and 
contemporaries and is attested by the court records, which indicate many ver- 
dicts that he has won favorable to the interests of his clients. He is a strong 
and able lawyer, clear in his arguments and logical in his deductions and seldom, 
if ever, at fault in the application of a legal principle. He practices largely in 
the federal courts. 

On the 9th of May, 1881, Mr. Merrick was united in marriage to Miss Violet 
Heath, a native of Minnesota and a daughter of Osman and Mary (Evoy) Heath, 
of an old Maine family of English descent on ihe paternal side and of French- 
Irish on the maternal side. Both of her parents are now deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Merrick have three sons: Evoy N., who was born in October, 1895; and 
Ambrose and France F., twins, who were born December 14, 1900. 

In politics Mr. Merrick is a democrat and is prominent in connection with 
political afifairs, ably supporting his position by intelligent argument and giving 
sound reason for the faith that is in him. He holds a life membership in the 
Elks Lodge No. 44 at Minneapolis, his certificate being No. i and bearing date 
April 25, 1886. During the celebration of the thirtieth anniversary of the 
founding of that organization, in 1916, the lodge made every possible effort to 
have him attend as its guest, intending to pay all the expenses of his trip, but 
he was unable to do so. When they learned that he could not be present they 
requested him to send a phonographic speech, which he did, and this in a measure 
compensated for his non-attendance. He has many admirable qualities which 
render him a valued citizen, and his whole life record indicates the truth of the 
Emersonian philosophy that "the way to win a friend is to be one." 



EVERETT C. LYLE. 



Everett C. Lyle, a civil and landscape engineer of Bellingham, was born in 
St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, June 27, 1865, a son of James and Sarah 
Lyle. He attended the public schools of Fredericton, Canada, advancing through 
the high school and afterward the A School of Infantry in the Eighth mili- 
tary district until he reached the age of twenty years. He next entered the 
provincial land surveying department, with which he was connected until 1892, 
when he went to Minneapolis and practiced civil engineering there for six 
months. On the expiration of that period he arrived in Bellingham and en- 
tered upon the work of his profession in connection with the street railway 
system, which work occupied him for two years. On the expiration of that 
period he devoted six months to civil engineering in Snohomish, Washington, 
and through the succeeding six months was principal of the Florence schools. 
Returning to Bellingham, he spent a year in the county engineer's office and 
afterward engaged with the Bellingham Bay & British Columbia Railroad as 



110 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

transitman with a surveying party for a year. He also spent a year as assist- 
ant civil engineer with that company and later became assistant engineer with the 
Bellingham branch of the Northern Pacific Railroad. When a year had passed 
in that connection he took up the private practice of his profession, which he 
has since followed with the exception of three years during which period he 
served as city engineer. He has been doing practically all the engineering work 
for the Bellingham Bay Improvement Company since 1902 and he has been 
retained for much important professional service. He spent the year 1910 in 
Boston, Massachusetts, where he studied the geometric layout of the metro- 
politan park system and also the trees and shrubbery at the Arnold Arboretum 
at Brookline, Massachusetts. Since then he has given attention to landscape 
work in Bellingham parks and cemeteries, in school yards and in residence 
grounds and has done much to adorn and beautify the city. He stands very high 
in professional connections, possessing marked skill as a civil and landscape en- 
gineer. 

On the lOth of June, 1908, in Bellingham, Mr. Lyle was united in marriage 
to Miss Lura Cozier and they have become the parents of three children, Lura 
Alice, Roland Cozier and Ruth Elsie, aged respectively eight, five and three 
years. The parents are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Lyle gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and belongs to the Canadian Club, 
of which he was the first president. He took a special course in army signaling 
at Fredericton, New Brunswick, and since coming to Washington served as 
first lieutenant and signal officer on the staff of IMajor Weisenburger of the 
State Militia. He also served during three summer seasons as recorder and 
field assistant to Major Charles H. Boyd of Portland, Maine, on the United 
States survey, covering an area of twenty miles on either side of the boundary 
line of the United States and Canada from the Bay of Fundy to Mars Hill. 
For several years he acted as examiner of engineers for positions on the board 
of public works in the city of Bellingham. He has attractive social qualities 
as well as marked business ability and professional skill and all these combine 
to make him one of the valued citizens of Bellingham. 



WARNER M. KARSHNER, M. D. 

Warner M. Karshner, M. D., who since 1904 has engaged in the practice of 
medicine in Puyallup, where, however, he has made his home since 1886, was 
born in Fremont, Ohio, December 27, 1874, and was therefore but a youth of 
twelve years when he came to Washington with his parents, J. F. and Louisa 
(Nichter) Karshner. His public school training was supplemented by a course 
in the University of Washington from which he was graduated in 1898, obtain- 
ing the degrees of B. S. and B. P. The following year he was engaged in teaching 
school in the schools of Puyallup and in fact his attention was largely given to 
teaching in the public schools of the state from 1898 until 1901. In the latter 
year he entered Northwestern University Medical School at Chicago and won his 
medical degree in 1904. He then returned to Puyallup, opened an office and has 
since successfully followed his profession there through the intervening period of 




DR. WARNER M. KARSTINER 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 113 

twelve years. He was health officer of the state from 1904 to 1908 but now 
devotes his entire time to a large private practice. 

On the 14th of May, 1905, Dr. Karshner was married to Miss Ella Hibbert, 
the daughter of William Hibbert, and they have one son, Paul H. Dr. Karshner 
is a republican in his political views and in November, 1916, was elected to repre- 
sent the twenty-fifth senatorial district in the state senate. He served as presi- 
dent of the school board for two years and has ever manifested a deep interest 
in the public schools and at all times stands for progress and improvement in 
relation to the interests of the city and the state. 



W. J. GRAMBS. 



W. J. Grambs figures prominently as a representative of electric interests in 
the northwest and in this connection has worked his way steadily upward until 
he now occupies the responsible position of assistant to the president of the Puget 
Sound Traction, Light & Power Company, to which position he was appointed in 
April, 1913. He was born in Honesdale, Pennsylvania, April 11, 1862. After 
attending the common schools of his native town he entered the United States 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, from which he was graduated in June, 
1882. Ten days later he was ordered to sea, joining the United States Steam- 
ship Hartford at Boston, Massachusetts. He sailed from that port on a foreign 
cruise on the 20th of July and on completing two years' sea service he was 
detached from the Hartford upon her return to United States waters at San 
Francisco, in June, 1884, and was ordered to AnnapoHs for final examination, 
which he successfully passed. He was then ordered home on waiting orders and 
the following November on account of a lack of ships he was- honorably dis- 
charged from the navy with one year's sea pay in accordance with an act of con- 
gress passed in 1882. 

After leaving the naval service Mr. Grambs accepted an appointment in the 
United States geological survey and was engaged in topographical work in 
southeastern Massachusetts for two years. In the early spring of 1887 he 
resigned from the government service and left Washington, D. C, for Seattle. 
On reaching this city he associated himself in the electrical business with S. Z. 
Mitchell and F. H. Sparling, former Naval Academy classmates of his and early 
in 1889 in connection with those gentlemen he incorporated the Northwest Electric 
Supply 81 Construction Company, which was the pioneer electrical construction 
company of the northwest. It was the intermediary for introducing the leading 
electric systems and machinery on the Pacific coast, particularly in the northwest, 
and laid the foundation for all of the large electrical utilities in that section. A 
year before he arrived in Seattle his associates had sold to a local syndicate headed 
by J. M. Frink, an Edison electric light plant, which was the first incandescent cen- 
tral station installed west of the Missouri river. The company sold and installed 
electric lighting plants in rapid succession in Spokane, Portland, Tacoma, Van- 
couver and Victoria, British Columbia, and in many smaller towns throughout 
the northwest. It was also the pioneer in electric railway work in the north- 
west installing electric railways in nearly all of the large cities of this section. 



114 . WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

His company successively represented the Edison United ^Manufacturing Com- 
pany of New York, which was the first company to exploit the Edison inventions 
in the electric lighting field, the Sprague Electric ]\Iotor Company, the first com- 
pany to place a successful electric street railway system on the market, the Edison 
General Electric Company, and later the General Electric Company of New 
York. 

In 1894 his company sold its business to the General Electric Company and 
Mr. Grambs accepted the position of local manager of that company's branch in 
Seattle. Between the years 1896 and 1899 he held the position of manager and 
also acted as receiver of several of the street railway and lighting properties of 
Seattle, while continuing to represent the General Electric Company. In 1899 
he resigned his position to accept a position with the newly organized corpora- 
tion known as the Seattle Electric Company. Avith which he occupied successively 
the positions of purchasing agent, sales manager, superintendent of light and 
power and finally assistant to the president of the Puget Sound Traction, Light 
& Power Company, to which position he was appointed in April, 19 13. 

In 1889, in Tacoma, ]\Ir. Grambs was married to Miss Blanche Lorette Kesler, 
of Honesdale, Pennsylvania, and they have three sons, Harold W., James K., 
and William M. Mr. Grambs joined the National Guard of the state of Washing- 
ton as second lieutenant of Company E in 1888 and resigned as first lieutenant of 
that company after two and a half years service in the guard. He has various 
membership relations which bring him pleasure and interest and which establish 
his position as a man of fraternal instinct as well as public spirit. He belongs to 
the United States Naval Graduates Association, to the United States Naval 
Institute and the United States Naval League. He is a member of Elks Lodge, 
No. 92, at Seattle, is a member of the Rainier, Arctic, Press and Ad Clubs and 
also of the new Chamber of Commerce and the Commercial Club. He looks 
always to activities working for the benefit of the community in lines of sub- 
stantial development, improvement, reform and progress and it is along those 
lines that his cooperation is most strongly felt. 



G. M. LAURIDSEN. 



The story of victory is always one that thrills and the greater the eflfort put 
forth to achieve it the more does it call forth admiration. Notable among those 
who have won success through determined and persistent efifort honorably directed 
is G. ^I. Lauridsen, the president of the Citizens National Bank of Port Angeles 
and now the largest individual property holder in Clallam county. He is alert, 
energetic, determined, carrying forward to successful completion his well defined 
plans and brooking no obstacle that can be overcome by persistent and laudable 
effort. Moreover, his afifairs have been of a character that have contributed to 
the upbuilding and progress of the city and district in which he lives. His 
life record began at Jutland, Denmark, in i860. His father, L. Lauridsen. was 
for forty years sherifif of Jutland and because of his long service the king of 
Denmark conferred upon him a badge of honor. In his later years he lived 
retired and had reached the advanced age of ninety years when death called him. 



WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 115 

In the schools of his native country G. AI. Lauridsen acquired a good educa- 
tion and when twenty years of age crossed the Atlantic, desirous of enjoying the 
business advantages which he believed might be secured on this side the w^ater. 
In Bridgeport, Connecticut, he secured a position in the general offices of the 
Adams Express Company and won almost immediate recognition of his ability 
in his promotion to the position of assistant cashier, in which capacity he served 
for nearly eleven years. In June, 1890, he started to carry out a plan which 
he had long cherished — a trip around the world. Sailing from New York to his 
old home in Denmark, he thence traveled through Europe, Egypt, the Holy Land, 
India, China and Japan. He then sailed over the Pacific waters to Puget Sound, 
where he arrived in May, 1891. Had he crossed the continent he would have 
completed his plan of encircling the globe, but so pleased was he with Port 
Angeles and this section of the country that he decided to remain and become a 
factor in the business development of this section, in the future of which he 
had firm belief. He embarked in commercial lines as proprietor of a grocery 
and general store on Front street but later he disposed of the general line to 
concentrate his time and energies upon the grocery trade, in which he built up 
a business of extensive proportions. He also handled the output of several 
shingle mills but has retired from those lines to concentrate his efforts upon 
the banking business and the management of his property interests. 

He is now president of the Citizens National Bank of Port Angeles, which 
is the only national bank in Clallam county, thereby occupying a distinctive posi- 
tion during the sixteen years of its existence. The patronage of the bank has 
constantly increased, constituting it one of the strongest influences in the upbuild- 
ing and progress of the city and county. As an officer of this bank ^Ir. Lauridsen 
has contributed toward making its policy a liberal one. The institution has 
extended credit to all who have sought it to a point consistent with safe banking. 
There is no facility oft'ered by the banks of the larger cities which is not furnished 
patrons of this progressive and enterprising institution, the officers and directors 
giving their personal attention to the wants of everyone having business relations 
with the bank. "Nothing too big and nothing too small" to l)e given promjit 
and courteous attention is the motto which actuates the bank's officers and as a 
result uniform satisfaction is attested by the patrons, whose number is rapidly 
increasing. After serving for some time as vice president of the bank Mr. 
Lauridsen was called to the presidency, in which connection he is bending his 
efforts to administrative direction and executive control. He also has extensive 
and important property holdings in his city, and throughout the county. In 
fact he is regarded as the largest property holder in Clallam county and from 
his realty derives a most substantial annual income. He has recently erected on 
Lincoln and First streets a thoroughly modern theater, known as the Lincoln 
Theater. He was one of those most active in securing the building of the Mil- 
waukee Railroad through this city and in appreciation of his efforts the lirst 
station outside of the city was named in his honor. He also erected and owns 
the Newspaper building on Lincoln, near First street, a modern building, erected 
especially for newspaper purposes and occupied by the Olympic Leader, the 
Tribune-Times and the Evening News. 

In 1893 Mr. Lauridsen was married at Port Angeles to Miss Faith A. Bryant, 
whose acquaintance he had formed in Bridgeport, Connecticut. She is a native 



116 \\ASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

of Toronto, Canada, and a daughter of Joseph and Mary Faith Bryant, who 
were of English and of Scotch descent. 

I\Ir. Lauridsen holds membership in the Masonic fraternity and he is a very 
prominent member of the Port Angeles Commercial Club. He served for eight 
years as its president and has always been active in its affairs. He has been 
prominent in political connections as city councilman at large and as chairman 
of the board of county commissioners for six years, his term of office expiring 
in 191 1. Such in brief is the record of G. M. Lauridsen. Centuries ago Shakes- 
peare said : 

"There's a tide in the affairs of men 

Which, taken at the flood, 

Leads on to fortune." 
That Mr. Lauridsen recognized the full tide is evident from his career. In a 
word he has seen and utilized opportunities which others have passed heedlessly 
by and he has made his* eft'orts count for the utmost. Through the faithful 
performance of each day's duties he has found courage, strength and inspiration 
for the labors of the succeeding day and what he has purposed he has accom- 
plished, knowing that every obstacle could be overcome by determination. ]^Iore- 
over, in his whole career he has never built his success upon another's failure, 
but has followed constructive methods and is today through merit and ability 
one of the foremost business men of his section of the coimtrv. 



WILLL\M W. KURTZ. 



Among the business enterprises which contribute to the stability and up- 
building of Hoquiam is the Hoquiam Packing Company, of which William W, 
Kurtz is the president. He came to the northwest when a young man and has 
since been identified with the commercial life of this locality. He was born in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1863. and came of a family of millers, all of 
the representatives of the name following the milling business. He, too, learned 
the trade and followed it for a time but was the first one of the family to abandon 
that pursuit as a life occupation. The family is of Holland lineage. His great- 
grandfather was a miller at \^alley Forge and operated the mill there at the 
time that Washington established the headquarters of his army at that place. 
Both the grandfather and the father of \Mlliam W. Kurtz continued in the same 
line of business and their name became a synonym for excellence in milling 
products in the section of the country in which they lived. 

William W. Kurtz remained in Pennsylvania until about twenty-nine years 
of age, when in 1892 he made his way to the northwest, settling at Hoquiam, 
where he engaged in fishing, using dragnets and small boats. In 1904 the 
Hoquiam Packing Company was incorporated, with Mr. Kurtz as the presi- 
dent and manager, Mrs. Kurtz as secretary and treasurer and W. E. Fererbee 
as trustee. They erected large buildings for cannery purposes, installed all the 
latest improved machinery and equipped their plant for the canning and packing 
of salmon and clams. Their buildings are situated at the foot of Eklund avenue 
on the river. They own and operate their own boats, traps and nets and have a 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 117 

capacity of one thousand cases per day. Their product includes the Point Eliza- 
beth brand of minced clams and the Point Elizabeth, Chehalis and Copalis brands 
of salmon and their output is shipped to every state in the Union. They also buy 
large quantities of salmon and clams on the open market. They have an ar- 
rangement for taking ice with them to the seining grounds and as fast as the 
salmon are taken they are iced, so that the tish are thus kept in most sanitary 
condition. They employ one hundred and fifty-five fishermen and seventy- 
five people in the cannery. In addition to his Hoquiam interests Mr. Kurtz has 
built and owns a factory at ]Moclips, on the Pacific beach, which was erected in 
1912 and is operated under his own name. It has a capacity of eight hundred 
cases per day and employs sixty-five people. There he packs the famous Quimalt 
brand of salmon and the same brand of clams as in the other factory. 

In 1902 Mr. Kurtz was married to Miss Jessie Evans, of Pennsylvania, 
and throughout the period of their residence in Hoquiam the hospitality of the 
best homes of the city has been freely accorded them in recognition of their 
personal worth. Mr. Kurtz votes wnth the republican party and in all matters 
relating to the general welfare is active and public-spirited, cooperating in many 
plans and measures for the benefit and upbuilding of the city. He does not seek 
office, however, preferring to devote his entire time and attention to his busi- 
ness, Avhich has grown to extensive proportions, becoming one of the important 
industries of this section of the state. Throughout his business career he has 
made steady progress, never fearing to venture where favoring opportunity has 
led the way. He is fortunate in that he possesses character and ability that 
awaken confidence in others and the simple weight of his character and ability 
has been the means of bringing him into close connection with important busi- 
ness interests of his adopted city. 



EDWARD W. FERRIS. 



Death removed a substantial citizen from Mount Vernon when on the 25th 
of August, 1916, Edward W. Ferris passed away. Fie was at that time occupy- 
ing the position of postmaster and he was one of the honored pioneer settlers 
of Skagit county. He was born at Mineral Point. Wisconsin, November 3, 1866, 
a son of Abram and Elizabeth (Fitzsimmons) Ferris, who were natives of Ire- 
land and in 1840 became residents of Mineral Point, where the father followed 
the occupation of farming, winning a substantial competence through his close 
application to the work of the fields. He died in 1883 at the age of sixty years, 
after which his widow removed to Red Cloud, Nebraska, where her death oc- 
curred in 1894, when she was seventy-two years of age. The family numbered 
two children, the elder being Miss Mary Ferris, now living in l^cd Cloud. 

Nebraska. 

Edward W. Ferris attended the public schools of Mineral Point. Wiscon- 
sin, and afterward secured employment in a law office, where he remained until 
he came to Washington in 1891, settling first at Tacoma. where he became sec- 
retary for W. J. Thompson. In 1893 he removed to Mount \'ernon. where he 
entered the employ of the Skagit Boom Company. In September of the same 



118 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

year he was appointed court reporter, which position he filled for a period of 
twenty years, a fact indicative of his marked fidelity and capability in that con- 
nection. In June, 1913, he was appointed state forester and fire warden, in which 
connection he continued until March i, 191 6. He was then appointed postmas- 
ter of JMount Vernon and continued to act in that capacity until his demise. 
He won wide popularity during his incumbency in the office of state forester 
and fire warden, being popular alike with democrats and republicans. His ap- 
pointment to that position came from Governor Lister and in the performance 
of his duties he became known all over Washington and won friends wherever 
he went. 

This does not cover the entire period of Mr. Ferris' public service, for through 
six years he was a member of the city council and in 1912 he was called to the 
office of mayor of Mount Vernon, in which capacity he served for two terms, 
giving to the city a businesslike and progressive administration in which he 
brought about various reforms and introduced many improvements. He resigned 
the mayoralty in order to become fire warden. He has ever been a stalwart 
democrat, unfaltering in his allegiance to the party and recognized as one of its 
leaders in the state. 

In June, 1904, Mr. Ferris was married to Miss Edith Keller, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Keller, of Marion, Kansas, and a niece of ex-Governor 
Edward W. Hoch. They became the parents of two children : Edith ^lary, 
born in 1905; and Edward K. in 1910. Both are now pupils in the schools of 
Mount Vernon. 

Mr. Ferris was an exemplary representative of the Masonic fraternity and 
presiding officer in the chapter. He also belonged to the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, while his religious faith was that of the Episcopal church. He 
stood for progress and improvement along all lines, cooperating in every measure 
and movement that he deemed of value in advancing the material, social, intel- 
lectual, political and moral progress of his community and the state. Death came 
to him after an illness of but ten days and the keenest regret was felt when 
the news of his demise was received, not only in his immediate community but 
throughout Washington, for he had made friends in all parts of the state and 
was a most progressive, valued and honored citizen. 



JOHN JOHNSON. 

John Johnson, a merchant tailor of Everett, was born at Vermland, Sweden, 
June 16, 1868, a son of Eric Johnson, a native of Sweden who spent his entire 
life there, passing away in March, 1868, at the age of thirty-eight years. He 
had successfully followed farming in his native country. His wife, Catherine 
Anderson, died July 16, 191 5, at the age of eighty-eight. In their family were 
six children. 

John Johnson, the youngest member of the household, acquired his educa- 
tion in the common schools of his native country but when fourteen years of 
age began to earn his living as an apprentice to the tailor's trade, which he fol- 
lowed in Sweden for ten years. In 1892 he sailed for America, locating in Chi- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 119 

cago, where he remained until 1902, and during the latter part of that period 
he engaged in business on his own account at the corner of Dearborn and 
Monroe streets. On the 6th of August of the latter year he came to Wash- 
ington, making his way to Everett, where on the ist of September he entered 
business on his own account in a comparatively small way. He has since con- 
tinued active in the trade and the growth of his business has made him one of 
the leading merchant tailors of the city. During the busy season he employs 
from six to ten skilled workmen at his store at Nos. 208 and 210 Commercial 
building. He has won a well earned reputation for the high class of goods which 
he turns out, representing the last word in style, fashion and material. 

On the 1st of September, 1894, in Chicago, Mr. Johnson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Amanda Moore, a native of Sweden and a daughter of Carl Swan- 
son. They have become parents of two children: Elsie E., born in Chicago, 
November 26, 1896; and Judith E., born in Chicago, November 6, 1898. Mrs. 
Johnson is a member of the Everett Benevolent Society and takes an active 
interest in its work and also in church work. Mr. Johnson belongs to the 
Elks lodge of Everett and to the Everett Commercial Club. Both he and his 
wife hold membership in the Baptist church and he is also prominently con- 
nected with the Young Men's Christian Association as a member of its board 
of directors. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to 
the new world, for he has here found the opportunities which he sought and in 
their utilization has made steady progress toward success. Moreover, he has 
gained the respect and goodwill of his fellowmen and has established a home 
amid pleasant surroundings and relations. 



MEDILL CONNELL. 



Medill Connell. who since 191 3 has been auditor in charge of the Ikllingham 
district with the state industrial insurance commission, has in other connections 
rendered valuable public service to the community in which he lives. He has 
also become well known in newspaper circles, having been identified with the 
leading journals of his section of the state. He was born in Lancaster, Ohio, 
August 14, 1857, a son of John and Jane Kaziah (Cox) Connell. The father 
was born in Lancaster, Ohio, in October 1823, was educated in Greenfield Acad- 
emy of that state and afterward studied law under Governor Medill, of Ohio. He 
then located for practice in Lancaster and at the time of the Civil war he was 
appointed colonel of the Seventeenth Ohio Regiment. In 1864. while still at the 
front, he was elected state senator on the democratic ticket and after serving 
in that position for one year he resumed the practice of law in Lancaster, where 
he remained an active and valued member of the bar until his deatli in 1881. He 
was recognized as one of Ohio's most gifted orators, the spell of his eloquence 
holding the closest attention of all whenever he addressed tlie ])ul)lic. 

Medill Connell had the usual educational training. Ijeing graduated from the 
high school when a youth of seventeen. He then entered the ofiice of the Lan- 
caster Gazette as printer's devil and for four years was connected with that pajx-r. 
after which he became a journeyman printer with the Ohio Eagle, on which he 



120 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

worked for three years. He next went to W^ashington, D. C, and secured a 
position in the government printing office, where he remained until 1884. That 
year witnessed his arrival in Mount \"ernon, Washington, and he became one of 
the employes in the office of the Mount \'ernon News. In 1885 he was appointed 
United States deputy collector of customs by Captain Herbert Foote Beecher in 
what was then known as the Whatcom district, now Bellingham. In 1886 he 
was transferred to the boats plying between Tacoma and \'ictoria, British Colum- 
bia, and in 1887 was returned to Bellingham, continuing in his official capacity 
as deputy collector of customs until 1888, when he resigned and went to Seattle, 
becoming advertising man on the Post-Intelligencer. He continued in that posi- 
tion until January, 1890. when he went to Sehome, now a part of Bellingham, 
and with John M. Edson established the first morning paper with telegraphic 
dispatches, called the Sehome Gazette. In 1891 he sold out and became foreman 
on the newspaper Reveille, with which he was associated until 1896, when, in 
connection with several others, he established a cooperative paper called the 
Blade. Air. Connell becoming president of the company. He sold his interest 
in that paper in 1906 and afterward served as deputy county sheriff for six 
months, at the end of which time he resumed the printing business in connection 
with the Bellingham Herald. He was thus employed until April, 191 3, when he 
was appointed auditor for the state industrial insurance commission, having juris- 
diction over the Bellingham district, which covers Whatcom, Skagit and San 
Juan counties. 

On the i6th of August, 1886, Mr. Connell was married in Bellingham to Miss 
Cecilia Hofercamp, whose father was one of the early -pioneers of this region, 
and they have one son, John, twenty-four }ears of age, who is now with the 
Morning Astorian, Astoria, Oregon. 

]\Ir. Connell has always been a stalwart supporter of the democratic party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Knights of Pythias, and his religious faith is that of the Presby- 
terian church. His has been an active and well spent life characterized by loyalty 
to duty in every relation, and his record in public office is one over which there 
falls no shadow or wrong or suspicion of evil. 



WALLACE FRANKLIN SMALL. 

Wallace Franklin Small, assistant superintendent of schools of Snohomis 
county, was born in \\'enona, ]\Iarshall county, Illinois, October 5, 1857. a son 
of Joshua D. P. and x\urelia Frances (Ryder) Small, who were natives of Prov- 
incetown, Massachusetts. They were married in that state and a year afterward 
removed to Illinois, becoming pioneers in Wenona when it was a small village. 
The father there followed the occupation of farming for many years. He passed 
away December 5, 1912, at Clayton, New Alexico. and the mother is now living 
at Clayton, at the age of eighty years. In their family were four children, of 
whom Wallace F. is the eldest. His brother. James Frederick, is a resident of 
Sumner, Nebraska ; his sister, Mrs. Morietta Murphy, is an osteopath and chiro- 



PL ;RARY 

ASTOR, LENOi 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 




MRS. RAINIE ADAMSON SMALL 




WALLACE F. SMALL 



- THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TIX-DEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 125 

praetor now conducting- a sanatorium at Clayton, New Mexico; and Samuel C. 
has a farm near Clayton. 

Wallace F. Small acquired his education in the common schools of Illinois 
and Nebraska and pursued a theological course in Lombard University at Gales- 
burg, Illinois, from which he was graduated with the class of 1885. He was then 
ordained to the ministry of the Universalist church and accepted the pastorate 
of a church at Blue Island, Illinois, where he remained for three years. He 
afterward spent one year as pastor of the Universalist church in Dixon, Illinois, 
and in the spring of 1890 came to Washington, settling at Machias, Snohomish 
county, where he took up forty acres of land near Lake Stevens. He also worked 
in the mills and finally turned his attention to the profession of teaching. His 
first position was as teacher in the Highland school near Hartford, after which 
he taught in various parts of Snohomish county. During the Klondike excite- 
ment of 1897 he went to the Yukon country, being one of the party that made 
the trip on the first boat the steamer Portland, from Seattle. Forty-one days 
were spent on the water between Seattle and Dawson. He remained in the north 
for four years with indifl^erent success and upon his return to Washington he 
again engaged in teaching general ranching and berry-growing. In the purusance 
of his educational work he took a course in Manual Training at the University of 
Washington Summer School and later spent a year in Seattle studying and teach- 
ing bench work. In 191 5 he was appointed assistant superintendent of the county 
schools. His work is visiting rural schools and in this connection he is making 
a specialty of suggesting lines of hand work, which he demonstrates as a step 
in the direction of manual training. In a word, he is studying the conditions 
that exist in rural schools, which are far dififerent from those in city schools, and 
as the result of his study and investigation he is endeavoring to suggest some- 
thing that will be of real value along the lines of manual training and which 
will take the place of bench work. He is thinking and working out along the 
line of knife work, carving, also rustic work, much of which is done out of school 
hours and supplies diversion and recreation to the country boy — a thing that he 
greatly needs where isolation of the farm prevents the boy from having the 
comradeship of friends of his own age. As the result of his observation and 
experience he has reached the conclusion that manual training in the way of bench 
work, as the courses are ordinarily arranged for cities and high schools, is not 
at all adaptable to the intermediate grades and most especially to the ordinary 
rural one or two room school. On the other hand, he feels that the need is for 
a course in hand work, simple and inexpensive enough in equipment and materials, 
flexible and expansive enough to fit the varying conditions in various localities 
and which can be guaranteed to come within the cajialiililies of the boy or girl 
of any age. His experience has brought him to the conclusion that the knife 
should be considered the one universal tool and its possil)ilities the theme to l)e 
exploited. He feels that every boy and girl of any size should be provided with 
a good knife, along with a few other simple accessories, and should be taught 
how to use this knife in the shaping of things useful and beautiful. To this end 
he believes that the normal schools should offer to the teachers, who care to take 
it, a special course in rural hand work. Wherever he has introduced such work 
he has seen manifested a sustained interest, both on the part of the teacher and 
pupil, and he believes that it will meet a twofold need— that of training the hand 
Vol. in— 7 



126 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

to skilled work and also providing entertainment for the country boy, especially 
on rainy days when outdoor life is denied him. 

At odd times, mostly while engaged in the occupation of teaching Air. Small 
has assembled a considerable collection of wood-carvings. Such a collection, 
composed of his own and pupils' work, he sent to the Lewis and Clark Exposition 
held at Portland, Oregon, some years ago, and on this exhibit was awarded a 
bronze medal. 

Mr. Small seems endowed with rather an ingenious, versatile nature, with a 
strong leaning toward the artistic temperament; has a genial personality, and 
has held many friends wherever he has become known. Early in his course at 
Lombard he became an active member in the Lambda Chapter of the Delta Tau 
Delta fraternity, and on the i6th of June, 1886, one year after graduating, was 
united in marriage to Rainie Adamson, a former schoolmate in the same institu- 
tion. 



MRS. RAINIE ADAMSON SMALL. 

Mrs. Rainie Adamson Small, county superintendent of schools of Snohomish 
county, is much more than an educator in the ordinary sense of the term. In 
notable measure does she attempt to make education a real preparation for life's 
duties and responsibilities and she has studied closely many of the great problems 
bearing upon conditions that affect the public in general and is identified with vari- 
ous movements that have to do with public welfare, including the good roads 
movement and farm and county improvements as well as civic betterment. 

Mrs. Small is of Norwegian birth. She was born in Norway, February 2, 
1 861, but in that summer was brought to America by her parents, Andrew and 
Julia (Charles) Adamson. Her father belonged to the farming class of Norway, 
while her mother belonged to the so called "upper crust." Their life in America 
was spent on a Minnesota farm until 191 2, when they came to Washington, 
making their home with their daughter, Mrs. Small. Each lived to be eighty-two 
years of age. 

Mrs. Small acquired her early education in the rural schools of Minnesota 
and in the graded public schools of Bloomfield, Iowa. She afterward attended 
the University of Colorado and was graduated from Lombard College at Gales- 
burg, Illinois, with the degree of Bachelor of Science, and from that institu- 
tion also received the degree of Master of Science. Thus liberally educated, 
she took up her chosen life work of teaching and for some time was identified 
with the schools of Colorado. She has been a resident of Washington since 
March, 1890, and after teaching in both rural and graded schools she was 
elected county superintendent of schools on the 5th of July, 1901, occupying that 
position until September 8, 1903. She was afterward principal of the high 
school of Florence two years, superintendent of the Edmonds schools and prin- 
cipal of the Snohomish graded school, but on the 7th of September, 191 5, again 
became county superintendent of schools, in which position she is still serving. 
She has done splendid work in this connection and has ever stood with that 
progressive element which is seeking to advance the interests of the schools 
in their scope, purpose and achievement. Studying closely the questions of 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 127 

development in community life, she believes that the greatest benefits are to 
be derived from the training of boys and girls. In this connection, therefore, 
she is now advocating instruction in agriculture in the public schools, believ- 
ing it will be perhaps of even more practical benefit and value than manual 
training and domestic arts because the necessary materials are at hand, requir- 
ing less outlay financially than the introduction of the other subjects. She recog- 
nizes the value of taking the pupil into the great outdoors and says that the 
problem of methods will largely depend upon the instructor and the pupils. 
She believes that in the first stages the child gets much more from observation and 
easy reading along many lines than by actually doing the work. This would 
be called arousing first interest, while the next step would be followed by actual 
experience. Moreover, realizing that the percentage of college and high school 
students is comparatively small, she feels that the work must necessarily be 
undertaken in the graded schools. One of the features which she advocates is 
the forming of boys' and girls' clubs, including the poultry clubs, the pig clubs 
and the canning clubs, and in order to have a successful canning club they must 
raise the things to can, so that the gardening club has come into existence. In 
connection with this work the boys and girls are given useful knowledge of 
how to do these things, and under the government plan they are enabled to earn 
money by selling their products. The government says the children must do 
three things in order to be members of these clubs : read the bulletins on the 
subject of the clubs to which they belong; keep an account of expenditures 
and receipts; and write a composition on how they did the things. If the 
child can show that he has made more than he has spent, he is then given an 
achievement button. Mrs. Small has also given the study of manual arts much 
thought and under her direction this work is being carried out with the mate- 
rials at hand. The pupil is beginning with the smaller branches of trees and 
developing simple furniture, such as porch settees, sewing racks, etc., and for 
such work all that is needed is a good saw, hammer, jack knife and nails. The 
proper training of boys in this direction will enable them later to erect buildings 
upon farms and all the pens and sheds necessary. The gardening includes the 
planting and care of trees and shrubs, and Mrs. Small, recognizing how largely 
concrete is becoming a factor in building projects of every character, believes 
that concrete making, which is a simple process, might become a feature of 
public school instruction. Thus in a constantly broadening scope is Mrs. Small 
promoting the splendid work of Snohomish county's schools along the lines 
which have given Washington leadership in educational methods over many 
of the other states of the country. 

Mrs. Small has not confined her work alone to the instruction of the young, 
for she has cooperated in many organized movements for devcloi^mcnt among 
the grown-ups as well. For two years she was vice president of the Farm Prod- 
ucts Association and she has been elected for the third term treasurer of the 
Western Washington Horticultural Association. A number of years ago she 
was sent by the government of Washington to the Dry I'arming Association 
International Convention, which was held in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She 
was for two years lecturer for the Snohomish County Pomona Grange and she 
is a member of the Everett Commercial Club. In politics she is a republican 
and was an earnest worker in the effort to obtain equal suffrage in Washington. 



128 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Through all these years she has been an interested worker in behalf of good roads, 
farm and county improvement and civic betterment and she bears the reputation 
of being one of the best public speakers in the state upon subjects of that character. 

At Galesburg, Illinois, on the i6th of June, 1886, Rainie Adamson became the 
wife of Wallace F. Small, a wood carver, who was educated for the Universalist 
ministry and is now assistant county superintendent of schools. Their only 
child died in infancy. 

Mrs. Small is a member of the Illinois Beta of Pi Beta Phi. She was elected 
national president in 1885 and was twice reelected, during which time she con- 
ducted three national conventions. In 1890 she resigned the office and in that 
year was elected historian, serving for two years. She is a member of the 
Seattle Alumnae Club, which was organized in 1906, and she belongs to the 
Everett Book Club, the Snohomish Cosmopolitan Club and to the Washington 
Educational Association and the National Educational Association. She is also 
a member of the National Dahlia Society of America and was the first super- 
intendent of its juvenile work. In 1914 she made a trip over Everett in an aero- 
plane with Aviator T. T. Maroney. 



FRANK WATERHOUSE. 

Frank Waterhouse, of Seattle, has, throughout his entire business career, 
been connected with transportation interests, first through railroading, and since 
1896 through steamship lines. He was born in England, August 8, 1867, a son of 
Joseph and Mary Elizabeth Waterhouse, and came to America in 1882. He has 
become very prominent and widely known for the importance of his work in the 
development and operation of steamship lines on the Pacific, and with all matters 
incidental thereto. He established one of the first steamship lines from Puget 
Sound to Alaska ; the first steamship line from Puget Sound to Manila ; the first 
steamship line from Puget Sound to the Hawaiian islands and to Australia. He 
was instrumental in establishing the first regular steamship service between Puget 
Sound and Europe, via Suez Canal ; he has been primarily responsible for the 
enormous development of the Russian trade across the Pacific, through the port 
of Vladivostock. Mr. Waterhouse is president of Frank Waterhouse & Com- 
pany, Inc., Waterhouse Trading Company, Wellington Coal Company, Water- 
house-Sands Motors Company, Arlington Dock Company, San Juan Navigation 
Company, Seattle Taxicab & Transfer Company, Frank Waterhouse & Employes, 
Inc., and other allied concerns. He is also the foreign freight agent of the 
Union Pacific system, and is general agent at United States ports on the Pacific 
for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, the Glen Line and other steamship 
lines, in addition to which his companies operate a large fleet of chartered 
steamers. 

On the 8th of February, 1891, at Tacoma, Mr. Waterhouse was married to 
Miss Lucy Dyer Hayden, daughter of John C. Hayden, and their children are 
Joseph, Hayden, Gladys, Mary and Muriel. Mr. Waterhouse is a member of the 
Rainier Club, of the Seattle Golf and Country Club and of the Seattle Athletic 
Club. He has a keen appreciation for worth in others, and highly values true 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 129 

friendships. His life has never been self-centered to the exclusion of duties and 
obligations in public connection, yet he has instituted and controlled mammoth 
business interests and in the attainment of his success has furthered the public 
welfare. 



JAMES PATTISON. 



When one travels across the country in a luxurious Pullman car, it is hard 
to realize that only fifty or sixty years have come and gone since travelers were 
crossing the plains with ox teams to become inhabitants of the then unsettled 
northwest, in which the work of development and progress had scarcely been 
begun. Such was the condition which confronted James Pattison when he, with 
his wife and infant child, came to the Puget Sound country. He was born in 
Illinois and was of Irish lineage. On the 17th of February, 1848, in Sparta, 
Illinois, he was united in marriage to Miss Jane Wyllie, who was bom June 21, 
1828, in Ayrshire, Scotland, but was taken by her parents to Illinois when but a 
baby. In 1849 the young couple severed the ties that bound them to the 
Prairie state and, bidding adieu to their friends, started across the plains. Two 
families traveled together, and James Pattison was also accompanied by his five 
brothers and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Pattison. They were several 
months in completing the trip. It was a long, tedious journey in which they en- 
dured hunger and many other trials and hardships, and the trip was also not free 
from danger. When they were near the Columbia river they were halted by 
heavy snows and could proceed no farther. Their provisions gave out and 
they suffered much from cold and hunger, but at length relief came and in time 
the family home was established on Chambers Prairie. The father and his wife, 
however, went to Oregon. James Pattison took up a claim in Washington, 
which he developed and improved, converting it into a rich and valuable tract 

of land. 

Mr. Pattison lived on the prairie for a few years and carried on general 
farming but afterward removed to a home that is now within the city limits 
of Olympia. There was a little pioneer cabin on the place, but later he erected 
a commodious and attractive residence, where his widow now lives. When they 
settled on Chambers Prairie they made all their own furniture. Before locating 
there, however, the family lived for a brief period on Cowlitz Prairie on the 
claim of Mr. Roberts, who was in charge of the Pludson's Bay post there. 
Upon that place Mr. and Mrs. Pattison spent the first summer, during which he 
raised some W'heat so as to have flour for the winter. When they took x\p their 
abode on the ranch there was no house— only a sheep shed, and as it was neces- 
sary for the men to begin plowing at once in order to get their wheat in so that 
it would yield a fall harvest, Mrs. Pattison took some new boards which she 
found around the place and put a floor in the sheep house, also made a table 
and beds and thus fixed up a comfortable home for herself and her baby for 
the summer. She often carried wood with her baby tied to her back and there 
is no phase of pioneer life with which she is not familiar. At all times she 
was of great assistance to her husband, her careful management of the house- 



130 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

hold affairs contributing in large measure to his success. At length she sold her 
half of the claim and bought the Swan place, all of which is now within the 
city limits of Olympia and has become very valuable property. She had three 
hundred and twenty acres of this land, which has been platted. It was all hills 
and gullies and had to be graded and filled in, but it has been converted into a 
valuable addition to the city and is now an attractive residential district. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Pattison were born seven children but only two are now 
living: James R., a resident of Seattle; and Martha A., now Mrs. Bradford 
Davis, living in Olympia. 

It was on the 9th of September, 1898, that Mr. Pattison passed away, when 
almost seventy-four years old for he was born December 25, 1824. He was a 
member of the Presbyterian church and he gave his political allegiance to the 
republican party but never sought nor desired office, preferring to concentrate 
his energies upon his business affairs. He was also a Master Mason. Mrs. 
Pattison still makes her home in Olympia at the old home and her tales of the 
early days, with their attendant hardships, privations and pioneer pleasures, are 
most interesting. For more than two-thirds of a century she has lived in 
western Washington, a record equalled by few, and her memory forms a con- 
necting link between the primitive past and the progressive present. 



IRA M. HENKLE. 



Ira Henkle, proprietor of the Arlington Garage in Arlington, was born in 
Philomath, Oregon, November 16, 1880, and is the eldest in a family of seven 
children whose parents were F. M. and Jennie (Reasnor) Henkle. The father, 
also a native of Oregon, was a son of A. J. Henkle, one of the pioneer settlers 
of that state, who crossed the plains from Iowa in 1852, reaching his destination 
after six months of travel, in which he met the usual hardships and experiences 
incident to a trip across the plains by wagon. He is still living at the age of 
ninety years, making his home at Priest River, Idaho, where F. M. Henkle also 
resides, having been engaged in farming there since 1896. The latter married 
Jennie Reasnor, a daughter of John Stout Reasnor, a native of Oregon, where 
he settled during the period of pioneer development. 

Ira M. Henkle pursued his education in the public schools of Oregon and 
Washington, being graduated from the Tekoa, Washington, high school with 
the class of 1900. His early experiences were those of the farm bred boy, his 
youthful days being spent upon the farm. On attaining his majority he started 
out to earn his own living and during the following two years gave his atten- 
tion to farming and lumbering in the employ of others. For three years he en- 
gaged in the manufacture of lumber at Priest River, Idaho, after which he came 
to Washington with his parents, the family home being established near Oakes- 
dale. In 1910 Ira M. Henkle removed to Arlington, where he followed the 
machinist's trade, which he had learned in young manhood. In June, 1910, he 
entered the employ of S. H. Hawley as a machinist, doing automobile repair 
work, and after eighteen months he bought out the business, which he is now 
conducting under the name of the Arlington Garage, of which he is sole pro- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 131 

prietor. He is also distributor of the Ford cars in his section of Snohomish 
county and annually sells many machines. 

In 1901 Mr. Henkle was married in Spokane, Washington, to Miss Margaret 
Warwick, a native of this state and a daughter of Samuel and Martha Warwick, 
of Belfast, Ireland, who became early settlers of Washington. The three chil- 
dren of this marriage are Von Vernel, Milton and Harriett. 

Mr. Henkle is identified with the Workmen and with the Yeomen. He is a 
member of the Commercial Club and in politics is a republican. His interests 
are varied, touching those things which afifect the public welfare, his aid and 
influence being always given on the side of progress and advancement. He has 
spent his entire life in the northwest and the spirit which has led to the rapid 
development of this section of the country has been manifest in his business 
activities. 



JOHN STANLEY MACKENZIE. 

John Stanley Mackenzie, who since 191 1 has been manager of the Gold Bar 
Lumber Company, entered into active relations with that company in 1902, which 
was the year of his arrival in this state. He reached Washington on the 24th of 
February, 1902, and on the i8th of June established his home at Gold Bar. He 
was born at Inverness, Scotland, November 16, 1879, a son of T. R. and Martha 
G. Mackenzie. The father was secretary and manager of the Clyde Navigation 
Company of Glasgow, Scotland, and in the schools of Glasgow and Edinburgh, 
Scotland, and of Geneva and Basle. Switzerland, John Stanley Mackenzie pursued 
his education. He came to the United States in 1892, when a youth of thirteen 
years, and was naturalized in 1912. On coming to the new world he was first 
employed by the firm of O'Connor, Moffat & Company, dry goods merchants of 
San Francisco, with whom he secured the position of cash boy at a salary of 
three dollars per week. He worked his way upward from this humble start and 
each step in his career has been a forward one, bringing him a broader outlook 
and wider opportunities. He has now long been connected with the lumber 
manufacturing business. Arriving at Gold Bar on the i8th of June, 1902, he 
became connected with the Gold Bar Lumber Company and through successive 
promotions has been steadily advanced to his present position of general manager, 
in which capacity he has now served for six years. He thoroughly understands 
every phase of the lumber business and his efforts have contributed much to the 
success of the company which he represents. In addition to his lumber interests 
he is a director of the Gold Bar Light & Water Company. 

In November, 1899, at Vancouver, British Columbia, Mr. Mackenzie was 
united in marriage to Miss Rosa B. Hammond, who was born in Devonshire. 
England, and when three years of age was taken to Stratford. Ontario, by her 
parents, John and Clementine (Smith) Hammond. By her marriage she has 
become' the mother of two children: Francis John, born December 9. 1900; 
and Elizabeth Stella, whose birth occurred October 17. 1902. Mr. Mackenzie 
was reared a Presbyterian. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and he works earnestly for its success in both city and state. He has been 



132 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

mayor of Gold Bar from 1914 until the present time and has been president of 
the board of education since March, 191 5. His cooperation can always be counted 
upon to further any plan or measure for the general good and his efforts look 
ever to the benefit of the district in which he lives. 



ALANSON DEAN WOOD. 

Thirty-three years have been added to the cycle of the centuries since Alanson 
Dean Wood, deceased, took up his abode in Aberdeen and he was for many years 
closely connected with the lumber business and kindred interests which have 
contributed to the development and substantial upbuilding of the district. He 
died August 11, 1916, when seventy-eight years of age, his birth having occurred 
in Pennsylvania in 1838. He was liberally educated, having the advantages of 
an excellent engineering course while later he was connected with the navy engi- 
neering department, thus putting his theoretical knowledge to the practical test 
by serving in that connection on the ship Tacoma during the Civil war. He took 
active part in the battle of Fort Fisher and other engagements, thus rendering 
valuable aid to his country. 

When hostilities had ceased he removed to Grand Rapids, northern Michigan, 
and became actively connected with the lumber industry through the operation of 
mills. He became familiar with every phase of the business and thus laid the 
foundation for his operations along the same line in the west. 

In 1869 Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hart, of Wood- 
stock, IlHnois, and to them were born four children. Clara is the wife of Charles 
R. Green, of Aberdeen. William H. is a resident of San Francisco. He has been 
very successful in business and is the junior partner of the Hart-Wood Lumber 
Company, which owns a fleet of ships and has others in course of construction. 
Belle B. is the wife of Fred Green, a prominent timber man of Portland, Oregon. 
Romayne was educated abroad and is the wife of Henry Wessinger, of Portland, 
a representative of one of the old families of that city. 

For fifteen years Mr. Wood continued to reside in Michigan and about 1885, 
attracted by the opportunities of the northwest in connection with the lumber 
trade, came to Washington, settling in Aberdeen. In connection with one Mack 
and a Mr. Emery he organized the Emery, Mack & Wood Company, afterward 
renamed the American Mills Company, one of the pioneer industries in that sec- 
tion of the state, and he remained very active in business until ill health obliged 
him to retire. He also had interests in some ships and shipping business. He 
was also active in developing Cohasset Beach, which was one of the first ocean 
resorts on the Pacific coast. He and his wife, with a few others, began looking 
for a spot in which to build cottages and spend their summer vacations and finally 
they decided upon what is now Cohasset Beach. The name was given to this 
beautiful resort by Mrs. Wood in honor of C. T. Wooding, a visitor from Boston, 
who had spent much time at Cohasset Beach, on the Atlantic coast and who 
afterward became a resident of Aberdeen, conducting the first bank of the city. 
He is now deceased. During a period of reverses Mrs. Wood turned her spacious 
cottage into a place of entertainment for those who desired to board at the Beach 




ALANSON D. WOOD 



r.- 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 135 

and in this way the place became widely known and popular. Her iiouse was 
taxed to its capacity and to accommodate other guests additions were built and 
the home converted into a hotel, which they later discontinued as a hotel, but it 
is still the summer home of the family. They still retain several cottages at the beach 
and enjoy several months each year there, often extending to their many friends 
the hospitality of their home, which is known as Pine Hurst Cottage. For twelve 
miles the beach at Cohasset offers a tine surface of hard sand, constituting a 
splendid automobile drive almost at the water's edge and there is also excellent 
bathing. The place has been improved with beautiful homes, protection is fur- 
nished by jetties built by the government and the people who enjoy Cohasset 
are largely indebted to Mr. and Mrs. Wood for the selection and development 
of this beautiful resort. 

Mr. Wood belonged to the Masonic fraternity. He was a public-spirited 
citizen, was much interested in school work and was president of the school board. 
He was an active worker for the benefit and upbuilding of his locality, served 
as a member of the city council and his position concerning any question vital to 
the welfare and improvement of his city was never an equivocal one, for he stood 
stanchly in support of every measure and movement for the general good. His 
death was sudden and was regarded as a personal loss to the community. His 
passing was at his much loved Cohassett Beach. Since his death Airs. Wood 
has continued to reside in Aberdeen. She, like her husband, has ever manifested 
a keen interest in the growth and development of Aberdeen. 



JEROME A. POWERS. 



Jerome A. Powers, manager of the Farm Products Association at Everett, 
was born in Bureau county, Illinois, July 8, 1875. His father. John Powers, 
a native of the state of New York, came of Scotch ancestry, although the family 
was founded in the new world at an early period in the colonization of the Jimpire 
state by Cyrus Hailstone Powers, his grandfather, who came to America about 
1800. John Powers is now living in Bureau county, Illinois, where for many 
years he has followed farming. He removed to that state with his father about 
1830, when sixteen years of age, the family settling in Indian township. Bureau 
county, where today they own an entire section of land. John Powers wedded 
Eliza Partridge, a native of Vermont and a member of an old family of that 
state of French extraction. She passed away on the Illinois farm April 6, 1911, 
when sixty-seven years of age. In the family were eleven children, nine of 

whom survive. 

Jerome A. Powers was the fourth in order of birth and be supplcnienled his 
district school education by study in the high school at Tiskihva. Illinois, while 
later he pursued a course in the Iowa Business College at Davenport. He was 
early trained to the work of the farm, remaining at home until twenty years of 
age. after which he entered upon an apprenticeship to the butcher's trade. He 
spent nine months in the employ of others and then engaged in busniess on his 
own account at Des Moines, Iowa, where he successfully conducted a meat market 
for a period of six years. He then disposed of his interests in Iowa and came 



136 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

to the Pacific coast, arriving in Everett on the 28th of January, 1903. He imme- 
diately secured employment with the firm of Frye & Company and after five 
months established a meat market on his own account, conducting it successfully 
for three years. He next entered the real estate and insurance business, in which 
he also met with a fair measure of success, until the panic of 1907, which caused 
real estate to slump in value, with the result that he failed in 1913. Soon after- 
ward he became general manager of the Farm Products Association, Incorpo- 
rated, of Everett. The business of that association had been in a state of decHne 
and conditions connected therewith were very bad, but under Mr. Powers a turn 
for the better was at once taken and the business has been developed into one of 
the leading retail mercantile houses of Snohomish county, the firm employing 
an average of twenty-two people. Although when he took charge the concern 
was two hundred dollars in debt and its business amounted to only fifteen hun- 
dred dollars a month he has built it up in three years so that its annual business 
now totals a quarter of a million dollars and its assets are over twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars. The officers of the company are : A. H. Holcomb, president ; 
A. B. Winter, secretary ; and Charles E. Feek, treasurer. Mr. Powers is also a 
director in the American Loan Association and is an enterprising, progres- 
sive business man who carries forward to successful completion whatever he 
undertakes. 

On the 4th of February, 1902, Mr. Powers was married in Des ]\Ioines, Iowa, 
to Miss Lelia T. Kloss, a native of that state and a daughter of Joseph and Emma 
(Meyers) Kloss. In politics Mr. Powers is a republican and has always taken 
an active interest in political affairs, doing everything in his power to promote 
the growth and insure the success of his party. In 1907 and 1908 he filled the 
office of city councilman in Everett. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks and Everett Camp, No. 147, W. O. W. He also 
belongs to the Commercial Club and his has been a well spent life which has 
commanded for him the respect and goodwill of those with whom he has been 
brought in contact. His success has been due to his own efforts. From the age 
of twenty he has made his own way in the world, early coming to realize the value 
of industr}^ and perseverance, and as time has passed he has wisely used his 
chances and his opportunities. 



JOSEPH M. LAUBE. 



Joseph M. Laube has throughout his entire life been connected with sheet 
metal work and is now engaged in that line of business on his own account in 
Bellingham. He was born in Switzerland, January 21, 1854, but was only six 
years of age when brought to the United States. His younger days were spent 
in Brodhead, Wisconsin. In that district he was reared and educated and thor- 
oughly learned the sheet metal trade, engaging in work of that character until 
1874, when he opened a hardware store at Brodhead. which he conducted for 
two decades, building up a business of large and substantial proportions. In 
1894, however, he sold out and removed to the west with Bellingham as his 
destination. Here he became connected with the establishment of Monroe & 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 137 

Haskell, sheet metal workers, in the capacity of foreman, in which responsible 
position he continued until 1913, when he established the present sheet metal 
and automobile supply business that he is now carrying on with his son F. E. 
Laube as a partner. They are representative business men of the city, actively 
connected with its industrial life. Mr. Laube is well known as a Mason, exem- 
plifying in his life the beneficent spirit of the craft, and he is also equally loyal 
as a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias. Before leaving Brodhead he was married in 1879 to ]\Iiss Edith Hahn 
and to them have been born two sons, Frederick E. and William Tell. 

The latter was born in Brodhead, Wisconsin, September 3, 1880, and there 
attended the public schools until 1894, when with the removal of the family to 
Bellingham, he became a pupil in the public schools of that city, completing the 
high school course with the class of 1898. He next became a student in the 
University of Washington and won his Bachelor of Arts degree upon the com- 
pletion of the literary course in 1902, while in 1904 the LL. B. degree was con- 
ferred upon him. His initial professional experience was obtained as a law 
clerk in the office of Peters & Powell, attorneys of Seattle, with whom he con- 
tinued until 191 5, when he became a partner in the firm of Griensted & Laube, 
in which relation he is now practicing. On the 17th of June, 1907, he was mar- 
ried in Seattle to Amy Wheeler and they have two children : Delora Lee, seven 
years of age; and William Tell, Jr., a little lad of five years. William T. Laube 
is a Scottish Rite Mason and member of the Mystic Shrine and belongs also 
to the Phi Gamma Delta. In politics he takes an active interest as a supporter 
of the republican party and has been a helpful worker in its ranks as chairman 
of the King county republican central committee. 



FREDERICK E. LAUBE. 

Frederick E. Laube, junior partner in the firm of Laube & Son, conducting 
a sheet metal and automobile supply business in Bellingham, was born in Brod- 
head, Wisconsin, May 6. 1884, a son of Joseph M. Laube, mentioned above. 
He attended the public schools of his native city until 1894 and then accom- 
panied his parents to Bellingham, where he continued his education, becoming 
a pupil in the high school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1902. 
He afterward entered the University of Washington, in which he pursued a 
course in mining, and was graduated in 1906. Going to Tacoma, he there 
accepted the position of chemist with the Tacoma Smelter, but after a year and 
a half resigned and went to Treadwell, Alaska, where he had charge of the 
metallurgical department, of the Alaska Treadwell Mining Company. When 
five years had passed in that connection he returned to Bellingham and became 
assistant engineer with the Olympia Portland Cement Company, with which he 
remained for a year. Joining his father, they established the present sheet 
metal and automobile supply business under the firm style of J. M. Laube & 
Son and from the beginning the trade has steadily increased until their enter- 
prise is now a large and profitable one. 



138 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

In BelHngham, Mr. Laube was united in marriage to Miss Ethel Birney, a 
daughter of Dr. H. J. Birney, the wedding being celebrated on the 3d of July, 
1909. They have one child, Katharine May, five years of age. Mr. Laube has 
membership in the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is also identified 
with Phi Gamma Delta, a Greek letter fraternity. 



ALEXANDER YOUNG. 



When death called Alexander Young on the nth of December, 1899, Aber- 
deen lost one of its representative and valued citizens who for a considerable 
period had been actively and successfully engaged in real estate dealing. He 
was born at Three Rivers, Canada, on the ist of February, 1842, a son of Alex- 
ander Young, who was a native of the Dominion of Canada and of Scotch 
descent. He wedded Helen Boyse, a native of Scotland. 

Alexander Young, Jr., spent the first eighteen years of his life in the land 
of his birth and then removed to Vermont, where he engaged in the milling 
business for two years. The tide of emigration, which was steadily flowing 
westward, carried him to Saginaw, Michigan, and there for five years he success- 
fully engaged in the lumber business, accumulating through diligent labor and 
judicious management a small capital which he decided to invest in the far west. 
Accordingly he made his way to San Francisco, California, where he arrived on 
the 1st of May, 1870, remaining for three months in that city. In the following 
autumn he came to Washington, settling at Olympia, where he began business as 
a timber cruiser and prospector for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. He 
afterward secured a contract with the same company for furnishing ties and 
timber to be used in the construction of twenty-five miles of road on the line 
from Kalama to Tacoma, and after meeting the terms of that contract he engaged 
in logging on the Cowlitz river. He also had similar interests on the Columbia 
but at length sold out to Mr. Knapp of the well known firm of Knapp, Burrill & 
Company. In September, 1875, he took up his abode upon a homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Chehalis county (now Grays Harbor county) and 
concentrated his efforts and attention upon agricultural pursuits and stock rais- 
ing. At that time the city of Aberdeen had not yet been platted but three years 
later a part of his farm was laid out in town lots and where once stood the tall 
timber is now seen a most thriving and enterprising western city. From that 
time forward Mr. Young engaged in the real estate business, in which he remained 
active until his death. He also became proprietor of a furniture store on Whish- 
kah street, conducted under the style of the Young Furniture Company. This 
business was carefully and successfully managed and in fact thoroughness and 
system characterized all that he undertook and led to his growing prosperity. 

On the 29th of September, 1875, Mr. Young was married to Miss Laura 
Clark and they became the parents of seven children, Roy Alexander, the eldest, 
married Miss Essie Coles, of Aberdeen, is now residing in Northport, Washing- 
ton, and has one child, Laura. Jessie, the eldest daughter, was married in 1906 
to William Irvine, who was born in New Brunswick in 1871 and came to 
the northwest in 1902. He removed to this section from Wisconsin, where he 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 139 

had been engaged in newspaper publication. Here he continued in the field of 
jOurnaHsm and estabUshed the Daily Sun, which he conducted for a number of 
years, but at present he is connected with the Aberdeen World. Arthur James 
is next of the family. Myrtle became the wife of A. T. Manning, of Seattle, 
and has two children, Roy and Elizabeth M. Chester E. married Agnes Wells 
and with their son, Alexander, they reside in Aberdeen. Grace and Walter 
Clark complete the family. 

Mr. Young attended the Presbyterian church and gave his political allegiance 
to the republican party. He was very active in all matters pertaining to the 
welfare and progress of his community and ever manifested a public-spirited 
devotion to the general good. He served as a member of the first city council 
and therefore aided in shaping the policy of the newly created municipality. 
His life was at all times upright and honorable and won for him the unfaltering 
regard of many friends. His wife passed away in 1895 and he survived until 
the nth of December, 1899, when death called him. 



WILLIAM C. HAMMOND. 

William C. Hammond, a real estate dealer of Port Townsend, his native 
city, was born June 22, 1855, and comes from one of the first pioneer families 
of this section of the Sound country — a family well known throughout western 
Washington. He was the first white child born at Port Townsend and is a 
son of Thomas M. and Sarah Hammond. The father, a native of Ireland, 
crossed the Atlantic to Boston, Massachusetts, in his boyhood days and was 
there reared. He afterward removed to New York city and later went to 
California by way of Cape Horn. He was a cooper by trade and was employed 
for a time on a whaling vessel. For a period he resided in California and 
in 1852 he came to Washington, settling at Port Townsend, where he secured 
a donation claim. He afterward homesteaded and upon the farm which lie 
developed he continued to reside until his death, which occurred when he 
had reached the age of eighty-three years. His wife was born in New ^'o^k 
city and was there reared and educated, their marriage being celebrated in the 
eastern metropolis just before they sailed for California. Mrs. Hammond passed 
away at Port Townsend in 191 2, when about eighty-two years of age. In their 
family were twelve children, of whom seven are yet living: Mrs. Emma Ilickey. 
residing in Victoria, British Columbia; Mrs. Adelaide Baker, living at Seattle; 
Mrs. Lottie Richardson, whose home is in Republic, Washington ; B. T.. living 
in Dawson, Alaska; D. S., of Seattle; and J. A. Hammond, also of tlii^ statr. 

William C. Hammond was the third in order of birth in tbat family, lli^ 
early education was acquired in the schools of Port Tnwnsc'ii.l and ore his 
school days were over he began earning his living by unrknig m vacation 
periods. He was early employed on a ranch and afterward m connection wilh 
the lumber industry. He followed the logging busmess in various states and 
for a number of years was engaged in the transfer business in Port Townsend. 
In 1902 he was chosen to the office of sheriff of Jeft'erson county, which position 
he acceptably filled for two terms, and on the expiration of that period he 



140 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

became foreman of a mill business at Hadlock, where he also conducted a 
lumber business. He is now operating in real estate at Port Townsend, where 
he handles much valuable property and has already negotiated many important 
realty transfers. 

In politics J\Ir. Hammond is a republican and in 1916 was candidate for 
sheriff on the republican ticket. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and with the Yeomen. Practically his entire life has 
been passed in the Sound country and his wide acquaintance in Port Townsend 
indicates largely the number of his friends, for he is popular wherever known. 
His life has been one of activity, contributing to the development of the region 
in which he lives, and he has long figured as a leading business man of his 
section. 



A. F. WHEATON. 



A. F. Wheaton, formerly president of the Raymond Automobile Company, 
established in this connection the first automobile sales room and garage in Ray- 
mond, in which connection he is now conducting a substantial business. He 
was born in Fort Willopa, Pacific county, Washington, in 1872. His father, 
Van Rensselaer Wheaton, was united in marriage to Miss Henrietta Lincoln 
and from Indiana they came to Washington in 1868, making the trip by way 
of the Isthmus of Panama. In 1870 they established their home upon a farm 
in Pacific county and Mr, W^heaton was active in the further development and 
improvement of that property until 1900, when he was called to his final rest. 
His widow is still a resident of Willapa. In their family were six children : 
Mary Jane, the wife of William Hastings, of Raymond, Washington; Mrs. 
Viola Beeson, of Frances, Washington ; Benson A., whose home is in South 
Bend, Washington; Xorilla, the wife of E. S. Bailey, of ]\Ienlo, Washington; 
Ray, chief of police in Raymond ; and A. F. An aunt, Mrs. Feister, was the 
first white woman in Pacific county, having come to the northwest with her hus- 
band in 1847. She lived on a farm near Chinook and afterward where Ray- 
mond now is. She passed away several years ago and was laid to rest in Olympia, 
W^ashington. 

A. F. Wheaton pursued his early education in the schools of Alenlo, sup- 
plemented by a high school course in Olympia, and when not busy with his text- 
books his time and energies were devoted to farming until he reached the age 
of thirty-three years. He then removed to Raymond, Washington, and became 
a member of the Raymond Foundry & Machine Company, doing the blacksmith 
work with the concern. Later on account of an injury resulting in the loss of a 
limb he was in the hospital for some time. The next three years was a period 
of enforced inactivity. He then purchased a liver\^ and sales stable and in 191 1 
secured a motor car, which constituted the beginning of his automobile business. 
He established the first automobile sales room and garage in Raymond and 
became the president of the Raymond Automobile Company but has severed 
his connection with that concern. Together with his brother he owns the old 
homestead farm near ]\Ienlo and also has real estate in Raymond. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 141 

On the 25th of November, 1906, Mr. Wheaton was united in marriage to 
Miss Bertha Gerow, a native of Michigan, and they have become the parents of 
two sons and a daughter, Charles, Marion and Mildred. Mr. Wheaton is a 
republican in his political views and fraternally is connected with the Eagles. 
He belongs to the Commercial Club and gives active aid in support of the many 
measures instituted by that organization for the development and upbuilding of 
the city. 



THE RAYMOND LAND & B'IPROVEMENT COMPANY. 

The Raymond Land & Improvement Company, one of the forceful business 
concerns of western Washington, was organized in 1903, with John T. Welsh 
as president. L. A". Raymond, vice president, and W. S. Cram, secretary and 
treasurer. In the enterprise were also associated Stella J. Raymond and J. B. 
Duryea, with A. C. Little as manager. At the present time the officers are: H. 
C. Heermans, president; M. C. Welsh, vice president, and Claud House, secre- 
tary-treasurer. This company has put forth most efifective effort in the develop- 
ment of the town of Raymond, almost the entire site of which was owned by 
the company. Their energies have made the town, which is a most enterprising 
and progressive community. All its mill sites have been donated by the Ray- 
mond Land & Improvement Company, who platted the town site, while all the 
additions to the town have been developed under their charge. A. C. Little was 
the original manager and the promoter of the project and the growth and devel- 
opment of the town were largely due to his powers of organization and his later 
effective work. The company is now very active in promoting building projects 
in Raymond and otherwise advancing its interests. The policy of the company 
has always been liberal in its dealings with other corporations or individuals in 
the way of property transfers or building operations. 



DAVID POPLACK. 



David Poplack, a clothing merchant of Everett and one of the wide-awake, 
progressive young business men of the city, is of Russian birth. He was born 
at Racsick, June 7, 1890, a son of Jacob and Rina Po])lack, who were also natives 
of Russia and were of Jewish extraction. The father was connected with 
mills as a flax buyer and he served for many years as president in the synagogue 
at Racsick, being a prominent and influential man among his people. He died 
in Russia, March 20, 191 5, at the age of sixty years, and his widow yet survives. 

David Poplack, the fourth in order of birth in a family of five children, 
attended the schools of his native city to the age of thirteen years, when he began 
earning his living in the employ of his father. Attracted by the opportunities 
of the new world, he came to America in .\pril, 1906, and soon secured em- 
ployment in a furniture store in New York city, where he remained for a year. 
On the 25th of June, 1907, he arrived in Washington, making his way to Bel- 



142 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

lingham, where he had relatives who had preceded him to this state about ten 
years. There he estabHshed a confectionery business, which he conducted suc- 
cessfully for four years. He then sold out and opened a clothing store at 
Everett in 191 1, beginning the business in a small way with an investment of 
about twenty-five hundred dollars. From that small start his present business 
has been developed until it is one of the leading clothing and dry goods houses 
of the city. Something of the growth of his trade is indicated in the fact 
that he today carries a stock worth approximately twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars, showing an increase in his business of about sevenfold. He is very energetic 
and progressive and his close attention to the interests of his trade and his 
enterprising methods have won for him deserved and gratifying success. 

On the 25th of December, 1913, Mr. Poplack was married in Seattle, Wash- 
ington, to Miss Ida Becker, a native of Russia and a daughter of Abraham Beck- 
er, deceased. They now have one child, Annie, born in Everett, November 24, 
1914. 

The family reside at No. 2421 Broadway and Mr. Poplack owns not only his 
home but also other property in the city. He belongs to the Masonic lodge of 
Everett, also to the B'nai B'rith and in religious views holds to the faith of his 
fathers. He secured the naturalization papers which made him an American 
citizen April 13. 1916, and in the fall of that year cast his first vote for re- 
publican candidates. He belongs to the Commercial Club and is interested in all 
that pertains to the welfare and progress of his city, cooperating in well de- 
fined plans and measures for its upbuilding and improvement. 



RICHARD HAMBIDGE. 

Richard Hambidge, of the Canyon Lumber Company, was born in Hereford, 
England, January 7, 1861, a son of Richard and Emma (Saunders) Hambidge, 
who were also natives of that country, where they were reared and married. In 
later life the father became a leading factor in railroad circles in England, 
where he passed away in 1872 at the age of forty years. His widow still survives 
and is living in England at the notable old age of ninety years. 

Richard Hambidge was the third in order of birth in their family of five 
children and after attending the public schools of his native country he sought 
em.ployment in railroad work. In 1882 he came to the United States, making his 
way first to Michigan, after which he went to Plaquemine, Louisiana, where he 
was engaged in the sawmill business and in shingle manufacturing from 1882 
until 1885. In the latter year he arrived in western Washington and worked in 
the shingle mills of Olympia, Centralia, Buckley and other places until 1886, 
when he returned to Louisiana, where he remained until 1891. He then again 
came to this state, taking up his abode at Tacoma. where he resided for a year, 
after which he entered the employ of the Standard Lumber Company at Sno- 
homish, there continuing until 1892. when Everett was established. He became 
associated with Jack Tyre in the conduct of a shingle mill and later their interests 
were merged with the Canyon Lumber Company in May, 1907. This has devel- 
oped until the company now controls one of the largest mills of western Washing- 




RICHARD HAxMBIDGE 



K THE NE'vv iuKK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
r TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 145 

ton. They started with a capacity of one hundred and fifty thousand feet and 
now turn out over three hundred thousand feet of lumber per day. They have 
two hundred and thirty employes and theirs is one of the best and most modernly 
equipped mills in this section of the state. Their plant embraces thirty-two acres 
of ground and they have three railroad connections. Mr. Hambidge is also asso- 
ciated with the Johnson-Dean Lumber Company and there is no phase of the 
lumber trade with which he is not familiar, so that he is able to speak with 
authority upon questions relating to the business. 

In September, 1898, Mr. Hambidge was united in marriage to Miss Olive 
Bodenham, of Hereford, England, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Boden- 
ham, who were natives of Hereford. They have three children : Clare, born in 
Snohomish in 1899 and now attending the high school at Everett; Jack, who 
was born in 1904 at Robe, Washington, and is in school at Everett; and James, 
who was born in 1912. 

In politics Mr. Hambidge maintains an independent course. He is promi- 
nent in Alasonic circles and has become a member of the Mystic Shrine. He 
belongs also to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of 
Pythias. He has membership in the Cascade Club and in the Commercial Club 
and his varied interests and activities are thus indicated. He left home a poor 
boy and has worked his way upward to a high position in business circles through 
his own efiforts. He ranks with the leading and representative men of Everett 
and stands high as well in citizenship. He has always been quick to recognize 
and utilize opportunities and this quality has advanced him continually until he 
is now controlling important lumber interests. 



JOHN M. EDSON. 



John M. Edson, registrar of the State Normal School of Bellingham, which 
position he has filled since 1913, was born in Sinclairville, New York, Septem- 
ber 29, 1861, a son of Obed and Emily (Allen) Edson. After attending the 
high school and the Chamberlain Institute at Randolph, New York, he put aside 
his textbooks at the age of nineteen years, and two years later became associated 
with Archie McLean in the purchase of the Sinclairville Commercial, which 
paper they published for one year. Mr. Edson then sold his interest and removed 
to Tyndall, Dakota, where he became editor of the Tyndall Tribune, continuing 
with this publication until 1887. In the spring of 1888, he crossed the continent 
to establish his home in Whatcom, now Bellingham, Washington. He purchased 
an interest in the Whatcom County Democrat, a paper which had been published 
by Charles Donovan, and in 1889 Mr. Donovan sold his remaining interest to 
Medill Council and the firm of Edson & Connell then continued the pul)licati()n 
of the paper until 1890. In that year Mr. Edson sold out and entered into i^art- 
nership with S. B. Irish under the firm style of Edson & Irish for the conduct 
of a general job printing business, which they carried on until 1906, when Mr. 
Edson withdrew and retired from active business on account of ill health. In 
1913 he accepted the appointment by the board of regents to the office of regis- 
trar of the State Normal School in Bellingham. in which connection he is now 



Vol. in— 8 



146 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

serving. Mr. Edson has always been interested in the cause of education and 
from 1898 until 1905 he served on the Whatcom (now Bellingham) city school 
board and during a part of that time was its chairman. He is a member of the 
American Ornithologists Union and for many years he has devoted much atten- 
tion to the study of ornithology, having made a list of more than two hundred 
and twenty species of birds that have come under his personal observation. 

In Minneapolis, Minnesota, on the 26th of September, 1889, Mr. Edson was 
united in marriage to Miss Alma Green and to them have been born three chil- 
dren : Arthur A., twenty-three years of age, who is a graduate of the course 
in electrical engineering in the University of Washington, and is enrolled in the 
first draft of American soldiers for the European war; Emily, a graduate of the 
State Normal School ; and William O., seventeen years of age, who is a student 
in the State Normal School. 

In his political views Mr. Edson is a democrat but has never been a politician, 
although he keeps in touch with the trend of modern thought along all the lines 
that have to do with the vital questions of the day. 



PHILIP R. MEREDITH. 

Philip R. Meredith, engaged in the manufacture of harness at Port Angeles, 
was born April 16, 1890, in Rock Springs, Wyoming. His father, Zora Bible 
Meredith, a native of Wales, came to America at the age of twenty-one 
years and during the early '70s turned his attention to mining in Wyoming. 
He was quite successful in his undertaking and he becarrie superintendent of 
Union Pacific Mine, No. 7, continuing in that position of trust and responsibility 
until he met with an accident in one of the mines which resulted in his death 
in 1892. His wife, who bore the maiden name of ]Matilda McFadden, is a 
native of Canada and of English lineage. She now resides in Port Angeles. 
They were the parents of seven sons and three daughters. 

Philip R. Meredith, the youngest of the family, was educated in the public 
schools of Port Angeles to the age of fourteen years, at which time he entered 
the teaming business, with which he was connected for three years. He then 
went to Sacramento, California, and engaged in the fish business there for three 
years, after which he returned to Port Angeles, where for a year he followed 
the barber's trade. The following two years were devoted to teaming and in 
December, 1913, he bought out the Tory Hedemark harness manufacturing 
establishment, employed Julius Danz, the former proprietor, and learned the 
trade under him. He has since conducted his shop and is today the only manu- 
facturer of harness and saddlery supplies in Clallam county. His trade has 
constantly grown as the months have sped by and he is today at the head of a 
business of very substantial and satisfactory proportions. 

On the 23d of October, 1907, in Port Angeles, Mr. Meredith was united in 
marriage to Miss Opha Critchfield, a native of Oklahoma and a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. U. G. Critchfield. They now have three children, Melvin, Le 
Roy and Athlene. 

Mr. Meredith maintains an independent course politically, while frater- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 147 

nally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, Naval Lodge, No. 353, B. 
P. O. E., and the Fraternal Brotherhood. He belongs also to the Commercial 
Club and the Merchants Association and is in hearty sympathy with its pur- 
poses to upbuild the city and extend its trade relations. His religious belief is 
that of the Presbyterian church and in a word he stands for progress and im- 
provement along material, intellectual, social and moral lines. 



HARRY ALEXANDER CHADWICK. 

Harry Alexander Chad wick has been connected with journalistic interests in 
Seattle ever since coming to the city in 1888 and is now the owner and publisher 
of the Argus. His birth occurred in Searsport, Maine, June 6, 1866, and he is a 
son of Henry Kimball and Maria (Manning) Chadwick, natives respectively of 
Gardiner and of Machias, Maine. 

Harry Alexander Chadwick was educated in the public schools of Gardiner 
and Farmingdale, Maine, and learned the printer's trade on the Gardiner Home 
Journal. When seventeen years of age he was appointed state editor of the 
Daily Kennebec Journal, published at Augusta, Maine, and upon leaving that 
paper went to Chicago. Later he made his way to Los Angeles, whence he came 
to Seattle, arriving here November 6, 1888. Until August, 1889, he was printer 
on the Post-Intelligencer and later became connected with the Seattle Daily 
Press, first as reporter and subsequently as assistant city editor. Later he became 

* 

superintendent of the mechanical department of the Press-Times, now known as 
the Times, which position he resigned in March, 1894, to buy a half interest in 
the Argus, which had been established but six weeks previously. Upon the death 
of his partner, A. T. Ambrose, May 17, 1900, Mr. Chadwick became sole owner 
of the Argus, which he has since published. 

Mr. Chadwick was married on the 20th of November, 1889, to Miss Laura 
M. Castle, a daughter of -Captain D. E. Castle, of Washington, 1). C. To this 
union have been born two sons, Leslie C. and I~Iarold D. 



WILLIAM A. MORROW. 

There seems to be no section in all this broad country that nature has not 
provided with resources which man may adapt to his use and thereby advance 
his success. The great forests of the northwest have offered splendid opi)or- 
tunity to the lumberman, and among those who have been active in this field 
in the Grays Harbor section of the state is William A. Morrow, who was one 
of the organizers of the East Iloquiam Shingle Company and is now its presi- 
dent and manager. He was born in Victoria county, Ontario, Canada, June 
15, 1877, and in early manhood he crossed the border into the United States, 
settling in Minnesota, where he engaged in the lumber business until the fall 
of 1899, at which date he arrived in Hoquiam. He was at first employed by 
the Lytle Logging Company, having charge of the booms on Andrus creek and 



148 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

on Elk river. He continued with that company for four years and then for 
three years had charge of booms for the Grays Harbor Commercial Company 
and on the expiration of that period organized with others the East Hoquiam 
Shingle Company, of which W. R. Caldwell became the first president. After 
a year Mr. Morrow was chosen president and manager and so continues, in 
which connection he bends his energies to administrative direction and execu- 
tive control. Long experience with the lumber trade has well qualified him to 
direct the important interests under his care and the success of the business is 
largely attributable to his enterprise and keen discernment. P. E. Stream is 
secretary of the company and Harvey Lord vice president, and the officers to- 
gether with Z. E. Archer and H. C. Hansen constitute the board of trustees. 
In 1903 Mr. Morrow was married to Miss Christine Smith, of Canada, and 
they have two children, Agnes and Maxine. His political indorsement is given 
to the republican party, which he has supported since age conferred upon him 
the right of franchise. Fraternally he is connected with the ]\Iasons and with 
the Odd Fellows and exemplifies in his life the beneficent spirit upon which 
those organizations are based. All these things, however, are made sub- 
servient to his business affairs, and his close application and unremitting energy 
have been the salient features in his well deserved success. 



JOHN A. SWETT. 

Among the few business and professional men of Snohomish county who 
can claim the distinction of having been born within its borders is numbered 
John A Swett, the enterprising editor and proprietor of the Sultan Star. He 
was born in the city of Snohomish on the nth of February, 1877, at a time 
when the town was practically the only one in the county. His parents, John 
H. and Martha ( Burham) Swett, are natives of ]\Iaine and both come of old 
colonial families. Actor Swett, the father of John H. Swett, was the son of 
a patriot of the Revolutionary war period and in his business career was first 
a sailor, afterward a farmer and later a lumberman. 

At the age of twenty years John H. Swett, who was born in Washington 
county, Maine, on the 7th of June, 1841, came to the Pacific coast by way of 
Panama and was engaged in various occupations in the Golden state until 
May, 1864, at which time he made his way northward, stopping first at Port- 
land, Oregon, Victoria, British Columbia, and finally reaching Port Townsend. 
He then devoted some time to logging at Hood Canal and on the White river 
near Seattle. In the fall of 1867 he purchased a team and began logging for 
himself at Pleasant Harbor, continuing successfully in business there until 
1870, when he visited his old home in Maine. On his return he went again to 
Hood Canal, where he was employed until ]\Iarch, 1873, which date marked 
his permanent settlement in Snohomish county. Three years later he was com- 
pelled to retire from the woods on account of a crushed leg. In 1876 he was 
chosen county auditor and served the county with great credit for two full 
terms. Later he was chosen county assessor and sheritT and also filled those 
positions of trust with great credit to himself and satisfaction to his constit- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 149 

uents. Since then he has successfully engaged in the transfer business in 
Snohomish, where he is an honored and respected citizen. He has also served 
his city as councilman for several terms and is most highly respected among 
the pioneer residents of Snohomish. His wife was a daughter of Captain 
George Burham, who was an officer in the War of 1812. She was born in 
1843 and before her marriage taught school in ]\Iaine for several years. On 
the 5tH of December, 1874, she was married in Portland, Oregon, having come 
west alone for the purpose of wedding the man of her choice, who had pre- 
viously sought her hand in marriage. Five children were born of this union 
and the two youngest were twins. One of the sons, George Burham Swett, 
of Everett, was born October 11, 1882, and is now an employe of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company. 

John A. Swett, after acquiring a good education in the schools of his 
native town, entered the office of the Daily Sun, owned by Will M. Sanger, 
to learn the printer's trade. Naturally fond of journalistic work, he desired 
to have a practical knowledge of all its details, and so rapidly did he master 
the business that he was soon able to enter the employ of the Seattle Times 
and also worked on various papers published in Everett. For two years prior 
to the founding of the Sultan Star on the 7th of September, 1907, he was 
employed ' on the Monitor at Monroe. The Star is a well written, four page 
paper which has through the years of its existence acquired a large circulation 
in the county, so that the coming of each issue is looked forward to by the many 
subscribers. The paper is independent politically and Mr. Swett maintains a 
similar course, never allying himself with either party. 

In June, 191 1, in Everett, Mr. Swett was united in marriage to Miss 
Evangeline E. Grawe, a daughter of Mary E. Grawe, of Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. 
Swett own and occupy one of the fine homes of Sultan. Their residence is 
thoroughly modern in every department, is tastefully furnished, and an air of 
comfort and good cheer there abounds. They entertain their many friends 
there in a most delightful way. Another source of recreation to them is their 
automobile trips far out into the Cascade mountains. 

Mr. Swett is well known in journalistic circles. He has been a delegate to 
various meetings of the state and national press associations and he is always 
closely studying the questions which affect the business in which he is now 
engage'd. He is filling the office of justice of the peace of Sultan and for two 
years has been president of the Sultan Commercial Club. He possesses a genial 
personality and excellent business ability and is widely and favorably known, 
having a circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



WALTER W. DOWNING. 



Walter W. Downing, a real estate dealer of Auburn and actively identified 
with municipal affairs as a member of the city council was born in Meridcn, 
Connecticut, June 28, 1866, a son of George Otis and Malissa Jane (Higby) 
Downing, the former a native of Massachusetts and the latter of Connecticut. 
In the public schools of his native city the son pursued his early education, which 



150 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

was supplemented by two years' study in the Cheshire MiHtary Academy, at 
Cheshire, Connecticut. He afterward learned the toolmaker's and machinist's 
trades, which he followed for three years before coming to the west. In 1886, 
traveling by way of Panama, he made his way to Los Angeles, California, where 
he worked at his trade for three years. He spent the succeeding seven years in 
quartz mining in Montana and Alaska, after which he returned to Meriden, where 
he continued for six years. The lure of the west, however, was upon him and 
in 1907 he became a resident of Auburn, where he has since made his home. 
Here he is active as a real estate dealer and he is thoroughly informed concern- 
ing the market values of property and has negotiated many important realty 
transfers. 

On the 6th of March, 1901, in Seattle, occurred the marriage of Mr. Down- 
ing and Miss Jessie A. Hubbart, of that city. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Masons and the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is a republican and served 
as city councilman at large for three and one-half years. Experience made him 
familiar with the needs of the city and his official prerogatives were exercised 
in support of many measures for the general good. He further strives to pro- 
mote the welfare of Auburn as a member of its Commercial Club and he stands 
for progress and improvement at all times. 



THOMAS S. DAHLQUIST. 

Thomas S. Dahlquist, of Bellingham, derives his income from the safest of 
all investments, real estate, and is now practically living retired save for the 
supervision which he gives to his property holdings. He was born in Christian- 
stad, Sweden, September 3, i860, a son of Swan and Elizabeth Dahlquist. After 
attending the public schools to the age of fourteen years he served an apprentice- 
ship in a grocery store, where he remained until 1881, when, having attained his 
majority, he sailed for the United States, wishing to try his fortune in the new 
world, for the stories which he had heard concerning its opportunities proved to 
him irresistibly attractive. He settled first upon a farm near Huron, South 
Dakota, and there gradually increasing his holdings, he ultimately became the 
owner of fifteen hundred acres of land. For seven years he continued to carry 
on general agricultural pursuits in that state, at the end of which time he made 
his way to the coast, settling at Sehome, now a part of Bellingham. There he 
established a grocery store in the ten hundred block on Elk street and with the 
growth of his business he was obliged to seek larger quarters, which he found 
in 1890 across the street. Still his business grew and developed and in order 
to secure yet greater space he removed to the corner of Elk and Holly streets. 
He next purchased a three-story building at the corner of C and Maple streets, 
the structure being fifty-five by one hundred and twenty-five feet. The first 
floor was utilized for his grocery store and the upper floor was arranged for 
apartments. There he remained until 1905, when he sold that property and 
removed to a three-story brick building with basement which he had erected. 
This was fifty-five by one hundred and twenty feet and was situated at No. 131 1 
Elk street. He used a space twenty-seven and a half by one hundred and twenty- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 151 

five feet on the first floor together with the basement for his grocery store and 
stock and rented the remainder of the first floor, twenty-seven and a half feet, 
for a meat market. The second floor of the building was finished for the use 
of the United States federal court and was so occupied for four years. Since 
then Mr. Dahlquist has converted the upper floor into apartments. 

He continued to successfully manage and control his grocery store for more 
than two decades but in 1910 he sold out and retired from active business man- 
agement save for the supervision which he gives to his personal interests. In 
the meantime as prosperity attended his efforts he made investments in property 
and is today the owner of much valuable realty in Bellingham together with a 
number of fine and productive farms in the state. He is also the largest stock- 
holder in the Whatcom county Abstract Company and from these varied inter- 
ests he derives a most substantial and gratifying annual income. 

On the 15th of March, 1891, in Bellingham, occurred the marriage of Mr. 
Dahlquist and Miss Amelia Wagnstad. In his fraternal relations he is well 
known, being a charter member of the Maccabees tent of Bellingham and also 
a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of 
the World. His political allegiance has been given to the republican party since 
he became a naturalized American citizen and he makes it his object to keep 
well informed on the vital questions and issues of the day. He served on the 
council one term but is not an office seeker, preferring to concentrate his ener- 
gies upon his business affairs, which have been most wisely and carefully 
directed, his investments showing notably sound judgment. 



CARL ALBRECHT SCHLETTWEIN. 

Carl Albrecht Schlettwein, proprietor of The Maize, "Everett's Popular 
Cafe," was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, July 29, 1878, and his 
father, Adolph Schlettwein, was also a native of that place, where he owned a 
large estate and was extensively engaged in farming. He belonged to an old 
German family that traced their ancestry back to 1485 and came originally 
from the south of Germany. Adolph Schlettwein passed away September 18, 
1914, .in Dresden, Saxony, at the age of seventy-five years. He was a con- 
servative and was very active in political affairs and in civic matters. His 
religious faith was that of the Lutheran church. He married Augusta Ruehs, 
a daughter of Carl Albrecht Ruehs, who was a prominent merchant and cit- 
izen of Germany, representing his country as consul at Caracas, Venezuela. 
His daughter, Mrs. Schlettwein, passed away January i, 1895. at the age of 
forty-two years. In their family were four children : Carl A. ; William, who 
is a major in the German army in the present war and at last accounts was in 
the Silesian army corps; Ada, a deaconess in St. George Hospital at Hamburg. 
Germany; and Ulrich, who was a young merchant of Shanghai, China, and 
just two weeks before the outbreak of the present war returned to his native 
country, where he is serving with the German troops if still living. 

Carl' A Schlettwein was educated in the Royal Gymnasium at Bromberg. 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1895. He also attended the 



152 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

university at Greifswald and the universities of Berlin, Halle and Leipzig. He 
studied with the object of becoming a university professor and following his 
graduation taught in the gymnasium at Xeu Ruppin for two years. He then 
came to America, arriving in New York city in September, 1905. Upon his 
arrival he decided to abandon educational lines and became connected with 
business interests. He entered into connection wuth the Prudential Life Insur- 
ance Company of New York, with which he was associated for eighteen months 
as an insurance solicitor, after which he resigned his position and made his way 
westward to Seattle. There he continued for a month and on the ist of De- 
cember, 1907, removed to Everett, after which he pursued a course of study in 
the Everett Business College. He then became an accountant and for two 
years was bookkeeper with the Independent Laundry Company. Later he ac- 
cepted the management of the Maize Cafe, which he has since successfully 
conducted, and in October, 1914, he became sole owner of this business, which 
is today the leading enterprise of its kind in Everett. It is equipped in a most 
modern and thoroughly attractive manner and employment is furnished to 
eighteen people. 

The marriage of Mr. Schlettwein and Miss Myrtle Elvrum was celebrated 
on the 28th of June, 1916, in the German Lutheran church in Seattle. Mrs. 
Schlettwein is a daughter of E. P. and Martha (Beck) Elvrum, the father a 
native of Norway and the mother of Denmark. They came to the United States 
early in life, settling in Stan wood, Washington, and being numbered among the 
pioneers of the state. 

Mr. Schlettwein is a republican in his political views and fraternally he is 
connected with Pilgrim Lodge, No. 187, I. O. O. F., of Everett. His religious 
faith is that of the Lutheran church. Along business lines he has made steady 
advance, adapting himself to conditions, and with liberal university training he 
has been able to understand and utilize opportunities which others have passed 
heedlessly by. 



CALVIN H. SHUTT. 



Calvin H. Shutt, deceased, who was the organizer and promoter of the Grays 
Harbor Logging Company and thus became one of the most prominent factors 
in industrial circles at Aberdeen and in that section of the state, was born in New- 
ville, Indiana, in 1871. His father, Jacob Shutt, was born upon a farm at Spen- 
cerville, Indiana, and in early manhood studied medicine, after which he engaged 
in the practice of his profession until his death, which occurred in his native state 
in December, 1894. He was married in 1870 to Kathrine Hinman, who is now 
living and makes her home with her daughter-in-law, Mrs. C. H. Shutt. There 
were three sons by that marriage : Calvin H. ; Victor H., who is deceased ; and 
George W., living in Wyoming. 

Calvin H. Shutt pursued his early education in the public schools of New- 
ville, Indiana, and afterward entered the Fayette Normal University at Fayette, 
Ohio, from which he was graduated with the class of 1891. He early had to 
depend on himself and took up the study of telegraphy but did not follow that 




CALVIN H. SHUTT 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRARY 



AST05^, LiiNOX 
J TH.DEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 155 

pursuit. While still living in the middle west he was married in 1894 to Miss 
Nellie H. Stockwell, mention of whose family is made elsewhere in this work. 
They became parents of four children: Thelma A., Clare H., Valdon and Theresa 
H., all now in school. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Shutt resided in Indiana until Sep- 
tember, 1898, when they arrived in Aberdeen, and for ten years he occupied the 
position of bookkeeper with the C. E. Burrows Company, but ambitious to engage 
in business on his own account, he organized the Grays Harbor Logging Com- 
pany in 1908 and became its first president, so continuing until his death. The 
business which he developed was one of the largest of the kind in this section 
of the state, growing under his capable management and reliable methods. He 
was very active and energetic, closely applying himself to the work in hand, and 
his sound judgment seemed to readily recognize the true value of every situation 
or opportunity. He was most just and considerate in his relations with his 
employes and he had their loyalty and high regard. He was drowned on the i8th 
of November, 191 5, at one of the logging camps, his body being found four days 
afterward by his friend Mr. Empey. His loss was deeply regretted by all who 
knew him, for he had the faculty of inspiring friendships among those with 
whom he came in contact — friendships that deepened and ripened into love as the 
years went on. There are few men who enjoy in greater degree the warm regard 
and kindly feeling of their fellowmen. His life was an inspiration to many 
and his memory remains as a blessed benediction to those who knew him. 

Mr. Shutt gave his political allegiance to the democratic party but the honors 
and emoluments of office had no attraction for him. Fraternally he was con- 
nected with the Masons, the Elks and the Woodmen of the World and in his life 
exemplified the beneficent teachings of those orders. The motive spirit of his 
conduct, however, was found in his Christian faith and the Methodist church 
found him a devoted and faithful member. His life at all times measured up 
to the highest standards, so that his death was the occasion of deep regret to 
young and old, rich and poor, who had counted his friendship as a treasured pos- 
session. 



ALEXANDER CARROLL CLARK. 

Identified with the pioneer development and history of tlie northwest was 
Alexander Carroll Clark, who was born in North Carolina in 1829, a son of 
James A. and Harriett fStinson) Clark. The former was a son of Joseph and 
Ruth (Alexandria) Clark. Joseph Clark was bom in North Carolina in 1753 
and in Mecklenburg county, that state, enlisted in the spring of 1780 for service 
in the Revolutionary war. He was with the army for two years and partici- 
pated in the Siege of Ninety-six and the battle of Orangeburg. His wife, who 
was born in April, 1769, was a daughter of Captain William Alexandria, who 
served under Colonel Wade Hampton in South Carolina. Joseph Clark and 
Ruth Alexandria were married in Mecklenburg county. North Carolina. April 
2, 1789, and their children were Rebecca, Mary. William. Susannah. Margaret, 
James A., Tosiah G., Elijah C. and Joseph H. The father of this family was 



156 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

a brother of Abraham Clark, one of the signers of the Mecklenburg Declara- 
tion. The Clark family was very prominent all through the Revolutionary war 
and also during the colonial period in the south. 

Alexander Carroll Clark acquired a common school education in Iowa, 
whither he went during the period in which that state was a frontier district. 
He was married in Iowa, in 1849, when but nineteen years of age, to Aliss Eliza 
Jane Baker and they became the parents of three sons and a daughter, Charles, 
Walter, Guy and Laura. The last named was the wife of Alexander Young 
and died November 3, 1895. 

Two years after his marriage Mr. Clark started over the old Oregon trail 
to the northwest and was seven months in completing the journey. A major 
portion of his party of two hundred died on the trail of cholera. In the fall of 
1852 he reached Portland. Oregon, and settled at the mouth of the Cowlitz 
river, where he became the owner of a large farm of three hundred and sixty 
acres. There he engaged in farming and cattle raising until his death in Feb- 
ruary, 1886. His widow is still residing near Catlin on the original farm at 
the advanced age of eighty-four years. Mr. Clark always remained a strong 
southern sympathizer but during the Civil war he had five brothers and eleven 
nephews who were soldiers in the Union army, although the Clarks had been 
a southern family for generations. Alexander C. Clark fought against the 
Indians in the uprisings in Washington territory and was among those who 
were active in planting the seeds of civilization in the northwest. 



JOHN EVANS DOBBS. 

John Evans Dobbs, secretary and manager of the Citizen's Independent Tele- 
phone Company, has been a resident of Washington for almost thirty years 
and throughout the entire period has made his home in Port Townsend. He was 
born at Bridgend, Wales, May 29, 1874, a son of Milson K. Dobbs, a native 
of England, who was a successful contractor. Coming to America in 1878 the 
father settled first in Troy, New York, where he engaged in the retail grocery 
business, having been active along that line before coming to the new world. 
In 1888 he arrived in Washington, establishing his home in Port Townsend 
where he engaged in the contracting business to the time of his death which 
occurred April 22, 191 5, when he had reached the age of sixty-seven years. 
He married Margaret Evans, a native of Wales, and unto them were born four 
sons: Jacob M., a retired government official living in Baltimore, Maryland; 
Milson I., connected with the United States customs service in Alaska; John 
Evans; and David S.. who died in Port Townsend in 1898 at the age of fourteen 
years. The wife and mother passed away in 1899 when forty-three years of age. 

John Evans Dobbs was but a young lad of four summers when brought by 
his parents to the new world. His education was largely acquired in the public 
and high schools of Fergus Falls, Minnesota, supplemented by study in the 
Business College of Port Townsend. He was afterward employed as a book- 
keeper until 191 1, and in 1912 he became manager for the Citizens Independent 
Telephone Company, which office he has since capably filled, and in 191 3 he 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 157 

was also elected secretary of the company. In this connection he largely controls 
the interests of the service and has developed the business along progressive 
Hnes. His only absence from Port Townsend since coming to the west in 1888 
covers two years spent as deputy collector of customs at Saint Michael, Alaska. 

On May 16, 1906, Mr. Dobbs was married in Port Townsend to Miss 'Har- 
riette Eloise Heath, who was born in Muscotah, Kansas, a daughter of Joseph C. 
Heath, a merchant of Port Townsend and one of its early settlers. They reside 
at No. 641 Filmore street and they have two interesting daughters, Nanette 
Eloise, born ]^Iarch 9, 1907, and Florence Margaret, born January 22, 1913. 

Mr. Dobbs has an interesting military record, having served as a member 
of Company I of the National Guard of Washington of which he was second 
sergeant for six years. His political support is given to the republican party 
and he has served as deputy assessor of Jefferson county, yet has never been 
an office seeker. He belongs to the Port Townsend Commercial Club and prefers 
that his public service shall be done as a member of that organization or in a 
private capacity. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church. He is 
serving as a vestryman and is very active in the church work. He is also a 
valued member of the Masonic lodge of Port Townsend in which he is now 
filling the office of junior deacon. His has been an active and well spent life, 
varied in its interests and at all times in harmony with those progressive move- 
ments which tend toward the uplift of the individual and the betterment of 
the community. 



CHARLES H. HOSS. 



Charles H. Hoss, who is now so acceptably serving as justice of the peace 
at Centralia, is one of Washington's honored pioneers, having come to this 
state in 1877 when the greater part of Lewis county was wild and unimproved. 
He was born in Wisconsin, April 16, 1858, a son of Theodore and Clara (Kup- 
pers) Hoss, who come to this country from Germany and first located in 
Wisconsin, where the father worked at the cooper's trade. Later he removed 
with his family to Nebraska and in 1877 came to Little Falls, Washington, where 
he took up a homestead, residing thereon for nine years. About 1887 he became 
a resident of Centralia, where his last days were spent in retirement from active 
labor, and here he passed away in 1908. His wife had died in 1897. 

Charles H. Hoss is the oldest of their five children. As his boyhood and 
youth were mainly passed upon the frontier he had little opportunity to attend 
school and he is almost wholly a self-educated as well as a self-made man. At 
an early age he began work in the lumber woods and later was m the employ 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad in the bridge and building dcivirtnicnt. For 
several years he was subsequently engaged in the butcher business in L hehalis 
and on disposing of that he embarked in merchandising at Centraha. where he 

has since made his home. 

In 1887 Mr Hoss was married in Centralia to Miss May T. Amler. a daughter 
of August Amler. who was an early settler and farmer of Thurston county. 
Washington Mr. and Mrs. Hoss have four children, one son and three daugh- 



158 ' WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

ters, namely: Mrs. Ethel Burdon; Maud M., a stenographer; Charles A., who is 
teaching school ; and Ruth, who is attending high school. 

Mr. Hoss is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity and for three 
years was secretary of his lodge. For about nine years he was also secretary 
of the Eagles, to which he belongs, and is a member of the Brotherhood of 
American Yeomen and the Commercial Club of Centralia. The democratic party 
finds in him a stanch supporter of its principles and upon his party ticket he 
has three times been elected justice of the peace, which office he is now filling 
with credit to himself and to the entire satisfaction of the general public. 

For forty years Mr. Hoss has made his home in Washington and he has 
therefore witnessed almost its entire development for when he came to this 
region but few settlements had been made and the country was an almost 
unbroken wilderness. He has watched with interest its growth and progress 
until it now ranks among the most prosperous states of the Union. 



WALTER H. LETTELIER. 

Walter H. Lettelier, president of the Everett Box . & Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Lowell, has been identified with the business interests of Snohomish 
county for a number of years and in a manner that has contributed to the 
general industrial development of this section as well as to individual success. 
He was born in Bloomington, Illinois. January 17, 1878. His father, George W. 
Lettelier, was a native of Trenton, New Jersey, and removed to Illinois in 1871. 
In 1 89 1 he came to the west, settling at Los Angeles, where he resided for 
fourteen years, conducting business as a successful contractor and builder. In 
1905 he removed to Everett and from that time until his demise was associated 
with the Everett Box & Manufacturing Company. He married Flora Edwards, 
a native of Illinois and a descendant of John Edwards, a native of England, who 
left a large unsettled estate in New York city involving many millions of dollars. 
This estate has been in litigation between the heirs and New York city for the 
past thirty years. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lettelier have passed away. The former, 
who was born in 1847, died in 1906 and the latter, who was born in 1857. departed 
this life in Los Angeles in 1900. In their family were five children, of whom one 
died in infancy, while four yet survive: Grace D., the wife of Roy" Ransburg, 
living at Burbank, California; Walter H. ; Charles G., vice president of the 
Everett Box & Manufacturing Company; and Roy H., who is associated with 
his brothers in the business. 

Weaker H. Lettelier was a young lad at the time of the removal of the 
family to Los Angeles and there he continued his education but started out to 
earn his own livelihood when a youth of fourteen. He was first employed by 
his uncle, John G. Lettelier, a pioneer box manufacturer on the Pacific coast, 
and while with him learned all branches of the business, as did his brothers. 
He worked his way upward through merit and ability and ultimately became 
foreman of his uncle's plant in Los Angeles, which position he filled for eight 
years. In November, 1903, the Los Angeles Box & Hive Company established 
a second factorv at Tacoma and Mr. Lettelier pi this review removed to that 



WASHINGTON. WEST OF THE CASCADES 159 

city to take charge of the Tacoma plant. Some time later one of the Los 
Angeles plants, of which there were two, was destroyed by fire and one of the 
two plants at Tacoma was also burned. As a result of these disasters the Los 
Angeles company sold out their entire business and Mr. Lettelier then determined 
to secure a location for himself and in this connection decided upon Everett, 
having been advised by the Commercial Club of its need for a box factory. 
He erected a plant, beginning in a small way with a few workmen and thus 
made his start in the development of the large enterprise, owned and controlled 
by him and his brothers, their business extending to South America, Mexico, 
California and neighboring states and as far east as Dakota and Minnesota. 
It became the foremost undertaking of the kind in this section of the state, 
representing an investment of over thirty thousand dollars, but September 17, 
1916, the plant was entirely destroyed by fire. The yards and plant covered over 
two acres and the shops were equipped with the most modern machinery, while 
eighteen people were employed. 

On the 26th of February, 1908, in Everett, Mr. Lettelier was married to 
Miss Ada M. White, a native of Canada and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William 
White. They have one child, Ralph. The family reside at No. 2430 Baker 
street, which property Mr. Lettelier owns. 

In politics he is a republican and he and his wife are members of the Baptist 
church, in which he has served as a trustee for many years. Undoubtedly one 
of the factors in his success is the fact that he has always continued in the same 
line in which he embarked as a young tradesman, never dissipating his energies 
over a broad field, but concentrating his efforts and thus gaining an efficiency 
which has been a dominant element in the attainment of prosperity. 



GLENN O. HAWLEY. 



Glenn O. Hawley, of Marysville, has long been prominently identified with 
the meat packing industry at that place and is now carrying on business on his 
own account as a wholesale and retail dealer under the name of the City Meat 
Market. He was born in Oceana county, Michigan, December 13, 1868.^ His 
father. Dr. Henry C. Hawley, a native of New York and a representative of 
one of the old families of that state, of French and German lineage, is now 
deceased. He was a prominent physician of Michigan for many years and spent 
his last years in Seattle, where he passed away August 7. IQ05, having become 
a resident of that city about 1903. Prior to that time he had for many years 
lived retired. His political allegiance was given to the republican party ana 
he was an active worker for its interests at local, state and national elections. 
He married Clarissa McGill. who was born in New York and was of Scotch and 
Holland Dutch parentage. She passed away at Hesperia, Michigan, in 1885 
at the age of fifty-two years, her birth having occurred in 1833. By lur 
marriage she became the mother of eleven children, ten of whom are yet living. 

Glenn O Hawley, the seventh in order of birth, is inde1)ted to the public 
school system of Hesperia, Michigan, for the educational opportunities which he 
enjoyed He was a youth of seventeen when he started out to earn his own living 



160 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

and about the time of his mother's death he was apprenticed to the stone and 
brick mason's trade, which he followed as a journeyman two years. He then 
entered the meat business in Hesperia and remained there in the same business 
fourteen years. He next engaged in the contracting business on his own account 
for three years. In 1906 he came to Washington, settling at Marysville, where 
he has since been connected with the meat business. He became associated 
with F. C. Bertois under the name of the Bertois Packing Company, a partner- 
ship that was maintained for four years. They conducted the first large packing 
and butchering business in Marysville. Since 1910 Mr. Hawley has conducted 
business on his own account under the name of the City Meat Market, selling 
to both the wholesale and the retail trades. He employs three people and enjoys 
a large and growing patronage that makes his undertaking a profitable one. 

In Michigan on the 27th of June, 1891, Mr. Hawley was united in marriage 
to Miss Arvilla Church, a native of that state and a daughter of Daniel D. and 
Celia (Hayes) Church, who were natives of Indiana. The father is living but 
the mother has passed away. In their family were four children, Floyden R., 
Hyacinth, Gerald and Rex. The eldest son is now associated with his father 
in business. 

Politically ^Mr. Hawley is an earnest republican and keeps well informed 
on the questions and issues of the day, while fraternally he is connected with 
the Independent Order of Odd fellows and the ^lodern Woodmen of America, 
joining both organizations when in Michigan. His religious belief is that of the 
Baptist church. His experiences have been varied, his hardships many, but 
notwithstanding the obstacles and difficulties which he has encountered he has 
worked his way steadily upward and has gained a creditable position among 
the substantial business men of his adopted city. 



LYMAN WALTER BONNEY. 

Lyman Walter Bonney, who is a member of the Bonney- Watson Company, 
funeral directors, has spent almost his entire life on the Pacific coast and 
throughout the entire period has been imbued with the spirit of enterprise that 
characterizes this section of the country. Today the company has the finest and 
best equipped establishment of the kind in the United States and are controlling 
a large business. A native of Des Moines county, Iowa, he was born March 17, 
1843, a son of Sherwood Samuel Bonney, who was born in Litchfield, Connecti- 
cut, in 1 81 2 and was but a small boy when his father died. His mother after- 
ward became the wife of Mr. Streeter and removed to Portage county. Ohio, 
where he grew to manhood. In the late '30s he married Miss Elizabeth Burns 
and moved to Iowa, where he followed the occupation of farming on land ceded 
to him by the government, there remaining until the spring of 1852, when with 
his wife and six sons he migrated to Oregon. He crossed the plains with an ox 
team and prairie schooner, arriving at Oregon City in early November. He 
passed the winter near there and the following summer at Salem, Oregon. During 
the fall of 1853 he continued his journey to Puget Sound, arriving at Steilacoom. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 161 

Pierce county, early in November. He took up a donation claim at American 
Lake, where he lived for several years and in 1863 located a preemption claim 
near Sumner, Pierce county, where he resided until his death March 29, 1908. 
He enjoyed the distinction of being the first justice of the peace elected in that 
county. His first wife died while crossing the plains and in 1853 ^^ married 
Mrs. Lydia Ann Bonney, to whom were born three sons and two daughters : 
William Pierce, Clarence, Fred W., Lucy Elizabeth and Etta. His children by 
his first marriage were : Edward P., David H., Lyman W., Samuel A., Alvin 
and Ransom K. Bonney. Lydia Ann Bonney, his second wife, was the widow 
of Timothy Bonney, by whom she had three children : Levi C, Mary Emeline and 
Sarah A. Bonney. 

In 1859 L. W. Bonney left home to learn the carpenter's trade and for a 
period of five years was a resident of The Dalles, Oregon. Following the gold 
excitement he went to Silver City, Idaho, and there became interested in a sash 
and door factory and planing mill, conducting a growing and successful business 
until 1873, when he disposed of his interest to his partner, T. W. Jones. The 
succeeding five years were spent in San Francisco and there he engaged in the 
fascinating game of dealing in mining stocks, at the end of which time his "get- 
rich-quick" idea was entirely eliminated, for losses instead of success had come 
to him. In 1877 he went to Puget Sound and for one season engaged in farming 
there, after which he worked at his trade in Tacoma during the spring and 
summer of 1878. He next made his way to Portland, Oregon, where he fol- 
lowed his trade until 1881. In that year he acquired a half interest in the 
undertaking business of his brother-in-law, O. C. Shorey, conducting the business 
under the name of O. C. Shorey & Company. In 1889 G. M. Stewart purchased 
Mr. Shorey's interest and they organized the firm of Bonney & Stewart. In 1903 
H. Watson acquired an interest in the business, which was then incorporated under 
the name Bonney-Watson Company, Mr. Bonney being elected president, which 
position he still fills, while Mr. Watson was the secretary and treasurer. The 
establishment has the distinction of being the finest and best equipped in the 
United States. There is in connection a modern crematory and columbarium, 
also a private ambulance service, all under one roof, and there is an efficient 
corps of assistants, making it possible to give the best service. Every part 
of the business is efficiently done, owing to the wise direction of its affairs. 

On the I St of December, 1884, in San Francisco, California, Mr. Bonney 
was united in marriage to Mrs. Eunice (Heckle) Hughes, daughter of Henry 
Heckle, a United States army officer, and widow of Samuel Hughes. She had 
one son and four daughters, as follows: Henry Heckle Hughes, who died in 
1876 at the age of eighteen years; Ida Evelyn, who gave her hand in marriage 
to Orville Moore, by whom she had two sons and two daughters ; Martha Marilla, 
who first became the wife of James McDonald and after his demise in the latter 
part of 1880 wedded Edward Damon, by whom she has a daughter, Doris Bonney 
Damon; Sarah Grayson, the wife of Fred A. Johnson, by whom she has two 
daughters, Bonney Doris and Leilla Eunice; and Clara Amelia Hughes. Mrs. 
Martha M. (Hughes) Damon had one son by her first husband, Theron, who 

passed away in 1913. 

Fraternally Mr. Bonney is identified with the following organizations: St. 
John's Lodge, No. 9, F. & A. M., having the honor of holding the office of 



162 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

treasurer in that lodge for twenty-six consecutive years and still filling the posi- 
tion; Seattle Commandery, No. 2, I^. T. ; Nile Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. ; Lawson 
Consistory, thirty-second degree Scottish Rite. He is likewise a past grand in 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is connected with several other 
organizations. Mr. Bonney is an ardent supporter of the principles of the 
republican party but he does not seek nor desire office as a reward for party 
fealty. He belongs to the Arctic Club and his interest in community affairs is 
indicated by his membership in the Commercial Club and the Chamber of Com- 
merce. He cooperates in all the plans and projects of those organizations for 
the development and upbuilding of the city and it is a well known fact that his 
cooperation can be counted upon to further any plan or movement for Seattle's 
benefit. 



HARVEY A. TITCOMB. 

Harvey A. Titcomb, of Bellingham, superintendent of electric production for 
the Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Company and chief engineer of their 
Nooksak river power plant, died on the 7th of May, 1917. He was born in 
Columbia county, Wisconsin, February 8, 1857, and while spending his youthful 
days in the home of his parents, Dexter and Ellen Titcomb, he attended the 
district schools to the age of sixteen years. He then worked upon his father's 
farm until he reached the age of eighteen. Thinking to find other pursuits more 
rnngenial and hoping to find a more ready source of profit for his labors, he went 
to Wyocena, Wisconsin, where for one year he was employed in a flour mill. 
Going to Rock Island, Illinois, he worked on a stock farm near that city for a 
year and a half and then went to Leadville, Colorado, where he engaged in pros- 
pecting and mining and also was employed in the engine rooms of mining com- 
panies until October, 1880, when he made his way to Grant county. New Mexico. 
There he engaged with the Mindrex Mining Company on construction work and 
also had charge of their engine room for three years. On the expiration of that 
period he went to Clifton, Arizona, and assisted in installing the turntables and 
cables of the Arizona Copper Company, with which he remained for a year. Six 
months were afterward devoted to prospecting and then at Kingston, New Mexico, 
he worked in a mine for eight months and also prospected there. Soon afterward 
he became chief engineer for the Enterprise Mining Company and acted in that 
capacity for two years, when he became a citizen of the northwest. 

Arriving in Tacoma, Washington, Mr. Titcomb assisted in installing machin- 
ery for the Tacoma Smelting Company, which occupied him for four months, and 
later he installed the machinery for the Puget Sound Flour Mill Company. He 
then went to Bellingham, where he installed the engines and boilers in a lumber 
mill. In 1892 he became chief engineer of the Whatcom County Railway & Light 
Company and in September, 191 2, when that company was taken over by the 
Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Company. Mr. Titcomb was made superin- 
tendent of electric production and also chief engineer of their Nooksak river 
plant. His entire business course was marked by steady progression and one may 
read between the lines concerning his stability, fidelity and efficiency. 




HAUVKY A. TITCOMB 



%:". THE WEV^ YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 

L) 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 165 

On the I2th of June, 1890, in Bellingham, Mr. Titcomb was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Carrie Olson and to them were born two children : Robert, who 
married Lillian Kaul and died August 7, 1916, at the age of twenty-four years; 
and Adeline, who became the wife of Arthur Hook, of Bellingham, and has 
one child, Bonnie Jean. 

Throughout his entire life Mr. Titcomb largely concentrated his energies and 
attention upon his business interests and his close application was a foremost 
factor in his success. His technical training came to him in the practical field of 
experience and he learned from each position which he filled those lessons which 
could be gleaned from the work that he undertook. His knowledge was thus 
constantly broadened and his position as superintendent of electric production for 
the Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Company was a most responsible one 
and involved an understanding of many scientific principles. He was one of the 
oldest employes of the company and being a careful and skilled workman was 
held in the highest esteem by those over him. While in the discharge of his 
duties he came in contact with a live wire and died two days later on the 7th of 
May, 1917. Fraternally he was a member of the Yeomen and the Foresters. 



GEORGE H. USTLER. 



George H. Ustler, proprietor of the Port Angeles Dairy, his close application 
to business winning him that success which ranks him with the substantial busi- 
ness men of Port Angeles, was born in Springfield, Ohio, June 28, 1885. His 
father, John Ustler, a native of Germany, came to America during the later 
'70s and settled in Springfield, where he engaged in various pursuits, but at 
the present time is practically living retired, still making his home in that city. 
He married Margaret Hotz, a native of Springfield and a daughter of Philip 
Hotz, who was born in Germany. 

George H. Ustler was the fourth in a family of ten children and while 
spending his youthful days under the parental roof he attended the iniblic 
schools, passing through consecutive grades until he was ready for the junior 
year in the high school. Later he took a course in the Willis Business College 
at Springfield, from which be was graduated in 1903. From the age of eighteen 
years he has depended upon his own resources, his first employment being that 
of bookkeeper. He so continued until 1908 and in September, 1914, he came to 
Washington, arriving in Port Angeles an entire stranger. He purchased a 
small milk route and has since developed an extensive wholesale and retail 
business in dairy products. At first he had but one man in his employ. Gradually 
changes have been wrought as the business has grown and developed until his 
dairy interests are among the most important of the kind in Port Angeles. Ik- 
handles a very large quantity of milk daily and has developed an extensive ice 
cream business. His plant is located at Nos. 117-119 West Fifth street and is 
supplied with the latest improved machinery and equipments for the handling 
of dairy products, all of which are scientifically treated. The milk is pasteurized 
and the utmost care is taken to send out a thoroughly sanitary output. Six 



Vol. Ill— 9 



166 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

people are now employed, three wagons are used in the delivery services and the 
growth of the business continues. 

At Springfield, Ohio, on the 12th of August, 1912, Mr. Ustler was married 
to Miss Rosa Anderson, a native of that city and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
E. H. Anderson, who were early settlers there, where they are still living. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ustler have two children: Helen, born in Springfield, Ohio, June 21, 
1913; and Lucy, born in Port Angeles, August 24, 1915. 

The family reside at No. 117 West Fifth street, where Mr. Ustler owns his 
home and plant. In politics he maintains an independent course, voting accord- 
ing to the dictates of his judgment rather than in accordance with party ties. 
He has membership in Naval Lodge, No. 353, B. P. O. E., and he belongs to the 
Christian Science church. He is also identified with the Commercial Club and 
with the Merchants' Association and thus is putting forth every possible effort 
to promote the business development of his city. His success is the legitimate 
outcome of persistent effort wisely directed and his progress since coming to 
the west has been such that he has never felt the slightest desire to return 
to the east as a place of residence. 



JAMES G. McCURDY. 



James G. McCurdy, cashier of the First National Bank of Port Townsend, 
has devoted his attention to the banking business from the age ot sixteen years. 
He was born March 15, 1872, in the city in wnich he still resides, his parents 
being William A. and Johanna C. McCurdy. At an early period in California's 
development the father went to that state and afterward was concerned in the 
Cariboo gold excitement. Well known as a capable ship joiner, he helped to 
construct all the tugboats aq I ships built on Puget Sound up to 1890. Descended 
from New England ancestry, representatives of the family were early settlers 
of New Brunswick and of Maine. His wife was of German lineage and her 
father, Charles Ebinger, was a pioneer of Portland, Oregon. 

After attending the public schools of Port Townsend to the age of sixteen 
years, James G. McCurdy entered the field of banking and through the inter- 
vening period has concentrated his efforts along that line, advancing step by 
step through merit and ability until he is now cashier of the First National 
Bank and one of its stockholders. He is also the secretary and a stockholder 
in the Port Townsend Pile Driving Company and in the Peninsular Motor Com- 
pany and is thus an active factor in the business activity and development of 
his native citv. 

On the loth of June, 1893, at Port Townsend. Air. McCurdy was united 
in marriage to Miss Anna T. Laursen, daughter of Bertel and Helene Laursen. 
They have one son, Horace W., who is now seventeen years of age. Mr. McCurdy 
votes with the republican party. For six years, from 1908 until 1914, he served 
as a director and clerk of school district No. i at Port Townsend and was 
recently unanimously elected for another term. He is past grand in the Port 
Townsend Lodge of Odd Fellows and now holds the position of chaplain and 
trustee. He has a wide acquaintance as a member of one of the old pioneer 
families and as a representive citizen in Port Townsend, and his activities havp 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 167. 

contributed in substantial measure to general improvement. His religious faith is 
indicated by his membership in the First Presbyterian church of Port Townsend, 
Washington, in which he has served as treasurer for a quarter of a century. 



DAVID S. AIAYNARD. 



David S. Maynard was born in Castleton, Rutland county, Vermont, March 
22, 1808, and died in Seattle, March 13, 1873. 

In the pages of this history his name receives frequent mention. He was 
an important figure in the days of Seattle's founding and early development. 

Early he gained a good common school education, which was followed by 
a full medical course, and for more than forty years he devoted much of his 
time to the practice of his profession. 

August 28, 1828, he and Lydia A. Rickey were married in Vermont. Shortly 
afterward they removed to Ohio, where a son, Henry C, and a daughter, Frances 
J., were born. 

Maynard soon acquired a competency but in a few years it was swept away. 
He resolved to go to the Pacific coast, with full confidence in his ability to 
win his way in that new country. All he had left was settled upon his wife 
and family and when he left home it was understood to be a practical separation 
between him and his wife. 

Starting across the plains for Oregon in April, 1850, he crossed the Missouri 
river at St. Joseph. He had a mule, a buffalo robe, a gun, a few medicines, his 
surgical instruments and several books. He connected himself with a party, 
depending upon his wits, his professional skill, his talent for doing things, his 
good humor and his general usefulness wherever placed to carry him through 
to the other shore in safety and reasonable comfort. 

Thomas W. Prosch, in his monograph of Dr. Maynard, says: "The journey 
across the continent was a hard one to all. There was constant struggle and 
suft'ering; fear of Indians, Mormons, deep and turbulent rivers, mountain 
climbings and starvation; worry unceasing concerning the animals and vehicles 
of the train, and of the wandering and helpless members of the family; un- 
certainty as to the future, that at times became distressing; dirt everywhere, 
sickness and disease, and frequently death. The immigrants tired of them- 
selves and tired of each other. Stretching out these unhappy conditions for a 
period of four or five months, as but faintly portrayed in diaries such as the 
foregoing (Maynard's), drove some of the participants into suicide, others 
into insanity, and left many a physical wreck for whom there was no possibility 
of recovery. Even the stoutest of mind and body, combining usually the best 
natures in the party, were so worn and exhausted by the end of the trip that 
they could no longer restrain their exhibitions and exclamations of impatience, 
of irritation, and of complaint. Dr. Maynard was one of this class. No one 
ever crossed the plains better equipped mentally and physically than he, more 
helpful and self-reliant, more able to lead and direct, more prepared for wise 
action in any emergency or contingency that might occur. He was one of the 
most jovial of men. whose good humor could hardly be disturbed, and who 



.168 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

was always smoothing out troubles, doing personal favors and calming the 
agitation of those about him. And yet even he could not continue to the end 
without showing some signs of the ill feeling he experienced." 

The legislature granted him a divorce during its session of 1852-3. 

January 15, 1853, he and Catherine Broshears were married near Olympia, 
and she was the "Mrs. Maynard"' who played an important part upon Seattle's 
stage for more than fifty years. 

She died in Seattle, October 15, 1906. During her later years she had been 
tenderly cared for by early friends. Her body was laid beside that of her 
husband in Lakeview cemetery. To again quote: "And thus, surrounded by 
friends who evidenced in every way their respect and regard, was laid to rest 
all that was mortal of one of the first women of this country, one who had lived 
long beyond the ordinary allotted time, one who had seen much of change and 
progress, and who had figured prominently in times and events that meant much 
to this community, and that will insure her memory among those who here 
projected and established what has become the state of W^ashington." 



JOHN A. MILLER. 



John A. Miller, division freight and passenger agent for that division of the 
Great Northern Railroad which covers Skagit and Whatcom counties, has been 
identified with that corporation since coming to the northwest in 1893. His 
youth and early manhood were spent upon the Atlantic coast, his birth having 
occurred in Worcester, Massachusetts, August 15, 1848. He attended school 
only until he had reached the age of thirteen years, when it seemed necessary 
for him to provide for his own support and he began working upon a farm. 
Later he was employed in a butcher shop until 1863, when, at the age of fifteen 
years, he oft'ered his services to the government, joining the army as a member 
of Company I, Second ]\Iassachusetts A'olunteer Infantry, with which he was 
connected until 1865, rendering valuable service to his country in defense of the 
Union. W'hen his military aid was no longer needed he returned to A\^orcester, 
and having come to a realization of the value of an education and thorough 
specific training as a preparation for life's practical and responsible duties, he 
then entered the Worcester Technical Institute, pursuing a course in steam engi- 
neering for a year. On the expiration of that period he became steam engineer 
with the Palace Organ & Piano Company of Worcester, Massachusetts, in which 
position he remained for six years, when he was promoted to take charge of 
the shipping department and continued in that position for eight years. He 
afterward went to Boston and accepted a clerical position in the cotton mills of 
Walker Brothers, thus continuing until 1893. 

Attracted by the opportunities of the growing west, Mr. Miller came to Wash- 
ington in that year, making his way first to Seattle, where he entered the employ 
of the Great Northern Railroad Company as division baggage agent. After two 
years he was made traveling freight and passenger agent, which position he occu- 
pied for three years, when he was promoted to general agent of the freight 
department and so continued until 191 5. In that year the ofiace of division 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 169 

freight and passenger agent for Skagit and Whatcom counties was created and 
Mr. Miller was appointed to the position with headquarters in Bellingham. 

In Boston, Massachusetts, April* 9, 1878, occurred the marriage of :\Ir. Miller 
and Miss Frances Noyes, who passed away on the 26th of August, 1903, leaving 
one child. Alberta, who is at home with her father. Mr. Miller is a member of 
the Methodist church and he votes with the republican party, having closely 
adhered to its principles since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. 
He is identified with St. John's Lodge, F. & A. M., at Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts, of which he is a past master. In Bellingham he has membership with the 
Country Club and also with the Chamber of Commerce, and his association with 
the latter indicates his deep interest in all that pertains to the welfare and prog- 
ress of the city. 



BURT E. CHAPPELL. 



Business enterprise and progressiveness find a worthy exemplar in Burt E. 
Chappell, now president of the Granite Falls State Bank and an enterprising 
merchant of that place. He was born August 8. 1866, in Berlin, Ottawa county, 
Michigan, being the eldest in a family of six children whose parents were 
Richard and Romelia (Gill) Chappell, both of whom are natives of New York. 
The former was the son of Peter H. Chappell, who, emigrating from England, 
became the founder of the American branch of this family. For many years 
Richard Chappell was a successful merchant and wool buyer of Michigan, where 
he is now living retired, enjoying a rest to which he is well entitled by reason 
of his former activity. His wife is a member of an old New York family of 
Irish lineage. The six children born of this marriage are: Ikirt E. ; Mrs. 
George Cook, living in Bellingham, Washington; Cassa, who is principal of one 
of the schools of Bellingham ; Edna, the wife of Walter H. Clarke, living in 
Grand Haven, Michigan ; Boyd, a practicing dentist of Grand Rapids, Michigan ; 
and A. Eddy Chappell, who is connected with railroad interests in Indiana. 

Burt E. Chappell attended the public schools of his native state to the age 
of fifteen years and when a youth of nineteen started out to earn his own liveli- 
hood. He was first apprenticed to the barber's trade and later engaged in 
business on his own account along that line for twelve years in Berlin and in 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. He came to Washington in May, 1896, making his 
way direct to Granite Falls, and is today one of the oldest settlers of the town. 
For four years he was employed by James Van Horn, a nuTchant and shingle 
manufacturer of Hartford, after which he returned to Granite i'alls. where he 
embarked in general merchandising, being the third merchant of the ciiy. lie 
had but a small stock at the beginning but from that humble start has developed 
his present business, being today proprietor of the largest general store of the 
town. He has closely studied trade conditions and the wants of the public and 
by reasonable prices, fair dealing and earnest effort to please his patrons he has 
secured a constantly growing and gratifying trade. He became one of the organ- 
izers of the Granite Falls State Bank and soon afterward was chosen its president, 
which position he still occupies, thus being closely associated with the financial 
interests of his town. 



170 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

On the 30th of January, 1890, Mr. Chappell was married in Coopersville, 
Michigan, to Miss Emma Stewart, a native of Ohio and a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edgar I. Stewart. They are well known socially, the hospitality of the best 
homes being freely accorded them. 

Mr. Chappell was made a Mason in Granite Falls and has been senior deacon 
in his lodge, while at present he is senior warden. He also has membership 
with the Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of the 
World and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. His political support is given to the 
democratic party and he is an active worker in local political ranks. He was 
the first mayor of Granite Falls and is now serving as president of the school 
board. He discharges his official duties with the same promptness and fidelity 
which characterizes his business affairs and as the years have gone on he has 
won a substantial place among the progressive business men and valued citizens 
of his adopted state. 



JAMES J. SULLIVAN. 

James J. Sullivan, proprietor of the Everett Marble & Granite Works and 
superintendent of the Evergreen, Greenwood and Mount Carmel cemeteries of 
Everett, was born in Ontario, Canada, Alarch 8, 1869. His father, Michael 
Sullivan, a native of Ontario, was descended from John Sullivan, who was of 
Irish birth and went to Canada about 1770. He was the great-great-grand- 
father of James J. Sullivan and was a blacksmith by trade. The old land grant 
received for land which the great-great-grandfather preempted in Canada is 
still in possession of the family. Michael Sullivan was also a blacksmith and 
in fact that trade was followed by the family through a number of generations. 
In 1874 Michael Sullivan removed to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and in that 
locality engaged in farming, passing away in Grand Forks in 1891 at the age 
of sixty-five years. He wedded Mary Laffin, a native of Ireland, who came 
to America in 1832, when five years of age, with her parents, who were among 
the first settlers in the vicinity of Ottawa, Canada. Mrs. Michael Sullivan 
passed away in Everett, Washington, in 191 1. In the family were eight chil- 
dren, of whom six are yet living. 

James J. Sullivan, who was the sixth child, pursued his education in the 
schools of Ontario and when a lad of twelve years started out to earn his own 
living, working as a grocery clerk. He followed mercantile lines as an em- 
ploye for about eight years. It was in 1882 that his mother with her children 
left Canada to join the father, who had preceded them to the United States 
about eight years. In January, 1888, James J. Sullivan became a resident of 
Tacoma, Washington, where he was employed in various ways. In 1890 he 
removed to Snohomish county, taking up his abode in the town of Snohomish, 
but on the establishment of Everett he removed to that city, where he has 
resided continuously since May 23, 1891. In 1893 he established the first monu- 
ment works in Everett and although he began business on a small scale he 
has developed the largest undertaking of the kind in this section of the state, 
employing on an average five skilled workmen. Aside from conducting a profit- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 171 

able monument business he has been superintendent of Evergreen cemetery 
since 1907. 

At Everett, on the 14th of December, 1896, Mr. SuUivan was married to 
Miss Esther Abrams, a native of Sweden and a daughter of Gustave Abrams. 
To them have been born three children: Helen, born in Everett, December i, 
1897; Thornton A., March 3, 1899; and Mildred Catherine, June 22, 1913. 
They also lost two children: Milton James, who was born February 2, 1902, 
and passed away June 12, 1912; and George Henry. The residence of the 
family at No. 4014 Broadway, in Everett, is one of the beautiful homes of the 
city. 

In politics Mr. Sullivan has taken a very active part as a supporter of Re- 
publican principles and in 19 12 he was candidate for state senator. He does 
everything in his power to promote public progress and improvement anrl he 
is an active member of the Commercial Club of Everett. He belongs to the 
Roman Catholic church and fraternally is connected with the Knights of 
Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the Woodmen of the World. Along the line of an orderly pro- 
gression in business Mr. Sullivan has advanced step by step, building up a 
trade that has brought him substantial success. His life record proves what 
can be accomplished through determination and energy when one makes the 
most of his opportunities and develops his skill along a given line. 



GEORGE L. NYERE. 



George L. Nyere, president of the Aberdeen State Bank at Aberdeen, was 
born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 1882 and after mastering the branches of 
learning taught in the public schools there attended the New York Military 
Academy at Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, New York, and also 'became a student 
in Coe College in his native city, where he studied history and economics. He 
afterward entered upon the study of law and on the completion of the law 
course was graduated from Notre Dame College of Indiana, subsequent to 
which time he was admitted to practice at the bars of Indiana, Pennsylvania 
and Iowa. He afterward followed his profession for five years in those states 
and then removed to the northwest, going first to Portland, Oregon, where he 
became connected with the banking house of the Hartman-Thompson Company, 
with which he was associated until he removed to Aberdeen in August, 191 1. 
There, in connection with G. W. Ripley and Robert B. Motherwell, he pur- 
chased the Chehalis County Bank and in this connection has since bent his 
energies to administrative direction and executive control, lie l)i.'canic presi- 
dent of the bank and still occupies that position, with Mr. Ri])ley as the cashier 
and Mr. Motherwell as the assistant cashier. The bank was established in 1898 
by John Lewis under the name of the Aberdeen State Bank and was afterward 
purchased by E. J. Bradley and C. W. Miller, at which time the former became 
president and the latter cashier. They conducted the institution as a state bank 
until 1908, when the name was changed to the Chehalis County Bank, Frank 
Jones becoming president, with P. H. Pike as cashier. The two remained in 



172 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

their respective ofifices until 191 1, when the bank was purchased by the present 
owners, and in 191 5 the name was changed to the Aberdeen State Bank. The 
institution is capitahzed for twenty-five thousand dollars and a general banking 
business is conducted. They have safety deposit vaults and all modern bank 
equipment and the business is now large and of a gratifying figure. 

Mr. Nyere was married in Chicago in 1909 to Miss Augusta Draheim, of 
Clarion, Iowa, but a native of Germany, and they have a son, John Edward. 
Mr. Nyere belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the Elks. He is interested 
in matters of public progress and anything which commends itself to his judg- 
ment as of benefit to the community receives his endorsement and coopera- 
tion. 



JOHN C. HANSEN. 



John C. Hansen was a young man of twenty years when in 1891 he became 
a resident of Clallam county. He makes his home in Port Angeles and is closely 
identified with its commercial interests as proprietor of The Leader, a well 
appointed department store. His activity along both business and political lines 
makes him one of the representative citizens of the district. He was born in Olden- 
burg, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, March i, 1871, a son of the Rev. Frederick 
and Johanna (Neidhardt) Hansen, who were also natives of that country. They 
came to America in 1884, settling first at Davenport, Iowa, and in 1890 they 
came to Washington, establishing their home at Port Townsend, where the mother 
passed away in 1913, the father surviving until 1915. He had devoted his life 
to the work of the ministry and his influence was a potent force in the moral 
progress of the district. To him and his wife were born four children : Herman 
L., of Port Townsend, who was county assessor of Clallam county; Mrs. Otto 
Sorge, of Port Townsend ; John C. ; and Ella, deceased. 

John C. Hansen was educated in the schools of Iowa and Chicago and com- 
pleted a pharmaceutical course in Northwestern University, which conferred upon 
him the Ph. G. degree at his graduation in 1891. For a year he was employed 
as a drug clerk and then entered business on his own account at Port Angeles, 
dealing in drugs and pharmaceutical supplies. He conducted the business suc- 
cessfully until 1900, when he sold out and organized the Port Angeles Grocery 
Company, under which name he conducted the business for five years. He then 
turned his attention to general merchandising, establishing The Leader depart- 
ment store, which is today the leading dry goods house of Port Angeles and one 
of the largest in this part of the state. His wide experience in business affairs 
qualifies him to pass sound judgment on all questions of commercial moment. 
He is likewise a director of the Citizens National Bank of Port Angeles and his 
business enterprise and progressiveness are widely acknowledged by those who 
know him. 

At Port Angeles, in April, 1895, Mr. Hansen was married to Miss Marjorie 
B. Fowler, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, and a daughter of Charles Fowler, 
who with his family came to Washington, settling at Blyn. Here he passed away 
but his widow still survives. Mr. and Mrs. Hansen have had five children but 




JOHN C. HANSEN 



.E NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOIl, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 175 

lost their first born, Charles. The others are John i'aul, Inga, Herman L. and 
Wallace Alexander, all born in Port Angeles. 

Mr. Hansen is an exemplary representative of the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has attained the Knight Templar degree in the York Rite. He is also 
identified with the Elks and is an active member of the Commercial Club, doing 
everything in his power to further its purposes. He and his family attend the 
First Congregational church. He is an influential worker in republican ranks 
and in 1896 and 1897 served as city treasurer of Port Angeles, while for the past 
six years he has been county commissioner of Clallam county. It was during the 
six years Mr. Hansen served as county commissioner and chairman of the board 
that practically every road in Clallam county was rebuilt — ninety miles new — 
seventy-five miles rebuilt of the main roads and many miles of side roads, with 
perm.anent grading and alignment. The state highway commisioner's report is 
that these roads are the best in the state. A bridge across the Elwha river was 
also erected at a cost of twenty thousand dollars. Up to the time of his taking 
office no system had been established for the valuation of lands in the county. 
Cruising the land was at once started in the different grades of timber zones and 
valuation was established in accordance with its accessibility. Logged off and 
farm lands were also assessed according to the cruiser's report and maps and 
descriptive matter were filed in the county courthouse properly describing each 
ten acres of land in the county, giving all information about the quality of the 
soil, amount of timber or cost of clearing logged off land, etc. This system was 
fought in the courts by the lumber interests and others but through the efforts of 
Mr. Hansen and his fellow members of the board was put into eft'ect. Mr. 
Hansen is regarded as a man of broad and liberal views, yet conservative and 
anxious to protect taxpayers to a point that does not block public progress. He 
devotes much time to the interests oi his office and his popularity is fully attested 
by the fact that he has been retained in this position for six years. He has also 
served for nine years on the school board of Port Angeles and the cause of edu- 
cation finds in him a stalwart and helpful champion. In a word his aid and 
influence are always on the side of advancement and improvement and liis prac- 
tical labors produce important and beneficial results. 



GEORGE W. BILES. 



Among the valued and substantial pioneer settlers of Washington who have 
passed from the scene of earthly activity to the home beyond is George W. 
Biles, who came to the northwest from Kentucky in 1853. He was at that time 
a youth of fourteen years. His birth occurred in Mississippi in March. 1839. 
and there he remained until his father, James Biles, went with ihe family to 
Kentucky. Thence in the winter of 1852 they started for the Pacific coast. 
They remained for a time in St. Louis, but in March, 1S53, rcsunu.l their jour- 
ney, traveling with ox teams and wagons and carrying .supplies and equipment 
for the trip. James Biles was the first to cross tlimu-h t!ie Natchez Pass. 
There were originally ten families in the party but others joined them en route, 
so there were about thirteen families in all and four months passed ere they 



176 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

reached their destination. They had to make their own trail from a point east 
of the mountains and the difificulties of the trip were many, but at length they 
safely reached the western coast. James Biles settled at Mound Prairie, where 
he entered land upon which he resided for four years, devoting his attention 
to the conduct of a tannery which he owned and to farming. He had some 
cows and horses which he had brought to the coast with him and was one 
of the first to introduce American horses into Idaho. He then removed to Tum- 
water and built the second tannery in the state at that point. There he spent his 
remaining days and lived a busy, useful and active life. In the south he had 
wedded Nancy Carter, a native of Tennessee, and they became the parents of 
seven children: Mrs. Kate Sargent, who died in Seattle; Mrs. ]\I. S. Drew, who 
resides in Seattle ; Mrs. Euphemia Knapp, of Portland ; and four who have 
passed away. 

As stated, George W. Biles came with the family to the northwest and was 
a youth of eighteen when the family home was established at Tumwater. He 
there engaged in general merchandising and afterward conducted a boot and 
shoe store at Portland, Oregon. At length he became a resident of Bellingham, 
where he resided for four years, engaged in the contracting business. On the 
expiration of that period he went to Olympia, where he again took up contract 
W'Ork, being largely engaged in building residences until his death. 

It was in 1865, at Tumwater, that Mr. Biles was married to Miss Phoebe L. 
Crosby, a daughter of Clanrick Crosby, who came to the northwest in the spring 
of 1850 and settled in Tumwater after a short stay at Portland. He traveled 
from Massachusetts around Cape Horn and was captain of the vessel on which 
he sailed. He brought with him a cargo to trade with the Indians in San Fran- 
cisco and eventually he landed at Portland. There he obtained a cargo of piles 
and spars from Butlers Cove, which he shipped to China. In the fall of 1850 
he removed to Tumwater, Washington, where he engaged in the milling business 
and in general merchandising. He built both a grist mill and a saw mill on the 
Deschutes river and devoted the remainder of his days to their operation, thus 
becoming connected with the lumber and grain industries during their pioneei 
epoch. He was a member of the convention when Washington was divided 
from Oregon and assisted in drafting the laws for the new^ territory. Alany 
times he served as a member of the territorial legislature and he took a very 
active and helpful part in framing the policy of the new commonwealth and 
in shaping its history. His political allegiance was given to the republican party 
and he filled many offices w'ith honor and distinction. He died in the '70s and 
in his passing the state lost one of its most valued citizens. He had a brother, 
Nathaniel Crosby, who came to the coast in 1845. He shipped lumber around 
Cape Horn to Portland and built a home there in 1849, said to be the first frame 
house in Oregon. He was a sea captain and left Portland in 1853, after which 
he miade a tour around the world, visiting China and other points in the Orient. 
It was after he made his first trip to the Pacific coast that ^Irs. Biles' father 
came to the west. The latter married Phoebe H. Fessenden, a native of Massa- 
chusetts, and they became the parents of seven children : Clanrick, who died in 
Centralia; William, who died in Massachusetts; Mrs. Biles; Mrs. J. PL Naylor, 
of Everett ; William F., who passed away in San Francisco ; Walter, living in 
Olympia ; and Mrs. Fannie Ostrander, a resident of Cordova, Alaska. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 177 

To Mr. and Mrs. Biles were born three children, but Essie C. is deceased. 
The sons are: Frank H., of Idaho; and Fred E., living in Olympia. Mr. Biles 
was reared in the faith of the Methodist church, of which his father was a 
devoted member, but in the later years of his life Mr. Biles became a member of 
the Christian Science church. His political faith was that of the democratic 
party in early life but later he became a stanch republican. He was also a sup- 
porter of the Masonic fraternity and in his life exemplified the beneficent spirit 
of the craft. He died December 31, 1913, and his death was the occasion of 
deep and widespread regret to his many friends, for he was long a valued, 
respected and honored resident of his part of the state. Mrs. Biles has lived 
continuously in the northwest since early pioneer times and is a member of the 
Pioneers Association. She has many friends among those with whom she has 
been associated from early days, but the circle is not limited to those alone, for 
all with whom she comes in contact entertain for her goodwill and kindly regard 
and she is highly esteemed as one of the pioneer women of the state. 



JEROME W. ROMAINE. 

The bar of Bellingham finds a prominent representative in Jerome W. Ro- 
maine, who has also become a recognized leader in political circles in Whatcom 
county. He comes to the Pacific coast from Wisconsin, his birth having occurred 
in Fond du Lac county, that state, May 15, 1859. His parents were Garrett and 
Martha L. (Harbaugh) Romaine, who were of Dutch and of German-English- 
French extraction respectively. The first representatives of the Romaine family 
in America came from Holland in 1679 and settled in New York. Garrett 
Romaine was born in New York city, March 8, 1829, and pursued his education 
there to the age of nineteen years. He afterward became a resident of Fond 
du Lac county, Wisconsin, where he operated a sawmill and flour mill and also 
did railroad contracting. On the 12th of February. 1874, he arrived at San 
Jose, California, whence he drove a team to Harrisburg, Oregon, where he 
engaged in farming until October, 1877. In that year he became a resident of 
Dayton, Washington, where he made his home until his death, which occurred 
October 22, 1903. He filled the ofiice of county assessor in 1885 and 1886 and 
was a well known, valued and respected resident of his district. In Fond du Lac 
county, Wisconsin, in 1854, he married Martha L. Harbaugh. a native of Ohio, 
and to them were born seven children : William B., now deceased : John 1 1.. who 
was born in 1857 and is now farming at Dayton, Washington; Jerome W. ; 
Frantz S., a farmer of Dayton; Charity A., the wife of A. T. James, also of 
Dayton; Freeman C, who passed away at Dayton; and Rachel J., the wife of 
Henry James, of Dayton. The mother is still living at the age of eighty-seven 

years. 

During his youthful days Jerome W. Romaine accompanied his parents on 
their removal to the Pacifi'c coast and completed his education by graduation 
from the high school at Dayton with the class of 1882. He then rode on the 
Yellowstone range in Montana for eleven months and after this experience as a 
cowboy he returned to Dayton, where in the spring of 1883 he was appointed 



178 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

deputy county assessor, which position he filled for three years. He was also 
deputy sheriff for seven months and at the same time occupied the position of 
clerk of the city schools. While filling these offices he devoted every possible 
moment to the reading of law under the direction of Judge R. F. Sturdevant of 
Dayton and in 1887 was admitted to the bar before Judge Langford, judge of 
the United Statess district court. He then went to Conconully, Washington, 
where he practiced law. and in 1889 he was elected county superintendent of 
schools in that county, which position he filled until October, 1889, when he 
removed to Olympia, Washington, to become assistant secretary of the senate 
during the first general assembly. He occupied that position until March, 1890, 
when he removed to Bellingham and entered into a law partnership with Major 
A. S. Cole, under the firm style of Cole & Romaine. That association was main- 
tained for two years, at the end of which time the partnership was discontinued 
and Mr. Romaine practiced alone until he joined Frank H. Richards. Later 
he was a partner of Judge L N. Alaxwell and eventually joined J. R. Crites in 
forming the firm of Crites & Romaine. Later he was joined by Curtis Abram, 
and the firm of Romaine & Abram still exists, occupying a prominent position 
at the Bellingham bar. Almost from the beginning he has been recognized as 
an able lawyer and his constantly expanding powers have brought him promi- 
nently to the front in professional connections. He is ever faithful to his clients, 
fair to his adversaries and candid to the court. In many cases with which he 
has been connected he has exhibited the possession of every faculty of which a 
lawyer may be proud — skill in presentation of his own evidence, extraordinary 
ability in cross-examination, persuasiveness before the jury, strong grasp of 
every feature of the case, ability to secure favorable rulings from the judge, 
unusual familiarity with human nature and untiring industry. In 1898 he was 
elected county attorney of Whatcom county and filled that position until Novem- 
ber, 1899, when he resigned. 

Mr. Romaine has aside from his law practice been quite extensively con- 
nected with mining interests. He acquired a two-thirds interest in the \Miistler 
group of mines on Slate creek in Washington and has other properties there and 
in the ]\Iount Baker district. He was one of the promoters and stockholders of 
the Bellingham Oyster Company, of which he became secretary. That company 
acquired seven hundred acres of the Samish flats, in which was found a choice 
variety of oyster. Lie likewise became one of the organizers and members of 
the Bellingham Lumber &: Shingle Company of Fairhaven, with a paid up capital 
stock of fifty thousand dollars. This company not only engaged in the manu- 
facture of lumber but also operated a box factory until their plant was burned. 

Mr. Romaine's activity outside of the field of his profession and his business 
connections is in the line of politics. He is a recognized republican leader in 
Whatcom county, has served as the secretary of the county central committee and 
also of the state committee. In 1891 he was secretary of the Whatcom county 
board of tide land appraisers. In 1905 he was elected the first mayor of Belling- 
ham after the consolidation of the four towns constituting this city, and remained 
in that position until January, 1907. He was then elected a member of the state 
legislature, in which he served for one term. 

Mr. Romaine has been married twice. On the 21st of July, 1898, in Bell- 
ingham, he wedded Marion Alma Cole, who passed away the following year, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 179 

leaving an infant daughter, Lecil Alma, who is now eighteen years of age. She 
is a graduate of the high school of Bellingham, then attended the State Normal 
Schorl and is now a student at the University of Washington. On the 23d of 
June, 1915, in Bellingham, Mr. Romaine was married to Mrs. Martha B. Cole. 
His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church and fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Benevolent Protective Order 
of EFcs and the Alasonic fraternity, having attained high rank in the last named 
organization. He is a past high priest of Bellingham Chapter, No. 12, R. A. M., 
is no\v commander of Hesperus Commandery, No. 8, and is a past wise master 
of St. Andrews Chapter of the Rose Croix No. 3. He has taken the various 
degrees of the York and Scottish Rites and is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. 
Natuie endowed him with keen mentality and he has used his powers wisely and 
well, his ability bringing him to a point of leadership in professional circles and 
also in public connections. 



VAN OGLE. 



There is something fascinating in the story of the pioneer — the man wIto 
faces difficulties, braves dangers and endures hardships. It was into a wild 
western region that \'an Ogle came when in 1853 he made his way to Washing- 
ton and his life history contains the story of warfare with the Indians as well 
as of the contest with material conditions. In both he won victory and in the 
conduct of his business affairs he became eventually one of the extensive hop 
growers of the state, winning thereby a substantial measure of success that now 
enables him to live retired. He is today one of Washington's most venerable 
citizens, having passed the ninety-first milestone on life's journey, his birth having 
occurred in Buckeye, Adams county, Ohio. September 21, 1825. He was but 
ten years of age when the family went to Indiana in 1835 and there he was 
reared amid frontier conditions, having the opportunity to attend school for only 
three months. Attracted by the west, he made his way across the plains by 
way of the Natchez Pass to Olympia, Washington, in 1853, traveling with a 
train of thirty-eight wagons. On reaching this section of the country the party 
scattered and Mr. Ogle made his way to Olympia, after which he soon secured 
a claim at Mound Prairie, where he remained for a year. He then returned to 
Olympia and a year later enlisted for service in the Indian wars of 185s and 
1856. In the latter year he was first Heutenant of Company B and it was during 
that period of his service that Quyemeth, the l)rothcr of Lcsohi and chief of all 
chiefs and a much wanted outlaw, agreed to surrender to \;ui Ogle and James 
Longmire. The man surrendered but was killed by an unknown hand while 
in the custody of his captors in the governor's office. Mr. Ogle was conncc'cd 
with the volunteer army, which was disbanded in 1856. when the Indians were 
defeated on Connells Prairie. He afterward acted as adjutant under Governor 
Stevens, the first territorial governor of Washington, who had also come to this 
state in 1853 and who was afterward killed while serving in the Civil war. Hie 
territorial legislature passed a bill to pay the enlisted soldiers who fought against 



180 WASHINGTON, VvEST OF THE CASCADES 

the Indians two dollars per day and Mr. Ogle received the money for his service 
in i<S55 but was never paid for his service in 1856. 

He remained in Olympia until 1859 ^"^ then, taking a claim in the Puyallup 
valley, began raising hops, finding soil and climate particularly adapted to that 
crop. Success in large measure attended his efforts and in 1882 his sale of hops 
netted him forty-four thousand dollars, at which time he had ninety-eight acres 
under cultivation. He had upon his place six drying houses and he employed 
many pickers during the season. He was the largest grower of hops in the 
northwest save the Meeker Company, which was an incorporated company and 
had three hundred acres of land. Each year he sent between six and seven car 
loads of hops to London and the careful management of his business affairs, 
combined with his unfaltering enterprise, brought to him very substantial pros- 
perity. In 1896 he left the valley for Douglas county in eastern Washington, 
where he secured a homestead claim on Badger mountain. In 1910. however, 
he retired to Orting, where he and his wife have since made their home. He 
is one of the honored as well as venerable citizens of his part of the state. He 
has remarkable health and vigor for one of his years and takes care of his garden 
himself. His memory is also clear and he recalls readily to mind the events of 
pioneer days. 

Mr. Ogle was first married in 1866, when Miss ]\Iary Kelley became his 
M-ife. She had arrived in this state in 1864, coming from Illinois. She passed 
away in 1879 and the two children born of that marriage both died in childhood. 
In 1882 Mr. Ogle wedded ]\Irs. Annie Edmunds, who by her former marriage 
had four children, whom ^Ir. Ogle legally adopted, they taking his full name — 
A'an Ogle — as their surname. John E. and Harry E. Van Ogle are both mar- 
ried. Annie E. is the wife of a Mr. Weisling, an attorney in Seattle, and Susan 
E. Vining is married and resides at San Jose, California. 

Mr. Ogle is a member of the Masonic fraternity, having joined lodge No. i 
at Olympia, and also belongs to the Christian church and in the teachings of 
these organizations are found the principles which have governed him in all 
life's relations. In politics he has always been a democrat but never an office 
seeker, preferring always to concentrate his efforts upon his business affairs. 
He was formerly closely associated with commercial activities in Tacoma in 
addition to his hop growing and agricultural interests in western and in eastern 
\\ ashington, but with the advance of years he put aside business cares and is 
now living retired, enjoying a well earned rest. His life work has been of great 
value to the state not only in suppressing the Indian uprisings but in utilizing 
the natural resources of Washington and promoting its progress and prosperity 



JOHN H. NEEF. 



John H. Neef, commissioner of public works and city engineer of Hoquiam, 
came to Washington in the fall of 1910 and at once entered the service of the 
engineering department, although he has not been in the service continuously. 
He was born in Portage, Wisconsin, in 1875, and was reared and educated in 
that state. He supplemented his public school course by study in the engineer- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 181 

ing department of the State University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he was 
graduated with the class of 1904. His father, Henry Neef, removed to that 
state from Buffalo, New York, in i860 and at the time of the Civil war enlisted 
for active service at the front as a private in an Ohio regiment. Following the 
close of hostilities he became actively interested in farming in Wisconsin, con- 
tinuing in the business for a number of years, when he was elected county 
treasurer of Columbia county. While in Ohio he married Helvetia Reese, of 
that state, and the parents carefully trained their children, giving them the best 
opportunities possible. 

Following his graduation John H. Neef became connected with the engin- 
eering department of the Chicago, ^Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company, 
with which he remained for several years, with offices at different times in 
Chicago, Minneapolis and Kansas City. He also worked at various points on 
the Milwaukee system in the engineering department, having charge of bridge 
building and the erection of new stations. He was thus actively connected with 
railroad construction until 1910, when he left Wisconsin and came direct to 
Hoc[uiam. Here he soon obtained a position in the city engineering department 
and so continued until July, 1912, after which he began operating independ- 
ently along the line of his chosen vocation. He had charge of considerable 
improvement work in Cosmopolis and afterward opened an office in the Lum- 
bermen's Bank building of Hoquiam. In December, 1914, he was elected com- 
missioner of public works and was appointed city engineer, street commis- 
sioner and building inspector. He also had charge of the city garbage col- 
lections and disposal. He has made an excellent record in office and all inter- 
ested speak in terms of high regard concerning his official service. 

In 1907, in Madison, Wisconsin, Mr. Neef was married to Miss Grace Marie 
Bradley, also a student in the University of Wisconsin. They have two chil- 
dren, Virginia Pearl and Marion Helvetia. Mr. Neef became a Mason in South 
Dakota and he is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He 
exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
progressive republican party and does everything in his power to promote its 
interests and secure the adoption of its principles. His professional service, 
independent and official, has brought him a substantial measure of prosperity 
and has gained him a well deserved reputation as one of the leading engineers 
of his part of the state. 



THOMAS C. PERRY. 



Thomas C. Perry, organizer and promoter of the Goldbar Mercantile Com- 
pany and thus well known as an enterprising business man of Goldbar. was 
born in Surrey, England, at Kingston-upon-Thames. December 2, 1879, a son 
of Edward and Elizabeth (Ford) Perry, who were also natives of that coun- 
try. The father became a contractor and builder there and continued a resident 
of England throughout his entire life. He passed away in 1904. at the age of 
forty-eight years, and the mother is still living there at the age of sixty years. 
In their family were seven children, one of whom is now deceased. The others 



182 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

are : Maude, Eva Evelyn, Lottie Jane, Daphne Bertha and Percival WilHam, 
all born in England ; and Thomas C, of this review. 

Thomas C. Perry is the eldest of the family. In his boyhood days he 
attended the schools of England, after which he turned his attention to the 
grocery business, with which he was connected in his native country for twelve 
years. On the 2d of March, 1907, he came to America and first settled in 
Boston, Massachusetts, where he entered the employ of Henry Siegle, remain- 
ing in the carpet department of the store for two years. The opportunities 
afforded in the northwest, however, led him to come to Washington in 1909, 
and he spent several months in Seattle. For two years he was manager of a 
general store. He next went to Cleo, Washington, where he conducted an4 
managed a grocery department for a short period. In June, 191 2, he arrived 
at Goldbar and joined Mr. McKay in establishing the Goldbar Mercantile Com- 
pany. He has developed the business from a very small start, making it one 
of the leading commercial industries of Goldbar, having a well appointed store 
in which he carries a large and carefully selected stock. 

On the 17th of September, 19 12, in Tacoma, Washington, Mr. Perry was 
united in marriage to Miss Jane Elizabeth Wiley, a daughter of Captain Adam 
Wiley, well known as captain of the police force of Tacoma. Mr. and Mrs. 
Perry have a child, Francis Ford, who was born at Goldbar in February, 1914. 
Mr. and Mrs. Perry hold membership in the Episcopal church and he is also 
connected through membership relations with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He came to the northwest without means but he possessed the sub- 
stantial qualities of determination, energy and industry and through upright 
dealing, persistency of purpose and close application he has steadily worked his 
way upward until he is one of the leading business men of Goldbar. 



JAMES HART. 



James Hart, a well known business man of Auburn, was born in Stafford- 
shire, England, July 18, 1848, a son of George and Louisa (Dainby) Hart, the 
former born in Lancashire, England, March 15, 1816, and the latter in Staf- 
fordshire in 181 2. Their marriage was celebrated in their native country about 
1845 and their son James was their only child. For more than twenty years the 
father was a railroad inspector and afterward became a prominent railroad con- 
tractor, while for some years he had charge of the Lancashire & Yorkshire Rail- 
way under the famous Thomas Brassey, father of Lord Brassey. Later ISIr. 
Hart engaged in railroad contracting on his own account and so continued until 
he retired from active business life in 1880, when he removed to Southport, Lan- 
cashire, England. He was quite prominent as a citizen of that place and served 
as a member of the city council from 1880 until 1884. On the ist of June, 1885, 
he and his wife arrived at the home of their son and with him spent their remain- 
ing days, the death of the father occurring in April, 1888, while the mother passed 
away February 18, 1905, having reached the notable old age of about ninety-two 
years. 

Having mastered the elementary branches of learning in the public schools of 




JAMES HART 



, THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDBN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 185 

his native town, James Hart continued his education in a college near ]\Ianches- 
ter, England, until 1862, when he entered upon a two years' clerkship in the 
canal department of the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railroad. He next became an 
apprentice of Mr. Maxwell, an architect and civil engineer of Bury, Lancashire, 
and his thorough training during the succeeding five years brought to him a com- 
prehensive knowledge of the profession. He then returned to the Lancashire & 
Yorkshire Railroad, holding an important position in that department where all 
plans and specifications for stations, warehouses, machine shops and engine houses 
were made. After several years thus passed, during which he had charge of 
the ofiice under Sturges Meek, chief engineer, he was appointed to take charge of 
the building and sanitary improvements in the borough of Salford, adjoining the 
city of Manchester, and was also appointed engineer of the Pendleton division, 
which is the largest district, under the direction of the Salford town council. Dur- 
ing the seven years in which he filled that office he had entire charge of the 
drainage and sewer system, the paving and flagging of the highways of that 
district, the construction of new streets and the repairing and maintaining of the 
roads, the town improvements and the sanitary reconstruction throughout the 
entire borough of Salford. He was next appointed borough engineer of St. 
Helens, in Lancashire, having control of the streets and highways and of the 
construction of a large system of tramways, besides repairing an entire system of 
sewage and drainage and town improvements. He served for seven years in the 
latter position, after which he became an applicant for the office of city engineer 
of Liverpool, was one of the six candidates selected, and was the one finally 
chosen by a special committee for the appointment, but in the ratification of the 
appointment by the city council he was beaten by a small majority. He was then 
offered the appointment by the crown agent of the colonies to go to Lagos, on 
the west coast of Africa, as chief civil engineer. Lie passed the necessary gov- 
ernment examination, but owing to the objection of his father to this move he 
declined to undertake this serA'ice because of the unhealthful conditions of Lagos. 
In 18S0 he was admitted as associate member of the Institute of Civil Engineers 
of England, and still holds his membership in that organization. He was also 
a member of the Municipal and Sanitary Engineers Society of London, the 
Mechanical Engineer Society of London and the Liverpool Engineering Society. 
In April, 1884, Mr. Hart left his native land for America. Arriving at 
Tacoma. Washington, on the 29th of that month, he acquired a tract of land 
in the White river valley, in Slaughter, now the Christopher precinct, and at once 
began clearing and improving the land. The town of Slaughter, now the city of 
Auburn, had not yet been founded. About 1886 Mr. Hart was elected justice 
of the peace and has served many years in that capacity. He has also filled the 
office of school director for a number of years, and the cause of education has 
found in him a warm and earnest friend. At the time he settled in King county 
there were few roads cut through the timber, and one had generally to follow the 
old Indian trails. From the first Mr. Hart has devoted much attention to drain- 
age and to the construction of good roads in the White river valley. In 1886. 
when Pierce county made an effort to secure possession of the south end of King 
county, he was one of the strongest opponents of the scheme, and at the request 
of county authorities and of John Collins, mayor of Seattle, he went before the 
legislature at Olympia to oppose the transfer, and after a bitter fight King county 



Vol. ni— 10 



186 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

succeeded in retaining possession of one of its most valuable districts. Road con- 
struction and drainage have been the two special subjects which have elicited Mr. 
Hart's particular attention for a number of years. He was also instrumental 
in assisting in the organization of the State Dairy Association and the King 
County Horticultural Society, and in securing legislation to encourage these 
industries. For one term he was vice president of the State Dairy Asso- 
ciation and was president of the King County Horticultural Society in 1901 
and 1902-3. The Lake Washington canal scheme and the lowering of the lake 
in order to assist in the drainage of the White river and surrounding valleys and 
the reclamation of a large area of land, have always claimed a share of Mr. 
Hart's attention. He appeared before the United States river and harbor com- 
mission to point out the necessity, during the construction of the work, of 
providing for sufficient and capacious outlet for the enormous amount of water 
flowing into the Sound from the south end of King county, which submerges that 
district for many months during the winter. In 1890 he was appointed superin- 
tendent of the construction of the King county hospital, one of the first fireproof 
constructions in the state, and in the face of numerous difficulties and objections 
to the methods of construction, it is now admitted to be a first-class, well designed 
and well built edifice. 

In politics Mr. Hart has taken a deep and abiding interest since 1886, and 
many times has delivered campaign addresess in the southern portion of the 
county in behalf of the republican party and its principles. Yet he does not 
believe it to be the duty of any citizen to adhere strictly to a party in the selec- 
tion of precinct, county or city officers, believing that the fitness and qualifications 
of the candidates should be the first consideration at these times. On the 5th 
of April, 1894, Mr. Hart was admitted to the bar by Judge Langley, in open 
court, the examining board being composed of W. H. Moore, afterwards superior 
judge ; George Fortson, one of the heroes of the Philippine war, who lost his 
life at Pasig; and E. P. Dole, the present attorney general of the Hawaiian islands. 
May 20, 1909, he was admitted to practice before the United States supreme 
court and September 22,, 191 5, before the United States district court. In 1887 
Mr. Hart opened an office in Auburn, and since 1894 has been engaged in law 
practice, having secured a good clientage. In the conduct of his cases he has 
shown marked legal ability and a thorough understanding of the principles of 
jurisprudence as well as careful preparation. He is the oldest business citizen 
of Auburn, his conection with the town being antedated only by the W. R. Bal- 
lard family, who were the founders of the town. Mr. Hart has labored most 
earnestly for the welfare, improvement and progress of this place. He prepared 
the plans for the Auburn school building and also for the Presbyterian church, 
and he likewise made the plans for the school buildings at Pialschie and Des 
Moines and for the Presbyterian church at Kent. He has ever taken a deep 
interest in educational matters in this county, realizing how important is good 
mental training as a preparation for life's responsible duties. 

In 1885, in King county, occurred the marriage of Mr. Hart and Miss Eliza 
Beaumont, who was born in Kent, England, in 1854. A son, Stanley Beaumont, 
was born to them in 1888, and died March 6, 1906. He was named for the 
great explorer who was a friend of Mr. Hart. They have a daughter. Rose Mabel, 
who was born March 28, 1889, ^'^^ is a pianist of marked ability. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 187 

Mr. Hart is a member of the Pacific Northwest Society of Engineers, also a 
member of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, and for a considerable time has 
been employed as the right of way and special agent of the Snoqualmie Falls & 
White River Company for the great scheme of utilizing a considerable portion 
of the stream of White river near Buckley as the means of generating electricity 
for power and lighting purposes, Lake Tapp's area having been acquired as the 
reservoir for storage purposes. It is expected that this great plant of sixty thou- 
sand horse power will be in operation in about two years and will have cost over 
two million dollars in its construction. It would be difficult to find in King county, 
among those whose residence extends over no greater period than that of Mr. 
Hart, one who has done so much practical work for the improvement, progress 
and promotion of this section of the state. His knowledge of civil engineering 
and his recognition of the possibilities of land through the agency of improve- 
ment and cultivation, have made his labors of the greatest value in public work, 
while as an architect he has done much to promote the pleasing conditions of 
various towns throughout this locality. He came to America determined that in 
the opportunities of the'northwest he would find a good business opening and 
he has done so. He possesses strength of character as well as sterling purpose 
and his career has ever been such as to commend him to public confidence. 



ALBERT C. SENKER. 



Albert C. Senker, conducting a profitable cigar and tobacco business at Bell- 
ingham, was born in Saxony, Germany, August 28, 1874. and there remained 
through the first seven years of his life, after which his mother, Ida Marie 
Senker. came with her family to the new world, establishing their home on a 
farm near Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1881. Albert C. Senker attended the public 
schools of that locality until 1884, when a removal was made by the family to 
Portland. Oregon, where he resumed his studies, continuing in the ])ublic schools 
there until he reached the age of thirteen years. At that time his textbooks were 
put aside and the lessons of life which he has since learned have been gained 
in the school of experience — often a difficult but always a thorough school. 

Between the ages of thirteen and sixteen Mr. Senker worked on his step- 
father's farm near Portland, Oregon, but desirous of engaging in other pursuits, 
he then left home and began learning the cigar maker's trade in the establish- 
ment of Charles Shaefiter in Bellingham. A year was spent in that connection, 
after which he returned to Portland, Oregon, where he completed his appren- 
ticeship to the cigar maker's trade in the establishment of Keller & Schwert. Tn 
December, 1894, he returned to Bellingham. where he engaged in the manufac- 
ture of cigars until 1900. In that year he was appointed manager of the retail 
cigar store of Jacob Beck and in 1902 he became manager of Beck's Theater, 
now called The American, which was erected in 1902 and was owned by Jacob 
Beck, who is now deceased. In 1908 Mr. Senker bought out a cigar and tobacco 
businesss at 109 West Holly street, Bellingham. which he has since successfully 
conducted, and he is now considered one of the most prosperous merchants in his 



188 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

line in the west, having developed his business to extensive and profitable 
proportions. 

In Bellingham, November 22. 1896, Mr. Senker was married to Miss Nellie 
J. W. Swearingen, and to them has been born a daughter, Halcie Gertrude, a 
graduate of Bellingham high school, class of 1917. • 

Mr. Senker exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the republican party. He is identified with the Woodmen of the World 
and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and in Masonry he has attained 
high rank, having reached the thirty-second degree in the consistory, while with 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands of the desert, and he 
also has the distinction of being a Knight Templar. He is well known as an 
enterprising and progressive business man and citizen. He certainly deserves 
much credit for what he has accomplished, for from the age of thirteen years 
he has been dependent upon his own resources, working his way steadily upward 
through his close application, persistency of purpose and indefatigable industr}^ 



J. P. CHRISTENSEN. 



J. P. Christensen, cashier of the Citizens National Bank of Port Angeles, 
the only national bank in Clallam county, was born in Denmark, October 16, 
1865. His father, Thomas Christensen, also a native of that country, carried 
on business as a contractor and did military duty as a soldier in the war of 
1864. He married Marie Andersen and both have now passed away. 

Their only child, J. P. Christensen, pursued his education in the schools 
of Copenhagen, Denmark, to the age of fourteen years, when necessity seemed 
to make it imperative that he provide for his own living. He secured a posi- 
tion as messenger boy in the private bank of ]\Iyer & Nathanson, with whom 
he remained for four years, during which time he was promoted from one 
position to another and gained a comprehensive knowledge of the banking busi- 
ness in its various departments. He afterward became a bookkeeper in the 
Royal Danish Navy and served in that capacity for six years. He then 
resigned his position to come to the United States, making his way to New 
York city, where he remained for a year. In the spring of 1890 he came to 
Port Angeles, where he followed various pursuits in connection with mercan- 
tile and manufacturing interests and in each proved his ability and trustworthi- 
ness. In 1904 he was elected cashier of the Citizens National Bank of Port 
Angeles, which position he has since successfully filled, and he is now well 
known as a representative of financial interests in his adopted city. He belongs 
to the W^ashington State Bankers' Association and to the American Bankers' 
Association and he is continually studying those questions which bear upon the 
financial interests and conditions of the country. 

Mr. Christensen is pleasantly situated in his home life. He was married 
in Port Angeles, April 29, 1890, to Miss Laura Olson, a native of Denmark, 
and socially they are well known and prominent in the city where they reside. 
Mr. Christensen votes with the democratic party. He has membership with the 
Commercial Club and his interest in community affairs is not of a superficial 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES ]89 

character but arises from a public-spirited devotion to the general good. He 
has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, 
for here he has found the opportunities which he sought and in their utilization 
has achieved success. 



ALBERT A. STITZ. 



Close study and broad experience have made Albert A. Stitz an authority 
upon many questions relative to the propagation and cultivation of plants and 
today he is conducting a successful and growing business at Everett as pro- 
prietor of the Rucker Avenue Greenhouse. He was born in La Fayette, 
Indiana, March 13, 1876. His father, Rudolph Stitz, a native of Germany, 
came to America during the latter '30s and settled in Chicago, where he owned 
one hundred and sixty acres of land where the Marshall Field store now stands, 
in the very center of the business district of the city. He afterward sold his 
property and removed to Indiana about 1850, becoming a pioneer of Tippecanoe 
county, living but six miles from the Tippecanoe battlefield and three miles 
from the place where the Indian chief Tecumseh was captured. For a con- 
siderable period Rudolph Stitz made his home at La Fayette, Indiana, on the 
banks of the Wabash. He died in 1898, on the day when Admiral Dewey cap- 
tured Manila. He had rendered aid to his country in the Civil war as a black- 
smith. His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church, his political views 
those of the republican party and he was a man of high standing in his com- 
munity, his sterling worth gaining for him the warm regard of all with whom 
he was associated. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Daum- 
gardt, was born in Germany and came to America alone when sixteen years of 
age, eight weeks being spent as a passenger on the sailing vessel which brought 
her to the new world. 

Albert A. Stitz pursued his education in the jmblic schools of La Fayette, 
Indiana, but when a lad of fourteen began to earn his living in the cmjjloy of 
his uncle, John Klemm, a florist of Arlington Heights, a suburb of Chicago. 
Here he remained for about ten years, becoming thoroughly acquainted with 
every phase of the business connected with the propagation and cultivation of 
flowers and shrubs, for the uncle conducted a nursery a swell as a florist's busi- 
ness. After his marriage Mr. Stitz clerked in a general merchandise store at 
Arlington Heights, after which he established a greenhouse at Forest City, Iowa, 
where he remained for three years. Lie then sold Iiis business and returned 
to Arlington .Heights, where he spent some time but at length lie took up the 
painting and contracting business in Chicago. Tn October. i(;c)5. he came to 
Washington, arriving in Everett an entire stranger. lie was first employed 
in the Weyerhaeuser mills at a salary of one dollar and seventy-five cents ])er 
day. He later worked in the various lines until 1910, when he established hi.s 
present business on Rucker avenue. He has four large greenhouses under glass, 
covering a floor space fifty-four by seventy feet. He raises all kinds of plants. 
flowers, shrubs, etc. He sells entirely to the local trade and is recognized as 
one of the leading florists of Everett and that section of the state. 



190 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

At Arlington Heights, Illinois, on the nth of June, 1899, Mr. Stitz was 
united in marriage to Miss Theresa Lorenzen, a native of that place and a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Lorenzen, who were early settlers there. Her 
father is now deceased, while the mother makes her home with Mr. a(nd Mrs. 
Stitz, who have become the parents of four children, one of whom has passed 
away. The others are : Edna S., who was born at Forest City, Iowa, October 
4, 1902; Fern Viola, born in Everett, June 2, 1908; and Everett Lawrence, born 
March 14, 1910. The daughter Mildred is deceased. 

In politics Mr. Stitz is a stalwart republican, giving unfaltering support to 
the party and its principles. He belongs to the Emanuel Lutheran church and 
throughout his entire life he has displayed many substantial qualities which 
have won for him high and enduring regard. He started out in the business 
world a poor boy at a salary of eight dollars per month and board, working 
from sunrise to sunset. Progressiveness and industry have been basic elements 
of his business advancement. He is much pleased with the west and the typi- 
cal spirit of western progress and enterprise finds exemplification in his life. 



GENERAL ROSSELL GALBRAITH O'BRIEN. 

The military organization of Washington was attributable to the efforts of 
General R. G. O'Brien and with its civic development he was also associated, 
ranking with the leading and prominent citizens and officials of Olympia for 
many years. A native of Ireland, General O'Brien was born in the city of 
Dublin, November 27, 1846, and traced his ancestry back to Brian Borough, 
who figured prominently in connection with early Irish history. A less remote 
ancestor was the Earl of Inchquin. In the maternal line he traced his ancestry 
back to the Stuarts of Scotland, who entered Ireland upon their expulsion from 
their native Highlands. The father of General O'Brien suffered financial re- 
verses in his native country and in 1850 sought to retrieve his fortunes by 
emigrating with his family to the United States. He sailed for New Orleans 
and thence proceeded to Cincinnati but afterward purchased several thousand 
acres of land in Jersey county, Illinois, but he had no practical experience and 
later sold his farm property, taking up his abode in Jerseyville. There he passed 
away in 1852, leaving his widow and four children in straightened financial cir- 
cumstances. The two sons were placed upon farms, while the mother sup- 
ported her daughters by teaching school in Carlinville and in Springfield, 
Illinois. 

General O'Brien was but six years of age at the time of his father's death. 
After three years spent upon a farm he returned to his mother and had the 
privilege of attending school for two years. He then again began working on 
a farm in Sangamon county, Illinois, for his board and clothes, but the hard- 
ships of his lot caused him to return to his mother after eighteen months. The 
family removed to Chicago about i860 and General O'Brien there obtained a 
position in one of the leading retail dry goods stores of the city. Two years 
passed in that connection, at the end of which time he became a soldier of the 
Union army in the Civil war. He had previously joined the Ellsworth Zouaves 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 191 

of Chicago and there received the military training that quahfied him for serv- 
ice as Heutenant in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth IlHnois Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He recruited that company and with the command went to 
the front, being on active duty in west Tennessee and west Kentucky. He par- 
ticipated in the campaign against the Confederate general, Price, in his famous 
raid in Missouri in 1864 and took part in a number of hotly contested engage- 
ments. At length he was mustered out with his regiment in Chicago, October 
25, 1864. 

When his military service had ended General O'Brien entered the employ 
of the Chicago & Alton Railroad Company as receiving clerk in the freight 
department, which position he filled for two years, when he engaged with G. 
W. and C. W. Sherwood, schoolbook publishers and manufacturers of school 
furniture, continuing in that connection until 1870. General O'Brien then 
nought a home in the northwest. Coming to Olympia with Governor Edward 
S. Salomon, he was appointed assistant assessor of internal revenue and was 
afterv/ard deputy collector in that department for the territory, serving in the 
latter position until 1875. In 1876 he was appoined clerk of the supreme court 
•of the territory and United States commissioner, which positions he held for 
twelve years or until the change of administration, when he resigned and en- 
tered the real estate and insurance business under the name of the Olympia 
Real Estate, Loan & Insurance Agency. In this he was subsequently asso- 
ciated with S. C. Woodrufif. In 1878 he was elected quartermaster general 
and in 1881 became adjutant general, thus winning the title by which he was 
commonly known in his later years. He figured prominently in connection with 
the military organization of Washington. He organized the first company at 
Olympia of the National Guard of the state in 1882 and personally commanded 
it until a qualified commander could be secured. He then continued the work 
of organizing companies of the National Guard in the state until it had reached 
its present standard of strength and efficiency, and he is justly termed the father 
of the National Guard of Washington. He believed fully in a thorough mili- 
tary organization and training and his work in that connection was most im- 
portant. Aside from that he held some civic offices, having been elected a mem- 
ber of the city council from the second ward of Olympia in 1883 and serving 
until 1 89 1, when he was chosen mayor of his city, proving most capable as its 
chief executive. 

In 1878 General O'Brien was united in marriage to Miss Fanny Orlo Steele, 
a native of Oregon City and a daughter of Dr. A. H. Steele, a respected pioneer 
of 1849. They had three children: Helen Steele, who is the wife of George 
A. Aetzel, a prominent lumber merchant of Olympia, and has two children, 
Charles Alden and Virginia; Rossell Lloyd, who was graduated from the en- 
gineering department of the University of Washington in 1909 and for three 
years had charge of different sections of highway construction for the state, 
but died in 1912; and Florence Blackler, who died in 1883. 

General O'Brien was an active member of the Grand Army of the Repulilic 
and of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion. lie likewise figured promi- 
nently in Masonic circles and at one time served as master of Olympia Lodge, 
No. I, F. & A. M. He was likewise venerable master of Olympia Lodge of 
Perfection, No. 2, A. A. S. R., was wise master of Robert Bruce Chapter of 



192 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

the Rose Croix and eminent commander of De Molay Council of Kadosh. The 
honorary thirty-third degree was conferred upon him in recognition of his 
splendid service and excellent work in behalf of Masonry. He was an active 
member of the Episcopal church and was known for his fine tenor voice and 
musical abihty. He passed away in California, February i8, 1914, after living 
for some time in the south. His name was long an honored one in the state. 
He took a prominent and helpful part in shaping public progress along various 
lines and left the impress of his individuality for good upon the history of the 
commonwealth. 



GEORGE H. WILSON. 



George H. Wilson, of the Wilson Grocery Company, Inc., was born in Chari- 
ton county, Missouri, January 26, 1883, a son of A. B. and Rosetta A. (Enyeart) 
Wilson, who were natives of Illinois and Indiana respectively. When a youth of 
fourteen the father accompanied his parents on their removal to Kansas and in 
her girlhood the mother became a resident of Chariton county, Missouri. The 
Wilsons were pioneer settlers of McPherson county, Kansas, and following his 
marriage A. B. Wilson took up his abode in Kingman county, that state, where he 
engaged in general farming. There he lived until the spring of 1895, when he 
again removed to McPherson county, living on his father's old homestead until 
1897. On the 30th of November of that year he started overland for Arkansas 
with two wagons and six horses. He took with him his family of six children 
and the family home was established in Johnson county, Arkansas, where the 
father engaged in farming until 1904. He then removed to Washington in 1905 
and has since lived retired in Everett, having now reached the age of sixty years. 
His wife, who was educated in Indiana, is still living at the age of fifty-eight. In 
their family were seven children, of whom George H. Wilson was the second in 
order of birth. 

In the public schools of Kansas George H. Wilson obtained his education 
and through the period of his boyhood worked on his father's farm. He spent 
some time at the St. Louis World's Fair and then came to the coast, arriving in 
Everett, Noverhber 6, 1904. On the 3d of ^lay, 1905. he went to work for 
the firm of Wilde, Metzger & Requa, with whom he continued for eight years, 
when he purchased the Riverside store and organized the Wilson Grocery Com- 
pany, which from the beginning has proven a profitable undertaking. He carries 
a stock valued at five thousand dollars and he employs three clerks. He gives 
his personal attention to the business and his close application and unfaltering 
enterprise are the salient factors in his growing success. 

On the 3d of June, 1908, Mr. Wilson was married to Miss Ruth A. Banks, of 
Los Angeles, California, a daughter of George E. and Julia (Goodhue) Banks, 
formerly of Everett and now residents of Los Angeles. Her father located in 
Everett in pioneer times and was one of the leading attorneys of the city for a 
number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have become the parents of two chil- 
dren: Herbert Ronald, born May 23, 191 1 ; and Frances Louise, born October 2, 
1914. 




M^^ 




-^e-<t^<^ 



■ THE NEW YO?^K 
PUBLIC UBRARY 



I 






WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 195 

Politically Mr. Wilson follows an independent course. His religious faith is 
that of, the Methodist Episcopal church and he is interested in all those forces 
which work for the uplift of the individual and the upbuilding of the community. 
He belongs to the Riverside Commercial Club and to the Merchants' Association 
and he is regarded as one of the most enterprising business men of his section 
of the state. Energy and determination have characterized his career at every 
point and he has at all times displayed a laudable ambition that has enabled him 
to push forward in spite of obstacles and gain for himself the creditable place 
that he now occupies as one of the leading grocers of Everett. 



WILLIAM NATHANIEL BELL. 

William Nathaniel Bell, of Welsh descent, was born on a farm near Edwards- 
ville, Illinois, March 6, 1817; married to Sarah Ann Peter, June, 1838, at 
Alton, Illinois ; died at Seattle, Washington, September 6, 1887. 

Nathaniel Bell, his grandfather, was born in the state of North Carolina, 
Bates county, March 15, 1755. At the age of nineteen years he enlisted as a 
soldier in the war of the revolution, and served until near the close of the war. 
In 1819 he moved to the state of Illinois and settled in St. Clair county. He 
died near Edwardsville, Madison county, Illinois, January 17, 1835, in the 
eightieth year of his age. 

Jesse Bell, his father, was born November .j 6, 1779; died April i, 1835; 
was a native of North CaroHna ; settled in 1811 n^ar the present site of Edwards- 
ville on the farm where he died. He was the father of sixteen children. Was 
twice married; each wife bore him eight children. His first marriage was on 
his twenty-first birthday, November .16, 1800. His second wife, Susan Meacham, 
mother of William N. Bell, was a native of Vermont. Jesse Bell took an active 
part in the war with Great Britain. He was also one of the frontier guards 
known as the rangers. 

William N. Bell, the subject of this sketch, when about thirty-five years of 
age, and the father of six children, two of whom he had buried in Illinois, 
started with his wife and four remaining children, across the plains by emigrant 
wagon and ox teams, leaving lUinois in the spring of 1851. Reaching Oregon, 
he joined the few first pioneers of Seattle, taking the schooner "Exact" from 
Portland, Oregon, landing at Alki Poinl, Puget Sound, on November 13, 1851, 
twenty-four persons in all, twelve adults and twelve children. The following 
spring, 1852, the party moved across the bay and located the city of Seattle, 
Washington, taking up government claims of 320 acres each. William N. Bell's 
claim lay to the north and for many years was known as "Belltown." After 
the Indian war, early in 1856, he moved his family to Napa, California, where 
his wife died, June 27, 1856, leaving him with five children, a son having been 
born in Seattle, Austin Americus, the second white boy born in Seattle, born 
January 9, 1854, in the original home in Belltown, a log house. Afterward, 
on the same spot, a frame house was built, with lumber from the first sawmill. 
It was burned by the Indians at the beginning of the war. At that time he had 
moved with his family into part of a house he owned, sharing the other side of 



196 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

the house with the Holgate family. This house was on the corner of Second 
avenue and Cherry street, where the Hoge building now stands. This property 
was in the C. D. Boren claim. William N. Bell had a deed to the lot from Mr. 
Boren and owned it from about 1856 to 1875, living in it after it had been re- 
modeled until after the latter date, when he built his last home in Belltown on 
First avenue between Bell and Battery streets, living there until his death in 
1887. After losing his wife in 1856 he moved into Napa city and kept his 
children together for some time until his eldest daughter was married. Then 
placing the younger children in school, he spent some time in Virginia City, 
Nevada. In the early '60s he made a trip to Seattle at the request of David 
T. Denny to come and plat his land into town lots. He soon returned to 
California. Finally, about 1870, he again came to Seattle and remained. In 1872 
he went east to Illinois and married Miss Lucy Gamble, a sister of his first wife. 
He was a lifelong Odd Fellow, and a member of Lodge No. 7, of Belltown. He 
was buried in I. O. O. F. cemetery, where he had prepared himself a lot and 
had a monument erected ready for the final inscription of his death. The 
remains of his wife, Sarah Ann Bell, and daughter, Alvina Lavisa Bell, who 
had been buried in Napa valley, California, were removed to Seattle and placed 
in the family lot beside him in 1889. 

W. N. Bell was ever loyal to Seattle and ready to give of his holdings to 
any enterprise that would benefit the city. Two blocks on the waterfront he 
gave to the old barrel factory, stipulating that it was to be used for that purpose 
only. The property should have reverted to the estate, as the agreement was 
not carried out. He also gave a church site in Belltown and other gifts of less 
importance to help the town. Also many poor men were enabled to buy homes 
■on small payments, or no payments for a time during dull times. 

William Nathaniel Bell was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, March 6, 1817; 
died at Seattle, Washington, September 6, 1887; buried in Odd Fellows ceme- 
tery. 

Sarah Ann Peter (Bell), his wife, born October 6, 1819; died June 27, 
1856, in Napa valley, California; remains removed to Odd Fellows cemetery, 
Seattle, Washington, 1889. 

William Nathaniel Bell and Sarah Ann Peter were married in June, 1838, 
at Alton, Illinois. 

The following is a list of their children: 

Martha Ann Bell, born December 5, 1840, in Illinois; died November 9, 
1848, in Illinois. 

Laura Keziah Bell, born November 19, 1842 ; married in Napa valley, Cali- 
fornia, August 29, 1858, to James E. Coffman; died at Seattle, Washington, 
November 15, 1887; buried in I. O. O. F. cemetery, Seattle. 

Susan Frances Bell, born November 17, 1844, in Illinois; died February 17, 
1845, i" Illinois. 

Olive Julia Bell, born March 20. 1846, in Illinois; married to Joseph A. 
Stewart, at Marysville, California, December, 1866. 

Mary Virginia Bell, born August 26, 1847, ""i Illinois; married at Seattle, 
Washington, May 22, 1872, at old Trinity church, by Rev. R. W. Summers, to 
George W. Hall. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 197 

Alvina Lavisa Bell, born February 6, 1851 ; died May 5, 1857, in Napa City, 
California ; the baby on the trip across the plains. 

Austin Americus Bell, born in Seattle, Washington, January 9, 1854; mar- 
ried in Vacaville, California, 1883 or 1884, to Eva Davis. He was the second 
white boy born in Seattle. 

Note : Austin A. Bell lost his mother when but two years of age. He lived 
with his married sisters and at an early age began work in a printing office. In 
later years he was associated with Beriah Brown & Son, of Seattle, for some 
years publishing a paper, The Dispatch, and others. 



SAMUEL M. BRUCE. 



Samuel M. Bruce, an active member of the Bellingham bar, has practiced 
continuously in that city since 1889. Studious habits have made him widely 
familiar with the principles of jurisprudence and his mind, naturally analytical, 
logical and inductive, has enabled him to correctly apply those principles to the 
points in litigation. He has thus won for himself a creditable position as a 
representative of the legal profession in Western Washington. 

He was born in Ross county, Ohio, April 12, 1856, and is a son of Thomas 
J. and Sarah A. Bruce, who in 1864 removed from Ross county to Pickaway 
county, Ohio, where the son attended the public schools until 1866. A further 
removal was then made to Fayette county, Ohio, and after a residence there of 
a year the family went to Sedalia, Missouri, arriving there in December, 1867. 
In 1868 Samuel M. Bruce attended the public schools at Sedalia. He after- 
ward worked upon his father's farm between the ages of thirteen and seventeen 
years, thus limiting his educational opportunities, yet learning many valuable 
lessons in the school of experience. On leaving home he spent six months as 
an employe of a farmer in that vicinity and later he rode the range in south- 
western Missouri and in Kansas for a year. On the expiration of that period he 
returned to Sedalia, Missouri, where he became connected with a drug company 
as buyer of raw ginseng root, devoting a year to that work. He was afterward 
employed as a farm hand in that locality for a year and then went to Ver- 
sailles^ Missouri, where he read law in the office of A. W. Anthony. After 
seven months' reading he asked for examination, which he successfully passed 
and was hcensed to practice law October 3, 1877. After admission to the bar 
he returned to Sedalia, where he engaged in the practice of his profession for a 
year, when failing health caused him to seek a change. He went to Washington 
Courthouse, Ohio, where for a year and a half he worked with his brother at 
the plasterer's trade. In 1880 he removed to Quincy, Illinois, where he becanie 
a partner of George A. Anderson in the law firm of Anderson & Bruce. This 
relationship was short lived, and at the expiration of three months he journeyed 
to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he became a partner of R. W. Rigg under the 
firm style of Bruce & Rigg. This partnership did not long survive and Mr. 
Bruce continued alone in practice until 1889. 

In that year Mr. Bruce came to Bellingham, arriving at his destination in 
the month of December. He opened a law office and practiced alone until 



198 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

August, 1890. when he entered into partnership with O. P. Brown, under the 
firm style of Bruce & Brown. This partnership was maintained until January 
1, 1896, when Mr. Bruce joined H. A. Fairchild as a member of the firm of 
Fairchild & Bruce. They were together until the death of the senior partner 
in 191 1, since which time ^Ir. Bruce has been practicing alone. He is well 
established in professional connections, having now a large and important 
clientage, and the court records bear testimony to his ability in handling involved 
and complex cases. 

Mr. Bruce has been twice married. His first wife was Mary S. Quacken- 
bush, whom he married in 1882. On the ist of ^lay, 1907, in Kansas City, 
Missouri, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Olive M. (Tromanhauser) Leonard, 
widow of John H. Leonard, who for many years was city editor of the Chicago 
Tribune. ]^Ir. Bruce gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
he keeps w^ell informed on the questions and issues of the day. While not seek- 
ing political office he has always been close to his party's deliberations and one of 
its confidential counsellors and has often been intrusted with its concerns. He 
is the onlv surviving member of a committee selected by the citizens of New 
Whatcom to procure the location of the normal school, known now as Belling- 
ham Normal School, on the magnificent site that institute occupies in Bellingham. 
Mr. Bruce was spokesman of the committee, every member of which always 
felt their success in winning the location of the school to be one of the biggest 
benefits and, so far, by odds, the greatest single asset of the city of Bellingham. 
Another most important fact of historical interest connected with the Belling- 
ham Normal School was the creation by Mrs. Olive AL Bruce, then Mrs. Leonard, 
of The Students' Loan Fund, in 1904. Mrs. Leonard wrote the class play for 
1904 : financed it. and from its production at the leading theatre of the city real- 
ized four hundred dollars profit. This sum she and the class presented to the 
trustees of the school to become the origin of a students' loan fund to be loaned 
to students needing financial aid in getting through school, the student to repay 
after becoming able. ]\Iany struggling boys and girls have reaped a benefit from 
this fund, others have added to it until the principal has been many times multi- 
plied, and the benefits from it have been many times bestowed. No loss has so 
far been suffered by failure to repay any of the borrowed principal. Though 
their respective efforts were unrelated, and their action taken while unacquainted 
with each other, both ^Irs. Bruce and Mr. Bruce regard their respective efforts 
in promoting the school as deserving the appreciation of both the community and 
the school. 



ERIC TOHANSON. 



Eric Johanson, a general merchant of Index, was born at Lund, Sweden, 
yiny 24, 1874, a son of Nels and Anna (Nelson) Johanson. For a time the 
father engaged in merchandising in Sweden, in which country he is still living 
at the age of seventy-five years. His wife, however, there passed away in 
191 5, when seventy-five years of age. In their family were six children besides 
our subject: Dr. N. A. Johanson, who is practicing at Seattle; Johan and Ata, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 199 

still lining in Sweden; Mrs. Ann Schertel, living in Index; ]^Irs. Rika Swen- 
sen, also of Index; and Mrs. Eva Zinn, residing in Lund, Sweden. 

Of this family Eric Johanson was the third in order of birth. In his boy- 
hood days he attended the public schools of his native country and after his 
textbooks were put aside he made his initial step in the business world as an 
employe in his father's store, there remaining until 1895, when he went to Lon- 
don, England, where he spent two years, continuing his education in that city. 
In 1898 he left London for America and became a resident of Denver, Colo- 
rado. Later, however, he removed to Greely, Colorado, where he engaged in 
merchandising for five years. In 191 1 he arrivefl in Index. Washington, and 
purchased the general merchandise business which he has since conducted. He 
has steadily developed his business until he is now conducting his interests on 
an extensive scale, carrying a large line of all kinds of merchandise. His busi- 
ness is care/ully and systematically managed and his enterprise and determin- 
ation have been salient elements in his growing success. He today has the 
largest general store in this section and those who wish to achieve success may 
well carefully study the methods that he has followed and the honorable prin- 
ciples which he has followed in the conduct of his mercantile interests. 

On the 4th of May, 1902, in Ouray, Colorado, Mr. Johanson was married 
to Miss Tina Pearson, a daughter of Johan Pearson, a native of Sweden. They 
have two sons: Nels, who was born in Ouray in 1904 and is now attending 
school in Index; and Peary, who was born in Greeley, Colorado, in 1910. Mrs. 
Johanson is a member of the Index school board and belongs to the Degree of 
Pocahontas and to the Rebeccas. 

In politics INIr. Johanson maintains an independent course. He belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, to the Improved Order of Red Men. 
and he also has membership in the Fish and Game Club of Index. He is thor- 
oughly American in spirit and interests, a firm believer in the republican prin- 
ciples upon which the country is based. He believes, moreover, in fair dealing 
with his fellowmen and the integrity of his commercial methods has been one 
of the salient elements in his success. 



PAUL W. HAR\'EY. 



Paul W. Harvey, owner and editor of the Elma Chronicle, was born in 
Columbus, Kansas, in 1888 and in the schools of his native state acquired his 
education. He also entered the newspaper field there in a reportorial capacity 
and in 191 1 he came to W^ishington, selecting Elma as the scene of his future 
labors. There, in connection with Frank Jacobs, he purchased the l-:ima 
Chronicle, a weekly paper which had been established in 1888 by R. M. W'atson. 
who was editor and proprietor until 1895 save that for a brief period it was 
owned and published by J. J. Carney. It afterward passed into possession of 
E. C. Kibbe, who continued the publication of the Chronicle until 1909, when 
he sold out to William Tliney. The paper afterward passed into possession 
of the firm of Boynton cS; Nye and in 191 1 was taken over by the present 
owners, Messrs. Harvey and Jacobs, who have since successfully published the 



200 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

paper. Their office is supplied with modern equipment, including a linotype 
machine, which they installed. The circulation was about eight hundred when 
they purchased the paper and today twelve hundred names are found on their 
subscription list, which makes the Chronicle a valuable advertising medium, and 
in this connection they receive a liberal patronage. 

In 191 2, at Seattle, Mr. Harvey was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Mayes, 
of Kansas, and to them has been born a son, Paul W. Mr. Harvey exercises 
his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican 
party and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day but has 
never sought nor desired office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his 
chosen life work. He stands for progress and improvement in all community 
affairs and has wielded a wide influence through the columns of his paper and 
through personal effort toward the upbuilding and improvement of his city. 



EDWARD C. HUDSON. 

Edward C. Hudson, a member of the firm of Hudson & Madison, well known 
attorneys of Bellingham, comes to the coast from the south, his birth having 
occurred in Harrison county, Mississippi, November 25, 1884. While spending 
his youthful days in the home of his parents, Claudius and Elizabeth Hudson, 
he attended the public schools and also worked on his father's farm, being em- 
ployed in the fields until he reached the age of twenty years. He spent the suc- 
ceeding two years as a pupil in Roanoke College at Salem, Virginia, after which 
he returned home and perfected arrangements whereby he and his brother, R. R. 
Hudson, opened and conducted a mercantile establishment at Sumrall, Missis- 
sippi, remaining at that point for two years. Still Edward C. Hudson was not 
satisfied with his business interests. Laudable ambition pointed to higher things 
and he became a law student in the University of Mississippi, which he attended 
for six months. He then returned to Sumrall and continued his law reading in 
the office and under the direction of Judge J- E. Parker, with whom he remained 
until IQ09, when he was admitted to the bar by the supreme court at Hatties- 
burg, Mississippi. 

Later Mr. Hudson went to Natchez, Mississippi, where he was engaged in 
the practice of law until January i, 1910, when, attracted by the opportunities 
of the growing northwest, he left the south and made his way to Bellingham. 
Here he entered into partnership with the law firm of Parrott & Griswold under 
the firm style of Parrott, Griswold & Hudson, an association that was main- 
tained until December, 1913, when the firm became Griswold & Hudson. In 
February, 191 5, that partnership was dissolved and Mr. Hudson entered into 
his present relation with Glenn R. Madison under the firm style of Hudson & 
Madison. They are now accorded a liberal clientage and are heard in connec- 
tion with much important litigation in the courts of the district. Mr. Hudson 
is thorough and painstaking in the preparation of his cases, is logical in argu- 
ment and sound in his reasoning. 

In Bellingham, in October, T911, Mr. Hudson was united in marriage to Miss 
Lauretta Morgan. In politics he is a republican and fraternally he is connected 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 201 

with th€ Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His social nature finds expres- 
sion in his membership in the Bellingham Country Club and along strictly pro- 
fessional lines he has connection with the Whatcom County Bar Association. 
Among its members he has gained many friends, enjoying the high regard and 
goodwill of his professional colleagues and contemporaries. 



FRANK W. HASTINGS. 

Frank W. Hastings is president and manager of the Hastings Estate Com- 
pany and in that and other business connections has become widely known, while 
the enterprise and progressiveness that he has manifested have placed him in a 
leading position among the representative men of Port Townsend. He was 
born in Portland, Oregon, on the 12th of November, 1848, and is a brother of 
Loren B. Hastings, who is mentioned elsewhere in this work. He pursued his 
education in the public schools of Port Townsend and in the University of 
Washington at Seattle and afterward returned to Port Townsend. where he 
clerked in his father's store and also worked on his father's farm. At the age 
of twenty years he started out on his own account and went to the mines at 
White Pine, and when the mines were exhausted he worked on a toll road, having 
charge of the road building and the entire system. The following summer he 
returned and reentered his father's store, being associated with him in business 
for several years. Later he and his elder brother, O. C. Hastings, purchased 
the store, which they conducted for a period of four years, when the business 
was purchased by C. C. Bartlett. Frank W. Hastings then devoted his attention 
to farming for several years on the old homestead, after which he reentered 
mercantile lines and became clerk for Gross Brothers and also clerked for several 
years in the Bartlett store. His next step was to enter the real estate business 
and he also opened the first commission business that was successfully conducted 
in Port Townsend. In 1888 he sold the commission business and devoted his 
entire time to real estate. He also had charge of the city water department 
for nine years and since 1914 has given his attention exclusively to the real 
estate business and is today one of the largest realty holders in Jefferson county. 
His business affairs have always been carefully managed and wisely directed. 
He has recognized the trend of the times concerning realty values and his invest- 
ments have been judiciously placed, bringing to him gratifying success as the 

years have passed on. 

In Port Townsend. on the 14th of May. 1872. Mr. Hastings was married 
to Miss Mabel Littlefield. a daughter of Tobias and Lucy Littlefield. PI is politi- 
cal support is given to the republican party and in 1891 he was elected to the 
state senate from the district comprising Clallam and Jefferson counties. He 
has also filled local offices, serving for three years in the city council and for 
two years as mayor. He was also county commissioner for six years aii.l has 
always been active in political and civic matters. He is a very helpful member 
of the Commercial Club, of which he has been president several tunes. He is 
also a leader in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has filled all of the 
chairs in the local lodge and has also been delegate to the grand lodge. He has 



202 WASHINGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

done much to mold public thought and action along the lines of general progress 
and improvement as well as business development and has left the impress of 
his individuality for good upon the community in which he lives. 



JAMES B. HAYXES. 

James B. Haynes, of Aberdeen, is now practically living retired but still has 
extensive farming interests from which he derives a substantial income and at 
different periods he has been prominently and actively connected with various 
business interests of his section of the state. He came to the northwest from 
Michigan in April, 1885, but is a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred near 
Delaware, that state, in 1846. He owned and cultivated a farm in Michigan and 
afterward became interested in logging. He also owned three shingle mills there. 

\\'hile still a resident of that state ^Ir. Haynes was married in 1866 to Miss 
Anna Stiles, who was born in ^Michigan, and they became the parents of six chil- 
dren, four sons and two daughters: Ora B., who married Eva Stewart, of Salt 
Lake, and has two sons, Harold and John ; Irene, the wife of J. E. A'andemark, 
of Wenatchee, by whom she has three sons and three daughters ; Thomas, a miner 
in Alaska ; Harry H., of Portland. Oregon, who married Lulu Gray, of Oak- 
land, California, and has a family of two daughters and one son ; Jessie, the wife 
of R. W. Hardcastle, of ^lonitor, Oregon, by whom she has seven sons ; and 
Donald E., who was drowned in Alaska. On the 22d of April, 1916, Mr. and 
Mrs. Haynes celebrated their golden wedding and received the felicitations of their 
many friends. Mrs. Haynes and Mrs. C. H. Phelps, now matron of the Portland 
Sanitarium, were leaders in the formation of the Associated Charities and Mrs. 
Haynes also took a prominent part in establishing the public library and has 
served upon the library board. In religious faith she is a Seventh Day Adventist. 
AMiile a resident of ]\Iichigan Islr. Haynes was one of a number of men who 
furnished the capital that made possible the building of the insane asylum at 
Traverse City. During the many years of his residence in Aberdeen he has done 
much to promote the general welfare and he is a member of the Pioneers Asso- 
ciation. 

]\Ir. Haynes was a youth of but nineteen years when in 1865 he responded to 
the country's call for troops, enlisting as a member of the Sixteenth ^Michigan 
Infantry, with which he served until the close of the war. He is now identified 
with the Grand Army of the Republic, thus maintaining pleasant relations with 
those who were his comrades in military service. He has a grandson. J. A. 
MacDonald. who served for a time as a members of the Washington National 
Guard and is now on duty at Honolulu as a member of the Second L'nited States 
Infantry. 

As previously stated, it was in April. 1885. that James B. Haynes came to 
Washington, settling in Aberdeen, where he became actively connected with lum- 
ber and logging interests. He joined J. ^L Weatherwax and built a sawmill, 
after which he engaged in the logging business in his part of the state for about 
a quarter of a century, retiring from active connection with that business only a 
few years ago. He has since been interested in farming in Chehalis. now Grays 




JAMES B. IIAYNES 



•''HE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOK, LENOX 
TtL-DEN FOUNDATION 



• WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 205 

Harbor county, his attention being given to general agricultural pursuits, dairying 
and stock raising. His farm is located near Montesano, Washington, and he also 
owns a valuable orchard in the Wenatchee valley. He is likewise interested in a 
bakery business in Portland and erected and owns the building in which his son 
is now carrying on the bakery. He has also been interested in helping his .son 
Thomas in Alaska. The Portland interests are conducted under the name of the 
Haynes-Foster Baking Company. With his son. Captain Thomas Haynes, he 
was interested, under the name of the Northern Commercial Company, in steam- 
boating in Alaska on the Yukon river and its tributaries until three years ago. 
He was the first man to run a steamboat to where Fairbanks now stands. They 
are now connected with dredging in that country and with mining. It was Mr. 
Haynes who in 1888 built the first piece of logging railroad in Grays Harbor 
county, which was an incline road on Mox Chuck, near the present golf links. He 
also helped build a three mile railroad from Aberdeen to South Aberdeen. Mr. 
Haynes was the first one to engage in logging in this locality and first operated 
where the Fern Hill cemetery is now. He was associated with a partner under 
the firm style of Haynes & Preston for a number of years, but at length they sold 
out to the Grays Harbor Logging Company. It was about five years ago that 
Mr. Haynes gave up logging but the undertaking had proven a profitable one and 
in that connection he laid the foundation of his success. 

Since coming to the northwest James B. Haynes has been continuously a resi- 
dent of Aberdeen and from this point has directed his manifold and important 
business affairs. He has ever been a most public-spirited citizen, devoted to the 
general welfare and active in his support of many well devised plans and meas- 
ures for the public good. In fact in all that he has undertaken in a business way 
or otherwise the public has been directly and indirectly a large benficiary. A 
pioneer in the development of Grays Harbor county and this section of the state, 
he has contributed much to its upbuilding and at the same time has builded his 
own fortunes along constructive lines that have made him one of the honored 
as well as one of the successful business men of Aberdeen. 



MILTON L. WATSON. 

During the last decade of the nineteenth century western Washington passed 
through a period of notable development and the work which was instituted at 
that time in Hoquiam has since been continued. INTilton L. Watson came to this 
state in 1889 and has since been numbered among the business men of Hoquiam, 
his activities doing much to further public progress and improvement. He was 
born in Madison, Wisconsin, in 1865, and there resided until he removed to 
Watertown, South Dakota, with his parents. His father was a contractor and 
hotel man. The family remained in South Dakota until 1889. when removal 
was made to the state of Washington. The father died in Hoquiam but the 

mother is still living. 

Milton L. Watson first took up his residence in Tacoma upon removing west 
but later in 1889 located in Hoquiam, where he has since remained. Here ho 
took up the occupation of carpentering and his excellent workmanship was the 
Vol. m— 11 



206 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

means of bringing to him substantial results. In 1898 he became a member of 
the Grays Harbor Construction Company, entering into partnership with Philip J. 
Mourant. Several years later they were joined by James T. Quigg. Mr. Mou- 
rant is the president of the company, with 'Mr. Quigg as vice president and Mr. 
Watson as the secretary and treasurer. They have two large and well equipped 
plants and they do everything in the way of construction, erecting fine resi- 
dences, large business blocks and factories and schoolhouses. They are also 
bridge builders and pile drivers and have recently entered the field of street 
paving, their contracts of this character being extensive and important. Before 
coming to Grays Harbor Mr. Watson devoted five years to building in Los 
Angeles. 

In 1900 occurred the marriage of Mr. Watson and Miss Minnie France. In 
politics he is independent, while fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. His time is well spent, his labors carefully and 
wisely directed and he belongs to that class of alert, enterprising citizens who 
are fast bringing about a marked transformation in this section of the country, 
utilizing its natural resources and so directing their energies that the material 
prosperity of the district is greatly enhanced. 



THOMAS MILBURNE REED. 

With "Life's battles well won, Life's work well done," Thomas IMilburne 
Reed passed on to the life beyond on the 7th of October, 1905. He was then in 
the eightieth year of his age. \^enerable in years but young in spirit, he had kept 
in touch with the interests of life and w^as to the last an inspiration to all with 
whom he came in contact, while his memory will ever remain as a blessed bene- 
diction to those who knew him. He was known throughout Washington as 
"Honest Tom Reed." What more splendid eulogy can any man have, for it has 
been justly said that "An honest man is the noblest work of God." His honesty 
was not merely that of the spoken word but of thought and of action, manifest in 
carefully considered judgments and in appreciation of the other's viewpoint. 
Advanced years never meant to him idleness nor want of occupation. His was 
an old age that gave out of its rich stores of wisdom and experience for the benefit 
of others and grew stronger and broader mentally and spiritually as the years 
went on. 

A native of Kentucky, Thomas M. Reed was born at Sharpsburg, in Bath 
county, December 8, 1825, and was descended from that north Irish Presbyterian 
stock that in colonial days did much to colonize the new world, for business 
activity was hampered in Ireland by the arbitrary will of the British government, 
which destroyed in wholesale manner the extensive manufactories of Ireland 
because of their feared rivalry to England's factories and commerce. With 
natural hostility in their hearts toward England these Irish emigrants sought 
the new world, expecting to find here the opportunities which were denied 
them in their native land, but again parliament ruled against them. These 
colonists became intensely American in their love of their adopted country 
nor did their hatred of England abate. In this connection a biographer of 
Mr. Reed's said : "It is well known that he cherished to the last all those senti- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 207 

ments of sturdy, independent, uncompromising Americanism which their (his 
ancestors) self-rehant rehgion, their democratic church polity, their racial 
antipathies, their sore political grievances and the heavy financial losses to which 
they had been subjected by the cruel policy of national selfishness, all made it so 
easy for them to imbibe and to perpetuate. Kentucky being, as Henry Clay said, 
a transplanted Ireland in which Presbyterianism was the dominant religion, those 
sentiments were from the outset sedulously cultivated and carefully bequeathed 
from sire to son. These circumstances of heredity and environment had their 
large part in molding the character and influencing the mind of Mr. Reed. All 
through his life he clung with unfaltering tenacity to the doctrines and the prin- 
ciples which had become an integral portion of his inheritance." 

Reared in his native state, there were many' hardships which fell to the lot 
of Thomas M. Reed during the period of his boyhood. He was but twelve 
years of age at the time of his mother's death and the father, sufifering financial 
reverses, removed from Sharpsburg to another part of the state. His son 
Thomas, then a youth of fourteen, went to live with his maternal uncle, James 
Workman, working on his farm for a wage of eight dollars per month and his 
board. Ambitious to acquire an education, he attended school through the winter 
seasons, meeting his expenses from the seventy-two dollars earned in the work- 
ing season and from that sum also paying for his clothing. He remained for 
some time in his uncle's employ, during which period he qualified for school 
teaching and accepted a position as teacher of a country school. The elemental 
strength of his character was shown during that period. He realized his own lack 
of training but he resolved that his pupils should never know of it and by unre- 
mitting study in every available moment managed to keep ahead of his classes. 
The same thoroughness characterized his entire life and he became a quick- 
minded, clear-headed thinker, every mental faculty alert, and to the last he "re- 
tained the precious prize of keen mentality." In young manhood he turned to 
the study of law and while he devoted but a brief period to active practict 
before the bar members of the profession recognized the fact that he possessed 
a fine logical mind and correctly and readily applied the principles of jurisprud- 
ence. He had taught school through a summer season when he secured a position 
in a country store and the succeeding five years were devoted to clerking, during 
which time he won various promotions and ultimately was made general manager 
of busin^ess enterprises of that character. The conditions of his life, however, 
did not satisfy his restless ambition, which continually spurred him on to some- 
thing higher and better and he utilized every available opportunity that promised 
progress and advance. When the news of the discovery of gold in California 
reached Kentucky he felt that perhaps his opportunity lay upon the Pacific coast 
and with a companion he started from Maysville, Kentucky, on the 23d of 
February, 1849, as one of the American Argonauts in search of the golden fleece, 
traveling by way of the Isthmus route and reaching San Francisco on the 26th 
of July, 1849, thus completing a journey which covered five months and three 
days. 

Mr. Reed remained in California for about five years and then returned to his 
old home on a visit. There on the 20th of October, 1853. at Upper Blue Licks, 
Kentucky, he was first married, Miss Elizabeth Hannah Finley becoming his wife. 
This marriage was blessed with two sons: Hon. Thomas M. Reed, former 



208 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

judge of the superior court of Washington, sitting at Olympia, and afterward 
United States commissioner at Nome, Alaska; and Mark Edward Reed, who is 
manager of the Simpson Logging Company. Having lost his first wife, Mr. 
Reed wedded Eliza Carter Giddings, and they had a daughter, Emma Eliza, now 
the wife of Dr. George W. Ingham, a leading physician of Olympia. Mr. Reed's 
third wife was in her maidenhood, Miss Hattie A. Fox, and the son of this 
marriage is Garnett Avery, connected with mercantile interests in Shelton, Wash- 
ington. All of the children are married and occupy positions of prominence in 
the localities in which they reside. 

After a two years' residence in California Mr. Reed ceased to engaged in 
mining, in which he had met with only a fair degree of success, and opened a 
general store in Georgetown, Eldorado county, forming a partnership with George 
Conness, who was afterward elected United States senator from California and 
later removed to Boston, Massachusetts. Mr. Conness was about five years 
the senior of Mr. Reed. The friendship which they formed in those early days 
remained unbroken to the last, being continued thjrough correspondence until the 
death of the junior partner. 

Success or failure connected with the development of the mining regions 
of California led to the upbuilding or decline of towns and cities and when in 
the turn of the wheel Georgetown lost its importance Mr. Reed resolved to try 
his fortunes in the Sound country and in 1857 landed at Seattle, but at that time 
Olympia was a place of greater size and importance and he made his way to the 
capital. He had previously been agent for the Wells Fargo Express Com- 
pany in California and was at once appointed agent at Olympia, where he also 
continued in active connection with merchandising. Later he became interested 
in the Florence gold mines at Idaho and while there was called upon for public 
service. He had previously filled a number of local posts in California, includ- 
mg those of postmaster, county treasurer, county supervisor and justice of the 
peace. That he might decide fairly and impartially the questions which came up 
lor settlement before him in the justice court he took up the study of law and 
alter becoming identified with Idaho his fellow citizens sought his services as 
prosecuting attorney and also elected him a member of the general assembly 
of the territory. He was in Idaho during the period of the Civil war when that 
state was regarded as a hotbed of secession sentiment. He was called upon to aid 
the internal revenue officers of the federal government who were unable to col- 
lect the taxes levied under congressional act. When it became known that Mr. 
Reed had undertaken the task the men at the hotel at which he was staying 
treated him with the utmost disdain. They would not sit at the table with him 
and heaped him with scorn and abuse. At length the leading stockraiser of the 
region addressed him in these words : "Reed, do you think you are going to get 
any money here for the support of your infernal Yankee government?" "Yes," 
came the quiet answer, 'T do ; and I expect you to pay me this day what you owe 
the government of the United States under the internal revenue law, for I am 
going to leave here today and am going to take that money with me." The answer 
was greeted with a scornful laugh but the determined look on the face of Mr. 
Reed told the cattleman there was to be no fooling with him. Years before, in 
California, after being repeatedly insulted by a bully, who was endeavoring to 
get him into a fight, Mr. Reed had taken the defensive and his antagonist was 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 209 

unable to be about for two weeks thereafter. The cattleman saw a wiry frame 
and guessed something of the power that might be behind that physical and mental 
makeup and the money was forthcoming that day. Mr. Reed on the whole was 
most kindly spoken but when injustice, abuse or falsehood aroused him he spoke 
in terms of the strongest indignation, standing as the exemplification of fairness 
in his exposure and condemnation of the wrong. 

Although he was thus active in Idaho he never changed his residence from 
Olympia and in the latter city he attempted to enlist for service in the Union army 
soon after the outbreak of the Civil war. He was elected captain of a volunteer 
company but the expense of transporting the troops caused the government to 
decline their active aid at the front but in other connections Mr. Reed rendered 
valuable service. He had once before attempted to render military aid to his 
country, for at the time of the Mexican war he enlisted, but the quota was full 
and the company was accordingly disbanded. From 1865 until 1872 he served 
as chief clerk in the office of the surveyor general of the United States for Wash- 
ington territory. On retiring from that position he gave much of his time to the 
survey of public lands in western Washington, sometimes in an official capacity 
and through other periods as a contractor, that business occupying his attention 
largely until 1880. In the meantime he was elected a member of the territorial 
council from Thurston and Lewis counties in 1877 ^"<^ '^^s chosen president of 
that body, which bore the same relation to the territorial government that the 
senate does to that of the state today. He was) retained in public office at the 
close of his legislative experience, being made auditor of Washington territory, 
which position he filled until January, 1888. His public-spirited devotion to the 
general good led to his election as a member of the constitutional convention in 
1889 and following the admission of the state into the Union he was elected 
the first state auditor, receiving the highest vote of any candidate on the repub- 
lican ticket although the others were men of acknowledged popularity. He re- 
mained in that position until January, 1893, and made a most excellent record, 
having "regarded a public office as a public trust." In his official duties he ever 
placed the public welfare before personal aggrandizement and subordinated parti- 
sanship to the general welfare. No one ever questioned the integrity of his 
position and it was his fearlessness and honesty in support of his convictions 
and in the performance of his official duties that led him to become known 
throughout the state as "Honest Tom Reed." 

One of the strongest forces in the life of Mr. Reed was his devotion to the 
high ideals inculcated by Masonry. In early youth he learned to study every 
phase of a question before making up his mind concerning it. He was in young 
manhood about the time when the Morgan excitement and the anti-Mason senti- 
ment was at its height. With his naturally inquiring turn of mind he began 
investigating conditions and believed that the opponents of Masonry were in the 
wrong and that the lodge contained elements which would be of the greatest 
helpfulness to every individual in the development of his cliaractcr and the 
shaping of his life. Accordingly, on the 30th of March. 1847. just four months 
after he attained his majority, he was made a Mason in HoUoway Lodge. No 
153 F & A. M., in Bath county, Kentucky, and soon after joining the order he 
became secretary of his lodge. He afterward advanced to high rank in the order 
but never neglected the lodge. He felt that there was nothmg so beautiful as the 



210 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

first three degrees. While in California he served as master of two lodges and 
he took the degrees of the council and of the commandery in that state. Follow- 
ing his removal to Washington he became grand high priest and grand secretary 
of the grand chapter and was grand recorder and grand treasurer of the grand 
commandery. In recognition of the able and faithful service which he rendered 
to the organization the honorary thirty-third degree was conferred upon him. 
He was long a loved and honored member of Afifi Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., 
of Tacoma and on the 8th of December, 1858, the thirty-third anniversary of his 
birth, he was installed as grand secretary of the grand lodge and occupied that 
position for nearly forty-seven years. Only once in all that time did he fail 
to attend a stated communication until that which was held just prior to his 
demise. Even then it was only by the strictest orders of his physician that he 
remained at home. Fifteen or twenty years before he passed away he and two 
other grand masters of Washington entered into a compact that the living should 
officiate at the last rites of the one who had passed away. These three were 
Colonel Granville O. Haller, U. S. A., of Seattle, Hon. Louis Zeigler, of Spokane, 
and Hon. Thomas M. Reed, of Olympia, and the second named lived to officiate 
at the interment of both of the others. At the death of Mr. Reed Masons gathered 
from all parts of Washington to do honor to his memory and he was laid to rest 
on such a day as he had wished for — a glorious October day, the warmth and 
beauty of which rivalled midsummer. In a memorial address John Arthur, 
worshipful master, said : 

"What shall I say of the grace and sweetness with which Thomas Milburne 
Reed met and bore the fast-growing years? How shall I tell you of that glorious 
boyish spirit which even in his later seventies made him one of ourselves and not 
at all an old man? How neat and tasteful was he in his attire ! How sympathetic 
was he with youth and inexperience ! What a warm personal interest he took 
in the new members of the Grand Lodge, and how eager was he to help them along 
in every way ! How he would encourage them to study and to foster Ancient 
Craft Masonry ! And how the young men warmed to him ! And if in the laudatory 
references to him at the lodge meetings, banquets and functions which he attended 
he was mentioned as 'our venerable grand secretary,' how pleasantly would he 
receive my repudiation of the adjective and my insistence that there was nothing 
'venerable' about him, and that he was a ringleader among our younger set and 
generation ! Brother Reed was an impressive personality. Tall, spare, straight 
as an arrow until recent years, with eyes of fire and force, a genial manner and 
a bearing of easy, natural dignity, he would attract attention in any concourse of 
men and would at once be acknowledged as a man to be reasoned with. He was 
by nature kindly, considerate and patient; but back of all this was the sleeping 
lion whom an underserved prod might awake to resistless fury. He was a 
stalwart in every phase of his life ; he was the outspoken enemy of all indirection ; 
he was the soul of honor in all transactions with his fellowmen ; his unselfish 
devotion to the public interest and needs of the community in which he lived 
brought him to the verge of financial ruin and cost him a fortune ; his guiding 
star alike in public and private life was the strictest integrity; and 

'Thus he bore, without abuse, 
The grand old name of gentleman.' 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 211 

The passing away of such a man is a heavy loss to the state in which he lived, 
to the neighbors who looked upon him as their guide, philosopher and friend, to 
the great fraternal society of which he was the most distinguished member, and 
to the widow, children and grandchildren who loved him with all the ardor which 
such a lovable man inspires." 

In Masonic circles he was the foremost "grand old man of Masonry," loved 
and honored by all of his brethren in the craft but also equally loved and 
honored in other relations, for the same sterling traits won him the endur- 
ing friendship and regard of all with whom he was associated through business, 
social, political or church relations. In business he had worked his way upward 
from obscure poverty and attained a considerable measure of success. In politics 
he had borne unsullied a name synonymous with pubhc-spirited devotion. In 
his social relations he was ever the considerate, helpful friend, and in the church 
a stanch advocate of Christianity. The sweetest traits of his character were 
reserved for his own household and his close associates may well say of him 

"He was a man ; 
Take him for all in all 
I shall not look upon his Hke again." 



ALBERT B. PETERSEN. 

Albert B. Petersen is engaged in the sale of the Ford car at Port Angeles, 
having the agency for Clallam county. In this connection he maintains a well 
appointed garage and deals in automobile supplies and accessories. He was 
born in Marshall county, Minnesota, April 7, 1881, a son of Hans Petersen, 
a native of Denmark, who was a successful agriculturist of Minnesota for 
many years and eventually became a resident of Tacoma, Washington, where his 
last days were passed, his death occurring February 3, 1903. He married in 
Denmark Stina Christensen, a native of that country, and since her husband's 
death she has made her home with her son Albert in Port Angeles, where she 
is now living. In the family were twelve children, eleven of whom still survive, 
Albert B. being the sixth in order of birth among eight sons and four daughters. 

At the usual age Albert B. Petersen became a pupil in the schools of his 
native city, passing through consecutive grades until at the age of sixteen years 
he put aside his textbooks to concentrate his efforts upon the work of the home 
farm. He was thus engaged until he reached the age of twenty years, when 
he left the work of the fields to engage in lumber manufacturing as an employe 
in lumber mills. He followed that line of work for a period of seven years, 
after which he once more took up his abode in Marshall county. Minnesota, 
where he followed farming. Owing to hail storms and droughts, however, which 
utterly ruined his crops he met with financial reverses and lost everything. He 
came to Washington and established his home in Port Angeles among people 
who were utter strangers to him. He had learned the value of industry and 
determination, however, and he resolved that those qualities should be the factors 
in retrieving his fortunes. He secured employment with the Tolcr Supply 
Company, automobile dealers, with whom he remained for two years, at the 



212 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

end of which time he purchased the business, which he has since successfully 
conducted. He is now agent for the Ford car in Clallam county, having the 
first business of the kind established here. The sale of the car has grown rapidly. 
He conducts a modern garage and carries a large and complete line of automobile 
accessories and supplies. The plant, which is located at No. 221 Laurel street, 
covers a floor space of fifty by one hundred feet. Not only has he prospered in 
his business, but in other ways has become recognized as a substantial citizen of 
the community. He now resides in the Gale addition to Port Angeles, where 
he owns an attractive home. 

Mr. Petersen was married October 6, 1906, in Seattle, to Miss Lena R. Rey- 
nolds, a native of Jackson county, Missouri, and a daughter of Texas and Sarah 
(Youngman) Reynolds, who were early residents of Missouri and are now 
residing in Port Angeles, where they have made their home since 1891. The 
father has retired from active business and is now enjoying a well earned rest. 
Mr. and Mrs. Petersen have four children : Clarence, born in Tacoma, August 
29, 1907; Estella, born September 18, 1908; Rosie. born in Marshall county, 
Minnesota, September 4, 1910; and Frank, born in Port Angeles, July 29, 1913. 

Mr. Petersen is a member of the Commercial Club and he belongs also to 
Naval Lodge No. 353, B. P. O. E. In politics he maintains an independent 
course, preferring to exercise his right of franchise without regard to party 
ties. He has no desire for public office, feehng that his business makes full 
demand upon his time and energies, and in the conduct of his interests he is 
meeting with well deserved success. 



GUY ANDREWS. 



Guy Andrews, of Aberdeen, president of the Wishkah Shingle Company, was 
born at Westport, Washington, on the 6th of May, 1877, a son of Julius Andrews, 
who came to the- northwest from St. Lawrence county, New York, at the time 
of the Eraser river rush, making his trip to the Pacific coast by way of the 
Isthmus route. He worked on the Oregonian of Portland when it was a weekly 
paper, over a half century ago. After the war he returned to New York for a 
visit. For a time he lived at Westport, Washington, and then went to California, 
where he remained for eight years, on the expiration of which period he returned 
to this state and settled on the homested on Andrews creek. He taught school 
for some time, however, following that profession at Elma, Hoquiam and 
Olympia. He was also engaged in newspaper work in ^lontesano and elsewhere.' 
In 1889 he came to Aberdeen and was foreman on the Aberdeen Herald until 
the paper was sold. Subsequently he was connected with the Bulletin and after- 
ward with the World, thus devoting almost his entire life to newspaper interests. 
He was a very active man, influential, enterprising and progressive, and was hon- 
ored by all who knew him. He served for a number of years as justice of the 
peace at Aberdeen and his record was commendable by reason of the fairness 
and impartiality of his decisions. His political allegiance was always given to the 
republican party. He died January 4, 1914, at the age of seventy-six years, and 
his widow, who bore the maiden name of Ada Cochall, is now living in California. 




GUY ANDREWS 



^^ 



, THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 215 

Guy Andrews pursued his education in the pubHc schools of the different cities 
in which the family home was maintained and when his textbooks were put aside 
began learning the business of making shingles and has followed that pursuit since 
1892. Gradually working his way upward as industry and experience promoted 
his efficiency, he came at length to the place where he felt that he was justified 
in embarking in business on his own account and in 1907 he organized the Wish- 
kah Shingle Company for the purpose of manufacturing cedar shingles. Building 
a plant on the Whishkah river, he installed all modern machinery and is now 
engaged in the conduct of a business which is bringing to him merited success. 
The plant has a capacity of one hundred and twenty thousand feet per day and 
Mr. Andrews devotes his entire attention to the business, being president of the 
company, with M. M. Ingebrigtsen as vice president and A. Ingebrigtsen as 
secretary. 

In 1899 Mr. Andrews was married to Miss Addie Clovinger, by whom he has 
three children, namely : Nora, Ralph and Guy. Politically Mr. Andrews is a repub- 
lican, well informed on the questions and issues of the day and thus able to sup- 
port his position by intelligent argument, but he does not seek nor desire office 
as a reward for party fealty. He is of that class of men, however, who recognize 
the duties and obligations of citizenship and give earnest and effective support to 
well defined plans and measures for the general good. In business he is very 
active and progressive and is controlling an enterprise which is a factor in the 
industrial development of his city as well as a source of individual success. 



REV. CHARLES McDERMOTH. 

Rev. Charles r^IcDermoth, minister of the Congregational church at Aber- 
deen, has been identified with the northwest since 1871, in which year he arrived 
in Seattle. He was born in Cork, Ireland, in March, 1852, and when a youth 
of fourteen and one-half years went to England, where he entered the St. 
Mary's Military School, preparing for the ministry. From that school there 
were eight students sent to India and to Africa under the care of a tutor, of 
which number Mr. IMcDermoth was one. Later he returned to England and 
later came to the Pacific coast by way of Panama. In Seattle he became identi- 
fied with the Church of England. Before arriving in that city, however, he 
went to Honolulu and afterward to Victoria, removing thence to Seattle in 1 87 1 . 
There he first engaged in teaching and followed the profession for ten years in 
this state and at the same time engaged in preaching in the Sound country. For 
three years he was connected with Governor Squire and his band at Seattle. In 
1885 he went to Aberdeen as an ordained minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and the same year he built a Methodist church at Cosmopolis and the 
following year was instrumental in erecting the Methodist church and parsonage 
at Aberdeen, the first one of that city. He acted as pastor of the various 
churches of the district and in 1886 the conference assigned him two assistants. 
In 1888 he went to Portland and for a year was superintendent of the Portland 
Hospital. Afterward he was at Mount Vernon, where he built the Methodist 
Episcopal church and parsonage and his work at that point covered a broad 



216 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

territory, for he preached at many outlying places and did everything in his 
power to extend the work of the gospel among the people of the district. He 
was likewise instrumental in building the churches at Anacortes and at Burling- 
ton and acted as pastor of those churches and also of the one at Fairhaven 
in 1893. He was likewise connected with journalistic interests there, spending 
three years as editor of the Fairhaven Herald. He had previously had some 
experience in that connection, for in 1886 in partnership with Ed Finch, he had 
established the Herald of Aberdeen. 

Mr. AIcDermoth spent two years as pastor of the first church in Bellingham 
and afterward went to the Centralia Methodist church, with which he was con- 
nected in pastoral relation for a year and a half. In 1900 he returned to Aber- 
deen and occupied the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church for three 
years, building a fine house of worship in 1903. Mr. McDermoth is now serving 
as pastor of the Congregational church of Aberdeen, whose congregation numbers 
fifty-two members. He devotes his efforts untiringly to the upbuilding of the 
cause and the extension of the influence of the church and he is also acting as 
charity commissioner and probation officer of the county, having organized the 
Charity Association of Aberdeen ten years ago. 

Into many fields of labor his activities have extended and all have been of 
an elevating character, actuated by a spirit of devotion to the public welfare and 
to high ideals. His political allegiance has ever been given to the republican 
party and in Kitsap county he has served as probate judge and also as county 
superintendent of schools. He has been a Mason for more than forty years, 
having been initiated into the order at Port Madison, since which time he has 
filled the various offices in the lodge. He has advanced through both routes, 
becoming a York and a Scottish Rite ]\Iason, and he has served as prelate of 
De Molai Commandery of Aberdeen. He is a life member of the Moose and 
of the Eagles, also of the Knights of Pythias lodge and has been major of the 
Washington Regiment of the Uniform Rank. In fact he has been very active 
in these different fraternities, exemplifying in his life the beneficent spirit upon 
which they are based. He has served as historian of the Qiehalis County 
Pioneers Association, was its president in 1915 and in 1916 became chaplain. 

In 1873, in Seattle, Rev. McDermoth was united in marriage to Miss Cora 
Scott, a daughter of Judge and IMrs. Roswell Scott, of Seattle, the former a 
native of Illinois and the latter of New York. Mrs. McDermoth was born in 
Chicago and this marriage has been blessed with five children : Charles, now of 
California; Isabelle, the wife of Roy Sargent of Aberdeen; ^Maude, the wife of 
Charles Allburty, of Grays Harbor county; Ethel, the wife of J. H. Fuller, of 
Aberdeen ; and Alanson W., a student in the Leland Stanford University in 
California. 

For forty-five years Rev. McDermoth has been identified with the northwest 
and his work has been of far-reaching effect and importance. Unlike many 
ministers, he does not possess the student habit to the exclusion of activity 
along other lines. He has never believed it to be the sole purpose of the minister 
to deliver his sermons from the pulpit and give his time only to their preparation. 
He feels that the duty of the preacher is something broader, that he must know 
life in order to advise and direct those whom he would teach, and thus it is 
that his activities have reached out into various fields, for he has felt the pulse 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 217 

of the people and become cognizant of the trend of modern thought and pur- 
pose. With this broad understanding he has labored to infuse into the communi- 
ties in which he has lived a recognition of true values and a desire to choose 
only that which is worth while, being never content with the second best. From 
the foregoing it will readily be seen that he is a man of broad sympathy, and 
added thereto is a tact and kindliness which has made his service of great worth. 



O. GUNDERSON. 



O. Gunderson, president of the Mount Vernon National Bank, is also engaged 
in farming and in both connections has manifested good business judgment, 
resourcefulness and enterprise. He was born in Throndhjem, Norway, on the 
22d of July, 1852, and his parents were Gundmun and Johanna (Peterson) 
Thorstenson, also natives of that country. The father, who was a farmer, came 
with his family to America in 1866 and for a year resided in Goodhue county, 
Minnesota. At the end of that time removal was made to Minnehaha county, 
South Dakota, where he cultivated land until his death in April, 1883. He was 
at once practical and progressive in his methods and seldom failed to harvest 
good crops. His wife died in 1897 in South Dakota when she had reached the 
advanced age of eighty-two years. To their union were born six children, as 
follows: Thorsten, who resides in Minnehaha county. South Dakota; Mali, 
deceased; Peter, a resident of Conway, Washington; Mrs. M. G. Rikdahl, de- 
ceased, who was a resident of Idaho, O. ; and Martin, also living in Conway. 

O. Gunderson is indebted for his education to the public schools of Nor- 
way, which he attended to the age of thirteen, and the district schools of South 
Dakota, where he continued his studies for a short time. However, he is largely 
self-educated, as from the age of fourteen he has made his own way. For 
several years he worked as a farm hand but at length became the owner of 
land. He followed agricultural pursuits in South Dakota until 1898, when he 
came to Washington, arriving in Stanwood on the 22d of December. Two months 
later he purchased a good farm in Skagit county and during the intervening 
years he has made his place one of the model farms of this section. He also 
has other interests as he is chief executive officer of the company which owns and 
operates the Hotel Windsor, the leading hostelry of the town. He aided in 
organizing the Mount Vernon State Bank, which is now known as the Mount 
Vernon National Bank and of which he served as vice president for a number 
of years. For the past four years, however, he has been president of that insti- 
tution, and under his direction the bank has prospered steadily. He is a mem- 
ber of the Washington State and the American Bankers' Associations. 

On the 20th of March, 1880, on the home farm in Minnehaha county. South 
Dakota, Mr. Gunderson was united in marriage to Miss Annie M. Johnson, a 
native of Norway and a daughter of Jens and Helen Johnson, both deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gunderson have four living children, namely: Oscar A., who 
was born in Minnehaha county, South Dakota, and is now living in Mount 
Vernon ; Ida T., also born in South Dakota ; Louis M.. a native of Mount X'ernon, 
where he still lives; and Lillian A., also a resident of Blount \'ernon. 



218 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Mr. Gunderson is a Lutheran in religious faith and a repubHcan in his 
political belief. He is active in civic affairs, served as school director for twenty- 
four years in South Dakota and since his removal to Skagit county has been a 
member of the school board and has also held the office of dike commissioner. 
He is not only respected because of his ability but he is also held in warm per- 
sonal regard because of his large capacity for friendship and his consideration 
of the rights of others. 

NICKOLAUS PLAMBECK. 

Nicholaus Plambeck, proprietor of the Union Laundry at Everett, was born 
September i6, 1855, at Neumiinster, Holstein, Germany. His father, Johann 
Plambeck, a native of that country, was a shoemaker by trade and there passed 
away during the boyhood of his son Nickolaus. The mother, who bore the 
maiden name of Christina Siemas, is also deceased. They had a family of 
four children, two sons and two daughters. 

Nickolaus Plambeck, the youngest, is the only one now living. In the com- 
mon schools of Holstein he pursued his education and in his boyhood learned 
the cooper's trade. He afterward engaged in breeding and raising registered 
cattle in the employ of others until he reached the age of twenty years. When 
twenty-four years of age he engaged in the dairy and fuel business on his 
own account near Hamburg and met with excellent success in this venture, 
but hearing of America and its opportunities, he decided to come to the new 
world and disposed of his business interests in the fatherland. He arrived in 
the United States in November, 1892, and took up his abode in Chicago, where 
he remained for about three months. He next removed to Wisconsin, settling 
at Tomah, where he followed farming, first cultivating a rented farm but after- 
ward purchasing land. He met with a fair measure of success during the five 
years devoted to agricultural interests there, at the end of which time he dis- 
posed of his farm and in 1898 removed to Washington, settling at Everett. He 
had no acquaintances in that city, but he resolved to win success if it could be 
done through industry and perseverance. For several years he was employed 
in the Bell sawmill at Everett and in 1901 he turned his attention to the laundry 
business, in which he engaged without capital or experience. From a humble 
start he has developed an enterprise of large and profitable proportions, having 
today one of the leading steam laundries of Everett. His first plant was in a 
private house a small building at 3432 Hoyt avenue. He purchased the lot 
and thereon erected a building at a cost of less than a hundred dollars, but 
though the beginning was small, he constantly developed his interests. At first 
he began operations under the name of the Everett Hand Laundry. Later he 
purchased a lot at No. 2923 Grand avenue, where he erected his present plant, 
and he is now operating under the name of the Union Laundry. In the mean- 
time, however, he carried on business for a time at 2913 Rucker avenue, where 
he leased a lot for seven dollars and a half per month and thereon erected a 
building sixteen by forty feet; but the business outgrew its quarters and he 
then removed to Grand avenue, where he purchased a lot for a thousand dollars 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 219 

and put up a building twenty-four by one hundred feet. His laundry is equipped 
with the latest improved machinery. There is a forty horse-power boiler and 
all modern appliances, and he conducts a first-class business, employing from 
six to ten people. Not only has he prospered in this way but has also made 
judicious investments in real estate and now owns considerable property. 

Mr. Plambeck was married in Germany, June 4, 1881, to Miss Sophia Steck- 
meister, who passed away in Everett in 1908. There were four children born to 
them, a son and three daughters: Magdalena; Emma, the wife of Fritz Schab, 
of Watts, California ; Olga, the wife of Karl Kuen, also of Watts ; and Wilhelm, 
who married Lillian Struck and resides in Everett. On the 12th of February, 
1910, in Everett, Mr. Plambeck married Sarah (Derr) Haney and they now 
reside at No. 3432 Hoyt avenue. 

Mr. Plambeck votes with the republican party and he holds membership 
with the Sons of Herman and with the Knights and Ladies of Security. Of 
the former he is now secretary, which office he has filled for eight years. He 
likewise belongs to the Commercial Club. He has membership in the Evangelical 
church and is president of Zion's church. His life has been actuated by high 
and honorable purposes and measures up to creditable standards of manhood 
and citizenship. He has had many hard experiences, especially through his 
business career, but obstacles and difficulties have seemed but to call forth 
renewed effort and energy on his part and today he has a gratifying income 
from the business which he has established and controls. 



OLIVER DYER COLVIN. 

Oliver Dyer Colvin, vice president and general manager of the Seattle Car & 
Foundry Company and president of the Vancouver Equipment Company, Lim- 
ited, is one of Seattle's foremost business men and looks the part. For diversion 
he plays golf and every now and then wins a trophy. It is characteristic of him 
that he is active and diligent, whether along the lines of business or of recreation, 
and he recognizes the fact that to maintain an even balance one must play well, 

as much as work well. 

Mr. Colvin is a native of Coldwater, Michigan, the year of his birili being 
1867, and he came to the west after completing a course of study in Baldwin 
University. Tacoma was the scene of his first efforts on the Pacific coast. In 
1888 he joined a surveying party and later assisted in laying out the town of 
Fairhaven, now a part of Bellingham, for Nelson Bennett. He became connected 
with the Fairhaven Land Company and afterward with the Fairhaven & South- 
ern Railway, which later became part of the Great Northern Coast Lme. 

Before coming to Seattle in 1901 Mr. Colvin returned to Tacoma and acquu'ed 
some timber holdings in Mason and Thurston counties. After h,s removal to 
Seattle he became chief deputy assessor and subsequently was ni the county treas- 
urer's office Later he was a deputy UnitedStates marshal and he became auditor 
of the old Seattle Consolidated Street Railway Company. He next was made 
receiver and afterward general manager of the Front Street Cable Railway 
but resigned to become general agent of the Washburn & Moen Manufacturing 



220 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Company, which later merged into the American Steel & Wire Company and 
then into the United States Steel Corporation. For three years Mr. Colvin was 
vice firesident and general manager of the Tacoma Power Company but resigned 
to accept his present position as vice president and general manager of the 
Seattle Car & Foundry Company and president of the Vancouver Equipment 
Company, Limited. His powers have ever been adequate to the demands made 
upon him, although the responsibilities he has assumed in these connections have 
ever been more and more important, bringing him steadily to the front in the 
business circles of the city. 



ALDEN HATCH STEELE, M. D. 

Dr. Alden Hatch Steele long ranked with the most progressive, capable and 
honored physicians of western Washington and Oregon. He was born in Os- 
wego, New York, February lo, 1823, a son of Orlo and Fanny (Abby) Steele, 
who were natives of Connecticut. After mastering the common branches of 
learning Dr. Steele determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work 
and began reading under the direction of P. H. Hurd, of Oswego, New York, 
and subsequently continued his studies under the direction of Dr. James R. 
Wood, a noted surgeon and medical educator of New York city. He then 
entered the medical department of the University of New York and was 
graduated in 1846, after which he located for practice in his native city. Sub- 
sequently he opened an office in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and in 1849 started for 
Oregon with a stage company and while en route overtook the Rifle Regiment, 
U. S. A. He was then invited to join the officers and traveled with them to 
Vancouver. He settled at Oregon City, Oregon, in 1849 and for fourteen years 
successfully engaged in practice there. He was ever a most progressive phy- 
sician, keeping in touch with the trend of modern scientific thought, investiga- 
tion, research and practice. He was the first to administer chloroform in ampu- 
tation north of San Francisco, this being the first time the anaesthetic was used 
in surgery, the operation being performed in 1852. Dr. Steele not only figured 
prominently in professional circles in Oregon City but also took active part in 
public life, serving for eleven years as a member of the city council and for 
three years as mayor. 

In August, 1854, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Steele and Miss Hannah 
H. Blackler. Her grandfather was a captain in the Revolutionary war and com- 
manded the flotilla with which Washington crossed the Delaware. Dr. and 
Mrs. Steele became parents of two children but only one is now living, Mrs. 
Rossell G. O'Brien, widow of General O'Brien, mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

For a short time in 1857 Dr. Steele was with General Palmer in the Grand 
Ronde Indian reservation and there, as at Oregon City, he had wonderful 
influence over the Indians, who came to him to settle all their difficulties. In 
1863, when the troops in Oregon were called east. Dr. Steele was appointed 
surgeon at Fort Dalles, when the post hospital was virtually a general hospital. 
After three years' service there, his own health becoming impaired, he was 
transferred to Fort Stevens, at the mouth of the Columbia river. In June, 1868, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 221 

he was sent to Fort Steilacoom, but the fort there was abandoned in 1869 and 
the troops were sent to Alaska. DecHning further service in the army, Dr, 
Steele came to Olympia, where he spent the rest of his life. In 1869-70, when 
Colonel Sam Ross of the United States army was superintendent of Indian 
affairs in Washington territory, Dr. Steele was appointed physician to the Indians 
of Nisqually and the Chehalis reservation. He was for fifteen years examing 
surgeon for pensions for both the army and navy, beginning in 1873, ^"^ in 
1876 he was appointed by Governor Ferry regent of the Territorial University, 
which position he filled for two terms or until 1880. He was likewise for six 
years medical inspector of the Territorial Penitentiary and for twenty-five years 
he was medical examiner for the New York Mutual Life Insurance' Company. 
For a considerable period he served as one of the directors of the First National 
Bank of Olympia, continuing in that office from the organization of the bank 
until a few years prior to its failure. He was one of the organizers of the first 
gas and power companies and a stockholder in the railroad to Tenino and also 
in the Olympia Hotel built by the citizens to help keep the capital here in Olym- 
pia. He did important work for the government as a pioneer physician of the 
northwest and for his fellow townsmen as well. He was a man of the highest 
character, thoroughly reliable, just, considerate and kindly. The Indians came 
to know that they could trust him fully and he enjoyed in equal measure the 
confidence and goodwill of the white men. He died in Olympia, June 29, 1902. 



THEODORE BROUNTY. 

Theodore Brounty, a dealer in meats at Arlington, comes to the Pacific 
northwest from Wisconsin, his birth having occurred at Rockdale, Dane county, 
that state, July 18, 1878. He is the eldest in a family of five children born to 
William J. and Anna (Thostenson) Brounty. The father, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, is of English descent. Through his active business life he has followed 
various pursuits, having at dififerent times been successfully engaged in hotel 
keeping, in butchering and in stock raising. He became one of the early 
settlers of Arlington, arriving in Snohomish county in 1888. He had previously 
served in Indian wars with the United States regular army in the Dakotas, hold- 
ing the rank of corporal. He is still active in business and is well known as 
the founder of the Daisy meat market. Pie was the first meat dealer of the 
city. His wife is also living and four of their children yet survive: Theodore, 
James, Walter and Elmer, all being residents of Arlington. 

During his early childhood Theodore Brounty accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Nebraska and there he began his education, later continuing 
his studies in Washington and California. After leaving school lie learned the 
butcher's trade and has since been associated with his father in that undertaking, 
becoming a member of the firm in 1902. He also conducts a iwd l)usiness and 
ice plant. He has likewise been connected with other pursuits and for three 
years he served as a member of the United States navy on the battleship Oregon. 
During the Spanish-American war he was on that ship and was present at the 
battle of Santiago. 



222 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

On the 29th of November, 1905, Mr. Brounty was married to Miss Capitola 
Gooch, a native of Washington and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Gooch, 
who were early pioneers of this state and are now residents of Everett. Mr. 
and Mrs. Brounty have one child, Eugene Clifford. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church and Mr. Brounty is identi- 
fied with the Knights of Pythias lodge of Arlington, the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen of Arlington and the Elks lodge of Everett. In politics he is a repub- 
lican and for two years served as a member of the city council of Arlington. He 
does everything in his power to promote the growth and insure the success of his 
party and stands for public progress whether accomplished through partisanship 
or through some more general movement. He displays keen discernment and 
enterprise and whatever he has undertaken, whether of a public or private nature, 
he has accomplished if it could be done through persistent, earnest and honor- 
able effort. 



ROBERT L. LOURY. 



For a decade Robert L. Loury has been connected with the real estate and 
investment business in Port Angeles and is today one of the leading land dealers 
in the northern peninsula, handling properties all over the state. He has made 
steady advancement in his business career since starting out to earnhis own living 
when a youth of sixteen. He was born in Linden, Roane county. West Virginia, 
July 28, 1882, a son of Robert William and Margaret (Chapman) Loury, who 
were also natives of that state and representatives of its old families. The former 
was of German and Irish descent and the latter came of Pennsylvania Dutch 
stock. To them were born nine children, seven sons and two daughters, all of 
whom are yet living, three being residents of the state of Washington, Edward 
Gailey Loury being now a partner of his brother Robert in the land business in 
Port Angeles, while Van Loury is engaged in the real estate and investment busi- 
ness at Raymond, Washington. The father passed away in Nicholas county, 
West Virginia, in 1916, and the mother is also deceased. He engaged in the 
lumber business during the greater part of his life and became successful and 
well known in that connection. At the time of the Civil war he responded to the 
call of the Confederacy for aid and was with a West Virignia company through- 
out the entire period of hostilities. He participated in the battle of Lookout 
Mountain and in the battle of Gettysburg and on two occasions was taken pris- 
oner. His political allegiance was given to the republican party and he was active 
in its councils in the state but never sought or desired official preferment. He 
exemplified in his life the beneficent spirit of the Masonic fraternity, in which 
he held membership, and he was equally loyal to the teachings of the Presbyterian 
church, to which he belonged. 

Robert L. Loury attended the public schools of West Virginia and when a 
youth of sixteen secured employment in the lumber woods, following that busi- 
ness for about a decade, which was a period of hard and persistent labor. At 
the end of that time he came west, following his brother Edward, who had pre- 
viously located in this section. Robert L. Loury made his way first to Chehalis, 




ROBERT L. LOURY 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 225 

Washington, where he engaged in the real estate and investment business under 
the name of the Chehalis Cooperative Realty Company. He met with fair suc- 
cess during the two years in which he remained there and in 1907 he came to 
Port Angeles, where he has since continued in similar lines, securing a clientage 
of large and gratifying proportions. He is today one of the leading land dealers 
in the northern peninsula, handling properties all over the state. In this under- 
taking he is associated with a partner under style of the Loury Land Company. 
They largely handle their own properties and their business is now a profitable 
and growing one. Mr. Loury has made it his purpose to thoroughly acquaint 
himself with every phase of real estate activity in the northwest and he has com- 
prehensive and intimate knowledge of properties upon the market and of land 
values. 

Mr. Loury belongs to the Commercial Club and does all in his power to 
further the interests and object of that organization. He exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party and his 
religious faith is that of the Christian Science church. Fraternally he is a Mason, 
having joined the order in West Viriginia, and he also belongs to Naval Lodge, 
No. 353, B. P. O. E. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to 
leave the Atlantic slope and make his way to the Pacific coast, for in this section 
of the country he has found opportunities which he has improved and in their 
utilization has advanced steadily step by step on the road toward success and 
financial independence. 



TOHN F. MILLER. 



John F. Miller, actively connected with the industrial interests of Belling- 
ham as a brick manufacturer, was born in Springfield, Illinois, August 30. 1863. 
a son of John H. and Nancy J. Miller. The father's birth occurred in Baden, 
Germany, August 16, 1839, and he there attended school until he reached the 
age of fourteen years, after which he came to the United States and joined his 
father at Springfield, Illinois, where the former had been engaged in the manu- 
facture of brick. Later John H. Miller became owner of the plant, which he 
operated until 1877, when he disposed of his business there and removed to 
Parsons, Kansas, where he engaged in both farming and in brick manufacturing 
until 1890, when he sold out and brought his family to Washington, establishing 
a brick manufacturing plant in Bellingham in connection witli his four sons, 
G. W., J. D., J. F. and T. W. For eighteen years he remained actively con- 
nected with the business but in 1908 retired and removed to Lyndcn. Washing- 
ton, his sons, however, continuing the business to the present time. The father's 
life has been one of marked activity and enterprise, resulting in the attainment 
of substantial success, so that he is now in possession of a competence when in 
the evening of life, for he is now seventy-nine years of age. 

John F. Miller remained a pupil in the public schools of his native city to the 
age' of fourteen years, when he accompanied his parents to Kansas and there 
resumed his education. He also obtained practical experience in his father's 
brickyard, mastering the business with which he has since been connected. \\ ith 



Vol. 111—12 



226 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

the removal of the family to Bellingham in 1890 he became an active factor in 
the conduct of a brick manufacturing plant at this point and is still connected 
therewith, being associated with his brothers in the ownership and conduct of 
the business, which is today one of the important industries of the state. They 
have a well equipped plant, turning out a product which by reason of its sub- 
stantial quality and excellent character finds a ready sale on the market. 

In Bellingham, Washington, on the 30th of December, 1896, Air. Miller was 
united in marriage to Aliss Hilda Berkman, and they have become the parents 
of four children: Alfred L., who is nineteen years of age and is attending the 
University of Washington ; Hope Elizabeth, a high school student ; Eugene 
Lawrence, fifteen years of age, who is also in high school ; and Ernest T., aged 
thirteen years, who is a pupil in the public schools. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Baptist church, in which the 
parents hold membership. Mr. Miller is a progressive republican in his political 
views, and fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Woodmen of the World. For twenty-seven years he has been a 
resident of Bellingham and throughout the entire period has enjoyed an unassail- 
able reputation as an enterprising business man, reliable at all times. He has 
never been known to take advantage of the necessities of another in a business 
transaction but along the legitimate lines of trade and commerce has built his 
fortunes, becoming one of the substantial residents of his adopted city. 



ARCHIBALD D. FRETS. 

Archibald D. Frets, proprietor of the Frets monument works at Mount 
Vernon, was born in Waterloo, Indiana, ]\Iarch 13, 1875. His parents were 
George and Katherine (Mortorifif) Smith, but at the age of six months he was 
taken by Daniel and Rebecca (Wyrick) Frets, who reared him. In early life 
Mr. Frets engaged in agricultural pursuits and removed to Missouri, settling at 
Albany. The year 1903 witnessed his arrival in Washington, at which time he 
took up his abode in Seattle, but later became a resident of Everett, where he 
died in 1907, when seventy-two years of age. At the time of the Civil war 
he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting in the Thirtieth Indiana 
Regiment, with which he served during the last two years of hostilities. Mrs. 
Frets is still living at Everett and has reached the advanced age of eighty 
years. In their family were four children : Mrs. Dolly Clark, of Everett, Wash- 
ington ; Mrs. Enola Garretson, of Denver, Colorado ; Mrs. Beatrice Fredberg, 
of St. Joseph, Missouri; and Archibald D. of this review. 

At the usual age Archibald D. Frets became a pupil in the public schools 
and when his education was completed he entered upon an apprenticeship to the 
monument business. For twelve years he worked at his trade in Albany, Mis- 
souri, and then journeyed across the country to the northwest, remaining for a 
time in Seattle. In 1908 he removed to Mount A'ernon. where he established 
the A. D. Frets Monument Company, beginning business in a small way. His 
trade, however, has developed rapidly and his business has now grown to large 
proportions, being the most extensive in his section. He turns out work of the 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 227 

highest grade and his finished product is shipped to all parts of the state. He 
conducts a branch business at Bellingham and he enjoys the reputation of 
doing most artistic work, so that his patronage is well merited, for his business 
methods are at all times reliable. 

On the 13th of October, 1895, Mr. Frets was married to Miss Cora Asher, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Asher, of Albany, Missouri, the former now 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Frets have become the parents of three sons and two 
daughters: Ellsworth, born in 1896; Richard, in 1899; Frank, in 1900 ; Kate, in 
1902; and Marjorie, in 1904. All were born in Albany, Missouri, save the 
younger daughter, whose birth occurred in Seattle. 

Mr. Frets belongs to the Free Methodist church. In politics he is a pro- 
hibitionist, stanchly advocating every movement that tends to the development 
of temperance sentiment. In a word his life is actuated by high and honorable 
purpose and characterized by nobleness of purpose and by good deeds. He is 
everywhere held in high esteem and spoken of in terms of confidence and regard. 



FREDERICK CRANE HARPER. 

Various business interests have claimed the attention of Frederick Crane 
Harper, who has controlled commercial and industrial concerns of importance, 
contributing to the business development of Seattle and the northwest in large 
measure. He was born June 16, 1855, in the province of New Brunswick, 
Canada, just across the boundary line from Maine, his parents being Joseph 
Crandall and Susan (Crane) Harper. He comes of English lienage on both 
sides. While born across the border, he came to the United States in 1887 and 
was naturalized as soon as possible. He is intensely American in spirit and 
patriotic in his devotion to his adopted country. He had uncles who crossed the 
border and fought for the Union cause in the Civil war. 

Frederick C. Harper acquired his education in the common schools and in 
the Mount Allison Wesleyan Academy at Sackville, New Brunswick. He made 
his initial step in the business world in connection with mercantile interests and 
afterward entered the real estate field. He has been a resident of the Puget Sound 
country for twenty-eight years and was at Port Townsend as collector of customs 
from 1906 to 191 3 when headquarters were transferred to Seattle. He was also 
one of the company which conducted the Hotel Stevens and also opened the 
Seattle Flotel. He became one of the organizers of the Harper Brick & Tile 
Company, now known as the Harper-Hill Brick Company, and he is a large stock- 
holder in and secretary of the Harper Barge & Lighterage Company. He also 
has other interests and is recognized as a man of resourceful business ability, of 
keen sagacity and of marked discrimination. He has exercised considerable 
influence in public affairs and since becoming a naturalized American citizen has 
given unfaltering support to the republican party and on its ticket was elected 
to the state senate for a four years' term, from 1895 until 1899. None questions 
the integrity of his opinions nor finds that he ever occupies an equivocal position, 
for he is fearless in the expression of his honest convictions. He has the proud 
distinction of being the only collector of customs in this district who has ever 



228 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

served a second term. He was so efficient and his conduct of the affairs of the 
office was so able and so far above reproach that when his term expired, under 
the present democratic administration he was continued in the office several 
months before his democratic successor was appointed September 15, 1915. 

Mr. Harper was married to Miss Clorinda Wells, a daughter of William A. 
Wells, at Bayfield, New Brunswick, in 1878. The eldest son, Frederick William 
Harper, a young man of exceptionally fine character, was killed in a hunting 
accident in the mountains in 1913. A daughter, Mabel Frances, married Ross 
C. Chestnut, who is in the customs service. Helen Louise is the wife of Rex 
Smith, of the Crescent Manufacturing Company. His two youngest sons, Joseph 
Crandall and Robert Wells are both at home. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Harper are members of the First Methodist Episcopal church 
and his fraternal relations are with the Modern Woodmen of America. He is 
also a member of the Arctic Club and the Commercial Club. He has made thou- 
sands of warm friends in Seattle. He is a stanch adherent of the highest prin- 
ciples of true democracy and there is no question but that he places the faithful 
discharge of duty before personal aggrandizement and that with him, strong 
republican as he is, the public welfare stands before partisanship. 



RE\^ AM^HE VENDELBERG ANDERSON. 

Rev. Ammie A^endelberg Anderson, pastor of the Zion Swedish Lutheran 
church at Everett, was born at Pittsfield, Warren county, Pennsylvania, May 6, 
1876, a son of Gust Anderson, a native of Sweden. His family came to America 
m 1850 and settled in Warren county, being among the first of the Swedish 
families in that portion of the country. He was born in 1843 ^^^ died in 1894 
at the age of fifty-one years. Through the period of his active life he was a 
successful farmer and lumberman and he passed away on the old homestead, 
where he had long carried on agricultural pursuits. In politics he was a re- 
publican, quite active in local political circles. His religious faith was that of 
the Lutheran church and he was a devout Christian man. He married Anna 
Johnson, a native of Sweden, who in her girlhood days came to America, being 
only two years old when her parents settled in Warren county, Pennsylvania, 
where she was reared and married. She passed away in the same county in 1905. 

The family numbered eight children, of whom Rev. A. V. Anderson was 
the fourth in order of birth. After attending the public schools he completed a 
college course at Rock Island, Illinois, and was graduated from the Augustana 
Theological Seminary with the class of 1907, winning the S. M. degree. Fol- 
lowing his graduation he immediately entered upon active church work and was 
assigned to the pastorate of a church in Missoula, Montana, there remaining 
from 1907 until 1910. He then became pastor of the Zion Swedish Lutheran 
church at Everett, having a membership of one hundred and fifty. This was 
organized and estal)lished in 1901 and in 1908 the present church edifice was 
built. The first ordained pastor was the Rev. V. N. Thoren. Under the guid- 
ance of Rev. Anderson the work has been carefully systematized and carried on 
and the church has been steadily growing. There is now a Ladies' x\id Society, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 229 

the Luther League and the Dorcas Society. The work of the Sunday school 
is carefully conducted and in addition Rev. Anderson maintains missions at 
Marysville, Hartford and Three Lakes. 

On the 15th of September, 1908, Rev. Anderson was united in marriage in 
Utica, Illinois, to Miss Hilda C. Olson, a native of Sweden and a daughter of 
John and Johanna (Lundberg) Olson, who are now residents of Utica, Illinois. 
The early life of Rev. Anderson was spent upon a farm and he made his own 
way through college. It was his life's ambition from his boyhood days to be- 
come a minister and he bent every effort toward that end. He has never 
regretted his choice. He feels that the highest purpose of man is to assist his 
fellowmen. If one appraises his life by the standard that "Not the good that 
comes to us but the good that comes to the world through us is the measure of 
our success," the record of Rev. Anderson is a most successful one. 



RALPH H. BURNSIDE. 

Washington without its lumber interests would be like Colorado without 
its mines and the central states without their great grain fields, for the wonder- 
ful forests of the northwest have largely constituted the source of Washington's 
development and of her wealth. Operating actively and prominently in this 
field is Ralph H. Burnside, of Raymond, who is now president of the Willapa 
Lumber Company. He was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, in 1870 and in the attain- 
ment of his education passed through consecutive grades to the high school 
there. His early business training was along the line in which he is now en- 
gaged, for in his native state he became general manager of the Hawkeye Lum- 
ber Company, so continuing until his removal to the northwest in 1909. Two 
years before, in connection with other Iowa business men, he became interested 
in a lumber mill at Raymond, and concentrating his attention more and more 
largely upon the northwest, he became an active factor in the management of 
the business here and arrived in 1909 to assume personal supervision of the 
plant of the Willapa Lumber Company. He is also manager of the Sunset Tim- 
ber Company, which is doing a logging business, and became connected also 
with the Pacific & Eastern Railway Company, which built a logging road that has 
recently been sold to the Milwaukee Railway Company. Mr. Burnside was also 
manager of the Pacific & Eastern Boom Company and has been active in all 
that has to do with the development of these different concerns. The Willapa 
Lumber Company was incorporated in 1905 under the laws of Iowa, Charles 
Mosqua becoming the first president with F. C. Schomaker as secretary and 
manager. That relation was maintained until 1907, when R. L. McCormick 
became president, Ralph H. Burnside vice president and F. C. Schomaker sec- 
retary. The last named continued in office until his death, which occurred in 
November, 1913. In 1910 the business was reorganized under the name of the 
Willapa Lumber Company of Washington and W. E. Bliven was elected presi- 
dent, so continuing until his demise in 1915- J- S. McKee became vice president, 
Z. H. Hutchinson treasurer and Howard Jayne secretary. Mr. Burnside has been 
manager since 1909, when he came to Raymond, and following the death of 



230 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Mr. Bliven he was elected to the presidency. The company purchased the plant 
of the West Coast Veneer Company at receiver's sale and remodeled the same 
so that the sawmill had a capacity of one hundred thousand feet. In 1907 this 
was increased to one hundred and fifty thousand feet and at the present time 
the capacity is two hundred thousand feet per day. They manufacture both 
lumber and lath and employ two hundred and twenty-five workmen. In June, 
1916, they leased the Creech Brothers mill and that plant is known as Mill B. 
It has a capacity of one hundred thousand feet and employs one hundred men. 
Before leaving Iowa Mr. Burnside was married in 1893 to Miss Clara Snow- 
den and they have two children, Catherine and Robert. Mr. Burnside takes no 
interest in fraternities, preferring to concentrate his time and attention upon his 
home and his business affairs. Close application has been one of the salient 
features in promoting his progress and in bringing about his present day suc- 
cess. He is now active in the management and ownership of important and 
extensive interests and his prosperity is the merited reward of his labor. 



JOHN A. STEIN. 



John A. Stein has been identified with the iron industry of Hoquiam since 
1904 when he organized and incorporated the Grays Harbor Iron & Steel Com- 
pany, of which he is the president and manager. It was in that year he came to 
the Pacific northwest from Minnesota where he had lived after leaving Alichigan. 
He was, however, a native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he was born in 1862. 
He spent some time in Michigan and then went to Virginia, Minnesota, where 
he was connected with the iron trade. The opportunities for the conduct of a 
successful business of that character in the northwest brought him to Hoquiam 
in 1904 and he organized and incorporated the Grays Harbor Iron & Steel Com- 
pany under which name he has since successfully operated. He took over the 
plant of the Grays Harbor Iron Works, rebuilt and added thereto and now has 
an extensive plant in which he manufactures all kinds of casts for the lumber 
business. He also ships building supplies and his trade has now reached exten- 
sive and gratifying proportions enabling him to employ twenty-three people. He 
has continued as president and manager of the business and the development and 
success of the industry is attributable to his sound judgment, indefatigable energy 
and his close application. He today makes shipments all over the country and 
his name is widely known in this connection. 

In 1889, at Marinette, Michigan, Mr. Stein was united in marriage to Miss 
Kate Wink and they became the parents of two children, Joseph and Mabel, 
both at home and the latter now in school. In 1898, at Virginia, Minnesota, Mr. 
Stein was again married, the second union being with Miss Teresa Maydall and 
unto them were born four children: John, Celia, Raymond and Edmund, all 
yet under the parental roof. 

Mr. Stein is an independent voter, considering the capability of the candidate 
rather than his party affiliation. He does not seek nor desire office himself but 
concentrates his energies on his business affairs and one of the strongest elements 
of his success is that he has always continued in the same line in which he 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 231 

embarked as a young man. He thoroughly understands every phase of the 
business and is constantly seeking to enlarge his interests according to modern 
methods. 



W. A. BURGER. 



W. A. Burger, manager of the Gloss Laundry at Aberdeen, was born near 
St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1883, and was reared to farm life, early becoming 
familiar with all the experiences that fall to the lot of the farm bred boy. Not 
desiring to make that occupation his life work, however, when a young man he 
went to Wyoming, where he learned the laundry business, which he followed 
for some time in that state and afterward in Ellensburg, Washington, arriving 
in the latter city in 1907. He was also for a time in Seattle and in Tacoma, where 
he continued in the same line of business, and in 1908 he removed to Aberdeen 
to accept the position of foreman of the Aberdeen Laundry. Later he spent a 
period in California but in 1912 returned to Aberdeen and became manager of 
the Gloss Laundry, which he has since conducted. This business was incor- 
porated October 10, 1905, with Emil Anderson as president and Lena Turk as 
secretary. Since then there has occurred a change in the personnel of the com- 
pany and the present officers are: E. W. Hunter, president; R. B. Ellis, vice 
president ; C. B. Sims, secretary and treasurer, and W. A. Burger, manager. 
In his present position he has control over the labors of twenty-five people. 
They carry on an extensive laundry business, having a well equipped plant which 
includes the latest improved machinery to facilitate work, and they are also 
operating two wagons in Aberdeen. 

In 1913, in Aberdeen, Mr. Burger was married to Mrs. Hazel M. Dodd, who 
by her former marriage had a son, Lawrence Dodd. Mr. Burger has become 
well known during the two periods of his residence in Aberdeen, where he has 
concentrated his efforts upon his business affairs in such a manner as to make 
substantial advancement. What he has accomplished represents the wise use 
which he has made of his time and opportunities and he is now classed with the 
representative young business men of his adopted city. 



EMIL DERMUL. 



More than a quarter of a century has come and gone since Emil Dermul 
became a resident of Port Angeles and throughout almost the entire period he 
has engaged in gardening, having the largest business of the kind in his city. He 
was born January i, 1854, in the province of Namur, Belgium. His father, 
Eduard Dermul, also a native of that country, there engaged in business as a 
contractor and builder and never came to the new world. He is now deceased. 
He married Jane Huson, a native of Belgium, who is also deceased. They were 
the parents of five children, of whom Emil is the eldest, and three of the number 
are now living. 



232 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Emil Dermul is largely a self-educated as well as a self-made man, for while 
he attended school in his native country to a limited extent, he started out to earn 
his own living when but ten years old. He was first employed in a glass factory 
and he also followed coal mining and iron mining in his native country. In 1880 
he came to the United States, making his way to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where 
he engaged in mining coal, but the opportunities of the west attracted him after 
a decade's residence in Pennbylvania and in 1890 he made his way to Port 
Angeles. Three years later he took up the gardening business, with which he has 
been connected for a longer period than any other in the same line in his city. 
His business, too, has grown steadily and consistently as the years have passed 
until he now controls the largest trade of the kind in Port Angeles, having a 
local market for his entire crop. When he started out he knew nothing of gar- 
dening, being self-taught, learning his lessons in the school of experience and 
through observation. He raises all kinds of vegetables and garden produce, and 
the quality and size of his productions insure a good market. He has the repu- 
tation of raising the best celery in the northern peninsula and received the grand 
prize over all competitors at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle. In 
19 1 3 he also won the grand prize at the Washington State Fair on celery, cabbage 
and cauliflower and he has received the first prize every year at the Jefiferson 
County Fair held in Port Townsend and at the King County Fair. He has also 
made investments in real estate from time to time and is now the owner of con- 
siderable valuable property in Port Angeles. 

On the 15th of October, 1886, in Belgium, Mr. Dermul was married to Miss 
Marie Timsoenet, a native of that country and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
August Timsoenet. Mr. and Mrs. Dermul have a daughter, Hypatia, the wife 
of Haral H. Ginnold, a resident of Seattle, and they have one son, Richard 
Ginnold. That Mr. Dermul thinks for himself and studies questions of the day 
is indicated in the fact that he is a socialist in politics and a theosophist in 
religious belief. He is connected with the Temple of the People in Halcyon, 
California, a Theosophical society. He does not follow the usually accepted lines 
but investigates subjects which are to him matters of deep import and his opin- 
ions are the result of a firm belief in the cause which he espouses. 



G. FRAZIER MATTHEWS. 

One of the important industrial concerns of Hoquiam is the shipbuilding 
yard of which G. Frazier Matthews is the owner and in this connection he has 
built up a business of extensive and gratifying proportions. He was born in 
Eureka, California, on the 4th of July, 1877, and is a son of Peter Matthews 
and S. C. (Eldridge) Matthews, the former a native of New Brunswick, Canada, 
and the latter of Maine. The latter is still living, her home being in San Diego, 
California. Mr. Matthews arrived in California in 1874 and his wife the follow- 
ing year. He engaged in shipbuilding at Eureka and was the builder of many 
vessels during the years in which he carried on business there. In March, 1897, 
he removed to Hoquiam, where he established a shipyard, continuing active in 
that business until his death in 1898. The yards changed hands several times 




G. fkazii:k a[attiii:\vs 



. THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 235 

between that date and 1906, when the Matthews Shipbuilding Company was incor- 
porated, with G. Frazier Matthews as the president and manager. In the inter- 
vening period he has enlarged the yards and the buildings and has. installed much 
modern machinery used in shipbuilding. The yard will accommodate three ves- 
sels at one time and they build both steam and sailing lumber carriers. In this 
yard have been constructed thirty-four ships, requiring twenty million feet of the 
best grade of lumber. These ships have a carrying capacity of thirty million 
feet and have all been built for Pacific coast ownership, mostly for California 
purchase. The company employs from seventy-five tO' one hundred men and 
they build boats to the size of two hundred and twenty-five feet, with forty-two 
and one-half feet beam and fifteen feet depth, the capacity being one million three 
hundred thousand feet of lumber. Mr. Matthews learned his trade in the ship- 
yards of California and is considered a most thorough man in his line, giving to 
each of the boats here constructed his personal supervision. 

In Hoquiam, in 1899, Mr. Matthews was married to Miss Florence E. Barker, 
who arrived in this city in 1890. She was born in London, July 6, 1878, and 
when but three years of age was brought to America, the family home being 
established in Iowa and afterward in Idaho. She came to Washington with her 
father, Henry Barker, who was the first furniture merchant of Hoquiam but 
after long connection with the commercial interests of the city retired and removed 
to Tacoma about three years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Matthews have three children, 
Mildred, Gordon and Harold, all born in Hoquiam. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Matthews is an Elk but he has little time for 
activities outside of his business, concentrating almost his entire attention upon 
the management and control of his shipbuilding interests, which have grown in 
volum.e and importance; making his one of the leading industries of the city. 



NATHANIEL D. HILL. 

The student of history does not have to carry his investigations far into 
the records of Washington to learn that the Hill family has long been con- 
nected with this state, for since pioneer times they have resided in the Pacific 
northwest and have been closely associated with the development and progress 
of the region in which they have made their home. Nathaniel D. Hill is one 
of the best known residents of Port Townsend and although he is ninety-three 
years of age he is still hale and hearty and takes a keen interest in all happenings 
of the day. He was born in Halboro, Pennsylvania, January 25, 1824, and is of 
English lineage, although the family has long been represented in the Keystone 
state. His active life was devoted to the drug business, in which he made his 
initial step in Philadelphia. About 1850 he came to the Pacific coast, first set- 
tling in CaHfornia after making the trip by way of the Isthmus route. Two 
years later he removed to Washington, locating on Whidbey island, and there he 
engaged in agricultural pursuits and for several years was Indian agent during 
the Indian war. In fact he took a most active and helpful part in promoting 
the welfare and progress of that district. It was in 1867 that he became a 
resident of Port Townsend, which was then in the pioneer stage of its develop- 



236 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

ment. He succeeded to the drug business of Dr. O'Brien, who was the first 
druggist of the town, and for twenty-two years Mr. Hill conducted the busi- 
ness, but at the end of that time retired, being succeeded by his sons, Howard 
H. and Daniel H. Hill, who are still proprietors of the store. Aside from his 
commercial interests Nathaniel D. Hill was actively interested in manufac- 
turing and financial affairs and for some years was vice president of the First 
National Bank of Port Townsend. In a word, he contributed in large measure 
to the upbuilding and development of the district and long ranked as one of the 
honored and representative business men of Port Townsend. 

In 1857 Mr. Hill was united in marriage to Miss Sallie Haddock, a native 
of Lynn, Massachusetts, whose ancestors removed from England to the Bay 
state at an early day. She passed away at Port Townsend in 1889 at the age of 
sixty-four years. She was the mother of four children : Daniel H., mentioned 
elsewhere in this work; Kate D., the deceased wife of Alfred Plummer; Robert, 
who has also passed away ; and Howard H. 

Mr. Hill is a stanch democrat and was elected on that ticket to the state 
legislature. He is interested in the moral progress of the community as a loyal 
member of the Methodist church and for years took a very active part in its 
work. He is also identified with the Masonic lodge and chapter and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, being the oldest Odd Fellow in the World, and 
is past chief templar of the Good Templars. In all relations of life he has meas- 
ured up to high standards of manhood and the esteem and warm regard in which 
he is universally held in Port Townsend are well deserved. 



HOWARD H. HILL. 



Howard H. Hill, like his father, has proved an energetic and successful 
business man and occupies an enviable place in commercial circles of Port Town- 
send. He was educated in the local public schools and after his textbooks were 
put aside entered his father's drug store, thoroughly learning the drug business 
in its every phase. As previously stated, he and his brother, Daniel H. Hill, 
succeeded to the business, which they have since conducted with growing suc- 
cess. Their close application, their reasonable prices and their earnest desire 
to please their patrons have been factors in winning for them the substantial busi- 
ness which is theirs today. 

At Port Townsend, on the 25th of January, 1889, Mr. Hill was married to 
Miss Eliza Payne, a native of New Brunswick, Canada, and a daughter of Syl- 
vanus Payne. The three children of their marriage are: Sallie H., who was 
born at Port Townsend, October 24, 1890; Howard Norman, born at Port Town- 
send March 18, 1891 ; and Francel E., born January 9, 1901. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist church. Mr. Hill 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias and is also identified with the Commercial 
Club of Port Townsend. He is a democrat but has never sought nor filled political 
office, preferring always to concentrate his energies upon the business to which 
he has devoted his entire life. He has, however, been a member of the school 
board for about six years. His success is undoubtedly due in part at least to the 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 237 

fact that he has concentrated upon a single Hne, never dissipating his energies 
over a wide field. His diligence and determination have been strongly manifest 
characteristics and have gained him an enviable place among the representa- 
tive merchants of Port Townsend. 



CHARLES F. ROEHL. 



The Bellingham district had scarcely entered upon the period of its earliest 
development when Charles F. Roehl located there, and although he was away 
for a brief period, he returned in 1889 and throughout all the intervening years 
has been closely associated with the progress and upbuilding of the city and dis- 
trict, winning a well deserved and enviable reputation through his operations in 
mercantile and real estate circles in connection with his brother, William F. 
Roehl, mentioned elsewhere in this work. The old family home was at Branden- 
burg, Germany, and there the brothers were born. They were sons of John 
Casper and Elizabeth (Kublanc) Roehl, who are mentioned at length in con- 
nection with the sketch of William F. Roehl on another page of this work. Until 
1873 Charles F. Roehl was a pupil in the schools of his native country but at 
that time his textbooks were put aside and his life's lessons were afterward 
learned in the school of experience. He was brought by his parents to the new 
world and remained under the parental roof until 1878, when he sought and 
obtained employment in a store in western Texas, spending four years in that 
connection. 

The year 1883 witnessed his arrival in the northwest and on the 31st of 
December he reached Bellingham bay. It was his purpose to locate in Tacoma, 
but Mayor Kalloch of San Francisco induced him to settle at Whatcom. He 
remained on Bellingham bay until 1886, when he secured a tract of government 
land and not long afterward he built a home on Elk street in Whatcom. He 
had sent for his brother William to join him and he came in 1884. A stock of 
goods was purchased in San Francisco and in the summer of 1884 the brothers 
began business in what is now Bellingham. In this connection a contemporary 
biographer said : 'Tt was then promised that a railroad would be built through 
this place to Sumas, and for a period of six or seven months the new town 
enjoyed great growth, but at the end of that time word was received that the 
Canadian government would not allow the American line to connect witJi its 
road, and this was followed by business depression in Whatcom. The brothers 
then closed up their business and removed to San Diego, which was then enjoy- 
ing much prosperity, but its growth was an unnatural one, and the brothers lost 
the money which they invested there. Returning to Whatcom in 1889, they again 
went into business here and continued as leading merchants of this place until 
1902, when they retired." Having made extensive investments in real estate, 
.the brothers then turned their attention to the management of their property 
and to continued activity in real estate circles. They have erected a number of 
good business blocks in the city and their other operations in the realty field have 
made them most prosperous citizens. 

In December, 1889, Charles F. Roehl was united in marriage to Miss Emma 



238 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Hull, a daughter of Nathan Hull, a fruit grower of Los Angeles, California, who 
became one of the early settlers of eastern Oregon but died in California in De- 
cember, 1894. Mr. and Mrs. Roehl have become parents of a son, William F., 
who was educated in the schools of Bellingham and Gonzala College at Spokane 
and was then appointed by Senator Pyles to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, 
Maryland, and \\as graduated in I\Iay, 1914, as ensign, and is now on the Cleveland 
having been raised to lieutenant. 

The family is well known in Bellingham and Charles F. and his brother, Wil- 
liam F. Roehl, have for about thirty years ranked among the foremost business 
men of this section of the state, their efforts contributing in very large* measure 
to the upbuilding and progress of the district in which they reside. 



WILLIAM FIERCE BONNEY. 

William Pierce Bonney, widely known as one oi the pioneers of Washington, 
is the secretary of the State Historical Society and has a very wide acquaintance 
among the early settlers as well as later arrivals in Washington. His present busi- 
ness connection is that of manager of the Hesperian Chemical Association, a manu- 
facturing concern making and selling family remedies. This was preceded by 
several years experience in the drug business. 

Mr. Bonney was bom at Steilacoom, Pierce county, Washington, April 24, 1856. 
He traces his ancestry back to Thomas Bonney, who was born in Dover, England, 
in 1604. and in 1634 or 1635 wedded ]\Iiss Mary Hunt. They crossed the Atlantic 
on the Hercules, becoming the founders of the family in the new world. Their 
son, Thomas Bonney, married Dorcas Sampson, and the line of descent is traced 
down through John Bonney, who married Elizabeth Bishop; Perez, who married 
Ruth Snow ; Titus Bonney, who married Anna Pierce ; John Bonney, who married 
Orilla Sherwood ; and Sherwood Bonney, who married Lydia Ann Wright. The 
last couple became the parents of William Pierce Bonney of his review. The 
father was born in Cornwall. Connecticut, February 28, 1812, and in 1852 he 
crossed the plains with his family making the journey with ox-teams. Sherwood 
Bonney was the first man elected to the ofifice of justice of the peace in Pierce 
county, Washington, and as such performed many marriage ceremonies for the 
pioneers. Mrs. Bonney was the first school teacher of Pierce county, teaching in 
Steilacoom in July, August and September of 1854. 

William Pierce Bonney acquired a common school education and in 1868 
secured a position in the drug store of Gardner Kellogg of Seattle. He was after- 
ward employed by various other drug houses until 1881 when he entered into part- 
nership with L. E. Sampson, under the firm name of Sampson & Bonney and 
purchased a drug store in Tacoma, where he continued active in the retail drug 
business for eleven years, or until 1892. He then became a member of the Hes- 
perian Chemical Association, engaging in the manufacture and sale of family reme- 
dies, and has continued active in the business for a quarter of a century. 

On the 17th of August, 1882, in Olympia, ]\Ir. Bonney was married to Miss 
Eva Bigelow, a daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Bigelow. Her father crossed 
the plains in 185 1 and from Portland, Oregon, made his way to Olympia, on the 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 239 

schooner Exact, reaching his destination on the 15th of November. On the 4th of 
July, of the following year he was chosen orator of the day and during his address 
he advocated the separation of the northern portion of Oregon into a new terri- 
tory. The idea took immediate root and steps were taken for calling a convention 
at Monticello, where resolutions were adopted asking Congress to organize a new 
territory. He was thus active in the forming of the present state. His daughter 
who became Mrs. Bonney was a teacher for eight years in various districts in 
western Washington. By her marriage she has become the mother of four chil- 
dren : Zaidee Elizabeth, a teacher in the home economics department of the Sta- 
dium high school, Tacoma ; Ruth L., who died when five years of age; Victor Big- 
elow, a chemist in the government employ at San Francisco with the bureau of 
standards ; and William Sherwood, who died in early life. 

In politics Mr. Bonney is a republican ; he served as councilman from the 
second ward of Tacoma in 1884-5. His military experience covers service as 
hospital steward of the Cavalry Battalion of the national guard, of Washington, 
from 1890-94. In 1905 he joined the Washington State Historical Society and in 
1906 was elected a member of the board of curators. The following year he was 
made chairman of the board to which position he was reelected every year until 
1915 when he was elected secretary. Three score years of residence in this com- 
monwealth have made Mr. Bonney familiar with much of the history of the state 
arid a w^ell known and popular official of the Historical Society. 



THOMAS W. PROSCH. 

No man in the state was better known to the older residents than Thomas 
W. Prosch. Since 1875 he had been intimately connected with Seattle's growth 
and development and until a few years ago had taken an active part in civic 
affairs. In later years he devoted himself to private matters and to his wait- 
ings, which were chiefly historical. He was one of a few men in the northwest 
who had the most intimate knowledge of the history of the Puget Sound region 
and was an authority upon the subject, particularly concerning the parts that 
the various pioneer families had played in the settlement and building up of 
the state. 

Mr. Prosch was the son of Charles and Susan Prosch, who were among 
the pioneers of the northwest. His father also a few years ago was a familiar 
figure on the streets of Seattle. The Prosch family came to the Pacific coast 
in 1855 from Brooklyn, New York, where Thomas was born in 1850. The elder 
Prosch was a printer and in 1858 founded The Puget Sound Herald at Steila- 
coom. Like most sons of country printers, young Thomas learned the trade 
and at the age of nine was "sticking type" and later running the press. He 
worked at intervals as a salesman in a store and as a logging camp hand. At 
nineteen he was a clerk in the legislature and a clerk in the customs office at 
Port Townsend at twenty. 

About 1869 Charles Prosch and his two sons. Fred and Thomas, acquired 
the Pacific Tribune from Randall H. Hewitt and continued its publication in 
Olympia. 



240 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

By reason of financial entanglements the ownership of the paper passed to 
Thomas W. in 1872. 

In 1873 the terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad was fixed at Com- 
mencement Bay and he decided to move to New Tacoma, the embryo metropolis 
of the northwest. There he continued the publication of the paper for nearly 
two years and then moved with it to Seattle, where it was continued about three 
years longer and then sold. 

About 1879 he and Samuel L. Crawford bought The Intelligencer of this 
city. Two years later that paper was merged with The Post and the name 
of the publication was changed to The Post-Intelligencer. Mr. Prosch retained 
a half interest in the new paper and later acquired the whole. Early in 1886 
he sold it to a joint stock company. 

In 1876 Mr. Prosch w'as appointed postmaster of Seattle by President Grant 
and held the office for two years, after which he resigned. He had charge of 
the municipal census of Seattle in 1890 and at the same time was special agent 
in charge of the federal census here. In the early '90s he served three years 
as a member of the Seattle school board and in 1894 he aided in platting the 
tide lands in front of the cities of Seattle, Ballard and Tacoma. He was 
formerly secretary of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, having held that office 
three years. For fourteen years he was a member of the board of trustees 
of the same organization. He was repeatedly president and trustee of the 
Washington Pioneers' Association and belonged to various other pioneer and 
historical societies. 

He had retired from active life, devoting his time to his historical writings 
and his private business. He owned much property in the city. With Mrs. 
Prosch he owned the old McCarver residence in Tacoma, which was built by 
the founder of that city in 1868. 

Mrs. Prosch, to whom he was married in 1877, was the daughter of General 
Morton M. McCarver, the founder and one of the historic figures of that city, 
and, beginning in 1843, O"^ o^ ^he most notable figures in old Oregon during 
the period of its provisional government and for twenty years later. She was 
born on the old McCarver homestead, near Oregon City, Oregon, in 1851 and 
moved with her parents to the present site of Tacoma. IMrs. Prosch's sister, 
Mrs. Dudley Harris, still lives in that city. Three daughters and one son survive 
Mr. and Mrs. Prosch. The son is Arthur Prosch, who is employed in the post- 
office. The daughters are Edith, Beatrice and Phoebe. 



NATHANIEL OSTRANDER. M. D. 

When death called Nathaniel Ostrander, Washington lost one of its oldest 
and most honored medical practitioners — one whose service had been of the 
utmost value to the state along professional lines. His worth as a man was 
also widely acknowledged. He was born in Ulster county, New York, December 
28, 1818, a son of Abel and Catherine (Esterly) Ostrander, who were natives of 
the Empire state and were of Holland descent. The father early became familiar 
with farm work and devoted his attention to the labors of the fields in the east 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 241 

until 1836, when he removed with his family to St. Louis, Missouri, and there 
engaged in building and renting houses ; but the tide of emigration was steadily 
flowing westward and with that current he was carried to Washington in 1852. 
Arriving in the northwest, he secured a donation claim upon the Cowlitz river 
and there devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits for some years. 

When Nathaniel Ostrander was an infant he was taken to the home of his 
uncle, Nathaniel, with whom he remained until he reached the age of fourteen 
years, enjoying the privileges of educational training in the schools of New York 
city. In 1832, however, he returned to the home of his parents, with whom he 
remained for two years, after which he became a clerk in the store of his brother 
John at St. Louis, Missouri, being there employed until 1836. In that year he 
removed to Lafayette county, Missouri, where he again engaged in mercantile 
pursuits. 

It was in 1838 that Dr. Ostrander was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Jane 
Yantis, a native of Kentucky of Dutch descent, and in 1845 he removed to Cass 
county, where he engaged in farming. It was about that time that his attention 
was directed to medical study. He began reading with Dr. D. K. Palmer as his 
preceptor, pursuing his studies as he followed the plow. In 1847 he removed to 
Saline county, Missouri, where he further devoted his attention to reading medi- 
cine, and he also attended two courses of lectures in the medical department of 
the St. Louis University, from which he was graduated in 1848. Immediately 
afterward he began practice in Saline county, where he remained until 1850. It 
was in that year that he turned his face westward and with a wagon drawn by 
oxen started across the plains for California. The journey was fraught with 
hardships and privations but with no unusual incidents, and after safely reaching 
the coast he devoted a year to mining and to the practice of his profession in 
the camps at Rough and Ready and in Onion A^alley. In the fall of 1851, how- 
ever, he returned to his family in Missouri, making the return trip by way of 
the Nicaragua route. He then converted his farm property into cash and with a 
prairie outfit of three wagons, drawn by oxen, he again started for the Pacific 
coast, accompanied this time by his family and his father. On this occasion he 
made Washington his destination, although at that time the territory had not 
been set ofif from Oregon. He located on the Cowlitz river, being one of the 
first settlers in that valley. There he engaged in farming and in the practice of 
medicine as occasion required, remaining in that locality until 1872. From wild 
and unimproved tracts of land he developed two good farms and his work in 
that district has been commemorated by naming a creek and a village in his honor. 
In 1872 he sold out and removed to Tum water, where he established a small 
drug store and also continued in the practice of medicine. He successfully con- 
ducted his store there until 1879, when he went to Olympia and remained a 
valued resident of the capital city until his demise. He became prominently 
identified with public afifairs there, as he had been in the district in which he had 
previously lived, and he wa$ ever untiring in his efiforts to contribute to the wel- 
fare of his state and its development along those lines that lead to the upbuilding 
of a great commonwealth. He was the first probate judge of Cowlitz county, 
appointed by Isaac I. Stevens, the first territorial governor of Washington, and 
for twelve years he continued on the probate bench. Several times he represented 
his ward a<i a member of the city council of Olympia and twice was honored with 



242 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

election to the office of mayor, giving to the city administrations that resulted in 
much progressive work and in public benefit along many lines. He also served 
for one term as a member of the territorial legislature. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Ostrander were born eleven children, as follows : Mrs. 
Priscilla Catherine Montague; Mary Anne, who is the wife of Thomas Roe; 
Susan Charlotte, who died and was buried on the plains ; Sarah Terese, the widow 
of Charles Catlin, who was a pioneer of Cowlitz county and in whose honor the 
town of Catlin was named ; Margaret Jane, who is the wife of Michael O'Connor, 
of Olympia ; Maria Evelyn, the widow of W. W. Work, who died in Olympia in 
1888; Isabella May, who is the wife of E. E. Eastman, of Olympia; John Yantis, 
who passed away in 1914; Florence Eliza, who gave her hand in marriage to 
Walter Crosby, of Olympia; Fannie Lee. the wife of C. M. Moore; and Minnie 
Augusta, who died in infancy. The family circle was again broken by the hand 
of death when on the 7th of February, 1902, Dr. Ostrander was called to the 
home beyond. He had long been a devoted member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and had filled all the offices in both the subordinate lodge and 
encampment. His was indeed a useful, active and upright life and won for him 
the high regard and unqualified confidence of all with whom he came in contact. 



ALONZO M. HADLEY. 



Alonzo M. Hadley, senior partner of the law firm of Hadley & Abbott of 
Bellingham. was born in Sylvania, Parke county, Indiana, October 4, 1867, a son 
of Jonathan and Martha Hadley. The father was also a native of Parke county, 
born March 11, 1831, and was there reared and educated, after which he devoted 
his entire life to farming in that locality. In Parke county on the nth of ]\Iarch, 
1852, he was married to Miss Martha McCoy and they became the parents of three 
sons: Judge H. E. Hadley, now of Seattle; Lin H., member of congress from 
the Bellingham district; and Alonzo M. The father was of the Quaker faith and 
passed away in his native county in 1894 at the age of sixty-three years. 

Alonzo M. Hadley attended the public schools of his native town until he 
reached the age of seventeen, when he continued his studies in the Bloomingdale 
Academy at Bloomingdale, Indiana. He then took up the profession of teaching, 
which he followed for a year in Parke county, and later he attended Earlham 
College at Richmond, Indiana, pursuing a two years' scientific course. At the 
end of that time he devoted another year to teaching in his native county and 
then went to Rockville, Indiana, where he entered upon the study of law in the 
office of Elwood Hunt, there pursuing his reading until April, 1891, when he was 
admitted to the bar and entered into partnership with his former preceptor under 
the firm style of Hunt & Hadley. There he remained until 1894, when he removed 
to Indianapolis, where he practiced law independently until 1898. In that year 
he came to Bellingham, where he became connected with the law firm of Dorr & 
Hadley, the latter being his brother Lin. In 1909 he was admitted to the partner- 
ship, at which time the firm name was changed to Hadley, Hadley & Abbott. On 
the 1st of March, 191 5, Lin H. Hadley retired from the firm on his election to 
congress and the association between the other partners is maintained under the 




ALONZO M. HADLEY 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, L£NOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES ' 245 

style of Hadley & Abbott. They are now accorded a good clientage that connects 
them with much important litigation and in the trial of his cases Mr. Hadley has 
proven himself an able lawyer of wide legal learning and notable resourcefulness 
in defending his cause. 

In Kankakee, Illinois, on the lOth of June, 1901, Mr. Hadley was united in 
marriage to Miss Edna Beebe and during their residence in Bellingham they have 
made many warm friends. Mr. Hadley is a prominent Mason, having taken the 
degrees of the York and Scottish Rites and also of the Mystic Shrine. He is a 
past high priest of Bellingham Bay Chapter, No. 12, R. A. M., and past com- 
mander of Hesperus Commandery, No. 8, K. T., and at present is senior warden 
of Lafayette Lodge of Perfection, No. 3, of the Scottish Rite. He also belongs 
to the Elks lodge and he is a member of the Bellingham Country Club and of the 
Cougar Club. He adheres to the religious faith of his ancestors, being identified 
with the Society of Friends, and his political belief is that of the republican party. 
Laudable ambition prompted his removal to the west with the hope of making for 
himself a creditable place in professional circles and this he has done, for Belling- 
ham numbers him among her most distinguished and able members of the bar. 



JOHN WHITE EDWARDS. 

John White Edwards is living retired in Seattle, having gained a competence 
through former years of labor that enables him to enjoy a well deserved period of 
leisure. He has reached the advanced age of eighty years, his birth having 
occurred in Canada on the 2d of April, 1836, and his life has been so spent that 
he is held in high honor by all who have been associated with him and enjoys 
the consciousness of work well done. His father, James Edwards, was engaged 
in the lumber and mercantile business in the Dominion and during his later years 
held the office of city treasurer of Peterborough, Ontario. His wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Elizabeth Cameron, was also a native of Canada and was 
of Scottish descent while Mr. Edwards was of EngHsh. 

John White Edwards received his education in private schools in Peterborough 
and on beginning his independent career engaged in the milling and lumber busi- 
ness in the employ of his father. Later he worked as clerk in a hardware store, 
receiving for his services a wage of ten dollars per month and board, and later 
he became connected with another hardware dealer and filled the position of 
bookkeeper at a salary of forty dollars per month. When twenty-one years of age 
he became manager of a large lumber firm which engaged chiefly in shipping 
sawed lumber and square timber. After remaining in that connection for three 
years he began dealing in timber on his own account and in 1862 he went to 
Victoria, British Columbia, by way of the Isthmus of Panama. Not long after- 
ward he began prospecting in the Cariboo mines, remaining there until the fall 
of that year, when he went to Alberni, on Barclay Sound, where he engaged in 
tallying lumber in connection with loading ships and also in scaling logs for 
Anderson & Company. He remained with that company until the mills closed in 
1865 and then became manager of the office and yards owned by W. P. Sayward 
at Victoria. In 1867 he severed that connection and was given charge of the 

Vol. Til— 13 



246 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

books and store at the Port Madison mills for Meigs & Gawley. This firm was 
the first on the Sound to build ships and their bark, the Northwest, was the first 
lumber barkentine constructed on the Sound. After remaining at Port Madison 
for about nine years Mr. Edwards went to Port Blakeley and was practically 
placed in charge of their mill business at that point. Six years later, or in the 
fall of 1882, he came to Seattle and turned his attention to the real estate business, 
which he followed with gratifying success for seven years. At the end of that 
time, or in 1890, he retired from active life and has since enjoyed a period of 
rest. In all that he undertook he was energetic, judicious and farsighted and the 
large measure of prosperity which he gained was well deserved. 

Mr. Edwards was married at San Francisco in 1862 to Elizabeth Hufton, a 
native of England, who removed to San Francisco in 1862. They have a daughter, 
Lizzie J., who is the wife of Roderick F. Tolmia, of Victoria. To this union 
has been born a son. Jack R., whose birth occurred in Seattle on the 19th of 
March, 1897, and who is now a student in the University of Washington. 

Air. Edwards is a stanch republican in politics and keeps well informed as to 
the questions and issues of the day. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, is also 
identified with the Earlington Golf Club and was one of the first members of the 
Rainier Club, these associations indicating his interests and the extent of his 
acquaintance. He still plays a good game of billiards, plays golf, shoots at the 
traps occasionally and yearly goes fishing and duck shooting. He is probably the 
oldest shot and golfer in the state. He has the greatest faith in the future of 
Seattle and has extensive property interests in the city. He is one of the sub- 
stantial men of Seattle and in promoting his business interests he has also aided 
in the development of the city. 



JOHN F. WARNER. 



John F. Warner is a well known merchant of Sultan, at the head of John F. 
Warner & Son, and his position in citizenship is indicated in the fact that he is 
now mayor of his town, to which office he was called by the vote of his fellow 
townsmen who recognized his public spirit and his devotion to duty. He was 
born in Delaware county, Indiana, in February, 1864, a son of Elias Warner, a 
native of Virginia, who in early life removed westward to Indiana and there 
engaged in farming. He died, however, at the age of fifty-two years, when his 
son John was but eight days old. The mother, who bore the maiden name of 
Selinda Pierce, was also a Virginian by birth, her natal year being 1821, and 
she passed away in 1888. By her marriage she became the mother of six children. 

John F. Warner enjoyed excellent educational advantages, supplementing his 
preliminary training by study in the Indiana State University. He left home at 
the age of nineteen years and went to Missouri, where he taught school for a 
short time but soon returned to Indiana, where he had previously had his first 
experience in teaching. He then decided to take up the study of law and entered 
the office of Robinson & Lovett at Anderson. In 1886 he completed his course of 
reading and was admitted to the bar. 

Mr. Warner dates his residence in Washington from the spring of 1892, when, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 247 

after a four months' visit in Missouri, he reached Snohomish. Later he took up 
a homestead near Skykomish, on which he resided for a few months, after which 
he returned to Snohomish. He had sought a location in the west with the inten- 
tion of practicing law but on his arrival found that the prospects were unfavor- 
able and hence changed his plans. As a temporary expedient he resumed his 
former profession of teaching, accepting the position of principal of the Sultan 
school, which then had an attendance of eighty pupils, of whom two were 
Indians. At the close of his second term he resigned, for in the meantime he 
had purchased an interest in the Sultan Cash Store. He then devoted his entire 
attention to the business, which was conducted under the firm name of Hawkes 
& Warner. After a year he became sole proprietor by the purchase of his part- 
ner's interest and in 1897 he erected his present large store building. By adher- 
ing to upright principles while also making a careful study of the needs and 
requirements of his customers, he has built up a large business, increasing his 
stock from time to time. In 1898, associated with Fred Harris, he opened a 
branch store at Monroe, conducted under the firm name of Harris & Warner, 
which was closed in 1909. Mr. Warner was one of the founders of the Citizen's 
Bank of Sultan and was its president for several years but sold his interest in 
1914. In all that he undertakes he is actuated by a progressive spirit and his 
determination and energy, combined with close application, have brought him 
substantial success. 

In 1888 Mr. Warner wedded Miss Belle Johnson, of Gallatin, Missouri, a 
daughter of William and Mary (Yates) Johnson, who were natives of Virginia. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Warner is a Mason. His political allegiance 
is given to the democratic party and in the fall of 1914 he was elected mayor 
of Sultan, entering upon the duties of that position in January, 1915. He has 
since served with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents and he is 
regarded as one of the most public-spirited citizens of Sultan. His efforts have 
constituted an important element in its upbuilding and his labors have been far- 
reaching and resultant. 



ELLIS E. WARNER. 



Ellis E. Warner, junior partner in John F. Warner & Son at Sultan, was 
born in Anderson, Indiana, March 18, 1890, but was quite young when brought 
by his parents to the northwest, so that he pursued his education in the graded 
and high schools of Sultan and in the LTniversity of Washington. He was 
graduated from the law department of that institution with the class of 1912 
but never entered upon active practice. On the contrary, he joined his father in 
business soon after the completion of his law course and that association has 
since been maintained under the name of John F. Warner & Son. He now has 
the active management of the store, which he is conducting along most progress- 
ive and resultant lines, his labors bringing about the rapid growth of the trade. 
The store is neatly and tastefully arranged and the attractive line of goods car- 
ried, as well as the honorable business methods of the house, insure to the com- 
pany a continued success. 



248 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

On the nth of July, 1915, in Suhan, Air. Warner was married to Miss Mamie 
W. Knutson, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Knutson and a representative of 
a well known pioneer family of the Snohomish valley. Ellis Warner is a Mason, 
loyal to the teachings of the craft, but in politics maintains an independent course. 
His position among the highly respected citizens and business men of Snohomish 
county is a creditable one. 



EDWARD C. DAILEY. 



Edward C. Dailey, a member of the Everett bar since May i, 1903, was born 
in Hudson Falls, New York, July 9, 1863, a son of W. S. and P. C. (Heming- 
way) Dailey. Preparing for the bar in early manhood, he has devoted more 
than twenty-five years to active practice in Nebraska and Washington, estab- 
lishing his home in Everett, as previously indicated. He served as city and 
county attorney when in the east and in Washington has concentrated his efforts 
upon the private practice of law, in which connection he has won an important 
clientage. 

On the 29th of August, 1881, in Nebraska, Mr. Dailey was married to Mary 
C. Sams and their children are: Frances M., Chester A., Alvah E., Ervin, Arthur, 
Walter S. and Florence. In politics Mr. Dailey is a liberal republican. He has 
membership with the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Royal Highlanders and the Knights and 
Ladies of Security. 



JUDGE JAMES THEODORE RONALD. 

There are in the salient characteristics of Judge J. T. Ronald those elements 
of strength and courage which have dominated his life and made him a most 
efficient, trustworthy and conscientious officer in guiding municipal aft'airs as 
mayor of the city or in administering justice upon the bench. The practice of 
law has been his real life ^\•ork and in his chosen calling he has gained distinction, 
winning an extensive practice of an important character. He has ever been re- 
markable among lawyers for the wide research and provident care with which 
he prepares his cases, while his decisions on the bench have indicated strong 
mentality, careful analysis, a thorough knowledge of the law and an unbiased 
judgment. 

Judge Ronald was born April 8, 1855, near Caledonia, Washington County, 
Missouri. His parents, O. G. and Amanda (Carson) Ronald, were both natives 
of Virginia and in childhood days accompanied their respective parents to Mis- 
souri, the family settling in the southeastern part of that state. The father is 
a direct descendant of the old Ronalds of Scotland and his grandfather's father 
was one of the colonists of Virginia and a personal friend of Patrick Henry. 
Mrs. Ronald belonged to the Carson family whose ancestors were from the north 
of Ireland and of the same lineage as the present Carson who has won wide 
notoriety in Belfast in connection with the Home Rule bill. The Ronald and 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 249 

Carson families that located in southeastern Missouri became well known in 
their respective neighborhoods, where they took up their abode in pioneer times, 
after which they were closely associated with the development and progress of 
that portion of the state. 

Judge Ronald attended the public schools of Missouri and at the age of 
eighteen years became a student in the State Normal School at Kirksville, com- 
pleting a three years' course by graduation in 1875, when he won the B. S. D. 
degree. A few years later because of successful work in after life his alma 
mater conferred upon him the Bachelor of Arts degree. Following his graduation 
he went to California, where he engaged in teaching school until his admission to 
the bar in Placer county, California, in April, 1882. He was a very successful 
educator, passing from one promotion to another in the scale until in 1882, when 
he abandoned the profession. He was considered one of the most able public 
school teachers in the central part of the state. During that period he had utilized 
his leisure hours in the industrious study of law and upon his admission to the bar 
removed with his family to Seattle, then a city of less than five thousand popu- 
lation. He had had no experience and met with hard times. Although he kept 
his profession ever in the foreground he utilized other means to advance his 
financial interests while gaining a start in law practice, selling books and real 
estate and keeping books nights and mornings. In fact he did anything to earn an 
honest dollar and make a living. In those days C. M. Bradshaw, prosecuting 
attorney for the third judicial district which comprised the whole of the Puget 
Sound country, lived at Port Townsend and appointed Mr. Ronald deputy for 
King county at a salary of twenty dollars per month. The city was then full of 
brothels and gambling houses, nearly all of the saloons having a brothel above. 
After his appointment as deputy prosecuting attorney, Mr. Ronald immediately 
began a war against vice. He had to fight in court nearly the whole bar but made 
such a reputation that he was nominated by the democratic party in the fall of 
1884 for district attorney for the district comprising King, Kitsap and Snohomish 
counties. Though a democrat and the republican party usually in the ascendency, 
he was elected and was reelected in the fall of 1886. While in office he had many 
important cases including the celebrated Squak riots, resulting in the murder of 
the Chinese. At times it took all his courage and resolution to do his duty but he 
never faltered, remaining faithful to the trust reposed in him and discharging 
every duty with a sense of conscientious obligation. 

In March, 1889, Mr. Ronald retired from the position of prosecuting attorney 
and formed a partnership with S. H. Piles, with whom he soon built up a large law 
practice. In fact their practice became one of the best in the state. They were 
retained in many important cases all over the Sound country and Mr. Ronald's 
ability was again and again demonstrated by his able handling of any case and by 
the favorable verdicts which the court awarded him. 

He was called upon for public service, when, in February, 1892, he was elected 
mayor over lohn Leary, running on the democratic ticket and receiving a majority 
of almost two thousand. He is the only man ever elected mayor on straight demo- 
cratic party lines in Seattle. Times were very hard, for this was during the great- 
est period of financial panic in the history of Seattle. Notwithstanding there were 
difficult situations to face he gave the people an honest, fearless administration, 
yet was handicapped and hampered during the entire period by the existing finan- 



250 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

cial conditions, by factions and by newspaper partisan opposition. He was the 
first mayor to recognize municipal ownership of the Hghting system and he also 
strongly favored the Cedar River waterworks. Before the city had finally com- 
mitted itself to the ownership of the Cedar River system he sent Major Rinehart, 
chairnaan of the board of public works, to acquire a tract of land that was offered 
at public sale and which he knew that the city would need if it was decided to 
acquire the water system. Mr. Ronald gave Major Rinehart a city warrant with- 
out authority of the council in order to secure the tract but recognized the need 
and the exigency of the situation. In his first report he recommended the 
acquisition of a number of small tracts of land for parks, which at that time 
could have been purchased very cheap but the council refused to meet the 
recommendation, thus showing themselves lacking in foresight. The purchases 
which he recommended were in line with the subsequently adopted Olmsted plan 
and all the tracts which he wished to have purchased at that time have been sub- 
sequently acquired at enormous expense. The office of mayor came to Mr. Ronald 
unsought, for he had no political aspiration in that direction. In 1900 he was 
made the democratic nominee for congress but was defeated, yet he ran ahead 
of all other candidates upon the ticket save the nominee for governor. 

In 1898 Mr. Ronald became a partner of Messrs. Ballinger & Battle, and the 
firm took front rank among the attorneys of the city, building up a splendid prac- 
tice, numbering among their clients many of the most prominent people of the 
county. Again Mr. Ronald was called to public office, when he was appointed by 
Governor Mead, a republican, to the position of regent of the State University, in 
which capacity he served for five years, during which time the fair buildings were 
erected. It was during his term in that office that he was elected and reelected to 
the Seattle school board, but he resigned his position as regent and head of the 
school board when appointed by Governor Hay, also a republican, to the superior 
bench in April, 1909. To that office he was reelected in 1910 and again in 191 2 
and although a stanch democrat he has carried the republican city of Seattle by 
large majorities in nine elections — twice for prosecuting attorney, once for mayor 
and once when a candidate for congress and once for the school board and also 
in two primaries and two general elections for judge. While he has ever been a 
democrat, he has been bold and ready to criticise his party for unwise acts and 
courageous enough to uphold and sustain the republican party when he has felt 
its course to be right. 

On the 26th of February, 1877, Judge Ronald was united in marriage to Miss 
Rhoda Coe, at Stockton, California, a daughter of Jamison and Mary Coe, of a 
highly respected family of northeastern Missouri. They have become parents 
of three daughters : Norma, now the wife of Edgar J. Knight, deputy prosecut- 
ing attorney of King county; Eva, the wife of Dr. H. K. Benson, of the chemistry 
department of the University; and Mabel, the wife of Fred Martine, of the 
Pacific Lithographing & Engraving Company. All are residing in Seattle and 
with their husbands and their several children meet often at the home of their 
parents in a most joyful and ofttimes hilarious reunion. 

Judge Ronald is an Odd Fellow in good standing and has passed through all 
of the chairs of the subordinate lodge. He belongs to no church but is a believer 
in the work that is being accomplished for the moral development and welfare 
of the community. His own life has ever been characterized by high moral 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 251 

standards. There have been in his Hfe many evidences of the high consideration 
which his contemporaries and colleagues entertain for the integrity, dignity, im- 
partiality, love of justice and strong common sense which have marked his 
character as a judge and as a man. He possesses many excellent traits, is brave 
and manly, sincere and outspoken, considerate of others, yet firm in the discharge 
of his duties. 



HENRY A. RATHVON. 

Henry A. Rathvon, who formerly filled the position of postmaster at Marys- 
ville, is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred at Lancaster, April 
5, 1854. He represents two of the oldest families of that state, his parents, Simon 
S. and Katherine (Freeburger) Rathvon, being natives of that state, where they 
spent their entire lives. For a considerable period the father engaged in merchant 
tailoring. He was also well known as an entomologist and as a writer upon 
questions of natural history. He died in Pennsylvania in 1891 at the age of 
seventy-nine years, while his wife passed away in that state in 1896 at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-six years. 

In a family of five children Henry A. Rathvon was the youngest and in his 
boyhood days he attended the schools of his native city, passing through consecu- 
tive grades to his graduation from the high school with the class of 1870. After 
leaving school he entered the United States signal service in 1876 and there re- 
mained for a year and a half. Later he turned his attention to ranching in 
northwestern Texas and in 1881 he began railroading in connection with the 
Texas-Pacific Railroad Company, in the service of which he remained for five 
years. Later he went to Utah and was in the employ of the Southern Pacific 
Railroad Company at Terrace, at which point he continued for three years. Since 
1 89 1 he has resided at Marysville, Washington, and for eight years he was in 
the employ of the Great Northern Railway Company, occupying the position of 
station agent. In 1900 he was appointed postmaster of the town under President 
McKinley and held that position for a period of about seventeen years, dis- 
charging his duties with marked promptness and fidelity. He was prompt and 
careful in all the work relative to the care of the mails and was a popular and 
obliging official, always courteous and always reliable. For three years he filled 
the position of city treasurer of Marysville. 

In June, 1888, Mr. Rathvon was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Rathbun, 
their marriage being celebrated at Odessa, Texas, the latter being a daughter of 
Chauncey W. Rathbun. In their family are two children: Valdy. who was 
born in Marysville in December, 1893, and who is now a resident of Philadel- 
phia, where he is connected with the drafting department of the United States 
Navy; and Lucille, who born in Odessa, Texas, in 1891. She is a graduate of 
the high school of Marysville and of Whitman College, while her brother was 
graduated from the University of Washington in the class of 191 5. 

Mr. Rathvon is identified with the Foresters of America. He has a wide 
acquaintance in his section of the state and he deserves much credit for what he 



252 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

has accomplished, for he started out at an early age, dependent entirely upon 
his own resources, and gradually he has advanced along the lines of well directed 
effort. He made a most capable official and is today justly accounted among the 
well known and popular residents of his town. 



CLARENCE I. WANAMAKER. 

Clarence I. Wanamaker, a Port Townsend merchant who is also filling the 
office of county commissioner in Jefferson county, was born in New Brunswick, 
Canada, November 2, 1866. His father, James F. Wanamaker, a native of that 
country, represented an old Canadian family of German lineage descended from 
Pickle Wanamaker. The father was a commission merchant for many years at 
Coupeville, Washington, having come to this state in June, 1889, at which time 
he cast in his lot among the early settlers on Whidbey Island. He was very 
active in local politics as a supporter of the republican party and for six years 
he served as county commissioner. He was also a member of the county school 
board and was filling the office of game commissioner at the time of his death, 
which occurred in May, 1916, when he was seventy-six years of age. He had 
married Cecelia Jane Smith, a native of Canada and of English lineage. They 
became the parents of five children: Elizabeth, the wife of A. S. Lockhart, resid- 
ing near Marysville, Washington ; Allison T., a physician and surgeon of Seattle ; 
Herman, who is county treasurer of Island county; and Lemuel, a civil engineer 
residing in Island county. 

The other member of the family, Clarence I. Wanamaker, was educated at 
St. Martins, New Brunswick, and when twenty-two years of age started out in 
life on his own account. He arrived at Port Townsend on the 28th of March, 
1889, and was first employed in lumber mills, entering the service of George 
Downs. He was afterward with C. C. Bartlett & Company, general merchants, 
as a clerk until the fall of 1894, when he entered the hay and feed business in 
connection with Peter Mutty, with whom he was associated until 1896. They 
purchased the entire interest in the Wanamaker & Mutty Grocery Company, 
Incorporated, and in 1907 the firm purchased the business of the Port Townsend 
Dry Goods Company from the McLellan Dry Goods Company. Of the last named 
Mr. Wanamaker is the president, Mr. Mutty the secretary and Sanford T. Lake, 
general manager. They have the largest store of the kind in Port Townsend, 
located at the corner of Lawrence and Tyler streets, their business having now- 
reached mammoth proportions. Aside from his interests of that character Mr. 
Wanamaker is half owner in the Wanamaker & Jones Logging Company, also in 
the Montesano Creamery Company at Montesano, Washington, and has large 
realty holdings. In fact his business interests connect him extensively with the 
commercial and industrial development of the county. His interests are carefully 
controlled and his wise management, combined with indefatigable industry, have 
made him one of the prosperous citizens of his section of the state. 

At Port Townsend, on the 4th of May, 1892, Mr. Wanamaker was married to 
Miss Blanche Helen Brown, a native of Maine and a daughter of Richard and 
Dolly E. (Brown) Brown. Mr. and Mrs. Wanamaker have become parents of 




CLARENCE I. W AN AMAK IIK 






I PUBLIC LIBRARY 

I ASTOR, LENOX 

TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 255 

eight children: Myrtis, Elva, Richard, Frank, Anna, Clarence, Ilene and Floyd, 
all born in Port Townsend and all at home with the exception of the two eldest. 

Mr. Wanamaker has a military record, having served in the Canada Volunteer 
Cavalry and also later as a private of Company I of the Washington National 
Guard. His political allegiance has ever been given to the republican party since 
becoming a naturalized American citizen and in politics he has long taken an active 
part. He served for three years in the city council of Port Townsend and is now 
filling the office of county commissioner and school director. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the World and the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen in Port Townsend and he belongs also to the Commer- 
cial Club and to the Methodist church — associations which indicate much of the 
nature of his interests and the rules that govern his conduct. Arriving in Port 
Townsend with a cash capital of thirty dollars, his advancement in the business 
world is due entirely to his own efiforts. Persistency of purpose has overcome 
obstacles, energy has overthrown difficulties and laudable ambition has prompted 
the utilization of every opportunity looking to honorable success. 



JUDGE GEORGE ALBERT KELLOGG. 

Judge George Albert Kellogg, deceased, was one of the pioneer lawyers of 
Whatcom county and with the development of city and state was closely identified, 
his efforts reaching out along many lines of usefulness that have proved highly 
resultant in connection with the benefit and progress of Washington. He was 
born in Yates county, New York, November 5, 1828, and acquired his education 
in the public schools of Erie county, Ohio, where his youth and early manhood were 
passed. He then took up the study of law in the office of a Mr. \''alandingham 
and afterward pursued a law course in the Cincinnati Law School, from which 
in due time he was graduated. Admitted to the Ohio bar, he soon afterward 
removed to Story county, Iowa, and entered upon active practice there as one 
of the pioneer lawyers of that section of the state. His ability won recognition in 
election to the office of county judge and he served upon the bench until the court 
was abolished by legislative enactment. 

The year 1871 witnessed the arrival of Judge Kellogg in Washington terri- 
tory, at which time he established his home in Whatcom, where he remained for 
three years, being the only attorney inWhatcom county during that period. He was 
influenced to come to the northwest through the fact that his brother. Dr. John 
C. Kellogg, was a resident of the territory, having settled on Whidbey island in 
1854, and was one of the best known pioneers of the territory. George A. Kellogg 
continued in law practice until he was elected and for one term served as county 
auditor of Whatcom county in the old courthouse now standing on F street in 
Bellingham. which was the first brick building erected on Puget Sound. In 1873 
he left the northwest and spent the succeeding decade in Iowa, Kansas and Col- 
orado but in the spring of 1883 once more became a resident of Whatcom 
and soon afterward established his home in the old town of Bellingham, later a part 
of Fairhaven and now a part of the city of Bellingham, there erecting one of the 
first houses of the town, which he occupied to the time of his demise. Reentering 



256 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

the field of law practice, he continued active therein until the Whatcom fire of 1885, 
which destroyed his office and law library. He did not resume active connection 
with the profession but concentrated his efforts upon the development of various 
business and railroad interests. In 1888, in company with other residents of 
Fairhaven, he raised the bonus and was instrumental in inducing Nelson Bennett to 
begin the construction of the Fairhaven & Southern Railway, now the Great 
Northern. \\'hen the city of Fairhaven was incorporated he was elected its first 
city attorney, but not being actively engaged in the practice of law, did not qual- 
ify. Following the Civil war he had become a stalwart advocate of the republican 
party and was ever deeply interested in the vital and significant political problems 
of the day, lending the weight of his influence toward winning support therefor. 

On the 1st of October. 1863, Judge Kellogg was married in Nevada, Iowa, to 
]\Iiss ]Mar}' E. Diffenbacher. who sunnves him and still occupies the old home in 
Bellingham. Judge Kellogg died September i, 1902, and left surviving him his 
widow and three children ; two daughters, ]\Irs. W. H. \\^elbon and Mrs. Thomas 
L. Savage ; and one son, John A. Kellogg, who was later judge of the superior court 
of the state of Washington for Whatcom county. 

For years Judge Kellogg was a prominent member of the ^^lasonic fraternity 
and his activities for moral progress in the community were marked and resultant. 
He became a most active worker in the Presbyterian church, with which he united 
in early manhood, and after coming to the northwest he organized the first Sunday 
school on Bellingham bay and assisted in founding the first church in Whatcom 
county. For years he served as elder in the Presbyterian church and in 1893 was 
selected as a delegate from the Presbytery of Puget Sound to the Presbyterian 
General Assembly which in that year convened in Washington, D. C. Of him it 
has been said : "Judge George Albert Kellogg was a man of pleasing personality 
and was a man who always stood for the best in the upbuilding of the community 
in which he resided, and his memory will long be cherished as one of the found- 
ers and builders of \\'hatcom county and the present city of Bellingham." 



JUDGE JOHN ALONZO KELLOGG. 

By reason of the wise use of which he made of his time and talents, Judge John 
Alonzo Kellogg, of Bellingham, carved his name high on the keystone of Wash- 
ington's legal arch, being recognized as one of the most distinguished jurists of 
the state. Inspired by the example of an honored father whose activities consti- 
tuted one of the most important elements in the development and progress of 
Whatcom county through its pioneer period and also through the era of later 
development, he has come to the front and through devotion to duty and to high 
ideals has made his record one which reflects credit and honor upon his fellow 
citizens who have honored him. 

He was born in Whatcom, now Bellingham, on the 17th of September, 1871, 
a son of Judge George Albert Kellogg, and after attending the public schools of his 
native city continued his education in the University of Washington, which con- 
ferred upon him the Bachelor of Science degree upon his graduation with the 
ciass of 1892. Whether natural predilection, early environment or inherited tend- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 257 

ency had most to do with shaping his choice of a profession it is impossible to 
determine, but at all events this choice was wisely made, for in the field of law 
practice Judge Kellogg has made substantial advance since he began preparation 
for the bar as a student in the law department of the Northwestern University 
at Chicago, where he was graduated in 1894. He first opened a law office in North- 
port, Washington, where he remained for eight years and during that period was 
also prominent in connection with the public atTairs of the city, of which he was 
one of the incorporators. Election after election established him in the office of 
city attorney, where he continued until 1904, when he was elected to represent 
Stevens county in the state legislature. He took an active part in framing the 
legislative work of the session and was the promoter of the state oil inspection bill. 
He also secured the passage by the house of the so-called dependent heirs' bill, 
providing for recovery for death by wrongful act of another, by fathers, mothers, 
or minor brothers and sisters when dependent for support. The bill was killed 
in the senate during that session but became a law in 1909. 

Judge Kellogg returned to Bellingham in 1905 and opened a law office in that 
city and in 1907, when the legislature gave to Whatcom county an additional judge 
of the superior court, he was appointed to the bench by the governor. At the pri- 
mary election of the following year he received the highest vote given to any of 
seven candidates and was elected to the office for a term of four years. At 
the close of that term, in January, 1913, he retired from the bench, having been 
defeated at the 1912 election, due to a combination of circumstances — partly due 
to the working of the local option law and wet and dry fight. He has since devoted 
his energies to his private law practice, which is extensive and of a notable char- 
acter. 

In November, 1908, Judge Kellogg was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. 
McBride and to them have been born two children : John Albert, born October 20, 
1909; and Mary Katherine, born May 17, 1915. Fraternally the Judge is con- 
nected with the Elks, Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen of America, Wood- 
men of the World, the Cougar Club and the Kulshan Club. The republican party 
numbers him among its stanch and stalwart supporters. A contemporary writef 
has said of him : "He is an entertaining speaker and holds his audience by the 
force and clarity of his reasoning rather than by appeal to prejudice." Judge Kel- 
logg is in every relation a strong man, strong in his ability to plan and perform 
for the benefit of his city or for the interests of his clients. He never allows his 
activity in one direction to interfere with the faithful performance of his duties 
in another. In a word, his is a well balanced character and his worth as a man and 
a citizen is widely acknowledged. 



GEORGE ANDERSON. 



George Anderson, city clerk of Port Townsend, has a notable record of 
service covering ten years, re-election as a candidate of the citizen's party con- 
tinuing him in the office through that extended period. Abraham Lincoln said : 
"You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of 
the time, but yon can't fool all of the people all of the time." And therefore it 



258 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

is a self-evident fact that capability, promptness, efficiency and loyalty have char- 
acterized the record of Mr. Anderson in the discharge of his duties. He was 
born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Alarch 12, 1850, a son of John B. Anderson, 
a native of Scotland, where he followed the occupation of farming as a life 
work, his death occurring in that country in 1904. He married Catherine Div- 
erty, also a native of the land of hills and heather. Following her husband's 
demise she removed with members of her family to Africa, locating in Johannes- 
burg, where she passed away in 191 2, at the age of eighty-four years. 

In a family of twelve children George Anderson was the third. The public 
schools of his native country afforded him his educational opportunities and his 
early life was spent upon the farm to the age of twenty years, when he started 
out on his own account. His first employment in America was that of clerk in 
mercantile lines. He crossed the Atlantic in 1870 and made his way to Lake 
Forest, Illinois, where he spent fifteen years in business as a merchant. In 1891 
he came to W^ashington, settling at Port Townsend, where he again followed 
mercantile pursuits for ten years. In 1906 he was appointed city clerk to fill out 
an unexpired term and since then has been re-elected until his retention in the 
office covers a period of a decade. He has always been a stalwart republican 
since becoming a naturalized American citizen, giving earnest and active sup- 
port to the party. 

In IJbertyville, Illinois, in 1876. Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Jeanette Lake, a native of New York and a daughter of Thomas and 
Catherine (Hill) Lake, representatives of an old New York family. Her great- 
grandfather. Governor Chittenden, was the first chief executive of Vermont. 
Among her ancestors were those who participated in the Revolutionary war and 
the War of 1812. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have become the parents of four chil- 
dren: Katherina N., the wife of A. R. Strathie, of Port Townsend; L. Ruth, 
the wife of Maurice S. Whittier, deputy collector of customs at Juneau, Alaska ; 
A. Lucille ; and A. Frank. The last named has been a clerk in the Merchants 
Bank of Port Townsend for eleven years. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church and Mr. 
Anderson is also a member of the Woodmen of the World. His loyalty to his 
belief has ever been one of his marked characteristics and neither fear nor favor 
can swerve him from a course which he believes to be right. He stands for 
that which is best in citizenship, doing everything in his power to promote those 
interests which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride, and throughout his 
adopted city he is held in the highest regard. 



E. F. BARKER. 



The name of Barker has been associated with the furniture trade at Hoquiam 
almost from the inception of the city and has ever been a synonym for reliable 
and enterprising business methods. E. F. Barker was bom in Des Moines, Iowa, 
in 1885, but almost his entire life has been passed in Aberdeen, where his father, 
F. H. Barker, located at an early day. becoming the pioneer furniture merchant 
of the city. He lived at Hoquiam and at Aberdeen for many years but is now 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 259 

a resident of Tacoma, where he is enjoying well earned rest, having put aside all 
business cares. 

Spending his youthful days in Hoquiam, E. F. Barker attended the public 
schools and when his text books were put aside received his business training 
under the direction of his father, in 1900, entering the furniture store then locat- 
ed at Aberdeen. In 1903 the firm burned out and in 1913 the business was sold 
to Mr. Comeau. E. F. Barker then went to Seattle and was salesman for the 
firm of Frederick & Nelson for two and one-half years in their furniture depart- 
ment. In March, 191 6, he became one of the organizers of the Barker Furniture 
Company of Aberdeen, of which he was made president, with H. A. Comeau as 
vice president and secretary. They took over the business of H. A. Comeau, 
who had been conducting a furniture store on Market street for some time. They 
removed their stock to the Finch building, where they are now conducting an 
up-to-date furniture and house furnishings business, carrying a large, carefully 
selected and attractive stock. The integrity of their business methods, the spirit 
of enterprise with which they conduct their interests and their indefatigable energy 
are the qualities that are bringing to them deserved success. 

In 1909, in Aberdeen, Mr. Barker was married to Miss Lou Belle Campbell, 
a daughter of Morris Campbell and a native of Michigan. They have one son, 
Edward Henry. In the social circles of Aberdeen they occupy an enviable posi- 
tion, having many friends in this city, where Mr. Barker has spent practically 
his entire life. His record in every connection is creditable and what he has 
undertaken he has accomplished, making steady advancement along the line of 
orderly progression. 



DANIEL WALDO BASS. 

Daniel Waldo Bass, who is one of the managers of the Hotel Frye of Seattle, 
is a representative of that class of energetic, alert and capable men upon whom 
the advancement of their communities rests in such large measure. Quick to 
see and utilize business opportunities, he also cooperates in movements seeking 
the progress of Seattle along other lines. He was born at Salem, Oregon, on the 
22d of July, 1864, and is the only son of Samuel and Avarilla (Waldo) Bass. 
He has one sister. Miss Jessie Logan Bass, who is likewise living in this city. He 
is a grandson of the well known Oregon pioneers, Daniel and Melinda Waldo, 
who crossed the plains in 1843, when the journey was not only tedious but also 
dangerous, and for whom the Waldo hills, seven miles east of Salem, Oregon, were 
named. 

Daniel Waldo Bass received liberal educational advantages, attending Willa- 
mette University at Salem, Oregon, the University of Oregon at Eugene, and 
the law school of Willamette University. For fourteen years he practiced law 
in Seattle and during the years 1893 and 1894 he held the office of deputy prose- 
cuting attorney under John F. Miller. His thorough preparation for the profes- 
sion, his natural ability and his habit of taking into account all features in his 
cases made him a successful attorney, but in 1905 he turned his attention to busi- 
ness interests. From that date until 1907 he was prominently connected with the 



260 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

manufacture of shingles in the state of Washington. He conducted his indi- 
vidual manufacturing interests well and also organized the shingle mills of the 
state into an association known as the Shingle Mills Bureau, which he success- 
fully managed for two or three years and W'hich proved of great value to the 
trade. In 1908 he closed his shingle mill and became manager of the Skagit 
Trading Company, conducting a general store at McMurray, Washington, and 
also devoted considerable time to the operation of his farm., located near McMur- 
ray. On leaving McAIurray he returned to Seattle as one of the managers of the 
Hotel Frye, a position which he is still filling to the satisfaction of all concerned. 
The hotel is acknowledged to be one of the leading hostelries of the Pacific coast 
and to manage it successfully requires a high order of business acumen and 
executive ability — qualities which "Sir. Bass possesses in a marked degree. 

Mr. Bass was married on the 14th of December, 1908, to Miss Sophie Frye, 
who is a daughter of the well known pioneers, George F. and Louisa C. Frye, the 
latter a daughter of A. A. Denny, the founder of Seattle. Mr. Bass is well 
known in Masonic circles, belonging to Arcana Lodge, No. 87, A. F. & A. M., 
which was organized largely through his efforts and which is now one of the 
leading if not the leading lodge of the state of Washington. He belongs also to 
the Scottish Rite bodies and the Mystic Shrine. While living in ]McMurray he 
served as postmaster for three years, resigning that office at the time of his re- 
turn to Seattle. In that connection as in all others he proved very efficient and 
made a highly creditable record. He is a western man by birth and training and 
his thorough understanding of conditions throughout this section of the country 
has enabled him to work intelligently for the further advancement and the future 
development of his city. 



REV. HIRAM P. SAINDON. 

Rev. Hiram P. Saindon, pastor of the Church of the Immaculate Conception 
at Everett, was born near Kankakee, Illinois, in March, 1864, a son of John B. 
Saindon, who was a native of Canada and was of French descent. The grand- 
father, John Saindon, was also a native of Canada and a descendant of Peter 
Saindon, who was one of four brothers, John, James, Peter and Charles, who 
went from France to Acadia, and two years after the dispersion of the Acadians, 
these brothers settled on the banks of the St. Lawrence river near Cacouna. 
John B. Saindon, father of the Rev. Hiram P. Saindon, was born October 28, 
1828, in the parish of St. George, at Cacouna, Canada, and was educated in the 
common schools of that locality. In early manhood he followed carpentering 
and during his school days he became the sweetheart and suitor of Theotista 
Saindon, a neighbor and a distant relative. In 1850 her father emigrated with 
his family to Illinois and John B. Saindon soon afterward followed. There in 
February, 1853, he was joined in the holy bonds of wedlock, the marriage cere- 
mony being performed in Kankakee. Illinois. They afterward resided in Lo- 
gansport, Indiana, until 1877 ^"^ then removed to the Pacific coast, arriving in 
Portland, Oregon, on the ist of November of that year. After a few months, 
however, they came to Washington, settling on the Cowlitz prairie, in Lewis 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES . 261 

county, where Mr. Saindon secured a homestead and followed farming through- 
out the remainder of his active life. In his later years he lived retired, enjoying 
the fruits of his former toil, passing away in Chehalis, Washington, April 13, 
1912. His wife was born March 15, 1836, in the same parish as her hus- 
band, and was a daughter of David Saindon, a descendant of James Sain- 
don, one of the four brothers who originally came from France. By her 
marriage she became the mother of eleven children, six of whom are yet 
living. Her death occurred in Chehalis, Washington, October 20, 1906. The 
sons and daughters of the family who still survive are : Frank, a resident of 
Chehalis ; Hiram P. ; Joseph and Alexander, living in Chehalis ; Josephine, the 
wife of Frank Calvin, of Chehalis ; and Eleonore, the widow of James Pattison, 
of Chehalis. 

Rev. Hiram P. Saindon began his education in the parochial schools of 
Logansport, Indiana, and afterward spent two years in the parochial schools of 
Portland, Oregon, and three years at Vancouver, Washington. He next entered 
St. Hyacinthe's Seminary at St. Hyacinthe, near Montreal, Canada, where he 
pursued the complete course in classics and philosophy. The succeeding four 
years were passed as a student in the Grand Seminary at Montreal. In 1892 he 
was ordained by Bishop Junger in Vancouver, Washington, and was assigned to 
his first charge as assistant priest at the cathedral at Vancouver, where he con- 
tinued for four years. His next charge was at the Indian reservation at Tulalip, 
Snohomish county, where he continued for one year and thence went to Olympia 
to take charge of St. Michael's church. He continued as pastor there for four 
years and from Olympia was transferred to the pastorate of St. John's church at 
Chehalis, where he remained for two years. Subsequently he went to Everett, 
Washington, where he arrived in September, 1903. His efforts there have been 
largely resultant. He purchased the ground and erected the Church of the Im- 
maculate Conception on the southeast corner of Hoyt avenue and Twenty-fifth 
street, the edifice being built in 1904. The church was opened with a member- 
ship of one hundred and twenty-five families, which has since increased to 
one hundred and sixty famiHes. He has purchased a tract of land, 125 feet by 
120 feet in dimensions, opposite the church for a school site. In addition to his 
priestly duties Father Saindon is very active in the Knights of Columbus and the 
Catholic Order of Foresters, in both of which organizations he is serving as 
chaplain. As the result of his zeal and consecration in the work, Catholicism has 
been growing in this section and the church has become a strong influence among 
its parishioners. 



HERBERT GODFREY. 



Herbert Godfrey, president of the Knight-Godfrey Mercantile Company, In- 
corporated, dealers in general merchandise at Sequim. was born in Bedford- 
shire, England, October 5, 1879. His father, William Godfrey, a native of that 
country, died in January, 1914, at the age of seventy-one years. He was a suc- 
cessful farmer and also engaged in raising and feeding stock. In his com- 
munity he was prominent in connection with local afifairs and for a period of 



262 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

ten years was a member of the board of guardians in the town of Buckingham. 
He married Elizabeth A. Marriott, also a native of England, and her death 
occurred in Buckingham in 1901, at the age of fifty-nine. In the family were 
ten children, the eighth of whom was Herbert Godfrey. 

After attending public schools of his native country and further pursuing 
his education by attendance at night schools, Herbert Godfrey concentrated his 
efforts upon farm work, early becoming familiar with the tasks of plowing, 
planting and harvesting. He was thus engaged until 1902 and in the following 
year, when a young man of twenty- four, he came to the new world and crossed 
the continent to the Pacific coast, settling first at Chimacum, in Jefferson county, 
Washington. There he entered the employ of the Glendale Creamer}^ Company, 
with which he was connected for six years, after which he returned to England 
on a visit, remaining away for eight months. When he again reached Wash- 
ington he once more entered the employ of the Glendale Creamery Company 
but afterward removed to Sequim and formed a partnership with J. T. Knight 
in the organization and incorporation of the Knight-Godfrey Company for the 
conducting of a mercantile business. They today have one of the leading stores 
of Sequim, building up a large and gratifying trade. 

In September, 1912, at Port Angeles, Clallam county, Washington, Mr. God- 
frey was joined in wedlock to ]\Iiss Alargaret Ritchie, her father being W. B. 
Ritchie, who is engaged in the practice of law at Port Angeles and represents 
one of the prominent families of the city. Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey have one son, 
George Ritchie, who was born at Port Angeles on the 24th of June, 1915. 

While in England, Mr. Godfrey was a member of the Royal Bucks Hussars 
for six years, thus being active in the cavalry service. This constitutes his mili- 
tary experience. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, being senior 
warden of the lodge at Sequim, and he also belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is likewise a member of the Commercial Club and belongs to 
the Pacific Northwest Hardware & Implement Association. He was elected city 
treasurer in the fall of 1916 for the third term. He is thoroughly satisfied with 
the progress that he has made in the west and has never for a moment regretted 
his determination to come to the new world, where he has felt that good oppor- 
tunities are offered to the man of laudable ambition and energy. Step by step 
he has advanced in his business career and his perseverance and determination 
have constituted a safe foundation on which to build prosperity. 



JOHN H. BAST. 

Among the prominent and well known citizens of Everett connected with the 
development of this part of the state from pioneer days is John H. Bast, a suc- 
cessful brick contractor, who represents a family that has been identified with 
the settlement and improvement of Snohomish county from a very early day. 
Before the city of Everett was ever dreamed of his father. Englebert Bast, took 
up his abode in Snohomish count}'. This was in 1879. He acquired five hundred 
and fifty acres of land on the east side of the Snohomish river where the town 
of Everett was first platted and embracing that district now commonly called 



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WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 265 

Riverside. On that tract he tilled the soil and became one of the county's first 
and most prosperous agriculturists. It was no unusual sight to see many Indians 
in their canoes on the river, in fact hundreds in a day from the Snoqualmie River 
reservation passed going to the hop fields to work. He established the first indus- 
trial enterprise in this section of Washington, starting a brickyard on a location 
now included in the city of Everett, and his son, John H. Bast, blew the first 
whistle. When the Union Pacific Railroad was built through this section of the 
state with Tacoma as the terminus Mr. Bast was ofl:ered two hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars for his land by the railroad company but, like many another 
man, he refused the offer. Later on when the town was platted by the improve- 
ment company they offered him one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars 
for his property, which was again turned down. Then the hard times set in and 
Mr. Bast was forced to mortgage his entire holdings and ultimately lost his five 
hundred and fifty acre farm. He bravely set out to recoup his shattered fortunes, 
taking up the work of contracting, and many of the first buildings in Everett were 
erected by him. He continued actively in that line up to the time of his death, 
which occurred November 21, 1907. He was a firm believer in the great value of 
education and served as a member of the first school board in this locality and the 
first schoolhouse is still standing upon the old Bast homestead. School was con- 
ducted there before the city of Everett had come into being, and the first teacher 
was Miss Frear. 

John H. Bast, now one of Everett's leading citizens and one of its best known 
contractors, was born in Detroit, Michigan, December 24, 1859, and is of German 
descent, for his parents, Englebert and Gertrude (Appell) Bast, were natives of 
Prussia and Hesse-Darmstadt respectively. The mother's people were originally 
French but sought refuge in Germany during the revolution in France and after- 
ward became German subjects. The Bast family emigrated to America when 
the father of our subject was but ten years of age and his mother's people came 
to this country when she was a maiden of nine summers. Settlement was made 
in Detroit, Michigan, and there she was educated and married. After the fire 
in Chicago the family home was established in that city and in 1875 a removal 
was made to San Francisco, where they remained for several years. Later they 
became residents of Tacoma, Washington, when that town had a population of 
but eight hundred. In 1879 they located where the town of Everett now stands, 
and here Mr. Bast secured the five hundred and fifty acres of land previously 
mentioned. He was born in 1833, so that he had reached the age of seventy- 
four years when he passed away in Everett. His widow survives at the age of 
eighty-one years and is now living in Seattle. Their children were: John H. ; 
Anthony F. ; -Peter T- ; George E. ; Lawrence W. ; Edward, deceased ; Alary and 
Josephine, deceased; and Katharine. Mary became the wife of R. D. McDou- 
gal, of Tacoma, and Katharine married George Lawrence, of Seattle. John H. 
Bast was the eldest of their nine children. In his boyhood he attended the schools 
of Michigan and afterward took up the bricklaying trade in Chicago. He com- 
pleted his apprenticeship in San Francisco and later he erected many of the build- 
ings in Everett and also many of the finest structures of Seattle and Tacoma. 
He had charge of all the brick work of the State Reformatory at Monroe, Wash- 
ington, and has had charge of all the brick work on many other important build- 
ings in Tacoma and Seattle. His life has been one of intense and well directed 

Vol. in— 14 



266 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

activity and the success which has crowned his efforts is the merited reward of 
his labor. As his financial resources have increased he has made investments" 
in real estate and is now the owner of much valuable property in Everett. 

On June 28, 1887, in Tacoma, Mr. Bast was united in marriage to Miss May 
O. Russell, a daughter of James and Agnes Russell, of Edinburgh, Scotland. 
They have become the parents of nine children, eight daughters and a son : Cas- 
per, born in Tacoma in 1891 ; Ellen, who was born in Snohomish in 1892 and is 
now the wife of N. J. Diggs, of Everett, by whom she has one child, James 
Roland; Beatrice, born in 1894, who is now the wife of Albert P. Broesamle, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and has one child, Jane; Genevieve, born in 1896, Celia born 
in 1898, and Clara, born in 1899, who are attending high school in Everett; and 
Theresa, born in 1901, Mildred, born in 1903, and Frances, born in 1904, all of 
whom are in school in Everett. 

Fraternally Mr. Bast is connected with the Knights of the Maccabees and 
in politics he maintains an independent course. He stands very high in public 
regard and his has been a well spent life justly entitling him to the respect and 
confidence of those with whom he has come in contact. He now occupies a fine 
home at No. 3620 Broadway, in Everett, which is one of the evidences of his 
life of well directed energy and thrift. He represents one of the honored pioneer 
families of this section of the state and his memory forms a connecting link between 
the primitive past and the progressive present. Both he and his wife can remem- 
ber a period long prior to the time when Everett was founded, when the red 
men were more numerous than the white settlers of this locality and deer were 
very plentiful, some being shot in the back yard of the Bast home. They have 
rejoiced in the changes which have occurred, bringing about modern day progress 
and improvement, and at all times have borne their share in the work of general 
advancement. 



WILLIAM F. ROEHL. 



William F. Roehl is now living retired in Bellingham but for a long period 
was actively identified with the business interests and consequent development 
of this city, owing his success in no small measure to his operations in the real 
estate field. His prosperity enabled him to put aside active business cares in 
1904 and now his attention is given only to the supervision of his investments. 
The family name indicates his German nativity and ancestry. He was born in 
Brandenburg, Germany, a son of John Casper and Elizabeth (Kublanc) Roehl, 
both of whom were natives of Germany. Coming to America with their family, 
they settled in Texas and there the father passed away in 1898, while his wife 
survived until 1902, her death also occurring in that state. They had a family 
of three sons and three daughters : Charles F. and William F., long associated 
in business in Bellingham ; August, who became a stock raiser of Texas ; Lottie, 
the wife of Peter Winter, a contractor of Brj^an, Texas; Alvina, the wife of 
Max Kiesewetter, of Beaumont, Texas; and Minnie, who married Fred Viereck 
and died leaving five children. 

William F. Roehl largely spent his youthful days in the Lone Star state, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 267 

acquiring his education there. He remained a resident of Texas until he joined 
his brother, Charles F., in the northwest and since that period he has largely 
been identified with the business development of this section of the country. In 
]886 he went to Vancouver, British Columbia, where he was employed for a 
number of months, and in 1887 he joined his brother Charles at San Diego, Cali- 
fornia. In 1889 they established business in Whatcom as merchants and from 
that period were closely identified with the commercial development of the city 
for thirteen years or until they retired. Success had attended their efforts in 
large measure and in the meantime they began investing in real estate. Again 
they prospered in this undertaking and their purchase and sale of town property 
brought them a very gratifying financial return. They have put up some of the 
best business blocks in Bellingham and the rental therefrom brings them a most 
gratifying annual income. William F. Roehl remained in active business until 
1906, when he retired and in the intervening period he has enjoyed that rest 
which should follow persistent, earnest and well directed effort. His energy 
stands as an unquestioned fact in his career and his sound judgment and keen 
discrimination have been salient features in the attainment of his present 
prosperity. 

On October i, 1Q08, in New York Mr. Roehl was married to Elizabeth E. 
Geulich, a native of Baden, Germany, who came as a child to America with her 
parents. To them have been born two sons: Henry John, born September 12, 
1909; and Carl Francis, born January 15, 1913. 



HON. EDWARD EVERETT CUSHMAN. 

Hon. Edward Everett Cushman, United States district judge for the western 
district of Washington, was born in Louisa county, Iowa, November 26, 1865, 
a son of Dr. Henry Cushman, a native of Vermont, and a grandson of Zabena 
Cushman, who was of English descent, tracing his ancestry back to Robert Cush- 
man, who came to America on the sailing vessel Speedwell in early Colonial 
times and located at Plymouth, Massachusetts. The direct ancestors through the 
first four generations were preachers of the gospel. Dr. Henry Cushman was 
a prominent and successful physician, who, leaving New England about 1859, 
settled in Iowa, casting in his lot with the pioneer residents of that state. He 
served as surgeon in a smallpox hospital at Louisville, Kentucky, during the Civil 
war and he passed away at Stromsburg, Nebraska, in 1903, at the age of sixty- 
seven years, his birth having occurred in 1836. His attention throughout his 
entire life had been concentrated upon the practice of medicine and he did good 
work in that connection for his fellowmen. He had removed to Nebraska about 
1890 and his last thirteen years were spent in that state. His political allej^iance 
was given to the republican party, while fraternally he was connected with the 
Masons. In early manhood he wedded Elizabeth Newell, a native of Ohio, and 
a daughter of Robert F. Newell. The first of the family to come to America left 
Ireland and settled in the new world during the period of the Revolutionary war, 
establishing his home in Virginia. Mrs. Cushman's father's people went by way 
of Kentucky to Ohio and her mother's people by way of Virginia to the Buckeye 



268 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

state. Mrs. Cushman is still living, being now a resident of Tacoma. Judgr 
Cushman, however, is the only survivor of a family of three children. 

Passing through consecutive grades in the public schools he became a high 
school student at Brighton, Iowa, and at Iowa City and when seventeen years of 
age he entered the law office of L. A. Reily, an attorney at law of Wapello, Iowa, 
with whom he studied for two years. He then removed to Wyoming, living at 
various places in that state, and followed various occupations from punching 
cows to teaching school. He was married there and afterward removed to Rock 
county, Nebraska, where he resumed the study of law, being admitted to prac- 
tice in the courts of that state in 1890. He followed his profession in Stromsburg 
until 1893 and built up a large and gratifying clientage. The opportunities of 
the northwest attracted him, however, and on the ist of July, 1893, he arrived in 
Tacoma, a comparative stranger. His brother, Francis W. Cushman, an attorney 
at law, however, had preceded him, having come to this city in 1891. Edward E. 
Cushman first entered the office of Snell & Bedford, the senior partner being 
then county attorney. He remained in a clerical position with that firm for about 
eighteen months after which he engaged in partnership with Hon. Charles E. 
Claypool and Francis W. Cushman, his brother, under the firm style of Claypool. 
Cushman & Cushman, which relationship was maintained until 1898, when his 
brother was elected to congress and Mr. Claypool was appointed assistant United 
States attorney. The firm was then Cushman & Cushman until 1900, when Mr. 
Claypool was appointed United States commissioner at Eagle City, Alaska, and 
Judge Cushman was appointed assistant to the United States attorney under 
Hon. Wilson R. Gay. The relationship was maintained while Mr. Gay was in 
office and afterward with Hon. Jesse A. Frye for two years, or until 1904. Judge 
Cushman afterward received the appointment of special assistant to the United 
States attorney general under Hon. Philander C. Knox, which position he held 
for eighteen months, during which time he was still a resident of Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. He then resigned and again engaged upon the private practice of his 
profession, in which "he continued until appointed district judge of Alaska in 
July, 1909. He occupied that position for three years and on the ist of July, 
1912, was appointed United States district judge for the western district of 
Washington, and is still serving upon the federal bench. He has made an excel- 
lent record in judicial service, being prompt and impartial in the discharge of his 
duties, his course being characterized by the utmost fidelity and a m.asterful grasp 
of every problem presented for solution. 

In 1888, in Wyoming, Judge Cushman was married to Miss Alice Louise 
Sommer, a native of Colorado, and a daughter of Wilhelm F. and Sarah (Fleck) 
Sommer, who went to Colorado during the time of the Pike's Peak excitement. 
Judge and Mrs. Cushman have three sons, Arthur W., who was bom in Rock 
county, Nebraska, in May, 1890, was for three years a law student in the State 
University and is now ranching in the mountains of Yakima county. Francis F., 
born in Stromsburg, Nebraska, in April, 1892, is also a ranchman of Yakima 
county. Edward H., born in Tacoma, in 1900, is attending high school and makes 
his home with his parents at North Thirty-ninth and Proctor streets. Mrs. 
Cushman is a member of the Study Club, of the Woman's Republican Club and 
other leading organizations of the city and is quite active in charitable work and 
in other lines to which women are now directing their attention. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 269 

Fraternally Judge Cushman was connected with the Elks while a resident of 
Alaska. His social nature finds expression in his membership in the Union and 
Country Clubs of Tacoma and along strictly professional lines he is associated 
with the Washington State and National Bar Associations and is a member of the 
National Council in Washington. The path of opportunity has opened up to him 
as he has taken advance steps and while his early opportunities gave him no par- 
ticular advantage he has proven his worth by his determination to progress. En- 
tering a calling wherein success depends entirely upon individual merit and ability 
he has through the force of his character, his laudable ambition and his persistent 
purpose gained a position of more than local distinction as a representative of 
the judiciary of the northwest. 



HENRY OWEN SHUEY. 

Henry Owen Shuey is a prominent representative of banking interests of 
Seattle as president of H. O. Shuey & Company, and is also the president of the 
Equitable Building, Loan & Investment Association, a concern which is an im- 
portant factor in the business world of Seattle. His has been a life of intense 
and wisely directed activity and he has gained wealth and an honored position in 
his city through the utilization of opportunities which others have failed to recog- 
nize. 

Mr. Shuey was born April 29, 1861, on a farm near Bainbridge, Putnam 
county, Indiana, and is a son of Daniel and Nancy (Owen) Shuey. The family 
is of I'rench Huguenot ancestry, but representatives of the name located in Ger- 
many, whence they emigrated to America in 1734. They have since been promi- 
nently identified with the history of this country and are numerous in Virginia, 
Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and California. Daniel 
Shuey was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, April i, 1804, and in 1829 located 
in Putnam county, Indiana, where he engaged in farming and stock raising until 
his demise in 1868. He was twice married and by his first wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Eve Garst, had twelve children. His second wife, the mother 
of our subject, was born in Rowan county, North Carolina, May 5, 1821, and 
about 1830 removed to Indiana, where she was married to Mr. Shuey about 1850. 
Her demise occurred on the 19th of March, 1899, when she had almost reached 
the age of seventy-eight years. She was the mother of eight children. Thomas 
J. Shuey, brother of our subject, was for years a noted minister of the Chris- 
tian church and was well known as an evangelist and lecturer throughout the 
Mississippi valley. His last pastorate was at Seattle, where he died February 17, 
191 1, and where his family still reside. Another brother, J. B. Shuey. is living in 
Paris, Illinois. 

Henry O. Shuey was but seven years of age when his father died and he 
remained upon the homestead farm in Putnam county with his mother until he 
was nineteen years of age. After attending the country schools he wasa student 
in an academy at Bainbridge, Indiana, and later attended the Northern Indiana 
Normal School, now Valparaiso University at Valparaiso, Indiana, and the Central 
Normal School at Ladoga. Montgomery county, that state. The energy and 
determination that have always characterized him were manifest in the days of 



270 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

his boyhood and youth, as he worked his way through school. Following his 
marriage, in 1884, he gave his entire attention to farming and stock raising but in 
1888 removed westward, arriving in Seattle on the 15th of February. He made 
the long journey without taking a sleeper and rode from Tacoma to Seattle on a 
freight train. For several years after locating in this city he continued his habit 
of rising at four o'clock in the morning, and he worked in his garden for several 
hours before going to his business. 

By personal solicitation Mr. Shuey built up a large fire insurance and loan 
business, enlarged his acquaintance and became known all over the city and county 
as a careful, energetic, systematic and successful business man. He also entered 
banking circles and at one time served as receiver of the Seattle Savings Bank. 
He established the banking firm of H. O. Shuey & Company, of which he is presi- 
dent, manager, director and principal stockholder; and was one of the organizers 
of the Citizens National Bank, of which he was also for a considerable period 
president, manager, director and principal stockholder; and he is at present presi- 
dent, manager and director of the Equitable Building, Loan & Investment Associa- 
tion; and president, manager and director of the Pacific Home Builders, which 
will erect any kind of a building, residence, store, apartment building, hotel or 
church. He is likewise trustee of Valparaiso University at Valparaiso, Indiana. 
He has large and valuable property holdings in Seattle and throughout the state 
of Washington. He takes just pride in the success which he has achieved and the 
large business interests which he has built up through his own enterprise and good 
management, but he finds equal pleasure in the knowledge that he has also been 
able to assist a large number of people to help themselves. Mr. Shuey has enabled 
more than one thousand families to own homes of their own by the easy payment 
plan. He has been instrumental in erecting houses, which, if placed in a line one 
house to each fifty feet, would reach more than ten miles and, although the homes 
cost the owners about three million dollars, they are now w^orth about ten million 
dollars, the profit representing the increase in values and the rents saved. He 
will build a house on a lot owned by the investor or on a lot which the company 
owns or, if it is desired, loan the investor the necessary money and allow him 
to have the house built by a private contractor. In all cases easy terms of pay- 
ment are given and his companies have done a great deal toward encouraging 
systematic saving among wage earners. Although the work has a great economic 
value, its importance along other lines is equally worth considering. It is well 
recognized that people who own their homes take a deeper interest in the develop- 
ment of the community than those who are paying rent and in assisting people 
to gain homes of their own Mr. Shuey is aiding in making better citizens. His 
company also deals in mortgage loans, real estate, insurance, rents and collec- 
tions and does a general investment business. The Equitable Building, Loan 
& Investment Association, of which Mr. Shuey is president, was established on 
the 23d of October, 1894, and is a mutual savings society of recognized reliability. 
Its affairs are conducted on a sound business basis and it is a safe depositor^' 
for the small investor. It has never paid less than six per cent per annum 
to its members, and the volume of its business has steadily grown since its 
establishment. 

Mr. Shuey was married on the 17th of August, 1884, in Putnam county, 
Indiana, to Miss Lucina Hestletine Sherrill, a daughter of Rev. J. W. and 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 271 

Mary C. (Denny) Sherrill, of that county. Her father was a minister of the 
Missionary Baptist church. His wife was a cousin of A. A. and D. T. Denny, 
the founders of Seattle, and a sister of William B. Denny, a well known early 
resident of this city. A brother of Mrs. Shuey, J. E. Sherrill, is a minister 
residing in Danville, Indiana. To Mr. and Mrs. Shuey have been born two 
sons: Charles E., who died when six years of age; and Clyde Sherrill, who was 
born in Seattle on the ist of April, 1897. 

Mr. Shuey is a republican and is never remiss in his duties as a citizen but 
has not taken an active part in politics. He has been a member of the Christian 
church since he was sixteen years of age and has filled every office in the church. 
He is now serving as elder and has been honored by election to state offices in 
the church and also to positions of still larger responsibility. He has helped to 
build scores of churches and has been a leader in various branches of church 
work. He was for some time trustee of the Washington Children's Homelinding 
Society, a director in the Young Men's Christian Association, and many benevolent 
and philanthropic movements have profited by his cooperation and support. He 
possesses in large measure that enterprising spirit that recognizes no obstacles, 
which has dominated the west and which has made possible the marvelous 
development of Seattle. It is greatly to his credit that in his determination to 
build up a large business he has not neglected the other phases of life, but, 
on the contrary, has utilized his executive ability and keen insight in helping to 
bring about the advancement of the city along the lines of moral progress. He 
is widely known and all who have come into contact with him esteem him most 
highly. 



THOMAS F. MONAHAN. 

Thomas F. Monahan, of Bellingham, looking after his personal interests and 
investments, became a resident of that city in 1885, when a lad of fourteen years. 
He was born in Danville, Illinois, May 5, 1871, and is a son of Thomas E. and Jane 
(Brady) Monahan. The father was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in January, 
1842. and there pursued his education to the age of fourteen years, when he went 
to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. His education was there continued and later he worked 
on the government arsenal. In 1862 he arrived in the United States and made his 
way to Danville, Illinois, where he engaged in merchandising until 1882, or for a 
period of twenty years. At that date he made his way to W^ishington, establish- 
ing his home in Bellingham, while he took up government land on Lake Whatcom 
and later on Lake Patten. He retained his residence in that part of the city 
which later became Fairhaven and was prominently associated with the public life 
as well as the business interests of the di.strict. He served for several years as a 
member of the Fairhaven city council and was one of the signers of the charter 
when Fairhaven and Bellingham were consolidated under the former name. He 
was married on Staten Island, New York, to Miss Jane Brady, and they became 
the parents of four children, of whom one passed away in infancy, while John C. 
and H. W. Monahan are also deceased. The death of the father occurred in Sep- 
tember, 1910, and thus Bellingham lost a citizen who for more than a quarter of a 
century had been closely identified with her interests. 



272 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Thomas F. Monahan, the only survivor of the family, became a public school 
puj)i] in Danville, Illinois, at the usual age, continuing his studies until 1885, when 
he joined his father in Bellingham. He afterward became connected with the 
management and conduct of his father's ranch, whereon he remained until 191 1, 
when he retired from active business and has since given his attention to the super- 
vision of his property interests and investments. 

In Bellingham Mr. Monahan was united in marriage to Miss Evelyn Schoss. 
His religious faith is that of the Catholic church and his fraternal connections are 
with the Benevolent Protective order of Elks. He belongs also to the Kulshan 
Club and he gives his political allegiance to the republican party, which he has sup- 
ported since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. Much of his life has 
been passed in Bellingham or this section of the state and of the growth and 
progress of western Washington he has been an interested witness for thirty-two 
years. 



JAMES LAURENCE RANDLES. 

A well appointed drug store of Granite Falls is the property of James 
Laurence Randies, who personally conducts the business and has made of it one 
of the growing commercial undertakings of the city. He is yet a young man, his 
birth having occurred in Gove county, Kansas, March 4, 1887. His father, 
George C. Randies, was a native of Ohio and belonged to one of the old families 
of that state that was founded in America prior to the Revolutionary war. 
George C. Randies was a carpenter and builder, devoting his life to that occu- 
pation. For many years he was a member of the National Guard of Ohio and 
was a valued resident of that state until 1886, when he moved to Gove county, 
Kansas, where he remained until 1899. He then came to Washington, settling 
at Newhall, now Rosario. He passed away in Granite Falls, July 6, 191 5, at the 
age of sixty-two years. He had lived retired for six years, spending his last 
days in the enjoyment of a rest which he had truly earned and richly deserved. 
He married Sarah Elizabeth Maston, a native of Ohio, who also belongs to an 
old American family long represented on this side of the Atlantic. She is still 
living, her home being now at Oakley, Logan county, Kansas. 

James L. Randies, who was the third in a family of six children, pursued a 
public school education, being graduated from the eighth grade at Friday Harbor 
and afterward from the Lincoln high school of Seattle. He completed a phar- 
maceutical course in the pharmacy department of the Washington State Univer- 
sity in 1910, at which time he won his degree. He was then employed in 
Bremerton and also by the Swift pharmacy of Seattle until 1914. On the 15th 
of December, 191 5, he arrived in Granite Falls, where he opened his present 
store, which he has since conducted under the name of the City Drug Store. He 
has the largest establishment of the kind in Granite Falls, it being modern in 
every detail. He carries a large and carefully selected line of drugs and drug- 
gists' sundries and his reliable and enterprising business methods insure him a 
liberal patronage. He started out to provide for his own support when a youth 
of but thirteen years and he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 273 

his industry and determination having constituted the basic elements of his grow- 
ing success. 

On the 2ist of February, 191 1, Mr. Randies was married in Seattle to Miss 
Cora Mae Breece, a native of Kansas and a daughter of Enoch E. and Hattie 
Breece, both now deceased. Mr. Randies follows an independent political course. 
He was made a Mason in Granite Falls Lodge, F. & A. M., and became a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Friday Harbor. His religious faith 
is that of the Methodist church. Those who know him recognize that his life 
is actuated by high standards and that his course is ever honorable, upright and 
progressive. 



JOHN H. HILTON. 



John H. Hilton, deceased, was one of the pioneers of Snohomish county and 
one of the founders of the city of Everett. He was born at St. Albans, Somerset 
county, Maine, September i, 1845, of colonial American and Scotch ancestry. 
His father, Nathaniel Hilton, was a prominent lumberman and land holder of 
that section of Maine and was a native of the Pine Tree state, his birth having 
occurred in Skowhegan in 1814. When a young man he crossed the border into 
Canada and made a fortune in the lumber trade in the heavy forests of Nova 
Scotia. While thus engaged he married Miss Jane Doak, a native of Nova Scotia, 
born at Mariamache in 181 7 and of Scotch parentage. Her life, which ended in 
1857, was marked by most devout Christian spirit. Nathaniel Hilton passed 
away in 1849, while residing in his native state. 

The boyhood of John Hilton was marked by severe misfortunes and a hard, 
grinding struggle for existence. He lost his father when but four years of age 
and his mother seven years later. The family was then scattered and he was 
forced to make his own way in the world. The mettle of the lad was indeed 
sorely tried but he rose to the occasion, thus demonstrating his inherent powers 
and qualities. He worked his way through the public schools and in 1861, when 
President Lincoln called for troops, he enlisted immediately as a member of the 
Fourteenth Maine Infantry and later enlisted in the Twenty-second Maine Regi- 
ment. Each time, however, he was unable to secure his guardian's consent to 
enter the army. Finally, in 1863, he left Maine and by way of the Nicaragua 
route started out to seek his fortune in California. He spent a year in the red- 
wood forests and then made his way to the Puget Sound country, locating on 
Whidbey island, where his brother, R. D. Llilton, was logging with oxen, there 
being no horses in the country at the time. John H. Hilton endeavored to secure 
work in the lumber camp. He was advised, however, to go to Port Gamble and 
obtain employment in the mills, being told that he would only be in the way in 
the camp. His experience in the mills on the Penobscot river of Maine, however, 
led him to avoid such employment. For a time he met with discouragements, 
finding no one inclined to be of real assistance to him. A little later he entered 
the employ of Brown & Foster on Brown's Bay. just below Mukilteo, at one of 
the company's oldest camps. He soon became their most efficient woodsman. In 
1865 he went up the Snohomish river to Foster's Slough, where he heard the 



274 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

news of Lincoln's assassination. In the fall of 1865 the camp was moved midway 
between Mukilteo and Everett and there he celebrated his twenty-first birthday, 
with a fortune of fourteen hundred dollars to his credit. Soon afterward he 
decided to go to San Francisco and made the trip by canoe, stage and steamer, 
by way of Seattle, Olympia and Portland. For a year he mined in Plumas county, 
California, and spent the next year in the redwood forests of Sonoma county. 
The year 1869 saw him stranded in San Francisco but undismayed by his reverses. 
At Pope & Tabbot's old dock he engaged passage on the bark Miland for Port 
Gamble and as soon as possible made his way back to Snohomish county, obtain- 
ing work at the lumber camp of Charles McLain on the -Pilchuck. There he 
remained until early spring, after which he drove logs on the Pilchuck river with 
Alex Ross, George Robinson and a man named Pullen, all of whom were expert 
loggers. He next went to the camp of E. D. Smith near Port Gamble, where 
Marysville now stands, and after a season there spent took up his abode at 
Lowell. 

In these various ventures Mr. Hilton was successful, saving one thousand 
dollars, a portion of which he invested in what became valuable tidelands of 
Seattle. In 1870 he took a preemption claim on Holmes Harbor, then thought 
to be the terminus of the Northern Pacific Railway, engineers being actually on 
the plats. In 1872 he took a homestead on the Everett peninsula, going down 
the river in a canoe with a frying pan and cofifee pot as his housekeeping equip- 
ment. At that time his only neighbor was a man named King, who was mentally 
deranged. Keen sagacity was shown in this investment of Mr. Hilton's, for nol 
only did he realize that the land was valuable for timber and agricultural pur- 
poses but he believed it would some day be the site of a great city. The year 
i8go saw the beginning of the verification of his prediction, for at that date 
Henry Hewitt, Jr., ofifered him twenty-five thousand dollars for the homestead, 
which he refused. Mr. Hilton engaged in various lines of business, establishing 
a butcher shop at Snohomish in 1875, and later developed his business into a 
general merchandise establishment. In 1883 he sold out to Comeg}^s & Vestal, 
well known pioneers. He had started the business with a credit line of goods 
valued at one hundred and ten dollars and during his ownership the enterprise 
netted him approximately twenty thousand dollars. He afterward made a trip 
to Oakland and San Francisco and then returned to Maine but again came to 
the Sound country and engaged in buying and selling land and stock and in 
improving farms. In 1890 he removed to Seattle, built a residence there and 
made that city his home for three years, after which he resided in Everett to 
the time of his death, which occurred August 25, 1907, at Pasadena, California. 

The old Blue Eagle building at Snohomish, one of the county's noted pioneer 
structures, was the scene of his wedding, which occurred December 7, 1873, Miss 
Susie Harriet Elwell becoming his wife. She was a daughter of John and Eliza 
(Crosby) Elwell, pioneers of Snohomish, and was born in Northfield, Maine, 
December 16, 1850. She departed this life March 5, 1902, leaving a memory 
that is cherished by all who knew her because of her unselfishness, her kindliness 
and many good qualities. Of the five children born of that marriage three have 
passed away: John H. ; Mortimer E. ; and Claude H., who died in infancy. A 
daughter, Mrs. Leila Loomis, resides in Seattle, and a son, Bailey G., is a resident 
of Everett. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 275 

Mr. and Mrs. Hilton were members of the Baptist church and he was also 
connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of 
Pythias. Politically he was a republican but never sought office. He contributed 
much to the development and progress of Snohomish county and the northwest, 
and his name is inseparably interwoven with its history. 



JERRY A. McGILLICUDDY, Jr. 

Jerry A. McGillicuddy, Jr., of Aberdeen, who since 1912 has filled the office 
of county treasurer of Chehalis, now Grays Harbor county, has for a consider- 
able period been an influential figure in political circles in southwestern Wash- 
ington and by reason of his activity in that connection and in business circles 
has become widely known. He was born in Hoquiam in 1883 ^^id the schools of 
Chehalis county afl^orded him his educational opportunities while he was spending 
the days of his boyhood and youth in the home of his father, Jerry A. McGil- 
licuddy, who went to Grays Harbor from the Coos bay country in Oregon in 
1883. The father was a native of New Brunswick, Canada, and on crossing 
the border into the United States settled first in Maine, where he followed the 
lumber business for some time. Upon his removal to the northwest he lived for 
a period in Oregon and thence came to Washington, settling at Hoquiam, where 
western Washington than he, for he has engaged in timber cruising all over this 
he entered upon the work of timber cruising and also timber surveying. He is 
still active in that line and no man is more familiar with the timber lands of 
part of the country and knows almost every foot of the forests, the kind of tim- 
ber and its value. 

His son, Jerry A. McGillicuddy, has been practically a lifelong resident of 
Grays Harbor county and when his text books were put aside and he made his 
initial step in the business world he became a clerk in the Dexter Horton Bank 
of Seattle, after which he spent some time in the First National Bank of 
Hoquiam. There he continued until 1908, when he became a student in the 
Washington State College, feeling that his educational opportunities had not 
been such as fully qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties, espec- 
ially if he would win advancement, which his laudable ambition prompted him 
to do. He afterward became a student in the State University at Seattle. He 
then engaged in the general insurance business in Seattle for a short time and 
then returned to the Grays Harbor country. He has since been active in politics 
as a recognized leader of the democratic party and in 1912 he was elected county 
treasurer, which position he has continuously filled to the present time, making 
a most creditable record as a faithful custodian of the jniblic funds. In 1916 
he was elected one of the county commissioners for a term of two years. 

At Spokane, in 191 2, Mr. McGillicuddy was married to Miss Margaret A. 
Reeder, of that city, a daughter of Charles D. and Cora (Davis) Reeder, of 
Spokane, the former a well known old-time resident of Spokane and a director 
of the Spokane Eastern Trust Company and manager of the Provident Trust 
Company, which he established years ago. Mr. and Mrs. McGillicuddy have 
two children, Geraldine and Ruth. In his fraternal relations Mr. McGillicuddy 



276 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

is connected with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Eagles and is a 
charter member of the Elks lodge at Hoquiam. His life conforms to the 
teachings and purposes of those organizations and he recognizes the brotherly 
spirit which should prevail among mankind. He has a wide and favorable ac- 
quaintance in his locality, where the greater part of his life has been passed, and 
his many substantial qualities have gained for him the warm regard of those 
with whom he has been associated. 



HARVEY L. TIBBALS. 



Harvey L. Tibbals, efficiently serving as postmaster in Port Townsend, his 
native city, was born June 2, 1881, a son of Henry L. and Nannette Mary 
(Sutherland) Tibbals. The father was also born in Port Townsend and 
was a son of Henry L. Tibbals, Sr., a native of Connecticut and a representative 
of one of the old New England families. He came to Washington by way of 
Cape Horn for many years led a sea-faring life. He cast in his lot among 
the early settlers of this state and he is still a valued and honored resident of Port 
Townsend, being now about eight-five years of age. His son and namesake, 
H. L. Tibbals, Jr., is engaged in the steamboat business, with which he has been 
identified throughout his entire life and in which line of activity he has won a 
substantial measure of success. He is regarded as one of the valued and honored 
residents of his city and about 1890 was chosen mayor of Port Townsend, in 
which connection he gave to the city a businesslike and progressive administra- 
tion. He has long been active in political and civic affairs and stands at all 
times for those projects which he deems of greatest value to the community. 
His wife is a native of Oregon and a daughter of Roderick and Mary E. (Low- 
man) Sutherland, who were pioneer settlers of the Sunset state. They made 
the long journey across the plains and through the mountain passes on horse- 
back about 1856, meeting with the usual hardships incident to such a trip. Mrs. 
Sutherland is still living and makes her home in Portland at the age of eighty-six 
years. To Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Tibbals, Jr., were born three sons and two 
daughters, of whom Harvey L., of this review, is the eldest. The others are : 
Maurice, residing in Seattle; Nannette Mary, now deceased; Henry C, of Port 
Townsend; and Lota C, the wife of Dr. P. L Carter, connected with the marine 
service in Port Townsend. 

At the usual age Harvey L. Tibbals became a pupil in the public schools 
of Port Townsend and passed through consecutive grades to his graduation from 
the high school with the class of 1898. He then became associated with his 
father in steamboating and the business connection has since been maintained. 
He also spent a year at Nome, Alaska, with a steamship company. The name 
of Tibbals has from early pioneer times been associated with marine interests 
in this section of the northwest and it has become recognized as a synonym of 
honorable business methods and integrity. In addition to his other interests Mr. 
Tibbals is secretary and treasurer of the Union Dock Company of Port Town- 
send. 

On the 5th of January, 1916, Mr. Tibbals was appointed by President Wil- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 277 

son to the office of postmaster of Port Townsend and is now acting in that 
capacity. His official record has at all times been creditable, characterized by- 
marked devotion to the public welfare. For two terms he was councilman at 
large and in 1912 was chosen mayor of Port Townsend on a non-partisan ticket. 
He is a Mason of high rank, being a member of Townsend Commandery, No. 9, 
K. T., and a member of the Mystic Shrine and he also belongs to the Elks Lodge 
No. 317 at Port Townsend. He has membership in the Arctic Club of Seattle, 
in the Commercial Club of Port Townsend and in the Episcopal church — asso- 
ciations which indicate much of the nature of his interests and the rules which 
govern his conduct. His life has at all times been honorable and upright and 
he is an alert, energetic business man and a progressive citizen whose support 
of public measures has done much to uphold high civic standards. 



A. A. BRAYMER. 



Born in Chicago in the early '70s, Mr. Braymer attended the Chicago public 
schools and after finishing the grammar grades entered the Chicago Manual 
Training School, now the Armour Institute, the first technological school estab- 
lished west of Boston, and second only in course of training to the Boston 
Institute of Technology, from which he graduated in the spring of 1893. His 
first business training was with a wholesale photo supply house but in the fall 
of that year he joined the ranks of commercial travelers covering a large portion 
of the middle western states before the summer of 1897. 

The following fall and winter he was employed by a hardwood floor concern 
but the influence of the Alaskan gold discoveries proved too much and he 
joined the Klondike rush, going west over the Canadian Pacific and outfitting 
in V^ancouver, B. C. 

In the fall of 1898 he arrived in Seattle from the north but after a short 
stay decided to "follow the flag" and set out for Honolulu by way of San 
Francisco. 

Joining the sales forces of a large wholesale house in Honolulu, Mr. Braymer 
spent the following six years representing this line out of Honolulu, covering 
the other islands of the Hawaiian group. The roads, especially on the island 
of Hawaii, were not completed at that time and Mr. Braymer made his earlier 
trips on horseback with his samples on pack animals. 

After a year in the office of the Governor of Hawaii, he joined the Honolulu 
agency of the National Cash Register Company, with whom he later went to 
Japan to exploit that line and a complete line of office fixtures, fittings and 
business systems. 

Japan ofi'ered little attraction to Mr. Braymer. The earthquake and fire 
in San Francisco in April of that year turned his eyes again toward the Pacific 
Coast and he decided to return and settle in Seattle. 

He joined his father for a short time in the brokerage business but in the 
fall of 1906 became manager of the Puget Sound Auto Company, one of the 
pioneer companies in the automobile business. 

In the early spring of 1907, Mr. Braymer embarked in the cash register and 



278 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

office system business, covering the state of Washington for himself, but the 
hard times and panic following caused him to give up this line in the fall. 

Bubonic plague having appeared in Seattle in October, 1907, he offered his 
services to the Health Department, having had considerable experience with 
this disease during the outbreak in Honolulu in 1899 ^^^ 1900, when he served 
as the representative of his employers on the merchants committee in charge 
of the stocks of merchandise within the quarantined district. He was put in 
charge of some special plague investigation w^ork for a time but soon was 
transferred to the office and assumed the duties of chief clerk and accountant 
of the funds of the Special Plague Division. 

When the department was reorganized, July loth, 1908, Mr. Braymer became 
chief clerk and secretary, which position he still retains. 



ALEXANDER S. TURNER. 

Alexander S. Turner is a well known and influential citizen of Marysville 
who located there during the period of pioneer development and he is now active- 
ly and prominently connected with its commercial interests as a dealer in hard- 
ware. He was born in Putnam county, Indiana, Xovember 13, 1857, and is a 
son of James W. and Amanda (Smith) Turner, the latter also a native of 
Indiana. Her parents, however, were of southern birth, she being a representa- 
tive of a most highly respected family of Richmond, Virginia. At an early day, 
however, the Smith family was established in Indiana, settlement being made 
in Putnam county, where the maternal grandparents of Alexander S. Turner 
reared a large family. Their daughter, ]\Irs. Turner, was educated and mar- 
ried in her home state and there resided up to the time of her death, which oc- 
curred in 1865, when she had reached the age of forty years. It was in Indiana 
that she gave her hand in marriage to James W. Turner, who afterward removed 
to Iowa, settling in Osceola, where he conducted one of the leading hotels for a 
number of years. Subsequently he became a resident of Glenwood and there he 
engaged in merchandising. His fellow^ townsmen, appreciative of his worth and 
ability, elected him to the office of sheriff of Mills county, in which position 
he served with credit and honor. He engaged in the furniture business and his 
last days were spent in Glenwood, Iowa, where he passed away in 1891 at the 
age of seventy-four years. In the family were eight children, of whom Alex- 
ander S. was the fifth in order of birth. 

In early life Mr. Turner of this review became a pupil in the country schools 
of Iowa and when he had completed the work of the eighth grade he left school 
and also the parental roof to start out independently in the world. He was first 
employed as a farm hand at a very small wage and board but that he proved 
faithful and capable is indicated in the fact that he remained with his first 
employer for several years. He next went to Osceola, Iowa, where he was ap- 
prenticed to the tinner's trade, and after completing his term of indenture he 
went to Omaha, Xebraska, where he followed his trade for a year. On the 
expiration of that period he removed to Loveland, Colorado, where he was en- 
gaged in the tinning business for five years, spending that entire period in the 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 279 

employ of one man. He was afterward a resident of Idaho Springs, Colorado, 
where he conducted a branch business for the Loveland house, remaining at that 
point for a decade. The year 1891 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Turner in Marys- 
ville, where he established himself in business as proprietor of a small tin shop, 
which he conducted for several years, the business increasing, however, as time 
went on. He afterward added a stock of hardware and almost from the be- 
ginning the new venture proved profitable until today he is at the head of one 
of the largest hardware stores in Marysville. He now carries an extensive 
general stock of hardware, stoves and paints, the estimated value being from 
four to five thousand dollars. He largely concentrates his efforts and attention 
upon the conduct of his business and success has come to him in substantial 
measure. 

On the 13th of November, 1888, Mr. Turner was united in marriage to Miss 
Carolina Adel Meyers, of Idaho Springs, a daughter of Mr. and Airs. Willis 
Meyers. They now have three children : Homer, who was born in Marysville, 
where he still resides, is now married and has two children, Rose and Violet. 
Clyde, born in Marysville, is living in Seattle. Florence, born in Marysville in 
1902, is attending school. 

Mr. Turner votes independently, never caring to ally himself with any 
party. He is connected with the Woodmen of the World and he has been called 
upon to serve in some local offices, acting as constable and as marshal of Marys- 
ville in 1892 and thereafter for about six years. In a review of his life it is 
noticed that his advancement has been continuous along well defined lines of 
labor. He left home empty handed but has worked his way steadily upward 
to a place where he has the full trust and respect of the community in which he 
lives. Moreover, he possesses the substantial evidence of his labor in his store 
and in the valuable real estate which he has acquired. 



JOHN L. EASTON. 



Various interests of a public character have profited by the cooperation and 
support of John L. Easton, wlio has also figured prominently in commercial 
circles here. He was born in Old Meldrum, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Decem- 
ber 18, 1862, a son of the Rev. James C. and Mary Montgomerie Easton. He 
supplemented his public school education by entering the West End Academy 
in the city of Aberdeen, Scotland, when thirteen years of age. there pursuing 
his studies for two years, at the close of which period he made his initial step 
in the business world by becoming an apprentice in the Britisli l.inen I'.auk. in 
which he remained for four years. Crossing the Atlantic to Canada, he fol- 
lowed the occupation of farming in Ontario for two years and for two years 
was in the insurance business, after which he returned to Scotland, spending 
the succeeding six months in his native land. Once more he made the voyage 
to the new world, with Tacoma, Washington, as his destination. There he ar- 
rived in February, 1889, and was engaged in the insurance business in that city 
until March, 1890, when he removed to Fairhaven. now P.cllingham, where he 
has since been an active factor in insurance circles, winning a large clientage 



280 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

in that connection. In addition to his insurance business he has been active in 
other fields. In 1892 he became a representative of the CaHfomia Powder Works 
and afterward formed the Easton Powder Company, of which he was president 
and manager until he disposed of his interests in the business in 1914. His 
plans have always been carefully formed and promptly executed in the conduct 
of his business interests and he has never stopped short of the successful accom- 
plishment of his purpose. 

In June. 1897, in Bellingham, Mr. Easton was united in marriage to Gertrude 
Elizabeth, only daughter of J. R. Mason, who was a pioneer of that city. There 
is one child of this marriage, Mary Elizabeth, who was born October 12, 1898, 
and is attending Miss Ransom's School for Girls at Piedmont, California. 

Air. and Mrs. Easton are members of St. Paul's Episcopal church, and their 
position in the social circles of the city is a prominent one. Mr. Easton is con- 
nected with the Bellingham Golf & Country Club, of which he was one of the 
organizers and charter members, and has been one of the trustees since its organ- 
ization. He w^as formerly secretary of the Fairhaven Commercial Club, which 
has since been changed to the Kulshan Club. He is president of the State As- 
sociation of Fire Insurance Agents, a position which indicates his prominence 
anions: the insurance men of the state. He is also identified with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. In politics he is a stalwart republican and he served 
as councilman at large for the city of Fairhaven for two terms. In the fall 
of 1898 he was elected county commissioner, reelected in 1902 and during the 
six years served as chairman of the board. His course was characterized by 
marked devotion to the public good through the prompt and faithful perform- 
ance of his official duties. Aberdeenshire made a valuable contribution to the 
citizenship of Bellingham when it gave to Washington this worthy Scot. 



GEORGE VENABLE SMITH. 

George Venable Smith, an honored and respected Washington pioneer who 
was the founder and in large measure the upbuilder of the city of Port Angeles, 
started out in life in a humble connection but has risen to high position on his 
own merits. His name is inseparably interwoven w'ith much of the history of 
the northwest. He was born February 22, 1843, in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. His 
father, Captain F. C. Smith, was one of the pioneer gold seekers of California, 
enduring all the hardships of the early forty-niners as they crossed the plains to 
the mining camps of the coast. He was born in Pennsylvania and was a son of 
Frederick Smith, a native of Germany, who in the opening years of the nineteenth 
century settled in the Keystone state. He patriotically served his adopted country 
in the War of 1812 as colonel. He married Miss Elizabeth Kelley, a native of 
London, England, and when Captain F. C. Smith was a lad of ten years the 
family home was established in Kentucky, where Captain Smith pursued his 
education in a log school. Later in life he engaged in mercantile pursuits until, 
attracted by the discovery of gold in California, he traveled to the Pacific coast. 
He was quite successful in the mines, accumulating a large fortune which he 
afterward invested with Ben Holliday, later the owner of the Oregon Railroad, in 




GEORGE V. S.MITII 



I THE NEW YORK 
Pl^BLlC LIBRARY 

' TTr ;^^'r°^' LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 283 

stock raising and in the sale of blooded horses. Mr. Smith returned to Kentucky 
and later took his family to Sacramento, California, where he remained to the 
time of his death, which occurred in 1870, when he had reached the ^ge of fifty- 
eight years. He passed iway, however, in Pendleton, Oregon, while on his way 
from Portland to Salt Lake City, and was buried at Pendleton. His wife had 
died at Springfield, Kentucky, when but twenty-two years of age, leaving a little 
son, George V. Smith, and an older son, Alphonso B. Smith. 

George Venable Smith when ten years of age entered the Sacramento schools, 
which he attended until he was seventeen years old, when he entered the law office 
of Pringle & Felton, then the leading law firm of San Francisco. He read law 
under their direction while performing clerical duties and here in September, 1864, 
at the age of twenty-one years, was admitted to the bar. He then began practice at 
Portland, Oregon, with General E. Hamilton and there remained for two years, 
after which he returned to San Francisco, where he practiced until impaired 
health caused him once more to seek a change and he again took up his abode in 
Portland. After practicing for some time in Portland he became a partner in a 
law firm at Salt Lake City, where he practiced for two years. He then returned 
to California and settled at Bakersfield, where he engaged in the practice of law 
for a decade. In 1879 he was elected to the constitutional convention of Cali- 
fornia and while performing the duties assigned to him he became the author of 
the judicial system of the superior court in addition to other prominent measures 
which constitute portions of the organic law of the state. His work, the exemplifi- 
cation of his marked ability, gave him great prominence and he was afterward, in 
his absence and without his knowledge, elected district attorney of Kern county, 
California, as a republican. While in that position he had a lawless element to 
deal with, but during the three years in which he remained district attorney he 
succeeded in clearing the county of this undesirable element in its citizenship and 
in breaking up a notorious band of criminals. 

In 1883 Mr. Smith removed to Seattle for the purpose of purchasing land and 
became so favorable impressed with the future possibilities of the city — then a 
small town — that he decided to remain and practice law there. In 1885 he was 
appointed acting city attorney and while serving in that connection was commis- 
sioned to codify the city ordinances in book form. It was at this time that the 
Chinese agitation there began. Into this he was drawn, without realizing what 
was occurring, as the leader of the anti-Chinese movement for the exclusion of 
the Orientals. From start to finish he carried out his purposes along peaceful 
lines and as far as possible along educational lines, it being his object to secure 
through congress the exclusion of Chinese and to prevent orientalism taking firm 
hold on the Pacific coast. When a congress of representatives of all western 
Washington counties had been called, Mr. Smith was chosen unanimously as the 
leader of the movement which ultimately resulted in the passage by congress of 
the exclusion act. Meantime, however, there was a strong element in the city of 
Seattle which objected strenuously to the movement and everything possible was 
done to discredit the work of Mr. Smith. The city was placed under martial law 
at the instigation of opponents of the movement and Mr. Smith and others were 
summarily put into jail, where they were detained for ten days. Upon their 
release, however, the agitation was continued along distinctively peaceable lines 
and at the next election the question was submitted to the people, on which 
Vol. in— 15 



284 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

occasion the anti-Chinese element elected every officer, and at length President 
Cleveland and congress became convinced that an exclusion act was necessary and 
thus saved the coast from the yellow peril. 

When the trouble concerning the Chinese had subsided Mr. Smith, following 
out the ambition of a lifetime to build an ideal city, organized the Puget Sound 
Cooperative Colony and with over two thousand members and ample capital he 
completed the organization and on the loth of May, 1886, they came to the small 
hamlet on Puget Sound, containing then only six or seven houses, which consti- 
tuted the commencement of the beautiful city of Port Angeles. When he resigned 
the presidency of the colony he left it with several hundreds of thousands of 
dollars worth of property and without any debts. He then accepted the position 
of probate judge, which position he filled from 1888 until 1890. He afterward 
served as prosecuting attorney of Clallam county for two years and since 1903 he 
has continuously been city attorney of Port Angeles. In addition he enjoys a very 
large private practice, connecting him with much of the most important litigation 
heard in the courts of this section of the state. His ability is widely recognized 
and is based upon comprehensive knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence. 
He is accurate in his deductions, clear and logical in his reasoning and strong in 
his presentation of a point. In addition to enjoying a large and lucrative practice 
he has the complete confidence of everybody who has business or professional 
dealings with him or enjoys the pleasure of his acquaintance. 

Mr. Smith has been married twice. In 1880, in Bakersfield, California, he 
wedded Miss May I. Vestal and they had one daughter, Lois. In 1890 Mr. Smith 
married Miss lone Tomlinson, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tomlinson, of 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and they have one child, Mrs. Lorna Haggard, of Spokane, 
who is the mother of two children, Russel V. and Milton Haggard. 

Mr. Smith belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Loyal 
Order of Moose. The experiences of his life have been broad and varied and 
from each he has gathered the lesson of life therein contained and has used it 
for his further benefit along the lines of progress and improvement. He yet has 
many activities bespeaking a fixedness of purpose and strength of character beyond 
the ordinary. For many years he has been a dominant factor in the life and 
upbuilding of Port Angeles, where his name is an honored one and his worth most 
widely acknowledged. 



LOUIS BETTMAN. 



With the passing of Louis Bettman on the 24th of May, 1904, Olympia lost 
one of its pioneer citizens and enterprising and successful business men. He 
was born in the kingdom of Bavaria, Germany, in 1833 ^""^ '^^ 1853 accompanied 
his two brothers, Mose and Sig Bettman, to Olympia, Washington, then but a 
hamlet in the midst of a wilderness and only a few blocks in extent. The three 
brothers opened a general merchandise store on the corner of Main and Second 
streets. As there was little money in circulation on the western coast at that time 
trade was carried on by barter, groceries, shoes and dry goods being exchanged 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 285 

for eggs, butter, wool, hides and grain. As the market value of the latter commo- 
dities in Olympia was low and as there was great demand for all kind of produce 
at a good price in San Francisco, the merchants made a good profit. Later the 
store changed in character, men's furnishings being carried almost exclusively. 
Mr. Bettman continued to manage the business until his death on the 24th of May, 
1904. In i860 he went to San Francisco on a pleasure trip and there met Miss 
Amalia Koblentzer, of Los Angeles, who was visiting in San Francisco. They 
were married a few weeks later and their wedding trip consisted of their journey 
to Olympia by sail boat, the voyage requiring four days. They landed at Brown's 
wharf, which was then the only landing place for large vessels, and for a time 
they ate at the old Pacific House at Fourth and Main streets. They went to 
housekeeping in a small house where the Mitchell Hotel now stands and resided 
there for years. At that time the house was well back in the woods and was 
surrounded by tall, ugly stumps. The town was still small and everybody knew 
everyone else, the whole population seeming to be one large family. As in all 
pioneer communities, hospitality was one of the most marked characteristics of 
the settlers and they were at all times ready to help each other. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Bettman were born three children : Belle, now Mrs. Oppenheimer ; Joseph- 
ine, deceased; and William W., who is conducting the store founded by his father 
over sixty years ago and a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. ATrs. 
Bettman is well known for her devotion to charitable enterprises and is a constant 
worker in the Ladies' Relief Society. She personally investigates cases coming 
to the attention of the society and while she is careful to protect the organization 
against impostors, she sees to it that all those who are really in need are gener- 
ously cared for. For years she has been chairman of the relief committee and 
her work in that connection has been indeed a public service. Since her husband's 
death she, her son and her granddaughter have lived together. The Bettman 
family have long occupied a prominent place among the leading families of 
Olympia and the name is held in the highest esteem in the capital city. 



ALEXANDER H. MONTGOMERY. 

Alexander H. Montgomery, conducting a growing fuel and transfer busi- 
ness at No. 1417 Railroad avenue in Bellingham, was born in Chicago, Illinois, 
August 8, 1855. His parents were the Rev. Alexander and Laura (Bliss) Mont- 
gomery, who, anxious that their son should have good educational op])()rtinn'tics, 
sent him to the graded and high schools of Westfield, New York, and later to 
the high school of Ionia, Michigan, which he attended to the age of seventeen 
years. He afterward devoted two years to teaching in that vicinity and then 
went to Dodge Center, Minnesota, where he engaged in farming for two years. 
He next accepted the position of brakeman with the Santa Fe Railroad Com- 
pany and later was promoted conductor, serving in that connection for a short 
time. Through the succeeding period of five years he served as conductor on 
the Missouri Pacific Railroad, during which time he was a resident of Parsons, 
Kansas, and of Fort Scott, Kansas, where he spent one year. He then bought 
out a transfer and fuel business, which he conducted successfully until 1888, 



286 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

when he came to Washington and engaged in farming near Chehalis. Disposing 
of his farm lands, he then removed to Napa, CaUfornia, where he carried on gen- 
eral farming until 1901. 

It was in that year that Mr. Montgomery arrived in Bellingham and estab- 
lished his present fuel and transfer business at No. 13 15 Railroad avenue. In 
T903 he bought a lot fifty-five by one hundred and ten feet at No. 1417 Railroad 
avenue and erected a two story building. There he has his present business 
plant and conducts his interests and in addition he has two other places, which 
he uses for fuel storage purposes. 

At Westfield, New York, on the 20th of October, 1880, Mr. Montgomery 
was united in marriage to Miss Abbie V. Marshall and to them have been born 
five children. Merle, who is thirty-three years of age, attended the high school 
and Pullman College of Washington and is now assisting his father in business. 
Laura, deceased, was the wife of J. R. Clewell, of Bellingham. Florence, a grad- 
uate of Pullman College, is the wife of Earl C. Galbraith, of Helena, Alontana. 
Ray, twenty-nine years of age, is a graduate of the University of Washington 
and is now principal of the high school at Lovelock, Nevada. Emma W, a 
graduate of the Bellingham high school and the State Normal School, is the 
wife of Colonel T. H. Wakeman, of Long Beach, California. 

Mr. ]\[ontgomery is identified with the Chamber of Commerce and thus 
gives tangible proof of his interest in the public welfare. He has membership 
Avith the Ancient Order of L'nited Workmen and he is active in promoting those 
forces which tend toward the advancement of higher standards of living among 
men. He is an active member of the Young Men's Christian Association, serv- 
ing at present as chairman of its finance committee, is an elder of the First 
Presbyterian church and is a stalwart worker in behalf of the temperance cause, 
voting with the prohibition party. His life is actuated by high ideals and worthy 
ambitions and the sterling worth of his character commands for him the con- 
fidence and high respect of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



HON. JOHN WOODING. 

Hon. John Wooding, formerly a member of the state senate and a well 
known ranchman now living retired at Auburn, has been numbered among the 
citizens of Washington for four decades, having arrived in the Green River 
valley in 1876. Michigan claims him as a native son, his birth having occurred 
in Saginaw on the lOth of February, 1858, his parents being John and Erma 
(Garland) Wooding. The father v/as born in Canada in 1818 and when a young 
man accompanied his parents on their removal to Michigan and becam.e an active 
factor in the lumber trade at Saginaw, where he continued successfully in busi- 
ness until his death in 1873. He came of Welsh-English ancestry, while his 
wife was of English lineage. Her birth, however, occurred in Saginaw, Mich- 
igan, in 1837. 

Their son, John Wooding, attended the grammar and high schools of his 
native city and was graduated from the Ypsilanti (Mich.) Normal School with 
the class of 1876. Immediately afterward he determined to try his fortune in 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 287 

the northwest and made his way to Auburn and the Green River valley, where 
he secured a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres situated on the 
river, five miles from the town. The tract was covered with trees and under- 
brush but he at once began to develop the property and in course of time he 
transformed the wild land into productive fields, which he carefully, systemat- 
ically and successsfully cultivated for a number of years. He also turned his 
attention to hop raising in King county and while thus engaged, during a period 
of ten or twelve years, won substantial success. General farming and dairying 
also proved profitable sources of income as the result of his well directed energy 
and thrift, but in 1890 he rented his farm, having in the previous year estab- 
lished his home in Auburn, where he has since resided. For five years there- 
after he was identified with commercial interests of the town as a partner of 
C. P. Lacey, Dave Hart, Dr. Ploge and W. H. Hemphill, who carried on a 
mercantile establishment until 1894 and then closed out the business. Mr. 
Wooding is now living retired, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and 
richly deserves. 

In 1879 occurred the marriage of Mr. Wooding and Miss Lucretia Brannan, 
a daughter of Joseph and Sarah Brannan, who were among the pioneer resi- 
dents of the White River valley in Washington, her father being a veteran of the 
Indian wars. Mr. and Mrs. Wooding have become parents of five children : 
Guy, Blanche, Grace, Ethel and Myra. 

Mr. Wooding belongs to the Masonic lodge at Auburn and to the Royal 
Arch chapter at Kent. He is also a member of Valley Lodge, I. O. O. F., and 
of Douglas Lodge, K. P., at Auburn. He is identified with the Auburn Com- 
mercial Club and puts forth every possible efifort in cooperation with that organ- 
ization as well as independently to further the growth and interests of his com- 
munity. In religious faith he is a Congregationalist and his influence is always 
on the side of right and truth. His political allegiance is given to the repub- 
lican party and for three terms, from 1888 until 1894, he served as county 
commissioner of King county. In 1895 he was chosen to represent his district 
in the state senate and by reelection was continued a member of the upi)er house 
for a second term. His political as well as his business record will bear the 
closest investigation and scrutiny. He carefully considered questions that came 
up for settlement and gave his support whenever he believed the measure would 
work for the best interests of the commonwealth, but when he believed it to be 
inimical to the interests of the state he opposed it just as strongly. This is 
characteristic of Mr. Wooding. He stands at all times loyally for what he be- 
lieves to be right and neither fear nor favor can cause him to change a course 
which his conscience and his judgment sanction. 



JUDGE MILO A. ROOT. 

judge Milo A. Root, who has won high judicial honors and is now actively 
engaged in the practice of law with a large clientage that indicates his position as 
a foremost member of the Seattle bar, was born at Wyanet, Illinois, on the 226 
of January, 1863. His great-grandfather in the Root line was a Revolutionary 



288 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

soldier, and his grandfather was among those who fought in the War of 1812. His 
father, Wilham H. Root, was born in Allegany county, New York, and wedded 
Miss Cordelia Holroyd, also a native of that state. 

Judge Root acquired his early education in the public schools and later attended 
the Albany Law School, which is the law department of Union College of New 
York. He became a resident of the territory of Washington in 1883 and since that 
lime has been engaged in the practice of law. He was for four years probate 
judge and afterward for the same length of time was prosecuting attorney of 
Thurston county. He was elevated to the state supreme court and served for 
another four years in that connection. His keen interest in his profession, his 
habit of sober and systematic thought, his diligence in research and his con- 
scientiousness in the discharge of every duty enables him to take high rank 
among those who have held the highest judicial offices. His reported opinions 
are monuments to his common sense, legal learning and superior ability, showing 
a thorough mastery of the questions involved, a keen sense of justice, a rare sim- 
plicity of style and an admirable terseness and clearness in the statement of the 
principles upon which the opinions rest. Several of his opinions against letting 
technicalities defeat substantial justice or cover fraud or trickery have attracted 
much attention. Since his retirement from the bench he has resumed the private 
practice of law and his business in connection with the courts makes heavy 
demands upon his time. He is consulted and employed in the trial of cases by 
other attorneys to an extent equalled by few if any other lawyers of the city. 

In 1890 Judge Root was united in marriage to Miss Anna E. Lansdale and to 
them have been born six children. The family has resided continuously in 
Seattle since 1897 and the members of the household occupy an enviable social 
position. Judge Root has fine offices and a working library in the New York 
building. He is a man of attractive personality, having many friends. His 
breadth of view has enabled him to recognize possibilities not only for his own 
advancement but for the city's development, and his lofty patriotism has prompted 
him to utilize the latter as quickly and effectively as the former. For several years 
he has been unanimously reelected president of the Beacon Hill Improvement 
Club, one of the leading community organizations of the city. He is a trustee of 
the Washington Children's Home Society and is connected with various fraternal 
and civic organizations. 



MARTIN F. SMITH. 



Chicago, the city marvelous, has sent its sons to all sections of the country 
and the spirit of marked enterprise which led to the development of the mid-west 
metropolis is contributing to the growth and progress of the western country. 
Among Chicago's native sons now identified with Hoquiam is Martin F. Smith, 
recognized as one of the ablest of the young attorneys of southwestern Wash- 
ington. He was born in Chicago, May 28, 1889, and comes of good Scandinavian 
stock. His father, John F. Smith, is a native of Denmark of German ancestry 
and emigrated to Chicago in 1886. His mother, Mathilda (Carlson) Smith, was 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 289 

born in the Blekinge district, near Karishamn, in Sweden, where her father was 
a well-to-do farmer. 

Mr. Smith has been engaged in the practice of the law at Hoquiam since 
191 1, is licensed to practice before all the courts of Washington, including the 
supreme court, has been admitted to practice before the United States district 
court and is a proctor in admiralty. He served as judge of the Hoquiam police 
court for three years, discharging his duties fearlessly and in an eminently satis- 
factory manner to the law-abiding public. His severity in dealing with violators 
of the "dry" law and invoking the abatement feature of the law against premises 
where intoxicating liquors were sold illegally attracted wide attention. 

Fraternally Mr. Smith is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and the Swedish Order of V^asa. He is also a member of the Washington 
State Bar Association, American Bar Association, the American-Scandinavian 
Foundation, Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study, Swedish 
Historical Society and numerous fraternal organizations besides those already 
mentioned. Politically he is a republican. He belongs to the Swedish Baptist 
church. Air. Smith is a lover of good books and literature and has one of the 
finest private libraries in southwestern Washington. He is a man of laudable 
ambition and firm purpose, qualities which constitute an excellent foundation 
upon which to build success. 



JUDGE CHARLES AIILTON EASTERDAY. 

Judge Charles Milton Easterday, judge of the superior court of Tacoma. is 
descended from ancestry honorable and distinguished. In the paternal line his 
ancestry in America can be traced back through five generations and on the 
maternal side can be traced back to Daniel Drew. jMany of his ancestors were 
connected with educational work and to that field of activity Judge Easterday 
directed his eft'orts after leaving the old family home. He was born at Nokomis, 
Montgomery county, IlHnois, December 17, 1854, a son of ]\Iartin ^^ Easterday, 
who was a native of Ohio and became one of the early settlers and successful 
farmers in Illinois. The family is of German lineage, the ancestral line being 
traced back to two brothers who came to America, Martin Easterday being the 
founder of the American branch of the family, which is represented by Judge 
Easterday in the fifth generation. The paternal grandparents of the Judge were 
Christian and Maria (Stemple) Easterday. Martin V. Easterday became a 
Civil war veteran, serving with the rank of second and first lieutenant in Com- 
pany F, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Illinois \^olunteer Infantry, his connec- 
tion with the Union army covering two years. He married Mary J. Fluston, a 
native of Ohio and a daughter of John and Isabelle (Drew) Huston, who were 
early settlers of the Buckeye state and the latter was a niece of Daniel Drew. 
Martin V. Easterday died in Tacoma. April 22, 191 5, when he had reached the 
very venerable age of ninety years. For about seven years he had survived his 
wife, who passed away in this city in December, 1908, at the age of seventy-six 

years. 

Judge Easterday was the second in order of birth in a family of eight sons, 



290 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

and in the public schools of Illinois and of Nebraska he pursued his early educa- 
tion. For two years he was a student in Carthage College at Carthage, Illinois. 
He spent two years as a student in the State University of Nebraska and was 
•graduated from the State University of Iowa in 1879, ^^ which time he received 
the LL. B. degree. His youthful days had been spent upon the home farm with 
the usual experiences that fall to the lot of the farm lad, and m early life he 
taught in the country schools of Johnson county, Nebraska, for a year. After 
he had completed his law course he entered upon the active practice of his pro- 
fession at Tecumseh, Nebraska, where he remained for five years, and then sought 
the opportunities offered in the rapidly growing and developing northwest, arriv- 
ing in Tacoma on the 6th of March, 1884. He is today the oldest practitioner 
at the Tacoma bar in years of continuous connection therewith, having for a 
quarter of a century been in active practice here, and throughout the entire 
period he has maintained a place in the foremost rank of the legal profession. 
In 1908 he was elected to the office of judge of the superior court to preside over 
department No. 3. As the time approached for another judicial election there 
was widely circulated a petition signed by fifty-seven lawyers w^ho had been in 
practice in Tacoma for more than twenty years and which also bore the signature 
of seventy-five lawyers who had more recently become practitioners in Pierce 
county. This petition read : 

"We, who have practiced at the bar with Judge C. M. Easterday more than 
twenty years, and before him as judge during the last four years, desiring his 
reelection to the superior court, and fearing lest a just judge be recalled, invite 
attention to the following facts : 

"Judge Easterday has lived among us twenty-nine years. Of these, twenty- 
five were spent in active practice of law and four have been spent on the bench. 
For four sessions he was a member of the state senate, serving as chairman of the 
judiciary committee during two of them. During that time he drafted and pro- 
cured the passage of many laws, among them one that applied one million, seven 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars, then lying idle in the treasury, to the payment 
of outstanding eight per cent general fund warrants, thereby saving to. the tax- 
payers one hundred and forty thousand dollars annual interest. 

"For four years he was one of the regents of the State University, and while 
serving as such, fifteen years ago, prevented the sale of the old university site 
for two hundred thousand dollars, then offered for it. This site comprises ten 
acres, nearly four double blocks, in the business district of the city of Seattle, 
and has since been leased for the benefit of the university for a term of fifty 
years, ten of which have expired. It is being covered with valuable business 
buildings, all of which will, under the lease, become the property of the university 
at the end of the term. It now yields an annual income of fifty thousand dollars 
to that institution, which wall be increased every five years of that term and is 
likely to yield on the expiration of the fifty years, not less than half a million, 
and probably a million dollars annually. 

"Not only is Judge Easterday entitled to the kindly consideration of every 
taxpayer and citizen of the state for these eminent services, but his experience 
at the bar and on the bench, coupled with more than thirty-five years' study of 
the law, have especially fitted him for the position he holds. This may be well 
proved by the fact that there have been appealed from him thirty-one civil cases, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 291 

twenty-seven of which were affirmed and but four reversed. When it is remem- 
bered that only dissatisfied parties appeal, and then only in doubtful cases, and 
that the judge who is sustained by the supreme court in three out of four cases 
makes a better than average record, these figures speak more eloquently in praise 
of Judge Easterday's work than words can do. 

"It is universally conceded by all who know him well that Judge Easterday 
is a man of the purest private life, of unquestionable honesty and integrity, of the 
most kindly disposition, learned and fair-minded and one of the ablest, most just 
and best judges in the state. 

"We submit to the voters of Pierce county that nc reason has been advanced, 
or exists, for discharging such a judge, other than the personal ambition of less 
experienced and less competent aspirants for the place." 

The above indicates most clearly Judge Easterday's high standing among the 
members of the profession and the confidence which they reposed in him in his 
eiTorts to maintain justice. 

On the 4th of March, 1884, in Brownville, Nebraska, Judge Easterday was 
married to Miss Minnie O. Locke, a native of Indiana and a daughter of Samuel 
and Virginia Locke. They have become parents of five children : Ruth L., the 
wife of Louis B. Olds, now residing in Wellington, Nevada; Fay B., who is a 
teacher of mathematics in the high schools of Tacoma; Forrest R., a civil engineer 
of Tacoma, who married Catherine A. Mounts, a daughter of Daniel ^Mounts, 
one of the old and prominent settlers of Pierce county ; Virginia, who is a teacher 
in the primary schools of Tacoma : and Edith O., at home. The family residence 
is at No. 3504 North Adams street. Judge Easterday has made a splendid record 
upon the bench. He is a Christian gentleman, of high ideals and a faithful, popu- 
lar official. 



REV. EDGAR M. ROGERS. 

Rev. Edgar M. Rogers, rector of the Episcopal church of Everett, was born 
at Jersey City Heights, New Jersey, August 19, 1874, a son of William Edgar 
and Jennie Lois (Martin) Rogers, the former a native of Rahway, New Jersey, 
and the latter of Jersey City, that state. They were married in New Jersey and 
later in life the father became well. known as' a representative of the legal profes- 
sion in New York and New Jersey. He was assistant corporation counsel in 
connection with railway interests and he also had a large private practice. He 
afterward removed to Washington, D. C, where he has remained continuously 
since 1878. His wife died in 1874 at the age of twenty-four years, leaving two 
children, Rev. Rogers being at that time but eight days old. 

In his boyhood he attended the schools of Huntington. New York, and of 
Washington, D. C, and later entered the Phillips Exeter Academy of New Hamp- 
shire. Subsequently he became a student in Trinity College at Hartford, Con- 
necticut, where he was graduated in 1902. For three years he was a student in 
the Berkeley Divinity School at Middletown. Connecticut, after which he was or- 
dained to the ministry of the Episcopal church and assigned to duty as assistant 
rector of Trinity church at Washington. D. C. There he remained from 1905 
until 1907, when he became connected with the work in the west. He was sta- 



292 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

tioned first at Port Angeles, Washington. He was for a short time assistant 
rector of Trinity church in Seattle and afterward went to the Imperial valley in 
southern California, having charge of a church there for a year and a half. 
On the expiration of that period he removed to Everett and has been continuously 
in charge of the Episcopal church of that city since September, 191 1. 

On the 8th of July, 1909, Rev. Rogers was married to Miss Mary Justina 
Lupen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Lupen, natives of Illinois and now 
residents of Port Angeles, Washington. Rev. and Mrs. Rogers have become the 
parents of a son, John Lupen, born in Everett in 191 1. 



HARRY W. BRINGHURST. 

Harry W. Bringhurst, for several years chief of the Seattle fire department 
and fire marshal since 191 1, is well known as an expert in his line and as a con- 
tributor to eastern fire and insurance journals. He was born on the 13th of June, 
1 86 1, in Logansport, Cass county, Indiana, his parents, Washington Henry and 
Anna (Torr) Bringhurst, being natives of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, born 
respectively in 1824 and 1832. On the paternal side the ancestry is traced back 
to John Bringhurst, a Quaker publisher of London, who died in 1699. Within a 
year thereafter, his widow Rosina Bringhurst, emigrated to Philadelphia with 
her four children, from whom all of the Bringhursts in the United States are 
descended. The branch of the family to which our subject belongs continued to 
reside in Philadelphia and its suburb, Germantown. His grandfather was Robert 
Ralston Bringhurst and the latter's sister, Cornelia Clarkson Bringhurst, married 
Samuel Bonnell and became the mother of Charles Russell Bonnell, who was 
born in Philadelphia on the 6th of May, 1827, and died there on the 26th of 
December, 1890. For a number of years prior to 1877 ^^^ was an Episcopal 
missionary in Seattle and Tacoma and did much pioneer work for his church. 
Mathew Clarkson, who was prominent in the Revolution and was mayor of 
Philadelphia from 1792 to 1796, was the great-great-grandfather of our subject, 
and others of the family served in the Revolution with the Colonial troops. The 
family was likewise represented in the War of 1812, the Mexican war and the 
Civil war. Robert Ralston Bringhurst and most of his sons, were enthusiastic 
members of the old volunteer fire department in Philadelphia. Washington 
Henry Bringhurst, father of our subject, went to California in 1849, spending six 
months on a sailing vessel going around the Horn, and in 1855 he returned by way 
of the Isthmus of Panama. The following year he went into business in Logans- 
port, Indiana, and remained there until his death in August, 1903. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Anna Torr in i860, and she continued to reside in Logansport. In 
February, 191 5, she died at East Orange, New Jersey. 

Harry W. Bringhurst received his education in the Logansport public schools 
and the University of Illinois, where he spent three years in the civil engineering 
class of 1882. He left Illinois to go on a railroad survey, and on the completion 
of the work went to Bismarck, Dakota territory, and opened an office as civil 
engineer and surveyor. In the month of June, 1883, when the capital was located 
there, he platted nearly a thousand acres in additions to the city, besides two new 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 293 

townsites. He did other interesting work later among the cattle ranges of the 
Little Missouri, when Theodore Roosevelt and the Marquis de Mores were 
local celebrities. He was city engineer of Bismarck and an officer in the volunteer 
fire department, the third with which he had been connected. Unfortunately the 
boom in that portion of Dakota collapsed, and after spending the fall of 1886 sub- 
dividing a military reservation among the Sioux Indians, Mr. Bringhurst took a 
temporary position in New York city. As he now thinks, the chief advantage of 
this was in the chance to see a number of large fires. He then went into the 
Santa Fe engineering department, working on the extension from Kansas City 
to Chicago, and was later assistant engineer on the Chicago & Alton. 

In April, 1889, Mr. Bringhurst came to Seattle, expecting to continue in 
engineering work, although he was then in very poor health. Having always been 
an enthusiast in fire protection work, he published a letter in one of the papers 
on May 26th of that year, calling attention to Seattle's fire hazard and Signing 
his communication "Bismarck." Although he was ill in bed when the great con- 
flagration of the sixth of June broke out, he ran down town and helped get the 
second stream on the fire, working as he could for the rest of the day. Within a 
week there was an outcry for more fire apparatus from all the larger towns of the 
state and this led to his taking up the business of selling such machines. That 
summer he sold Tacoma, Spokane and many other towns their first fire engines 
and supplied Seattle with its first machines for the new paid fire department. In 
March, 1893, he went with his family to Chicago to take charge of the fire 
apparatus exhibit at the World's Columbian Exposition. In September, 1897, 
he returned to Seattle and continued to sell fire appliances until he took up the 
work of fire protection. In December, 1906, he was asked by Mayor Moore to 
become chief of the fire department ; a request that was a complete surprise to 
him, being of the opposite political party and having no ambition to hold public 
office. However, he accepted and held the position until March, 1910, during 
which time he reorganized the department and increased its efficiency as is shown 
by statistics. In December, 191 1, he was appointed fire marshal and still holds 
that office. 

Mr. Bringhurst has always been a republican of progressive tendencies. For 
about fifteen years he has been a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and twice he has served as president of the Pugct Sound Association of the 
University of Illinois and of the North Dakota Association. Fie is a charter 
member of the Pacific Coast Association of Fire Chiefs, now twenty-three years 
old, and has served as president and secretary ; the latter position he has held 
about fifteen years. He is a member of the National Fire Protection Association 
of Boston, and in 1915 wrote for them their official handbook of volunteer fire 
departments. He has been a vestryman in the Episcopal church. He was a mem- 
ber of the Logan Greys, a crack military company in Indiana, and of Company A 
of Bismarck, the first National Guard company organized in Dakota territory. 

On the loth of May, 1890, at Tacoma, Mr. Bringhurst was united in marriage 
to Miss Delia Zipf, a daughter of Frederick Zipf of Chicago. ITer parents were 
born in Germany and for about thirty years Mr. Zipf was a merchant in Kanka- 
kee, Illinois, where Mrs. Bringhurst was born. ITe passed away in 1894. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bringhurst met while both were students at the University of Illinois. 
To them have been born two children: Horace Morton, whose birth occurred in 



294 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Seattle in 1891 and who was married in August, 191 3, to Miss Jeanne Prewett, a 
native of Santa Rosa, California; .and Alice Constance, born in Seattle, May 6, 
1901. 



JOHN E. TIERNEY 



John E. Tierney, engaged in blacksmithing and wagon making in Belling- 
ham, is a son of John and Johana Tierney and was born in Canton, St. Law- 
rence county. New York, June 22, 1861. His father was a native of Tipperary, 
Ireland, and there pursued his education, coming to the United States when 
twenty years of age. He took up his abode in St. Lawrence county, New York, 
where *he engaged in farming until his death. 

John E. Tierney attended the public schools of his native county, dividing 
his time between the duties of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground 
and the work of the fields until he reached the age of eighteen years. He then 
entered upon a three years' apprenticeship to the blacksmith's trade and when 
he had rounded out that period he went to Tonawanda, New York, where he be- 
came blacksmith at the Tonawanda Spring Wagon W^orks. Later he removed to 
New Madrid, New York, where he became connected with the Lockwood Car- 
riage Works, there remaining until 1888. Attracted by the opportunities of the 
growing northwest, he made his way across the continent to Fairhaven, now 
South Bellingham, where he has since been engaged in blacksmithing and wagon 
making. He has acquired a great deal of business property from time to time 
and his holdings in business real estate are among the most extensive in that 
part of the city. Success has attended his efiforts in substantial measure and 
although he might now retire from active business he enjoys his work and con- 
tinues therein. 

]\Ir. Tierney belongs to the Kulshan Club and in his religious faith is a 
Catholic. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day. 



WILLLA.M L. CARTER. 



William L. Carter, president of the Montesano Lumber Company, in which 
connection he has developed a business of large and gratifying proportions, is a 
native of Concord, North Carolina. His father, Samuel S. Carter, served 
throughout the period of the Civil war with the Confederate army and while 
thus engaged lost his right arm. At the close of the war, although thus crippled, 
he took up the broken threads of his life, making excellent use of his time in a 
business way and providing his children with good educational advantages. Both 
he and his wife passed away at the old North Carolina home. 

In the schools of his native town William L. Carter began his education and 
afterward had the advantage of study in the Charlotte Military Academy. He 
then turned his attention to railroading as an employe of the Seaboard Air Line 
and in 1896 he went to New York, where he entered the employ of the George N. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 295 

Pierce Company, manufacturers of the Pierce Arrow motor car. His experi- 
ences were all of a broadening and beneficial character, constituting successive 
steps in his orderly progression in business. In 1906 he arrived in Seattle, where 
he secured employment with a lumber company, and in 1908 he removed to Mon- 
tesano, where he organized the Montesano Lumber Company for the conduct of 
a retail business, in which he has since been actively engaged, his trade increasing 
as the public has come to recognize the reliability of his business methods and 
his earnest desire to please his patrons. 

On the 17th of June, 1904, Mr. Carter was united in marriage to Miss Fannie 
Mead, of Lansing, Michigan, and to them has been born a daughter, Marion, now 
attending high school. Mr. Carter exercises his right of franchise in support of 
the men and measures of the democratic party and fraternally he is connected 
with the Knights of Pythias and the Eagles. He is also a member of the Com- 
mercial Club and cooperates in all its well defined plans and measures for pro- 
moting public progress and extending the trade relations of his adopted city. 



REV. WILLIAAI E. RANDALL, D. D. 

Rev. William E. Randall, D. D., former pastor of the Baptist church at 
Everett and actively connected with many lines of practical uplift work, was 
born in Syracuse, New York, September 6, 1858, a son of William and Lydia 
A. (Herrick) Randall, both of whom were natives of New York, in which state 
they were reared and married. In 1864 they removed to Black Hawk county, 
Iowa, but the father was not long permitted to enjoy his new home, his death 
occurring in 1866, when he had reached the age of forty years. He had followed 
the occupation of farming as a life work. His widow still survives at the age 
of eighty-three years and now makes her home with Rev. Randall in Everett. 
They had but two children, the elder being Melvin E., a resident of Iowa. 

In his boyhood days William E. Randall attended the schools of Cedar Falls, 
Iowa, and received his theological training under private instruction in that 
state. In 1913 the Central University of Iowa conferred upon him the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity. His first pastoral charge was at Dow City, Iowa, where 
he remained for two years and then accepted a call from a church at Jefl:'erson, 
Iowa. He afterward spent four years as minister at Iowa Falls and five years 
at Boone, Iowa, and also had charge of a church at \'alparaiso. Indiana. Later 
he was appointed to take charge of the American Home Missionary Society 
interests for Washington and British Columbia and came to the northwest in 
1897. He was in charge of the missionary work for five years and was pastor 
of the Baptist church in Everett for an equal period. In 1910 the juvenile court 
of Everett was organized and the Rev. Randall was then made probation officer, 
which position he continued to fill until January, 1916, when he resigned. He is 
now pastor of the Baptist church at Snohomish. 

On the 25th of December, 1879, at Cedar Falls, Iowa. Rev. Randall was 
joined in wedlock to Miss Mary R. Johnson, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. 
Isaac Johnson, representing a well known pioneer family of that place. Rev. 
and Mrs Randall have the following children: Mrs. Mae Parkhurst. who was 



296 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

born in Cedar Falls, Iowa, and who now resides in Everett, Washington, and is 
the mother of three children, Paul, Mary Elizabeth and Helen; Mrs. Lydia A. 
Paterson, who was born in Cedar Falls, now resides in Everett and is the mother 
of two children, Watson and Dorothy; Zala J., who is engaged in the laundry 
business at Everett; William Ray, who was born in Iowa, is now^ a stock raiser 
of eastern Oregon and married Gladys Doolittle and has one child ; and Nadine. 
In his political views Rev. Randall is a republican and fraternally he is asso- 
ciated with the ]\Iasons and the Odd Fellows, having filled all the offices in the 
latter lodge, being in hearty sympathy with the beneficent spirit that underlies these 
organizations. He was but seven years of age at the time of his father's death 
and almost from that time he has been dependent upon his own resources. He 
early came to a recognition of those things which are most vital in character 
building and has ever directed his efforts along lines which have looked to the 
betterment of the individual and the community. His labors have been fraught 
wuh good results. That he has won the love and confidence of the people in 
the community in which he resides is indicated in the fact that he now marries 
as many couples as all the ministers of other denominations put together, officiat- 
ing at three hundred w^edding ceremonies and about sixty funerals annually. He 
is a man of deep sympathy reaching out in kindly spirit to all mankind, and he 
has indeed been a helpful factor in bringing about the moral progress of the 
district in which he lives. 



ARTHUR F. GIERE. 



Among the young lawyers of Lewns county wdio have already won distinction 
in their profession is Arthur F. Giere of Centralia. He was born on the 6th of 
May, 1885, in Belgrade, Minnesota, and is a son of Rev. Xiles and Susan 
( Xelson) Giere, both natives of Madison, Wisconsin. The father is a prominent 
minister of the Lutheran church and is now serving as bishop and makes his 
home in Sacred Heart, Alinnesota. 

Arthur F. Giere, who is the oldest in a family of five children, obtained his 
early education in the public and high schools of Renville, Minnesota, and later 
attended Willmar Seminary, from which he was graduated in 1901. He received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Gale College and that of Master of Arts 
w^as conferred upon him by Minnesota College. For six years he was principal 
of Gale College at Galesville, Wisconsin, and then entered the law department 
of the University of ^Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1909 with the 
degree of Ph. D. 

Coming to Washington in 191 o, ]\Ir. Giere was made principal of Pacific 
Academy at Tacoma, where he remained one year, and the following year was 
principal of Columbia College at Everett. He was next at the head of the foreign 
language department of the Everett high school for one year and then formed a 
partnership with Andrew Engeset for the practice of law at that place. In the 
fall of 1914, however, Mr. Giere came to Centralia where he has since engaged 
in general practice with good success. For one year he served as judge of the 
police court of Centralia and is now filling the office of justice of the peace. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 297 

In politics Mr. Giere is a republican and he takes a deep and commendable 
interest in public affairs. He is a member of the county, state and national bar 
associations and is regarded as one of the most capable young attorneys of 
western Washington. He has always taken a great interest in music and is a 
graduate of the Northwestern Conservatory at Minneapolis. He has been a 
director of bands and orchestras in the different schools with which he has been 
connected and has done much to promote a love for good music wherever he 
has lived. In religious faith he is a Lutheran. Genial and pleasant in manner 
he makes many friends and is held in the highest esteem by all who know him. 



JOHN P. DALOUEST. 



John P. Dalquest was born in the southern part of Sweden, August 22, 1846, 
and is now living retired at Everett. He came to the northwest from Minne- 
apolis in 1 90 1 and for a long period was actively identified with the industrial 
interests of this section of the country. He had previously been a resident of 
Minnesota from 1869, in which year he came from Sweden to the new world. 
After crossing the Atlantic he worked on a railroad for many years and while 
thus engaged carefully saved his earnings until his capital was sufficient to enable 
him to purchase two hundred and eighty acres of farm land in Minnesota in 
1876. The next year the grasshoppers destroyed his entire crop and the following 
year a storm damaged all his crops. These reverses discouraged Mr. Dalquest 
in his farming so that he concentrated his time and energies upon railroading in 
connection with the building department. To that work he devoted his energies 
until his removal to the northwest. Upon reaching Everett he was awarded the 
contract for repairing the coast line for the Great Northern Railroad between 
Everett and Seattle, the company at that time being engaged in preparation for 
the rebuilding of the road. For two years Mr. Dalquest devoted his attention to 
the repair work and then took up the work of contracting for the Great Northern 
Kailroad Company. He did much contract work for that corporation in the 
mountain districts. At one time he employed between four and five hundred men 
and continued active in the business until July, 1914, when he retired to enjoy a 
well earned rest. He makes his home in Everett, where he was joined by his 
family in June, 1901. He has since rebuilt his home and is now most comfort- 
ably situated. He cleared twenty acres of land in the southwestern part of the 
town and still owns that property. He had cleared a farm for James J. Hill, tlic 
railroad magnate, in Minnesota years before and for two and a half years was 
superintendent of that property. His has been an active and useful life fraught 
with good results and he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. 

In Minneapolis Mr. Dalquest was united in marriage to Miss Emma C. Lind- 
quist and there were three children of that marriage. Mrs. Dalquest passed away 
in 1 88 1 and in 1885, in St. Paul, Minnesota, Mr. Dalquest was again married, his 
second union being with Carrie Erickson. By this marriage there were five 
children. Of the family of eight children seven are now living and all came to 
Everett. The eldest, Mrs. Anderson, has passed away. The others are: ^Irs. 
Hilda Crawford; Samuel Edwin, a resident of Richmond Beach; Emma C, at 



298 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

home; N. W., living in Seattle; John O., whose home is at Bellingham ; and Lena 
J. and Carl A., also at home. 

Mr. Dalquest's life has been one of untiring activity and his labors have been 
fraught with good results. He has now lived in the northwest for sixteen years 
and, prominently identified with railroad contracting, he has made for himself a 
most enviable position in business circles. He is also esteemed as a citizen and 
his fellow townsmen recognize him as one worthy their high regard because of a 
well spent life. He is a Knights Templar Mason and a member of the Mystic 
Shrine and likewise belongs to the Druids in Minneapolis and to the Knights of 
Pythias at Everett. 



A. S. FARQUHARSON. 



A. S. Farquharson, ranked as a distinguished citizen of Puyallup, is now 
living retired but has left his impress upon the material development of the 
district through the conduct of large business enterprises and upon the political 
history of the state as an active worker in support of democratic principles but is 
now of the republican party. Moreover, he is a veteran of the Civil war, in which 
connection his record is in keeping with that of an honored and distinguished 
ancestry which has been represented in the Forty-second Regiment of High- 
landers, the famous "Black Watch" of Scotland, since its organization. The 
family is of Celtic origin and the ancestral line is traced back through six cen- 
turies. Representatives of the family served under Prince Charlie of the Nether- 
lands in 1745 in his attempt to obtain the throne of the Stuarts from the English 
but met defeat at Bannockburn. The Farquharson estates were then confiscated. 
These included Balmoral, which is still part of the Crown's possessions, but a 
part of the Farquharson estates was afterward returned. At the time they joined 
the army of Prince Charlie some of the family escaped to France and today there 
are Frenchmen of that name. Alexander Scott Farquharson is a son of Alex- 
ander Farquharson, the fourth son of Sir James Farquharson. The father was 
born on the Dee river in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and was an officer of the 
"Black Watch" in India, seeing active service in the Burmese \var. He came to 
the United States but was never naturalized, remaining always a subject of the 
queen of England. The title and estate of the family are now held by a younger 
branch — Farquharson of Finzean in Scotland, a branch descended from a brother 
of Sir James Farquharson. Alexander Farquharson continued his residence in 
the new world until his death, which occurred in Boston in 1883. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Elizabeth La Bae, was a native of Mobile, Alabama, and 
her parents, who were owners of a plantation and slaves prior to the Civil war, 
we're of French descent, her grandparents having settled in the south on coming 
to the new world direct from France, which they left in order to seek religious 
liberty. The death of Elizabeth (La Bae) Farquharson occurred in Boston 
in 1866. 

A. S. Farquharson, whose name introduces this review, pursued his education 
in the schools of his native city, Boston, Massachusetts, attending the grammar and 
high schools and the Boston Latin school. In 1859 he entered Andover College, 




A. S. FARQUHARSON 



("the new YORK. 

j PUBLIC LIBRARY 
t 

' ASTOB^, LENOX 

TTLDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 301 

which he attended until he put aside his textbooks in order to join the army with 
the outbreak of the Civil war in 1861. He was a member of the Boston Li^ht 
Infantry, the second oldest military organization in the United States, organized in 
1798. When was issued the call to arms to preserve the Union the Boston Light 
Infantry was made the nucleus of the Forty-third Regiment of Massachusetts 
Infantry, and became Company A. He was at one time attached to the Eighteenth 
Army Corps, was with the Sixth Army Corps at Gettysburg, after which he was 
transferred to the Signal Corps and sent to Washington, D. C, to school and 
later was attached to the Sixteenth Army Corps under General A. J. Smith. He 
entered Mobile with the Thirteenth Army Corps under General Gordon Granger 
and afterward joined General Sheridan on the Rio Grande when the army was 
sent there to enforce the demand that Louis Napoleon remove the French troops 
from Mexican soil. He participated in a large number of engagements, includ- 
ing the battle of Mobile Bay under Admiral Farragut. He was honorably dis- 
charged from the service on the 21st of October, 1865, the war having been 
brought to a successful termination. 

Leaving the east, Mr. Farquharson entered into partnership with John Stacy, 
of Kansas City, in 1870 for the purpose of manufacturing packing and fiour 
barrels for the supply of the packing houses at that point and the Diamond Mills. 
In 1872 he sold out and made his way westward to California. On the ist of 
December, 1874, he arrived in the territory of Washington but on the nth of 
May, 1875. returned to San Francisco. A brief period convinced him that he 
preferred the northern territory and in October of the same year he established 
his home in Tacoma. In the following December he visited the Puyallup valley 
and secured control of the cottonwood timber of the valley. He then brought in 
machinery for the equipment of a barrel manufactory and work was started on 
the I St of September, 1877. Timber was cut in the valley and from the reserva- 
tion and Air. Farquharson continued active in the business for ten years. \'arious 
commercial and industrial enterprises of importance have occupied his attention 
during his residence in the northwest, covering a period of more than four 
decades, but he is now living retired, his wise investments and judicious manage- 
ment having brought to him a substantial capital. 

Mr. Farquharson has been married twice. In September, 1871, at Kansas 
City, Missouri, he wedded Madora Elizabeth Vinyard, a daughter of John Vin- 
yard, a Virginian living sixty miles south of St. Louis, Missouri. Mrs. Farquhar- 
son passed away in August, 1872, and five years later — on the 7th of October, 
1877 — ^^^- Farquharson wedded a daughter of William Wagner of Yelm, Wash- 
ington, from whom he secured a legal separation in December, 1895. There were 
two sons of the second marriage: Percy A., born in October, 1880; and Chester 
S., in November, 1882. Both are married and are residents of Washington. 

Mr. Farquharson joined the Grand Army of the Republic in September, 1866, 
four months after its organization. He was the organizer of L. C. Ladd Post, 
No. 17, at Puyallup, which was formed in 1884 with twenty-six charter members 
and was named in honor of the first man who. was killed in the Civil war. who 
belonged to the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment. He met death at Baltimore and 
was buried by the Boston Light Infantry of Boston with military honors, and as 
a member of that company Mr. Farquharson assisted in the burial. He was 
chosen the first commander of the L. C. Ladd Post and has always been deeply 



Vol. m— 16 



302 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

interested in the welfare of the organization. He was for twelve years prominent 
in politics in the territory and state as a democrat but at length, feeling entirely 
out of sympathy with the policy and attitude of the party on many vital questions, 
he joined the ranks of the republican party, which he now endorses. He has 
never sought political office, being always too busily engaged with important and 
extensive business enterprises — enterprises that have been an element in promot- 
ing the material progress and prosperity of his part of the state as well as his 
individual success. 



JOHN H. REIFSNYDER. 

John H. Reifsnyder, of Bellingham, engaged in pile driving on Puget Sound, 
was born in Guyard township, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, February 17, 
1854, a son of Henry Reifsnyder. After attending the public schools until he 
reached the age of sixteen years he learned the flour milling business, serving 
an apprenticeship of three years. Realizing the value of educational training, 
however, he then resumed his studies in the public schools, which he attended 
until he attained his majority. At that time he took charge of a flour mill, which 
he operated until 1878, when he went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and entered 
the employ of the Great Northern Railroad Company, operating a track driver 
until May, 1890, at which date he became a resident of Bellingham. There he 
entered the employ of Haller & McGregor, pile driving contractors, for whom 
he ran an engine until the spring of 1891, but desirous of engaging in business 
on his own account, he then purchased a pile driver and for three years operated 
it on the Nooksack river. Since 1894 he has been engaged in pile driving on 
Puget Sound, owning two water pile drivers, one pile puller, the steamer Edna, 
the launch Roxana and two scows. He employs twenty-three men, and his 
business since he started out on his own account has been a growing and profit- 
able one. 

On the 24th of December, 1881, Mr. Reifsnyder was united in marriage to 
Miss Roxanna Miller, of Goodhue, Minnesota. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Masons and is loyal to the teachings of the craft. Politically he is a repub- 
lican and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day but has 
never sought nor desired office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his 
business afifairs, in which close application and ability have brought him success. 



EDWIN EELLS. 



Edwin Eells is a native son of Washington, his birth occurring in pioneer 
times when into the wild mountain fastnesses of the unexplored west went brave 
men whose courage was often called forth in encounters with hostile savages. 
The land was rich in all natural resources, in minerals, in agricultural and com- 
mercial possibilities and awaited the demands of man to yield up its treasures, but 
its mountain heights were hard to climb, its forests difficult to penetrate and the 
magnificent trees, the dense bushes or jagged rocks often sheltered the skulking 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 303 

foe who resented the encroachment of the pale faces upon these hunting grounds. 
The estabhshment of homes therefore in this beautiful region meant sacrifice, 
hardships and ofttimes death, but there were some men, however, brave enough 
to meet the red man in his familiar haunts and undertake the task of reclaiming 
the district for purposes of civilization. There is no phase of frontier life in 
Washington with which Edwin Eells is unfamiliar and today his mind is a store 
house, rich with reminiscences of the Indians and with tales of conditions which 
existed here five or six decades ago. He has rejoiced in what has been accom- 
plished, as man has planted the seeds of civilization in this section of the country, 
and the part which he has played has been a most important one. 

Mr. Eells was born at Tshimakain, now called Walker's Prairie, in Stevens 
county, Washington, July 27, 1841, and is the eldest son of the Rev. Cushing and 
Myra F. Eells, who were missionaries to the Indians. They were natives of Mas- 
sachusetts, born in Blanford and Holden respectively. Rev. Cushing was a 
graduate of Hartford Seminary, at Hartford, Connecticut, and of WilHams Col- 
lege of Massachusetts. He taught school in New England until 1838, when he 
and his wife made the trip from Massachusetts to Washington on horseback. 
The arduousness of the undertaking can scarcely be imagined in this day, when 
one travels over the country in a Pullman palace car. There were not even the 
landmarks of the " '49ers" to guide them. They made their way over trackless 
prairies and through the mountain passes and ultimately reached what is now 
Walker's Prairie, in eastern Washington. At the time of the Indian outbreak 
and the Whitman massacre, November 29, 1847, the Eells family and their sur- 
viving missionaries fled the country and the father established a school at West 
Tualatin Plains, now Forest Grove, Oregon. Edwin Eells there began his educa- 
tion, which he continued in other schools, of which his father was the teacher, 
and one of his classmates was Harvey W. Scott, late the honored editor of the 
Portland Oregonian. His youthful days brought him strenuous but happy ex- 
periences as farmer and clerk, and when the family returned to the Whitman mis- 
sion station near Walla Walla, in the spring of 1862, he aided his father and his 
brothers in building a room sixteen feet square which was used for school pur- 
poses. Out of this frontier school developed Whitman Seminary and ultimately 
Whitman College, although the original school building was never used by the 
seminary. Edwin Eells taught there during the winter and his father taught 
there in 1868 and 1869. He continued to reside upon the Whitman mission claim 
until 1872, when his buildings were destroyed by fire and he sold his claim, taking 
up his abode with his son Edwin, with whom he and his wife lived until 1878. 
In that year, however, Mrs. Myra F. Eells passed away, at tlic age of seventy- 
three years. The Rev. Eells then went to eastern Washington, settling in Daytcn, 
and for ten years thereafter was a self-supporting missionary, during which time 
he organized a number of congregations, building for them churches which he 
supplied with the bells that each Sunday "called to holy worship." In 1889 he 
again took up his abode with his son Edwin at the Puyallu]) Agency, where he 
resided until his death, which occurred February 6, 1893, on the eighty-third 
anniversary of his birth. To him and his wife were born two children: Edwin, 
of this review; and the Rev. Myron Eells, D. D.. who was born in 1841 and died 
in 1907. He was a graduate of the Pacific University of Washington county, 
Oregon, and of Hartford Seminary of Hartford, Connecticut. He became a 



304 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

distinguished divine and he was also the author of many books and biographies. 
He wrote the Life of Dr. Whitman, and among his other pubhshed works are 
Father Fells, Ten Years at Skokomish Indian Missions, and many pamphlets 
which he prepared for the Smithsonian Institution. His was a very active life of 
far-reaching usefulness, for he was a man of scholarly attainments, practical in 
all that he undertook, his labors proving a potent force in intellectual and moral 
progress and uplift. He married Sarah M. Crosby, who was born on the Pacific 
coast, and they had five children, Edwin F., Arthur H., Chester C, Walter C, 
and Roy W. Of this family the fourth son. Professor Walter C. Eells, taught 
for two years at Whitworth College in Tacoma, which has been moved to Spo- 
kane, he having previously pursued post-graduate work in Chicago University, 
and he is now one of the professors in the United States Naval Academy at 
Annapolis. 

As previously stated, Edwin Eells devoted his youth and early manhood to 
farming and clerking and when living at Whitman mission station and identified 
with agricultural pursuits in that district, he became one of the organizers of the 
First Congregational church in the territory of Washington, its location being at 
Walla \\'alla. In 1871 he was married to Aliss Abbie A. Foster, the wedding 
being celebrated on Black river, ten miles from Seattle, at Rose Bluff, which was 
the name of the ranch owned by her father, S. H. Foster, who in 1865 removed 
from Maine to Washington and settled on a claim on Black river. His remaining 
days were spent upon that property and in Seattle and his active business life 
was devoted to agricultural pursuits. He married Philinda Comstock, also a 
native of Maine, and both have now passed away. 

After devoting a number of years to farming, Edwin Eells in 1870 took up 
the study of law in Seattle and at the same time acted as secretary and treasurer 
of the Seattle Coal Company, which was opening up coal mines east of Lake 
Washington. The year 1871 was an important one in his life, for it was at that 
time that he was admitted to practice in the territorial and federal courts. In 
the same year he was appointed agent of the Skokomish Indian agency. He was 
also married that year and took his bride to the Skokomish Indian reservation, 
where he rendered valuable service to the tribe and to the government for more 
than eleven years. In 1882 he was in charge of the consolidated agency, embrac- 
ing the Tulalip, Nisqually and Skokomish Indians. The next year a division was 
made and his office was moved from Tulalip to the Puyallup reservation. In 
1888 the two reservations of the Kuinaielt Indians were added to his charge. He 
allotted the lands in severalty to the Indians of most of the reservations in his 
agency. There is no feature of Indian life in its more peaceful as well as in its 
warlike relations, with which Mr. Eells is not familiar and his mind is enriched 
with many of their interesting legends and tales of their habits and modes of life. 

In 1895, when the Indian agency was abolished, Mr. Eells removed to Tacoma, 
where for three years he lived retired. He then embarked in general merchan- 
dising, in which business he continued for three years, when he again retired 
from active business life. He has since enjoyed a well earned rest and is now in 
his seventy-fifth year, although in appearance and interests he seems yet in his 
prime. 

To ]Mr. and Mrs. Eells were born eight children, of whom five are yet living: 
Ida M., who is a domestic science teacher in the schools of Helena, Montana ; 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 305 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Coates, living in Seattle; Mrs. Grace E. Foster, residing at 
Omack, Washington; Abbie May, also at Helena, Montana; and Edwin, who is 
attending Overland Theological Seminary. 

Mr. Eells has ever been deeply interested in the moral progress of his com- 
munity and was made superintendent of construction of the big stone church, 
which was built by the Congregationalists at J and Division streets. Seven years 
passed from the time the work was begun until its completion, during which 
period he collected all the money and gave his undivided attention to the further- 
ance of the work. His entire life has been actuated by his Christian faith, which 
has prompted him in all his relations with his fellowmen. He became one of the 
organizers of the State Historical Society and also of the County Pioneer 
Society, of which he was vice president for one year and secretary for two years. 
He has membership with the Pioneer Society of the State of Washington, of 
which he was once vice president and at one time he was president of the Pioneer 
Society of Pierce County. His memory forms a connecting link between the prim- 
itive past and the progressive present and that there has been builded a great 
empire on the shores of the Sound is due in no small measure to his efforts. No 
story of fiction contains more interesting or exciting chapters than may be found 
in his history but space forbids an extended account here. The days of chivalry 
and knighthood in Europe cannot furnish more romantic tales than the annals 
of our own west. 



CHARLES LEHMAN. 



Charles Lehman, proprietor of a meat market in Sequim, discloses in his 
business career the force of energy and persistency of purpose in the attain- 
ment of success. He was born in Dresden, Germany, August 29, 1874, and is 
a son of Karl Lehman, a native of that country, now deceased. For many years 
the father was a successful merchant of Dresden, where he passed away in 1874. 
The mother, who bore the maiden name of Amelia Otto, died in Dresden in 
1905, at the age of sixty-seven years. 

The only child of that marriage was Charles Lehman, who was educated in 
the public schools in a village near Dresden. Germany, and when a youth o£ 
fourteen was apprenticed to learn the butcher's trade, which he afterward fol- 
lowed as a journeyman until he reached the age of twenty years. He then entered 
the army, serving as a private for two years, and later he followed the butchering 
business in the fatherland until 1907, when he crossed the Atlantic to the new 
world, making his way first to Galveston, Texas. There he remained for only 
a short period, after which he went to Fort Worth. Texas, where he engaged in 
the butchering business in the employ of others for four months. 1 Ic next spent 
a year at Palestine, Texas, and in April, 1909, he arrived in Spokane, Washing- 
ton. He spent six weeks in seeking employment there without success, after 
which he went to Odessa, Washington, where he was more fortunate, remaining 
for about a year at that place. He then removed to Seattle and while in that 
city secured a position with a meat dealer of Port Angeles and for a year was 
in the employ of E. W. Merrill. The succeeding three months were spent in the 



306 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Garrison market of Port Angeles and on the ist of May, 191 1, he removed to 
Sequim, where he began business on his own account on a small scale. He first 
purchased one beef and one hog and he equipped his market with a few second- 
hand fixtures. From that small start he has built up an extensive business until 
he has the finest and best equipped market in the northern peninsula, while his 
trade is very extensive and nets him a most gratifying annual income. As his 
financial resources have increased he has made judicious investments in real 
estate and now owns considerable valuable property. 

On the 20th of July, 1901, in Dresden, Germany, Mr. Lehman was united in 
marriage to Miss Liddy Kopprash, her parents being Gustave and ^larie Kop- 
prash, also natives of that country. Mr. and Mrs. Lehman have two sons, 
namely: Herbert, who was born in Dresden, Germany, October 3, 1904; and 
Alfred, whose birth occurred in Port Angeles, W'ashington, on the 19th of 
November, 1910. 

Mr. Lehman attributes much of his success to the efforts and sound judgment 
of his wife, who has always been to him a faithful helpmate. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Odd Fellows lodge of Sequim, while his religious faith is 
evidenced in his membership in the Lutheran church. His has been an active 
and well spent life, gaining for him the respect and high regard of those with 
whom he has been associated. The opportunities of the new world have afforded 
him ample scope for his energ}' and determination, which are his dominant quali- 
ties, and in the utilization of the chances which have come to him he has made 
for himself a creditable position among the substantial business men of Clallam 
county. 



HENRY A. SMITH, M. D. 

The subject of this review is one whose history touched the pioneer epoch in 
the annals of the Pacific coast, and whose days formed an integral part in that in- 
dissoluble chain which links the early formative period W'ith that latter day progress 
and prosperity. When Washington was cut off from the comfort and advantages 
of the east by the long, hot stretches of sand and the high mountains, Dr. Smith 
made his way across the plains, braving all the trials and hardships of pioneer 
life, in order to make a home in the northwest — rich in its resources, yet unclaimed 
from the dominion of the red man. For more than half a century he resided 
in this section of the country and was the first physician to locate in the little 
settlement which has developed into the beautiful city of Seattle. 

Dr. Smith was born near Wooster, Wayne county, Ohio, on the nth of 
April, 1830, and died at his home in Seattle. August 16, 191 5. He was 
of German lineage on the paternal side, while on the maternal side he was of 
English ancestry, the two families being founded in America during an early 
epoch in her history. His great-grandfather, Copleton Smith, served his country 
under General Washington in the Revolutionary war. He owned one thousand 
acres of land, over which the city of Philadelphia has since spread, and from 
which he was driven by the Indians who murdered his wife. Later when he 
returned to his property he found that it had been taken by others, who met 
him with rifles and would have killed him had he pressed his claim. He was a 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 307 

man of wonderful endurance and lived to the very advanced age of ninety-eight 
years. 

Rev. Nicholas Smith, the father of the Doctor, was born in Pennsylvania in 
1799. He married Abigail Teafif, a native of Virginia, and they removed to 
Wooster, Ohio. He was a minister of the Christian church and engaged in 
preaching during the greater part of his life. He served in the War of 1812. 
He died in his fiftieth year, but his wife, long surviving him, passed away at the 
ripe age of eighty years. She came west with her son, the Doctor, and acted as 
his housekeeper throughout the pioneer period of Seattle's development. A 
most earnest and devoted Christian woman, she belonged to the church in which 
her husband was a minister and her influence was widely felt for good and 
left an indelible impression on the lives and character of her children. She 
was the mother of nine children — two of her sons fought in the Civil war. Dr. 
Samuel S. Smith and Colonel George P. Smith. 

Dr. Henry A. Smith was educated in the public schools of Wooster, Ohio, 
later attending Allegheny College, Meadville, Pennsylvania, where he began the 
study of medicine which was continued in the office of Dr. Charles Roode in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and later at the University of Pennsylvania. For a time he 
engaged in the practice of medicine in Keokuk, Iowa, and then resolved to make 
his home on the Pacific coast, which was then being developed although pioneer 
conditions yet largely existed. In 1852 he crossed the plains with oxen and 
mules, California being his objective point. He traveled with a large company 
and fortunately took with him a large supply of medicine which proved of the 
greatest benefit, for it was the year of the cholera scourge when so many suffered 
from that dread disease. Dr. Smith was instrumental in relieving the suft"ering 
and saved the lives of many during the journey. After a six months trip, which 
was full of hazards, the party reached what is now Portland, Oregon, on the 
26th of October, 1852, the place being then a logging camp containing a hundred 
people. 

General Stevens was engaged in surveying a road to the Sound and the 
Doctor concluded that was an outlook for the development of the country, so he 
decided to go on. Leaving his mother and sister at Portland he followed the 
road up the Cowlitz river, reached Olympia in safety and on shipboard proceeded 
down Puget Sound. He became enamored with the beauty of the scenery and 
resolved to make a home in this portion of the country. He took up a claim of 
one hundred and sixty acres on one of the bays which jut inland from the 
Sound, and the place naturally took his name, being called Smith's cove. To 
the south of his location there was a large bay beside which was a saw mill and 
a few log cabins. He became the physician of the little settlement, which is now 
the magnificent city of Seattle. He erected his first log hut in 1853. The next 
year he built an infirmary for his patients, which was a large log cabin. Surgeon 
as well as physician, ailing persons from all over the Sound were brought to him 
% Indian canoes. His friendly disposition and his charity won him a host of 
friends among the pioneers. In 1854 he set out llic first grafted fruit orchard in 
Washington territory. Wherever the Doctor lived fruit and flowers grew as if by 
magic. But many years have passed away and it required the combined efforts 
of many enterprising citizens to make Seattle the beautiful city which today we 
find it. 



308 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Dr. Smith recalled many incidents of pioneer days when life was fraught 
with hardships. During the time of the Indian wars he had to leave his claim 
for a time after the White river massacre to convey his mother to a place of 
safety, by night, in a boat with muffled oars. To quote his own words : "Early 
the next morning I persuaded James Broad and Charley Williamson, a couple of 
harum-scarum, run-away sailors, to accompany me to my ranch in the cove, 
where we remained two weeks securing crops. We always kept our riiles near 
us while working in the fields, so as to be ready for emergencies, and brave as 
they seemed their faces several times blanched white as they sprang for their 
guns on hearing brush crack near them, usually caused by deer. One morning, 
on going to the fields, we found fresh moccasin tracks and judged from the 
differences in size that at least half a dozen savages had paid the field a visit 
during the night. As nothing had been disturbed we concluded that they were 
waiting in ambush for us and we accordingly retired to the side of the field 
farthest from the woods and began to work, keeping a sharp outlook the while. 
Soon we heard a crackling in the brush and a noise that sounded like the snapping 
of a fiint-lock. We grabbed our rifles and rushed into the woods where we heard 
the noise, so as to have the trees for shelter. The crackling sound receded 
towards Salmon bay but fearing a surprise if we followed the sound of retreat, 
we concluded to reach the bay by way of a trail that led to it, but higher up ; we 
reached the water just in time to see five redskins land in a canoe on the opposite 
side of the bay. After that I had hard work to keep the runaways until the crop 
was secured, and did so only by keeping one of them secreted in the nearest brush, 
constantly on guard. 

"At night we barred the doors and slept in the attic, hauling the ladder up 
after us. Sometimes when the boys told blood-curdling stories until they became 
panicky by their own eloquence, we slept in the woods, but that was not often. 

'Tn this way the crops were all saved, cellared, and stacked away, only to be 
destroyed afterwards by the common enemy. Twice the house was fired before 
it was finally consumed; each time I happened to arrive in time to extinguish the 
flames, the incendiaries evidently having taken to their heels as soon as the torch 
was applied." 

Finally, owing to the raids and destroyed homes, it was necessary to organize 
volunteer companies for the defense of the white people. In Company D of the 
volunteers Dr. Smith enlisted for three months and he was commissioned surgeon 
by Governor Stevens. Subsequently he enlisted in Company A for six months 
and took part in the battle of Seattle. Their duty was to scour the country and 
guard the town while the families remained in safety within the stockade. In 
December, 1856, the Indians attacked the town, the fight lasting all day. The 
government ship, Decatur, had just entered the bay and took a part in the battle 
which saved the town. The ship shelled the Indians, who were filled with great 
consternation at the balls which shot twice. An Indian saw a ball from the ship 
fall, and thinking he had found a great prize, ran and picked it up. Just then it 
exploded and killed him and several others. Only two white men lost their lives 
in the struggle. 

In 1862 Dr. Smith was happily married to Miss Mary A. Phelen, a native of 
Wisconsin, who by reason of her sunny nature and sweet, self-sacrificing disposi- 
tion endeared herself to the pioneers, and to them were born seven daughters and 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 309 

a son — all but two of them are living. Lulu M. became the wife of R. H. J. 
Pennefather. Luma E. married George Linder, Jr. Maude, who married C. H. 
Teaff, died in 1908. lone H. married Christian F. Graff. Ralph Waldo was 
drowned in Alaska. May B. and Laurine live together in Seattle. Lillian L 
married Alfred Hope. 

In 1864, having developed his Smith cove property to a large extent, Dr. 
Smith acquired six hundred acres of tide flats near the mouth of Snohomish 
river — which became known as Smith island. He formed the idea of reclaiming 
the tide lands about him. He recalled that this had been done in Holland. He 
reclaimed seventy-five acres and at once cultivated it, and wrote articles for 
the papers explaining the details of the reclaiming process. 

While on the island Dr. Smith built an annex to his house which he used 
as a hospital. He was the only physician for five counties and always traveled 
by Indian canoe to answer the call of his profession. After six years on the 
island Dr. Smith was appointed government physician for the Tulalip Indian 
reservation. He was also at this time the owner and manager of twelve logging 
camps, besides being the proprietor of the only general store. These facts go 
to show the wonderful energy of the Doctor. 

In 1878 he returned to Seattle where his property grew in value. He became 
possessed of nearly one thousand acres of land at Smith cove, and sold a portion 
of this for seventy-five thousand dollars, retaining, however, fifty acres. Subse- 
quently this became worth far more than the part which he sold. In 1889 he 
built the London Hotel at the foot of Pike street, extending a pier into deep 
water. In 1890 he built the Smith block, now known as the Crown building, at 
Second avenue and James street. After the Seattle fire he also erected a number 
of homes, which he rented. His real estate investments brought to him a hand- 
some fortune owing to the increase in the value of property. For years Dr. 
Smith was the largest tax payer in King county. He was also the first superin- 
tendent of public schools in King county, serving for several years. 

Dr. Smith was' a republican from the organization of the party and had 
four times been elected to the lower house of the legislature, where he served 
with honor and credit, leaving the impress of his strong and upright nature upon 
the legislation enacted during that period. Lie never sought office, never asked 
for a vote, and never was defeated in an election, and while he was presiding 
officer in the council there never was an appeal from his rulings. His political 
record is almost without parallel and indicates not only his personal popularity, 
but the unqualified confidence reposed in his ability, loyalty and trustworthiness. 

During the many years he lived in the northwest, Dr. Smith, of a philosophical 
turn, wove into verses and essays much of his musings. It is planned to publish 
this work. He had also written a number of poems and valuable reminiscent 
articles of the early times which have been published by the press, and are of 
much historical value and interest. One of these is a fine description of the 
Indian Chief, Seattle, for whom the town of Seattle was named, and which 
gives an account of one of the chief's oratorical efforts, of which the Doctor had 
taken notes. 

Mrs. Smith died in 1880. 

During the panic of 1903 the Doctor lost a fortune, but nothing daunted kept 
on working. When he was seventy-seven years old he cleared and planted over 



310 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

ten lots in West Queen Anne addition to Seattle, and for years took the greatest 
interest and pride in his choice fruit trees and shrubbery. 

During the month of April, 191 5, the Doctor had a severe attack of la grippe, 
from the effects of which he did not recover, and on August i6th, surrounded by 
five of his devoted daughters, he passed away, his consciousness being retained 
almost to the last. 

The measure of good Dr. Smith accomplished can never be estimated, but 
all who knew him acknowledge his worth, first as a loving and devoted father, 
next in his professional capacity and charity, and then as a citizen who contributed 
to the material upbuilding of city and state, and finally as a public official over 
whose record there falls no shadow of wrong nor suspicion of evil. 



JESSE B. BRIDGES. 



Jesse B. Bridges is one of the well known attorneys of Aberdeen, highly 
respected both as a member of the bar and as a citizen. He is also connected 
with various corporate interests of the city and is thus active in promoting its 
material development. His residence in Washington dates from 1890, in which 
year he opened a law office in Tacoma. He was born in Indiana in 1862 and in 
that state prepared for the bar, being graduated from De Pauw University at 
Greencastle on the completion of a law course. He was then admitted to practice 
at the bar of his native state and for three years followed his profession there, 
but the opportunities of the west attracted him and in 1890 he arrived in Tacoma, 
where he followed his profession for six months. He then removed to Mon- 
tesano, where he remained in practice for ten years, after which he came to 
Aberdeen. In 1900 he entered into partnership with Judge Mason Irwin for the 
practice of law in Aberdeen and this association was maintained for four years. 
He had previously been connected with the professional interests of the city 
while living in Montesano, for at that time he maintained an office in Aberdeen 
and in fact practiced throughout the Grays Harbor district. Following the disso- 
lution of his partnership with Judge Irwin he practiced alone for five years and 
in 191 1 entered into partnership with T. B. Bruener, who is his present associate 
under the firm style of Bridges & Bruener, with offices in the Hayes & Hayes 
Bank building. They are accorded a very liberal and distinctively representative 
clientage that connects them with much of the important litigation tried in the 
courts of the district. While Mr. Bridges makes the practice of law his real life 
work he has also extended his efforts along other lines and his sound judgment 
and enterprise have proven salient forces in the successful conduct of several 
important corporations, for he is now president of the Electric Service & Supply 
Company, first vice president and counsel for the Grays Harbor Railway & Light 
Company and vice president of the Big Creek Timber Company. 

In New York, Mr. Bridges was married to Miss Mary Smith, a daughter of 
H. W. Smith, who was cashier of the Hoquiam Bank, the pioneer bank of 
Hoquiam, but later returned to the east. Fraternally Mr. Bridges is connected 
with the Elks and in his political views is a republican. The only office he has 
ever held was in the strict path of his profession, that of prosecuting attorney 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 311 

in 1895. He was the first president of the County Bar Association and president 
of the State Bar Association in 191 1 and has always occupied a distinguished 
position as a leader of the bar of western Washington. His ability is pronounced, 
embracing all the qualities which make him a strong advocate and safe counselor 
and his resourcefulness in the trial of cases has again and again been manifest. 



J. A. LEWIS. 



J. A. Lewis, treasurer and manager of the Coats Shingle Company at Ho- 
quiam, was born in Washtenaw county, Michigan, in 1862, a son of Daniel and 
Martha ( Hoyt ) Lewis, the former a native of New York and the latter of 
Michigan, in which state they were married. The father devoted his life to the 
occupation of farming but both he and his wife passed away when their son, J. 
A., was quite young. They had but two children, the elder being Charles L., 
now a resident of Raymond, Washington. When J. A. Lewis was but a year 
and a half old his parents removed from the farm on which he was born to Ionia 
and there he pursued his education in the public schools. When fourteen years 
of age he began to learn the shingle business and worked in all departments of 
the mill, becoming familiar with every phase of shingle making. Several years 
were devoted to that work, during which he made steady progress and eventually 
became the owner of a shingle mill at McBride, Michigan, and later of one at 
Gladwin. 

While still a resident of that state Mr. Lewis was married on the 24th of 
December, 1883, to Miss Malinda Ferine, also a native of Michigan, and they 
became the parents of three children: Clyde, who is secretary of the Coats 
shingle mill; Forrest, who is in the mill at Hoquiam ; and Charles, attending 

school. 

Mr. Lewis continued in business in Michigan until 1892, when he removed 
his mill from Gladwin, to Markham. Washington, forming a partnership with 
his brother. Charles L. Lewis, now of Raymond, Washington. :\Ir. Lewis con- 
tinued in business in Markham until 1898 when he sold out there and at 
Hoquiam built what is today the largest cedar shingle mill on Grays Harbor, 
having a capacity of five hundred thousand daily. In 1909 he reorganized the 
business and improved the plant, installing new machinery, and changed the 
capacity to four hundred thousand daily. The business is conducted under the 
name of the Coats Shingle Company, with B. F. Johnson of Seattle as president; 
Mrs. J. C. Chapman, of Aberdeen, vice president; J. D. C. Lewis, secretary, and 
J. A. Lewis, treasurer and manager. Under the management of Mr. Lewis the 
business is most wisely and carefully conducted. It is kept constantly in opera- 
tion and one year ran three hundred and two days. He thoroughly under- 
stands every department of the work, keeps in close touch with conditions and 
is always in command of the situation. At the same time he is pleasant and 
courteous to patrons and employes alike, is just and fair in his treatment of 
both and has ever recognized the fact that satisfied patrons are the best adver- 
tisement. 



312 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

In his political views Mr. Lewis is a stalwart republican, and while well in- 
formed on the questions and issues of the day, does not seek office. He belongs 
to the Masonic lodge, to the consistory and to the Mystic Shrine, to the Modem 
Woodmen of America, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Mac- 
cabees. He is likewise a member of the Commercial Club of Hoquiam and 
was on its board of directors in 191 5. He is a man of keen insight, as is manifest 
in his judgment of business affairs and of public questions and interests. He 
pursues the even tenor of his way, devoted to public welfare and progress as 
well as to individual interests, nor is he disturbed by erratic movements or 
spectacular displays in business or in public life. 



GEORGE P. CORNEIL. 



George P. Corneil. deceased, of Lowell, Washington, was born in Ekfrid, 
Middlesex county, Ontario, on the 22d of January, 1840. He left that country in 
1865 and became a resident of Big Rapids, Michigan, where he 'engaged in lum- 
bering for a third of a century. In 1908 he turned his attention to the north- 
west and became a resident of Lowell, Washington, a suburb of Everett. Here 
he was again identified with the lumber trade, but for some years lived retired, 
his death occurring in Everett, August 12, 1914. 



WILLIAM R. SIMMONS, M. D. 

Dr. William R. Simmons, a representative of the medical profession who has 
won success in his practice at Port Townsend, was born in Midland, Michigan, 
December 18, 1871. His father, William Simmons, a native of Germany, came 
to America in 1846, when a child of seven years, with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilhelm Simmons, who were the founders of the American branch of the family. 
William Simmons was educated in Port Huron, Michigan, and for many years 
successfully followed agricultural pursuits, but at the time of the Civil war he 
put aside all business and personal considerations and enlisted in the First Michi- 
gan Cavalry, with which he served for a period of three years, taking part in the 
battle of Gettysburg, in the second battle of Bull Run and various other engage- 
ments. Being captured, he was sent to Andersonville prison, where he suft'ered 
many hardships but eventually was exchanged. Something of the starvation 
methods practiced there is indicated in the fact that when he entered the prison 
he weighed one hundred and sixty pounds and on coming out his weight was 
only eighty-one pounds. With the close of the war he returned to Michigan, 
where he resumed agricultural pursuits. He was also quite active in local politics 
there as a supporter of the republican party and filled various city and county 
offices. In 1902 he removed to Washington, establishing his home in Tacoma, 
where he remained until 191 1, when he became a resident of Snohomish, where 
he is now living retired. In early manhood he wedded Phoebe E. Holmes, a 
native of New York and a daughter of Jeremiah Holmes, representative of an 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 313 

old New York family of English lineag-e. She died in 1906, in Tacoma, at the 
age of fifty-seven years. In the family were three children: Avis Viola, the 
wife of Dr. T. J. Allen, of Tacoma; William R. ; and Ernest, who died in Mid- 
land, Michigan, at the age of seven years. 

Dr. Simmons, after graduating from the Midland high school with the class 
of 1888, pursued a literary course in the Battle Creek College of Battle Creek, 
Michigan. His youthful days were spent upon the home farm with the usual 
experiences of the farm bred boy, but his desire to pursue a professional career 
led him to take up the study of medicine and he was graduated from the Ameri- 
can Medical Missionary College of Chicago, now affiliated with the University 
of Illinois. He completed his course there and won his degree in 1899 '^"'^ 
for six months he was an interne in the Battle Creek Sanitarium, after which 
he became connected with the Portland Sanitarium at Portland, Oregon, con- 
tinuing his connection with that institution until 1906, when he came to Port 
Townsend and established the Northwest Sanitarium. It was the third hospital 
of the city, its predecessors being the St. John's and the United States Marine 
Hospitals. The Northwest Sanitarium contained accommodations for over two 
hundred patients and was the largest private hospital in Washington outside of 
Seattle. Dr. Simmons sold the hospital in June, 19 14, and entered upon the 
private practice of medicine and surgery, to which he now devotes his attention. 

On the 30th of June, 1899, Dr. Simmons was married at Des Moines, Iowa, 
to Miss Lura M. Spencer, a native of Iowa and a daughter of John W. Spencer. 
Dr. and Mrs. Simmons have become parents of a son, William Gerald, who was 
born in Port Townsend, December 19, 1906. Dr. Simmons holds to the faith 
of the Seventh Day Adventist church. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Eagles at Port Townsend and has been physician for that organization for the 
past seven years. He belongs to the Commercial Club and is deeply interested 
in all that pertains to the progress and improvement of the city. His efforts and 
attention, however, are chiefly concentrated upon his professional duties, which 
he discharges with a marked sense of conscientious obligation. He is now presi- 
dent of the Jefferson County Medical Society, also belongs to the Washington 
State Medical Association and to the American Medical Association, and thus 
he keeps in close touch with the progressive work of the profession and with all 
the latest scientific researches and discoveries. 



FRANK J. BARLOW. 



Frank J. Barlow, president of the board of regents of the State Normal 
School served four years and was reappointed for six years more and is thus 
actively identified with educational interests of Washington. He is also well 
known as a business man in Bellingham, being proprietor of the Barlow Garage 
and agent at that place for the Dodge Brothers cars. He was born in Clinton 
county, New York, March 19, 1848, a son of A. J. and Emily C. (Marvin) Bar- 
low. In 1855 his parents removed with their family to Champaign county, 
Illinois, where he attended the public schools and also worked upon his father's 
farm. He next went to Effingham, Illinois, where he worked at the harness 



314 WASHINGTON. WEST OF THE CASCADES 

maker's trade for about two years. Later he removed to A'andalia, Illinois, 
where he was employed at harness making for three years, after which he em- 
barked in the saddlery business at Vandalia on his own account, continuing 
a representative of trade interests at that place until 1871, when he removed 
to St. Elmo, Illinois. In that town he conducted a saddlery business for seven 
years, after which he returned to Effingham, where he again established a har- 
ness and saddlery shop. At the end of four years he disposed of his interests 
and made his initial step toward the Pacific northwest by removing to Huron, 
South Dakota, where he engaged in the saddlery business until September, 1889. 
That year witnessed his arrival in Bellingham, where he opened a saddlery and 
farm implement store. From the beginning his trade constantly grew and he 
continued in that connection until 191 5, when he sold out. In the meantime, 
or in 191 1, he had established the Barlow Garage, which he has since conducted, 
and he now has the agency for the Dodge Brothers cars in Bellingham. His 
business has grown to substantial proportions and is bringing to him gratifying 
success. 

In Vandalia. Illinois, in July, 1871, occurred the marriage of Mr. Barlow 
and Miss Marie Heiz and they have become the parents of five children: C. H., 
who is now the president of the Bellingham Harness Company; T. M.. who is 
a practicing dentist of Bellingham ; Carl, a successful merchant at Monroe, Wash- 
ington ; F. Glenn, manager of the Barlow Garage; and E. Lee, a mechanic at 
the garage. 

Mr. Barlow exercises his right of franchise in support of the principles and 
candidates of the democratic party and fraternally he is identified with the Ma- 
sons and the Ancient Order of L^nited Workmen. He has made his home at 
Bellingham continuously for about twenty-eight years and is widely know'n as 
an active, enterprising and representative business man whose diligence and deter- 
mination are the foundation upon which he has built his success. 



lp:onard h. jacobsen, m. d. 

Dr. Leonard H. Jacobsen. mayor of Stanwood and now actively connected 
with the Stanwood Hospital, was born in Luverne, Minnesota, August 19, 1879, 
a son of William and Milla (Erickson) Jacobsen. the former a native of Norway, 
while the latter was born in Iowa. The mother's people came to this country at 
an early period, settling in the Hawkeye state, and the father crossed the At- 
lantic to the new world when a young man of twenty-one years. He first took up 
his abode in Winneshiek county, Iowa, where he turned his attention to mercan- 
tile lines, and after his removal to Minnesota he continued in the same field of 
business. For a number of years prior to his death he was president of the 
First National Bank of Luverne, Minnesota, and became a prominent and in- 
fluential business man of that place. He was called to his final rest in 1906, 
when he had reached the age of sixty years, and his widow is still living at 
Luverne at the age of fifty-eight years. In their family were seven children, 
all of whom survive, namely: Mrs. C..H. Christopherson, of Luverne; Wil- 
liam, hving in Luverne; Leonard H. ; WaUer, wdiose home is in Howard, South 



WASHINGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 315 

Dakota ; Nora, a school teacher in MinneapoHs, Minnesota ; Jessie, who is a 
music teacher in Minneapohs ; and Milton, who is a student in the University of 
Minnesota. 

At the usual age Dr. Jacobsen became a pupil in the public schools of Luverne, 
Minnesota, and passed through consecutive grades to the high school. He after- 
ward did academic work and for one year was a student in the University of 
Minnesota. He then matriculated in the Medical College of the University of 
Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1905, subsequent to which time 
he spent a year as interne in the Luther Hospital at St. Paul and thus gained 
that broad experience and wide knowledge that one quickly secures in hospital 
practice. In 19 15 he was a student in the Chicago Post Graduate School. 

Dr. Jacobsen entered upon the active practice of his profession in Seattle, 
Washington, and was ship physician on the steamer Dakota for one year, sailing 
out of Seattle. In 191 1 he came to Stanwood, where he has since built up a large 
and growing practice. In that year he bought out the Stanwood Hospital, of 
which he has since been chief physician. He was appointed health officer for 
Stanwood and served in that capacity for four years. 

On the 20th of March, 1909, Dr. Jacobsen was married in Seattle, Wash- 
ington, to Miss Ella Thorsen. a daughter of the Rev. J. A. Thorsen. residing at 
Byron, Minnesota. He has just resigned after forty-six years of work in 
connection with the ministry. To Dr. and Mrs. Jacobsen have been born two 
children: Harold, born in Seattle March 10, 1910; and William, born in Stan- 
wood, February 23, 1913. 

Dr. Jacobsen belongs to the Sons of Norway and to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. His political endorsement is given to the republican party and 
he served for three years as a member of the city council of Stanwood. He is 
now serving as mayor of the city, having been elected in 191 5. Along strictly 
professional lines he has connection with the Snohomish County ]\[edical So- 
ciety, the Washington State Medical Society and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and thus he keeps in close touch with the latest scientific research, 
investigation and discoveries. 



JAMES CAMPBELL. 



James Campbell, a Seattle capitalist, who is regarded as one of the dis- 
tinguished figures in business circles in the northwest, was born in Nova Scotia, 
October 25, 1853. His father. Captain John Campbell, now deceased was a native 
of Scotland and sailed as a captain of steamboats of the Cunard Coal Company for 
forty-nine years. This company ran tow boats, coast boats and wreckers. At 
the age of eighty-nine he passed away, while his wife died at the age of eighty- 
eight years. In her maidenhood she was Mary Renton, a sister of Captain Renton, 
one of the old pioneers of this section of the country, mentioned elsewhere in this 

work. 

James Campbell acquired his education in the common schools of Nova Scotia 
and entered the workaday world as an apprentice to the carpenter's trade. After 
thoroughly acquainting himself with the business he went to sea and then engaged 



316 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

in steamboating with his father, saiHng as officer out of Montreal to St. John's, 
Newfoundland, after which he came to Puget Sound in the year 1879. For two 
years thereafter he worked as a millwright at Port Blakeley and in 1882 he oper- 
ated a planer for five or six months, after which he again engaged as foreman 
millwright, continuing actively along that line for twelve years. He next became 
superintendent of the mills in w^hich he had purchased an interest and remained 
with the business until it was sold. Some time before Captain and Mrs. Renton 
and a Mr. Holmes of San Francisco had entered into an agreement by which James 
Campbell and his brother, John A. Campbell, were to operate the mill as managers 
until ten years after Captain Kenton's death. After the captain died in 189 1, 
Mr. Campbell and his brother bought stock in the property, which they sold in 
1903, the deal for which sale was principally conducted by James Campbell for 
the family interests, he having gone to San Francisco for that purpose and made 
what was considered a very advantageous sale. His business judgment is sound, 
his sagacity marked, his enterprise unfaltering, and his ready recognition and utili- 
zation of opportunity have been salient points in his successful career. 

On the 17th of July, 1888, at Port Blakeley, Washington, Mr. Campbell married 
]\Iiss Annie AI. Swanberg, a daughter of Charles Swanberg, a pattern maker. Mr. 
Campbell is a republican in his political convictions, but is not an active party 
worker. He is a Hfe member of the Elks Lodge, No. 92, of Seattle, also a life 
member in the Rainier Club and Seattle Athletic Club, and his name is on the 
membership rolls of the Earlington Golf Club and the Seattle Golf and Country 
Club, a fact that indicates much of the nature of his recreation and his interests 
outside of business. He is thoroughly progressive, a dynamic force in whatever 
he undertakes, and in the accomplishment of his purpose he readily recognizes 
the value of plans and forces that lead to success. He is now engaged in the 
timber, logging and mill business, near Seattle. 



FRANK F. LIESNER. 



Frank F. Liesner, a resident of Centralia and the owner of the electric light 
plant and valuable farm property at Oakville, was born in Prussia, Germany, in 
1855. and in his youthful days came with his parents to America, the family home 
being established in Waupaca county, Wisconsin, where the father followed farm- 
ing. Mr. Liesner spent his youth in Wheeling, West A'irignia, and in other east- 
ern states, but later became a resident of the middle west, where he lived until 
1894, when he came to the Pacific coast, making his way to Oakville. He first 
purchased a place in Chehalis \"alley, where he began farming and subsequently 
bought another farm two miles w^est of Oakville. With characteristic energy 
he concentrated his attention upon the further development of his place and made 
it one of the best improved farms of his locality, in the midst of which was a 
beautiful residence. He planted a fine orchard and otherwise added to the value 
and attractive appearance of his place. In 1915 he purchased the Oakville 
Cruiser, a weekly paper which was established in 1901 by G. J. Taylor and Law- 
rence Stewart. The printing office is thoroughly modern in its equipment and 
the paper, published weekly, has a circulation of four hundred. Mr. Liesner was 



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- THE WLW VUKK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 319 

the proprietor of the paper until 191 7, when he sold it to William Aloore. Mr. 
Liesner has directed his efforts into many fields and in everything that he has 
undertaken has won success. He built and owns the electric light plant which 
lights the city, owns and developed the fair grounds, built the ball park for the 
benefit of the public and has been one of the directors of the Grays Harbor 
County Fair Association since its organization in 1910. His labors have been 
a most important element in advancing the interests of Oakville. In February, 
1917, he acquired some business property in Centralia, where he is now residing. 
In Wisconsin, in 1879, Mr. Liesner was united in marriage to Miss Minnie 
Peters, who was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, and they have become the par- 
ents of eight children who are yet living, namely: Ida, Louise, Minnie, Alvina, 
Herman, Walter, Arthur and Henry. Mr. Liesner is an exemplary representa- 
tive of the Masonic order and has been a member of the Odd Fellows since 1887. 
He organized the Grange at Oakville in 1910 and served as master thereof almost 
continuously until his removal to Centralia. In that connection he has done much 
to promote agricultural interests. He has a splendid collection of curios and 
coins to which he is constantly adding, this being one of the side issues and inter- 
ests of his life. His efforts have at all times been well directed in the accom- 
plishment of his purposes and with him the attainment of success in business has 
been but one feature of his life, never precluding his support of important public 
measures, for at all times he is found as a progressive citizen, ready and willing 
to do his part in promoting the general welfare. 



SIGURD G. FOLLESTAD. 

Sigurd G. Follestad, of Everett, a member of a firm doing business under the 
name of the F. & M. Tire Hospital, is today controlling the largest and most 
complete tire house in the state of Washington. Along well defined lines of 
labor he has built up a business of extensive proportions, and although he came 
to this country a poor boy with a cash capital of only fifty dollars, he is now 
one of the substantial citizens and business men of Everett. He was born in 
Christiania, Norway, May 20, 1890, a son of Torleif Gustave Berg Follestad, a 
successful baker and farmer who passed away in Christiania, Norway, in i8()2. 
His wife, Mrs. Cecelia Follestad, is now living at the old home in Christiania, 
Norway. She has three children: Ralph, now living in Seattle, Washington; 
Sigurd G., of Everett; and Gudrun, now residing in Christiania. 

Sigurd G. Follestad pursued his education in the public schools of his nati\c 
city until he reached the age of sixteen years, when he came to the new world. 
He had already had some business experience and training as an employe in his 
mother's dry goods store in Christiania. After crossing the Atlantic he enlisted 
in the United States navy, with which he .served for a four years' term, 1)eginning 
as a second class boy, while at the close of his service he was serving as quarter- 
master. After resigning his position in the navy he secured work with the 
Federal Rubber Company at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and there thoroughly 
learned the rubber tire business during a period when the tire was all hand made. 
He was connected with that company for two years and then made a short trij) 
Vol. in— 17 



320 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

to sea. On his return he removed to the west, settHng in Everett, Washington, 
in February, 1912. He arrived there a comparative stranger and entered the 
employ of L. W. Norman, a pioneer tire man of Everett, with whom he con- 
tinued for six months. He then purchased a half interest in the business and the 
partnership continued for six months, at the end of which time I\Ir. Follestad 
became sole proprietor. Soon afterward he admitted W. M. Maloney to a part- 
nership and they are now proprietors of the F. & M. Tire Hospital. They began 
business on a small scale but their trade has steadily increased under their 
capable management until they now carry a very large stock and in fact have 
the most complete and modern tire house in the state. Their present building, 
erected in May, 1916, is located at 2625 Colby street, one of the principal 
thoroughfares of Everett, and covers a ground space seventy-five by one hundred 
and ten feet. The firm acts as distributors for the United States Tire Company 
in Snohomish county and they also handle many other of the standard makes 
of tires. 

On the 3d of October, 1914, in the Trinity Episcopal church of Everett, 
Mr. Follestad was united in marriage to Miss Phoebe Hall, a native of Newcastle, 
England, and a daughter of Oden Hall, now residing at Everett. Mr. and Mrs. 
Follestad reside at No. 2003 Wetmore street and its hospitality is one of the 
most marked characteristics of their home. 

In religiotis faith Mr. Follestad is a Lutheran and fraternally he is connected 
with the Elks and with the Eagles. He gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party and that he is interested in the welfare and progress of his city 
is indicated in his membership in the Commercial Club, in the reorganization 
of which he assisted in 191 5. He also belongs to the Automobile Club and he 
does everything in his power to further the best interests of the city in all its 
varied connections. He has never regretted his determination to come to the 
new world, for on this side the Atlantic he has found the opportunities which 
he sought and through their utilization has won for himself a most creditable 
position as a successful business man. 



FRANCIS M. FAWCETT. 

Francis M. Fawcett is now living retired from active business, although he 
still retains financial interests in an official connection with the Fawcett Wagon 
Company as its vice president. For a long period he was prominently identified 
with commercial and industrial interests in Tacoma and they operated as well 
in several other cities of the northwest, their ramifying trade interests covering 
a broad territory. 

Mr. Fawcett was born in Mount Vernon, Ohio, November 4, 1848, a son 
of Philip and Martha E. (\^ance) Fawcett, who were also natives of the Buckeye 
state. The paternal grandfather, Arthur Fawcett, was born in the north of Ire- 
land and sailed thence to the new world when a lad of fourteen years. He 
remained a resident of Pennsylvania and there married a lady of German birth. 
For a considerable period he successfully followed agricultural pursuits. His 
son, Philip Fawcett, also carried on agricultural pursuits but at the time of the 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 321 

War of 1812 joined the American army as a private. With the close of hostihties 
he returned home to resume agricultural pursuits, living for some time in Ohio. 
His last days were spent in Saybrook, Illinois, where he passed away at the age 
of sixty-seven years. His wife, Martha Ellen (Vance) Fawcett, was born in 
Ohio, and died in Logan county, Illinois, in 1864, the family having there removed 
in 1852. The family numbered four sons and two daughters, but one of the 
daughters died in early girlhood. The four sons are yet living, Angelo Vance 
being mayor of Tacoma, while the others are Francis M., Philip Douglas and 
John Arthur. 

Francis M. Fawcett was a child of four years when the family home was 
established in Logan county, Illinois. His educational privileges were such as 
were afforded by the public schools of Illinois and he was trained to the work 
of the farm, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and 
caring for the crops. He continued his residence in Illinois until 1883, when he 
came to the northwest, arriving in Tacoma on the 19th of November of that year. 
Here he joined his brother, Angelo Vance Fawcett, in the agricultural implement 
business and they became very prominent merchants in their line in this section 
of the country. As their trade increased they extended their efforts into other 
business centers, establishing branch houses at Portland, Oregon, and at Yakima 
and Bellingham, Washington. They also conducted a branch house at Seattle 
for four years, operating under the name of Fawcett Brothers, implement dealers, 
and at Tacoma the business was carried on under the same firm style. Year by 
year their trade increased and their sales became very extensive, their shipments 
largely covering the northwest. The firm of Fawcett Brothers was the pioneer 
in its line in Tacoma. opening its doors for business in 1882 on Pacific avenue, 
just below Thirteenth street. For many years it occupied the Fawcett building 
at the corner of Broadway and Seventeenth street and its business has always 
been conducted along broad and progressive lines. Francis M. Fawcett is still 
the vice president of the Fawcett Wagon Company of Tacoma, although he 
retired from active connection with the business a decade ago. 

In 1877, in Minnesota, Mr. Fawcett was united in marriage to Miss Annie C. 
Canfield and to them have been born seven children, namely : Robert Angelo ; 
Clyde Canfield; Perry Douglass; Mrs. Hazel Ganong; Marjorie, the wife of 
T. C. Smith ; and Francis M. and R. Merton, both of whom are deceased. For 
a third of a century Mr. Fawcett has been a resident in Tacoma and is one of 
the best known citizens. 



JOSEPH C. JEFFERS. 

Joseph C. Jefifers, a well known photographer of Olympia, with acknowledged 
skill and ability in his profession, was born August 20, 1881, in Georgetown, 
Colorado, but was brought to Olympia when but six months old. He attended 
the public schools until he completed the high school course and in 1900-01 was a 
student in business college. As a boy he worked in lumber mills and in other 
positions that would yield him a living, and while still attending school he be- 
came interested in the kodak business, cleaning and trading kodaks until 1902. 
He then began studying and working along that line, traveling and making pic- 



322 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

tures for a year and a half, his skill and ability constantly increasing as the result 
of his study and experience. He then returned to Olympia and purchased an 
art studio. He afterward bought the ground and has since conducted business 
on his own account, having now a splendidly equipped photographic studio, while 
his work displays the most distinctive and artistic features of the profession. 

On the i6th of November, 1905, Mr. Jeffers was married to Miss Opal Merle 
Prigmore, a native of Sarcoxie, Missouri, and they have two children: Vibert, 
ten years of age, now in school; and Joseph C, who is in his first year. Mr. 
Jeffers is a Protestant in religious belief and a republican in political faith. He 
has membership with the Elks and also in the Chamber of Commerce. 



JUDGE THOMAS H. CANN. 

Judge Thomas H. Cann, who passed away October 25, 1915, was accorded 
high rank among his professional brethren of the state and the general public 
honored him for the ability which he displayed and for the distinguished position 
which he won. A native of St. Clair county, Illinois, he was born July 18, 1833, 
and is of Scotch-Irish descent. His ancestors were among the early settlers 
of A^irginia and his grandfather, William Cann, served under General Wash- 
ington throughout the struggle for American independence. He ^^as one of the 
early pioneers of Kentucky and it was in Hart county, that state, that James 
Cann, father of the Judge, was born in 1793. Reared to manhood in that 
locality, he was there married to Nancy Miller, of pure Irish stock, who was 
also a native of that commonwealth, where her people were among the early 
pioneers. Mr. and Mrs. James Cann became the parents of nine children, six 
sons and three daughters, but the Judge is the only one now living. His brother, 
John B., died in January, 1905. Following their marriage Mr. and ]\Irs. James 
Cann removed to Indiana and were among the first settlers along the Wabash 
river, but about 1827 they left that state for St. Clair county, Illinois, taking 
up their abode where Belleville now stands. During the period of the Civil 
war their son, John B., enlisted for service in the Union army, joining the 
Sixteenth Army Corps, with which he served under General A. J. Smith and 
General Buell. During his connection with the troops at the front he was 
promoted from the ranks to a captaincy and at the battle of Shiloh he was 
wounded. A younger brother, Elias Cann, was also a volunteer of the Union 
army and lost his life in the battle of Wilson creek. The father of this family 
was called to his final rest at the age of fifty-six years, his death resulting from 
an accident. 

Thomas H. Cann obtained his early education in a public school of his native 
locality, the little "temple of learning" being built of logs. In 1854, after 
reaching his twentieth year, he crossed the plains to California with ox teams, 
reaching his destination after a trip that consumed five and a half months. 
Following his arrival on the Pacific coast he mined at a place called Hangtown, 
now Placerville, and at Coloma, Shasta and Yreka, going from one mining 
camp to another. In 1861 he went to a new mining camp in the Nez Perce 
Indian country, which section was a part of Washington territory. The dis- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 323 

covery of gold was made at places called Oro Fino and Pierce City. This 
section of the country was set over to Idaho in 1863 at the time the territorial 
government was formed for Idaho. 

Judge Cann said: "It will be remembered that this country was overrun 
by the rough element, many of whom had been driven out of California, and 
I desire to mention one occurrence in which the best citizens in that country 
took the law into their own hands and administered the most severe punishment 
known to the law. Travelers and packers were being robbed almost every day 
in the mountain passes. Three men named Dave English, Nels Scott and Billy 
Peoples, in the fall of 1862, had robbed a man known well as Judge Bailey 
(his first name I have forgotten) and many others on the mountain roads. 
They were endeavoring to make their escape out of the country but were cap- 
tured at Walla Walla and taken back to Lewiston. On the arrival of the stage 
which was conveying them at the outskirts of the town the stage was stopped 
by an armed band of citizens and they were taken before a committee of citizens 
and received sentence and were hanged. The place of execution was a small 
shed near the steamboat landing, just at the forks of the Clearwater and Snake 
rivers and in front of the business center of Lewiston. The murderer of Lloyd 
Magruder and party was run down by Mr. Hill Beachy and was tried at Lewis- 
ton and hanged. These two hanging bees, following one after the other, gave 
the bandits in that country such a scare that they left for parts unknown and for 
a time there were no more stage robberies. The hanging of Scott English and 
Peoples by the citizens gave considerable nerve to the authorities and the execu- 
tion of the Magruder murderer followed. The stage that conveyed these men 
from Walla Walla arrived at Lewiston late in the evening. I. with many others, 
went and saw the three men hanging to the rafters of the old shed, where they 
had hung for several hours. They were taken upon the hill and buried." 

Mr. Cann was made a deputy sheriff of the new county called Shoshone 
and after a time was elected sheriff by the county commissioners. A year 
later, however, he resigned to enter the employ of Wells Fargo & Company, 
carrying their express from the mines to Lewiston, making the journey prin- 
cipally on horseback, but when the snow was very deep in the winter season 
he packed the express on his back, using snowshoes. While thus engaged the 
exposure during the winters was very severe, while the danger from road agents, 
as they were called, was imminent, so that this was a position which only a man 
of heroism could fill. After continuing in that capacity for a year Mr. Cann 
was then employed by the same company on the steamers running on the Snake 
and Columbia rivers. At that time the Pacific railroad had not been completed 
to California and all the gold and silver taken from the northern mines in Boise 
county came to the Columbia river. Millions of money were carried on the 
Columbia river in the course of about five years. Mr. Cann remained with the 
company until 1870, during which period he carried gold worth millions of 
dollars down the river. He received from the governor of Oregon the appoint- 
ment of clerk of the board of state land commissioners and was appointed 
lieutenant colonel of the state militia by the governor, which position he filled 
for eight years. That covered the period in which General Canby of the United 
States army and the Rev. Thomas were massacred by the Modoc Indians and 
Superintendent A. B. Meacham of Indian affairs was wounded and left for 



324 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

dead. The chief, Captain Jack, and his followers had decoyed the general to 
a place near their rendezvous in the vicinity of the cave where they were quar- 
tered for the purpose of talking peace. The Indians were afterward captured 
by General Jefferson C. Davis and the chief was hanged. 

While filling the positions above alluded to Mr. Cann also read law and 
following his admission to the bar began the practice of his chosen profession 
at Salem, Oregon, where he remained for ten years, when he removed to Seattle. 
He won almost immediate distinction by reason of his well known ability, 
based upon a thorough grasp of legal principles and ability to readily see the 
relation of such principles to the cause at issue. When he took up his abode 
in Seattle the now thriving city was a hamlet. He immediately opened his office 
and continued to practice with increasing success for many years. He was 
then elected justice of the peace and after serving in that capacity for four 
years he again resumed the private practice of law. In 1898 he was once more 
called to public life, this time being elected to the office of justice of the peace, 
while shortly afterward he was appointed police judge, which position he filled 
until 1904, his decisions in that connection being strictly fair and impartial. 

In 1864, in Portland. Oregon, Judge Cann married Miss Louisa A. Gephart, 
a native of Hamburg, Germany, and at the time of their removal to Seattle 
they had three children : Adeline, at home ; Thomas H., who is a lawyer by 
profession and is now employed as master mariner by the Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company on steamers sailing out of Seattle ; and Louisa, who is a successful 
journalist. 

Mr. Cann had the honor of being one of the oldest Masons on the Pacific 
coast, having been made a Master Mason at The Dalles, Oregon, in 1863, while 
in the same year he received the Royal Arch degrees. He was a charter member 
at Portland, Oregon, of the first Scottish Rite body that met in the west and 
he received all the degrees in Scottish Rite Masonry up to and including the 
thirty-second. In 1877 he became a member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen at Salem, Oregon, and was a charter member of the second body of 
that fraternity organized in the state. He served as a member of its committee 
on laws in the Grand Lodge of Washington, having continued in that position 
for a number of years. From the organization of the republican party he was 
an ardent supporter of its principles, his first presidential vote being cast for 
John C. Fremont in 1856. 

Judge Cann was reared in a Methodist family and adhered to that faith, 
although he became a member of the Episcopal church, to which his wife and 
daughter belong. The Judge was a member of the Pioneer Society of Wash- 
ington, as is his wife, and he served as its president from June, 1906, until 
June, 1907. He also held the office of code commissioner for the territory of 
Washington under Governor Eugene Semple, and he was ever ready to assist in 
any movement which had for its object the improvement and upbuilding of the 
city of his choice. During the sixty-one years that he spent on the Pacific 
coast, he witnessed the wonderful growth of this great west. Five states wore 
organized and developed and many great cities sprang up. 

Judge Cann remained in active practice until his death on the 25th of October, 
191 5. Judge W. H. White, a leading member of the bar, in speaking of Judge 
Cann, said: "I consider him one of the most active, thorough and successful 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 325 

members of the profession. During his term of service on the bench here he 
made himself a terror to the evildoers, and did much to improve the moral tone 
of the community. He had to a remarkable degree that rare ability for detect- 
ing truth from falsehood, for unearthing fraud and hypocrisy, which is so neces- 
sary in a committing magistrate. In his practice he has received a large clientage, 
and is intrusted with many important interests. He has the unbounded confidence 
of his clients and is, I believe, in the enjoyment of as remunerative a practice as 
any lawyer in Seattle." 



CAPTAIN THOMAS H. CANN. 

Captain Thomas H. Cann, of Seattle, has been a lifelong resident of the 
northwest and has ever been deeply interested in its development. He was 
born at The Dalles, Oregon, July 6, 1867, a son of Judge Thomas H. and 
Louisa A. Cann. Liberal educational advantages were accorded him. He at- 
tended the University of Washington from 1881 until 1886. He was admitted 
to the bar and entered upon the practice of law, which he followed for a time. 
He then returned to the sea, having previously been connected with navigation 
interests ere preparing for a professional career. His initial step in business, 
however, was made as printer's devil in the office of the Intelligencer before 
that paper was consolidated with the Post, the office being in a basement at the 
foot of Cherry street. During his next vacation^for he was still attending 
school then during the regular session — Captain Cann worked for O. F. Casper 
at First and Yesler streets, then Mills street, and in 1886 he entered the employ 
of Wells Fargo & Company in their express office, occupying a clerical position. 
In the latter part of that year he became freight clerk with the Oregon Railroad 
& Navigation Company on the steamer Idaho and after five months was made 
purser, since which time he has followed the sea, save in 1893, when he spent 
the year ashore in the practice of law with his father. About 1885 he was also 
bailiff of the district court under Judge Green. He loves the sea, however, 
and on it finds congenial occupation. In 1889 he went to Alaska for the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company immediately following the big fire in Seattle, and 
has been sailing to Alaska at intervals continuously since and the remainder of 
the time has sailed out of San Francisco. In May, 1903, he was made captain 
and has commanded twenty different steamships since that time, sixteen of 
which have been owned by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. In March, 
191 5, he took the steamship Mantora from Seattle to San Francisco and thence 
to New York city by way of the Panama canal, making the trip in thirty days 
from the Golden state to New York. In 1897 he was quartermaster on the 
steamship Queen and took the first passengers to Skagway bound for the Klon- 
dike. In 1906 he was sent by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company to pilot 
the flagship Chicago, and the Pacific squadron to Alaska by way of the inside 
passage, on which occasion Admiral Goodrich and Captain E. K. Moore were 
in command. The Chicago is the largest naval ship that has ever made the trip 
to Alaska by way of the inside passage. Another notable trip made by Captain 
Cann was in 1907, when he took the gunboat Yorktown through to Sitka and 



326 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

return by way of the regular mail route, this being the only government ship 
of any size that has ever made the trip. 

On the 15th of February, 1893, in Trinity church, Seattle, Captain Cann 
was married to Miss Edna True, a daughter of John G. and Emma True. Her 
father is a jeweler who came to Seattle from Illinois the year prior to the fire. 

Captain Cann has an interesting military chapter in his life record, for he 
helped to organize the first company known as the Seattle Rifles and afterward 
called Company B. Later he left that command to form the famous Company 
D, in which he worked up to the rank of sergeant. He w^as with the militia 
at the time of the Chinese riots and later the company was sent to Port Blakeley 
to settle trouble there. The first encampment of the command was held back 
of Olympia. Captain Cann joined the Masons in 1888, becoming a member 
of Eureka Lodge, No. 20, at Seattle. He belongs to the Transportation Club 
and to the Masters Association, and he is regarded as one of the leading figures 
in marine circles in the northwest. 



JASPER M. RIDDLE. 



Jasper M. Riddle, a contractor in street grading, paving and sewer building 
at Bellingham, is thus closely associated with the industrial interests of that 
city, employing sixty men. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born in Crawford 
county, March 23, 1866. and is a son of Marion C. and Mary C. Riddle, who 
when their son Jasper M. was but a year and a half old crossed the plains with 
an ox team to Houston county, Minnesota, where he attended the public schools 
until he reached the age of ten years. He afterward worked in logging camps 
near Superior, Minnesota, until seventeen years of age and subsequently went 
to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he was employed as conductor on a street car 
for six months. He next went to Anoka, Minnesota, where he worked as a 
motorman for a half year. In 1887 he removed to Port Moody, British Colum- 
bia, where he engaged in logging until April, 1888. At Bellingham he secured 
a position with the firm of Bell & McDaniels, contractors, and so continued until 
November, 1888, after which he was employed with the Washington Colony Mill 
until April, 1889. For eight years he was filer at the Decan Shingle Mill, after 
which he assisted in organizing the Badger Mill Company, of which he was one 
of the trustees and the filer. Eleven months later he sold his interest and became 
connected with the city street department. At the end of a year he turned his 
attention to street grading, paving and sewer building and in that connection has 
since done contract work. 

In New Westminster, British Columbia, Mr. Riddle was married to Miss 
Efifie M. Beam on the loth of April, 1888, and they have become the parents of 
five children : Mrs. Nellie Schenck, of Bellingham ; Mrs. Annie M. Brooks, also 
residing in Bellingham ; Edna Grace, at home ; Inez Elizabeth, who is attending 
the public schools ; and Georgia Willia, who died at the age of eighteen years. 

Mr. Riddle is a Protestant in his religious belief and in politics is independ- 
ent. Fjaternally he is connected with the Elks, the Moose, the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, the Woodmen of the World, the Junior Order of Amer- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 327 

ican Mechanics, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Chamber of 
Commerce. He belongs also to the American Rifle Club and in some of these 
organizations is quite prominent. He is a past state councilor of the Junior 
Order of American Mechanics and is the present dictator of the Moose lodge 
at Bellingham. He is also a past representative of the supreme lodge of Moose, 
is a past councilor of the Daughters of America, a past master of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, a past national representative of the Junior Order 
of American Mechanics and a member of the Sons of Veterans. He has thus 
occupied prominent positions in these various organizations and enjoys in large 
measure the high regard and goodwill of his brethren in these different fra- 
ternities. 



CHRISTIAN N. WOLD. 

Christian N. Wold, engaged in the grocery business in Everett, was born 
in Chicago, Illinois, December 23, 1863. His father, Nels Wold, was a native 
of Norway, born in 1826, and in 1861 he crossed the Atlantic to the new world, 
at which time he established his home in Lower Canada. The following year, 
however, he removed to Chicago. In early life he learned the shoemaker's trade 
but later turned his attention to agricultural pursuits in Minnesota, removing 
to Sibley county in 1864. In that state he spent his remaining days, covering 
forty-two years, his death occurring in October, 1906, when he had reached 
the age of seventy-eight years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Cecelia 
Harris, was also a native of Norway and in that country their marriage was 
celebrated. She passed away in 1904, at the age of seventy-two years. In their 
family were twelve children, nine of whom are yet living. Christian N. being 
the fifth in order of birth. 

During his infancy the family removed to Minnesota and there he was reared 
.upon the home farm with the usual experiences of the farm bred boy. He ob- 
tained a public school education and at the age of twenty-two years started out 
in life independently. He began farming in Norman county, Minnesota, to 
which district the family had removed in 1880, and there he devoted nine years 
quite successfully to the work of tilling the soil. He then sold his farm in that 
state and made his way westward to the Pacific coast, spending about two years 
in California and Oregon. He afterward went to Alaska, where he engaged in 
prospecting and mining in the Klondike, where he spent parts of seven years, 
but met with only moderate success. On his return to the States he settled in 
Everett, Washington, where he established a retail grocery business which he 
has since conducted with profit, his being among the leaders of the old estab- 
lished business enterprises of the city, his location being at Thirty-sixth and 
Colby streets, where he enjoys a very gratifying and growing patronage. 

On the 20th of October, 1887, Mr. Wold was united in marriage, in Wadena 
county, Minnesota, to Miss Jensene Wold, a daughter of Iver Wold. She died 
in Portland, Oregon, in 1896 and in that city, on the 17th of October. 1906, 
Christian N. Wold was married to Miss Ellen Sampson, a native of Norway 
and a daughter of Samuel Peterson. There are three children by this marriage : 



328 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Clifford E., born in Everett, September 28, 1907; Evelyn B.; and Lloyd S. The 
family reside at No. 181 1 Broadway, v^here they own a pleasant home. 

In politics Mr. Wold has always maintained an independent course but is 
interested in affairs of general moment and cooperates in movements for the 
public good as a member of the Commercial Club. His religious faith is that 
of the Lutheran church and its teachings have guided him in all life's relations. 
He early learned the value of industry and determination as factors in business 
and through the intervening years he has won the success that comes from per- 
sistent and intelligently directed effort. 



W. A. NOLANDER. 



W. A. Nolander, superintendent of the National Canning Company of Olym- 
pia, entered upon his present business relation in 1912. He was born in Chicago, 
Illinois, December 30, 1887, a son of John and Annie (Berg) Nolander, who 
are still residents of Chicago, in which city they were married in 1886. They 
are natives of Sweden. 

At the usual age W. A. Nolander entered the public schools of his native 
city and after he had completed a high school course he entered the Chicago 
University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1910. He then took 
up the profession of mining engineering at Wallace, Idaho, where he remained 
for about a year. In the latter part of 1910 he went to Portland, Oregon, and 
for two years was connected with the Ladd & Tilton Bank of that city. In 1912 
he came to Olympia and has since been identified with the National Canning 
Company as superintendent, being still active in the conduct of the business. 

On the 30th of December, 1914, Mr. Nolander was married in San Diego, 
California, to Miss Barbara Gray, of Portland, Oregon. He is a progressive 
young business man, alert, wide-awake and energetic, the possibilities for 
achievement make strong appeal to him and in the utilization of his opportuni- 
ties he is working his way steadily upward. 



WINFIELD S. GAMBLE. 

Winfield S. Gamble, president of the Snohomish Iron Works at Snohomish, 
Washington, has through his business career closely studied conditions and op- 
portunities relative to the work which he has undertaken and, wisely using his 
time and talents, he has ultimately become the head of an important industrial 
concern. He was born in Canton, New York, January 4. 1863, a son of Henry 
and Maria (Pond) Gamble. The father was born in western Canada and was 
of English and Irish descent. His father, William Gamble, on crossing the At- 
lantic to Canada in 1831. settled at Huntington. He was a native of the north 
of Ireland and was a man of military experience, having served with the rank 
of colonel in the English army. After coming to the new world he followed 
agricultural pursuits and his remaining days were spent in Canada. Henry 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 329 

Gamble was reared and educated there and in young manhood came to the 
United States, settling at Malone, New York. He was a shoemaker by trade 
and was also a Civil war veteran, for following the outbreak of hostilities be- 
tween the north and the south he joined the Eleventh New York Regiment as 
a private and served for three years, being slightly wounded during one of the 
skirmishes. In 1880 he removed with his family from New York to Lisbon, 
North Dakota, where he followed agricultural pursuits until the later years of 
his Hfe, when he retired from active business, making his home with his son 
Winfield in Seattle. Washington. There he passed away in 1902, when about 
seventy-two years old. His wife was a daughter of Samuel Pond, a member of 
an old New York family of English lineage. That family was represented in 
the Revolutionary war. Mrs. Gamble passed away at the home of her son Win- 
field in Seattle in igcxi, when seventy years of age. 

At the usual age Winfield S. Gamble began his education in the public schools 
of Canton, New York, and when he left school at the age of seventeen years 
he entered upon an apprenticeship at the machinist's trade in the shop of Wil- 
liam Barlow of Canton, thus serving for three years. He then went to Lisbon, 
North Dakota, then Dakota territory, and there worked at his trade until 1887, 
when he went to Minneapolis, where he was similarly employed until 1898. In 
that year he went to Seattle and for six years followed his trade there. Later 
he secured a situation in the Snohomish Iron Works and from that time for- 
ward has made steady advancement. In 191 2 he became president and manager 
and has since largely developed and improved the business, which is the third 
oldest plant of the kind in the county. The plant covers an area of an acre 
and twelve skilled workmen are employed. The business is now covering con- 
siderable western territory. The company is engaged in the manufacture of 
machinists', founders' and blacksmiths' supplies and the Snohomish Iron Works 
constitute an important industry in the town in which they are located. 

On the 25th of September, 1887, Mr. Gamble was married in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, to Miss Annie Hansen, a native of Denmark and a daughter of 
Sorn Hansen. Mrs. Gamble died in Minneapolis, September 7, 1897, at the 
age of thirty-three years. In the family were four children: Maude K., who 
was born in Minneapolis, May 4, 1889, and died at Bellingham, Washington, 
November 7, 1912; Roy A., who was born in Minneapolis, October 15, 1891, 
and is now in Seattle; Alfred August, who was born May 5, 1893, ^^i Minne- 
apolis, and died in Snohomish in October, 1908; Elizabeth, born in Minneap- 
olis, September 17, 1895, and now the wife of Frank Cutter, of Snohomish, 
by whom she has three children — Violet, Myrtle and John Francis. 

Having lost his first wife, Mr. Gamble was married in Minneapolis, Sep- 
tember 28, 1898, to Miss Gernie Spaulding, a native of Maine and a daughter 
of Charles Spaulding, representatives of an old family of that state. There are 
six children of the second marriage: Henry, born in Seattle, July 7, 1901; 
Winfield S., May 16, 1904; Mary, April 4, 1906; Harold, born in Snohomish, 
February 11, 1908; Paul, November 22, 1910; and Robert Burns, July 13, 1913. 

In politics Mr. Gamble is independent yet is active in political and civic mat- 
ters and in 191 2 served as a member of the city council of Snohomish. He be- 
longs to the Snohomish Commercial Club and he has membership with the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. Starting out in life in a business way at a salary of 



330 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

three dollars per week, he has gradually worked his way upward, resolved to 
win success if it could be done through honorable and persistent effort. He has 
thoroughly mastered the tasks entrusted to him and from the faithful perform- 
ance of each day's duties he gained inspiration, courage and experience for the 
labors of the succeeding day. Step by step he has advanced and the Snohomish 
Iron Works are a monument to his enterprise and ability. 



OLE SCHILLESTAD. 



Ole Schillestad was for many years one of the well known undertakers of 
Seattle, in which city he took up his abode in pioneer times. He was a native of 
Bergen, Norway, and there acquired his education. In early life he learned and 
followed the cabinetmaker's trade and in early manhood he married Regina Peter- 
sen. On coming from his native country to the new world he settled in Chicago, 
where he resided for a number of years, but on the 3d of July, 1875, left that city 
and became a resident of Seattle. Here he entered the undertaking business in 
connection with a Mr. Coulter, who passed away a few years later. Mr. Schilles- 
tad then continued the business alone until 1888, when he retired from active life 
to enjoy his remaining days in well earned rest. 

On the 27th of August, 1863, Mr. Schillestad was united in marriage to Miss 
Regina Petersen and to them were born four children : Frank William, who 
wedded Miss Lillian Draper; Alfred M., who married Lucy Brown; Sophie, the 
wife of H. L. Hanson; and William O., who died in Peotone, Illinois, in 1874. 

As a pioneer settler Mr. Schillestad took an active interest in the early develop- 
ment of the city and has always maintained a deep interest in its later progress 
and improvement. He has at all times done all in his power to further the moral 
advancement of the community and is a loyal member of Trinity Methodist 
Episcopal church. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and 
fraternally he is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, joining 
that organization in the year that the Columbia Lodge of Seattle was organized. 



JOSEPH L. KEELER. 



Joseph L. Keeler, president of the Sequim Light & Power Company, In- 
corporated, also engaged in the real estate business and in the conduct of a hotel, 
has, in a word, been connected with almost every phase of the city's develop- 
ment and progress and, moreover, is entitled to distinctive mention as the founder 
of the town, thus becoming one of the builders of the great empire of the north- 
west. He was born October 7, 1873, in Clay county, Kansas, a son of Hammond 
and Margaret (Neil) Keeler. The father is of Canadian birth and of English 
descent. He is a son of Hammond Keeler, Sr., who became the founder of the 
branch of the family on this side of the Atlantic and was a pioneer settler of 
the province of Ontario, settling at Battersea. For many years the father of 
our subject was a sailor but in March, 1888, came to Washington, settling" 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 331 

first at Port Townsend. He followed agricultural pursuits in the west and he. 
also served as marshal of Port Townsend for a number of years. He now 
makes his home in Sequim, where he is living retired. In politics he is a stanch ■ 
democrat and has been active in the local councils of the party. He married 
Margaret Neil in Australia in 1864. She had gone to that country from Scot- 
land, her native land, with her parents when twelve years of age and was there 
reared and educated. In 1868 Mr. and Mrs. Keeler sailed for San Fran- 
cisco, where they engaged in the hotel business, and in 1871 removed to Kansas, 
where they took up a homestead. Mrs. Keeler passed away in Sequim, April 
8, 191 5, at the age of eighty-three years. Of their four children, Maggie is now 
the wife of A. B. Robinson, living in Chimacum, Washington; Hammond died 
in Clay county, Kansas, in 1884, when but four years of age; Martha became the 
wife of W. T. Bowman and after his demise she passed away in Portland, 
Oregon, in 191 2, at the age of forty-four years. 

The other member of the family is Joseph L. Keeler, who attended the public 
schools of Clay county, Kansas, and of Port Townsend. His spirit of industry 
prompted him to undertake the task of providing for his own support when but 
fourteen years of age. The first money that he ever earned was at selling 
papers and shining shoes. He was afterward employed in a shooting gallery 
and later in a restaurant. Starting out in the business world empty handed, 
he has steadily worked his way upward and from a humble start has continuously 
progressed until he is one of the leading, influential and prosperous citizens of 
western Washington. In 1897 he went to the Klondike and was with the first 
contingent that made the trip over Chilkoot Pass. He engaged in prospecting 
and mining there met with little success in his search for the precious metal. 
After a brief period he turned his attention to the saloon business and was 
most liberally patronized. In addition to his saloon at Dawson he established 
a similar business at Nome, Alaska, where he remained for a year after spend- 
ing five years in Dawson. He then returned to Washington and for two years 
was engaged in the liquor business at Granite Falls. He next located at Mount 
Sicker on Vancouver Island and laid out the town site, becoming one of the 
founders of the city, in which he engaged in general merchandising until 
1904. He then returned to Washington and located at what is now Sequim. 
There he re-entered the liquor business and he also built and conducted the 
first sawmill established at Sequim. He likewise laid out the town site and 
has promoted and developed the same from the start. He has engaged extensive- 
ly in the real estate business and he has large mercantile and various other in- 
terests. He also built and opened the Sinclair Hotel, named in honor of the 
Sinclair family, who were pioneer settlers of this region, being located on the 
site adjoining the present location of the hotel, their one hundred and sixty 
acre ranch being a part of the present town site. At, the present writing Mr. 
Keeler is the principal owner of the electric and water plant conducted under 
the name of the Sequim Light & Power Company, Tncorporated. Of this com- 
pany he is the president and general manager and is also the president of the 
United States Automatic Gate Manufacturing Company, a local corj)oration 
which he organized. In addition he conducts the Sinclair Hotel and he estab- 
lished and built the first telephone lines in eastern Clallam county, organizing 
the first telephone company, which is now a part of the system of the Port 



332 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Angeles Phone Company. He started the business on the 13th of June, 1904, 
with thirteen telephones and today there are three hundred and forty-six sub- 
scribers. The original switchboard was a home-made affair, the work of Mr. 
Keeler. All this indicates the variety and extent of his interests, his resource- 
fulness and capability, and in addition to his commercial, industrial and financial 
undertakings he has large property interests in both city and county. 

At Port Townsend, on the i6th of May, 1897, Mr. Keeler was married to 
Miss Etta Priest, a native of Canada and a daughter of George A. and Jennie 
Priest, who are residents of Sequim. There is one son, Hammond Keeler, 
who is the fifth of that name and who was born at Port Townsend, August 
22, 1898. 

Politically Mr. Keeler is a democrat and has been an active party worker, 
especially during the campaigns, in which he has made many speeches through- 
out Jefferson and Clallam counties in support of party principles and candidates, 
but he has never sought nor desired office for himself. He belongs to Naval 
Lodge, No. 353, B. P. O. E., of Port Angeles, and is connected with the Red 
Men of Sequim, being chief sachem. He was also one of the organizers and is 
still an active member of the Commercial Club and his enterprise, business 
capacity and progressiveness make him one of the leading residents of his 
town. 



FRANK J. SHIELDS. 

Frank J. Shields, manager for the Northwest Lumber Company at Hoquiam 
and thus active in controlling one of the most important business interests of 
that section of the country, was born in Illinois, July 2'j, 1856, and after pur- 
suing his education in the schools of his native state engaged in merchandising 
for a time in Dakota. He dates his residence in Washington from 1889, in 
which year he made his way to Tacoma, and throughout the period of his resi- 
dence in the west he has been connected with the lumber trade. In 1910 he 
built the Union Mills of Tacoma, which was the first electric mill built in this 
section of the country. Of the company he was president and successfully 
managed its interests until 191 3, when he came to Hoquiam as manager for the 
Northwest Lumber Company, who sought a man of broad business experience, 
keen discernment and sound judgment to take charge of its interests at this 
point. With every phase of the business Mr. Shields is thoroughly familiar 
and the work in every detail is thoroughly systematized, so that the operation 
of the mill is carried on without useless expenditure of time, money or material. 

In 1878 Mr. Shields was united in marriage to Miss Alice Chatfield. a native 
of Illinois, and they have become the parents of three daughters: Mabel, the 
wife of F. L. Marvin, of Hoquiam; Bertha, who is at home; and Bessie, who 
passed away in 1915. 

The family attend the Congregational church, in which Mr. and Mrs. Shields 
hold membership, and his political allegiance is given to the republican party, 
but while well versed on the questions and issues of the day and able to sup- 
port his position by intelligent argument, he does not seek nor desire office, 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 333 

taking little active part in politics. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, having 
joined the order in South Dakota over twenty-five years ago, and he is a 
Knight Templar and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He took an active part 
in the work of the order in Tacoma and is also a prominent member of the 
Commercial Club of that city, serving on the building committee when their 
present building was erected. His interests, however, center in his home and 
his family and the management of the important business affairs entrusted to 
his care. He is capable of handling big projects in a manner that indicates that 
there is no narrowness in his make-up, and he seems to readily grasp every view- 
point in solving important business problems. 



HARRY THORNTON D'ARC, M. D. 

Dr. Harry Thornton D'Arc, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery 
in Mount Vernon, was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, May 31, 1880, his par- 
ents being Robert and Phoebe (Plummer) D'Arc, who were natives of England 
and Canada respectively. In his boyhood days the father crossed the Atlantic 
with his parents, settling in Ontario, Canada, and later in life he there took up 
the real estate business and farming, continuing his residence in the Dominion 
until called to his final home in 1891, when he had reached the age of seventy 
years. His widow survived him for two decades and passed away in Canada in 
191 1 at the age of seventy years. 

Dr. D'Arc was the youngest in a family of nine children and in his youthful 
days he was instructed by a private teacher. In preparation for a professional 
career he entered the College of Pharmacy at Manitoba in 1902 and afterward 
devoted a year to study at McMaster University in Toronto. Later he was 
graduated in medicine from Toronto University with the class of 1908 and in 
191 5 was awarded an honorary degree. He has since taken post graduate work 
in the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh and in the same year (1912) 
studied in the Polyclinic at London, England. He began practice at Elk Lake, 
in northern Canada, but remained there for only six months. He then entered 
practice at Lethb ridge, Alberta, where he resided for five years, and on the 15th 
of January, 191 5, he arrived in Mount Vernon, Washington, where he has since 
remained. In that year he was appointed city physician. Well versed in all 
departments of his profession, he makes a specialty of major surgery and has 
displayed marked skill and ability in that connection. 

On the 15th of June, 1910, in Alberta, Canada, Dr. D'Arc was married to 
Miss Mattie A. Clark and they have become the parents of three children : 
Howard Thornton, born in Alberta in 1912; Rupert Vincent, in 1913; and Dor- 
othy Jean, in Mount Vernon in 1915. 

Fraternally Dr. D'Arc is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Masonic order. He belongs 
to the Canadian Medical Association, the Skagit County Medical Society, the 
Washington Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and he has 
continued his studies through all the years of his practice, keeping in touch with 
the trend of modern professional thought and investigation. While he never 



334 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

hastily discards old and time-tried methods, the value of which has been proven, 
he is yet quick to adopt new ideas and processes which his judgment sanctions 
as of value in the treatment of disease or the prosecution of surgical work and 
he has gained more than local fame as a successful surgeon. 



EDWARD HULBERT. 



Edward Hulbert, the manager of the American Mill Company, possesses 
initiative and enterprise and in the conduct of important business interests has 
always followed constructive methods, building up a business along legitimate 
lines of trade rather than seeking his success by the undoing of competitors. 
He was born in England in 1855 and when a young man of eighteen years came 
to the United States in 1873, establishing his home in Michigan, then a great 
center of the lumber trade of the country. He secured employment in lumber 
and .shingle mills there and was so engaged until he came to Washington in 1890, 
settling at Aberdeen, where he has now made his home for more than a quarter 
of a century. He was employed in a shingle mill for a short time, after which 
he joined with others in establishing the Union Shingle Mill in South Aberdeen, 
but the plant was destroyed three years later. He was then associated with 
others in incorporating the Aberdeen Lumber & Shingle Mill Company, which 
built a plant with a capacity of sixty-five thousand feet. Of this company A. H. 
Farnam became the president, Ben Averill the vice president and Edward Hul- 
bert secretary, treasurer and manager. The mill was erected in 1898 and Mr. 
Hulbert continued as manager of the business for eleven years, when they sold 
out. Subsequently he became interested in the Michigan Lumber Mill, which 
was uniformly known as the Hulbert mill and which had a capacity of ninety 
thousand feet. Again fire brought disaster, for after three years the mill was 
burned. Mr. Hulbert had previously purchased an interest in the American 
Mill Company, of which E. A. Christensen, of San Francisco, is president ; A. E. 
Hulbert, secretary ; and Edward Hulbert, manager. He made many improve- 
ments in the mill, installing modern machinery and the latest ufy-to-date equip- 
ment. He built two large dry kilns with a capacity of thirty thousand feet of 
lumber per day, and with the development of the business he has increased the 
capacity of the mill from one hundred to one hundred and twenty-five thou- 
sand feet of lumber daily. The company buys logs on the open market, not 
operating any logging camps, and employment is given to ninety men in the mills. 
In January, 1916, Mr. Hulbert purchased the Federal Mill situated at the end 
of West Heron street and operated that plant under the name of the Hulbert 
Mill Company, with himself as president, and A. E. Hulbert as manager. This 
mill has a capacity of one hundred and ten thousand feet. This company is now 
consolidated with the American Mill Company on North Market street, although 
each mill is operated separately. Edward Hulbert is also a stockholder in the 
Raymond Lumber Company at Raymond. Washington, in the Columbia Box & 
Lumber Company at Raymond and in the Prosper Mill Company at Prosper, 
Oregon. His ramifying business interests have thus reached out over a broad 
territory and are now extensive in scope. 




EDWARD HULI3ERT 



"THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX 
'• TIJ-D£N FOUNDATION 

.i. _^.^^,-.^^— — .^— ^— — ^ 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 337 

In Michigan, in 1880, Mr. Hulbert was married to Miss Laura J. Wellwood, 
by whom he has seven children, namely : Maude E. ; Bessie J., who is the wife 
of Dr. E. B. Riley; Albert E. ; Laura C. ; Frederick; George L. ; and Earl. In 
his political views Mr. Hulbert is an earnest democrat and fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Masons and the Elks. He possesses social qualities which render 
him popular but he makes all outside interests subservient to his business affairs. 
He has grown up in the lumber business and there is no phase of it with which 
he is not thoroughly familiar. At the outset of his career he made it his pur- 
pose to thoroughly master whatever he undertook and he learned everything that 
he could in connection with the lumber trade from the time the logs are cut in 
the forests until the finished product is upon the market. Realizing the oppor- 
tunities of the northwest, he cast in his lot with those enterprising men who through 
the development of important manufacturing and commercial enterprises have 
been the founders and promoters of a great commonwealth upon the Pacific coast. 



THOMAS E. JONES. 



Thomas E. Jones, whose success in business during the period of his con- 
nection with Seattle has been uniform and who has carefully directed his interests 
so as to conserve time, labor and material and thus attain prosperity, is now 
engaged in contract work, including pile-driving and wharf constructing on a large 
scale, receiving contracts of this character from some of the most important busi- 
ness concerns of the city. He is a native son of the middle west, having been 
born in Fairbury, Livingston county, Illinois, August 2, 1856, his parents being 
Thomas A. and Minerva (Damall) Jones. 

Thomas E. Jones was the only son in a family of four children. He was 
reared in his native county, acquiring his early education in the public schools, 
supplemented by a course in the State Normal School of Bloomington, Illinois. 
At the age of eighteen years he returned to his home at Fairbury, Illinois, where 
he conducted a flour and feed business, afterward extending the scope of his 
interests to include the sale of meats and groceries. He continued active along 
that line until he reached the age of twenty years, when he sold out and began 
working on his father's farm, which was an extensive property. He concentrated 
his activities upon that work until 1883, when his father disposed of his business 
interests in Illinois and the family removed to Seattle, traveling by rail to San 
Francisco, thence by steamer to Portland, Oregon, by train to Tacoma, and by 
boat to Seattle. During the first four years of his residence in Seattle Thomas E. 
Jones engaged in the ice trade, cutting ice in the winter on Lake Union. He after- 
ward turned his attention to the business of pile-driving and has become one of 
the most prominent contractors in that line. He has done much important work 
for the Centennial Mill Company, the Stetson Post Mill Company and the Seattle 
Electric Company. He built the first Yesler wharf and after the fire of 1889 built 
the second Yesler wharf. As his financial resources have increased he has utilized 
his opportunities for judicious and profitable investment and is now the owner 
of large realty holdings in Seattle, including a large amount of tide lands. 

On the 25th of December, 1876, Mr. Jones was married, in Fairbur)', Illinois, 



Vol. ni— 18 



338 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

to Miss Clare Vincent, who died April i8, 1914, leaving five children: Mrs. 
Lilla Hayes, a resident of Seattle; Mrs. Olive Austin, also Hving in this city; L. 
Dee, twenty-seven years of age, who acts as boom man for a logging company at 
Redondo, Washington ; Carl H., twenty-three years of age, who is manager for 
the Republic Rubber Company at Tacoma ; and Thomas C., aged twenty-one years, 
who works at the stamp mills in Alaska for the Alaska Gastineau Mining Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Jones belongs to the Nisqually Gun Club. He gives his political allegiance 
to the democratic party and has long been recognized as a prominent figure in its 
ranks. In 1888 he was elected to the city council for a two years' term and served 
as chairman of the street committee. For four years he was one of the fire com- 
missioners of Seattle and he has been connected with other interests and activities 
which have a direct bearing upon the welfare and upbuilding of the city. His 
constantly expanding powers have taken him from humble business surroundings 
to the field of large enterprises and constantly broadening opportunities. In 
all of his business career he has displayed a clear understanding that readily solve.<- 
complex problems and unites seemingly unfavorable and adverse interests into a 
harmonious whole. 



CHARLES I. ROTH. 



Charles I. Roth, now living retired in Bellingham, was for many years, how- 
ever, actively identified with the business interests of the city as president and 
manager of the Chuckanut Stone Company. In 1912, however, he put aside the 
more arduous cares of business life and now devotes his attention merely to 
the supervision of his invested interests, which have been so wisely placed as 
to bring to him a very creditable and gratifying financial return. He was born 
in Peoria, Illinois, July 4, i860, a son of Charles and Louisa Roth, both of 
whom were natives of Germany. After attending the public and high schools 
he took up the reading of law under private instruction and subsequently en- 
tered the Illinois Wesleyan College, which he attended until 1882. He afterward 
practiced law in Peoria for six months and then went to Fargo, Dakota, where 
he remained in active practice for nine months. On the expiration of that period 
he came to Washington and was an active member of the bar in Bellingham 
until 1889, in which year he purchased a third interest in the Chuckanut stone 
quarry, which was owned by Captain Roeder. With the organization of the 
Chuckanut Stone Company Charles I. Roth became the president and manager 
and so continued successfully until the business was discontinued in 19 12. Since 
that time he has lived retired, looking after his personal interests. He was 
ever regarded as an alert, enterprising and progressive business man and his 
energy, determination and capable management brought him deserved success. 

On the 1 6th of September, 1885, in Bellingham, Mr. Roth was united in 
marriage to Miss Lottie T. Roeder, by whom he has a son and a daughter, 
namely: Victor H., who married Miss Margaret Gage, is a graduate of the 
University of Washington, spent one year as a student at Purdue University 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 339 

and is now with Gage, Dodson & Company of Bellingham; and Mrs. W. H. 
Abbot, of Bellingham. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Episcopal church and in addi- 
tion to his church relations Mr. Roth has membership in both the York and 
Scottish Rite bodies of Masonry, also in the Mystic Shrine and is a most loyal 
advocate of the craft. He likewise is identified with the Woodmen of the World 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. "His political support is given to 
the republican party and he has ever kept well informed on the questions and 
issues of the day yet has seldom been an office seeker, preferring to concentrate 
his energies upon his business affairs. He is, however, a member of the state 
legislature, having been chosen in 1916. His life record proves what may be 
accomplished through determined, persistent and straightforward effort. 



WILLIAM GARDNER. 



William Gardner was for some time identified with the trade interests of 
Tacoma as a wholesale plumber but is now living retired. He has resided in 
this city since 1887 ^nd has been upon the Pacific coast since 1874, at which 
time he removed from Montreal, Canada, to San Francisco. He was born in 
Montreal in 1852, a son of William Gardner, who was born at Castlegate, Scot- 
land, and in young manhood crossed the Atlantic to Canada. He became a 
carpenter and builder and there resided until his death. He married Elizabeth 
Bryson, a native of Canada, who was born, however, of Scotch parentage. After 
the death of her husband she came to Tacoma to live with her son William, with 
whom she remained until her demise in 191 2. In the family were nine children, 
all of whom came to the coast, and one of the sons, Alexander Gardner, is still 
engaged in business in Tacoma. 

William Gardner of this review pursued his education in his native city. 
When a young man of twenty-two years he determined to try his fortune else- 
where and became a resident of California, where he remained until 1878. In 
that year he removed to Portland, Oregon, where he resided for nine years or 
until 1887, when he came to Tacoma. Here he engaged in the heating and 
plumbing business, organizing the engineering firm of William Gardner & Com- 
pany. His place of business was on Commerce, between Ninth and Eleventh 
streets. He installed the first heating plants on the western coast at Portland, 
also installed plants at an early period in British Columbia and from that time 
forward his business extended all along the coast. All of the material had to 
be shipped by water to San Francisco and thence to the north. He continued 
actively and successfully in the business for many years and in 1898 merged his 
interests into a wholesale plumbing and supply business which was conducted 
under the same name until 1906, when it was sold to the Crane Company. Mr. 
Gardner had the contract for in.stalling the heating plants in the city hall of 
Tacoma and also of Seattle. He did work in his line in connection with various 
schoolhouses of Tacoma and other cities and in fact developed a business that 
was one of the most extensive of the northwest, contracts being accorded him in 
all parts of the state. He maintained a business house in Portland while also 



340 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

conducting his interests in Tacoma. His associates in the undertaking were 
WiUiam Ferguson and Fred H. Martin, all three being active forces in the con- 
duct of the business. Mr. Gardner became the owner of property in Tacoma, 
including a store building at the corner of A and Twelfth streets, and he also 
built a residence in this city. 

In 1900 Mr. Gardner married Miss Ada May Cathcart, and they became the 
parents of three children, Ruth, William and Bryson. In his political views Mr. 
Gardner is a republican, supporting the party since becoming a naturalized Ameri- 
can citizen. He belongs to the Commercial Club but is not active in club or 
fraternal circles. His business career has been crowned with notable success, 
due to his persistency of purpose, his energy and his capability in discriminating 
between the essential and non-essential in business management and in com- 
mercial transactions. 



ENSLEY J. DONCASTER. 

The hum of industry at Raymond is accentuated by the efforts of Ensley J. 
Doncaster, now prominently connected with the industrial life of the com- 
munity. He was born at Seabeck, Washington, in 1885. His father, Ensley 
Doncaster, went from Nova Scotia to California in 1849 and later came to 
Washington, being employed as ship carpenter at Seabeck for a number of 
years, while at the present time he is with the Puget Sound Tugboat Company 
at Seattle in a similar capacity. He married Martha Bowker, a native of Maine, 
and to them were born three children : Lloyd, who is now living in Spokane ; 
Mrs. Ruth Menick, of Seattle; and Ensley J. 

A western man by birth and preference, Ensley J. Doncaster learned the 
machinist's trade in Seattle with the Moran Company and in 19 10 came to Ray- 
mond as a representative of the Raymond Foundry & Machine Company, which 
had been incorporated in 1906 with C. Hanson as the president, B. F. Jones as 
secretary^ Len Hunton as treasurer and R. Gerber as manager. They built a 
foundry and began the operation of their plant. In 191 1 Mr. Doncaster was 
elected president with Mr. Gerber as secretary, treasurer and manager. They 
erected a thoroughly up-to-date and modern machine shop sixty by one hun- 
dred and twenty feet. Their foundry was destroyed by fire and they are now 
engaged in building a new foundry and blacksmith shop which is fifty by one 
hundred and twenty feet. They have a shop equipped with all modem machin- 
ery for repair work of all kinds and they are also doing manufacturing in that 
line. Their patronage comes from all parts of Pacific county and to some extent 
from Grays Harbor and from Astoria and the business is constantly growing 
and expanding year by year. 

Mr. Doncaster was married in Seattle in 191 1 to Miss Clara Peterson and 
they have two children, Emily and Millicent. Fraternally Mr. Doncaster is 
connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and he finds pleasant association with his fellow members 
in those lodges. He is appreciative of the social amenities of Hfe and at the 
same time he never neglects business affairs for social activities. It has been 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 3il 

his firm purpose, his close apphcation and his indefatigable effort that have 
placed him in the creditable position which he now occupies in the business cir- 
cles of his city. 



CAPTAIN JOHN H. PRATHER. 

Captain John H. Prather, a vessel owner residing at Freeland, has been 
actively identified with the business development of western Washington, par- 
ticularly in connection with shipping interests. He was born in Appanoose 
county, Iowa, on the 14th of September, 1868, a son of Enoch L. and Mary E. 
(Walmer) Prather. The father was a native of Indiana and a representative 
of an old Pennsylvania family of Dutch descent. He became a minister of the 
Dunkard faith and devoted much of his life to preaching the gospel. With his 
family he removed from Iowa to California in the year 1872 and afterward 
became a resident of Oregon but spent his last days at Laton, California. His 
widow, a native of Ohio, is now living at Myrtle Point, Oregon. In their family 
were seven children. 

John H. Prather was a little lad of but four years at the time of the removal 
of the family to the west, so that his education was acquired in the public 
schools of Oregon and of California. When a youth of eighteen he started out 
to earn his own livelihood and until thirty-six years of age engaged in ranch- 
ing, spending a part of that time in the employ of others but afterward engag- 
ing in business on his own account. In November, 1898, he removed to Wash- 
ington, settling at Gig Harbor and subsequently he was employed in the logging 
woods. In 1905 he leased a small twenty-eight foot passenger boat called the 
Freeland and became connected with the passenger service from Freeland to 
Everett, operating that boat for a year. With the earnings acquired in that 
way he purchased in April, 1906, a larger passenger boat known as the Mitchell 
and soon increased his fleet to the number of four boats. One of these was the 
Ruby Marie, a fifty-foot boat which was put in service in the fall of 1907. In 
1910 his brother, Enoch P. Prather, became connected with him in business and 
they have since successfully conducted their interests, operating a first-class 
passenger and freight service between the points named. John H. Prather is 
also an expert mechanic. In early life he thoroughly acquainted himself with 
steam engines and has been engaged in construction and repair work along that 
line for eighteen years. The latest addition to their line of boats is one known 
as the Alverene, which was built under their supervision for the passenger service. 

On the 13th of August, 1896, at Maricopa, Arizona, Mr. Prather was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary E. Prouty and they have become parents of eight 
children : William Louis, whose birth occurred in Maricopa county. Arizona ; 
James Hiram, Ruby May and Velma Marie, all of whom were born in Pierce 
county, Washington; and George Perry, Vergie, Alvin Woodard and Frederick 
Eugene, natives of Freeland, Island county, Washington. 

The family occupy a pleasant home at Freeland which is the property of Mr. 
Prather. Politically he is a socialist and an active worker for his party. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen camp at Langley, Washing- 



342 • WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

ton. His business affairs connect him largely with the interests of his part of 
the state and he cooperates heartily in every plan and measure for the upbuild- 
ing, development and improvement of this section of Washington. 



FRANK E. BABCOCK 

Frank E. Babcock, a representative of the real estate business at Everett, was 
born in Osborne county, Kansas, April 26, 1884, a son of John M. and Fynett 
(Ellison) Babcock. The father, who died in Everett, July 24, 1912, at the age 
of seventy-two years, was a native of Wisconsin and a son of Ellison Babcock, 
who represented an old Wisconsin family of Welsh and English descent. John 
M. Babcock was a well known lawyer and successful real estate dealer. He came 
to Washington in 1889, first settling at Coupeville, Island county, where he 
remained until 1896, when he removed to Everett. While at Coupeville he served 
as postmaster under President Harrison and he was always an active and earnest 
supporter of republican principles, doing everything in his power to promote the 
success of his party. He became one of the early residents of Everett and was 
a prominent and influential citizen, doing all in his power to advance public 
progress. At the time of the Civil war he responded to the country's call for 
troops and joined the Forty-fourth Illinois Infantry, with which he served for 
three years, participating in the battle of Shiloh, the siege of Vicksburg and 
other important engagements, in one of which he was slightly wounded. Fra- 
ternally he was connected with the Masons and was prominent in their councils. 
His wife, a native of Wisconsin, was a daughter of Lavelett Ellison, one of the 
pioneers of that state of German and English ancestry. Mrs. Babcock still makes 
her home in Everett, where she is widely and favorably known. She has been 
married twice, her first husband being Joseph House, by whom she had two 
sons : Chauncey House, a pioneer druggist of Everett ; and Fred House, who is 
a farmer of Snohomish county. John M. Babcock had also been previously 
married and had two daughters : Eva, the wife of Charles Knapp, a grocer of 
Seattle ; and one who died in infancy. The children born to John M. and 
Fynett Babcock were : Frank E., of this review ; Lenora, the wife of Roy Sar- 
geant, of Everett; and Ella, the wife of George Phillipp, living in Snohomish. 

Frank E. Babcock acquired his early education in the country schools of 
Coupeville and afterward was graduated on the completion of the eighth grade 
work in Everett. ' He later entered the University of Washington, from which 
he was graduated in 1909 with the degree of Mining Engineer. He was first 
employed in the office of R. H. Thompson, then city engineer at Seattle, where 
he continued for a period of six months. While a student in the university he 
worked in that city during his vacation periods. After leaving the service of 
the city he went upon a ranch which he owned in Snohomish county and for 
some time conducted and improved that property but prior to his father's death 
became associated with him in the real estate business, which he has since 
successfully conducted, handling much important property and negotiating many 
notable real estate transfers. He is also correspondent for the American Lum- 
berman. 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 343 

On the 8th of July, 1910, in Everett, Mr. Babcock was married to Miss 
Ada F. Forrest, a native of Michigan and a daughter of Mrs. Mary J. Forrest. 
They now have two children: John F., born in Everett, July 7, 191 1 ; and Harry 
Manley, born in Everett, September 27, 1914. The family residence is at No. 1122 
Colby street. 

Mr. Babcock has always been interested in athletics and manly outdoor 
sports, and while in college he was active in athletic circles in connection with 
the track and football teams. He was for four years on the football team 
and for three years on the basket ball team, and he is a member of the Seattle 
Athletic Club. He also has membership with the Sigma Alpha Epsilon, a college 
fraternity. His political views are indicated in his support of the republican 
party and his religious faith is evidenced in his membership in the First Pres- 
byterian church. His life has ever been actuated by sterling principles and 
guided by honorable purposes. There have been no spectacular phases in his 
career, but persistency of purpose and close conformity to a high standard of 
business ethics have brought him to a creditable place among the representative 
and prosperous business men of Everett. 



FREDERICK HEATH. 



Frederick Heath, architect, has been engaged in the practice of his profession 
in Tacoma since 1898 and some of the most beautiful and notable structures of 
the city stand as monuments to his skill and ability. He arrived in Tacoma when 
a young man of about thirty years. He was born in La Crosse, Wisconsin, April 
15, 1861. His father, William Heath, was born in New York in 1832, and came 
of English ancestry, the family being founded on American soil during the 
colonial epoch. When the original ancestor came from England in the early part 
of the seventeenth century settlement was made in Connecticut Among his 
ancestors was General William Heath, who served on the staff of General Wash- 
ington in the Revolutionary war. 

William Heath, the father of Frederick Heath, continued his residence in the 
Empire state until 1857, when he removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin. In 1889 
he came to Tacoma, where he now makes his home, at the age of eighty-four 
years. During the early days he was a prominent builder of this city but for 
twenty years he has lived retired. He has always taken an active interest in 
civic matters and his loyal support has been given to many plans and measures 
for the public good. He married Elizabeth Noyes, also a native of New York 
and of Dutch descent, her ancestors being among the early Dutch settlers of 
Van Rensselaer stock of Syracuse, N. Y. Mrs. Heath passed away in 
Tacoma in the summer of 1913, leaving three sons, Frederick and Charles, who 
are residents of Tacoma, and Sydney, of Minneapolis. 

Frederick Heath was a young lad when his parents removed from Wisconsin 
to Caledonia, Minnesota, where he attended the public schools and also Powell's 
Academy. Starting out in life, he was first employed at the printer's trade, his 
ambition being to master that business, which he followed for several years. 
He afterward, however, located in Minneapolis and took up the study of archi- 



344 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

tecture in the office of Warren H. Hayes. He displayed ability in that direction, 
making steady advancement, and for ten years was employed as chief draftsman 
by Mr, Hayes, during which time he also engaged in designing and made the plans 
for many of the leading buildings both of Minneapolis and St. Paul. He has 
also built churches in every state in the Union except Arizona and has been the 
architect of many of the leading colleges and schools of the country. 

Mr. Heath arrived in Tacoma on the 30th of December, 1893, and in 1901 
he established business on his own account as an architect. For eleven years he 
has been the official school architect of the city and has erected some of Tacoma's 
modem school buildings and its Stadium. He has also made the plans and super- 
intended the erection of many notable buildings elsewhere in the state, including 
the stately Masonic Temple in North Yakima, the building being designed after 
King Solomon's Temple. It is said to contain the most elaborate room in the 
style of that period in the world. He was the architect and builder of the Na- 
tional Realty building in Tacoma, an eighteen-story structure, which at the time 
of its erection was the tallest building west of the Mississippi. He is now the 
senior member of the firm of Heath & Gove. Mr. Gove has made a world-wide 
study of architecture and its history. 

At St. Paul, Minnesota, on the 14th of January, 1885, Mr. Heath was united 
in marriage to Miss Mabel Fallensbee, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of 
Rev. Alfred and Emily (Porter) Fallensbee. They became parents of a 
daughter and two sons: Zella, who is now the wife of Guy Colvin, of Tacoma; 
Frederick, a student in the State University ; and Chadwick, who is a pupil in 
the Tacoma high school. Mrs. Heath passed away June 18, 1910. 

Mr. Heath resides at No. 409 North Yakima, where he has an attractive 
home. Politically he is independent and fraternally he is a prominent Mason, 
having been initiated into the order at St. Paul, Minnesota. He is now identified 
with the Royal Arch Chapter, the Red Cross of Constantine and has attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in the consistory. He also belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias and he is a member of the Commercial Club of Tacoma. 

In community affairs ]\Ir. Heath is deeply interested and for seven years he 
has served on the park board of Tacoma, of which he is now the president. Thi.= 
board is independent of the city government and of politics. The board has the 
power to fill any vacancy in its own body and is free from all indebtedness. The 
parks are supported by local and state appropriations, and the city has some 01 
the finest parks in the west, notable among these being Point Defiance. Mr. 
Heath believes in the uplifting influence of beauty as seen in architecture and in 
the adornment of the city through its park and street systems, and he stands 
equally strong in support of those measures which are looking to civic righteous- 
ness and virtue, believing that politics should be kept separate from municipal gov- 
ernment, where the question of capability is that of the efficiency of the candidate 
to care for the business of the city. After all, however, his real life work has 
been that of architect and throughout the country are seen evidences of the skill 
to which he has attained in this line — a skill that has constituted <i most effective 
force in the adornment of many cities. 

Mr. Heath is called the "Father of the Stadium," a remarkable structure that 
has attracted national attention. He first brought the enterprise to public atten- 
tion and persistently kept it before the people until his project was taken up in 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 345 

an earnest way. He was largely responsible in procuring for the city the build- 
ing which now is the handsome Stadium high school. He planned the Lincoln 
Park high school, the design of which has won national admiration. He planned 
the Central school, a building wonderfully well adapted to its location and to the 
needs of the community. Mr. Heath is recognized as one of the foremost school 
architects of America. He has prepared plans for a remarkably beautiful Greek 
theater for a Los Angeles Park. This structure probably will soon be erected, 
and it will place Mr. Heath's name permanently among those of great American 
architects. He is a lover of good music and has assisted in every effort to add 
to the musical wealth of the community. 



WILLIAM SOUTHERN. 

William Southern, long identified with the entertainment business on the 
Pacific coast and now proprietor of a moving picture and vaudeville house at 
Bellingham, known as the Grand Theater, was born in Lancashire, England, 
October 8, 1861, a son of Wright and Alice Southern. After attending the 
public schools to the age of ten years he found it necessary to provide for his 
own support and began working in a coal mine, being thus employed until he 
reached the age of nineteen years. Thinking that he might enjoy better busi- 
ness opportunities in the new world, he came to the United States and settled 
at Streator, Illinois, where he worked in the mines for a year and a half. He 
afterward devoted two and a half years to coal mining at Lucas, Iowa, and later 
was employed in various coal mines in different parts of Montana until 1889. 
In that year he returned to his native country on a visit and spent three months 
in England, but he had become strongly attached to the land of his adoption and 
on the expiration of that period he returned to the United States. 

Going to Rock Spring, Wyoming, Mr. Southern there conducted a ten cent 
vaudeville show, which was the first vaudeville in the west. He was thus engaged 
until the spring of 1904, when he went to San Francisco and organized a trav- 
eling theatrical company, which he managed for six months. At the end of 
that time he removed to Bellingham and for two years was not active in busi- 
ness but throughout that period was looking for a good investment. He then 
purchased the Grand Theater and has since conducted it as a moving picture 
house through four nights of the week, while on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday 
evenings he runs a vaudeville show. In 191 6 he installed an eighteen thousand 
dollar pipe organ, enabling him to give to music lovers and theatergoers of Bell- 
ingham music of the highest class. This is a Kimball organ, one of the finest 
and largest on the Pacific coast. It required five months to build the organ at 
the factory and nearly seven weeks to set it up. Every pipe in the organ was 
built especially for this purpose. ' There are twenty-one miles of copper wire 
and nearly eighteen miles of pipe. A local paper in writing of this organ said : 
"Under his control, arranged so that every note may be blown simultaneously, 
the operator has fifteen hundred pipes, ranging in size from the giant base 
diapason twenty feet long and eighteen inches in diameter to the tiny flute pipe 
three-quarters of an inch long and an eighth of an inch across. The organ is 



346 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

electrically controlled and operated. A five horsepower motor driven fan sup- 
plies the air for its operation and a little direct current generator the current for 
the playing mechanisms. Under each key, and there are three banks, or man- 
uals, of sixty-one keys each, are nine electric contact points. From these points 
a network of tiny wires, like the nerves of the human body, lead to the organ's 
'brain.' Here a maze of delicate apparatus distributes the current to the pneu- 
matics which control the air supply to the pipes. There literally are millions 
of wires in the distributing board and a single mistake in their connection would 
mean an organ without harmony. On each side of the proscenium are banks 
of pipes, carefully concealed by beautiful ornamental pipes, and high above the 
heads of the audience another organ, distinct from the grand organ, is concealed. 
The strains of the echo organ, as the smaller one is called, are filtered through 
a grill and the effect is weirdly beautiful. The echo organ contains the cathedral 
chimes, xylophone and bells. These are the only accessories combined in the 
organ, yet it is capable of producing the music of any orchestra instrument 
excepting the drums. An organ is divided into four instruments, each com- 
plete yet dependent upon the other for the finished musical product. First there 
is the grand organ, or the diapason. This is the 'base' of the organ and imitates 
no instrument whatever. There is the flute department, which produces sounds 
like those of the hundred and one varieties of flutes. There is the string de- 
partment, which sends forth the tones of the violin, the violincello, the bass 
viol and other string instruments and lastly the reed department, which imi- 
tates the tones of the cornet, the trombone and like instruments." The installa- 
tion of this organ is an indication of the high grade of entertainments which Mr. 
Southern furnishes to his patrons. Upon the screen are to be seen the finest 
pictures put out by many of the best companies of this country and other lands 
and he also secures the finest vaudeville talent. 

On the 6th of October, 1886, in Keokuk county, Iowa, Mr. Southern was 
married to Miss Efiie May Foster, a native of that state. They now have three 
children : Earl H., who is twenty-seven years of age and is electrician and 
assistant manager of the Grand Theater; Wesley, who is twenty-four years of 
age and is also connected with the Grand Theater; and Mildred, fifteen years of 
age, a high school student. 

Mr. Southern has membership with the Elks and his religious faith is that 
of the Episcopal church. His life has been crowned with a substantial measure 
of success, and he deserves much credit for his accomplishment as his efforts 
have been put forth along well defined lines and with a definite purpose in view. 



CHARLES R. GREEN. 



Charles R. Green, formerly engaged in ship building at Aberdeen, as secre- 
tary of the Lindstrom Ship Building Company, arrived in Washington in 1890 
and in 1900 became connected with that concern. He was born in England, in 
which country his parents died some years ago. With a sister he came to America 
in 1888, settling in Kentucky. He there worked at farming and at carpentering 
for a while, but he could not content himself away from the salt water and so 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 347 

removed to Washington. He was employed in various ways until 1900, when 
he purchased an interest in the Lindstrom Ship Building Company, which had 
been founded the previous year, and upon the death of its promoter, Mr. Lind- 
strom, in 1908, Mr. Green took over all of his interests. He became secretary of 
the company, which is now conducting an important ship building enterprise 
and also operates a large marine railway for the repairing and painting of big 
vessels. Throughout his entire life he has been interested in ship building and 
he quickly embraced the opportunity which made him an active factor in that 
field of labor. He is now thoroughly acquainted with every phase of the busi- 
ness and his interests balance up with the principles of truth and honor. 

In October, 1897, Mr. Green was married to Miss Clara Wood, a native 
of Michigan, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alanson D. Wood, who were 
pioneers of Aberdeen. Mr. and Mrs. Green now have five children : Susan, who 
is attending school in Portland; and Edward W., Lance W., Newby A. and 
Genevieve, all of whom are now in school in Aberdeen. 

Mr. Green counts as one of his chief interests the education of his children, 
desiring to qualify them so that they will be able to fill important positions and 
make themselves independent. He is also very enthusiastic in regard to Ameri- 
can business methods and in all that he does he is actuated by the spirit of 
progress and enterprise, a spirit that brought good results in his own business 
career. 



GEORGE M. HORTON, M. D. 

There are various well known citizens of Seattle who accord to Dr. George 
M. Horton the place of preeminence in his profession in this city. While he 
modestly disclaims such distinction, there are none who gainsay the fact that 
he stands among the foremost representatives of the profession in the northwest 
and enjoys the largest practice in his city. He has spent the greater part of 
his life here, being only five years of age when his parents removed to Seattle. 
He is a son of Julius Horton, now deceased, and a nephew of Dexter Horton, 
also deceased, who was one of the most progressive bankers and builders of the 
city. Julius Horton was born in New York, and after arriving at man's estate 
married Miss Annie E. Bigelow, a native of Washington. They became the 
parents of four children, three of whom are yet living. At one time Julius 
Horton served as assessor of King county. Both he and his wife were well 
known and highly esteemed among the early residents of the state, having 
settled here during the pioneer epoch of territorial days. 

George M. Horton was born at Shabbona Grove, De Kalb county, Illinois, 
March 17, 1865, and was only five years of age when brought by his parents 
to the west, since which time he has been continuously a resident of Seattle. 
His literary education was begun in the public schools here and after he com- 
pleted the high-school course he entered the territorial university. Still later 
he began preparation for professional duties as a student in Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College of New York city, from which institution he was graduated 
with the class of 1890. Returning at once to Seattle, he here entered upon the 
active practice of his profession, for which he had received excellent training 



348 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

in one of the best schools of the land. He formed a partnership with Dr. 
J. S. M. Smart, who had been his preceptor before he entered college, but the 
death of Dr. Smart occurred a little later and Dr. Horton has since been alone, 
gradually acquiring an extensive and important practice among Seattle's best 
citizens. As a physician and surgeon he ranks among the most skilled in the 
northwest and is constantly broadening his knowledge and promoting his efficiency 
as a practitioner by wide reading, investigation and experiment. For four years 
he served as coroner of King county but aside from that he has never sought 
nor desired political preferment. Fraternally he is a member of St. John's 
Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., of Seattle, has attained the thirty-second degree 
in the Scottish Rite, the Knights Templar degree in the York Rite and is a 
member of Nile Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Seattle. He likewise holds 
membership with the Odd Fellows, the United Workmen, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Woodmen of the World. Along strictly professional lines he 
is connected with the King County Aiedical Society, which has honored him 
with election to the presidency, the Washington State Medical Society, the 
American Medical Association and is a fellow of the American College of 
Surgeons. 

In 1891 Dr. Horton married Miss Ethel G. Benson, a daughter of H. A. 
Benson, of Portland, Oregon, and they have two sons, and a daughter, George 
M., Kenneth and Gertrude. Dr. and Mrs. Horton enjoy a very enviable position 
in the social circles of the city and he is a member of all of the leading clubs. 
While his interests have largely been concentrated upon his professional duties, 
his interest along other lines is sufficient to maintain an even balance in his 
character and in his activities. He is a strong and resourceful man, ready to 
meet any emergency with a consciousness that comes from the right conception 
of things and a true regard for the privileges of others. 



SAMUEL McGEE. 



Samuel McGee, sole proprietor of the business conducted under the name 
of the City Transfer Company, at Port Townsend, was born in the county of 
Perth, Ontario, Canada, October 31, 1867. His father. James McGee, is a 
native of County Antrim, Ireland, and in 1848, when a youth of eleven years, 
came to America with his parents, who settled in Ontario, where he was reared 
and educated. He made farming his life work but has long since retired from 
active connection with agricultural pursuits. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Mary Jordan, is also a native of Canada and belongs to one of the 
old families of that country of English descent. By her marriage she became 
the mother of eleven children, of whom Samuel McGee is the eldest. Three 
of the family have now passed away, while six daughters are yet living. 

Samuel McGee pursued his education in the public schools of his native 
county and after leaving the high school concentrated his energies upon the 
work of the home farm, on which he remained until he reached the age of 
nineteen years. He then secured employment in bridge construction work with 
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company and devoted two years to railway service 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 349 

in Ontario. He then removed to Vancouver, British Columbia, where he was 
employed by the Canadian Pacific until 1888, when he came to Washington, 
settling at Port Townsend. For ten years he engaged in teaming in the employ 
of others, at the end of which time he formed a partnership with M. D. Hardy 
and entered the livery and transfer business under the name of the Key City 
Transfer Company. The partnership was maintained for two and one-half years, 
at the end of which time Mr. McGee succeeded to the business, which he has 
since conducted alone, under the name City Transfer Company. It is today the 
largest of the kind in Port Townsend, having become a very profitable under- 
taking, and he is also financially interested in various other industries, including 
the Key City Light & Power Company, of which he is the vice president. 

On the 1st of June, 1893, in Hibbert township, Huron county, Ontario, Mr. 
McGee was married to Miss Lena Pollard, a native of Canada and a daughter of 
George Pollard, who was of Irish lineage. Mr. and Mrs. McGee have become 
parents of three sons, William S., George and James R., all residents of Port 
Townsend. 

The family attend the Presbyterian church, of which Mr. and Mrs. McGee 
are members. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows and Elks lodges 
and the Modern Woodmen camp at Port Townsend. His political allegiance 
is given to the republican party. When he arrived at Port Townsend his cash 
capital consisted of fourteen dollars and today he is one of the most substantial 
and influential residents of the city, having worked his way upward along well 
defined lines of labor, realizing that industry and honesty constitute a most 
substantial basis on which to rear the superstructure of success. 



ERNEST L. BERRY. 



Ernest L. Berry, although a newcomer in the state, has during the com- 
paratively brief period of his residence in Everett become an important factor 
in the business life of the community and has identified himself with municipal 
interests as a citizen of true worth. Upon his first visit to Washington in 1913 
he made arrangements to establish a permanent home here and with that .end in 
view returned to Michigan to dispose of his business and landed interests in 
the latter state. Again coming to Everett, he organized the Riverside Cement 
Block Works and from the beginning the enterprise has proven a profitable one, 
including the manufacture of cement blocks, chimney blocks, blocks for bulk- 
heads, foundation blocks and flower pots. He takes contracts for putting in 
bulkheads, for house moving and raising and sells Michigan hard maple and 
other house moving rollers and the business has become one of the successful 
enterprises of the city. Prior to the time that he established the enterprise, the 
business of manufacturing and selling cement blocks had never been tried out 
in this community on account of the low cost of lumber but in the intervening 
period of three years many houses and business buildings have been erected 
from the product of his establishment and the demand is steadily growing. 

Mr. Berry was born in St. Lawrence county. New York. February 3. 1856. 
and is a son of R. M. and Nancy (Wetherell) Berry, the former a native of 



350 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Vermont and the latter of New York. The father removed to the Empire state 
in his boyhood days in company with his parents and was educated and married 
there. After many years' residence in the east he removed to Michigan and 
during his business Hfe was identified with the carding mill industry. Following 
his removal to Michigan he lived retired until his death, which occurred at Old 
Mission, Grand Traverse county, when he was seventy-two years of age. His 
wife passed away in St. Lawrence county. New York, when sixty-one years 
of age. 

Ernest L. Berry was the youngest of their family of four children and in 
early life attended the country schools of St. Lawrence county. New York, 
after which he engaged in farming for four years. He then served as a car- 
penter's apprentice and continued to work at the trade until 1890, after which 
he engaged in the building contracting business in various places in Michigan 
until January, 191 3, when he sought a new location and came to Washington. 
After remaining in the state for five or six months he decided to locate in 
Everett and, as previously stated, returned to his Michigan home to make 
arrangements for. his removal to Everett and following his return he established 
the Riverside Cement Block Works, which he has since conducted and of which 
he is sole owner. 

On the i6th of July, 1908, in Antrim county, Michigan, Mr. Berry was 
united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Sanders of that county. He gives his 
political allegiance to the republican party, while fraternally he is identified 
with the Foresters. Mr. Berry deserves much credit for what he has accom- 
plished as he started out in life a poor boy and has made his way in the world 
through hard work and honorable methods, reaching a creditable position in 
business circles, while his record proves that success and an honored name may 
be won simultaneously. 



OLIVER L. BECKETT. 



Oliver L. Beckett, a well known farmer residing at Orting, is a representa- 
tive of one of the pioneer families of the state, his parents, Henry and Hannah 
Beckett, having emigrated from their native England to the new world in 1864, 
at which time they settled on the family homestead at Orting, where their son 
Oliver was born on the 24th of January, 1867. In pioneer times all trading had 
to be done at Steilacoom, twenty-eight miles away. At the time of the arrival 
of the family the land on which they settled was covered with a dense timber 
growth. The father with the aid of his sons cleared away the forest trees and 
now the farm is very productive. 

Oliver L. Beckett has always resided upon this place and throughout his 
entire life has carried on general agricultural pursuits. He has a small farm 
near Orting, on which he raises cattle, chickens and corn, and the practical and 
progressive methods which he follows in the conduct of his business have led 
to very substantial success. He receives forty-two cents per pound for sweet 
cream, which is a very high price in this part of the country, but all know that 
the quality justifies the price. Each year he realizes more than a thousand dol- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 351 

lars on his eggs alone. His business affairs are all wisely directed and both 
his farming and stock raising are proving profitable. He has also made judi- 
cious investment in real estate in Orting, where he owns considerable valuable 
property. 

On the 24th of January, 1899, Mr. Beckett was married to Miss Viola J. 
Knapp, of Hokah. Houston county, Minnesota, and they have had two sons : 
Easter L., who was born on Easter Sunday of 1901 and is now fifteen years of 
age; and Glenn V., deceased. Mr. Beckett holds membership with the Modern 
Woodmen of America and in religious faith is an Episcopalian. In politics he 
maintains an independent course, supporting men and measures rather than 
party. For almost a half century he has lived at his present place of residence 
and has therefore been .a witness of much of the growth and development of 
this section of the state and at all times has borne his part in promoting the 
work of public improvement. 



JOSEPH N. HERMSEN. 

Joseph N. Hermsen, president and manager of the Empire Meat & Grocery 
Company, is at the head of one of the leading establishments of this character 
in Bellingham and is therefore a very active factor in the commercial circles 
of the city. His life record had its beginning in De Fere, Wisconsin, December 
6, 1873, his parents being Henry and Dora Hermsen. In his youthful days he 
attended the parochial schools until he reached the age of ten years, at which 
time his parents removed with their family to New Rockford, North Dakota, 
after which he worked in the fields on his father's farm to the age of fifteen 
years. He then came to Washington and at Tacoma worked for the firm of 
Nealand & Spofford, proprietors of a meat market. After a year he entered 
the employ of H. J. Swin, in whose meat market he remained for one year. He 
next went to Portland, Oregon, and spent two years in the Empire Market, at 
the end of which time he removed to Rossland, British Columbia, where he con- 
ducted a meat market for a year and a half. 

On the expiration of that period Mr. Hermsen came to Bellingham and en- 
gaged as tallyman with the Pacific American Fisheries but after six months, 
desirous of engaging in business on his own account that his labors might more 
directly benefit himself, he opened a meat market at No. 129 Holly street, which 
he conducted for eleven years. He then organized the Empire Meat & Grocery 
Company, of which he is president and manager, and in this connection he em- 
ploys twenty people in the care of a mammoth trade that is constantly growing. 
In addition to his business interests in Bellingham he owns a forty acre ranch 
near Lynden, Washington, on which he raises full blooded Holstein cattle, hav- 
ing at the present time thirty-four head. Ten of these are full blooded and 
the balance graded. 

On the 8th of November, 1899, in Portland, Oregon, Mr. Hermsen was 
united in marriage to Miss Amelia Fleming, by whom he has eight children, as 
follows: Mildred, who is now a high school student; Winifred, Alice, Joseph 



352 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

and John, who are attending the parochial schools ; Edward, who is five years 
old ; Kathlyn, three years of age ; and Mary Jane, one year old. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and Mr. 
Hermsen belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of For- 
esters. He also has membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. His has been an active 
business life crowned with substantial success that has been the direct and legiti- 
mate outcome of earnest, persistent and honorable effort. 



CHARLES HENRY CLEAVER. 

Charles Henry Cleaver, secretary and manager of the Granite Falls Electric 
Company, was born at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, March 31, 1874, a son of Joseph 
Cleaver, a native of Germany, and a grandson of Carl and Margaret (Volkl) 
Cleaver. The name was perhaps Von Kleiwer or most likely Kleber. It appears 
that both the grandparents were born and lived in the town of Pf reimt, Germany, 
where Carl Cleaver owned a brewery, while the father of Margaret Volkl owned 
and operated a flour mill. The Cleavers at one time were possesed of consid- 
erable of the world's goods but the younger generation, being of a more leisurely 
type, spent the money earned in the brewing industry of their parents and grand- 
parents. Carl Cleaver was a college bred man and a citizen of considerable influ- 
ence in his community. 

Joseph Cleaver was born in Pfreimt, March 18, 1844, and in 1852 came to 
America with his mother and stepfather and landed in New York city, where 
he took steamer to Albany and thence proceeded by rail to Buffalo, New York. 
The family remained there for about six months, when an epidemic of cholera 
caused them to remove from Buffalo to Transit, near Lockport, New York. In 
the spring of 1857 they became residents of Rock View, New York, where the 
stepfather, John Zaph, purchased a farm. During his youthful days Joseph 
Cleaver was employed on farms and in connection with the lumber industry, 
taking rafts of lumber down the Allegheny river from Allegany, New York, to 
Pittsburgh, Pennslyvania. In 1867 he removed to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and was 
there married on the 15th of September, 1869, by Rev. Father Marco to Margaret 
Bockmier, of Allegany, New York, a daughter of Joseph Bockmier, or according 
to the German spelling, Bachmaier, who was a native of Wolfsfeld. Bavaria, and 
became a soldier and shoemaker. He married Catherine Gutenberg, who was 
born at Kassel Oberpfalz, a daughter of Joseph and Catherine (Hiebel) Guten- 
berg who were from Munich. Mrs. Cleaver was born in Nuremberg, March 30, 
1844, and was brought to this country in May, 1847. After a voyage of forty- 
nine days, during which severe storms were encountered, the family landed at 
Baltimore and went to Frenchville, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, where her 
parents invested in land, becoming the owners of about seventy-five acres. Five 
years were spent upon that place, during which the land was cleared and became 
a valuable and productive farm. The real owners then appeared to claim the 
land and it was found that the deed given to Mr. Bockmier was fraudulent and 
had been given by fraudulent agents. The loss of his earnings caused him to 




CHARLES H. CLEAVER 



,.. THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC UBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
riLDEN FOUNDATION 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 355 

become greatly discouraged. He was a shoemaker by trade and in 1856 he 
removed with his family to that section of Cattaraugus county, New York, 
known as the Nine Mile, near Allegany. There he remained until the Civil war 
broke out, when he and his oldest son, Conrad Bockmier, enlisted in Company K, 
Sixty-fourth New York Regiment, in November, 1861. The father was taken 
ill in the camp at Elmira, not being able to stand the hardships of drilling and 
preparation for war, and was sent home. He then moved his family to Allegany 
and there passed away September 14, 1862, at the age of forty-eight years, a 
victim of an epidemic of smallpox. After his death his wife became a profes- 
sional nurse and thus supported her ten children with the help of the older mem- 
bers of the family. She was killed at the College Railroad crossing in Allegany, 
April 22, 1875. 

While residing in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, Joseph Cleaver was employed chiefly 
by William Doe, a prominent lumberman. In 1878 he removed to Rock View, 
New York, where his stepfather's holdings had become valuable due to the dis- 
covery of petroleum. He became a contractor in the building of oil derricks 
which were noted for their strength and ability to stand against the wind storms 
that frequently sent many derricks tumbling to the ground. In 1887 Mr. Cleaver 
purchased the Bockmier homestead in Allegany, New York, and there resided 
until September, 1914, when he and his wife removed to San Antonio, Texas, in 
order that they might be near their two daughters and enjoy a milder climate. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cleaver have become parents of five sons and two daughters, and 
with the exception of one who died in infancy, all are yet living. These are : 
Lettie, the wife of Francis P. Pfeil, living in San Antonio, Texas; Charles Henry; 
George Joseph, whose home is in San Antonio, Florida ; William Conrad, general 
manager for Sears Roebuck & Company at Dallas, Texas ; and Francis and 
Kathryn, twins, the former residing at the old home in Allegany, New York, 
while the latter has met with great success as a teacher of physical training in the 
schools of San Antonio, Texas. She is commonly called the "play lady." 

Charles Henry Cleaver attended the public school at Rock View and after 
school hours worked in a country store, being at this time about twelve years 
of age. The family then moved to Allegany, where he continued working after 
school hours and on Saturdays in a general store. After finishing the grades at 
the public school he had two years at St. Bonaventure's College. While attend- 
ing school he was much interested in natural philosophy, made experiments with 
electric batteries and read everything he could get on the subject. 

In 1891 he went to work for the Standard Oil Company, at Olean, New York, 
as a common laborer, having nothing better in sight, and in six months was pro- 
moted to be foreman of the receiving department, having charge of receiving all 
the stock used in the barrel factory. In this capacity he served four years. 
In 1896 he removed westward to Palouse, Washington, where he engaged in pros- 
pecting and mining but met with limited success. While there he began to pre- 
pare himself for the business which most appealed to him, by enrolling in a cor- 
respondence course in the International Correspondence Schools, of Scranton, 
Pennsylvania and he devoted all his spare time to his studies. In 1900 he removed 
to Snohomish, Washington, where he occupied the position of steam engineer with 
the lumber and shingle mills and later held a similar position with the Snohomish 

Electric Light Company. 
Vol. in— 19 



356 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

In January, 1906, he arrived in Granite Falls to take charge of the Granite 
Falls Electric Company, then just building. He later secured an interest in the 
company, finished the construction of the system, extended its lines, and, in spite 
of reverses, caused by tw^ice loosing a dam in the Pilchuck river, saw his company 
prosper, and business develop until today ninety-eight per cent of the homes and 
business houses along its lines are using the company's power and light. 

In Iowa City, Iowa, on the 9th of June, 1914, Mr. Cleaver was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Catherine Barrer, a native of Iowa City, Iowa, and a 
representative of an old family of that state, her parents being Joseph B. and 
Emma (Brock) Barrer. They now have one child, Helen Gertrude, born in Gran- 
ite Falls, September 6, 191 5. The parents are members of the Roman Catholic 
church and Mr. Cleaver has membership with the Knights of Columbus and with 
the Royal Highlanders. He has also been secretary of the Granite Falls Com- 
mercial Club for the past six years and in this way cooperates heartily in all 
the measures and movements put forth for the benefit and upbuilding of the city. 
In politics he is a democrat and for four years served as precinct committeeman. 
In 1916 he w^as a candidate on the democratic ticket for the state legislature from 
the forty-ninth district and made a good run, but was defeated in a district where 
the normal republican vote is two to one. While interested in the political situ- 
ation and vital questions of the day, he prefers to concentrate his energies upon 
his business affairs and has developed an industrial enterprise which is justly 
regarded as a valuable asset in the business circles of his town. 



GEORGE FRANCIS BRACKETT. 

George Francis Brackett, engaged in blacksmithing and wagon making in 
Sequim, was born in Webster, Massachusetts, August 23, 1868, a son of George 
Leonard Brackett, who was likewise born in that state and belonged to one of 
its old families. The genealogical records of the family trace the ancestry back 
in Scotland through many generations and in America since early colonial days. 
Representatives of the name participated in the Revolutionary war and in the 
War of 1812. George L. Brackett was a farmer of ^lassachusetts and afterward 
of Minnesota, making his home in Becker county of the latter state for thirty- 
three years, during which he was closely associated with its agricultural develop- 
ment. He was a republican, strongly endorsing the principles of the party to 
prevent the further extension of slavery into the north, and when the Civil 
war was declared he espoused the cause of the Union and throughout the entire 
period of hostilities serv'ed with the Twenty-first Massachusetts Infantry Avith 
the rank of sergeant. He was one of but two survivors of his company. He 
participated in the battles of Bull Run and of Gettysburg and many other of 
the sanguinary conflicts that ultimately led to Union victory and to peace. In 
1903 he became a resident of Clallam county, Washington, where he followed 
farming to the time of his death, which occurred in 1907. His wife, who in her 
maidenhood was Elizabeth Belknap, was born in Massachusetts and is now 
living at the old home in Clallam county at the age of seventy-two years. In 
their family were four children: Ella, the wife of R. W. Long, of Sequim; 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 357 

George F., Helen, the wife of Harley Edgington, of Sequini; and Bessie, the 
wife of Augustus Balch, of Sequim. 

George Francis Brackett pursued his education in the pubHc schools of 
Detroit, Minnesota, and his early life to the age of twenty years was spent 
upon the home farm, after which he entered upon a three years' apprenticeship 
to the trade of wagon making and general blacksmithing. He followed those 
pursuits as a journeyman for three years and then entered business on his own 
account at Richwood, Minnesota, where he remained for eight years. He met 
success there, but thinking that he might have still better opportunities in the 
new but rapidly developing west, he made his way to Sequim, Washington, in 
October, 1903, and there opened a blacksmith and wagon making shop. He 
has since conducted the business, which has steadily grown in extent and 
importance, and he also has a highly cultivated ranch of fifteen acres a mile 
from town. He likewise owns city realty and his property holdings are the 
visible evidence of his Hfe of well directed energy and thrift. 

On the 8th of January, 1900, at Richwood, Minnesota, Mr. Brackett was 
married to Miss Anna Belle Tindall, a native of that state and a daughter of 
John R. and Martha Tindall, early settlers of Minnesota of Irish birth. They 
are still living at Richwood. Mr. and Mrs. Brackett have a daughter, Thelma,. 
who was born in Detroit, Minnesota, October i, 1901. 

Fraternally Mr. Brackett is connected with the Yeomen at Sequim. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and he keeps well informed 
on the questions and issues of the day although he does not seek nor desire 
office. He is never remiss in the duties of citizenship, however, but gives his 
support wherever the aid of a loyal and public-spirited citizen is needed. 



F. A. PATRED. 



F. A. Patred, the president of the Hoquiam Steam Boiler Works and thus 
active in the control of one of the important industrial concerns of Hoquiam, 
is a native of Michigan and in that state was educated and learned the boiler 
maker's trade, which he followed for some time in the middle west. While 
still residing in that state he was married on the 6th of .\pril, 1873. to Miss 
Elizabeth Goodyear, of Calumet, Wisconsin, and to' them was born a son, 
F. V. Patred. 

Continuing his residence in the middle west until igoo. F. A. Patred then 
came to Washington, settling in Tacoma, and in 1903 he removed to Grays 
Harbor. In 1906 he organized the Hoquiam Steam Boiler Works in connection 
with J. J. McNally and the partnership was continued until 1908. when Mr. 
McNally sold out to F. V. Patred, who together with his father has continued 
to develop what is now a prosperous business in the building of steam boilers 
and heavy sheet metal work. Theirs is a well equipped and well regulated 
plant, the work being carefully systematized, and their patronage is now extensive 
and gratifying. 

Mr. Patred votes independently and fraternally he is connected witli the 
Masons, exemplifying in his life the beneficent spirit of the craft. F. V. Patred, 



358 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

the only son of F. A. Patred and his partner in the ownership and conduct of 
the Hoquiam Steam Boiler Works, pursued his education in the schools of 
Wisconsin and in that state learned the boiler maker's trade, thus following in 
the business footsteps of his father. He was afterward associated in that con- 
nection with the Union Pacific Railway Company of Denver and following the 
removal of his parents to the northwest he came to Hoquiam in 1906 and after 
two years purchased the interest of J. J. McNally in the Hoquiam Steam Boiler 
Works, of which his father was the senior partner. In the intervening period 
of eight years their business has developed along substantial lines and success in 
subtantial meaure is theirs as the reward of their industry, close application and 
keen business discernment. 

On the i6th of November, 1908, F. V. Patred was married to Miss Elizabeth 
J. Ihle, a native of Oregon and afterward a resident of Hoquiam. They have 
one son, Edward. F. V. Patred is an Elk and, like his father, is an independent 
voter, although not remiss in the duties of citizenship, the obligations of which 
he fully realizes and meets. Both prefer that their public service shall be done 
as private citizens rather than office holders, and while there has been nothing 
spectacular in their careers, their enterprise in business has constituted an 
important element in the industrial development of the town. 



• CHRIST SCHAU. 



Christ Schau, proprietor of the Scandia Bakery, a wholesale and retail 
establishment of Everett, was born in Fredrikshald, Norway, on the 12th of 
March, 1887, a son of John and Clara (Johnson) Schau, both of whom are 
natives of the land of the midnight sun. The father engaged in the bakery 
business at Fredrikshald, Norway, where he is still living at the age of sixty 
years, while the mother has reached the age of fifty-eight years. Their family 
numbered nine children, eight of whom survive. 

Christ Schau, who was the third in order of birth, attended the schools of 
Norway and afterward entered his father's store, in which he was employed 
outside of school hours from the age of eight years. He continued to work in 
that connection until 1906, when he heard and heeded the call of the west, coming 
to America. He arrived in New York in due time and thence made his way 
across the continent to Everett, Washington, where he secured employment in a 
bakery, spending three years in that connection. In 1908 he bought out a bakery 
business and started to develop it, his efiforts being attended with excellent 
success, for his close application and capable management, combined with the 
excellence of the product, has resulted in the upbuilding of one of the largest 
wholesale bakeries in Everett, conducted under the name of the Scandia Bakery. 
He has a large delivery and wholesale business, shipping to various parts of the 
state and employing a number of expert bakers in his large plant. He has based 
his success upon honorable dealing and upon the quality of his goods. The most 
sanitary and cleanly conditions prevail in the plant and the excellence of his 
bakery supplies has gained for him a most gratifying patronage. He owns con- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 359 

siderable real estate in Everett, is interested in mining and is a stockholder in 
the Scandia-American Savings & Loan Association. 

On the 8th of January, 191 1, in Everett, Washington, Mr. Schau was united 
in marriage to Miss Annie Olsen, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Olsen, 
residents of Fredrikshald, Norway. Mr. Schau may truly be called a self-made 
man and as the architect of his fortunes has builded wisely and well. He is 
today widely known in the business circles of Everett and is numbered among 
the progressive and energetic men. His life record should serve to inspire and 
encourage others, showing what may be accomplished when there is a will to 
dare and to do. 



F. R. KLUMB. 



F. R. Klumb, engaged in business in Olympia as proprietor of the Capital 
City Creamery, has made his home in Washington since 191 1, at which time he 
made his way direct to Olympia. He was born in Brodhead, Wisconsin, June 
9, 1872. His father, Jacob J. Klumb, a native of Wisconsin, was born in 
Brodhead in 1849 and in 1872 he removed to the west, since which time he has 
been identified with ranching interests. He was married on the 4th of July, 1871, 
to Miss Ida L. Boslaw, also a native of Brodhead. 

Their son, F. R. Klumb, was but a year old when the parents removed to 
Hampton, Nebraska, where he became a public school pupil, passing through 
consecutive grades to the high school, from which he was graduated when sixteen 
years of age. He afterward taught school in Hamilton county, Nebraska, for 
two years and then entered the Rohrbaugh Brothers Business College, in which he 
continued his studies until February, 1893. At that date he went to Chicago 
and entered the restaurant business, in which he continued until the ist of June 
of the same year, when he was appointed a cadet to the United States Military 
Academy at West Point from Hamilton county by Congressman Heiner. He 
afterward returned to Chicago for four months and then went to Aurora, 
Nebraska, where he filled the office of deputy county clerk for two years, entering 
in the fall of 1895. At that date he took up the occupation of farming in Hamil- 
ton county, Nebraska, where he remained for two years, and in the fall of 1897 
he entered the employ of the Burlington & Missouri Railroad Company as brake- 
man, running out of Lincoln, Nebraska, until February, 1898. In the spring 
of that year he made his way to the Klondike, going to Dawson City, where he 
engaged in mining for six years. He afterward spent four years in mining at 
Fairbanks, where he continued until 1908, when he was married and took a 
wedding trip of sixteen thousand miles, touring the country for seven months. 
On the expiration of that period he returned to Fairbanks, where he was identi- 
fied with mining interests until September, 191 1. He then went to Lynden. 
Washington, and after a brief period removed to Olympia, where he purchased 
the Capital City Creamery, which he has since conducted, winning for himself 
a place among the substantial business men there. 

It was on the 8th of September, 1908, that Mr. Klumb married Miss Kathryn 
Olsen, a native of Sweden. Their marriage was celebrated in Fairbanks, Alaska, 
and to them have been born five children : Kermit, Ruth, Margaret, and Harold 



360 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

and Helen, twins. Mr. Klumb is a member of the Elks lodge and of the Wood- 
men of the World and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. 
He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and he gives his political support to 
the republican party. He is interested in all those forces which make for good 
citizenship and at the same time he gives untiring attention and effort to the 
upbuilding of his business, being prompted by a laudable ambition toward the 
attainment of legitimate success. 



CHESTER O. BEAN. 



Chester O. Bean, engaged in the manufacture of sash, doors, moldings and 
interior finishings and also doing general mill work, has won for himself a 
creditable place in business circles of Raymond and is today widely known in his 
section of Washington. He. came to this state when a young man of twenty-eight 
years, his birth having occurred in Oregon in 1874. It was in 1902 that he took 
up his abode in Aberdeen, where he turned his attention to the contracting busi- 
ness, having previously learned the carpenter's trade. He was thus engaged 
until 1907, when he removed to Raymond and in connection with I. L. Isakson 
established the Raymond Manufacturing Company. They erected a building 
twenty-eight by sixty feet and in 1908 built what is now their main shop, sixty 
by eighty feet. In this they installed all the modern machinery necessary to 
facilitate the work of manufacturing sash, doors, moldings and interior finish- 
ings. Both partners devote their entire time and attention to the business and 
they also employ eight or nine men. 

Mr. Bean was married in Oregon in 1903 to Miss Kathryn Brund, a native 
of New York, and they have a son, James. Mr. Bean is identified with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World and his 
political allegiance is given to the republican party, which he has supported since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise. His has been an active and well 
spent life and its usefulness is manifest in the liberal patronage now accorded him. 



DONALD B. CAMPBELL. 

Donald B. Campbell, of Bellingham, is now operating extensively in Whatcom 
county and in Seattle in the general brick contracting and street paving business. 
He is one of the substantial citizens that Canada has furnished to Western Wash- 
ington. He was born in London, Ontario, January 24, 1843, of the marriage of 
John and Christina (Smith) Campbell. He attended the public schools until he 
reached the age of eighteen years, after which he taught school for three years in 
Ontario, at the end of which time he made his initial step in the Hne of business 
in which he has since been active, becoming a bricklayer near London, Canada. 
He was thus employed for twelve years, after which he removed to Eau Claire, 
Wisconsin, where he engaged in the brick contracting business for a similar 
period. Believing that the growing west furnished better opportunities, he then 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 361 

made his way to Fairhaven, now Bellingham, where he arrived in February, 
1890. He worked as a bricklayer on the Fairhaven Hotel for six weeks and 
was afterward employed on other building projects until 1891, when he removed 
to Whatcom, also now a part of Bellingham, and entered into business relations 
with F. E. Bolster, a brick contractor, with whom he was associated for six 
months. He next entered into the brick contracting business on his own account 
and was thus employed until 1898, when he admitted Edgar S. Booker to a 
partnership under the firm style of Booker & Campbell. 

In January, 1871, at London, Ontario, Canada, Mr. Campbell was joined in 
wedlock to Miss Mary McLarty, by whom he has three children, namely : Chris- 
tina, at home; Mrs. J. B. Scott, of Bellingham; and Helen, who is also yet under 
the parental roof. 

The family adhere to the Baptist faith, and Mr. Campbell also belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity and to the Masonic Club. His study of the poHtical ques- 
tions and issues, of the day has led him to give his support to the republican party 
because of his belief in its principles as factors in good government. He has 
never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the west, for with 
the growth and development of this section of the country he has found a profit- 
able field of labor and has constantly worked his way upward. 



S. FRED CORBIN. 



S. Fred Corbin, a dry goods merchant of Stanwood, was born in Aroostook 
county, Maine, January 19, 1881, a son of Sylvan and Julia (Therriault) Corbin, 
who were also natives of the Pine Tree state and there spent their entire lives. 
In early manhood the father became connected with the lumber industry, with 
which he was long associated, but at the time of the Civil war he put aside all 
business and personal considerations and offered his services to the government, 
going to the front as a private of a Pennsylvania regiment. He died in May, 
1916, at the age of seventy-six years, while his wife passed away in 1893, at 
the age of forty years. In their family were twelve children, eight of whom are 

yet living. 

S. Fred Corbin was the fifth in order of birth. In his youthful days he 
pursued a common school education, eventually becoming a pupil in the high 
school at Fort Kent, Maine. He also received private instructions at Westminster 
Abbey in London, England, and he pursued a private course in a school in Paris, 
France. His training was therefore most comprehensive and liberal and well 
qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties. He was graduated from 
the Fort Kent Normal School with the class of 1900, after which he went to 
Montana and became postmaster and also proprietor of a store at Poison, in tlie 
Flathead reservation. Several years later he removed to Washington, arriving 
at Wenatchee in 1905. There he secured a position in a store and also engaged 
in fruit raising in the Wenatchee valley, a region famous for the fine apples there 
produced. At length he disposed of his interests there but remained in Wenat- 
chee until 191 5, when he arrived in Stanwood, where he now conducts a large 
dry goods store. He has since carefully and persistently carried on business 



362 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

along that line and his energy and enterprise are salient features in his growing 
prosperity. He also has a store at East Stanwood. 

On the 25th of September, 191 1, at Cashmere, Washington, Mr. Corbin was 
united in marriage to Miss Mayme Treadwell, her parents being David and 
Emma (Levrett) Treadwell, representing a well known pioneer family of that 
place. Mr. and Mrs. Corbin have one child, Emrose, who was born at Cash- 
mere, Washington, on the ist of October, 1913. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Roman Catholic church. Mr. 
Corbin has always voted with the republican party since age conferred upon him 
the right of franchise and is a stalwart champion of its principles. He is both 
a self-educated and self-made man, for he has been dependent upon his own 
resources since he started out in life a poor boy at the age of fifteen. Step by 
step he has advanced until he is now one of the leading and substantial business 
men of Stanwood, at all times measuring up to high standards of manhood and 
of citizenship. 



WILLIAM H. McWHINNEY. 

William H. McWhinney is now living retired in Aberdeen and the success 
which has attended his efforts is manifest in the property which he owns, indicat- 
ing a life of well directed energy and thrift. He has been a resident of Wash- 
ington since 1875 and has made his home on the Pacific coast since 1873, in which 
year he came to the west from New Brunswick, where he was born in 1853. He 
was therefore at that time a young man of twenty years. For one summer he 
was employed in the lumber woods at Seattle, after which he made his way to 
Victoria and later to the present site of Vancouver, British Columbia. He was 
engaged in the lumber business in that country and in 1875 he came to Wash- 
ington, entering into active connection with lumber manufacturing interests in 
the vicinity of Aberdeen. Thus his time was passed until 1899, when he became 
a partner of Frone Cousins in the shipbuilding business, operations being carried 
on under the firm style of Cousins & McWhinney. Following the death of his 
partner the business was continued under the name of the McWhinney Ship- 
building Company. Theirs became an important industry of this character. For 
the firm of West & Slade Mr. McWhinney built various vessels, including the 
Coronado, the F. M. Slade, the Eldorado, the Watson West, the Edward West 
and several small boats and lighters. In 191 1 Mr. McWhinney sold out to Chris 
Henderson and has since lived retired. In the meantime he had made judicious 
investments in land and built several houses on his property. He today has 
quite large real estate holdings in Aberdeen and from his interests derives a very 
substantial and gratifying annual income. 

In May, 1884, Mr. McWhinney was married to Miss May Byard, a native of 
California, and they have become parents of a daughter and two sons : Mrs. Edith 
Chamberlin, of California, who has three children ; Earl, who is captain of a 
boat on the Harbor; and George, living in Aberdeen. 

Mr. and Airs. McWhinney hold membership in the Congregational church, of 
which he is one of the trustees, and fraternally he is connected with the Independent 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 363 

Order of Odd Fellows. His political allegiance is given to the republican party 
and in 1907 he was elected sheriff of Chehalis, now Grays Harbor, county, which 
position he filled for one term. In 191 5 he was elected a member of the city 
council of Aberdeen and is now serving in that capacity. He is a public-spirited 
man, interested in everything pertaining to the welfare and progress of his locality, 
and in many lines his cooperation has proven of great value in promoting the 
general good. For more than forty-one years he has been a resident of Wash- 
ington and the northwest and has therefore witnessed the greater part of its 
growth and transformation, his activities being always of a character that have 
contributed to the development of the state. 



CLARENCE W. IDE. 



Clarence W. Ide, superintendent of the courthouse of King county, has held 
various public positions in which he has ever proven himself a faithful official, 
loyal to the best interests intrusted to his care. He was born in Buffalo county, 
Wisconsin, September 10, i860, a son of Chester D. Ide, who was born in 
Vermont, October 18, 1830. In the year 1856 he removed to Wisconsin, where 
he resided until May, 1878, when he brought his entire family to Washington, 
making the trip by wagon train over the old Union Pacific trail to Ogden, thence 
by way of Boise and Walla Walla to Spokane. In the family were three sons, 
Clarence W., G. L. and Ernest W., but the last named passed away May 2, 
1903. The wife and mother was called to her final rest on the loth of March, 
1903, but Mr. Ide is still living, hale and hearty at the age of eighty-five years. 
The younger of the living sons, G. L. Ide, was born August 27, 1870, and was 
brought by his parents to Washington in 1878. His education was largely 
acquired in the common schools of Spokane and in 1897 ^^^ ^^^^^ appointed 
deputy United States marshal, in which position he continued until he was made 
cashier of the Puget Sound customs district in 1903, since which time he has 
occupied that position. He was married in 1896 to Miss Edith Hull, of Spokane, 
and they have two children, Wilson G. and Helen. With the removal of the 
customs headquarters from Port Townsend to Seattle, Mr. Ide brought his 
family to this city, where he still resides. 

The elder son, Clarence W. Ide, acquired his education in the public schools 
of his native town, being eighteen years of age when he accompanied his parents 
across the plains to the northwest. He first resided at Dayton, Washington, 
but after a year removed to Spokane with his father, who took up a claim in 
Spokane county. The next two or three years were spent upon a farm and in. 
1881 he began work in the engineering department of the Northern Pacific 
Railroad, which was then being constructed across the continent to Puget 
Sound. Although he had received no technical training in that line, experience 
brought him knowledge of surveying and he remained with the Northern Pacific 
in that capacity in Montana, Idaho and Washington for about five years, being 
first engaged on the line of construction and later in town site work. He after- 
ward became interested in real estate and in 1888 was elected county surveyor 
of Spokane county, but in a short time resigned that position to accept an 



364 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

appointment from President Harrison to the position of examiner of surveys in 
the interior department. Two years later he was elected to the state senate 
from Spokane county on the republican ticket and was a member of the upper 
house for four years, during which time he carefully considered all vital ques- 
tions which came up for settlement and used his influence in behalf of public 
improvement and progress. 

In July, 1897, Mr. Ide was appointed United States marshal of the district 
of Washington by President McKinley and while occupying that position made 
his headquarters at Tacoma, where he established his home. He continued in 
the office until March, 1902, when he was appointed collector of customs for 
the Puget Sound district by President Roosevelt. His confirmation was held 
up by Senator Foster on several frivolous charges which were finally with- 
draw^n and he was confirmed by the United States senate in June, 1902. Dur- 
ing the four years which he occupied the position of collector he resided at Port 
Townsend but June, 1906, returned to Seattle and engaged in the contracting 
business. His first work in that line was the construction of the Green Lake 
reservoir and in November, 191 3, he was appointed superintendent of con- 
struction of the Cedar River masonry dam. in which connection he served until 
the dam was completed in June, 1915. On the ist of December of the same 
year he was appointed superintendent of the King county courthouse, v/hich 
position he now fills. 

In February, 1896, Mr. Ide was married to Miss Dora J\I. McKay, of Michi- 
gan, by whom he has six children, namely : Irma, Margaret, Elizabeth, Dorothy, 
Jean and Edna. The family is well known in Seattle, where they have many 
friends, and Mr. Ide also has a wide acquaintance throughout the northern part 
of the state, his activities having brought him into prominent connection with 
afl:'airs of public importance. 



CONRAD L. HOSKA. 



The keynote of the life history of Conrad L. Hoska has been summed up in 
a single sentence by a friend, who said: "His ambition was never realized un- 
less he was doing somthing to make someone happy." What a eulogy to be pro- 
nounced upon any man ! It indicates that around him he shed much of life's sun- 
shine and that the world is better and happier because he lived. He was a 
Knight Templar and in his life he exemplified the highest principles of Chris- 
tion manhood and was the embodiment of the highest ideals of American citizen- 
ship. 

Chicago claimed him as a native son and his life record covered fifty-four 
years beginning June 26, 1856. When he was but seven years of age his father 
died, and a few years later he and his three brothers were orphaned by the 
mother's death, Conrad L. Hoska being then a lad of nine summers. The chil- 
dren were placed in an orphan asylum, the main building of which was then 
being constructed and the children had to help by carrying concrete for the 
foundation. Later Conrad was taken by a German farmer, with whom he lived 
for a few months. He afterward learned the wood carver's trade, which he 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 365 

followed until he was about twenty-five years of age, when he embarked in the 
furniture business at Marinette, Wisconsin. A year later he became a partner in 
the firm of Hicks & Hoska at Menominee, Michigan. Soon afterward, in 1883, he 
determined to come to the west, making the trip his wedding journey. He had 
planned to enter the furniture business in Tacoma but, owing to business condi- 
tions he changed his plans, and took up the undertaking business, becoming the 
second to engage in that line in this city. His partner was A. J. Littlejohn, 
and three years later he became sole proprietor, acquiring the interest of his 
associate. He began operations on a small scale and developed his business 
until it was second to none on the Pacific coast. However, he did not confine his 
attention entirely to his work as a funeral director but also instituted and con- 
summated several large land deals which added materially to his wealth, and 
he extended his efl:"orts into industrial circles as a member of the firm of Dugan, 
Bringham & Company, contractors, to whom were awarded contracts for the 
erection of important buildings in different cities, among which was the federal 
building at Los Angeles, California. 

Mr. Hoska acquired large interests in wheat lands in Eastern Washington. 
In all of his business dealings he not only intelligently and wisely directed his 
efforts but crowned his contracts with integrity and personal consideration for 
others. His strictly reliable methods were the basis of the substantial esteem 
which was everywhere tendered him. He possessed business insight and sagac- 
ity and ever followed constructive methods, his gains never representing 
another's losses. From time to time he had been forced to seek larger quarters 
for his undertaking business and at length for a time conducted his business in 
the old Chamber of Commerce, at the corner of Ninth and Commerce streets, 
in which was a fine chapel and all modern equipments connected with funeral 
direction. Afterward Mr. Hoska erected the beautiful building now occupied 
by his successors, the firm of Buckley & King. This building is one of the finest 
on the coast for undertaking purposes and was a prominent contribution to the 
architectural beauty of Tacoma and a credit to the founder and owner. It was 
completed and opened in 1902 and is constructed of light colored brick with cut 
stone trimmings. 

It is a building of which the city and the builders are justly proud. Mr. 
Hoska remained active in the business until a month prior to his death, when I'.e 
turned over the management to Buckley & King. The last month was devoted to 
arranging every phase of his business so that it could be turned over entirely 
to others, and he was planning to go abroad with his wife for a year's sojourn 
in foreign lands. 

While in Menominee. Michigan, Mr. Hoska was married to Miss Grace 
M. Gage, the wedding being celebrated on the 28th of June. 1883. To them 
were born two children: Imogene and Lukas E. Imogcnc married Captain 
Thomas B. Doe, of Lowell, Massachusetts, and they have one son. Thomas B., 
Jr. Lukas E. Hoska wedded Miss Marian Pratt, a daugiitcr of L. W. Pratt, 
and they have one son, Lukas E. Jr. 

The family circle was broken by the hand of death June 29. 1910, when Mr. 
Hoska passed away. During the long years of his residence in Tacoma he had 
taken the deepest interest in the welfare and good of his city. He was a member 
of the First Presbyterian church, the Commercial Club and the Chamber of 



366 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

Commerce, and he gave earnest support to all their plans for Tacoma's im- 
provement. In politics he was a democrat and for several terms served as county 
coroner. He was also a member of the school board for several terms and per- 
haps the greatest act of a public nature which he did for the city was instituting 
the movement which made the present Stadium high school building the prop- 
erty of the school system. He and E. E. Rosling were the first men to suggest 
the possibility of getting the building from the Northern Pacific and using it for 
school purposes. The idea came to them as they passed the building and saw- 
that it was being torn down, and immediately Mr. Hoska proceeded to visit mem- 
bers of the school board, to whom he mentioned the project. The next day the 
school board called a special meeting and the final arrangements were made. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Hoska was prominent, belonging to the Masons, the 
Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Elks, the Eagles and the United 
Workmen, and he took the degrees of both the York and Scottish Rites in Ma- 
sonry and was honored with high official preferment in the order, becoming 
grand senior warden of the Grand Commandery of the Knights Templar of 
Washington. It was while marching with that order to take part in religious 
services in St. Luke's church that he was suddenly stricken and a few moments 
later the end had come. 

W^riting of this one of the local papers said: "Word of the death of their 
brother knight was sent at once to St. Luke's church. Bishop Frederic W. 
Keator told the assembly of it and cut short the services. The efifect of the news 
was most marked. The knights at once sent an escort to take the remains to 
the Lloska family residence at No. 410 North D street. The encampment met 
in the Masonic Temple and solemnly adjourned. All features of the program 
were eliminated and the chair of the departed grand senior warden was draped 
in white and black. The shock left the entire body bewildered and on every 
hand personal tributes to the life and character of Mr. Hoska could be heard. 
The news of Mr. Hoska's death flew quickly over the city and everywhere it 
caused profound regret. On the streets, in the hotels and street cars, wherever 
two or three residents of Tacoma were gathered, in subdued voice they spoke 
with sorrow in their tones of his many manly and kindly virtues. Seldom in 
the history of the city has the death of a citizen called forth such universal 
expressions of sorrow. His unheralded charities and hundreds of kindly acts 
won to him friends in every walk of life. With a full, warm-hearted sympathy 
he was ever seeking to please others. Even to his last days his attention was 
directed to the entertainment of his friends." 

The day prior to his death he entertained a number of the Knights Templar 
at dinner at the Commercial Club and on Sunday had taken a party up the 
mountains, and on the day following his demise he was to have been the host 
of his comrads in a pilgrimage to his beautiful summer home on an island 
which he owned and which he called Tanglewood. He was thus bidding adieu 
to his friends preparatory to joining his wife, who was then visiting their daugh- 
ter in Philadelphia and with whom he was to start upon an extended trip 
around the world. He was a director of the Masonic Temple Association and 
devoted much time to securing a suitable site for the new temple. 

It would be impossible to enumerate all of his acts which have contributed 
to public progress and improvement in Tacoma, just as it is impossible in a pen 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 367 

picture to delineate the spirit of kindliness, generosity and helpfulness which 
animated him at every point in his life. When he answered the last roll call a 
feeling of the deepest sorrow spread throughout the community in which he 
had lived and everywhere people spoke of his many manly and kindly virtues. 
One with whom he had long been acquainted said: "I shall always hold him 
in memory as one of my dearest personal friends. I have known him for twenty 
years and always admired the spirit he displayed in public matters and his atti- 
tude toward his associates. I was a member of the school board with him and 
realize how much he did for the public schools as well." Another said : "You 
may say the best things possible of Conrad L. Hoska, yet it will not express the 
feeling entertained for him. His death has taken from us one of our very best 
members, one whom we loved as a friend and revered as a true knight." The 
Tacoma Ledger wrote : "During the hard times of a few years past so numer- 
ous were his acts of charity and kindness that they are only known to the recip- 
ients. He never spoke of them himself. . . . His unheralded charities and 
hundreds of kindly acts won to him friends in every walk of life." 



WILLIAM D. SMITH, M. D. 

Dr. William D. Smith, actively engaged in the practice of medicine at 
Everett, was born at Tomah, Wisconsin, on the 25th of April, 1881, a son of 
Adam and Katherine (Lorigan) Smith, both of whom were natives of the 
badger state. The father was a representative of an old Wisconsin family, 
being the son of Adam Smith, a native of Germany, who came from Frankfort- 
on-the-Main to the new world in 1845. Making his way to the interior of the 
country, he cast in his lot with the pioneer agriculturists of Wisconsin. His son, 
Adam Smith, became a wagon maker and in addition to following his trade was 
active in public afifairs of the community, serving as deputy sherifif and as game 
warden for seven years. He was quite a sportsman and greatly enjoyed hunting 
but believed thoroughly in the rightful protection of game. He passed away in 
Tomah, Wisconsin, in 1901 at the age of forty-nine years. His wife, who was 
born at Wilton, Wisconsin, was the daughter of a pioneer farmer of that state. 
She passed away on the old homestead in 191 o, when fifty-one years of age. In 
their family were four children, three of whom are yet living: Mrs. Mae E. 
Clark, a resident of Iroquois- Falls, Canada; William D. ; and Mrs. Josephine 
Carney, residing at Powell River, British Columbia. 

At the usual age Dr. Smith became a pupil in the jniblic schools of Tomah. 
passing through consecutive grades to the high school, while later he attended 
the Wisconsin College of Physicians and Surgeons. He was graduated on the 
completion of his medical course in 1904 and became local surgeon for the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad at Tomah, where he remained in prac- 
tice for three years. On the 26th of June, 1907, he arrived in Everett. Washing- 
ton, where he has since followed his profession, and is now accorded a very 
liberal practice. He is a member of the Snohomish County Medical Society, the 
Washington State Medical Society and the American Medical Association and 



368 WASHIXGTOX, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

is interested in all that tends to bring to man the key to the complex mystery 
which we call life. 

On the 2ist of June, 191 1, in Everett, Dr. Smith was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna Diefenbacher, a representative of a well known family of Everett, 
and they now have two children: Erminie Dolores, born May 13, 1912; and John 
Edwin, born September 13, 1914. 

Dr. Smith has an interesting military record covering four years' service 
with the Wisconsin National Guard as a member of Company K, Third Wiscon- 
sin Infantry, in which he was connected with the musical department. His 
religious faith is that of the Roman Catholic church and he has taken the fourth 
degree in the Knights of Columbus. He also has membership with the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, the Improved Order of Red Men, the Mystic Workers, the Tribe 
of Ben Hur, the Yeomen, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of 
the World, the Royal Arcanum and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. For the 
last named he was physician for six years and he was coroner of Snohomish 
county in 191 1 and 1912. He belongs to the Riverside Commercial Club of 
Everett and he is deeply interested in everything pertaining to the welfare and 
progress of his city, cooperating heartily in carefully devised plans for its 
development and substantial improvement. 



SANFORD A. SHERWOOD. 

Sanford A. Sherwood, manager of the Bellingham branch of the Ryan Fruit 
Company, wholesale dealers in Produce, was born in New Brunswick, Canada, 
October 23, 1879, a son of Albert and Amine Sherwood. He attended public 
schools in his native country to the age of fifteen years, after which his text- 
books- were put aside and his further life lessons have been learned in the prac- 
tical school of experience. He first worked on his father's farm and in his 
father's flour mill until 1900, when, having attained his majority, he determined 
to try his fortune on the Pacific coast and made his way to Everett, Washington. 
There he became connected with his brother, B. \\\ Sherwood, who was in the 
hay and grain business, as a clerk for a year. Feeling the necessity for more 
thorough training in preparation for life's responsibilities, he attended business 
college for three months, at the end of which time he became a salesman with 
the Western Produce Company, continuing in that connection for a year and a 
half. Removing to Bellingham, he then organized the Bellingham Commission 
Company, in which he was a partner until April i, 1908, when he sold his inter- 
est and established the Sherwood Brothers Company, wholesale produce dealers, 
of which he was president and manager, with J. A. Love as secretary and treas- 
urer. They conducted a general foreign and domestic produce business and 
employed ten people, doing business throughout \\'hatcom county and British 
Columbia, their sales amounting to about three hundred thousand dollars a year. 
He is now manager of the Bellingham branch of the Ryan Fruit Company. 
Close application, watchfulness of all details, a progressive spirit and indefati- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES ' 369 

gable energy have been crowning points in the career of Mr. Sherwood, bringing 
to him the substantial measure of success which is today his. 

On the 2ist of June, 191 1, in Everett, Washington, Air. Sherwood was united 
in marriage to Miss Annetta Davis. They are Protestants in religious belief and 
]\Ir. Sherwood is a loyal representative of Masonry and a member of the Masonic 
Club. He also has membership with the United Commercial Travelers. His 
political endorsement is given to the republican party and his ballot is cast only 
after intelligent consideration of the vital questions which come up for settle- 
ment. Dependent upon his own resources from the age of fifteen years, he has 
worked steadily to achieve honorable success. Early recognizing the eternal 
principle that industry wins, he has made industry the beacon light of his life. 



, CARL H. OLBERG. 



Business enterprise and progressiveness have brought Carl H. Olberg to a 
creditable position in commercial circles of Port Townsend, where he is well 
known as a clothing and shoe merchant. He is numbered among those who, 
recognizing the opportunities of the new world, have crossed the Atlantic to 
enjoy its advantages and have never had occasion to regret their determination 
to seek a home and fortune on this side the water. He was born near Chris- 
tiania, Norway, August 30, 1863, a son of Henry and Christina (Amundson) 
Olberg, who were natives of Norway and spent their entire lives in that coun- 
try, where the father made a very comfortable living as an agriculturist. He 
died in 1879, at the age of sixty-four years, while his wife passed away in 1907, 
at the age of eighty-eight, having long survived him. In their family were 
seven children, of whom six are yet living: Andrew, Gilbert and Casper, all 
residents of Norway; Martin, living in Port Townsend; John, whose home is in 
Ballard, Washington ; and Carl H., of this review. The only daughter, Caro- 
line, is deceased. 

Carl H. Olberg acquired his education in the schools of his native country 
while spending his early life upon the home farm. On attaining his majority 
he started out to earn his living and entered upon an apprenticeship to the shoe- 
maker's trade, which he followed in his native country for four years. In 188-I 
he left home and came alone to America, settling first at Brookings. South Da- 
kota, where he resided for three years. For one year of that time he was 
engaged in farming but afterward devoted his attention to shoemaking. Later 
he followed the same pursuit in Watertown, South Dakota, where he first 
engaged in the shoe business on his own account. In the fall of 1889 he arrived 
in Tacoma, Washington, where he entered the employ of Eder & McDonald, 
shoe dealers, remaining with that firm and with Preger Brothers for three years, 
twenty-one months being spent in the employ of the latter firm. On the expira- 
tion of that period he removed to Port Townsend and became connected with 
John H. Livermore, the pioneer shoe merchant of the city, with whom he was 
associated for about six months. He then started a small shop of his own and 
from that humble beginning has developed his present extensive and profitable 
business. For seven years he was associated with William R. Lyle under the 



370 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

firm name of Olberg & Lyle, but since then has conducted the business alone and 
is the second oldest shoe merchant in the city. He has the largest and best shoe 
store in this section of the state and he is also engaged in the clothing and men's 
furnishing goods business, in which undertaking he is a partner of C. C. Bart- 
lett. He has ever been careful to conform his interests to a high standard of 
commercial ethics and the thoroughness and diligence which he has manifested 
in his business career have also been salient points in his success. 

At Port Townsend, on the 25th of November, 1900, Mr. Olberg was mar- 
ried to Miss Lilly Norby, a native of Norway and a daughter of Henry and 
Purnel Norby. Mr. and Mrs. Olberg have four children : Clarence William, 
born at Port Townsend, May 31, 1902; Leon Norby, March 22, 1904; Lillian 
Cecelia, June 11, 1908; and Helen Barbara, June 7, 1913. 

Politically Mr. Olberg is a republican, somewhat active in party ranks. He 
has served for one term as city councilman but has never been a politician in 
the sense of office seeking. Fraternally he is connected with the Port Town- 
send organizations of the Knights of Pythias, the Red Men and the Yoemen, 
is also a member of the Port Townsend Commercial Club and in his religious 
faith is a Lutheran. His has been an active and well spent life, measuring up 
to high standards of manhood and citizenship, and the sterling traits of his 
character have gained for him unqualified confidence and high regard. 



GLEN CARROLL HYATT. 

The enterprise and industry of Glen C. Hyatt have constituted a stimulating 
factor in the management and control of various successful business interests of 
Bellingham and it would be impossible to dissociate his life record from the 
history of the city, so closely is it woven into the warp and woof of Bellingham's 
annals. He was bom February 22, 1874, his parents being Akin D. and Olive 
(Walker) Hyatt. The father's birth occurred in Wayne county, Indiana, in 
1834, and there he was educated and learned the saddle maker's trade. He first 
visited the western coast country in 1858, when, by way of the Isthmus of Panama, 
he arrived in California and settled at Crescent City, where he conducted a hotel 
until 1861. He then returned to the east and on the 5th of September of that 
year enlisted as a member of the Fourth Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, being made 
sergeant major of his company. With that rank he served until April 22, 1864, 
when he became captain of the Seventieth Regiment of United States Volunteer 
Infantry, with which he remained until the close of the war. He then went again 
to Indiana, later returning to the south where at Natchez, Mississippi, he wedded 
Miss Olive Walker, removing to Linn county, Kansas, where he continued to 
reside until 1883, when he went to Bellingham. There he opened a real estate 
office and continued in the business until his death, which occurred in 1886. 

Residing in New Orleans, Louisiana, until the death of his mother in 1878, 
Glen C. Hyatt joined his father in Linn county, Kansas, when four years of age 
and in October, 1883, they arrived in Bellingham, where the son had the benefit 
of instruction in the public schools until 1886. Through the summer of that year 
he worked on a farm in Skagit county and in the fall entered the normal school 




GLEN C. HYATT 



I THE NEW YORK 
[PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 373 

at Lynden, Washington, where he remained for two years and then returned to 
Belhngham, securing a situation as clerk in the general store of C. W. Carter, 
with whom he continued until April, 1890. At that date he was appointed to a 
clerkship under the county auditor, Hugh Eldridge, and afterward continued in 
the same position until April, 1893, when he became chief clerk to Hugh Eldridge, 
the executor of the Edward Eldridge estate and so continued until March, 1896. 
He was afterward connected with the Whatcom County Railway & Light Com- 
pany in various capacities until June i, 1900, when he became secretary and land 
agent for the Bellingham Bay Improvement Company and in 1906 was made vice 
president and general manager. Since 1912 he has been president of the com- 
pany and so continues. 

In 1906 the Bellingham Terminals & Railway Company was organized under 
his direction and a belt line of railway was built connecting the Bellingham Bay 
& British Columbia Railroad with the Bellingham industrial waterfront. In 19 12 
he became president of the Bellingham Bay & British Columbia Railroad, of the 
Bellingham Terminals & Railway Company and of the Bellingham Bay Lumber 
Company. The same year a corporation known as the Bellingham Securities 
Syndicate was formed, which is controlled by Glen C. Hyatt and his associates, 
E. B. Deming, J. J. Donovan, J. H. Bloedel, E. W. Purdy and C. W. Howard, all 
of Bellingham; Joshua Green and Charles E. Peabody, of Seattle; and W. R. 
Rust, of Tacoma. This corporation purchased of the New York and California 
owners of the previously mentioned railroads the Bellingham Bay Lumber Com- 
pany and the Bellingham Bay Improvement Company. The railroad holdings 
were during that year sold to the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Com- 
pany and are now operated under the name of the Bellingham & Northern Rail- 
way Company of which corporation Mr. Hyatt is a director. The following year 
the properties of the Bellingham Bay Lumber Company were sold to the Bloedel 
Donovan Lumber Mills, while the Bellingham Bay Improvement properties were 
retained and are now being operated by the Bellingham Securities Syndicate, Inc., 
of which Mr. Hyatt is the president and manager. He is, therefore, one of the 
foremost operators in the real estate field in his part of Washington and occupies 
a conspicuous position in business circles. 

In the latter part of the year 1916 Mr. Hyatt extended his activities to British 
Columbia where he organized Canadian Metals, Limited, a corporation conspicu- 
ous in the metal trade at Vancouver and of which he is president. 

In his political views Mr. Hyatt is a republican. He is a member of the Cougar 
Club and Bellingham Golf Club, of Bellingham ; the Rainier Club and Seattle 
Golf Club at Seattle; the Vancouver Club and the Shaughnessy Heights Golf 
Club of Vancouver, British Columbia; and he was one of the founders of the 
Belhngham Chamber of Commerce, which was organized in the winter of 1900 
and of which he serves as a director. Fraternally he is a member of Bellingham 
Bay Lodge, No. 194, B. P. O. E., of which he was a charter member and the first 
secretary. He is a member of Whatcom Lodge, 151, F. & A. M., Hesperus Com- 
mandery, No. 8, K. T. ; Lawson Consistory, No. i, Scottish Rite of Free Masonry 
and of Nile Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 

It has been well said of Mr. Plyatt that he is never too busy to be courteous 
or too courteous to be busy. In other words his is a well balanced character and 
the various interests of life are given their due proportion of time and attention. 

Vol. Ill— 20 



374 WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 

His activities have been of a constantly expanding character, reaching out along 
lines which have constituted the basis of pubHc progress and prosperity as well 
as of marked individual success. 



BOREN FAMILY. 



Carson Dobbins Boren was born in Nashville, Tennessee, December 12, 
1824; died August 19, 1912, in Seattle. 

Mary Kays was born in Indiana, November 6, 1831 ; died June 21, 1906, in 
Seattle. They were married in Illinois. Their children were : 

Gertrude Levinia, born in Abingdon, Illinois, December 12, 1850; died 
June 3, 1912, in Seattle; William Richard, born in Seattle, October 4, 1853; 
died January 19, 1899, in Seattle; Mary, born in Seattle. 

Grandchildren of Carson D. and Mary (Kays) Boren, were given as follows, 
all born in Seattle : 

Amy Gertrude English, February 29, 1876; Walter E. Denny, June 21, 1877; 
Ozena D. Morehouse, October 18, 1879; George C. Denny, born August 20, 
1884; died November 6, 1891, in Seattle; Rex E. Denny, born April 10, 1889; 
died in Seattle, June 24, 1913; Frank Denny, born August 20, 1884; Samuel 
T. Denny, born March 15, 1895; Rolland Boren, son of William R., born 
1893 or '94. 



WILLIAM LEGOE. 



William Legoe. engaged in the agricultural implement business in Belling- 
ham, was born at Mineral Point, Iowa county, Wisconsin, May 2"], 185 1, a son 
of W. H. and Elizabeth Legoe. The father was born in Cornwall, England, in 
1824 and in 1840 went to Mineral Point, Wisconsin, where he engaged in car- 
penter work ; but attracted by the discovery of gold in California, he made his 
way across the plains in 1850 and worked in the famous 76 Mine at placer min- 
ing for two years. He then returned to ^Mineral Point, where he resumed 
carpentering, but the lure of the west was upon him and in 1863 he again made 
his way to California, devoting his attention to mining at Marysville. Once 
more he became a resident of Mineral Point in 1868 and there settled upon a 
farm, to the further development and improvement of w^hich he devoted his 
energies until his death, which occurred in May, 1887. 

William Legoe was a pupil in the public schools at Mineral Point until he 
reached the age of twelve years, after which he worked on his fathers ranch 
near there and also attended district schools until he reached the age of twenty. 
He then removed to Kansas City and was employed in his uncle's carriage factory 
as an apprentice for two years. Returning to his home in Wisconsin, he remained 
for a few months and then went to Miner county, Dakota, settling on a claim 
of three hundred and twenty acres which he continuously farmed until 1881. He 
then sold his property in that state and came to Washington, arriving in Belling- 



WASHINGTON, WEST OF THE CASCADES 375 

ham in June, 1882. He spent a year in a logging camp on Lummi island, after 
which he opened a blacksmith shop on the water front in Bellingham, which was 
for a time the only blacksmith shop in Whatcom county, and conducted business 
there until 1906. At that date he sold his smithy and has since been engaged in 
the agricultural implement business, controlling a large and gratifying trade. 

In Bellingham Mr. Legoe was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Miller, by 
whom he has a son, Fred F., who is now nineteen years of age and is engaged 
in ranching in Whatcom county. A life of activity has brought him a substan- 
tial measure of success and he is well known as a substantial and representative 
citizen who is always loyal to the best interests of the community. 



WALTER S. GREEN. 



Walter S. Green, president and manager of the Green Mill Company. Inc., 
manufacturers of red cedar shingles at Quilcene, has in the development of this 
industry contributed in substantial measure to the upbuilding of business activity in 
this section. Of Canadian birth, he was born on Prince Edward Island, February 
3, 1872. His father, William C. Green, also a native of that place, was of Irish 
descent. He became a successful merchant and pioneer settler of North Dakota, 
where he established his home in 1884, settling at Hamilton, where he engaged 
in commercial pursuits for many years. He died at Quilcene while on a visit 
to his son in 1913 at the age of sixty-five years. His wife, Cecelia Caldwell, 
also a native of Prince Edward Island and of Irish lineage, is now living in 
Hamilton, North Dakota, occupying the old family home there. In their family 
were six children, of whom three are yet living: Walter S. ; J. G., residing at 
Grand Forks, North Dakota ; and Fred S., whose home is in Canada. 

Walter S. Green was a young lad of twelve years when his parents became 
residents of North Dakota and in the public schools of Hamilton he pursued 
his education to the age of fourteen, since which time he has been dependent upon 
his own resources for a livelihood. He secured farm work, at which he engaged 
for three years, and then took up railroad work with the Chicago Great Wester